Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 106 No.209



Fishing guide is
murdered in Exuma

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning
four men following the mur-
der of a well-known fishing
guide in Exuma.

Cely Smith, 45, was at his
home in Stuart Manor on
Sunday morning when four
gunmen with dreadlocked
hair kicked down his door and
fired gunshots in his direction.

Mr Smith later died of his
injuries at a local clinic.

Sources close to the inves-
tigation report that four men
helping police with their
inquiries were arrested by
Drug Enforcement Unit offi-
cers off the Montagu fore-
shore.

It is believed that after
shooting Mr Smith, the cul-
prits fled to Staniel Cay where
they commandeered a white
coloured go-fast boat and
headed for New Providence,
however police were last night
tight-lipped over the details.

It is understood that in

addition to the four men
assisting police two others are
being sought.

Chrislyn Skippings, press
officer of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, said there was
no information to suggest the
incident was drug-related at
this time.

Police have also disputed
claims that the incident was
linked to a fight which took
place yesterday in a nightclub
in Black Point, a settlement
15 minutes away from Stuart
Manor, where two men got
into an altercation which
resulted in one of them being
gun butted and flown to hos-
pital in Nassau.

According to relatives, Mr
Smith had seven children and
had lived at his two-storey
home in Stuart’s Manor for
nearly 15 years.

On the morning of his
shooting, four of his sons were
present — two of whom are
still in high school.

A family member said:

SEE page eight

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO TECHNICAL ISSUES,

tle OS CO TS



es



The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

By AVA TURNQUEST
| Tribune Staff Reporter
| aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THESE are the dramatic moments when |]
bystanders and tourists rushed to rescue the victims
| of a horrific boardwalk collapse.
| The terrified victims were among a 50-strong par-
| ty of mourners who had turned up on Saturday
morning to pay their last respects to 32-year-old
Sharmaine Smith-Downy.

SEE apaee nine

THE BODY is removed from the scene on East Bay Street.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe @tribunemedia.net

A 43-YEAR-OLD
woman was last night being
questioned by police after a
man believed to be her hus-

band was stabbed to death
in a parking lot.

The killing took place in
the vacant lot located
between the Green Parrot
bar and Bahamas Air Sea
Rescue Association (BAS-
RA) headquarters on East

Bay Street.

While the victim has not
been formally identified,
The Tribune understands his
surname is Williams.

A manager at the Green
Parrot Bar and Grill, which
is next to the site of the

death, said Mr Williams was
arriving for his work shift at
about 9pm on Saturday as a
security guard securing
property belonging to US-
based civil engineering firm

SEE page eight



Two die in tragic opening |
to the crawfish season

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The opening of the

crawfish season on Grand Bahama was i seized almost $600,000 worth of illegal

marked with tragedy when two men died | drugs and arrested two men, one of whom

in separate crawfishing incidents in the | WS Shot during a high-speed chase and

: shootout with officers.

West End and East End areas.

According to police reports, the body 7 : : :
of one man was pulled from the waters said police are searching for a third man

M Rack Monte bie who escaped after the vehicle being pur-
ee een | aud by officers crashed into a tree.

identity is being withheld by police.
SEE page eight

$600,000 worth of drugs

_ seized alter chase, shootout |

By DENISE MAYCOCK
? Tribune Freeport Reporter
: dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT: Grand Bahama Police

Assistant Superintendent Hector Delva

According to reports, DEU officers were

SEE page nine

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER

400 attempt to illegally
enter Bahamas in two days

LOCAL and international law
enforcement agents in the past two days
have apprehended more than 400 people
attempting to enter the Bahamas ille-
gally.

The influx has caused the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force to increase its
patrols at sea and in the air. The US
Coast Guard has reportedly done like-
wise.

The first group, 159 Haitians, were
apprehended on Friday north west of
Great Inagua by the US Coast Guard

SEE page eight

HOME IMPROVEMENTS



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Police in Florida confident they have

found remains of Bahamian woman

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Florida are
confident they have found
the remains of a Bahamian
woman who went missing
there in 2006.

Cocoa Police Department
believe the body to be that
of 22-year-old Darice
Knowles. They were tipped
off to the location by a
prison inmate.

Barbara Matthews, a
spokesperson for the Cocoa
Police Department in Bre-
vard County, Florida, told a
local newspaper that police
had not “positively identi-
fied” the remains, but were
nonetheless “certain” that
they belong to the Bahami-
an.

“She’s pretty much intact
and you can make out the
outline of her remains,” said



MISSING WOMAN:
Darice Knowles

Ms Matthews.

The discovery of Darice’s
suspected remains revives
what had become a cold
case file for local police.

Darice was said to have
flown to the US from Nas-
sau in March 2006 to visit
male friends from the
Bahamas when she went

missing. Her disappearance
was not reported to police
until three months later.
Foul play was suspected,
but no one has ever been
taken into custody in con-
nection with the matter.

A former Miss Bahamas
contestant and law student,
Darice is the only child of
Mario and _ Princess
Knowles. According to
Darice’s cousin, Dana
Munnings, many of her
family members in Nassau
have been locked in a state
of denial over the disap-
pearance.

This weekend, detectives
were said to be unwilling to
discuss what may have hap-
pened to Darice, but said it
was likely she knew her
attacker.

One of the suspects in the
matter went with police to
the scene to help find where
Knowles’ body was located,

according to local reports.

The first signs that law i
enforcement officials may :
found Darice’s }
remains came on Friday :}
when police were able to }
locate a foot bone ata }
wooded site off State Road ;

have

524 in Brevard County.

They were reported to }
have unearthed yet more }
bones yesterday, a week
after police called in heavy
equipment to begin clear- }
ing the area where they :
believed her body may have ;

been located.

"Part of the thing that has }
kept us driven for the last }
four years to find her body }
was the fact that we wanted }
to give the family closure,”
said Ms Matthews. “Of ;
course, after we do what we }
need to do, everything will :
be turned over to the fami- |
ly so they can give her a }

proper burial."

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SCENES from the
Emancipation Day
Junkanoo parade at Fox Hill
yesterday morning. Crowds
and Junkanoo groups took
to the streets to celebrate
the historical date.

THE TRIBUNE

Police receive information,
but have yet to identify body

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedida.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama Police have received
information from the public
that could possibly help iden-
tity the decomposed body
found inside a high voltage
building on Kings Road.

“We have an unconfirmed
identity of a person who was

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known to frequent the area,
but we are still trying to make
some determination and so
we are awaiting the results of
an autopsy,” Inspector Hector
Delva told The Tribune.

On Wednesday, police dis-
covered the partly decom-
posed body of a black male,
dressed in white t-shirt and
dark trousers. A dog was also
found dead.

A Grand Bahama Power
Company statement said:
“We are saddened to learn of
the recent loss of life found
at our premises on Kings
Road.

“We are satisfied that every
reasonable precautionary
measure was taken to prevent
such an unfortunate mishap
from happening.”

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Marsh Harbour airport
renovations set to take off

Architectural design contract awarded

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

LONG-AWAITED renovations for Marsh
Harbour airport were set in stone yesterday as a
contract for the new architectural design was
awarded yesterday.

Minister of Public Works Neko Grant flew to
Abaco with a team of delegates from his depart-
ment to award the $600,000 contract for the
$10million development to Freeport company
The Architects Incorporated in Marsh Harbour.

An estimated 200,000 passengers pass through
the Marsh Harbour airport every year, and Aba-
conians expect many more will visit when the
expansion is complete.

They hope the expansion promised in the
FNM’s 1992 manifesto will drive down high inter-
national ticket prices and encourage more direct
travel between the United States and Abaco.

The 24,000 sq ft single storey terminal and fire
crash facility to be built west of the existing ter-
minal has been designed with space for expansion
in all directions, as it replaces the existing 3,315 sq
ft facility which will be converted and utilised.



















By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

WRITER, director and
producer of Bahamian film
‘Rain’ signed copies of the
newly-released DVD for fans
this weekend.

Filmmaker Marian Govan’s
film about a 14-year-old girl’s
journey from Ragged Island to
inner city Nassau in search of
her estranged mother after her
grandmother’s death has won
critical acclaim around the
world since its release at the
Bahamas International Film
Festival (BIFF) in December
2008.

It premiered on the US cable

Mr Grant said the new building will give visi-
tors a “sense of place” as well as offer more facil-
ities, including indoor arrival and departure
lounges, airline offices and storage areas, and
offices for the police, security staff and airport
manager.

“Abaco continues to develop at a rapid place,”
the minister said.

“Tt has the third largest population after New
Providence and Grand Bahama.

“Furthermore, it is estimated that in excess of
200,000 passengers utilise the Marsh Harbour
International Airport annually.

“Tt is against this background that the govern-
ment is proceeding with this plan to construct a
larger, modern, state-of-the-art facility.”

The Marsh Harbour airport project follows
completion of a new 6,100 ft jet runway, conver-
sion of the original runway into a jet taxi-way and
installation of new signage and lighting.

Eight Bahamian architecture firms submitted
fee proposals for the works, and The Architects
Incorporated won the bid with a fee of six per
cent of the construction cost and a commitment
to provide tender documents for construction
within three months.

“I do believe it is a film that
will leave you proud to be
Bahamian!”

The common Bahamian sto-
ry of a child who forgoes the
sheltered simple life of her
home in Ragged Island after
the death of her grandmother,
played by Irma P Hall, to seek
out her estranged mother in
the big city of Nassau, told
in ‘Rain’, is also a universal

coming of age tale.

Ms Govan described how
Rain's dreams of a loving
reconciliation are quickly
shattered when she meets
Glory, played by Nicki
\ Micheaux, a scarred,
proud, guarded woman
bearing no resemblance
of the mother she had

TV channel “Showtime” in Jan-
uary and was released on DVD
this week, to be sold on Internet
shopping giant Amazon.com as
well as stores across the United
States.

Sales of the DVD will not
only repay Bahamian investors
in the film and afford them
some profit, it will also support
the success of the film at large.

During the filming, the crew
and cast stayed at a Cable
Beach hotel, rented trucks and
cars from local businesses, hired
local caterers, musicians and

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actors
to support the film.

Ms Govan said: “We have to
realise that investment in film is
really important, in that it
impacts the entire economy.

“Tt's time we begin cultivating
alternative means of generating
income while utilising our cre-
ative talent.

“Bahamians are such a cre-
ative people and yet our cultur-
al landscape can feel void at
times.

“As we face forward, culture
will need to take a front seat.

“Film is a powerful vehicle
that can serve our community
on so many levels both spiritu-
ally and practically.

“So for those of you who
wish to support new, creative,
Bahamian industry, buy a copy
of ‘Rain’, buy two, and tell your
friends and family to do the
same.

hoped for.

Glory's self-destructive
lifestyle, diminished by drug
abuse is rudely awakened by
the imminent role of mother-
hood.

"Confronted by unforesee-
able trials, Rain's passion for
running and deeply-rooted spir-
it brings two allies into her life:
An insightful and inspiring track
coach, played by CCH Pounder,
and a charming rebellious
teenage neighbour. In time,
Rain's spirit and talent take her
to unimaginable heights," Ms
Govan said.

"Shot in a style that combines
gritty realism, a bold and unfor-
gettable colour palette, soulful
Bahamian music, and the use
of local actors alongside sea-
soned pros, ‘Rain’ takes us on a
journey into the heart of a child,
the pulse of a country and the
spirit of its people.”

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PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOP

By Jamaal Rolle

WEATHER NEWS

~jamaaltheartistgigmail.com

METEOROLOGY DEPT EYES TROPICAL DEPRESSION

THE Department of
Meteorology is paying close
attention to a tropical
depression which has
formed in the Atlantic and
which had reached very
near tropical storm status
last night.

According to Senior
Meteorological Officer
Geoffrey Greene, it is too
early to say if the weather
system will directly impact
the Bahamas as it is a “good

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way off”.

However, the forecasters
said that by Friday or Sat-
urday evening, meteorolog-
ical officers will be able to
make a better determina-
tion in this regard.

The tropical depression is
the fourth of the hurricane
season, and if it does fur-
ther develop, it may become
Tropical Storm Colin.

At present, it is on a tra-
jectory which sees it headed



for the US Atlantic
seaboard and the Carolinas,
but it may yet “swing out
to sea”, according to
reports.

Its location at Spm yes-
terday was recorded by the
US National Hurricane
Centre as: 13.0 degrees
north, 42.5 degrees west,
moving west north west at
16 miles per hour with max-
imum sustained winds of 35
miles per hour.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



cs
No trade without help on undeniable climate change

insight |

WORLD VIEW.

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat).

CLIMATE change is now
undeniable according to a
new study headed by the US
National Oceans and Atmos-

200

pheric Administration. It is
already having a disastrous

i All
Ser

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The very existence of some

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of them, particularly in the
Pacific and the Indian
Oceans, is threatened.
Caribbean islands too are
endangered as are countries
such as Belize and Guyana
with low lying coastlands.

In the latter case, coastal
erosion is reducing beaches
that are crucial to the
tourism industry on which all
of the small Caribbean
islands now depend. The
Atlantic coasts of both
Guyana and Belize are
below sea level, but it accom-
modates most of their popu-
lations and their agricultural
lands. Sea-level rise, there-
fore, threatens all of them.

The challenges that cli-
mate change poses to small
states are not only over-
whelming, they are impossi-
ble to meet from the scarce
resources of the govern-
ments.

In a recent speech in
Trinidad and Tobago, the
Prime Minister of St Vincent
and the Grenadines put the
matter in clear terms when
he said: “In mountainous
States like my own, over 80
per cent of our major infra-
structure is located along our
coastline, within a few feet
of the inexorably rising seas.
The cost of adaptation and
preservation of our infra-
structural developments are
daunting, and beyond our
individual capacity to
address.”

While small states are the
primary victims of climate
change, they are the least
contributors to the green-
house gas emissions that, as
many studies have con-
firmed, are causing climate
change and global warming.
Together, the harmful emis-
sions of greenhouse gases
from all small states account
for less than 0.1 per cent of
the global total.

In a fatuous argument, the
US Department of Energy’s
Carbon Dioxide Information
Analysis Centre had rated
Trinidad and Tobago at
number 9 in the worst emit-
ters of harmful gases in the
world in the year 2007.
However, the measurement
was based on population
size, not on the volume of
emissions. To underscore the

a



SIR RONALD SANDERS

silliness of the argument, the
tiny Caribbean island,
Montserrat, with a popula-
tion of 10,000 people and no
manufacturing or industrial
production of any magni-
tude, was rated at number 17
in the world.

The reality is that, despite
the per capita argument that
developed countries and
international institutions are
fond of using to measure a
range of issues to procure a
desired (but illusionary)
result, small states contribute
little to global warming but
they are its primary victims
as evidenced by sea-level
rise, stronger and more fre-
quent hurricanes, flooding
and other natural disasters.

These same small states
are also the victims of the
worst trading arrangements
in the world.

The World Trade Orga-
nization (WTO) makes no
provision for their special cir-
cumstances, nor does the
International Financial Insti-
tutions (IFIs) such as the
International Monetary
Fund (IMF) and the World
Bank. Hence, small islands
such as St Lucia (100,000
people) and St Kitts-Nevis
(50,000 people) are treated
in the same way in the WTO
as the United States (350
million), Canada (33 million)
or the European Union (400
million). No special rules
apply.
In the IFIs, many small
states — and certainly all
those in the Caribbean — are
“graduated” from conces-

‘
x

ee i
327-5956



sional financing because, on
the measurement of per capi-
ta income, they are rated as
middle-income countries.

The point is that small
states are the casualties of
climate change but the large
industrialized nations that
cause the problem are doing
little to help them cope with
the difficulties that have
already been created and
that are worsening. The
member countries of the
Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Develop-
ment (OECD), which are the
world’s most industrialized
countries, are responsible for
an estimated 77 per cent of
the total greenhouse gases
which were emitted in the
past.

The IFI’s that are con-
trolled by the OECD gov-
ernments have no machinery
in place to provide small
states (especially those in the
Caribbean who have been
graduated from concessional
financing) with soft loans or
grants to help them mitigate
the impact of climate change,
on their key trade sectors,
including agriculture, fish-
eries, forestry and tourism.

And, the terms of trade
are punitive rather than
helpful. A case in point is the
Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) between
the European Union (EU)
and individual small coun-
tries in the Caribbean and
the Pacific. Nowhere in the
EPA is there an acknowl-
edgment by the EU that its
greenhouse gas emissions are
adversely affecting climate
change and harming small
island states and states with
vulnerable coastlines. And,
nowhere is there a correla-
tion drawn between the cost
of such harmful effects and
trade benefits that could be
granted.

Indeed, small states are
punished twice for their
innocence. Their key trade
sectors are compromised by
climate change caused by
industrialized nations, and
then they are made to open
up their markets for a flood
of goods and services from
the industrialized nations on
the false idea of reciprocal
treatment.

The WTO admits that
“global greenhouse gas emis-
sions have roughly doubled
since the beginning of the
1970s. Current estimates
indicate that these emissions
will increase by between 25
and 90 per cent in the period
from 2000 to 2030.”

China, India and Brazil
(now G20 countries) will be
three of the large develop-
ing countries contributing to
the projected increases, and
they too have a responsibili-
ty to face up to the harm that
they are doing to small coun-
tries that lack the financial
means to pay for adaptation
and mitigation.

There is clearly need for a
major change in the IFIs in
their policies toward small
and vulnerable economies.
The insistence on per capita
income as a measure to grad-
uate countries from conces-
sionary financing has proven
that, by itself, it is an illogical
calculation for the capacity
of small countries.

But, the trade rules in the
WTO also have to be adapt-
ed to cater for small and vul-
nerable states more widely
and effectively than they do.
A special category of special
and differential treatment for
small states is necessary both
to provide these countries
with the means to cope and,
also, to make the WTO rele-
vant to their needs.

Small countries should
refuse to sign any more
agreements until their plight
is acknowledged and
machinery established to
address the harmful effects
of climate change on them.

A growing body of litera-
ture now exists on the prob-
lems of climate change and
trade for small states. But,
the governments of small
states themselves should be
making the case in the WTO
and the IFI’s in a persistent
fashion.

A high-level team drawn
from the Caribbean, Pacific,
and the Indian Oceans
should be created to press
their case at the next meeting
of the G20. It would be a
good occasion for frank talks
between offenders and suf-
ferers on an issue of human
survival.

Responses and
previous commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Woman questioned after
man is stabbed to death

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FROM page one

American Bridge, which is
located in the dirt lot, when
he was attacked.

American Bridge’s
Bahamian — subsidiary,
American Bridge Bahamas
Ltd, is constructing part of
the new Arawak Cay port,
which is being developed
by a public-private partner-
ship made up of the Gov-
ernment and 19 private sec-
tor stakeholders.

According to the Green
Parrot manager, a woman
and the victim arrived
together in a maroon-
coloured Chevrolet Blazer.
She followed him out of the
car. He was stabbed a num-
ber of times.

The man, who was wear-
ing khaki pants and a black
stripe shirt, died at the
scene. Witnesses reported
that a young boy, thought
to be his son, was in the
car at the time.

There were a number of
witnesses to the attack,
including someone who was

still sitting in their car in the
parking lot when the stab-
bing occurred.

They are said to have run
in to Green Parrot to alert
security officers, who con-
tacted the police.

Another witness was a
Green Parrot chef who
arrived on the scene shortly
after Mr Williams was
attacked.

According to the manag-
er at the Bar and Grill, a
woman was still standing
over the body when the
chef arrived.

“She was freaking out.
She told him to shine his
flashlight on the body,” said
the manager.

Peter Moree, owner of
the Green Parrot Bar and
Grill, expressed his sadness
and that of his staff at the
killing.

“Tt’s an absolute

tragedy,” he told The Tri-
bune.

Nonetheless, fearing that
it could hurt his business,
the owner also distanced his
establishment from the
crime, pointing out that
none of those involved had
been patrons of the bar that
evening and the attack took
place outside of the bounds
of the popular hangout.

“T called ZNS when I saw
their report which said it
happened at Green Parrot
to tell them it was not actu-
ally us, it was the American
Bridge property,” said Mr
Moree, acknowledging that
Green Parrot does utilise
the space as a parking lot
on busy evenings.

Police yesterday identi-
fied the woman being ques-
tioned as a resident of Nas-
sau Village, and a “relative”
of the deceased.

Fishing guide is

murdered in Exuma

FROM page one

“Three of them escaped, the oldest one and the two younger
ones, one stayed behind, but he was unharmed. I think the
older one tried to wake him up but he wasn’t getting up so he
escaped with the younger ones.”

The three sons reportedly jumped from an upstairs win-
dow and ran into nearby bushes.

Mr Smith is the country’s 55th homicide, and police con-
firmed a team of officers from the Central Detective Unit
have been flown into Exuma as investigations on the island con-
tinue.

Though married, family members said Mr Smith had been

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separated from his wife for several years.
He had 12 brothers and five sisters, and his mother, Mrs
Eugene Smith Sr, 74, has lived in Stuart Manor for nearly 60

years.

Mrs Smith described her son as a good boy during his child-
hood, however she said she could not account for his life as a

man.

Mrs Smith said: “The whole island is in shock, this is the first
major crime in this settlement. We never had no crime, I hard-
ly lock my doors. Sometimes I lock my doors or when my chil-
dren come they will lock the door.”

Two die in tragic opening
to the crawfish season

FROM page one

Senior Assistant Quinn
McCartney reported that the
victim and two other men
were out crawfishing. Two of
the men had dived overboard
to retrieve traps while the vic-
tim waited on the boat.

“Our preliminary investi-
gations indicate that the per-
son in the boat fell overboard.
The boat went out of control
and he sustained serious
injuries that resulted in his
death,” said Mr McCartney.

The victim’s body was
brought to shore at Old
Bahama Bay and transport-
ed by hearse to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where an
autopsy will be held to deter-
mine the cause of death.

In East End, residents there

are saddened following the
apparent drowning of 35-
year-old Nixon Mitchell, of
Sweeting’s Cay.

The fishermen were check-
ing on their crawfish traps on
Sunday when Mr Mitchell
failed to surface after a rea-
sonable time.

He was pulled from the sea
bottom by his brother, who
performed CPR. A doctor
pronounced him dead at the
scene.

High Rock MP Kenneth
Russell said Mr Mitchell’s
death is a shock to the East
End community.

Mr Russell is urging peo-
ple to make sure that they are
well trained before they go
diving for crawfish.

Police are investigating
both incidents.

400 attempt to enter Bahamas illegally
FROM page one

Cutter (USCGC) Legare.

Meanwhile, that same day, the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force removed 177 Haitians (129 men, 43 women and five
children) from Channel Cay in the southern Bahamas.

These migrants were apprehended by police and Immigration
officials in Exuma after their vessel reportedly ran aground on
the island.

It is believed this latest group was onboard a Haitian sailing
sloop the Defence Force had been searching for since Wednes-
day morning

During the operation, a Haitian man jumped overboard
while being transported. A search for him is under way.

The following day, the USCGC Chandeliur, with a Bahami-
an ship rider (Defence Force Marine) onboard, stopped a go
fast boat in the area of Memory Rock, north of Grand Bahama,
transporting 15 illegal migrants.

When officials boarded the boat, they found five Jamaican
men, four Haitian men, four Haitian women, one Peruvian
man, one Peruvian woman and four Bahamians.

The four Bahamians and 15 illegals were handed over to the
police and immigration authorities in Freeport.

Later on, 99 Haitians were apprehended in the Exuma chain
by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.

While on patrol, Defence Force vessel EF 27 spotted a Hait-
ian sailing sloop in the area of Shroud Cay. Upon further
investigation, they discovered 75 men and 24 women) aboard
the vessel.

The operations conducted over the two days has netted 450
illegal migrants apprehended by police, immigration, USCG and
the RBDF.

All of the Haitians are expected to be transported back to
Haiti by the United States Coast Guard.

“The RBDF is concerned with these recent events and has
since increased its patrols at sea and in the air. The US Coast
Guard has reportedly done likewise,” a statement released by
the RBDF yesterday said.

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THE TRIBUNE





TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

THE collapsed boardwalk after Saturday’s accident.

Mourners in boardwalk rescue

FROM page one

They had earlier attended a
funeral service for Mrs Smith-
Downy at Christ Community
Church, on Bellot Road, and
gathered at the boardwalk near
the Beach Club Café, Sandyport,
to scatter her ashes into the sea.

But panic broke out when a
section of the boardwalk, which
is connected to an adjacent gaze-
bo, collapsed underneath about
25 people, including children as
young two.

Almost immediately, people
in the area pitched in to rescue
the fallen loved ones, some of
whom had slipped underneath
the broken planks.

Five people were taken to
hospital by emergency medical
services for minor injuries, one of
whom was said to be an elderly
woman who had suffered a
seizure in the water.

Some mourners, who had
safely crossed the boardwalk on
to the gazebo and were subse-
quently trapped, were rescued
by a fisherman’s boat.

Ulric Woodside, the photog-

rapher hired to document the
ceremony, said he heard the
nails on the boardwalk give way
underneath the weight of peo-
ple, just before it collapsed.

“It was really a community
effort, he said, “as soon as it hap-
pened everybody came over and
assisted, jet-ski operators, beach-
goers, tourists as well.”

Mr Woodside said the remain-
ing mourners continued the cer-
emony and scattered Mrs Smith-
Downy’s remains into the sea
after the situation was under
control.

Garth Buckner, president of
Sandyport Development Com-
pany, said the company had little
details concerning the incident
but had launched an investiga-
tion into the matter.

Mr Buckner said: “The dock
is private property, so the public
is welcome to use it but we do
ask that we be informed before
any events are put on so that we
can provide adequate security
and prepare. We were not
informed, so we were not pre-
pared for anything.”

Police are investigating.

$600,000 of drugs seized

FROM page one

on patrol around 11.25pm on Saturday when they observed a white
2000 Chevy Astro van exiting Magellan Road.

The occupants were acting in a suspicious manner so officers pur-
sued the vehicle and a chase ensued.

ASP Delva said there was an exchange of gunfire between the

suspects and police.

The driver of the Astro van eventually lost control of the vehicle
and collided into a tree on Tarleton Road, where two suspects
were apprehended. A third fled into bushes.

While searching the vehicle, officers discovered 584lbs of sus-
pected marijuana with an estimated street value of $584,000.

The officers also discovered that one of the suspects was shot in
the upper shoulder. They were both taken into custody and received
medical treatment for their injuries. Investigations are continuing.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





‘Inappropriate invasion
of privacy’ at Lyford Cay
== TOUGH CALL

By LARRY SMITH

IN the Bahamas, every-
thing is a plot and every-
one has an agenda.

We are conspiracy mon-
gerers of the worst kind -a
tendency that is amplified
by the anonymity offered
by the internet, the diffi-
culty of accessing accurate
information, the lack of
professionalism of many in
the media, and the inability
of some to think critically,
which is a legacy of our
failed education system.

The plot at Lyford Cay
these days is that behind
the gates of this sinister pri-
vate community are rich,
white foreigners who are
getting away with murder
and deploying advanced
weaponry with impunity.

Well, there are certainly
rich, white foreigners living
at Lyford Cay — along
with many members of our
own black and white elite.
And it is most definitely a
private community. I have
been admitted only twice
in the last two decades - on
both occasions to attend a
social event.

But the narrative subtext
that has lately been
attached to the activities of
this very reserved commu-
nity is best captured by the

ARRY SMITH

word "sinister". One poster
on the popular Bahamas
Issues website put it this
way:

"Is it not the job of the
police to investigate crime?
Or was this action egre-
gious because it involved a
Lyford Cay resident. Every
day regular Bahamians
have investigations levied
against them by RBPF, so
if this was Tony who lives
in Bain Town, and the
police received information
that weapons were seen on
the premises, what should
the police do? No one is
and should be above the
law."

Well, by that logic if I
tell the police that Hubert
Ingraham and Perry
Christie are stockpiling
weapons at their old law
office to mount a coup,
Commissioner Greenslade
should order his special
force commandos to hand-
cuff the former law part-
ners together while picking
through their things for sev-
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rant. After all, no one is
and should be above the
law.

That's the first point I
wish to make about the
recent events at Lycay —
just how ridiculously inap-
propriate this invasion of
privacy was. It raises seri-
ous questions about judg-
ment.

Lawyers say that when
the police have reasonable
suspicion, a warrant is not
required to search for
firearms or dangerous
drugs in the Bahamas. They
can enter your home or
business at will. This right
of entry, they say, is based
on the need for police offi-
cers to react immediately
to intelligence reports in
the public interest. It is a
hangover from colonial
times aimed at countering
armed insurgencies in the
former British Empire.

Judgment

But although police can
enter premises without a
search warrant from a
judge, it is expected that a
high degree of common
sense, good judgment and
ordinary decency will be
applied, one lawyer told
me. "Normally the appoint-
ment to particular duties
carries with it standing and
assumed authority from the
commissioner that general-
ly empowers detectives to
hunt for firearms and
drugs.

"However, it is easy to
abuse such a system, and
our police often do not go
for warrants even when
there is the time, or the cir-
cumstances are appropri-
ate to do so. Partly, this is
because of the scale of the
task they face, but there is
also a disturbing trend of
just showing up and
demanding entry to search
for firearms or drugs. This
erodes our civil liberties
and sophisticated criminals
can and do impersonate
officers using the same
words.

"These things are very
hard for international per-
sons, especially Americans,
to understand, because
their rights of privacy and
premises are so well
entrenched in law. This
means that although inter-
national second home own-
ers should not be consid-

ered above the law, there
needs to be greater sensi-
tivity by the authorities in
such circumstances."

However, in this case the
object of the search and
seizure was not a firearm,
which brings me to the sec-
ond point.

Both traditional and
internet "news" sites
reported as if it were gospel
the obviously cooked-up
story that the "firearms" in
question at Lyford Cay
were advanced military-
grade sonic blasters that
could injure people and
damage property. Accord-
ing to one "knowledge-
able" report, the equipment
was of "a type which is
used by Israeli intelligence
and has the affect of caus-
ing you to get loose bow-
els."

Well, we don't know
what kind of "intelligence"
the police employed in this
case, but we did hear a
broadcast on Island FM
just before the raid when a
talk show caller bracketed
Commissioner Greenslade
about ultrasonic weapons
being used with impunity
by rich, white foreigners at
Lyford Cay. Greenslade
said he would deal with the
matter expeditiously
because, after all, no one is
or should be above the law.

But these “ultrasonic
weapons” were actually
high-end outdoor speakers
(google Meyer Sound SB-
1). They are easily pur-
chased in the US and were
legally imported. Police
returned the speakers no
less than three hours after
they were seized. And
although they have yet to
make a public statement,
an inquiry is said to be
underway and meetings
have been held to soothe
ruffled feathers at Lyford
Cay.

The speakers were used
at Point House, the home
of American financier
Louis Bacon, as a response
to aggravated and contin-
ual noise harassment from
the adjacent property of
Canadian fashion mogul
Peter Nygard.

According to a
spokesman for Bacon, "the
intent was to counterbal-
ance loud music that origi-
nated from the Nygard
property (by directing) it
back to the specific loca-
tion of the music. This was
intended to repulse music
originating from Nygard's
property after it reached a
certain decibel level.

"It is unfortunate that
the police were diverted
from their work by such a

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frivolous complaint," the
spokesman said. "With
respect to the health risks
associated with these
speakers, there are none —
unless, of course, they were
knocked over and fell on
your foot."

This brings me to the
main point.

Property owners clearly
have a longstanding issue
with Nygard's development
and operation of a major
resort over many years at
the western tip of the
Lyford Cay peninsula. In
fact, there is a lengthy his-
tory of complaints about
noise pollution emanating
from the Nygard property
as well as other land use
issues associated with unau-
thorized dredging and
reclamation of the sea bed
to the detriment of neigh-
bouring properties.

After initially trying to
resolve these issues amica-
bly, Bacon turned to the
Lyford Cay Property Own-
er's Association to register
these complaints. At least
16 complaints were made
to police and Lyford Cay
security in the first half of
this year alone, the
spokesman said. "The con-
tinued escalation of
Nygard's late night parties
and his refusal to abide by
Lyford protocols left few
options, but an effort to
return in kind the music
that he broadcasted."

Nygard acquired his
property in 1984 and it is
well known that construc-
tion has been non-stop for
the past 20 years, continu-
ally disturbing neighbours
and the Lyford community
in general. There are
apparently no specific
covenants that prevent
"lawful" activities on the
Nygard property, but the
site is zoned for single fam-
ily use and the conflict with
the residential nature of the
exclusive community is
obvious.

Until a large portion of
the resort burned down last
November due to an elec-
trical fault, advertised facil-
ities included a disco with a
100-person dance floor, a
human aquarium, water-
slides, movie theatre, two
yachts, swimming pools,
tennis, volleyball and bas-
ketball courts, 10 bedrooms
and a helicopter landing
pad. Nygard has been seek-
ing government approvals
to rebuild the resort.

At one point, Nygard
wanted to build a restau-
rant on nearby Golding
Cay, a Bahamas National
Trust bird sanctuary. He
also sought to import exot-
ic animals, add a dolphin
enclosure and build a shark
tank. Dredge pumps have
been used almost continu-
ously for years to move
sand from the bay onto the
shoreline at the resort.

But a report prepared in
2008 for the Lyford Cay
Property Owners Associa-
tion by Melanie Roach (a
former public works direc-
tor) determined that
Nygard did not have a hotel

or business license, and
there was no record of
building approvals granted
for resort amenities. There
was also no record of a per-
mit being issued for a heli-
copter landing pad at the
property.

All these facilities and
more — were being adver-
tised on various travel web-
sites up to the time of the
fire. For example, Unusual
Villa & Island Rentals of
Richmond, Virginia pro-
moted Nygard Cay like
this:

"For only $42,000 in
2008 (If you add the two
staterooms on the yacht the
total price will be $47,000
per day). Your group of
celebrities, executives,
sports moguls or any per-
son celebrating a birthday,
anniversary, seminar, wed-
ding, or vacation can have a
trip of a lifetime. Special 4-
hour dinners are available
for $300 per additional per-
son above 20 people. The
Cay can hold up to 600
people. Unusual Villas and
Island Rentals is open 24
hours per day, 365 days a
year, for any information
requests and booking poli-
cies for Bahamas Luxury
Nygard Cay."

Resort

Since the fire last year,
Nygard has been seeking
government approval to
rebuild the resort. In recent
months he has been mak-
ing press statements about
a $50 million investment,
touting the many jobs this
would create: "‘I want to
do it like Atlantis in two or
three years (and) that
would take a lot of people,"
he said recently.

Observers say it is no
coincidence that the police
raid on Bacon's property
occurred several days after
it was reported that Nygard
received a letter from the
Office of the Prime Minis-
ter demanding that he
restore his property to its
original deeded footprint.
"What has now become
increasingly evident is that
much of the expansion and
continued work at Nygard
Cay has occurred on Crown
land without permits."

The letter from the
OPM ordered Nygard to
"remove any structures that
would have been erected
on this land over the years"
and advised that "going for-
ward no applications for
construction on, or occupa-
tion of, the accreted land
will be approved by any
agencies of the govern-
ment."

So, does the plot thick-
en? It will certainly be
interesting to see how this
unfortunate melodrama
plays out in the weeks and
months ahead.

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

Contact: Ms. Charlene Seith 21 telephone 302-1158 e Working knowledge and experience with

Environmental and Conservation policies and

SUDMISSOnS should be marked as follows:
procedures

al eee

Tender No. 735/10
Surveys of Proposed Power Station Site
and Substation Site
INAGUA, BAHAMAS

* Working knowledge of conducting Property Inspections

British Colo nial ‘Hilton Hate]
Marfboraugh St, Shop #1

Summer

SALE

For the whole month of July

¢ Working knowledge of outside Environmental and
Energy Conservation partners to ensure compliance
¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills
Tenders are io be addressed to:
Mr Mevin Basen
Gener! Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Bue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahar

* Excellent leadership skills

* Ability to single-handedly direct and manage various

270mm Balls $20.00
40mm Balls and up $30.00

projects and processes
* Ability to work with several departments to ensure

Deadline for delivery to BEC compliance with environmental standards

on or before 1th Auqaest, 2070
no later than 400 pum.

Pearl strands - 50% off
All necklaces and mesh - 30% off
All balls on the system - 30% off
All rings and earrings - 30% off
Free parking at the Hilton

* Must be computer literate in Excel and Word

* Industry experience is a plus
The Corporation reserves the right ta aoorpt
or reject any or all proposals
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact

Wr. Jenone Ellicott at telephone 2-1764

P.0,Box EE-15827
Netsau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-323-1865

Email: gems-pearlsihoimail com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Applications should be faxed in to :- 327-6961 or
email amusgrove@grp.sandals.com





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 15
LOCAL NEWS












T1
=
me)









MAJOR/TRIBUNE STAFF









} .
amy a fa

RECRUITS from the 47th entry to the Royal Bahamas Defence Force demonstrated acquired skills during
their graduation ceremony on Friday. The graduation also marked the 17th entry since women were allowed
to join the force.

ass

& BILLING CHANGES

Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for all consumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th:

The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

TARIFF

RESIDENTIAL
0-200 units per month 10.95 cents per unit
201-800 units per month 11.95 cents per unit
Remaining units 14.95 cents per unit
Minimum monthly charge $5.00

COMMERCIAL

All units per month 15.00 cents per unit
Minimum monthly charge $10.00

GENERAL SERVICE
MONTHLY BILLS
UNIT CHARGE KVA CHARGE
Demand charge per month $11.36 per KVA
0-900,000 units per month 8.70 cents per unit
Remaining units per month 6.20 cents per unit
Minimum monthly charge $ 568.00

TEMPORARY SUPPLIES

16.38 cents per unit $20.00 connection fee $10.00 per month Meter Rental

(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel)

SPECIAL SERVICES
Special Reading, Check Reading, Fuse $5.00
Replacement
Meter Test — Minimum charge $10.00
Visit with intent to disconnect
Residential Consumer $10.00
Commercial Consumer $15.00
Reconnection Fee $20.00
Returned Cheque Fee $15.00

Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639

The British Airways Visa Business Credit Card,
issued by FirstCaribbean International Bank,

offers tailored solutions designed for jetset executives
and managers who often have to entertain key

business partners. a

e Recieve a complimentry ticket for a TEN aI ~~
: PMA)

upon card issuance companian when you purchase a
° Earn 1 BA Mile for every US$1 transaction qualifying ticket in World Traveller Plus, BUSINESS

and 2 BA Miles for every US$1 spent on Club World and First.
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GET THERE.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



RoyalFidelity Market Wrap

By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS

It was a slow week of trad-
ing in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in
four out of the 24 listed secu-
rities, with two advancers and
the other securities remain-
ing unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 29,648 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 3,128 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
26,520 shares.

