Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 106 No.204
tits



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





Sat

nar’ iio ria
not guilty

Troyniko McNeil
acquitted of murder

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TROYNIKO McNeil was
acquitted yesterday of the
November 2007 murder of well
known handbag designer Harl
Taylor.

The 37-year-old handbag
designer was found dead in his
bedroom at Mountbatten
House, on West Hill Street,
with multiple stab wounds on
November 18, 2007. After some
three hours of deliberation, the
jury returned shortly before 8
o’clock last night with a not
guilty verdict, 9-3, on the charge
of murder.

MecNeil’s father, Troy
McNeil, who was a former busi-
ness partner of Harl Taylor
shouted, “Thank you, Jesus!”
and raced out of the courtroom
immediately after the verdict
was handed down. Moments
later his son, visibly relieved,
left the courtroom a free man,
swarmed by family and friends.

Last July, McNeil’s three-
week long first trial ended in a
hung jury. When asked what
may have made the difference
this time around McNeil’s
attorney Murrio Ducille said,
“The difference is we have very

SEE page eight

Work in bad weather ‘may have
affected time to assess tornado threat’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



THE Freeport Container Port's habit of allowing work to con-
tinue in relatively bad weather and fluctuating wind may have
affected the time taken to assess the seriousness of the tornado that
killed three of its workers on March 29, said an independent

report into the incident.

"The fact that terminal work during relatively bad weather and
fluctuating winds is a common occurrence may have affected the

SEE page eight

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Delicious = CE |



USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

CARS FOR SALE,
a
AND REAL ESTATE '



|





Steak ik hates

For Breakfast!

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Almost 6,000
warrants issued

g by police this year





By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net







SEE page 12



POLICE have issued almost 6,000 war- |, |
rants this year, according to reported
weekly averages, but top officials main-
tain the crime rate is “not overwhelm-
ing.” Based on weekly averages
announced at a press conference yester-
day, it was also revealed there have been
over 6,000 traffic tickets issued.

Police Commissioner Ellison





Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade





=



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Appeal filed to remove Philip Galanis from court proceedings

ATTORNEY Damien
Gomez confirmed last night
that an appeal has been filed
before the courts to remove
his client, former PLP cam-
paign general Philip Galanis,
as a defendant in court pro-
ceedings seeking payment of
$215,000 for services offered
to the PLP prior to the 2007
general election.

Although the US company,

ACT Productions Inc, had
secured a summary judgment
against a Bahamian firm and
a group of PLP officials, Mr
Gomez said that his client
should never have been on
the court documents in the
first place as he was only act-
ing as an agent for the PLP.
“It is obvious from the
pleadings that he (Mr Gala-
nis) entered into the agree-

Fast Track your plans...
with a Fast Track Loan.

ments as an agent for the
PLP. There is no allegation
that he acted without author-
ity. So he really ought not to
be a defendant in the action,”
Mr Gomez said.

As such, Mr Gomez said his
application was filed, with full
confidence that his client will
be removed as a defendant in

SEE page eight

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

Bill will give title
to those occupying
generation land

THE Land Adjudication Bill
of 2010 will be placed on the
government’s website for com-
mentary as Parliament seeks to
provide the legal framework to
give title to persons occupying
generation land throughout the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

In his explanation on the pur-
pose of this new Bill, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
it will enable families who have
been in possession of their
property for 12 years or more
of a parcel of land not exceed-
ing an acre to claim ownership
over that property and if suc-
cessful, to be granted a certifi-
cate of title for that land.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, PLP MP Ryan Pin-
der said he took special pride in

SEE page 11

PM outlines
new Business
Licence Bill

IN an effort to facilitate the
creation of new businesses and
the expansion of existing ones,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham outlined the new Business
Licence Bill in the House of
Assembly yesterday.

This new bill, which will
repeal the old Business Licence
Act, the Liquor Licences Act,
the Shop Licences Act, the
Music and Dancing Licences
Act, and the Registration of
Business Names Act, seeks to
simplify the “legal and regula-
tory requirements” of doing
business in the Bahamas by
essentially creating a “one-stop-
shop”.

According to the Prime Min-
ister, this bill will simplify the
legal and regulatory require-
ments to start and operate a
business in both New Provi-
dence and the Family Islands,
as well as facilitate a one-stop-

SEE page 11

‘a, et

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BAHAMIAN CONTRACTORS’ ASSOCIATION

St a
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT TEAM

ALL BAHAMIAN CONTRACTORS
are invited to attend a

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email: bcabahamas@gmail.com

Learn how the

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participate in the
Baha Mar Project



Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

Is currently seeking applications for the following position:
Senior Manager, Client Relationships
Corporate & Commercial Banking Centre

Position Summary:

The Senior Manager, Client Relationships must possess a broad knowledge of
financial products and services and will focus on the cross-sell, up-sell, and retention
of existing commercial customers. He/she is responsible for identifying prospects in
target markets, developing prospect acquisition strategies, maintaining prospect
relationships, maintaining a sustainable prospect sales pipeline, conducting prospect
sales calls, qualification of opportunities based on customer information and high
level of due diligence. The incumbent is on the coverage team with the Credit
Solutions Group on deal structuring, negotiation and pricing for new and existing
customers with key emphasis placed on profitability to the Bank.

Key Accountabilities for this Role:

Promotes the development and profitable growth of the commercial banking portfolio
in the assigned market area.

Pursues an aggressive business development program within the assigned market area
according to agreed upon growth objectives.

Builds and maintains a high market profile in the assigned market area with both
internal and external contacts.

Ensures all aspects of assigned relationships receive ongoing attention, as required to
maintain, improve, grow and retain the relationship.

Safeguards the Bank’s assets and liabilities.

Executes the Branch Compliance responsibilities as reflected in the Branch Services and
Procedures Manual.

Educational Requirements:

External education and/or licensing prerequisites: Graduate degree in business or
economics or work equivalency. Other training requirements as determined by the Bank
from time to time.

Functional Competencies:

e The incumbent must have at least 5 years of commercial banking experience;
Strong knowledge of the commercial banking marketplace and a detailed knowledge of
the assigned market area's key prospects, major companies and competitive positioning
within the assigned market area.
The incurnbent must also have a strong understanding of the Commercial Bank's
objectives, strategies, structure, as well as its lending and deposit products and services.
Very strong interpersonal skills and communication skills are essential to this position.
The incurnbent must be able to effectively articulate views both within the Bank and
externally in the market

e Strong PC skills are necessary, including a working knowledge of MS Word, Excel,
PowerPoint, and all commercial systems and platforms.

e Ability to conduct due diligence on strength of customer financials

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all interested
parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will

be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit applications via e-mail to: Manager, Resources Planning at

scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com on or before August 6, 2010.
, ee ‘
3 Scotiabank



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Police release
bullet riddled
Car hecause

of “bad smell”

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The bullet-
riddled SUV at the centre of
a double homicide investiga-
tion has been released and is
no longer at the police
impound, it was confirmed
yesterday.

The vehicle was impound-
ed by police in May after two
Haitian-Bahamian men were
gunned down in South

Bahamia.

Senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Quinn
McCartney confirmed that
the vehicle was released on
June 11 to the relatives of the
deceased because of an
“odour problem.”

“There was a lot of human
remains in the vehicle and it
was causing a problem at the
police impound so we autho-
rised its release to the rela-
tives of the deceased,” he told
The Tribune.

On May 23, police discov-
ered a dark blue Ford Expe-
dition parked at the entrance
gate of The Hamptons apart-
ment building following
reports of a shooting in the
South Bahamia area.

The engine was still run-
ning and the body of a Hait-
ian-Bahamian man was found
in the driver’s seat with mul-
tiple gunshot wounds.

A second man found lying
outside the vehicle was taken
to hospital, where he later
died of his injuries.

The Tribune was contact-
ed by residents of the Hearn
Lane area who wanted to
know why the vehicle was
released.

When asked, ACP McCart-
ney said that it is not unusual
for the police to release a
vehicle after examining it for
evidence.

“Tt all depends on the cir-
cumstances,” he said.

Three men have been
charged in connection with
the murders of Silvano Yas-
min, also known as "Ameri-
can", and Kendrick Dolphy.

The Tribune also learned
that the victims’ families have
been granted permission by
the US Embassy to have the
bodies flown to the US for
burial.

P Cee AE MCL



s

a

———





EXPLATNATION: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham gets an explana-

Bets / l
TALKING SHOP: Mark Hudson, BEC manager for the Northern B

CTS Ta




—



tion from Toni Seymour, plant engineer in training for the Wilson

City site.

Tornatio investigation ‘raises
questions about occupational
health and Safety Standards’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Staff Reporter
rshearer @tribunemedia.net

AN investigation into the
March 29 tornado that killed
three workers at the Freeport
Container Port raises ques-
tions about the country’s
occupational health and safe-
ty standards, Labour Minister
Dion Foulkes told the Sen-
ate yesterday.

Since the tragic incident,
the FNM senator said, the
government has moved
quickly to improve the situa-
tion.

“Government is deter-
mined to put in place and
cause to be put in place mea-
sures that will help in the pre-
vention of other such
tragedies,” said Senator
Foulkes.

It is the government’s
intention, he said, that such
improvements not only ben-
efit the workers of the
Freeport Container Port, but
also workers throughout the
country.

The shortfall in worker
safety was highlighted by
International Labour Organ-
isation (ILO) official Jacques
Obadia in a report commis-
sioned by the government in
the wake of the disaster (see
story, page 1).

Mr Obadia made recom-
mendations for the Contain-
er Port specifically, and busi-
nesses in the Bahamas in

general.

These include: participat-
ing in regional occupational
safety networking systems
which are designed to
exchange information; train-
ing labour inspectors in occu-
pational health and safety;
and amending the Health
and Safety at Work Act to
bring it in line with the pro-
visions of the ILO’s Safety
and Heath Convention 198
and Protocol 2002 with
regard to recording occupa-
tional accidents.

Mr Foulkes said the ILO
has committed to carrying out
“a complete audit of our
occupational safety and
health functions, as well as
the current legislation gov-
erning these areas.”

In addition to considering
Mr Obadia’s recommenda-
tions, Mr Foulkes said the
government will enhance the
Labour Department’s ability
to play a proactive role in
raising awareness about occu-
pational health and safety,
strengthen its labour inspec-
torate and increase its ability
to supervise and enforce
national labour legislation.

The March 29 tornado hit
the Container Port hard, pro-
ducing heavy rain, strong
gusts of wind and even hail.

In addition to the three
workers who died, another
six were injured when one of
the port’s huge marine cranes
collapsed into the harbour.

ahamas, answers questions.





TAKING A STROLL: Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham leads a
group tour at the new Wilson
City power plant. Dr Ronnie
Knowles is on the right.

crime



Teenage girl
shot in stomach

¢ A TEENAGE girl
was shot in the stomach
by a male gunman as she
walked with a friend
along Augusta Street.

Police said the 14-year-
old and her companion
were approached by a
man who opened fire with
a handgun at around
10.30pm on Sunday.

The teen was taken to
hospital by paramedics
where she is listed in seri-
ous but stable condition.

A 16-year-old male res-
ident of Finlayson Street
in assisting police with
their investigations.

Man robbed and
shot by gunman

e POLICE are probing
another shooting which
took place on Kiki Street
near Baillou Hill Road at
around 12.45pm on Sat-
urday.

Responding officers
were told that the male
victim was approached by
aman armed with a hand-
gun, who demanded cash.

The victim was robbed
of an undisclosed amount
of cash before being shot
in the leg.

He was taken to the
hospital, treated and dis-
charged.

Police investigations
continue.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

US embargo ‘will be lifted if
Cuba allows more freedoms’

But official says this should not worny the Bahamas

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the Obama adminis-
tration’s top foreign policy
experts says the economic
embargo the United States
imposes on Cuba will be lifted if
the country’s government allows
more freedoms — but this should
not worry the Bahamas.

Dr Arturo Valenzuela, Assis-
tant Secretary of State for West-
ern Hemisphere Affairs in the
US Department of State, also
emphasised that the lifting of the
long-standing embargo will not
happen “overnight” as it is cod-
ified in US law and would
require the consent of Congress.

However, the top official said
he foresees that if the embargo is
lifted — taking with it the travel
restriction which imposes penal-
ties on US citizens caught trav-
elling to Cuba — the Bahamas
can still find itself in an advanta-
geous position economically,
despite the greater competition
for tourists.

“Certainly there will be more
competition for tourist dollars
and that kind of thing, but it
seems as if there’s plenty of
room for everybody and a coun-
try like this beautiful country
here will always have a chance to
be able to be a good place for
people to come and visit.

“At the same time, I think
that with the measures this coun-
try needs to take in providing
better educational opportunities
and those kind of things, that the
Bahamas in the long-haul will
find that its niche in services and
other areas like that will go
beyond tourism so I don’t think
it will necessarily be a detrimen-
tal effect for the Bahamas.”

Dr Valenzuela met with
Bahamian media yesterday at
US Ambassador Nicole Avan-
t’s residence on Sandford Dri-





DR ARTURO VALENZUELA, United States Assistant Secretary of
State for Western Hemisphere Affairs (right) with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Nicole Avant, US Ambassador to the Bahamas.

ve, Cable Beach.

He is visiting the Bahamas as
part of a five-day trip which will
see him fly on to Jamaica and
Trinidad and address issues such
as the recently launched
Caribbean Basin Security Initia-
tive, economic opportunity, com-
petitiveness, energy, environ-
mental and health initiatives.

One of Secretary of State
Hilary Clinton’s key advisers on
foreign policy, which he both
formulates and implements, the
former academic had discussions
with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, other government
officials and leader of the oppo-
sition Perry Christie yesterday
morning to discuss a number of
issues relevant to the US-
Bahamas bilateral relationship.

Asked about the administra-

tion’s position on the 48-year-
old embargo against Cuba dur-
ing a session with the local
media, Dr Valenzuela first noted
that despite the embargo that
makes trade between US com-
panies and Cuba difficult and
makes it illegal for US citizens to
travel to the Communist-led
country, the US still has a “sig-
nificant commercial relation-
ship” with Cuba and has been
able to have “very constructive
conversations” with the Cuban
government on issues of mutual
concern, such as the reconstruc-
tion of Haiti post-earthquake.
He added that the policy of
President Barack Obama’s
administration towards Cuba at
present is focused on enhancing
“people-to-people relationships”
between the two countries’ pop-

ulations, with this evidenced in
the lifting of travel restrictions
strengthened under the presi-
dency of George W Bush which
stopped Cuban Americans trav-
elling freely to visit their family
members in the island nation.

The administration also eased
limitations on the transfer of
money from the US to Cuba.

Echoing other Obama offi-
cials, Dr Valenzuela said that he
expects that the embargo could
be totally lifted if the Cuban gov-
ernment “liberalises”.

Nonetheless, since the embar-
go has been codified in law in
the US since 1992, such a shift in
the US’ approach to Cuba would
require legislation calling for it to
end to be passed by US law-
makers before receiving Presi-
dential assent.

Such legislation has been pro-
posed by politicians in the US
before, but none have been suc-
cessful.

At the moment the Travel
Restriction Reform and Export
Enhancement Act, sponsored by
Democratic Senator Byron Dor-
gan and Republican Senator
Mike Enzi, is working its way
towards a vote in the US House
of Representatives.

The House Agriculture Com-
mittee voted 25 to 50 in favour of
the legislation moving to the full
House vote. Whether this hap-
pens is not up to the House
Democratic leadership.

The Bill seeks an easing of
restrictions on agricultural
exports to Cuba in particular —a
move which would create signif-
icant new economic opportuni-
ties for US farmers — along with
the lifting of the travel ban for
most US citizens.

Senators Dorgan and Enzi
have said that they believe they
can secure the 60 votes neces-
sary in the Senate to overcome a
filibuster and end the ban.

US ‘would like closer integration’ in Caribbean



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE United States govern-
ment would like to see closer
integration between countries in
the Caribbean, with this a topic
of conversation yesterday
between a high level US official
and Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham.

According to Dr Arturo
Valenzuela, Assistant Secretary
of State for Western Hemisphere
Affairs, one of the major “pil-
lars of engagement” that the
United States government is
hoping to promote in its rela-
tions with countries like the
Bahamas and its neighbours in
the Caribbean is the “strength-
ening” of the integration process
that CARICOM represents.

Speaking to the Bahamian
media during a press conference
with US Ambassador to the
Bahamas, Nicole Avant, at her
official residence yesterday, Dr
Valenzuela said this was one of a
number of issues discussed with
both Mr Ingraham and opposi-
tion leader Perry Christie dur-
ing meetings that morning.

“We were talking about the
CARICOM, how we see the
evolution of CARICOM and



DR VALENZUELA said integration
was one of a number of issues dis-
cussed with both Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham (left) and oppo-
sition leader Perry Christie (right).

what role could CARICOM play
with regard to some of the issues
(such as) climate change, securi-
ty and economic development,”
said Dr Arturo, a key adviser to
Secretary of State Hilary Clin-
ton on a broad range of political,
economic and security issues that
affect the Caribbean region, as
well as South and Central Amer-
ica and Canada.

“There’s always room to see
how we can improve processes of
democratic governance and in
particular in the Caribbean; (we
want to) have a dialogue with
leaders in the country about the
possibility of increasing the inte-
gration process in the Caribbean

Chinese investment interest
in the Bahamas ‘welcomed’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE United States government “welcomes” the growth of Chi-
nese interest in making investments in the Bahamas, according to

a top US official.

Dr Arturo Valenzuela, Assistant Secretary of State for Western
Hemisphere Affairs, said that increasing ties between China and the
Bahamas “will not impact” US-Bahamas relations.

“We welcome the fact that China is interested in the Caribbean
and is interested in this particular area because I think it benefits
everybody,” said Dr Valenzuela, who heads the Bureau of West-

ern Hemisphere Affairs.

Dr Valenzuela was in the Bahamas yesterday to meet with local
government officials, including Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham,
and leader of the opposition Perry Christie about a number of
issues pertinent to US-Bahamas relations. His meetings with the
Bahamian leaders come at the start of a five day trip that will
also take him to Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica.

As the head of a Department charged with managing and pro-
moting US interests in the Caribbean, South America, Central
America and Canada, the top official said the growing relationship
between the Bahamas and China is not a problem for his country.

“It’s such a pleasure to be able to meet with officials of both the
government and the opposition and I repeated to both of them
(Hubert Ingraham and Perry Christie) what I’'d like to repeat
now, which is that the United States views the Bahamas as a very

important ally.

“We've had a very close relationship with the Bahamas histor-
ically and we’ll continue to have a very close relationship with the
Bahamas and we’re not concerned if the Bahamas as a sovereign
state looks to try to get investment from other countries in the
world, looks for opportunities to try to create jobs and to develop
trading patterns and partnerships with other countries,” said Dr

Valenzuela.

— whether CARICOM and its
framework can be strenghtened
moving forward.

“Our co-operative efforts with
the nations of the Caribbean
have to be dealt with bilaterally —
between the US and those
nations — but at the same time
we’re mindful of the fact that
we’re better off if we can co-
operate and discuss things in a
broader context and in this sense
a regional integration process is a
process that would help in our
own co-operation.

“Our security framework right
now for example is within the
Caribbean Basin Security Initia-
tive (CBSI) and as you know
much of our trade and economic
policy has an overall focus on
the Caribbean as such,”
explained Dr Valenzuela.

The CBSI is a recently
launched Shared Regional Secu-

rity Partnership between the US
and the Caribbean that seeks to
bring all members of CARI-
COM and the Dominican
Republic together to jointly col-
laborate on regional security with
the United States as a partner.

The US is set to contribute $45
million this year and $79 million
in 2011 to the initiative, which
has as its core objectives the
reduction of illicit trafficking, the
advancement of public safety and
security and the promotion of
social justice.












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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Fidel absent at Cuba’s Revolution Day

SANTA CLARA, Cuba — A B-team of
socialist speakers spent Cuba's Revolution
Day bashing the United States for every-
thing from its drug consumption to the war
in Iraq to its military support for Colombia,
portraying Washington as the great villain in
world affairs.

But the day was more notable for who
didn't address the crowd — President Raul
Castro never took the lectern, brother Fidel
Castro was a no-show and Venezuela's Hugo
Chavez cancelled his trip to Cuba altogeth-
er. It was the first Revolution Day in mem-
ory in which neither Castro spoke, leaving
some in the crowd and on Cuba's streets
disappointed and perplexed. No reason was
given.

The Castros often use July 26 — the most
important date on Cuba's calendar — to set
the agenda for the coming year and
announce major changes.

A spate of public appearances by the 83-
year-old Fidel after years of seclusion had
fuelled speculation he would be onstage with
his younger brother and possibly even
address his compatriots.

That neither man spoke was a surprise,
particularly since Cubans have much they
are waiting to hear from their leaders,
together in power for more than half a cen-
tury.

"The country is in the grips of a painful
economic downturn, and there have been
increasing warnings from intellectuals that
corruption is eating away at the revolution's
foundations.

Raul Castro has made halting efforts to
open the economy, while exhorting Cubans
to work harder and stop depending on the
state for everything.

The government is also in the midst of ful-
filling a pledge to release 52 political pris-
oners jailed since 2003, a major concession
that has some hoping more change might
be on the way. But none of the speakers
brought up the dissidents on Monday, in
keeping with the government's position that
they are mercenaries and common crimi-
nals not worthy of mention.

Tens of thousands of people filled the
plaza in the central city of Santa Clara in
front of a huge bronze statue of gun-toting
revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara.
Many in the crowd wore red T-shirts bearing
his likeness or other homages to the revolu-
tion.

They got speeches by local party bosses
interspersed with music, poetry readings and
chants of “Long live the Revolution!"

Vice President Jose Ramon Machado
Ventura gave the main speech, saying Cuba
must tighten its belt and make changes to the
closed economy — but will not be pushed to
move too quickly.

"Savings, reduction of costs and the max-
imum rationing of energy and resources are
our urgent needs in all areas," he said,

In anticipation of the opening of our new SOLee Ss FreshMarkel, We are seek apphcwns

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Project Manager
Store Manager
Assistant Stor Managers
Front-End Supervisors
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Outstanding salary, benefits and incentives offered.

Experience desired

Interested condidates should forward their resumes

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Mo telephone calls please. Only persons sebecbed for

an interview will be contacted.

adding that the country is taking a step-by-
step approach to transforming its economy.
"We will never accept outside pressure."

While neither of the Castros played much
part in Monday's event, both made sepa-
rate appearances elsewhere later in the day.
Fidel kept up a string of impromptu stop-ins
by laying a wreath at a memorial to Cuban
independence hero Jose Marti at Havana's
Revolution Plaza and later met with Cuban
artists and intellectuals. Raul appeared on
Venezuelan and Cuban television discussing
new economic ties with Venezuela and say-
ing Cuba stands with its ally in its dispute
with Colombia.

As in a weekend appearance, Fidel wore
an olive-green shirt that was reminiscent of
the military uniform for which he was once
famous. At Santa Clara, Machado hailed
the re-emergence of Fidel as giving his coun-
trymen hope.

"The visible recovery of our commander
in chief is a point of pride and makes all
revolutionaries happy today," he said.

Machado and others decried Washing-
ton's 48-year-old trade embargo against
Cuba and accused the United States of impe-
rialist intentions in Latin America and the
world.

Venezuela's Chavez was scheduled to
attend as a guest of honour, but cancelled at
the last minute due to a diplomatic conflict
with neighbouring Colombia.

In his place he sent Energy Minister Ali
Rodriguez, who blamed the United States
for the confrontation between Caracas and
Bogota.

Chavez cut off diplomatic relations with
Colombia after outgoing President Alvaro
Uribe's government presented photos,
videos and maps of what it said were Colom-
bian rebel camps inside Venezuela.

Chavez called it an attempt to smear his
government and said Uribe could be trying
to lay the groundwork for an armed con-
flict.

In his speech Monday, Rodriguez also
spoke of drug problems among America's
youth, the global economic meltdown, the
war in Iraq, U.S. support for Israel and
American military backing for Colombia.

"There is a crisis in global capitalism, and
when these systems are in crisis they start to
generate violence,” Rodriguez said.

Revolution Day commemorates July 26,
1953, when the Castros led an attack on the
Moncada army barracks in the eastern city of
Santiago and a smaller military outpost in
the nearby Bayamo.

The operation failed spectacularly, but
Cubans consider it the beginning of the rev-
olution that culminated with dictator Ful-
gencio Batista's ouster on New Year's Day
1959.

(This article was written by Paul Haven,
Associated Press Writer)



Must we accept a
foreign honours
system as our own?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“BE IT RESOLVED that
the British Empire Medal
(BEM) is totally inappro-
priate and belittling to
grants in our national devel-
opment. It has been passed
and carried in Mother Eng-
land itself. To perpetuate
such an “honour” is only a
manifestation of our mental
state, that says we are still a
colony.

Isn’t it laughable of us to
have diminished the British
Empire through the obtain-
ing of independence and
now, quite ironically, fix this
badge of colonial enslave-
ment around the necks of a
free and sovereign people.
Yes, even England has come
to grips with this hypocrisy
thus phasing this humiliat-
ing honour out.

Again, look at the recent
list of honourees, those des-
tined by our political leaders
to be recipients of the colo-
nial awards. Are we so
impotent that we must
accept a foreign honour sys-
tem as our own? Wake up
Bahamas! July 10, 1973
started us on a mission of
reform that should progres-
sively build blocks. The
father of our nation, the late
Sir Lynden O Pindling knew
this, therefore in his waning
years publicly stated, “It’s
time the Bahamas considers
becoming a republic.”

I am afraid to admit that
leaders since Sir Lynden O
Pindling are less progressive
in their thinking than he
was.

He was the one, in the
right place, at the right time,
who daringly steered our
ship of state into the
uncharted seas of nation-
hood. It was an idea that
stunned his opponents and
caused detractors to reel
over. It was a most radical
step. Many seem still to be
in shock because of this
move and are indeed so
paralysed from it that they
seem incapable of continu-
ing this progressive voyage.
We have been mentally
stuck since 1973 and are
afraid of moving forward
and onward so that one day
we would have sailed
beyond the horizon of the
colonial shores.

Every Bahamian singled
out, on the current honours
list, for the British Empire
Medal is deserving of higher
honour. To the powers that
be, I urge you to take these

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



giants off your humiliating
list. Exalt these nation
builders to higher places of
honour. For if you fail them
we as a people must have
the guts to rise up and hon-
our them most appropriate-
ly. There is no way that the
single individual set on the
pedestal for highest honour
in this same list ought ever
to be seen to obliterate the
valiant contributions made
by the blood, sweat and
tears of our local home
grown heroes.

Our unconnected grass-
root people deserve better.
Stop trampling on them. We
must never take them to be
pawns on the chess-board of
our political and social
games. In fact there are
many others who very well
deserve to be decorated in
our national colours of hon-
ours. As long as the govern-
ment has a hand in this sys-
tem of honours it will give
rise to political patronage
whether real of perceived.
Advancing names for hon-
ours can be most effectively
done by a non-partisan
group. The local system of
the Order of Merit was well
on the way to achieving this.

The late Archdeacon
William Thompson and
Monsignor Preston Moss
were co-chairs. This com-
mittee was complete with
non-politicians. True to
form, we had no confidence
in our local product and
soon scrapped it. Now we
have a local system of
awards, already passed into
law, and the government fail
to enact it. It can only
enhance government’s
image to move forward in
rescuing this legislation out
of obscurity.

Church leaders, budding
politicians, youth leaders,
you are all silent in our quest
for the mental liberation of
our people. We keep our
Bahamas behind many
smaller countries in the
region who are continuous-
ly navigating through
unchartered waters towards
full and meaningful inde-
pendence.

“Pressing onward, march
together to a common lofti-
er goal.....March on
Bahamaland.”

REV FR S SEBASTIAN
CAMPBELL,
Chairman,

The National

Heroes Day

Committee

Nassau,

June, 2010.

Branville McCartney
and the Prime Minister

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Branville McCartney:

The next Prime Minister of the Bahamas. It does have a
ring to it. And it is certainly thought provoking. Without a
doubt, one has to admire the courage Branville has dis-
played. He is the first to get out of the gates. And he has let
it be known that he wants to be Prime Minister of the

Bahamas. He has a lot of guts.

First, he resigned. Then he held several press confer-
ences and spoke his mind — a brave fellow indeed. Howev-
er, let’s review the other side of the coin.

I believe the astute political pundits will agree that if
Branville had attempted this same scenario under the late
Lynden Pindling, he would have been cut down at the knees
for more reasons than one; which brings me to the point that
Hubert A Ingraham is a product of Sir Lynden and not a

whimp out of the PM.

And I ask myself, what if anything could be brewing?
Mr Ingraham has announced that he will make a decision in
November whether he will run again or not. What if he
says yes? Will Branville challenge Goliath for the leadership
post? What if the PM says he won’t? Will Branville get his
blessings? Will Bamboo Town be around for the next elec-
tion as is rumoured Clifton won’t? I believe the DPM is the
chairman of the nominations committee. How will his rela-
tionship with Branville factor leading up to 2012?

These are indeed interesting scenarios. The fact of the
matter is Branville wants to be Prime Minister. Where does
that leave Tommy Turnquest? And does the PM still have
the confidence in him? - And Zhivargo Laing? — And
Hubert Minnis? Will Goliath step aside and allow a cat
fight to take place? Or will he give one of the above his bless-

ings?

In closing, I can assure you that I will be closely scrutin-
ising the political environment pre-2012.

PAT STRACHAN
Nassau,
July 9, 2010.









My. and My, - Ahilphat
/ Nfear Anniversary

Jrem your daughter
God Pless Vou. f





THE TRIBUNE

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Brenda Van-
derpool, president of the
MCCA Women, has expressed
strong disappointment with the
Bahamas government for refus-
ing to grant visas to some of
their Haitian sisters wishing to
attend the MCCA Women
Conference in Freeport.

The conference takes place
every five years and is held in
the different districts of the
MCCA. This year it is held in
the Bahamas for the first time
in 30 years.

Over 500 Methodist women
from 27 countries throughout
the Caribbean and the Ameri-
cas are in Grand Bahama
attending the conference at the
Our Lucaya Resort.

According to Mrs Vander-
pool, a total of 15 Haitian
women were expected to also
attend, but only six were grant-
ed visas.

