Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
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Full Text
McCOMBO
OF THE DAY itm towin it

The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY a 2010

CARS FOR SALE,



LOW —séSS1F
MOSTLY

2 ~ SUNNY

Volume: 106 No.206

92F
81F





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SECTION



a é
AND REAL ESTATE “==
SUS ee

Chinese govt says
yes’ to Baha Mar

$2.6bn investment
formally approved

By PAUL G Ambassador Hu is
TURNQUEST expected to return to
Tribune Staff the Bahamas on
Reporter August 18 when he
pturnquest@ will meet Prime
tribunemedia.net Minister Ingraham to

THE Govern-
ment of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of
China yesterday
formally approved
the $2.6 billion
investment in the
Baha Mar project
on Cable Beach,
bringing an end to
speculation on the
viability of the
resort development.

In a statement from the
Cabinet office yesterday,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham confirmed that
His Excellency Dingxian
Hu, the Ambassador of the
People’s Republic of China,
had advised that his govern-



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham
confirmed that His
Excellency Dingxi-
an Hu had advised
that his govern-
ment has given
formal approval.

hand over the formal
approval from the
Chinese government.

Baha Mar chair-
man Sarkis Izmirlian
said yesterday that
the project is expect-
ed to create 11,000
Bahamian jobs and
add $1 billion in new
spending to the econ-
omy in the first year
after completion.

This, of course, all
depends on final approval
from the Bahamas govern-
ment.

On their behalf, Mr Izmir-
lian said that Baha Mar has
now concluded the neces-
sary agreements with the
Export-Import Bank of Chi-

Ne eee GNM A UV Se Le





THE mother of slain
handbag designer Harl
Taylor last night told
how she has been left
distraught and without
closure.

Beverly Taylor
described herself as
"mentally" drained but
surrounded with
friends and family as
she coped with the
ordeal.

Her comments were
made a day after a jury

SEE page 12











Felipé Major/Tribune staff



TOURISTS TAKE A LOOK at products on display at the makeshift straw market at Cable Beach yesterday. The site is a temporary solution after
fire destroyed the original market in June. A new site is to be constructed for the vendors on West Bay Street.

a Se Director of Antiquities, § Man accused of Director has ‘no =. Woman intends to
cies of the Chinese govern- Corporation. Monuments and — defrauding local knowledge of low Pun against PM
‘entire with Bana Mar Lid the People's Repuone ot Museums Corporation - bank of $100,000 : morale at Met Office in North Abaco

a eeegeuopment of SFE page seven expected to step down’ = ByNATARIOMcKENZIE © By TANEKATHOMPSON § a. ai icon LOWE



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DIRECTOR of the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museums Corporation Dr
Keith Tinker is expected to
tender his resignation fol-
lowing an 18-week vacation,
The Tribune has learned.

However, Dr Tinker last
night denied that the ten-
dering of his resignation was
on the cards.

“That’s not even a matter
being discussed,” he told
The Tribune.

He is said to have told
the board that during his
vacation he plans to work
on his book and accelerate
his research.

SEE page 11

: Tribune Staff Reporter

: A MAN accused of
: forging bank cheques and
: defrauding a local bank of
: more than $100,000 was
: arraigned in a Magistrate's
: Court yesterday on a list
: of fraud charges.

: Keno Gaitor, 33, of
: Mount Vernon, appeared
: before Magistrate Guilli-
: mena Archer in Court 10,
: Nassau Street, yesterday
: charged with 33 counts of
: fraud, 22 counts of uttering
: a forged document, 12
: counts of forgery and five
: counts of attempted fraud.

SEE page seven

: Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net :

: THE director of the :
: Department of Meteorolo- ;
: gy said he has no knowl- :
: edge of claims of low :
: morale at the Meteorologi- :
: cal Office due to "micro- :
: managing” from senior offi-
: Clals. i
: Earlier this week, sources
: Said staff are unhappy with :
: the leadership style of :
: department officials and :
: that employee concerns are :
: disregarded. :
: Yesterday, the depart- :
: ment's Director Arthur :
: Rolle said these claims were

SEE page 11

: Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MIDDLE-AGED
: woman has announced her
intention to run against
: Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham in his North Aba-
co constituency in the 2012
: general election.

: S. Ali McIntosh, the
interim leader of the recent-
ly launched Bahamas Con-
stitution Party, said that
despite North Abaco resi-
dents having voted for Mr
: Ingraham as their represen-
: tative for over thirty years,
: she believes they are ready
: to go to the “next level of

SEE page seven





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Thursday, Friday & Saturday July 29th, 30th & 31st



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NASSAU AND BAHAWIA

ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

in the frame for more than 60 years

PHOTOGRAPHER Roland Rose has been
capturing Bahamian life and society on film for
more than 60 years. For more than 50 years, his
award-winning photographs have captured the
hearts and souls of millions around the world.
They have also played their part in promoting the
Bahamas and drawing tourists to our wonderful
islands. Now Mr Rose’s images are to get a sec-
ond airing in The Tribune’s new weekly column,

Flashback.
By DIANE PHILLIPS

ROLAND ROSE was 13
when he got his first camera,
an Ansco Clipper he traded his
harmonica for with a buddy at
school. Today, at 72, Mr Rose is
the dean of photography in the
Bahamas, his exhaustive body
of work as rich in texture and
emotion as it is important his-
torically for capturing fleeting
magic moments, a portrait of
more than half a century of an
emerging country’s life and of
the soul of its people.

Through his eyes, those who

grew up in the Bahamas and
visitors from around the world
can experience a life of simpler
times but often greater pain, of
joy and sorrow and hope. They
can feel the explosion of energy
of the drummer in a photo-
graph so powerful you can
almost hear the cymbals and
percussion. They can shrink at a
wall of water slapping at the
lighthouse as 10-foot waves
crash and nearly topple the lit-
tle 14-foot boat the photogra-
pher was in. They can see the
breathtaking beauty of deep
purple bougainvillea and bril-

LOCAL NEWS

Roland Rose's photos have put Bahamas







THE NEW Flashback column by Roland Rose (pictured right in 1969)



features photos such as the one above with Princess Margaret
accompanied by Governor Lord Ranfurly.

liant Royal Poinciana in bloom
in a garden lit by the sun with
the blues of the harbor just
beyond.

They can see the work of a
man who has seen so much and
told it through a lens, a boy
who drove a little boat across



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

& BILLING CHANGES



0-200 units per month

Remaining units

All units per month

UNIT CHARGE

Minimum monthly charge

Minimum monthly charge

Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for allconsumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th;

The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
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at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

TARIFF

RESIDENTIAL

10.95 cents per unit
11.95 cents per unit
14.95 cents per unit
$5.00

201-800 units per month

COMMERCIAL

15.00 cents per unit
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GENERAL SERVICE

MONTHLY BILLS

KVA CHARGE



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0-900,000 units per month
Remaining units per month
Minimum monthly charge

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8.70 cents per unit
6.20 cents per unit
$ 568.00

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Visit with intent to disconnect
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Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639







from the island where he lived
to take laborers for his father’s
property overseeing job so he
could buy film at two shillings a
roll (50 cents) long before the
days of digital cameras and
Photoshop.

If an ordinary picture is
worth a thousand words, they
will see the photography that
is worth encyclopedic volumes,
a virtual Wikipedia of visual
wonder.

Roland Rose was born in
Italy in 1937 to English parents.
“Six weeks before war broke
out, we were driving across
France trying to get back to
England,” he says, crediting his
parents’ decision to flee as the
pivotal point that would deter-
mine his life and career. His
father’s position, overseeing an
Italian garden, led to the offer
from the Bahamas, managing
the gardens and property of
one of the original residents of
what was then Hog Island, now
Paradise Island. As a child,
Roland and his three brothers
roamed free on the beaches
where later Club Med would
be built and today Atlantis
dominates the horizon. But
then, it was just endless beach
where young boys could fish,
swim, snorkel, dive, many days
never encountering another
footprint in the sand beside
their own.

But there was work to do,
too, and Roland, being the old-
est, got the paying job of ferry-
ing workers.

“T used to go over at 7.30 in
the morning every day in the
boat to get the laborers for the
Killam Estate where my father
was working,” he said. He
dropped them off, took the
boat with his brothers back
over to the island of Nassau
where they would then climb
on their bikes and ride the rest
of the few miles journey to
school. In the afternoon, the
pattern was repeated in reverse.
“T earned 10 shillings a week
($2.50) and spent it all on a new
camera, a Kodak Retinette I
got from (the late) Stanley Too-
good. It was one of those prod-
ucts Kodak made in Germany
and it cost 14 pounds. Paying
that off was an eternity,” he
says, laughing at it now. And
he still had to buy film. Kodak
Kodachrome had just been
introduced and Rose’s fascina-
tion with colour intensified with

THE TRIBUNE







a film that began to do it justice.

Trading up before he even
got paid for a photograph — his
first commission came later,
photographing a woman’s rugs
for insurance records — was an
early indication of his determi-
nation to keep abreast of equip-
ment and technology.

“[’m not an antique collec-
tor,” he says. “Every time
something new came out, I
tried it. I have tried to stay on
the cutting edge of photogra-
phy.” What he does collect is
classical music. He admits to
“over 4,000” records and at
least as many CDs, much to his
good-natured and lively wife
Barbara’s chagrin when he buys
more. What he would like to
be if he hadn’t devoted his life
to photography is a grand mas-
ter of chess. He used to play on
a street corner every afternoon,
but the game fell apart when
he was the only one who main-
tained a steady interest after so
many years.

Mr Rose is the epitome of a
person who has perfected his
craft but manages to keep it
fresh, always searching for the
touch that will make an image
memorable rather than a cel-
luloid or digital record. He
pours boundless energy into
getting the light just right, mov-
ing a floor flash to swallow a
shadow, re-arranging flowers
or furniture to set the stage,
reflecting on colour of apparel
or backdrop, never taking the
easy way out and justifying it
with a flippant “This will do.”

He seems to move in fast-
motion, a perplexing puzzle.
Quick on his feet and filled with
surefooted drive, yet socially,
a soft-spoken connoisseur with-
out airs (getting dressed up is
trading his shorts for long
pants) who simply enjoys a
vacation in Europe, a fine Bor-
deaux and classical music.

Roland Rose spent 32 years
working for the Bahamas
Development Board. When he
left in 1982, he left a collection
of work that told the story of
the country, its march through
Independence, its natural dis-
asters and hurricanes, its
celebrities and secrets. Tragi-
cally, thousands of his photos
were later destroyed in a clean-
out, set afire, images never to
be recaptured.

Fortunately, Rose had some
of the negatives and a handful
of prints. Friends and associ-

PASM GW TALON SR)

HALL





ates who had come by his work
over the years have given him
back photos. With scanning
technology, he can re-create
some from those originals. One
of his most famous, a Junkanoo
shot with a former Miss
Bahamas in the photo, became
an album cover and one just
sold on e-Bay for thousands of
dollars.

If there is a thread of conti-
nuity throughout the work still
in existence that spans six
decades, it is the astounding
beauty of the Bahamian land-
scape and sea. If there is a dis-
tinguishing factor between the
‘then’ and the ‘now’, it is that
change has brought a new level
of stress and strain to faces.
Nowhere is the change more
apparent than in a 1960s-era
photo when Sean Connery
arrived in Nassau for the shoot-
ing of Thunderball. It wasn’t
the Pan Am tote bag that was
such a startling reminder of
how times had changed, but the
outright broad smiles on faces
of the entire group — children,
adults, the police and the actor
himself even as his limbs and
attention were being sought by
the crowd around him. Every
face was relaxed. The times,
they were a-friendly and with-
out fear. Celebrities didn’t have
bodyguards. Police weren’t
donned in bulletproof vests.
Trust reined.

In each of Rose’s pho-
tographs, a story unfolds, a slice
of life too rich to be ignored.
In black and white, they tell of
passion — a drummer of burning
drive, a child filled with wonder,
an old man’s hands worn and
crinkled from honest labour. In
colour, they paint a landscape
bursting with brilliance. Black
and white shots require simplic-
ity, he explains: “If you are
shooting in black and white,
you have to keep your images
very simple, clean images.
Messy images don’t work in
black and white but they work
in colour because of the
colour.”

Colour is his preference, but
that, he says, is because of
where he lives.

“The colour of the Bahamas
is the most wonderful thing in
the world.”

© FOR THE FIRST INSTALLMENT
OF FLASHBACK, SEE THE FEATURES
SECTION IN TODAY'S TRIBUNE.



MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE Charles Maynard is pictured (centre) cutting the ribbon
to unveil the Hall of Champions at the Lynden Pindling International Airport on Monday. Also pictured are
gold medalist Eldece Clarke-Lewis (left) and gold medalist Pauline Davis-Thompson.

GOVERNMENT and airport officials on
Monday unveiled the new Hall of Champions at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport.

The Hall features legendary Bahamian ath-
letes ranging from Sir Durward Knowles, who
won the Bahamas’ first Olympic medal in
1956, to the Golden Girls who won gold in
the 4x100 women’s relay at the 2000 Sydney

Games.

Speaking at the unveiling ceremony, John
Sprinks, vice-president of commercial develop-
ment at the Nassau Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD), said the new Hall of Champions is
the culmination of a three-year initiative between
NAD, the Ministry of Tourism and the Ministry

of Sports, Youth and Culture.

“The Hall of Champions is special because it
allows visitors coming to the Bahamas to see
some of the best and brightest sports stars in the

country,” he said.

“As Bahamians have continued to accom-
plish more on the international sports scene, the
number of sports figures represented on the wall

has increased, showcasing the ongoing success
of local sports stars.”

The new US Departures at LPIA is currently
under construction. Once that stage of the airport
redevelopment project is finished early next year,
Mr Sprinks said the area where the Hall of Cham-
pions is now located will be completely gutted to
make way for stage two of the $409 million

expansion, that being the new International

Arrivals Terminal.

During construction of the new terminal the
plaques in the Hall of Champions will temporar-
ily be placed in the US Arrivals walkway. The
Hall of Champions will then be relocated to its
permanent home in the entrance of the new

Bahamian Immigration Hall.

The plaques in the new Hall of Champions,
Mr Sprinks said, were created using a digital
printing technique on bronze.

“We also added bios on each plaque in raised

bronze lettering so that those seeing these local
heroes for the first time could learn of their indi-
vidual success stories,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Investigation into

‘cat torture’ claims

By AVA TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



REPORTS of alleged animal cru-
elty have sparked controversy within
a small community in North
Eleuthera.

Police have launched an investiga-
tion into claims that three young men
on the island of Spanish Wells are tor-
turing cats by tying them to golf carts
and dragging them along until they are
skinned alive.

The culprits reportedly torture the
animals for their own entertainment
because “they like to hear the cats
scream,” according to reports by some
residents.

However, police investigators say
no supporting evidence has been found
as yet.

The gory allegations have reported-
ly spread throughout the settlement,
generating outrage and confusion

Controversy in small
community after allegations

| Daylight robbery at water depot

THREE men staged a brazen daylight armed robbery at a

water depot on Yamacraw Hill road on Monday, police
: reported.

An employee was robbed of an undetermined amount of
cash and cellphone cards after three men pulled up at the
Water Depot in a silver sports utility vehicle at around mid-
day. Two of the three men inside the car were said to have
exited the vehicle demanding cash.

One was armed with a handgun.

The culprits fled the area in the car, heading west on

Yamacraw Hill Road. Police are investigating.

Two in custody after drug selzure

suspect the rumours are an attempt to
cast a negative light on the small fishing
community.

Officials at the Bahamas Humane
Society (BHS), however, told The Tri-
bune that they have received several
reports from concerned residents about
cats being abused in this manner.

The Humane Society said in their
view there is sufficient information to
warrant a thorough investigation.

Animal cruelty of the magnitude
reported could, if true, point towards
the behavioral pattern of sociopaths,
the BHS said. They fear this kind of
violence could escalate.

Stephen Turnquest, executive direc-
tor of the BHS, is encouraging potential

among residents.

Some residents have vehemently
denied the accusations and said they

Residents’ ‘outrage’ at off-line
land-line telephone system

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of North
Andros and the Berry
Islands are said to be out-
raged that their land-line
telephone system has been
completely off-line for
almost a week.

MP for the area Vincent
Peet said that coming on the
heels of a huge drop in busi-
ness for the community as a
result of the economic down-
turn, the loss of phone ser-
vices is a devastating blow.

According to Mr Peet,
restaurants and take-aways
have been hit particularly
hard, as they rely heavily on
call-in orders and reserva-
tions.

“When there is a scarcity
of customers, food remains
sitting around to spoil,” he
said.

The downed phone lines
have also affected law
enforcement and emergency
response services, as resi-
dents cannot call the police
or an ambulance.

“T’ve got a bunch of elder-
ly people in the constituency
who are facing health chal-
lenges so the phone is critical
for them to order medication
or request emergency assis-
tance,” said Mr Peet.

The MP said he is deeply
concerned that five days
have passed without the situ-
ation being resolved.

Mr Peet called on the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation (BTC) to
double its efforts to help res-
idents “return to normalcy
in these difficult economic
times.”

BTC executive vice presi-
dent Marlon Johnson admit-
ted that “intermittent prob-
lems” have affected North
Andros’ phone system.

witnesses to step forward and contact
the authorities.

"We need the folks in Spanish Wells
who have any idea of who is doing it or

what is going on to report it to the
police,” he said.

Mr Turnquest suggested that if per-
sons find the bodies of any mutilated
cats to put them in plastic bags, freeze
them, and then send them to the police
or the BHS, though he noted physical
evidence may not be necessary if there
is supporting testimony.

Kim Aranha, president of the BHS,
added: “It is certainly a cause for great
concern and reason for an investiga-
tion. I hope to God it’s not true, it
would make me very happy to know
it’s just malicious gossip.

“Animal cruelty is merely the step-
ping stone for much, much worse, when
you get a report of something like this
you've got to find out whether there is
truth to it, and the only way to find out
whether or not there is truth is to con-
duct a thorough investigation.”

A 64-YEAR-OLD

: woman anda 23-year-old
: man were taken into custody
: after marijuana was discov-
? eredina bag in the back of a
: van at Potters Cay Dock.

The arrests occurred

shortly after 6pm on Mon-

Man ‘chopped!’ in face in har row

: By ALISON LOWE
: Tribune Staff Reporter

day after officers from the
Paradise Island Police Sta-
tion observed a man and a
woman in a red 1989 Ford
Aerostar van “acting suspi-
ciously.”

Investigations are continu-
ing.



: alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAN who was “chopped” in the face during an argu-

: ment at a bar remains in serious condition, according to
: police.

Press liaison officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings said the

: man was taken to hospital by paramedics after being attacked
: at around 1.20am at Headquarters Bar on Miami Street.

“Police received information that that a 36-year-old male

: got into an altercation with another male which resulted in the



He said his technicians are
working on the problem and
that the corporation has also
sent over foreign consultants
to assess the situation.

Mr Johnson said he under-
stands the frustration of the
residents, as he tried unsuc-
cessfully to get through to
several North Andros num-
bers himself after being
informed about the situation.

He explained that BTC
learned of the problem from
residents of the area who
contacted the corporation’s
Call Centre to complain —
only to be cut off.

“Persons have called in
for five to 10 minutes, and
then the service is dropped,”
he said.

Since then, the problem is
said to have worsened, even-
tually leaving the North
Andros community with no
land-line telephone service
whatsoever.

Mr Johnson told The Tri-
bune yesterday he wanted to
assure those affected that
BTC has been working, and
will continue to work non-
stop to rectify the situation.



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RESIDENTS of North Andros
and the Berry Islands have
had issues with their land-
lines. MP Vincent Peet (inset)
says the loss of phone ser-
vices is a ‘devastating blow’.









ENTIRE
atu
ae

Siete
eS
Se ie

: 36-year-old being chopped to the face,” said Sgt Skippings.

His medical condition was yesterday said to be “serious but

stable.”

Police investigations are continuing.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Titanic expedition will create 3D map of wreck

RICHMOND, Va. — A team of scien-
tists will launch an expedition to the Titanic
next month to assess the deteriorating con-
dition of the world's most famous shipwreck
and create a detailed three-dimensional map
that will "virtually raise the Titanic” for the
public.

The expedition to the site 2.5 miles
beneath the North Atlantic is billed as the
most advanced scientific mission to the
Titanic wreck since its discovery 25 years
ago.

: The 20-day expedition is to leave St.
John's, Newfoundland, on August 18 under
a partnership between RMS Titanic Inc.,
which has exclusive salvage rights to the
wreck, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institution in Massachusetts. The expedi-
tion will not collect artifacts but will probe a
2-by-3-mile debris field where hundreds of
thousands of artifacts remain scattered.

Some of the world's most frequent visitors
to the site will be part of the expedition
along with a who's who of underwater scien-
tists and organizations such as the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Organizers say the new scientific data and
images will ultimately will be accessible to
the public.

"For the first time, we're really going to
treat it as an archaeological site with two
things in mind,” David Gallo, an expedition
leader and Woods Hole scientist, told The
Associated Press on Monday. "One is to
preserve the legacy of the ship by enhancing
the story of the Titanic itself. The second
part is to really understand what the state of
the ship is."

The Titanic struck ice and sank on its
maiden voyage in international waters on
April 15, 1912, leaving 1,522 people dead.

Since oceanographer Robert Ballard and
an international team discovered the Titan-
ic in 1985, most of the expeditions have
either been to photograph the wreck or gath-
er thousands of artifacts, like fine china,
shoes and ship fittings. "Titanic" director
James Cameron has also led teams to the
wreck to record the bow and the stern, which
separated during the sinking and now lie
one-third of a mile apart.

RMS Titanic made the last expedition to
site in 2004. The company, a subsidiary of
Premier Exhibitions Inc. of Atlanta, con-
ducts travelling displays of the Titanic arti-
facts, which the company says have been
viewed by tens of millions of people world-
wide.

"We believe there's still a number of real-
ly exciting mysteries to be discovered at the
wreck site," said Chris Davino, president of
and CEO of Premier Exhibitions and RMS
Titanic. "It's our contention that substan-
tial portions of the wreck site have never
really been properly studied.”

RMS Titanic is bankrolling the expedi-
tion. Davino declined to state the cost of the
exploration other than to say it will be mil-
lions of dollars.

The "dream team" of archaeologists,
oceanographers and other scientists want to
get the best assessment yet on the two main
sections of the ship, which have been subject-
ed to fierce deep-ocean currents, salt water
and intense pressure.

Gallo said while the rate of Titanic's dete-
rioration is not known, the expedition
approaches the mission with a sense of
urgency.

"We see places where it looks like the
upper decks are getting thin, the walls are
thin, the ceilings may be collapsing a bit," he
said. "We hear all these anecdotal things
about the ship is rusting away, it's collapsing
on itself. No one really knows."

The expedition will use imaging technol-
ogy and sonar devices that never have been
used before on the Titanic wreck and to
probe nearly a century of sediment in the
debris field to seek a full inventory of the
ship's artifacts.

"We're actually treating it like a crime
scene," Gallo said. "We want to know what's
out there in that debris field, what the stern
and the bow are looking like."

The expedition will be based on the RV
Jean Charcot, a 250-foot research vessel with
a crew of 20. Three submersibles and the
latest sonar, acoustic and filming technology
also will be part of the expedition.

"Never before have we had the scientific
and technological means to discover so much
of an expedition to Titanic,” said P.H. Nar-
geolet, who is co-leading the expedition. He
has made more than 30 dives to the wreck.

Bill Lange, a Woods Hole scientist who
will lead the optical survey and will be one of
the first to visit the wreck, said a key analy-
sis will be comparing images from the first
expedition 25 years ago and new images to
measure decay and erosion.

"We're going to see things we haven't
seen before. That's a given," he said. "The
technology has really evolved in the last 25
years."

Davino said he anticipates future salvage
expeditions to the wreck, and Gallo said he
doesn't expect the science will end with one
trip.

"I'm sure there will be future expeditions
because this is just the beginning of a whole
new era of these kind of expeditions to
Titanic — serious, archaeological mapping
expeditions,” Gallo said.

RMS Titanic is still awaiting a judge's
ruling in Norfolk, Va., on the 5,500 artifacts
it has in its possession.

The company is seeking limited owner-
ship of the artifacts as compensation for its
salvage efforts. In its court filing for a salvage
award, the company put the fair market val-
ue of the collection at $110.9 million.

US. District Judge Rebecca Beach Smith,
a maritime jurist who is presiding over the
hearings, has called the wreck an "interna-
tional treasure."

(This article was written by Steve
Szkotak, Associated Press writer).



Potential for
development
is based on
education

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me an
opportunity during this fes-
tive season of Indepen-
dence, but what for me is a
time of introspection and
refection, to posit my views.

During this time of intro-
spection and reflection, my
mind is drawn to a time
when in this diaspora, hang-
ing, brutality and the total
disintegration of the family
was the order of the day.
However, despite the gifts
that our ancestors gave, to
the extent that they even on
occasion sacrificed their very
lives so that we who are
their “dream and hope”,
may enjoy what was absent
for them — human dignity,
family and education. Para-
doxically, we now live in a
society where “mothers,
fathers, sons”, education is
not the first option and
because we lack the intesti-
nal fortitude to solve our
social problems we in
essence yearn for a “Police
State.”

We scem to suffer from
what Professor Hilary Beck-
les termed “Historical
Amnesia” and a clear ide-
ology and philosophy of
who we are. We have sys-
tematically denied ourselves
the right to celebrate our
heroes, embrace our obliga-
tion to family, to respect our
women and children and a
commitment to community.
Rather than creating a
national “commitment to
Self-discipline, Industry,
Loyalty, Unity and an abid-
ing respect for Christian val-
ues and the Rule of Law,”
we have slavishly worked to
developed a culture of indi-
vidualism rooted in
hypocrisy and corruption,
which has resulted in a most
profound diagnosis “that our
society is more threatened
by a pervasive culture of dis-
honesty, greed and a casual
disregard for social norms
and formal regulation, than
it is by crime in a narrow
sense.”

While I may be inclined
to be sold on the idea that
“it is better in The
Bahamas,” I must accept the
following: that there are par-

Sandals Worldwide

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



ents that are terrified of
their children, there is
organised crime in our
midst, the police are under
enormous stress and they
focus on the weaker element
of our society, thirty-seven
years after Independence we
have yet to establish a uni-
versity; our Judicial system is
in a State of disrepair despite
the lamentations of the Judi-
ciary; incest and sexual
harassment are prevalent in
the community and not to
mention our local neigh-
bourhood predators, those
who prey on our young girls
and boys. I must apologise I
got carried away! Neverthe-
less, in this our thirty-sev-
enth anniversary, rather
than have a one thousand
man march to foster a com-
mitment to family, commu-
nity, education, “Self-disci-
pline, Industry, Loyalty,
Unity and an abiding respect
for Christian values and the
Rule of Law,” there is a one
thousand man march to
hang young men who prob-
ably never had a chance!
As I would have commu-
nicated in a previous letter
to the Editor, there is no sci-
entific proof provided that
hanging is a deterrent to

crime and I accept that
penal sanctions are well suit-
ed for any society. However,
respect for the rights of oth-
ers, charity and strong fam-
ily values are effective deter-
rents.

The way forward to solv-
ing our crime problem is not
through hysteria, blaming
others, emotionally charged
rash decisions, but rather by
acknowledging and eradicat-
ing the scourge of disloyalty,
disunity, dishonesty, indis-
cipline and hypocrisy.

The potential for our
nation to develop is based
on the number of persons
who have a proper educa-
tion. Education in its truest
sense should not be a luxury
in our Bahama Land. We
can either choose to commit
our time and = scarce
resources to building sophis-
ticated state-of-the-art pris-
ons, hiring more police,
defense force and prison
officers, or we can invest our
limited resources educating
our human capital rather
than expunging it. Thereby
developing a culture com-
mitted to “Self-discipline,
Industry, Loyalty, Unity and
an abiding respect for Chris-
tian values and the Rule of
Law.”

ELSWORTH N
JOHNSON
Nassau,

July, 2010.

Our constipated justice system

EDITOR, THE TRIBUNE.

OUR justice system is in a state of dilemma. It is suffer-
ing from a severe case of “constipation,” and in need of
an enema. Under no circumstance should someone
charged with murder be given bail.

Over seven years ago, my sister’s son was brutally
stabbed to death while on his way to work, simply
because he refused to give a culprit a dollar he asked for.
This savage thug has been on bail all this time and the
case is yet to be called in the Supreme Court.

Is this justice?

My nephew is languishing in a cold earth while his
alleged murderer is alive and enjoying the good life. Jus-
tice delayed is justice denied and justice denied is the

greatest of all injustices.

REUBEN W. SEARS
Nassau,
July 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

STABBING violence has
become a trend among young
persons, according to police,
amidst cries by youth advo-
cates for the nation to address
the gang subculture.

At a press conference on
Monday, Police Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade acknow!-
edged the organization had a
lot more work to complete
concerning gang intervention.

Mr Greenslade said:
"We've had far too many stab-
bings for the year to date in
this country, it seems that it’s
something that is 'en vogue’







among our young people and
certainly is tied to that gang-
type activity. And so we con-
tinue to pursue these young
people, to arrest them, to take
them before the courts on
charges whenever they offend
against the laws."

Reid,

POLICE COMMISSIONER Ellison Greenslade voiced concerns about
the ‘stabbing trend’.

However, Pastor Carlos
founder of Youth
Against Violence and the
Hope Centre, does not think
increased arrests will deter

gang involvement. He strongly
believes young people are frus-
trated by a lack of identity that
compels them to seek associa-
tion with a gang. He charged

Reports of alleged police
brutality are investigated



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Senior Assistant Quinn
McCartney, officer in charge of the Grand
Bahama District, said police are trying to sub-
stantiate reports of alleged police brutality
involving a young man over the weekend on
Grand Bahama.

According to reports in a local newspaper,
Glen Laing, 26, claimed that police officers
beat, tied him up, stripped off his clothing, and
dunked him into the sea until he lost conscious-
ness.

Mr McCartney said that while no formal
complaint has been filed yet the police have
been contacted by Laing’s attorney Simeon
Brown about the matter.

“T have forwarded the article that appeared
in Monday’s Freeport News to our Complaints
and Corruption Unit,” he said.

Laing was asleep at a friend’s house when
police officers arrived on Saturday morning
with a search warrant, according to the
report.

Laing claimed that five officers arrived at the
residence in a police bus with his friend, who
was in custody, and searched the house.

Laing was also taken into custody by the
officers at police headquarters, where he was



reported to have been questioned in connection
with an alleged armed robbery.

He claims that officers threatened to beat
him with a bat if he did not talk.

After he denied knowing anything about
armed robbery, he claimed that officers put a
black garbage bag over his head and hit him
about his body.

Laing then claimed that sometime around
11pm Saturday, he was taken to a police bus
where the officers put a tam over his face so he
could not see where they were taking him.

When the vehicle stopped, they were at a
beach. He claimed that officers then stripped
him of clothing, taped up his hands and feet and
kept dunking him into the water until he passed
out.

Laing alleged that officers poured water
over him to remove the sand from his body
and dressed him in his clothing. He was taken
back to police headquarters and put back into
a cell.

Mr McCartney was concerned about the
reports in the newspaper. He said that he police
were doing what they could to substantiate
Laing’s claims.

“It concerns me and I have made contact
with the officer in charge of CDU to substanti-
ate whether Laing was in our custody over the
weekend and to account for his time with us,”
said Mr McCartney.





YOUR CONNECTION

QO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE
DISPOSAL OF SCRAP
CABLE & EQUIPMENT

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is currently
Tendering for fhe Disposal of Scrap Cable & Equipment. All in-
lerested companies are asked fo collect a proposal from the
security booth af JFK Head Office.

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before August
10th, 2010 by 5:00 pm, to be included in the evaluation exer-
cise, Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER FOR THE
DISPOSAL OF SCRAP CABLE & EQUIPMENT" and should be de-

livered to the attention of:

Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lid
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas

BIC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

www.btcbahamas.com » www.face

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



the first step towards reducing
crime among young people is
the establishment of a gang
unit.

