Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 106 No.181

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The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010



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MPS fall to spend

COMMUNILY Casi

Report reveals how
constituencies missed
out on project money

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ALMOST two years after it
was first allocated, three MPs
had failed to spend any of the
$100,000 in constituency
allowances made available to
them in the 2008/2009 budget
on a single upgrade or enhance-
ment project in their commu-
nities — among them, former
Prime Minister and MP for
Farm Road and Centreville
Perry Christie.

Neither MP for Bain and
Grants Town, Dr Bernard Not-
tage, Mr Christie or MP for
Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked
Island, Acklins and Long Cay
(MICAL), Alfred Gray, had
spent any of the total $300,000
provided in the 2008/2009 bud-
get for projects in their con-
stituencies by April 2010.

This is revealed in a report
compiled by the Ministry of
Finance in April 2010, just
months before the end of the
2009/2010 budget cycle tomor-
row, when the money will fail to
roll over for another year as the
Government cut backs in the
face of revenue shortfalls.

Yesterday Mr Gray claimed
that the figures did not reflect
the truth of the matter in his
case, as he had in fact spent the
full $100,000 for the second
year in his constituency. The
2007/2008 Ministry of Finance
report on the expenditure of
the constituency allowances
shows that Mr Gray had suc-
cessfully applied for just under
$100,000 to be spent on the
construction of the Acklins
Community Centre in 2007 and
the MP claimed that having
sought to have the same
amount spent on a Community
Centre in Mayaguana from the
following year's funds, he was
told by the Ministry of Finance
that they would prefer he use
second $100,00 allocation to fin-
ish the project in Acklins. He
said he agreed to this and the
contract for the centre was
signed in November 2009.

Messages left for Dr Not-
tage and Mr Christie were not
returned.

In the case of Dr Nottage,
former minister of health, the
failure to allocate any of the
funds in his constituency were a

SEE page 10



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You Can Be Bl
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EAA Ger
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BUT team
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By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



FOR the first time in the his-
tory of the Bahamas Union of
Teachers, the entire executive
team was voted out of office at
the union’s 63rd annual meeting
yesterday.

Up to press time, the union
was in the process of selecting
three committees, an election
commission, a candidacy com-
mittee and an appeals commit-
tee, for elections scheduled Sep-

SEE page 10





BU GaN emmy OD LTE





PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured with Archbishop Desmond Tutu (left), at a dinner in n the Archbishop’ s honour held Satur-
day at the home of Sol Kerzner in Cape Town, South Africa. Mr Ingraham is in South Africa for the FIFA World Cup, which has now

reached the quarter-final stages.

Psychologist
speaks out on

homicide trend

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GREATER focus on clini-
cal research, educational
resources and community
involvement is needed to fully
address the growing trend of
homicides in the Bahamas,
according to psychologist Dr
David Allen.

Based on two years of
focused research, he said that

Police confident of apprehending
suspects over six recent homicides

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE are con-
fident they will
apprehend the sus-
pects wanted in con-
nection with all six
homicides commit-
ted over six days last
week.











ELLISON
GREENSLADE



Cheryl Grant-Bethel
yet to give up post
as deputy director



ings are under inves-
tigation, and police
are working effec-
tively to bring six
suspects to court.
Detectives
charged one person

.) in connection with

one of the murders
on Monday, expect
to charge another
today, and people
will also be charged
in connection with

THE BROILING feud over
the appointment of the Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions con-
tinued yesterday with sources
in the Attorney General’s office
confirming that Cheryl Grant-
Bethel has yet to give up her
post as deputy director and
move to the office of Law
Reform and Revision Depart-
ment.

At this new office, Mrs
Grant-Bethel was expected to
head the post of Deputy Law

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance

the remaining four murders

: ee : Reform and Revision Commis-
as investigations continue.

the current behavioral patterns ‘ )
sioner, as the post of Director

Cc iSSi f Poli
displayed by adults are paral- Sean mena ane Tm

Ellison Greenslade said the














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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS









$100,000 constituency
allowance helped MPs tackle
‘minor’ issues, says Laing

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
Alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE provision of a $100,000 constituency
allowance to each MP in two recent budget
cycles - but which has now been dropped
due to the government’s revenue slump -
made a “world of difference” to the ability of
political representatives to make small but
positive changes in their constituencies,
according to the Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing.

A Ministry of Finance report obtained by
The Tribune records that FNM MPs were
slightly more successful in spending money
allocated to them for constituency projects in
the 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 budget cycles
under the current FNM administration.

The report, compiled in April 2010, shows
that 17 PLP MPs spent $1,568,290.46 out of
a total $1.7 million in constituency allowance
funds available to them in the form of
$100,000 allocations per MP in 2007/2008.
That amounted to expenditure of 92.3 per
cent of all monies allocated to them. In the
same period, 24 FNM MPs spent $2,358,678
out of a total of $2.4 million - 98.3 per cent.

Report

By the time the report was compiled in
April 2010, PLP MPs had spent $991,800.70,
or 58 per cent of a total of $1.7 million allo-
cated in the 2008/2009 budget. FNM MPs
spent $1,825,473.02 out of a total of $2.4
million, or 76 per cent. This means that over
both years, the 17 PLP MPs spent 75 per
cent of their possible $3.4 million allocation
over two years, while the FNM MPs spent
87.7 per cent.

Among the most popular projects to have
been supported by MPs in their constituen-
cies are new or renovated basketball court
facilities, cleaning of roads and clearing of
property, the construction or upgrading of
parks, donations of computers to schools or

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MR ZHIVARGO
LAING and MP for
Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell (above),
who also spent
the full $200,000
allocated to his
constituency,
agreed that the
money allowed
MPs to address
problems in their
constituencies
more quickly than
they would tradi-
tionally have, or
will now have, the
capacity to.

Zhivargo Laing





“We Care About
Your Health”

computer labs, donations to community
organisations, the erection of signage and the
purchase of interactive whiteboards for
schools.

Mr Laing, also MP for Marco City, spent
more money than any other MP on con-
stituency projects funded through the con-
stituency allowances given to MPs in the
2007/2008 and 2008/2009 budget cycles,
according to the report. He was one of 11
MPs - seven FNM and four PLP - who spent
all of the $100,000 allocated to them in both
years. These MPs are: Loretta Butler Turn-
er, Larry Cartwright, Earl Deveaux, Edi-
son Key, Zhivargo Laing, Kenneth Russell,

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 3
LOCAL NEWS



Woman charged

‘iw Stroke patient ‘denied

judicial officer

@ 9
A WOMAN accused of
using a fraudulent job let- :
ter to sign bail has been i

charged with deceiving a

judicial officer
Jewel Elizabeth Hanna, : By MEGAN REYNOLDS

roe Toure stattreporer, §=FFamily Claims there was no room in ward

accused of deceiving a mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
local magistrate. Accord-



ing to court dockets. on A STROKE patient at he suffered a stroke early and was taken to hospital remained in the male med- “It’s disgusting,” she said.
ae Mav 28 fea Princess Margaret Hospital yesterday morning were by ambulance. ical ward. Hospital administrator
a eee deceive was allegedly denied Inten- outraged that he was being His sister flew from Mia- “The doctor said his Coralee Adderley said:
Magistrate Carolita sive Care treatment yester- kept in the male medical mi to see him as his condi- brain is swelling every “Physicians have met with
Bethell by means of a false day as there was no room ward after his doctor said tion appeared to be seri- minute, and he needs tobe — the family and I have not
podem for him in the ward, his he needed Intensive Care ous. in Intensive Care but there spoken to them yet, but I
Eisarwhowes family claim. treatment. — Yesterday afternoon, the are no beds,” a friend of the — can confirm he is in a bed in
areneaed belo Mame: Relatives who travelled Mr Rahming had suffered family claimed Mr Rah- family told The Tribune. the male surgical ward.
eae mene: from as far as Miamitosee astroke at hishome in Yel- _ming’s brain was swelling — “He is in critical condi- “IT am not aware that he
Davis on Monday was : Anthony Rahming, 47, after low Elder Gardens at and he needed to be in _ tion. needs to be in Intensive
granted $5,000 bail. The : around midnight yesterday Intensive Care, but he “How can someone in Care, but we will meet with

as ace summed 4a critical condition be left like the physicians and the fam-
Ostober co that? And his family are ily and allow them to keep

. - not getting any answers. you updated.”
¢ AN American accused
of gun and ammunitions i
possession is expected i
back in court tomorrow i uper Si |

Kevin Godfrey, 55, of
Salt Lake City, Utah, was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethell in
Court 8, Bank Lane on
Monday, charged with
possession of an unli-
censed firearm and posses-
sion of ammunition.

It is alleged that on Sun-
day, June 27, Godfrey was
n possession of a .357
Smith and Wesson
revolver as well as 19 live
rounds of .357 ammunition
allegedly found in his bag-
gage while he was leaving
the country.

He pleaded not guilty to
the charges but has been
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison until
tomorrow when he will
return to court for a bail
hearing.

Margaret Morgan
Thomas dies age 80

Mrs. Margaret Morgan
Thomas of the Isle of Man,
formerly of Nassau, passed
away at her home in Bal-
lasalla, Isle of Man on April
21, at the age of 80.

Mrs Morgan spent more
than 20 years of her adult
life in the Bahamas where
her first husband, Lewis
Morgan worked extensively
in Education as a teacher at
Government High
School, as Director of Edu-
cation and also as headmas-
ter of St Andrews School.
Mr Morgan is remembered
fondly by many Bahamians
to whom he taught Geogra-
phy with skill and enthusi-

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914















SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M.,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

































































WEBSITE

www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Gibson tells the Carlton Francis story

DURING the Budget debate, Kennedy
MP Kenyatta Gibson, in putting the case for
legalising gambling, told the tragic story of
the political churchman who sacrificed him-
self to support his church’s anti-gambling
beliefs.

The irony was that the church never assist-
ed him or protested his fall. Instead it became
a firm supporter of the very government that
had condemned their brother. It was the
government that had introduced the evil that
Baptists claimed they abhorred. Baptist
churchmen took the position that neither
they, nor their members, would ever sup-
port a government that depended on gam-
bling as a source of national income.

Mr Gibson was, of course, referring to
the late Carlton Francis, once Minister of
Finance in the Pindling government, who
was also a lay preacher in the Baptist church.
Although Mr Gibson did not name the
denomination to which he referred, he was
talking of the Baptists. Because of the large
vote the church controls at election time, all
governments have been loath to take them
on over one of the strictest tenants of their
faith. Gambling is a capital sin which the
church claims it will not tolerate, nor permit
the indulgence of its members.

We recall the election of ’67 when the
PLP came to power for the first time. Just
days before Bahamians were to go to the
polls, the PLP sent in a release for publica-
tion. If the UBP were returned to power, it
said, it would mean the extension of casino
gambling. This was not true. As a matter of
fact it was an unfair lie, because Sir Roland
Symonette, this country’s first premier, who
was a staunch Methodist, was personally
opposed to gambling. No such plan was on
his party’s agenda.

However, it spooked the Baptist commu-
nity and, of course, churchmen stepped up
their political opposition. There was hardly
time to deny the story because Bahamians
were getting ready to go to the polls. It was
only with a PLP government, said the
release, that Bahamians could be assured
that gambling would be kept out of this coun-

behalf.”

The PLP, of course, won the day, but it
was not long afterwards that casino gam-
bling was introduced and flourished in the
Bahamas. And it was only six years after the
PLP came to power that Mr Francis was put
in the awkward position of having to choose
between his government and his conscience.
The issue was gambling. Here the politician
had to give way to the conscience of the
Baptist preacher. He voted against his gov-
ernment on the gambling issue and in 1973
had to resign from the Pindling cabinet.

That was bad enough, but a vindictive

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prime minister never forgave him his mortal
sin. Thrown on the political trash heap, Mr
Francis was hounded from pillar to post. A
respected teacher before he entered poli-
tics, he could not get a job at the College of
the Bahamas. As a matter of fact, he found it
difficult after that to make a living.

As he crossed the street at one of Sir Lyn-
den’s political meetings, the “Chief” looked
down from his lofty dais, spotted his former
finance minister and sneered that there went
Carlton Francis, but all he could see was a
three-piece suit. It was true, Mr Francis then
dying of cancer, was a shell of his former
self and all one could see was a baggy suit.
The crowd jeered. It was cruel.

But where was his church, which had
declared that it would never support a gov-
ernment that got its revenue from gambling?
Mr Gibson said that in his research, he could
not find that Mr Francis’ church came to his
support when, having been abandoned by
his party, he decided to run for parliament
from the South Beach constituency. Of
course, with his party against him and no
help from his church, he lost the contest.

Mr Gibson said that “the record will show
that they abandoned him and quickly
realigned themselves with the same political
party which he had abandoned on their

And, said Mr Gibson, “to complicate this
issue many leading Churchmen of the day
then accepted positions of significance from
the same political party which had expanded
casino gambling. These princes and princess-
es now piously sat as secretary generals and
parliamentarians in the political organiza-
tion which had ushered in the very same
expansion, which they previously had vocif-
erously argued against...

“And so the question begs an answer,”
said Mr Gibson, “what did they do for the
Prince of their Church, Carlton Elisha Fran-
cis who sided with his Church on the gam-
bling issue and gave up his cabinet portfolio?
Absolutely nothing. The man could not even
get the pastorship of a recognizable Church
in this denomination.”
try Mr Gibson revived this bit of history to
advise Bahamians to hold their own counsel
in what they believed was best for them and
their families and not be guided by special

In the debate on whether gambling —
the numbers game — should be made legal,
he said the “people have the inalienable right
to choose for themselves.”

Mr Gibson ended his presentation in the
House with a quote from Mr Francis: “They
who stand on the sand banks of history trying
to hold back the tide will be swept up in the
flood gates of insurrection.”

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

The former Minister of
Education recently confirmed
that the education system in
the Bahamas is “broken” and
needs a total transformation.
Most educated and concerned
citizens would probably echo
that sentiment.

As a former educator of 34
years, I don’t have a first hand
knowledge of the Bahamian
system, but I would like to
examine the nature of the
“total transformation” of
which Mr Sears speaks and
translate that into something a
little more concrete and spe-
cific.

It is easy to criticise any
educational system and rant
and rave that it has to change
and improve. Instead of work-
ing towards solutions to the
problems, finding someone to
blame and accuse of being
incompetent seems to be the
extent of public discussion
and debate. Most people
don’t know how to change
and improve the education
system, but they know “some-
one” must do “something”!

No “one” can improve and
change the Bahamian educa-
tion system. “Every one” has
a part to play — government,
teachers, parents and stu-
dents. Unless all players are
committed, coordinated and
accountable, nothing will hap-
pen. All four tyres on a car
must be inflated to the same
pressure for the car to run
smoothly and all four mem-
bers of the educational sys-
tem must operate in harmony
as well.

What does this mean for
the government? Firstly, the
government must develop
and implement a curriculum
that meets the needs of the
future and not the past,
includes the most effective
methodologies and materials,
and focuses on inquiry based
learning, problem solving and
creative thinking. Govern-
ment must provide safe and
healthy school buildings and
grounds, an appraisal system
to help measure progress, and
professional support to con-
tinually improve the educa-
tion of the nation’s teachers.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Frank Henderson, I read
your article this morning
and J have to say that I was
quite disturbed by your
rhetoric. I’m unclear as to
your statement that “chil-
dren’s well being has suf-
fered due to woman becom-
ing more responsible for
their own bodies and repro-

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



The government must set
standards and have the means
to assist schools and teachers
to meet these high standards.
It will be an expensive and
difficult responsibility, but
without this kind of govern-
ment leadership, little else will
happen.

What does this mean for
teachers? Teachers must
faithfully teach the prescribed
curriculum as set by the Min-
istry. They must constantly
work to learn more effective
methodologies and be willing
to deal with the diversity of
students that enter their class-
es. All students have differ-
ent strengths and weakness-
es and teachers must attempt
to teach not only the eager
but also the reluctant and dif-
ficult. No one ever said teach-
ing was an easy job and if the
classroom is too hot an envi-
ronment for some, then they
should get out of the kitchen.
For those, who are commit-
ted and have chosen teaching
as a vocation, not a job, they
should be well compensated.
Teaching is difficult, but with-
out dedicated teachers who
love to work with children,
little improvement will hap-
pen.

What does this mean for
parents? The parent has
always been considered the
“primary educator”. Parents
have a responsibility for the
education of their children
from the day of their birth,
until they grow to become
responsible adults. It does not
end when the child goes to
school!

Parents must read to their
children and talk to their chil-
dren before they go to school
and teach them the basic
manners and responsibilities
to become contributing mem-
bers of our society.

Once the child enters public
education the parents have
just as much responsibility as
before — they must supervise
homework, stay in close con-
tact with the teachers and

duction.” How is that? It
seems to me that with the
pill and the knowledge of
birth control, that women
do not bring unwanted chil-
dren into the world.

Is it better and more pro-
ductive for women to keep
having unwanted babies?

You need only to look
around your own environ-
ment to see what the lack of
birth control is all about and
what a pity it is in this coun-
try.

Young girls who are
babies themselves, pregnant,
simply out of ignorance, or,
because of the lack of avail-
ability for birth control. Is
this scenario more pleasing
to you? I don’t see how...

I also take great offence
to your statement that
women “have never been

Odessa

Educational
transformation:
what does it mean?

school, and set high expecta-
tions for their children’s
behaviour and academic
progress. For the 18 hours a
day when the child is not in
school, parents are the teach-
ers! Being a parent is harder
than being a teacher but if
Bahamian schools are going
to steadily improve, parental
involvement in their child’s
education is essential or very
little improvement will hap-
pen.

What does this mean for
the child? Every child is
equipped with different skills
and abilities, interests and
family background. Regard-
less of their mental, physical
and emotional makeup they
are all responsible for one
thing — the choices they make
when they are at school. If
they want to be successful in
life they need to practice self-
discipline, work to the best of
their abilities, listen to class-
room instruction attentively,
and conscientiously do home-
work. If they don’t make
good choices they must learn
to accept the consequences.
A student’s job is hard work
but so is a parent’s and so is a
teacher’s.

Everyone in the education-
al community has a very
demanding and challenging
role to play and everyone has
to meet their own individual
challenges. Unless all four
partners — the Ministry of
Education, the teachers, the
parents and the students are
working in harmony towards
the common goal of academ-
ic excellence — the transfor-
mation that Mr Sears is
searching for will never hap-
pen.

Only the commitment of all
of the members involved can
make it a reality! Otherwise
the Bahamas, like the Titanic,
will continue to slowly, but
relentlessly, slip beneath the
waves!

TIME TO SINK OR
SWIM

Nassau,

June 11, 2010.

Women have come far and to not need to he debased by ignorance

seen more as sex objects as
they are today.”

Iam positive that many of
the women who are business
executives, working moth-
ers, and mothers in general,
will feel just as shocked and
insulted by that ignorant
statement.

Women have come far
and certainly do not need to
be debased by you and your
ignorance.

God won't help in this
scenario, Mr Henderson, the
only thing that will help
however, is education and
teaching women how to be
responsible for themselves
and their bodies.

SUE KATZ
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

June 16, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

WALKABOUT

POLICE

PINEWOOD

Residents told: all is being
done to crack down on crime

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE Commissioner Elli-
son Greenslade and his team
of senior officers reassured
Pinewood Gardens residents
that all is being done to crack-
down on crime following a mur-
der in the area which trauma-
tised a mother and her three
children.

The Commissioner, flanked
by Assistant Commissioner
Glenn Miller and Assistant
Superintendent Hulan Hanna
and a dozen senior officials,
reassured the community that
police are doing their utmost
to stamp out crime.

Murder-accused Bradley Fer-
guson was shot in Sequoia
Street, Pinewood Gardens, on
Saturday evening, and forced
himself into a car occupied by a
mother and her three children,
ages 11, 14 and 16.

Ferguson had recently been
released from prison. He was
acquitted on appeal for the
March 2002 murders of preg-
nant Rosemary Bennett-Wright
and her son Jakeel Wright of
Fox Hill, as well as the attempt-
ed murders of Devonna Brown
and Omega Fox.

His murder was the sixth in
Nassau in just six days, and fol-
lows a number of violent crimes
and homicides in Pinewood in
recent years.

The Commissioner and
senior officers on ‘walkabout’ in
Pinewood yesterday visited an





dent of Pinewood Gardens.

area of Avocado Street where
there have been seven murders
in recent years, including the
double murder of a mother and
son in January last year.

Mr Hanna said Ferguson also
lived in the area near a strip
mall housing the Platinum Play-
ers sports bar and L and M
Wholesale store.

The police also visited griev-
ing mother Maria Scott exactly
four years after her police offi-
cer son Marcian Clarke, 31, was
shot dead outside her house in
Willow Tree Avenue.

Mr Clarke was killed shortly
before he was due to testify as a
witness in the murder trial of
his former police partner Jim-
my Armbrose, Ms Scott said.

“It’s ironic there are so many
police officers in the area today
because this is the exact spot



where it happened exactly four
years ago,” she said.

“This is like an omen saying
everything is going to be OK.”

As Mr Greenslade and his
team continued on the neigh-
bourhood patrol they were
greeted by Bishop Neil Ellis
who had seen them passing
from the Mount Tabor Baptist
Church in Pinewood.

Mr Ellis expressed his seri-
ous concerns about crime in the
area and level of violence in the
country.

The Commissioner argued
crime is not a localised prob-
lem confined to crime “hot
spots” but he said the victims
and perpetrators of crime are
often people with criminal
records who have been charged

SEE page 15

GARDEN S



‘Significant improvement’ in murder detection rate

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT: While more murders were
recorded so far for the year as opposed to last
year, Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade
revealed there has been significant improvement
in its detection rate.

Of the 47 recorded murders to date in the
Bahamas, he reported that the police have solved
38.

“Our detection rate is better and it is improv-
ing,” he told the press while in Grand Bahama
yesterday.

Commissioner Greenslade was in Freeport to
attend a farewell reception at Police Headquar-
ters for the United States Customs and Border
Protection and Drug Enforcement Agency
(DEA) officers. US Ambassador Nicole Avant
was also present.

Mr Greenslade took time out to give an update
on criminal matters, including the recent homi-
cides that occurred in New Providence and
firearm seizures.

Of the six homicides in Nassau, police have
charged one person and are preparing to charge
suspects in three other matters.

“We charged (one person) yesterday in one
matter and we will charge (someone) again
tomorrow in another matter. A day following, we
will bring additional charges in a third matter.

And I feel very confident that we will bring
charges in a fourth matter,” Commissioner
Greenslade said.

He was particularly encouraged by the work
the police have done and the progress they are
making relative to the murder of a young woman
at Cordeaux Avenue.

Mr Greenslade also noted that the police are
following very distinct leads in an outstanding
matter of a young man who was found dead at
Carmichael Road near Gladstone Road.

He said the people committing murders are
persons who have been in and out of the prison
and court systems.

“T believe it is important to tell you that people
who are committing murders are not church-
going people; these are not people that want to
have a conversation with you and want to attend
conflict resolution classes.

“These are people that have been in and out of
the system charged with murder, illegal firearm,
drug trafficking, and armed robbery, and who
have been put on bail and are re-offending.

“We know the names and we have suspects we
are seeking.

“These people are in and out of the system. It’s
as real as that.

“And sadly, over the course of the year, last
year and years prior, many of the victims of mur-
ders are people that are on bail for murder and
have been in out of the system. That is what we
are dealing with,” said the nation’s police chief.

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COMMISSIONER OF POLICE Ellison Greenslade speaks to a rene in Pinewood Gardens yesterday.

URSA CERT SC DS DUT)

: By MEGAN REYNOLDS
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PINEWOOD residents called

: for consistent community polic-
: ing, positive activities for young
: people and a clean-up of their
: neighbourhood to help combat
: crime in the area as senior police
: conducted a high-profile walka-
: bout in the community.

Young people who have

: grown up in Pinewood said they
: have seen the area degenerate in
recent years as there are limited
: positive activities for young peo-
: ple and fewer community police
: on the streets.

They also called for the return

of community policing to com-
: bat crime.

Kevin Moss, 20, of Willow

: Tree Avenue, said misguided
: youths in Pinewood are drawn
: into criminal behaviour because
: they are inspired by the drug
: dealers, thieves, burglars, rob-
: bers and murderers who return
: to the community after being
: charged by police and released
: On bail. These individuals con-
; tinue to commit crimes in the
: area because there are not
: enough police on the streets at
: night, he said.

“The police might be here for

? two weeks from now, but it will
: never get under control if they
: keep letting these people back
: on the streets,” Mr Moss said.

“Tf they would keep walking

: around and have community
: policing that would be a good
: thing.



“When we had the police
here with Urban Renewal, every
night we were sure the park was
empty, clean and calm.

“Now they stopped, people’s
houses are broken into every
night, and the young people are
just seeing violence, they are not
seeing any positive activity.

“They say there’s nothing to
do so they just get into trouble.”

Mr Moss said he does not fol-
low a particular political party
but said he has noticed how
community projects thriving
under PLP MP Allyson May-
nard-Gibson have dropped of
since FNM MP Byran Wood-
side came to power in 2007.

He is keen to run a baseball
or alternative sports programme
for young people if given the
resources.

“The young people don’t
have anybody to look up to so
they end up doing what the
criminals are doing,” Mr Moss
said.

“They think crime is the way
to go, but if they had someone
to look up to, a positive pro-
gramme for them, it would help.

“All I want to do is do good
for the community. I don’t mind
what, just give me the equip-
ment.”

Pinewood Park is overgrown,
one of the basketball hoops has
been broken and Mr Moss said
it has been hanging unmended
for years. The children’s swings
have snapped and rusty chains
hang unused, and residents say
the public toilet has never been
opened.



Dumped cars rust in front
yards and on empty lots, fly-tip-
ping, dumping and overgrown
areas are dotted between the
well-kept homes of respectable
families, and cleaning these
areas up would provide enough
work for all the unemployed
members of the community
looking for work, Mr Moss said.

While the population of
Pinewood has swelled over the
last ten years, the infrastructure
has fallen into disrepair,
explained resident Angelo King,
21.

Mr King said basketball
“saved him” from being tempt-
ed into a life of crime as he got a
scholarship to a Oklahoma
school and has graduated from
the University of Central Okla-
homa with a psychology degree.
He hopes to work as a counsel-
lor in Nassau.

He said: “Pinewood has got
worse but it’s not a bad area.

“There are good people here,
but there is also a certain set of
bad people around and they are
very bad people.

“The important thing is to
stop the kids from being influ-
enced by them and give them
something positive to do.”

ig
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PHONE: 322-2157

Tue Roman CarHoutc Community IN THE BAHAMAS

IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE

A SOLEMN PonrTIFICAL MASS

TO CELEBRATE THE

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Monday, July 5th at 7:30 p.m.





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

BRADLEY ROBERTS TAKES AIM AT MINISTER OF STATE FOR WORKS AND ENVIRONMENT

PLP chairman: FNM crippling BEC

PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts
attacked the FNM and its Minister of
State for Works and Environment
Phenton Neymour for “crippling”
the Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion.

In a statement yesterday, Mr
Roberts said he had announced an
unprecedented decrease in the basic
rate of electricity in 2003 when he
was the then Minister of Works
under the PLP administration.

This announcement, Mr Roberts
said, was well received throughout
the Bahamas even with the FNM
who were quick to claim that such a
reduction could only be made possi-
ble through the good stewardship of
the FNM and its previous two terms
in office.

“Since the FNM’s return to office,
the Junior Minister Phenton Ney-
mour and MP for South Beach with
the support of Minister Earl
Deveaux have repeatedly blamed
BEC financial deterioration on the

$100,000 constituency allowance helped PRIVAT ital teria

MPs tackle ‘minor’ issues, says Laing

2003 rate reduction. The PLP have
on numerous occasions provided fac-
tual evidence to deny this bogus
claim.

“The FNM in September 2003 not
only boldly endorsed the rate reduc-
tion as being possible only by their
stewardship during their term in
office and yet unashamedly on the
other hand blames the PLP. This is a
classical case of double mindedness.

“The plain and simple truth is that
Phenton Neymour and Earl
Deveaux were both sound asleep at
the wheel during the record oil price
crisis (when oil was at $147 per bar-
rel) and allowed the Corporation to
fully absorb Custom Duty and
Stamp Tax on BEC oil imports
which the corporation was unable
to bear as a result of the sharp spike
in oil and is the major reason BEC
finds itself with one foot on the
banana peel and the other in the
proverbial grave.

“The public will recall that BEC’s

former Chairman Frederick Gottlieb
disclosed to the press in February
2009 that BEC was aiming to come
“within $1 to $2 million of breaking
even” by the end of its financial year
September 2009. Junior Minister
Neymour has disclosed that the actu-
al loss for the year ending September
2009 was placed at $20 million.
Could this be the reason why Fred-
erick Gottlieb resigned and washed
his hands of this terrible and dismal
mismanagement of the Corporation
as a result of political interference?
The Ministers had failed to provide
an explanation as to why BEC’s
actual performance was so drasti-
cally different when compared with
the then able Chairman’s forecast,”
Mr Roberts said.

As it stands now, the PLP chair-
man said the FNM is seeking to find
a way out of “the very grave state”
that BEC finds itself in as a result of
“political interference” by Ministers
whose policies caused the corpora-

tion to hit “an all time low.”

“This much was acknowledged by
the general manager when he said
‘we are unable to procure various
parts and equipment and this has
affected our ability to adhere to
some of the maintenance schedules’.
This very simple and straight for-
ward statement is in direct and bla-
tant contrast to the disclosure made
by Junior Minister Neymour during
a recent contribution in the House of
Assembly.

“During his contribution, the
junior minister boldly assured New
Providence and Paradise Island res-
idences that the Bahamas Electrici-
ty Corporation (BEC) had made the
necessary preparations for the sum-
mer months and that power outages
were not foreseeable.

“Contrary to the misleading assur-
ances given by the junior minister,
our sources have informed us that
BEC power plants in New Provi-
dence and several family Islands will

FROM page two

Alvin Smith and in the PLP, Fred Mitchell,
Anthony Moss, Picewell Forbes and Oswald
Ingraham. Mr Laing, like several other MPs,
also obtained an extension on his con-
stituency allowance - in his case to the tune
of $8,944.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham was
recorded as having spent the total $100,000
allocated for his constituency in 2007/2008
on “upgrading public facilities” in his con-
stituency and $84,472.51 from the follow-
ing year’s allocation on “assistance with a
public beach facility” in Treasure Cay.

This facility is understood to include nine
cabanas, a main building, restroom facili-
ties, walking paths, parking, electrical, water
and telephone connections to central supply
and sporting facilities.

Mr Laing and MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell, who also spent the full $200,000
allocated to his constituency, both agreed
that the money allowed MPs to address
problems in their constituencies more quick-
ly than they would traditionally have, or
will now have, the capacity to.

“It speeded up the process in getting
minor things done. Under the normal
process through the Ministry of Works you
put in an application and it goes on an enor-
mous pile and it’s hopeless. Something as
simple as putting in a road crossing on a
dangerous road can take forever,” said Mr
Mitchell, who also made numerous contri-
butions to local community organisations
such as the Fox Hill Mother's Club and the
Monastery Park Crime Watch Committee.

Mr Laing said he felt there was little room
for abuse of the funds by the MPs.

“They'd submit a letter to myself and that

Our ATM Machines will be out of service from:
5:00 p.m. Wednesday June 30, 2010 to 9:00 a.m.
Thursday July 1, 2010 for routine maintenance.

“It speeded up the process
in getting minor things
done. Under the normal
process through the Min-
istry of Works you put in an
application and it goes on
an enormous pile and it’s
hopeless.”



Zhivargo Laing

letter would have the request and the sup-
porting documents. So if they wanted to
make contribution to an organization in
their area, a Junkanoo group, it had to be
accompanied by letter from that group. If
they wanted to purchase computers, they
needed invoices from the computer com-
pany. For the development of a park, they’d
either have to get confirmation from Public
Works that the contract they got was rea-
sonable or a quantity surveyor or architect
had to provide that level of confirmation so
in every instance had to be accompanied by
supporting documentation and cheques were
then made payable to vendors, not to the
Mps.”

He could not say whether the Govern-
ment would continue the initiative when
economic conditions are more favorable.

See tomorrow’s Tribune for a further
breakdown of expenditures by MPs in their
constituencies.






Tutu.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

Signed Management

le Bank of The Bahamas



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham is pic-
tured with South
Africa's Justice Minis-
ter, Jeffrey Radede (left)
and Sol Kerzner (right),
at Kerzner's home in
Cape Town, South
Africa on Saturday,
June 26, 2010. Mr.
Ingraham was an invit-
ed guest at a dinner
held at the Kerzner
home in honour of
Archbishop Desmond

pantetes.
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applications.

>
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Service Representative — will
responsible for providing detailed
information and support to clients
and perspective clients on all the
products and services provided by the
organization. Great oral and written
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The ideal candidate should also have
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in office procedures and computer











a

BRADLEY ROBERTS

not be able to meet the summer
power demands and the generators
have not been properly maintained.
Farmers Cay in the Exumas is an
example; one of its two generators
was recently completely destroyed
by fire and the remaining engine is in
need of maintenance. A promise to
provide a rented generator is likely
to be conditional on BEC being able
to obtain credit,” Mr Roberts said.















PM Hubert
Ingraham (left),
is greeted by
President of
Fédération Inter-
nationale de Football Associa-
tion (FIFA) Sepp Blatter dur-
ing a World Cup match in
Johannesburg, South Africa
on Monday, June 28, 2010.





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THE TRIBUNE




Our society has failed our population in education. We have to

change this.’ — Philip P. Smith

Let's honour our academic
‘heroes’ — ex-PLP Minister

Philip Smith points to achievements of Rhodes Scholars

SOCIETY needs to hon-
our those of our people who
achieve internationally-cel-
ebrated academic success,
specifically young people
who have earned the
Rhodes Scholar Award, for-
mer PLP Minister Philip P.
Smith suggested yesterday.

He said: " Our society has
failed our population in edu-
cation. We have to change
this. I am convinced that if a
meaningful effort was made
to craft people who have
achieved in academic and
intellectual pursuits as
‘heroes’ then we would help
those young people still in
school to consider achieving
to their potential in acade-
mic pursuits.”

Mr Smith said this process
could begin with regular
focus on the activities of
people like our four Rhodes
scholars, Dr Deidre Cox,
Felice Swapp, Dr Christian
Campbell and Myron Rolle.

"Tsupport a grant to each
of these exceptional young
people provided by The
Bahamas from either the
public purse or private
sources very much along the
lines of the American
MacArthur Fellowship, pop-
ularly referred to as the
Genius Award,” he said.

Mr Smith proposed that a
panel of “noteworthy citi-
zens” should manage the
award.

"As I envision it, the
Bahamas financial award
would only be made on suc-
cessful completion of a
degree at Oxford Universi-
ty,” he said.



MYRON ROLLE

“It is hoped to find fund-
ing to permit the award of a
stipend of $100,000 per
annum for a period of five
years to every Bahamian
Rhodes Scholar while they
live in the Bahamas.”

Selected

He added that the
awardees would be selected
by the Committee of Selec-
tion of the Rhodes Scholar-
ship Trustees for the Com-
monwealth Caribbean
Rhodes Scholarship (an
authority outside the
Bahamas).

He continued: " Pho-
tographs of the holders of
doctorates should be proud-
ly displayed in the arrival
section of the Lynden Pin-
dling Airport with special
recognition for Rhodes
Scholars and Rhodes Schol-
arship finalists.

"I propose a scholarship
donation of $100,000 to each

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

finalist. The proposed dol-
lar value of this award is in
the same range as the value
of grants provided by the
Government of The
Bahamas to Olympic Gold
Medal Winners," he said.

Mr Smith = strongly
believes that at the very
least, it would serve to
inspire others with the
potential to make the effort
to enable consideration for
granting of the same schol-
arship to them.

“There would be no oth-
er restrictions and no
requirement to perform any
specific functions or work.
They would be free to do as
they pleased with their
time,” he added.

“The premise is very sim-
ple, these extraordinarily tal-
ented people would not be
unproductive with their time
and talent. Any creative or
productive activity they
would indulge in while in
The Bahamas would serve
to enrich the community.”

Mr Smith noted that:
“There are many others in
our society who give so
much without a community
based award but they would
all be subject to biased
assessments of individual
value. The achievement of
a doctorate, though not a
guarantee of notable intelli-
gence, is free of community
subjectivity.

“The distinction of a
Rhodes Scholarship Award
is internationally recognised
as the achievement of sin-
gular excellence in academ-
ic pursuits.”



eA RR ae TS

UE Re a a a

BAMBOO Town MP Branville McCart-
ney received an honorary doctorate degree
when he gave the graduating address at
the 30th Commencement Exercises at
Sojourner-Douglass College.

Thirty-one students were graduated from
the college, five in Masters of Applied
Social Science degrees and 26 undergrad-
uates.