Colina Holdings (CHL)
was the volume leader and

lead advancer, trading 21,100
shares to see its stock close
the week up by $0.05 at $2.55.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) followed, trading 7,298
shares to see its shares close
the week up by $0.02 at $6.04.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Earnings Releases:

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) released its unaudit-
ed financial results for the
quarter ended June 30, 2010,
reporting total comprehen-
sive income of $13.9 million,

an increase of $3.8 million or
37 per cent from $10.1 mil-
lion reported in the same
quarter in the previous year.
It was noted that while net
interest income of $27.2 mil-
lion increased slightly by $1
million or 3.9 per cent, up
from $26.2 million in the
comparative period, loan
impairment expense fell sig-
nificantly by $4.5 million or
59.6 per cent - from $7.6 mil-
lion to $3.1 million.
Management noted that
the improvement in loan
impairment expense was due
to improved credit quality
and the stabilisation of its
non-performing loans, which

remained flat over the last
two quarters.

CBL's non-interest expense
of $13.5 million increased by
$1.5 million or 12 per cent
year-over-year, due primarily
to higher general and admin-
istrative expenses.

Earnings per share for the
quarter were $0.13, com-
pared to $0.09 in the 2009
second quarter, an increase
of $0.04.

Total assets and liabilities
of CBL were $1.4 billion and

$1.17 billion respectively,
compared to $1.38 billion and
$1.15 billion at year-end
December 31, 2009.

It was noted that while
CBL grew its deposit base
over the six-month period by
$15 million, its loan receiv-
ables declined by $24 million,
with the offset being seen in
increased cash /deposits with
banks and investments by
CBL, which rose collectively
by $53 milllion during the
period.

EQUITY MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS

Week ending 30.07.10

Dividend Notes:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
declared a dividend of $0.04
to all shareholders of record
date as at July 30, 2010,
payable on August 10, 2010.

AGM NOTICE:

Bahamas First Holdings
has announced its AGM will
be held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel on August
4, 2010, at Spm.

BISX SYMBOL CLOSING PRICE WKLY PRICE CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE
AML... 91 OA ieee ees cacesceescebecacesdeeccseccvavstecd) veseesecssccacesevevevscd -11.11%
BBL... $0.30 Lovee eis se Abies saeeseestel easteses Ors eseceesesc ees -52.38%
> BOB... $5.00 Lecce Dees csc euetasvstessdstaseseesvi vases AO0 woe cece -15.25%
BPP... $10.63 voces Nees scdaeeesteteescaesscesesssevaestls Ohseeeeiea ess scsi -1.02%
BS Lissessssssssassvees 9 OA? esses nus Doesnt ess Qiaissesnchttissats -6.36%
BWL .... $ 3.15 vce eee a Oossssctscestessedertsssteztas 0.00%
CAB... eee SILL wo Ge eactaeteeeeesvvseeseisietiesees Oieeiyaresstesdiestienews 11.32%
LIVE & WORK IN PARADISE CBL uw... $ 6.04 voce $0.02 wocecccccceccceseseeees T 298 veccecscecseees -13.71%
Every day of the year CHL eeesssssseeee $2.55 veecccsssssseeessse $0.05 csessssssssssseensssseee QT 100 .eccccssssseeee 6.25%
CUB sesecsssssssseseave $9.7 eccccccsseeeceees Biegeeeteritesisesssesseeeeseevinecess Oscsssceseseuetiedes tastes -2.50%
0
Little Switzerland is a company with over 50 years experience in luxury retalling with over 30 stores Sa specetesee ss oe seesgeiiesisusveeiees - 9) s.sdeccssssastssavesssseeaial piers sesesssstsasereeeses pret
in The Caribbean, Florida and Alaska. We sell great names like Breitling, Tag Heuer, Omega, Rado, becca eee eeeeeeeee AUT caesesereressseseseses mE TESTE LELELTS STOLE TELS SST STE LETT eT A Cee TESTS e Tee eee Teese eee = . -
Baume & Mercier, Raymond Weil, Movado and more. FAM ue $6.07 sSsedaledasscepmensrun: $- sesbieuuseusissstecsccowseawscadeces Oovswatsisotasiceseonduusadsd -6.47%
FBB........ GO Teseegectessts saute Ge aeeeceeesteseese esses estes ie ereeetisse: -8.44%
If you want a career in watch repair we have an immediate opening in Nassau for the position of FCC. eee $O.27 ececcccssescseees es caceseesseete sie vesseeeeevezsecsees O ceeccecceseecccessesesseeees 0.00%
Watcha’? Inour: Brettling Waren Bourlgue: BCL vecsssssssesee $4.65 ccccccccsssseeseeeee OF cccjeeeetoceectesscercerasemced O vcessssssssssssessessssse 2.52%
PCL B wicisasseasseves $100 niece he essere secittv estes Onavesreteecsiesteas 0.00%
FIN. $8.90 Lecce be iacescessvetefSes Stteevasscesiestis B50 Lecceceecceecseeeees -4.09%
Watchmaker ICD vecceecccccsseesee G9 99 veccecctee cusses Gee esis ees Oriente 0.00%
: oe isa ISI oecccccceceeees $9.95 Locecccseeeeees Ge tes setavsiscdsisistsesvieetess O ceeccecceseccccessesesseeees 0.00%
Major Responsibilities Include:
: eocite i Ln a cine cichce ince aisrime ker stot. mescanne nciument Gener PRE voeessessseeeone $10.00 ..cceessecceseeereee Go sid esi psvestdpeommsndional O cecescsseccssesersecesseeens 0.00%
machines, and cleaning equipment. Removes mechanism from case and examines mechanism
for defective parts. Repairs broken, damaged or worn parts using handtools and machines.
* Implements effective inventory controls in compliance with Internal Audit standards to allow for the BOND MARKET , TRADING STATISTICS
effective and timely ordering of watch parts and supplies. BISX SYMBOL DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE
« Provide helpful and accurate communication and feedback to customers to ensure personal :
customer Seiice that would exceed their expectations. FBB13 BB Series C Notes Due 2013 0 $1,000
FBB15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015 0 $1,000
Position Requirements: 7 a FBB17 FBB Series A Notes Due 2017 0 $1,000
* Must othe completed factory training and certification by BREITLING and WOSTEP or FBB22 FBB Series B Notes Due 2022 0 $1,000
equivalent. ;
* Strong communication skills and ability to work cooperatively with others.
siesta cechuditescuiaunercienceneaiea INTERNATIONAL MARKETS
ood oral and written compre! ll of the English language. FOREX Rates
To apply, please email or fax your CV/resume with a cover letter to: CURRENCY WEEKLY % CHANGE
E-mail: Tballas@nxpco.com Of wearey@nxpco.com
Fax: (242) 356-9860 CAD 0.9730 0.77
Mail: William Carey GBP 1.5691 1.69
Little Switzerland EUR 1.3041 0.95

PO Box N-7116
Nassau, Bahamas

SUNY s.
AIRWAYS

BRiTIsy ©
YIN

©} Firstc
anne

i a ee

aL]
a 4499 oT ee

“8 03749

Las Nia ie UE ANn
The British Airways Visa Business

Credit Card, issued by

FirstCaribbean International Bank,

offers tailored solutions designed for

jetset executives and managers who

often have to entertain key business

eee

Enjoy:
o mA bonus BA Miles

upon card issuance

¢ Earn 1 BA Mile for every US$1 and
2 BA Miles for every US$1 or local
equivalent spent on British Airways

¢ Automatic enrolment in the British
Airways Executive Club*

¢ Receive a complimentary ticket for a
companion when you purchase a
qualifying ticket in World Traveller
Plus, Club World and First*.

* Redeem BA Miles on British Airways,
American Airlines and other members
of the oneworld alliance***

e Easy access to Working Capital

¢ Be a part of the Visa Business Network
with access to Visa virtual advisors

Speak with a Corporate Manager today.
www firstcaribbeanbank.com/creditcards

WHR oN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

* Visit ba.com for details
** Conditions Apply

*** Subject to fees, taxes and surcharges (including airline surcharges). GET THERE. TOGETHER.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



RoyalFidelity Market Wrap

By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS

It was a slow week of trad-
ing in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in
four out of the 24 listed secu-
rities, with two advancers and
the other securities remain-
ing unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 29,648 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 3,128 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
26,520 shares.

Colina Holdings (CHL)
was the volume leader and

lead advancer, trading 21,100
shares to see its stock close
the week up by $0.05 at $2.55.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) followed, trading 7,298
shares to see its shares close
the week up by $0.02 at $6.04.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Earnings Releases:

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) released its unaudit-
ed financial results for the
quarter ended June 30, 2010,
reporting total comprehen-
sive income of $13.9 million,

an increase of $3.8 million or
37 per cent from $10.1 mil-
lion reported in the same
quarter in the previous year.
It was noted that while net
interest income of $27.2 mil-
lion increased slightly by $1
million or 3.9 per cent, up
from $26.2 million in the
comparative period, loan
impairment expense fell sig-
nificantly by $4.5 million or
59.6 per cent - from $7.6 mil-
lion to $3.1 million.
Management noted that
the improvement in loan
impairment expense was due
to improved credit quality
and the stabilisation of its
non-performing loans, which

remained flat over the last
two quarters.

CBL's non-interest expense
of $13.5 million increased by
$1.5 million or 12 per cent
year-over-year, due primarily
to higher general and admin-
istrative expenses.

Earnings per share for the
quarter were $0.13, com-
pared to $0.09 in the 2009
second quarter, an increase
of $0.04.

Total assets and liabilities
of CBL were $1.4 billion and

$1.17 billion respectively,
compared to $1.38 billion and
$1.15 billion at year-end
December 31, 2009.

It was noted that while
CBL grew its deposit base
over the six-month period by
$15 million, its loan receiv-
ables declined by $24 million,
with the offset being seen in
increased cash /deposits with
banks and investments by
CBL, which rose collectively
by $53 milllion during the
period.

EQUITY MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS

Week ending 30.07.10

Dividend Notes:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
declared a dividend of $0.04
to all shareholders of record
date as at July 30, 2010,
payable on August 10, 2010.

AGM NOTICE:

Bahamas First Holdings
has announced its AGM will
be held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel on August
4, 2010, at Spm.

BISX SYMBOL CLOSING PRICE WKLY PRICE CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE
AML... 91 OA ieee ees cacesceescebecacesdeeccseccvavstecd) veseesecssccacesevevevscd -11.11%
BBL... $0.30 Lovee eis se Abies saeeseestel easteses Ors eseceesesc ees -52.38%
> BOB... $5.00 Lecce Dees csc euetasvstessdstaseseesvi vases AO0 woe cece -15.25%
BPP... $10.63 voces Nees scdaeeesteteescaesscesesssevaestls Ohseeeeiea ess scsi -1.02%
BS Lissessssssssassvees 9 OA? esses nus Doesnt ess Qiaissesnchttissats -6.36%
BWL .... $ 3.15 vce eee a Oossssctscestessedertsssteztas 0.00%
CAB... eee SILL wo Ge eactaeteeeeesvvseeseisietiesees Oieeiyaresstesdiestienews 11.32%
LIVE & WORK IN PARADISE CBL uw... $ 6.04 voce $0.02 wocecccccceccceseseeees T 298 veccecscecseees -13.71%
Every day of the year CHL eeesssssseeee $2.55 veecccsssssseeessse $0.05 csessssssssssseensssseee QT 100 .eccccssssseeee 6.25%
CUB sesecsssssssseseave $9.7 eccccccsseeeceees Biegeeeteritesisesssesseeeeseevinecess Oscsssceseseuetiedes tastes -2.50%
0
Little Switzerland is a company with over 50 years experience in luxury retalling with over 30 stores Sa specetesee ss oe seesgeiiesisusveeiees - 9) s.sdeccssssastssavesssseeaial piers sesesssstsasereeeses pret
in The Caribbean, Florida and Alaska. We sell great names like Breitling, Tag Heuer, Omega, Rado, becca eee eeeeeeeee AUT caesesereressseseseses mE TESTE LELELTS STOLE TELS SST STE LETT eT A Cee TESTS e Tee eee Teese eee = . -
Baume & Mercier, Raymond Weil, Movado and more. FAM ue $6.07 sSsedaledasscepmensrun: $- sesbieuuseusissstecsccowseawscadeces Oovswatsisotasiceseonduusadsd -6.47%
FBB........ GO Teseegectessts saute Ge aeeeceeesteseese esses estes ie ereeetisse: -8.44%
If you want a career in watch repair we have an immediate opening in Nassau for the position of FCC. eee $O.27 ececcccssescseees es caceseesseete sie vesseeeeevezsecsees O ceeccecceseecccessesesseeees 0.00%
Watcha’? Inour: Brettling Waren Bourlgue: BCL vecsssssssesee $4.65 ccccccccsssseeseeeee OF cccjeeeetoceectesscercerasemced O vcessssssssssssessessssse 2.52%
PCL B wicisasseasseves $100 niece he essere secittv estes Onavesreteecsiesteas 0.00%
FIN. $8.90 Lecce be iacescessvetefSes Stteevasscesiestis B50 Lecceceecceecseeeees -4.09%
Watchmaker ICD vecceecccccsseesee G9 99 veccecctee cusses Gee esis ees Oriente 0.00%
: oe isa ISI oecccccceceeees $9.95 Locecccseeeeees Ge tes setavsiscdsisistsesvieetess O ceeccecceseccccessesesseeees 0.00%
Major Responsibilities Include:
: eocite i Ln a cine cichce ince aisrime ker stot. mescanne nciument Gener PRE voeessessseeeone $10.00 ..cceessecceseeereee Go sid esi psvestdpeommsndional O cecescsseccssesersecesseeens 0.00%
machines, and cleaning equipment. Removes mechanism from case and examines mechanism
for defective parts. Repairs broken, damaged or worn parts using handtools and machines.
* Implements effective inventory controls in compliance with Internal Audit standards to allow for the BOND MARKET , TRADING STATISTICS
effective and timely ordering of watch parts and supplies. BISX SYMBOL DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE
« Provide helpful and accurate communication and feedback to customers to ensure personal :
customer Seiice that would exceed their expectations. FBB13 BB Series C Notes Due 2013 0 $1,000
FBB15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015 0 $1,000
Position Requirements: 7 a FBB17 FBB Series A Notes Due 2017 0 $1,000
* Must othe completed factory training and certification by BREITLING and WOSTEP or FBB22 FBB Series B Notes Due 2022 0 $1,000
equivalent. ;
* Strong communication skills and ability to work cooperatively with others.
siesta cechuditescuiaunercienceneaiea INTERNATIONAL MARKETS
ood oral and written compre! ll of the English language. FOREX Rates
To apply, please email or fax your CV/resume with a cover letter to: CURRENCY WEEKLY % CHANGE
E-mail: Tballas@nxpco.com Of wearey@nxpco.com
Fax: (242) 356-9860 CAD 0.9730 0.77
Mail: William Carey GBP 1.5691 1.69
Little Switzerland EUR 1.3041 0.95

PO Box N-7116
Nassau, Bahamas

SUNY s.
AIRWAYS

BRiTIsy ©
YIN

©} Firstc
anne

i a ee

aL]
a 4499 oT ee

“8 03749

Las Nia ie UE ANn
The British Airways Visa Business

Credit Card, issued by

FirstCaribbean International Bank,

offers tailored solutions designed for

jetset executives and managers who

often have to entertain key business

eee

Enjoy:
o mA bonus BA Miles

upon card issuance

¢ Earn 1 BA Mile for every US$1 and
2 BA Miles for every US$1 or local
equivalent spent on British Airways

¢ Automatic enrolment in the British
Airways Executive Club*

¢ Receive a complimentary ticket for a
companion when you purchase a
qualifying ticket in World Traveller
Plus, Club World and First*.

* Redeem BA Miles on British Airways,
American Airlines and other members
of the oneworld alliance***

e Easy access to Working Capital

¢ Be a part of the Visa Business Network
with access to Visa virtual advisors

Speak with a Corporate Manager today.
www firstcaribbeanbank.com/creditcards

WHR oN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

* Visit ba.com for details
** Conditions Apply

*** Subject to fees, taxes and surcharges (including airline surcharges). GET THERE. TOGETHER.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 3B



po USINESS
‘Great injustice’

for contractors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s decision
to increase the Business Licence
fee rate by 50 per cent for most
contractors “serves a great injus-
tice” on the Bahamian con-
struction industry, the Bahamian
Contractors Association’s
(BCA) president told Tribune
Business, and fails to recognise
the “extremely high risk” firms
could lose money on projects.

Speaking after this newspa-
per revealed that the Govern-
ment had abandoned initial
plans to place “all construction
companies” in a special category
where they paid a Business
Licence fee equivalent to 0.5 per
cent of annual turnover, Stephen
Wrinkle said: ‘We’re extremely
disappointed, and it’s serving a
great injustice to our industry.

“We had met with Minister
Laing last year, and expressed
our concerns and views, and
made some proposals as to how
to accommodate the construc-
tion industry. By and large,
they’ve been totally ignored.”

The BCA and its members
are now working with the Cham-
ber of Commerce to arrange
another meeting with the Gov-
ernment in a bid to change the
revised Business Licence Bill,
which requires contractors gen-
erating turnover of greater than
$500,000 per annum to pay a
0.75 per cent rate.

Given that many perform on
multi-million dollar jobs, most
Bahamian contractors will be
pushed from a 0.5 per cent rate
to a 0.75 per cent rate, yet Mr
Wrinkle pointed out again that
in most cases they acted as pro-
ject managers, handling huge
sums that were paid out to sub-
contractors, tradesmen and sup-
pliers, and retaining only a small
portion as their fee.

Yet Bahamian contractors are
being taxed on the gross amount
of these contracts, something Mr
Wrinkle agreed was unfair.
Comparing a contractor’s role
as project manager to that of an
attorney holding funds in escrow
for a client, the BCA president
said attorneys were taxed on
their net receipts, while contrac-
tors were hit on the gross.

“They’ve put us into a cate-
gory inconsistent with the fidu-
ciary responsibilities of a con-
tractor,” Mr Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business. “The realtors and
attorneys are able to hold large
sums of money, but are not
taxed on the gross receipts, just
the net receipts.

“The general contractor is
more of a project manager role
rather than the actual builder.
Most of the proceeds from a
construction contract go to sub-
contractors, specialist workers
and suppliers. One has to look at
the industry as a whole, and
begin to realise the cost will not
be absorbed by contractors and
will be passed on to consumers.”

Mr Wrinkle said several large
contractors had told him the
revised Business Licence Bill

BCA chief says Business Licence fee
changes fail to recognise ‘extremely high
risk’ nature of construction industry

could add more than $100,000
to their annual fee payable to
the Government.

Referring to last year’s dis-
cussions with the Government,
the BCA president added: “It’s
not fair. Construction is a very
volatile industry.. The risk of los-
ing money on a project is
extremely high.

“No consideration has been
given for such losses. No consid-
eration has been given for non-
payment by the client. No con-
sideration has been given for
growing your company at a time
when unemployment in the
Bahamas is high.”

Mr Wrinkle added that unlike
most other countries, the
amount of taxes levied on
Bahamian contractors and other
businesses appeared to increase
the more they expanded, and
the higher their revenues
(turnover) and profits became.

As a result, he lamented that
there was “no incentive to grow
our business. The larger you get,
the more they want to tax you”.

Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s presi-
dent, confirmed that his organi-
sation was arranging a meeting
with Mr Laing on the contrac-
tors’ behalf to discuss their con-
cerns.

“Tt’s a process of we talk
about it, and hopefully arrive at
a solution that makes sense,” Mr
Rolle said. “What I’ve found
with Mr Laing is that if you pre-
sent a reasonable case, he will
go to bat for you.

“That’s why I try to work
closely with him, because he
understands the country’s com-
mercial issues.

“We'll try and discuss every
single issue that arises and reach
a middle ground, which has been
the case of late.”

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campaigns
Markets all bank products and services (internally &
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bank (for e.g, Iflex)
Tracks market development, trends, introduction of new
products by the competitors
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frequent basis of comparative or new products by
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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5B

Venture capital





Renewable energy |
training plan for |
Bahamas unveiled |

FROM page one

“Our goal is to have a fully Bahamian workforce under

APS, and develop a market where other companies enter }
the field with people who have been accredited. The }
reality is that there is no way we as a company can pro- }

vide all the renewable energy sources for the entire
Bahamas.

“We want to lead the transition to a renewable energy ;
industry, and our goal is to create employment. We don’t }
want a foreign workforce. We want trained Bahamians.” }

Apart from Mr Lyn, APS also provided other lecturers }
to the UWI’s renewable energy technology courses. Mr }
Gilbert said APS ultimately wanted to take its school }
to all regional nations, as the aim was to educate a }

Caribbean market.

Mr Lyn told Tribune Business that when it came to }
renewable energies, the key for the Bahamas was the }
“right education” for consumers and the industry, and }
then to “get on with it”. The IDB-funded contracts }
require APS to supervise the installation of the PV sys-
tems and solar water heaters on the selected number of }

Bahamian homes.
“We’re excited as to what we could do, We get sun 365

days of the year, so we might as well take advantage of

it,” Mr Gilbert said.

Touting renewable energy’s benefits, he added: “It :
reduces the carbon footprint, and the Bahamas at some }

point will be able to take advantage of carbon credits.”

APS undertakes a lot of its own research and devel- }
opment, extensively testing renewable energy products }
before bringing them to the Bahamas, to ensure they }

can withstand the rigors of practical application.

The company is now set to commence testing a wind }
turbine which only requires two miles per hour winds to }
start generating electricity, as opposed to most contem- }

poraries that need 12-13 miles per hour winds.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

fund’s 193 jobs

FROM page one

entrepreneurs because
banks in this nation did not
accept payments via PayPal
and the Internet.

Arguing that Baker Tilly
Gomez “give more service
than we get”, in the sense
that the work it does on the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund is worth more
than the fee it receives, Mr
Gomez said the fund had
worked in the sense that
there had been no political
interference impacting its
operations.

“Td say that over the five
years of this fund, no politi-
cal pressure has been
applied at all,” Mr Gomez
said, adding that there had
been no calls from politi-
cians along the lines of urg-
ing them to approve and
finance a particular business
idea.

“Half the MPs did not
know this fund ever exist-
ed,” he joked.

Acknowledging that the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund had “crossed
over a bit” with the
Bahamas Development
Bank’s (BDB) lending activ-
ities, Mr Gomez said one
notable difference between
the two was that the fund

was far more involved with
its entrepreneur clients.

Apart from the Board
seats it had taken in the 12
companies in which it had
equity stakes, Mr Gomez
said the fund provided a
source of constant advice
and training, even going as
far as paying for services the
entrepreneur needed, such
as accounts.

“The BDB does not offer
these kind of value added
services,” Mr Gomez said.
“The BDB, once you get the
loan, usually will not see you
unless you default on it.
Default on the loan, and
they will come looking for
you.”

He added that the BDB
and other organisations in
the Government’s small
business support infrastruc-
ture, such as the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation (BAIC), did
not have enough staff with
the skills required, pointing
out that many had been
transferred into these agen-
cies from other government
departments and ministries.

In response to audience
questions, Mr Gomez said
the Bahamas Entrepreneur-
ial Venture Fund had
received virtually no busi-
ness plans and applications

‘a THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

related to the agricultural
sector.

“I can only remember one
project in five years that had
anything to do with agricul-
ture, and that young gentle-
man did not have a clear
vision of how to do it - geta
few acres here, through a
few crops there,” Mr Gomez
said.

“We may need foreign
help. We have to consider
that - that we need foreign
help in agriculture in our
economy. We may have to
accept that.”



JEROME GOMEZ
























THE REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT

The Registrar General's Department wishes to inform our valued customers ani
the penetal public thet our British Colonind Hilton and Apsley Howse Olfices will
be relocating to Shirkey House, #3) Shirley Street opposite Fingo elfectnve
Monday, 3” August, 2010,

Weapologize for amy inccavenience cased

NOTICE

Notice to
New and Current Financial Aid

Applicants for Fall 2010

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Greg Smith and/or Greg Smith
& Associates

All current and new students are advised
that the new Fall 2010 Financial Aid appli-
cation form is now available online at
www.cob.edu.bs and at all College loca-
tions. The deadline for Financial Aid
applications, including the submission of
supporting documents, has been extended
to 4:00 p.m. on 18th August, 2010.

(a) LEONARDO DA VINCI FUND LIMITED (SAC) is in
dissolution under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000 S.137 and section 45 of the Segregated Accounts
Companies Act, Chapter 396C

Are no longer authorized to
conduct business on behalf of

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 5, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

STAR GENERAL INSURANCE
AGENCY (GRAND BAHAMA) LTD.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Authorized Agents for:
RoyalStar Assurance Limited
Bahamas First General Insurance
Company
Lloyds — Worldwide Medical Trust
International Medical Group (IMG)

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 17th day of June, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquida-
tor of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from

For more information, contact:
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Office of Financial Aid, Oakes Field Campus,
Tel: (242) 302-4371
or email: financialaid@cob.edu.bs

WWW.BAHAMA-WALL.COM

May 6, 2010
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2010
New Student Orientation

We Build:

* Tumn-Key Homes

Build Stronger
rT | Build Faster

Parents’ Evening
Tuesday, 17th August, 2010 #

6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m. Safe Rooms
Orientation
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

* Precast Floor

System Green

Construction
—

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

* Super Shell
Structures

More Ene
Fficient

Advisement, Registration &
Bill Payment
Thursday, 19th August, 2010
Friday, 20th August, 2010
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

* Architects
Contractors
Engineer

~ Call for a free estimate
Bahama Wall System
Office: 328-8287 | 427-6951

Venue:
Performing Arts Centre,
The College Of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard

* Inquiries Welcome



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

BIC offer sparks competition fear

FROM page one

interested in this asset, and have the right
idea about value, but there are some impor-
tant issues that would need to be negotiat-
the Government got the best strategic partner ed”
both in terms of purchase price and terms/con-
ditions.

Cable & Wireless was described by one
source as “really well suited as the strategic
partner. The committee believes they’re very

Crawtish

Sale ends August 7th, 2010

bey =o rol

“Some very fruitful discussions” were said to
have taken place between the BTC privatisa-
tion committee and Cable & Wireless, in a
bid to get to a point where the Government
might find its proposal attractive.



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THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
SUPPLEMENTARY X-RAY SUPPLIES &
ACCESSORIES
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

TENDERS ARE INVITED FROM QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS
TO PROVIDE X-RAY SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES FOR THE
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL FOR A PERIOD OF ONE (1)
YEAR.

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers,
specifications and other relevant information, can be collected 9:
00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at the Materials
Management Directorate, Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound,
Shirley Street.

ATENDER MUST BESUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE INASEALED
ENVELOPE OR PACKAGE IDENTIFIED AS “TENDER FOR
THE PROVISION OF SUPPLEMENTARY X-RAY TENDER
FOR SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES, PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL” AND ADDRESSED TO:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE “B”
THIRD & WEST TERRACES, COLLINS AVENUE.
P.O. BOX N-8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M Monday, 6'#
September, 2010. LATE TENDER(S) WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.

A copy of a valid business license and a letter of good standing
from the National Insurance Board should accompany all
proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any
or all Tender(s).



THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas ‘far
beyond Wild

Wild West

FROM page one

now the highest in his life-
time, Khaalis Rolle said
many Bahamian businesses
were now afraid to conduct
commerce at night, as crim-
inals seemed to have no fear
of the law.

Arguing that guns were
seemingly as commonplace
as cars in the Bahamas, Mr
Rolle said the First-
Caribbean armed robbery
and high speed chase/shoot-
out between the crooks and
the police showed just what
a lawless, dangerous society
this nation had become.

“It’s extremely frighten-
ing to do business in this
country now,” Mr Rolle
said. “When you get to the
point where the criminals
have equal or better ammu-
nition than the police, and
have absolutely no fear of
the law, what’s the alterna-
tive? What do we do?”

Recalling a reggae song
that described Jamaica as a
‘Cowboy town’, the Cham-
ber president added: “The
Bahamas is far beyond a
Cowboy town, the Wild
Wild West. Every single day
there is a report of some
armed robbery or attempted
armed robbery. The crimi-
nals just don’t have any fear
of the law.

“T think about 10 years
ago I spoke at a Toastmas-
ters meeting, and I had a
conversation with a politi-
cian. I said the Bahamas was
becoming an increasingly

dangerous society and some-
thing had to be done. His
response was as if there was
no concern, and we’re at the
point now where business-
people are extremely afraid
to do business after dark.”

Pointing to the Supreme
Court break-in at Justice
Jon Isaacs’ office, Mr Rolle
said this showed that “no
place is off limits”.

“The criminals are so dar-
ing that they do what they
want to do during the day,
and the one entity where
you'd have thought they
would be off limits is no
longer. The fellow broke
into the courts. This is
extremely serious,” the
Chamber president added,
pointing out that the impli-
cations went beyond just the
immediate negative impact
on business and the Bahami-
an economy.

Warning that it would
“not be long” before travel
advisories and media reports
declared the Bahamas an
unsafe destination, Mr Rolle
added: “Everyone seeming-
ly has a gun. Guns seem to
be as ubiquitous as vehicles.
Guns are everywhere; cars
are everywhere. Gun crime
is fare more pervasive than
it has ever been in my life.

“The mindset has degen-
erated to the point where
people do not believe there
is a penalty attached to their
actions, and if there is some
penalty attached, people
don’t care.”

Acknowledging that it was

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that I, KENSON
FERGUSTE of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
intend to change my name to KENSON FERJUSTE.
If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PRO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

“easy to point the finger” of
blame at the Government
or Royal Bahamas Police
Force for this nation’s crime
problems, Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business: “There’s a
huge implication for society
as a whole.

“T believe this problem
goes far deeper, and if we
do not resolve it now, or at
least start taking preparato-
ry steps to, we’re going to
be in significant trouble in
five years. In five years’
time, the Bahamas will not
be the same Bahamas we
see now.

“We’ve got some issues
that are going to impact this
country, and even though I
speak on behalf of the busi-
ness community, the impli-
cations far beyond. It goes
back to deficiencies in the
education system, deficien-
cies in the social system, and
we have to address these
deficiencies and do it proac-
tively.”





















The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

GAMING BOARD FOR
THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries and Gaming Act
Chapter 387, notice is hereby given that Treasure Bay,
G.B.I. Ltd. a company incorporated under the laws of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has in accordance with the
provisions of Section 34(2) of the said Act, made application
to the Secretary of The Gaming Board for The Bahamas for a
licence to manage a casino on the premises situated at Our
Lucaya Hotel in Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

And notice is also given that on Friday, August 20th, 2010, at
10:00 a.m. at the Magistrate Court, Garnet Levarity Justice
Centre, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas the application of Treasure
Bay, G.B.I. Limited will be considered by the Gaming Board.

Notice is also given that any person who desires to object
to the grant of the licence shall send to the Secretary of The
Gaming Board for The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas or
deliver to the offices situated in the Renaissance Building,
West Bay Street on or before noon on Thursday, August.12th,
2010, two (2) copies of a brief statement in writing of the

grounds of objections.

Signed : Dennis W. Martin
Secretary

Gaming Board

For The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 7B





Economic reports give stocks big start for August

NEW YORK

THE stock market began
August with a huge rally after
reports from around the world
revived investors’ faith in the
global recovery, according to
Associated Press.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 208 points Mon-
day. All the major stock indexes
rose about 2 percent.

The first day of the month
brought a stream of news that
reassured investors who have
worried about a slowing of eco-
nomic growth in the U.S., China
and Europe. Manufacturing was
a common thread:

¢ The Institute for Supply
Management's index of U.S.
manufacturing activity during
July was better than the mar-
ket expected. Traders were
pleased because the report still

showed that manufacturing is
growing.

¢ A manufacturing report for
the 16 countries that use the
euro was revised higher for July
and showed that the European
economy is recovering faster
than expected. Strong earnings
reports from European banks
also pleased the market, espe-
cially after the continent's ris-
ing debt problems helped trigger





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

2009

IN THE SUPREME COURT










COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

BETWEEN

CLE/GEN/00509

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

Plaintiff

a spring plunge in stocks.

¢ From China came news that
industrial growth was moderate
enough that Beijing isn't likely
to take steps to slow that coun-
try's economy. Investors have
periodically sold stocks on con-
cerns that China's economy
would slow and pull others
down with it.

Monday's news was encour-
aging after months of reports
that showed the recovery was
weakening. Those reports pulled
the major stock indexes off their
2010 highs in late April and con-
tributed to sharp swings in stock
prices since then. The ISM
report is significant because it
is the first major reading of the
economy from July, and
investors are trying to determine
just how strong the recovery will
be in the second half of the year.

The big advance was a bit of a
surprise for traders who are
used to more subdued trading
as August arrives. Over the past
12 years, the Dow has fallen
nine times on the first trading
day in August, although it has
risen the past three years.
August in general is seen as a
volatile month for stocks, large-
ly because many traders are
away on vacation. That makes
for low trading volumes and
exaggerated price moves.

Some analysts were cautious
even as stock prices jumped.

Alan Gayle, senior invest-
ment strategist for Ridge-
Worth Investments in Rich-
mond, Virginia, said Monday's
news, while good, showed only
small changes in the economy.

"Fundamentally, I do
believe the pace of the (eco-
nomic) expansion is slowing
and I think that's going to
weigh on the markets as we go
through the second half of the
year," he said.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 208.44, or 2 per-
cent, to 10,674.38. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index rose
24.26, or 2.2 percent, to
1,125.86, while the Nasdaq
composite index rose 40.66, or
1.8 percent, to 2,295.36.

Six stocks rose for every one
that fell on the New York
Stock Exchange where volume
came to a light 1 billion shares.

With stocks looking more
appealing, bond prices fell
because investors felt less need
to seek the safety of govern-
ment securities. The yield on
the 10-year Treasury note,
which moves opposite its price,
rose to 2.97 percent from 2.91
percent late Friday. Its yield
is often used as a benchmark
to set interest rates on mort-
gages and other consumer
loans.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
of

Stocks were up across the
market. Industrial and mate-
rials stocks, including 3M Co.
and General Electric Co., rose
after the ISM report. Investors
were encouraged in particular
by several key components of
the index. Production and new
orders both improved, as did
companies’ willingness to hire
new employees.

3M rose $1.8799, or 2.2 per-
cent, to $87.41, while GE rose
29 cents to $16.41.

Energy companies rose as
the price of oil gained on
expectations that a healthier
economy will lift demand.
Exxon Mobil Corp. rose $2.26,
or 3.8 percent, to $61.94, while

Chevron Corp. jumped $1.59,
or 2.1 percent, to $77.80.

Benchmark crude rose $2.53
to $81.48 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

Financial stocks rose on the
strong earnings reports from
European-based banking
giants HSBC and BNP
Paribas, which convinced
investors that the continent's
financial sector is not being
hurt by the debt problems.

HSBC shares trading in the
US. rose $2.66, or 5.2 percent,
to $53.74. Bank of America
Corp. rose 40 cents, or 2.9 per-
cent, to $14.44. JPMorgan
Chase & Co. rose $1.36, or 3.4
percent, to $41.64.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land com-
prising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres
situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant
on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on
the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas

AND

BKNV LIMITED

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIE’S PLACE LTD.

JAMAAL R. HORTON

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of above
company commenced on the 29 day of July,
2010. Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed
Liquidator of the Company.

NOTICE

Defendant

SUMMONS

LET ALL PARTIES concerned
attend before Deputy Registrar, Tabitha
Cumberbatch of the Supreme Court,
Supreme Court Building, Bank Lane,
Nassau, The Bahamas on Monday the 9"
day of August, A.D., 2010 at 11:00
o'clock in the fore noon for the hearing of an
application on the part of the Plaintiff for an
Order for leave to enter Judgment in Default
of Appearance pursuant to Order 73 of the
Rules of the Supreme Court for the amount
claimed in the Statement of Claim with
interest, as therein claimed and costs.

TAKE NOTICE that a party intending
to oppose this application or to apply for
a stay of execution should send to the
opposition party or its Attorneys to reach
them not less than three (3) days before
the date above mentioned a copy of any
Affidavit intended to be used.

THE PETITION OF SADIE’S PLACE in respect of:-

In respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising
One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres situate
approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant on the
East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant
land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet
and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and
running thereon 138.47 feet to a point thence SOUTH-
WARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to
a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTH-
WARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate
of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point
thence WESTWARDLY and by land 5.04 feet to a point
thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon
12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon
169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or for-
merly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon
37.78 feet to the beginning.



Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LISCARD MANAGEMENT LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act No. (45 of 2000) LISCARD MANAGE-
MENT LTD. has been Dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Register General on the 21st day of

Dated this 28" day of June, A.D., 2010

Sadie’s Place claims to be the owner of the unincum-
bered fee simple estate in possession of the said land

REGISTRAR

This Summons was taken out by Messers. Gibson, Rigby & Co.,

Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The Bahamas,

Attorneys for the Plaintiff.

June, 2010.

John Fleetwood
PO Box 521,
9 Burrard Street, St. Helier
Jersey, JE4 5UE
Liquidator

and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3)
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have it’s title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions

of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the following
places:

EJ FG CAPITAL MARKETS
Ges BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cart

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Moser at York
fc ze Tf. a T.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 30 JULY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,486.14 | CHG -0.01 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -79.24 | YTD % -5.06
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.04 0.250
10.63 0.050
5.00 0.598
0.30 -0.877
3.15 0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.141
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.720
0.366
0.000
0.407
0.952
0.156

iP The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor
Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nas-
sau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Re-
tiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Previous Close
1.04
10.63
5.00
0.30
3.15
2.17
Tt
2.55
6.04
2.41
2.31
6.07
8.30
9.74
4.65
1.00
5.59

Security
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 zi
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets 9.42 10.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD%
1.4825
2.9199
1.5438
2.8522
13.4110
109.3929
100.1833
AIT
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

2.17
41.11
2.55
6.04
2.40
2.31
6.07
8.90
8.74
4.65
1.00
5.59

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower
or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not rec-
ognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration
of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Pe-
titioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith.

cooosesaogggoso®
ecoocoooooooooo*d
ecocesc0Cc0qcoogog

64.1

Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

99.46
100.00
100.00

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $ P/E Yield
-2.945
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.55 0.000
NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.911577
1.527368

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.511377

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

Last 12 months % Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall

operate as bar to such claims.

