Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 106 No.200

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The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





BAHAMAS EDITION

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THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

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Crisis Centre
building to be
demolished

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Crisis
Centre is to close its doors at
Knowles House in eight
days amid claims by hospital
doctors that the building is
to be demolished to make
way for a car park extension.

Workers at the only non-
government and non-profit
refuge are to be evicted
from their current building
in the grounds of Princess
Margaret Hospital (PMH).

And last night they issued
a desperate appeal to the
community for secure
premises in which they can
continue their work.

Dr Sandra Dean-Patter-
son, founder of the Bahamas
Crisis Centre, said: “We are
in crisis. We are in despera-
tion because we have
nowhere to go.



“We are grateful to the
hospital, who have housed
us since 1982 but we have
created a refuge, an oasis for
persons who are victims of
violence, and it will create
a great vacuum if we are no
longer able to provide the
service.”

The crisis centre is funded
through a government sub-
vention, fundraising efforts
and private donations.

Launched by Dr Dean-
Patterson in 1982, the centre
opened with its main focus
on providing support to
female victims of sexual,
physical and psychological
abuse and their children as
the Women’s Crisis Centre.

Janet Hutcheson, chief
welfare officer assigned to
Health Social Services in the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
lamented the unfortunate

SEE page 10

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Doomed |
eignt days



Weathermen
keep watch on

tropical system







By ALESHA CADET



BAHAMIANS are being
warned to keep an eye on the
weather forecasts with the
development of a tropical sys-
tem approaching the south-
east.

Meteorologists are watch-
ing a front that has a 60 per
cent chance of developing into
a tropical depression or storm

with the chance of it affecting
the Bahamas by Friday.

According to internation-
al weather reports, environ-
mental conditions are
favourable for some develop-
ment as the front moves to the
west-northwest from Hispan-
iola into the Bahamas at about
1Omph.

SEE page 11



GUILTY PLEA IN DOG CRUELTY CASE

FIND OUT WHY Humane Society chiefs regard court case over severely meee ee as a ‘hollow victory’.

Tituiaorscksscsia MP accused of failing to

car crash after shoot-out

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are without any
leads in their latest homi-
cide after culprits escaped a
car crash that preceded a
high speed shoot-out
through Montell Heights
early yesterday morning.

The officers had respond-
ed to reports of a shooting
shortly before 1 am and
while in the area observed a
gold coloured Honda
Inspire that appeared to be
fleeing the scene.

Patrol officers and the cul-
prits, believed to be respon-
sible for the death of Dani-
achew Dikobe Miller of Mil-



lennium Gardens, and
numerous armed robberies,
exchanged gun fire during
the high speed chase. How-
ever, the culprits escaped
when their vehicle crashed
in the area of East Street
south of Robinson Road. In
the car, police recovered a
high powered weapon with
ammunition.

Mr Miller, a 29-year-old,
was found with gunshot
injuries to the chest. He was
wearing short navy blue
denim jeans and a black t-
shirt. He was pronounced
dead by emergency medical
services at the scene.

Reports indicated he was

SEE page 11

* SEE PAGE TWO











cool



report crime in House spat

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A PARLIAMENTARY
spat over a Grand Bahama
public servant who was
charged with illegal posses-
sion of ammunition ended

with MP for Golden Gates
Shane Gibson being accused
of failing to report a crime.
Mr Gibson used his contri-
bution to the debate on two
bills — the Central Bank of the

SEE page 11





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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS













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Son of Police
Superintendent
pleads guilty but
escapes conviction

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -_ The
Humane Society of Grand
Bahama believes the animal
cruelty trial of Wenito Bootle
in the case of a severely mal-
nourished dog was a “hollow
victory”.

After a year of adjourn-
ments in the Magistrates
Court, Bootle suddenly
changed his plea to guilty and
was granted a conditional dis-
charge and ordered to pay
$1,758 in costs.

Bootle, a resident of Gor-
don Avenue and the son of
Police Superintendent Wel-
bourne Bootle, appeared in
Court Two where he was
charged a year ago with ani-
mal cruelty with regard to a
female Doberman mix-breed
dog named “Meka.”

Meka was adopted, along
with second male Doberman
mix named “Mr Thomas”
from the HSGB, in February
2009.

On July 15, 2009 the HSGB
received a call from a con-
cerned citizen who reported
that her neighbour’s dog had
staggered into her yard and
collapsed.

Meka, a once healthy 75-
pound dog, weighed only 35
pounds six months after being
adopted. There was a heavy
chain around her neck. She
was covered in ticks and
there were large patches of
hair missing, according to the
HSGB.

She was euthanised the
next morning after her con-
dition had deteriorated fur-
ther.

The Doberman mix named
“Mr Thomas” was never
found.

In court on Monday,
Bootle’s lawyer Robert
Adams of Graham Thomp-
son & Co asked for mercy for
his client.

Mr Adams stated that his
client was remorseful and had
been unemployed for a peri-
od of time.

He explained that Bootle
was an animal lover who sim-
ply faced challenges caring
for the dogs.

Mr Adams also noted that
a conviction on Mr Bootle’s
record would jeopardise his
pending job with Bahamas
Customs and thus ruin his
career.

Magistrate Andrew Forbes
said the statutory provision
on the charge was for a max-
imum penalty of $150 or
three months imprisonment,
and that neither seemed ade-
quate for such a significant
charge.

Magistrate Forbes said he

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wishes some sort of class
existed which Mr Bootle

could attend.

He then ordered him to
pay $1,758 in costs by Octo-
ber 29, or be convicted at that
time.

Tip Burrows, executive
director of the HSGB, said
the outcome of the trial was
somewhat “bittersweet”.

“Mr Bootle gets to pay a
small sum of money and go
on with his life with no mean-
ingful consequences for his
actions,” she said.

Bootle changed his plea to
“guilty” after the defence
counsel and the prosecution
conferred privately. Despite
the HSGB’s attorney, Tiffany
Dennison of Dennison & Co
being present, Tip Burrows
said she and the HSGB were
not involved in the meeting.

Ms Burrows said the
HSGB hopes that once in a
while, Mr Bootle thinks
about the suffering of Meka
and Mr Thomas.

She added that anyone who
adopts from the HSGB can
simply pick up the phone and
call if they are no longer able
to care for their pets.

Ms Burrows hopes the case
will discourage other people
from abusing animals.

“T would like to think it
would make people stop and
think, especially in cases
where people have an oppor-
tunity to get help for their
animal. There is no reason
for this to ever happen,” she
said.

The Humane Society visits
schools to educate students
about the importance of car-
ing for animals.

The organisation also has
an active student volunteer
programme.

“Right now, we currently
have five kids volunteering
at the facility and they learn
by example, watching how we
care for the animals at our
shelter,” Ms Burrows said.

“With adults it is harder to
educate, and when people
adopt an animal from us we
give them literature about
how to care for their pet, we
give them a free DVD on
how to train the adopted ani-
mal, we counsel them about
proper animal care and the
importance of veterinary
care,” she said.









THE TRIBUNE

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

NEW legislation govern-
ing business licences will pos-
itively and “substantially
change the way we do busi-
ness”, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham told parliament.

The Business License Bill,
set to be debated and passed
in parliament next week,
intends to simplify the legal
and regulatory requirements
on business operators by cre-
ating a “one-stop-shop” for
all licensing needs, whether it
be for shop, liquor, music,
dancing or other licenses.

It would repeal the Liquor
Licenses Act, the Music and
Dancing Licenses Act and
the Registration of Business

HUBERT INGRAHAM



THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 3

New licence legislation ‘will

change way we do business’

Names Act and both repeal
and replace the Business
Licence Act.

“All requirements to carry
on business” will be included
in the proposed new bill, Mr
Ingraham said.

Moving forward with a
first reading of the Business
Licence Bill in the House of
Assembly, Prime Minister
Ingraham said the legislation,
once passed, will come into
effect in January 2011, bring-
ing with it “substantial
reforms.”

“We propose to pass it
next week before parliamen-
t’s four month summer
recess, giving businesses and
government agencies a
chance to become familiar
with the requirements of the
Bill so by the time it comes

into effect all and sundry will
have knowledge of the bill
and its requirements,” said
Mr Ingraham.

Aside from the issuance of
licenses, the Business License
Bill deals with approval of
business names, and the
establishment and function
of the Business License
Review Board which will
hear appeals against deci-
sions regarding business
licenses, as well as any
offences and penalties that
exist for contravention of the
law.

Mr Ingraham said: “This
is only one of a good number
of legislative decisions being
taken to change the way
business is done in the most
beneficial way in the
Bahamas.”

Government alters plans over
Central Bank board appointments

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE government has altered its
plans to allow individuals to be appoint-
ed members of the Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ board of directors despite
holding up to a five per cent interest in
a financial institution regulated by the
Central Bank.

This came after PLP MPs suggested
that any interest of board members in
such entities could be seen as a “conflict
of interest” for the critical regulator.

Faced with criticisms of proposals to
remove the prohibition, Minister of
State Zhivargo Laing said the govern-
ment would still push ahead with
removing the total prohibition on such
ownership.

However, he said the government
change the proposed amendments to
reduce the quantity of paid-up share
capital that can be owned by a board
director from five per cent to one.

Earlier, Mr Laing had suggested that
the government would like to sce the
prohibition on any board director being
a director, employee, officer or share-
holder in any institution regulated by
the Central Bank lifted to the extent
that persons could still be considered
for membership of the board despite
owning up to five per cent of the shares









ZHIVARGO LAING

in any such institution.

He said the prohibition against such
ownership in the present Central Bank
of the Bahamas Act was “onerous” and
meant it was very hard to find qualified
board directors in a small country like
the Bahamas.

Contributing to the debate on the
Central Bank of the Bahamas (Amend-
ment) Bill 2010 as the lead speaker for
the PLP, St Thomas Moore MP Frank
Smith said he was concerned that by
ending the prohibition the government

would be allowing for a “conflict of
interest that isn’t healthy” at a time
when it is also seeking to enhance the
Central Bank’s powers as a regulator.
He claimed that to remove such a
prohibition would set a precedent and
break with international convention.

Debate

Responding to the concerns raised
later in the debate, Mr Laing disputed
suggestions that the change would set a
precedent, pointing to Jamaica, Aus-
tralia and New Zealand as countries
which allow board directors to hold
shares in licensees.

“Malta provides for instance that
Central Bank directors cannot own
more than one per cent of ordinary
paid-up share capital of a licensee so we
would not be cutting new ground on
this issue in allowing directors on the
board to have ownership in a regulat-
ed entity.

“But I do believe that the issue of
the maximum holding may be some-
thing that may be at issue given some of
the comments that have been made, so
we have determined to amend that
number to one per cent as opposed to
the five per cent that had been pro-
posed, which would be in keeping with
the practices we are seeing in place.”

MP calls for Central Bank
prime rate to be lowered



OPPOSITION MP for Fox
Hill Fred Mitchell is calling
for the Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ prime rate to be
lowered.

According to Mr Mitchell,
such a move would be in the
“best interest” of the Bahami-
an people at this time.

Although he was out of the
country attending a mecting
of Caribbean opposition MPs
when the House of Assem-
bly met yesterday, Mr
Mitchell issued a statement
asking his parliamentary col-
leagues on both sides of the
House to make their views
known on this matter.

The MP said he had intend-
ed to put forward a resolu-
tion with regard to the prime
rate in yesterday’s session of
parliament, but decided after
consultation with his col-
leagues to stand down until
after the debate on the Cen-
tral Bank Amendment Bill,
as he feels the debate will
accomplish the objective of
bringing the matter to the
attention of the public.

“That is my sole objective,”
Mr Mitchell said. “Legislators
have their role. The Central
Bank has its role.

“Tn this, we mirror the com-
ments made about the secre-
cy of policy considerations by
the Federal Reserve Bank in
the United States.

“The Central Bank can be
acclimatised to public opin-
ion. They are not bound to
act according to it but ought
to take cognisance of it,” he
said.

The reasoning behind this
push is compelling, the MP
said, as it is a move that will

lower the cost of government
debt, lower the cost of pri-
vately held debt, including
that of mortgagors of land
and homes, as well as stimu-
late demand.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly yesterday in

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response to what he said were
“concerns” raised about the
prime rate, State Minister for
Finance Zhivargo Laing said
that the prime rate remains
the sole responsibility of the
Central Bank, which is inde-
pendent of the government.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

New BEC tariffs
are announced

CONFIRMING recent reports, the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation has
announced that effective July 1, it will
increase its monthly basic rates by around
five per cent.

In a statement issued yesterday, BEC point-
ed out that it has a “very costly” business
model, operating 28 generating plants on 13
islands.

“The cost of constructing, maintaining and
operating so many plants and so much equip-
ment over such a large and harsh geographi-
cal area is extremely expensive. BEC requires
this increase to restore the financial well-
being of the corporation,” the statement said.

BEC noted that it has not increased the
basic rate since 1993, in fact decreasing it in
2004. The company also pointed out that even
with the increase, BEC rates will remain
among the lowest in the region.

BEC bills have two components: the basic
rate, which is designed to cover all operating
costs of the corporation except fuel; and the
fuel charge, which is designed to recoup the
cost of all fuel necessary to operate the cor-
poration’s generators.

The statement said: “The corporation nego-
tiates excellent rates on fuel and thereby min-
imises the effects of the cost of fuel on the
average monthly bill.

However, world crude oil markets are the
ultimate decision makers of the price of fuel
purchased by the corporation and the cor-
poration, unfortunately, exerts little influ-
ence on those markets.”

BEC also said it is committed to improving
operational efficiencies, and that if these
efforts prove successful, customers will see
savings that offset much of the basic rate
increase.

Top Boston institution
welcomes former COB VP

Wheelock College has
announced the arrival of Dr
Linda Davis as associate
professor and interim direc-
tor of the Centre for Inter-
national Education, Lead-
ership, and Innovation.

The college said in a
statement: “The much
anticipated arrival of the
Bahamian educator to the
Boston Campus was met
with great enthusiasm. Dr
Davis joins a team of very
impressive and highly qual-
ified tertiary level educa-
tors from all over the

began her career as a high
school teacher before join-
ing the College of The
Bahamas faculty in 1987.
There she also served in
various administrative roles,
taking on her most recent
position in 2006, in which
she worked to increase
research activity and acces-
sibility to graduate degrees
as well as to expand the
international opportunities
available to the institution’s
students, faculty, and staff.
Dr Davis said: “I am
privileged to have been pro-





PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOPE
By Jamaal Rolle








YA Bree .
MIGHT BE -

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world.”

Already a member of the
Wheelock family, having
served as a Presidential
International Visiting
Scholar for one month last
fall, Dr Davis began her
year-long tenure as interim
director on July 1.

Dr Davis is the former
vice president for Research,
Graduate Programmes, and
International Relations at
the College of the
Bahamas, with which

DR LINDA DAVIS

Wheelock has growing col-
laborations.

She spent the last year on
sabbatical, travelling the
globe as part of her contin-
uing study of the nature of
international partnerships
and their dynamics.

A native of New Provi-
dence and eldest daughter
of Sir Winston “Tappy”
Davis and the late Joyce Y
Bosfield Davis, Dr Davis



Daylight armed robbery at Bahamasair office

POLICE are investigating a daring armed robbery commit-
ted in broad daylight at the Bahamasair office, Oakes Field.

On Tuesday afternoon, it was reported a gunman, who was
described as a dark male, entered the airline office armed with

a handgun and demanded cash.

The gunman fled the area with an undetermined amount
of cash in a blue Honda Accord, with licence plate 199781,
which was later found to have been reported stolen.

Responding officers gave chase traveling north on Pitt Road,
however the gunman eluded capture when he abandoned the
Honda for a blue Ford Explorer travelling west on Horseshoe
Drive. Investigations are continuing.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Accused ‘was put in
boot cast two weeks
before Taylor murder’



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By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LAWYERS for both sides
rested their cases in the retrial
of murder accused Troyniko
McNeil yesterday after the
defence's last witness testified
that the defendant was put in a
boot cast two weeks before
popular handbag designer Harl
Taylor was found murdered.

Dr Sarah Friday, a consul-
tant emergency physician and
chief of the emergency depart-
ment at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, said McNeil was given the
cast on November 4, 2007.

Taylor was found dead in a
bedroom of his home on
November 18, 2007.

Dr Friday, who was deemed
an expert in emergency med-
ical care by the court, said casts
are typically worn for about
three weeks but depending on
the severity of the injury, could
be worn for a shorter or longer
time.

She could not say how long
McNeil's ankle remained in the
cast or if the cast would have
restricted his ability to negotiate
a staircase.

Responding to a question
from the jury, Dr Friday said it
was possible for a person with-
out medical expertise to
remove a cast, adding that she
had heard of persons removing
their own casts.

McNeil, 24, may have had to
use crutches or a wheelchair to












































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avoid placing pressure on the
injured leg, the witness said.

Dr Friday said McNeil came
to PMH complaining of a
painful right ankle which he
claimed to have twisted play-
ing basketball.

She based her testimony on
McNeil's patient record, which
was signed by Dr Rodgers-
Rolle.

Dr Friday said McNeil regis-
tered at PMH at 7.17pm accom-
panied by his girlfriend.
According to hospital records,
the attending physician noted
gross swelling, decreased range
of motion and severe ligamen-
tation in his right ankle, she
said.

It was also noted that during
the examination, the defen-
dant's right ankle was tender
to the touch.

Based on this diagnosis, the
witness said McNeil's ankle
would have been in pain.

Dr Friday also testified that
doctors at PMH outfitted
McNeil with a leg cast. While
she could not specify the length
of McNeil's cast, she said casts
of this nature typically start at
the base of the toes going under
the foot, up the ankle and pos-
sibly extending to just above or
below the kneecap.

She said that based on the
hospital record, McNeil was
scheduled to return to PMH
on November 20, 2007 pre-
sumably for doctors to examine
his cast.

Ankle Injury

Dr Friday said a person
wearing such a cast is typically
given either crutches or a
wheelchair so weight is not
placed on the injured leg.

When asked by defence
attorney Murrio Ducille if a
person wearing such a cast
would be able to walk up a
flight of stairs, Dr Friday said
she did not want to speculate
and that the question should
be directed to an orthopedic
expert.

Under cross examination by
Prosecutor Franklyn Williams,
Dr Friday said moving about
without crutches or a wheel-
chair while wearing a leg cast
could delay healing.

Also testifying yesterday was
DNA analysis expert Dr Mar-
tin Tracey, a professor of bio-
logical science at Florida Inter-
national University in Miami.
He lectures on DNA forensics
and molecular biology.

Dr Tracey said DNA sam-
ples can last for weeks, months,
even decades and that analysts
cannot tell exactly when they
were deposited.

"If you have a mixed DNA
profile you know you have
DNA from two people but if
it's from a counter or floor and
it's two people, you don't know
if one left DNA there months
ago or yesterday,” he said.

The crux of the prosecution's
case is DNA evidence which







Harl iro

they argue links the accused to
the crime scene.

Dr Tracey, who did not
study the case's forensic evi-
dence, said it should have been
"obvious" to DNA analysts at
the outset if there was a kin-
ship link between DNA taken
from the defendant's father,
Troy McNeil, and DNA found
at the crime scene.

He was responding to ques-
tions from Mr Ducille regard-
ing Monday's testimony of
prosecution witness Kevin
Noppinger, who said that in
December, 2007 his lab tested
and compared samples from
Taylor's home and DNA sam-
ples from Troy McNeil and
other individuals.

On January 11, 2008, the
defendant's father was exclud-
ed as a possible source of the
samples found at the crime
scene.

At the time Mr Noppinger
did not notice any link between
Troy McNeil's DNA and
forensic evidence from the
crime scene because he was not
looking for it, he said.

It was not until June, 2008
that he tested the DNA for a
kinship link and found that
while Troy McNeil was exclud-
ed as a donor, there were sim-
ilarities between his samples
and some found at the scene.

Mr Noppinger said he con-
cluded there was a 99.99 per
cent chance that Troy McNeil
was the biological father of a
source of some of the samples
at the scene.

Closing submissions will be
heard today at 1lam before
Senior Justice Jon Issacs.

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By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE suspect an
autopsy report will shed
some light into the myste-
rious death of a 38-year-
old Jamaican.

Responding officers
found no visual signs of
injury to the body of Oral
Claude Walker of Shirley
Street, who was found
slumped over the steering
wheel of a black S-10 pick
up truck at Bradley Street,
Madiera yesterday
evening. The truck’s
licence plate number is
30530.

Emergency medical ser-
vices pronounced him
dead at the scene. Police
have classified the incident
a sudden death and inves-
tigations are continuing.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



hoberts: Bahamians
font buy the excuse that
Crime is drug related

PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts said the opposition
responds with “great alarm”
to the government’s tendency
to say crime in the Bahamas
is largely drug related.

Mr Roberts said the public
does not accept this excuse,
as they know many armed
robberies and murders have
nothing to do with drugs.

Accusing Minister of
National Security of being
incapable of coping with the
“levels of crime daily assailing
citizens of the Bahamas”, Mr
Roberts noted that buying
new police cars, while a posi-
tive step, does not solve
crime.

He said: “The fact of the
matter is that the minister of
National Security is clueless
and has no ideas. He is out of
his league and must do the
honourable thing and be gone.

“The PLP suggests to the
government that it should
immediately and fully rein-
state the Urban Renewal and
the School Policing Pro-
grammes.

“We note the concerns
expressed in the media today
by Dr David Allen, one of
the authors of the Urban
Renewal programme, about
rising violence among
teenage girls.”

Mr Roberts added that
churches should be better
supported in their communi-
ty outreach programmes and
that recently cut government
subsidies should be immedi-
ately restored to church
schools, the Ranfurly Home,
the PACE programme, the
Crisis Centre, and other
organisations fighting against
poverty and attempting to
improve education.

“Statistics show that pover-









ty is directly related to crime.
Statistics also show that goal
oriented young people sel-
dom become involved in
criminal activity. Studies



“The fact of the matter is that the
minister of National Security is clue-
# less and has no ideas. He is out of his
league and must do the honourable
thing and be gone.”

— PLP chairman Bradley Roberts -



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE









FREEPORT, BAHAMAS
— Sharon Smith’s ‘Back to
Basics’ Girls Basketball Camp
plays a significant role in the
lives of many young girls on
the island - some of whom
even go on to win college
scholarships.

The camp, sponsored by the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
has a number of components

including fundamental basket-
ball training, as well as educa-
tional and youth development.

“GBPA encourages all cor-
porate citizens and the com-
munity to become advocators
for this young generation by
supporting all such positive
endeavors,” said GBPA vice
president, Ginger Moxey. “As
we make advances into a better

Pe GCM r Meee Callie camp

future, it must start today with
the leading voices of tomor-
row. Therefore, GBPA is more
than pleased to support pro-
grammes that focus on the bet-
terment of our island through
the lives of our young people.”

The annual event ran for two
weeks this month. Camp direc-
tor, Sharon Smith, in receiving
GBPA’s donation, expressed

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thanks and shared a synopsis
of the programme.

“This year’s camp schedule
included mother-daughter/
father-daughter shooting com-
petitions, ‘let’s talk’ sessions,
meetings with college coaches,

seminars and a banquet and
closing ceremony. We were so
appreciative of the Port’s sup-
port which helped to make the
event so successful. The girls
and I had a wonderful time this
year,” Ms Smith said.

| SHARON SMITH (3rd from



left) along with her girls,
present a ‘thank you’ gift to
vice president of the GBPA,
Ginger Moxey (centre) for

the GBPA’s continued sup-
port of this positive youth

programme.



The Bahamian Brewery and Beverage
Company shines for coud Quality inl

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Bahami-
an Brewery and Beverage
Company has achieved inter-
national recognition, winning a
Gold Quality Award for ‘High
Rock’ beer less than a year
after its release.

Launched in 2009, High
Rock beer was submitted for
testing at the 49th World Selec-
tions of the Monde Selection
Gold Quality Award in May.

About 2,500 products from
more than 80 countries and 850
different companies were sub-
mitted.

High Rock won the Gold
Quality Award on its first sub-
mission.

Now, the brewery team has
decided to change the beer’s
label to commemorate the
award.

The brewery in Grand
Bahama produces Sands, High
Rock and Strong Back beers.
The company sells locally and
exports.

In May, Sands beer was fea-
tured in Southern Boating mag-
azine, which is internationally
distributed and reaches more
than 150,000 readers.

James Sands, CEO, said the
new label with the gold award
on it has been approved and
will soon be seen on High Rock
beer.

“This team and my Grand
Bahama staff are the real rea-
sons behind the gold award,”
he said.

“They are on our line every-
day ensuring that each time we

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that road works will be carried
out on sections of Robinson Road between Palm Beach Street and Balfour Avenue effective Monday July 26",
2010. Installation of new twenty-four inches (24”) Water main pipes will be constructed in this phase.
Construction works will be done in different phases starting eastbound.
¢ Motorist should diverted east through Palm Beach Street, continue along Balfour Avenue and exit through
Claridge Road to their destination.

¢ Motorist travelling westbound should continue on the one way traffic scheme in place.

Access will be granted to the business places, pedestrians and residents. Kindly observe all traffic signs delineating
the work zone, please keep abreast with the local additional media through which we will keep you updated.

We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project.
For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.ar

Robinson Rd. closed
Alternative route

Balfour Av.

CLOSED

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport

Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs

CLOSED

Lateral street full closures by stages














brew we match the standards
we have set.

“This award shows that what
we are brewing here in Grand
Bahama is a consistent product
that meets the standards of
international breweries around
the world.”

f) their High Rock Gold medal from
"| the 49th World Quality Selections



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are some of the Grand Bahama
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Lorenzo Johnson, assistant brew-
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 9





KIRKLAND ‘KB’ BODIE performs in England.

Photo/Lorenzo McKenzie



Kirkland ‘KB’ Bodie takes
Bahamian music to the UK

HENLEY, England -
Bahamian performer Kirkland
“KB” Bodie electrified the audi-
ence at the recent Henley Festi-
val in Henley on Thames, Eng-
land.

He was a part of the “Rakin’ n
Scrapin’” aspect of the Bahami-
an delegation, who are perform-
ing at various venues and festi-
vals during the month of July.

Junkanoo artists are currently
there showcasing their artistry

in the “Bahamas Junkanoo Dey
Comin’” section of the tour.

Musicians Colyn McDonald
and Basil Rolle backed KB for
two days at the week-long fes-
tival, performing such hits as
“Juz Cuz She Phat” and
“Hangova”.

According to project manager
for the initiative Angelique
McKay, the performances have
“gone over very well” with the
festival audiences.

“Bahamian culture is well
received, which is one of the rea-
sons the Bahamas is represented
here again,” she said.

One of the local radio sta-
tions in Henley requested an
interview from KB and now has
his music in rotation on their sta-
tion “Marlow FM”.

KB said: “I am having a great
time here in Jolly old England,
showing them what real Bahami-
an music is all about.”






Betty. K. Agencies Ltd.





Spain predicts thaw in US and EU ties with Cuba

MADRID (AP) — Spain's
foreign minister predicted
Wednesday that Cuba's
release of dozens of political
prisoners could eventually lead
to a thaw in USS. relations and
the lifting of a decades-old
embargo against the Commu-
nist-run island.

Speaking in Parliament,

Miguel Angel Moratinos said
the freeing of some 52 Cuban
prisoners would prompt a shift
in European Union policy
toward Cuba "and it will have
political consequences in USS.
relations with Cuba, (such as)
the lifting of the embargo."

A spokeswoman for the
US. embassy in Madrid said,

while the U.S. welcomed the
release of the Cuban political
inmates, it was too early to say
whether that would have any
effect on the embargo. And
officials from France and Ger-
many didn't share Moratinos'
optimism that the release of
the 52 would trigger an EU
policy shift.

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Bahamian Contractors’ Association

MEET THE BAHA MAR
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT TEAM

ALL BAHAMIAN CONTRACTORS
are invited to attend a

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5TH PASTORAL & 29TH CHURCH’S ANNIVERSARY
THEME: “INCREASE”
SCRIPTURE TEXTS: JOB 8:5-7 & PsaLm 115:12-14

#

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JULY 22ND-25TH

THURSDAY, 7:30 PM
SPEAKER:
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FRIDAY, 7:30 PM
SPEAKER:
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SATURDAY, 630 AM
FUN, RUN, WALK, SWIM &
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



= lati

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KNOWLES HOUSE, where the Bahamas Crisis Centre is currently located.








Crisis Centre
building to be
demolished

FROM page one

circumstances as close prox-
imity to the hospital was an
ideal location for the centre.

