Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 106 No.182

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The Tribune |



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST





USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

NOBODY - BUT NOBODY - BEATS THE TRIBUNE

INSIDETODAY | â„¢
UMA Le Me TN Dao YH a] ay aT



Available at

The Paint Depot

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875

PRICE —75¢ (Abacqand Grand Bahama $1.25)



Gar fees increase
facing legal threat

Attorney offering
his services free to
‘overcharged’ drivers

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Road Traffic Depart-
ment may face legal action over
its increased car licensing fees,
with attorney Wayne Munroe
prepared to offer free legal ser-
vices to those who feel over-
charged by the new policy.

The new fees come into effect
today and are based on the man-
ufacturer's curb weight of a vehi-
cle, and will not be weighed at
the inspection site.

However, Mr Munroe argues
that a motorist should be able to
demand his or her car be
weighed if they feel the actual
weight is less than the factory
standard.

Mr Munroe, partner of
Munroe and Associates, con-
tends that if a motorist were to
remove car accessories — like an
extra row of seating common in
sports utility vehicles (SUVs), a
spare tyre etc — it may put their
car in another weight classifica-
tion.

"I have a Chevy Tahoe that
has a third row of seats in the
back. If you take out the third
row it's lighter, and if the dif-

ference is to save $400, I don't
see why people shouldn't
demand for it (the car) to be
weighed.

"Four hundred dollars is a lot
of money, for a lot people that's
a week's pay or more — and if
they owe it, they owe it, but the
government should be in a posi-
tion to say you owe it because of
what their scale says — not what
the manufacture says this vehicle
weighs.”

Starting today he, with a few
colleagues, are prepared to offer
pro bono assistance to those
who feel they have been over-
charged under the new fee struc-
ture.

"They can put a contact on
our Facebook page and once we
commence action (against the
Road Traffic Department) we
will include them in the action,"
he said.

On the eve of the fee change,
hundreds of motorists queued
outside several locations of the
Road Traffic Department's
Vehicle Licensing Unit, most
waiting hours in the brutal heat.

When The Tribune arrived at

SEE page nine



Baa
SANDWICH



PM explains change
of mind on contract



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yes-
terday explained how he changed his mind
about directing Ministry of Works officials to
use the construction services of a company
run by a dedicated FNM supporter after he
realised that the cost of the project in ques-
tion was to exceed $290,000.

The renovation of the police commis-
sioner’s residence, located at the police
headquarters on East Street North, will now
go out to a more competitive selective ten-
der process with six construction compa-
nies — including Telco Enterprises, the orig-
inally selected contractor — now having been
picked to have a chance to bid on the job.

The clarification from the Prime Minister,

SEE page 10







Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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| Try = ==





ing fees which come on stream today.

MPs’ use of
$8.2m in public
funds is revealed

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TODAY, for the first time,
The Tribune can reveal how
MPs chose to utilise a total of
$8.2 million in public funds
within their constituencies.

This article, based on official
Treasury records from the Min-
istry of Finance, follows sever-
al other articles in January of
this year based on a verbal
accounting of these expendi-
tures from 16 MPs.

Fifteen FNMs and one PLP
responded to a request to
account for the funds from this
newspaper in December 2009.

Now for the first time, The

SEE page two

: Radio host and







guest ‘hack’ into

: ministry website

: By AVA TURNQUEST
: Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia. net

THE Ministry of Foreign

: Affairs (MOFA) website,
: www.mfabahamas.org, got an
: unexpected update yesterday
: when a radio talk show host
: and his guest illustrated their

ne
Fd telat
aria

Ta
SH

HOU



el
LE UH



C ALLEN JOHNSON (above
left) ‘hacked’ into the website
(above) with radio host
Lincoln Bain.

control of its content. ;

The website, which had :
fallen into disuse, was said to}
be inaccessible by govern- :
ment because they did not :
have the password.

SEE page eight

aes mg eet
com iit eet af

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

MOTORISTS queue outside of the Road Traffic Department’s Vehicle Inspection section on Thompson Boulevard trying to beat increased licens-

ee
LOD HO TVW's -

Murder accused
makes plea for

protective custody

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN charged with mur-
der yesterday pleaded for a
magistrate to put him in pro-
tective custody.

Prince McPhee, 34, of High
Vista Estates, was charged yes-
terday with the murder of
Bradley Ferguson.

Ferguson was acquitted ear-
lier this year of the March 2002
murders of a pregnant Rose-
mary Bennett-Wright and her
son five-year-old son Jakeel
Wright, of Fox Hill, as well as
the attempted murders of
Devonna Brown and Omega
Fox.

SEE page nine

EEE) powwTo wn | MURLTHON MALL | HARSOUR BAY | CUFLE BEACH | PALMBALE Ge





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010



THE TRIBUNE

oe i} MBPs’ use of $8.2m in

BYRAN WOODSIDE

PINEWOOD PARK
(right) came in for
criticism on Tuesday.





MP Woodside hits back at












rig ates

Pinewood Park criticism

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MP BYRAN WOODSIDE
has hit back at criticism of the
unkempt state of Pinewood
Park and neighbourhoods, and
the lack of positive activities
for young people made by local
residents who spoke exclusive-
ly to The Tribune.

As Police Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade and his
team of senior officers met res-
idents in Pinewood in areas
where murders and serious
crimes have occurred, Willow
Tree Avenue resident Kevin
Moss, 20, and Angelo King, 21,
said more needs to be done in
Pinewood on a daily basis to
keep the streets safe and
encourage young people to
have positive futures.

As they looked on at the
overgrown grass in the park,
broken and rusted swings,
overflowing garbage cans and
broken basketball hoop they
criticised FNM MP Byran
Woodside for not doing
enough for the community.

But the MP who has invest-
ed nearly all of the $200,000

id lB
Sars el

ee
PHONE: 822-2157



allocated for his constituency
between 2007 and 2009 in local
projects disputed the claim.

He released a press state-
ment yesterday detailing all of
the programmes involving
Pinewood residents and the
work he has done in the com-
munity.

“It is against this backdrop
that we take exception to the
statements made by one resi-
dent whose comments were
given an entire article in The
Tribune,” Mr Woodside said.

“We have proved there are
lots of initiatives for Pinewood
residents to participate in.”

Activities run by the Cru-
saders for Christ Junkanoo
Group, the Pinewood March-
ing Bank, the basketball team,
junior football team, literacy
programme and after-school
programme for children were
detailed by the MP who took
the Pinewood seat from PLP
representative Allyson May-
nard-Gibson in 2007.

He said: “Since coming to
office in 2007 I have been able
to represent the people of
Pinewood with pride.

“T introduced new initiatives
which sought to address the
current needs of the commu-
nity, mainly in the areas of edu-
cation, employment, entrepre-
neurialism and empowerment.”

Mr Woodside said the over-
grown community park is usu-
ally well-kept with recently
installed trash bins positioned
throughout.

At present, he said, the con-

tract for the park’s upkeep has :
expired and a new contract will ;
commence today under the :
government’s new budget :
under the responsibility of the :
Department of Environmental ;

Heath.

Mr Woodside said: “The :
interviewee’s comments about :
the basketball hoop are incor- ;
rect; in fact, it was recently bro- :
ken and I have been assured
by Ministry of Sports officials :
that a replacement will arrive ;

shortly.

“The public toilets at the :
park, were another issue :
addressed in the article. The :
toilets were constructed when I :
came to office, and they are :

fully functional.

“However, the facility is only
available to residents who :
apply to the Ministry of Youth, :
Sports, and Culture for access :

to the park and its facilities.

“As for the comment about :
derelict vehicles, we partnered :
with the Urban Renewal Office :
and the Department of Envi- :
ronmental Health to conduct :
acampaign to clean up many of :
the derelict vehicles in the :

area.”

To address crime, Mr Wood- :
side said his constituency office :
made “concerted efforts” to :
support several “anti-violence ;
initiatives”. One of these “hall- :
mark” events, he said is the :
Pastor/Police/Constituency }
alliance in Pinewood called the :
Southeastern fellowship, head- :
ed by Reverend Sebastian :

Campbell.

FROM page one

Tribune is able to further illu-
minate how all MPs spent the
funds, with today’s piece high-
lighting the expenditure of the
$100,000 each member was
allocated in the 2007/2008 bud-
get year which ended July Ist
2008.

Tomorrow readers will be
able to see a breakdown of the
2008/2009 expenditures, or lack
thereof.

Ultimately each MP was
able to access $100,000 per year

in funding for discretionary pro-
jects in their constituency over
three budget periods.

The money was initially allo-
cated in the 2007/2008 budget
year, which began on July 1,
2007, and again in the
2008/2009 budget year, which
began on July 1, 2008. Leftover
funds from those budgetary
periods which had not been
allocated by MPs rolled over
into the 2009/2010 budget peri-
od, which ends today.

A number of MPs, includ-
ing MP for Englerston Glenys

public funds is revealed

Hanna Martin and former MP
for Elizabeth, Malcolm Adder-
ley, contacted The Tribune yes-
terday to claim that the Min-
istry of Finance report did not
accurately reflect their usage of
the funds.

Both MPs said they had
used the majority of their
$100,000 allocation in
2008/2009, rather than the
$17,000 and $9,000 respectively
which the report, compiled in
April 2010, reflected.

See tomorrow’s Tribune for
more details on this.





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ae i

FRED MITCHELL EARL DEVEAUX

Malcolm Adderley, Elizabeth, $99,285.63:
Upgrade two parks ($86,604.60). Donation of
furniture to the Elizabeth Estates Children
Home ($3,861.03). Donation of computers
($8,820).

Desmond Bannister, Carmichael, $95,794:
Upgrades to parks

Carl Bethel, Sea Breeze, $99,600: Con-
struction of sea walls ($8,000), cleaning of
street ($5,700), cleaning and clearing of prop-
erties ($22,100), clearing curbs and providing
entrance signs ($50,480), beautification and
landscaping of parks ($13,320).

Loretta Butler Turner, Montagu, $100,000:
Road cleaning ($92,500), donation to the L.W.
Young school ($2,500), donation to the
Colours Junkanoo Group ($5,000).

Larry Cartwright, Long Island and Ragged
Island, $100,000: Construction of toilet block,
basketball court and street signs ($85,000),
development of community parks in Duncan
Town, Ragged Island ($100,000).

Perry Christie, Farm Road and Centreville,
$31,000: Donation to the Joe Billy Blind Blake
Festival ($31,000).

Sidney Collie, Blue Hills, $99,306.25:
Resurfacing of the basketball court and fenc-
ing of a park in Bozine Town ($20,000), con-
struction of walking tracks ($65,380), dona-
tion of computers to various schools
($13,926.25).

Philip Davis, Cat Island, Rum Cay, San Sal-
vador, $77,000: Refurbishment and renova-
tion of bathrooms at the regatta site ($21,000),
repairs to the stage at the regatta site ($21,000),
repairs to the road and bridges in Rum Cay
($35,000).

Earl Deveaux, Marathon, $100,039.10:
Upgrades to community parks ($54,904), dona-
tions of computers to schools ($14,755), assis-
tance to Bay Street project ($30,005.10), repairs
to parks ($375).

Picewell Forbes, South Andros, $100,000:
Various constituency projects ($97,400), pro-
jects ($2,600).

Shane Gibson, Golden Gates, $99,837.27:
Renovations to parks ($32,100), donation to
the Golden Gates Marching Band ($15,000),
donation/upgrading of computers ($10,755),
beautification of entrances ($14,695), dona-
tion to the Trail Blazers Basketball Tourna-
ment ($5,153.94), entrance signs ($12,000),
donation of an air condition system for a
school ($2,433.33), donation to a mini cultural
festival ($3,000), quantitative analysis report
($1,200), installation of an electricity supply at
a park ($3,500).

Kenyatta Gibson , Kennedy, $94,950: Dona-
tion to a Junkanoo Group ($30,000), dona-
tion of computers ($64,950).

Verna Grant, Eight Mile Rock, $95,007.32:
Donation to social and community clubs
($15,529.82), assistance relating to destruction
of home ($1,510, $6,000), construction and
repair of roads and sidewalks ($65,480), assis-
tance with the construction of a community
centre ($1,190), donation of basketball sup-
plies ($496), donation for labour and security
services ($4,801.50).

Neko Grant, Lucaya, $99,932.57: Repairs,
security bars and furniture for community cen-
tres ($53,828.85), donation to a school to attend
a tournament ($2,100), repairs to roads
($19,500), donation of musical instruments
($7,003.72), donation of computers ($17,500).

V Alfred Gray, MICAL, $99,647.91: Repairs
to the Acklins Community Centre ($99,647.91)

Melanie Griffin, Yamacraw, $100,000: Ren-
ovations and upgrades to parks ($92,690),
donations to the basketball classic tournament
($6,000), maintenance work in constituency
($1,310).

Glenys Hanna Martin, Englerston,
$99,519.88: Donations to schools ($40,175),
Repairs to parks/park equipment ($40,710),
street signs ($9,959.93), after school programs
($7,000), computers for constituency office
($1,160), school supplies ($514.95).

Hubert Ingraham, North Abaco, $100,000:
Upgrading beach facilities, Treasure Cay
($100,000)

Oswald Ingraham, South Eleuthera,
$100,000: Drainage wells ($50,000), construc-
tion of a garage for fire engine and ambulance
($10,000), funds to assist the local government
office ($40,000).



VINCENT PEET

2007/2008 BUDGET YEAR



KENNETH RUSSELL OBIE WILCHCOMBE

Edison Key, South Abaco, $100,000:
S.C.Bootle Highway ($10,000), upgrading
sports facilities ($90,000).

Zhivargo Laing, Marco City, $100,000:
Repairs to schools ($6,150), donations to
schools ($14,300), donations to community
organisations ($15,000), assistance to senior
citizens/disabled people ($14,700), clean up
campaign ($21,800), donations of computers to
schools ($27,750), air conditioning for con-
stituency office ($300).

Charles Maynard - Golden Isles - $100,000 -
Construction of playgrounds and playground
equipment ($100,000).

Branville McCartney - Bamboo Town -
$99,329.24 - upgrades to parks and playground
equipment ($99,329.24)

Hubert Minnis - Killarney - $91,860 -
entrance signs ($47,700), construction of speed
bumps ($17,160), paving and resurfacing of
basketball court ($27,700).

Frederick Mitchell - Fox Hill - $100,000 -
computers donated to schools ($7,800),
upgrades to parks ($67,521.75), repairs to com-
munity centre ($2,205), donations to commu-
nity festival ($21,442.25), donation to schools
($1,030).

Anthony Moss - Exuma - $100,000 - recon-
struct sports facilities ($40,000), reconstruct
school bleachers ($6,000), construct boat ramp
($20,000), construct bathroom $9,000), dona-
tion to Junkanoo groups ($20,000), donation to
regatta ($5,000).

Phenton Neymour - South Beach - $91,050
- upgrades to Baker’s park ($90,250), provid-
ed signs ($800).

Bernard Nottage - Bain and Grants Town -
$82,489.98 - donations of computers to schools
($26,989.25), computers for the constituency
computer lab ($9,657.30), donations to com-
munity groups ($45,843.43).

Vincent Peet - North Andros - $100,000 -
Upgrade of the North Andros auditorium.

Cynthia Pratt - St Cecelia - $99,813.14 -
renovations to parks/basketballs ($25,907.54),
clearing vacant property ($23,750), donations
to community organizations ($8,264.60), vari-
ous unspecified community projects ($41,891).

Brensil Rolle - Garden Hills - $99,500 -
after school programmes ($22,400), donations
to junkanoo groups ($11,900), park and play-
ground equipment ($23,420), subdivision
improvement ($26,710), clean up campaign
($6,050), material and labour for entrepre-
neurial straw market classes ($9,019.60).

Kenneth Russell - High Rock - $100,000 -
Donations to schools ($13,100), computers for
schools ($9,700), clean-up campaign ($18,300),
donations for community organisations
($27,000), unspecified community projects.

Kwasi Thompson - Pine Ridge - $98,000 -
road work ($61,620), donations to schools
($4,100), computer centre ($22,280), clean up
campaign ($10,000).

Alfred Sears - Fort Charlotte - $81,770.50 -
paving roads ($1,770.50), donations to schools
($40,000), assistance to church ($40,000).

Alvin Smith - North Eleuthera - $100,000 -
road rehabilitation, James Cistern ($10,000),
unspecified capital works, North Eleuthera
($52,000), unspecified capital works, Central
Eleuthera ($38,000).

Frank Smith - St Thomas More - $98,026.15
- donation of musical instruments to commu-
nity band ($3,500), computer research centre
($23,000), after school programmes ($4,596),
repairs and upgrades to parks ($66,930.15)

Brent Symonette - St. Anne’s - $97,481.30 -
drilling wells ($35,773), upgrades to parks
($46,935.30), beach upgrades ($14,773).

Tommy Turnquest - Mount Moriah -
$99,850.03 - upgrades to parks ($77,796.28),
playground equipment ($22,053.75).

Obie Wilchcombe - West End and Bimini -
$100,000 - construction of a park ($100,000)

Byron Woodside - Pinewood - $97,000.56 -
clean-up campaign ($34,500), construction of
bathroom block ($29,500.56), computer equip-
ment donation($33,000).

Kendal Wright - Clifton - $99,978.03 - ren-
ovation of basketball court ($56,900), donation
of basketball uniforms ($1,873), entrance signs
($28,445.03), donations to community festi-
vals ($10,000), completion of a toilet block
($99,978.03).

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



BP should pay for Bahamas’ oil
spill protection efforts — Trust

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



THE Bahamas National Trust is pushing
for the government to appeal directly to
British Petroleum (BP) to pay for national
efforts to protect The Bahamas from the
potential damage of the Deepwater Hori-
zon oil spill.

The National Oil Spill Contingency
Team has so far led two expeditions to Cay
Sal Bank, and one to Bimini, for scientists
to assess the thriving marine, sea bird and
terrestrial habitats under threat as they are
the most vulnerable to slicks spreading
from the Gulf of Mexico.

As oil continued to gush from the BP
rig 5,000ft below the ocean surface for the
72nd day yesterday, BNT director Eric
Carey said funding is needed now to pay for
the essential scientific assessments.

Although research indicates the Bahami-
an government may have no legal rights
to claim compensation for the spill, Mr
Carey said a direct appeal should be made
to BP as an international organisation with
a responsibility for the threat of damage
to the Bahamas.

Just as the governor of Florida success-
fully appealed directly to BP for compen-
sation, the Bahamian government should
also exercise its right to appeal for funding,
Mr Carey said. “The Trust is pushing for
the government to reach out to BP to let
them know that we are incurring costs, as
has been done in the state of Florida and by
other scientific organisation,” he said.

“They have reached out to get funding
for expeditions and The Bahamas is no dif-
ferent. We are doing the same thing they
are doing. We need the money now, oth-
erwise we have to find it from an impossi-

© In brief





THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST'S Lindy
Knowles and Predensa Moore explore Cay
Sal Bank recently.

ble budget to fund whatever our costs are
over the next six months.”

Mr Carey estimates the regular expedi-
tions to Cay Sal and Bimini required over
the next six months will cost around
$500,000. This will pay International Mar-
itime Organisation (IMO) approved scien-
tists to lead regular expeditions to Cay Sal
Cay to document the diversity and abun-
dance of marine life and collect sediment
samples from the islands.

It will also fund the necessary testing of
samples in US laboratories to meet inter-
national standards.

So far IMO scientists Dr Kathleen Sealy
and Dr Ethan Freid who led the first two
expeditions to Cay Sal and Bimini have
yet to be paid for their work, well-placed
sources told The Tribune.

And the National Oil Spill Contingency
Committee is struggling to secure the atten-
dance of a leading sea bird biologist on the
next expedition but the Team maintains
this will be difficult without being able to
guarantee payment.

Experts have highlighted the importance
of documenting the health of sea bird
colonies as they would be the most obvious
indicators of any impact from the oil spill,

and their survival is all the more critical as
colonies in the Gulf are wiped out.

Mr Carey said: “It’s really important to
the country to have these assessments done
and to keep being able to come back and
report that the oil has still not come and the
Bahamas is still open for business.

“It fends off speculation that oil is com-
ing, and if it comes we will be able to doc-
ument that we have oil in that portion of
the Bahamas, but other areas are safe.

“This oil is not going to respect interna-
tional boundaries and BP is an interna-
tional company and we should write to
them and stake our initial claim for funding
to support these assessments.”

In addition to securing funding, the team
will meet to discuss how they can better
plan the next mission to Cay Sal.

Poor planning was evident on the last
expedition onboard the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force (RBDF) vessel HMBS
Bahamas last week as marine scientists
found they did not have sufficient diving
equipment to carry out their research at
depths below 20ft.

And the BNT’s team taking samples on
land did not have sufficient equipment as
funding had not been cleared by the gov-
ernment to purchase it before the trip.

Several members of the expedition team
were also not aware Dr Sealy would not be
able to join the expedition until the day of
departure and were given only a few hours
before setting sail. Captain Stephen Russell,
Director of the National Emergency Plan-
ning Agency (NEMA), spearheading the
National Oil Spill Contingency Team, said:
“T will make sure proper planning is done
and we have covered all bases.

“In terms of basic diving gear and equip-
ment, we will make sure they are there
before they leave. And we will have a check
list to make sure we have those things.”

HOT TOPIC: PROTEST ABOUT AC SYSTEM BREAKDOWN



Police probe
shooting and
armed robbery

POLICE reported a
shooting and an armed
robbery on Tuesday
evening.

At about 9.44pm, police
received information of a
shooting at Baillou Hill
Road and John Road.

It is reported that a 17-
year-old boy was walking
through John Road when
he was approached by a
group of man who attacked
him.

Police say the teenager
fled but heard gunshots
and realised a short time
later, while at Windsor
Lane, that he was shot to





the right thigh.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MINISTRY OF LABOUR staff on Monday after the air conditioning unit went out.

Super Sale
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Stable

The victim was taken to
hospital via EMS person-
nel where he is detained in
stable condition.

The armed robbery
reported by the police
occurred a few minutes lat-
er in Dignity Gardens at
about 10.15pm.

A 19-year-old man was
walking through the area
when he was approached
and robbed of cash by two
men, one of whom was
allegedly armed with a
handgun.

Police are investigating.

Man victim
of multiple

By ALESHA CADET

FOR the second time in a
week, workers say they have
walked off the job due to the
air conditioning system break-
ing down again at the Min-
istry of Labour on East Hill
Street yesterday.

A worker, who wished to
remain anonymous, said:
"The air conditioning is com-
pletely off and the entire
building is being affected by
it."

However, Minister of State
for Labour and Social Devel-

opment Loretta Butler-Turn-
er told The Tribune that it was
not a “walk-out”.

She said: "In our Ministry
and the Attorney General's
Office, many of the persons
were allowed to leave at lpm.
The Ministry of Public Works
is looking to repair the entire
building.

"As I understand, by the
end of the week they are
looking into how they are
going to repair or replace the
air conditioning so we could
at least be at a comfort level.

"The Ministry of Public



Works are actively address-
ing the matter. They are look-
ing at the long term problems
as well so that they can repair
it.”

Dion Foulkes, Minister of
Labour, was unavailable for
comment.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

World leaders take the deficit pledge

TORONTO — World leaders made bold
pledges to cut their spiraling budget deficits
but will probably fall far short of their lofty
goals.

After spending massive amounts of mon-
ey to rescue the global economy from the
worst downturn in decades, the Group of
20 major industrial and developing nations
have reversed course and promised to cut
their deficits in half in terms of the global
economy in just three years.

This pledge, by nations which represent 85
per cent of the global economy, would rep-
resent a sea change in how the world's major
economies are handling their finances.

It could usher in sizable tax increases and
massive cuts in government programmes,
including popular benefit programmes such
as Social Security and Medicare in the Unit-
ed States.

President Barack Obama and other lead-
ers in their closing news conferences on Sun-
day insisted that they really meant what they
said, sounding like the dawning of a new age
of austerity was just around the corner.

There is certainly the possibility that the
Greek debt crisis has scared many nations
with similarly high debt burdens into doing
what they can to improve their budget out-
look to avoid their own Greek-style tragedy.

Greece is facing years of painful austeri-
ty measures after it was forced to accept
massive bailouts from its neighbours when it
could no longer meet its debt obligations.

"Other countries have seen what has hap-
pened to Greece and they have gotten wor-
ried. They are facing deficits and debt bur-
dens that are overwhelming,” said Mark
Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics.

In the United States, the issue isn't the
threat of an unprecedented default on U.S.
government debt. It is the threat that foreign
investors such as China, the largest holder of
Treasury securities, will suddenly decide they
do not want to hold as much USS. govern-
ment debt, a move that could send US. inter-
est rates rising.

The deficit cutting pledge, included in
the G-20 joint communique issued Sunday,
certainly sounded dramatic. The developed
countries promised to cut deficits in half in
three years as a percentage of their total
economies and said they would stabilize their
total debt burdens by 2016.

For the United States and most of the
other nations, that would be a remarkable
turnaround, especially from the past two
years, a period when deficits soared as gov-
ernment's boosted spending and cut taxes
in an effort to keep the 2007-2009 Great
Recession from becoming a repeat of the
Great Depression of the 1930s.

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The U.S. deficit hit an astonishing $1.42
trillion last year, the highest in history, and
analysts think it will show only a slight
improvement to $1.3 trillion this year.

Obama's budget projects the deficit will
never fall below $707 billion over the next
decade.

However, even these seemingly grim
numbers would represent an improvement in
the deficit picture that would allow Obama to
meet one of the deficit targets — cutting the
red ink in half by 2013. His spending plan
released last February has the deficit falling
from 10 per cent of GDP last year to 4.2 per
cent of GDP in 2013, a cut of more than
half.

Obama does miss the other target of get-
ting total debt stabilized by 2016. His budget
shows that the debt held by the public, which
doesn't count what is owed to the Social
Security trust fund, would keep rising from
56 per cent of the economy this year to 69
per cent of the economy a decade from now
and not stabilize by 2016, as the G-20 target
calls for.

But Obama insisted in his closing news
conference Sunday that his administration
has a plan to meet the G-20 goals. That effort
includes getting recommendations from a
deficit commission due to report in Decem-
ber on how to trim spending further in such
areas as government benefit programmes.

The trouble is that Congress has shown lit-
tle enthusiasm for making the tough choices
on taxes and entitlement programmes that
will be needed to get the US. deficit down to
3 per cent of GDP, the level economists
believe would stabilize the debt burden.

And lawmakers in other countries, who
also have to face voters, have shown a simi-
lar reluctance.

"The G-20 goals are very good, but his-
tory tells us it is very unlikely that they will
be met," said Sung Won Sohn, an economics
professor at the Martin Smith School of Busi-
ness at California State University.

Obama said he would force Congress next
year to address the deficit problem, which
Republicans in Congress have made a major
issue and polls show is eliciting growing con-
cern among voters.

"Next year when I start presenting some
very difficult choices to the country, I hope
some of these folks who are hollering about
deficits and debt step up, because I'm calling
their bluff," he said.

But Obama is likely to find that lawmak-
ers are much more willing to talk about the
deficit than take the painful votes needed
to do something about the deficit.

(This article was written by Martin
Crutsinger, AP Economics writer).



ental liberation
and the outdated
colonial honours

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The time is long past due
when we as a free and sover-
eign people ought to have
phased out Colonial Honours.
Shackles of our sojourn as a
colony of Great Britain
should not be haunting us
thirty plus years into inde-
pendence. How long does it
take to achieve mental free-
dom?

With the high percentage
of current leaders, both polit-
ical and otherwise, born into
an independent Bahamas or
with little attachment to the
colonial era, we had great
hope that our transition
would have been well on the
way into carving out our own
unique identity. Young lead-
ers seem so distant from our
pilgrimage into Bahamianiza-
tion. Many seem only to lap-
up that which is handed down
to them by overpowering
leaders who are stuck into a
colonial mindset. This renders
our youthful members of par-
liament almost impotent in
affecting change or is it their
own political survival that is
the only important stake to
them?

It is unbelievable that
again our “Sunshine” gov-
ernment is keeping us in the
dark era of colonialism. Why
must we perpetuate the
accreditation of a foreign
power to have sway on the
honouring of our citizens?

Yes, these awards have
been adopted as our own, but
how sad! Jamaica, swears alle-
giance to Jamaica, not to Her
Majesty, her heirs and suc-
cessors. Barbados has Nation-

letters@triounemedia.net



al Heroes Day. All progres-
sive Caribbean countries have
developed a system of nation-
al honours. Jamaica has a sys-
tem of national heroes, com-
plete with a park. The march
goes on.

Too, how can we have gov-
ernment and not a free parti-
san group initiating the giv-
ing of awards?

The honouring of a people
must never be tied to any
political master.

Even Great Britain, the
place we try to imitate is mov-
ing away from this outdated
move.

True to form, every gov-
ernment lines up its own stal-
warts for national recognition
at the expense of others
whose contribution far out-
weighs that of some of their
stalwarts.

This heavy handedness of
the government clouds the
contribution made by the very
people they seek to honour.
Many persons on the current
list of honours (2010) should
be on the very top. How
demeaning it is to give a mere
B.E.M. to any of those lined
up to be recipients. Their con-
tribution far exceeds that of
the person that has been put
on the very pinnacle of hon-
ours on this list. Very many
Bahamians have given of their
blood, sweat and tears but
because they are not con-
nected or have big-big dollars
they are reduced to nothing-

ness such as a B.E.M. It
should never happen. Stop
belittling the great contribu-
tions made by the small peo-
ple. The current list ought to
be turned upside down. It's
not fair!

Church leaders allow
themselves to be used for
every time. Again they sell us
out for a bowl of pottage.
The church must be leading
the way, not getting in the
way. I call on church leaders
to join a giant like the late Dr.
Burnside and not collect this
medal of colonial slavery. Go
on fighting for the liberation
of the mindset of our people.
Join Speaker Alvin Smith
who has abandoned the colo-
nial wig. We urge our educat-
ed lawyers to show they have
educated their minds and do
likewise.

We urge government to
enforce the National System
of Awards already passed by
parliament.

We urge that the Order of
Merit be further developed.
We urge our leaders to give
leadership, mental leadership,
and join the great warriors of
the past whose reform can
only be continued with fear-
less leaders who will daringly
take our nation to a higher
level.

It's time we press
onward.....to a common lofti-
er goal.

Rev. Fr. S. Sebastian
Campbell,
Chairman,

The National Heroes
Day Committee
Nassau,

June 20, 2010.

Offering scandal to the children of God

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Regarding the Vatican
newspaper L’Osservatore
Romano giving its approval
to the Blues Brothers movie
- June 19, 2010:

In condoning “The Blues
Brothers” movie L’Osser-
vatore Romano makes yet
another silly attempt to be
“relevant” to an interna-
tional pop culture that is
increasingly decadent. The
movie is laced with profani-
ties and obscenities.

While L’Osservatore
Romano is published by the
Vatican Press Office, not
everything in the paper —
including editorial com-
ments — necessarily reflect
the “official” opinion of the
Catholic Church. Statements





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from the Holy Father and
Magisterial documents carry
authoritative weight. Arti-
cles such as those about The
Blues Brother reflect the
Opinions only of the writers.

Sadly, since Giovanni
Maria Vian became the edi-
tor in chief of L’Osservatore
Romano a few years ago,
the paper has become some-
what of an international
scandal failing in its mission
to stay faithful to the
unchangeable principles of
religion and morals. From
Vian’s infamous assertion
that Barack Obama “is not a
pro-abortion president”, to
his attempted rehabilitation
of Marxist pop guru John
Lennon, the paper has
become a sort of ecclesial
jukebox filled with the songs

of fools and offering scan-
dal to the children of God. It
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faithful papal defender and
more like a rebellious
teenager.

PAUL KOKOSKI
Canada,
June, 2010.

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au to Oe yes







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 5

Non-profit groups

‘should solicit
funding from MPs’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



NON-PROFIT organisations
should solicit funding directly from F
Members of Parliament, said
social activist C B Moss after
learning of how some MPs did not
use all of their constituency
allowance.

Mr Moss, who heads the Bain
and Grant Town Advancement
Association, said the allowances
were fundamental and it was the
duty of every representative to use
the funds, especially in “lower
socio-economic areas”.

“We are going to write the various MPs
that fall under our association directly for
funding,” he said.

“We have a tremendous amount of pro-
jects that are woefully underfunded.”

Mr Moss explained his association consid-
ered their boundary line to encompass the
“old over-the-hill”, stretching from Nassau
Street in the west, Collin’s Wall in the east,
Shirley Street to the north and Wulff Road in
the south. The area is split up in three dif-
ference constituencies, Bain and Grants



rE.



Claude-Saintilien last week.



last Tuesday.

The men fled into the Miami Street area.

descriptions provided by witnesses.

328-TIPS (8477).



Oa om lehsto



COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison E. Greenslade shows a sketch
of the man wanted for questioning in the murder of Marie

POLICE have composed a sketch of a man who they
believe shot a pregnant woman dead in Cordeaux Avenue

Marie Claude-Saintilien, 23, was sitting with her sister
and 18-month-old niece outside her parents house in Coconut
Grove at around 4pm when three men approached and one
opened fire. Ms Claude-Saintilien, who was five months
pregnant, was shot several times and later died in hospital.

Police artists have composed a sketch of a suspect using
Anyone with any information is asked to call the emer-

gency number 919, or the Criminal Detective Unit (CDU) on
502-9991, or Crime Stoppers under complete anonymity on

Town, Farm Road, and Englerston.

He advised all other non-profit
organisations to also contact MPs
in their constituency directly for
funding of their projects.

The Tribune yesterday revealed
how three MPs failed to spend any
of the $100,000 in constituency
allowances provided for them in
the 2008/2009 budget.

