Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST





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Culprits flee

after struggle a

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER and her son
fought off two home invaders
who broke into their home ear-
ly yesterday.

The drama began when the
sleeping mother awoke and
found two men in dark clothing
and hooded jackets, allegedly
armed with a firearm, in her
bedroom at their Infant View
Road home.

She screamed for help, and
her son, who was sleeping in
another room, rushed to her
aid.

Assistant Superintendent

Clayton Fernander, of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit, said: "They
entered the home. We suspect
they picked the lock, jimmied
the lock of the kitchen door.

"There was a struggle. It
started in the mother's bed-
room and ended up in the front
room area. She screamed and
alerted the son, the son came in
and there was a struggle from
there."

Police were called to the
scene around 3am and were
told that during the confronta-
tion the son, said to be in his
early to mid-20s, was able to
disarm one of the thugs by

SEE page 11

FNM: Opposition’s Director of Public
Prosecutions criticism is ‘hypocrisy’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



LABELLING as “hysteria and hypocrisy” the Opposition’s
growing criticism of the appointment of a foreigner as the new
Director of Public Prosecutions, the FNM says the PLP’s past
actions conflict with their current argument.

In a press statement yesterday, the party pointed out that

SEE page 11



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SEE PAGE SEVEN



BAHAMAS BIGGEST fiir

Mum anit Son fight
Off home invaders

Government
schools set for
major repairs

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net





FREEPORT -— The Ministry
of Education is preparing to
start major repairs at various
government schools here this
summer.

The scope of works for
school repairs is expected to
be released this week and sent
out to tender by the Ministry
of Education, according to an

SEE page 11









Da ud RAISES aaa Sy Wt

RACARO CLARKE, who was
born June 18 at 24 weeks,
weighing just two pounds
and 12 ounces, touches the
hand of his mother yester-
day.

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

DESPITE the current
economic climate, over
150 private and corporate
entities nation-wide con-
tributed to a life-saving
fundraiser for high risk,
premature, or critically ill
new borns.

Organized by the
Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation, The
Rotary Club of East Nas-
sau, Doctors Hospital,
The Tribune Media, and
Tile King, the “Breathe
Easy Campaign” raised
nearly $400,000.

The funds purchased
eight ventilators and
three incubators for
Princess Margaret Hos-
pital’s Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit, the only
NICU in the region.

SEE page 11





a
als

SIM cards ‘ may

be being used in

prison illegally’
By NOELLE NICOLLS

Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



in cell phones, it was said yesterday.

International consultant Howard :
Melamed made the claim at the fourth :
annual conference of the Association of
Caribbean Heads of Corrections and :

Prison Services (ACHCPS), presently
underway in the Bahamas.

SEE page 11



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“PLP reportetly facing difficulties
in choosing election nominee

WITH former representatives, new candi-

: dates, and Senators waiting in the wings, the
: PLP is reportedly facing some difficulty in choos-
: ing which nominee will get a chance to represent
: the party in the next general election.

According to information received by The
Tribune, the PLP has actually taken to asking

SIM cards being sold by vendors near to : persons who had expressed an interest in run-

Her Majesty’s Prison are probably get- :

ting into the prison and being used illegally overwhelming in some Key “black belt” seats.

ning to possibly withdraw their nomination and
“wait” for another term as the interest has been

However, there has also been reports that in
some instances, this offer by the candidates com-
mittee was not always as altruistic as one would
believe.

In one “die-hard” PLP seat, an up-and-coming

: young PLP nominee was reportedly asked not to
: run as his perceived “lifestyle choices” could

Lax regulations around the sale of SIM :
cards is a worldwide problem contributing :
to the illegal use of cell phones inside pris- ;
ons, said Mr Melamed, who is also presi- :
dent of Cell Antenna, a US-based com- :
pany specializing in cell phone jamming :

hinder his chances and that of the party of win-
ning the seat.

With this nominee having the perceived back-
ing of influential members within the party, the
candidates committee is said to be working
“overtime” to ensure that the “absolute best”

SEE page 11





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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Thirteen candidates emerge from first
round COB presidential search process

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THIRTEEN candidates
have emerged from the first
elimination round of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas’ presi-
dential search process.

The candidates were short-
listed from a pool of 82
Bahamian and non-Bahami-
an applicants, in accordance
with the skills and expertise
guidelines established by the
college (http://www.cob.
edu.bs/ Administration/Pres-
identSearch/PositionPro-
file.pdf).

With the help of US search
consultants Academic Search
Inc, the search committee has
begun a series of reference
checks from which they will
select no more than eight
candidates to move into the
evaluation phase of the
process.

These semi-finalists will
each be interviewed by the
ASC and a maximum of four
finalists chosen.

In a letter to the academic
community, Chair of the Col-
lege Council and the Advi-
sory Search Committee T
Baswell Donaldson
explained: “During the open-
ing weeks of the Fall 2010
semester, finalists will be
invited to visit the campus an
d meet with the college com-
munity at large.
Based on these visits, mem-
bers of the college commu-
nity will be invited to share th
eir views on each finalist’s suit
ability for the position. All fe
edback shared will be held in
strict confidence.”

The college president’s
areas of responsibility
include:

¢ Relations with the exter-
nal community

¢ Hiring faculty and staff

¢ Working effectively with
the leadership team

¢ Organising funding

¢ Effectively leading a
developing institution.

In terms of education cre-
dentials and professional

experience, the successful
candidate must have:

¢ A masters degree (doc-
torate or the equivalent is
preferred)

¢ Seven to 10 years of
senior administrative/ lead-
ership experience in pro-
gressively more responsible
positions, with a strong
record of achievement (at
the higher education level is
preferred).

¢ Demonstrated under-
standing of and sensitivity to
diversity in academic, socioe-
conomic, cultural, and eth-
nic backgrounds, and tireless
support for multicultural sen-
sitivity.

According to the position
profile, all applicants should
be available for appointment
by early fall this year.

Mr Donaldson encouraged
community feedback on the
process and urged persons to
visit the college’s website
(http:/Awww.cob.edu.bs/Admi
nistration/PresidentSearch/)
to keep informed on the
progress of the search.








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Neymour dismisses
criticism from Roberts
over handling of BEC

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State for
the Environment Phenton
Neymour dismissed criti-
cism of his handling of the
Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration by PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts as nothing
more than a “cheap”
attempt to gain “political
brownie points.”

Over the weekend, BEC
issued a statement advising
the public that due to the
high temperatures and con-
sequent increase in demand
for power to run air condi-
tioners, some of its genera-
tors at Clifton Pier experi-
enced problems that result-
ed in power cuts.

Making reference to Mr
Neymour’s budget commu-

a
aU es
Wes te)
PHONE: 822-2157



T 242.325.6633 ¢ F 242.325-6638

c oOo m

nication in the House of
Assembly, in which he
assured the public that BEC
had made the necessary
preparations for the sum-
mer months and that power
outages were not foresee-
able, Mr Roberts said the
junior minister has been
noticeably silent on this
matter.

“Information coming to
the attention of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party
strongly advises that the
summer of 2010 is likely to
be a very miserable one and
will bring further hardship
to residences, in particular
the elderly and the young.