She said: “I know Dr Pat-
terson and the work that she
is doing there. For a long
time she was out there by
herself, almost in the wilder-
ness, until people came and
saw the work she has been
doing over the years and the
lives she’s impacted as a
result of her passion for
those affected by domestic
abuse.”

Since the name change to
the Bahamas Crisis Centre,
Dr Patterson said the flood-
gates were opened and over
the years the organisation
has seen thousands of vic-
tims of both sexes and all
ages; and seek counsel from
a pro-bono network of psy-
chologists, psychiatrists,
social workers, volunteer
counsellors, and attorneys
who all advocate for legisla-
tive and societal protection
of survivors.

Ms Hutcheson continued:
“They’re playing a vital role
in our community, and a lot
of people — for want of a
better word — don’t really

appreciate their intrusive-
ness into the family envi-
ronment, but they are doing
an enormous task and we
want to continue to encour-
age them and the commu-
nity to support them. It’s a
sad situation where there is
so much domestic violence
and sometimes nowhere for
the women to run.”

Dr Dean-Patterson admit-
ted the centre had been giv-
en ample notice of the pend-
ing demolition, to make
space for the construction
of new operating theatres,
but they have been unable
to secure alternate housing.
Also scheduled for demoli-
tion is the building adjacent
to the centre, Huggins
Lodge.

Doctors at PMH lament-
ed the destruction of the
buildings they felt bore his-
torical significance. They
noted their demolition was
not to accommodate the
new theatres, but to increase
parking space.

One doctor claimed: “The
new theatres don’t extend
out this far. This is really
being done to achieve more
parking space. And that is
sad because this is one of

FOCOL HOLDINGS LIMITED

PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is advised that as of July 15,
2010, ten million (10,000,000) Class ‘C’
Perpetual Preference Shares of Focol
Holdings Limited were sold via private
placement for ten million dollars
($10,000,000).

The proceeds from the offering will be
used to strengthen Focol Holdings
Limited's balance sheet by prepaying
long term debt.

Colina Financial Advisors Limited (CFAL)}
was the escrow agent for the offering.

“Fuelling Growth For People”



the last remaining buildings
of the original hospital com-
pound.”

The doctor added: “This
building (Huggin’s Lodge)
has history and historical
value. It was named after
one of the first surgeons that
worked at PMH, Dr
Leonard Catesby Huggins.
He came here from Trinidad
in the late 20s and was a well
known physician in Nassau.”

Legislative records show
there was a Leonard Cates-
by Huggins (Private Prac-
tice) Act 1958, suggesting
Dr Huggins’ contributions
may have exceeded public
medical practice. However
this act was repealed in the
first schedule of the Statute
Law Revision Act 1964.

The protection of historic
buildings is entrusted to the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museum Corporation
(AMMC) and sites are eval-
uated based on Bahamian
history, architecture, arche-
ology, engineering, and cul-
ture.

Requests for site preser-
vation should be sent in
written form with photos to
the AMMC, upon which its
team of historical architects
and consultants will conduct
an evaluation.

Dr Dean-Patterson said
the crisis centre’s hotline will
remain operational despite
the lack of a physical space
to administer therapy.

“We provide a refuge and
a place of healing. In a time
like this when the violence is
escalating, we don’t want to
lose this place — the only
place — where victims can
achieve that healing, and at
no cost.”

She added: “So we’re
appealing to the community
— hopefully someone will
come forward and help us
in some way. Perhaps give
us a building we can use or
options of other avenues we
can pursue.”

Calls made to the Public
Hospitals Authority to veri-
fy the reason for demolition
were not returned.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS







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Water Corp suffers

$25m net loss in ‘08

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE WATER and Sewer-
age Corporation suffered a
$25 million net loss in 2008
before its $20 million subsidy,
with losses up $1 million over
2007, the corporation’s annu-
al report revealed.

The losses suffered by this
Corporation and _ the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration alone, total close to $50
million, and continued to
mount into 2009.

Tabled in the House of
Assembly yesterday, the
report reveals the deep-seated
losses that continue to occur
at the Water and Sewerage
Corporation.

The Corporation’s final net
loss for 2008, after the annual
government subsidy, totalling
$20.789 million, was $4.913
million, up $1.005 million over



2007.

Net losses before govern-
ment funds were injected for
New Providence and the
Family Islands were $16.5 mil-
lion and $9.2 million respec-
tively.

The Water and Sewerage
Corporation saw its operat-
ing expenses increase by $6.8
million in 2008 compared to
2007.

According to the report,
the Corporation saw an
almost $3 million hike in the
cost of purchasing water and a
$1.6 million hike in the pur-
chase of fuel and oil, plus a
$1.5 million increase in elec-
tricity costs in 2008.

The Corporation continued
to depend on barged water
from a reverse osmosis plant
in Andros to supply New
Providence, which had often
proven to accrue high costs.
However, shipping costs
appeared to decrease by $1.6

million year-over-year for
2008.

Water and Sewerage has
been plagued by aging infra-
structure for years, resulting
in inceasing non-revenue
water or water waste due to
leaks in the aging system.

Chairman of the Corpora-
tion, Anton Saunders, said the
utility was challenged by eco-
nomic declines, its aging infra-
structure and a dramatic
increase in the price of fuel.
The Corporation was also
plagued by increased demand
for water supplies and unre-
solved industrial agreements
in both of its unions.

The cash-strapped Corpo-
ration, at the end of the first
quarter 2010, owed its main
supplier, Consolidated Water,
$4.6 million, and vowed to
make monthly payment
through June to meet current
invoices and reduce delin-
quent receivable.







THE FRONT ENTRANCE of Doctors Hospital...

Doctors Hospital gets top honour

DOCTORS Hospital yes-
terday became the first hos-

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
SECTION 24

JFK Drive, Farrington Road & Thompson Boulevard

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that traffie will be diverted
along the new rownd-about being constructed at the intersection of JFK Drive & Thompson Boulevard.
Motorist travelling along JFK Drive, Thompson Boulevard & Farrington Road should expect changes at these

; a ania
intersections between July 18° and August 4, 2010,

Installation of néw drainage facilities, utilities, water main systems, street lightings, traffic signs, asphalt

povement and rod markings will be constructed in this phiese,

Motorists are advised to drive with caution as they approach the new round-about; ramps are constructed at some
sections of the round-about. The existing traffic signal will be removed. Traffic signs wall be wisibke while

approaching the round-about.

The following businesses and residents along Thompeon Blvd will be affected:
*" Nassau Readi-mixed Conerete Company Ltd.
* Bahamas Mack Trucks Sales Ltd.

The original aceess route will be permanently closed. Access will be provided west of the original acoess at the
round-aboutiend of Thompson Bled. A safe route will be provided for pedestrians as the alternative for the closed

footpath.

We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project,

For ferther iaformunion plane coat:
Jie Cineione Connraccione: Chiles 5,4.
Office Hoon: Men-Fin4:fem to 64pm
OMe: (a2) 122-A I AE2-1hld
Enreait: |ubpenain righ bs re cartelle ne comm or

eo oe ee eT OS eos co '
a FT :
=a Se a =a = i
hee pie poe «ae
= eo re
= : aero
ce ques 1 ee
a a oh ve
Sag Tae



The Projest Execution Lett
fdinbiry of Werks & Tranmport
VWhevilina: (2424 E-



pital in the Caribbean to
achieve international accred-
itation from Joint Commis-
sion International (JCI), a
worldwide leader in improv-
ing the quality of healthcare.

JCI is the global arm of the
US-based Joint Commission
on the Accreditation of
Healthcare Organisations
(JCAHO), the same body
that certifies over 18,000 hos-
pitals in the US.

The distinction certifies that
Doctors Hospital’s pro-
grammes meet international
standards and follow the lat-
est US clinical guidelines.
Having a JCI accreditation
signifies and ensures that
Doctors Hospital demon-
strates a high quality of
patient care and patient safe-
ty, and also has an ongoing
program for continuous
improvement.

The JCI accreditation was
awarded to Doctors Hospital
after a rigorous onsite evalu-
ation by an international sur-
veyor team of healthcare
experts.

Charles Sealy, Doctors
Hospital’s chief executive,
said: “We sought accredita-
tion because we want to pro-
vide the best care possible for
our patients. Our patients are
always our number one pri-
ority, and to ensure their well-
being and satisfaction, this
accreditation recognises that
Doctors Hospital is at the
forefront of administration
procedures, staff qualifica-
tions, safety, leadership, and

technology.

“Earning accreditation
from Joint Commission Inter-
national is the gold standard
of excellence in the health-
care industry. Providing high
quality care is a team effort,
and the end results depend
very much upon a cumulative
and consistent team effort
from every individual and
every department at the hos-
pital. It is their professional-
ism and dedication that
results in the accolades
received from the surveyors.
We are very proud and con-
gratulate all of the associates
at Doctors Hospital whose
hard work and dedication to
excellence helped achieve this
honour.”

Marsha Sands, vice-presi-
dent of quality and standards
and patient safety at Doctors
Hospital, said: “While our
work is focused on the overall
care of our patients, it is great
to receive verification that we
are doing things right. It is
good to know that we are
meeting the highest expecta-
tions and delivering on our
promises.

“Tt is reassuring to know
that patients being treated at
Doctors Hospital are in the
best hands. This accreditation
lets our community know that
not only are we tested, but we
are trusted. This accredita-
tion is essentially a confirma-
tion of best practice, and we
will continually strive to
achieve the highest standards
of evidence-based care.”

awe
NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

REGIS GLOBAL INVESTMENT
FUND LIMITED

Matice is hereby given in weeordinge with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of SOM, the
Dissolution of REGIS GLORAL INVESTMENT FUND

LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution

has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

olf the Regeter of companies. The date of completion of the

dissolution was the 20" day of July, 2010,

Las Eduarde Dapine

Liquidator



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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 17

LOCAL NEWS

OUTSTANDING STUDENT:
Be

WILDGOOSE

ik Ministry of Education believes that all students
should be given the opportunity to achieve their dreams
through excellence in education.

Each child must be educated, nurtured and supported so that
they may realize their full potential.

The Ministry of Education is proud to showcase the special
abilities, talents, and academic gifts of outstanding students in
the public schools.

Fredricka Judith Wildgoose is an eleven (11) year old student
at Mabel Walker Primary School. With a grade point average
(GPA) of 3.56, Fredricka says that her academic success is due to
her four hours of study every evening, going to bed early, arriv-
ing at school on time, and limiting the time that she watches tele-
vision.

Fredricka is a member of the Student Christian Movement,
Chimes Music Group, Choir, and Drama Clubs at her school.
She encourages her peers to listen carefully to their parents and
teachers, and to ask questions when they do not understand what
is being asked of them. Her dream is to become a doctor, how-
ever, She has not decided on the area of specialty as yet. The
Ministry of Education applauds this young student, encourages
her to continue to work diligently, and wishes her continued suc-
cess in her endeavours.





































Sew a

Sheraton
Nassau

BEACH RESORT











KALIK "THE BEER OF THE BAHAMAS" continues to make its presence felt
at the Bahamas’ major iconic cultural activities. Donations in cash and kind
were made by the Burns House Group to the ALL Andros and Berry Island Regat-
ta Committee to ensure that the regatta, held July 9th - 12th, would continue to
thrive. Pictured is Stafford Armbrister, Chairman of the Committee, receiving the
cash donation from the BHG reps Nicola Heastie (left) and Dewitte Farrington

(right).

Connections
were created.

Sheraton is where people gather. On behalf of all the
associates at Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort, we would like
to thank Nassau’s business community for supporting our
Creating Connections event on Thursday, July 15th. When
you think business, think Sheraton,

THE MANAGEMENT &
Staff of The Bahamas
Heart Centre located at
the Medical Pavilion,
Bahamas kicked off their
20th Anniversary cele-
brations by attending
the Early Morning Mass
at Christ The King Angli-
can Church, Ridgeland
Park on July 4th, 2010.
Celebrant was The Rev-
erend Father Ivan Eldon.
To commemorate 20
years of the honor and
the privilege of provid-

De eT a Ch

20th ANNIVERSARY

Book at sheratonnassau.com or call 327-6000



ing specialty medical
services to our
Bahamas, Dr. Conville
Brown donated the fol-
lowing items to the
Anglican Parish Family:
20 Hymnals; 20 Bibles;
20 Mass Books; 20
Chairs.





4MERIDIEN

a) 2)

lala

THE LUXURY COLLECTION

on on

STREGIS

Mil



0.0) ice Ney

Ma

Cte)







Subs & Salads

SEVEN LOCATIONS: JFK, TOWN CENTER MALL, HARBOUR BAY,
MADEIRA RD. BLUE HILL RD. GEORGE §T., CHARLOTTE ST.







-

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Michael Davis beats
odds to win 11K with
eS wendy & Coca Cola

a!

















| ONLY 99 GENTS
! TASTE THE HEAT
i. |
ft a
4 Sh}
? j i* ae 7
= f. f ; 2 ty Wi 7 OO
——— Pay ip Ati kage [Ade oa
HOMEGROWN NFL CHAMP Devard Darling & several recipients of the Wendy’s & Coca Cola Scholarship nee - hl o oan SPA ARS
Program participate in the final 1K drawing leading up to the 10K giveaway. jew F hagas jofiame oc OL Put :
e oad
oe ie a a






















Leeds ee

Wn ap Om eli l a)







Wy

OLD Fast) RGE i

HAMBU RGERS

j SPICY wueetrs
NLY 99° EMT
TASTE THE HEAT.







Ale, Alssdae® Dax '$ 70,000, 00

DOLLARS

ee

Die Poe a

10,000!







PARTNERED FOR SUCCESS! (left to right): Cyndi Williams-Rahming, Marketing Consultant Coca-Cola;
Michelle Lewis, Marketing Manager Coca Cola; Giles Wells, Spirit 92.5FM, Joyann Stuart Freeport, Coca
Cola Rep; Michael Davis, 10K WINNER; Inigo “Naughty” Zenicazelaya, More 94.9FM; Terry Tsavoussis,
Vice President Wendy’s; Yolanda Pawar, Marketing Manager Wendy’s.

S A WN an yay ‘id | A ec oe FE ied T fs Was it destiny, a winning strategy or just family the motivation and determination to
extreme luck, that pushed Michael Davis _ press on.
iT rr A a ve to beat the odds and win not only the initial For the Davis’, it was a group effort. The
#1 Salli ls ais) DR Alas drawing of $1,000, but also the highly cov- banded together with MM iecen es that
eted $10,000 cash jackpot in Wendy’s and _ the family dine at Wendy’s (their favorite
Coca Cola’s “Upgrade Me Too” promo- quick serve restaurant) at least twice a day
tion? for the duration of the promotion; a strate-

: — = This easy going, down home guy from _ gy that paid off in a big way!
AVAILABLE AT SELECT BURNS HOUSE Freeport says he set his sights on winning During the past six weeks of the “Upgrade
ee Se | ee | eee i) from the very start. Michael says “some- Me Too” promotion customers upgrading

how” he just knew the big cash prize would
be his, and the first win gave him and his

SEE page nineteen





Saturday 7
Juifanoe Boneh Bast |
[oem © 1 OB NA

© og
cae —

FEES ey gg tourismtoday.comâ„¢

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@nautil US F Bank of The Bahamas

SoM











THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS



UME UI









COOL PRIZES FOR COOL KIDS enjoying tha Uparade Me Too family fun day.

Michael Davis beats odds to win
11K with Wendy's & Coca Cola

FROM page 18

their combos to a large at all Wendy’s loca-
tions (including the airport and Freeport)
became eligible to complete the blanks and
enter their receipt to win. There were four
weekly $1,000 prizes, and the promotion
culminated with a mega cash jackpot give-
away of $10,000.

Not only was Michael the first customer to
win 1K in this year’s promotion, but also
became the first person from Freeport to
ever win in the two years that the promotion
has been run. Proving that lightning does
sometimes strike the same place twice,
Michael sealed the deal with his super-sur-
prising second win, five weeks later.

On that fateful Friday day dozens of curi-
ous onlookers flocked to Wendy’s at the
Mall at Marathon to deposit their last
minute entries, and see first-hand who would
walk away 10K richer courtesy of Wendy’s







CURIOUS CUSTOMERS queue pies just une will
win the coveted 10K prize.

and Coca Cola.

While the drive thru and in-store staff
kept the queues moving at a record pace,
spectators enjoyed an exciting afternoon

SEE page twenty









THE TRIPLE COMBO EATING contest heats up as the ladies chow down.





LUCKY CUSTOMER wins Boss Gift Certificate in “Pop The Balloon”

contest.



* Galeries Chain Tee dtr

Toast pry Wiha Bee cunect month period
bo reneae the Sole pice

Paces and avelinity seabed to cunge
woe! nobes, Fleets call le cae.



ma
EAU











NAUGHTY (94.4 FM) concedes defeat to fellow deejay Giles (Spirit 92.5) in the hilarious “Dueling Deejays”
Hula Hoop spin off.

Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday - 20th, 21st & 22nd af July‘'10
(Between 10:00 am to 6:00 pm)

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Gold Earrings, Neckaces, Tie Tacks,
Rings, Old Wedding Rings,

Gold Chains, Bracelets,
or other Gold Items.





Your old Gold Jewelry could
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Highest CA$H Paid!
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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE









PROVING She can “out eat them all’, D’Rekell sports her prize: a state-
of-the-art I-Pod Touch.

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
and TRUCKS

ee
CAR SALES ACCEPTED

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01 DAEWOO NUBIRA
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OPEN: Mon to Fri 8:30am - 5:30pm ° Sat 8:30am - 12:30pm





pom




reer

LOCAL NEWS

a

ne





LOVELY LITTLE LOGAN points out her favourite promotion.

Michael Davis beats odds to win 11K with Wendy’s & Coca Cola

FROM page 19

filled with free treats, prizes
and surprises. Festivities
included a hilarious “Duel-
ing Deejays” Hula Hoop
spin off between Inigo
(Naughty) of More 94.9FM
and Giles (The G-Juice
Guy) of Spirit 92.5; a Triple
Combo Eating Contest; free
face painting by Seahorse
Face Painting; and numer-
ous promotional giveaways
from Coca Cola.

As an added bonus cus-
tomers making a purchase
were able to participate in
a game of “Pop The Bal-
loon” to win gift certificates
from Bani Shoe Warehouse;
Bahamas Office and School
Supplies (BOSS); The Work
Shop (Signature Brows By
Janine) and Marco’s Pizza.
Additional prizes included

LAUNCH WORKSHOP FOR THE INTRODUCTION OF A
DRIVERS INSTRUCTOR'S MANUAL FOR THE BAHAMAS







f.
oe 2

I-Tune Cards, an I-Pod
Touch, Wendy’s meal
vouchers; and six packs of
Coca Cola.

Michael says that he and
the family were practically
glued to the radio as More



i =
CUSTOMERS relax and enjoy the day’s events.



94.9FM and Spirit 92.5FM,
(promotional partners)
broadcasted live from the
10K drawing.

After four ineligible tick-
ets were drawn, Michael
heard his name announced,

and there was instant rejoic-
ing and celebrating in the
Davis yard. Although this
was the win he’d been
patiently waiting on,
Michael admitted he had to
see the cheque with his
name on it to really believe
the cash was his. When
asked about his wife’s reac-
tion, Michael chuckled and
said “she told me to bring
the cheque straight home.”

Following his historic dou-
ble win, Michael was flown
to Nassau to redeem his
prize. Michael who works in
Freeport as a Bellman, says
this cash windfall will allow
him to bring his bills current,
put away money to cover
back to school expenses, and
with the remaining funds a
smiling Michael says he and
the wife will “party like
Rock Stars!”

The Road Traffic Department is to hold a Launch Workshop
for the introduction of a Driver Instructor's Manual for The
Bahamas. The launch will be held at Workers House on the
12" August 2010 between 9.0am and 5.0pm.

Participation at the workshop is aimed at all driving
schools and instructors who are presently teaching
learners drivers how to drive and those persons who wish
to establish driving schools or become driving instructors.

Interested persons are invited to register for attendance at
the workshop by submitting their name and contact details
to the Transportation Policy and Planning Unit at the
following address

Transportation Policy and Planning Unit
PO Box N Box 1615
Pitt Road
Nassau Street
Nassau N.P.,
Tel: (242) 328 4825/6

The number of attendees is restricted to a first come first
serve basis. In the event that the workshop is over
subscribed it is anticipated that further workshops will be
held in the future.

The latest submission date for registration is 20" July 2010



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Drink up and redeem a FREE
Maxwell House Coffee Mug!

Just bring your store receipt, dated after
July 8, for TWO 8 oz jars of Maxwell
House Coffee or ONE 8 oz jar and

ONE 8 oz jar of Sanka Coffee to

The d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.

Offer good while supplies last.

3Â¥ The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.
Palmdale, 677-144

ote

ver













THE TRIBUNE

UU



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



BAHAMIAN ee
residential and
commercial cus- |
tomers should
see a slight
reduction in the
fuel surcharge
component of
their Bahamas
Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC)
bills due to an
improved power generating
mix, the minister responsible
telling Tribune Business that
the state-owned supplier had
“made some remarkable
progress in the last several
months”.

Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, said he had
been informed that both the

SEE page 11B







DEVEAUX





e

I

THURSDAY, JULY 22



— ' :





, 2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

BEC fuel surcharge
reduction awaited

* Minister says improved
power generation mix
should result in lower
surcharge for business
and residential customers

* BEC ‘makes remarkable
progress in the last several
months’, with Abaco and
Eleuthera plants set to
come on line in 60 days

* Waste-to-energy plant
construction would take
36 months, once approved

* ‘The dark days are not
completely behind us, but
we have some headroom
and can see a glimmer
of light at the end
of the tunnel’

Agent targets $4m
in extra business
from new branch

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LEADING Bahamian
insurance agency yesterday
said it hoped to generate some
$4 million in new business
within five years of opening
its new Carmichael service
centre next month, a project
involving a $450,000 invest-
ment in 2,000 square feet
premises at Benchmark
(Bahamas) first real estate
development.

John Dunkley, president
and managing director of Nas-
sau Underwriters Brokers &
Agents (NUA), told Tribune
Business that the company
had been looking to establish a
physical presence in the
Carmichael area for some
eight years, and after finding
the right opportunity hoped
to attract new business from
both residential and commer-
cial clients.

“We’re projecting, over a

Nassau Underwriters
says $450k investment
in Carmichael service
centre, set for August
opening, set to grab
substantial new
business and market
share within five years

five-year period, to hopefully
get up to an amount of $4 mil-
lion in new business,” Mr
Dunkley said. “I think it’s a
good opportunity to perhaps
grab more market share and
new business.

“We've been looking at the
Carmichael area for a long
time. We’re going to set up a
service centre there because
it’s fast growing, and we want
to become part of that com-
munity and make it more con-

SEE page 5B

Licencees urged: ‘Lead
the charge to rejuvenate’
Freeport city

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority’s (GBPA) 3,000
licencees were yesterday chal-
lenged to “pull together and
lead the charge” to attract new
investors to Freeport and revi-
talise the city’s economy, with
the GBPA having become
soley a ‘regulator or city man-
ager’.

Acknowledging that
Freeport was enduring “one
of its bleakest times” econom-
ically, following the loss of 800
jobs with the 2004 closure of
the Royal Oasis, Carey
Leonard, the former GBPA
in-house counsel, told the
Rotary Club of Grand
Bahama Sunrise yesterday
that the city’s economic devel-

Former GBPA in-house
counsel says Port Authority's
role now confined to that of
regulator, and city’s private
sector businesses must

lead drive to renegotiate
Hawksbill Creek Agreement

opment “requires everyone to
be involved”.

Calling for a “new strategy
to rejuvenate Freeport”, Mr
Leonard said this could only
succeed with the full involve-
ment of the GBPA’s licencees,
adding that they - rather than
the GBPA - would have to
lead any negotiations with the

SEE page 10B

Discussions on Hawksbill Creek
amendments ‘must start now’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

NEGOTIATIONS over
necessary amendments to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
“must start now”, the former
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty (GBPA) in-house counsel
warned yesterday, because this
nation’s move to obtain full
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) membership could
block any changes.

Urging the GBPA’s 3,000
licencees to lead the push for
amendments to the agreement

Former GBPA attorney says
impending WTO membership
could block needed changes
to Freeport’s foundation,
adding that focus should
not be on real property
tax benefit expiration

upon which Freeport was
founded, Carey Leonard, in
an address to the Rotary Club
of Grand Bahama Sunrise,

SEE page 8B



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S73m CLICO asset’s
missing accounts

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he real estate

development

that accounts for

63 per cent of

insolvent insurer
CLICO (Bahamas) assets has
been placed in Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection to pre-
vent its seizure by the US
Internal Revenue Service
(IRS) and other tax authori-
ties, its Bahamian liquidator
revealing that he has been
unable to locate tax and
accounting records for the pro-
ject since 2005.

In a batch of documents
obtained by Tribune Business
from the US bankruptcy court
in southern Florida, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez, the CLICO
(Bahamas) and CLICO Enter-
prises liquidator, who is also
acting as Wellington Preserve

* US real estate project that accounts for 63 per cent of
insolvent insurer’s assets in Chapter 11 to prevent it being
seized by IRS and others to settle $3m-plus tax debts
* Bahamian liquidator unable to find tax returns and accounting records
for 2006-2009, and blasts CLICO bosses for lack of co-operation
* Over $500k owed to IRS, and $2.8m in real estate taxes to
Palm Beach County, in addition to $73m CLICO debt

Corporation’s debtor-in-pos-
session, reveals that apart from
the $73 million owed to the
latter Bahamian company, the
project also owes a significant
unknown sum to the IRS plus
$2.849 million in real estate
taxes to Palm Beach County.

Wellington Preserve, which
is CLICO Enterprises (and
therefore CLICO Bahamas)
main asset, was placed in
Chapter 11 to prevent the

development from being
seized by its creditors - chiefly
the IRS and Palm Beach
County - both of which have
“priority unsecured claims”
over the real estate develop-
ment.

In his reports to the US
court, Mr Gomez blasted
Lawrence Duprey, owner of
CLICO (Bahamas) Trinidadi-
an parent, CL Financial, and
Karen-Ann Gardier, former

head of CLICO (Bahamas),
for not providing any assis-
tance to him in relation to
Wellington Preserve, despite
being listed as the project’s
officers when it was placed
into Chapter 11.

“After diligent research,
Gomez has been unable to
locate any tax returns for
[Wellington Preserve] more

SEE page 5B

Bahamas First beats Budget by 3% on premium

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First’s gross



written premiums from its
Bahamian business are 3 per
cent ahead of Budget for the
2010 year-to-date, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with its investment income
also trending ahead of 2009
levels.

Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First Holdings’ president and
chief executive, said the gen-
eral insurance carrier’s Board
was set to meet later this year
to assess further expansion
possibilities in the Caribbean,
following its recent acquisition
of a 75 per cent majority equi-
ty stake in Sagicor General
(Cayman).

And he added that the com-
pany was also set to meet with
the global insurance industry’s
leading credit rating agency,
A. M. Best, “in the next four
weeks” in a bid to have the
‘watch with negative implica-
tions’, which was placed upon
Bahamas First Holdings after
the acquisition announcement,
removed.

“On a year-to-date basis, in
terms of Bahamas First Hold-
ings’ Bahamas business alone,
taking gross premiums into
account we’re up by 3 per cent
on Budget,” Mr Ward told
Tribune Business. “We were
basically hoping to hold our
own, given the current envi-
ronment. That’s what the
expectations were, and
whether this performance per-
tains for the rest of the year is
open to question.

“T can also tell you that at
this stage of the game, our
investment income is better
than it was at the same point
last year.”

Underwriting performance
and claims trends were on par
with 2009, Mr Ward said,
although there had been “a
slight uptick” in motor vehi-
cle claims. He added that
Bahamas First Holdings had
been “surprised” about the
level of suspected fraudulent
claims it had received, as they
were lower for both 2009 and

2010 year-to-date than had
been expected.

Looking ahead for the
remainder of 2010, the
Bahamas First Holdings pres-
ident said: “This year looks
just as good as last year on a
number of different fronts, and
barring any major catastroph-
ic event, we expect we’ll be
able to mirror - if not improve
- the result we achieved in
2009.”

As for the A. M. Best situa-
tion, Mr Ward said: “We’re
looking to get a meeting with
them very shortly, as part of
our annual review. We hope
to meet with them, certainly
in the next four weeks.”