Included within this group was
former Prime Minister and MP for
Farm Road and Centreville Perry
Christie.

Mr Moss said he was surprised to
learn that MP for Bain & Grants
Town Bradley Nottage did not use
his funds last year, considering the “consid-
erable amount” he spent in 2008 on various
projects.

Mr Moss maintained however that he
would not criticise the dissuse on the possi-
bility that Mr Nottage may have something
planned to use the funds.

Regardless of this fact, however, those
funds are unavailable as of today, the end
of the 2009/2010 budget cycle.

One of the many cutbacks made in the
face of revenue shortfalls, the funds will no
longer roll over to another year.



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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

Bahamas Ambassador to the US | |

promotes relations with Mexico

By KHYLE QUINCY
PARKER

Press Attaché

Embassy of the Bahamas

WASHINGTON, DC:
Bahamas Ambassador to the
United States Cornelius A
Smith presented his credentials
to President Felipe de Jesus
Calderon Hinojosa of Mexico
in Mexico City, and used the
occasion to promote the “mul-
tilateralism” which he said has
benefitted both countries.

The Bahamas and Mexico
established diplomatic relations
on January, 23, 1974, and dur-
ing remarks he made at the
presentation ceremony, Mr
Smith said the two nations
share a common respect for
human rights, a belief in the
social and economic develop-
ment of both peoples, and the
promotion of peace and secu-
rity.

“The pursuit of these ideals
has not been without chal-

lenges, especially at the nation-
al level and in cross-border
encounters,” Mr Smith said.
“Our two countries, neverthe-
less, also share a resolve to
overcome these challenges. In
this regard, ultimate success is
augured by the fact that we
have both been blessed with
natural resources of global
splendour, pluralist yet
resilient, talented, hard-work-
ing human resources, and rich
cultural heritage, universally
acknowledged.”

The ambassador said The
Bahamas and Mexico have
both benefited from multilat-
eralism as enhancer and cata-
lyst for the advancement of the
ideals cited.

The Bahamas and Mexico
are both part of the United
Nations’ Latin American and
Caribbean Group of States. Mr
Smith said that through this
multilateral forum, The
Bahamas and Mexico contin-
ue to advance their common

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At The British Colonial Hilton
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Board Secretary
dune fio



interests in matters related to
disarmament; the respect for
human rights and democratic
institutions in the hemisphere;
the protection of our vulnera-
ble environment; the advance-
ment of women; and mutually
beneficial and fair trade
between our two countries.

“Our two countries have also
deepened relations through our
membership in the Organisa-
tion of American States, the
Hemisphere’s oldest multilat-
eral body,” he said. “Indeed,
most recently, during the 2009-
2010 period, The Bahamas
served as Vice-Chair of the
Inter-American Committee
Against Terrorism of the
Organisation of American
States under the Chairmanship
of Mexico. In executing its
responsibilities as CICTE Vice-
Chair, The Bahamas received
the full support and wise coun-
sel of the Mexican delegation
to the OAS.”

Noting already strong rela-
tions between the two coun-
tries, Mr Smith said the Gov-
ernment of The Bahamas seeks
to broaden and deepen ties
with Mexico.

“We are pleased that For-
eign Direct Investment from
Mexican nationals in The

Bahamas and the employment
generated from these invest-
ments continue to grow,” he
said. “My Government also
encourages Mexican nationals
to explore existing business
opportunities in The Bahamas
through joint ventures with
Bahamian partners.”

Mr Smith also noted that
The Bahamas has been the
beneficiary of valuable techni-
cal assistance from Mexico in
the areas of preventative health
care and in the training of
Spanish-language teachers.

With respect to the financial
services sector, Mr Smith said
Government of The Bahamas
was pleased with the conclu-
sion of a Tax Information and
Exchange Agreement between
the two countries earlier this
year, and particularly pleased
that the TIEA signing took
place during an historic mile-
stone — the first CARICOM-
Mexico Summit. He said the
gathering resulted in “a laud-
able work programme on eco-
nomic matters for our region,
including ensuring the
resilience of our economies in
the wake of the global finan-
cial crisis, social development,
sustainable development and
climate change.”

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THE TRIBUNE









BAHAMAS AMBASSADOR to the United States Cornelius A Smith and
President Felipe de Jesus Calderon Hinojosa of Mexico.

Rotary’s ‘Mock Casino’

ew UCM UIE TULA

THE Rotary Club of Nassau
Sunrise hosted its second annu-
al Mock Casino Night at the
Sheraton Hotel Ballroom.

The event featured a Texas
Hold ‘Em Poker and Blackjack
tournaments along with a
roulette table and bingo games
throughout the evening with a
variety of prizes. The evening
also offered a silent auction
along with door and raffle || dia
prizes. RCNS PRESIDENT Carla Card-

A cigar lounge with hand- Stubbs and District Assistant
rolled cigars was located out- Governor Felix Stubbs
side the main tournament area.

For those VIP guests, there was a Monte Carlo-themed seating
area.

Nearly 100 poker players competed “Vegas style” for a spot
at the final table, while some 90 Blackjack players competed in
two semifinal rounds for a chance to make it into the final
round. There were fantastic prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place
winners of each tournament and consolation prizes for the
players who won a seat at the final table but didn’t place in
either tournament.

Rotary congratulated all tournament winners and wished
them good luck at defending their title next year in what they
expected to be an even more exciting and enjoyable event.

Proceeds from this event will be donated in part to the
Bahamas Down Syndrome Association and REACH,
(Resource & Education for Autism & Other Challenges).









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THE TRIBUNE



NASSAU Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD) officials
have closed on a $165 million
deal to facilitate funding for
stage two of the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
redevelopment project.

Confirming the official sign-
off on the financing was com-
pany president & CEO Stewart
Steeves. a

“We are pleased to announce =
that funding for stage two of
the $409.5 million airport rede-
velopment project is now in
place. With the 13 new
investors, we now have a total
of 28 investors backing this pro-
ject,” said Mr Steeves.

“Based on our success in
stage one construction, the
overall airport operation and
market conditions, we were
able to achieve a lower inter-
est rate from our creditors, sav-



ing the airport $2.5 million per
year in interest payments.”
Stage two of the airport
expansion includes selective
demolition of the current US
Departures Terminal and con-
struction of a new 226,000 sq ft
International Arrivals terminal.
The project will also include an

LOE aT

CHESS legend Anatoly Karpov is the special guest in Nassau for
the Caribbean Sub Zonal Chess Championship, which takes place
up until tomorrow.

Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
hailed the event as one that fulfills all the criteria for gaining the
support of his ministry; pointing out that the championship is
expected to bring travel business to the country as it draws com-
petitors from 10 different countries.

In addition, the Minister said, it advances the Bahamas socially
and provides promotional opportunities to showcase the Bahamas
as the perfect venue for events of every kind.

“We will work with any organisation that is involved with bring-
ing groups of people to The Bahamas for whatever reason because
we believe we have the best atmosphere for you to do anything,
including chess,” he said. “So that is why it is so easy for us to agree
to do these things.”

Mr Karpov, a Russian chess grandmaster and former world
champion, sought Minister Vanderpool-Wallace’s support in lob-
bying the Bahamian Minister of Education for an official chess pro-
gramme in schools. He pointed out that FIDE, the international
governing body for chess, had opportunities to teach chess to chil-
dren around the world.

Those opportunities include a programme through the United
Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation
(UNESCO), which required the endorsement of the Minister of
Education. He said the programmes were part of a plan to put chess
on the map again. “Unfortunately, we have lost a lot,” Mr Karpov
said. “Other sports were developing. We were much more popu-
lar than tennis when we were playing in the ’80s and ’90s.”

Mr Karpov recalled that at the height of chess’ popularity, he
played fellow Russian grandmaster Gary Kasparov in France.
The match attracted 700 international journalists, he said. Years lat-
er, however, only four journalists would cover a similar match.

Vernice Walkine, director general of the Ministry of Tourism &
Aviation, told Mr Karpov that chess matches in the Bahamas had
the potential to assist in bringing more focus to the game.



Rae Ciena ro ail AP ous FIO es mel egTe)h
) ves ong ERG ara

Seco Mee

\



WORKERS at the site of the Airport redevelopment project.



Accounting Scholarships

According to Paul Ward, vice
president, finance & CFO at
NAD, the majority of the note
issuance will be used to repay
the revolving credit facility used
to fund stage one construction.

Balance

“Our plan is to repay the out-
standing balance of the
revolver. We will then use the
remainder of the $165 million
and the reset revolving credit
facility to fund stage two con-
struction,” Mr Ward explained.

“We anticipate drawing
down the funds in November
of this year once the NAD
board gives final approval to
proceed with stage two.”

As financing of stage two
concludes, construction on the
new US Departures terminal
hits the halfway mark.



addition of approximately
200,000 sq ft of Asphalt Apron
rehabilitation and the removal
and rebuilding of existing park-
ing facilities.

Total cost for stage two con-
struction is estimated at $128
million with a scheduled com-
pletion date of October 2012.




Derek Smith/BIS

PICTURED (from left) are Kean Smith, president of the Bahamas

Chess Federation; Mr. Karpov; Minister Vanderpool-Wallace; Ms

Walkine; Nicole Campbell, Permanent Secretary of Youth, Sports

& Culture; and Tyrone Sawyer, Director of Sports Tourism in Min-
ielny of Tourism & Aviation.

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THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

$165m funding deal for stage two of Airport project

To date, the airport manage-
ment company has spent some
$98 million on construction,
with a completion date for stage
one set for the first quarter of
2011.

The third and final stage con-
struction of a domestic and
international departures hall
has a projected completion date
of November, 2013 at a cost of
$84 million.





















































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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Radio host and guest ‘hack’

into ministry's website

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Thursday, Friday & Saturday
T: 242-322-2302 -Mt. Royal Avenue, (opposite Gatezay Chapel) - Nassau Bahamas

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JENNIFER DANIELLE BUTLER

d

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham and Edith
Buller are proud to announce the
Oraduation of their daughter, Jan-
nifer Danielle Butler from Wayne
Siate University School of Medi-
cine in Detrot, Michigan. Ms,
Butler is the past Deputy Head
Gin and Valedictorian of King-
sway Academy High Scheel,

She grduste] summa cum
laude from Tuskegee University
with a Bachelor's degree in
Bialagy in 2006. While at Tuske-
gee University she earned the
distinction of being named Uni-
versity Scholar for the College of
Agneculiure, Environmental and
Natural Sciences,

Cr. Butler has been involved with numerous community service projects in
the city of Detroit, including Cade Blue, a health education outreach program
Tor inher city youth, Additionally she held multiple leadership positions
serving as Chair for the Student National Medical Association Region V
2007 Conference and Chair of the Minority Affairs Action Committee of the
American Medical Student Association. She is a Paul Ambrose Scholar and
she will begin her intemal Medicine residency in NYC this fall. Her long term
goals invelve fellowship training, private practice, and pursuing a Master's

Degree in Public Health.

Her Father, Mother, Reno, the entire Butler family and friends are very proud
of her achievement and she is grateful for their support throughout the years,

“With Good all things are possibile,” -ldatihew 19:26

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FROM page one

However it was proven yester-
day that the real cause of the gov-
ernment’s inability to access the
site was due to its failure to rereg-
ister the domain name.

During the radio talk show The
New Nation, host Lincoln Bain
and his guest, C Allen Johnson, an
information technology consultant,
told of how they discovered the
registration lapse after investigat-
ing the claims made by govern-
ment.

Mr Johnson reportedly pur-
chased the domain for only $2.

In a move which appeared they had
“hacked” the MOFA website, Mr Bain and
Mr Johnson redirected website traffic to
another domain also owned by Mr Johnson
titled www.zhivargolaing.com. Persons trying
to access the site were automatically redi-
rected to a static page bearing the names,
contact information and picture of the two
men.

Mr Bain explained: “They said they didn’t
have a password for it. If you don’t have a
password you just have to call the adminis-
trator or server and they’ll send you a new
password — just like an e-mail account. That
shouldn’t be a valid excuse.

“Government didn’t lose the password,
they failed to re-register after it expired soa
Bahamian (Mr Johnson) bought it. So now
it’s his to do with it what he wants.”

Perhaps to add more insult to injury, the
website is shown to be registered under
“Zhivargo ‘Monavie’ Laing”.

When first notified of the changes, Minis-
ter of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing
recalled: “I did speak with Mr Johnson con-




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cerning the website. He’d called
me saying that he had information
about the website regarding some-
thing that needed to be fixed but it
was very convoluted, I don’t know
if he was soliciting his services. I
told him we have an IT depart-
ment and that I would speak to
them about it.”

Though the tampered website
had been linked on the govern-
ment’s main website as the MOFA
website for some time, the link was
recently removed and Mr Laing
confirmed it was not an official
government website.

He explained: “It’s not the gov-
ernment’s official website. That
site was set up when Fred Mitchell was there,
but it was not done through the normal chan-
nels so the IT department has only limited
access to it. The reality is we have some enti-
ties that have a web presence but not on the
Bahamas government’s official website. P’ve
spoken to controller of the IT department
and they are now investigating the matter.”

Mr Laing added the government was in
the process of removing all association with
the website and discouraging the practice of
ministries using external websites.

Criticism over the government’s web pres-
ence flared earlier this year with many point-
ing out critical failures in site infrastructure
and poor and conflicting design. Specific to
this tampered website, opposition member
responsible for the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs and MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
has repeatedly criticised its disuse.

Mr Bain maintained: “They would have
went there and simply seen that they lost the
domain name. That would have been the
simplest IT fix ever. If they want the domain
back, they can simply come and ask for it.”

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THE TRIBUNE

Car fees increase facing legal threat

FROM page one

the department's Thompson Boulevard location,
there was a line of about 50 outside. Inside, a
group of about 40 more were crammed into a
small air-conditioned room waiting for one of the
four cashiers to serve them.

Some who spoke with The Tribune were
angered over the price increases, saying govern-
ment is out of touch with the average person's
financial hardship.

Kevin Ingraham, who drives a Ford Expedi-
tion, came to the department yesterday, a month
before his car's registration expired to save a few
hundred dollars.

"T would think that if the Prime Minister, who is
supposed to be the Prime Minister of the people,
was going to do something like this he would have
done it in the new year," said Mr Ingraham, 42. "It
shows they don't have a vision for the people."

Herbert Sears, who said he had been queuing
for more than hour "in the hot sun", doesn't see
why he should have to pay increased inspection
fees when many of the country's roads are in need
of repair.

"What are we paying more to drive on the road
for when they ain' fix the roads? It's a slap in the

Murder accused makes
plea for protective custody

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 9

face," he said.

At the department's car licensing unit on West
Bay Street, mother-of-three Erica Hunt said the
fee increase will force her family to sell their SUV

for a compact car.

"We can afford it but it's still a dent (in the
budget). Next year maybe we will sell our car and
get asmaller car to get that smaller payment — but
we need a bigger car because of our large family,"
said Ms Hunt whose car registration expires in

August.

Separated into classes of A, B, and C respec-
tively, the fees will rise from $135 to $150 for vehi-
cles weighing up to 5,000lbs, $550 for vehicles
5,001 to 15,000lbs, and $700 for any vehicle more

than 15,001 |bs.

Cars such as the Hyundai Accent, Ford Fiesta,
and Dodge Neon weigh less than 3,000lbs. Ford's
E150 and Expedition weigh more than 5,000lbs as
does a Dodge Ram or Durango vehicle. Larger
vehicles like a Hummer H2 or H1 Alpha model

could weigh in at more than 7,000lbs.

Dump trucks and tractors are predominantly

vehicles weighing more than 15,000lbs.

FROM page one

But he became the country’s
46th homicide victim for 2010 at
about 7.15pm on Saturday,
June 26, when he was shot a
number of times outside a club
on Sequoia Street.

According to police, Fergu-
son was reportedly shot after
he got into an argument with
another man who was armed
with a handgun. Badly wound-
ed, Ferguson got into a wom-
an’s car in an attempt to flee
the scene.

tive of Ferguson was incarcer-
ated at Her Majesty’s Prison
and that he wanted prison
authorities to be mindful of that
fact.

McPhee told the magistrate:
“T ask that you please place me
in protective custody. I am in
fear for my life.”

Magistrate Gomez said he
would make a note of his con-
cerns on his file. The case was
adjourned to July 14 and trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street.



ant C= a



The mother told The Tribune
how she and her three children
were headed to a convenience
store when the incident
occurred. The woman said she
drove to the nearest phone and
called police. When officers
arrived, Ferguson had already
died of his wounds.

McPhee was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane yesterday, charged with
Ferguson’s murder.

He was not required to enter
a plea to the murder charge and
was informed that a prelimi-
nary inquiry will be held to
determine whether there is suf-
ficient evidence against him to
have him stand trial in Supreme
Court.

His attorney Roberto Reck-
ley told the court that a rela-



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THE BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY
CORPORATION
WISHES TO ADVISE
ALL CONSUMERS
That it is presently reviewing ALL DELINQUENT
ACCOUNTS. Consumers are advised to make

prompt payment(s) on all accounts to avoid
interruption of electricity service(s).

The public is also advised that all overdue payments
should be made directly to the Corporation. Those
payments can be made in New Providence at the
Head Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall
at Marathon or the Main Post Office on East Hill
Street, and at the local office on your respective
Family Island.

Consumers whose account(s) are not overdue can
make payment(s) directly to the Corporation or over
the counter at the nearest Scotiabank, FirstCaribbean,
Fidelity and Royal Bank. You can also pay your
electricity bill online by logging on to your online
accounts at Scotiabank, FirstCaribbean, Fidelity and
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Please call 302-1679 or 302-1685 should you have any
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FREEPORT CITY SUBDIVISION -
CENTRAL AREA, FREEPORT
LOT NO. 5 Block “OQ”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single

Storey Commercial Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 65,341 sq. ft.

LOCATION: On the Mall at the
Ranfurly Circus

APPRAISED VALUE: $2,260,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF
TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO:

CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT
DEPARTMENT, P.O. BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL
US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
FOR GENERAL ENQUIRIES PLEASE CALL: 394-6464 EXT. 5836.

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yA OW

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cea |=

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Each Camp is valued at 5495. Please visit www.atlantis.com/kids,Tantasycamps
for a detailed deseripien of camp. oweepsiekes for Camps includes some
meals but does not include accommodations. Drop off locaton for entries 5 at
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camp can be won per person. Sweepstakes winners will be selected on 7/6/10

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

who returns from South Africa tomorrow, came in an
e-mail response to an inquiry from this newspaper
after suggestions were made that Mr Ingraham may
have improperly intervened with the Ministry of
Works to have the contract for the police residence
renovations given to an FNM supporter’s compa-
ny.

"The renovations are understood to have been
required so that Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade could move into the residence with his
family.

PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts told The Tribune
he saw “absolutely no coincidence” in the fact that
Telco Enterprises — the company that an internal
letter from Chief Architect at the Ministry of Works,
Livingston Forbes, identified as the one that Mr
Ingraham telephoned him to suggest should get the
renovation job — is owned by a “big time FNM sup-
porter”, Floyd Wilmott.

Mr Roberts charged that it was improper for Mr
Ingraham to have personally intervened in the
process of having the contract for the work awarded.
In his e-mail to The Tribune yesterday in which this
was put to him, Mr Ingraham said he found such
“baseless assertions offensive” as his “record speaks
for itself.”

Mr Ingraham confirmed that he “asked the Min-
istry of Public Works to do the necessary to have a
residence on the Police Compound on East Street
repaired so that it might be occupied by the end of
July.”

FNM Chairman Carl Bethel said he expects it
was due to the Prime Minister’s commitment to
ensuring that the Commissioner of Police, who would
be residing on the property, is sufficiently accom-
modated to be able to effectively carry out his man-
date as head of the police force and to fight crime. He
said the FNM is committed to putting contracts out
to competitive tender “generally” and its record in
doing this is “without parallel in the Bahamas.”

Mr Ingraham and Mr Bethel’s comments came
after The Tribune received a copy of the internal
letter from Mr Forbes to Permanent Secretary in
the Ministry of Public Works Colin Higgs and Deputy
Director of Works Caldwell Pratt which outlined
how Mr Ingraham had communicated with the Min-
istry in May that he would like to see a scope of
works prepared and priced for the renovation of
one floor of the two storey police residence.

The letter to the senior officials said documents
were prepared in this regard before going on to add
that on June 8, a call was received by cellphone by Mr
Forbes from the Prime Minister himself in which
Mr Ingraham “directed that this Ministry engage
the Building Construction Services of Telco Enter-
prises, whose proprietor is Floyd Wilmott, in nego-
tiating a contract for the works as the time line for
occupancy of the user was very tight (end of July
2010) and competitive tendering time line would not
achieve a desirous completion time for the user’s
occupancy needs.”

The letter goes on to outline that in conjunction
with a representative from Telco Enterprises, Min-
istry of Works officials concluded negotiations with
the result that two potential prices for the work were
agreed: $292,923.62 or $315,293.22 (if impact glass
hurricane windows were included).

The letter concludes by recommending that the re-
evant information be sent from the Ministry of Works
to the Office of the Prime Minister for “further
review and directive on construction costing and
pending contract approval.”

PM explains

In his e-mailed response to
The Tribune , Mr Ingraham
agreed he had intervened to “ask
the Ministry of Public Works to
do the necessary to have a resi-
dence on the Police Compound
on East Street repaired so that it
might be occupied by the end of
July.”

"It was assumed that the
repair job would be minor cost-
ing under $50,000, rather than
the roughly $300,000 it ultimate-
ly was priced at,” said the Prime
Minister.

Mr Ingraham noted that the
Ministry of Public Works “main-



‘HUBERT
INGRAHAM

tains a register of pre-qualified contractors who are

regularly invited to bid on public works,” adding
that “where such works fall below a stipulated thresh-
old, (i.e. $50,000) a job may be negotiated directly
with a contractor.”

He continued: “Upon inspection it was deter-
mined that the residence in question, which is a two
storey building, was in far worse shape than expect-
ed. It was also recommended that both upstairs and
downstairs apartments would be renovated. Rather
than minor repairs, substantial work is apparently
required to improve the entire building, including
major plumbing works, installation of air-condition-
ing, and the replacement of all windows. As you
indicated in your letter, the scope of works estimat-
ed that the job will cost in the vicinity of $300,000.

“On being advised of this on Monday past, the
Minister of Works was advised to put the job to ten-
der. As is usual practice, a list of pre-qualified con-
tractors were identified and approved by the Minis-
ter of Public Works. I am told that this list was
approved yesterday morning.”

Those companies are: Telco Enterprises (Floyd
Wilmott), JB & Sons (Jeffrey Bethel), AB Con-
struction (Arthur Brown), Buildex Construction
(Vincent Rahming), Kirk Thompson Construction
(Kirk Thompson) and Career Builders (Trevor
Wright).

Mr Ingraham said the “tentative date” for the bid
opening is Tuesday, July 13, and given that a July
completion date is now unlikely, alternative arrange-
ments are to be made to accommodate the intended
occupants.

“As regards Mr Floyd Wilmott, I confirm that he
is a member of the Free National Movement, a mem-
bership which does not disqualify him for bidding for
and carrying out works required by the Government
of The Bahamas,” added the Prime Minister.

Mr Wilmott’s company recently came to public
attention as the contractor who was awarded an $8.6
million contract to complete the Robert Smith Child
and Adolescent Centre and Education Unit at the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

The contract was signed by the current government
with Mr Wilmott’s firm in December 2009 after the
former contractor, hired under the previous govern-
ment in 2006, was terminated when the building was
around 50 per cent complete.

The Government said the termination was due
to shoddy workmanship.

Mr Wilmott revealed last month that the scheduled
completion date of the project had been delayed by
six to eight weeks due to excessive rain, mechanical
and structural issues.

Tue Roman Carnouc Communtry 1s THe Banamas
1S PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE

A SoLeMN PonTIFICAL Mass
TO CELEBRATE THE

St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill Street
Monday, July 5th at 7:30 p.m.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Paying tribute
to the young

THE 37th anniversary of
Independence celebrations will
be celebrated this year under
the theme, “celebrating Inde-
pendence through the eyes of
our youth”.

As such, the celebrations will
incorporate and pay special
tribute to young people in soci-
ety. The Independence Cele-
brations Committee has been
meeting since April to plan a
schedule of activities and was
guided by the following princi-
ples:

1. The tough economic con-
ditions that prevail in our coun-
try.

% The decision by successive
governments that grand cele-
brations would be held every
five years and scale down cele-
brations during the interim

3. The successful campaign
during the 35th celebrations to
push the celebrations into
neighbourhoods and local com-
munities

4. The promotion of an all-
inclusive celebration, including
the involvement of the One
Bahamas Organization, and the
partnering with public and pri-
vate organizations.

Chairman of the Indepen-
dence Celebrations Committee,
Peter Deveaux Isaacs, said:
“We will build on the momen-
tum of last year’s successful
activities, tempered only by the
financial reality that affects us
all. In particular, we will
encourage Bahamians every-
where to celebrate indepen-
dence where they are, where
they live, where they worship,
where they work and where
they recreate. This is a full





endorsement of the neighbour-
hood and local communities
celebrations philosophy.”

The schedule of events for
this year’s celebrations are as
follows:

Tomorrow
10am-6pm - National Pride
Day — “Celebration of Her-
itage”, Rawson Square.

National Pride Day (NPD),
celebrated on the Friday before
Independence Day, is an annu-
al independence celebration
event that encourages Bahami-
ans to celebrate and be proud
of what it is to be Bahamian.

Bahamians are encouraged
to display their patriotism dur-
ing National Pride day by wear-
ing, eating, playing and listening
to Bahamian music or cele-
brating something Bahamian.
The epicenter for the all day
festival is Rawson Square. Var-
ious Bahamian artists, includ-
ing winners of the E.Clement
Bethel Festival will perform;
culinary artists will feature their
latest creations; Independence
T-shirts will be on sale. The day
will be one of song, dance,
poetry and merriment. Nation-
al Pride Day will also feature
the announcement of the win-
ners of the yard competition.

Saturday, July 3

6am - Independence Fun
Run/Walk, Clifford Park.

Starting points Montague,
Golden Gates, Christie Park
and Goodman’s Bay and end-
ing at Clifford Park. Organised
by the Ministry of Health, the
event is expected to attract
walkers and joggers from all
over New Providence.

The fun run will start from

ERUOY TIME OFF WITH







a

PETER DEVEAUX ISAACS makes a een

the four different points on Sat-
urday and will also feature a
health fair, with the usual blood
glucose, pressure and choles-
terol testing. Representatives
from the law enforcement com-
munity, the Police recruits and
cadets, the Defence Force
recruits and Rangers and the
Prison recruits, will lead the
walkers: Defence from the
south west, Prison from the
south east, and the Police from
the south.

5pm - Independence Beat
Retreat (Royal Bahamas Police
Force & Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Combined
Bands), Rawson Square.

This is the traditional per-
formance of the Police as they
march back to Police Head-
quarters. The performance is
held in Rawson Square. It is
considered a formal event, but
no invitations are needed for
seats other than designated
seats for Bahamian Officialdom
and representatives of the
diplomatic and consular corps.

Sunday, July 4

6am - Independence Fun
Run/Walk, Clifford Park.

Starting point is the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre and
ending at Clifford Park.

Monday, July 5

7pm - “Explosion of the
Arts”- Arawak Cay.

This Cultural Explosion
promises to be a colorful
expression of God’s love
through liturgical dance with
dancers/church dance ministries
brought together in a treat of









Bahamian folklore, rake and
scrape and Bahamian gospel
music with dance under the
direction of Dr Ann Higgins.

Tuesday, July 6
10am - “A Celebration of
Dance” — National Dance
School
Tpm - “A Celebration of

Dance” - Rawson Square
Friday, July 9

8pm — “Youth Salute to the
Nation: An Evening of Prayer,
Culture, Official Inspection,
and Flag Raising” — Clifford
Park

All roads lead to Clifford
Park on July 9 for the center-
piece of the national celebra-












k

SUPT KEVIN ROLLE talks about the Clifford Park March Pass.



tions. Clifford Park is generally
regarded as the seat of inde-
pendence. Bahamians look for-
ward with great anticipation
and nostalgia to the Clifford
Park activities. Last year’s
crowd was one of the largest
ever, and people braved a pass-
ing rain storm just to be there.

There will be no Tattoo this
year, nor is there a People’s
Concert, which normally fol-
lows the fireworks. The Cul-
ture show however, will incor-
porate several big name per-
formers, from the secular and
non-secular world. Children will
feature prominently and there
will be the ceremonial reenact-

PHOTOS: Kathy Ingraham

ment of the first flag rising,
prayers for the nation. The fire-
works display will round off the
night of festivities courtesy of
Kerzner International, at
promptly 12.0lam.

Saturday, July 10

2am “The People’s Rush”-
Rawson Square

10am-2pm — Youth Service
Day- Community Outreach
Projects

The Junkanoo community’s
summer rush.

The Rush begins at Rawson
Square and ends at Arawak
Cay for the traditional boil and
stew fish breakfast. The event is
open to all.

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NAD's 10%
landing fee

rise sparks ONL A

CONCERHS

* Private operators say
increases run counter
to reduced air fare plans

* LPIA operator proposes
3% rises to parking and
terminal fees, and more
than one-third increase
to international passenger
fees to $27.50

* Says even with rise,
[PIA fee of $41.64 per
passenger some $3.43
or 8.2% below
Caribbean average

* Says increases needed
to maintain debt service
cover of not less
than 1.3 to 1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company’s (NAD)
plans to increase landing fees
at Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA) by 10 per
cent as of January 1, 2011, and
raise other fees by 3 per cent,
were yesterday branded as run-
ning counter to the Govern-
ment’s plans to reduce air trav-
el costs and boost tourism.

Unveiling its plans to raise
additional revenues, and ensure
it complies with the financing
covenants related to LPIA’s
$409.5 million redevelopment
and expansion, NAD said that
apart from the landing fees
increase, it was also planning
to raise terminal fees, aircraft
parking fees and aircraft load-
ing bridge fees by some 3 per
cent as of the same date.

And international passenger
facility user fees will rise from
$20 per head to $27.5, a more
than one-third increase,
although NAD said LPIA’s
user costs will still remain below
the Caribbean average.

Using a Boeing 737-200 with
a 75 per cent load factor (102
passengers) and 90-minute
turnaround with use of a load-
ing bridge as its benchmark,
NAD said: “Excluding govern-
ment taxes, LPIA’s costs are
currently $30.44 per passenger,
and with the recommended
increase become $38.21 per pas-
senger.

“The average cost of the
Caribbean airports presented
in the graph excluding LPIA is
$41.64 per passenger. LPIA’s
recommended rates are very
competitive at $3.43 or 8.2 per
cent less than the Caribbean
average.”

Outlining the need for the
increase, on which NAD is
seeking feedback, the airport
operator said: “In accordance
with its financing obligations
the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company must maintain
a debt service coverage ratio
(DSCR) of not less than 1.3 to
1. The average DSCR ratio for
the 10-year period of 2011 to

SEE page 8B

THE TRIBUNE

ye U

©



y

THURSDAY,



TEU Ne elt



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Developer fights bank

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamas-
based resort
development is
alleging that it
has suffered
more than $21 million in losses
as a result of FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
refusal to honour two perfor-
mance bonds designed to guar-
antee construction work by
well-known contractor Edward
Penn, claims both he and the
bank are vigorously denying.

Cotton Bay Villas Eleuthera
and Cotton Bay Estates, both
part of the Cotton Bay project
headed by Bahamian business-
man Franklyn Wilson, have
filed a Supreme Court action
seeking declarations that the
two bonds - alleged to be for
sums totalling $8 million and
$3 million respectively - are
valid and enforceable, and that
FirstCaribbean “breached its
obligations” to them.

In its defence, First-
Caribbean, in documents
obtained by Tribune Business
alleged that neither of the two
was “a valid performance
bond”, both lacking seals and a
stamp to show compliance with

‘Great
benefit’ for
Andros

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is plan-
ning a July town meeting to
ensure that proposals for the
redevelopment of Andros’s
Lighthouse Yacht Club &
Marina are “in keeping with
the community’s wishes”, the
minister of tourism and avia-
tion telling Tribune Business
the project would be “of great
benefit” to the island’s near and
long-term future.

Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
explained that the Government
wanted to make sure Illinois-
based Scheck Industries’ plans
for the site received the
approval of Androsians,
describing the Town Meeting
as one of “the last pieces” to
fall into place.

“One of the things we want
to do is have a meeting with
the community in terms of what
the latest discussions were with
Scheck, and once we have that
input - we hope to do it some
time before the middle of July -
that’s the last piece outstand-
ing,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said, “to hold a Town Meeting
to see if what is happening is
in keeping with their wishes.”

Scheck has on its website a
link to another site, called
www.androssportingclub.com,
a project it describes as "com-
ing soon". Its potential pur-
chase of the Lighthouse Yacht
Club & Marina has been on the
table now for several years, and
the resort's sale would dispose

SEE page 10B

Loss leaders less effective

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

USING loss leaders as a con-
sumer business driver has
become a less successful strate-
gy due to the increasing savvy
of Bahamian shoppers, AML
Foods chief executive said yes-
terday, as they are increasingly
looking around to obtain the
best deals.

Gavin Watchorn, who is also
the BISX-listed food group’s
president, told Tribune Busi-
ness that as the recession bites
harder on consumer incomes,
many Bahamians are showing
“less and less loyalty to a par-
ticular brand or store”, instead
shopping around to obtain the
different deals and discounts
on offer at each chain and
thereby lower their food/gro-
cery bill.

