Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

OF THE DAY itm tovin' it

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Volume: 106 No.203

91F
81F

MOSTLY SUNNY,



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST



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Teenager stabbed
ny gang of men

voices for historic

hospital buildings? °
SEE INSIGHT SECTION



15-year-old attacked,
man shot dead in
weekend violence

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A 15-YEAR-OLD boy is
recovering in hospital after being
stabbed multiple times by a
group of men early yesterday
morning.

It is unclear whether the inci-
dent, which occurred shortly
after lam at Tonique Williams
Darling Highway, was gang-
related. The teenager was tak-
en to hospital by emergency
medical services where he 1s list-
ed in stable condition.

The stabbing comes just
hours before the closing cere-
mony of the 15th Nelson Coop-
er Peace on the Streets Basket-
ball Tournament. Organized by
the Hope Centre, an outreach
mission for at-risk youth, the
tournament is meant to remforce
positive values and encourage
healthy conflict resolution.

Carlos Reid, co-founder of the
Hope Centre, told The Tribune
he believes the incident has to
be gang-related.

“Any time you see you some-
thing where a group of men
attack one person, it is gang vio-
lence. It doesn’t take an expert
to figure that out,” he said.

s3e0D09910/LPca4aT00
Mead 100 sheet BRW
Composition

Mr Reid said he believes vio-
lence among young people will
not decrease until the country
addresses its growing sub-cul-
ture of gang violence.

HOMICIDE

POLICE found the bullet-rid-
dled body of the nation's 53rd
homicide in the Englerston com-
munity early yesterday morning.

It was reported that Kevin
Hepburn, 23, of Balfour
Avenue, who had been recently
released from prison, had just
arrived home when he was
approached by two men, both
armed with handguns. They fired
in his direction.

The deceased was found in
the driver's seat of a black 1993
Nissan 300 ZX after police
responded to reports of a shoot-
ing at Balfour Avenue between
Washington Street and Podoleo
Street. The car's license plate
number is 233852.

Emergency medical services
pronounced the victim dead at
the scene. Family members said
he had recently been released
from prison, however despite his
criminal history he was “well
loved.”

SEE page 16

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE MISS TEEN USA
contestants take to the stage
at Atlantis last night.

KAMIE CRAWFORD, 17, of

Maryland (right) took the
crown.

By CHESTER ROBARDS

crobards@tribunemedia. net

FOR the Third consecu-
tive year the Miss Teen
USA competition bedaz-
zled the ballrooms of the
Atlantis Paradise Island
where the only lady of
colour, chosen among the
top 15 contestants, grabbed
the crown in the end to be
dubbed Miss Teen USA
2010. She is Kamie Craw-
ford, 17, of Maryland.

And as she represented
the continental USA's teen
beauties, the very first Miss
USA of Arab descent took
the stage on Saturday night
to talk about her demand-
ing schedule as miss USA
before she takes the stage
as a Miss Universe contes-
tant 2010. The Bahamas
was privileged to host Miss
Universe 2009.

While not many Bahami-
ans scooped up tickets for
the competition, there was a

5 FG

WITH ES:







fair showing of tourists,
including the winner of the
Miss Teen USA Fantasy
Camp 14-year-old Peteche
Bethell and Judge Michelle
Malcolm who owns the
Miss Bahamas (franchise),
but the house was packed
with supporters from a
cross-section of the USA
screaming for their
favourites and jumping
from their seats at each seg-
ment of the competition.
Atlantis had a full house.
Miss Teen USA 2009,
favoured as an up-and-com-
ing country singer, per-

SEE page 11









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Quartermilers
head to final

SEE PAGE TWELVE



Abaco power
outages go on
despite BEC
assurances



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





MASSIVE power outages con-
tinued for Abaconians yesterday
despite assurances of improvement
from the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration at the start of the weekend,
hours after hundreds of residents
took to the streets in Marsh Har-
bour to protest chronic power gen-
eration problems.

On Friday, Minister of Public
Utilities Phenton Neymour and
Antionette Turnquest, Assistant

SEE page 11





Historic hospital buildings’






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff








fate ‘still under review’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE fate of two historic
buildings at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital is still "under
review", according to Minis-
ter of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Charles Maynard.

With the exception of the
main hospital buildings, Hug-
gins Lodge and Knowles
House, are among the last
remaining buildings from the
Bahamas’ first hospital.

Knowles House has been
used by the Bahamas Crisis
Centre since 1982, while Hug-
gins Lodge currently houses
three government clinics.

The buildings had been
originally scheduled for demo-
lition in September to provide
site access for equipment and
materials for construction of
new operating theatres.

In an interview with The
Tribune, Mr Maynard said the
buildings were important, not
just because of their age, but
also because of how they had
been used over the years.

He explained that officials
from the Antiquities, Muse-
ums and Monuments Corpo-
ration, the Ministry of Health
and the Public Hospitals
Authority met on Friday,
which prompted the need for
more review.

Mr Maynard said: "We will
be meeting to go over the plan
because what we are being
told is that there is no struc-
ture that is expected to go
over the two buildings, only
parking areas. So we will meet
and do a site visit to see how
best we can protect the build-
ings."

e SEE INSIGHT
SECTION






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Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

Is currently seeking applications for the following position:
Senior Manager, Client Relationships
Corporate & Commercial Banking Centre

Position Summary:

The Senior Manager, Client Relationshies mist posses a broad knowledge of
Tinka nical products and services and will Fogus on the-crepss-sell, up-sell, and retention
et sting COnrercial CUOMTeeTS, Feeee 6 eo ND for Retin preegeCtS in
farget markets, developing penépect acquBitION Strategies, manmtaining peipect
relationships, maintaining a sustainable prospect sales. pipeline, conducting prospect
sales cals, qualification of opportunities based on customer inéormation and high
level of de filigence, The ingumbant is an the cowirige team with the Credit
Solin: Geeup on deal Snacturing, megatiation amd pricing tor new ared exeiry
customers wah key emphases gland on profitability bo the Bank.

Key Accountabilities for this Role:

homGhe the devel opment geal profitable qeewth ef the eorimencial Barking payrtfichay
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Pures: an ayeesiee buines Geweloprmert progr ann within the aiigne) market area
Stoned reg bo egpresed upon geceatth objectives,

fash: and reenter @ high racke! profile in the aegned marked area aris both
nternal and external comtects.

(regres all eepects ad aeaigned relationships neces ageing attention, as neqpared ta
Ten iBin, Improve, grav and reiain the relationship.

Slequants the Bank's sets and babii:

fscube: the Branch Compience reyporeihd ries a reflected in She Branch Sennice: and
Proceduces Manuel,

Educational Requirements:

Eternal educabon andor licensing prerequevies: Graduate degree in business or
STS Ot Wack eiiranerecy, Carey Waiter Meg uanerraery got dee teerrniiteead bey Cee Beet
from: ime to time:

Functional Competencies:

The incumbent must have ai least S years of commercial banking mqperience:

Strong keowvedge od the commercial banking markeiplace anda detabed knovwdedge of
ihe waged muret area's hey Prlpects, major companies and com petitive positioning
wihhin the asigned marked area.

The incumbent must also have a strong undersianding of the Commercial Bank's
Obpecthers, sirabegies, Sinciuee, 25 Wed 28 is lending and depodt products and senioes
Vennsong inteypernsonal ddls and communication skills. anc eaential bo th: posiaon
The incumbent must be sbie io effectively articulvie-views both within the Bank and
eater aly in ihe market

Strong PC chile ane necessary, Including 2 veorting knowweoge of MS Word, Exce,
Poet Point, and all commnancal systems aired plytlorrre.

Aly to conduct duo diligence on stength of customer financials

The Sootibenk Group &.anequal opporiunity employer and weloomes applications érom all interesied
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be Domed,

Qualified candidates onky ahould subsril applicator id det dll ee Fer, Racor Phare ot

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Police seek ‘armed
and dangerous’ men

ALL Points Bulletins were issued for three
men all considered to be “armed and danger-
ous” over the weekend, in connection with
murder, armed robbery and causing harm.

Officers from the Central Detective Unit

LOCAL NEWS















are seeking the assistance of the public in

locating Carlos Colebrooke, alias “Skulla”,
Erel Erilio Ariste and Mark Kenson McKen-

zie.

According to information released by police
press liaison officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skip-
pings, Colebrooke, age 22, is last known to
have resided at Williams Street. He is believed
to be around five feet eight inches tall, weigh-
ing 180 pounds and with a slim to medium
build. He is wanted for questioning in con-
nection with murder and armed robbery.

Ariste, 22, is also wanted in connection with
murder and armed robbery. His last known
address is Henrey Street, Montell Heights. He
is five feet eight inches tall or thereabouts,

Carlos Colebrooke, Erel Erilio Ariste and Mark
Kenson McKenzie.

weighs 180 pounds and has a slim to medium
build, according to police.

McKenzie, 20, is wanted for questioning in

connection with causing harm. His last known
address is 23 Worrick Terrace, Blue Hill
Heights. He stands at around five feet eight
inches tall, weighing 150 pounds and has a
slim build. Police say he should be considered
“armed and extremely dangerous.”

Anyone with information on the where-
abouts of any of these suspects is asked to
contact the police emergency room at 919, the
Central Detective Unit at 502-9991 or 502-
9930 or the anonymous Crime Stoppers num-
ber at 328-8477.



Temporary closures on Robinson Road

SECTIONS of Robinson
Road will be temporarily closed
as crews begin road improve-
ment construction on that street
today.

Motorists should also be on
the lookout for traffic changes
in the areas of JFK Drive, Far-
rington Road and Thompson
Boulevard.

The Jose Cartellone con-
struction company, the firm con-
tracted by government for its
road improvement project,
announced they will be working

aug ii eads

OUT Aen a ad Lito um ete

eee



in the area between Palm Beach
Street and Balfour Avenue.

New 24-inch water main pipes
also will be installed during this
phase. Road construction will be
done in different phases starting
eastbound, said a statement by
the Ministry of Works.

Motorists driving along
Robinson Road should divert
east through Palm Beach Street,
continue along Balfour Avenue
and exit through Claridge Road
to get to their final destination.

Those driving westbound
should continue on the one way
traffic scheme in place.

Access will be granted to busi-
nesses, pedestrians and residents
in the area, said the ministry.

Traffic also will be diverted
along the new round-about
being constructed at the inter-
section of JFK Drive and
Thompson Boulevard. Motorists
driving along these streets should
expect changes at these inter-
sections between July 18 and
August 4.

Installation of new drainage
facilities, utilities, water main



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ot 110451)!







ae

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TOTALLY REINVENTED



systems, street lighting, traffic
signs, asphalt pavement and road
markings will be constructed in
this phase.

The ministry warned
motorists to drive with caution as
they approach the new round-
about adding that ramps are con-
structed at some sections of the
round junction.

The ministry added that the
existing traffic signal will be
removed while signs will be in
place to alert the public about
approaching the round-about.

Two businesses, Nassau
Ready-mixed Concrete Compa-
ny and Bahamas Mack Trucks
Sales Ltd, and residents along
Thompson Boulevard will be
affected by the work.

Additionally, the original
access route will be permanent-
ly closed so entry will be provid-
ed west of the original access
point at the round-about or at
the end of Thompson Boule-
vard. “A safe route will be pro-
vided for pedestrians as the alter-
native for the closed footpath.

“We look forward to the co-
operation of the motoring public
throughout this project,” said the
ministry.

Those with questions or con-
cerns are asked to contact the
Jose Cartellone company at 322-
8341/322-2160 or bahamas-
neighbor@cartellone.com.ar and
the Ministry of Works and
Transport hotline at 302-9700 or
publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs.





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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

For Obama, race means repeated distractions

WASHINGTON — Right when Presi-
dent Barack Obama should have been mak-
ing political hay over big-deal legislative tri-
umphs, race once again blew in with a storm
of distraction.

Obama and his administration have
proved to be one of the most deliberate,
highly disciplined in recent history. Whether
you approve or disapprove of his policies,
political missteps have been rare.

Yet for a second time, a government led
by America's first black president embar-
rassed itself with a hair-trigger reaction on
race.

In the grand sweep of presidential histo-
ry, both cases probably will be lost. Still,
they gnaw, unseen, like termites on the foun-
dation of Obama's administration.

As hard as the president has tried to
downplay race, he knows he's under special
scrutiny for just that reason, a lingering social
hangover from this country's profoundly
troubling history of enslaving, then segre-
gating blacks.

In the latest incident, a right-wing blogger
posted a truncated video of a black woman
who worked at the Department of Agricul-
ture in Georgia and was speaking to a meet-
ing of the NAACP.

In the edited portion of the video that was
first available, Shirley Sherrod seemed to
have been endorsing get-even discrimina-
tion against whites. Fox News jumped on
the story, which also got wide distribution on
other cable outlets.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
ordered Sherrod fired. The NAACP con-
demned her comments.

But it wasn't long before the entirety of
Sherrod's message got out. She was speaking
of her own mistake, of having learned a les-
son of redemption.

The White House apologised. Vilsack
said he was sorry and offered Sherrod a new
job. Obama called Sherrod on Thursday to
express his regret.

He said he ordered "my team" to make
sure "that we're focusing on doing the right
thing instead of what looks to be politically
necessary at that very moment."

Had the administration waited a day, it
could have avoided all the embarrassment
and apologising. In fact the attack on Sher-
rod would have turned back on those behind
it, seen as an example of nasty extremism.

The White House, however, didn't wait.
So the storm engulfed the better part of a
work week that otherwise might have
focused on celebrating Obama's most recent
legislative victory — financial regulatory
reform — and his party's defeat of a Senate
GOP filibuster that delayed additional pay-
ments for the jobless.

It took time away from Obama's efforts
to revive the economy and reduce the near-
10 per cent unemployment rate.

Nearly a year ago to the day, Obama also

tripped up on the race issue. That stumble,
seven months into his presidency, distracted
the White House when time might have bet-
ter been spent pushing for Obama's health
care overhaul.

Within the next month, opponents had
managed, inaccurately, to convey the impres-
sion that his plan included death panels for
the old and sick, amounted to socialist redis-
tribution of wealth and rationed health care.

While Obama managed to stand slightly
aside from the Sherrod case, he was at the
centre of last summer's brouhaha over the
arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr., a black pro-
fessor at Harvard University, by Sgt. James
Crowley, a white police sergeant in Cam-
bridge, Mass.

Crowley was sent to investigate a possible
burglary at Gates’ home. Although he deter-
mined Gates was in his own home and not a
burglar, he arrested Gates anyway after their
encounter grew heated.

The charges were quickly dropped, but
Obama's remarks at a news conference — he
said the police had "acted stupidly" in arrest-
ing Gates — inflamed the debate. The pres-
ident later said he should have expressed
his concerns with different language.

That's when he invited Crowley, who
steadfastly denied race was a factor in the
arrest, and Gates, a friend of Obama's, to the
White House to thrash things out — face to
face — over a beer.

Conservative media outlets and bloggers
also have tried to win points against Obama
with complaints about the Justice Depart-
ment's handling of two New Black Panther
Party members who allegedly threatened
voters at a Philadelphia polling place on the
day Obama was elected.

A criminal investigation into the episode
was dropped by the Bush administration,
but the Obama Justice Department obtained
a narrower civil court order against the con-
duct than Bush officials had sought.

The issue of racism and right-wing attacks
dogged Obama through his historic run for
the presidency, especially his relations with
Rev. Jeremiah Wright, the pastor of Oba-
ma's Chicago church.

Obama finally cut ties with Wright, but he
stood fast with his preacher for a long time.

That was Obama the candidate, before he
became a president ensnared in a political
climate of extreme partisanship and a news
cycle that moves at nearly warp-speed.

That explains why Vilsack "jumped the
gun," Obama said, "partly because we now
live in this media culture where something
goes up on YouTube or a blog and every-
body scrambles."

It's time for everyone to take a deep
breath, the president said, "to take our time
and think these issues through.”

(This article was written by Steven R.
Hurst of the Associated Press).



A leading retailer is seeking a person for this senior position.

ACCOUNTANT

















Applicants should have a Masters Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA,
CA qualification or equivalent qualification recognized by the Bahamas

Institute of Chartered Accountants.

The successful candidate will be responsible for all financial aspects of the
company and ensuring compliance to established company policies and

procedures.

The ideal candidate should:

Have a minimum five years experience in a similar fast paced




environment.

Have experience in compiling financial statements in line with






International Accounting standards.
Be able to prepare budgets and financial reports for upper management.

Have experience liaising with banking officers, auditors and insurance




agents.

Be able to communicate effectively with all levels of management.
Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines.

Be proficient in Excel and Quickbooks.

Ability to communicate with international franchisor and travel

as necessary.

Have the ability to be a team leader.
Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

The position offers an excellent remuneration and benefits package.

Interested person should submit your resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 328-4211



I pray for
Tax reform in
the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANKS for this oppor-
tunity to express my feelings
on Tax Reform in our coun-
try.
As a small business per-
son my company can be
classified more so as a prod-
uct based than a service
based establishment. I con-
tinue to pray for tax reform
in our beloved Bahamas
because customs duty is just
not cutting it.

This country has long out-
grown customs duty as we
know it today in the

LETTERS

KcUUCHEN@UNAL OLN alelantere (eM ALedE



Bahamas, and we should
move to other forms of tax-
es that will level the playing
field for all, and lighten the
strain on our public purse.
I read with interest the
statements made by Abaco
Markets Limited CEO
Gavin Watchorn, and its
Chairman Dionisio
D’ Aguilar about re-invoic-
ing on the rise in the
Bahamas. Re-invoicing is an

I do not believe these
allegations against PM

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me to comment on your front page article
(dated Friday, July 23, 2010) entitled: “PM threats to pros-
ecutor”. Not for one second do I believe these allegations.
It is a case of “Hell hath no fury like that of a woman
scorned”. The nearest case which comes to mind is that of
USS. Supreme Court Justice Thomas when in a similar man-
ner the lady involved felt it necessary to retaliate since she

could not have her way.

I also believe the woman in this article is being used by
politicians (mainly Opposition Members) to achieve their
goals. The FNM Party should make their response that no
one is entitled to a promotion in any business. Think of
the dozens of people who felt they deserved the next pro-
motion in their company or service, but it went to another
— however, they did not react in this way. How ridiculous.

A BAHAMIAN,
Nassau
July 23, 2010.

A major moral, spiritual
problem of our age

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Paul Kokoski’s excellent letter (June 25, 2010) under the
heading — “Euthanasia: Bringing back the ghost of Adolph
Hitler” — spotlighted a major moral, spiritual problem of our age
which today is largely overlooked, explicitly ignored, or even
supported by many countries and religious institutions.

Suffice it to say that at the 1945 Nuremberg Trials of the
Nazis, euthanasia and abortion were denounced strongly by the
judges as evil war crimes, and no person, group or country
disagreed with that verdict. Shortly afterwards, there was a
change of heart of some people, prompting celebrated British
author/broadcaster Malcolm Muggeridge to observe sardon-
ically in 1975: “It only takes 30 years in our Western civilisation
to transform a war crime into an act of compassion.”

The moral code of many people is simple: If our enemies
engage in certain acts, they are an abomination; if we or our
friends engage in similar acts, we are humanitarians!

FRANCIS NORONHA
Nassau,
July 14, 2010.

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old scheme that Bahamas
Customs knew about a long
time ago, among other
schemes. With this re-invoic-
ing scheme companies are
avoiding the full duty on the
items. Big importers, and
companies love our present
customs duty form of taxa-
tion because they make a
killing in profits with the re-
invoicing scheme. Compa-
nies that are service base
also like the customs duty
system as they are not
affected like a product based
company. Small honest busi-
ness Owners in this country
do not stand a chance.

We need to implement
some type of income or val-
ue added tax moving for-
ward that will spread the tax
collection more equally to
companies, and citizens who
fit in the category of product
based, or service based envi-
ronment.

Basically, the customs
duty method of collecting
taxes heavily rely on a prod-
uct based society for its rev-
enue, whereas the service
based part of our society
never pay their fair share of
taxes.

Example of this is a doc-
tor or lawyer would pay
business license and the rest
of it, but he or she never pay
taxes on the services they
render.

Customs duty is bad for
small businesses, as it ties
up a business cash flow at
the front end as we import
products. We are then stuck
with that product with hopes
of selling the item. On the
other hand customs receives
its money up front with no
regard to the small business
person’s struggles.

The OECD, and others
will force the Bahamas to
change its tax structure
whether we want it or not.
Therefore, we should at
least discuss this matter
which will come sooner than
later.

GENE GIBSON
Nassau,
July, 2010.

There is a
worldwide
recession
in progress

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ACCORDING to news
reports (Associated Press
and other media) over the
weekend even Her
Majesty, Queen Elizabeth
II, has made budget cuts in
keeping with the severe
budgets cuts made by her
government in England,
and the spending freezes
by countries of Europe.

I just wonder whether
that Opposition Member
of the Bahamian Parlia-
ment has yet learned that
there is a world-wide reces-
sion in progress, and
whether it is necessary for
all of us to tighten our belts
for the good of the coun-
try. If not, then his follow-
ers Should enlighten him so
that others do not follow
his blind way.

A BAHAMIAN
Nassau,
July 19, 2010.

SE
eae

PHONE: 327-6464
De a ta dele

WE SEND ‘EM PAGKINY!



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 5



Seminar advises on
lucrative potential
of school tuck shops

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MINISTRY of Educa-
tion seminar was held to
advise Principals and school-
board members in Grand
Bahama on ways to min-
imise losses from potentially
lucrative school tuckshops
that can generate hundreds
of thousands of dollars
annually from each school.

According to Minister of
Education, Desmond Ban-
nister, Principals and other
school administrators have
found themselves “distract-
ed” from their core educa-
tional mandate by the
demands of accounting for
the funds generated through
school tuck shops.

Resources

Such funds, which can add
up to hundreds of thousands
of dollars per school each
year in the case of some of
the larger schools, or poten-
tially millions across the
public education system as
a whole, can be “very use-
ful” for schools seeking addi-
tional resources in their
institutions, said Mr Bannis-
ter.

“They can spend it on
institutional materials,
books, underprivileged stu-
dents who may have prob-
lems, additional janitorial
people when they have spe-
cial events... any number of
things to help within school
system,” explained Mr Ban-
nister.

Putting things in perspec-
tive, noted Mr Bannister, the
revenues from tuck shops in
large schools can generate









TUCK SHOP SEMINAR: Desmond Bannister

significantly more than the
government allocates to
schoolboards, which adds up
to $700,000 for seven schools
in Grand Bahama.

“The important thing is
that principals are really
educators — they should be
spending time dealing with
instruction and discipline but
what they are having to do
because of tuck shops is
spend time dealing a lot with
accounting issues also,” said
the Minister.

An accounting firm has
been brought onboard by
the Ministry of Education to
explain to schools the advan-
tages of some new technolo-
gy which the Ministry hopes
to implement in schools to
assist in making accounting
for the funds easier and to
minimise losses.

Computer accounting soft-

Police investigate
two drownings

POLICE are investigating two drownings that happened

yesterday.

The first incident was at Balmoral Beach at Blackbeard’s
Cay in the afternoon. A man, believed to be in his 40s, was
taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead.

The second drowning took place an hour later at Adelaide
Beach. A man, believed to be in his late 50s, was found on
the sand and pronounced dead at the scene.

— oo

ware has already been
installed at SC McPherson
school, and there are plans
to expand the installation to
five other major schools
within the year, and more
when funds permit.

Principals

“You have principals and
administrators dealing with
tuck shops on a daily basis
and there are hundreds and
hundreds of receipts. An
automated system will make
their job so much easier and
if there would have been
losses it will mean there is
more efficiency,” said Mr
Bannister.

Auditor General Terrance
Bastian also attended the
Grand Bahama seminar to
speak with educators about
means of improving finan-
cial accountability in schools.

tem eM ee ee

RS ae Re ad
PHONE: 327-6464
Wii. archi con

ee a



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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Third Met Office employee asked to
explain actions ahead of deadly tornado

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A THIRD employee at the
Meteorological Office has been
given a “show cause” letter by
officials to explain their actions
ahead of the deadly tornado
that killed three people in
Grand Bahama in March, The
Tribune understands.

According to multiple
sources close to the situation,
the employee — who was on
duty on March 29 the day the
twister ripped through portions
of Grand Bahama —- received
the disciplinary letter last
Thursday. The forecaster is
said to have 14 days in which to
respond.

However, well-placed
sources claim the forecaster
was on a break and left anoth-
er officer in the office when

reports came in about tornado
activity.

The sources believe the let-
ter is an act of retaliation
because the employee did not
issue a severe weather warn-
ing earlier this month when
asked by a senior official to do
so.

Thunderstorm

“It quite surprised me, I
don’t know why (the employ-
ee) was chosen. I think it’s a
matter of retaliation because
there was a time when (the
forecaster) was asked to issue a
severe weather warning at the
beginning of this month and
was contacted by (a senior offi-
cial) and told that wherever he
was in the city he was experi-
encing heavy thunderstorm and
showers. He asked (the fore-

caster) to issue a warning.”

However the employee did
not adhere to these instructions
because it was felt there was
no need based on reading of
monitoring systems, the source
added.

This comes as claims emerge
of low staff morale at the Mete-
orological Office due to claims
of “micro-managing” from offi-
cials at the Department of
Meteorology and reports of in-
fighting at the senior manage-
ment level during staff meet-
ings.

“In headquarters at Oakes
Field, they are micro-manag-
ing the Met Office. We have
all the necessary tools and
models at hand but they are
sitting there and telling the staff
at the airport what to do — it’s
demoralising,” said one source.
“This is the lowest the morale
has ever been.”

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Said another source at the
Meteorological office: “The
morale in that office is under
a snake’s belly — it’s very
poor.”

A message left for the direc-
tor at the Meteorological
Department was not returned
up to press time.

Response

Yesterday Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux could
not confirm if a third employee
received a disciplinary letter.
He added that he did not know
the response of the other two
forecasters who were given let-
ters earlier this month.



“T know about two people
(who received letters). I know
that they responded, with



respect to the final outcome,
as we speak I’m not aware,”
Mr Deveaux said.

‘Intense and productive’ OECD meeting

By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information Services



THE Peer Review Group of the Organisation
for Economic Cooperation and Development
Global Forum held a “very intense and produc-
tive” meeting in the Bahamas, said the Ministry of
Finance.

The Third Meeting of the Peer Review Group
of the Global Forum on Transparency and
Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes was
held last Tuesday until Thursday at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino,
Cable Beach. It was the first time that the
Bahamas hosted a meeting of an OECD-related
initiative.

About 35 jurisdictions were represented either
as members of the Peer Review Group or as juris-
dictions that were part of the first tranche of
assessments. The outcome of the meeting will be
submitted for consideration at the full Global
Forum of 94 members scheduled in Singapore at
the end of September, 2010.

Rowena Bethel, legal advisor at the Ministry of
Finance and the Bahamas’ Representative on the
OECD Global Forum led the country’s position.

Reviews

“The Bahamas provided an assessor for the
first tranche of reviews demonstrating its com-
mitment to make an effective contribution to the
work of the Global Forum,” said Ms Bethel at a
closing press conference on Thursday, July 22.

She said the assessments can be viewed as a
means for maintaining the level playing field as
they ensure that all jurisdictions are assessed
against a set of standards that seek to establish
where each jurisdiction is in relation to the imple-
mentation of the tax transparency standards.

“Clearly, all jurisdictions are engaged in the
ground work to ensure implementation of the

standards. Indeed, the Global Forum has set an
ambitious schedule of reviews for some 100 plus
countries over the next three years,” she said.

Ms Bethel applauded the Global Forum for its
inclusiveness; as the membership of the Peer
Review Group is diverse, covering countries and
territories from many countries developing and
developed and having onshore and offshore finan-
cial services centres.

“This approach assists in the creation of the
level playing field and should be applauded and
replicated by other international groupings.

“It is our belief that global matters should
have a global dialogue,” she said.

Deliberations

Ms Bethel described the deliberations as frank
and open and highlighted not only the important
differences in the various countries’ systems, but
also helped to bridge the gaps in understanding
between members about their respective tax and
information sharing systems.

“The issue of tax cooperation is relatively
new for many jurisdictions — particularly those
countries without domestic income or corporate
tax regimes.

“Therefore, the tremendous efforts of all par-
ticipating jurisdictions to apply the internationally
agreed standards through the negotiation of tax
information sharing arrangements and the effec-
tive implementation of those arrangements should
be recognised as an important achievement by
the international community,” Ms Bethel said.

Pascal Saint-Amans, Head of the Global
Forum Secretariat also highly praised the out-
come of the meeting.

“We have had a very important meting for
the first time in the history of the work that we
have a conclusive process resulting in the adopt-
ing of reports which have been agreed by every-
body and most of them agreeing the reports.




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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Getting the most out of appraisals

By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

IF YOU'RE selling your
property, an appraisal is cru-
cial for establishing the mar-
Ket value.

The local banks have a list
of approved appraisers.
These appraisers are able to
access data to comparable
sales, which along with oth-
er factors, helps them deter-
mine the true value.