The ‘watch with negative
implications’ had been placed
on Bahamas First following
confirmation of its deal, first
revealed exclusively by Tri-
bune Business, to acquire Sagi-
cor General (Cayman), but
Bahamas First said its 2009

SEE page 4B





PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010
Browsing the Internet at your leisure

THE intense competition between Netscape
and Internet Explorer in the late 1990s ended
with the World Wide Web dominated by one
browser. At its height, Internet Explorer was
used by an estimated 95 per cent of online
users. There were many reasons Explorer took
over, one of them being that it was offered free
with Windows, the most common operating
system. However, as time went on webmasters
wrote their web pages without checking for
errors, except by testing them in Internet
Explorer. As the smaller browsers started
emerging, the heavyweights battled for domi-
nance and competition kept innovation moving.
End result: all browsers improved and everyone
won.

Apparently, many people are not clear as to
the difference between a browser and a search
engine. While they are both family, they serve
different roles and work together beautifully.
Before we outline the various search engines,
let’s firstly arm ourselves with their role.

What is a Browser?

Merriam-Webster's dictionary defines a web
browser as a computer program used for access-
ing sites or information on a network (such as
the World Wide Web). This is an accurate
description, but search engines are the appli-
cation that helps find web pages. Simply put, a
Web Browser is a program and a Search Engine
is an application (function).

The main reason a person uses a web brows-
er is to view web pages on the Internet.
Browsers require a connection to the Internet
(through a cable modem, or a direct Ethernet
connection). Additionally, a Browser allows
users to employ embedded links (hypertext)
to jump from a word or image instantly to
another set of data.

How does a Browser

Retrieve a Web Page?

The browser application retrieves codes, usu-
ally written in HTML (HyperText Markup Lan-
guage) and/or another language, from a web
server, interprets this code and renders (dis-
plays) it as a web page for viewing. Usually,
user interaction is needed to tell the browser
what web site or web page the person would
like to view. One way this is done is via the
browser's address bar.

The web address or URL (Uniform Resource
Locator), which you type into the browser's
address bar, tells the browser where to obtain a
page from. For example, let's say you typed
the following URL into the browser's address
bar: http://about.com/compute/. In this case,
you're attempting to reach the Computing and
Technology section of About.com. The brows-
er looks at this particular URL in two main
sections. The first is the protocol, which in the
address shown is "http://". HTTP, which stands
for (HyperText Transfer Protocol), is the stan-
dard protocol used to request and transmit files
on the Internet, mostly web pages and their
respective components.

BUY



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

’ The Art
of Graphix

ya Wate etynicrn

It now looks at "about.com", which tells the
browser the location of the web server it needs
to retrieve the page from. Once it reaches this
web server, it retrieves the index page of the
"/compute" directory. Once this page is
retrieved by the browser, it is interpreted and
rendered in the browser's main window for you
to view. Throughout this article you will uncov-
er information on different styles of browser,
different purposes and much more. Most of us
don't desire twenty 20 search engines, but actu-
ally one that delivers three key features:



Relevant results: Results you are actually
interested in.

Order: Uncluttered, easy to read interface.
Helpfulness: Helpful options to broaden or
tighten a search

With these criteria, these search engines
should meet 99 per cent of the searching needs
of a regular, everyday user. Below is a list of
user favorites with many different styles, and
with their own nuances.

Clusty (aka 'Yippy'): Clusty is a deep web
engine that searches other search engines.
Unlike the regular Web, which is indexed by
robot spider programs, Deep Web pages are
usually harder to locate by conventional search.
That's where Clusty becomes very useful. If
you are searching for obscure hobby interest
blogs, obscure government information, tough-
to-find obscure news, academic research and
otherwise-obscure content, then Clusty is your
tool.

Bing: Bing is Microsoft's attempt at unseating
Google. Bing used to be MSN search until it
was updated in summer 2009. Publicised as a
‘decision engine’, Bing tries to support research-
ing by offering suggestions in the leftmost col-
umn, while also offering various search options
across the top screen. Is ‘Bing’ dethroning
Google in the near future?. Certainly not, but
Bing is definitely worth a try.

Ask (aka 'Ask Jeeves'): The Ask/AJ/Ask
Jeeves search engine is a long-time name in
the World Wide Web. The super-clean interface
rivals the other major search engines, and the
search options are as good as Google, Bing or
DuckDuckGo. The results groupings are what
really make Ask.com stand out. The presenta-
tion 1s arguably cleaner and easier to read than
Google, Yahoo! or Bing, and the results groups

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seem to be more relevant. Decide for yourself.
Give Ask.com a whirl and compare it to the
other search engines you prefer.

Mahalo: Mahalo is the one 'human-pow-
ered’ search site in this list, employing a com-
mittee of editors to manually sift and vet thou-
sands of pieces of content. This means you'll get
fewer Mahalo hit results than you will get at
Bing or Google.

But it also means that most Mahalo results
have a higher quality of content and relevance
(as best as human editors can judge). Mahalo
also offers regular web searching in addition
to asking questions. Depending on which of the
two search boxes you use at Mahalo, you will
either get direct content topic hits or suggested
answers to your question.

The Internet Archive: The Internet archive is
a favourite destination for long-time Web
lovers. The Archive has been taking snapshots
of the entire World Wide Web for years now,
allowing you and me to travel back in time to
see what a web page looked like in 1999, or
what the news was like around Hurricane Kat-
rina in 2005. You won't visit the Archive daily,
like you would Google, Yahoo or Bing, but
when you do, try this search site.

Cuil (pronounced 'cool'): This search engine
was founded by ex-Google staff. It is spartan,
like Google and DuckDuckGo, but there are
differences. Cuil uses a column format like a
newspaper, and it offers both tabled and
columned groups to help searching. The results
are not ranked in the same current events/pop-
ularity sequence that Google is known for, but
Cuil.com can really be helpful in choosing
research directions when you are just discov-
ering a topic for the first time.

Duck Duck Go: At first, DuckDuckGo.com
looks like Google, but there are many sub-
tleties that make this spartan search engine dif-
ferent. DuckDuckGo has some features, such as
‘zero-click' information (all your answers are
found on the first results page). DuckDuckgo
offers disambiguation prompts (helping to clar-
ify what question you are really asking). And
the ad spam is much less than Google. Give
DuckDuckGo.com a try... you might really like
this clean and simple search engine. (This is one
of my favorites).

Webopedia: Webopedia is one of the most
useful websites on the World Wide Web, as it is
an encyclopaedic resource dedicated to search-
ing techno terminology and computer defini-
tions. Teach yourself what 'domain name sys-
tem’, is as itis a perfect resource for non-tech-
nical users.

Yahoo: Yahoo! is several things: It is a search
engine, a news aggregator, a shopping centre, an
e-mail-box, a travel directory, a horoscope and
games centre, and more. This 'web portal’

Cal

THE TRIBUNE

breadth of choice makes this it a very helpful
site for Internet beginners. Searching the Web
should also be about discovery and exploration,
and Yahoo! delivers that in wholesale quanti-
ties.

Google: Google is the undisputed king of
‘spartan searching’. While it doesn't offer all the
shopping features of Yahoo, Google is fast, rel-
evant and the largest single catalogue of Web
pages available today. Make sure you try the
Google ‘images’, ‘maps’ and ‘news’ features...
they are outstanding services for locating pho-
tos, geographic directions and news headlines.
However, to see a video tutorial on browsers,
link to:
http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/10/what-
is-browser.html

Some other popular web browsers include
Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari. Firefox
and Safari are available for both Windows and
Mac computers, while Internet Explorer is no
longer being developed for the Mac. There are
many alternative browsers available if you do
not wish to use those described, but if you have
an older computer that cannot run current
browsers, you might consider downloading an
older version or an alternate browser.

Also, Lynx is a text-only browser that lets
you view web documents, but doesn't support
viewing graphical images or play sound and
video files. It is useful if you have a slow or
restricted connection to the Internet, or if your
computer hardware doesn't support multimedia
features. Lynx does not support a mouse, so
you must enter all your selections with the key-
board, using arrow keys to move through menus
and links. Lynx is convenient for modem users
because it requires less information transfer
than graphical browsers that load large multi-
media files. Users with network connections
(such as Ethernet cards), for whom transmission
time is less of a concern, may prefer to use
graphical browsers such as Firefox or Internet
Explorer.

Now that we’ve learnt that our choice of
browsing is limitless, everyone wins. I hope
these tips were helpful, so until we meet again,
play a little, have fun and stay on top of your
game!

NB: The author welcomes feedback at:
deedee2111@hotmail.com

READER FEEDBACK

To: The Art of Graphics

Deidre M. Bastian

From: Ifferguson@gmail.com

Ms Bastian, I am a frequent reader of your
column every Thursday; The Art of Grahics.
The articles are well written and very knowl-
edgeable. I particularly enjoyed the article on
Presenting the best of yourself - Presentations" .
If you have a chance could you publish that
one again please? This is also good for Family
Islanders who are not able to receive this type
of computer/Graphic training. Keep up the
good work.

- ::WITH SPECIAL PERFORMERS::

’ Tyanna Love and AnastarmigvAnagquway

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THE TRIBUNE

NIB sees $18.8m
benefit/contribution junior passes
deficit in 2009

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business sReporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NATIONAL Insur-
ance Board (NIB) a deficit
between contributions and
benefit pay-Outs for the first
time in hits history in 2009,
with an $18.8 million gap
resulting from the unemploy-
ment benefit implemented last
year, according to its annual
report.

The report revealed that
while contributions increased 3
per cent over the previous year
and totaled $159.9 million in
2009, benefit expenditure
increased 17 per cent to total
$178.7 million.

The unemployment benefit

fund created in the 2009 sec-
ond quarter of 2009 drained
NIB of more than $20 million,
which was transferred from its
internal medical fund, in just
eight months, as unemploy-
ment grew due to the coun-
try’s declining economy.

Unemployment benefit pay-
ments represented 52.9 per
cent of total payments in 2009,
while 25.6 per cent were due
to “sickness”, 17.8 per cent to
maternity and 3.7 per cent to
Injury.

Despite this negative gap in
contributions versus benefits,
NIB saw a record amount of
contributions collected in 2009,
even while the number of
“contributing employers and
the average amount due from

EMPLOYMENT

them were lower than 2008”.

Director of NIB, Algernon
Cargill, in his director’s report,
attributed the increase in con-
tribution collections to a rise in
compliance efforts “designed
to ensure that employers kept
up with their current contri-
bution payment”.

Major

NIB began a major crack-
down on firms that had delin-
quent payments, some owing
several years’ worth, prose-
cuting some companies and
entering into payment agree-
ments with those who vowed
to become compliant.

According to Mr Cargill,
legal action against a business

was the last recourse for NIB
when contributions were
owed.

NIB saw a 96 per cent
reduction in its unemployment
benefit payments year-on-year
for June, according to its latest
figures.

The minister responsible for
labour, Dion Foulkes, said
recently that unemployment
levels in the country are now
“stable” and that there have
been no major lay-offs recent-

This, along with the ear-
marked increases in NIB ben-
efit contributions, could
realign the negative contribu-
tion/benefit payment gap
caused by the high unemploy-
ment numbers of 2009.

LEGAL NOTICE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 3B

Credit Suisse

the Series 7

A JUNIOR securities gen-
eralist at Credit Suisse AG’s
Nassau branch, Amelia
Ritchie, has passed the Series
7 Exam in the US after study-
ing with the Nassau-based
Securities Training Institute
(STI).

STI offers workshops for
the Series 7, Series 6 and the
Canadian Securities Course,
along with various one-day
workshops catering to finan-
cial service professionals.











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NOTICE

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FRIDAY 23"? July, 2010
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We regret any inconvenience
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MANAGEMENT



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ATL Utes

FREEPORT
Six-Plex, Apartment Building, on Lot

#12, Black #86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R, Freeport Grand
Bahama. Five | bed |bath units and One 4
bed 2 bath unit. Appraised (a) $706,347 as
at January 9, 2009

NEW PROVIDENCE

Three Apartment Buildings

Lot #1, 58 & 49

Ferguson Terrace off Malcolm Road
Buildings A & B - Two duplexes
comprising two bedrooms, one bathroom,
living’dining room é& kitchen

Building C: triplex comprising 2-Bedrooms
and 1-Bathroom Apartments. Appraised (a)
ST00,000 as at August 20, 2009

Vacant Land — Hill Top

Lot 412, Orange Hill # | Subdivision
27,377 sq. ft. and about 1.0417 miles west
of Blake Road, or 1" Corner left after
Kisskadee Dr. West Bay Street property
located (@) southern end of road reservation.
Appraised (a) $493,000 as at March 18,
2010

ABACO

Creal Guana Cay, Abaco Cays

Colonial Style Commercial Building
situates in the vicinity of the Public Dock

the settlement of Guana Cay, Appraisal
TBA.

Commercial Complex Includes 5 Octagon
Shape Buildings. Marsh Harbour Abaco,
situated on approximately 8.7605 f piece
of property on East Bay Street



Four Plex, Robinson Close Of McKinney
Drive, Carmichael Road, on a portion of
land Contaming 11,747 sq ft, (3) Two bed
] bath & (1) One bed, 1 bath. Appratsal
TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot #4 Block # 1, Winton Heights
Subdivision comprising of 15,589 sq fi.
Appraisal TRA

Multi Purpose Commercial Building
(known as Faith Convention Center)
nestles on approximately 2.4 acres of land,
situated in the town of Marsh Harbour on
the island of Abaco, Appraisal THA.



EXUMA

Two Storey Commercial Building
George Town Exuma

4.2 bed | bath apartment | bed | bath
apartment on the top floor, bottom floor
house's five retail/offices spaces,
Appraised TBA.

Single Family Residence

Bahama Island Beach Section 3, Little
Exuma Bahamas1974 sq ft building
comprising of 6 bed, 2 bath on
approximately 19,700 sq fl of property.

ELEL THERA

A single storey Commercial Building
situated on Lot # 90-D Approximately
42.616 sq ft. in the settlement of Lower
Bogue on the Island of Eleuthera,
Appraised TBA.

A vacant single Storey Structure Building
situated on Lot # 90-F Approximately
27,736 sq ft. in the settement of Lower
Bogue on the Island of Eleuthera,
Appraised TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot # 9140, Approximately 18,826 sq ft. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot # 90-B, Approximately 22,376 sq fi. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

Three Incomplete Villas situated on Lot
17380 Bahama Sound #18 Subdivision,
Near the Township of George Town,
Exuma Bahamas. Appraised TBA.



Asingle storey Triplex Building (fully
rented) situated on Lot # 9-A
approximately 17,807 sq ft. in the
settlement of Lower Bogue on the Island of

Eleuthera, Appraised TBA,

Vacant Land

Lot # 90-E, Approximately 16,52 1sq ft. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot # 90-C, Approximately 21,430 sq ft. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

For conditions of sale and any other information,
please contact:
THE COMMERCIAL CREDIT COLLECTION UNIT
@502-1320/356-1685
502-0929/356-1608

Nassau,

Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offer in writing
addressed to:
THE COMMERCIAL CREDIT COLLECTION UNIT
P..O.. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010
Bahamas First
beats Budget by

% ON premium

FROM page 1B

year-end solvency ratio of 140

per cent, compared to 129 per
cent the year before, stood the
company in good stead to

THE TRIBUNE

retain its A-(Excellent) rating.
“Tt is actually performing
based on expectation for the







half-year point,” Mr Ward told
Tribune Business of Bahamas
First Holdings’ Cayman acqui-
sition. “We expect it to be
accretive to earnings immedi-
ately, so during 2010 we expect
it to add positively to the bot-
tom line returns of Bahamas
First Holdings. We have every
expectation to believe that will
be met.”

Asked whether Bahamas
First Holdings was eyeing fur-
ther expansion into the
Caribbean, its president
replied: “The Board will meet
to decide that particular issue
later this year, so in the mean-
time we will just keep our eyes
out for opportunities.”

Holdings

Bahamas First Holdings is
a company that never stands
still, and is always on the look
out for acquisition and growth
opportunities, as evidenced by
its historical market.

Acknowledging that the
Bahamian general insurance
market was relatively mature,
and effectively a market share
battle, with opportunities for
organic growth limited, Mr
Ward said these factors meant
there were limited possibili-
ties for Bahamas First Hold-
ings locally.

“We expect that opportuni-
ties for growth in the Bahamas
are going to be fairly limited
for Bahamas First, in particu-
lar, as while there are no laws
pertaining to monopolies and
competition as it relates to a
company of our size, one has
to understand it might be part
of the regulatory landscape,
and as such opportunities for
growth in the Bahamas will be
limited,” Mr Ward told Tri-
bune Business.

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Fertilien Erdly of
Bailey Town, Bimini, Bahamas, is appying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within ea days from the 15
day of July, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

BPS el

Tal







PCS Cem GR amet MINIT at) Fier edema

Le cea



ete a

° é
Business Brokers Ps,
Ks

Hotel $4,900,000
FastFood Franchise $590,000
Apparel Stores SETURL)
SIM Se Kat R eile)
Taxi Cab Advertising $110,000
Cosmetics Wholesaler $25,000

RES SOCIUS

RXem ice MI A A AR eole UReoli a

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Fo

SSSEE]E————

Career Opportunity

Sales Executive

We at DHL Express Bahamas are seeking to expand aggressively in the marketplace and are seeking
a highly driven, dynamic and results oriented Sales Executive to promote and sell DHL services.
The ideal candidate will lead direct sales in a defined territory, identifying business opportunities
and assessing customer needs to generate revenue on new business and existing accounts.

MINIMUM OUALIFICATIONS:
5 years sales success in a service industry
Demonstrated ability to infiltrate senior customer levels and represent value.
Excellent interpersonal communication & probing skills, high aptitude and
initiative for follow-up.
Customer service orientation.
Strong business, courier and/or supply chain management knowledge.
Analytical and problem solving skills. Knowledge of technology applications in
business.
Demonstrated drive, persistence & initiative.
Implemented measurements & strategies to attain goals.
Proven planning, organizational, time and paper management skills.
Demonstrated presentation skills.
Team player.
Proficient with technical computer software skills (Microsoft).

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
BS/BA in related discipline

This is a challenging job opportunity with the world’s leading provider of transportation services.
Our commitment to excellence and team spirit is a substantial element of our company’s culture.

Send your application and resume no later than Saturday, July 24, 2010 via email to
michele.louden@dhl.com referencing Sales Executive Bahamas in the subject line.
or to:

HR Department

DHL Express Bahamas

Island Traders Building

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

recent than 2005,” the Baker
Tilly Gomez accountant and
partner said in a court filing
by his attorneys.
“Moreover, he has been
unable to locate books and
records for [Wellington Pre-
serve] since 2005. This will
necessitate the retention of
accountants for [Wellington
Preserve] in order to recon-
struct the books and records
and file the necessary returns.”
Due to the absence of any
books and records for the
years 2006-2009, Mr Gomez
had been forced to rely on
third parties to provide infor-
mation on CLICO (Bahamas)
debts, “as he has been unable
to interview the former offi-
cers, Lawrence Duprey and
Karen-Ann Gardier, having
received no co-operation from
them at all. He is not aware
of their current location”.
The implication of all this
for CLICO (Bahamas) policy-
holders and Bahamian credi-
tors is that the return of their
monies might be further
delayed, as the liquidator will
have to work out and through
all the potential tax liabilities
and creditor claims.
Wellington Preseve’s IRS
liabilities were unknown, as it
had not filed any tax returns

$73m CLICO asset’s
missing accounts

since 2005, and the US federal
tax authority was said be court
filings to be “holding over
$50,000 in unapplied payments
since returns were never filed
from which it could determine
where to apply the money”.

“Best estimate at this time is
that IRS may be owed
$500,000 or more,” the court
filings said, adding: “Ad val-
orem real estate taxes are
$2.85 million through 2009,
accruing at approximately $1.5
million per year.”

Wellington Preserve was put
into Chapter 11 due to its
inability to pay these real
estate taxes, worth at least $3
million, plus a $1.45 million
judgment against it (later set-
tled) and other debts owed.
Apart from the $73 million
owed to CLICO Enterprises,
some $720,000 was due to
CLICO (Bahamas) in return
for settling a mortgage over
Wellington Preserve, while
there were some $200,000 in
other development-related
claims.

The US courts gave Mr
Gomez some 180 days, until
December 21, 2010, to pro-
duce Wellington Preserve’s tax
returns.

The last financial statements
for Wellington Preserve, which
were unaudited, showed it

having $127 million worth of
investment property on its
books in January 2009, but Mr
Gomez said the property "val-
ued on an ‘as is’ basis today is
worth approximately $62 mil-
lion".

Explaining that the project
consisted of 80 residential lots
and equestrian amenities, plus
commercial sites, on a 523-acre
site, Mr Gomez said: "It was
previously estimated that the
project required a substantial
cash injection of a minimum
$42 million to fund the devel-
opment before it could be rea-
sonably presented for sale.
The financing is not yet in
place, and in my opinion
would not be an option.”

The liquidator has been in
lengthy negotiations with the
Hines Group, a major inter-
national real estate develop-
ment firm, for the sale of
Wellington Preserve, but a
deal appears not to have been
concluded yet.

Maximising its sales price is
vital to ensuring that CLICO
(Bahamas) policyholders and
creditors recover the sums due
to them, but at the moment
the insolvent Bahamian life
and health insurer has total
assets of some $50.865 million,
with liabilities standing at
$65.259 million.

Agent targets $4m in extra
business from new branch

FROM page 1B

venient for customers by bringing service to
that area, rather than have them sit in traffic” to

get to our current locations.

And Mr Dunkley added: “We see the oppor-
tunity for new business is there in such a thriv-
ing community, both private and commercial

business.”

He told Tribune Business that NUA’s new
customer service centre would be located in
Benchmark (Bahamas) new commercial com-
plex at the corner of Carmichael and Fire Trail
Roads, which has a Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national tenant as the ‘anchor’.

Mr Dunkley said the service centre, which is
set for an August 2010 opening, would be

staffed by employees from NUA’s existing net-
work initially, as the company wanted to mon-

itor business levels and demand “very close-

ly”. He acknowledged that NUA would prob-
ably hire new staff “down the road”, the initial
complement featuring four persons.

The new service centre will initially use 75 per

cent of the 2,000 square feet it has rented, giv-
ing NUA an option to expand depending on
business levels.

“We’ve budgeted for roughly about $450,000
to build it and get all the other required services

in place,” Mr Dunkley added.

DISCONNECTION NOTICE

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation wishes to advise
that effective July 19, 2010, it will commence Island-
Wide Electricity service disconnections of all
consumer accounts with overdue balances inclusive
of accounts of customers who have entered into
payment arrangements with BEC but are failing to
honor their commitments.

The public is also advised that all overdue payments
should be made directly to the Corporation.

Consumers whose account(s) are not overdue can
make payment(s) directly to the Corporation or over
the counter at the nearest Scotiabank, FirstCaribbean,
Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal Bank and RBC
Finco. You can also pay your electricity bill online by
logging on to your online accounts at Scotiabank,
FirstCaribbean, Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal

Bank and RBC Finco,

Please call 302-1679 or 302-1685 should you have any

queries.



Visit us at WWW.my-bec.com

PUBLIC NOTICE

BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION

Registrar

The following persons have been remowed from The Register of Real Estate Browers and Salesmen for

failure to pay their annual fees for licensing and membership in the Bahamas Real Estate Association
within six months after the date on which the fees became payable. (Section 32 (1) (b) Real Estate
(Brokers and Salesman), Chapter 171). Without valid licenses, these persons cannot engage in the

practice of real estate business (Section 4 (1) (a)(b) and [2) Real Estate (Brokers and Salesman], Chapter

171}.

FIRST NAME © LAST NAME

auth Albury
Gurney 5. Armstrong
Glenn Bannister
Leroy P. Bell
Ternaille
Clement
Charles A
Janine
irk D,
Sharel
Selena
lisa Faith

Bunows
Butler
Carey
Carey
Carey
Carter
Cartwright
Cassar
Cleare
Clarke
Draklay-Smith
Dawkins
rraser
Glinton
Hanna

Perry J,
Arianna T.
Therese
Dolly
Astrid 8,
Byron
Laverde

Henderson
Jones-Dixon
Knowles
Knowles
Know les
Know les

Donna
Kirk Antoine
Felicity
Gavin
Geoffrey W.
Glenardo
Reginald §.
Michael Knowles
MargaretP, Lee
Henry Lous
Christopher Louis
Berard L. Miller
joan C. Nealy
Pinder
Plummer
Pyirom
Roberts
Rose
Rubenstein
Sams
Sands

Know les

Sharon Erma
Elizabeth

Paul

Rosita

Trevor

Nicole

Sarah

Frances 4,

fill Smnith

Smith

srnith

Srnith

Storr
Sweeting
Sylvan-Ferrier

Donna
Donald H.
Cayton
Annstacia
Sandra
Lecinea
Roscoe
Jennifer
juet
Douglas
Angelo

Thompson
Treco
Turner
Turnquest
Turnquest

Signed: Registrar of Real Estate

P.O. BOX

P.O. Box AB-20473
P.O. Bax 55-5230)
General Delivery
P.O. Box Fii91.
P.O. Box FH-14053
P.O. Box N+ 765
P.O. Box Ftd258
General Delivery
P.O. Box C8-11556
PLD. Box F274
P.O. Box $5-19710
P.O. Box 5519282
P.O. Box N-L1B8
P.O. Box N-£953
General Delivery
P.0. Box F-43099
P.O. Box C8-10964
General Delivery
P.O), Box FH-14137

PQ. Box CB-11 74]

P.O. Bow N-9152
P.O, Bow F-80368

P.O. Bow CB-11894

P.O. Bou N-1818
P.O. Box N-10133
P.O. Bom S8-4272

P.O. Bow AB-20113
P.O. Bow AB-20777
P.O. Box (B-11730

P.O, Bow APSS223

P.O. Box CB-11404

6.0, Bow F-42480

P.O. Bow AB-20179
P.O. Bow AB-22705

P.O. Box N-2371
General Delivery

P.O. Box CB-11605

General Delivery

P.O. Bow AB-22705
P.O. Bom AB-22705

P.O. Box L- 30-
105

P.O, Bow N-9349
P.O. Bow N-9523
General Delivery
General Delivery

P.O. Box CB-L2372

P.O. Bow 85-5270
P.O. Bow - 20404
P.O, Bow 55-6285
General Delivery
P.O. Bow N-10411
P.O. Bow N-B408

TOWN/DISTRICT

Marsh Harbour
Nassau
Matthew Town,
Freaport
Nassau

Nassau
Freaport
Nassau

Nassau
Freaport
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau
Freaport
Nassau

Rock Sound
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau
Freeport
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Rock Sound
Marsh Harbour
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau
Freeport
Treasure Cay
Green Turtle Cay
Nassau
Harbour Island
Nassau

Nassau

Green Turtle Cay
Guana Cay

Stella Mares
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Marsh Harbour
Nassau

Nassau

Marsh Harbour
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

ISLAND

Abaco

Now Providence
nagua

Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
Eleuthera

New Providence

New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Eleuthera
Abaco

New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Baharia
Abaca

Abaca

New Providence
Bahamas

New Providence
New Providence
Abaca

Abaca

Long Island
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Abaca
New Providence
New Providence
Abaca
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 7B
a ae a

a yy













Banking managers go back to school

WITH recent studies con- _—s cessful companies arerun by company ranks, Bank of the
firming that the most suc- executives who rose through Bahamas International’s top
management went back to
the classroom recently for a
LEGAL NOTICE ‘leaders teaching leadership’
series of workshops.

Managing Director Paul

McWeeney (above far
right), led a session, fol-
lowed by Beverley Far-

quharson, deputy managing
director, (standing, other

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138 (4) of The photo). —

International Business Companies Act, 2000, Notice is _ Intensive workshops

hereby given that:- included local and interna-
tional speakers and creative

(a) PUBLISHING AND BROADCASTING EXCICISCS.

INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is in dissolution;
¢ Also shown (I-r) are Ian

(b) the date of commencement of the dissolution is Thompson, business manag-
June 29, 2010. er, retail credit; Perry
Thompson, manager, collec-
(c) The name of the Liquidator is EDWARD B. tions; Mrs Farquharson;
TURNER of EDWARD B. TURNER & CO. #10 Alaasis Braynen, branch
PETRONA HOUSE, FOWLER STREET OFF manager, Village Road,
EAST BAY STREET, P.O. BOX N-1375, Suzette Darville, assistant
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS. branch manager, Thompson
Boulevard; Gena Brown,
EDWARD B. TURNER assistant manager, human
Liquidator resources and training; and

John Sands, manager,
Grand Bahama Division.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 00141
Common Law and Equity Division

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-
dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959, Chapter 393 Revised Statute
Law of The Bahamas

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY
ISABELLA BIANCA ROSA HARRISON

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY ISABELLA BIANCA
ROSA HARRISON both of Green Court, La Rue Du Douet De Rue, St. Lawrence,
Jersey, Channel Islands, UK, in respect of:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-

dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

The Petitioners in this matter claim to be the owners in fee simple of the said lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
their title of the said lot investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

COPIES of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working hours at:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
(b) The Office of the Administrator, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
(c) The Office of Local Government, Hope Town, Abaco, Bahamas
(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Higgs & Johnson, Ocean Centre, Montagu
Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
adverse claim or claims not recognised in the Petition shall on or before the 30th
day of August, A.D., 2010 file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the
undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the prescribed form verified by
an affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim on or before the 30th day of August, A.D., 2010 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

DATED this 18th day of June, A.D., 2010

Samantha Fox
Messrs. Higgs & Johnson
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioners









Soclety of Trost & Esta
STE ST E Pivectitionars (Bahamas)

The Society of Trast and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

lrviies applicatioes [ora schabarihip fer ons models of he STEP Ciplema program in
Intereatoreal Trus Mar:
Applicant: should meet the follawing antera

© Haboeniaa cilia
Mut howe 2 Founchtion Certificate or bore been offically cocnptca from the
Foundation Cesticate Frege
> Corrente empkreed Un the ue UneeTry en Seong 0 Oe ni he red Lnery

Application fore: shradd be obtaned from STEP Gtahoran af ite adronietrative officer bekrw, ond
subrrationd tagether with the fllewing:

Proof of Aahorrdas citenship icertifier copy peapent
«Coren resume deniling employee! history ad cancer
pon
étude el any aber Gling anuiocs

Coonpleied agplirarteers chaul dé be stented delivered to - FROM page 1B

STEF Bahamas

‘onda 's Hay Corporate Centre, Firat Fleer
Pot Bas Mei Tel

Wane, Aakormas

‘Tel Mea









Deadline for applications ls Augwst 31, 2010

said both extensions of existing
investment incentives - and
new concessions - were
required under it “to meet the
changing economic environ-

While many had viewed
2015 as a key date, because





» KRYS RAMMING & ASSOCIATES

GLOGAL EHNQWLEDGE = LOCAL PERSPECTIVE

Krys Rahming & Associates (Bahamas) Ltd is a newly established provider of
corporate recovery, insolvency, forensic accounting and business advisory services
in the Bahamas. The firm Is affiliated with Krys and Associates (Cayman) Ltd., a
premier provider of corporate recovery, insolvency, forensic accounting and business
advisory services in the Caribbean. We are seeking applications for the below listed
position.

Executive Assistant to the Managing Director

This is a highly demanding and challenging role. The ideal candidate must be able
to demonstrate at a minimum 8 years experience in a fast paced and demanding
environment, working under tight deadlines, in a law firm, accounting or other
professional firm. Computer literacy, effective time management skills, flexibility and
excellent interpersonal skills are essential. Good proficiency in the use of Microsoft
Office Suite, Excel and Outlook is required. A proven ability to be discreet and
professional in all communications is also required.

The Executive Assistant will provide support to Managing Director. Duties and
responsibilities will include, but not be limited to:

Liaise with local and international clients, attorneys and press personnel:
Process confidential internal and external documentation;

Draft routine reports, correspondence, minutes and memoranda
Schedule, coordinate and participate in local and international firm events;
Facilitate and co-ordinate all aspects of business travel:

Management of diary system;

Assisting with marketing efforts and office management

Assisting with time tracking and preparation of client invoices; and

Other general administrative as assigned by the Managing Director.

Extra hours at month-end and occasional evening and weekend work may be required to meet strict
deadlines.

The salary range for this position is dependent on qualifications and experience. In addition, an
attractive benefits package will be offered to the successful candidate.

To apply please email your application to personnel@krysandassoc.com. Interested persons
should apply no later than July 30, 2010.

Krys Rahming & Associates (Bahamas) Ltd



PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

Discussions on
Hawksbill Creek
amendments
‘must start now’

Freeport’s exemption from
real property tax payments
was due to expire on August 4
that year, Mr Leonard said the
Government’s move to secure
full WTO membership for the
Bahamas meant it was imper-
ative to open Hawksbill Creek
Agreement negotiations soon-
er - since the accession
process to the body that over-
seas all rules-based trading
regimes was likely to be com-
pleted earlier.

“ T want to emphasise this,”
said Mr Leonard. “We don’t

have until 2015 to negotiate
any changes to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement. We must
start now.

“The reason for this is that
the Bahamas applied for full
World Trade Organisation
membership last year. The
minister responsible has been
quoted in the press as saying
that he expects the Bahamas
to receive membership in
2012.

“What this means is that we
need to have negotiated, with
the Bahamas government, any

POSITION WANTED
aXe eel a1 Ore] alee (iI

We are looking for a

Ee cow eae eae se ce

manager the financial operations of a 10 year
old company.
aspects of the Accounts office.

Duties will include overseeing al

Must be hands

eT Rees] *) aR seas

esa ra aca ge
finan

communicate well, both orally
a) mes Te) |e

Knowledge fae be
must, Must be fli

able to produce timely
SECC RCen ea ear

ee
em a plus but nota
Bc layepe cis) a][cmre

meet deadlines.
Please write to us at: P.O. Box CB-13526,
if Veen antes stele

Ministry Of Agric



ith en



THE TRIBUNE



amendments to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement by 2012, or
we may find that under WTO
rules no further amendments
are permitted.”

Mr Leonard declined to go
any further on the WTO
angle, but emphasised that
upgrading and amending the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
was vital to Freeport’s eco-
nomic development and
attracting more investment to
revitalise an economy that has
been in doldrums for some six
years.

He pointed out that the ser-
vice charge currently levied on
income-earning Freeport com-
mercial and residential prop-
erties, amounting to a “cou-
ple hundred dollars” per
annum, paled in comparison
to the real property tax pay-
ments that would be required
if this exemption expired and
was never renewed.

“We might complain about
service charges, but think
about the real property tax bill
for your business premises,
that does not exceed $500,000
in value, which attracts a tax of
1 per cent, or around $5,000,
or if it is over $500,000 in val-
ue, attracts a tax of 2 per cent,
or over $10,000,” Mr Leonard
said.

“If you have a duplex,
triplex or fourplex, you can
only claim exemption on the
part of the building that you,
and your family, actually live
in, but you pay 1 per cent or 2
per cent tax, depending on the
value, on the rest, thousands of
dollars.”

uur a Marine pesoutces

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



Bernanke: Fed to hold off
on steps to aid recovery

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke told Congress on
Wednesday that the outlook for
the economy remains “unusu-
ally uncertain" but that the Fed
plans no specific steps "in the
near term" to try to fuel the
struggling recovery.

Instead, Bernanke said the
Fed would monitor the strength
of the recovery and consider
action if matters worsen.

"If the recovery seems to be
faltering, we have to at least
review our options,” Bernanke
told lawmakers. But he said no
further action is planned for
now because the economy is
still growing.

Record low interest rates are
still needed to bolster the econ-
omy, Bernanke said. He repeat-
ed a pledge to keep them there
for an “extended period."

His comments to the Senate
Banking Committee sent stocks
tumbling downward. The Dow
Jones industrial average had
been up 20 points before he
spoke. It fell as much as 160
points during his testimony, but
recovered some losses to close
down 109 points. Investors
shifted money into the safety
of Treasury bonds; the yield on
10-year Treasury notes fell to
2.86 per cent.

Economy

Bernanke downplayed the
odds that the economy will slide
back into a "double-dip" reces-
sion. But he acknowledged the
economy is fragile.

Given that, the Fed is "pre-
pared to take further policy
actions as needed" to keep the
recovery on track, he said.
Bernanke said Fed policymak-
ers haven't settled on "leading
options” but they are being
explored. Those options include
lowering the rate the Fed pays
banks to keep money parked

at the Fed, strengthening the
pledge to hold rates at record
lows and reviving some crisis-
era programs, Bernanke said.

Bernanke is trying to send
Congress, Wall Street and Main
Street a positive message that
the recovery will last in the face
of growing threats. At the same
time, he wants to assure Amer-
icans that the Fed will take new
stimulative actions if necessary.

The recovery, which had
been flashing signs of strength-
ening earlier this year, is losing
momentum. And fears are
growing that it could stall.

Consumers have cut spend-
ing. Businesses, uncertain about
the strength of their own sales
or the economic recovery, are
sitting on cash, reluctant to beef
up hiring and expand opera-
tions. A stalled housing mar-
ket, near double-digit unem-
ployment and an edgy Wall
Street shaken by Europe's debt
crisis are other factors playing
into the economic slowdown.

"In short, it look likes our
economy is in need of addi-
tional help,” said the commit-
tee's chairman, Sen. Chris
Dodd, D-Conn. And, Sen.
Richard Shelby of Alabama,
the highest-ranking Republican
on the panel, said the econom-
ic outlook has become a "bit
more cloudy."

With little appetite in Con-
gress to provide a major new
stimulus package, more pres-
sure falls on Bernanke to keep
the recovery going.

Bernanke and his Fed col-
leagues have cut their forecasts
for growth this year.

If the recovery were to flash
serious signs of backsliding, the
Fed could revive programs to
buy mortgage securities or gov-
ernment debt. It could cut to
zero the interest rate paid to
banks on money left at the Fed
or lower the rate banks pay for
emergency Fed loans. The Fed
also could create a new pro-
gram to spark more lending to
businesses and consumers in a

bid to lure them to ratchet up
spending and grow the econo-
my.

Bernanke said the debt crisis
in Europe, which has rattled
Wall Street, played a role in the
Fed's "somewhat weaker out-
look." Although financial mar-
kets have improved consider-
ably since the depth of the
financial crisis in the fall of
2008, conditions have become
"less supportive of economic
growth in recent months," he
explained.

Result

As a result, Bernanke said
progress in reducing the
nation's unemployment rate,
now at 9.5 per cent, is now
expected to be "somewhat
slower" than thought. Unem-
ployment is expect to stay high,
in the 9 percent range, through
the end of this year, under the
Fed's forecast.

High unemployment is a
drag on household spending,
Bernanke said, although he
believed both consumers and
businesses would spend enough
to keep the recovery intact.

Bernanke also said it would
take a "significant amount of
time" to restore the nearly 8.5
million jobs wiped out over
2008 and 2009.

And, Bernanke said the
housing market remains
"weak" and noted that the
overhang of vacant or fore-
closed houses are weighing on
home prices and home con-
struction.

Given the weak recovery,
inflation is not a problem,
Bernanke said. However,
Bernanke didn't talk about
deflation, a prolonged and
destabilizing drop in prices for
goods, the values of stocks and
homes and in wages. Although
most economists think the
prospects of deflation are
remote, some Fed officials have
expressed concern about it.

To strengthen the economy,

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many economists predict the
Fed will hold a key bank lend-
ing rate at a record low near
zero well into 2011, or possibly
into 2012. Doing so, would help
nip any deflationary forces.

And keeping that bank rate
at super low levels also would
mean rates on certain credit
cards, home equity loans, some
adjustable-rate mortgages and
other consumer loans would
stay at their lowest point in
decades.

Ultra-low lending rates, how-
ever, haven't done much lately
to rev up the economy. Con-
sumers and businesses are cau-
tious and aren't showing an
appetite to spend as lavishly as
they usually do in the early
stages of economic recoveries.

Bernanke, meanwhile, wel-
comed Congress’ new revamp
of financial regulations signed
into law by President Barack
Obama on Wednesday. The
new law, he said, "will place
our financial system on a
sounder foundation and mini-
mize the risk of a repetition of
the devastating events of the
past three years."















THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 9B









FAMGUARD

The Annual General Meeting
of the
Shareholders of

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION
LIMITED
will be held in the
“Victoria Room”
of the
British Colonial Hilton
No. 1 Bay Street
at 4:00 p.m.
on Thursday, July 29, 2010







GOVERNMENT NOTICE

F ON

TENDER FOR SCHOOL REPAIRS






1 The Minisiry of Education inviies sealed bids from eligible qualified Contractors for the

execution of the folkewing school repamr works, in fhe named islands of The Bahamas:









ABACO

HO. | DESCRIPTION
Electrical
Electrical

ANDROS

NO. | DESCRIPTION
3 | Electrical
4 | Electrical

ELEUTHERA

NO. | DESCRIPTION
5 | Mechanical & Electrical
6 | Repairs

GRAND Baha MLA

DESCRIPTION
Repairs
Repairs
Repairs
Repairs

LONG ISLAND

NO. | DESCRIPTION

[SCHOOL
| 50 Boole High School

| SCHOOL
| Herth Andros High Schoal
| ‘Gantral Andros High Schocd

| SCHOOL
| orth Eleuthera High School
| Spanish Welle Albage Senonl

| SCHOOL

| BTV -'G.B.

| Jack Hayward High School
(St, Georpe's High School

| Walter Parker Primary School

SCHOOL

| ESTIMATED COST
| $220,000.00
3 95,000.00

| ESTIMATED COST
| $204,000.00
| $200,000.00

| ESTIMATED COST
[$ 180,000.00
[$50,000.00

[ESTIMATED COST
| $100,232.00
[3 59,715.00
[3 60,855.00
[$50,710.00

| ESTIMATED COST

11 | Construction of 3 Class- | Mangrova Bush Primary School | $230,000.00

room Block (far pre-school

And giaiea 1 and 2)

NEW PROVIDENCE

HO. | DESCRIPTION
12 | Mechanical & Electrical

| SCHOOL
| H. O, Nasi Junior High School

| ESTIMATED COST
| $250,000.00

Zz Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tanders Board utilizing established

procequnes

3. Interested eligihle qualified Contractors may receve Scopes of Works from the
Administrator's Offices of the respeclive Family Islands and Freeport, Grand Bahama ard the
Ministry of Public Works and Transport, in New Providence between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to

S000 gum,

4 All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and a National

Insurance compliance lafter.

5 Bids must be encosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and musi be clearly marked across the top “Bid for (Description of work and Name of School)
Family island and Grand Bahama sealed bids must reach the

= Ministry of Education’.

raspectve Administrator's Office by Monday. 26° July, 2070 at 10:00 a.m.

6 All New Providence bids musl be delivered to tha Office of the Financial Secretary,
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 10.00 am, on Monday

the 26" July, 2008,

? New Providence bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tussday, 27" July, 2070 at the
Ministry of Finance, Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Family Islands
and Grand Bahama Bids wil be opened on Tuesday, 27" July, 2009 at 10:30 a.m. at their
raspacive Adminisiralors office. Tenderars or their designated reprasenialive are inviled to

attend ihe openings.

4. The Ministry of Education reserves the night to raject any or all bid submissions.

Signed:

Elma |. Garreway (hrs. }
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education









PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS eee
Licencees urged: ‘Lead the charge

to rejuvenate’ Freeport city

FROM page 1B

Bahamian government over
amendments to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.

Apart from the GBPA, such
an effort also needed the sup-
port of Grand Bahama Power
Company, commercial busi-
nesses and real estate devel-

opers - both local and the likes
of Harcourt and Shoreline.
Referring to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, Mr
Leonard said: “Today, all
these constituents must be
involved if we are to take
Freeport forward. Remember,
there are around 3,000
licensees who are part of this
agreement, and for a real

South Andros High School
Alumni Association

Date: Tuesday, 27th July, 2010
Time: 7:30p.m.

Venue: R. M. Bailey High School - Room T4

Contact: Darell Taylor - 326-5348

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Requirements:

* Must be a High School Graduate

¢ Must be Customer Service driven

¢ Experience in Restaurant Management would be a plus

¢ Must be Results-Oriented & Articulate

¢ Must have excellent Inter-Personal Skills

* Must have excellent Oral & Written Communication
Skills

¢ Professionalism required

Job Summary:

To assist the restaurant Manager in maintaining the
McDonald’s Formula for success - offering to the
customer high QUALITY, moderately priced food; fast,
courteous SERVICE in immaculately CLEAN
surroundings; and to assist in the attainment of Restaurant
Goals.

Goal:

To exceed the customer’s expectations. McDonald’s
success is dependant upon providing services and
products that meet and exceed each customer’s
expectations. Therefore, the goal of each McDonald’s
employee is Total Customer Satisfaction. Each
employee’s success will be based upon his/her
contribution to this goal.

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Please submit resume to:
Human Resources Department
McDonald’s Head Office on Market St. North
P. O. Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444
Nassau, The Bahamas

ROYAL FIDELITY

Paorey at Week



amendment to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement you need
the signatures of 80 per cent of
the licensees, so we need the
involvement of a large num-
ber of licensees to accomplish
this.

“The days of sitting back
and waiting for investors to
come to Freeport are long
gone. Freeport must go after
the investor and do so in a sur-
gical, well-researched, well
planned and organised man-
ner. There are many other
places throughout the world
that are energetically pursu-
ing investors to invest in their
countries. These other places,
through their trade ministries
or chambers of commerce are
targeting specific investors.
The competition is stiff and, it
is well organised.”

Mr Leonard said Freeport’s
successes between 1950 and
the early 1970s occurred when
all the parties he identified
worked together, aided by the
fact that the GBPA then
owned all the utility compa-
nies and provided the local
government services.

During that period, the
GBPA and several licencees
created infrastructure to sup-
port Freeport as a city for
250,000 persons, but Mr
Leonard said that now the
GBPA’s “sole purpose is to
regulate”.

It no longer had any own-
ership stake in the Grand
Bahama Power Company he
added, arguing that it had
widely outsourced functions it
had limited expertise in to
those who did.

“The GBPA’s sole purpose,
now, is to be a ‘regulator’ and
‘city manager’,” Mr Leonard
said.

“Tt is no longer in a position
to formulate what is asked of
Government with respect to
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment, or to lead the charge for
new investors. The licencees
are. The GBPA can and
should be one constituent, of
many, in the drive to rejuve-
nate Freeport and Grand
Bahama as a whole, but only
as the regulator.

“So, with respect to negoti-
ations regarding the Hawks-

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BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 20 JULY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,487.09 | CHG 0.03 | %CHG 0.00| YTD -78.29 | YTD % -5.00
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit _y
7.00 AML Foods Limited 7.04
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
5.00 Bank of Bahamas 5.00
0.30. Benchmark 0.30
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2417
9.62 Cable Bahamas 10.96
2.50 Colina Holdings 2.50
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.02
2.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.21
1.60 Doctor's Hospital 2.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07
8.75 — Finco 8.90
9.50 — FirstCaribbean Bank 9.81
3.75 — Focol (S) 4.65
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete ~* 0.27
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
1.04 0.00
10.63 0.00
5.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
se Lae 0.00
2.17 0.00
10.96 0.00
2.50 0.00
6.02 0.00
2.24 9.03
2.00 0.00
6.07 0.00
8.90 0.00
9.81 0.00
4.65 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.27 0.00
S.5a 0.00
9.95 0.00
10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $



FG CAP TTAL MARKETS

RAGE zs SERVICES

Div $ P/E
0.250 4.2
0.050

0.598

OB

0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
O.111
0.627

-0,.003.

0.168
0.720
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

bill Creek Agreement, the
GBPA, because it no longer
owns anything, is no longer in
a position

to lead such negotiations,
and it would be wrong of them
to do so.

“In the 1950s, 1960s and
1970s, the GBPA owned and
controlled most of the land
and businesses; that is no
longer the case. The GBPA
can - and must - be a party

with of all the licensees with
respect to any such negotia-
tions, but nothing more. The
GBPA does not own or run
your business, it does not
know, in sufficient detail, the
needs of your company and,
in all fairness to the GBPA, it
cannot be expected to be in a
position to formulate what you
would like to see happen to
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land com-
prising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres
situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant
on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on
the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIE’S PLACE LTD.

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF SADIE’S PLACE in respect of:-

In respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising
One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres situate
approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant on the
East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant
land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet
and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and
running thereon 138.47 feet to a point thence SOUTH-
WARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to
a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTH-
WARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate
of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point
thence WESTWARDLY and by land 5.04 feet to a point
thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon
12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon
169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or for-
merly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon
37.78 feet to the beginning.

Sadie’s Place claims to be the owner of the unincum-
bered fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3)
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have it’s title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions
of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the following
places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor
Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nas-
sau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Re-
tiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower
or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not rec-
ognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration
of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.46 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Pe-
titioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith.

20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022

30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

Symbol Bid $ Ask $
Bahamas Supermarkets 9.42 10.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD%
1.4825 3.04
2.9199 1.14
1.5376 2.02
2.8522 -8.49
13.4110 0.33
107.5706 3.45
105.7706 3.99
1.1177 2.52
1.0785 0.98
1.1162 2.34
9.5439 2.16

EPS $
“2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price Daily Vol.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall
operate as bar to such claims.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
Sart lee
1.525400

NAV G6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.508709

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Last 12 Months %
1.4387
2.8266
1.4777
2.8522
13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal

Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int’

Protected TIGRS, Series

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

LOCKHART & Co.
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

10.0000 tment Fund Principal

10.0344 -6.84

4.8105 7.3073 -5.31
MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19

52wk-Hi - Highest closing pric.

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* Trading Suspen ded

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 11B



BEC fuel surcharge
reduction awaited

FROM page 1B

Abaco-based Wilson City and
Eleuthera’s Hatchet Bay
plants were due to start ser-
vice “within the next 60 days”,
and together with enhanced
operational efficiencies, they
would in 12 months leave
BEC better-placed to address
its long-term capital and infra-
structure needs within 12.

“We've gotten some head-
room as a result of the
improvements the BEC Board
has put in place,” Mr Deveaux
told Tribune Business. “I don’t
think the dark days are com-
pletely behind us, but we can
see a glimmer of light at the
end of the tunnel.

“BEC has made some
remarkable progress in the last
several months with regard to
getting control of its generat-
ing mix. We brought Clifton’s
diesel generators on line, and
the consumer should see direct
benefits in the next billing. The
consumer ought to be paying a
little less based on the fuel sur-
charge, because BEC is using
less gas turbines.”

This does not mean
Bahamian commercial and
residential customers will nec-
essarily see a total reduction
in the amount they pay to
BEC, given that the Corpora-
tion’s basic tariff rate is set to
also rise in August - a move
the Board anticipates will gen-
erate an extra $12 million in
revenues per annum. Bills are
made up of two components,
the basic tariff rate, and the
fuel surcharge, the latter of

which merely covers BEC’s
fuel costs.

The minister acknowledged
that consumers may not draw
comfort from any fuel sur-
charge reduction, given the
tariff rate rise, but added that
the BEC Board had also “giv-
en more focused attention to
maintenance at BEC”.

“BEC’s challenges were in
several forms, where the Blue
Hills plant was being forced
to produce more of the power
demand for New Providence,
which impacted maintenance
at that plant,” Mr Deveaux
explained.

The Clifton Pier plan had
been taking a lesser share of
the electricity production loan,
and this situation meant BEC
was “using a higher mix of gas
turbines, so it was not getting
the right generation mix in
place”.

This had been rectified “in
the last two weeks” as a result
of BEC bringing its Clifton
diesel generation capacity
online, and as a result “BEC is
producing more electricity and
cheaper because of the better
mix of generating plant”.

Once the $105 million Wil-
son City power plant “came
on stream”, Mr Deveaux said
BEC would be able to rede-
ploy generation capacity from
Abaco to other islands, includ-
ing Exuma, Andros and Bimi-
ni.

“The Hatchet Bay plant will
be coming on stream to elimi-
nate some of the problems
Harbour Island is experienc-
ing,” Mr Deveaux said. When

asked when BEC’s in-con-
struction power plants would
become operational, the min-
ister said, according to infor-
mation he had been given:
“They’re all scheduled for
within the next 60 days, Abaco
and Hatchet Bay. Whenever
they come on, they will pro-
vide long-term power and
increased reliability to the con-
sumer.”

These developments, cou-
pled with the tariff increase
and other improvements, such
as fuel hedging, improved
inventory management and
management of the Corpora-
tion’s maintenance schedule,
“will all put BEC in a better
position, so that in the next 12
months we will have a Corpo-
ration..... better able to address
its long-term capital needs”.

Mr Deveaux said the Gov-
ernment was hoping that the
report it was due to receive
from Canadian power giant,
Emera, on how to implement
recommendations for BEC’s

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area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

transformation, would provide
greater insight into the range
of options available.

Pointing out that a waste-
to-energy power generation
plant could be constructed in
36 months if building work
started today, Mr Deveaux
said among the anticipated
updates from Emera were
more details on fuel hedging
and the use of a circulating flu-
oridised bed in power genera-
tion.

The installation of the lat-
ter, the minister added, would
give BEC “a range” of fuel
options it could use for power
generation, “and do it ina

cleaner way”.










For the stories
behind the news,
syle [pL fo ls 14
on Mondays

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS &

AGENTS



Bt CR RC Rel Ya\P) ne

A

PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE









TWENTY -three year veteran in the courier industry, Peter Skinner (far right), opens Bahamas Messengers
with a new look and a promise to deliver.
(Photo: Terrell Glinton for DP&A)

Sending a cost
Saving message

HONKING horns, crowd-
ed roundabouts and traffic
jams could be the route to suc-
cess for one of the island’s old-
est Messengers, a company
that is celebrating its re-launch
next week with a new name,
new look, logo and goal.

“We plan to deliver, literal-
ly, hundreds of times a day,
and do it in a way that people
can trust - fast, reliably and
reasonably,” says Peter Skin-
ner, a 23-year veteran of the
courier industry, which was
more of a one-man operation
than an industry when he
climbed into his first vehicle, a
Volkswagen Beetle, in 1987 to
hand-carry the first package
of his career from one point
to another.

For more than two decades
he called his service We Do.
Traffic drove him to consider
change.

“So much has changed and
we were idling along with a
few solid customers,” said Mr
Skinner.

“Being on the road hours
and hours every day, I realised
how much things had changed
and we needed to change with

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the times.”

Mr Skinner sought profes-
sional help. He also attended a
Chamber of Commerce Insti-
tute presentation. Now he
believes he can create a niche
for himself and a better bot-
tom line for other businesses
by doing the chore that Nassau
businesspeople dread most -
facing traffic. With full-time
staff and independent con-
tractors, he’ll deliver
envelopes, packages, mes-
sages, invitations, boxes -
whatever legal material has to
go from point A to point B,
and get there quickly and cost-
effectively.

Bahamas Messengers plans
to focus primarily on con-
tracted services, including reg-
ular pick-ups and deliveries.
According to Mr Skinner, a
local mid-sized business could
trim costs by up to $5,000 per
year by outsourcing a messen-
ger through his company, sav-
ing on National Insurance pay-
ments, weekly salaries, vehi-
cle maintenance, fuel, insur-
ance, licensing fees and more.

“Tt was time to redefine our-
selves,” said Mr Skinner. “The

demand for good on-island,
island-wide, point-to-point
delivery service increases
every time a new car enters
the frustrating fray of already
overburdened roads. If we can
save businesses time, we are
saving them money and pre-
cious resources.”

Booking will become easi-
er, too, through an online pick-
up request form and a tracking
system to see what time a
package was delivered and
who it was signed by. Those
changes are underway and will
be announced soon. There will
also be special provisions for
bulk mail and ‘Man and a
Van’ distribution services to
and from the Family Islands.

The company operates out
of an office on Dowdeswell
Street and currently has four
vehicles. Delivery rates are
based on how long it takes to
get from place to place. Most
deliveries within Nassau gen-
erally are under $15. One
thing, said Mr Skinner, won’t
change - red cap service.

“Tt’s more than a tradition,”
said Mr Skinner, “It’s a symbol



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Sewing
machine and
cash to the

f Bandit
Summer
School
Program

Ms Brown
and staff from
Bilney Lane
Home for
children, are
shown here
receiving a
check from
Dicrius Ramsey,
General
Manager,
Island Luck.

Cash to

# Bandit
Junkanoo
Group
Cooking
Class.



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ling Chea a

lor
aritie ies:

Ms Rhiney
Coordinator of
Business
Department at
Doris Johnson
High received
10 new
computers
from Island
Luck Web Café
G, M. Dicrius
Ramsey

of service.”
-——
i:

Mr Dicrius
Ramsey,
General

Manager of
Island Luck
is shown here
donating a
check to
Unity House.

Cash to the
2 Bandit
Junkanoo
Group
Summer
School
Programme,





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The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

USA TODAY

(PPITTSBURGH
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Crisis Centre
building to be
demolished

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Crisis
Centre is to close its doors at
Knowles House in eight
days amid claims by hospital
doctors that the building is
to be demolished to make
way for a car park extension.

