Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
OF THE DAY itm tovint it

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 106 No.198

Safety

90F
83F

SUN AND
+t CLOUDS



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST





Ct] ROMO

‘collapsing’
CL mea Cet)
SEE PAGE TWO

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

et ty)
Arianna

SPORTS STARTS ON PAGE NINE

big guns in
new third
arty talks

Former Ministers,
current MPs in
private discussions

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER cabinet minis-
ters, current Members of Par-
liament, and newcomers to
politics held private talks last
night on the possibility of
forming a new political party
capable of successfully chal-
lenging the PLP and the FNM
at the next general election.

With the sensitive nature
of their talks, these persons,

sources have highlighted, are
determined to keep their exis-
tence and membership as pri-
vate as possible for fear of ret-
ribution from the two major
political parties — of which
some of their budding mem-
bership is said to include.
Last night, a source at the
meeting said they are under-
going extensive research on
the acceptability of a third
party in the Bahamas’ politi-

SEE page seven

Pair charged with attempting to

transport Chinese nationals to US

MARIO Bowe, alias Michael Lunn, and Adrian Fox, alias
“Baldhead” were both charged in the United States’ Southern
District of New York with attempting to illegally transport
Chinese nationals from the Bahamas to Miami en route to
New York and other cities throughout the United States.

In the previously sealed indictment, it reads that Bowe and
Fox “knowingly and wilfully” arranged transportation and

SEE page seven

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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





Dengue fever:
govt prepared to
face outbreak



By ALESHA CADET



AS CONCERNS of a dengue
fever epidemic spreading across
the Caribbean increase, Health
Minister Dr Hubert Minnis yes-
terday assured the public that
local authorities are “on top” of
the situation and will do all in
their power to prevent an out-
break of the mosquito-borne dis-

ease in the Bahamas.

According to international
reports, dozens of dengue fever-
related deaths have been report-
ed, including in the Dominican
Republic, where the outbreak is at
its worst in the region.

Puerto Rican officials told the
BBC they fear they may be facing

SEE page eight





DR HUBERT
MINNIS







re ee ree eT eS tUiteais



Ad



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





Electricity bills are

set to rise in August

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE public must prepare
for a rise in electricity bills
come August as a proposed
increase in the base tariff rate
paid by all Bahamas Electric-
ity Corporation customers will
be enforced this month, The
Tribune has learned.

The government has made
it known for some time that it
was considering implement-
ing an increase in the base tar-
iff rate paid for electricity by
all BEC consumers, reversing
the reduction in the base rate
effected in 2003 under the
previous government. It did

not make clear when this
increase would be imposed,
although sources had implied
it may be July 1, 2010, in line
with the new fiscal cycle.
During an interview with
The Tribune last week, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
when asked about when the
rate rise would be effected,
said he believed it was to take
place this month and that he
thought a statement had
already been released to
advise the public of the same.
Mr Ingraham said it was
likely that consumers would
see the effect of the rate
increase in next month's bills.

SEE page seven

Fast Track your plans...
with a Fast Track Loan.



| ADRIAN ROBINSON out-
| side of court yesterday.

| By MEGAN

REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

EMOTIONS ran high
as the man accused of
murdering Long Island
woman Veronica
Knowles was arraigned
in court yesterday.

As Adrian Robinson,
42, was led to Court
One, in Bank Lane,
Nassau, a fight broke
out between Mrs
Knowles’ son and anoth-
er man in the crowd out-
side.

Witnesses said he was
provoked when some-
one made an allegation
about his dead mother.

Police press liaison
officer Sergeant Chris-
lyn Skippings confirmed










Weather officer
punished for failing
to issue timely
tornato warning

THE Bahamas Public Ser-
vice union and the government
of the Bahamas yesterday
reached an agreement on how
to punish the weather officer
responsible for failing to issue a
timely warning on the tornados
that caused the death of four
persons in Grand Bahama ear-
lier this year.

According to BPSU Presi-
dent John Pinder, the weather
officer in question will not be
receiving his annual increment
this year and he will be trans-
ferred from the Lynden Pin-
dling International airport to
the Meteorological Depart-
ment’s head office.

Foreigners in
court on $100m
fraud charges

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FOREIGN fraud suspects
from Japan, Indonesia and
the United States accused of
attempting to obtain $100 mil-
lion cash by false pretences
were arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

But one of the four accused
escaped arraignment before
Magistrate Guillimina Archer
in Court 10 yesterday as he
complained of feeling ill and
was taken to hospital for
treatment.

Hirofumi Tanabe, 57, of
Fukuoka, Japan, told the
court he had been denied his
heart medication since being
taken into custody at the Cen-
tral Police Station on Sunday

Mrs Knowles’ son and night.
another man were tak- And as Ms Archer ordered
SEE page eight SEE page eight



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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







Hemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

Funeral Service

OSWALD
JACK
APPLETON
CUFFY, 84

a resident of Freeport,
Grand Bahama &
formerly of Arima,
Trinidad, who passed
away on 14th July, 2010,
will be held at St.
Anselm's Roman
Catholic Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill on
Tuesday, 20th July, 2010 at 4:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Msgr. Preston A. Moss & Deacon Raymond
Forbes. Interment follows in St. Anselm's
Cemetery.



Precious memories will always linger in the hearts
of his loving and devoted wife: Joan; Sons: Trevor,
Ashton and Compton Cuffy; Daughters: Theresa
Stubbs, Blanche Cuffy-Bethel and Natasha
Henderson; Step Daughter: Valerie Parham (of

California); Brothers: Millard Cuffy (of England)
and Lloyd Cuffy (of Trinidad); Sons-in-law:
DeCosta Bethel and Jeffrey Henderson; Daughter-
in-law: Sheila Cuffy; Grandchildren: Ryan, Ashley
and Amber Stubbs; Elaina and Ethan Cuffy; Tate
and Devin Cuffy-Bethel, Peyton and Zane
Henderson and DontE Cuffy; numerous relatives
and friends including: Harold and Estland Ford,
Avis Outten, Iris Dean and family, Edith (Val)
Lockhart and family, Beryl Rolle and family, C.
Ednol Smith and family, Sharon Deal and family;
Elvin Smith and family, Anthony Lewis, Carlton
Harris, Paul Thompson, Carl lynch and family,
Grafton Ifill, Rex Shephard, Elaine Sands, Audrey
Fountain, Terri Roberts, Marina Miller, Joyce
Fagan, Cecil Aliens, Netha Armbrister, Violet
Smith, Mavis Shephard, Shurn Penn-Sawyer, Lady
Laurie Miller, Nurse Ione Henley, Kirkland Moody,
Fr. McKinnon, Congregation and Choir of Mary
Star of The Sea, The Retired Police Officers
Association, Arch Deacon Harry and Anne Bain,
members of Christ The King ProCathedral,
Freeport, including the ACW, the Alter Guild, St.
Luke's Ministry, the Vision and Transformer Cell
groups.

Friends may pay their last respects at St. Anselm's
Church on Tuesday from 3:00 p.m. until service
time.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street.







Thigh & Leg Snack
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Rib & Wing Snack
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EDUCATION MINISTER ‘APPALLED’ BY STATE OF GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL

Satety fears over
‘collapsing’ GHS

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE terrible state of the
physical infrastructure at Gov-
ernment High School is posing
a safety risk for students and
teachers, according to Educa-
tion Minister Desmond Ban-
nister.

Mr Bannister said he per-
sonally visited the school and
was “appalled” by what he saw.

A worker at the school told
The Tribune that GHS is “col-
lapsing” and the situation is
“dangerous.”

Mr Bannister committed to
making certain the situation
was “dealt with” by the start of
the new school year. He said
funds have already been bud-
geted for the repairs and that
“as soon as our budget is avail-
able” the tenders board will go
through the process of selecting
a contractor.

The minister spoke on the
issue in response to complaints
by school board chairman Jef-
fery Collie, aired at a workshop
for public school administra-
tors and board members last
week. “Every time I have a
meeting it is the first thing I
mention. They sent someone
and they did a little something
and they left, but nothing is
really moving. They can’t wait
until something happens to try
move, because I won’t sit there
and cover up for you,” said Mr
Collie. Work was completed on
four of at least 15 arcades in
need of repair in the past few
months.

“That was the first time I met
the (new) minister. I was in
contact with the former minis-

i dle
a
ae
Meaty













TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











on,

PLASTER and bits of concrete are peeling off. ABOVE RIGHT: THERE are holes in the ceiling and pan-
els coming off of broken windows.

TN



PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







PIECES OF CONCRETE have crumbled from the
underside of the staircase close to where the support
pillars are.

ter, Carl Bethel. It made me
feel a little better to hear (Mr
Bannister) speak,” he said.
Complaints about structural
problems at GHS are not new.
Two years ago, administrators
complained that the school was
“structurally unsafe” for stu-
dents and staff. There was even
a dispute in 2008 over the pay-
ment of workers contracted to
repair six staircases at the
school. Little has changed
today, according to the admin-
istrators. Sizable concrete
pieces chip away from the wall
in some areas “on a daily
basis”, said Mr Collie. Along
several bridges that connect
classroom blocks the steel
frames are exposed due to the
concrete having been eroded.
The same problem affects
concrete staircases and upstairs
railings — the metal bindings of
which have been dislodged
from eroded concrete. On one
staircase, part of the railing
dropped off completely.



Mr Collie said some of the
8x8 plywood planks that are
being used as makeshift
columns are bending due to the
load. He said some of them
may even be rotting.

Some of the structures are
also braced by 4x4 planks. All
of the wooden supports are
wedged in place using small
pieces of plywood jammed at
the top and bottom of the
planks. “Children knock down
the wood like nothing with peo-
ple trampling past it ever day,”
said Mr Collie.

Collin Johnson, the new prin-
cipal at GHS, said he has not
been informed as yet about the
budget allocation for structural
repairs.

“T have started doing some
things. I don’t believe in just
sitting around waiting on gov-
ernment when we can do cer-
tain things. There are a few
holes in the fence we are look-
ing into. I am in communica-
tion with the Ministry of Works



RAILING that has become loose has been cor-
doned off. There are fears of a safety risk posed for
students and teachers.

about painting and cutting the
grass. We are taking the initia-
tive ourselves,” said Mr John-
son. The new principal admit-
ted that structural problems are
another matter. He said he has
some concerns, but that the
school is doing its best nonethe-
less.

The budget for infrastructure
projects at public schools this
year is “limited,” said Elma
Garraway, permanent secretary
in the Ministry of Education.

The ministry has not given
out any contracts as yet. She
said all schools were to deter-
mine their top priorities.

Mrs Garraway added that
the Ministry of Works had met
with less than one third of the
public schools represented at
the workshop to determine the
scope of work for each school
and assess their priorities. All
schools are to participate in
consultations. It is not clear why
the Ministry of Works has not
met with all the schools yet.

mm SUPREME COURT: Forrester Bowe, Corey Hepburn and Barry Parcoi

Judge adjourns trial of three men
accused of killing prison guard

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



THE three men accused of killing a prison
guard when they broke out of Her Majesty’s
Prison in 2006 appeared in Supreme Court yes-
terday but their hearing was adjourned to Octo-
ber.

Senior Justice Anita Allen opened and
adjourned the trial of Forrester Bowe, Corey
Hepburn and Barry Parcoi, all accused in con-
nection with the stabbing death of Corporal Dion
Bowles, which took place as the prisoners made
an escape from the prison on January 17, 2006.

Prison officers Kenneth Sweeting and David
Armbrister were both injured in the prison break,
as were Bowe and Parcoi. A fourth inmate, Neil
Brown, was shot and killed as he attempted to
escape.

Senior Justice Allen adjourned the trial until
October 4 as she is currently presiding over
another hearing that will occupy her for at least
another two weeks.

Defence attorney Keod Smith, representing
Hepburn, 30, and Bowe, 33, indicated his plans to
make an application to stay the trial until after
Bowe’s appeal has been heard.

Bowe was convicted of murder in October
1992, and is appealing against further re-incar-

Mt Etc)
PUT aR

ceration after he was sentenced to life in prison.

Mr Smith said the Appeal Court’s decision
could impact his client’s case as it will raise issues
regarding whether criminal proceedings can be
heard in the Supreme Court without first under-
going a preliminary inquiry or voluntary bill of
indictment.

However, prosecuting attorney Jillian Williams
objected to the application maintaining the two
matters are not linked.

Ms Williams told the court: “We fail to see
why the matter should be stayed because of this
particular appeal.

“What we are saying is that there is really no
connection, no material connection, between the
appeal and the matters before the court this
morning.”

Senior Justice Allen agreed to hear Mr Smith’s
application for the trial to be stayed as a pre-
liminary matter when the trial resumes at 10am
on October 4.

Parcoi, 46, asked the judge to look into the
matter he put before her and Justice Jon Isaacs in
2008 regarding his rape conviction on May 14,
1994.

“My constitutional rights were grossly violated
on this same matter,” Parcoi said.

“T don’t have no issue with the conviction, I
have an issue with the sentence.”

Senior Justice Allen agreed to look into the
matter and update him when the trial resumes.

UE
TN Alea se





THE TRIBUNE

mi COURT: Troyniko McNeil

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

US DNA expert testifies in
Harl Taylor murder retrial

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



AN American DNA expert yester-
day testified in the retrial of Troyniko
McNeil, who is accused of the 2007
murder of famed handbag designer
Harl Taylor.

Kevin Noppinger — lab director at
DNA Labs International in Deerfield,
Florida — testified that DNA samples
from Troyniko's clothing and hair sent
to his lab by the Royal Bahamas Police
Force in 2008 matched DNA taken
from Taylor's home.

McNeil is the son of the victim’s for-
mer business partner Troy McNeil.
Taylor, 37, was found dead in his bed-
room at Mountbatten House on West
Hill Street with multiple stab wounds
on November 18, 2007.

Mr Noppinger has produced seven
different reports on the Taylor case
since becoming involved in December,
2007.

He said he created a DNA profile
from blood stain samples, swab sam-
ples, samples from known individuals
and samples bearing the name
Troyniko McNeil.

In December, 2007 Mr Noppinger
said, his lab tested and compared sam-
ples from Taylor's home and DNA
samples from the defendant's father
and other individuals.

In a report prepared on January 11,
2008, the defendant's father was exclud-
ed as a possible source of the samples
found at the crime scene, said the
expert.

Mr Noppinger said in mid-2008 the
RBPF asked DNA Labs to test the
samples again to determine if DNA
from a relative of one of the individuals
was present.

He said in June, 2008 he tested the
DNA and found that while Troy
McNeil was excluded as a donor, some
samples had a similar genetic make up
to his. Mr Noppinger said he concluded

m@ CORONER’S COURT:









Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
TROY MCNEIL and son Troyniko McNeil out-
side of court yesterday. Troyniko McNeil, son
of Harl Taylor’s former business partner, is
accused of murdering the 37-year-old.

there was a 99.99 per cent chance that
Troy McNeil was the biological father
of a donor.

He said he then contacted the RBPF
and gave them certain information.

Samples

On August 16, 2008 Mr Noppinger
said he received additional evidence
labelled as samples from the accused,
including samples from a T-shirt and a
sock.

Mr Noppinger said he tested sam-
ples identified as blood from a face
bowl, and that the DNA on the swab
came from one individual and matched
the DNA of Troyniko.

The expert said he issued another

Death of Gladstone Ferguson

report on November 9, 2009 based on
two swabs received in September, 2009,
labelled as coming from a knife blade
and knife handle.

Mr Noppinger said he created a
DNA profile based on the knife swabs
adding that the DNA profile on the
blade matched Taylor's.

He said the knife handle had a mix-
ture of DNA and he could not exclude
Taylor or Troyniko McNeil as DNA
matches.

During cross-examination, lead
defence attorney Murrio Ducille sug-
gested the expert's reports were "gross-
ly unreliable."

He questioned why the expert did
not find a link between Troy McNeil's
DNA and samples taken from Taylor's
home in his initial report of January
11, 2008.

Mr Noppinger said that at the time,
he had not been looking for such a con-
nection, as he was not requested to do
so by the RBPF until the summer of
2008.

Mr Ducille noted that a recent pub-
lication by the National Academy of
Sciences found that hair, fibres, bites
and swabs from firearms are not
enough to extract DNA for evidence at
trial.

He noted that Mr Noppinger
received hair and fibre samples cut
from clothing that he linked to the
accused and asked if the expert col-
lected any bodily fluid from Troyniko.

Mr Noppinger said he did not know
what sort of DNA was on the clothing
swabs.

Also testifying yesterday were Senior
Assistant Commissioner Quinn
McCartney and Immigration Enforce-
ment Agent at the US Department of
Homeland Security Hector Gonzales.

The trial resumes today at 10am
before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs.

McNeil, 23, whose first trial ended
in a mistrial when a jury failed to reach
a legally recognised verdict, is current-
ly on bail.

Boat collision survivors speak at
inquest into fisherman’s death

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

impaired with near-sighted-
ness since birth, and had no

two Defence Force officers
listed as interested parties

The inquest is expected to
resume today at 2pm when





SURVIVORS of a boat
collision that preceded the
death of a 78-year-old man
testified in Coroner’s court
yesterday.

Jurors heard from Wen-
zel King Sr and a 14-year-
old witness, both of whom
were with the deceased fish-
erman Gladstone Ferguson
when a P-40 Defence Force
boat collided with his 14-
foot aluminum fishing vessel
at the eastern end of Nas-
sau Harbour.

The inquest into the death
of Mr Ferguson began last
week before Coroner
William Campbell. Jurors
heard that according to an
autopsy report, Mr Fergu-
son died as a result of blunt
force trauma consistent with
the history of a boating acci-
dent.

Both witnesses described
the night as calm and moon-
lit, and also recalled that
homes on Paradise Island
served as an additional light
source.

It was revealed through
his own testimony that Mr
King has been visually

official boating training.

According to their testi-
mony, neither Mr King nor
the young witness saw the
actual impact, only hearing
and feeling its effects.

As Mr Ferguson’s vessel
did not have lights, Mr King
told jurors, they normally
used a floodlight as a means
of alerting other vessels to
their presence — and had
done so on the night of the
incident.

Rescued

After the incident, the
pair were rescued from the
water by a P-40 Defence
Force boat. Mr King told
jurors that he had wanted to
go back into the water to
search for Mr Ferguson, but
was stopped by Defence
Force officers who told him
that they were “already in
enough trouble.”

The young witness was 11
years old at the time of the
incident. He testified that he
also heard the response
made by the officers to Mr
King.

Attorney Calvin Seymour
appeared on behalf of the

in the inquest: Leading Sea-
man Demetrius Ferguson
and Marine Mechanic David
Balfour.

Mr Seymour suggested
that the floodlight was not
on at the time of impact. He
also suggested that earlier
that evening, prior to the
incident, an RBDF boat had
warned the men of safety
risks. Mr King denied this.

the young witness will be
cross-examined.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
a LT
AROS

Ue Pe
a ALY |















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by of Sandals
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ne bent El
— eS
ae
4
of Aa QUA Ou
Established in 1936 by an old Bahamian tamily
Parlianeendt Sireel (mer Bay 51) Tel: 222-8595 or F28-T 157
+ Pax: 3-083
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Parodie Island Tel: 4-4) 61/2
|

Lyford Cay (Harbour Cireen Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 32-5255 Ss

e-mail: info@eolesofnassn com
wwwcnlesninassauconm * PO), Row 8-121

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Stripper suspects

esr

POLICE arrested a number of women suspected of
being strippers during a raid of a club on Market Street on
Monday.

At around lam, officers from the Central Division con-
ducted an inspection of a property on Market and Bay
Streets.

There were 13 patrons in the club and seven women
who the officers suspected of being “strip dancers,” an
official report said.

The patrons and the women — six of whom were
Jamaicans, the other a Bahamian — were all arrested.

They were later released pending further investiga-
tions. The Jamaican women were turned over to Immigra-
tion officials.

The club was ordered closed pending further inquiries.



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited, | It’s our birthday
: , — but why are
we so unhappy’?



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Dems enacted much of Obama’s agenda

WASHINGTON — Far-reaching legis-
lation aimed at reining in Wall Street marks
the latest and likely the last major achieve-
ment by President Barack Obama and the
Democratic-controlled Congress, an 18-
month partnership that strove simultane-
ously to fix a battered economy and enact
sweeping changes to health care, education
and more.

Whatever the longer term impact — the
most far-reaching changes in the health care
legislation won't start until 2014 — the imme-
diate aftermath is unemployment that scrapes
double digits and deficits far deeper than
Obama and his allies inherited in January
2009.

The Republicans who worked ceaselessly
to thwart the president's agenda are embold-
ened, while Democrats who voted it into law
brace for majority-threatening election loss-
es. "Did they do the right thing for the pub-
lic interest? I think so, but that depends on
your values," said James Thurber, professor
and director of the Centre for Congression-
al & Presidential Studies at American Uni-
versity. "You are elected, you get power,
you govern and you change things the way
you said you would.”

That doesn't mean you'll be rewarded.

"They're going to get punished for it,”
Thurber said, in part because the economy
has not responded strongly, but also because
mid-term elections are rarely kind to the
party in control of the White House.

That's the long view — the political pen-
dulum swings — a perspective rarely if ever
in fashion in Congress and certainly not in the
run-up to an election. It also masks a peren-
nial debate about the proper role of govern-
ment in the economy, in health care, in the
auto industry, in energy policy and other
areas.

"If we had health care sooner, if we had
energy sooner, if we had the education bill
sooner, they were all three pillars of job cre-
ation, and that would have resulted in more
jobs created by now," House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi said at a news conference on Thursday.
The 2009 economic stimulus legislation has
created or saved 3.6 million jobs, she added,
using an estimate that Republicans challenge.

"Without it, we would never have dug
out of the deep recession that the Bush
administration had taken us in," Pelosi said.

It was anything but an apology for the
policies she, Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid and others have pursued relentlessly
but something of a lament that the Senate
can't act as quickly as the House. Frustrated,
House Democrats compiled a list of bills that
they have cleared but still await action in
the Senate. It runs to 345 items.

Not surprisingly, there are far fewer if-
onlys at the moment among Republicans,
politically ascendant after losing seats in two
straight elections.

"In every case, the administration saw a

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MEDICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The medical sales representative will be responsible
for promoting international pharmaceutical brands

crisis and used it to achieve some other long-
desired goal of the left. And the crisis
remained," Sen. Mitch McConnell of Ken-
tucky said in a speech a few hours before
the financial regulation bill won final
approval.

"The trillion dollar stimulus that promised
to keep unemployment at 8 per cent didn't
prevent 9.5 per cent unemployment and a
loss of nearly 3 million more American jobs,"
he told the Young Republican Leadership
Conference. "The new health care law,
according to the administration's own actu-
ary, will bring us higher, not lower health
care costs. The financial regulation bill does-
n't do a thing to reform the two institutions
that played what may have been the leading
role in creating the financial mess in the first
place," a reference to mortgage giants Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac.

After eight years of a Republican presi-
dency, the Democrats pursued numerous
other priorities over 18 months.

Obama signed legislation giving the Food
and Drug Administration authority to regu-
late advertising, marketing and manufactur-
ing of tobacco products. Another bill over-
rode a Supreme Court ruling, strengthening
the rights of women and others who allege
they were victims of discrimination on the
job. Democrats also enacted hate crime leg-
islation. With less than four months remain-
ing until the elections and a lame-duck ses-
sion of Congress likely this fall, Obama is
on track to win confirmation for Elena Kagan
to the Supreme Court, his second pick in
two years. An extension of unemployment
benefits is all but certain. Democrats hope to
overturn the Pentagon policy against gays
serving openly in the military.

Reid intends to seek passage of a
slimmed-down energy bill that includes
greater liability for BP in the oil spill in the
Gulf of Mexico. But even if it passes, it will
fall far short of the sweeping plan Obama
outlined to control carbon emissions. That's
one of the 345 stalled measures on the House
list, and one that some rank-and-file moder-
ates would like to have back.

Democrats may also yet attempt to roll
back tax cuts from the Bush era that benefit
those at the highest income levels.

For the most part, though, the major leg-
islative record is complete for Democrats
who took office 18 months ago.

But not the argument.

"T think it ought to be repealed," Boehn-
er said of the financial legislation, even before
it had cleared. The bill "gives far too much
authority to federal bureaucrats to bail out
virtually any company in America they
decide ought to be bailed out,” he added.

Obama rebutted from the White House:
"We can't afford another financial crisis, just
as we're digging out from the last one."

(By David Espo, AP's chief congressional
correspondent).



EDITOR, The Tribune.

Is it a happy birthday and
why are the citizens of the
Bahamas so unhappy, what
have we done to ourselves
and where did we go wrong?
With majority rule we should
be moving forward, upward
and onward together as we
march on Bahamaland.

The Bahamas’ coat of arms
and the national anthem
speak volumes of what
Bahamians should be about.
Songwriters like Phil Stubbs
and Willie Love sing about
the Bahamian people and
what life is like in the true
Bahamas.

Bahamas someone says we
are celebrating 37 years of
independence and it is
through the eyes of our youth,
what a profound statement.
So Bahamas let’s celebrate or
can we really celebrate at a
time like this, when there is
no new jobs for Bahamians,
the education learning aver-
age is below C-grade, the
crime rate is very high, the
health care system is badly in
need of three state of the art
hospitals, too many social and
moral ills in the country, too
much wickedness in high
places and the people are
being enslaved by those in
authority.

Bahamas we have moved
forward as a people estab-
lishing our identity as a
Bahamian, black or whites,
establishing an excellent edu-
cation system, creating
employment and opportuni-
ties for all citizens of the

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



Bahamas. Caring and provid-
ing for the children and the
elderly through the Depart-
ment of Social Services and
the Ministry of Health; pro-
viding a sound and beneficial
banking system for Bahami-
ans, providing forums and
programmes to teach and
educate Bahamians on the
role of parents and being a
productive citizen of the
Bahamas, and most of all pro-
viding the freedom to wor-
ship and honour the Lord
God, who is the creator of all
things.

Bahamas we have moved
upward as a people by being
our brothers keeper, helping
and caring for the disabled by
promoting peace and love to
our fellow Bahamians and our
visitors/guests to our country,
and most of all building a
Bahamas with communities
where everyone can live as
one family.

Bahamas we have moved
onwards as a people for lov-
ing our neighbours (Ameri-
cans, Canadians, Caribbean
people etc) as ourselves, invit-
ing investors to come to our
shores and help us build this
beautiful Bahamaland and
most of all by believing that
Bahamians can oversee their
country from the lowest to the
highest level.

Bahamas as we moved for-

ward, upward, onward and
together, we have built a great
heritage with a rich culture of
the people, great athletic
achievements, prominent and
intelligent leaders, a people
with a friendly smile and a
heart of gold, a people who
love and worship God the
Creator and most of all the
beautiful archipelagic Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas
that the world wants to visit
and discover.

Bahamas why is there not
that great feeling and desire
to celebrate 37 years of Inde-
pendence, just look around
the answer to clear. Bahamas
where did we go wrong? Did
we as a people disobey God
and his commandments? Did
we as a people forget how to
love our brothers and sisters
(black or white)? Did we as a
people forget how to make
the Bahamas as a place where
everyone would want to live.

Wake up Bahamas, wake
up Bahamas and return to
your first love and become
once again a nation that is
pleasing in God’s sight. God
the Creator love the Bahamas
and the people that live here
and we can only get better by
our love for one another.

Then and only then can we
celebrate our independence
and march on Bahamaland to
our common loftier goal for
all Bahamians.

RUDY STUBBS
Son of the

soil Bahamas
Nassau,

July, 2010.

Crime is everyone’s problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I double dare anyone to contradict what
Iam about to say. Too many of us refuse to
see truth in what is said; we always look at
who is saying it. But if we have a conscience,
we would stop covering up for unscrupu-
lous politicians and say it as it is and stop

being used.

I think it is high time that sensible
Bahamians stop letting PLP rhetoric cause
them to be fools. When certain question-
able members of the PLP make public state-
ments it is treated as gospel. How could
people repeat what a man who is already
unpopular with his own party is saying?

Think about it; there is absolutely no way
the FNM government can prevent anyone
from raping his supposed girlfriend or dic-
tating morality. There is no way the FNM
government can prevent two drug dealers

from killing each other.

It is all of our faults. The FNM cannot go
into people’s bedroom and prevent a domes-

tic fight. How preposterous. These are some
of the environments that cause major prob-
lems, sometimes totally ignoring conflict
resolution exercises.

If anyone wants to get technical, then the
drug trade is the core of the problem. Now

we all can remember who facilitated that.

clusions.

There is no way the FNM government

can prevent a judge from exercising his/her
discretion and give bail to a murderer. The
rise in crime is not the FNM or PLP’s fault.

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort
& Offshore Island

Invites application for the following position:

qualifications

to the healthcare community in The Bahamas.

DIRECTOR OF WATERSPORTS

The successful candidate should have the following

* Senior Management position looking after all

Nassau,

REMEMBER?
Crime has no politics, no religion, no
race, no colour.

It is hatched in a demented mind. It
knows no gender. So the PLP should stop
using the fear, emotions and anxiety of crime
to torture the people.

It is cruel and has far reaching conse-
quences, the likes of which some of us may
not be too happy with later.

We have our own minds, let’s use it and
arrive at our own sensible reasonable con-

IVOINE W. INGRAHAM

July 14, 2010.

VST TCT CT TEC

sound like Jamaican reggae singer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

that picture.

Last night I attended the 37th Independence Celebra-
tions at Clifford Park. I was disappointed to hear a
Bahamian singer trying to sound like a Jamaican reggae
singer. Not that I have anything against reggae music,
because I enjoy listening to it. But at our Independence
Celebrations, a Bahamian singer trying to sound like a
Jamaican singer — something is definitely wrong with



Skills & Educational Requirements

v Bachelor's degree in medical sciences, allied health,
or business administration

/ Effective communication and presentation abilities

/ Effective time management, planning, and
organizing skills

/ Proficiency in a variety of computer applications

/ Self-motivated team player

/ Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing,
sales and marketing would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle,
be willing to travel to the family islands, the U.S.,
and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
July 28th, 2010 to:

MEDICAL REP
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 393-0440

We thank all applicants for their interest; however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

fatersports, Dive Center, Scuba and Boat
operations.
Previous Senior Watersports Management in
Resort environment in Resort is a prerequisite
Have tertiary level education preferably in
hospitality management
Be knowledgeable of hotel non-motorized
walersports activities
Have experience in pool Maintenance,
Chemicals, and pumps

* Be knowledgeable of hotel Scuba Operations
® Possess excellent oral and written communication

skills

Have excellent leadership and administrative
skills

Have highly developed social analytical and
interpersonal skills

* Be able to work flexible hours
* Have the ability to manage operations within

budgetary provisions /
Knowledge of International Watersports Rules
& Resulations.

SALARY BENEFIT Commensurate with

experience

Applications should be emailed to:
cmajor@egrp.sandals.com



PAT STRACHAN
Nassau,
July, 2010.







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Tal: 242-323-1865

Email: gems-pearksiiheimail. corn





THE TRIBUNE

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS of Parliament
called on to account for how they
spent a monthly stipend for their
constituency offices are being giv-
en a chance to explain their
expenditures in response to an
Auditor General’s report on the
use of the funds.

According to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, Auditor Gen-
eral Terrance Bastian complet-
ed his investigation into the
expenditure of the money earlier
this year, but the “full” report is
not due to be released until Octo-
ber 2010.