Appraisers are happy to
factor any information you
can provide about your
property to generate a more
accurate report. As a seller,

REAL ESTATE

list the best features of your
home, including recent
improvements, professional
landscaping, or even benefits
of your location (such as
avoiding traffic hassles and
ease of access - i.e. short-
cuts - to nearby schools).
While you won’t neces-
sarily be graded for your
housekeeping skills, apprais-
ers do pay attention to the
very appearance and clean-
liness of your home. You
can positively affect your

appraisal’s outcome if your
lawn is mowed and raked,
your windows sparkle and
your closets look spacious.
Appraisers are almost look-
ing through a purchaser’s
eyes, SO pretend you’re
preparing for an open house
before their arrival.

It would be helpful to pro-
vide a copy of the appraisal
to a potential purchaser.
Purchasers can only consid-
er a home if it’s within an
appraised value they can
afford. Also, there is
ABSOLUTELY no point in
listing your home at a high-

er figure than the appraised
value. Almost all purchasers
need a mortgage and they
are not going to pay above
the appraised value!

An important question to
ask when pricing your home
is: Would you pay above the
appraised value for the
property? And, more to the
point, would a bank lend
above the appraised value?

Of course, in both cases
the answer is No.

Tip of the Week — Read
through the appraisal report
as soon as you get it. If you

find any errors (hopefully
there won’t be any) contact
the appraiser immediately.

(Mike Lightbourn is pres-
ident of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty)

Questions or comments?
Email me at
ask@ColdwellBanker

Bahamas.com. MIKE LIGHTBOURN



BAHAMAROST LOGO UNVEILED

VACANCY

In anticipation of ihe opening of our new sion,
Solomon’s Fresh hlarket, we are seeking applications
for the following positions:

Project Mansirer
Store Manager
AGS Shore Managers
From-End Supervisors
Warehouse Supervise
Micat Supervisor
Produce Supervisor
Re-Order Buyer
Pharmacist



PERMANENT SECRETARY
to the Ministry of Tourism | _
Mrs. Hyacinth Winder- | \J
Pratt unveiled the logo for
the new BahamaHost Cor-
porate Programme. The
programme was launched
on Thursday at the British
Colonial Hilton.

Mrs. Pratt said the
Bahamahost Corporate
Programme will provide
the opportunity for private
businesses to participate
in further strengthening
customer service in the
Bahamas.

Through this new cor-
















Ouistanding solary, benefits and incentives offered
Expenence desiree,

Interested candidates shoukd forward their mesumes
to hngtamlioods com.
















ee dae i
IGH COMMISSIONER OF REPUBLIC OF SRI LANKA VISITS MINISTER



No telephone calls please. Only persons selected for
an interview will be contacted.

















2 ! { | a ik it : porate component of |Z
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MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest welcomes Dr. Palitha Tiriki Bandara Kohona, High
Commissioner of The Republic of Sri Lanka, to the Bahamas during a courtesy call on Friday at the Min-
istry of National Security in the Churchill Building. Also pictured is Peter Deveaux Isaacs, acting perma-
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Don’t burn our bridges: The case
for a single Caribbean airline

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

“DON’T BURN OUR
BRIDGES: The Case for
Owning Airlines” is the
title of a book authored

by Jean Holder, the cur-
rent Chairman of the
Caribbean airline, LIAT.
It is a serious work which
should be read by all who
are concerned with both
Caribbean economic inte-
gration and the growth of
the services industries at
both the national and
regional levels.

Holder is uniquely
placed to write the book,
not only because of his
position with LIAT but
also because of his past
work as Secretary-Gener-
al of the Caribbean
Tourism Organization and
the Caribbean Tourism
Research and Develop-
ment Centre.



MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 13A

ROBINSON ROAD
Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

=F
Cs

7 an

=

WORLD VIEW

His basic argument is
that Caribbean govern-
ments must own a region-
al airline. “To those who
say Caribbean govern-
ments cannot afford to do
this, I reply that they can-
not afford not to,” he
emphatically declares.

As Holder sees it, the
countries of the Caribbean
archipelago “depend on
air transportation services
to connect them with the
world and each other, and
for this, they cannot rely
solely on foreign carriers,
which would take deci-
sions about services,
routes, schedules and
financial performances
according to the best
interests of their owners
and shareholders.” He
argues that “such deci-
sions will not, and cannot,
always coincide with the
best interests of the
Caribbean states.”

Ambition

One of the compelling
reasons that Holder
advances for an airline
that is a Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM) car-
rier, is the ambition to
create a Single Market
and Economy among the
15-member states of the
grouping. “In a vibrant,
working, single market
and economy where there
is a greater harmonization
of regional and interna-
tional policies than cur-
rently exist, the political
directorate of the CARI-
COM member states must
know for certain that it is
not a hostage to external
forces, for either political
or economic reasons.”

“Tt should not be possi-
ble,” he says, “for it (the
Caribbean Single Market)
to be cut off from the rest
of the world and the mem-
ber states from each other,
simply because it offends
some other country or

JC
Co

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that road works will be carried out on sec-
tions of Robinson Road between Palm Beach Street and Balfour Avenue effective Monday July 26th, 2010. Installation of
new twenty-four inches (24”) Water main pipes will be constructed in this phase. Construction works will be done in dif-
ferent phases starting eastbound.
e Motorist should diverted east through Palm Beach Street, continue along Balfour Avenue and exit through Claridge

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e Motorist travelling westbound should continue on the one way traffic scheme in place.

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We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project.of Thompson Blvd. A safe route will be
provided for pedestrians as the alternative for the closed footpath.

We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project.

For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@ cartellone.com.ar

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks @bahamas.gov.bs



1



“It has long
been argued
that the airlines,
owned by
individual
Caribbean states
in pursuit of
their ‘symbols
of nationhood
and sovereignty’
were luxuries
they could not
afford.”



some other person outside
the community.”

He may be over empha-
sizing the case to make
the point. It is hardly like-
ly that the region would
ever be entirely cut off
from the rest of the world
by all foreign carriers.
Equally, it is unlikely that
all air transportation with-
in the region would be cut
off by all carriers at the
same time. Some airline
or airlines will always
remain to pick up the
slack and the business,
even though it may be ata
higher cost to the region.

But, it is the case not
only that some foreign-
owned airlines could
desert some countries in
the region if they consid-
ered that the destinations
had become uneconomic,
but also that the airlines
that remain could demand
higher prices for the ser-
vices they provide. In this
regard, it is important that
all CARICOM countries
should have a carrier,
owned within the region,
on which they can rely
and which they can use to
calm prices, provided that
the governments of all the
countries understand that
they cannot expect other
regional governments to
subsidize their routes.

This is the contention
right now about LIAT -
the airline that serves the
Eastern and Southern
Caribbean.

LIAT is owned and
financed by only three of
CARICOM’s govern-
ments — Antigua and Bar-
buda, Barbados and St
Vincent & the
Grenadines. The St Vin-
cent Prime Minister,
Ralph Gonsalves, makes
the point repeatedly that
many other CARICOM
countries (not Bahamas,
Belize Jamaica, Trinidad
and Tobago, and Suri-
name) depend on LIAT to
provide air transportation
for people, the services
industries and some
goods, but they decline to
contribute to the cost.

It is quite remarkable
that some of the
Caribbean countries that
refuse to participate finan-
cially in LIAT have no
hesitancy in providing
subsidies to large foreign
owned airlines to continue
flying into their countries.
British Airways, Ameri-
can Airlines and even
German airlines have







SIR RONALD SANDERS

been the beneficiaries of
such subsidies.

The Caribbean has also
witnessed the financial
failure of airlines that
have been owned within
individual states — either
by governments or private
sector companies. BWIA,
owned by the government
of Trinidad and Tobago,
collapsed under a moun-
tain of debt and had to be
closed-down to rid itself
of many of its unsustain-
able obligations. The
Trinidad and Tobago gov-
ernment assumed much of
the debts of BWIA and
launched Caribbean Air-
lines which now flies much
fewer routes.

Jamaica, too, saw Air
Jamaica seamlessly accu-
mulate huge debt in a
transition from govern-
ment to private sector and
back to government own-
ership, until the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund
(IMF) made it clear, as
part of its conditions for
a loan to the government
to prop up the economy,
that Air Jamaica had to
be sold.

Merged

In an arrangement
between the governments
of Jamaica and Trinidad
and Tobago, Caribbean
Airlines now owns Air
Jamaica. Even though the
name “Air Jamaica” will
remain, the airline is now
effectively owned by
Caribbean Airlines and
will be merged with it.

It has long been argued
that the airlines, owned by
individual Caribbean
states in pursuit of their
‘symbols of nationhood
and sovereignty’ were lux-
uries they could not
afford.

When Holder was writ-
ing this book, he could not
have envisaged that the
Trinidad and Tobago
owned, Caribbean Air-
lines, would have bought
out Air Jamaica a few
months later.

He said: “The move
from national ownership
and control, to what I
refer as community own-
ership and control, would
require a sea change in
the thinking of the region,
not only among political
leaders but also at the lev-
el of the people them-
selves”.

That sea change has
begun to happen, swelled
by a huge tsunami of
necessity that is wrecking
weak national capacity
and underscoring the
urgency of more robust
capability from deeper
Caribbean economic inte-
gration.

It has taken severe eco-
nomic collapse in Jamaica
to cause pride to be swal-
lowed and a single airline
to be created for Jamaica
and Trinidad and Tobago.

St. Albans Drive

Newly refurbished, 2

bedroom,

1.5 bath, condo

in courtyard setting. Single storey bldg. Kitchen
appliances

granite counter

tops, washer dryer,

$127,000 Bank Financing available $6,500 down

Tel: 325-1325
422-4489
477-0200







THE TRIBUNE





MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 15

LOCAL NEWS









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7

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e





Senior police officers
and govt officials on
community walkabout

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Police
Superintendent Christopher
Pickstock, officer in charge
of the EMR Division, led a
team of senior officers and
government officials on a
community walkabout in the
Martin Town and Russell
Town areas.

“We not only want to
increase police visibility but
we want to reach out to res-
idents living in the settle-
ments of Eight Mile Rock,”
said Supt Pickstock.

“We want show them that
we care about their wellbe-
ing and safety,” he said.

The Police have partnered
with community leaders in

the various sectors of EMR.

Participating in the walk-
about were EMR MP Ver-
nae Grant, Pastor Lindy
Russell, Pastor Carlton Gar-
diner and Rev Rita Stuart,
as well officers from Police
Fire Dept, Environmental
Health, Road Traffic, and
Socials Services.

“We have certainly bene-
fited from the support given
by members of the commu-
nities,” said Supt Pickstock.

“We recognise that if we
are to achieve any measure
of success, we have to work
together with all sectors of
our society,” Supt Pickstock
said.

The walkabouts in EMR
commenced in February and
the goal is to visit a different
community each month.

GB traffic victim identified

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The victim in Grand Bahama’s fifth traffic
fatality for the year has been identified as 42-year-old Brid-

gette Dean.

She and two others were seriously injured in a car accident
on Midshipman Road on Thursday.
Dean, a passenger, was ejected from the vehicle upon

impact.

The driver and the other female passenger are detained at

Rand Memorial Hospital.

Inspector Hector Delva, assistant police liaison officer,
reported that a traffic accident occurred around 2.30pm in
the area of Victoria Inn Hotel, involving a red-coloured

Chevy Trail Blazer.

The vehicle was being driven by 26-year-old Tino Deal of

Holmes Rock.

Mr Delva said the vehicle was traveling west along Mid-
shipman Road when the driver lost control and collided

into a tree in the median.

The vehicle was extensively damaged.

The victims were transported by EMS personnel to RMH,
where Dean was pronounced dead around 3.10pm.

Investigations are continuing into the matter.

PUERTO RICO: Governor seeks
aid for 17 flooded communities

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

PUERTO RICO'S gov-
ernor has declared a state
of emergency for 17 flood-
ed communities in the U.S.
territory as he presses the
federal government to con-
tribute aid, according to
Associated Press.

Gov. Luis Fortuno says
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency noti-
fied him Sunday that it will
review his request for aid
in low-lying areas hit by
days of heavy rains that

flooded dozens of homes
and damaged roadways.

The cash-strapped Puer-
to Rican government is
helping repair infrastruc-
ture with its own emer-
gency aid while officials
await a federal determina-
tion.

A weather system that
later turned into Tropical
Storm Bonnie caused wide-
spread flooding last week
in eastern Puerto Rico.

A 14-year-old boy
drowned in one swollen
river.









ABOVE: Supt Christopher





Pickstock and several senior 1
police officers along with Thigh & Leg Snack
EMR MP Vernae Grant (in wi fries & biscuit




pink) and Rev Rita Stuart are
seen during the walkabout in
Martin Town/Russell Town.



Rib & Wing Snack
w/ fries & biscuit




<0 Fae







































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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010
LOCAL NEWS

Armstrong bids Tour adieu, heads for the Bahamas

PARIS (AP) — Lance Arm-
strong didn't want to go out this
way.

In his final Tour de France,

the seven-time champion
popped a tyre, crashed and
struggled up the mountains.
Worse, he appears to be the tar-

get of a US. federal investigation
into doping and fraud allegations
while a rider on the US Postal
team.

One Tour too many? Maybe.
Still, he maintained he had
no regrets despite the ignomin-
ious ending of No. 13 — nearly



OE MN MTC mm my. deL-D (Ko



Donnetta Turnquest puts high

Donnetta Turnquest heads a driving force behind the scenes at Royal Bank, ensuring that background
staff is equipped to provide quality service to each internal client. As Service Centre Manager for
The Bahamas, Cayman and Turks & Caicos Islands, Turnquest often encounters fresh faces and
new challenges while seeking to maintain trained and motivated employees.

Ms. Turnquest is well equipped for the task, having worked 25 years with RBC and RBC FINCO.
She notes, “I work closely with management and staff to ensure the Service Centre interacts
seamlessly with the branch network to deliver an exceptional client experience. | am responsible
for building a dynamic team that is responsive to an ever changing environment and for ensuring
that staff enhance their skills to attain both their personal and professional goals.”

At age 17, Turnquest journeyed from her home in Long Island to work as a summer student in
banking. She fell in love with the field and soon began a longstanding career with RBC. Over the
years, Ms. Turnquest has held numerous positions with increasing levels of responsibility including:
Customer Service Officer, Proof Operator, Loans Secretary, Loans Supervisor, Collateral Securities
Supervisor, Branch Operations Officer and Manager Customer Service & Operations. The past 6
years were spent within the Bahamas Service Centre at RBC with the added oversight of the
Barbados Service Centre for 2 years and current oversight of Cayman Service Centre.

As a 2006 Royal Performance Cruise Winner for Leadership, Turnquest is an Associate of the
Institute of Canadian Bankers and holds a Bsc. Business Professional Management with concentration
in Finance from Nova University and Master of Business Administration from McHari Institute.
When she is not traveling, Tumquest enjoys walking, cooking, boating and spending quality time
with son, family and friends.

RBC Royal Bank
of Canada

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

® Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada.
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

LieLe

value on helping her staff succeed.







40 minutes behind the leader,
former teammate and rival
Alberto Contador.

"IT wouldn't say that it's
ruined,” he said during an inter-
view with a few reporters Sun-
day. "In 10 years, when I look
back on the 2010 Tour, it won't
be the memory that I have.

"Obviously, I won't have a
yellow jersey to remember —
I'll remember the team, digging
deep to win the team GC (gen-
eral classification)," he said. "It's
significant for us and the spon-
sor.

"I'll remember having my son
here for a week at the Tour," he
said, referring to 10-year-old
Luke. "I'll remember the bad
luck, certainly — the crashes.
But that won't be the thing that
I'll take away."

During the race, there were
numerous published reports of a
federal investigation led by Jeff
Novitzky, a special agent with
the Food and Drug Administra-
tion, into claims about Arm-
strong and doping by former
teammate Floyd Landis.

Several former riders who
race with Armstrong have
reportedly been subpoenaed.
Armstrong faced questions
about those reports at the Tour.
He said he had not been sub-
poenaed or contacted by
Novitzky himself.

Landis, who was stripped of
his 2006 Tour title for doping,
had long denied doping until
April, when he announced that
he, in fact, did — and alleged
Armstrong did, too. The claim
came as Armstrong was riding
in the Tour of California.

Armstrong, who denies the
allegations, faulted Landis for
trying to clear his conscience and
trying "to incriminate a half-
dozen other people. ... To me,
that doesn't add up."

"That's just somebody who's
trying to ruin the lives of oth-
ers," Armstrong said on a high-
speed French train from Bor-
deaux to the Paris area for the
Tour's 20th and final stage.

He insisted his life isn't going
to change.

The Livestrong wristbands of
his charitable foundation will
continue to sell; he will do char-
ity rides; he will still be a father
of four — soon to be five — chil-
dren; he will still hang out with
stars like singer Bono and actor
Matthew McConaughey.

Ask any rider or team man-
ager at the Tour, and it's clear
Armstrong's mark on the sport is
indelible — the use of earpiece
radios for riders, training regi-
mens, diet and race strategy,
among other things. His success
helped convert what was mostly
a summertime passion in Europe
into a 21st Century business fan-
ning interest from Canada to
China.

But his long-masterful con-
trol of his image — cancer sur-
vivor, Tour champion, public
personality and pitchman —
may finally be escaping his grasp.

THE TRIBUNE









FINAL TOUR: Lance Armstrong

Last year, returning from a
four-year retirement from the
Tour, he finished an impressive
third, got within one second of
the yellow jersey he knows so
well, and warmed the hearts of
French fans who once despised
him for his methodical, "Amer-
ican" drive to victory above all.

This year, he was but a mere
23rd, and his best single showing
was arguably in the prologue in
Rotterdam, where he placed
fourth.

He gradually downscaled his
ambitions. At first he wanted to
win. Then, he wanted a stage
win, which he narrowly missed in
an eight-man sprint finish to the
16th stage, the toughest day in
the Pyrenees.

When that opportunity van-
ished, he focused on his
RadioShack squad — which did
give him a sliver of glory and a
podium appearance by winning
the team classification.

In Stage 3, he blew a tyre on
cobblestones, and lost time. In
Stage 8, he got involved in three
crashes that his 38-year-old body
just couldn't recover from in
time to scale tough Alpine
climbs.

"With the first crash, my body
never felt the same after that,
and the second was the nail in
the coffin,” he said. "So you
could look at it like that, and
yeah, it was one (Tour) too
many."

Yet he said pulling out wasn't
an option.

"T couldn't quit," Armstrong
said. "I could have said a dozen
things were wrong, but that's not
the commitment that I made.
The result wasn't ideal, but it
would have been a serious mis-
take to quit on the team, to quit
on the sponsor, to quit on my
fans.

"OK, it's not what they want-
ed, it's not what any of us want-
ed. But it would have been far
worse to DNF" — Did Not Fin-
ish, he said.

He's happy, for the time
being, to be out of the limelight.

"Right now, I'm going to the
Bahamas, I'm gonna put my feet
up and forget about riding the
bike for a little bit. Drink some
cold beer. Build some sand cas-
tles with my kids," he said after
the race ended.

"T got my competitive fix for
the next 40 years, it will take
until about 80 (years old) and
then I don't think I will wanna
come back," he said.

His 2.5 million-plus follow-
ers on Twitter will have to wait.

"I'm laying off the Twitter
for a while. I gotta go away.”

Teenager stabbed

FROM page one
SHOOTING

POLICE are investigating a shooting that sent two men to hospi-

tal early yesterday morning.

It was reported the men were at Cottonwood Street, Pinewood
Gardens when a masked man in a Honda Inspire car with heavily tint-

ed windows fired in their direction.

The men were taken to hospital by ambulance and are both list-

ed in stable condition.

Police are also investigating an alleged armed robbery.

On Saturday evening, two men — one armed with a handgun —
robbed a store on Farrington Road.

It was reported that the men entered Destiny General Trading
Store, demanded cash and escaped with cellphones, jewellery and an

undetermined amount of cash.

Anyone with any information that may assist investigations should
call police urgently on 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on

328-TIPS (8477).



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THE TRIBUNE

usiness

MONDAY, 2010





FRUSTRATED: Peter Nygard.

Nygard Cay’s $50m
lease ‘frustration’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CANADIAN fashion
mogul Peter Nygard has
expressed “frustration” with
the wait for government
approvals that would enable
him to proceed with the $50
million project to rebuild his
luxury Lyford Cay play-
ground, saying on Friday that
he had been waiting for some
permits for “a couple of
years now”.

Speaking from the Nygard
Cay home that was ravaged
by fire last November, Mr
Nygard said the two-three
year project he had planned
would “easily be” a $50 mil-
lion investment that could
employ 200-300 Bahamian
construction workers, adding

SEE page 6B

* Fashion tycoon says
rebuilding of fire-ravaged
luxury playground ‘stalled’
by wait for Department
of Lands and Surveys,
as all relevant permits
will flow from that

* Says been waiting two
years for some approvals,
and situation making
him a ‘bit tongue-tied’
on Bahamas promotion

* Nygard Cay loss strips
Bahamas of marketing tool
to attract high-end tourists

* Reality TV show featuring
Nygard and Bahamas
put on hold due to
reconstruction wait

Handicraft project
eyes $1.1m sales
in 12 months

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A $500,000 Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) fund-
ed project is projecting that sales of Bahamian-made handicraft
products through a virtual, Internet-based marketplace it will
create should hit $1.1 million after 12 months in operation.

Don Demeritte, the former Water & Sewerage Corporation
chairman who is acting as a consultant to the project, entitled
Bahamas Virtual Platform, said it aimed to strengthen the
Bahamian handicraft industry by “clustering” its participants for
“strength in numbers”, enabling them to enjoy greater raw
materials buying power and to sell their products to a global

market.



Praising Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) chairman, Edison Key, and the organisation’s annual
general manager responsible for handicraft projects, Donnalee
Bowe, for playing pivotal roles in the successful bid for funding
from the IDB’s Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF), Mr

Demeritte said the project ulti-
mately hoped to make the

SEE page 7B

Hotels ‘quarters, not years
away’ from recovery

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian resort indus-
try wants to see business levels
comparable to 2008 numbers
“sustained for two-three quar-
ters” before declaring it has tru-
ly recovered, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president telling Tribune Busi-
ness that while July and August
were unlikely to match June
numbers, continued improve-
ment upon 2009 comparatives
was expected.

Robert Sands, who is also

Baha Mar’s senior vice-presi-
dent of governmental and
external affairs, said: “The
trend for July and August
remains cautious growth, cer-
tainly better than last year’s lev-
els, but not to levels achieved in
June.

“If we get that, it will be a
bonus for us, but we’re look-
ing for improvement upon last
year going forward. I think we
want to get a real year under
our belts, because while there
may be confidence levels grow-

SEE page 5B

Nygard Cay resort
plan is dropped

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FASHION tycoon Peter
Nygard said on-again, off-again
plans to develop a small private
resort at his Nygard Cay retreat
now look off the table, given
opposition from his wealthy
neighbours behind the gates of
the exclusive Lyford Cay com-
munity.

Acknowledging that propos-
als for developing a mini-pri-
vate resort at Nygard Cay, giv-

en its popularity as a sought-
after, exclusive getaway desti-
nation, had been around since
the late Sir Lynden Pindling
was prime minister, when asked
whether such plans were again
being ruled out, Mr Nygard
responded: “It sounds like it.
“Tt doesn’t sound like the rest
of the community wants it.
That’s fine; I do not want to
fight with the neighbours.
We’re here in a beautiful com-

SEE page 7B

Well Lev. 2 2.0



=

BREITLING

Cable & Wireless ‘front
runner’ to acquire BIC

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government-

appointed

Bahamas

Telecommunica-

tions Company’s
(BTC) privatisation committee
is focusing on talks with Cable
& Wireless Communications,
the regional telco with opera-
tions in 13 other Caribbean
countries, as the current front-
runner to acquire a stake in the
state-owned incumbent, sources
familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business.

This newspaper was
informed that the committee
had been “working for a little
while” with Cable & Wireless,
having rejected earlier bids
from the JP Morgan/Vodafone
combination, plus the Atlantic
Tele-Network/CFAL duo.

However, the BTC privati-
sation is by no means ‘a done
deal’, as numerous issues still
need to be resolved via negoti-
ation between the commit-
tee/Government and Cable &
Wireless. This newspaper also
understands, from reliable
sources, that there is at least
one other “major party” that
has expressed an interest in
becoming BTC’s strategic part-

* Government-appointed privatisation committee talking to
regional telco with operations in 13 Caribbean countries
over BTC stake sale, although much remains to be done

* Sources say J P Morgan/Vodafone, Atlantic Tele
Network/CFAL, both informed offers have been rejected

* Yet ‘significant other party’ also now interested
in BTC to give Cable & Wireless competition

* Unions said tight-lipped after meeting PM on
Friday, given opposition to Cable & Wireless

ner, after learning that all the
proposals submitted by the four
parties that qualified for the
due diligence round had been
rejected.

While the BTC privatisation
committee believes Cable &
Wireless is “very focused and
serious” in its attempt to
acquire a majority BTC stake,
Tribune Business was told that
the committee would also look
at other serious prospects to
ensure it did not “jump too
soon”, thereby making sure the
Government got the best strate-

gic partner both in terms of
purchase price and terms/con-
ditions.

Cable & Wireless was
described by one source as
“really well suited as the strate-
gic partner. The committee
believes they’re very interest-
ed in this asset, and have the
right idea about value, but there
are some important issues that
would need to be negotiated”.

“Some very fruitful discus-
sions” were said to have taken
place between the BTC pri-
vatisation committee and Cable

Nygard calls for medical
tourism to boost economy

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CANADIAN fashion tycoon
Peter Nygard has urged the
Bahamas to develop a medical
tourism industry to kick-start
its flagging economy, and
warned that implementing a
personal income tax to replace
the current Customs duty sys-
tem would be “disastrous” for
this nation.

Calling on the Bahamas to
“get on with it”, Mr Nygard
said during a Friday interview
that this nation needed to start
implementing the mega resort

* Urges Bahamas to ‘get on with it’ and look
for new industry to kick-start flagging economy,
and warns other nations already bypassing us

* Says personal income tax would be ‘disastrous’
for Bahamas, and increasing taxes to boost
revenues ‘sort of dangerous’ as costs of
doing business in this nation already high

projects it had on the table,
such as the $2.6 billion Baha
Mar redevelopment of Cable
Beach, or otherwise it would
lose its competitive edge as oth-
er nations did so and bypassed

BREITLING BOUTIQUE

it.

The flamboyant tycoon
warned that the Bahamas was
likely to lose “‘a lot of traffic” in

SEE page 7B

Ce i oe ee ed

& Wireless, in a bid to get toa
point where the Government
might find its proposal attrac-
tive.

Much work remains to be
done in this regard over the
coming months to reach an
agreement that both the Gov-
ernment and Cable & Wireless
find acceptable, with key issues
likely to include purchase price
(important for political reasons,
given the $260 million offer
made by Bluewater Communi-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





Pwo rs|





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP



The Bahamian Stock Market



BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE

By RoyalFidelity Capital two advancers and the other compared to the previous Cable Bahamas (CAB) =AML $1.04 $- 0 -11.11%
Markets securities remaining week's trading volume of was the big advancer, trad- BBL $0.30 $- 0 -52.38%
unchanged. 14,441 shares. ing 5,050 shares to see its BOB $5.00 $- 0 -15.25%

IT WAS another slow week Commonwealth Bank _ stock close the week up by BPF $10.63 $- 0 -1.02%
of trading in the Bahamian EQUITY MARKET (CBL) was the volume leader, $0.15 at $11.11. BSL $9.42 $- 0 -6.36%
stock market. Investors trad- A total of 26,520 shares trading 13,600 shares to see First Caribbean Interna- BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
ed in five out of the 24 listed changed hands, representing its stock close the week tional Bank (CIB) was the CAB $11.11 $0.15 5,050 11.32%
securities with one decliner, an increase of 12,079 shares unchanged at $6.02 sole decliner, trading 2,000 CBL $6.02 $- 13,600 -14.00%
shares to see its share price CHL $2.50 $- 0 -8.09%

close the week down by CIB $9.74 -$0.07 2,000 -2.50%

$0.07 at $9.74. CWCB — $2.32 -$0.01 0 -18.60%

DHS $2.00 $- 0 -21.57%

BOND MARKET FAM $6.07 $- 0 -6.47%

There was no activity in FBB $2.17 $- 0 -8.44%

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION the bond market last week. = FCC $0.27 $- 0 0.00%

FCL $4.65 $0.07 5,370 -2.52%

COMPANY NEWS FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%

FIN $8.90 $- 500 -4.09%

Earnings Releases: ICD $5.59 $- 0 0.00%

There was noearnings JSJ $9.95 $- 0 0.00%

release from any of the list- PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

ed companies this week.

& BILLING CHANGES

AGM Notice:
Fidelity Bank Bahamas
(FBB) will hold its AGM at

the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel on July 28, 2010, at
6pm.

Benchmark Bahamas
(BBL) has announced its
AGM will be held at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel
on July 28, 2010, at 6.30pm.



Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for allconsumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Famguard Corporation
(FAM) has announced its
AGM will be held at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel
on July 29, 2010, at 4pm.

Tela

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

Bahamas First Holdings has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel on August 4,
2010, at 5pm.

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;



Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th;



eee

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“We chose Indi¢O because we wanted

a cost effective, turnkey telephone system
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crucial fora 24/7 business like ours to have the

The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

TARIFF

RESIDENTIAL

10.95 cents per unit
11.95 cents per unit
14.95 cents per unit

0-200 units per month
201-800 units per month
Remaining units

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All units per month 15.00 cents per unit Steve Haughey
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GENERAL SERVICE
MONTHLY BILLS

CUSTOMER NEEDS - Better Service, Lower Coat

"Bimingte equipment rental expense

UNIT CHARGE for multine taephone systems

Demand charge per month
0-900,000 units per month
Remaining units per month
Minimum monthly charge

KVA CHARGE
$11.36 per KVA
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 3B



$152m caught up in
‘suspicious’ reports

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SUSPICIOUS transaction
reports received by the Finan-
cial Intelligence Unit (FIU)
increased by only nine cases
last year compared to 2008,
involving sums worth over
$152 million, the organisa-
tion’s anual report predicting
these figures would increase
in the future due to changes in
the global financial system.

According to the FIU’s
2009 annual report, there
were 138 reported cases of
suspicious transactions, up
over the 129 reported the pre-
vious year.

Of the 138 cases, 39 per
cent of those were forward-
ed to the Commissioner of
Police for review, 7 per cent

were closed and 52 per cent
are still pending.

The value of the funds
involved in the reported sus-
picious transactions valued
was $152.823 million. Only 10
per cent of that amount was
reported to the police for
investigation, with some 86
per cent of that figure caught
up in probes still pending. Just
$3.8 million was the final val-
ue of transactions where the
investigation had closed.

The FIU’s report also
revealed that 46 per cent of
the suspicious transaction
reports originated from
domestic/offshore banks,
while 31 per cent originated
solely from offshore banks.
Only 15 per of reports origi-
nated at standalone domestic
banks.

The report also revealed,

however, that Bahamians
accounted for more than 90
per cent in the categories of
nationality of contract part-
ners, domicile of contract
partners and nationality of
beneficial owners who were
the “subjects of the suspicious
transaction reports”.

Suspects

It was found that almost
half the suspects under review
were long-standing customers
of the disclosing institution,
while 35 per cent were new
customers.

The majority of the report-
ed transactions involved cash,
according to the FIU’s
grounds for suspicious trans-
action reports. They also cited
Internet research as the pri-
mary reason for making an

Ex-CFAL executive sets up own firm

A FORMER senior CFAL
executive has founded his
own financial services firm,
Leno Corporate Services,
with a focus on encouraging
Bahamians to become confi-
dent investors.

Leno is headed by char-
tered accountant Sean Long-
ley, who said the firm was
born out of an idea to pro-
vide a variety of financial ser-
vices to the local and regional
financial community, catering
to both large commercial
investora and taking an inter-
est small investors.

“We are pleased that Leno
is creating a very important
niche in financial services in
the Bahamas, with specialised
services designed to get ordi-
nary Bahamians investing
with confidence. All too often







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the small investor is intimi-
dated by lack of knowledge
and know-how,” said Mr Lon-
gley.

“We want to give smaller
clients that personal touch to
demonstrate how a seemingly
insignificant amount of fund-
ing can work for them. It’s
one of the reasons we chose
the motto ‘Bridging the gap
between your present and
future financial goals.”

Mr Longley, the company’s
president, said Leno offers a
wide range of financial con-
sulting and management ser-
vices, including pension con-
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investment management, bro-
kerage and trading, account-
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public accountant, holding
credentials from the Georgia
State Board of Accountancy.
He is a member of the Amer-
ican Institute of Certified
Public Accountants, and a
licensed member of the
Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants (BICA).

Mr Longley formed Leno
in May 2010. His previous
engagements include a two-
year stint as vice-president of
business development/client
relations at Colina Financial
Advisors.

He also served as a director
of the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) from
September 2002 to August
2006. The offices of Leno
Corporate Services are locat-
ed at Pineapple Place on
Bernard Road.



BAHAMAS

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&







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suspicious transaction report.

And while 43 per cent of
the cases cited fraud as the
reason for the report, 37 per
cent of the total suspected
cases had no idea of the
nature of the offense. Only 9
per cent of the cases involved
alleged drugs proceeds.

According to the Director
of the FIU, Reginald Fergu-
son, the increase in the vol-
ume of suspicious transaction
reporting will come from
jurisdictions heightening their
vigilance on the anti-money
laundering and counter-ter-
rorism fronts.

“This will become a reality
because of the relentless
efforts of countries to shore
up their images by closing
loopholes to money launder-
ing and financing of terror-
ism,” Mr Ferguson said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Cable & Wireless ‘front runner’ to acquire BICA

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a \ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the fol-
lowing position:

Associate, Alumni Relations and Annual Fund, responsible for
implementing The College of The Bahamas Alumni Relations
Programme and delivering a successful Annual Giving fundraising
programme. The successful candidate will be someone with strong
interpersonal, communication (both orally and written) and organi-
sational skills who enjoys the challenge of engaging people on a one
to one level.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to,
maintaining records of solicitations and donations; engaging and
supporting COB Alumni Association participation with leadership
level gift solicitations; participating in the development of short and
long range strategic planning activities to realize alumni engage-
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Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree; excellent interper-

FROM page 1B

cations Holdings under the for-
mer PLP administration) and
who takes responsibility for the
inevitable downsizing - the
Government or the strategic
partner.

And it is still by no means
certain that Cable & Wireless
will remain as the preferred
bidder. Tribune Business
sources suggested that other
telecoms operators with
Caribbean interests have also
now expressed an interest in
BTC, creating the possibility of
a bidding war and competition
for what initially was slated as a
51 per cent controlling interest
in BTC. “There is a significant
other party that has expressed
very strong desires to be part
of any discussions,” one source
told Tribune Business, although
they declined to name them.

Tribune Business revealed
on May 17, 2010, how Cable &
Wireless’s Caribbean unit had
entered the BTC privatisation
race, a development that did
not please the then-two remain-
ing contenders, the J P Mor-
gan/Vodafone combination,
and Atlantic Tele-Network,
which had partnered with
CFAL, the investment advisory
arm of Bahamian financial ser-
vices conglomerate A. F. Hold-
ings (the former Colina Finan-
cial Group).

Those two bidders had gone
through the process of paying
the $25,000 entrance fee and
entered the due diligence
phase. They saw Cable & Wire-
less as an uninvited interloper,
although this newspaper has
been told that the latter has also
paid the same entrance fee.

“The parties in the initial
phase, the competitive bidding
process, have been advised that
their proposals have not been
accepted,” one source now told
Tribune Business in relation to
the JP Morgan/Vodafone and
Atlantic Tele-Network/CFAL
bids. The other two companies

that entered the due diligence
phase along with this duo - Tril-
ogy International Partners and
Digicel - had already dropped
out of contention.

The J P Morgan bid was a
financially-led one, driven by
the global financial institution’s
private equity arm, with Voda-
fone in for a minority stake as
operating partner. The latter,
though, despite its global cov-
erage is chiefly a cellular oper-
ator, and does not have the
interest/experience in business
lines that BTC either has or
would likely get into once pri-
vatisation is complete.

Atlantic Tele-Network,
which is listed on the US Nas-
daq stock market, provides
wireless, fixed-line and broad-
band Internet in markets in the
US and the Caribbean, making
it - on the surface - a good fit
for BTC given that it is in the
same products and markets.

The company has a presence
in Bermuda and the Turks &
Caicos, where it operates as
Bermuda Digital Communica-
tions; in Guyana, where it is GT
& T; and Choice Communica-
tions in the US Virgin Islands.
Atlantic Tele-Network says it
specialises in telecoms markets
that are underserved and pro-
vide geographical challenges.

However, Tribune Business
was told that Atlantic Tele-Net-
work was “not the jigsaw fit
that Cable & Wireless would
be”, given the latter’s existing
pan-Caribbean coverage and
ability to deploy technology
and resources - both human
and financial - to transforming
BTC at relatively short notice.

Tribune Business sources
confirmed that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham met with
senior officials from the two
trade unions that represent
BTC’s line staff and middle
managers, the Bahamas Com-
munications and Public Offi-
cers Union (BCPOU), and the
Bahamas Communications and

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF HIRAM DAVIS, late
of Dundas Town, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demand against the above Estate
are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 9th day of August, A.D., 2010, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute
the assets having regard only to the claims
of which he shall then have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the dated
hereinbefore mentioned.

MICHAELA. DEAN & CO.
Loyalist Plaza
Don Mackay Boulevard
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor

i

Public Managers Union (BCP-
MU), at the Cabinet Office on
late Friday afternoon in rela-
tion to the BTC privatisation
process.

It is unclear what exactly was
discussed, as Tribune Business
understands that union leaders
were told by the Prime Minister
not to reveal the content of
their discussions publicly. That,
in and of itself, indicates that
something is moving in the
BTC privatisation process.

It is quite possible that the
PM met the unions to try and
ease their fears about the con-
sequences of any Cable &
Wireless purchase of a control-
ling interest in BTC. Both trade
unions have been anti-Cable &
Wireless for several years, sen-
timents that were again recent-
ly expressed by BCPOU presi-
dent, Bernard Evans, who said:
“Their track record as far as
labour relations is not
good... We go on record as
saying that we do not support
any kind of sale to Cable &
Wireless.”

Informed sources, though,
said that while these criticisms
may have had some merit years
ago, Cable & Wireless’
Caribbean operations had been
transformed out of all recogni-
tion within the past few years,
following the splitting of the
company’s international and
UK operations into two sepa-
rate businesses.

The Caribbean operations,
which would be the ones to
acquire BTC, have been
restructured under new man-
agement, with a strong pres-
ence from Caribbean nation-
als, in addition to being
rebranded as LIME - a slogan
that stands for Landline,
Mobile, Internet, Entertain-
ment.

One attraction it might hold
is that it operates in all four
segments, unlike Vodafone,
essentially a cellular operator,
and Atlantic Tele-Network, a
traditional landline, cellular,
Internet operator.

The Entertainment side
Cable & Wireless brings, which
is cable TV and programming,
means it would likely be the
candidate best-positioned to
enable BTC to go head-to-head
the quickest with Cable
Bahamas.

Cable & Wireless’ Caribbean
operations generated $873 mil-
lion in revenues and $270 mil-
lion in operating income dur-
ing the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2009, holding gross mar-
gins at 74 per cent.

Meanwhile, this newspaper
was told that a meeting of the
BTC privatisation’s advisory
committee was also held on Fri-
day afternoon to provide a “sta-
tus update” on the process. The
committee, chaired by minister
of state for finance, Zhivargo
Laing, also features represen-
tatives from the two BTC
unions. Its role is to vet the pri-
vatisation committee’s work,
and advise the Government on
the process.

As for the privatisation’s
progress, one source said: “It’s
significantly advanced, the
process, over the last several
months, but there’s lots to do.
It’s fairly advanced, but there’s
still a ways to go. There’s a
desire to get it done.”

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sonal skills; ability to exercise good judgment and work effectively
within a team environment and demonstrated organizational skills
and experience in managing events and other complex activities in
support of The College’s objectives. For a detailed job description,
visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submit
a detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Monday,
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 5B



Hotels ‘quarters, not years away’ from recovery

FROM page 1B

ing in major markets, we want
to get group business back to
where it was. While improving,
it’s certainly lagging behind
leisure traveller confidence lev-
els.”

On the industry’s overall
position compared to 2008
numbers prior to September,
when the fallout from the Wall
Street collapse and global reces-
sion first started to be felt, Mr
Sands told Tribune Business:
“We’re quarters behind, not
years behind. We want to
achieve some of those levels
sustained for two to three quar-
ters, and are not there yet, but
are headed in the right direc-
tion.”

The 71.5 per cent average
occupancy rate achieved by
New Providence's 14 major
hotels during June 2010 was just
0.4 percentage points behind
June 2008's 71.9 per cent show-
ing, which occurred before the
Lehman Brothers collapse and
full effects of the global reces-
sion were felt.

However, June 2010's aver-
age daily room (ADR) rate of
$225.55 was still some $10 or
4.3 per cent below the $235.77
June 2008 comparative, while
last month's room nights sold
and room revenues were also
4.8 per cent and 8.9 per cent
respectively behind two years
ago.

Still, the 2010 performance
was comfortably ahead of June
2009 comparatives. The 2010
average occupancy rate was
some 5.6 percentage points
ahead of last year's 65.9 per
cent, while a year-over-year
$15.17 ADR increase generated
a 16.3 per cent room revenue
boost and an 8.5 per cent rise in
room nights sold. ADR for
2009 was $210.38, compared to
$225.55 this year.

Mr Sands described as
“huge” the $50 million in room
revenues and 255,702 visitor
nights generated by the Com-
panion Fly Free promotion,
adding that talks between the
Government and private sec-
tor were taking place on how
to extend this in some form.

“Obviously, that has tremen-
dous budgetary implications,
but it’s fair to say the industry
has seen the value of such an

arrangement, and is discussing
the way forward,” he added,
although no decision had been
taken yet.

“There is no question that
the strategically placed promo-
tions are reaping the dividends
that the industry contemplat-
ed.”

Acknowledging the “if it
ain’t broke, don’t fix it” saying
in the case of Companion Fly
Free, Mr Sands said the hotel
industry was focusing on
“something that has really got-
ten teeth” and that, combined
with other promotions, “con-
tinues to give equity to the
Bahamas brand name”.

The Bahamas’ Companion
Fly Free airfare promotion has
generated up to $50 million in
hotel room revenues for 2010
to-date, along with 138,000 vis-
itors, and has been seen as a
key factor behind the strong
June 2010 showing by the New
Providence resort industry.
“T think June was an extremely
encouraging month for us as a
sector,” Mr Sands said. “The
majority of hotels who partici-
pated in the performance study
on a monthly basis, the over-
whelming majority of them, saw

in increase in rate and occu-
pancy better than the 2009 posi-
tion, and close to the 2008 posi-

“We’re very hopeful that this
trend and stabilisation contin-
ues to hold. Hopefully, July and
August will show similar posi-
tions, but this is the season
where we have to be cautious.”

That was a reference to hur-
ricane season, and Mr Sands
said Tropical Storm Bonnie last
week “had some impact on
business levels that we’ve not
been able to ascertain”.

In last week’s joint statement,
the BHA/Ministry of Tourism
said: "Of the 14 properties, nine
reported increases in their
room revenue, with seven of
them showing double-digit
growth. While there was wide-
spread increases in ADRs at
these properties (eight of 14
properties), it was the surge in
room nights sold that con-
tributed the most to the growth
in revenue.

"Of the nine reporting rev-
enue increases, all showed
increases in room nights sold,
with five showing double-digit
growth."

The joint statement said the

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2010 second quarter "surpassed
all measures of performance"
for last year, adding: "It even
surpassed room nights sold for
the first quarter of this year, 2.6
per cent more room nights sold.
However, it was still 6.8 per
cent behind in room revenue
due to a $23.87 higher ADR in

the first quarter.

"The second quarter of 2010
ended with a 68.3 per cent occu-
pancy rate and a $236.73 ADR,
compared to 66.4 per cent and
$232.41 last year, and 67.2 per
cent and $260.60 in the first
quarter of this year.

"To the end of June, occu-



pancy stood at 67.7 per cent,
ADR at $248.51 and room
nights sold and room revenue
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above 2009 levels. This com-
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DISCONNECTION NOTICE

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation wishes to advise
that effective July 19%, 2010, it will commence Island-

Wide

Electricity service disconnections of all

consumer accounts with overdue balances inclusive
of accounts of customers who have entered into
payment arrangements with BEC but are failing to
honor their commitments.

The public is also advised that all overdue payments
should be made directly to the Corporation.

Consumers whose account(s) are not overdue can
make payment(s) directly to the Corporation or over
the counter at the nearest Scotiabank, FirstCaribbean,
Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal Bank and RBC
Finco. You can also pay your electricity bill online by
logging on to your online accounts at Scotiabank,
FirstCaribbean, Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal
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Please call 302-1679 or 302-1685 should you have any

queries.

Visit us at WWW.m

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Nygard Cay’s $50m lease ‘frustration’

FROM page 1B

that if permission came today
contractors and workers could
be “mobilised by August 1”.
My Nygard indicated that the
extended wait for government
approvals was starting to make
him a little “tongue tied” when
it came to promoting the
Bahamas on his many global
travels, adding that the recon-
struction wait at Nygard Cay












had also deprived this nation
of a marketing tool to attract
high net-worth tourists and real
estate purchasers, given that
many had either stayed at the
property or knew of it.

The flamboyant fashion
tycoon revealed that he had
also been forced to put off pro-
posals to film a reality TV series
on his life, until Nygard Cay
had been restored to former
glories.

Mr Nygard said he had been

THE REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT





The Registrar General's Department wehes io inform wor valued costomers aul
the general pubic that our British Colonial Hilios and Apeley House Offices will
be pelocating to Shirley House, #3) Shirley Street opposite Fineo effective
Monday, 3° Aupest, 2000,














We apologize for any inconvenience caused.



Justi} Babies

told the main cause of the per-
mit delays related to the lease
of some government land.

He explained that when con-
structed in the mid to late-
1908s, Nygard Cay, which had a
roof area covering some
120,000 square feet, was built
mostly on land he owned, but
also leased a “small portion”
of government-owned land.

While the lease had been
executed and agreed to, Mr
Nygard said the Department of
Lands and Surveys had never
sent him formal documentation
on this. It was this formality,
he suggested, that was causing
the hold-up, as there had been
indications from the relevant
government planning and
building approvals agencies that
once the lease issue was settled,
all other permits and approvals
would be forthcoming.

“We already submitted vari-
ous plans to them, before and
after the fire, to keep on build-
ing,” Mr Nygard said, explain-
ing that prior to last Novem-
ber’s tragedy he had applied
for permission to complete a
structure at one end of his
property, plus install a water
break at the Nygard Cay mari-
na to prevent the intrusion of
sand.

“ve been waiting for these
approvals, and have not been
able to get them through for a
couple of years now,” Mr
Nygard said. “Unfortunately,
it’s been stalled for a couple of
years now. There was a struc-
ture at the end to put a finishing
touch to the project - that was

held back under the new
regime, as it seems to be, and
I’ve not been able to get on
with it.”

“T applied to protect the
marina with a water break, and
prevent sand loss from the
beach, as sand was getting into
the marina.”

Referring to the proposed
reforms to the Bahamas’ plan-
ning system in the shape of the
Planning & Subdivisions Act,
whose implementation has
been delayed until October 1,
2010, Mr Nygard said he had
been told by the Town Plan-
ning Committee that “every-
thing is on hold”. It is under-
stood that no planning propos-
als are likely to be approved
until the New Providence Land
Use Plan, the key document
from which all planning deci-
sions will flow, is approved.

“T’ve accepted that,” the
fashion mogul added. “I’ve
been as patient as I can be, and
am anxiously waiting for it to
go through. I could start in a
month. I’m trying to start now.
We could mobilise by August

“I have to do it fast now. It
means I have to explode with it.
We have to get it done during
two-three years. By the time
you cost it out, spending $50
million in two-three years will
require 200-300 people. What
burnt down was $50 million
worth of investment.

“Tt’s been frustrating, and ’m
so tongue-tied now as to how to
talk about it. We’re being held
back by this lease” Mr Nygard

said both he and Nygard Cay
had effectively functioned as
‘Goodwill Ambassadors’ for
the Bahamas, adding: “I don’t
know if another place gets as
much publicity as this place has
got, even Atlantis.”

Prior to the fire, Nygard Cay
had frequently been rented out
when My Nygard was not there.
“It became a very sought-after
place for people wanting exclu-
sivity, the best-of-the-best,” he
said, pointing to its use for wed-
dings, anniversaries and such
like.

That angle, a great promo-
tional tool for the Bahamas tar-
geted at its client market, has
been lost due to the fire and
subsequent wait for building
permits. It has also delayed
potential reality TV shows
focusing on Mr Nygard’s life.

“There’s so many people that
have tried to do a reality show
on me, because my life is an
interesting life and original
life,” he added. “Most interest-
ing is Nygard Cay, the
Bahamas. What a piece of
advertising that would be. I
have had to put that off.

“T’ve been trying to put out
bush fires for so long. I should
be building this.” Due to the
highly specialised nature of
Nygard Cay’s reconstruction,
Mr Nygard estimated that some






50 expatriate construction per-
sonnel would be required to
return the 100,000 square foot,
six-acre property to new glo-
ries.

“People are always con-
cerned and scared as to how it
is to get things built, and then to
feel secure that in having built
it, they don’t somehow lose it,”
Mr Nygard said. “The Bahamas
has had that great reputation
of being stable, having a solid,
reliable government, a great
democratic system, and having
great people.

“The people of the Bahamas
are one of its greatest assets.
They are smiling, friendly peo-
ple and feel nice to be around.”

Yet, hinting that such things
as his building permit delay
could impact how the Bahamas
was perceived by investors and
developers, Mr Nygard said:
“The whole message of the
Bahamas’ great reputation
should not be lost.”

He added that in his travels
two countries were always
praised for their great reputa-
tions, Canada and _ the
Bahamas, and he added: “It’s
critically important in my mind
that this is enhanced, and you
have people speaking well
about it and giving testimony.
This kind of thing tends to hold
the tongue a bit...




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ROYAL FIDELITY

kioney ot Fierk

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given_ that LOUISEMENE
ARISTILDE of P.O.Box SS-19080, OKRA HILL
Nassau, Bahamas, is appa to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, _for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within eds days from the 19"
day of July, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN DAVIS, late of
Moore’s Island, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demand against the above Estate
are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 9th day of August, A.D., 2010, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute
the assets having regard only to the claims
of which he shall then have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the dated
hereinbefore mentioned.

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.
Loyalist Plaza
Don Mackay Boulevard
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor

FG CAP

ITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cL eat. co NT A OT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 23 JULY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,484.38 | CHG -4.28 | %CHG -0.29| YTD -81.00 | YTD % -5.17
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.00

Securit
AML Foods Limited 1.04
Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
Bank of Bahamas 5.00
Benchmark 0.30
Bahamas Waste 3.15
Fidelity Bank 2.1F
Cable Bahamas Ato
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete *
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

9.67
5.00
0.30
1S
2.14
9.62
2.50
5.00
2.23
1.60
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00

2.50
6.02
2.26
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.81
4.65
1.00
0.27
5.55
2.55
10.00

3.95.
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00

Div $
0.040
0.200
0.260
0.000
0.0980
0.040
0.300
0.040
0.230
0.052
0.110
0.240
0.520
0.350
0.170

EPS $
0.250
0.050
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.720
0.366

P/E
4.2

10.63
5.00
0.30
S18
ee

eat
2.50
6.02
2.30
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.74
4.65
1.00

0.27
S53

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.07
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.240

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

0.640
0.800

3.55
10.00

0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Hi__52wk-Low Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
99.46

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

Change Interest
0.00 6.95%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol.
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyaiFid élity Mercnant Bank & |1rust Ltd. (ovéer- | Re-Gounter sécurities)

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bid $
9.42
2.00
0.35

Ask $
10.42
6.25
0.40

Div $ P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price
14.00
4.00
55

Daily Vol. EPS $
“2.945
0.000

0.001

N/M
256.6

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55:

0.000
0.000

2.03
261.90

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV

1.4825
2.9199
1.5424
2.8522
13.4110
107.5706
105.7706
1.1177
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.4387
2.8266
1.4777
2.8522
13.0484
100.5448
83.1998:

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah In

1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005
10.0000

iment Fund Principal 10.0344

9.3299 iment Fund Principal 9.3299

4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.3073

YTD%

3.04
1.14
2.34

-8.49
0.33
3.45
3.99
2.352
0.98
2.34
2.16

-6.84
-6.70

-5.31

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.811577
1.526816

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.510057

Last 12 Months % NAV Date
30-Jun-10
16-Jul-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10

30-Jun-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing pric. 1 52 weeks

- Ks

i for daily volume
Today's Clos.

Change - Chan

e for daily volume
day to day
J

EPS $ - A company’
NAV - Net Asset Val:

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

ported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* Trading Suspended

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

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South Andros High School
Alumni Association

Date: Tuesday, 27th July, 2010

Time: 7:30p.m.

Venue: R. M. Bailey High School - Room T4
Contact: Darell Taylor - 326-5348

POSITION WANTED
eee Uae MI Tel ate (11

We are looking for a mature Accountant to
manager the financial operations of a 10 year
old company. Duties will include overseeing all
EL a a CRM Te tees eee oe Ym Loa 8 3
ek ee) *) ea le eee
Candidate must be able to produce timely
financial information to the CEO and be able ta
TAN es Coe eee |e ae Ria
Knowledge of ISL payroll system a plus but nota
HTT aE sh de] oR: [ ate soe] a] oc
meet deadlines.

Please write to us at: P.O. Box CB-13526,
LeU mees ee magic

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2010
New Student Orientation

Parents’ Evening
Tuesday, 17th August, 2010
6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Orientation
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Advisement, Registration &
Bill Payment
Thursday, 19th August, 2010
Friday, 20th August, 2010
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

Venue:
Performing Arts Centre,
The College Of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard





THE TRIBUNE





Handicraft project eyes
$1.1m sales in 12 months

FROM page 1B

Bahamas a global and regional
“centre of handicraft excel-
lence”.

“What it does in a nutshell
is seek to cluster the handicraft
industry for strength in num-
bers,” Mr Demeritte told Tri-
bune Business. “By using
strength in numbers, working
together, we achieve a couple
of things - buying power in
sourcing raw materials, and
organising the entire sector in
doing so - having the critical
mass to sell handicraft products
to the world.”

The Internet-based virtual
platform, he added, would
allow the Bahamas National
Craft Association, its 30 mem-
ber associations and some 1,000
individual members, to sell
their products across the globe,
and not just rely on tourists pur-
chasing while visiting the
Bahamas. Consumers would
now be able to shop online
wherever they were in the
world for authentic Bahamian
products.

“What the virtual platform
seeks to do is organize the sec-

tor and have the sector sell
throughout the world, the
region and the Bahamas,” Mr
Demeritte said. “After the pro-
ject is completed, we project
that for the first year, after 12
months, the annual sales
through the portal will be about
$1.1 million.

“We actually call it a virtual
market. The beauty of it comes
from a couple of things. We
focused on the islands in the
south, the south-east like Ack-
lins, Mayaguana, where they
have pretty good crafts persons.
But their ability to get the prod-
uct to market is impaired. They
do not have the access of
craftspersons in Abaco,
Andros, Grand Bahama.”

Mr Demeritte said the pro-
ject also aimed to establish
benchmarks and standards for
the Bahamian handicraft indus-
try, in addition to collecting
hard data so that the sector’s
true contribution to the
Bahamian economy could be
assessed. It also aimed to attract
persons outside the Association
and its affiliates into the fold.

The Ministry of Tourism was
set to play a role as a strategic

partner, and Mr Demeritte said
a key objective was to ‘shape
up the concept of authentically-
made Bahamian products, so
that items sold via the Internet
platform were “stamped or
sealed with Bahamian authen-
tically-made product” to show
that they were the real deal.

The July month-end was
being targeted for the project’s
start, and Mr Demeritte said of
the objective to make the
Bahamas a handicraft centre of
excellence: “It’s a tall order, but
the ingredients are there. Once
you have 1,000 operations
around the country, you’re talk-
ing about the capacity to do
some things.

“You bring them together
and develop the market, devel-
op the distribution chain. We’re
talking to local merchants to be
on board and push the prod-
ucts.”

Mr Demeritte said the pro-
ject had been in the planning
stages since May 2009, and the
Bahamas was only one of two
Caribbean countries to obtain
approval from the IDB’s MIF
lending facility for this tranche
of proposals.

Nygard Cay resort plan dropped

FROM page 1B

munity, and want to live as good neighbours.”

Mr Nygard said he had received “some mixed
messages” from the Government over the years
on the private resort idea, adding: “I’ve been
trying to work very closely with the Govern-
ment, and be in harmony with them.

being a resort”, namely that it could access invest-
ment incentives under legislation such as the

“The Government encouraged me to look atit, | dropped.

see if I could make it a resort, investment more
money back from Sir Lynden Pindling’s time.”
However, the pattern became one of encour-
agement, before the Government then backed

off.

Mr Nygard said there were “advantages to

Hotels Encouragement Act to import duty-free
construction materials and such like.

He last received encouragement to look at the
private resort idea two years ago, prior to the
November 2009 fire that ravaged Nygard Cay,
but the idea appears once again to have been

The concept of Bahamas property owners rent-
ing out their homes to exclusive guests while
they were away, and Nygard Cay’s appeal to the
rich and famous, underpinned the private resort

approach, but Mr Nygard said he had “backed off

that and stayed with the private home”.