Workers at the only non-
government and non-profit
refuge are to be evicted
from their current building
in the grounds of Princess
Margaret Hospital (PMH).

And last night they issued
a desperate appeal to the
community for secure
premises in which they can
continue their work.

Dr Sandra Dean-Patter-
son, founder of the Bahamas
Crisis Centre, said: “We are
in crisis. We are in despera-
tion because we have
nowhere to go.



“We are grateful to the
hospital, who have housed
us since 1982 but we have
created a refuge, an oasis for
persons who are victims of
violence, and it will create
a great vacuum if we are no
longer able to provide the
service.”

The crisis centre is funded
through a government sub-
vention, fundraising efforts
and private donations.

Launched by Dr Dean-
Patterson in 1982, the centre
opened with its main focus
on providing support to
female victims of sexual,
physical and psychological
abuse and their children as
the Women’s Crisis Centre.

Janet Hutcheson, chief
welfare officer assigned to
Health Social Services in the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
lamented the unfortunate

SEE page 10

ay
ie a

« 4
SRR





Doomed |
eignt days



Weathermen
keep watch on

tropical system







By ALESHA CADET



BAHAMIANS are being
warned to keep an eye on the
weather forecasts with the
development of a tropical sys-
tem approaching the south-
east.

Meteorologists are watch-
ing a front that has a 60 per
cent chance of developing into
a tropical depression or storm

with the chance of it affecting
the Bahamas by Friday.

According to internation-
al weather reports, environ-
mental conditions are
favourable for some develop-
ment as the front moves to the
west-northwest from Hispan-
iola into the Bahamas at about
1Omph.

SEE page 11



GUILTY PLEA IN DOG CRUELTY CASE

FIND OUT WHY Humane Society chiefs regard court case over severely meee ee as a ‘hollow victory’.

Tituiaorscksscsia MP accused of failing to

car crash after shoot-out

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are without any
leads in their latest homi-
cide after culprits escaped a
car crash that preceded a
high speed shoot-out
through Montell Heights
early yesterday morning.

The officers had respond-
ed to reports of a shooting
shortly before 1 am and
while in the area observed a
gold coloured Honda
Inspire that appeared to be
fleeing the scene.

Patrol officers and the cul-
prits, believed to be respon-
sible for the death of Dani-
achew Dikobe Miller of Mil-



lennium Gardens, and
numerous armed robberies,
exchanged gun fire during
the high speed chase. How-
ever, the culprits escaped
when their vehicle crashed
in the area of East Street
south of Robinson Road. In
the car, police recovered a
high powered weapon with
ammunition.

Mr Miller, a 29-year-old,
was found with gunshot
injuries to the chest. He was
wearing short navy blue
denim jeans and a black t-
shirt. He was pronounced
dead by emergency medical
services at the scene.

Reports indicated he was

SEE page 11

* SEE PAGE TWO











cool



report crime in House spat

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A PARLIAMENTARY
spat over a Grand Bahama
public servant who was
charged with illegal posses-
sion of ammunition ended

with MP for Golden Gates
Shane Gibson being accused
of failing to report a crime.
Mr Gibson used his contri-
bution to the debate on two
bills — the Central Bank of the

SEE page 11





DOCTORS
y HOSPITAL
MAKES
CARIBBEAN
HISTORY

© SEE PAGE 12















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18000 BTU
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ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS













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Son of Police
Superintendent
pleads guilty but
escapes conviction

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -_ The
Humane Society of Grand
Bahama believes the animal
cruelty trial of Wenito Bootle
in the case of a severely mal-
nourished dog was a “hollow
victory”.

After a year of adjourn-
ments in the Magistrates
Court, Bootle suddenly
changed his plea to guilty and
was granted a conditional dis-
charge and ordered to pay
$1,758 in costs.

Bootle, a resident of Gor-
don Avenue and the son of
Police Superintendent Wel-
bourne Bootle, appeared in
Court Two where he was
charged a year ago with ani-
mal cruelty with regard to a
female Doberman mix-breed
dog named “Meka.”

Meka was adopted, along
with second male Doberman
mix named “Mr Thomas”
from the HSGB, in February
2009.

On July 15, 2009 the HSGB
received a call from a con-
cerned citizen who reported
that her neighbour’s dog had
staggered into her yard and
collapsed.

Meka, a once healthy 75-
pound dog, weighed only 35
pounds six months after being
adopted. There was a heavy
chain around her neck. She
was covered in ticks and
there were large patches of
hair missing, according to the
HSGB.

She was euthanised the
next morning after her con-
dition had deteriorated fur-
ther.

The Doberman mix named
“Mr Thomas” was never
found.

In court on Monday,
Bootle’s lawyer Robert
Adams of Graham Thomp-
son & Co asked for mercy for
his client.

Mr Adams stated that his
client was remorseful and had
been unemployed for a peri-
od of time.

He explained that Bootle
was an animal lover who sim-
ply faced challenges caring
for the dogs.

Mr Adams also noted that
a conviction on Mr Bootle’s
record would jeopardise his
pending job with Bahamas
Customs and thus ruin his
career.

Magistrate Andrew Forbes
said the statutory provision
on the charge was for a max-
imum penalty of $150 or
three months imprisonment,
and that neither seemed ade-
quate for such a significant
charge.

Magistrate Forbes said he

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wishes some sort of class
existed which Mr Bootle

could attend.

He then ordered him to
pay $1,758 in costs by Octo-
ber 29, or be convicted at that
time.

Tip Burrows, executive
director of the HSGB, said
the outcome of the trial was
somewhat “bittersweet”.

“Mr Bootle gets to pay a
small sum of money and go
on with his life with no mean-
ingful consequences for his
actions,” she said.

Bootle changed his plea to
“guilty” after the defence
counsel and the prosecution
conferred privately. Despite
the HSGB’s attorney, Tiffany
Dennison of Dennison & Co
being present, Tip Burrows
said she and the HSGB were
not involved in the meeting.

Ms Burrows said the
HSGB hopes that once in a
while, Mr Bootle thinks
about the suffering of Meka
and Mr Thomas.

She added that anyone who
adopts from the HSGB can
simply pick up the phone and
call if they are no longer able
to care for their pets.

Ms Burrows hopes the case
will discourage other people
from abusing animals.

“T would like to think it
would make people stop and
think, especially in cases
where people have an oppor-
tunity to get help for their
animal. There is no reason
for this to ever happen,” she
said.

The Humane Society visits
schools to educate students
about the importance of car-
ing for animals.

The organisation also has
an active student volunteer
programme.

“Right now, we currently
have five kids volunteering
at the facility and they learn
by example, watching how we
care for the animals at our
shelter,” Ms Burrows said.

“With adults it is harder to
educate, and when people
adopt an animal from us we
give them literature about
how to care for their pet, we
give them a free DVD on
how to train the adopted ani-
mal, we counsel them about
proper animal care and the
importance of veterinary
care,” she said.






THE TRIBUNE

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

NEW legislation govern-
ing business licences will pos-
itively and “substantially
change the way we do busi-
ness”, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham told parliament.

The Business License Bill,
set to be debated and passed
in parliament next week,
intends to simplify the legal
and regulatory requirements
on business operators by cre-
ating a “one-stop-shop” for
all licensing needs, whether it
be for shop, liquor, music,
dancing or other licenses.

It would repeal the Liquor
Licenses Act, the Music and
Dancing Licenses Act and
the Registration of Business

HUBERT INGRAHAM



THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 3

New licence legislation ‘will

change way we do business’

Names Act and both repeal
and replace the Business
Licence Act.

“All requirements to carry
on business” will be included
in the proposed new bill, Mr
Ingraham said.

Moving forward with a
first reading of the Business
Licence Bill in the House of
Assembly, Prime Minister
Ingraham said the legislation,
once passed, will come into
effect in January 2011, bring-
ing with it “substantial
reforms.”

“We propose to pass it
next week before parliamen-
t’s four month summer
recess, giving businesses and
government agencies a
chance to become familiar
with the requirements of the
Bill so by the time it comes

into effect all and sundry will
have knowledge of the bill
and its requirements,” said
Mr Ingraham.

Aside from the issuance of
licenses, the Business License
Bill deals with approval of
business names, and the
establishment and function
of the Business License
Review Board which will
hear appeals against deci-
sions regarding business
licenses, as well as any
offences and penalties that
exist for contravention of the
law.

Mr Ingraham said: “This
is only one of a good number
of legislative decisions being
taken to change the way
business is done in the most
beneficial way in the
Bahamas.”

Government alters plans over
Central Bank board appointments

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE government has altered its
plans to allow individuals to be appoint-
ed members of the Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ board of directors despite
holding up to a five per cent interest in
a financial institution regulated by the
Central Bank.

This came after PLP MPs suggested
that any interest of board members in
such entities could be seen as a “conflict
of interest” for the critical regulator.

Faced with criticisms of proposals to
remove the prohibition, Minister of
State Zhivargo Laing said the govern-
ment would still push ahead with
removing the total prohibition on such
ownership.

However, he said the government
change the proposed amendments to
reduce the quantity of paid-up share
capital that can be owned by a board
director from five per cent to one.

Earlier, Mr Laing had suggested that
the government would like to sce the
prohibition on any board director being
a director, employee, officer or share-
holder in any institution regulated by
the Central Bank lifted to the extent
that persons could still be considered
for membership of the board despite
owning up to five per cent of the shares









ZHIVARGO LAING

in any such institution.

He said the prohibition against such
ownership in the present Central Bank
of the Bahamas Act was “onerous” and
meant it was very hard to find qualified
board directors in a small country like
the Bahamas.

Contributing to the debate on the
Central Bank of the Bahamas (Amend-
ment) Bill 2010 as the lead speaker for
the PLP, St Thomas Moore MP Frank
Smith said he was concerned that by
ending the prohibition the government

would be allowing for a “conflict of
interest that isn’t healthy” at a time
when it is also seeking to enhance the
Central Bank’s powers as a regulator.
He claimed that to remove such a
prohibition would set a precedent and
break with international convention.

Debate

Responding to the concerns raised
later in the debate, Mr Laing disputed
suggestions that the change would set a
precedent, pointing to Jamaica, Aus-
tralia and New Zealand as countries
which allow board directors to hold
shares in licensees.

“Malta provides for instance that
Central Bank directors cannot own
more than one per cent of ordinary
paid-up share capital of a licensee so we
would not be cutting new ground on
this issue in allowing directors on the
board to have ownership in a regulat-
ed entity.

“But I do believe that the issue of
the maximum holding may be some-
thing that may be at issue given some of
the comments that have been made, so
we have determined to amend that
number to one per cent as opposed to
the five per cent that had been pro-
posed, which would be in keeping with
the practices we are seeing in place.”

MP calls for Central Bank
prime rate to be lowered



OPPOSITION MP for Fox
Hill Fred Mitchell is calling
for the Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ prime rate to be
lowered.

According to Mr Mitchell,
such a move would be in the
“best interest” of the Bahami-
an people at this time.

Although he was out of the
country attending a mecting
of Caribbean opposition MPs
when the House of Assem-
bly met yesterday, Mr
Mitchell issued a statement
asking his parliamentary col-
leagues on both sides of the
House to make their views
known on this matter.

The MP said he had intend-
ed to put forward a resolu-
tion with regard to the prime
rate in yesterday’s session of
parliament, but decided after
consultation with his col-
leagues to stand down until
after the debate on the Cen-
tral Bank Amendment Bill,
as he feels the debate will
accomplish the objective of
bringing the matter to the
attention of the public.

“That is my sole objective,”
Mr Mitchell said. “Legislators
have their role. The Central
Bank has its role.

“Tn this, we mirror the com-
ments made about the secre-
cy of policy considerations by
the Federal Reserve Bank in
the United States.

“The Central Bank can be
acclimatised to public opin-
ion. They are not bound to
act according to it but ought
to take cognisance of it,” he
said.

The reasoning behind this
push is compelling, the MP
said, as it is a move that will

lower the cost of government
debt, lower the cost of pri-
vately held debt, including
that of mortgagors of land
and homes, as well as stimu-
late demand.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly yesterday in

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response to what he said were
“concerns” raised about the
prime rate, State Minister for
Finance Zhivargo Laing said
that the prime rate remains
the sole responsibility of the
Central Bank, which is inde-
pendent of the government.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

New BEC tariffs
are announced

CONFIRMING recent reports, the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation has
announced that effective July 1, it will
increase its monthly basic rates by around
five per cent.

In a statement issued yesterday, BEC point-
ed out that it has a “very costly” business
model, operating 28 generating plants on 13
islands.

“The cost of constructing, maintaining and
operating so many plants and so much equip-
ment over such a large and harsh geographi-
cal area is extremely expensive. BEC requires
this increase to restore the financial well-
being of the corporation,” the statement said.

BEC noted that it has not increased the
basic rate since 1993, in fact decreasing it in
2004. The company also pointed out that even
with the increase, BEC rates will remain
among the lowest in the region.

BEC bills have two components: the basic
rate, which is designed to cover all operating
costs of the corporation except fuel; and the
fuel charge, which is designed to recoup the
cost of all fuel necessary to operate the cor-
poration’s generators.

The statement said: “The corporation nego-
tiates excellent rates on fuel and thereby min-
imises the effects of the cost of fuel on the
average monthly bill.

However, world crude oil markets are the
ultimate decision makers of the price of fuel
purchased by the corporation and the cor-
poration, unfortunately, exerts little influ-
ence on those markets.”

BEC also said it is committed to improving
operational efficiencies, and that if these
efforts prove successful, customers will see
savings that offset much of the basic rate
increase.

Top Boston institution
welcomes former COB VP

Wheelock College has
announced the arrival of Dr
Linda Davis as associate
professor and interim direc-
tor of the Centre for Inter-
national Education, Lead-
ership, and Innovation.

The college said in a
statement: “The much
anticipated arrival of the
Bahamian educator to the
Boston Campus was met
with great enthusiasm. Dr
Davis joins a team of very
impressive and highly qual-
ified tertiary level educa-
tors from all over the

began her career as a high
school teacher before join-
ing the College of The
Bahamas faculty in 1987.
There she also served in
various administrative roles,
taking on her most recent
position in 2006, in which
she worked to increase
research activity and acces-
sibility to graduate degrees
as well as to expand the
international opportunities
available to the institution’s
students, faculty, and staff.
Dr Davis said: “I am
privileged to have been pro-





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Already a member of the
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served as a Presidential
International Visiting
Scholar for one month last
fall, Dr Davis began her
year-long tenure as interim
director on July 1.

Dr Davis is the former
vice president for Research,
Graduate Programmes, and
International Relations at
the College of the
Bahamas, with which

DR LINDA DAVIS

Wheelock has growing col-
laborations.

She spent the last year on
sabbatical, travelling the
globe as part of her contin-
uing study of the nature of
international partnerships
and their dynamics.

A native of New Provi-
dence and eldest daughter
of Sir Winston “Tappy”
Davis and the late Joyce Y
Bosfield Davis, Dr Davis



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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Accused ‘was put in
boot cast two weeks
before Taylor murder’



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By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LAWYERS for both sides
rested their cases in the retrial
of murder accused Troyniko
McNeil yesterday after the
defence's last witness testified
that the defendant was put in a
boot cast two weeks before
popular handbag designer Harl
Taylor was found murdered.

Dr Sarah Friday, a consul-
tant emergency physician and
chief of the emergency depart-
ment at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, said McNeil was given the
cast on November 4, 2007.

Taylor was found dead in a
bedroom of his home on
November 18, 2007.

Dr Friday, who was deemed
an expert in emergency med-
ical care by the court, said casts
are typically worn for about
three weeks but depending on
the severity of the injury, could
be worn for a shorter or longer
time.

She could not say how long
McNeil's ankle remained in the
cast or if the cast would have
restricted his ability to negotiate
a staircase.

Responding to a question
from the jury, Dr Friday said it
was possible for a person with-
out medical expertise to
remove a cast, adding that she
had heard of persons removing
their own casts.

McNeil, 24, may have had to
use crutches or a wheelchair to












































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avoid placing pressure on the
injured leg, the witness said.

Dr Friday said McNeil came
to PMH complaining of a
painful right ankle which he
claimed to have twisted play-
ing basketball.

She based her testimony on
McNeil's patient record, which
was signed by Dr Rodgers-
Rolle.

Dr Friday said McNeil regis-
tered at PMH at 7.17pm accom-
panied by his girlfriend.
According to hospital records,
the attending physician noted
gross swelling, decreased range
of motion and severe ligamen-
tation in his right ankle, she
said.

It was also noted that during
the examination, the defen-
dant's right ankle was tender
to the touch.

Based on this diagnosis, the
witness said McNeil's ankle
would have been in pain.

Dr Friday also testified that
doctors at PMH outfitted
McNeil with a leg cast. While
she could not specify the length
of McNeil's cast, she said casts
of this nature typically start at
the base of the toes going under
the foot, up the ankle and pos-
sibly extending to just above or
below the kneecap.

She said that based on the
hospital record, McNeil was
scheduled to return to PMH
on November 20, 2007 pre-
sumably for doctors to examine
his cast.

Ankle Injury

Dr Friday said a person
wearing such a cast is typically
given either crutches or a
wheelchair so weight is not
placed on the injured leg.

When asked by defence
attorney Murrio Ducille if a
person wearing such a cast
would be able to walk up a
flight of stairs, Dr Friday said
she did not want to speculate
and that the question should
be directed to an orthopedic
expert.

Under cross examination by
Prosecutor Franklyn Williams,
Dr Friday said moving about
without crutches or a wheel-
chair while wearing a leg cast
could delay healing.

Also testifying yesterday was
DNA analysis expert Dr Mar-
tin Tracey, a professor of bio-
logical science at Florida Inter-
national University in Miami.
He lectures on DNA forensics
and molecular biology.

Dr Tracey said DNA sam-
ples can last for weeks, months,
even decades and that analysts
cannot tell exactly when they
were deposited.

"If you have a mixed DNA
profile you know you have
DNA from two people but if
it's from a counter or floor and
it's two people, you don't know
if one left DNA there months
ago or yesterday,” he said.

The crux of the prosecution's
case is DNA evidence which







Harl iro

they argue links the accused to
the crime scene.

Dr Tracey, who did not
study the case's forensic evi-
dence, said it should have been
"obvious" to DNA analysts at
the outset if there was a kin-
ship link between DNA taken
from the defendant's father,
Troy McNeil, and DNA found
at the crime scene.

He was responding to ques-
tions from Mr Ducille regard-
ing Monday's testimony of
prosecution witness Kevin
Noppinger, who said that in
December, 2007 his lab tested
and compared samples from
Taylor's home and DNA sam-
ples from Troy McNeil and
other individuals.

On January 11, 2008, the
defendant's father was exclud-
ed as a possible source of the
samples found at the crime
scene.

At the time Mr Noppinger
did not notice any link between
Troy McNeil's DNA and
forensic evidence from the
crime scene because he was not
looking for it, he said.

It was not until June, 2008
that he tested the DNA for a
kinship link and found that
while Troy McNeil was exclud-
ed as a donor, there were sim-
ilarities between his samples
and some found at the scene.

Mr Noppinger said he con-
cluded there was a 99.99 per
cent chance that Troy McNeil
was the biological father of a
source of some of the samples
at the scene.

Closing submissions will be
heard today at 1lam before
Senior Justice Jon Issacs.

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By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE suspect an
autopsy report will shed
some light into the myste-
rious death of a 38-year-
old Jamaican.

Responding officers
found no visual signs of
injury to the body of Oral
Claude Walker of Shirley
Street, who was found
slumped over the steering
wheel of a black S-10 pick
up truck at Bradley Street,
Madiera yesterday
evening. The truck’s
licence plate number is
30530.

Emergency medical ser-
vices pronounced him
dead at the scene. Police
have classified the incident
a sudden death and inves-
tigations are continuing.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



hoberts: Bahamians
font buy the excuse that
Crime is drug related

PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts said the opposition
responds with “great alarm”
to the government’s tendency
to say crime in the Bahamas
is largely drug related.

Mr Roberts said the public
does not accept this excuse,
as they know many armed
robberies and murders have
nothing to do with drugs.

Accusing Minister of
National Security of being
incapable of coping with the
“levels of crime daily assailing
citizens of the Bahamas”, Mr
Roberts noted that buying
new police cars, while a posi-
tive step, does not solve
crime.

He said: “The fact of the
matter is that the minister of
National Security is clueless
and has no ideas. He is out of
his league and must do the
honourable thing and be gone.

“The PLP suggests to the
government that it should
immediately and fully rein-
state the Urban Renewal and
the School Policing Pro-
grammes.

“We note the concerns
expressed in the media today
by Dr David Allen, one of
the authors of the Urban
Renewal programme, about
rising violence among
teenage girls.”

Mr Roberts added that
churches should be better
supported in their communi-
ty outreach programmes and
that recently cut government
subsidies should be immedi-
ately restored to church
schools, the Ranfurly Home,
the PACE programme, the
Crisis Centre, and other
organisations fighting against
poverty and attempting to
improve education.

“Statistics show that pover-









ty is directly related to crime.
Statistics also show that goal
oriented young people sel-
dom become involved in
criminal activity. Studies



“The fact of the matter is that the
minister of National Security is clue-
# less and has no ideas. He is out of his
league and must do the honourable
thing and be gone.”

— PLP chairman Bradley Roberts -



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE









FREEPORT, BAHAMAS
— Sharon Smith’s ‘Back to
Basics’ Girls Basketball Camp
plays a significant role in the
lives of many young girls on
the island - some of whom
even go on to win college
scholarships.

The camp, sponsored by the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
has a number of components

including fundamental basket-
ball training, as well as educa-
tional and youth development.

“GBPA encourages all cor-
porate citizens and the com-
munity to become advocators
for this young generation by
supporting all such positive
endeavors,” said GBPA vice
president, Ginger Moxey. “As
we make advances into a better

Pe GCM r Meee Callie camp

future, it must start today with
the leading voices of tomor-
row. Therefore, GBPA is more
than pleased to support pro-
grammes that focus on the bet-
terment of our island through
the lives of our young people.”

The annual event ran for two
weeks this month. Camp direc-
tor, Sharon Smith, in receiving
GBPA’s donation, expressed

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thanks and shared a synopsis
of the programme.

“This year’s camp schedule
included mother-daughter/
father-daughter shooting com-
petitions, ‘let’s talk’ sessions,
meetings with college coaches,

seminars and a banquet and
closing ceremony. We were so
appreciative of the Port’s sup-
port which helped to make the
event so successful. The girls
and I had a wonderful time this
year,” Ms Smith said.

| SHARON SMITH (3rd from



left) along with her girls,
present a ‘thank you’ gift to
vice president of the GBPA,
Ginger Moxey (centre) for

the GBPA’s continued sup-
port of this positive youth

programme.



The Bahamian Brewery and Beverage
Company shines for coud Quality inl

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Bahami-
an Brewery and Beverage
Company has achieved inter-
national recognition, winning a
Gold Quality Award for ‘High
Rock’ beer less than a year
after its release.

Launched in 2009, High
Rock beer was submitted for
testing at the 49th World Selec-
tions of the Monde Selection
Gold Quality Award in May.

About 2,500 products from
more than 80 countries and 850
different companies were sub-
mitted.

High Rock won the Gold
Quality Award on its first sub-
mission.

Now, the brewery team has
decided to change the beer’s
label to commemorate the
award.

The brewery in Grand
Bahama produces Sands, High
Rock and Strong Back beers.
The company sells locally and
exports.

In May, Sands beer was fea-
tured in Southern Boating mag-
azine, which is internationally
distributed and reaches more
than 150,000 readers.

James Sands, CEO, said the
new label with the gold award
on it has been approved and
will soon be seen on High Rock
beer.

“This team and my Grand
Bahama staff are the real rea-
sons behind the gold award,”
he said.

“They are on our line every-
day ensuring that each time we

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that road works will be carried
out on sections of Robinson Road between Palm Beach Street and Balfour Avenue effective Monday July 26",
2010. Installation of new twenty-four inches (24”) Water main pipes will be constructed in this phase.
Construction works will be done in different phases starting eastbound.
¢ Motorist should diverted east through Palm Beach Street, continue along Balfour Avenue and exit through
Claridge Road to their destination.

¢ Motorist travelling westbound should continue on the one way traffic scheme in place.

Access will be granted to the business places, pedestrians and residents. Kindly observe all traffic signs delineating
the work zone, please keep abreast with the local additional media through which we will keep you updated.

We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project.
For further information please contact:

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341/ 322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.ar

Robinson Rd. closed
Alternative route

Balfour Av.

CLOSED

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport

Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs

CLOSED

Lateral street full closures by stages














brew we match the standards
we have set.

“This award shows that what
we are brewing here in Grand
Bahama is a consistent product
that meets the standards of
international breweries around
the world.”

f) their High Rock Gold medal from
"| the 49th World Quality Selections



PICTURED proudly showing off |




are some of the Grand Bahama
Bahamian Brewery and Beverage
team — Hazel Springer, lab man-
ager; Dieter Stich, brewmaster;
James ‘Jimmy’ Sands, CEO;
Lorenzo Johnson, assistant brew-
master, and Donny Delahey, GB
brewery manager.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 9





KIRKLAND ‘KB’ BODIE performs in England.

Photo/Lorenzo McKenzie



Kirkland ‘KB’ Bodie takes
Bahamian music to the UK

HENLEY, England -
Bahamian performer Kirkland
“KB” Bodie electrified the audi-
ence at the recent Henley Festi-
val in Henley on Thames, Eng-
land.

He was a part of the “Rakin’ n
Scrapin’” aspect of the Bahami-
an delegation, who are perform-
ing at various venues and festi-
vals during the month of July.

Junkanoo artists are currently
there showcasing their artistry

in the “Bahamas Junkanoo Dey
Comin’” section of the tour.

Musicians Colyn McDonald
and Basil Rolle backed KB for
two days at the week-long fes-
tival, performing such hits as
“Juz Cuz She Phat” and
“Hangova”.

According to project manager
for the initiative Angelique
McKay, the performances have
“gone over very well” with the
festival audiences.

“Bahamian culture is well
received, which is one of the rea-
sons the Bahamas is represented
here again,” she said.

One of the local radio sta-
tions in Henley requested an
interview from KB and now has
his music in rotation on their sta-
tion “Marlow FM”.

KB said: “I am having a great
time here in Jolly old England,
showing them what real Bahami-
an music is all about.”






Betty. K. Agencies Ltd.





Spain predicts thaw in US and EU ties with Cuba

MADRID (AP) — Spain's
foreign minister predicted
Wednesday that Cuba's
release of dozens of political
prisoners could eventually lead
to a thaw in USS. relations and
the lifting of a decades-old
embargo against the Commu-
nist-run island.

Speaking in Parliament,

Miguel Angel Moratinos said
the freeing of some 52 Cuban
prisoners would prompt a shift
in European Union policy
toward Cuba "and it will have
political consequences in USS.
relations with Cuba, (such as)
the lifting of the embargo."

A spokeswoman for the
US. embassy in Madrid said,

while the U.S. welcomed the
release of the Cuban political
inmates, it was too early to say
whether that would have any
effect on the embargo. And
officials from France and Ger-
many didn't share Moratinos'
optimism that the release of
the 52 would trigger an EU
policy shift.

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Bahamian Contractors’ Association

MEET THE BAHA MAR
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT TEAM

ALL BAHAMIAN CONTRACTORS
are invited to attend a

LUNCHEON

WED. JULY 28, 2010 at 12 NOON

Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort & Casino
CRYSTAL PALACE BALLROOM
BCA Members * $25 Non Members * $35
Reservations: Phone / Fax 24? 325-7524 or
email: beabahamas@gmail.com

Learn how the
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all interested
eae
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Baha Mar Project |

CONGRATULATIONS

5TH PASTORAL & 29TH CHURCH’S ANNIVERSARY
THEME: “INCREASE”
SCRIPTURE TEXTS: JOB 8:5-7 & PsaLm 115:12-14

#

>

JULY 22ND-25TH

THURSDAY, 7:30 PM
SPEAKER:
| | APOSTLE KELSON MILLER

FRIDAY, 7:30 PM
SPEAKER:
BISHOP CHESTER ROLLE

SATURDAY, 630 AM
FUN, RUN, WALK, SWIM &
FAMILY FUN DAY
IN MEMORY OF
THE LATE,

REV. DR. AUSTIN E SAUNDERS
SUNDAY, 100 AM

SPEAKER:
BISHOP VICTOR JOHNSON

Pastor
Rev. Sherelle L. Saunders

COME AND JOIN US AS WE CELEBRATE WHAT
GOD HAS DONE, IS DOING AND IS ABOUT TO
DO.