“T think the competition is

* AML Foods chief says
consumers have ‘wised
up’ to selling below cost,
and now showing less
brand loyalty by shopping
around for deals

* BISX-listed firm’s food
and franchise division saw
Q1 sales declines of 8.1%
and 6.5% respectively

driving prices down, and a lot of
prices we see are just above
cost or below cost,” Mr
Watchorn explained. “Com-
petitors are using loss leaders to
drive traffic to their stores,
where prices are close to cost or
below cost.

SEE page 4B



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

) . @
Winsetiona! Moeny itor

Rank of The Bahasa

TIN TERRARATIONAL

Online at
BankBahamas Online.com

lleged $21m losses

* Franklyn Wilson’s Cotton Bay claims damages suffered after FirstCaribbean allegedly
failed to honour two performance bonds to guarantee Edward Penn’s work

* Bank denies this, saying bonds not valid because employees involved
not authorised, and documents failed to comply with Act and own rules

* Penn counterclaims for $5.565m in unpaid work,
while bank seeks order that he indemnifies them

* Case set for trial in early 2011

the Stamp Act. The bank also
alleged that the two purported
bonds were not executed “in
accordance” with its Articles of
Association.

And, in a document filed in
the Supreme Court on May 26,
2010, FirstCaribbean’s attor-
neys, Alexiou, Knowles & Co,
said that while the bank “denies
any liability” under both the
alleged performance bonds and
collateral contracts, it was seek-
ing an Order that Mr Penn “‘is
liable to contribute to, or
indemnify the bank, in respect
of any losses the bank may suf-
fer” if the Supreme Court
found he failed to perform
under both construction con-
tracts.

The case is before Justice
Stephen Isaacs, who has set it
down for a five-day trial set to
begin on April 18, 2011, and
issued detailed case manage-
ment orders.

In its statement of claim, Cot-
ton Bay Villas Eleuthera
alleged that Mr Penn had been
hired to construct a clubhouse,
three three-bed villas and three
two-bed duplex villas at the
resort development via a con-
tract worth $8.3 million.

The construction contract
allegedly required the contrac-
tor to obtain a performance
bond equal to the contract sum,
and Cotton Bay claimed Mr
Penn did this with First-
Caribbean.

Cotton Bay, which is repre-
sented by Higgs & Johnson,
alleged that its then-attorneys,
Sharon Wilson & Company,
wrote to FirstCaribbean on
November 18, 2005, seeking
confirmation that this perfor-
mance bond was valid, follow-
ing up with further correspon-
dence on January 27, 2006.

The developer then alleged
that Ian Rutherford, a former
relationship manager at First-
Caribbean, confirmed the per-
formance bond was valid in ear-
ly 2006, the bank sending a con-
firmation letter on March 10
that year. As a result, Cotton
Bay alleged it felt that the per-
formance bond was in place
and its financial interests were

Concerns over fishing exports

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS fisheries
industries is in danger of miss-
ing out on millions of dollars
worth of exports to the Euro-
pean Union (EU) if the Gov-
ernment does not have proper
systems in place to register
product caught in Bahamian
waters by August 1, the
Bahamas Commercial Fishers
Alliance (BCFA) Chief told
Tribune Business yesterday.

Adrian La-Roda said if the
Government does not catch
certificates to accompany lob-
ster shipments required by the
EU by the end of July, the fish-

f

eries industry could buckle
under export sanctions.

And he also insists that if the
Bahamas cannot meet other
requirements mandated by the
Marine Stewardship Council
(MSC), the Bahamas could face
further export restrictions.

Director of the Department
of Marine Resources, Michael
Braynen, yesterday gave assur-
ances that these requirements
should be met by the end of the
month, and that proper logging
of lobster hauls by Bahamian
fishermen to satisfy EU import
requirements will be in place.

The EU is this country’s
largest fisheries export market,
and Belize the largest competi-
tor.

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Mr Braynen said that while
the MSC and EU requirements
were not mutually exclusive,
there existed some commonal-
ity in their mandates.

He added that while some
importers of seafood within the
EU may require a country to
be MSC certified, many do not.
He said, though, that many of
the larger importers do require
the certification.

Mr La-Roda suggested this
important MSC international
mandate, which has reportedly
been met by the majority of
exporters in the region, means
the difference between the suc-
cess or failure of the Bahamas’

SEE page 10B

fi

Sign up now and get a free prepaid card membership for the first year.

www, BankBahamas.com

"Certain restrictions apply



FRANKLYN WILSON

“adequately safeguarded”.
The developer then alleged it
entered into a second con-
struction contract with Mr
Penn, this time through its Cot-

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.





I” BOB





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 3B

1-5
Hanging photos on the best ‘peg’

WITH the technological explosion of
scanners, digital cameras and the World
Wide Web, the JPEG image format has
been for some time the most widely-used
digital image format used on the web today.
This format was created to be a standard
format for image compression, and I would
say that 99 per cent of the pictures on the
Internet are JPEGs or should be.

With that being said, let us identify what
exactly is JPEG? It is (pronounced ‘jay-
peg’) a standardised image compression
mechanism usually ending with the exten-
sion jpg or jpeg. Its acronym defines Joint
Photographic Experts Group, and works
well on photographs and naturalistic art-
work, but not so well on lettering, simple
cartoons or line drawings.

There is much misunderstanding about
JPEG, which has left many professional
photographers and graphic designers per-
plexed. Let’s define some terms:

RAW files are compressed files, but are
“lossless”, meaning information “is not
lost” during compression. It loses no infor-
mation when making an image smaller.

A JPEG file is a compressed file, where
data is lost in the process of compression.
This means some ‘quality image’ is ‘lost’
when the image is made smaller). Howev-
er, the quantity is so small that it is virtual-
ly indiscernible to the human eye. Con-
versely, the image maker can trade off file
size against output image quality for
extremely small files if poor quality is not a
problem for you.

Battle of Raw /JPEG

The choice to shoot RAW or JPEG is a
battle that constantly rages, but you will
find that some of the biggest tasks in pho-
tography involve choosing RAW as
opposed to the JPEG format. Nonetheless,
there are pros and cons for each format
and I will highlight a few:

RAW format:

The major disadvantage with RAW for-
mat is obviously the file size. This can range
from 5-20 MB (megabytes) or more per
picture, which can cause a serious storage
crunch. Another con to RAW is the time it
takes to read or write a file, and the long
length of time ity takes to open on your
computer. It also takes special software to
open a RAW file, which is proprietary to
each camera manufacturer. However, a
Raw file cannot be uploaded to the Inter-
net, as it must be converted to JPEG or
some other standard format for viewing.

JPEG format:

Being a smaller file size, JPEG is better
for action photography due to the fact that
your camera will not have to pause to write
to disk, and you will certainly receive more
shots per flash card. JPEG files take up far
less space on your hard drive, and you can
fit much more on a CD or DVD for archiv-





The Art of

Graphix

Oo emi Wee Any

ing.

The obvious advantage is that JPEG is a
small file size, with faster loading time on
your computer and across the Internet. It
allows more photos to be captured by the
camera as it takes less time to write each
picture to memory.

I will not get into the algorithms the
compression uses, but a JPEG basically
takes the photo from an RGB format and
puts it into another format, which focuses
more on the luminance as opposed to
colour. What is happening is that the soft-
ware is determining what parts of the image
to keep and what parts should be thrown
away. It’s that simple.

Ultimately, JPEG is best suited for large
photographic images, not small images
under a few hundred pixels in dimension. It
is not suitable for screen shots, images with
text, sharp lines and large blocks of colour,
or images that will be edited repeatedly.

A tip: When editing a JPEG image,
always keep a master copy if you expect to
edit it again in the future. It is important
you preserve the integrity of your JPEG
file by ensuring that you retain the original
file without over-writing, and always make
alterations in Photoshop, which results in a
more clear-cut finish. Remember: Any pro-
cessing done in camera to a JPEG file can-
not be undone.

Chiefly, the decision photographers have
to make over RAW or JPEG is a decision
of choice of format.

How many photos you take, your pro-
cessing level and what you intend to do
with the image (Internet, print, personal
use, commercial use, etc) must all be mea-
sured. If itis mind boggling, resort to the
RAW+JPEG mode and you'll experience
the best of both worlds.

Theoretically, a RAW file is superior to
a JPEG file most of the time, but the ques-
tion to ask is that since you cannot see the
difference in print, is shooting RAW real-
ly any advantage?

Why use JPEG?: Chiefly to make your
image files smaller and have them appear
virtually the same as the original. Another
benefit is that it stores full colour informa-
tion: 24 bits/pixel (16 million colours).

JPEG is far more practical than GIF for
exchanging images with widely varying dis-
play hardware because it avoids prejudging
how many colours to use.

A Pélinishry CF

Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
Ph

BO. Bow ABZOF OO Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Rahames -

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

42 367 47TT

in Kindergarten, Primary, Junior and Senior High School.
Religious Studies, Mathematles, Language Arts, Computer Sclence

Sciences (General & Health Science, Biology, Combined & Agricultural Science),

History/Social Studies, Physical Education & Coaching,

Art (Arts & Craft /Art Drawing / Technical Drawire),
Bookkeeping, Home Economics.

There are also opportunities in the offlee as well as Administrative Levels

for the new school year beginning September 2010

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the
Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
They must be Bahamian or a reskdent with work status, Teachers must also

When should I use JPEG and when
should I stick with GIF?:

One of the first things to learn about
JPEG is which kinds of images to apply it
to. Generally speaking, JPEG is superior
for storing full-colour or grey-scale images
of ‘realistic’ scenes. The more complex and
subtle, the better.

If you have a GIF image with a lot of
small-size overlaid text, don't JPEG it.
Plain black-and-white (two level) images
should never be converted to JPEG.

What are good "quality" settings for
JPEG? :

Most JPEG compressors let you pick a
file size versus image quality. However,
there seems to be a little uncertainty about
the settings. ‘Quality 95’ does not mean
‘keep 95 per cent of the information’.

The quality scale is purely arbitrary as it
is not a percentage of anything. In fact,
quality scales aren't even standardised
across JPEG programs and the user's goal
is to always choose the lowest quality.

Are all JPEG images high resolution,
print-quality photos? :

I am sorry but it’s not. Print quality is
always determined by the pixel dimensions
of any image. Since JPEG is often used to
be transmitted and displayed via the Web,
they are typically reduced to screen reso-
lution and do not contain enough pixel
data to get a high-quality print.

When sharpening a JPEG, the artifacts
(a ‘wrinkled’ appearance between colours)
begin to show up more distinctly as the
sharp level increases. Sadly, you also loose
data every time an edit (even a crop or
rotate) is made, due to the re-compression
of the file.

If you desire having images that are of
high resolution (over 640 x 480), it's a good
idea to have a separate link (perhaps with
the use of thumbnails). This makes your
site more user friendly...and customers will
return!

After all, if your image takes ‘forever’ to
load, how many people are going to stick
around to actually view it? Do you know
that if your page takes more than eight sec-
onds to download you stand the risk of los-
ing one-third of your visitors?

Finally, your web page is prepared by
you (entrepreneur) but it's designed for
them! (customers). You've got to get your
visitors interested first and know that trans-
ferring a shorter file is mandatory for
today's "I want it now" mentality. I hope
this article has assisted you with the fun-
damental principles when choosing superi-
or and fast downloading images via JPEG
format. So until we meet again, play a little,
have fun and stay on top of your game!

NB: Author welcomes feedback at
deedee2111@hotmail.com

FOR RENT

2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET
Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.

WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 322-8833

Legal Secretary

Needed

A minimum of 5 years litigation experience
is required.

All applications will be held in the strictest of
confidence.

Please submit resume to:

brightonplace242@gmail.com
Only short-listed applicants will be contacted

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LISA JOSEPH of ALLEN BROCK
DRIVE, #76 APT 1, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24th day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES THERVECUS OF
FINLAYSON STREET, OFF NASSAU STREET, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1ST day of JULY, 2010 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, The
Bahamas.





PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, twenty-five years ago, a young lady, Ann Pelerson, became a pioneer of

Liturgical Dance in The Bahamas when she decided to use her gift of dance to worship Gad and

bring praise and glory to His name within the confines of the church;

AND WHEREAS, there was a pened in The Bahama|s when this form of dancing wes

looked upon as non-Christian: today however, most major Christian denominations embrace the

Ministry of Liturgical Dance as a for of worship,

AND WHEREAS, the Liturgical Dance minssines in many of our local churches have been

guocesstul in both capturing fhe atlenton and interest of the youth, theredy providing ihem win a

Creative avenue for positive achiavemen

AND WHEREAS, in commemorating the 25° anniversary of Lilurgical Dance in ihe

Bahamas, the Carbbean Christian Dance Network has organized a schedule of events for the

pened 4° io 177 July 2070, which are geared to highlight and showcase fhe alanis of dance

have at least a Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate, groups from as many a8 1,500 churches, to faclitale cross-cultural exchanges between Bahamian

Also a heart and love for the total child, spirtiual, mental, physical and academic!

APPLY NOW

At Agape you can be a part of a friendly, family atmosphere,
taking our students to the next level. Be a part of moving our
top rated academic program to greater heights.

We use a combination of the ABeka, Bob Jones and
The Bahamas Ministry of Educathon currtculurns,

We also offer a varlety of team sports and are the current all Abaco
champions in Ladies Basketball and Mens Volleyball.

We have a 20 station, state-of-the-art Computer Lab and offer electives
in Drama, Music and Home Economics and Electrical Instalation.
Students are well prepared for Natlonal Exams - GLAT, BIC & BOCSE
as well as International Exams - SAT and City/Guilds (Pitman,

| te ars but most of all they are prepared for - Life!
bogeatlinends
opie

ly eI Applications may be obtained from the
taf school office or on-line at

and Intemational dancers as well as to direc! the focus of the community on the growth and
expansion of Liurgical Dance minisines nationally

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Miniter of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the week of 4" to 17° July 2010 a5 “LITURIGICAL DANCE
WEEK"

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, | hawa
hereunto sel my Hand and Seal
this 2" day of March, 2010

[( KA Pp jp

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM __
PRIME MINISTER
www.agape-school.com —



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



































































nie
at

John S. Bain

MBA, FCCA, CFE, CFFA, Cr.FA, CAMS, CMA, CFM. FIMIS.
Chartered Forensic Accountant

JOHN §, BAIN, The Bahamas’ most credentialed forensic accountant, is pleased
to announce that he will continue the practice of investigative & forensic
accounting from his new offices located:

SUITE NO E-1, UNION COURT
ELIZABETH AVENUE AND SHIRLEY STREET
P.O, BOX 88-3609
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 322-6656 FAX: (242) 323-0971

Email: johma}johnsbain.com
Website: ware Jjohnshain.com

In addition % traditional accounting and auditing services, we offer the following areas of
specialization:
Investigative & forensic accounting
Fraud investigations
Litigation support
Divoree litigation
Parinership & shareholder disputes
Business interruption losses
Expert testimony
Trial preparation asistance

Arbitration & medsaton
Critique of expert reports
Bankruptcy & insolvency
Liquidations & Receiverships
Asset Recovery

Elder abuse forensics

KEEPING FOUR BUSINESS IN BUSINESS

780 PICTET

PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

FROM page 1B

“The consumer has become
very wise, because we are see-
ing less and less loyalty to a par-
ticular chain or brand, and con-
sumers are shopping around to
where the deals and discounts
are. Selling below cost is not
being that successful, even to
increase the percentage of con-
sumers calling in that manner.”

Mr Watchorn was speaking
after AML Foods, the owner
of the Solomon’s SuperCentre
and Cost Right brands, suffered
a 72.2 per cent decline in fiscal
2011 first quarter net income,
which fell to $292,000 or $0.02
per share from the $1.05 mil-
lion or $0.067 per share
achieved during the three
months to April 30, 2009.

Sales at the BISX-listed
group’s food distribution busi-
ness, which includes those
brands, dropped by 8.1 per cent
to $18.55 million year-over-
year, compared to $20.186 mil-
lion, while gross profits in this

segment fell by 11.4 per cent -
from $5.344 million to $4.735
million.

As a percentage of sales,
gross profits in the food distri-
bution business fell to 25.5 per
cent from 26.5 per cent in the
fiscal 2011 first quarter, with
operating profits down by
almost 55 per cent at $653,000,
compared to $1.446 million the
year before.

On the food franchise side,
which chiefly features Domi-
no’s Pizza, top-line sales fell by
6.5 per cent to $2.32 million,
compared to $2.481 million the
year before, with gross profits
dropping by 9.3 per cent to
$1.43 million compared to
$1.584 million the year before.

Gross profits as a percentage
of sales again declined slightly,
from 63.9 per cent in the three
months to April 30, 2009, to
61.6 per cent this year. As a
result, operating profits again
declined by just over 50 per



ANDRE],

“*
> SCHOOL

iby talesnrtiomas idee! of Shr Brees

HES ae

THE TRIBUNE

Loss leaders less effective

cent in AML Foods’ food fran-
chise business, falling from
$385,000 to $190,000.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that AML Foods was
“very top line dependent”, as
were many Bahamian retailers,
given that they all incurred
large fixed costs such as rent,
salaries and utilities. “It’s dif-
ficult to add more expenses at
the same level as your sales,” he
added, implying that sales
increases largely made their
way to the bottom line.

Still, Mr Watchorn told Tri-
bune Business that AML Foods
was Starting to see signs the
economy was “levelling off a
little bit”, with people - espe-
cially those on fixed incomes -
starting to spend more money,
having “adjusted their lifestyle
now to what was happening”.

And, writing in AML Foods’
annual report for 2009, Mr
Watchorn said: “We do antici-
pate 2010 being more challeng-
ing than 2009 for our
group......Our performance in
2009 means we have a big task
ahead of us in 2010 to record
similar results, and we will
endeavour to meet these tar-
gets in light of some
unfavourable conditions.

“The economic challenges in
the Bahamas remain, and the
market in which we operate
continued to be extremely com-
petitive as new stores enter the
market at all levels. Our sales
declines of the third and fourth
quarters of 2009 are reflective
of both these economic condi-
tions and increased competi-
tion.” To counter this, Mr
Watchorn said AML Foods had
implemented “new sales initia-
tives”, in addition to working
on cost savings and synergies
in the existing business.

Apart from Domino’s Pizza-
’s website, he added that the
new revenue and sales oppor-
tunities included the pharma-
cy and bakery at Solomon’s
SuperCentre in Nassau, which
the company had just assumed
ownership of.

18045

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

SENIOR TRUST OFFICER

* Administration of a portfolio of complex trusts including
the preparation of all relevant documentation and
Annual Reviews. Particular emphasis will be the
administration of structures originating from Latin
America.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned
fiduciary structures.

* Written and verbal communication with Client
Relationship Managers and other industry
professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant
professional qualification

Strong trust and company administration skills plus a
sound knowledge of drafting relevant documents,
reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local and international
legislation

Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 7 years of relevant experience in a Private Bank
or Trust Company.

Fluency in Spanish.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. ©. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas

world school

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized
International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications for the following
vacancies, with effect from August 2010. Full information regarding the school may
be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com.

Primary Library Assistant

The primary library assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with the head of
primary and the school librarian.

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms, the library
assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

¢ To supervise primary students’ library visits (book swaps and story telling)

e To assure the smooth running of the primary section of the school library

¢ To ensure that materials are shelved, re-shelved and displayed according to library
organizational schemes, which are based on Dewey decimal classification.

e To assist with the circulation and retrieval of primary materials on a daily basis.

° To assist with processing and cataloguing new materials in the primary collection.

e To manage all photocopying, scanning and laminating requests for teachers and students
in the primary section of the library.

e To organise the Scholastic book programme

e To troubleshoot simple technology programmes

e To assist the librarian with data collection, entry, maintenance and reports.

© To operate a specific automated library management system for the primary school.

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the
principal

Receptionist/Office Assistant

The School Receptionist/Office Assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with
the heads of school (primary and secondary).

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms and conditions
of service, the School Receptionist/Office Assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

® Serving as the major point of contact with visitors to and enquiries for the head of primary
and/or principal

e Maintaining professional ethical standards in all areas, particularly confidentiality

e Maintaining regular office routines (such as answering the telephone, attending to the fax
ee handling email messages, word processing documents, photocopying, and filing
papers

e Preparing materials indicated by the head of primary and/or for distribution to faculty

e Maintaining school documentation

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the
principal

Re fe fe fe 2s ie fe of fe oe fe fe fs 2 he fe of fe fe fe fe 2fe oft i 2fe 2fe 2K aft he fe ofc oft he fe oft oie fe fe fe 2fe ais fe ale fe oie fe fe 24s 2k he fe ofc fe 2K fe fe ofs oft is fe fe fe oft he fe ofc oft a ofe ole 2k ft ahs afc 2c as a ale

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as possible. All applications
MUST include the following:

® letter of application

© a personal statement

e a full resume

® the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and e-mail of three people who may be
approached for confidential professional references

® acurrent police record

e acurrent health certificate

Please direct all correspondence to:
Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:

Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846



The closing date for applications is 9 July 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE









ANTHONY STUBBS

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 5B
SssS*~*~*~=~ BAF Financial
agent passes

securities test

A BAF Financial sales agent,
Anthony Stubbs, has passed the
Canadian Securities Course
(CSC) after studying with the
Nassau-based Securities Train-
ing Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, STI’s course
administrator, said: ‘““The CSC

provides a very comprehensive
coverage of investment prod-
ucts and markets, and can pro-
vide a gateway to a rewarding
career in financial services.”

STI continues to offer the full
study programme for the Cana-
dian Securities Course.



NAD adds 13 investors via $165m completion

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) yes-
terday confirmed that its $165
million second stage financing
for Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport’s (LPIA) rede-
velopment had closed, with the
participation of 13 new
investors.

Following behind last week’s
Tribune Business report that
revealed the second stage
financing was oversubscribed
by some $20 million, NAD said
yesterday that the addition of
the 13 new investors took the
total number of financing par-
ticipants to 28.

Stewart Steeves, NAD’s
president and chief executive,
said: "We are pleased to
announce that funding for stage
two of the $409.5 million air-
port redevelopment project is
now in place.

“With the 13 new investors,
we now have a total of 28
investors backing this project.
Based on our success in stage

one construction, the overall
airport operation and market
conditions, we were able to
achieve a lower interest rate
from our creditors, saving the
airport $2.5 million per year in
interest payments.”

Stage two of LPIA’s expan-
sion includes selective demoli-
tion of the current US Depar-
tures Terminal and construc-
tion of a new 226,000 square
foot international arrivals ter-
minal. ‘

The project will also include
an addition of about 200,000
square feet of asphalt apron
rehabilitation, and the removal
and rebuilding of existing park-
ing facilities.

The total cost for stage two
construction is estimated at
$128 million, with a scheduled
completion date of October
2012.

Paul Ward, NAD’s vice-pres-
ident of finance and chief finan-
cial officer, the majority of the
$165 million will be used to

Home prices rise 0.8 per
cent in April from March

NEW YORK (AP) — Home
prices in April rose for the first
time in seven months as gov-
ernment tax credits bolstered
the housing market. But the
rebound may be short-lived
now that the incentives have
expired.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-
Shiller 20-city home price index

Big Moments are
Better When Shared

released Tuesday posted an 0.8
per cent gain. It had fallen in
each of the past six months.
Eighteen of 20 cities showed
price increases in April from
March. Washington, San Fran-
cisco and Dallas each posted
gains of two per cent or more.
Eleven cities reversed their
declines from the month before.

This Independence Day Weekend

(U.S. and Bahamas), surprise the family
with a getaway io Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort. Activities include:

FIREWORKS SHOW MINI FAIR

COMPLIMENTARY
DIVE-IN MOVIES

KARAOKE
ARTS & CRAFTS

CARNIVAL
GAMES &
CONTESTS

PETTING ZOO

repay the revolving credit facil-
ity used to fund stage one con-
struction.

“Our plan is to repay the out-
standing balance of the
revolver. We will then use the
remainder of the $165 million
and the reset revolving credit
facility to fund stage two con-
struction," Mr Ward said. "We
anticipate drawing down the
funds in November of this year
once the NAD Board gives
final approval to proceed with
stage two."

While financing of stage two
concludes, construction on the
new US Departures terminal
has hit the halfway mark. To
date, NAD has spent some $98
million on construction, with a
completion date for stage one
set for the 2011 first quarter.

The third and final stage-con-
struction of a domestic and
international departures hall
has a projected completion date
of November 2013, at a cost of
$84 million.

INSIGHT

For the stories

otal tale Mlat=)

news, read
Insight on
Mondays

Sheraton
Nassau

BEACH RESORT

Bahamian resident
room rates from

2159

per night plus tax
and gratuities

For hotel reservations call 327-6000 or visit sheraton.com/nassau

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Guest

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THE LUXURY COLLECTION

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©2010 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sheraton and its logo are the trademarks
of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates






































ROYAL FIDELITY

Re ae ele

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.
If you have it, we want you.

We are growing! Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- ASSISTANT TRUST ADMINISTRATOR -

Reporting directly to the Manager, Trust & Corporate Services, the successful applicant's main
duties and responsibilities will be:

¢ Effecting clients’ banking instructions

¢ Constructing written communication

¢ Completing varying bookkeeping tasks
Assisting with cash collections
Liaising and communicating with clients and other
team members regarding client instructions

Minimum requirements / qualifications

Bachelor's degree

STEP qualification

Minimum 5 years Trust Administration experience

Extensive knowledge of trust formation and administration
Sound knowledge of Bahamian trust and company legislation
Proficient in the use of Microsoft Office, Word & Excel
Excellent organizational skills

Ability to work independently as well as with a team

Strong writing skills

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: Assistant Trust Administrator

51 Frederick Street | P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau | F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
July 9%, 2010 to:

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions) will be
commensurate with relevant experience and qualification. Royal Fidelity appreciates your
interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.

Please be advised that

The Nassau office of

PRICEVVAIERHOUSE( COPERS

will be closed on

Friday, 2 July 2010

To allow staff to enjoy their

ANNUAL
FUN DAY

We regret any inconvenience
this may cause.

Normal working hours will resume
on

Monday, 5 July 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT (AP) — Ford
Motor Co., the only Detroit
automaker to avoid bankruptcy
protection, said Wednesday it
will reduce its huge debt by
another $4 billion as it contin-
ues to show signs of financial
strength.

The Dearborn, Michigan,
automaker will pay $3.8 billion
in cash to a United Auto Work-
ers trust fund that pays retiree
health care bills, and it will pay
out $255 million in dividends
on preferred securities that had
been deferred as the automak-
er worked its way through
financial troubles. The compa-
ny now will make quarterly
payments on the securities,
which are a combination of pre-
ferred stock and bonds.

Ford CEO Alan Mulally said
in a statement that the pay-
ments are another sign of con-
fidence that the company's
restructuring plan is working.

"We expect to continue to
improve our balance sheet as
we deliver on our plan,” Mulal-

Ford Motor to repay
$4bn more in debt

ly said. "Our business results
make it possible to take these
actions while still accelerating
the investments we are making
in our business."

Ford sales are up more than
30 per cent through May,
almost double the 17 per cent
increase in total US car sales.

Ford shares rose 50 cents, or
five per cent, to $10.38 in mid-
day trading.

Automaker

The automaker said the
actions combined with a $3 bil-
lion debt payment in April will
reduce its total debt to around
$27 billion from $34 billion at
the end of the first quarter.

The payments will save Ford
roughly $470 million in annual
interest costs, the company said.

Ford was forced to mortgage
its factories and even its blue
oval logo to borrow more than
$23 billion in 2006 and 2007.
But the move helped it avoid
bankruptcy protection, unlike
Chrysler Group LLC and Gen-
eral Motors Corp.

Recently Ford has reported

RBC

S

Dominion

Rae, Securities

GLOBAL LIMITED

ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF ITS OFFICE TO

BAYSIDE EXECUTIVE PARK
Weat Bay Street
Building # 3
Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 702-5950
FAX: (242) 362-6744

OFFICE HOURS
B0A.M. to 400 BM.
Monday - Friday



280 PICTET

i68oO5

sales gains and four straight
quarterly profits. It earned $2.1
billion in the first quarter,
helped by higher transaction
prices for its cars and trucks,
which have been getting high
quality ratings from third-party
groups such as Consumer
Reports magazine and JD Pow-
er and Associates.

Even before the debt reduc-
tion announcement, Citigroup
Global Markets analyst Itay
Michaeli upgraded Ford shares
to "hold" from “sell.”

Michaeli said in a note to
investors that Ford shares have
dropped 32 per cent from highs
after a strong 2009 perfor-
mance.

"At these levels, we believe
prior relative risk/reward bal-
ances have been corrected,
prompting the upgrade," he
wrote.

As the US auto industry
headed toward financial disas-
ter in 2007, the UAW agreed
to set up trust funds that would
take on enormous health care
payments for Ford, GM and
Chrysler retirees. Ford made
initial payments to the trust and
agreed to pay roughly another
$7 billion.

Ford will make the $3.8 bil-
lion to payment to the trust on
Wednesday, including $860 mil-
lion in cash on two notes that
were due Wednesday. The
company had the option of pay-
ing one of the notes in stock,
but chose to pay in cash. The
remaining $2.9 billion will retire
a note early and come from
$1.6 billion in Ford cash, plus
$1.3 billion from Ford's credit
arm. The payment from Ford
Motor Credit Co. is instead of a
tax payment that it would have
made to the parent company.

After the payments, Ford will
still owe the UAW trust about
$3.6 billion, payable over three
years. The company said it
intends to repay the note early
but wouldn't say when.

In March, the trust raised
$1.78 billion by selling warrants
to buy the automaker's stock.

It pays health care bills for
more than 200,000 retirees and
their spouses. Ford agreed to
fund the trust with a total of
$14.8 billion in cash and other
assets.

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST

CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

HEAD OF FOUNDATIONS, PRIVATE TRUST
COMPANIES & CORPORATE

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

Advising potential clients and liaising with industry professionals
on all matters relating to the establishment and management of
Foundations and Private Trust Companies and the administration

thereof

- Oversight of the Corporate Department including the
administration of multi jurisdictional corporate structures and

dealing with all matters arising therefrom.

Preparation of and checking Annual Reviews.
Oversight of fee billings and collection.
Liaising with local and international regulators on matters
pertaining to his/her portfolio,

PRE-REQUISITIES;-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant professional

qualification.

In-depth knowledge of relevant Bahamian and international
legislation and practice,
Impeccable written and verbal communication skills.

- Computer literate with proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
At least 7 years related experience in a private bank, law firm

OF trust Company.

Extensive knowledge of Foundations, Private Trust Companies,
International Business Companies, “Regular Bahamian”
Companies and similar structures from other jurisdictions.
Extensive knowledge the Qualified Intermediary regime and
similar trans-national fiscal measures.
Knowledge of Spanish and / or French would be advantageous.
Ability to function in a multi-cultural working environment.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE

ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:-
The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

FO. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE

NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar slipped against the euro
Wednesday, but rose in rela-
tion to most other currencies
after a private report on US
employment showed a smaller-
than-expected number of job
gains.

Lingering high unemploy-
ment in the US, the world's
largest economy, is a big part of
the reason why growth is
expected to slow in the second
quarter.

In midday trading in New
York, the euro rose to $1.2283
from $1.2209 late Tuesday.

The European Central Bank
said that it would lend 131.9 bil-
lion euros to banks for three
months, a day before 442 bil-
lion euros in 12-month loans

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 9B
Dollar slips
against euro, rises

against others

lysts.

In other trading Wednesday,
the British pound fell to $1.4962
from $1.5081.

The US currency also gained
to 1.0613 Canadian dollars from
1.0550 Canadian dollars, and
was higher versus the Aus-
tralian and New Zealand dol-
lars. All three, which are big
commodity exporters, tend to
fall when economic confidence
falls.

The dollar dropped to 1.0763
Swiss francs from 1.0807 francs,
and was nearly flat versus
Japan's currency at 88.51 yen
from 88.49 yen.

Like the dollar, the franc and
the yen are considered safe
havens.

Driving the appeal for

"safer" assets was a report from
payroll company ADP, which
said that private-sector employ-
ers added 13,000 jobs in June,
down from 57,000 in May.
Economists polled by Thom-
son Reuters had expected
60,000 jobs to be added this
month.

A lower US unemployment
rate, which was 9.7 per cent in
May, is crucial to the econo-
my's recovery. The Labour
Department is releasing jobs
data for June on Friday. Econ-
omists expect the unemploy-
ment rate to rise to 9.8 per cent,
and for 110,000 jobs to be cut as
people hired earlier this year
by the federal government for
temporary work on the census
are laid off.

























a

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PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

TRUST OFFICER

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

* Administration of a portfolio of trusts including the
preparation of relevant documentation and Annual
Reviews.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned
fiduciary structures,

* Written and verbal communication with Clent
Relationship Managers and other industry
professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

comes due.

Analysts had worried that if a
large number of banks sub-
scribed to Wednesday's ECB
loans, that implied weakness in
European banks’ ability to get
funding. The ECB said 171
institutions got three-month
loans, while 1,121 institutions
had received the 12-month
loans a year ago.

The "relatively low demand"
for new central bank loans
helped bolster the euro, said
Brown Brothers Harriman ana-

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For stories behind Fax only 1 page Resume to:
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Mondays 356-4833







COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

2010
No. 00141

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-
dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959, Chapter 393 Revised Statute
Law of The Bahamas

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY
ISABELLA BIANCA ROSA HARRISON

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY ISABELLA BIANCA
ROSA HARRISON both of Green Court, La Rue Du Douet De Rue, St. Lawrence,
Jersey, Channel Islands, UK, in respect of:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-
dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

The Petitioners in this matter claim to be the owners in fee simple of the said lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
their title of the said lot investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

COPIES of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working hours at:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
(b) The Office of the Administrator, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
(c) The Office of Local Government, Hope Town, Abaco, Bahamas
(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Higgs & Johnson, Ocean Centre, Montagu
Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
adverse claim or claims not recognised in the Petition shall on or before the 30th
day of August, A.D., 2010 file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the
undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the prescribed form verified by
an affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim on or before the 30th day of August, A.D., 2010 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

DATED this 18th day of June, A.D., 2010

Samantha Fox
Messrs. Higgs & Johnson
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioners

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


















Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant
professional qualification.