Mr McCartney advised the graduates
that they are educated, enabled and
empowered, and encouraged them to fol-
low their convictions and determine their
own destiny just as Sojourner Truth (whose
name the institution bears), never with
malice or anger, but with determination.

In addition, Mr McCartney stressed the
words of Frederick Douglass, that they
must “pray with their legs.”

Indeed, the Bamboo Town MP remind-
ed them of the famous words of Mr Dou-



Branville McCartney

glass, that “I prayed for twenty years but
received no answer until I pray with my
legs.”

Mr McCartney encouraged the gradu-
ates to find their legs and pursue excel-
lence for there is much to accomplish in the
Bahamas.

He questioned the students, however,
as to what “moral compass” would be their
guide as they start their own sojourn.

He suggested giving to those who are
less fortunate; knowing that the greater
richness comes from enriching the lives of
others.

“Do not settle for the passive life, nor act
the part of the cold and timid soul who
shall know neither victory nor defeat,” Mr
McCartney said.

The students were urged to unleash their
inner strength and unbridle their inner
selfless self.



SER NY EAs
Coat ae

Qualifications:

B.A. in Business Administration or Entrepreneurship
Minimum of 5 years' experience in marine industry
Must be a strong self starter

Knowledge of QuickBooks, inventory control &

merchandising

Ability to create design boards
Must be able to lift heavy loads

Applicant must be willing to work Saturdays and some

evenings.

Please submit resume to dpa@dpa-media.com.

No Phone Calls Please
Only short-listed applicants will be contacted.





IMPORTANT CUSTOMER NOTICE

Sagicor Life Inc (Sagicor) and Capital Life Insurance Company Bahamas Limited (Capital Life) wish to remind
their customers of some important changes in service arrangements.

With effect from July 1, 2010, Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited (Family Guardian) will assume the
administration of policies and mortagages from the Capital Life and Sagicor portfolios. Family Guardian is a
wholly-owned life and health subsidiary of FamGuard Corporation Limited, with which Sagicor has a strategic

alliance.

Should you have any queries regarding these changes, please contact Ms. Necka Wells, Senior Manager,
Operations at:

Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
Family Guardian Financial Centre

East Bay & Church Street

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 396-1365

Sagicor Life Inc and Capital Life Insurance Company Bahamas Limited continue to enhance its systems and
procedures with the aim of improving the delivery of service to its customers, and wishes to thank you in
advance for your co-operation with this matter.

Sagicor S



| he Capital Life Insurance Company Bahamas Ltd.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 9



Energy security inseparable trom

By LARRY SMITH

HIRTY years ago
a mechanical fail-
ure at a nuclear
power plant in
Pennsylvania released radioac-
tive gases into the atmosphere,
forcing the evacuation of
140,000 people from the sur-
rounding area. It was a signifi-
cant turning point in the devel-
opment of nuclear power.

As Canadian commentator
Jeff Rubin recently pointed out,
“The real legacy of Three Mile
Island wasn’t what happened
back in 1979, but rather what
happened — or more precisely
didn’t happen — over the course
of the next 30 years in the US."

He was referring to the fact
that the near-meltdown of the
Three-Mile Island reactor
changed public acceptance of
nuclear power plants, and none
has been built in the US since.
Could the catastrophic explo-
sion at the BP drilling rig in the
Gulf of Mexico have the same
effect on the oil industry today?

Well, in Rubin's words:
"The scene of hurricane-force
winds raining oil on New
Orleans and the rest of Ameri-
ca’s Gulf Coast will no doubt
make for an apocalyptic image
of the end of the age of
oil... Unfortunately, our depen-
dence on the stuff will survive
this catastrophe.”

Now, a major new report
from insurance giant Lloyd's
and British think tank Chatham
House, spells out just how the
end game for oil is likely to play
out. It argues that our over-
reliance on fossil fuels is dri-
ving companies to take unnec-
essary environmental risks, and
calls for a rapid shift towards
low carbon energy sources as
the only way to address the
industry's soaring risk profile.

The meticulously researched
Lloyd's report says the world
has entered "a period of deep
uncertainty in how we will
source energy for power, heat
and mobility, and how much
we will have to pay for it." The
key factors are constraints on
“easy to access” oil; the urgency
of reducing carbon emissions;
and a sharp rise in energy
demand, particularly from Chi-
na. This means that business
and political leaders will have to
deal with energy supplies that
are increasingly less reliable
and more expensive, leading
Richard Ward, Lloyd's chief
executive, to urge governments
to identify "a clear path
towards sustainable energy
which businesses can follow."

Business as usual forecasts
suggest a 40 per cent increase in
global energy demand by 2030,
requiring an investment of
some $26 trillion. And while we
should be directing that invest-
ment to the technologies with
the best future, the most cost-
effective short-term approach
is to cut fossil fuel consumption
as much as possible.

Lloyd's says an oil supply
crunch as early as 2013 is likely,
due to a combination of insuf-
ficient investment in produc-
tion over the last two decades
and surging demand from Asia
following the global recession.
This could create a price spike
in excess of $200 per barrel,
with profound consequences
for the way business operates.

In 2008 oil prices peaked at
$140 per barrel, and most of us
can recall the impacts of that
price shock. Consumer behav-
iour began to change dramati-
cally, and a new price spike can
be expected to prompt drastic
national measures to cut oil
dependency.

This forecast is backed up
by the US National Intelligence
Council, which says the next
decade or so will see unprece-
dented pressure on world
resources, making an energy
transition inevitable. "The only
questions are when and how
abruptly or smoothly such a
transition occurs. (This) is an
event that historically has only
happened once a century at
most, with momentous conse-
quences.”

Here are the main indica-
tors of the looming energy tran-
sition as outlined in the Lloyd's
report:

¢ Global demand is putting
pressure on fossil fuel markets
and increasing price volatility.

¢ Past investment trends cou-
pled with resurging demand
suggest an imminent oil supply
crunch.

¢ Policies to reduce carbon
emissions are inevitable and
will affect the viability of cur-
rent operations.

¢ Renewable energy is
attracting unprecedented
investment and is now part of
the mainstream energy mix in
some countries.

¢ Existing energy infrastruc-
ture will be vulnerable to

—

7
Ki
extreme weather events caused
by climate change.

Lloyd's says that rising ener-
gy costs "are best tackled in the
short term by changes in prac-
tices or via the use of technolo-
gy to reduce energy consump-
tion. The wider use of renew-
able energy and even self gen-
eration, bring added price and
supply security benefits, and
governments have an impor-
tant role in delivering policies
that create the necessary invest-
ment conditions.”

Without stronger policies, it
is unclear whether there are
sufficient drivers for large-scale
renewable investment and
deployment, the Lloyd's report
says. "Only strong policy incen-
tives will promote renewable
energy activity under existing
market conditions...Where
there is political will, invest-
ments are taking place.”

Renewable

By 2008, for example,
Europe was generating nearly a
quarter of all new electricity
from renewable sources. And
last year the EU required all
new buildings to comply with
tough energy-performance
standards. Even stricter
requirements were made for
public sector buildings, requir-
ing “nearly zero” energy stan-
dards by the end of 2018. This
has set a clear agenda for the
construction industry.

So where do we stand on
these issues in the Bahamas?
Well, we are more vulnerable
than most because all of the
fossil fuel we use to drive our
economy has to be imported at
great cost. And Bahamians in
general must be highly moti-
vated to effect behavioural
changes — in both the public
and private sectors.

The government has been
pushing two big initiatives. An
expert committee was appoint-
ed by the Environment Min-
istry to formulate a national
energy policy, which was pub-
lished in 2008. And the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion began investigating alter-



native fuel sources, which led
to an invitation to private
investors to produce renewable
energy for purchase by BEC.

Unfortunately, BEC has
serious financial and opera-
tional difficulties, and abruptly
cancelled its two-year renew-
able energy tendering process
recently with nothing to show
for it. Meanwhile, the Environ-
ment Ministry is still building
a framework to implement the
national energy policy, with
help from the Inter-American
Development Bank.

"A policy can only take con-
crete form on the basis of hard
facts," BEST Commission
chairman Philip Weech told me
recently. "These did not exist
on renewable energy potential
across the country, despite
claims to the contrary. The IDB
was extremely helpful in facili-
tating our work to fill this gap."

Two major projects are cur-
rently underway by IDB-fund-
ed consultants. Information
from hotel, residential and pub-
lic building energy audits is
being used to develop a nation-
al energy efficiency plan, which
will address building code and
import tariff changes. This plan
will be completed by Septem-
ber, but some initial recom-
mendations were included in
the 2010-11 budget.

A detailed study on the
potential for renewable energy
will determine which technolo-
gies are feasible on a utility or
distributed scale in the
Bahamas. Researchers are col-
lecting and analysing relevant
data from all the main inhabit-
ed islands, and the Environ-
ment Ministry has held talks
with private investors on waste-
to-energy proposals for New
Providence.

The IDB consultants have
also been reviewing BECs
operational and financial issues.
This led to the engagement of a
team from the Canadian power
company, Emera, who were
given 120 days to produce a
turnaround plan for the corpo-
ration. Their proposals should
be ready by the end of July.

In tandem with this, the IDB

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consultants are reviewing our
regulatory regime to develop
renewable energy incentives
and electricity grid feed-in
guidelines. This review should
also be finished in July and the
next step would be to draft leg-
islation to fundamentally
reform the energy sector,
although no timeframe for this
has been set.

Projects

At the same time, demon-
stration projects are being
financed by the IDB and the
UN's Global Environment
Facility to the tune of $1.5 mil-
lion. A residential pilot project
will procure and install com-
pact fluorescent lightbulbs,
solar water heaters and solar
power panels to determine the
technical, operational and logis-
tical challenges of widescale
implementation.

According to Glen Laville,
the newly appointed general
manager of the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation who is also
the Environment Ministry's
overall project manager, pro-
curement contracts have been
issued for over 150,000 CFLs,
130 water heaters and 30 panel
installs. Installations should be
completed before the end of
the year, after which their per-
formance will be evaluated over
a six-month period.

"All the studies will be wide-
ly communicated,” said Phil
Weech. "The demonstration
activities will give us hard num-
bers on renewable energy appli-
cations in our local environ-
ment. Quite simply, we started
in an information wasteland,
and tried to fill it as fast as we
could. This was done having to
draw on external resources and

technical assistance. I must
admit, however, that we have
received little public reaction
despite the importance of this
effort."

As for the renewable energy
tendering process, BEC chair-
man Michael Moss acknowl-
edged that "in retrospect it was
a mistake for BEC to be lead-
ing that process. We don't have
the expertise and none of the
bids were robust enough
according to the consultants,
although we could have nego-
tiated with the top two. Inde-
pendent power producers
depend on interconnection
agreements — and who is going
to administer that here?

Moss said the country is
some distance away from utili-
ty scale renewable energy:
"Conservation is the only real
green energy at the moment
and BEC will be pushing that
angle strongly. We will also
encourage small-scale distrib-
uted power generation. The
proposed changes to the regu-
latory regime will be available
this year, but I don't know
about enactment."

In the meantime, BEC is
investing heavily in new con-
ventional generating plant to
meet the country's growing
energy needs — $30 million on
Bimini, $30 million on
Eleuthera, $105 million on
Abaco, and $10 million on a
variety of improvements to oth-
er islands, including New Prov-
idence. Such energy infrastruc-
ture has a decades-long lifes-
pan. This is despite the fact
that, given the global commit-
ment to radically reduce emis-
sions and the finite nature of
conventional fossil fuel sources,
a rapid movement towards a
highly efficient non-fossil ener-

(i fees tee! of Se Be ree

@ world school

transition to low-carbon economy

gy future would seem to be the
logical investment choice.

If these changes come too
little too late on a worldwide
scale, rebalancing of supply and
demand will have to be
achieved through massive
shortages, which would trans-
late to extreme economic hard-
ship, according to a 2005 report
by the US Energy Department.

Lloyd's says energy planners
and financiers need to take into
account the global transition
towards greater sustainability.
And policies to incentivise the
deployment of progressively
cleaner energy technologies
may mean the need to retire
some energy infrastructures
prematurely.

Meanwhile, there are oppor-
tunities for low-carbon business
innovation that most Bahami-
ans have yet to consider. In
addition to clean energy, these
include the electrification of
transportation, and green con-
struction. The conclusion from
all this is that energy security
is now inseparable from the
transition to a low-carbon econ-
omy and businesses should pre-
pare for this new reality.

"Security of supply and
emissions reduction objectives
should be addressed equally, as
prioritising one over the other
will increase the risk of strand-
ed investments or requirements
for expensive retro-fitting,"
Lloyd's says. "Investing in a
secure, low-carbon energy
future may have higher upfront
costs, but will deliver lower cost
energy in the future.”

What do you think? Send
comments to:

larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit:

www.bahamapundit.com

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized
International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications for the following
vacancies, with effect from August 2010. Full information regarding the school may
be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com.

Primary Library Assistant

The primary library assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with the head of
primary and the school librarian.

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms, the library
assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

e To supervise primary students’ library visits (book swaps and story telling)

e To assure the smooth running of the primary section of the school library

° To ensure that materials are shelved, re-shelved and displayed according to library
organizational schemes, which are based on Dewey decimal classification.

e To assist with the circulation and retrieval of primary materials on a daily basis.

© To assist with processing and cataloguing new materials in the primary collection.

¢ To manage all photocopying, scanning and laminating requests for teachers and students
in the primary section of the library.

¢ To organise the Scholastic book programme

© To troubleshoot simple technology programmes

® To assist the librarian with data collection, entry, maintenance and reports.

© To operate a specific automated library management system for the primary school.

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the

principal

Receptionist/Office Assistant

The School Receptionist/Office Assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with
the heads of school (primary and secondary).

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms and conditions
of service, the School Receptionist/Office Assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

° Serving as the major point of contact with visitors to and enquiries for the head of primary

and/or principal

e Maintaining professional ethical standards in all areas, particularly confidentiality
e Maintaining regular office routines (such as answering the telephone, attending to the fax
machine, handling email messages, word processing documents, photocopying, and filing

papers)

e Preparing materials indicated by the head of primary and/or for distribution to faculty
© Maintaining school documentation

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the

principal

BRE Ag AG KS he 24S Ae OE a fs AS OE he Ag Oe OS 2h 296 eS 2h AR OS As 24s AC as Of AS OE fe fs AS 2K Os hs fe 2s Oe 29s 296 2S he Ag Ie OS fs 246 Oe Hk he fg 2 Ig 2s 2k oe os 2s oe OK os 2s OK oo

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as possible. All applications

MUST include the following:

e letter of application
* a personal statement
° a full resume

e the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and e-mail of three people who may be
approached for confidential professional references

® acurrent police record

* a current health certificate

Please direct all correspondence to:

Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com



Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

The closing date for applications is 9 July 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Requirements:

Employment
Opportunity

Managers Needed

for leading Fast Food Franchise

e Must be a high school graduate
Must have management experience
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Must have strong leadership skills

’m lovin’ it

FROM page one

tember 21 so that a new executive body
can be formed to lead the union going
forward.

Supporting a vote of “no confidence”,
244 delegates decided they were fed up
with the “bickering and infighting” with-
in their executive team, which they felt
prevented the union from effectively
serving its members.

Vincent Rolle, a Grand Bahama dele-
gate, said: “There was a desire to get
either the executive board to work
together with each other or to dismantle
it. This is a crucial time, we’re about to
go to the bargaining table.

“A vote of no confidence doesn’t nec-
essarily have to affect the entire team
but in this instance there was no cohe-
siveness and a level of distrust within
the team — there was a general frustra-
tion and unhappiness with all the bick-
ering and infighting.”

There were only six votes against the
decision.

An issue that was noted as a major
proponent in the executive team’s inabil-
ity to achieve cohesion was the accused
misappropriation of union funds last
year.

BUT President Belinda Wilson was

BUT team voted
out of office

later reinstated. She supported the vote,
even though it meant she would lose her
seat.

At the meeting, she said the vote came
as a relief to her, as she had been agi-
tating for the change since last year.

She said: “For two years we have been
unable to resolve internal conflict, and if
we cannot resolve conflict, how will we
be able to represent members strongly?
We need to be united, we need to be
strong.”

Confident she has the support and
trust of members, Mrs Wilson intends
to seek presidency in the new election.

She said: “The only thing that will
change in this election is instead of doing
a solo campaign for presidency, I plan to
run a full slate of 15 persons.”

Last year, it was alleged the executive
team was given the similar ultimatum
and votes of “no confidence” raised
against two of its members. These votes
were withdrawn however as the team
was able to agree to work together.

This time, the vote was initiated by

ame speaks to the press yesterday.

of Stapledon Primary and John Mus-
grove of L N Coakley in Eleuthera.

Elections have been scheduled for
September 21, 2010. In the meantime,
the executive team plans to continue the
union’s mandate.

Mrs Wilson is confident the decision
will not jeapordise ongoing negotiations
with the Government towards a new
Controlling Bargaining Agreement. Con-
cerning industrial negotiations, the union
is awaiting a counter-proposal from the



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initially suspended over the charges but

FROM page one

marked contrast from
actions in the previous year.
The Ministry of Finance report
shows that in 2007 and 2008 he
spent a total of $82,489 out of
the $100,000 available to him
on donations of computers to
schools and his constituency’s
computer lab and within that
figure, $45,843 on donations to
community groups.

However, this was not the
case for Mr Christie, who only
spent $31,000 of his first
$100,000 allowance in
2007/2008. This was in the form
of a donation to the Joe Billy
Blind Blake Festival, according
to Ministry of Finance records.

For this and the apparent
lack of expenditure of the
2008/2009 allowance, Mr
Christie, member of parliament
for Farm Road and Centreville,
achieved the dubious distinc-
tion of having spent the small-
est percentage of the total
$200,000 constituency
allowance funds over the two
year period of all MPs — at just
15 per cent.

Coming up behind him in
the low-spending stakes in the
PLP was former chairperson
and MP for Englerston, Glenys
Hanna Martin, who allocated
$17,018 to her constituency in

Â¥/

1805

MPs fail to spend

the form of an interactive white
board for the EP Roberts
School, ten computers for the
community’s computer training
programme, two computer pro-
gramme instructors and the
summer basketball camp in the
2008/2009 period and up to
April 2010. This was a signifi-
cant reduction from the $99,519
she spent in the previous year
on donations to schools, after
school programmes, repairs to
parks and park equipment,
among other things.

Kendal Wright, MP for
Clifton, was the lowest spend-
ing FNM MP, having just
$1,298.45 of his $100,000 budget
for 2008 and 2009 by April
2010. This was expended on the
repair and construction of
“entrance signs” in the con-
stituency. In the previous year
Mr Wright caused the expen-
diture of a much more signifi-
cant $99,978.03 in his con-
stituency. This include
$28,445.03 on “entrance signs”,
56,900 on the renovation of a
local basketball court and
$10,000 to community festivals.

Dr Hubert Minnis, minister
of health and MP for Killarney,
had up to the report period also
spent a relatively small $19,800

PICTET

two shop stewards, Helena Cartwright

(on the construction of a bas-
Ketball court) in his con-
stituency from the 2008/2009
allocation, while Kenyatta Gib-
son, MP for Kennedy, had
found ways to spend $25,000
out of a possible $100,000 (in
the form of a $10,000 donation
to Unity House retirement
home and $15,000 to Red Land
Soldiers Junkanoo Group).

How the MPs did or did not
spend the money available to
them is only just coming to light
as The Tribune has obtained a
copy of a Ministry of Finance
report on how all 41 MPs, PLP
and FNM, made applications
to spend the $200,000 available
— $8.2 million in total for 41
MPs between 2007 and 2009 -—
in their constituencies. The Tr1-
bune first requested a break-
down of the MP’s spending in
June of 2009 from Minister of
State for Finance, Zhivargo
Laing and has made repeated
requests for an official report
on the matter ever since.

Individual requests from
The Tribune to all MPs for an
accounting of how they spent
the funds was for all intents and
purposes ignored in December
of last year by the majority of
members. 15 FNMs responded
out of a total of 24, and only
one PLP - Fred Mitchell — did
so.

Earlier this year, Prime Min-

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST

CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

SENIOR TRUST OFFICER

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

* Administration of a portfolio of complex trusts including
the preparation of all relevant documentation and
Annual Reviews. Particular emphasis will be the
administration of structures originating from Latin

America.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned
fiduciary structures.

* Written and verbal communication with Client
Relationship Managers and other industry

professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant
professional qualification
Strong trust and company administration skills plus a
sound knowledge of drafting relevant documents,
reporting and accounting.
Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local and international

legislation

Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 7 years of relevant experience in a Private Bank
or Trust Company.
Fluency in Spanish.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE

ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:
The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas



Government.

ister Hubert Ingraham alluded
to how Mr Christie had failed
to spend his constituency
allowance funds in 2007/2008,
claiming that perhaps Mr
Christie felt there was “noth-
ing to be done” in his area. Mr
Christie responded to Mr Ingra-
ham’s comments by stating that
he was still determining exactly
how to best spend the money.
He said he had plans to expand
three parks in his constituency
and to add bathrooms to two.

It is unclear whether any
more funds were disbursed at
the request of any of the above
MPs since April 2010. Messages
left for each seeking comment
on the matter were not
returned up to press time,
except by Mr Wright, who
returned a phone call when this
reporter was out of office and
could not be contacted after
this.

Yesterday Minister of State
for Finance, Zhivargo Laing,
said that the unspent funds ini-
tially provided in the con-
stituency allocations of 07/08
and 08/09 will not again “roll
over” into the 2010/2011 bud-
get. This means that any money
that was not spent by MPs in
their constituencies cannot now
be spent.

Aside from the MPs listed
above, other MPs who had
failed to spend a large part of
their 2008/2009 allowances up
to April 2010, include: PLP MP
for St Cecilia Cynthia Pratt
($39,826.43, primarily on
parks), PLP MP for Fort Char-
lotte Alfred Sears ($29,143.65
on a donation to the Fort Char-
lotte Junkanoo Museum and
musical instruments for the
Fort Charlotte Community
Marching band), FNM MP for
Mount Moriah Tommy Turn-
quest ($43,272 on the beautifi-
cation of Stapledon Gardens
Park) and Seabreeze MP Carl
Bethel ($48,860.44).

Malcolm Adderley, MP for
Elizabeth, spent just over
$9,000 on a donation of two
interactive white boards. Mr
Adderley, however, resigned
from his seat in January, mean-
ing that he would not have had
as much of an opportunity to
utilise the money as other
MPs.

Commenting on why partic-
ular MPs may not have spent
the full amount available for
constituency projects, MP for
Seabreeze and FNM Chairman
Carl Bethel told The Tribune
that meeting the conditions
required by the Ministry of
Finance for the release of the
funds for projects in one’s con-
stituency required quite a bit
of “legwork” by MPs, such as
providing certain supporting
documentation to validate their
request for funds to be released
to a particular vendor. In his
case, Mr Bethel said he was of
the opinion he had spent his
full $100,000 allowance for
2008/2009, but if there was a
shortfall in the amount spent it
was likely due to savings
achieved on the cost of the
work.

Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing, who
received MPs applications for
funds to be released from the
constituency allowance fund
and himself successfully spent
over $200,000 in his Marco City
constituency (having had an
additional $8,000 expenditure
approved by the Prime Minis-
ter) suggested that successfully
utilizing the money “requires a
level of focus, creativity and dis-
cipline” by MPs.

“Sometimes what is strange
when you don’t have resources
easy to dream about all prob-
lems you have in your area then
when you get resources and
have to make choices and deci-
sions it becomes almost para-
lyzing about how to use those
funds.

“You have to make deci-
sions. Sometimes people get
stuck with that judgment that
has to be made with that limit-
ed amount,” he said.

e SEE PAGE TWO

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

0 =
FROM pageone Psychologist speaks out on homicide trend

leled in children; and this phe-
nomenon perpetuates the cur-
rent culture of materialism and
death.

He said: “We cannot ignore
the economic downturn effect
on work and finances. When
the economy goes down men
feel somewhat worthless, angry,
on edge and there is generally a
heavier consumption of alco-
holic drink. This puts pressure
on the wives and in turn domes-
tic violence increases. Every
one out of seven cases of
domestic violence, a child is
abused.”

Dr Allen said there was an
inextricable link between child
abuse and murder and urged
the community to recognize this
critical fact.

He offered: “You can reduce
child abuse in an area if you
have a group of people walk
around the area once a week.
This has been proven. Can you
imagine if all the churches in
the Bahamas walked in their
community? Abuse would not
be able to prevail.

“We freak out about the
murder of biological life but not
the quality of life. The meaning
of life is now being destroyed
too. There are thousands com-
ing out of school. Where are
they going to work?”

But the social ills contribut-
ing to the tragic increase in
homicides go much farther than
financial difficulties, Dr Allen
said.

He stressed that much more
research is need to address the
country’s deep issues with con-
flict resolution.

“The deeper a person is hurt,
the harder it is to achieve con-
flict resolution,” he said. “This
is different because in the old
Bahamas we had poverty, but
it’s harder now when people
have been used to more and
have to deal with less, rather

than having less and continu-
ing to deal with having less.”

Dr Allen led the crime surge
could be traced all the way back
to the drug epidemic of the 80s
and the unprecedented social
rifts it created.

He continued: “In the 1980s
we had the most comprehen-
sive national crack epidemic
outside of South America.
Crack obviously is a very pow-
erful drug — and it was the first
drug to feminize drug addiction
in a big way in the Bahamas.

“Mothers got knocked out of
the home, in most of the urban
areas women were the glue that
held the home together. This
produced a powerful commu-
nity fragmentation leading to
kids fending for themselves.”

Dr Allen said these children
often turned to gangs to fill the
need for community and accep-
tance, for self esteem, protec-
tion, and in some instances pos-
session.

These children of the drug-
stricken 80s are now the fathers,
mothers, and in some cases
grandparents of today’s chil-
dren. Dr Allen stressed the
need for more research to be
done in the community.

“Take a sample of people in
the community, get to know
them really,” he said. “Before
this whole thing broke there
was an incident in a focus group
and a third of the people in
each group said they wish they
could kill somebody. There’s a
culture of violence and destruc-
tion in our midst. We didn’t
think like that before. We can
extrapolate that something is
going on in the community.”

Child psychologist Dr
Michelle Major also correlated
the significance of childhood
learning disabilities and
instances of violent crime. She
said that some 30 per cent of

children currently in school
have some form of learning
disability.

She said: “One of the pre-
dominant issues with children
and crime is the presence of
learning disabilities. There are
simply not enough special
learning programmes for kids.
They face difficulties, whether
they can’t read, do math, or
write and so they drop out and
do crime — research around the
world shows this.”

She continued: “It starts at
the early stage, not getting
basic needs met. Learning dis-
abilities, not being loved or
successful affect a child to be
an angry adult.”

Dr Allen explained: “When
you get angry, your heart rate,
blood pressure, and pulse go
up. When the pulse goes 10
peer cent above normal, IQ
drops about 20-30 points. So
when a person is angry, there
in a subnormal intelligence
mode.

“By taking a drink or mari-
juana, all that does is take
away inhibitions. Look at the
situation, you’re under the
influence, angry so you’re
already operating at a subnor-
mal intelligence and you have
in your hand or possession a
knife or a gun. The end result
is before us everyday.”

Dr Allen has been conduct-
ing research on violence in
children for two years with
focus groups in Washington
and New Providence. Titled
“The Haven Study”, he said
the findings give him increased
optimism towards improving
social conditions in the coun-
try.

“This is our time, we need
to do the work. I don’t have
enough hours in the day. All
the stress about murder, the
precursors you will see — we

Cheryl Grant-Bethel yet to give up post

FROM page one

of Public Prosecutions has already been filled
by Jamaican attorney, Vinette Graham-Allen
who is to take up the post in August of this year.

On June 17, a minute paper was filed with the
Permanent Secretary, Under Secretary, Director
of Legal Affairs and the Attorney General from
Mrs Grant-Bethel which reported how the
Deputy Director was not prepared to hand over
files that had been assigned to her as she intend-
ed to continue her work and duties.

According to the letter, a copy of which was
obtained by The Tribune, Mrs Grant-Bethel said
she has not requested a transfer from her current
post, and further she does not intend to leave
her substantive post to take another job within
the same rank and scale “with a token increase in
salary.”

“Additionally,” the letter read, “your constant
meetings and reference relative to the same is
causing me emotional distress and physical dis-
comfort. I will have to see my doctor in this
regard.

“Further, I feel uncertain about my future and
tenure within the office. I also feel threatened
that if I do not agree to the unilateral variation of
my contract I will suffer dire consequences.

“In response to the move to the Law Reform

and Revisions Department in the British Amer-
ican Building,” Mrs Grant-Bethel wrote, “that
building is known to have a problem of ‘flowing
faeces’. I do not wish to be assigned to an area
which has a (faeces) problem. I am currently
working in an area of the Office of the Attorney
General which is mould infested. More impor-
tantly, I do not wish to be placed in close prox-
imity to the residing Chief Justice Sir Michael
Barnett,” the letter said.

For the past few weeks there has been a num-
ber of reports on this on-going saga with threats
of litigation hanging in the balance.

Mrs Grant-Bethel’s attorney Wayne Munroe
has already confirmed that his firm had not yet
filed any legal applications on behalf of Mrs
Grant-Bethel which would challenge the Judi-
cial and Legal Service Commission’s decision.
He said his busy schedule and the complex nature
of the application were behind the delay.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham recently told
Parliament he first supported the idea of Mrs
Grant-Bethel being promoted as DPP until infor-
mation, which he did not disclose, was brought to
his attention.

These comments unleashed a firestorm of con-
troversy, with Mr Munroe and others arguing
that Mr Ingraham’s statements are “character
assassination” based on “innuendo.”

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went through this same thing
in the 80s with drugs, now with
this murder thing, the two are
powerfully connected. Our
country is easy because we’re
small, we could change the
Bahamas in three years,” he
said.

mee

1805

He also recalled: “True sto-
ry. Aman came in to my office
one day, and he was so rough
looking my secretary actually
hid from him. When I came
out I asked him what was the
matter and he told me ‘ma
bad man. I’m a gangster,’ and
then he said ‘but I want you
to help my kids’.

“He had brought his kids to

2” PICTET

therapy, he was like ‘I know
things are bad but I don’t want
my kids to go the way I am
going’. It was very over-
whelming, I cried, he under-
stood the affect his lifestyle
would have on his kids and
that was amazing. Imagine if
everyone took that into con-
sideration. We need to create
more opportunities.”

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

HEAD OF FOUNDATIONS, PRIVATE TRUST
COMPANIES & CORPORATE

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

Advising potential clients and liaising with industry professionals
on all matters relating to the establishment and management of
Foundations and Private Trust Companies and the administration

thereof

Oversight of the Corporate Department including the
administration of multi jurisdictional corporate structures and

dealing with all matters arising therefrom.

Preparation of and checking Annual Reviews.
Oversight of fee billings and collection.
Liaising with local and international regulators on matters
pertaining to his/her portfolio.

PRE-RE

UISITIES:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant professional

qualification.

In-depth knowledge of relevant Bahamian and international
legislation and practice.
Impeccable written and verbal communication skills.
Computer literate with proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
At least 7 years related experience in a private bank, law firm

or trust company.

Extensive knowledge of Foundations, Private Trust Companies,
International Business Companies, “Regular Bahamian”
Companies and similar structures from other jurisdictions.
Extensive knowledge the Qualified Intermediary regime and
similar trans-national fiscal measures.
Knowledge of Spanish and / or French would be advantageous.
Ability to function in a multi-cultural working environment.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE

ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:-
The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

P. O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas



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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
Police confident of apprehending .



suspects over six recent homicides

FROM page one

He confirmed murder-

dens on Saturday event and
forced himself into the car
of a mother and her three
children before he died of

accused Bradley Ferguson
was shot in Pinewood Gar-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FILLETTE FRANCOIS
of PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-50904,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 30" day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, TREVOR THOMAS
MUNROE of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas intend to change my name to TREVOR THOMAS
KELLY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO. Box N-742, Nassau Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this

notice
2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING
ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET
Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.

WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 322-8833

his injuries.



Mr Greenslade said most
victims and those commit-
ting murders have previ-
ously been arrested and
charged in connection with
other serious crimes.

Often they have been
arraigned in Magistrates
Courts on murder charges
or charges of illegal
firearms and drug posses-
sion, armed robbery, or vio-
lent crime and released on
bail, Mr Greenslade said.

Once they have been
freed they return to their
communities and continue
committing crimes, allow-
ing violence to permeate
neighbourhoods like
Pinewood Gardens where
he and senior police officers
visited residents yesterday.

Mr Greenslade said:
“These people that are mur-
dering people are not peo-
ple attending our churches -
these are people known to
you, these are our relatives,
and they are in and out of
the system, having been
arrested and then allowed
to walk freely in our com-
munities, and that is very
powerful.”

He added: “No one
should ever die but a lot of
people who are dying are
on bail for murder or are on
bail for armed robbery.”

The Commissioner reas-
sured the public that police
are doing all they can to
fight crime as he explained
how officers who had been
in administrative roles have
been redeployed to bring
more police to the front
line, and shift patterns are
being established so more
officers can work on the












MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT
ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT

BASIC FEE STRUCTURE
EFFECTIVE 1 JULY, 2010

REGISTRATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES

BICYCLE

TRANSFER OF MOTOR VEHICLE FROM FAMILY ISLAND

MOTORCYCLE
vehicle.

price according to size of engine





THE POLICE walkabout yesterday.







streets at night.

He has also moved three
talented, trained detectives
from within the wider police
force to the homicide
department of the Criminal
Detective Unit (CDU) to
increase the team from two
detectives to five.

And the Commissioner
has made efforts to enhance
the selective enforcement
team and heavy arms unit
to improve response times
to serious crimes.

More than 133 illegal
firearms and over 2,600
rounds of ammunition have
been seized by police since
January, and several serious
crimes have resulted in the
charging of suspects, Mr
Greenslade said.

However the force is not
capable of stamping out
crime alone.

He called on every indi-
vidual to help root out crim-
inals from their communi-
ties by anonymously
informing police of their
activities.

“Tam very concerned that
we as Bahamians are so tol-
erant we cannot allow
young Bahamian men con-
tinue to walk the streets of
our country 24/7 with ille-
gal weapons, selling drugs
in our communities, and
poisoning our children,” Mr
Greenslade said.

“That’s not a policing
problem - that’s a Bahamian

ah

1805

problem.

“If a person is walking
our streets on bail and
believes he or she is above
everybody else, I don’t
know how policing will pre-

vent that.

“It’s very important that
all Bahamians call in these

matters.

call it in, and we are going
to be anonymous’.”

Mr Greenslade denied
allegations criminals are
from immigrant communi-
ties or that violent crime
occurs in “hot spots” but
said crime is done by indi-
viduals with evil intent,
regardless of their nation-

“This is about all of us as
Bahamians saying ‘Enough
is enough; we are going to

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RICHARDSON PETIT-
PHARD of TALL PINE, JUBILEE GARDENS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 30° day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ality or where they live.

e SEE PAGE FIVE

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JAY MALRINE
MORLEY of VENICE BAY ANNEX OFF BACARDI ROAD,
P.O. BOX SP-63953, NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend to change
the name to JAY MALRINE BETHEL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after
the date of publication of this notice.



PICTET

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

TRUST OFFICER

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

VEHICLE REGISTRATION........... pieeveweesece price based on unladen weight of

vehicle.



[VEHICLE CLASS __| VEHICLE WEIGHT

0—5,000 LBS
5,001 — 15, 000LBS



15, 001 LBS - AND OVER

_ | RATE

$550.00
$700.00

—

N.B. First time licensing is pro-rated to applicant’s birth month.

TOUR OPERATOR

a) For each vehicle (per plate)
PUBLIC SCHEDULE OMNIBUS

a) For.each vehicle (per plate)
PRIVATE SCHEDULE OMNIBUS

a) For every vehicle (each plate)
PRIVATELY CHARTERED FRANCHISE

a) For every vehicle (per plate)

SELF-DRIVE VEHICLE

\a) For every vehicle (per plate)

TRADE PLATES (0.T)

a) A set of plates per annum

ANY FURTHER QUESTION'S CAN BE DIRECTED TO THE DEPARTMENT'S HOTLINE AT

302-3870

328-4825/6

328-4164

325-8019 ext. 224/235

* Administration of a portfolio of trusts including the
preparation of relevant documentation and Annual
Reviews.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned
fiduciary structures.

* ‘Written and verbal communication with Client
Relationship Managers and other industry
professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant
professional qualification.

Strong trust and company administration skills plus
a sound knowledge of drafting relevant documents,
reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local legislation.
Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 5 years of relevant experience in a Private
Bank or Trust Company.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL
BE ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







Blue Hill
business

losses up
to 80%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BUSINESSES on Blue Hill
road are continuing to be
“ground to the ground”, hav-
ing lost up to 80 per cent of
their business since the start of
the road rerouting, Super Val-
ue’s owner and president said
yesterday.