The conference opened on
July 21 with an opening mes-
sage from Rev Dr George Mul-
rain, the head of MCCA, who is
from Antigua. It ends on July
26.

“We have a total of 515
women who have registered





TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 5

‘Nine Haitian women denied visas’
for MCCA Women Conference

Organisation’s president expresses
disappointment with government



from all over the Caribbean
and many more could have
come but because of economics
and family difficulties they were
unable to come.

“And we cannot leave the
Bahamas without saying that
we are disappointed that the
Bahamas government did not
grant visas to some of our Hait-
ian sisters,” said the MCCA
Women’s president.

Mrs Vanderpool said that
the women were given assis-
tance by the United
Methodist Church to travel to
Freeport.

She noted that the women
were really looking forward to
travelling to the Bahamas, espe-
cially as Haiti is still trying to
recover from a major earth-
quake.

“As president, I would like
to say that we regret this, and
we trust the Bahamian govern-
ment will treat us differently
and find other ways; maybe
they could have held passports,
but not to bar some of our sis-
ters from Haiti who were so

looking forward to the change
of scenery.

“We have one Haitian sister
who is here and lost two sons
during the earthquake in Haiti,
and we thought it would be a
nice change for them so they
can be refreshed to go back and
share with the ladies over there.

“So we are disappointed,
really disappointed with the
Bahamian government for not
granting those visas,” said pres-
ident Vanderpool.

Despite the situation, she
said that it has been wonderful
in the Bahamas.

“We are really enjoying it
here, the warm hospitality of
the Bahamian people and we
have enjoyed eating conch in
so many different ways here,”
said the president.

Mrs Vanderpool said the
conference brings Methodist
women together and is referred
to as the Quinquenntial Assem-
bly.

She explained that there are
eight districts in the conference
area. Last year’s conference



was held in Panama.

“It is important for the peo-
ple here to see such a large
gathering of sisters who come
together to fellowship and
encourage Methodist people to
hold strong onto their faith.

“It also serves as a training
experience for women because
we deal with social issues and
educate them about a number
of things like the United
Nation’s Millennium Goals,
which we have adopted as part
of our goals.”

Mrs Vanderpool said the
conference also focused on top-
ics of parenting, domestic vio-
lence, money management in
tough economic times, and the
environment.

She indicated that domestic
violence is a big problem in the
Caribbean where many women
are being abused by men.

“These are all important
issues we face today and we
want women to get some
insight and go back to their
communities and share what
they have learned,” she said.

BON MMR ee ea eel)







card.

noon.



WHEN is a medical emergency not a
medical emergency? When the ambu-
lance driver has to stop to buy a phone

The Emergency Medical Services
ambulance in the photograph had its
emergency lights flashing as it raced
along East Bay Street on Saturday after-

phone card.

Yet when it came to a set of traffic
lights, it pulled over, and one of the
crew members bought a phone card
from a street vendor.

The scene was witnessed by a 7ri-
bune member of staff.

He said: “The driver didn’t attempt to
cross the lights, he just stopped to buy a

“The ambulance’s lights were flash-
ing, giving the impression it was reacting
to an emergency call. If it wasn’t, why
were the lights flashing? If it was, why
did the crew stop waste valuable time to
stop to buy a phone card?”

A spokesman for the Emergency
Medical Services said an investigation
will be launched into the incident.





Charity drives to help back-to-school needs

THE Zonta Club of Nassau
together with the Rotary Club of
Nassau Sunrise will hold two
charity drives this Saturday to
help out with back-to-school
requirements.

Janet Johnson, president of
Zonta Club of Nassau, said that
given the recent budgetary cuts
to non-governmental organisa-
tions, the need to help is even
greater.

Rotarian Emerika Robinson,
organiser of Saturday’s events,
said members of the public are
asked to donate generously any
item that will equip students for
their return to school.

Monetary donations will also
be accepted, she said.

The drives will be held at
Robin Hood Megastore on
Tonique Williams Highway and
Solomon’s Megastore on East
West Highway from 9am to 2pm.

The Zonta Club also has a
project targeted towards the
homeless called “Empty Pots”.

Also assisting in this area of
need is Project Lend a Hand, an
initiative the Rotary Club of Nas-
sau Sunrise said it conceived to
provide measurable and tangible
help to the increasing numbers
of persons who are, or are on the
verge of, homelessness largely
due to recent economic misfor-
tunes.

Immediate past president of
the club Carla Card - Stubbs not-
ed that the Social Services
Department reports that the
number of persons seeking assis-
tance rose from over 8,000 in
2008 to an unprecedented 12,000
by end of December 2009.
“Reports from various non-gov-
ernmental organisations, church-
es, ministries and similar organi-
sations are that requests for assis-
tance with clothing, food and
shelter have increased. There
have been reports of families who
now live in their cars and rely on
public sanitary facilities to main-
tain a semblance of order,” she
said.

There are four phases of Pro-
ject Lend a Hand: Charity drives
for food, bedding, clothing and
other items; a public awareness

campaign; fundraising and com-
munity development projects.

The Rotary Club of Nassau
Sunrise said it will work with
members of the public, corporate
sponsors, other civic organisa-
tions/NGOs and government
agencies to institute sustainable
programmes.

So far, two charity drives plus
many radio interviews have been
held as part of the first and sec-
ond phases.

The first charity drive took

place on May 1 at Solomon’s
Super Centre.

On May 29, the Rotary Club
of Nassau Sunrise partnered with
the Zonta Club of Nassau for a
second drive at Town Centre
Mall.

The second drive was sup-
ported by many private citizens
as well as corporate sponsors
including Prime Bahamas, Nau-
tilus Water and Bahamas Whole-
sale Agency, the Rotary Club
said.

LEGAL NOTICE

Grand Caribbean Resorts Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 164 of the Intemational
Business Companies Act and in accordance with
section 147 (a) of the Companies Act, 1992,
Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company ("the Company") is in Receivership,
commencing the 19% day of July 2010 and Craig
A. (Tony) Gomez and Edward R. Rolle of Baker

Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28 Cumberland
Street, P.O. Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas are

appointed

the Receiver-Managers of the

Company for the purpose of managing the affairs

of the said Company.

Dated the 22, July 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Recelver-Manager

Edward R. Rolle
Receiver-Manager





POSITION WANTED
Accounts Manager

We are looking for a mature Accountant to
manager the financial operations of a 10 year
old company. Duties will include overseeing all
Lies Meee a MOTB ek
STAR Ue ces CR CeM eT alee
eee Mier ia ee] 6) [m(e melee eB
PSE MMe CSUMCe Ri MO late Merce] nae
mene Ra el ele ele) Tee ane
Knowledge of ISL payroll system a plus but nota

must. Must be flexible and be able to
Nissim ere |e
Please write to us at: P.O. Box CB-13526,

le aie ee eee

Ry:

Dive Charter Boat
Compressor
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+ Scuba & Snorkeling Equipment for 6.

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See photos www.divecustomaqatics.com
Call 362-1492 or 362-1409



LEGAL NOTICE

EGI, Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 147 (a) of the Companies
Act, 1992, Notice is hereby given that the above-
named Company ‘the Company") is in
Receivership, commencing the 19 day of July
2010 and Craig A. (Tony) Gomez and Edward R.
Rolle of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28
Cumberland Street, P. 0. Box N-1991, Nassau,
Bahamas are appointed the Receiver-Managers
of the Company for the purpose of managing the
affairs of the said Company

Dated the 23, July 2070

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Receiver-Manager

Edward R. Rolle
Receiver-Manager



A leading retailer is seeking a person for this senior position.

ACCOUNTANT

Applicants should have a Masters Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA,
CA qualification or equivalent qualification recognized by the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants.

The successful candidate will be responsible for all financial aspects of the
company and ensuring compliance to established company policies and

procedures.

The ideal candidate should:
* Have a minimum five years experience in a similar fast paced

environment.

Have experience in compiling financial statements in line with
International Accounting standards.

Be able to prepare budgets and financial reports for upper management.
Have experience liaising with banking officers, auditors and insurance

agents.

Be able to communicate effectively with all levels of management.
Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines.

Be proficient in Excel and Quickbooks.

Ability to communicate with international franchisor and travel

as necessary.

Have the ability to be a team leader.
Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

The position offers an excellent remuneration and benefits package.

Interested person should submit your resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax (242) 328-4211



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010







LOCAL NEWS

PICTURED L-R: Lisa Humes, marketing assistant, Doctors Hospital; Dr
Mildred Hall Watson, director, Bahamas PACE Foundation; Jacqueline
Knowles, director, Bahamas PACE Foundation; Charles Sealy, CEO, Doc-

tors Hospital; Michele Rassin, VP operations, Doctors Hospital.





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NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

ZXR TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), ZXR TECHNOLOGY
CONSULTANTS LIMITED is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the ZXR TECHNOLOGY CONSUL-
TANTS LIMITED is required on or before 29th day of June 2010 to send
their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of
the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such claim is approved.

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 29th day Of June, 2010.
We, Sovereign Managers Limited c/o Suites 1601-1603, 16th Floor, Kin-

wick Centre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong is the Liquidator of
ZXR TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANTS LIMITED.

Sovereign Plan |
Liqakiaaor

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT
NOTICE
CORRIDOR I1A

BAILLOU HILL ROAD
Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that construction works will be carried out on

the eastern side of Baillou Hill Road effective Monday August 9th, 2010 for approximately twenty-four (24) weeks.

The works includes installation of new drainage facilities, utilities, water main systems, street lighting, traffic signs,

asphalt paving & landscaping.

Motorist travelling northbound on Baillou Hill Road should expect changes as construction works will be carried out in four
(4) stages. The following lateral streets will be temporarily closed to motorist & pedestrians: PALM TREE AVE, COCONUT
GROVE AVE, POINCIANA AVE, BAHAMA AVE, WEST END AVE, CORDEAUX AVE, PALMETTO ST, NEWBOLD

ST, BAKER ST & FATHER CALNAN RD.

STAGE 1

Motorist travelling through Palm Tree Ave should use Robinson Road as an alternative route and continue through

First Street or Second Street to their destination.

STAGE 2

Motorist travelling through Coconut Grove & Poinciana Avenue should use Palm Tree Avenue as an alternative

route.
STAGE 3

Motorist travelling through Bahama Avenue, West End Avenue & Cordeaux Avenue should use Poinciana

Avenue as an alternative route from the southern side.

STAGE 4

Motorist travelling through Palmetto Street, Newbold Street, Baker Street & Father Calnan Road should use

Oxford Avenue as an alternative route.

During construction we kindly ask that motorist travelling on Baillou Hill Road observe traffic signs delineating the work zone
and follow the signs posted “DIVERSION”. Access will be granted to the residents of the affected streets.

We apologize for the inconvenience & delays caused.
For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@ cartellone.com.ar

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs



THE TRIBUNE





Doctors Hospital
lends a hand to

aaa



teen moms at PACE

VIEWED by many as a perfect little paradise, the Bahamas
has nevertheless acquired its share of social ills — teenage
pregnancy being one of the most significant, according to the
Bahamas PACE Foundation.

PACE (Providing Access to Continued Education) is sup-
ported by volunteer organisations and the government, with two
ministries — the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture; and the Ministry of Health and Social Development — hay-
ing responsibilities for the education, health, and social well
being of teen mothers.

According to statistics gathered by PACE, despite ongoing
efforts to reverse the trend, teen pregnancy continues to be
prevalent and the consequences are having a significant impact
on communities and the country in general.

Pregnancy in adolescents often results in serious medical
complications, and sexual relationships at a young age can put
teens at risk of life-threatening sexually transmitted diseases.

According to the PACE website, HIV/AIDS is growing
fastest among girls aged 15 to 19. Girls are more likely to be
infected than boys, and represent 69.4 per cent of reported
cases in this age group.

Even if a young mother manages to avoid these risks, getting
back on her feet can be a difficult task.

Formed by the Zonta Club of Nassau, over the years PACE
has provided assistance to more than 3,000 teenage mothers,

helping them to complete high school and have a better chance
of breaking the cycle of poverty and hopelessness.

PACE needs more support, and corporate sponsor Doctors
Hospital continued its commitment to community service with
a donation to the Foundation to assist with operating costs.

Doctors Hospital’s Chief Executive Officer Charles Sealy and
Michele Rassin, Vice President of Operations, were on hand for

the cheque presentation.

Jury selection opens in
Anna Nicole Smith case

LINDA DEUTSCH,
AP Special Correspondent

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A
woman who works with addic-
tive drugs and one who was a
fan of Anna Nicole Smith's TV
reality show were among those
cleared to fill out question-
naires during the first phase of
jury selection for the drug con-
spiracy trial of two doctors and
the late model's lawyer-
boyfriend.

Superior Court Judge Robert
Perry greeted the jury prospects
Thursday with warnings that it
was a high-profile case, and that
they may be familiar with the
life of the blonde Playboy mod-
el who died of a drug overdose
in 2007 in Florida.

The defendants are not
charged with causing Smith's
death, but are accused of ille-
gally providing her with opiates
and sedatives.

Dr. Sandeep Kapoor, Dr.
Khristine Eroshevich and Stern
have pleaded not guilty to
charges related to overpre-
scribing drugs and illegally
obtaining drugs for Smith under
pseudonyms.

"IT work for a hospital, and I
know what Oxycodone does to
people,” one prospect said,
referring to one of the drugs
involved in the case. "I've had
relatives that got hooked into
it."

The prospect also said she
watched TV coverage when
Smith died.

The judge asked whether
she could be fair in evaluating
the evidence, to which she
replied, after a long pause: "I
think I could be fair.”

He told her to fill out the
14-page questionnaire. Those
who complete the forms will
return August 2 for in-depth
questioning.

Another woman said she
had been a fan of Smith's real-
ity show. Looking across the
courtroom at Smith's lawyer-
boyfriend, defendant Howard
K. Stern, she said she did not
like him because Smith "pushed
him around, and I thought he
should have been tougher."
The judge ordered her to fill
out a questionnaire.

In an unusual procedure,
jurors are being asked to dis-
close their own medical histo-



HIGH-PROFILE CASE:
Anna Nicole Smith

ries and drugs they have used.
They are being asked if they or
anyone they know has ever
abused prescription drugs, and
whether they socialize with
their doctors.

Many of the queries on the
questionnaire distributed to
prospective jurors are specific
to expected evidence in the
case, such as whether a doctor
ever made a house call for
them, as Kapoor did for Smith;
whether they have ever
obtained a prescription with-
out visiting a doctor's office, as
Smith did; or whether they have
had a relative or friend pick up
a prescription from a pharmacy,
as Stern allegedly did for Smith.

Prospective jurors also are
asked if they believe celebrities
have a right to privacy about
their medical records.

Perry told the prospects in
court that until they know
whether they are going to be
jurors, they are forbidden to
watch or read any news relating
to the case.

The questionnaire also
included a list of 94 potential
trial witnesses, including Larry
Birkhead, who was declared the
father of Smith's daughter after
a public fight over paternity
with Stern. Smith's bodyguard
and his wife, two nannies who
worked for Smith in the
Bahamas, and the Florida med-
ical examiner who performed
the autopsy on Smith's body
are also on the list.

The trial was expected to last
three months. Opening state-
ments are scheduled for August
4.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE









GOVERNOR GENERAL SPEAKS AT FORMER BIS EMPLOYEE’ 5 FUNERAL

GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Arthur Foulkes is pictured speaking at the funeral of Deborah Kerr on Sat-
urday, July 24, at the Voice of Deliverance Disciple Centre. Ms Kerr, a former employee of Bahamas
Information Services, died on July 13 at the age of 54. Apostle Leon Wallace officiated at the ser-
vice and she was interred in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery. Derek Smith/BIS

hy BAC | Bahamas Bank

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ASSISTANT RESIDENT MANAGER / SENIOR OFFICIAL II
ROLE SUMMARY

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ensure objectives are accomplished in accordance with prescribed priorities and time
constraints. Ensure the business of the Bank is conducted in a controlled, efficient and
prudent manner in accordance with enacted legislation, regulatory guidelines and the
Group's policies and procedures,

APPLICANTS MUST BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE

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‘Bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Finance or similar
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CONTACT

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degrees and professional certifications electronically to

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MASTER of Business Admin-
istration holders across the
Caribbean devoted an entire con-
ference to the issue last year. In
The Bahamas, business leaders
across a broad range of disciplines
and economic sectors have iden-
tified it as a grave organizational
demand.

MBA graduates with a spe-
cialty in entrepreneurship have
the potential to drive the kinds
of changes that would help give
The Bahamas a competitive
advantage.

Those with backgrounds in
either entrepreneurship and inno-
vation; leadership; or financial
decision-making can open doors
of opportunity for increased
wealth generation. These partic-
ular areas will be specialties for
future graduates of the impending
MBA programme at The College
of The Bahamas.

The programme is aimed at
educating men and women capa-
ble of adapting to constantly
changing global experiences with
the potential to drive some of the
world’s most innovative changes.

“Tf one is serious about pursu-
ing excellence in business, I
believe a degree at the masters
level is critical; a first degree is
not enough,” says Franklyn Wil-
son, Chairman of Sunshine Hold-
ings and former College Council
Chairman. “There are some
aspects about business in The
Bahamas that can be addressed
better at The College of The
Bahamas than anywhere else in
the world. The College is com-
mitted to an MBA degree which
will maintain high educational
standards and will be respected
globally.”

Businesses, leaders of industry
and executives crave that excel-
lence, especially as The Bahamas
and the world are still attempt-
ing to recover from a global eco-
nomic slowdown and are eager
to capitalise on niche areas to
improve their resiliency.

A timely, research-based
review of graduate business edu-
cation published by the Harvard
Business Press called “Rethinking
the MBA” reveals that globally,
managers and recruiters are
beginning to question traditional
business education in favour of
one that emphasizes heightened
cultural awareness, global per-
spectives, leadership skills and

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 7

COB MBA aims to strengthen the

ais) Bahamas’ competitive advantage

“I think it is very important for Bahamians
to realise that they can achieve higher
education right here at home.”



Dr. Sonya Wisdom, Director, Graduate Programmes at COB

creative and critical thinking.

This September, The College
hopes to enrol the first MBA stu-
dents in a programme uniquely
crafted to meet the prevailing
needs of the Bahamian econom-
ic environment. Offering this
degree on home soil and tailoring
it for working professionals, with
classes being held on alternate
Tuesdays and Saturdays means a
competitive cost for the pro-
gramme and stabilising staff levels
for local businesses.

“T think it is very important
for Bahamians to realise that they
can achieve higher education right
here at home,” says Dr. Sonya
Wisdom, Director, Graduate Pro-
grammes at The College. “All
around, it’s just less expensive
and the value that you get while
paying less is incredibly high.”

The COB MBA combines
practical course work, research,
experiential and team-based
learning into a 19-month pro-
gramme that also includes an off-
island intensive where students
will study at a host institution
abroad. The core study areas
include international business and
management in a cross cultural
environment with an emphasis
on the Bahamian economy.

According to Dr. Wisdom, the
programme’s home court advan-
tage is also a worthwhile benefit
for employers.

“Often, persons would like to
further their education. But if
they need to go away to school
they are not sure if their job will
be waiting for them when they
return. And in this economic cli-
mate there is no guarantee. So
this programme provides an
opportunity for persons to fur-
ther their education while guar-
anteeing employers that their
employees will be better skilled
and prepared to make good deci-
sions that will enhance the per-
formance of the company or
organisation. In many ways this
is a wonderful opportunity for
persons personally and profes-
sionally,” she says.

Vaughn Roberts, AA 791,

Managing Director, Downtown
Nassau Partnership (DNP) is con-
vinced of the strength of The Col-
lege’s academic programmes and
by extension the vast potential of
its newest academic offering — the
MBA.

“The MBA degree challenges
you in areas of critical thinking,
analysis, leadership and business
ethics,” he says. “Given the
strength of The College’s busi-
ness education programmes, I am
certain that students will devel-
op all the tools necessary for suc-
cess.”

In a highly competitive envi-
ronment, there are numerous
benefits to obtaining an MBA
including increasing business
knowledge and managerial exper-
tise and career and academic
advancement. The College’s
graduate business programme
was developed following exten-
sive research an input from orga-
nizations and businesses across
various economic sectors in order
to address The Bahamas’ partic-
ular needs.

“The COB MBA programme
is unique because it is crafted
specifically for the needs of indus-
try in our country and as you look
across the global landscape, lead-
ership; entrepreneurship and
innovation and financial decision-
making are especially important,”
notes Mrs. Remelda Moxey, Act-
ing Dean of the Faculty of Busi-
ness at The College of The
Bahamas. “If you can’t lead, you
will not go to the next level. If
you are not strategic in terms of
management, then you will not
move up within the organization.
These skills will also assist in mas-
tering areas of finance, opera-
tions, management and market-
ing. You will become a valuable
asset.”

With The College’s mission of
supporting national development
in all its forms and a commitment
to driving ingenuity through a
pool of highly skilled human cap-
ital, the possibilities are endless.

The deadline to apply for the
programme is July 30th.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Man charged with two murders

Harl Taylor
retrial verdict

FROM page one

sensible jurors who were lis-
tening to the case and who ;
were not motivated by senti- :

ments, but the hard cold facts,

dealing with the evidence :
based on what was presented :
in court and not what they :
may have heard on the out- :
side. The system does work :
and that’s really what :

counts.”

Mr Ducille noted that the :
jurors had to consider tech- }
nical evidence from DNA :
experts and that the case was :
substantially based on cir- :
cumstantial evidence. “It was :
very important that the jury :
listen to the facts and relate :

it,” said Mr Ducille.

“My son has been vindi- }
cated and rightfully so. I think :
we can now pick up the :
pieces and move on with our :
lives,” Troy McNeil told :
reporters yesterday. When :
asked what his son’s future :

plans are, Mr McNeil said,

“My son is definitely going :
to go to university. It won’t :
be in the United States obvi- :
ously until we get that situa- :
tion resolved but either Cana-

da or England.

“He wants to pursue a :
degree in medicine and I will :
encourage and stick by him :
110 per cent in achieving that. :
He has lost three years of his :
life unnecessarily and I will :
stick by him to ensure that :
he can move on comfortably :
with his life,” Mr McNeil said. :

Taylor’s mother, Beverly :
Taylor, declined to comment :
after the verdict was handed :
down yesterday. Mr McNeil :
said that he has no problems :
with Ms Taylor, noting that :
she has been like a mother :
to him and he has been likea :

son to her over the years.

“Her grieving Harl’s loss is:
just the same as myself. Harl :
and I were very close. We :
were business partners for :
almost ten years, he was a }
true friend to me. I feel as :
well, but get the right per- :

son,” Mr McNeil said.

Deputy Director of Public
Franklyn :
Williams and Basil Cumber- :

Prosecutions

batch prosecuted the case,

which was heard before

senior Justice Jon Isaacs.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A MAN was arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on two murder charges
as well as several armed robbery and car
theft charges.

Vinson Ariste, 20, of Goggle Eye
Road, alias “Spy” was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane yesterday, charged with
the murders of Daniachew Miller, 29,
and Noel Roach, 35. Roach of Walnut
Street became the country’s 51st mur-
der victim after being shot multiple times
while sitting in a vehicle in Pinewood
Gardens on the morning of Friday, July
16.

According to initial reports, Roach,
was sitting in a car on Cascarilla Street
with another man around 12.50 am when
two men pulled up in another car, got out
and shot at the pair. Roach was hit mul-
tiple times about the body. He was tak-
en to hospital where he later died from
his injuries. The second man in the vehi-
cle was unharmed.

Miller, the country’s 52nd murder vic-

tim, was found dead with gunshot
wounds to the chest in the area of Abun-
dant Life Road. According to reports,
around 12.45am the Millennium Gar-
dens resident was walking to his car after
leaving a party in the area of Abundant
Life Road when he was approached by
the occupants of a heavily tinted gold-
coloured Honda Inspire. According to
reports, one of the men got out of the car
armed with a high powered weapon and
opened fire on Miller. The police chased
the suspects, but they managed to escape
after their car crashed on East Street,
south of Robinson Road.

Ariste was not required to enter a plea
to the murder charges yesterday. The
cases were adjourned to August 6 and
transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street.
Ariste was also arraigned on 14 counts of
armed robbery. It is alleged that Ariste,
while armed with a handgun and a rifle,
robbed two phone card vendors of hun-
dreds of dollars in phone cards, three
gas stations of a total of $12,000 in cash
and several other individuals of cash,
jewellery, cellular phones and other per-
sonal effects. He was also arraigned on
one count of attempted armed robbery.

Police have also charged Ariste with two
counts of possession of a firearm with
intent to endanger the lives of two police
officers. He was also charged with pos-
session of a prohibited AK 47 automat-
ic rifle; 25 live rounds of 7.62mm ammu-
nition and one live round of 9mm ammu-
nition. Ariste was not required to enter a
plea to the charges. The cases were
adjourned to August 13 and transferred
to Court 6, Parliament Street.

Ariste was also arraigned on 17 counts
of stealing and receiving. It is alleged
that Ariste stole cars - mostly of the
Honda make — between April and July
of this year. He pleaded not guilty to
the stealing and receiving charges. Aris-
te’s attorney Romona Farquharson told
the court that her client alleged that he
was beaten by police officers while at
the Central Detective Unit. She asked
the magistrate to take note of the visible
bruises to her client’s forehead and cheek
as well as his right eye which was swollen
shut. She pointed out that his bottom
lip was also bruised and swollen. Accord-
ing to Ms Farquharson her client alleged
that officers beat him and stomped on his
chest. She told the court that her client



MURDER CHARGES: Vinson Ariste

claimed that he was spanked on the but-
tocks with a pipe and cutlass. She said
that Ariste claimed that a plastic bag
was also placed over his head and he
passed out. Chief Magistrate Gomez
ordered that Ariste be taken to see a
doctor yesterday. He was also ordered to
be remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison
until the completion of his preliminary
inquiries.

FROM page one

time taken to assess the seri-
ousness of the situation,"
according to a portion of the
report's findings.

The document, prepared by
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) Occupational
Safety and Health Expert
Jacques Obadia, found several
shortcomings in the port's com-
munication systems, emergency
response equipment was par-
tially deficient and that all nec-
essary safety training was not
carried out.

However the report added,
that due to the brevity of the
tornado, these “shortcomings
did not have an significant
impact on the outcome.”

One finding was that after
the twister ripped through the
port around 11.17am, the com-
pany ambulance had a flat tyre
when it arrived on the quay and
"could not be used.” The report
noted however that a sufficient
number of external ambulances
arrived quickly on site.

The ILO expert also said he
has not been able to conclu-
sively determine if all of the
FCP's cranes had been pinned
down on that fateful day, in
keeping with prescribed safety
procedures.

Work in bad weather

"With the exception of Cl
and C2... it is probable that
none of the cranes at issue had
been pinned down. Several rea-
sons related to convenience and
required efficiently of opera-
tions, as well as lack of aware-
ness of the seriousness of the
weather conditions may not
have been adhered to.”

But the report added that
due to the unpredictability of
tornadoes "it is impossible to
determine whether the out-
come of the incident would
have been more or less severe
in terms of injuries to employ-
ees and property damage if all
or at least cranes C8 and C10
had been pinned down."

The report also noted the
absence of an on-site weather
monitoring system at the FCP
during the tornado which
"might have helped on detect-
ing an incoming storm system
but not necessarily its capacity
to generate tornadoes."

The absence of an efficient
system to detect and relay
appropriate information to the
FCP workers about relevant
weather conditions was also
called into question by the con-
sultant.

eur TIS

PARADISE ISLAND.

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"This is regrettable and
should be remedied," said the
report. Still, due to the brief
and unpredictable nature of
tornadoes, it is improbable that
the existence of a more efficient
weather relaying system could
have prevented the deaths of
the employees, the document
added.

It was also found that safety
rules at the port were not
designed for brief and rapid
weather events like tornadoes
and are set up to deal with hur-
ricanes and other storms that
build slowly.

The consultant recommend-
ed that government strengthen
the full implementation of the
Health and Safety at Work Act,
2002, facilitated by the devel-
opment of regulations, codes
of practice and technical stan-
dards.

While the report noted that a
weather monitoring system was
installed at the FCP shortly
after the tornado hit, the con-
sultant suggested the port
improve its communication
with the Department of Mete-
orology, among other recom-
mendations.

The invitation by the gov-










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ernment for the ILO to con-
duct an inquiry came after
some FCP workers alleged that
safety protocols were not fol-
lowed at the port in the run up
to and during the devastating
tornado strike that killed Cleve-
land Lowe, Michael Young and

Shawn Saunders, and injured
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safety measures to be examined
at the container port.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

Appeal is filed

FROM page one

the case.

As to who should be held responsible for the outstanding fees
incurred on behalf of the party, Mr Gomez said that responsi-
bility should fall on the PLP trustees named in the case (Tom
Basden, Valentine Grimes, and Henry Storr).

ACT Productions alleges in its case that they were con-
tracted by the PLP to provide sound equipment and other ser-
vices for various rallies for a three-week period from April
10, 2007, to May 2, 2007. The agreement was reportedly con-
firmed by letter dated April 17, with ACT Production sub-
mitting invoices for $212,859.84. Payment of $178,224.08 was

made on this bill.

The company alleges that the rented equipment was delivered
to Tropical Brokerage Ltd on May 3, 2007, to be shipped to
Miami but was not released due to outstanding sums owed by
the PLP. Tropical allegedly retained ACT’s equipment for
three weeks, for which ACT claims they suffered losses of
$180,000. The company is therefore seeking the $180,000
amount, plus the $34,635.76 and any outstanding interest on the

amounts owed.

Attorneys Sharon Wilson and Raynard Rigby are reported-
ly looking into the matter on behalf of the PLP.

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

shop approach to business
licensing.

As a result, he said business
licensing will become “easier,
faster and more efficient.”

“It is proposed that the new
Business Licence Act will take
effect on January 1, 2011, to
align its entry into force with
the start of the next annual
licensing cycle. In the meantime,
officials will be working to fur-
ther streamline application pro-
cedures to ensure that the grant-
ing of prior approvals by other
regulatory agencies is clear-cut
and as seamless as possible.
They will also be meeting with
representatives of the Chamber
of Commerce and the business
community to review and
explain the new licensing
requirements and application
procedures,” Mr Ingraham
explained.