He said: “We don't want to
criminalise young people. We
want to teach them. We can’t
ask them to do things that they
aren't capable of or don't
know how to do. The gang unit
is not to just arrest them, but to
fix the problem. We don't need
another unit that's just going to
lock people up and put them in
court. The court system is
already stressed, why put them
through a system that isn't
working right now? The unit
should be to deal with trou-
bled kids, teach them identity,
teach them how to resolve
their conflict and teach them
anger management. Many par-
ents today they ask the kids:
"What's wrong with you?' so
the kids think 'something must
be wrong with me’.”

Pastor Reid is confident the
gang population has grown sig-
nificantly in the six years since
the last study was conducted.
At that time, the number of
persons involved in gang activ-
ity was estimated to be 15,000
spread over more than 50
gangs.

He said: "We've been call-
ing for the establishment of a
gang unit for years. Govern-
ments upon governments have
come into power and it is still
not implemented. The gang
unit shouldn’t just be police
force because the police force
can’t gather the kind of infor-
mation necessary to make that
kind of unit a success.”

Pastor Reid maintained that
although police participation

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Police concerned over ‘stabbing
trend’ among young people

was important, the unit should
be established by the govern-
ment in cooperation with the
private sector.

He continued: “In my hon-
est opinion we don't have a
gang problem. We don't have a
crime problem. We basically
have an identity problem, and
that is killing our country.
Most people don't know who
they are. Young people who
don’t know who they are, are
being taught by old people
who don't know who they are.
This is why young people just
want to identify with some-
thing. They can care less about
the danger that is involved in
the gang culture, being a part
of it gives them significance
and it validates them.”

Highlighting parallels in the
recidivism rates of youth
reform institutions and Her
Majesty’s Prison, Mr Reid
added: “We need to start
teaching them about who they
are, afford them opportunities
to receive validation for their
talents rather than the mischief
that they get into. When you
look at the newspaper it’s easy
for a young person to receive
recognition for getting into
mayhem than getting into
something positive — but we
tell them don't (get into may-
hem). Everyone wants their 15
minutes of fame, I don’t care
who you are. We have to find
ways as a nation to give them
that.”

Man taken to
hospital after

being clipped
by truck

A MAN was treated in

: hospital on Monday after
: he was clipped by a pass-
? ing truck on Shirley

: Street.

The man, identified by

: aresident of the area as

: handyman Vincent Curtis,
: is said to have stumbled

: away from a Guinep tree

? across the street from Sul-
? ly's Tailor Shop on

: Shirley Street into the

: busy thoroughfare during

: afternoon traffic.

An eyewitness said Mr

: Curtis, 46, of Shirley

: Street was hit in his head
: by the side mirror of a

: passing truck and

: knocked down by the

: impact.

The driver of the truck

: and small crowd of curi-

: ous onlookers hovered

: around the scene shortly
: after the incident, which
: occurred just after 2 pm

: yesterday.

Angela Romer, an area

: resident and acquaintance
: of Mr Curtis, was sitting

: under the tree when the

: incident happened.

She said Mr Curtis

: seemed coherent and not

: seriously harmed when he
: was taken away by ambu-
: lance for treatment at the
: hospital.

His present condition

: was not known up to
: press time.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





THE BAHAMAS’ VERY OWN STREET PHILOSOPHER

i









Flease be advised that the Minister of Public Works has approved temporary closure to North
Street, and Pason Lane on Thussday, fuly 29, 2010 berween che hours of 10:30am to 23pm, for
utility service upgrade.

Motocists are advised to evoid the area if at all possible during the posted time.

The Minsstry wishes to thank motorists for your assistance in this matter, and apologies in advance
for any inconvenience coased.

Sioned:

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works



YY ta\ 4-m7yea Licence Bill aims

to create review
board for appeals

“The Review Board will
be required to render its
decision in writing,
including its reasons for the
decision, within thirty days
of an appeal to the Board.”



Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham

IN ADDITION to imple-
menting a new fee structure,
the 2010 Business Licence
Bill introduced in the House
of Assembly yesterday also
seeks to create a Licence
Review Board to hear
appeals on exactly why
applications for licences
have been refused.

This Board will replace
the Supreme Court as the
arbiter of business licence
appeals and have the powers
of a magistrate for com-
pelling the attendance of
persons to give evidence on
oath and for the production
and inspection of docu-
ments, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said.

During his contribution to
the Bill yesterday, Mr
Ingraham said that for New
Providence appeals, the
Review Board will be made
up of a maximum of seven
members, including a chair-
man, appointed by the Min-
ister of Finance.

The constitution of
Boards in Grand Bahama
and the Family Islands will
be slightly different in order
to better respond to local
needs. Such Boards he said
will consist of up to five
members appointed by the
Minister, including the chair-
man, a member of the New
Providence Board and two
members from the Local
Government districts, one
of whom shall be from the
district in which the appeal-
ing business is located.

“Except where prescribed
by regulation, the Board will
be empowered to establish
its own operating proce-
dures. As well, the Board
will have the authority to
make, on its own initiative,
investigations and inquiries
and seek and receive evi-
dence additional to that ten-
dered by the parties to any
appeal.

“The Review Board will
be required to render its
decision in writing, includ-
ing its reasons for the deci-

sion, within thirty days of an
appeal to the Board. The
appeals themselves will be
required to be lodged within
21 days of the decision by
the Secretary,” he said.

In the new Business
Licence Bill a distinction has
been made _ between
offences of a fraudulent
nature and all other
offences. For any action that
is proven to be fraudulent,
the Prime Minister said that
there will no longer be an
option between a fine of
$10,000 and imprisonment
for two years. Such offences
he said will automatically
carry a prison term, which
will not exceed two years.

Penalty

“For other types of
offences such as carrying on
a business without a licence,
obstructing the Secretary in
the exercise of his functions,
or failing to maintain
accounts and records as
required, for example, the
penalty will be a fine of
$5,000 plus the sum of $100
for each day the offence
continues after the date to
which the conviction relates.
These amounts are more
reasonable and straightfor-
ward than the current struc-
ture of fines for such
offences.

“In particular, the possi-
bility of confiscating goods,
machinery and equipment
where a business operates
without a licence has been
eliminated. For offences
committed by corporations
or firms, every director, sec-
retary and officer of the cor-
poration or every partner in
the firm, as the case may be,
will be guilty of the offence
and liable to a like penalty
as the corporation or firm.

“To simplify the adminis-
tration of penalties, the Bill
proposes to grant the power
to the Secretary to com-
pound offences where he is
satisfied that an offence has



been committed in respect
of which a fine is prescribed.
Such power will only be
exercisable where the per-
son admits in writing that he
has committed the offence
and requests the Secretary
to deal with it,” he said.

This new Business
Licence Bill also seeks to
tighten up the various
exemptions from the
requirement to pay business
licences.

“For one,” Mr Ingraham
said, “only ecclesiastical,
charitable and cultural insti-
tutions and organizations
registered as non-profit enti-
ties within The Bahamas will
be eligible for exemption.
As such, all institutions
operating for profit, such as
private schools, will be sub-
ject to the requirement to
pay business licence tax.

“The same treatment will
apply to medical clinics and
hospitals operating other
than in the service of the
government or of a public
body. As well, a telecommu-
nication service subject toa
licence under section 21 of
the Broadcasting Act will no
longer be exempt but will
be subject to an annual busi-
ness licence tax of three per
cent of gross revenue.

“As a means of rationalis-
ing the various fees and tax-
es paid by the private sec-
tor, the Bill proposes to
incorporate into the new
Business Licence Act the
present annual fees imposed
on the assets of Banks and
Trust Companies appointed
by the Controller of
Exchange as authorised
dealers as defined in para-
graph one of Regulation 42
of the Exchange Control
Regulations. Similarly, the
new Act will also incorpo-
rate the taxes imposed on
insurance companies’ gross
premiums collected in
respect of local policies.”

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 7



Woman intends to
run against PM
in North Abaco
FROM page one

their development.”

Forty-four-year-old Ms McIntosh
ran unsuccessfully in the constituen-
cy of North Abaco in 2002.

In a release issued yesterday she
said that “returning to Abaco has
been an issue that has been in my
most earnest and prayerful consider-
ation for a extended time,” adding
that “the sensitive proposal of con-
testing a seat now occupied by the
sitting Prime Minister and leader of
the country, presents a very volatile
situation for a relative newcomer to
front line politics, such as myself.”

However, Ms McIntosh said that
with violent crime on the rise and
the “economic predicament for
many residents of the country at a
critical level” people coming for-
ward to represent the nation must
be “men and women of inspiration
and courage.”

Ms McIntosh said her party

FROM page one

China government is a critical
component to enable the Baha
Mar project to move forward.
We strongly believe that the cre-
ation of this world class resort
will significantly benefit the
Bahamas and all Bahamians. We
now await Bahamian govern-
mental approval, which will
enable us to begin work on the
resort’s construction.
“Ultimately, our project will
result in the creation of 11,000
Bahamian jobs, including 6-7,000
new permanent positions. This
will be the most substantial single



intends to create a “new political
culture.”

They are also calling for anyone
who wishes to run under their ban-
ner in the 2012 general election to
apply to the party.

She said that the party is looking
for people of “like minds and philo-
sophical ideas” who wish to serve
their country rather than them-
selves.

“In the vein of gender equality,
the BCP wishes to field 17-19
women as candidates in the elec-
tion, close to 50 per cent of the pool,
giving equal access to young women



BAHA MAR CHAIRMAN

Sarkis Izmirlian

job stimulus opportunity the
Bahamas has ever experienced,”
he said.

According to Mr Izmirlian, the
first action that Baha Mar will
undertake following the Bahami-
an government’s approval will
be the awarding of almost $60
million of construction contracts
to six Bahamian contractors rep-
resenting carly infrastructure
works needed to prepare the
resort site.

Two months after the Bahami-
an government’s approval, Baha
Mar expects that “several hun-
dred Bahamian jobs” will be cre-
ated involving the construction
of the new commercial village
and work to re-route West Bay
Street and the JFK Connector.

“It is anticipated that Baha
Mar will make the Bahamas one
of the premier tourist locations in

Chinese government
Says ‘yes’ to Baha Mar

the world,” read a statement
issued on behalf of the project.
“Baha Mar will draw millions of
vacationers and business trav-
ellers every year to the resort’s
six hotels, with almost 3,500
rooms and condos, the largest
casino in the Caribbean, the
largest convention centre in the
Bahamas, a world-class golf
course, retail village and much
more.

“Baha Mar will employ
approximately 4,000 Bahamians
over the life of the construction
period, expected to last almost
four years. Once the resort is ful-
ly operating, approximately 98
per cent of the staff will be
Bahamian nationals,” the news
release said.

Man accused of defrauding

local bank of $100,000

and men wanting to make them-
selves available to serve the nation
in political service,” said Ms McIn-
tosh.

The party has designed “a series
of workshops, training sessions, lit-
mus testing and interviews for candi-
dates with the primary goal of iden-
tifying people with integrity,
courage, honesty, passion and Chris-
tian standards” who wish to “pro-
vide leadership to the nation,” said
the statement.

Those interested in applying can
contact Bahamasconstitutionpar-
ty@gmail.com, visit the website
Bahamasyouthrenewal.com, or send
a letter by mail to P. O. Box N-7938,

FROM page one

It is alleged that Gaitor forged several Roy-
al Bank of Canada cheques and a First
Caribbean Bank cheque.

According to court dockets, Gaitor forged
Royal Bank of Canada cheques drawn on the
accounts of Deltec Bank and Trust Limited
and Harbourside Marine and Bahamas
Supermarkets Limited. It is further alleged
that the cheques ranging from $2,550 to $8,300
were made payable to Teran Moss, Therez
Johnson, Dario Taylor, D’Amatto Deveaux,
Peggy Joseph and Dwight Miller. A First
Caribbean Bank cheque drawn on the account
of Credit Suisse in the sum of $18,550 was
made payable to Johnathan Adderley.

It is claimed that Gaitor used fraudulent

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cheques to obtain $114,450 from Common-
wealth Bank this year as well as $6,000 from
the Bank of the Bahamas. According to court
dockets, Gaitor uttered fraudulent cheques
in the amounts varying from $500 to $55,000
on one alleged occasion.

Gaitor, who was represented by attorney
Davard Francis, pleaded not guilty to the long
list of charges and opted for a summary trial
in the Magistrate’s Court. The matters were
transferred to Court One, Bank Lane, for fix-
ture on August 6.

Also appearing in court with Gaitor yes-
terday were Deandro Munnings, 19,
Johnathan Adderley, 21, and Teran Moss, 20.
They are all accused of conspiring on Thurs-
day, July 15, to commit fraud. They all plead-
ed not guilty.













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Police bail was extended for Munnings,
Adderley and Moss. Dario Taylor, 20, and
Teran Moss are also accused of abatement
to commit fraud. They pleaded not guilty to
the charge and their police bail was extended.

Therez Johnson was also arraigned with
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Attorney Francis told the court yesterday
that his client had voluntarily turned himself
in to police after learning that he was wanted
for questioning. Mr Francis said Gaitor had
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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BEC is more than a dirty
word on Abaco these days

TOUGH CALL

By LARRY SMITH

FOR months during the
busiest and hottest season of
the year, the state-owned util-
ity has been unable to provide
steady power for the country's
third largest economy. This has
led to rising anger among the
island's 15,000 residents as well
as bitter complaints from
departing tourists.

Craig Roberts, owner of the
Bahama Beach Club in Trea-
sure Cay, said customers were
demanding refunds, with some
saying they would not return.
Peggy Thompson of Hope
Town Hideaways, a property
management business, said
many guests had to either
move to cottages with a gener-
ator, or were giving up and
demanding their money back.

"BEC has effectively ruined
our tourist season and that will
reverberate for the next sev-
eral summers.

“Our visitors are very angry
and leaving,” one resident told
me.

"We don't get any informa-
tion from BEC on anything.
They do not want to talk.
Everything is referred to Nas-
sau."

The power cuts have been
ongoing since May, almost dai-
ly and often for as long as eight
or 10 hours at a time — occa-
sionally up to 13 hours. And
until last week, when the prime
minister raised the matter in
Parliament, BEC has had little
to say about them.

"These interruptions are a
problem Abaco is all too famil-
lar with and one that BEC is
actively working to improve,"
the corporation said in a press
statement issued last Friday.

"The present challenges are
due to faults that developed
on a few generators, coupled
with a shortage of lubricating
oil.”

But behind that soothing
tone lies a disturbing reality.
Sources on Abaco say the oil
shortage was due to BEC's
inability to approve pre-pay-





=?



1 ARRY SMITH

ment for suppliers who are
refusing to extend credit to the
financially troubled corpora-
tion. The latest scuttlebutt is
that Shell, which holds the cur-
rent BEC fuel contract, is
owed some $40 million by the
corporation.

Last Thursday, BEC had to
airlift - presumably at great
cost — six 55-gallon drums of
lube oil into Marsh Harbour
prior to the prime minister's
visit on Saturday — probably
for generators that have just
been repaired.

This is despite the fact that a
local supplier was willing to
provide the oil but insisted on
a purchase order first.

According to a well-placed
BEC source, “literally all hell
broke loose at the old plant in
Murphy Town on June 13. It is
possible the lube oil run-out is
reflective of gross negligence
on someone's part as suggested
by the PM, but there are other
possibilities such as late deliv-
ery from the supplier, or non-
payment to the supplier for
prior shipments resulting in a
longer than normal delivery
time. Many suppliers are now
requiring BEC to make
advance payment for goods
and services because of the
corporation's financial situa-
tion."

The source also referred to
stories circulating in Marsh
Harbour that BEC wouldn't
fix the old generators because
they were waiting for the new
$105 million Wilson City pow-
er plant to come on stream.

"We are working to get a
1.6 MW unit that has been out
for more than a year, as well as
two 1.6 MW units that have
been out since the fire that

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destroyed associated
switchgear six months ago,
back in service," the source
told me earlier this month. "A
prior reluctance to fix genera-
tors in the existing station may
be one reason why those
engines were sitting idle fol-
lowing the fire."

Meanwhile, the timeline for
bringing the new Wilson City
plant on stream has been
steadily pushed back from the
original date of last April. BEC
likes to blame the environmen-
talist opposition to the new
plant for this debacle. Accord-
ing to last Friday's press state-
ment: "Delays and adjustments
to the project, initially arising
from an injunction being filed
to stop construction, as well as
subsequent, ongoing litigation
challenges and other consider-
ations have resulted in the new
plant not yet producing pow-
er."

There were three major
components to the huge Wil-
son City project - a 48
megawatt fossil fuel power
plant, a two-mile pipeline from
a new fuel terminal in the
Bight of Old Robinson, and 20
miles of new transmission lines
to supply electricity to the
Marsh Harbour grid. A Sal-
vadoran construction compa-
ny was subcontracted by MAN
Diesel of Canada to build the
plant and construction began
last September.

After plans to use heavy
fuel oil were scrapped earlier
this year due to pollution con-
cerns, it was proposed to truck
diesel oil to the new plant from
the port at Marsh Harbour — so
the pipeline was cancelled.
There are storage facilities for
2.5 million gallons of fuel at









the new plant and observers
say about 20,000 gallons a day
are needed to operate the new
plant. This means hundreds of
four-hour tanker truck round
trips to fill the storage tanks
as well as regular ongoing
deliveries to keep them sup-
plied. BEC has been indicat-
ing that one of the new gener-
ators will be put online soon.
But it was only last week that
the Wilson City plant was con-
nected to the Marsh Harbour
distribution system for start-
up and testing procedures.
However, since the contractors
need about I MW of steady
power to begin testing, it is dif-
ficult to see how this can hap-
pen under the present chaotic
circumstances.

On top of that is the fact
that the transmission lines
from the new plant to Marsh
Harbour still have to be
upgraded, as they are not
heavy enough to take all the
new power.

However, experts say the
existing lines should be able to
handle the output from a single
generator.

Another critical component
is a dedicated communications
link from the new plant's con-
trol room to the existing
plant's control room.

This is for coordinating the
testing and connection of the
new generator. Experts say
that bringing a 12 MW genera-
tor online must be carefully
handled or it will destroy half
the electrical items in Marsh
Harbour.

So while BEC scrambles to
bring one of the four new gen-
erators at Wilson City on
stream to help resolve their
immediate difficulties, comple-
tion of the entire project is
probably a year behind sched-
ule.

HISTORY

BEC operates 29 generating
plants around the country.
Installed capacity on New
Providence is around 340 MW,
with another 100 MW distrib-
uted across plants on the fam-
ily islands. Demand for elec-
tricity is growing at 3-5 per
cent a year in the Bahamas.

The installed generating
capacity on Abaco is about 30
MW, comprised of many small
units. Peak demand has been
around 19 MW recently, but
the difficulties experienced by
BEC - and the privately
owned Grand Bahama Power
Company — in meeting rising
demand on our three most
populated islands is cause for
great concern in terms of the
country's economic future.

The original commercial
utility on Abaco was Marsh
Harbour Power & Light, start-
ed in the 1950s by local busi-
nessmen Chris Roberts and
Lucien Stratton when the
island first began to develop.
In the late 1960s this opera-
tion was acquired by an Amer-

ican engineer named Phil Fer-
rar, who renamed it Abaco
Electric.

Private power stations were
also set up on Man o' War Cay
by Vernon Albury, on Green
Turtle Cay by Bill Elden, at
Cooper's Town by Joe Sawyer,
at Crossing Rocks by Frank
Hepburn, and at Treasure Cay.
Grand Cay was supplied by the
developers of Walker's Cay.
Elbow Cay was supplied by
Abaco Electric.

All of these operations were
gradually acquired by BEC,
beginning with Cooper's Town
in 1975. The main utility -
Abaco Electric — was acquired
in 1987, when the owner was
operating on a year-to-year
franchise.

"IT don't know of any pri-
vate producers that wanted to
get out of the business," one
oldtimer told me.

"They would have stayed on
if they could have gotten better
franchise terms.

“My recollection is that gov-
ernment pushed the issue of
nationalization. But some sys-
tems were marginal in terms
of infrastructure, so perhaps
this consolidation by BEC was
necessary.”

People often point to the
success of the privately owned
Spanish Wells power compa-
ny when discussing these mat-
ters. But that company pro-
vides power for a single com-
pact community. And although
by most accounts it is super
efficient, it nevertheless
charges a much higher rate
than BEC's out island rate,
which is subsidised by con-
sumers in Nassau.

On Abaco, it is unlikely that
private operators would have
invested in expanding their sys-
tems into remote communities.
Each operator serviced his par-
ticular area and expanded into
nearby areas where there were
sufficient paying customers.
But BEC services all these
communities — except for the
predominately expatriate vil-
lage of Little Harbour, which is
powered by solar panels and
backup generators.

That is the main argument
for a public utility. But BEC’s
bureaucratic and uncommu-
nicative approach to its cus-
tomers, its operational ineffi-
ciencies, union featherbedding
and financial irresponsibility
are more than enough to justi-
fy a major overhaul and
rethink of this state corpora-
tion.

THE SHERROD
CHARADE

The Shirley Sherrod story
is an indictment of US Presi-
dent Barack Obama any way
you look at it, in the view of his
craziest critics.

First, there was the affront
that a black public official was
promoting discrimination
against white farmers. It was
caught on tape, so what was

Obama going to do about it?

Then there was the rush to
judgment that led to Sherrod's
hasty firing July 19 based on a
doctored YouTube video of a
speech she gave to the
NAACP.

There are so many dimen-
sions to this story that it's hard
to choose among them. But
let's start with the woman her-
self — Shirley Sherrod, direc-
tor of Rural Development for
the US Department of Agri-
culture in Georgia until last
week.

Her father was the victim
of a hate crime in 1965. A Bap-
tist deacon and farmer, he was
shot to death by a white
farmer, and no charges were
returned against the shooter
by an all-white grand jury.
There are scores of similar
unsolved deaths from that era.

Then there's Andrew Breit-
bart, the right wing commenta-
tor who published the doc-
tored Sherrod video on his
website (Biggovernment.com

). His posting of the video was
part of a tit for tat cultural war,
with each side accusing the
other of playing the race card.

The NAACP and others
complained about anti-black
racism in the Tea Party move-
ment, so the Sherrod speech
excerpt was published to make
it appear that the NAACP
supported racism against
whites.

Breitbart claims the charges
against the Tea Party are part
of an effort to discredit the
movement prior to the Novem-
ber mid-term elections. Oppo-
nents accuse Tea Party activists
of trying to "delegitimise"” the
elected US government —
about a third of its supporters
believe Obama is a foreigner
who is moving the US towards
communism.

The administration's swift
and thoughtless reaction to the
Sherrod video is a telling indi-
cation of the vitriol that per-
meates media coverage of
American politics these days.
It was apparently an attempt
to head off a right-wing bar-
rage on cable news.

Meanwhile, the history of
the USDA itself is just as
incredible as the deliberate
smear campaign that led to
Sherrod's forced resignation.

Massive financial settle-
ments have been reached in
lawsuits filed by minority farm-
ers alleging discrimination by
the agency over many decades.

The fact that a doctored
video designed to create an
outcome became the news of
the day demonstrates the valid-
ity of some time-honoured
advice to journalists — if your
mother tells you she loves you,
check it out first.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

he BAC Bahamas Bank

INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR THE POSITION OF

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‘Indepth knowledge of compliance, regulatory quidelines and the related reporting

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CONTACT

Interested persons should submit a cover letter, resume plus copies of any
degrees and professional certifications electronically to

Igonsalves@bs.bac.net by 15-Aug-2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

Sp

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28,

PAGE 9









4



=

. =
Z ira

ts

2010



ALL 1 DO IS WIN: Pro middleweight boxer Taureano Johnson (AP file photo) won a first round knock-
out over Roy Ashworth at the Fitzgerald Hotel and Casino in Tunica, Mississippi.



Team Bahamas
returns from IAAF
World Juniors

TEAM Bahamas returned
home yesterday afternoon fol-
lowing a series of outstand-
ing performances and a
record-setting 400m feat at
the 13th IAAF World Junior
Championships in Moncton
city.

More than 1,400 athletes
and team officials from 170
countries converged in New
Brunswick, Canada, for the
track and field meet.

The Bahamas was high-
lighted by Shaunae Miller’s
gold medal performance in
the women's 400m with a
time of 52.52s.

In the tightly contested
final, she handily defeated
2010 world junior leader Mar-
garet Etim of Nigeria who fin-
ished in 53.05s, while Bianca
Razor of Romania finished
third in 53.17s.

Miller set a new junior
national record in the 400m
and became the second gold
medallist for the Bahamas at
the meet. In Poland in 2008,
Olympian Sheniqua 'Q' Fer-
guson captured the gold in the
200m.

200m

In the women's 200m, both
Anthonique Strachan and
Tynia Gaither reached the
semifinal but were unable to
advance. Strachan finished
fourth in heat four in 23.99s
while Gaither finished 8th in
heat one in 24.48s.

In the men's 200m, Trevo-
rano Mackey reached the
semifinal round as well, but
failed to advance. He finished
seventh in heat two in a time
of 21.71s. Laron Hield fin-
ished eighth in heat five of
the opening round with a time
of 22.15s.

Long Jump

Raymond Higgs finished
11th in the men's long jump
with a leap of 7.09m.

High Jump

Higgs finished 15th in
group B of the High Jump
qualification with a leap of
2.00m, which was a season's
best.

Triple Jump

Latario Minns finished
eighth in group A with a leap
of 15.35m in the opening







Photos by Stanley Mitchell





REPRESENTING: The Bahamas was highlighted by Shaunae Miller's
gold medal performance in the women's 400m.

round of the event.

400m

Rashan Brown just missed
out on a berth to the final
after she finished fifth in semi-
final three in 54.14s.

In the men's 400m, Stephen
Newbold struggled in the pre-
liminaries of the men's 400m
and finished seventh in 50.62s.

100m

V'Alonee Robinson's bid
in the women's 100m ended
in the semifinals where she
finished seventh in 12.14s.

Marvar Etienne finished
fourth in heat five, however,
her time of 12.12s was not fast
enough to qualify for the
semifinals.

Warren Fraser advanced to
the second round of the men's
century when he took heat
four in 10.46s, a new personal
best.

He advanced to the semi-
final where he ran in heat
three and finished third in
10.72s

Geno Jones finished third

in heat three in 10.66s, but
failed to advance to the next
round.

100mH

Ivanique Kemp turned in a
personal best in the prelimi-
nary round with a time of
13.58s. She finished fifth in
heat two in a time of 13.77s.

400mH

Nejmi Burnside posted a
time of 54.17s in the prelimi-
naries of the men's 400m hur-
dles, good enough for seventh
place.

1600m relay

In the men's event, Burn-
side, Earl Rahming, Alonzo
Russell and Delano Deveaux
finished eighth in heat two in
3:14.42.

In the women's event,
Miller, Brown, Katrina Sey-
mour and Amara Jones
reached the final and just
barely missed out on a medal
when they finished in fourth
place, setting a new junior
national record of 3:33.43s.



By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

{ter a stellar

amateur

career, Tau-

reano John-

son shows no
signs of slowing down early
in his professional career and
continues to sport an unde-
feated record.

Johnson won another mid-
dleweight bout with a first
round knockout over Roy
Ashworth at the Fitzgerald
Hotel and Casino in Tunica,
Mississippi. He moved to a 4-
0 record with four knockouts
after dominating Ashworth,
who hails from Luke Charles,
Louisiana.

The 26-year-old Olympian
floored Ashworth, who fell to
a win-loss record of 5-9, just
1:31 into the opening round.

Both fighters brawled toe-
to-toe early on, but Johnson
became the first to assert his
advantage by forcing his
opponent into a corner.









CAC Games:
Eve throws

her season’s
best for 4th...

See page 10

laureano
§ undefeated

Pro boxer wins
middleweight bout
with Ist round KO

After gaining an advantage,
forcing Asworth on the ropes,
Johnson delivered a right
uppercut to floor him for
good. Johnson's barrage of
punches did more damage
than initially suspected.

Hours after the fight,
reports surfaced that Ash-
worth suffered breathing and
dizziness and was airlifted to
the nearest hospital where he
was treated for fractured
facial bones and released.

Johnson's record includes
wins over Cleoney Fuqua,
Ryan Bianchini, Anthony
Bowman at venues through-
out the US, including Ten-

nessee, Georgia and Missis-
sippi.

Johnson rose to promi-
nence in the amateur ranks
with his effort against PanAm
Champion Pedro Lima at the
first Olympic qualifier where
he lost a close bout.

At the second qualifier, he
won the rematch 10:6 and
earned a berth to the 2008
Summer Olympic Games in
Beijing, China.

He won a pair of matches
in the welterweight division
and finished just one bout shy
of the country's first ever
medal in boxing at the
Olympics.

Bahamas’ junior soccer
team fails to qualify
for FIFA U-17 WCup

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
iceCe)ecx1acCAN AT OLIN sdnalse le MALslE

A VALIANT effort by the Bahamas’
junior national soccer team players result-
Xo BUONO UUme) MmpONTTKecmysUOOmBote Tan styialotes
opponents. But they failed to qualify for
the next round of international competi-
tion.

The under-17 boys’ team hosted
Bermuda at the Roscoe Davies soccer
field in one segment of the long road to
qualification for the 2010 FIFA under-17
World Cup.

In match one, Bermuda stunned the
Bahamas with a lopsided 5-1 victory,
which all but sealed qualification for the
next round.

Terry Delancey was the lone goal scor-
er for the Bahamas when he netted a goal
in the 63rd minute.

In match two, the Bahamas delivered a
stellar defensive effort as they held the
Bermudians scoreless for the 1-0 win, a
stark contrast to the five goals given up in
out Meolen

Harold Anthor's left-footed goal in the
76th minute was the lone score of the
match and gave the Bahamas the edge
for the win.

Bermuda was able to advance to the
regional qualifier by virtue of aggregate
goals scored with a 5-2 advantage.

National team head coach Cory Fraser
said the team started uncharacteristically
COMA

"The guys really underplayed in the
first game, but I credit that to them being
nervous. A lot of them were really affect-
ed by the crowd and representing the
country for the first time,” he said.

"In game two we played together and
followed the game plan. The guys got
more accustomed to international com-
petition and they knew what they had to
do to come out and beat this team."

The regional qualifier is scheduled to
take place in Trinidad & Tobago August
18-22. And the FIFA U-17 World Cup is
set for Mexico in 2011.

Brazil and Nigeria are the most suc-
cessful countries in the history of the tour-
nament with three titles won by each side.

1
1
1

f Ni! 1 h iV

eee





400m relay

In the men's 400m, Mack-
ey, Fraser, Jones and Alfred
Higgs (above) finished in

40.58s for a season's best time,
but failed to advance to the
final. The women's team of
Robinson, Etienne, Gaither

and Deandra Whitehorne fin-
ished in a season's best time
of 45.45s, but they failed to
advance.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

HIGHLIGHTS: XX|I Central American & Caribbean Games in Puerto Rico...





Bahamas’ tennis
Stars continue
to deliver

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net





TEAM Bahamas
continues to deliver
an impressive per-
formance on its way
to the latter stages
of the respective
draw at the XXI
Central American
and Caribbean
(CAC) Games in
Mayaguez, Puerto
Rico.

The women's
draw has featured
some of the
strongest play for ADVANCES: L Russell.
the Bahamas with
both Kerrie Cartwright and Larikah Russell
recording wins yesterday to advance to the
quarterfinal.

Cartwright, the fifth ranked player in the
draw, received a bye in round one and hand-
ily dispatched her opponent in yesterday's
second round. She topped Jessica Roland in
straight sets, 6-2, 6-3 to advance to the quar-
terfinals.

In her second round match, Russell out-
lasted the top ranked player of the draw in
a three-set thriller to advance to the quar-
terfinal. With a 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 win, Russell
eliminated Marina Giral of Venezuela. In
her opening round match, she dominated
Taylor Davis of the US Virgin Islands 6-0, 6-
0.







In the quarterfinals, Cartwright will face
Adriana Perez of Venezuela, the fourth
ranked player in the draw. Perez breezed by
Melissa Golfin of Costa Rica 6-2, 6-1 yes-

terday to advance.

Russell will face Francesca Segarelli of
the Dominican Republic in her quarterfinal
match, after Segarelli got by Kristen Wee-
don of Guatemala 6-1, 6-1.