“You'll get a full report of the
$1,500 a month they give to MPs,
how they spent it,” he told The

WAT STRUTS TCC TT q

ENGLERSTON MP Glenys
Hanna-Martin has partnered
with a group of churches in her
constituency to help launch and
provide funding for a food dis-
tribution programme intended
to feed the hungry.

Mrs Hanna-Martin and the
multi-denominational Engler-
ston Pastoral Association are
hoping that in addition to the
$10,000 being provided by the
MP for the food programme
from her constituency
allowance, more donations may
be forthcoming from the local
business community.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence to launch the food distrib-
ution initiative yesterday, Mrs
Hanna-Martin said she has
“seen first-hand the hardship”
that has been felt by those in
her community, particularly in
the last two years as a result of
the economic downturn.

“Many homes are without
electricity and families are
struggling under very stressful
conditions to meet basic needs.
I have seen, however, incredi-
ble courage and resilience
under very distressing circum-
stances.

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 5

MPs are given chance to

explain stipend spending

PM says Auditor General has completed investigation



Tribune.

“The report is complete in the
sense that you audit someone’s
account, you put forward what
the situation is and they have a
chance to say ‘well you didn’t
take account of this, that
etcetera’. That process is still
ongoing, but when we have fin-
ished we will make it public and
you will see how your MP for
North Abaco and others disposed
of the $1,500 he gets for operating
a constituency office. You can
see if he’s done it in accountable
fashion or not.”

The Government revealed in
2009 that it was going to audit
the MPs’ use of constituency

“We have also seen in this
community what appears to be
a significant increase in vio-
lence in particular amongst
young people.

“It is our duty to do all that
we can to address these issues
and to do so effectively
requires us to develop alliances
and partnerships and to com-
bine our efforts,” she said.

In this regard, the MP said
she is “proud to announce” her
partnership with the Engler-
ston Pastoral Association,
headed by Pastor Ednal Minnis
of Pilgrim Ministries Interna-
tional, to create the sustained
food distribution programme.
The local Urban Renewal Cen-
tre will also play a part in coor-
dinating the drive.

Food distribution will take
place from the Church of God
of Prophecy on Minnie Street
on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

“This project is to be a struc-
tured, unified and coordinated
initiative. In this regard I have
additionally liaised with a num-
ber of commercial warehouses
to seek their assistance in these
objectives. The response has
been favourable and donations

funds, which amount to $18,000
per year to run their constituency
offices, for the first time.

The move came in the wake
of the “expenses scandal” in the
United Kingdom, in which many
MPs were found to have misused
their allowances from the public
purse — ostensibly given for the
purposes of covering expenses
incurred “during the perfor-
mance of a Member’s parliamen-
tary duties” — and were made to
either resign, or pay the money
back.

Others British MPs who were
accused of abuse or made to pay
back funds went on to announce
their intention to retire from pol-

itics or found themselves “de-
selected” as candidates.

Three former MPs, who
resigned over the revelation of
their alleged “fiddling” of the
expenses, are now in the process
of being criminally prosecuted
for their wrongful expense claims.

While declining to go into
specifics on the Bahamas expens-
es report, Mr Ingraham told The
Tribune that “as a general state-
ment, I think it’s fair to say that
most (of the country’s 41 MPs)
gave a fair accounting for their
expenditures.”

“That’s a general statement
and in those areas where there
are questions they are being










FROM LEFT: Mr. Omar Neely, Englerston Marching Band Director;
Bishop Solomon Humes, 2nd Vice President - Englerston Pastoral Fel-
lowship; Rev Dr. Antoine St. Louis, 1st Vice President; Rev Ednal Min-
nis, President; Glenys Hanna-Martin, MP - Englerston; and Dennis
Dames, Manager - Englerston Urban Renewal Programme.

of food have already been com-
mitted for immediate distribu-
tion,” said Mrs Hanna-Martin.

Antoine St Louis, vice-pres-
ident of the Englerston Pas-
toral Association, which was
formed in 2006, said: “Individ-
ual churches have been doing
distributions of food, clothing,
funds and so on but we saw the
need to come together in meet-
ing the needs of the Englerston
community, working not just
as pastors and churches but
with Urban Renewal and the
Member of Parliament for
Englerston to see that we are a

stronger body and force to
meet total need of communi-
ty.”

Dennis Dames, manager of
the local Urban Renewal
office, said he would “encour-
age others to come forward so
we can improve the condition
and quality of life of our peo-
ple.”

Any individuals or business-
es interested in donating to the
programme are encouraged to
contact the area’s Urban
Renewal office or the Church
of God of Prophecy on Minnie
Street.

allowed to put forward the facts
to support whatever it is that they
may wish to put forward and the
Auditor General will then be able
to determine whether I’m satis-
fied or I’m not satisfied, and if
the Auditor General is not satis-
fied then there are consequences
for that in terms of (having to
pay the money) back and so on,”
he added.

The audit conducted by the
Auditor General covers the
expenditure of the allowance
since June 2007, when the Ingra-
ham administration returned to
office. Last year, MPs on both
sides of the political divide said
they were in agreement with the

A e. '

HUBERT INGRAHAM



scrutiny, which they called “nec-
essary” and a “great thing to do”
to increase accountability in pub-
lic finances.

The $18,000 per MP over the
two-year period — 2007 to 2009 -—
covered by the report adds up to
a total of $1,476,000 in public
funds.

This is separate from the
$100,000 made available for allo-
cation by each of the MPs for
constituency enhancement pro-

jects in the 2007/2008 and

2008/2009 budgets (or $8.2 mil-
lion over two years for all 41
members), as reported on recent-
ly by this newspaper.

To Baldwin L. Rieby [on his graduation from
Dalhousie University, Baltfax, NA. Careeda witht

Bachelor of Commerce Co-op ‘Accounting Degree

Well done BY. With lave and congratulations from
your entire family, To God be the Glory!



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







@ Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

UL MUU eam eel a (Gon mele

Prison Officer
Sergeant Julian Strachan, 37

of Stanleyville, Faith Avenue will
be held on Thursday 10 a.m. at
Southwest Cathedral Church of
God, Carmichael Road. Officiating
will be Bishop Donnie Storr and
Rev. Leonard Clarke assisted by
other ministers. Internment will
be made in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

He is survived by his wife,

Rashetta Strachan; two sons,

Julian Jr. and Naquan Strachan;

his parents, Vernal and Mavis

Strachan; five brothers, Shanda,
Kervin, Erlin, Marvin and Prison Sergeant Marcus Strachan; seven
sisters, Nurse Prenetta Antonio, Shirley Strachan, Sharon Cleare,
Alice Strachan, Renia Moncur, Permal and Patricia Strachan; father-
in-law, Franklyn Culmer; mother-in-law, Bernese Culmer, eight
aunts, Berthamae Pyfrom, Gwendolyn Pinder, Merlean Cash,
Maryann Strachan, Mayruth Ferguson, Beatrece Stubbs, Princess
Burrows and Victoria Missick, six uncles, Roderick, Wilfred, Leroy,
Alexander, Thomas and Felix Strachan; one grand-aunt, Iva Bain,
sisters-in-law, Laranamae, Raquel and Martina Strachan and Raquel
Culmer-Strachan, Rendi and Sherell Culmer; brothers-in-law:
Lawrence Antonio, Allan Cleare Jr,. Allan Moncur and Shane
Culmer; nieces, Monalisa Williams, Nicole, Samantha and Candi
Antonio, Alicia Cooper, Shelese Strachan, Azaria Moncur, Alexandria
Strachan, Tanesha Wright, Shaniah Strachan and Reniah Hepburn,
nephews, Magen Antonio of Dallas Texas, Police Corporal Tavares
Pratt, Geno and Jeremy Strachan of Bronx, New York, Alreno
Moncur, Alshorn Cleare, Erin, Erlin Jr., Aaron, Trescant and Tyrese
Strachan and Kervin Strachan Jr.; grandnieces and nephews,
Skyeesha Lightfoot, Hailee and Tyler Pratt, Gabriel and Geno
Mackey, Ashanti and Jermiah Strachan of Bronx, New York, Garvin
Johnson and Aleo Cooper, one god-child; Reniah Hepburn and a
host of other relatives and friends including, Thelma Miller,
Patricia Jones, Rachael and Robert Gradolph, Christine Verdell and
Lewis Sweeting, Joseph, Habbakuh and Sherry, David and Joanne,
Carl and Bloneva Ferguson, Rev. Catherine Nairn and Family, Rev.
Henry Davis and family, Lloyd Strachan and family, the Missick
Family, Rev. Pennerman and family, Derrick Williams, Felix Cooper,
the Cash family, the Pinder family, Tanika Pratt, the Pyfrom family,
the Ferguson family of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Prescott Strachan
of Freeport, Grand Bahama, the Green family, Katie Miller, All
Saints Anglican Church Mangrove Cay Prayer Band and ACM,
Superintendent Dr. Elliston Rahming and the entire Her Majesty
Prison Officers and Staff, Prison Officer Leon Johnson, Prison
Officer Corporal Ronald Farrington, Prison Officer Ivan Bodie, the
entire 1993 Squad B, Bishop Donnie Storr and family, Rev. Rhodrick
Brown and family, Rev. Saunders and family, Southwest Cathedral
Church of God family, Dr. Kirk Lewis and family, Sophia Edgecombe
and family of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Rev. Tyrone Greene and
family, Patrick Bowleg, Hollis Cox, Carletha Fox, Emily Hall,
Doreen Forbes and Pamela Gibson.

Friends. may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and at
the church on Thursday from 9 a.m. to service time.



BEC holds annual
health fair for staff



FOR the seventh consecutive year, the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC)
recently held a health fair for its staff.

BEC said the fair is in keeping with its
policy to encourage healthy living.

Held at the corporation’s headquarters
on Baillou Hill and Tucker Roads, the fair
featured health screenings for blood pres-
sure and glucose.

The Cancer Society also participated and
brought timely information on a disease
that is on the increase among Bahamians.

The fair also drew local insurance carri-
ers.

BEC staff were able to take advantage of
massages from various spas represented at
the fair and there were also displays of
pharmaceuticals and other health-related
items.

“Our continuous aim is to get employees
in the mindset of health and wellness,” said
Antoinette Turnquest, assistant general
manager of BEC’s human resources.

“We make sure to add more things that
are conducive to healthy lifestyles every
year. We want to be certain that our

COOKING dem

onstration by Chef Owen Bain





employees live healthy lifestyles.”

Amongst the many attractions were sev-
eral that emphasised healthy lifestyles while
providing a lot of fun.

Chef Owen Bethel held a cooking
demonstration in which staff became active-
ly involved.

Baptist Health out of Florida sponsored
the many health related prizes.

The health fair also spun off into a series
of health seminars led by physicians who
spoke on various topical health issues, par-
ticularly focusing on prevention.

Staff members situated in satellite offices
around the Bahamas found that they were
not left out, as management saw to it that
the seminars came to them.

“We know that we have staff members
that are not situated at our headquarters,”
Ms Turnguest said. “So what we did was
make sure that many of our 16 guest speak-
ers went to other offices to bring their
healthy messages to staff.”

a
GETTING the kinks out at the health fair.





BORCO offers Bahamians welding chance





THE Bahamas Oil Refining
Company International (BOR-
CO) Foundation said it is giving
Bahamians the chance acquire
new technical skills and become
certified welders.

The Foundation’s board
announced the signing of a con-
tract with a local construction
company for the renovations of
two buildings that will be the
home of the BORCO Founda-
tion Technical School which is
expected to start operations on
September 6, 2010.

The Technical School will

ASSES

Career Opportunity

be located in the Old Hawksbill
High School complex.
BORCO further announced
that an agreement has been
concluded with a US based
company for the acquisition of
two fully equipped container-
ised mobile units for the train-

ing, testing and certification of
welders that will support the
training programme.

The six-month programme
will be free of charge. The
application process and entry
requirements will be
announced in the upcoming

weeks.

BORCO provides storage
of petroleum products for a
number of international clients
with a present capacity of 21.4
million barrels and offers blend-
ing, transshipment and bunker-
ing services.

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however, only those applicants short listed wall be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

ANEW eee
Big guns in new

third party talks

FROM page one

cal arena — considering the disastrous histo-
ry of such organisations to date.

He said one only has to look at the Peo-
ple’s Democratic Force, once led by the
PLP’s now Member of Parliament for Fox
Hill Fred Mitchell, the National Democra-
tic Party led by the former PLP Attorney
General Paul Adderley, the Workers Party
led by the ever present social activist Rod-
ney Moncur, or Cassius Stuart’s Bahamas
Democratic Movement to “get the picture.”

“Third parties have had a history in this
country of not doing well, and some people
are concerned about the seriousness of this
venture. But that is why we say that if we
are serious, we must present to the Bahami-
an people candidates who provide the bet-
ter alternative to what the PLP or the FNM
currently have.

“We cannot have persons bringing in
unwanted baggage, and we must represent
credibility with this new party. Newcomers
to politics cannot do it alone. That is why
we have some ‘well-known’ names who

have had Cabinet experience who we hope
could create a shift in the consciousness of
the Bahamian people,” he said.

Along with this “experience” in govern-
ment, the source highlighted the new group
would also require of itself as broad a lev-
el of support as possible. This, he said, will
require discussions with PLPs, FNMs and
independents.

For some time now, these discussions
have been reported to be taking place with
some notable names being dropped in con-
versation as having “held talks” from both
sides of the political divide. Despite this
fact, however, the face of this new and
growing “third force” has yet to be
revealed.

“One thing that has been brought up is
that we must ensure that the individuals
who are going to be put forward are people
who will be well received by the public.
You have a number of people in either par-
ty in the House of Assembly who might
entertain the thought of a new group. But
are they willing to express that desire pub-
licly is another whole other matter,” he
said.

Pair charged with attempting to
_ transport Chinese nationals to US

FROM page one

safe houses for these aliens of Chinese decent
and other nationalities while they were in the
Bahamas waiting to be taken to Miami.

As a result of these smuggling charges, Bowe
and Fox were ordered to forfeit to the United
States any conveyance, including “any vessel,

vehicle, and aircraft that has been or is being
used in the commission of the violation alleged
in counts one through three” of the indict-
ment as well as the gross proceeds of such a
violation.

The case is being handled by US attorney
Preet Bharara for the Southern District of
New York.

FROM page one

However, no notification
has yet been forthcoming
from BEC.

The Tribune understands
the corporation should be
advertising the information in
the local media in the form
of a gazette shortly, just ahead
of the rate increase taking
place.

We also understand that
actual base rate rises may vary
between residential and com-
mercial consumers, with the
extra amounts to be paid hav-
ing yet to be disclosed.

BEC carried out a number
of town meetings to gather

Electricity bills

public opinion on the pro-
posed rate hike leading up to
the implementation of the
increase.

The rise is said to be neces-
sary to help guide the finan-
cially-stricken corporation -
which has in recent months
blamed a lack of funds for an
inability to generate adequate
power, leaving consumers hit
with power blackouts - back
to stability going forward.

Continuing a long term
trend of deterioration in the
corporation’s finances, April
2010 showed that BEC’s

receivables by $66 million.
However, with the cost of
electricity already high com-
parative to places such as
Florida, and with businesses
and consumers mired in the
midst of a recession and in a
season when electricity usage
is traditionally high and sup-
plies particularly patchy, some
have questioned how reason-
able it is for the cost of the
service to rise at this time.
BEC general manager
Kevin Basden, who did not
return a phone call from this
newspaper seeking comment
yesterday, has promised to
look at ways the corporation
can increase its service and

accounts payable dwarfed its reliability.

PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2031, 2034 AND 2037
ISSUE OF B$100,000, 000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 10th

June, 2010. THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029 , 2031, 2034 AND 2037

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 15th July, 2010 and will close
at 3:00pm on 22nd July, 2010. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 23rd-July, 2010 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on
26th July, 2010.

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No.
ALLOTMENT No.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$100,000,000.00 (Nomital) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as posritls after allotment. No interest will be paid on
amounts so refunded. ;

DATE:

The Registrar

c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4868

Nassau, Bahamas



The date of this Pr ospectus | is July 9, 2010.

dnvites "applications for Bahamas Registered Stock
totalling 88100, 000,000.00. The Stock will be.available’i ina range of maturity:dates; the earliest being repayable in Sir:
2028 and the latest in 2037. The total amount’o tate of interest'and the issue price are given below :- , :
= ees I/We hereby apply for the following amount
oo Q Issue Price ORS é
Amount BS ee . Insert below the amount applied for
BS oo n Units-of B$100 2.
25,000,000.00 100.00 ; iS : 7
20,000,000.00
15,000,000.00 5
20,000,000.00 A
100,000,000.00

"Bahamas Register

Rate of Interest



Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
‘Bahamas Registered Stock 2029
Bahamas Registered: Stock 2031
Bahamas:Registered Stock 2034
Bahamas ‘Registered Stock 2037

1/12 % Above Prime Rate

3/32% Above Prime Rate
11/96% Above Prime-Rate

1/48% _Above Prime Rate.
17/96% Above Prime Rate

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
Bahamas) egistered Stock 2029
_ Bahamas Registered Stock 2031

112% Above Prime Rate
3/32% Above Prime Rate
11/96% Above Prime Rate
7/48% Above Prime Rate
17/96% Above Pri













26th July, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock. . te

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 26th July, 2010, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent per
annum over the Prime Rate:(ie: the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks
carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shail be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 26th January,
2011 and thereafter on 26th July and 26th January in every year until the Stock is repaid.

in payment for the Stock applied for.

In the event of the full atount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sumrefundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:

% : Bahamas Registered Stock BS
CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND ee
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated

Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF B$50,000.00 MUST BE MADE VIA REALTIME GROSS SETTLEMENT

SYSTEM (RTGS) THROUGH ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS EXCEPT FINCO.

PAYMENTS OF B$50,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM OR BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
PAYMENTS OF B$5,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM, BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS OR BY
CASH.

INDIVIDUALS PURCHASING FOR THE FIRST TIME MUST PRESENT A VALID PASSPORT
WITH THEIR COMPLETED APPLICATION.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas), Applications will

ne received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 15th July, 2010 and will close:at

H ¥:2010; Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 23rd July, 2010 and will

cease at 3: 0p m. on 26th July, 2010. All envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled
“Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks”.

1. (One Person)

The Stock will be in units of B$100.00. Ordinary Signature



Applications Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum:.
Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)
Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The Treasury
Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road au), applications may also be
downloaded from the Central Bank of the.Bahamas website at www.centralbankbahamas.com or

any of the following banks:



Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )

Bank of The Bahamas Internatio: nal EOOPEOX



Commonwealth Bank Limite
Royal Bank Of Canada:.,

Telephone Nos.(H

SS Oe oP

Citibank, N.A.

2. (Where two or more persons apply as join abs ribers, th dditional names and addresses should
be given below.) i

Provisional estimates from the unaudi d accel at March 3 1, 2010 show the Public Debt of The Bahamas to

Ordinary Signatures
be B$3,876,659,000.*



Names in Full

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE



ing information’is ted fromthe unaudited accounts of the Government of The Commonwealth of

And/OR.

FY2007/2008p** FY2008/2009p** FY2009/201 0p**
BS B$ BS

Approved Budget Approved Budget

1,569,330,000 1,400,046,000

Address



Revenue 1,424, 108,000

Telephone Nos.(H)



Recurrent Expenditure (excluding

Repayment of Public Debt) 1,344,028,000 1,484, 150,000 1,430,454,000

V/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

Capital Development Bank Name

Expenditure (excluding Joans
contributions and advances

to public corporations) 176,778,000 188,718,000 208,850,000 Bank Branch



** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at March 31,
2010 totalled B$573,245,000.

Account Number





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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010




Butler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

| “Chuck”
Norris Simms,
of Elizabeth Estates,
formerly of Simms, Long
Island, will be held on
Thursday, 22nd July, 2010
at 10:00 a.m. at Calvary
Bible Church, Collins

Avenue. Officiating will be

Pastor Allan Lee. Interment will follow in Ebenezer
Cemetery, East Shirley Street.

Mr. Charles

Left to cherish his memories are: three sisters: Patricia
Moutardier-Smith, Suzanne Culmer and Mary Louise
Culmer; one aunt: Martha Farquharson-Deveaux; two
brothers-in-law: Claude Smith and Sanford Culmer; six
nieces: Rosine Moutardier, Anne Moutardier-Masotti,
Sanique Culmer, Bernadette Davis, Suzanne Porter-
Simms and Alicia Simms-Dowdell; eight nephews:
Charles Simms, Cristophe and Dwan Culmer, Todd
Simms of New York, Tarique Cunningham, Paolo Moxey,
Marvin Simms and Renardo Brennen; five grand nieces:
Diah Culmer, Sanae Knowles, Jasmine and Julia Simms
and Doneisha Hamilton; one grand nephew: Renardo
Brennen; numerous cousins including: Thelma Pyfrom,
Rosie Thrower, Paul Farquharson, Judy Knowles,
Charles Knowles, Dale Davis, Paula Hunter, David
Knowles, Douglas Simms of New York, Suzette Uriasz,
Jean Knowles, Wilfred Knowles, Marina Simms, Mario
and Michael Simms, Maria, Alfred and Frederick
Deveaux of California. Tina Kern and Stephanie Dean
of California, Marcel Pratt, Thelma Knowles and Karen
Archer; other relatives and friends including: Mrs. Ruth
Cooper, Tracey and Marcian Cooper, Stephan Miller,
Sheila Andrews, Ruth Knowles, Stuart Culmer, Ingrid
Culmer, Wellington Scantlebury, Buff Bartlett, Bruno
Cunningham, Basil Smith, Thomas Culmer, Joy Culmer,
Melissa Jones, Gary Knowles, Denise Carew, Elizabeth
Cox, Sharnette McKinney, Charles and Joan Deveaux,
Ella Thompson, Ellen Stubbs, Roscoe Darville, Godfrey
Bain, Tyrone Sawyer Anthony Rolle, Kenrick Arthur
and Walter Sawyer; and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes & Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Wednesday, July 21st, 2010, 10:00 a. m. until 4:00 p.m.
and at the church on Thursday from 9:00 a.m. until
service time.



LOCAL NEWS





THE TRIBUNE













Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





FROM LEFT: Steve DeGruiter and Katsuichi Yufu; Carol Collins (top) and Hirofumi Tanabe (above).



Foreigners in court on
$100m fraud charges

FROM page one

for the medication to be
found, co-accused Steve
DeGruiter, 60, an Ameri-
can resident of Indonesia,
told the court Tanabe
shares his high blood pres-
sure and heart disease med-
ication and therefore he
would have to go with him





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to retrieve it.

As he was handcuffed to
third accused man Katsuichi
Yufu, 71, also of Fukuoka,
they were led out together,
with American financial
consultant Carol Collins, 49,
of Massachusetts, following
closely behind.

The four are facing
charges together, while Tan-
abe faces an additional
charge.

October 27.

Defence attorney Milton
Cox made bail applications
for all three defendants, ask-
ing the magistrate to grant
cash bail.

But the prosecuting coun-
sel objected to bail as the
accused do not live in the
Bahamas.

Ms Archer said: “The
court will make no determi-
nation of the matter at this

time but defer the applica-
tion until Wednesday at
10am.”

Tanabe will be arraigned
on Wednesday if not before,
Ms Archer said.

He is expected to be
arraigned on the same four
charges as well as a further
charge of possession of a
forged document, a
Citibank cheque in the
amount of $50 million.

But only DeGruiter, Yufu
and Collins returned to
court to be arraigned yes-
terday as Tanabe was taken
to hospital.

Yufu held the bench for
support as the charges were
read, and translated to him,
while DeGruiter and Collins
stood alongside.

The three foreigners were
charged together with con-
spiracy to commit fraud by
false pretences, forgery, of a
JP Morgan Bank cheque,
uttering a forged document,
the same forged cheque,
and attempted fraud by
false pretences.

The final charge states
they attempted to obtain
$100 million cash from JP
Morgan Trust.

All crimes are said to
have been committed in
New Providence on July 8.

The three accused
entered not guilty pleas to
all charges and requested
for their matters to be heard
in the Magistrate’s Court.

Their trial was set for

and stuff.

en into custody.

Robinson, of Alligator Creek, Long Island, was charged
with murdering Mrs Knowles sometime between Monday, July
12, and Tuesday, July 13, in Long Island.

Dressed in dark blue jeans and a navy blue checked button-
down shirt, Robinson said he feared for his safety in prison
when taken before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez.

He said: “There have been a lot of twists against my life

Man charged
with murder

FROM page one

“They have a lot of guys who are up there and they have
plans to stretch me when I reach.”

Mr Gomez said he would ask prison authorities to be extra
vigilant with him as he remanded him in custody until the pre-
liminary inquiry on June 26 at Court Six in Parliament Street.

There are 18 witnesses to be called in the trial, according to
court dockets.

Robinson indicated he would like to make an application for
a voluntary bill of indictment whereby the matter would be sent
straight to the Supreme Court.

Mr Gomez assured him he could make the application when
he returns to court on Monday, but could not guarantee it
would be granted.



Dengue fever:
govt prepared to
face outbreak

FROM page one

the worst outbreak of dengue fever in more
than a decade, while Saint Martin, French
Guiana and Guadeloupe are also reporting
high numbers of dengue fever cases.

Key West, in Florida, has reported 27 sus-
pected cases of the disease.

As of early June, almost 17,000 cases have
been reported across the Caribbean.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Dr
Minnis said his ministry is “actively doing
survey programmes" where healthcare work-
ers immediately inform officials of any sus-
pected cases of dengue fever they come
across.

"We are on top of it to ensure we do not
have an outbreak in the Bahamas. We are
doing active fogging of our areas, especially
(now) during the rainy season,” he said.

Dr Minnis said workers are carrying out
fogging exercises at night, and he appealed to
residents not to leave out open water contain-
ers that can serve as breeding areas for mos-
quitos.

The Minister said that while there was
one case of dengue fever in the Bahamas
earlier this year, health officials acted imme-



MU aa RS

THE World Health Organisation
(WHO) defines dengue fever as a mos-
quito-borne infection that in recent years
has become a major international health
concern.

The disease causes severe flu-like illness
and sometimes a potentially-lethal com-
plication called dengue haemorrhagic
fever.

Other symptoms include headache,
muscle and joint pains and rash.

Dengue fever is found in tropical and
sub-tropical climates worldwide, in urban
as well as in rural areas.

According to the WHO, there is no
specific treatment for dengue, “but appro-
priate medical care frequently saves the
lives of patients with the more serious
dengue haemorrhagic fever.”

“The only way to prevent dengue virus
transmission is to combat the disease-car-
rying mosquitoes.”

Dengue fever is caused by four distinct,
but closely related viruses.

If a person recovers from one virus,
they have life-long immunity against that
particular form, but only partial protec-
tion against the three other types.







diately to contain the disease.

“We knew exactly where the location in
which it was contracted and Environmental
Health went to fog the area,” he said.

Dr Minnis said he is aware of the signifi-
cant impact an outbreak of dengue fever
could have on the country’s tourism industry
and the community itself.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Miss Gospel
ahamas

CONTESTANTS TAKE PART IN FLOAT PARADE





BAP.

SHELDIRA JOHNSON of Christian Discipleship Ministries International portrays Miriam.

THE contestants of this
year’s Miss Gospel Bahamas
pulled out all the stops during
the weekend float parade, the
final public event leading up to
pageant night on August 1.

“Going through the streets
of Nassau was a stress free
moment for me. Wearing our
Biblical costumes, people got
to see for themselves what we
came into the pageant to do.
That was the sweet part of it,”
said Kervinique Ferguson, who
portrayed Mary the mother of
Jesus in the Biblical float
parade.

For many of the contestants
the elaborate float parade was a
“bittersweet” event as it sig-
nalled the end of months of
camaraderie and fellowship and
is indicative that a nail-biting
crowning night looms.

In Ms Ferguson’s case, focus-
ing on making sure that every-
thing is right for pageant night
“Gs a lot to do.”

She’s not the only one feeling
the pressure.

“T prayed to God while I was
on the parade just to fulfill me
come pageant night and I
thanked Him for the great
memories he’s given me of this
experience from March up to
now,” said contestant Shantia
Williams. With less than two
weeks to go until the pageant,
the Golden Gates Assembly
member who portrayed Rahab
on the parade also bemoaned
the pending loss of new-found
camaraderie. During the
months of preparatory activi-
ties the contestants formed a
tight knit circle as they paid
courtesy calls, participated in
make-up and etiquette classes,
had a speech contest and went
into a spiritual retreat at
Breezes, among other activi-
ties.

“Tm not going to think of it
as if I’m losing friends. We are
still going to remain friends,”
said Ms Williams. “We’re just
not going to see each other as
often as we have over these
past weeks.”

The contestants used the
float parade to wow members
of the public who gathered
along the route which took the
small motorcade from the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture’s Oakesfield headquarters
into downtown Nassau and
over-the-hill areas.

“T just love the Miss Gospel
Bahamas pageant because it is
a positive thing for young ladies
and the proceeds help the
under privileged,” said
bystander Michele Hanna



i







SHARELL FERGUSON of Bahamas Faith Ministries depicts the Samari-

tan woman at the well.

McDonald. “The ladies looked
great.”

The themes of floats ranged
from ornate presentations of
the bride of Christ portrayed
by Sylvian Rahming to more
obscure Biblical characters like
Latasha Munning’s depiction
of the Shunammite woman —
the mother of a young boy that
the prophet Elisha brought
back to life.

Contestants chose the char-
acters they wanted to portray
based on their personal prefer-
ences. For instance, contestant
Angelique Collie chose Ruth
because she was intrigued by
her hardworking character and
devotion to her mother-in-law,
while Sheldira Johnson picked
Miriam because, like the Bibli-
cal character, she loves praise,
worship and dance.

Each presentation took
weeks to research and bring to
fruition. It was that eye for
detail that spectators appreci-
ated. “The contestants brought
the Bible alive,” said Mrs
McDonald. Another bystander,
Nola King, agreed.

“The contestants look great,”
said Mrs King. “I have three
small daughters and every year
I take them to see the pageant.”

She added: “The pageant
teaches us about Christianity
which keeps us alive because
prayer without work is dead. I
just love that pageant. It’s just a
positive one.”

The new Miss Gospel
Bahamas queen will be
crowned on Sunday, August 1,
at the Rainforest Theatre in the
Wyndham Nassau Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino. Tickets
for the event are on sale at
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SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



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Film Studios wind-up threat after $90k rule

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



Bahamian engineer-

ing company may

petition for the liqui-

dation of the

Bahamas Film Stu-
dios’ holding company after obtaining
a $90,000 judgment against it for
breach of contract, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, with the latter’s
“principal shareholder” saying he was
no longer involved with the develop-
ment.

A Supreme Court judgment, issued
last Thursday in favour of well-known
Bahamian firm, Islands by Design,
requires Gold Rock Creek Enterpris-
es, the parent of the Grand Bahama-

* Bahamian engineering firm may petition for liquidation of company owning project where Pirates
of the Caribbean filmed, after Supreme Court awards it $90,000 plus interest for breach of contract
* ‘Principal shareholder’ denies any responsibility, saying he has ‘nothing’ more to do with Bahamas Film Studios

based Bahamas Film Studios, to pay it
$89,822 for engineering and environ-
mental consulting work, including
preparation of an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) to meet the
Government’s requirements.

Gold Rock Creek was also ordered
to pay Islands by Design interest at
the rate of 1.5 per cent per month, dat-
ing back to September 30, 2006, after it
was not represented at the trial before
Supreme Court Justice Bernard Turn-
er.