Along with a number of oth-
er changes, businesses will no
longer be required to apply for
the registration of business
names with the Registrar Gen-
eral as this task will be taken
care of jointly by the Ministry
of Finance and the Business
Licence office. As such, Mr
Ingraham said, the fee of $150
for the registration of business
names will therefore be elimi-
nated. In addition, the Prime
Minister said that waiting inor-
dinate and uncertain amounts
of time for the processing and
approval of an application to
start up a new business will be
“a thing of the past.”



PM outlines

“The calculation of business
licence fees is presently complex
and cumbersome. The fee varies
depending on the size of the
business, with six different cate-
gories, namely petty, very small,
small, medium, large or very
large. The fee also depends on
the profitability of the enter-
prise, with four different cate-
gories of profit, namely low,
medium, high and very high.
Further complicating calcula-
tions is the fact that three dif-
ferent rates of fee are applied: a
half of one per cent of turnover,
one per cent of turnover and
one and a half per cent of
turnover. And, as if that were
not complex enough, profitabil-
ity is not only calculated by
applying a list of allowable costs
to produce turnover but that list
is different depending on which
industry a business finds itself
in.

“One can only imagine the
inequities and arbitrariness
engendered by such a convolut-
ed calculation of fees, not to
mention the opportunities for
impropriety. For example, ser-
vice and repair entities may
deduct direct labour and Nation-
al Insurance costs in calculating
profitability but retail and
wholesale merchandisers may
not. Manufacturers may deduct
depreciation of production plant
but restaurants and proprietary
clubs may not. Under the new
Business Licence Bill, the tax
calculation will be significantly
simpler and considerably less

arbitrary and thereby less subject
to manipulation,” he said.

As such, the new Bill will
introduce three general tax rates
based on the turnover of a busi-
ness. These will be, $100 per
annum where a business has a
turnover not exceeding $50,000;
0.5 per cent of the turnover for
businesses with turnover exceed-
ing $50,000 per annum but not
exceeding $500,000 per annum;
and 0.75 per cent of turnover for
businesses with turnover exceed-
ing $500,000 per annum.

Additionally, a special rate of
one half of one per cent of
turnover will apply for business-
es in the following sectors: agri-
culture and animal hus-
bandry/mixed farming;
fishing/fish farms; and
food/meat/fruit processing. Also
a tax rate of one per cent of
turnover will apply to service
businesses in relation to the fol-
lowing professions: accountants,
doctors, lawyers, architects, engi-
neers and other similar or like
professions, Mr Ingraham said.

“A separate and simpler tax
schedule is proposed for gaso-
line stations, again based on total
revenues. This schedule replaces
a complex fee calculation based
on business size and profitability.
New businesses will continue to
pay an annual business licence
tax of only $100. And, with the
elimination of the need for shop,
liquor and music and dancing
licenses, businesses involved in
these areas will now only pay for
the annual business licence and
separate and additional fees will
no longer be required.

“This will eliminate the need

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to pay a bevy of small “nui-
sance” fees such as, for exam-
ple, $1.00 for a shop licence; $100
for a wholesale liquor licence;
and $200 for a restaurant liquor
licence.”

Businesses in the agricultur-
al, animal husbandry and mixed
farming sector will see a small
reduction in aggregate taxes as
they go from an effective tax rate
of roughly 0.58 per cent to 0.5
per cent. The tax rate for fishing
and fish farms will go from an
effective rate of roughly 0.47 per
cent to 0.5 per cent. For food,
meat and fruit processing, the
tax rate will remain unchanged
at 0.5 per cent.

“Professional Services in
aggregate will face an unchanged
tax rate of one per cent. Busi-
nesses with turnover over
$50,000 per annum but not
exceeding $500,000 will face a
tax rate essentially unchanged
at 0.5 per cent. Finally, for firms
with turnover greater than
$500,000 per annum, the busi-
ness licence tax rate will go up
from an effective rate of 0.68 per
cent to 0.75 per cent.

“As a means of supporting
and encouraging the smaller
firms in the Bahamian economy
during these difficult economic
times, the Government
announced in the 2010/11 Bud-

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

get Communication that it was
providing a two-year holiday
from the payment of business
licence tax for small and medium

FROM page one

this issue coming before the House of Assem-
bly as he made a similar presentation before
Parliament’s Select Committee on Crown

Land in November 2009.

At the time, Mr Pinder was not the Member
of Parliament for Elizabeth, but gave a detailed
testimony before the Select Committee. Using
this instance to dissuade the naysayers who
believe that nothing can be accomplished out-
side of the powers of the government, Mr Pin-
der said the discussion around this new Bill
shows that with proper research and “proper
debate” any goal can be accomplished.

size businesses with turnover
under $250,000. This holiday
extends over the 2010 and 2011
business licence years.”



SPECIAL PRIDE:
Ron Pinder

“Certainly many people say that the Oppo-
sition party cannot accomplish anything in Parliament. But this cer-
tainly shows otherwise. So I am happy for many of our Family
Islanders who have been held back by this issue and who now can
have a future in the economic advancement of our country.

“TI do have one concern, and I raised this concern when the
Forestry Bill was debated, that when we legislate land reform,
and the Forestry Bill dealt with designating some commonage
land, I made the point at the time that we should be considering all
applicable legislation on land reform at the same time.

“This piecemeal type of debate is dangerous. I had hoped that
my point had gotten across. I would have liked the commonage bill
being debated at the same time as generation property, but I sup-
port the legislation of commonage and generation land,” Mr Pin-

der said.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

Ss

& BILLING CHANGES



0-200 units per month

Remaining units

All units per month

UNIT CHARGE

201-800 units per month

Minimum monthly charge

Minimum monthly charge

Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for allconsumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th:

The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

Le Vidias

RESIDENTIAL
10.95 cents per unit
11.95 cents per unit
14.95 cents per unit
$5.00

COMMERCIAL

15.00 cents per unit
$10.00

GENERAL SERVICE

MONTHLY BILLS

KVA CHARGE



Demand charge per month
0-900,000 units per month
Remaining units per month
Minimum monthly charge

$11.36 per KVA
8.70 cents per unit
6.20 cents per unit
$ 568.00

TEMPORARY SUPPLIES

16.38 cents per unit

$20.00 connection fee

$10.00 per month Meter Rental

(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel)

SPECIAL SERVICES

Special Reading, Check Reading, Fuse

Replacement

Meter Test — Minimum charge

Visit with intent to disconnect

Residential Consumer
Commercial Consumer

Reconnection Fee
Returned Cheque Fee

$5.00

$10.00

$10.00
$15.00
$20.00
$15.00

Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Police identify woman found dead in triplex unit



POLICE have released the identity death was classified as "sudden," how- in South Beach.

of the woman found unresponsive ata ever, an autopsy will be conducted to Storr was pulled from waters near }
triplex unit on Dunmore Avenue last determine the official cause of death. the Cay, which is a few miles away :
week. A man, who drowned at Black- from New Providence, Sunday after- :

She is 32-year-old Sharmine beard's Cay around 2.50 pm Sunday, noon and taken to hospital in New :

Williamson of Dunmore Avenue. has been identified as Christopher Providence where he was pronounced :
Last week police said Willamson's Brunell Storr, 49, of Valencia Drive dead. i

FAMILY GUARDIAN =sss

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED ~—=3——

,



POLICE COMMISSIONER Ellison Greenslade speaks yesterday.

Almost 6,000 warrants issued

Responding to concerns on
FROM page one progress in high-risk commu-



nities, he said: “There isn’t
Greenslade commended the just one hot spot. All over
police force for the “signifi- New Providence you have
cant number” of arrests in crime being committed. If
connection with murder cases you're not able to make the
executed this year. He con- intervention, meaning take
firmed police have made an that person into custody, it
excess of 40 arrests concern- could spread to the whole
ing persons believed to be island. It’s not just isolated to

responsible for the country’s one little area and by saying if

53 murders. . you fix this the problem is
Mr Greenslade said: golyed.”

“What you have is something He advised that while

that is staring you inthe face- there are “pockets of social

young adults, predominantly decay” where crime may be
Bahamian males, committing committed more frequently,

[ leave your children financially secure crimes, predominantly crimi- police have to be cognizant

nal on criminal and in some of the rights of residents.

[1 provide a safety net for your loved ones cases there are innocent peo- “Mr Greenslade added:
CS ensure a bright future for your family tee ae

and lose their lives or are seri- successes that we have today,

[| f th li ously injured, . if it were not for increased
a 0 e a ove These are our relatives patrol initiatives and the
and friends — as I've said deployment of new cars.”
before — they live right here in Over the weekend, police
New Providence, most of — issued three wanted bulletins
them, on an island 21 by sev- for men suspected in connec-
en. We know as a people, who tion with murder, armed rob-
these people are, they livein bery and causing harm. In
our communities, they livein addition to Carlos “Skulla”
our homes. That can't be Colebrooke, Erel Erilio
overwhelming that’s simply Ariste, and Mark Kenson
an issue of something wrong McKenzie, police are also
that has occurred, its contrary searching for Nathaniel “Nat”
to law and all law-abiding cit- Miller, age 22. Miller’s last
izens need to play arole in known residence was Lee

making sure we reclaim our Street, Nassau Village.
A SUBSIDIARY OF country.” Anyone with information

FA MGU ARD Mr Greenslade attributed on the whereabouts of these

Ca | | us toda at = | the recent crime break- — suspects or any ongoing crim-
CORPORATION LIMITE throughs to the dedication inal investigation is asked to

and diligence of police offi- call the police emergency

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbahama: cers and the increased patrol room at 919 or Crime Stop-
i initiative. pers at 328-TIPS.





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REGULATIONS: Dion Foulkes.

Worker
safety:
Balance
right’

* Government aiming
to get ‘three sets of
regulations’ to give teeth
to Health and Safety at
Work Act tabled in
Parliament ‘very soon’

* Act to ensure workplace
salety passed in 2002,
but not properly
implemented for eight
years due to absence
of standards, regulations
and codes of practice
* Minister says reforms
protect Bahamian workers
without burdening business

¢

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government yesterday
said it had struck “the right bal-
ance” over proposed regula-
tions and codes of practice it
plans to table in Parliament to
give effect to the Health and
Safety at Work Act 2002, after
the report into the three torna-
do-induced deaths at the
Freeport Container Port point-
ed out that this legislation had
not been “fully implemented”.

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour and social services, con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
three sets of regulations
designed to ‘give teeth’ to the
Health and Safety at Work Act
had now been drafted, and rec-
ommendations on them
received from the Attorney
General’s Office.

He explained that the regu-
lations would now be returned
to the committee, chaired by
the Bahamas Employers Con-
federation’s (BECon) Pauline
Petty, which had originally
drafted them for their sign-off.
Once this happened, the regu-
lations would be presented to
the Government and tabled in
Parliament.

Although unable to give a

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE

—_



TU Es DAY.

ine

We UR Eee Zee

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



2010

Auto worker loss fear
despite 4% sales rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



ahamian new car dealers
may have to reducinbg
staffing levels or consolidate
through mergers if they are
to survive until the market
turns, an industry executive said yester-
day, even though there were “positive
signs” in the form of a 4.48 per cent second
quarter sales increase year-over-year.

The Bahamas Motor Dealers Associa-
tion (BMDA), in data submitted to Tri-
bune Business yesterday by Friendly Ford
sales manager and past association presi-
dent, Andrew Barr, said that while the
2010 second quarter sales rise was posi-
tive, year-over-year comparisons with 2009
showed that first half sales this year were
still 1.89 per cent down on the prior period
- one of the weakest sales years on record.

Chris Leandre, general manager for
sales at Executive Motors and Quality
Auto, said that while there were some pos-
itive indicators for the BMDA’s members
to grasp on to, such as signs that the com-
mercial banks were becoming slightly
“more aggressive” in lending activity, the
auto industry was still facing significant
challenges.

“Even though there are some positive
signs here and there, the reality for some of
the dealerships is that they now have to
either trim down in terms of head count, or
some of the smaller dealerships will have
to consolidate as a survival technique,”
Mr Leandre told Tribune Business.

“The impact of the duty increases and

RoyalFidelity to
yA a

the slowdown in sales, even though we’ve
seen increased sales in June, that was one
of the worst years ever.

“Literally to survive, and make it until
the market turns, they will have to look at
trimming head count. That’s a bit of real-
ity that, unfortunately, some businesses
will have to look at right now.”

Mr Leandre agreed that the 2010 second
quarter sales boost could have been at
least partly generated by consumers rush-
ing to buy before the full impact of the
2010-2011 Budget duty increases was felt,
and auto prices raised as a result.

“A lot of people realised that did affect
vehicles on the ground, and a few people
took advantage of that,” he added.

“One customer put a deposit on half
the value of a new vehicle, realising new
models coming in would be subject to new
duty rates.”

Mr Leandre also suggested that the gen-
erous lending rates extended by some
Bahamas-based commercial banks, in pro-
motions subsequent to the April Car
Show, when coupled with the event itself
could also have been responsible for the
modest 2010 second quarter sales improve-
ment.

“There is some optimism out there, and
the banks are trying to be as supportive as
they can,” he added, suggesting that
Bahamian commercial institutions were
being “more aggressive, a little more com-
petitive and trying to be a little more felx-
ible right now”.

And Mr Leandre said that despite the
gloom still enveloping much of the econ-
omy and Bahamian auto industry, his com-

panies were still seeing bright spots, being
“back-ordered” for the remainder of 2010
on the Tucson model, due to demand out-
stripping supply.

“For those who want to stand out from
the crowd, this is kind of the time to be
first in line for these products,” Mr Lean-
dre said, pointing to new model ranges
scheduled to be imported into the
Bahamas by the likes of Friendly Ford
and rival dealerships.

He added that the Hyundai brand,
which Quality distributes, had “jumped a
few points” in market share both here in
the Bahamas and globally.

Yet Executive and Quality, along with
other dealerships, were “still being very
conservative, very cautious” as a turn-
around in the Bahamian market for new
car sales was not anticipated until the mid-
dle or latter part of 2011.

“By mid to late next year, we should
see some signs of recovery. We have to
see what the banks say,” Mr Leandre said.

In its statement, the BMDA said: “The
Bahamas Motor Dealers Association is
reporting a 4.48 per cent increase in sales
for the quarter ending June 30, 2010, but
sales remain down 1.89 per cent over the
six months from January | through June
30, 2010, in comparison to 2009.

“BMDA member firms remain cau-
tiously optimistic and hopeful that sales
will remain at 2009 levels. Recent activity
with the banks to promote car and home
shows indicate that there is a possibility the
credit market is loosening, so hopefully
more potential clients will have access to
loans.”

Employers chief: Workers must get
rights to escape from ‘harm’s way’



new fund by
Cea TH

“Merchant bank says
still getting redemption
requests for flagship
Bahamian market fund,
but rate has slowed, and
suspects some investors
switching capital to
better international
prospects
* Eyes end-September or
end-December for new
international sub-fund



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALFidelity Mer-
chant Bank & Trust yester-
day said it would “have a
shot” at launching another
foreign-currency denomi-
nated, international mutual
fund later this year, at either
end-September or end-
December, its president
telling Tribune Business
that investors seemed to be
switching monies from local
mutual funds to those that
could access global markets.

SEE page 3B







Sothebys

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN workers must
have the right to remove them-
selves from “harm’s way” in the
workplace and not suffer con-
sequences that threaten their
employment, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
(BECon) president said yester-
day, something employees cur-
rently enjoy no protection on.

Brian Nutt, speaking to Tri-
bune Business in the wake of
the report on the Freeport Con-
tainer Port tornado incident
being released, said he agreed
with the recommendations

made by its author on reform-
ing Bahamian occupational
health and safety laws, includ-
ing the provision of statutory
protection for workers wanti-
ng to remove themselves from
life-threatening workplace sit-
uations.

The report by Jacques Oba-
dia, a former International
Labour Organisation (ILO)
executive, said the Bahamas
needed to amend the Health
and Safety at Work Act 2002 -
its main workplace safety
statute - “in a number of areas”
to bring it into line with key
ILO conventions on the issue.

A key reform, the report

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

said, was to address “the pro-
tection of workers removing
themselves from a work situa-
tion presenting an imminent
danger to their life or health”.

Backing this recommenda-
tion, Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business: “I guess right now
that it would be the employer
who would determine whether
it’s a life or death situation, and
it could be that someone is
dealt with unjustly.

“There has to be a right for
an individual to get themselves
out of harm’s way.”

Mr Nutt confirmed to Tri-

SEE page 3B

ROYAL FIDELITY

UU a ag
RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Entrepreneur
hits at venture
fund takeover

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

JUST six weeks old, Marcy’s
Kitchen, the only business built
so far this year through the
Government-sponsored ven-
ture capital fund, has seen its
chief executive and brainchild
fired, its whole staff let go and
had its name changed, its for-
mer chief telling Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday he was chased
out by those who helped him
to realise his dream.

Marcellus Miller, Marcy’s
former chief executive, said the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund and its administra-
tors, Baker Tilly Gomez, which
had taken an 80 per cent equity
stake in the business, voted him
out last month, according to
him, without due cause.

He said the eatery, located
in the domestic departure
lounge at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA),
wasn’t expected by the Fund to
gross $700 per day. However,
Mr Miller began to see net
profits of $2,300 to $2,700 per
day shortly before he saw his
dream taken from him.

Mr Miller said he was a part
of the three-man Board of
Directors that voted him out of
his company, leaving him only
with a 20 per cent equity stake

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 3B





Commission inspections
increase by almost 50%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE SECURITIES Com-
mission increased its on-site

inspections by license type by
almost 50 per cent last year
compared to 2008, due to
increased personnel and proce-
dural improvements in the
department, according to the

Entrepreneur hits at

venture fund takeover



FROM page 1B

and nothing else.

He claimed, though, that the venture capital fund’s administra-
tors had asked there to be formed a five-member Board of Direc-
tors, where two would have been appointed by Mr Miller himself.
The other two board members were the two fund administrators,
one of whom was chief administrator, Jerome Gomez.

Mr Gomez said yesterday that the $1 million per year govern-
ment-sponsored fund often retains a share in the businesses they
give start-up capital to in order to protect the investment.

Addressing a Nassau Institute seminar last week, Mr Gomez
appeared to refer to Marcy’s. Giving an insight into the difficulties
encountered by the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund, Mr
Gomez said that in one case it had to vote the original entrepreneur
off the company's Board and remove him from management con-
trol, since he was acting contrary to all agreements put in place.

"We had to do it recently with an equity project we had invest-
ed in, as the entrepreneur was doing things contrary to agree-
ments," Mr Gomez said. "We had to convene a Board meeting, and
voted him out. He just has an equity investment in it.”

Mr Gomez further indicated that the venture capital fund only
invested in Marcy’s because of its three-year contract to manage a

restaurant at LPIA.

He said many of the businesses previously started through the
veneture capital fund should not have been funded, and he added
that the fund had lost an estimated 50 per cent of its $4 million val-
ue since it was incorporated five years ago.

The Fund often takes control of businesses that seem to be fail-
ing in an attempt to recoup the loan from the fund.

However, Mr Miller declares that in his six weeks open, Marcy’s
proved its potential for success and he is baffled as to why the fund
would eject him and change the business’s name.

Mr Gomez would not say if Marcy’s, now Island Cafe, was now
owned by the fund. Meanwhile, Mr Miller no longer has anything
to do with the day to day running of the business.

Mr Gomez declined to comment further on the matter, stating
only that he would draft a response to any article published in the

media.

Employers chief:
Workers must get
rights to escape
from ‘harm’s way’

FROM page 1B

bune Business that the Health
and Safety at Work Act had
effectively been a toothless
piece of legislation during the
eight years since it had been
passed in 2002, as it had lacked
the standards, codes of practice
and regulations to give it
enforcement teeth.

This was confirmed by the
Freeport Container Port report,
which hinted that this state of
affairs could potentially have
left Bahamian workers danger-
ously exposed.

“The Act has been in force
since 2002, but without the reg-
ulations and codes of practice,
nobody knows what they are
supposed to do,” Mr Nutt said.
“Other than making people
more aware of health and safe-
ty, and the fact the Act does
require any business with more
than 20 employees to form a
Health and Safety Committee,
there’s nothing else in the Act.
The Act provides for these
committees, but it’s the regu-
lations and codes of practice
that give them an agenda as to
what meetings should be like.

“All the Act is is a frame-
work. It’s similar to the Nation-
al Health Insurance Act passed
by the PLP. That’s enacted;
that’s a law, but no regulations
under it, so there’s nothing hap-
pening with it.”

Mr Nutt said that while he
had not been on the commit-
tee, formed from trade union,
government and employer rep-
resentatives, that had been
asked by the second Ingraham
administration to draft the
Act’s regulations, he knew it
had “put a lot of work into it”
and passed its draft on to the
Government, where it had been
“for some time”.

The BECon president added
that the regulations’ drafting
had also been interrupted by
the 2002 change of government,
the Health and Safety at Work
Act being one of three Bills
passed into statute by the first
FNM government just prior to
that year’s general election.

“The PLP came into power
and did not do anything to put
in regulations and codes of
practice,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business, adding that the FNM
had to pick up the thread once
it returned to power in 2007.

The BECon chief questioned
whether the “price tag” that
would come from enforcing the
Health and Safety at Work Act
may had caused the Govern-
ment to hesitate, given the state
of the Bahamian economy and
fears about imposing addition-
al costs on business, and sug-
gested the administration could
have “stripped it down a bit to
get something out there”.

Mr Nutt said that when the
first Ingraham administration
passed the Health and Safety
at Work Act, along with the
Employment Act and Mini-
mum Wage Act, it had viewed
this legislation as bringing the
Bahamas into compliance with
the ILO’s “core conventions”.

Yet the Freeport Container
Port report confirms that the
Bahamas is still not in compli-
ance with all these conventions,
as it urges this nation to “initi-
ate the formal process leading
to the ratification of the main
ILO occupational health and
safety standards”.

These include the ILO’s
Convention 155 of 1981, and its
Protocol 2002 relating to the
recording and notification of
occupational accidents and dis-
eases.

CURT A 1)

regulator’s 2009 annual report.

Chairman Philip Stubbs said
the global fianancial crisis and
ensuing recession played a piv-
otal role in increasing the level
of oversight of licencees, and
sparked changes in the Securi-
ties Commission’s own process-
es. “These events continued to
challenge regulators, and their
roles and functions came under
increased scrutiny,” said Mr
Stubbs.

The Commission inspected
23 entities by type last year,
compared to 14 in 2008. There
were 20 routine examinations
made last year, three joint
inspections with the Central
Bank of the Bahamas and no
inspections for cause.

Last year, seven major
enforcement matters were
addressed by the Securities

RoyalFidelity to ‘have shot’

FROM page 1B

Speaking after the BISX-list-
ing of RoyalFidelity’s $5 mil-
lion international commodities
sub-fund, Michael Anderson
said: “We’re looking potential-
ly at bringing out another one
at the end of September, or
end-December.

“Our allocation comes
through on the quarter, so we
have to look at the end of Sep-
tember or the end of Decem-
ber. Itv’ll probably be Decem-
ber. Depending on how the
markets look, we’ll have a shot
at it. Let’s look at how the mar-
kets lie, and what the opportu-
nities are, and let’s see if we
can put something together.
When things go well or badly, it
creates opportunities.”

The end-September or end-
December timeline is deter-
mined because RoyalFidelity
will only receive its quarterly
$2 million-plus allocation of for-
eign currency from the Central
Bank of the Bahamas at quar-
ter-end.

52wk-Low

Securit y
AML Foods Limited

Commission and were trans-
ferred to its Office of Legal
Counsel. Three of those mat-
ters were addressed by litiga-
tion, three through administra-
tive action and one transferred
to the Attorney General’s
office for criminal prosecution.

At the end of 2009, 16 out of
25 investigations carried over
from previous years were
closed. Of the 16 cases, two
were forwarded to the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and two
aided in international matters,
while nine carried over into
2010.

Finanacial institutions - espe-
cially offshore centres - and
their regulators faced intense
scrutiny last year by the Group
of 20 Countries (G20) and the
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development,

Mr Anderson said RoyalFi-
delity, which now has three
international sub-funds and
their master fund, had seen
“good interest” from Bahamian
investors in the equities sub-
fund, which had enjoyed “an
excellent last year” and contin-
ued its performance until end-
2010 first quarter, prior to the
last quarter’s stock market dip.

Despite the 2010 second
quarter blip, Mr Anderson said:
“International equities markets
have fairly good potential for
Bahamians to invest in, and we
have fairly good subscriptions
coming in from Bahamians for
the international equities sub-
fund.”

In contrast, RoyalFidelity’s
main mutual fund targeted at
the domestic Bahamian mar-
ket, the RoyalFidelity Growth
and Income fund, “continues
to see redemptions, but not at
previous levels.

“T think there may be peo-
ple taking money out of the
local market and putting it into
the international market,” Mr

and made several policy
changes and procedural amend-
ments.

Forces

Mr Stubbs said that due to
the forces of the OECD and
their wish to do away with bank
secrecy and tax havens, the via-
bility of the Bahamas finaicial
sector was for a moment
swathed in a veil of discomfort
as it was placed on a ‘grey list’.

“The Bahamas is tied to the
global economy, and while the
initial impact of the crisis was
felt primarily throught the
reduction in revenue from the
tourism and financial services
sector, there was growing dis-
quiet about the viability and
competitiveness of our finan-
cial services sector,” Mr Stubbs

said.

“In addition, concerns were
raised regarding the survival of
entities whose securities are
traded in our local markets.

“At the international level,
increased focus continued to be
directed toward offshore finan-
cial centres with their activities
being subjected to greater glob-
al regulation.”

According to the report, the
Securities Commission’s new
legislative and policy-related
developments included amend-
ments to the Investment Funds
Act 2003, the template for
SMART Fund Model 006, the
Investment Funds (SMART
Fund) Rules, and the Guidlines
for Licensees/Registrants on
the Prevention of Money Laun-
dering and Countering the
Financing of Terrorism.

at new fund by year’s end

Anderson told Tribune Busi-
ness, indicating that Bahamian
institutional and retail investors
were switching to global oppor-
tunities because they were per-
ceived as holding greater return
potential than the domestic
equities market.

“It’s growing quite nicely this
year, and we will have a much
larger fund by the end of this
year,” Mr Anderson added of
RoyalFidelity’s international
equities sub-fund. “The local
market is not perceived to have
much potential and people are
recognising it, moving across
[to the international fund],
which is what it is there for.”

Meanwhile, the RoyalFideli-
ty president conceded that its
$4.7 million TIGRS 3 interna-
tional investment fund, the lat-
est in the family that is focused
on gold, copper and nickel com-
modities markets, had not
enjoyed a good first quarter due
to the 2010 second quarter
retreat in global equities mar-
kets as doubts over the global
recovery’s strength surfaced.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 26 JULY 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,484.46 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.01| YTD -80.92 | YTD % -5.17

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Bahamas Property Fund

5.00
0.30
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.50
5.00
2.23
1.60
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
9.95
10.00

Benchmark
Fidelity Bank

Colina Holdings

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

100.00
100.00
100.00

Bank of Bahamas
Bahamas Waste
Cable Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete *

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Last Sale
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22
+

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C)

5.00
0.30
3.15
2.17

2.50
6.02
2.30
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.74
4.65
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17

FBB13

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

5.00
0.30
3.15
2.17

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.08
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

2.50
6.02
2.38
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.74
4.65
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Change

0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

99.46
100.00

100.00
100.00

EPS $

6.95%
7% 19 October 2017

Prime + 1.75%
7% 30 May 2013

100.00

52wk-Low

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND Holdings

FBB15

Bid $
9.42
2.00
0.35

100.00
Royairid élity Mercnant Bank & 1ruSt Lt (Uver- 1 ffe-Vounter sécuriues)

Ask $
10.42

6.25
0.40

0.00

Last Price

14.00
4.00
0.55

CFAL Securities Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.4387
2.8266
1.4777
2.8522
13.0484
101.6693
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

10.0000

9.3299

4.8105

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months %

NAV
1.4825
2.9199
1.5424
2.8522

13.4110
109.3929
100.1833

1.1177
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

10.0344

9.3299

7.3073

YTD%
3.04
1.14
2.34
-8.49
0.33
5.20
-1.52
2.52
0.98
2.34
2.16

-6.84
-6.70

-5.31

MARKET TERMS

7.60
3.56
5.19
5.29
5.45
6.25

5.63

-6.70

16.22

Daily Vol.

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.911577
1.526816

107.570620
105.779540

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $

While gold “shot up” in val-
ue during the 2010 second quar-
ter, due to investor uncertainty
about the global equities mar-
ket and its perception as “the
next reserve currency”, copper
and nickel’s value fell over
recovery concerns.

“We saw a low for the first
three months,” Mr Anderson
conceded in respect of the com-
modities sub-fund, but added
that the 2010 second quarter
position had been reversed this
quarter to-date.

Concerns over the global
economic recovery’s sustain-
ability had started to dissipate,
Mr Anderson said, which
meant that copper and nickel
prices had begun to appreciate
again, while gold had gone into
reverse.

The short-term volatility of
markets, Mr Anderson
explained, was why the com-
modities sub-fund had been
established as a closed-end fund
taking a long-term position on
its investments. Investor prin-
cipal had also been protected.

bas

cs

City LCI NT AL

Div $ PIE
0.201
0.050
0.236

-0.400
0.182
0.030
1.408
0.511
0.380
0.111
0.356
0.290
0.168
0.720
0.420
0.000
0.035
0.493
1.001
0.156

Interest Maturity

20 November 2029

19 October 2022
29 May 2015

Div$ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Yield
-2.945
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.510057

NAV Date

103.987340
101.725410



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
‘S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* Trading Suspen ded

aed ES el

in circulation, just call
ere A

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 9B





B

The Tribune

DY it



ea



ith



HISTORY

Samantha’s amazing transformation

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

WO years ago, Samantha
Evans walked around "wear-
ing a smile, but carrying a
heart full of pain," desperate to
end the cycle of obesity that had
controlled her life since her early

teens.

That desperation led her to make medical
history, becoming one of the first people in
the Bahamas to have a lap -band surgery done
locally.

"Thave struggled with my weight most of my
life, at age 15, I wore a size 22, I was the fat girl
that no one asked to the prom. I had tried all
kinds of weight loss programs including the
Mayo Diet, Weight Watchers, Slender You. I
even had my mouth wired shut, but nothing
really worked," she told Tribune Health in an
interview just days before her 37th birthday.