30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
23-Jul-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10

1.4387
2.8266
1.4804
2.8522
13.0484
101.6693
93.1998

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int! Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3

Royal Fidelity Intl Fund - Equities Sub Fund

107.570620
105.779543

103.987340
101.725415
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

10.0000 10.0344 30-Jun-10

$.3299 30-Jun-10

LOCKHART & Co.
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

7.3073
MARKET TERMS

30-Jun-10

ed price for daily volume
m day to day
aded today
@ last 12 months

ded by the last 12 month eamin: as
KS) -4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

volume of the prior week
reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningfu

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100









HOT WRIST: Pandora bracelets (above and below) have become one of the hottest, must-have jewellery pieces nowadays.

Pandora’s Charm

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

n 1999, the Pandora jewel-
ry manufacturers intro-
duced for the very first time
a charm bracelet to rival all
charm bracelets. Pandora
charm bracelets put a spin on the
classical trinkets and captures some
of life’s most precious memories.

When the Pandora line was first
introduced to the Bahamian public
seven years ago by Bahama Repub-
lic, a local jewelry store located East
By Street, it took jewelry lovers a
while to catch the Pandora fever.

Now, Pandora has become one
of the hottest must-have jewelry
items today. Women, teens, and
tweens have all indulged in Pando-
ra’s “charm”.

But what is it that actually puts
them on the most wanted list? Is it
because they are made with pre-
cious metals like gold, oxidised and
sterling silver? Is it because they
can be customised? Or is it because
they are affordable and make great
gifts?

Tribune Woman spoke to
Natalia, an assistant manager at
Bahama Republic who said the
answer to that question is all of the
above.

“What makes a Pandora bracelet
a must have item is they make great
gifts. You might have a family mem-
ber you may want to purchase a gift
for, you can purchase her a Pando-
ra bracelet or if she already has one
you can purchase a bead as

reminder,” she said.

The idea of collecting beads to
fill the entire patent threaded nov-
elty is what makes it fun. Swapping
charms to suit attire and mood is
another reason women have fallen
head over heels for Pandora.

“The charms can reflect your
mood. You can switch them up. For
instance if you are feeling happy
you can choose a bead that signifies
your happiness. If are feeling blue
you can select a bead that suits your
mood,” Natalia explained.

However, one of the main rea-
sons women have fallen weak to
Pandora’s “charm is because it
allows them to tell stories with each

THE TRIBUNE

bead.

For three women, Pryia Simmons,
Cara Bethel, and Alesha Cadet the
bracelets don’t just make fashion
statements. They make statements
about their lives and some of the
people in it.

Pryia Simmons has a few special
beads on her bracelet. They are an
angel, a suitcase, a heart stopper,
and flowers.

She said: “I got the angel because
I am my dad’s angel. I got the suit-
case because I love to travel. The
heart stopper represents my
boyfriend because he keeps every-
thing in place in my life and the
flower is so that my life could flour-

Civas Cerbhesn Baby
Fresines = ree Exuyece

i. J» de JR

-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3,



2010

ish,” she told Tribune Woman.

After having her first son last
October, Cara Bethel is customising
a bracelet to record every milestone
in his life. She even named the
bracelet after him. She calls it “The
Dylan Bracelet.’

“My Pandora is a permanent
reminder of the milestones in my
baby's life. So far, I have two blue
coloured beads, a little boy because
he is a boy of course, a baby car-
riage, a mama monkey holding a
baby monkey because his nursery
has a monkey theme and a gift box
because he is the best present I ever
got,” Mrs Bethel said.

Alesha Cadet started her





bracelet with a home bead. She said:
“Home is where the heart is and
that is Eleuthera. I got the number
21 charm when I turned 21. I am
going with light colours for my
charm bracelet because they match
my spirit. I am light hearted and
happy,” she said.

One of her charm in particular
represents a past love. She chose
that bead because she said it moti-
vates her to keep moving forward.

“The teddy bear is a reminder of
an ex special love. Whenever I want
to pick up the phone to give him a
call, [look at it and it is a reminder
of what to never get myself into,”
she told Tribune Woman.

Look for Festival in

your favorite store.

Oettvedty Bahomas Wholesale Agencies, East West Hay, * tl: 242-394-1759 + fax: 242-094-1859 + nail: bveadahamasecoraivawn.com * Freeport: 1 Milton Si, « tel: 242-351-2201 «fax: 242-061-2205 * email byesipoecoraivann.com





PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





By MAGGIE BAIN

JUST thinking of a series of arti-
cles about love produces a
slideshow of picture memories,
moving through our mind. Even
better, we can control it ourselves;
replay, fast forward, rewind and
even pause at the highlights.

First loves, summer loves, crazy
puppy loves, one-sided loves, and
the list goes on. Decades later, we
bask in the warm glow of happy
flashbacks and amaze ourselves by
how we survived the lows.

As we journey around the world,
we realise that the nature, process,
and biology of love are universal;
no society is exempt. Outwardly
we may look different, speak dif-
ferent languages, have been
brought up with different values
and beliefs, but when it comes to
love, we are the same.

In our early years of innocence,
we dreamt of being someone’s Cin-
derella or gallant Prince Charming.
We had visions of being swept

Romantic Love

away on a wave of eternal love and
leaving the ugly world behind. For
many, romantic love conjures up
images of tenderness, candlelight,
pastel colours and a sense of peace
and contentment. This is the per-
fect love we all desire to obtain —
at least once in our lives.

Visible for all to see is a new
inner glow that speaks of our inner
happiness. The mere thought,
touch or sight of our love stimu-
lates our brain’s dopamine recep-
tors, and we are on a ‘high’. Our
newfound motivation is accompa-
nied with a steely determination.
We find ourselves automatically
reshuffling our priorities and full
attention directed to that special
person. Our newfound energy and
focus allows us to believe that any-
thing is possible. It is not unheard
of to feel you would go to the ends
of the earth,even to sacrifice your
life for them.

Intense thoughts of our lover are
fueled, day and night, by this newly
channeled energy. It motivates us,



but at the same time leaves us feel-
ing naked in our vulnerability. It is
exhilarating, floating on ‘Cloud
Nine’, but we quickly discover that
any small disappointment can send
us on a free-fall. The result is a
craving for more, and the strong
attachment becomes all consum-
ing.

Only when you have experi-
enced this particular euphoria can
you truly appreciate the saying,
‘Love is a drug’. The dependence
and obsessive nature of romantic
love could essentially class persons
as addicts.

Rejection, unreciprocated love,
and break- ups trigger similar with-

drawal symptoms, as in other
recognised addictions.

This analogy may seem incon-
gruous to some, but is backed by
scientific research. What makes it
all the more interesting is that can-
didates also included those who
were experiencing unrequited love,
rejection or the end of the relation-
ship. In all cases, the right ventral
tegmental area (VTA) and the
right caudate nucleus in the brain
were stimulated. These are the
dopamine rich areas associated
with reward, motivation, and also
affected by cocaine use.

Romantic love speaks of true
motivational drive, and possibly
acts as a constant reminder of
human reproduction. It is quite dif-
ferent from sexual drive because of
its specific ability to conserve ener-
gy and focus on one individual. In
fact romantic love is possible with
out sex, and is often described as
emotional or spiritual love.

Knowing this allows us to under-
stand those who mutually decide to

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Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New

Delhi, India.

AMODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week

in Bangalore, India.

AUSTRALIAN cricketer Brett Lee presents a creation by designers Abu
Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week

2010 in New Delhi, India.

eee]
aaa et
oe

A MODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week

in Bangalore, India.

Delhi, India.



in Bangalore, India.

abstain from pre- marital sex.
Their constant state of elation
allows for a deepening of emo-
tions, and in turn satisfies their
deep cravings. We then go on to
comprehend those who are able to
maintain long distance relation-
ships, communicate only by written
word, or who are physically chal-
lenged. To close your eyes and
dwell in the pure joy that it pro-
duces, can be equated to great sex
for others.

If you are going through life
feeling fulfilled but not being able
to relate to this description of
romantic love, then perhaps you
need to review your relationship or
dating life. Remember we only
have one life to live and love fully,
and no time to waste.

* Listen to “Love on the Rock’
with Maggie Bain every Thursday
5-6 pm on

Island FM 102.9 For appoint-
ments call364-7230, email

relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com



A MODEL presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep
Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New

(AP Photos)

A MODEL presents a creation by Neeru's at Bangalore Fashion Week

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9B



Understanding
depression in women

epression is a serious con-

D dition that can impact

every area of your life. It

can affect your social life, your fami-

ly relationships, your career, and your

sense of self-worth and purpose. And

for women in particular, depression is
common.

If you're feeling sad, guilty, tired,
and just generally “down in the
dumps,” you may be suffering from
major depression. But the good news
is that depression is treatable, and
the more you understand depression's
particular implications for and its
impact on women, the more equipped
you will be to tackle the condition
head on.

Risk Factors for
depression in Women

-Family history of mood disorders

-Personal past history of mood dis-
orders in early reproductive years

-Loss of a parent before the age of
10 years

-Childhood history of physical or
sexual abuse

-Use of an oral contraceptive, espe-
cially one with a high progesterone
content

-Use of gonadotropin stimulants as
part of infertility treatment

-Persistent psychosocial stressors
(e.g., loss of job)

-Loss of social support system or
the threat of such a loss

Signs and symptoms
of depression in women

The symptoms of depression in
women are the same as those for
major depression. Common com-
plaints include:

-Depressed mood Loss of interest
or pleasure in activities you used to
enjoy

-Feelings of guilt, hopelessness and
worthlessness

-Suicidal thoughts or recurrent
thoughts of death

-Sleep disturbance (sleeping more
or sleeping less)

-Appetite and weight changes

-Difficulty concentrating

-Lack of energy and fatigue

Specifics about
depression in women

Seasonal affective disorder-depres-
sion in the winter months due to low-
er levels of sunlight-is more common
in women

Women are about twice as likely as
men to suffer from depression. This
two-to-one difference persists across
racial, ethnic, and economic divides.
In fact, this gender difference in rates
of depression is found in most coun-
tries around the world.

There are a number of theories
which attempt to explain the higher
incidence of depression in women.
Many factors have been implicated,
including biological, psychological,
and social factors.



SIGNS & SYMPTOMS of depression in women include lack of energy and fatigue.

Biological causes of
depression in women

Postpartum depression -

Many new mothers experience the
“baby blues.” This is a normal reac-
tion that tends to subside within a
few weeks. However, some women
experience severe, lasting depression.
This condition is known as postpar-
tum depression. Postpartum depres-
sion is believed to be influenced, at
least in part, by hormonal fluctua-
tions.

Perimenopause & menopause -

Women may be at increased risk
for depression during peri-
menopause, the stage leading to
menopause when reproductive hor-
mones rapidly fluctuate. Women with
past histories of depression are at an
increased risk of depression during
menopause as well.

Social and cultural causes
of depression in women

Role strain -

Women often suffer from role
strain over conflicting and over-
whelming responsibilities in their life.
The more roles a woman is expected

to play (mother, wife, working
woman), the more vulnerable she is
to role strain and subsequent stress
and depression. Depression is more
common in women who receive little
help with housework and child care.

Single mothers are particularly at
risk. Research indicates that single
mothers are three times more likely
than married mothers to experience
an episode of major depression.

Unequal power & status -

Women's relative lack of power
and status in our society may lead to
feelings of helplessness. This sense
of helplessness puts women at greater
risk for depression. These feelings
may be provoked by discrimination in
the workplace leading to underem-
ployment or unemployment. Low
socioeconomic status is a risk factor
for major depression. Another con-
tributing factor is society's emphasis
on youth, beauty, and thinness in
women, traits which to a large extent
are out of their control.

Sexual and physical abuse -

Sexual and physical abuse may play
a role in depression in women. Girls
are much more likely to be sexually

abused than boys, and researchers
have found that sexual abuse in child-
hood puts one at increased risk for
depression in adulthood. Higher rates
of depression are also found among
victims of rape, a crime almost exclu-
sively committed against women.
Other common forms of abuse,
including physical abuse and sexual
harassment, may also contribute to
depression.

Relationship dissatisfaction -

While rates of depression are low-
er for the married than for the single
and divorced, the benefits of mar-
riage and its general contribution to
well-being are greater for men than
for women. Furthermore, the benefits
disappear entirely for women whose
marital satisfaction is low. Lack of
intimacy and marital strife are linked
to depression in women.

Poverty -

Poverty is more common among
women than men. Single mothers
have the highest rates of poverty
across all demographic groups. Pover-
ty is a severe, chronic stressor than
can lead to depression.

Psychological causes
of depression in women

Coping mechanisms -

Women are more likely to rumi-
nate when they are depressed. This
includes crying to relieve emotional
tension, trying to figure out why
you're depressed, and talking to your
friends about your depression. How-
ever, rumination has been found to
maintain depression and even make it
worse. Men, on the other hand, tend
to distract themselves when they are
depressed. Unlike rumination, dis-
traction can reduce depression.

Stress response -

According to Psychology Today,
women are more likely than men to
develop depression under lower lev-
els of stress. Furthermore, the female
physiological response to stress is dif-
ferent. Women produce more stress
hormones than men do, and the
female sex hormone progesterone
prevents the stress hormone system
from turning itself off as it does in
men.

Puberty and body image -

The gender difference in depres-
sion begins in adolescence. The emer-
gence of sex differences during puber-
ty likely plays a role.

Some researchers point to body
dissatisfaction, which increases in girls
during the sexual development of
puberty. Body image is closely linked
to self-esteem in women, and low
self-esteem is a risk factor for depres-
sion.

¢ Prepared by
Public Relations Department
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Low-carb diet trumps low-fat
on ‘good’ cholesterol

NOTHINGS

SUGAR’S seductive
power is proven in the
fact that the actual Amer-
ican consumes 150
pounds of sugar per year.
This all despite warnings
from doctors who say it
spikes blood sugar levels
and leads to the storage
of fat!

The American Heart
Association (the people
responsible for efforts to
reduce death associated
with cardiovascular dis-
ease) is the latest agency
to releases data on the
dangers of sugar.

Where does the sugar
come from? Mostly soft
drinks and candy, fol-
lowed by cakes, cookies
and pies. But don't give a
knowing smile if you turn
your back on these kinds
of snacks: sugar sneaks
into items you'd never
believe, including fruit-
flavoured yogurt (eight
ounces can have six tea-
spoons of added sugar)
and frosted whole grain
cereal (3 teaspoons in one
cup).
The next professional
to warn against sugar
intake may be your skin
therapist, as new findings
show sugar does impact
skin.

Collagen, essential to
skin strength and elastic-
ity, is a protein. A diet
rich in sugar can create
excess waste products in
the form of glucose.
Instead of “burning off,”
this glucose (sugar)
attaches to proteins in our
skin. This process is clas-
sified as glycation, and
leads to the formation of
Advanced Glycation
End-products (AGEs),
which increases inflam-
mation in the body.
Inflammation breaks
down collagen and leads
to the loss of elasticity: in
laymen's terms, this
means wrinkles, sagging
and loss of tone.

To check for added
sugar, look at the label
for sugar, corn syrup,
fructose, dextrose,
molasses or evaporated
cane juice in the ingredi-
ent list. And doctors and
dietitians say moderation
is one way to keep skin
and body healthy, but
keeping active is also key.

As part of healthy
aging diet, eschew refined
sugars for whole grains,
fruits and vegetables, and
topically treat skin with
AGE Smart products that
include Glucosamine,
Soy, Genestein, Vitamin
A, licorice, and the
unique Argine/Lysine
Polypeptide which binds
and traps sugars to help
prevent formation of
AGEs.

“This information was
taken from dermalogi-
ca.com. “Sara Beek isa
Dermalogica Skin Care
Therapist at The Dermal
Clinic in Sandyport.
Please call 327-6788 for

By STEPHANIE NANO
Associated Press Writer

problems or diabetes.

Half followed a low-carb
diet modelled after the
Atkins’ plan and half went
on a low-calorie, low-fat
diet. All attended group
sessions to help them
change bad eating habits,

ended up with similar
improvements to bad cho-
lesterol.

The study's strengths
include its size, length and
its multiple locations —
Denver, Philadelphia and St
Louis, said Dr William Yan-

more information or visit
www.dermal-clinic.com

NEW YORK (AP) — :
ic.com>.

Over the long term, a low-
carb diet works just as well
as a low-fat diet at taking
off the pounds — and it



might be better for your get more active and stick to — cy, of the Durham VA
heart, new research sug- their diets. Medical Center in North
gests. The volunteers had peri- Carolina.

"These are results we
should have a lot of confi-
dence in," said Yancy, who
has done similar diet
research but was not
involved in the study.

Foster, the study leader,
said dieters should be less
concerned about which diet
to use, and focus on finding
the support or technique —
like writing down what they
eat — that keeps them on
track.

"It doesn't make a differ-
ence for weight loss how
you get there," he said.

With the current obesity
epidemic, more than one
way is needed to attack the
problem, Yancy said. "Both
of these are options. These
diets work," he said.

Both diets improved cho-
lesterol in a two-year study
that included intensive
group counselling. But
those on the low-carbohy-
drate diet got a bigger boost
in their so-called good cho-
lesterol, nearly twice as
much as those on low-fat.

In previous studies, low-
carb diets have done better
at weight loss at six months,
but longer-term results have
been mixed. And there's
been a suggestion of better
cholesterol from low-carb
eating.

The latest test is one of
the longest to compare the
approaches. At the end of
two years, average weight
loss was the same for both
— about 15 pounds (6.8

odic checks of their weight,
blood, bone density and
body composition. After
two years, there was no
major differences between
diet groups, except in good
cholesterol. Why the low-
carb diet had a bigger effect
on good cholesterol isn't
known, the researchers said.
As low-carb plans
became popular, experts
feared the diet would drive
up the risk of heart disease
because it allows more fat.
The latest results suggest
those concerns are
unfounded, Foster said. In
the low-carb group, there
was an early rise in "bad"
cholesterol, the kind that
builds up in arteries. But
after two years, both groups

your

news

He said the low-carb
boost is the kind one might
get from medicines that
improve HDL.

"For a dict, that's pretty
mmpressive," Foster said.

The findings, published in
Tuesday's Annals of Inter-
nal Medicine, are based on
a study of 307 adults, two-
thirds of them women. Par-
ticipants were obese but
didn't have cholesterol

kilograms) or seven per
cent.

The key difference was in
HDL, or good cholesterol: a
23 per cent increase from
low-carb dieting compared
to a 12 per cent improve-
ment from low-fat, said
Gary Foster, director of
Temple University's Center
for Obesity Research and
Education, who led the fed-
erally funded study.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 11B



August - The end or a new beginning?

WHEN I put my book A
Year With Gardener Jack
together I started with Sep-
tember and ended with
August, a month that in many
ways is the low point of the
growing year but in many oth-
er ways is remarkably fecund.

All the vegetables we grow
during the cooler months are
absent from the veggie plots.
We may have a few cherry
tomatoes and peppers to
boast about but beyond that
we only have very hardy pro-
ducers like okra, Malabar
spinach and snake beans to
comfort us.

In the absence of prime
vegetables it might be wise to
cover your veggie plots with
clear plastic, a process called
solarisation. The plastic will
stop weeds growing and will
also sterilise the soil. August
gives the last opportunity to
solarise before the new veg-
etable growing season gets
under way. Make sure your
soil is wet to a depth of 5-6
inches before covering it.

August is a wonderful time
for tropical fruits. The last of
the Barbados cherries may
still be around while the first
carambolas ripen. In the gar-
den and along the shore, sea-
grapes can be found in sever-
al stages of development and
ripeness. August is also the
beginning of the guava duff
season with guava trees hang-
ing with fruit.

Many flowering shrubs are
at their best during August.
Hibiscus, oleander, crepe
myrtle, bougainvillea and
bridal bouquet give abundant
colour while yellow poinciana
(Peltophorum pterocarpum)
takes over from royal poin-
ciana as the main flowering

THE WEATHER REPORT (lee

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- —=
ta a

Clouds: and son with
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EARLY TOMATOES have to be sown early. Jack will be trying Solar Fire this year to get really early tomatoes.

tree.

Back to vegetables. Many
gardeners look upon early
tomatoes as a priority. Nor-
mal tomatoes set fruit at 68

TODAY

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dates to give the earliest
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into fruit production by a cool
tropical storm during Sep-
tember.

Bahamian gardeners are
divided over whether to sow
tomatoes in August in the
hope that the right conditions
come along (including the
absence of hurricanes) or
leave the task until Septem-
ber. If you plan to aim for ear-
ly, sow your tomatoes in pots
that can be easily moved and
allow the seedlings to develop
in semi shade. Harden them
off by increasing the amount
of direct sunlight every day
over a week or two until the
plants can take full sun, then
transplant them into their pre-
pared growing area.

Peppers are natural warm
weather vegetables and are
best started early. Cabbages
and cucumbers are also can-
didates for an early start.

Any early vegetables will
be at the mercy of hurricane
activity, which is more likely
in September than any other
time. That said, if a hurricane
strikes one of the last things
we will be worrying about is
tomatoes. Plants in their pots
can be brought inside for a
day or two without doing
them any harm.

If your lawn is not looking
good right now, it never will.
Fertilize with a high nitrogen
mix at least every month dur-
ing the rainy season and you
will maintain a good colour
well into the dry season. If
you have St. Augustine grass
it will grow profusely whether
you fertilize it or not. Add
fertilizer and it will grow but
be much more verdant.

gardenerjack@

coralwave.com

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

as





PAGE

1 2



THE TRIBUNE

S | | S
k

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3,



2010

NUMBER ONE: Valentino Knowles captured a gold medal in the men’s light welterweight division at the
CAC Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on Saturday.

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Thomas,
Barry jump

high for gold

and silver...
See page 14

Valentino
wins gold

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

n the twilight of the
XXI Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean
(CAC) Games, the
country’s most deco-
rated amateur boxer added
to his legacy and won the
Bahamas’ final medal.
Valentino Knowles cap-
tured a gold medal in the
men’s light welterweight divi-
sion on Saturday in
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico .
Knowles put some of his
best boxing skills on display at
perhaps the timeliest point in
the tournament, with a domi-
nating round three to defeat
Luis Romero of Venezuela,
6:2 on points.
Both fighters failed to score
a single point over the course
of the first two opening
rounds and headed into the
decisive third round 0:0.
The 21-year-old Knowles
outboxed Romero 6:2 in the
third round to secure the gold.

Becomes third Bahamian
to win boxing medal
at the CAC Games

He became the third Bahami-
an to win a boxing medal at
the games _ following
Nathaniel Knowles who won
the silver medal in 1973 and
Marvin Smith who won silver
in 1986.

Earlier this year, Knowles
moved up from the 60 to the
64 kilo weight class after he
won the Bahamas’ first medal
at the AIBA World Champi-
onships in 2009. He followed
with the highest honour of
any Bahamian fighter ever at
the Commonwealth Boxing
Championships when he won
a silver medal.

Along with Carl Hield, he
also competed in the Conti-
nental Elite Championships
in Ecuador in June.

SU ew

PRA ADIS® ISLAND.

In the CAC semifinals,
Knowles defeated Juan Pablo
Romero of Mexico 7:5 on
points to earn a berth in the
gold-medal match.

A dominant first round ulti-
mately paved the way for the
win as Knowles came out with
an aggressive first round to
outscore Romero, 4:1. He
continued to hold a decisive
advantage following the sec-
ond round as both fighters
managed to score a single
point.

Romero won his first round
of the match in the third, but
the 3:2 was far from enough
to close the three-point
deficit. He defeated Ricardo
Garcia Tejada 6:5 in the other
semifinal to advance.

RESERVATIONS
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TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 13



SPORTS



PUSHING HARD: Jamaica's Allodin Fothergill (left)
Bahamas’ Demetrius Pinder in the men's 4x400 meter relay at the Central American and Caribbean Games



in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on July 30, 2010.



SKY HIGH: Bahamas’ Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long
jump at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez,
Puerto Rico July 30, 2010.

(AP Photo)

Bahamas loses
Opening match
but rebounds
to take game 2

EARLY into their historic
bid against the world’s best
in youth baseball, the
Bahamas has been on both
sides of the win-loss column
after two games.

At the Pony-13 World
Series in Fullerton, Califor-
nia, the Bahamas lost in its
opening match but rebounded
to take game two over the
weekend. The team got off to
a slow start against Chula
Vista, California, when they
were shutout 10-0.

In game two, the Bahamas
rebounded to take a game
two win over the hosts Fuller-
ton, California, in a hard
fought one run win, 14-13.

The Bahamas advanced for
the first time in the country’s
nine year Caribbean Zone
participation.

After hosting the
Caribbean Zone Tournament,
which also included an area
host team from the Grand
Bahamas and the Panama
Champions, the winner of the
pool advanced directly to the
Championship with the top
seed.

The team from Nassau got
off to a rough start in their
first two games to the
Bahamas area team from
Grand Bahama 18-8 and 9-6.

They rebounded and took a
4-3 win over Panama but lost
9-3 in its second contest.

Nassau made history in the
Championship, when they
beat Panama 10-2 to become
the country’s first Zone
Championship and securing
a spot in the PONY-13 World
Series for the first time.

Team Bahamas
hauls in record
18-medal total

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE largest team ever
assembled under the current
Bahamas Olympic Commit-
tee administration, with more
than 100 athletes participat-
ing, delivered a series of note-
worthy performances and
brought in the largest medal
total ever for the Bahamas at
the Central American and
Caribbean (CAC) Games.

Team Bahamas won a
record-setting total of 18
medals which included seven
gold, five silver and six bronze
at the 21st edition of the
games which concluded yes-
terday in Mayaguez Puerto,
Rico.

The team medalled in four
disciplines, beginning with
swimming that won eight
medals, track and field fin-
ished with six, the tennis team
won three medals and boxing
finished with one.

The Bahamas finished 10th
overall in the final medal
standings.

Mexico topped the overall
medal count with 384 medals
which included 133 gold, 129
silver and 122 bronze.

Venezuela finished second

104b), Colombia was third
with 260 (100g, 84s, 76b),
Puerto Rico fourth with 167
medals (48g, 44s, 75b), while
the Dominican Republic
rounded out the top five with
133 medals (31g, 37s, 65b).

Jamaica was the leading
medal winner of all English-
Speaking Caribbean countries
with 42 total medals (15g, 10s,
17b).

The represented disciplines
included athletics, bowling,
judo, rugby, sailing, swimming
and tennis.

Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace became the story of the
games early on for Team
Bahamas as she hauled in a
total of six medals and set a
pair of new meet records.

The 20-year-old Olympian
won four individual medals,
including gold in 50m and
100m butterfly and a pair of
bronze medals as a member
of relay teams.

On the tennis court, Larika
Russell won a bronze in the
women’s singles and teamed
with Nikkita Fountain to win
gold in doubles play.

In track and field, a trio of
Olympians returned to top
form when Leevan Sands,
Donald Thomas and Chris-
tine Amertil took gold in their

Valentino Knowles won the
final medal of the games for
the Bahamas in the boxing
ring when he took gold in the
welterweight division.

The Bahamas surpassed its
medal total of 10 from the
2006 CAC Games in Carte-
gena, Colombia, when they
totalled 10 medals, six silver
and four bronze.

In 2002 in El Salvador, the
team won just two silver
medals.

In 1998 in Maracaibo,
Venezuela, the Bahamas won
eight medals, two gold, two
silver and four bronze and in
1993 in Ponce, Puerto Rico
they totalled four medals, one
gold and three bronze.

It was the third time Puerto
Rico hosted the CAC Games,
they also hosted in San Juan
in 1966 and Ponce in 1993.

Approximately 5,000 ath-
letes participated in 39 sports
held across Puerto Rico, from
July 17 to August 1.

For the stories
behind the news,

bette MeL T[o/ Ty
on Mondays



(AP Photo) — with 322 medals (114g, 104s, respective signature events.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT
NOTICE
CORRIDOR I1A

BAILL HILL ROAD
Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that construction works will be carried out on
the eastern side of Baillou Hill Road effective Monday August 9th, 2010 for approximately twenty-four (24) weeks.

The works includes installation of new drainage facilities, utilities, water main systems, street lighting, traffic signs,
asphalt paving & landscaping.

Motorist travelling northbound on Baillou Hill Road should expect changes as construction works will be carried out in four
(4) stages. The following lateral streets will be temporarily closed to motorist & pedestrians: PALM TREE AVE, COCONUT
GROVE AVE, POINCIANA AVE, BAHAMA AVE, WEST END AVE, CORDEAUX AVE, PALMETTO ST, NEWBOLD
ST, BAKER ST & FATHER CALNAN RD.

STAGE 1
Motorist travelling through Palm Tree Ave should use Robinson Road as an alternative route and continue through
First Street or Second Street to their destination.

STAGE 2
Motorist travelling through Coconut Grove & Poinciana Avenue should use Palm Tree Avenue as an alternative
route.

STAGE 3
Motorist travelling through Bahama Avenue, West End Avenue & Cordeaux Avenue should use Poinciana
Avenue as an alternative route from the southern side.

STAGE 4
Motorist travelling through Palmetto Street, Newbold Street, Baker Street & Father Calnan Road should use
Oxford Avenue as an alternative route.

During construction we kindly ask that motorist travelling on Baillou Hill Road observe traffic signs delineating the work zone
and follow the signs posted “DIVERSION”. Access will be granted to the residents of the affected streets.

We apologize for the inconvenience & delays caused.
For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fni 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@ cartellone.com.ar

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs



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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS





UP AND OVER: Bahamas’ Donald Thomas clears the bar during the high jump at the Central American and
Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, July 30, 2010.

GETTIN’ UP: Bahamas’ Trevor Barry clears the bar during the high jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010.

(AP Photos)

Thomas, Barry get gold
and silver in high jump

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

e Bianca Stuart jumps long for bronze
e Men’s 1,600 relay team win silver

Donald Thomas and

AFTER several days
marred with disqualifications,
injuries and disappointments,
the Bahamas ended the ath-
letics competition at the XXI
Central American and

field, and another added in
the finale on the track

Both recorded the winning

Caribbean Games with four
medals won on the final day.
Three medals won in the

brought the total medal count
in the athletics discipline to
Six.

Trevor Barry highlighted the
final session for the Bahamas
with a gold and silver finish
in the men’s high jump.

jump of 2.28m, however,
Thomas cleared the mark on
his first attempt for the gold,
while Barry was unsuccessful

on his first attempt and
cleared in round two.

Wagner Miller of Colom-
bia finished third with a leap
of 2.19m.

Thomas entered the com-
petition at 2.16m, cleared on
his first attempt, and followed
to do the same at 2:19.

The former IAAF World
Champion and Pan Am
Games silver medallist fouled
both first attempts at 2.22m
and 2.25m but cleared on the
second.

Barry entered the contest
at 2.10m and cleared on his
first attempt. He passed on
2.13m but followed to clear
2.16m and 2.19m on first

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ALL FOR ONE: Athletes compete (Team Bahamas far right) in the men's 4x400 meter relay at the CAC
Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico on July 30, 2010.































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IN FLIGHT: Bahamas’ Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long
jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010.

attempts.

Barry failed two attempts
at 2.22m before clearing on
his third and also failed on
two attempts at 2.25m before
advancing.

In the women’s long jump,
Bianca Stuart needed just a
single jump to secure her
standing atop the medal podi-
um and claim the bronze
medal. Stuart recorded the
mark of 6.50m on her first
attempt for the third place fin-
ish. It was one of only two
successful attempts for Stuart
over the six rounds of the
competition.

Rhonda Watkins of
Trinidad and Tobago set a
new meet record to win the
gold medal with a leap of
6.67m to surpass the old mark
of 6.61m.

Jovanee Jarrett of Jamaica
finished with a silver medal

(AP Photo)

with her mark of 6.52m.

Watkins started the com-
petition with a list of 6.55m
and held the top position for
the duration of the contest.

Stuart took hold of second
place with her jump, but was
surpassed by Jarrett in round
two.

Her only other recorded
mark of the competition was a
leap of 6.21m in the fourth
round.

The men’s 1600m relay
team finished with a silver
medal just behind Jamaica
who set a new games record
in 3:01.68s.

The team of Andretti Bain,
Michael Mathieu, Le’Sean
Pickstock and Demetrius Pin-
der finished in a new season’s
best time of 3:01.82s.

Trinidad and Tobago fin-
ished third, also in a season’s
best time of 3:04.07s.

HE’S OFF: Bahamas’ Andretti Bain starts the men's 4x400 meter
relay at the CAC Games on July 30, 2010.