Strong trust and company administration skills plus
a sound knowledge of drafting relevant documents,
reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local legislation.
Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 5 years of relevant experience in a Private
Bank or Trust Company.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL
BE ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P.O, Box N-4837

Nassau, Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

y ,

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

a programme for the working professional

erage gt) eo mea ese ea

Three specialisations for a
competitive edge:

Hu lae ye) sly tere eon em ese)
Leadership
Financial Decision Making

ees]
informational meetings:

Thursday, July 1st at 6 p.m.
so ee eee es eee
Thompson Blvd., 3rd floor

SEL Ca ec c=
ei ee See eee
Thompson Blyd., 3rd floor

For more information contact:

CMe sam sre 2

Tie meee bt eee

Dae =e =e le

ea a= ee oes ed ES eee ellen

INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE.



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Julius Bar

Julius Baer (sroup, the leading dedicated Wvealtn Management is seeking
candidates for the position of

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Acquire new clients through personal network (within defined objectives)

- Acquire new client finders

- Provide financial information to clients as requested

- Create / Maintain a privileged relationship with new or existing clients
providing a service of excellence

- Develop Julus Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) as a booking centre through
Julius Baer worldwide network

REQUIRED SKILLS:
- Excellent German verbal and written communication skils
- PC literate with strong Excel, Word, PowerPoint (ablity fo lear new

Concerns over fishing exports

FROM page 1B According to other sources, it
could take two to three years

fishing industry. before the fishing industry is
“We could end up with alob- — brought up to MSC certifica-

ster season that is a total
waste,” he said. “And we will
lose the European market.”

tion level.
Mr La-Roda said that if the
Bahamas lost the European

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PAMELA HAMILTON
late of the Southern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to send
their names, addresses and particulars of the same
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the
21st day July A.D., 2010 and if required, prove such
debts or claims, or in default be excluded from any
distribution; after the above date the assets will be
distributed having regard only to the proved debts or
claims of which the Executors shall have had Notice.

applications quickly)

- Strong understanding of Swiss Private Banking industry creed and
regulatory framework

- A commitment to service excellence

EXPERIENCE:
- Minimum 5 years expenence in Private Banking, Asset Management or
related field

EDUCATION:

- A Bachelor's degree with concentration in Economic, Business
Administration or euivalent

- The Securities Course Series 7 or equivalent.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES:
- The abilty to soeak a third language (Italian, Frenich, Spanish or
Portuguese) would be a strong asset.

We offer a very competitve compensation and benefits package, a stimulating
work environment and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our
business while expanding your career

Interested candldates should forward a copy of their resume by 7" July, 2040 to
the attention of.

BY HAND

Personal & Confidential

Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Lt.
Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore
East Bay Street

P.O, Box N-4890

Nassau, Bahamas

BY MAIL

Personal & Confidential

Julus Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas)Ltd.
Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore
East Bay Street

P.O, Box N-4880

Nassau, Bahamas



And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement

on or before the aforementioned date.

ROYAL SFIDELITY

Koney at Wark

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Executors
Alvernia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$81,000,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Friday, July 2, 2010. Successful tenderers, who will be advised
should take up their bills against payment on Tuesday, July 6,
2010. These bills will be in minimum multiples of B$100.00.
Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central
Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

ORO ORIK AR R R OR OKOK OK OKOK OROK OR OR R OR OR OKOK OK OK OROK OROR OR ORROKOKKKRRKRR



FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

a

Cy L CIN TA Lh

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 29 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,507.70 | CHG 2.96 | %CHG 0.20 | YTD -57.68 | YTD % -3.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
AML Foods Limited 1.05
Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 5.20
0.30 Benchmark 0.30
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.17
9.62 Cable Bahamas 11.16
2.56 Colina Holdings 2.60
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.29
2.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.46
1.60 Doctor's Hospital 2.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07
8.75 Finco 8.90
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 9.81
3.75 Focol (8) 4.58
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

4

1

4

Div $
0.040
0.200
0.260
0.000
0.090
0.040
0.300
0.040
0.230
0.052
0.110
0.240
0.520
0.350
0.170
0.000
0.000
0.240
0.640
0.800

Change Daily Vol. EPS $

1.05 i 0.250
0.63 . 0.050
5.20 0.00 0.598
0.30 0.00 -0.877
3.15 0.00 0.168
2.17 0.00 0.055
1.16 0.00 1.408
2.84 0.24 0.511
6.29 0.00 0.460
2.35 -0.11 0.111
2.00 0.00 0.627
6.07 0.00 -0.003
8.90 0.00 0.168
9.81 0.00 0.678
4.58 0.00 0.366
1.00 0.00 0.000
0.27 0.00 0.035
5.59 0.00 0.407
9.95 0.00 0.952
0.00 0.00 0.156

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

99.46 0.00
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00

Interest
6.95%

Change Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Prime + 1.75%

Prime + 1.75%

RoyalFidelity *tmerenahP odnk ith st-_GY vei -The-Counter Gewuitirs,

Symbol Bid $
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00
RND Holdings 0.35

Ask $
11.06
6.25
0.40

Last Price EPS $
14.00 -2.945
4.00 0.000
0.55 0.001

Daily Vol. Div $ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M

0.000 256.6

Yield

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

ABDAB 30.13
RND Holdings 0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00 4.540
0.55 0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name NAV
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4752
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9265
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5374
2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0368
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.6388
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund 107.5706
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund 105.7706
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.1127
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0917
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1150

9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal 9.5078
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

2.8266
1.4712

10.0000 10.2744

4.8105 7.9664

YTD%

2.03
3.45
3.99
2.10
2.22
2.23
1.78

-4.61
3.23

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.906205
1.520591

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.506072

NAV Date
31-May-10
31-May-10
18-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
5.56 31-Mar-10
6.99 103.987340 103.095570 31-Mar-10
13.50 101.725415 99.417680 31-Mar-10
5.19 31-May-10
6.29 31-May-10
5.65 31-May-10
6.39 31-Mar-10

Last 12 Months %

8.15 31-Mar-10

58.37 31-Mar-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Ghange - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



20 November 2029

0.00%
0.00%

market it would have to look
to the US for all of its export
potential, leaving it subject to
price fixing under low market
demand.

He said Bahamian fishermen
and distributors would be made
to compete with a market that
is already self-sustained by local
lobster products.

The purpose of the catch cer-
tificate is largely to ensure qual-
ity and accountability in the
exporting country, and among
fishermen and distributors. The
catch certificate also attempts
to prevent poachers selling their
catch to the EU.

Mr Braynen said the imple-
mentation of the catch certifi-
cate will not require fishermen
to pay any extra taxes, but they
will be asked to contribute
information on their catches for

the certificate, which will con-
tribute to the statistical data on
the country’s fisheries industry.

“We think it (implementing
catch certificates) will help us
address one of the require-
ments (for MSC),” he said.
“We will be able to say defini-
tively that we have a handle on
illegal fishing. And it will help
us in that we will be able to
demonstrate that we have a sys-
tem of record keeping.

“We can know the volume
of fish extracted by fisheries,
so we can set management lim-
its.”

Mr Braynen said the catch
certificate will assure Bahamian
fisherman have the widest pos-
sible export market within the
EU, though the MSC require-
ment will broaden those mar-
kets even more.

‘Great benefit’ for Andros

FROM page 1B

of the last property owned by
the former Hotel Corporation,
plus 7,000-10,000 acres of sur-
rounding land in the Fresh
Creek area.

“We think it is something
that will be of great benefit to
Andros in the near and long-
term,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added.

Residents of Coakley Town
have been consulted several
times before on the Scheck
Industries project, which has

Requirements:

skills

holidays

i'm lovin’ it
Employment
Opportunity

Managers Needed

for leading Fast Food Franchise

¢ Must be a high school graduate
Must have management experience
and/or management degree

Must have strong leadership skills
Must be customer service driven
Must be results-oriented & articulate
Must have excellent inter-personal

¢ Must have excellent oral & written
communication skills

¢ Pofessionalism required

¢ Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!
Please submit resume to:

Human Resources Department
Mcdonald’s Head Office
on Market St. North
P. O. Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444
Nassau, The Bahamas

been modified several times to
account for the ELA, which was
prepared by the consulting firm,
Black & Veatch.

The project is also said to
include a marina, marina villas
and shopping/retail facilities,
fishing lodges and boutique
hotels. The Lighthouse Yacht
Club & Marina currently has
about 30 employees, and fea-
tures a 20-slip marina, beach
frontage and a 20-room hotel.
Yet the average occupancy at
the Fresh Creek property is
only about 35 per cent.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ad poy ince fat...
© Aipierds kite child avery 0 eons?

* Vistas threatens fut works popwlation being a00e of oY case ia Atos?
* The Novartis! Males inivaties is fhe feqpest peogram of eocie! nesponeibility

fn the phecoaceytice! sector?

Sor objectives is fo cere ard! core. hereon Nowarts proves free Goariam

dreurirertis fo lbs eniiemA: allecied nego caving milo of ives. Jon
Sovsrtis in the fight agate! Moterial
Thikok (byes Poecata!

Wie ge bookie ler a Mader fo Mada Ua erraition of:

Account Executive - Consumer Health

ihe Corporatic on imachpeks ios ch OTE. c :
aod deveop sale coll cache. Dev mpeermery: bree Thar keting ond 5.nhe4
re achrdies ip Secure s2kes, ras — wy ie
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* ES ey ere aed pre ee
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Compehive compereston snd bennett pawns vettun he market of reucagonal

working aewiroemeni highh amposaeed in cnowia
ana Gportun ee

Position based in The Bho.

Ps send jou Resumes to the bolicnaang esta

‘Biers, Ferennevartie, com ne later than Jute OT. 210

Place in Subject dnb Posing - WW l- Aooound (eecgtes Gongueesr Revatth
fighamas'

(hy NOVARTIS

Pes Soe Ls

ET TS A 07

just call 502-2371 today!





Fishermen: We’ll act
on poaching ourselves

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



POACHING, which robs the Bahamas
of up to $22 million worth of marine
resources per year, continues to persist
unabated, the Bahamas Commercial Fish-
ers Alliance said yesterday, with Bahamians
threatening to overlook Defence Force
help and take matters into their own hands
this coming lobster season.

Adrian La-Roda said with Bahamian
fishermen having up to $1 million worth
of lobster traps in the water per season,
they will no longer stand aside and watch
poachers take away their livelihood. And
they insist they are fed up with the Defence
Force and Immigration department’s catch
and release method of dealing with them.

“Our guys are taking a different
approach and now won’t call the Defense

Force,” he said.

Mr La-Roda added that poaching
remains a national problem that the
Defence Force seems to be doing nothing
about. According to him, the Defence force
has not arrested poachers in two years.

“Tt has been two years since the Defence
Force has arrested a fishing vessel,” he
said. “How can these people be on the job
for two years and have not apprehended a
poaching vessel?”

Organisation

He said his organisation intends on hav-
ing a press conference in the coming weeks
to highlight the urgency of the poaching
situation in this country.

Mr La-Roda said recently that when
caught, poachers were not stripped of their
cargo, but made to pay a $10,000 fine - 0.5
per cent of the total value of their catch,

and the BCFA has identified by name up to
11 vessels that poach in Bahamian waters.

He said those ships can often carry up to
60,000 pounds of fish or lobsters out of
these waters on one trip.

The Minister of National Security, Tom-
my Turnquest, suggested possible links
between the poachers and the Defence
Force, saying intelligence operations are
in place to confirm the veracity of those
allegations.

Mr La-Roda said a recent apprehension
of a poaching vessel yielded no results and
no retribution, as the poachers were let go.
He insisted that one of the poachers appre-
hended and released could now be working
on a Bahamian fishing vessel. And he said
the catch from the apprehended vessel dis-
appeared. “I’m impotent in terms of deal-
ing with this,” he said. “When you see these
kinds of things happen, we are the ones
who are losing money.”

Teens tackle boredom via ‘Odd Jobs’

SUMMER is here, and for
many young people summer
vacation means fun. But fun
can turn to boredom if you hap-
pen to be young, jobless, and
short on cash. That’s where the
Odd Job Squad (OJS) comes
in - an advertising service for
young people offering odd jobs
services in their communities.

While it cannot offer the
security of a regular summer
job, the OJ Exchange helps
young people earn money, gain
work experience, gather job ref-
erences, and put their skills to
use in helping residents, organ-
isations and businesses with
odd jobs.

The OJ Exchange was intro-
duced to the Bahamas by the
Teen Economic Empowerment

work,"

Network (T.E.E.N.), a group
of teens who have come togeth-
er to learn about investment
principles, personal finance and
entrepreneurship. The first edi-
tion of the OJS directory will
be published in July and will
list the services of approxi-
mately 20-30 young people, or
as many as 90 service listings.
According to Keshelle Kerr,
founder of the T.E.E.N. and
chief executive of Creative
Wealth Training, the OJS
works like a newspaper's clas-
sified advertising section.
"Youth fill out a short appli-
cation with a checklist of three
services they can offer, such as
babysitting, painting, or yard
she says. "OJS coordi-
nators enter their services into

youth.

email

a special database, publish a
services directory and distrib-
ute it freely throughout the
community." Residents, organ-
isations and businesses use the
directory to contact and hire

Any young person aged 13-
21 can sign up for the Squad by
picking up a brochure at loca-
tions throughout the island,
calling (242) 376-9449 or via

oddjobsquadbs@gmail.com.
“We anticipate having an
online registration for the
exchange very soon,” said Ms
Kerr. Two personal or work-
related references and atten-
dance at an orientation are
required, and participants
under 18 must obtain parental

or guardian permission.

On Saturday, July 3, from
lam to 6pm, the Squad will be
at the Mall at Marathon, with
an information booth and reg-
istration forms for both youth
and employers.

There will also be an orien-
tation meeting for all jobbers
and interested jobbers at the
British Colonial Hilton on Sun-
day July 11, 2010, at Spm. Par-
ents, teens, youth leaders and
the community at large is invit-
ed.

T.E.EN. is a network of that
focuses on areas such as finan-
cial literacy and entrepreneurial
development, leadership and
communication development,
personal and professional
development.

at







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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



IDANCING FOR

CSUS

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

FTER a life as the lead

Ait: in the casino got

er nowhere, Dr Ann
Higgins Director of the
Caribbean Christian Dance
Network decided to accept
Christ as her Saviour and use
her talents to bring glory and

honour to his name.
"Before I gave my life to Christ I was a
dancer in one of the casinos. I decided



this wasn't the life for me so I gave my life
to Christ. I was then encouraged to begin
dancing in the church so I did just that,"
she said.

It was this simple step that started the
introduction of liturgical dance in church-
es all over the Bahamas. And now, 25
years later, a week long celebration has
been dedicated to liturgical dance.

At that time, Ms Higgins attended
Bahamas Faith Ministries which was the
first church in the Bahamas _ that
embraced this style of dance.

This year's celebration will be a cultur-
al explosion, as dancers from other parts
of the world will come to the island to

eaten

show off a little bit of their culture.

The celebration kicks off this Sunday
with an opening ceremony at Bahamas
Faith Ministries where Pastor Myles
Munroe will present the keynote address.

On Monday there will be an explosion
of the arts at Arawak Key starting at Spm.

"A number of dancers from churches all
over the Bahamas will be taking part in
this celebration at Arawak Key," Ms
Higgins told Tribune Religion.

Dancers from Caribbean nations, the
United States, and other parts of the world
will travel to the Bahamas to take part ina
cultural exchange on Rawson Square.

Members of the public will be thor-
oughly entertained at a Liturgical Dance
showcase at the National Performing
Arts Centre on Wednesday night at 7pm.

"We want to bring a presence of the
Lord in our nation. We want to evoke that
presence because we know we need the
presence of the Lord to bring change into
the country," Ms Higgins said.

On Thursday there will be a dress
rehearsal for the 37th Independence

¢ THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010 «

The Tribune’s

RELIGION

| es Ooms Mas |

PG 23



ennai’

Celebrations on Clifford Park and on
Friday there will be a liturgical Dance
Parade through the street with the Ark of
the Covenant.

"We are looking forward to the support
of the public. We are also inviting the chil-
dren from a number of homes to come
out and take part in the celebrations, “she
said.

Ever since it’s inception many young
people have dedicated their lives to min-
istering in dance.

"So many young people are involved
with liturgical dance and this goes to show
that not all of them are engaging in nega-
tive activities, but they are doing some-
thing positive with their lives,” she said.

"We use the young people to travel
around the world and use their talents to
minister to others. So far we have been to
a number of different places where the
people were so receptive to what we were
doing," she explained.

For more information call 328-8670,
322-4079, 565-0613 or log onto www.cc-
dn.org.



PG 24 @ Thursday, July 1, 2010

Youth

PASTOR Dave Burrows speaks a full house at

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

ahamas Faith Ministries’

2010 Youth Alive confer-

ence comes on the heels of
six murders over the weekend,
all involving young men. It will
seek to address some of the
criminal and major social prob-
lems attributed to youth.

Seeking to give Bahamian youth posi-
tive alternatives to destructive behavior,
Youth Alive will address topics and issues
that today’s youth are faced with and try
to provide practical, relevant answers to
these challenges in a way that young peo-
ple can understand.

Another topic which will be explored is
the alarming increase of females who are
following the lead of males in anti social
or self destructive behaviour and are in

RELIGION

Youth Alive 2009.

need of guidance and intervention.

Headed by Dr Myles Munroe, Youth
Alive is spareheaded by youth ministry,
Pastor Dave Burrows.

The event kicks off Tuesday, July 13
until July 18, at The Diplomat Center,
with a spectacular drama and movie pro-
duction titled “The Code.’

Continuing throughout the week will
be Friday Night Live, Young Champions
(male mentoring program for inner city
and other youth,) P31 (female mentoring
program for inner city and other youth),
Stagez and Super Sunday (Sunday Youth
Only Church Service), Effective Youth
TV Program (positive alternative youth
programming), Strictly Positive Tour (vis-
iting local schools and using stories of
young men and women who have turned
their lives around as examples along with
motivational and inspirational speeches
and music).

The Strictly Positive Tour also visits
Family Islands, putting on ‘Operation
Burnout’ (an all night fun and games

2010

affair, ‘Christian Youth and Talent Jam’,
Christ 4 Life School Ministries impacting
local schools, mission trips to various
islands and countries as a group and in
conjunction with youth missions organi-
sations such as Teen Mania.

In the past Youth Alive has brought in
over 5,000 youth from the United States,
Canada, Europe and the Bahamas.

Reaching the Youth

It is a lively, energetic event with dynam-
ic teaching, music, drama and special
events that has captivated young people
over the years from around the world.

The goal of the program is to reach
youth at their level, through programs cen-
tred around the theme, “Aliens — In the
World but Not of it”, featuring messages
by Dr Myles Munroe, international youth
and family specialist Pastor Dave Burrows
and Mrs Angie Burrows, Ricardo Miller of
Dallas, Brooke Eneas, minister and for-
mer Miss Florida Panhandle, Stefan

The Tribune

“Syntist” Moss, a Dove award winner and
son of the soil, currently living in Atlanta
as well as local renowned speakers.

Providing music for this event will be ris-
ing local artist Ricardo Clark, Christian
Massive, Monty G, Mr. Lynxx, Landlord
and a host of others, some who are fea-
tured on the upcoming Youth Alive
Soundtrack.

Day and night’ sessions follow
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday with
special sessions for Youth and Youth
Leaders as well as pastors and parents.
Entry is free, however special incentives
and discounts are offered in registration
packages ranging from $15 - $85. Call
Bahamas Faith Ministries for more infor-
mation.

Special testimonies will be given by
Orlando “Landlord” Francis, a former
gang member turned singer and business-
man; Raymond “Double Syxx” Eneas, a
street hustler who became a college gradu-
ate, and Lavard “Manifest” Parks — from
Deejaying for Gangs.





The Tribune

Teaching to Influence Lives Forever
was the theme at the recent Temple
Christian School K5 graduation. How can
we apply this to the teaching profession?
What have we learnt ourselves and what
have we taught over the years?

As a former primary teacher, I know
that the role of the teacher is to spend
long hours in a classroom for many
months throughout the year. They are
expected to expend endless energy in vig-
ilant care-giving. To few are entrusted
many children, and most of them deserve
a standing ovation for being workers of
miracles.

Often without parental support, teach-
ers single-handedly chart the course of a
child’s educational life for a year. Imagine
what it means for a first grade teacher to
be presented with a child who cannot
read, write, recognise colours or num-
bers.

Reflect on the frustration of trying to
work with children whose homework is
unsupervised or regularly left undone.

RELIGION

Cm ii
Teaching to influence

_ REV. ANGELA
PALACIOUS

Add to this, the pressure to meet academ-
ic deadlines and to surpass national grade
averages, and you begin to understand
the mammoth task facing our teachers.

We have to praise God for those who
answer the call and have made teaching a
vocation. We need to pray daily for those
who use their gifts so freely.

To you who are teachers, I say “hats
off” to you. You engaged in multi-tasking
before the word was coined. Your job
description includes: broadening minds,
stretching horizons, imparting knowl-
edge, improving grades, and challenging
limits.

Because of you, our children discover

their own brilliance. While you polish,
they shine. The heat you apply enables
their character to be refined.

We celebrate your accomplishments:
1. You teach talented students to reveal
that their best possibilities can become
realities.
2. You water seeds of music and harvest
musicians.
3. You take artistic dwarfs and create
cultural giants.
4. You take mediocre athletic ability and
help discipline our youth to bring home
the gold.
5. You go beyond the call of duty to
involve our children in extra-curricular
activities.

You teach to influence lives forever, as
you work with the Holy Spirit to create a
new social DNA to civilise the ‘savage
beast’ that threatens to overcome us
when we forget our spiritual selves. Never
cease to model the right way, instructing
with your words and example. You are

Thursday, July 1,2010 ® PG 25

lives

God’s gift to each student. Be faithful.

Fathers: Teaching to Influence Lives

How can we apply this to our lives as
parents, and especially as fathers? What
have we learnt and what have we taught
over the years?

The role of the parent as teacher of life
and survival skills was poignantly por-
trayed in the Disney Oceans movie. It
draws attention to relationships that exist
deep under the sea, just as other species
follow their natural instincts to care for
and preserve the species.

Parents have the wonderful opportunity
to improve on each generation. They have
the awesome responsibility to model good-
ness, kindness, honesty, love, faithfulness
and commitment. Whatever values, morals
and principles we wish to see upheld in
society, our children need to see them in us:

Whatever you have learned or perceived
or heard from me, or seen in me put it into

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RELIGION

The Tribune

Re CTE









FROM left to right : Mr and Mrs Adrian Finley, Mr and Mrs Kevin Williams, Rev Dr Earle and Dr Marjorie Francis - Center; Mr and Mrs Percival Francis (eldest son of the couple), Mr and Mrs
Wilkinson Francis (son) and Mr and Mrs Keno Dames (grandson).

IN celebration of their 63rd Wedding Anniversary,

the late Rev Dr Enoch Backford Sr.

Reverend and Mrs Francis thank God for the lega-

Rev Dr Earle Francis, senior pastor of First Baptist
Church, and his "Sweet Potato" Dr Marjorie Francis
renewed their wedding vows before family and
friends on Sunday past at First Baptist Church's sanc-
tuary.

It was on June 29,1947, at 6am at the Salem Baptist
Church, then located on Parliament Street that this
couple was first joined together in holy matrimony by

This union gave birth to thirteen children, two of
whom predeceased the couple. Since their 50th
Anniversary, the couple has held a service each year
to renew their vows. Many other couples from the
ministry joined them in this commitment ceremony.

The couples were blessed with a charge by the Rev
Matthias Munroe, Associate Minister of the Bethel
Baptist Church, Nassau, Bahamas.

cy of their 63 years of marriage and 46 years of min-
istry as pastor and organist respectively.

When asked why they renew their vows annually,
Pastor Francis said it is their desire to set a good
example for their congregation to follow as leaders in
the Lord's work. The couple said the secrets to a good
marriage are “communication, sharing and much
love.”



God has a plan!

And as Jesus passed by, he saw a man
which was blind from his birth. And his dis-
ciples asked him, saying, ‘Master, who did
sin, this man, or his parents, that he was
born blind?’ Jesus answered, ‘Neither hath
this man sinned, nor his parents: but that the
works of God should be made manifest in
him.
(John 9:1-3)

God always have a reason for every-
thing that He does, therefore He has a
plan.

When uncomfortable things happen it is
not necessarily a bad thing. Sometimes
God has to use hard methods to get a point




ALLISON
| MILLER

across to us. That's ok because He has a
plan and He gives us the strength for the
process of His plan.

I believe that if the devil knew that the
church would rise after the death of Jesus
Christ, he would not have played any part
in His death. A living organism with a dia-

bolical message, he truly would not have
had anything to do with it.

Often times we go through difficult
times not understanding what God is
doing in our lives. Or we think that He has
left us to deal with the situation on our
own. That in itself can be frustrating
because you don't what is going on. Not
until everything is over, do we understand
the whole process of what has happen.

However, this is where faith comes in.
As believers we need to trust that God has
a plan and it will work for us. If anyone
knows what He is doing, God does. Also
remember what the devil means for bad,
God will turn around for our good.

Indeed God has a plan for each of our
lives. For example take the
"Recession."Some may be jobless and
experiencing a real distressing time.

However, God still feeds, clothes and

shelters you. God protects His own.

I take solace in the fact that the God we
serve is not ‘slack’ concerning His promis-
es toward His children. He promises that
He will never leave nor forsake us. He is
with us until the end of the earth and even
unto death.

Wherever we go He is there also. So
there is no need to panic or become fearful
when situations and circumstances happen
because God has everything under con-
trol. I have confidence in the fact that God
simply knows what he is doing and we can
leave everything up to Him.

So when what we call, "bad things” hap-
pen to us, it is not necessarily bad, it's a
part of God's plan that becomes the
process. Besides what starts out as bad
God do use it for our good. I encourage us
to trust God’s plan for our lives, after all it
is better than we could ever imagine.



The Tribune

THEY could have been out shopping, at
the movies or just hanging out with friends,
yet a group of believers gathered Saturday
(June 26) at New Mt Zion Missionary
Baptist Church on Blue Hill South.

On this hot afternoon, their mission was
simple - but by no means easy - bring lost
souls to Christ.

"In less than two hours in Garden Hills
we went out as a combined force to minis-
ter," explained Bishop Walter Hanchell,
chairman of newly formed National
Soulwinners Network. "We had 33 deci-
sions for Christ and three rededications."

And what if they hadn't ventured out?

"Let's just say this was an ordinary
Saturday and everyone was doing their
own thing, that would have been 33 souls
still lost. Suppose 33 souls were saved
every day in Nassau. Think about it. They
would have to fire about 50 per cent of the
police force," Bishop Hanchell joked.

Formed earlier this year by a conglomer-
ation of local churches, the National

Soulwinners Network aims to amass a
group of local missionaries to travel locally
and around the world preaching the
gospel. Coming out of its first conference
last week, NSWN has set a goal to win
2,000 souls in The Bahamas by the end of
this year.

Already, it reportedly has over 100
members in the network. That number is
said to be growing daily. By year's end it is
hoped membership would have swelled to
500. To date, the network has trained
roughly 30 persons, from a cross section of
churches, in the art of witnessing and shar-
ing their faith.

"Many persons have a desire and a pas-
sion for soul winning, but they do not know
how to do it,” said Bishop Hanchell. "The
best way to resolve that is for persons to be
properly trained, equipped and motivat-
ed."

Part of that training involves going out
into the community, knocking on doors.

Joining the Soulwinners Network in this
initiative this past weekend were the con-
testants in the Miss Gospel Bahamas
Pageant. More than two dozen participants
were divided into 11 groups of twos or
threes and dispatched in the Garden Hills
constituency.

After 90 minutes of going door-to-door
in the scorching heat, all gathered back at
New Mt. Zion shortly after 4pm to give a
report.According to Bishop Hanchell,
"every seed that is sown, every word that is
given will not return void."

Fishers of men

Among those providing a report was
Miss Gospel Bahamas contestant, Sharell
Ferguson.

She and her team shared the gospel
with 11 persons. Three gave their lives to
the Lord.

"All the people who were saved were

RELIGION

Winning souls for Christ

—








Thursday, July 1, 2010 © PG 27



Precision Media Agency/Photos



(LEFT) Yvonne Poitier and her team member, MGB contestant Angelique Collie, went door to door in the Garden Hills area Saturday. They

shared the gospel with seven persons.

young men,” she reported. "We were
really happy about that.”

Oralyn Elliott and her team witnessed
to 12 persons. Seven persons gave their
lives to the Lord.

"We went to one house. The people
didn't know who we were but they said,
‘Come right on in.’ We went in and all in
that house came and accepted God."

She continued: "We walked out onto
the street and another gentleman came to
us and he said 'My spirit take to you all
come and pray with me.' He gave his life
to God right on the street, just like that.”

Agatha Minus went out with Dr Tejado
Hanchell and MGB contestant Shantia
Williams. They shared the gospel to nine
persons.

"The first house we went to, three per-
sons accepted the Lord," she reported.
"One of those persons was a 72-year-old
lady who accepted the Lord for the first
time. That was a blessing.”

A strong believer in divine appoint-
ments, Bishop Hanchell said these suc-
cess stories came about through God and
prayer. He and his team member, Miss
Gospel Bahamas Shenique Gray, shared
the gospel with four persons, who then
prayed to receive eternal life.

"When I go out I pray for divine
appointments,” he shared. "When you do
that, your work is easy. You don't have



vies ¢l \



MGB contestant Shantia Williams jots down information from a 72-year-old mother of 14 who
accepted the Lord into her heart for the first time this past weekend.

that much resistance, in other words, their
hearts are already prepared and that's
exactly what we got."

The teams were urged to do follow-ups
within two days, which entails getting new

believers in church and presenting them
to their respective pastors.

Bishop Hanchell advised that if nothing
is done within 48 hours new converts have
a tendency to revert to their old ways.



PG 28 @ Thursday, July 1, 2010

he members of St Mark’s

Anglican Church in Port

Howe had a teary eye
moment at the farewell service
for Errie and Menawattie

Samaroo on Sunday June 20.

The Guyanese couple will be relocating
to Nassau to continue their service to the
youth of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. The Samaroos are educators
dedicated to the advancement of all
young people on the isle of Cat Island and
have been living there for the past three
years. During this period of time the cou-
ple were ardent Anglicans who wor-
shipped every Sunday with the congrega-
tion of St Peter’s and after St Mark’s in
Port Howe was rededicated they joined
the body in Port Howe.

Errie Samaroo was the senior master at
the Old Bight High School and
Menawattie Samaroo is a third grade
teacher at the New Bight Primary School.

The Farewell Service coincided with
the Father’s Day Celebration which
began at 8am Fr Chester Burton, priest
in charge, in his sermon used the simple
familiar word “FATHER?” to describe the
Samaroos.

First, he said the letter ‘F’ stood for the
faithfulness that they exhibited while they
worshipped at St Mark’s in Port Howe.
They were always at the Eucharistic cele-
bration every Sunday. He said it calls to
mind the old adage “the family that prays
together stays together.” He continued
saying that the faithfulness did not end
with the church but it was exemplified in
the school where Errie was elevated and
afforded the opportunity to serve as the
Old Bight High School senior master.

Secondly, the letter “A’ stood for the
ability that Samaroos possess in inspiring
people around them to reach and achieve
more than the mediocrity that they are
accustomed to in their everyday life.

Fr Burton reminisced that it was Errie
who envisioned the first ever Christmas
Cantata that was held in Port Howe
Christmas of 2009. It was visionary and
indeed it was successful beyond all meas-
ure because nothing of that nature was
ever staged and produced in the parish of

RELIGION

St Saviour's bids farewell to the Samaroos

The Tribune





St Saviour’s.

Thirdly, the letter “T’ stood for the tal-
ent that couple displayed when they
enrolled themselves in the teaching pro-
fession and left their homeland of
Guyana to leave an indelible mark on the
mind of some school age child in Cat
Island. Fr Burton also joked that Errie
has a unique way of selling tickets to raise
funds.

Fairness

Fourth, the letter ‘H’ stood for the
humble nature and spirit the couple

|

THE Samaroos are presented a plaque for their dediction to the Anglican Church on Cat Island by Fr Chester Burton.

exhibit in the daily execution of their
duties. Burton told the congregation that
although Errie maybe the Old Bight High
School’s senior master he does not flaunt
or abuse his authority at any given time.
Menawattie also in her own quiet and
unassuming way has transformed the
lives of so many teachers and children at
the New Bight Primary School by her
humble and peaceful spirit.

Fifth , the letter ‘E’ stood for the
encouragement they have given so many
people not only in church but in the
school and wider community.

Finally, Burton said the ‘R’ denotes



â„¢~



that the Samaroos are role models par
excellence. He noted that Mr Samarroo
opens the bus door for all ladies on the
way to worship service at St Mark’s in
Port Howe on Sunday. They showed
members of St. Mark’s and Cat Island in
general the epitome of how Guyanese
live, work, worship and play, he added

Fr Burton in presenting a parochial
plague to the couple said he and his wife
Coral Patrice felt honoured and apprecia-
tive that the Samaroos were members of
their church. Following the service, the
congregation and guests of honour
enjoyed a farewell lunch.