"Being overweight caused me a lot of pain
and rejection. I had a situation where I had
applied for a job and I was actually told, "We're
sorry, you have a great attitude and excellent
qualifications and a pretty face, but we cannot
hire an overweight person as the first contact
to our clients.’ That crushed me."

She explained that she was trapped in a
vicous cyle- her weight led to depression and
her depression led to eating as a comfort mea-
sure.

"At my heaviest, I was well over 300
pounds,” she said. “ Fortunately, I didn't have
any of the medical conditions associated with
obesity like hypertension or diabetes, but I
knew I had to do something to change my life.
I have four children and I was not able to do
things with them.”



Life Changing Decision

Her opportunity to make a life changing
decision came at work one day, when she
heard that a local doctor -Charles Diggiss was
qualified to perform laproscopic lap-band
surgery right at home.

"I was familiar with the concept of weight
loss surgery, I had even corresponded with a
doctor in Mexico, but one day, I was at work (
in the surgical unit of Doctor's Hospital) and
my coworker asked me if I knew that Dr Dig-
giss was looking for patients who wanted to
have the surgery, but who were also willing to
be a spokesperson for the procedure and tell
their story.

"It was a just a dream come for me- because
it meant that I didn't have to travel , but I
would be able to have the surgery performed at
home, in the facility where I worked by a fellow
countryman and I jumped at the opportunity.”

Samantha's surgery took place on November
26, 2008. She was one of two patients to have
the procedure done that day.

According to lapbandsurgery.com- the lap-
band system started with the development of
the open adjustable silicone gastric banding

(ASGB) by Dr Lubomyr Kuzmak in 1986.
Only during 1991 was it developed to be used
in the treatment of obesity by Dr Mitiku
Belachew and Dr. M. Legrand in Belgium.
After two years of experimenting on animals,
the first laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding
procedure was done on a human in Belgium. In
2001, the Lap-Band System was finally
approved for use in the US by the Food and
Drug Administration. Dr Belachew was actu-
ally present in the theatre for Samantha’s
surgery.

"Tt was a not a difficult descision to make at
all. [had everyone's support at work and am
married to a wonderful man Arthur Evans, he
loved me just the way I was, but he was my
biggest supporter and saw the depression I was
feelng. He told me, he would support me in
whatever decision I chose to make."

Samantha said she was never afraid of the
medical risks associated with any elective sur-
gical procedure.

"T just focused on the new me. I was ashamed
of my body going into surgery, (1 was wearing
a size 32) but Dr Diggiss assured me before we
went in that what I was seing then, I would
never see again.

During the two and a half hour procedure,
Dr Diggiss inserted a band over the uppper
portion of Samantha’s stomach to drastically
reduce her stomach to just a small pouch. This
reduces the amount of food a patient can con-
sume resulting in significant weight loss.

Samantha describes the day of her surgery as
“ the day that Dr Diggiss rescued me.” She
said that after a brief recovery period of about
two weeks, she was gradually able to move
from liquid to puree to soft and then regular
foods and to date has experienced no side
effects.

However the physical transformation has
been nothing short of amazing. “ [have lost 107
pounds so far, I have about 65 more pounds to
lose before I get to my ideal weight, I feel won-
derful, my self esteem has gone through the
roof and everyone who sees my tells me how
incredible it is.”

As part of her transfromation, Samantha
has learnt to make better food choices without
totally depriving herself of her favourite foods.
She stays on track through a food journal and
mointored weigh ins and also has a personal
trainer for her gym workouts.

She says her journey has inspired her to
assist others who may be in the same predica-
ment.

“There are so many reasons why people
become overweight and cannot lose the weight.
This surgery is obviously not the answer for
some people. You have to weigh at least 250
pounds and have a body mass index of over 40
to be considered. But who better to tell people
about its benefits than someone who has lived
through it.”

She and other weight loss surgery patients
are banding together to form a support group
to encourage and motivate each other.

“Tam on a quest to help others who need to
lose weight, because this surgery has been a
blessing for me.”











THE NEW SAMANTHA: After losing more than 100 pounds and gaining a wealth of confidence.









PAST: Before lap band surgery Samantha weighed well over 300 pounds and suffered from depres-
sion.



The Itchy Dog

PROBABLY the most
complex, the most frustrating
and the most annoying clinical
condition that clients in the
Bahamas are faced with on a
daily basis is that of a scratch-
ing, itchy dog. Every day I
hear the same com-
plaint...... Dr Sands, my dog
will not stop scratching! What
can we do to correct it?



recognise these obvious caus-

itching and hair loss. Some
dogs may be lethargic and
depressed.

Treatment for bacterial skin
disease usually requires
antibiotics and medical sham-
poos. [Benzoyl peroxide] It
is recommended that antibi-
otic therapy be continued for
seven to ten days after reso-
lution of the clinical signs. If
the response to antibiotic
therapy is poor, then bacteri-
al culture and antibiotic sen-
sitivity tests should be con-
sidered.

There are many causes of
scratching in the dog. Only by
a thorough work up of the
scratchy patient can an exact
diagnosis be made, and then
the appropriate treatment can
be started. I always tell my
clients to be patient as I work
up the case. The Bahamian
client wants and expects solu-
tions now and if the dog does
not stop scratching today we
tend to get upset.

Causes

One of the first things to
eliminate is any external par-
asites. Fleas, ticks, mosqui-
toes and lice which may be
visible or those invisible par-
asites (mites such as Scabies
or Demodex)that bury in the
skin and cause intense itch-
ing can only be detected by
microscopic examination of
skin scrapings.

Your veterinarian will

es of scratching and will be
able to advise you on appro-

priate treatment. E.g:
Paramite and Frontline for
ticks and fleas. In most cases
when the cause of scratching
is parasitic the response to
treatment is excellent. How-
ever the elimination of para-
sites from the environment is
just as important, as re-infes-
tation of your pet will cause
recurrence of the symptoms.
For example; fleas and ticks
require year round control in
the Bahamas.

Bacterial skin disease or
Pyoderma is another common
cause of scratching. The pres-
ence of bacterial infection on
the skin is usually secondary,
but may be primary. Common
causes are skin parasites, poor
nutrition, unhygienic envi-
ronment, allergies or long
term steroid therapy. Bacter-
ial skin disease is usually char-
acterised by pustules, crusts,

This leads us to probably
the most common cause of
skin disease- allergies!

Allgeries

One such allergy is food
hypersensitivity. This is where
your dog becomes sensitised
to some components of its
diet resulting in skin disease.
Common foodstuffs that have
been implicated in food
hypersensitivity are beef,
dairy products, wheat, eggs
and even chicken. Some dogs
that experience food hyper-
sensitivity will have gastroin-
testinal signs. Foods allergies
may cause intense itching,
they may also be involved in
ear infections as do most skin
allergies.

Your vet will advise on an
appropriate diet to test if food
hypersensitivity is involved.
These diets are known as

hypoallergenic diets and may
be home made or may be
commercially available. Mut-
ton, rice and fish are exam-
ples of some food compo-
nents that appear to be less
allergy stimulating. These
diets may have to be given for
four to eight weeks before
complete resolution of signs
is seen. Then it is possible to
re-introduce foods you are
suspicious of to the diet and
observe if the signs reoccur.
This way the guilty foods can
be totally eliminated from the
diet in the future. Failure to
clear up the skin condition
may indicate allergies are pre-
sent apart from food based
allergies.

Contact based allergies are
another cause of skin disease.
This is where the dog
becomes affected in its envi-
ronment where it is lying or
sleeping. The feet and under
side of the body are fre-
quently affected. This form of
irritation may also be caused
by an irritant substance and
may not be allergic. An exam-
ination of the bedding and
places that your dog is laying
should be examined. Blan-
kets, feeding bowls, carpets
should be given scrutiny. To
test this allergy, the dog
should be removed from sus-
pect rooms and possible bed-
ding in its sleeping area to
something which is known not
to irritate or introduce allergy.
Paper is ideal bedding for

these dogs and can be used
to test if there own bedding
was guilty increasing skin irri-
tation. If no improvement is
seen after rigorous avoidance
of suspect floor coverings and
beddings then this form of
allergy can be eliminated
from the investigation.

This brings us to the most
common cause of allergy
based skin disease, atopy!
This is where the dog
becomes sensitised to envi-
ronmental allergens. These
allergens cause skin disease
after being inhaled. This form
of allergy may be seasonal or
year round. The house dust
mite and certain pollens are
frequently implicated as caus-
es of atopic skin disease. Cer-
tain breeds of dog appear sus-
ceptible such as the west high-
land terrier, the corgi, the
Shar Pie, but any breed of dog
may develop the condition.
Cases presented with itching
of the face feet and under-
sides of the body, possible ear
infections and they may be
running from the eyes or
show a combination of these
symptoms. In general these
dogs are eighteen months plus
before they developed this
condition.

Treatment
So what can we do about

the treatment of allergies?
Unfortunately it is not very

easy, by using tests; it may be
possible to determine the
exact causes of allergies.
However it is very expensive
and I don’t routinely recom-
mend it. This is of great ben-
efit when it is something we
can eliminate from the envi-
ronment. However frequent-
ly the allergens such as pillow
mites are impossible to elimi-
nate from the environment
and in these cases we have to
rely on symptomatic relief of
the patient. This involves the
use of an arsenal of various
anti-inflammatory drugs.

Anti-histamines help in
moderate cases. In difficult
cases the use of oral gluco-
corticoid steroids may be nec-
essary to control the symp-
toms. The combination of
supplementation of the diet
with essential fatty acids have
proved to be beneficial. In
treatment, it is always the aim
of the vet to keep the use of
steroids to a minimum and
use combinations of other
drugs to reduce their dosage.
In some cases there will be
no choice to use steroids. I
personally feel this is always
better than a pet that is in
constant discomfort and does
not get the quality of life it
deserves. In summary, the
control of itching in these
dogs can be very difficult, so
be patient with your vet as
he/she endeavors to get the
scratchy and underlying con-
ditions under control.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



(GY JOINING HANDS FOR HEATH
Keeping a lid on anger wm:

No matter what, one thing is certain,
people are sure to get angry some-
times. Everyone does. Anger is a
normal emotion, and there is nothing
wrong with feeling mad. However,
left untamed, it can lead to harmful
events. What does matter is how we
handle and respond to anger. Poor
management of anger can have seri-
ous short and long term effects. It is
therefore very important that anger is
appropriately managed at all times.
This article - the second of two parts
- provides some useful tips for man-
aging ones anger.

nger is a natural
Arve to some of our

ess pleasant life experi-
ences. However, anger is not
always the best response one
can generate, as it often
brings about harmful life long
regrets. On the other hand,
the best responses to conflict,
that often bring about posi-
tive less harmful results, are
neither simple nor easy but
rather time consuming, self
consuming and self-sacrific-
ing.

Nevertheless, they work for the
good of the majority in the long term
and offer a positive alternative to
harsh and harmful regretful respons-
es. This article provides some guide-
lines that are valuable in helping
individuals through times and expe-
riences that are not pleasant and
gives birth to anger.

The Five-Step Approach
to Managing Anger

If something happens that makes
you feel angry, a problem-solving
approach can be helpful. Begin by
thinking about what it is that trig-
gered the anger. Next, think about
the choices you have in responding
to the situation and decide what you
will do.

Each step involves answering a

(© Se
The ubiquitous hibiscus

RARE is the Bahamian garden
without a single hibiscus. Hibiscus is
one of the most popular of tropical
flowering shrubs and because it is so
hardy and common, the plants are
often neglected by their owners

The original hibiscus (Hibiscus
rosa-sinensis) came to us from eastern
Asia and the Pacific islands. The
flowers were deep red and used for
breeding purposes so much that most
of our modern hibiscus varieties have
the same basic ancestry.

A couple of decades ago, hibiscus
flowers were mostly single and came
in red, yellow or pink. These plants
were tough and lived for a long time.
Modern varieties are a little more
attenuated and are not as tough as
their predecessors. They have main-
ly double or multiple stamens and
come in a wide range of colours,
some even bi-coloured.

A healthy hibiscus needs full sun,
regular watering, good drainage and
occasional feeding. Some plants will
grow well enough in shade or partial
shade but only reach their potential in
full sun. The leaves of a mature shrub
should be dark green and, except for
occasional rest periods, flowers
should be produced at least half a
dozen at a time on a regular daily
basis.

Hibiscus shrubs discard their leaves
in ones and twos, so a large number
of yellowing leaves is a cause for con-
cern. The problem is often brought
about by nutrients being tied up in
our limestone soil and can be allevi-
ated by applying compost around the
base of the plant but not touching
the stem. If the problem persists, then

(ey LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

couple of questions, based on the
situation. For example as a child,
you are told to do something or face
a negative consequence if you do
not, such as being denied something
that you really want. The red-hot
anger starts building because you
neither want to do what was asked
nor face the promised punishment.
Or as an adult someone does some-
thing that despite being told not to
do it and warned of the conse-
quences still went ahead and did it.

Here is what to do:

1) Identify the problem (self-
awareness). Start by noticing what
you are angry about and why. Put
into words what is making you
upset so you can act rather than
react.

Ask yourself: What got me angry?
What am I feeling and why? This
can be done either mentally or out
loud, but it needs to be clear and
specific.

2) Think of potential solutions
before responding (self-control).
This is where you stop for a minute
to give yourself time to manage
your anger. It is also where you
start thinking of how you might
react, but without reacting yet.
Ask yourself: What can I do?
Think of at least three things that
might solve the problem.

3) Consider the consequences of
each solution (think it through).
This is where you think about what
is likely to result from each of the
different reactions you came up
with.

Ask yourself: What will happen for
each one of these options?

4) Make a decision (pick one of
your options). This is where you
take action by choosing one of the
three things you could do. Look at
the list and pick the one that is
likely to be most effective, solving
the problem and not make the situ-
ation worse.

Ask yourself: What is my best
choice? By the time you would
have thought it through, you would

a drench of chelated iron in the form
of Sequestrene 128 should be applied
to the base. Chelated iron acts as a
catalyst and conditions the soil so
nutrients can be absorbed.

If the leaves of a hibiscus shrub
are light green, this may indicate a
mild case of chlorosis. After applying
a Sequestrene drench, you can add
Epsom salts in liquid form, or even a
palm fertiliser that contain man-
ganese and magnesium.

The biggest enemy of hibiscus is
scale insects. The bark of most hibis-
cus shrubs is so formed that scale
insects are well camouflaged and it
needs a close inspection to identify
them. The temptation is to use a sys-
temic insecticide such as is used on
rose bushes, but this is not a good
idea as most systemic insecticides
specifically warm against their use
on hibiscus plants.

The most insidious of all scale
insects is snow scale. It starts looking
like a small dusting of fine sand or
flower and ends up looking like a
snowdrift. If left unchecked snow
scale will kill a hibiscus shrub in very
short order. Early detection is impor-
tant.

The best treatment for scale on
hibiscus is oil. Dormant oil should be
sprayed onto the woody parts, try-
ing to avoid the leaves. Do the spray-
ing on cool, sunless days or you may
fry your shrub. If after several appli-
cations the problem persists you may
have to resort to Ethion and Oil,
probably the smelliest, most foul of
all chemical insecticides allowed to
be sold to the general public. But it
works.

Follow the scent

THE harsh reality, and lack of
desirable dating opportunities can
dumbfound even the most optimistic
single. Self-analysis over relationship
patterns, choices, types, and ‘it must
be me' slows even the most deter-
mined.

You may decide not to be so
choosy and go with the flow, even if
the 'wow' and ‘soul mate’ is not
there. You even daydream of making
a special friend the ‘ideal lover’,
because they fit the bill in every oth-
er way. Would it be too outrageous to
consider ‘a friend with benefits’ a life
long partner? Have marriage possi-
bilities really passed you by?

We seem to spend our lives bump-
ing into people, connecting briefly
with people, who we can admire,
become enamored with, but who ulti-
mately leave almost no distinguish-



By MAGGIE
AN



NS i

able imprint in our mind.

Then, once in a while you are hit
by someone's entrance, almost before
truly seeing or knowing him or her.
Forces within the atmosphere seem
to pull you in their direction and you
find yourself acting in a way so unlike
the person you Know yourself to be.
If we could just be pre-warned or at
least play a role in the decision-mak-
ing, then it could help relieve the sur-
prise element.



probably be past the temptation to
yell; which is the usual (knee-jerk)
response.

Once you choose your solution, it
is time to act.

5) Check your progress. After you
have acted and the situation is
over, spend some time thinking
about how it went.

Ask yourself: How did I do? Did
things work out as I expected? If
not, why not? Am I satisfied with
the choice I made? Taking some
time to reflect on how things
worked out after it is all over is a
very important step. It helps one
learn about self and it allows the
testing of problem-solving
approaches and finding out what
work best in different situations.
At the end of the steps reward
yourself for a job well done, if the
solution you chose worked out
well. If it did not, go back through
the five steps and see if you can
figure out why.

These five steps are pretty simple
when one is calm, but are much
tougher to work through when angry
or sad (kind of like in basketball
practice when making baskets is
much easier than in a real game
when the pressure is on!). So it helps
to practice over and over again.

Other Ways to
Manage Anger
The five-step approach is good

when facing a particular situation
that got you mad and you need to
decide what action to take. But oth-
er things can help you manage
anger too. Try these even if you
are not mad to help prevent angry
feelings from building up inside.
e Exercise. Go for a walk/run,
work out, or go play a sport. Lots
of research has shown that exer-
cise is a great way to improve
your mood and decrease negative
feelings.
¢ Listen to music (with your
headphones on). Music has also
been shown to change a person's

BEAUTY: Cranberry hibiscus is an
example of modern hybrids.

The outer shell of scale insects is
waxy and oil breaks down this waxy
protection. While the waxy coating
is in place most insecticides cannot
penetrate and do their job.

The original hibiscus from Asia
was a coastline plant and to this day
hibiscus thrives in sandy soil close to
the shore but beyond the salt drift
line. Coastal plants receive protec-
tion from predators because of their
location and when we move them
inland they are more susceptible to
attack

The best defense against insects
and disease is a healthy plant. Treat
your hibiscus shrubs well and they
will reward you abundantly.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

You are intrigued by the look of
this earthly force, and an accidental
but planned brush passed them feels
like electricity. Now, you are fasci-
nated, scared but almost powerless
not to investigate it further. Is this
what ‘love at first sight’ is all about?
Is this what they mean when they
say, ‘You will just know'? Sniffing
around and checking the territory,
just like law enforcement dogs fol-
lowing the trail. As humans, we know
we do not have such advanced skills
as animals that have developed them
for navigational purposes.

Our own pheromones are unique
chemical substances that can cause a
specific reaction in another, and gen-
erally this is done by smell. The fact
that it is not the same as consciously
smelling food or perfume makes it
all the more mysterious. Is it all
hyped modern day propaganda to
make us appear and act more roman-
tic? Or can we trace it to ancient folk-
lore, samples of bodily fluids, gar-
ments of clothing, or cuttings of hair

mood pretty quickly. And if you
dance, then you're exercising and
it's a two-for-one.

¢ Write down thoughts and emo-
tions. This can be done in lots of
ways; for example, in a journal or
as poetry or song lyrics. After it
written it can be kept or thrown
away; it does not matter. The
important thing is, writing down
your thoughts and feelings can
improve how one feel. Noticing,
labeling, and releasing feelings as
they show up in smaller portions,
stop them from building up
inside.

¢ Drawing, Scribbling, doodling,
or sketching thoughts or feelings
might help too.

¢ Meditate or practice deep
breathing. This one works best if
done regularly. It is a stress man-
agement technique that promotes
use self-control when mad.

¢ Share feelings with someone
you trust. Lots of times there are
other emotions, such as fear or
sadness, beneath anger. Talking
about them can help.

¢ Distract yourself. Tf you find
yourself ‘steaming’ about some-
thing and you just can not seem to
let go, it helps to do something
that will get your mind past what
is bothering you - watch TV, read
the newspaper, a magazine or
book, or go to the movies or pull
out one of your movies.

These ideas can be helpful for two
reasons:

1. They help you cool down when
you feel like your anger might
explode. When you need to cool
down, do one or more of the activi-
ties in the list above. Think of these
as alternatives to taking an action
you will regret, such as yelling at
someone. Some of them, like writing
down feelings, can help you release
tension and begin the thinking
process at the same time.

2. They help you manage anger in
general. What if there's no immedi-
ate problem to solve? The need to

shift into a better mood is always
there. Sometimes when you are
angry, you just need to stop dwelling
on how mad you are.

When to Ask for Extra Help

Sometimes anger is a sign that
more is going on. People who have
frequent trouble with anger, who get
in fights or arguments, who get pun-
ished, who have life situations that
give them reason to often be angry
may need special help to get a prob-
lem with anger under control.

Tell parents, a teacher, a coun-
selor, or another adult you trust if
any of these things have been hap-
pening:

e You have a lasting feeling of
anger over things that have either
happened to you in the past or are
going on now.

e You feel irritable, grumpy, or in
a bad mood more often than not.

e You feel consistent anger or rage
at yourself.

e You feel anger that lasts for days
or makes you want to hurt yourself
or someone else.

e You're often getting into fights
or arguments.

These could be signs of depression
or something else and you should
not have to handle that alone.
Conclusion

Anger is a strong emotion. It can
feel overwhelming at times. Learn-
ing how to deal with strong emo-
tions - without losing control - is
part of becoming more mature. It
takes a little effort, a little practice,
and a little patience, but you can
get there if you want to.

¢ For more information on anger man-
agement visit the community Counsel-
ing and Assessment Center on Market
Street, near Purity Bakery, or call them
at telephone number 323-3295. Also,
tune in to Joining Hands for Health
Radio Programme every Wednesday
evening at 7:30 p.m. of Radio
Bahamas 1540 A.M. for discussions
on this and other health issues.




DANCING LADY: (Hibiscus schitzopetalus) is an enchanting variation on the

hibiscus theme.

and nails to entice romantic unions?
We discover the latter is true and
admire their creativity.

These subliminal scents have direct
access to our brains and nervous sys-
tems via our nasal passages. Evidence
tells us that these aromas are carried
by way of the vomero nasal organ
(VNO), which is a small cavity with-
in each nostril. Recognising the close
proximity of the part of the brain that
registers smell, and the area that deals
with strong emotions, provides us
with questions not only of attraction
but sexual performance.

What happens when we suffer
from chronic nasal congestion? Or
how do nasal sprays affect our other
medications affecting brain chem-
istry, such as antidepressants? Due
to the parallel effect of increased
blood flow to the penis and the nose,
there results a complex link between
the nose and orgasm. Interestingly,
there are contradictory reports of
decongestants being linked to impo-
tence and others resulting in rapid



orgasm. Also, chronic nasal drip suf-
ferers and asthmatics becoming tem-
porarily symptom free during sexual
activity.

The future looks promising in the
development of male and female
pharmaceuticals for the treatment of
sexual problems. We know we can
manipulate certain aspects of sexual
desire, arousal, and orgasm, but we
cannot overlook the importance of
the relationship. If we can manufac-
ture all this sexual activity it makes
you wonder if the desired effect will
be ‘fabricated love’. Will the ease of
availability and rapid response make
the ‘old way’ seem too much hard
work? Long live true and lasting love,
let it never be replaced.

¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock ' with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9 For appointments call
364 7230 , email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 11B



Building respect at work

espect is often confused

Rev: obedience because
he end result is com-

pliance but the process and
underlying reasons that drive
compliance may have nothing
to do with respect. More
specifically, respect is not fear
based, it is inspired because it
is shows you value people by
treating them in a way that
gives them a voice and leaves
them with their dignity intact.
In an environment where there is
mutual respect, information is
exchanged in a way that everyone's
dignity can be sustained however,
compliance may not be an outcome.
When there is obedience, there is
no room for the injection of creativ-
ity by employees because leaders
are autocratic or dictatorial. Building
obedience achieves compliance at
the cost of the infusion of a diversi-
ty of perspectives.
Professor and author Robin Dillon
adds some clarity to the discussion of
respect dimension of respect which
he refers to as care. Caring respect
comes out of seeing the unique val-
ue in persons and treating them as
though they bring value and per-
spective to a situation.
Author David Balovich suggests
that, “In order to earn the respect of
others, one must first have respect
for themselves. One must recognise
they are a person worthy of respect.
One earns respect by giving respect
to one-self and to others.”

Perspectives
on Disrespect

Bullying: Bullying can manifest
as intimidation in the form of name
calling, shouting, inappropriate jok-
ing, demeaning (condescending)
behaviour, exclusion, sexual harass-



ment, profanity or sarcasm. It can
also show up as disciplined behav-
iour designed to methodically show
employees who has the power
through humiliation, micromanage-
ment or undermining activity.

Bullying is not limited to face-to-
face communication, it can manifest
in written form as well. Examples
include but are not limited to exclu-
sion from e-mails related to your
work; bold, capitalised or red let-
ters; emails sent at night with the
expectation of an immediate
response and bombardment of
emails, not allowing you sufficient
time to get the work done.

Undermining Behaviour: This
type of behaviour is designed to
make a person seem to be less than
competent than they are. Con-
scious and unconscious undermin-
ing strategies can minimise, neu-
tralise or negate a person's contri-
butions. Sometimes undermining
behaviour can be seemingly neces-
sary like spoon-feeding employees,
not allowing them to develop their
critical thinking and leadership
abilities. At other times, undermin-
ing behaviour can manifest as
deliberate sabotage where some-
one neglects their responsibilities
because of passive aggressive
intentions. There also people who
are prepared to lie to achieve their
undermining goals.

Conscious Underutilisation:

There are times when employees
are very competent and outspoken,
so they are used for their compe-
tence but not rewarded, promoted,
respected, used optimally or
empowered because they are
labeled as trouble makers.

Instead, they are relegated toa
position where they are contacted
directly or by a third party only
when their input is needed. And
this sometimes means after a bad
decision begins to unravel. These
people are valued for their compe-
tence but there is a competing
need to keep them muzzled that
restricts the scope of the contribu-
tion they can make.

Hierarchical Adherence: This
occurs when the levels of hierarchy
are so strictly adhered to that it
disallows effective bottom-up and
top-down flows of information.
This reality is worsened when
there is a weak layer of middle
management. Anyone who
attempts to circumvent the hierar-
chy and goes directly to the top to
state their case is open to attack
and can be summarily put in their
place for their perceived audacity.
In a case like this, if the person
needing to be heard is reprimand-
ed, they can feel disrespected and
demoralised because the person at
the top places more importance on
procedural adherence than on cre-
ating effective channels of commu-
nication. Unfortunately, in cases
like this, the person at the top may
also feel disrespected because of a
deformed, antiquated system of
communication.

Immobilised Decision Makers:
These are managers who cannot
make the tough calls because of
profound incompetence or because
of a highly political work environ-
ment. They are viewed by employ-

ees as toothless and are disrespect-
ed because an unfair distribution
of work or voiceless employees can
be the result of immobilisation.

Unfounded Accusations: There
are managers who lack the critical
thinking skills necessary for mak-
ing fair decisions. Their biases are
overwhelming so they react to
opinion as though there is
irrefutable evidence being present-
ed. In circumstances like this, mis-
takes in judgment can happen, and
when there is a trend of mistakes,
employees don't trust or respect
this type of manager because of
their undisciplined reactions.

Respect and
Reciprocity

When you give respect you may
receive it in return but if your respect
is viewed as misplaced, you may not
receive it back from all the stake-
holders in the situation. Creating an
environment based on compliance
and voicelessness can open you up to
disrespect by those who don't fear
the consequences of their actions or
it can cause obedience which looks
suspiciously like respect on the sur-
face.

How to Build Respect

When building respect, keep in
mind that trust is usually impaired if
the environment if characterised by
disrespect so a respect building exer-
cise will also have trust building
dynamics. Here are a few tips to help
build respect.

e Treat people with courtesy and
respect leaving them with their
human dignity.

e Take an inclusive approach
encouraging members of the team
to share their ideas.

e Embrace differences as a team

strength. Avoid labeling differ-
ences as an obstacle.

e If an idea is a good one, use it.

e Think before you act. Weigh the
risks of various alternatives. Knee-
jerking behaviours demonstrate a
lack of depth and engender disre-
spect.

e Use active listening skills to
process other points of view.
Remember, someone may have a
perspective that can positively
enhance your solution.

e Get over your biases and treat
people equitably.

e Build your courage.

e Learn to praise as much as you
criticise. You will build respect,
confidence and performance.

e Encourage flows of constructive
information.

¢ Do some self reflection to deter-
mine if you may be inadvertently
bullying members of your team.

e When you make changes in your
behaviours, be consistent with your
new behaviours. Flip-flopping in
and out of old patterns will only
create the perception that you
were not serious about making
meaningful change.

In a diverse work environment,
building respect can enhance team
productivity and creativity by
reducing levels of conflict and
building healthy working relation-
ships. An unknown author
summed it up this way, “To be one,
to be united is a great thing. But to
respect the right to be different is
maybe even greater.”

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organization-
al Soul, an HR Consulting and Leader-
ship Development company. If you
are interested in exploring how you
can create higher performing team
leaders, you contact her at

www.orgsoul.com.



























































































iil





































































INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Se VAS eS a
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Low MODERATE | HIGH V. HIGH EXT.
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t-storm in spots t-storm possible t-storm possible greater the need for eye and skin protection.
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105° F LL 8er FO [gg°-a7° FC [105°-87° Fs 100°-87° F 107°-87° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.) |
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, . .
and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. Today gre oir ae oo on A
:42 p.m. : :27 p.m. F
A Wednesday 9:01 a.m. 2.6 3:05am. 0.4
vod PE a7
17 p.m. 3.0 3:06pm. 0.4
<= Ww Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 9:39am, 26 3:39am. 04
> v ABACO . A a Temperature 9:52pm. 28 3:46pm. 06
High: 92° F/33° C s High .. 93° F/34° C :
° 0 q ° ° Friday 10:18am. 2.7 4:13am. 04
a F/27°C Low ... .. 82° F/28° C : :
ple knots Normal high ». 88° F/31° C 10:28 p.m. 2.7 4:26 p.m. 0.7
> WEST PALM BEAC Vv Normal low ...... . Saturday 10:58am. 27 4:47am. 0.6
~ High: 92° F/33° Last year's high 11:05pm. 25 5:09pm. 0.9
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

To Ta eT TT ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Full Text
McCOMBO (\

OF THE DAY i'm tovint it

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LOW

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Volume: 106 No.204
tits



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





Sat

nar’ iio ria
not guilty

Troyniko McNeil
acquitted of murder

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TROYNIKO McNeil was
acquitted yesterday of the
November 2007 murder of well
known handbag designer Harl
Taylor.