“The PLP is very sad-
dened by the large number
of families (estimated at
some 10,000, including
Grand Bahama) who are
without electricity. Further,
the numbers of homes being
disconnected by BEC with-
out any hope of reinstate-
ment are growing daily as
unemployment continues to
escalate,” Mr Roberts said.

However, Mr Neymour
was quick to rebuff the
PLP’s chairman’s comments
as utter nonsense — point-
ing out that as the Minister
of State for the Environ-
ment he has no direct
responsibility for the Grand
Bahama Power Company
which regulates the elec-
tricity needs of residents on
that island.

Further, Mr Neymour
said, the financial difficul-
ties that BEC currently
finds itself in — which are
reportedly hindering repairs
to the damaged generators —
are a direct result of the
mismanagement by Mr
Roberts himself, who served
as the minister with respon-
sibility for BEC during the
last PLP administration
when electricity rates were
lowered in 2003.

As for the damaged gen-
erators at Clifton Pier, Mr





gO Dee a OL

Neymour was proud to
report that some have now
been brought back online,
and will soon be producing
260 megawatts - 57
megawatts over the current
level of demand.

“What had happened was
that BEC’s capacity
dropped down to approxi-
mately 214 megawatts,
which is below the peak
demand of 230 megawatts
and so we had to load shed
during peak periods. We
were able to repair some of
the generators and bring
BEC’s capacity yesterday
up to 238 megawatts by
repairing a number of those
generators. We are now
repairing generator DAQ,
generator DAO, and DA11.
We expect to be up to 260
megawatts which is more
than sufficient at peak time.

“What happened essen-
tially is that we had run into
challenges on a number of
generators on consecutive
days that were unforeseen
and unexpected. So we do
not foresee any additional
challenges. As for Mr
Roberts’ comments, I find
them irresponsible and I do
not regard him as one with
much knowledge in this
area anyway,” Mr Neymour
said.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

PN Ae l8- (eel Ip lZ

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 3



Man and wife

are charged in
connection with
Marijuana seizure

A MAN and his wife
arrested in connection
with the seizure of $48,000
worth of marijuana have
been formally charged in
Magistrates Court.

Alfred Marvin Dawkins,
32; and his wife Rene
Dawkins, 30; of West
Ridge Estates, are accused
of possessing marijuana

with the intent to supply it.

It is alleged that on Fri-
day, June 8, the couple
was found with 48 pounds
of marijuana.

Mr Dawkins, who was
arraigned on Monday
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethell, entered a not
guilty plea. He was
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

His wife, who was
arraigned yesterday, also
pleaded not guilty to the
charge.

Both are expected back
in court on Monday for a
bail hearing.

A man who had a war-
rant outstanding for 16
years on a drug charge has
been sentenced to nine
months in prison.

Vinslo Billups was
charged in 1994 with pos-
session of dangerous
drugs and possession of
drugs with the intent to
supply.

He was reportedly
found in possession of two
and a quarter pounds of
marijuana.

Billups was convicted
and a warrant for his
arrest was issued in
November 1995 after he
failed to appear in court
for sentencing.

At the time, his lawyer
indicated that he was
imprisoned in the United
States.

Billups, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethell on Monday,
claimed that he had been
imprisoned in the US for
four years before return-
ing to the Bahamas.

Magistrate Bethell sen-
tenced Billups to nine
months in prison along

with a $10,000 fine. Failure |

to pay the fine will result
in an additional year of
imprisonment.

A 21-YEAR-OLD man
was arraigned in Magis-
trates Court on Monday
on attempted murder
charges.

Carl Fisher of Bacardi
Road is accused of the
April 2 attempted murder
of Michael Conti and
Justin Munroe.

Fisher is also accused of
causing harm to Justin
Major.

The accused, who was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Derrence Rolle-
Davis in Court Five, Bank
Lane, was not required to
enter a plea.

He was granted bail in
the sum of $30,000 and
ordered to surrender all
travel documents.

Fisher was also ordered
to report to the
Carmichael Road Police
Station every day.

His case was adjourned
to October 5 and 6.



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Prison Department is
reviewing bids submitted by cell
phone jamming specialists in an
open tender process, said Dr
Elliston Rahming, Superinten-
dent of Prisons.

Once a service provider is
selected, the prison intends to
use the technology to block the
illegal use of cell phones.

“Like prisons everywhere
around the world, we are chal-
lenged by the importation of
cellular phones. There are
clearly too many that come in —
one cell phone is too many —
and it is my resolve to bring
those numbers to an irreducible
minimum. But failing that we
will jam them, including my
phone,” said Dr Rahming.

Last month the prison
acquired six service dogs includ-
ing attack dogs, drug sniffing
dogs and cell phone sniffing
dogs.

Prisoners use cell phones to
alert criminal counterparts on
the outside of upcoming court
dates and thereby arrange for
the intimidation of witnesses,
according to Leslie Campbell
from the Jamaica Department
of Correctional Services. He
said, “Cell phones are rampant
in every corner of the prison in
Jamaica”, and corrupt prison
officers bring them in.

Dr Rahming said the
Jamaican experience is applic-
able to the Bahamas. “Once
they get use of the cell phones
(they use them for) whatever
use they can imagine, whatever
needs they can fulfill,” he said.

The Prison Act states that
communication between
inmates and outsiders must be
made within the “sight and
sound” of an officer. If an
inmate uses a cell phone, he or
she is in violation of the Prison
Act.

As for prison officers, it is
against regulations for all
guards to have cell phones with-
in the living confines of
inmates.

There are many criminal uses
prisoners find for cell phones,
according to Howard Melamed,
president of Cell Antenna, a
US-based company specialising
in cell phone jamming technol-
ogy. Mr Melamed was a pre-
senter at the forth annual con-
ference of the Association of
Caribbean Heads of Correc-
tions and Prison Services
(ACHCPS), presently under-
way in the Bahamas.








Kris Ingraham/BIS



Mana of Her Nocona Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming

He said prisoners can oper-
ate cell phones as servers, and
conduct business online. When
they have access to credit cards,
he said they order products and
have them sent to the prison as
gifts. He said they also use cell
phones to intimidate witness-
es, and to operate gambling,
extortion and prostitution rings
on the outside.

There are examples of pris-
oners charged with rape, using
their cell phones to “constantly
harass” victims by making
repeated late night phone calls
and sending text messages, said
Mr Melamed.

One prisoner, who had under
two years left to serve on his
sentence, continued to operate
as a pimp from inside the
prison.

He used the money collected
to “buy drugs and other ser-
vices” inside the prison, he said.

In his experience, Mr
Melamed said, the few prison
officers who are involved in
trafficking cell phones into pris-
ons hide it from authorities and
are disciplined once they are
discovered. However, he said
every one has a price, and pris-
ons should implement regula-
tions to reduce the possibility of
officers being corrupted.

“No guard should have a cell
phone. It is too much of a sweet
habit, worse than cocaine. Sell-
ing cell phones in prison can
turn some of the best. You
don’t want it to be something
they think of,” said Mr
Melamed.

“Everyone has the same
problems. The politicians only
get on the bandwagon when
something happens,” he said.