(AP Photo)

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Full Text

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 106 No.209TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNYWITH ASHOWER HIGH 92F LOW 79F By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net P OLICE are questioning four men following the mur der of a well-known fishing g uide in Exuma. C ely Smith, 45, was at his home in Stuart Manor on Sunday morning when four gunmen with dreadlocked hair kicked down his door and fired gunshots in his direction. Mr Smith later died of his i njuries at a local clinic. Sources close to the investigation report that four men helping police with theiri nquiries were arrested by Drug Enforcement Unit offi cers off the Montagu foreshore. It is believed that after shooting Mr Smith, the culprits fled to Staniel Cay where they commandeered a white coloured go-fast boat and headed for New Providence, however police were last night tight-lipped over the details. It is understood that in addition to the four men a ssisting police two others are being sought. Chrislyn Skippings, press o fficer of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, said there was no information to suggest thei ncident was drug-related at t his time. Police have also disputed claims that the incident wasl inked to a fight which took place yesterday in a nightclub in Black Point, a settlement1 5 minutes away from Stuart Manor, where two men got into an altercation which resulted in one of them beingg un butted and flown to hos pital in Nassau. According to relatives, Mr Smith had seven children and had lived at his two-storey home in Stuarts Manor for nearly 15 years. On the morning of his shooting, four of his sons were present two of whom are still in high school. A family member said: The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST BAHAMASEDITION McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W www.tribune242.com HORROR WEEKEND By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THESE are the dramatic moments when bystanders and tourists rushed to rescue the victims of a horrific boardwalk collapse. The terrified victims were among a 50-strong party of mourners who had turned up on Saturday morning to pay their last respects to 32-year-old Sharmaine Smith-Downy. MOURNERSINDRAMATICBOARDWALKRESCUE S EE page nine THE BODY is removed from the scene on East Bay Street. Felip Major /Tribune staff By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A 43-YEAR-OLD woman was last night being questioned by police after a man believed to be her husband was stabbed to death in a parking lot. The killing took place in the vacant lot located between the Green Parrot bar and Bahamas Air Sea Rescue Association (BASRA) headquarters on East Bay Street. While the victim has not been formally identified, The Tribune understands his surname is Williams. A manager at the Green Parrot Bar and Grill, which is next to the site of the death, said Mr Williams was arriving for his work shift at about 9pm on Saturday as a security guard securing property belonging to USbased civil engineering firm W OMAN QUESTIONED AFTERMANSTABBEDTODEATH SEE page eight F ishing guide is murdered in Exuma SEE page eight By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The opening of the crawfish season on Grand Bahama was marked with tragedy when two men died in separate crawfishing incidents in the West End and East End areas. According to police reports, the body of one man was pulled from the waters near Memory Rock on Monday. His identity is being withheld by police. Two die in tragic opening to the crawfish season SEE page eight By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT: Grand Bahama Police seized almost $600,000 worth of illegal drugs and arrested two men, one of whom was shot during a high-speed chase and shootout with officers. Assistant Superintendent Hector Delva said police are searching for a third man who escaped after the vehicle being pursued by officers crashed into a tree. According to reports, DEU officers were LOCAL and international law enforcement agents in the past two days have apprehended more than 400 people attempting to enter the Bahamas illegally. The influx has caused the Royal Bahamas Defence Force to increase its patrols at sea and in the air. The US Coast Guard has reportedly done like wise. The first group, 159 Haitians, were apprehended on Friday north west of Great Inagua by the US Coast Guard $600,000 worth of drugs seized after chase, shootout SEE page nine 400 attempt to illegally enter Bahamas in two days SEE page eight P h o t o s / U l r i c W o o d s i d e PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO TECHNICAL ISSUES, THERE IS N O USA TODAY IN TODAYS TRIBUNE

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B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedida.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Police have receivedi nformation from the public t hat could possibly help iden tity the decomposed body found inside a high voltageb uilding on Kings Road. We have an unconfirmed identity of a person who was k nown to frequent the area, but we are still trying to make some determination and so w e are awaiting the results of an autopsy, Inspector Hector Delva told The Tribune O n Wednesday, police discovered the partly decomposed body of a black male, dressed in white t-shirt andd ark trousers. A dog was also found dead. A Grand Bahama Power C ompany statement said: We are saddened to learn of the recent loss of life found at our premises on Kings R oad. We are satisfied that every reasonable precautionarym easure was taken to prevent such an unfortunate mishap from happening. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeIf you protect your lifestyle with a CGI company,you can pay less for motor and home insurance,and enjoy firstrate business cover too.From health insurance,rich in benefits and offering global coverage,to pensions and family protection,CGI companies offer flexible products to make the most of your budget.Insurance326-7100 for an agent Health326-8191* Pensions502-7526 Life 356-5433www.cgigroup.bm* Freeport 351-3960 Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Lifestyle ProtectionHealth,wealth and happiness cover.Insurance,Health,Pensions,Life Colonial Pension Services (Bahamas Tel.502-7526 Atlantic Medical Insurance Tel.326-8191 Freeport Tel.351-3960 Security & General Insurance Tel.326-7100 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE in Florida are c onfident they have found t he remains of a Bahamian w oman who went missing there in 2006. Cocoa Police Department believe the body to be that of 22-year-old Darice Knowles. They were tipped off to the location by a prison inmate. Barbara Matthews, a spokesperson for the Cocoa Police Department in Brevard County, Florida, told al ocal newspaper that police had not positively identified the remains, but were nonetheless certain that t hey belong to the Bahamian. Shes pretty much intact a nd you can make out the o utline of her remains, said M s Matthews T he discovery of Darices s uspected remains revives w hat had become a cold c ase file for local police. Darice was said to have flown to the US from Nassau in March 2006 to visit male friends from theB ahamas when she went m issing. Her disappearance w as not reported to police u ntil three months later. Foul play was suspected, but no one has ever been taken into custody in connection with the matter. A former Miss Bahamas contestant and law student, Darice is the only child of Mario and Princess Knowles. According to Darices cousin, Dana Munnings, many of her family members in Nassau h ave been locked in a state o f denial over the disappearance. T his weekend, detectives w ere said to be unwilling to discuss what may have happ ened to Darice, but said it w as likely she knew her a ttacker. One of the suspects in the matter went with police tot he scene to help find where Knowles body was located, a ccording to local reports T he first signs that law e nforcement officials may have found Darices remains came on Friday when police were able to locate a foot bone at a wooded site off State Road 524 in Brevard County. They were reported to have unearthed yet more bones yesterday, a week after police called in heavy equipment to begin clearing the area where they b elieved her body may have b een located. "Part of the thing that has k ept us driven for the last f our years to find her body was the fact that we wanted t o give the family closure, s aid Ms Matthews. Of c ourse, after we do what we need to do, everything will be turned over to the fami l y so they can give her a proper burial." Police in Florida confident they have found remains of Bahamian woman M ISSINGWOMAN: D arice Knowles Police receive information, but have yet to identify body SCENES from the Emancipation Day Junkanoo parade at Fox Hill yesterday morning. Crowds and Junkanoo groups took t o the streets to celebrate t he historical date. EMANCIPATIONDAY PHOTOS/FELIPE MAJOR

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ tribunemedia.net WRITER, director and producer of Bahamian film Rain signed copies of the newly-released DVD for fans this weekend. Filmmaker Marian Govans f ilm about a 14-year-old girls journey from Ragged Island to i nner city Nassau in search of her estranged mother after her grandmothers death has won critical acclaim around the world since its release at the Bahamas International Film Festival (BIFF 2008. It premiered on the US cable TV channel Showtime in January and was released on DVD this week, to be sold on Internet shopping giant Amazon.com as well as stores across the United States. Sales of the DVD will not only repay Bahamian investors in the film and afford themsome profit, it will also support the success of the film at large. During the filming, the crew and cast stayed at a Cable Beach hotel, rented trucks and cars from local businesses, hired local caterers, musicians and actors to support the film. M s Govan said: We have to realise that investment in film is really important, in that it impacts the entire economy. It's time we begin cultivating alternative means of generating income while utilising our cre ative talent. Bahamians are such a creative people and yet our cultur al landscape can feel void at times. As we face forward, culture will need to take a front seat. Film is a powerful vehicle that can serve our community on so many levels both spiritually and practically. So for those of you who wish to support new, creative, Bahamian industry, buy a copy of Rain, buy two, and tell your friends and family to do the same. I do believe it is a film that will leave you proud to be Bahamian! The common Bahamian story of a child who forgoes the sheltered simple life of her home in Ragged Island after the death of her grandmother, p layed by Irma P Hall, to seek out her estranged mother in the big city of Nassau, told in 'Rain', is also a universal coming of age tale. Ms Govan described how Rain's dreams of a loving reconciliation are quickly shattered when she meets G lory, played by Nicki Micheaux, a scarred, proud, guarded woman bearing no resemblance of the mother she had hoped for. Glory's self-destructive lifestyle, diminished by drug abuse is rudely awakened byt he imminent role of motherhood. "Confronted by unforesee able trials, Rain's passion for running and deeply-rooted spir it brings two allies into her life: An insightful and inspiring track coach, played by CCH Pounder, and a charming rebellioust eenage neighbour. In time, Rain's spirit and talent take her to unimaginable heights," Ms Govan said. "Shot in a style that combines gritty realism, a bold and unfor gettable colour palette, soulful Bahamian music, and the use of local actors alongside seas oned pros, Rain takes us on a journey into the heart of a child, the pulse of a country and the spirit of its people." C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE Department of Meteorology is paying close attention to a tropicald epression which has f ormed in the Atlantic and which had reached very near tropical storm statusl ast night. According to Senior Meteorological Officer G eoffrey Greene, it is too e arly to say if the weather s ystem will directly impact the Bahamas as it is a good way off. However, the forecasters said that by Friday or Sat-u rday evening, meteorologi cal officers will be able to make a better determina tion in this regard. T he tropical depression is the fourth of the hurricane season, and if it does furt her develop, it may become T ropical Storm Colin. A t present, it is on a trajectory which sees it headed for the US Atlantic seaboard and the Carolinas, but it may yet swing outt o sea, according to r eports. Its location at 5pm yes terday was recorded by the U S National Hurricane Centre as: 13.0 degrees north, 42.5 degrees west, m oving west north west at 1 6 miles per hour with max i mum sustained winds of 35 miles per hour. METEOROLOGY DEPT EYES TROPICAL DEPRESSION B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net LONG-AWAITED renovations for Marsh Harbour airport were set in stone yesterday as a contract for the new architectural design was awarded yesterday. Minister of Public Works Neko Grant flew to A baco with a team of delegates from his department to award the $600,000 contract for the $10million development to Freeport company The Architects Incorporated in Marsh Harbour. An estimated 200,000 passengers pass through the Marsh Harbour airport every year, and Abaconians expect many more will visit when the expansion is complete. They hope the expansion promised in the F NMs 1992 manifesto will drive down high international ticket prices and encourage more direct travel between the United States and Abaco. The 24,000 sq ft single storey terminal and fire crash facility to be built west of the existing terminal has been designed with space for expansionin all directions, as it replaces the existing 3,315 sq ft facility which will be converted and utilised. Mr Grant said the new building will give visitors a sense of place as well as offer more facilities, including indoor arrival and departure lounges, airline offices and storage areas, and offices for the police, security staff and airport manager. Abaco continues to develop at a rapid place, the minister said. It has the third largest population after New Providence and Grand Bahama. Furthermore, it is estimated that in excess of 200,000 passengers utilise the Marsh Harbour International Airport annually. It is against this background that the government is proceeding with this plan to construct a larger, modern, state-of-the-art facility. The Marsh Harbour airport project follows completion of a new 6,100 ft jet runway, conversion of the original runway into a jet taxi-way and installation of new signage and lighting. Eight Bahamian architecture firms submitted fee proposals for the works, and The Architects Incorporated won the bid with a fee of six per cent of the construction cost and a commitment to provide tender documents for construction within three months. Marsh Harbour airport renovations set to take off Architectural design contract awarded Bahamian film Rain makes a splash at signing WEATHERNEWS

PAGE 4

By SIR RONALD S ANDERS ( The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat). CLIMATE change is now u ndeniable according to a new study headed by the US National Oceans and Atmospheric Administration. It is already having a disastrous affect on small island states. The very existence of some of them, particularly in the Pacific and the Indian Oceans, is threatened. Caribbean islands too are e ndangered as are countries s uch as Belize and Guyana with low lying coastlands. In the latter case, coastal erosion is reducing beaches that are crucial to the tourism industry on which all o f the small Caribbean i slands now depend. The Atlantic coasts of both Guyana and Belize are below sea level, but it accommodates most of their popu-l ations and their agricultural l ands. Sea-level rise, theref ore, threatens all of them. The challenges that climate change poses to small states are not only overwhelming, they are impossi-b le to meet from the scarce r esources of the governments. In a recent speech in T rinidad and Tobago, the P rime Minister of St Vincent a nd the Grenadines put the matter in clear terms when he said: In mountainousS tates like my own, over 80 per cent of our major infrastructure is located along ourc oastline, within a few feet o f the inexorably rising seas. The cost of adaptation and preservation of our infras tructural developments are daunting, and beyond our individual capacity toa ddress. W hile small states are the primary victims of climate change, they are the least contributors to the greenhouse gas emissions that, as many studies have con f irmed, are causing climate change and global warming. Together, the harmful emissions of greenhouse gases from all small states account f or less than 0.1 per cent of the global total. I n a fatuous argument, the US Department of Energys Carbon Dioxide InformationA nalysis Centre had rated Trinidad and Tobago at number 9 in the worst emit ters of harmful gases in the w orld in the year 2007. However, the measurement was based on population s ize, not on the volume of emissions. To underscore the silliness of the argument, the tiny Caribbean island, Montserrat, with a popula-t ion of 10,000 people and no manufacturing or industrial production of any magnitude, was rated at number 17 in the world. T he reality is that, despite t he p er capita a rgument that developed countries and i nternational institutions are f ond of using to measure a range of issues to procure a desired (but illusionary r esult, small states contribute l ittle to global warming but they are its primary victims as evidenced by sea-levelr ise, stronger and more frequent hurricanes, flooding and other natural disasters. T hese same small states a re also the victims of the w orst trading arrangements in the world. T he World Trade Orga nization (WTO provision for their special cir-c umstances, nor does the I nternational Financial Institutions (IFIs International Monetary Fund (IMF Bank. Hence, small islands such as St Lucia (100,000p eople) and St Kitts-Nevis (50,000 people in the same way in the WTO a s the United States (350 million), Canada (33 million) or the European Union (400 million). No special rules a pply. In the IFIs, many small states and certainly allt hose in the Caribbean are graduated from concessional financing because, on the measurement of per capita income, they are rated as middle-income countries. T he point is that small s tates are the casualties of climate change but the large industrialized nations that cause the problem are doing little to help them cope with the difficulties that have a lready been created and t hat are worsening. The member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECDw orlds most industrialized c ountries, are responsible for a n estimated 77 per cent of the total greenhouse gases which were emitted in the past. The IFIs that are cont rolled by the OECD gove rnments have no machinery in place to provide small states (especially those in the C aribbean who have been g raduated from concessional f inancing) with soft loans or grants to help them mitigate the impact of climate change,o n their key trade sectors, including agriculture, fisheries, forestry and tourism. A nd, the terms of trade a re punitive rather than helpful. A case in point is the Economic Partnership A greement (EPA the European Union (EU and individual small coun-t ries in the Caribbean and t he Pacific. Nowhere in the EPA is there an acknowledgment by the EU that its greenhouse gas emissions are adversely affecting climate change and harming smalli sland states and states with vulnerable coastlines. And, nowhere is there a correlation drawn between the cost of such harmful effects and t rade benefits that could be granted. I ndeed, small states are punished twice for their innocence. Their key trades ectors are compromised by climate change caused by industrialized nations, and then they are made to openu p their markets for a flood of goods and services from the industrialized nations on t he false idea of reciprocal treatment. The WTO admits that global greenhouse gas emiss ions have roughly doubled since the beginning of the 1970s. Current estimatesi ndicate that these emissions will increase by between 25 and 90 per cent in the period from 2000 to 2030. China, India and Brazil (now G20 countriest hree of the large develop ing countries contributing to t he projected increases, and they too have a responsibility to face up to the harm that they are doing to small count ries that lack the financial means to pay for adaptation and mitigation. There is clearly need for a major change in the IFIs in their policies toward small and vulnerable economies. The insistence on per capita income as a measure to graduate countries from concessionary financing has proven that, by itself, it is an illogical calculation for the capacity of small countries. But, the trade rules in the WTO also have to be adapt ed to cater for small and vulnerable states more widely and effectively than they do. A special category of special and differential treatment for small states is necessary both to provide these countries with the means to cope and, also, to make the WTO relevant to their needs. Small countries should refuse to sign any more agreements until their plight is acknowledged and machinery established to address the harmful effects of climate change on them. A growing body of litera ture now exists on the problems of climate change and trade for small states. But, the governments of small states themselves should be making the case in the WTO and the IFIs in a persistent fashion. A high-level team drawn from the Caribbean, Pacific, and the Indian Oceans should be created to press their case at the next meeting of the G20. It would be a good occasion for frank talks between offenders and suf ferers on an issue of human survival. Responses and previous commentaries at: www.sirronaldsanders.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM No trade without help on undeniable climate change WORLDVIEW S IR RONALDSANDERS

PAGE 5

C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM American Bridge, which is located in the dirt lot, when h e was attacked. A merican Bridges B ahamian subsidiary, American Bridge Bahamas Ltd, is constructing part of the new Arawak Cay port, which is being developed by a public-private partnership made up of the Gove rnment and 19 private sector stakeholders. A ccording to the Green Parrot manager, a woman and the victim arrived together in a marooncoloured Chevrolet Blazer. She followed him out of the car. He was stabbed a numb er of times. T he man, who was weari ng khaki pants and a black s tripe shirt, died at the s cene. Witnesses reported t hat a young boy, thought to be his son, was in the car at the time. T here were a number of witnesses to the attack, including someone who was still sitting in their car in the parking lot when the stabb ing occurred. They are said to have run in to Green Parrot to alert security officers, who contacted the police. Another witness was a G reen Parrot chef who a rrived on the scene shortly a fter Mr Williams was attacked. According to the manager at the Bar and Grill, a woman was still standing o ver the body when the c hef arrived. She was freaking out. She told him to shine hisf lashlight on the body, said the manager. Peter Moree, owner of the Green Parrot Bar and G rill, expressed his sadness and that of his staff at the killing. Its an absolute tragedy, he told The Tribune. N onetheless, fearing that it could hurt his business, the owner also distanced his establishment from the crime, pointing out that none of those involved had b een patrons of the bar that e vening and the attack took p lace outside of the bounds of the popular hangout. I called ZNS when I saw their report which said it happened at Green Parrot t o tell them it was not actua lly us, it was the American Bridge property, said Mr Moree, acknowledging thatG reen Parrot does utilise the space as a parking lot on busy evenings. Police yesterday identif ied the woman being questioned as a resident of Nassau Village, and a relative o f the deceased. S enior Assistant Quinn McCartney reported that the victim and two other men were out crawfishing. Two of the men had dived overboard to retrieve traps while the victim waited on the boat. Our preliminary investigations indicate that the per son in the boat fell overboard. The boat went out of control and he sustained serious injuries that resulted in his death, said Mr McCartney. The victims body was brought to shore at Old Bahama Bay and transported by hearse to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where an autopsy will be held to deter mine the cause of death. In East End, residents there are saddened following the a pparent drowning of 35year-old Nixon Mitchell, of Sweetings Cay. The fishermen were checking on their crawfish traps on Sunday when Mr Mitchell failed to surface after a reasonable time. He was pulled from the sea bottom by his brother, whop erformed CPR. A doctor pronounced him dead at the scene. High Rock MP Kenneth Russell said Mr Mitchells death is a shock to the East End community. Mr Russell is urging people to make sure that they are well trained before they go diving for crawfish. Police are investigating both incidents. Cutter (USCGC Meanwhile, that same day, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force removed 177 Haitians (129 men, 43 women and five children) from Channel Cay in the southern Bahamas. These migrants were apprehended by police and Immigration officials in Exuma after their vessel reportedly ran aground on the island. It is believed this latest group was onboard a Haitian sailing sloop the Defence Force had been searching for since Wednesday morning During the operation, a Haitian man jumped overboard while being transported. A search for him is under way. The following day, the USCGC Chandeliur, with a Bahamian ship rider (Defence Force Marine fast boat in the area of Memory Rock, north of Grand Bahama, transporting 15 illegal migrants. When officials boarded the boat, they found five Jamaican men, four Haitian men, four Haitian women, one Peruvian man, one Peruvian woman and four Bahamians. The four Bahamians and 15 illegals were handed over to the police and immigration authorities in Freeport. Later on, 99 Haitians were apprehended in the Exuma chain by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. While on patrol, Defence Force vessel EF 27 spotted a Hait ian sailing sloop in the area of Shroud Cay. Upon further investigation, they discovered 75 men and 24 women) aboard the vessel. The operations conducted over the two days has netted 450 illegal migrants apprehended by police, immigration, USCG and the RBDF. All of the Haitians are expected to be transported back to Haiti by the United States Coast Guard. The RBDF is concerned with these recent events and has since increased its patrols at sea and in the air. The US Coast Guard has reportedly done likewise, a statement released by the RBDF yesterday said. Woman questioned after man is stabbed to death FROM page one Three of them escaped, the oldest one and the two younger o nes, one stayed behind, but he was unharmed. I think the older one tried to wake him up but he wasnt getting up so he escaped with the younger ones. T he three sons reportedly jumped from an upstairs window and ran into nearby bushes. Mr Smith is the countrys 55th homicide, and police confirmed a team of officers from the Central Detective Unit have been flown into Exuma as investigations on the island continue. Though married, family members said Mr Smith had been s eparated from his wife for several years. He had 12 brothers and five sisters, and his mother, Mrs Eugene Smith Sr, 74, has lived in Stuart Manor for nearly 60 years. M rs Smith described her son as a good boy during his childhood, however she said she could not account for his life as a man. M rs Smith said: The whole island is in shock, this is the first major crime in this settlement. We never had no crime, I hardly lock my doors. Sometimes I lock my doors or when my chil d ren come they will lock the door. Fishing guide is murdered in Exuma F ROM page one FROM page one 400 attempt to enter Bahamas illegally FROM page one T wo die in tragic opening to the crawfish season

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9 Practical or Luxury? C-CLASS ML-CLASS E-CLASS Tyreflex Star MotorsCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 You may ask the question: Is it practical to own a Mercedes-Benz or is it a luxury? W ell, Mercedes-Benz would like to ask you a question. Are excellent gas mileage, top safety standards and superior driving technology considered a luxury? Mercedes-Benz doesnt think so and you shouldnt either. You deserve to get the most out of your gas dollar. You and your family deserve to be safe and comfortable when maneuveringt hrough our nations less-than-perfect roadways. Thats why these features and so much more come standard in every class and model of Mercedes-Benz. So do something practical while still enjoying the best of life become an owner of a beautiful new Mercedes-Benz today. REPLACEMENT BULBS for all uses MEDICINE CABINET BULBS, SHOP LIGHT BULBS AND MORE!!!If its a Bulb we sell it NASSAU GLASS Mackey St 393-8165T HE LIGHT BULB CENTREa t the Nassau Glass Lighting Centre They had earlier attended a f uneral service for Mrs SmithDowny at Christ Community Church, on Bellot Road, and gathered at the boardwalk near the Beach Club Caf, Sandyport, to scatter her ashes into the sea. But panic broke out when a section of the boardwalk, which is connected to an adjacent gazeb o, collapsed underneath about 25 people, including children as young two. Almost immediately, people in the area pitched in to rescue the fallen loved ones, some of whom had slipped underneath the broken planks. Five people were taken to hospital by emergency medical services for minor injuries, one of whom was said to be an elderly woman who had suffered a seizure in the water. Some mourners, who had safely crossed the boardwalk on to the gazebo and were subsequently trapped, were rescued by a fishermans boat. Ulric Woodside, the photographer hired to document the ceremony, said he heard the nails on the boardwalk give way underneath the weight of peop le, just before it collapsed. It was really a community effort, he said, as soon as it happened everybody came over and assisted, jet-ski operators, beachgoers, tourists as well. Mr Woodside said the remaining mourners continued the ceremony and scattered Mrs Smith-D ownys remains into the sea a fter the situation was under control. Garth Buckner, president of Sandyport Development Company, said the company had little details concerning the incident but had launched an investiga-t ion into the matter. Mr Buckner said: The dock i s private property, so the public is welcome to use it but we do ask that we be informed before any events are put on so that we can provide adequate security and prepare. We were not informed, so we were not pre-p ared for anything. Police are investigating. on patrol around 11.25pm on Saturday when they observed a white 2000 Chevy Astro van exiting Magellan Road. The occupants were acting in a suspicious manner so officers pur sued the vehicle and a chase ensued. ASP Delva said there was an exchange of gunfire between the suspects and police. The driver of the Astro van eventually lost control of the vehicle and collided into a tree on Tarleton Road, where two suspects were apprehended. A third fled into bushes. While searching the vehicle, officers discovered 584lbs of sus pected marijuana with an estimated street value of $584,000. The officers also discovered that one of the suspects was shot in the upper shoulder. They were both taken into custody and received medical treatment for their injuries. Investigations are continuing. T HE c ollapsed boardwalk after Saturdays accident. F ROM page one F ROM page one $600,000 of drugs seized Mourners in boardwalk rescue

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B y LARRYSMITH IN the Bahamas, everything is a plot and everyone has an agenda. We are conspiracy mongerers of the worst kind a tendency that is amplified b y the anonymity offered by the internet, the diffic ulty of accessing accurate information, the lack of professionalism of many in the media, and the inability o f some to think critically, which is a legacy of our failed education system. T he plot at Lyford Cay t hese days is that behind t he gates of this sinister priv ate community are rich, w hite foreigners who are g etting away with murder and deploying advanced weaponry with impunity. Well, there are certainly rich, white foreigners living at Lyford Cay along with many members of our o wn black and white elite. And it is most definitely a private community. I have b een admitted only twice i n the last two decades on b oth occasions to attend a social event. But the narrative subtext t hat has lately been attached to the activities of this very reserved community is best captured by the word "sinister". One poster o n the popular Bahamas I ssues website put it this w ay: "Is it not the job of the police to investigate crime? Or was this action egregious because it involved a Lyford Cay resident. Every day regular Bahamians h ave investigations levied a gainst them by RBPF, so if this was Tony who lives i n Bain Town, and the p olice received information t hat weapons were seen on the premises, what should the police do? No one isa nd should be above the law." Well, by that logic if I tell the police that Hubert I ngraham and Perry Christie are stockpiling weapons at their old law o ffice to mount a coup, C ommissioner Greenslade s hould order his special force commandos to hand-c uff the former law partn ers together while picking through their things for several hours without a warrant. After all, no one is a nd should be above the l aw. T hat's the first point I wish to make about the recent events at Lycay just how ridiculously inappropriate this invasion of privacy was. It raises serious questions about judgm ent. L awyers say that when the police have reasonable s uspicion, a warrant is not r equired to search for f irearms or dangerous drugs in the Bahamas. They can enter your home orb usiness at will. This right of entry, they say, is based on the need for police offi cers to react immediatelyt o intelligence reports in the public interest. It is a hangover from colonial t imes aimed at countering a rmed insurgencies in the f ormer British Empire. Judgment But although police can e nter premises without a search warrant from a judge, it is expected that ah igh degree of common sense, good judgment and ordinary decency will be applied, one lawyer toldm e. "Normally the appointm ent to particular duties carries with it standing and assumed authority from thec ommissioner that generally empowers detectives to hunt for firearms and drugs. However, it is easy to a buse such a system, and our police often do not go for warrants even when there is the time, or the cir cumstances are appropri ate to do so. Partly, this is b ecause of the scale of the t ask they face, but there is a lso a disturbing trend of just showing up and demanding entry to search for firearms or drugs. This erodes our civil liberties and sophisticated criminals can and do impersonate officers using the same words. "These things are very hard for international persons, especially Americans, to understand, because their rights of privacy and premises are so well entrenched in law. This means that although international second home own ers should not be consid e red above the law, there n eeds to be greater sensitivity by the authorities in such circumstances." However, in this case the object of the search and seizure was not a firearm, which brings me to the seco nd point. Both traditional and i nternet "news" sites reported as if it were gospel the obviously cooked-up story that the "firearms" in q uestion at Lyford Cay were advanced militarygrade sonic blasters that c ould injure people and d amage property. Accordi ng to one "knowledgea ble" report, the equipment w as of "a type which is u sed by Israeli intelligence and has the affect of causing you to get loose bow els." Well, we don't know what kind of "intelligence" the police employed in this c ase, but we did hear a broadcast on Island FM just before the raid when a t alk show caller bracketed C ommissioner Greenslade a bout ultrasonic weapons being used with impunity by rich, white foreigners atL yford Cay. Greenslade said he would deal with the matter expeditiously because, after all, no one is or should be above the law. But these "ultrasonic weapons" were actually h igh-end outdoor speakers ( google Meyer Sound SB1). They are easily pur chased in the US and were l egally imported. Police returned the speakers no less than three hours after they were seized. Anda lthough they have yet to make a public statement, an inquiry is said to be underway and meetingsh ave been held to soothe ruffled feathers at Lyford Cay. The speakers were used a t Point House, the home of American financier Louis Bacon, as a response to aggravated and continual noise harassment from the adjacent property of Canadian fashion mogul Peter Nygard. According to a spokesman for Bacon, "the intent was to counterbalance loud music that origi nated from the Nygard property (by directing back to the specific location of the music. This was intended to repulse music originating from Nygard's property after it reached a certain decibel level. "It is unfortunate that the police were diverted from their work by such a f rivolous complaint," the s pokesman said. "With respect to the health risks associated with these speakers, there are none unless, of course, they were knocked over and fell on your foot." T his brings me to the main point. P roperty owners clearly have a longstanding issue with Nygard's development and operation of a major r esort over many years at the western tip of the Lyford Cay peninsula. In f act, there is a lengthy hist ory of complaints about n oise pollution emanating f rom the Nygard property a s well as other land use i ssues associated with unauthorized dredging and reclamation of the sea bed to the detriment of neighbouring properties. After initially trying to resolve these issues amicab ly, Bacon turned to the Lyford Cay Property Own er's Association to registert hese complaints. At least 1 6 complaints were made t o police and Lyford Cay security in the first half of this year alone, thes pokesman said. "The continued escalation of Nygard's late night parties and his refusal to abide by Lyford protocols left few options, but an effort to return in kind the music t hat he broadcasted." N ygard acquired his property in 1984 and it is well known that construc-t ion has been non-stop for the past 20 years, continually disturbing neighbours and the Lyford communityi n general. There are apparently no specific covenants that prevent "lawful" activities on theN ygard property, but the site is zoned for single family use and the conflict with the residential nature of thee xclusive community is obvious. Until a large portion of the resort burned down last November due to an elec trical fault, advertised facil ities included a disco with a 100-person dance floor, a human aquarium, waterslides, movie theatre, two yachts, swimming pools, tennis, volleyball and bas ketball courts, 10 bedrooms and a helicopter landing pad. Nygard has been seeking government approvals to rebuild the resort. At one point, Nygard wanted to build a restau rant on nearby Golding Cay, a Bahamas National Trust bird sanctuary. He also sought to import exotic animals, add a dolphin enclosure and build a shark tank. Dredge pumps have been used almost continuously for years to move sand from the bay onto the shoreline at the resort. But a report prepared in 2008 for the Lyford Cay Property Owners Association by Melanie Roach (a former public works direc tor) determined that Nygard did not have a hotel o r business license, and t here was no record of building approvals granted for resort amenities. There was also no record of a permit being issued for a helicopter landing pad at the property. A ll these facilities and more were being advert ised on various travel websites up to the time of the fire. For example, Unusual Villa & Island Rentals of R ichmond, Virginia promoted Nygard Cay like this: For only $42,000 in 2 008 (If you add the two s taterooms on the yacht the t otal price will be $47,000 p er day). Your group of c elebrities, executives, sports moguls or any person celebrating a birthday, anniversary, seminar, wedding, or vacation can have a trip of a lifetime. Special 4hour dinners are available f or $300 per additional person above 20 people. The Cay can hold up to 600 p eople. Unusual Villas and I sland Rentals is open 24 h ours per day, 365 days a year, for any information requests and booking poli c ies for Bahamas Luxury Nygard Cay." Resort Since the fire last year, N ygard has been seeking government approval to rebuild the resort. In recentm onths he has been making press statements abouta $50 million investment, touting the many jobs thisw ould create: "I want to d o it like Atlantis in two or three years (andw ould take a lot of people," h e said recently. Observers say it is no coincidence that the police raid on Bacon's propertyo ccurred several days after it was reported that Nygard received a letter from the Office of the Prime Minis t er demanding that he restore his property to its original deeded footprint. "What has now become increasingly evident is that much of the expansion and continued work at Nygard C ay has occurred on Crown land without permits." The letter from the OPM ordered Nygard to "remove any structures that would have been erected on this land over the years" and advised that "going forward no applications for construction on, or occupation of, the accreted land will be approved by any agencies of the government." So, does the plot thicken? It will certainly be interesting to see how this unfortunate melodrama plays out in the weeks and months ahead. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa Resort & Offshore IslandInvites applications for the positions of:ENVIRONMENTAL COORDINATOR Applications should be faxed in to :327-6961 or email amusgrove@grp.sandals.com Inappropriate invasion of privacy at Lyford Cay

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM RECRUITS from the 47th entry to the Royal Bahamas Defence Force demonstrated acquired skills during their graduation ceremony on Friday. The graduation also marked the 17th entry since women were allowedt o join the force. THE47TH ENTRY TO ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE NEW RATES& BILLING CHANGES EffectiveJuly1st,2010TheBahamasElectricityCorporation (BEC ProvidenceandtheFamilyIslands.Billingsforallconsumers during this transition period will be carried out as follows:BillsfortheserviceperiodMay16thtoJune15thwiththebillingdate July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for payment on July 23rd at the old rates; Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated period are due for payment on August 6th; The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing July1st,2010.Meterreadingsforthisserviceperiodwilltakeplace attheendofJuly,andbillswillbesentoutinmid-August.Paymentfor this period will become due on September 6th, 2010. C ommercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates. The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows: RESIDENTIAL0 -200 units per month10.95 cents per unit 201-800 units per month11.95 cents per unit Remaining units14.95 cents per unitM inimum monthly charge$5.00COMMERCIALAll units per month15.00 cents per unit Minimum monthly charge$10.00GENERAL SERVICEMONTHLY BILLS UNIT CHARGE KVA CHARGE Demand charge per month$11.36 per KVA 0-900,000 units per month8.70 cents per unit Remaining units per month6.20 cents per unit Minimum monthly charge$ 568.00TEMPORARY SUPPLIES16.38 cents per unit $20.00 connection fee $10.00 per month Meter RentalFUEL CHARGE(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel SPECIAL SERVICES Special Reading, Check Reading, Fuse Replacement $5.00 Meter Test Minimum charge$10.00 Visit with intent to disconnect Residential Consumer Commercial Consumer $10.00 $15.00 Reconnection Fee $20.00 Returned Cheque Fee$15.00 TARIFFBAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639 F ELIPEMAJOR/TRIBUNESTAFF THE NEW RECRUITS fire a ceremonial three gun salute. MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest speaks to the recruits.

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By ROYALFIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS It was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian stock market. Investors traded in four out of the 24 listed securities, with two advancers and the other securities remaining unchanged. EQUITY MARKET A total of 29,648 shares changed hands, representing an increase of 3,128 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 26,520 shares. Colina Holdings (CHL was the volume leader and lead advancer, trading 21,100 shares to see its stock close the week up by $0.05 at $2.55. Commonwealth Bank (CBL shares to see its shares close the week up by $0.02 at $6.04. BOND MARKET There was no activity in the bond market last week. COMPANY NEWS: Earnings Releases: Commonwealth Bank (CBL ed financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2010, reporting total comprehensive income of $13.9 million, an increase of $3.8 million or 37 per cent from $10.1 million reported in the same quarter in the previous year. It was noted that while net interest income of $27.2 million increased slightly by $1 million or 3.9 per cent, up from $26.2 million in the comparative period, loan impairment expense fell significantly by $4.5 million or 59.6 per cent from $7.6 million to $3.1 million. Management noted that the improvement in loan impairment expense was due to improved credit quality and the stabilisation of its non-performing loans, which remained flat over the last two quarters. CBL's non-interest expense of $13.5 million increased by $1.5 million or 12 per cent year-over-year, due primarily to higher general and administrative expenses. Earnings per share for the quarter were $0.13, compared to $0.09 in the 2009 second quarter, an increase of $0.04. Total assets and liabilities of CBL were $1.4 billion and $1.17 billion respectively, compared to $1.38 billion and $1.15 billion at year-end December 31, 2009. It was noted that while CBL grew its deposit base over the six-month period by $15 million, its loan receivables declined by $24 million, with the offset being seen in increased cash /deposits with banks and investments by CBL, which rose collectively by $53 milllion during the period. Dividend Notes: FOCOL Holdings (FCL declared a dividend of $0.04 to all shareholders of record date as at July 30, 2010, payable on August 10, 2010. AGM NOTICE: Bahamas First Holdings has announced its AGM will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel on August 4, 2010, at 5pm. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /,9(t:25.,13$5$',6( (YHU\GD\RIWKH\HDU/LWWOHZLW]HUODQGLVDFRPSDQ\ZLWKRYHU\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQOX[XU\UHWDLOLQJZLWKRYHUVWRUHV LQ7KH&DULEEHDQ)ORULGDDQG$ODVND:HVHOOJUHDWQDPHVOLNH%UHLWOLQJ7DJ+HXHU %DXPHt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oyalFidelity Market Wrap E QUITY MARKET TRADING STATISTICS Week ending 30.07.10 BISX SYMBOLCLOSING PRICEWKLY PRICE CHANGEVOLUMEYTD PRICE CHANGE AML................$1.04......................$-....................................0.........................-11.11% BBL.................$0.30......................$-....................................0........................-52.38% BOB.................$5.00......................$-....................................400.....................-15.25% BPF..................$10.63....................$-....................................0...........................-1.02%B SL..................$ 9.42.....................$-....................................0..........................-6.36% B WL................$ 3.15.....................$-....................................0............................0.00% CAB.................$11.11....................$-....................................0..........................11.32% CBL.................$ 6.04.....................$0.02..............................7,298.................-13.71% CHL.................$2.55......................$0.05..............................21,100..................-6.25% C IB...................$9.74......................$-....................................0...........................-2.50% C WCB.............$2.41......................$0.09..............................0.........................-15.44% DHS.................$2.00......................$-....................................0.........................-21.57% F AM................$6.07......................$-....................................0...........................-6.47% FBB..................$2.17......................$-....................................0...........................-8.44% FCC..................$0.27......................$-....................................0............................0.00% FCL..................$4.65......................$-....................................0...........................-2.52% F CLB...............$1.00......................$-....................................0............................0.00% F IN...................$8.90......................$-....................................850.......................-4.09% ICD .................$5.59......................$-....................................0............................0.00% JSJ....................$9.95......................$-....................................0............................0.00%P RE.................$10.00....................$-....................................0............................0.00% BOND MARKET TRADING STATISTICS BISX SYMBOLDESCRIPTIONVOLUMEPAR VALUE FBB13BB Series C Notes Due 20130$1,000 FBB15FBB Series D Notes Due 20150$1,000 F BB17FBB Series A Notes Due 20170$1,000 FBB22FBB Series B Notes Due 20220$1,000 I NTERNATIONAL MARKETS FOREX Rates C URRENCY W EEKLY% CHANGE C AD 0.97300.77 GBP1.56911.69 EUR 1 .30410.95

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By ROYALFIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS It was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian stock market. Investors traded in four out of the 24 listed securities, with two advancers and the other securities remaining unchanged. EQUITY MARKET A total of 29,648 shares changed hands, representing an increase of 3,128 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 26,520 shares. Colina Holdings (CHL was the volume leader and lead advancer, trading 21,100 shares to see its stock close the week up by $0.05 at $2.55. Commonwealth Bank (CBL shares to see its shares close the week up by $0.02 at $6.04. BOND MARKET There was no activity in the bond market last week. COMPANY NEWS: Earnings Releases: Commonwealth Bank (CBL ed financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2010, reporting total comprehensive income of $13.9 million, an increase of $3.8 million or 37 per cent from $10.1 million reported in the same quarter in the previous year. It was noted that while net interest income of $27.2 million increased slightly by $1 million or 3.9 per cent, up from $26.2 million in the comparative period, loan impairment expense fell significantly by $4.5 million or 59.6 per cent from $7.6 million to $3.1 million. Management noted that the improvement in loan impairment expense was due to improved credit quality and the stabilisation of its non-performing loans, which remained flat over the last two quarters. CBL's non-interest expense of $13.5 million increased by $1.5 million or 12 per cent year-over-year, due primarily to higher general and administrative expenses. Earnings per share for the quarter were $0.13, compared to $0.09 in the 2009 second quarter, an increase of $0.04. Total assets and liabilities of CBL were $1.4 billion and $1.17 billion respectively, compared to $1.38 billion and $1.15 billion at year-end December 31, 2009. It was noted that while CBL grew its deposit base over the six-month period by $15 million, its loan receivables declined by $24 million, with the offset being seen in increased cash /deposits with banks and investments by CBL, which rose collectively by $53 milllion during the period. Dividend Notes: FOCOL Holdings (FCL declared a dividend of $0.04 to all shareholders of record date as at July 30, 2010, payable on August 10, 2010. AGM NOTICE: Bahamas First Holdings has announced its AGM will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel on August 4, 2010, at 5pm. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /,9(t:25.,13$5$',6( (YHU\GD\RIWKH\HDU/LWWOHZLW]HUODQGLVDFRPSDQ\ZLWKRYHU\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQOX[XU\UHWDLOLQJZLWKRYHUVWRUHV LQ7KH&DULEEHDQ)ORULGDDQG$ODVND:HVHOOJUHDWQDPHVOLNH%UHLWOLQJ7DJ+HXHU %DXPHt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oyalFidelity Market Wrap E QUITY MARKET TRADING STATISTICS Week ending 30.07.10 BISX SYMBOLCLOSING PRICEWKLY PRICE CHANGEVOLUMEYTD PRICE CHANGE AML................$1.04......................$-....................................0.........................-11.11% BBL.................$0.30......................$-....................................0........................-52.38% BOB.................$5.00......................$-....................................400.....................-15.25% BPF..................$10.63....................$-....................................0...........................-1.02%B SL..................$ 9.42.....................$-....................................0..........................-6.36% B WL................$ 3.15.....................$-....................................0............................0.00% CAB.................$11.11....................$-....................................0..........................11.32% CBL.................$ 6.04.....................$0.02..............................7,298.................-13.71% CHL.................$2.55......................$0.05..............................21,100..................-6.25% C IB...................$9.74......................$-....................................0...........................-2.50% C WCB.............$2.41......................$0.09..............................0.........................-15.44% DHS.................$2.00......................$-....................................0.........................-21.57% F AM................$6.07......................$-....................................0...........................-6.47% FBB..................$2.17......................$-....................................0...........................-8.44% FCC..................$0.27......................$-....................................0............................0.00% FCL..................$4.65......................$-....................................0...........................-2.52% F CLB...............$1.00......................$-....................................0............................0.00% F IN...................$8.90......................$-....................................850.......................-4.09% ICD .................$5.59......................$-....................................0............................0.00% JSJ....................$9.95......................$-....................................0............................0.00%P RE.................$10.00....................$-....................................0............................0.00% BOND MARKET TRADING STATISTICS BISX SYMBOLDESCRIPTIONVOLUMEPAR VALUE FBB13BB Series C Notes Due 20130$1,000 FBB15FBB Series D Notes Due 20150$1,000 F BB17FBB Series A Notes Due 20170$1,000 FBB22FBB Series B Notes Due 20220$1,000 I NTERNATIONAL MARKETS FOREX Rates C URRENCY W EEKLY% CHANGE C AD 0.97300.77 GBP1.56911.69 EUR 1 .30410.95