The 37-year-old handbag
designer was found dead in his
bedroom at Mountbatten
House, on West Hill Street,
with multiple stab wounds on
November 18, 2007. After some
three hours of deliberation, the
jury returned shortly before 8
o’clock last night with a not
guilty verdict, 9-3, on the charge
of murder.

MecNeil’s father, Troy
McNeil, who was a former busi-
ness partner of Harl Taylor
shouted, “Thank you, Jesus!”
and raced out of the courtroom
immediately after the verdict
was handed down. Moments
later his son, visibly relieved,
left the courtroom a free man,
swarmed by family and friends.

Last July, McNeil’s three-
week long first trial ended in a
hung jury. When asked what
may have made the difference
this time around McNeil’s
attorney Murrio Ducille said,
“The difference is we have very

SEE page eight

Work in bad weather ‘may have
affected time to assess tornado threat’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



THE Freeport Container Port's habit of allowing work to con-
tinue in relatively bad weather and fluctuating wind may have
affected the time taken to assess the seriousness of the tornado that
killed three of its workers on March 29, said an independent

report into the incident.

"The fact that terminal work during relatively bad weather and
fluctuating winds is a common occurrence may have affected the

SEE page eight

Domino's

os
oo yy
ei

WES

order a Ue 3-TOPPING F PIZZA

i

pene at
Hy aa :
si

tet

Delicious = CE |



USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

CARS FOR SALE,
a
AND REAL ESTATE '



|





Steak ik hates

For Breakfast!

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Almost 6,000
warrants issued

g by police this year





By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net







SEE page 12



POLICE have issued almost 6,000 war- |, |
rants this year, according to reported
weekly averages, but top officials main-
tain the crime rate is “not overwhelm-
ing.” Based on weekly averages
announced at a press conference yester-
day, it was also revealed there have been
over 6,000 traffic tickets issued.

Police Commissioner Ellison





Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade





=



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Appeal filed to remove Philip Galanis from court proceedings

ATTORNEY Damien
Gomez confirmed last night
that an appeal has been filed
before the courts to remove
his client, former PLP cam-
paign general Philip Galanis,
as a defendant in court pro-
ceedings seeking payment of
$215,000 for services offered
to the PLP prior to the 2007
general election.

Although the US company,

ACT Productions Inc, had
secured a summary judgment
against a Bahamian firm and
a group of PLP officials, Mr
Gomez said that his client
should never have been on
the court documents in the
first place as he was only act-
ing as an agent for the PLP.
“It is obvious from the
pleadings that he (Mr Gala-
nis) entered into the agree-

Fast Track your plans...
with a Fast Track Loan.

ments as an agent for the
PLP. There is no allegation
that he acted without author-
ity. So he really ought not to
be a defendant in the action,”
Mr Gomez said.

As such, Mr Gomez said his
application was filed, with full
confidence that his client will
be removed as a defendant in

SEE page eight

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

Bill will give title
to those occupying
generation land

THE Land Adjudication Bill
of 2010 will be placed on the
government’s website for com-
mentary as Parliament seeks to
provide the legal framework to
give title to persons occupying
generation land throughout the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

In his explanation on the pur-
pose of this new Bill, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
it will enable families who have
been in possession of their
property for 12 years or more
of a parcel of land not exceed-
ing an acre to claim ownership
over that property and if suc-
cessful, to be granted a certifi-
cate of title for that land.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, PLP MP Ryan Pin-
der said he took special pride in

SEE page 11

PM outlines
new Business
Licence Bill

IN an effort to facilitate the
creation of new businesses and
the expansion of existing ones,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham outlined the new Business
Licence Bill in the House of
Assembly yesterday.

This new bill, which will
repeal the old Business Licence
Act, the Liquor Licences Act,
the Shop Licences Act, the
Music and Dancing Licences
Act, and the Registration of
Business Names Act, seeks to
simplify the “legal and regula-
tory requirements” of doing
business in the Bahamas by
essentially creating a “one-stop-
shop”.

According to the Prime Min-
ister, this bill will simplify the
legal and regulatory require-
ments to start and operate a
business in both New Provi-
dence and the Family Islands,
as well as facilitate a one-stop-

SEE page 11

‘a, et

CAR PURCHASE
BAHAMIAN CONTRACTORS’ ASSOCIATION

St a
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT TEAM

ALL BAHAMIAN CONTRACTORS
are invited to attend a

LUNCHEON

WED. JULY 28, 2010 at 12 NOON

Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort & Casino
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BCA Members ° $25 Non Members ° $35
Reservations: Phone/Fax 242 325-7524 or
email: bcabahamas@gmail.com

Learn how the

BCA will help

Tag Ad eae
parties to

participate in the
Baha Mar Project



Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

Is currently seeking applications for the following position:
Senior Manager, Client Relationships
Corporate & Commercial Banking Centre

Position Summary:

The Senior Manager, Client Relationships must possess a broad knowledge of
financial products and services and will focus on the cross-sell, up-sell, and retention
of existing commercial customers. He/she is responsible for identifying prospects in
target markets, developing prospect acquisition strategies, maintaining prospect
relationships, maintaining a sustainable prospect sales pipeline, conducting prospect
sales calls, qualification of opportunities based on customer information and high
level of due diligence. The incumbent is on the coverage team with the Credit
Solutions Group on deal structuring, negotiation and pricing for new and existing
customers with key emphasis placed on profitability to the Bank.

Key Accountabilities for this Role:

Promotes the development and profitable growth of the commercial banking portfolio
in the assigned market area.

Pursues an aggressive business development program within the assigned market area
according to agreed upon growth objectives.

Builds and maintains a high market profile in the assigned market area with both
internal and external contacts.

Ensures all aspects of assigned relationships receive ongoing attention, as required to
maintain, improve, grow and retain the relationship.

Safeguards the Bank’s assets and liabilities.

Executes the Branch Compliance responsibilities as reflected in the Branch Services and
Procedures Manual.

Educational Requirements:

External education and/or licensing prerequisites: Graduate degree in business or
economics or work equivalency. Other training requirements as determined by the Bank
from time to time.

Functional Competencies:

e The incumbent must have at least 5 years of commercial banking experience;
Strong knowledge of the commercial banking marketplace and a detailed knowledge of
the assigned market area's key prospects, major companies and competitive positioning
within the assigned market area.
The incurnbent must also have a strong understanding of the Commercial Bank's
objectives, strategies, structure, as well as its lending and deposit products and services.
Very strong interpersonal skills and communication skills are essential to this position.
The incurnbent must be able to effectively articulate views both within the Bank and
externally in the market

e Strong PC skills are necessary, including a working knowledge of MS Word, Excel,
PowerPoint, and all commercial systems and platforms.

e Ability to conduct due diligence on strength of customer financials

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all interested
parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will

be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit applications via e-mail to: Manager, Resources Planning at

scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com on or before August 6, 2010.
, ee ‘
3 Scotiabank



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Police release
bullet riddled
Car hecause

of “bad smell”

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The bullet-
riddled SUV at the centre of
a double homicide investiga-
tion has been released and is
no longer at the police
impound, it was confirmed
yesterday.

The vehicle was impound-
ed by police in May after two
Haitian-Bahamian men were
gunned down in South

Bahamia.

Senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Quinn
McCartney confirmed that
the vehicle was released on
June 11 to the relatives of the
deceased because of an
“odour problem.”

“There was a lot of human
remains in the vehicle and it
was causing a problem at the
police impound so we autho-
rised its release to the rela-
tives of the deceased,” he told
The Tribune.

On May 23, police discov-
ered a dark blue Ford Expe-
dition parked at the entrance
gate of The Hamptons apart-
ment building following
reports of a shooting in the
South Bahamia area.

The engine was still run-
ning and the body of a Hait-
ian-Bahamian man was found
in the driver’s seat with mul-
tiple gunshot wounds.

A second man found lying
outside the vehicle was taken
to hospital, where he later
died of his injuries.

The Tribune was contact-
ed by residents of the Hearn
Lane area who wanted to
know why the vehicle was
released.

When asked, ACP McCart-
ney said that it is not unusual
for the police to release a
vehicle after examining it for
evidence.

“Tt all depends on the cir-
cumstances,” he said.

Three men have been
charged in connection with
the murders of Silvano Yas-
min, also known as "Ameri-
can", and Kendrick Dolphy.

The Tribune also learned
that the victims’ families have
been granted permission by
the US Embassy to have the
bodies flown to the US for
burial.

P Cee AE MCL



s

a

———





EXPLATNATION: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham gets an explana-

Bets / l
TALKING SHOP: Mark Hudson, BEC manager for the Northern B

CTS Ta




—



tion from Toni Seymour, plant engineer in training for the Wilson

City site.

Tornatio investigation ‘raises
questions about occupational
health and Safety Standards’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Staff Reporter
rshearer @tribunemedia.net

AN investigation into the
March 29 tornado that killed
three workers at the Freeport
Container Port raises ques-
tions about the country’s
occupational health and safe-
ty standards, Labour Minister
Dion Foulkes told the Sen-
ate yesterday.

Since the tragic incident,
the FNM senator said, the
government has moved
quickly to improve the situa-
tion.

“Government is deter-
mined to put in place and
cause to be put in place mea-
sures that will help in the pre-
vention of other such
tragedies,” said Senator
Foulkes.

It is the government’s
intention, he said, that such
improvements not only ben-
efit the workers of the
Freeport Container Port, but
also workers throughout the
country.

The shortfall in worker
safety was highlighted by
International Labour Organ-
isation (ILO) official Jacques
Obadia in a report commis-
sioned by the government in
the wake of the disaster (see
story, page 1).

Mr Obadia made recom-
mendations for the Contain-
er Port specifically, and busi-
nesses in the Bahamas in

general.

These include: participat-
ing in regional occupational
safety networking systems
which are designed to
exchange information; train-
ing labour inspectors in occu-
pational health and safety;
and amending the Health
and Safety at Work Act to
bring it in line with the pro-
visions of the ILO’s Safety
and Heath Convention 198
and Protocol 2002 with
regard to recording occupa-
tional accidents.

Mr Foulkes said the ILO
has committed to carrying out
“a complete audit of our
occupational safety and
health functions, as well as
the current legislation gov-
erning these areas.”

In addition to considering
Mr Obadia’s recommenda-
tions, Mr Foulkes said the
government will enhance the
Labour Department’s ability
to play a proactive role in
raising awareness about occu-
pational health and safety,
strengthen its labour inspec-
torate and increase its ability
to supervise and enforce
national labour legislation.

The March 29 tornado hit
the Container Port hard, pro-
ducing heavy rain, strong
gusts of wind and even hail.

In addition to the three
workers who died, another
six were injured when one of
the port’s huge marine cranes
collapsed into the harbour.

ahamas, answers questions.





TAKING A STROLL: Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham leads a
group tour at the new Wilson
City power plant. Dr Ronnie
Knowles is on the right.

crime



Teenage girl
shot in stomach

¢ A TEENAGE girl
was shot in the stomach
by a male gunman as she
walked with a friend
along Augusta Street.

Police said the 14-year-
old and her companion
were approached by a
man who opened fire with
a handgun at around
10.30pm on Sunday.

The teen was taken to
hospital by paramedics
where she is listed in seri-
ous but stable condition.

A 16-year-old male res-
ident of Finlayson Street
in assisting police with
their investigations.

Man robbed and
shot by gunman

e POLICE are probing
another shooting which
took place on Kiki Street
near Baillou Hill Road at
around 12.45pm on Sat-
urday.

Responding officers
were told that the male
victim was approached by
aman armed with a hand-
gun, who demanded cash.

The victim was robbed
of an undisclosed amount
of cash before being shot
in the leg.

He was taken to the
hospital, treated and dis-
charged.

Police investigations
continue.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

US embargo ‘will be lifted if
Cuba allows more freedoms’

But official says this should not worny the Bahamas

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the Obama adminis-
tration’s top foreign policy
experts says the economic
embargo the United States
imposes on Cuba will be lifted if
the country’s government allows
more freedoms — but this should
not worry the Bahamas.

Dr Arturo Valenzuela, Assis-
tant Secretary of State for West-
ern Hemisphere Affairs in the
US Department of State, also
emphasised that the lifting of the
long-standing embargo will not
happen “overnight” as it is cod-
ified in US law and would
require the consent of Congress.

However, the top official said
he foresees that if the embargo is
lifted — taking with it the travel
restriction which imposes penal-
ties on US citizens caught trav-
elling to Cuba — the Bahamas
can still find itself in an advanta-
geous position economically,
despite the greater competition
for tourists.

“Certainly there will be more
competition for tourist dollars
and that kind of thing, but it
seems as if there’s plenty of
room for everybody and a coun-
try like this beautiful country
here will always have a chance to
be able to be a good place for
people to come and visit.

“At the same time, I think
that with the measures this coun-
try needs to take in providing
better educational opportunities
and those kind of things, that the
Bahamas in the long-haul will
find that its niche in services and
other areas like that will go
beyond tourism so I don’t think
it will necessarily be a detrimen-
tal effect for the Bahamas.”

Dr Valenzuela met with
Bahamian media yesterday at
US Ambassador Nicole Avan-
t’s residence on Sandford Dri-





DR ARTURO VALENZUELA, United States Assistant Secretary of
State for Western Hemisphere Affairs (right) with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Nicole Avant, US Ambassador to the Bahamas.

ve, Cable Beach.

He is visiting the Bahamas as
part of a five-day trip which will
see him fly on to Jamaica and
Trinidad and address issues such
as the recently launched
Caribbean Basin Security Initia-
tive, economic opportunity, com-
petitiveness, energy, environ-
mental and health initiatives.

One of Secretary of State
Hilary Clinton’s key advisers on
foreign policy, which he both
formulates and implements, the
former academic had discussions
with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, other government
officials and leader of the oppo-
sition Perry Christie yesterday
morning to discuss a number of
issues relevant to the US-
Bahamas bilateral relationship.

Asked about the administra-

tion’s position on the 48-year-
old embargo against Cuba dur-
ing a session with the local
media, Dr Valenzuela first noted
that despite the embargo that
makes trade between US com-
panies and Cuba difficult and
makes it illegal for US citizens to
travel to the Communist-led
country, the US still has a “sig-
nificant commercial relation-
ship” with Cuba and has been
able to have “very constructive
conversations” with the Cuban
government on issues of mutual
concern, such as the reconstruc-
tion of Haiti post-earthquake.
He added that the policy of
President Barack Obama’s
administration towards Cuba at
present is focused on enhancing
“people-to-people relationships”
between the two countries’ pop-

ulations, with this evidenced in
the lifting of travel restrictions
strengthened under the presi-
dency of George W Bush which
stopped Cuban Americans trav-
elling freely to visit their family
members in the island nation.

The administration also eased
limitations on the transfer of
money from the US to Cuba.

Echoing other Obama offi-
cials, Dr Valenzuela said that he
expects that the embargo could
be totally lifted if the Cuban gov-
ernment “liberalises”.

Nonetheless, since the embar-
go has been codified in law in
the US since 1992, such a shift in
the US’ approach to Cuba would
require legislation calling for it to
end to be passed by US law-
makers before receiving Presi-
dential assent.

Such legislation has been pro-
posed by politicians in the US
before, but none have been suc-
cessful.

At the moment the Travel
Restriction Reform and Export
Enhancement Act, sponsored by
Democratic Senator Byron Dor-
gan and Republican Senator
Mike Enzi, is working its way
towards a vote in the US House
of Representatives.

The House Agriculture Com-
mittee voted 25 to 50 in favour of
the legislation moving to the full
House vote. Whether this hap-
pens is not up to the House
Democratic leadership.

The Bill seeks an easing of
restrictions on agricultural
exports to Cuba in particular —a
move which would create signif-
icant new economic opportuni-
ties for US farmers — along with
the lifting of the travel ban for
most US citizens.

Senators Dorgan and Enzi
have said that they believe they
can secure the 60 votes neces-
sary in the Senate to overcome a
filibuster and end the ban.

US ‘would like closer integration’ in Caribbean



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE United States govern-
ment would like to see closer
integration between countries in
the Caribbean, with this a topic
of conversation yesterday
between a high level US official
and Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham.

According to Dr Arturo
Valenzuela, Assistant Secretary
of State for Western Hemisphere
Affairs, one of the major “pil-
lars of engagement” that the
United States government is
hoping to promote in its rela-
tions with countries like the
Bahamas and its neighbours in
the Caribbean is the “strength-
ening” of the integration process
that CARICOM represents.

Speaking to the Bahamian
media during a press conference
with US Ambassador to the
Bahamas, Nicole Avant, at her
official residence yesterday, Dr
Valenzuela said this was one of a
number of issues discussed with
both Mr Ingraham and opposi-
tion leader Perry Christie dur-
ing meetings that morning.

“We were talking about the
CARICOM, how we see the
evolution of CARICOM and



DR VALENZUELA said integration
was one of a number of issues dis-
cussed with both Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham (left) and oppo-
sition leader Perry Christie (right).

what role could CARICOM play
with regard to some of the issues
(such as) climate change, securi-
ty and economic development,”
said Dr Arturo, a key adviser to
Secretary of State Hilary Clin-
ton on a broad range of political,
economic and security issues that
affect the Caribbean region, as
well as South and Central Amer-
ica and Canada.

“There’s always room to see
how we can improve processes of
democratic governance and in
particular in the Caribbean; (we
want to) have a dialogue with
leaders in the country about the
possibility of increasing the inte-
gration process in the Caribbean

Chinese investment interest
in the Bahamas ‘welcomed’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE United States government “welcomes” the growth of Chi-
nese interest in making investments in the Bahamas, according to

a top US official.

Dr Arturo Valenzuela, Assistant Secretary of State for Western
Hemisphere Affairs, said that increasing ties between China and the
Bahamas “will not impact” US-Bahamas relations.

“We welcome the fact that China is interested in the Caribbean
and is interested in this particular area because I think it benefits
everybody,” said Dr Valenzuela, who heads the Bureau of West-

ern Hemisphere Affairs.

Dr Valenzuela was in the Bahamas yesterday to meet with local
government officials, including Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham,
and leader of the opposition Perry Christie about a number of
issues pertinent to US-Bahamas relations. His meetings with the
Bahamian leaders come at the start of a five day trip that will
also take him to Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica.

As the head of a Department charged with managing and pro-
moting US interests in the Caribbean, South America, Central
America and Canada, the top official said the growing relationship
between the Bahamas and China is not a problem for his country.

“It’s such a pleasure to be able to meet with officials of both the
government and the opposition and I repeated to both of them
(Hubert Ingraham and Perry Christie) what I’'d like to repeat
now, which is that the United States views the Bahamas as a very

important ally.

“We've had a very close relationship with the Bahamas histor-
ically and we’ll continue to have a very close relationship with the
Bahamas and we’re not concerned if the Bahamas as a sovereign
state looks to try to get investment from other countries in the
world, looks for opportunities to try to create jobs and to develop
trading patterns and partnerships with other countries,” said Dr

Valenzuela.

— whether CARICOM and its
framework can be strenghtened
moving forward.

“Our co-operative efforts with
the nations of the Caribbean
have to be dealt with bilaterally —
between the US and those
nations — but at the same time
we’re mindful of the fact that
we’re better off if we can co-
operate and discuss things in a
broader context and in this sense
a regional integration process is a
process that would help in our
own co-operation.

“Our security framework right
now for example is within the
Caribbean Basin Security Initia-
tive (CBSI) and as you know
much of our trade and economic
policy has an overall focus on
the Caribbean as such,”
explained Dr Valenzuela.

The CBSI is a recently
launched Shared Regional Secu-

rity Partnership between the US
and the Caribbean that seeks to
bring all members of CARI-
COM and the Dominican
Republic together to jointly col-
laborate on regional security with
the United States as a partner.

The US is set to contribute $45
million this year and $79 million
in 2011 to the initiative, which
has as its core objectives the
reduction of illicit trafficking, the
advancement of public safety and
security and the promotion of
social justice.












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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Fidel absent at Cuba’s Revolution Day

SANTA CLARA, Cuba — A B-team of
socialist speakers spent Cuba's Revolution
Day bashing the United States for every-
thing from its drug consumption to the war
in Iraq to its military support for Colombia,
portraying Washington as the great villain in
world affairs.

But the day was more notable for who
didn't address the crowd — President Raul
Castro never took the lectern, brother Fidel
Castro was a no-show and Venezuela's Hugo
Chavez cancelled his trip to Cuba altogeth-
er. It was the first Revolution Day in mem-
ory in which neither Castro spoke, leaving
some in the crowd and on Cuba's streets
disappointed and perplexed. No reason was
given.

The Castros often use July 26 — the most
important date on Cuba's calendar — to set
the agenda for the coming year and
announce major changes.

A spate of public appearances by the 83-
year-old Fidel after years of seclusion had
fuelled speculation he would be onstage with
his younger brother and possibly even
address his compatriots.

That neither man spoke was a surprise,
particularly since Cubans have much they
are waiting to hear from their leaders,
together in power for more than half a cen-
tury.

"The country is in the grips of a painful
economic downturn, and there have been
increasing warnings from intellectuals that
corruption is eating away at the revolution's
foundations.

Raul Castro has made halting efforts to
open the economy, while exhorting Cubans
to work harder and stop depending on the
state for everything.

The government is also in the midst of ful-
filling a pledge to release 52 political pris-
oners jailed since 2003, a major concession
that has some hoping more change might
be on the way. But none of the speakers
brought up the dissidents on Monday, in
keeping with the government's position that
they are mercenaries and common crimi-
nals not worthy of mention.

Tens of thousands of people filled the
plaza in the central city of Santa Clara in
front of a huge bronze statue of gun-toting
revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara.
Many in the crowd wore red T-shirts bearing
his likeness or other homages to the revolu-
tion.

They got speeches by local party bosses
interspersed with music, poetry readings and
chants of “Long live the Revolution!"

Vice President Jose Ramon Machado
Ventura gave the main speech, saying Cuba
must tighten its belt and make changes to the
closed economy — but will not be pushed to
move too quickly.

"Savings, reduction of costs and the max-
imum rationing of energy and resources are
our urgent needs in all areas," he said,

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adding that the country is taking a step-by-
step approach to transforming its economy.
"We will never accept outside pressure."

While neither of the Castros played much
part in Monday's event, both made sepa-
rate appearances elsewhere later in the day.
Fidel kept up a string of impromptu stop-ins
by laying a wreath at a memorial to Cuban
independence hero Jose Marti at Havana's
Revolution Plaza and later met with Cuban
artists and intellectuals. Raul appeared on
Venezuelan and Cuban television discussing
new economic ties with Venezuela and say-
ing Cuba stands with its ally in its dispute
with Colombia.

As in a weekend appearance, Fidel wore
an olive-green shirt that was reminiscent of
the military uniform for which he was once
famous. At Santa Clara, Machado hailed
the re-emergence of Fidel as giving his coun-
trymen hope.

"The visible recovery of our commander
in chief is a point of pride and makes all
revolutionaries happy today," he said.

Machado and others decried Washing-
ton's 48-year-old trade embargo against
Cuba and accused the United States of impe-
rialist intentions in Latin America and the
world.

Venezuela's Chavez was scheduled to
attend as a guest of honour, but cancelled at
the last minute due to a diplomatic conflict
with neighbouring Colombia.

In his place he sent Energy Minister Ali
Rodriguez, who blamed the United States
for the confrontation between Caracas and
Bogota.

Chavez cut off diplomatic relations with
Colombia after outgoing President Alvaro
Uribe's government presented photos,
videos and maps of what it said were Colom-
bian rebel camps inside Venezuela.

Chavez called it an attempt to smear his
government and said Uribe could be trying
to lay the groundwork for an armed con-
flict.

In his speech Monday, Rodriguez also
spoke of drug problems among America's
youth, the global economic meltdown, the
war in Iraq, U.S. support for Israel and
American military backing for Colombia.

"There is a crisis in global capitalism, and
when these systems are in crisis they start to
generate violence,” Rodriguez said.

Revolution Day commemorates July 26,
1953, when the Castros led an attack on the
Moncada army barracks in the eastern city of
Santiago and a smaller military outpost in
the nearby Bayamo.

The operation failed spectacularly, but
Cubans consider it the beginning of the rev-
olution that culminated with dictator Ful-
gencio Batista's ouster on New Year's Day
1959.

(This article was written by Paul Haven,
Associated Press Writer)



Must we accept a
foreign honours
system as our own?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“BE IT RESOLVED that
the British Empire Medal
(BEM) is totally inappro-
priate and belittling to
grants in our national devel-
opment. It has been passed
and carried in Mother Eng-
land itself. To perpetuate
such an “honour” is only a
manifestation of our mental
state, that says we are still a
colony.

Isn’t it laughable of us to
have diminished the British
Empire through the obtain-
ing of independence and
now, quite ironically, fix this
badge of colonial enslave-
ment around the necks of a
free and sovereign people.
Yes, even England has come
to grips with this hypocrisy
thus phasing this humiliat-
ing honour out.

Again, look at the recent
list of honourees, those des-
tined by our political leaders
to be recipients of the colo-
nial awards. Are we so
impotent that we must
accept a foreign honour sys-
tem as our own? Wake up
Bahamas! July 10, 1973
started us on a mission of
reform that should progres-
sively build blocks. The
father of our nation, the late
Sir Lynden O Pindling knew
this, therefore in his waning
years publicly stated, “It’s
time the Bahamas considers
becoming a republic.”

I am afraid to admit that
leaders since Sir Lynden O
Pindling are less progressive
in their thinking than he
was.

He was the one, in the
right place, at the right time,
who daringly steered our
ship of state into the
uncharted seas of nation-
hood. It was an idea that
stunned his opponents and
caused detractors to reel
over. It was a most radical
step. Many seem still to be
in shock because of this
move and are indeed so
paralysed from it that they
seem incapable of continu-
ing this progressive voyage.
We have been mentally
stuck since 1973 and are
afraid of moving forward
and onward so that one day
we would have sailed
beyond the horizon of the
colonial shores.

Every Bahamian singled
out, on the current honours
list, for the British Empire
Medal is deserving of higher
honour. To the powers that
be, I urge you to take these

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



giants off your humiliating
list. Exalt these nation
builders to higher places of
honour. For if you fail them
we as a people must have
the guts to rise up and hon-
our them most appropriate-
ly. There is no way that the
single individual set on the
pedestal for highest honour
in this same list ought ever
to be seen to obliterate the
valiant contributions made
by the blood, sweat and
tears of our local home
grown heroes.

Our unconnected grass-
root people deserve better.
Stop trampling on them. We
must never take them to be
pawns on the chess-board of
our political and social
games. In fact there are
many others who very well
deserve to be decorated in
our national colours of hon-
ours. As long as the govern-
ment has a hand in this sys-
tem of honours it will give
rise to political patronage
whether real of perceived.
Advancing names for hon-
ours can be most effectively
done by a non-partisan
group. The local system of
the Order of Merit was well
on the way to achieving this.

The late Archdeacon
William Thompson and
Monsignor Preston Moss
were co-chairs. This com-
mittee was complete with
non-politicians. True to
form, we had no confidence
in our local product and
soon scrapped it. Now we
have a local system of
awards, already passed into
law, and the government fail
to enact it. It can only
enhance government’s
image to move forward in
rescuing this legislation out
of obscurity.

Church leaders, budding
politicians, youth leaders,
you are all silent in our quest
for the mental liberation of
our people. We keep our
Bahamas behind many
smaller countries in the
region who are continuous-
ly navigating through
unchartered waters towards
full and meaningful inde-
pendence.

“Pressing onward, march
together to a common lofti-
er goal.....March on
Bahamaland.”

REV FR S SEBASTIAN
CAMPBELL,
Chairman,

The National

Heroes Day

Committee

Nassau,

June, 2010.

Branville McCartney
and the Prime Minister

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Branville McCartney:

The next Prime Minister of the Bahamas. It does have a
ring to it. And it is certainly thought provoking. Without a
doubt, one has to admire the courage Branville has dis-
played. He is the first to get out of the gates. And he has let
it be known that he wants to be Prime Minister of the

Bahamas. He has a lot of guts.

First, he resigned. Then he held several press confer-
ences and spoke his mind — a brave fellow indeed. Howev-
er, let’s review the other side of the coin.

I believe the astute political pundits will agree that if
Branville had attempted this same scenario under the late
Lynden Pindling, he would have been cut down at the knees
for more reasons than one; which brings me to the point that
Hubert A Ingraham is a product of Sir Lynden and not a

whimp out of the PM.

And I ask myself, what if anything could be brewing?
Mr Ingraham has announced that he will make a decision in
November whether he will run again or not. What if he
says yes? Will Branville challenge Goliath for the leadership
post? What if the PM says he won’t? Will Branville get his
blessings? Will Bamboo Town be around for the next elec-
tion as is rumoured Clifton won’t? I believe the DPM is the
chairman of the nominations committee. How will his rela-
tionship with Branville factor leading up to 2012?

These are indeed interesting scenarios. The fact of the
matter is Branville wants to be Prime Minister. Where does
that leave Tommy Turnquest? And does the PM still have
the confidence in him? - And Zhivargo Laing? — And
Hubert Minnis? Will Goliath step aside and allow a cat
fight to take place? Or will he give one of the above his bless-

ings?

In closing, I can assure you that I will be closely scrutin-
ising the political environment pre-2012.

PAT STRACHAN
Nassau,
July 9, 2010.









My. and My, - Ahilphat
/ Nfear Anniversary

Jrem your daughter
God Pless Vou. f


THE TRIBUNE

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Brenda Van-
derpool, president of the
MCCA Women, has expressed
strong disappointment with the
Bahamas government for refus-
ing to grant visas to some of
their Haitian sisters wishing to
attend the MCCA Women
Conference in Freeport.

The conference takes place
every five years and is held in
the different districts of the
MCCA. This year it is held in
the Bahamas for the first time
in 30 years.

Over 500 Methodist women
from 27 countries throughout
the Caribbean and the Ameri-
cas are in Grand Bahama
attending the conference at the
Our Lucaya Resort.

According to Mrs Vander-
pool, a total of 15 Haitian
women were expected to also
attend, but only six were grant-
ed visas.