Dr Rahming said he suspect-
ed a cell phone jamming sys-
tem would also be “tremen-
dously relevant” to the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, recalling an incident
where a former prison officer

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called him while being detained
there.

He said the former employee
was detained by immigration
officials and scheduled for
deportation to Jamaica. He said
he got a call early in the morn-
ing from the former employee
asking for help. “I asked, how
are you calling me? She said
someone down here has a cell
phone”.

He said the incident revealed
the problem extended beyond
the prison into other security
agencies.

A cell phone jamming device
was purchased over four years
ago; however that device was
a military unit and knocked out
cell phones from Yamacraw to
Sea Breeze.

Despite attempts to recali-
brate the device, it had to be
discarded.

Dr Rahming said the prison
is trying to get “a more circuital
system to be contained within
the prison environment”.




ee Bee Biles
aR LL
sa AW icy
gute Da ECs
322-2197

Prison dept looks into cell
phone jamming technology








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Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
¢ Fax: 326-9953

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Funeral arrangements to follow.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

General’s remarks echo troubled Afghan war

WASHINGTON (AP) — The war in
Afghanistan appears in disarray.

The commanding general's disrespectful
remarks about President Barack Obama and
his team are the latest setback for a nine-
year war rocked by rising casualties, declining
public support, growing doubts among allies
and feuding between Washington and Kabul.

Whether he fires Gen. Stanley McChrystal
or lets him survive with a harsh scolding,
Obama opens himself to further political
attack as he struggles to keep his balance in
the midst of the nation's economic woes and
the environmental devastation from the Gulf
oil spill.

The Republican opposition will likely seize
on the McChrystal flap as evidence of Oba-
ma's weakness as commander in chief, even
though the party supports the president's
Afghan policy.

Liberal Democrats were already disen-
chanted with Obama for continuing to fight
the war against daunting odds and at huge
cost.

The White House would not say on Tues-
day if McChrystal will be fired, but declared
he had made an “enormous mistake" in the
unflattering Rolling Stone magazine article
and that "all options are on the table."

McChrystal's immediate boss, Defence
Secretary Robert Gates, called the com-
manding general's remarks a "distraction"
from the United States’ "singular focus” of
"fighting a war against al-Qaida and its
extremist allies, who directly threaten the
United States, Afghanistan, and our friends
and allies around the world."

McChrystal's troubles with Obama are
not new and began shortly after he was
named commander in May 2009. The gener-
al sent Gates a report that concluded the
Afghan mission required 40,000 more troops
or the United States faced mission failure.

The assessment was leaked and deeply
angered the White House that was in the
midst of a protracted study of how to prose-
cute the war. Some said McChrystal was bul-
lying the administration. In the end, Obama
agreed to send 30,000 additional troops, giv-
ing McChrystal nearly all the resources he
wanted.

McChrystal had already been called to
account once by Obama after the commander
publicly derided Vice President Joe Biden's
position that called for a small troop increase
with a heavy emphasis on counter-insurgency
efforts to win over the Afghan people.

Since then U.S. troop deaths in the war
crossed the 1,000 mark late last month. A
mission to take control of the city of Marja in
the south has not been the clear success
promised by the military. Rolling Stone said
McChrystal calls it a "bleeding ulcer."

And McChrystal seems to have sided with
Afghan President Hamid Karzai — who is
clearly on the outs with the administration —

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on how to conduct a long-promised offen-
sive on Kandahar, the biggest city in the
south and a Taliban stronghold. The Kan-
dahar operation is considered crucial to the
US. strategy to turn back the Taliban.

A statement from Karzai's office on Tues-
day defended McChrystal.

"The president believes that Gen.
McChrystal is the best commander that
NATO and coalition forces have had in
Afghanistan over the past nine years," the
statement said.

But that is likely to do McChrystal more
harm than good given the Karzai's falling
stock at the White House.

Obama's troubles in Afghanistan, as bad
as McChrystal public complaints have now
made them, do not stop with internal USS. dis-
putes.

The US. war effort, which has always been
tinged with the bad odour of America's
defeat in Vietnam, also has caused troubles
for Washington's allies in the fight.

On Monday, Britain marked the 300th
death among its Afghan forces, and new
Prime Minister David Cameron called that
"desperately bad news."

The same day, Britain's Foreign Office
confirmed that its outspoken special envoy to
Afghanistan and Pakistan had taken an
extended leave of absence after reports of
rifts with his U.S. colleagues in the region.

Sherard Cowper-Coles has long had a rep-
utation for frank talk and was once quoted as
saying the war in Afghanistan was doomed to
fail.

Canada, another key ally in the conflict,
removed its top military commander in
Afghanistan for allegedly having an inap-
propriate relationship with a female subor-
dinate. Canada is withdrawing all its forces
next year.

Poland's interim president said Tuesday he
will end his country's military mission in
Afghanistan in 2012, if he wins next month's
runoff election.

Bronislaw Komorowski said he would
start scaling back Poland's force of some
2,600 troops in 2011, and end the mission the
following year. That, he said, only echoes
Obama's promise to start bringing U.S.
troops home in July 2011.

The Netherlands will withdraw all its
forces on August 1.

McChrystal took command in Afghanistan
after Obama fired Gen. David McKiernan
13 months ago.

That was the first presidential dismissal of
a wartime general since President Harry Tru-
man ousted Gen. Douglas MacArthur during
the Korean War.

History may be repeating itself more
quickly this time.

(This article was written by Steven R. Hurst,
Associated Press Writer).



Bran McCartney —
a politician with
popular appeal

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There have been many
incidences these days that
has begun to distinguish the
difference between the
politicians who are hell bent
on keeping power in the
same families and genu-
flecting to special interest
groups instead of a new kind
of sensitive politician who is
genuine in, not only their
words, but their actions.
None in leadership these
days seem to remember the
people who are not con-
nected to anyone.

Since November of last
year much has happened
politically in both parties.
There were many interest-
ing “musical chairs” events.
People were shuffled
around. The PLP saw the re-
emergence of a stale politi-
cian who was chased off the
scene apparently from pres-
sure of his own party. The
deputy leader’s race was
hyped and lived up to the
hype.

The FNM also had their
share of drama, the much
anticipated chairman’s race
ended with mystery, drama
and political horse-trading
and manoeuvrings
unmatched. Then months
later there was a great
crescendo with the resigna-
tion from the Cabinet by the

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



Hon Branville McCartney.
There was no shortage of
speculations as to why and
why now, but as they say the
rest is history.

Since then, Mr McCart-
ney has been focusing on his
constituency. Doing what he
always has been doing and
that is serving. He has grad-
ually caught the attention of
many Bahamians who could
see clearly how sincere this
man really is. The children
know his goodness and the
precious pearls are singing
his praises. People in Bam-
boo Town could care less
about party colours; it is
Bran who lifts their spirits.

There is no politician in
history that can erase the
imaginary line of division
between parties.

He is being well sought
after as a public speaker
because most organisations
know that he possesses what
all of the potential leaders
in the PLP and FNM do not
have, and that’s popular
appeal. He has distinguished
himself from the likes of
Tommy Turnquest, who lost
the 2002 election in an
embarrassing way, and

Brave Davis who simply
does not matchup. So he has
more political currency than
all of the potential leaders
today.