Teaching to influence lives

FROM page 25

practice. And the God of peace will be with
you.

We need to put in place a long-term
vision of one generation of fathers (and
mothers) passing on the baton of spiritual
greatness to the next.

What is being learned in your home
today can impact persons yet unborn until
the Lord comes again.

Now is the time to clean up our acts
before our children catch on that we are
not practicing what we preach. We all
need to do better, abandoning our bad
ways to walk worthy of the high calling to

be a child of God, a royal prince or
princess in the court of the king of kings,
and an ambassador for Christ.

If fathers, in particular, pray with and
for their children, if they allow them to
see Christ in them, then they will influ-
ence their children’s lives forever, even if
the youth try to stray away. If fathers love,
lead, teach, and guide them, as they
laugh, learn and play with them, then they
model wholesome family life and create
good memories to last a lifetime..

As we all speak words of praise and

encouragement, as we speak our truth
with love, as we remain firm, consistent,
fair with no favourites, we teach our
nation’s children something about the
character of God who loves us all uncon-
ditionally, and yet holds us to account.
Bless your children by being the best
parent possible. Fathers who lead by
example provide spiritual and moral
security in turbulent times. May you rise
to the occasion, and change the course of
Bahamian social history, as we re-direct
our efforts to accomplish godly goals.



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Volume: 106 No.182

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Gar fees increase
facing legal threat

Attorney offering
his services free to
‘overcharged’ drivers

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Road Traffic Depart-
ment may face legal action over
its increased car licensing fees,
with attorney Wayne Munroe
prepared to offer free legal ser-
vices to those who feel over-
charged by the new policy.

The new fees come into effect
today and are based on the man-
ufacturer's curb weight of a vehi-
cle, and will not be weighed at
the inspection site.

However, Mr Munroe argues
that a motorist should be able to
demand his or her car be
weighed if they feel the actual
weight is less than the factory
standard.

Mr Munroe, partner of
Munroe and Associates, con-
tends that if a motorist were to
remove car accessories — like an
extra row of seating common in
sports utility vehicles (SUVs), a
spare tyre etc — it may put their
car in another weight classifica-
tion.

"I have a Chevy Tahoe that
has a third row of seats in the
back. If you take out the third
row it's lighter, and if the dif-

ference is to save $400, I don't
see why people shouldn't
demand for it (the car) to be
weighed.

"Four hundred dollars is a lot
of money, for a lot people that's
a week's pay or more — and if
they owe it, they owe it, but the
government should be in a posi-
tion to say you owe it because of
what their scale says — not what
the manufacture says this vehicle
weighs.”

Starting today he, with a few
colleagues, are prepared to offer
pro bono assistance to those
who feel they have been over-
charged under the new fee struc-
ture.

"They can put a contact on
our Facebook page and once we
commence action (against the
Road Traffic Department) we
will include them in the action,"
he said.

On the eve of the fee change,
hundreds of motorists queued
outside several locations of the
Road Traffic Department's
Vehicle Licensing Unit, most
waiting hours in the brutal heat.

When The Tribune arrived at

SEE page nine



Baa
SANDWICH



PM explains change
of mind on contract



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yes-
terday explained how he changed his mind
about directing Ministry of Works officials to
use the construction services of a company
run by a dedicated FNM supporter after he
realised that the cost of the project in ques-
tion was to exceed $290,000.

The renovation of the police commis-
sioner’s residence, located at the police
headquarters on East Street North, will now
go out to a more competitive selective ten-
der process with six construction compa-
nies — including Telco Enterprises, the orig-
inally selected contractor — now having been
picked to have a chance to bid on the job.

The clarification from the Prime Minister,

SEE page 10







Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Viste



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ing fees which come on stream today.

MPs’ use of
$8.2m in public
funds is revealed

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TODAY, for the first time,
The Tribune can reveal how
MPs chose to utilise a total of
$8.2 million in public funds
within their constituencies.

This article, based on official
Treasury records from the Min-
istry of Finance, follows sever-
al other articles in January of
this year based on a verbal
accounting of these expendi-
tures from 16 MPs.

Fifteen FNMs and one PLP
responded to a request to
account for the funds from this
newspaper in December 2009.

Now for the first time, The

SEE page two

: Radio host and







guest ‘hack’ into

: ministry website

: By AVA TURNQUEST
: Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia. net

THE Ministry of Foreign

: Affairs (MOFA) website,
: www.mfabahamas.org, got an
: unexpected update yesterday
: when a radio talk show host
: and his guest illustrated their

ne
Fd telat
aria

Ta
SH

HOU



el
LE UH



C ALLEN JOHNSON (above
left) ‘hacked’ into the website
(above) with radio host
Lincoln Bain.

control of its content. ;

The website, which had :
fallen into disuse, was said to}
be inaccessible by govern- :
ment because they did not :
have the password.

SEE page eight

aes mg eet
com iit eet af

Umeda



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

MOTORISTS queue outside of the Road Traffic Department’s Vehicle Inspection section on Thompson Boulevard trying to beat increased licens-

ee
LOD HO TVW's -

Murder accused
makes plea for

protective custody

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN charged with mur-
der yesterday pleaded for a
magistrate to put him in pro-
tective custody.

Prince McPhee, 34, of High
Vista Estates, was charged yes-
terday with the murder of
Bradley Ferguson.

Ferguson was acquitted ear-
lier this year of the March 2002
murders of a pregnant Rose-
mary Bennett-Wright and her
son five-year-old son Jakeel
Wright, of Fox Hill, as well as
the attempted murders of
Devonna Brown and Omega
Fox.

SEE page nine

EEE) powwTo wn | MURLTHON MALL | HARSOUR BAY | CUFLE BEACH | PALMBALE Ge


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010



THE TRIBUNE

oe i} MBPs’ use of $8.2m in

BYRAN WOODSIDE

PINEWOOD PARK
(right) came in for
criticism on Tuesday.





MP Woodside hits back at












rig ates

Pinewood Park criticism

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MP BYRAN WOODSIDE
has hit back at criticism of the
unkempt state of Pinewood
Park and neighbourhoods, and
the lack of positive activities
for young people made by local
residents who spoke exclusive-
ly to The Tribune.

As Police Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade and his
team of senior officers met res-
idents in Pinewood in areas
where murders and serious
crimes have occurred, Willow
Tree Avenue resident Kevin
Moss, 20, and Angelo King, 21,
said more needs to be done in
Pinewood on a daily basis to
keep the streets safe and
encourage young people to
have positive futures.

As they looked on at the
overgrown grass in the park,
broken and rusted swings,
overflowing garbage cans and
broken basketball hoop they
criticised FNM MP Byran
Woodside for not doing
enough for the community.

But the MP who has invest-
ed nearly all of the $200,000

id lB
Sars el

ee
PHONE: 822-2157



allocated for his constituency
between 2007 and 2009 in local
projects disputed the claim.

He released a press state-
ment yesterday detailing all of
the programmes involving
Pinewood residents and the
work he has done in the com-
munity.

“It is against this backdrop
that we take exception to the
statements made by one resi-
dent whose comments were
given an entire article in The
Tribune,” Mr Woodside said.

“We have proved there are
lots of initiatives for Pinewood
residents to participate in.”

Activities run by the Cru-
saders for Christ Junkanoo
Group, the Pinewood March-
ing Bank, the basketball team,
junior football team, literacy
programme and after-school
programme for children were
detailed by the MP who took
the Pinewood seat from PLP
representative Allyson May-
nard-Gibson in 2007.

He said: “Since coming to
office in 2007 I have been able
to represent the people of
Pinewood with pride.

“T introduced new initiatives
which sought to address the
current needs of the commu-
nity, mainly in the areas of edu-
cation, employment, entrepre-
neurialism and empowerment.”

Mr Woodside said the over-
grown community park is usu-
ally well-kept with recently
installed trash bins positioned
throughout.

At present, he said, the con-

tract for the park’s upkeep has :
expired and a new contract will ;
commence today under the :
government’s new budget :
under the responsibility of the :
Department of Environmental ;

Heath.

Mr Woodside said: “The :
interviewee’s comments about :
the basketball hoop are incor- ;
rect; in fact, it was recently bro- :
ken and I have been assured
by Ministry of Sports officials :
that a replacement will arrive ;

shortly.

“The public toilets at the :
park, were another issue :
addressed in the article. The :
toilets were constructed when I :
came to office, and they are :

fully functional.

“However, the facility is only
available to residents who :
apply to the Ministry of Youth, :
Sports, and Culture for access :

to the park and its facilities.

“As for the comment about :
derelict vehicles, we partnered :
with the Urban Renewal Office :
and the Department of Envi- :
ronmental Health to conduct :
acampaign to clean up many of :
the derelict vehicles in the :

area.”

To address crime, Mr Wood- :
side said his constituency office :
made “concerted efforts” to :
support several “anti-violence ;
initiatives”. One of these “hall- :
mark” events, he said is the :
Pastor/Police/Constituency }
alliance in Pinewood called the :
Southeastern fellowship, head- :
ed by Reverend Sebastian :

Campbell.

FROM page one

Tribune is able to further illu-
minate how all MPs spent the
funds, with today’s piece high-
lighting the expenditure of the
$100,000 each member was
allocated in the 2007/2008 bud-
get year which ended July Ist
2008.

Tomorrow readers will be
able to see a breakdown of the
2008/2009 expenditures, or lack
thereof.

Ultimately each MP was
able to access $100,000 per year

in funding for discretionary pro-
jects in their constituency over
three budget periods.

The money was initially allo-
cated in the 2007/2008 budget
year, which began on July 1,
2007, and again in the
2008/2009 budget year, which
began on July 1, 2008. Leftover
funds from those budgetary
periods which had not been
allocated by MPs rolled over
into the 2009/2010 budget peri-
od, which ends today.

A number of MPs, includ-
ing MP for Englerston Glenys

public funds is revealed

Hanna Martin and former MP
for Elizabeth, Malcolm Adder-
ley, contacted The Tribune yes-
terday to claim that the Min-
istry of Finance report did not
accurately reflect their usage of
the funds.

Both MPs said they had
used the majority of their
$100,000 allocation in
2008/2009, rather than the
$17,000 and $9,000 respectively
which the report, compiled in
April 2010, reflected.

See tomorrow’s Tribune for
more details on this.





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ae i

FRED MITCHELL EARL DEVEAUX

Malcolm Adderley, Elizabeth, $99,285.63:
Upgrade two parks ($86,604.60). Donation of
furniture to the Elizabeth Estates Children
Home ($3,861.03). Donation of computers
($8,820).

Desmond Bannister, Carmichael, $95,794:
Upgrades to parks

Carl Bethel, Sea Breeze, $99,600: Con-
struction of sea walls ($8,000), cleaning of
street ($5,700), cleaning and clearing of prop-
erties ($22,100), clearing curbs and providing
entrance signs ($50,480), beautification and
landscaping of parks ($13,320).

Loretta Butler Turner, Montagu, $100,000:
Road cleaning ($92,500), donation to the L.W.
Young school ($2,500), donation to the
Colours Junkanoo Group ($5,000).

Larry Cartwright, Long Island and Ragged
Island, $100,000: Construction of toilet block,
basketball court and street signs ($85,000),
development of community parks in Duncan
Town, Ragged Island ($100,000).

Perry Christie, Farm Road and Centreville,
$31,000: Donation to the Joe Billy Blind Blake
Festival ($31,000).

Sidney Collie, Blue Hills, $99,306.25:
Resurfacing of the basketball court and fenc-
ing of a park in Bozine Town ($20,000), con-
struction of walking tracks ($65,380), dona-
tion of computers to various schools
($13,926.25).

Philip Davis, Cat Island, Rum Cay, San Sal-
vador, $77,000: Refurbishment and renova-
tion of bathrooms at the regatta site ($21,000),
repairs to the stage at the regatta site ($21,000),
repairs to the road and bridges in Rum Cay
($35,000).

Earl Deveaux, Marathon, $100,039.10:
Upgrades to community parks ($54,904), dona-
tions of computers to schools ($14,755), assis-
tance to Bay Street project ($30,005.10), repairs
to parks ($375).

Picewell Forbes, South Andros, $100,000:
Various constituency projects ($97,400), pro-
jects ($2,600).

Shane Gibson, Golden Gates, $99,837.27:
Renovations to parks ($32,100), donation to
the Golden Gates Marching Band ($15,000),
donation/upgrading of computers ($10,755),
beautification of entrances ($14,695), dona-
tion to the Trail Blazers Basketball Tourna-
ment ($5,153.94), entrance signs ($12,000),
donation of an air condition system for a
school ($2,433.33), donation to a mini cultural
festival ($3,000), quantitative analysis report
($1,200), installation of an electricity supply at
a park ($3,500).

Kenyatta Gibson , Kennedy, $94,950: Dona-
tion to a Junkanoo Group ($30,000), dona-
tion of computers ($64,950).

Verna Grant, Eight Mile Rock, $95,007.32:
Donation to social and community clubs
($15,529.82), assistance relating to destruction
of home ($1,510, $6,000), construction and
repair of roads and sidewalks ($65,480), assis-
tance with the construction of a community
centre ($1,190), donation of basketball sup-
plies ($496), donation for labour and security
services ($4,801.50).

Neko Grant, Lucaya, $99,932.57: Repairs,
security bars and furniture for community cen-
tres ($53,828.85), donation to a school to attend
a tournament ($2,100), repairs to roads
($19,500), donation of musical instruments
($7,003.72), donation of computers ($17,500).

V Alfred Gray, MICAL, $99,647.91: Repairs
to the Acklins Community Centre ($99,647.91)

Melanie Griffin, Yamacraw, $100,000: Ren-
ovations and upgrades to parks ($92,690),
donations to the basketball classic tournament
($6,000), maintenance work in constituency
($1,310).

Glenys Hanna Martin, Englerston,
$99,519.88: Donations to schools ($40,175),
Repairs to parks/park equipment ($40,710),
street signs ($9,959.93), after school programs
($7,000), computers for constituency office
($1,160), school supplies ($514.95).

Hubert Ingraham, North Abaco, $100,000:
Upgrading beach facilities, Treasure Cay
($100,000)

Oswald Ingraham, South Eleuthera,
$100,000: Drainage wells ($50,000), construc-
tion of a garage for fire engine and ambulance
($10,000), funds to assist the local government
office ($40,000).



VINCENT PEET

2007/2008 BUDGET YEAR



KENNETH RUSSELL OBIE WILCHCOMBE

Edison Key, South Abaco, $100,000:
S.C.Bootle Highway ($10,000), upgrading
sports facilities ($90,000).

Zhivargo Laing, Marco City, $100,000:
Repairs to schools ($6,150), donations to
schools ($14,300), donations to community
organisations ($15,000), assistance to senior
citizens/disabled people ($14,700), clean up
campaign ($21,800), donations of computers to
schools ($27,750), air conditioning for con-
stituency office ($300).

Charles Maynard - Golden Isles - $100,000 -
Construction of playgrounds and playground
equipment ($100,000).

Branville McCartney - Bamboo Town -
$99,329.24 - upgrades to parks and playground
equipment ($99,329.24)

Hubert Minnis - Killarney - $91,860 -
entrance signs ($47,700), construction of speed
bumps ($17,160), paving and resurfacing of
basketball court ($27,700).

Frederick Mitchell - Fox Hill - $100,000 -
computers donated to schools ($7,800),
upgrades to parks ($67,521.75), repairs to com-
munity centre ($2,205), donations to commu-
nity festival ($21,442.25), donation to schools
($1,030).

Anthony Moss - Exuma - $100,000 - recon-
struct sports facilities ($40,000), reconstruct
school bleachers ($6,000), construct boat ramp
($20,000), construct bathroom $9,000), dona-
tion to Junkanoo groups ($20,000), donation to
regatta ($5,000).

Phenton Neymour - South Beach - $91,050
- upgrades to Baker’s park ($90,250), provid-
ed signs ($800).

Bernard Nottage - Bain and Grants Town -
$82,489.98 - donations of computers to schools
($26,989.25), computers for the constituency
computer lab ($9,657.30), donations to com-
munity groups ($45,843.43).

Vincent Peet - North Andros - $100,000 -
Upgrade of the North Andros auditorium.

Cynthia Pratt - St Cecelia - $99,813.14 -
renovations to parks/basketballs ($25,907.54),
clearing vacant property ($23,750), donations
to community organizations ($8,264.60), vari-
ous unspecified community projects ($41,891).

Brensil Rolle - Garden Hills - $99,500 -
after school programmes ($22,400), donations
to junkanoo groups ($11,900), park and play-
ground equipment ($23,420), subdivision
improvement ($26,710), clean up campaign
($6,050), material and labour for entrepre-
neurial straw market classes ($9,019.60).

Kenneth Russell - High Rock - $100,000 -
Donations to schools ($13,100), computers for
schools ($9,700), clean-up campaign ($18,300),
donations for community organisations
($27,000), unspecified community projects.

Kwasi Thompson - Pine Ridge - $98,000 -
road work ($61,620), donations to schools
($4,100), computer centre ($22,280), clean up
campaign ($10,000).

Alfred Sears - Fort Charlotte - $81,770.50 -
paving roads ($1,770.50), donations to schools
($40,000), assistance to church ($40,000).

Alvin Smith - North Eleuthera - $100,000 -
road rehabilitation, James Cistern ($10,000),
unspecified capital works, North Eleuthera
($52,000), unspecified capital works, Central
Eleuthera ($38,000).

Frank Smith - St Thomas More - $98,026.15
- donation of musical instruments to commu-
nity band ($3,500), computer research centre
($23,000), after school programmes ($4,596),
repairs and upgrades to parks ($66,930.15)

Brent Symonette - St. Anne’s - $97,481.30 -
drilling wells ($35,773), upgrades to parks
($46,935.30), beach upgrades ($14,773).

Tommy Turnquest - Mount Moriah -
$99,850.03 - upgrades to parks ($77,796.28),
playground equipment ($22,053.75).

Obie Wilchcombe - West End and Bimini -
$100,000 - construction of a park ($100,000)

Byron Woodside - Pinewood - $97,000.56 -
clean-up campaign ($34,500), construction of
bathroom block ($29,500.56), computer equip-
ment donation($33,000).

Kendal Wright - Clifton - $99,978.03 - ren-
ovation of basketball court ($56,900), donation
of basketball uniforms ($1,873), entrance signs
($28,445.03), donations to community festi-
vals ($10,000), completion of a toilet block
($99,978.03).

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



BP should pay for Bahamas’ oil
spill protection efforts — Trust

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



THE Bahamas National Trust is pushing
for the government to appeal directly to
British Petroleum (BP) to pay for national
efforts to protect The Bahamas from the
potential damage of the Deepwater Hori-
zon oil spill.

The National Oil Spill Contingency
Team has so far led two expeditions to Cay
Sal Bank, and one to Bimini, for scientists
to assess the thriving marine, sea bird and
terrestrial habitats under threat as they are
the most vulnerable to slicks spreading
from the Gulf of Mexico.

As oil continued to gush from the BP
rig 5,000ft below the ocean surface for the
72nd day yesterday, BNT director Eric
Carey said funding is needed now to pay for
the essential scientific assessments.

Although research indicates the Bahami-
an government may have no legal rights
to claim compensation for the spill, Mr
Carey said a direct appeal should be made
to BP as an international organisation with
a responsibility for the threat of damage
to the Bahamas.

Just as the governor of Florida success-
fully appealed directly to BP for compen-
sation, the Bahamian government should
also exercise its right to appeal for funding,
Mr Carey said. “The Trust is pushing for
the government to reach out to BP to let
them know that we are incurring costs, as
has been done in the state of Florida and by
other scientific organisation,” he said.

“They have reached out to get funding
for expeditions and The Bahamas is no dif-
ferent. We are doing the same thing they
are doing. We need the money now, oth-
erwise we have to find it from an impossi-

© In brief





THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST'S Lindy
Knowles and Predensa Moore explore Cay
Sal Bank recently.

ble budget to fund whatever our costs are
over the next six months.”

Mr Carey estimates the regular expedi-
tions to Cay Sal and Bimini required over
the next six months will cost around
$500,000. This will pay International Mar-
itime Organisation (IMO) approved scien-
tists to lead regular expeditions to Cay Sal
Cay to document the diversity and abun-
dance of marine life and collect sediment
samples from the islands.

It will also fund the necessary testing of
samples in US laboratories to meet inter-
national standards.

So far IMO scientists Dr Kathleen Sealy
and Dr Ethan Freid who led the first two
expeditions to Cay Sal and Bimini have
yet to be paid for their work, well-placed
sources told The Tribune.

And the National Oil Spill Contingency
Committee is struggling to secure the atten-
dance of a leading sea bird biologist on the
next expedition but the Team maintains
this will be difficult without being able to
guarantee payment.

Experts have highlighted the importance
of documenting the health of sea bird
colonies as they would be the most obvious
indicators of any impact from the oil spill,

and their survival is all the more critical as
colonies in the Gulf are wiped out.

Mr Carey said: “It’s really important to
the country to have these assessments done
and to keep being able to come back and
report that the oil has still not come and the
Bahamas is still open for business.

“It fends off speculation that oil is com-
ing, and if it comes we will be able to doc-
ument that we have oil in that portion of
the Bahamas, but other areas are safe.

“This oil is not going to respect interna-
tional boundaries and BP is an interna-
tional company and we should write to
them and stake our initial claim for funding
to support these assessments.”

In addition to securing funding, the team
will meet to discuss how they can better
plan the next mission to Cay Sal.

Poor planning was evident on the last
expedition onboard the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force (RBDF) vessel HMBS
Bahamas last week as marine scientists
found they did not have sufficient diving
equipment to carry out their research at
depths below 20ft.

And the BNT’s team taking samples on
land did not have sufficient equipment as
funding had not been cleared by the gov-
ernment to purchase it before the trip.

Several members of the expedition team
were also not aware Dr Sealy would not be
able to join the expedition until the day of
departure and were given only a few hours
before setting sail. Captain Stephen Russell,
Director of the National Emergency Plan-
ning Agency (NEMA), spearheading the
National Oil Spill Contingency Team, said:
“T will make sure proper planning is done
and we have covered all bases.

“In terms of basic diving gear and equip-
ment, we will make sure they are there
before they leave. And we will have a check
list to make sure we have those things.”

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POLICE reported a
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At about 9.44pm, police
received information of a
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Road and John Road.

It is reported that a 17-
year-old boy was walking
through John Road when
he was approached by a
group of man who attacked
him.

Police say the teenager
fled but heard gunshots
and realised a short time
later, while at Windsor
Lane, that he was shot to





the right thigh.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MINISTRY OF LABOUR staff on Monday after the air conditioning unit went out.

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Stable

The victim was taken to
hospital via EMS person-
nel where he is detained in
stable condition.

The armed robbery
reported by the police
occurred a few minutes lat-
er in Dignity Gardens at
about 10.15pm.

A 19-year-old man was
walking through the area
when he was approached
and robbed of cash by two
men, one of whom was
allegedly armed with a
handgun.

Police are investigating.

Man victim
of multiple

By ALESHA CADET

FOR the second time in a
week, workers say they have
walked off the job due to the
air conditioning system break-
ing down again at the Min-
istry of Labour on East Hill
Street yesterday.

A worker, who wished to
remain anonymous, said:
"The air conditioning is com-
pletely off and the entire
building is being affected by
it."

However, Minister of State
for Labour and Social Devel-

opment Loretta Butler-Turn-
er told The Tribune that it was
not a “walk-out”.

She said: "In our Ministry
and the Attorney General's
Office, many of the persons
were allowed to leave at lpm.
The Ministry of Public Works
is looking to repair the entire
building.

"As I understand, by the
end of the week they are
looking into how they are
going to repair or replace the
air conditioning so we could
at least be at a comfort level.

"The Ministry of Public



Works are actively address-
ing the matter. They are look-
ing at the long term problems
as well so that they can repair
it.”

Dion Foulkes, Minister of
Labour, was unavailable for
comment.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

World leaders take the deficit pledge

TORONTO — World leaders made bold
pledges to cut their spiraling budget deficits
but will probably fall far short of their lofty
goals.

After spending massive amounts of mon-
ey to rescue the global economy from the
worst downturn in decades, the Group of
20 major industrial and developing nations
have reversed course and promised to cut
their deficits in half in terms of the global
economy in just three years.

This pledge, by nations which represent 85
per cent of the global economy, would rep-
resent a sea change in how the world's major
economies are handling their finances.

It could usher in sizable tax increases and
massive cuts in government programmes,
including popular benefit programmes such
as Social Security and Medicare in the Unit-
ed States.

President Barack Obama and other lead-
ers in their closing news conferences on Sun-
day insisted that they really meant what they
said, sounding like the dawning of a new age
of austerity was just around the corner.

There is certainly the possibility that the
Greek debt crisis has scared many nations
with similarly high debt burdens into doing
what they can to improve their budget out-
look to avoid their own Greek-style tragedy.

Greece is facing years of painful austeri-
ty measures after it was forced to accept
massive bailouts from its neighbours when it
could no longer meet its debt obligations.

"Other countries have seen what has hap-
pened to Greece and they have gotten wor-
ried. They are facing deficits and debt bur-
dens that are overwhelming,” said Mark
Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics.

In the United States, the issue isn't the
threat of an unprecedented default on U.S.
government debt. It is the threat that foreign
investors such as China, the largest holder of
Treasury securities, will suddenly decide they
do not want to hold as much USS. govern-
ment debt, a move that could send US. inter-
est rates rising.

The deficit cutting pledge, included in
the G-20 joint communique issued Sunday,
certainly sounded dramatic. The developed
countries promised to cut deficits in half in
three years as a percentage of their total
economies and said they would stabilize their
total debt burdens by 2016.

For the United States and most of the
other nations, that would be a remarkable
turnaround, especially from the past two
years, a period when deficits soared as gov-
ernment's boosted spending and cut taxes
in an effort to keep the 2007-2009 Great
Recession from becoming a repeat of the
Great Depression of the 1930s.

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The U.S. deficit hit an astonishing $1.42
trillion last year, the highest in history, and
analysts think it will show only a slight
improvement to $1.3 trillion this year.

Obama's budget projects the deficit will
never fall below $707 billion over the next
decade.

However, even these seemingly grim
numbers would represent an improvement in
the deficit picture that would allow Obama to
meet one of the deficit targets — cutting the
red ink in half by 2013. His spending plan
released last February has the deficit falling
from 10 per cent of GDP last year to 4.2 per
cent of GDP in 2013, a cut of more than
half.

Obama does miss the other target of get-
ting total debt stabilized by 2016. His budget
shows that the debt held by the public, which
doesn't count what is owed to the Social
Security trust fund, would keep rising from
56 per cent of the economy this year to 69
per cent of the economy a decade from now
and not stabilize by 2016, as the G-20 target
calls for.

But Obama insisted in his closing news
conference Sunday that his administration
has a plan to meet the G-20 goals. That effort
includes getting recommendations from a
deficit commission due to report in Decem-
ber on how to trim spending further in such
areas as government benefit programmes.

The trouble is that Congress has shown lit-
tle enthusiasm for making the tough choices
on taxes and entitlement programmes that
will be needed to get the US. deficit down to
3 per cent of GDP, the level economists
believe would stabilize the debt burden.

And lawmakers in other countries, who
also have to face voters, have shown a simi-
lar reluctance.

"The G-20 goals are very good, but his-
tory tells us it is very unlikely that they will
be met," said Sung Won Sohn, an economics
professor at the Martin Smith School of Busi-
ness at California State University.

Obama said he would force Congress next
year to address the deficit problem, which
Republicans in Congress have made a major
issue and polls show is eliciting growing con-
cern among voters.

"Next year when I start presenting some
very difficult choices to the country, I hope
some of these folks who are hollering about
deficits and debt step up, because I'm calling
their bluff," he said.

But Obama is likely to find that lawmak-
ers are much more willing to talk about the
deficit than take the painful votes needed
to do something about the deficit.

(This article was written by Martin
Crutsinger, AP Economics writer).



ental liberation
and the outdated
colonial honours

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The time is long past due
when we as a free and sover-
eign people ought to have
phased out Colonial Honours.
Shackles of our sojourn as a
colony of Great Britain
should not be haunting us
thirty plus years into inde-
pendence. How long does it
take to achieve mental free-
dom?

With the high percentage
of current leaders, both polit-
ical and otherwise, born into
an independent Bahamas or
with little attachment to the
colonial era, we had great
hope that our transition
would have been well on the
way into carving out our own
unique identity. Young lead-
ers seem so distant from our
pilgrimage into Bahamianiza-
tion. Many seem only to lap-
up that which is handed down
to them by overpowering
leaders who are stuck into a
colonial mindset. This renders
our youthful members of par-
liament almost impotent in
affecting change or is it their
own political survival that is
the only important stake to
them?

It is unbelievable that
again our “Sunshine” gov-
ernment is keeping us in the
dark era of colonialism. Why
must we perpetuate the
accreditation of a foreign
power to have sway on the
honouring of our citizens?

Yes, these awards have
been adopted as our own, but
how sad! Jamaica, swears alle-
giance to Jamaica, not to Her
Majesty, her heirs and suc-
cessors. Barbados has Nation-

letters@triounemedia.net



al Heroes Day. All progres-
sive Caribbean countries have
developed a system of nation-
al honours. Jamaica has a sys-
tem of national heroes, com-
plete with a park. The march
goes on.

Too, how can we have gov-
ernment and not a free parti-
san group initiating the giv-
ing of awards?

The honouring of a people
must never be tied to any
political master.

Even Great Britain, the
place we try to imitate is mov-
ing away from this outdated
move.

True to form, every gov-
ernment lines up its own stal-
warts for national recognition
at the expense of others
whose contribution far out-
weighs that of some of their
stalwarts.

This heavy handedness of
the government clouds the
contribution made by the very
people they seek to honour.
Many persons on the current
list of honours (2010) should
be on the very top. How
demeaning it is to give a mere
B.E.M. to any of those lined
up to be recipients. Their con-
tribution far exceeds that of
the person that has been put
on the very pinnacle of hon-
ours on this list. Very many
Bahamians have given of their
blood, sweat and tears but
because they are not con-
nected or have big-big dollars
they are reduced to nothing-

ness such as a B.E.M. It
should never happen. Stop
belittling the great contribu-
tions made by the small peo-
ple. The current list ought to
be turned upside down. It's
not fair!

Church leaders allow
themselves to be used for
every time. Again they sell us
out for a bowl of pottage.
The church must be leading
the way, not getting in the
way. I call on church leaders
to join a giant like the late Dr.
Burnside and not collect this
medal of colonial slavery. Go
on fighting for the liberation
of the mindset of our people.
Join Speaker Alvin Smith
who has abandoned the colo-
nial wig. We urge our educat-
ed lawyers to show they have
educated their minds and do
likewise.

We urge government to
enforce the National System
of Awards already passed by
parliament.

We urge that the Order of
Merit be further developed.
We urge our leaders to give
leadership, mental leadership,
and join the great warriors of
the past whose reform can
only be continued with fear-
less leaders who will daringly
take our nation to a higher
level.

It's time we press
onward.....to a common lofti-
er goal.

Rev. Fr. S. Sebastian
Campbell,
Chairman,

The National Heroes
Day Committee
Nassau,

June 20, 2010.

Offering scandal to the children of God

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Regarding the Vatican
newspaper L’Osservatore
Romano giving its approval
to the Blues Brothers movie
- June 19, 2010:

In condoning “The Blues
Brothers” movie L’Osser-
vatore Romano makes yet
another silly attempt to be
“relevant” to an interna-
tional pop culture that is
increasingly decadent. The
movie is laced with profani-
ties and obscenities.

While L’Osservatore
Romano is published by the
Vatican Press Office, not
everything in the paper —
including editorial com-
ments — necessarily reflect
the “official” opinion of the
Catholic Church. Statements





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from the Holy Father and
Magisterial documents carry
authoritative weight. Arti-
cles such as those about The
Blues Brother reflect the
Opinions only of the writers.

Sadly, since Giovanni
Maria Vian became the edi-
tor in chief of L’Osservatore
Romano a few years ago,
the paper has become some-
what of an international
scandal failing in its mission
to stay faithful to the
unchangeable principles of
religion and morals. From
Vian’s infamous assertion
that Barack Obama “is not a
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Lennon, the paper has
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au to Oe yes




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 5

Non-profit groups

‘should solicit
funding from MPs’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



NON-PROFIT organisations
should solicit funding directly from F
Members of Parliament, said
social activist C B Moss after
learning of how some MPs did not
use all of their constituency
allowance.

Mr Moss, who heads the Bain
and Grant Town Advancement
Association, said the allowances
were fundamental and it was the
duty of every representative to use
the funds, especially in “lower
socio-economic areas”.

“We are going to write the various MPs
that fall under our association directly for
funding,” he said.

“We have a tremendous amount of pro-
jects that are woefully underfunded.”

Mr Moss explained his association consid-
ered their boundary line to encompass the
“old over-the-hill”, stretching from Nassau
Street in the west, Collin’s Wall in the east,
Shirley Street to the north and Wulff Road in
the south. The area is split up in three dif-
ference constituencies, Bain and Grants



rE.



Claude-Saintilien last week.



last Tuesday.

The men fled into the Miami Street area.

descriptions provided by witnesses.

328-TIPS (8477).



Oa om lehsto



COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison E. Greenslade shows a sketch
of the man wanted for questioning in the murder of Marie

POLICE have composed a sketch of a man who they
believe shot a pregnant woman dead in Cordeaux Avenue

Marie Claude-Saintilien, 23, was sitting with her sister
and 18-month-old niece outside her parents house in Coconut
Grove at around 4pm when three men approached and one
opened fire. Ms Claude-Saintilien, who was five months
pregnant, was shot several times and later died in hospital.