The conference opened on
July 21 with an opening mes-
sage from Rev Dr George Mul-
rain, the head of MCCA, who is
from Antigua. It ends on July
26.

“We have a total of 515
women who have registered





TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 5

‘Nine Haitian women denied visas’
for MCCA Women Conference

Organisation’s president expresses
disappointment with government



from all over the Caribbean
and many more could have
come but because of economics
and family difficulties they were
unable to come.

“And we cannot leave the
Bahamas without saying that
we are disappointed that the
Bahamas government did not
grant visas to some of our Hait-
ian sisters,” said the MCCA
Women’s president.

Mrs Vanderpool said that
the women were given assis-
tance by the United
Methodist Church to travel to
Freeport.

She noted that the women
were really looking forward to
travelling to the Bahamas, espe-
cially as Haiti is still trying to
recover from a major earth-
quake.

“As president, I would like
to say that we regret this, and
we trust the Bahamian govern-
ment will treat us differently
and find other ways; maybe
they could have held passports,
but not to bar some of our sis-
ters from Haiti who were so

looking forward to the change
of scenery.

“We have one Haitian sister
who is here and lost two sons
during the earthquake in Haiti,
and we thought it would be a
nice change for them so they
can be refreshed to go back and
share with the ladies over there.

“So we are disappointed,
really disappointed with the
Bahamian government for not
granting those visas,” said pres-
ident Vanderpool.

Despite the situation, she
said that it has been wonderful
in the Bahamas.

“We are really enjoying it
here, the warm hospitality of
the Bahamian people and we
have enjoyed eating conch in
so many different ways here,”
said the president.

Mrs Vanderpool said the
conference brings Methodist
women together and is referred
to as the Quinquenntial Assem-
bly.

She explained that there are
eight districts in the conference
area. Last year’s conference



was held in Panama.

“It is important for the peo-
ple here to see such a large
gathering of sisters who come
together to fellowship and
encourage Methodist people to
hold strong onto their faith.

“It also serves as a training
experience for women because
we deal with social issues and
educate them about a number
of things like the United
Nation’s Millennium Goals,
which we have adopted as part
of our goals.”

Mrs Vanderpool said the
conference also focused on top-
ics of parenting, domestic vio-
lence, money management in
tough economic times, and the
environment.

She indicated that domestic
violence is a big problem in the
Caribbean where many women
are being abused by men.

“These are all important
issues we face today and we
want women to get some
insight and go back to their
communities and share what
they have learned,” she said.

BON MMR ee ea eel)







card.

noon.



WHEN is a medical emergency not a
medical emergency? When the ambu-
lance driver has to stop to buy a phone

The Emergency Medical Services
ambulance in the photograph had its
emergency lights flashing as it raced
along East Bay Street on Saturday after-

phone card.

Yet when it came to a set of traffic
lights, it pulled over, and one of the
crew members bought a phone card
from a street vendor.

The scene was witnessed by a 7ri-
bune member of staff.

He said: “The driver didn’t attempt to
cross the lights, he just stopped to buy a

“The ambulance’s lights were flash-
ing, giving the impression it was reacting
to an emergency call. If it wasn’t, why
were the lights flashing? If it was, why
did the crew stop waste valuable time to
stop to buy a phone card?”

A spokesman for the Emergency
Medical Services said an investigation
will be launched into the incident.





Charity drives to help back-to-school needs

THE Zonta Club of Nassau
together with the Rotary Club of
Nassau Sunrise will hold two
charity drives this Saturday to
help out with back-to-school
requirements.

Janet Johnson, president of
Zonta Club of Nassau, said that
given the recent budgetary cuts
to non-governmental organisa-
tions, the need to help is even
greater.

Rotarian Emerika Robinson,
organiser of Saturday’s events,
said members of the public are
asked to donate generously any
item that will equip students for
their return to school.

Monetary donations will also
be accepted, she said.

The drives will be held at
Robin Hood Megastore on
Tonique Williams Highway and
Solomon’s Megastore on East
West Highway from 9am to 2pm.

The Zonta Club also has a
project targeted towards the
homeless called “Empty Pots”.

Also assisting in this area of
need is Project Lend a Hand, an
initiative the Rotary Club of Nas-
sau Sunrise said it conceived to
provide measurable and tangible
help to the increasing numbers
of persons who are, or are on the
verge of, homelessness largely
due to recent economic misfor-
tunes.

Immediate past president of
the club Carla Card - Stubbs not-
ed that the Social Services
Department reports that the
number of persons seeking assis-
tance rose from over 8,000 in
2008 to an unprecedented 12,000
by end of December 2009.
“Reports from various non-gov-
ernmental organisations, church-
es, ministries and similar organi-
sations are that requests for assis-
tance with clothing, food and
shelter have increased. There
have been reports of families who
now live in their cars and rely on
public sanitary facilities to main-
tain a semblance of order,” she
said.

There are four phases of Pro-
ject Lend a Hand: Charity drives
for food, bedding, clothing and
other items; a public awareness

campaign; fundraising and com-
munity development projects.

The Rotary Club of Nassau
Sunrise said it will work with
members of the public, corporate
sponsors, other civic organisa-
tions/NGOs and government
agencies to institute sustainable
programmes.

So far, two charity drives plus
many radio interviews have been
held as part of the first and sec-
ond phases.

The first charity drive took

place on May 1 at Solomon’s
Super Centre.

On May 29, the Rotary Club
of Nassau Sunrise partnered with
the Zonta Club of Nassau for a
second drive at Town Centre
Mall.

The second drive was sup-
ported by many private citizens
as well as corporate sponsors
including Prime Bahamas, Nau-
tilus Water and Bahamas Whole-
sale Agency, the Rotary Club
said.

LEGAL NOTICE

Grand Caribbean Resorts Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 164 of the Intemational
Business Companies Act and in accordance with
section 147 (a) of the Companies Act, 1992,
Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company ("the Company") is in Receivership,
commencing the 19% day of July 2010 and Craig
A. (Tony) Gomez and Edward R. Rolle of Baker

Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28 Cumberland
Street, P.O. Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas are

appointed

the Receiver-Managers of the

Company for the purpose of managing the affairs

of the said Company.

Dated the 22, July 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Recelver-Manager

Edward R. Rolle
Receiver-Manager





POSITION WANTED
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LEGAL NOTICE

EGI, Ltd.
(In Receivership)

Pursuant to section 147 (a) of the Companies
Act, 1992, Notice is hereby given that the above-
named Company ‘the Company") is in
Receivership, commencing the 19 day of July
2010 and Craig A. (Tony) Gomez and Edward R.
Rolle of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28
Cumberland Street, P. 0. Box N-1991, Nassau,
Bahamas are appointed the Receiver-Managers
of the Company for the purpose of managing the
affairs of the said Company

Dated the 23, July 2070

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Receiver-Manager

Edward R. Rolle
Receiver-Manager



A leading retailer is seeking a person for this senior position.

ACCOUNTANT

Applicants should have a Masters Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA,
CA qualification or equivalent qualification recognized by the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants.

The successful candidate will be responsible for all financial aspects of the
company and ensuring compliance to established company policies and

procedures.

The ideal candidate should:
* Have a minimum five years experience in a similar fast paced

environment.

Have experience in compiling financial statements in line with
International Accounting standards.

Be able to prepare budgets and financial reports for upper management.
Have experience liaising with banking officers, auditors and insurance

agents.

Be able to communicate effectively with all levels of management.
Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines.

Be proficient in Excel and Quickbooks.

Ability to communicate with international franchisor and travel

as necessary.

Have the ability to be a team leader.
Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

The position offers an excellent remuneration and benefits package.

Interested person should submit your resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax (242) 328-4211



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010







LOCAL NEWS

PICTURED L-R: Lisa Humes, marketing assistant, Doctors Hospital; Dr
Mildred Hall Watson, director, Bahamas PACE Foundation; Jacqueline
Knowles, director, Bahamas PACE Foundation; Charles Sealy, CEO, Doc-

tors Hospital; Michele Rassin, VP operations, Doctors Hospital.





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situate on corner of Mackey St. and
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Tel: 322-941 4/322-9415/6 » Fax: 322-9417

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British Golonial Hilton Hote)
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20mm Balls $20.00
40mm Balls and up $30.00

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All necklaces and mesh - 30° off
All balls on the system - 30% off
All rings and earrings - 30% off
Free parking at the Hilton
P.O, Box EE 15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-323-1865

Email: germs-pearlsiiheimail. corn



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

ZXR TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), ZXR TECHNOLOGY
CONSULTANTS LIMITED is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the ZXR TECHNOLOGY CONSUL-
TANTS LIMITED is required on or before 29th day of June 2010 to send
their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of
the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such claim is approved.

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 29th day Of June, 2010.
We, Sovereign Managers Limited c/o Suites 1601-1603, 16th Floor, Kin-

wick Centre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong is the Liquidator of
ZXR TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANTS LIMITED.

Sovereign Plan |
Liqakiaaor

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT
NOTICE
CORRIDOR I1A

BAILLOU HILL ROAD
Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that construction works will be carried out on

the eastern side of Baillou Hill Road effective Monday August 9th, 2010 for approximately twenty-four (24) weeks.

The works includes installation of new drainage facilities, utilities, water main systems, street lighting, traffic signs,

asphalt paving & landscaping.

Motorist travelling northbound on Baillou Hill Road should expect changes as construction works will be carried out in four
(4) stages. The following lateral streets will be temporarily closed to motorist & pedestrians: PALM TREE AVE, COCONUT
GROVE AVE, POINCIANA AVE, BAHAMA AVE, WEST END AVE, CORDEAUX AVE, PALMETTO ST, NEWBOLD

ST, BAKER ST & FATHER CALNAN RD.

STAGE 1

Motorist travelling through Palm Tree Ave should use Robinson Road as an alternative route and continue through

First Street or Second Street to their destination.

STAGE 2

Motorist travelling through Coconut Grove & Poinciana Avenue should use Palm Tree Avenue as an alternative

route.
STAGE 3

Motorist travelling through Bahama Avenue, West End Avenue & Cordeaux Avenue should use Poinciana

Avenue as an alternative route from the southern side.

STAGE 4

Motorist travelling through Palmetto Street, Newbold Street, Baker Street & Father Calnan Road should use

Oxford Avenue as an alternative route.

During construction we kindly ask that motorist travelling on Baillou Hill Road observe traffic signs delineating the work zone
and follow the signs posted “DIVERSION”. Access will be granted to the residents of the affected streets.

We apologize for the inconvenience & delays caused.
For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@ cartellone.com.ar

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs



THE TRIBUNE





Doctors Hospital
lends a hand to

aaa



teen moms at PACE

VIEWED by many as a perfect little paradise, the Bahamas
has nevertheless acquired its share of social ills — teenage
pregnancy being one of the most significant, according to the
Bahamas PACE Foundation.

PACE (Providing Access to Continued Education) is sup-
ported by volunteer organisations and the government, with two
ministries — the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture; and the Ministry of Health and Social Development — hay-
ing responsibilities for the education, health, and social well
being of teen mothers.

According to statistics gathered by PACE, despite ongoing
efforts to reverse the trend, teen pregnancy continues to be
prevalent and the consequences are having a significant impact
on communities and the country in general.

Pregnancy in adolescents often results in serious medical
complications, and sexual relationships at a young age can put
teens at risk of life-threatening sexually transmitted diseases.

According to the PACE website, HIV/AIDS is growing
fastest among girls aged 15 to 19. Girls are more likely to be
infected than boys, and represent 69.4 per cent of reported
cases in this age group.

Even if a young mother manages to avoid these risks, getting
back on her feet can be a difficult task.

Formed by the Zonta Club of Nassau, over the years PACE
has provided assistance to more than 3,000 teenage mothers,

helping them to complete high school and have a better chance
of breaking the cycle of poverty and hopelessness.

PACE needs more support, and corporate sponsor Doctors
Hospital continued its commitment to community service with
a donation to the Foundation to assist with operating costs.

Doctors Hospital’s Chief Executive Officer Charles Sealy and
Michele Rassin, Vice President of Operations, were on hand for

the cheque presentation.

Jury selection opens in
Anna Nicole Smith case

LINDA DEUTSCH,
AP Special Correspondent

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A
woman who works with addic-
tive drugs and one who was a
fan of Anna Nicole Smith's TV
reality show were among those
cleared to fill out question-
naires during the first phase of
jury selection for the drug con-
spiracy trial of two doctors and
the late model's lawyer-
boyfriend.

Superior Court Judge Robert
Perry greeted the jury prospects
Thursday with warnings that it
was a high-profile case, and that
they may be familiar with the
life of the blonde Playboy mod-
el who died of a drug overdose
in 2007 in Florida.

The defendants are not
charged with causing Smith's
death, but are accused of ille-
gally providing her with opiates
and sedatives.

Dr. Sandeep Kapoor, Dr.
Khristine Eroshevich and Stern
have pleaded not guilty to
charges related to overpre-
scribing drugs and illegally
obtaining drugs for Smith under
pseudonyms.

"IT work for a hospital, and I
know what Oxycodone does to
people,” one prospect said,
referring to one of the drugs
involved in the case. "I've had
relatives that got hooked into
it."

The prospect also said she
watched TV coverage when
Smith died.

The judge asked whether
she could be fair in evaluating
the evidence, to which she
replied, after a long pause: "I
think I could be fair.”

He told her to fill out the
14-page questionnaire. Those
who complete the forms will
return August 2 for in-depth
questioning.

Another woman said she
had been a fan of Smith's real-
ity show. Looking across the
courtroom at Smith's lawyer-
boyfriend, defendant Howard
K. Stern, she said she did not
like him because Smith "pushed
him around, and I thought he
should have been tougher."
The judge ordered her to fill
out a questionnaire.

In an unusual procedure,
jurors are being asked to dis-
close their own medical histo-



HIGH-PROFILE CASE:
Anna Nicole Smith

ries and drugs they have used.
They are being asked if they or
anyone they know has ever
abused prescription drugs, and
whether they socialize with
their doctors.

Many of the queries on the
questionnaire distributed to
prospective jurors are specific
to expected evidence in the
case, such as whether a doctor
ever made a house call for
them, as Kapoor did for Smith;
whether they have ever
obtained a prescription with-
out visiting a doctor's office, as
Smith did; or whether they have
had a relative or friend pick up
a prescription from a pharmacy,
as Stern allegedly did for Smith.

Prospective jurors also are
asked if they believe celebrities
have a right to privacy about
their medical records.

Perry told the prospects in
court that until they know
whether they are going to be
jurors, they are forbidden to
watch or read any news relating
to the case.

The questionnaire also
included a list of 94 potential
trial witnesses, including Larry
Birkhead, who was declared the
father of Smith's daughter after
a public fight over paternity
with Stern. Smith's bodyguard
and his wife, two nannies who
worked for Smith in the
Bahamas, and the Florida med-
ical examiner who performed
the autopsy on Smith's body
are also on the list.

The trial was expected to last
three months. Opening state-
ments are scheduled for August
4.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE









GOVERNOR GENERAL SPEAKS AT FORMER BIS EMPLOYEE’ 5 FUNERAL

GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Arthur Foulkes is pictured speaking at the funeral of Deborah Kerr on Sat-
urday, July 24, at the Voice of Deliverance Disciple Centre. Ms Kerr, a former employee of Bahamas
Information Services, died on July 13 at the age of 54. Apostle Leon Wallace officiated at the ser-
vice and she was interred in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery. Derek Smith/BIS

hy BAC | Bahamas Bank

INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR THE POSITION OF

ASSISTANT RESIDENT MANAGER / SENIOR OFFICIAL II
ROLE SUMMARY

Assist with the management of the licensee's day-to-day operations in The Bahamas to
ensure objectives are accomplished in accordance with prescribed priorities and time
constraints. Ensure the business of the Bank is conducted in a controlled, efficient and
prudent manner in accordance with enacted legislation, regulatory guidelines and the
Group's policies and procedures,

APPLICANTS MUST BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE

‘In depth banking knowledge of banking products, services and aperations
“Excellent communication skills

‘(In depth knowledge of compliance, regulatory quidelines and the related reporting
environment

QUALIFICATIONS

‘Minium of 10 years experlence in financial services with 5 years at a senior level
‘Bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Finance or similar
‘Multilingual capabilities preferred - English and Spanish

CONTACT

Interested persons should submit a cover letter, resume plus copies of any
degrees and professional certifications electronically to

Igonsalves@bs.bac.net by 15-Aug-2010

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MASTER of Business Admin-
istration holders across the
Caribbean devoted an entire con-
ference to the issue last year. In
The Bahamas, business leaders
across a broad range of disciplines
and economic sectors have iden-
tified it as a grave organizational
demand.

MBA graduates with a spe-
cialty in entrepreneurship have
the potential to drive the kinds
of changes that would help give
The Bahamas a competitive
advantage.

Those with backgrounds in
either entrepreneurship and inno-
vation; leadership; or financial
decision-making can open doors
of opportunity for increased
wealth generation. These partic-
ular areas will be specialties for
future graduates of the impending
MBA programme at The College
of The Bahamas.

The programme is aimed at
educating men and women capa-
ble of adapting to constantly
changing global experiences with
the potential to drive some of the
world’s most innovative changes.

“Tf one is serious about pursu-
ing excellence in business, I
believe a degree at the masters
level is critical; a first degree is
not enough,” says Franklyn Wil-
son, Chairman of Sunshine Hold-
ings and former College Council
Chairman. “There are some
aspects about business in The
Bahamas that can be addressed
better at The College of The
Bahamas than anywhere else in
the world. The College is com-
mitted to an MBA degree which
will maintain high educational
standards and will be respected
globally.”

Businesses, leaders of industry
and executives crave that excel-
lence, especially as The Bahamas
and the world are still attempt-
ing to recover from a global eco-
nomic slowdown and are eager
to capitalise on niche areas to
improve their resiliency.

A timely, research-based
review of graduate business edu-
cation published by the Harvard
Business Press called “Rethinking
the MBA” reveals that globally,
managers and recruiters are
beginning to question traditional
business education in favour of
one that emphasizes heightened
cultural awareness, global per-
spectives, leadership skills and

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 7

COB MBA aims to strengthen the

ais) Bahamas’ competitive advantage

“I think it is very important for Bahamians
to realise that they can achieve higher
education right here at home.”



Dr. Sonya Wisdom, Director, Graduate Programmes at COB

creative and critical thinking.

This September, The College
hopes to enrol the first MBA stu-
dents in a programme uniquely
crafted to meet the prevailing
needs of the Bahamian econom-
ic environment. Offering this
degree on home soil and tailoring
it for working professionals, with
classes being held on alternate
Tuesdays and Saturdays means a
competitive cost for the pro-
gramme and stabilising staff levels
for local businesses.

“T think it is very important
for Bahamians to realise that they
can achieve higher education right
here at home,” says Dr. Sonya
Wisdom, Director, Graduate Pro-
grammes at The College. “All
around, it’s just less expensive
and the value that you get while
paying less is incredibly high.”

The COB MBA combines
practical course work, research,
experiential and team-based
learning into a 19-month pro-
gramme that also includes an off-
island intensive where students
will study at a host institution
abroad. The core study areas
include international business and
management in a cross cultural
environment with an emphasis
on the Bahamian economy.

According to Dr. Wisdom, the
programme’s home court advan-
tage is also a worthwhile benefit
for employers.

“Often, persons would like to
further their education. But if
they need to go away to school
they are not sure if their job will
be waiting for them when they
return. And in this economic cli-
mate there is no guarantee. So
this programme provides an
opportunity for persons to fur-
ther their education while guar-
anteeing employers that their
employees will be better skilled
and prepared to make good deci-
sions that will enhance the per-
formance of the company or
organisation. In many ways this
is a wonderful opportunity for
persons personally and profes-
sionally,” she says.

Vaughn Roberts, AA 791,

Managing Director, Downtown
Nassau Partnership (DNP) is con-
vinced of the strength of The Col-
lege’s academic programmes and
by extension the vast potential of
its newest academic offering — the
MBA.

“The MBA degree challenges
you in areas of critical thinking,
analysis, leadership and business
ethics,” he says. “Given the
strength of The College’s busi-
ness education programmes, I am
certain that students will devel-
op all the tools necessary for suc-
cess.”

In a highly competitive envi-
ronment, there are numerous
benefits to obtaining an MBA
including increasing business
knowledge and managerial exper-
tise and career and academic
advancement. The College’s
graduate business programme
was developed following exten-
sive research an input from orga-
nizations and businesses across
various economic sectors in order
to address The Bahamas’ partic-
ular needs.

“The COB MBA programme
is unique because it is crafted
specifically for the needs of indus-
try in our country and as you look
across the global landscape, lead-
ership; entrepreneurship and
innovation and financial decision-
making are especially important,”
notes Mrs. Remelda Moxey, Act-
ing Dean of the Faculty of Busi-
ness at The College of The
Bahamas. “If you can’t lead, you
will not go to the next level. If
you are not strategic in terms of
management, then you will not
move up within the organization.
These skills will also assist in mas-
tering areas of finance, opera-
tions, management and market-
ing. You will become a valuable
asset.”

With The College’s mission of
supporting national development
in all its forms and a commitment
to driving ingenuity through a
pool of highly skilled human cap-
ital, the possibilities are endless.

The deadline to apply for the
programme is July 30th.

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P.0. Box $S-5592, Nassau, The Bahamas

Phone: (242) 324-6794 © Fax: (242) 324-7554

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Man charged with two murders

Harl Taylor
retrial verdict

FROM page one

sensible jurors who were lis-
tening to the case and who ;
were not motivated by senti- :

ments, but the hard cold facts,

dealing with the evidence :
based on what was presented :
in court and not what they :
may have heard on the out- :
side. The system does work :
and that’s really what :

counts.”

Mr Ducille noted that the :
jurors had to consider tech- }
nical evidence from DNA :
experts and that the case was :
substantially based on cir- :
cumstantial evidence. “It was :
very important that the jury :
listen to the facts and relate :

it,” said Mr Ducille.

“My son has been vindi- }
cated and rightfully so. I think :
we can now pick up the :
pieces and move on with our :
lives,” Troy McNeil told :
reporters yesterday. When :
asked what his son’s future :

plans are, Mr McNeil said,

“My son is definitely going :
to go to university. It won’t :
be in the United States obvi- :
ously until we get that situa- :
tion resolved but either Cana-

da or England.

“He wants to pursue a :
degree in medicine and I will :
encourage and stick by him :
110 per cent in achieving that. :
He has lost three years of his :
life unnecessarily and I will :
stick by him to ensure that :
he can move on comfortably :
with his life,” Mr McNeil said. :

Taylor’s mother, Beverly :
Taylor, declined to comment :
after the verdict was handed :
down yesterday. Mr McNeil :
said that he has no problems :
with Ms Taylor, noting that :
she has been like a mother :
to him and he has been likea :

son to her over the years.

“Her grieving Harl’s loss is:
just the same as myself. Harl :
and I were very close. We :
were business partners for :
almost ten years, he was a }
true friend to me. I feel as :
well, but get the right per- :

son,” Mr McNeil said.

Deputy Director of Public
Franklyn :
Williams and Basil Cumber- :

Prosecutions

batch prosecuted the case,

which was heard before

senior Justice Jon Isaacs.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A MAN was arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on two murder charges
as well as several armed robbery and car
theft charges.

Vinson Ariste, 20, of Goggle Eye
Road, alias “Spy” was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane yesterday, charged with
the murders of Daniachew Miller, 29,
and Noel Roach, 35. Roach of Walnut
Street became the country’s 51st mur-
der victim after being shot multiple times
while sitting in a vehicle in Pinewood
Gardens on the morning of Friday, July
16.

According to initial reports, Roach,
was sitting in a car on Cascarilla Street
with another man around 12.50 am when
two men pulled up in another car, got out
and shot at the pair. Roach was hit mul-
tiple times about the body. He was tak-
en to hospital where he later died from
his injuries. The second man in the vehi-
cle was unharmed.

Miller, the country’s 52nd murder vic-

tim, was found dead with gunshot
wounds to the chest in the area of Abun-
dant Life Road. According to reports,
around 12.45am the Millennium Gar-
dens resident was walking to his car after
leaving a party in the area of Abundant
Life Road when he was approached by
the occupants of a heavily tinted gold-
coloured Honda Inspire. According to
reports, one of the men got out of the car
armed with a high powered weapon and
opened fire on Miller. The police chased
the suspects, but they managed to escape
after their car crashed on East Street,
south of Robinson Road.

Ariste was not required to enter a plea
to the murder charges yesterday. The
cases were adjourned to August 6 and
transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street.
Ariste was also arraigned on 14 counts of
armed robbery. It is alleged that Ariste,
while armed with a handgun and a rifle,
robbed two phone card vendors of hun-
dreds of dollars in phone cards, three
gas stations of a total of $12,000 in cash
and several other individuals of cash,
jewellery, cellular phones and other per-
sonal effects. He was also arraigned on
one count of attempted armed robbery.

Police have also charged Ariste with two
counts of possession of a firearm with
intent to endanger the lives of two police
officers. He was also charged with pos-
session of a prohibited AK 47 automat-
ic rifle; 25 live rounds of 7.62mm ammu-
nition and one live round of 9mm ammu-
nition. Ariste was not required to enter a
plea to the charges. The cases were
adjourned to August 13 and transferred
to Court 6, Parliament Street.

Ariste was also arraigned on 17 counts
of stealing and receiving. It is alleged
that Ariste stole cars - mostly of the
Honda make — between April and July
of this year. He pleaded not guilty to
the stealing and receiving charges. Aris-
te’s attorney Romona Farquharson told
the court that her client alleged that he
was beaten by police officers while at
the Central Detective Unit. She asked
the magistrate to take note of the visible
bruises to her client’s forehead and cheek
as well as his right eye which was swollen
shut. She pointed out that his bottom
lip was also bruised and swollen. Accord-
ing to Ms Farquharson her client alleged
that officers beat him and stomped on his
chest. She told the court that her client



MURDER CHARGES: Vinson Ariste

claimed that he was spanked on the but-
tocks with a pipe and cutlass. She said
that Ariste claimed that a plastic bag
was also placed over his head and he
passed out. Chief Magistrate Gomez
ordered that Ariste be taken to see a
doctor yesterday. He was also ordered to
be remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison
until the completion of his preliminary
inquiries.

FROM page one

time taken to assess the seri-
ousness of the situation,"
according to a portion of the
report's findings.

The document, prepared by
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) Occupational
Safety and Health Expert
Jacques Obadia, found several
shortcomings in the port's com-
munication systems, emergency
response equipment was par-
tially deficient and that all nec-
essary safety training was not
carried out.

However the report added,
that due to the brevity of the
tornado, these “shortcomings
did not have an significant
impact on the outcome.”

One finding was that after
the twister ripped through the
port around 11.17am, the com-
pany ambulance had a flat tyre
when it arrived on the quay and
"could not be used.” The report
noted however that a sufficient
number of external ambulances
arrived quickly on site.

The ILO expert also said he
has not been able to conclu-
sively determine if all of the
FCP's cranes had been pinned
down on that fateful day, in
keeping with prescribed safety
procedures.

Work in bad weather

"With the exception of Cl
and C2... it is probable that
none of the cranes at issue had
been pinned down. Several rea-
sons related to convenience and
required efficiently of opera-
tions, as well as lack of aware-
ness of the seriousness of the
weather conditions may not
have been adhered to.”

But the report added that
due to the unpredictability of
tornadoes "it is impossible to
determine whether the out-
come of the incident would
have been more or less severe
in terms of injuries to employ-
ees and property damage if all
or at least cranes C8 and C10
had been pinned down."

The report also noted the
absence of an on-site weather
monitoring system at the FCP
during the tornado which
"might have helped on detect-
ing an incoming storm system
but not necessarily its capacity
to generate tornadoes."

The absence of an efficient
system to detect and relay
appropriate information to the
FCP workers about relevant
weather conditions was also
called into question by the con-
sultant.

eur TIS

PARADISE ISLAND.

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"This is regrettable and
should be remedied," said the
report. Still, due to the brief
and unpredictable nature of
tornadoes, it is improbable that
the existence of a more efficient
weather relaying system could
have prevented the deaths of
the employees, the document
added.

It was also found that safety
rules at the port were not
designed for brief and rapid
weather events like tornadoes
and are set up to deal with hur-
ricanes and other storms that
build slowly.

The consultant recommend-
ed that government strengthen
the full implementation of the
Health and Safety at Work Act,
2002, facilitated by the devel-
opment of regulations, codes
of practice and technical stan-
dards.

While the report noted that a
weather monitoring system was
installed at the FCP shortly
after the tornado hit, the con-
sultant suggested the port
improve its communication
with the Department of Mete-
orology, among other recom-
mendations.

The invitation by the gov-










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ernment for the ILO to con-
duct an inquiry came after
some FCP workers alleged that
safety protocols were not fol-
lowed at the port in the run up
to and during the devastating
tornado strike that killed Cleve-
land Lowe, Michael Young and

Shawn Saunders, and injured
four others.

Some workers and opposi-
tion MPs called for investiga-
tions into the incident and for
safety measures to be examined
at the container port.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

Appeal is filed

FROM page one

the case.

As to who should be held responsible for the outstanding fees
incurred on behalf of the party, Mr Gomez said that responsi-
bility should fall on the PLP trustees named in the case (Tom
Basden, Valentine Grimes, and Henry Storr).

ACT Productions alleges in its case that they were con-
tracted by the PLP to provide sound equipment and other ser-
vices for various rallies for a three-week period from April
10, 2007, to May 2, 2007. The agreement was reportedly con-
firmed by letter dated April 17, with ACT Production sub-
mitting invoices for $212,859.84. Payment of $178,224.08 was

made on this bill.

The company alleges that the rented equipment was delivered
to Tropical Brokerage Ltd on May 3, 2007, to be shipped to
Miami but was not released due to outstanding sums owed by
the PLP. Tropical allegedly retained ACT’s equipment for
three weeks, for which ACT claims they suffered losses of
$180,000. The company is therefore seeking the $180,000
amount, plus the $34,635.76 and any outstanding interest on the

amounts owed.

Attorneys Sharon Wilson and Raynard Rigby are reported-
ly looking into the matter on behalf of the PLP.

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

shop approach to business
licensing.

As a result, he said business
licensing will become “easier,
faster and more efficient.”