On the men's side of the draw, the final
Bahamian player Marvin Rolle was elimi-
nated when he lost a hard-fought, straight-
set match to Christopher Diaz of
Guatemala. He suffered a 6-7, 4-6 defeat
at the hands of the fifth ranked player of the
men's draw.

Olympian Devin Mullings was eliminated
in the opening round when he suffered a
lopsided loss at the hands of Marcelo Areva-
lo of El Salvador, the fourth seeded player
of the draw, 1-6, 4-6.

In women's doubles, Russell and Nikkita
Fountain continued their stellar play with a
three-set match to oust the third ranked
team of the draw. The duo defeated home
favourites Monica Puig and Jessica Roland
of Puerto Rico, 1-6, 6-4, 10-8 to advance to
the semifinals of the draw.

Russell and Fountain will face Mariana
Muci Andrea Amiz in the semifinals after
they blanked Caitlin Gordon and Tara Lam-
bert of Bermuda 6-0, 6-0.

Russell and Fountain easily advanced to
the quarterfinals after dispatching of Rox-
ann Williams and Lerissa Morris of St Vin-
cent and the Grenadines in straight sets, 6-
1, 6-1.

In men's doubles, Rolle was able to exact
revenge on Diaz when he and Mullings
paired to advance to the semifinals. They
defeated Diaz and Sebastian Vidal, 6-4, 6-2
and will face Piero Luisi and Jose de Armas
of Venezuela.

In the opening round, they advanced with
a straight-set win over David Thomas and
Neal Towlson of Bermuda, 6-0, 7-5.





|

Andretti Bain places fourth in 400m final...

~







HOMESTRETCH: Olympian Andretti Bain (far right) placed fourth in the 400m final Monday night. Costa
Rica’s Nery Brenes (center), won the gold and Jamaica’s Allodin Fothergill (far left) the bronze at the CAC
Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on July 26, 2010.

(AP Photo)








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BEST EFFORT: Olympian
Lavern Eve (shown in this
file photo) placed fourth in
the women’s javelin at the
CAC Games.







TRIBUNE SPORTS



b



Eve tosses her
season’s best to
place fourth

A BUSY Monday night for
Team Bahamas at the XXI
CAC Games turned into a
disappointing session Tues-
day on the track but a wel-
come surprise on the field.

Olympian Lavern Eve was
the lone bright spot for the
Bahamas when she turned in
a fourth place finish in the
women's javelin.

Her toss of 51.02m was a
season's best for the veteran
thrower and came on her final

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¢ Nathaniel McKinney disqualified
for false start in semifinal

¢ Jamail Rolle finishes third in
semis but doesn’t advance

attempt.

Kateema Riettie of Jamaica
took the gold medal in
53.77m, Fresa Nunez of the
Dominican Republic won sil-
ver in 52.96m while Maria
Murillo of Colombia won
bronze with a throw of
51.29m.

The 200m proved to be
unkind as neither athlete in
the men's event was able to
advance to the final.

Nathaniel McKinney was
disqualified in semifinal one
due to a false start while
Jamail Rolle finished third in
semifinal four in 21.06s and
failed to advance.

Athletics breaks today and
is expected to continue
tomorrow with qualification
in both 4x100m events and
Olympian Leevan “Super-
man” Sands in the triple
jump.





Amertil's gold triumph





NUMBER 107: Olympian Christine Amertil (right) and Grenada’s
Trish Bartholomew (left) sprint to the finish line in the women’s 400
final at the CAC Games on July 26, 2010. Amertil won the gold.

(AP Photo)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 11



Human Resources Association
holds meeting on NI Benefit Plan

THE Bahamas Human
Resources Association
held a meeting on the
highly anticipated Nation-
al Insurance Benefit Plan
as part of its efforts to pro-
vide a forum to discuss
human resources and
employment issues.

The speakers were:
actuary consultant at the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) Derek Osborne and
public relations manager
Pandora Butler.

Mr Osborne stated that
NIB is a “social premise”
that serves people by aid-
ing with basic social needs.

For example, NIB offers
benefits covering the
death of a parent, sickness
and maternity benefits, as
well as a pension benefit.

The pension benefit is
the only form of retire-
ment savings that most
Bahamians have access to,
he said.

Nevertheless, Mr
Osborne insisted that NIB
“has to be relevant.” In

the context of mass lay-
offs and a declining econo-
my, the government there-
fore implemented an
Unemployment Benefit
Scheme to assist the newly
unemployed.

However, according to
Mr Osborne, NIB has lost
its relevance for some
Bahamians, for example
those who earn more than
$400 per week.

“The goal has to be reg-
ular changes in the NI
scheme to stay relevant to
the realities of life,” he
said.

Pandora Butler noted
that National Insurance
was “never intended to
take full care of people
when there is a problem,”
but rather to provide par-
tial income replacement.

She said many Bahami-
ans think they have paid a
great deal for NI over the
years, but do not realise
that someone making reg-
ular contributions since
the scheme’s inception in

1972 would have paid just
over $16,000.

“There is no doubt that
if we live long enough, we
get more out of it than we
put into it,” she said.

The speakers took a
number of questions from
the audience, including:

e Q: If someone retires
at age 60 and claims bene-
fits before age 65, what
will their benefits be?

e A: The individual
receives 80 per cent of
what they are entitled to.
If you wait, the benefit
increases by 4 per cent
each year. Therefore, at
age 61 the benefit increas-
es to 84 per cent.

¢ Q: Will summer stu-
dents be subject to nation-
al insurance increases?

e A: No

¢ Q: How do sickness
and maternity benefits
work when taken consecu-

tively?

¢ A: NI will cease sick-
ness benefits six weeks pri-
or to the commencement
of maternity leave. This six
week period is considered
maternity leave.

¢ Q: What does the
“permanent phase” of the
unemployment benefit
mean?

¢ A: This means that the
payment aspect of the
Unemployment Benefit
Programme will be
enforced, effective June 1,
2010 and employers and
employees will begin pay-
ing an increase of 0.5 per
cent.

The Bahamas Human
Resources Development
Association is a national,
non-profit organisation
and an affiliate of the

Society for Human
Resources Management
(SHRM).

BHRDA’s objective is
to provide a forum for

Director of Antiquities, Monuments ant
Museums Corporation ‘expected to step down’

FROM page one

Minister of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Charles Maynard said that Dr Tin-
ker “applied for a leave of absence and
has been contemplating retirement.”

Nonetheless, Mr Maynard noted that
the board has been directed to under-
take a restructuring of the corporation
so that they can fulfil their tasks and
objectives while Dr Tinker takes his

vacation.

A search has already been commis-

sioned to identify a new director of the
corporation, with the Minister confirm-
ing that he anticipates to fill this post
with someone “hopefully” from within
the wider public service arena.

The development comes after an
investigation was launched into the
handling of the Antiquities, Monu-
ments, and Museums Corporation,
although Mr Maynard denied the two
matters were linked.

Having been appointed to the post in
1998 when the corporation was first

formed, Minister Maynard said that
Dr Tinker is a fully pensionable public
servant.

For some time now, questions have
been raised about the management of
the AMMC board. According to
sources with intimate knowledge of
the matter, it was considered that the
board was not functioning as intended.

Reportedly decisions were being

made without the board’s approval or

involvement, raising questions over the
corporation’s overall management.

Director has ‘no knowledge’
of low morale at Met Office

FROM page one

not brought to his atten-
tion until they were made
public in the media. He
added that he and his
senior management team
adhere to the guidelines of
the Department of Public
Service.

"We don’t know of it,"
said Mr Rolle, referring to
himself and deputy direc-
tors Jeffrey Simmons and
Basil Dean who were pre-
sent during a telephone
interview with The Tribune
yesterday. "We don't have
those sources at all (so) we
can't respond."

"We do our duties at the
department of meteorology
as outlined by the Depart-
ment of Public Service and
the governing of the
department through its
policies and that's all I
want to say on the matter,"
said Mr Rolle when
pressed about claims of
micro-managing, or senior
management interfering
with the day-to-day func-
tions of persons at the
Meteorological Office.

When asked about com-
plaints that the department
still does not have a set of
guidelines to identify
severe weather formation,
Mr Rolle refused to answer
further questions, again
stating: "That's all I want
to say on the matter."

"Frustrated" sources
claim senior management
has only instituted a set of
protocols, or a chain of
command of who should be
contacted in the event of
severe weather, leaving it
to the discretion of each
forecaster to determine
what warrants a severe
weather alarm.

"There are no guidelines
in place at the Met Office
for issuing severe weather
warning, what he (the
director) has is a protocol.
The protocol he has in

place now says if a fore-
caster can determine on
the weather radar system
a severity or if you have
spotted a funnel cloud
forming you would go
ahead and issue a severe
weather warning, issued
first to NEMA, then the
director or the senior
deputy director.

"In most territories
around the world there are
steps. What good is a pro-
tocol without standard
operating procedures?
Issuing severe weather
warning is left to the dis-
cretion of the duty fore-
caster,” said a well-placed





re

source who asked to
remain anonymous.

The department was put
in the hot seat in March
after it failed to issue a
severe weather warning
ahead of a tornado that left
three workers at the
Freeport Container Port
dead in March, even
though reports of funnel
clouds had come into the
Meteorological Office in
Nassau beginning that
morning.

Back in March, officials
said this failure was due to
employee “negligence” and
a "breakdown in protocol."

This week, sources with-

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Make a Statement

in the department voiced
frustration about senior
management.

“In headquarters at
Oakes Field, they are mir-
co-managing the Met
Office. We have all the
necessary tools and mod-
els at hand but they are sit-
ting there and telling the
staff at the airport what to
do. It is demoralising,” said
one source. “This is the
lowest the morale has ever
been.”

Another source at the
Meteorological office said:
“The morale in that office
is under a snake’s belly. It’s
very poor.”

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THE MEETING was part of
efforts to provide a forum to
discuss human resources and
employment issues.

human resources profes-
sionals to enhance their
knowledge and skills in
the area of HR and to pro-
vide technical assistance
and support to its mem-
bers.

Meetings are held on the
third Wednesday of each
month.

The week of October 17,
2010, has been proclaimed
by the prime minister as
HR Professional’s Week.
A conference has been
planned for October 2010.
More details will be
announced soon.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



After not guilty verdict, the question remains:

WHO KILLED
HARL TAYLOR?

WITH Troyniko McNeil
now free, the question
remains: Who killed Harl
Taylor, and was there a link
between his death and the
unsolved murders of Dr
Thaddeus McDonald, and
AIDS activist Wellington
Adderley?

All of the men were bru-
tally slain in their homes
located within a short dis-
tance of each other, appar-
ently by people who they
knew well enough to let
inside. Taylor, who was
stabbed dozens of times,
and McDonald, who was
bludgeoned with an iron,
were killed within the space
of two days in November
2007. Adderley met his
death in strikingly similar
fashion six months later on
May 27, 2008, his throat slit
with a knife.

All three men, although
perhaps not so openly in
their lifetimes, were widely
recognised afterwards as
homosexuals.

Despite the apparent sim-
ilarities between the killings
and their own admission
that they were investigating
the possibility of a link
between the cases, police
said they found no evidence
that caused them to view
the murders as having been
committed by the same per-
son, or people.

Mistrial

Troyniko McNeil was
charged with the murder of
Harl Taylor nine months
after it happened, in August
2008. On Monday, he was
acquitted of the killing dur-
ing his second trial on the
charges. The first ended in a
mistrial in July 2009, after
a jury could not reach a
legally recognised verdict
on McNeil’s alleged guilt.

No one was ever charged
in connection or even iden-
tified as under suspicion in
the cases of Dr McDonald
and Mr Adderley.

An extensive archive of
reports relating to the
killing of Dr McDonald and
Mr Taylor, and later Mr
Adderley, provide details of
deaths that not surprising-
ly inspired significant spec-
ulation among the general
public and disquiet among
the gay community that a
“gay serial killer” could be

exter

~ 4



TROYNIKO MCNEIL was acquitted
in his second trial of the charges.

on the loose in Nassau.
Today we find ourselves no
closer to assurance that the
person or people who com-
mitted these gruesome
crimes will not do so again.

An acclaimed handbag
designer, Taylor, 37, was
found in his Mountbatten
House home on West Hill
Street on November 18,
2007 by a man police later
revealed as an off-duty
police officer and identified
in Mr Taylor’s trial as Jim-
my Bastian.

Mr Taylor’s killing came
within two days of that of
59-year-old Dr McDonald,
Dean of the Faculty of
Social and Educational
Studies at the College of the
Bahamas. Mr McDonald,
who lived on the adjacent
Queen’s Street, the location
of the US Embassy, and
within walking distance of
Mr Taylor’s home, had been
so brutally bludgeoned that
sources said he was almost
unrecognisable.

On the scene the morn-
ing that the designer’s body
was found, then assistant
commissioner of Police,
now Police Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade admit-
ted that part of the reason
he was there was to deter-
mine “whether these (mur-
ders) are connected or sep-
arate and apart.”

Police press liaison offi-
cer Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans said lat-
er that day that police con-
vened an emergency meet-

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ing that called for shifting
of manpower to allow for
extra police patrols in the
West Hill Street area and
its surrounds in response to
the attack.

Within days, police
admitted that they were
exploring the possibility of a
“gay connection” between
the murders, although this
has never been verified.

Insiders expressed fears
that the inquiries would “go
cold” because of the men’s
alleged high-level gay con-
nections and the possibility
that those who might know
something about the deaths
might not come forward for
fear of being “outed.”

Questions arose regard-
ing the ability of police to
independently investigate
the murders considering
that such an investigation
could possibly identify some
high profile, but closeted
homosexuals in high-places.

The location of the mur-
der of Dr McDonald in his
home near the US Embassy
led some to speculate that it
should have been relatively
simple to identify any sus-
pect in his killing and conse-
quently, perhaps that of Mr
Taylor.

“This case should be
pretty easy to solve. It is a
small community and
Queen Street where Thad-
deus was killed is under
CCTV surveillance from the
American Embassy,” a
source told The Tribune.

Motives

As for motives for the
murders of McDonald and
Taylor, speculation was
rampant.

Some spoke of a gay
relationship between Mr
Taylor and Mr McDonald
and the possible fury of a
third jealous party.

“Tt is understood that a
birthday party was held ear-
lier this month at which
there was a scene, when a
man who is said to have left
his wife and family to be
with Harl became angry
over an incident involving
a birthday cake. It is said
that Thaddeus offered Harl
the first piece of cake, trig-
gering off an angry scene,
with a third man becoming
extremely abusive. After-
wards, I gather there were

ram e

unpleasant exchanges,” said
a source days after the mur-
der of Taylor.

Seven Dominicans and
one Bahamian were taken
in for questioning in the
immediate wake of the
killing. The group were
chefs and waiters at a wed-
ding reception in the gar-
dens of Mountbatten House
the day before the design-
er’s body was found. Police
were able to get an exten-
sion that allowed them to
hold the group for 96 hours,
but all were eventually
released without charge.

By the end of January
2009, over two months after
the two bloody homicides,
police said they were no
closer to putting someone
before the courts for either
of the murders.

In April, lead police
investigator Assistant
Superintendent Leon
Bethel appealed to the pub-
lic to give detectives the
“breakthrough” they need-
ed to identify the killer,
revealing that police had
“strong forensic evidence
from both murder scenes.

“Tt’s just a matter of
matching this up with the
killer. We need to get this
person off the streets,” he
said.

Academics from COB
were said to have been
quizzed by officers at
around this time.

Later in the same month,
Bishop Simeon Hall of the
New Covenant Baptist
Church revealed that he was
threatened with death and
sexual violence by two men
during muffled phone con-
versations after he pressed
police for an update on the
investigation.

Meanwhile, it was on May
29th that AIDS activist and
Director of the Bahamas
National Network for Posi-
tive Living Wellington
Adderley was found slain in
his Delancey Street home,
within a mile of those of
both Mr Taylor and Dr
McDonald.

Fifty-one-year-old Mr
Adderley had suffered stab
wounds to the neck, with
sources telling The Tribune
that he had been “virtually
decapitated.”

In this case also, there
was no sign of forced entry
into the building. Asst Supt

c 60







iE:







Bethel again asserted that
police “could not say” that
there was anything connect-
ing the murders.

By June 11th, a man had
been questioned and
released in connection with
the killing of Mr Adderley.
Within days Marvin Wilson,
another gay man, was
stabbed to death in his Cen-
treville apartment. A 17-
year-old minor was charged
with that matter.

However, focus remained
on the possible connection
between the murders of
Taylor, McDonald and
Adderley.

Perception

Erin Greene, spokesper-
son for the gay advocacy
group the Rainbow
Alliance, said in June 2009
that the alliance remained
“very concerned about the
deaths of three prominent
gay men within the last
year.”

She said there was a per-
ception within the commu-
nity at large that “those two
murders (Taylor and
McDonald) may never be
solved” and called for a spe-
cial task force to investigate
the killings.

Shortly after, on June
26th, police named
Troyniko McNeil — son of
Mr Taylor’s former business
partner Troy McNeil - as a
person of interest in the
case seven months after
Taylor’s death. It soon
became known that he was
in the US, and had been so
since three days after Tay-
lor’s death.

In early August 2008 The
Tribune learned that a
senior foreign bank official
and a young police consta-
ble were taken in for ques-
tioning in connection with

HARL TAYLOR was murdered in 2007.

Taylor’s death. Nothing
more came of this.

Twenty-one-year-old
McNeil was brought back to
the Bahamas and charged
with Taylor’s murder on
August 22, 2009.

He pleaded not guilty.

On July 2, 2009 the first
trial opened, with then
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner telling
the court that there was evi-
dence that more than one
person was involved in the
murder.

A father of two, McNeil
was linked to the crime
scene through the finding of
his fingerprints on a door in
Mountbatten House.

No motive was ever given
for why he would want to
kill Taylor, and the trial
ended in a hung jury.

The young McNeil was
denied bail four times,
remaining in Her Majesty’s
Prison in the run up to and
throughout his trial and for
many months afterwards, as
he awaited a retrial.

On July 12, 2010,
McNeil’s second trial
opened in the Supreme
Court. Again, no motive
was given, but the prosecu-
tion noted how he left the
country shortly after Tay-
lor’s killing and called wit-
nesses who linked him to
the crime scene through evi-
dence that his DNA was
found on the murder
weapon and in two other
areas of the house. McNeil
claimed he was set up.

On Monday, a jury found
the 23 year old not guilty of
the crime after three hours
of deliberation.

So who did kill Harl Tay-
lor? His family, like those
of Dr Thaddeus McDonald
and Wellington Adderley,
now remain without
answers.

Harl Taylor’s mother
is left ‘distraught’

FROM page one

returned a 9-3 not guilty verdict in the retrial of
Troyniko McNeil who stood accused of Mr Taylor's

murder.

Despite his loss, yesterday lead prosecutor Franklyn
Williams praised the work of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and their assistance in getting the case to trial.

"The jury has rendered their verdict (but) the police
did an excellent job, they were meticulous in their evi-
dence taking, they were meticulous in their note-keep-
ing, they were meticulous in their evidence of chain of

custody in this matter.

"So [commend the police for the job that they did in
this matter, they provided a firm foundation for this
case," said the deputy director of public prosecutions at
the Attorney General's Office.

McNeil was acquitted on Monday of the November

2007 murder.

After the verdict was announced his father and Mr
Taylor's former business partner, Troy McNeil, shouted,
“Thank you, Jesus!” before racing out of the court-

room.

Moments later a visibly relieved McNeil left the court-
room a free man, swarmed by family and friends. He
declined to speak to the press.

His father said Troyniko has plans to pursue a medical
degree in Canada or England.

"My son has been vindicated and rightfully so. I think
we can now pick up the pieces and move on with our
lives,” Troy McNeil told reporters yesterday.

“My son is definitely going to go to university. It
won't be in the United States obviously until we get
that situation resolved but either Canada or England."

The 37-year-old handbag designer was found dead in
his bedroom at Mountbatten House, on West Hill Street,
with multiple stab wounds on November 18, 2007.

The jury returned with the not guilty verdict after

three hours of deliberation.

SEE STORY ABOVE

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| THE TRIBUNE
a ru

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

eeing ‘his dream





ine

WEDNESDAY,

Ur LY. 2.8.



2010

live, thrive and die’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

hree times per

week for four

hours Marcellus

Miller is

attached to a
dialysis machine in a hospital
to clean his blood. He is
stricken with diabetes, and
consequently kidney failure,
and also suffers from hyper-
tension.

However, through his fre-
quent hospital visits and bad
days due to his condition, Mr
Miller found the time and
strength over almost three
years to build the business he

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





had always dreamt of owning.

Then, in a heartbeat, it was
stripped from him by the very
entity whose business it is to
help small entrepreneurs
build those dreams.

Mr Miller created Marcy’s
Kitchen in his mind, then
transferred those ideas to a
business plan. And after
more than one and a half
years of grovelling to airport
officials to secure a space for
Marcy’s, he signed the lease
to open his restaurant in the
Lynden Pindling Internation-
al Airport’s domestic depar-
ture lounge.

However, as with many
small entrepreneurs (and dia-
betics), Mr Miller suffered a
common setback - he had no
money.

Having secured the lease
and formed his business plan,
Mr Miller approached the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund, a $1million per
year government-sponsored
fund, to assist him in building
Marcy’s Kitchen from the
ground up.

After presenting his idea to
the fund, administrators Bak-
er, Tilly, Gomez, agreed to
finance the development of
Marcy’s Kitchen.

Appointed administrators,
Jerome Gomez and Een
Colebrooke, created the com-
pany Marcy’s Kitchen Grab
and Go Limited, signed them-
selves on as executives in the
company and gave the fund
80 per cent of the share in the
business, leaving Mr Miller
with 20 per cent equity stake.

‘Your Workplace
Survival Kit’



TRIBUNE = columnist
Yvette Bethel recently
released a CD based on her
popular articles which focused
on helping individuals
improve their careers and
enhance their skills inside and
outside the workplace.

The CD, Your Workplace
Survival Kit, give listeners
concrete steps toward improv-
ing their careers.

“T encounter a variety of
complex organisational cul-
tures where there are a myri-
ad of interpersonal chal-
lenges,” said Ms Bethel. “I
am committed to being a cat-
alyst for positive, meaningful
transformation - providing
tools like Your Workplace
Survival Kit to enhance the
performance and morale of
teams.”

The kit, according to her,
can be used to enhance the
skills of business owners,
employees, managers and stu-
dents who are seeking to rein-
vent or start their careers by
developing a deeper under-
standing of their environment
and equipping them with tools
to help them navigate diffi-
cult situations.

Ms Bethel held her launch
at 100 per cent Bible book-
store, with which she secured
an exclusive distribution deal
in Nassau. The CD can also
be found on Amazon.com.

In 2006, Ms Bethel founded
her company Organisational
Soul which provides Human
Resources Consulting Ser-
vices, Strategic Session facili-
tation services, leadership and
executive coaching services,
SkillSoft e-learning solutions,





NEW CD: Yvette Bethel.

“Tam committed to
being a catalyst for
positive, meaningful
transformation - providing
tools like Your Workplace
Survival Kit to enhance
the performance and
morale of teams.”

— Yvette Bethel

leadership seminars and is
one of the only certified
providers of Emotional Intel-
ligence Individual and Busi-
ness Solutions in the
Bahamas.

At the end of the CD
launch her audience, filled
with professionals from myri-
ad business sectors, was eager
to pepper her with question
they had on their own meth-
ods of conducting business.

The fund also asked that a
board be formed consisting
of five members, two of which
would be nominated by Mr
Miller, while he, Mr Gomez
and Mr Colebrooke made up
the final three.

And so construction and
renovations began in the
domestic departure lounge of
LPIA with Mr Miller the
frontman on the project,
watching his dream take form.

It was only three weeks
after the dust cleared and the
first customers took receipt
of Mr Miller’s - chief execu-
tive of the company and head
chef - Bahamian food, that
the fund administrators began
the processes of ousting him
from the restaurant that held
his shortened name.

According to him, the fund
administrators first attempt-
ed to have his name removed
from the lease he fervently
convinced the Nassau Airport
Development Company to
give an “underqualified”, but
determined cook.

After he was made aware
that the fund was attempting
to remove him from the lease,
he approached Director of
Economic Planning at the
Ministry of Finance, Simon
Wilson, to eke out what the
fund’s relationship should be
to the businesses they finance
- specifically to his.

According to Mr Miller, he
was informed by Mr Wilson
to remove Mr Gomez and Mr
Colebrooke as directors of the
company, ensure the control-
ling shares (at least 51 per

cent) is turned over to Mar-
cy's Kitchen and conduct an
official review of all signed
documents between the
Bahamas Venture Capital
and Marcy’s Kitchen.

When Mr Miller
approached the fund after
undertaking Mr Wilson’s sug-
gestion, days later he was vot-
ed out of his company by Mr
Gomez and Mr Colebrooke -
the board that never became
five members.

And he received a termi-
nation letter stating:

“We write to advise you
that the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial fund Ltd, the majority
shareholder of Marcy’s
kitchen grab and go Ltd have
effective Friday, July 2, 2010,
terminated your employment
as Chief Operating Officer of
the company.

“You are also removed as
VP and a director of Marcy’s
kitchen Grab and Go Ltd
effective the same date. You
will, however, retain your role
as a shareholder in the com-
pany.

“We have attached a copy
of the written consent of the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture fund removing you
from your position in the
company for your records.”

The letter was signed by
Een Colebrooke “President”.

In less than one month Mr
Miller built his dream and
watched the very fund that
made it possible strip it from
him with no explanation.

SEE page 4B

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NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135





royalfidelity.com




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GOLD MINE?: This crawfish season could yeild higher profits for
fishermen and exporters.

Crawlish season could
vield higher profits

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

. =

iL



.
"
* el
pA.

THE CRAWFISH season could yield higher profits for
fishermen and exporters this year, the chief counsel for
Spanish Wells said yesterday.

And with fishermen adopting catch certificates which will
allow trade with Europe, and with crawfish market prices
on the rise, the season could be a good one.

Abner Pinder said the initial indicators show the market
price of crawfish to be on the rise and with the Bahamas re-
opening the crawfish trade with Europe that was closed at
the beginning of the year, the sector could see a turn-
around when the season opens next week.

“The season looks like it will be better than last year,”
said Mr Pinder.

Heads of the Fishing industry have worked tirelessly
for months to prepare fishermen to use the catch certifi-
cates that will be required to allow the crawfish tails to
enter and be distributed through the EU.

According to them, the Bahamas will not be allowed to
trade with the EU if the chain of custody for lobster tails
is not certified by use of the catch certificates, which will
allow purchasing entities to trace catches from their pos-
session all the way back to the fishing boat that made the
catch - and possibly even back to the exact spot in the
Bahamas the product was caught.

This certificate is the
SEE page 4B

key to restarting trade,



RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com





























co

Sure you'll marry a millionaire!
Now what's Plan B?











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BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

St. Michael: 246.435.1955









PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Ex-UBS client gets house

arrest for tax conviction



By CURT ANDERSON

AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI (AP) — A busi-
nessman who admitted
evading hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in taxes
using secret accounts at
Swiss bank UBS AG was
sentenced Tuesday to a year
of house arrest and proba-
tion, a reward for his quick
guilty plea and substantial
assistance to US investiga-
tors.

Paul Zabczuk, 55, became
the seventh former UBS
client to avoid jail out of 10
prosecutions in a crackdown
on offshore accounts to hide
wealth. Dozens more prose-
cutions are expected in the
coming months, especially



with UBS's agreement to
disclose the identities of
4,450 suspected American
tax dodgers.

Zabezuk, an oil industry
supplier from Woodland
Hills, Texas, used four secret
accounts set up by UBS in
the Bahamas and Switzer-
land to hide assets from
1999 until 2009, according to
court records.

Method

One method he used to
access money was to transfer
funds to China for the pur-
chase of antiques, which
were then shipped to him in
Texas for his own use or to
be sold.

In October 2009, Zabzcuk

attempted to voluntarily dis-
close his illegal accounts to
the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice under a programme
that would allow him to
avoid prosecution — some-
thing about 15,000 other off-
shore account holders did.
But he was rejected because
the IRS had already
obtained Zabzcuk's name
from UBS, leading to his
agreement to plead guilty to
filing a false tax return and
disclosure of Swiss bankers
who had advised him.

"Mr Zabczuk has done
everything the government
has asked," said his attor-
ney, Scott Frewing.

Frewing added that
Zabezuk has already begun
paying the government
$832,000 in back taxes,
penalties and interest, which
will require that he sell his
Texas home.



Zabezuk, in tearful
remarks to US District
Judge William Dimitrouleas,
said he was sorry for his
actions.

"This is the first time that
I've broken the law and I
will never break it again,"
Zabezuk said. "I showed
bad judgment.”

Prosecutors had sought
prison time of 18 months,
even with credit for
Zabezuk's cooperation.

UBS in 2009 paid a $780
million fine under a deferred
prosecution agreement with
the US, which also led to
disclosure of an initial batch
of between 250 and 300
American clients.

UBS later agreed under
pressure to reveal an addi-
tional 4,450 names and said
Tuesday it expects the tax
dispute with the US to be
resolved by October.

RECOVERING: Oswald Gruebel, CEO of Swiss bank UBS, speaks at
a press conference yesterday to announce the 2010 half year result
in Zurich, Switzerland. Swiss bank UBS AG offered evidence of its
recovery with stronger-than-expected second-quarter profits of

LEGAL NOTICE

Commonwealth of The Bahamas 2009
In The Supreme Court No. 01457
Equity Side CLE/QUI

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT Tract of land containing
an area of 5.00 Acres situate on the Western side of the main
public road in the Settlement of Wilson Bay in the Island of
Cat Island, Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER
of the Petition of Elsworth Poitier

NOTICE OF PETITION

Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the
16th day of April, A. D., 2010. The Petition of Elsworth
Poitier of Wilson Bay, Cat Island, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas showith in respect of:

ALL THAT Tract of land containing an area of 5.00 Acres
situate on the Western side of the main public road in the
Settlement of Wilson Bay in the Island of Cat Island,
Bahamas.

The Petitioner, Elsworth Poitier, herein claims to be the
owner in fee simple in possession of the said piece of
land and has made application to The Supreme Court of
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
piece of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of
that Act.

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said piece of land may be
inspected during normal working office hours at the
following places:

The Registry of The Supreme Court, 2â„¢ floor, Ansbacher
Building, East Street North, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Chambers of EDWARD B. TURNER & CO., #10
Petrona House, Fowler Street off East Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

The Office of the Island Administrator in Wilson Bay on the
Island of Cat Island.

Notice 1s hereby given that any person having Dower or
right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty
(30) days after the final publication of these presents file
at the said Registry of The Supreme Court, and serve on
the Petitioner or on the undersigned a Statement of his/her
Claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be
filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of
his/her Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as
a bar to such claim.

EDWARD B. TURNER & CO.
CHAMBERS
#10 Petrona House
Fowler Street off East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner





NOTICE
BEMUS INVEST LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, BEMUS INVEST LTD. is in dissolution as of
July 13, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

Uwaser Ltd.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given thatin accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, Uwaser Ltd. is in dissolution as of July 22,
2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 3rd
Floor Withfield Tower, 4792 Coney Drive, Belize
City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

Grand Caribbean Resorts Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 164 of the International
Business Companies Act and in accordance with
section 147 (a) of the Companies Act, 1992,
Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company (“the Company") is in Receivership,
commencing the 19° day of July 2010 and Craig
A, (Tony) Gomez and Edward R. Rolle of Baker
Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28 Cumberland
street, P.O, Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas are
appointed the Receiver-Managers of the
Company for the purpose of managing the affairs
of the said Company,

Dated the 22, July 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Receiver-Manager

Edward R. Rolle
Receiver-Manager

two billion Swiss francs (US dollar 1.9 billion), and said it should
resolve all tax matters with the US government by October.
(AP Photo)

NOTICE

CONTINENTAL INVEST
& TRADE LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1384) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, CONTINENTAL INVEST & TRADE LTD. is
in dissolution as of July 13, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

To: All Members of

the Public Workers’

Co-operative Credit
Union Limited

The Credit Union’s
Office will be closed on
Friday, July 30th, 2010,

for the

ANNUAL
STAFF FUN

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THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 3B



BP replaces CEO Hayward, reports $17 billion loss

By HARRY R WEBER
and JANE WARDELL
AP Business Writers

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
The American picked to lead
oil giant BP as it struggles to
restore its finances and oil
spill-stained reputation
pledged Tuesday that his
company will remain com-
mitted to the Gulf of Mexico
region even after the blown-
out well is sealed.