Rupert Roberts, who is also
an advisor to the Coconut
Grove Business League
(CGBL), told Tribune Business
that one business owner
“dropped off the precipice”
once the road construction
began, seeing an immediate 80
per cent reduction in business
levels in the first few months.

According to him, and con-
trary to what was published in
another Nassau newspaper,
traffic in the area has
decreased, but congestion due
to the closure of one lane on
Blue Hill Road has increased.

“Things are still doing very
poorly and business along that
street keeps dropping off more
and more each week,” said Mr
Roberts. “I've talked to some
merchants off 80 per cent and
their business is gone.”

The CGBL, which comprises
almost 50 businesses, last week
applied for a Judicial Review
of the road work project, not
to have the road work stopped
Mr Roberts said, but to find out
if it could be expedited much
quicker or done a different way
so as to not affect businesses in
the area adversely.

The application alleges that
the Government’s “ears are
closed” to the situation facing
businesses near Blue Hill Road
and Market Street, and that if
nothing is done to alleviate it,
those businesses could suffer
"irreparable" financial
injury.

Chief executive of Blue Hill
Meat Market, Patrick Treco,
said his business had suffered
30 per cent declines. And while
he admits he does not know
how much of his shortfall is to

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY,



JoUENGE 2 35,0 33002205150

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

n alleged Canadian
mobster boss offered to
acquire a 45 per cent
stake in a former
Bahamas-based bro-
ker/dealer to rescue it from its eventual
collapse caused by the fraudulent $22
million scheme he and his associates
perpetrated, US court documents reveal.

Court transcripts released yesterday
from the trial of George Georgiou, a
former Canadian stockbroker, disclose
that his partner in the fraudulent “pump
and dump” scheme he ran, “mobster”
Vince DeRosa, offered to buy a stake in
former Bahamian broker/dealer, Cale-
donia Corporate Management, as a solu-
tion to the “multi-million dollar hole”
created by their trading activities.

The scheme was revealed in testimo-
ny under oath by Robert Dunkley, Cale-
donia’s Bahamian former investment
adviser, who made a number of other
stunning admissions. These were:

¢ That he and other senior Caledonia
executives allowed Georgiou to trade
on margin using credit backed by the
assets/cash of other Caledonia clients,
exposing innocent trading customers to
the huge losses some eventually suf-
fered.

¢ That Matthew McNeilly, Caledo-
nia’s former chairman and owner,
allegedly “asset stripped” the
broker/dealer shortly before its early
2008 collapse, transferring all its “good”

Freeport food store to bring 40 jobs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE owner of a new
Freeport-based food store yes-

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE



assets to another company, Ecosse.

e That Caledonia should have carried
out more due diligence on Georgiou,
who had been barred from working as a
broker by Canadian regulators, DeRosa
and their sources of wealth and busi-
ness activities.

The evidence outlined in the eastern
district court for Pennsylvania, adduced
by Mr Georgiou’s attorneys, also indi-
cated that Caledonia’s management may
have either turned a “blind eye” to what
was going on, or been lulled into a false
sense of security, because they were
earning huge commissions from the vol-
ume of trades initiated by the conspira-
tors.

In his testimony, Mr Dunkley alleged
that Georgiou’s Caledonia margin
account was some $8-$9 million over-
drawn when he and DeRosa appeared in
June 2007 with their offer to acquire a 45
per cent stake in the troubled Bahamian
broker/dealer, presenting this as a solu-
tion to the problem.

“T’m not so sure whether it be a solu-
tion to it, but there was a clear indication
that George Georgiou’s group, he and
Vincent DeRosa, wanted to buy a part

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‘Mobster boss’ offered to
rescue Bahamas broker



* Court testimony reveals that ‘Canadian mobster’
and convicted associate offered to take 45% stake
in Caledonia Corporate Management and rescue it
from collapse caused by $22m hole they created

* Bahamian banker Robert Dunkley admits that other
clients’ funds used to finance fraudulent scheme, while
Caledonia owner asset-stripped company before end

* Evidence shows ‘hefty commissions’
influenced Caledonia attitude to account

* Banker admits ‘deep embarrassment’ at losses
suffered by innocent Bahamian broker’s clients

of Caledonia,” Mr Dunkley told the US
court.

“It was June 18, [2007], and this is
when Georgiou and DeRosa had come
to really discuss them buying a major
share of Caledonia. At that time we pre-
sented them with what their account sit-
uation was, and requested that they pay
us the money that was owed before they
got into any discussions on ownership.”

He added that Ron Wyles, the person
Georgiou used as a nominee or “front
man” for his trading activities, had first
proposed the scheme in May 2007, and

Savemore owner pledges venture to open in August ‘100% Bahamian
owned’, rejecting claims made against it, and says numerous Grand
Bahama firms have benefited from work already

acknowledged that if DeRosa and Geor-
giou had obtained an equity stake they
would have had “control” at Caledonia
and been able to “borrow more money.”

Mr Dunkley said he did not see any
documents relating to the ownership
discussions until January 2008, when a
company called Zaitech, beneficially
controlled by Georgiou and DeRosa,
was named as the purchaser of a 45 per
cent stake in Caledonia.

Mr Dunkley testified that the Bahami-

SEE page 2B

terday pledged to Tribune Busi-
ness that it was “100 per cent
Bahamian owned”, adding that
the company would create
some much-needed 40 jobs in a
city desperate for employment
when it opens in August 2010.

Steve Savola, Savemore’s
president and director, in a let-
ter sent to Tribune Business
responding to concerns raised
about the company’s ownership
and possible future plans, said
the new store would be 22,500
square feet and, as revealed by
this newspaper, located in the

FamGuard: Dividends show
faith in ‘working out’ claims

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FAMILY Guardian yester-
day said it was aiming to have
its new general insurance
agency “up and running in
August”, its president and chief
executive telling Tribune Busi-
ness the company was “defi-
nitely seeing improving signs”
on its health claims through
adjusting premiums to match
claims.

Patricia Hermanns said the
life and health insurer, and its
BISX-listed parent, FamGuard
Corporation, had shown confi-
dence in their ability to work
through the increased health
claims that depressed 2010 first
quarter profits by more than 80

Real estate

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN law firms have
had to redeploy resources in a
bid to complete real estate
transactions, and have the rele-
vant conveyancings Stamped,
before the two percentage point
increase in Stamp Duty takes
effect tomorrow, one senipor
attorney describing the situa-
tion as a “madhouse”.

“We've had to redeploy all
our resources,” the senior attor-
ney told Tribune Business,
pointing out that some trans-
actions were for $30-$40 mil-
lion sums. If these attracted the
new 12 per cent Stamp Duty
rate, a $30 million transaction
would attract $3.6 million in tax
instead of the previous $3 mil-
lion, an increase of $600,000,
while a $4 million deal would

* Insurer targets August
for general agency launch

* Two financial services
subsidiaries both started
year with $14m in client
assets under management

* Company believes
top-line growth shows
gaining market share

per cent via the $0.06 per share
dividend they declared.

“We are very optimistic
about the initiatives we are tak-
ing to recalibrate claims against

SEE page 3B

‘madhouse’

attract $4.8 million instead of
$4 million - an $800,000
increase.

The senior attorney said the
Treasury was turning around
conveyancings for Stamping in
48 hours, and his law firm has
asked it for guidance as to
whether documents presented
before the end of today would
still attract the old rates.

REAL estate brokers have
also seen a rush of buyers trying
to complete their transactions
before the Government’s
Stamp Tax increase comes into
effect, a Bahamas Realty bro-
ker/appraiser said yesterday,
adding that the increase could
eventually deter future middle
to low income buyers.

Carlyle Campbell said there
had been a numberof people
trying to beat the increase in

SEE page 2B

former Pegasus Warehouse in
downtown Freeport.

“IT am a first-generation
Bahamian born in West End,
Grand Bahama, when my
father Leo Helmut Savola was
the accountant for the Wallace
Groves Lumber Company. I
have returned frequently to my
childhood home and have
always wanted to invest in my
place of birth,” Mr Savola told
Tribune Business.

“My goal is to offer afford-
able product to the local cus-

tomers and maintain consistent
stock supplies, something my
Grand Bahamian friends and
family have lamented.

“Savemore will have a
butcher’s counter, deli and bak-
ery departments as well, and I
am pleased to be working with
both international and local dis-
tributors who have embraced
our presence and seem eager
to have us join the Bahamian
food retail business.”

He added: “Once construc-
tion is complete, ordering and

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

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stocking of the store will begin
as well as hiring of the estimat-
ed 40 local employees that will
be needed. We will open seven
days a week, with late opening
hours and ample parking.

“T hope this information will
allay any fears, and assure you
that Savemore is a 100 per cent
Bahamian-owned retail grocery
store and will produce a quality
product for Grand Bahama.”

Mr Savola added that Save-

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Realtor hits $9m first quarter sales

A C.A Christie real estate
agent sold $9 million-plus worth
of residential real estate dur-
ing the 2010 first quarter, the
company said yesterday.

Specialising in luxury real
estate, Gavin G. Christie
recently closed a $6.5 million
sale in a depressed market.

“Gavin has a great natural
ability of putting luxury deals
together and matching unique
buyers with unique sellers. He
is well organised, bright, per-

sonable, committed and has a
strong future as a leader in the
industry”, said C.A. Christie
Real Estate principal and
senior broker, Charles Christie.

Gavin Christie added: “Iam
thankful for the opportunity
afforded me by C.A Christie
Real Estate. My senior broker,
Charles Christie, is a real estate
guru who has willingly shared
his experience and knowledge
of the real estate industry with
me.

“T expect us to continue to
do well together.”

After four years in the real
estate profession, Gavin
Christie has completed a num-
ber of Certified Residential
Specialist (CRS) courses, Cer-
tified International Property
Specialist (CIPS) and the
Appraisal course.

“Gavin’s sales are extremely
impressive. In his four years at
the company, Gavin’s total
sales far exceed the industry

norm,” said Charles Christie.

Gavin Christie graduated
from the University of
Charleston in West Virginia
with a Bachelor of Science in
Sports Medicine and a minor
in Psychology.

He then moved to Prague,
the Czech Republic, where he
played professional soccer for
three years while pursing his
MBA. He has been a member
of the Bahamas National Soc-
cer Team since 1999.





GAVIN AND CHARLES CHRISTIE





‘Mobster boss’ offered to rescue Bahamas broker

FROM page 1B

an broker/dealer had wanted
some $6 million from the pair
before entering into ownership
discussions, but alleged that
because he was a director he
knew nothing about how the
talks were progressing until the
January 2008 document. That
was just weeks before Caledo-
nia’s collapse.

Under cross-examination by
Georgiou’s attorneys, Mr
Dunkley agreed that by Janu-
ary 2008, Caledonia’s financial
structure had been radically
altered through Mr McNeilly
transferring “most of the
assets” to another firm, Ecosse
Services, even though he was
still attempting to sell the
“shell” of the Bahamian bro-
ker/dealer to Mr DeRosa.

“T think it was a panic situa-
tion,” Mr Dunkley confessed.
“T think it was one where the
owner of Caledonia (McNeil-
ly) decided he was going to bail,
so he started another company
and transferred — (was) at least
in the process of transferring
assets — probably in the begin-
ning of January 2008.

“And he came to me and
said: ‘Robert, here is Caledo-
nia, you can have what remains
with Caledonia and go and
work it out with Vincent and
George’, to which I said I will
do whatever I can to try and
save my clients’ assets. And I
did look at that as an alterna-
tive.

“And my decision in the end
was that, nope, because I did
not — quite honestly, did not
trust George and Vincent

DeRosa in the end.”

Under continued cross-exam-
ination by Georgiou’s attor-
neys, Mr Dunkley admitted
that after learning of Mr
McNeilly’s asset transfers, he
flew to Toronto to meet with
both DeRosa and Georgiou to
discuss Caledonia’s potential
sale.

He added, though, that this
was “only in the vane that if
there was any way that I could
get assets back for my clients,
or not put them in a position
where they are going to be los-
ing a tremendous amount of
money, I would entertain it.”

He acknowledged, though,
that it was not the same Cale-
donia under discussion “from
the standpoint of Matthew
McNeilly having shifted assets.”

Mr Dunkley agreed that the
terms of the discussions
involved William Jennings,
Caledonia’s managing director,
convincing Mr McNeilly to
“take those assets that had been
spirited away because they had
been cherry picked, and to put
them back into the company.”

This did not happen, though,
with the assets in question
eventually returned from
Ecosse to Caledonia by the lat-
ter’s liquidator, Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas) accountant
and partner, Anthony Kiki-
varakis, in what has become a
court-supervised liquidation.

Mr Dunkley described the
liquidation process as “the most
decent thing that could be
done”, and then gave what has
probably been the first apology
from any of Caledonia’s man-
agement team to the compa-

ny’s 150-160 clients. Its total
investment holdings had been
$120-$130 million.

Describing himself as
“extremely embarrassed”, Mr
Dunkley told the US court: “It
is very unfortunate you know.
A lot of the clients at Caledonia
were people I have known for
many years, and none of this
would have happened without
George Georgiou’s involve-
ment with Caledonia.

“T was simply there as an
investment advisor with a book
of a number of portfolios for
good clients who are people
that, you know, P’ve known for
many, many years and I’m
indebted to them, extremely
embarrassed. I don’t know how
I can ever repay them for the
situation George Georgiou put
us in.

“We along the way had
approached George Georgiou
many times to please pay up.
We trusted him, we were in a
situation, a very, very bad situ-
ation that he created. It was not
me, it was not us at Caledonia.
We were remiss, or put it this
way, we made our mistakes, I
grant you that. With more
knowledge, perhaps, with more
due diligence, perhaps this
wouldn’t have happened.
Unfortunately, it did, and it did
based on the actions of George
Georgiou.”

Mr Dunkley admitted that
Caledonia initially extended
Georgiou a $3 million margin
facility because they believed
it was covered by some $30 mil-
lion worth of shares. Yet the
value of these shares, which
were penny stocks, had been

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artificially inflated by Georgiou
and were ultimately worthless.

Georgiou’s attorneys ques-
tioned Mr Dunkley about
whether Caledonia was using
its other clients’ assets to
finance their man’s trading
activities, drawing from him the
admission: “That’s the way it
ended up.”

Realising that activity in the
account was going to be
extremely active, Mr Dunkley
told Mr Jennings in early 2007
that a $1.5 million margin on
the Georgiou account needed
to be covered in two days, oth-
erwise there would be a $1.1
million debit at its Canadian
corespondent broker.

And there was evidence to

suggest that the “very hefty
commissions” earned on the
account blinded Caledonia to
what was really going on, an e-
mail from Mr Dunkley to Mr
Jennings stating: “As you will
see, we are up nicely on the
month to date, $32,000 as a
result of the new Ron
Wyles/Georgiou account. I
think before month end we can
add another $10,000-$12,000,
correct?”

Georgiou’s attorneys
referred to this as “cannibalis-
ing other clients’ assets”.

Georgiou was ultimately con-
victed of running a securities
fraud known as a “pump and
dump” scheme, where he
manipulated the price of sev-

eral thinly-traded penny stocks
he controlled via the Caledo-
nia account.

To cover Georgiou’s over-
drawn margin balance, Cale-
donia’s Canadian correspon-
dent broker, Jitney, sold off all
the securities, cash and assets
held in the Bahamian broker’s
omnibus account, where all the
latter’s client assets were held.
Thus several hundred clients
were impacted by Georgiou’s
actions.

Georgiou was described as a
“professional con man” by US
government attorneys, who
added that DeRosa “in his own
words is a Canadian mobster”.
DeRosa has not been charged
in connection with this case.



FROM page 1B

the Stamp Tax.

$50,000 themselves.

real estate transactions.



A $500,000 house purchase previously
attracted a 10 per cent Stamp Duty rate,
meaning that $50,000 was paid to the Treasury
when the transaction closes. If split 50/50
between buyer and seller, each pays $25,000,
or otherwise the buyer or seller pays the

Now, with a 12 per cent Stamp Duty rate
coming into effect as of July 1, 2010, such a
transaction would require $60,000 to be paid
to the Public Treasury. If the seller or pur-
chaser agrees to pay this 100 per cent, then
their tax burden has risen by $10,000, where-
as if split 50/50 it goes to $30,000 each. Either
way, this represents a significant $5,000-
$10,000 increase associated with the cost of

Real estate ‘madhouse’

Mr Campbell said the people who have
purchases pending are rushing to complete
their transactions before those increases come

into effect.

According to him, he has a pending sale
that he expects to go through by today due to
the rush to beat the new rates.

“T anticipate closing on the last day because
there has been an increase to beat that record-
ing fee,” he said

Mr Campbell added that he was worried
the rise in Stamp Tax could affect the ability of
lower income families, who had been hoping
to purchase a new home, to do so and there-
fore could affect real estate sales in the future.

“What that is going to do is it will affect
some of the sales because you are just putting
up costs that a lot of people won't be able to
afford,” he said. “That will affect sales on the
local middle to low income households.”





Blue Hill business losses up to 80%

FROM page 1B

blame on the economic reces-
sion versus the roadworks, he
said his frequent customers
often express their ire about
the difficulty of reaching his
store.

According to Mr Treco, he
has had to slash prices and
focus on advertising in order to
keep up with his competitors.
He even opted to use the pop-
ular social networking website
Facebook to push his business.
He said direct competition had
already caused his sales to
decline 20 per cent in the

month of January.

Mr Treco added that in order
to keep business flowing, he has
had to increase his delivery ser-
vices to negate the loss of walk-
in business.

“We are still holding,” he
said. “The biggest problem, like
I tell people, is if they would
hurry and get it finished. We
are still holding on, but because
of the congestion people aren’t
coming to the place, so we have
to go hustle extra business.”

Mr Roberts said the Gov-
ernment should have consid-
ered a different approach to the
roadworks, which have now

The Tribune

Tel: 502 2356}

for ad rates

seen the road raised as much
as two to three feet.

According to him, Blue Hill
Meat Market’s parking lot was
directly affected by the height
increase.

“In front of the meat market
they have elevated the road two
to three feet, so you have to
dive down off the road into the
parking lot and probably have
to rent a crane to get the car
back out,” he said.

Mr Roberts said his hope is
that the Judicial Review will be
completed quickly and that the
courts will find against the Gov-
ernment.







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS ee
Fewer than 20% of owners eye selling

LESS than one in five Bahamian
business owners have considered sell-
ing, a newly-launched local business
broker believes, although the market is
becoming more educated on this top-
ic and the forces driving such a process.

A survey of business activity in the
US revealed that almost one-third of
business owners are considering selling
their business, but Simon Cooper,
founder of Bahamas-based Res Socius,
said: “That number does not neces-
sarily apply to Bahamian businesses.”

He added: “Our findings from local
business owners are that many of them
hadn’t even considered it. The main

reasons given were that in our small
economy, it was difficult to put a busi-
ness up for sale confidentially since
there were no specialists that could
handle the transaction for them. Some
owners somehow felt that it was an
admission of failure to consider selling
their business, although that generally
isn’t the case.”

He suggested that the statistics in
the Bahamas are that less than one in
five business owners have considered
selling, “although the market is grad-
ually become more educated in this
regard”.

Mr Cooper said that when the econ-

omy is doing well, owners can sell for
a higher return. In downturns it simply
may be necessary to sell before it is
too late.

Reported

The US Small Business Adminis-
tration (SBA), in researching selling
trends, reported that three to five years
is a long enough stretch for many of
today's business owners. One in every
three plans to sell; many of them right
from the outset.

The business they've bought is not a
legacy for their children, it's a shorter-

term investment of their time as well as
their money. The ability to present a
healthy operation, with an owner in
the position to "role model" its success,
are major advantages in the comple-
tion of a successful business sale.

Mr Cooper said: “A popular mis-
conception amongst Bahamian busi-
ness owners is that they need to own
the property the business operates
from before they can sell. Only in rare
cases is this true.”

One of the surest ways to maximize
the value of a business is by not waiting
too long to sell. A more detailed ten
step guide to maximizing business val-

ue can be downloaded from the Res
Socius website at www.ressocius.com.

Res Socius was founded by British
expatriate, Simon Cooper, in 2009 and
is authorised by the Bahamas Invest-
ment Authority to practice as business
brokers and consultants.

Formerly the chief executive of a
publicly traded investment company,
Mr Cooper has extensive private and
public SME management experience.
Specialisations include the acquisition,
mergers, troubleshooting and divesti-
ture of businesses. His MBA was
awarded with a Distinction by the Uni-
versity of Liverpool in 2005.

FamGuard: Dividends show faith in ‘working out’ claims

FROM page 1B

premium on the health side,”
Ms Hermanns told Tribune
Business. “We are confident
about our ability to work out
of the substantial increase in
claims, and that’s reflected in
the dividend and our ability to
pay dividends.

“We have strong retained
earnings. Our solvency is
almost two times the minimum
expected at 195 per cent, almost
double the minimum require-
ment of 100 per cent.”

The Family Guardian chief
added that the company was
“definitely seeing improving
signs” in its health insurance
portfolio, the first quarter
claims increase having exceed-
ed 2009 levels and been respon-
sible for net income dropping to
$303,855 from $1.571 million.

Elsewhere, Ms Hermanns
said the BISX-listed firm would
launch its long-anticipated gen-
eral insurance business, Family
Guardian General Insurance
Agency, before the 2010 third
quarter end.

“We are hoping to be up and
running before the end of this
quarter,” she told Tribune Busi-

ness. “We expect to be up and
running in August. The agency
network will be supporting that
business in terms of sales, but
certainly we will be adding per-
sons with property and casual-
ty experience to our team.

“Tt will one or two initially,
and then we will add depending
on how the business grows.
We’ll expand as the business
expands. We believe that it will
be able to make some impor-
tant contributions to revenue,
and allow us to broaden the
types of products we offer to
clients.”

Family Guardian’s financial
services affiliates, FG Financial
and FG Capital Markets, were
continuing to grow, Ms Her-
manns said, each having around
$14 million in client assets
under management at the start
of 2010.

“We are seeing year-on-year
improvement,” she added. “We
are continuing to be encour-
aged by the incremental growth
from both these business lines.”

While many mortgage
lenders continue to experience
problems with non-performing
and past due loans, Ms Her-

Freeport food store

FROM page 1B

more had already obtained its
business licence from the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) via its president, Ian
Rolle, adding that the GBPA
and others had been “very sup-
portive” of his first business
venture in Grand Bahama.

Detailing some of the
Bahamian companies that had
benefited from construction
work carried out on the Save-
more property, Mr Savola said:
“The Savemore premises have
been completely upgraded,
including new electrical wiring,
state of the art ‘green’ appli-
ances and total redesign of the
spacious interior to allow for
the ease of flow of customers.

“T have been very pleased in
working with local Grand
Bahamian companies. They
include Allied Builders, Fre-
con, C & L Air Conditioning,
Quality Plumbing, Sea Port
Construction and Mechanical
Engineering, and we have
already begun work with local
advertising company, Barefoot
Marketing, to help us launch
and promote our new busi-
ness.”

Concerns were expressed in
yesterday’s Tribune Business,

chiefly by rival Jeff Butler, own-
er of Butler’s Specialty Foods,
that Savemore had a foreign
ownership component, which
went against the National
Investment Policy of reserving
the retail and wholesale indus-
try for 100 per cent Bahamian
ownership. It was said my mul-
tiple sources that Derek
Kramer, the principal of Allied
Caribbean Distribution, was
involved with Savemore.

This, though, was denied by
Mr Savola. Garland Evans,
owner of Prime Bahamas, also
told Tribune Business he and
his family were not involved
with Savemore, saying they
“never had any interest in the
Freeport food store”.

Commenting on the likely
impact of Savemore’s arrival in
Grand Bahama, Mr Butler told
Tribune Business on Tuesday:
"We have right now 11 grocery
outlets in Grand Bahama with a
population of 47,000 in a reces-
sion.

"If we did not have a reces-
sion, everything was hunky
dory and there were 60,000-
70,000 people here, there would
be no impact because they
would be able to serve a cer-
tain segment of people."

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NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD (KAGA HUB)
LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 23rd day of March, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 28th day of June, A.D., 2010.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
(KAGA HUB) LIMITED

manns told Tribune Business
that Family Guardian had not
seen “any significant deterio-
ration” in its book for the year
to date. It had some $3.174 mil-
lion in outstanding mortgage
commitments on its books at
the 2010 first quarter end.

“We have, in recent months,
seen some improvement. We
have been working through the
sales of defaulted properties,
and are starting to see some
progress,” she added.

Setting aside the 80 per cent
profit drop, caused by the
increase in policyholder bene-
fits and provisions for future
claims, Ms Hermanns said:
“We've had a fairly strong

growth in new business for the
first three months of the year.
That’s strong growth.

“It’s come from both the life
and the health side. Our health
sales continue to be strong, our
life sales continue to grow, and
our annuity business is grow-
ing very strongly with a
$350,000 increase over the pri-
or year quarter - more than a 20
per cent increase. We’re seeing
growth generally in our busi-
ness lines.”

This had resulted in a more-
than $2 million or 10 per cent
increase in Family Guardian’s
2010 first quarter top-line, and
Ms Hermanns suggested it was
coming from the company gain-

ing increased market share and
clients from other financial ser-
vices providers.

“What we are seeing is that
our growth rate is higher than
what is perceived to be the
industry average based on the
assessments we’ve done, and if
ours is higher it indicates that
business is moving from [other]
companies,” she explained.

“T can’t speak specifically to
why people are moving their
business, but we are very
focused on customer service for
quality products, and adding
value to the client base. We
have a very strong agency force,
which helps as well.”

The increase in provisions for

future policyholder benefits
grew to $4.461 million year-
over-year, compared to $1.921
million in 2009, something Ms
Hermanns said was related to
both the health claims rise and
increase in new business.

The company has now
moved to match health insur-
ance premiums to past claims
experience, increasing them
where necessary, and has also
implemented a new software
system for this portfolio.

Ms Hermanns said the “high-
er level of automation” would
speed up claims processing and
enhance efficiency, further bol-
stering customer service to “a
higher level”.


















































NOTICE
NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD (DAMALLA

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
HUB) LIMITED

(DOHOLO-BAO) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 23rd day of March, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 28th day of June, A.D., 2010.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the

International Business Companies Act 2000, notice

is hereby given that the above-named Company has

been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant

to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar

General on the 23rd day of March, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 28th day of June, A.D., 2010.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
(DAMALLA HUB) LIMITED

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
(DOHOLO-BAO) LIMITED

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Ze

COLON 1 AL

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Mariy at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 29 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,507.70 | CHG 2.96 | %CHG 0.20 | YTD -57.68 | YTD % -3.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 0.00 0.250
9.67 0.00 0.050
5.20 0.00 0.598
0.30 0.00 -0.877
3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 0.00 0.055
9.62 0.00 1.408
2.56 0.24 0.511
5.00 0.00 0.460
2.23 -0.11 0.111
1.60 0.00 0.627
5.94 0.00 -0.003
8.75 0.00 0.168
9.50 0.00 0.678
3.75 0.00 0.366
1.00 0.00 0.000
0.27 0.00 0.035
5.00 0.00 0.407
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest

Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.46 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity *faertnaahPodak &irtseLuâ„¢ (vive -The-Counter Geuuities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4752 2.54
2.9265 1.37
1.5374 2.00
3.0368 2.57
13.6388 2.03
107.5706 3.45
105.7706 3.99
1.1127 2.10
1.0917 2.22
1.1150 2.23
9.5078 1.78

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

Previous Close Today's Close
1.05 1.05
10.63 10.63
5.20 5.20
0.30 0.30
3.15 3.15
2.17 2.17
11.16 11.16
2.60 2.84
6.29 6.29
2.46 2.35
2.00 2.00
6.07 6.07
8.90 8.90
9.81 9.81
4.58 4.58
1.00 1.00
0.27 0.27
5.59 5.59

64.1

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3787
2.8266
1.4712
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.906205
1.520591

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.506072

NAV Date
31-May-10
31-May-10
18-Jun-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-May-10
-May-10
-May-10
-Mar-10

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

0.95
4.50
-4.99
5.56
6.99 103.987340

101.725415

103.095570
99.417680
5.19

6.29

5.65

10.0000 10.2744 4.61 8.15 -Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS §$ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

58.37 -Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
‘S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 5B















All that mango goodness

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



colored mangos can be seen sitting beauti-

fully on the fruit vendor’s stall. The sight of
the golden mangoes hanging lusciously from tree
stems is enticing to the eyes alone. Even the ones
camouflaged in the grass

Sam of big, small, raspberry, and yellow

This is the start of mango season, prob-
ably on of the most delightful fruit sea-
sons in the Bahamas.

Mangoes in the Bahamas bear in abun-
dance. Those who don’t want to waste
their mangoes have a number of options.

Here are some recipes provided by
Lady Ingrid Darling who is the author of
the book

Many Tastes of The Bahamas & Culi-
nary Influences of the Caribbean:

seem too delicious
to go to
waste.

(ARA) - With summer just
around the corner, calendars will be
filling up with barbecues, picnics and
trips to the beach. Unfortunately,
these warm-weather activities may
go hand-in-hand with heartburn.
And with more than 50 million
Americans suffering from frequent
heartburn (symptoms occurring
twice or more weekly), that adds up
to a lot of post-barbecue blues.

While a little burning is expected
when you fire up the grill, Dr
Michael Rahmin, a leading gas-
troenterologist based in the New
York Metropolitan area, says that
if you follow some simple, at-home
guidelines, you may be able to avoid
the burning sensation in your chest.

"By making a few simple adjust-
ments, you can enjoy the barbecue
season and help keep your heart-
burn at bay,” says Dr Rahmin.
"Don't miss the parties this summer,
just protect your stomach both
before and after you hit the grill.”

Dr Rahmin recommends the fol-
lowing tips for a healthier, happier
barbecue season:

Don't overdo it. Smaller, more
frequent meals help optimise the
digestive process. Eating big por-
tions can put more pressure on your

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

stomach and lead to heartburn.
Remember that the next barbecue is
probably around the corner so be
reasonable about portion sizes.

Watch out for triggers. If you are
prone to heartburn, be cautious
when considering certain foods that
are known to cause problems,
including caffeinated drinks, alco-
hol, chocolate and spicy, fatty foods.
Barbecue alternatives to consider
include lower-fat dogs instead of tra-
ditional beef hot dogs, or make your
burgers with lean ground turkey.

With the right condiments, it's
hard to tell the difference. Since all
stomachs are not created equal, also
be aware of your own personal trig-
gers and try to cut back or at least
avoid them late in the evening.

Let gravity help. Although that
hammock may be calling your name,
keep away after a big meal. To help
your food digest properly, stay in an
upright position rather than lying
down after you eat. The natural
force of gravity helps with the diges-
tive process.

Keep your medicine cabinet
stocked. If you are a frequent heart-
burn sufferer, try an over-the-
counter (OTC) medication like
Zegerid OTC, an OTC proton pump
inhibitor (PPI).























MANGO CHUTNEY

10 large frim-ripe mangoes

1 cup raisins

1 cup vinegar

1 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1-1/2 cups brown sugar

2 to 4 bird peppers

2 cloves garlic, grated

1 medium-sized onion, finely chopped
1tbsp mustard seed

ltbsp celery seed

2 tbsp. chopped fresh gingerroot or 2tsp.
ground ginger

1-1/2 tbsp

Peel the mangoes, slice the flesh from the
seeds and cut into small piece. Combine all
the ingredients in a large bowl, mix well.
Cover and let stand overnight (no need to
refrigerate).

After the overnight soak, place the mixture
into a large stockpot and cook low heat for
45 minutes to 1-hour . Pour into sterilised
jars and seal. Serve with meat dishes.

MANGO DIP

1 cup chopped ripe mango

2 tbsp. minced scallions

1-1/2 tbsp. freshly squeezed lime juice
1tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

2 tbsp. chopped green or red pepper

Combine the ingredients in a bowl or a
blender and puree. Cover, chill for 2 hours
and serve with breadfruit chips, or chips of
your choice.

Azaleta’s Mango Chicken
1 whole chicken about 2lbs., cut into large
chunks for stew
Salt and pepper to taste
Garlic powder to taste
1/2 cup Mango Chutney or 1/2 cup store
bought chutney
1 cup chicken broth

Taking hearthurn Off the menu this barbecue season





Clean chicken thoroughly, cut into chunks
for stewing and season with salt, pepper
and garlic. Chutney and broth together to
make a gravy. Arrange chicken in a large
non stick skillet; coat with the chutney mix,
cover tightly and cook over very low heat
for about 45 minutes. You add hot pepper
for flavor if using the store bought chutney.

MANGO CREPES & ICE CREAM

3/4 cup all purpose flour

2 tbsp. Confectioner’s sugar
1/4 tsp. salt

1 cup milk

2 eggs, slightly beaten
2tbsp. vegetable oil

Filling

2 ripe mangoes finely chopped

1 cup plain yogurt

3 tsbp. honey

1/2 cup chopped Maraschino cherries

Crepes

Inasmall mixing bowl , mix together the
flour, sugar and salt. Add the milk, eggs,
and oil stirring until smooth. Cover and
refrigerate for 1 hour.

Lightly grease a 6 inch non stick skillet and
heat over medium heat. Pour in 2
tablespoons of batter, tilting the skillet to
make the crepe. Keep the pan moving for
60 seconds or until the bottom is brown.
Turn the crepe over and cook for 20-45
seconds longer. Cool on a wire rack. Light-
ly oil the skillet if necessary and repeat with
remaining batter.

Filling

Inasmall bowl blend together the yogurt
and honey. Remove 1/2 cup and place into
another bowl, stir in the mango chunks and
cherries.

Spread about 2 to 3 -tablespoonfuls of the
fruit mixture down the Centre of each
crepe. Fold opposite edges of crepe over
the mixture and arrange 2 crepes on each
serving dish. Top with remaining yogurt
mixture.







a +
4 i eo =a,

it miNA) moe i ee on the grill.





PPIs work by deactivating acid-
producing pumps in the stomach,
offering 24-hour relief of frequent

heartburn with one dose per day.
For more information and tips to
avoid heartburn, visit

www. ZegeridOTC.com.
¢ Courtesy of ARAcontent



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune

SATURDAY

Dov rs



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls @tripunemedia.net



to figure out, who these

people are — Mdeez,Padri-
no, TaDa, Sammi Star, Young
B, RapQuelle, SosaMan.

This list of names would sound like
a bad rap song placed in the wrong
hands, but parents should make them-
selves familiar, because they repre-
sent the new breed of Bahamian musi-
cians that are carrying on the mantle,
with great success, to help continue
the Bahamian music industry.

Their core fan base is the thousands
of next generation Bahamians who
will be begging their parents for $20
this Saturday to attend “SosaMan’s
Birthday Celebration” at Mario’s
Bowling and Entertainment Palace.
In fact,they will probably ask for $40
to buy the ‘I Love Sosa Package’,
which includes admission and a Sosa
gift set.

Brandon ‘SosaMan’ Major, is a
leader in the pack of Bahamian hip-
hop artists. He is a member of the
new breed that looks different, sounds
different and appeals to a different
audience than the famil-
iar faces of the old
guard.

I gather parents are trying

— s.

ae ee 4

a ey































































DINIIDAI

Contribution

SosaMan is making a significant
contribution to the burgeoning indus-
try, and making no apologies. In fact,
he wants to be a Bahamian music
ambassador. He feels corporate
Bahamas, politicans and parents
should know the man who is influ-
encing their children, and the move-
ment that is taking the Bahamas by
storm. He wants “to open their eyes a
little more”.

Do not be quick to accuse Sosa of
being an inauthentic Bahamian musi-
cian. He's quick to point out that:
“They can’t take my flag away from
me. Hip Hop is not Bahamian, but
Brandon Major is”.Everyone on his
team is Bahamian, from the manager
of his studio, to the artist designing
his comic series, Adventures of Ted
Major”.

He said Bahamians who major in

American tax law are not
questioned about their iden-
tity. He said Bahamians who
play basketball, when bas-
ketball was invented by an

American Indian, are not
questioned on their iden-
tity. He said hip hop is the
language of the next gen-
eration and it is giving
Bahamians a voice at home
and abroad.
Sosa received at least
eight requests to perform
)) his hit single, “I Dream”,
/ at graduation ceremonies
(across the country, including
b’ schools like Uriah McPhee
/ and SC Mcpherson. He said
_ none of the schools cleared his
performance.
In the not so distant
past, Bahamian musi-
cians were laughed
to scorn for
produc-

\

>

{9

ing music tracks with Bahamian slang.
DJs slashed those records like teachers
would slash an assignment with red
ink wherever a student slipped out of
the Queen’s English.