“It is proposed that the new
Business Licence Act will take
effect on January 1, 2011, to
align its entry into force with
the start of the next annual
licensing cycle. In the meantime,
officials will be working to fur-
ther streamline application pro-
cedures to ensure that the grant-
ing of prior approvals by other
regulatory agencies is clear-cut
and as seamless as possible.
They will also be meeting with
representatives of the Chamber
of Commerce and the business
community to review and
explain the new licensing
requirements and application
procedures,” Mr Ingraham
explained.

Along with a number of oth-
er changes, businesses will no
longer be required to apply for
the registration of business
names with the Registrar Gen-
eral as this task will be taken
care of jointly by the Ministry
of Finance and the Business
Licence office. As such, Mr
Ingraham said, the fee of $150
for the registration of business
names will therefore be elimi-
nated. In addition, the Prime
Minister said that waiting inor-
dinate and uncertain amounts
of time for the processing and
approval of an application to
start up a new business will be
“a thing of the past.”



PM outlines

“The calculation of business
licence fees is presently complex
and cumbersome. The fee varies
depending on the size of the
business, with six different cate-
gories, namely petty, very small,
small, medium, large or very
large. The fee also depends on
the profitability of the enter-
prise, with four different cate-
gories of profit, namely low,
medium, high and very high.
Further complicating calcula-
tions is the fact that three dif-
ferent rates of fee are applied: a
half of one per cent of turnover,
one per cent of turnover and
one and a half per cent of
turnover. And, as if that were
not complex enough, profitabil-
ity is not only calculated by
applying a list of allowable costs
to produce turnover but that list
is different depending on which
industry a business finds itself
in.

“One can only imagine the
inequities and arbitrariness
engendered by such a convolut-
ed calculation of fees, not to
mention the opportunities for
impropriety. For example, ser-
vice and repair entities may
deduct direct labour and Nation-
al Insurance costs in calculating
profitability but retail and
wholesale merchandisers may
not. Manufacturers may deduct
depreciation of production plant
but restaurants and proprietary
clubs may not. Under the new
Business Licence Bill, the tax
calculation will be significantly
simpler and considerably less

arbitrary and thereby less subject
to manipulation,” he said.

As such, the new Bill will
introduce three general tax rates
based on the turnover of a busi-
ness. These will be, $100 per
annum where a business has a
turnover not exceeding $50,000;
0.5 per cent of the turnover for
businesses with turnover exceed-
ing $50,000 per annum but not
exceeding $500,000 per annum;
and 0.75 per cent of turnover for
businesses with turnover exceed-
ing $500,000 per annum.

Additionally, a special rate of
one half of one per cent of
turnover will apply for business-
es in the following sectors: agri-
culture and animal hus-
bandry/mixed farming;
fishing/fish farms; and
food/meat/fruit processing. Also
a tax rate of one per cent of
turnover will apply to service
businesses in relation to the fol-
lowing professions: accountants,
doctors, lawyers, architects, engi-
neers and other similar or like
professions, Mr Ingraham said.

“A separate and simpler tax
schedule is proposed for gaso-
line stations, again based on total
revenues. This schedule replaces
a complex fee calculation based
on business size and profitability.
New businesses will continue to
pay an annual business licence
tax of only $100. And, with the
elimination of the need for shop,
liquor and music and dancing
licenses, businesses involved in
these areas will now only pay for
the annual business licence and
separate and additional fees will
no longer be required.

“This will eliminate the need

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to pay a bevy of small “nui-
sance” fees such as, for exam-
ple, $1.00 for a shop licence; $100
for a wholesale liquor licence;
and $200 for a restaurant liquor
licence.”

Businesses in the agricultur-
al, animal husbandry and mixed
farming sector will see a small
reduction in aggregate taxes as
they go from an effective tax rate
of roughly 0.58 per cent to 0.5
per cent. The tax rate for fishing
and fish farms will go from an
effective rate of roughly 0.47 per
cent to 0.5 per cent. For food,
meat and fruit processing, the
tax rate will remain unchanged
at 0.5 per cent.

“Professional Services in
aggregate will face an unchanged
tax rate of one per cent. Busi-
nesses with turnover over
$50,000 per annum but not
exceeding $500,000 will face a
tax rate essentially unchanged
at 0.5 per cent. Finally, for firms
with turnover greater than
$500,000 per annum, the busi-
ness licence tax rate will go up
from an effective rate of 0.68 per
cent to 0.75 per cent.

“As a means of supporting
and encouraging the smaller
firms in the Bahamian economy
during these difficult economic
times, the Government
announced in the 2010/11 Bud-

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

get Communication that it was
providing a two-year holiday
from the payment of business
licence tax for small and medium

FROM page one

this issue coming before the House of Assem-
bly as he made a similar presentation before
Parliament’s Select Committee on Crown

Land in November 2009.

At the time, Mr Pinder was not the Member
of Parliament for Elizabeth, but gave a detailed
testimony before the Select Committee. Using
this instance to dissuade the naysayers who
believe that nothing can be accomplished out-
side of the powers of the government, Mr Pin-
der said the discussion around this new Bill
shows that with proper research and “proper
debate” any goal can be accomplished.

size businesses with turnover
under $250,000. This holiday
extends over the 2010 and 2011
business licence years.”



SPECIAL PRIDE:
Ron Pinder

“Certainly many people say that the Oppo-
sition party cannot accomplish anything in Parliament. But this cer-
tainly shows otherwise. So I am happy for many of our Family
Islanders who have been held back by this issue and who now can
have a future in the economic advancement of our country.

“TI do have one concern, and I raised this concern when the
Forestry Bill was debated, that when we legislate land reform,
and the Forestry Bill dealt with designating some commonage
land, I made the point at the time that we should be considering all
applicable legislation on land reform at the same time.

“This piecemeal type of debate is dangerous. I had hoped that
my point had gotten across. I would have liked the commonage bill
being debated at the same time as generation property, but I sup-
port the legislation of commonage and generation land,” Mr Pin-

der said.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

Ss

& BILLING CHANGES



0-200 units per month

Remaining units

All units per month

UNIT CHARGE

201-800 units per month

Minimum monthly charge

Minimum monthly charge

Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for allconsumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th:

The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

Le Vidias

RESIDENTIAL
10.95 cents per unit
11.95 cents per unit
14.95 cents per unit
$5.00

COMMERCIAL

15.00 cents per unit
$10.00

GENERAL SERVICE

MONTHLY BILLS

KVA CHARGE



Demand charge per month
0-900,000 units per month
Remaining units per month
Minimum monthly charge

$11.36 per KVA
8.70 cents per unit
6.20 cents per unit
$ 568.00

TEMPORARY SUPPLIES

16.38 cents per unit

$20.00 connection fee

$10.00 per month Meter Rental

(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel)

SPECIAL SERVICES

Special Reading, Check Reading, Fuse

Replacement

Meter Test — Minimum charge

Visit with intent to disconnect

Residential Consumer
Commercial Consumer

Reconnection Fee
Returned Cheque Fee

$5.00

$10.00

$10.00
$15.00
$20.00
$15.00

Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Police identify woman found dead in triplex unit



POLICE have released the identity death was classified as "sudden," how- in South Beach.

of the woman found unresponsive ata ever, an autopsy will be conducted to Storr was pulled from waters near }
triplex unit on Dunmore Avenue last determine the official cause of death. the Cay, which is a few miles away :
week. A man, who drowned at Black- from New Providence, Sunday after- :

She is 32-year-old Sharmine beard's Cay around 2.50 pm Sunday, noon and taken to hospital in New :

Williamson of Dunmore Avenue. has been identified as Christopher Providence where he was pronounced :
Last week police said Willamson's Brunell Storr, 49, of Valencia Drive dead. i

FAMILY GUARDIAN =sss

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED ~—=3——

,



POLICE COMMISSIONER Ellison Greenslade speaks yesterday.

Almost 6,000 warrants issued

Responding to concerns on
FROM page one progress in high-risk commu-



nities, he said: “There isn’t
Greenslade commended the just one hot spot. All over
police force for the “signifi- New Providence you have
cant number” of arrests in crime being committed. If
connection with murder cases you're not able to make the
executed this year. He con- intervention, meaning take
firmed police have made an that person into custody, it
excess of 40 arrests concern- could spread to the whole
ing persons believed to be island. It’s not just isolated to

responsible for the country’s one little area and by saying if

53 murders. . you fix this the problem is
Mr Greenslade said: golyed.”

“What you have is something He advised that while

that is staring you inthe face- there are “pockets of social

young adults, predominantly decay” where crime may be
Bahamian males, committing committed more frequently,

[ leave your children financially secure crimes, predominantly crimi- police have to be cognizant

nal on criminal and in some of the rights of residents.

[1 provide a safety net for your loved ones cases there are innocent peo- “Mr Greenslade added:
CS ensure a bright future for your family tee ae

and lose their lives or are seri- successes that we have today,

[| f th li ously injured, . if it were not for increased
a 0 e a ove These are our relatives patrol initiatives and the
and friends — as I've said deployment of new cars.”
before — they live right here in Over the weekend, police
New Providence, most of — issued three wanted bulletins
them, on an island 21 by sev- for men suspected in connec-
en. We know as a people, who tion with murder, armed rob-
these people are, they livein bery and causing harm. In
our communities, they livein addition to Carlos “Skulla”
our homes. That can't be Colebrooke, Erel Erilio
overwhelming that’s simply Ariste, and Mark Kenson
an issue of something wrong McKenzie, police are also
that has occurred, its contrary searching for Nathaniel “Nat”
to law and all law-abiding cit- Miller, age 22. Miller’s last
izens need to play arole in known residence was Lee

making sure we reclaim our Street, Nassau Village.
A SUBSIDIARY OF country.” Anyone with information

FA MGU ARD Mr Greenslade attributed on the whereabouts of these

Ca | | us toda at = | the recent crime break- — suspects or any ongoing crim-
CORPORATION LIMITE throughs to the dedication inal investigation is asked to

and diligence of police offi- call the police emergency

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbahama: cers and the increased patrol room at 919 or Crime Stop-
i initiative. pers at 328-TIPS.





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REGULATIONS: Dion Foulkes.

Worker
safety:
Balance
right’

* Government aiming
to get ‘three sets of
regulations’ to give teeth
to Health and Safety at
Work Act tabled in
Parliament ‘very soon’

* Act to ensure workplace
salety passed in 2002,
but not properly
implemented for eight
years due to absence
of standards, regulations
and codes of practice
* Minister says reforms
protect Bahamian workers
without burdening business

¢

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government yesterday
said it had struck “the right bal-
ance” over proposed regula-
tions and codes of practice it
plans to table in Parliament to
give effect to the Health and
Safety at Work Act 2002, after
the report into the three torna-
do-induced deaths at the
Freeport Container Port point-
ed out that this legislation had
not been “fully implemented”.

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour and social services, con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
three sets of regulations
designed to ‘give teeth’ to the
Health and Safety at Work Act
had now been drafted, and rec-
ommendations on them
received from the Attorney
General’s Office.

He explained that the regu-
lations would now be returned
to the committee, chaired by
the Bahamas Employers Con-
federation’s (BECon) Pauline
Petty, which had originally
drafted them for their sign-off.
Once this happened, the regu-
lations would be presented to
the Government and tabled in
Parliament.

Although unable to give a

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE

—_



TU Es DAY.

ine

We UR Eee Zee

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



2010

Auto worker loss fear
despite 4% sales rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



ahamian new car dealers
may have to reducinbg
staffing levels or consolidate
through mergers if they are
to survive until the market
turns, an industry executive said yester-
day, even though there were “positive
signs” in the form of a 4.48 per cent second
quarter sales increase year-over-year.

The Bahamas Motor Dealers Associa-
tion (BMDA), in data submitted to Tri-
bune Business yesterday by Friendly Ford
sales manager and past association presi-
dent, Andrew Barr, said that while the
2010 second quarter sales rise was posi-
tive, year-over-year comparisons with 2009
showed that first half sales this year were
still 1.89 per cent down on the prior period
- one of the weakest sales years on record.

Chris Leandre, general manager for
sales at Executive Motors and Quality
Auto, said that while there were some pos-
itive indicators for the BMDA’s members
to grasp on to, such as signs that the com-
mercial banks were becoming slightly
“more aggressive” in lending activity, the
auto industry was still facing significant
challenges.

“Even though there are some positive
signs here and there, the reality for some of
the dealerships is that they now have to
either trim down in terms of head count, or
some of the smaller dealerships will have
to consolidate as a survival technique,”
Mr Leandre told Tribune Business.

“The impact of the duty increases and

RoyalFidelity to
yA a

the slowdown in sales, even though we’ve
seen increased sales in June, that was one
of the worst years ever.

“Literally to survive, and make it until
the market turns, they will have to look at
trimming head count. That’s a bit of real-
ity that, unfortunately, some businesses
will have to look at right now.”

Mr Leandre agreed that the 2010 second
quarter sales boost could have been at
least partly generated by consumers rush-
ing to buy before the full impact of the
2010-2011 Budget duty increases was felt,
and auto prices raised as a result.

“A lot of people realised that did affect
vehicles on the ground, and a few people
took advantage of that,” he added.

“One customer put a deposit on half
the value of a new vehicle, realising new
models coming in would be subject to new
duty rates.”

Mr Leandre also suggested that the gen-
erous lending rates extended by some
Bahamas-based commercial banks, in pro-
motions subsequent to the April Car
Show, when coupled with the event itself
could also have been responsible for the
modest 2010 second quarter sales improve-
ment.

“There is some optimism out there, and
the banks are trying to be as supportive as
they can,” he added, suggesting that
Bahamian commercial institutions were
being “more aggressive, a little more com-
petitive and trying to be a little more felx-
ible right now”.

And Mr Leandre said that despite the
gloom still enveloping much of the econ-
omy and Bahamian auto industry, his com-

panies were still seeing bright spots, being
“back-ordered” for the remainder of 2010
on the Tucson model, due to demand out-
stripping supply.

“For those who want to stand out from
the crowd, this is kind of the time to be
first in line for these products,” Mr Lean-
dre said, pointing to new model ranges
scheduled to be imported into the
Bahamas by the likes of Friendly Ford
and rival dealerships.

He added that the Hyundai brand,
which Quality distributes, had “jumped a
few points” in market share both here in
the Bahamas and globally.

Yet Executive and Quality, along with
other dealerships, were “still being very
conservative, very cautious” as a turn-
around in the Bahamian market for new
car sales was not anticipated until the mid-
dle or latter part of 2011.

“By mid to late next year, we should
see some signs of recovery. We have to
see what the banks say,” Mr Leandre said.

In its statement, the BMDA said: “The
Bahamas Motor Dealers Association is
reporting a 4.48 per cent increase in sales
for the quarter ending June 30, 2010, but
sales remain down 1.89 per cent over the
six months from January | through June
30, 2010, in comparison to 2009.

“BMDA member firms remain cau-
tiously optimistic and hopeful that sales
will remain at 2009 levels. Recent activity
with the banks to promote car and home
shows indicate that there is a possibility the
credit market is loosening, so hopefully
more potential clients will have access to
loans.”

Employers chief: Workers must get
rights to escape from ‘harm’s way’



new fund by
Cea TH

“Merchant bank says
still getting redemption
requests for flagship
Bahamian market fund,
but rate has slowed, and
suspects some investors
switching capital to
better international
prospects
* Eyes end-September or
end-December for new
international sub-fund



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALFidelity Mer-
chant Bank & Trust yester-
day said it would “have a
shot” at launching another
foreign-currency denomi-
nated, international mutual
fund later this year, at either
end-September or end-
December, its president
telling Tribune Business
that investors seemed to be
switching monies from local
mutual funds to those that
could access global markets.

SEE page 3B







Sothebys

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN workers must
have the right to remove them-
selves from “harm’s way” in the
workplace and not suffer con-
sequences that threaten their
employment, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
(BECon) president said yester-
day, something employees cur-
rently enjoy no protection on.

Brian Nutt, speaking to Tri-
bune Business in the wake of
the report on the Freeport Con-
tainer Port tornado incident
being released, said he agreed
with the recommendations

made by its author on reform-
ing Bahamian occupational
health and safety laws, includ-
ing the provision of statutory
protection for workers wanti-
ng to remove themselves from
life-threatening workplace sit-
uations.

The report by Jacques Oba-
dia, a former International
Labour Organisation (ILO)
executive, said the Bahamas
needed to amend the Health
and Safety at Work Act 2002 -
its main workplace safety
statute - “in a number of areas”
to bring it into line with key
ILO conventions on the issue.

A key reform, the report

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

said, was to address “the pro-
tection of workers removing
themselves from a work situa-
tion presenting an imminent
danger to their life or health”.

Backing this recommenda-
tion, Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business: “I guess right now
that it would be the employer
who would determine whether
it’s a life or death situation, and
it could be that someone is
dealt with unjustly.

“There has to be a right for
an individual to get themselves
out of harm’s way.”

Mr Nutt confirmed to Tri-

SEE page 3B

ROYAL FIDELITY

UU a ag
RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Entrepreneur
hits at venture
fund takeover

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

JUST six weeks old, Marcy’s
Kitchen, the only business built
so far this year through the
Government-sponsored ven-
ture capital fund, has seen its
chief executive and brainchild
fired, its whole staff let go and
had its name changed, its for-
mer chief telling Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday he was chased
out by those who helped him
to realise his dream.

Marcellus Miller, Marcy’s
former chief executive, said the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund and its administra-
tors, Baker Tilly Gomez, which
had taken an 80 per cent equity
stake in the business, voted him
out last month, according to
him, without due cause.

He said the eatery, located
in the domestic departure
lounge at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA),
wasn’t expected by the Fund to
gross $700 per day. However,
Mr Miller began to see net
profits of $2,300 to $2,700 per
day shortly before he saw his
dream taken from him.

Mr Miller said he was a part
of the three-man Board of
Directors that voted him out of
his company, leaving him only
with a 20 per cent equity stake

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

Old Fort Bay

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

*- |
4 -

Sure you'll win the Lotto!
Now what's Plan B?

We can get you there. Royal Fidelity.

ISLANDS AT OLD FORT BAY

#5586 SAPODILLA Colonial style 3 bed 3.5 bath beautifully appointed home sits
ona 14,974 square foot canalfront lot in this prestigious gated community. 2,700
square feet of interior space, 12 foot ceilings, coral stone floors and an open plan
kitchen concept with breakfast nook and lounge area opening out to a large covered
patio and pool. Boat dock and gorgeous views of the canal. US$2,500,000.
Offered exclusively by Mark.Hussey@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.9193 BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
St. Michael:

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

246.435.1955

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | The Bahamas MLS | Hube-


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 3B





Commission inspections
increase by almost 50%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE SECURITIES Com-
mission increased its on-site

inspections by license type by
almost 50 per cent last year
compared to 2008, due to
increased personnel and proce-
dural improvements in the
department, according to the

Entrepreneur hits at

venture fund takeover



FROM page 1B

and nothing else.

He claimed, though, that the venture capital fund’s administra-
tors had asked there to be formed a five-member Board of Direc-
tors, where two would have been appointed by Mr Miller himself.
The other two board members were the two fund administrators,
one of whom was chief administrator, Jerome Gomez.

Mr Gomez said yesterday that the $1 million per year govern-
ment-sponsored fund often retains a share in the businesses they
give start-up capital to in order to protect the investment.

Addressing a Nassau Institute seminar last week, Mr Gomez
appeared to refer to Marcy’s. Giving an insight into the difficulties
encountered by the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund, Mr
Gomez said that in one case it had to vote the original entrepreneur
off the company's Board and remove him from management con-
trol, since he was acting contrary to all agreements put in place.

"We had to do it recently with an equity project we had invest-
ed in, as the entrepreneur was doing things contrary to agree-
ments," Mr Gomez said. "We had to convene a Board meeting, and
voted him out. He just has an equity investment in it.”

Mr Gomez further indicated that the venture capital fund only
invested in Marcy’s because of its three-year contract to manage a

restaurant at LPIA.

He said many of the businesses previously started through the
veneture capital fund should not have been funded, and he added
that the fund had lost an estimated 50 per cent of its $4 million val-
ue since it was incorporated five years ago.

The Fund often takes control of businesses that seem to be fail-
ing in an attempt to recoup the loan from the fund.

However, Mr Miller declares that in his six weeks open, Marcy’s
proved its potential for success and he is baffled as to why the fund
would eject him and change the business’s name.

Mr Gomez would not say if Marcy’s, now Island Cafe, was now
owned by the fund. Meanwhile, Mr Miller no longer has anything
to do with the day to day running of the business.

Mr Gomez declined to comment further on the matter, stating
only that he would draft a response to any article published in the

media.

Employers chief:
Workers must get
rights to escape
from ‘harm’s way’

FROM page 1B

bune Business that the Health
and Safety at Work Act had
effectively been a toothless
piece of legislation during the
eight years since it had been
passed in 2002, as it had lacked
the standards, codes of practice
and regulations to give it
enforcement teeth.

This was confirmed by the
Freeport Container Port report,
which hinted that this state of
affairs could potentially have
left Bahamian workers danger-
ously exposed.

“The Act has been in force
since 2002, but without the reg-
ulations and codes of practice,
nobody knows what they are
supposed to do,” Mr Nutt said.
“Other than making people
more aware of health and safe-
ty, and the fact the Act does
require any business with more
than 20 employees to form a
Health and Safety Committee,
there’s nothing else in the Act.
The Act provides for these
committees, but it’s the regu-
lations and codes of practice
that give them an agenda as to
what meetings should be like.

“All the Act is is a frame-
work. It’s similar to the Nation-
al Health Insurance Act passed
by the PLP. That’s enacted;
that’s a law, but no regulations
under it, so there’s nothing hap-
pening with it.”

Mr Nutt said that while he
had not been on the commit-
tee, formed from trade union,
government and employer rep-
resentatives, that had been
asked by the second Ingraham
administration to draft the
Act’s regulations, he knew it
had “put a lot of work into it”
and passed its draft on to the
Government, where it had been
“for some time”.

The BECon president added
that the regulations’ drafting
had also been interrupted by
the 2002 change of government,
the Health and Safety at Work
Act being one of three Bills
passed into statute by the first
FNM government just prior to
that year’s general election.

“The PLP came into power
and did not do anything to put
in regulations and codes of
practice,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business, adding that the FNM
had to pick up the thread once
it returned to power in 2007.

The BECon chief questioned
whether the “price tag” that
would come from enforcing the
Health and Safety at Work Act
may had caused the Govern-
ment to hesitate, given the state
of the Bahamian economy and
fears about imposing addition-
al costs on business, and sug-
gested the administration could
have “stripped it down a bit to
get something out there”.

Mr Nutt said that when the
first Ingraham administration
passed the Health and Safety
at Work Act, along with the
Employment Act and Mini-
mum Wage Act, it had viewed
this legislation as bringing the
Bahamas into compliance with
the ILO’s “core conventions”.

Yet the Freeport Container
Port report confirms that the
Bahamas is still not in compli-
ance with all these conventions,
as it urges this nation to “initi-
ate the formal process leading
to the ratification of the main
ILO occupational health and
safety standards”.

These include the ILO’s
Convention 155 of 1981, and its
Protocol 2002 relating to the
recording and notification of
occupational accidents and dis-
eases.

CURT A 1)

regulator’s 2009 annual report.

Chairman Philip Stubbs said
the global fianancial crisis and
ensuing recession played a piv-
otal role in increasing the level
of oversight of licencees, and
sparked changes in the Securi-
ties Commission’s own process-
es. “These events continued to
challenge regulators, and their
roles and functions came under
increased scrutiny,” said Mr
Stubbs.

The Commission inspected
23 entities by type last year,
compared to 14 in 2008. There
were 20 routine examinations
made last year, three joint
inspections with the Central
Bank of the Bahamas and no
inspections for cause.

Last year, seven major
enforcement matters were
addressed by the Securities

RoyalFidelity to ‘have shot’

FROM page 1B

Speaking after the BISX-list-
ing of RoyalFidelity’s $5 mil-
lion international commodities
sub-fund, Michael Anderson
said: “We’re looking potential-
ly at bringing out another one
at the end of September, or
end-December.

“Our allocation comes
through on the quarter, so we
have to look at the end of Sep-
tember or the end of Decem-
ber. Itv’ll probably be Decem-
ber. Depending on how the
markets look, we’ll have a shot
at it. Let’s look at how the mar-
kets lie, and what the opportu-
nities are, and let’s see if we
can put something together.
When things go well or badly, it
creates opportunities.”

The end-September or end-
December timeline is deter-
mined because RoyalFidelity
will only receive its quarterly
$2 million-plus allocation of for-
eign currency from the Central
Bank of the Bahamas at quar-
ter-end.

52wk-Low

Securit y
AML Foods Limited

Commission and were trans-
ferred to its Office of Legal
Counsel. Three of those mat-
ters were addressed by litiga-
tion, three through administra-
tive action and one transferred
to the Attorney General’s
office for criminal prosecution.

At the end of 2009, 16 out of
25 investigations carried over
from previous years were
closed. Of the 16 cases, two
were forwarded to the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and two
aided in international matters,
while nine carried over into
2010.

Finanacial institutions - espe-
cially offshore centres - and
their regulators faced intense
scrutiny last year by the Group
of 20 Countries (G20) and the
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development,

Mr Anderson said RoyalFi-
delity, which now has three
international sub-funds and
their master fund, had seen
“good interest” from Bahamian
investors in the equities sub-
fund, which had enjoyed “an
excellent last year” and contin-
ued its performance until end-
2010 first quarter, prior to the
last quarter’s stock market dip.

Despite the 2010 second
quarter blip, Mr Anderson said:
“International equities markets
have fairly good potential for
Bahamians to invest in, and we
have fairly good subscriptions
coming in from Bahamians for
the international equities sub-
fund.”

In contrast, RoyalFidelity’s
main mutual fund targeted at
the domestic Bahamian mar-
ket, the RoyalFidelity Growth
and Income fund, “continues
to see redemptions, but not at
previous levels.

“T think there may be peo-
ple taking money out of the
local market and putting it into
the international market,” Mr

and made several policy
changes and procedural amend-
ments.

Forces

Mr Stubbs said that due to
the forces of the OECD and
their wish to do away with bank
secrecy and tax havens, the via-
bility of the Bahamas finaicial
sector was for a moment
swathed in a veil of discomfort
as it was placed on a ‘grey list’.

“The Bahamas is tied to the
global economy, and while the
initial impact of the crisis was
felt primarily throught the
reduction in revenue from the
tourism and financial services
sector, there was growing dis-
quiet about the viability and
competitiveness of our finan-
cial services sector,” Mr Stubbs

said.

“In addition, concerns were
raised regarding the survival of
entities whose securities are
traded in our local markets.

“At the international level,
increased focus continued to be
directed toward offshore finan-
cial centres with their activities
being subjected to greater glob-
al regulation.”

According to the report, the
Securities Commission’s new
legislative and policy-related
developments included amend-
ments to the Investment Funds
Act 2003, the template for
SMART Fund Model 006, the
Investment Funds (SMART
Fund) Rules, and the Guidlines
for Licensees/Registrants on
the Prevention of Money Laun-
dering and Countering the
Financing of Terrorism.

at new fund by year’s end

Anderson told Tribune Busi-
ness, indicating that Bahamian
institutional and retail investors
were switching to global oppor-
tunities because they were per-
ceived as holding greater return
potential than the domestic
equities market.

“It’s growing quite nicely this
year, and we will have a much
larger fund by the end of this
year,” Mr Anderson added of
RoyalFidelity’s international
equities sub-fund. “The local
market is not perceived to have
much potential and people are
recognising it, moving across
[to the international fund],
which is what it is there for.”

Meanwhile, the RoyalFideli-
ty president conceded that its
$4.7 million TIGRS 3 interna-
tional investment fund, the lat-
est in the family that is focused
on gold, copper and nickel com-
modities markets, had not
enjoyed a good first quarter due
to the 2010 second quarter
retreat in global equities mar-
kets as doubts over the global
recovery’s strength surfaced.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 26 JULY 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,484.46 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.01| YTD -80.92 | YTD % -5.17

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Bahamas Property Fund

5.00
0.30
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.50
5.00
2.23
1.60
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
9.95
10.00

Benchmark
Fidelity Bank

Colina Holdings

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

100.00
100.00
100.00

Bank of Bahamas
Bahamas Waste
Cable Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete *

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Last Sale
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22
+

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C)

5.00
0.30
3.15
2.17

2.50
6.02
2.30
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.74
4.65
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17

FBB13

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

5.00
0.30
3.15
2.17

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.08
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

2.50
6.02
2.38
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.74
4.65
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Change

0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

99.46
100.00

100.00
100.00

EPS $

6.95%
7% 19 October 2017

Prime + 1.75%
7% 30 May 2013

100.00

52wk-Low

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND Holdings

FBB15

Bid $
9.42
2.00
0.35

100.00
Royairid élity Mercnant Bank & 1ruSt Lt (Uver- 1 ffe-Vounter sécuriues)

Ask $
10.42

6.25
0.40

0.00

Last Price

14.00
4.00
0.55

CFAL Securities Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.4387
2.8266
1.4777
2.8522
13.0484
101.6693
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

10.0000

9.3299

4.8105

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months %

NAV
1.4825
2.9199
1.5424
2.8522

13.4110
109.3929
100.1833

1.1177
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

10.0344

9.3299

7.3073

YTD%
3.04
1.14
2.34
-8.49
0.33
5.20
-1.52
2.52
0.98
2.34
2.16

-6.84
-6.70

-5.31

MARKET TERMS

7.60
3.56
5.19
5.29
5.45
6.25

5.63

-6.70

16.22

Daily Vol.

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.911577
1.526816

107.570620
105.779540

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $

While gold “shot up” in val-
ue during the 2010 second quar-
ter, due to investor uncertainty
about the global equities mar-
ket and its perception as “the
next reserve currency”, copper
and nickel’s value fell over
recovery concerns.

“We saw a low for the first
three months,” Mr Anderson
conceded in respect of the com-
modities sub-fund, but added
that the 2010 second quarter
position had been reversed this
quarter to-date.

Concerns over the global
economic recovery’s sustain-
ability had started to dissipate,
Mr Anderson said, which
meant that copper and nickel
prices had begun to appreciate
again, while gold had gone into
reverse.