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THEGovernments decision to increase the Business Licence fee rate by 50 per cent for most contractors serves a great injustice on the Bahamian construction industry, the Bahamian Contractors Associations (BCA Business, and fails to recognise the extremely high risk firms could lose money on projects. Speaking after this newspaper revealed that the Government had abandoned initial plans to place all construction companies in a special category where they paid a Business Licence fee equivalent to 0.5 per cent of annual turnover, Stephen Wrinkle said: Were extremely disappointed, and its serving a great injustice to our industry. We had met with Minister Laing last year, and expressed our concerns and views, and made some proposals as to how to accommodate the construction industry. By and large, theyve been totally ignored. The BCA and its members are now working with the Chamber of Commerce to arrange another meeting with the Government in a bid to change the revised Business Licence Bill, which requires contractors generating turnover of greater than $500,000 per annum to pay a 0.75 per cent rate. Given that many perform on multi-million dollar jobs, most Bahamian contractors will be pushed from a 0.5 per cent rateto a 0.75 per cent rate, yet Mr Wrinkle pointed out again that in most cases they acted as pro ject managers, handling huge sums that were paid out to subcontractors, tradesmen and suppliers, and retaining only a small portion as their fee. Yet Bahamian contractors are being taxed on the gross amountof these contracts, something Mr Wrinkle agreed was unfair. Comparing a contractors role as project manager to that of an attorney holding funds in escrow for a client, the BCA president said attorneys were taxed on their net receipts, while contrac tors were hit on the gross. Theyve put us into a category inconsistent with the fidu ciary responsibilities of a con tractor, Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. The realtors and attorneys are able to hold large sums of money, but are not taxed on the gross receipts, just the net receipts. The general contractor is more of a project manager role rather than the actual builder. Most of the proceeds from a construction contract go to subcontractors, specialist workers and suppliers. One has to look at the industry as a whole, and begin to realise the cost will not be absorbed by contractors and will be passed on to consumers. Mr Wrinkle said several large contractors had told him the revised Business Licence Bill could add more than $100,000 to their annual fee payable to the Government. Referring to last years discussions with the Government, the BCA president added: Its not fair. Construction is a very volatile industry.. The risk of losing money on a project is extremely high. No consideration has been given for such losses. No consideration has been given for nonpayment by the client. No consideration has been given for growing your company at a time when unemployment in the Bahamas is high. Mr Wrinkle added that unlike most other countries, the amount of taxes levied on Bahamian contractors and other businesses appeared to increase the more they expanded, and the higher their revenues (turnover As a result, he lamented that there was no incentive to grow our business. The larger you get, the more they want to tax you. Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerces president, confirmed that his organisation was arranging a meeting with Mr Laing on the contractors behalf to discuss their concerns. Its a process of we talk about it, and hopefully arrive at a solution that makes sense, Mr Rolle said. What Ive found with Mr Laing is that if you present a reasonable case, he will go to bat for you. Thats why I try to work closely with him, because he understands the countrys commercial issues. Well try and discuss every single issue that arises and reach a middle ground, which has been the case of late. C M Y K C M Y K B USINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Great injustice for contractors BCA chief says Business Licence fee changes fail to recognise extremely high risk nature of construction industry

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entrepreneurs because banks in this nation did not accept payments via PayPal a nd the Internet. A rguing that Baker Tilly Gomez give more service than we get, in the senset hat the work it does on the Bahamas EntrepreneurialV enture Fund is worth more t han the fee it receives, Mr Gomez said the fund had worked in the sense that there had been no political interference impacting its operations. Id say that over the five y ears of this fund, no politic al pressure has been a pplied at all, Mr Gomez s aid, adding that there had been no calls from politic ians along the lines of urging them to approve and finance a particular business idea. Half the MPs did not k now this fund ever existed, he joked. A cknowledging that the B ahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund had crossed o ver a bit with the Bahamas Development B anks (BDB ities, Mr Gomez said one notable difference between t he two was that the fund was far more involved with its entrepreneur clients. A part from the Board s eats it had taken in the 12 c ompanies in which it had equity stakes, Mr Gomez said the fund provided a source of constant advice and training, even going as f ar as paying for services the e ntrepreneur needed, such as accounts. The BDB does not offer t hese kind of value added services, Mr Gomez said. The BDB, once you get the loan, usually will not see you unless you default on it. Default on the loan, and they will come looking for y ou. H e added that the BDB a nd other organisations in t he Governments small business support infrastruct ure, such as the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial C orporation (BAIC not have enough staff with the skills required, pointing o ut that many had been transferred into these agenc ies from other government departments and ministries. In response to audience q uestions, Mr Gomez said the Bahamas Entrepreneuri al Venture Fund had received virtually no business plans and applications related to the agricultural sector. I can only remember one p roject in five years that had a nything to do with agriculture, and that young gentleman did not have a clear vision of how to do it get a few acres here, through a f ew crops there, Mr Gomez s aid. We may need foreign h elp. We have to consider t hat that we need foreign help in agriculture in our economy. We may have to accept that. C M Y K C M Y K B USINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs IMPOR T ANT DA TES Fall Semester2010 New Student OrientationParentsEveningTuesday, 17th August, 2010 6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m.OrientationWednesday, 18th August, 2010 8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.Advisement & RegistrationWednesday, 18th August, 2010 2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.Advisement, Registration & Bill PaymentThursday, 19th August, 2010 Friday, 20th August, 2010 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.Venue:Performing Arts Centre, The College Of The Bahamas Thompson Boulevard T HE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bsNotice to NewandCur r ent Financial Aid Applicants for Fall 2010 All current and new students are advised that the new Fall 2010 Financial Aid application form is now available online at www .cob.edu.bs and at all College locations. The deadline for Financial Aid applications, including the submission of supporting documents, has been extended to4:00 p.m. on 18th August, 2010. For more information, contact: Office of Financial Aid, Oakes Field Campus, Tel: (242 or email: financialaid@cob.edu.bs 1 2 7 & ( *UHJPLWKDQGRU*UHJPLWK t $VVRFLDWHV $UHQRORQJHUDXWKRUL]HGWR FRQGXFWEXVLQHVVRQEHKDOIRI67$5*(1(5$/,1685$1&( $*(1&<*5$1'%$+$0$f/7'$XWKRUL]HG$JHQWVIRU 5R\DO6WDU$VVXUDQFH/LPLWHG %DKDPDV)LUVW*HQHUDO,QVXUDQFH &RPSDQ\ /OR\GV:RUOGZLGHHGLFDO7UXVW ,QWHUQDWLRQDOHGLFDO*URXS,0*f Our goal is to have a fully Bahamian workforce under A PS, and develop a market where other companies enter the field with people who have been accredited. The reality is that there is no way we as a company can provide all the renewable energy sources for the entire Bahamas. We want to lead the transition to a renewable energy i ndustry, and our goal is to create employment. We dont w ant a foreign workforce. We want trained Bahamians. Apart from Mr Lyn, APS also provided other lecturers to the UWIs renewable energy technology courses. Mr Gilbert said APS ultimately wanted to take its school to all regional nations, as the aim was to educate a Caribbean market. M r Lyn told Tribune Business that when it came to r enewable energies, the key for the Bahamas was the right education for consumers and the industry, and then to get on with it. The IDB-funded contracts require APS to supervise the installation of the PV sys-t ems and solar water heaters on the selected number of B ahamian homes. Were excited as to what we could do, We get sun 365 d ays of the year, so we might as well take advantage of i t, Mr Gilbert said. T outing renewable energys benefits, he added: It r educes the carbon footprint, and the Bahamas at some point will be able to take advantage of carbon credits. APS undertakes a lot of its own research and development, extensively testing renewable energy products before bringing them to the Bahamas, to ensure they c an withstand the rigors of practical application. The company is now set to commence testing a wind t urbine which only requires two miles per hour winds to s tart generating electricity, as opposed to most contemporaries that need 12-13 miles per hour winds. Venture capital funds 193 jobs JEROMEGOMEZ FROM page one Renewable energy training plan for Bahamas unveiled FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in theirn eighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won ana ward. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 13

now the highest in his lifetime, Khaalis Rolle said many Bahamian businesses were now afraid to conduct commerce at night, as crimi nals seemed to have no fear o f the law. Arguing that guns were s eemingly as commonplace a s cars in the Bahamas, Mr R olle said the FirstCaribbean armed robbery and high speed chase/shoot-o ut between the crooks and the police showed just whata lawless, dangerous society this nation had become. Its extremely frightening to do business in this country now, Mr Rolle s aid. When you get to the p oint where the criminals h ave equal or better ammunition than the police, andh ave absolutely no fear of t he law, whats the alternative? What do we do? Recalling a reggae song that described Jamaica as a Cowboy town, the Chamber president added: The Bahamas is far beyond a C owboy town, the Wild W ild West. Every single day there is a report of some a rmed robbery or attempted a rmed robbery. The crimi nals just dont have any fear of the law. I think about 10 years a go I spoke at a Toastmas ters meeting, and I had a conversation with a politi-c ian. I said the Bahamas was becoming an increasingly dangerous society and somet hing had to be done. His r esponse was as if there was n o concern, and were at the point now where businesspeople are extremely afraid to do business after dark. P ointing to the Supreme Court break-in at Justice Jon Isaacs office, Mr Rolle s aid this showed that no p lace is off limits. The criminals are so daring that they do what theyw ant to do during the day, a nd the one entity where youd have thought they would be off limits is no longer. The fellow broke into the courts. This is extremely serious, the Chamber president added, p ointing out that the implic ations went beyond just the immediate negative impact o n business and the Bahamia n economy. W arning that it would not be long before travel advisories and media reportsd eclared the Bahamas an unsafe destination, Mr Rolle added: Everyone seeming ly has a gun. Guns seem to be as ubiquitous as vehicles. Guns are everywhere; cars are everywhere. Gun crime is fare more pervasive thani t has ever been in my life. The mindset has degenerated to the point wherep eople do not believe there is a penalty attached to their actions, and if there is some penalty attached, peopled ont care. A cknowledging that it was easy to point the finger of b lame at the Government o r Royal Bahamas Police F orce for this nations crime problems, Mr Rolle told Tribune Business: Theres a huge implication for society a s a whole. I believe this problem goes far deeper, and if we d o not resolve it now, or at l east start taking preparator y steps to, were going to be in significant trouble inf ive years. In five years t ime, the Bahamas will not be the same Bahamas we see now. Weve got some issues that are going to impact this country, and even though I speak on behalf of the busin ess community, the implic ations far beyond. It goes back to deficiencies in the e ducation system, deficienc ies in the social system, and w e have to address these deficiencies and do it proactively. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 7(1'(5)257+(,6,21 6833/(0(17$5<< $&&(6625,(6 35,1&(66$5*$5(7+263,7$/7(1'(56$5(,19,7(')52048$/,),('&2175$&7256 73529,'(;$<6833/,(6$&&(6625,(6)257+( 35,1&(660$5*$5(7+263,7$/)25$3(5,2'21( <($5 7HQGHUGRFXPHQWVZKLFKLQFOXGHLQVWUXFWLRQVWR7HQGHUHUV VSHFLFDWLRQVDQGRWKHUUHOHYDQWLQIRUPDWLRQFDQEHFROOHFWHG 0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\ DW WKH0DWHULDOV 0DQDJHPHQW'LUHFWRUDWH3ULQFHVV0DUJDUHW+RVSLWDOFRPSRXQG 6KLUOH\WUHHW $7(1'(5086768%0,77(',1'83/,&$,1$6($/(' (19(/23(253$&.$*(,'(17,),('$6 (1'(5)25 7+(3529,6,212)6833/(0(17$5<;$<7(1'(5 )256833/,(6$&&(6625,(635,1&(660$5*$5(7 +263,7$/ $1' $''5(66('7 7+(&+$,50$1 7(1'(56&200,77(( 7+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7< &25325$ 7+,5't:(677(55$&(6&2//,16$9(18( 3 1$66$8%$+$0$6 7(1'(56$5(7$55,9($77+(38%/,&+263,7$/6 $87+25,7<12/$7(57+$1 30RQGD\7+6HSWHPEHU/$7(1'(5f:,//127 $&&(37(' $FRS\RIYDOLGEXVLQHVVOLFHQVHDQGOHWWHURIJRRGVWDQGLQJ IURPWKH1DWLRQDO,QVXUDQFH%RDUGVKRXOGDFFRPSDQ\DOO SURSRVDOV 7KH 3XEOLF+RVSLWDOV$XWKRULW\UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\ RU7HQGHUVf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the Government got the best strategic partner both in terms of purchase price and terms/conditions. Cable & Wireless was described by one source as really well suited as the strategic partner. The committee believes theyre very interested in this asset, and have the right idea about value, but there are some important issues that would need to be negotiated. Some very fruitful discussions were said to have taken place between the BTC privatisation committee and Cable & Wireless, in a bid to get to a point where the Government might find its proposal attractive. BTC offer sparks competition fear FROM page one Bahamas far beyond Wild Wild West F ROM page one Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 14

NEW YORK THEstock market began August with a huge rally after reports from around the world revived investors' faith in the global recovery, according to Associated Press. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 208 points Monday. All the major stock indexes rose about 2 percent. The first day of the month brought a stream of news that reassured investors who have worried about a slowing of economic growth in the U.S., China and Europe. Manufacturing was a common thread: The Institute for Supply Management's index of U.S. manufacturing activity during July was better than the market expected. Traders were pleased because the report still showed that manufacturing is growing. A manufacturing report for the 16 countries that use the euro was revised higher for July and showed that the European economy is recovering faster than expected. Strong earnings reports from European banks also pleased the market, especially after the continent's rising debt problems helped trigger a spring plunge in stocks. From China came news that industrial growth was moderate enough that Beijing isn't likely to take steps to slow that country's economy. Investors have periodically sold stocks on concerns that China's economy would slow and pull others down with it. Monday's news was encouraging after months of reports that showed the recovery was weakening. Those reports pulled the major stock indexes off their 2010 highs in late April and contributed to sharp swings in stock prices since then. The ISM report is significant because it is the first major reading of the economy from July, and investors are trying to determine just how strong the recovery will be in the second half of the year. The big advance was a bit of a surprise for traders who are used to more subdued trading as August arrives. Over the past 12 years, the Dow has fallen nine times on the first trading day in August, although it has risen the past three years. August in general is seen as a volatile month for stocks, largely because many traders are away on vacation. That makes for low trading volumes and exaggerated price moves. Some analysts were cautious even as stock prices jumped. Alan Gayle, senior investment strategist for RidgeWorth Investments in Richmond, Virginia, said Monday's news, while good, showed only small changes in the economy. "Fundamentally, I do believe the pace of the (economic) expansion is slowing and I think that's going to weigh on the markets as we go through the second half of the year," he said. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 208.44, or 2 percent, to 10,674.38. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 24.26, or 2.2 percent, to 1,125.86, while the Nasdaq composite index rose 40.66, or 1.8 percent, to 2,295.36. Six stocks rose for every one that fell on the New York Stock Exchange where volume came to a light 1 billion shares. With stocks looking more appealing, bond prices fell because investors felt less need to seek the safety of government securities. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which moves opposite its price, rose to 2.97 percent from 2.91 percent late Friday. Its yield is often used as a benchmark to set interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans. Stocks were up across the market. Industrial and materials stocks, including 3M Co. and General Electric Co., rose after the ISM report. Investors were encouraged in particular by several key components of the index. Production and new orders both improved, as did companies' willingness to hire new employees. 3M rose $1.8799, or 2.2 percent, to $87.41, while GE rose 29 cents to $16.41. Energy companies rose as the price of oil gained on expectations that a healthier economy will lift demand. Exxon Mobil Corp. rose $2.26, or 3.8 percent, to $61.94, while Chevron Corp. jumped $1.59, or 2.1 percent, to $77.80. Benchmark crude rose $2.53 to $81.48 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Financial stocks rose on the strong earnings reports from European-based banking giants HSBC and BNP Paribas, which convinced investors that the continent's financial sector is not being hurt by the debt problems. HSBC shares trading in the U.S. rose $2.66, or 5.2 percent, to $53.74. Bank of America Corp. rose 40 cents, or 2.9 percent, to $14.44. JPMorgan Chase & Co. rose $1.36, or 3.4 percent, to $41.64. C M Y K C M Y K B USINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.341.00AML Foods Limited1.041.040.000.2500.0404.23.85% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0500.200212.61.88% 6.255.00Bank of Bahamas5.005.000.000.5980.2608.45.20% 0.580.30Benchmark0.300.300.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1680.09018.82.86% 2.152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0550.04039.51.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas11.1111.110.001.4080.3007.92.70% 2.842.50Colina Holdings2.552.550.000.5110.0405.01.57% 7.005.00Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.046.040.000.4600.23013.13.81% 3 .652.23Consolidated Water BDRs2.412.40-0.010.1110.05221.62.17% 2.551.60Doctor's Hospital2.312.310.000.6270.1103.74.76% 6.995.94Famguard6.076.070.00-0.0030.240N/M3.95% 1 0.908.75Finco8.908.900.000.1680.52053.05.84% 11.409.50FirstCaribbean Bank9.749.740.000.7200.35013.53.59% 5.533.75Focol (S 4.654.650.000.3660.17012.73.66% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 5.595.00ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.24013.74.29% 10.509.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.80064.18.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 5 2wk-Hi 5 2wk-Low S ymbol B id$ A sk$ L astPrice D ailyVol E PS$ D iv$ P /E Y ield BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% I nterest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)2 9 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 P rime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%20 November 2029FRIDAY, 30 JULY 2010BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,486.14 | CHG -0.01 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -79.24 | YTD % -5.06BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)M aturity 19 October 2017FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 5 2wk H i 5 2wk L ow S ymbol B id $ A sk $ L ast P rice D aily V ol E PS $ D iv $ P /E Y ield 10.067.92Bahamas Supermarkets9.4210.4214.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 8 .006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.48251.4387CFAL Bond Fund1.48253.046.961.460225 2.92652.8266CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.91991.140.852.911577 1.54381.4804CFAL Money Market Fund1.54382.434.281.527368 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.8522-8.49-8.08 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.41100.333.32 109.3929101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund109.39295.207.60107.570620 105.779593.1998CFAL Global Equity Fund100.1833-1.523.56105.779543 1.11771.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.11772.525.19 1.09171.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.07850.985.29 1.11621.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.11622.345.45 9.57959.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.54392.166.25 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.0344-6.845.63 10.00009.3299Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 39.3299-6.70-6.70 7.96644.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund7.3073-5.3116.22 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Jun-10BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 23-Jul-10 30-Jun-10MARKET TERMS30-Jun-10 NAV 6MTH 1.438700 2.886947 1.511377 103.987340 101.725415 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 C OMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010 IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529 C ommon Law and Equity Division IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 A ND I N THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land comprising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024es situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wallys Restaurant o n the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on t he Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas A ND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIES PLACE LTD.N O T I C ETHE PETITION OF SADIES PLACE in respect of:I n respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising O ne and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024es situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wallys Restaurant on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and running thereon 138.47 feet to a point thence SOUTHW ARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point t hence WESTWARDLY and by land 5.04 feet to a point thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon 12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon 169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or formerly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon 37.78 feet to the beginning. Sadies Place claims to be the owner of the unincumbered fee simple estate in possession of the said land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have its title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certicate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act. Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal oce hours in the following places: 1.The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nassau, Bahamas; and 2.The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Retiro Road, o Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas. NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30ys after the nal publication of these presents, le in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form veried by an adavit to be led therewith. Failure of any such person to le and serve a Statement of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30 days after the nal publication of these presents shall operate as bar to such claims.LOCKHART & Co. Chambers #35 Buen Retiro Road O Shirley Street Nassau, Bahamas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conomic reports give stocks big start for August

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer I n 1999, the Pandora jewelry manufacturers introduced for the very first time a charm bracelet to rival all charm bracelets. Pandora charm bracelets put a spin on the classical trinkets and captures some of lifes most precious memories. When the Pandora line was first introduced to the Bahamian public seven years ago by Bahama Republic, a local jewelry store located East By Street, it took jewelry lovers a while to catch the Pandora fever. Now, Pandora has become one of the hottest must-have jewelry items today. Women, teens, and tweens have all indulged in Pandoras charm. But what is it that actually puts them on the most wanted list? Is it because they are made with precious metals like gold, oxidised and sterling silver? Is it because they can be customised? Or is it because they are affordable and make great gifts? Tribune Woman spoke to Natalia, an assistant manager at Bahama Republic who said the answer to that question is all of the above. What makes a Pandora bracelet a must have item is they make great gifts. You might have a family mem ber you may want to purchase a gift for, you can purchase her a Pandora bracelet or if she already has one you can purchase a bead as reminder, she said. The idea of collecting beads to fill the entire patent threaded novelty is what makes it fun. Swapping charms to suit attire and mood is another reason women have fallen head over heels for Pandora. The charms can reflect your mood. You can switch them up. For instance if you are feeling happy you can choose a bead that signifies your happiness. If are feeling blue you can select a bead that suits your mood, Natalia explained. However, one of the main reasons women have fallen weak to Pandoras charm is because it allows them to tell stories with each bead. For three women, Pryia Simmons, Cara Bethel, and Alesha Cadet the bracelets dont just make fashion statements. They make statements about their lives and some of the people in it. Pryia Simmons has a few special beads on her bracelet. They are an angel, a suitcase, a heart stopper, and flowers. She said: I got the angel because I am my dads angel. I got the suitcase because I love to travel. The heart stopper represents my boyfriend because he keeps every thing in place in my life and the flower is so that my life could flourish, she told Tribune Woman. After having her first son last October, Cara Bethel is customising a bracelet to record every milestone in his life. She even named the bracelet after him. She calls it The Dylan Bracelet. My Pandora is a permanent reminder of the milestones in my baby's life. So far, I have two blue coloured beads, a little boy because he is a boy of course, a baby car riage, a mama monkey holding a baby monkey because his nursery has a monkey theme and a gift box because he is the best present I ever got, Mrs Bethel said. Alesha Cadet started her bracelet with a home bead. She said: Home is where the heart is and that is Eleuthera. I got the number 21 charm when I turned 21. I am going with light colours for my charm bracelet because they match my spirit. I am light hearted and happy, she said. One of her charm in particular represents a past love. She chose that bead because she said it motivates her to keep moving forward. The teddy bear is a reminder of an ex special love. Whenever I want to pick up the phone to give him a call, I look at it and it is a reminder of what to never get myself into, she told Tribune Woman. Pandoras Charm H OT WRIST: P andora bracelets (above and below

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AUSTRALIAN cricketer Brett Lee presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New Delhi, India. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By MAGGIE BAIN JUST thinking of a series of articles about love produces a slideshow of picture memories, moving through our mind. Even better, we can control it ourselves; replay, fast forward, rewind and even pause at the highlights. First loves, summer loves, crazy puppy loves, one-sided loves, and the list goes on. Decades later, webask in the warm glow of happy flashbacks and amaze ourselves by how we survived the lows. As we journey around the world, we realise that the nature, process, and biology of love are universal;no society is exempt. Outwardly we may look different, speak different languages, have beenbrought up with different values and beliefs, but when it comes to love, we are the same. In our early years of innocence, we dreamt of being someones Cinderella or gallant Prince Charming.We had visions of being swept away on a wave of eternal love and leaving the ugly world behind. For many, romantic love conjures up images of tenderness, candlelight, pastel colours and a sense of peace and contentment. This is the perfect love we all desire to obtain at least once in our lives. Visible for all to see is a new inner glow that speaks of our inner happiness. The mere thought, touch or sight of our love stimulates our brains dopamine receptors, and we are on a high. Our newfound motivation is accompanied with a steely determination. We find ourselves automatically reshuffling our priorities and full attention directed to that special person. Our newfound energy and focus allows us to believe that anything is possible. It is not unheard of to feel you would go to the ends of the earth,even to sacrifice your life for them. Intense thoughts of our lover are fueled, day and night, by this newly channeled energy. It motivates us, but at the same time leaves us feeling naked in our vulnerability. It is exhilarating, floating on Cloud Nine, but we quickly discover that any small disappointment can send us on a free-fall. The result is a craving for more, and the strong attachment becomes all consuming. Only when you have experienced this particular euphoria can you truly appreciate the saying, Love is a drug. The dependence and obsessive nature of romantic love could essentially class persons a s addicts. R ejection, unreciprocated love, a nd breakups trigger similar withdrawal symptoms, as in other recognised addictions. This analogy may seem incongruous to some, but is backed by scientific research. What makes it all the more interesting is that candidates also included those who were experiencing unrequited love, rejection or the end of the relationship. In all cases, the right ventral tegmental area (VTA right caudate nucleus in the brain were stimulated. These are the dopamine rich areas associated with reward, motivation, and also affected by cocaine use. Romantic love speaks of true motivational drive, and possibly acts as a constant reminder of human reproduction. It is quite different from sexual drive because of its specific ability to conserve energy and focus on one individual. In fact romantic love is possible with out sex, and is often described as emotional or spiritual love. Knowing this allows us to understand those who mutually decide to abstain from premarital sex. Their constant state of elation allows for a deepening of emotions, and in turn satisfies their deep cravings. We then go on to comprehend those who are able to maintain long distance relationships, communicate only by written word, or who are physically challenged. To close your eyes and dwell in the pure joy that it produces, can be equated to great sex for others. If you are going through life feeling fulfilled but not being able to relate to this description of romantic love, then perhaps you need to review your relationship or dating life. Remember we only have one life to live and love fully, and no time to waste. Listen to Love on the Rock with Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6 pm on Island FM 102.9 For appointments call364-7230, email relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com Romantic Love By MAGGIE BAIN Weeks of fashion in India... A MODEL presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New Delhi, India. A MODEL presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New Delhi, India. (AP Photos A MODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week in Bangalore, India. A MODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week in Bangalore, India. A MODEL presents a creation by Neeru's at Bangalore Fashion Week in Bangalore, India.

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SWEET NOTHINGS C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SUGARS seductive power is proven in the fact that the actual Amer-i can consumes 150 pounds of sugar per year. This all despite warnings from doctors who say it spikes blood sugar levels and leads to the storage of fat! The American Heart Association (the people responsible for efforts to reduce death associated with cardiovascular disease) is the latest agency to releases data on the dangers of sugar. W here does the sugar come from? Mostly soft drinks and candy, followed by cakes, cookies and pies. But don't give a knowing smile if you turn your back on these kindso f snacks: sugar sneaks into items you'd never believe, including fruit-f lavoured yogurt (eight ounces can have six teaspoons of added sugar) and frosted whole grain c ereal (3 teaspoons in one cup). The next professional to warn against sugar intake may be your skin therapist, as new findings show sugar does impact skin. C ollagen, essential to skin strength and elasticity, is a protein. A diet r ich in sugar can create excess waste products in the form of glucose. Instead of burning off, this glucose (sugar attaches to proteins in our skin. This process is clas s ified as glycation, and leads to the formation of Advanced Glycation E nd-products (AGEs which increases inflam mation in the body. Inflammation breaks down collagen and leads to the loss of elasticity: in laymen's terms, this means wrinkles, sagging and loss of tone. To check for added s ugar, look at the label for sugar, corn syrup, fructose, dextrose, molasses or evaporated cane juice in the ingredient list. And doctors andd ietitians say moderation is one way to keep skin and body healthy, but keeping active is also key. As part of healthy aging diet, eschew refined sugars for whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and topically treat skin with AGE Smart products that include Glucosamine, Soy, Genestein, Vitamin A, licorice, and the unique Argine/Lysine Polypeptide which binds and traps sugars to help prevent formation of AGEs. This information was taken from dermalogica.com. Sara Beek is a Dermalogica Skin Care Therapist at The Dermal Clinic in Sandyport. Please call 327-6788 for more information or visit www.dermal-clinic.com . D epression is a serious condition that can impact every area of your life. It c an affect your social life, your family relationships, your career, and your sense of self-worth and purpose. And for women in particular, depression is common. If you're feeling sad, guilty, tired, and just generally down in the dumps, you may be suffering from major depression. But the good news is that depression is treatable, and the more you understand depression's particular implications for and its impact on women, the more equipped you will be to tackle the condition head on. R R i i s s k k F F a a c c t t o o r r s s f f o o r r d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n W W o o m m e e n n -Family history of mood disorders -Personal past history of mood disorders in early reproductive years -Loss of a parent before the age of 10 years -Childhood history of physical or s exual abuse -Use of an oral contraceptive, especially one with a high progesteronec ontent -Use of gonadotropin stimulants as part of infertility treatment -Persistent psychosocial stressors (e.g., loss of job -Loss of social support system or the threat of such a loss S S i i g g n n s s a a n n d d s s y y m m p p t t o o m m s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n The symptoms of depression in women are the same as those form ajor depression. Common com plaints include: -Depressed mood Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy -Feelings of guilt, hopelessness and worthlessness -Suicidal thoughts or recurrent thoughts of death -Sleep disturbance (sleeping more o r sleeping less) -Appetite and weight changes -Difficulty concentrating -Lack of energy and fatigue S S p p e e c c i i f f i i c c s s a a b b o o u u t t d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Seasonal affective disorder-depres sion in the winter months due to lowe r levels of sunlight-is more common in women W omen are about twice as likely as men to suffer from depression. This two-to-one difference persists across racial, ethnic, and economic divides. In fact, this gender difference in rates of depression is found in most coun tries around the world. There are a number of theories which attempt to explain the higher incidence of depression in women. Many factors have been implicated, including biological, psychological, and social factors. B B i i o o l l o o g g i i c c a a l l c c a a u u s s e e s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Postpartum depression Many new mothers experience the baby blues. This is a normal reaction that tends to subside within a few weeks. However, some womene xperience severe, lasting depression. This condition is known as postpartum depression. Postpartum depres sion is believed to be influenced, at least in part, by hormonal fluctuations. Perimenopause & menopause Women may be at increased risk for depression during peri menopause, the stage leading to m enopause when reproductive hormones rapidly fluctuate. Women with past histories of depression are at an increased risk of depression during menopause as well. S S o o c c i i a a l l a a n n d d c c u u l l t t u u r r a a l l c c a a u u s s e e s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Role strain Women often suffer from role strain over conflicting and over whelming responsibilities in their life. The more roles a woman is expected to play (mother, wife, working woman), the more vulnerable she is to role strain and subsequent stress and depression. Depression is more common in women who receive little help with housework and child care. Single mothers are particularly at risk. Research indicates that singlem others are three times more likely than married mothers to experience an episode of major depression. Unequal power & status Women's relative lack of power and status in our society may lead to feelings of helplessness. This sense of helplessness puts women at greater risk for depression. These feelingsm ay be provoked by discrimination in the workplace leading to underemployment or unemployment. Low socioeconomic status is a risk factor for major depression. Another contributing factor is society's emphasis on youth, beauty, and thinness in women, traits which to a large extent are out of their control. Sexual and physical abuse Sexual and physical abuse may play a role in depression in women. Girls are much more likely to be sexually abused than boys, and researchers have found that sexual abuse in childhood puts one at increased risk for depression in adulthood. Higher rates of depression are also found among victims of rape, a crime almost exclusively committed against women. Other common forms of abuse, including physical abuse and sexual harassment, may also contribute to depression. Relationship dissatisfaction W hile rates of depression are lower for the married than for the single and divorced, the benefits of mar-r iage and its general contribution to well-being are greater for men than for women. Furthermore, the benefits disappear entirely for women whose marital satisfaction is low. Lack of intimacy and marital strife are linked to depression in women. Poverty Poverty is more common among w omen than men. Single mothers have the highest rates of poverty across all demographic groups. Poverty is a severe, chronic stressor than can lead to depression. P P s s y y c c h h o o l l o o g g i i c c a a l l c c a a u u s s e e s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Coping mechanisms W omen are more likely to ruminate when they are depressed. This includes crying to relieve emotionalt ension, trying to figure out why you're depressed, and talking to your friends about your depression. However, rumination has been found to maintain depression and even make it worse. Men, on the other hand, tend to distract themselves when they are depressed. Unlike rumination, dis traction can reduce depression. S tress response According to Psychology Today, women are more likely than men to develop depression under lower lev els of stress. Furthermore, the female physiological response to stress is different. Women produce more stress hormones than men do, and the female sex hormone progesterone prevents the stress hormone systemf rom turning itself off as it does in men. Puberty and body image The gender difference in depression begins in adolescence. The emer gence of sex differences during puber ty likely plays a role. Some researchers point to body dissatisfaction, which increases in girls during the sexual development of puberty. Body image is closely linked to self-esteem in women, and low self-esteem is a risk factor for depres sion. Prepared by Public Relations Department Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre Understanding depression in women By SARAH B EEK Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y SIGNS & SYMPTOMS of depression in women include lack of energy and fatigue. By STEPHANIE NANO Associated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP Over the long term, a lowcarb diet works just as well as a low-fat diet at taking off the pounds and it might be better for your heart, new research sug gests. Both diets improved cholesterol in a two-year study that included intensive group counselling. But those on the low-carbohydrate diet got a bigger boost in their so-called good cho lesterol, nearly twice as much as those on low-fat. In previous studies, lowcarb diets have done better at weight loss at six months, but longer-term results have been mixed. And there's been a suggestion of better cholesterol from low-carb eating. The latest test is one of the longest to compare the approaches. At the end of two years, average weight loss was the same for both about 15 pounds (6.8 kilograms) or seven per cent. The key difference was in HDL, or good cholesterol: a 23 per cent increase from low-carb dieting compared to a 12 per cent improvement from low-fat, said Gary Foster, director of Temple University's Center for Obesity Research and Education, who led the federally funded study. He said the low-carb boost is the kind one might get from medicines that improve HDL. "For a diet, that's pretty impressive," Foster said. The findings, published in Tuesday's Annals of Inter nal Medicine, are based on a study of 307 adults, twothirds of them women. Par ticipants were obese but didn't have cholesterol problems or diabetes. Half followed a low-carb diet modelled after the Atkins' plan and half went on a low-calorie, low-fat diet. All attended group sessions to help them change bad eating habits, get more active and stick to their diets. The volunteers had periodic checks of their weight, blood, bone density and body composition. After two years, there was no major differences between diet groups, except in good cholesterol. Why the lowcarb diet had a bigger effect on good cholesterol isn't known, the researchers said. As low-carb plans became popular, experts feared the diet would drive up the risk of heart disease because it allows more fat. The latest results suggest those concerns are unfounded, Foster said. In the low-carb group, there was an early rise in "bad" cholesterol, the kind that builds up in arteries. But after two years, both groups ended up with similar improvements to bad cholesterol. The study's strengths include its size, length and its multiple locations Denver, Philadelphia and St Louis, said Dr William Yancy, of the Durham VA Medical Center in North Carolina. "These are results we should have a lot of confidence in," said Yancy, who has done similar diet research but was not involved in the study. Foster, the study leader, said dieters should be less concerned about which diet to use, and focus on finding the support or technique like writing down what they eat that keeps them on track. "It doesn't make a difference for weight loss how you get there," he said. With the current obesity epidemic, more than one way is needed to attack the problem, Yancy said. "Both of these are options. These diets work," he said. Lo w-carb diet tr umps low-fat on good cholesterol These are results we should have a lot of confidence in. Dr William Yancy

PAGE 18

C M Y K C M Y K GARDENING THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WHEN I put my book A Year With Gardener Jack together I started with September and ended with August, a month that in many ways is the low point of the growing year but in many other ways is remarkably fecund. All the vegetables we grow during the cooler months are absent from the veggie plots. We may have a few cherry tomatoes and peppers to boast about but beyond that we only have very hardy producers like okra, Malabar spinach and snake beans to comfort us. In the absence of prime vegetables it might be wise to cover your veggie plots with clear plastic, a process called solarisation. The plastic will stop weeds growing and will also sterilise the soil. August gives the last opportunity to solarise before the new vegetable growing season gets under way. Make sure your soil is wet to a depth of 5-6 inches before covering it. August is a wonderful time for tropical fruits. The last of the Barbados cherries may still be around while the first carambolas ripen. In the garden and along the shore, seagrapes can be found in several stages of development and ripeness. August is also the beginning of the guava duff season with guava trees hanging with fruit. Many flowering shrubs are at their best during August. Hibiscus, oleander, crepe myrtle, bougainvillea and bridal bouquet give abundant colour while yellow poinciana (Peltophorum pterocarpum takes over from royal poinciana as the main flowering t ree. Back to vegetables. Many gardeners look upon early tomatoes as a priority. Nor mal tomatoes set fruit at 68 d egrees or lower and we ordinarily experience suitable nighttime temperatures in late October. There are some hybrid tomatoes developed d uring the past decade that were developed for Florida Solar Fire is an example and set fruit at a higher tempera ture and therefore are candid ates to give the earliest crops. Even regular tomatoes can set fruit early if exceptional conditions happen along. Tomatoes at the flowering stage may be triggered into fruit production by a cool tropical storm during September. Bahamian gardeners are divided over whether to sow tomatoes in August in the hope that the right conditions come along (including the absence of hurricanes) or leave the task until September. If you plan to aim for early, sow your tomatoes in pots that can be easily moved and allow the seedlings to develop in semi shade. Harden them off by increasing the amount of direct sunlight every day over a week or two until the plants can take full sun, then transplant them into their prepared growing area. Peppers are natural warm weather vegetables and are best started early. Cabbages and cucumbers are also candidates for an early start. Any early vegetables will be at the mercy of hurricane activity, which is more likely in September than any other time. That said, if a hurricane strikes one of the last things we will be worrying about is tomatoes. Plants in their pots can be brought inside for a day or two without doing them any harm. If your lawn is not looking good right now, it never will. Fertilize with a high nitrogen mix at least every month during the rainy season and you will maintain a good colour well into the dry season. If you have St. Augustine grass it will grow profusely whether you fertilize it or not. Add fertilizer and it will grow but be much more verdant. g g a a r r d d e e n n e e r r j j a a c c k k @ @ c c o o r r a a l l w w a a v v e e . c c o o m m August The end or a new beginning? EARLY TOMATOES have to be sown early. Jack will be trying Solar Fire this year to get really early tomatoes.