Not so today in the music indus-
try, but Sosa admits in the early days
of his career he faked it along with
other musicians, who used American
and Jamaican accents as a strategy to
gain acceptance. For them, although
this tarnished the Bahamian brand to
some extent, it was a necessary evil
to establish credibility and secure air

play.
Acceptance

“People started to act like that
because musicians have a certain dying
love that they want to be heard. I write
to be heard. But at first when you put
a track with Bahamian dialect on the
radio they would run you. The com-
munity is opening up now though to
allow you to be more Bahamian,” said
SosaMan.

Sosa’s outlook was partially changed
by his college experience, where he
realised ‘Brand Bahamas’ was a seller,
especially to the ladies. It was further
shaped when he realised his follow-
ing of young Bahamians were “putting
on a heavy accent” to imitate his
American persona.

Those days are a thing of the past
for the serious Bahamian artist, like
Sosa, who are breaking through.

Leap

A quantum leap appears to have
taken place, but behind the scenes the
artists were taking blows, making sac-
rifices and perserving to the point of a
success.

Last year Sosa made over $30,000
from his events and performances,
which is more than his regular day
job. He said that is small compared
to the amount some artists make, but
said from where he comes from it

means a lot.
The Bahamian market is where
Sosa makes most of his money
: and appeases his core fan base,
but the US market is where
the opportunties are to
experiment and expand. It
is a major expense though.
Over the past ten years,
Sosa recalls performing
in US shows where he
paid for his own plane
ticket, accommoda-
tions and received
no performance
_ fees. “They may
\ put some mon-
ey in your
\ hand, or they
. may not,
because you
are an
unknown,”
said Sosa.

That
started
t oO



i

JULY 3RD, 2010

sawp SONGS

MUCH TO CELEBRATE ON |

SOSATIAIS






change slightly around 2007, and now
he is securing jobs where his travel
and accommodation expenses are paid
for, and he can leave with a few hun-
dred dollars in his pocket. He said it is
important for artists to judge success
by looking at their growth over time.

Today, the Bahamian market can
barely contain the man everyone in
high school knew as ‘Muff’: the base-
ball star, basketball starter, footballer,
and certifiable class clown. So much so
that Sosa is considering flying the
coop. He has a vision of living “6-
months in 6-months out” of the
Bahamas, primarily because the risk of
saturation in the Bahamas is high and
the potential for business success out-
side of the Bahamas is great.

Market

The listening market in the
Bahamas is about 35,000, which rep-
resents 10-15 per cent of the popula-
tion, who are active listeners of new
Bahamian music, according to Sosa.
His business ambitions are greater
than the local market potential.

In his debut album Sosa says he
wants to make six figures. That is
where Toronto, Nashville, and South
Florida come into the picture. These
are the markets Sosa is trying to pen-
etrate; he already has a bit of expo-
sure, established networks and friends.

He is aware people may think he is
"selling out" from the local industry by
leaving at such a critical time, but he
says he has to balance the need to
recognise the people supporting him
locally, and the need to grow his busi-
ness.

For Sosa, spending time abroad is
beneficial for another reason: to pre-
vent over exposure, but it’s a tight
rope to balance. He said people can
always forget about you as well, and
move on to the next best thing, if you
are out for too long.

“That is the biggest threat any artist
has down here because the promoters,

sad to say, they will use you. They
will put you on their flyers; use you in
their commercials until people don’t
want to see you any more. “If there is
a big show, Sosa is on it. I am very
afraid of the word saturation. That is
one thing we have been calculating,
strategising to avoid. The other end
of saturation is people forgetting about
you."

In the early days, Sosa said it was
difficult for friends to take him seri-
ously. They would laugh when he went
on stage with his big glasses, call him a
fake, and box him into his old high
school persona.

This did not stop him, and now
Sosa believes his market is the gener-
ation that never ever knew him as
Brandon or ‘Muff’. The new genera-
tion knows Sosa as Chief Executive
Officer of Fame 406 Biz, which is the
parent company for Sosa’s portfolio of
music, an autobiography and comic
book, fan merchandise and events, as
well as a recording studio, marketing
company, and business development
company for musicians.

Fame 406 Biz is no class prank. It is
a homegrown entertainment business
conglomerate, owned and operated
by one of the top Bahamian musi-
cians. Ten years ago, the market was
barely primed for the new breed of
Bahamian musicians, and now they
have virtually taken over. They have
captured the imaginations of the
Bahamian youth and are not holding
back.

TO DISCUSS PIKES en WHE PAGE LOG a TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







© “ROCKIN’ DA SQUARE”
NATIONAL YOUTH
INDEPENDENCE BLOCK PARTY

Recess Bahamas Youth
Organization and The
Ministry of Youth present
the National Youth Inde-
pendence Block Party,
“Rockin' Da Square”, at
Rawson Square, Friday,
July 2. Party includes
music, dancing, singing, a
live band, fashion show,
step show, and food and
drinks. Telephone: 677-
5407. Email:
mgordon@recessba-
hamas.com

© BAHAMAS NATIONAL YOUTH
ORCHESTRA'S BANQUET

The Bahamas National
Youth Orchestra, under
the patronage of Sir
Arthur and Lady Joan
Foulkes, presents a cele-
bratory 20th anniversary
banquet at Super Club
Breezes. July 3 - Saturday.

Banquet features Ron-
nie Butler, Ralph
Munnings and 2 exciting
bands throughout the
evening. Cocktails begin
7.30pm. Dinner served at
8pm. Tickets: $70. Tele-
phone: 393-4180 or 325-
6254.

© CONCERT: “THA DIRTY
SOUTH INVASION”

Luna Nightclub hosts
“Tha Dirty South Inva-
sion” concert featuring
Ludacris and Rasheeda
with guest appearances by
Daddy Whites and El
Padrino on Friday, July 9.
Doors open 9pm. Tickets:
$50, available at The
Jukebox. Telephone: 326-
6227.

* REMNANT ACADEMY'S
BASKETBALL CAMP

The Remnant Academy
hosts a basketball camp,
from July 13 to July 24, at
Yam-1pm daily, with guest
appearance by Wali
Jones, top NBA 76ers
Hall of Famer. Telephone:
361-4294.

© ATLANTIS LIVE: KATY PERRY

The Atlantis Live Series
presents Katy Perry, two-
time Grammy nominated
artists and one of the most
talked about pop acts of
the last two years, Satur-
day, July 17. Here's your
chance to see her bring
her energetic live show to
Atlantis, 9:30pm in The
Grand Ballroom. See
www. Atlantis.com

* COLORS HAIR STUDIO IS
IMPLEMENTING A NEW PRO-
GRAMME CALLED "COLORS

HAIR STUDIO OUTREACH TO
STUDENTS 2010."

For the month of July
and August (inclusive of
June 29th) they will be
giving away 2 free hair
cuts weekly to high school
(minimum age 16) and
COB students. The hair
cuts will be given on Tues-
days between the hours of
3 - opm. If you have long
hair and would like some
shaping, we will be more
than happy to do it for
you.

This is limited to 2 visits
per person during these
two months. If you know
of anyone that may want
to take advantage of the
programme just have
them call the salon 394-
7400 and enquire about
the free hair cuts.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 7B



ARTS



Candy

Bouquets

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



andy Bouquets are the delicious alterna-

tive to flowers that never fade, wilt, or die,

and are sure to surprise and delight the
person who receives them. They are a unique
and edible, one-of-a-kind gift that will make a
lasting impression on the receiver, says Miran-
da Powell, proprietor of Candyland Creations;
"the candy store with more."

She creates candy confec-
tions that appeal to the senses,
and creates a world of senso-
ry bliss to her patrons.

"T've always loved baking,”
said Ms Powell. "I've been
baking since high school, and
worked in the hotel field since
2001." From there, she
became a home-maker before
she decided to wanted to per-
sue this line of work that
would give her the opportu-
nity to engage her passion.

“T have customers from
England who purchase items
to carry away with them as
gifts for families and friends,”
said Ms Powell. “Most of
those customers would be the
ones that order fudge, which
comes in chocolate, pineapple,
and vanilla flavours.” But gua-
va fudge is the main best seller.

"The guava fudge is very
sweet, and taste like guava,”
she said. She developed the
recipe with former business

partner, now Sweet 'Tings
owner Kimberly Beneby.
"The texture melts in your
mouth. People say they
savour it, others eat it by the
handful."

She also makes chocolate
flavours include key lime
pie,strawberry
cheesecake,chocolate milk,
boysenberry, and cotton can-
dy. These can all be enjoyed
and start at soda glass sizes
to large sizes.

Ms Powell also prepares a
molded chocolate in milk,
dark and white flavours, and
even mixes them into two
toned chocolate bars.

Spiced cranberry sauce is
also a nice purchase. It is usu-
ally made as a side for turkey
and ham at Christmas. But
that is far from it. Ms Powell
uses the spiced cranberry
sauce as a dip for cream
cheese and crackers.

Spiced cranberry sauce can

be eaten on toast, used almost
as a pepper jelly. For cheese-
cake lovers, butter rum
cheesecake is very smooth. It
has a rum sauce that is heated
and poured.

It's unique and can be
enjoyed and eaten at the same
time, starting at soda glass size
to the large sizes.

Bennie and peanut cakes
and coconut pastries are also
available. The flavour and
colour of the bouquet is
decided by the customer.

Each bouquet comes in its
own designer container filled
with delicious confections and
gourmet chocolates from
around the world and they are
prefect

Candy Bouquets for Valen-
tine's Day, celebrating a pro-
motion, bouquets that say
“Get Well Soon,” “ Happy
Valentine’s Day,” “ Happy
Halloween,” “ Happy Moth-
er's Day,” and “Just
Because,” are all available,
and can be personalised with
cakes, candies, and chocolates
with photos of your choice.

Once it is in a cool envi-
ronment, Ms Powell says the
candy bouquets stay fresh
tasting.

¢ If you would like to purchase
one of Miranda Powell's novel-
ty items, call 557-4523 to

order. Email her at candyland-

creations@gmail.com








































































































































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*)\INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





THE TRIBUNE

—








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PAGE 12
- F

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

PAGE 13¢@ BIC National Open Track RESULTS...

_ =
j =— e ; r Lf z: ee a

HEIGHT AND POWER — MAGNUM ROLLE, the 6°11 forward-center out of Louisiana Tech, goes up for a layup...



a





Venus upset,
Serena wins
in Wimbledon

quar ters...
See page 14

Magnum in Pacers
rookie/free agent

s Camp th

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



sal gees 5

raft night was the official

start to Magnum Rolle’s

NBA journey, but he had

little time to celebrate as
he and the other members of his draft
class immediately got to work on the
next and most important step, mak-
ing the roster.

Rolle will participate in his first offi-
cial event as a member of the Indiana
Pacers when the team begins
rookie/free agent camp on Thursday at
Conseco Fieldhouse, the Pacers home
arena.

The 6°11 forward-center out of
Louisiana Tech will be joined by fellow
2010 draft classmates, lottery pick Paul
George out of Fresno State who was
taken with the 10th overall pick, and
swingman Lance Stephenson out of
Cincinnati who was selected in the sec-
ond round with the 40th pick.

Rolle was selected by the Indi-
ana Pacers with the 51st pick in last
Thursday's NBA Draft and became
the first native Bahamian to hear his
name called on draft night in over 30
years.

The Oklahoma City Thunder origi-
nally held the rights to the 51st pick,
however, agreed to swap picks with
the Pacers who held the 57th pick and
selected Ryan Reid.

The Pacers’ newest trio will be
joined by other undrafted rookies, sev-
eral journeymen looking for a spot on
the roster, including Josh McRoberts,
Marcus Landry, Marcus Williams,
Richard Hendrix, Chris Kramer,
Thomas Heurtel, Russell Robinson,
Drew Naymick, Darryl Watkins, Bryce
Taylor and James Mays.

The camp will feature a series of
two-a-day practices, then the roster
heads to Orlando, Florida, for the Air
Tran Orlando Pro Summer League
2010.

The Pacers will open up their Orlan-

is week

611 forward-center
looking to make
NBA roster

do Summer League Schedule 3pm July
5 against the Orlando Magic.

Rolle should face his first true test
matched up against Magic rookie for-
ward Daniel Orton out of Kentucky.

In game two, 7pm July 6, the Pacers
take on the New Jersey Nets where
Rolle will square off against third over-
all pick, Derrick Favors.

In game three, George should get
the bulk of attention when the Pacers
meet the Utah Jazz, 7pm July 7, when
he is matched up with fellow lottery
pick Gordon Hayward.

July 8th at 3 pm, the Pacers will face
the Eastern Conference champion
Boston Celtics, with key players Luke
Harangody and Avery Bradley.

The Pacers Orlando Summer
League schedule ends 8am July 9
against the Oklahoma City Thunder
where Rolle will face the team that
originally selected him, and the player
he was traded for, Ryan Reid.

The Thunder’s stacked roster will
also feature lottery pick Cole Aldrich,
James Harden, Eric Maynor, and
Serge Ibaka.

The Orlando Pro Summer League
runs from July 5-10 at the RDV Sport-
splex in Orlando.

The Summer League gives teams an
early indication of evaluating their
draft picks and gives a medium for
franchises to unearth diamonds in the
rough, and overlooked players who
they hope can surpass expectations
and make an impact in the NBA.

Former NBA pro Dexter Cam-
bridge made his mark in the 1992 Sum-
mer League and was signed as an
undrafted free agent by the Dallas
Mavericks.





TRACK
STEWART BANNED

USADA announced today
that Raymond Stewart, a
coach in the sport of track and
field, and four-time Olympic
sprinter who competed for
Jamaica, has received a life-
time suspension in a decision
by an independent American
Arbitration Association
(AAA) arbitrator.

The suspension was
imposed for Stewart’s partic-
ipation in trafficking in pro-
hibited substances, as well as
administration and attempt-
ed administration of prohib-
ited substances, in violation
of applicable sport anti-dop-
ing rules, including Interna-
tional Association of Athletics
Federation (TAAF) Rules and
the World Anti-Doping Code
(Code).

Stewart’s sanction result-
ed from information recent-
ly received by USADA dur-
ing separate investigations
arising from information
obtained during the BALCO
conspiracy.

BIANCA STUART soars
through the air to win the
BAAA BTC national title in
the women’s long jump.
Stuart is one of the athletes
named to the BAAA Under-
23 national team for the
NACAC championships...

Photo by Tim Clarke

FOLLOWING the comple-
tion of the BTC National Open
Track and Field Champi-
onships, the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations
(BAAA) has selected a 26-
member team to travel to the
North American, Central
American and Caribbean
(NACAC Under-23) Track and
Field Championships.

The team, made up of eight
women and 18 men, will rep-
resent the Bahamas at the
event in Miramar, Florida
Ansin Sports Complex July 9-
11.

Under the auspices of the
International Amateur Athlet-

ics Federation and the USA
Track & Field, a number of top
athletes from several countries
are expected to compete at this
high level under 23 competi-
tion.

Participating countries
include Anguilla, Antigua and
Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas,
Barbados, Belize, Bermuda,
British Virgin Islands, Canada,
Cayman Islands, Costa Rica,
Dominica, Dominican Repub-
lic, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti,
Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico,
Montserrat, Netherlands
Antilles, Nicaragua, Puerto
Rico, El Salvador, St Kitts/
Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent, The

Wik] 26 make up Team Bahamas
WY for NACAC championships

Grenadines, Trinidad and
Tobago, Turk and Caicos
Islands, United States Virgin
Islands, and the US.

The makeup of the Bahamas’
team is predominantly colle-
giate athletes, a number of
whom recently competed for
their universities and colleges
at their conference and nation-
al championships.

Leading the team will be
Demetrius Pinder, the new
national champion in the men’s
400m who has a season’s best of
44.93, Jamal Forbes in the
100m, with a season’s best of
10.28, Nathan Arnett 400m hur-
dles Junior College Champion







SS >





with a season’s best of 51.47.

Among the women compet-
ing are Bianca Stuart NCAA
All American and seven-time
Missouri Valley Conference
champion in the long jump with
a season’s best 6.54m along
with Michelle Cumberbatch
NCAA Division 2, 400m hur-
dles champion and Ramona
Nicholls 800m and 1500m
standout from Park Atlanta
University.

The Bahamas will also field
relay teams to compete in the

Women’s team
Charlesha Lightbourne
Ramona Nicholls
Shellyka Rolle
Michelle Cumberbatch
Bianca Stuart
Keythra Richards
Yanique Clarke
Ashley Hanna
Michelle Cumberbatch
Shellyka Rolle

Women’s team
Jamal Forbes
Jonathan Davis
Demitrius Pinder

relay
Latoy Williams

relay
Laquardo Newbold
Dennis Bain
Nathan Arnett
Jeffry Gibson
Jamal Wilson
Stanley Poitier
J’Venta Deveaux
Antillio Bastian
Cordero Bonamy
La’Sean Pickstock
Jamal Butler
Jerone Mitchell

women’s 4x400m and men’s
4x100 and 4x400.

The team will be managed
by Tyrone Burrows. The head
coach is Everette Frazier, a lev-
el 4 sprints coach, assisted by
Jason Edwards, a level 3 jumps
coach, Floyd Armbrister, an
TAAF level 2 middle distance
coach, Grand Bahamian Fred-
erick Bastian, an IAAF level 1
sprints coach and Olympic and
world champion Tonique
Williams-Darling, now a sprints
coach.

Event

200 meters

800 meters

800 meters

400 meters Hurdles
Long Jump

Long Jump

4x400 meters relay
4x400 meters relay
4x400 meters relay
4x400 meters relay

100 & 200m & 4x1m relay
100 & 200m & 4x1m relay
400 meters & 4x400m

400 meters & 4x400m

800 meters

110mH & 4x100m relay
400meters Hurdles
400mH & 4x400m relay
High Jump

Long Jump

Triple Jump

Triple Jump

4x100 meter relay
4x400 meter relay
4x400 meter relay
4x400 meter relay

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

RESULTS: BIC National Open

RESULTS of the two-day
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations (BAAA)
BTC National Open Track and
Field Championships at the
Thomas A Robinson Track and
Field Stadium over the week-
end are as follows:

Open Women

100 Meter Dash - Sturrup,
Chandra, 11.15 CACG; Robin-
son, V'Alonee, 11.89 WJC; Eti-
enne, Marvar, 11.94 WJC.

200 Meter Dash - Smith,
Nivea, 22.71 CACG; Amertil,
Christine, 23.00 CACG; Stra-
chan, Anthonique, 24.14 WJC.

400 Meter Run - Miller,
Shaunae, 53.13; Rolle, Sasha,
54.05 WJC; Clarke, Yanique,
56.76.

800 Meter Run - Nicholls,
Romona, 2:12.61 U-23; Rolle,
Shellyka, 2:14.88 U-23; Burn-
side, Deshana, 2:17.09.

1500 Meter Run - Rolle,
Hughnique, 5:07.66; Smith, Ista,
5:12.92.

100 Meter Hurdles - Kemp,
Ivanique, 14.13 WJC; Mullings,
Tess, 14.59; Cartwright, Devinn,
14.60.

400 Meter Hurdles - Cum-
berbatch, Michelle, 1:00.33
WIC; Mullings, Tess, 1:03.97.

High Jump - Culmer, Kenya,
1.70m, 5-07.00; Gibson, Dan-
nielle, 1.57m, 5-01.75.

Long Jump - Stuart, Bian-
ca, 6.53m CG, 21-05.25;
Richards, Keythra, 5.75m, 18-
10.50; Gibson, Dannielle,
5.61m, 18-05.00.

Triple Jump - Richards,
Keythra, 12.41m, 40-08.75; Mar-
tin, Donnavette, 12.27m, 40-
03.25; Campbell, Krishand,
11.97m, 39-03.25.

Discus Throw - Duncanson,
Juliann, 38.73m, 127-01; Moss,
Adrienne, 37.04m, 121-06;
Jacques, Jennie, 36.29m, 119-
01.





ATHLETES compete during the BTC National Open Track and Field Championships...

Javelin Throw - Eve, Lav-
ern, 53.88m U-23, 176-09; Bas-
tian, Melinda, 45.28m, 148-07.

Shot Put - Moss, Adrienne,
13.65m U-23, 44-09.50;
Williams, Racquel, 12.94m, 42-
05.50; Duncanson, Juliann,
12.33m, 40-05.50.

Women 4x100 Meter Relay
Open - Bahamas Juniors ‘A’
46.73; Bahamas Youth 'A'
47.24.

Men’s Open

100 Meter - Griffith, Adrian,
10.23 CG; Rolle, Jamial, 10.42
U-23; Sands, Michael, 10.52
WIC.

200 Meter - Rolle, Jamial,
21.03 U-23; Mackey, Trevor-
vano, 21.50 WJC; Moss, Jamal,
21.63.

400 Meter Run - Pinder,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, JAY MALRINE

MORLEY of VENICE BAY ANNEX OFF BACARDI ROAD,
P.O. BOX SP-63953, NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend to change
the name to JAY MALRINE BETHEL, ff there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.



28 PICTET

18O5

Demetrius, 45.21 CACG; Bain,
Andretti, 45.44; Brown, Chris,
45.78 CACG.

800 Meter Run - Carey,
James Audley, 1:55.02; New-
bold, Laquardo, 1:56.68; Neilly,
Ramon, 1:56.76.

1500 Meter Run - Carey,
James Audley, 4:04.43; Taylor,
Lester, 4:13.74; Colebrook,
Andre, 4:14.10.

110 Meter Hurdles - Bain,
Dennis, 14.98.

400 Meter Hurdles - Burn-
side, Nejmi, 52.48 U-23; Arnett,
Nathan, 53.04 WJC; Bodie,
Patrick, 53.80.

High Jump - Thomas, Don-
ald, 2.30m CG, 7-06.50; Barry,
Trevor, 2.14m WJC, 7-00.25;
Wilson, Jamal, 2.14m WJC, 7-
00.25.

Pole Vault - Roker, Ter-
rance, 3.60m, 11-09.75.

Long Jump - Bastian,
Rudon, 7.98m CACG, 26-02.25;
Stuart, Nyles, 7.71m U-23, 25-
03.50; Delaney, Lamar, 7.33m,
24-00.75.

Triple Jump - Sands, Lee-
van, 16.78m CACG, 55-00.75;
Collie-Minns, Lathone, 15.78m
WJC, 51-09.25; Deveaux,
J'Vente, 15.64m WJC, 51-03.75.

Discus Throw - Whyte,
Leslie, 49.23m, 161-06; Nottage,
DeAngelo, 42.66m, 139-11;
Inniss, Delron, 39.90m, 130-11.

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST

CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

TRUST OFFICER

WILL INCLUDE:-

* Administration of a portfolio of trusts including the
preparation of relevant documentation and Annual

Reviews.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned

fiduciary structures,

* Written and verbal communication with Client
Relationship Managers and other industry

professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant

professional qualification.

Strong trust and company administration skills plus
a sound Knowledge of drafting relevant documents,

reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local legislation.
Proficiency i in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 5 years of relevant experience in a Private

Bank or Trust Company.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL

BE ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park

P ©. Box N-4837

Nassau, Bahamas



Hammer Throw- Inniss,
Delron, 43.78m, 143-08; Ster-
ling, Mark, 39.17m, 128-06.

Javelin Throw- Brown, Liv-
ingston, 53.81m, 176-06; Carey,
Elvardo, 53.50m, 175-06;
Andrews, Edward, 47.82m, 156-
11.

Shot Put - Inniss, Delron,
14.10m, 46-03.25; Watson,
Nikeo, 12.65m, 41-06.00; Cony-
ers, Maurice, 12.01m, 39-05.00.

100 Meter Dash Consola-
tion- Miller, Kohfe, 10.67;
Davis, Jonathan, 10.69; Green,
Travon, 10.70.

400 Meter Run Consolation-
Butler, Jamal, 47.25 WJC;
Mitchell, Jerone, 47.34 WJC;
Gibson, Jeffery, 47.44 WIC.

110 Meter Hurdles Junior -
Wilmore, Aaron, 14.49; Bodie,
Patrick, 14.55.

4x100 Meter Relay Open-
Bahamas Under 23 'A' 41.47;
Bahamas Juniors 'A' 42.54;
Bahamas Youth 'A' 42.68.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 13

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FILLETTE FRANCOIS
of PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-50904,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 30" day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, TREVOR THOMAS
MUNROE of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas intend to change my name to TREVOR THOMAS
KELLY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice



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BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 30‘ day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS





RAFAEL NADAL sits on a outside court as he takes a break during a practice session at the
All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, Tuesday. Nadal will play Sweden's
Robin Soderling in a quarterfinal here today...

(AP Photo)

Nadal, Soderling to renew rivalry

By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer



WIMBLEDON, England (AP) —
While waiting more than a decade for
another shot at Roger Federer on a
Grand Slam stage, Rafael Nadal has
developed a pretty fair rivalry with
Robin Soderling.

The Spaniard and Swede will meet
in a major event for the third time since
June 2009 in today's quarterfinals at
Wimbledon.

Soderling pulled off a shocker last
year when they played in the fourth
round of the French Open, still Nadal's
only defeat in that event. Nadal avenged
the loss in this month's final at Roland
Garros.

Nadal expects the big-swinging Soder-
ling to be even tougher on grass than on
clay.

"Probably he's one of the more diffi-
cult opponents that you can play on all
surfaces today, but especially here,"
Nadal said, "because the ball goes faster,
and it's going to be very difficult to
return, and difficult to stop him from
the baseline.

"It's going to be a very difficult match
for me, I think. Hopefully for him, too."

While upsets were the norm Tuesday
for the women, with five-time champion
Venus Williams among those eliminat-
ed, the four highest-seeded men have
reached the final eight. Along with the
No. 2-seeded Nadal against No. 6 Soder-
ling, the other matchups include No. 1
Federer against No. 12 Tomas Berdych,
No. 3 Novak Djokovic against unseeded
Yen-hsun Lu, and No. 4 Andy Murray
against No. 10 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.

Federer vs. Nadal remains a tantaliz-
ing possibility Sunday. Nadal has won
the past three times they've met in a
Grand Slam final, including an epic
match for the 2008 Wimbledon title, but
they haven't played each other in a
major event since the 2009 Australian
Open.

Soderling might again forestall a
rematch. He has been the runner-up at
the French Open the past two years,
beating Federer in Paris this year, and is
now into the quarterfinals at Wimble-
don for the first time.

Growing up, Soderling said, he
watched telecasts of finals from the All
England Club between fellow Swede
Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker.

"T always loved to watch the bigger
tournaments, especially Wimbledon,

such an old tournament with a lot of
tradition," Soderling said. "For me,
Wimbledon is the biggest one. If I had
to pick one I really wanted to win, I
would pick Wimbledon."

The same goes for another potential
spoiler: Murray. He's trying to become
the first British man since 1936 to win
the title.

Despite the weight of a nation's
expectations, he's the only man who has
yet to lose a set in the tournament.

"At home in all sports is just a huge,
huge advantage," Murray said. "People
talk a lot about the pressure and the
expectation of playing at Wimbledon,
but you have that home support. For
me, anyway, it has made a huge differ-
ence to the way that I played. It makes
you feel comfortable on the court."

PARTNERSHIP REVIVED: Anna
Kournikova and Martina Hingis say
their tennis comebacks won't involve a
return to singles on the WTA Tour.

They ended long Wimbledon
absences by playing legends doubles
Tuesday. At 29, they're younger than
some tour regulars but not tempted to
resume their careers.

"I'm going to be 30 years old," Hingis
said. "It's a commitment you have to
do. You travel 35, 40 weeks a year. I
think I've played enough tennis in my
life."

"It's time to experience other things
and grow and move on," Kournikova
added.

Kournikova and Hingis revived their
doubles partnership and beat Saman-
tha Smith and Anne Hobbs of Britain 6-
2, 6-4 in a first-round legends match.
Kournikova hadn't played at Wimble-
don since 2002, Hingis since 2007.

"It's an amazing opportunity to be
back at Wimbledon," said Kournikova,
who reached the semifinals as a 16-year-
old in 1997. "I had so much fun today.
Kind of jittery a little bit. But I had an
amazing time."

Hingis plans to play a full season of
WorldTeam Tennis this summer after a
two-year ban for testing positive for
cocaine at Wimbledon in 2007. The for-
mer No. 1 player denied taking the drug
but did not appeal the ban.

"It's great fun to be out there again
with Anna,” Hingis said. "We had some
great times. We're sharing some good
times again. Totally different ballgame.”

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By SIMON HAYDON
AP Sports Writer



JOHANNESBURG (AP) —
Spain showed touches of the class
that makes the team European
champion on Tuesday, edging out
Portugal in a tough second round
game while Paraguay needed
penalties to dispose of Japan.

David Villa finished off a fluid
move of intricate passing to final-
ly break down Portugal's defen-
sive wall and give Spain a 1-0 vic-
tory. Villa's goal was his fourth of
the tournament, making him joint
top scorer in South Africa, while
Cristiano Ronaldo could not man-
age to inspire Portugal.

The Barcelona-bound striker
saw his first shot blocked by Por-
tugal goalkeeper Eduardo, but on
the rebound, he coolly slotted
home with his right foot.

"It was one of my best goals
because it got us through to the
next round,” Villa said. "Keep
scoring so we can keep going.”

Spain will face Paraguay on Sat-
urday at Johannesburg's Ellis Park
in the quarterfinal, hoping for a
semifinal meeting with Argentina
or Germany.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter,
acknowledging the fury of foot-
ball fans around the world, said
that he has apologized to England
and Mexico for refereeing mis-
takes that helped eliminate their
teams from the World Cup.

He said FIFA will reopen the
debate on high-tech methods to
improve decision-making on the
pitch following the mistakes in
Bloemfontein and Johannesburg
— when Germany and Argentina
advanced.

"Naturally, we deplore when
you see the evidence of referees’
mistakes," said Blatter, adding it
would be "a nonsense” for FIFA
not to look again at goal-line tech-
nology with its rule-making panel.

"After having witnessed such a
situation,” Blatter said, referring to
England's non-goal against Ger-
many, "we have to open again this
file, definitely.



Spain edges out Portugal in
tough second round game

Paraguay disposes of Japan in penalty shootout



CRISTIANO RONALDO reacts after a
tackle during the World Cup round of
16 soccer match between Spain and
Portugal at the Green Point stadium in
Cape Town, South Africa, Tuesday...
(AP Photo}

"Naturally, we will take on
board again the discussion about
technology. Something has to be
changed."

The refereeing system won't be
changed midway through the
World Cup. Blatter said the panel,
known as the International Foot-
ball Association Board, would
begin considering changes at a July
meeting in Cardiff, Wales.

Uruguay's Jorge Larrionda and
Italy's Roberto Rosetti, whose
blunders prompted the FIFA
rethink, have been left off the list
of referees for the rest of the
World Cup. FIFA did not
announce its reasons, but referees
involved in controversy rarely
make it to the later rounds.

Paraguay qualified for the first
time with a penalty shootout vic-
tory over Japan after 120 minutes
of tedious football in Pretoria's
Loftus Versfeld.

Paraguay and Japan drew 0-0
after extra time and the South
Americans won the shootout 5-3
after Yuichi Komano hit the cross-
bar with Japan's third kick — his
team's only miss.

Five-time world champion
Brazil beat South American rival
Chile 3-0 Monday to make the

quarterfinals for a fifth straight
tournament. The Netherlands beat
Slovakia 2-1 to join Uruguay,
Ghana, Germany and Argentina
in the last eight.

Netherlands coach Bert van
Marwijk has demanded unity from
his World Cup players after Robin
van Persie's angry outburst at
being substituted in the 2-1 defeat
of Slovakia threatened to derail
preparations for its quarterfinal
against Brazil.

Van Marwijk said he called a
team meeting after reports in
Dutch media that the Arsenal
striker said midfielder Wesley
Sneijder should have been brought
off instead of him.

"IT will never accept anything
that could upset the next match,”
Van Marwijk told Dutch national
broadcaster NOS.

South Africa's police chief said a
British tabloid journalist has been
arrested after what police called
an orchestrated attempt to under-
mine World Cup security with an
England fan's intrusion into the
team's changing room.

National police commissioner
Bheki Cele said police arrested
Simon Wright on Monday. He said
the Sunday Mirror journalist
admitted to harboring and inter-
viewing Pavlos Joseph while police
were searching for him.

And in Germany, an octopus
called Paul hesitated but ultimate-
ly picked Germany to win — again
— this time over Argentina in
their quarterfinal matchup.

Paul, who appeared to correctly
predict all four of Germany's
games in this year's tournament,
indicated that Saturday's game will
be a tough battle and that it may
even end in a penalty shootout.

It took the octopus about an
hour to approach a water glass
containing a mussel marked with a
German flag, said Tanja Munzig, a
spokeswoman for Sea Life Aquar-
ium in the western city of Ober-
hausen.





Nets trade Yi to Wizards, clearing more cap room



YI JIANLIAN
(AP Photo)

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AP Basketball Writer



EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) — The New Jersey Nets traded
forward Yi Jianlian to the Washing-
ton Wizards on Tuesday, creating
even more room under the salary cap
as they head into free agency.

The Wizards dealt forward Quin-
ton Ross to the Nets, who also sent an
undisclosed amount of cash to Wash-
ington.

The Nets freed up another $3 mil-
lion with the deal, leaving them about
$30 million to spend once free agency
opens on July 1.

Yi was the No. 6 pick in the 2007
draft by Milwaukee and has now been
traded twice. He averaged career
highs of 12.0 points and 7.0 rebounds

By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Five-time champion
Venus Williams was ousted in

last season, but was limited to 51
games because of injury.

The forward from China, sched-
uled to earn $4.1 million next season,
has averaged 9.6 points and 5.8
rebounds in his career.

"This trade is a good opportunity
to add a skilled 7-footer with signifi-
cant NBA experience who was the
sixth overall pick in the draft just
three years ago," Wizards president
Ernie Grunfeld said in a statement.
"Yi fits in very well with our ongoing
plan of building towards the future
with a core of young, talented play-
ers."

New Jersey may have found Yi's
replacement when it drafted Derrick
Favors from Georgia Tech with the
No. 3 pick, or could target another
power forward in free agency.

Venus upset, Serena wins
in Wimbledon quarters

EMAIL: bend retarted Lown
WEESITE: hendhmotorshahamas com

the Wimbledon quarterfinals
Tuesday, losing 6-2, 6-3 to
82nd-ranked Tsvetana Pironko-
va of Bulgaria.

Defending champion Serena
Williams, however, stayed on
course to keep the title in fam-
ily hands.

Venus, seeded second, had
reached the Wimbledon final
in eight of the past 10 years.
This time, she was undone by a
slew of unforced errors and
double-faults in her worst loss
at Wimbledon in terms of
games won — five.

In another surprise, 21st-
seeded Vera Zvonareva of Rus-
sia rallied past two-time US
Open winner Kim Clijsters 3-6,
6-4, 6-2 to reach her first Wim-
bledon semifinal, where she will
face Pironkova.

Serena Williams avoided the
wave of upsets, beating China's
Li Na 7-5, 6-3 and moving clos-
er to her fourth Wimbledon
title and 13th Grand Slam
championship. The top-seeded
Serena had 11 aces to take her
tournament total to 73, break-
ing the record of 72 she set last
year. She had 21 winners and
just six unforced errors.

"T always serve well at Wim-
bledon, but this is the first time
I've ever served this well so
consistently," Serena said.

Her semifinal opponent is
62nd-ranked Petra Kvitova of
the Czech Republic, who saved
five match points before beat-
ing Estonian qualifier Kaia
Kanepi 4-6, 7-6 (8), 8-6.

"I'm very happy,” said the



SERENA WILLIAMS looks to make
a return during her quarterfinal
match against Li Na at All England
Lawn Tennis Championships at
Wimbledon on Tuesday...

(AP Photo)

20-year-old Kvitova, her voice
shaking. "I can't believe it. It's
something incredible.”

It's the first time two unseed-
ed players have reached the
women's semifinals at Wimble-
don since 1999. With all the
other big names gone, Serena
Williams is the overwhelming
favourite for the title.

"It's not mine to lose, it's
mine to win if I can get it," she
said. "There's three other peo-
ple that are vying to win it.
They have just as good a chance
as I do."

Serena said she's not sur-
prised the left-handed Kvitova
got this far.

"She's a really tough player,
especially on grass,” she said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE









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LOCAL NEWS

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(lone to crack down on crime

FROM page five

in connection with serious
offences and released on bail.

He said: “There are areas
like Avocado Street where
there were seven murders, and
you could call that a ‘hot spot’,
but the victims and the perpe-
trators involved are not
strangers to the system.

“It’s about being evil in your
heart, having no respect for
human beings, or care about
the communities in which we
live.”

Mr Greenslade and his team
greeted the young Bahamas
American Football Alliance
team practising in Pinewood
Park as they walked through
the area.

He assured the children they
do not live in a bad neighbour-
hood despite the “bad things”
that have happened.

He said: “Some bad things
have happened in this commu-
nity, there are some bad people
in the neighbourhoods, but we
believe you have a good neigh-
bourhood.”

The children were advised by
the Police Commissioner to lis-
ten to the advice of their par-
ents and teachers and steer
clear of crime.