Nygard calls for medical tourism to boost economy

FROM page 1B

the tourism industry once Cuba
opened up properly to US trav-
ellers, and revealed that he had
a disagreement with fellow
Lyford Cay resident and hedge
fund manager, Louis Bacon,
over the now long-dead Chaffin
Light/Clifton Cay investment
project - he was for it, Mr
Bacon against it.

Looking at how the Bahamas
could move forward, Mr
Nygard said: “The key, in my
mind, is what is its next real
industry? We perhaps lost
financial services, the banking
and trust companies, we have
tourism and not much else.
What industries are there that
are going to come here?”

He suggested medical
tourism would be the answer,

but warned that the Bahamas
would “have to build the indus-
try and invest in that industry”.

“Td be after that medical
tourism bit time,” Mr Nygard
said. “You have to create a
favourable law to do it, incen-
tives like the hotel industry.
The medical industry also
involves equipment and tech-
nology, you have to bring that.”

A favourable Immigration
policy would also be required to
allow specialist doctors to work
from the Bahamas, along with
the importation of medical ser-
vices.

“It needs to do that and get
on with it,” Mr Nygard said,
warning that medical tourism
was “on everybody’s lips” and
other countries were already
moving ahead of the Bahamas
in this field.

Meanwhile, Mr Nygard said
it was “sort of dangerous” for
the Bahamas to seek to arrest
its fiscal decline through tax
increases, given that the costs of
doing business in this nation
were already relatively high.

He suggested that the best
way for the Bahamas to arrest
declining government revenues
was to stimulate economic
growth and the private sector,
given that this nation “quite
frankly was up there now as
one of the most expensive
places now” to do business.

Asked whether the Bahamas
should look to replace its Cus-
toms duty-oriented tax regime
with an income tax, Mr Nygard
said: “A personal income tax
would be disastrous for the
Bahamas, as other countries are
moving away from that.”



MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 7B

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MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010





INSIGHT

The stories behind the news





Where are the voices for
historic hospital buildings ?

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

WHEN I first approached
the consequence of expan-
sion at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital I thought
there was only one casual-
ty, the Bahamas Crisis Cen-
tre.

It was made clear, until
last week, the centre had
until July 30 to evacuate so
that its building could be
demolished to make way for
new operating theatres at
the hospital.

After 37 years, several
swings of the economic pen-
dulum paired with a staunch
neglect of the deterioration
to the nuclear family have
produced an ever increasing
crime rate. Thus making it
impossible to deny or dis-
pute the centre’s critical rel-
evance in our community
and disturbing to learn the
centre could not find alter-
nate accommodations.

This non-profit organiza-
tion had been housed at
Knowles House on the
grounds of Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for nearly
three decades. The leaders
of this country had less than
10 years of Independence
under their belts when Dr
Sandra Dean-Patterson,
sought to create and sustain
a refuge for victims of
abuse.

The demolition wasn’t a
surprise to Dr Dean-Patter-
son or her team. They’d
always known Knowles
House was destined for
destruction, but hoped the
lengthy discourse over the
redevelopment of the hos-
pital would keep an eviction
notice at bay. It was their
choice to leave their accom-
modations up to fate, but
where else would they have
been allowed to practise
rent-free, and in such close
proximity to their direct
clients?

Despite the thousands of
lives healed by this centre, it
seemed unimaginable that
in just a few days it would
be forced to disrupt service,
and be indefinitely dis-
placed.

Even more stifling, why
wasn’t anyone making any
noise about it?

If a tree falls in an empty
forest, does it make a
sound? For a lengthy period
last year, the non-native
trees at Saunders Beach
rose to an incredible volume
amidst those that listened.
The list of riled up naysay-
ers ranged from columnists
to politicians to artists.

Did we assume because
Dr Dean-Patterson was so

KNOWLES HOUSE



THE CRISIS CENTRE had been housed at Knowles House on the grounds of Princess Margaret Hospital for nearly three decades.

resourceful in establishing
the centre and securing its
Operation over the years
that there was no need to
worry? Admittedly, the
decades of commitment,
dedication and passion, give
her an admirable advantage
over the destructive nature
of casuarina trees.

No, I didn’t grasp the full
promise of the consequences
which would force the cen-
tre’s relocation until I was
approached by a doctor dur-
ing a visit to Knowles
House.

Demolition

He asked if I knew about
the pending demolition and
I said yes and immediately
launched into concerns for
the future of the crisis cen-
tre.

“Yes,” he said. “But even
before that, do you know
the history of these build-
ings?”

His question stumped
me. I didn’t know the histo-
ry, but more importantly, I
hadn’t even considered its
relevance.

The need for facility
upgrades at PMH is so

blindingly essential, it is not
a surprise there have been
little to no objections
towards the course of action
taken to achieve it. It was
then I realized the com-
pound of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, formerly the
Bahamas General Hospital,
was an empty forest.

Also to be demolished
alongside Knowles House is
Huggins Lodge. Both build-
ings are of the last remain-
ing remnants of the first
hospital in the Bahamas.

Built in the 1920s as the
private medical ward, years
later Huggins Lodge was
named after Dr Leonard
Catesby Huggins. There
were no other hospitals at
that time, so by private med-
ical ward, this means that
anyone who wished to give
birth or receive medical
treatment privately, was
attended to here — if not in
their private homes.

Dr Leonard Huggins,
born in Trinidad in 1901 of
Chinese descent, came to
the Bahamas in 1926 to join
the Bahamas medical ser-
vice and served as a medical
officer in Inagua, Exuma,
Long Island and Bimini.

In 1940 he joined the
staff of the Bahamas Gen-
eral Hospital and was
appointed senior surgical
specialist at the Princess
Margaret Hospital in 1960
and often served as Chief
Medical Officer of that insti-
tution. He retired from gov-
ernment service in 1963 to
go into private practice and
made his home on Collins
Avenue. He was made an
Officer of the British
Empire (OBE) in 1960 and
received the Sir Victor Sas-
soon Golden Heart Award
in 1973. On his death, on
January 12, 1992, he was
described as an “an untiring
man devoted to medicine.”

To commemorate his
memory the private ward of
the former Bahamas Gen-
eral Hospital was named for
him.

I would probably be cor-
rect in saying that Huggins
Lodge as the once private
ward was the birthplace of
many in our nation. Would
it make a difference if we
dug deep and uncovered the
names of those born there?
With just a little more than a
month left before demoli-
tion was initially scheduled,

and none of the truly con-
cerned willing or able to
speak on record, I think it
is already a wasted effort.
It has to make a sound.
Where are the voices for
Huggins Lodge and
Knowles House, named
after the late Hubert
Knowles, MBE, for many
years superintendent of the
Princess Margaret Hospital?

Balance

The voices unrestricted
by employment or compro-
mised due to special inter-
est. In this, the new modern
Bahamas, is there nothing
that can be done to achieve
balance? ’m having a hard
time accepting that the
omission of our past is the
benchmark to our future.

History aside, the demo-
lition of Huggins Lodge will
displace three government
clinics, namely the compre-
hensive clinic for sexually
transmitted diseases and
infections, HIV and AIDS
treatment.

Demolition now proves
to be a multi-faceted prob-
lem, one with possibly infi-
nite casualties.





There is no shortage of
stigmas in the Bahamas,
possibly two of the greatest
stigmas concern mental and
sexual health. A freshly
abused victim, albeit rape or
gang violence as is so preva-
lent now, can walk the short
steps from the hospital to
the crisis centre and receive
immediate counsel. These
are victims who would have
otherwise, gone home and
disregarded their need to
mentally heal. The senti-
ment is doubled, as you can
imagine, for the compre-
hensive HIV/AIDS clinic.

Nurses and outreach
counselors testify to having
to walk patients to therapy,
just to ensure they get the
critical psychological assess-
ment.

Desperate to understand
how such a magnanimous
task could be still in its
infantile stages this close to
scheduled demolition, I
sought clarity from the
demolitionists, the Public
Hospitals Authority (PHA).

Herbert Brown, manag-
ing director of the PHA,
told me the site was essen-

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010
Where are the voices for

historic hospital buildings?

FROM page one

tial to the construction of
three new operating the-
atres, and the PHA had
explored all possible
avenues in hopes of avoid-
ing demolition.

He said: “In the overall
redevelopment at PMH
many buildings were demol-
ished and Knowles House
was declared sometime ago
as unsafe for occupancy. But
under no circumstances will
we have them moved and
not find suitable place for
them to go. Demolition
hinges on finding suitable
accommodations, firstly for
the services we provide and
also we are looking at what
we can do to assist the
Bahamas Crisis Centre.

“We can’t delay indefi-
nitely, but the buildings will
not be demolished until suit-
able accommodations are
found.”

Though reassuring for the
Crisis Centre, which
receives only a government
subvention and survives
from private donations and
fundraising efforts, this
mandate was stark in com-
parison to the bewildered
concerns of the medical staff
at Huggins Lodge, who
bemoan the fact that they
have been unable to tell
their patients where to
return for follow-up visits
past July 30.

The term “suitable
accommodations” does not

echo the fears of AIDS
counselors who predict the
comprehensive clinic’s
assimilation into the main
hospital will ostracize
patients to the point of
denying treatment. Senior
nurses at the clinic witness
inevitable breaches in con-
fidentiality and lack of pri-
vacy [in the main hospital]
every day and are strongly
opposed to losing the
anonymity Huggins Lodge
provides.

They insist the old build-
ings are not dilapidated but
evidence of years of neglect
and poor maintenance.

Expansion

Mr Brown explained:
“The expansion will greatly
reduce waiting times for
surgeries at PMH and effect
a one hundred per cent
increase in efficiency. In
total there will be seven
brand new operating the-
atres which will be capable
of providing — for the first
time — all support services
required in one location.

“The main building itself
is historic. When we make
improvements, we are care-
ful it does not change the

overall history of the facility.
We have to create a balance
between providing care and
the improvement of care —
to which patients are enti-
tled and demand. We are
very cognizant of the his-
toric nature of PMH and
[the public] can be assured
we will try to ensure that we
won’t lose that history.”

Mr Brown assured me
that the intent for demoli-
tion was not to achieve
greater parking, but to allow
access to the construction
site for equipment and
materials. I believe him.
However once the theatres
are erected and construction
equipment is cleared away,
what will become of the
vacant lot? Does it matter
whether or not the means
satisfied the end or the end
satisfied the means?

Will there even be a plac-
ard marking the spot? Will
our children, as we before
them, with a parallel park
be completely ignorant of
the consequences of such
convenience?

The Historic Buildings
Act offers duty exemptions
and up to a 20-year real
property tax break for the
restoration of historic build-
ings.



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THE TRIBUNE





At a workshop to foster
incentives for Property and
Business Development held
earlier this year, Mrs Janet
Bostwick, former MP and
the first woman sworn into
the House of Assembly, not-
ed that the rules that pro-
tected listed buildings dis-
couraged preservation. Like
everything else in this coun-
try, she suggested the rules
be reformed as existing reg-
ulations could change the
historical significance of the
buildings after
renovation/restoration and
exempt them from tax con-
cessions.

Could it be that in actual-
ity, unlike wine, these build-
ings are ticking steadily
towards an expiration date?
Falling so deep into disre-
pair that they can no longer
serve as accurate landmarks
of the past? And if they are
on a protected list, why are
they allowed to disintegrate
to such an extent before
something is done? All too
common is the opportunist
Lorax come to claim nation-
al spotlight through feigned
concern of already too-far-
gone circumstances.

Though, for me, it only
adds to an already thick plot
of ill-preparedness and inad-
equate planning, some may
find solace in a recent letter
to the PHA from the

|<

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UT a

t - b p

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

estab

HUGGINS LODGE was named after Dr Leonard Catesby Huggins.

AMMC Chairman Colin
Saunders.

The letter, dated July 20,
informs Mr Brown of the
historic designation of Hug-
gins Lodge and Knowles
House as national monu-
ments.

It reads: “The Corpora-
tion is aware of your urgent
need for the spaces and facil-
ities specified for new con-
struction and the implication
in maintaining the two
resources within the pro-
posed construction zone.

Visitors

However, the Corpora-
tion holds strongly to its
mandate to have tangible
aspects of our history pre-
served for the varied whole-
some benefits of our people
as well as visitors to our
islands.”

I received the document
well after my meeting with
Mr Brown, however his
omission of the AMMC’s
last minute decision, while
taking care to inform me
that the two bodies were in
conference, is only slightly
worrying in light of what
seems to be a completely
overlooked historical gaffe
and the sorely needed med-
ical upgrades.

Does intent truly matter?

lished

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We could go on for days
about actions and concerns
that should have been initi-
ated years ago, but what
remains is the critical need
for new operating theatres
and like modern amenities
juxtaposed against our oblig-
ation to acknowledge and
preserve past achievements.
The fact that the PHA has
pledged to delay demolition
until the centre and clinics
are reasonably housed
means nothing to the peo-
ple whose memories of
Knowles House and Huggins
Lodge predate the lives of
the governing generation.
The possibility of those
buildings being declared
protected sites by the
AMMC means nothing to
the families of surgical
patients negatively affected
by the current operational
challenges. There are no
spoils in compromise, and
perhaps we should stop con-
structing, stop demolishing,
stop modernizing until we
come to a consensus on the
relevancy of physical rem-
nants and the integrity of
record-keeping. We need to
have a set standard because
on an island of this size,
space will always be an issue.

e SEE PAGE ONE
FOR THE LATEST
ON THIS ISSUE



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THE TRIBUNE

INSIGHT

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 3C



Russia's Putin
sings with
expelled agents

FOROS, Ukraine

VLADIMIR PUTIN

says he met with the Russ-

ian spies who were
expelled from the United
States, joining them in
singing an unofficial KGB
anthem and promising
them good jobs and a
bright future back in their
homeland, according to
Associated Press.

Russia's prime minister
said late Saturday he
recently got together with
the 10 sleeper agents,
without saying when or
where. The agents were
deported from the U.S.
earlier this month in a
biggest spy scandal since
the Cold War.

"We talked about life,"
Putin told reporters in
Ukraine. "We sang ‘What
Motherland Begins With’
and other songs of that
character."

"What Motherland
Begins With" is a song
from the 1968 television

series about Soviet spies in :

Nazi Germany. The song
is widely known as an

unofficial anthem of Russ- :

ian intelligence officers.

Putin, a former KGB
officer who in the early
1980s worked in commu-
nist East Germany as a
low-level functionary,
spoke about the uneasy
lives the secret agents had
in the U.S., where they
were caught by the FBI in
U.S. cities and suburbs
where they had been liv-
ing for more than a
decade.

"They had a very diffi-
cult fate," Putin said,
referring to the expelled
spies who spent years of
burrowing into American
society. "They had to car-
ry out a task to benefit
their motherland's inter-
ests for many, many years
without a diplomatic cov-
er, risking themselves and
those close to them."

The 10 agents were
deported in exchange for
three former intelligence
officers and a think tank
arms expert convicted and
sentenced to long prison
sentences in Russia. An
11th Russian spy escaped
authorities in Cyprus and
remains at large, anda
12th one, who had worked
for Microsoft, was deport-
ed from the United States
in mid-July.

U.S. authorities did not
charge the agents with
spying, and it is not clear
whether they actually
compromised any U.S.
secrets. Some Russian
analysts called their mis-
sion a failure that showed
how inefficient Russian
intelligence agencies are.

Putin, however,
promised that Russia will

take a good care of its spy-

ing sons and daughters.

"They will work, and I
am sure they will have
decent jobs,” he said.
"And I am sure they will
have an interesting and
bright life."

The biggest spy swap
since the Soviet collapse
did not complicate Presi-
dent Barack Obama's
campaign to improve and
broaden U.S. relations
with Russia, and both
Moscow and Washington
sides expressed satisfac-
tion with the resolution of
the spy case.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Hugo Chavez warns of US oil
cutoff in Colombia dispute

CARACAS, Venezuela



PRESIDENT HUGO
CHAVEZ threatened on Sunday
to halt oil sales to the United States
if Venezuela faces any military
attack by its U.S.-allied neighbor
Colombia, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Chavez said in a speech to thou-
sands of supporters that if there is
an "armed aggression against
Venezuela" from Colombia backed
by the U.S., "we would suspend
shipments of oil."

Chavez said that "we wouldn't
send one more drop" of oil to the
United States, which is the top buy-
er of oil from the South American
country.

If actually carried out, such a
threat would be titanic economic
blow for Chavez's government,
which depends heavily on oil sales.
It's likely Chavez made the warning
in part to put the U.S. and Colom-
bia on notice that he will not stand
for a more aggressive international
campaign to denounce allegations
that leftist Colombian rebels are
finding safe haven in Venezuela.

Camps

The Venezuelan leader cut off
diplomatic relations with Colom-
bia on Thursday after outgoing
President Alvaro Uribe's govern-
ment presented photos, videos and
maps of what it said were Colom-
bian rebel camps inside Venezuela.

Chavez called it an attempt to
smear his government and said
Uribe could be trying to lay the
groundwork for an armed conflict.

The Colombian government
denies secking a military conflict. It
says it went to the Organization of
American States with its evidence
about the rebels’ alleged presence





ENEZUELA'S PRESIDENT HUGO CHAVEZ, right, speaks next to Argentina's national soccer team coach Diego Armando
Maradona upon Maradona’s arrival to Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday. (AP)

in Venezuela because Chavez's
government has not addressed the
situation.

Chavez also said Sunday that he
had canceled a trip to Cuba due to
the tensions with Colombia.

In 2008, Chavez warned of a pos-
sible war with Colombia after the
Colombian military staged a cross-
border raid on a rebel camp in
Ecuador that killed a guerrilla
leader, Raul Reyes. Chavez on
Sunday appeared to be giving a
new warning to Colombia — and
the U.S. — that he won't tolerate a
repeat in Venezuelan territory.

He said separately in a newspa-
per column, however, that he will

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wait to see if Colombian President-
elect Juan Manuel Santos, who
takes office next month, expresses
what Chavez deems a genuine will-
ingness to ease the diplomatic con-
flict.

Dialogue

"We have to receive clear and
unequivocal signals that there is a
real political will in the new Colom-
bian government to take up the
path of dialogue again, without
tricks," Chavez wrote.

The conservative Uribe has fre-
quently feuded with the socialist
Chavez, and Colombian officials

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have long complained, mostly in
private, that Chavez has harbored
leaders of its two main leftist rebel
groups.

Santos, however, has stressed the
importance of mending trade rela-
tions with Venezuela that over-
whelmingly benefit Colombia's
food producers. And Chavez has
raised the possibility that relations
could be restored under Santos.

Trade between Venezuela and
Colombia has fallen about 70 per-
cent since Chavez froze relations
a year ago in response to Colom-
bia's decision to grant the U.S. mil-
itary expanded access to its mili-
tary bases.







THE TRIBUNE

INSIGHT

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 5C



Work to plug
leaky well is
back on track
after storm

NEW ORLEANS

THE effort to plug BP's
leaky oil well in the Gulf of
Mexico was back on track
Sunday as the skies cleared
and crews raced to stop the
gusher for good before
another storm halts the
operation again, according
to Associated Press.

A drill rig is expected to
reconnect at around mid-
night (0400 GMT) to the
relief tunnel that will be
used to pump in mud and
cement to seal the well, and
drilling could resume in the
next few days.

A temporary plug already
has held in the oil for nine
days, and BP was able to
leave it in place even after
the government's point man
on the spill ordered ships
working in the Gulf to evac-
uate ahead of Tropical
Storm Bonnie late last week.

Retired Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen said offi-
cials will spend the next day
determining how the small
storm affected the area.

Oil may have migrated
north to Mississippi Sound,
he said, and officials are
checking to see if boom that
was protecting sensitive
marshlands was pushed
ashore.

As work on the well
resumed, British media
reported that BP chief exec-
utive Tony Hayward is nego-
tiating the terms of his
departure ahead of the com-
pany's half-year results
announcement Tuesday.

Citing unidentified
sources, the BBC and Sun-
day Telegraph reported that
detailed talks regarding
Hayward's future took place
over the weekend. A formal
announcement is expected
in the next 24 hours, the
BBC reported.

BP spokesman Toby
Odone said Sunday that
Hayward "remains BP's
chief executive, and he has
the confidence of the board
and senior management."

Allen said he hadn't heard
of any management changes.

"T've got no knowledge of
the inner workings of BP,”
he said.

Hayward, who angered
Americans by minimizing



IN THIS June 17, 2010 file photo, BP PLC CEO Tony Hayward testi-



aes

fies before an Energy and Environment Subcommittee on Oversight
and Investigations hearing on the role of BP in the Deepwater Horizon
explosion and oil spill on Capitol Hill in Washington. A senior U.S. gov-
ernment official says BP Chief Executive Tony Hayward, under fire for
his handling of the Gulf oil spill, is being replaced. An official announce-
ment could come as early as Monday, July 26, 2010. The official, who
spoke on condition of anonymity Sunday because that announcement
had not been made, was briefed on the decision by a senior BP offi-

cial late last week. (AP)

the spill's environmental
impact and expressing his
exasperation by saying "I'd
like my life back," has been
under heavy criticism over
his gaffe-prone leadership
during the spill.

Before the cap was
attached and closed a week
ago, the broken well had
spewed 94 million gallons
(356 million liters) to 184
million gallons (697 million
liters) into the Gulf since the
BP-leased Deepwater Hori-
zon rig exploded April 20,
killing 11 workers.

Completion of the relief
well that is the best chance
to permanently stop the oil
now looks possible by mid-
August, but Allen said he
wouldn't hesitate to order
another evacuation based on
forecasts similar to the ones
for Bonnie.

"We have no choice but
to start well ahead of time
if we think the storm track is
going to bring gale force
winds, which are 39 mph (63

kph) or above, anywhere
close to well site," Allen
said.

In the oil-affected hamlet
of Grand Isle, Louisiana,
thousands of people spent a
gray Saturday at the beach,
listening to music. The
Island Aid concert, which
included LeAnn Rimes and
Three Dog Night, raised
money for civic projects on
the island.

For the afternoon at least,
things were almost back to
normal. Young women in
bathing suits rode around on
golf carts while young men
in pickup trucks tooted their
horns and shouted.

"This is the way Grand
Isle is supposed to be but
hasn't been this year," said
Anne Leblanc of Metairie,
Louisiana, who said her fam-
ily has been visiting the
island for years. "This is the
first we came this year. With
the oil spill there hasn't been
a reason to come, no swim-
ming, no fishing."

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24, 2010. The music festival is being held on the beach since the island canceled their tarpon fishing tour-
nament. Officials held the music festival despite the approach of Tropical Depression Bonnie. (AP)

Taliban claim capture of US sailor killing of second

KABUL, Afghanistan

THE Taliban have offered
to exchange the body of a US.
Navy sailor they said was killed
in an ambush two days ago in
exchange for insurgent prison-
ers, an Afghan official said Sun-
day, according to Associated
Press.

U.S. and NATO officials
confirmed that two American
Navy personnel went missing
Friday in the eastern province
of Logar, after an armored
sports utility vehicle was seen
driving into a Taliban-held
area.

In a telephone interview Sun-
day with The Associated Press,
Taliban spokesman Zabiullah
Mujahid said the pair drove
into an area under insurgent
control, prompting a brief gun-
fight in which one American
was killed and the other was
captured.

He said both were taken toa
“safe area" and "are in the
hands of the Taliban.”





Mujahid did not mention any
offer to exchange the pair for
Taliban prisoners. A local
Afghan official said the Taliban
sent a message through inter-
mediaries offering to hand over
the body in exchange for jailed
insurgents.

Abdul Wali, the deputy head
of the provincial governing
council, said local authorities
responded by saying, "Let's talk
about the one that is still alive."
The insurgents said they would
have to talk to superiors before
making any deal.

Checkpoints

Hundreds of posters of the
two missing sailors have been
hung at checkpoints through-
out Logar province where
NATO troops are stopping
vehicles, searching people,
peering inside windows and
searching trunks.

The posters, with pho-
tographs of the missing sailors,

state: "This American troop is
missing. He was last seen in a
white Land Cruiser vehicle. If
you have any information about
this solider, kindly contact the
Logar Joint Coordination Cen-
ter," run by coalition and
Afghan forces.

A phone number is listed
along with information about
a $20,000 reward being offered
for information leading to their
location.

The photographs show one
clean-shaven sailor wearing a
soft cap and another with short-
cropped hair, wearing a blue
civilian shirt and a white under-
shirt.

"Our latest, accurate infor-
mation reports are that they are
still in the area," said Din
Mohammed Darwesh,

spokesman for the provincial
governor of Logar.

He said the governor's office
was upset because the two
Americans left their base with-
out notifying Afghan security
forces in Logar.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 7C



INSIGHT

Raul Castro prepares
Revolution Day speech

HAVANA, Cuba

IT WOULD be easy for
Raul Castro to make head-
lines in a major Revolution
Day speech Monday. All he
has to do is bring up the 52
political prisoners he has
agreed to release, or discuss
plans to open the island's
communist economy, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Of course, nothing Cuba's
79-year-old president says will
mean as much as whether
elder brother Fidel is stand-
ing by his side. A recent spate
of appearances by the revolu-
tionary leader after four years
of near-total seclusion has got
everybody talking. Could this
be Fidel's coming out party?

"If Fidel is there it will
cause a huge stir. It will be
very important,” said Wayne
Smith, a former top Ameri-
can diplomat in Havana and
senior fellow at the Washing-
ton-based Center for Interna-
tional Policy.

He said the elder Castro
brother's presence would
make clear to many in Wash-
ington that the 83-year old
revolutionary still has a strong
hand in affairs of state. That,
Smith says, would not be
viewed positively by those
waiting for Cuba to allow
more economic, political and
social changes.

"The thought has been that
they are moving toward
reforms under Raul, but that
they might be moving more
energetically if not for the fact
that Fidel Castro is still sitting
on the porch and Raul is
afraid he might not be enthu-



“If Fidel is there it will

cause a huge stir. It will be
very important.”



Wayne Smith, a former top American diplomat in
Havana and senior fellow at the Washington-based
Center for International Policy

silastic,” Smith said. "If Fidel
does come back, that could
suggest they aren't going to
move as fast as they should
with these changes."

Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez, a close friend and
admirer of the Castros whose
country provides Cuba billions
of dollars a year in subsidized
oil, is also expected to speak
Monday.

Fidel Castro ruled Cuba for
nearly half a century until he
was forced to step down in
2006 and undergo emergency
intestinal surgery, turning
power over — first temporar-
ily, then permanently — to his
brother.

Since then, Castro has lived
in near total seclusion. Until
this month, that is.

The former president has
seemingly been everywhere,
most recently making an emo-
tional visit Saturday to a town
outside Havana to honor fall-
en revolutionary fighters.
There he read a statement
that was right out of his much-
weathered revolutionary play-
book, turning Cuba's tortured
half-century conflict with the
United States into a positive.

"The simple fact of main-
taining this fight for such a
long time provides proof of
what a small country can
achieve against a gigantic,
imperial power," Castro said
after laying a wreath at a mau-
soleum for his comrades. In
other appearances Castro has
visited economists, scientists,
diplomats and even dolphins
at the national aquarium, his
every move captured on
national television and in
state-run newspapers.

State media have even tak-
en to calling him "comman-
der in chief" again, a title he
has largely shunned since step-
ping down.

Fidel Castro has used the
publicity spree to warn that
the world stands on the
precipice of a nuclear war —
pitting the United States and
Israel on one side, and Iran
on the other.

So far he has stayed clear
of commenting on current
events in Cuba, perhaps in an
effort to avoid the appearance
of interfering with his broth-
er's work running the coun-
try. But merely attending Rev-
olution Day celebrations



REVOLUTION DAY SPEECH: Cuba's President Raul Castro.

would be an overtly political
act.

While Raul Castro has
remained loyal to his broth-
er's communist ideals, he has
overseen the handover of tens
of thousands of acres of gov-
ernment land to individual
farmers; has allowed some
small-level entrepreneurship
in a country where the state
controls well over 90 percent
of the economy; and has
spearheaded an anti-corrup-
tion drive in which several
senior officials were fired.

Wages

He has also tried to scale
back unsustainable subsidies
in a system where most people
earn low government wages
but receive free health care
and education, near-free hous-
ing and transportation and
deeply discounted basic food.

The reforms — while halt-
ing — have allowed Raul to
emerge from the shadow of
his more famous brother,
though opinion is divided on
how much influence Fidel
wields behind the scenes.

The government has said
nothing about whether Fidel
will be on hand for Monday's
celebration, which commem-
orates the date in 1953 when
the Castros led an attack on
the Moncada army barracks
in the eastern city of Santiago
and a smaller military outpost
in the nearby city of Bayamo.
The operation failed spectac-
ularly, but Cubans consider it
the beginning of the revolu-
tion that culminated with dic-
tator Fulgencio Batista's
ouster on New Year's Day
1959.

Cuba celebrates Revolution
Day in a different part of the
island each year. The 2010
affair in the central city of
Santa Clara offers an intrigu-
ing backdrop. The speeches
will be held at a towering out-
door memorial housing the
remains of Argentine revolu-
tionary Ernesto "Che" Gue-
vara. Santa Clara is also home
to Guillermo Farinas, a dissi-
dent who recently ended a
134-day hunger strike after the
government agreed to release
the last remaining opposition
leaders jailed since 2003. At
least 15 have been released





Javier Galeano, Pool/AP

and sent to Spain so far, with
the rest expected to follow in
coming months.