His most recent address
to the Commencement Cer-
emony at Sojourner-Dou-
glass College showed that
he is encouraging us to be
educated, enabled and
empowered. This would
help us to be employers
rather than employees.

Mr McCartney is strong,
yet he captures the attention
of the children and the
seniors. He is compassion-
ate and will appreciate the
sensitive nature of things as
it relates to people’s feeling.
But he has already displayed
that he would make a tough
decision.

PLP more than anyone
else want Mr McCartney,
even though he is an FNM.
This speaks volumes.
Recently we have been hol-
lering a new kind of leader-
ship, to take this country in
another direction, now we
have a powerful candidate
that fits the bill. FNM had
better take note, because
they know what happened
when they chose a candidate
that had no popular appeal.

SEAN THOMPSON
Nassau,
June 18, 2010.

Drug prohibition and violence in Jamaica

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The violence in Jamaica
is because of drug prohibi-
tion, not in spite of it.

The US drug war has
done little other than to give
the land of the free the high-
est incarceration rate in the
world.

Zero tolerance hasn’t
deterred use, in fact the US
has higher rates of drug use
than European Union coun-
tries that have decrimi-
nalised.

Drug prohibition finances
organised crime at home
and terrorism abroad, which
is then used to justify
increased drug war spend-
ing.

It’s time to end this mad-
ness and instead treat all
substance abuse, legal or
otherwise, as the public
health problem it is.

Thanks to public educa-
tion efforts, tobacco use has
declined considerably in

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recent years. Apparently
mandatory minimum prison
sentences, civil asset forfei-
ture, random drug testing
and racial profiling are not
necessarily the most cost-
effective means of discour-
aging unhealthy choices.

United Nations drug stats:

http://www.unodc.org/

Comparative analysis of
US vs Dutch rates of drug
use:

http://www.drugwar-
facts.org/thenethe.htm

ROBERT SHARPE

Policy Analyst

Common Sense for Drug
Policy

www.csdp.org

PO Box 59181

Washington, DC 20012

USA

May 27, 2010.

Pm Ch TT

It doesn't appear so!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

free lunch after all!

KEN W
KNOWLES MD
Nassau,

June 13, 2010.



Re: House to vote on Chinese workers.
The Tribune June 11, 2010.

It was very kind of them when our Chinese friends gave us
the wonderful gift of a new stadium. However, it now seems
they may be expecting a little payback in the form of 5,000
Chinese workers being employed at the Baha Mar resort.
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 5



FNM expects ‘interesting
batch of new candidates’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Free National Move-
ment expects to be able to
offer “an interesting batch
of new candidates” to the
public in the next general
election, having had “a num-
ber of good, new” prospec-
tive MPs expressing interest
in running.

According to FNM chair-
man Carl Bethel, MP for
Seabreeze, the party has not
yet begun its formal selec-
tion process but this has not
stopped people from putting
themselves forward as
potential candidates.

“It’s not under way yet.
Some persons may have
indicated an interest but the
Candidates Committee has
not yet met,” said Mr
Bethel.

“We’ve had a number of

FNM chairman Carl Bethel

good new prospective can-
didates offering themselves.
We’re sure the party will
certainly have an interesting
batch of new candidates.”
Asked whether he expects
most or all of the party’s cur-
rent incumbents MPs to run
again in the next general
election, Mr Bethel said he
“sees no reason why an





incumbent would not wish
to stay on” adding that from
among the seats currently
held by PLP MPs, there will
be “enough vacancies to
take on all new comers” in
the FNM’s slate of candi-
dates.

However, he added that
“not all would want to stay
on merely because they’re

an incumbent.”

“We'll see,” said Mr
Bethel, who noted that when
the party decides to
announce its candidates is
down to its leadership. The
FNM currently holds 24 Of
the 41 seats in the House of
Assembly. The PLP holds
17.

It is not yet clear when the
general election will be held,
although it must be called
no later than May 2012. This
is at the discretion of the
prime minister.

In contrast to the relative-
ly late announcement of can-
didates by the PLP prior to
the 2007 general election,
the opposition party has
already announced six can-
didates for the next general
election. These are: Kendal
Major (Garden Hills), Sena-
tor Hope Strachan
(Seabreeze), Senator
Michael Halkitis (Golden

Load shedding and heavy rain
may be affecting traffic signals

NEKO GRANT





SEVERAL traffic lights in New Providence
have been affected by the load shedding
being conducted by the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Ministry of Works permanent
secretary Colin Higgs said.

Minister of Works Neko Grant confirmed
that this and the heavy rain are the most like-
ly explanations of why traffic signals have
been failing in several areas of the island
over the past few days.

Mr Grant explained that power surges
cause the lights to automatically switch to
“flash mode” to guard against being dam-
aged.

He said he was not aware of any systemic

lights.

problems and believed the authorities “have
been doing a fairly good job” at managing the

Mr Grant advised members of the public to

call the ministry’s hotline, 302-9700, to report

any downed lights.

A team of private contractors from High
Power and Campbell’s Electric has been
assembled to maintain the lights and bring

any which malfunction back online.

Mr Higgs said whenever a report is made
through the hotline, or on the ministry’s web-
site, it is forwarded to a mobile team.

He said the length of time needed to fix a

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Isles), Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald (Marathon), Sen-
ator Dr Michael Darville
and Gregory Moss

PLP Chairman Bradley
Roberts says the party
intends to announce another
five next month.

“We are committed to
putting candidates out in the

field early,” said Mr
Roberts.
The party’s website,

myplp.com, has an election
countdown ticker which yes-
terday said there are 679
days until the next general
election. This would suggest
the party expects it to be
called around May 2012,
although with only the prime
minister able to make this
determination, it is as yet
unknown if Bahamians will
go to the polls at an earlier
date.

MOLT

mC
Tiel

A WOMAN was robbed



: of her jewellery while walk-
: ing in the busy Palmdale dis-
: trict in broad daylight on

: Monday.

Police were told that the

: victim was walking along

? Collins Avenue at around

: 4pm when she was

: approached by three men —
: one of whom was armed

: with a handgun.

After demanding her jew-

: ellery, the culprits ran off on
: foot.

Two teenage boys aged 16

: and 19 years old are report-
: edly assisting police with
: their investigation.

TOURISTS ARRESTED

A COUPLE from New

: Mexico were arrested at the
: Lynden Pindling Interna-

: tional Airport after a small

: quantity of a substance sus-
; pected to be marijuana was

; found.

The arrests were made at

? around 5pm on Monday,

: after Drug Enforcement

: Unit officers, acting on a tip,
: searched a 55-year-old man
: and a 48-year-old woman.

Investigations continue.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Cuban dissident found guilty, then freed

HAVANA black-market building materials and then :
ordered released. He is supposed to serve :
the roughly four months remaining on his 15- :
month sentence at the couple's Havana home. :

"I think what happened inside was the fair :
outcome. It's what we've waited for since the :
beginning,” Jorge told reporters outside the :
courthouse in the Cuban capital's 10 de :
Octubre district. "We only wanted to repair :
our home." :

Ferrer was taken to a police station for :



A CUBAN court found prominent opposi-
tion leader Darsy Ferrer guilty of purchasing
black-market cement Tuesday, but he was
released on time served since it took nearly a
year for his case to go to trial, according to
Associated Press.