“Tf you want guns and think
it’s exciting, join the police
force or the defence force,” Mr
Greenslade said as he invited
them to visit him at police
headquarters.

He ended the Pinewood Gar-
dens walkabout with a pep-talk
for southwestern division police
officers at the South Beach
Police Station in East Street
South.

The Commissioner then flew
to Grand Bahama to visit com-
munities there.

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MPS fall to spend

COMMUNILY Casi

Report reveals how
constituencies missed
out on project money

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ALMOST two years after it
was first allocated, three MPs
had failed to spend any of the
$100,000 in constituency
allowances made available to
them in the 2008/2009 budget
on a single upgrade or enhance-
ment project in their commu-
nities — among them, former
Prime Minister and MP for
Farm Road and Centreville
Perry Christie.

Neither MP for Bain and
Grants Town, Dr Bernard Not-
tage, Mr Christie or MP for
Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked
Island, Acklins and Long Cay
(MICAL), Alfred Gray, had
spent any of the total $300,000
provided in the 2008/2009 bud-
get for projects in their con-
stituencies by April 2010.

This is revealed in a report
compiled by the Ministry of
Finance in April 2010, just
months before the end of the
2009/2010 budget cycle tomor-
row, when the money will fail to
roll over for another year as the
Government cut backs in the
face of revenue shortfalls.

Yesterday Mr Gray claimed
that the figures did not reflect
the truth of the matter in his
case, as he had in fact spent the
full $100,000 for the second
year in his constituency. The
2007/2008 Ministry of Finance
report on the expenditure of
the constituency allowances
shows that Mr Gray had suc-
cessfully applied for just under
$100,000 to be spent on the
construction of the Acklins
Community Centre in 2007 and
the MP claimed that having
sought to have the same
amount spent on a Community
Centre in Mayaguana from the
following year's funds, he was
told by the Ministry of Finance
that they would prefer he use
second $100,00 allocation to fin-
ish the project in Acklins. He
said he agreed to this and the
contract for the centre was
signed in November 2009.

Messages left for Dr Not-
tage and Mr Christie were not
returned.

In the case of Dr Nottage,
former minister of health, the
failure to allocate any of the
funds in his constituency were a

SEE page 10



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EAA Ger
[aur FEN 08

BUT team
voted out
of office





By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



FOR the first time in the his-
tory of the Bahamas Union of
Teachers, the entire executive
team was voted out of office at
the union’s 63rd annual meeting
yesterday.

Up to press time, the union
was in the process of selecting
three committees, an election
commission, a candidacy com-
mittee and an appeals commit-
tee, for elections scheduled Sep-

SEE page 10





BU GaN emmy OD LTE





PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured with Archbishop Desmond Tutu (left), at a dinner in n the Archbishop’ s honour held Satur-
day at the home of Sol Kerzner in Cape Town, South Africa. Mr Ingraham is in South Africa for the FIFA World Cup, which has now

reached the quarter-final stages.

Psychologist
speaks out on

homicide trend

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GREATER focus on clini-
cal research, educational
resources and community
involvement is needed to fully
address the growing trend of
homicides in the Bahamas,
according to psychologist Dr
David Allen.

Based on two years of
focused research, he said that

Police confident of apprehending
suspects over six recent homicides

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE are con-
fident they will
apprehend the sus-
pects wanted in con-
nection with all six
homicides commit-
ted over six days last
week.











ELLISON
GREENSLADE



Cheryl Grant-Bethel
yet to give up post
as deputy director



ings are under inves-
tigation, and police
are working effec-
tively to bring six
suspects to court.
Detectives
charged one person

.) in connection with

one of the murders
on Monday, expect
to charge another
today, and people
will also be charged
in connection with

THE BROILING feud over
the appointment of the Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions con-
tinued yesterday with sources
in the Attorney General’s office
confirming that Cheryl Grant-
Bethel has yet to give up her
post as deputy director and
move to the office of Law
Reform and Revision Depart-
ment.

At this new office, Mrs
Grant-Bethel was expected to
head the post of Deputy Law

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance

the remaining four murders

: ee : Reform and Revision Commis-
as investigations continue.

the current behavioral patterns ‘ )
sioner, as the post of Director

Cc iSSi f Poli
displayed by adults are paral- Sean mena ane Tm

Ellison Greenslade said the














coverage no matter which spate of murders and shoot- SEE page 12
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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS









$100,000 constituency
allowance helped MPs tackle
‘minor’ issues, says Laing

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
Alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE provision of a $100,000 constituency
allowance to each MP in two recent budget
cycles - but which has now been dropped
due to the government’s revenue slump -
made a “world of difference” to the ability of
political representatives to make small but
positive changes in their constituencies,
according to the Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing.

A Ministry of Finance report obtained by
The Tribune records that FNM MPs were
slightly more successful in spending money
allocated to them for constituency projects in
the 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 budget cycles
under the current FNM administration.

The report, compiled in April 2010, shows
that 17 PLP MPs spent $1,568,290.46 out of
a total $1.7 million in constituency allowance
funds available to them in the form of
$100,000 allocations per MP in 2007/2008.
That amounted to expenditure of 92.3 per
cent of all monies allocated to them. In the
same period, 24 FNM MPs spent $2,358,678
out of a total of $2.4 million - 98.3 per cent.

Report

By the time the report was compiled in
April 2010, PLP MPs had spent $991,800.70,
or 58 per cent of a total of $1.7 million allo-
cated in the 2008/2009 budget. FNM MPs
spent $1,825,473.02 out of a total of $2.4
million, or 76 per cent. This means that over
both years, the 17 PLP MPs spent 75 per
cent of their possible $3.4 million allocation
over two years, while the FNM MPs spent
87.7 per cent.

Among the most popular projects to have
been supported by MPs in their constituen-
cies are new or renovated basketball court
facilities, cleaning of roads and clearing of
property, the construction or upgrading of
parks, donations of computers to schools or

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MR ZHIVARGO
LAING and MP for
Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell (above),
who also spent
the full $200,000
allocated to his
constituency,
agreed that the
money allowed
MPs to address
problems in their
constituencies
more quickly than
they would tradi-
tionally have, or
will now have, the
capacity to.

Zhivargo Laing





“We Care About
Your Health”

computer labs, donations to community
organisations, the erection of signage and the
purchase of interactive whiteboards for
schools.

Mr Laing, also MP for Marco City, spent
more money than any other MP on con-
stituency projects funded through the con-
stituency allowances given to MPs in the
2007/2008 and 2008/2009 budget cycles,
according to the report. He was one of 11
MPs - seven FNM and four PLP - who spent
all of the $100,000 allocated to them in both
years. These MPs are: Loretta Butler Turn-
er, Larry Cartwright, Earl Deveaux, Edi-
son Key, Zhivargo Laing, Kenneth Russell,

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 3
LOCAL NEWS



Woman charged

‘iw Stroke patient ‘denied

judicial officer

@ 9
A WOMAN accused of
using a fraudulent job let- :
ter to sign bail has been i

charged with deceiving a

judicial officer
Jewel Elizabeth Hanna, : By MEGAN REYNOLDS

roe Toure stattreporer, §=FFamily Claims there was no room in ward

accused of deceiving a mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
local magistrate. Accord-



ing to court dockets. on A STROKE patient at he suffered a stroke early and was taken to hospital remained in the male med- “It’s disgusting,” she said.
ae Mav 28 fea Princess Margaret Hospital yesterday morning were by ambulance. ical ward. Hospital administrator
a eee deceive was allegedly denied Inten- outraged that he was being His sister flew from Mia- “The doctor said his Coralee Adderley said:
Magistrate Carolita sive Care treatment yester- kept in the male medical mi to see him as his condi- brain is swelling every “Physicians have met with
Bethell by means of a false day as there was no room ward after his doctor said tion appeared to be seri- minute, and he needs tobe — the family and I have not
podem for him in the ward, his he needed Intensive Care ous. in Intensive Care but there spoken to them yet, but I
Eisarwhowes family claim. treatment. — Yesterday afternoon, the are no beds,” a friend of the — can confirm he is in a bed in
areneaed belo Mame: Relatives who travelled Mr Rahming had suffered family claimed Mr Rah- family told The Tribune. the male surgical ward.
eae mene: from as far as Miamitosee astroke at hishome in Yel- _ming’s brain was swelling — “He is in critical condi- “IT am not aware that he
Davis on Monday was : Anthony Rahming, 47, after low Elder Gardens at and he needed to be in _ tion. needs to be in Intensive
granted $5,000 bail. The : around midnight yesterday Intensive Care, but he “How can someone in Care, but we will meet with

as ace summed 4a critical condition be left like the physicians and the fam-
Ostober co that? And his family are ily and allow them to keep

. - not getting any answers. you updated.”
¢ AN American accused
of gun and ammunitions i
possession is expected i
back in court tomorrow i uper Si |

Kevin Godfrey, 55, of
Salt Lake City, Utah, was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethell in
Court 8, Bank Lane on
Monday, charged with
possession of an unli-
censed firearm and posses-
sion of ammunition.

It is alleged that on Sun-
day, June 27, Godfrey was
n possession of a .357
Smith and Wesson
revolver as well as 19 live
rounds of .357 ammunition
allegedly found in his bag-
gage while he was leaving
the country.

He pleaded not guilty to
the charges but has been
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison until
tomorrow when he will
return to court for a bail
hearing.

Margaret Morgan
Thomas dies age 80

Mrs. Margaret Morgan
Thomas of the Isle of Man,
formerly of Nassau, passed
away at her home in Bal-
lasalla, Isle of Man on April
21, at the age of 80.

Mrs Morgan spent more
than 20 years of her adult
life in the Bahamas where
her first husband, Lewis
Morgan worked extensively
in Education as a teacher at
Government High
School, as Director of Edu-
cation and also as headmas-
ter of St Andrews School.
Mr Morgan is remembered
fondly by many Bahamians
to whom he taught Geogra-
phy with skill and enthusi-

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914















SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M.,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

































































WEBSITE

www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Gibson tells the Carlton Francis story

DURING the Budget debate, Kennedy
MP Kenyatta Gibson, in putting the case for
legalising gambling, told the tragic story of
the political churchman who sacrificed him-
self to support his church’s anti-gambling
beliefs.

The irony was that the church never assist-
ed him or protested his fall. Instead it became
a firm supporter of the very government that
had condemned their brother. It was the
government that had introduced the evil that
Baptists claimed they abhorred. Baptist
churchmen took the position that neither
they, nor their members, would ever sup-
port a government that depended on gam-
bling as a source of national income.

Mr Gibson was, of course, referring to
the late Carlton Francis, once Minister of
Finance in the Pindling government, who
was also a lay preacher in the Baptist church.
Although Mr Gibson did not name the
denomination to which he referred, he was
talking of the Baptists. Because of the large
vote the church controls at election time, all
governments have been loath to take them
on over one of the strictest tenants of their
faith. Gambling is a capital sin which the
church claims it will not tolerate, nor permit
the indulgence of its members.

We recall the election of ’67 when the
PLP came to power for the first time. Just
days before Bahamians were to go to the
polls, the PLP sent in a release for publica-
tion. If the UBP were returned to power, it
said, it would mean the extension of casino
gambling. This was not true. As a matter of
fact it was an unfair lie, because Sir Roland
Symonette, this country’s first premier, who
was a staunch Methodist, was personally
opposed to gambling. No such plan was on
his party’s agenda.

However, it spooked the Baptist commu-
nity and, of course, churchmen stepped up
their political opposition. There was hardly
time to deny the story because Bahamians
were getting ready to go to the polls. It was
only with a PLP government, said the
release, that Bahamians could be assured
that gambling would be kept out of this coun-

behalf.”

The PLP, of course, won the day, but it
was not long afterwards that casino gam-
bling was introduced and flourished in the
Bahamas. And it was only six years after the
PLP came to power that Mr Francis was put
in the awkward position of having to choose
between his government and his conscience.
The issue was gambling. Here the politician
had to give way to the conscience of the
Baptist preacher. He voted against his gov-
ernment on the gambling issue and in 1973
had to resign from the Pindling cabinet.

That was bad enough, but a vindictive

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prime minister never forgave him his mortal
sin. Thrown on the political trash heap, Mr
Francis was hounded from pillar to post. A
respected teacher before he entered poli-
tics, he could not get a job at the College of
the Bahamas. As a matter of fact, he found it
difficult after that to make a living.

As he crossed the street at one of Sir Lyn-
den’s political meetings, the “Chief” looked
down from his lofty dais, spotted his former
finance minister and sneered that there went
Carlton Francis, but all he could see was a
three-piece suit. It was true, Mr Francis then
dying of cancer, was a shell of his former
self and all one could see was a baggy suit.
The crowd jeered. It was cruel.

But where was his church, which had
declared that it would never support a gov-
ernment that got its revenue from gambling?
Mr Gibson said that in his research, he could
not find that Mr Francis’ church came to his
support when, having been abandoned by
his party, he decided to run for parliament
from the South Beach constituency. Of
course, with his party against him and no
help from his church, he lost the contest.

Mr Gibson said that “the record will show
that they abandoned him and quickly
realigned themselves with the same political
party which he had abandoned on their

And, said Mr Gibson, “to complicate this
issue many leading Churchmen of the day
then accepted positions of significance from
the same political party which had expanded
casino gambling. These princes and princess-
es now piously sat as secretary generals and
parliamentarians in the political organiza-
tion which had ushered in the very same
expansion, which they previously had vocif-
erously argued against...

“And so the question begs an answer,”
said Mr Gibson, “what did they do for the
Prince of their Church, Carlton Elisha Fran-
cis who sided with his Church on the gam-
bling issue and gave up his cabinet portfolio?
Absolutely nothing. The man could not even
get the pastorship of a recognizable Church
in this denomination.”
try Mr Gibson revived this bit of history to
advise Bahamians to hold their own counsel
in what they believed was best for them and
their families and not be guided by special

In the debate on whether gambling —
the numbers game — should be made legal,
he said the “people have the inalienable right
to choose for themselves.”

Mr Gibson ended his presentation in the
House with a quote from Mr Francis: “They
who stand on the sand banks of history trying
to hold back the tide will be swept up in the
flood gates of insurrection.”

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

The former Minister of
Education recently confirmed
that the education system in
the Bahamas is “broken” and
needs a total transformation.
Most educated and concerned
citizens would probably echo
that sentiment.

As a former educator of 34
years, I don’t have a first hand
knowledge of the Bahamian
system, but I would like to
examine the nature of the
“total transformation” of
which Mr Sears speaks and
translate that into something a
little more concrete and spe-
cific.

It is easy to criticise any
educational system and rant
and rave that it has to change
and improve. Instead of work-
ing towards solutions to the
problems, finding someone to
blame and accuse of being
incompetent seems to be the
extent of public discussion
and debate. Most people
don’t know how to change
and improve the education
system, but they know “some-
one” must do “something”!

No “one” can improve and
change the Bahamian educa-
tion system. “Every one” has
a part to play — government,
teachers, parents and stu-
dents. Unless all players are
committed, coordinated and
accountable, nothing will hap-
pen. All four tyres on a car
must be inflated to the same
pressure for the car to run
smoothly and all four mem-
bers of the educational sys-
tem must operate in harmony
as well.

What does this mean for
the government? Firstly, the
government must develop
and implement a curriculum
that meets the needs of the
future and not the past,
includes the most effective
methodologies and materials,
and focuses on inquiry based
learning, problem solving and
creative thinking. Govern-
ment must provide safe and
healthy school buildings and
grounds, an appraisal system
to help measure progress, and
professional support to con-
tinually improve the educa-
tion of the nation’s teachers.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Frank Henderson, I read
your article this morning
and J have to say that I was
quite disturbed by your
rhetoric. I’m unclear as to
your statement that “chil-
dren’s well being has suf-
fered due to woman becom-
ing more responsible for
their own bodies and repro-

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



The government must set
standards and have the means
to assist schools and teachers
to meet these high standards.
It will be an expensive and
difficult responsibility, but
without this kind of govern-
ment leadership, little else will
happen.

What does this mean for
teachers? Teachers must
faithfully teach the prescribed
curriculum as set by the Min-
istry. They must constantly
work to learn more effective
methodologies and be willing
to deal with the diversity of
students that enter their class-
es. All students have differ-
ent strengths and weakness-
es and teachers must attempt
to teach not only the eager
but also the reluctant and dif-
ficult. No one ever said teach-
ing was an easy job and if the
classroom is too hot an envi-
ronment for some, then they
should get out of the kitchen.
For those, who are commit-
ted and have chosen teaching
as a vocation, not a job, they
should be well compensated.
Teaching is difficult, but with-
out dedicated teachers who
love to work with children,
little improvement will hap-
pen.

What does this mean for
parents? The parent has
always been considered the
“primary educator”. Parents
have a responsibility for the
education of their children
from the day of their birth,
until they grow to become
responsible adults. It does not
end when the child goes to
school!

Parents must read to their
children and talk to their chil-
dren before they go to school
and teach them the basic
manners and responsibilities
to become contributing mem-
bers of our society.

Once the child enters public
education the parents have
just as much responsibility as
before — they must supervise
homework, stay in close con-
tact with the teachers and

duction.” How is that? It
seems to me that with the
pill and the knowledge of
birth control, that women
do not bring unwanted chil-
dren into the world.

Is it better and more pro-
ductive for women to keep
having unwanted babies?

You need only to look
around your own environ-
ment to see what the lack of
birth control is all about and
what a pity it is in this coun-
try.

Young girls who are
babies themselves, pregnant,
simply out of ignorance, or,
because of the lack of avail-
ability for birth control. Is
this scenario more pleasing
to you? I don’t see how...

I also take great offence
to your statement that
women “have never been

Odessa

Educational
transformation:
what does it mean?

school, and set high expecta-
tions for their children’s
behaviour and academic
progress. For the 18 hours a
day when the child is not in
school, parents are the teach-
ers! Being a parent is harder
than being a teacher but if
Bahamian schools are going
to steadily improve, parental
involvement in their child’s
education is essential or very
little improvement will hap-
pen.

What does this mean for
the child? Every child is
equipped with different skills
and abilities, interests and
family background. Regard-
less of their mental, physical
and emotional makeup they
are all responsible for one
thing — the choices they make
when they are at school. If
they want to be successful in
life they need to practice self-
discipline, work to the best of
their abilities, listen to class-
room instruction attentively,
and conscientiously do home-
work. If they don’t make
good choices they must learn
to accept the consequences.
A student’s job is hard work
but so is a parent’s and so is a
teacher’s.

Everyone in the education-
al community has a very
demanding and challenging
role to play and everyone has
to meet their own individual
challenges. Unless all four
partners — the Ministry of
Education, the teachers, the
parents and the students are
working in harmony towards
the common goal of academ-
ic excellence — the transfor-
mation that Mr Sears is
searching for will never hap-
pen.

Only the commitment of all
of the members involved can
make it a reality! Otherwise
the Bahamas, like the Titanic,
will continue to slowly, but
relentlessly, slip beneath the
waves!

TIME TO SINK OR
SWIM

Nassau,

June 11, 2010.

Women have come far and to not need to he debased by ignorance

seen more as sex objects as
they are today.”

Iam positive that many of
the women who are business
executives, working moth-
ers, and mothers in general,
will feel just as shocked and
insulted by that ignorant
statement.

Women have come far
and certainly do not need to
be debased by you and your
ignorance.

God won't help in this
scenario, Mr Henderson, the
only thing that will help
however, is education and
teaching women how to be
responsible for themselves
and their bodies.

SUE KATZ
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

June 16, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

WALKABOUT

POLICE

PINEWOOD

Residents told: all is being
done to crack down on crime

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE Commissioner Elli-
son Greenslade and his team
of senior officers reassured
Pinewood Gardens residents
that all is being done to crack-
down on crime following a mur-
der in the area which trauma-
tised a mother and her three
children.

The Commissioner, flanked
by Assistant Commissioner
Glenn Miller and Assistant
Superintendent Hulan Hanna
and a dozen senior officials,
reassured the community that
police are doing their utmost
to stamp out crime.

Murder-accused Bradley Fer-
guson was shot in Sequoia
Street, Pinewood Gardens, on
Saturday evening, and forced
himself into a car occupied by a
mother and her three children,
ages 11, 14 and 16.

Ferguson had recently been
released from prison. He was
acquitted on appeal for the
March 2002 murders of preg-
nant Rosemary Bennett-Wright
and her son Jakeel Wright of
Fox Hill, as well as the attempt-
ed murders of Devonna Brown
and Omega Fox.

His murder was the sixth in
Nassau in just six days, and fol-
lows a number of violent crimes
and homicides in Pinewood in
recent years.

The Commissioner and
senior officers on ‘walkabout’ in
Pinewood yesterday visited an





dent of Pinewood Gardens.

area of Avocado Street where
there have been seven murders
in recent years, including the
double murder of a mother and
son in January last year.

Mr Hanna said Ferguson also
lived in the area near a strip
mall housing the Platinum Play-
ers sports bar and L and M
Wholesale store.

The police also visited griev-
ing mother Maria Scott exactly
four years after her police offi-
cer son Marcian Clarke, 31, was
shot dead outside her house in
Willow Tree Avenue.

Mr Clarke was killed shortly
before he was due to testify as a
witness in the murder trial of
his former police partner Jim-
my Armbrose, Ms Scott said.

“It’s ironic there are so many
police officers in the area today
because this is the exact spot



where it happened exactly four
years ago,” she said.

“This is like an omen saying
everything is going to be OK.”

As Mr Greenslade and his
team continued on the neigh-
bourhood patrol they were
greeted by Bishop Neil Ellis
who had seen them passing
from the Mount Tabor Baptist
Church in Pinewood.

Mr Ellis expressed his seri-
ous concerns about crime in the
area and level of violence in the
country.

The Commissioner argued
crime is not a localised prob-
lem confined to crime “hot
spots” but he said the victims
and perpetrators of crime are
often people with criminal
records who have been charged

SEE page 15

GARDEN S



‘Significant improvement’ in murder detection rate

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT: While more murders were
recorded so far for the year as opposed to last
year, Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade
revealed there has been significant improvement
in its detection rate.

Of the 47 recorded murders to date in the
Bahamas, he reported that the police have solved
38.

“Our detection rate is better and it is improv-
ing,” he told the press while in Grand Bahama
yesterday.

Commissioner Greenslade was in Freeport to
attend a farewell reception at Police Headquar-
ters for the United States Customs and Border
Protection and Drug Enforcement Agency
(DEA) officers. US Ambassador Nicole Avant
was also present.

Mr Greenslade took time out to give an update
on criminal matters, including the recent homi-
cides that occurred in New Providence and
firearm seizures.

Of the six homicides in Nassau, police have
charged one person and are preparing to charge
suspects in three other matters.

“We charged (one person) yesterday in one
matter and we will charge (someone) again
tomorrow in another matter. A day following, we
will bring additional charges in a third matter.

And I feel very confident that we will bring
charges in a fourth matter,” Commissioner
Greenslade said.

He was particularly encouraged by the work
the police have done and the progress they are
making relative to the murder of a young woman
at Cordeaux Avenue.

Mr Greenslade also noted that the police are
following very distinct leads in an outstanding
matter of a young man who was found dead at
Carmichael Road near Gladstone Road.

He said the people committing murders are
persons who have been in and out of the prison
and court systems.

“T believe it is important to tell you that people
who are committing murders are not church-
going people; these are not people that want to
have a conversation with you and want to attend
conflict resolution classes.

“These are people that have been in and out of
the system charged with murder, illegal firearm,
drug trafficking, and armed robbery, and who
have been put on bail and are re-offending.

“We know the names and we have suspects we
are seeking.

“These people are in and out of the system. It’s
as real as that.

“And sadly, over the course of the year, last
year and years prior, many of the victims of mur-
ders are people that are on bail for murder and
have been in out of the system. That is what we
are dealing with,” said the nation’s police chief.

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sae ‘

COMMISSIONER OF POLICE Ellison Greenslade speaks to a rene in Pinewood Gardens yesterday.

URSA CERT SC DS DUT)

: By MEGAN REYNOLDS
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PINEWOOD residents called

: for consistent community polic-
: ing, positive activities for young
: people and a clean-up of their
: neighbourhood to help combat
: crime in the area as senior police
: conducted a high-profile walka-
: bout in the community.

Young people who have

: grown up in Pinewood said they
: have seen the area degenerate in
recent years as there are limited
: positive activities for young peo-
: ple and fewer community police
: on the streets.

They also called for the return

of community policing to com-
: bat crime.

Kevin Moss, 20, of Willow

: Tree Avenue, said misguided
: youths in Pinewood are drawn
: into criminal behaviour because
: they are inspired by the drug
: dealers, thieves, burglars, rob-
: bers and murderers who return
: to the community after being
: charged by police and released
: On bail. These individuals con-
; tinue to commit crimes in the
: area because there are not
: enough police on the streets at
: night, he said.

“The police might be here for

? two weeks from now, but it will
: never get under control if they
: keep letting these people back
: on the streets,” Mr Moss said.

“Tf they would keep walking

: around and have community
: policing that would be a good
: thing.



“When we had the police
here with Urban Renewal, every
night we were sure the park was
empty, clean and calm.

“Now they stopped, people’s
houses are broken into every
night, and the young people are
just seeing violence, they are not
seeing any positive activity.

“They say there’s nothing to
do so they just get into trouble.”

Mr Moss said he does not fol-
low a particular political party
but said he has noticed how
community projects thriving
under PLP MP Allyson May-
nard-Gibson have dropped of
since FNM MP Byran Wood-
side came to power in 2007.

He is keen to run a baseball
or alternative sports programme
for young people if given the
resources.

“The young people don’t
have anybody to look up to so
they end up doing what the
criminals are doing,” Mr Moss
said.

“They think crime is the way
to go, but if they had someone
to look up to, a positive pro-
gramme for them, it would help.

“All I want to do is do good
for the community. I don’t mind
what, just give me the equip-
ment.”

Pinewood Park is overgrown,
one of the basketball hoops has
been broken and Mr Moss said
it has been hanging unmended
for years. The children’s swings
have snapped and rusty chains
hang unused, and residents say
the public toilet has never been
opened.



Dumped cars rust in front
yards and on empty lots, fly-tip-
ping, dumping and overgrown
areas are dotted between the
well-kept homes of respectable
families, and cleaning these
areas up would provide enough
work for all the unemployed
members of the community
looking for work, Mr Moss said.

While the population of
Pinewood has swelled over the
last ten years, the infrastructure
has fallen into disrepair,
explained resident Angelo King,
21.

Mr King said basketball
“saved him” from being tempt-
ed into a life of crime as he got a
scholarship to a Oklahoma
school and has graduated from
the University of Central Okla-
homa with a psychology degree.
He hopes to work as a counsel-
lor in Nassau.

He said: “Pinewood has got
worse but it’s not a bad area.

“There are good people here,
but there is also a certain set of
bad people around and they are
very bad people.

“The important thing is to
stop the kids from being influ-
enced by them and give them
something positive to do.”

ig
sy
ae tay
PHONE: 322-2157

Tue Roman CarHoutc Community IN THE BAHAMAS

IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE

A SOLEMN PonrTIFICAL MASS

TO CELEBRATE THE

G

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Df) if! (fF |
Yd Y LV Y Irniversary )

(July 1960 - July 2010)

St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill Street
Monday, July 5th at 7:30 p.m.


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

BRADLEY ROBERTS TAKES AIM AT MINISTER OF STATE FOR WORKS AND ENVIRONMENT

PLP chairman: FNM crippling BEC

PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts
attacked the FNM and its Minister of
State for Works and Environment
Phenton Neymour for “crippling”
the Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion.

In a statement yesterday, Mr
Roberts said he had announced an
unprecedented decrease in the basic
rate of electricity in 2003 when he
was the then Minister of Works
under the PLP administration.

This announcement, Mr Roberts
said, was well received throughout
the Bahamas even with the FNM
who were quick to claim that such a
reduction could only be made possi-
ble through the good stewardship of
the FNM and its previous two terms
in office.

“Since the FNM’s return to office,
the Junior Minister Phenton Ney-
mour and MP for South Beach with
the support of Minister Earl
Deveaux have repeatedly blamed
BEC financial deterioration on the

$100,000 constituency allowance helped PRIVAT ital teria

MPs tackle ‘minor’ issues, says Laing

2003 rate reduction. The PLP have
on numerous occasions provided fac-
tual evidence to deny this bogus
claim.

“The FNM in September 2003 not
only boldly endorsed the rate reduc-
tion as being possible only by their
stewardship during their term in
office and yet unashamedly on the
other hand blames the PLP. This is a
classical case of double mindedness.

“The plain and simple truth is that
Phenton Neymour and Earl
Deveaux were both sound asleep at
the wheel during the record oil price
crisis (when oil was at $147 per bar-
rel) and allowed the Corporation to
fully absorb Custom Duty and
Stamp Tax on BEC oil imports
which the corporation was unable
to bear as a result of the sharp spike
in oil and is the major reason BEC
finds itself with one foot on the
banana peel and the other in the
proverbial grave.

“The public will recall that BEC’s

former Chairman Frederick Gottlieb
disclosed to the press in February
2009 that BEC was aiming to come
“within $1 to $2 million of breaking
even” by the end of its financial year
September 2009. Junior Minister
Neymour has disclosed that the actu-
al loss for the year ending September
2009 was placed at $20 million.
Could this be the reason why Fred-
erick Gottlieb resigned and washed
his hands of this terrible and dismal
mismanagement of the Corporation
as a result of political interference?
The Ministers had failed to provide
an explanation as to why BEC’s
actual performance was so drasti-
cally different when compared with
the then able Chairman’s forecast,”
Mr Roberts said.

As it stands now, the PLP chair-
man said the FNM is seeking to find
a way out of “the very grave state”
that BEC finds itself in as a result of
“political interference” by Ministers
whose policies caused the corpora-

tion to hit “an all time low.”

“This much was acknowledged by
the general manager when he said
‘we are unable to procure various
parts and equipment and this has
affected our ability to adhere to
some of the maintenance schedules’.
This very simple and straight for-
ward statement is in direct and bla-
tant contrast to the disclosure made
by Junior Minister Neymour during
a recent contribution in the House of
Assembly.

“During his contribution, the
junior minister boldly assured New
Providence and Paradise Island res-
idences that the Bahamas Electrici-
ty Corporation (BEC) had made the
necessary preparations for the sum-
mer months and that power outages
were not foreseeable.

“Contrary to the misleading assur-
ances given by the junior minister,
our sources have informed us that
BEC power plants in New Provi-
dence and several family Islands will

FROM page two

Alvin Smith and in the PLP, Fred Mitchell,
Anthony Moss, Picewell Forbes and Oswald
Ingraham. Mr Laing, like several other MPs,
also obtained an extension on his con-
stituency allowance - in his case to the tune
of $8,944.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham was
recorded as having spent the total $100,000
allocated for his constituency in 2007/2008
on “upgrading public facilities” in his con-
stituency and $84,472.51 from the follow-
ing year’s allocation on “assistance with a
public beach facility” in Treasure Cay.

This facility is understood to include nine
cabanas, a main building, restroom facili-
ties, walking paths, parking, electrical, water
and telephone connections to central supply
and sporting facilities.

Mr Laing and MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell, who also spent the full $200,000
allocated to his constituency, both agreed
that the money allowed MPs to address
problems in their constituencies more quick-
ly than they would traditionally have, or
will now have, the capacity to.

“It speeded up the process in getting
minor things done. Under the normal
process through the Ministry of Works you
put in an application and it goes on an enor-
mous pile and it’s hopeless. Something as
simple as putting in a road crossing on a
dangerous road can take forever,” said Mr
Mitchell, who also made numerous contri-
butions to local community organisations
such as the Fox Hill Mother's Club and the
Monastery Park Crime Watch Committee.

Mr Laing said he felt there was little room
for abuse of the funds by the MPs.

“They'd submit a letter to myself and that

Our ATM Machines will be out of service from:
5:00 p.m. Wednesday June 30, 2010 to 9:00 a.m.
Thursday July 1, 2010 for routine maintenance.

“It speeded up the process
in getting minor things
done. Under the normal
process through the Min-
istry of Works you put in an
application and it goes on
an enormous pile and it’s
hopeless.”



Zhivargo Laing

letter would have the request and the sup-
porting documents. So if they wanted to
make contribution to an organization in
their area, a Junkanoo group, it had to be
accompanied by letter from that group. If
they wanted to purchase computers, they
needed invoices from the computer com-
pany. For the development of a park, they’d
either have to get confirmation from Public
Works that the contract they got was rea-
sonable or a quantity surveyor or architect
had to provide that level of confirmation so
in every instance had to be accompanied by
supporting documentation and cheques were
then made payable to vendors, not to the
Mps.”

He could not say whether the Govern-
ment would continue the initiative when
economic conditions are more favorable.

See tomorrow’s Tribune for a further
breakdown of expenditures by MPs in their
constituencies.






Tutu.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

Signed Management

le Bank of The Bahamas



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham is pic-
tured with South
Africa's Justice Minis-
ter, Jeffrey Radede (left)
and Sol Kerzner (right),
at Kerzner's home in
Cape Town, South
Africa on Saturday,
June 26, 2010. Mr.
Ingraham was an invit-
ed guest at a dinner
held at the Kerzner
home in honour of
Archbishop Desmond

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a

BRADLEY ROBERTS

not be able to meet the summer
power demands and the generators
have not been properly maintained.
Farmers Cay in the Exumas is an
example; one of its two generators
was recently completely destroyed
by fire and the remaining engine is in
need of maintenance. A promise to
provide a rented generator is likely
to be conditional on BEC being able
to obtain credit,” Mr Roberts said.















PM Hubert
Ingraham (left),
is greeted by
President of
Fédération Inter-
nationale de Football Associa-
tion (FIFA) Sepp Blatter dur-
ing a World Cup match in
Johannesburg, South Africa
on Monday, June 28, 2010.





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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE




Our society has failed our population in education. We have to

change this.’ — Philip P. Smith

Let's honour our academic
‘heroes’ — ex-PLP Minister

Philip Smith points to achievements of Rhodes Scholars

SOCIETY needs to hon-
our those of our people who
achieve internationally-cel-
ebrated academic success,
specifically young people
who have earned the
Rhodes Scholar Award, for-
mer PLP Minister Philip P.
Smith suggested yesterday.

He said: " Our society has
failed our population in edu-
cation. We have to change
this. I am convinced that if a
meaningful effort was made
to craft people who have
achieved in academic and
intellectual pursuits as
‘heroes’ then we would help
those young people still in
school to consider achieving
to their potential in acade-
mic pursuits.”

Mr Smith said this process
could begin with regular
focus on the activities of
people like our four Rhodes
scholars, Dr Deidre Cox,
Felice Swapp, Dr Christian
Campbell and Myron Rolle.

"Tsupport a grant to each
of these exceptional young
people provided by The
Bahamas from either the
public purse or private
sources very much along the
lines of the American
MacArthur Fellowship, pop-
ularly referred to as the
Genius Award,” he said.

Mr Smith proposed that a
panel of “noteworthy citi-
zens” should manage the
award.

"As I envision it, the
Bahamas financial award
would only be made on suc-
cessful completion of a
degree at Oxford Universi-
ty,” he said.



MYRON ROLLE

“It is hoped to find fund-
ing to permit the award of a
stipend of $100,000 per
annum for a period of five
years to every Bahamian
Rhodes Scholar while they
live in the Bahamas.”

Selected

He added that the
awardees would be selected
by the Committee of Selec-
tion of the Rhodes Scholar-
ship Trustees for the Com-
monwealth Caribbean
Rhodes Scholarship (an
authority outside the
Bahamas).

He continued: " Pho-
tographs of the holders of
doctorates should be proud-
ly displayed in the arrival
section of the Lynden Pin-
dling Airport with special
recognition for Rhodes
Scholars and Rhodes Schol-
arship finalists.

"I propose a scholarship
donation of $100,000 to each

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

finalist. The proposed dol-
lar value of this award is in
the same range as the value
of grants provided by the
Government of The
Bahamas to Olympic Gold
Medal Winners," he said.

Mr Smith = strongly
believes that at the very
least, it would serve to
inspire others with the
potential to make the effort
to enable consideration for
granting of the same schol-
arship to them.

“There would be no oth-
er restrictions and no
requirement to perform any
specific functions or work.
They would be free to do as
they pleased with their
time,” he added.

“The premise is very sim-
ple, these extraordinarily tal-
ented people would not be
unproductive with their time
and talent. Any creative or
productive activity they
would indulge in while in
The Bahamas would serve
to enrich the community.”

Mr Smith noted that:
“There are many others in
our society who give so
much without a community
based award but they would
all be subject to biased
assessments of individual
value. The achievement of
a doctorate, though not a
guarantee of notable intelli-
gence, is free of community
subjectivity.

“The distinction of a
Rhodes Scholarship Award
is internationally recognised
as the achievement of sin-
gular excellence in academ-
ic pursuits.”



eA RR ae TS

UE Re a a a

BAMBOO Town MP Branville McCart-
ney received an honorary doctorate degree
when he gave the graduating address at
the 30th Commencement Exercises at
Sojourner-Douglass College.