Sources familiar with the situation

suggested that Islands by Design might
now petition the Supreme Court to
“put the company [Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises] into liquidation” in a bid
to recover the sums owed, as it was
now a creditor to whom the Bahamas
Film Studios’ developer owed money.

An insight into the difficulties
Islands by Design will likely face in
recovering the judgment sum were
shown yesterday when Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises’ “principal share-
holder”, Nashville-based investment
banker Ross Fuller, told Tribune Busi-

ness he no longer had any connection
with the company or the Grand
Bahama-based Bahamas Film Studios.

“T am no longer involved with Gold
Rock Creek Enterprises or the Stu-
dio, nor do I have any information
about the judgment,” Mr Fuller, a
principal at Stockton, Fuller & Com-
pany, said in reply to a series of ques-
tions e-mailed to him by Tribune Busi-
ness.

This, of course, begs the question
of who is responsible for the Bahamas
Film Studios and its debts, especially

since Mr Fuller, in a February 11, 2010,
article in Tribune Business, was accus-
ing the Government of breaching the
project’s Heads of Agreement and fail-
ing to act in good faith by not negoti-
ating a new lease for the project site
with him.

The episode is again likely to high-
light - and possibly create pressure for
- the need for major foreign developers
to put up performance bonds or some
form of escrow security to ensure that

SEE page 2B

Government eyeing $30m bridge ‘fully funds’ Arawak port

‘this week’ for

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Facility put together by RoyalFidelity/Royal Bank gives

landfill deal

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is “hop-
ing this week” to conclude a
management contract for the
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway landfill, the minister
for the environment telling Tri-
bune Business the private sec-
tor entity involved believes it
can complete a waste ‘break-
down profile’ within 90-120
days of taking over.

Updating this newspaper on
the status of negotiations
between the Government and
Cambridge Project Develop-
ment Inc, Earl Deveaux said:
“We have not finished things.
I’m hoping it’s done this week,
but we haven’t concluded nego-
tiations yet. They have pro-
posed an agreement, but we
don’t have final authorisation
of it yet.”

* Some 30% of waste
‘immediately recyclable’,
and private sector partner
promises break down
in 90-120 days
* TPO may be some way off,
as government focuses on
management contract in
near term
Describing the conclusion of
a Management contract as “one
of my priorities”, Mr Deveaux
said it was critical for the land-
fill to be placed under profes-
sional, permanent management.
Apart from managing the
site, securing it and preventing

pollution run-offs and fires, the
minister said Cambridge would

SEE page 3B

Abaco power woes
costing firms 50%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

BROWNOUTS, blackouts
and fried equipment continue
to plague Abaco, with one store
owner yesterday saying busi-
ness had fallen 50 per cent
because of the power issues,
while one hardware store said
commerce was flowing because
of it.

Peter Bradley said his com-
pany, Conch Pearl Gallery, had
lost half its business because of
the consistent power cuts across
the island, as tourists - his
biggest customers - peer into
the darkened store and subse-
quently leave.

According to Mr Bradley,
the power outages can go on
for three to four hours at a
time, and because the building,
where three other businesses
have rented out space, has no

back-up generator, the frequent
daily losses are mounting.

As he spoke to Tribune Busi-
ness by phone yesterday, the
power in his store was out and
“someone just looked in and
left”.

Mr Bradley said that while
the power outages are an annu-
al summer menace, the cuts
seems to be much worse this
year. And they seem to be hurt-
ing Abaco’s tourism industry
far more than previous years.

“We simply are not seeing
the tourists,” he said. “They are
not wanting to come, so second
home owners who come two
and three times a year are com-
ing once. I don’t know if it’s the
power cuts or the economy. But
there have been a lot com-
plaints (by tourists).”

A hardware store employee,
who spoke on condition of

SEE page 3B

Sotheby's

THE $70 million Arawak
Cay post is now “fully funded”
after receiving a $30 million
bridge loan facility from Royal
Bank of Canada, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with construc-
tion already started and likely
to be visible “in less than 30
days”.

The $30 million received
from Royal Bank of Canada (a
facility arranged by RoyalFi-
delity Merchant Bank & Trust),
when combined with the $20
million in equity injected by
both the Government and the
private sector, will provide all
the financing needed to con-
struct the new port, for which
the “first order of sheet piling”
has already arrived.

Multiple sources yesterday
confirmed that the $30 million
bridge loan facility was now in
place, and one told Tribune
Business: ““We’re fully funded.

“The first order of sheet pile
is here. The work is going to
start at the western end of
Arawak Cay and work east. It'll
go east.

“They’ve already started.
Basically, we had all the mate-
rial on order waiting to pull the
trigger. We’ve now paid the
first big bill, and stuff is here. I
think it will be quite exciting,
and will be visible in less than
30 days.

“It’s a big project, and while
it’s early days it should go well.
We'll accelerate it as fast as we
can. Nothing has changed. The
primary focus is the redevelop-

$70m Arawak Cay port all financing it needs, before
replacement with preference shares and IPO

* Construction to be ‘visible in less than 30 days’, with
big payments now being made and first sheet pile
order already in Bahamas

* Not all 20 private sector stakeholders invest for $1m
each, a small minority not going beyond initial
$55,000 contribution, although full $20m raised

ment of Bay Street, and that’s
the big push.”

The $30 million bridging loan
facility will ensure the Arawak
Cay port project has enough
capital to fund its construction,
and it will eventually be
replaced by a million prefer-
ence share issue that will pay
out Royal Bank of Canada.

RoyalFidelity, as previously
revealed by Tribune Business,
has already been appointed as
placement/advisory agent for
the preference share issue,
which sources suggested would
take place some time within the
next two years. It is likely to
happen, though, before that
timeframe expires, with funds
being sought from selected high
net worth and institutional
investors.

Then, the $10 million initial
public offering (IPO) will take
place, allowing the Bahamian
public - especially retail
investors - to subscribe for

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

shares in the Arawak Cay port,
and hold a stake in real estate
that services New Providence’s
cargo shipping needs. The IPO
will be the last financing act to
occur.

Currently, equity ownership
of Arawak Port Development
Ltd (APD) is split 50/50
between the Government and
private sector through their $20
million investments each.

Tribune Business has been
told that while there are some
20 shareholders collectively
owning the private sector’s 50
per cent share, not all invested
the $1 million that was sought.

This newspaper understands
that a small minority, including
Bethell Estates, elected not to
invest any equity beyond the
$55,000 all had ponied up to
fund the initial feasibility stud-
ies, While a small number also
chose to increase their contri-

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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Civil society exclusion furthering our malaise

IN my column last week, I
ended with the warning: “Plan-
ning and execution are now
more important than ever” as it
relates to the future of the
Bahamas. I pondered on
whether or not the Bahamas
was up to the challenge. The
reality is that the Bahamas has
no choice but to be up to the
challenge.

Thave always argued that we
would be a much stronger and
more resilient country if we
encouraged and actively sup-
ported the development of civ-
ul society organisations (CSOs).
One just has to look at devel-
oped societies and see how

CSOs have contributed to their
development and economic
success. For instance, if one
looks at the US, you immedi-
ately become deeply apprecia-
tive of that country’s level of
civil society development. How-
ever, if we were to contrast this
with the Bahamas, one quickly
laments this nation’s inherent
and fundamental weakness in
this regard.

Civil Society

The London School of Eco-
nomics’ Centre for Civil Society
defines civil society as referring
“to the arena of uncoerced col-
lective action around shared

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010
IN THE SUPREME COURT — CLE/qui/No.00298
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence in the Fox Hill Area North of the
Creek in Sandilands Village and being Lot Number
46 on a plan filed in the Department of Lands and
Surveys in the City of Nassau as Number 5179 NP.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of THOMAS J.
LOVE by virtue of Power of Attorney for THOMAS

L, LOVE

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that Thomas J. Love is
applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas to have his title to the following
land investigated under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act 1959 and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title
to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act. A plan of the said land
may be inspected during normal working hours at

the following places:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lat of land situate in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence in
the Fox Hill Area North of the Creek in Sandilands
Village and being Lot Number 46 on a plan filed in
the Department of Lands and Surveys in the City of
Nassau as Number 5179 N.P.”

Copies of the same may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:
The Registry of the Supreme Court of Nassau,

Bahamas;

The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., No. 35 Buen
Retiro Road, Off Shirley Street, Nassau, The

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having a
dower or right of dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the said Petition shall on
or before the expiration of thirty (30) days after the
final publication of these presents file in the Registry
of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
a Statement of his Claim on or before the expiration
of thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents shall operate as a bar to such claims.

Lockhart & Co.
Chambers
35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff



interests, purposes and values.

“In theory, its institutional
forms are distinct from those
of the state, family and market,
though in practice, the bound-
aries between state, civil soci-
ety, family and market are
often complex, blurred and
negotiated.

“Civil society commonly
embraces a diversity of spaces,
actors and institutional forms,
varying in their degree of for-
mality, autonomy and power.
Civil societies are often popu-
lated by organisations such as
registered charities, develop-
ment non-governmental organ-
isations, community groups,
women's organisations, faith-
based organisations, profes-
sional associations, trades
unions, self-help groups, social
movements, business associa-
tions, coalitions and advocacy
groups.”

Following this definition, one
can clearly see that there are
many important stakeholders
in the Bahamas who are sim-
ply not ‘stepping up to the
plate’ as it relates to helping
shape public policy in a mean-
ingful way.

Default

One would have thought that
some 37 years after indepen-
dence, we would have made
more progress in this regard.

Rather than being embraced,
the few organisations that do
exist are often viewed scepti-
cally, and too much energy is
spent trying to figure out their





Financial
Focus

By Larry Gibson



1



fs

Li

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agenda as opposed to evaluat-
ing the merits of their message.

Therefore, by default, the
work normally contributed by
civil society organisations is left
to the major political parties,
whose first obligation is to put a
‘political spin’ on every issue.
I would argue that this does not
provide the robust policy for-
mulation that the country
deserves.

An interesting challenge fac-
ing both major political parties
is the issue of leadership and
leadership transition. In 2012,
when the next elections are
likely, Mr Ingraham will be 65
years old and Mr Christie will
be 68 years old. Should we be
identifying new blood now, so
that the respective party struc-
tures have choices among
viable alternatives, or do we
simply maintain the status quo?

Assessment

In March 2006, the Canadian
Foundation for the Americas
hosted a conference under the
theme Civil Society in the Pro-
motion and Strengthening of
Democracy in the Americas: A
Vision for the Future. The con-
ference report, in its assessment
of the current landscape in the
Americas, made the following

Film Studios wind-up

FROM page 1B

all Bahamian companies and
workers are paid what is due
to them should they suddenly
decide to abandon the project
and leave the jurisdiction.

The Supreme Court judg-
ment in the Islands by Design
case noted that evidence was
produced to show Mr Fuller
was served with all relevant
documents at his Nashville
office following Justice Turn-
er’s March 29, 2010, case man-
agement conference. These
documents included the June
30, 2010, trial date, the judg-
ment showed, but neither Mr
Fuller nor Gold Rock Creek
appeared at the case manage-
ment trial.

And after filing a defence on
Gold Rock Creek’s behalf, the
attorney representing it and Mr
Fuller’s interests was given
leave to withdraw from the case
in May 2009.

Turning to the brief trial
hearing itself, Justice Turner
accepted the evidence given by
Islands by Design’s principal
and president, Keith Bishop,
who described how the firm
was hired by the late Paul

Quigley, a former Bahamas
Film Studios’ principal, in 2004
to provide environmental and
engineering services for the
project.

“The proposal for the envi-
ronmental impact assessment
support was for an estimate of
$231,000 for labour only, and
for the engineering consulta-
tion services, an estimate of
$169,850 for labour only,” the
Supreme Court judgment
recalled. “Other direct expens-
es were to be invoiced at cost
plus 15 per cent as incurred.

“The evidence was further
that bills were submitted at
roughly 30-day intervals, and
that for the first two months of
the contracts, the bills were
paid on time, but started falling
into arrears after some 90
days.”

Mr Bishop then informed Mr
Quigley that interest, at the rate
of 1.5 per cent per month,
would be charged on the
arrears - something Mr Quigley
agreed to. But after the
Bahamas Film Studios fell into
arrears, Islands by Design
stopped work and informed the
Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission of the same.

Then, in a February 6, 2006,

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

observation about political par-
ties:

Crisis of Political Parties

“Political parties are indis-
pensable to the workings of
democratic governance, which
relies on them to fulfill the clas-
sic roles of recruiting candidates
for political office, structuring
public political support around
identifiable sets of policy pro-
grams, socioeconomic interests
and values, and forming gov-
ernment and legislative policy
agreements.

“Unfortunately, political par-
ties throughout the region are
in crisis. A weak democratic
culture and the competition for
the benefits associated with the
state have contributed to their
failure to effectively articulate
coherent positions and respond
to popular interests. Parties are
charged, often correctly, with
corruption, lack of transparen-
cy, weak internal party democ-
racy and the incapacity to pro-
mote new leaders.

“Further, they are increas-
ingly challenged by the com-
plex social and political trans-
formations emerging as a result
of globalisation and structural
adjustment. Unable to present
innovative and responsive gov-
ernance and policy options,
they are viewed with wide-
spread distrust, reinforcing divi-
sions and disillusionment
instead of fostering the
informed dialogue and repre-
senting citizens’ interests need-
ed for further democratic con-

threat after

letter to Islands by Design and
Mr Bishop, the Bahamas Film
Studios’ David Williams III
acknowledged the company’s
debt, and praised the Bahamian
engineer for doing “an excel-
lent job” and being in the final
stages of EIA preparation.

Mr Williams pledged that
settling the debt was a Bahamas
Film Studios’ “priority”, and
two further letters from Mr
Quigley, on February 10, 2006,
and February 13, 2006,
acknowledged that Islands by
Design was owed $180,653 and
$207,774 respectively.

Passing

After Mr Fuller took over
following Mr Quigley’s passing,
he pledged in a July 27, 2006, e-
mail to Mr Bishop that the debt
would be settled. A $35,000
wire transfer would be forth-
coming the following day, with
a further $35,000 coming on
August 18, 2006, and the
remaining balance by Septem-
ber 8, 2006.

Mr Fuller then sent a further
letter on August 4, 2006, in
which he described himself as a
“director and principal share-
holder of Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises”. Promising to set-
tle the matter, it was agreed
that Islands by Design would
complete the EIA, with Mr
Fuller setting out a payments
schedule to clear the compa-
ny’s debt.

He pledged that $35,000
would be paid by August 9,
2006, with a bond “fully
enforceable in the Bahamas”
to be issued for $84,834. Pay-
ment of that was guaranteed by
September 30, 2006. Both sides
signed up.

The EIA was submitted to

THE TRIBUNE

solidation.”

Conclusion

Civil society organisations
can contribute in many impor-
tant ways such as promoting
dialogue, advancing construc-
tive policy reform, nurturing
future leaders, consensus build-
ing and harnessing technical
expertise, all of which serve to
strengthen values and struc-
tures critical to democracy.

If you accept that political
parties are not perfect in their
default role as exclusive policy
formulators, and you further
accept that there is a distinct
under-development of civil
society capacity in our society,
why are we surprised by the
current malaise our society
finds itself in?

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst, is
vice-president - pensions, Colo-
nial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

S90k rule

the BEST Commission by
Islands by Design on August
24, 2006, the judgment found,
with $35,000 wired to the
Bahamian company by August
11, 2006.

The balance was not forth-
coming, though, and Mr Fuller
was found by Justice Turner to
have acknowledged in his
August 4, 2006, letter that 1.5
per cent monthly interest
charges were part of the com-
pany’s debt.

This was “the only significant
component” of Islands by
Design’s case that was disputed
by Mr Fuller and Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises, but Justice
Turner found they did “have
knowledge” of these.

“The only other point of
departure between [Islands by
Design’s] case and the pleaded
defence is that the defence
asserts that [Islands by Design]
agreed to provide a copy of the
EIA to Gold Rock Creek
before the defendant paid the
balance of the monies owed,”
Justice Turner said.

“T find on the evidence in this
case that there was no such
agreement, and that indeed it
was, as asserted in the evidence
of Mr Bishop, the then-policy
of the Government of the
Bahamas that EIA reports,
although prepared at the
instance and expense of an
intended developer, were to be
submitted directly to BEST by
their authors, and were not to
be provided to the intended
developer.”

The Supreme Court found
that Islands by Design carried
out all its contractual obliga-
tions, and was entitled to the
$90,000 plus monthly interest
due to breach of contract by
Gold Rock Creek Enterprises.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 3B





AG concerns on Contractors Bill

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors
Association’s (BCA) president
is at his “wits’ ends” over the
status of legislation to regulate
this nation’s construction indus-
try, telling Tribune Business the
last communication received
indicated the Attorney Gener-

al’s Office had concerns over
‘double regulation’ of three
contractor categories.
Stephen Wrinkle said the
BCA was “desperately trying
to get some information as to
the status of the Contractors
Bill as we speak”, adding that
the Government had indicated
the 2010-2011 Budget and sub-
sequent debate had placed a

temporary hold on all other leg-
islation.

However, the last informa-
tion received by the BCA indi-
cated that the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office had concerns
about the Bill regulating three
particular sub-contractor cate-
gories - electricians, plumbers
and liquefied petroleum gas
(LPG) installers - because they

were already regulated by oth-
er existing legislation.

Mr Wrinkle said BEC dealt
with electricians, the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
Services (DEHS) covered
plumbers, and the Ministry of
Works was responsible for LPG
installers.

“We have three different
entities with oversight of three

different categories of sub-con-
tractors, and the intent of the
Contractors Bill was to transfer
all contractors and sub-con-
tractors under one entity, the
Contractors Board within the
Ministry of Works,” the BCA
president said.

Mr Wrinkle said the final
draft legislation had been
agreed by government and

Government eyeing ‘this week’ for landfill deal

FROM page 1B

also analyse the waste streams
being generated by the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
landfill, a vital precursor to
developing a waste-to-energy
plant at the site.

“The other big thing they
[Cambridge] will did is that
there is a mass of waste
streams,” Mr Deveaux
explained to Tribune Business.
“We think 30 per cent of the
waste can be immediately recy-
cles, and the bulk of the rest
separated, so we have a better
inventory of waste coming in
and properly structure a waste-
to-energy plant.

“They [Cambridge] believe
they can have that profile in 90
days to 120 days.”

On the management front,
Mr Deveaux said that once
Cambridge took over at
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway, their first step would

be to build a new cell, followed
by completion of a leachable
pond so no polluted water ran
off into the surrounding wet-
lands and water table. Then
there was the need to put mon-
itoring wells in to prevent fire.

The minister indicated that
an initial public offering (IPO)
of shares in the landfill man-
agement firm to Bahamian
institutional and retail investors
might be some way down the
line, the Government’s priority
being to get the management
contract in place.

“Tnitially, we are going to
enter into a management agree-
ment with Cambridge, so we
have professional management
of the landfill,” Mr Deveaux
said. “When we make any fur-
ther transfer, there will be
opportunities for public own-
ership, but right now we are
trying to conclude a solid man-

$30m bridge ‘fully
funds’ Arawak port

FROM page 1B

bution - but not the full $1 mil-
lion. The main thing, at least
from APD’s viewpoint, was
that the private sector’s full $20
million stake was raised.

The Arawak Cay port will
have a 75,000 twenty-foot
equipment unit (TEU) capaci-
ty, with APD Ltd and its con-
tractors set to enjoy some $4.75
million in Customs duty exemp-
tions for its construction. The
port site and Gladstone Road
depot are to be leased for 45
years, with construction com-
pleted by June 27, 2011.

Prior to the port's substan-
tial completion, APD Ltd will
pay an annual rent of $40 per
twenty foot equipment unit
(TEU) container and, follow-
ing completion, the rent will be
the greater of $2 million per
annum or the $40 per container
fee. An internal rate of return
on investment has been set at
10 per cent.

There are also numerous

"Reserved Matters’ upon which
APD Ltd's Board of Directors
cannot take a decision or action
"unless the Government's prior
approval in writing has been
obtained".

The Reserved Matters
include:

* Changes to APD Ltd's
Memorandum and Articles of
Association

* Changes in APD Ltd's
share capital

* Borrowings. APD Ltd and
any subsidiaries cannot, with-
out government approval,
"incur any financial indebted-
ness which would result in the
secure debt exceeding an
amount being equal to 3 times'
EBITDA or a debt service cov-
erage ratio that is less than 1.25
times (or such other amount or
ratio as may be agreed in writ-
ing from time to time)".

Construction work on the
Arawak Cay port is supposed
to be completed by June 27,
2011, a total of 294 days.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), CD Properties Limited (the “Company”’) is in disso-
lution. Kyrene Kelty is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
CIT (Bahamas) Limited, One Marina Drive, Paradise Island,
P.O. Box SS-19140, Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named Company are required to send their

names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Liquidator before August 13th, 2010.

agement agreement. We need
competent, professional man-
agement.”

The existing problems at the
New Providence landfill were
exposed in an Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB)
report obtained by Tribune
Business, which placed the
facility almost six years past its
‘sell by’ date and noted that tip-
ping fees only covered 11 per
cent of operating costs.

It said: “The life expectancy
of the landfill constructed in
New Providence was four years
as of November 2000. Already,
more than seven years have
gone by and the landfill is still
in use.

"The situation is further
exacerbated by the fact that in
the first two years of operation,
the waste was not being com-
pacted to the recommended
density of 750 kg/m. It is esti-

mated that only 70 per cent of
the waste currently being gen-
erated is being collected.”
Further problems, according
to the IDB report, related to
the landfill's financing. While
tipping fees were being collect-
ed at the Tonique-Williams
Darling Highway site, these -
at the time of the report - were
only "being applied to private
collection contractors who are
responsible for the collection
and disposal of waste generated
by commercial and industrial
enterprises". This meant the
fees were not levied on the
Department of Environmental
Health Services (DEHS), which
collected household waste.
"Approximately $450,000 in
tipping fees is collected annu-
ally at the New Providence
landfill," the IDB report said,
"and this accounts for 11 per
cent of the cost of operating the

Abaco power woes

FROM page 1B

anonymity, said while BEC’s
power cuts have been hard on
their equipment, it has brought
business in for the store.

According to the employee,
they have seen and had to
replace many burnt refrigera-
tor circuit boards and fan
motors.

“Tt is terrible,” said the
employee. “It is hard on the
equipment and it doesn’t go off
on a snap; it goes off on a grad-
ual slope, which is bad for
equipment and makes me work
my equipment hard.”

General Manager of Belle-
vue Business Depot, Timothy
Sands, said his business has also
seen the consequences of the
blackouts and brownouts, with
fried office equipment coming
in frequently to be repaired or
replaced. He said they them-
selves have had to replace thou-
sands of dollars worth of equip-
ment because of it.

And while Bellevue is fortu-
nate enough to have a back-up
generator to weather the out-
ages, Mr Sands said fuel and
generator maintenance costs
are mounting for the store.

“We are one of the business-

es who are fortunate to have a
back-up generator,” he said.
“But the fuel bill and the main-
tenance (costs) have increased
because it is being used for
more than just a back up.”

He said the hotels of Hope
Town and Green Turtle Cay
have seen their businesses
devoid of tourists because of
the blackouts.

Mr Sands said power has
often gone off in those islands
for more than 20 hours, and
some tourists have simply
upped and left.

Abaco is not expected to
have its new power plant locat-
ed in Wilson City up and run-
ning until the end of the year.
Until then, power outages are
expected to plague Abaco.

Mr Sands said he is not con-
vinced the power plant itself
will solve Abaco’s power prob-
lems, as he sees the transmis-
sion infrastructure as being an
equally debilitating problem.

“Most people in Abaco
understand the issue with the
plant and forget the controver-
sy where distribution is a larger
problem,” he said. “Most of the
time we are out of power, it’s
because the power lines are so
old and poorly maintained.”

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Colina Holdings

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ROYAL FIDELITY

Marin ae Work

landfill, which handles an esti-
mated 400,000 tons of solid
waste per year. The operating
cost of that facility along has
escalated to $4 million." That
compared to $2 million in oper-
ating costs when the landfill
began operation in 1999-2000.

The report said tipping fees
alone would be an insufficient
revenue stream to finance the
landfill, and solid waste man-
agement generally, in the
Bahamas.

industry a year ago in July 2009,
with the final meeting held in
November.

He added that the situation
had not been helped by the
transfer of Nicole Campbell,
the Ministry of Works under-
secretary who had direct
responsibility for the matter.

“T’m at my wits end. I don’t
know how to convince the Gov-
ernment to prioritise passage
of this critical legislation,” he
added. “T’ve done all I can do.”

If you need a
matured, honest and
reliable person to
help your business
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and profitably,

Please Call

324-1005

















COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

UPREME COURT
ol i ai

IN THE MATTER cf ihe Properly comprised ind Deed af
Morpags dated the 28” day of July, AD, 2000 between
Desmond Sanda and Sarah Louse Sancs as Borrowers and



Bank of thet Bahamas Lirribed

AND IN THE MATTER of tha Conyeyancing and Law af



Property Aci, Chapler 135 of ha Revieed Stahule Laws of the








Commonwealth of The Gahanna,

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED




Plaintiff

AND





DESMOND SANDS




AND




GARAH LQUISE SANDS






Defendants

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING






TAKE NOTICE that tha Notice of Appointment to Hear the Criginating





Summons filed on the 26” day of July, AO. 2008 and set down to be heard on




Friday the §° day of August, A.D, AMOR at 12:00 o'deek ni the noon will now be




heard before tha Honourable Justice, Mr. Nevile Adderley, Justice of the




Supreme Court, 2" Floor, Charlotte House, Charlotte and Shirley Streets



Nassau, The Rahanas ant Tuesday lhe ay" day of July, A. D., 2040 at 9:30

o'clock in forenoon,

Dated thie 25° day of May, A.D. 2040

REGISTRAR

This Adin war take cul by Muiira. Gibson, Flgby £ Ci, Chambors, Midvale Mousa, [ipmaocennl Saget

ica, hai aad, ANTES Ha TO ha

]E &

oF A Lb

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 19 JULY 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,487.06 | CHG 1.30 | %CHG 0.09 | YTD -78.32 | YTD % -5.00

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.04
10.63
5.00
0.30
3.15
aT
10.96
2.50
6.02
2.16
2.00
6.07
8.90

Previous Close _Today’'s Close

Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00

Change
1.04

10.63
5.00
0.30
3.15
21

10.96
2.50
6.02
221
2.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.07
8.90

EPS $

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE &

ADVISORY SERVICES

clea bce ST AT.

Div $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
OT 14
0.627

-0.003
0.168

Legal Notice

NOTICE

8,50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
8.95:
10.00

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.46 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity *twertnahe penk Gro séLGY (ve -The-Counter Getuuitins,
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets 9.42 10.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
O45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4825 3.04 2.96
2.9199 1.14 0.85
1.5376 4.06
2.8522 -8.08
13.4110 3.32
107.5706 6.99
105.7706
11?
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

9.81
4.58

9.81
4.65
1.00
0.27
ao

0.00
0.07

0.720
0.366
1.00
O27
5.39

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.000
0.035
0.407
0,952

0.156 64.1

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
A-CAP RESOURCES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Yield

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act No. 45 of 2000, A-CAP RESOURCES
LIMITED, is in Dissolution.

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.911577
1.525400

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.508709

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
1.4777 CFAL Money Market Fund
2.8522 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 = FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund
9.1005

1.4387
2.8266
2.02
-8.49
0.33
3.45
3.95
2.52
0.98
2.34
2.16

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
13.50 99.417680
Sto
5.29
5.45
6.25

The date of commencement of dissolution is the
19th day of July 2010.

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000 10.0344 -6.84 5.63

4.8105 7.3073 +531
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

16.22

Mr. Avraam Kapiri
57 Steliou Mavrommati St.,
Agios Dometios
2364 Nicosia, Cyprus
Liquidator

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 5B



The Tribune

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

BOUT thirteen years

A Nikechia Hall- Den-

is watched her mother
Dr Mildred Hall- Watson put
on a white lab coat and make
her way to the hospital. Now,
thirteen years later she is
doing the same, dedicating
selfless service at the Depart-
ment of Obstetrics and Gyne-
cology at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.

It was never predetermined or
planned. It was simply their mutual
desire and aspiration that landed
them both in the field of obstetrics
and gynecology.

For Dr Mildred Hall- Watson the
decision to become a gynecologist
was not a spontaneous one. She
recalls from as far back as the age of
six when she first spoke about the
path she wanted her career to take.

“Tt started with the desire which as
far back as I could recall age six. I
actually verbalised that I wanted to
be a doctor. What I said at the time
was ‘I wanted to deliver babies’ and
being unaware that you could be a
midwife and still deliver babies I
looked at it from the angle of being
a physician and delivering babies,”
she told Tribune Health.

No one in her family was a physi-
cian. She was never exposed to this
particular field and she had not the
slightest intimation of what being a
physician entailed.

“At that time in Government
High you had to choose if you want-
ed to do something that had a scien-



(CY JOINING HANDS FOR HEALTH






©

tific bend as oppose to an art's bend
as oppose to a general curriculum
and I figured if I was interested in
medicine then I would choose a sci-
entific bend that’s how I began,” Dr
Mildred Hall Watson explained.
Unlike her mother, Dr Hall Den-
nis knew from the beginning the task
at hand when she signed up for med-
ical school. She knew that besides
having love and passion for it, time,
commitment, and dedication was a
big part of the equation. But she did-
nm’t care how much time she exhaust-
ed into her work, because watching
her mother make life easier for
expectant mothers was a beautiful
thing she wanted to be a part of.

Motivation

“This was something that I was
always exposed to. I was always
around it because of my mother and
my interest sparked from just watch-
ing her,” Dr Hall Dennis said.

Watching her mother was moti-
vating and it propelled her to pursue
a Bachelor of Arts in psychology
first and then enter medical school at
the University of the West Indies.

It was a tough, but rewarding
experience.

“Medical school was a challenge.
It was a lot of work and a lot of
hours. But this is something that I
always wanted to do so I did the
work and I stayed committed,” Dr
Hall Dennis told Tribune Health.

It gave her a good feeling to know
that if she didn’t understand some-
thing in school she could give her
mother a call who would have been
able to clear things up for her.

Even now, their relationship has-
n’t changed. She can still call her





mother if she stumbles. But now she
has to address her by a different
name other than “mummy.”

“She is my boss now since I have
been doing my internship at the hos-
pital in the Gynecology department
at the hospital. If I have a question I
have to address her as Dr Hall- Wat-
son not mummy because at work we
are not mother and daughter,” she
said. “Working under my mother is
no different than working under
someone else. There is no
favouritism and we are professional
as possible. We also make a conser-
vative effort to make the distinction
between our relationship at work
and our relationship at home,” she
explained.

Dr Mildred Hall-Watson
expressed pride and is extremely
proud of her daughter.

"The pleasure for me in the last
year or two, as she went through her
clinical at the end of her medical
school period and internship, was
seeing her commitment to wanting
to work and helping with individuals.
She thinks properly, she empathetic,
she's concern not only about the dis-
ease process but she is concerned
about the individual. She is very
independent minded and she does
not want people to look at her as
Dr Hall- Watson’s daughter. She
wants to be able to stand on her own
and so far she has done a really good
job,” Dr Hall Watson said.

She hopes that in the near future
her daughter makes the decision to
work alongside her.

“T cannot wait. At first it might
be some tension simply because we
are two strong young women but I
think my desire to see her succeed
and the training she has at the end of

ith







DR Mildred Hall Watson and daughter Nickechia Hall Dennis.

it will in some ways surpass mine
because of new technology that she
will be exposed to,” she said.