Police artists have composed a sketch of a suspect using
Anyone with any information is asked to call the emer-

gency number 919, or the Criminal Detective Unit (CDU) on
502-9991, or Crime Stoppers under complete anonymity on

Town, Farm Road, and Englerston.

He advised all other non-profit
organisations to also contact MPs
in their constituency directly for
funding of their projects.

The Tribune yesterday revealed
how three MPs failed to spend any
of the $100,000 in constituency
allowances provided for them in
the 2008/2009 budget.

Included within this group was
former Prime Minister and MP for
Farm Road and Centreville Perry
Christie.

Mr Moss said he was surprised to
learn that MP for Bain & Grants
Town Bradley Nottage did not use
his funds last year, considering the “consid-
erable amount” he spent in 2008 on various
projects.

Mr Moss maintained however that he
would not criticise the dissuse on the possi-
bility that Mr Nottage may have something
planned to use the funds.

Regardless of this fact, however, those
funds are unavailable as of today, the end
of the 2009/2010 budget cycle.

One of the many cutbacks made in the
face of revenue shortfalls, the funds will no
longer roll over to another year.



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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

Bahamas Ambassador to the US | |

promotes relations with Mexico

By KHYLE QUINCY
PARKER

Press Attaché

Embassy of the Bahamas

WASHINGTON, DC:
Bahamas Ambassador to the
United States Cornelius A
Smith presented his credentials
to President Felipe de Jesus
Calderon Hinojosa of Mexico
in Mexico City, and used the
occasion to promote the “mul-
tilateralism” which he said has
benefitted both countries.

The Bahamas and Mexico
established diplomatic relations
on January, 23, 1974, and dur-
ing remarks he made at the
presentation ceremony, Mr
Smith said the two nations
share a common respect for
human rights, a belief in the
social and economic develop-
ment of both peoples, and the
promotion of peace and secu-
rity.

“The pursuit of these ideals
has not been without chal-

lenges, especially at the nation-
al level and in cross-border
encounters,” Mr Smith said.
“Our two countries, neverthe-
less, also share a resolve to
overcome these challenges. In
this regard, ultimate success is
augured by the fact that we
have both been blessed with
natural resources of global
splendour, pluralist yet
resilient, talented, hard-work-
ing human resources, and rich
cultural heritage, universally
acknowledged.”

The ambassador said The
Bahamas and Mexico have
both benefited from multilat-
eralism as enhancer and cata-
lyst for the advancement of the
ideals cited.

The Bahamas and Mexico
are both part of the United
Nations’ Latin American and
Caribbean Group of States. Mr
Smith said that through this
multilateral forum, The
Bahamas and Mexico contin-
ue to advance their common

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Board Secretary
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interests in matters related to
disarmament; the respect for
human rights and democratic
institutions in the hemisphere;
the protection of our vulnera-
ble environment; the advance-
ment of women; and mutually
beneficial and fair trade
between our two countries.

“Our two countries have also
deepened relations through our
membership in the Organisa-
tion of American States, the
Hemisphere’s oldest multilat-
eral body,” he said. “Indeed,
most recently, during the 2009-
2010 period, The Bahamas
served as Vice-Chair of the
Inter-American Committee
Against Terrorism of the
Organisation of American
States under the Chairmanship
of Mexico. In executing its
responsibilities as CICTE Vice-
Chair, The Bahamas received
the full support and wise coun-
sel of the Mexican delegation
to the OAS.”

Noting already strong rela-
tions between the two coun-
tries, Mr Smith said the Gov-
ernment of The Bahamas seeks
to broaden and deepen ties
with Mexico.

“We are pleased that For-
eign Direct Investment from
Mexican nationals in The

Bahamas and the employment
generated from these invest-
ments continue to grow,” he
said. “My Government also
encourages Mexican nationals
to explore existing business
opportunities in The Bahamas
through joint ventures with
Bahamian partners.”

Mr Smith also noted that
The Bahamas has been the
beneficiary of valuable techni-
cal assistance from Mexico in
the areas of preventative health
care and in the training of
Spanish-language teachers.

With respect to the financial
services sector, Mr Smith said
Government of The Bahamas
was pleased with the conclu-
sion of a Tax Information and
Exchange Agreement between
the two countries earlier this
year, and particularly pleased
that the TIEA signing took
place during an historic mile-
stone — the first CARICOM-
Mexico Summit. He said the
gathering resulted in “a laud-
able work programme on eco-
nomic matters for our region,
including ensuring the
resilience of our economies in
the wake of the global finan-
cial crisis, social development,
sustainable development and
climate change.”

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THE TRIBUNE









BAHAMAS AMBASSADOR to the United States Cornelius A Smith and
President Felipe de Jesus Calderon Hinojosa of Mexico.

Rotary’s ‘Mock Casino’

ew UCM UIE TULA

THE Rotary Club of Nassau
Sunrise hosted its second annu-
al Mock Casino Night at the
Sheraton Hotel Ballroom.

The event featured a Texas
Hold ‘Em Poker and Blackjack
tournaments along with a
roulette table and bingo games
throughout the evening with a
variety of prizes. The evening
also offered a silent auction
along with door and raffle || dia
prizes. RCNS PRESIDENT Carla Card-

A cigar lounge with hand- Stubbs and District Assistant
rolled cigars was located out- Governor Felix Stubbs
side the main tournament area.

For those VIP guests, there was a Monte Carlo-themed seating
area.

Nearly 100 poker players competed “Vegas style” for a spot
at the final table, while some 90 Blackjack players competed in
two semifinal rounds for a chance to make it into the final
round. There were fantastic prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place
winners of each tournament and consolation prizes for the
players who won a seat at the final table but didn’t place in
either tournament.

Rotary congratulated all tournament winners and wished
them good luck at defending their title next year in what they
expected to be an even more exciting and enjoyable event.

Proceeds from this event will be donated in part to the
Bahamas Down Syndrome Association and REACH,
(Resource & Education for Autism & Other Challenges).









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THE TRIBUNE



NASSAU Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD) officials
have closed on a $165 million
deal to facilitate funding for
stage two of the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
redevelopment project.

Confirming the official sign-
off on the financing was com-
pany president & CEO Stewart
Steeves. a

“We are pleased to announce =
that funding for stage two of
the $409.5 million airport rede-
velopment project is now in
place. With the 13 new
investors, we now have a total
of 28 investors backing this pro-
ject,” said Mr Steeves.

“Based on our success in
stage one construction, the
overall airport operation and
market conditions, we were
able to achieve a lower inter-
est rate from our creditors, sav-



ing the airport $2.5 million per
year in interest payments.”
Stage two of the airport
expansion includes selective
demolition of the current US
Departures Terminal and con-
struction of a new 226,000 sq ft
International Arrivals terminal.
The project will also include an

LOE aT

CHESS legend Anatoly Karpov is the special guest in Nassau for
the Caribbean Sub Zonal Chess Championship, which takes place
up until tomorrow.

Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
hailed the event as one that fulfills all the criteria for gaining the
support of his ministry; pointing out that the championship is
expected to bring travel business to the country as it draws com-
petitors from 10 different countries.

In addition, the Minister said, it advances the Bahamas socially
and provides promotional opportunities to showcase the Bahamas
as the perfect venue for events of every kind.

“We will work with any organisation that is involved with bring-
ing groups of people to The Bahamas for whatever reason because
we believe we have the best atmosphere for you to do anything,
including chess,” he said. “So that is why it is so easy for us to agree
to do these things.”

Mr Karpov, a Russian chess grandmaster and former world
champion, sought Minister Vanderpool-Wallace’s support in lob-
bying the Bahamian Minister of Education for an official chess pro-
gramme in schools. He pointed out that FIDE, the international
governing body for chess, had opportunities to teach chess to chil-
dren around the world.

Those opportunities include a programme through the United
Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation
(UNESCO), which required the endorsement of the Minister of
Education. He said the programmes were part of a plan to put chess
on the map again. “Unfortunately, we have lost a lot,” Mr Karpov
said. “Other sports were developing. We were much more popu-
lar than tennis when we were playing in the ’80s and ’90s.”

Mr Karpov recalled that at the height of chess’ popularity, he
played fellow Russian grandmaster Gary Kasparov in France.
The match attracted 700 international journalists, he said. Years lat-
er, however, only four journalists would cover a similar match.

Vernice Walkine, director general of the Ministry of Tourism &
Aviation, told Mr Karpov that chess matches in the Bahamas had
the potential to assist in bringing more focus to the game.



Rae Ciena ro ail AP ous FIO es mel egTe)h
) ves ong ERG ara

Seco Mee

\



WORKERS at the site of the Airport redevelopment project.



Accounting Scholarships

According to Paul Ward, vice
president, finance & CFO at
NAD, the majority of the note
issuance will be used to repay
the revolving credit facility used
to fund stage one construction.

Balance

“Our plan is to repay the out-
standing balance of the
revolver. We will then use the
remainder of the $165 million
and the reset revolving credit
facility to fund stage two con-
struction,” Mr Ward explained.

“We anticipate drawing
down the funds in November
of this year once the NAD
board gives final approval to
proceed with stage two.”

As financing of stage two
concludes, construction on the
new US Departures terminal
hits the halfway mark.



addition of approximately
200,000 sq ft of Asphalt Apron
rehabilitation and the removal
and rebuilding of existing park-
ing facilities.

Total cost for stage two con-
struction is estimated at $128
million with a scheduled com-
pletion date of October 2012.




Derek Smith/BIS

PICTURED (from left) are Kean Smith, president of the Bahamas

Chess Federation; Mr. Karpov; Minister Vanderpool-Wallace; Ms

Walkine; Nicole Campbell, Permanent Secretary of Youth, Sports

& Culture; and Tyrone Sawyer, Director of Sports Tourism in Min-
ielny of Tourism & Aviation.

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THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

$165m funding deal for stage two of Airport project

To date, the airport manage-
ment company has spent some
$98 million on construction,
with a completion date for stage
one set for the first quarter of
2011.

The third and final stage con-
struction of a domestic and
international departures hall
has a projected completion date
of November, 2013 at a cost of
$84 million.





















































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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Radio host and guest ‘hack’

into ministry's website

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Mr. and Mrs. Abraham and Edith
Buller are proud to announce the
Oraduation of their daughter, Jan-
nifer Danielle Butler from Wayne
Siate University School of Medi-
cine in Detrot, Michigan. Ms,
Butler is the past Deputy Head
Gin and Valedictorian of King-
sway Academy High Scheel,

She grduste] summa cum
laude from Tuskegee University
with a Bachelor's degree in
Bialagy in 2006. While at Tuske-
gee University she earned the
distinction of being named Uni-
versity Scholar for the College of
Agneculiure, Environmental and
Natural Sciences,

Cr. Butler has been involved with numerous community service projects in
the city of Detroit, including Cade Blue, a health education outreach program
Tor inher city youth, Additionally she held multiple leadership positions
serving as Chair for the Student National Medical Association Region V
2007 Conference and Chair of the Minority Affairs Action Committee of the
American Medical Student Association. She is a Paul Ambrose Scholar and
she will begin her intemal Medicine residency in NYC this fall. Her long term
goals invelve fellowship training, private practice, and pursuing a Master's

Degree in Public Health.

Her Father, Mother, Reno, the entire Butler family and friends are very proud
of her achievement and she is grateful for their support throughout the years,

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FROM page one

However it was proven yester-
day that the real cause of the gov-
ernment’s inability to access the
site was due to its failure to rereg-
ister the domain name.

During the radio talk show The
New Nation, host Lincoln Bain
and his guest, C Allen Johnson, an
information technology consultant,
told of how they discovered the
registration lapse after investigat-
ing the claims made by govern-
ment.

Mr Johnson reportedly pur-
chased the domain for only $2.

In a move which appeared they had
“hacked” the MOFA website, Mr Bain and
Mr Johnson redirected website traffic to
another domain also owned by Mr Johnson
titled www.zhivargolaing.com. Persons trying
to access the site were automatically redi-
rected to a static page bearing the names,
contact information and picture of the two
men.

Mr Bain explained: “They said they didn’t
have a password for it. If you don’t have a
password you just have to call the adminis-
trator or server and they’ll send you a new
password — just like an e-mail account. That
shouldn’t be a valid excuse.

“Government didn’t lose the password,
they failed to re-register after it expired soa
Bahamian (Mr Johnson) bought it. So now
it’s his to do with it what he wants.”

Perhaps to add more insult to injury, the
website is shown to be registered under
“Zhivargo ‘Monavie’ Laing”.

When first notified of the changes, Minis-
ter of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing
recalled: “I did speak with Mr Johnson con-




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cerning the website. He’d called
me saying that he had information
about the website regarding some-
thing that needed to be fixed but it
was very convoluted, I don’t know
if he was soliciting his services. I
told him we have an IT depart-
ment and that I would speak to
them about it.”

Though the tampered website
had been linked on the govern-
ment’s main website as the MOFA
website for some time, the link was
recently removed and Mr Laing
confirmed it was not an official
government website.

He explained: “It’s not the gov-
ernment’s official website. That
site was set up when Fred Mitchell was there,
but it was not done through the normal chan-
nels so the IT department has only limited
access to it. The reality is we have some enti-
ties that have a web presence but not on the
Bahamas government’s official website. P’ve
spoken to controller of the IT department
and they are now investigating the matter.”

Mr Laing added the government was in
the process of removing all association with
the website and discouraging the practice of
ministries using external websites.

Criticism over the government’s web pres-
ence flared earlier this year with many point-
ing out critical failures in site infrastructure
and poor and conflicting design. Specific to
this tampered website, opposition member
responsible for the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs and MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
has repeatedly criticised its disuse.

Mr Bain maintained: “They would have
went there and simply seen that they lost the
domain name. That would have been the
simplest IT fix ever. If they want the domain
back, they can simply come and ask for it.”

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THE TRIBUNE

Car fees increase facing legal threat

FROM page one

the department's Thompson Boulevard location,
there was a line of about 50 outside. Inside, a
group of about 40 more were crammed into a
small air-conditioned room waiting for one of the
four cashiers to serve them.

Some who spoke with The Tribune were
angered over the price increases, saying govern-
ment is out of touch with the average person's
financial hardship.

Kevin Ingraham, who drives a Ford Expedi-
tion, came to the department yesterday, a month
before his car's registration expired to save a few
hundred dollars.

"T would think that if the Prime Minister, who is
supposed to be the Prime Minister of the people,
was going to do something like this he would have
done it in the new year," said Mr Ingraham, 42. "It
shows they don't have a vision for the people."

Herbert Sears, who said he had been queuing
for more than hour "in the hot sun", doesn't see
why he should have to pay increased inspection
fees when many of the country's roads are in need
of repair.

"What are we paying more to drive on the road
for when they ain' fix the roads? It's a slap in the

Murder accused makes
plea for protective custody

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 9

face," he said.

At the department's car licensing unit on West
Bay Street, mother-of-three Erica Hunt said the
fee increase will force her family to sell their SUV

for a compact car.

"We can afford it but it's still a dent (in the
budget). Next year maybe we will sell our car and
get asmaller car to get that smaller payment — but
we need a bigger car because of our large family,"
said Ms Hunt whose car registration expires in

August.

Separated into classes of A, B, and C respec-
tively, the fees will rise from $135 to $150 for vehi-
cles weighing up to 5,000lbs, $550 for vehicles
5,001 to 15,000lbs, and $700 for any vehicle more

than 15,001 |bs.

Cars such as the Hyundai Accent, Ford Fiesta,
and Dodge Neon weigh less than 3,000lbs. Ford's
E150 and Expedition weigh more than 5,000lbs as
does a Dodge Ram or Durango vehicle. Larger
vehicles like a Hummer H2 or H1 Alpha model

could weigh in at more than 7,000lbs.

Dump trucks and tractors are predominantly

vehicles weighing more than 15,000lbs.

FROM page one

But he became the country’s
46th homicide victim for 2010 at
about 7.15pm on Saturday,
June 26, when he was shot a
number of times outside a club
on Sequoia Street.

According to police, Fergu-
son was reportedly shot after
he got into an argument with
another man who was armed
with a handgun. Badly wound-
ed, Ferguson got into a wom-
an’s car in an attempt to flee
the scene.

tive of Ferguson was incarcer-
ated at Her Majesty’s Prison
and that he wanted prison
authorities to be mindful of that
fact.

McPhee told the magistrate:
“T ask that you please place me
in protective custody. I am in
fear for my life.”

Magistrate Gomez said he
would make a note of his con-
cerns on his file. The case was
adjourned to July 14 and trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street.



ant C= a



The mother told The Tribune
how she and her three children
were headed to a convenience
store when the incident
occurred. The woman said she
drove to the nearest phone and
called police. When officers
arrived, Ferguson had already
died of his wounds.

McPhee was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane yesterday, charged with
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He was not required to enter
a plea to the murder charge and
was informed that a prelimi-
nary inquiry will be held to
determine whether there is suf-
ficient evidence against him to
have him stand trial in Supreme
Court.

His attorney Roberto Reck-
ley told the court that a rela-



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WISHES TO ADVISE
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That it is presently reviewing ALL DELINQUENT
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prompt payment(s) on all accounts to avoid
interruption of electricity service(s).

The public is also advised that all overdue payments
should be made directly to the Corporation. Those
payments can be made in New Providence at the
Head Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall
at Marathon or the Main Post Office on East Hill
Street, and at the local office on your respective
Family Island.

Consumers whose account(s) are not overdue can
make payment(s) directly to the Corporation or over
the counter at the nearest Scotiabank, FirstCaribbean,
Fidelity and Royal Bank. You can also pay your
electricity bill online by logging on to your online
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LOT NO. 5 Block “OQ”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single

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camp can be won per person. Sweepstakes winners will be selected on 7/6/10

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

who returns from South Africa tomorrow, came in an
e-mail response to an inquiry from this newspaper
after suggestions were made that Mr Ingraham may
have improperly intervened with the Ministry of
Works to have the contract for the police residence
renovations given to an FNM supporter’s compa-
ny.

"The renovations are understood to have been
required so that Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade could move into the residence with his
family.

PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts told The Tribune
he saw “absolutely no coincidence” in the fact that
Telco Enterprises — the company that an internal
letter from Chief Architect at the Ministry of Works,
Livingston Forbes, identified as the one that Mr
Ingraham telephoned him to suggest should get the
renovation job — is owned by a “big time FNM sup-
porter”, Floyd Wilmott.

Mr Roberts charged that it was improper for Mr
Ingraham to have personally intervened in the
process of having the contract for the work awarded.
In his e-mail to The Tribune yesterday in which this
was put to him, Mr Ingraham said he found such
“baseless assertions offensive” as his “record speaks
for itself.”

Mr Ingraham confirmed that he “asked the Min-
istry of Public Works to do the necessary to have a
residence on the Police Compound on East Street
repaired so that it might be occupied by the end of
July.”

FNM Chairman Carl Bethel said he expects it
was due to the Prime Minister’s commitment to
ensuring that the Commissioner of Police, who would
be residing on the property, is sufficiently accom-
modated to be able to effectively carry out his man-
date as head of the police force and to fight crime. He
said the FNM is committed to putting contracts out
to competitive tender “generally” and its record in
doing this is “without parallel in the Bahamas.”

Mr Ingraham and Mr Bethel’s comments came
after The Tribune received a copy of the internal
letter from Mr Forbes to Permanent Secretary in
the Ministry of Public Works Colin Higgs and Deputy
Director of Works Caldwell Pratt which outlined
how Mr Ingraham had communicated with the Min-
istry in May that he would like to see a scope of
works prepared and priced for the renovation of
one floor of the two storey police residence.

The letter to the senior officials said documents
were prepared in this regard before going on to add
that on June 8, a call was received by cellphone by Mr
Forbes from the Prime Minister himself in which
Mr Ingraham “directed that this Ministry engage
the Building Construction Services of Telco Enter-
prises, whose proprietor is Floyd Wilmott, in nego-
tiating a contract for the works as the time line for
occupancy of the user was very tight (end of July
2010) and competitive tendering time line would not
achieve a desirous completion time for the user’s
occupancy needs.”

The letter goes on to outline that in conjunction
with a representative from Telco Enterprises, Min-
istry of Works officials concluded negotiations with
the result that two potential prices for the work were
agreed: $292,923.62 or $315,293.22 (if impact glass
hurricane windows were included).

The letter concludes by recommending that the re-
evant information be sent from the Ministry of Works
to the Office of the Prime Minister for “further
review and directive on construction costing and
pending contract approval.”

PM explains

In his e-mailed response to
The Tribune , Mr Ingraham
agreed he had intervened to “ask
the Ministry of Public Works to
do the necessary to have a resi-
dence on the Police Compound
on East Street repaired so that it
might be occupied by the end of
July.”

"It was assumed that the
repair job would be minor cost-
ing under $50,000, rather than
the roughly $300,000 it ultimate-
ly was priced at,” said the Prime
Minister.

Mr Ingraham noted that the
Ministry of Public Works “main-



‘HUBERT
INGRAHAM

tains a register of pre-qualified contractors who are

regularly invited to bid on public works,” adding
that “where such works fall below a stipulated thresh-
old, (i.e. $50,000) a job may be negotiated directly
with a contractor.”

He continued: “Upon inspection it was deter-
mined that the residence in question, which is a two
storey building, was in far worse shape than expect-
ed. It was also recommended that both upstairs and
downstairs apartments would be renovated. Rather
than minor repairs, substantial work is apparently
required to improve the entire building, including
major plumbing works, installation of air-condition-
ing, and the replacement of all windows. As you
indicated in your letter, the scope of works estimat-
ed that the job will cost in the vicinity of $300,000.

“On being advised of this on Monday past, the
Minister of Works was advised to put the job to ten-
der. As is usual practice, a list of pre-qualified con-
tractors were identified and approved by the Minis-
ter of Public Works. I am told that this list was
approved yesterday morning.”

Those companies are: Telco Enterprises (Floyd
Wilmott), JB & Sons (Jeffrey Bethel), AB Con-
struction (Arthur Brown), Buildex Construction
(Vincent Rahming), Kirk Thompson Construction
(Kirk Thompson) and Career Builders (Trevor
Wright).

Mr Ingraham said the “tentative date” for the bid
opening is Tuesday, July 13, and given that a July
completion date is now unlikely, alternative arrange-
ments are to be made to accommodate the intended
occupants.

“As regards Mr Floyd Wilmott, I confirm that he
is a member of the Free National Movement, a mem-
bership which does not disqualify him for bidding for
and carrying out works required by the Government
of The Bahamas,” added the Prime Minister.

Mr Wilmott’s company recently came to public
attention as the contractor who was awarded an $8.6
million contract to complete the Robert Smith Child
and Adolescent Centre and Education Unit at the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

The contract was signed by the current government
with Mr Wilmott’s firm in December 2009 after the
former contractor, hired under the previous govern-
ment in 2006, was terminated when the building was
around 50 per cent complete.

The Government said the termination was due
to shoddy workmanship.

Mr Wilmott revealed last month that the scheduled
completion date of the project had been delayed by
six to eight weeks due to excessive rain, mechanical
and structural issues.

Tue Roman Carnouc Communtry 1s THe Banamas
1S PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE

A SoLeMN PonTIFICAL Mass
TO CELEBRATE THE

St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill Street
Monday, July 5th at 7:30 p.m.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Paying tribute
to the young

THE 37th anniversary of
Independence celebrations will
be celebrated this year under
the theme, “celebrating Inde-
pendence through the eyes of
our youth”.

As such, the celebrations will
incorporate and pay special
tribute to young people in soci-
ety. The Independence Cele-
brations Committee has been
meeting since April to plan a
schedule of activities and was
guided by the following princi-
ples:

1. The tough economic con-
ditions that prevail in our coun-
try.

% The decision by successive
governments that grand cele-
brations would be held every
five years and scale down cele-
brations during the interim

3. The successful campaign
during the 35th celebrations to
push the celebrations into
neighbourhoods and local com-
munities

4. The promotion of an all-
inclusive celebration, including
the involvement of the One
Bahamas Organization, and the
partnering with public and pri-
vate organizations.

Chairman of the Indepen-
dence Celebrations Committee,
Peter Deveaux Isaacs, said:
“We will build on the momen-
tum of last year’s successful
activities, tempered only by the
financial reality that affects us
all. In particular, we will
encourage Bahamians every-
where to celebrate indepen-
dence where they are, where
they live, where they worship,
where they work and where
they recreate. This is a full





endorsement of the neighbour-
hood and local communities
celebrations philosophy.”

The schedule of events for
this year’s celebrations are as
follows:

Tomorrow
10am-6pm - National Pride
Day — “Celebration of Her-
itage”, Rawson Square.

National Pride Day (NPD),
celebrated on the Friday before
Independence Day, is an annu-
al independence celebration
event that encourages Bahami-
ans to celebrate and be proud
of what it is to be Bahamian.

Bahamians are encouraged
to display their patriotism dur-
ing National Pride day by wear-
ing, eating, playing and listening
to Bahamian music or cele-
brating something Bahamian.
The epicenter for the all day
festival is Rawson Square. Var-
ious Bahamian artists, includ-
ing winners of the E.Clement
Bethel Festival will perform;
culinary artists will feature their
latest creations; Independence
T-shirts will be on sale. The day
will be one of song, dance,
poetry and merriment. Nation-
al Pride Day will also feature
the announcement of the win-
ners of the yard competition.

Saturday, July 3

6am - Independence Fun
Run/Walk, Clifford Park.

Starting points Montague,
Golden Gates, Christie Park
and Goodman’s Bay and end-
ing at Clifford Park. Organised
by the Ministry of Health, the
event is expected to attract
walkers and joggers from all
over New Providence.

The fun run will start from

ERUOY TIME OFF WITH







a

PETER DEVEAUX ISAACS makes a een

the four different points on Sat-
urday and will also feature a
health fair, with the usual blood
glucose, pressure and choles-
terol testing. Representatives
from the law enforcement com-
munity, the Police recruits and
cadets, the Defence Force
recruits and Rangers and the
Prison recruits, will lead the
walkers: Defence from the
south west, Prison from the
south east, and the Police from
the south.

5pm - Independence Beat
Retreat (Royal Bahamas Police
Force & Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Combined
Bands), Rawson Square.

This is the traditional per-
formance of the Police as they
march back to Police Head-
quarters. The performance is
held in Rawson Square. It is
considered a formal event, but
no invitations are needed for
seats other than designated
seats for Bahamian Officialdom
and representatives of the
diplomatic and consular corps.

Sunday, July 4

6am - Independence Fun
Run/Walk, Clifford Park.

Starting point is the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre and
ending at Clifford Park.

Monday, July 5

7pm - “Explosion of the
Arts”- Arawak Cay.

This Cultural Explosion
promises to be a colorful
expression of God’s love
through liturgical dance with
dancers/church dance ministries
brought together in a treat of









Bahamian folklore, rake and
scrape and Bahamian gospel
music with dance under the
direction of Dr Ann Higgins.

Tuesday, July 6
10am - “A Celebration of
Dance” — National Dance
School
Tpm - “A Celebration of

Dance” - Rawson Square
Friday, July 9

8pm — “Youth Salute to the
Nation: An Evening of Prayer,
Culture, Official Inspection,
and Flag Raising” — Clifford
Park

All roads lead to Clifford
Park on July 9 for the center-
piece of the national celebra-












k

SUPT KEVIN ROLLE talks about the Clifford Park March Pass.



tions. Clifford Park is generally
regarded as the seat of inde-
pendence. Bahamians look for-
ward with great anticipation
and nostalgia to the Clifford
Park activities. Last year’s
crowd was one of the largest
ever, and people braved a pass-
ing rain storm just to be there.

There will be no Tattoo this
year, nor is there a People’s
Concert, which normally fol-
lows the fireworks. The Cul-
ture show however, will incor-
porate several big name per-
formers, from the secular and
non-secular world. Children will
feature prominently and there
will be the ceremonial reenact-

PHOTOS: Kathy Ingraham

ment of the first flag rising,
prayers for the nation. The fire-
works display will round off the
night of festivities courtesy of
Kerzner International, at
promptly 12.0lam.

Saturday, July 10

2am “The People’s Rush”-
Rawson Square

10am-2pm — Youth Service
Day- Community Outreach
Projects

The Junkanoo community’s
summer rush.

The Rush begins at Rawson
Square and ends at Arawak
Cay for the traditional boil and
stew fish breakfast. The event is
open to all.

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NAD's 10%
landing fee

rise sparks ONL A

CONCERHS

* Private operators say
increases run counter
to reduced air fare plans

* LPIA operator proposes
3% rises to parking and
terminal fees, and more
than one-third increase
to international passenger
fees to $27.50

* Says even with rise,
[PIA fee of $41.64 per
passenger some $3.43
or 8.2% below
Caribbean average

* Says increases needed
to maintain debt service
cover of not less
than 1.3 to 1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company’s (NAD)
plans to increase landing fees
at Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA) by 10 per
cent as of January 1, 2011, and
raise other fees by 3 per cent,
were yesterday branded as run-
ning counter to the Govern-
ment’s plans to reduce air trav-
el costs and boost tourism.

Unveiling its plans to raise
additional revenues, and ensure
it complies with the financing
covenants related to LPIA’s
$409.5 million redevelopment
and expansion, NAD said that
apart from the landing fees
increase, it was also planning
to raise terminal fees, aircraft
parking fees and aircraft load-
ing bridge fees by some 3 per
cent as of the same date.

And international passenger
facility user fees will rise from
$20 per head to $27.5, a more
than one-third increase,
although NAD said LPIA’s
user costs will still remain below
the Caribbean average.

Using a Boeing 737-200 with
a 75 per cent load factor (102
passengers) and 90-minute
turnaround with use of a load-
ing bridge as its benchmark,
NAD said: “Excluding govern-
ment taxes, LPIA’s costs are
currently $30.44 per passenger,
and with the recommended
increase become $38.21 per pas-
senger.

“The average cost of the
Caribbean airports presented
in the graph excluding LPIA is
$41.64 per passenger. LPIA’s
recommended rates are very
competitive at $3.43 or 8.2 per
cent less than the Caribbean
average.”

Outlining the need for the
increase, on which NAD is
seeking feedback, the airport
operator said: “In accordance
with its financing obligations
the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company must maintain
a debt service coverage ratio
(DSCR) of not less than 1.3 to
1. The average DSCR ratio for
the 10-year period of 2011 to

SEE page 8B

THE TRIBUNE

ye U

©



y

THURSDAY,



TEU Ne elt



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Developer fights bank

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamas-
based resort
development is
alleging that it
has suffered
more than $21 million in losses
as a result of FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
refusal to honour two perfor-
mance bonds designed to guar-
antee construction work by
well-known contractor Edward
Penn, claims both he and the
bank are vigorously denying.

Cotton Bay Villas Eleuthera
and Cotton Bay Estates, both
part of the Cotton Bay project
headed by Bahamian business-
man Franklyn Wilson, have
filed a Supreme Court action
seeking declarations that the
two bonds - alleged to be for
sums totalling $8 million and
$3 million respectively - are
valid and enforceable, and that
FirstCaribbean “breached its
obligations” to them.

In its defence, First-
Caribbean, in documents
obtained by Tribune Business
alleged that neither of the two
was “a valid performance
bond”, both lacking seals and a
stamp to show compliance with

‘Great
benefit’ for
Andros

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is plan-
ning a July town meeting to
ensure that proposals for the
redevelopment of Andros’s
Lighthouse Yacht Club &
Marina are “in keeping with
the community’s wishes”, the
minister of tourism and avia-
tion telling Tribune Business
the project would be “of great
benefit” to the island’s near and
long-term future.

Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
explained that the Government
wanted to make sure Illinois-
based Scheck Industries’ plans
for the site received the
approval of Androsians,
describing the Town Meeting
as one of “the last pieces” to
fall into place.

“One of the things we want
to do is have a meeting with
the community in terms of what
the latest discussions were with
Scheck, and once we have that
input - we hope to do it some
time before the middle of July -
that’s the last piece outstand-
ing,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said, “to hold a Town Meeting
to see if what is happening is
in keeping with their wishes.”

Scheck has on its website a
link to another site, called
www.androssportingclub.com,
a project it describes as "com-
ing soon". Its potential pur-
chase of the Lighthouse Yacht
Club & Marina has been on the
table now for several years, and
the resort's sale would dispose

SEE page 10B

Loss leaders less effective

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

USING loss leaders as a con-
sumer business driver has
become a less successful strate-
gy due to the increasing savvy
of Bahamian shoppers, AML
Foods chief executive said yes-
terday, as they are increasingly
looking around to obtain the
best deals.

Gavin Watchorn, who is also
the BISX-listed food group’s
president, told Tribune Busi-
ness that as the recession bites
harder on consumer incomes,
many Bahamians are showing
“less and less loyalty to a par-
ticular brand or store”, instead
shopping around to obtain the
different deals and discounts
on offer at each chain and
thereby lower their food/gro-
cery bill.

“T think the competition is

* AML Foods chief says
consumers have ‘wised
up’ to selling below cost,
and now showing less
brand loyalty by shopping
around for deals

* BISX-listed firm’s food
and franchise division saw
Q1 sales declines of 8.1%
and 6.5% respectively

driving prices down, and a lot of
prices we see are just above
cost or below cost,” Mr
Watchorn explained. “Com-
petitors are using loss leaders to
drive traffic to their stores,
where prices are close to cost or
below cost.