Robert Dudley will become
BP PLC's first ever non-
British chief executive, the
company said as it reported
a record quarterly $17 billion
loss and set aside $32.2 bil-
lion to cover costs from the
spill.

Ending weeks of specula-
tion, BP confirmed that gaffe-
prone Tony Hayward will
step down October 1 as the
London-based company seeks
to reassure both the public
and investors that it is learn-
ing lessons from the spill.

"There's no question we
are going to learn things from
this investigation of the inci-
dent,” Dudley told reporters

GLINTON

by phone from London after
the announcement was made.

BP Chairman Carl-Henric
Svanberg echoed that during
a webcast presentation on the
company's earnings, telling
investors that BP will change
as a result of the April 20 oil
rig explosion that killed 11
workers and set off the worst
offshore spill in US history.

"We are taking a hard look
at ourselves, what we do and
how we doit," he said. "What
we learn will have implica-
tions for our ways of work-
ing, our strategy and our gov-
ernance."

Svanberg said the compa-
ny's priority was to stop the
Gulf leak permanently and
then to clean up miles of
spoiled waters and beaches
and compensate people
whose livelihoods have been
lost because of the accident.

But he added that the com-
pany was determined to
restore value to shareholders,
after a 35 per cent, or $60 bil-
lion, drop in market value to
around $116 billion since the
explosion. Under US politi-
cal pressure, the company also

axed divi-
dends_ to
shareholders
this year.

In New
York, BP
stock]
slumped |
about 1.8 per
cent to
$37.95 in BOSS: Dudley.
afternoon
trading after BP announced
it would sell $30 billion in
assets to help pay potential
costs related to the spill.

Analysts said they were dis-
appointed at how many assets
BP was willing to sell, and its
cost estimate was thought to
be on the conservative side.

BP made its estimate on the
assumption that it won't be
deemed "grossly negligent”
in its handling of the well. If it
is, then BP won't be able to
ask its partners to help pay
for the cleanup, and federal
fines will go up.

"The penalties are obvi-
ously going to be more than
what they're saying,” Oppen-
heimer & Co. analyst Fadel
Gheit said.

| SWEETING | O'BRIEN

303 SHIRLEY STREET | PO BOX N- 499



Dudley, BP's managing
director, was brought in to
oversee the spill response
after Hayward was vilified for
a series of ill-timed moves,
including saying that he would
like his life back and attend-
ing a yacht race off the coast
of England as Gulf residents
struggled to cope with the
spill.

Dudley spent some of his
childhood in Mississippi and
worked for 20 years at Amo-
co Corp., which merged with
BP in 1998. He lost out to
Hayward on the CEO slot
three years ago.

"T don't particularly like
talking about myself, but I
think you will find I listen
hard and carefully to people
and have worked with restruc-
turing organisations to
achieve change," he said. "I
did not seek out this job. I
was asked to step into these
shoes, and I firmly and deeply
believe that BP is a company
made up of great people and
great businesses."

Dudley will be based in
London and will hand over
spill response coordination to
Lamar McKay, the chairman
and president of BP America.

He also downplayed specu-
lation that BP might pull back
from the Gulf once the flow
of oil is stopped permanently,
which could happen as soon
as mid-August.

"There's no one thinking
that way,” he said.

White House press secre-
tary Robert Gibbs said Tues-
day that President Barack

BP kicked off the revamp
by announcing the sale of $30
billion in assets to streamline
the company into a leaner,
higher-quality business.

The company has already
made a start with the $7 bil-
lion sale of gas assets in the
United States, Canada and
Egypt to Apache Corp.

Svanberg said the planned
asset sales did not necessarily
reflect a fear that spill costs
could soar above the $32.2 bil-
lion set aside by the company.
That charge includes the $20
billion compensation fund the
company set up following
pressure from President
Barack Obama as well as

costs to date of $2.9 billion.

Hayward, who will stay on
BP's board until November
30, said the company had
reached a "significant mile-
stone” with the temporary
capping of the leaking well,
which stopped oil from spew-
ing nearly two weeks ago.
Before that, anywhere from
94 million gallons (356 mil-
lion liters) to 184 million gal-
lons (697 million liters) had
gushed into the Gulf.

In a mark of faith in its out-
going leader, the company
said it planned to recommend
him for a non-executive board
position at its Russian joint
venture, TNK-BP.





FAMGUARD

The Annual General Meeting
of the
Shareholders of

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION
LIMITED

NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE | THE BAHAMAS
t 242 328 3500 | £242 328 8008 | www.gsolegal.com

The Public is hereby notified that our offices

will be closed on Friday, 30" July, 2010
for our Annual Staff Retreat.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

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Obama discussed the change
in leadership with the chair-
man of BP's board Monday.
No details about the conver-
sation were released.

"Our concern is not who
heads BP. Mr Hayward is
leaving,” Gibbs said. "The
key is that BP can't leave and
should not leave the Gulf.
That is our viewpoint. I think
that is the viewpoint of every-
one involved here. They have
obligations and responsibili-
ties as the responsible party
in this instance that have to
be met regardless of who the



will be held in the
“Victoria Room”
of the
British Colonial Hilton
No. 1 Bay Street
at 4:00 p.m.
on Thursday, July 29, 2010







CEO is."







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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM















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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Confidence falls even as
corporate profits rise

Stocks fall
slightly on
consumer
confidence
report

By STEPHEN
BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
News that consumers are
more pessimistic has put
the stock market's rally on
hold. Stocks have closed
modestly lower Tuesday
after three days of gains.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose slightly due
to DuPont, which was lift-
ed by strong earnings, but
the overall market is
down.

The Conference Board
said its Consumer Confi-
dence Index fell to 50.4
from June's 54.3. The
report distracted investors
from another batch of
upbeat earnings reports.

The Dow rose 12, or 0.1
per cent, to 10,537. The
Standard & Poor's 500
index fell one, or 0.1 per
cent, to 1,113. The Nas-
daq composite index fell
eight, or 0.4 per cent, to
2,288. Losing stocks were
ahead of gainers by about
four to three on the New
York Stock Exchange.
Volume came to 1.1 bil-
lion shares.



INSIGHT

For stories behind
news, read /nsight
Mondays







By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
disconnect between Wall
Street and Main Street is
growing.

Americans’ confidence in
the economy faded further in
July, according to a monthly
survey released Tuesday,
amid job worries and skimpy
wage growth. That's at odds
with Wall Street's recent rally
fuelled by upbeat earnings
reports from big businesses
such as chemical maker
DuPont Co. and equipment
maker Caterpillar Inc. That's
because the pumped-up prof-
its are being fuelled by cost
cuts like layoffs and overseas
sales. In fact, big companies
have shown few signs they're
ready to hire.

The Consumer Confidence
Index came in at 51.0 in July,
a steeper-than-expected
decline from the revised 54.3
in June, according to a sur-
vey the Conference Board.
The decline follows last mon-
th's decline of nearly 10
points, from 62.7 in May, and
is the lowest point since Feb-
ruary. It takes a reading of 90
to indicate a healthy econo-
my — a level not seen since
the recession began in
December 2007.

"Consumers have a much
different view of the econo-
my than the stock market
does, and their views matter
more to the economy,” said
Mark Vitner, an economist at
Wells Fargo. The index "tells
me the economy is heading
for slower growth in the sec-
ond half. We have low expec-
tations for back-to-school."

Joel Naroff, president of
Naroff Economic Advisors,
agreed, noting that the fatter
profits have shown that com-
panies have been able to



a *

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE: Shoppers Joselin Pena

squeeze out higher produc-
tivity from workers, but that
also means that "households
are not benefiting.”

The profit picture is "good
news for Wall Street, but not
good for workers," he added.

The survey was taken July
1-21, beginning just before the
Standard & Poor's 500 index
hit a nine-month low of
1,022.58 on July 2. It had risen
4.5 per cent by July 21 and
has since climbed an addi-
tional four per cent as upbeat
earnings reports from key
manufacturers have made
investors more convinced that
the economic recovery isn't
stalling as much as they had
originally thought.

The Dow Jones industrial
average fell three points on
Tuesday, ending three days
of big gains, as investors
digested the confidence data
as well as a slowdown in
regional manufacturing
reported by the Richmond
Federal Reserve. Stocks rose
moderately at the open

Seeing ‘his dream
live, thrive and die’

FROM page 1B

Since being ousted, Mr Miller has sought
to find answers to why after only three weeks
he saw his dream live, thrive and die.

He maintains the business was doing 69 per
cent more in sales per day than the fund
administrators thought it would.

Now, Mr Gomez and Mr Colebrook have
changed Marcy’s name to Island Cafe and
changed the menu Mr Miller worked tireless-

ly to create.

Since his removal, he has sought answers
from Minister of Finance, Zhivargo Laing, in
eight emails sent over 11 days telling him: “I
have been working tirelessly to get this busi-
ness off the ground and in good working order.

This has been an outrageous and displeasing
experience working with so-called profession-
al and prudent people. I am further angered by

the raid and their attempts to ‘take-over’.
Mr Laing replied: “I am quite disturbed
about the way this matter is going. I am not
encouraged by reports brought to me on either
side, so I have asked for a meeting soon.”

209

According to Mr Miller, Mr Laing told him

there was nothing he could do to help.
He is now awaiting a reply from the Office
of the Prime Minister to get the answers on

how the fund created by government to help

three months.

entrepreneurs build their own businesses,
could take his over only weeks after its open-
ing. In the end, offering the diabetic, footing
$800 medication costs per month, $300 every

because of strong earnings
from chemical maker DuPont
Co. and European banks
UBS and Deutsche Bank.

DuPont, which has
announced thousands of job
cuts over the past year,
reported that second-quarter
income nearly tripled, as rev-
enue surged in most of its
businesses. The results were
led by revenue gains in the
Asia Pacific region. DuPont
didn't announce any hiring
plans.

A rapid, sustainable recov-
ery can't happen without the
American consumer. And the
second straight month of
declining confidence follow-
ing three months of increases
is worrisome, economists say.

Economists watch confi-
dence closely because con-
sumer spending accounts for
about 70 per cent of US eco-
nomic activity and is critical to
a strong rebound.

Both components of the
index declined. They measure
how people feel about the

(left) and her niece Ingrid Romero (center), both of
Boston, load packages into their car after shopping at a Target location in Boston. A monthly consumer
survey shows that Americans’ confidence in the economy eroded further in July amid job worries. The read-
ing raises concern about the economic recovery and the back-to-school shopping season.

(AP Photo)

economy now, and their
expectations for the next six
months.

The index — which mea-
sures how Americans feel
about business conditions, the
job market and the next six
months — had been recover-
ing fitfully since hitting an all-
time low of 25.3 in February
2009. The index typically falls
before the economy slows
down, and on the way out of a
recession, the expectations
component, which accounts
for 60 per cent of index, rises
sharply, said Lynn Franco,
director of The Conference
Board Consumer Research
Center.

"It's all about jobs. That's
still the primary source of
income,” Franco said. "Until
we see the pace of job growth
pick up and consumers are
confident that this is sustain-
able, we are not likely to see a
significant pickup in confi-
dence."

The Conference Board sur-
vey, based on a random sur-

THE TRIBUNE

vey mailed to 5,000 house-
holds, showed that con-
sumers’ assessment of the job
market was more negative
than the month before. Those
claiming that jobs are "hard to
get" increased to 45.8 from
43.5 per cent, while those say-
ing jobs are "plentiful"
remained unchanged at 4.3
per cent.

Michelle Banks, 38, a
teacher from Bloomfield, N.J.,
said she's more worried about
job security than she was last
year because of rampant state
budget cuts. So she started
saving money for back-to-
school items for her five-year-
old son in January. She plans
to spend $200, evenly divided
between school supplies and
clothing.

"I'm buying clothes that
will last, not fall apart,” she
said. Economists say the
index's expectations compo-
nent tends to track stock mar-
ket movements, but Vitner
noted that the market's big
plunge in May has made such
an imprint on consumers that
the recent rebound hasn't reg-
istered.

Retailers had a surprisingly
solid start to the year, but
business has been slowing
since April. With unemploy-
ment stuck near 10 per cent,
Americans are expected to
remain skittish through the
back-to-school and Christmas
season.

Concerns are also rising
about the housing market.
While the S&P/Case-Shiller
20-city home price index
released Tuesday showed a
1.3 per cent rise in May from
April, the home buyer's tax
credit, which expired April
30, helped pull more buyers
into the market. In fact, the
report warned that the recent
gains in home prices are not
likely to last.



FROM page 1B

while adhering to the Marine Stewardship
Council's (MSC) - the world's leading envi-
ronmental certification programme for
wild-caught fisheries - mandates.

The campaign, that in the end will cost
the government and private sector a siz-
able sum, will bolster the Bahamian fish-
eries industry and ensure that trade with
other countries does not founder. It is
being undertaken by a number of agencies
and sectors, including the World Wildlife

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL



The Public is hereby advised that I, NADJA
CHRISTINA BERGMANN, of No. 16 Harmony
Hill, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to NADIA CHRISTINA JOHNSON. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of the publication
of this notice.

NOTICE

TASSIN LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) | TASSIN LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 27th July 2010 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Blue Seas
Administration Ltd., The Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 28th day of July, A. D. 2010



Blue Seas Administration Ltd.
Liquidator



Crawlish season could
vield higher profits

Fund (WWF), the Bahamas Department
of Marine Resources (DMR), the Nature
Conservancy, the Bahamas Commercial
Fishers Alliance, the Bahamas National
Trust, the Friends of the Environment and

Global

The requirement is part of a global man-
date to help countries ensure their food
exports are safe and traceable, and that
they keep their marine resources in check
to ensure sustainability.

BMEA.





PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that | SHEVONIA LATIKA
WOODSIDE, of Pride Estates, Nassau, The Bahamas,
intend to change my name to SHAVONIA LATIKA BAIN.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, The Bahamas, no later
than thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JACKSON FIRMIN
of Davis Street, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas, is
applying to the Minister ee for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why eel
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 21% day of July, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PATRICK LEWIS
of Buttonwood Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28'" day of
July, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and

Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

EGI, Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 147 (a) of the Companies
Act, 1992, Notice is hereby given that the above-
named Company (‘the Company") is in
Receivership, commencing the 19! day of July
2010 and Craig A. (Tony) Gomez and Edward R.
Rolle of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28
Cumberland Street, P. 0. Box N-1991, Nassau,
Bahamas are appointed the Receiver-Managers
of the Company for the purpose of managing the
affairs of the said Company.

Dated the 23, July 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Receiver-Manager

Edward R. Ralle
Receiver-Manager



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THE TRIBUNE




By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

HAT makes the crab
\ / \ of the sea a Bahami-
an delicacy? It’s fla-

vorful, fat and sweet meat.
Put it in a mixture with
dough and vegetables and
you get crab soup. Put it ina
batter, bake it and you get
crab cakes, put it in a mixture
with grits and you get one of

the tastiest combinations.

There are so many interesting things
that can be done with crabs. Lady Ingrid
Darling, author of Many Tastes of the
Bahamas & Culinary Influences of the
Caribbean told Tribune Taste that one
of her favourite things to do with crab
meat is swap it with conch.

"What I like to do with crab meat is
change it with conch for fritters. It is
very tasty because the meat is sweet
and has a good flavour to it. However it
is a lot of work because you have to
have sufficient meat" she said.

For those who are looking for ways to
utilise crab meat or want to try a new
dish, Lady Darling provided a few
recipes from her book that she said are
delicious.



HERITAGE CRAB & DOUGH
4 land crabs with biters

tsp. salt

1tsp. whole allspice

1 bay leaf

hot peppers

3-1/2 cups of water

DOUGH
2 cups of all purpose flour

Plot. Bb.

The Tribune

Tast

Crab 3
Dishes 46

3tsp. baking powder

tsp. salt

1/4 cup vegetable shortening
1 cup water

Remove the legs, and remove the
biters. Wash and scrub the whole crabs
and biters thoroughly and place all into
a large stockpot. Add the water salt,
allspice and bay leaf.

Dough

In a medium-sized bowl, sift together
the flour, baking powder and salt. Cut in
the shortening and stir in the water to
form soft dough.

Turn the dough into the pot and
spread evenly over the top. Cover bring
to a boil. Reduce the heat and cook for
20-25 mins. Serve immediately.

ANDROS STUFFED BAKED CRABS
6 land crabs with biters

20z. butter

1/2 medium-sized onion, finely chopped
1/2 medium sized green pepper finely
chopped

1-1/2 cups crisp bread crumbs

3/4 tsp. dried thyme leaves

Salt

Black Pepper
Hot Peppers, optional
Bake 350 degrees

Scrub the crabs and biters, break
open and clean preserving the fat (save
the backs to be stuffed). Place the bod-
ies and biters into a large stockpot with
water to cover. Bring to a boil and boil
for about 5 mins. Drain and allow to
cool.

Break up the bodies and biters; pick
out as much of the crab meat as possi-
ble and place into a medium-sized
bowl.



eS

aon

. +
Ss

Heat half the butter in a large
skillet and sauté the onion and
green pepper. Stir on the crab
fat and sauté for several min-
utes. Turn into the bowl with
the crab meat mixing in the
bread crumbs, thyme salt and
pepper to taste.

Fill the crab back with the
mixture and place into a shallow
baking dish, shell side down.
Dot the tops of each with butter
and bake until the stuffing is
browned, 15 to 20 minutes.
Serve hot.

CRAB SOUFFLE

2 land crabs with biter or 1-1/2
cups crab meat, flaked

2 tsp. all purpose flour

2 thsp. butter

1-1/2 cups milk

4 egg yolks, beaten

Ground white pepper

Salt to Taste

1/2 cups finely grated Parmesan
Cheese

4 eggs whites

Bake at 400 degrees F

Prepare the crab and biters
and pick to produce 1-1/2 cups

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 7B

meat.

butter in a 2-quart sized
saucepan, stirring in the flour
and cooking slowly for a few
minutes.

Remove the saucepan from
the heat and gradually stir in the
milk. Return to medium heat
and stir vigorously until the
sauce thickens. Allow to cool
slightly.

Stir in the beaten egg yolks,
seasoning, and pepper. Add the
crab meat and the finely grated
cheese.

Using a wire whisk or electric
mixer, whip the egg white until
stiff. Carefully fold into the crab
mixture.

Turn into a greased soufflé
dish and bake for about 25- to 30
minutes or until risen and brown.
Serve immediately.

CAT ISLAND CORN GRITS & CRAB
2 Island crabs with biters

1 cup island corn grits

1 cup boiled pigeon peas, drained
(reserve liquid) or canned pigeon
peas

3-1/2 cups water (including stock
from peas)






slices bacon, chopped
3 oz. Champion tomato paste
1.2tsp. dried thyme leaves
Ttsp. Lady Darling’s Island sea~
soning '
Salt to taste
Black pepper
Hot peppers to taste

oz. vegetable oil and the crab fat
Make a sauce by melting th rom crabs

Prepare crabs reserving the fat.

Heat the oil in a 2 quart sized
saucepan and sauté the bacon
for a few minutes. Add the
onion thyme; continue to sauté
adding crab fat. Simmer for
about 5 minutes stirring in the
tomato paste.

Add the water, grits Island sea-
soning, salt and black/hot pep-
pers to taste. Add the crab bod-
ies and claws.

Over medium heat, bring to a
boil, stirring continually. Lower
the heat, taste test and adjust
the seasonings if necessary. Cov-
er and cook over low heat for
30-35 minutes.

Place a heat diffuser under
the pot for the last 10 minutes
of cooking time to avoid grits
sticking.



TEPPING back in time, to the
Bahamas of the 40s, 50s and 60s

with the images of award-winning

photographer Roland Rose.















The year is 1955, and in the main photograph we see
Princess Margaret, accompanied by Governor Lord
Ranfurly, making her way down the steps from Govern-
ment House. The Princess was in the country for the
renaming ceremony of the Bahamas General Hospital,
the Princess Margaret Hospital as we know it today.
Some years later, her son David Linley, exhibited his
furniture at the Lyford Cay Gallery of House and Gar-
den. We see him above with one of his magnificent
screens, and in conversation with Tony Jervis, architect
of the National Art Gallery.
If you have fond memories of these events, or if you
have your own photographs, please write and send to
Rupert Missick at rmissick@tribunemedia.net.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

ENTERTAINMENT

THE TRIBUNE





wil

The Tribune



.

terté

all —

i







Moving Up Against the Odds

BY NATARIO McKENZIE

ITH the hope of
W/ inspiring others to
overcome challenges

in their life, a Bahamian
entrepreneur is telling his
rags to riches story of perse-
verance in his autobiography
aptly titled, “Moving Up
Against the Odds.”

Jack Andrews, known to many as
“Maljack” recently launched his
autobiography, “Moving Up
Against the Odds,” which chroni-
cles his humble beginnings as a
young boy in South Andros to
adulthood and his successful entre-
preneurial career in the construc-
tion industry. Still, despite his suc-
cess, Mr Andrews, 46, describes
himself as a “simple and humble
island boy.”

In his autobiography, Mr
Andrews who owns Mal Jack Con-
struction Company Limited as well
a 14 room bone fishing lodge in
South Andros, highlights the adver-
sities he faced growing up on
Andros many years ago.

In his autobiography, Mr
Andrews acknowledges that Andros
was far less developed when he was
growing up back in the 60’s.
Tragedy struck him at an early age
as Mr Andrews recalls the fateful
day in March 1969 when his father
died in the field from a stroke, leav-
ing his mother to play the role of
both mother and father to him and
his three siblings. Mr Andrews has
dedicated his book to his mother
Anabell Davis-Knowles; who
inspired him to go on and whose
sacrifices he says made it possible
for him to live his dream.



In his book, Mr Andrews recalls





the dream he had as a little boy-
to become a building contractor-a
dream he eventually made a reality.

He also recalls many adversities
that he had to overcome including
the death of a sister to cancer, a
troubled early marriage and his
struggles moving up in the con-
struction industry to eventually own
his own construction company. Mr
Andrews acknowledges that
through all his adversities, his moth-
er always inspired him to go on.

“God is first in my life,” says Mr
Andrews. “My mother from a very
young age taught me to pray. She
would say ‘son, in whatever you do
give God thanks.’ I feel like I am
blessed. I was a blessed as a child
and I am blessed today.”

Mr Andrews acknowledges that
growing up, his family did not have
alot of money and because of this,
he developed the practice of sav-
ing 40 cents out of every dollar.

Today, he says that he is able to
give back to the community and his
construction company has made it
easier for many Bahamians to own
their own homes.

“T would say to the young folks
especially the ones in school, once
you make up your mind to be
someone and do something in life
you work towards it ” says Mr
Andrews.

It’s good to have a trade. J am
happy to employ people and watch
them elevate,” noting that most of
his employees are from south
Andros.

“Even today I have to move
against the odds but I encourage
everyone to try,” says Mr Andrews.

Mr Andrews’ 82 page autobiog-
raphy, “Moving Up Against the
Odds,” can be purchased at Book
World and Logos Bookstore.



BIFF presents encore presentations
of some of it’s films from last year

By REUBEN SHEARER

THE BAHAMAS Interna-
tional Film Festival will pre-
sent encore presentations of
several of the films from last
year’s film festival at the Old
Fort Bay Club begining
tonight with the airing of The
Price To Pay and Insignificant
Others.

“We want to make sure that
people have the opportunity
to see the films shown last year
and to showcase the film mak-
ers,” said Leslie Vanderpool,
BIFF’s founder.

“Every one of them is well
done, which is why we are
showing them again. They are
really good quality and have
great stories to be told.”

The series of films, which
will be run into November,
include short and feature
length productions

Tonight, two motion pic-
tures will be replayed, includ-
ing a short feature thriller, The
Price To Pay a short feature ,
in which Lucien, a petty crook,
and his girlfriend Anna dream
of moving to Hawaii. They
decide to rob a jeweler. But
when things go haywire and
Anna finds herself in the trunk
of a car, Lucien and his accom-
plices rush to her rescue.

A follow-up to the festival
hit Among Brothers, Insignifi-
cant Others, is a multi-narra-
tive drama that navigates
through the different lives of
one city’s residents, each of

whom is connected to the
same local homicide investi-
gation.

This cast of characters
includes an Iraq War vet
returned home to an emotion-
ally disturbed wife, a new
father living in the shadow of a
successful older brother, a sis-
ter caught up in a web of
addiction, and a camera man
who attempts to exploit the
reality behind all of their sto-
ries, or at least his version of
them.

Ms Vanderpool, highly rec-
ommends three of the films
which were award winners at
the film festival last year and
which will be aired in upcom-
ing weeks.

These include La Soga,

which won the 2009 BIFF
Spirit of Freedom Narrative
Award, Traces of the Trades,
the 2009 BIFF Spirit of Free-
dom Documentary Award,
and Morenita, the 2009 BIFF
New Visions Award.

La Soga is inspired by true
events, and made on location
in the Dominican Republic
for the price of a high-end
German car. The movie
embodies elements of film-
making like passion instead
of money, story instead of
special effects and soul
instead of spin.

Traces of the Trade follows
Browne and nine fellow
DeWolf descendants as they
travel from Rhode Island, to
Ghana and Cuba on a trip that

brings them face-to-face with
the history and legacy of New
England's hidden enterprise.
Morenita chronicles the sto-
ry of a man desperate to save
his family from death threats
by a notorious drug dealer.
He ends up stealing the ven-
erated image of the Virgin of
Guadalupe causing pandemo-
nium throughout Mexico.
Persons can RSVP before
noon each Wednesday to
reserve their seat. Tickets are
$12, including popcorn. For a
schedule of when the films will
be showing, visit www. bintl-
filmfest.com. Or call 325-5747
for more information.
Tonight’s viewing takes
place at the pavilion at the Old
Fort Bay Club at 7.30pm.



Junkanoo
at Hotel
Conference

By FELICITY INGRAHAM

THE reverberating sounds
of Junkanoo opened the 14th
annual International African
American Investment Sum-
mit and Trade show held this
past weekend at the Doral
Golf Resort in Doral, Flori-
da. The event is hosted each
year by NABHOOD - the
National Asssociation of
Black Hotel Owners and
Developers. NABHOOD's
President and CEO Andy
Ingraham's Eleutheran roots
led him to utilise the music of
his home to welcome hotel
owners and developers from
throughout the United States
and the region.

NABHOOD is playing a
role in many of the acquisi-
tion deals related to the lodg-
ing, restaurant and investment
industry here in The
Bahamas. But this year, it
was the presence of the Min-

ister of Tourism for Jamaica
Robert Bartlett at the Sum-
mit that made it possible for
the eyes of investors to turn
towards Jamaica. On August
16, a team of investors (four
have already committed dur-
ing the conference) will head
to Jamaica to consider the
prospects of setting up major
brands there.

Eight students and alumni
from the College of the
Bahamas were awarded free
sponsorship to the confer-
ence. Four of them were giv-
en the opportunity to be inter-
viewed for either internship
or employment at established
hotel chains such as the Mar-
1ott, Hilton and Hyatt.

The other four are either
in their last year or are recent
graduates of COB, and were
asked to return to work for
NABHOOD again because
of their stellar performance
in 2009.








JULY 31
Junkanoo Summer

Festival Continues
e Enjoy a close
encounter with authentic
Bahamian culture at the
Junkanoo Summer Festi-
val, featuring entertain-
ment and musical perfor-
mances, traditional
Bahamian cuisine,
authentic Bahamian craft,
Junkanoo rush-outs, and
more! Noon-10pm daily
at Junkanoo Beach East.

AUGUST

Provence
Restaurant’s Fresh
Lobster 3 Course

Dinner Special

e Lobster season opens
August 1 and Provence is
celebrating the season
with a 3 Course Lobster
Dinner Special every
Monday and Wednesday
(for only $40). Also enjoy
Grey Goose and tapas
every Tuesday and Thurs-
day. See other great spe-
cials on Provence's flyer.
Enjoy lunch 11.30am-3pm
Mon-Fri and dinner,
Mon-Sat, 6-10pm. Call:
327-0985 for reservations.

Hatchet Bay

Festival

e Hatchet Bay,
Eleuthera hosts its annual
festival featuring enter-
tainment by Terez Hep-
burn, Spider and the
Boys, the Hatchet Bay
Dinner Band, Addilee,
Naomi Taylor, Her
Majesty's Prison Pop
Band and Geno D. Also
features a Junkanoo Rush
Out, jump and dance,
Quadrill dancers, Sands
Beer Fest, a fishing tour-
nament, Kangaroo Court,
Dexter Cambridge fun
run/walk, a watermelon
eating contest and lots of
great down home food!
You don't want to miss it.

AUG 3 - AUGUST 27
JB Studio Art &

Pottery Classes

e JB Pottery Studio
holds its summer 2010 art
and pottery classes. Art
classes held 9am-12pm or
2pm-4pm for age ranges
4-8, 9-12 and 13-16. Topic
includes tie dye, mosaics,
still life drawing, sculp-
ture, ceramics, and weav-
ing. Cost: $450/full day;
$225/half-day. Pottery
classes held for 6 weeks
on Thursdays, 10am-lpm
or 6:30pm-9:30pm, or Sat-
urdays 10am-1pm for ages
18 and over . Cost: $350/6
weeks. Telephone: 327-
1151 or 327-8109.
July 31 - August 3 (Inagua)
Inagua Salty

Festival

¢ Don't miss the Inagua
Salty Festival, the signa-
ture event for the island
that features a gospel con-
cert, live entertainment,
karate demonstrations, a
cultural extravaganza,
Junkanoo rush-out, food
and drinks, and tours of
Morton Salt Company,
Inagua National Park and
the Inagua Lighthouse.
Telephone: 339-1271.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 9B



AVAILABLE @

THE JUKE BOX
ISLAND CELLULAR
& JOHN'S SHOES
(CARMICHAEL RD.)






b45.00 @ THE DOOR.






SEINE ec









GY






FTER three years of y) 9
: successfully leaving Ly)
Se Ray 4 udiences in stitches, —

this year’s Laugh Fest Come-
dy Show promises to be the

best ever.

On Saturday, July 31 at the Wynd-
ham Rainforest Theatre, Bahamians
will get to see some of their favourite
urban comedians hone their craft up
close and personal; De- Ray Davis of

MTV’S Wild and Out fame as well as
numerous HBO/DEF Comedy Jam
Specials, Shaq and Cedric the Enter-
tainer’s All- Star Comedy Jam, Johnson
Family Vacation and Barbershop land 2
is the show’s very funny celebrity head-
liner.

Also scheduled to appear live on-stage
is Finesse Mitchell, of Saturday Night
Live acclaim, along with Shang Forbes, x
a popular return choice for fans who
first saw this Def Comedy Jam and Com-
ic View funnyman perform at LoveFest
2010. Karlous Miller, winner of Bill Bel-
lamy’s Who’s Got Jokes? will also per-
form.

It should be noted that while the
American comedians certainly have an
impressive fan base in the Bahamas
there will be no shortage of local talent;
Joker’s Wild and Nassau’s very own
Naughty, who has over twelve years
experience as a stand up comedian both
at home and abroad will serve as host
for the event, touching on local topics
like only he can, while new comers Mark
B and Action ‘the Jet-ski King’ will also
showcase their improvisational skills.

Laughfest 2010 tickets are on sale
now for $35 in advance and $45 on the
night of the event and are available at
the Jukebox, Island Cellular and John’s
Shoe Carmichael Road. Laughfest
organisers encourage patrons to arrive
on time as the doors will open at 7.30
for a 9pm sharp start.