Future

Dr Mildred Hall Watson is the
Chief of Services of Obstetrics &
Gynecology at Princess Margaret
Hospital. She also established a
birthing center in 1995. She is the
medical director of Health Care
Centre for Women located East
Avenue North, Centreville. She is
fellow a Diplomate and Fellow of

agement and assertiveness
skills.

TOOLS TO TAME A TEMPER:

the American Board of Obstetrics
and Gynecology and a Fellow of the
American College of Surgeons.
Nikechia Hall- Dennis recently
finished her internship at Princess
Margaret Hospital. She attended
St Andrews High School and
attended Oglethrope University in
Atlanta where she obtained her
Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology.
She also obtained her Medical
Degree last year. Now she is sta-
tioned at the Princess Margaret
Hospital in the Obstetrics and
Gynecology department.

Deciding to take control of
anger rather than letting it
control you means first tak-

‘Keeping a lid on ange?” sumox

No matter what, one thing is certain, people are sure to get angry
sometimes. Everyone does. Anger is a normal emotion, and there
is nothing wrong with feeling mad. What counts is how anger is
handled and the manner in which persons respond when they are
angry. Poor management of anger can have serious long term

effects.

It is therefore very important that anger is managed at all times.
This article provides useful guidelines for anger management)

WHAT IS ANGER?

Anger is a very powerful
emotion that can stem from
feelings of frustration, hurt,
annoyance, or disappoint-
ment. It is a normal human
emotion that can range from
slight irritation to strong rage.
Some persons suppress anger,
which can lead to serious
action over time.

WHAT ARE THE DANGERS OF
SUPPRESSED ANGER?
Suppressed anger can be
an underlying cause of anxi-
ety and depression. Anger
that is not appropriately
expressed can disrupt rela-
tionships, affect thinking and
behaviour patterns, and cre-
ate a variety of physical prob-
lems. Chronic (long-term)
anger has been linked to
health issues such as high
blood pressure, heart prob-
lems, headaches, skin disor-

ders and digestive problems.
In addition, anger can be
linked to problems such as
crime, emotional and physical
abuse, and other violent
behaviour.

WHAT CAN STEPS CAN BE
TAKEN TO HELP MANAGE
ANGER?

When beginning to feel
angry there are several steps
one can take such as:
© Deep breathing - breathe
deeply from your
diaphragm.
¢ Positive self-talk - slowly
repeat a calm word or
phrase such as "relax" or
"take it easy.” Repeat it to
yourself while breathing
deeply until the anger sub-
sides.

e Stop angry thoughts - If
you have trouble realising
when you are having angry
thoughts, keep a log of when

you feel angry.

e Seek out the support of
others.

e Talk through your feel-
ings and try to work on
changing your behaviours.
Although expressing anger
is better than keeping it in,
anger should be expressed in
an appropriate way. Fre-
quent outbursts of anger are
often counter-productive
and cause problems in rela-
tionships with others. Anger
outbursts are also stressful
to the nervous and cardio-
vascular systems and can
make health problems
worse.

¢ Learn how to use
assertiveness. This is the
healthy way to express feel-
ings, needs and preferences.
Being assertive can be used
in place of using anger in
these situations.

e Try to gain a different per-
spective by putting yourself
in another's place.

¢ Learn how to laugh at
yourself and see humour in
situations.

e Practice good listening
skills. Listening can help
improve communication and
can promote trusting feel-

ings between people. This
trust can help in dealing
with hostile emotions.

¢ Learn to assert one’s self,
expressing feelings calmly
and directly without becom-
ing defensive, hostile or
emotionally charged up.
Read self-help books on
assertiveness or seek help
from a professional therapist
to learn how to use
assertiveness and anger
management skills.

DEALING WITH ANGER INA
HEALTHY WAY?

If you believe that your
anger is out of control and
is having a negative affect on
your life and relationships,
seek the help of a mental
health professional. A psy-
chologist or other licensed
mental health professional
can work with you to devel-
op techniques for changing
your thinking and your
behaviour. A mental health
professional can help you to
deal with your anger in an
appropriate way. Choose
your therapist carefully and
make sure to seek treatment
from a professional who is
trained to teach anger man-

SELF-AWARENESS AND SELF-
CONTROL

Because anger can be pow-
erful, managing it is some-
times challenging. It takes
plenty of self-awareness and
self-control to manage angry
feelings. And these skills take
time to develop.

Self-awareness is the ability
to notice what you are feel-
ing and thinking, and why.
Children are not very aware
of what they feel; they just act
it out in their behaviour. That
is why they have tantrums
when they are mad. But teens
and adults have the mental
ability to be self-aware. When
angry, take a moment to
notice what you are feeling
and thinking.

Self-contrel is all about
thinking before acting. It puts
some precious seconds or
minutes between feeling a
strong emotion and taking an
action that will bring regrets.

A combination of self-
awareness and self-control
allows one to have more
choice about how to act when
feeling an intense emotion
like anger.

GETTING READY TO MAKE A
CHANGE

ing a good hard look at the
ways you have been reacting
when you get mad.

Behaviours such as yelling,
screaming, saying hurtful,
mean, disrespectful things,
throwing things, kicking or
punching walls, breaking stuff,
hitting someone, hurting
yourself, or pushing and shovy-
ing others around are clear
signs of uncontrolled anger.

For most people who have
trouble harnessing a hot tem-
per, reacting like this is not
what they want. They feel
ashamed by their behaviour
and do not think it reflects
the real them, their best
selves.

Everyone can change, but
only when they want to. Mak-
ing change in the way we
manage anger brings many
benefits. These include: more
self-respect and more respect
from other people, less time
feeling annoyed and frustrat-
ed and a more relaxed
approach to life.

Making a change takes
time, practice, and patience.
Managing anger is about
developing new skills and new
responses. As with any skill,
like playing basketball or
learning the piano, it helps to
practice over and over again.

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PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

heach organisations opens resource centre

By REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia.net



sation has been a source of support for

O= the last 12 years, the REACH organi-

the families affected by autism Recently,
the organisation saw the fulfillment of a dream
when it officially opened its resource centre in

the Dewgard Plaza.

Autism is a complex neu-

robiological disorder that
typically lasts throughout a
person’s lifetime and affects
essential human behaviors
such as the ability to com-
municate ideas and feelings,
imagination, and self-regula-
tion.
Minister of Education, Hon
Desmond Bannister, offi-
cially opened the centre say-
ing:

"It is so special to see such a
committed group of persons
who understand the impor-
tance of creating awareness
in our community of a con-
dition that affects so many
of our children and we need
to be able to assist them as
best we can."

There is no “cure’ yet for
autism, but early diagnosis
and intervention improves
outcomes of the condition.
With appropriate specialised
education, behavioural and
biomedical interventions,
combined with an under-
standing community and



adequate support services
most persons with autism can
become productive, happy
citizens.

Denise Beneby, office
administrator at REACH,
knows first hand, the chal-
lenges families with Autistic
children face. Her children
Justin, 17, and Jewel, 4, are
“nonverbal.”

She says that she suf-
fered a 10-year depression
after her son’s diagnosis.

“Tt’s a lot of work dealing
with special kids,” said Mrs
Beneby. “My average bed-
time is midnight every night,
but Pm living life and enjoy-
ing it.”

With Justin, it was very
stressful, said Mrs Beneby,
to the point where she left
her job as a banker. Coming
to grips that her child suf-
fered from the disease left
her in a sad place, but she
said that the support from
other REACH members and
her family have helped
tremendously.





Her involvement with
REACH has given her
access to a plethora of books
and informative DVDs on
autism, and how to help per-
sons with the condition. She
herself has become a consul-
tant and encourages the fam-
ilies in the program. Mrs
Beneby promised that the
new centre will seek to
“spread new information on
autism to teachers and





| ee

>

>

. \.
eee ¢ oso oe oe

bh

schools who cater to autistic
children. We hope to bring
more awareness and offer
information for parents of
children with autism, and
we’re there for people to
come and talk.”

Schools that offer special
programs to children with
autism are: Garvin Tynes
Primary School, Stapledon
School, MOE Special Edu-
cation Units, Blairwood



Academy, Hopedale Centre,
Anatol Rogers High School,
and Willard Patton Pre-
School.

DeCosta Bethel, president
of REACH said at the open-
ing, “We believe that this
new centre is going to allow
us the opportunity to do
even greater good in the
community with assisting
these children with autism
and improving the awareness

THE TRIBUNE




EDUCATION
Minister
Desmond
Bannister
cuts the
ribbon at the
opening of
the REACH
centre in
Dewgard
Plaza.

and prevention that will all
be facilitated.”

This summer, REACH,
along with the Ministry of
Education will begin a pro-
gram for autistic children,
ages four to 21, and partici-
pants are allowed to bring

their siblings.
REACH’s doors are
opened on Mondays,

Wednesdays, and Fridays
from 9.30 am to 1 pm.

Cataracts



~ 75

A CATARACT is cloudiness or
opacity of the lens of the eye. The
lens is inside the eye directly behind
the pupil. In a normal eye, the lens is
clear and normally is transparent. A
cataract interferes with normal vision
or sight by partially or completely
blocking clarity of the lens. The
cloudiness can vary from a little spot
of white to a totally opaque structure
that affects the entire lens. If the lens
become completely masked, the result
is blindness.

Dogs suffer from cataracts more
commonly than any other species.
Cataracts can develop at any age, but
most cases are found in dogs over 5
years of age. While cataracts are
extremely common in dogs, cats do
not suffer from the diabetes- related
or “old age” cataracts often found in
dogs.

Several things can result in lens
changes. Trauma and/or resulting
inflammation may cause a cataract
but usually to only one eye. Cataracts
can be caused by poor nutrition, but
because of modern advances to canine
and feline diets, such causes are rare.

Dogs most often suffer from senile
or old age cataract. Almost all dogs
over 8 years suffer from some degree
of cloudiness to the lens. Cataracts in
dogs may also result from diabetes
when the lens protein is injured by
metabolic changes.

Vision loss

A cataract may affect only a por-
tion of the lens, and consequently
some animals may show no sign of
vision loss at all. Even the cataract
that covers the entire lens may still
allow some vision. Treatment may
not be necessary until a high degree
of vision is lost and cataract becomes
problematic for the dog or cat. Often,
even blind animals continue to do
well in familiar surroundings by rely-
ing on other acute senses. The under-
lying cause is treated when possible.

In animals that have trouble navi-
gating due to vision loss, sight can be
restored to near normal by surgery.
Surgical treatment with lens extrac-
tion provides predictable restoration
of functional vision. The general con-
dition of the patient as to health and
behaviour should be considered.
Cataract surgery should be left to vet-
erinarians with special interest in oph-
thalmology and experience in lens
extraction.

This long expensive procedure is
done under general anesthesia,
removes most, but not the entire
affected lens. The lens itself is con-
tained in a kind of capsule like
eggshell. Most commonly, the surgery
removes the front part of the shell
and the contents inside while leaving
the back half of the capsule/shell
intact. In some cases, the whole lens is
removed and new lens is transplanted
to replace the damaged lens. A pro-
cedure called PHACOEMULSIFI-
CATION produces high frequency
sound waves- ultrasound- to break
the lens, which is then removed by
suction or aspiration. Dogs and cats
that have this type of surgery usually
recover quite well.

GREEN SCENE

6



as

ALTHOUGH photosynthesis provides most of a plant's needs, elements from the soil are also required.

Fertilisers

SOMETIMES when there is an
excavation you can see how a shrub
or tree has sent roots deep into little
cracks and crevices within pure
white limestone rock. It is almost
unbelievable that these roots could
support a healthy looking plant of
such size. This brings home strong-
ly the fact that plants derive almost
90 per cent of their nutrients from
the process of photosynthesis. The
rest of the nutrients required come
from mineral salts produced from
rotted leaves, insect detritus and
such that are washed down to the
roots by rain.

In a cultivated garden, of course,
most of the added nutrients are
applied by you and me in the form
of liquid, granulated or pelleted
commercial fertilisers, or compost.
An unfertilised tomato plant will
complete its life cycle and produce
seeds but will be of no joy to the
home gardener who wants plump
and juicy fruits. These are attained
by adding fertiliser.

There are 13 constituents to a
good commercial fertiliser, the most

abundant being salts of Nitrogen,
Phosphorus and Potassium. These
three give the initial assay of the
fertiliser — N-P-K — in the form of
the percentage of usable elements.
A general purpose fertiliser will be
6-6-6 indicating that there is 6 per
cent of each of the main elements
available.

Growth

Nitrogen promotes vegetative
growth, particularly the leaves, and
a fertiliser high in nitrogen is used
on lawns to make them green and
pleasant. Phosphorus strengthens
root growth and flowering while
Potassium regulates the general
vigour of plants and the synthesis of
starches.

The minor elements in fertiliser
are Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc,
Chlorine, Copper, Manganese,
Molybdenum, Sulphur, Boron and
Iron. These can be thought of as
the equivalent of vitamins and min-
erals in a human diet. The minor
elements are available in liquid form

at nurseries and can be sprayed
onto plants to ensure their presence
as some fertiliser mixes skimp on
them.

Special fertilisers are produced for
certain needs. Palms require much
larger doses of Manganese and Mag-
nesium so a palm special includes at
least 2 per cent of these elements.

We can only understand the val-
ue of fertiliser if we take into
account the condition of our soil.
Soil can be acid or alkaline. A bal-
ance between the two is a pH value
of 7; a lower figure indicates an acid
soil, a higher figure an alkaline soil.
In general our Bahamian soil is
heavily alkaline and this is not ide-
al because alkaline soils tend to pre-
vent the mineral salts from being
usable, a process we call ‘tying-up’.

The early citrus producers in
Florida were bugged by this phe-
nomenon. They applied tons of fer-
tiliser but the limestone soil would
not allow the mineral salts to live up
to their potential, the result being
chlorosis. It was long known that
iron acted as a catalyst and assisted
in the absorption of other elements
but even iron was tied up in Flori-
da’s calcareous soil.

Along came Sequestrene 138, a

By Gardener Jack

.





chelated iron designed to work in
limestone soils. Sequestrene 138 was
close to a miracle for the citrus
industry and could be in your gar-
den too. Only very little is required
and it is soluble in water. If you
apply plenty of fertiliser to your
shrubs and trees but they remain
light green or even yellowish, a sea-
sonal application of Sequestrene
138 could make all the difference. It
works on the roots of plants so is
best applied as a drench.

Compost

Another way of treating chlorot-
ic plants is to apply compost or
peat moss to the soil. These amend
the soil and reduce its alkalinity,
making minerals readily available
to the roots.

Kindness can kill. All fertilisers
should be used sparingly. A little
too much fertiliser is a waste of
money as it will be leached through
the soil without being used by your
plants. Too much will burn the
roots and either set the plant back
or kill it.

¢ gardenerjack@coralwave.com

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 7B





Miss Teen Plus

beauty pageant

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



poetry recital.

The audience was filled
with supportive family and
friends who show their love
and adoration to all of the
girls. Even if it wasn’t there
family members or friends
they clapped and praised
they young a ladies for a job
well done.



HE precious gems of the new Miss Teen

Plus beauty pageant took to the stage on

Sunday night at the British Colonial to
compete in the talent, spokesmodel, and com-
mercial segments of the pageant.

Sunday night marked a
beautiful experience for the
ten voluptuous young ladies.
It was their first time greeting
the audience since their
introductions on Friday
night.

The ladies who have just
broken into the world of
pageantry, having no prior
experience at all, displayed
the poise, beauty, charisma,
and intelligence required for
a beauty queen.

They wore smiles on their
faces all night, they spoke
eloquently, their speeches
were well researched and
there was never a hint of
fear, because all barriers
were broken and all ordeals
overcome when they
stepped onto the stage.

Even when they stumbled
over a few words, with the
support of the crowd they
quickly regained their com-
posure and kept things flow-
ing smoothly.

Each of the beauty queens
took part in the three seg-
ments.

The show was in some

to see her vulnerability.
Members in the audience
were moved to tears when
one of the young ladies told
her past experiences of being
discriminated against because
of her weight.

She told the audience that
after all the teasing and being
broken down by children
and adults she tapped into
her inner strength which gave
her the boost to enter the
competition.

Talent

Because of the discrimina-
tion she had faced over the
years she chose a platform
focusing on children with dis-
abilities.

Other competitors chose
platforms of youth and crime,
school violence, and teen sex-
uality.

The talent segment of the
show was exciting to watch.
The young ladies put their all
into their performances and
they showed themselves wor-
thy of the coveted titled.

It was exciting to watch the

They ladies did their best
that night and the organisers
are promising a five star
show. One of the organisers
said to the audience: “ We
are putting on a grand show.
You better bring your sun-
glasses because it’s going to
be bright.”

Rayette McDonald creator
of the Miss Teen Plus
pageant came on stage and
said how proud she is of the
young ladies making it this
far. She said the main thing
she wanted to do was build
self confidence in plus size
young women. And with the
introduction of this pageant
she said she had the oppor-
tunity to do just that.

With tears in her eyes Ms
McDonald said: “I am very
proud of what we saw
tonight. And I must say that
if this pageant has nothing
else it has integrity. I can say
without contradiction we do
not cheat and whichever girl
wins on August 7 wins
because she wanted it the
most.”

The Miss Teen Plus

tnt

1 young ladies of the first ever Miss Teen Plus beauty pageant t competeed in the talent,
spokemodel and commercial segment of the event Sunday night.







































































































































































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By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



is holding an all day semi-

nar on the neuro develop-
ment perspective of learning on
July 24. It’s taking place at
Stephen Dillet Primary School
auditorium, and will be opened
to teachers, parents, and church

workers.

The goal is to equip instructors to reach
and effectively teach students with devel-
opmental problems such as Autism, and
Down Syndrome, Michelle Wildgoose, prin-
cipal of Bahamas Wisdom Academy told

B ahamas Wisdom Academy






“We evaluate indi-
viduals and design
an individualised
program specifically

to move the child
from where he’s at

THE TRIBUNE

Tribune Health yesterday.

“Even the highly capable child has prob-
lems,” Ms Wildgoose explained. “Bahamas
Wisdom Academy is putting on a seminar to
the public, and is looking to give parents
information in a seminar presented by Cyn-
di Ringoen a and Marilee Coots,certified
neuro-developmentalists.

The American specialists will be doing
evaluations for individuals with special
needs; those dealing with slow learning,
reading problems, hyperactivity, learning
disability, ADD and ADHD, Autism, Down
Syndrome, cerebral palsy, and brain injury.

Evaluations will be conducted from July
26 to July 31, where students will be able to
learn about various disabilities. Christian
Access to Neuro-Developmental Organisa-
tion (CAN DO), and the Help With Learn-
ing organisation (www.help-with-learn-

TUESDAY, JULY 20,

ing.com), sponsored by Marilee Coots.



For example, if the child is not reading,
instructors at the school can design a pro-
gram that will help the student with reading
over a period of time. And if he isn’t feed-
ing himself, the group would design a pro-
gram for the parent to work with the child so
that they would be able to reach that point
of independence within a three month time
frame.

The programs at the school are framed
around the needs of the child, said Ms Wild-
goose. Various processing skills and dealing
with challenges with children, from the func-
tioning side of the individual will be taught.

If the child is not an auditory learner, the

2010

to the next level.”

Surprising facts about
staying hydrated in

summer's heat

(ARA) - Record temperatures
bring disturbing news reports of
heat related deaths and the famil-
iar calls to seek shade, limit out-
side work and drink large quanti-
ties of water. But experts caution
water alone may not be sufficient
and could actually increase your
risk of severe heat related
injuries.

According to Dr David McCar-
ron, adjunct professor at Univer-
sity of California Davis, "You
must also replace the sodium and
potassium along with the water.
This is why athletes drink sports
drinks like Gatorade, rather than
just water. Replacing water with-
out sufficient sodium can quickly
produce hyponatremia, a poten-
tially fatal condition," says
McCarron.

When the body loses elec-
trolytes, typically from perspira-
tion, over-rehydration with only
water will produce hyponatremia
which is a true medical emer-
gency. Hyponatremia symptoms
are similar to those of heat
exhaustion and heat stroke and
can often be overlooked. Symp-
toms range from mild to severe
and can include nausea, muscle

cramps, disorientation, confusion,
seizures, coma and death.

To avoid this condition, med-
ical authorities advise marathon
runners to consume extra salt and
this advice should also be consid-
ered by those exposed to exces-
sive heat. Salt is critical in main-
taining hydration.

The proper balance of elec-
trolytes in the human body is
essential for normal function of
the cells and organs. Electrolytes
help to regulate cardiovascular
and neurological functions, fluid
balance and oxygen delivery.

In 2007, a 28-year-old mother of
three died from hyponatremia
hours after competing in a Sacra-
mento radio station contest to see
which contestant could drink the
most water without urinating.

A few years ago, a 21-year-old
student died of water intoxication
during a hazing incident. He had
been forced to drink from a five-
gallon jug of water that was
repeatedly refilled. He soon col-
lapsed and had a seizure. Frater-
nity members didn't initially call
an ambulance. By the time they
did, it was too late. He was pro-
nounced dead a few hours later.

na

WO ee
Bat ener oe



evaluation will reveal that something is going
on, and instructors will design something
that works to his auditory function.

Ms Wildgoose also teaches processing
skills, and deals with challenges based on
what is going on with the child, discovering
any learning disabilities that need to be
treated.

The seminar “can help to bring some solu-
tions to our problems, in helping our chil-
dren,” said Ms Wildgoose. She promises a
very informative time with the American
duo. “These women are more detailed.
They go into getting specific information to
meet the need of the individual.”

Call Michelle Wildgoose at 362-4397/98 or
visit www.bwdc-edu.net for more informa-
tion on the program. Any other inquiries
can be made at
bahamaswisdom@ymail.com.





Water intoxication is more
commonly seen among athletes,
usually extreme athletes, but old-
er individuals are also at high risk
for several reasons. Their kidneys
are less efficient at conserving salt
when the body is stressed and
common medications such as
diuretics greatly increase that risk.
That is why during severe high
temperatures, news accounts most
often refer to elderly victims of
the heat.

Although most hyponatremia
victims may not have obvious
symptoms, severe hyponatremia
is a medical emergency that calls
for immediate treatment. The low
sodium level is restored to a nor-
mal level by gradually and steadi-
ly giving sodium and water intra-
venously. Milder cases can be
handled by administering of salt
and fluid replacers by mouth.

The next time the local meteo-
rologist recommends cranking up
the air conditioner and drinking a
lot of water to beat the heat,
remember that doctors recom-
mend also cranking up your
intake of electrolytes, particular-
ly sodium and potassium.

Courtesy of ARAcontent





































Ben

|

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Miller expecting
plenty of open
shots with the

Miami Heat

MIAMI (AP) — Mike
Miller knows he could be
open often in Miami.

LeBron James and
Dwyane Wade wanted a
shooter like Miller to help
open things up for them. In
return, Miller knows teams
facing the Heat might not pay
him too much attention, sim-
ply because James, Wade and
Chris Bosh will dominate
many defensive gameplans.

Miller says "there's no
question" he'll get plenty of
open looks.

He was the NBA's second-
best shooter from 3-point
range this past season, mak-
ing a career-best 48 percent
of his attempts. He signed a
five-year contract with Miami
last week.



In offseason of change, Heat point job unsettled



DWYANE WADE controls the ball during the
Summer Groove All-Star game Sunday at
American Airlines Arena in Miami...

(AP Photo)

By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer



MIAMI (AP) — LeBron James will
play some point guard for the Miami
Heat. So will Dwyane Wade, as he has
throughout his NBA career. Mike Miller
will likely do some ballhandling as well.

Thing is, none of them are true point
guards. And that means this Heat sum-
mer of change still has some things left to
address — particularly finding a starter
at the point spot.

Mario Chalmers is under contract,
Carlos Arroyo is expected to re-sign
with the Heat and there's some talk of a
possible Miami reunion with 2006 title-
team point guard Jason Williams.
Whomever it is, the next starter for the
Heat will inherit the keys to what could
be one of basketball's most dynamic
offenses with Wade, James and Chris
Bosh. "It's going to be a lot of fun,”
Chalmers said.

Maybe for him. Probably not for oth-
er clubs. Take what happened in this
past season's playoffs as an example.
Wade faced the Boston Celtics in the

first round, James faced Boston in the
second round. Both saw virtually the
same defensive scheme from the Celtics,
who kept running multiple people
against them in waves. It worked. The
Celtics won both series.

With Wade and James on the floor
together — with another ballhandler —
the same approach likely wouldn't be
as successful in the 2011 postseason. And
that's already creating some concern for
Heat opponents.

"We tried to just make them see a lot
of guys,” Celtics point guard Rajon Ron-
do said Sunday at a charity event Wade
hosted. "It's going to be difficult with
both those guys on the court, because
you can't really load to one particular
guy because the other one's on the oppo-
site wing. It's going to be fun. I'm going
to enjoy the matchup. I'm probably not
going to be checking either of those
guys."

Throughout their seven seasons in the
league, both Wade and James have reg-
ularly taken over the point-guard duty,
especially down the stretch in close
games. Each will continue doing the

same in Miami, though likely not as
much as in the past. And even though
the notion has been floated that Miami
could line up this season without a true
point guard — a hybrid lineup of Wade,
James, Miller, Bosh and newly re-signed
center Joel Anthony, perhaps? — Wade
himself doesn't see it happening regu-
larly. He thinks, for now anyway, the
job is Chalmers’ to lose.

"Of course, you've got to go through
training camp and you have to go
through practices to see what happens,”
Wade said. "But right now, as I look at
it, I think that would be the plan. I would
like to play (shooting guard), at least in
the starting lineup. I think I've done OK
there. But you never know."

Miller said Monday that he likes the
idea of handling the ball at times, espe-
cially if that gets him on the floor with
Wade and James more. "I see no prob-
lem with that," Miller said. "Obviously,
Dwyane and LeBron are two of the best
in pick-and-roll situations and in the
open court. So it's all about defense and
rebounding at that point. ... It's defi-
nitely an option, for sure."

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With stars sitting, US
begins training for worlds

By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer

LEBRON James, Dwyane
Wade and Chris Bosh had
some free agency business.
Kobe Bryant and Chris Paul
need to heal injuries.

Time to start choosing their
replacements.

While its recent mainstays
take the summer off, the US
gets back to work Tuesday in
Las Vegas, opening training
camp for the players compet-
ing for a chance to play in the
world championships.

"T think everyone is antsy to
get going again. It'll be fun
because we've got a bunch of
young guys who are very hun-
gry and it's a different group,"
USA Basketball chairman Jer-
ry Colangelo said. "It's chal-
lenging, but it's also exciting.
That's the way we choose to
look at it.”

The new-look team still has
plenty of talent, including NBA
scoring champion Kevin
Durant, perennial All-Stars
Amare Stoudemire and
Chauncey Billups, and Lamar
Odom and Rajon Rondo, last
seen on the court in Game 7 of
the NBA finals.

The camp roster includes 21
players who will practice
through Friday, working some
of the time against a group of
20 college seniors. The week
ends with an intrasquad game
Saturday night at the Thomas
& Mack Center.

The roster could then be
trimmed before the team recon-
venes next month in New York
to continue its training before
leaving for Europe. The world
championships run August 28
to September 12 in Turkey.

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KEVIN DURANT (left) passes to a
teammate from under the basket in
the fourth quarter of Game 6 of a
first-round playoff series in the
Oklahoma City.

(AP Photo)

Colangelo won't make any
predictions about who will
make the final roster, saying
the team is "just wide open as
to what our plan is." Durant is
considered a lock, having near-
ly made the team that played
in the 2007 Olympic qualifier
before he played his first NBA
game.

There were no such ques-
tions about the roster the last
time the Americans played.
Most of the team had been
together three years before

they won gold in the 2008
Olympics, and the core of that
team committed early last year
to return for another run.

But it wasn't long before talk
of free agency put the status of
Miami's new trio in jeopardy.
Those who aren't under con-
tract don't chance playing in
the summer, and though
they've already signed their
deals, it was obvious they
wouldn't be taking part.

"That all took its toll. Every-
thing centered around free
agency, certainly took the focus
away from the world champi-
onships. We definitely have our
share of guys who couldn't par-
ticipate anyway," Colangelo
said, citing injuries to Bryant,
Paul, Deron Williams and
Tayshaun Prince.

Carmelo Anthony was just
married, and Colangelo said
other players just wanted some
time off, so he decided all of
them could have a pass with-
out jeopardizing their status in
the programme, calling it "no
harm, no foul."

"All we do is focus on the
world championships with
excitement about this group,
outstanding young players to
go with some veterans," Colan-
gelo said.

Mike Krzyzewski and his
coaching staff of Jim Boeheim,
Mike D'Antoni and Nate
McMillan are back, and they'll
have some familiar faces in
camp.

Billups, Stoudemire and
Tyson Chandler all were on the
US team that went undefeated
in the FIBA Americas tourna-
ment three years ago, and a
number of players who will be
in camp took part in a mini-
camp last summer.





C BURT URS TSU TCE





BARCELONA’S Brazilian Adriano Correia kisses his jersey during his
official presentation at the Camp Nou Stadium in Barcelona, Spain, on
Monday. Correia has completed a move from Sevilla to Barcelona, sign-
ing a four-year deal with the Catalan club. The 25-year-old Brazilian,
who plays in defense and midfield, signed the contract Saturday along-
side Barcelona president Sandro Rosell.

(AP Photo)



Starace, Fognini advance
at the German Open

HAMBURG, Germany
(AP) — Spanish qualifier Pere
Riba upset 2009 German Open
runner-up Paul-Henri Mathieu
of France 1-6, 6-0, 6-3 Monday
for a spot in the second round
of the clay-court tournament.

Italian duo Potito Starace
and Fabio Fognini also reached
the second round.

Starace defeated German
qualifier Bjorn Phau 7-5, 6-0
and Fognini beat Ruben
Ramirez Hidalgo of Spain 7-6
(4), 6-4.

In other matches, Florian
Mayer of Germany beat Pablo
Cuevas of Uruguay 6-4, 6-1,
and Maximo Gonzalez of
Argentina defeated Olivier
Rochus of Belgium 64, 5-7, 6-2.
Rochus' brother Christophe
also lost, going out 6-3, 7-6 (6)
to Jarkko Nieminen of Finland.

Others who advanced includ-
ed Jan Hajek of the Czech
Republic, Denis Istomin of
Uzbekistan, Andrey Golubev
of Kazakhstan and Florent Ser-
ra of France.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Full Text


OF THE DAY itm tovint it

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 106 No.198

Safety

90F
83F

SUN AND
+t CLOUDS



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST





Ct] ROMO

‘collapsing’
CL mea Cet)
SEE PAGE TWO

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

et ty)
Arianna

SPORTS STARTS ON PAGE NINE

big guns in
new third
arty talks

Former Ministers,
current MPs in
private discussions

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER cabinet minis-
ters, current Members of Par-
liament, and newcomers to
politics held private talks last
night on the possibility of
forming a new political party
capable of successfully chal-
lenging the PLP and the FNM
at the next general election.

With the sensitive nature
of their talks, these persons,

sources have highlighted, are
determined to keep their exis-
tence and membership as pri-
vate as possible for fear of ret-
ribution from the two major
political parties — of which
some of their budding mem-
bership is said to include.
Last night, a source at the
meeting said they are under-
going extensive research on
the acceptability of a third
party in the Bahamas’ politi-

SEE page seven

Pair charged with attempting to

transport Chinese nationals to US

MARIO Bowe, alias Michael Lunn, and Adrian Fox, alias
“Baldhead” were both charged in the United States’ Southern
District of New York with attempting to illegally transport
Chinese nationals from the Bahamas to Miami en route to
New York and other cities throughout the United States.