SEE page 4B



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

) . @
Winsetiona! Moeny itor

Rank of The Bahasa

TIN TERRARATIONAL

Online at
BankBahamas Online.com

lleged $21m losses

* Franklyn Wilson’s Cotton Bay claims damages suffered after FirstCaribbean allegedly
failed to honour two performance bonds to guarantee Edward Penn’s work

* Bank denies this, saying bonds not valid because employees involved
not authorised, and documents failed to comply with Act and own rules

* Penn counterclaims for $5.565m in unpaid work,
while bank seeks order that he indemnifies them

* Case set for trial in early 2011

the Stamp Act. The bank also
alleged that the two purported
bonds were not executed “in
accordance” with its Articles of
Association.

And, in a document filed in
the Supreme Court on May 26,
2010, FirstCaribbean’s attor-
neys, Alexiou, Knowles & Co,
said that while the bank “denies
any liability” under both the
alleged performance bonds and
collateral contracts, it was seek-
ing an Order that Mr Penn “‘is
liable to contribute to, or
indemnify the bank, in respect
of any losses the bank may suf-
fer” if the Supreme Court
found he failed to perform
under both construction con-
tracts.

The case is before Justice
Stephen Isaacs, who has set it
down for a five-day trial set to
begin on April 18, 2011, and
issued detailed case manage-
ment orders.

In its statement of claim, Cot-
ton Bay Villas Eleuthera
alleged that Mr Penn had been
hired to construct a clubhouse,
three three-bed villas and three
two-bed duplex villas at the
resort development via a con-
tract worth $8.3 million.

The construction contract
allegedly required the contrac-
tor to obtain a performance
bond equal to the contract sum,
and Cotton Bay claimed Mr
Penn did this with First-
Caribbean.

Cotton Bay, which is repre-
sented by Higgs & Johnson,
alleged that its then-attorneys,
Sharon Wilson & Company,
wrote to FirstCaribbean on
November 18, 2005, seeking
confirmation that this perfor-
mance bond was valid, follow-
ing up with further correspon-
dence on January 27, 2006.

The developer then alleged
that Ian Rutherford, a former
relationship manager at First-
Caribbean, confirmed the per-
formance bond was valid in ear-
ly 2006, the bank sending a con-
firmation letter on March 10
that year. As a result, Cotton
Bay alleged it felt that the per-
formance bond was in place
and its financial interests were

Concerns over fishing exports

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS fisheries
industries is in danger of miss-
ing out on millions of dollars
worth of exports to the Euro-
pean Union (EU) if the Gov-
ernment does not have proper
systems in place to register
product caught in Bahamian
waters by August 1, the
Bahamas Commercial Fishers
Alliance (BCFA) Chief told
Tribune Business yesterday.

Adrian La-Roda said if the
Government does not catch
certificates to accompany lob-
ster shipments required by the
EU by the end of July, the fish-

f

eries industry could buckle
under export sanctions.

And he also insists that if the
Bahamas cannot meet other
requirements mandated by the
Marine Stewardship Council
(MSC), the Bahamas could face
further export restrictions.

Director of the Department
of Marine Resources, Michael
Braynen, yesterday gave assur-
ances that these requirements
should be met by the end of the
month, and that proper logging
of lobster hauls by Bahamian
fishermen to satisfy EU import
requirements will be in place.

The EU is this country’s
largest fisheries export market,
and Belize the largest competi-
tor.

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Mr Braynen said that while
the MSC and EU requirements
were not mutually exclusive,
there existed some commonal-
ity in their mandates.

He added that while some
importers of seafood within the
EU may require a country to
be MSC certified, many do not.
He said, though, that many of
the larger importers do require
the certification.

Mr La-Roda suggested this
important MSC international
mandate, which has reportedly
been met by the majority of
exporters in the region, means
the difference between the suc-
cess or failure of the Bahamas’

SEE page 10B

fi

Sign up now and get a free prepaid card membership for the first year.

www, BankBahamas.com

"Certain restrictions apply



FRANKLYN WILSON

“adequately safeguarded”.
The developer then alleged it
entered into a second con-
struction contract with Mr
Penn, this time through its Cot-

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.





I” BOB


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 3B

1-5
Hanging photos on the best ‘peg’

WITH the technological explosion of
scanners, digital cameras and the World
Wide Web, the JPEG image format has
been for some time the most widely-used
digital image format used on the web today.
This format was created to be a standard
format for image compression, and I would
say that 99 per cent of the pictures on the
Internet are JPEGs or should be.

With that being said, let us identify what
exactly is JPEG? It is (pronounced ‘jay-
peg’) a standardised image compression
mechanism usually ending with the exten-
sion jpg or jpeg. Its acronym defines Joint
Photographic Experts Group, and works
well on photographs and naturalistic art-
work, but not so well on lettering, simple
cartoons or line drawings.

There is much misunderstanding about
JPEG, which has left many professional
photographers and graphic designers per-
plexed. Let’s define some terms:

RAW files are compressed files, but are
“lossless”, meaning information “is not
lost” during compression. It loses no infor-
mation when making an image smaller.

A JPEG file is a compressed file, where
data is lost in the process of compression.
This means some ‘quality image’ is ‘lost’
when the image is made smaller). Howev-
er, the quantity is so small that it is virtual-
ly indiscernible to the human eye. Con-
versely, the image maker can trade off file
size against output image quality for
extremely small files if poor quality is not a
problem for you.

Battle of Raw /JPEG

The choice to shoot RAW or JPEG is a
battle that constantly rages, but you will
find that some of the biggest tasks in pho-
tography involve choosing RAW as
opposed to the JPEG format. Nonetheless,
there are pros and cons for each format
and I will highlight a few:

RAW format:

The major disadvantage with RAW for-
mat is obviously the file size. This can range
from 5-20 MB (megabytes) or more per
picture, which can cause a serious storage
crunch. Another con to RAW is the time it
takes to read or write a file, and the long
length of time ity takes to open on your
computer. It also takes special software to
open a RAW file, which is proprietary to
each camera manufacturer. However, a
Raw file cannot be uploaded to the Inter-
net, as it must be converted to JPEG or
some other standard format for viewing.

JPEG format:

Being a smaller file size, JPEG is better
for action photography due to the fact that
your camera will not have to pause to write
to disk, and you will certainly receive more
shots per flash card. JPEG files take up far
less space on your hard drive, and you can
fit much more on a CD or DVD for archiv-





The Art of

Graphix

Oo emi Wee Any

ing.

The obvious advantage is that JPEG is a
small file size, with faster loading time on
your computer and across the Internet. It
allows more photos to be captured by the
camera as it takes less time to write each
picture to memory.

I will not get into the algorithms the
compression uses, but a JPEG basically
takes the photo from an RGB format and
puts it into another format, which focuses
more on the luminance as opposed to
colour. What is happening is that the soft-
ware is determining what parts of the image
to keep and what parts should be thrown
away. It’s that simple.

Ultimately, JPEG is best suited for large
photographic images, not small images
under a few hundred pixels in dimension. It
is not suitable for screen shots, images with
text, sharp lines and large blocks of colour,
or images that will be edited repeatedly.

A tip: When editing a JPEG image,
always keep a master copy if you expect to
edit it again in the future. It is important
you preserve the integrity of your JPEG
file by ensuring that you retain the original
file without over-writing, and always make
alterations in Photoshop, which results in a
more clear-cut finish. Remember: Any pro-
cessing done in camera to a JPEG file can-
not be undone.

Chiefly, the decision photographers have
to make over RAW or JPEG is a decision
of choice of format.

How many photos you take, your pro-
cessing level and what you intend to do
with the image (Internet, print, personal
use, commercial use, etc) must all be mea-
sured. If itis mind boggling, resort to the
RAW+JPEG mode and you'll experience
the best of both worlds.

Theoretically, a RAW file is superior to
a JPEG file most of the time, but the ques-
tion to ask is that since you cannot see the
difference in print, is shooting RAW real-
ly any advantage?

Why use JPEG?: Chiefly to make your
image files smaller and have them appear
virtually the same as the original. Another
benefit is that it stores full colour informa-
tion: 24 bits/pixel (16 million colours).

JPEG is far more practical than GIF for
exchanging images with widely varying dis-
play hardware because it avoids prejudging
how many colours to use.

A Pélinishry CF

Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
Ph

BO. Bow ABZOF OO Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Rahames -

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

42 367 47TT

in Kindergarten, Primary, Junior and Senior High School.
Religious Studies, Mathematles, Language Arts, Computer Sclence

Sciences (General & Health Science, Biology, Combined & Agricultural Science),

History/Social Studies, Physical Education & Coaching,

Art (Arts & Craft /Art Drawing / Technical Drawire),
Bookkeeping, Home Economics.

There are also opportunities in the offlee as well as Administrative Levels

for the new school year beginning September 2010

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the
Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
They must be Bahamian or a reskdent with work status, Teachers must also

When should I use JPEG and when
should I stick with GIF?:

One of the first things to learn about
JPEG is which kinds of images to apply it
to. Generally speaking, JPEG is superior
for storing full-colour or grey-scale images
of ‘realistic’ scenes. The more complex and
subtle, the better.

If you have a GIF image with a lot of
small-size overlaid text, don't JPEG it.
Plain black-and-white (two level) images
should never be converted to JPEG.

What are good "quality" settings for
JPEG? :

Most JPEG compressors let you pick a
file size versus image quality. However,
there seems to be a little uncertainty about
the settings. ‘Quality 95’ does not mean
‘keep 95 per cent of the information’.

The quality scale is purely arbitrary as it
is not a percentage of anything. In fact,
quality scales aren't even standardised
across JPEG programs and the user's goal
is to always choose the lowest quality.

Are all JPEG images high resolution,
print-quality photos? :

I am sorry but it’s not. Print quality is
always determined by the pixel dimensions
of any image. Since JPEG is often used to
be transmitted and displayed via the Web,
they are typically reduced to screen reso-
lution and do not contain enough pixel
data to get a high-quality print.

When sharpening a JPEG, the artifacts
(a ‘wrinkled’ appearance between colours)
begin to show up more distinctly as the
sharp level increases. Sadly, you also loose
data every time an edit (even a crop or
rotate) is made, due to the re-compression
of the file.

If you desire having images that are of
high resolution (over 640 x 480), it's a good
idea to have a separate link (perhaps with
the use of thumbnails). This makes your
site more user friendly...and customers will
return!

After all, if your image takes ‘forever’ to
load, how many people are going to stick
around to actually view it? Do you know
that if your page takes more than eight sec-
onds to download you stand the risk of los-
ing one-third of your visitors?

Finally, your web page is prepared by
you (entrepreneur) but it's designed for
them! (customers). You've got to get your
visitors interested first and know that trans-
ferring a shorter file is mandatory for
today's "I want it now" mentality. I hope
this article has assisted you with the fun-
damental principles when choosing superi-
or and fast downloading images via JPEG
format. So until we meet again, play a little,
have fun and stay on top of your game!

NB: Author welcomes feedback at
deedee2111@hotmail.com

FOR RENT

2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET
Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.

WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 322-8833

Legal Secretary

Needed

A minimum of 5 years litigation experience
is required.

All applications will be held in the strictest of
confidence.

Please submit resume to:

brightonplace242@gmail.com
Only short-listed applicants will be contacted

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LISA JOSEPH of ALLEN BROCK
DRIVE, #76 APT 1, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24th day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES THERVECUS OF
FINLAYSON STREET, OFF NASSAU STREET, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1ST day of JULY, 2010 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, The
Bahamas.





PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, twenty-five years ago, a young lady, Ann Pelerson, became a pioneer of

Liturgical Dance in The Bahamas when she decided to use her gift of dance to worship Gad and

bring praise and glory to His name within the confines of the church;

AND WHEREAS, there was a pened in The Bahama|s when this form of dancing wes

looked upon as non-Christian: today however, most major Christian denominations embrace the

Ministry of Liturgical Dance as a for of worship,

AND WHEREAS, the Liturgical Dance minssines in many of our local churches have been

guocesstul in both capturing fhe atlenton and interest of the youth, theredy providing ihem win a

Creative avenue for positive achiavemen

AND WHEREAS, in commemorating the 25° anniversary of Lilurgical Dance in ihe

Bahamas, the Carbbean Christian Dance Network has organized a schedule of events for the

pened 4° io 177 July 2070, which are geared to highlight and showcase fhe alanis of dance

have at least a Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate, groups from as many a8 1,500 churches, to faclitale cross-cultural exchanges between Bahamian

Also a heart and love for the total child, spirtiual, mental, physical and academic!

APPLY NOW

At Agape you can be a part of a friendly, family atmosphere,
taking our students to the next level. Be a part of moving our
top rated academic program to greater heights.

We use a combination of the ABeka, Bob Jones and
The Bahamas Ministry of Educathon currtculurns,

We also offer a varlety of team sports and are the current all Abaco
champions in Ladies Basketball and Mens Volleyball.

We have a 20 station, state-of-the-art Computer Lab and offer electives
in Drama, Music and Home Economics and Electrical Instalation.
Students are well prepared for Natlonal Exams - GLAT, BIC & BOCSE
as well as International Exams - SAT and City/Guilds (Pitman,

| te ars but most of all they are prepared for - Life!
bogeatlinends
opie

ly eI Applications may be obtained from the
taf school office or on-line at

and Intemational dancers as well as to direc! the focus of the community on the growth and
expansion of Liurgical Dance minisines nationally

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Miniter of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the week of 4" to 17° July 2010 a5 “LITURIGICAL DANCE
WEEK"

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, | hawa
hereunto sel my Hand and Seal
this 2" day of March, 2010

[( KA Pp jp

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM __
PRIME MINISTER
www.agape-school.com —



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
































































nie
at

John S. Bain

MBA, FCCA, CFE, CFFA, Cr.FA, CAMS, CMA, CFM. FIMIS.
Chartered Forensic Accountant

JOHN §, BAIN, The Bahamas’ most credentialed forensic accountant, is pleased
to announce that he will continue the practice of investigative & forensic
accounting from his new offices located:

SUITE NO E-1, UNION COURT
ELIZABETH AVENUE AND SHIRLEY STREET
P.O, BOX 88-3609
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 322-6656 FAX: (242) 323-0971

Email: johma}johnsbain.com
Website: ware Jjohnshain.com

In addition % traditional accounting and auditing services, we offer the following areas of
specialization:
Investigative & forensic accounting
Fraud investigations
Litigation support
Divoree litigation
Parinership & shareholder disputes
Business interruption losses
Expert testimony
Trial preparation asistance

Arbitration & medsaton
Critique of expert reports
Bankruptcy & insolvency
Liquidations & Receiverships
Asset Recovery

Elder abuse forensics

KEEPING FOUR BUSINESS IN BUSINESS

780 PICTET

PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

FROM page 1B

“The consumer has become
very wise, because we are see-
ing less and less loyalty to a par-
ticular chain or brand, and con-
sumers are shopping around to
where the deals and discounts
are. Selling below cost is not
being that successful, even to
increase the percentage of con-
sumers calling in that manner.”

Mr Watchorn was speaking
after AML Foods, the owner
of the Solomon’s SuperCentre
and Cost Right brands, suffered
a 72.2 per cent decline in fiscal
2011 first quarter net income,
which fell to $292,000 or $0.02
per share from the $1.05 mil-
lion or $0.067 per share
achieved during the three
months to April 30, 2009.

Sales at the BISX-listed
group’s food distribution busi-
ness, which includes those
brands, dropped by 8.1 per cent
to $18.55 million year-over-
year, compared to $20.186 mil-
lion, while gross profits in this

segment fell by 11.4 per cent -
from $5.344 million to $4.735
million.

As a percentage of sales,
gross profits in the food distri-
bution business fell to 25.5 per
cent from 26.5 per cent in the
fiscal 2011 first quarter, with
operating profits down by
almost 55 per cent at $653,000,
compared to $1.446 million the
year before.

On the food franchise side,
which chiefly features Domi-
no’s Pizza, top-line sales fell by
6.5 per cent to $2.32 million,
compared to $2.481 million the
year before, with gross profits
dropping by 9.3 per cent to
$1.43 million compared to
$1.584 million the year before.

Gross profits as a percentage
of sales again declined slightly,
from 63.9 per cent in the three
months to April 30, 2009, to
61.6 per cent this year. As a
result, operating profits again
declined by just over 50 per



ANDRE],

“*
> SCHOOL

iby talesnrtiomas idee! of Shr Brees

HES ae

THE TRIBUNE

Loss leaders less effective

cent in AML Foods’ food fran-
chise business, falling from
$385,000 to $190,000.

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that AML Foods was
“very top line dependent”, as
were many Bahamian retailers,
given that they all incurred
large fixed costs such as rent,
salaries and utilities. “It’s dif-
ficult to add more expenses at
the same level as your sales,” he
added, implying that sales
increases largely made their
way to the bottom line.

Still, Mr Watchorn told Tri-
bune Business that AML Foods
was Starting to see signs the
economy was “levelling off a
little bit”, with people - espe-
cially those on fixed incomes -
starting to spend more money,
having “adjusted their lifestyle
now to what was happening”.

And, writing in AML Foods’
annual report for 2009, Mr
Watchorn said: “We do antici-
pate 2010 being more challeng-
ing than 2009 for our
group......Our performance in
2009 means we have a big task
ahead of us in 2010 to record
similar results, and we will
endeavour to meet these tar-
gets in light of some
unfavourable conditions.

“The economic challenges in
the Bahamas remain, and the
market in which we operate
continued to be extremely com-
petitive as new stores enter the
market at all levels. Our sales
declines of the third and fourth
quarters of 2009 are reflective
of both these economic condi-
tions and increased competi-
tion.” To counter this, Mr
Watchorn said AML Foods had
implemented “new sales initia-
tives”, in addition to working
on cost savings and synergies
in the existing business.

Apart from Domino’s Pizza-
’s website, he added that the
new revenue and sales oppor-
tunities included the pharma-
cy and bakery at Solomon’s
SuperCentre in Nassau, which
the company had just assumed
ownership of.

18045

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

SENIOR TRUST OFFICER

* Administration of a portfolio of complex trusts including
the preparation of all relevant documentation and
Annual Reviews. Particular emphasis will be the
administration of structures originating from Latin
America.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned
fiduciary structures.

* Written and verbal communication with Client
Relationship Managers and other industry
professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant
professional qualification

Strong trust and company administration skills plus a
sound knowledge of drafting relevant documents,
reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local and international
legislation

Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 7 years of relevant experience in a Private Bank
or Trust Company.

Fluency in Spanish.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. ©. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas

world school

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized
International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications for the following
vacancies, with effect from August 2010. Full information regarding the school may
be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com.

Primary Library Assistant

The primary library assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with the head of
primary and the school librarian.

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms, the library
assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

¢ To supervise primary students’ library visits (book swaps and story telling)

e To assure the smooth running of the primary section of the school library

¢ To ensure that materials are shelved, re-shelved and displayed according to library
organizational schemes, which are based on Dewey decimal classification.

e To assist with the circulation and retrieval of primary materials on a daily basis.

° To assist with processing and cataloguing new materials in the primary collection.

e To manage all photocopying, scanning and laminating requests for teachers and students
in the primary section of the library.

e To organise the Scholastic book programme

e To troubleshoot simple technology programmes

e To assist the librarian with data collection, entry, maintenance and reports.

© To operate a specific automated library management system for the primary school.

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the
principal

Receptionist/Office Assistant

The School Receptionist/Office Assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with
the heads of school (primary and secondary).

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms and conditions
of service, the School Receptionist/Office Assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

® Serving as the major point of contact with visitors to and enquiries for the head of primary
and/or principal

e Maintaining professional ethical standards in all areas, particularly confidentiality

e Maintaining regular office routines (such as answering the telephone, attending to the fax
ee handling email messages, word processing documents, photocopying, and filing
papers

e Preparing materials indicated by the head of primary and/or for distribution to faculty

e Maintaining school documentation

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the
principal

Re fe fe fe 2s ie fe of fe oe fe fe fs 2 he fe of fe fe fe fe 2fe oft i 2fe 2fe 2K aft he fe ofc oft he fe oft oie fe fe fe 2fe ais fe ale fe oie fe fe 24s 2k he fe ofc fe 2K fe fe ofs oft is fe fe fe oft he fe ofc oft a ofe ole 2k ft ahs afc 2c as a ale

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as possible. All applications
MUST include the following:

® letter of application

© a personal statement

e a full resume

® the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and e-mail of three people who may be
approached for confidential professional references

® acurrent police record

e acurrent health certificate

Please direct all correspondence to:
Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:

Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846



The closing date for applications is 9 July 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE









ANTHONY STUBBS

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 5B
SssS*~*~*~=~ BAF Financial
agent passes

securities test

A BAF Financial sales agent,
Anthony Stubbs, has passed the
Canadian Securities Course
(CSC) after studying with the
Nassau-based Securities Train-
ing Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, STI’s course
administrator, said: ‘““The CSC

provides a very comprehensive
coverage of investment prod-
ucts and markets, and can pro-
vide a gateway to a rewarding
career in financial services.”

STI continues to offer the full
study programme for the Cana-
dian Securities Course.



NAD adds 13 investors via $165m completion

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) yes-
terday confirmed that its $165
million second stage financing
for Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport’s (LPIA) rede-
velopment had closed, with the
participation of 13 new
investors.

Following behind last week’s
Tribune Business report that
revealed the second stage
financing was oversubscribed
by some $20 million, NAD said
yesterday that the addition of
the 13 new investors took the
total number of financing par-
ticipants to 28.

Stewart Steeves, NAD’s
president and chief executive,
said: "We are pleased to
announce that funding for stage
two of the $409.5 million air-
port redevelopment project is
now in place.

“With the 13 new investors,
we now have a total of 28
investors backing this project.
Based on our success in stage

one construction, the overall
airport operation and market
conditions, we were able to
achieve a lower interest rate
from our creditors, saving the
airport $2.5 million per year in
interest payments.”

Stage two of LPIA’s expan-
sion includes selective demoli-
tion of the current US Depar-
tures Terminal and construc-
tion of a new 226,000 square
foot international arrivals ter-
minal. ‘

The project will also include
an addition of about 200,000
square feet of asphalt apron
rehabilitation, and the removal
and rebuilding of existing park-
ing facilities.

The total cost for stage two
construction is estimated at
$128 million, with a scheduled
completion date of October
2012.

Paul Ward, NAD’s vice-pres-
ident of finance and chief finan-
cial officer, the majority of the
$165 million will be used to

Home prices rise 0.8 per
cent in April from March

NEW YORK (AP) — Home
prices in April rose for the first
time in seven months as gov-
ernment tax credits bolstered
the housing market. But the
rebound may be short-lived
now that the incentives have
expired.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-
Shiller 20-city home price index

Big Moments are
Better When Shared

released Tuesday posted an 0.8
per cent gain. It had fallen in
each of the past six months.
Eighteen of 20 cities showed
price increases in April from
March. Washington, San Fran-
cisco and Dallas each posted
gains of two per cent or more.
Eleven cities reversed their
declines from the month before.

This Independence Day Weekend

(U.S. and Bahamas), surprise the family
with a getaway io Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort. Activities include:

FIREWORKS SHOW MINI FAIR

COMPLIMENTARY
DIVE-IN MOVIES

KARAOKE
ARTS & CRAFTS

CARNIVAL
GAMES &
CONTESTS

PETTING ZOO

repay the revolving credit facil-
ity used to fund stage one con-
struction.

“Our plan is to repay the out-
standing balance of the
revolver. We will then use the
remainder of the $165 million
and the reset revolving credit
facility to fund stage two con-
struction," Mr Ward said. "We
anticipate drawing down the
funds in November of this year
once the NAD Board gives
final approval to proceed with
stage two."

While financing of stage two
concludes, construction on the
new US Departures terminal
has hit the halfway mark. To
date, NAD has spent some $98
million on construction, with a
completion date for stage one
set for the 2011 first quarter.

The third and final stage-con-
struction of a domestic and
international departures hall
has a projected completion date
of November 2013, at a cost of
$84 million.

INSIGHT

For the stories

otal tale Mlat=)

news, read
Insight on
Mondays

Sheraton
Nassau

BEACH RESORT

Bahamian resident
room rates from

2159

per night plus tax
and gratuities

For hotel reservations call 327-6000 or visit sheraton.com/nassau

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©2010 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sheraton and its logo are the trademarks
of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates






































ROYAL FIDELITY

Re ae ele

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.
If you have it, we want you.

We are growing! Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- ASSISTANT TRUST ADMINISTRATOR -

Reporting directly to the Manager, Trust & Corporate Services, the successful applicant's main
duties and responsibilities will be:

¢ Effecting clients’ banking instructions

¢ Constructing written communication

¢ Completing varying bookkeeping tasks
Assisting with cash collections
Liaising and communicating with clients and other
team members regarding client instructions

Minimum requirements / qualifications

Bachelor's degree

STEP qualification

Minimum 5 years Trust Administration experience

Extensive knowledge of trust formation and administration
Sound knowledge of Bahamian trust and company legislation
Proficient in the use of Microsoft Office, Word & Excel
Excellent organizational skills

Ability to work independently as well as with a team

Strong writing skills

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: Assistant Trust Administrator

51 Frederick Street | P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau | F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
July 9%, 2010 to:

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions) will be
commensurate with relevant experience and qualification. Royal Fidelity appreciates your
interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.

Please be advised that

The Nassau office of

PRICEVVAIERHOUSE( COPERS

will be closed on

Friday, 2 July 2010

To allow staff to enjoy their

ANNUAL
FUN DAY

We regret any inconvenience
this may cause.

Normal working hours will resume
on

Monday, 5 July 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT (AP) — Ford
Motor Co., the only Detroit
automaker to avoid bankruptcy
protection, said Wednesday it
will reduce its huge debt by
another $4 billion as it contin-
ues to show signs of financial
strength.

The Dearborn, Michigan,
automaker will pay $3.8 billion
in cash to a United Auto Work-
ers trust fund that pays retiree
health care bills, and it will pay
out $255 million in dividends
on preferred securities that had
been deferred as the automak-
er worked its way through
financial troubles. The compa-
ny now will make quarterly
payments on the securities,
which are a combination of pre-
ferred stock and bonds.

Ford CEO Alan Mulally said
in a statement that the pay-
ments are another sign of con-
fidence that the company's
restructuring plan is working.

"We expect to continue to
improve our balance sheet as
we deliver on our plan,” Mulal-

Ford Motor to repay
$4bn more in debt

ly said. "Our business results
make it possible to take these
actions while still accelerating
the investments we are making
in our business."

Ford sales are up more than
30 per cent through May,
almost double the 17 per cent
increase in total US car sales.

Ford shares rose 50 cents, or
five per cent, to $10.38 in mid-
day trading.

Automaker

The automaker said the
actions combined with a $3 bil-
lion debt payment in April will
reduce its total debt to around
$27 billion from $34 billion at
the end of the first quarter.

The payments will save Ford
roughly $470 million in annual
interest costs, the company said.

Ford was forced to mortgage
its factories and even its blue
oval logo to borrow more than
$23 billion in 2006 and 2007.
But the move helped it avoid
bankruptcy protection, unlike
Chrysler Group LLC and Gen-
eral Motors Corp.

Recently Ford has reported

RBC

S

Dominion

Rae, Securities

GLOBAL LIMITED

ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF ITS OFFICE TO

BAYSIDE EXECUTIVE PARK
Weat Bay Street
Building # 3
Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 702-5950
FAX: (242) 362-6744

OFFICE HOURS
B0A.M. to 400 BM.
Monday - Friday



280 PICTET

i68oO5

sales gains and four straight
quarterly profits. It earned $2.1
billion in the first quarter,
helped by higher transaction
prices for its cars and trucks,
which have been getting high
quality ratings from third-party
groups such as Consumer
Reports magazine and JD Pow-
er and Associates.

Even before the debt reduc-
tion announcement, Citigroup
Global Markets analyst Itay
Michaeli upgraded Ford shares
to "hold" from “sell.”

Michaeli said in a note to
investors that Ford shares have
dropped 32 per cent from highs
after a strong 2009 perfor-
mance.

"At these levels, we believe
prior relative risk/reward bal-
ances have been corrected,
prompting the upgrade," he
wrote.

As the US auto industry
headed toward financial disas-
ter in 2007, the UAW agreed
to set up trust funds that would
take on enormous health care
payments for Ford, GM and
Chrysler retirees. Ford made
initial payments to the trust and
agreed to pay roughly another
$7 billion.

Ford will make the $3.8 bil-
lion to payment to the trust on
Wednesday, including $860 mil-
lion in cash on two notes that
were due Wednesday. The
company had the option of pay-
ing one of the notes in stock,
but chose to pay in cash. The
remaining $2.9 billion will retire
a note early and come from
$1.6 billion in Ford cash, plus
$1.3 billion from Ford's credit
arm. The payment from Ford
Motor Credit Co. is instead of a
tax payment that it would have
made to the parent company.

After the payments, Ford will
still owe the UAW trust about
$3.6 billion, payable over three
years. The company said it
intends to repay the note early
but wouldn't say when.

In March, the trust raised
$1.78 billion by selling warrants
to buy the automaker's stock.

It pays health care bills for
more than 200,000 retirees and
their spouses. Ford agreed to
fund the trust with a total of
$14.8 billion in cash and other
assets.

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST

CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

HEAD OF FOUNDATIONS, PRIVATE TRUST
COMPANIES & CORPORATE

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

Advising potential clients and liaising with industry professionals
on all matters relating to the establishment and management of
Foundations and Private Trust Companies and the administration

thereof

- Oversight of the Corporate Department including the
administration of multi jurisdictional corporate structures and

dealing with all matters arising therefrom.

Preparation of and checking Annual Reviews.
Oversight of fee billings and collection.
Liaising with local and international regulators on matters
pertaining to his/her portfolio,

PRE-REQUISITIES;-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant professional

qualification.

In-depth knowledge of relevant Bahamian and international
legislation and practice,
Impeccable written and verbal communication skills.

- Computer literate with proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
At least 7 years related experience in a private bank, law firm

OF trust Company.

Extensive knowledge of Foundations, Private Trust Companies,
International Business Companies, “Regular Bahamian”
Companies and similar structures from other jurisdictions.
Extensive knowledge the Qualified Intermediary regime and
similar trans-national fiscal measures.
Knowledge of Spanish and / or French would be advantageous.
Ability to function in a multi-cultural working environment.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE

ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:-
The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

FO. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE

NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar slipped against the euro
Wednesday, but rose in rela-
tion to most other currencies
after a private report on US
employment showed a smaller-
than-expected number of job
gains.

Lingering high unemploy-
ment in the US, the world's
largest economy, is a big part of
the reason why growth is
expected to slow in the second
quarter.

In midday trading in New
York, the euro rose to $1.2283
from $1.2209 late Tuesday.

The European Central Bank
said that it would lend 131.9 bil-
lion euros to banks for three
months, a day before 442 bil-
lion euros in 12-month loans

THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, PAGE 9B
Dollar slips
against euro, rises

against others

lysts.

In other trading Wednesday,
the British pound fell to $1.4962
from $1.5081.

The US currency also gained
to 1.0613 Canadian dollars from
1.0550 Canadian dollars, and
was higher versus the Aus-
tralian and New Zealand dol-
lars. All three, which are big
commodity exporters, tend to
fall when economic confidence
falls.

The dollar dropped to 1.0763
Swiss francs from 1.0807 francs,
and was nearly flat versus
Japan's currency at 88.51 yen
from 88.49 yen.

Like the dollar, the franc and
the yen are considered safe
havens.

Driving the appeal for

"safer" assets was a report from
payroll company ADP, which
said that private-sector employ-
ers added 13,000 jobs in June,
down from 57,000 in May.
Economists polled by Thom-
son Reuters had expected
60,000 jobs to be added this
month.

A lower US unemployment
rate, which was 9.7 per cent in
May, is crucial to the econo-
my's recovery. The Labour
Department is releasing jobs
data for June on Friday. Econ-
omists expect the unemploy-
ment rate to rise to 9.8 per cent,
and for 110,000 jobs to be cut as
people hired earlier this year
by the federal government for
temporary work on the census
are laid off.

























a

“at PICTET
PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

TRUST OFFICER

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

* Administration of a portfolio of trusts including the
preparation of relevant documentation and Annual
Reviews.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned
fiduciary structures,

* Written and verbal communication with Clent
Relationship Managers and other industry
professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

comes due.

Analysts had worried that if a
large number of banks sub-
scribed to Wednesday's ECB
loans, that implied weakness in
European banks’ ability to get
funding. The ECB said 171
institutions got three-month
loans, while 1,121 institutions
had received the 12-month
loans a year ago.

The "relatively low demand"
for new central bank loans
helped bolster the euro, said
Brown Brothers Harriman ana-

NOW HIRING
Graphic Artists
Sales Associates

sign Makers/Installers.

sign industry experience preferred!



For stories behind Fax only 1 page Resume to:
hews, read /nsight
Mondays 356-4833







COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

2010
No. 00141

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-
dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959, Chapter 393 Revised Statute
Law of The Bahamas

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY
ISABELLA BIANCA ROSA HARRISON

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of PETER EDWARD HARRISON and LADY ISABELLA BIANCA
ROSA HARRISON both of Green Court, La Rue Du Douet De Rue, St. Lawrence,
Jersey, Channel Islands, UK, in respect of:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate within the Settlement of Hope Town
in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public street called and known as
“Gillam Street” and running thereon Forty-nine and four hundredths (49.04) feet
on the EAST by a four (4) foot wide lane called and known as “Russell Lane” and
running thereon Eighty-two (82.00) feet on the SOUTH by land now or formerly
the property of Valdo Prosa and running thereon Forty-nine and Sixty-five hun-
dredths (49.65) feet AND on the WEST partly by land now or formerly the property
of Iver Malone and partly by land now or formerly the property of Vernon Malone
and jointly running thereon Eighty-two and Sixteen hundredths (82.16) feet.