Thirty-one students were graduated from
the college, five in Masters of Applied
Social Science degrees and 26 undergrad-
uates.

Mr McCartney advised the graduates
that they are educated, enabled and
empowered, and encouraged them to fol-
low their convictions and determine their
own destiny just as Sojourner Truth (whose
name the institution bears), never with
malice or anger, but with determination.

In addition, Mr McCartney stressed the
words of Frederick Douglass, that they
must “pray with their legs.”

Indeed, the Bamboo Town MP remind-
ed them of the famous words of Mr Dou-



Branville McCartney

glass, that “I prayed for twenty years but
received no answer until I pray with my
legs.”

Mr McCartney encouraged the gradu-
ates to find their legs and pursue excel-
lence for there is much to accomplish in the
Bahamas.

He questioned the students, however,
as to what “moral compass” would be their
guide as they start their own sojourn.

He suggested giving to those who are
less fortunate; knowing that the greater
richness comes from enriching the lives of
others.

“Do not settle for the passive life, nor act
the part of the cold and timid soul who
shall know neither victory nor defeat,” Mr
McCartney said.

The students were urged to unleash their
inner strength and unbridle their inner
selfless self.



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IMPORTANT CUSTOMER NOTICE

Sagicor Life Inc (Sagicor) and Capital Life Insurance Company Bahamas Limited (Capital Life) wish to remind
their customers of some important changes in service arrangements.

With effect from July 1, 2010, Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited (Family Guardian) will assume the
administration of policies and mortagages from the Capital Life and Sagicor portfolios. Family Guardian is a
wholly-owned life and health subsidiary of FamGuard Corporation Limited, with which Sagicor has a strategic

alliance.

Should you have any queries regarding these changes, please contact Ms. Necka Wells, Senior Manager,
Operations at:

Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
Family Guardian Financial Centre

East Bay & Church Street

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 396-1365

Sagicor Life Inc and Capital Life Insurance Company Bahamas Limited continue to enhance its systems and
procedures with the aim of improving the delivery of service to its customers, and wishes to thank you in
advance for your co-operation with this matter.

Sagicor S



| he Capital Life Insurance Company Bahamas Ltd.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 9



Energy security inseparable trom

By LARRY SMITH

HIRTY years ago
a mechanical fail-
ure at a nuclear
power plant in
Pennsylvania released radioac-
tive gases into the atmosphere,
forcing the evacuation of
140,000 people from the sur-
rounding area. It was a signifi-
cant turning point in the devel-
opment of nuclear power.

As Canadian commentator
Jeff Rubin recently pointed out,
“The real legacy of Three Mile
Island wasn’t what happened
back in 1979, but rather what
happened — or more precisely
didn’t happen — over the course
of the next 30 years in the US."

He was referring to the fact
that the near-meltdown of the
Three-Mile Island reactor
changed public acceptance of
nuclear power plants, and none
has been built in the US since.
Could the catastrophic explo-
sion at the BP drilling rig in the
Gulf of Mexico have the same
effect on the oil industry today?

Well, in Rubin's words:
"The scene of hurricane-force
winds raining oil on New
Orleans and the rest of Ameri-
ca’s Gulf Coast will no doubt
make for an apocalyptic image
of the end of the age of
oil... Unfortunately, our depen-
dence on the stuff will survive
this catastrophe.”

Now, a major new report
from insurance giant Lloyd's
and British think tank Chatham
House, spells out just how the
end game for oil is likely to play
out. It argues that our over-
reliance on fossil fuels is dri-
ving companies to take unnec-
essary environmental risks, and
calls for a rapid shift towards
low carbon energy sources as
the only way to address the
industry's soaring risk profile.

The meticulously researched
Lloyd's report says the world
has entered "a period of deep
uncertainty in how we will
source energy for power, heat
and mobility, and how much
we will have to pay for it." The
key factors are constraints on
“easy to access” oil; the urgency
of reducing carbon emissions;
and a sharp rise in energy
demand, particularly from Chi-
na. This means that business
and political leaders will have to
deal with energy supplies that
are increasingly less reliable
and more expensive, leading
Richard Ward, Lloyd's chief
executive, to urge governments
to identify "a clear path
towards sustainable energy
which businesses can follow."

Business as usual forecasts
suggest a 40 per cent increase in
global energy demand by 2030,
requiring an investment of
some $26 trillion. And while we
should be directing that invest-
ment to the technologies with
the best future, the most cost-
effective short-term approach
is to cut fossil fuel consumption
as much as possible.

Lloyd's says an oil supply
crunch as early as 2013 is likely,
due to a combination of insuf-
ficient investment in produc-
tion over the last two decades
and surging demand from Asia
following the global recession.
This could create a price spike
in excess of $200 per barrel,
with profound consequences
for the way business operates.

In 2008 oil prices peaked at
$140 per barrel, and most of us
can recall the impacts of that
price shock. Consumer behav-
iour began to change dramati-
cally, and a new price spike can
be expected to prompt drastic
national measures to cut oil
dependency.

This forecast is backed up
by the US National Intelligence
Council, which says the next
decade or so will see unprece-
dented pressure on world
resources, making an energy
transition inevitable. "The only
questions are when and how
abruptly or smoothly such a
transition occurs. (This) is an
event that historically has only
happened once a century at
most, with momentous conse-
quences.”

Here are the main indica-
tors of the looming energy tran-
sition as outlined in the Lloyd's
report:

¢ Global demand is putting
pressure on fossil fuel markets
and increasing price volatility.

¢ Past investment trends cou-
pled with resurging demand
suggest an imminent oil supply
crunch.

¢ Policies to reduce carbon
emissions are inevitable and
will affect the viability of cur-
rent operations.

¢ Renewable energy is
attracting unprecedented
investment and is now part of
the mainstream energy mix in
some countries.

¢ Existing energy infrastruc-
ture will be vulnerable to

—

7
Ki
extreme weather events caused
by climate change.

Lloyd's says that rising ener-
gy costs "are best tackled in the
short term by changes in prac-
tices or via the use of technolo-
gy to reduce energy consump-
tion. The wider use of renew-
able energy and even self gen-
eration, bring added price and
supply security benefits, and
governments have an impor-
tant role in delivering policies
that create the necessary invest-
ment conditions.”

Without stronger policies, it
is unclear whether there are
sufficient drivers for large-scale
renewable investment and
deployment, the Lloyd's report
says. "Only strong policy incen-
tives will promote renewable
energy activity under existing
market conditions...Where
there is political will, invest-
ments are taking place.”

Renewable

By 2008, for example,
Europe was generating nearly a
quarter of all new electricity
from renewable sources. And
last year the EU required all
new buildings to comply with
tough energy-performance
standards. Even stricter
requirements were made for
public sector buildings, requir-
ing “nearly zero” energy stan-
dards by the end of 2018. This
has set a clear agenda for the
construction industry.

So where do we stand on
these issues in the Bahamas?
Well, we are more vulnerable
than most because all of the
fossil fuel we use to drive our
economy has to be imported at
great cost. And Bahamians in
general must be highly moti-
vated to effect behavioural
changes — in both the public
and private sectors.

The government has been
pushing two big initiatives. An
expert committee was appoint-
ed by the Environment Min-
istry to formulate a national
energy policy, which was pub-
lished in 2008. And the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion began investigating alter-



native fuel sources, which led
to an invitation to private
investors to produce renewable
energy for purchase by BEC.

Unfortunately, BEC has
serious financial and opera-
tional difficulties, and abruptly
cancelled its two-year renew-
able energy tendering process
recently with nothing to show
for it. Meanwhile, the Environ-
ment Ministry is still building
a framework to implement the
national energy policy, with
help from the Inter-American
Development Bank.

"A policy can only take con-
crete form on the basis of hard
facts," BEST Commission
chairman Philip Weech told me
recently. "These did not exist
on renewable energy potential
across the country, despite
claims to the contrary. The IDB
was extremely helpful in facili-
tating our work to fill this gap."

Two major projects are cur-
rently underway by IDB-fund-
ed consultants. Information
from hotel, residential and pub-
lic building energy audits is
being used to develop a nation-
al energy efficiency plan, which
will address building code and
import tariff changes. This plan
will be completed by Septem-
ber, but some initial recom-
mendations were included in
the 2010-11 budget.

A detailed study on the
potential for renewable energy
will determine which technolo-
gies are feasible on a utility or
distributed scale in the
Bahamas. Researchers are col-
lecting and analysing relevant
data from all the main inhabit-
ed islands, and the Environ-
ment Ministry has held talks
with private investors on waste-
to-energy proposals for New
Providence.

The IDB consultants have
also been reviewing BECs
operational and financial issues.
This led to the engagement of a
team from the Canadian power
company, Emera, who were
given 120 days to produce a
turnaround plan for the corpo-
ration. Their proposals should
be ready by the end of July.

In tandem with this, the IDB

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consultants are reviewing our
regulatory regime to develop
renewable energy incentives
and electricity grid feed-in
guidelines. This review should
also be finished in July and the
next step would be to draft leg-
islation to fundamentally
reform the energy sector,
although no timeframe for this
has been set.

Projects

At the same time, demon-
stration projects are being
financed by the IDB and the
UN's Global Environment
Facility to the tune of $1.5 mil-
lion. A residential pilot project
will procure and install com-
pact fluorescent lightbulbs,
solar water heaters and solar
power panels to determine the
technical, operational and logis-
tical challenges of widescale
implementation.

According to Glen Laville,
the newly appointed general
manager of the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation who is also
the Environment Ministry's
overall project manager, pro-
curement contracts have been
issued for over 150,000 CFLs,
130 water heaters and 30 panel
installs. Installations should be
completed before the end of
the year, after which their per-
formance will be evaluated over
a six-month period.

"All the studies will be wide-
ly communicated,” said Phil
Weech. "The demonstration
activities will give us hard num-
bers on renewable energy appli-
cations in our local environ-
ment. Quite simply, we started
in an information wasteland,
and tried to fill it as fast as we
could. This was done having to
draw on external resources and

technical assistance. I must
admit, however, that we have
received little public reaction
despite the importance of this
effort."

As for the renewable energy
tendering process, BEC chair-
man Michael Moss acknowl-
edged that "in retrospect it was
a mistake for BEC to be lead-
ing that process. We don't have
the expertise and none of the
bids were robust enough
according to the consultants,
although we could have nego-
tiated with the top two. Inde-
pendent power producers
depend on interconnection
agreements — and who is going
to administer that here?

Moss said the country is
some distance away from utili-
ty scale renewable energy:
"Conservation is the only real
green energy at the moment
and BEC will be pushing that
angle strongly. We will also
encourage small-scale distrib-
uted power generation. The
proposed changes to the regu-
latory regime will be available
this year, but I don't know
about enactment."

In the meantime, BEC is
investing heavily in new con-
ventional generating plant to
meet the country's growing
energy needs — $30 million on
Bimini, $30 million on
Eleuthera, $105 million on
Abaco, and $10 million on a
variety of improvements to oth-
er islands, including New Prov-
idence. Such energy infrastruc-
ture has a decades-long lifes-
pan. This is despite the fact
that, given the global commit-
ment to radically reduce emis-
sions and the finite nature of
conventional fossil fuel sources,
a rapid movement towards a
highly efficient non-fossil ener-

(i fees tee! of Se Be ree

@ world school

transition to low-carbon economy

gy future would seem to be the
logical investment choice.

If these changes come too
little too late on a worldwide
scale, rebalancing of supply and
demand will have to be
achieved through massive
shortages, which would trans-
late to extreme economic hard-
ship, according to a 2005 report
by the US Energy Department.

Lloyd's says energy planners
and financiers need to take into
account the global transition
towards greater sustainability.
And policies to incentivise the
deployment of progressively
cleaner energy technologies
may mean the need to retire
some energy infrastructures
prematurely.

Meanwhile, there are oppor-
tunities for low-carbon business
innovation that most Bahami-
ans have yet to consider. In
addition to clean energy, these
include the electrification of
transportation, and green con-
struction. The conclusion from
all this is that energy security
is now inseparable from the
transition to a low-carbon econ-
omy and businesses should pre-
pare for this new reality.

"Security of supply and
emissions reduction objectives
should be addressed equally, as
prioritising one over the other
will increase the risk of strand-
ed investments or requirements
for expensive retro-fitting,"
Lloyd's says. "Investing in a
secure, low-carbon energy
future may have higher upfront
costs, but will deliver lower cost
energy in the future.”

What do you think? Send
comments to:

larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit:

www.bahamapundit.com

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized
International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications for the following
vacancies, with effect from August 2010. Full information regarding the school may
be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com.

Primary Library Assistant

The primary library assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with the head of
primary and the school librarian.

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms, the library
assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

e To supervise primary students’ library visits (book swaps and story telling)

e To assure the smooth running of the primary section of the school library

° To ensure that materials are shelved, re-shelved and displayed according to library
organizational schemes, which are based on Dewey decimal classification.

e To assist with the circulation and retrieval of primary materials on a daily basis.

© To assist with processing and cataloguing new materials in the primary collection.

¢ To manage all photocopying, scanning and laminating requests for teachers and students
in the primary section of the library.

¢ To organise the Scholastic book programme

© To troubleshoot simple technology programmes

® To assist the librarian with data collection, entry, maintenance and reports.

© To operate a specific automated library management system for the primary school.

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the

principal

Receptionist/Office Assistant

The School Receptionist/Office Assistant is supervised by the principal in consultation with
the heads of school (primary and secondary).

As well as the requirements outlined in her/his individual appointment terms and conditions
of service, the School Receptionist/Office Assistant has the following specific responsibilities:

° Serving as the major point of contact with visitors to and enquiries for the head of primary

and/or principal

e Maintaining professional ethical standards in all areas, particularly confidentiality
e Maintaining regular office routines (such as answering the telephone, attending to the fax
machine, handling email messages, word processing documents, photocopying, and filing

papers)

e Preparing materials indicated by the head of primary and/or for distribution to faculty
© Maintaining school documentation

In addition, he/she is expected to undertake any other reasonable task assigned by the

principal

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Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as possible. All applications

MUST include the following:

e letter of application
* a personal statement
° a full resume

e the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and e-mail of three people who may be
approached for confidential professional references

® acurrent police record

* a current health certificate

Please direct all correspondence to:

Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com



Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

The closing date for applications is 9 July 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Requirements:

Employment
Opportunity

Managers Needed

for leading Fast Food Franchise

e Must be a high school graduate
Must have management experience
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Must have strong leadership skills

’m lovin’ it

FROM page one

tember 21 so that a new executive body
can be formed to lead the union going
forward.

Supporting a vote of “no confidence”,
244 delegates decided they were fed up
with the “bickering and infighting” with-
in their executive team, which they felt
prevented the union from effectively
serving its members.

Vincent Rolle, a Grand Bahama dele-
gate, said: “There was a desire to get
either the executive board to work
together with each other or to dismantle
it. This is a crucial time, we’re about to
go to the bargaining table.

“A vote of no confidence doesn’t nec-
essarily have to affect the entire team
but in this instance there was no cohe-
siveness and a level of distrust within
the team — there was a general frustra-
tion and unhappiness with all the bick-
ering and infighting.”

There were only six votes against the
decision.

An issue that was noted as a major
proponent in the executive team’s inabil-
ity to achieve cohesion was the accused
misappropriation of union funds last
year.

BUT President Belinda Wilson was

BUT team voted
out of office

later reinstated. She supported the vote,
even though it meant she would lose her
seat.

At the meeting, she said the vote came
as a relief to her, as she had been agi-
tating for the change since last year.

She said: “For two years we have been
unable to resolve internal conflict, and if
we cannot resolve conflict, how will we
be able to represent members strongly?
We need to be united, we need to be
strong.”

Confident she has the support and
trust of members, Mrs Wilson intends
to seek presidency in the new election.

She said: “The only thing that will
change in this election is instead of doing
a solo campaign for presidency, I plan to
run a full slate of 15 persons.”

Last year, it was alleged the executive
team was given the similar ultimatum
and votes of “no confidence” raised
against two of its members. These votes
were withdrawn however as the team
was able to agree to work together.

This time, the vote was initiated by

ame speaks to the press yesterday.

of Stapledon Primary and John Mus-
grove of L N Coakley in Eleuthera.

Elections have been scheduled for
September 21, 2010. In the meantime,
the executive team plans to continue the
union’s mandate.

Mrs Wilson is confident the decision
will not jeapordise ongoing negotiations
with the Government towards a new
Controlling Bargaining Agreement. Con-
cerning industrial negotiations, the union
is awaiting a counter-proposal from the



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initially suspended over the charges but

FROM page one

marked contrast from
actions in the previous year.
The Ministry of Finance report
shows that in 2007 and 2008 he
spent a total of $82,489 out of
the $100,000 available to him
on donations of computers to
schools and his constituency’s
computer lab and within that
figure, $45,843 on donations to
community groups.

However, this was not the
case for Mr Christie, who only
spent $31,000 of his first
$100,000 allowance in
2007/2008. This was in the form
of a donation to the Joe Billy
Blind Blake Festival, according
to Ministry of Finance records.

For this and the apparent
lack of expenditure of the
2008/2009 allowance, Mr
Christie, member of parliament
for Farm Road and Centreville,
achieved the dubious distinc-
tion of having spent the small-
est percentage of the total
$200,000 constituency
allowance funds over the two
year period of all MPs — at just
15 per cent.

Coming up behind him in
the low-spending stakes in the
PLP was former chairperson
and MP for Englerston, Glenys
Hanna Martin, who allocated
$17,018 to her constituency in

Â¥/

1805

MPs fail to spend

the form of an interactive white
board for the EP Roberts
School, ten computers for the
community’s computer training
programme, two computer pro-
gramme instructors and the
summer basketball camp in the
2008/2009 period and up to
April 2010. This was a signifi-
cant reduction from the $99,519
she spent in the previous year
on donations to schools, after
school programmes, repairs to
parks and park equipment,
among other things.

Kendal Wright, MP for
Clifton, was the lowest spend-
ing FNM MP, having just
$1,298.45 of his $100,000 budget
for 2008 and 2009 by April
2010. This was expended on the
repair and construction of
“entrance signs” in the con-
stituency. In the previous year
Mr Wright caused the expen-
diture of a much more signifi-
cant $99,978.03 in his con-
stituency. This include
$28,445.03 on “entrance signs”,
56,900 on the renovation of a
local basketball court and
$10,000 to community festivals.

Dr Hubert Minnis, minister
of health and MP for Killarney,
had up to the report period also
spent a relatively small $19,800

PICTET

two shop stewards, Helena Cartwright

(on the construction of a bas-
Ketball court) in his con-
stituency from the 2008/2009
allocation, while Kenyatta Gib-
son, MP for Kennedy, had
found ways to spend $25,000
out of a possible $100,000 (in
the form of a $10,000 donation
to Unity House retirement
home and $15,000 to Red Land
Soldiers Junkanoo Group).

How the MPs did or did not
spend the money available to
them is only just coming to light
as The Tribune has obtained a
copy of a Ministry of Finance
report on how all 41 MPs, PLP
and FNM, made applications
to spend the $200,000 available
— $8.2 million in total for 41
MPs between 2007 and 2009 -—
in their constituencies. The Tr1-
bune first requested a break-
down of the MP’s spending in
June of 2009 from Minister of
State for Finance, Zhivargo
Laing and has made repeated
requests for an official report
on the matter ever since.

Individual requests from
The Tribune to all MPs for an
accounting of how they spent
the funds was for all intents and
purposes ignored in December
of last year by the majority of
members. 15 FNMs responded
out of a total of 24, and only
one PLP - Fred Mitchell — did
so.

Earlier this year, Prime Min-

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Government.

ister Hubert Ingraham alluded
to how Mr Christie had failed
to spend his constituency
allowance funds in 2007/2008,
claiming that perhaps Mr
Christie felt there was “noth-
ing to be done” in his area. Mr
Christie responded to Mr Ingra-
ham’s comments by stating that
he was still determining exactly
how to best spend the money.
He said he had plans to expand
three parks in his constituency
and to add bathrooms to two.

It is unclear whether any
more funds were disbursed at
the request of any of the above
MPs since April 2010. Messages
left for each seeking comment
on the matter were not
returned up to press time,
except by Mr Wright, who
returned a phone call when this
reporter was out of office and
could not be contacted after
this.

Yesterday Minister of State
for Finance, Zhivargo Laing,
said that the unspent funds ini-
tially provided in the con-
stituency allocations of 07/08
and 08/09 will not again “roll
over” into the 2010/2011 bud-
get. This means that any money
that was not spent by MPs in
their constituencies cannot now
be spent.

Aside from the MPs listed
above, other MPs who had
failed to spend a large part of
their 2008/2009 allowances up
to April 2010, include: PLP MP
for St Cecilia Cynthia Pratt
($39,826.43, primarily on
parks), PLP MP for Fort Char-
lotte Alfred Sears ($29,143.65
on a donation to the Fort Char-
lotte Junkanoo Museum and
musical instruments for the
Fort Charlotte Community
Marching band), FNM MP for
Mount Moriah Tommy Turn-
quest ($43,272 on the beautifi-
cation of Stapledon Gardens
Park) and Seabreeze MP Carl
Bethel ($48,860.44).

Malcolm Adderley, MP for
Elizabeth, spent just over
$9,000 on a donation of two
interactive white boards. Mr
Adderley, however, resigned
from his seat in January, mean-
ing that he would not have had
as much of an opportunity to
utilise the money as other
MPs.

Commenting on why partic-
ular MPs may not have spent
the full amount available for
constituency projects, MP for
Seabreeze and FNM Chairman
Carl Bethel told The Tribune
that meeting the conditions
required by the Ministry of
Finance for the release of the
funds for projects in one’s con-
stituency required quite a bit
of “legwork” by MPs, such as
providing certain supporting
documentation to validate their
request for funds to be released
to a particular vendor. In his
case, Mr Bethel said he was of
the opinion he had spent his
full $100,000 allowance for
2008/2009, but if there was a
shortfall in the amount spent it
was likely due to savings
achieved on the cost of the
work.

Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing, who
received MPs applications for
funds to be released from the
constituency allowance fund
and himself successfully spent
over $200,000 in his Marco City
constituency (having had an
additional $8,000 expenditure
approved by the Prime Minis-
ter) suggested that successfully
utilizing the money “requires a
level of focus, creativity and dis-
cipline” by MPs.

“Sometimes what is strange
when you don’t have resources
easy to dream about all prob-
lems you have in your area then
when you get resources and
have to make choices and deci-
sions it becomes almost para-
lyzing about how to use those
funds.

“You have to make deci-
sions. Sometimes people get
stuck with that judgment that
has to be made with that limit-
ed amount,” he said.

e SEE PAGE TWO

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

0 =
FROM pageone Psychologist speaks out on homicide trend

leled in children; and this phe-
nomenon perpetuates the cur-
rent culture of materialism and
death.

He said: “We cannot ignore
the economic downturn effect
on work and finances. When
the economy goes down men
feel somewhat worthless, angry,
on edge and there is generally a
heavier consumption of alco-
holic drink. This puts pressure
on the wives and in turn domes-
tic violence increases. Every
one out of seven cases of
domestic violence, a child is
abused.”

Dr Allen said there was an
inextricable link between child
abuse and murder and urged
the community to recognize this
critical fact.

He offered: “You can reduce
child abuse in an area if you
have a group of people walk
around the area once a week.
This has been proven. Can you
imagine if all the churches in
the Bahamas walked in their
community? Abuse would not
be able to prevail.

“We freak out about the
murder of biological life but not
the quality of life. The meaning
of life is now being destroyed
too. There are thousands com-
ing out of school. Where are
they going to work?”

But the social ills contribut-
ing to the tragic increase in
homicides go much farther than
financial difficulties, Dr Allen
said.

He stressed that much more
research is need to address the
country’s deep issues with con-
flict resolution.

“The deeper a person is hurt,
the harder it is to achieve con-
flict resolution,” he said. “This
is different because in the old
Bahamas we had poverty, but
it’s harder now when people
have been used to more and
have to deal with less, rather

than having less and continu-
ing to deal with having less.”

Dr Allen led the crime surge
could be traced all the way back
to the drug epidemic of the 80s
and the unprecedented social
rifts it created.

He continued: “In the 1980s
we had the most comprehen-
sive national crack epidemic
outside of South America.
Crack obviously is a very pow-
erful drug — and it was the first
drug to feminize drug addiction
in a big way in the Bahamas.

“Mothers got knocked out of
the home, in most of the urban
areas women were the glue that
held the home together. This
produced a powerful commu-
nity fragmentation leading to
kids fending for themselves.”

Dr Allen said these children
often turned to gangs to fill the
need for community and accep-
tance, for self esteem, protec-
tion, and in some instances pos-
session.

These children of the drug-
stricken 80s are now the fathers,
mothers, and in some cases
grandparents of today’s chil-
dren. Dr Allen stressed the
need for more research to be
done in the community.

“Take a sample of people in
the community, get to know
them really,” he said. “Before
this whole thing broke there
was an incident in a focus group
and a third of the people in
each group said they wish they
could kill somebody. There’s a
culture of violence and destruc-
tion in our midst. We didn’t
think like that before. We can
extrapolate that something is
going on in the community.”

Child psychologist Dr
Michelle Major also correlated
the significance of childhood
learning disabilities and
instances of violent crime. She
said that some 30 per cent of

children currently in school
have some form of learning
disability.

She said: “One of the pre-
dominant issues with children
and crime is the presence of
learning disabilities. There are
simply not enough special
learning programmes for kids.
They face difficulties, whether
they can’t read, do math, or
write and so they drop out and
do crime — research around the
world shows this.”

She continued: “It starts at
the early stage, not getting
basic needs met. Learning dis-
abilities, not being loved or
successful affect a child to be
an angry adult.”

Dr Allen explained: “When
you get angry, your heart rate,
blood pressure, and pulse go
up. When the pulse goes 10
peer cent above normal, IQ
drops about 20-30 points. So
when a person is angry, there
in a subnormal intelligence
mode.

“By taking a drink or mari-
juana, all that does is take
away inhibitions. Look at the
situation, you’re under the
influence, angry so you’re
already operating at a subnor-
mal intelligence and you have
in your hand or possession a
knife or a gun. The end result
is before us everyday.”

Dr Allen has been conduct-
ing research on violence in
children for two years with
focus groups in Washington
and New Providence. Titled
“The Haven Study”, he said
the findings give him increased
optimism towards improving
social conditions in the coun-
try.

“This is our time, we need
to do the work. I don’t have
enough hours in the day. All
the stress about murder, the
precursors you will see — we

Cheryl Grant-Bethel yet to give up post

FROM page one

of Public Prosecutions has already been filled
by Jamaican attorney, Vinette Graham-Allen
who is to take up the post in August of this year.

On June 17, a minute paper was filed with the
Permanent Secretary, Under Secretary, Director
of Legal Affairs and the Attorney General from
Mrs Grant-Bethel which reported how the
Deputy Director was not prepared to hand over
files that had been assigned to her as she intend-
ed to continue her work and duties.

According to the letter, a copy of which was
obtained by The Tribune, Mrs Grant-Bethel said
she has not requested a transfer from her current
post, and further she does not intend to leave
her substantive post to take another job within
the same rank and scale “with a token increase in
salary.”

“Additionally,” the letter read, “your constant
meetings and reference relative to the same is
causing me emotional distress and physical dis-
comfort. I will have to see my doctor in this
regard.

“Further, I feel uncertain about my future and
tenure within the office. I also feel threatened
that if I do not agree to the unilateral variation of
my contract I will suffer dire consequences.

“In response to the move to the Law Reform

and Revisions Department in the British Amer-
ican Building,” Mrs Grant-Bethel wrote, “that
building is known to have a problem of ‘flowing
faeces’. I do not wish to be assigned to an area
which has a (faeces) problem. I am currently
working in an area of the Office of the Attorney
General which is mould infested. More impor-
tantly, I do not wish to be placed in close prox-
imity to the residing Chief Justice Sir Michael
Barnett,” the letter said.

For the past few weeks there has been a num-
ber of reports on this on-going saga with threats
of litigation hanging in the balance.

Mrs Grant-Bethel’s attorney Wayne Munroe
has already confirmed that his firm had not yet
filed any legal applications on behalf of Mrs
Grant-Bethel which would challenge the Judi-
cial and Legal Service Commission’s decision.
He said his busy schedule and the complex nature
of the application were behind the delay.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham recently told
Parliament he first supported the idea of Mrs
Grant-Bethel being promoted as DPP until infor-
mation, which he did not disclose, was brought to
his attention.

These comments unleashed a firestorm of con-
troversy, with Mr Munroe and others arguing
that Mr Ingraham’s statements are “character
assassination” based on “innuendo.”

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went through this same thing
in the 80s with drugs, now with
this murder thing, the two are
powerfully connected. Our
country is easy because we’re
small, we could change the
Bahamas in three years,” he
said.

mee

1805

He also recalled: “True sto-
ry. Aman came in to my office
one day, and he was so rough
looking my secretary actually
hid from him. When I came
out I asked him what was the
matter and he told me ‘ma
bad man. I’m a gangster,’ and
then he said ‘but I want you
to help my kids’.

“He had brought his kids to

2” PICTET

therapy, he was like ‘I know
things are bad but I don’t want
my kids to go the way I am
going’. It was very over-
whelming, I cried, he under-
stood the affect his lifestyle
would have on his kids and
that was amazing. Imagine if
everyone took that into con-
sideration. We need to create
more opportunities.”

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

HEAD OF FOUNDATIONS, PRIVATE TRUST
COMPANIES & CORPORATE

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

Advising potential clients and liaising with industry professionals
on all matters relating to the establishment and management of
Foundations and Private Trust Companies and the administration

thereof

Oversight of the Corporate Department including the
administration of multi jurisdictional corporate structures and

dealing with all matters arising therefrom.

Preparation of and checking Annual Reviews.
Oversight of fee billings and collection.
Liaising with local and international regulators on matters
pertaining to his/her portfolio.

PRE-RE

UISITIES:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant professional

qualification.

In-depth knowledge of relevant Bahamian and international
legislation and practice.
Impeccable written and verbal communication skills.
Computer literate with proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
At least 7 years related experience in a private bank, law firm

or trust company.

Extensive knowledge of Foundations, Private Trust Companies,
International Business Companies, “Regular Bahamian”
Companies and similar structures from other jurisdictions.
Extensive knowledge the Qualified Intermediary regime and
similar trans-national fiscal measures.
Knowledge of Spanish and / or French would be advantageous.
Ability to function in a multi-cultural working environment.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE

ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:-
The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

P. O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas



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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
Police confident of apprehending .



suspects over six recent homicides

FROM page one

He confirmed murder-

dens on Saturday event and
forced himself into the car
of a mother and her three
children before he died of

accused Bradley Ferguson
was shot in Pinewood Gar-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FILLETTE FRANCOIS
of PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-50904,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 30" day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, TREVOR THOMAS
MUNROE of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas intend to change my name to TREVOR THOMAS
KELLY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO. Box N-742, Nassau Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this

notice
2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING
ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET
Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.

WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 322-8833

his injuries.



Mr Greenslade said most
victims and those commit-
ting murders have previ-
ously been arrested and
charged in connection with
other serious crimes.

Often they have been
arraigned in Magistrates
Courts on murder charges
or charges of illegal
firearms and drug posses-
sion, armed robbery, or vio-
lent crime and released on
bail, Mr Greenslade said.

Once they have been
freed they return to their
communities and continue
committing crimes, allow-
ing violence to permeate
neighbourhoods like
Pinewood Gardens where
he and senior police officers
visited residents yesterday.

Mr Greenslade said:
“These people that are mur-
dering people are not peo-
ple attending our churches -
these are people known to
you, these are our relatives,
and they are in and out of
the system, having been
arrested and then allowed
to walk freely in our com-
munities, and that is very
powerful.”

He added: “No one
should ever die but a lot of
people who are dying are
on bail for murder or are on
bail for armed robbery.”

The Commissioner reas-
sured the public that police
are doing all they can to
fight crime as he explained
how officers who had been
in administrative roles have
been redeployed to bring
more police to the front
line, and shift patterns are
being established so more
officers can work on the












MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT
ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT

BASIC FEE STRUCTURE
EFFECTIVE 1 JULY, 2010

REGISTRATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES

BICYCLE

TRANSFER OF MOTOR VEHICLE FROM FAMILY ISLAND

MOTORCYCLE
vehicle.

price according to size of engine





THE POLICE walkabout yesterday.







streets at night.

He has also moved three
talented, trained detectives
from within the wider police
force to the homicide
department of the Criminal
Detective Unit (CDU) to
increase the team from two
detectives to five.

And the Commissioner
has made efforts to enhance
the selective enforcement
team and heavy arms unit
to improve response times
to serious crimes.

More than 133 illegal
firearms and over 2,600
rounds of ammunition have
been seized by police since
January, and several serious
crimes have resulted in the
charging of suspects, Mr
Greenslade said.

However the force is not
capable of stamping out
crime alone.

He called on every indi-
vidual to help root out crim-
inals from their communi-
ties by anonymously
informing police of their
activities.

“Tam very concerned that
we as Bahamians are so tol-
erant we cannot allow
young Bahamian men con-
tinue to walk the streets of
our country 24/7 with ille-
gal weapons, selling drugs
in our communities, and
poisoning our children,” Mr
Greenslade said.

“That’s not a policing
problem - that’s a Bahamian

ah

1805

problem.

“If a person is walking
our streets on bail and
believes he or she is above
everybody else, I don’t
know how policing will pre-

vent that.

“It’s very important that
all Bahamians call in these

matters.

call it in, and we are going
to be anonymous’.”

Mr Greenslade denied
allegations criminals are
from immigrant communi-
ties or that violent crime
occurs in “hot spots” but
said crime is done by indi-
viduals with evil intent,
regardless of their nation-

“This is about all of us as
Bahamians saying ‘Enough
is enough; we are going to

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RICHARDSON PETIT-
PHARD of TALL PINE, JUBILEE GARDENS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 30° day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ality or where they live.

e SEE PAGE FIVE

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JAY MALRINE
MORLEY of VENICE BAY ANNEX OFF BACARDI ROAD,
P.O. BOX SP-63953, NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend to change
the name to JAY MALRINE BETHEL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after
the date of publication of this notice.



PICTET

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST
CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

TRUST OFFICER

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

VEHICLE REGISTRATION........... pieeveweesece price based on unladen weight of

vehicle.



[VEHICLE CLASS __| VEHICLE WEIGHT

0—5,000 LBS
5,001 — 15, 000LBS



15, 001 LBS - AND OVER

_ | RATE

$550.00
$700.00

—

N.B. First time licensing is pro-rated to applicant’s birth month.

TOUR OPERATOR

a) For each vehicle (per plate)
PUBLIC SCHEDULE OMNIBUS

a) For.each vehicle (per plate)
PRIVATE SCHEDULE OMNIBUS

a) For every vehicle (each plate)
PRIVATELY CHARTERED FRANCHISE

a) For every vehicle (per plate)

SELF-DRIVE VEHICLE

\a) For every vehicle (per plate)

TRADE PLATES (0.T)

a) A set of plates per annum

ANY FURTHER QUESTION'S CAN BE DIRECTED TO THE DEPARTMENT'S HOTLINE AT

302-3870

328-4825/6

328-4164

325-8019 ext. 224/235

* Administration of a portfolio of trusts including the
preparation of relevant documentation and Annual
Reviews.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned
fiduciary structures.

* ‘Written and verbal communication with Client
Relationship Managers and other industry
professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant
professional qualification.

Strong trust and company administration skills plus
a sound knowledge of drafting relevant documents,
reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local legislation.
Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 5 years of relevant experience in a Private
Bank or Trust Company.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL
BE ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




Blue Hill
business

losses up
to 80%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BUSINESSES on Blue Hill
road are continuing to be
“ground to the ground”, hav-
ing lost up to 80 per cent of
their business since the start of
the road rerouting, Super Val-
ue’s owner and president said
yesterday.

Rupert Roberts, who is also
an advisor to the Coconut
Grove Business League
(CGBL), told Tribune Business
that one business owner
“dropped off the precipice”
once the road construction
began, seeing an immediate 80
per cent reduction in business
levels in the first few months.

According to him, and con-
trary to what was published in
another Nassau newspaper,
traffic in the area has
decreased, but congestion due
to the closure of one lane on
Blue Hill Road has increased.

“Things are still doing very
poorly and business along that
street keeps dropping off more
and more each week,” said Mr
Roberts. “I've talked to some
merchants off 80 per cent and
their business is gone.”

The CGBL, which comprises
almost 50 businesses, last week
applied for a Judicial Review
of the road work project, not
to have the road work stopped
Mr Roberts said, but to find out
if it could be expedited much
quicker or done a different way
so as to not affect businesses in
the area adversely.