In the previously sealed indictment, it reads that Bowe and
Fox “knowingly and wilfully” arranged transportation and

SEE page seven

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Dengue fever:
govt prepared to
face outbreak



By ALESHA CADET



AS CONCERNS of a dengue
fever epidemic spreading across
the Caribbean increase, Health
Minister Dr Hubert Minnis yes-
terday assured the public that
local authorities are “on top” of
the situation and will do all in
their power to prevent an out-
break of the mosquito-borne dis-

ease in the Bahamas.

According to international
reports, dozens of dengue fever-
related deaths have been report-
ed, including in the Dominican
Republic, where the outbreak is at
its worst in the region.

Puerto Rican officials told the
BBC they fear they may be facing

SEE page eight





DR HUBERT
MINNIS







re ee ree eT eS tUiteais



Ad



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





Electricity bills are

set to rise in August

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE public must prepare
for a rise in electricity bills
come August as a proposed
increase in the base tariff rate
paid by all Bahamas Electric-
ity Corporation customers will
be enforced this month, The
Tribune has learned.

The government has made
it known for some time that it
was considering implement-
ing an increase in the base tar-
iff rate paid for electricity by
all BEC consumers, reversing
the reduction in the base rate
effected in 2003 under the
previous government. It did

not make clear when this
increase would be imposed,
although sources had implied
it may be July 1, 2010, in line
with the new fiscal cycle.
During an interview with
The Tribune last week, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
when asked about when the
rate rise would be effected,
said he believed it was to take
place this month and that he
thought a statement had
already been released to
advise the public of the same.
Mr Ingraham said it was
likely that consumers would
see the effect of the rate
increase in next month's bills.

SEE page seven

Fast Track your plans...
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| ADRIAN ROBINSON out-
| side of court yesterday.

| By MEGAN

REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

EMOTIONS ran high
as the man accused of
murdering Long Island
woman Veronica
Knowles was arraigned
in court yesterday.

As Adrian Robinson,
42, was led to Court
One, in Bank Lane,
Nassau, a fight broke
out between Mrs
Knowles’ son and anoth-
er man in the crowd out-
side.

Witnesses said he was
provoked when some-
one made an allegation
about his dead mother.

Police press liaison
officer Sergeant Chris-
lyn Skippings confirmed










Weather officer
punished for failing
to issue timely
tornato warning

THE Bahamas Public Ser-
vice union and the government
of the Bahamas yesterday
reached an agreement on how
to punish the weather officer
responsible for failing to issue a
timely warning on the tornados
that caused the death of four
persons in Grand Bahama ear-
lier this year.

According to BPSU Presi-
dent John Pinder, the weather
officer in question will not be
receiving his annual increment
this year and he will be trans-
ferred from the Lynden Pin-
dling International airport to
the Meteorological Depart-
ment’s head office.

Foreigners in
court on $100m
fraud charges

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FOREIGN fraud suspects
from Japan, Indonesia and
the United States accused of
attempting to obtain $100 mil-
lion cash by false pretences
were arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

But one of the four accused
escaped arraignment before
Magistrate Guillimina Archer
in Court 10 yesterday as he
complained of feeling ill and
was taken to hospital for
treatment.

Hirofumi Tanabe, 57, of
Fukuoka, Japan, told the
court he had been denied his
heart medication since being
taken into custody at the Cen-
tral Police Station on Sunday

Mrs Knowles’ son and night.
another man were tak- And as Ms Archer ordered
SEE page eight SEE page eight



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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







Hemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

Funeral Service

OSWALD
JACK
APPLETON
CUFFY, 84

a resident of Freeport,
Grand Bahama &
formerly of Arima,
Trinidad, who passed
away on 14th July, 2010,
will be held at St.
Anselm's Roman
Catholic Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill on
Tuesday, 20th July, 2010 at 4:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Msgr. Preston A. Moss & Deacon Raymond
Forbes. Interment follows in St. Anselm's
Cemetery.



Precious memories will always linger in the hearts
of his loving and devoted wife: Joan; Sons: Trevor,
Ashton and Compton Cuffy; Daughters: Theresa
Stubbs, Blanche Cuffy-Bethel and Natasha
Henderson; Step Daughter: Valerie Parham (of

California); Brothers: Millard Cuffy (of England)
and Lloyd Cuffy (of Trinidad); Sons-in-law:
DeCosta Bethel and Jeffrey Henderson; Daughter-
in-law: Sheila Cuffy; Grandchildren: Ryan, Ashley
and Amber Stubbs; Elaina and Ethan Cuffy; Tate
and Devin Cuffy-Bethel, Peyton and Zane
Henderson and DontE Cuffy; numerous relatives
and friends including: Harold and Estland Ford,
Avis Outten, Iris Dean and family, Edith (Val)
Lockhart and family, Beryl Rolle and family, C.
Ednol Smith and family, Sharon Deal and family;
Elvin Smith and family, Anthony Lewis, Carlton
Harris, Paul Thompson, Carl lynch and family,
Grafton Ifill, Rex Shephard, Elaine Sands, Audrey
Fountain, Terri Roberts, Marina Miller, Joyce
Fagan, Cecil Aliens, Netha Armbrister, Violet
Smith, Mavis Shephard, Shurn Penn-Sawyer, Lady
Laurie Miller, Nurse Ione Henley, Kirkland Moody,
Fr. McKinnon, Congregation and Choir of Mary
Star of The Sea, The Retired Police Officers
Association, Arch Deacon Harry and Anne Bain,
members of Christ The King ProCathedral,
Freeport, including the ACW, the Alter Guild, St.
Luke's Ministry, the Vision and Transformer Cell
groups.

Friends may pay their last respects at St. Anselm's
Church on Tuesday from 3:00 p.m. until service
time.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street.







Thigh & Leg Snack
vel Tries & biscuit

Rib & Wing Snack
wi fries & biscuit

EDUCATION MINISTER ‘APPALLED’ BY STATE OF GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL

Satety fears over
‘collapsing’ GHS

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE terrible state of the
physical infrastructure at Gov-
ernment High School is posing
a safety risk for students and
teachers, according to Educa-
tion Minister Desmond Ban-
nister.

Mr Bannister said he per-
sonally visited the school and
was “appalled” by what he saw.

A worker at the school told
The Tribune that GHS is “col-
lapsing” and the situation is
“dangerous.”

Mr Bannister committed to
making certain the situation
was “dealt with” by the start of
the new school year. He said
funds have already been bud-
geted for the repairs and that
“as soon as our budget is avail-
able” the tenders board will go
through the process of selecting
a contractor.

The minister spoke on the
issue in response to complaints
by school board chairman Jef-
fery Collie, aired at a workshop
for public school administra-
tors and board members last
week. “Every time I have a
meeting it is the first thing I
mention. They sent someone
and they did a little something
and they left, but nothing is
really moving. They can’t wait
until something happens to try
move, because I won’t sit there
and cover up for you,” said Mr
Collie. Work was completed on
four of at least 15 arcades in
need of repair in the past few
months.

“That was the first time I met
the (new) minister. I was in
contact with the former minis-

i dle
a
ae
Meaty













TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











on,

PLASTER and bits of concrete are peeling off. ABOVE RIGHT: THERE are holes in the ceiling and pan-
els coming off of broken windows.

TN



PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







PIECES OF CONCRETE have crumbled from the
underside of the staircase close to where the support
pillars are.

ter, Carl Bethel. It made me
feel a little better to hear (Mr
Bannister) speak,” he said.
Complaints about structural
problems at GHS are not new.
Two years ago, administrators
complained that the school was
“structurally unsafe” for stu-
dents and staff. There was even
a dispute in 2008 over the pay-
ment of workers contracted to
repair six staircases at the
school. Little has changed
today, according to the admin-
istrators. Sizable concrete
pieces chip away from the wall
in some areas “on a daily
basis”, said Mr Collie. Along
several bridges that connect
classroom blocks the steel
frames are exposed due to the
concrete having been eroded.
The same problem affects
concrete staircases and upstairs
railings — the metal bindings of
which have been dislodged
from eroded concrete. On one
staircase, part of the railing
dropped off completely.



Mr Collie said some of the
8x8 plywood planks that are
being used as makeshift
columns are bending due to the
load. He said some of them
may even be rotting.

Some of the structures are
also braced by 4x4 planks. All
of the wooden supports are
wedged in place using small
pieces of plywood jammed at
the top and bottom of the
planks. “Children knock down
the wood like nothing with peo-
ple trampling past it ever day,”
said Mr Collie.

Collin Johnson, the new prin-
cipal at GHS, said he has not
been informed as yet about the
budget allocation for structural
repairs.

“T have started doing some
things. I don’t believe in just
sitting around waiting on gov-
ernment when we can do cer-
tain things. There are a few
holes in the fence we are look-
ing into. I am in communica-
tion with the Ministry of Works



RAILING that has become loose has been cor-
doned off. There are fears of a safety risk posed for
students and teachers.

about painting and cutting the
grass. We are taking the initia-
tive ourselves,” said Mr John-
son. The new principal admit-
ted that structural problems are
another matter. He said he has
some concerns, but that the
school is doing its best nonethe-
less.

The budget for infrastructure
projects at public schools this
year is “limited,” said Elma
Garraway, permanent secretary
in the Ministry of Education.

The ministry has not given
out any contracts as yet. She
said all schools were to deter-
mine their top priorities.

Mrs Garraway added that
the Ministry of Works had met
with less than one third of the
public schools represented at
the workshop to determine the
scope of work for each school
and assess their priorities. All
schools are to participate in
consultations. It is not clear why
the Ministry of Works has not
met with all the schools yet.

mm SUPREME COURT: Forrester Bowe, Corey Hepburn and Barry Parcoi

Judge adjourns trial of three men
accused of killing prison guard

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



THE three men accused of killing a prison
guard when they broke out of Her Majesty’s
Prison in 2006 appeared in Supreme Court yes-
terday but their hearing was adjourned to Octo-
ber.

Senior Justice Anita Allen opened and
adjourned the trial of Forrester Bowe, Corey
Hepburn and Barry Parcoi, all accused in con-
nection with the stabbing death of Corporal Dion
Bowles, which took place as the prisoners made
an escape from the prison on January 17, 2006.

Prison officers Kenneth Sweeting and David
Armbrister were both injured in the prison break,
as were Bowe and Parcoi. A fourth inmate, Neil
Brown, was shot and killed as he attempted to
escape.

Senior Justice Allen adjourned the trial until
October 4 as she is currently presiding over
another hearing that will occupy her for at least
another two weeks.

Defence attorney Keod Smith, representing
Hepburn, 30, and Bowe, 33, indicated his plans to
make an application to stay the trial until after
Bowe’s appeal has been heard.

Bowe was convicted of murder in October
1992, and is appealing against further re-incar-

Mt Etc)
PUT aR

ceration after he was sentenced to life in prison.

Mr Smith said the Appeal Court’s decision
could impact his client’s case as it will raise issues
regarding whether criminal proceedings can be
heard in the Supreme Court without first under-
going a preliminary inquiry or voluntary bill of
indictment.

However, prosecuting attorney Jillian Williams
objected to the application maintaining the two
matters are not linked.

Ms Williams told the court: “We fail to see
why the matter should be stayed because of this
particular appeal.

“What we are saying is that there is really no
connection, no material connection, between the
appeal and the matters before the court this
morning.”

Senior Justice Allen agreed to hear Mr Smith’s
application for the trial to be stayed as a pre-
liminary matter when the trial resumes at 10am
on October 4.

Parcoi, 46, asked the judge to look into the
matter he put before her and Justice Jon Isaacs in
2008 regarding his rape conviction on May 14,
1994.

“My constitutional rights were grossly violated
on this same matter,” Parcoi said.

“T don’t have no issue with the conviction, I
have an issue with the sentence.”

Senior Justice Allen agreed to look into the
matter and update him when the trial resumes.

UE
TN Alea se


THE TRIBUNE

mi COURT: Troyniko McNeil

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

US DNA expert testifies in
Harl Taylor murder retrial

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



AN American DNA expert yester-
day testified in the retrial of Troyniko
McNeil, who is accused of the 2007
murder of famed handbag designer
Harl Taylor.

Kevin Noppinger — lab director at
DNA Labs International in Deerfield,
Florida — testified that DNA samples
from Troyniko's clothing and hair sent
to his lab by the Royal Bahamas Police
Force in 2008 matched DNA taken
from Taylor's home.

McNeil is the son of the victim’s for-
mer business partner Troy McNeil.
Taylor, 37, was found dead in his bed-
room at Mountbatten House on West
Hill Street with multiple stab wounds
on November 18, 2007.

Mr Noppinger has produced seven
different reports on the Taylor case
since becoming involved in December,
2007.

He said he created a DNA profile
from blood stain samples, swab sam-
ples, samples from known individuals
and samples bearing the name
Troyniko McNeil.

In December, 2007 Mr Noppinger
said, his lab tested and compared sam-
ples from Taylor's home and DNA
samples from the defendant's father
and other individuals.

In a report prepared on January 11,
2008, the defendant's father was exclud-
ed as a possible source of the samples
found at the crime scene, said the
expert.

Mr Noppinger said in mid-2008 the
RBPF asked DNA Labs to test the
samples again to determine if DNA
from a relative of one of the individuals
was present.

He said in June, 2008 he tested the
DNA and found that while Troy
McNeil was excluded as a donor, some
samples had a similar genetic make up
to his. Mr Noppinger said he concluded

m@ CORONER’S COURT:









Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
TROY MCNEIL and son Troyniko McNeil out-
side of court yesterday. Troyniko McNeil, son
of Harl Taylor’s former business partner, is
accused of murdering the 37-year-old.

there was a 99.99 per cent chance that
Troy McNeil was the biological father
of a donor.

He said he then contacted the RBPF
and gave them certain information.

Samples

On August 16, 2008 Mr Noppinger
said he received additional evidence
labelled as samples from the accused,
including samples from a T-shirt and a
sock.

Mr Noppinger said he tested sam-
ples identified as blood from a face
bowl, and that the DNA on the swab
came from one individual and matched
the DNA of Troyniko.

The expert said he issued another

Death of Gladstone Ferguson

report on November 9, 2009 based on
two swabs received in September, 2009,
labelled as coming from a knife blade
and knife handle.

Mr Noppinger said he created a
DNA profile based on the knife swabs
adding that the DNA profile on the
blade matched Taylor's.

He said the knife handle had a mix-
ture of DNA and he could not exclude
Taylor or Troyniko McNeil as DNA
matches.

During cross-examination, lead
defence attorney Murrio Ducille sug-
gested the expert's reports were "gross-
ly unreliable."

He questioned why the expert did
not find a link between Troy McNeil's
DNA and samples taken from Taylor's
home in his initial report of January
11, 2008.

Mr Noppinger said that at the time,
he had not been looking for such a con-
nection, as he was not requested to do
so by the RBPF until the summer of
2008.

Mr Ducille noted that a recent pub-
lication by the National Academy of
Sciences found that hair, fibres, bites
and swabs from firearms are not
enough to extract DNA for evidence at
trial.

He noted that Mr Noppinger
received hair and fibre samples cut
from clothing that he linked to the
accused and asked if the expert col-
lected any bodily fluid from Troyniko.

Mr Noppinger said he did not know
what sort of DNA was on the clothing
swabs.

Also testifying yesterday were Senior
Assistant Commissioner Quinn
McCartney and Immigration Enforce-
ment Agent at the US Department of
Homeland Security Hector Gonzales.

The trial resumes today at 10am
before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs.

McNeil, 23, whose first trial ended
in a mistrial when a jury failed to reach
a legally recognised verdict, is current-
ly on bail.

Boat collision survivors speak at
inquest into fisherman’s death

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

impaired with near-sighted-
ness since birth, and had no

two Defence Force officers
listed as interested parties

The inquest is expected to
resume today at 2pm when





SURVIVORS of a boat
collision that preceded the
death of a 78-year-old man
testified in Coroner’s court
yesterday.

Jurors heard from Wen-
zel King Sr and a 14-year-
old witness, both of whom
were with the deceased fish-
erman Gladstone Ferguson
when a P-40 Defence Force
boat collided with his 14-
foot aluminum fishing vessel
at the eastern end of Nas-
sau Harbour.

The inquest into the death
of Mr Ferguson began last
week before Coroner
William Campbell. Jurors
heard that according to an
autopsy report, Mr Fergu-
son died as a result of blunt
force trauma consistent with
the history of a boating acci-
dent.

Both witnesses described
the night as calm and moon-
lit, and also recalled that
homes on Paradise Island
served as an additional light
source.

It was revealed through
his own testimony that Mr
King has been visually

official boating training.

According to their testi-
mony, neither Mr King nor
the young witness saw the
actual impact, only hearing
and feeling its effects.

As Mr Ferguson’s vessel
did not have lights, Mr King
told jurors, they normally
used a floodlight as a means
of alerting other vessels to
their presence — and had
done so on the night of the
incident.

Rescued

After the incident, the
pair were rescued from the
water by a P-40 Defence
Force boat. Mr King told
jurors that he had wanted to
go back into the water to
search for Mr Ferguson, but
was stopped by Defence
Force officers who told him
that they were “already in
enough trouble.”

The young witness was 11
years old at the time of the
incident. He testified that he
also heard the response
made by the officers to Mr
King.

Attorney Calvin Seymour
appeared on behalf of the

in the inquest: Leading Sea-
man Demetrius Ferguson
and Marine Mechanic David
Balfour.

Mr Seymour suggested
that the floodlight was not
on at the time of impact. He
also suggested that earlier
that evening, prior to the
incident, an RBDF boat had
warned the men of safety
risks. Mr King denied this.

the young witness will be
cross-examined.

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There were 13 patrons in the club and seven women
who the officers suspected of being “strip dancers,” an
official report said.

The patrons and the women — six of whom were
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They were later released pending further investiga-
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited, | It’s our birthday
: , — but why are
we so unhappy’?



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Dems enacted much of Obama’s agenda

WASHINGTON — Far-reaching legis-
lation aimed at reining in Wall Street marks
the latest and likely the last major achieve-
ment by President Barack Obama and the
Democratic-controlled Congress, an 18-
month partnership that strove simultane-
ously to fix a battered economy and enact
sweeping changes to health care, education
and more.

Whatever the longer term impact — the
most far-reaching changes in the health care
legislation won't start until 2014 — the imme-
diate aftermath is unemployment that scrapes
double digits and deficits far deeper than
Obama and his allies inherited in January
2009.

The Republicans who worked ceaselessly
to thwart the president's agenda are embold-
ened, while Democrats who voted it into law
brace for majority-threatening election loss-
es. "Did they do the right thing for the pub-
lic interest? I think so, but that depends on
your values," said James Thurber, professor
and director of the Centre for Congression-
al & Presidential Studies at American Uni-
versity. "You are elected, you get power,
you govern and you change things the way
you said you would.”

That doesn't mean you'll be rewarded.

"They're going to get punished for it,”
Thurber said, in part because the economy
has not responded strongly, but also because
mid-term elections are rarely kind to the
party in control of the White House.

That's the long view — the political pen-
dulum swings — a perspective rarely if ever
in fashion in Congress and certainly not in the
run-up to an election. It also masks a peren-
nial debate about the proper role of govern-
ment in the economy, in health care, in the
auto industry, in energy policy and other
areas.

"If we had health care sooner, if we had
energy sooner, if we had the education bill
sooner, they were all three pillars of job cre-
ation, and that would have resulted in more
jobs created by now," House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi said at a news conference on Thursday.
The 2009 economic stimulus legislation has
created or saved 3.6 million jobs, she added,
using an estimate that Republicans challenge.

"Without it, we would never have dug
out of the deep recession that the Bush
administration had taken us in," Pelosi said.

It was anything but an apology for the
policies she, Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid and others have pursued relentlessly
but something of a lament that the Senate
can't act as quickly as the House. Frustrated,
House Democrats compiled a list of bills that
they have cleared but still await action in
the Senate. It runs to 345 items.

Not surprisingly, there are far fewer if-
onlys at the moment among Republicans,
politically ascendant after losing seats in two
straight elections.

"In every case, the administration saw a

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The medical sales representative will be responsible
for promoting international pharmaceutical brands

crisis and used it to achieve some other long-
desired goal of the left. And the crisis
remained," Sen. Mitch McConnell of Ken-
tucky said in a speech a few hours before
the financial regulation bill won final
approval.

"The trillion dollar stimulus that promised
to keep unemployment at 8 per cent didn't
prevent 9.5 per cent unemployment and a
loss of nearly 3 million more American jobs,"
he told the Young Republican Leadership
Conference. "The new health care law,
according to the administration's own actu-
ary, will bring us higher, not lower health
care costs. The financial regulation bill does-
n't do a thing to reform the two institutions
that played what may have been the leading
role in creating the financial mess in the first
place," a reference to mortgage giants Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac.

After eight years of a Republican presi-
dency, the Democrats pursued numerous
other priorities over 18 months.

Obama signed legislation giving the Food
and Drug Administration authority to regu-
late advertising, marketing and manufactur-
ing of tobacco products. Another bill over-
rode a Supreme Court ruling, strengthening
the rights of women and others who allege
they were victims of discrimination on the
job. Democrats also enacted hate crime leg-
islation. With less than four months remain-
ing until the elections and a lame-duck ses-
sion of Congress likely this fall, Obama is
on track to win confirmation for Elena Kagan
to the Supreme Court, his second pick in
two years. An extension of unemployment
benefits is all but certain. Democrats hope to
overturn the Pentagon policy against gays
serving openly in the military.

Reid intends to seek passage of a
slimmed-down energy bill that includes
greater liability for BP in the oil spill in the
Gulf of Mexico. But even if it passes, it will
fall far short of the sweeping plan Obama
outlined to control carbon emissions. That's
one of the 345 stalled measures on the House
list, and one that some rank-and-file moder-
ates would like to have back.

Democrats may also yet attempt to roll
back tax cuts from the Bush era that benefit
those at the highest income levels.

For the most part, though, the major leg-
islative record is complete for Democrats
who took office 18 months ago.

But not the argument.

"T think it ought to be repealed," Boehn-
er said of the financial legislation, even before
it had cleared. The bill "gives far too much
authority to federal bureaucrats to bail out
virtually any company in America they
decide ought to be bailed out,” he added.

Obama rebutted from the White House:
"We can't afford another financial crisis, just
as we're digging out from the last one."

(By David Espo, AP's chief congressional
correspondent).



EDITOR, The Tribune.

Is it a happy birthday and
why are the citizens of the
Bahamas so unhappy, what
have we done to ourselves
and where did we go wrong?
With majority rule we should
be moving forward, upward
and onward together as we
march on Bahamaland.

The Bahamas’ coat of arms
and the national anthem
speak volumes of what
Bahamians should be about.
Songwriters like Phil Stubbs
and Willie Love sing about
the Bahamian people and
what life is like in the true
Bahamas.

Bahamas someone says we
are celebrating 37 years of
independence and it is
through the eyes of our youth,
what a profound statement.
So Bahamas let’s celebrate or
can we really celebrate at a
time like this, when there is
no new jobs for Bahamians,
the education learning aver-
age is below C-grade, the
crime rate is very high, the
health care system is badly in
need of three state of the art
hospitals, too many social and
moral ills in the country, too
much wickedness in high
places and the people are
being enslaved by those in
authority.

Bahamas we have moved
forward as a people estab-
lishing our identity as a
Bahamian, black or whites,
establishing an excellent edu-
cation system, creating
employment and opportuni-
ties for all citizens of the

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



Bahamas. Caring and provid-
ing for the children and the
elderly through the Depart-
ment of Social Services and
the Ministry of Health; pro-
viding a sound and beneficial
banking system for Bahami-
ans, providing forums and
programmes to teach and
educate Bahamians on the
role of parents and being a
productive citizen of the
Bahamas, and most of all pro-
viding the freedom to wor-
ship and honour the Lord
God, who is the creator of all
things.

Bahamas we have moved
upward as a people by being
our brothers keeper, helping
and caring for the disabled by
promoting peace and love to
our fellow Bahamians and our
visitors/guests to our country,
and most of all building a
Bahamas with communities
where everyone can live as
one family.

Bahamas we have moved
onwards as a people for lov-
ing our neighbours (Ameri-
cans, Canadians, Caribbean
people etc) as ourselves, invit-
ing investors to come to our
shores and help us build this
beautiful Bahamaland and
most of all by believing that
Bahamians can oversee their
country from the lowest to the
highest level.

Bahamas as we moved for-

ward, upward, onward and
together, we have built a great
heritage with a rich culture of
the people, great athletic
achievements, prominent and
intelligent leaders, a people
with a friendly smile and a
heart of gold, a people who
love and worship God the
Creator and most of all the
beautiful archipelagic Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas
that the world wants to visit
and discover.

Bahamas why is there not
that great feeling and desire
to celebrate 37 years of Inde-
pendence, just look around
the answer to clear. Bahamas
where did we go wrong? Did
we as a people disobey God
and his commandments? Did
we as a people forget how to
love our brothers and sisters
(black or white)? Did we as a
people forget how to make
the Bahamas as a place where
everyone would want to live.

Wake up Bahamas, wake
up Bahamas and return to
your first love and become
once again a nation that is
pleasing in God’s sight. God
the Creator love the Bahamas
and the people that live here
and we can only get better by
our love for one another.

Then and only then can we
celebrate our independence
and march on Bahamaland to
our common loftier goal for
all Bahamians.

RUDY STUBBS
Son of the

soil Bahamas
Nassau,

July, 2010.

Crime is everyone’s problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I double dare anyone to contradict what
Iam about to say. Too many of us refuse to
see truth in what is said; we always look at
who is saying it. But if we have a conscience,
we would stop covering up for unscrupu-
lous politicians and say it as it is and stop

being used.

I think it is high time that sensible
Bahamians stop letting PLP rhetoric cause
them to be fools. When certain question-
able members of the PLP make public state-
ments it is treated as gospel. How could
people repeat what a man who is already
unpopular with his own party is saying?

Think about it; there is absolutely no way
the FNM government can prevent anyone
from raping his supposed girlfriend or dic-
tating morality. There is no way the FNM
government can prevent two drug dealers

from killing each other.

It is all of our faults. The FNM cannot go
into people’s bedroom and prevent a domes-

tic fight. How preposterous. These are some
of the environments that cause major prob-
lems, sometimes totally ignoring conflict
resolution exercises.

If anyone wants to get technical, then the
drug trade is the core of the problem. Now

we all can remember who facilitated that.

clusions.

There is no way the FNM government

can prevent a judge from exercising his/her
discretion and give bail to a murderer. The
rise in crime is not the FNM or PLP’s fault.

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort
& Offshore Island

Invites application for the following position:

qualifications

to the healthcare community in The Bahamas.

DIRECTOR OF WATERSPORTS

The successful candidate should have the following

* Senior Management position looking after all

Nassau,

REMEMBER?
Crime has no politics, no religion, no
race, no colour.

It is hatched in a demented mind. It
knows no gender. So the PLP should stop
using the fear, emotions and anxiety of crime
to torture the people.

It is cruel and has far reaching conse-
quences, the likes of which some of us may
not be too happy with later.

We have our own minds, let’s use it and
arrive at our own sensible reasonable con-

IVOINE W. INGRAHAM

July 14, 2010.

VST TCT CT TEC

sound like Jamaican reggae singer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

that picture.

Last night I attended the 37th Independence Celebra-
tions at Clifford Park. I was disappointed to hear a
Bahamian singer trying to sound like a Jamaican reggae
singer. Not that I have anything against reggae music,
because I enjoy listening to it. But at our Independence
Celebrations, a Bahamian singer trying to sound like a
Jamaican singer — something is definitely wrong with



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/ Proficiency in a variety of computer applications

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/ Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing,
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Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle,
be willing to travel to the family islands, the U.S.,
and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
July 28th, 2010 to:

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or Fax: 393-0440

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Have tertiary level education preferably in
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* Be knowledgeable of hotel Scuba Operations
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Have excellent leadership and administrative
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Have highly developed social analytical and
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Nassau,
July, 2010.







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THE TRIBUNE

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS of Parliament
called on to account for how they
spent a monthly stipend for their
constituency offices are being giv-
en a chance to explain their
expenditures in response to an
Auditor General’s report on the
use of the funds.

According to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, Auditor Gen-
eral Terrance Bastian complet-
ed his investigation into the
expenditure of the money earlier
this year, but the “full” report is
not due to be released until Octo-
ber 2010.

“You'll get a full report of the
$1,500 a month they give to MPs,
how they spent it,” he told The

WAT STRUTS TCC TT q

ENGLERSTON MP Glenys
Hanna-Martin has partnered
with a group of churches in her
constituency to help launch and
provide funding for a food dis-
tribution programme intended
to feed the hungry.

Mrs Hanna-Martin and the
multi-denominational Engler-
ston Pastoral Association are
hoping that in addition to the
$10,000 being provided by the
MP for the food programme
from her constituency
allowance, more donations may
be forthcoming from the local
business community.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence to launch the food distrib-
ution initiative yesterday, Mrs
Hanna-Martin said she has
“seen first-hand the hardship”
that has been felt by those in
her community, particularly in
the last two years as a result of
the economic downturn.

“Many homes are without
electricity and families are
struggling under very stressful
conditions to meet basic needs.
I have seen, however, incredi-
ble courage and resilience
under very distressing circum-
stances.

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 5

MPs are given chance to

explain stipend spending

PM says Auditor General has completed investigation



Tribune.

“The report is complete in the
sense that you audit someone’s
account, you put forward what
the situation is and they have a
chance to say ‘well you didn’t
take account of this, that
etcetera’. That process is still
ongoing, but when we have fin-
ished we will make it public and
you will see how your MP for
North Abaco and others disposed
of the $1,500 he gets for operating
a constituency office. You can
see if he’s done it in accountable
fashion or not.”

The Government revealed in
2009 that it was going to audit
the MPs’ use of constituency

“We have also seen in this
community what appears to be
a significant increase in vio-
lence in particular amongst
young people.

“It is our duty to do all that
we can to address these issues
and to do so effectively
requires us to develop alliances
and partnerships and to com-
bine our efforts,” she said.

In this regard, the MP said
she is “proud to announce” her
partnership with the Engler-
ston Pastoral Association,
headed by Pastor Ednal Minnis
of Pilgrim Ministries Interna-
tional, to create the sustained
food distribution programme.
The local Urban Renewal Cen-
tre will also play a part in coor-
dinating the drive.

Food distribution will take
place from the Church of God
of Prophecy on Minnie Street
on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

“This project is to be a struc-
tured, unified and coordinated
initiative. In this regard I have
additionally liaised with a num-
ber of commercial warehouses
to seek their assistance in these
objectives. The response has
been favourable and donations

funds, which amount to $18,000
per year to run their constituency
offices, for the first time.

The move came in the wake
of the “expenses scandal” in the
United Kingdom, in which many
MPs were found to have misused
their allowances from the public
purse — ostensibly given for the
purposes of covering expenses
incurred “during the perfor-
mance of a Member’s parliamen-
tary duties” — and were made to
either resign, or pay the money
back.

Others British MPs who were
accused of abuse or made to pay
back funds went on to announce
their intention to retire from pol-

itics or found themselves “de-
selected” as candidates.

Three former MPs, who
resigned over the revelation of
their alleged “fiddling” of the
expenses, are now in the process
of being criminally prosecuted
for their wrongful expense claims.