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net I n the twilight of the XXI Central American and Caribbean (CAC c ountrys most decor ated amateur boxer added t o his legacy and won the Bahamas final medal. Valentino Knowles captured a gold medal in the mens light welterweight division on Saturday in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico Knowles put some of his best boxing skills on display at perhaps the timeliest point in the tournament, with a dominating round three to defeat Luis Romero of Venezuela, 6:2 on points. Both fighters failed to score a single point over the course of the first two opening rounds and headed into the decisive third round 0:0. The 21-year-old Knowles outboxed Romero 6:2 in the third round to secure the gold. He became the third Bahamian to win a boxing medal at the games following Nathaniel Knowles who won the silver medal in 1973 and Marvin Smith who won silver in 1986. Earlier this year, Knowles m oved up from the 60 to the 64 kilo weight class after he won the Bahamas' first medal at the AIBA World Championships in 2009. He followed with the highest honour of any Bahamian fighter ever at the Commonwealth Boxing Championships when he won a silver medal. Along with Carl Hield, he also competed in the Continental Elite Championships in Ecuador in June. In the CAC semifinals, Knowles defeated Juan Pablo Romero of Mexico 7:5 on points to earn a berth in the gold-medal match. A dominant first round ulti mately paved the way for the win as Knowles came out witha n aggressive first round to outscore Romero, 4:1. He continued to hold a decisive advantage following the second round as both fighters managed to score a single point. Romero won his first round of the match in the third, but the 3:2 was far from enough to close the three-point deficit. He defeated Ricardo Garcia Tejada 6:5 in the other semifinal to advance. Valentino wins gold Becomes third Bahamian to win boxing medal at the CAC Games NUMBER ONE: Valentino Knowles captured a gold medal in the mens light welterweight division at the CAC Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on Saturday. T homas, Barry jump high for gold and silver... See page 14

PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 13 BAILLOU HILL ROAD Temporary Road Closure & DiversionsJose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.Awishes to advise the motoring public that construction works will be carried out on the eastern side of Baillou Hill Road effective Monday August 9th, 2010 for approximately twenty-four (24 asphalt paving & landscaping. M otorist travelling northbound on Baillou Hill Road should expect changes as construction works will be carried out in four (4stages. The following lateral streets will be temporarily closed to motorist & pedestrians: PALM TREE AVE, COCONUT GROVE AVE, POINCIANAAVE, BAHAMAAVE, WESTEND AVE, CORDEAUX AVE, PALMETTO ST, NEWBOLD ST, BAKER ST & FATHER CALNAN RD. S TAGE 1 Motorist travelling through Palm Tree Ave should use Robinson Road as an alternative route and continue through First Street or Second Street to their destination. STAGE 2 Motorist travelling through Coconut Grove & Poinciana Avenue should use Palm Tree Avenue as an alternative route. STAGE 3 Motorist travelling through Bahama Avenue,West End Avenue & Cordeaux Avenue should use Poinciana Avenue as an alternative route from the southern side. STAGE 4 Motorist travelling through Palmetto Street, Newbold Street, Baker Stree t & Father Calnan Road should use Oxford Avenue as an alternative route. and follow the signs posted DIVERSION Access will be granted to the residents of the affected streets.MINISTRY OFWORKS & TRANSPORT NOTICE CORRIDOR 11A The Project Execution Unit Ministry of Works & Transport Hotline: (242 Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.arWe apologize for the inconvenience & delays caused. For further information please contact: TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM EARLY into their historic bid against the worlds best in youth baseball, the Bahamas has been on both sides of the win-loss column after two games. At the Pony-13 World Series in Fullerton, California, the Bahamas lost in its opening match but rebounded to take game two over the weekend. The team got off toa slow start against Chula Vista, California, when they were shutout 10-0. In game two, the Bahamas rebounded to take a game two win over the hosts Fuller-ton, California, in a hard fought one run win, 14-13. The Bahamas advanced for the first time in the countrys nine year Caribbean Zone participation. After hosting the Caribbean Zone Tournament, which also included an area host team from the Grand Bahamas and the Panama Champions, the winner of the pool advanced directly to the Championship with the top seed. The team from Nassau got off to a rough start in their first two games to the Bahamas area team from Grand Bahama 18-8 and 9-6. They rebounded and took a 4-3 win over Panama but lost 9-3 in its second contest. Nassau made history in the Championship, when they beat Panama 10-2 to become the countrys first Zone Championship and securing a spot in the PONY-13 World Series for the first time. Bahamas loses opening matc h but rebounds to take game 2 By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE largest team ever assembled under the current Bahamas Olympic Committee administration, with more than 100 athletes participating, delivered a series of noteworthy performances and brought in the largest medal total ever for the Bahamas at the Central American and Caribbean (CAC Team Bahamas won a record-setting total of 18 medals which included seven gold, five silver and six bronze at the 21st edition of the games which concluded yesterday in Mayaguez Puerto, Rico. The team medalled in four disciplines, beginning with swimming that won eight medals, track and field finished with six, the tennis team won three medals and boxing finished with one. The Bahamas finished 10th overall in the final medal standings. Mexico topped the overall medal count with 384 medals which included 133 gold, 129 silver and 122 bronze. Venezuela finished second with 322 medals (114g, 104s, 104b), Colombia was third with 260 (100g, 84s, 76b Puerto Rico fourth with 167 medals (48g, 44s, 75b the Dominican Republic rounded out the top five with 133 medals (31g, 37s, 65b Jamaica was the leading medal winner of all EnglishSpeaking Caribbean countries with 42 total medals (15g, 10s, 17b). The represented disciplines included athletics, bowling, judo, rugby, sailing, swimming and tennis. Arianna Vanderpool-Wall ace became the story of the g ames early on for Team B ahamas as she hauled in a total of six medals and set a pair of new meet records. The 20-year-old Olympian won four individual medals, including gold in 50m and 100m butterfly and a pair of bronze medals as a member of relay teams. On the tennis court, Larika Russell won a bronze in the womens singles and teamed with Nikkita Fountain to win gold in doubles play. In track and field, a trio of Olympians returned to top form when Leevan Sands, Donald Thomas and Christine Amertil took gold in their respective signature events. Valentino Knowles won the final medal of the games for the Bahamas in the boxing ring when he took gold in the welterweight division. The Bahamas surpassed its medal total of 10 from the 2006 CAC Games in Cartegena, Colombia, when they totalled 10 medals, six silver and four bronze. In 2002 in El Salvador, the team won just two silver medals. In 1998 in Maracaibo, Venezuela, the Bahamas won eight medals, two gold, two s ilver and four bronze and in 1 993 in Ponce, Puerto Rico t hey totalled four medals, one gold and three bronze. It was the third time Puerto Rico hosted the CAC Games, they also hosted in San Juan in 1966 and Ponce in 1993. Approximately 5,000 athletes participated in 39 sports held across Puerto Rico, from July 17 to August 1. Team Bahamas hauls in record 18-medal total F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s P USHING HARD: J amaica's Allodin Fothergill (left Bahamas Demetrius Pinder in the men's 4x400 meter relay at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on July 30, 2010. (AP Photo SKY HIGH: Bahamas' Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long jump at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico July 30, 2010. (AP Photo

PAGE 21

By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTER several days marred with disqualifications, injuries and disappointments, the Bahamas ended the ath letics competition at the XXI Central American and Caribbean Games with four medals won on the final day. Three medals won in the field, and another added in the finale on the track brought the total medal count in the athletics discipline to six. Donald Thomas and Trevor Barry highlighted the final session for the Bahamas with a gold and silver finish in the mens high jump. Both recorded the winning jump of 2.28m, however, Thomas cleared the mark on his first attempt for the gold, while Barry was unsuccessful on his first attempt and cleared in round two. Wagner Miller of Colombia finished third with a leap of 2.19m. Thomas entered the com petition at 2.16m, cleared on his first attempt, and followed to do the same at 2:19. The former IAAF World Champion and Pan Am Games silver medallist fouled both first attempts at 2.22m and 2.25m but cleared on the second. Barry entered the contest at 2.10m and cleared on his first attempt. He passed on 2.13m but followed to clear 2.16m and 2.19m on first attempts. Barry failed two attempts at 2.22m before clearing on his third and also failed on two attempts at 2.25m before advancing. In the womens long jump, Bianca Stuart needed just a single jump to secure her standing atop the medal podi um and claim the bronze medal. Stuart recorded the mark of 6.50m on her first attempt for the third place finish. It was one of only two successful attempts for Stuart over the six rounds of the competition. Rhonda Watkins of Trinidad and Tobago set a new meet record to win the gold medal with a leap of 6.67m to surpass the old mark of 6.61m. Jovanee Jarrett of Jamaica finished with a silver medal with her mark of 6.52m. Watkins started the competition with a list of 6.55m and held the top position for the duration of the contest. Stuart took hold of second place with her jump, but was surpassed by Jarrett in round two. Her only other recorded mark of the competition was a leap of 6.21m in the fourth round. The mens 1600m relay team finished with a silver medal just behind Jamaica who set a new games record in 3:01.68s. The team of Andretti Bain, Michael Mathieu, LeSean Pickstock and Demetrius Pinder finished in a new seasons best time of 3:01.82s. Trinidad and Tobago fin ished third, also in a seasons best time of 3:04.07s. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Thomas, Barry get gold and silver in high jump Bianca Stuart jumps long for bronze Mens 1,600 relay team win silver GETTIN UP: Bahamas Trevor Barry clears the bar during the high jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010. (AP Photos UP AND OVER: Bahamas Donald Thomas clears the bar during the high jump at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, July 30, 2010. HES OFF: Bahamas Andretti Bain starts the men's 4x400 meter relay at the CAC Games on July 30, 2010. (AP Photo IN FLIGHT: Bahamas Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010. (AP Photo ALL FOR ONE: Athletes compete (Team Bahamas far right Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico on July 30, 2010.


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Volume: 106 No.209



Fishing guide is
murdered in Exuma

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning
four men following the mur-
der of a well-known fishing
guide in Exuma.

Cely Smith, 45, was at his
home in Stuart Manor on
Sunday morning when four
gunmen with dreadlocked
hair kicked down his door and
fired gunshots in his direction.

Mr Smith later died of his
injuries at a local clinic.

Sources close to the inves-
tigation report that four men
helping police with their
inquiries were arrested by
Drug Enforcement Unit offi-
cers off the Montagu fore-
shore.

It is believed that after
shooting Mr Smith, the cul-
prits fled to Staniel Cay where
they commandeered a white
coloured go-fast boat and
headed for New Providence,
however police were last night
tight-lipped over the details.

It is understood that in

addition to the four men
assisting police two others are
being sought.

Chrislyn Skippings, press
officer of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, said there was
no information to suggest the
incident was drug-related at
this time.

Police have also disputed
claims that the incident was
linked to a fight which took
place yesterday in a nightclub
in Black Point, a settlement
15 minutes away from Stuart
Manor, where two men got
into an altercation which
resulted in one of them being
gun butted and flown to hos-
pital in Nassau.

According to relatives, Mr
Smith had seven children and
had lived at his two-storey
home in Stuart’s Manor for
nearly 15 years.

On the morning of his
shooting, four of his sons were
present — two of whom are
still in high school.

A family member said:

SEE page eight

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO TECHNICAL ISSUES,

tle OS CO TS



es



The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

By AVA TURNQUEST
| Tribune Staff Reporter
| aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THESE are the dramatic moments when |]
bystanders and tourists rushed to rescue the victims
| of a horrific boardwalk collapse.
| The terrified victims were among a 50-strong par-
| ty of mourners who had turned up on Saturday
morning to pay their last respects to 32-year-old
Sharmaine Smith-Downy.

SEE apaee nine

THE BODY is removed from the scene on East Bay Street.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe @tribunemedia.net

A 43-YEAR-OLD
woman was last night being
questioned by police after a
man believed to be her hus-

band was stabbed to death
in a parking lot.

The killing took place in
the vacant lot located
between the Green Parrot
bar and Bahamas Air Sea
Rescue Association (BAS-
RA) headquarters on East

Bay Street.

While the victim has not
been formally identified,
The Tribune understands his
surname is Williams.

A manager at the Green
Parrot Bar and Grill, which
is next to the site of the

death, said Mr Williams was
arriving for his work shift at
about 9pm on Saturday as a
security guard securing
property belonging to US-
based civil engineering firm

SEE page eight



Two die in tragic opening |
to the crawfish season

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The opening of the

crawfish season on Grand Bahama was i seized almost $600,000 worth of illegal

marked with tragedy when two men died | drugs and arrested two men, one of whom

in separate crawfishing incidents in the | WS Shot during a high-speed chase and

: shootout with officers.

West End and East End areas.

According to police reports, the body 7 : : :
of one man was pulled from the waters said police are searching for a third man

M Rack Monte bie who escaped after the vehicle being pur-
ee een | aud by officers crashed into a tree.

identity is being withheld by police.
SEE page eight

$600,000 worth of drugs

_ seized alter chase, shootout |

By DENISE MAYCOCK
? Tribune Freeport Reporter
: dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT: Grand Bahama Police

Assistant Superintendent Hector Delva

According to reports, DEU officers were

SEE page nine

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER

400 attempt to illegally
enter Bahamas in two days

LOCAL and international law
enforcement agents in the past two days
have apprehended more than 400 people
attempting to enter the Bahamas ille-
gally.

The influx has caused the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force to increase its
patrols at sea and in the air. The US
Coast Guard has reportedly done like-
wise.

The first group, 159 Haitians, were
apprehended on Friday north west of
Great Inagua by the US Coast Guard

SEE page eight

HOME IMPROVEMENTS
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Police in Florida confident they have

found remains of Bahamian woman

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Florida are
confident they have found
the remains of a Bahamian
woman who went missing
there in 2006.

Cocoa Police Department
believe the body to be that
of 22-year-old Darice
Knowles. They were tipped
off to the location by a
prison inmate.

Barbara Matthews, a
spokesperson for the Cocoa
Police Department in Bre-
vard County, Florida, told a
local newspaper that police
had not “positively identi-
fied” the remains, but were
nonetheless “certain” that
they belong to the Bahami-
an.

“She’s pretty much intact
and you can make out the
outline of her remains,” said



MISSING WOMAN:
Darice Knowles

Ms Matthews.

The discovery of Darice’s
suspected remains revives
what had become a cold
case file for local police.

Darice was said to have
flown to the US from Nas-
sau in March 2006 to visit
male friends from the
Bahamas when she went

missing. Her disappearance
was not reported to police
until three months later.
Foul play was suspected,
but no one has ever been
taken into custody in con-
nection with the matter.

A former Miss Bahamas
contestant and law student,
Darice is the only child of
Mario and _ Princess
Knowles. According to
Darice’s cousin, Dana
Munnings, many of her
family members in Nassau
have been locked in a state
of denial over the disap-
pearance.

This weekend, detectives
were said to be unwilling to
discuss what may have hap-
pened to Darice, but said it
was likely she knew her
attacker.

One of the suspects in the
matter went with police to
the scene to help find where
Knowles’ body was located,

according to local reports.

The first signs that law i
enforcement officials may :
found Darice’s }
remains came on Friday :}
when police were able to }
locate a foot bone ata }
wooded site off State Road ;

have

524 in Brevard County.

They were reported to }
have unearthed yet more }
bones yesterday, a week
after police called in heavy
equipment to begin clear- }
ing the area where they :
believed her body may have ;

been located.

"Part of the thing that has }
kept us driven for the last }
four years to find her body }
was the fact that we wanted }
to give the family closure,”
said Ms Matthews. “Of ;
course, after we do what we }
need to do, everything will :
be turned over to the fami- |
ly so they can give her a }

proper burial."

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SCENES from the
Emancipation Day
Junkanoo parade at Fox Hill
yesterday morning. Crowds
and Junkanoo groups took
to the streets to celebrate
the historical date.

THE TRIBUNE

Police receive information,
but have yet to identify body

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedida.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama Police have received
information from the public
that could possibly help iden-
tity the decomposed body
found inside a high voltage
building on Kings Road.

“We have an unconfirmed
identity of a person who was

a Beebe
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known to frequent the area,
but we are still trying to make
some determination and so
we are awaiting the results of
an autopsy,” Inspector Hector
Delva told The Tribune.

On Wednesday, police dis-
covered the partly decom-
posed body of a black male,
dressed in white t-shirt and
dark trousers. A dog was also
found dead.

A Grand Bahama Power
Company statement said:
“We are saddened to learn of
the recent loss of life found
at our premises on Kings
Road.

“We are satisfied that every
reasonable precautionary
measure was taken to prevent
such an unfortunate mishap
from happening.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Marsh Harbour airport
renovations set to take off

Architectural design contract awarded

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

LONG-AWAITED renovations for Marsh
Harbour airport were set in stone yesterday as a
contract for the new architectural design was
awarded yesterday.

Minister of Public Works Neko Grant flew to
Abaco with a team of delegates from his depart-
ment to award the $600,000 contract for the
$10million development to Freeport company
The Architects Incorporated in Marsh Harbour.

An estimated 200,000 passengers pass through
the Marsh Harbour airport every year, and Aba-
conians expect many more will visit when the
expansion is complete.

They hope the expansion promised in the
FNM’s 1992 manifesto will drive down high inter-
national ticket prices and encourage more direct
travel between the United States and Abaco.

The 24,000 sq ft single storey terminal and fire
crash facility to be built west of the existing ter-
minal has been designed with space for expansion
in all directions, as it replaces the existing 3,315 sq
ft facility which will be converted and utilised.



















By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

WRITER, director and
producer of Bahamian film
‘Rain’ signed copies of the
newly-released DVD for fans
this weekend.

Filmmaker Marian Govan’s
film about a 14-year-old girl’s
journey from Ragged Island to
inner city Nassau in search of
her estranged mother after her
grandmother’s death has won
critical acclaim around the
world since its release at the
Bahamas International Film
Festival (BIFF) in December
2008.

It premiered on the US cable

Mr Grant said the new building will give visi-
tors a “sense of place” as well as offer more facil-
ities, including indoor arrival and departure
lounges, airline offices and storage areas, and
offices for the police, security staff and airport
manager.

“Abaco continues to develop at a rapid place,”
the minister said.

“Tt has the third largest population after New
Providence and Grand Bahama.

“Furthermore, it is estimated that in excess of
200,000 passengers utilise the Marsh Harbour
International Airport annually.

“Tt is against this background that the govern-
ment is proceeding with this plan to construct a
larger, modern, state-of-the-art facility.”

The Marsh Harbour airport project follows
completion of a new 6,100 ft jet runway, conver-
sion of the original runway into a jet taxi-way and
installation of new signage and lighting.

Eight Bahamian architecture firms submitted
fee proposals for the works, and The Architects
Incorporated won the bid with a fee of six per
cent of the construction cost and a commitment
to provide tender documents for construction
within three months.

“I do believe it is a film that
will leave you proud to be
Bahamian!”

The common Bahamian sto-
ry of a child who forgoes the
sheltered simple life of her
home in Ragged Island after
the death of her grandmother,
played by Irma P Hall, to seek
out her estranged mother in
the big city of Nassau, told
in ‘Rain’, is also a universal

coming of age tale.

Ms Govan described how
Rain's dreams of a loving
reconciliation are quickly
shattered when she meets
Glory, played by Nicki
\ Micheaux, a scarred,
proud, guarded woman
bearing no resemblance
of the mother she had

TV channel “Showtime” in Jan-
uary and was released on DVD
this week, to be sold on Internet
shopping giant Amazon.com as
well as stores across the United
States.

Sales of the DVD will not
only repay Bahamian investors
in the film and afford them
some profit, it will also support
the success of the film at large.

During the filming, the crew
and cast stayed at a Cable
Beach hotel, rented trucks and
cars from local businesses, hired
local caterers, musicians and

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actors
to support the film.

Ms Govan said: “We have to
realise that investment in film is
really important, in that it
impacts the entire economy.

“Tt's time we begin cultivating
alternative means of generating
income while utilising our cre-
ative talent.

“Bahamians are such a cre-
ative people and yet our cultur-
al landscape can feel void at
times.

“As we face forward, culture
will need to take a front seat.

“Film is a powerful vehicle
that can serve our community
on so many levels both spiritu-
ally and practically.

“So for those of you who
wish to support new, creative,
Bahamian industry, buy a copy
of ‘Rain’, buy two, and tell your
friends and family to do the
same.

hoped for.

Glory's self-destructive
lifestyle, diminished by drug
abuse is rudely awakened by
the imminent role of mother-
hood.

"Confronted by unforesee-
able trials, Rain's passion for
running and deeply-rooted spir-
it brings two allies into her life:
An insightful and inspiring track
coach, played by CCH Pounder,
and a charming rebellious
teenage neighbour. In time,
Rain's spirit and talent take her
to unimaginable heights," Ms
Govan said.

"Shot in a style that combines
gritty realism, a bold and unfor-
gettable colour palette, soulful
Bahamian music, and the use
of local actors alongside sea-
soned pros, ‘Rain’ takes us on a
journey into the heart of a child,
the pulse of a country and the
spirit of its people.”

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PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOP

By Jamaal Rolle

WEATHER NEWS

~jamaaltheartistgigmail.com

METEOROLOGY DEPT EYES TROPICAL DEPRESSION

THE Department of
Meteorology is paying close
attention to a tropical
depression which has
formed in the Atlantic and
which had reached very
near tropical storm status
last night.

According to Senior
Meteorological Officer
Geoffrey Greene, it is too
early to say if the weather
system will directly impact
the Bahamas as it is a “good

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way off”.

However, the forecasters
said that by Friday or Sat-
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ical officers will be able to
make a better determina-
tion in this regard.

The tropical depression is
the fourth of the hurricane
season, and if it does fur-
ther develop, it may become
Tropical Storm Colin.

At present, it is on a tra-
jectory which sees it headed



for the US Atlantic
seaboard and the Carolinas,
but it may yet “swing out
to sea”, according to
reports.

Its location at Spm yes-
terday was recorded by the
US National Hurricane
Centre as: 13.0 degrees
north, 42.5 degrees west,
moving west north west at
16 miles per hour with max-
imum sustained winds of 35
miles per hour.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



cs
No trade without help on undeniable climate change

insight |

WORLD VIEW.

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat).

CLIMATE change is now
undeniable according to a
new study headed by the US
National Oceans and Atmos-

200

pheric Administration. It is
already having a disastrous

i All
Ser

affect on small island states.
The very existence of some

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of them, particularly in the
Pacific and the Indian
Oceans, is threatened.
Caribbean islands too are
endangered as are countries
such as Belize and Guyana
with low lying coastlands.

In the latter case, coastal
erosion is reducing beaches
that are crucial to the
tourism industry on which all
of the small Caribbean
islands now depend. The
Atlantic coasts of both
Guyana and Belize are
below sea level, but it accom-
modates most of their popu-
lations and their agricultural
lands. Sea-level rise, there-
fore, threatens all of them.

The challenges that cli-
mate change poses to small
states are not only over-
whelming, they are impossi-
ble to meet from the scarce
resources of the govern-
ments.

In a recent speech in
Trinidad and Tobago, the
Prime Minister of St Vincent
and the Grenadines put the
matter in clear terms when
he said: “In mountainous
States like my own, over 80
per cent of our major infra-
structure is located along our
coastline, within a few feet
of the inexorably rising seas.
The cost of adaptation and
preservation of our infra-
structural developments are
daunting, and beyond our
individual capacity to
address.”

While small states are the
primary victims of climate
change, they are the least
contributors to the green-
house gas emissions that, as
many studies have con-
firmed, are causing climate
change and global warming.
Together, the harmful emis-
sions of greenhouse gases
from all small states account
for less than 0.1 per cent of
the global total.

In a fatuous argument, the
US Department of Energy’s
Carbon Dioxide Information
Analysis Centre had rated
Trinidad and Tobago at
number 9 in the worst emit-
ters of harmful gases in the
world in the year 2007.
However, the measurement
was based on population
size, not on the volume of
emissions. To underscore the

a



SIR RONALD SANDERS

silliness of the argument, the
tiny Caribbean island,
Montserrat, with a popula-
tion of 10,000 people and no
manufacturing or industrial
production of any magni-
tude, was rated at number 17
in the world.

The reality is that, despite
the per capita argument that
developed countries and
international institutions are
fond of using to measure a
range of issues to procure a
desired (but illusionary)
result, small states contribute
little to global warming but
they are its primary victims
as evidenced by sea-level
rise, stronger and more fre-
quent hurricanes, flooding
and other natural disasters.

These same small states
are also the victims of the
worst trading arrangements
in the world.

The World Trade Orga-
nization (WTO) makes no
provision for their special cir-
cumstances, nor does the
International Financial Insti-
tutions (IFIs) such as the
International Monetary
Fund (IMF) and the World
Bank. Hence, small islands
such as St Lucia (100,000
people) and St Kitts-Nevis
(50,000 people) are treated
in the same way in the WTO
as the United States (350
million), Canada (33 million)
or the European Union (400
million). No special rules
apply.
In the IFIs, many small
states — and certainly all
those in the Caribbean — are
“graduated” from conces-

‘
x

ee i
327-5956



sional financing because, on
the measurement of per capi-
ta income, they are rated as
middle-income countries.

The point is that small
states are the casualties of
climate change but the large
industrialized nations that
cause the problem are doing
little to help them cope with
the difficulties that have
already been created and
that are worsening. The
member countries of the
Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Develop-
ment (OECD), which are the
world’s most industrialized
countries, are responsible for
an estimated 77 per cent of
the total greenhouse gases
which were emitted in the
past.

The IFI’s that are con-
trolled by the OECD gov-
ernments have no machinery
in place to provide small
states (especially those in the
Caribbean who have been
graduated from concessional
financing) with soft loans or
grants to help them mitigate
the impact of climate change,
on their key trade sectors,
including agriculture, fish-
eries, forestry and tourism.

And, the terms of trade
are punitive rather than
helpful. A case in point is the
Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) between
the European Union (EU)
and individual small coun-
tries in the Caribbean and
the Pacific. Nowhere in the
EPA is there an acknowl-
edgment by the EU that its
greenhouse gas emissions are
adversely affecting climate
change and harming small
island states and states with
vulnerable coastlines. And,
nowhere is there a correla-
tion drawn between the cost
of such harmful effects and
trade benefits that could be
granted.

Indeed, small states are
punished twice for their
innocence. Their key trade
sectors are compromised by
climate change caused by
industrialized nations, and
then they are made to open
up their markets for a flood
of goods and services from
the industrialized nations on
the false idea of reciprocal
treatment.

The WTO admits that
“global greenhouse gas emis-
sions have roughly doubled
since the beginning of the
1970s. Current estimates
indicate that these emissions
will increase by between 25
and 90 per cent in the period
from 2000 to 2030.”

China, India and Brazil
(now G20 countries) will be
three of the large develop-
ing countries contributing to
the projected increases, and
they too have a responsibili-
ty to face up to the harm that
they are doing to small coun-
tries that lack the financial
means to pay for adaptation
and mitigation.

There is clearly need for a
major change in the IFIs in
their policies toward small
and vulnerable economies.
The insistence on per capita
income as a measure to grad-
uate countries from conces-
sionary financing has proven
that, by itself, it is an illogical
calculation for the capacity
of small countries.

But, the trade rules in the
WTO also have to be adapt-
ed to cater for small and vul-
nerable states more widely
and effectively than they do.
A special category of special
and differential treatment for
small states is necessary both
to provide these countries
with the means to cope and,
also, to make the WTO rele-
vant to their needs.

Small countries should
refuse to sign any more
agreements until their plight
is acknowledged and
machinery established to
address the harmful effects
of climate change on them.

A growing body of litera-
ture now exists on the prob-
lems of climate change and
trade for small states. But,
the governments of small
states themselves should be
making the case in the WTO
and the IFI’s in a persistent
fashion.

A high-level team drawn
from the Caribbean, Pacific,
and the Indian Oceans
should be created to press
their case at the next meeting
of the G20. It would be a
good occasion for frank talks
between offenders and suf-
ferers on an issue of human
survival.

Responses and
previous commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Woman questioned after
man is stabbed to death

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FROM page one

American Bridge, which is
located in the dirt lot, when
he was attacked.

American Bridge’s
Bahamian — subsidiary,
American Bridge Bahamas
Ltd, is constructing part of
the new Arawak Cay port,
which is being developed
by a public-private partner-
ship made up of the Gov-
ernment and 19 private sec-
tor stakeholders.

According to the Green
Parrot manager, a woman
and the victim arrived
together in a maroon-
coloured Chevrolet Blazer.
She followed him out of the
car. He was stabbed a num-
ber of times.

The man, who was wear-
ing khaki pants and a black
stripe shirt, died at the
scene. Witnesses reported
that a young boy, thought
to be his son, was in the
car at the time.

There were a number of
witnesses to the attack,
including someone who was

still sitting in their car in the
parking lot when the stab-
bing occurred.

They are said to have run
in to Green Parrot to alert
security officers, who con-
tacted the police.

Another witness was a
Green Parrot chef who
arrived on the scene shortly
after Mr Williams was
attacked.

According to the manag-
er at the Bar and Grill, a
woman was still standing
over the body when the
chef arrived.

“She was freaking out.
She told him to shine his
flashlight on the body,” said
the manager.

Peter Moree, owner of
the Green Parrot Bar and
Grill, expressed his sadness
and that of his staff at the
killing.

“Tt’s an absolute

tragedy,” he told The Tri-
bune.

Nonetheless, fearing that
it could hurt his business,
the owner also distanced his
establishment from the
crime, pointing out that
none of those involved had
been patrons of the bar that
evening and the attack took
place outside of the bounds
of the popular hangout.

“T called ZNS when I saw
their report which said it
happened at Green Parrot
to tell them it was not actu-
ally us, it was the American
Bridge property,” said Mr
Moree, acknowledging that
Green Parrot does utilise
the space as a parking lot
on busy evenings.

Police yesterday identi-
fied the woman being ques-
tioned as a resident of Nas-
sau Village, and a “relative”
of the deceased.

Fishing guide is

murdered in Exuma

FROM page one

“Three of them escaped, the oldest one and the two younger
ones, one stayed behind, but he was unharmed. I think the
older one tried to wake him up but he wasn’t getting up so he
escaped with the younger ones.”

The three sons reportedly jumped from an upstairs win-
dow and ran into nearby bushes.

Mr Smith is the country’s 55th homicide, and police con-
firmed a team of officers from the Central Detective Unit
have been flown into Exuma as investigations on the island con-
tinue.

Though married, family members said Mr Smith had been

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separated from his wife for several years.
He had 12 brothers and five sisters, and his mother, Mrs
Eugene Smith Sr, 74, has lived in Stuart Manor for nearly 60

years.

Mrs Smith described her son as a good boy during his child-
hood, however she said she could not account for his life as a

man.

Mrs Smith said: “The whole island is in shock, this is the first
major crime in this settlement. We never had no crime, I hard-
ly lock my doors. Sometimes I lock my doors or when my chil-
dren come they will lock the door.”

Two die in tragic opening
to the crawfish season

FROM page one

Senior Assistant Quinn
McCartney reported that the
victim and two other men
were out crawfishing. Two of
the men had dived overboard
to retrieve traps while the vic-
tim waited on the boat.

“Our preliminary investi-
gations indicate that the per-
son in the boat fell overboard.
The boat went out of control
and he sustained serious
injuries that resulted in his
death,” said Mr McCartney.

The victim’s body was
brought to shore at Old
Bahama Bay and transport-
ed by hearse to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where an
autopsy will be held to deter-
mine the cause of death.

In East End, residents there

are saddened following the
apparent drowning of 35-
year-old Nixon Mitchell, of
Sweeting’s Cay.

The fishermen were check-
ing on their crawfish traps on
Sunday when Mr Mitchell
failed to surface after a rea-
sonable time.

He was pulled from the sea
bottom by his brother, who
performed CPR. A doctor
pronounced him dead at the
scene.

High Rock MP Kenneth
Russell said Mr Mitchell’s
death is a shock to the East
End community.

Mr Russell is urging peo-
ple to make sure that they are
well trained before they go
diving for crawfish.

Police are investigating
both incidents.

400 attempt to enter Bahamas illegally
FROM page one

Cutter (USCGC) Legare.

Meanwhile, that same day, the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force removed 177 Haitians (129 men, 43 women and five
children) from Channel Cay in the southern Bahamas.

These migrants were apprehended by police and Immigration
officials in Exuma after their vessel reportedly ran aground on
the island.

It is believed this latest group was onboard a Haitian sailing
sloop the Defence Force had been searching for since Wednes-
day morning

During the operation, a Haitian man jumped overboard
while being transported. A search for him is under way.

The following day, the USCGC Chandeliur, with a Bahami-
an ship rider (Defence Force Marine) onboard, stopped a go
fast boat in the area of Memory Rock, north of Grand Bahama,
transporting 15 illegal migrants.

When officials boarded the boat, they found five Jamaican
men, four Haitian men, four Haitian women, one Peruvian
man, one Peruvian woman and four Bahamians.

The four Bahamians and 15 illegals were handed over to the
police and immigration authorities in Freeport.

Later on, 99 Haitians were apprehended in the Exuma chain
by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.

While on patrol, Defence Force vessel EF 27 spotted a Hait-
ian sailing sloop in the area of Shroud Cay. Upon further
investigation, they discovered 75 men and 24 women) aboard
the vessel.

The operations conducted over the two days has netted 450
illegal migrants apprehended by police, immigration, USCG and
the RBDF.

All of the Haitians are expected to be transported back to
Haiti by the United States Coast Guard.

“The RBDF is concerned with these recent events and has
since increased its patrols at sea and in the air. The US Coast
Guard has reportedly done likewise,” a statement released by
the RBDF yesterday said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE





TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

THE collapsed boardwalk after Saturday’s accident.

Mourners in boardwalk rescue

FROM page one

They had earlier attended a
funeral service for Mrs Smith-
Downy at Christ Community
Church, on Bellot Road, and
gathered at the boardwalk near
the Beach Club Café, Sandyport,
to scatter her ashes into the sea.

But panic broke out when a
section of the boardwalk, which
is connected to an adjacent gaze-
bo, collapsed underneath about
25 people, including children as
young two.

Almost immediately, people
in the area pitched in to rescue
the fallen loved ones, some of
whom had slipped underneath
the broken planks.

Five people were taken to
hospital by emergency medical
services for minor injuries, one of
whom was said to be an elderly
woman who had suffered a
seizure in the water.

Some mourners, who had
safely crossed the boardwalk on
to the gazebo and were subse-
quently trapped, were rescued
by a fisherman’s boat.

Ulric Woodside, the photog-

rapher hired to document the
ceremony, said he heard the
nails on the boardwalk give way
underneath the weight of peo-
ple, just before it collapsed.

“It was really a community
effort, he said, “as soon as it hap-
pened everybody came over and
assisted, jet-ski operators, beach-
goers, tourists as well.”

Mr Woodside said the remain-
ing mourners continued the cer-
emony and scattered Mrs Smith-
Downy’s remains into the sea
after the situation was under
control.

Garth Buckner, president of
Sandyport Development Com-
pany, said the company had little
details concerning the incident
but had launched an investiga-
tion into the matter.

Mr Buckner said: “The dock
is private property, so the public
is welcome to use it but we do
ask that we be informed before
any events are put on so that we
can provide adequate security
and prepare. We were not
informed, so we were not pre-
pared for anything.”

Police are investigating.

$600,000 of drugs seized

FROM page one

on patrol around 11.25pm on Saturday when they observed a white
2000 Chevy Astro van exiting Magellan Road.

The occupants were acting in a suspicious manner so officers pur-
sued the vehicle and a chase ensued.

ASP Delva said there was an exchange of gunfire between the

suspects and police.

The driver of the Astro van eventually lost control of the vehicle
and collided into a tree on Tarleton Road, where two suspects
were apprehended. A third fled into bushes.

While searching the vehicle, officers discovered 584lbs of sus-
pected marijuana with an estimated street value of $584,000.

The officers also discovered that one of the suspects was shot in
the upper shoulder. They were both taken into custody and received
medical treatment for their injuries. Investigations are continuing.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





‘Inappropriate invasion
of privacy’ at Lyford Cay
== TOUGH CALL

By LARRY SMITH

IN the Bahamas, every-
thing is a plot and every-
one has an agenda.

We are conspiracy mon-
gerers of the worst kind -a
tendency that is amplified
by the anonymity offered
by the internet, the diffi-
culty of accessing accurate
information, the lack of
professionalism of many in
the media, and the inability
of some to think critically,
which is a legacy of our
failed education system.

The plot at Lyford Cay
these days is that behind
the gates of this sinister pri-
vate community are rich,
white foreigners who are
getting away with murder
and deploying advanced
weaponry with impunity.

Well, there are certainly
rich, white foreigners living
at Lyford Cay — along
with many members of our
own black and white elite.
And it is most definitely a
private community. I have
been admitted only twice
in the last two decades - on
both occasions to attend a
social event.

But the narrative subtext
that has lately been
attached to the activities of
this very reserved commu-
nity is best captured by the

ARRY SMITH

word "sinister". One poster
on the popular Bahamas
Issues website put it this
way:

"Is it not the job of the
police to investigate crime?
Or was this action egre-
gious because it involved a
Lyford Cay resident. Every
day regular Bahamians
have investigations levied
against them by RBPF, so
if this was Tony who lives
in Bain Town, and the
police received information
that weapons were seen on
the premises, what should
the police do? No one is
and should be above the
law."

Well, by that logic if I
tell the police that Hubert
Ingraham and Perry
Christie are stockpiling
weapons at their old law
office to mount a coup,
Commissioner Greenslade
should order his special
force commandos to hand-
cuff the former law part-
ners together while picking
through their things for sev-
eral hours without a war-

C. A. Christie Real Estate
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to "Sea Grapes”,
West Bay Street.

We start in the new
location 3rd August 2010.