The application alleges that
the Government’s “ears are
closed” to the situation facing
businesses near Blue Hill Road
and Market Street, and that if
nothing is done to alleviate it,
those businesses could suffer
"irreparable" financial
injury.

Chief executive of Blue Hill
Meat Market, Patrick Treco,
said his business had suffered
30 per cent declines. And while
he admits he does not know
how much of his shortfall is to

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY,



JoUENGE 2 35,0 33002205150

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

n alleged Canadian
mobster boss offered to
acquire a 45 per cent
stake in a former
Bahamas-based bro-
ker/dealer to rescue it from its eventual
collapse caused by the fraudulent $22
million scheme he and his associates
perpetrated, US court documents reveal.

Court transcripts released yesterday
from the trial of George Georgiou, a
former Canadian stockbroker, disclose
that his partner in the fraudulent “pump
and dump” scheme he ran, “mobster”
Vince DeRosa, offered to buy a stake in
former Bahamian broker/dealer, Cale-
donia Corporate Management, as a solu-
tion to the “multi-million dollar hole”
created by their trading activities.

The scheme was revealed in testimo-
ny under oath by Robert Dunkley, Cale-
donia’s Bahamian former investment
adviser, who made a number of other
stunning admissions. These were:

¢ That he and other senior Caledonia
executives allowed Georgiou to trade
on margin using credit backed by the
assets/cash of other Caledonia clients,
exposing innocent trading customers to
the huge losses some eventually suf-
fered.

¢ That Matthew McNeilly, Caledo-
nia’s former chairman and owner,
allegedly “asset stripped” the
broker/dealer shortly before its early
2008 collapse, transferring all its “good”

Freeport food store to bring 40 jobs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE owner of a new
Freeport-based food store yes-

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE



assets to another company, Ecosse.

e That Caledonia should have carried
out more due diligence on Georgiou,
who had been barred from working as a
broker by Canadian regulators, DeRosa
and their sources of wealth and busi-
ness activities.

The evidence outlined in the eastern
district court for Pennsylvania, adduced
by Mr Georgiou’s attorneys, also indi-
cated that Caledonia’s management may
have either turned a “blind eye” to what
was going on, or been lulled into a false
sense of security, because they were
earning huge commissions from the vol-
ume of trades initiated by the conspira-
tors.

In his testimony, Mr Dunkley alleged
that Georgiou’s Caledonia margin
account was some $8-$9 million over-
drawn when he and DeRosa appeared in
June 2007 with their offer to acquire a 45
per cent stake in the troubled Bahamian
broker/dealer, presenting this as a solu-
tion to the problem.

“T’m not so sure whether it be a solu-
tion to it, but there was a clear indication
that George Georgiou’s group, he and
Vincent DeRosa, wanted to buy a part

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‘Mobster boss’ offered to
rescue Bahamas broker



* Court testimony reveals that ‘Canadian mobster’
and convicted associate offered to take 45% stake
in Caledonia Corporate Management and rescue it
from collapse caused by $22m hole they created

* Bahamian banker Robert Dunkley admits that other
clients’ funds used to finance fraudulent scheme, while
Caledonia owner asset-stripped company before end

* Evidence shows ‘hefty commissions’
influenced Caledonia attitude to account

* Banker admits ‘deep embarrassment’ at losses
suffered by innocent Bahamian broker’s clients

of Caledonia,” Mr Dunkley told the US
court.

“It was June 18, [2007], and this is
when Georgiou and DeRosa had come
to really discuss them buying a major
share of Caledonia. At that time we pre-
sented them with what their account sit-
uation was, and requested that they pay
us the money that was owed before they
got into any discussions on ownership.”

He added that Ron Wyles, the person
Georgiou used as a nominee or “front
man” for his trading activities, had first
proposed the scheme in May 2007, and

Savemore owner pledges venture to open in August ‘100% Bahamian
owned’, rejecting claims made against it, and says numerous Grand
Bahama firms have benefited from work already

acknowledged that if DeRosa and Geor-
giou had obtained an equity stake they
would have had “control” at Caledonia
and been able to “borrow more money.”

Mr Dunkley said he did not see any
documents relating to the ownership
discussions until January 2008, when a
company called Zaitech, beneficially
controlled by Georgiou and DeRosa,
was named as the purchaser of a 45 per
cent stake in Caledonia.

Mr Dunkley testified that the Bahami-

SEE page 2B

terday pledged to Tribune Busi-
ness that it was “100 per cent
Bahamian owned”, adding that
the company would create
some much-needed 40 jobs in a
city desperate for employment
when it opens in August 2010.

Steve Savola, Savemore’s
president and director, in a let-
ter sent to Tribune Business
responding to concerns raised
about the company’s ownership
and possible future plans, said
the new store would be 22,500
square feet and, as revealed by
this newspaper, located in the

FamGuard: Dividends show
faith in ‘working out’ claims

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FAMILY Guardian yester-
day said it was aiming to have
its new general insurance
agency “up and running in
August”, its president and chief
executive telling Tribune Busi-
ness the company was “defi-
nitely seeing improving signs”
on its health claims through
adjusting premiums to match
claims.

Patricia Hermanns said the
life and health insurer, and its
BISX-listed parent, FamGuard
Corporation, had shown confi-
dence in their ability to work
through the increased health
claims that depressed 2010 first
quarter profits by more than 80

Real estate

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN law firms have
had to redeploy resources in a
bid to complete real estate
transactions, and have the rele-
vant conveyancings Stamped,
before the two percentage point
increase in Stamp Duty takes
effect tomorrow, one senipor
attorney describing the situa-
tion as a “madhouse”.

“We've had to redeploy all
our resources,” the senior attor-
ney told Tribune Business,
pointing out that some trans-
actions were for $30-$40 mil-
lion sums. If these attracted the
new 12 per cent Stamp Duty
rate, a $30 million transaction
would attract $3.6 million in tax
instead of the previous $3 mil-
lion, an increase of $600,000,
while a $4 million deal would

* Insurer targets August
for general agency launch

* Two financial services
subsidiaries both started
year with $14m in client
assets under management

* Company believes
top-line growth shows
gaining market share

per cent via the $0.06 per share
dividend they declared.

“We are very optimistic
about the initiatives we are tak-
ing to recalibrate claims against

SEE page 3B

‘madhouse’

attract $4.8 million instead of
$4 million - an $800,000
increase.

The senior attorney said the
Treasury was turning around
conveyancings for Stamping in
48 hours, and his law firm has
asked it for guidance as to
whether documents presented
before the end of today would
still attract the old rates.

REAL estate brokers have
also seen a rush of buyers trying
to complete their transactions
before the Government’s
Stamp Tax increase comes into
effect, a Bahamas Realty bro-
ker/appraiser said yesterday,
adding that the increase could
eventually deter future middle
to low income buyers.

Carlyle Campbell said there
had been a numberof people
trying to beat the increase in

SEE page 2B

former Pegasus Warehouse in
downtown Freeport.

“IT am a first-generation
Bahamian born in West End,
Grand Bahama, when my
father Leo Helmut Savola was
the accountant for the Wallace
Groves Lumber Company. I
have returned frequently to my
childhood home and have
always wanted to invest in my
place of birth,” Mr Savola told
Tribune Business.

“My goal is to offer afford-
able product to the local cus-

tomers and maintain consistent
stock supplies, something my
Grand Bahamian friends and
family have lamented.

“Savemore will have a
butcher’s counter, deli and bak-
ery departments as well, and I
am pleased to be working with
both international and local dis-
tributors who have embraced
our presence and seem eager
to have us join the Bahamian
food retail business.”

He added: “Once construc-
tion is complete, ordering and

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

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stocking of the store will begin
as well as hiring of the estimat-
ed 40 local employees that will
be needed. We will open seven
days a week, with late opening
hours and ample parking.

“T hope this information will
allay any fears, and assure you
that Savemore is a 100 per cent
Bahamian-owned retail grocery
store and will produce a quality
product for Grand Bahama.”

Mr Savola added that Save-

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Realtor hits $9m first quarter sales

A C.A Christie real estate
agent sold $9 million-plus worth
of residential real estate dur-
ing the 2010 first quarter, the
company said yesterday.

Specialising in luxury real
estate, Gavin G. Christie
recently closed a $6.5 million
sale in a depressed market.

“Gavin has a great natural
ability of putting luxury deals
together and matching unique
buyers with unique sellers. He
is well organised, bright, per-

sonable, committed and has a
strong future as a leader in the
industry”, said C.A. Christie
Real Estate principal and
senior broker, Charles Christie.

Gavin Christie added: “Iam
thankful for the opportunity
afforded me by C.A Christie
Real Estate. My senior broker,
Charles Christie, is a real estate
guru who has willingly shared
his experience and knowledge
of the real estate industry with
me.

“T expect us to continue to
do well together.”

After four years in the real
estate profession, Gavin
Christie has completed a num-
ber of Certified Residential
Specialist (CRS) courses, Cer-
tified International Property
Specialist (CIPS) and the
Appraisal course.

“Gavin’s sales are extremely
impressive. In his four years at
the company, Gavin’s total
sales far exceed the industry

norm,” said Charles Christie.

Gavin Christie graduated
from the University of
Charleston in West Virginia
with a Bachelor of Science in
Sports Medicine and a minor
in Psychology.

He then moved to Prague,
the Czech Republic, where he
played professional soccer for
three years while pursing his
MBA. He has been a member
of the Bahamas National Soc-
cer Team since 1999.





GAVIN AND CHARLES CHRISTIE





‘Mobster boss’ offered to rescue Bahamas broker

FROM page 1B

an broker/dealer had wanted
some $6 million from the pair
before entering into ownership
discussions, but alleged that
because he was a director he
knew nothing about how the
talks were progressing until the
January 2008 document. That
was just weeks before Caledo-
nia’s collapse.

Under cross-examination by
Georgiou’s attorneys, Mr
Dunkley agreed that by Janu-
ary 2008, Caledonia’s financial
structure had been radically
altered through Mr McNeilly
transferring “most of the
assets” to another firm, Ecosse
Services, even though he was
still attempting to sell the
“shell” of the Bahamian bro-
ker/dealer to Mr DeRosa.

“T think it was a panic situa-
tion,” Mr Dunkley confessed.
“T think it was one where the
owner of Caledonia (McNeil-
ly) decided he was going to bail,
so he started another company
and transferred — (was) at least
in the process of transferring
assets — probably in the begin-
ning of January 2008.

“And he came to me and
said: ‘Robert, here is Caledo-
nia, you can have what remains
with Caledonia and go and
work it out with Vincent and
George’, to which I said I will
do whatever I can to try and
save my clients’ assets. And I
did look at that as an alterna-
tive.

“And my decision in the end
was that, nope, because I did
not — quite honestly, did not
trust George and Vincent

DeRosa in the end.”

Under continued cross-exam-
ination by Georgiou’s attor-
neys, Mr Dunkley admitted
that after learning of Mr
McNeilly’s asset transfers, he
flew to Toronto to meet with
both DeRosa and Georgiou to
discuss Caledonia’s potential
sale.

He added, though, that this
was “only in the vane that if
there was any way that I could
get assets back for my clients,
or not put them in a position
where they are going to be los-
ing a tremendous amount of
money, I would entertain it.”

He acknowledged, though,
that it was not the same Cale-
donia under discussion “from
the standpoint of Matthew
McNeilly having shifted assets.”

Mr Dunkley agreed that the
terms of the discussions
involved William Jennings,
Caledonia’s managing director,
convincing Mr McNeilly to
“take those assets that had been
spirited away because they had
been cherry picked, and to put
them back into the company.”

This did not happen, though,
with the assets in question
eventually returned from
Ecosse to Caledonia by the lat-
ter’s liquidator, Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas) accountant
and partner, Anthony Kiki-
varakis, in what has become a
court-supervised liquidation.

Mr Dunkley described the
liquidation process as “the most
decent thing that could be
done”, and then gave what has
probably been the first apology
from any of Caledonia’s man-
agement team to the compa-

ny’s 150-160 clients. Its total
investment holdings had been
$120-$130 million.

Describing himself as
“extremely embarrassed”, Mr
Dunkley told the US court: “It
is very unfortunate you know.
A lot of the clients at Caledonia
were people I have known for
many years, and none of this
would have happened without
George Georgiou’s involve-
ment with Caledonia.

“T was simply there as an
investment advisor with a book
of a number of portfolios for
good clients who are people
that, you know, P’ve known for
many, many years and I’m
indebted to them, extremely
embarrassed. I don’t know how
I can ever repay them for the
situation George Georgiou put
us in.

“We along the way had
approached George Georgiou
many times to please pay up.
We trusted him, we were in a
situation, a very, very bad situ-
ation that he created. It was not
me, it was not us at Caledonia.
We were remiss, or put it this
way, we made our mistakes, I
grant you that. With more
knowledge, perhaps, with more
due diligence, perhaps this
wouldn’t have happened.
Unfortunately, it did, and it did
based on the actions of George
Georgiou.”

Mr Dunkley admitted that
Caledonia initially extended
Georgiou a $3 million margin
facility because they believed
it was covered by some $30 mil-
lion worth of shares. Yet the
value of these shares, which
were penny stocks, had been

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artificially inflated by Georgiou
and were ultimately worthless.

Georgiou’s attorneys ques-
tioned Mr Dunkley about
whether Caledonia was using
its other clients’ assets to
finance their man’s trading
activities, drawing from him the
admission: “That’s the way it
ended up.”

Realising that activity in the
account was going to be
extremely active, Mr Dunkley
told Mr Jennings in early 2007
that a $1.5 million margin on
the Georgiou account needed
to be covered in two days, oth-
erwise there would be a $1.1
million debit at its Canadian
corespondent broker.

And there was evidence to

suggest that the “very hefty
commissions” earned on the
account blinded Caledonia to
what was really going on, an e-
mail from Mr Dunkley to Mr
Jennings stating: “As you will
see, we are up nicely on the
month to date, $32,000 as a
result of the new Ron
Wyles/Georgiou account. I
think before month end we can
add another $10,000-$12,000,
correct?”

Georgiou’s attorneys
referred to this as “cannibalis-
ing other clients’ assets”.

Georgiou was ultimately con-
victed of running a securities
fraud known as a “pump and
dump” scheme, where he
manipulated the price of sev-

eral thinly-traded penny stocks
he controlled via the Caledo-
nia account.

To cover Georgiou’s over-
drawn margin balance, Cale-
donia’s Canadian correspon-
dent broker, Jitney, sold off all
the securities, cash and assets
held in the Bahamian broker’s
omnibus account, where all the
latter’s client assets were held.
Thus several hundred clients
were impacted by Georgiou’s
actions.

Georgiou was described as a
“professional con man” by US
government attorneys, who
added that DeRosa “in his own
words is a Canadian mobster”.
DeRosa has not been charged
in connection with this case.



FROM page 1B

the Stamp Tax.

$50,000 themselves.

real estate transactions.



A $500,000 house purchase previously
attracted a 10 per cent Stamp Duty rate,
meaning that $50,000 was paid to the Treasury
when the transaction closes. If split 50/50
between buyer and seller, each pays $25,000,
or otherwise the buyer or seller pays the

Now, with a 12 per cent Stamp Duty rate
coming into effect as of July 1, 2010, such a
transaction would require $60,000 to be paid
to the Public Treasury. If the seller or pur-
chaser agrees to pay this 100 per cent, then
their tax burden has risen by $10,000, where-
as if split 50/50 it goes to $30,000 each. Either
way, this represents a significant $5,000-
$10,000 increase associated with the cost of

Real estate ‘madhouse’

Mr Campbell said the people who have
purchases pending are rushing to complete
their transactions before those increases come

into effect.

According to him, he has a pending sale
that he expects to go through by today due to
the rush to beat the new rates.

“T anticipate closing on the last day because
there has been an increase to beat that record-
ing fee,” he said

Mr Campbell added that he was worried
the rise in Stamp Tax could affect the ability of
lower income families, who had been hoping
to purchase a new home, to do so and there-
fore could affect real estate sales in the future.

“What that is going to do is it will affect
some of the sales because you are just putting
up costs that a lot of people won't be able to
afford,” he said. “That will affect sales on the
local middle to low income households.”





Blue Hill business losses up to 80%

FROM page 1B

blame on the economic reces-
sion versus the roadworks, he
said his frequent customers
often express their ire about
the difficulty of reaching his
store.

According to Mr Treco, he
has had to slash prices and
focus on advertising in order to
keep up with his competitors.
He even opted to use the pop-
ular social networking website
Facebook to push his business.
He said direct competition had
already caused his sales to
decline 20 per cent in the

month of January.

Mr Treco added that in order
to keep business flowing, he has
had to increase his delivery ser-
vices to negate the loss of walk-
in business.

“We are still holding,” he
said. “The biggest problem, like
I tell people, is if they would
hurry and get it finished. We
are still holding on, but because
of the congestion people aren’t
coming to the place, so we have
to go hustle extra business.”

Mr Roberts said the Gov-
ernment should have consid-
ered a different approach to the
roadworks, which have now

The Tribune

Tel: 502 2356}

for ad rates

seen the road raised as much
as two to three feet.

According to him, Blue Hill
Meat Market’s parking lot was
directly affected by the height
increase.

“In front of the meat market
they have elevated the road two
to three feet, so you have to
dive down off the road into the
parking lot and probably have
to rent a crane to get the car
back out,” he said.

Mr Roberts said his hope is
that the Judicial Review will be
completed quickly and that the
courts will find against the Gov-
ernment.




THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS ee
Fewer than 20% of owners eye selling

LESS than one in five Bahamian
business owners have considered sell-
ing, a newly-launched local business
broker believes, although the market is
becoming more educated on this top-
ic and the forces driving such a process.

A survey of business activity in the
US revealed that almost one-third of
business owners are considering selling
their business, but Simon Cooper,
founder of Bahamas-based Res Socius,
said: “That number does not neces-
sarily apply to Bahamian businesses.”

He added: “Our findings from local
business owners are that many of them
hadn’t even considered it. The main

reasons given were that in our small
economy, it was difficult to put a busi-
ness up for sale confidentially since
there were no specialists that could
handle the transaction for them. Some
owners somehow felt that it was an
admission of failure to consider selling
their business, although that generally
isn’t the case.”

He suggested that the statistics in
the Bahamas are that less than one in
five business owners have considered
selling, “although the market is grad-
ually become more educated in this
regard”.

Mr Cooper said that when the econ-

omy is doing well, owners can sell for
a higher return. In downturns it simply
may be necessary to sell before it is
too late.

Reported

The US Small Business Adminis-
tration (SBA), in researching selling
trends, reported that three to five years
is a long enough stretch for many of
today's business owners. One in every
three plans to sell; many of them right
from the outset.

The business they've bought is not a
legacy for their children, it's a shorter-

term investment of their time as well as
their money. The ability to present a
healthy operation, with an owner in
the position to "role model" its success,
are major advantages in the comple-
tion of a successful business sale.

Mr Cooper said: “A popular mis-
conception amongst Bahamian busi-
ness owners is that they need to own
the property the business operates
from before they can sell. Only in rare
cases is this true.”

One of the surest ways to maximize
the value of a business is by not waiting
too long to sell. A more detailed ten
step guide to maximizing business val-

ue can be downloaded from the Res
Socius website at www.ressocius.com.

Res Socius was founded by British
expatriate, Simon Cooper, in 2009 and
is authorised by the Bahamas Invest-
ment Authority to practice as business
brokers and consultants.

Formerly the chief executive of a
publicly traded investment company,
Mr Cooper has extensive private and
public SME management experience.
Specialisations include the acquisition,
mergers, troubleshooting and divesti-
ture of businesses. His MBA was
awarded with a Distinction by the Uni-
versity of Liverpool in 2005.

FamGuard: Dividends show faith in ‘working out’ claims

FROM page 1B

premium on the health side,”
Ms Hermanns told Tribune
Business. “We are confident
about our ability to work out
of the substantial increase in
claims, and that’s reflected in
the dividend and our ability to
pay dividends.

“We have strong retained
earnings. Our solvency is
almost two times the minimum
expected at 195 per cent, almost
double the minimum require-
ment of 100 per cent.”

The Family Guardian chief
added that the company was
“definitely seeing improving
signs” in its health insurance
portfolio, the first quarter
claims increase having exceed-
ed 2009 levels and been respon-
sible for net income dropping to
$303,855 from $1.571 million.

Elsewhere, Ms Hermanns
said the BISX-listed firm would
launch its long-anticipated gen-
eral insurance business, Family
Guardian General Insurance
Agency, before the 2010 third
quarter end.

“We are hoping to be up and
running before the end of this
quarter,” she told Tribune Busi-

ness. “We expect to be up and
running in August. The agency
network will be supporting that
business in terms of sales, but
certainly we will be adding per-
sons with property and casual-
ty experience to our team.

“Tt will one or two initially,
and then we will add depending
on how the business grows.
We’ll expand as the business
expands. We believe that it will
be able to make some impor-
tant contributions to revenue,
and allow us to broaden the
types of products we offer to
clients.”

Family Guardian’s financial
services affiliates, FG Financial
and FG Capital Markets, were
continuing to grow, Ms Her-
manns said, each having around
$14 million in client assets
under management at the start
of 2010.

“We are seeing year-on-year
improvement,” she added. “We
are continuing to be encour-
aged by the incremental growth
from both these business lines.”

While many mortgage
lenders continue to experience
problems with non-performing
and past due loans, Ms Her-

Freeport food store

FROM page 1B

more had already obtained its
business licence from the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) via its president, Ian
Rolle, adding that the GBPA
and others had been “very sup-
portive” of his first business
venture in Grand Bahama.

Detailing some of the
Bahamian companies that had
benefited from construction
work carried out on the Save-
more property, Mr Savola said:
“The Savemore premises have
been completely upgraded,
including new electrical wiring,
state of the art ‘green’ appli-
ances and total redesign of the
spacious interior to allow for
the ease of flow of customers.

“T have been very pleased in
working with local Grand
Bahamian companies. They
include Allied Builders, Fre-
con, C & L Air Conditioning,
Quality Plumbing, Sea Port
Construction and Mechanical
Engineering, and we have
already begun work with local
advertising company, Barefoot
Marketing, to help us launch
and promote our new busi-
ness.”

Concerns were expressed in
yesterday’s Tribune Business,

chiefly by rival Jeff Butler, own-
er of Butler’s Specialty Foods,
that Savemore had a foreign
ownership component, which
went against the National
Investment Policy of reserving
the retail and wholesale indus-
try for 100 per cent Bahamian
ownership. It was said my mul-
tiple sources that Derek
Kramer, the principal of Allied
Caribbean Distribution, was
involved with Savemore.

This, though, was denied by
Mr Savola. Garland Evans,
owner of Prime Bahamas, also
told Tribune Business he and
his family were not involved
with Savemore, saying they
“never had any interest in the
Freeport food store”.

Commenting on the likely
impact of Savemore’s arrival in
Grand Bahama, Mr Butler told
Tribune Business on Tuesday:
"We have right now 11 grocery
outlets in Grand Bahama with a
population of 47,000 in a reces-
sion.

"If we did not have a reces-
sion, everything was hunky
dory and there were 60,000-
70,000 people here, there would
be no impact because they
would be able to serve a cer-
tain segment of people."

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD (KAGA HUB)
LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 23rd day of March, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 28th day of June, A.D., 2010.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
(KAGA HUB) LIMITED

manns told Tribune Business
that Family Guardian had not
seen “any significant deterio-
ration” in its book for the year
to date. It had some $3.174 mil-
lion in outstanding mortgage
commitments on its books at
the 2010 first quarter end.

“We have, in recent months,
seen some improvement. We
have been working through the
sales of defaulted properties,
and are starting to see some
progress,” she added.

Setting aside the 80 per cent
profit drop, caused by the
increase in policyholder bene-
fits and provisions for future
claims, Ms Hermanns said:
“We've had a fairly strong

growth in new business for the
first three months of the year.
That’s strong growth.

“It’s come from both the life
and the health side. Our health
sales continue to be strong, our
life sales continue to grow, and
our annuity business is grow-
ing very strongly with a
$350,000 increase over the pri-
or year quarter - more than a 20
per cent increase. We’re seeing
growth generally in our busi-
ness lines.”

This had resulted in a more-
than $2 million or 10 per cent
increase in Family Guardian’s
2010 first quarter top-line, and
Ms Hermanns suggested it was
coming from the company gain-

ing increased market share and
clients from other financial ser-
vices providers.

“What we are seeing is that
our growth rate is higher than
what is perceived to be the
industry average based on the
assessments we’ve done, and if
ours is higher it indicates that
business is moving from [other]
companies,” she explained.

“T can’t speak specifically to
why people are moving their
business, but we are very
focused on customer service for
quality products, and adding
value to the client base. We
have a very strong agency force,
which helps as well.”

The increase in provisions for

future policyholder benefits
grew to $4.461 million year-
over-year, compared to $1.921
million in 2009, something Ms
Hermanns said was related to
both the health claims rise and
increase in new business.

The company has now
moved to match health insur-
ance premiums to past claims
experience, increasing them
where necessary, and has also
implemented a new software
system for this portfolio.

Ms Hermanns said the “high-
er level of automation” would
speed up claims processing and
enhance efficiency, further bol-
stering customer service to “a
higher level”.


















































NOTICE
NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD (DAMALLA

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
HUB) LIMITED

(DOHOLO-BAO) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 23rd day of March, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 28th day of June, A.D., 2010.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the

International Business Companies Act 2000, notice

is hereby given that the above-named Company has

been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant

to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar

General on the 23rd day of March, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 28th day of June, A.D., 2010.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
(DAMALLA HUB) LIMITED

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CHAD
(DOHOLO-BAO) LIMITED

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Ze

COLON 1 AL

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Mariy at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 29 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,507.70 | CHG 2.96 | %CHG 0.20 | YTD -57.68 | YTD % -3.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 0.00 0.250
9.67 0.00 0.050
5.20 0.00 0.598
0.30 0.00 -0.877
3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 0.00 0.055
9.62 0.00 1.408
2.56 0.24 0.511
5.00 0.00 0.460
2.23 -0.11 0.111
1.60 0.00 0.627
5.94 0.00 -0.003
8.75 0.00 0.168
9.50 0.00 0.678
3.75 0.00 0.366
1.00 0.00 0.000
0.27 0.00 0.035
5.00 0.00 0.407
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest

Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.46 0.00 6.95%
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity *faertnaahPodak &irtseLuâ„¢ (vive -The-Counter Geuuities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4752 2.54
2.9265 1.37
1.5374 2.00
3.0368 2.57
13.6388 2.03
107.5706 3.45
105.7706 3.99
1.1127 2.10
1.0917 2.22
1.1150 2.23
9.5078 1.78

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

Previous Close Today's Close
1.05 1.05
10.63 10.63
5.20 5.20
0.30 0.30
3.15 3.15
2.17 2.17
11.16 11.16
2.60 2.84
6.29 6.29
2.46 2.35
2.00 2.00
6.07 6.07
8.90 8.90
9.81 9.81
4.58 4.58
1.00 1.00
0.27 0.27
5.59 5.59

64.1

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3787
2.8266
1.4712
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.906205
1.520591

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.506072

NAV Date
31-May-10
31-May-10
18-Jun-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-May-10
-May-10
-May-10
-Mar-10

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

0.95
4.50
-4.99
5.56
6.99 103.987340

101.725415

103.095570
99.417680
5.19

6.29

5.65

10.0000 10.2744 4.61 8.15 -Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS §$ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

58.37 -Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
‘S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 5B















All that mango goodness

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



colored mangos can be seen sitting beauti-

fully on the fruit vendor’s stall. The sight of
the golden mangoes hanging lusciously from tree
stems is enticing to the eyes alone. Even the ones
camouflaged in the grass

Sam of big, small, raspberry, and yellow

This is the start of mango season, prob-
ably on of the most delightful fruit sea-
sons in the Bahamas.

Mangoes in the Bahamas bear in abun-
dance. Those who don’t want to waste
their mangoes have a number of options.

Here are some recipes provided by
Lady Ingrid Darling who is the author of
the book

Many Tastes of The Bahamas & Culi-
nary Influences of the Caribbean:

seem too delicious
to go to
waste.

(ARA) - With summer just
around the corner, calendars will be
filling up with barbecues, picnics and
trips to the beach. Unfortunately,
these warm-weather activities may
go hand-in-hand with heartburn.
And with more than 50 million
Americans suffering from frequent
heartburn (symptoms occurring
twice or more weekly), that adds up
to a lot of post-barbecue blues.

While a little burning is expected
when you fire up the grill, Dr
Michael Rahmin, a leading gas-
troenterologist based in the New
York Metropolitan area, says that
if you follow some simple, at-home
guidelines, you may be able to avoid
the burning sensation in your chest.

"By making a few simple adjust-
ments, you can enjoy the barbecue
season and help keep your heart-
burn at bay,” says Dr Rahmin.
"Don't miss the parties this summer,
just protect your stomach both
before and after you hit the grill.”

Dr Rahmin recommends the fol-
lowing tips for a healthier, happier
barbecue season:

Don't overdo it. Smaller, more
frequent meals help optimise the
digestive process. Eating big por-
tions can put more pressure on your

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

stomach and lead to heartburn.
Remember that the next barbecue is
probably around the corner so be
reasonable about portion sizes.

Watch out for triggers. If you are
prone to heartburn, be cautious
when considering certain foods that
are known to cause problems,
including caffeinated drinks, alco-
hol, chocolate and spicy, fatty foods.
Barbecue alternatives to consider
include lower-fat dogs instead of tra-
ditional beef hot dogs, or make your
burgers with lean ground turkey.

With the right condiments, it's
hard to tell the difference. Since all
stomachs are not created equal, also
be aware of your own personal trig-
gers and try to cut back or at least
avoid them late in the evening.

Let gravity help. Although that
hammock may be calling your name,
keep away after a big meal. To help
your food digest properly, stay in an
upright position rather than lying
down after you eat. The natural
force of gravity helps with the diges-
tive process.

Keep your medicine cabinet
stocked. If you are a frequent heart-
burn sufferer, try an over-the-
counter (OTC) medication like
Zegerid OTC, an OTC proton pump
inhibitor (PPI).























MANGO CHUTNEY

10 large frim-ripe mangoes

1 cup raisins

1 cup vinegar

1 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1-1/2 cups brown sugar

2 to 4 bird peppers

2 cloves garlic, grated

1 medium-sized onion, finely chopped
1tbsp mustard seed

ltbsp celery seed

2 tbsp. chopped fresh gingerroot or 2tsp.
ground ginger

1-1/2 tbsp

Peel the mangoes, slice the flesh from the
seeds and cut into small piece. Combine all
the ingredients in a large bowl, mix well.
Cover and let stand overnight (no need to
refrigerate).

After the overnight soak, place the mixture
into a large stockpot and cook low heat for
45 minutes to 1-hour . Pour into sterilised
jars and seal. Serve with meat dishes.

MANGO DIP

1 cup chopped ripe mango

2 tbsp. minced scallions

1-1/2 tbsp. freshly squeezed lime juice
1tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

2 tbsp. chopped green or red pepper

Combine the ingredients in a bowl or a
blender and puree. Cover, chill for 2 hours
and serve with breadfruit chips, or chips of
your choice.

Azaleta’s Mango Chicken
1 whole chicken about 2lbs., cut into large
chunks for stew
Salt and pepper to taste
Garlic powder to taste
1/2 cup Mango Chutney or 1/2 cup store
bought chutney
1 cup chicken broth

Taking hearthurn Off the menu this barbecue season





Clean chicken thoroughly, cut into chunks
for stewing and season with salt, pepper
and garlic. Chutney and broth together to
make a gravy. Arrange chicken in a large
non stick skillet; coat with the chutney mix,
cover tightly and cook over very low heat
for about 45 minutes. You add hot pepper
for flavor if using the store bought chutney.

MANGO CREPES & ICE CREAM

3/4 cup all purpose flour

2 tbsp. Confectioner’s sugar
1/4 tsp. salt

1 cup milk

2 eggs, slightly beaten
2tbsp. vegetable oil

Filling

2 ripe mangoes finely chopped

1 cup plain yogurt

3 tsbp. honey

1/2 cup chopped Maraschino cherries

Crepes

Inasmall mixing bowl , mix together the
flour, sugar and salt. Add the milk, eggs,
and oil stirring until smooth. Cover and
refrigerate for 1 hour.

Lightly grease a 6 inch non stick skillet and
heat over medium heat. Pour in 2
tablespoons of batter, tilting the skillet to
make the crepe. Keep the pan moving for
60 seconds or until the bottom is brown.
Turn the crepe over and cook for 20-45
seconds longer. Cool on a wire rack. Light-
ly oil the skillet if necessary and repeat with
remaining batter.

Filling

Inasmall bowl blend together the yogurt
and honey. Remove 1/2 cup and place into
another bowl, stir in the mango chunks and
cherries.

Spread about 2 to 3 -tablespoonfuls of the
fruit mixture down the Centre of each
crepe. Fold opposite edges of crepe over
the mixture and arrange 2 crepes on each
serving dish. Top with remaining yogurt
mixture.







a +
4 i eo =a,

it miNA) moe i ee on the grill.





PPIs work by deactivating acid-
producing pumps in the stomach,
offering 24-hour relief of frequent

heartburn with one dose per day.
For more information and tips to
avoid heartburn, visit

www. ZegeridOTC.com.
¢ Courtesy of ARAcontent
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune

SATURDAY

Dov rs



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls @tripunemedia.net



to figure out, who these

people are — Mdeez,Padri-
no, TaDa, Sammi Star, Young
B, RapQuelle, SosaMan.

This list of names would sound like
a bad rap song placed in the wrong
hands, but parents should make them-
selves familiar, because they repre-
sent the new breed of Bahamian musi-
cians that are carrying on the mantle,
with great success, to help continue
the Bahamian music industry.

Their core fan base is the thousands
of next generation Bahamians who
will be begging their parents for $20
this Saturday to attend “SosaMan’s
Birthday Celebration” at Mario’s
Bowling and Entertainment Palace.
In fact,they will probably ask for $40
to buy the ‘I Love Sosa Package’,
which includes admission and a Sosa
gift set.

Brandon ‘SosaMan’ Major, is a
leader in the pack of Bahamian hip-
hop artists. He is a member of the
new breed that looks different, sounds
different and appeals to a different
audience than the famil-
iar faces of the old
guard.

I gather parents are trying

— s.

ae ee 4

a ey































































DINIIDAI

Contribution

SosaMan is making a significant
contribution to the burgeoning indus-
try, and making no apologies. In fact,
he wants to be a Bahamian music
ambassador. He feels corporate
Bahamas, politicans and parents
should know the man who is influ-
encing their children, and the move-
ment that is taking the Bahamas by
storm. He wants “to open their eyes a
little more”.

Do not be quick to accuse Sosa of
being an inauthentic Bahamian musi-
cian. He's quick to point out that:
“They can’t take my flag away from
me. Hip Hop is not Bahamian, but
Brandon Major is”.Everyone on his
team is Bahamian, from the manager
of his studio, to the artist designing
his comic series, Adventures of Ted
Major”.

He said Bahamians who major in

American tax law are not
questioned about their iden-
tity. He said Bahamians who
play basketball, when bas-
ketball was invented by an

American Indian, are not
questioned on their iden-
tity. He said hip hop is the
language of the next gen-
eration and it is giving
Bahamians a voice at home
and abroad.
Sosa received at least
eight requests to perform
)) his hit single, “I Dream”,
/ at graduation ceremonies
(across the country, including
b’ schools like Uriah McPhee
/ and SC Mcpherson. He said
_ none of the schools cleared his
performance.
In the not so distant
past, Bahamian musi-
cians were laughed
to scorn for
produc-

\

>

{9

ing music tracks with Bahamian slang.
DJs slashed those records like teachers
would slash an assignment with red
ink wherever a student slipped out of
the Queen’s English.

Not so today in the music indus-
try, but Sosa admits in the early days
of his career he faked it along with
other musicians, who used American
and Jamaican accents as a strategy to
gain acceptance. For them, although
this tarnished the Bahamian brand to
some extent, it was a necessary evil
to establish credibility and secure air

play.
Acceptance

“People started to act like that
because musicians have a certain dying
love that they want to be heard. I write
to be heard. But at first when you put
a track with Bahamian dialect on the
radio they would run you. The com-
munity is opening up now though to
allow you to be more Bahamian,” said
SosaMan.

Sosa’s outlook was partially changed
by his college experience, where he
realised ‘Brand Bahamas’ was a seller,
especially to the ladies. It was further
shaped when he realised his follow-
ing of young Bahamians were “putting
on a heavy accent” to imitate his
American persona.

Those days are a thing of the past
for the serious Bahamian artist, like
Sosa, who are breaking through.

Leap

A quantum leap appears to have
taken place, but behind the scenes the
artists were taking blows, making sac-
rifices and perserving to the point of a
success.