While declining to go into
specifics on the Bahamas expens-
es report, Mr Ingraham told The
Tribune that “as a general state-
ment, I think it’s fair to say that
most (of the country’s 41 MPs)
gave a fair accounting for their
expenditures.”

“That’s a general statement
and in those areas where there
are questions they are being










FROM LEFT: Mr. Omar Neely, Englerston Marching Band Director;
Bishop Solomon Humes, 2nd Vice President - Englerston Pastoral Fel-
lowship; Rev Dr. Antoine St. Louis, 1st Vice President; Rev Ednal Min-
nis, President; Glenys Hanna-Martin, MP - Englerston; and Dennis
Dames, Manager - Englerston Urban Renewal Programme.

of food have already been com-
mitted for immediate distribu-
tion,” said Mrs Hanna-Martin.

Antoine St Louis, vice-pres-
ident of the Englerston Pas-
toral Association, which was
formed in 2006, said: “Individ-
ual churches have been doing
distributions of food, clothing,
funds and so on but we saw the
need to come together in meet-
ing the needs of the Englerston
community, working not just
as pastors and churches but
with Urban Renewal and the
Member of Parliament for
Englerston to see that we are a

stronger body and force to
meet total need of communi-
ty.”

Dennis Dames, manager of
the local Urban Renewal
office, said he would “encour-
age others to come forward so
we can improve the condition
and quality of life of our peo-
ple.”

Any individuals or business-
es interested in donating to the
programme are encouraged to
contact the area’s Urban
Renewal office or the Church
of God of Prophecy on Minnie
Street.

allowed to put forward the facts
to support whatever it is that they
may wish to put forward and the
Auditor General will then be able
to determine whether I’m satis-
fied or I’m not satisfied, and if
the Auditor General is not satis-
fied then there are consequences
for that in terms of (having to
pay the money) back and so on,”
he added.

The audit conducted by the
Auditor General covers the
expenditure of the allowance
since June 2007, when the Ingra-
ham administration returned to
office. Last year, MPs on both
sides of the political divide said
they were in agreement with the

A e. '

HUBERT INGRAHAM



scrutiny, which they called “nec-
essary” and a “great thing to do”
to increase accountability in pub-
lic finances.

The $18,000 per MP over the
two-year period — 2007 to 2009 -—
covered by the report adds up to
a total of $1,476,000 in public
funds.

This is separate from the
$100,000 made available for allo-
cation by each of the MPs for
constituency enhancement pro-

jects in the 2007/2008 and

2008/2009 budgets (or $8.2 mil-
lion over two years for all 41
members), as reported on recent-
ly by this newspaper.

To Baldwin L. Rieby [on his graduation from
Dalhousie University, Baltfax, NA. Careeda witht

Bachelor of Commerce Co-op ‘Accounting Degree

Well done BY. With lave and congratulations from
your entire family, To God be the Glory!



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







@ Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

UL MUU eam eel a (Gon mele

Prison Officer
Sergeant Julian Strachan, 37

of Stanleyville, Faith Avenue will
be held on Thursday 10 a.m. at
Southwest Cathedral Church of
God, Carmichael Road. Officiating
will be Bishop Donnie Storr and
Rev. Leonard Clarke assisted by
other ministers. Internment will
be made in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

He is survived by his wife,

Rashetta Strachan; two sons,

Julian Jr. and Naquan Strachan;

his parents, Vernal and Mavis

Strachan; five brothers, Shanda,
Kervin, Erlin, Marvin and Prison Sergeant Marcus Strachan; seven
sisters, Nurse Prenetta Antonio, Shirley Strachan, Sharon Cleare,
Alice Strachan, Renia Moncur, Permal and Patricia Strachan; father-
in-law, Franklyn Culmer; mother-in-law, Bernese Culmer, eight
aunts, Berthamae Pyfrom, Gwendolyn Pinder, Merlean Cash,
Maryann Strachan, Mayruth Ferguson, Beatrece Stubbs, Princess
Burrows and Victoria Missick, six uncles, Roderick, Wilfred, Leroy,
Alexander, Thomas and Felix Strachan; one grand-aunt, Iva Bain,
sisters-in-law, Laranamae, Raquel and Martina Strachan and Raquel
Culmer-Strachan, Rendi and Sherell Culmer; brothers-in-law:
Lawrence Antonio, Allan Cleare Jr,. Allan Moncur and Shane
Culmer; nieces, Monalisa Williams, Nicole, Samantha and Candi
Antonio, Alicia Cooper, Shelese Strachan, Azaria Moncur, Alexandria
Strachan, Tanesha Wright, Shaniah Strachan and Reniah Hepburn,
nephews, Magen Antonio of Dallas Texas, Police Corporal Tavares
Pratt, Geno and Jeremy Strachan of Bronx, New York, Alreno
Moncur, Alshorn Cleare, Erin, Erlin Jr., Aaron, Trescant and Tyrese
Strachan and Kervin Strachan Jr.; grandnieces and nephews,
Skyeesha Lightfoot, Hailee and Tyler Pratt, Gabriel and Geno
Mackey, Ashanti and Jermiah Strachan of Bronx, New York, Garvin
Johnson and Aleo Cooper, one god-child; Reniah Hepburn and a
host of other relatives and friends including, Thelma Miller,
Patricia Jones, Rachael and Robert Gradolph, Christine Verdell and
Lewis Sweeting, Joseph, Habbakuh and Sherry, David and Joanne,
Carl and Bloneva Ferguson, Rev. Catherine Nairn and Family, Rev.
Henry Davis and family, Lloyd Strachan and family, the Missick
Family, Rev. Pennerman and family, Derrick Williams, Felix Cooper,
the Cash family, the Pinder family, Tanika Pratt, the Pyfrom family,
the Ferguson family of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Prescott Strachan
of Freeport, Grand Bahama, the Green family, Katie Miller, All
Saints Anglican Church Mangrove Cay Prayer Band and ACM,
Superintendent Dr. Elliston Rahming and the entire Her Majesty
Prison Officers and Staff, Prison Officer Leon Johnson, Prison
Officer Corporal Ronald Farrington, Prison Officer Ivan Bodie, the
entire 1993 Squad B, Bishop Donnie Storr and family, Rev. Rhodrick
Brown and family, Rev. Saunders and family, Southwest Cathedral
Church of God family, Dr. Kirk Lewis and family, Sophia Edgecombe
and family of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Rev. Tyrone Greene and
family, Patrick Bowleg, Hollis Cox, Carletha Fox, Emily Hall,
Doreen Forbes and Pamela Gibson.

Friends. may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and at
the church on Thursday from 9 a.m. to service time.



BEC holds annual
health fair for staff



FOR the seventh consecutive year, the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC)
recently held a health fair for its staff.

BEC said the fair is in keeping with its
policy to encourage healthy living.

Held at the corporation’s headquarters
on Baillou Hill and Tucker Roads, the fair
featured health screenings for blood pres-
sure and glucose.

The Cancer Society also participated and
brought timely information on a disease
that is on the increase among Bahamians.

The fair also drew local insurance carri-
ers.

BEC staff were able to take advantage of
massages from various spas represented at
the fair and there were also displays of
pharmaceuticals and other health-related
items.

“Our continuous aim is to get employees
in the mindset of health and wellness,” said
Antoinette Turnquest, assistant general
manager of BEC’s human resources.

“We make sure to add more things that
are conducive to healthy lifestyles every
year. We want to be certain that our

COOKING dem

onstration by Chef Owen Bain





employees live healthy lifestyles.”

Amongst the many attractions were sev-
eral that emphasised healthy lifestyles while
providing a lot of fun.

Chef Owen Bethel held a cooking
demonstration in which staff became active-
ly involved.

Baptist Health out of Florida sponsored
the many health related prizes.

The health fair also spun off into a series
of health seminars led by physicians who
spoke on various topical health issues, par-
ticularly focusing on prevention.

Staff members situated in satellite offices
around the Bahamas found that they were
not left out, as management saw to it that
the seminars came to them.

“We know that we have staff members
that are not situated at our headquarters,”
Ms Turnguest said. “So what we did was
make sure that many of our 16 guest speak-
ers went to other offices to bring their
healthy messages to staff.”

a
GETTING the kinks out at the health fair.





BORCO offers Bahamians welding chance





THE Bahamas Oil Refining
Company International (BOR-
CO) Foundation said it is giving
Bahamians the chance acquire
new technical skills and become
certified welders.

The Foundation’s board
announced the signing of a con-
tract with a local construction
company for the renovations of
two buildings that will be the
home of the BORCO Founda-
tion Technical School which is
expected to start operations on
September 6, 2010.

The Technical School will

ASSES

Career Opportunity

be located in the Old Hawksbill
High School complex.
BORCO further announced
that an agreement has been
concluded with a US based
company for the acquisition of
two fully equipped container-
ised mobile units for the train-

ing, testing and certification of
welders that will support the
training programme.

The six-month programme
will be free of charge. The
application process and entry
requirements will be
announced in the upcoming

weeks.

BORCO provides storage
of petroleum products for a
number of international clients
with a present capacity of 21.4
million barrels and offers blend-
ing, transshipment and bunker-
ing services.

= ) FIDELITY

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if you have it, we want you.

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Personal Banking Representative

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¢ Demonstrated ability to infiltrate senior customer levels and represent value.
Excellent interpersonal communication & probing skills, high aptitude and

initiative for follow-up.
Customer service orientation.

Strong business, courier and/or supply chain management knowledge.
Analytical and problem solving skills. Knowledge of technology applications in

business.
Demonstrated drive, persistence & initiative.

Implemented measurements & strategies to attain goals.

Proven planning, organizational, time and paper management skills.
Demonstrated presentation skills.
Team player.

Proficient with technical computer software skills (Microsoft).

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

BS/BA in related discipline

Reporting directly to: Credit Manager
Main duties etc:

*peparal

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em al credit applications loans, awendralts, credit carck)

1 opening lar banking services [Ourrent, savings, Timed depasiis & loan]

tenewel of credit facilities and fieed deposits

ater, al Anais annually
Oan and
ev Sotislaction

2 TAMA bo 2st | CEN:

* Banking prints

colale Planning

SCit cand payments |p 10

mays (using comment card)

Minimum requirements / qualifications:

J ears SADE ENCE In Ine Financ

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ent at frerosoalt Uithce Suite pmcrams

to work ina sell motivated enviranment

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This is a challenging job opportunity with the world’s leading provider of transportation services.
Our commitment to excellence and team spirit is a substantial element of our company’s culture.

Send your application and resume no later than Saturday, July 24, 2010 via email to
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or to:

HR Department

DHL Express Bahamas

Island Traders Building

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Nassau, Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



ABSOLUTELY ho
PHONE CALLS

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE fe: Personal fanking Representative
July 23", 2010 ta: 91 Frederick Street
PO. Box M4859 | Magsau | F: 28.7108
careerettidalitynahamascom

A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with
relevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest,
however, only those applicants short listed wall be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

ANEW eee
Big guns in new

third party talks

FROM page one

cal arena — considering the disastrous histo-
ry of such organisations to date.

He said one only has to look at the Peo-
ple’s Democratic Force, once led by the
PLP’s now Member of Parliament for Fox
Hill Fred Mitchell, the National Democra-
tic Party led by the former PLP Attorney
General Paul Adderley, the Workers Party
led by the ever present social activist Rod-
ney Moncur, or Cassius Stuart’s Bahamas
Democratic Movement to “get the picture.”

“Third parties have had a history in this
country of not doing well, and some people
are concerned about the seriousness of this
venture. But that is why we say that if we
are serious, we must present to the Bahami-
an people candidates who provide the bet-
ter alternative to what the PLP or the FNM
currently have.

“We cannot have persons bringing in
unwanted baggage, and we must represent
credibility with this new party. Newcomers
to politics cannot do it alone. That is why
we have some ‘well-known’ names who

have had Cabinet experience who we hope
could create a shift in the consciousness of
the Bahamian people,” he said.

Along with this “experience” in govern-
ment, the source highlighted the new group
would also require of itself as broad a lev-
el of support as possible. This, he said, will
require discussions with PLPs, FNMs and
independents.

For some time now, these discussions
have been reported to be taking place with
some notable names being dropped in con-
versation as having “held talks” from both
sides of the political divide. Despite this
fact, however, the face of this new and
growing “third force” has yet to be
revealed.

“One thing that has been brought up is
that we must ensure that the individuals
who are going to be put forward are people
who will be well received by the public.
You have a number of people in either par-
ty in the House of Assembly who might
entertain the thought of a new group. But
are they willing to express that desire pub-
licly is another whole other matter,” he
said.

Pair charged with attempting to
_ transport Chinese nationals to US

FROM page one

safe houses for these aliens of Chinese decent
and other nationalities while they were in the
Bahamas waiting to be taken to Miami.

As a result of these smuggling charges, Bowe
and Fox were ordered to forfeit to the United
States any conveyance, including “any vessel,

vehicle, and aircraft that has been or is being
used in the commission of the violation alleged
in counts one through three” of the indict-
ment as well as the gross proceeds of such a
violation.

The case is being handled by US attorney
Preet Bharara for the Southern District of
New York.

FROM page one

However, no notification
has yet been forthcoming
from BEC.

The Tribune understands
the corporation should be
advertising the information in
the local media in the form
of a gazette shortly, just ahead
of the rate increase taking
place.

We also understand that
actual base rate rises may vary
between residential and com-
mercial consumers, with the
extra amounts to be paid hav-
ing yet to be disclosed.

BEC carried out a number
of town meetings to gather

Electricity bills

public opinion on the pro-
posed rate hike leading up to
the implementation of the
increase.

The rise is said to be neces-
sary to help guide the finan-
cially-stricken corporation -
which has in recent months
blamed a lack of funds for an
inability to generate adequate
power, leaving consumers hit
with power blackouts - back
to stability going forward.

Continuing a long term
trend of deterioration in the
corporation’s finances, April
2010 showed that BEC’s

receivables by $66 million.
However, with the cost of
electricity already high com-
parative to places such as
Florida, and with businesses
and consumers mired in the
midst of a recession and in a
season when electricity usage
is traditionally high and sup-
plies particularly patchy, some
have questioned how reason-
able it is for the cost of the
service to rise at this time.
BEC general manager
Kevin Basden, who did not
return a phone call from this
newspaper seeking comment
yesterday, has promised to
look at ways the corporation
can increase its service and

accounts payable dwarfed its reliability.

PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2031, 2034 AND 2037
ISSUE OF B$100,000, 000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 10th

June, 2010. THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029 , 2031, 2034 AND 2037

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 15th July, 2010 and will close
at 3:00pm on 22nd July, 2010. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 23rd-July, 2010 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on
26th July, 2010.

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No.
ALLOTMENT No.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$100,000,000.00 (Nomital) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as posritls after allotment. No interest will be paid on
amounts so refunded. ;

DATE:

The Registrar

c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4868

Nassau, Bahamas



The date of this Pr ospectus | is July 9, 2010.

dnvites "applications for Bahamas Registered Stock
totalling 88100, 000,000.00. The Stock will be.available’i ina range of maturity:dates; the earliest being repayable in Sir:
2028 and the latest in 2037. The total amount’o tate of interest'and the issue price are given below :- , :
= ees I/We hereby apply for the following amount
oo Q Issue Price ORS é
Amount BS ee . Insert below the amount applied for
BS oo n Units-of B$100 2.
25,000,000.00 100.00 ; iS : 7
20,000,000.00
15,000,000.00 5
20,000,000.00 A
100,000,000.00

"Bahamas Register

Rate of Interest



Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
‘Bahamas Registered Stock 2029
Bahamas Registered: Stock 2031
Bahamas:Registered Stock 2034
Bahamas ‘Registered Stock 2037

1/12 % Above Prime Rate

3/32% Above Prime Rate
11/96% Above Prime-Rate

1/48% _Above Prime Rate.
17/96% Above Prime Rate

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
Bahamas) egistered Stock 2029
_ Bahamas Registered Stock 2031

112% Above Prime Rate
3/32% Above Prime Rate
11/96% Above Prime Rate
7/48% Above Prime Rate
17/96% Above Pri













26th July, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock. . te

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 26th July, 2010, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent per
annum over the Prime Rate:(ie: the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks
carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shail be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 26th January,
2011 and thereafter on 26th July and 26th January in every year until the Stock is repaid.

in payment for the Stock applied for.

In the event of the full atount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sumrefundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:

% : Bahamas Registered Stock BS
CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND ee
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated

Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF B$50,000.00 MUST BE MADE VIA REALTIME GROSS SETTLEMENT

SYSTEM (RTGS) THROUGH ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS EXCEPT FINCO.

PAYMENTS OF B$50,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM OR BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
PAYMENTS OF B$5,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM, BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS OR BY
CASH.

INDIVIDUALS PURCHASING FOR THE FIRST TIME MUST PRESENT A VALID PASSPORT
WITH THEIR COMPLETED APPLICATION.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas), Applications will

ne received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 15th July, 2010 and will close:at

H ¥:2010; Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 23rd July, 2010 and will

cease at 3: 0p m. on 26th July, 2010. All envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled
“Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks”.

1. (One Person)

The Stock will be in units of B$100.00. Ordinary Signature



Applications Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum:.
Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)
Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The Treasury
Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road au), applications may also be
downloaded from the Central Bank of the.Bahamas website at www.centralbankbahamas.com or

any of the following banks:



Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )

Bank of The Bahamas Internatio: nal EOOPEOX



Commonwealth Bank Limite
Royal Bank Of Canada:.,

Telephone Nos.(H

SS Oe oP

Citibank, N.A.

2. (Where two or more persons apply as join abs ribers, th dditional names and addresses should
be given below.) i

Provisional estimates from the unaudi d accel at March 3 1, 2010 show the Public Debt of The Bahamas to

Ordinary Signatures
be B$3,876,659,000.*



Names in Full

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE



ing information’is ted fromthe unaudited accounts of the Government of The Commonwealth of

And/OR.

FY2007/2008p** FY2008/2009p** FY2009/201 0p**
BS B$ BS

Approved Budget Approved Budget

1,569,330,000 1,400,046,000

Address



Revenue 1,424, 108,000

Telephone Nos.(H)



Recurrent Expenditure (excluding

Repayment of Public Debt) 1,344,028,000 1,484, 150,000 1,430,454,000

V/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

Capital Development Bank Name

Expenditure (excluding Joans
contributions and advances

to public corporations) 176,778,000 188,718,000 208,850,000 Bank Branch



** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at March 31,
2010 totalled B$573,245,000.

Account Number





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010




Butler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

| “Chuck”
Norris Simms,
of Elizabeth Estates,
formerly of Simms, Long
Island, will be held on
Thursday, 22nd July, 2010
at 10:00 a.m. at Calvary
Bible Church, Collins

Avenue. Officiating will be

Pastor Allan Lee. Interment will follow in Ebenezer
Cemetery, East Shirley Street.

Mr. Charles

Left to cherish his memories are: three sisters: Patricia
Moutardier-Smith, Suzanne Culmer and Mary Louise
Culmer; one aunt: Martha Farquharson-Deveaux; two
brothers-in-law: Claude Smith and Sanford Culmer; six
nieces: Rosine Moutardier, Anne Moutardier-Masotti,
Sanique Culmer, Bernadette Davis, Suzanne Porter-
Simms and Alicia Simms-Dowdell; eight nephews:
Charles Simms, Cristophe and Dwan Culmer, Todd
Simms of New York, Tarique Cunningham, Paolo Moxey,
Marvin Simms and Renardo Brennen; five grand nieces:
Diah Culmer, Sanae Knowles, Jasmine and Julia Simms
and Doneisha Hamilton; one grand nephew: Renardo
Brennen; numerous cousins including: Thelma Pyfrom,
Rosie Thrower, Paul Farquharson, Judy Knowles,
Charles Knowles, Dale Davis, Paula Hunter, David
Knowles, Douglas Simms of New York, Suzette Uriasz,
Jean Knowles, Wilfred Knowles, Marina Simms, Mario
and Michael Simms, Maria, Alfred and Frederick
Deveaux of California. Tina Kern and Stephanie Dean
of California, Marcel Pratt, Thelma Knowles and Karen
Archer; other relatives and friends including: Mrs. Ruth
Cooper, Tracey and Marcian Cooper, Stephan Miller,
Sheila Andrews, Ruth Knowles, Stuart Culmer, Ingrid
Culmer, Wellington Scantlebury, Buff Bartlett, Bruno
Cunningham, Basil Smith, Thomas Culmer, Joy Culmer,
Melissa Jones, Gary Knowles, Denise Carew, Elizabeth
Cox, Sharnette McKinney, Charles and Joan Deveaux,
Ella Thompson, Ellen Stubbs, Roscoe Darville, Godfrey
Bain, Tyrone Sawyer Anthony Rolle, Kenrick Arthur
and Walter Sawyer; and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes & Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Wednesday, July 21st, 2010, 10:00 a. m. until 4:00 p.m.
and at the church on Thursday from 9:00 a.m. until
service time.



LOCAL NEWS





THE TRIBUNE













Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





FROM LEFT: Steve DeGruiter and Katsuichi Yufu; Carol Collins (top) and Hirofumi Tanabe (above).



Foreigners in court on
$100m fraud charges

FROM page one

for the medication to be
found, co-accused Steve
DeGruiter, 60, an Ameri-
can resident of Indonesia,
told the court Tanabe
shares his high blood pres-
sure and heart disease med-
ication and therefore he
would have to go with him





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to retrieve it.

As he was handcuffed to
third accused man Katsuichi
Yufu, 71, also of Fukuoka,
they were led out together,
with American financial
consultant Carol Collins, 49,
of Massachusetts, following
closely behind.

The four are facing
charges together, while Tan-
abe faces an additional
charge.

October 27.

Defence attorney Milton
Cox made bail applications
for all three defendants, ask-
ing the magistrate to grant
cash bail.

But the prosecuting coun-
sel objected to bail as the
accused do not live in the
Bahamas.

Ms Archer said: “The
court will make no determi-
nation of the matter at this

time but defer the applica-
tion until Wednesday at
10am.”

Tanabe will be arraigned
on Wednesday if not before,
Ms Archer said.

He is expected to be
arraigned on the same four
charges as well as a further
charge of possession of a
forged document, a
Citibank cheque in the
amount of $50 million.

But only DeGruiter, Yufu
and Collins returned to
court to be arraigned yes-
terday as Tanabe was taken
to hospital.

Yufu held the bench for
support as the charges were
read, and translated to him,
while DeGruiter and Collins
stood alongside.

The three foreigners were
charged together with con-
spiracy to commit fraud by
false pretences, forgery, of a
JP Morgan Bank cheque,
uttering a forged document,
the same forged cheque,
and attempted fraud by
false pretences.

The final charge states
they attempted to obtain
$100 million cash from JP
Morgan Trust.

All crimes are said to
have been committed in
New Providence on July 8.

The three accused
entered not guilty pleas to
all charges and requested
for their matters to be heard
in the Magistrate’s Court.

Their trial was set for

and stuff.

en into custody.

Robinson, of Alligator Creek, Long Island, was charged
with murdering Mrs Knowles sometime between Monday, July
12, and Tuesday, July 13, in Long Island.

Dressed in dark blue jeans and a navy blue checked button-
down shirt, Robinson said he feared for his safety in prison
when taken before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez.

He said: “There have been a lot of twists against my life

Man charged
with murder

FROM page one

“They have a lot of guys who are up there and they have
plans to stretch me when I reach.”

Mr Gomez said he would ask prison authorities to be extra
vigilant with him as he remanded him in custody until the pre-
liminary inquiry on June 26 at Court Six in Parliament Street.

There are 18 witnesses to be called in the trial, according to
court dockets.

Robinson indicated he would like to make an application for
a voluntary bill of indictment whereby the matter would be sent
straight to the Supreme Court.

Mr Gomez assured him he could make the application when
he returns to court on Monday, but could not guarantee it
would be granted.



Dengue fever:
govt prepared to
face outbreak

FROM page one

the worst outbreak of dengue fever in more
than a decade, while Saint Martin, French
Guiana and Guadeloupe are also reporting
high numbers of dengue fever cases.

Key West, in Florida, has reported 27 sus-
pected cases of the disease.

As of early June, almost 17,000 cases have
been reported across the Caribbean.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Dr
Minnis said his ministry is “actively doing
survey programmes" where healthcare work-
ers immediately inform officials of any sus-
pected cases of dengue fever they come
across.

"We are on top of it to ensure we do not
have an outbreak in the Bahamas. We are
doing active fogging of our areas, especially
(now) during the rainy season,” he said.

Dr Minnis said workers are carrying out
fogging exercises at night, and he appealed to
residents not to leave out open water contain-
ers that can serve as breeding areas for mos-
quitos.

The Minister said that while there was
one case of dengue fever in the Bahamas
earlier this year, health officials acted imme-



MU aa RS

THE World Health Organisation
(WHO) defines dengue fever as a mos-
quito-borne infection that in recent years
has become a major international health
concern.

The disease causes severe flu-like illness
and sometimes a potentially-lethal com-
plication called dengue haemorrhagic
fever.

Other symptoms include headache,
muscle and joint pains and rash.

Dengue fever is found in tropical and
sub-tropical climates worldwide, in urban
as well as in rural areas.

According to the WHO, there is no
specific treatment for dengue, “but appro-
priate medical care frequently saves the
lives of patients with the more serious
dengue haemorrhagic fever.”

“The only way to prevent dengue virus
transmission is to combat the disease-car-
rying mosquitoes.”

Dengue fever is caused by four distinct,
but closely related viruses.

If a person recovers from one virus,
they have life-long immunity against that
particular form, but only partial protec-
tion against the three other types.







diately to contain the disease.

“We knew exactly where the location in
which it was contracted and Environmental
Health went to fog the area,” he said.

Dr Minnis said he is aware of the signifi-
cant impact an outbreak of dengue fever
could have on the country’s tourism industry
and the community itself.





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Miss Gospel
ahamas

CONTESTANTS TAKE PART IN FLOAT PARADE





BAP.

SHELDIRA JOHNSON of Christian Discipleship Ministries International portrays Miriam.

THE contestants of this
year’s Miss Gospel Bahamas
pulled out all the stops during
the weekend float parade, the
final public event leading up to
pageant night on August 1.

“Going through the streets
of Nassau was a stress free
moment for me. Wearing our
Biblical costumes, people got
to see for themselves what we
came into the pageant to do.
That was the sweet part of it,”
said Kervinique Ferguson, who
portrayed Mary the mother of
Jesus in the Biblical float
parade.

For many of the contestants
the elaborate float parade was a
“bittersweet” event as it sig-
nalled the end of months of
camaraderie and fellowship and
is indicative that a nail-biting
crowning night looms.

In Ms Ferguson’s case, focus-
ing on making sure that every-
thing is right for pageant night
“Gs a lot to do.”

She’s not the only one feeling
the pressure.

“T prayed to God while I was
on the parade just to fulfill me
come pageant night and I
thanked Him for the great
memories he’s given me of this
experience from March up to
now,” said contestant Shantia
Williams. With less than two
weeks to go until the pageant,
the Golden Gates Assembly
member who portrayed Rahab
on the parade also bemoaned
the pending loss of new-found
camaraderie. During the
months of preparatory activi-
ties the contestants formed a
tight knit circle as they paid
courtesy calls, participated in
make-up and etiquette classes,
had a speech contest and went
into a spiritual retreat at
Breezes, among other activi-
ties.

“Tm not going to think of it
as if I’m losing friends. We are
still going to remain friends,”
said Ms Williams. “We’re just
not going to see each other as
often as we have over these
past weeks.”

The contestants used the
float parade to wow members
of the public who gathered
along the route which took the
small motorcade from the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture’s Oakesfield headquarters
into downtown Nassau and
over-the-hill areas.

“T just love the Miss Gospel
Bahamas pageant because it is
a positive thing for young ladies
and the proceeds help the
under privileged,” said
bystander Michele Hanna



i







SHARELL FERGUSON of Bahamas Faith Ministries depicts the Samari-

tan woman at the well.

McDonald. “The ladies looked
great.”

The themes of floats ranged
from ornate presentations of
the bride of Christ portrayed
by Sylvian Rahming to more
obscure Biblical characters like
Latasha Munning’s depiction
of the Shunammite woman —
the mother of a young boy that
the prophet Elisha brought
back to life.

Contestants chose the char-
acters they wanted to portray
based on their personal prefer-
ences. For instance, contestant
Angelique Collie chose Ruth
because she was intrigued by
her hardworking character and
devotion to her mother-in-law,
while Sheldira Johnson picked
Miriam because, like the Bibli-
cal character, she loves praise,
worship and dance.

Each presentation took
weeks to research and bring to
fruition. It was that eye for
detail that spectators appreci-
ated. “The contestants brought
the Bible alive,” said Mrs
McDonald. Another bystander,
Nola King, agreed.

“The contestants look great,”
said Mrs King. “I have three
small daughters and every year
I take them to see the pageant.”

She added: “The pageant
teaches us about Christianity
which keeps us alive because
prayer without work is dead. I
just love that pageant. It’s just a
positive one.”

The new Miss Gospel
Bahamas queen will be
crowned on Sunday, August 1,
at the Rainforest Theatre in the
Wyndham Nassau Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino. Tickets
for the event are on sale at
Great Commission Ministries
International. Miss Gospel
Bahamas is the brainchild of
the non-profit mission organi-
sation which reaches out to the









RAQUEL PINDER of Pentecostal Church of Faith in God depicts Hanna
and baby Samuel.

All photos by Precision Media

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Pa



F



poor, homeless and high-risk
youths. Organisers said that
while the pageant is a great
learning experience for contes-
tants, it is the year of commu-
nity service which follows that
helps the winner learn the
importance of making a true
difference in society.

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SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



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Film Studios wind-up threat after $90k rule

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



Bahamian engineer-

ing company may

petition for the liqui-

dation of the

Bahamas Film Stu-
dios’ holding company after obtaining
a $90,000 judgment against it for
breach of contract, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, with the latter’s
“principal shareholder” saying he was
no longer involved with the develop-
ment.

A Supreme Court judgment, issued
last Thursday in favour of well-known
Bahamian firm, Islands by Design,
requires Gold Rock Creek Enterpris-
es, the parent of the Grand Bahama-

* Bahamian engineering firm may petition for liquidation of company owning project where Pirates
of the Caribbean filmed, after Supreme Court awards it $90,000 plus interest for breach of contract
* ‘Principal shareholder’ denies any responsibility, saying he has ‘nothing’ more to do with Bahamas Film Studios

based Bahamas Film Studios, to pay it
$89,822 for engineering and environ-
mental consulting work, including
preparation of an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) to meet the
Government’s requirements.

Gold Rock Creek was also ordered
to pay Islands by Design interest at
the rate of 1.5 per cent per month, dat-
ing back to September 30, 2006, after it
was not represented at the trial before
Supreme Court Justice Bernard Turn-
er.

Sources familiar with the situation

suggested that Islands by Design might
now petition the Supreme Court to
“put the company [Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises] into liquidation” in a bid
to recover the sums owed, as it was
now a creditor to whom the Bahamas
Film Studios’ developer owed money.

An insight into the difficulties
Islands by Design will likely face in
recovering the judgment sum were
shown yesterday when Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises’ “principal share-
holder”, Nashville-based investment
banker Ross Fuller, told Tribune Busi-

ness he no longer had any connection
with the company or the Grand
Bahama-based Bahamas Film Studios.