New Telephone No:676 8100
New Fax No: 676 8104

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rant. After all, no one is
and should be above the
law.

That's the first point I
wish to make about the
recent events at Lycay —
just how ridiculously inap-
propriate this invasion of
privacy was. It raises seri-
ous questions about judg-
ment.

Lawyers say that when
the police have reasonable
suspicion, a warrant is not
required to search for
firearms or dangerous
drugs in the Bahamas. They
can enter your home or
business at will. This right
of entry, they say, is based
on the need for police offi-
cers to react immediately
to intelligence reports in
the public interest. It is a
hangover from colonial
times aimed at countering
armed insurgencies in the
former British Empire.

Judgment

But although police can
enter premises without a
search warrant from a
judge, it is expected that a
high degree of common
sense, good judgment and
ordinary decency will be
applied, one lawyer told
me. "Normally the appoint-
ment to particular duties
carries with it standing and
assumed authority from the
commissioner that general-
ly empowers detectives to
hunt for firearms and
drugs.

"However, it is easy to
abuse such a system, and
our police often do not go
for warrants even when
there is the time, or the cir-
cumstances are appropri-
ate to do so. Partly, this is
because of the scale of the
task they face, but there is
also a disturbing trend of
just showing up and
demanding entry to search
for firearms or drugs. This
erodes our civil liberties
and sophisticated criminals
can and do impersonate
officers using the same
words.

"These things are very
hard for international per-
sons, especially Americans,
to understand, because
their rights of privacy and
premises are so well
entrenched in law. This
means that although inter-
national second home own-
ers should not be consid-

ered above the law, there
needs to be greater sensi-
tivity by the authorities in
such circumstances."

However, in this case the
object of the search and
seizure was not a firearm,
which brings me to the sec-
ond point.

Both traditional and
internet "news" sites
reported as if it were gospel
the obviously cooked-up
story that the "firearms" in
question at Lyford Cay
were advanced military-
grade sonic blasters that
could injure people and
damage property. Accord-
ing to one "knowledge-
able" report, the equipment
was of "a type which is
used by Israeli intelligence
and has the affect of caus-
ing you to get loose bow-
els."

Well, we don't know
what kind of "intelligence"
the police employed in this
case, but we did hear a
broadcast on Island FM
just before the raid when a
talk show caller bracketed
Commissioner Greenslade
about ultrasonic weapons
being used with impunity
by rich, white foreigners at
Lyford Cay. Greenslade
said he would deal with the
matter expeditiously
because, after all, no one is
or should be above the law.

But these “ultrasonic
weapons” were actually
high-end outdoor speakers
(google Meyer Sound SB-
1). They are easily pur-
chased in the US and were
legally imported. Police
returned the speakers no
less than three hours after
they were seized. And
although they have yet to
make a public statement,
an inquiry is said to be
underway and meetings
have been held to soothe
ruffled feathers at Lyford
Cay.

The speakers were used
at Point House, the home
of American financier
Louis Bacon, as a response
to aggravated and contin-
ual noise harassment from
the adjacent property of
Canadian fashion mogul
Peter Nygard.

According to a
spokesman for Bacon, "the
intent was to counterbal-
ance loud music that origi-
nated from the Nygard
property (by directing) it
back to the specific loca-
tion of the music. This was
intended to repulse music
originating from Nygard's
property after it reached a
certain decibel level.

"It is unfortunate that
the police were diverted
from their work by such a

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frivolous complaint," the
spokesman said. "With
respect to the health risks
associated with these
speakers, there are none —
unless, of course, they were
knocked over and fell on
your foot."

This brings me to the
main point.

Property owners clearly
have a longstanding issue
with Nygard's development
and operation of a major
resort over many years at
the western tip of the
Lyford Cay peninsula. In
fact, there is a lengthy his-
tory of complaints about
noise pollution emanating
from the Nygard property
as well as other land use
issues associated with unau-
thorized dredging and
reclamation of the sea bed
to the detriment of neigh-
bouring properties.

After initially trying to
resolve these issues amica-
bly, Bacon turned to the
Lyford Cay Property Own-
er's Association to register
these complaints. At least
16 complaints were made
to police and Lyford Cay
security in the first half of
this year alone, the
spokesman said. "The con-
tinued escalation of
Nygard's late night parties
and his refusal to abide by
Lyford protocols left few
options, but an effort to
return in kind the music
that he broadcasted."

Nygard acquired his
property in 1984 and it is
well known that construc-
tion has been non-stop for
the past 20 years, continu-
ally disturbing neighbours
and the Lyford community
in general. There are
apparently no specific
covenants that prevent
"lawful" activities on the
Nygard property, but the
site is zoned for single fam-
ily use and the conflict with
the residential nature of the
exclusive community is
obvious.

Until a large portion of
the resort burned down last
November due to an elec-
trical fault, advertised facil-
ities included a disco with a
100-person dance floor, a
human aquarium, water-
slides, movie theatre, two
yachts, swimming pools,
tennis, volleyball and bas-
ketball courts, 10 bedrooms
and a helicopter landing
pad. Nygard has been seek-
ing government approvals
to rebuild the resort.

At one point, Nygard
wanted to build a restau-
rant on nearby Golding
Cay, a Bahamas National
Trust bird sanctuary. He
also sought to import exot-
ic animals, add a dolphin
enclosure and build a shark
tank. Dredge pumps have
been used almost continu-
ously for years to move
sand from the bay onto the
shoreline at the resort.

But a report prepared in
2008 for the Lyford Cay
Property Owners Associa-
tion by Melanie Roach (a
former public works direc-
tor) determined that
Nygard did not have a hotel

or business license, and
there was no record of
building approvals granted
for resort amenities. There
was also no record of a per-
mit being issued for a heli-
copter landing pad at the
property.

All these facilities and
more — were being adver-
tised on various travel web-
sites up to the time of the
fire. For example, Unusual
Villa & Island Rentals of
Richmond, Virginia pro-
moted Nygard Cay like
this:

"For only $42,000 in
2008 (If you add the two
staterooms on the yacht the
total price will be $47,000
per day). Your group of
celebrities, executives,
sports moguls or any per-
son celebrating a birthday,
anniversary, seminar, wed-
ding, or vacation can have a
trip of a lifetime. Special 4-
hour dinners are available
for $300 per additional per-
son above 20 people. The
Cay can hold up to 600
people. Unusual Villas and
Island Rentals is open 24
hours per day, 365 days a
year, for any information
requests and booking poli-
cies for Bahamas Luxury
Nygard Cay."

Resort

Since the fire last year,
Nygard has been seeking
government approval to
rebuild the resort. In recent
months he has been mak-
ing press statements about
a $50 million investment,
touting the many jobs this
would create: "‘I want to
do it like Atlantis in two or
three years (and) that
would take a lot of people,"
he said recently.

Observers say it is no
coincidence that the police
raid on Bacon's property
occurred several days after
it was reported that Nygard
received a letter from the
Office of the Prime Minis-
ter demanding that he
restore his property to its
original deeded footprint.
"What has now become
increasingly evident is that
much of the expansion and
continued work at Nygard
Cay has occurred on Crown
land without permits."

The letter from the
OPM ordered Nygard to
"remove any structures that
would have been erected
on this land over the years"
and advised that "going for-
ward no applications for
construction on, or occupa-
tion of, the accreted land
will be approved by any
agencies of the govern-
ment."

So, does the plot thick-
en? It will certainly be
interesting to see how this
unfortunate melodrama
plays out in the weeks and
months ahead.

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

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email amusgrove@grp.sandals.com


THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 15
LOCAL NEWS












T1
=
me)









MAJOR/TRIBUNE STAFF









} .
amy a fa

RECRUITS from the 47th entry to the Royal Bahamas Defence Force demonstrated acquired skills during
their graduation ceremony on Friday. The graduation also marked the 17th entry since women were allowed
to join the force.

ass

& BILLING CHANGES

Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for all consumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th:

The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

TARIFF

RESIDENTIAL
0-200 units per month 10.95 cents per unit
201-800 units per month 11.95 cents per unit
Remaining units 14.95 cents per unit
Minimum monthly charge $5.00

COMMERCIAL

All units per month 15.00 cents per unit
Minimum monthly charge $10.00

GENERAL SERVICE
MONTHLY BILLS
UNIT CHARGE KVA CHARGE
Demand charge per month $11.36 per KVA
0-900,000 units per month 8.70 cents per unit
Remaining units per month 6.20 cents per unit
Minimum monthly charge $ 568.00

TEMPORARY SUPPLIES

16.38 cents per unit $20.00 connection fee $10.00 per month Meter Rental

(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel)

SPECIAL SERVICES
Special Reading, Check Reading, Fuse $5.00
Replacement
Meter Test — Minimum charge $10.00
Visit with intent to disconnect
Residential Consumer $10.00
Commercial Consumer $15.00
Reconnection Fee $20.00
Returned Cheque Fee $15.00

Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



RoyalFidelity Market Wrap

By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS

It was a slow week of trad-
ing in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in
four out of the 24 listed secu-
rities, with two advancers and
the other securities remain-
ing unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 29,648 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 3,128 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
26,520 shares.

Colina Holdings (CHL)
was the volume leader and

lead advancer, trading 21,100
shares to see its stock close
the week up by $0.05 at $2.55.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) followed, trading 7,298
shares to see its shares close
the week up by $0.02 at $6.04.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Earnings Releases:

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) released its unaudit-
ed financial results for the
quarter ended June 30, 2010,
reporting total comprehen-
sive income of $13.9 million,

an increase of $3.8 million or
37 per cent from $10.1 mil-
lion reported in the same
quarter in the previous year.
It was noted that while net
interest income of $27.2 mil-
lion increased slightly by $1
million or 3.9 per cent, up
from $26.2 million in the
comparative period, loan
impairment expense fell sig-
nificantly by $4.5 million or
59.6 per cent - from $7.6 mil-
lion to $3.1 million.
Management noted that
the improvement in loan
impairment expense was due
to improved credit quality
and the stabilisation of its
non-performing loans, which

remained flat over the last
two quarters.

CBL's non-interest expense
of $13.5 million increased by
$1.5 million or 12 per cent
year-over-year, due primarily
to higher general and admin-
istrative expenses.

Earnings per share for the
quarter were $0.13, com-
pared to $0.09 in the 2009
second quarter, an increase
of $0.04.

Total assets and liabilities
of CBL were $1.4 billion and

$1.17 billion respectively,
compared to $1.38 billion and
$1.15 billion at year-end
December 31, 2009.

It was noted that while
CBL grew its deposit base
over the six-month period by
$15 million, its loan receiv-
ables declined by $24 million,
with the offset being seen in
increased cash /deposits with
banks and investments by
CBL, which rose collectively
by $53 milllion during the
period.

EQUITY MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS

Week ending 30.07.10

Dividend Notes:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
declared a dividend of $0.04
to all shareholders of record
date as at July 30, 2010,
payable on August 10, 2010.

AGM NOTICE:

Bahamas First Holdings
has announced its AGM will
be held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel on August
4, 2010, at Spm.

BISX SYMBOL CLOSING PRICE WKLY PRICE CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE
AML... 91 OA ieee ees cacesceescebecacesdeeccseccvavstecd) veseesecssccacesevevevscd -11.11%
BBL... $0.30 Lovee eis se Abies saeeseestel easteses Ors eseceesesc ees -52.38%
> BOB... $5.00 Lecce Dees csc euetasvstessdstaseseesvi vases AO0 woe cece -15.25%
BPP... $10.63 voces Nees scdaeeesteteescaesscesesssevaestls Ohseeeeiea ess scsi -1.02%
BS Lissessssssssassvees 9 OA? esses nus Doesnt ess Qiaissesnchttissats -6.36%
BWL .... $ 3.15 vce eee a Oossssctscestessedertsssteztas 0.00%
CAB... eee SILL wo Ge eactaeteeeeesvvseeseisietiesees Oieeiyaresstesdiestienews 11.32%
LIVE & WORK IN PARADISE CBL uw... $ 6.04 voce $0.02 wocecccccceccceseseeees T 298 veccecscecseees -13.71%
Every day of the year CHL eeesssssseeee $2.55 veecccsssssseeessse $0.05 csessssssssssseensssseee QT 100 .eccccssssseeee 6.25%
CUB sesecsssssssseseave $9.7 eccccccsseeeceees Biegeeeteritesisesssesseeeeseevinecess Oscsssceseseuetiedes tastes -2.50%
0
Little Switzerland is a company with over 50 years experience in luxury retalling with over 30 stores Sa specetesee ss oe seesgeiiesisusveeiees - 9) s.sdeccssssastssavesssseeaial piers sesesssstsasereeeses pret
in The Caribbean, Florida and Alaska. We sell great names like Breitling, Tag Heuer, Omega, Rado, becca eee eeeeeeeee AUT caesesereressseseseses mE TESTE LELELTS STOLE TELS SST STE LETT eT A Cee TESTS e Tee eee Teese eee = . -
Baume & Mercier, Raymond Weil, Movado and more. FAM ue $6.07 sSsedaledasscepmensrun: $- sesbieuuseusissstecsccowseawscadeces Oovswatsisotasiceseonduusadsd -6.47%
FBB........ GO Teseegectessts saute Ge aeeeceeesteseese esses estes ie ereeetisse: -8.44%
If you want a career in watch repair we have an immediate opening in Nassau for the position of FCC. eee $O.27 ececcccssescseees es caceseesseete sie vesseeeeevezsecsees O ceeccecceseecccessesesseeees 0.00%
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E-mail: Tballas@nxpco.com Of wearey@nxpco.com
Fax: (242) 356-9860 CAD 0.9730 0.77
Mail: William Carey GBP 1.5691 1.69
Little Switzerland EUR 1.3041 0.95

PO Box N-7116
Nassau, Bahamas

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



RoyalFidelity Market Wrap

By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS

It was a slow week of trad-
ing in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in
four out of the 24 listed secu-
rities, with two advancers and
the other securities remain-
ing unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 29,648 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 3,128 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
26,520 shares.

Colina Holdings (CHL)
was the volume leader and

lead advancer, trading 21,100
shares to see its stock close
the week up by $0.05 at $2.55.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) followed, trading 7,298
shares to see its shares close
the week up by $0.02 at $6.04.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Earnings Releases:

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) released its unaudit-
ed financial results for the
quarter ended June 30, 2010,
reporting total comprehen-
sive income of $13.9 million,

an increase of $3.8 million or
37 per cent from $10.1 mil-
lion reported in the same
quarter in the previous year.
It was noted that while net
interest income of $27.2 mil-
lion increased slightly by $1
million or 3.9 per cent, up
from $26.2 million in the
comparative period, loan
impairment expense fell sig-
nificantly by $4.5 million or
59.6 per cent - from $7.6 mil-
lion to $3.1 million.
Management noted that
the improvement in loan
impairment expense was due
to improved credit quality
and the stabilisation of its
non-performing loans, which

remained flat over the last
two quarters.

CBL's non-interest expense
of $13.5 million increased by
$1.5 million or 12 per cent
year-over-year, due primarily
to higher general and admin-
istrative expenses.

Earnings per share for the
quarter were $0.13, com-
pared to $0.09 in the 2009
second quarter, an increase
of $0.04.

Total assets and liabilities
of CBL were $1.4 billion and

$1.17 billion respectively,
compared to $1.38 billion and
$1.15 billion at year-end
December 31, 2009.

It was noted that while
CBL grew its deposit base
over the six-month period by
$15 million, its loan receiv-
ables declined by $24 million,
with the offset being seen in
increased cash /deposits with
banks and investments by
CBL, which rose collectively
by $53 milllion during the
period.

EQUITY MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS

Week ending 30.07.10

Dividend Notes:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
declared a dividend of $0.04
to all shareholders of record
date as at July 30, 2010,
payable on August 10, 2010.

AGM NOTICE:

Bahamas First Holdings
has announced its AGM will
be held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel on August
4, 2010, at Spm.

BISX SYMBOL CLOSING PRICE WKLY PRICE CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE
AML... 91 OA ieee ees cacesceescebecacesdeeccseccvavstecd) veseesecssccacesevevevscd -11.11%
BBL... $0.30 Lovee eis se Abies saeeseestel easteses Ors eseceesesc ees -52.38%
> BOB... $5.00 Lecce Dees csc euetasvstessdstaseseesvi vases AO0 woe cece -15.25%
BPP... $10.63 voces Nees scdaeeesteteescaesscesesssevaestls Ohseeeeiea ess scsi -1.02%
BS Lissessssssssassvees 9 OA? esses nus Doesnt ess Qiaissesnchttissats -6.36%
BWL .... $ 3.15 vce eee a Oossssctscestessedertsssteztas 0.00%
CAB... eee SILL wo Ge eactaeteeeeesvvseeseisietiesees Oieeiyaresstesdiestienews 11.32%
LIVE & WORK IN PARADISE CBL uw... $ 6.04 voce $0.02 wocecccccceccceseseeees T 298 veccecscecseees -13.71%
Every day of the year CHL eeesssssseeee $2.55 veecccsssssseeessse $0.05 csessssssssssseensssseee QT 100 .eccccssssseeee 6.25%
CUB sesecsssssssseseave $9.7 eccccccsseeeceees Biegeeeteritesisesssesseeeeseevinecess Oscsssceseseuetiedes tastes -2.50%
0
Little Switzerland is a company with over 50 years experience in luxury retalling with over 30 stores Sa specetesee ss oe seesgeiiesisusveeiees - 9) s.sdeccssssastssavesssseeaial piers sesesssstsasereeeses pret
in The Caribbean, Florida and Alaska. We sell great names like Breitling, Tag Heuer, Omega, Rado, becca eee eeeeeeeee AUT caesesereressseseseses mE TESTE LELELTS STOLE TELS SST STE LETT eT A Cee TESTS e Tee eee Teese eee = . -
Baume & Mercier, Raymond Weil, Movado and more. FAM ue $6.07 sSsedaledasscepmensrun: $- sesbieuuseusissstecsccowseawscadeces Oovswatsisotasiceseonduusadsd -6.47%
FBB........ GO Teseegectessts saute Ge aeeeceeesteseese esses estes ie ereeetisse: -8.44%
If you want a career in watch repair we have an immediate opening in Nassau for the position of FCC. eee $O.27 ececcccssescseees es caceseesseete sie vesseeeeevezsecsees O ceeccecceseecccessesesseeees 0.00%
Watcha’? Inour: Brettling Waren Bourlgue: BCL vecsssssssesee $4.65 ccccccccsssseeseeeee OF cccjeeeetoceectesscercerasemced O vcessssssssssssessessssse 2.52%
PCL B wicisasseasseves $100 niece he essere secittv estes Onavesreteecsiesteas 0.00%
FIN. $8.90 Lecce be iacescessvetefSes Stteevasscesiestis B50 Lecceceecceecseeeees -4.09%
Watchmaker ICD vecceecccccsseesee G9 99 veccecctee cusses Gee esis ees Oriente 0.00%
: oe isa ISI oecccccceceeees $9.95 Locecccseeeeees Ge tes setavsiscdsisistsesvieetess O ceeccecceseccccessesesseeees 0.00%
Major Responsibilities Include:
: eocite i Ln a cine cichce ince aisrime ker stot. mescanne nciument Gener PRE voeessessseeeone $10.00 ..cceessecceseeereee Go sid esi psvestdpeommsndional O cecescsseccssesersecesseeens 0.00%
machines, and cleaning equipment. Removes mechanism from case and examines mechanism
for defective parts. Repairs broken, damaged or worn parts using handtools and machines.
* Implements effective inventory controls in compliance with Internal Audit standards to allow for the BOND MARKET , TRADING STATISTICS
effective and timely ordering of watch parts and supplies. BISX SYMBOL DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE
« Provide helpful and accurate communication and feedback to customers to ensure personal :
customer Seiice that would exceed their expectations. FBB13 BB Series C Notes Due 2013 0 $1,000
FBB15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015 0 $1,000
Position Requirements: 7 a FBB17 FBB Series A Notes Due 2017 0 $1,000
* Must othe completed factory training and certification by BREITLING and WOSTEP or FBB22 FBB Series B Notes Due 2022 0 $1,000
equivalent. ;
* Strong communication skills and ability to work cooperatively with others.
siesta cechuditescuiaunercienceneaiea INTERNATIONAL MARKETS
ood oral and written compre! ll of the English language. FOREX Rates
To apply, please email or fax your CV/resume with a cover letter to: CURRENCY WEEKLY % CHANGE
E-mail: Tballas@nxpco.com Of wearey@nxpco.com
Fax: (242) 356-9860 CAD 0.9730 0.77
Mail: William Carey GBP 1.5691 1.69
Little Switzerland EUR 1.3041 0.95

PO Box N-7116
Nassau, Bahamas

SUNY s.
AIRWAYS

BRiTIsy ©
YIN

©} Firstc
anne

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FirstCaribbean International Bank,

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often have to entertain key business

eee

Enjoy:
o mA bonus BA Miles

upon card issuance

¢ Earn 1 BA Mile for every US$1 and
2 BA Miles for every US$1 or local
equivalent spent on British Airways

¢ Automatic enrolment in the British
Airways Executive Club*

¢ Receive a complimentary ticket for a
companion when you purchase a
qualifying ticket in World Traveller
Plus, Club World and First*.

* Redeem BA Miles on British Airways,
American Airlines and other members
of the oneworld alliance***

e Easy access to Working Capital

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 3B



po USINESS
‘Great injustice’

for contractors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s decision
to increase the Business Licence
fee rate by 50 per cent for most
contractors “serves a great injus-
tice” on the Bahamian con-
struction industry, the Bahamian
Contractors Association’s
(BCA) president told Tribune
Business, and fails to recognise
the “extremely high risk” firms
could lose money on projects.

Speaking after this newspa-
per revealed that the Govern-
ment had abandoned initial
plans to place “all construction
companies” in a special category
where they paid a Business
Licence fee equivalent to 0.5 per
cent of annual turnover, Stephen
Wrinkle said: ‘We’re extremely
disappointed, and it’s serving a
great injustice to our industry.

“We had met with Minister
Laing last year, and expressed
our concerns and views, and
made some proposals as to how
to accommodate the construc-
tion industry. By and large,
they’ve been totally ignored.”

The BCA and its members
are now working with the Cham-
ber of Commerce to arrange
another meeting with the Gov-
ernment in a bid to change the
revised Business Licence Bill,
which requires contractors gen-
erating turnover of greater than
$500,000 per annum to pay a
0.75 per cent rate.

Given that many perform on
multi-million dollar jobs, most
Bahamian contractors will be
pushed from a 0.5 per cent rate
to a 0.75 per cent rate, yet Mr
Wrinkle pointed out again that
in most cases they acted as pro-
ject managers, handling huge
sums that were paid out to sub-
contractors, tradesmen and sup-
pliers, and retaining only a small
portion as their fee.

Yet Bahamian contractors are
being taxed on the gross amount
of these contracts, something Mr
Wrinkle agreed was unfair.
Comparing a contractor’s role
as project manager to that of an
attorney holding funds in escrow
for a client, the BCA president
said attorneys were taxed on
their net receipts, while contrac-
tors were hit on the gross.

“They’ve put us into a cate-
gory inconsistent with the fidu-
ciary responsibilities of a con-
tractor,” Mr Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business. “The realtors and
attorneys are able to hold large
sums of money, but are not
taxed on the gross receipts, just
the net receipts.

“The general contractor is
more of a project manager role
rather than the actual builder.
Most of the proceeds from a
construction contract go to sub-
contractors, specialist workers
and suppliers. One has to look at
the industry as a whole, and
begin to realise the cost will not
be absorbed by contractors and
will be passed on to consumers.”

Mr Wrinkle said several large
contractors had told him the
revised Business Licence Bill

BCA chief says Business Licence fee
changes fail to recognise ‘extremely high
risk’ nature of construction industry

could add more than $100,000
to their annual fee payable to
the Government.

Referring to last year’s dis-
cussions with the Government,
the BCA president added: “It’s
not fair. Construction is a very
volatile industry.. The risk of los-
ing money on a project is
extremely high.

“No consideration has been
given for such losses. No consid-
eration has been given for non-
payment by the client. No con-
sideration has been given for
growing your company at a time
when unemployment in the
Bahamas is high.”

Mr Wrinkle added that unlike
most other countries, the
amount of taxes levied on
Bahamian contractors and other
businesses appeared to increase
the more they expanded, and
the higher their revenues
(turnover) and profits became.

As a result, he lamented that
there was “no incentive to grow
our business. The larger you get,
the more they want to tax you”.

Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s presi-
dent, confirmed that his organi-
sation was arranging a meeting
with Mr Laing on the contrac-
tors’ behalf to discuss their con-
cerns.

“Tt’s a process of we talk
about it, and hopefully arrive at
a solution that makes sense,” Mr
Rolle said. “What I’ve found
with Mr Laing is that if you pre-
sent a reasonable case, he will
go to bat for you.

“That’s why I try to work
closely with him, because he
understands the country’s com-
mercial issues.

“We'll try and discuss every
single issue that arises and reach
a middle ground, which has been
the case of late.”

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Markets all bank products and services (internally &
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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5B

Venture capital





Renewable energy |
training plan for |
Bahamas unveiled |

FROM page one

“Our goal is to have a fully Bahamian workforce under

APS, and develop a market where other companies enter }
the field with people who have been accredited. The }
reality is that there is no way we as a company can pro- }

vide all the renewable energy sources for the entire
Bahamas.

“We want to lead the transition to a renewable energy ;
industry, and our goal is to create employment. We don’t }
want a foreign workforce. We want trained Bahamians.” }

Apart from Mr Lyn, APS also provided other lecturers }
to the UWI’s renewable energy technology courses. Mr }
Gilbert said APS ultimately wanted to take its school }
to all regional nations, as the aim was to educate a }

Caribbean market.

Mr Lyn told Tribune Business that when it came to }
renewable energies, the key for the Bahamas was the }
“right education” for consumers and the industry, and }
then to “get on with it”. The IDB-funded contracts }
require APS to supervise the installation of the PV sys-
tems and solar water heaters on the selected number of }

Bahamian homes.
“We’re excited as to what we could do, We get sun 365

days of the year, so we might as well take advantage of

it,” Mr Gilbert said.

Touting renewable energy’s benefits, he added: “It :
reduces the carbon footprint, and the Bahamas at some }

point will be able to take advantage of carbon credits.”

APS undertakes a lot of its own research and devel- }
opment, extensively testing renewable energy products }
before bringing them to the Bahamas, to ensure they }

can withstand the rigors of practical application.

The company is now set to commence testing a wind }
turbine which only requires two miles per hour winds to }
start generating electricity, as opposed to most contem- }

poraries that need 12-13 miles per hour winds.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

fund’s 193 jobs

FROM page one

entrepreneurs because
banks in this nation did not
accept payments via PayPal
and the Internet.

Arguing that Baker Tilly
Gomez “give more service
than we get”, in the sense
that the work it does on the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund is worth more
than the fee it receives, Mr
Gomez said the fund had
worked in the sense that
there had been no political
interference impacting its
operations.

“Td say that over the five
years of this fund, no politi-
cal pressure has been
applied at all,” Mr Gomez
said, adding that there had
been no calls from politi-
cians along the lines of urg-
ing them to approve and
finance a particular business
idea.

“Half the MPs did not
know this fund ever exist-
ed,” he joked.

Acknowledging that the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund had “crossed
over a bit” with the
Bahamas Development
Bank’s (BDB) lending activ-
ities, Mr Gomez said one
notable difference between
the two was that the fund

was far more involved with
its entrepreneur clients.

Apart from the Board
seats it had taken in the 12
companies in which it had
equity stakes, Mr Gomez
said the fund provided a
source of constant advice
and training, even going as
far as paying for services the
entrepreneur needed, such
as accounts.

“The BDB does not offer
these kind of value added
services,” Mr Gomez said.
“The BDB, once you get the
loan, usually will not see you
unless you default on it.
Default on the loan, and
they will come looking for
you.”

He added that the BDB
and other organisations in
the Government’s small
business support infrastruc-
ture, such as the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation (BAIC), did
not have enough staff with
the skills required, pointing
out that many had been
transferred into these agen-
cies from other government
departments and ministries.

In response to audience
questions, Mr Gomez said
the Bahamas Entrepreneur-
ial Venture Fund had
received virtually no busi-
ness plans and applications

‘a THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

related to the agricultural
sector.

“I can only remember one
project in five years that had
anything to do with agricul-
ture, and that young gentle-
man did not have a clear
vision of how to do it - geta
few acres here, through a
few crops there,” Mr Gomez
said.

“We may need foreign
help. We have to consider
that - that we need foreign
help in agriculture in our
economy. We may have to
accept that.”



JEROME GOMEZ
























THE REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT

The Registrar General's Department wishes to inform our valued customers ani
the penetal public thet our British Colonind Hilton and Apsley Howse Olfices will
be relocating to Shirkey House, #3) Shirley Street opposite Fingo elfectnve
Monday, 3” August, 2010,

Weapologize for amy inccavenience cased

NOTICE

Notice to
New and Current Financial Aid

Applicants for Fall 2010

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Greg Smith and/or Greg Smith
& Associates

All current and new students are advised
that the new Fall 2010 Financial Aid appli-
cation form is now available online at
www.cob.edu.bs and at all College loca-
tions. The deadline for Financial Aid
applications, including the submission of
supporting documents, has been extended
to 4:00 p.m. on 18th August, 2010.

(a) LEONARDO DA VINCI FUND LIMITED (SAC) is in
dissolution under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000 S.137 and section 45 of the Segregated Accounts
Companies Act, Chapter 396C

Are no longer authorized to
conduct business on behalf of

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 5, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

STAR GENERAL INSURANCE
AGENCY (GRAND BAHAMA) LTD.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Authorized Agents for:
RoyalStar Assurance Limited
Bahamas First General Insurance
Company
Lloyds — Worldwide Medical Trust
International Medical Group (IMG)

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 17th day of June, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquida-
tor of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from

For more information, contact:
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Office of Financial Aid, Oakes Field Campus,
Tel: (242) 302-4371
or email: financialaid@cob.edu.bs

WWW.BAHAMA-WALL.COM

May 6, 2010
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2010
New Student Orientation

We Build:

* Tumn-Key Homes

Build Stronger
rT | Build Faster

Parents’ Evening
Tuesday, 17th August, 2010 #

6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m. Safe Rooms
Orientation
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

* Precast Floor

System Green

Construction
—

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

* Super Shell
Structures

More Ene
Fficient

Advisement, Registration &
Bill Payment
Thursday, 19th August, 2010
Friday, 20th August, 2010
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

* Architects
Contractors
Engineer

~ Call for a free estimate
Bahama Wall System
Office: 328-8287 | 427-6951

Venue:
Performing Arts Centre,
The College Of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard

* Inquiries Welcome



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

BIC offer sparks competition fear

FROM page one

interested in this asset, and have the right
idea about value, but there are some impor-
tant issues that would need to be negotiat-
the Government got the best strategic partner ed”
both in terms of purchase price and terms/con-
ditions.

Cable & Wireless was described by one
source as “really well suited as the strategic
partner. The committee believes they’re very

Crawtish

Sale ends August 7th, 2010

bey =o rol

“Some very fruitful discussions” were said to
have taken place between the BTC privatisa-
tion committee and Cable & Wireless, in a
bid to get to a point where the Government
might find its proposal attractive.



* except on
emai

Season opens
Santen August Is!

¢ Glass Bottom Water Buckets * Rods & Reels
¢ Fishing Lines & Hooks Ce: mali
¢ Fishing Accessories LG
¢ Mesh Diving Bags om CTeTo fe [253
lie Mme 1

3 as

Fishing
Spears
$9950

pie net
‘om 8563-10010 aR es hw (0 OY)
Fax: (242) 393-4096

RTT [eyed do:
SAA Ae oie Keel

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
SUPPLEMENTARY X-RAY SUPPLIES &
ACCESSORIES
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

TENDERS ARE INVITED FROM QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS
TO PROVIDE X-RAY SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES FOR THE
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL FOR A PERIOD OF ONE (1)
YEAR.

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers,
specifications and other relevant information, can be collected 9:
00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at the Materials
Management Directorate, Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound,
Shirley Street.

ATENDER MUST BESUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE INASEALED
ENVELOPE OR PACKAGE IDENTIFIED AS “TENDER FOR
THE PROVISION OF SUPPLEMENTARY X-RAY TENDER
FOR SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES, PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL” AND ADDRESSED TO:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE “B”
THIRD & WEST TERRACES, COLLINS AVENUE.
P.O. BOX N-8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M Monday, 6'#
September, 2010. LATE TENDER(S) WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.

A copy of a valid business license and a letter of good standing
from the National Insurance Board should accompany all
proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any
or all Tender(s).



THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas ‘far
beyond Wild

Wild West

FROM page one

now the highest in his life-
time, Khaalis Rolle said
many Bahamian businesses
were now afraid to conduct
commerce at night, as crim-
inals seemed to have no fear
of the law.

Arguing that guns were
seemingly as commonplace
as cars in the Bahamas, Mr
Rolle said the First-
Caribbean armed robbery
and high speed chase/shoot-
out between the crooks and
the police showed just what
a lawless, dangerous society
this nation had become.

“It’s extremely frighten-
ing to do business in this
country now,” Mr Rolle
said. “When you get to the
point where the criminals
have equal or better ammu-
nition than the police, and
have absolutely no fear of
the law, what’s the alterna-
tive? What do we do?”

Recalling a reggae song
that described Jamaica as a
‘Cowboy town’, the Cham-
ber president added: “The
Bahamas is far beyond a
Cowboy town, the Wild
Wild West. Every single day
there is a report of some
armed robbery or attempted
armed robbery. The crimi-
nals just don’t have any fear
of the law.

“T think about 10 years
ago I spoke at a Toastmas-
ters meeting, and I had a
conversation with a politi-
cian. I said the Bahamas was
becoming an increasingly

dangerous society and some-
thing had to be done. His
response was as if there was
no concern, and we’re at the
point now where business-
people are extremely afraid
to do business after dark.”

Pointing to the Supreme
Court break-in at Justice
Jon Isaacs’ office, Mr Rolle
said this showed that “no
place is off limits”.

“The criminals are so dar-
ing that they do what they
want to do during the day,
and the one entity where
you'd have thought they
would be off limits is no
longer. The fellow broke
into the courts. This is
extremely serious,” the
Chamber president added,
pointing out that the impli-
cations went beyond just the
immediate negative impact
on business and the Bahami-
an economy.

Warning that it would
“not be long” before travel
advisories and media reports
declared the Bahamas an
unsafe destination, Mr Rolle
added: “Everyone seeming-
ly has a gun. Guns seem to
be as ubiquitous as vehicles.
Guns are everywhere; cars
are everywhere. Gun crime
is fare more pervasive than
it has ever been in my life.

“The mindset has degen-
erated to the point where
people do not believe there
is a penalty attached to their
actions, and if there is some
penalty attached, people
don’t care.”

Acknowledging that it was

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that I, KENSON
FERGUSTE of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
intend to change my name to KENSON FERJUSTE.
If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PRO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

“easy to point the finger” of
blame at the Government
or Royal Bahamas Police
Force for this nation’s crime
problems, Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business: “There’s a
huge implication for society
as a whole.

“T believe this problem
goes far deeper, and if we
do not resolve it now, or at
least start taking preparato-
ry steps to, we’re going to
be in significant trouble in
five years. In five years’
time, the Bahamas will not
be the same Bahamas we
see now.

“We’ve got some issues
that are going to impact this
country, and even though I
speak on behalf of the busi-
ness community, the impli-
cations far beyond. It goes
back to deficiencies in the
education system, deficien-
cies in the social system, and
we have to address these
deficiencies and do it proac-
tively.”





















The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

GAMING BOARD FOR
THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries and Gaming Act
Chapter 387, notice is hereby given that Treasure Bay,
G.B.I. Ltd. a company incorporated under the laws of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has in accordance with the
provisions of Section 34(2) of the said Act, made application
to the Secretary of The Gaming Board for The Bahamas for a
licence to manage a casino on the premises situated at Our
Lucaya Hotel in Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

And notice is also given that on Friday, August 20th, 2010, at
10:00 a.m. at the Magistrate Court, Garnet Levarity Justice
Centre, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas the application of Treasure
Bay, G.B.I. Limited will be considered by the Gaming Board.

Notice is also given that any person who desires to object
to the grant of the licence shall send to the Secretary of The
Gaming Board for The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas or
deliver to the offices situated in the Renaissance Building,
West Bay Street on or before noon on Thursday, August.12th,
2010, two (2) copies of a brief statement in writing of the

grounds of objections.

Signed : Dennis W. Martin
Secretary

Gaming Board

For The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 7B





Economic reports give stocks big start for August

NEW YORK

THE stock market began
August with a huge rally after
reports from around the world
revived investors’ faith in the
global recovery, according to
Associated Press.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 208 points Mon-
day. All the major stock indexes
rose about 2 percent.

The first day of the month
brought a stream of news that
reassured investors who have
worried about a slowing of eco-
nomic growth in the U.S., China
and Europe. Manufacturing was
a common thread:

¢ The Institute for Supply
Management's index of U.S.
manufacturing activity during
July was better than the mar-
ket expected. Traders were
pleased because the report still

showed that manufacturing is
growing.

¢ A manufacturing report for
the 16 countries that use the
euro was revised higher for July
and showed that the European
economy is recovering faster
than expected. Strong earnings
reports from European banks
also pleased the market, espe-
cially after the continent's ris-
ing debt problems helped trigger





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

2009

IN THE SUPREME COURT










COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

BETWEEN

CLE/GEN/00509

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

Plaintiff

a spring plunge in stocks.

¢ From China came news that
industrial growth was moderate
enough that Beijing isn't likely
to take steps to slow that coun-
try's economy. Investors have
periodically sold stocks on con-
cerns that China's economy
would slow and pull others
down with it.

Monday's news was encour-
aging after months of reports
that showed the recovery was
weakening. Those reports pulled
the major stock indexes off their
2010 highs in late April and con-
tributed to sharp swings in stock
prices since then. The ISM
report is significant because it
is the first major reading of the
economy from July, and
investors are trying to determine
just how strong the recovery will
be in the second half of the year.