Davis | -~











presents

THE COMEDY EVENT OF T
Ul
nt

day)

OREST THEATRE, WY



LAUGHFEST 2010 LAUGH NOW CRY LATER BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

@ RAl
SMIRNOFF, THE ISLAND GAME, K.F.C., JOHN'S SHOES, ISLAND CELLULAR, BIG LEAF, ISLAND TUNERZ, MILO BUTLER & SONS, THE DILLY TREE, SGC CONSTRUCTION, SOLOMON'S MINES & JEDILALL DESIGNS


























































































































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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
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(P]) INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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Full Text
McCOMBO
OF THE DAY itm towin it

The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY a 2010

CARS FOR SALE,



LOW —séSS1F
MOSTLY

2 ~ SUNNY

Volume: 106 No.206

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81F





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

ee

aU a

Ter ey ES)

HC

SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SECTION



a é
AND REAL ESTATE “==
SUS ee

Chinese govt says
yes’ to Baha Mar

$2.6bn investment
formally approved

By PAUL G Ambassador Hu is
TURNQUEST expected to return to
Tribune Staff the Bahamas on
Reporter August 18 when he
pturnquest@ will meet Prime
tribunemedia.net Minister Ingraham to

THE Govern-
ment of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of
China yesterday
formally approved
the $2.6 billion
investment in the
Baha Mar project
on Cable Beach,
bringing an end to
speculation on the
viability of the
resort development.

In a statement from the
Cabinet office yesterday,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham confirmed that
His Excellency Dingxian
Hu, the Ambassador of the
People’s Republic of China,
had advised that his govern-



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham
confirmed that His
Excellency Dingxi-
an Hu had advised
that his govern-
ment has given
formal approval.

hand over the formal
approval from the
Chinese government.

Baha Mar chair-
man Sarkis Izmirlian
said yesterday that
the project is expect-
ed to create 11,000
Bahamian jobs and
add $1 billion in new
spending to the econ-
omy in the first year
after completion.

This, of course, all
depends on final approval
from the Bahamas govern-
ment.

On their behalf, Mr Izmir-
lian said that Baha Mar has
now concluded the neces-
sary agreements with the
Export-Import Bank of Chi-

Ne eee GNM A UV Se Le





THE mother of slain
handbag designer Harl
Taylor last night told
how she has been left
distraught and without
closure.

Beverly Taylor
described herself as
"mentally" drained but
surrounded with
friends and family as
she coped with the
ordeal.

Her comments were
made a day after a jury

SEE page 12











Felipé Major/Tribune staff



TOURISTS TAKE A LOOK at products on display at the makeshift straw market at Cable Beach yesterday. The site is a temporary solution after
fire destroyed the original market in June. A new site is to be constructed for the vendors on West Bay Street.

a Se Director of Antiquities, § Man accused of Director has ‘no =. Woman intends to
cies of the Chinese govern- Corporation. Monuments and — defrauding local knowledge of low Pun against PM
‘entire with Bana Mar Lid the People's Repuone ot Museums Corporation - bank of $100,000 : morale at Met Office in North Abaco

a eeegeuopment of SFE page seven expected to step down’ = ByNATARIOMcKENZIE © By TANEKATHOMPSON § a. ai icon LOWE



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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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a : pe ee sama). i Saleen

DIRECTOR of the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museums Corporation Dr
Keith Tinker is expected to
tender his resignation fol-
lowing an 18-week vacation,
The Tribune has learned.

However, Dr Tinker last
night denied that the ten-
dering of his resignation was
on the cards.

“That’s not even a matter
being discussed,” he told
The Tribune.

He is said to have told
the board that during his
vacation he plans to work
on his book and accelerate
his research.

SEE page 11

: Tribune Staff Reporter

: A MAN accused of
: forging bank cheques and
: defrauding a local bank of
: more than $100,000 was
: arraigned in a Magistrate's
: Court yesterday on a list
: of fraud charges.

: Keno Gaitor, 33, of
: Mount Vernon, appeared
: before Magistrate Guilli-
: mena Archer in Court 10,
: Nassau Street, yesterday
: charged with 33 counts of
: fraud, 22 counts of uttering
: a forged document, 12
: counts of forgery and five
: counts of attempted fraud.

SEE page seven

: Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net :

: THE director of the :
: Department of Meteorolo- ;
: gy said he has no knowl- :
: edge of claims of low :
: morale at the Meteorologi- :
: cal Office due to "micro- :
: managing” from senior offi-
: Clals. i
: Earlier this week, sources
: Said staff are unhappy with :
: the leadership style of :
: department officials and :
: that employee concerns are :
: disregarded. :
: Yesterday, the depart- :
: ment's Director Arthur :
: Rolle said these claims were

SEE page 11

: Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MIDDLE-AGED
: woman has announced her
intention to run against
: Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham in his North Aba-
co constituency in the 2012
: general election.

: S. Ali McIntosh, the
interim leader of the recent-
ly launched Bahamas Con-
stitution Party, said that
despite North Abaco resi-
dents having voted for Mr
: Ingraham as their represen-
: tative for over thirty years,
: she believes they are ready
: to go to the “next level of

SEE page seven





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Thursday, Friday & Saturday July 29th, 30th & 31st



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NASSAU AND BAHAWIA

ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

in the frame for more than 60 years

PHOTOGRAPHER Roland Rose has been
capturing Bahamian life and society on film for
more than 60 years. For more than 50 years, his
award-winning photographs have captured the
hearts and souls of millions around the world.
They have also played their part in promoting the
Bahamas and drawing tourists to our wonderful
islands. Now Mr Rose’s images are to get a sec-
ond airing in The Tribune’s new weekly column,

Flashback.
By DIANE PHILLIPS

ROLAND ROSE was 13
when he got his first camera,
an Ansco Clipper he traded his
harmonica for with a buddy at
school. Today, at 72, Mr Rose is
the dean of photography in the
Bahamas, his exhaustive body
of work as rich in texture and
emotion as it is important his-
torically for capturing fleeting
magic moments, a portrait of
more than half a century of an
emerging country’s life and of
the soul of its people.

Through his eyes, those who

grew up in the Bahamas and
visitors from around the world
can experience a life of simpler
times but often greater pain, of
joy and sorrow and hope. They
can feel the explosion of energy
of the drummer in a photo-
graph so powerful you can
almost hear the cymbals and
percussion. They can shrink at a
wall of water slapping at the
lighthouse as 10-foot waves
crash and nearly topple the lit-
tle 14-foot boat the photogra-
pher was in. They can see the
breathtaking beauty of deep
purple bougainvillea and bril-

LOCAL NEWS

Roland Rose's photos have put Bahamas







THE NEW Flashback column by Roland Rose (pictured right in 1969)



features photos such as the one above with Princess Margaret
accompanied by Governor Lord Ranfurly.

liant Royal Poinciana in bloom
in a garden lit by the sun with
the blues of the harbor just
beyond.

They can see the work of a
man who has seen so much and
told it through a lens, a boy
who drove a little boat across



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

& BILLING CHANGES



0-200 units per month

Remaining units

All units per month

UNIT CHARGE

Minimum monthly charge

Minimum monthly charge

Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for allconsumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th;

The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

TARIFF

RESIDENTIAL

10.95 cents per unit
11.95 cents per unit
14.95 cents per unit
$5.00

201-800 units per month

COMMERCIAL

15.00 cents per unit
$10.00

GENERAL SERVICE

MONTHLY BILLS

KVA CHARGE



Demand charge per month
0-900,000 units per month
Remaining units per month
Minimum monthly charge

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8.70 cents per unit
6.20 cents per unit
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Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639







from the island where he lived
to take laborers for his father’s
property overseeing job so he
could buy film at two shillings a
roll (50 cents) long before the
days of digital cameras and
Photoshop.

If an ordinary picture is
worth a thousand words, they
will see the photography that
is worth encyclopedic volumes,
a virtual Wikipedia of visual
wonder.

Roland Rose was born in
Italy in 1937 to English parents.
“Six weeks before war broke
out, we were driving across
France trying to get back to
England,” he says, crediting his
parents’ decision to flee as the
pivotal point that would deter-
mine his life and career. His
father’s position, overseeing an
Italian garden, led to the offer
from the Bahamas, managing
the gardens and property of
one of the original residents of
what was then Hog Island, now
Paradise Island. As a child,
Roland and his three brothers
roamed free on the beaches
where later Club Med would
be built and today Atlantis
dominates the horizon. But
then, it was just endless beach
where young boys could fish,
swim, snorkel, dive, many days
never encountering another
footprint in the sand beside
their own.

But there was work to do,
too, and Roland, being the old-
est, got the paying job of ferry-
ing workers.

“T used to go over at 7.30 in
the morning every day in the
boat to get the laborers for the
Killam Estate where my father
was working,” he said. He
dropped them off, took the
boat with his brothers back
over to the island of Nassau
where they would then climb
on their bikes and ride the rest
of the few miles journey to
school. In the afternoon, the
pattern was repeated in reverse.
“T earned 10 shillings a week
($2.50) and spent it all on a new
camera, a Kodak Retinette I
got from (the late) Stanley Too-
good. It was one of those prod-
ucts Kodak made in Germany
and it cost 14 pounds. Paying
that off was an eternity,” he
says, laughing at it now. And
he still had to buy film. Kodak
Kodachrome had just been
introduced and Rose’s fascina-
tion with colour intensified with

THE TRIBUNE







a film that began to do it justice.

Trading up before he even
got paid for a photograph — his
first commission came later,
photographing a woman’s rugs
for insurance records — was an
early indication of his determi-
nation to keep abreast of equip-
ment and technology.

“[’m not an antique collec-
tor,” he says. “Every time
something new came out, I
tried it. I have tried to stay on
the cutting edge of photogra-
phy.” What he does collect is
classical music. He admits to
“over 4,000” records and at
least as many CDs, much to his
good-natured and lively wife
Barbara’s chagrin when he buys
more. What he would like to
be if he hadn’t devoted his life
to photography is a grand mas-
ter of chess. He used to play on
a street corner every afternoon,
but the game fell apart when
he was the only one who main-
tained a steady interest after so
many years.

Mr Rose is the epitome of a
person who has perfected his
craft but manages to keep it
fresh, always searching for the
touch that will make an image
memorable rather than a cel-
luloid or digital record. He
pours boundless energy into
getting the light just right, mov-
ing a floor flash to swallow a
shadow, re-arranging flowers
or furniture to set the stage,
reflecting on colour of apparel
or backdrop, never taking the
easy way out and justifying it
with a flippant “This will do.”

He seems to move in fast-
motion, a perplexing puzzle.
Quick on his feet and filled with
surefooted drive, yet socially,
a soft-spoken connoisseur with-
out airs (getting dressed up is
trading his shorts for long
pants) who simply enjoys a
vacation in Europe, a fine Bor-
deaux and classical music.

Roland Rose spent 32 years
working for the Bahamas
Development Board. When he
left in 1982, he left a collection
of work that told the story of
the country, its march through
Independence, its natural dis-
asters and hurricanes, its
celebrities and secrets. Tragi-
cally, thousands of his photos
were later destroyed in a clean-
out, set afire, images never to
be recaptured.

Fortunately, Rose had some
of the negatives and a handful
of prints. Friends and associ-

PASM GW TALON SR)

HALL





ates who had come by his work
over the years have given him
back photos. With scanning
technology, he can re-create
some from those originals. One
of his most famous, a Junkanoo
shot with a former Miss
Bahamas in the photo, became
an album cover and one just
sold on e-Bay for thousands of
dollars.

If there is a thread of conti-
nuity throughout the work still
in existence that spans six
decades, it is the astounding
beauty of the Bahamian land-
scape and sea. If there is a dis-
tinguishing factor between the
‘then’ and the ‘now’, it is that
change has brought a new level
of stress and strain to faces.
Nowhere is the change more
apparent than in a 1960s-era
photo when Sean Connery
arrived in Nassau for the shoot-
ing of Thunderball. It wasn’t
the Pan Am tote bag that was
such a startling reminder of
how times had changed, but the
outright broad smiles on faces
of the entire group — children,
adults, the police and the actor
himself even as his limbs and
attention were being sought by
the crowd around him. Every
face was relaxed. The times,
they were a-friendly and with-
out fear. Celebrities didn’t have
bodyguards. Police weren’t
donned in bulletproof vests.
Trust reined.

In each of Rose’s pho-
tographs, a story unfolds, a slice
of life too rich to be ignored.
In black and white, they tell of
passion — a drummer of burning
drive, a child filled with wonder,
an old man’s hands worn and
crinkled from honest labour. In
colour, they paint a landscape
bursting with brilliance. Black
and white shots require simplic-
ity, he explains: “If you are
shooting in black and white,
you have to keep your images
very simple, clean images.
Messy images don’t work in
black and white but they work
in colour because of the
colour.”

Colour is his preference, but
that, he says, is because of
where he lives.

“The colour of the Bahamas
is the most wonderful thing in
the world.”

© FOR THE FIRST INSTALLMENT
OF FLASHBACK, SEE THE FEATURES
SECTION IN TODAY'S TRIBUNE.



MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE Charles Maynard is pictured (centre) cutting the ribbon
to unveil the Hall of Champions at the Lynden Pindling International Airport on Monday. Also pictured are
gold medalist Eldece Clarke-Lewis (left) and gold medalist Pauline Davis-Thompson.

GOVERNMENT and airport officials on
Monday unveiled the new Hall of Champions at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport.

The Hall features legendary Bahamian ath-
letes ranging from Sir Durward Knowles, who
won the Bahamas’ first Olympic medal in
1956, to the Golden Girls who won gold in
the 4x100 women’s relay at the 2000 Sydney

Games.

Speaking at the unveiling ceremony, John
Sprinks, vice-president of commercial develop-
ment at the Nassau Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD), said the new Hall of Champions is
the culmination of a three-year initiative between
NAD, the Ministry of Tourism and the Ministry

of Sports, Youth and Culture.

“The Hall of Champions is special because it
allows visitors coming to the Bahamas to see
some of the best and brightest sports stars in the

country,” he said.

“As Bahamians have continued to accom-
plish more on the international sports scene, the
number of sports figures represented on the wall

has increased, showcasing the ongoing success
of local sports stars.”

The new US Departures at LPIA is currently
under construction. Once that stage of the airport
redevelopment project is finished early next year,
Mr Sprinks said the area where the Hall of Cham-
pions is now located will be completely gutted to
make way for stage two of the $409 million

expansion, that being the new International

Arrivals Terminal.

During construction of the new terminal the
plaques in the Hall of Champions will temporar-
ily be placed in the US Arrivals walkway. The
Hall of Champions will then be relocated to its
permanent home in the entrance of the new

Bahamian Immigration Hall.

The plaques in the new Hall of Champions,
Mr Sprinks said, were created using a digital
printing technique on bronze.

“We also added bios on each plaque in raised

bronze lettering so that those seeing these local
heroes for the first time could learn of their indi-
vidual success stories,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Investigation into

‘cat torture’ claims

By AVA TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



REPORTS of alleged animal cru-
elty have sparked controversy within
a small community in North
Eleuthera.

Police have launched an investiga-
tion into claims that three young men
on the island of Spanish Wells are tor-
turing cats by tying them to golf carts
and dragging them along until they are
skinned alive.

The culprits reportedly torture the
animals for their own entertainment
because “they like to hear the cats
scream,” according to reports by some
residents.

However, police investigators say
no supporting evidence has been found
as yet.

The gory allegations have reported-
ly spread throughout the settlement,
generating outrage and confusion

Controversy in small
community after allegations

| Daylight robbery at water depot

THREE men staged a brazen daylight armed robbery at a

water depot on Yamacraw Hill road on Monday, police
: reported.

An employee was robbed of an undetermined amount of
cash and cellphone cards after three men pulled up at the
Water Depot in a silver sports utility vehicle at around mid-
day. Two of the three men inside the car were said to have
exited the vehicle demanding cash.

One was armed with a handgun.

The culprits fled the area in the car, heading west on

Yamacraw Hill Road. Police are investigating.

Two in custody after drug selzure

suspect the rumours are an attempt to
cast a negative light on the small fishing
community.

Officials at the Bahamas Humane
Society (BHS), however, told The Tri-
bune that they have received several
reports from concerned residents about
cats being abused in this manner.

The Humane Society said in their
view there is sufficient information to
warrant a thorough investigation.

Animal cruelty of the magnitude
reported could, if true, point towards
the behavioral pattern of sociopaths,
the BHS said. They fear this kind of
violence could escalate.

Stephen Turnquest, executive direc-
tor of the BHS, is encouraging potential

among residents.

Some residents have vehemently
denied the accusations and said they

Residents’ ‘outrage’ at off-line
land-line telephone system

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of North
Andros and the Berry
Islands are said to be out-
raged that their land-line
telephone system has been
completely off-line for
almost a week.

MP for the area Vincent
Peet said that coming on the
heels of a huge drop in busi-
ness for the community as a
result of the economic down-
turn, the loss of phone ser-
vices is a devastating blow.

According to Mr Peet,
restaurants and take-aways
have been hit particularly
hard, as they rely heavily on
call-in orders and reserva-
tions.

“When there is a scarcity
of customers, food remains
sitting around to spoil,” he
said.

The downed phone lines
have also affected law
enforcement and emergency
response services, as resi-
dents cannot call the police
or an ambulance.

“T’ve got a bunch of elder-
ly people in the constituency
who are facing health chal-
lenges so the phone is critical
for them to order medication
or request emergency assis-
tance,” said Mr Peet.

The MP said he is deeply
concerned that five days
have passed without the situ-
ation being resolved.

Mr Peet called on the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation (BTC) to
double its efforts to help res-
idents “return to normalcy
in these difficult economic
times.”

BTC executive vice presi-
dent Marlon Johnson admit-
ted that “intermittent prob-
lems” have affected North
Andros’ phone system.

witnesses to step forward and contact
the authorities.

"We need the folks in Spanish Wells
who have any idea of who is doing it or

what is going on to report it to the
police,” he said.

Mr Turnquest suggested that if per-
sons find the bodies of any mutilated
cats to put them in plastic bags, freeze
them, and then send them to the police
or the BHS, though he noted physical
evidence may not be necessary if there
is supporting testimony.

Kim Aranha, president of the BHS,
added: “It is certainly a cause for great
concern and reason for an investiga-
tion. I hope to God it’s not true, it
would make me very happy to know
it’s just malicious gossip.

“Animal cruelty is merely the step-
ping stone for much, much worse, when
you get a report of something like this
you've got to find out whether there is
truth to it, and the only way to find out
whether or not there is truth is to con-
duct a thorough investigation.”

A 64-YEAR-OLD

: woman anda 23-year-old
: man were taken into custody
: after marijuana was discov-
? eredina bag in the back of a
: van at Potters Cay Dock.

The arrests occurred

shortly after 6pm on Mon-

Man ‘chopped!’ in face in har row

: By ALISON LOWE
: Tribune Staff Reporter

day after officers from the
Paradise Island Police Sta-
tion observed a man and a
woman in a red 1989 Ford
Aerostar van “acting suspi-
ciously.”

Investigations are continu-
ing.



: alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAN who was “chopped” in the face during an argu-

: ment at a bar remains in serious condition, according to
: police.

Press liaison officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings said the

: man was taken to hospital by paramedics after being attacked
: at around 1.20am at Headquarters Bar on Miami Street.

“Police received information that that a 36-year-old male

: got into an altercation with another male which resulted in the



He said his technicians are
working on the problem and
that the corporation has also
sent over foreign consultants
to assess the situation.

Mr Johnson said he under-
stands the frustration of the
residents, as he tried unsuc-
cessfully to get through to
several North Andros num-
bers himself after being
informed about the situation.

He explained that BTC
learned of the problem from
residents of the area who
contacted the corporation’s
Call Centre to complain —
only to be cut off.

“Persons have called in
for five to 10 minutes, and
then the service is dropped,”
he said.

Since then, the problem is
said to have worsened, even-
tually leaving the North
Andros community with no
land-line telephone service
whatsoever.

Mr Johnson told The Tri-
bune yesterday he wanted to
assure those affected that
BTC has been working, and
will continue to work non-
stop to rectify the situation.



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RESIDENTS of North Andros
and the Berry Islands have
had issues with their land-
lines. MP Vincent Peet (inset)
says the loss of phone ser-
vices is a ‘devastating blow’.









ENTIRE
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His medical condition was yesterday said to be “serious but

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Police investigations are continuing.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Titanic expedition will create 3D map of wreck

RICHMOND, Va. — A team of scien-
tists will launch an expedition to the Titanic
next month to assess the deteriorating con-
dition of the world's most famous shipwreck
and create a detailed three-dimensional map
that will "virtually raise the Titanic” for the
public.

The expedition to the site 2.5 miles
beneath the North Atlantic is billed as the
most advanced scientific mission to the
Titanic wreck since its discovery 25 years
ago.

: The 20-day expedition is to leave St.
John's, Newfoundland, on August 18 under
a partnership between RMS Titanic Inc.,
which has exclusive salvage rights to the
wreck, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institution in Massachusetts. The expedi-
tion will not collect artifacts but will probe a
2-by-3-mile debris field where hundreds of
thousands of artifacts remain scattered.

Some of the world's most frequent visitors
to the site will be part of the expedition
along with a who's who of underwater scien-
tists and organizations such as the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Organizers say the new scientific data and
images will ultimately will be accessible to
the public.

"For the first time, we're really going to
treat it as an archaeological site with two
things in mind,” David Gallo, an expedition
leader and Woods Hole scientist, told The
Associated Press on Monday. "One is to
preserve the legacy of the ship by enhancing
the story of the Titanic itself. The second
part is to really understand what the state of
the ship is."

The Titanic struck ice and sank on its
maiden voyage in international waters on
April 15, 1912, leaving 1,522 people dead.

Since oceanographer Robert Ballard and
an international team discovered the Titan-
ic in 1985, most of the expeditions have
either been to photograph the wreck or gath-
er thousands of artifacts, like fine china,
shoes and ship fittings. "Titanic" director
James Cameron has also led teams to the
wreck to record the bow and the stern, which
separated during the sinking and now lie
one-third of a mile apart.

RMS Titanic made the last expedition to
site in 2004. The company, a subsidiary of
Premier Exhibitions Inc. of Atlanta, con-
ducts travelling displays of the Titanic arti-
facts, which the company says have been
viewed by tens of millions of people world-
wide.

"We believe there's still a number of real-
ly exciting mysteries to be discovered at the
wreck site," said Chris Davino, president of
and CEO of Premier Exhibitions and RMS
Titanic. "It's our contention that substan-
tial portions of the wreck site have never
really been properly studied.”

RMS Titanic is bankrolling the expedi-
tion. Davino declined to state the cost of the
exploration other than to say it will be mil-
lions of dollars.

The "dream team" of archaeologists,
oceanographers and other scientists want to
get the best assessment yet on the two main
sections of the ship, which have been subject-
ed to fierce deep-ocean currents, salt water
and intense pressure.

Gallo said while the rate of Titanic's dete-
rioration is not known, the expedition
approaches the mission with a sense of
urgency.

"We see places where it looks like the
upper decks are getting thin, the walls are
thin, the ceilings may be collapsing a bit," he
said. "We hear all these anecdotal things
about the ship is rusting away, it's collapsing
on itself. No one really knows."

The expedition will use imaging technol-
ogy and sonar devices that never have been
used before on the Titanic wreck and to
probe nearly a century of sediment in the
debris field to seek a full inventory of the
ship's artifacts.

"We're actually treating it like a crime
scene," Gallo said. "We want to know what's
out there in that debris field, what the stern
and the bow are looking like."

The expedition will be based on the RV
Jean Charcot, a 250-foot research vessel with
a crew of 20. Three submersibles and the
latest sonar, acoustic and filming technology
also will be part of the expedition.

"Never before have we had the scientific
and technological means to discover so much
of an expedition to Titanic,” said P.H. Nar-
geolet, who is co-leading the expedition. He
has made more than 30 dives to the wreck.

Bill Lange, a Woods Hole scientist who
will lead the optical survey and will be one of
the first to visit the wreck, said a key analy-
sis will be comparing images from the first
expedition 25 years ago and new images to
measure decay and erosion.

"We're going to see things we haven't
seen before. That's a given," he said. "The
technology has really evolved in the last 25
years."

Davino said he anticipates future salvage
expeditions to the wreck, and Gallo said he
doesn't expect the science will end with one
trip.

"I'm sure there will be future expeditions
because this is just the beginning of a whole
new era of these kind of expeditions to
Titanic — serious, archaeological mapping
expeditions,” Gallo said.

RMS Titanic is still awaiting a judge's
ruling in Norfolk, Va., on the 5,500 artifacts
it has in its possession.

The company is seeking limited owner-
ship of the artifacts as compensation for its
salvage efforts. In its court filing for a salvage
award, the company put the fair market val-
ue of the collection at $110.9 million.

US. District Judge Rebecca Beach Smith,
a maritime jurist who is presiding over the
hearings, has called the wreck an "interna-
tional treasure."

(This article was written by Steve
Szkotak, Associated Press writer).



Potential for
development
is based on
education

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me an
opportunity during this fes-
tive season of Indepen-
dence, but what for me is a
time of introspection and
refection, to posit my views.

During this time of intro-
spection and reflection, my
mind is drawn to a time
when in this diaspora, hang-
ing, brutality and the total
disintegration of the family
was the order of the day.
However, despite the gifts
that our ancestors gave, to
the extent that they even on
occasion sacrificed their very
lives so that we who are
their “dream and hope”,
may enjoy what was absent
for them — human dignity,
family and education. Para-
doxically, we now live in a
society where “mothers,
fathers, sons”, education is
not the first option and
because we lack the intesti-
nal fortitude to solve our
social problems we in
essence yearn for a “Police
State.”

We scem to suffer from
what Professor Hilary Beck-
les termed “Historical
Amnesia” and a clear ide-
ology and philosophy of
who we are. We have sys-
tematically denied ourselves
the right to celebrate our
heroes, embrace our obliga-
tion to family, to respect our
women and children and a
commitment to community.
Rather than creating a
national “commitment to
Self-discipline, Industry,
Loyalty, Unity and an abid-
ing respect for Christian val-
ues and the Rule of Law,”
we have slavishly worked to
developed a culture of indi-
vidualism rooted in
hypocrisy and corruption,
which has resulted in a most
profound diagnosis “that our
society is more threatened
by a pervasive culture of dis-
honesty, greed and a casual
disregard for social norms
and formal regulation, than
it is by crime in a narrow
sense.”

While I may be inclined
to be sold on the idea that
“it is better in The
Bahamas,” I must accept the
following: that there are par-

Sandals Worldwide

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



ents that are terrified of
their children, there is
organised crime in our
midst, the police are under
enormous stress and they
focus on the weaker element
of our society, thirty-seven
years after Independence we
have yet to establish a uni-
versity; our Judicial system is
in a State of disrepair despite
the lamentations of the Judi-
ciary; incest and sexual
harassment are prevalent in
the community and not to
mention our local neigh-
bourhood predators, those
who prey on our young girls
and boys. I must apologise I
got carried away! Neverthe-
less, in this our thirty-sev-
enth anniversary, rather
than have a one thousand
man march to foster a com-
mitment to family, commu-
nity, education, “Self-disci-
pline, Industry, Loyalty,
Unity and an abiding respect
for Christian values and the
Rule of Law,” there is a one
thousand man march to
hang young men who prob-
ably never had a chance!
As I would have commu-
nicated in a previous letter
to the Editor, there is no sci-
entific proof provided that
hanging is a deterrent to

crime and I accept that
penal sanctions are well suit-
ed for any society. However,
respect for the rights of oth-
ers, charity and strong fam-
ily values are effective deter-
rents.

The way forward to solv-
ing our crime problem is not
through hysteria, blaming
others, emotionally charged
rash decisions, but rather by
acknowledging and eradicat-
ing the scourge of disloyalty,
disunity, dishonesty, indis-
cipline and hypocrisy.

The potential for our
nation to develop is based
on the number of persons
who have a proper educa-
tion. Education in its truest
sense should not be a luxury
in our Bahama Land. We
can either choose to commit
our time and = scarce
resources to building sophis-
ticated state-of-the-art pris-
ons, hiring more police,
defense force and prison
officers, or we can invest our
limited resources educating
our human capital rather
than expunging it. Thereby
developing a culture com-
mitted to “Self-discipline,
Industry, Loyalty, Unity and
an abiding respect for Chris-
tian values and the Rule of
Law.”

ELSWORTH N
JOHNSON
Nassau,

July, 2010.

Our constipated justice system

EDITOR, THE TRIBUNE.

OUR justice system is in a state of dilemma. It is suffer-
ing from a severe case of “constipation,” and in need of
an enema. Under no circumstance should someone
charged with murder be given bail.

Over seven years ago, my sister’s son was brutally
stabbed to death while on his way to work, simply
because he refused to give a culprit a dollar he asked for.
This savage thug has been on bail all this time and the
case is yet to be called in the Supreme Court.

Is this justice?

My nephew is languishing in a cold earth while his
alleged murderer is alive and enjoying the good life. Jus-
tice delayed is justice denied and justice denied is the

greatest of all injustices.

REUBEN W. SEARS
Nassau,
July 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

STABBING violence has
become a trend among young
persons, according to police,
amidst cries by youth advo-
cates for the nation to address
the gang subculture.

At a press conference on
Monday, Police Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade acknow!-
edged the organization had a
lot more work to complete
concerning gang intervention.

Mr Greenslade said:
"We've had far too many stab-
bings for the year to date in
this country, it seems that it’s
something that is 'en vogue’







among our young people and
certainly is tied to that gang-
type activity. And so we con-
tinue to pursue these young
people, to arrest them, to take
them before the courts on
charges whenever they offend
against the laws."

Reid,

POLICE COMMISSIONER Ellison Greenslade voiced concerns about
the ‘stabbing trend’.

However, Pastor Carlos
founder of Youth
Against Violence and the
Hope Centre, does not think
increased arrests will deter

gang involvement. He strongly
believes young people are frus-
trated by a lack of identity that
compels them to seek associa-
tion with a gang. He charged

Reports of alleged police
brutality are investigated



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Senior Assistant Quinn
McCartney, officer in charge of the Grand
Bahama District, said police are trying to sub-
stantiate reports of alleged police brutality
involving a young man over the weekend on
Grand Bahama.

According to reports in a local newspaper,
Glen Laing, 26, claimed that police officers
beat, tied him up, stripped off his clothing, and
dunked him into the sea until he lost conscious-
ness.

Mr McCartney said that while no formal
complaint has been filed yet the police have
been contacted by Laing’s attorney Simeon
Brown about the matter.

“T have forwarded the article that appeared
in Monday’s Freeport News to our Complaints
and Corruption Unit,” he said.

Laing was asleep at a friend’s house when
police officers arrived on Saturday morning
with a search warrant, according to the
report.

Laing claimed that five officers arrived at the
residence in a police bus with his friend, who
was in custody, and searched the house.

Laing was also taken into custody by the
officers at police headquarters, where he was



reported to have been questioned in connection
with an alleged armed robbery.

He claims that officers threatened to beat
him with a bat if he did not talk.

After he denied knowing anything about
armed robbery, he claimed that officers put a
black garbage bag over his head and hit him
about his body.

Laing then claimed that sometime around
11pm Saturday, he was taken to a police bus
where the officers put a tam over his face so he
could not see where they were taking him.

When the vehicle stopped, they were at a
beach. He claimed that officers then stripped
him of clothing, taped up his hands and feet and
kept dunking him into the water until he passed
out.

Laing alleged that officers poured water
over him to remove the sand from his body
and dressed him in his clothing. He was taken
back to police headquarters and put back into
a cell.

Mr McCartney was concerned about the
reports in the newspaper. He said that he police
were doing what they could to substantiate
Laing’s claims.

“It concerns me and I have made contact
with the officer in charge of CDU to substanti-
ate whether Laing was in our custody over the
weekend and to account for his time with us,”
said Mr McCartney.





YOUR CONNECTION

QO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE
DISPOSAL OF SCRAP
CABLE & EQUIPMENT

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is currently
Tendering for fhe Disposal of Scrap Cable & Equipment. All in-
lerested companies are asked fo collect a proposal from the
security booth af JFK Head Office.

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before August
10th, 2010 by 5:00 pm, to be included in the evaluation exer-
cise, Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER FOR THE
DISPOSAL OF SCRAP CABLE & EQUIPMENT" and should be de-

livered to the attention of:

Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lid
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas

BIC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

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the first step towards reducing
crime among young people is
the establishment of a gang
unit.