Human rights officials say Ferrer was
arrested for a common crime that officials
usually overlook — or punish with a simple
fine — in an attempt to silence his criticism of processing then driven home, saying: "I'm ;
the government. going to enjoy this with my friends and fam- :

Ferrer's trial was closed to the media and ily." :
most of the public, but his wife, Yusnaimy From his Havana home, Ferrer said he was :
Jorge Soca, said he was found guilty of buying _—_not giving up his activism for political change. :

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PERMANENT SECRETARY in the Ministry of National Security Ms A Missouri Sherman-Peter
(centre) outlines the course of action of the United Nations Firearm Destruction and Stockpile
Management Assessment Mission to the Bahamas which opened on Monday. Also pictured (from
left) are: Marvin Dames, Commissioner of Police (Acting), and Raymond Gibson of the Ministry

of National Security.

Key UN small arms and
light weapons mission
opens in New Providence

SENIOR law enforce-
ment officials from six
agencies are participating
in a workshop aimed at
addressing ways to reduce
the number of illegal small
arms and light weapons
being used to commit vio-
lent crimes in the Bahamas.

The discussions will also
address firearm destruction
and stockpile management
assessment.

Officials from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, the Department of
Immigration, the Depart-
ment of Customs, Her
Majesty’s Prisons and the
Airport Authority are par-
ticipating in the workshop,
which officials say should
serve to assist law enforce-
ment efforts to decrease
the number of illegal
firearms in circulation,
while reducing the inci-
dences of armed violence.

Crimes

National security and law
enforcement officials con-
tend that a proliferation of
small arms and light
weapons trafficking and
the use of these weapons
in the perpetration of vio-
lent crimes —- including
murder, armed robbery
and burglary — are “a most
serious threat to national
and regional security.”

“While the Bahamas has

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the strictest gun laws, the
availability of illegal small
arms also contributes to
the perpetration of violent
crime in our country,” Per-
manent Secretary in the
Ministry of National Secu-
rity Ms Missouri Sherman-
Peter said.

Ms Sherman-Peter said
regional statistics show that
“upwards of 70 per cent of
all homicides committed in
the Caribbean are commit-
ted using illegal firearms.”

She said the elimination
of small arms trafficking
and the related challenges
are matters that are high
on the agenda of the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas
and other Caribbean Com-
munity countries.

Both matters have been
placed on the agenda of
the CARICOM Imple-
mentation Agency for
Crime and Security, which
was established at the 27th
Meeting of the Conference
of Heads of Government
of CARICOM in July,
2006.

The Agency is headed by
an executive director and
reports to the CARICOM
Council of Ministers
responsible for national
security and law enforce-
ment.

“We regard a compre-
hensive approach as critical
to promoting public secu-
rity and transparency in
this area, and to reduce —
to the fullest extent — the
diversion of small arms and
light weapons to criminal
networks,” Ms Sherman-
Peter said.

“This assessment mission
will contribute to our ini-
tiatives to ensure that our
stockpile management
policies and procedures are
comprehensive and effec-
tive, including our periodic
destruction of confiscated

and surplus weapons.”

Ms Sherman-Peter said
national security officials
expect the assessment mis-
sion will “inform our
national policy on firearms
destruction and stockpiles
management.”

“This mission under-
scores two important mat-
ters in particular. The first
is the key role that the
United Nations Pro-
gramme of Action to Pre-
vent, Combat and Eradi-
cate the Illicit Trade in
Small Arms and Light
Weapons in All its
Aspects, can play in this
area of critical concern for
governments,” Ms Sher-
man-Peter said.

Standards

“The second matter this
mission underscores is that
it is open to the countries
of our region to gain from
the review of international
standards, including the
United Nations Pro-
gramme of Action, the
CIFTA Convention and
the Palermo Proposal.

“We stand to gain from
the insights, exchange of
information and ideas and
best practices in these
areas the UN-LiRec
experts will share with us
in reviewing our own sys-
tems for firearms destruc-
tion and stockpile manage-
ment,” Ms Sherman-Peter
added.

UN-LiRec is the United
Nations Regional Centre
for Peace and Disarma-
ment and Development in
Latin America and the
Caribbean.

“We view this mission as
an important step in the
Bahamas’ co-operative
partnership with UN-
LiRec,” Ms Sherman-Peter
added.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Rae

nie anaiad wait OXI Saal} PHILOSOPHER







LEG-WAS Y
BETTER

MUG,







Govt seeking Bahamian
leaders of tomorrow

THE government has
launched an ambitious pro-
gramme to identify and sup-
port the development of the
Bahamian leaders of the
future.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles Maynard
told the first group of co-ordi-
nators for the National High
School Leaders Programme
that the government expects
their work to be instrumental
in the cultivating the country’s
next generation of trailblaz-
ers.

“We are expecting that
coming out of this, that this
programme will start to bear
the fruit and that our young
people throughout the islands
will get this early exposure to
the kind of influence that will
cause them to become the
leaders in the country that we
all would want them to be,”
Mr Maynard said at a press
conference on June 18.

“Tt is a programme designed
to serve as a training mecha-
nism in leadership and pro-
fessional development for
youths who lead their peers, to
provide an avenue for stu-
dents leaders to develop their
social skills and networking
capabilities, to assist student
leaders in the development of
a strong personal brand that
will allow them to stand out
in their leadership roles,” he
said.

Assistant Youth Officer at
the ministry John Darville
explained that the National
High School Leaders Pro-
gramme aims to become a
nation-wide effort to develop
young leaders in Bahamian
high schools, and the govern-
ment has provided resources
to this end on eight pilot
islands.

The co-ordinators, who
received training this week,
hail from Andros, Grand
Bahama, Long Island,
Eleuthera, Exuma, Abaco,
Cat Island and Bimini.

Mr Darville encouraged the
principals of schools on those
islands to prepare their stu-
dents and staff to participate
in the programme, as the co-
ordinators will begin as soon
as they return.

“These persons, who in
some cases are educators
themselves, will not just be
responsible for co-ordinating
this programme for their
school; but they will be
responsible, on behalf of the
ministry, to co-ordinate the
programme for all schools in
that specific jurisdiction,” Mr
Darville said.

Programme aims to identify and
support next generation of trailblazers

“We encourage you to
please note that these persons
will be certified.

“They will be equipped and
ready to co-ordinate holistic
activities that will enhance the
development of the leadership
brand of the students they will
be entrusted with in the

incoming year.

Mr Maynard added: “These
persons will serve as the first
co-ordinators of this national
programme and I am happy
to say that, as a pilot in the
first year, if we are successful,
we expect to expand it
through the whole country.”