The Petitioners in this matter claim to be the owners in fee simple of the said lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
their title of the said lot investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

COPIES of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working hours at:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
(b) The Office of the Administrator, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
(c) The Office of Local Government, Hope Town, Abaco, Bahamas
(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Higgs & Johnson, Ocean Centre, Montagu
Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
adverse claim or claims not recognised in the Petition shall on or before the 30th
day of August, A.D., 2010 file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the
undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the prescribed form verified by
an affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim on or before the 30th day of August, A.D., 2010 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

DATED this 18th day of June, A.D., 2010

Samantha Fox
Messrs. Higgs & Johnson
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioners

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


















Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant
professional qualification.

Strong trust and company administration skills plus
a sound knowledge of drafting relevant documents,
reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local legislation.
Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 5 years of relevant experience in a Private
Bank or Trust Company.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL
BE ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P.O, Box N-4837

Nassau, Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

y ,

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

a programme for the working professional

erage gt) eo mea ese ea

Three specialisations for a
competitive edge:

Hu lae ye) sly tere eon em ese)
Leadership
Financial Decision Making

ees]
informational meetings:

Thursday, July 1st at 6 p.m.
so ee eee es eee
Thompson Blvd., 3rd floor

SEL Ca ec c=
ei ee See eee
Thompson Blyd., 3rd floor

For more information contact:

CMe sam sre 2

Tie meee bt eee

Dae =e =e le

ea a= ee oes ed ES eee ellen

INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE.
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Julius Bar

Julius Baer (sroup, the leading dedicated Wvealtn Management is seeking
candidates for the position of

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Acquire new clients through personal network (within defined objectives)

- Acquire new client finders

- Provide financial information to clients as requested

- Create / Maintain a privileged relationship with new or existing clients
providing a service of excellence

- Develop Julus Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) as a booking centre through
Julius Baer worldwide network

REQUIRED SKILLS:
- Excellent German verbal and written communication skils
- PC literate with strong Excel, Word, PowerPoint (ablity fo lear new

Concerns over fishing exports

FROM page 1B According to other sources, it
could take two to three years

fishing industry. before the fishing industry is
“We could end up with alob- — brought up to MSC certifica-

ster season that is a total
waste,” he said. “And we will
lose the European market.”

tion level.
Mr La-Roda said that if the
Bahamas lost the European

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PAMELA HAMILTON
late of the Southern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to send
their names, addresses and particulars of the same
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the
21st day July A.D., 2010 and if required, prove such
debts or claims, or in default be excluded from any
distribution; after the above date the assets will be
distributed having regard only to the proved debts or
claims of which the Executors shall have had Notice.

applications quickly)

- Strong understanding of Swiss Private Banking industry creed and
regulatory framework

- A commitment to service excellence

EXPERIENCE:
- Minimum 5 years expenence in Private Banking, Asset Management or
related field

EDUCATION:

- A Bachelor's degree with concentration in Economic, Business
Administration or euivalent

- The Securities Course Series 7 or equivalent.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES:
- The abilty to soeak a third language (Italian, Frenich, Spanish or
Portuguese) would be a strong asset.

We offer a very competitve compensation and benefits package, a stimulating
work environment and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our
business while expanding your career

Interested candldates should forward a copy of their resume by 7" July, 2040 to
the attention of.

BY HAND

Personal & Confidential

Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Lt.
Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore
East Bay Street

P.O, Box N-4890

Nassau, Bahamas

BY MAIL

Personal & Confidential

Julus Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas)Ltd.
Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore
East Bay Street

P.O, Box N-4880

Nassau, Bahamas



And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement

on or before the aforementioned date.

ROYAL SFIDELITY

Koney at Wark

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Executors
Alvernia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$81,000,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Friday, July 2, 2010. Successful tenderers, who will be advised
should take up their bills against payment on Tuesday, July 6,
2010. These bills will be in minimum multiples of B$100.00.
Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central
Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

ORO ORIK AR R R OR OKOK OK OKOK OROK OR OR R OR OR OKOK OK OK OROK OROR OR ORROKOKKKRRKRR



FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

a

Cy L CIN TA Lh

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 29 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,507.70 | CHG 2.96 | %CHG 0.20 | YTD -57.68 | YTD % -3.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
AML Foods Limited 1.05
Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 5.20
0.30 Benchmark 0.30
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.17
9.62 Cable Bahamas 11.16
2.56 Colina Holdings 2.60
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.29
2.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.46
1.60 Doctor's Hospital 2.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07
8.75 Finco 8.90
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 9.81
3.75 Focol (8) 4.58
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

4

1

4

Div $
0.040
0.200
0.260
0.000
0.090
0.040
0.300
0.040
0.230
0.052
0.110
0.240
0.520
0.350
0.170
0.000
0.000
0.240
0.640
0.800

Change Daily Vol. EPS $

1.05 i 0.250
0.63 . 0.050
5.20 0.00 0.598
0.30 0.00 -0.877
3.15 0.00 0.168
2.17 0.00 0.055
1.16 0.00 1.408
2.84 0.24 0.511
6.29 0.00 0.460
2.35 -0.11 0.111
2.00 0.00 0.627
6.07 0.00 -0.003
8.90 0.00 0.168
9.81 0.00 0.678
4.58 0.00 0.366
1.00 0.00 0.000
0.27 0.00 0.035
5.59 0.00 0.407
9.95 0.00 0.952
0.00 0.00 0.156

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

99.46 0.00
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00

Interest
6.95%

Change Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Prime + 1.75%

Prime + 1.75%

RoyalFidelity *tmerenahP odnk ith st-_GY vei -The-Counter Gewuitirs,

Symbol Bid $
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00
RND Holdings 0.35

Ask $
11.06
6.25
0.40

Last Price EPS $
14.00 -2.945
4.00 0.000
0.55 0.001

Daily Vol. Div $ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M

0.000 256.6

Yield

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

ABDAB 30.13
RND Holdings 0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00 4.540
0.55 0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name NAV
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4752
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9265
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5374
2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0368
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.6388
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund 107.5706
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund 105.7706
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.1127
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0917
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1150

9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal 9.5078
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

2.8266
1.4712

10.0000 10.2744

4.8105 7.9664

YTD%

2.03
3.45
3.99
2.10
2.22
2.23
1.78

-4.61
3.23

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.906205
1.520591

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.506072

NAV Date
31-May-10
31-May-10
18-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
5.56 31-Mar-10
6.99 103.987340 103.095570 31-Mar-10
13.50 101.725415 99.417680 31-Mar-10
5.19 31-May-10
6.29 31-May-10
5.65 31-May-10
6.39 31-Mar-10

Last 12 Months %

8.15 31-Mar-10

58.37 31-Mar-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Ghange - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



20 November 2029

0.00%
0.00%

market it would have to look
to the US for all of its export
potential, leaving it subject to
price fixing under low market
demand.

He said Bahamian fishermen
and distributors would be made
to compete with a market that
is already self-sustained by local
lobster products.

The purpose of the catch cer-
tificate is largely to ensure qual-
ity and accountability in the
exporting country, and among
fishermen and distributors. The
catch certificate also attempts
to prevent poachers selling their
catch to the EU.

Mr Braynen said the imple-
mentation of the catch certifi-
cate will not require fishermen
to pay any extra taxes, but they
will be asked to contribute
information on their catches for

the certificate, which will con-
tribute to the statistical data on
the country’s fisheries industry.

“We think it (implementing
catch certificates) will help us
address one of the require-
ments (for MSC),” he said.
“We will be able to say defini-
tively that we have a handle on
illegal fishing. And it will help
us in that we will be able to
demonstrate that we have a sys-
tem of record keeping.

“We can know the volume
of fish extracted by fisheries,
so we can set management lim-
its.”

Mr Braynen said the catch
certificate will assure Bahamian
fisherman have the widest pos-
sible export market within the
EU, though the MSC require-
ment will broaden those mar-
kets even more.

‘Great benefit’ for Andros

FROM page 1B

of the last property owned by
the former Hotel Corporation,
plus 7,000-10,000 acres of sur-
rounding land in the Fresh
Creek area.

“We think it is something
that will be of great benefit to
Andros in the near and long-
term,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added.

Residents of Coakley Town
have been consulted several
times before on the Scheck
Industries project, which has

Requirements:

skills

holidays

i'm lovin’ it
Employment
Opportunity

Managers Needed

for leading Fast Food Franchise

¢ Must be a high school graduate
Must have management experience
and/or management degree

Must have strong leadership skills
Must be customer service driven
Must be results-oriented & articulate
Must have excellent inter-personal

¢ Must have excellent oral & written
communication skills

¢ Pofessionalism required

¢ Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!
Please submit resume to:

Human Resources Department
Mcdonald’s Head Office
on Market St. North
P. O. Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444
Nassau, The Bahamas

been modified several times to
account for the ELA, which was
prepared by the consulting firm,
Black & Veatch.

The project is also said to
include a marina, marina villas
and shopping/retail facilities,
fishing lodges and boutique
hotels. The Lighthouse Yacht
Club & Marina currently has
about 30 employees, and fea-
tures a 20-slip marina, beach
frontage and a 20-room hotel.
Yet the average occupancy at
the Fresh Creek property is
only about 35 per cent.



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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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Fishermen: We’ll act
on poaching ourselves

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



POACHING, which robs the Bahamas
of up to $22 million worth of marine
resources per year, continues to persist
unabated, the Bahamas Commercial Fish-
ers Alliance said yesterday, with Bahamians
threatening to overlook Defence Force
help and take matters into their own hands
this coming lobster season.

Adrian La-Roda said with Bahamian
fishermen having up to $1 million worth
of lobster traps in the water per season,
they will no longer stand aside and watch
poachers take away their livelihood. And
they insist they are fed up with the Defence
Force and Immigration department’s catch
and release method of dealing with them.

“Our guys are taking a different
approach and now won’t call the Defense

Force,” he said.

Mr La-Roda added that poaching
remains a national problem that the
Defence Force seems to be doing nothing
about. According to him, the Defence force
has not arrested poachers in two years.

“Tt has been two years since the Defence
Force has arrested a fishing vessel,” he
said. “How can these people be on the job
for two years and have not apprehended a
poaching vessel?”

Organisation

He said his organisation intends on hav-
ing a press conference in the coming weeks
to highlight the urgency of the poaching
situation in this country.

Mr La-Roda said recently that when
caught, poachers were not stripped of their
cargo, but made to pay a $10,000 fine - 0.5
per cent of the total value of their catch,

and the BCFA has identified by name up to
11 vessels that poach in Bahamian waters.

He said those ships can often carry up to
60,000 pounds of fish or lobsters out of
these waters on one trip.

The Minister of National Security, Tom-
my Turnquest, suggested possible links
between the poachers and the Defence
Force, saying intelligence operations are
in place to confirm the veracity of those
allegations.

Mr La-Roda said a recent apprehension
of a poaching vessel yielded no results and
no retribution, as the poachers were let go.
He insisted that one of the poachers appre-
hended and released could now be working
on a Bahamian fishing vessel. And he said
the catch from the apprehended vessel dis-
appeared. “I’m impotent in terms of deal-
ing with this,” he said. “When you see these
kinds of things happen, we are the ones
who are losing money.”

Teens tackle boredom via ‘Odd Jobs’

SUMMER is here, and for
many young people summer
vacation means fun. But fun
can turn to boredom if you hap-
pen to be young, jobless, and
short on cash. That’s where the
Odd Job Squad (OJS) comes
in - an advertising service for
young people offering odd jobs
services in their communities.

While it cannot offer the
security of a regular summer
job, the OJ Exchange helps
young people earn money, gain
work experience, gather job ref-
erences, and put their skills to
use in helping residents, organ-
isations and businesses with
odd jobs.

The OJ Exchange was intro-
duced to the Bahamas by the
Teen Economic Empowerment

work,"

Network (T.E.E.N.), a group
of teens who have come togeth-
er to learn about investment
principles, personal finance and
entrepreneurship. The first edi-
tion of the OJS directory will
be published in July and will
list the services of approxi-
mately 20-30 young people, or
as many as 90 service listings.
According to Keshelle Kerr,
founder of the T.E.E.N. and
chief executive of Creative
Wealth Training, the OJS
works like a newspaper's clas-
sified advertising section.
"Youth fill out a short appli-
cation with a checklist of three
services they can offer, such as
babysitting, painting, or yard
she says. "OJS coordi-
nators enter their services into

youth.

email

a special database, publish a
services directory and distrib-
ute it freely throughout the
community." Residents, organ-
isations and businesses use the
directory to contact and hire

Any young person aged 13-
21 can sign up for the Squad by
picking up a brochure at loca-
tions throughout the island,
calling (242) 376-9449 or via

oddjobsquadbs@gmail.com.
“We anticipate having an
online registration for the
exchange very soon,” said Ms
Kerr. Two personal or work-
related references and atten-
dance at an orientation are
required, and participants
under 18 must obtain parental

or guardian permission.

On Saturday, July 3, from
lam to 6pm, the Squad will be
at the Mall at Marathon, with
an information booth and reg-
istration forms for both youth
and employers.

There will also be an orien-
tation meeting for all jobbers
and interested jobbers at the
British Colonial Hilton on Sun-
day July 11, 2010, at Spm. Par-
ents, teens, youth leaders and
the community at large is invit-
ed.

T.E.EN. is a network of that
focuses on areas such as finan-
cial literacy and entrepreneurial
development, leadership and
communication development,
personal and professional
development.

at







5-Day FORECAST

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IDANCING FOR

CSUS

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

FTER a life as the lead

Ait: in the casino got

er nowhere, Dr Ann
Higgins Director of the
Caribbean Christian Dance
Network decided to accept
Christ as her Saviour and use
her talents to bring glory and

honour to his name.
"Before I gave my life to Christ I was a
dancer in one of the casinos. I decided



this wasn't the life for me so I gave my life
to Christ. I was then encouraged to begin
dancing in the church so I did just that,"
she said.

It was this simple step that started the
introduction of liturgical dance in church-
es all over the Bahamas. And now, 25
years later, a week long celebration has
been dedicated to liturgical dance.

At that time, Ms Higgins attended
Bahamas Faith Ministries which was the
first church in the Bahamas _ that
embraced this style of dance.

This year's celebration will be a cultur-
al explosion, as dancers from other parts
of the world will come to the island to

eaten

show off a little bit of their culture.

The celebration kicks off this Sunday
with an opening ceremony at Bahamas
Faith Ministries where Pastor Myles
Munroe will present the keynote address.

On Monday there will be an explosion
of the arts at Arawak Key starting at Spm.

"A number of dancers from churches all
over the Bahamas will be taking part in
this celebration at Arawak Key," Ms
Higgins told Tribune Religion.

Dancers from Caribbean nations, the
United States, and other parts of the world
will travel to the Bahamas to take part ina
cultural exchange on Rawson Square.

Members of the public will be thor-
oughly entertained at a Liturgical Dance
showcase at the National Performing
Arts Centre on Wednesday night at 7pm.

"We want to bring a presence of the
Lord in our nation. We want to evoke that
presence because we know we need the
presence of the Lord to bring change into
the country," Ms Higgins said.

On Thursday there will be a dress
rehearsal for the 37th Independence

¢ THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010 «

The Tribune’s

RELIGION

| es Ooms Mas |

PG 23



ennai’

Celebrations on Clifford Park and on
Friday there will be a liturgical Dance
Parade through the street with the Ark of
the Covenant.

"We are looking forward to the support
of the public. We are also inviting the chil-
dren from a number of homes to come
out and take part in the celebrations, “she
said.

Ever since it’s inception many young
people have dedicated their lives to min-
istering in dance.

"So many young people are involved
with liturgical dance and this goes to show
that not all of them are engaging in nega-
tive activities, but they are doing some-
thing positive with their lives,” she said.

"We use the young people to travel
around the world and use their talents to
minister to others. So far we have been to
a number of different places where the
people were so receptive to what we were
doing," she explained.

For more information call 328-8670,
322-4079, 565-0613 or log onto www.cc-
dn.org.
PG 24 @ Thursday, July 1, 2010

Youth

PASTOR Dave Burrows speaks a full house at

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

ahamas Faith Ministries’

2010 Youth Alive confer-

ence comes on the heels of
six murders over the weekend,
all involving young men. It will
seek to address some of the
criminal and major social prob-
lems attributed to youth.

Seeking to give Bahamian youth posi-
tive alternatives to destructive behavior,
Youth Alive will address topics and issues
that today’s youth are faced with and try
to provide practical, relevant answers to
these challenges in a way that young peo-
ple can understand.

Another topic which will be explored is
the alarming increase of females who are
following the lead of males in anti social
or self destructive behaviour and are in

RELIGION

Youth Alive 2009.

need of guidance and intervention.

Headed by Dr Myles Munroe, Youth
Alive is spareheaded by youth ministry,
Pastor Dave Burrows.

The event kicks off Tuesday, July 13
until July 18, at The Diplomat Center,
with a spectacular drama and movie pro-
duction titled “The Code.’

Continuing throughout the week will
be Friday Night Live, Young Champions
(male mentoring program for inner city
and other youth,) P31 (female mentoring
program for inner city and other youth),
Stagez and Super Sunday (Sunday Youth
Only Church Service), Effective Youth
TV Program (positive alternative youth
programming), Strictly Positive Tour (vis-
iting local schools and using stories of
young men and women who have turned
their lives around as examples along with
motivational and inspirational speeches
and music).

The Strictly Positive Tour also visits
Family Islands, putting on ‘Operation
Burnout’ (an all night fun and games

2010

affair, ‘Christian Youth and Talent Jam’,
Christ 4 Life School Ministries impacting
local schools, mission trips to various
islands and countries as a group and in
conjunction with youth missions organi-
sations such as Teen Mania.

In the past Youth Alive has brought in
over 5,000 youth from the United States,
Canada, Europe and the Bahamas.

Reaching the Youth

It is a lively, energetic event with dynam-
ic teaching, music, drama and special
events that has captivated young people
over the years from around the world.

The goal of the program is to reach
youth at their level, through programs cen-
tred around the theme, “Aliens — In the
World but Not of it”, featuring messages
by Dr Myles Munroe, international youth
and family specialist Pastor Dave Burrows
and Mrs Angie Burrows, Ricardo Miller of
Dallas, Brooke Eneas, minister and for-
mer Miss Florida Panhandle, Stefan

The Tribune

“Syntist” Moss, a Dove award winner and
son of the soil, currently living in Atlanta
as well as local renowned speakers.

Providing music for this event will be ris-
ing local artist Ricardo Clark, Christian
Massive, Monty G, Mr. Lynxx, Landlord
and a host of others, some who are fea-
tured on the upcoming Youth Alive
Soundtrack.

Day and night’ sessions follow
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday with
special sessions for Youth and Youth
Leaders as well as pastors and parents.
Entry is free, however special incentives
and discounts are offered in registration
packages ranging from $15 - $85. Call
Bahamas Faith Ministries for more infor-
mation.

Special testimonies will be given by
Orlando “Landlord” Francis, a former
gang member turned singer and business-
man; Raymond “Double Syxx” Eneas, a
street hustler who became a college gradu-
ate, and Lavard “Manifest” Parks — from
Deejaying for Gangs.


The Tribune

Teaching to Influence Lives Forever
was the theme at the recent Temple
Christian School K5 graduation. How can
we apply this to the teaching profession?
What have we learnt ourselves and what
have we taught over the years?

As a former primary teacher, I know
that the role of the teacher is to spend
long hours in a classroom for many
months throughout the year. They are
expected to expend endless energy in vig-
ilant care-giving. To few are entrusted
many children, and most of them deserve
a standing ovation for being workers of
miracles.

Often without parental support, teach-
ers single-handedly chart the course of a
child’s educational life for a year. Imagine
what it means for a first grade teacher to
be presented with a child who cannot
read, write, recognise colours or num-
bers.

Reflect on the frustration of trying to
work with children whose homework is
unsupervised or regularly left undone.

RELIGION

Cm ii
Teaching to influence

_ REV. ANGELA
PALACIOUS

Add to this, the pressure to meet academ-
ic deadlines and to surpass national grade
averages, and you begin to understand
the mammoth task facing our teachers.

We have to praise God for those who
answer the call and have made teaching a
vocation. We need to pray daily for those
who use their gifts so freely.

To you who are teachers, I say “hats
off” to you. You engaged in multi-tasking
before the word was coined. Your job
description includes: broadening minds,
stretching horizons, imparting knowl-
edge, improving grades, and challenging
limits.

Because of you, our children discover

their own brilliance. While you polish,
they shine. The heat you apply enables
their character to be refined.

We celebrate your accomplishments:
1. You teach talented students to reveal
that their best possibilities can become
realities.
2. You water seeds of music and harvest
musicians.
3. You take artistic dwarfs and create
cultural giants.
4. You take mediocre athletic ability and
help discipline our youth to bring home
the gold.
5. You go beyond the call of duty to
involve our children in extra-curricular
activities.

You teach to influence lives forever, as
you work with the Holy Spirit to create a
new social DNA to civilise the ‘savage
beast’ that threatens to overcome us
when we forget our spiritual selves. Never
cease to model the right way, instructing
with your words and example. You are

Thursday, July 1,2010 ® PG 25

lives

God’s gift to each student. Be faithful.

Fathers: Teaching to Influence Lives

How can we apply this to our lives as
parents, and especially as fathers? What
have we learnt and what have we taught
over the years?

The role of the parent as teacher of life
and survival skills was poignantly por-
trayed in the Disney Oceans movie. It
draws attention to relationships that exist
deep under the sea, just as other species
follow their natural instincts to care for
and preserve the species.

Parents have the wonderful opportunity
to improve on each generation. They have
the awesome responsibility to model good-
ness, kindness, honesty, love, faithfulness
and commitment. Whatever values, morals
and principles we wish to see upheld in
society, our children need to see them in us:

Whatever you have learned or perceived
or heard from me, or seen in me put it into

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RELIGION

The Tribune

Re CTE









FROM left to right : Mr and Mrs Adrian Finley, Mr and Mrs Kevin Williams, Rev Dr Earle and Dr Marjorie Francis - Center; Mr and Mrs Percival Francis (eldest son of the couple), Mr and Mrs
Wilkinson Francis (son) and Mr and Mrs Keno Dames (grandson).

IN celebration of their 63rd Wedding Anniversary,

the late Rev Dr Enoch Backford Sr.

Reverend and Mrs Francis thank God for the lega-

Rev Dr Earle Francis, senior pastor of First Baptist
Church, and his "Sweet Potato" Dr Marjorie Francis
renewed their wedding vows before family and
friends on Sunday past at First Baptist Church's sanc-
tuary.

It was on June 29,1947, at 6am at the Salem Baptist
Church, then located on Parliament Street that this
couple was first joined together in holy matrimony by

This union gave birth to thirteen children, two of
whom predeceased the couple. Since their 50th
Anniversary, the couple has held a service each year
to renew their vows. Many other couples from the
ministry joined them in this commitment ceremony.

The couples were blessed with a charge by the Rev
Matthias Munroe, Associate Minister of the Bethel
Baptist Church, Nassau, Bahamas.

cy of their 63 years of marriage and 46 years of min-
istry as pastor and organist respectively.

When asked why they renew their vows annually,
Pastor Francis said it is their desire to set a good
example for their congregation to follow as leaders in
the Lord's work. The couple said the secrets to a good
marriage are “communication, sharing and much
love.”



God has a plan!

And as Jesus passed by, he saw a man
which was blind from his birth. And his dis-
ciples asked him, saying, ‘Master, who did
sin, this man, or his parents, that he was
born blind?’ Jesus answered, ‘Neither hath
this man sinned, nor his parents: but that the
works of God should be made manifest in
him.
(John 9:1-3)

God always have a reason for every-
thing that He does, therefore He has a
plan.

When uncomfortable things happen it is
not necessarily a bad thing. Sometimes
God has to use hard methods to get a point




ALLISON
| MILLER

across to us. That's ok because He has a
plan and He gives us the strength for the
process of His plan.

I believe that if the devil knew that the
church would rise after the death of Jesus
Christ, he would not have played any part
in His death. A living organism with a dia-

bolical message, he truly would not have
had anything to do with it.

Often times we go through difficult
times not understanding what God is
doing in our lives. Or we think that He has
left us to deal with the situation on our
own. That in itself can be frustrating
because you don't what is going on. Not
until everything is over, do we understand
the whole process of what has happen.

However, this is where faith comes in.
As believers we need to trust that God has
a plan and it will work for us. If anyone
knows what He is doing, God does. Also
remember what the devil means for bad,
God will turn around for our good.

Indeed God has a plan for each of our
lives. For example take the
"Recession."Some may be jobless and
experiencing a real distressing time.

However, God still feeds, clothes and

shelters you. God protects His own.

I take solace in the fact that the God we
serve is not ‘slack’ concerning His promis-
es toward His children. He promises that
He will never leave nor forsake us. He is
with us until the end of the earth and even
unto death.

Wherever we go He is there also. So
there is no need to panic or become fearful
when situations and circumstances happen
because God has everything under con-
trol. I have confidence in the fact that God
simply knows what he is doing and we can
leave everything up to Him.

So when what we call, "bad things” hap-
pen to us, it is not necessarily bad, it's a
part of God's plan that becomes the
process. Besides what starts out as bad
God do use it for our good. I encourage us
to trust God’s plan for our lives, after all it
is better than we could ever imagine.
The Tribune

THEY could have been out shopping, at
the movies or just hanging out with friends,
yet a group of believers gathered Saturday
(June 26) at New Mt Zion Missionary
Baptist Church on Blue Hill South.

On this hot afternoon, their mission was
simple - but by no means easy - bring lost
souls to Christ.

"In less than two hours in Garden Hills
we went out as a combined force to minis-
ter," explained Bishop Walter Hanchell,
chairman of newly formed National
Soulwinners Network. "We had 33 deci-
sions for Christ and three rededications."

And what if they hadn't ventured out?

"Let's just say this was an ordinary
Saturday and everyone was doing their
own thing, that would have been 33 souls
still lost. Suppose 33 souls were saved
every day in Nassau. Think about it. They
would have to fire about 50 per cent of the
police force," Bishop Hanchell joked.

Formed earlier this year by a conglomer-
ation of local churches, the National

Soulwinners Network aims to amass a
group of local missionaries to travel locally
and around the world preaching the
gospel. Coming out of its first conference
last week, NSWN has set a goal to win
2,000 souls in The Bahamas by the end of
this year.

Already, it reportedly has over 100
members in the network. That number is
said to be growing daily. By year's end it is
hoped membership would have swelled to
500. To date, the network has trained
roughly 30 persons, from a cross section of
churches, in the art of witnessing and shar-
ing their faith.

"Many persons have a desire and a pas-
sion for soul winning, but they do not know
how to do it,” said Bishop Hanchell. "The
best way to resolve that is for persons to be
properly trained, equipped and motivat-
ed."

Part of that training involves going out
into the community, knocking on doors.

Joining the Soulwinners Network in this
initiative this past weekend were the con-
testants in the Miss Gospel Bahamas
Pageant. More than two dozen participants
were divided into 11 groups of twos or
threes and dispatched in the Garden Hills
constituency.

After 90 minutes of going door-to-door
in the scorching heat, all gathered back at
New Mt. Zion shortly after 4pm to give a
report.According to Bishop Hanchell,
"every seed that is sown, every word that is
given will not return void."

Fishers of men

Among those providing a report was
Miss Gospel Bahamas contestant, Sharell
Ferguson.

She and her team shared the gospel
with 11 persons. Three gave their lives to
the Lord.

"All the people who were saved were

RELIGION

Winning souls for Christ

—








Thursday, July 1, 2010 © PG 27



Precision Media Agency/Photos



(LEFT) Yvonne Poitier and her team member, MGB contestant Angelique Collie, went door to door in the Garden Hills area Saturday. They

shared the gospel with seven persons.

young men,” she reported. "We were
really happy about that.”

Oralyn Elliott and her team witnessed
to 12 persons. Seven persons gave their
lives to the Lord.

"We went to one house. The people
didn't know who we were but they said,
‘Come right on in.’ We went in and all in
that house came and accepted God."

She continued: "We walked out onto
the street and another gentleman came to
us and he said 'My spirit take to you all
come and pray with me.' He gave his life
to God right on the street, just like that.”

Agatha Minus went out with Dr Tejado
Hanchell and MGB contestant Shantia
Williams. They shared the gospel to nine
persons.

"The first house we went to, three per-
sons accepted the Lord," she reported.
"One of those persons was a 72-year-old
lady who accepted the Lord for the first
time. That was a blessing.”

A strong believer in divine appoint-
ments, Bishop Hanchell said these suc-
cess stories came about through God and
prayer. He and his team member, Miss
Gospel Bahamas Shenique Gray, shared
the gospel with four persons, who then
prayed to receive eternal life.

"When I go out I pray for divine
appointments,” he shared. "When you do
that, your work is easy. You don't have



vies ¢l \



MGB contestant Shantia Williams jots down information from a 72-year-old mother of 14 who
accepted the Lord into her heart for the first time this past weekend.

that much resistance, in other words, their
hearts are already prepared and that's
exactly what we got."

The teams were urged to do follow-ups
within two days, which entails getting new

believers in church and presenting them
to their respective pastors.

Bishop Hanchell advised that if nothing
is done within 48 hours new converts have
a tendency to revert to their old ways.
PG 28 @ Thursday, July 1, 2010

he members of St Mark’s

Anglican Church in Port

Howe had a teary eye
moment at the farewell service
for Errie and Menawattie

Samaroo on Sunday June 20.

The Guyanese couple will be relocating
to Nassau to continue their service to the
youth of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. The Samaroos are educators
dedicated to the advancement of all
young people on the isle of Cat Island and
have been living there for the past three
years. During this period of time the cou-
ple were ardent Anglicans who wor-
shipped every Sunday with the congrega-
tion of St Peter’s and after St Mark’s in
Port Howe was rededicated they joined
the body in Port Howe.

Errie Samaroo was the senior master at
the Old Bight High School and
Menawattie Samaroo is a third grade
teacher at the New Bight Primary School.

The Farewell Service coincided with
the Father’s Day Celebration which
began at 8am Fr Chester Burton, priest
in charge, in his sermon used the simple
familiar word “FATHER?” to describe the
Samaroos.

First, he said the letter ‘F’ stood for the
faithfulness that they exhibited while they
worshipped at St Mark’s in Port Howe.
They were always at the Eucharistic cele-
bration every Sunday. He said it calls to
mind the old adage “the family that prays
together stays together.” He continued
saying that the faithfulness did not end
with the church but it was exemplified in
the school where Errie was elevated and
afforded the opportunity to serve as the
Old Bight High School senior master.

Secondly, the letter “A’ stood for the
ability that Samaroos possess in inspiring
people around them to reach and achieve
more than the mediocrity that they are
accustomed to in their everyday life.

Fr Burton reminisced that it was Errie
who envisioned the first ever Christmas
Cantata that was held in Port Howe
Christmas of 2009. It was visionary and
indeed it was successful beyond all meas-
ure because nothing of that nature was
ever staged and produced in the parish of

RELIGION

St Saviour's bids farewell to the Samaroos

The Tribune





St Saviour’s.

Thirdly, the letter “T’ stood for the tal-
ent that couple displayed when they
enrolled themselves in the teaching pro-
fession and left their homeland of
Guyana to leave an indelible mark on the
mind of some school age child in Cat
Island. Fr Burton also joked that Errie
has a unique way of selling tickets to raise
funds.

Fairness

Fourth, the letter ‘H’ stood for the
humble nature and spirit the couple

|

THE Samaroos are presented a plaque for their dediction to the Anglican Church on Cat Island by Fr Chester Burton.

exhibit in the daily execution of their
duties. Burton told the congregation that
although Errie maybe the Old Bight High
School’s senior master he does not flaunt
or abuse his authority at any given time.
Menawattie also in her own quiet and
unassuming way has transformed the
lives of so many teachers and children at
the New Bight Primary School by her
humble and peaceful spirit.

Fifth , the letter ‘E’ stood for the
encouragement they have given so many
people not only in church but in the
school and wider community.

Finally, Burton said the ‘R’ denotes



â„¢~



that the Samaroos are role models par
excellence. He noted that Mr Samarroo
opens the bus door for all ladies on the
way to worship service at St Mark’s in
Port Howe on Sunday. They showed
members of St. Mark’s and Cat Island in
general the epitome of how Guyanese
live, work, worship and play, he added

Fr Burton in presenting a parochial
plague to the couple said he and his wife
Coral Patrice felt honoured and apprecia-
tive that the Samaroos were members of
their church. Following the service, the
congregation and guests of honour
enjoyed a farewell lunch.



Teaching to influence lives

FROM page 25

practice. And the God of peace will be with
you.

We need to put in place a long-term
vision of one generation of fathers (and
mothers) passing on the baton of spiritual
greatness to the next.

What is being learned in your home
today can impact persons yet unborn until
the Lord comes again.

Now is the time to clean up our acts
before our children catch on that we are
not practicing what we preach. We all
need to do better, abandoning our bad
ways to walk worthy of the high calling to

be a child of God, a royal prince or
princess in the court of the king of kings,
and an ambassador for Christ.

If fathers, in particular, pray with and
for their children, if they allow them to
see Christ in them, then they will influ-
ence their children’s lives forever, even if
the youth try to stray away. If fathers love,
lead, teach, and guide them, as they
laugh, learn and play with them, then they
model wholesome family life and create
good memories to last a lifetime..

As we all speak words of praise and

encouragement, as we speak our truth
with love, as we remain firm, consistent,
fair with no favourites, we teach our
nation’s children something about the
character of God who loves us all uncon-
ditionally, and yet holds us to account.
Bless your children by being the best
parent possible. Fathers who lead by
example provide spiritual and moral
security in turbulent times. May you rise
to the occasion, and change the course of
Bahamian social history, as we re-direct
our efforts to accomplish godly goals.