He said: “We don't want to
criminalise young people. We
want to teach them. We can’t
ask them to do things that they
aren't capable of or don't
know how to do. The gang unit
is not to just arrest them, but to
fix the problem. We don't need
another unit that's just going to
lock people up and put them in
court. The court system is
already stressed, why put them
through a system that isn't
working right now? The unit
should be to deal with trou-
bled kids, teach them identity,
teach them how to resolve
their conflict and teach them
anger management. Many par-
ents today they ask the kids:
"What's wrong with you?' so
the kids think 'something must
be wrong with me’.”

Pastor Reid is confident the
gang population has grown sig-
nificantly in the six years since
the last study was conducted.
At that time, the number of
persons involved in gang activ-
ity was estimated to be 15,000
spread over more than 50
gangs.

He said: "We've been call-
ing for the establishment of a
gang unit for years. Govern-
ments upon governments have
come into power and it is still
not implemented. The gang
unit shouldn’t just be police
force because the police force
can’t gather the kind of infor-
mation necessary to make that
kind of unit a success.”

Pastor Reid maintained that
although police participation

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Police concerned over ‘stabbing
trend’ among young people

was important, the unit should
be established by the govern-
ment in cooperation with the
private sector.

He continued: “In my hon-
est opinion we don't have a
gang problem. We don't have a
crime problem. We basically
have an identity problem, and
that is killing our country.
Most people don't know who
they are. Young people who
don’t know who they are, are
being taught by old people
who don't know who they are.
This is why young people just
want to identify with some-
thing. They can care less about
the danger that is involved in
the gang culture, being a part
of it gives them significance
and it validates them.”

Highlighting parallels in the
recidivism rates of youth
reform institutions and Her
Majesty’s Prison, Mr Reid
added: “We need to start
teaching them about who they
are, afford them opportunities
to receive validation for their
talents rather than the mischief
that they get into. When you
look at the newspaper it’s easy
for a young person to receive
recognition for getting into
mayhem than getting into
something positive — but we
tell them don't (get into may-
hem). Everyone wants their 15
minutes of fame, I don’t care
who you are. We have to find
ways as a nation to give them
that.”

Man taken to
hospital after

being clipped
by truck

A MAN was treated in

: hospital on Monday after
: he was clipped by a pass-
? ing truck on Shirley

: Street.

The man, identified by

: aresident of the area as

: handyman Vincent Curtis,
: is said to have stumbled

: away from a Guinep tree

? across the street from Sul-
? ly's Tailor Shop on

: Shirley Street into the

: busy thoroughfare during

: afternoon traffic.

An eyewitness said Mr

: Curtis, 46, of Shirley

: Street was hit in his head
: by the side mirror of a

: passing truck and

: knocked down by the

: impact.

The driver of the truck

: and small crowd of curi-

: ous onlookers hovered

: around the scene shortly
: after the incident, which
: occurred just after 2 pm

: yesterday.

Angela Romer, an area

: resident and acquaintance
: of Mr Curtis, was sitting

: under the tree when the

: incident happened.

She said Mr Curtis

: seemed coherent and not

: seriously harmed when he
: was taken away by ambu-
: lance for treatment at the
: hospital.

His present condition

: was not known up to
: press time.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





THE BAHAMAS’ VERY OWN STREET PHILOSOPHER

i









Flease be advised that the Minister of Public Works has approved temporary closure to North
Street, and Pason Lane on Thussday, fuly 29, 2010 berween che hours of 10:30am to 23pm, for
utility service upgrade.

Motocists are advised to evoid the area if at all possible during the posted time.

The Minsstry wishes to thank motorists for your assistance in this matter, and apologies in advance
for any inconvenience coased.

Sioned:

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works



YY ta\ 4-m7yea Licence Bill aims

to create review
board for appeals

“The Review Board will
be required to render its
decision in writing,
including its reasons for the
decision, within thirty days
of an appeal to the Board.”



Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham

IN ADDITION to imple-
menting a new fee structure,
the 2010 Business Licence
Bill introduced in the House
of Assembly yesterday also
seeks to create a Licence
Review Board to hear
appeals on exactly why
applications for licences
have been refused.

This Board will replace
the Supreme Court as the
arbiter of business licence
appeals and have the powers
of a magistrate for com-
pelling the attendance of
persons to give evidence on
oath and for the production
and inspection of docu-
ments, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said.

During his contribution to
the Bill yesterday, Mr
Ingraham said that for New
Providence appeals, the
Review Board will be made
up of a maximum of seven
members, including a chair-
man, appointed by the Min-
ister of Finance.

The constitution of
Boards in Grand Bahama
and the Family Islands will
be slightly different in order
to better respond to local
needs. Such Boards he said
will consist of up to five
members appointed by the
Minister, including the chair-
man, a member of the New
Providence Board and two
members from the Local
Government districts, one
of whom shall be from the
district in which the appeal-
ing business is located.

“Except where prescribed
by regulation, the Board will
be empowered to establish
its own operating proce-
dures. As well, the Board
will have the authority to
make, on its own initiative,
investigations and inquiries
and seek and receive evi-
dence additional to that ten-
dered by the parties to any
appeal.

“The Review Board will
be required to render its
decision in writing, includ-
ing its reasons for the deci-

sion, within thirty days of an
appeal to the Board. The
appeals themselves will be
required to be lodged within
21 days of the decision by
the Secretary,” he said.

In the new Business
Licence Bill a distinction has
been made _ between
offences of a fraudulent
nature and all other
offences. For any action that
is proven to be fraudulent,
the Prime Minister said that
there will no longer be an
option between a fine of
$10,000 and imprisonment
for two years. Such offences
he said will automatically
carry a prison term, which
will not exceed two years.

Penalty

“For other types of
offences such as carrying on
a business without a licence,
obstructing the Secretary in
the exercise of his functions,
or failing to maintain
accounts and records as
required, for example, the
penalty will be a fine of
$5,000 plus the sum of $100
for each day the offence
continues after the date to
which the conviction relates.
These amounts are more
reasonable and straightfor-
ward than the current struc-
ture of fines for such
offences.

“In particular, the possi-
bility of confiscating goods,
machinery and equipment
where a business operates
without a licence has been
eliminated. For offences
committed by corporations
or firms, every director, sec-
retary and officer of the cor-
poration or every partner in
the firm, as the case may be,
will be guilty of the offence
and liable to a like penalty
as the corporation or firm.

“To simplify the adminis-
tration of penalties, the Bill
proposes to grant the power
to the Secretary to com-
pound offences where he is
satisfied that an offence has



been committed in respect
of which a fine is prescribed.
Such power will only be
exercisable where the per-
son admits in writing that he
has committed the offence
and requests the Secretary
to deal with it,” he said.

This new Business
Licence Bill also seeks to
tighten up the various
exemptions from the
requirement to pay business
licences.

“For one,” Mr Ingraham
said, “only ecclesiastical,
charitable and cultural insti-
tutions and organizations
registered as non-profit enti-
ties within The Bahamas will
be eligible for exemption.
As such, all institutions
operating for profit, such as
private schools, will be sub-
ject to the requirement to
pay business licence tax.

“The same treatment will
apply to medical clinics and
hospitals operating other
than in the service of the
government or of a public
body. As well, a telecommu-
nication service subject toa
licence under section 21 of
the Broadcasting Act will no
longer be exempt but will
be subject to an annual busi-
ness licence tax of three per
cent of gross revenue.

“As a means of rationalis-
ing the various fees and tax-
es paid by the private sec-
tor, the Bill proposes to
incorporate into the new
Business Licence Act the
present annual fees imposed
on the assets of Banks and
Trust Companies appointed
by the Controller of
Exchange as authorised
dealers as defined in para-
graph one of Regulation 42
of the Exchange Control
Regulations. Similarly, the
new Act will also incorpo-
rate the taxes imposed on
insurance companies’ gross
premiums collected in
respect of local policies.”

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 7



Woman intends to
run against PM
in North Abaco
FROM page one

their development.”

Forty-four-year-old Ms McIntosh
ran unsuccessfully in the constituen-
cy of North Abaco in 2002.

In a release issued yesterday she
said that “returning to Abaco has
been an issue that has been in my
most earnest and prayerful consider-
ation for a extended time,” adding
that “the sensitive proposal of con-
testing a seat now occupied by the
sitting Prime Minister and leader of
the country, presents a very volatile
situation for a relative newcomer to
front line politics, such as myself.”

However, Ms McIntosh said that
with violent crime on the rise and
the “economic predicament for
many residents of the country at a
critical level” people coming for-
ward to represent the nation must
be “men and women of inspiration
and courage.”

Ms McIntosh said her party

FROM page one

China government is a critical
component to enable the Baha
Mar project to move forward.
We strongly believe that the cre-
ation of this world class resort
will significantly benefit the
Bahamas and all Bahamians. We
now await Bahamian govern-
mental approval, which will
enable us to begin work on the
resort’s construction.
“Ultimately, our project will
result in the creation of 11,000
Bahamian jobs, including 6-7,000
new permanent positions. This
will be the most substantial single



intends to create a “new political
culture.”

They are also calling for anyone
who wishes to run under their ban-
ner in the 2012 general election to
apply to the party.

She said that the party is looking
for people of “like minds and philo-
sophical ideas” who wish to serve
their country rather than them-
selves.

“In the vein of gender equality,
the BCP wishes to field 17-19
women as candidates in the elec-
tion, close to 50 per cent of the pool,
giving equal access to young women



BAHA MAR CHAIRMAN

Sarkis Izmirlian

job stimulus opportunity the
Bahamas has ever experienced,”
he said.

According to Mr Izmirlian, the
first action that Baha Mar will
undertake following the Bahami-
an government’s approval will
be the awarding of almost $60
million of construction contracts
to six Bahamian contractors rep-
resenting carly infrastructure
works needed to prepare the
resort site.

Two months after the Bahami-
an government’s approval, Baha
Mar expects that “several hun-
dred Bahamian jobs” will be cre-
ated involving the construction
of the new commercial village
and work to re-route West Bay
Street and the JFK Connector.

“It is anticipated that Baha
Mar will make the Bahamas one
of the premier tourist locations in

Chinese government
Says ‘yes’ to Baha Mar

the world,” read a statement
issued on behalf of the project.
“Baha Mar will draw millions of
vacationers and business trav-
ellers every year to the resort’s
six hotels, with almost 3,500
rooms and condos, the largest
casino in the Caribbean, the
largest convention centre in the
Bahamas, a world-class golf
course, retail village and much
more.

“Baha Mar will employ
approximately 4,000 Bahamians
over the life of the construction
period, expected to last almost
four years. Once the resort is ful-
ly operating, approximately 98
per cent of the staff will be
Bahamian nationals,” the news
release said.

Man accused of defrauding

local bank of $100,000

and men wanting to make them-
selves available to serve the nation
in political service,” said Ms McIn-
tosh.

The party has designed “a series
of workshops, training sessions, lit-
mus testing and interviews for candi-
dates with the primary goal of iden-
tifying people with integrity,
courage, honesty, passion and Chris-
tian standards” who wish to “pro-
vide leadership to the nation,” said
the statement.

Those interested in applying can
contact Bahamasconstitutionpar-
ty@gmail.com, visit the website
Bahamasyouthrenewal.com, or send
a letter by mail to P. O. Box N-7938,

FROM page one

It is alleged that Gaitor forged several Roy-
al Bank of Canada cheques and a First
Caribbean Bank cheque.

According to court dockets, Gaitor forged
Royal Bank of Canada cheques drawn on the
accounts of Deltec Bank and Trust Limited
and Harbourside Marine and Bahamas
Supermarkets Limited. It is further alleged
that the cheques ranging from $2,550 to $8,300
were made payable to Teran Moss, Therez
Johnson, Dario Taylor, D’Amatto Deveaux,
Peggy Joseph and Dwight Miller. A First
Caribbean Bank cheque drawn on the account
of Credit Suisse in the sum of $18,550 was
made payable to Johnathan Adderley.

It is claimed that Gaitor used fraudulent

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cheques to obtain $114,450 from Common-
wealth Bank this year as well as $6,000 from
the Bank of the Bahamas. According to court
dockets, Gaitor uttered fraudulent cheques
in the amounts varying from $500 to $55,000
on one alleged occasion.

Gaitor, who was represented by attorney
Davard Francis, pleaded not guilty to the long
list of charges and opted for a summary trial
in the Magistrate’s Court. The matters were
transferred to Court One, Bank Lane, for fix-
ture on August 6.

Also appearing in court with Gaitor yes-
terday were Deandro Munnings, 19,
Johnathan Adderley, 21, and Teran Moss, 20.
They are all accused of conspiring on Thurs-
day, July 15, to commit fraud. They all plead-
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Adderley and Moss. Dario Taylor, 20, and
Teran Moss are also accused of abatement
to commit fraud. They pleaded not guilty to
the charge and their police bail was extended.

Therez Johnson was also arraigned with
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to commit fraud. The two pleaded not guilty
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Attorney Francis told the court yesterday
that his client had voluntarily turned himself
in to police after learning that he was wanted
for questioning. Mr Francis said Gaitor had
already surrendered his travel documents to
police, was released on $90,000 police bail
and is not a flight risk. According to Mr Fran-
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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BEC is more than a dirty
word on Abaco these days

TOUGH CALL

By LARRY SMITH

FOR months during the
busiest and hottest season of
the year, the state-owned util-
ity has been unable to provide
steady power for the country's
third largest economy. This has
led to rising anger among the
island's 15,000 residents as well
as bitter complaints from
departing tourists.

Craig Roberts, owner of the
Bahama Beach Club in Trea-
sure Cay, said customers were
demanding refunds, with some
saying they would not return.
Peggy Thompson of Hope
Town Hideaways, a property
management business, said
many guests had to either
move to cottages with a gener-
ator, or were giving up and
demanding their money back.

"BEC has effectively ruined
our tourist season and that will
reverberate for the next sev-
eral summers.

“Our visitors are very angry
and leaving,” one resident told
me.

"We don't get any informa-
tion from BEC on anything.
They do not want to talk.
Everything is referred to Nas-
sau."

The power cuts have been
ongoing since May, almost dai-
ly and often for as long as eight
or 10 hours at a time — occa-
sionally up to 13 hours. And
until last week, when the prime
minister raised the matter in
Parliament, BEC has had little
to say about them.

"These interruptions are a
problem Abaco is all too famil-
lar with and one that BEC is
actively working to improve,"
the corporation said in a press
statement issued last Friday.

"The present challenges are
due to faults that developed
on a few generators, coupled
with a shortage of lubricating
oil.”

But behind that soothing
tone lies a disturbing reality.
Sources on Abaco say the oil
shortage was due to BEC's
inability to approve pre-pay-





=?



1 ARRY SMITH

ment for suppliers who are
refusing to extend credit to the
financially troubled corpora-
tion. The latest scuttlebutt is
that Shell, which holds the cur-
rent BEC fuel contract, is
owed some $40 million by the
corporation.

Last Thursday, BEC had to
airlift - presumably at great
cost — six 55-gallon drums of
lube oil into Marsh Harbour
prior to the prime minister's
visit on Saturday — probably
for generators that have just
been repaired.

This is despite the fact that a
local supplier was willing to
provide the oil but insisted on
a purchase order first.

According to a well-placed
BEC source, “literally all hell
broke loose at the old plant in
Murphy Town on June 13. It is
possible the lube oil run-out is
reflective of gross negligence
on someone's part as suggested
by the PM, but there are other
possibilities such as late deliv-
ery from the supplier, or non-
payment to the supplier for
prior shipments resulting in a
longer than normal delivery
time. Many suppliers are now
requiring BEC to make
advance payment for goods
and services because of the
corporation's financial situa-
tion."

The source also referred to
stories circulating in Marsh
Harbour that BEC wouldn't
fix the old generators because
they were waiting for the new
$105 million Wilson City pow-
er plant to come on stream.

"We are working to get a
1.6 MW unit that has been out
for more than a year, as well as
two 1.6 MW units that have
been out since the fire that

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destroyed associated
switchgear six months ago,
back in service," the source
told me earlier this month. "A
prior reluctance to fix genera-
tors in the existing station may
be one reason why those
engines were sitting idle fol-
lowing the fire."

Meanwhile, the timeline for
bringing the new Wilson City
plant on stream has been
steadily pushed back from the
original date of last April. BEC
likes to blame the environmen-
talist opposition to the new
plant for this debacle. Accord-
ing to last Friday's press state-
ment: "Delays and adjustments
to the project, initially arising
from an injunction being filed
to stop construction, as well as
subsequent, ongoing litigation
challenges and other consider-
ations have resulted in the new
plant not yet producing pow-
er."

There were three major
components to the huge Wil-
son City project - a 48
megawatt fossil fuel power
plant, a two-mile pipeline from
a new fuel terminal in the
Bight of Old Robinson, and 20
miles of new transmission lines
to supply electricity to the
Marsh Harbour grid. A Sal-
vadoran construction compa-
ny was subcontracted by MAN
Diesel of Canada to build the
plant and construction began
last September.

After plans to use heavy
fuel oil were scrapped earlier
this year due to pollution con-
cerns, it was proposed to truck
diesel oil to the new plant from
the port at Marsh Harbour — so
the pipeline was cancelled.
There are storage facilities for
2.5 million gallons of fuel at









the new plant and observers
say about 20,000 gallons a day
are needed to operate the new
plant. This means hundreds of
four-hour tanker truck round
trips to fill the storage tanks
as well as regular ongoing
deliveries to keep them sup-
plied. BEC has been indicat-
ing that one of the new gener-
ators will be put online soon.
But it was only last week that
the Wilson City plant was con-
nected to the Marsh Harbour
distribution system for start-
up and testing procedures.
However, since the contractors
need about I MW of steady
power to begin testing, it is dif-
ficult to see how this can hap-
pen under the present chaotic
circumstances.

On top of that is the fact
that the transmission lines
from the new plant to Marsh
Harbour still have to be
upgraded, as they are not
heavy enough to take all the
new power.

However, experts say the
existing lines should be able to
handle the output from a single
generator.

Another critical component
is a dedicated communications
link from the new plant's con-
trol room to the existing
plant's control room.

This is for coordinating the
testing and connection of the
new generator. Experts say
that bringing a 12 MW genera-
tor online must be carefully
handled or it will destroy half
the electrical items in Marsh
Harbour.

So while BEC scrambles to
bring one of the four new gen-
erators at Wilson City on
stream to help resolve their
immediate difficulties, comple-
tion of the entire project is
probably a year behind sched-
ule.

HISTORY

BEC operates 29 generating
plants around the country.
Installed capacity on New
Providence is around 340 MW,
with another 100 MW distrib-
uted across plants on the fam-
ily islands. Demand for elec-
tricity is growing at 3-5 per
cent a year in the Bahamas.

The installed generating
capacity on Abaco is about 30
MW, comprised of many small
units. Peak demand has been
around 19 MW recently, but
the difficulties experienced by
BEC - and the privately
owned Grand Bahama Power
Company — in meeting rising
demand on our three most
populated islands is cause for
great concern in terms of the
country's economic future.

The original commercial
utility on Abaco was Marsh
Harbour Power & Light, start-
ed in the 1950s by local busi-
nessmen Chris Roberts and
Lucien Stratton when the
island first began to develop.
In the late 1960s this opera-
tion was acquired by an Amer-

ican engineer named Phil Fer-
rar, who renamed it Abaco
Electric.

Private power stations were
also set up on Man o' War Cay
by Vernon Albury, on Green
Turtle Cay by Bill Elden, at
Cooper's Town by Joe Sawyer,
at Crossing Rocks by Frank
Hepburn, and at Treasure Cay.
Grand Cay was supplied by the
developers of Walker's Cay.
Elbow Cay was supplied by
Abaco Electric.

All of these operations were
gradually acquired by BEC,
beginning with Cooper's Town
in 1975. The main utility -
Abaco Electric — was acquired
in 1987, when the owner was
operating on a year-to-year
franchise.

"IT don't know of any pri-
vate producers that wanted to
get out of the business," one
oldtimer told me.

"They would have stayed on
if they could have gotten better
franchise terms.

“My recollection is that gov-
ernment pushed the issue of
nationalization. But some sys-
tems were marginal in terms
of infrastructure, so perhaps
this consolidation by BEC was
necessary.”

People often point to the
success of the privately owned
Spanish Wells power compa-
ny when discussing these mat-
ters. But that company pro-
vides power for a single com-
pact community. And although
by most accounts it is super
efficient, it nevertheless
charges a much higher rate
than BEC's out island rate,
which is subsidised by con-
sumers in Nassau.

On Abaco, it is unlikely that
private operators would have
invested in expanding their sys-
tems into remote communities.
Each operator serviced his par-
ticular area and expanded into
nearby areas where there were
sufficient paying customers.
But BEC services all these
communities — except for the
predominately expatriate vil-
lage of Little Harbour, which is
powered by solar panels and
backup generators.

That is the main argument
for a public utility. But BEC’s
bureaucratic and uncommu-
nicative approach to its cus-
tomers, its operational ineffi-
ciencies, union featherbedding
and financial irresponsibility
are more than enough to justi-
fy a major overhaul and
rethink of this state corpora-
tion.

THE SHERROD
CHARADE

The Shirley Sherrod story
is an indictment of US Presi-
dent Barack Obama any way
you look at it, in the view of his
craziest critics.

First, there was the affront
that a black public official was
promoting discrimination
against white farmers. It was
caught on tape, so what was

Obama going to do about it?

Then there was the rush to
judgment that led to Sherrod's
hasty firing July 19 based on a
doctored YouTube video of a
speech she gave to the
NAACP.

There are so many dimen-
sions to this story that it's hard
to choose among them. But
let's start with the woman her-
self — Shirley Sherrod, direc-
tor of Rural Development for
the US Department of Agri-
culture in Georgia until last
week.

Her father was the victim
of a hate crime in 1965. A Bap-
tist deacon and farmer, he was
shot to death by a white
farmer, and no charges were
returned against the shooter
by an all-white grand jury.
There are scores of similar
unsolved deaths from that era.

Then there's Andrew Breit-
bart, the right wing commenta-
tor who published the doc-
tored Sherrod video on his
website (Biggovernment.com

). His posting of the video was
part of a tit for tat cultural war,
with each side accusing the
other of playing the race card.

The NAACP and others
complained about anti-black
racism in the Tea Party move-
ment, so the Sherrod speech
excerpt was published to make
it appear that the NAACP
supported racism against
whites.

Breitbart claims the charges
against the Tea Party are part
of an effort to discredit the
movement prior to the Novem-
ber mid-term elections. Oppo-
nents accuse Tea Party activists
of trying to "delegitimise"” the
elected US government —
about a third of its supporters
believe Obama is a foreigner
who is moving the US towards
communism.

The administration's swift
and thoughtless reaction to the
Sherrod video is a telling indi-
cation of the vitriol that per-
meates media coverage of
American politics these days.
It was apparently an attempt
to head off a right-wing bar-
rage on cable news.

Meanwhile, the history of
the USDA itself is just as
incredible as the deliberate
smear campaign that led to
Sherrod's forced resignation.

Massive financial settle-
ments have been reached in
lawsuits filed by minority farm-
ers alleging discrimination by
the agency over many decades.

The fact that a doctored
video designed to create an
outcome became the news of
the day demonstrates the valid-
ity of some time-honoured
advice to journalists — if your
mother tells you she loves you,
check it out first.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

Sp

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28,

PAGE 9









4



=

. =
Z ira

ts

2010



ALL 1 DO IS WIN: Pro middleweight boxer Taureano Johnson (AP file photo) won a first round knock-
out over Roy Ashworth at the Fitzgerald Hotel and Casino in Tunica, Mississippi.



Team Bahamas
returns from IAAF
World Juniors

TEAM Bahamas returned
home yesterday afternoon fol-
lowing a series of outstand-
ing performances and a
record-setting 400m feat at
the 13th IAAF World Junior
Championships in Moncton
city.

More than 1,400 athletes
and team officials from 170
countries converged in New
Brunswick, Canada, for the
track and field meet.

The Bahamas was high-
lighted by Shaunae Miller’s
gold medal performance in
the women's 400m with a
time of 52.52s.

In the tightly contested
final, she handily defeated
2010 world junior leader Mar-
garet Etim of Nigeria who fin-
ished in 53.05s, while Bianca
Razor of Romania finished
third in 53.17s.

Miller set a new junior
national record in the 400m
and became the second gold
medallist for the Bahamas at
the meet. In Poland in 2008,
Olympian Sheniqua 'Q' Fer-
guson captured the gold in the
200m.

200m

In the women's 200m, both
Anthonique Strachan and
Tynia Gaither reached the
semifinal but were unable to
advance. Strachan finished
fourth in heat four in 23.99s
while Gaither finished 8th in
heat one in 24.48s.

In the men's 200m, Trevo-
rano Mackey reached the
semifinal round as well, but
failed to advance. He finished
seventh in heat two in a time
of 21.71s. Laron Hield fin-
ished eighth in heat five of
the opening round with a time
of 22.15s.

Long Jump

Raymond Higgs finished
11th in the men's long jump
with a leap of 7.09m.

High Jump

Higgs finished 15th in
group B of the High Jump
qualification with a leap of
2.00m, which was a season's
best.

Triple Jump

Latario Minns finished
eighth in group A with a leap
of 15.35m in the opening







Photos by Stanley Mitchell





REPRESENTING: The Bahamas was highlighted by Shaunae Miller's
gold medal performance in the women's 400m.

round of the event.

400m

Rashan Brown just missed
out on a berth to the final
after she finished fifth in semi-
final three in 54.14s.

In the men's 400m, Stephen
Newbold struggled in the pre-
liminaries of the men's 400m
and finished seventh in 50.62s.

100m

V'Alonee Robinson's bid
in the women's 100m ended
in the semifinals where she
finished seventh in 12.14s.

Marvar Etienne finished
fourth in heat five, however,
her time of 12.12s was not fast
enough to qualify for the
semifinals.

Warren Fraser advanced to
the second round of the men's
century when he took heat
four in 10.46s, a new personal
best.

He advanced to the semi-
final where he ran in heat
three and finished third in
10.72s

Geno Jones finished third

in heat three in 10.66s, but
failed to advance to the next
round.

100mH

Ivanique Kemp turned in a
personal best in the prelimi-
nary round with a time of
13.58s. She finished fifth in
heat two in a time of 13.77s.

400mH

Nejmi Burnside posted a
time of 54.17s in the prelimi-
naries of the men's 400m hur-
dles, good enough for seventh
place.

1600m relay

In the men's event, Burn-
side, Earl Rahming, Alonzo
Russell and Delano Deveaux
finished eighth in heat two in
3:14.42.

In the women's event,
Miller, Brown, Katrina Sey-
mour and Amara Jones
reached the final and just
barely missed out on a medal
when they finished in fourth
place, setting a new junior
national record of 3:33.43s.



By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

{ter a stellar

amateur

career, Tau-

reano John-

son shows no
signs of slowing down early
in his professional career and
continues to sport an unde-
feated record.

Johnson won another mid-
dleweight bout with a first
round knockout over Roy
Ashworth at the Fitzgerald
Hotel and Casino in Tunica,
Mississippi. He moved to a 4-
0 record with four knockouts
after dominating Ashworth,
who hails from Luke Charles,
Louisiana.

The 26-year-old Olympian
floored Ashworth, who fell to
a win-loss record of 5-9, just
1:31 into the opening round.

Both fighters brawled toe-
to-toe early on, but Johnson
became the first to assert his
advantage by forcing his
opponent into a corner.









CAC Games:
Eve throws

her season’s
best for 4th...

See page 10

laureano
§ undefeated

Pro boxer wins
middleweight bout
with Ist round KO

After gaining an advantage,
forcing Asworth on the ropes,
Johnson delivered a right
uppercut to floor him for
good. Johnson's barrage of
punches did more damage
than initially suspected.

Hours after the fight,
reports surfaced that Ash-
worth suffered breathing and
dizziness and was airlifted to
the nearest hospital where he
was treated for fractured
facial bones and released.

Johnson's record includes
wins over Cleoney Fuqua,
Ryan Bianchini, Anthony
Bowman at venues through-
out the US, including Ten-

nessee, Georgia and Missis-
sippi.

Johnson rose to promi-
nence in the amateur ranks
with his effort against PanAm
Champion Pedro Lima at the
first Olympic qualifier where
he lost a close bout.

At the second qualifier, he
won the rematch 10:6 and
earned a berth to the 2008
Summer Olympic Games in
Beijing, China.

He won a pair of matches
in the welterweight division
and finished just one bout shy
of the country's first ever
medal in boxing at the
Olympics.

Bahamas’ junior soccer
team fails to qualify
for FIFA U-17 WCup

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
iceCe)ecx1acCAN AT OLIN sdnalse le MALslE

A VALIANT effort by the Bahamas’
junior national soccer team players result-
Xo BUONO UUme) MmpONTTKecmysUOOmBote Tan styialotes
opponents. But they failed to qualify for
the next round of international competi-
tion.

The under-17 boys’ team hosted
Bermuda at the Roscoe Davies soccer
field in one segment of the long road to
qualification for the 2010 FIFA under-17
World Cup.

In match one, Bermuda stunned the
Bahamas with a lopsided 5-1 victory,
which all but sealed qualification for the
next round.

Terry Delancey was the lone goal scor-
er for the Bahamas when he netted a goal
in the 63rd minute.

In match two, the Bahamas delivered a
stellar defensive effort as they held the
Bermudians scoreless for the 1-0 win, a
stark contrast to the five goals given up in
out Meolen

Harold Anthor's left-footed goal in the
76th minute was the lone score of the
match and gave the Bahamas the edge
for the win.

Bermuda was able to advance to the
regional qualifier by virtue of aggregate
goals scored with a 5-2 advantage.

National team head coach Cory Fraser
said the team started uncharacteristically
COMA

"The guys really underplayed in the
first game, but I credit that to them being
nervous. A lot of them were really affect-
ed by the crowd and representing the
country for the first time,” he said.

"In game two we played together and
followed the game plan. The guys got
more accustomed to international com-
petition and they knew what they had to
do to come out and beat this team."

The regional qualifier is scheduled to
take place in Trinidad & Tobago August
18-22. And the FIFA U-17 World Cup is
set for Mexico in 2011.

Brazil and Nigeria are the most suc-
cessful countries in the history of the tour-
nament with three titles won by each side.

1
1
1

f Ni! 1 h iV

eee





400m relay

In the men's 400m, Mack-
ey, Fraser, Jones and Alfred
Higgs (above) finished in

40.58s for a season's best time,
but failed to advance to the
final. The women's team of
Robinson, Etienne, Gaither

and Deandra Whitehorne fin-
ished in a season's best time
of 45.45s, but they failed to
advance.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

HIGHLIGHTS: XX|I Central American & Caribbean Games in Puerto Rico...





Bahamas’ tennis
Stars continue
to deliver

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net





TEAM Bahamas
continues to deliver
an impressive per-
formance on its way
to the latter stages
of the respective
draw at the XXI
Central American
and Caribbean
(CAC) Games in
Mayaguez, Puerto
Rico.

The women's
draw has featured
some of the
strongest play for ADVANCES: L Russell.
the Bahamas with
both Kerrie Cartwright and Larikah Russell
recording wins yesterday to advance to the
quarterfinal.

Cartwright, the fifth ranked player in the
draw, received a bye in round one and hand-
ily dispatched her opponent in yesterday's
second round. She topped Jessica Roland in
straight sets, 6-2, 6-3 to advance to the quar-
terfinals.

In her second round match, Russell out-
lasted the top ranked player of the draw in
a three-set thriller to advance to the quar-
terfinal. With a 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 win, Russell
eliminated Marina Giral of Venezuela. In
her opening round match, she dominated
Taylor Davis of the US Virgin Islands 6-0, 6-
0.







In the quarterfinals, Cartwright will face
Adriana Perez of Venezuela, the fourth
ranked player in the draw. Perez breezed by
Melissa Golfin of Costa Rica 6-2, 6-1 yes-

terday to advance.

Russell will face Francesca Segarelli of
the Dominican Republic in her quarterfinal
match, after Segarelli got by Kristen Wee-
don of Guatemala 6-1, 6-1.

On the men's side of the draw, the final
Bahamian player Marvin Rolle was elimi-
nated when he lost a hard-fought, straight-
set match to Christopher Diaz of
Guatemala. He suffered a 6-7, 4-6 defeat
at the hands of the fifth ranked player of the
men's draw.