The big advance was a bit of a
surprise for traders who are
used to more subdued trading
as August arrives. Over the past
12 years, the Dow has fallen
nine times on the first trading
day in August, although it has
risen the past three years.
August in general is seen as a
volatile month for stocks, large-
ly because many traders are
away on vacation. That makes
for low trading volumes and
exaggerated price moves.

Some analysts were cautious
even as stock prices jumped.

Alan Gayle, senior invest-
ment strategist for Ridge-
Worth Investments in Rich-
mond, Virginia, said Monday's
news, while good, showed only
small changes in the economy.

"Fundamentally, I do
believe the pace of the (eco-
nomic) expansion is slowing
and I think that's going to
weigh on the markets as we go
through the second half of the
year," he said.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 208.44, or 2 per-
cent, to 10,674.38. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index rose
24.26, or 2.2 percent, to
1,125.86, while the Nasdaq
composite index rose 40.66, or
1.8 percent, to 2,295.36.

Six stocks rose for every one
that fell on the New York
Stock Exchange where volume
came to a light 1 billion shares.

With stocks looking more
appealing, bond prices fell
because investors felt less need
to seek the safety of govern-
ment securities. The yield on
the 10-year Treasury note,
which moves opposite its price,
rose to 2.97 percent from 2.91
percent late Friday. Its yield
is often used as a benchmark
to set interest rates on mort-
gages and other consumer
loans.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
of

Stocks were up across the
market. Industrial and mate-
rials stocks, including 3M Co.
and General Electric Co., rose
after the ISM report. Investors
were encouraged in particular
by several key components of
the index. Production and new
orders both improved, as did
companies’ willingness to hire
new employees.

3M rose $1.8799, or 2.2 per-
cent, to $87.41, while GE rose
29 cents to $16.41.

Energy companies rose as
the price of oil gained on
expectations that a healthier
economy will lift demand.
Exxon Mobil Corp. rose $2.26,
or 3.8 percent, to $61.94, while

Chevron Corp. jumped $1.59,
or 2.1 percent, to $77.80.

Benchmark crude rose $2.53
to $81.48 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

Financial stocks rose on the
strong earnings reports from
European-based banking
giants HSBC and BNP
Paribas, which convinced
investors that the continent's
financial sector is not being
hurt by the debt problems.

HSBC shares trading in the
US. rose $2.66, or 5.2 percent,
to $53.74. Bank of America
Corp. rose 40 cents, or 2.9 per-
cent, to $14.44. JPMorgan
Chase & Co. rose $1.36, or 3.4
percent, to $41.64.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land com-
prising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres
situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant
on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on
the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas

AND

BKNV LIMITED

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIE’S PLACE LTD.

JAMAAL R. HORTON

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of above
company commenced on the 29 day of July,
2010. Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed
Liquidator of the Company.

NOTICE

Defendant

SUMMONS

LET ALL PARTIES concerned
attend before Deputy Registrar, Tabitha
Cumberbatch of the Supreme Court,
Supreme Court Building, Bank Lane,
Nassau, The Bahamas on Monday the 9"
day of August, A.D., 2010 at 11:00
o'clock in the fore noon for the hearing of an
application on the part of the Plaintiff for an
Order for leave to enter Judgment in Default
of Appearance pursuant to Order 73 of the
Rules of the Supreme Court for the amount
claimed in the Statement of Claim with
interest, as therein claimed and costs.

TAKE NOTICE that a party intending
to oppose this application or to apply for
a stay of execution should send to the
opposition party or its Attorneys to reach
them not less than three (3) days before
the date above mentioned a copy of any
Affidavit intended to be used.

THE PETITION OF SADIE’S PLACE in respect of:-

In respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising
One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres situate
approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant on the
East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant
land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet
and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and
running thereon 138.47 feet to a point thence SOUTH-
WARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to
a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTH-
WARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate
of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point
thence WESTWARDLY and by land 5.04 feet to a point
thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon
12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon
169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or for-
merly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon
37.78 feet to the beginning.



Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LISCARD MANAGEMENT LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act No. (45 of 2000) LISCARD MANAGE-
MENT LTD. has been Dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Register General on the 21st day of

Dated this 28" day of June, A.D., 2010

Sadie’s Place claims to be the owner of the unincum-
bered fee simple estate in possession of the said land

REGISTRAR

This Summons was taken out by Messers. Gibson, Rigby & Co.,

Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The Bahamas,

Attorneys for the Plaintiff.

June, 2010.

John Fleetwood
PO Box 521,
9 Burrard Street, St. Helier
Jersey, JE4 5UE
Liquidator

and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3)
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have it’s title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions

of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the following
places:

EJ FG CAPITAL MARKETS
Ges BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cart

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Moser at York
fc ze Tf. a T.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 30 JULY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,486.14 | CHG -0.01 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -79.24 | YTD % -5.06
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.04 0.250
10.63 0.050
5.00 0.598
0.30 -0.877
3.15 0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.141
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.720
0.366
0.000
0.407
0.952
0.156

iP The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor
Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nas-
sau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Re-
tiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Previous Close
1.04
10.63
5.00
0.30
3.15
2.17
Tt
2.55
6.04
2.41
2.31
6.07
8.30
9.74
4.65
1.00
5.59

Security
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 zi
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets 9.42 10.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD%
1.4825
2.9199
1.5438
2.8522
13.4110
109.3929
100.1833
AIT
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

2.17
41.11
2.55
6.04
2.40
2.31
6.07
8.90
8.74
4.65
1.00
5.59

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower
or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not rec-
ognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration
of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Pe-
titioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith.

cooosesaogggoso®
ecoocoooooooooo*d
ecocesc0Cc0qcoogog

64.1

Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

99.46
100.00
100.00

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $ P/E Yield
-2.945
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.55 0.000
NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.911577
1.527368

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.511377

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

Last 12 months % Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall

operate as bar to such claims.

30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
23-Jul-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10

1.4387
2.8266
1.4804
2.8522
13.0484
101.6693
93.1998

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int! Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3

Royal Fidelity Intl Fund - Equities Sub Fund

107.570620
105.779543

103.987340
101.725415
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

10.0000 10.0344 30-Jun-10

$.3299 30-Jun-10

LOCKHART & Co.
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

7.3073
MARKET TERMS

30-Jun-10

ed price for daily volume
m day to day
aded today
@ last 12 months

ded by the last 12 month eamin: as
KS) -4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

volume of the prior week
reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningfu

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100






HOT WRIST: Pandora bracelets (above and below) have become one of the hottest, must-have jewellery pieces nowadays.

Pandora’s Charm

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

n 1999, the Pandora jewel-
ry manufacturers intro-
duced for the very first time
a charm bracelet to rival all
charm bracelets. Pandora
charm bracelets put a spin on the
classical trinkets and captures some
of life’s most precious memories.

When the Pandora line was first
introduced to the Bahamian public
seven years ago by Bahama Repub-
lic, a local jewelry store located East
By Street, it took jewelry lovers a
while to catch the Pandora fever.

Now, Pandora has become one
of the hottest must-have jewelry
items today. Women, teens, and
tweens have all indulged in Pando-
ra’s “charm”.

But what is it that actually puts
them on the most wanted list? Is it
because they are made with pre-
cious metals like gold, oxidised and
sterling silver? Is it because they
can be customised? Or is it because
they are affordable and make great
gifts?

Tribune Woman spoke to
Natalia, an assistant manager at
Bahama Republic who said the
answer to that question is all of the
above.

“What makes a Pandora bracelet
a must have item is they make great
gifts. You might have a family mem-
ber you may want to purchase a gift
for, you can purchase her a Pando-
ra bracelet or if she already has one
you can purchase a bead as

reminder,” she said.

The idea of collecting beads to
fill the entire patent threaded nov-
elty is what makes it fun. Swapping
charms to suit attire and mood is
another reason women have fallen
head over heels for Pandora.

“The charms can reflect your
mood. You can switch them up. For
instance if you are feeling happy
you can choose a bead that signifies
your happiness. If are feeling blue
you can select a bead that suits your
mood,” Natalia explained.

However, one of the main rea-
sons women have fallen weak to
Pandora’s “charm is because it
allows them to tell stories with each

THE TRIBUNE

bead.

For three women, Pryia Simmons,
Cara Bethel, and Alesha Cadet the
bracelets don’t just make fashion
statements. They make statements
about their lives and some of the
people in it.

Pryia Simmons has a few special
beads on her bracelet. They are an
angel, a suitcase, a heart stopper,
and flowers.

She said: “I got the angel because
I am my dad’s angel. I got the suit-
case because I love to travel. The
heart stopper represents my
boyfriend because he keeps every-
thing in place in my life and the
flower is so that my life could flour-

Civas Cerbhesn Baby
Fresines = ree Exuyece

i. J» de JR

-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3,



2010

ish,” she told Tribune Woman.

After having her first son last
October, Cara Bethel is customising
a bracelet to record every milestone
in his life. She even named the
bracelet after him. She calls it “The
Dylan Bracelet.’

“My Pandora is a permanent
reminder of the milestones in my
baby's life. So far, I have two blue
coloured beads, a little boy because
he is a boy of course, a baby car-
riage, a mama monkey holding a
baby monkey because his nursery
has a monkey theme and a gift box
because he is the best present I ever
got,” Mrs Bethel said.

Alesha Cadet started her





bracelet with a home bead. She said:
“Home is where the heart is and
that is Eleuthera. I got the number
21 charm when I turned 21. I am
going with light colours for my
charm bracelet because they match
my spirit. I am light hearted and
happy,” she said.

One of her charm in particular
represents a past love. She chose
that bead because she said it moti-
vates her to keep moving forward.

“The teddy bear is a reminder of
an ex special love. Whenever I want
to pick up the phone to give him a
call, [look at it and it is a reminder
of what to never get myself into,”
she told Tribune Woman.

Look for Festival in

your favorite store.

Oettvedty Bahomas Wholesale Agencies, East West Hay, * tl: 242-394-1759 + fax: 242-094-1859 + nail: bveadahamasecoraivawn.com * Freeport: 1 Milton Si, « tel: 242-351-2201 «fax: 242-061-2205 * email byesipoecoraivann.com


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





By MAGGIE BAIN

JUST thinking of a series of arti-
cles about love produces a
slideshow of picture memories,
moving through our mind. Even
better, we can control it ourselves;
replay, fast forward, rewind and
even pause at the highlights.

First loves, summer loves, crazy
puppy loves, one-sided loves, and
the list goes on. Decades later, we
bask in the warm glow of happy
flashbacks and amaze ourselves by
how we survived the lows.

As we journey around the world,
we realise that the nature, process,
and biology of love are universal;
no society is exempt. Outwardly
we may look different, speak dif-
ferent languages, have been
brought up with different values
and beliefs, but when it comes to
love, we are the same.

In our early years of innocence,
we dreamt of being someone’s Cin-
derella or gallant Prince Charming.
We had visions of being swept

Romantic Love

away on a wave of eternal love and
leaving the ugly world behind. For
many, romantic love conjures up
images of tenderness, candlelight,
pastel colours and a sense of peace
and contentment. This is the per-
fect love we all desire to obtain —
at least once in our lives.

Visible for all to see is a new
inner glow that speaks of our inner
happiness. The mere thought,
touch or sight of our love stimu-
lates our brain’s dopamine recep-
tors, and we are on a ‘high’. Our
newfound motivation is accompa-
nied with a steely determination.
We find ourselves automatically
reshuffling our priorities and full
attention directed to that special
person. Our newfound energy and
focus allows us to believe that any-
thing is possible. It is not unheard
of to feel you would go to the ends
of the earth,even to sacrifice your
life for them.

Intense thoughts of our lover are
fueled, day and night, by this newly
channeled energy. It motivates us,



but at the same time leaves us feel-
ing naked in our vulnerability. It is
exhilarating, floating on ‘Cloud
Nine’, but we quickly discover that
any small disappointment can send
us on a free-fall. The result is a
craving for more, and the strong
attachment becomes all consum-
ing.

Only when you have experi-
enced this particular euphoria can
you truly appreciate the saying,
‘Love is a drug’. The dependence
and obsessive nature of romantic
love could essentially class persons
as addicts.

Rejection, unreciprocated love,
and break- ups trigger similar with-

drawal symptoms, as in other
recognised addictions.

This analogy may seem incon-
gruous to some, but is backed by
scientific research. What makes it
all the more interesting is that can-
didates also included those who
were experiencing unrequited love,
rejection or the end of the relation-
ship. In all cases, the right ventral
tegmental area (VTA) and the
right caudate nucleus in the brain
were stimulated. These are the
dopamine rich areas associated
with reward, motivation, and also
affected by cocaine use.

Romantic love speaks of true
motivational drive, and possibly
acts as a constant reminder of
human reproduction. It is quite dif-
ferent from sexual drive because of
its specific ability to conserve ener-
gy and focus on one individual. In
fact romantic love is possible with
out sex, and is often described as
emotional or spiritual love.

Knowing this allows us to under-
stand those who mutually decide to

Weeks of fashion in India...

A MODEL presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep
Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New

Delhi, India.

AMODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week

in Bangalore, India.

AUSTRALIAN cricketer Brett Lee presents a creation by designers Abu
Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week

2010 in New Delhi, India.

eee]
aaa et
oe

A MODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week

in Bangalore, India.

Delhi, India.



in Bangalore, India.

abstain from pre- marital sex.
Their constant state of elation
allows for a deepening of emo-
tions, and in turn satisfies their
deep cravings. We then go on to
comprehend those who are able to
maintain long distance relation-
ships, communicate only by written
word, or who are physically chal-
lenged. To close your eyes and
dwell in the pure joy that it pro-
duces, can be equated to great sex
for others.

If you are going through life
feeling fulfilled but not being able
to relate to this description of
romantic love, then perhaps you
need to review your relationship or
dating life. Remember we only
have one life to live and love fully,
and no time to waste.

* Listen to “Love on the Rock’
with Maggie Bain every Thursday
5-6 pm on

Island FM 102.9 For appoint-
ments call364-7230, email

relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com



A MODEL presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep
Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New

(AP Photos)

A MODEL presents a creation by Neeru's at Bangalore Fashion Week

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9B



Understanding
depression in women

epression is a serious con-

D dition that can impact

every area of your life. It

can affect your social life, your fami-

ly relationships, your career, and your

sense of self-worth and purpose. And

for women in particular, depression is
common.

If you're feeling sad, guilty, tired,
and just generally “down in the
dumps,” you may be suffering from
major depression. But the good news
is that depression is treatable, and
the more you understand depression's
particular implications for and its
impact on women, the more equipped
you will be to tackle the condition
head on.

Risk Factors for
depression in Women

-Family history of mood disorders

-Personal past history of mood dis-
orders in early reproductive years

-Loss of a parent before the age of
10 years

-Childhood history of physical or
sexual abuse

-Use of an oral contraceptive, espe-
cially one with a high progesterone
content

-Use of gonadotropin stimulants as
part of infertility treatment

-Persistent psychosocial stressors
(e.g., loss of job)

-Loss of social support system or
the threat of such a loss

Signs and symptoms
of depression in women

The symptoms of depression in
women are the same as those for
major depression. Common com-
plaints include:

-Depressed mood Loss of interest
or pleasure in activities you used to
enjoy

-Feelings of guilt, hopelessness and
worthlessness

-Suicidal thoughts or recurrent
thoughts of death

-Sleep disturbance (sleeping more
or sleeping less)

-Appetite and weight changes

-Difficulty concentrating

-Lack of energy and fatigue

Specifics about
depression in women

Seasonal affective disorder-depres-
sion in the winter months due to low-
er levels of sunlight-is more common
in women

Women are about twice as likely as
men to suffer from depression. This
two-to-one difference persists across
racial, ethnic, and economic divides.
In fact, this gender difference in rates
of depression is found in most coun-
tries around the world.

There are a number of theories
which attempt to explain the higher
incidence of depression in women.
Many factors have been implicated,
including biological, psychological,
and social factors.



SIGNS & SYMPTOMS of depression in women include lack of energy and fatigue.

Biological causes of
depression in women

Postpartum depression -

Many new mothers experience the
“baby blues.” This is a normal reac-
tion that tends to subside within a
few weeks. However, some women
experience severe, lasting depression.
This condition is known as postpar-
tum depression. Postpartum depres-
sion is believed to be influenced, at
least in part, by hormonal fluctua-
tions.

Perimenopause & menopause -

Women may be at increased risk
for depression during peri-
menopause, the stage leading to
menopause when reproductive hor-
mones rapidly fluctuate. Women with
past histories of depression are at an
increased risk of depression during
menopause as well.

Social and cultural causes
of depression in women

Role strain -

Women often suffer from role
strain over conflicting and over-
whelming responsibilities in their life.
The more roles a woman is expected

to play (mother, wife, working
woman), the more vulnerable she is
to role strain and subsequent stress
and depression. Depression is more
common in women who receive little
help with housework and child care.

Single mothers are particularly at
risk. Research indicates that single
mothers are three times more likely
than married mothers to experience
an episode of major depression.

Unequal power & status -

Women's relative lack of power
and status in our society may lead to
feelings of helplessness. This sense
of helplessness puts women at greater
risk for depression. These feelings
may be provoked by discrimination in
the workplace leading to underem-
ployment or unemployment. Low
socioeconomic status is a risk factor
for major depression. Another con-
tributing factor is society's emphasis
on youth, beauty, and thinness in
women, traits which to a large extent
are out of their control.

Sexual and physical abuse -

Sexual and physical abuse may play
a role in depression in women. Girls
are much more likely to be sexually

abused than boys, and researchers
have found that sexual abuse in child-
hood puts one at increased risk for
depression in adulthood. Higher rates
of depression are also found among
victims of rape, a crime almost exclu-
sively committed against women.
Other common forms of abuse,
including physical abuse and sexual
harassment, may also contribute to
depression.

Relationship dissatisfaction -

While rates of depression are low-
er for the married than for the single
and divorced, the benefits of mar-
riage and its general contribution to
well-being are greater for men than
for women. Furthermore, the benefits
disappear entirely for women whose
marital satisfaction is low. Lack of
intimacy and marital strife are linked
to depression in women.

Poverty -

Poverty is more common among
women than men. Single mothers
have the highest rates of poverty
across all demographic groups. Pover-
ty is a severe, chronic stressor than
can lead to depression.

Psychological causes
of depression in women

Coping mechanisms -

Women are more likely to rumi-
nate when they are depressed. This
includes crying to relieve emotional
tension, trying to figure out why
you're depressed, and talking to your
friends about your depression. How-
ever, rumination has been found to
maintain depression and even make it
worse. Men, on the other hand, tend
to distract themselves when they are
depressed. Unlike rumination, dis-
traction can reduce depression.

Stress response -

According to Psychology Today,
women are more likely than men to
develop depression under lower lev-
els of stress. Furthermore, the female
physiological response to stress is dif-
ferent. Women produce more stress
hormones than men do, and the
female sex hormone progesterone
prevents the stress hormone system
from turning itself off as it does in
men.

Puberty and body image -

The gender difference in depres-
sion begins in adolescence. The emer-
gence of sex differences during puber-
ty likely plays a role.

Some researchers point to body
dissatisfaction, which increases in girls
during the sexual development of
puberty. Body image is closely linked
to self-esteem in women, and low
self-esteem is a risk factor for depres-
sion.

¢ Prepared by
Public Relations Department
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Low-carb diet trumps low-fat
on ‘good’ cholesterol

NOTHINGS

SUGAR’S seductive
power is proven in the
fact that the actual Amer-
ican consumes 150
pounds of sugar per year.
This all despite warnings
from doctors who say it
spikes blood sugar levels
and leads to the storage
of fat!

The American Heart
Association (the people
responsible for efforts to
reduce death associated
with cardiovascular dis-
ease) is the latest agency
to releases data on the
dangers of sugar.

Where does the sugar
come from? Mostly soft
drinks and candy, fol-
lowed by cakes, cookies
and pies. But don't give a
knowing smile if you turn
your back on these kinds
of snacks: sugar sneaks
into items you'd never
believe, including fruit-
flavoured yogurt (eight
ounces can have six tea-
spoons of added sugar)
and frosted whole grain
cereal (3 teaspoons in one
cup).
The next professional
to warn against sugar
intake may be your skin
therapist, as new findings
show sugar does impact
skin.

Collagen, essential to
skin strength and elastic-
ity, is a protein. A diet
rich in sugar can create
excess waste products in
the form of glucose.
Instead of “burning off,”
this glucose (sugar)
attaches to proteins in our
skin. This process is clas-
sified as glycation, and
leads to the formation of
Advanced Glycation
End-products (AGEs),
which increases inflam-
mation in the body.
Inflammation breaks
down collagen and leads
to the loss of elasticity: in
laymen's terms, this
means wrinkles, sagging
and loss of tone.

To check for added
sugar, look at the label
for sugar, corn syrup,
fructose, dextrose,
molasses or evaporated
cane juice in the ingredi-
ent list. And doctors and
dietitians say moderation
is one way to keep skin
and body healthy, but
keeping active is also key.

As part of healthy
aging diet, eschew refined
sugars for whole grains,
fruits and vegetables, and
topically treat skin with
AGE Smart products that
include Glucosamine,
Soy, Genestein, Vitamin
A, licorice, and the
unique Argine/Lysine
Polypeptide which binds
and traps sugars to help
prevent formation of
AGEs.

“This information was
taken from dermalogi-
ca.com. “Sara Beek isa
Dermalogica Skin Care
Therapist at The Dermal
Clinic in Sandyport.
Please call 327-6788 for

By STEPHANIE NANO
Associated Press Writer

problems or diabetes.

Half followed a low-carb
diet modelled after the
Atkins’ plan and half went
on a low-calorie, low-fat
diet. All attended group
sessions to help them
change bad eating habits,

ended up with similar
improvements to bad cho-
lesterol.

The study's strengths
include its size, length and
its multiple locations —
Denver, Philadelphia and St
Louis, said Dr William Yan-

more information or visit
www.dermal-clinic.com

NEW YORK (AP) — :
ic.com>.

Over the long term, a low-
carb diet works just as well
as a low-fat diet at taking
off the pounds — and it



might be better for your get more active and stick to — cy, of the Durham VA
heart, new research sug- their diets. Medical Center in North
gests. The volunteers had peri- Carolina.

"These are results we
should have a lot of confi-
dence in," said Yancy, who
has done similar diet
research but was not
involved in the study.

Foster, the study leader,
said dieters should be less
concerned about which diet
to use, and focus on finding
the support or technique —
like writing down what they
eat — that keeps them on
track.

"It doesn't make a differ-
ence for weight loss how
you get there," he said.

With the current obesity
epidemic, more than one
way is needed to attack the
problem, Yancy said. "Both
of these are options. These
diets work," he said.

Both diets improved cho-
lesterol in a two-year study
that included intensive
group counselling. But
those on the low-carbohy-
drate diet got a bigger boost
in their so-called good cho-
lesterol, nearly twice as
much as those on low-fat.

In previous studies, low-
carb diets have done better
at weight loss at six months,
but longer-term results have
been mixed. And there's
been a suggestion of better
cholesterol from low-carb
eating.

The latest test is one of
the longest to compare the
approaches. At the end of
two years, average weight
loss was the same for both
— about 15 pounds (6.8

odic checks of their weight,
blood, bone density and
body composition. After
two years, there was no
major differences between
diet groups, except in good
cholesterol. Why the low-
carb diet had a bigger effect
on good cholesterol isn't
known, the researchers said.
As low-carb plans
became popular, experts
feared the diet would drive
up the risk of heart disease
because it allows more fat.
The latest results suggest
those concerns are
unfounded, Foster said. In
the low-carb group, there
was an early rise in "bad"
cholesterol, the kind that
builds up in arteries. But
after two years, both groups

your

news

He said the low-carb
boost is the kind one might
get from medicines that
improve HDL.

"For a dict, that's pretty
mmpressive," Foster said.

The findings, published in
Tuesday's Annals of Inter-
nal Medicine, are based on
a study of 307 adults, two-
thirds of them women. Par-
ticipants were obese but
didn't have cholesterol

kilograms) or seven per
cent.

The key difference was in
HDL, or good cholesterol: a
23 per cent increase from
low-carb dieting compared
to a 12 per cent improve-
ment from low-fat, said
Gary Foster, director of
Temple University's Center
for Obesity Research and
Education, who led the fed-
erally funded study.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 11B



August - The end or a new beginning?

WHEN I put my book A
Year With Gardener Jack
together I started with Sep-
tember and ended with
August, a month that in many
ways is the low point of the
growing year but in many oth-
er ways is remarkably fecund.

All the vegetables we grow
during the cooler months are
absent from the veggie plots.
We may have a few cherry
tomatoes and peppers to
boast about but beyond that
we only have very hardy pro-
ducers like okra, Malabar
spinach and snake beans to
comfort us.

In the absence of prime
vegetables it might be wise to
cover your veggie plots with
clear plastic, a process called
solarisation. The plastic will
stop weeds growing and will
also sterilise the soil. August
gives the last opportunity to
solarise before the new veg-
etable growing season gets
under way. Make sure your
soil is wet to a depth of 5-6
inches before covering it.

August is a wonderful time
for tropical fruits. The last of
the Barbados cherries may
still be around while the first
carambolas ripen. In the gar-
den and along the shore, sea-
grapes can be found in sever-
al stages of development and
ripeness. August is also the
beginning of the guava duff
season with guava trees hang-
ing with fruit.

Many flowering shrubs are
at their best during August.
Hibiscus, oleander, crepe
myrtle, bougainvillea and
bridal bouquet give abundant
colour while yellow poinciana
(Peltophorum pterocarpum)
takes over from royal poin-
ciana as the main flowering

THE WEATHER REPORT (lee

bs

- —=
ta a

Clouds: and son with
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EARLY TOMATOES have to be sown early. Jack will be trying Solar Fire this year to get really early tomatoes.

tree.

Back to vegetables. Many
gardeners look upon early
tomatoes as a priority. Nor-
mal tomatoes set fruit at 68

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ering stage may be triggered
into fruit production by a cool
tropical storm during Sep-
tember.

Bahamian gardeners are
divided over whether to sow
tomatoes in August in the
hope that the right conditions
come along (including the
absence of hurricanes) or
leave the task until Septem-
ber. If you plan to aim for ear-
ly, sow your tomatoes in pots
that can be easily moved and
allow the seedlings to develop
in semi shade. Harden them
off by increasing the amount
of direct sunlight every day
over a week or two until the
plants can take full sun, then
transplant them into their pre-
pared growing area.

Peppers are natural warm
weather vegetables and are
best started early. Cabbages
and cucumbers are also can-
didates for an early start.

Any early vegetables will
be at the mercy of hurricane
activity, which is more likely
in September than any other
time. That said, if a hurricane
strikes one of the last things
we will be worrying about is
tomatoes. Plants in their pots
can be brought inside for a
day or two without doing
them any harm.

If your lawn is not looking
good right now, it never will.
Fertilize with a high nitrogen
mix at least every month dur-
ing the rainy season and you
will maintain a good colour
well into the dry season. If
you have St. Augustine grass
it will grow profusely whether
you fertilize it or not. Add
fertilizer and it will grow but
be much more verdant.

gardenerjack@

coralwave.com

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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PAGE

1 2



THE TRIBUNE

S | | S
k

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3,



2010

NUMBER ONE: Valentino Knowles captured a gold medal in the men’s light welterweight division at the
CAC Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on Saturday.

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Thomas,
Barry jump

high for gold

and silver...
See page 14

Valentino
wins gold

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

n the twilight of the
XXI Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean
(CAC) Games, the
country’s most deco-
rated amateur boxer added
to his legacy and won the
Bahamas’ final medal.
Valentino Knowles cap-
tured a gold medal in the
men’s light welterweight divi-
sion on Saturday in
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico .
Knowles put some of his
best boxing skills on display at
perhaps the timeliest point in
the tournament, with a domi-
nating round three to defeat
Luis Romero of Venezuela,
6:2 on points.
Both fighters failed to score
a single point over the course
of the first two opening
rounds and headed into the
decisive third round 0:0.
The 21-year-old Knowles
outboxed Romero 6:2 in the
third round to secure the gold.

Becomes third Bahamian
to win boxing medal
at the CAC Games

He became the third Bahami-
an to win a boxing medal at
the games _ following
Nathaniel Knowles who won
the silver medal in 1973 and
Marvin Smith who won silver
in 1986.

Earlier this year, Knowles
moved up from the 60 to the
64 kilo weight class after he
won the Bahamas’ first medal
at the AIBA World Champi-
onships in 2009. He followed
with the highest honour of
any Bahamian fighter ever at
the Commonwealth Boxing
Championships when he won
a silver medal.

Along with Carl Hield, he
also competed in the Conti-
nental Elite Championships
in Ecuador in June.

SU ew

PRA ADIS® ISLAND.

In the CAC semifinals,
Knowles defeated Juan Pablo
Romero of Mexico 7:5 on
points to earn a berth in the
gold-medal match.

A dominant first round ulti-
mately paved the way for the
win as Knowles came out with
an aggressive first round to
outscore Romero, 4:1. He
continued to hold a decisive
advantage following the sec-
ond round as both fighters
managed to score a single
point.

Romero won his first round
of the match in the third, but
the 3:2 was far from enough
to close the three-point
deficit. He defeated Ricardo
Garcia Tejada 6:5 in the other
semifinal to advance.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 13



SPORTS



PUSHING HARD: Jamaica's Allodin Fothergill (left)
Bahamas’ Demetrius Pinder in the men's 4x400 meter relay at the Central American and Caribbean Games



in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on July 30, 2010.



SKY HIGH: Bahamas’ Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long
jump at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez,
Puerto Rico July 30, 2010.

(AP Photo)

Bahamas loses
Opening match
but rebounds
to take game 2

EARLY into their historic
bid against the world’s best
in youth baseball, the
Bahamas has been on both
sides of the win-loss column
after two games.

At the Pony-13 World
Series in Fullerton, Califor-
nia, the Bahamas lost in its
opening match but rebounded
to take game two over the
weekend. The team got off to
a slow start against Chula
Vista, California, when they
were shutout 10-0.

In game two, the Bahamas
rebounded to take a game
two win over the hosts Fuller-
ton, California, in a hard
fought one run win, 14-13.

The Bahamas advanced for
the first time in the country’s
nine year Caribbean Zone
participation.

After hosting the
Caribbean Zone Tournament,
which also included an area
host team from the Grand
Bahamas and the Panama
Champions, the winner of the
pool advanced directly to the
Championship with the top
seed.

The team from Nassau got
off to a rough start in their
first two games to the
Bahamas area team from
Grand Bahama 18-8 and 9-6.

They rebounded and took a
4-3 win over Panama but lost
9-3 in its second contest.

Nassau made history in the
Championship, when they
beat Panama 10-2 to become
the country’s first Zone
Championship and securing
a spot in the PONY-13 World
Series for the first time.

Team Bahamas
hauls in record
18-medal total

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE largest team ever
assembled under the current
Bahamas Olympic Commit-
tee administration, with more
than 100 athletes participat-
ing, delivered a series of note-
worthy performances and
brought in the largest medal
total ever for the Bahamas at
the Central American and
Caribbean (CAC) Games.

Team Bahamas won a
record-setting total of 18
medals which included seven
gold, five silver and six bronze
at the 21st edition of the
games which concluded yes-
terday in Mayaguez Puerto,
Rico.

The team medalled in four
disciplines, beginning with
swimming that won eight
medals, track and field fin-
ished with six, the tennis team
won three medals and boxing
finished with one.

The Bahamas finished 10th
overall in the final medal
standings.

Mexico topped the overall
medal count with 384 medals
which included 133 gold, 129
silver and 122 bronze.

Venezuela finished second

104b), Colombia was third
with 260 (100g, 84s, 76b),
Puerto Rico fourth with 167
medals (48g, 44s, 75b), while
the Dominican Republic
rounded out the top five with
133 medals (31g, 37s, 65b).

Jamaica was the leading
medal winner of all English-
Speaking Caribbean countries
with 42 total medals (15g, 10s,
17b).

The represented disciplines
included athletics, bowling,
judo, rugby, sailing, swimming
and tennis.

Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace became the story of the
games early on for Team
Bahamas as she hauled in a
total of six medals and set a
pair of new meet records.

The 20-year-old Olympian
won four individual medals,
including gold in 50m and
100m butterfly and a pair of
bronze medals as a member
of relay teams.

On the tennis court, Larika
Russell won a bronze in the
women’s singles and teamed
with Nikkita Fountain to win
gold in doubles play.

In track and field, a trio of
Olympians returned to top
form when Leevan Sands,
Donald Thomas and Chris-
tine Amertil took gold in their

Valentino Knowles won the
final medal of the games for
the Bahamas in the boxing
ring when he took gold in the
welterweight division.

The Bahamas surpassed its
medal total of 10 from the
2006 CAC Games in Carte-
gena, Colombia, when they
totalled 10 medals, six silver
and four bronze.

In 2002 in El Salvador, the
team won just two silver
medals.

In 1998 in Maracaibo,
Venezuela, the Bahamas won
eight medals, two gold, two
silver and four bronze and in
1993 in Ponce, Puerto Rico
they totalled four medals, one
gold and three bronze.

It was the third time Puerto
Rico hosted the CAC Games,
they also hosted in San Juan
in 1966 and Ponce in 1993.

Approximately 5,000 ath-
letes participated in 39 sports
held across Puerto Rico, from
July 17 to August 1.

For the stories
behind the news,

bette MeL T[o/ Ty
on Mondays



(AP Photo) — with 322 medals (114g, 104s, respective signature events.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT
NOTICE
CORRIDOR I1A

BAILL HILL ROAD
Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that construction works will be carried out on
the eastern side of Baillou Hill Road effective Monday August 9th, 2010 for approximately twenty-four (24) weeks.

The works includes installation of new drainage facilities, utilities, water main systems, street lighting, traffic signs,
asphalt paving & landscaping.

Motorist travelling northbound on Baillou Hill Road should expect changes as construction works will be carried out in four
(4) stages. The following lateral streets will be temporarily closed to motorist & pedestrians: PALM TREE AVE, COCONUT
GROVE AVE, POINCIANA AVE, BAHAMA AVE, WEST END AVE, CORDEAUX AVE, PALMETTO ST, NEWBOLD
ST, BAKER ST & FATHER CALNAN RD.

STAGE 1
Motorist travelling through Palm Tree Ave should use Robinson Road as an alternative route and continue through
First Street or Second Street to their destination.

STAGE 2
Motorist travelling through Coconut Grove & Poinciana Avenue should use Palm Tree Avenue as an alternative
route.

STAGE 3
Motorist travelling through Bahama Avenue, West End Avenue & Cordeaux Avenue should use Poinciana
Avenue as an alternative route from the southern side.

STAGE 4
Motorist travelling through Palmetto Street, Newbold Street, Baker Street & Father Calnan Road should use
Oxford Avenue as an alternative route.

During construction we kindly ask that motorist travelling on Baillou Hill Road observe traffic signs delineating the work zone
and follow the signs posted “DIVERSION”. Access will be granted to the residents of the affected streets.

We apologize for the inconvenience & delays caused.
For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fni 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@ cartellone.com.ar

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs



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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS





UP AND OVER: Bahamas’ Donald Thomas clears the bar during the high jump at the Central American and
Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, July 30, 2010.

GETTIN’ UP: Bahamas’ Trevor Barry clears the bar during the high jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010.

(AP Photos)

Thomas, Barry get gold
and silver in high jump

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

e Bianca Stuart jumps long for bronze
e Men’s 1,600 relay team win silver

Donald Thomas and

AFTER several days
marred with disqualifications,
injuries and disappointments,
the Bahamas ended the ath-
letics competition at the XXI
Central American and

field, and another added in
the finale on the track

Both recorded the winning

Caribbean Games with four
medals won on the final day.
Three medals won in the

brought the total medal count
in the athletics discipline to
Six.

Trevor Barry highlighted the
final session for the Bahamas
with a gold and silver finish
in the men’s high jump.

jump of 2.28m, however,
Thomas cleared the mark on
his first attempt for the gold,
while Barry was unsuccessful

on his first attempt and
cleared in round two.

Wagner Miller of Colom-
bia finished third with a leap
of 2.19m.

Thomas entered the com-
petition at 2.16m, cleared on
his first attempt, and followed
to do the same at 2:19.

The former IAAF World
Champion and Pan Am
Games silver medallist fouled
both first attempts at 2.22m
and 2.25m but cleared on the
second.

Barry entered the contest
at 2.10m and cleared on his
first attempt. He passed on
2.13m but followed to clear
2.16m and 2.19m on first

2010 FORD MUSTANG

an American Icon



ALL FOR ONE: Athletes compete (Team Bahamas far right) in the men's 4x400 meter relay at the CAC
Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico on July 30, 2010.































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IN FLIGHT: Bahamas’ Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long
jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010.

attempts.

Barry failed two attempts
at 2.22m before clearing on
his third and also failed on
two attempts at 2.25m before
advancing.

In the women’s long jump,
Bianca Stuart needed just a
single jump to secure her
standing atop the medal podi-
um and claim the bronze
medal. Stuart recorded the
mark of 6.50m on her first
attempt for the third place fin-
ish. It was one of only two
successful attempts for Stuart
over the six rounds of the
competition.

Rhonda Watkins of
Trinidad and Tobago set a
new meet record to win the
gold medal with a leap of
6.67m to surpass the old mark
of 6.61m.

Jovanee Jarrett of Jamaica
finished with a silver medal

(AP Photo)

with her mark of 6.52m.

Watkins started the com-
petition with a list of 6.55m
and held the top position for
the duration of the contest.

Stuart took hold of second
place with her jump, but was
surpassed by Jarrett in round
two.

Her only other recorded
mark of the competition was a
leap of 6.21m in the fourth
round.

The men’s 1600m relay
team finished with a silver
medal just behind Jamaica
who set a new games record
in 3:01.68s.

The team of Andretti Bain,
Michael Mathieu, Le’Sean
Pickstock and Demetrius Pin-
der finished in a new season’s
best time of 3:01.82s.

Trinidad and Tobago fin-
ished third, also in a season’s
best time of 3:04.07s.

HE’S OFF: Bahamas’ Andretti Bain starts the men's 4x400 meter
relay at the CAC Games on July 30, 2010.

(AP Photo)

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