BLESSINGS!
FAITH MISSION CHURCH OF GOD MINISTRIES
“THE MEGA WORSHIP CENTER”
Fox HILL ROAD & DAVIS STREET





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



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KNOWLES HOUSE, where the Bahamas Crisis Centre is currently located.








Crisis Centre
building to be
demolished

FROM page one

circumstances as close prox-
imity to the hospital was an
ideal location for the centre.

She said: “I know Dr Pat-
terson and the work that she
is doing there. For a long
time she was out there by
herself, almost in the wilder-
ness, until people came and
saw the work she has been
doing over the years and the
lives she’s impacted as a
result of her passion for
those affected by domestic
abuse.”

Since the name change to
the Bahamas Crisis Centre,
Dr Patterson said the flood-
gates were opened and over
the years the organisation
has seen thousands of vic-
tims of both sexes and all
ages; and seek counsel from
a pro-bono network of psy-
chologists, psychiatrists,
social workers, volunteer
counsellors, and attorneys
who all advocate for legisla-
tive and societal protection
of survivors.

Ms Hutcheson continued:
“They’re playing a vital role
in our community, and a lot
of people — for want of a
better word — don’t really

appreciate their intrusive-
ness into the family envi-
ronment, but they are doing
an enormous task and we
want to continue to encour-
age them and the commu-
nity to support them. It’s a
sad situation where there is
so much domestic violence
and sometimes nowhere for
the women to run.”

Dr Dean-Patterson admit-
ted the centre had been giv-
en ample notice of the pend-
ing demolition, to make
space for the construction
of new operating theatres,
but they have been unable
to secure alternate housing.
Also scheduled for demoli-
tion is the building adjacent
to the centre, Huggins
Lodge.

Doctors at PMH lament-
ed the destruction of the
buildings they felt bore his-
torical significance. They
noted their demolition was
not to accommodate the
new theatres, but to increase
parking space.

One doctor claimed: “The
new theatres don’t extend
out this far. This is really
being done to achieve more
parking space. And that is
sad because this is one of

FOCOL HOLDINGS LIMITED

PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is advised that as of July 15,
2010, ten million (10,000,000) Class ‘C’
Perpetual Preference Shares of Focol
Holdings Limited were sold via private
placement for ten million dollars
($10,000,000).

The proceeds from the offering will be
used to strengthen Focol Holdings
Limited's balance sheet by prepaying
long term debt.

Colina Financial Advisors Limited (CFAL)}
was the escrow agent for the offering.

“Fuelling Growth For People”



the last remaining buildings
of the original hospital com-
pound.”

The doctor added: “This
building (Huggin’s Lodge)
has history and historical
value. It was named after
one of the first surgeons that
worked at PMH, Dr
Leonard Catesby Huggins.
He came here from Trinidad
in the late 20s and was a well
known physician in Nassau.”

Legislative records show
there was a Leonard Cates-
by Huggins (Private Prac-
tice) Act 1958, suggesting
Dr Huggins’ contributions
may have exceeded public
medical practice. However
this act was repealed in the
first schedule of the Statute
Law Revision Act 1964.

The protection of historic
buildings is entrusted to the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museum Corporation
(AMMC) and sites are eval-
uated based on Bahamian
history, architecture, arche-
ology, engineering, and cul-
ture.

Requests for site preser-
vation should be sent in
written form with photos to
the AMMC, upon which its
team of historical architects
and consultants will conduct
an evaluation.

Dr Dean-Patterson said
the crisis centre’s hotline will
remain operational despite
the lack of a physical space
to administer therapy.

“We provide a refuge and
a place of healing. In a time
like this when the violence is
escalating, we don’t want to
lose this place — the only
place — where victims can
achieve that healing, and at
no cost.”

She added: “So we’re
appealing to the community
— hopefully someone will
come forward and help us
in some way. Perhaps give
us a building we can use or
options of other avenues we
can pursue.”

Calls made to the Public
Hospitals Authority to veri-
fy the reason for demolition
were not returned.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

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Water Corp suffers

$25m net loss in ‘08

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE WATER and Sewer-
age Corporation suffered a
$25 million net loss in 2008
before its $20 million subsidy,
with losses up $1 million over
2007, the corporation’s annu-
al report revealed.

The losses suffered by this
Corporation and _ the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration alone, total close to $50
million, and continued to
mount into 2009.

Tabled in the House of
Assembly yesterday, the
report reveals the deep-seated
losses that continue to occur
at the Water and Sewerage
Corporation.

The Corporation’s final net
loss for 2008, after the annual
government subsidy, totalling
$20.789 million, was $4.913
million, up $1.005 million over



2007.

Net losses before govern-
ment funds were injected for
New Providence and the
Family Islands were $16.5 mil-
lion and $9.2 million respec-
tively.

The Water and Sewerage
Corporation saw its operat-
ing expenses increase by $6.8
million in 2008 compared to
2007.

According to the report,
the Corporation saw an
almost $3 million hike in the
cost of purchasing water and a
$1.6 million hike in the pur-
chase of fuel and oil, plus a
$1.5 million increase in elec-
tricity costs in 2008.

The Corporation continued
to depend on barged water
from a reverse osmosis plant
in Andros to supply New
Providence, which had often
proven to accrue high costs.
However, shipping costs
appeared to decrease by $1.6

million year-over-year for
2008.

Water and Sewerage has
been plagued by aging infra-
structure for years, resulting
in inceasing non-revenue
water or water waste due to
leaks in the aging system.

Chairman of the Corpora-
tion, Anton Saunders, said the
utility was challenged by eco-
nomic declines, its aging infra-
structure and a dramatic
increase in the price of fuel.
The Corporation was also
plagued by increased demand
for water supplies and unre-
solved industrial agreements
in both of its unions.

The cash-strapped Corpo-
ration, at the end of the first
quarter 2010, owed its main
supplier, Consolidated Water,
$4.6 million, and vowed to
make monthly payment
through June to meet current
invoices and reduce delin-
quent receivable.







THE FRONT ENTRANCE of Doctors Hospital...

Doctors Hospital gets top honour

DOCTORS Hospital yes-
terday became the first hos-

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
SECTION 24

JFK Drive, Farrington Road & Thompson Boulevard

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A wishes to advise the motoring public that traffie will be diverted
along the new rownd-about being constructed at the intersection of JFK Drive & Thompson Boulevard.
Motorist travelling along JFK Drive, Thompson Boulevard & Farrington Road should expect changes at these

; a ania
intersections between July 18° and August 4, 2010,

Installation of néw drainage facilities, utilities, water main systems, street lightings, traffic signs, asphalt

povement and rod markings will be constructed in this phiese,

Motorists are advised to drive with caution as they approach the new round-about; ramps are constructed at some
sections of the round-about. The existing traffic signal will be removed. Traffic signs wall be wisibke while

approaching the round-about.

The following businesses and residents along Thompeon Blvd will be affected:
*" Nassau Readi-mixed Conerete Company Ltd.
* Bahamas Mack Trucks Sales Ltd.

The original aceess route will be permanently closed. Access will be provided west of the original acoess at the
round-aboutiend of Thompson Bled. A safe route will be provided for pedestrians as the alternative for the closed

footpath.

We look forward to the co-operation of the motoring public throughout this project,

For ferther iaformunion plane coat:
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The Projest Execution Lett
fdinbiry of Werks & Tranmport
VWhevilina: (2424 E-



pital in the Caribbean to
achieve international accred-
itation from Joint Commis-
sion International (JCI), a
worldwide leader in improv-
ing the quality of healthcare.

JCI is the global arm of the
US-based Joint Commission
on the Accreditation of
Healthcare Organisations
(JCAHO), the same body
that certifies over 18,000 hos-
pitals in the US.

The distinction certifies that
Doctors Hospital’s pro-
grammes meet international
standards and follow the lat-
est US clinical guidelines.
Having a JCI accreditation
signifies and ensures that
Doctors Hospital demon-
strates a high quality of
patient care and patient safe-
ty, and also has an ongoing
program for continuous
improvement.

The JCI accreditation was
awarded to Doctors Hospital
after a rigorous onsite evalu-
ation by an international sur-
veyor team of healthcare
experts.

Charles Sealy, Doctors
Hospital’s chief executive,
said: “We sought accredita-
tion because we want to pro-
vide the best care possible for
our patients. Our patients are
always our number one pri-
ority, and to ensure their well-
being and satisfaction, this
accreditation recognises that
Doctors Hospital is at the
forefront of administration
procedures, staff qualifica-
tions, safety, leadership, and

technology.

“Earning accreditation
from Joint Commission Inter-
national is the gold standard
of excellence in the health-
care industry. Providing high
quality care is a team effort,
and the end results depend
very much upon a cumulative
and consistent team effort
from every individual and
every department at the hos-
pital. It is their professional-
ism and dedication that
results in the accolades
received from the surveyors.
We are very proud and con-
gratulate all of the associates
at Doctors Hospital whose
hard work and dedication to
excellence helped achieve this
honour.”

Marsha Sands, vice-presi-
dent of quality and standards
and patient safety at Doctors
Hospital, said: “While our
work is focused on the overall
care of our patients, it is great
to receive verification that we
are doing things right. It is
good to know that we are
meeting the highest expecta-
tions and delivering on our
promises.

“Tt is reassuring to know
that patients being treated at
Doctors Hospital are in the
best hands. This accreditation
lets our community know that
not only are we tested, but we
are trusted. This accredita-
tion is essentially a confirma-
tion of best practice, and we
will continually strive to
achieve the highest standards
of evidence-based care.”

awe
NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

REGIS GLOBAL INVESTMENT
FUND LIMITED

Matice is hereby given in weeordinge with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of SOM, the
Dissolution of REGIS GLORAL INVESTMENT FUND

LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution

has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

olf the Regeter of companies. The date of completion of the

dissolution was the 20" day of July, 2010,

Las Eduarde Dapine

Liquidator



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 17

LOCAL NEWS

OUTSTANDING STUDENT:
Be

WILDGOOSE

ik Ministry of Education believes that all students
should be given the opportunity to achieve their dreams
through excellence in education.

Each child must be educated, nurtured and supported so that
they may realize their full potential.

The Ministry of Education is proud to showcase the special
abilities, talents, and academic gifts of outstanding students in
the public schools.

Fredricka Judith Wildgoose is an eleven (11) year old student
at Mabel Walker Primary School. With a grade point average
(GPA) of 3.56, Fredricka says that her academic success is due to
her four hours of study every evening, going to bed early, arriv-
ing at school on time, and limiting the time that she watches tele-
vision.

Fredricka is a member of the Student Christian Movement,
Chimes Music Group, Choir, and Drama Clubs at her school.
She encourages her peers to listen carefully to their parents and
teachers, and to ask questions when they do not understand what
is being asked of them. Her dream is to become a doctor, how-
ever, She has not decided on the area of specialty as yet. The
Ministry of Education applauds this young student, encourages
her to continue to work diligently, and wishes her continued suc-
cess in her endeavours.





































Sew a

Sheraton
Nassau

BEACH RESORT











KALIK "THE BEER OF THE BAHAMAS" continues to make its presence felt
at the Bahamas’ major iconic cultural activities. Donations in cash and kind
were made by the Burns House Group to the ALL Andros and Berry Island Regat-
ta Committee to ensure that the regatta, held July 9th - 12th, would continue to
thrive. Pictured is Stafford Armbrister, Chairman of the Committee, receiving the
cash donation from the BHG reps Nicola Heastie (left) and Dewitte Farrington

(right).

Connections
were created.

Sheraton is where people gather. On behalf of all the
associates at Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort, we would like
to thank Nassau’s business community for supporting our
Creating Connections event on Thursday, July 15th. When
you think business, think Sheraton,

THE MANAGEMENT &
Staff of The Bahamas
Heart Centre located at
the Medical Pavilion,
Bahamas kicked off their
20th Anniversary cele-
brations by attending
the Early Morning Mass
at Christ The King Angli-
can Church, Ridgeland
Park on July 4th, 2010.
Celebrant was The Rev-
erend Father Ivan Eldon.
To commemorate 20
years of the honor and
the privilege of provid-

De eT a Ch

20th ANNIVERSARY

Book at sheratonnassau.com or call 327-6000



ing specialty medical
services to our
Bahamas, Dr. Conville
Brown donated the fol-
lowing items to the
Anglican Parish Family:
20 Hymnals; 20 Bibles;
20 Mass Books; 20
Chairs.





4MERIDIEN

a) 2)

lala

THE LUXURY COLLECTION

on on

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Michael Davis beats
odds to win 11K with
eS wendy & Coca Cola

a!

















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! TASTE THE HEAT
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HOMEGROWN NFL CHAMP Devard Darling & several recipients of the Wendy’s & Coca Cola Scholarship nee - hl o oan SPA ARS
Program participate in the final 1K drawing leading up to the 10K giveaway. jew F hagas jofiame oc OL Put :
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PARTNERED FOR SUCCESS! (left to right): Cyndi Williams-Rahming, Marketing Consultant Coca-Cola;
Michelle Lewis, Marketing Manager Coca Cola; Giles Wells, Spirit 92.5FM, Joyann Stuart Freeport, Coca
Cola Rep; Michael Davis, 10K WINNER; Inigo “Naughty” Zenicazelaya, More 94.9FM; Terry Tsavoussis,
Vice President Wendy’s; Yolanda Pawar, Marketing Manager Wendy’s.

S A WN an yay ‘id | A ec oe FE ied T fs Was it destiny, a winning strategy or just family the motivation and determination to
extreme luck, that pushed Michael Davis _ press on.
iT rr A a ve to beat the odds and win not only the initial For the Davis’, it was a group effort. The
#1 Salli ls ais) DR Alas drawing of $1,000, but also the highly cov- banded together with MM iecen es that
eted $10,000 cash jackpot in Wendy’s and _ the family dine at Wendy’s (their favorite
Coca Cola’s “Upgrade Me Too” promo- quick serve restaurant) at least twice a day
tion? for the duration of the promotion; a strate-

: — = This easy going, down home guy from _ gy that paid off in a big way!
AVAILABLE AT SELECT BURNS HOUSE Freeport says he set his sights on winning During the past six weeks of the “Upgrade
ee Se | ee | eee i) from the very start. Michael says “some- Me Too” promotion customers upgrading

how” he just knew the big cash prize would
be his, and the first win gave him and his

SEE page nineteen





Saturday 7
Juifanoe Boneh Bast |
[oem © 1 OB NA

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cae —

FEES ey gg tourismtoday.comâ„¢

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

@nautil US F Bank of The Bahamas

SoM








THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS



UME UI









COOL PRIZES FOR COOL KIDS enjoying tha Uparade Me Too family fun day.

Michael Davis beats odds to win
11K with Wendy's & Coca Cola

FROM page 18

their combos to a large at all Wendy’s loca-
tions (including the airport and Freeport)
became eligible to complete the blanks and
enter their receipt to win. There were four
weekly $1,000 prizes, and the promotion
culminated with a mega cash jackpot give-
away of $10,000.

Not only was Michael the first customer to
win 1K in this year’s promotion, but also
became the first person from Freeport to
ever win in the two years that the promotion
has been run. Proving that lightning does
sometimes strike the same place twice,
Michael sealed the deal with his super-sur-
prising second win, five weeks later.

On that fateful Friday day dozens of curi-
ous onlookers flocked to Wendy’s at the
Mall at Marathon to deposit their last
minute entries, and see first-hand who would
walk away 10K richer courtesy of Wendy’s







CURIOUS CUSTOMERS queue pies just une will
win the coveted 10K prize.

and Coca Cola.

While the drive thru and in-store staff
kept the queues moving at a record pace,
spectators enjoyed an exciting afternoon

SEE page twenty









THE TRIPLE COMBO EATING contest heats up as the ladies chow down.





LUCKY CUSTOMER wins Boss Gift Certificate in “Pop The Balloon”

contest.



* Galeries Chain Tee dtr

Toast pry Wiha Bee cunect month period
bo reneae the Sole pice

Paces and avelinity seabed to cunge
woe! nobes, Fleets call le cae.



ma
EAU











NAUGHTY (94.4 FM) concedes defeat to fellow deejay Giles (Spirit 92.5) in the hilarious “Dueling Deejays”
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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE









PROVING She can “out eat them all’, D’Rekell sports her prize: a state-
of-the-art I-Pod Touch.

Quality Auto Sales
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and TRUCKS

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pom




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LOCAL NEWS

a

ne





LOVELY LITTLE LOGAN points out her favourite promotion.

Michael Davis beats odds to win 11K with Wendy’s & Coca Cola

FROM page 19

filled with free treats, prizes
and surprises. Festivities
included a hilarious “Duel-
ing Deejays” Hula Hoop
spin off between Inigo
(Naughty) of More 94.9FM
and Giles (The G-Juice
Guy) of Spirit 92.5; a Triple
Combo Eating Contest; free
face painting by Seahorse
Face Painting; and numer-
ous promotional giveaways
from Coca Cola.

As an added bonus cus-
tomers making a purchase
were able to participate in
a game of “Pop The Bal-
loon” to win gift certificates
from Bani Shoe Warehouse;
Bahamas Office and School
Supplies (BOSS); The Work
Shop (Signature Brows By
Janine) and Marco’s Pizza.
Additional prizes included

LAUNCH WORKSHOP FOR THE INTRODUCTION OF A
DRIVERS INSTRUCTOR'S MANUAL FOR THE BAHAMAS







f.
oe 2

I-Tune Cards, an I-Pod
Touch, Wendy’s meal
vouchers; and six packs of
Coca Cola.

Michael says that he and
the family were practically
glued to the radio as More



i =
CUSTOMERS relax and enjoy the day’s events.



94.9FM and Spirit 92.5FM,
(promotional partners)
broadcasted live from the
10K drawing.

After four ineligible tick-
ets were drawn, Michael
heard his name announced,

and there was instant rejoic-
ing and celebrating in the
Davis yard. Although this
was the win he’d been
patiently waiting on,
Michael admitted he had to
see the cheque with his
name on it to really believe
the cash was his. When
asked about his wife’s reac-
tion, Michael chuckled and
said “she told me to bring
the cheque straight home.”

Following his historic dou-
ble win, Michael was flown
to Nassau to redeem his
prize. Michael who works in
Freeport as a Bellman, says
this cash windfall will allow
him to bring his bills current,
put away money to cover
back to school expenses, and
with the remaining funds a
smiling Michael says he and
the wife will “party like
Rock Stars!”

The Road Traffic Department is to hold a Launch Workshop
for the introduction of a Driver Instructor's Manual for The
Bahamas. The launch will be held at Workers House on the
12" August 2010 between 9.0am and 5.0pm.

Participation at the workshop is aimed at all driving
schools and instructors who are presently teaching
learners drivers how to drive and those persons who wish
to establish driving schools or become driving instructors.

Interested persons are invited to register for attendance at
the workshop by submitting their name and contact details
to the Transportation Policy and Planning Unit at the
following address

Transportation Policy and Planning Unit
PO Box N Box 1615
Pitt Road
Nassau Street
Nassau N.P.,
Tel: (242) 328 4825/6

The number of attendees is restricted to a first come first
serve basis. In the event that the workshop is over
subscribed it is anticipated that further workshops will be
held in the future.

The latest submission date for registration is 20" July 2010



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







Drink up and redeem a FREE
Maxwell House Coffee Mug!

Just bring your store receipt, dated after
July 8, for TWO 8 oz jars of Maxwell
House Coffee or ONE 8 oz jar and

ONE 8 oz jar of Sanka Coffee to

The d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.

Offer good while supplies last.

3Â¥ The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.
Palmdale, 677-144

ote

ver










THE TRIBUNE

UU



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



BAHAMIAN ee
residential and
commercial cus- |
tomers should
see a slight
reduction in the
fuel surcharge
component of
their Bahamas
Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC)
bills due to an
improved power generating
mix, the minister responsible
telling Tribune Business that
the state-owned supplier had
“made some remarkable
progress in the last several
months”.

Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, said he had
been informed that both the

SEE page 11B







DEVEAUX





e

I

THURSDAY, JULY 22



— ' :





, 2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

BEC fuel surcharge
reduction awaited

* Minister says improved
power generation mix
should result in lower
surcharge for business
and residential customers

* BEC ‘makes remarkable
progress in the last several
months’, with Abaco and
Eleuthera plants set to
come on line in 60 days

* Waste-to-energy plant
construction would take
36 months, once approved

* ‘The dark days are not
completely behind us, but
we have some headroom
and can see a glimmer
of light at the end
of the tunnel’

Agent targets $4m
in extra business
from new branch

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LEADING Bahamian
insurance agency yesterday
said it hoped to generate some
$4 million in new business
within five years of opening
its new Carmichael service
centre next month, a project
involving a $450,000 invest-
ment in 2,000 square feet
premises at Benchmark
(Bahamas) first real estate
development.

John Dunkley, president
and managing director of Nas-
sau Underwriters Brokers &
Agents (NUA), told Tribune
Business that the company
had been looking to establish a
physical presence in the
Carmichael area for some
eight years, and after finding
the right opportunity hoped
to attract new business from
both residential and commer-
cial clients.

“We’re projecting, over a

Nassau Underwriters
says $450k investment
in Carmichael service
centre, set for August
opening, set to grab
substantial new
business and market
share within five years

five-year period, to hopefully
get up to an amount of $4 mil-
lion in new business,” Mr
Dunkley said. “I think it’s a
good opportunity to perhaps
grab more market share and
new business.

“We've been looking at the
Carmichael area for a long
time. We’re going to set up a
service centre there because
it’s fast growing, and we want
to become part of that com-
munity and make it more con-

SEE page 5B

Licencees urged: ‘Lead
the charge to rejuvenate’
Freeport city

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority’s (GBPA) 3,000
licencees were yesterday chal-
lenged to “pull together and
lead the charge” to attract new
investors to Freeport and revi-
talise the city’s economy, with
the GBPA having become
soley a ‘regulator or city man-
ager’.

Acknowledging that
Freeport was enduring “one
of its bleakest times” econom-
ically, following the loss of 800
jobs with the 2004 closure of
the Royal Oasis, Carey
Leonard, the former GBPA
in-house counsel, told the
Rotary Club of Grand
Bahama Sunrise yesterday
that the city’s economic devel-

Former GBPA in-house
counsel says Port Authority's
role now confined to that of
regulator, and city’s private
sector businesses must

lead drive to renegotiate
Hawksbill Creek Agreement

opment “requires everyone to
be involved”.

Calling for a “new strategy
to rejuvenate Freeport”, Mr
Leonard said this could only
succeed with the full involve-
ment of the GBPA’s licencees,
adding that they - rather than
the GBPA - would have to
lead any negotiations with the

SEE page 10B

Discussions on Hawksbill Creek
amendments ‘must start now’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

NEGOTIATIONS over
necessary amendments to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
“must start now”, the former
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty (GBPA) in-house counsel
warned yesterday, because this
nation’s move to obtain full
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) membership could
block any changes.

Urging the GBPA’s 3,000
licencees to lead the push for
amendments to the agreement

Former GBPA attorney says
impending WTO membership
could block needed changes
to Freeport’s foundation,
adding that focus should
not be on real property
tax benefit expiration

upon which Freeport was
founded, Carey Leonard, in
an address to the Rotary Club
of Grand Bahama Sunrise,

SEE page 8B



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Money Fast.

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9 Bank of The Bahamas

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S73m CLICO asset’s
missing accounts

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he real estate

development

that accounts for

63 per cent of

insolvent insurer
CLICO (Bahamas) assets has
been placed in Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection to pre-
vent its seizure by the US
Internal Revenue Service
(IRS) and other tax authori-
ties, its Bahamian liquidator
revealing that he has been
unable to locate tax and
accounting records for the pro-
ject since 2005.

In a batch of documents
obtained by Tribune Business
from the US bankruptcy court
in southern Florida, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez, the CLICO
(Bahamas) and CLICO Enter-
prises liquidator, who is also
acting as Wellington Preserve

* US real estate project that accounts for 63 per cent of
insolvent insurer’s assets in Chapter 11 to prevent it being
seized by IRS and others to settle $3m-plus tax debts
* Bahamian liquidator unable to find tax returns and accounting records
for 2006-2009, and blasts CLICO bosses for lack of co-operation
* Over $500k owed to IRS, and $2.8m in real estate taxes to
Palm Beach County, in addition to $73m CLICO debt

Corporation’s debtor-in-pos-
session, reveals that apart from
the $73 million owed to the
latter Bahamian company, the
project also owes a significant
unknown sum to the IRS plus
$2.849 million in real estate
taxes to Palm Beach County.

Wellington Preserve, which
is CLICO Enterprises (and
therefore CLICO Bahamas)
main asset, was placed in
Chapter 11 to prevent the

development from being
seized by its creditors - chiefly
the IRS and Palm Beach
County - both of which have
“priority unsecured claims”
over the real estate develop-
ment.

In his reports to the US
court, Mr Gomez blasted
Lawrence Duprey, owner of
CLICO (Bahamas) Trinidadi-
an parent, CL Financial, and
Karen-Ann Gardier, former

head of CLICO (Bahamas),
for not providing any assis-
tance to him in relation to
Wellington Preserve, despite
being listed as the project’s
officers when it was placed
into Chapter 11.

“After diligent research,
Gomez has been unable to
locate any tax returns for
[Wellington Preserve] more

SEE page 5B

Bahamas First beats Budget by 3% on premium

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First’s gross



written premiums from its
Bahamian business are 3 per
cent ahead of Budget for the
2010 year-to-date, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with its investment income
also trending ahead of 2009
levels.

Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First Holdings’ president and
chief executive, said the gen-
eral insurance carrier’s Board
was set to meet later this year
to assess further expansion
possibilities in the Caribbean,
following its recent acquisition
of a 75 per cent majority equi-
ty stake in Sagicor General
(Cayman).

And he added that the com-
pany was also set to meet with
the global insurance industry’s
leading credit rating agency,
A. M. Best, “in the next four
weeks” in a bid to have the
‘watch with negative implica-
tions’, which was placed upon
Bahamas First Holdings after
the acquisition announcement,
removed.

“On a year-to-date basis, in
terms of Bahamas First Hold-
ings’ Bahamas business alone,
taking gross premiums into
account we’re up by 3 per cent
on Budget,” Mr Ward told
Tribune Business. “We were
basically hoping to hold our
own, given the current envi-
ronment. That’s what the
expectations were, and
whether this performance per-
tains for the rest of the year is
open to question.

“T can also tell you that at
this stage of the game, our
investment income is better
than it was at the same point
last year.”

Underwriting performance
and claims trends were on par
with 2009, Mr Ward said,
although there had been “a
slight uptick” in motor vehi-
cle claims. He added that
Bahamas First Holdings had
been “surprised” about the
level of suspected fraudulent
claims it had received, as they
were lower for both 2009 and

2010 year-to-date than had
been expected.

Looking ahead for the
remainder of 2010, the
Bahamas First Holdings pres-
ident said: “This year looks
just as good as last year on a
number of different fronts, and
barring any major catastroph-
ic event, we expect we’ll be
able to mirror - if not improve
- the result we achieved in
2009.”

As for the A. M. Best situa-
tion, Mr Ward said: “We’re
looking to get a meeting with
them very shortly, as part of
our annual review. We hope
to meet with them, certainly
in the next four weeks.”

The ‘watch with negative
implications’ had been placed
on Bahamas First following
confirmation of its deal, first
revealed exclusively by Tri-
bune Business, to acquire Sagi-
cor General (Cayman), but
Bahamas First said its 2009

SEE page 4B


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010
Browsing the Internet at your leisure

THE intense competition between Netscape
and Internet Explorer in the late 1990s ended
with the World Wide Web dominated by one
browser. At its height, Internet Explorer was
used by an estimated 95 per cent of online
users. There were many reasons Explorer took
over, one of them being that it was offered free
with Windows, the most common operating
system. However, as time went on webmasters
wrote their web pages without checking for
errors, except by testing them in Internet
Explorer. As the smaller browsers started
emerging, the heavyweights battled for domi-
nance and competition kept innovation moving.
End result: all browsers improved and everyone
won.

Apparently, many people are not clear as to
the difference between a browser and a search
engine. While they are both family, they serve
different roles and work together beautifully.
Before we outline the various search engines,
let’s firstly arm ourselves with their role.

What is a Browser?

Merriam-Webster's dictionary defines a web
browser as a computer program used for access-
ing sites or information on a network (such as
the World Wide Web). This is an accurate
description, but search engines are the appli-
cation that helps find web pages. Simply put, a
Web Browser is a program and a Search Engine
is an application (function).