Last year Sosa made over $30,000
from his events and performances,
which is more than his regular day
job. He said that is small compared
to the amount some artists make, but
said from where he comes from it

means a lot.
The Bahamian market is where
Sosa makes most of his money
: and appeases his core fan base,
but the US market is where
the opportunties are to
experiment and expand. It
is a major expense though.
Over the past ten years,
Sosa recalls performing
in US shows where he
paid for his own plane
ticket, accommoda-
tions and received
no performance
_ fees. “They may
\ put some mon-
ey in your
\ hand, or they
. may not,
because you
are an
unknown,”
said Sosa.

That
started
t oO



i

JULY 3RD, 2010

sawp SONGS

MUCH TO CELEBRATE ON |

SOSATIAIS






change slightly around 2007, and now
he is securing jobs where his travel
and accommodation expenses are paid
for, and he can leave with a few hun-
dred dollars in his pocket. He said it is
important for artists to judge success
by looking at their growth over time.

Today, the Bahamian market can
barely contain the man everyone in
high school knew as ‘Muff’: the base-
ball star, basketball starter, footballer,
and certifiable class clown. So much so
that Sosa is considering flying the
coop. He has a vision of living “6-
months in 6-months out” of the
Bahamas, primarily because the risk of
saturation in the Bahamas is high and
the potential for business success out-
side of the Bahamas is great.

Market

The listening market in the
Bahamas is about 35,000, which rep-
resents 10-15 per cent of the popula-
tion, who are active listeners of new
Bahamian music, according to Sosa.
His business ambitions are greater
than the local market potential.

In his debut album Sosa says he
wants to make six figures. That is
where Toronto, Nashville, and South
Florida come into the picture. These
are the markets Sosa is trying to pen-
etrate; he already has a bit of expo-
sure, established networks and friends.

He is aware people may think he is
"selling out" from the local industry by
leaving at such a critical time, but he
says he has to balance the need to
recognise the people supporting him
locally, and the need to grow his busi-
ness.

For Sosa, spending time abroad is
beneficial for another reason: to pre-
vent over exposure, but it’s a tight
rope to balance. He said people can
always forget about you as well, and
move on to the next best thing, if you
are out for too long.

“That is the biggest threat any artist
has down here because the promoters,

sad to say, they will use you. They
will put you on their flyers; use you in
their commercials until people don’t
want to see you any more. “If there is
a big show, Sosa is on it. I am very
afraid of the word saturation. That is
one thing we have been calculating,
strategising to avoid. The other end
of saturation is people forgetting about
you."

In the early days, Sosa said it was
difficult for friends to take him seri-
ously. They would laugh when he went
on stage with his big glasses, call him a
fake, and box him into his old high
school persona.

This did not stop him, and now
Sosa believes his market is the gener-
ation that never ever knew him as
Brandon or ‘Muff’. The new genera-
tion knows Sosa as Chief Executive
Officer of Fame 406 Biz, which is the
parent company for Sosa’s portfolio of
music, an autobiography and comic
book, fan merchandise and events, as
well as a recording studio, marketing
company, and business development
company for musicians.

Fame 406 Biz is no class prank. It is
a homegrown entertainment business
conglomerate, owned and operated
by one of the top Bahamian musi-
cians. Ten years ago, the market was
barely primed for the new breed of
Bahamian musicians, and now they
have virtually taken over. They have
captured the imaginations of the
Bahamian youth and are not holding
back.

TO DISCUSS PIKES en WHE PAGE LOG a TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







© “ROCKIN’ DA SQUARE”
NATIONAL YOUTH
INDEPENDENCE BLOCK PARTY

Recess Bahamas Youth
Organization and The
Ministry of Youth present
the National Youth Inde-
pendence Block Party,
“Rockin' Da Square”, at
Rawson Square, Friday,
July 2. Party includes
music, dancing, singing, a
live band, fashion show,
step show, and food and
drinks. Telephone: 677-
5407. Email:
mgordon@recessba-
hamas.com

© BAHAMAS NATIONAL YOUTH
ORCHESTRA'S BANQUET

The Bahamas National
Youth Orchestra, under
the patronage of Sir
Arthur and Lady Joan
Foulkes, presents a cele-
bratory 20th anniversary
banquet at Super Club
Breezes. July 3 - Saturday.

Banquet features Ron-
nie Butler, Ralph
Munnings and 2 exciting
bands throughout the
evening. Cocktails begin
7.30pm. Dinner served at
8pm. Tickets: $70. Tele-
phone: 393-4180 or 325-
6254.

© CONCERT: “THA DIRTY
SOUTH INVASION”

Luna Nightclub hosts
“Tha Dirty South Inva-
sion” concert featuring
Ludacris and Rasheeda
with guest appearances by
Daddy Whites and El
Padrino on Friday, July 9.
Doors open 9pm. Tickets:
$50, available at The
Jukebox. Telephone: 326-
6227.

* REMNANT ACADEMY'S
BASKETBALL CAMP

The Remnant Academy
hosts a basketball camp,
from July 13 to July 24, at
Yam-1pm daily, with guest
appearance by Wali
Jones, top NBA 76ers
Hall of Famer. Telephone:
361-4294.

© ATLANTIS LIVE: KATY PERRY

The Atlantis Live Series
presents Katy Perry, two-
time Grammy nominated
artists and one of the most
talked about pop acts of
the last two years, Satur-
day, July 17. Here's your
chance to see her bring
her energetic live show to
Atlantis, 9:30pm in The
Grand Ballroom. See
www. Atlantis.com

* COLORS HAIR STUDIO IS
IMPLEMENTING A NEW PRO-
GRAMME CALLED "COLORS

HAIR STUDIO OUTREACH TO
STUDENTS 2010."

For the month of July
and August (inclusive of
June 29th) they will be
giving away 2 free hair
cuts weekly to high school
(minimum age 16) and
COB students. The hair
cuts will be given on Tues-
days between the hours of
3 - opm. If you have long
hair and would like some
shaping, we will be more
than happy to do it for
you.

This is limited to 2 visits
per person during these
two months. If you know
of anyone that may want
to take advantage of the
programme just have
them call the salon 394-
7400 and enquire about
the free hair cuts.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 7B



ARTS



Candy

Bouquets

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



andy Bouquets are the delicious alterna-

tive to flowers that never fade, wilt, or die,

and are sure to surprise and delight the
person who receives them. They are a unique
and edible, one-of-a-kind gift that will make a
lasting impression on the receiver, says Miran-
da Powell, proprietor of Candyland Creations;
"the candy store with more."

She creates candy confec-
tions that appeal to the senses,
and creates a world of senso-
ry bliss to her patrons.

"T've always loved baking,”
said Ms Powell. "I've been
baking since high school, and
worked in the hotel field since
2001." From there, she
became a home-maker before
she decided to wanted to per-
sue this line of work that
would give her the opportu-
nity to engage her passion.

“T have customers from
England who purchase items
to carry away with them as
gifts for families and friends,”
said Ms Powell. “Most of
those customers would be the
ones that order fudge, which
comes in chocolate, pineapple,
and vanilla flavours.” But gua-
va fudge is the main best seller.

"The guava fudge is very
sweet, and taste like guava,”
she said. She developed the
recipe with former business

partner, now Sweet 'Tings
owner Kimberly Beneby.
"The texture melts in your
mouth. People say they
savour it, others eat it by the
handful."

She also makes chocolate
flavours include key lime
pie,strawberry
cheesecake,chocolate milk,
boysenberry, and cotton can-
dy. These can all be enjoyed
and start at soda glass sizes
to large sizes.

Ms Powell also prepares a
molded chocolate in milk,
dark and white flavours, and
even mixes them into two
toned chocolate bars.

Spiced cranberry sauce is
also a nice purchase. It is usu-
ally made as a side for turkey
and ham at Christmas. But
that is far from it. Ms Powell
uses the spiced cranberry
sauce as a dip for cream
cheese and crackers.

Spiced cranberry sauce can

be eaten on toast, used almost
as a pepper jelly. For cheese-
cake lovers, butter rum
cheesecake is very smooth. It
has a rum sauce that is heated
and poured.

It's unique and can be
enjoyed and eaten at the same
time, starting at soda glass size
to the large sizes.

Bennie and peanut cakes
and coconut pastries are also
available. The flavour and
colour of the bouquet is
decided by the customer.

Each bouquet comes in its
own designer container filled
with delicious confections and
gourmet chocolates from
around the world and they are
prefect

Candy Bouquets for Valen-
tine's Day, celebrating a pro-
motion, bouquets that say
“Get Well Soon,” “ Happy
Valentine’s Day,” “ Happy
Halloween,” “ Happy Moth-
er's Day,” and “Just
Because,” are all available,
and can be personalised with
cakes, candies, and chocolates
with photos of your choice.

Once it is in a cool envi-
ronment, Ms Powell says the
candy bouquets stay fresh
tasting.

¢ If you would like to purchase
one of Miranda Powell's novel-
ty items, call 557-4523 to

order. Email her at candyland-

creations@gmail.com








































































































































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*)\INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


THE TRIBUNE

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PAGE 12
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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

PAGE 13¢@ BIC National Open Track RESULTS...

_ =
j =— e ; r Lf z: ee a

HEIGHT AND POWER — MAGNUM ROLLE, the 6°11 forward-center out of Louisiana Tech, goes up for a layup...



a





Venus upset,
Serena wins
in Wimbledon

quar ters...
See page 14

Magnum in Pacers
rookie/free agent

s Camp th

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



sal gees 5

raft night was the official

start to Magnum Rolle’s

NBA journey, but he had

little time to celebrate as
he and the other members of his draft
class immediately got to work on the
next and most important step, mak-
ing the roster.

Rolle will participate in his first offi-
cial event as a member of the Indiana
Pacers when the team begins
rookie/free agent camp on Thursday at
Conseco Fieldhouse, the Pacers home
arena.

The 6°11 forward-center out of
Louisiana Tech will be joined by fellow
2010 draft classmates, lottery pick Paul
George out of Fresno State who was
taken with the 10th overall pick, and
swingman Lance Stephenson out of
Cincinnati who was selected in the sec-
ond round with the 40th pick.

Rolle was selected by the Indi-
ana Pacers with the 51st pick in last
Thursday's NBA Draft and became
the first native Bahamian to hear his
name called on draft night in over 30
years.

The Oklahoma City Thunder origi-
nally held the rights to the 51st pick,
however, agreed to swap picks with
the Pacers who held the 57th pick and
selected Ryan Reid.

The Pacers’ newest trio will be
joined by other undrafted rookies, sev-
eral journeymen looking for a spot on
the roster, including Josh McRoberts,
Marcus Landry, Marcus Williams,
Richard Hendrix, Chris Kramer,
Thomas Heurtel, Russell Robinson,
Drew Naymick, Darryl Watkins, Bryce
Taylor and James Mays.

The camp will feature a series of
two-a-day practices, then the roster
heads to Orlando, Florida, for the Air
Tran Orlando Pro Summer League
2010.

The Pacers will open up their Orlan-

is week

611 forward-center
looking to make
NBA roster

do Summer League Schedule 3pm July
5 against the Orlando Magic.

Rolle should face his first true test
matched up against Magic rookie for-
ward Daniel Orton out of Kentucky.

In game two, 7pm July 6, the Pacers
take on the New Jersey Nets where
Rolle will square off against third over-
all pick, Derrick Favors.

In game three, George should get
the bulk of attention when the Pacers
meet the Utah Jazz, 7pm July 7, when
he is matched up with fellow lottery
pick Gordon Hayward.

July 8th at 3 pm, the Pacers will face
the Eastern Conference champion
Boston Celtics, with key players Luke
Harangody and Avery Bradley.

The Pacers Orlando Summer
League schedule ends 8am July 9
against the Oklahoma City Thunder
where Rolle will face the team that
originally selected him, and the player
he was traded for, Ryan Reid.

The Thunder’s stacked roster will
also feature lottery pick Cole Aldrich,
James Harden, Eric Maynor, and
Serge Ibaka.

The Orlando Pro Summer League
runs from July 5-10 at the RDV Sport-
splex in Orlando.

The Summer League gives teams an
early indication of evaluating their
draft picks and gives a medium for
franchises to unearth diamonds in the
rough, and overlooked players who
they hope can surpass expectations
and make an impact in the NBA.

Former NBA pro Dexter Cam-
bridge made his mark in the 1992 Sum-
mer League and was signed as an
undrafted free agent by the Dallas
Mavericks.





TRACK
STEWART BANNED

USADA announced today
that Raymond Stewart, a
coach in the sport of track and
field, and four-time Olympic
sprinter who competed for
Jamaica, has received a life-
time suspension in a decision
by an independent American
Arbitration Association
(AAA) arbitrator.

The suspension was
imposed for Stewart’s partic-
ipation in trafficking in pro-
hibited substances, as well as
administration and attempt-
ed administration of prohib-
ited substances, in violation
of applicable sport anti-dop-
ing rules, including Interna-
tional Association of Athletics
Federation (TAAF) Rules and
the World Anti-Doping Code
(Code).

Stewart’s sanction result-
ed from information recent-
ly received by USADA dur-
ing separate investigations
arising from information
obtained during the BALCO
conspiracy.

BIANCA STUART soars
through the air to win the
BAAA BTC national title in
the women’s long jump.
Stuart is one of the athletes
named to the BAAA Under-
23 national team for the
NACAC championships...

Photo by Tim Clarke

FOLLOWING the comple-
tion of the BTC National Open
Track and Field Champi-
onships, the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations
(BAAA) has selected a 26-
member team to travel to the
North American, Central
American and Caribbean
(NACAC Under-23) Track and
Field Championships.

The team, made up of eight
women and 18 men, will rep-
resent the Bahamas at the
event in Miramar, Florida
Ansin Sports Complex July 9-
11.

Under the auspices of the
International Amateur Athlet-

ics Federation and the USA
Track & Field, a number of top
athletes from several countries
are expected to compete at this
high level under 23 competi-
tion.

Participating countries
include Anguilla, Antigua and
Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas,
Barbados, Belize, Bermuda,
British Virgin Islands, Canada,
Cayman Islands, Costa Rica,
Dominica, Dominican Repub-
lic, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti,
Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico,
Montserrat, Netherlands
Antilles, Nicaragua, Puerto
Rico, El Salvador, St Kitts/
Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent, The

Wik] 26 make up Team Bahamas
WY for NACAC championships

Grenadines, Trinidad and
Tobago, Turk and Caicos
Islands, United States Virgin
Islands, and the US.

The makeup of the Bahamas’
team is predominantly colle-
giate athletes, a number of
whom recently competed for
their universities and colleges
at their conference and nation-
al championships.

Leading the team will be
Demetrius Pinder, the new
national champion in the men’s
400m who has a season’s best of
44.93, Jamal Forbes in the
100m, with a season’s best of
10.28, Nathan Arnett 400m hur-
dles Junior College Champion







SS >





with a season’s best of 51.47.

Among the women compet-
ing are Bianca Stuart NCAA
All American and seven-time
Missouri Valley Conference
champion in the long jump with
a season’s best 6.54m along
with Michelle Cumberbatch
NCAA Division 2, 400m hur-
dles champion and Ramona
Nicholls 800m and 1500m
standout from Park Atlanta
University.

The Bahamas will also field
relay teams to compete in the

Women’s team
Charlesha Lightbourne
Ramona Nicholls
Shellyka Rolle
Michelle Cumberbatch
Bianca Stuart
Keythra Richards
Yanique Clarke
Ashley Hanna
Michelle Cumberbatch
Shellyka Rolle

Women’s team
Jamal Forbes
Jonathan Davis
Demitrius Pinder

relay
Latoy Williams

relay
Laquardo Newbold
Dennis Bain
Nathan Arnett
Jeffry Gibson
Jamal Wilson
Stanley Poitier
J’Venta Deveaux
Antillio Bastian
Cordero Bonamy
La’Sean Pickstock
Jamal Butler
Jerone Mitchell

women’s 4x400m and men’s
4x100 and 4x400.

The team will be managed
by Tyrone Burrows. The head
coach is Everette Frazier, a lev-
el 4 sprints coach, assisted by
Jason Edwards, a level 3 jumps
coach, Floyd Armbrister, an
TAAF level 2 middle distance
coach, Grand Bahamian Fred-
erick Bastian, an IAAF level 1
sprints coach and Olympic and
world champion Tonique
Williams-Darling, now a sprints
coach.

Event

200 meters

800 meters

800 meters

400 meters Hurdles
Long Jump

Long Jump

4x400 meters relay
4x400 meters relay
4x400 meters relay
4x400 meters relay

100 & 200m & 4x1m relay
100 & 200m & 4x1m relay
400 meters & 4x400m

400 meters & 4x400m

800 meters

110mH & 4x100m relay
400meters Hurdles
400mH & 4x400m relay
High Jump

Long Jump

Triple Jump

Triple Jump

4x100 meter relay
4x400 meter relay
4x400 meter relay
4x400 meter relay

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

RESULTS: BIC National Open

RESULTS of the two-day
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations (BAAA)
BTC National Open Track and
Field Championships at the
Thomas A Robinson Track and
Field Stadium over the week-
end are as follows:

Open Women

100 Meter Dash - Sturrup,
Chandra, 11.15 CACG; Robin-
son, V'Alonee, 11.89 WJC; Eti-
enne, Marvar, 11.94 WJC.

200 Meter Dash - Smith,
Nivea, 22.71 CACG; Amertil,
Christine, 23.00 CACG; Stra-
chan, Anthonique, 24.14 WJC.

400 Meter Run - Miller,
Shaunae, 53.13; Rolle, Sasha,
54.05 WJC; Clarke, Yanique,
56.76.

800 Meter Run - Nicholls,
Romona, 2:12.61 U-23; Rolle,
Shellyka, 2:14.88 U-23; Burn-
side, Deshana, 2:17.09.

1500 Meter Run - Rolle,
Hughnique, 5:07.66; Smith, Ista,
5:12.92.

100 Meter Hurdles - Kemp,
Ivanique, 14.13 WJC; Mullings,
Tess, 14.59; Cartwright, Devinn,
14.60.

400 Meter Hurdles - Cum-
berbatch, Michelle, 1:00.33
WIC; Mullings, Tess, 1:03.97.

High Jump - Culmer, Kenya,
1.70m, 5-07.00; Gibson, Dan-
nielle, 1.57m, 5-01.75.

Long Jump - Stuart, Bian-
ca, 6.53m CG, 21-05.25;
Richards, Keythra, 5.75m, 18-
10.50; Gibson, Dannielle,
5.61m, 18-05.00.

Triple Jump - Richards,
Keythra, 12.41m, 40-08.75; Mar-
tin, Donnavette, 12.27m, 40-
03.25; Campbell, Krishand,
11.97m, 39-03.25.

Discus Throw - Duncanson,
Juliann, 38.73m, 127-01; Moss,
Adrienne, 37.04m, 121-06;
Jacques, Jennie, 36.29m, 119-
01.





ATHLETES compete during the BTC National Open Track and Field Championships...

Javelin Throw - Eve, Lav-
ern, 53.88m U-23, 176-09; Bas-
tian, Melinda, 45.28m, 148-07.

Shot Put - Moss, Adrienne,
13.65m U-23, 44-09.50;
Williams, Racquel, 12.94m, 42-
05.50; Duncanson, Juliann,
12.33m, 40-05.50.

Women 4x100 Meter Relay
Open - Bahamas Juniors ‘A’
46.73; Bahamas Youth 'A'
47.24.

Men’s Open

100 Meter - Griffith, Adrian,
10.23 CG; Rolle, Jamial, 10.42
U-23; Sands, Michael, 10.52
WIC.

200 Meter - Rolle, Jamial,
21.03 U-23; Mackey, Trevor-
vano, 21.50 WJC; Moss, Jamal,
21.63.

400 Meter Run - Pinder,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, JAY MALRINE

MORLEY of VENICE BAY ANNEX OFF BACARDI ROAD,
P.O. BOX SP-63953, NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend to change
the name to JAY MALRINE BETHEL, ff there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.



28 PICTET

18O5

Demetrius, 45.21 CACG; Bain,
Andretti, 45.44; Brown, Chris,
45.78 CACG.

800 Meter Run - Carey,
James Audley, 1:55.02; New-
bold, Laquardo, 1:56.68; Neilly,
Ramon, 1:56.76.

1500 Meter Run - Carey,
James Audley, 4:04.43; Taylor,
Lester, 4:13.74; Colebrook,
Andre, 4:14.10.

110 Meter Hurdles - Bain,
Dennis, 14.98.

400 Meter Hurdles - Burn-
side, Nejmi, 52.48 U-23; Arnett,
Nathan, 53.04 WJC; Bodie,
Patrick, 53.80.

High Jump - Thomas, Don-
ald, 2.30m CG, 7-06.50; Barry,
Trevor, 2.14m WJC, 7-00.25;
Wilson, Jamal, 2.14m WJC, 7-
00.25.

Pole Vault - Roker, Ter-
rance, 3.60m, 11-09.75.

Long Jump - Bastian,
Rudon, 7.98m CACG, 26-02.25;
Stuart, Nyles, 7.71m U-23, 25-
03.50; Delaney, Lamar, 7.33m,
24-00.75.

Triple Jump - Sands, Lee-
van, 16.78m CACG, 55-00.75;
Collie-Minns, Lathone, 15.78m
WJC, 51-09.25; Deveaux,
J'Vente, 15.64m WJC, 51-03.75.

Discus Throw - Whyte,
Leslie, 49.23m, 161-06; Nottage,
DeAngelo, 42.66m, 139-11;
Inniss, Delron, 39.90m, 130-11.

PICTET OVERSEAS TRUST

CORPORATION LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

TRUST OFFICER

WILL INCLUDE:-

* Administration of a portfolio of trusts including the
preparation of relevant documentation and Annual

Reviews.

* Administration of companies underlying assigned

fiduciary structures,

* Written and verbal communication with Client
Relationship Managers and other industry

professionals.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Law Degree, STEP Certification or other relevant

professional qualification.

Strong trust and company administration skills plus
a sound Knowledge of drafting relevant documents,

reporting and accounting.

Ability to read and assimilate trust documents.
Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
Familiarity with relevant local legislation.
Proficiency i in Microsoft Word and Excel.

At least 5 years of relevant experience in a Private

Bank or Trust Company.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL

BE ACCEPTED.

Please send Resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park

P ©. Box N-4837

Nassau, Bahamas



Hammer Throw- Inniss,
Delron, 43.78m, 143-08; Ster-
ling, Mark, 39.17m, 128-06.

Javelin Throw- Brown, Liv-
ingston, 53.81m, 176-06; Carey,
Elvardo, 53.50m, 175-06;
Andrews, Edward, 47.82m, 156-
11.

Shot Put - Inniss, Delron,
14.10m, 46-03.25; Watson,
Nikeo, 12.65m, 41-06.00; Cony-
ers, Maurice, 12.01m, 39-05.00.

100 Meter Dash Consola-
tion- Miller, Kohfe, 10.67;
Davis, Jonathan, 10.69; Green,
Travon, 10.70.

400 Meter Run Consolation-
Butler, Jamal, 47.25 WJC;
Mitchell, Jerone, 47.34 WJC;
Gibson, Jeffery, 47.44 WIC.

110 Meter Hurdles Junior -
Wilmore, Aaron, 14.49; Bodie,
Patrick, 14.55.

4x100 Meter Relay Open-
Bahamas Under 23 'A' 41.47;
Bahamas Juniors 'A' 42.54;
Bahamas Youth 'A' 42.68.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 13

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FILLETTE FRANCOIS
of PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-50904,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 30" day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, TREVOR THOMAS
MUNROE of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas intend to change my name to TREVOR THOMAS
KELLY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice



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Telephone: 322-8833

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RICHARDSON PETIT-
PHARD of TALL PINE, JUBILEE GARDENS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 30‘ day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



[VEHICLECLASS

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT
ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
BASIC FEE STRUCTURE
EFFECTIVE 1 JULY, 2010

REGISTRATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES

DUPLICATE REGISTRATION...

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FRIVATE SCHEDULE OMMTBDS
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS





RAFAEL NADAL sits on a outside court as he takes a break during a practice session at the
All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, Tuesday. Nadal will play Sweden's
Robin Soderling in a quarterfinal here today...

(AP Photo)

Nadal, Soderling to renew rivalry

By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer



WIMBLEDON, England (AP) —
While waiting more than a decade for
another shot at Roger Federer on a
Grand Slam stage, Rafael Nadal has
developed a pretty fair rivalry with
Robin Soderling.

The Spaniard and Swede will meet
in a major event for the third time since
June 2009 in today's quarterfinals at
Wimbledon.

Soderling pulled off a shocker last
year when they played in the fourth
round of the French Open, still Nadal's
only defeat in that event. Nadal avenged
the loss in this month's final at Roland
Garros.

Nadal expects the big-swinging Soder-
ling to be even tougher on grass than on
clay.

"Probably he's one of the more diffi-
cult opponents that you can play on all
surfaces today, but especially here,"
Nadal said, "because the ball goes faster,
and it's going to be very difficult to
return, and difficult to stop him from
the baseline.

"It's going to be a very difficult match
for me, I think. Hopefully for him, too."

While upsets were the norm Tuesday
for the women, with five-time champion
Venus Williams among those eliminat-
ed, the four highest-seeded men have
reached the final eight. Along with the
No. 2-seeded Nadal against No. 6 Soder-
ling, the other matchups include No. 1
Federer against No. 12 Tomas Berdych,
No. 3 Novak Djokovic against unseeded
Yen-hsun Lu, and No. 4 Andy Murray
against No. 10 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.

Federer vs. Nadal remains a tantaliz-
ing possibility Sunday. Nadal has won
the past three times they've met in a
Grand Slam final, including an epic
match for the 2008 Wimbledon title, but
they haven't played each other in a
major event since the 2009 Australian
Open.

Soderling might again forestall a
rematch. He has been the runner-up at
the French Open the past two years,
beating Federer in Paris this year, and is
now into the quarterfinals at Wimble-
don for the first time.

Growing up, Soderling said, he
watched telecasts of finals from the All
England Club between fellow Swede
Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker.

"T always loved to watch the bigger
tournaments, especially Wimbledon,

such an old tournament with a lot of
tradition," Soderling said. "For me,
Wimbledon is the biggest one. If I had
to pick one I really wanted to win, I
would pick Wimbledon."

The same goes for another potential
spoiler: Murray. He's trying to become
the first British man since 1936 to win
the title.

Despite the weight of a nation's
expectations, he's the only man who has
yet to lose a set in the tournament.

"At home in all sports is just a huge,
huge advantage," Murray said. "People
talk a lot about the pressure and the
expectation of playing at Wimbledon,
but you have that home support. For
me, anyway, it has made a huge differ-
ence to the way that I played. It makes
you feel comfortable on the court."

PARTNERSHIP REVIVED: Anna
Kournikova and Martina Hingis say
their tennis comebacks won't involve a
return to singles on the WTA Tour.

They ended long Wimbledon
absences by playing legends doubles
Tuesday. At 29, they're younger than
some tour regulars but not tempted to
resume their careers.

"I'm going to be 30 years old," Hingis
said. "It's a commitment you have to
do. You travel 35, 40 weeks a year. I
think I've played enough tennis in my
life."

"It's time to experience other things
and grow and move on," Kournikova
added.

Kournikova and Hingis revived their
doubles partnership and beat Saman-
tha Smith and Anne Hobbs of Britain 6-
2, 6-4 in a first-round legends match.
Kournikova hadn't played at Wimble-
don since 2002, Hingis since 2007.

"It's an amazing opportunity to be
back at Wimbledon," said Kournikova,
who reached the semifinals as a 16-year-
old in 1997. "I had so much fun today.
Kind of jittery a little bit. But I had an
amazing time."

Hingis plans to play a full season of
WorldTeam Tennis this summer after a
two-year ban for testing positive for
cocaine at Wimbledon in 2007. The for-
mer No. 1 player denied taking the drug
but did not appeal the ban.

"It's great fun to be out there again
with Anna,” Hingis said. "We had some
great times. We're sharing some good
times again. Totally different ballgame.”

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By SIMON HAYDON
AP Sports Writer



JOHANNESBURG (AP) —
Spain showed touches of the class
that makes the team European
champion on Tuesday, edging out
Portugal in a tough second round
game while Paraguay needed
penalties to dispose of Japan.

David Villa finished off a fluid
move of intricate passing to final-
ly break down Portugal's defen-
sive wall and give Spain a 1-0 vic-
tory. Villa's goal was his fourth of
the tournament, making him joint
top scorer in South Africa, while
Cristiano Ronaldo could not man-
age to inspire Portugal.

The Barcelona-bound striker
saw his first shot blocked by Por-
tugal goalkeeper Eduardo, but on
the rebound, he coolly slotted
home with his right foot.

"It was one of my best goals
because it got us through to the
next round,” Villa said. "Keep
scoring so we can keep going.”

Spain will face Paraguay on Sat-
urday at Johannesburg's Ellis Park
in the quarterfinal, hoping for a
semifinal meeting with Argentina
or Germany.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter,
acknowledging the fury of foot-
ball fans around the world, said
that he has apologized to England
and Mexico for refereeing mis-
takes that helped eliminate their
teams from the World Cup.

He said FIFA will reopen the
debate on high-tech methods to
improve decision-making on the
pitch following the mistakes in
Bloemfontein and Johannesburg
— when Germany and Argentina
advanced.

"Naturally, we deplore when
you see the evidence of referees’
mistakes," said Blatter, adding it
would be "a nonsense” for FIFA
not to look again at goal-line tech-
nology with its rule-making panel.

"After having witnessed such a
situation,” Blatter said, referring to
England's non-goal against Ger-
many, "we have to open again this
file, definitely.



Spain edges out Portugal in
tough second round game

Paraguay disposes of Japan in penalty shootout



CRISTIANO RONALDO reacts after a
tackle during the World Cup round of
16 soccer match between Spain and
Portugal at the Green Point stadium in
Cape Town, South Africa, Tuesday...
(AP Photo}

"Naturally, we will take on
board again the discussion about
technology. Something has to be
changed."

The refereeing system won't be
changed midway through the
World Cup. Blatter said the panel,
known as the International Foot-
ball Association Board, would
begin considering changes at a July
meeting in Cardiff, Wales.

Uruguay's Jorge Larrionda and
Italy's Roberto Rosetti, whose
blunders prompted the FIFA
rethink, have been left off the list
of referees for the rest of the
World Cup. FIFA did not
announce its reasons, but referees
involved in controversy rarely
make it to the later rounds.

Paraguay qualified for the first
time with a penalty shootout vic-
tory over Japan after 120 minutes
of tedious football in Pretoria's
Loftus Versfeld.

Paraguay and Japan drew 0-0
after extra time and the South
Americans won the shootout 5-3
after Yuichi Komano hit the cross-
bar with Japan's third kick — his
team's only miss.

Five-time world champion
Brazil beat South American rival
Chile 3-0 Monday to make the

quarterfinals for a fifth straight
tournament. The Netherlands beat
Slovakia 2-1 to join Uruguay,
Ghana, Germany and Argentina
in the last eight.

Netherlands coach Bert van
Marwijk has demanded unity from
his World Cup players after Robin
van Persie's angry outburst at
being substituted in the 2-1 defeat
of Slovakia threatened to derail
preparations for its quarterfinal
against Brazil.

Van Marwijk said he called a
team meeting after reports in
Dutch media that the Arsenal
striker said midfielder Wesley
Sneijder should have been brought
off instead of him.

"IT will never accept anything
that could upset the next match,”
Van Marwijk told Dutch national
broadcaster NOS.

South Africa's police chief said a
British tabloid journalist has been
arrested after what police called
an orchestrated attempt to under-
mine World Cup security with an
England fan's intrusion into the
team's changing room.

National police commissioner
Bheki Cele said police arrested
Simon Wright on Monday. He said
the Sunday Mirror journalist
admitted to harboring and inter-
viewing Pavlos Joseph while police
were searching for him.

And in Germany, an octopus
called Paul hesitated but ultimate-
ly picked Germany to win — again
— this time over Argentina in
their quarterfinal matchup.

Paul, who appeared to correctly
predict all four of Germany's
games in this year's tournament,
indicated that Saturday's game will
be a tough battle and that it may
even end in a penalty shootout.

It took the octopus about an
hour to approach a water glass
containing a mussel marked with a
German flag, said Tanja Munzig, a
spokeswoman for Sea Life Aquar-
ium in the western city of Ober-
hausen.





Nets trade Yi to Wizards, clearing more cap room



YI JIANLIAN
(AP Photo)

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AP Basketball Writer



EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) — The New Jersey Nets traded
forward Yi Jianlian to the Washing-
ton Wizards on Tuesday, creating
even more room under the salary cap
as they head into free agency.

The Wizards dealt forward Quin-
ton Ross to the Nets, who also sent an
undisclosed amount of cash to Wash-
ington.

The Nets freed up another $3 mil-
lion with the deal, leaving them about
$30 million to spend once free agency
opens on July 1.

Yi was the No. 6 pick in the 2007
draft by Milwaukee and has now been
traded twice. He averaged career
highs of 12.0 points and 7.0 rebounds

By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Five-time champion
Venus Williams was ousted in

last season, but was limited to 51
games because of injury.

The forward from China, sched-
uled to earn $4.1 million next season,
has averaged 9.6 points and 5.8
rebounds in his career.

"This trade is a good opportunity
to add a skilled 7-footer with signifi-
cant NBA experience who was the
sixth overall pick in the draft just
three years ago," Wizards president
Ernie Grunfeld said in a statement.
"Yi fits in very well with our ongoing
plan of building towards the future
with a core of young, talented play-
ers."

New Jersey may have found Yi's
replacement when it drafted Derrick
Favors from Georgia Tech with the
No. 3 pick, or could target another
power forward in free agency.

Venus upset, Serena wins
in Wimbledon quarters

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the Wimbledon quarterfinals
Tuesday, losing 6-2, 6-3 to
82nd-ranked Tsvetana Pironko-
va of Bulgaria.

Defending champion Serena
Williams, however, stayed on
course to keep the title in fam-
ily hands.

Venus, seeded second, had
reached the Wimbledon final
in eight of the past 10 years.
This time, she was undone by a
slew of unforced errors and
double-faults in her worst loss
at Wimbledon in terms of
games won — five.

In another surprise, 21st-
seeded Vera Zvonareva of Rus-
sia rallied past two-time US
Open winner Kim Clijsters 3-6,
6-4, 6-2 to reach her first Wim-
bledon semifinal, where she will
face Pironkova.

Serena Williams avoided the
wave of upsets, beating China's
Li Na 7-5, 6-3 and moving clos-
er to her fourth Wimbledon
title and 13th Grand Slam
championship. The top-seeded
Serena had 11 aces to take her
tournament total to 73, break-
ing the record of 72 she set last
year. She had 21 winners and
just six unforced errors.

"T always serve well at Wim-
bledon, but this is the first time
I've ever served this well so
consistently," Serena said.

Her semifinal opponent is
62nd-ranked Petra Kvitova of
the Czech Republic, who saved
five match points before beat-
ing Estonian qualifier Kaia
Kanepi 4-6, 7-6 (8), 8-6.

"I'm very happy,” said the



SERENA WILLIAMS looks to make
a return during her quarterfinal
match against Li Na at All England
Lawn Tennis Championships at
Wimbledon on Tuesday...

(AP Photo)

20-year-old Kvitova, her voice
shaking. "I can't believe it. It's
something incredible.”

It's the first time two unseed-
ed players have reached the
women's semifinals at Wimble-
don since 1999. With all the
other big names gone, Serena
Williams is the overwhelming
favourite for the title.

"It's not mine to lose, it's
mine to win if I can get it," she
said. "There's three other peo-
ple that are vying to win it.
They have just as good a chance
as I do."

Serena said she's not sur-
prised the left-handed Kvitova
got this far.

"She's a really tough player,
especially on grass,” she said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE









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LOCAL NEWS

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FROM page five

in connection with serious
offences and released on bail.

He said: “There are areas
like Avocado Street where
there were seven murders, and
you could call that a ‘hot spot’,
but the victims and the perpe-
trators involved are not
strangers to the system.

“It’s about being evil in your
heart, having no respect for
human beings, or care about
the communities in which we
live.”

Mr Greenslade and his team
greeted the young Bahamas
American Football Alliance
team practising in Pinewood
Park as they walked through
the area.

He assured the children they
do not live in a bad neighbour-
hood despite the “bad things”
that have happened.

He said: “Some bad things
have happened in this commu-
nity, there are some bad people
in the neighbourhoods, but we
believe you have a good neigh-
bourhood.”

The children were advised by
the Police Commissioner to lis-
ten to the advice of their par-
ents and teachers and steer
clear of crime.

“Tf you want guns and think
it’s exciting, join the police
force or the defence force,” Mr
Greenslade said as he invited
them to visit him at police
headquarters.

He ended the Pinewood Gar-
dens walkabout with a pep-talk
for southwestern division police
officers at the South Beach
Police Station in East Street
South.

The Commissioner then flew
to Grand Bahama to visit com-
munities there.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 2010, PAGE 15

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