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Co-operative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)
The 24" Annual General Meeting
Originally Scheduled For

Wednesday, June 23, 2010
HAS BEEN POSTPONED

And Will Now Be Held At 6:30 PM
On Wednesday, July 7, 2010

At The British Colonial Hilton
#1 Bay Street

For The Following Purposes

>» To receive the Report of the Board of Direchors for 2009

» To receive the Audiled Accounts for 2009

* To take action on such matiers es may come before the meeting
* To elec members of The Board of Directors, Supervisory

Commitige & Credit Committee

THERE WILL BE NO SECOND CALL MEETING AS PER THE
CO-OPERATIVE ACT 2005 SECTION 22

Board Secretary
June 2010



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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Rotarians take on world's major challenges

By LARRY SMITH

MONTREAL, Canada —
This week I attended one of
the world's greatest gather-
ings of downright decent,
mostly middle-aged, and
thoroughly middle class folks.

It was a tough call for an
old cynic like me. To borrow
a quote, I usually lump orga-
nized religion, organized
labour, and service clubs
together. But Rotarians do
get points for having the
most entertaining meetings.

More than 18,000 of them
from around the world
clogged the streets of Mon-
treal for their annual inter-
national conference this
week. Everywhere you
turned there were earnest
Africans, Asians, Latinos,
North Americans and Euro-
peans flashing their logo
shirts, badges, pins, flags and
business cards.

This was a major event by
any standard, and is reck-
oned to have pumped some
$28 million into Montreal's
economy. It was so big they
had to have a mini-conven-
tion for first-time convention
goers. And after that, you
were eligible to join the
International Fellowship of

Convention-goers, one of
scores of networking groups
for like-minded Rotarians.

There are fellowships for
bird watchers, pilots, yachts-
men, golfers, environmental-
ists, internet users, skiers,
gourmets, quilters, singles
and even Esperanto speak-
ers (in case you were won-
dering, there are only about
100 in that particular fellow-
ship.) Esperanto was a 19th
century attempt to create a
politically neutral world lan-
guage.

Many of these groups
enable Rotarians to use their
hobbies or skills to help oth-
ers. For example, the Fel-
lowship of Canoeing Rotari-
ans has organized cleanups
of polluted rivers. In fact,
that tells you a lot about this
huge service organisation.
Just puree business, pleasure
and philanthropy together in
a blender — and out pops a
Rotarian working on a pro-
ject somewhere.

WTILITIES FEGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

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June 23, 2010

Time: 6-8 om
Venue: Sheraton Nassau Beach

Resort Convention Centre

NB alisi=si(=18 6 ele ail=i

qre

‘ome to attend.
TO CONFIRM YOUR
ATTENDANCE PLEASE

email info@urcabahamas.bs.



There are some 500
Bahamian Rotarians in 13
clubs on New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco,
Eleuthera and Cat Island.
And a few of them were at
the Montreal conference —
including Lindsey Cancino of
Bahamas Realty, Felix
Stubbs of IBM and Barry
Rassin of Doctors Hospital.
All three are big Rotary
cheeses.

Members of the fellowship
groups stood guard at booths
in the Great Hall of Friend-
ship, a huge meeting space
in Montreal's Palais des Con-
gres, where many of the
smaller conference events
took place. Here you could
order suits custom-tailored
in Hong Kong, buy foot mas-
sagers and books about
Rotary, and talk to some of
the folks involved in dozens
of humanitarian projects
around the world.

Like Prince Abraham
Appiah-Fei of the Kumasi-
East Rotary Club in Ghana,
for example. He was on hand
with his Canadian partners
from the Rotary Club of
Cornwall Sunrise to promote
the Sustainable Villages Pro-
gramme. Appiah-Fei grew up
on a cocoa farm and studied
electrical engineering in
Canada before becoming
administrator of this rural
communities project near his
hometown.

Supplies

"We are bringing basic
sanitation to these villages,”
he told me enthusiastically.
"They don't even have run-
ning water and it helps to
stop them from moving to
overcrowded cities like
Kumasi, which has 2.5 mil-
lion people. We also focus on
reducing infant mortality as
well as providing school sup-
plies."

Building wells, giving
scholarships, or supporting
local charities at cookouts
and fairs is the more mun-
dane level of Rotary. But at
the other end of the scale are
such global programmes as
the multi-billion-dollar cam-
paign to eradicate polio. This
might seem like a ho-hum
goal to us, who have only dis-
tant memories of what polio
was like. But this incurable
yet easily prevented disease

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

still cripples children in
developing countries.

In 1980 smallpox was
eradicated after a 10-
year global effort,
and polio was next
on the list. There
were 350,000 cas-
es a year when the
programme was
launched in the
1980s, with the last
holdouts today in
Central Asia and
Africa. According
to Dr Bruce Ayl-
ward, who is in charge
of the World Health
Organisation effort, "If
we do not end polio now,
another 20 million children
will be permanently paral-
ysed by Rotary's next cente-
nary in 2105."

Over the past 25 years the
1.2 million Rotarians around
the world have contributed
hundreds of millions of dol-
lars to polio eradication, as
well as tens of thousands of
volunteer-hours. Lindsey
Cancino says the 13 Bahami-
an clubs have raised more
than $25,000 for the effort.
It means a lot, because in
1985, one child was being
crippled by polio every two
minutes.

Despite setbacks, the inci-
dence of the disease has fall-
en by more than 90 per cent
and Aylward is convinced it
will be wiped out early in this
decade. "You have funda-
mentally changed the game,”
he told thousands of cheering
Rotarians at Montreal's Bell
Centre hockey stadium on
Tuesday. "Rotary is now
reaching more children than
ever before for less than 25
cents each. And eradicating
polio will deliver tens of mil-
lions of net dolars to the
poorest countries. Rotarians
have inspired the world as
the heart and soul of the
largest global health effort in
history."

With the war on polio
about to be won, what's next
on the list for Rotary?

Well, Nobel Peace Prize
nominee Greg Mortenson
was a keynote speaker at the
convention on Monday.
Mortenson is co-founder of
the nonprofit Central Asia
Institute, founder of Pennies
For Peace, and author of two
bestselling books: Three Cups
of Tea and Stones into
Schools on promoting peace
through education.

For the past 15 years he
has been working in Pakistan
and Afghanistan to educate
the illiterate, especially
women and girls. Only a few
years ago, less than 800,000
children went to school in











Afghanistan,
and hardly any were girls.
Today, there are 9 million
schoolchildren there, and 2.8
million are girls.

"We could use the polio
campaign as a model to erad-
icate illiteracy in a decade
just by raising pennies,"
Mortenson urged Rotarians.
"While a penny is virtually
worthless, in poor countries it
buys a pencil and opens the
door to literacy."

Literacy

In fact, Rotary already
supports a variety of litera-
cy projects in local commu-
nities. For example, the
Bahamian clubs established
Project Read, which teaches
adults how to read. It's esti-
mated that a quarter of the
world’s population is func-
tionally illiterate, and in
many developing countries
women are unable to learn
to read and write.

Calling young women the
single biggest potential
agents of change in the devel-
oping world, Mortenson said
the bad news was that the
Taliban shut thousands of
schools, to stop girls getting
an education. "Their great-
est fear is the pen, not the
bullet. They realise that if
you educate a girl, you edu-
cate a community. The good
news is that lately
Afghanistan has seen the
greatest increase in school
enrolment for girls in mod-
ern history."