The short-term volatility of
markets, Mr Anderson
explained, was why the com-
modities sub-fund had been
established as a closed-end fund
taking a long-term position on
its investments. Investor prin-
cipal had also been protected.

bas

cs

City LCI NT AL

Div $ PIE
0.201
0.050
0.236

-0.400
0.182
0.030
1.408
0.511
0.380
0.111
0.356
0.290
0.168
0.720
0.420
0.000
0.035
0.493
1.001
0.156

Interest Maturity

20 November 2029

19 October 2022
29 May 2015

Div$ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Yield
-2.945
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.510057

NAV Date

103.987340
101.725410



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
‘S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* Trading Suspen ded

aed ES el

in circulation, just call
ere A

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 27, 2010, PAGE 9B





B

The Tribune

DY it



ea



ith



HISTORY

Samantha’s amazing transformation

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

WO years ago, Samantha
Evans walked around "wear-
ing a smile, but carrying a
heart full of pain," desperate to
end the cycle of obesity that had
controlled her life since her early

teens.

That desperation led her to make medical
history, becoming one of the first people in
the Bahamas to have a lap -band surgery done
locally.

"Thave struggled with my weight most of my
life, at age 15, I wore a size 22, I was the fat girl
that no one asked to the prom. I had tried all
kinds of weight loss programs including the
Mayo Diet, Weight Watchers, Slender You. I
even had my mouth wired shut, but nothing
really worked," she told Tribune Health in an
interview just days before her 37th birthday.

"Being overweight caused me a lot of pain
and rejection. I had a situation where I had
applied for a job and I was actually told, "We're
sorry, you have a great attitude and excellent
qualifications and a pretty face, but we cannot
hire an overweight person as the first contact
to our clients.’ That crushed me."

She explained that she was trapped in a
vicous cyle- her weight led to depression and
her depression led to eating as a comfort mea-
sure.

"At my heaviest, I was well over 300
pounds,” she said. “ Fortunately, I didn't have
any of the medical conditions associated with
obesity like hypertension or diabetes, but I
knew I had to do something to change my life.
I have four children and I was not able to do
things with them.”



Life Changing Decision

Her opportunity to make a life changing
decision came at work one day, when she
heard that a local doctor -Charles Diggiss was
qualified to perform laproscopic lap-band
surgery right at home.

"I was familiar with the concept of weight
loss surgery, I had even corresponded with a
doctor in Mexico, but one day, I was at work (
in the surgical unit of Doctor's Hospital) and
my coworker asked me if I knew that Dr Dig-
giss was looking for patients who wanted to
have the surgery, but who were also willing to
be a spokesperson for the procedure and tell
their story.

"It was a just a dream come for me- because
it meant that I didn't have to travel , but I
would be able to have the surgery performed at
home, in the facility where I worked by a fellow
countryman and I jumped at the opportunity.”

Samantha's surgery took place on November
26, 2008. She was one of two patients to have
the procedure done that day.

According to lapbandsurgery.com- the lap-
band system started with the development of
the open adjustable silicone gastric banding

(ASGB) by Dr Lubomyr Kuzmak in 1986.
Only during 1991 was it developed to be used
in the treatment of obesity by Dr Mitiku
Belachew and Dr. M. Legrand in Belgium.
After two years of experimenting on animals,
the first laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding
procedure was done on a human in Belgium. In
2001, the Lap-Band System was finally
approved for use in the US by the Food and
Drug Administration. Dr Belachew was actu-
ally present in the theatre for Samantha’s
surgery.

"Tt was a not a difficult descision to make at
all. [had everyone's support at work and am
married to a wonderful man Arthur Evans, he
loved me just the way I was, but he was my
biggest supporter and saw the depression I was
feelng. He told me, he would support me in
whatever decision I chose to make."

Samantha said she was never afraid of the
medical risks associated with any elective sur-
gical procedure.

"T just focused on the new me. I was ashamed
of my body going into surgery, (1 was wearing
a size 32) but Dr Diggiss assured me before we
went in that what I was seing then, I would
never see again.

During the two and a half hour procedure,
Dr Diggiss inserted a band over the uppper
portion of Samantha’s stomach to drastically
reduce her stomach to just a small pouch. This
reduces the amount of food a patient can con-
sume resulting in significant weight loss.

Samantha describes the day of her surgery as
“ the day that Dr Diggiss rescued me.” She
said that after a brief recovery period of about
two weeks, she was gradually able to move
from liquid to puree to soft and then regular
foods and to date has experienced no side
effects.

However the physical transformation has
been nothing short of amazing. “ [have lost 107
pounds so far, I have about 65 more pounds to
lose before I get to my ideal weight, I feel won-
derful, my self esteem has gone through the
roof and everyone who sees my tells me how
incredible it is.”

As part of her transfromation, Samantha
has learnt to make better food choices without
totally depriving herself of her favourite foods.
She stays on track through a food journal and
mointored weigh ins and also has a personal
trainer for her gym workouts.

She says her journey has inspired her to
assist others who may be in the same predica-
ment.

“There are so many reasons why people
become overweight and cannot lose the weight.
This surgery is obviously not the answer for
some people. You have to weigh at least 250
pounds and have a body mass index of over 40
to be considered. But who better to tell people
about its benefits than someone who has lived
through it.”

She and other weight loss surgery patients
are banding together to form a support group
to encourage and motivate each other.

“Tam on a quest to help others who need to
lose weight, because this surgery has been a
blessing for me.”











THE NEW SAMANTHA: After losing more than 100 pounds and gaining a wealth of confidence.









PAST: Before lap band surgery Samantha weighed well over 300 pounds and suffered from depres-
sion.



The Itchy Dog

PROBABLY the most
complex, the most frustrating
and the most annoying clinical
condition that clients in the
Bahamas are faced with on a
daily basis is that of a scratch-
ing, itchy dog. Every day I
hear the same com-
plaint...... Dr Sands, my dog
will not stop scratching! What
can we do to correct it?



recognise these obvious caus-

itching and hair loss. Some
dogs may be lethargic and
depressed.

Treatment for bacterial skin
disease usually requires
antibiotics and medical sham-
poos. [Benzoyl peroxide] It
is recommended that antibi-
otic therapy be continued for
seven to ten days after reso-
lution of the clinical signs. If
the response to antibiotic
therapy is poor, then bacteri-
al culture and antibiotic sen-
sitivity tests should be con-
sidered.

There are many causes of
scratching in the dog. Only by
a thorough work up of the
scratchy patient can an exact
diagnosis be made, and then
the appropriate treatment can
be started. I always tell my
clients to be patient as I work
up the case. The Bahamian
client wants and expects solu-
tions now and if the dog does
not stop scratching today we
tend to get upset.

Causes

One of the first things to
eliminate is any external par-
asites. Fleas, ticks, mosqui-
toes and lice which may be
visible or those invisible par-
asites (mites such as Scabies
or Demodex)that bury in the
skin and cause intense itch-
ing can only be detected by
microscopic examination of
skin scrapings.

Your veterinarian will

es of scratching and will be
able to advise you on appro-

priate treatment. E.g:
Paramite and Frontline for
ticks and fleas. In most cases
when the cause of scratching
is parasitic the response to
treatment is excellent. How-
ever the elimination of para-
sites from the environment is
just as important, as re-infes-
tation of your pet will cause
recurrence of the symptoms.
For example; fleas and ticks
require year round control in
the Bahamas.

Bacterial skin disease or
Pyoderma is another common
cause of scratching. The pres-
ence of bacterial infection on
the skin is usually secondary,
but may be primary. Common
causes are skin parasites, poor
nutrition, unhygienic envi-
ronment, allergies or long
term steroid therapy. Bacter-
ial skin disease is usually char-
acterised by pustules, crusts,

This leads us to probably
the most common cause of
skin disease- allergies!

Allgeries

One such allergy is food
hypersensitivity. This is where
your dog becomes sensitised
to some components of its
diet resulting in skin disease.
Common foodstuffs that have
been implicated in food
hypersensitivity are beef,
dairy products, wheat, eggs
and even chicken. Some dogs
that experience food hyper-
sensitivity will have gastroin-
testinal signs. Foods allergies
may cause intense itching,
they may also be involved in
ear infections as do most skin
allergies.

Your vet will advise on an
appropriate diet to test if food
hypersensitivity is involved.
These diets are known as

hypoallergenic diets and may
be home made or may be
commercially available. Mut-
ton, rice and fish are exam-
ples of some food compo-
nents that appear to be less
allergy stimulating. These
diets may have to be given for
four to eight weeks before
complete resolution of signs
is seen. Then it is possible to
re-introduce foods you are
suspicious of to the diet and
observe if the signs reoccur.
This way the guilty foods can
be totally eliminated from the
diet in the future. Failure to
clear up the skin condition
may indicate allergies are pre-
sent apart from food based
allergies.

Contact based allergies are
another cause of skin disease.
This is where the dog
becomes affected in its envi-
ronment where it is lying or
sleeping. The feet and under
side of the body are fre-
quently affected. This form of
irritation may also be caused
by an irritant substance and
may not be allergic. An exam-
ination of the bedding and
places that your dog is laying
should be examined. Blan-
kets, feeding bowls, carpets
should be given scrutiny. To
test this allergy, the dog
should be removed from sus-
pect rooms and possible bed-
ding in its sleeping area to
something which is known not
to irritate or introduce allergy.
Paper is ideal bedding for

these dogs and can be used
to test if there own bedding
was guilty increasing skin irri-
tation. If no improvement is
seen after rigorous avoidance
of suspect floor coverings and
beddings then this form of
allergy can be eliminated
from the investigation.

This brings us to the most
common cause of allergy
based skin disease, atopy!
This is where the dog
becomes sensitised to envi-
ronmental allergens. These
allergens cause skin disease
after being inhaled. This form
of allergy may be seasonal or
year round. The house dust
mite and certain pollens are
frequently implicated as caus-
es of atopic skin disease. Cer-
tain breeds of dog appear sus-
ceptible such as the west high-
land terrier, the corgi, the
Shar Pie, but any breed of dog
may develop the condition.
Cases presented with itching
of the face feet and under-
sides of the body, possible ear
infections and they may be
running from the eyes or
show a combination of these
symptoms. In general these
dogs are eighteen months plus
before they developed this
condition.

Treatment
So what can we do about

the treatment of allergies?
Unfortunately it is not very

easy, by using tests; it may be
possible to determine the
exact causes of allergies.
However it is very expensive
and I don’t routinely recom-
mend it. This is of great ben-
efit when it is something we
can eliminate from the envi-
ronment. However frequent-
ly the allergens such as pillow
mites are impossible to elimi-
nate from the environment
and in these cases we have to
rely on symptomatic relief of
the patient. This involves the
use of an arsenal of various
anti-inflammatory drugs.

Anti-histamines help in
moderate cases. In difficult
cases the use of oral gluco-
corticoid steroids may be nec-
essary to control the symp-
toms. The combination of
supplementation of the diet
with essential fatty acids have
proved to be beneficial. In
treatment, it is always the aim
of the vet to keep the use of
steroids to a minimum and
use combinations of other
drugs to reduce their dosage.
In some cases there will be
no choice to use steroids. I
personally feel this is always
better than a pet that is in
constant discomfort and does
not get the quality of life it
deserves. In summary, the
control of itching in these
dogs can be very difficult, so
be patient with your vet as
he/she endeavors to get the
scratchy and underlying con-
ditions under control.

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(GY JOINING HANDS FOR HEATH
Keeping a lid on anger wm:

No matter what, one thing is certain,
people are sure to get angry some-
times. Everyone does. Anger is a
normal emotion, and there is nothing
wrong with feeling mad. However,
left untamed, it can lead to harmful
events. What does matter is how we
handle and respond to anger. Poor
management of anger can have seri-
ous short and long term effects. It is
therefore very important that anger is
appropriately managed at all times.
This article - the second of two parts
- provides some useful tips for man-
aging ones anger.

nger is a natural
Arve to some of our

ess pleasant life experi-
ences. However, anger is not
always the best response one
can generate, as it often
brings about harmful life long
regrets. On the other hand,
the best responses to conflict,
that often bring about posi-
tive less harmful results, are
neither simple nor easy but
rather time consuming, self
consuming and self-sacrific-
ing.

Nevertheless, they work for the
good of the majority in the long term
and offer a positive alternative to
harsh and harmful regretful respons-
es. This article provides some guide-
lines that are valuable in helping
individuals through times and expe-
riences that are not pleasant and
gives birth to anger.

The Five-Step Approach
to Managing Anger

If something happens that makes
you feel angry, a problem-solving
approach can be helpful. Begin by
thinking about what it is that trig-
gered the anger. Next, think about
the choices you have in responding
to the situation and decide what you
will do.

Each step involves answering a

(© Se
The ubiquitous hibiscus

RARE is the Bahamian garden
without a single hibiscus. Hibiscus is
one of the most popular of tropical
flowering shrubs and because it is so
hardy and common, the plants are
often neglected by their owners

The original hibiscus (Hibiscus
rosa-sinensis) came to us from eastern
Asia and the Pacific islands. The
flowers were deep red and used for
breeding purposes so much that most
of our modern hibiscus varieties have
the same basic ancestry.

A couple of decades ago, hibiscus
flowers were mostly single and came
in red, yellow or pink. These plants
were tough and lived for a long time.
Modern varieties are a little more
attenuated and are not as tough as
their predecessors. They have main-
ly double or multiple stamens and
come in a wide range of colours,
some even bi-coloured.

A healthy hibiscus needs full sun,
regular watering, good drainage and
occasional feeding. Some plants will
grow well enough in shade or partial
shade but only reach their potential in
full sun. The leaves of a mature shrub
should be dark green and, except for
occasional rest periods, flowers
should be produced at least half a
dozen at a time on a regular daily
basis.

Hibiscus shrubs discard their leaves
in ones and twos, so a large number
of yellowing leaves is a cause for con-
cern. The problem is often brought
about by nutrients being tied up in
our limestone soil and can be allevi-
ated by applying compost around the
base of the plant but not touching
the stem. If the problem persists, then

(ey LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

couple of questions, based on the
situation. For example as a child,
you are told to do something or face
a negative consequence if you do
not, such as being denied something
that you really want. The red-hot
anger starts building because you
neither want to do what was asked
nor face the promised punishment.
Or as an adult someone does some-
thing that despite being told not to
do it and warned of the conse-
quences still went ahead and did it.

Here is what to do:

1) Identify the problem (self-
awareness). Start by noticing what
you are angry about and why. Put
into words what is making you
upset so you can act rather than
react.

Ask yourself: What got me angry?
What am I feeling and why? This
can be done either mentally or out
loud, but it needs to be clear and
specific.

2) Think of potential solutions
before responding (self-control).
This is where you stop for a minute
to give yourself time to manage
your anger. It is also where you
start thinking of how you might
react, but without reacting yet.
Ask yourself: What can I do?
Think of at least three things that
might solve the problem.

3) Consider the consequences of
each solution (think it through).
This is where you think about what
is likely to result from each of the
different reactions you came up
with.

Ask yourself: What will happen for
each one of these options?

4) Make a decision (pick one of
your options). This is where you
take action by choosing one of the
three things you could do. Look at
the list and pick the one that is
likely to be most effective, solving
the problem and not make the situ-
ation worse.

Ask yourself: What is my best
choice? By the time you would
have thought it through, you would

a drench of chelated iron in the form
of Sequestrene 128 should be applied
to the base. Chelated iron acts as a
catalyst and conditions the soil so
nutrients can be absorbed.

If the leaves of a hibiscus shrub
are light green, this may indicate a
mild case of chlorosis. After applying
a Sequestrene drench, you can add
Epsom salts in liquid form, or even a
palm fertiliser that contain man-
ganese and magnesium.

The biggest enemy of hibiscus is
scale insects. The bark of most hibis-
cus shrubs is so formed that scale
insects are well camouflaged and it
needs a close inspection to identify
them. The temptation is to use a sys-
temic insecticide such as is used on
rose bushes, but this is not a good
idea as most systemic insecticides
specifically warm against their use
on hibiscus plants.

The most insidious of all scale
insects is snow scale. It starts looking
like a small dusting of fine sand or
flower and ends up looking like a
snowdrift. If left unchecked snow
scale will kill a hibiscus shrub in very
short order. Early detection is impor-
tant.

The best treatment for scale on
hibiscus is oil. Dormant oil should be
sprayed onto the woody parts, try-
ing to avoid the leaves. Do the spray-
ing on cool, sunless days or you may
fry your shrub. If after several appli-
cations the problem persists you may
have to resort to Ethion and Oil,
probably the smelliest, most foul of
all chemical insecticides allowed to
be sold to the general public. But it
works.

Follow the scent

THE harsh reality, and lack of
desirable dating opportunities can
dumbfound even the most optimistic
single. Self-analysis over relationship
patterns, choices, types, and ‘it must
be me' slows even the most deter-
mined.

You may decide not to be so
choosy and go with the flow, even if
the 'wow' and ‘soul mate’ is not
there. You even daydream of making
a special friend the ‘ideal lover’,
because they fit the bill in every oth-
er way. Would it be too outrageous to
consider ‘a friend with benefits’ a life
long partner? Have marriage possi-
bilities really passed you by?

We seem to spend our lives bump-
ing into people, connecting briefly
with people, who we can admire,
become enamored with, but who ulti-
mately leave almost no distinguish-



By MAGGIE
AN



NS i

able imprint in our mind.

Then, once in a while you are hit
by someone's entrance, almost before
truly seeing or knowing him or her.
Forces within the atmosphere seem
to pull you in their direction and you
find yourself acting in a way so unlike
the person you Know yourself to be.
If we could just be pre-warned or at
least play a role in the decision-mak-
ing, then it could help relieve the sur-
prise element.



probably be past the temptation to
yell; which is the usual (knee-jerk)
response.

Once you choose your solution, it
is time to act.

5) Check your progress. After you
have acted and the situation is
over, spend some time thinking
about how it went.

Ask yourself: How did I do? Did
things work out as I expected? If
not, why not? Am I satisfied with
the choice I made? Taking some
time to reflect on how things
worked out after it is all over is a
very important step. It helps one
learn about self and it allows the
testing of problem-solving
approaches and finding out what
work best in different situations.
At the end of the steps reward
yourself for a job well done, if the
solution you chose worked out
well. If it did not, go back through
the five steps and see if you can
figure out why.

These five steps are pretty simple
when one is calm, but are much
tougher to work through when angry
or sad (kind of like in basketball
practice when making baskets is
much easier than in a real game
when the pressure is on!). So it helps
to practice over and over again.

Other Ways to
Manage Anger
The five-step approach is good

when facing a particular situation
that got you mad and you need to
decide what action to take. But oth-
er things can help you manage
anger too. Try these even if you
are not mad to help prevent angry
feelings from building up inside.
e Exercise. Go for a walk/run,
work out, or go play a sport. Lots
of research has shown that exer-
cise is a great way to improve
your mood and decrease negative
feelings.
¢ Listen to music (with your
headphones on). Music has also
been shown to change a person's

BEAUTY: Cranberry hibiscus is an
example of modern hybrids.

The outer shell of scale insects is
waxy and oil breaks down this waxy
protection. While the waxy coating
is in place most insecticides cannot
penetrate and do their job.

The original hibiscus from Asia
was a coastline plant and to this day
hibiscus thrives in sandy soil close to
the shore but beyond the salt drift
line. Coastal plants receive protec-
tion from predators because of their
location and when we move them
inland they are more susceptible to
attack

The best defense against insects
and disease is a healthy plant. Treat
your hibiscus shrubs well and they
will reward you abundantly.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

You are intrigued by the look of
this earthly force, and an accidental
but planned brush passed them feels
like electricity. Now, you are fasci-
nated, scared but almost powerless
not to investigate it further. Is this
what ‘love at first sight’ is all about?
Is this what they mean when they
say, ‘You will just know'? Sniffing
around and checking the territory,
just like law enforcement dogs fol-
lowing the trail. As humans, we know
we do not have such advanced skills
as animals that have developed them
for navigational purposes.

Our own pheromones are unique
chemical substances that can cause a
specific reaction in another, and gen-
erally this is done by smell. The fact
that it is not the same as consciously
smelling food or perfume makes it
all the more mysterious. Is it all
hyped modern day propaganda to
make us appear and act more roman-
tic? Or can we trace it to ancient folk-
lore, samples of bodily fluids, gar-
ments of clothing, or cuttings of hair

mood pretty quickly. And if you
dance, then you're exercising and
it's a two-for-one.

¢ Write down thoughts and emo-
tions. This can be done in lots of
ways; for example, in a journal or
as poetry or song lyrics. After it
written it can be kept or thrown
away; it does not matter. The
important thing is, writing down
your thoughts and feelings can
improve how one feel. Noticing,
labeling, and releasing feelings as
they show up in smaller portions,
stop them from building up
inside.

¢ Drawing, Scribbling, doodling,
or sketching thoughts or feelings
might help too.

¢ Meditate or practice deep
breathing. This one works best if
done regularly. It is a stress man-
agement technique that promotes
use self-control when mad.

¢ Share feelings with someone
you trust. Lots of times there are
other emotions, such as fear or
sadness, beneath anger. Talking
about them can help.

¢ Distract yourself. Tf you find
yourself ‘steaming’ about some-
thing and you just can not seem to
let go, it helps to do something
that will get your mind past what
is bothering you - watch TV, read
the newspaper, a magazine or
book, or go to the movies or pull
out one of your movies.

These ideas can be helpful for two
reasons:

1. They help you cool down when
you feel like your anger might
explode. When you need to cool
down, do one or more of the activi-
ties in the list above. Think of these
as alternatives to taking an action
you will regret, such as yelling at
someone. Some of them, like writing
down feelings, can help you release
tension and begin the thinking
process at the same time.

2. They help you manage anger in
general. What if there's no immedi-
ate problem to solve? The need to

shift into a better mood is always
there. Sometimes when you are
angry, you just need to stop dwelling
on how mad you are.

When to Ask for Extra Help

Sometimes anger is a sign that
more is going on. People who have
frequent trouble with anger, who get
in fights or arguments, who get pun-
ished, who have life situations that
give them reason to often be angry
may need special help to get a prob-
lem with anger under control.

Tell parents, a teacher, a coun-
selor, or another adult you trust if
any of these things have been hap-
pening:

e You have a lasting feeling of
anger over things that have either
happened to you in the past or are
going on now.

e You feel irritable, grumpy, or in
a bad mood more often than not.

e You feel consistent anger or rage
at yourself.

e You feel anger that lasts for days
or makes you want to hurt yourself
or someone else.

e You're often getting into fights
or arguments.

These could be signs of depression
or something else and you should
not have to handle that alone.
Conclusion

Anger is a strong emotion. It can
feel overwhelming at times. Learn-
ing how to deal with strong emo-
tions - without losing control - is
part of becoming more mature. It
takes a little effort, a little practice,
and a little patience, but you can
get there if you want to.

¢ For more information on anger man-
agement visit the community Counsel-
ing and Assessment Center on Market
Street, near Purity Bakery, or call them
at telephone number 323-3295. Also,
tune in to Joining Hands for Health
Radio Programme every Wednesday
evening at 7:30 p.m. of Radio
Bahamas 1540 A.M. for discussions
on this and other health issues.




DANCING LADY: (Hibiscus schitzopetalus) is an enchanting variation on the

hibiscus theme.

and nails to entice romantic unions?
We discover the latter is true and
admire their creativity.

These subliminal scents have direct
access to our brains and nervous sys-
tems via our nasal passages. Evidence
tells us that these aromas are carried
by way of the vomero nasal organ
(VNO), which is a small cavity with-
in each nostril. Recognising the close
proximity of the part of the brain that
registers smell, and the area that deals
with strong emotions, provides us
with questions not only of attraction
but sexual performance.

What happens when we suffer
from chronic nasal congestion? Or
how do nasal sprays affect our other
medications affecting brain chem-
istry, such as antidepressants? Due
to the parallel effect of increased
blood flow to the penis and the nose,
there results a complex link between
the nose and orgasm. Interestingly,
there are contradictory reports of
decongestants being linked to impo-
tence and others resulting in rapid



orgasm. Also, chronic nasal drip suf-
ferers and asthmatics becoming tem-
porarily symptom free during sexual
activity.

The future looks promising in the
development of male and female
pharmaceuticals for the treatment of
sexual problems. We know we can
manipulate certain aspects of sexual
desire, arousal, and orgasm, but we
cannot overlook the importance of
the relationship. If we can manufac-
ture all this sexual activity it makes
you wonder if the desired effect will
be ‘fabricated love’. Will the ease of
availability and rapid response make
the ‘old way’ seem too much hard
work? Long live true and lasting love,
let it never be replaced.

¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock ' with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9 For appointments call
364 7230 , email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com

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TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 11B



Building respect at work

espect is often confused

Rev: obedience because
he end result is com-

pliance but the process and
underlying reasons that drive
compliance may have nothing
to do with respect. More
specifically, respect is not fear
based, it is inspired because it
is shows you value people by
treating them in a way that
gives them a voice and leaves
them with their dignity intact.
In an environment where there is
mutual respect, information is
exchanged in a way that everyone's
dignity can be sustained however,
compliance may not be an outcome.
When there is obedience, there is
no room for the injection of creativ-
ity by employees because leaders
are autocratic or dictatorial. Building
obedience achieves compliance at
the cost of the infusion of a diversi-
ty of perspectives.
Professor and author Robin Dillon
adds some clarity to the discussion of
respect dimension of respect which
he refers to as care. Caring respect
comes out of seeing the unique val-
ue in persons and treating them as
though they bring value and per-
spective to a situation.
Author David Balovich suggests
that, “In order to earn the respect of
others, one must first have respect
for themselves. One must recognise
they are a person worthy of respect.
One earns respect by giving respect
to one-self and to others.”

Perspectives
on Disrespect

Bullying: Bullying can manifest
as intimidation in the form of name
calling, shouting, inappropriate jok-
ing, demeaning (condescending)
behaviour, exclusion, sexual harass-



ment, profanity or sarcasm. It can
also show up as disciplined behav-
iour designed to methodically show
employees who has the power
through humiliation, micromanage-
ment or undermining activity.

Bullying is not limited to face-to-
face communication, it can manifest
in written form as well. Examples
include but are not limited to exclu-
sion from e-mails related to your
work; bold, capitalised or red let-
ters; emails sent at night with the
expectation of an immediate
response and bombardment of
emails, not allowing you sufficient
time to get the work done.

Undermining Behaviour: This
type of behaviour is designed to
make a person seem to be less than
competent than they are. Con-
scious and unconscious undermin-
ing strategies can minimise, neu-
tralise or negate a person's contri-
butions. Sometimes undermining
behaviour can be seemingly neces-
sary like spoon-feeding employees,
not allowing them to develop their
critical thinking and leadership
abilities. At other times, undermin-
ing behaviour can manifest as
deliberate sabotage where some-
one neglects their responsibilities
because of passive aggressive
intentions. There also people who
are prepared to lie to achieve their
undermining goals.

Conscious Underutilisation:

There are times when employees
are very competent and outspoken,
so they are used for their compe-
tence but not rewarded, promoted,
respected, used optimally or
empowered because they are
labeled as trouble makers.

Instead, they are relegated toa
position where they are contacted
directly or by a third party only
when their input is needed. And
this sometimes means after a bad
decision begins to unravel. These
people are valued for their compe-
tence but there is a competing
need to keep them muzzled that
restricts the scope of the contribu-
tion they can make.

Hierarchical Adherence: This
occurs when the levels of hierarchy
are so strictly adhered to that it
disallows effective bottom-up and
top-down flows of information.
This reality is worsened when
there is a weak layer of middle
management. Anyone who
attempts to circumvent the hierar-
chy and goes directly to the top to
state their case is open to attack
and can be summarily put in their
place for their perceived audacity.
In a case like this, if the person
needing to be heard is reprimand-
ed, they can feel disrespected and
demoralised because the person at
the top places more importance on
procedural adherence than on cre-
ating effective channels of commu-
nication. Unfortunately, in cases
like this, the person at the top may
also feel disrespected because of a
deformed, antiquated system of
communication.

Immobilised Decision Makers:
These are managers who cannot
make the tough calls because of
profound incompetence or because
of a highly political work environ-
ment. They are viewed by employ-

ees as toothless and are disrespect-
ed because an unfair distribution
of work or voiceless employees can
be the result of immobilisation.

Unfounded Accusations: There
are managers who lack the critical
thinking skills necessary for mak-
ing fair decisions. Their biases are
overwhelming so they react to
opinion as though there is
irrefutable evidence being present-
ed. In circumstances like this, mis-
takes in judgment can happen, and
when there is a trend of mistakes,
employees don't trust or respect
this type of manager because of
their undisciplined reactions.

Respect and
Reciprocity

When you give respect you may
receive it in return but if your respect
is viewed as misplaced, you may not
receive it back from all the stake-
holders in the situation. Creating an
environment based on compliance
and voicelessness can open you up to
disrespect by those who don't fear
the consequences of their actions or
it can cause obedience which looks
suspiciously like respect on the sur-
face.

How to Build Respect

When building respect, keep in
mind that trust is usually impaired if
the environment if characterised by
disrespect so a respect building exer-
cise will also have trust building
dynamics. Here are a few tips to help
build respect.

e Treat people with courtesy and
respect leaving them with their
human dignity.

e Take an inclusive approach
encouraging members of the team
to share their ideas.

e Embrace differences as a team

strength. Avoid labeling differ-
ences as an obstacle.

e If an idea is a good one, use it.

e Think before you act. Weigh the
risks of various alternatives. Knee-
jerking behaviours demonstrate a
lack of depth and engender disre-
spect.

e Use active listening skills to
process other points of view.
Remember, someone may have a
perspective that can positively
enhance your solution.

e Get over your biases and treat
people equitably.

e Build your courage.

e Learn to praise as much as you
criticise. You will build respect,
confidence and performance.

e Encourage flows of constructive
information.

¢ Do some self reflection to deter-
mine if you may be inadvertently
bullying members of your team.

e When you make changes in your
behaviours, be consistent with your
new behaviours. Flip-flopping in
and out of old patterns will only
create the perception that you
were not serious about making
meaningful change.

In a diverse work environment,
building respect can enhance team
productivity and creativity by
reducing levels of conflict and
building healthy working relation-
ships. An unknown author
summed it up this way, “To be one,
to be united is a great thing. But to
respect the right to be different is
maybe even greater.”

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organization-
al Soul, an HR Consulting and Leader-
ship Development company. If you
are interested in exploring how you
can create higher performing team
leaders, you contact her at

www.orgsoul.com.



























































































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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
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