“T am no longer involved with Gold
Rock Creek Enterprises or the Stu-
dio, nor do I have any information
about the judgment,” Mr Fuller, a
principal at Stockton, Fuller & Com-
pany, said in reply to a series of ques-
tions e-mailed to him by Tribune Busi-
ness.

This, of course, begs the question
of who is responsible for the Bahamas
Film Studios and its debts, especially

since Mr Fuller, in a February 11, 2010,
article in Tribune Business, was accus-
ing the Government of breaching the
project’s Heads of Agreement and fail-
ing to act in good faith by not negoti-
ating a new lease for the project site
with him.

The episode is again likely to high-
light - and possibly create pressure for
- the need for major foreign developers
to put up performance bonds or some
form of escrow security to ensure that

SEE page 2B

Government eyeing $30m bridge ‘fully funds’ Arawak port

‘this week’ for

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Facility put together by RoyalFidelity/Royal Bank gives

landfill deal

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is “hop-
ing this week” to conclude a
management contract for the
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway landfill, the minister
for the environment telling Tri-
bune Business the private sec-
tor entity involved believes it
can complete a waste ‘break-
down profile’ within 90-120
days of taking over.

Updating this newspaper on
the status of negotiations
between the Government and
Cambridge Project Develop-
ment Inc, Earl Deveaux said:
“We have not finished things.
I’m hoping it’s done this week,
but we haven’t concluded nego-
tiations yet. They have pro-
posed an agreement, but we
don’t have final authorisation
of it yet.”

* Some 30% of waste
‘immediately recyclable’,
and private sector partner
promises break down
in 90-120 days
* TPO may be some way off,
as government focuses on
management contract in
near term
Describing the conclusion of
a Management contract as “one
of my priorities”, Mr Deveaux
said it was critical for the land-
fill to be placed under profes-
sional, permanent management.
Apart from managing the
site, securing it and preventing

pollution run-offs and fires, the
minister said Cambridge would

SEE page 3B

Abaco power woes
costing firms 50%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

BROWNOUTS, blackouts
and fried equipment continue
to plague Abaco, with one store
owner yesterday saying busi-
ness had fallen 50 per cent
because of the power issues,
while one hardware store said
commerce was flowing because
of it.

Peter Bradley said his com-
pany, Conch Pearl Gallery, had
lost half its business because of
the consistent power cuts across
the island, as tourists - his
biggest customers - peer into
the darkened store and subse-
quently leave.

According to Mr Bradley,
the power outages can go on
for three to four hours at a
time, and because the building,
where three other businesses
have rented out space, has no

back-up generator, the frequent
daily losses are mounting.

As he spoke to Tribune Busi-
ness by phone yesterday, the
power in his store was out and
“someone just looked in and
left”.

Mr Bradley said that while
the power outages are an annu-
al summer menace, the cuts
seems to be much worse this
year. And they seem to be hurt-
ing Abaco’s tourism industry
far more than previous years.

“We simply are not seeing
the tourists,” he said. “They are
not wanting to come, so second
home owners who come two
and three times a year are com-
ing once. I don’t know if it’s the
power cuts or the economy. But
there have been a lot com-
plaints (by tourists).”

A hardware store employee,
who spoke on condition of

SEE page 3B

Sotheby's

THE $70 million Arawak
Cay post is now “fully funded”
after receiving a $30 million
bridge loan facility from Royal
Bank of Canada, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with construc-
tion already started and likely
to be visible “in less than 30
days”.

The $30 million received
from Royal Bank of Canada (a
facility arranged by RoyalFi-
delity Merchant Bank & Trust),
when combined with the $20
million in equity injected by
both the Government and the
private sector, will provide all
the financing needed to con-
struct the new port, for which
the “first order of sheet piling”
has already arrived.

Multiple sources yesterday
confirmed that the $30 million
bridge loan facility was now in
place, and one told Tribune
Business: ““We’re fully funded.

“The first order of sheet pile
is here. The work is going to
start at the western end of
Arawak Cay and work east. It'll
go east.

“They’ve already started.
Basically, we had all the mate-
rial on order waiting to pull the
trigger. We’ve now paid the
first big bill, and stuff is here. I
think it will be quite exciting,
and will be visible in less than
30 days.

“It’s a big project, and while
it’s early days it should go well.
We'll accelerate it as fast as we
can. Nothing has changed. The
primary focus is the redevelop-

$70m Arawak Cay port all financing it needs, before
replacement with preference shares and IPO

* Construction to be ‘visible in less than 30 days’, with
big payments now being made and first sheet pile
order already in Bahamas

* Not all 20 private sector stakeholders invest for $1m
each, a small minority not going beyond initial
$55,000 contribution, although full $20m raised

ment of Bay Street, and that’s
the big push.”

The $30 million bridging loan
facility will ensure the Arawak
Cay port project has enough
capital to fund its construction,
and it will eventually be
replaced by a million prefer-
ence share issue that will pay
out Royal Bank of Canada.

RoyalFidelity, as previously
revealed by Tribune Business,
has already been appointed as
placement/advisory agent for
the preference share issue,
which sources suggested would
take place some time within the
next two years. It is likely to
happen, though, before that
timeframe expires, with funds
being sought from selected high
net worth and institutional
investors.

Then, the $10 million initial
public offering (IPO) will take
place, allowing the Bahamian
public - especially retail
investors - to subscribe for

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

shares in the Arawak Cay port,
and hold a stake in real estate
that services New Providence’s
cargo shipping needs. The IPO
will be the last financing act to
occur.

Currently, equity ownership
of Arawak Port Development
Ltd (APD) is split 50/50
between the Government and
private sector through their $20
million investments each.

Tribune Business has been
told that while there are some
20 shareholders collectively
owning the private sector’s 50
per cent share, not all invested
the $1 million that was sought.

This newspaper understands
that a small minority, including
Bethell Estates, elected not to
invest any equity beyond the
$55,000 all had ponied up to
fund the initial feasibility stud-
ies, While a small number also
chose to increase their contri-

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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Civil society exclusion furthering our malaise

IN my column last week, I
ended with the warning: “Plan-
ning and execution are now
more important than ever” as it
relates to the future of the
Bahamas. I pondered on
whether or not the Bahamas
was up to the challenge. The
reality is that the Bahamas has
no choice but to be up to the
challenge.

Thave always argued that we
would be a much stronger and
more resilient country if we
encouraged and actively sup-
ported the development of civ-
ul society organisations (CSOs).
One just has to look at devel-
oped societies and see how

CSOs have contributed to their
development and economic
success. For instance, if one
looks at the US, you immedi-
ately become deeply apprecia-
tive of that country’s level of
civil society development. How-
ever, if we were to contrast this
with the Bahamas, one quickly
laments this nation’s inherent
and fundamental weakness in
this regard.

Civil Society

The London School of Eco-
nomics’ Centre for Civil Society
defines civil society as referring
“to the arena of uncoerced col-
lective action around shared

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010
IN THE SUPREME COURT — CLE/qui/No.00298
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence in the Fox Hill Area North of the
Creek in Sandilands Village and being Lot Number
46 on a plan filed in the Department of Lands and
Surveys in the City of Nassau as Number 5179 NP.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of THOMAS J.
LOVE by virtue of Power of Attorney for THOMAS

L, LOVE

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that Thomas J. Love is
applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas to have his title to the following
land investigated under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act 1959 and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title
to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act. A plan of the said land
may be inspected during normal working hours at

the following places:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lat of land situate in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence in
the Fox Hill Area North of the Creek in Sandilands
Village and being Lot Number 46 on a plan filed in
the Department of Lands and Surveys in the City of
Nassau as Number 5179 N.P.”

Copies of the same may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:
The Registry of the Supreme Court of Nassau,

Bahamas;

The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., No. 35 Buen
Retiro Road, Off Shirley Street, Nassau, The

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having a
dower or right of dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the said Petition shall on
or before the expiration of thirty (30) days after the
final publication of these presents file in the Registry
of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
a Statement of his Claim on or before the expiration
of thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents shall operate as a bar to such claims.

Lockhart & Co.
Chambers
35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff



interests, purposes and values.

“In theory, its institutional
forms are distinct from those
of the state, family and market,
though in practice, the bound-
aries between state, civil soci-
ety, family and market are
often complex, blurred and
negotiated.

“Civil society commonly
embraces a diversity of spaces,
actors and institutional forms,
varying in their degree of for-
mality, autonomy and power.
Civil societies are often popu-
lated by organisations such as
registered charities, develop-
ment non-governmental organ-
isations, community groups,
women's organisations, faith-
based organisations, profes-
sional associations, trades
unions, self-help groups, social
movements, business associa-
tions, coalitions and advocacy
groups.”

Following this definition, one
can clearly see that there are
many important stakeholders
in the Bahamas who are sim-
ply not ‘stepping up to the
plate’ as it relates to helping
shape public policy in a mean-
ingful way.

Default

One would have thought that
some 37 years after indepen-
dence, we would have made
more progress in this regard.

Rather than being embraced,
the few organisations that do
exist are often viewed scepti-
cally, and too much energy is
spent trying to figure out their





Financial
Focus

By Larry Gibson



1



fs

Li

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agenda as opposed to evaluat-
ing the merits of their message.

Therefore, by default, the
work normally contributed by
civil society organisations is left
to the major political parties,
whose first obligation is to put a
‘political spin’ on every issue.
I would argue that this does not
provide the robust policy for-
mulation that the country
deserves.

An interesting challenge fac-
ing both major political parties
is the issue of leadership and
leadership transition. In 2012,
when the next elections are
likely, Mr Ingraham will be 65
years old and Mr Christie will
be 68 years old. Should we be
identifying new blood now, so
that the respective party struc-
tures have choices among
viable alternatives, or do we
simply maintain the status quo?

Assessment

In March 2006, the Canadian
Foundation for the Americas
hosted a conference under the
theme Civil Society in the Pro-
motion and Strengthening of
Democracy in the Americas: A
Vision for the Future. The con-
ference report, in its assessment
of the current landscape in the
Americas, made the following

Film Studios wind-up

FROM page 1B

all Bahamian companies and
workers are paid what is due
to them should they suddenly
decide to abandon the project
and leave the jurisdiction.

The Supreme Court judg-
ment in the Islands by Design
case noted that evidence was
produced to show Mr Fuller
was served with all relevant
documents at his Nashville
office following Justice Turn-
er’s March 29, 2010, case man-
agement conference. These
documents included the June
30, 2010, trial date, the judg-
ment showed, but neither Mr
Fuller nor Gold Rock Creek
appeared at the case manage-
ment trial.

And after filing a defence on
Gold Rock Creek’s behalf, the
attorney representing it and Mr
Fuller’s interests was given
leave to withdraw from the case
in May 2009.

Turning to the brief trial
hearing itself, Justice Turner
accepted the evidence given by
Islands by Design’s principal
and president, Keith Bishop,
who described how the firm
was hired by the late Paul

Quigley, a former Bahamas
Film Studios’ principal, in 2004
to provide environmental and
engineering services for the
project.

“The proposal for the envi-
ronmental impact assessment
support was for an estimate of
$231,000 for labour only, and
for the engineering consulta-
tion services, an estimate of
$169,850 for labour only,” the
Supreme Court judgment
recalled. “Other direct expens-
es were to be invoiced at cost
plus 15 per cent as incurred.

“The evidence was further
that bills were submitted at
roughly 30-day intervals, and
that for the first two months of
the contracts, the bills were
paid on time, but started falling
into arrears after some 90
days.”

Mr Bishop then informed Mr
Quigley that interest, at the rate
of 1.5 per cent per month,
would be charged on the
arrears - something Mr Quigley
agreed to. But after the
Bahamas Film Studios fell into
arrears, Islands by Design
stopped work and informed the
Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission of the same.

Then, in a February 6, 2006,

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

observation about political par-
ties:

Crisis of Political Parties

“Political parties are indis-
pensable to the workings of
democratic governance, which
relies on them to fulfill the clas-
sic roles of recruiting candidates
for political office, structuring
public political support around
identifiable sets of policy pro-
grams, socioeconomic interests
and values, and forming gov-
ernment and legislative policy
agreements.

“Unfortunately, political par-
ties throughout the region are
in crisis. A weak democratic
culture and the competition for
the benefits associated with the
state have contributed to their
failure to effectively articulate
coherent positions and respond
to popular interests. Parties are
charged, often correctly, with
corruption, lack of transparen-
cy, weak internal party democ-
racy and the incapacity to pro-
mote new leaders.

“Further, they are increas-
ingly challenged by the com-
plex social and political trans-
formations emerging as a result
of globalisation and structural
adjustment. Unable to present
innovative and responsive gov-
ernance and policy options,
they are viewed with wide-
spread distrust, reinforcing divi-
sions and disillusionment
instead of fostering the
informed dialogue and repre-
senting citizens’ interests need-
ed for further democratic con-

threat after

letter to Islands by Design and
Mr Bishop, the Bahamas Film
Studios’ David Williams III
acknowledged the company’s
debt, and praised the Bahamian
engineer for doing “an excel-
lent job” and being in the final
stages of EIA preparation.

Mr Williams pledged that
settling the debt was a Bahamas
Film Studios’ “priority”, and
two further letters from Mr
Quigley, on February 10, 2006,
and February 13, 2006,
acknowledged that Islands by
Design was owed $180,653 and
$207,774 respectively.

Passing

After Mr Fuller took over
following Mr Quigley’s passing,
he pledged in a July 27, 2006, e-
mail to Mr Bishop that the debt
would be settled. A $35,000
wire transfer would be forth-
coming the following day, with
a further $35,000 coming on
August 18, 2006, and the
remaining balance by Septem-
ber 8, 2006.

Mr Fuller then sent a further
letter on August 4, 2006, in
which he described himself as a
“director and principal share-
holder of Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises”. Promising to set-
tle the matter, it was agreed
that Islands by Design would
complete the EIA, with Mr
Fuller setting out a payments
schedule to clear the compa-
ny’s debt.

He pledged that $35,000
would be paid by August 9,
2006, with a bond “fully
enforceable in the Bahamas”
to be issued for $84,834. Pay-
ment of that was guaranteed by
September 30, 2006. Both sides
signed up.

The EIA was submitted to

THE TRIBUNE

solidation.”

Conclusion

Civil society organisations
can contribute in many impor-
tant ways such as promoting
dialogue, advancing construc-
tive policy reform, nurturing
future leaders, consensus build-
ing and harnessing technical
expertise, all of which serve to
strengthen values and struc-
tures critical to democracy.

If you accept that political
parties are not perfect in their
default role as exclusive policy
formulators, and you further
accept that there is a distinct
under-development of civil
society capacity in our society,
why are we surprised by the
current malaise our society
finds itself in?

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst, is
vice-president - pensions, Colo-
nial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

S90k rule

the BEST Commission by
Islands by Design on August
24, 2006, the judgment found,
with $35,000 wired to the
Bahamian company by August
11, 2006.

The balance was not forth-
coming, though, and Mr Fuller
was found by Justice Turner to
have acknowledged in his
August 4, 2006, letter that 1.5
per cent monthly interest
charges were part of the com-
pany’s debt.

This was “the only significant
component” of Islands by
Design’s case that was disputed
by Mr Fuller and Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises, but Justice
Turner found they did “have
knowledge” of these.

“The only other point of
departure between [Islands by
Design’s] case and the pleaded
defence is that the defence
asserts that [Islands by Design]
agreed to provide a copy of the
EIA to Gold Rock Creek
before the defendant paid the
balance of the monies owed,”
Justice Turner said.

“T find on the evidence in this
case that there was no such
agreement, and that indeed it
was, as asserted in the evidence
of Mr Bishop, the then-policy
of the Government of the
Bahamas that EIA reports,
although prepared at the
instance and expense of an
intended developer, were to be
submitted directly to BEST by
their authors, and were not to
be provided to the intended
developer.”

The Supreme Court found
that Islands by Design carried
out all its contractual obliga-
tions, and was entitled to the
$90,000 plus monthly interest
due to breach of contract by
Gold Rock Creek Enterprises.

A leading law firm with offices located
in Nassau and Freeport is seeking to fill
the following position:

ATTORNEY

The successful applicant should possess

the following qualifications:

¢ 5 years specialization in Litigation .

* Appearances before Supreme Court
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communication skills, including

computer skills

Salary commensurate with experience

WE OFFER
An attractive and competitive package of
benefits including pension and medical
insurance. Interested persons should

apply in writing to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
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NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 242-325-5383


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 3B





AG concerns on Contractors Bill

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors
Association’s (BCA) president
is at his “wits’ ends” over the
status of legislation to regulate
this nation’s construction indus-
try, telling Tribune Business the
last communication received
indicated the Attorney Gener-

al’s Office had concerns over
‘double regulation’ of three
contractor categories.
Stephen Wrinkle said the
BCA was “desperately trying
to get some information as to
the status of the Contractors
Bill as we speak”, adding that
the Government had indicated
the 2010-2011 Budget and sub-
sequent debate had placed a

temporary hold on all other leg-
islation.

However, the last informa-
tion received by the BCA indi-
cated that the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office had concerns
about the Bill regulating three
particular sub-contractor cate-
gories - electricians, plumbers
and liquefied petroleum gas
(LPG) installers - because they

were already regulated by oth-
er existing legislation.

Mr Wrinkle said BEC dealt
with electricians, the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
Services (DEHS) covered
plumbers, and the Ministry of
Works was responsible for LPG
installers.

“We have three different
entities with oversight of three

different categories of sub-con-
tractors, and the intent of the
Contractors Bill was to transfer
all contractors and sub-con-
tractors under one entity, the
Contractors Board within the
Ministry of Works,” the BCA
president said.

Mr Wrinkle said the final
draft legislation had been
agreed by government and

Government eyeing ‘this week’ for landfill deal

FROM page 1B

also analyse the waste streams
being generated by the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
landfill, a vital precursor to
developing a waste-to-energy
plant at the site.

“The other big thing they
[Cambridge] will did is that
there is a mass of waste
streams,” Mr Deveaux
explained to Tribune Business.
“We think 30 per cent of the
waste can be immediately recy-
cles, and the bulk of the rest
separated, so we have a better
inventory of waste coming in
and properly structure a waste-
to-energy plant.

“They [Cambridge] believe
they can have that profile in 90
days to 120 days.”

On the management front,
Mr Deveaux said that once
Cambridge took over at
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway, their first step would

be to build a new cell, followed
by completion of a leachable
pond so no polluted water ran
off into the surrounding wet-
lands and water table. Then
there was the need to put mon-
itoring wells in to prevent fire.

The minister indicated that
an initial public offering (IPO)
of shares in the landfill man-
agement firm to Bahamian
institutional and retail investors
might be some way down the
line, the Government’s priority
being to get the management
contract in place.

“Tnitially, we are going to
enter into a management agree-
ment with Cambridge, so we
have professional management
of the landfill,” Mr Deveaux
said. “When we make any fur-
ther transfer, there will be
opportunities for public own-
ership, but right now we are
trying to conclude a solid man-

$30m bridge ‘fully
funds’ Arawak port

FROM page 1B

bution - but not the full $1 mil-
lion. The main thing, at least
from APD’s viewpoint, was
that the private sector’s full $20
million stake was raised.

The Arawak Cay port will
have a 75,000 twenty-foot
equipment unit (TEU) capaci-
ty, with APD Ltd and its con-
tractors set to enjoy some $4.75
million in Customs duty exemp-
tions for its construction. The
port site and Gladstone Road
depot are to be leased for 45
years, with construction com-
pleted by June 27, 2011.

Prior to the port's substan-
tial completion, APD Ltd will
pay an annual rent of $40 per
twenty foot equipment unit
(TEU) container and, follow-
ing completion, the rent will be
the greater of $2 million per
annum or the $40 per container
fee. An internal rate of return
on investment has been set at
10 per cent.

There are also numerous

"Reserved Matters’ upon which
APD Ltd's Board of Directors
cannot take a decision or action
"unless the Government's prior
approval in writing has been
obtained".

The Reserved Matters
include:

* Changes to APD Ltd's
Memorandum and Articles of
Association

* Changes in APD Ltd's
share capital

* Borrowings. APD Ltd and
any subsidiaries cannot, with-
out government approval,
"incur any financial indebted-
ness which would result in the
secure debt exceeding an
amount being equal to 3 times'
EBITDA or a debt service cov-
erage ratio that is less than 1.25
times (or such other amount or
ratio as may be agreed in writ-
ing from time to time)".

Construction work on the
Arawak Cay port is supposed
to be completed by June 27,
2011, a total of 294 days.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), CD Properties Limited (the “Company”’) is in disso-
lution. Kyrene Kelty is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
CIT (Bahamas) Limited, One Marina Drive, Paradise Island,
P.O. Box SS-19140, Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named Company are required to send their

names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Liquidator before August 13th, 2010.

agement agreement. We need
competent, professional man-
agement.”

The existing problems at the
New Providence landfill were
exposed in an Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB)
report obtained by Tribune
Business, which placed the
facility almost six years past its
‘sell by’ date and noted that tip-
ping fees only covered 11 per
cent of operating costs.

It said: “The life expectancy
of the landfill constructed in
New Providence was four years
as of November 2000. Already,
more than seven years have
gone by and the landfill is still
in use.

"The situation is further
exacerbated by the fact that in
the first two years of operation,
the waste was not being com-
pacted to the recommended
density of 750 kg/m. It is esti-

mated that only 70 per cent of
the waste currently being gen-
erated is being collected.”
Further problems, according
to the IDB report, related to
the landfill's financing. While
tipping fees were being collect-
ed at the Tonique-Williams
Darling Highway site, these -
at the time of the report - were
only "being applied to private
collection contractors who are
responsible for the collection
and disposal of waste generated
by commercial and industrial
enterprises". This meant the
fees were not levied on the
Department of Environmental
Health Services (DEHS), which
collected household waste.
"Approximately $450,000 in
tipping fees is collected annu-
ally at the New Providence
landfill," the IDB report said,
"and this accounts for 11 per
cent of the cost of operating the

Abaco power woes

FROM page 1B

anonymity, said while BEC’s
power cuts have been hard on
their equipment, it has brought
business in for the store.

According to the employee,
they have seen and had to
replace many burnt refrigera-
tor circuit boards and fan
motors.

“Tt is terrible,” said the
employee. “It is hard on the
equipment and it doesn’t go off
on a snap; it goes off on a grad-
ual slope, which is bad for
equipment and makes me work
my equipment hard.”

General Manager of Belle-
vue Business Depot, Timothy
Sands, said his business has also
seen the consequences of the
blackouts and brownouts, with
fried office equipment coming
in frequently to be repaired or
replaced. He said they them-
selves have had to replace thou-
sands of dollars worth of equip-
ment because of it.

And while Bellevue is fortu-
nate enough to have a back-up
generator to weather the out-
ages, Mr Sands said fuel and
generator maintenance costs
are mounting for the store.

“We are one of the business-

es who are fortunate to have a
back-up generator,” he said.
“But the fuel bill and the main-
tenance (costs) have increased
because it is being used for
more than just a back up.”

He said the hotels of Hope
Town and Green Turtle Cay
have seen their businesses
devoid of tourists because of
the blackouts.

Mr Sands said power has
often gone off in those islands
for more than 20 hours, and
some tourists have simply
upped and left.

Abaco is not expected to
have its new power plant locat-
ed in Wilson City up and run-
ning until the end of the year.
Until then, power outages are
expected to plague Abaco.

Mr Sands said he is not con-
vinced the power plant itself
will solve Abaco’s power prob-
lems, as he sees the transmis-
sion infrastructure as being an
equally debilitating problem.

“Most people in Abaco
understand the issue with the
plant and forget the controver-
sy where distribution is a larger
problem,” he said. “Most of the
time we are out of power, it’s
because the power lines are so
old and poorly maintained.”

+ Hou

52wk-Low
1.00,
9.67
5.00
0.30
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.50
5.00
2,23
1.60

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
5.94
8.75

Famguard
Finco

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AML Foods Limited
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ROYAL FIDELITY

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landfill, which handles an esti-
mated 400,000 tons of solid
waste per year. The operating
cost of that facility along has
escalated to $4 million." That
compared to $2 million in oper-
ating costs when the landfill
began operation in 1999-2000.

The report said tipping fees
alone would be an insufficient
revenue stream to finance the
landfill, and solid waste man-
agement generally, in the
Bahamas.

industry a year ago in July 2009,
with the final meeting held in
November.

He added that the situation
had not been helped by the
transfer of Nicole Campbell,
the Ministry of Works under-
secretary who had direct
responsibility for the matter.

“T’m at my wits end. I don’t
know how to convince the Gov-
ernment to prioritise passage
of this critical legislation,” he
added. “T’ve done all I can do.”

If you need a
matured, honest and
reliable person to
help your business
to run efficiently

and profitably,

Please Call

324-1005

















COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

UPREME COURT
ol i ai

IN THE MATTER cf ihe Properly comprised ind Deed af
Morpags dated the 28” day of July, AD, 2000 between
Desmond Sanda and Sarah Louse Sancs as Borrowers and



Bank of thet Bahamas Lirribed

AND IN THE MATTER of tha Conyeyancing and Law af



Property Aci, Chapler 135 of ha Revieed Stahule Laws of the








Commonwealth of The Gahanna,

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED




Plaintiff

AND





DESMOND SANDS




AND




GARAH LQUISE SANDS






Defendants

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING






TAKE NOTICE that tha Notice of Appointment to Hear the Criginating





Summons filed on the 26” day of July, AO. 2008 and set down to be heard on




Friday the §° day of August, A.D, AMOR at 12:00 o'deek ni the noon will now be




heard before tha Honourable Justice, Mr. Nevile Adderley, Justice of the




Supreme Court, 2" Floor, Charlotte House, Charlotte and Shirley Streets



Nassau, The Rahanas ant Tuesday lhe ay" day of July, A. D., 2040 at 9:30

o'clock in forenoon,

Dated thie 25° day of May, A.D. 2040

REGISTRAR

This Adin war take cul by Muiira. Gibson, Flgby £ Ci, Chambors, Midvale Mousa, [ipmaocennl Saget

ica, hai aad, ANTES Ha TO ha

]E &

oF A Lb

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 19 JULY 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,487.06 | CHG 1.30 | %CHG 0.09 | YTD -78.32 | YTD % -5.00

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.04
10.63
5.00
0.30
3.15
aT
10.96
2.50
6.02
2.16
2.00
6.07
8.90

Previous Close _Today’'s Close

Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00

Change
1.04

10.63
5.00
0.30
3.15
21

10.96
2.50
6.02
221
2.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.07
8.90

EPS $

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE &

ADVISORY SERVICES

clea bce ST AT.

Div $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
OT 14
0.627

-0.003
0.168

Legal Notice

NOTICE

8,50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
8.95:
10.00

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.46 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity *twertnahe penk Gro séLGY (ve -The-Counter Getuuitins,
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets 9.42 10.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
O45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4825 3.04 2.96
2.9199 1.14 0.85
1.5376 4.06
2.8522 -8.08
13.4110 3.32
107.5706 6.99
105.7706
11?
1.0785
1.1162
9.5439

9.81
4.58

9.81
4.65
1.00
0.27
ao

0.00
0.07

0.720
0.366
1.00
O27
5.39

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.000
0.035
0.407
0,952

0.156 64.1

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
A-CAP RESOURCES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Yield

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act No. 45 of 2000, A-CAP RESOURCES
LIMITED, is in Dissolution.

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.911577
1.525400

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.508709

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
1.4777 CFAL Money Market Fund
2.8522 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 = FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund
9.1005

1.4387
2.8266
2.02
-8.49
0.33
3.45
3.95
2.52
0.98
2.34
2.16

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
13.50 99.417680
Sto
5.29
5.45
6.25

The date of commencement of dissolution is the
19th day of July 2010.

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000 10.0344 -6.84 5.63

4.8105 7.3073 +531
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

16.22

Mr. Avraam Kapiri
57 Steliou Mavrommati St.,
Agios Dometios
2364 Nicosia, Cyprus
Liquidator

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 5B



The Tribune

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

BOUT thirteen years

A Nikechia Hall- Den-

is watched her mother
Dr Mildred Hall- Watson put
on a white lab coat and make
her way to the hospital. Now,
thirteen years later she is
doing the same, dedicating
selfless service at the Depart-
ment of Obstetrics and Gyne-
cology at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.

It was never predetermined or
planned. It was simply their mutual
desire and aspiration that landed
them both in the field of obstetrics
and gynecology.

For Dr Mildred Hall- Watson the
decision to become a gynecologist
was not a spontaneous one. She
recalls from as far back as the age of
six when she first spoke about the
path she wanted her career to take.

“Tt started with the desire which as
far back as I could recall age six. I
actually verbalised that I wanted to
be a doctor. What I said at the time
was ‘I wanted to deliver babies’ and
being unaware that you could be a
midwife and still deliver babies I
looked at it from the angle of being
a physician and delivering babies,”
she told Tribune Health.

No one in her family was a physi-
cian. She was never exposed to this
particular field and she had not the
slightest intimation of what being a
physician entailed.

“At that time in Government
High you had to choose if you want-
ed to do something that had a scien-



(CY JOINING HANDS FOR HEALTH






©

tific bend as oppose to an art's bend
as oppose to a general curriculum
and I figured if I was interested in
medicine then I would choose a sci-
entific bend that’s how I began,” Dr
Mildred Hall Watson explained.
Unlike her mother, Dr Hall Den-
nis knew from the beginning the task
at hand when she signed up for med-
ical school. She knew that besides
having love and passion for it, time,
commitment, and dedication was a
big part of the equation. But she did-
nm’t care how much time she exhaust-
ed into her work, because watching
her mother make life easier for
expectant mothers was a beautiful
thing she wanted to be a part of.

Motivation

“This was something that I was
always exposed to. I was always
around it because of my mother and
my interest sparked from just watch-
ing her,” Dr Hall Dennis said.

Watching her mother was moti-
vating and it propelled her to pursue
a Bachelor of Arts in psychology
first and then enter medical school at
the University of the West Indies.

It was a tough, but rewarding
experience.

“Medical school was a challenge.
It was a lot of work and a lot of
hours. But this is something that I
always wanted to do so I did the
work and I stayed committed,” Dr
Hall Dennis told Tribune Health.

It gave her a good feeling to know
that if she didn’t understand some-
thing in school she could give her
mother a call who would have been
able to clear things up for her.

Even now, their relationship has-
n’t changed. She can still call her





mother if she stumbles. But now she
has to address her by a different
name other than “mummy.”

“She is my boss now since I have
been doing my internship at the hos-
pital in the Gynecology department
at the hospital. If I have a question I
have to address her as Dr Hall- Wat-
son not mummy because at work we
are not mother and daughter,” she
said. “Working under my mother is
no different than working under
someone else. There is no
favouritism and we are professional
as possible. We also make a conser-
vative effort to make the distinction
between our relationship at work
and our relationship at home,” she
explained.

Dr Mildred Hall-Watson
expressed pride and is extremely
proud of her daughter.

"The pleasure for me in the last
year or two, as she went through her
clinical at the end of her medical
school period and internship, was
seeing her commitment to wanting
to work and helping with individuals.
She thinks properly, she empathetic,
she's concern not only about the dis-
ease process but she is concerned
about the individual. She is very
independent minded and she does
not want people to look at her as
Dr Hall- Watson’s daughter. She
wants to be able to stand on her own
and so far she has done a really good
job,” Dr Hall Watson said.

She hopes that in the near future
her daughter makes the decision to
work alongside her.

“T cannot wait. At first it might
be some tension simply because we
are two strong young women but I
think my desire to see her succeed
and the training she has at the end of

ith







DR Mildred Hall Watson and daughter Nickechia Hall Dennis.

it will in some ways surpass mine
because of new technology that she
will be exposed to,” she said.