The prospect for peace
and security in the 21st cen-
tury was the theme of a
keynote speech on Tuesday
by Queen Noor of Jordan.
An Arab-American who is
the widow of King Hussein,
Queen Noor co-founded the
Global Zero movement, a
coalition of political, busi-
ness, military, faith and civic
leaders working for the elim-

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18

SAUNDERS BEACH (West Bay St.)

Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

ination of nuclear weapons.

She called on Rotarians to
support what she con-
sidered to be the
world's two greatest
challenges — envi-
ronmental degrada-
tion and nuclear

proliferation.

"We are
already feeling the
effects of climate
change in the Mid-
dle East," she said.
"Migration caused
by desertification has
fueled the conflict in
Sudan, for example.
Environmental issues need
to be on a par with other
global macro issues because
what could be more of a pri-
ority than human survival on
our planet? We need to tran-
sition to a green economy
and we need a coalition to
act as a foundation for urgent

international action."

She said some 40 countries
had the ability to produce
nuclear weapons and it was
critical to prevent such
weapons from getting into
the hands of terrorists. She
urged American Rotarians to
support Congressional ratifi-
cation of the Strategic Arms
Limitation Treaty. "There is
no challenge that coalitions
of concerned global citizens
cannot surmount, and Rotary
has pioneered such
alliances."

Frankly, it's a little hard
to believe that Rotary began
in 1905 when four lonely guys
got together to make new
friends in the big windy city
of Chicago. One of the first
names proposed for the new
organisation was "Food,
Friends, and Fun", and it was
expected that members
would "let their hair down,
engage in horseplay, call one
another by first names and
in general have a grand
time."

And that's just what they
do at their weekly luncheons
around the world. But the
organisation has also taken
on amore purposeful air, by
leveraging the not insignifi-
cant skills, resources and
energy of elite professionals
and business people to
advance worthwhile causes.
Yes, they may be boy scouts
in long pants, as Sinclair
Lewis once disparagingly
wrote, but what boy scout
ever gets the chance to erad-
icate a killer disease?

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

WC
Co

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES 8.4 would like to inform the motoring public that Saunders Beach (West
Bay 30) pads will be closed bo the motonne public effective Wednesday June 23, 2010 between the bourse of Tpm to 12pm.

Asphalt paving will be carried out during this. time and we kindly ask that ALL motorist travelling along this rowie make the following

diversions to their destination:

"Motorist travelling enst along Saunders Beach showkd divert onto GROVE AVE. and folkew the signs posted "DIVERSION" through
DOLPHIN DR, JFK DR, FARRINGTON RD, EDEN ST, POSTER ST, NORTH DUNMORE AVE, CHIFPINGHAM ED and

cominue along West Ray Street to their destination.

*Mintorist travelling west towards Saunders Reach should fallowing the signe posted "DIVERSION" through CHIFPINGHAM RD,
SORTH DUNMORE AVE, POSTER AWE, EDEN ST, FARRINGTON RD, JFK DR. DOLPHIN LINK DRAGROVE AVE

and comtinwe along Weel Hay street.

Detours will be clearly marked te allow the safe passage for pedestrians & motorist and proper signage will be erected delineating

the work zone.

Your poticnce Minanghout this project is pready appreciated and we de apelegice for Me inconvenience & delays coursed.



















For further inhormation please contact 3

Jose Cartellone Constrocciones Civiles S.A
(Tice Hers: Mon-Fri Bele ae dae fod orn

CMTices( 242) 322-04 S22- Dall)

Fanuc: bahaoasnekph bore cartel ene. com. a

‘The Project Execothon Uni
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotlines (242) 12-7 70Hb

Email: pulviicworksithahamuas.giv les

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THE TRIBUNE

spor

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23,

PAGE 9





ts

2010

PAGE 10 e Junior CAC track team members...










France, SAfrica
eliminated,
Argentina

advances...
See page 10

Swimmers get bronze medals

Women’s 4 x 1 medley relay team in ‘07 PanAm Games awarded

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



Ibeit three years later, the
team of Alana Dillette,
Alica Lightbourne, Ari-
ana Vanderpool-Wallace
and journalist Nikia Deveaux had a
night to celebrate as bronze medal-
lists in the 2007 Pan American Games.

The quartet were last night pre-
sented with the medals by Governor
General Arthur Foulkes at Govern-
ment House after they were elevated
from fourth to third place in the wom-
en’s 4x 100m medley relay.

The race took place at the Maria
Lenk Aquatic Park in Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, on July 22, 2007, but due to the
disqualification of the third place
Brazilian team last year as a result of
the positive doping testing of Rebeca
Gusmao, the Bahamians finally got
the medals.

The Bahamas clocked four minutes
and 18.97 seconds to now sit in third
place on the games website behind
gold medallists United States (4: 4.60)
and silver medallists Canada (4:07.85).

Dillette, one of two swimmers
speaking on behalf of their teammates,
said it was a gratifying feeling for all of
them because “their years and months
of hard work has finally paid off.”

The Auburn University senior
thanked the Bahamas Government,
the Bahamas Olympic Committee, the
Bahamas Swimming Federation and
their parents and family for their
tremendous support of their accom-
plishments to enable them to be where
they are today.

She also thanked the Royal Bank
of Canada, whose managing director





cll

a Li F om

ALL SMILES (I-r) are Alana Dillette, Alica Lightbourne, Ariana Vanderpool-Wallace and Nikia

Deveaux...

Tanya McCartney presented with the
Leo Award, the highest award pre-
sented by the bank, for their continued
commitment and sponsorship of the
BSF.

Then she turned to her teammates
and said without their “support and
dedication,” none of them would have
been in the position that they were in.

Deveaux, now retired and working
as a journalist at Jones Communica-
tions, echoed the sentiments of Dil-
lette and even went a bit further in
thanking the coaches for “taking four
girls from the island and making us
the Pan American Games bronze
medallists.”

Although they have specialized in
different events, Deveaux said over
the years, all four girls have been
“rivals,” but most importantly, they
have been “friends.”

In fact, she said they have been able
to develop such a bond that sometimes
they think they are actually sisters, but
when reality sets in, they realize that

Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

they “aren’t.”

Asking and answering the question
as to what has been their success,
Deveaux said it has been a combina-
tion of all of the attributes she men-
tioned.

With some many younger swim-
mers, including Ariel Weech, who
swum with Deveaux, Vanderpool-Wal-
lace and Dillette at the Central Amer-
ican and Caribbean Games in 2006
when they won a gold, Deveaux
advised them never to “give up on
their goals and their dreams because
it’s moments, friends and teammates
like these that make it all worthwhile.”

The medal presentation followed
the presentation to retired track queen
Pauline Davis-Thompson two weeks
ago when she got the gold for the
200m at the 2000 Olympic Games in
Sydney, Australia, after American
Marion Jones was disqualified for test-
ing positive for steroids.

BOC president Wellington Miller
said after it was proven that the Brazil-

ians were disqualified, they immedi-
ately sprung into action to pursue the
medal. “The wheels of justice some-
times turns slowly, but we continued to
push those wheels and now, your
medals are here tonight,” Miller said.
“This is just the latest of several
Bahamian medals that have now right-
fully come home.”