The main reason a person uses a web brows-
er is to view web pages on the Internet.
Browsers require a connection to the Internet
(through a cable modem, or a direct Ethernet
connection). Additionally, a Browser allows
users to employ embedded links (hypertext)
to jump from a word or image instantly to
another set of data.

How does a Browser

Retrieve a Web Page?

The browser application retrieves codes, usu-
ally written in HTML (HyperText Markup Lan-
guage) and/or another language, from a web
server, interprets this code and renders (dis-
plays) it as a web page for viewing. Usually,
user interaction is needed to tell the browser
what web site or web page the person would
like to view. One way this is done is via the
browser's address bar.

The web address or URL (Uniform Resource
Locator), which you type into the browser's
address bar, tells the browser where to obtain a
page from. For example, let's say you typed
the following URL into the browser's address
bar: http://about.com/compute/. In this case,
you're attempting to reach the Computing and
Technology section of About.com. The brows-
er looks at this particular URL in two main
sections. The first is the protocol, which in the
address shown is "http://". HTTP, which stands
for (HyperText Transfer Protocol), is the stan-
dard protocol used to request and transmit files
on the Internet, mostly web pages and their
respective components.

BUY



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

’ The Art
of Graphix

ya Wate etynicrn

It now looks at "about.com", which tells the
browser the location of the web server it needs
to retrieve the page from. Once it reaches this
web server, it retrieves the index page of the
"/compute" directory. Once this page is
retrieved by the browser, it is interpreted and
rendered in the browser's main window for you
to view. Throughout this article you will uncov-
er information on different styles of browser,
different purposes and much more. Most of us
don't desire twenty 20 search engines, but actu-
ally one that delivers three key features:



Relevant results: Results you are actually
interested in.

Order: Uncluttered, easy to read interface.
Helpfulness: Helpful options to broaden or
tighten a search

With these criteria, these search engines
should meet 99 per cent of the searching needs
of a regular, everyday user. Below is a list of
user favorites with many different styles, and
with their own nuances.

Clusty (aka 'Yippy'): Clusty is a deep web
engine that searches other search engines.
Unlike the regular Web, which is indexed by
robot spider programs, Deep Web pages are
usually harder to locate by conventional search.
That's where Clusty becomes very useful. If
you are searching for obscure hobby interest
blogs, obscure government information, tough-
to-find obscure news, academic research and
otherwise-obscure content, then Clusty is your
tool.

Bing: Bing is Microsoft's attempt at unseating
Google. Bing used to be MSN search until it
was updated in summer 2009. Publicised as a
‘decision engine’, Bing tries to support research-
ing by offering suggestions in the leftmost col-
umn, while also offering various search options
across the top screen. Is ‘Bing’ dethroning
Google in the near future?. Certainly not, but
Bing is definitely worth a try.

Ask (aka 'Ask Jeeves'): The Ask/AJ/Ask
Jeeves search engine is a long-time name in
the World Wide Web. The super-clean interface
rivals the other major search engines, and the
search options are as good as Google, Bing or
DuckDuckGo. The results groupings are what
really make Ask.com stand out. The presenta-
tion 1s arguably cleaner and easier to read than
Google, Yahoo! or Bing, and the results groups

=)

establish

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seem to be more relevant. Decide for yourself.
Give Ask.com a whirl and compare it to the
other search engines you prefer.

Mahalo: Mahalo is the one 'human-pow-
ered’ search site in this list, employing a com-
mittee of editors to manually sift and vet thou-
sands of pieces of content. This means you'll get
fewer Mahalo hit results than you will get at
Bing or Google.

But it also means that most Mahalo results
have a higher quality of content and relevance
(as best as human editors can judge). Mahalo
also offers regular web searching in addition
to asking questions. Depending on which of the
two search boxes you use at Mahalo, you will
either get direct content topic hits or suggested
answers to your question.

The Internet Archive: The Internet archive is
a favourite destination for long-time Web
lovers. The Archive has been taking snapshots
of the entire World Wide Web for years now,
allowing you and me to travel back in time to
see what a web page looked like in 1999, or
what the news was like around Hurricane Kat-
rina in 2005. You won't visit the Archive daily,
like you would Google, Yahoo or Bing, but
when you do, try this search site.

Cuil (pronounced 'cool'): This search engine
was founded by ex-Google staff. It is spartan,
like Google and DuckDuckGo, but there are
differences. Cuil uses a column format like a
newspaper, and it offers both tabled and
columned groups to help searching. The results
are not ranked in the same current events/pop-
ularity sequence that Google is known for, but
Cuil.com can really be helpful in choosing
research directions when you are just discov-
ering a topic for the first time.

Duck Duck Go: At first, DuckDuckGo.com
looks like Google, but there are many sub-
tleties that make this spartan search engine dif-
ferent. DuckDuckGo has some features, such as
‘zero-click' information (all your answers are
found on the first results page). DuckDuckgo
offers disambiguation prompts (helping to clar-
ify what question you are really asking). And
the ad spam is much less than Google. Give
DuckDuckGo.com a try... you might really like
this clean and simple search engine. (This is one
of my favorites).

Webopedia: Webopedia is one of the most
useful websites on the World Wide Web, as it is
an encyclopaedic resource dedicated to search-
ing techno terminology and computer defini-
tions. Teach yourself what 'domain name sys-
tem’, is as itis a perfect resource for non-tech-
nical users.

Yahoo: Yahoo! is several things: It is a search
engine, a news aggregator, a shopping centre, an
e-mail-box, a travel directory, a horoscope and
games centre, and more. This 'web portal’

Cal

THE TRIBUNE

breadth of choice makes this it a very helpful
site for Internet beginners. Searching the Web
should also be about discovery and exploration,
and Yahoo! delivers that in wholesale quanti-
ties.

Google: Google is the undisputed king of
‘spartan searching’. While it doesn't offer all the
shopping features of Yahoo, Google is fast, rel-
evant and the largest single catalogue of Web
pages available today. Make sure you try the
Google ‘images’, ‘maps’ and ‘news’ features...
they are outstanding services for locating pho-
tos, geographic directions and news headlines.
However, to see a video tutorial on browsers,
link to:
http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/10/what-
is-browser.html

Some other popular web browsers include
Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari. Firefox
and Safari are available for both Windows and
Mac computers, while Internet Explorer is no
longer being developed for the Mac. There are
many alternative browsers available if you do
not wish to use those described, but if you have
an older computer that cannot run current
browsers, you might consider downloading an
older version or an alternate browser.

Also, Lynx is a text-only browser that lets
you view web documents, but doesn't support
viewing graphical images or play sound and
video files. It is useful if you have a slow or
restricted connection to the Internet, or if your
computer hardware doesn't support multimedia
features. Lynx does not support a mouse, so
you must enter all your selections with the key-
board, using arrow keys to move through menus
and links. Lynx is convenient for modem users
because it requires less information transfer
than graphical browsers that load large multi-
media files. Users with network connections
(such as Ethernet cards), for whom transmission
time is less of a concern, may prefer to use
graphical browsers such as Firefox or Internet
Explorer.

Now that we’ve learnt that our choice of
browsing is limitless, everyone wins. I hope
these tips were helpful, so until we meet again,
play a little, have fun and stay on top of your
game!

NB: The author welcomes feedback at:
deedee2111@hotmail.com

READER FEEDBACK

To: The Art of Graphics

Deidre M. Bastian

From: Ifferguson@gmail.com

Ms Bastian, I am a frequent reader of your
column every Thursday; The Art of Grahics.
The articles are well written and very knowl-
edgeable. I particularly enjoyed the article on
Presenting the best of yourself - Presentations" .
If you have a chance could you publish that
one again please? This is also good for Family
Islanders who are not able to receive this type
of computer/Graphic training. Keep up the
good work.

- ::WITH SPECIAL PERFORMERS::

’ Tyanna Love and AnastarmigvAnagquway

“SHERATON CABLE BEACH
JULY .25.2010
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THE TRIBUNE

NIB sees $18.8m
benefit/contribution junior passes
deficit in 2009

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business sReporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NATIONAL Insur-
ance Board (NIB) a deficit
between contributions and
benefit pay-Outs for the first
time in hits history in 2009,
with an $18.8 million gap
resulting from the unemploy-
ment benefit implemented last
year, according to its annual
report.

The report revealed that
while contributions increased 3
per cent over the previous year
and totaled $159.9 million in
2009, benefit expenditure
increased 17 per cent to total
$178.7 million.

The unemployment benefit

fund created in the 2009 sec-
ond quarter of 2009 drained
NIB of more than $20 million,
which was transferred from its
internal medical fund, in just
eight months, as unemploy-
ment grew due to the coun-
try’s declining economy.

Unemployment benefit pay-
ments represented 52.9 per
cent of total payments in 2009,
while 25.6 per cent were due
to “sickness”, 17.8 per cent to
maternity and 3.7 per cent to
Injury.

Despite this negative gap in
contributions versus benefits,
NIB saw a record amount of
contributions collected in 2009,
even while the number of
“contributing employers and
the average amount due from

EMPLOYMENT

them were lower than 2008”.

Director of NIB, Algernon
Cargill, in his director’s report,
attributed the increase in con-
tribution collections to a rise in
compliance efforts “designed
to ensure that employers kept
up with their current contri-
bution payment”.

Major

NIB began a major crack-
down on firms that had delin-
quent payments, some owing
several years’ worth, prose-
cuting some companies and
entering into payment agree-
ments with those who vowed
to become compliant.

According to Mr Cargill,
legal action against a business

was the last recourse for NIB
when contributions were
owed.

NIB saw a 96 per cent
reduction in its unemployment
benefit payments year-on-year
for June, according to its latest
figures.

The minister responsible for
labour, Dion Foulkes, said
recently that unemployment
levels in the country are now
“stable” and that there have
been no major lay-offs recent-

This, along with the ear-
marked increases in NIB ben-
efit contributions, could
realign the negative contribu-
tion/benefit payment gap
caused by the high unemploy-
ment numbers of 2009.

LEGAL NOTICE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 3B

Credit Suisse

the Series 7

A JUNIOR securities gen-
eralist at Credit Suisse AG’s
Nassau branch, Amelia
Ritchie, has passed the Series
7 Exam in the US after study-
ing with the Nassau-based
Securities Training Institute
(STI).

STI offers workshops for
the Series 7, Series 6 and the
Canadian Securities Course,
along with various one-day
workshops catering to finan-
cial service professionals.











a



AMELIA RITCHIE

NOTICE

Ey

IN

OPPORTUNITY

SALES/ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTAR
ee CoM eee Meare ie] e OO Cee ieee ie

are eee et ee
customer service skills.

‘Good organization, oral, and written skills
ioe a

NOTICE

GUN POINT INVESTMENTS LIMITED

This is to inform the General Public that all that private
thoroughfare or roadway known as Gun Point situate
northeastwards of the Settlement of Spanish Wells at
the northwestern end of the Island of North Eleuthera
will be closed to the public from 6:00am on Sunday,

HIGGS & JOHNSON

will be closed on

FRIDAY 23"? July, 2010
due to the observance of the firm’s
Staff Appreciation Day
We regret any inconvenience
caused

MANAGEMENT



Ist August, 2010 to 6:00am on Monday, 2nd August,

‘Must be self-motivated with pleasant, 2010 to protect the right of ownership.

outgoing demeanor.

POU Ce a7
ea MCAS CTRL

Everette Sands

‘Must have Associate's Degree or higher President

just call 502-2371 today!

Email Resumé to cpcbahamas@qmail.cor

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Ph: 393-0262
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
ATL Utes

FREEPORT
Six-Plex, Apartment Building, on Lot

#12, Black #86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R, Freeport Grand
Bahama. Five | bed |bath units and One 4
bed 2 bath unit. Appraised (a) $706,347 as
at January 9, 2009

NEW PROVIDENCE

Three Apartment Buildings

Lot #1, 58 & 49

Ferguson Terrace off Malcolm Road
Buildings A & B - Two duplexes
comprising two bedrooms, one bathroom,
living’dining room é& kitchen

Building C: triplex comprising 2-Bedrooms
and 1-Bathroom Apartments. Appraised (a)
ST00,000 as at August 20, 2009

Vacant Land — Hill Top

Lot 412, Orange Hill # | Subdivision
27,377 sq. ft. and about 1.0417 miles west
of Blake Road, or 1" Corner left after
Kisskadee Dr. West Bay Street property
located (@) southern end of road reservation.
Appraised (a) $493,000 as at March 18,
2010

ABACO

Creal Guana Cay, Abaco Cays

Colonial Style Commercial Building
situates in the vicinity of the Public Dock

the settlement of Guana Cay, Appraisal
TBA.

Commercial Complex Includes 5 Octagon
Shape Buildings. Marsh Harbour Abaco,
situated on approximately 8.7605 f piece
of property on East Bay Street



Four Plex, Robinson Close Of McKinney
Drive, Carmichael Road, on a portion of
land Contaming 11,747 sq ft, (3) Two bed
] bath & (1) One bed, 1 bath. Appratsal
TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot #4 Block # 1, Winton Heights
Subdivision comprising of 15,589 sq fi.
Appraisal TRA

Multi Purpose Commercial Building
(known as Faith Convention Center)
nestles on approximately 2.4 acres of land,
situated in the town of Marsh Harbour on
the island of Abaco, Appraisal THA.



EXUMA

Two Storey Commercial Building
George Town Exuma

4.2 bed | bath apartment | bed | bath
apartment on the top floor, bottom floor
house's five retail/offices spaces,
Appraised TBA.

Single Family Residence

Bahama Island Beach Section 3, Little
Exuma Bahamas1974 sq ft building
comprising of 6 bed, 2 bath on
approximately 19,700 sq fl of property.

ELEL THERA

A single storey Commercial Building
situated on Lot # 90-D Approximately
42.616 sq ft. in the settlement of Lower
Bogue on the Island of Eleuthera,
Appraised TBA.

A vacant single Storey Structure Building
situated on Lot # 90-F Approximately
27,736 sq ft. in the settement of Lower
Bogue on the Island of Eleuthera,
Appraised TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot # 9140, Approximately 18,826 sq ft. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot # 90-B, Approximately 22,376 sq fi. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

Three Incomplete Villas situated on Lot
17380 Bahama Sound #18 Subdivision,
Near the Township of George Town,
Exuma Bahamas. Appraised TBA.



Asingle storey Triplex Building (fully
rented) situated on Lot # 9-A
approximately 17,807 sq ft. in the
settlement of Lower Bogue on the Island of

Eleuthera, Appraised TBA,

Vacant Land

Lot # 90-E, Approximately 16,52 1sq ft. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

Vacant Land

Lot # 90-C, Approximately 21,430 sq ft. in
the settlement of Lower Bogue on the
Island of Eleuthera, Appraised TBA.

For conditions of sale and any other information,
please contact:
THE COMMERCIAL CREDIT COLLECTION UNIT
@502-1320/356-1685
502-0929/356-1608

Nassau,

Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offer in writing
addressed to:
THE COMMERCIAL CREDIT COLLECTION UNIT
P..O.. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010
Bahamas First
beats Budget by

% ON premium

FROM page 1B

year-end solvency ratio of 140

per cent, compared to 129 per
cent the year before, stood the
company in good stead to

THE TRIBUNE

retain its A-(Excellent) rating.
“Tt is actually performing
based on expectation for the







half-year point,” Mr Ward told
Tribune Business of Bahamas
First Holdings’ Cayman acqui-
sition. “We expect it to be
accretive to earnings immedi-
ately, so during 2010 we expect
it to add positively to the bot-
tom line returns of Bahamas
First Holdings. We have every
expectation to believe that will
be met.”

Asked whether Bahamas
First Holdings was eyeing fur-
ther expansion into the
Caribbean, its president
replied: “The Board will meet
to decide that particular issue
later this year, so in the mean-
time we will just keep our eyes
out for opportunities.”

Holdings

Bahamas First Holdings is
a company that never stands
still, and is always on the look
out for acquisition and growth
opportunities, as evidenced by
its historical market.

Acknowledging that the
Bahamian general insurance
market was relatively mature,
and effectively a market share
battle, with opportunities for
organic growth limited, Mr
Ward said these factors meant
there were limited possibili-
ties for Bahamas First Hold-
ings locally.

“We expect that opportuni-
ties for growth in the Bahamas
are going to be fairly limited
for Bahamas First, in particu-
lar, as while there are no laws
pertaining to monopolies and
competition as it relates to a
company of our size, one has
to understand it might be part
of the regulatory landscape,
and as such opportunities for
growth in the Bahamas will be
limited,” Mr Ward told Tri-
bune Business.

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Fertilien Erdly of
Bailey Town, Bimini, Bahamas, is appying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within ea days from the 15
day of July, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

BPS el

Tal







PCS Cem GR amet MINIT at) Fier edema

Le cea



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Business Brokers Ps,
Ks

Hotel $4,900,000
FastFood Franchise $590,000
Apparel Stores SETURL)
SIM Se Kat R eile)
Taxi Cab Advertising $110,000
Cosmetics Wholesaler $25,000

RES SOCIUS

RXem ice MI A A AR eole UReoli a

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Fo

SSSEE]E————

Career Opportunity

Sales Executive

We at DHL Express Bahamas are seeking to expand aggressively in the marketplace and are seeking
a highly driven, dynamic and results oriented Sales Executive to promote and sell DHL services.
The ideal candidate will lead direct sales in a defined territory, identifying business opportunities
and assessing customer needs to generate revenue on new business and existing accounts.

MINIMUM OUALIFICATIONS:
5 years sales success in a service industry
Demonstrated ability to infiltrate senior customer levels and represent value.
Excellent interpersonal communication & probing skills, high aptitude and
initiative for follow-up.
Customer service orientation.
Strong business, courier and/or supply chain management knowledge.
Analytical and problem solving skills. Knowledge of technology applications in
business.
Demonstrated drive, persistence & initiative.
Implemented measurements & strategies to attain goals.
Proven planning, organizational, time and paper management skills.
Demonstrated presentation skills.
Team player.
Proficient with technical computer software skills (Microsoft).

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
BS/BA in related discipline

This is a challenging job opportunity with the world’s leading provider of transportation services.
Our commitment to excellence and team spirit is a substantial element of our company’s culture.

Send your application and resume no later than Saturday, July 24, 2010 via email to
michele.louden@dhl.com referencing Sales Executive Bahamas in the subject line.
or to:

HR Department

DHL Express Bahamas

Island Traders Building

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas
THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

recent than 2005,” the Baker
Tilly Gomez accountant and
partner said in a court filing
by his attorneys.
“Moreover, he has been
unable to locate books and
records for [Wellington Pre-
serve] since 2005. This will
necessitate the retention of
accountants for [Wellington
Preserve] in order to recon-
struct the books and records
and file the necessary returns.”
Due to the absence of any
books and records for the
years 2006-2009, Mr Gomez
had been forced to rely on
third parties to provide infor-
mation on CLICO (Bahamas)
debts, “as he has been unable
to interview the former offi-
cers, Lawrence Duprey and
Karen-Ann Gardier, having
received no co-operation from
them at all. He is not aware
of their current location”.
The implication of all this
for CLICO (Bahamas) policy-
holders and Bahamian credi-
tors is that the return of their
monies might be further
delayed, as the liquidator will
have to work out and through
all the potential tax liabilities
and creditor claims.
Wellington Preseve’s IRS
liabilities were unknown, as it
had not filed any tax returns

$73m CLICO asset’s
missing accounts

since 2005, and the US federal
tax authority was said be court
filings to be “holding over
$50,000 in unapplied payments
since returns were never filed
from which it could determine
where to apply the money”.

“Best estimate at this time is
that IRS may be owed
$500,000 or more,” the court
filings said, adding: “Ad val-
orem real estate taxes are
$2.85 million through 2009,
accruing at approximately $1.5
million per year.”

Wellington Preserve was put
into Chapter 11 due to its
inability to pay these real
estate taxes, worth at least $3
million, plus a $1.45 million
judgment against it (later set-
tled) and other debts owed.
Apart from the $73 million
owed to CLICO Enterprises,
some $720,000 was due to
CLICO (Bahamas) in return
for settling a mortgage over
Wellington Preserve, while
there were some $200,000 in
other development-related
claims.

The US courts gave Mr
Gomez some 180 days, until
December 21, 2010, to pro-
duce Wellington Preserve’s tax
returns.

The last financial statements
for Wellington Preserve, which
were unaudited, showed it

having $127 million worth of
investment property on its
books in January 2009, but Mr
Gomez said the property "val-
ued on an ‘as is’ basis today is
worth approximately $62 mil-
lion".

Explaining that the project
consisted of 80 residential lots
and equestrian amenities, plus
commercial sites, on a 523-acre
site, Mr Gomez said: "It was
previously estimated that the
project required a substantial
cash injection of a minimum
$42 million to fund the devel-
opment before it could be rea-
sonably presented for sale.
The financing is not yet in
place, and in my opinion
would not be an option.”

The liquidator has been in
lengthy negotiations with the
Hines Group, a major inter-
national real estate develop-
ment firm, for the sale of
Wellington Preserve, but a
deal appears not to have been
concluded yet.

Maximising its sales price is
vital to ensuring that CLICO
(Bahamas) policyholders and
creditors recover the sums due
to them, but at the moment
the insolvent Bahamian life
and health insurer has total
assets of some $50.865 million,
with liabilities standing at
$65.259 million.

Agent targets $4m in extra
business from new branch

FROM page 1B

venient for customers by bringing service to
that area, rather than have them sit in traffic” to

get to our current locations.

And Mr Dunkley added: “We see the oppor-
tunity for new business is there in such a thriv-
ing community, both private and commercial

business.”

He told Tribune Business that NUA’s new
customer service centre would be located in
Benchmark (Bahamas) new commercial com-
plex at the corner of Carmichael and Fire Trail
Roads, which has a Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national tenant as the ‘anchor’.

Mr Dunkley said the service centre, which is
set for an August 2010 opening, would be

staffed by employees from NUA’s existing net-
work initially, as the company wanted to mon-

itor business levels and demand “very close-

ly”. He acknowledged that NUA would prob-
ably hire new staff “down the road”, the initial
complement featuring four persons.

The new service centre will initially use 75 per

cent of the 2,000 square feet it has rented, giv-
ing NUA an option to expand depending on
business levels.

“We’ve budgeted for roughly about $450,000
to build it and get all the other required services

in place,” Mr Dunkley added.

DISCONNECTION NOTICE

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation wishes to advise
that effective July 19, 2010, it will commence Island-
Wide Electricity service disconnections of all
consumer accounts with overdue balances inclusive
of accounts of customers who have entered into
payment arrangements with BEC but are failing to
honor their commitments.

The public is also advised that all overdue payments
should be made directly to the Corporation.

Consumers whose account(s) are not overdue can
make payment(s) directly to the Corporation or over
the counter at the nearest Scotiabank, FirstCaribbean,
Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal Bank and RBC
Finco. You can also pay your electricity bill online by
logging on to your online accounts at Scotiabank,
FirstCaribbean, Fidelity, Commonwealth Bank, Royal

Bank and RBC Finco,

Please call 302-1679 or 302-1685 should you have any

queries.



Visit us at WWW.my-bec.com

PUBLIC NOTICE

BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION

Registrar

The following persons have been remowed from The Register of Real Estate Browers and Salesmen for

failure to pay their annual fees for licensing and membership in the Bahamas Real Estate Association
within six months after the date on which the fees became payable. (Section 32 (1) (b) Real Estate
(Brokers and Salesman), Chapter 171). Without valid licenses, these persons cannot engage in the

practice of real estate business (Section 4 (1) (a)(b) and [2) Real Estate (Brokers and Salesman], Chapter

171}.

FIRST NAME © LAST NAME

auth Albury
Gurney 5. Armstrong
Glenn Bannister
Leroy P. Bell
Ternaille
Clement
Charles A
Janine
irk D,
Sharel
Selena
lisa Faith

Bunows
Butler
Carey
Carey
Carey
Carter
Cartwright
Cassar
Cleare
Clarke
Draklay-Smith
Dawkins
rraser
Glinton
Hanna

Perry J,
Arianna T.
Therese
Dolly
Astrid 8,
Byron
Laverde

Henderson
Jones-Dixon
Knowles
Knowles
Know les
Know les

Donna
Kirk Antoine
Felicity
Gavin
Geoffrey W.
Glenardo
Reginald §.
Michael Knowles
MargaretP, Lee
Henry Lous
Christopher Louis
Berard L. Miller
joan C. Nealy
Pinder
Plummer
Pyirom
Roberts
Rose
Rubenstein
Sams
Sands

Know les

Sharon Erma
Elizabeth

Paul

Rosita

Trevor

Nicole

Sarah

Frances 4,

fill Smnith

Smith

srnith

Srnith

Storr
Sweeting
Sylvan-Ferrier

Donna
Donald H.
Cayton
Annstacia
Sandra
Lecinea
Roscoe
Jennifer
juet
Douglas
Angelo

Thompson
Treco
Turner
Turnquest
Turnquest

Signed: Registrar of Real Estate

P.O. BOX

P.O. Box AB-20473
P.O. Bax 55-5230)
General Delivery
P.O. Box Fii91.
P.O. Box FH-14053
P.O. Box N+ 765
P.O. Box Ftd258
General Delivery
P.O. Box C8-11556
PLD. Box F274
P.O. Box $5-19710
P.O. Box 5519282
P.O. Box N-L1B8
P.O. Box N-£953
General Delivery
P.0. Box F-43099
P.O. Box C8-10964
General Delivery
P.O), Box FH-14137

PQ. Box CB-11 74]

P.O. Bow N-9152
P.O, Bow F-80368

P.O. Bow CB-11894

P.O. Bou N-1818
P.O. Box N-10133
P.O. Bom S8-4272

P.O. Bow AB-20113
P.O. Bow AB-20777
P.O. Box (B-11730

P.O, Bow APSS223

P.O. Box CB-11404

6.0, Bow F-42480

P.O. Bow AB-20179
P.O. Bow AB-22705

P.O. Box N-2371
General Delivery

P.O. Box CB-11605

General Delivery

P.O. Bow AB-22705
P.O. Bom AB-22705

P.O. Box L- 30-
105

P.O, Bow N-9349
P.O. Bow N-9523
General Delivery
General Delivery

P.O. Box CB-L2372

P.O. Bow 85-5270
P.O. Bow - 20404
P.O, Bow 55-6285
General Delivery
P.O. Bow N-10411
P.O. Bow N-B408

TOWN/DISTRICT

Marsh Harbour
Nassau
Matthew Town,
Freaport
Nassau

Nassau
Freaport
Nassau

Nassau
Freaport
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau
Freaport
Nassau

Rock Sound
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau
Freeport
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Rock Sound
Marsh Harbour
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau
Freeport
Treasure Cay
Green Turtle Cay
Nassau
Harbour Island
Nassau

Nassau

Green Turtle Cay
Guana Cay

Stella Mares
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Marsh Harbour
Nassau

Nassau

Marsh Harbour
Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

Nassau

ISLAND

Abaco

Now Providence
nagua

Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
Eleuthera

New Providence

New Providence
New Providence
Grand Bahama
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Eleuthera
Abaco

New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Grand Baharia
Abaca

Abaca

New Providence
Bahamas

New Providence
New Providence
Abaca

Abaca

Long Island
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
Abaca
New Providence
New Providence
Abaca
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence
New Providence


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 7B
a ae a

a yy













Banking managers go back to school

WITH recent studies con- _—s cessful companies arerun by company ranks, Bank of the
firming that the most suc- executives who rose through Bahamas International’s top
management went back to
the classroom recently for a
LEGAL NOTICE ‘leaders teaching leadership’
series of workshops.

Managing Director Paul

McWeeney (above far
right), led a session, fol-
lowed by Beverley Far-

quharson, deputy managing
director, (standing, other

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138 (4) of The photo). —

International Business Companies Act, 2000, Notice is _ Intensive workshops

hereby given that:- included local and interna-
tional speakers and creative

(a) PUBLISHING AND BROADCASTING EXCICISCS.

INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is in dissolution;
¢ Also shown (I-r) are Ian

(b) the date of commencement of the dissolution is Thompson, business manag-
June 29, 2010. er, retail credit; Perry
Thompson, manager, collec-
(c) The name of the Liquidator is EDWARD B. tions; Mrs Farquharson;
TURNER of EDWARD B. TURNER & CO. #10 Alaasis Braynen, branch
PETRONA HOUSE, FOWLER STREET OFF manager, Village Road,
EAST BAY STREET, P.O. BOX N-1375, Suzette Darville, assistant
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS. branch manager, Thompson
Boulevard; Gena Brown,
EDWARD B. TURNER assistant manager, human
Liquidator resources and training; and

John Sands, manager,
Grand Bahama Division.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 00141
Common Law and Equity Division

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-
dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959, Chapter 393 Revised Statute
Law of The Bahamas

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY
ISABELLA BIANCA ROSA HARRISON

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY ISABELLA BIANCA
ROSA HARRISON both of Green Court, La Rue Du Douet De Rue, St. Lawrence,
Jersey, Channel Islands, UK, in respect of:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-

dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

The Petitioners in this matter claim to be the owners in fee simple of the said lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
their title of the said lot investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

COPIES of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working hours at:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
(b) The Office of the Administrator, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
(c) The Office of Local Government, Hope Town, Abaco, Bahamas
(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Higgs & Johnson, Ocean Centre, Montagu
Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
adverse claim or claims not recognised in the Petition shall on or before the 30th
day of August, A.D., 2010 file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the
undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the prescribed form verified by
an affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim on or before the 30th day of August, A.D., 2010 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

DATED this 18th day of June, A.D., 2010

Samantha Fox
Messrs. Higgs & Johnson
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioners






Soclety of Trost & Esta
STE ST E Pivectitionars (Bahamas)

The Society of Trast and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

lrviies applicatioes [ora schabarihip fer ons models of he STEP Ciplema program in
Intereatoreal Trus Mar:
Applicant: should meet the follawing antera

© Haboeniaa cilia
Mut howe 2 Founchtion Certificate or bore been offically cocnptca from the
Foundation Cesticate Frege
> Corrente empkreed Un the ue UneeTry en Seong 0 Oe ni he red Lnery

Application fore: shradd be obtaned from STEP Gtahoran af ite adronietrative officer bekrw, ond
subrrationd tagether with the fllewing:

Proof of Aahorrdas citenship icertifier copy peapent
«Coren resume deniling employee! history ad cancer
pon
étude el any aber Gling anuiocs

Coonpleied agplirarteers chaul dé be stented delivered to - FROM page 1B

STEF Bahamas

‘onda 's Hay Corporate Centre, Firat Fleer
Pot Bas Mei Tel

Wane, Aakormas

‘Tel Mea









Deadline for applications ls Augwst 31, 2010

said both extensions of existing
investment incentives - and
new concessions - were
required under it “to meet the
changing economic environ-

While many had viewed
2015 as a key date, because





» KRYS RAMMING & ASSOCIATES

GLOGAL EHNQWLEDGE = LOCAL PERSPECTIVE

Krys Rahming & Associates (Bahamas) Ltd is a newly established provider of
corporate recovery, insolvency, forensic accounting and business advisory services
in the Bahamas. The firm Is affiliated with Krys and Associates (Cayman) Ltd., a
premier provider of corporate recovery, insolvency, forensic accounting and business
advisory services in the Caribbean. We are seeking applications for the below listed
position.

Executive Assistant to the Managing Director

This is a highly demanding and challenging role. The ideal candidate must be able
to demonstrate at a minimum 8 years experience in a fast paced and demanding
environment, working under tight deadlines, in a law firm, accounting or other
professional firm. Computer literacy, effective time management skills, flexibility and
excellent interpersonal skills are essential. Good proficiency in the use of Microsoft
Office Suite, Excel and Outlook is required. A proven ability to be discreet and
professional in all communications is also required.

The Executive Assistant will provide support to Managing Director. Duties and
responsibilities will include, but not be limited to:

Liaise with local and international clients, attorneys and press personnel:
Process confidential internal and external documentation;

Draft routine reports, correspondence, minutes and memoranda
Schedule, coordinate and participate in local and international firm events;
Facilitate and co-ordinate all aspects of business travel:

Management of diary system;

Assisting with marketing efforts and office management

Assisting with time tracking and preparation of client invoices; and

Other general administrative as assigned by the Managing Director.

Extra hours at month-end and occasional evening and weekend work may be required to meet strict
deadlines.

The salary range for this position is dependent on qualifications and experience. In addition, an
attractive benefits package will be offered to the successful candidate.

To apply please email your application to personnel@krysandassoc.com. Interested persons
should apply no later than July 30, 2010.

Krys Rahming & Associates (Bahamas) Ltd



PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

Discussions on
Hawksbill Creek
amendments
‘must start now’

Freeport’s exemption from
real property tax payments
was due to expire on August 4
that year, Mr Leonard said the
Government’s move to secure
full WTO membership for the
Bahamas meant it was imper-
ative to open Hawksbill Creek
Agreement negotiations soon-
er - since the accession
process to the body that over-
seas all rules-based trading
regimes was likely to be com-
pleted earlier.

“ T want to emphasise this,”
said Mr Leonard. “We don’t

have until 2015 to negotiate
any changes to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement. We must
start now.

“The reason for this is that
the Bahamas applied for full
World Trade Organisation
membership last year. The
minister responsible has been
quoted in the press as saying
that he expects the Bahamas
to receive membership in
2012.

“What this means is that we
need to have negotiated, with
the Bahamas government, any

POSITION WANTED
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We are looking for a

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old company.
aspects of the Accounts office.

Duties will include overseeing al

Must be hands

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Knowledge fae be
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ee
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Bc layepe cis) a][cmre

meet deadlines.
Please write to us at: P.O. Box CB-13526,
if Veen antes stele

Ministry Of Agric



ith en



THE TRIBUNE



amendments to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement by 2012, or
we may find that under WTO
rules no further amendments
are permitted.”

Mr Leonard declined to go
any further on the WTO
angle, but emphasised that
upgrading and amending the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
was vital to Freeport’s eco-
nomic development and
attracting more investment to
revitalise an economy that has
been in doldrums for some six
years.

He pointed out that the ser-
vice charge currently levied on
income-earning Freeport com-
mercial and residential prop-
erties, amounting to a “cou-
ple hundred dollars” per
annum, paled in comparison
to the real property tax pay-
ments that would be required
if this exemption expired and
was never renewed.

“We might complain about
service charges, but think
about the real property tax bill
for your business premises,
that does not exceed $500,000
in value, which attracts a tax of
1 per cent, or around $5,000,
or if it is over $500,000 in val-
ue, attracts a tax of 2 per cent,
or over $10,000,” Mr Leonard
said.

“If you have a duplex,
triplex or fourplex, you can
only claim exemption on the
part of the building that you,
and your family, actually live
in, but you pay 1 per cent or 2
per cent tax, depending on the
value, on the rest, thousands of
dollars.”

uur a Marine pesoutces

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



Bernanke: Fed to hold off
on steps to aid recovery

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke told Congress on
Wednesday that the outlook for
the economy remains “unusu-
ally uncertain" but that the Fed
plans no specific steps "in the
near term" to try to fuel the
struggling recovery.

Instead, Bernanke said the
Fed would monitor the strength
of the recovery and consider
action if matters worsen.

"If the recovery seems to be
faltering, we have to at least
review our options,” Bernanke
told lawmakers. But he said no
further action is planned for
now because the economy is
still growing.

Record low interest rates are
still needed to bolster the econ-
omy, Bernanke said. He repeat-
ed a pledge to keep them there
for an “extended period."

His comments to the Senate
Banking Committee sent stocks
tumbling downward. The Dow
Jones industrial average had
been up 20 points before he
spoke. It fell as much as 160
points during his testimony, but
recovered some losses to close
down 109 points. Investors
shifted money into the safety
of Treasury bonds; the yield on
10-year Treasury notes fell to
2.86 per cent.

Economy

Bernanke downplayed the
odds that the economy will slide
back into a "double-dip" reces-
sion. But he acknowledged the
economy is fragile.

Given that, the Fed is "pre-
pared to take further policy
actions as needed" to keep the
recovery on track, he said.
Bernanke said Fed policymak-
ers haven't settled on "leading
options” but they are being
explored. Those options include
lowering the rate the Fed pays
banks to keep money parked

at the Fed, strengthening the
pledge to hold rates at record
lows and reviving some crisis-
era programs, Bernanke said.

Bernanke is trying to send
Congress, Wall Street and Main
Street a positive message that
the recovery will last in the face
of growing threats. At the same
time, he wants to assure Amer-
icans that the Fed will take new
stimulative actions if necessary.

The recovery, which had
been flashing signs of strength-
ening earlier this year, is losing
momentum. And fears are
growing that it could stall.

Consumers have cut spend-
ing. Businesses, uncertain about
the strength of their own sales
or the economic recovery, are
sitting on cash, reluctant to beef
up hiring and expand opera-
tions. A stalled housing mar-
ket, near double-digit unem-
ployment and an edgy Wall
Street shaken by Europe's debt
crisis are other factors playing
into the economic slowdown.

"In short, it look likes our
economy is in need of addi-
tional help,” said the commit-
tee's chairman, Sen. Chris
Dodd, D-Conn. And, Sen.
Richard Shelby of Alabama,
the highest-ranking Republican
on the panel, said the econom-
ic outlook has become a "bit
more cloudy."

With little appetite in Con-
gress to provide a major new
stimulus package, more pres-
sure falls on Bernanke to keep
the recovery going.

Bernanke and his Fed col-
leagues have cut their forecasts
for growth this year.

If the recovery were to flash
serious signs of backsliding, the
Fed could revive programs to
buy mortgage securities or gov-
ernment debt. It could cut to
zero the interest rate paid to
banks on money left at the Fed
or lower the rate banks pay for
emergency Fed loans. The Fed
also could create a new pro-
gram to spark more lending to
businesses and consumers in a

bid to lure them to ratchet up
spending and grow the econo-
my.

Bernanke said the debt crisis
in Europe, which has rattled
Wall Street, played a role in the
Fed's "somewhat weaker out-
look." Although financial mar-
kets have improved consider-
ably since the depth of the
financial crisis in the fall of
2008, conditions have become
"less supportive of economic
growth in recent months," he
explained.

Result

As a result, Bernanke said
progress in reducing the
nation's unemployment rate,
now at 9.5 per cent, is now
expected to be "somewhat
slower" than thought. Unem-
ployment is expect to stay high,
in the 9 percent range, through
the end of this year, under the
Fed's forecast.

High unemployment is a
drag on household spending,
Bernanke said, although he
believed both consumers and
businesses would spend enough
to keep the recovery intact.

Bernanke also said it would
take a "significant amount of
time" to restore the nearly 8.5
million jobs wiped out over
2008 and 2009.

And, Bernanke said the
housing market remains
"weak" and noted that the
overhang of vacant or fore-
closed houses are weighing on
home prices and home con-
struction.

Given the weak recovery,
inflation is not a problem,
Bernanke said. However,
Bernanke didn't talk about
deflation, a prolonged and
destabilizing drop in prices for
goods, the values of stocks and
homes and in wages. Although
most economists think the
prospects of deflation are
remote, some Fed officials have
expressed concern about it.

To strengthen the economy,

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P.0. Box 55-5592, Nassau, The Bahamas

Phone: (242) 324-6794 © Fax: (242) 324-7554

—— i

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many economists predict the
Fed will hold a key bank lend-
ing rate at a record low near
zero well into 2011, or possibly
into 2012. Doing so, would help
nip any deflationary forces.

And keeping that bank rate
at super low levels also would
mean rates on certain credit
cards, home equity loans, some
adjustable-rate mortgages and
other consumer loans would
stay at their lowest point in
decades.

Ultra-low lending rates, how-
ever, haven't done much lately
to rev up the economy. Con-
sumers and businesses are cau-
tious and aren't showing an
appetite to spend as lavishly as
they usually do in the early
stages of economic recoveries.

Bernanke, meanwhile, wel-
comed Congress’ new revamp
of financial regulations signed
into law by President Barack
Obama on Wednesday. The
new law, he said, "will place
our financial system on a
sounder foundation and mini-
mize the risk of a repetition of
the devastating events of the
past three years."















THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 9B









FAMGUARD

The Annual General Meeting
of the
Shareholders of

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION
LIMITED
will be held in the
“Victoria Room”
of the
British Colonial Hilton
No. 1 Bay Street
at 4:00 p.m.
on Thursday, July 29, 2010







GOVERNMENT NOTICE

F ON

TENDER FOR SCHOOL REPAIRS






1 The Minisiry of Education inviies sealed bids from eligible qualified Contractors for the

execution of the folkewing school repamr works, in fhe named islands of The Bahamas:









ABACO

HO. | DESCRIPTION
Electrical
Electrical

ANDROS

NO. | DESCRIPTION
3 | Electrical
4 | Electrical

ELEUTHERA

NO. | DESCRIPTION
5 | Mechanical & Electrical
6 | Repairs

GRAND Baha MLA

DESCRIPTION
Repairs
Repairs
Repairs
Repairs

LONG ISLAND

NO. | DESCRIPTION

[SCHOOL
| 50 Boole High School

| SCHOOL
| Herth Andros High Schoal
| ‘Gantral Andros High Schocd

| SCHOOL
| orth Eleuthera High School
| Spanish Welle Albage Senonl

| SCHOOL

| BTV -'G.B.

| Jack Hayward High School
(St, Georpe's High School

| Walter Parker Primary School

SCHOOL

| ESTIMATED COST
| $220,000.00
3 95,000.00

| ESTIMATED COST
| $204,000.00
| $200,000.00

| ESTIMATED COST
[$ 180,000.00
[$50,000.00

[ESTIMATED COST
| $100,232.00
[3 59,715.00
[3 60,855.00
[$50,710.00

| ESTIMATED COST

11 | Construction of 3 Class- | Mangrova Bush Primary School | $230,000.00

room Block (far pre-school

And giaiea 1 and 2)

NEW PROVIDENCE

HO. | DESCRIPTION
12 | Mechanical & Electrical

| SCHOOL
| H. O, Nasi Junior High School

| ESTIMATED COST
| $250,000.00

Zz Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tanders Board utilizing established

procequnes

3. Interested eligihle qualified Contractors may receve Scopes of Works from the
Administrator's Offices of the respeclive Family Islands and Freeport, Grand Bahama ard the
Ministry of Public Works and Transport, in New Providence between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to

S000 gum,

4 All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and a National

Insurance compliance lafter.

5 Bids must be encosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and musi be clearly marked across the top “Bid for (Description of work and Name of School)
Family island and Grand Bahama sealed bids must reach the

= Ministry of Education’.

raspectve Administrator's Office by Monday. 26° July, 2070 at 10:00 a.m.

6 All New Providence bids musl be delivered to tha Office of the Financial Secretary,
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 10.00 am, on Monday

the 26" July, 2008,

? New Providence bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tussday, 27" July, 2070 at the
Ministry of Finance, Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Family Islands
and Grand Bahama Bids wil be opened on Tuesday, 27" July, 2009 at 10:30 a.m. at their
raspacive Adminisiralors office. Tenderars or their designated reprasenialive are inviled to

attend ihe openings.

4. The Ministry of Education reserves the night to raject any or all bid submissions.

Signed:

Elma |. Garreway (hrs. }
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education






PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS eee
Licencees urged: ‘Lead the charge

to rejuvenate’ Freeport city

FROM page 1B

Bahamian government over
amendments to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.

Apart from the GBPA, such
an effort also needed the sup-
port of Grand Bahama Power
Company, commercial busi-
nesses and real estate devel-

opers - both local and the likes
of Harcourt and Shoreline.
Referring to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, Mr
Leonard said: “Today, all
these constituents must be
involved if we are to take
Freeport forward. Remember,
there are around 3,000
licensees who are part of this
agreement, and for a real

South Andros High School
Alumni Association

Date: Tuesday, 27th July, 2010
Time: 7:30p.m.

Venue: R. M. Bailey High School - Room T4

Contact: Darell Taylor - 326-5348

i'm lovin’ it
Employment
Opportunity

FULL TIME
MANAGERS

Requirements:

* Must be a High School Graduate

¢ Must be Customer Service driven

¢ Experience in Restaurant Management would be a plus

¢ Must be Results-Oriented & Articulate

¢ Must have excellent Inter-Personal Skills

* Must have excellent Oral & Written Communication
Skills

¢ Professionalism required

Job Summary:

To assist the restaurant Manager in maintaining the
McDonald’s Formula for success - offering to the
customer high QUALITY, moderately priced food; fast,
courteous SERVICE in immaculately CLEAN
surroundings; and to assist in the attainment of Restaurant
Goals.

Goal:

To exceed the customer’s expectations. McDonald’s
success is dependant upon providing services and
products that meet and exceed each customer’s
expectations. Therefore, the goal of each McDonald’s
employee is Total Customer Satisfaction. Each
employee’s success will be based upon his/her
contribution to this goal.

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Please submit resume to:
Human Resources Department
McDonald’s Head Office on Market St. North
P. O. Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444
Nassau, The Bahamas

ROYAL FIDELITY

Paorey at Week



amendment to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement you need
the signatures of 80 per cent of
the licensees, so we need the
involvement of a large num-
ber of licensees to accomplish
this.

“The days of sitting back
and waiting for investors to
come to Freeport are long
gone. Freeport must go after
the investor and do so in a sur-
gical, well-researched, well
planned and organised man-
ner. There are many other
places throughout the world
that are energetically pursu-
ing investors to invest in their
countries. These other places,
through their trade ministries
or chambers of commerce are
targeting specific investors.
The competition is stiff and, it
is well organised.”

Mr Leonard said Freeport’s
successes between 1950 and
the early 1970s occurred when
all the parties he identified
worked together, aided by the
fact that the GBPA then
owned all the utility compa-
nies and provided the local
government services.

During that period, the
GBPA and several licencees
created infrastructure to sup-
port Freeport as a city for
250,000 persons, but Mr
Leonard said that now the
GBPA’s “sole purpose is to
regulate”.

It no longer had any own-
ership stake in the Grand
Bahama Power Company he
added, arguing that it had
widely outsourced functions it
had limited expertise in to
those who did.

“The GBPA’s sole purpose,
now, is to be a ‘regulator’ and
‘city manager’,” Mr Leonard
said.

“Tt is no longer in a position
to formulate what is asked of
Government with respect to
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment, or to lead the charge for
new investors. The licencees
are. The GBPA can and
should be one constituent, of
many, in the drive to rejuve-
nate Freeport and Grand
Bahama as a whole, but only
as the regulator.

“So, with respect to negoti-
ations regarding the Hawks-

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BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 20 JULY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,487.09 | CHG 0.03 | %CHG 0.00| YTD -78.29 | YTD % -5.00
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit _y
7.00 AML Foods Limited 7.04
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
5.00 Bank of Bahamas 5.00
0.30. Benchmark 0.30
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2417
9.62 Cable Bahamas 10.96
2.50 Colina Holdings 2.50
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.02
2.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.21
1.60 Doctor's Hospital 2.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07
8.75 — Finco 8.90
9.50 — FirstCaribbean Bank 9.81
3.75 — Focol (S) 4.65
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete ~* 0.27
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
1.04 0.00
10.63 0.00
5.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
se Lae 0.00
2.17 0.00
10.96 0.00
2.50 0.00
6.02 0.00
2.24 9.03
2.00 0.00
6.07 0.00
8.90 0.00
9.81 0.00
4.65 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.27 0.00
S.5a 0.00
9.95 0.00
10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $



FG CAP TTAL MARKETS

RAGE zs SERVICES

Div $ P/E
0.250 4.2
0.050

0.598

OB

0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
O.111
0.627

-0,.003.

0.168
0.720
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

bill Creek Agreement, the
GBPA, because it no longer
owns anything, is no longer in
a position

to lead such negotiations,
and it would be wrong of them
to do so.

“In the 1950s, 1960s and
1970s, the GBPA owned and
controlled most of the land
and businesses; that is no
longer the case. The GBPA
can - and must - be a party

with of all the licensees with
respect to any such negotia-
tions, but nothing more. The
GBPA does not own or run
your business, it does not
know, in sufficient detail, the
needs of your company and,
in all fairness to the GBPA, it
cannot be expected to be in a
position to formulate what you
would like to see happen to
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land com-
prising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres
situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant
on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on
the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIE’S PLACE LTD.

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF SADIE’S PLACE in respect of:-

In respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising
One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres situate
approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant on the
East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant
land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet
and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and
running thereon 138.47 feet to a point thence SOUTH-
WARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to
a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTH-
WARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate
of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point
thence WESTWARDLY and by land 5.04 feet to a point
thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon
12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon
169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or for-
merly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon
37.78 feet to the beginning.

Sadie’s Place claims to be the owner of the unincum-
bered fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3)
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have it’s title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions
of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the following
places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor
Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nas-
sau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Re-
tiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower
or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not rec-
ognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration
of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.46 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Pe-
titioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith.

20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022

30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

Symbol Bid $ Ask $
Bahamas Supermarkets 9.42 10.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD%
1.4825 3.04
2.9199 1.14
1.5376 2.02
2.8522 -8.49
13.4110 0.33
107.5706 3.45
105.7706 3.99
1.1177 2.52
1.0785 0.98
1.1162 2.34
9.5439 2.16

EPS $
“2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price Daily Vol.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall
operate as bar to such claims.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
Sart lee
1.525400

NAV G6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.508709

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Last 12 Months %
1.4387
2.8266
1.4777
2.8522
13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal

Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int’

Protected TIGRS, Series

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

LOCKHART & Co.
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

10.0000 tment Fund Principal

10.0344 -6.84

4.8105 7.3073 -5.31
MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19

52wk-Hi - Highest closing pric.

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* Trading Suspen ded

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010, PAGE 11B



BEC fuel surcharge
reduction awaited

FROM page 1B

Abaco-based Wilson City and
Eleuthera’s Hatchet Bay
plants were due to start ser-
vice “within the next 60 days”,
and together with enhanced
operational efficiencies, they
would in 12 months leave
BEC better-placed to address
its long-term capital and infra-
structure needs within 12.

“We've gotten some head-
room as a result of the
improvements the BEC Board
has put in place,” Mr Deveaux
told Tribune Business. “I don’t
think the dark days are com-
pletely behind us, but we can
see a glimmer of light at the
end of the tunnel.

“BEC has made some
remarkable progress in the last
several months with regard to
getting control of its generat-
ing mix. We brought Clifton’s
diesel generators on line, and
the consumer should see direct
benefits in the next billing. The
consumer ought to be paying a
little less based on the fuel sur-
charge, because BEC is using
less gas turbines.”

This does not mean
Bahamian commercial and
residential customers will nec-
essarily see a total reduction
in the amount they pay to
BEC, given that the Corpora-
tion’s basic tariff rate is set to
also rise in August - a move
the Board anticipates will gen-
erate an extra $12 million in
revenues per annum. Bills are
made up of two components,
the basic tariff rate, and the
fuel surcharge, the latter of

which merely covers BEC’s
fuel costs.

The minister acknowledged
that consumers may not draw
comfort from any fuel sur-
charge reduction, given the
tariff rate rise, but added that
the BEC Board had also “giv-
en more focused attention to
maintenance at BEC”.

“BEC’s challenges were in
several forms, where the Blue
Hills plant was being forced
to produce more of the power
demand for New Providence,
which impacted maintenance
at that plant,” Mr Deveaux
explained.

The Clifton Pier plan had
been taking a lesser share of
the electricity production loan,
and this situation meant BEC
was “using a higher mix of gas
turbines, so it was not getting
the right generation mix in
place”.

This had been rectified “in
the last two weeks” as a result
of BEC bringing its Clifton
diesel generation capacity
online, and as a result “BEC is
producing more electricity and
cheaper because of the better
mix of generating plant”.

Once the $105 million Wil-
son City power plant “came
on stream”, Mr Deveaux said
BEC would be able to rede-
ploy generation capacity from
Abaco to other islands, includ-
ing Exuma, Andros and Bimi-
ni.

“The Hatchet Bay plant will
be coming on stream to elimi-
nate some of the problems
Harbour Island is experienc-
ing,” Mr Deveaux said. When

asked when BEC’s in-con-
struction power plants would
become operational, the min-
ister said, according to infor-
mation he had been given:
“They’re all scheduled for
within the next 60 days, Abaco
and Hatchet Bay. Whenever
they come on, they will pro-
vide long-term power and
increased reliability to the con-
sumer.”

These developments, cou-
pled with the tariff increase
and other improvements, such
as fuel hedging, improved
inventory management and
management of the Corpora-
tion’s maintenance schedule,
“will all put BEC in a better
position, so that in the next 12
months we will have a Corpo-
ration..... better able to address
its long-term capital needs”.

Mr Deveaux said the Gov-
ernment was hoping that the
report it was due to receive
from Canadian power giant,
Emera, on how to implement
recommendations for BEC’s

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

transformation, would provide
greater insight into the range
of options available.

Pointing out that a waste-
to-energy power generation
plant could be constructed in
36 months if building work
started today, Mr Deveaux
said among the anticipated
updates from Emera were
more details on fuel hedging
and the use of a circulating flu-
oridised bed in power genera-
tion.

The installation of the lat-
ter, the minister added, would
give BEC “a range” of fuel
options it could use for power
generation, “and do it ina

cleaner way”.










For the stories
behind the news,
syle [pL fo ls 14
on Mondays

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
i (BAHAMAS) LIMITED LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS BROKERS & AGENTS
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS &

AGENTS
Bt CR RC Rel Ya\P) ne

A

PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE









TWENTY -three year veteran in the courier industry, Peter Skinner (far right), opens Bahamas Messengers
with a new look and a promise to deliver.
(Photo: Terrell Glinton for DP&A)

Sending a cost
Saving message

HONKING horns, crowd-
ed roundabouts and traffic
jams could be the route to suc-
cess for one of the island’s old-
est Messengers, a company
that is celebrating its re-launch
next week with a new name,
new look, logo and goal.

“We plan to deliver, literal-
ly, hundreds of times a day,
and do it in a way that people
can trust - fast, reliably and
reasonably,” says Peter Skin-
ner, a 23-year veteran of the
courier industry, which was
more of a one-man operation
than an industry when he
climbed into his first vehicle, a
Volkswagen Beetle, in 1987 to
hand-carry the first package
of his career from one point
to another.

For more than two decades
he called his service We Do.
Traffic drove him to consider
change.

“So much has changed and
we were idling along with a
few solid customers,” said Mr
Skinner.

“Being on the road hours
and hours every day, I realised
how much things had changed
and we needed to change with

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CABLE BAHAMAS



the times.”

Mr Skinner sought profes-
sional help. He also attended a
Chamber of Commerce Insti-
tute presentation. Now he
believes he can create a niche
for himself and a better bot-
tom line for other businesses
by doing the chore that Nassau
businesspeople dread most -
facing traffic. With full-time
staff and independent con-
tractors, he’ll deliver
envelopes, packages, mes-
sages, invitations, boxes -
whatever legal material has to
go from point A to point B,
and get there quickly and cost-
effectively.

Bahamas Messengers plans
to focus primarily on con-
tracted services, including reg-
ular pick-ups and deliveries.
According to Mr Skinner, a
local mid-sized business could
trim costs by up to $5,000 per
year by outsourcing a messen-
ger through his company, sav-
ing on National Insurance pay-
ments, weekly salaries, vehi-
cle maintenance, fuel, insur-
ance, licensing fees and more.

“Tt was time to redefine our-
selves,” said Mr Skinner. “The

demand for good on-island,
island-wide, point-to-point
delivery service increases
every time a new car enters
the frustrating fray of already
overburdened roads. If we can
save businesses time, we are
saving them money and pre-
cious resources.”

Booking will become easi-
er, too, through an online pick-
up request form and a tracking
system to see what time a
package was delivered and
who it was signed by. Those
changes are underway and will
be announced soon. There will
also be special provisions for
bulk mail and ‘Man and a
Van’ distribution services to
and from the Family Islands.

The company operates out
of an office on Dowdeswell
Street and currently has four
vehicles. Delivery rates are
based on how long it takes to
get from place to place. Most
deliveries within Nassau gen-
erally are under $15. One
thing, said Mr Skinner, won’t
change - red cap service.

“Tt’s more than a tradition,”
said Mr Skinner, “It’s a symbol



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Sewing
machine and
cash to the

f Bandit
Summer
School
Program

Ms Brown
and staff from
Bilney Lane
Home for
children, are
shown here
receiving a
check from
Dicrius Ramsey,
General
Manager,
Island Luck.

Cash to

# Bandit
Junkanoo
Group
Cooking
Class.



ci & Doin










ling Chea a

lor
aritie ies:

Ms Rhiney
Coordinator of
Business
Department at
Doris Johnson
High received
10 new
computers
from Island
Luck Web Café
G, M. Dicrius
Ramsey

of service.”
-——
i:

Mr Dicrius
Ramsey,
General

Manager of
Island Luck
is shown here
donating a
check to
Unity House.

Cash to the
2 Bandit
Junkanoo
Group
Summer
School
Programme,





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