While many think Fidel
Castro's appearance Saturday
means it's less likely he will
also show up in Santa Clara,
there have been some signs
he might attend.

When Chavez announced
that he would be attending the
festivities, he wrote that he
wanted to share the day “with
Raul, with Fidel and with the
Cuban people.”

On the streets of Havana,
many believe the former
leader will make an appear-
ance.

"T think Fidel has to be in
Santa Clara," said Mariana
Delgado, a 71-year-old retiree
standing in line to buy a copy
of state-run newspaper Juven-
tud Rebelde, or "Rebel
Youth."

"The people are waiting to
see him at a public event, and
we are waiting to hear him
speak about the situation in
Cuba," she said. "Until now,
he has only talked about prob-
lems in other countries. We
have many problems here that
we need to solve."






























































































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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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FILES


WEATHER

OF THE DAY itm tovin' it

HIGH
LOW

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Volume: 106 No.203

91F
81F

MOSTLY SUNNY,



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST



eae Ul

UN

Teenager stabbed
ny gang of men

voices for historic

hospital buildings? °
SEE INSIGHT SECTION



15-year-old attacked,
man shot dead in
weekend violence

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A 15-YEAR-OLD boy is
recovering in hospital after being
stabbed multiple times by a
group of men early yesterday
morning.

It is unclear whether the inci-
dent, which occurred shortly
after lam at Tonique Williams
Darling Highway, was gang-
related. The teenager was tak-
en to hospital by emergency
medical services where he 1s list-
ed in stable condition.

The stabbing comes just
hours before the closing cere-
mony of the 15th Nelson Coop-
er Peace on the Streets Basket-
ball Tournament. Organized by
the Hope Centre, an outreach
mission for at-risk youth, the
tournament is meant to remforce
positive values and encourage
healthy conflict resolution.

Carlos Reid, co-founder of the
Hope Centre, told The Tribune
he believes the incident has to
be gang-related.

“Any time you see you some-
thing where a group of men
attack one person, it is gang vio-
lence. It doesn’t take an expert
to figure that out,” he said.

s3e0D09910/LPca4aT00
Mead 100 sheet BRW
Composition

Mr Reid said he believes vio-
lence among young people will
not decrease until the country
addresses its growing sub-cul-
ture of gang violence.

HOMICIDE

POLICE found the bullet-rid-
dled body of the nation's 53rd
homicide in the Englerston com-
munity early yesterday morning.

It was reported that Kevin
Hepburn, 23, of Balfour
Avenue, who had been recently
released from prison, had just
arrived home when he was
approached by two men, both
armed with handguns. They fired
in his direction.

The deceased was found in
the driver's seat of a black 1993
Nissan 300 ZX after police
responded to reports of a shoot-
ing at Balfour Avenue between
Washington Street and Podoleo
Street. The car's license plate
number is 233852.

Emergency medical services
pronounced the victim dead at
the scene. Family members said
he had recently been released
from prison, however despite his
criminal history he was “well
loved.”

SEE page 16

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE MISS TEEN USA
contestants take to the stage
at Atlantis last night.

KAMIE CRAWFORD, 17, of

Maryland (right) took the
crown.

By CHESTER ROBARDS

crobards@tribunemedia. net

FOR the Third consecu-
tive year the Miss Teen
USA competition bedaz-
zled the ballrooms of the
Atlantis Paradise Island
where the only lady of
colour, chosen among the
top 15 contestants, grabbed
the crown in the end to be
dubbed Miss Teen USA
2010. She is Kamie Craw-
ford, 17, of Maryland.

And as she represented
the continental USA's teen
beauties, the very first Miss
USA of Arab descent took
the stage on Saturday night
to talk about her demand-
ing schedule as miss USA
before she takes the stage
as a Miss Universe contes-
tant 2010. The Bahamas
was privileged to host Miss
Universe 2009.

While not many Bahami-
ans scooped up tickets for
the competition, there was a

5 FG

WITH ES:







fair showing of tourists,
including the winner of the
Miss Teen USA Fantasy
Camp 14-year-old Peteche
Bethell and Judge Michelle
Malcolm who owns the
Miss Bahamas (franchise),
but the house was packed
with supporters from a
cross-section of the USA
screaming for their
favourites and jumping
from their seats at each seg-
ment of the competition.
Atlantis had a full house.
Miss Teen USA 2009,
favoured as an up-and-com-
ing country singer, per-

SEE page 11









Sausage & Egg
Burrito |









Quartermilers
head to final

SEE PAGE TWELVE



Abaco power
outages go on
despite BEC
assurances



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





MASSIVE power outages con-
tinued for Abaconians yesterday
despite assurances of improvement
from the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration at the start of the weekend,
hours after hundreds of residents
took to the streets in Marsh Har-
bour to protest chronic power gen-
eration problems.

On Friday, Minister of Public
Utilities Phenton Neymour and
Antionette Turnquest, Assistant

SEE page 11





Historic hospital buildings’






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff








fate ‘still under review’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE fate of two historic
buildings at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital is still "under
review", according to Minis-
ter of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Charles Maynard.

With the exception of the
main hospital buildings, Hug-
gins Lodge and Knowles
House, are among the last
remaining buildings from the
Bahamas’ first hospital.

Knowles House has been
used by the Bahamas Crisis
Centre since 1982, while Hug-
gins Lodge currently houses
three government clinics.

The buildings had been
originally scheduled for demo-
lition in September to provide
site access for equipment and
materials for construction of
new operating theatres.

In an interview with The
Tribune, Mr Maynard said the
buildings were important, not
just because of their age, but
also because of how they had
been used over the years.

He explained that officials
from the Antiquities, Muse-
ums and Monuments Corpo-
ration, the Ministry of Health
and the Public Hospitals
Authority met on Friday,
which prompted the need for
more review.

Mr Maynard said: "We will
be meeting to go over the plan
because what we are being
told is that there is no struc-
ture that is expected to go
over the two buildings, only
parking areas. So we will meet
and do a site visit to see how
best we can protect the build-
ings."

e SEE INSIGHT
SECTION






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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Police seek ‘armed
and dangerous’ men

ALL Points Bulletins were issued for three
men all considered to be “armed and danger-
ous” over the weekend, in connection with
murder, armed robbery and causing harm.

Officers from the Central Detective Unit

LOCAL NEWS















are seeking the assistance of the public in

locating Carlos Colebrooke, alias “Skulla”,
Erel Erilio Ariste and Mark Kenson McKen-

zie.

According to information released by police
press liaison officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skip-
pings, Colebrooke, age 22, is last known to
have resided at Williams Street. He is believed
to be around five feet eight inches tall, weigh-
ing 180 pounds and with a slim to medium
build. He is wanted for questioning in con-
nection with murder and armed robbery.

Ariste, 22, is also wanted in connection with
murder and armed robbery. His last known
address is Henrey Street, Montell Heights. He
is five feet eight inches tall or thereabouts,

Carlos Colebrooke, Erel Erilio Ariste and Mark
Kenson McKenzie.

weighs 180 pounds and has a slim to medium
build, according to police.

McKenzie, 20, is wanted for questioning in

connection with causing harm. His last known
address is 23 Worrick Terrace, Blue Hill
Heights. He stands at around five feet eight
inches tall, weighing 150 pounds and has a
slim build. Police say he should be considered
“armed and extremely dangerous.”

Anyone with information on the where-
abouts of any of these suspects is asked to
contact the police emergency room at 919, the
Central Detective Unit at 502-9991 or 502-
9930 or the anonymous Crime Stoppers num-
ber at 328-8477.



Temporary closures on Robinson Road

SECTIONS of Robinson
Road will be temporarily closed
as crews begin road improve-
ment construction on that street
today.

Motorists should also be on
the lookout for traffic changes
in the areas of JFK Drive, Far-
rington Road and Thompson
Boulevard.

The Jose Cartellone con-
struction company, the firm con-
tracted by government for its
road improvement project,
announced they will be working

aug ii eads

OUT Aen a ad Lito um ete

eee



in the area between Palm Beach
Street and Balfour Avenue.

New 24-inch water main pipes
also will be installed during this
phase. Road construction will be
done in different phases starting
eastbound, said a statement by
the Ministry of Works.

Motorists driving along
Robinson Road should divert
east through Palm Beach Street,
continue along Balfour Avenue
and exit through Claridge Road
to get to their final destination.

Those driving westbound
should continue on the one way
traffic scheme in place.

Access will be granted to busi-
nesses, pedestrians and residents
in the area, said the ministry.

Traffic also will be diverted
along the new round-about
being constructed at the inter-
section of JFK Drive and
Thompson Boulevard. Motorists
driving along these streets should
expect changes at these inter-
sections between July 18 and
August 4.

Installation of new drainage
facilities, utilities, water main



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systems, street lighting, traffic
signs, asphalt pavement and road
markings will be constructed in
this phase.

The ministry warned
motorists to drive with caution as
they approach the new round-
about adding that ramps are con-
structed at some sections of the
round junction.

The ministry added that the
existing traffic signal will be
removed while signs will be in
place to alert the public about
approaching the round-about.

Two businesses, Nassau
Ready-mixed Concrete Compa-
ny and Bahamas Mack Trucks
Sales Ltd, and residents along
Thompson Boulevard will be
affected by the work.

Additionally, the original
access route will be permanent-
ly closed so entry will be provid-
ed west of the original access
point at the round-about or at
the end of Thompson Boule-
vard. “A safe route will be pro-
vided for pedestrians as the alter-
native for the closed footpath.

“We look forward to the co-
operation of the motoring public
throughout this project,” said the
ministry.

Those with questions or con-
cerns are asked to contact the
Jose Cartellone company at 322-
8341/322-2160 or bahamas-
neighbor@cartellone.com.ar and
the Ministry of Works and
Transport hotline at 302-9700 or
publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs.





SPICY CHICKEN

CAESAR



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

For Obama, race means repeated distractions

WASHINGTON — Right when Presi-
dent Barack Obama should have been mak-
ing political hay over big-deal legislative tri-
umphs, race once again blew in with a storm
of distraction.

Obama and his administration have
proved to be one of the most deliberate,
highly disciplined in recent history. Whether
you approve or disapprove of his policies,
political missteps have been rare.

Yet for a second time, a government led
by America's first black president embar-
rassed itself with a hair-trigger reaction on
race.

In the grand sweep of presidential histo-
ry, both cases probably will be lost. Still,
they gnaw, unseen, like termites on the foun-
dation of Obama's administration.

As hard as the president has tried to
downplay race, he knows he's under special
scrutiny for just that reason, a lingering social
hangover from this country's profoundly
troubling history of enslaving, then segre-
gating blacks.

In the latest incident, a right-wing blogger
posted a truncated video of a black woman
who worked at the Department of Agricul-
ture in Georgia and was speaking to a meet-
ing of the NAACP.

In the edited portion of the video that was
first available, Shirley Sherrod seemed to
have been endorsing get-even discrimina-
tion against whites. Fox News jumped on
the story, which also got wide distribution on
other cable outlets.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
ordered Sherrod fired. The NAACP con-
demned her comments.

But it wasn't long before the entirety of
Sherrod's message got out. She was speaking
of her own mistake, of having learned a les-
son of redemption.

The White House apologised. Vilsack
said he was sorry and offered Sherrod a new
job. Obama called Sherrod on Thursday to
express his regret.

He said he ordered "my team" to make
sure "that we're focusing on doing the right
thing instead of what looks to be politically
necessary at that very moment."

Had the administration waited a day, it
could have avoided all the embarrassment
and apologising. In fact the attack on Sher-
rod would have turned back on those behind
it, seen as an example of nasty extremism.

The White House, however, didn't wait.
So the storm engulfed the better part of a
work week that otherwise might have
focused on celebrating Obama's most recent
legislative victory — financial regulatory
reform — and his party's defeat of a Senate
GOP filibuster that delayed additional pay-
ments for the jobless.

It took time away from Obama's efforts
to revive the economy and reduce the near-
10 per cent unemployment rate.

Nearly a year ago to the day, Obama also

tripped up on the race issue. That stumble,
seven months into his presidency, distracted
the White House when time might have bet-
ter been spent pushing for Obama's health
care overhaul.

Within the next month, opponents had
managed, inaccurately, to convey the impres-
sion that his plan included death panels for
the old and sick, amounted to socialist redis-
tribution of wealth and rationed health care.

While Obama managed to stand slightly
aside from the Sherrod case, he was at the
centre of last summer's brouhaha over the
arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr., a black pro-
fessor at Harvard University, by Sgt. James
Crowley, a white police sergeant in Cam-
bridge, Mass.

Crowley was sent to investigate a possible
burglary at Gates’ home. Although he deter-
mined Gates was in his own home and not a
burglar, he arrested Gates anyway after their
encounter grew heated.

The charges were quickly dropped, but
Obama's remarks at a news conference — he
said the police had "acted stupidly" in arrest-
ing Gates — inflamed the debate. The pres-
ident later said he should have expressed
his concerns with different language.

That's when he invited Crowley, who
steadfastly denied race was a factor in the
arrest, and Gates, a friend of Obama's, to the
White House to thrash things out — face to
face — over a beer.

Conservative media outlets and bloggers
also have tried to win points against Obama
with complaints about the Justice Depart-
ment's handling of two New Black Panther
Party members who allegedly threatened
voters at a Philadelphia polling place on the
day Obama was elected.

A criminal investigation into the episode
was dropped by the Bush administration,
but the Obama Justice Department obtained
a narrower civil court order against the con-
duct than Bush officials had sought.

The issue of racism and right-wing attacks
dogged Obama through his historic run for
the presidency, especially his relations with
Rev. Jeremiah Wright, the pastor of Oba-
ma's Chicago church.

Obama finally cut ties with Wright, but he
stood fast with his preacher for a long time.

That was Obama the candidate, before he
became a president ensnared in a political
climate of extreme partisanship and a news
cycle that moves at nearly warp-speed.

That explains why Vilsack "jumped the
gun," Obama said, "partly because we now
live in this media culture where something
goes up on YouTube or a blog and every-
body scrambles."

It's time for everyone to take a deep
breath, the president said, "to take our time
and think these issues through.”

(This article was written by Steven R.
Hurst of the Associated Press).



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Interested person should submit your resume to:

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P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 328-4211



I pray for
Tax reform in
the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANKS for this oppor-
tunity to express my feelings
on Tax Reform in our coun-
try.
As a small business per-
son my company can be
classified more so as a prod-
uct based than a service
based establishment. I con-
tinue to pray for tax reform
in our beloved Bahamas
because customs duty is just
not cutting it.

This country has long out-
grown customs duty as we
know it today in the

LETTERS

KcUUCHEN@UNAL OLN alelantere (eM ALedE



Bahamas, and we should
move to other forms of tax-
es that will level the playing
field for all, and lighten the
strain on our public purse.
I read with interest the
statements made by Abaco
Markets Limited CEO
Gavin Watchorn, and its
Chairman Dionisio
D’ Aguilar about re-invoic-
ing on the rise in the
Bahamas. Re-invoicing is an

I do not believe these
allegations against PM

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me to comment on your front page article
(dated Friday, July 23, 2010) entitled: “PM threats to pros-
ecutor”. Not for one second do I believe these allegations.
It is a case of “Hell hath no fury like that of a woman
scorned”. The nearest case which comes to mind is that of
USS. Supreme Court Justice Thomas when in a similar man-
ner the lady involved felt it necessary to retaliate since she

could not have her way.

I also believe the woman in this article is being used by
politicians (mainly Opposition Members) to achieve their
goals. The FNM Party should make their response that no
one is entitled to a promotion in any business. Think of
the dozens of people who felt they deserved the next pro-
motion in their company or service, but it went to another
— however, they did not react in this way. How ridiculous.

A BAHAMIAN,
Nassau
July 23, 2010.

A major moral, spiritual
problem of our age

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Paul Kokoski’s excellent letter (June 25, 2010) under the
heading — “Euthanasia: Bringing back the ghost of Adolph
Hitler” — spotlighted a major moral, spiritual problem of our age
which today is largely overlooked, explicitly ignored, or even
supported by many countries and religious institutions.

Suffice it to say that at the 1945 Nuremberg Trials of the
Nazis, euthanasia and abortion were denounced strongly by the
judges as evil war crimes, and no person, group or country
disagreed with that verdict. Shortly afterwards, there was a
change of heart of some people, prompting celebrated British
author/broadcaster Malcolm Muggeridge to observe sardon-
ically in 1975: “It only takes 30 years in our Western civilisation
to transform a war crime into an act of compassion.”

The moral code of many people is simple: If our enemies
engage in certain acts, they are an abomination; if we or our
friends engage in similar acts, we are humanitarians!

FRANCIS NORONHA
Nassau,
July 14, 2010.

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old scheme that Bahamas
Customs knew about a long
time ago, among other
schemes. With this re-invoic-
ing scheme companies are
avoiding the full duty on the
items. Big importers, and
companies love our present
customs duty form of taxa-
tion because they make a
killing in profits with the re-
invoicing scheme. Compa-
nies that are service base
also like the customs duty
system as they are not
affected like a product based
company. Small honest busi-
ness Owners in this country
do not stand a chance.

We need to implement
some type of income or val-
ue added tax moving for-
ward that will spread the tax
collection more equally to
companies, and citizens who
fit in the category of product
based, or service based envi-
ronment.

Basically, the customs
duty method of collecting
taxes heavily rely on a prod-
uct based society for its rev-
enue, whereas the service
based part of our society
never pay their fair share of
taxes.

Example of this is a doc-
tor or lawyer would pay
business license and the rest
of it, but he or she never pay
taxes on the services they
render.

Customs duty is bad for
small businesses, as it ties
up a business cash flow at
the front end as we import
products. We are then stuck
with that product with hopes
of selling the item. On the
other hand customs receives
its money up front with no
regard to the small business
person’s struggles.

The OECD, and others
will force the Bahamas to
change its tax structure
whether we want it or not.
Therefore, we should at
least discuss this matter
which will come sooner than
later.

GENE GIBSON
Nassau,
July, 2010.

There is a
worldwide
recession
in progress

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ACCORDING to news
reports (Associated Press
and other media) over the
weekend even Her
Majesty, Queen Elizabeth
II, has made budget cuts in
keeping with the severe
budgets cuts made by her
government in England,
and the spending freezes
by countries of Europe.

I just wonder whether
that Opposition Member
of the Bahamian Parlia-
ment has yet learned that
there is a world-wide reces-
sion in progress, and
whether it is necessary for
all of us to tighten our belts
for the good of the coun-
try. If not, then his follow-
ers Should enlighten him so
that others do not follow
his blind way.

A BAHAMIAN
Nassau,
July 19, 2010.

SE
eae

PHONE: 327-6464
De a ta dele

WE SEND ‘EM PAGKINY!
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 5



Seminar advises on
lucrative potential
of school tuck shops

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MINISTRY of Educa-
tion seminar was held to
advise Principals and school-
board members in Grand
Bahama on ways to min-
imise losses from potentially
lucrative school tuckshops
that can generate hundreds
of thousands of dollars
annually from each school.

According to Minister of
Education, Desmond Ban-
nister, Principals and other
school administrators have
found themselves “distract-
ed” from their core educa-
tional mandate by the
demands of accounting for
the funds generated through
school tuck shops.

Resources

Such funds, which can add
up to hundreds of thousands
of dollars per school each
year in the case of some of
the larger schools, or poten-
tially millions across the
public education system as
a whole, can be “very use-
ful” for schools seeking addi-
tional resources in their
institutions, said Mr Bannis-
ter.

“They can spend it on
institutional materials,
books, underprivileged stu-
dents who may have prob-
lems, additional janitorial
people when they have spe-
cial events... any number of
things to help within school
system,” explained Mr Ban-
nister.

Putting things in perspec-
tive, noted Mr Bannister, the
revenues from tuck shops in
large schools can generate









TUCK SHOP SEMINAR: Desmond Bannister

significantly more than the
government allocates to
schoolboards, which adds up
to $700,000 for seven schools
in Grand Bahama.

“The important thing is
that principals are really
educators — they should be
spending time dealing with
instruction and discipline but
what they are having to do
because of tuck shops is
spend time dealing a lot with
accounting issues also,” said
the Minister.

An accounting firm has
been brought onboard by
the Ministry of Education to
explain to schools the advan-
tages of some new technolo-
gy which the Ministry hopes
to implement in schools to
assist in making accounting
for the funds easier and to
minimise losses.

Computer accounting soft-

Police investigate
two drownings

POLICE are investigating two drownings that happened

yesterday.

The first incident was at Balmoral Beach at Blackbeard’s
Cay in the afternoon. A man, believed to be in his 40s, was
taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead.

The second drowning took place an hour later at Adelaide
Beach. A man, believed to be in his late 50s, was found on
the sand and pronounced dead at the scene.

— oo

ware has already been
installed at SC McPherson
school, and there are plans
to expand the installation to
five other major schools
within the year, and more
when funds permit.

Principals

“You have principals and
administrators dealing with
tuck shops on a daily basis
and there are hundreds and
hundreds of receipts. An
automated system will make
their job so much easier and
if there would have been
losses it will mean there is
more efficiency,” said Mr
Bannister.

Auditor General Terrance
Bastian also attended the
Grand Bahama seminar to
speak with educators about
means of improving finan-
cial accountability in schools.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Third Met Office employee asked to
explain actions ahead of deadly tornado

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A THIRD employee at the
Meteorological Office has been
given a “show cause” letter by
officials to explain their actions
ahead of the deadly tornado
that killed three people in
Grand Bahama in March, The
Tribune understands.

According to multiple
sources close to the situation,
the employee — who was on
duty on March 29 the day the
twister ripped through portions
of Grand Bahama —- received
the disciplinary letter last
Thursday. The forecaster is
said to have 14 days in which to
respond.

However, well-placed
sources claim the forecaster
was on a break and left anoth-
er officer in the office when

reports came in about tornado
activity.

The sources believe the let-
ter is an act of retaliation
because the employee did not
issue a severe weather warn-
ing earlier this month when
asked by a senior official to do
so.

Thunderstorm

“It quite surprised me, I
don’t know why (the employ-
ee) was chosen. I think it’s a
matter of retaliation because
there was a time when (the
forecaster) was asked to issue a
severe weather warning at the
beginning of this month and
was contacted by (a senior offi-
cial) and told that wherever he
was in the city he was experi-
encing heavy thunderstorm and
showers. He asked (the fore-

caster) to issue a warning.”

However the employee did
not adhere to these instructions
because it was felt there was
no need based on reading of
monitoring systems, the source
added.

This comes as claims emerge
of low staff morale at the Mete-
orological Office due to claims
of “micro-managing” from offi-
cials at the Department of
Meteorology and reports of in-
fighting at the senior manage-
ment level during staff meet-
ings.

“In headquarters at Oakes
Field, they are micro-manag-
ing the Met Office. We have
all the necessary tools and
models at hand but they are
sitting there and telling the staff
at the airport what to do — it’s
demoralising,” said one source.
“This is the lowest the morale
has ever been.”

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Said another source at the
Meteorological office: “The
morale in that office is under
a snake’s belly — it’s very
poor.”

A message left for the direc-
tor at the Meteorological
Department was not returned
up to press time.

Response

Yesterday Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux could
not confirm if a third employee
received a disciplinary letter.
He added that he did not know
the response of the other two
forecasters who were given let-
ters earlier this month.



“T know about two people
(who received letters). I know
that they responded, with



respect to the final outcome,
as we speak I’m not aware,”
Mr Deveaux said.

‘Intense and productive’ OECD meeting

By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information Services



THE Peer Review Group of the Organisation
for Economic Cooperation and Development
Global Forum held a “very intense and produc-
tive” meeting in the Bahamas, said the Ministry of
Finance.

The Third Meeting of the Peer Review Group
of the Global Forum on Transparency and
Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes was
held last Tuesday until Thursday at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino,
Cable Beach. It was the first time that the
Bahamas hosted a meeting of an OECD-related
initiative.

About 35 jurisdictions were represented either
as members of the Peer Review Group or as juris-
dictions that were part of the first tranche of
assessments. The outcome of the meeting will be
submitted for consideration at the full Global
Forum of 94 members scheduled in Singapore at
the end of September, 2010.

Rowena Bethel, legal advisor at the Ministry of
Finance and the Bahamas’ Representative on the
OECD Global Forum led the country’s position.

Reviews

“The Bahamas provided an assessor for the
first tranche of reviews demonstrating its com-
mitment to make an effective contribution to the
work of the Global Forum,” said Ms Bethel at a
closing press conference on Thursday, July 22.

She said the assessments can be viewed as a
means for maintaining the level playing field as
they ensure that all jurisdictions are assessed
against a set of standards that seek to establish
where each jurisdiction is in relation to the imple-
mentation of the tax transparency standards.

“Clearly, all jurisdictions are engaged in the
ground work to ensure implementation of the

standards. Indeed, the Global Forum has set an
ambitious schedule of reviews for some 100 plus
countries over the next three years,” she said.

Ms Bethel applauded the Global Forum for its
inclusiveness; as the membership of the Peer
Review Group is diverse, covering countries and
territories from many countries developing and
developed and having onshore and offshore finan-
cial services centres.

“This approach assists in the creation of the
level playing field and should be applauded and
replicated by other international groupings.

“It is our belief that global matters should
have a global dialogue,” she said.

Deliberations

Ms Bethel described the deliberations as frank
and open and highlighted not only the important
differences in the various countries’ systems, but
also helped to bridge the gaps in understanding
between members about their respective tax and
information sharing systems.

“The issue of tax cooperation is relatively
new for many jurisdictions — particularly those
countries without domestic income or corporate
tax regimes.

“Therefore, the tremendous efforts of all par-
ticipating jurisdictions to apply the internationally
agreed standards through the negotiation of tax
information sharing arrangements and the effec-
tive implementation of those arrangements should
be recognised as an important achievement by
the international community,” Ms Bethel said.

Pascal Saint-Amans, Head of the Global
Forum Secretariat also highly praised the out-
come of the meeting.

“We have had a very important meting for
the first time in the history of the work that we
have a conclusive process resulting in the adopt-
ing of reports which have been agreed by every-
body and most of them agreeing the reports.




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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Getting the most out of appraisals

By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

IF YOU'RE selling your
property, an appraisal is cru-
cial for establishing the mar-
Ket value.

The local banks have a list
of approved appraisers.
These appraisers are able to
access data to comparable
sales, which along with oth-
er factors, helps them deter-
mine the true value.

Appraisers are happy to
factor any information you
can provide about your
property to generate a more
accurate report. As a seller,

REAL ESTATE

list the best features of your
home, including recent
improvements, professional
landscaping, or even benefits
of your location (such as
avoiding traffic hassles and
ease of access - i.e. short-
cuts - to nearby schools).
While you won’t neces-
sarily be graded for your
housekeeping skills, apprais-
ers do pay attention to the
very appearance and clean-
liness of your home. You
can positively affect your

appraisal’s outcome if your
lawn is mowed and raked,
your windows sparkle and
your closets look spacious.
Appraisers are almost look-
ing through a purchaser’s
eyes, SO pretend you’re
preparing for an open house
before their arrival.

It would be helpful to pro-
vide a copy of the appraisal
to a potential purchaser.
Purchasers can only consid-
er a home if it’s within an
appraised value they can
afford. Also, there is
ABSOLUTELY no point in
listing your home at a high-

er figure than the appraised
value. Almost all purchasers
need a mortgage and they
are not going to pay above
the appraised value!

An important question to
ask when pricing your home
is: Would you pay above the
appraised value for the
property? And, more to the
point, would a bank lend
above the appraised value?

Of course, in both cases
the answer is No.

Tip of the Week — Read
through the appraisal report
as soon as you get it. If you

find any errors (hopefully
there won’t be any) contact
the appraiser immediately.

(Mike Lightbourn is pres-
ident of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty)

Questions or comments?
Email me at
ask@ColdwellBanker

Bahamas.com. MIKE LIGHTBOURN



BAHAMAROST LOGO UNVEILED

VACANCY

In anticipation of ihe opening of our new sion,
Solomon’s Fresh hlarket, we are seeking applications
for the following positions:

Project Mansirer
Store Manager
AGS Shore Managers
From-End Supervisors
Warehouse Supervise
Micat Supervisor
Produce Supervisor
Re-Order Buyer
Pharmacist



PERMANENT SECRETARY
to the Ministry of Tourism | _
Mrs. Hyacinth Winder- | \J
Pratt unveiled the logo for
the new BahamaHost Cor-
porate Programme. The
programme was launched
on Thursday at the British
Colonial Hilton.

Mrs. Pratt said the
Bahamahost Corporate
Programme will provide
the opportunity for private
businesses to participate
in further strengthening
customer service in the
Bahamas.