Future

Dr Mildred Hall Watson is the
Chief of Services of Obstetrics &
Gynecology at Princess Margaret
Hospital. She also established a
birthing center in 1995. She is the
medical director of Health Care
Centre for Women located East
Avenue North, Centreville. She is
fellow a Diplomate and Fellow of

agement and assertiveness
skills.

TOOLS TO TAME A TEMPER:

the American Board of Obstetrics
and Gynecology and a Fellow of the
American College of Surgeons.
Nikechia Hall- Dennis recently
finished her internship at Princess
Margaret Hospital. She attended
St Andrews High School and
attended Oglethrope University in
Atlanta where she obtained her
Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology.
She also obtained her Medical
Degree last year. Now she is sta-
tioned at the Princess Margaret
Hospital in the Obstetrics and
Gynecology department.

Deciding to take control of
anger rather than letting it
control you means first tak-

‘Keeping a lid on ange?” sumox

No matter what, one thing is certain, people are sure to get angry
sometimes. Everyone does. Anger is a normal emotion, and there
is nothing wrong with feeling mad. What counts is how anger is
handled and the manner in which persons respond when they are
angry. Poor management of anger can have serious long term

effects.

It is therefore very important that anger is managed at all times.
This article provides useful guidelines for anger management)

WHAT IS ANGER?

Anger is a very powerful
emotion that can stem from
feelings of frustration, hurt,
annoyance, or disappoint-
ment. It is a normal human
emotion that can range from
slight irritation to strong rage.
Some persons suppress anger,
which can lead to serious
action over time.

WHAT ARE THE DANGERS OF
SUPPRESSED ANGER?
Suppressed anger can be
an underlying cause of anxi-
ety and depression. Anger
that is not appropriately
expressed can disrupt rela-
tionships, affect thinking and
behaviour patterns, and cre-
ate a variety of physical prob-
lems. Chronic (long-term)
anger has been linked to
health issues such as high
blood pressure, heart prob-
lems, headaches, skin disor-

ders and digestive problems.
In addition, anger can be
linked to problems such as
crime, emotional and physical
abuse, and other violent
behaviour.

WHAT CAN STEPS CAN BE
TAKEN TO HELP MANAGE
ANGER?

When beginning to feel
angry there are several steps
one can take such as:
© Deep breathing - breathe
deeply from your
diaphragm.
¢ Positive self-talk - slowly
repeat a calm word or
phrase such as "relax" or
"take it easy.” Repeat it to
yourself while breathing
deeply until the anger sub-
sides.

e Stop angry thoughts - If
you have trouble realising
when you are having angry
thoughts, keep a log of when

you feel angry.

e Seek out the support of
others.

e Talk through your feel-
ings and try to work on
changing your behaviours.
Although expressing anger
is better than keeping it in,
anger should be expressed in
an appropriate way. Fre-
quent outbursts of anger are
often counter-productive
and cause problems in rela-
tionships with others. Anger
outbursts are also stressful
to the nervous and cardio-
vascular systems and can
make health problems
worse.

¢ Learn how to use
assertiveness. This is the
healthy way to express feel-
ings, needs and preferences.
Being assertive can be used
in place of using anger in
these situations.

e Try to gain a different per-
spective by putting yourself
in another's place.

¢ Learn how to laugh at
yourself and see humour in
situations.

e Practice good listening
skills. Listening can help
improve communication and
can promote trusting feel-

ings between people. This
trust can help in dealing
with hostile emotions.

¢ Learn to assert one’s self,
expressing feelings calmly
and directly without becom-
ing defensive, hostile or
emotionally charged up.
Read self-help books on
assertiveness or seek help
from a professional therapist
to learn how to use
assertiveness and anger
management skills.

DEALING WITH ANGER INA
HEALTHY WAY?

If you believe that your
anger is out of control and
is having a negative affect on
your life and relationships,
seek the help of a mental
health professional. A psy-
chologist or other licensed
mental health professional
can work with you to devel-
op techniques for changing
your thinking and your
behaviour. A mental health
professional can help you to
deal with your anger in an
appropriate way. Choose
your therapist carefully and
make sure to seek treatment
from a professional who is
trained to teach anger man-

SELF-AWARENESS AND SELF-
CONTROL

Because anger can be pow-
erful, managing it is some-
times challenging. It takes
plenty of self-awareness and
self-control to manage angry
feelings. And these skills take
time to develop.

Self-awareness is the ability
to notice what you are feel-
ing and thinking, and why.
Children are not very aware
of what they feel; they just act
it out in their behaviour. That
is why they have tantrums
when they are mad. But teens
and adults have the mental
ability to be self-aware. When
angry, take a moment to
notice what you are feeling
and thinking.

Self-contrel is all about
thinking before acting. It puts
some precious seconds or
minutes between feeling a
strong emotion and taking an
action that will bring regrets.

A combination of self-
awareness and self-control
allows one to have more
choice about how to act when
feeling an intense emotion
like anger.

GETTING READY TO MAKE A
CHANGE

ing a good hard look at the
ways you have been reacting
when you get mad.

Behaviours such as yelling,
screaming, saying hurtful,
mean, disrespectful things,
throwing things, kicking or
punching walls, breaking stuff,
hitting someone, hurting
yourself, or pushing and shovy-
ing others around are clear
signs of uncontrolled anger.

For most people who have
trouble harnessing a hot tem-
per, reacting like this is not
what they want. They feel
ashamed by their behaviour
and do not think it reflects
the real them, their best
selves.

Everyone can change, but
only when they want to. Mak-
ing change in the way we
manage anger brings many
benefits. These include: more
self-respect and more respect
from other people, less time
feeling annoyed and frustrat-
ed and a more relaxed
approach to life.

Making a change takes
time, practice, and patience.
Managing anger is about
developing new skills and new
responses. As with any skill,
like playing basketball or
learning the piano, it helps to
practice over and over again.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

heach organisations opens resource centre

By REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia.net



sation has been a source of support for

O= the last 12 years, the REACH organi-

the families affected by autism Recently,
the organisation saw the fulfillment of a dream
when it officially opened its resource centre in

the Dewgard Plaza.

Autism is a complex neu-

robiological disorder that
typically lasts throughout a
person’s lifetime and affects
essential human behaviors
such as the ability to com-
municate ideas and feelings,
imagination, and self-regula-
tion.
Minister of Education, Hon
Desmond Bannister, offi-
cially opened the centre say-
ing:

"It is so special to see such a
committed group of persons
who understand the impor-
tance of creating awareness
in our community of a con-
dition that affects so many
of our children and we need
to be able to assist them as
best we can."

There is no “cure’ yet for
autism, but early diagnosis
and intervention improves
outcomes of the condition.
With appropriate specialised
education, behavioural and
biomedical interventions,
combined with an under-
standing community and



adequate support services
most persons with autism can
become productive, happy
citizens.

Denise Beneby, office
administrator at REACH,
knows first hand, the chal-
lenges families with Autistic
children face. Her children
Justin, 17, and Jewel, 4, are
“nonverbal.”

She says that she suf-
fered a 10-year depression
after her son’s diagnosis.

“Tt’s a lot of work dealing
with special kids,” said Mrs
Beneby. “My average bed-
time is midnight every night,
but Pm living life and enjoy-
ing it.”

With Justin, it was very
stressful, said Mrs Beneby,
to the point where she left
her job as a banker. Coming
to grips that her child suf-
fered from the disease left
her in a sad place, but she
said that the support from
other REACH members and
her family have helped
tremendously.





Her involvement with
REACH has given her
access to a plethora of books
and informative DVDs on
autism, and how to help per-
sons with the condition. She
herself has become a consul-
tant and encourages the fam-
ilies in the program. Mrs
Beneby promised that the
new centre will seek to
“spread new information on
autism to teachers and





| ee

>

>

. \.
eee ¢ oso oe oe

bh

schools who cater to autistic
children. We hope to bring
more awareness and offer
information for parents of
children with autism, and
we’re there for people to
come and talk.”

Schools that offer special
programs to children with
autism are: Garvin Tynes
Primary School, Stapledon
School, MOE Special Edu-
cation Units, Blairwood



Academy, Hopedale Centre,
Anatol Rogers High School,
and Willard Patton Pre-
School.

DeCosta Bethel, president
of REACH said at the open-
ing, “We believe that this
new centre is going to allow
us the opportunity to do
even greater good in the
community with assisting
these children with autism
and improving the awareness

THE TRIBUNE




EDUCATION
Minister
Desmond
Bannister
cuts the
ribbon at the
opening of
the REACH
centre in
Dewgard
Plaza.

and prevention that will all
be facilitated.”

This summer, REACH,
along with the Ministry of
Education will begin a pro-
gram for autistic children,
ages four to 21, and partici-
pants are allowed to bring

their siblings.
REACH’s doors are
opened on Mondays,

Wednesdays, and Fridays
from 9.30 am to 1 pm.

Cataracts



~ 75

A CATARACT is cloudiness or
opacity of the lens of the eye. The
lens is inside the eye directly behind
the pupil. In a normal eye, the lens is
clear and normally is transparent. A
cataract interferes with normal vision
or sight by partially or completely
blocking clarity of the lens. The
cloudiness can vary from a little spot
of white to a totally opaque structure
that affects the entire lens. If the lens
become completely masked, the result
is blindness.

Dogs suffer from cataracts more
commonly than any other species.
Cataracts can develop at any age, but
most cases are found in dogs over 5
years of age. While cataracts are
extremely common in dogs, cats do
not suffer from the diabetes- related
or “old age” cataracts often found in
dogs.

Several things can result in lens
changes. Trauma and/or resulting
inflammation may cause a cataract
but usually to only one eye. Cataracts
can be caused by poor nutrition, but
because of modern advances to canine
and feline diets, such causes are rare.

Dogs most often suffer from senile
or old age cataract. Almost all dogs
over 8 years suffer from some degree
of cloudiness to the lens. Cataracts in
dogs may also result from diabetes
when the lens protein is injured by
metabolic changes.

Vision loss

A cataract may affect only a por-
tion of the lens, and consequently
some animals may show no sign of
vision loss at all. Even the cataract
that covers the entire lens may still
allow some vision. Treatment may
not be necessary until a high degree
of vision is lost and cataract becomes
problematic for the dog or cat. Often,
even blind animals continue to do
well in familiar surroundings by rely-
ing on other acute senses. The under-
lying cause is treated when possible.

In animals that have trouble navi-
gating due to vision loss, sight can be
restored to near normal by surgery.
Surgical treatment with lens extrac-
tion provides predictable restoration
of functional vision. The general con-
dition of the patient as to health and
behaviour should be considered.
Cataract surgery should be left to vet-
erinarians with special interest in oph-
thalmology and experience in lens
extraction.

This long expensive procedure is
done under general anesthesia,
removes most, but not the entire
affected lens. The lens itself is con-
tained in a kind of capsule like
eggshell. Most commonly, the surgery
removes the front part of the shell
and the contents inside while leaving
the back half of the capsule/shell
intact. In some cases, the whole lens is
removed and new lens is transplanted
to replace the damaged lens. A pro-
cedure called PHACOEMULSIFI-
CATION produces high frequency
sound waves- ultrasound- to break
the lens, which is then removed by
suction or aspiration. Dogs and cats
that have this type of surgery usually
recover quite well.

GREEN SCENE

6



as

ALTHOUGH photosynthesis provides most of a plant's needs, elements from the soil are also required.

Fertilisers

SOMETIMES when there is an
excavation you can see how a shrub
or tree has sent roots deep into little
cracks and crevices within pure
white limestone rock. It is almost
unbelievable that these roots could
support a healthy looking plant of
such size. This brings home strong-
ly the fact that plants derive almost
90 per cent of their nutrients from
the process of photosynthesis. The
rest of the nutrients required come
from mineral salts produced from
rotted leaves, insect detritus and
such that are washed down to the
roots by rain.

In a cultivated garden, of course,
most of the added nutrients are
applied by you and me in the form
of liquid, granulated or pelleted
commercial fertilisers, or compost.
An unfertilised tomato plant will
complete its life cycle and produce
seeds but will be of no joy to the
home gardener who wants plump
and juicy fruits. These are attained
by adding fertiliser.

There are 13 constituents to a
good commercial fertiliser, the most

abundant being salts of Nitrogen,
Phosphorus and Potassium. These
three give the initial assay of the
fertiliser — N-P-K — in the form of
the percentage of usable elements.
A general purpose fertiliser will be
6-6-6 indicating that there is 6 per
cent of each of the main elements
available.

Growth

Nitrogen promotes vegetative
growth, particularly the leaves, and
a fertiliser high in nitrogen is used
on lawns to make them green and
pleasant. Phosphorus strengthens
root growth and flowering while
Potassium regulates the general
vigour of plants and the synthesis of
starches.

The minor elements in fertiliser
are Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc,
Chlorine, Copper, Manganese,
Molybdenum, Sulphur, Boron and
Iron. These can be thought of as
the equivalent of vitamins and min-
erals in a human diet. The minor
elements are available in liquid form

at nurseries and can be sprayed
onto plants to ensure their presence
as some fertiliser mixes skimp on
them.

Special fertilisers are produced for
certain needs. Palms require much
larger doses of Manganese and Mag-
nesium so a palm special includes at
least 2 per cent of these elements.

We can only understand the val-
ue of fertiliser if we take into
account the condition of our soil.
Soil can be acid or alkaline. A bal-
ance between the two is a pH value
of 7; a lower figure indicates an acid
soil, a higher figure an alkaline soil.
In general our Bahamian soil is
heavily alkaline and this is not ide-
al because alkaline soils tend to pre-
vent the mineral salts from being
usable, a process we call ‘tying-up’.

The early citrus producers in
Florida were bugged by this phe-
nomenon. They applied tons of fer-
tiliser but the limestone soil would
not allow the mineral salts to live up
to their potential, the result being
chlorosis. It was long known that
iron acted as a catalyst and assisted
in the absorption of other elements
but even iron was tied up in Flori-
da’s calcareous soil.

Along came Sequestrene 138, a

By Gardener Jack

.





chelated iron designed to work in
limestone soils. Sequestrene 138 was
close to a miracle for the citrus
industry and could be in your gar-
den too. Only very little is required
and it is soluble in water. If you
apply plenty of fertiliser to your
shrubs and trees but they remain
light green or even yellowish, a sea-
sonal application of Sequestrene
138 could make all the difference. It
works on the roots of plants so is
best applied as a drench.

Compost

Another way of treating chlorot-
ic plants is to apply compost or
peat moss to the soil. These amend
the soil and reduce its alkalinity,
making minerals readily available
to the roots.

Kindness can kill. All fertilisers
should be used sparingly. A little
too much fertiliser is a waste of
money as it will be leached through
the soil without being used by your
plants. Too much will burn the
roots and either set the plant back
or kill it.

¢ gardenerjack@coralwave.com

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010, PAGE 7B





Miss Teen Plus

beauty pageant

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



poetry recital.

The audience was filled
with supportive family and
friends who show their love
and adoration to all of the
girls. Even if it wasn’t there
family members or friends
they clapped and praised
they young a ladies for a job
well done.



HE precious gems of the new Miss Teen

Plus beauty pageant took to the stage on

Sunday night at the British Colonial to
compete in the talent, spokesmodel, and com-
mercial segments of the pageant.

Sunday night marked a
beautiful experience for the
ten voluptuous young ladies.
It was their first time greeting
the audience since their
introductions on Friday
night.

The ladies who have just
broken into the world of
pageantry, having no prior
experience at all, displayed
the poise, beauty, charisma,
and intelligence required for
a beauty queen.

They wore smiles on their
faces all night, they spoke
eloquently, their speeches
were well researched and
there was never a hint of
fear, because all barriers
were broken and all ordeals
overcome when they
stepped onto the stage.

Even when they stumbled
over a few words, with the
support of the crowd they
quickly regained their com-
posure and kept things flow-
ing smoothly.

Each of the beauty queens
took part in the three seg-
ments.

The show was in some

to see her vulnerability.
Members in the audience
were moved to tears when
one of the young ladies told
her past experiences of being
discriminated against because
of her weight.

She told the audience that
after all the teasing and being
broken down by children
and adults she tapped into
her inner strength which gave
her the boost to enter the
competition.

Talent

Because of the discrimina-
tion she had faced over the
years she chose a platform
focusing on children with dis-
abilities.

Other competitors chose
platforms of youth and crime,
school violence, and teen sex-
uality.

The talent segment of the
show was exciting to watch.
The young ladies put their all
into their performances and
they showed themselves wor-
thy of the coveted titled.

It was exciting to watch the

They ladies did their best
that night and the organisers
are promising a five star
show. One of the organisers
said to the audience: “ We
are putting on a grand show.
You better bring your sun-
glasses because it’s going to
be bright.”

Rayette McDonald creator
of the Miss Teen Plus
pageant came on stage and
said how proud she is of the
young ladies making it this
far. She said the main thing
she wanted to do was build
self confidence in plus size
young women. And with the
introduction of this pageant
she said she had the oppor-
tunity to do just that.

With tears in her eyes Ms
McDonald said: “I am very
proud of what we saw
tonight. And I must say that
if this pageant has nothing
else it has integrity. I can say
without contradiction we do
not cheat and whichever girl
wins on August 7 wins
because she wanted it the
most.”

The Miss Teen Plus

tnt

1 young ladies of the first ever Miss Teen Plus beauty pageant t competeed in the talent,
spokemodel and commercial segment of the event Sunday night.







































































































































































ways touching as one ofthe = pageant is scheduled for
young ladies (Jasmine Rah- _ girls. Some sang, some dance, August 7 at the Rain Forest loin
ming) allowed the audience some did a spoken word Theater. Mia a
INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
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SESESESES Se Ses RSS ARs Wye SESrces Wednesday: E at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 1 Miles 84° F
Warm Cold Stationary Showers Rain T-storms Flurries Snow Ice RAGGED ISLAND Today: E at 15-25 Knots. 3-6 Feet 5 Miles 85° F
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

iil



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



is holding an all day semi-

nar on the neuro develop-
ment perspective of learning on
July 24. It’s taking place at
Stephen Dillet Primary School
auditorium, and will be opened
to teachers, parents, and church

workers.

The goal is to equip instructors to reach
and effectively teach students with devel-
opmental problems such as Autism, and
Down Syndrome, Michelle Wildgoose, prin-
cipal of Bahamas Wisdom Academy told

B ahamas Wisdom Academy






“We evaluate indi-
viduals and design
an individualised
program specifically

to move the child
from where he’s at

THE TRIBUNE

Tribune Health yesterday.

“Even the highly capable child has prob-
lems,” Ms Wildgoose explained. “Bahamas
Wisdom Academy is putting on a seminar to
the public, and is looking to give parents
information in a seminar presented by Cyn-
di Ringoen a and Marilee Coots,certified
neuro-developmentalists.

The American specialists will be doing
evaluations for individuals with special
needs; those dealing with slow learning,
reading problems, hyperactivity, learning
disability, ADD and ADHD, Autism, Down
Syndrome, cerebral palsy, and brain injury.

Evaluations will be conducted from July
26 to July 31, where students will be able to
learn about various disabilities. Christian
Access to Neuro-Developmental Organisa-
tion (CAN DO), and the Help With Learn-
ing organisation (www.help-with-learn-

TUESDAY, JULY 20,

ing.com), sponsored by Marilee Coots.



For example, if the child is not reading,
instructors at the school can design a pro-
gram that will help the student with reading
over a period of time. And if he isn’t feed-
ing himself, the group would design a pro-
gram for the parent to work with the child so
that they would be able to reach that point
of independence within a three month time
frame.

The programs at the school are framed
around the needs of the child, said Ms Wild-
goose. Various processing skills and dealing
with challenges with children, from the func-
tioning side of the individual will be taught.

If the child is not an auditory learner, the

2010

to the next level.”

Surprising facts about
staying hydrated in

summer's heat

(ARA) - Record temperatures
bring disturbing news reports of
heat related deaths and the famil-
iar calls to seek shade, limit out-
side work and drink large quanti-
ties of water. But experts caution
water alone may not be sufficient
and could actually increase your
risk of severe heat related
injuries.

According to Dr David McCar-
ron, adjunct professor at Univer-
sity of California Davis, "You
must also replace the sodium and
potassium along with the water.
This is why athletes drink sports
drinks like Gatorade, rather than
just water. Replacing water with-
out sufficient sodium can quickly
produce hyponatremia, a poten-
tially fatal condition," says
McCarron.

When the body loses elec-
trolytes, typically from perspira-
tion, over-rehydration with only
water will produce hyponatremia
which is a true medical emer-
gency. Hyponatremia symptoms
are similar to those of heat
exhaustion and heat stroke and
can often be overlooked. Symp-
toms range from mild to severe
and can include nausea, muscle

cramps, disorientation, confusion,
seizures, coma and death.

To avoid this condition, med-
ical authorities advise marathon
runners to consume extra salt and
this advice should also be consid-
ered by those exposed to exces-
sive heat. Salt is critical in main-
taining hydration.

The proper balance of elec-
trolytes in the human body is
essential for normal function of
the cells and organs. Electrolytes
help to regulate cardiovascular
and neurological functions, fluid
balance and oxygen delivery.

In 2007, a 28-year-old mother of
three died from hyponatremia
hours after competing in a Sacra-
mento radio station contest to see
which contestant could drink the
most water without urinating.

A few years ago, a 21-year-old
student died of water intoxication
during a hazing incident. He had
been forced to drink from a five-
gallon jug of water that was
repeatedly refilled. He soon col-
lapsed and had a seizure. Frater-
nity members didn't initially call
an ambulance. By the time they
did, it was too late. He was pro-
nounced dead a few hours later.

na

WO ee
Bat ener oe



evaluation will reveal that something is going
on, and instructors will design something
that works to his auditory function.

Ms Wildgoose also teaches processing
skills, and deals with challenges based on
what is going on with the child, discovering
any learning disabilities that need to be
treated.

The seminar “can help to bring some solu-
tions to our problems, in helping our chil-
dren,” said Ms Wildgoose. She promises a
very informative time with the American
duo. “These women are more detailed.
They go into getting specific information to
meet the need of the individual.”

Call Michelle Wildgoose at 362-4397/98 or
visit www.bwdc-edu.net for more informa-
tion on the program. Any other inquiries
can be made at
bahamaswisdom@ymail.com.





Water intoxication is more
commonly seen among athletes,
usually extreme athletes, but old-
er individuals are also at high risk
for several reasons. Their kidneys
are less efficient at conserving salt
when the body is stressed and
common medications such as
diuretics greatly increase that risk.
That is why during severe high
temperatures, news accounts most
often refer to elderly victims of
the heat.

Although most hyponatremia
victims may not have obvious
symptoms, severe hyponatremia
is a medical emergency that calls
for immediate treatment. The low
sodium level is restored to a nor-
mal level by gradually and steadi-
ly giving sodium and water intra-
venously. Milder cases can be
handled by administering of salt
and fluid replacers by mouth.

The next time the local meteo-
rologist recommends cranking up
the air conditioner and drinking a
lot of water to beat the heat,
remember that doctors recom-
mend also cranking up your
intake of electrolytes, particular-
ly sodium and potassium.

Courtesy of ARAcontent





































Ben

|

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Miller expecting
plenty of open
shots with the

Miami Heat

MIAMI (AP) — Mike
Miller knows he could be
open often in Miami.

LeBron James and
Dwyane Wade wanted a
shooter like Miller to help
open things up for them. In
return, Miller knows teams
facing the Heat might not pay
him too much attention, sim-
ply because James, Wade and
Chris Bosh will dominate
many defensive gameplans.

Miller says "there's no
question" he'll get plenty of
open looks.

He was the NBA's second-
best shooter from 3-point
range this past season, mak-
ing a career-best 48 percent
of his attempts. He signed a
five-year contract with Miami
last week.



In offseason of change, Heat point job unsettled



DWYANE WADE controls the ball during the
Summer Groove All-Star game Sunday at
American Airlines Arena in Miami...

(AP Photo)

By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer



MIAMI (AP) — LeBron James will
play some point guard for the Miami
Heat. So will Dwyane Wade, as he has
throughout his NBA career. Mike Miller
will likely do some ballhandling as well.

Thing is, none of them are true point
guards. And that means this Heat sum-
mer of change still has some things left to
address — particularly finding a starter
at the point spot.

Mario Chalmers is under contract,
Carlos Arroyo is expected to re-sign
with the Heat and there's some talk of a
possible Miami reunion with 2006 title-
team point guard Jason Williams.
Whomever it is, the next starter for the
Heat will inherit the keys to what could
be one of basketball's most dynamic
offenses with Wade, James and Chris
Bosh. "It's going to be a lot of fun,”
Chalmers said.

Maybe for him. Probably not for oth-
er clubs. Take what happened in this
past season's playoffs as an example.
Wade faced the Boston Celtics in the

first round, James faced Boston in the
second round. Both saw virtually the
same defensive scheme from the Celtics,
who kept running multiple people
against them in waves. It worked. The
Celtics won both series.

With Wade and James on the floor
together — with another ballhandler —
the same approach likely wouldn't be
as successful in the 2011 postseason. And
that's already creating some concern for
Heat opponents.

"We tried to just make them see a lot
of guys,” Celtics point guard Rajon Ron-
do said Sunday at a charity event Wade
hosted. "It's going to be difficult with
both those guys on the court, because
you can't really load to one particular
guy because the other one's on the oppo-
site wing. It's going to be fun. I'm going
to enjoy the matchup. I'm probably not
going to be checking either of those
guys."

Throughout their seven seasons in the
league, both Wade and James have reg-
ularly taken over the point-guard duty,
especially down the stretch in close
games. Each will continue doing the

same in Miami, though likely not as
much as in the past. And even though
the notion has been floated that Miami
could line up this season without a true
point guard — a hybrid lineup of Wade,
James, Miller, Bosh and newly re-signed
center Joel Anthony, perhaps? — Wade
himself doesn't see it happening regu-
larly. He thinks, for now anyway, the
job is Chalmers’ to lose.

"Of course, you've got to go through
training camp and you have to go
through practices to see what happens,”
Wade said. "But right now, as I look at
it, I think that would be the plan. I would
like to play (shooting guard), at least in
the starting lineup. I think I've done OK
there. But you never know."

Miller said Monday that he likes the
idea of handling the ball at times, espe-
cially if that gets him on the floor with
Wade and James more. "I see no prob-
lem with that," Miller said. "Obviously,
Dwyane and LeBron are two of the best
in pick-and-roll situations and in the
open court. So it's all about defense and
rebounding at that point. ... It's defi-
nitely an option, for sure."

Licjr titi
JOB OPENING

Computer Technicians/
Systems Engineer

Openings: For Abaco & Nassau

Must have experience in:
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PC Repairs and Maintenance
Server 2008 Networking
Web Design- (An Asset)

Please fax, hand deliver or email your
resume to Lignum Technologies.

Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
Harbor Bay Shopping Plaza
Phone: 393-2164 Fax: 394-4971
Email:info@lignumtech.com

2010 FORD MUSTAN





With stars sitting, US
begins training for worlds

By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer

LEBRON James, Dwyane
Wade and Chris Bosh had
some free agency business.
Kobe Bryant and Chris Paul
need to heal injuries.

Time to start choosing their
replacements.

While its recent mainstays
take the summer off, the US
gets back to work Tuesday in
Las Vegas, opening training
camp for the players compet-
ing for a chance to play in the
world championships.

"T think everyone is antsy to
get going again. It'll be fun
because we've got a bunch of
young guys who are very hun-
gry and it's a different group,"
USA Basketball chairman Jer-
ry Colangelo said. "It's chal-
lenging, but it's also exciting.
That's the way we choose to
look at it.”

The new-look team still has
plenty of talent, including NBA
scoring champion Kevin
Durant, perennial All-Stars
Amare Stoudemire and
Chauncey Billups, and Lamar
Odom and Rajon Rondo, last
seen on the court in Game 7 of
the NBA finals.

The camp roster includes 21
players who will practice
through Friday, working some
of the time against a group of
20 college seniors. The week
ends with an intrasquad game
Saturday night at the Thomas
& Mack Center.

The roster could then be
trimmed before the team recon-
venes next month in New York
to continue its training before
leaving for Europe. The world
championships run August 28
to September 12 in Turkey.

an American Icon

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KEVIN DURANT (left) passes to a
teammate from under the basket in
the fourth quarter of Game 6 of a
first-round playoff series in the
Oklahoma City.

(AP Photo)

Colangelo won't make any
predictions about who will
make the final roster, saying
the team is "just wide open as
to what our plan is." Durant is
considered a lock, having near-
ly made the team that played
in the 2007 Olympic qualifier
before he played his first NBA
game.

There were no such ques-
tions about the roster the last
time the Americans played.
Most of the team had been
together three years before

they won gold in the 2008
Olympics, and the core of that
team committed early last year
to return for another run.

But it wasn't long before talk
of free agency put the status of
Miami's new trio in jeopardy.
Those who aren't under con-
tract don't chance playing in
the summer, and though
they've already signed their
deals, it was obvious they
wouldn't be taking part.

"That all took its toll. Every-
thing centered around free
agency, certainly took the focus
away from the world champi-
onships. We definitely have our
share of guys who couldn't par-
ticipate anyway," Colangelo
said, citing injuries to Bryant,
Paul, Deron Williams and
Tayshaun Prince.

Carmelo Anthony was just
married, and Colangelo said
other players just wanted some
time off, so he decided all of
them could have a pass with-
out jeopardizing their status in
the programme, calling it "no
harm, no foul."

"All we do is focus on the
world championships with
excitement about this group,
outstanding young players to
go with some veterans," Colan-
gelo said.

Mike Krzyzewski and his
coaching staff of Jim Boeheim,
Mike D'Antoni and Nate
McMillan are back, and they'll
have some familiar faces in
camp.

Billups, Stoudemire and
Tyson Chandler all were on the
US team that went undefeated
in the FIBA Americas tourna-
ment three years ago, and a
number of players who will be
in camp took part in a mini-
camp last summer.





C BURT URS TSU TCE





BARCELONA’S Brazilian Adriano Correia kisses his jersey during his
official presentation at the Camp Nou Stadium in Barcelona, Spain, on
Monday. Correia has completed a move from Sevilla to Barcelona, sign-
ing a four-year deal with the Catalan club. The 25-year-old Brazilian,
who plays in defense and midfield, signed the contract Saturday along-
side Barcelona president Sandro Rosell.

(AP Photo)



Starace, Fognini advance
at the German Open

HAMBURG, Germany
(AP) — Spanish qualifier Pere
Riba upset 2009 German Open
runner-up Paul-Henri Mathieu
of France 1-6, 6-0, 6-3 Monday
for a spot in the second round
of the clay-court tournament.

Italian duo Potito Starace
and Fabio Fognini also reached
the second round.

Starace defeated German
qualifier Bjorn Phau 7-5, 6-0
and Fognini beat Ruben
Ramirez Hidalgo of Spain 7-6
(4), 6-4.

In other matches, Florian
Mayer of Germany beat Pablo
Cuevas of Uruguay 6-4, 6-1,
and Maximo Gonzalez of
Argentina defeated Olivier
Rochus of Belgium 64, 5-7, 6-2.
Rochus' brother Christophe
also lost, going out 6-3, 7-6 (6)
to Jarkko Nieminen of Finland.

Others who advanced includ-
ed Jan Hajek of the Czech
Republic, Denis Istomin of
Uzbekistan, Andrey Golubev
of Kazakhstan and Florent Ser-
ra of France.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



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