Olympian Devin Mullings was eliminated
in the opening round when he suffered a
lopsided loss at the hands of Marcelo Areva-
lo of El Salvador, the fourth seeded player
of the draw, 1-6, 4-6.

In women's doubles, Russell and Nikkita
Fountain continued their stellar play with a
three-set match to oust the third ranked
team of the draw. The duo defeated home
favourites Monica Puig and Jessica Roland
of Puerto Rico, 1-6, 6-4, 10-8 to advance to
the semifinals of the draw.

Russell and Fountain will face Mariana
Muci Andrea Amiz in the semifinals after
they blanked Caitlin Gordon and Tara Lam-
bert of Bermuda 6-0, 6-0.

Russell and Fountain easily advanced to
the quarterfinals after dispatching of Rox-
ann Williams and Lerissa Morris of St Vin-
cent and the Grenadines in straight sets, 6-
1, 6-1.

In men's doubles, Rolle was able to exact
revenge on Diaz when he and Mullings
paired to advance to the semifinals. They
defeated Diaz and Sebastian Vidal, 6-4, 6-2
and will face Piero Luisi and Jose de Armas
of Venezuela.

In the opening round, they advanced with
a straight-set win over David Thomas and
Neal Towlson of Bermuda, 6-0, 7-5.





|

Andretti Bain places fourth in 400m final...

~







HOMESTRETCH: Olympian Andretti Bain (far right) placed fourth in the 400m final Monday night. Costa
Rica’s Nery Brenes (center), won the gold and Jamaica’s Allodin Fothergill (far left) the bronze at the CAC
Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on July 26, 2010.

(AP Photo)








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BEST EFFORT: Olympian
Lavern Eve (shown in this
file photo) placed fourth in
the women’s javelin at the
CAC Games.







TRIBUNE SPORTS



b



Eve tosses her
season’s best to
place fourth

A BUSY Monday night for
Team Bahamas at the XXI
CAC Games turned into a
disappointing session Tues-
day on the track but a wel-
come surprise on the field.

Olympian Lavern Eve was
the lone bright spot for the
Bahamas when she turned in
a fourth place finish in the
women's javelin.

Her toss of 51.02m was a
season's best for the veteran
thrower and came on her final

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¢ Nathaniel McKinney disqualified
for false start in semifinal

¢ Jamail Rolle finishes third in
semis but doesn’t advance

attempt.

Kateema Riettie of Jamaica
took the gold medal in
53.77m, Fresa Nunez of the
Dominican Republic won sil-
ver in 52.96m while Maria
Murillo of Colombia won
bronze with a throw of
51.29m.

The 200m proved to be
unkind as neither athlete in
the men's event was able to
advance to the final.

Nathaniel McKinney was
disqualified in semifinal one
due to a false start while
Jamail Rolle finished third in
semifinal four in 21.06s and
failed to advance.

Athletics breaks today and
is expected to continue
tomorrow with qualification
in both 4x100m events and
Olympian Leevan “Super-
man” Sands in the triple
jump.





Amertil's gold triumph





NUMBER 107: Olympian Christine Amertil (right) and Grenada’s
Trish Bartholomew (left) sprint to the finish line in the women’s 400
final at the CAC Games on July 26, 2010. Amertil won the gold.

(AP Photo)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 11



Human Resources Association
holds meeting on NI Benefit Plan

THE Bahamas Human
Resources Association
held a meeting on the
highly anticipated Nation-
al Insurance Benefit Plan
as part of its efforts to pro-
vide a forum to discuss
human resources and
employment issues.

The speakers were:
actuary consultant at the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) Derek Osborne and
public relations manager
Pandora Butler.

Mr Osborne stated that
NIB is a “social premise”
that serves people by aid-
ing with basic social needs.

For example, NIB offers
benefits covering the
death of a parent, sickness
and maternity benefits, as
well as a pension benefit.

The pension benefit is
the only form of retire-
ment savings that most
Bahamians have access to,
he said.

Nevertheless, Mr
Osborne insisted that NIB
“has to be relevant.” In

the context of mass lay-
offs and a declining econo-
my, the government there-
fore implemented an
Unemployment Benefit
Scheme to assist the newly
unemployed.

However, according to
Mr Osborne, NIB has lost
its relevance for some
Bahamians, for example
those who earn more than
$400 per week.

“The goal has to be reg-
ular changes in the NI
scheme to stay relevant to
the realities of life,” he
said.

Pandora Butler noted
that National Insurance
was “never intended to
take full care of people
when there is a problem,”
but rather to provide par-
tial income replacement.

She said many Bahami-
ans think they have paid a
great deal for NI over the
years, but do not realise
that someone making reg-
ular contributions since
the scheme’s inception in

1972 would have paid just
over $16,000.

“There is no doubt that
if we live long enough, we
get more out of it than we
put into it,” she said.

The speakers took a
number of questions from
the audience, including:

e Q: If someone retires
at age 60 and claims bene-
fits before age 65, what
will their benefits be?

e A: The individual
receives 80 per cent of
what they are entitled to.
If you wait, the benefit
increases by 4 per cent
each year. Therefore, at
age 61 the benefit increas-
es to 84 per cent.

¢ Q: Will summer stu-
dents be subject to nation-
al insurance increases?

e A: No

¢ Q: How do sickness
and maternity benefits
work when taken consecu-

tively?

¢ A: NI will cease sick-
ness benefits six weeks pri-
or to the commencement
of maternity leave. This six
week period is considered
maternity leave.

¢ Q: What does the
“permanent phase” of the
unemployment benefit
mean?

¢ A: This means that the
payment aspect of the
Unemployment Benefit
Programme will be
enforced, effective June 1,
2010 and employers and
employees will begin pay-
ing an increase of 0.5 per
cent.

The Bahamas Human
Resources Development
Association is a national,
non-profit organisation
and an affiliate of the

Society for Human
Resources Management
(SHRM).

BHRDA’s objective is
to provide a forum for

Director of Antiquities, Monuments ant
Museums Corporation ‘expected to step down’

FROM page one

Minister of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Charles Maynard said that Dr Tin-
ker “applied for a leave of absence and
has been contemplating retirement.”

Nonetheless, Mr Maynard noted that
the board has been directed to under-
take a restructuring of the corporation
so that they can fulfil their tasks and
objectives while Dr Tinker takes his

vacation.

A search has already been commis-

sioned to identify a new director of the
corporation, with the Minister confirm-
ing that he anticipates to fill this post
with someone “hopefully” from within
the wider public service arena.

The development comes after an
investigation was launched into the
handling of the Antiquities, Monu-
ments, and Museums Corporation,
although Mr Maynard denied the two
matters were linked.

Having been appointed to the post in
1998 when the corporation was first

formed, Minister Maynard said that
Dr Tinker is a fully pensionable public
servant.

For some time now, questions have
been raised about the management of
the AMMC board. According to
sources with intimate knowledge of
the matter, it was considered that the
board was not functioning as intended.

Reportedly decisions were being

made without the board’s approval or

involvement, raising questions over the
corporation’s overall management.

Director has ‘no knowledge’
of low morale at Met Office

FROM page one

not brought to his atten-
tion until they were made
public in the media. He
added that he and his
senior management team
adhere to the guidelines of
the Department of Public
Service.

"We don’t know of it,"
said Mr Rolle, referring to
himself and deputy direc-
tors Jeffrey Simmons and
Basil Dean who were pre-
sent during a telephone
interview with The Tribune
yesterday. "We don't have
those sources at all (so) we
can't respond."

"We do our duties at the
department of meteorology
as outlined by the Depart-
ment of Public Service and
the governing of the
department through its
policies and that's all I
want to say on the matter,"
said Mr Rolle when
pressed about claims of
micro-managing, or senior
management interfering
with the day-to-day func-
tions of persons at the
Meteorological Office.

When asked about com-
plaints that the department
still does not have a set of
guidelines to identify
severe weather formation,
Mr Rolle refused to answer
further questions, again
stating: "That's all I want
to say on the matter."

"Frustrated" sources
claim senior management
has only instituted a set of
protocols, or a chain of
command of who should be
contacted in the event of
severe weather, leaving it
to the discretion of each
forecaster to determine
what warrants a severe
weather alarm.

"There are no guidelines
in place at the Met Office
for issuing severe weather
warning, what he (the
director) has is a protocol.
The protocol he has in

place now says if a fore-
caster can determine on
the weather radar system
a severity or if you have
spotted a funnel cloud
forming you would go
ahead and issue a severe
weather warning, issued
first to NEMA, then the
director or the senior
deputy director.

"In most territories
around the world there are
steps. What good is a pro-
tocol without standard
operating procedures?
Issuing severe weather
warning is left to the dis-
cretion of the duty fore-
caster,” said a well-placed





re

source who asked to
remain anonymous.

The department was put
in the hot seat in March
after it failed to issue a
severe weather warning
ahead of a tornado that left
three workers at the
Freeport Container Port
dead in March, even
though reports of funnel
clouds had come into the
Meteorological Office in
Nassau beginning that
morning.

Back in March, officials
said this failure was due to
employee “negligence” and
a "breakdown in protocol."

This week, sources with-

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Make a Statement

in the department voiced
frustration about senior
management.

“In headquarters at
Oakes Field, they are mir-
co-managing the Met
Office. We have all the
necessary tools and mod-
els at hand but they are sit-
ting there and telling the
staff at the airport what to
do. It is demoralising,” said
one source. “This is the
lowest the morale has ever
been.”

Another source at the
Meteorological office said:
“The morale in that office
is under a snake’s belly. It’s
very poor.”

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THE MEETING was part of
efforts to provide a forum to
discuss human resources and
employment issues.

human resources profes-
sionals to enhance their
knowledge and skills in
the area of HR and to pro-
vide technical assistance
and support to its mem-
bers.

Meetings are held on the
third Wednesday of each
month.

The week of October 17,
2010, has been proclaimed
by the prime minister as
HR Professional’s Week.
A conference has been
planned for October 2010.
More details will be
announced soon.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



After not guilty verdict, the question remains:

WHO KILLED
HARL TAYLOR?

WITH Troyniko McNeil
now free, the question
remains: Who killed Harl
Taylor, and was there a link
between his death and the
unsolved murders of Dr
Thaddeus McDonald, and
AIDS activist Wellington
Adderley?

All of the men were bru-
tally slain in their homes
located within a short dis-
tance of each other, appar-
ently by people who they
knew well enough to let
inside. Taylor, who was
stabbed dozens of times,
and McDonald, who was
bludgeoned with an iron,
were killed within the space
of two days in November
2007. Adderley met his
death in strikingly similar
fashion six months later on
May 27, 2008, his throat slit
with a knife.

All three men, although
perhaps not so openly in
their lifetimes, were widely
recognised afterwards as
homosexuals.

Despite the apparent sim-
ilarities between the killings
and their own admission
that they were investigating
the possibility of a link
between the cases, police
said they found no evidence
that caused them to view
the murders as having been
committed by the same per-
son, or people.

Mistrial

Troyniko McNeil was
charged with the murder of
Harl Taylor nine months
after it happened, in August
2008. On Monday, he was
acquitted of the killing dur-
ing his second trial on the
charges. The first ended in a
mistrial in July 2009, after
a jury could not reach a
legally recognised verdict
on McNeil’s alleged guilt.

No one was ever charged
in connection or even iden-
tified as under suspicion in
the cases of Dr McDonald
and Mr Adderley.

An extensive archive of
reports relating to the
killing of Dr McDonald and
Mr Taylor, and later Mr
Adderley, provide details of
deaths that not surprising-
ly inspired significant spec-
ulation among the general
public and disquiet among
the gay community that a
“gay serial killer” could be

exter

~ 4



TROYNIKO MCNEIL was acquitted
in his second trial of the charges.

on the loose in Nassau.
Today we find ourselves no
closer to assurance that the
person or people who com-
mitted these gruesome
crimes will not do so again.

An acclaimed handbag
designer, Taylor, 37, was
found in his Mountbatten
House home on West Hill
Street on November 18,
2007 by a man police later
revealed as an off-duty
police officer and identified
in Mr Taylor’s trial as Jim-
my Bastian.

Mr Taylor’s killing came
within two days of that of
59-year-old Dr McDonald,
Dean of the Faculty of
Social and Educational
Studies at the College of the
Bahamas. Mr McDonald,
who lived on the adjacent
Queen’s Street, the location
of the US Embassy, and
within walking distance of
Mr Taylor’s home, had been
so brutally bludgeoned that
sources said he was almost
unrecognisable.

On the scene the morn-
ing that the designer’s body
was found, then assistant
commissioner of Police,
now Police Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade admit-
ted that part of the reason
he was there was to deter-
mine “whether these (mur-
ders) are connected or sep-
arate and apart.”

Police press liaison offi-
cer Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans said lat-
er that day that police con-
vened an emergency meet-

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ing that called for shifting
of manpower to allow for
extra police patrols in the
West Hill Street area and
its surrounds in response to
the attack.

Within days, police
admitted that they were
exploring the possibility of a
“gay connection” between
the murders, although this
has never been verified.

Insiders expressed fears
that the inquiries would “go
cold” because of the men’s
alleged high-level gay con-
nections and the possibility
that those who might know
something about the deaths
might not come forward for
fear of being “outed.”

Questions arose regard-
ing the ability of police to
independently investigate
the murders considering
that such an investigation
could possibly identify some
high profile, but closeted
homosexuals in high-places.

The location of the mur-
der of Dr McDonald in his
home near the US Embassy
led some to speculate that it
should have been relatively
simple to identify any sus-
pect in his killing and conse-
quently, perhaps that of Mr
Taylor.

“This case should be
pretty easy to solve. It is a
small community and
Queen Street where Thad-
deus was killed is under
CCTV surveillance from the
American Embassy,” a
source told The Tribune.

Motives

As for motives for the
murders of McDonald and
Taylor, speculation was
rampant.

Some spoke of a gay
relationship between Mr
Taylor and Mr McDonald
and the possible fury of a
third jealous party.

“Tt is understood that a
birthday party was held ear-
lier this month at which
there was a scene, when a
man who is said to have left
his wife and family to be
with Harl became angry
over an incident involving
a birthday cake. It is said
that Thaddeus offered Harl
the first piece of cake, trig-
gering off an angry scene,
with a third man becoming
extremely abusive. After-
wards, I gather there were

ram e

unpleasant exchanges,” said
a source days after the mur-
der of Taylor.

Seven Dominicans and
one Bahamian were taken
in for questioning in the
immediate wake of the
killing. The group were
chefs and waiters at a wed-
ding reception in the gar-
dens of Mountbatten House
the day before the design-
er’s body was found. Police
were able to get an exten-
sion that allowed them to
hold the group for 96 hours,
but all were eventually
released without charge.

By the end of January
2009, over two months after
the two bloody homicides,
police said they were no
closer to putting someone
before the courts for either
of the murders.

In April, lead police
investigator Assistant
Superintendent Leon
Bethel appealed to the pub-
lic to give detectives the
“breakthrough” they need-
ed to identify the killer,
revealing that police had
“strong forensic evidence
from both murder scenes.

“Tt’s just a matter of
matching this up with the
killer. We need to get this
person off the streets,” he
said.

Academics from COB
were said to have been
quizzed by officers at
around this time.

Later in the same month,
Bishop Simeon Hall of the
New Covenant Baptist
Church revealed that he was
threatened with death and
sexual violence by two men
during muffled phone con-
versations after he pressed
police for an update on the
investigation.

Meanwhile, it was on May
29th that AIDS activist and
Director of the Bahamas
National Network for Posi-
tive Living Wellington
Adderley was found slain in
his Delancey Street home,
within a mile of those of
both Mr Taylor and Dr
McDonald.

Fifty-one-year-old Mr
Adderley had suffered stab
wounds to the neck, with
sources telling The Tribune
that he had been “virtually
decapitated.”

In this case also, there
was no sign of forced entry
into the building. Asst Supt

c 60







iE:







Bethel again asserted that
police “could not say” that
there was anything connect-
ing the murders.

By June 11th, a man had
been questioned and
released in connection with
the killing of Mr Adderley.
Within days Marvin Wilson,
another gay man, was
stabbed to death in his Cen-
treville apartment. A 17-
year-old minor was charged
with that matter.

However, focus remained
on the possible connection
between the murders of
Taylor, McDonald and
Adderley.

Perception

Erin Greene, spokesper-
son for the gay advocacy
group the Rainbow
Alliance, said in June 2009
that the alliance remained
“very concerned about the
deaths of three prominent
gay men within the last
year.”

She said there was a per-
ception within the commu-
nity at large that “those two
murders (Taylor and
McDonald) may never be
solved” and called for a spe-
cial task force to investigate
the killings.

Shortly after, on June
26th, police named
Troyniko McNeil — son of
Mr Taylor’s former business
partner Troy McNeil - as a
person of interest in the
case seven months after
Taylor’s death. It soon
became known that he was
in the US, and had been so
since three days after Tay-
lor’s death.

In early August 2008 The
Tribune learned that a
senior foreign bank official
and a young police consta-
ble were taken in for ques-
tioning in connection with

HARL TAYLOR was murdered in 2007.

Taylor’s death. Nothing
more came of this.

Twenty-one-year-old
McNeil was brought back to
the Bahamas and charged
with Taylor’s murder on
August 22, 2009.

He pleaded not guilty.

On July 2, 2009 the first
trial opened, with then
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner telling
the court that there was evi-
dence that more than one
person was involved in the
murder.

A father of two, McNeil
was linked to the crime
scene through the finding of
his fingerprints on a door in
Mountbatten House.

No motive was ever given
for why he would want to
kill Taylor, and the trial
ended in a hung jury.

The young McNeil was
denied bail four times,
remaining in Her Majesty’s
Prison in the run up to and
throughout his trial and for
many months afterwards, as
he awaited a retrial.

On July 12, 2010,
McNeil’s second trial
opened in the Supreme
Court. Again, no motive
was given, but the prosecu-
tion noted how he left the
country shortly after Tay-
lor’s killing and called wit-
nesses who linked him to
the crime scene through evi-
dence that his DNA was
found on the murder
weapon and in two other
areas of the house. McNeil
claimed he was set up.

On Monday, a jury found
the 23 year old not guilty of
the crime after three hours
of deliberation.

So who did kill Harl Tay-
lor? His family, like those
of Dr Thaddeus McDonald
and Wellington Adderley,
now remain without
answers.

Harl Taylor’s mother
is left ‘distraught’

FROM page one

returned a 9-3 not guilty verdict in the retrial of
Troyniko McNeil who stood accused of Mr Taylor's

murder.

Despite his loss, yesterday lead prosecutor Franklyn
Williams praised the work of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and their assistance in getting the case to trial.

"The jury has rendered their verdict (but) the police
did an excellent job, they were meticulous in their evi-
dence taking, they were meticulous in their note-keep-
ing, they were meticulous in their evidence of chain of

custody in this matter.

"So [commend the police for the job that they did in
this matter, they provided a firm foundation for this
case," said the deputy director of public prosecutions at
the Attorney General's Office.

McNeil was acquitted on Monday of the November

2007 murder.

After the verdict was announced his father and Mr
Taylor's former business partner, Troy McNeil, shouted,
“Thank you, Jesus!” before racing out of the court-

room.

Moments later a visibly relieved McNeil left the court-
room a free man, swarmed by family and friends. He
declined to speak to the press.

His father said Troyniko has plans to pursue a medical
degree in Canada or England.

"My son has been vindicated and rightfully so. I think
we can now pick up the pieces and move on with our
lives,” Troy McNeil told reporters yesterday.

“My son is definitely going to go to university. It
won't be in the United States obviously until we get
that situation resolved but either Canada or England."

The 37-year-old handbag designer was found dead in
his bedroom at Mountbatten House, on West Hill Street,
with multiple stab wounds on November 18, 2007.

The jury returned with the not guilty verdict after

three hours of deliberation.

SEE STORY ABOVE

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


| THE TRIBUNE
a ru

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

eeing ‘his dream





ine

WEDNESDAY,

Ur LY. 2.8.



2010

live, thrive and die’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

hree times per

week for four

hours Marcellus

Miller is

attached to a
dialysis machine in a hospital
to clean his blood. He is
stricken with diabetes, and
consequently kidney failure,
and also suffers from hyper-
tension.

However, through his fre-
quent hospital visits and bad
days due to his condition, Mr
Miller found the time and
strength over almost three
years to build the business he

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





had always dreamt of owning.

Then, in a heartbeat, it was
stripped from him by the very
entity whose business it is to
help small entrepreneurs
build those dreams.

Mr Miller created Marcy’s
Kitchen in his mind, then
transferred those ideas to a
business plan. And after
more than one and a half
years of grovelling to airport
officials to secure a space for
Marcy’s, he signed the lease
to open his restaurant in the
Lynden Pindling Internation-
al Airport’s domestic depar-
ture lounge.

However, as with many
small entrepreneurs (and dia-
betics), Mr Miller suffered a
common setback - he had no
money.

Having secured the lease
and formed his business plan,
Mr Miller approached the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund, a $1million per
year government-sponsored
fund, to assist him in building
Marcy’s Kitchen from the
ground up.

After presenting his idea to
the fund, administrators Bak-
er, Tilly, Gomez, agreed to
finance the development of
Marcy’s Kitchen.

Appointed administrators,
Jerome Gomez and Een
Colebrooke, created the com-
pany Marcy’s Kitchen Grab
and Go Limited, signed them-
selves on as executives in the
company and gave the fund
80 per cent of the share in the
business, leaving Mr Miller
with 20 per cent equity stake.

‘Your Workplace
Survival Kit’



TRIBUNE = columnist
Yvette Bethel recently
released a CD based on her
popular articles which focused
on helping individuals
improve their careers and
enhance their skills inside and
outside the workplace.

The CD, Your Workplace
Survival Kit, give listeners
concrete steps toward improv-
ing their careers.

“T encounter a variety of
complex organisational cul-
tures where there are a myri-
ad of interpersonal chal-
lenges,” said Ms Bethel. “I
am committed to being a cat-
alyst for positive, meaningful
transformation - providing
tools like Your Workplace
Survival Kit to enhance the
performance and morale of
teams.”

The kit, according to her,
can be used to enhance the
skills of business owners,
employees, managers and stu-
dents who are seeking to rein-
vent or start their careers by
developing a deeper under-
standing of their environment
and equipping them with tools
to help them navigate diffi-
cult situations.

Ms Bethel held her launch
at 100 per cent Bible book-
store, with which she secured
an exclusive distribution deal
in Nassau. The CD can also
be found on Amazon.com.

In 2006, Ms Bethel founded
her company Organisational
Soul which provides Human
Resources Consulting Ser-
vices, Strategic Session facili-
tation services, leadership and
executive coaching services,
SkillSoft e-learning solutions,





NEW CD: Yvette Bethel.

“Tam committed to
being a catalyst for
positive, meaningful
transformation - providing
tools like Your Workplace
Survival Kit to enhance
the performance and
morale of teams.”

— Yvette Bethel

leadership seminars and is
one of the only certified
providers of Emotional Intel-
ligence Individual and Busi-
ness Solutions in the
Bahamas.

At the end of the CD
launch her audience, filled
with professionals from myri-
ad business sectors, was eager
to pepper her with question
they had on their own meth-
ods of conducting business.

The fund also asked that a
board be formed consisting
of five members, two of which
would be nominated by Mr
Miller, while he, Mr Gomez
and Mr Colebrooke made up
the final three.

And so construction and
renovations began in the
domestic departure lounge of
LPIA with Mr Miller the
frontman on the project,
watching his dream take form.

It was only three weeks
after the dust cleared and the
first customers took receipt
of Mr Miller’s - chief execu-
tive of the company and head
chef - Bahamian food, that
the fund administrators began
the processes of ousting him
from the restaurant that held
his shortened name.

According to him, the fund
administrators first attempt-
ed to have his name removed
from the lease he fervently
convinced the Nassau Airport
Development Company to
give an “underqualified”, but
determined cook.

After he was made aware
that the fund was attempting
to remove him from the lease,
he approached Director of
Economic Planning at the
Ministry of Finance, Simon
Wilson, to eke out what the
fund’s relationship should be
to the businesses they finance
- specifically to his.

According to Mr Miller, he
was informed by Mr Wilson
to remove Mr Gomez and Mr
Colebrooke as directors of the
company, ensure the control-
ling shares (at least 51 per

cent) is turned over to Mar-
cy's Kitchen and conduct an
official review of all signed
documents between the
Bahamas Venture Capital
and Marcy’s Kitchen.

When Mr Miller
approached the fund after
undertaking Mr Wilson’s sug-
gestion, days later he was vot-
ed out of his company by Mr
Gomez and Mr Colebrooke -
the board that never became
five members.

And he received a termi-
nation letter stating:

“We write to advise you
that the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial fund Ltd, the majority
shareholder of Marcy’s
kitchen grab and go Ltd have
effective Friday, July 2, 2010,
terminated your employment
as Chief Operating Officer of
the company.

“You are also removed as
VP and a director of Marcy’s
kitchen Grab and Go Ltd
effective the same date. You
will, however, retain your role
as a shareholder in the com-
pany.

“We have attached a copy
of the written consent of the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture fund removing you
from your position in the
company for your records.”

The letter was signed by
Een Colebrooke “President”.

In less than one month Mr
Miller built his dream and
watched the very fund that
made it possible strip it from
him with no explanation.

SEE page 4B

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

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RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135





royalfidelity.com




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GOLD MINE?: This crawfish season could yeild higher profits for
fishermen and exporters.

Crawlish season could
vield higher profits

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

. =

iL



.
"
* el
pA.

THE CRAWFISH season could yield higher profits for
fishermen and exporters this year, the chief counsel for
Spanish Wells said yesterday.

And with fishermen adopting catch certificates which will
allow trade with Europe, and with crawfish market prices
on the rise, the season could be a good one.

Abner Pinder said the initial indicators show the market
price of crawfish to be on the rise and with the Bahamas re-
opening the crawfish trade with Europe that was closed at
the beginning of the year, the sector could see a turn-
around when the season opens next week.

“The season looks like it will be better than last year,”
said Mr Pinder.

Heads of the Fishing industry have worked tirelessly
for months to prepare fishermen to use the catch certifi-
cates that will be required to allow the crawfish tails to
enter and be distributed through the EU.

According to them, the Bahamas will not be allowed to
trade with the EU if the chain of custody for lobster tails
is not certified by use of the catch certificates, which will
allow purchasing entities to trace catches from their pos-
session all the way back to the fishing boat that made the
catch - and possibly even back to the exact spot in the
Bahamas the product was caught.

This certificate is the
SEE page 4B

key to restarting trade,



RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com





























co

Sure you'll marry a millionaire!
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BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

St. Michael: 246.435.1955






PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Ex-UBS client gets house

arrest for tax conviction



By CURT ANDERSON

AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI (AP) — A busi-
nessman who admitted
evading hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in taxes
using secret accounts at
Swiss bank UBS AG was
sentenced Tuesday to a year
of house arrest and proba-
tion, a reward for his quick
guilty plea and substantial
assistance to US investiga-
tors.

Paul Zabczuk, 55, became
the seventh former UBS
client to avoid jail out of 10
prosecutions in a crackdown
on offshore accounts to hide
wealth. Dozens more prose-
cutions are expected in the
coming months, especially



with UBS's agreement to
disclose the identities of
4,450 suspected American
tax dodgers.

Zabezuk, an oil industry
supplier from Woodland
Hills, Texas, used four secret
accounts set up by UBS in
the Bahamas and Switzer-
land to hide assets from
1999 until 2009, according to
court records.

Method

One method he used to
access money was to transfer
funds to China for the pur-
chase of antiques, which
were then shipped to him in
Texas for his own use or to
be sold.

In October 2009, Zabzcuk

attempted to voluntarily dis-
close his illegal accounts to
the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice under a programme
that would allow him to
avoid prosecution — some-
thing about 15,000 other off-
shore account holders did.
But he was rejected because
the IRS had already
obtained Zabzcuk's name
from UBS, leading to his
agreement to plead guilty to
filing a false tax return and
disclosure of Swiss bankers
who had advised him.

"Mr Zabczuk has done
everything the government
has asked," said his attor-
ney, Scott Frewing.

Frewing added that
Zabezuk has already begun
paying the government
$832,000 in back taxes,
penalties and interest, which
will require that he sell his
Texas home.



Zabezuk, in tearful
remarks to US District
Judge William Dimitrouleas,
said he was sorry for his
actions.

"This is the first time that
I've broken the law and I
will never break it again,"
Zabezuk said. "I showed
bad judgment.”

Prosecutors had sought
prison time of 18 months,
even with credit for
Zabezuk's cooperation.

UBS in 2009 paid a $780
million fine under a deferred
prosecution agreement with
the US, which also led to
disclosure of an initial batch
of between 250 and 300
American clients.

UBS later agreed under
pressure to reveal an addi-
tional 4,450 names and said
Tuesday it expects the tax
dispute with the US to be
resolved by October.

RECOVERING: Oswald Gruebel, CEO of Swiss bank UBS, speaks at
a press conference yesterday to announce the 2010 half year result
in Zurich, Switzerland. Swiss bank UBS AG offered evidence of its
recovery with stronger-than-expected second-quarter profits of

LEGAL NOTICE

Commonwealth of The Bahamas 2009
In The Supreme Court No. 01457
Equity Side CLE/QUI

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT Tract of land containing
an area of 5.00 Acres situate on the Western side of the main
public road in the Settlement of Wilson Bay in the Island of
Cat Island, Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER
of the Petition of Elsworth Poitier

NOTICE OF PETITION

Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the
16th day of April, A. D., 2010. The Petition of Elsworth
Poitier of Wilson Bay, Cat Island, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas showith in respect of:

ALL THAT Tract of land containing an area of 5.00 Acres
situate on the Western side of the main public road in the
Settlement of Wilson Bay in the Island of Cat Island,
Bahamas.

The Petitioner, Elsworth Poitier, herein claims to be the
owner in fee simple in possession of the said piece of
land and has made application to The Supreme Court of
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
piece of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of
that Act.

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said piece of land may be
inspected during normal working office hours at the
following places:

The Registry of The Supreme Court, 2â„¢ floor, Ansbacher
Building, East Street North, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Chambers of EDWARD B. TURNER & CO., #10
Petrona House, Fowler Street off East Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

The Office of the Island Administrator in Wilson Bay on the
Island of Cat Island.

Notice 1s hereby given that any person having Dower or
right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty
(30) days after the final publication of these presents file
at the said Registry of The Supreme Court, and serve on
the Petitioner or on the undersigned a Statement of his/her
Claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be
filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of
his/her Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as
a bar to such claim.

EDWARD B. TURNER & CO.
CHAMBERS
#10 Petrona House
Fowler Street off East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner





NOTICE
BEMUS INVEST LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, BEMUS INVEST LTD. is in dissolution as of
July 13, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

Uwaser Ltd.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given thatin accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, Uwaser Ltd. is in dissolution as of July 22,
2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 3rd
Floor Withfield Tower, 4792 Coney Drive, Belize
City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

Grand Caribbean Resorts Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 164 of the International
Business Companies Act and in accordance with
section 147 (a) of the Companies Act, 1992,
Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company (“the Company") is in Receivership,
commencing the 19° day of July 2010 and Craig
A, (Tony) Gomez and Edward R. Rolle of Baker
Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28 Cumberland
street, P.O, Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas are
appointed the Receiver-Managers of the
Company for the purpose of managing the affairs
of the said Company,

Dated the 22, July 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Receiver-Manager

Edward R. Rolle
Receiver-Manager

two billion Swiss francs (US dollar 1.9 billion), and said it should
resolve all tax matters with the US government by October.
(AP Photo)

NOTICE

CONTINENTAL INVEST
& TRADE LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1384) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, CONTINENTAL INVEST & TRADE LTD. is
in dissolution as of July 13, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

To: All Members of

the Public Workers’

Co-operative Credit
Union Limited

The Credit Union’s
Office will be closed on
Friday, July 30th, 2010,

for the

ANNUAL
STAFF FUN

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 3B



BP replaces CEO Hayward, reports $17 billion loss

By HARRY R WEBER
and JANE WARDELL
AP Business Writers

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
The American picked to lead
oil giant BP as it struggles to
restore its finances and oil
spill-stained reputation
pledged Tuesday that his
company will remain com-
mitted to the Gulf of Mexico
region even after the blown-
out well is sealed.