Through this new cor-
















Ouistanding solary, benefits and incentives offered
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IGH COMMISSIONER OF REPUBLIC OF SRI LANKA VISITS MINISTER



No telephone calls please. Only persons selected for
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Don’t burn our bridges: The case
for a single Caribbean airline

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

“DON’T BURN OUR
BRIDGES: The Case for
Owning Airlines” is the
title of a book authored

by Jean Holder, the cur-
rent Chairman of the
Caribbean airline, LIAT.
It is a serious work which
should be read by all who
are concerned with both
Caribbean economic inte-
gration and the growth of
the services industries at
both the national and
regional levels.

Holder is uniquely
placed to write the book,
not only because of his
position with LIAT but
also because of his past
work as Secretary-Gener-
al of the Caribbean
Tourism Organization and
the Caribbean Tourism
Research and Develop-
ment Centre.



MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 13A

ROBINSON ROAD
Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

=F
Cs

7 an

=

WORLD VIEW

His basic argument is
that Caribbean govern-
ments must own a region-
al airline. “To those who
say Caribbean govern-
ments cannot afford to do
this, I reply that they can-
not afford not to,” he
emphatically declares.

As Holder sees it, the
countries of the Caribbean
archipelago “depend on
air transportation services
to connect them with the
world and each other, and
for this, they cannot rely
solely on foreign carriers,
which would take deci-
sions about services,
routes, schedules and
financial performances
according to the best
interests of their owners
and shareholders.” He
argues that “such deci-
sions will not, and cannot,
always coincide with the
best interests of the
Caribbean states.”

Ambition

One of the compelling
reasons that Holder
advances for an airline
that is a Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM) car-
rier, is the ambition to
create a Single Market
and Economy among the
15-member states of the
grouping. “In a vibrant,
working, single market
and economy where there
is a greater harmonization
of regional and interna-
tional policies than cur-
rently exist, the political
directorate of the CARI-
COM member states must
know for certain that it is
not a hostage to external
forces, for either political
or economic reasons.”

“Tt should not be possi-
ble,” he says, “for it (the
Caribbean Single Market)
to be cut off from the rest
of the world and the mem-
ber states from each other,
simply because it offends
some other country or

JC
Co

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that road works will be carried out on sec-
tions of Robinson Road between Palm Beach Street and Balfour Avenue effective Monday July 26th, 2010. Installation of
new twenty-four inches (24”) Water main pipes will be constructed in this phase. Construction works will be done in dif-
ferent phases starting eastbound.
e Motorist should diverted east through Palm Beach Street, continue along Balfour Avenue and exit through Claridge

Road to their destination.

e Motorist travelling westbound should continue on the one way traffic scheme in place.

Access will be granted to the business places, pedestrians and residents. Kindly observe all traffic signs delineating the work
zone, please keep abreast with the local additional media through which we will keep you updated.

We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project.of Thompson Blvd. A safe route will be
provided for pedestrians as the alternative for the closed footpath.

We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project.

For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@ cartellone.com.ar

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks @bahamas.gov.bs



1



“It has long
been argued
that the airlines,
owned by
individual
Caribbean states
in pursuit of
their ‘symbols
of nationhood
and sovereignty’
were luxuries
they could not
afford.”



some other person outside
the community.”

He may be over empha-
sizing the case to make
the point. It is hardly like-
ly that the region would
ever be entirely cut off
from the rest of the world
by all foreign carriers.
Equally, it is unlikely that
all air transportation with-
in the region would be cut
off by all carriers at the
same time. Some airline
or airlines will always
remain to pick up the
slack and the business,
even though it may be ata
higher cost to the region.

But, it is the case not
only that some foreign-
owned airlines could
desert some countries in
the region if they consid-
ered that the destinations
had become uneconomic,
but also that the airlines
that remain could demand
higher prices for the ser-
vices they provide. In this
regard, it is important that
all CARICOM countries
should have a carrier,
owned within the region,
on which they can rely
and which they can use to
calm prices, provided that
the governments of all the
countries understand that
they cannot expect other
regional governments to
subsidize their routes.

This is the contention
right now about LIAT -
the airline that serves the
Eastern and Southern
Caribbean.

LIAT is owned and
financed by only three of
CARICOM’s govern-
ments — Antigua and Bar-
buda, Barbados and St
Vincent & the
Grenadines. The St Vin-
cent Prime Minister,
Ralph Gonsalves, makes
the point repeatedly that
many other CARICOM
countries (not Bahamas,
Belize Jamaica, Trinidad
and Tobago, and Suri-
name) depend on LIAT to
provide air transportation
for people, the services
industries and some
goods, but they decline to
contribute to the cost.

It is quite remarkable
that some of the
Caribbean countries that
refuse to participate finan-
cially in LIAT have no
hesitancy in providing
subsidies to large foreign
owned airlines to continue
flying into their countries.
British Airways, Ameri-
can Airlines and even
German airlines have







SIR RONALD SANDERS

been the beneficiaries of
such subsidies.

The Caribbean has also
witnessed the financial
failure of airlines that
have been owned within
individual states — either
by governments or private
sector companies. BWIA,
owned by the government
of Trinidad and Tobago,
collapsed under a moun-
tain of debt and had to be
closed-down to rid itself
of many of its unsustain-
able obligations. The
Trinidad and Tobago gov-
ernment assumed much of
the debts of BWIA and
launched Caribbean Air-
lines which now flies much
fewer routes.

Jamaica, too, saw Air
Jamaica seamlessly accu-
mulate huge debt in a
transition from govern-
ment to private sector and
back to government own-
ership, until the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund
(IMF) made it clear, as
part of its conditions for
a loan to the government
to prop up the economy,
that Air Jamaica had to
be sold.

Merged

In an arrangement
between the governments
of Jamaica and Trinidad
and Tobago, Caribbean
Airlines now owns Air
Jamaica. Even though the
name “Air Jamaica” will
remain, the airline is now
effectively owned by
Caribbean Airlines and
will be merged with it.

It has long been argued
that the airlines, owned by
individual Caribbean
states in pursuit of their
‘symbols of nationhood
and sovereignty’ were lux-
uries they could not
afford.

When Holder was writ-
ing this book, he could not
have envisaged that the
Trinidad and Tobago
owned, Caribbean Air-
lines, would have bought
out Air Jamaica a few
months later.

He said: “The move
from national ownership
and control, to what I
refer as community own-
ership and control, would
require a sea change in
the thinking of the region,
not only among political
leaders but also at the lev-
el of the people them-
selves”.

That sea change has
begun to happen, swelled
by a huge tsunami of
necessity that is wrecking
weak national capacity
and underscoring the
urgency of more robust
capability from deeper
Caribbean economic inte-
gration.

It has taken severe eco-
nomic collapse in Jamaica
to cause pride to be swal-
lowed and a single airline
to be created for Jamaica
and Trinidad and Tobago.

St. Albans Drive

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Tel: 325-1325
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THE TRIBUNE





MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 15

LOCAL NEWS









=e :
ao r
a = et
7

are
Th. al













e





Senior police officers
and govt officials on
community walkabout

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Police
Superintendent Christopher
Pickstock, officer in charge
of the EMR Division, led a
team of senior officers and
government officials on a
community walkabout in the
Martin Town and Russell
Town areas.

“We not only want to
increase police visibility but
we want to reach out to res-
idents living in the settle-
ments of Eight Mile Rock,”
said Supt Pickstock.

“We want show them that
we care about their wellbe-
ing and safety,” he said.

The Police have partnered
with community leaders in

the various sectors of EMR.

Participating in the walk-
about were EMR MP Ver-
nae Grant, Pastor Lindy
Russell, Pastor Carlton Gar-
diner and Rev Rita Stuart,
as well officers from Police
Fire Dept, Environmental
Health, Road Traffic, and
Socials Services.

“We have certainly bene-
fited from the support given
by members of the commu-
nities,” said Supt Pickstock.

“We recognise that if we
are to achieve any measure
of success, we have to work
together with all sectors of
our society,” Supt Pickstock
said.

The walkabouts in EMR
commenced in February and
the goal is to visit a different
community each month.

GB traffic victim identified

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The victim in Grand Bahama’s fifth traffic
fatality for the year has been identified as 42-year-old Brid-

gette Dean.

She and two others were seriously injured in a car accident
on Midshipman Road on Thursday.
Dean, a passenger, was ejected from the vehicle upon

impact.

The driver and the other female passenger are detained at

Rand Memorial Hospital.

Inspector Hector Delva, assistant police liaison officer,
reported that a traffic accident occurred around 2.30pm in
the area of Victoria Inn Hotel, involving a red-coloured

Chevy Trail Blazer.

The vehicle was being driven by 26-year-old Tino Deal of

Holmes Rock.

Mr Delva said the vehicle was traveling west along Mid-
shipman Road when the driver lost control and collided

into a tree in the median.

The vehicle was extensively damaged.

The victims were transported by EMS personnel to RMH,
where Dean was pronounced dead around 3.10pm.

Investigations are continuing into the matter.

PUERTO RICO: Governor seeks
aid for 17 flooded communities

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

PUERTO RICO'S gov-
ernor has declared a state
of emergency for 17 flood-
ed communities in the U.S.
territory as he presses the
federal government to con-
tribute aid, according to
Associated Press.

Gov. Luis Fortuno says
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency noti-
fied him Sunday that it will
review his request for aid
in low-lying areas hit by
days of heavy rains that

flooded dozens of homes
and damaged roadways.

The cash-strapped Puer-
to Rican government is
helping repair infrastruc-
ture with its own emer-
gency aid while officials
await a federal determina-
tion.

A weather system that
later turned into Tropical
Storm Bonnie caused wide-
spread flooding last week
in eastern Puerto Rico.

A 14-year-old boy
drowned in one swollen
river.









ABOVE: Supt Christopher





Pickstock and several senior 1
police officers along with Thigh & Leg Snack
EMR MP Vernae Grant (in wi fries & biscuit




pink) and Rev Rita Stuart are
seen during the walkabout in
Martin Town/Russell Town.



Rib & Wing Snack
w/ fries & biscuit




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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010
LOCAL NEWS

Armstrong bids Tour adieu, heads for the Bahamas

PARIS (AP) — Lance Arm-
strong didn't want to go out this
way.

In his final Tour de France,

the seven-time champion
popped a tyre, crashed and
struggled up the mountains.
Worse, he appears to be the tar-

get of a US. federal investigation
into doping and fraud allegations
while a rider on the US Postal
team.

One Tour too many? Maybe.
Still, he maintained he had
no regrets despite the ignomin-
ious ending of No. 13 — nearly



OE MN MTC mm my. deL-D (Ko



Donnetta Turnquest puts high

Donnetta Turnquest heads a driving force behind the scenes at Royal Bank, ensuring that background
staff is equipped to provide quality service to each internal client. As Service Centre Manager for
The Bahamas, Cayman and Turks & Caicos Islands, Turnquest often encounters fresh faces and
new challenges while seeking to maintain trained and motivated employees.

Ms. Turnquest is well equipped for the task, having worked 25 years with RBC and RBC FINCO.
She notes, “I work closely with management and staff to ensure the Service Centre interacts
seamlessly with the branch network to deliver an exceptional client experience. | am responsible
for building a dynamic team that is responsive to an ever changing environment and for ensuring
that staff enhance their skills to attain both their personal and professional goals.”

At age 17, Turnquest journeyed from her home in Long Island to work as a summer student in
banking. She fell in love with the field and soon began a longstanding career with RBC. Over the
years, Ms. Turnquest has held numerous positions with increasing levels of responsibility including:
Customer Service Officer, Proof Operator, Loans Secretary, Loans Supervisor, Collateral Securities
Supervisor, Branch Operations Officer and Manager Customer Service & Operations. The past 6
years were spent within the Bahamas Service Centre at RBC with the added oversight of the
Barbados Service Centre for 2 years and current oversight of Cayman Service Centre.

As a 2006 Royal Performance Cruise Winner for Leadership, Turnquest is an Associate of the
Institute of Canadian Bankers and holds a Bsc. Business Professional Management with concentration
in Finance from Nova University and Master of Business Administration from McHari Institute.
When she is not traveling, Tumquest enjoys walking, cooking, boating and spending quality time
with son, family and friends.

RBC Royal Bank
of Canada

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

® Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada.
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

LieLe

value on helping her staff succeed.







40 minutes behind the leader,
former teammate and rival
Alberto Contador.

"IT wouldn't say that it's
ruined,” he said during an inter-
view with a few reporters Sun-
day. "In 10 years, when I look
back on the 2010 Tour, it won't
be the memory that I have.

"Obviously, I won't have a
yellow jersey to remember —
I'll remember the team, digging
deep to win the team GC (gen-
eral classification)," he said. "It's
significant for us and the spon-
sor.

"I'll remember having my son
here for a week at the Tour," he
said, referring to 10-year-old
Luke. "I'll remember the bad
luck, certainly — the crashes.
But that won't be the thing that
I'll take away."

During the race, there were
numerous published reports of a
federal investigation led by Jeff
Novitzky, a special agent with
the Food and Drug Administra-
tion, into claims about Arm-
strong and doping by former
teammate Floyd Landis.

Several former riders who
race with Armstrong have
reportedly been subpoenaed.
Armstrong faced questions
about those reports at the Tour.
He said he had not been sub-
poenaed or contacted by
Novitzky himself.

Landis, who was stripped of
his 2006 Tour title for doping,
had long denied doping until
April, when he announced that
he, in fact, did — and alleged
Armstrong did, too. The claim
came as Armstrong was riding
in the Tour of California.

Armstrong, who denies the
allegations, faulted Landis for
trying to clear his conscience and
trying "to incriminate a half-
dozen other people. ... To me,
that doesn't add up."

"That's just somebody who's
trying to ruin the lives of oth-
ers," Armstrong said on a high-
speed French train from Bor-
deaux to the Paris area for the
Tour's 20th and final stage.

He insisted his life isn't going
to change.

The Livestrong wristbands of
his charitable foundation will
continue to sell; he will do char-
ity rides; he will still be a father
of four — soon to be five — chil-
dren; he will still hang out with
stars like singer Bono and actor
Matthew McConaughey.

Ask any rider or team man-
ager at the Tour, and it's clear
Armstrong's mark on the sport is
indelible — the use of earpiece
radios for riders, training regi-
mens, diet and race strategy,
among other things. His success
helped convert what was mostly
a summertime passion in Europe
into a 21st Century business fan-
ning interest from Canada to
China.

But his long-masterful con-
trol of his image — cancer sur-
vivor, Tour champion, public
personality and pitchman —
may finally be escaping his grasp.

THE TRIBUNE









FINAL TOUR: Lance Armstrong

Last year, returning from a
four-year retirement from the
Tour, he finished an impressive
third, got within one second of
the yellow jersey he knows so
well, and warmed the hearts of
French fans who once despised
him for his methodical, "Amer-
ican" drive to victory above all.

This year, he was but a mere
23rd, and his best single showing
was arguably in the prologue in
Rotterdam, where he placed
fourth.

He gradually downscaled his
ambitions. At first he wanted to
win. Then, he wanted a stage
win, which he narrowly missed in
an eight-man sprint finish to the
16th stage, the toughest day in
the Pyrenees.

When that opportunity van-
ished, he focused on his
RadioShack squad — which did
give him a sliver of glory and a
podium appearance by winning
the team classification.

In Stage 3, he blew a tyre on
cobblestones, and lost time. In
Stage 8, he got involved in three
crashes that his 38-year-old body
just couldn't recover from in
time to scale tough Alpine
climbs.

"With the first crash, my body
never felt the same after that,
and the second was the nail in
the coffin,” he said. "So you
could look at it like that, and
yeah, it was one (Tour) too
many."

Yet he said pulling out wasn't
an option.

"T couldn't quit," Armstrong
said. "I could have said a dozen
things were wrong, but that's not
the commitment that I made.
The result wasn't ideal, but it
would have been a serious mis-
take to quit on the team, to quit
on the sponsor, to quit on my
fans.

"OK, it's not what they want-
ed, it's not what any of us want-
ed. But it would have been far
worse to DNF" — Did Not Fin-
ish, he said.

He's happy, for the time
being, to be out of the limelight.

"Right now, I'm going to the
Bahamas, I'm gonna put my feet
up and forget about riding the
bike for a little bit. Drink some
cold beer. Build some sand cas-
tles with my kids," he said after
the race ended.

"T got my competitive fix for
the next 40 years, it will take
until about 80 (years old) and
then I don't think I will wanna
come back," he said.

His 2.5 million-plus follow-
ers on Twitter will have to wait.

"I'm laying off the Twitter
for a while. I gotta go away.”

Teenager stabbed

FROM page one
SHOOTING

POLICE are investigating a shooting that sent two men to hospi-

tal early yesterday morning.

It was reported the men were at Cottonwood Street, Pinewood
Gardens when a masked man in a Honda Inspire car with heavily tint-

ed windows fired in their direction.

The men were taken to hospital by ambulance and are both list-

ed in stable condition.

Police are also investigating an alleged armed robbery.

On Saturday evening, two men — one armed with a handgun —
robbed a store on Farrington Road.

It was reported that the men entered Destiny General Trading
Store, demanded cash and escaped with cellphones, jewellery and an

undetermined amount of cash.

Anyone with any information that may assist investigations should
call police urgently on 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on

328-TIPS (8477).



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THE TRIBUNE

usiness

MONDAY, 2010





FRUSTRATED: Peter Nygard.

Nygard Cay’s $50m
lease ‘frustration’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CANADIAN fashion
mogul Peter Nygard has
expressed “frustration” with
the wait for government
approvals that would enable
him to proceed with the $50
million project to rebuild his
luxury Lyford Cay play-
ground, saying on Friday that
he had been waiting for some
permits for “a couple of
years now”.

Speaking from the Nygard
Cay home that was ravaged
by fire last November, Mr
Nygard said the two-three
year project he had planned
would “easily be” a $50 mil-
lion investment that could
employ 200-300 Bahamian
construction workers, adding

SEE page 6B

* Fashion tycoon says
rebuilding of fire-ravaged
luxury playground ‘stalled’
by wait for Department
of Lands and Surveys,
as all relevant permits
will flow from that

* Says been waiting two
years for some approvals,
and situation making
him a ‘bit tongue-tied’
on Bahamas promotion

* Nygard Cay loss strips
Bahamas of marketing tool
to attract high-end tourists

* Reality TV show featuring
Nygard and Bahamas
put on hold due to
reconstruction wait

Handicraft project
eyes $1.1m sales
in 12 months

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A $500,000 Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) fund-
ed project is projecting that sales of Bahamian-made handicraft
products through a virtual, Internet-based marketplace it will
create should hit $1.1 million after 12 months in operation.

Don Demeritte, the former Water & Sewerage Corporation
chairman who is acting as a consultant to the project, entitled
Bahamas Virtual Platform, said it aimed to strengthen the
Bahamian handicraft industry by “clustering” its participants for
“strength in numbers”, enabling them to enjoy greater raw
materials buying power and to sell their products to a global

market.



Praising Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) chairman, Edison Key, and the organisation’s annual
general manager responsible for handicraft projects, Donnalee
Bowe, for playing pivotal roles in the successful bid for funding
from the IDB’s Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF), Mr

Demeritte said the project ulti-
mately hoped to make the

SEE page 7B

Hotels ‘quarters, not years
away’ from recovery

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian resort indus-
try wants to see business levels
comparable to 2008 numbers
“sustained for two-three quar-
ters” before declaring it has tru-
ly recovered, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president telling Tribune Busi-
ness that while July and August
were unlikely to match June
numbers, continued improve-
ment upon 2009 comparatives
was expected.

Robert Sands, who is also

Baha Mar’s senior vice-presi-
dent of governmental and
external affairs, said: “The
trend for July and August
remains cautious growth, cer-
tainly better than last year’s lev-
els, but not to levels achieved in
June.

“If we get that, it will be a
bonus for us, but we’re look-
ing for improvement upon last
year going forward. I think we
want to get a real year under
our belts, because while there
may be confidence levels grow-

SEE page 5B

Nygard Cay resort
plan is dropped

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FASHION tycoon Peter
Nygard said on-again, off-again
plans to develop a small private
resort at his Nygard Cay retreat
now look off the table, given
opposition from his wealthy
neighbours behind the gates of
the exclusive Lyford Cay com-
munity.

Acknowledging that propos-
als for developing a mini-pri-
vate resort at Nygard Cay, giv-

en its popularity as a sought-
after, exclusive getaway desti-
nation, had been around since
the late Sir Lynden Pindling
was prime minister, when asked
whether such plans were again
being ruled out, Mr Nygard
responded: “It sounds like it.
“Tt doesn’t sound like the rest
of the community wants it.
That’s fine; I do not want to
fight with the neighbours.
We’re here in a beautiful com-

SEE page 7B

Well Lev. 2 2.0



=

BREITLING

Cable & Wireless ‘front
runner’ to acquire BIC

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government-

appointed

Bahamas

Telecommunica-

tions Company’s
(BTC) privatisation committee
is focusing on talks with Cable
& Wireless Communications,
the regional telco with opera-
tions in 13 other Caribbean
countries, as the current front-
runner to acquire a stake in the
state-owned incumbent, sources
familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business.

This newspaper was
informed that the committee
had been “working for a little
while” with Cable & Wireless,
having rejected earlier bids
from the JP Morgan/Vodafone
combination, plus the Atlantic
Tele-Network/CFAL duo.

However, the BTC privati-
sation is by no means ‘a done
deal’, as numerous issues still
need to be resolved via negoti-
ation between the commit-
tee/Government and Cable &
Wireless. This newspaper also
understands, from reliable
sources, that there is at least
one other “major party” that
has expressed an interest in
becoming BTC’s strategic part-

* Government-appointed privatisation committee talking to
regional telco with operations in 13 Caribbean countries
over BTC stake sale, although much remains to be done

* Sources say J P Morgan/Vodafone, Atlantic Tele
Network/CFAL, both informed offers have been rejected

* Yet ‘significant other party’ also now interested
in BTC to give Cable & Wireless competition

* Unions said tight-lipped after meeting PM on
Friday, given opposition to Cable & Wireless

ner, after learning that all the
proposals submitted by the four
parties that qualified for the
due diligence round had been
rejected.

While the BTC privatisation
committee believes Cable &
Wireless is “very focused and
serious” in its attempt to
acquire a majority BTC stake,
Tribune Business was told that
the committee would also look
at other serious prospects to
ensure it did not “jump too
soon”, thereby making sure the
Government got the best strate-

gic partner both in terms of
purchase price and terms/con-
ditions.

Cable & Wireless was
described by one source as
“really well suited as the strate-
gic partner. The committee
believes they’re very interest-
ed in this asset, and have the
right idea about value, but there
are some important issues that
would need to be negotiated”.

“Some very fruitful discus-
sions” were said to have taken
place between the BTC pri-
vatisation committee and Cable

Nygard calls for medical
tourism to boost economy

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CANADIAN fashion tycoon
Peter Nygard has urged the
Bahamas to develop a medical
tourism industry to kick-start
its flagging economy, and
warned that implementing a
personal income tax to replace
the current Customs duty sys-
tem would be “disastrous” for
this nation.

Calling on the Bahamas to
“get on with it”, Mr Nygard
said during a Friday interview
that this nation needed to start
implementing the mega resort

* Urges Bahamas to ‘get on with it’ and look
for new industry to kick-start flagging economy,
and warns other nations already bypassing us

* Says personal income tax would be ‘disastrous’
for Bahamas, and increasing taxes to boost
revenues ‘sort of dangerous’ as costs of
doing business in this nation already high

projects it had on the table,
such as the $2.6 billion Baha
Mar redevelopment of Cable
Beach, or otherwise it would
lose its competitive edge as oth-
er nations did so and bypassed

BREITLING BOUTIQUE

it.

The flamboyant tycoon
warned that the Bahamas was
likely to lose “‘a lot of traffic” in

SEE page 7B

Ce i oe ee ed

& Wireless, in a bid to get toa
point where the Government
might find its proposal attrac-
tive.

Much work remains to be
done in this regard over the
coming months to reach an
agreement that both the Gov-
ernment and Cable & Wireless
find acceptable, with key issues
likely to include purchase price
(important for political reasons,
given the $260 million offer
made by Bluewater Communi-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





Pwo rs|


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP



The Bahamian Stock Market



BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE

By RoyalFidelity Capital two advancers and the other compared to the previous Cable Bahamas (CAB) =AML $1.04 $- 0 -11.11%
Markets securities remaining week's trading volume of was the big advancer, trad- BBL $0.30 $- 0 -52.38%
unchanged. 14,441 shares. ing 5,050 shares to see its BOB $5.00 $- 0 -15.25%

IT WAS another slow week Commonwealth Bank _ stock close the week up by BPF $10.63 $- 0 -1.02%
of trading in the Bahamian EQUITY MARKET (CBL) was the volume leader, $0.15 at $11.11. BSL $9.42 $- 0 -6.36%
stock market. Investors trad- A total of 26,520 shares trading 13,600 shares to see First Caribbean Interna- BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
ed in five out of the 24 listed changed hands, representing its stock close the week tional Bank (CIB) was the CAB $11.11 $0.15 5,050 11.32%
securities with one decliner, an increase of 12,079 shares unchanged at $6.02 sole decliner, trading 2,000 CBL $6.02 $- 13,600 -14.00%
shares to see its share price CHL $2.50 $- 0 -8.09%

close the week down by CIB $9.74 -$0.07 2,000 -2.50%

$0.07 at $9.74. CWCB — $2.32 -$0.01 0 -18.60%

DHS $2.00 $- 0 -21.57%

BOND MARKET FAM $6.07 $- 0 -6.47%

There was no activity in FBB $2.17 $- 0 -8.44%

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION the bond market last week. = FCC $0.27 $- 0 0.00%

FCL $4.65 $0.07 5,370 -2.52%

COMPANY NEWS FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%

FIN $8.90 $- 500 -4.09%

Earnings Releases: ICD $5.59 $- 0 0.00%

There was noearnings JSJ $9.95 $- 0 0.00%

release from any of the list- PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

ed companies this week.

& BILLING CHANGES

AGM Notice:
Fidelity Bank Bahamas
(FBB) will hold its AGM at

the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel on July 28, 2010, at
6pm.

Benchmark Bahamas
(BBL) has announced its
AGM will be held at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel
on July 28, 2010, at 6.30pm.



Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
Providence and the Family Islands. Billings for allconsumers
during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Famguard Corporation
(FAM) has announced its
AGM will be held at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel
on July 29, 2010, at 4pm.

Tela

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

Bahamas First Holdings has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel on August 4,
2010, at 5pm.

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;



Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
period are due for payment on August 6th;



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The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

TARIFF

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Remaining units per month
Minimum monthly charge

KVA CHARGE
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8.70 cents per unit
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$ 568.00

TEMPORARY SUPPLIES

16.38 cents per unit $20.00 connection fee $10.00 per month Meter Rental

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 3B



$152m caught up in
‘suspicious’ reports

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SUSPICIOUS transaction
reports received by the Finan-
cial Intelligence Unit (FIU)
increased by only nine cases
last year compared to 2008,
involving sums worth over
$152 million, the organisa-
tion’s anual report predicting
these figures would increase
in the future due to changes in
the global financial system.

According to the FIU’s
2009 annual report, there
were 138 reported cases of
suspicious transactions, up
over the 129 reported the pre-
vious year.

Of the 138 cases, 39 per
cent of those were forward-
ed to the Commissioner of
Police for review, 7 per cent

were closed and 52 per cent
are still pending.

The value of the funds
involved in the reported sus-
picious transactions valued
was $152.823 million. Only 10
per cent of that amount was
reported to the police for
investigation, with some 86
per cent of that figure caught
up in probes still pending. Just
$3.8 million was the final val-
ue of transactions where the
investigation had closed.

The FIU’s report also
revealed that 46 per cent of
the suspicious transaction
reports originated from
domestic/offshore banks,
while 31 per cent originated
solely from offshore banks.
Only 15 per of reports origi-
nated at standalone domestic
banks.

The report also revealed,

however, that Bahamians
accounted for more than 90
per cent in the categories of
nationality of contract part-
ners, domicile of contract
partners and nationality of
beneficial owners who were
the “subjects of the suspicious
transaction reports”.

Suspects

It was found that almost
half the suspects under review
were long-standing customers
of the disclosing institution,
while 35 per cent were new
customers.

The majority of the report-
ed transactions involved cash,
according to the FIU’s
grounds for suspicious trans-
action reports. They also cited
Internet research as the pri-
mary reason for making an

Ex-CFAL executive sets up own firm

A FORMER senior CFAL
executive has founded his
own financial services firm,
Leno Corporate Services,
with a focus on encouraging
Bahamians to become confi-
dent investors.

Leno is headed by char-
tered accountant Sean Long-
ley, who said the firm was
born out of an idea to pro-
vide a variety of financial ser-
vices to the local and regional
financial community, catering
to both large commercial
investora and taking an inter-
est small investors.

“We are pleased that Leno
is creating a very important
niche in financial services in
the Bahamas, with specialised
services designed to get ordi-
nary Bahamians investing
with confidence. All too often







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the small investor is intimi-
dated by lack of knowledge
and know-how,” said Mr Lon-
gley.

“We want to give smaller
clients that personal touch to
demonstrate how a seemingly
insignificant amount of fund-
ing can work for them. It’s
one of the reasons we chose
the motto ‘Bridging the gap
between your present and
future financial goals.”

Mr Longley, the company’s
president, said Leno offers a
wide range of financial con-
sulting and management ser-
vices, including pension con-
sulting and administration,
investment management, bro-
kerage and trading, account-
ing and payroll services, and
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Mr Longley is a certified

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public accountant, holding
credentials from the Georgia
State Board of Accountancy.
He is a member of the Amer-
ican Institute of Certified
Public Accountants, and a
licensed member of the
Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants (BICA).

Mr Longley formed Leno
in May 2010. His previous
engagements include a two-
year stint as vice-president of
business development/client
relations at Colina Financial
Advisors.

He also served as a director
of the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) from
September 2002 to August
2006. The offices of Leno
Corporate Services are locat-
ed at Pineapple Place on
Bernard Road.



BAHAMAS

reast Lenires





&







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suspicious transaction report.

And while 43 per cent of
the cases cited fraud as the
reason for the report, 37 per
cent of the total suspected
cases had no idea of the
nature of the offense. Only 9
per cent of the cases involved
alleged drugs proceeds.

According to the Director
of the FIU, Reginald Fergu-
son, the increase in the vol-
ume of suspicious transaction
reporting will come from
jurisdictions heightening their
vigilance on the anti-money
laundering and counter-ter-
rorism fronts.

“This will become a reality
because of the relentless
efforts of countries to shore
up their images by closing
loopholes to money launder-
ing and financing of terror-
ism,” Mr Ferguson said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Cable & Wireless ‘front runner’ to acquire BICA

Back BY Popular Demand
Now Thru August

BUY ANY 3 MOVIES
GET 1 FREE

of equal or lesser value

Mall at Marathon
Town Centre Mall
Golden Gates Shopping Centre
Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza

hy BAC Bahamas Bank

INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR THE POSITION OF

ASSISTANT RESIDENT MANAGER / SENIOR OFFICIAL II
ROLE SUMMARY

Assist with the management of the licensee's day-to-day operations in The Bahamas to
ensure objectives are accomplished in accordance with prescribed priorities and time
constraints. Ensure the business of the Bank is conducted ina controlled, efficient and
prudent manner in accordance with enacted legislation, regulatory guidelines and the
Group's policies and procedures.

APPLICANTS MUST BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE
‘in depth banking knowledge of banking products, services and operations
‘Excellent communication skills

‘Indepth knowledge of compliance, regulatory guidelines and the related reporting
environment

QUALIFICATIONS

‘Minimum of 10 years experience in financial services with 5 years at a senior level
‘Bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Finance or similar
‘Multilingual capabilities preferred - English and Spanish

CONTACT

Interested persons should submit a cover letter, resume plus copies of any
degrees and professional certifications electronically to

Igonsalves@bs.bac.net by 15-Aug-2010



a \ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the fol-
lowing position:

Associate, Alumni Relations and Annual Fund, responsible for
implementing The College of The Bahamas Alumni Relations
Programme and delivering a successful Annual Giving fundraising
programme. The successful candidate will be someone with strong
interpersonal, communication (both orally and written) and organi-
sational skills who enjoys the challenge of engaging people on a one
to one level.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to,
maintaining records of solicitations and donations; engaging and
supporting COB Alumni Association participation with leadership
level gift solicitations; participating in the development of short and
long range strategic planning activities to realize alumni engage-
ment goals and objectives and interacting and supporting The
College’s Alumni Association on the development and delivery of
its programmes.

Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree; excellent interper-

FROM page 1B

cations Holdings under the for-
mer PLP administration) and
who takes responsibility for the
inevitable downsizing - the
Government or the strategic
partner.

And it is still by no means
certain that Cable & Wireless
will remain as the preferred
bidder. Tribune Business
sources suggested that other
telecoms operators with
Caribbean interests have also
now expressed an interest in
BTC, creating the possibility of
a bidding war and competition
for what initially was slated as a
51 per cent controlling interest
in BTC. “There is a significant
other party that has expressed
very strong desires to be part
of any discussions,” one source
told Tribune Business, although
they declined to name them.

Tribune Business revealed
on May 17, 2010, how Cable &
Wireless’s Caribbean unit had
entered the BTC privatisation
race, a development that did
not please the then-two remain-
ing contenders, the J P Mor-
gan/Vodafone combination,
and Atlantic Tele-Network,
which had partnered with
CFAL, the investment advisory
arm of Bahamian financial ser-
vices conglomerate A. F. Hold-
ings (the former Colina Finan-
cial Group).

Those two bidders had gone
through the process of paying
the $25,000 entrance fee and
entered the due diligence
phase. They saw Cable & Wire-
less as an uninvited interloper,
although this newspaper has
been told that the latter has also
paid the same entrance fee.

“The parties in the initial
phase, the competitive bidding
process, have been advised that
their proposals have not been
accepted,” one source now told
Tribune Business in relation to
the JP Morgan/Vodafone and
Atlantic Tele-Network/CFAL
bids. The other two companies

that entered the due diligence
phase along with this duo - Tril-
ogy International Partners and
Digicel - had already dropped
out of contention.

The J P Morgan bid was a
financially-led one, driven by
the global financial institution’s
private equity arm, with Voda-
fone in for a minority stake as
operating partner. The latter,
though, despite its global cov-
erage is chiefly a cellular oper-
ator, and does not have the
interest/experience in business
lines that BTC either has or
would likely get into once pri-
vatisation is complete.

Atlantic Tele-Network,
which is listed on the US Nas-
daq stock market, provides
wireless, fixed-line and broad-
band Internet in markets in the
US and the Caribbean, making
it - on the surface - a good fit
for BTC given that it is in the
same products and markets.

The company has a presence
in Bermuda and the Turks &
Caicos, where it operates as
Bermuda Digital Communica-
tions; in Guyana, where it is GT
& T; and Choice Communica-
tions in the US Virgin Islands.
Atlantic Tele-Network says it
specialises in telecoms markets
that are underserved and pro-
vide geographical challenges.

However, Tribune Business
was told that Atlantic Tele-Net-
work was “not the jigsaw fit
that Cable & Wireless would
be”, given the latter’s existing
pan-Caribbean coverage and
ability to deploy technology
and resources - both human
and financial - to transforming
BTC at relatively short notice.

Tribune Business sources
confirmed that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham met with
senior officials from the two
trade unions that represent
BTC’s line staff and middle
managers, the Bahamas Com-
munications and Public Offi-
cers Union (BCPOU), and the
Bahamas Communications and

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF HIRAM DAVIS, late
of Dundas Town, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demand against the above Estate
are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 9th day of August, A.D., 2010, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute
the assets having regard only to the claims
of which he shall then have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the dated
hereinbefore mentioned.

MICHAELA. DEAN & CO.
Loyalist Plaza
Don Mackay Boulevard
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor

i

Public Managers Union (BCP-
MU), at the Cabinet Office on
late Friday afternoon in rela-
tion to the BTC privatisation
process.

It is unclear what exactly was
discussed, as Tribune Business
understands that union leaders
were told by the Prime Minister
not to reveal the content of
their discussions publicly. That,
in and of itself, indicates that
something is moving in the
BTC privatisation process.

It is quite possible that the
PM met the unions to try and
ease their fears about the con-
sequences of any Cable &
Wireless purchase of a control-
ling interest in BTC. Both trade
unions have been anti-Cable &
Wireless for several years, sen-
timents that were again recent-
ly expressed by BCPOU presi-
dent, Bernard Evans, who said:
“Their track record as far as
labour relations is not
good... We go on record as
saying that we do not support
any kind of sale to Cable &
Wireless.”

Informed sources, though,
said that while these criticisms
may have had some merit years
ago, Cable & Wireless’
Caribbean operations had been
transformed out of all recogni-
tion within the past few years,
following the splitting of the
company’s international and
UK operations into two sepa-
rate businesses.

The Caribbean operations,
which would be the ones to
acquire BTC, have been
restructured under new man-
agement, with a strong pres-
ence from Caribbean nation-
als, in addition to being
rebranded as LIME - a slogan
that stands for Landline,
Mobile, Internet, Entertain-
ment.

One attraction it might hold
is that it operates in all four
segments, unlike Vodafone,
essentially a cellular operator,
and Atlantic Tele-Network, a
traditional landline, cellular,
Internet operator.

The Entertainment side
Cable & Wireless brings, which
is cable TV and programming,
means it would likely be the
candidate best-positioned to
enable BTC to go head-to-head
the quickest with Cable
Bahamas.

Cable & Wireless’ Caribbean
operations generated $873 mil-
lion in revenues and $270 mil-
lion in operating income dur-
ing the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2009, holding gross mar-
gins at 74 per cent.

Meanwhile, this newspaper
was told that a meeting of the
BTC privatisation’s advisory
committee was also held on Fri-
day afternoon to provide a “sta-
tus update” on the process. The
committee, chaired by minister
of state for finance, Zhivargo
Laing, also features represen-
tatives from the two BTC
unions. Its role is to vet the pri-
vatisation committee’s work,
and advise the Government on
the process.

As for the privatisation’s
progress, one source said: “It’s
significantly advanced, the
process, over the last several
months, but there’s lots to do.
It’s fairly advanced, but there’s
still a ways to go. There’s a
desire to get it done.”

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sonal skills; ability to exercise good judgment and work effectively
within a team environment and demonstrated organizational skills
and experience in managing events and other complex activities in
support of The College’s objectives. For a detailed job description,
visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submit
a detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Monday,
July 26th, 2010. A completed application package, cover letter of

: #111 Mount Roval Avenue
interest and resume should be forward to: paseoirged-iglpnosanin

Tel: (242) 356-4806 Fax: (242) 328-3676

(BONE Heat LOreGOUBny WIN Genesis Thevany Guout

www.genesistherapygroup.com

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The College of The Bahamas

Oakes Field Campus

P.O. Box N-4912

Nassau, Bahamas OR hrapply @cob.edu.bs

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 5B



Hotels ‘quarters, not years away’ from recovery

FROM page 1B

ing in major markets, we want
to get group business back to
where it was. While improving,
it’s certainly lagging behind
leisure traveller confidence lev-
els.”

On the industry’s overall
position compared to 2008
numbers prior to September,
when the fallout from the Wall
Street collapse and global reces-
sion first started to be felt, Mr
Sands told Tribune Business:
“We’re quarters behind, not
years behind. We want to
achieve some of those levels
sustained for two to three quar-
ters, and are not there yet, but
are headed in the right direc-
tion.”

The 71.5 per cent average
occupancy rate achieved by
New Providence's 14 major
hotels during June 2010 was just
0.4 percentage points behind
June 2008's 71.9 per cent show-
ing, which occurred before the
Lehman Brothers collapse and
full effects of the global reces-
sion were felt.

However, June 2010's aver-
age daily room (ADR) rate of
$225.55 was still some $10 or
4.3 per cent below the $235.77
June 2008 comparative, while
last month's room nights sold
and room revenues were also
4.8 per cent and 8.9 per cent
respectively behind two years
ago.

Still, the 2010 performance
was comfortably ahead of June
2009 comparatives. The 2010
average occupancy rate was
some 5.6 percentage points
ahead of last year's 65.9 per
cent, while a year-over-year
$15.17 ADR increase generated
a 16.3 per cent room revenue
boost and an 8.5 per cent rise in
room nights sold. ADR for
2009 was $210.38, compared to
$225.55 this year.

Mr Sands described as
“huge” the $50 million in room
revenues and 255,702 visitor
nights generated by the Com-
panion Fly Free promotion,
adding that talks between the
Government and private sec-
tor were taking place on how
to extend this in some form.

“Obviously, that has tremen-
dous budgetary implications,
but it’s fair to say the industry
has seen the value of such an

arrangement, and is discussing
the way forward,” he added,
although no decision had been
taken yet.

“There is no question that
the strategically placed promo-
tions are reaping the dividends
that the industry contemplat-
ed.”

Acknowledging the “if it
ain’t broke, don’t fix it” saying
in the case of Companion Fly
Free, Mr Sands said the hotel
industry was focusing on
“something that has really got-
ten teeth” and that, combined
with other promotions, “con-
tinues to give equity to the
Bahamas brand name”.

The Bahamas’ Companion
Fly Free airfare promotion has
generated up to $50 million in
hotel room revenues for 2010
to-date, along with 138,000 vis-
itors, and has been seen as a
key factor behind the strong
June 2010 showing by the New
Providence resort industry.
“T think June was an extremely
encouraging month for us as a
sector,” Mr Sands said. “The
majority of hotels who partici-
pated in the performance study
on a monthly basis, the over-
whelming majority of them, saw

in increase in rate and occu-
pancy better than the 2009 posi-
tion, and close to the 2008 posi-

“We’re very hopeful that this
trend and stabilisation contin-
ues to hold. Hopefully, July and
August will show similar posi-
tions, but this is the season
where we have to be cautious.”

That was a reference to hur-
ricane season, and Mr Sands
said Tropical Storm Bonnie last
week “had some impact on
business levels that we’ve not
been able to ascertain”.

In last week’s joint statement,
the BHA/Ministry of Tourism
said: "Of the 14 properties, nine
reported increases in their
room revenue, with seven of
them showing double-digit
growth. While there was wide-
spread increases in ADRs at
these properties (eight of 14
properties), it was the surge in
room nights sold that con-
tributed the most to the growth
in revenue.

"Of the nine reporting rev-
enue increases, all showed
increases in room nights sold,
with five showing double-digit
growth."

The joint statement said the

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Tel: 242-326-6526
Fax: 242-322-5607

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2010 second quarter "surpassed
all measures of performance"
for last year, adding: "It even
surpassed room nights sold for
the first quarter of this year, 2.6
per cent more room nights sold.
However, it was still 6.8 per
cent behind in room revenue
due to a $23.87 higher ADR in

the first quarter.

"The second quarter of 2010
ended with a 68.3 per cent occu-
pancy rate and a $236.73 ADR,
compared to 66.4 per cent and
$232.41 last year, and 67.2 per
cent and $260.60 in the first
quarter of this year.

"To the end of June, occu-



pancy stood at 67.7 per cent,
ADR at $248.51 and room
nights sold and room revenue
3.8 per cent and 5.9 per cent
above 2009 levels. This com-
pared to 65.2 per cent and
$243.47 in 2009. Air arrivals to
Nassau to the end of April were
up 2.4 per cent."

ROT

Tel: 502 23561 a



DISCONNECTION NOTICE

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation wishes to advise
that effective July 19%, 2010, it will commence Island-

Wide

Electricity service disconnections of all

consumer accounts with overdue balances inclusive
of accounts of customers who have entered into
payment arrangements with BEC but are failing to
honor their commitments.

The public is also advised that all overdue payments
should be made directly to the Corporation.

Consumers whose account(s) are not overdue can
make payment(s) directly to the Corporation or over
the counter at the nearest Scotiabank, FirstCaribbean,
Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal Bank and RBC
Finco. You can also pay your electricity bill online by
logging on to your online accounts at Scotiabank,
FirstCaribbean, Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal
Bank and RBC Finco.

Please call 302-1679 or 302-1685 should you have any

queries.

Visit us at WWW.m

-bec.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Nygard Cay’s $50m lease ‘frustration’

FROM page 1B

that if permission came today
contractors and workers could
be “mobilised by August 1”.
My Nygard indicated that the
extended wait for government
approvals was starting to make
him a little “tongue tied” when
it came to promoting the
Bahamas on his many global
travels, adding that the recon-
struction wait at Nygard Cay












had also deprived this nation
of a marketing tool to attract
high net-worth tourists and real
estate purchasers, given that
many had either stayed at the
property or knew of it.

The flamboyant fashion
tycoon revealed that he had
also been forced to put off pro-
posals to film a reality TV series
on his life, until Nygard Cay
had been restored to former
glories.

Mr Nygard said he had been

THE REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT





The Registrar General's Department wehes io inform wor valued costomers aul
the general pubic that our British Colonial Hilios and Apeley House Offices will
be pelocating to Shirley House, #3) Shirley Street opposite Fineo effective
Monday, 3° Aupest, 2000,














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Justi} Babies

told the main cause of the per-
mit delays related to the lease
of some government land.

He explained that when con-
structed in the mid to late-
1908s, Nygard Cay, which had a
roof area covering some
120,000 square feet, was built
mostly on land he owned, but
also leased a “small portion”
of government-owned land.

While the lease had been
executed and agreed to, Mr
Nygard said the Department of
Lands and Surveys had never
sent him formal documentation
on this. It was this formality,
he suggested, that was causing
the hold-up, as there had been
indications from the relevant
government planning and
building approvals agencies that
once the lease issue was settled,
all other permits and approvals
would be forthcoming.

“We already submitted vari-
ous plans to them, before and
after the fire, to keep on build-
ing,” Mr Nygard said, explain-
ing that prior to last Novem-
ber’s tragedy he had applied
for permission to complete a
structure at one end of his
property, plus install a water
break at the Nygard Cay mari-
na to prevent the intrusion of
sand.

“ve been waiting for these
approvals, and have not been
able to get them through for a
couple of years now,” Mr
Nygard said. “Unfortunately,
it’s been stalled for a couple of
years now. There was a struc-
ture at the end to put a finishing
touch to the project - that was

held back under the new
regime, as it seems to be, and
I’ve not been able to get on
with it.”

“T applied to protect the
marina with a water break, and
prevent sand loss from the
beach, as sand was getting into
the marina.”

Referring to the proposed
reforms to the Bahamas’ plan-
ning system in the shape of the
Planning & Subdivisions Act,
whose implementation has
been delayed until October 1,
2010, Mr Nygard said he had
been told by the Town Plan-
ning Committee that “every-
thing is on hold”. It is under-
stood that no planning propos-
als are likely to be approved
until the New Providence Land
Use Plan, the key document
from which all planning deci-
sions will flow, is approved.

“T’ve accepted that,” the
fashion mogul added. “I’ve
been as patient as I can be, and
am anxiously waiting for it to
go through. I could start in a
month. I’m trying to start now.
We could mobilise by August

“I have to do it fast now. It
means I have to explode with it.
We have to get it done during
two-three years. By the time
you cost it out, spending $50
million in two-three years will
require 200-300 people. What
burnt down was $50 million
worth of investment.

“Tt’s been frustrating, and ’m
so tongue-tied now as to how to
talk about it. We’re being held
back by this lease” Mr Nygard

said both he and Nygard Cay
had effectively functioned as
‘Goodwill Ambassadors’ for
the Bahamas, adding: “I don’t
know if another place gets as
much publicity as this place has
got, even Atlantis.”

Prior to the fire, Nygard Cay
had frequently been rented out
when My Nygard was not there.
“It became a very sought-after
place for people wanting exclu-
sivity, the best-of-the-best,” he
said, pointing to its use for wed-
dings, anniversaries and such
like.

That angle, a great promo-
tional tool for the Bahamas tar-
geted at its client market, has
been lost due to the fire and
subsequent wait for building
permits. It has also delayed
potential reality TV shows
focusing on Mr Nygard’s life.

“There’s so many people that
have tried to do a reality show
on me, because my life is an
interesting life and original
life,” he added. “Most interest-
ing is Nygard Cay, the
Bahamas. What a piece of
advertising that would be. I
have had to put that off.

“T’ve been trying to put out
bush fires for so long. I should
be building this.” Due to the
highly specialised nature of
Nygard Cay’s reconstruction,
Mr Nygard estimated that some






50 expatriate construction per-
sonnel would be required to
return the 100,000 square foot,
six-acre property to new glo-
ries.

“People are always con-
cerned and scared as to how it
is to get things built, and then to
feel secure that in having built
it, they don’t somehow lose it,”
Mr Nygard said. “The Bahamas
has had that great reputation
of being stable, having a solid,
reliable government, a great
democratic system, and having
great people.

“The people of the Bahamas
are one of its greatest assets.
They are smiling, friendly peo-
ple and feel nice to be around.”

Yet, hinting that such things
as his building permit delay
could impact how the Bahamas
was perceived by investors and
developers, Mr Nygard said:
“The whole message of the
Bahamas’ great reputation
should not be lost.”

He added that in his travels
two countries were always
praised for their great reputa-
tions, Canada and _ the
Bahamas, and he added: “It’s
critically important in my mind
that this is enhanced, and you
have people speaking well
about it and giving testimony.
This kind of thing tends to hold
the tongue a bit...




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Tel/Fax: 242-326-0008

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EMPLOYMENT
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ROYAL FIDELITY

kioney ot Fierk

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given_ that LOUISEMENE
ARISTILDE of P.O.Box SS-19080, OKRA HILL
Nassau, Bahamas, is appa to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, _for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within eds days from the 19"
day of July, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN DAVIS, late of
Moore’s Island, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demand against the above Estate
are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 9th day of August, A.D., 2010, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute
the assets having regard only to the claims
of which he shall then have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the dated
hereinbefore mentioned.

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.
Loyalist Plaza
Don Mackay Boulevard
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor

FG CAP

ITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cL eat. co NT A OT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 23 JULY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,484.38 | CHG -4.28 | %CHG -0.29| YTD -81.00 | YTD % -5.17
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.00

Securit
AML Foods Limited 1.04
Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
Bank of Bahamas 5.00
Benchmark 0.30
Bahamas Waste 3.15
Fidelity Bank 2.1F
Cable Bahamas Ato
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete *
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

9.67
5.00
0.30
1S
2.14
9.62
2.50
5.00
2.23
1.60
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00

2.50
6.02
2.26
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.81
4.65
1.00
0.27
5.55
2.55
10.00

3.95.
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00

Div $
0.040
0.200
0.260
0.000
0.0980
0.040
0.300
0.040
0.230
0.052
0.110
0.240
0.520
0.350
0.170

EPS $
0.250
0.050
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.720
0.366

P/E
4.2

10.63
5.00
0.30
S18
ee

eat
2.50
6.02
2.30
2.00
6.07
8.90
9.74
4.65
1.00

0.27
S53

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.07
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.240

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

0.640
0.800

3.55
10.00

0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Hi__52wk-Low Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
99.46

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

Change Interest
0.00 6.95%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol.
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyaiFid élity Mercnant Bank & |1rust Ltd. (ovéer- | Re-Gounter sécurities)

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bid $
9.42
2.00
0.35

Ask $
10.42
6.25
0.40

Div $ P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price
14.00
4.00
55

Daily Vol. EPS $
“2.945
0.000

0.001

N/M
256.6

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55:

0.000
0.000

2.03
261.90

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV

1.4825
2.9199
1.5424
2.8522
13.4110
107.5706
105.7706
1.1177
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.4387
2.8266
1.4777
2.8522
13.0484
100.5448
83.1998:

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah In

1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005
10.0000

iment Fund Principal 10.0344

9.3299 iment Fund Principal 9.3299

4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.3073

YTD%

3.04
1.14
2.34

-8.49
0.33
3.45
3.99
2.352
0.98
2.34
2.16

-6.84
-6.70

-5.31

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.811577
1.526816

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.510057

Last 12 Months % NAV Date
30-Jun-10
16-Jul-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10

30-Jun-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing pric. 1 52 weeks

- Ks

i for daily volume
Today's Clos.

Change - Chan

e for daily volume
day to day
J

EPS $ - A company’
NAV - Net Asset Val:

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

ported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* Trading Suspended

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

South Andros High School
Alumni Association

Date: Tuesday, 27th July, 2010

Time: 7:30p.m.

Venue: R. M. Bailey High School - Room T4
Contact: Darell Taylor - 326-5348

POSITION WANTED
eee Uae MI Tel ate (11

We are looking for a mature Accountant to
manager the financial operations of a 10 year
old company. Duties will include overseeing all
EL a a CRM Te tees eee oe Ym Loa 8 3
ek ee) *) ea le eee
Candidate must be able to produce timely
financial information to the CEO and be able ta
TAN es Coe eee |e ae Ria
Knowledge of ISL payroll system a plus but nota
HTT aE sh de] oR: [ ate soe] a] oc
meet deadlines.

Please write to us at: P.O. Box CB-13526,
LeU mees ee magic

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2010
New Student Orientation

Parents’ Evening
Tuesday, 17th August, 2010
6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Orientation
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 18th August, 2010
2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Advisement, Registration &
Bill Payment
Thursday, 19th August, 2010
Friday, 20th August, 2010
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

Venue:
Performing Arts Centre,
The College Of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard


THE TRIBUNE





Handicraft project eyes
$1.1m sales in 12 months

FROM page 1B

Bahamas a global and regional
“centre of handicraft excel-
lence”.

“What it does in a nutshell
is seek to cluster the handicraft
industry for strength in num-
bers,” Mr Demeritte told Tri-
bune Business. “By using
strength in numbers, working
together, we achieve a couple
of things - buying power in
sourcing raw materials, and
organising the entire sector in
doing so - having the critical
mass to sell handicraft products
to the world.”

The Internet-based virtual
platform, he added, would
allow the Bahamas National
Craft Association, its 30 mem-
ber associations and some 1,000
individual members, to sell
their products across the globe,
and not just rely on tourists pur-
chasing while visiting the
Bahamas. Consumers would
now be able to shop online
wherever they were in the
world for authentic Bahamian
products.

“What the virtual platform
seeks to do is organize the sec-

tor and have the sector sell
throughout the world, the
region and the Bahamas,” Mr
Demeritte said. “After the pro-
ject is completed, we project
that for the first year, after 12
months, the annual sales
through the portal will be about
$1.1 million.

“We actually call it a virtual
market. The beauty of it comes
from a couple of things. We
focused on the islands in the
south, the south-east like Ack-
lins, Mayaguana, where they
have pretty good crafts persons.
But their ability to get the prod-
uct to market is impaired. They
do not have the access of
craftspersons in Abaco,
Andros, Grand Bahama.”

Mr Demeritte said the pro-
ject also aimed to establish
benchmarks and standards for
the Bahamian handicraft indus-
try, in addition to collecting
hard data so that the sector’s
true contribution to the
Bahamian economy could be
assessed. It also aimed to attract
persons outside the Association
and its affiliates into the fold.

The Ministry of Tourism was
set to play a role as a strategic

partner, and Mr Demeritte said
a key objective was to ‘shape
up the concept of authentically-
made Bahamian products, so
that items sold via the Internet
platform were “stamped or
sealed with Bahamian authen-
tically-made product” to show
that they were the real deal.

The July month-end was
being targeted for the project’s
start, and Mr Demeritte said of
the objective to make the
Bahamas a handicraft centre of
excellence: “It’s a tall order, but
the ingredients are there. Once
you have 1,000 operations
around the country, you’re talk-
ing about the capacity to do
some things.

“You bring them together
and develop the market, devel-
op the distribution chain. We’re
talking to local merchants to be
on board and push the prod-
ucts.”

Mr Demeritte said the pro-
ject had been in the planning
stages since May 2009, and the
Bahamas was only one of two
Caribbean countries to obtain
approval from the IDB’s MIF
lending facility for this tranche
of proposals.

Nygard Cay resort plan dropped

FROM page 1B

munity, and want to live as good neighbours.”

Mr Nygard said he had received “some mixed
messages” from the Government over the years
on the private resort idea, adding: “I’ve been
trying to work very closely with the Govern-
ment, and be in harmony with them.

being a resort”, namely that it could access invest-
ment incentives under legislation such as the

“The Government encouraged me to look atit, | dropped.

see if I could make it a resort, investment more
money back from Sir Lynden Pindling’s time.”
However, the pattern became one of encour-
agement, before the Government then backed

off.

Mr Nygard said there were “advantages to

Hotels Encouragement Act to import duty-free
construction materials and such like.

He last received encouragement to look at the
private resort idea two years ago, prior to the
November 2009 fire that ravaged Nygard Cay,
but the idea appears once again to have been

The concept of Bahamas property owners rent-
ing out their homes to exclusive guests while
they were away, and Nygard Cay’s appeal to the
rich and famous, underpinned the private resort

approach, but Mr Nygard said he had “backed off

that and stayed with the private home”.

Nygard calls for medical tourism to boost economy

FROM page 1B

the tourism industry once Cuba
opened up properly to US trav-
ellers, and revealed that he had
a disagreement with fellow
Lyford Cay resident and hedge
fund manager, Louis Bacon,
over the now long-dead Chaffin
Light/Clifton Cay investment
project - he was for it, Mr
Bacon against it.

Looking at how the Bahamas
could move forward, Mr
Nygard said: “The key, in my
mind, is what is its next real
industry? We perhaps lost
financial services, the banking
and trust companies, we have
tourism and not much else.
What industries are there that
are going to come here?”

He suggested medical
tourism would be the answer,

but warned that the Bahamas
would “have to build the indus-
try and invest in that industry”.

“Td be after that medical
tourism bit time,” Mr Nygard
said. “You have to create a
favourable law to do it, incen-
tives like the hotel industry.
The medical industry also
involves equipment and tech-
nology, you have to bring that.”

A favourable Immigration
policy would also be required to
allow specialist doctors to work
from the Bahamas, along with
the importation of medical ser-
vices.