Robert Dudley will become
BP PLC's first ever non-
British chief executive, the
company said as it reported
a record quarterly $17 billion
loss and set aside $32.2 bil-
lion to cover costs from the
spill.

Ending weeks of specula-
tion, BP confirmed that gaffe-
prone Tony Hayward will
step down October 1 as the
London-based company seeks
to reassure both the public
and investors that it is learn-
ing lessons from the spill.

"There's no question we
are going to learn things from
this investigation of the inci-
dent,” Dudley told reporters

GLINTON

by phone from London after
the announcement was made.

BP Chairman Carl-Henric
Svanberg echoed that during
a webcast presentation on the
company's earnings, telling
investors that BP will change
as a result of the April 20 oil
rig explosion that killed 11
workers and set off the worst
offshore spill in US history.

"We are taking a hard look
at ourselves, what we do and
how we doit," he said. "What
we learn will have implica-
tions for our ways of work-
ing, our strategy and our gov-
ernance."

Svanberg said the compa-
ny's priority was to stop the
Gulf leak permanently and
then to clean up miles of
spoiled waters and beaches
and compensate people
whose livelihoods have been
lost because of the accident.

But he added that the com-
pany was determined to
restore value to shareholders,
after a 35 per cent, or $60 bil-
lion, drop in market value to
around $116 billion since the
explosion. Under US politi-
cal pressure, the company also

axed divi-
dends_ to
shareholders
this year.

In New
York, BP
stock]
slumped |
about 1.8 per
cent to
$37.95 in BOSS: Dudley.
afternoon
trading after BP announced
it would sell $30 billion in
assets to help pay potential
costs related to the spill.

Analysts said they were dis-
appointed at how many assets
BP was willing to sell, and its
cost estimate was thought to
be on the conservative side.

BP made its estimate on the
assumption that it won't be
deemed "grossly negligent”
in its handling of the well. If it
is, then BP won't be able to
ask its partners to help pay
for the cleanup, and federal
fines will go up.

"The penalties are obvi-
ously going to be more than
what they're saying,” Oppen-
heimer & Co. analyst Fadel
Gheit said.

| SWEETING | O'BRIEN

303 SHIRLEY STREET | PO BOX N- 499



Dudley, BP's managing
director, was brought in to
oversee the spill response
after Hayward was vilified for
a series of ill-timed moves,
including saying that he would
like his life back and attend-
ing a yacht race off the coast
of England as Gulf residents
struggled to cope with the
spill.

Dudley spent some of his
childhood in Mississippi and
worked for 20 years at Amo-
co Corp., which merged with
BP in 1998. He lost out to
Hayward on the CEO slot
three years ago.

"T don't particularly like
talking about myself, but I
think you will find I listen
hard and carefully to people
and have worked with restruc-
turing organisations to
achieve change," he said. "I
did not seek out this job. I
was asked to step into these
shoes, and I firmly and deeply
believe that BP is a company
made up of great people and
great businesses."

Dudley will be based in
London and will hand over
spill response coordination to
Lamar McKay, the chairman
and president of BP America.

He also downplayed specu-
lation that BP might pull back
from the Gulf once the flow
of oil is stopped permanently,
which could happen as soon
as mid-August.

"There's no one thinking
that way,” he said.

White House press secre-
tary Robert Gibbs said Tues-
day that President Barack

BP kicked off the revamp
by announcing the sale of $30
billion in assets to streamline
the company into a leaner,
higher-quality business.

The company has already
made a start with the $7 bil-
lion sale of gas assets in the
United States, Canada and
Egypt to Apache Corp.

Svanberg said the planned
asset sales did not necessarily
reflect a fear that spill costs
could soar above the $32.2 bil-
lion set aside by the company.
That charge includes the $20
billion compensation fund the
company set up following
pressure from President
Barack Obama as well as

costs to date of $2.9 billion.

Hayward, who will stay on
BP's board until November
30, said the company had
reached a "significant mile-
stone” with the temporary
capping of the leaking well,
which stopped oil from spew-
ing nearly two weeks ago.
Before that, anywhere from
94 million gallons (356 mil-
lion liters) to 184 million gal-
lons (697 million liters) had
gushed into the Gulf.

In a mark of faith in its out-
going leader, the company
said it planned to recommend
him for a non-executive board
position at its Russian joint
venture, TNK-BP.





FAMGUARD

The Annual General Meeting
of the
Shareholders of

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION
LIMITED

NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE | THE BAHAMAS
t 242 328 3500 | £242 328 8008 | www.gsolegal.com

The Public is hereby notified that our offices

will be closed on Friday, 30" July, 2010
for our Annual Staff Retreat.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

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Obama discussed the change
in leadership with the chair-
man of BP's board Monday.
No details about the conver-
sation were released.

"Our concern is not who
heads BP. Mr Hayward is
leaving,” Gibbs said. "The
key is that BP can't leave and
should not leave the Gulf.
That is our viewpoint. I think
that is the viewpoint of every-
one involved here. They have
obligations and responsibili-
ties as the responsible party
in this instance that have to
be met regardless of who the



will be held in the
“Victoria Room”
of the
British Colonial Hilton
No. 1 Bay Street
at 4:00 p.m.
on Thursday, July 29, 2010







CEO is."







ee

100 Jamz, Cool 96
& Y98 make music

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM















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eel ee
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Confidence falls even as
corporate profits rise

Stocks fall
slightly on
consumer
confidence
report

By STEPHEN
BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
News that consumers are
more pessimistic has put
the stock market's rally on
hold. Stocks have closed
modestly lower Tuesday
after three days of gains.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose slightly due
to DuPont, which was lift-
ed by strong earnings, but
the overall market is
down.

The Conference Board
said its Consumer Confi-
dence Index fell to 50.4
from June's 54.3. The
report distracted investors
from another batch of
upbeat earnings reports.

The Dow rose 12, or 0.1
per cent, to 10,537. The
Standard & Poor's 500
index fell one, or 0.1 per
cent, to 1,113. The Nas-
daq composite index fell
eight, or 0.4 per cent, to
2,288. Losing stocks were
ahead of gainers by about
four to three on the New
York Stock Exchange.
Volume came to 1.1 bil-
lion shares.



INSIGHT

For stories behind
news, read /nsight
Mondays







By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
disconnect between Wall
Street and Main Street is
growing.

Americans’ confidence in
the economy faded further in
July, according to a monthly
survey released Tuesday,
amid job worries and skimpy
wage growth. That's at odds
with Wall Street's recent rally
fuelled by upbeat earnings
reports from big businesses
such as chemical maker
DuPont Co. and equipment
maker Caterpillar Inc. That's
because the pumped-up prof-
its are being fuelled by cost
cuts like layoffs and overseas
sales. In fact, big companies
have shown few signs they're
ready to hire.

The Consumer Confidence
Index came in at 51.0 in July,
a steeper-than-expected
decline from the revised 54.3
in June, according to a sur-
vey the Conference Board.
The decline follows last mon-
th's decline of nearly 10
points, from 62.7 in May, and
is the lowest point since Feb-
ruary. It takes a reading of 90
to indicate a healthy econo-
my — a level not seen since
the recession began in
December 2007.

"Consumers have a much
different view of the econo-
my than the stock market
does, and their views matter
more to the economy,” said
Mark Vitner, an economist at
Wells Fargo. The index "tells
me the economy is heading
for slower growth in the sec-
ond half. We have low expec-
tations for back-to-school."

Joel Naroff, president of
Naroff Economic Advisors,
agreed, noting that the fatter
profits have shown that com-
panies have been able to



a *

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE: Shoppers Joselin Pena

squeeze out higher produc-
tivity from workers, but that
also means that "households
are not benefiting.”

The profit picture is "good
news for Wall Street, but not
good for workers," he added.

The survey was taken July
1-21, beginning just before the
Standard & Poor's 500 index
hit a nine-month low of
1,022.58 on July 2. It had risen
4.5 per cent by July 21 and
has since climbed an addi-
tional four per cent as upbeat
earnings reports from key
manufacturers have made
investors more convinced that
the economic recovery isn't
stalling as much as they had
originally thought.

The Dow Jones industrial
average fell three points on
Tuesday, ending three days
of big gains, as investors
digested the confidence data
as well as a slowdown in
regional manufacturing
reported by the Richmond
Federal Reserve. Stocks rose
moderately at the open

Seeing ‘his dream
live, thrive and die’

FROM page 1B

Since being ousted, Mr Miller has sought
to find answers to why after only three weeks
he saw his dream live, thrive and die.

He maintains the business was doing 69 per
cent more in sales per day than the fund
administrators thought it would.

Now, Mr Gomez and Mr Colebrook have
changed Marcy’s name to Island Cafe and
changed the menu Mr Miller worked tireless-

ly to create.

Since his removal, he has sought answers
from Minister of Finance, Zhivargo Laing, in
eight emails sent over 11 days telling him: “I
have been working tirelessly to get this busi-
ness off the ground and in good working order.

This has been an outrageous and displeasing
experience working with so-called profession-
al and prudent people. I am further angered by

the raid and their attempts to ‘take-over’.
Mr Laing replied: “I am quite disturbed
about the way this matter is going. I am not
encouraged by reports brought to me on either
side, so I have asked for a meeting soon.”

209

According to Mr Miller, Mr Laing told him

there was nothing he could do to help.
He is now awaiting a reply from the Office
of the Prime Minister to get the answers on

how the fund created by government to help

three months.

entrepreneurs build their own businesses,
could take his over only weeks after its open-
ing. In the end, offering the diabetic, footing
$800 medication costs per month, $300 every

because of strong earnings
from chemical maker DuPont
Co. and European banks
UBS and Deutsche Bank.

DuPont, which has
announced thousands of job
cuts over the past year,
reported that second-quarter
income nearly tripled, as rev-
enue surged in most of its
businesses. The results were
led by revenue gains in the
Asia Pacific region. DuPont
didn't announce any hiring
plans.

A rapid, sustainable recov-
ery can't happen without the
American consumer. And the
second straight month of
declining confidence follow-
ing three months of increases
is worrisome, economists say.

Economists watch confi-
dence closely because con-
sumer spending accounts for
about 70 per cent of US eco-
nomic activity and is critical to
a strong rebound.

Both components of the
index declined. They measure
how people feel about the

(left) and her niece Ingrid Romero (center), both of
Boston, load packages into their car after shopping at a Target location in Boston. A monthly consumer
survey shows that Americans’ confidence in the economy eroded further in July amid job worries. The read-
ing raises concern about the economic recovery and the back-to-school shopping season.

(AP Photo)

economy now, and their
expectations for the next six
months.

The index — which mea-
sures how Americans feel
about business conditions, the
job market and the next six
months — had been recover-
ing fitfully since hitting an all-
time low of 25.3 in February
2009. The index typically falls
before the economy slows
down, and on the way out of a
recession, the expectations
component, which accounts
for 60 per cent of index, rises
sharply, said Lynn Franco,
director of The Conference
Board Consumer Research
Center.

"It's all about jobs. That's
still the primary source of
income,” Franco said. "Until
we see the pace of job growth
pick up and consumers are
confident that this is sustain-
able, we are not likely to see a
significant pickup in confi-
dence."

The Conference Board sur-
vey, based on a random sur-

THE TRIBUNE

vey mailed to 5,000 house-
holds, showed that con-
sumers’ assessment of the job
market was more negative
than the month before. Those
claiming that jobs are "hard to
get" increased to 45.8 from
43.5 per cent, while those say-
ing jobs are "plentiful"
remained unchanged at 4.3
per cent.

Michelle Banks, 38, a
teacher from Bloomfield, N.J.,
said she's more worried about
job security than she was last
year because of rampant state
budget cuts. So she started
saving money for back-to-
school items for her five-year-
old son in January. She plans
to spend $200, evenly divided
between school supplies and
clothing.

"I'm buying clothes that
will last, not fall apart,” she
said. Economists say the
index's expectations compo-
nent tends to track stock mar-
ket movements, but Vitner
noted that the market's big
plunge in May has made such
an imprint on consumers that
the recent rebound hasn't reg-
istered.

Retailers had a surprisingly
solid start to the year, but
business has been slowing
since April. With unemploy-
ment stuck near 10 per cent,
Americans are expected to
remain skittish through the
back-to-school and Christmas
season.

Concerns are also rising
about the housing market.
While the S&P/Case-Shiller
20-city home price index
released Tuesday showed a
1.3 per cent rise in May from
April, the home buyer's tax
credit, which expired April
30, helped pull more buyers
into the market. In fact, the
report warned that the recent
gains in home prices are not
likely to last.



FROM page 1B

while adhering to the Marine Stewardship
Council's (MSC) - the world's leading envi-
ronmental certification programme for
wild-caught fisheries - mandates.

The campaign, that in the end will cost
the government and private sector a siz-
able sum, will bolster the Bahamian fish-
eries industry and ensure that trade with
other countries does not founder. It is
being undertaken by a number of agencies
and sectors, including the World Wildlife

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL



The Public is hereby advised that I, NADJA
CHRISTINA BERGMANN, of No. 16 Harmony
Hill, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to NADIA CHRISTINA JOHNSON. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of the publication
of this notice.

NOTICE

TASSIN LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) | TASSIN LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 27th July 2010 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Blue Seas
Administration Ltd., The Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 28th day of July, A. D. 2010



Blue Seas Administration Ltd.
Liquidator



Crawlish season could
vield higher profits

Fund (WWF), the Bahamas Department
of Marine Resources (DMR), the Nature
Conservancy, the Bahamas Commercial
Fishers Alliance, the Bahamas National
Trust, the Friends of the Environment and

Global

The requirement is part of a global man-
date to help countries ensure their food
exports are safe and traceable, and that
they keep their marine resources in check
to ensure sustainability.

BMEA.





PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that | SHEVONIA LATIKA
WOODSIDE, of Pride Estates, Nassau, The Bahamas,
intend to change my name to SHAVONIA LATIKA BAIN.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, The Bahamas, no later
than thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JACKSON FIRMIN
of Davis Street, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas, is
applying to the Minister ee for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why eel
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 21% day of July, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PATRICK LEWIS
of Buttonwood Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28'" day of
July, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and

Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

EGI, Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 147 (a) of the Companies
Act, 1992, Notice is hereby given that the above-
named Company (‘the Company") is in
Receivership, commencing the 19! day of July
2010 and Craig A. (Tony) Gomez and Edward R.
Rolle of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28
Cumberland Street, P. 0. Box N-1991, Nassau,
Bahamas are appointed the Receiver-Managers
of the Company for the purpose of managing the
affairs of the said Company.

Dated the 23, July 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Receiver-Manager

Edward R. Ralle
Receiver-Manager



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THE TRIBUNE




By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

HAT makes the crab
\ / \ of the sea a Bahami-
an delicacy? It’s fla-

vorful, fat and sweet meat.
Put it in a mixture with
dough and vegetables and
you get crab soup. Put it ina
batter, bake it and you get
crab cakes, put it in a mixture
with grits and you get one of

the tastiest combinations.

There are so many interesting things
that can be done with crabs. Lady Ingrid
Darling, author of Many Tastes of the
Bahamas & Culinary Influences of the
Caribbean told Tribune Taste that one
of her favourite things to do with crab
meat is swap it with conch.

"What I like to do with crab meat is
change it with conch for fritters. It is
very tasty because the meat is sweet
and has a good flavour to it. However it
is a lot of work because you have to
have sufficient meat" she said.

For those who are looking for ways to
utilise crab meat or want to try a new
dish, Lady Darling provided a few
recipes from her book that she said are
delicious.



HERITAGE CRAB & DOUGH
4 land crabs with biters

tsp. salt

1tsp. whole allspice

1 bay leaf

hot peppers

3-1/2 cups of water

DOUGH
2 cups of all purpose flour

Plot. Bb.

The Tribune

Tast

Crab 3
Dishes 46

3tsp. baking powder

tsp. salt

1/4 cup vegetable shortening
1 cup water

Remove the legs, and remove the
biters. Wash and scrub the whole crabs
and biters thoroughly and place all into
a large stockpot. Add the water salt,
allspice and bay leaf.

Dough

In a medium-sized bowl, sift together
the flour, baking powder and salt. Cut in
the shortening and stir in the water to
form soft dough.

Turn the dough into the pot and
spread evenly over the top. Cover bring
to a boil. Reduce the heat and cook for
20-25 mins. Serve immediately.

ANDROS STUFFED BAKED CRABS
6 land crabs with biters

20z. butter

1/2 medium-sized onion, finely chopped
1/2 medium sized green pepper finely
chopped

1-1/2 cups crisp bread crumbs

3/4 tsp. dried thyme leaves

Salt

Black Pepper
Hot Peppers, optional
Bake 350 degrees

Scrub the crabs and biters, break
open and clean preserving the fat (save
the backs to be stuffed). Place the bod-
ies and biters into a large stockpot with
water to cover. Bring to a boil and boil
for about 5 mins. Drain and allow to
cool.

Break up the bodies and biters; pick
out as much of the crab meat as possi-
ble and place into a medium-sized
bowl.



eS

aon

. +
Ss

Heat half the butter in a large
skillet and sauté the onion and
green pepper. Stir on the crab
fat and sauté for several min-
utes. Turn into the bowl with
the crab meat mixing in the
bread crumbs, thyme salt and
pepper to taste.

Fill the crab back with the
mixture and place into a shallow
baking dish, shell side down.
Dot the tops of each with butter
and bake until the stuffing is
browned, 15 to 20 minutes.
Serve hot.

CRAB SOUFFLE

2 land crabs with biter or 1-1/2
cups crab meat, flaked

2 tsp. all purpose flour

2 thsp. butter

1-1/2 cups milk

4 egg yolks, beaten

Ground white pepper

Salt to Taste

1/2 cups finely grated Parmesan
Cheese

4 eggs whites

Bake at 400 degrees F

Prepare the crab and biters
and pick to produce 1-1/2 cups

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 7B

meat.

butter in a 2-quart sized
saucepan, stirring in the flour
and cooking slowly for a few
minutes.

Remove the saucepan from
the heat and gradually stir in the
milk. Return to medium heat
and stir vigorously until the
sauce thickens. Allow to cool
slightly.

Stir in the beaten egg yolks,
seasoning, and pepper. Add the
crab meat and the finely grated
cheese.

Using a wire whisk or electric
mixer, whip the egg white until
stiff. Carefully fold into the crab
mixture.

Turn into a greased soufflé
dish and bake for about 25- to 30
minutes or until risen and brown.
Serve immediately.

CAT ISLAND CORN GRITS & CRAB
2 Island crabs with biters

1 cup island corn grits

1 cup boiled pigeon peas, drained
(reserve liquid) or canned pigeon
peas

3-1/2 cups water (including stock
from peas)






slices bacon, chopped
3 oz. Champion tomato paste
1.2tsp. dried thyme leaves
Ttsp. Lady Darling’s Island sea~
soning '
Salt to taste
Black pepper
Hot peppers to taste

oz. vegetable oil and the crab fat
Make a sauce by melting th rom crabs

Prepare crabs reserving the fat.

Heat the oil in a 2 quart sized
saucepan and sauté the bacon
for a few minutes. Add the
onion thyme; continue to sauté
adding crab fat. Simmer for
about 5 minutes stirring in the
tomato paste.

Add the water, grits Island sea-
soning, salt and black/hot pep-
pers to taste. Add the crab bod-
ies and claws.

Over medium heat, bring to a
boil, stirring continually. Lower
the heat, taste test and adjust
the seasonings if necessary. Cov-
er and cook over low heat for
30-35 minutes.

Place a heat diffuser under
the pot for the last 10 minutes
of cooking time to avoid grits
sticking.



TEPPING back in time, to the
Bahamas of the 40s, 50s and 60s

with the images of award-winning

photographer Roland Rose.















The year is 1955, and in the main photograph we see
Princess Margaret, accompanied by Governor Lord
Ranfurly, making her way down the steps from Govern-
ment House. The Princess was in the country for the
renaming ceremony of the Bahamas General Hospital,
the Princess Margaret Hospital as we know it today.
Some years later, her son David Linley, exhibited his
furniture at the Lyford Cay Gallery of House and Gar-
den. We see him above with one of his magnificent
screens, and in conversation with Tony Jervis, architect
of the National Art Gallery.
If you have fond memories of these events, or if you
have your own photographs, please write and send to
Rupert Missick at rmissick@tribunemedia.net.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010

ENTERTAINMENT

THE TRIBUNE





wil

The Tribune



.

terté

all —

i







Moving Up Against the Odds

BY NATARIO McKENZIE

ITH the hope of
W/ inspiring others to
overcome challenges

in their life, a Bahamian
entrepreneur is telling his
rags to riches story of perse-
verance in his autobiography
aptly titled, “Moving Up
Against the Odds.”

Jack Andrews, known to many as
“Maljack” recently launched his
autobiography, “Moving Up
Against the Odds,” which chroni-
cles his humble beginnings as a
young boy in South Andros to
adulthood and his successful entre-
preneurial career in the construc-
tion industry. Still, despite his suc-
cess, Mr Andrews, 46, describes
himself as a “simple and humble
island boy.”

In his autobiography, Mr
Andrews who owns Mal Jack Con-
struction Company Limited as well
a 14 room bone fishing lodge in
South Andros, highlights the adver-
sities he faced growing up on
Andros many years ago.

In his autobiography, Mr
Andrews acknowledges that Andros
was far less developed when he was
growing up back in the 60’s.
Tragedy struck him at an early age
as Mr Andrews recalls the fateful
day in March 1969 when his father
died in the field from a stroke, leav-
ing his mother to play the role of
both mother and father to him and
his three siblings. Mr Andrews has
dedicated his book to his mother
Anabell Davis-Knowles; who
inspired him to go on and whose
sacrifices he says made it possible
for him to live his dream.



In his book, Mr Andrews recalls





the dream he had as a little boy-
to become a building contractor-a
dream he eventually made a reality.

He also recalls many adversities
that he had to overcome including
the death of a sister to cancer, a
troubled early marriage and his
struggles moving up in the con-
struction industry to eventually own
his own construction company. Mr
Andrews acknowledges that
through all his adversities, his moth-
er always inspired him to go on.

“God is first in my life,” says Mr
Andrews. “My mother from a very
young age taught me to pray. She
would say ‘son, in whatever you do
give God thanks.’ I feel like I am
blessed. I was a blessed as a child
and I am blessed today.”

Mr Andrews acknowledges that
growing up, his family did not have
alot of money and because of this,
he developed the practice of sav-
ing 40 cents out of every dollar.

Today, he says that he is able to
give back to the community and his
construction company has made it
easier for many Bahamians to own
their own homes.

“T would say to the young folks
especially the ones in school, once
you make up your mind to be
someone and do something in life
you work towards it ” says Mr
Andrews.

It’s good to have a trade. J am
happy to employ people and watch
them elevate,” noting that most of
his employees are from south
Andros.

“Even today I have to move
against the odds but I encourage
everyone to try,” says Mr Andrews.

Mr Andrews’ 82 page autobiog-
raphy, “Moving Up Against the
Odds,” can be purchased at Book
World and Logos Bookstore.



BIFF presents encore presentations
of some of it’s films from last year

By REUBEN SHEARER

THE BAHAMAS Interna-
tional Film Festival will pre-
sent encore presentations of
several of the films from last
year’s film festival at the Old
Fort Bay Club begining
tonight with the airing of The
Price To Pay and Insignificant
Others.

“We want to make sure that
people have the opportunity
to see the films shown last year
and to showcase the film mak-
ers,” said Leslie Vanderpool,
BIFF’s founder.

“Every one of them is well
done, which is why we are
showing them again. They are
really good quality and have
great stories to be told.”

The series of films, which
will be run into November,
include short and feature
length productions

Tonight, two motion pic-
tures will be replayed, includ-
ing a short feature thriller, The
Price To Pay a short feature ,
in which Lucien, a petty crook,
and his girlfriend Anna dream
of moving to Hawaii. They
decide to rob a jeweler. But
when things go haywire and
Anna finds herself in the trunk
of a car, Lucien and his accom-
plices rush to her rescue.

A follow-up to the festival
hit Among Brothers, Insignifi-
cant Others, is a multi-narra-
tive drama that navigates
through the different lives of
one city’s residents, each of

whom is connected to the
same local homicide investi-
gation.

This cast of characters
includes an Iraq War vet
returned home to an emotion-
ally disturbed wife, a new
father living in the shadow of a
successful older brother, a sis-
ter caught up in a web of
addiction, and a camera man
who attempts to exploit the
reality behind all of their sto-
ries, or at least his version of
them.

Ms Vanderpool, highly rec-
ommends three of the films
which were award winners at
the film festival last year and
which will be aired in upcom-
ing weeks.

These include La Soga,

which won the 2009 BIFF
Spirit of Freedom Narrative
Award, Traces of the Trades,
the 2009 BIFF Spirit of Free-
dom Documentary Award,
and Morenita, the 2009 BIFF
New Visions Award.

La Soga is inspired by true
events, and made on location
in the Dominican Republic
for the price of a high-end
German car. The movie
embodies elements of film-
making like passion instead
of money, story instead of
special effects and soul
instead of spin.

Traces of the Trade follows
Browne and nine fellow
DeWolf descendants as they
travel from Rhode Island, to
Ghana and Cuba on a trip that

brings them face-to-face with
the history and legacy of New
England's hidden enterprise.
Morenita chronicles the sto-
ry of a man desperate to save
his family from death threats
by a notorious drug dealer.
He ends up stealing the ven-
erated image of the Virgin of
Guadalupe causing pandemo-
nium throughout Mexico.
Persons can RSVP before
noon each Wednesday to
reserve their seat. Tickets are
$12, including popcorn. For a
schedule of when the films will
be showing, visit www. bintl-
filmfest.com. Or call 325-5747
for more information.
Tonight’s viewing takes
place at the pavilion at the Old
Fort Bay Club at 7.30pm.



Junkanoo
at Hotel
Conference

By FELICITY INGRAHAM

THE reverberating sounds
of Junkanoo opened the 14th
annual International African
American Investment Sum-
mit and Trade show held this
past weekend at the Doral
Golf Resort in Doral, Flori-
da. The event is hosted each
year by NABHOOD - the
National Asssociation of
Black Hotel Owners and
Developers. NABHOOD's
President and CEO Andy
Ingraham's Eleutheran roots
led him to utilise the music of
his home to welcome hotel
owners and developers from
throughout the United States
and the region.

NABHOOD is playing a
role in many of the acquisi-
tion deals related to the lodg-
ing, restaurant and investment
industry here in The
Bahamas. But this year, it
was the presence of the Min-

ister of Tourism for Jamaica
Robert Bartlett at the Sum-
mit that made it possible for
the eyes of investors to turn
towards Jamaica. On August
16, a team of investors (four
have already committed dur-
ing the conference) will head
to Jamaica to consider the
prospects of setting up major
brands there.

Eight students and alumni
from the College of the
Bahamas were awarded free
sponsorship to the confer-
ence. Four of them were giv-
en the opportunity to be inter-
viewed for either internship
or employment at established
hotel chains such as the Mar-
1ott, Hilton and Hyatt.

The other four are either
in their last year or are recent
graduates of COB, and were
asked to return to work for
NABHOOD again because
of their stellar performance
in 2009.








JULY 31
Junkanoo Summer

Festival Continues
e Enjoy a close
encounter with authentic
Bahamian culture at the
Junkanoo Summer Festi-
val, featuring entertain-
ment and musical perfor-
mances, traditional
Bahamian cuisine,
authentic Bahamian craft,
Junkanoo rush-outs, and
more! Noon-10pm daily
at Junkanoo Beach East.

AUGUST

Provence
Restaurant’s Fresh
Lobster 3 Course

Dinner Special

e Lobster season opens
August 1 and Provence is
celebrating the season
with a 3 Course Lobster
Dinner Special every
Monday and Wednesday
(for only $40). Also enjoy
Grey Goose and tapas
every Tuesday and Thurs-
day. See other great spe-
cials on Provence's flyer.
Enjoy lunch 11.30am-3pm
Mon-Fri and dinner,
Mon-Sat, 6-10pm. Call:
327-0985 for reservations.

Hatchet Bay

Festival

e Hatchet Bay,
Eleuthera hosts its annual
festival featuring enter-
tainment by Terez Hep-
burn, Spider and the
Boys, the Hatchet Bay
Dinner Band, Addilee,
Naomi Taylor, Her
Majesty's Prison Pop
Band and Geno D. Also
features a Junkanoo Rush
Out, jump and dance,
Quadrill dancers, Sands
Beer Fest, a fishing tour-
nament, Kangaroo Court,
Dexter Cambridge fun
run/walk, a watermelon
eating contest and lots of
great down home food!
You don't want to miss it.

AUG 3 - AUGUST 27
JB Studio Art &

Pottery Classes

e JB Pottery Studio
holds its summer 2010 art
and pottery classes. Art
classes held 9am-12pm or
2pm-4pm for age ranges
4-8, 9-12 and 13-16. Topic
includes tie dye, mosaics,
still life drawing, sculp-
ture, ceramics, and weav-
ing. Cost: $450/full day;
$225/half-day. Pottery
classes held for 6 weeks
on Thursdays, 10am-lpm
or 6:30pm-9:30pm, or Sat-
urdays 10am-1pm for ages
18 and over . Cost: $350/6
weeks. Telephone: 327-
1151 or 327-8109.
July 31 - August 3 (Inagua)
Inagua Salty

Festival

¢ Don't miss the Inagua
Salty Festival, the signa-
ture event for the island
that features a gospel con-
cert, live entertainment,
karate demonstrations, a
cultural extravaganza,
Junkanoo rush-out, food
and drinks, and tours of
Morton Salt Company,
Inagua National Park and
the Inagua Lighthouse.
Telephone: 339-1271.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2010, PAGE 9B



AVAILABLE @

THE JUKE BOX
ISLAND CELLULAR
& JOHN'S SHOES
(CARMICHAEL RD.)






b45.00 @ THE DOOR.






SEINE ec









GY






FTER three years of y) 9
: successfully leaving Ly)
Se Ray 4 udiences in stitches, —

this year’s Laugh Fest Come-
dy Show promises to be the

best ever.

On Saturday, July 31 at the Wynd-
ham Rainforest Theatre, Bahamians
will get to see some of their favourite
urban comedians hone their craft up
close and personal; De- Ray Davis of

MTV’S Wild and Out fame as well as
numerous HBO/DEF Comedy Jam
Specials, Shaq and Cedric the Enter-
tainer’s All- Star Comedy Jam, Johnson
Family Vacation and Barbershop land 2
is the show’s very funny celebrity head-
liner.

Also scheduled to appear live on-stage
is Finesse Mitchell, of Saturday Night
Live acclaim, along with Shang Forbes, x
a popular return choice for fans who
first saw this Def Comedy Jam and Com-
ic View funnyman perform at LoveFest
2010. Karlous Miller, winner of Bill Bel-
lamy’s Who’s Got Jokes? will also per-
form.

It should be noted that while the
American comedians certainly have an
impressive fan base in the Bahamas
there will be no shortage of local talent;
Joker’s Wild and Nassau’s very own
Naughty, who has over twelve years
experience as a stand up comedian both
at home and abroad will serve as host
for the event, touching on local topics
like only he can, while new comers Mark
B and Action ‘the Jet-ski King’ will also
showcase their improvisational skills.

Laughfest 2010 tickets are on sale
now for $35 in advance and $45 on the
night of the event and are available at
the Jukebox, Island Cellular and John’s
Shoe Carmichael Road. Laughfest
organisers encourage patrons to arrive
on time as the doors will open at 7.30
for a 9pm sharp start.

Davis | -~











presents

THE COMEDY EVENT OF T
Ul
nt

day)

OREST THEATRE, WY



LAUGHFEST 2010 LAUGH NOW CRY LATER BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

@ RAl
SMIRNOFF, THE ISLAND GAME, K.F.C., JOHN'S SHOES, ISLAND CELLULAR, BIG LEAF, ISLAND TUNERZ, MILO BUTLER & SONS, THE DILLY TREE, SGC CONSTRUCTION, SOLOMON'S MINES & JEDILALL DESIGNS


























































































































O INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
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(P]) INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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