“It needs to do that and get
on with it,” Mr Nygard said,
warning that medical tourism
was “on everybody’s lips” and
other countries were already
moving ahead of the Bahamas
in this field.

Meanwhile, Mr Nygard said
it was “sort of dangerous” for
the Bahamas to seek to arrest
its fiscal decline through tax
increases, given that the costs of
doing business in this nation
were already relatively high.

He suggested that the best
way for the Bahamas to arrest
declining government revenues
was to stimulate economic
growth and the private sector,
given that this nation “quite
frankly was up there now as
one of the most expensive
places now” to do business.

Asked whether the Bahamas
should look to replace its Cus-
toms duty-oriented tax regime
with an income tax, Mr Nygard
said: “A personal income tax
would be disastrous for the
Bahamas, as other countries are
moving away from that.”



MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 7B

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MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010





INSIGHT

The stories behind the news





Where are the voices for
historic hospital buildings ?

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

WHEN I first approached
the consequence of expan-
sion at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital I thought
there was only one casual-
ty, the Bahamas Crisis Cen-
tre.

It was made clear, until
last week, the centre had
until July 30 to evacuate so
that its building could be
demolished to make way for
new operating theatres at
the hospital.

After 37 years, several
swings of the economic pen-
dulum paired with a staunch
neglect of the deterioration
to the nuclear family have
produced an ever increasing
crime rate. Thus making it
impossible to deny or dis-
pute the centre’s critical rel-
evance in our community
and disturbing to learn the
centre could not find alter-
nate accommodations.

This non-profit organiza-
tion had been housed at
Knowles House on the
grounds of Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for nearly
three decades. The leaders
of this country had less than
10 years of Independence
under their belts when Dr
Sandra Dean-Patterson,
sought to create and sustain
a refuge for victims of
abuse.

The demolition wasn’t a
surprise to Dr Dean-Patter-
son or her team. They’d
always known Knowles
House was destined for
destruction, but hoped the
lengthy discourse over the
redevelopment of the hos-
pital would keep an eviction
notice at bay. It was their
choice to leave their accom-
modations up to fate, but
where else would they have
been allowed to practise
rent-free, and in such close
proximity to their direct
clients?

Despite the thousands of
lives healed by this centre, it
seemed unimaginable that
in just a few days it would
be forced to disrupt service,
and be indefinitely dis-
placed.

Even more stifling, why
wasn’t anyone making any
noise about it?

If a tree falls in an empty
forest, does it make a
sound? For a lengthy period
last year, the non-native
trees at Saunders Beach
rose to an incredible volume
amidst those that listened.
The list of riled up naysay-
ers ranged from columnists
to politicians to artists.

Did we assume because
Dr Dean-Patterson was so

KNOWLES HOUSE



THE CRISIS CENTRE had been housed at Knowles House on the grounds of Princess Margaret Hospital for nearly three decades.

resourceful in establishing
the centre and securing its
Operation over the years
that there was no need to
worry? Admittedly, the
decades of commitment,
dedication and passion, give
her an admirable advantage
over the destructive nature
of casuarina trees.

No, I didn’t grasp the full
promise of the consequences
which would force the cen-
tre’s relocation until I was
approached by a doctor dur-
ing a visit to Knowles
House.

Demolition

He asked if I knew about
the pending demolition and
I said yes and immediately
launched into concerns for
the future of the crisis cen-
tre.

“Yes,” he said. “But even
before that, do you know
the history of these build-
ings?”

His question stumped
me. I didn’t know the histo-
ry, but more importantly, I
hadn’t even considered its
relevance.

The need for facility
upgrades at PMH is so

blindingly essential, it is not
a surprise there have been
little to no objections
towards the course of action
taken to achieve it. It was
then I realized the com-
pound of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, formerly the
Bahamas General Hospital,
was an empty forest.

Also to be demolished
alongside Knowles House is
Huggins Lodge. Both build-
ings are of the last remain-
ing remnants of the first
hospital in the Bahamas.

Built in the 1920s as the
private medical ward, years
later Huggins Lodge was
named after Dr Leonard
Catesby Huggins. There
were no other hospitals at
that time, so by private med-
ical ward, this means that
anyone who wished to give
birth or receive medical
treatment privately, was
attended to here — if not in
their private homes.

Dr Leonard Huggins,
born in Trinidad in 1901 of
Chinese descent, came to
the Bahamas in 1926 to join
the Bahamas medical ser-
vice and served as a medical
officer in Inagua, Exuma,
Long Island and Bimini.

In 1940 he joined the
staff of the Bahamas Gen-
eral Hospital and was
appointed senior surgical
specialist at the Princess
Margaret Hospital in 1960
and often served as Chief
Medical Officer of that insti-
tution. He retired from gov-
ernment service in 1963 to
go into private practice and
made his home on Collins
Avenue. He was made an
Officer of the British
Empire (OBE) in 1960 and
received the Sir Victor Sas-
soon Golden Heart Award
in 1973. On his death, on
January 12, 1992, he was
described as an “an untiring
man devoted to medicine.”

To commemorate his
memory the private ward of
the former Bahamas Gen-
eral Hospital was named for
him.

I would probably be cor-
rect in saying that Huggins
Lodge as the once private
ward was the birthplace of
many in our nation. Would
it make a difference if we
dug deep and uncovered the
names of those born there?
With just a little more than a
month left before demoli-
tion was initially scheduled,

and none of the truly con-
cerned willing or able to
speak on record, I think it
is already a wasted effort.
It has to make a sound.
Where are the voices for
Huggins Lodge and
Knowles House, named
after the late Hubert
Knowles, MBE, for many
years superintendent of the
Princess Margaret Hospital?

Balance

The voices unrestricted
by employment or compro-
mised due to special inter-
est. In this, the new modern
Bahamas, is there nothing
that can be done to achieve
balance? ’m having a hard
time accepting that the
omission of our past is the
benchmark to our future.

History aside, the demo-
lition of Huggins Lodge will
displace three government
clinics, namely the compre-
hensive clinic for sexually
transmitted diseases and
infections, HIV and AIDS
treatment.

Demolition now proves
to be a multi-faceted prob-
lem, one with possibly infi-
nite casualties.





There is no shortage of
stigmas in the Bahamas,
possibly two of the greatest
stigmas concern mental and
sexual health. A freshly
abused victim, albeit rape or
gang violence as is so preva-
lent now, can walk the short
steps from the hospital to
the crisis centre and receive
immediate counsel. These
are victims who would have
otherwise, gone home and
disregarded their need to
mentally heal. The senti-
ment is doubled, as you can
imagine, for the compre-
hensive HIV/AIDS clinic.

Nurses and outreach
counselors testify to having
to walk patients to therapy,
just to ensure they get the
critical psychological assess-
ment.

Desperate to understand
how such a magnanimous
task could be still in its
infantile stages this close to
scheduled demolition, I
sought clarity from the
demolitionists, the Public
Hospitals Authority (PHA).

Herbert Brown, manag-
ing director of the PHA,
told me the site was essen-

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010
Where are the voices for

historic hospital buildings?

FROM page one

tial to the construction of
three new operating the-
atres, and the PHA had
explored all possible
avenues in hopes of avoid-
ing demolition.

He said: “In the overall
redevelopment at PMH
many buildings were demol-
ished and Knowles House
was declared sometime ago
as unsafe for occupancy. But
under no circumstances will
we have them moved and
not find suitable place for
them to go. Demolition
hinges on finding suitable
accommodations, firstly for
the services we provide and
also we are looking at what
we can do to assist the
Bahamas Crisis Centre.

“We can’t delay indefi-
nitely, but the buildings will
not be demolished until suit-
able accommodations are
found.”

Though reassuring for the
Crisis Centre, which
receives only a government
subvention and survives
from private donations and
fundraising efforts, this
mandate was stark in com-
parison to the bewildered
concerns of the medical staff
at Huggins Lodge, who
bemoan the fact that they
have been unable to tell
their patients where to
return for follow-up visits
past July 30.

The term “suitable
accommodations” does not

echo the fears of AIDS
counselors who predict the
comprehensive clinic’s
assimilation into the main
hospital will ostracize
patients to the point of
denying treatment. Senior
nurses at the clinic witness
inevitable breaches in con-
fidentiality and lack of pri-
vacy [in the main hospital]
every day and are strongly
opposed to losing the
anonymity Huggins Lodge
provides.

They insist the old build-
ings are not dilapidated but
evidence of years of neglect
and poor maintenance.

Expansion

Mr Brown explained:
“The expansion will greatly
reduce waiting times for
surgeries at PMH and effect
a one hundred per cent
increase in efficiency. In
total there will be seven
brand new operating the-
atres which will be capable
of providing — for the first
time — all support services
required in one location.

“The main building itself
is historic. When we make
improvements, we are care-
ful it does not change the

overall history of the facility.
We have to create a balance
between providing care and
the improvement of care —
to which patients are enti-
tled and demand. We are
very cognizant of the his-
toric nature of PMH and
[the public] can be assured
we will try to ensure that we
won’t lose that history.”

Mr Brown assured me
that the intent for demoli-
tion was not to achieve
greater parking, but to allow
access to the construction
site for equipment and
materials. I believe him.
However once the theatres
are erected and construction
equipment is cleared away,
what will become of the
vacant lot? Does it matter
whether or not the means
satisfied the end or the end
satisfied the means?

Will there even be a plac-
ard marking the spot? Will
our children, as we before
them, with a parallel park
be completely ignorant of
the consequences of such
convenience?

The Historic Buildings
Act offers duty exemptions
and up to a 20-year real
property tax break for the
restoration of historic build-
ings.



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THE TRIBUNE





At a workshop to foster
incentives for Property and
Business Development held
earlier this year, Mrs Janet
Bostwick, former MP and
the first woman sworn into
the House of Assembly, not-
ed that the rules that pro-
tected listed buildings dis-
couraged preservation. Like
everything else in this coun-
try, she suggested the rules
be reformed as existing reg-
ulations could change the
historical significance of the
buildings after
renovation/restoration and
exempt them from tax con-
cessions.

Could it be that in actual-
ity, unlike wine, these build-
ings are ticking steadily
towards an expiration date?
Falling so deep into disre-
pair that they can no longer
serve as accurate landmarks
of the past? And if they are
on a protected list, why are
they allowed to disintegrate
to such an extent before
something is done? All too
common is the opportunist
Lorax come to claim nation-
al spotlight through feigned
concern of already too-far-
gone circumstances.

Though, for me, it only
adds to an already thick plot
of ill-preparedness and inad-
equate planning, some may
find solace in a recent letter
to the PHA from the

|<

BUY



Tate |)

UT a

t - b p

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

estab

HUGGINS LODGE was named after Dr Leonard Catesby Huggins.

AMMC Chairman Colin
Saunders.

The letter, dated July 20,
informs Mr Brown of the
historic designation of Hug-
gins Lodge and Knowles
House as national monu-
ments.

It reads: “The Corpora-
tion is aware of your urgent
need for the spaces and facil-
ities specified for new con-
struction and the implication
in maintaining the two
resources within the pro-
posed construction zone.

Visitors

However, the Corpora-
tion holds strongly to its
mandate to have tangible
aspects of our history pre-
served for the varied whole-
some benefits of our people
as well as visitors to our
islands.”

I received the document
well after my meeting with
Mr Brown, however his
omission of the AMMC’s
last minute decision, while
taking care to inform me
that the two bodies were in
conference, is only slightly
worrying in light of what
seems to be a completely
overlooked historical gaffe
and the sorely needed med-
ical upgrades.

Does intent truly matter?

lished

GET ONE



MHC)

eat a tT aa pees

We could go on for days
about actions and concerns
that should have been initi-
ated years ago, but what
remains is the critical need
for new operating theatres
and like modern amenities
juxtaposed against our oblig-
ation to acknowledge and
preserve past achievements.
The fact that the PHA has
pledged to delay demolition
until the centre and clinics
are reasonably housed
means nothing to the peo-
ple whose memories of
Knowles House and Huggins
Lodge predate the lives of
the governing generation.
The possibility of those
buildings being declared
protected sites by the
AMMC means nothing to
the families of surgical
patients negatively affected
by the current operational
challenges. There are no
spoils in compromise, and
perhaps we should stop con-
structing, stop demolishing,
stop modernizing until we
come to a consensus on the
relevancy of physical rem-
nants and the integrity of
record-keeping. We need to
have a set standard because
on an island of this size,
space will always be an issue.

e SEE PAGE ONE
FOR THE LATEST
ON THIS ISSUE



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THE TRIBUNE

INSIGHT

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 3C



Russia's Putin
sings with
expelled agents

FOROS, Ukraine

VLADIMIR PUTIN

says he met with the Russ-

ian spies who were
expelled from the United
States, joining them in
singing an unofficial KGB
anthem and promising
them good jobs and a
bright future back in their
homeland, according to
Associated Press.

Russia's prime minister
said late Saturday he
recently got together with
the 10 sleeper agents,
without saying when or
where. The agents were
deported from the U.S.
earlier this month in a
biggest spy scandal since
the Cold War.

"We talked about life,"
Putin told reporters in
Ukraine. "We sang ‘What
Motherland Begins With’
and other songs of that
character."

"What Motherland
Begins With" is a song
from the 1968 television

series about Soviet spies in :

Nazi Germany. The song
is widely known as an

unofficial anthem of Russ- :

ian intelligence officers.

Putin, a former KGB
officer who in the early
1980s worked in commu-
nist East Germany as a
low-level functionary,
spoke about the uneasy
lives the secret agents had
in the U.S., where they
were caught by the FBI in
U.S. cities and suburbs
where they had been liv-
ing for more than a
decade.

"They had a very diffi-
cult fate," Putin said,
referring to the expelled
spies who spent years of
burrowing into American
society. "They had to car-
ry out a task to benefit
their motherland's inter-
ests for many, many years
without a diplomatic cov-
er, risking themselves and
those close to them."

The 10 agents were
deported in exchange for
three former intelligence
officers and a think tank
arms expert convicted and
sentenced to long prison
sentences in Russia. An
11th Russian spy escaped
authorities in Cyprus and
remains at large, anda
12th one, who had worked
for Microsoft, was deport-
ed from the United States
in mid-July.

U.S. authorities did not
charge the agents with
spying, and it is not clear
whether they actually
compromised any U.S.
secrets. Some Russian
analysts called their mis-
sion a failure that showed
how inefficient Russian
intelligence agencies are.

Putin, however,
promised that Russia will

take a good care of its spy-

ing sons and daughters.

"They will work, and I
am sure they will have
decent jobs,” he said.
"And I am sure they will
have an interesting and
bright life."

The biggest spy swap
since the Soviet collapse
did not complicate Presi-
dent Barack Obama's
campaign to improve and
broaden U.S. relations
with Russia, and both
Moscow and Washington
sides expressed satisfac-
tion with the resolution of
the spy case.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Hugo Chavez warns of US oil
cutoff in Colombia dispute

CARACAS, Venezuela



PRESIDENT HUGO
CHAVEZ threatened on Sunday
to halt oil sales to the United States
if Venezuela faces any military
attack by its U.S.-allied neighbor
Colombia, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Chavez said in a speech to thou-
sands of supporters that if there is
an "armed aggression against
Venezuela" from Colombia backed
by the U.S., "we would suspend
shipments of oil."

Chavez said that "we wouldn't
send one more drop" of oil to the
United States, which is the top buy-
er of oil from the South American
country.

If actually carried out, such a
threat would be titanic economic
blow for Chavez's government,
which depends heavily on oil sales.
It's likely Chavez made the warning
in part to put the U.S. and Colom-
bia on notice that he will not stand
for a more aggressive international
campaign to denounce allegations
that leftist Colombian rebels are
finding safe haven in Venezuela.

Camps

The Venezuelan leader cut off
diplomatic relations with Colom-
bia on Thursday after outgoing
President Alvaro Uribe's govern-
ment presented photos, videos and
maps of what it said were Colom-
bian rebel camps inside Venezuela.

Chavez called it an attempt to
smear his government and said
Uribe could be trying to lay the
groundwork for an armed conflict.

The Colombian government
denies secking a military conflict. It
says it went to the Organization of
American States with its evidence
about the rebels’ alleged presence





ENEZUELA'S PRESIDENT HUGO CHAVEZ, right, speaks next to Argentina's national soccer team coach Diego Armando
Maradona upon Maradona’s arrival to Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday. (AP)

in Venezuela because Chavez's
government has not addressed the
situation.

Chavez also said Sunday that he
had canceled a trip to Cuba due to
the tensions with Colombia.

In 2008, Chavez warned of a pos-
sible war with Colombia after the
Colombian military staged a cross-
border raid on a rebel camp in
Ecuador that killed a guerrilla
leader, Raul Reyes. Chavez on
Sunday appeared to be giving a
new warning to Colombia — and
the U.S. — that he won't tolerate a
repeat in Venezuelan territory.

He said separately in a newspa-
per column, however, that he will

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wait to see if Colombian President-
elect Juan Manuel Santos, who
takes office next month, expresses
what Chavez deems a genuine will-
ingness to ease the diplomatic con-
flict.

Dialogue

"We have to receive clear and
unequivocal signals that there is a
real political will in the new Colom-
bian government to take up the
path of dialogue again, without
tricks," Chavez wrote.

The conservative Uribe has fre-
quently feuded with the socialist
Chavez, and Colombian officials

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have long complained, mostly in
private, that Chavez has harbored
leaders of its two main leftist rebel
groups.

Santos, however, has stressed the
importance of mending trade rela-
tions with Venezuela that over-
whelmingly benefit Colombia's
food producers. And Chavez has
raised the possibility that relations
could be restored under Santos.

Trade between Venezuela and
Colombia has fallen about 70 per-
cent since Chavez froze relations
a year ago in response to Colom-
bia's decision to grant the U.S. mil-
itary expanded access to its mili-
tary bases.




THE TRIBUNE

INSIGHT

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 5C



Work to plug
leaky well is
back on track
after storm

NEW ORLEANS

THE effort to plug BP's
leaky oil well in the Gulf of
Mexico was back on track
Sunday as the skies cleared
and crews raced to stop the
gusher for good before
another storm halts the
operation again, according
to Associated Press.

A drill rig is expected to
reconnect at around mid-
night (0400 GMT) to the
relief tunnel that will be
used to pump in mud and
cement to seal the well, and
drilling could resume in the
next few days.

A temporary plug already
has held in the oil for nine
days, and BP was able to
leave it in place even after
the government's point man
on the spill ordered ships
working in the Gulf to evac-
uate ahead of Tropical
Storm Bonnie late last week.

Retired Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen said offi-
cials will spend the next day
determining how the small
storm affected the area.

Oil may have migrated
north to Mississippi Sound,
he said, and officials are
checking to see if boom that
was protecting sensitive
marshlands was pushed
ashore.

As work on the well
resumed, British media
reported that BP chief exec-
utive Tony Hayward is nego-
tiating the terms of his
departure ahead of the com-
pany's half-year results
announcement Tuesday.

Citing unidentified
sources, the BBC and Sun-
day Telegraph reported that
detailed talks regarding
Hayward's future took place
over the weekend. A formal
announcement is expected
in the next 24 hours, the
BBC reported.

BP spokesman Toby
Odone said Sunday that
Hayward "remains BP's
chief executive, and he has
the confidence of the board
and senior management."

Allen said he hadn't heard
of any management changes.

"T've got no knowledge of
the inner workings of BP,”
he said.

Hayward, who angered
Americans by minimizing



IN THIS June 17, 2010 file photo, BP PLC CEO Tony Hayward testi-



aes

fies before an Energy and Environment Subcommittee on Oversight
and Investigations hearing on the role of BP in the Deepwater Horizon
explosion and oil spill on Capitol Hill in Washington. A senior U.S. gov-
ernment official says BP Chief Executive Tony Hayward, under fire for
his handling of the Gulf oil spill, is being replaced. An official announce-
ment could come as early as Monday, July 26, 2010. The official, who
spoke on condition of anonymity Sunday because that announcement
had not been made, was briefed on the decision by a senior BP offi-

cial late last week. (AP)

the spill's environmental
impact and expressing his
exasperation by saying "I'd
like my life back," has been
under heavy criticism over
his gaffe-prone leadership
during the spill.

Before the cap was
attached and closed a week
ago, the broken well had
spewed 94 million gallons
(356 million liters) to 184
million gallons (697 million
liters) into the Gulf since the
BP-leased Deepwater Hori-
zon rig exploded April 20,
killing 11 workers.

Completion of the relief
well that is the best chance
to permanently stop the oil
now looks possible by mid-
August, but Allen said he
wouldn't hesitate to order
another evacuation based on
forecasts similar to the ones
for Bonnie.

"We have no choice but
to start well ahead of time
if we think the storm track is
going to bring gale force
winds, which are 39 mph (63

kph) or above, anywhere
close to well site," Allen
said.

In the oil-affected hamlet
of Grand Isle, Louisiana,
thousands of people spent a
gray Saturday at the beach,
listening to music. The
Island Aid concert, which
included LeAnn Rimes and
Three Dog Night, raised
money for civic projects on
the island.

For the afternoon at least,
things were almost back to
normal. Young women in
bathing suits rode around on
golf carts while young men
in pickup trucks tooted their
horns and shouted.

"This is the way Grand
Isle is supposed to be but
hasn't been this year," said
Anne Leblanc of Metairie,
Louisiana, who said her fam-
ily has been visiting the
island for years. "This is the
first we came this year. With
the oil spill there hasn't been
a reason to come, no swim-
ming, no fishing."

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nament. Officials held the music festival despite the approach of Tropical Depression Bonnie. (AP)

Taliban claim capture of US sailor killing of second

KABUL, Afghanistan

THE Taliban have offered
to exchange the body of a US.
Navy sailor they said was killed
in an ambush two days ago in
exchange for insurgent prison-
ers, an Afghan official said Sun-
day, according to Associated
Press.

U.S. and NATO officials
confirmed that two American
Navy personnel went missing
Friday in the eastern province
of Logar, after an armored
sports utility vehicle was seen
driving into a Taliban-held
area.

In a telephone interview Sun-
day with The Associated Press,
Taliban spokesman Zabiullah
Mujahid said the pair drove
into an area under insurgent
control, prompting a brief gun-
fight in which one American
was killed and the other was
captured.

He said both were taken toa
“safe area" and "are in the
hands of the Taliban.”





Mujahid did not mention any
offer to exchange the pair for
Taliban prisoners. A local
Afghan official said the Taliban
sent a message through inter-
mediaries offering to hand over
the body in exchange for jailed
insurgents.

Abdul Wali, the deputy head
of the provincial governing
council, said local authorities
responded by saying, "Let's talk
about the one that is still alive."
The insurgents said they would
have to talk to superiors before
making any deal.

Checkpoints

Hundreds of posters of the
two missing sailors have been
hung at checkpoints through-
out Logar province where
NATO troops are stopping
vehicles, searching people,
peering inside windows and
searching trunks.

The posters, with pho-
tographs of the missing sailors,

state: "This American troop is
missing. He was last seen in a
white Land Cruiser vehicle. If
you have any information about
this solider, kindly contact the
Logar Joint Coordination Cen-
ter," run by coalition and
Afghan forces.

A phone number is listed
along with information about
a $20,000 reward being offered
for information leading to their
location.

The photographs show one
clean-shaven sailor wearing a
soft cap and another with short-
cropped hair, wearing a blue
civilian shirt and a white under-
shirt.

"Our latest, accurate infor-
mation reports are that they are
still in the area," said Din
Mohammed Darwesh,

spokesman for the provincial
governor of Logar.

He said the governor's office
was upset because the two
Americans left their base with-
out notifying Afghan security
forces in Logar.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2010, PAGE 7C



INSIGHT

Raul Castro prepares
Revolution Day speech

HAVANA, Cuba

IT WOULD be easy for
Raul Castro to make head-
lines in a major Revolution
Day speech Monday. All he
has to do is bring up the 52
political prisoners he has
agreed to release, or discuss
plans to open the island's
communist economy, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Of course, nothing Cuba's
79-year-old president says will
mean as much as whether
elder brother Fidel is stand-
ing by his side. A recent spate
of appearances by the revolu-
tionary leader after four years
of near-total seclusion has got
everybody talking. Could this
be Fidel's coming out party?

"If Fidel is there it will
cause a huge stir. It will be
very important,” said Wayne
Smith, a former top Ameri-
can diplomat in Havana and
senior fellow at the Washing-
ton-based Center for Interna-
tional Policy.

He said the elder Castro
brother's presence would
make clear to many in Wash-
ington that the 83-year old
revolutionary still has a strong
hand in affairs of state. That,
Smith says, would not be
viewed positively by those
waiting for Cuba to allow
more economic, political and
social changes.

"The thought has been that
they are moving toward
reforms under Raul, but that
they might be moving more
energetically if not for the fact
that Fidel Castro is still sitting
on the porch and Raul is
afraid he might not be enthu-



“If Fidel is there it will

cause a huge stir. It will be
very important.”



Wayne Smith, a former top American diplomat in
Havana and senior fellow at the Washington-based
Center for International Policy

silastic,” Smith said. "If Fidel
does come back, that could
suggest they aren't going to
move as fast as they should
with these changes."

Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez, a close friend and
admirer of the Castros whose
country provides Cuba billions
of dollars a year in subsidized
oil, is also expected to speak
Monday.

Fidel Castro ruled Cuba for
nearly half a century until he
was forced to step down in
2006 and undergo emergency
intestinal surgery, turning
power over — first temporar-
ily, then permanently — to his
brother.

Since then, Castro has lived
in near total seclusion. Until
this month, that is.

The former president has
seemingly been everywhere,
most recently making an emo-
tional visit Saturday to a town
outside Havana to honor fall-
en revolutionary fighters.
There he read a statement
that was right out of his much-
weathered revolutionary play-
book, turning Cuba's tortured
half-century conflict with the
United States into a positive.

"The simple fact of main-
taining this fight for such a
long time provides proof of
what a small country can
achieve against a gigantic,
imperial power," Castro said
after laying a wreath at a mau-
soleum for his comrades. In
other appearances Castro has
visited economists, scientists,
diplomats and even dolphins
at the national aquarium, his
every move captured on
national television and in
state-run newspapers.

State media have even tak-
en to calling him "comman-
der in chief" again, a title he
has largely shunned since step-
ping down.

Fidel Castro has used the
publicity spree to warn that
the world stands on the
precipice of a nuclear war —
pitting the United States and
Israel on one side, and Iran
on the other.

So far he has stayed clear
of commenting on current
events in Cuba, perhaps in an
effort to avoid the appearance
of interfering with his broth-
er's work running the coun-
try. But merely attending Rev-
olution Day celebrations



REVOLUTION DAY SPEECH: Cuba's President Raul Castro.

would be an overtly political
act.

While Raul Castro has
remained loyal to his broth-
er's communist ideals, he has
overseen the handover of tens
of thousands of acres of gov-
ernment land to individual
farmers; has allowed some
small-level entrepreneurship
in a country where the state
controls well over 90 percent
of the economy; and has
spearheaded an anti-corrup-
tion drive in which several
senior officials were fired.

Wages

He has also tried to scale
back unsustainable subsidies
in a system where most people
earn low government wages
but receive free health care
and education, near-free hous-
ing and transportation and
deeply discounted basic food.

The reforms — while halt-
ing — have allowed Raul to
emerge from the shadow of
his more famous brother,
though opinion is divided on
how much influence Fidel
wields behind the scenes.

The government has said
nothing about whether Fidel
will be on hand for Monday's
celebration, which commem-
orates the date in 1953 when
the Castros led an attack on
the Moncada army barracks
in the eastern city of Santiago
and a smaller military outpost
in the nearby city of Bayamo.
The operation failed spectac-
ularly, but Cubans consider it
the beginning of the revolu-
tion that culminated with dic-
tator Fulgencio Batista's
ouster on New Year's Day
1959.

Cuba celebrates Revolution
Day in a different part of the
island each year. The 2010
affair in the central city of
Santa Clara offers an intrigu-
ing backdrop. The speeches
will be held at a towering out-
door memorial housing the
remains of Argentine revolu-
tionary Ernesto "Che" Gue-
vara. Santa Clara is also home
to Guillermo Farinas, a dissi-
dent who recently ended a
134-day hunger strike after the
government agreed to release
the last remaining opposition
leaders jailed since 2003. At
least 15 have been released





Javier Galeano, Pool/AP

and sent to Spain so far, with
the rest expected to follow in
coming months.

While many think Fidel
Castro's appearance Saturday
means it's less likely he will
also show up in Santa Clara,
there have been some signs
he might attend.

When Chavez announced
that he would be attending the
festivities, he wrote that he
wanted to share the day “with
Raul, with Fidel and with the
Cuban people.”

On the streets of Havana,
many believe the former
leader will make an appear-
ance.

"T think Fidel has to be in
Santa Clara," said Mariana
Delgado, a 71-year-old retiree
standing in line to buy a copy
of state-run newspaper Juven-
tud Rebelde, or "Rebel
Youth."

"The people are waiting to
see him at a public event, and
we are waiting to hear him
speak about the situation in
Cuba," she said. "Until now,
he has only talked about prob-
lems in other countries. We
have many problems here that
we need to solve."






























































































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