Miller warned all nations that “once
it has been discovered and proven that
your athletes have defrauded Bahami-
an athletes out of any medal, we don’t
care about your military might, we’re
coming to get our medal.

“We don’t care what your position is
with NATO, we’re coming to get our



medal. We don’t care what your posi-
tion is in the G8 or the G20 nations,
we’re coming to our get medal.”

Minister of Education Desmond
Bannister, who was acting as the Min-
ister of Sport for Charles Maynard,
who was attending the FIFA World
Cup with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, said he’s so pleased to see
the relay bronze medal in the Bahamas
where it belongs.

“It’s been an exciting journey. Our
country is pleased with your progress
and the progress of your sport in the
international scene,” said Bannister,

SEE NEXT page

Motors Magnum enters 64th NBA Draft

ITXX Caribbean Island Swimming
Championships June 28 to July 2

THE Bahamas Swimming Federation (BSF) will be sending a 27-
member team to the ITXX Caribbean Island Swimming Champi-
onships in Havana, Cuba.

The event is to be held at the Pan American Water Sports
Complex June 28 to July 2. Albert Bell is the head coach, John
Bradley and Dr Susana Campbell are team managers and Laura
Williams the team chaperone.

The team is scheduled to depart the day after the 39th RBC
Nationals and the swimmers are looking to swim best times and
bring home records and medals.

“This team is a strong team that has a lot of experience and
should do well at representing the Bahamas,” according to a press
release. “There are several relay teams that should do very well and
hopefully the RBC Nationals will be a great warm up competition
for CISC.”

The team includes the following swimmers:

Female

11-12 — Simone Sturrup and Leslie Campbell

13-14 — Gabrielle Greene, Laura Morley, Berchadette Moss,
Taryn Smith, Ashley Butler and Bria Deveaux

18 & over — Jenna Chaplin, Alicia Lightbourne, Ariel Weech and
Teisha Lightbourne

Male

11-12 — Dionisio Carey, Farion Cooper, Zach Moses

13-14 — Zarian Cleare, Peter Farquharson, Dustin Tynes, Evante
Gibson, Matthew Lowe, Toby McCarroll, Armando Moss and
Mancer Roberts

18 & over — Vereance Burrows, Inoa Charlton, Michael McIn-
tosh, Chadeau Wilson

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

NOT since the 1978 National
Basketball Association (NBA)
Draft has a native Bahamian
been selected among the list of
amateur hopefuls looking to
join the ranks of the world’s
most elite basketball league.
But on Thursday night, one
Grand Bahamian looks to
make history.

After a stellar collegiate
career spanning four years and
a pair of top tier NCAA Divi-
sion I institutions, Magnum
Rolle has entered his name into
the 64th edition of the NBA
Draft.

Scheduled for 7pm Thursday
(June 24) at the world famous
Madison Square Garden Arena
in New York City, New York,
Rolle hopes to hear his name
called as a selection by one of
the 30 NBA franchises.

Rolle, the 6°11” 225-pound
forward/center, has been pro-
jected by several scouting ser-
vices, including ESPN.com,
www.nbadraft.net and
www.draftexpress.com as a pos-





MAGNUM ROLLE

sible mid-to-late second round
pick.

Rolle has been invited to sev-
en workouts over the course of
the evaluation period since the
NCAA season ended.

The senior out of Louisiana
Tech University has gone
through workouts with the
Washington Wizards, Phoenix
Suns, Milwaukee Bucks, Char-

lotte Bobcats and most recent-
ly, the Indiana Pacers.

Rolle declared for the 2009
NBA draft as an early entrant
following his junior season
when he averaged 12.2 points
and 7.2 rebounds per game. He
rescinded the entry, and with-
out hiring an agent, was eligible
to return for his senior season
when he averaged 13.9 points to
finish second on the team in
scoring and first with 8.4
rebounds per game.

Rolle starred on the Grand
Bahama high school basketball
scene before relocating to the
Laurinburg Institute in North
Carolina. After a standout high
school senior season, Rolle was
signed by SEC powerhouse
Louisiana State University.

At LSU, Rolle was a part of
an historic Tigers team in the
2005-06 season which advanced
all the way to the NCAA
Championship game before
they fell to the UCLA Bruins.

Rolle averaged 2.2 points and
2.5 rebounds per game and
appeared in 33 of the 36 games
for the eventual runners- up on
a team which featured future
NBA standouts Glen “Big

Baby” Davis
Thomas.

With a depleted roster fol-
lowing the loss of its major
superstars, Rolle returned to
average 4 points and 4.1
rebounds per game with 31
blocks during his sophomore
season.

Rolle transferred the follow-
ing season and transferred to
Louisiana Tech where he
became one of the top front-
court players in the WAC Con-
ference. He became a two time
all-WAC Defensive team play-
er and was named to the Lefty
Driesell All-America Defen-
sive Team.

Rolle looks to become the
first native Bahamian since
Mychal Thompson to be draft-
ed into the NBA since the Port-
land Trailblazers took him with
the first overall selection in
1978.

Dexter Cambridge and Jan
Lockhart were the others to
advance to the league, however
they were acquired by their
teams through free agency.
Rolle could not be reached for
comment up to press time last
night.

and Tyrus

Talented Mr Bullard Jr is Ridley College standout

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



GENO Bullard Jr, arguably one of
the most versatile high school athletes,
is proving just how talented he is at
Ridley College in St Catherine,
Ontario, Canada.

Last year, Bullard Jr’s father, Geno
Sr, sent him off to Canada instead of
letting his son complete his final two
years at Westminster College.

In just one year, Bullard Jr has made
a tremendous impact at the indepen-
dent co-educational institution for
boarding and day students from grade
five through to university (entrance).

“The year started with soccer, then
it was basketball and I ended it with
track and field,” said Bullard Jr, who
managed to star on all three varsity
teams.

Although he was just a freshman,
Bullard Jr said he was able to make the
necessary adjustments and fit right into
the system.

While soccer wasn’t as high profiled,
Bullard Jr said it was good for him to
get his feet wet at the school. Once he
did, he said he went on to really excel
in basketball.

Bullard Jr said he was able to take
Ridley College all the way to the State

Championships where he had an aver-
age of 18.3 points per game, 11 assists
and five rebounds per game.

Ridley College finished with a 31-2
win-loss record during the season, but
in total, Bullard Jr ended up playing at
least 60 games, counting the various
tournaments they played in.

The 17-year-old also went on to play
with the St Catherines Rebels AAU
team that travelled throughout Cana-
da where they finished fourth in the
Nationals, losing by one point to get to
the finals.

Before his basketball season was
done, Bullard Jr ended up winning
quite a number of individual awards,
including the Standard Tournament
All-Tournament, All-Star and Most
Improved Player for Ridley College.

Bullard Jr was also considered for
the MVP honour at Ridley College,
but during the awards presentation, it
was given to one of the senior players
as a graduation gift.

However, he was awarded a plaque
that was presented in honour of a
Bahamian who helped out Ridley Col-
lege as the ‘Rookie of the Year.’

In track and field, Bullard Jr was
just as impressive. He managed to
break a Ridley College long jump
record with a leap of 6.9 metres or 22-
feet, 73/4-inches, surpassing the pre-











GENO BULLARD JR with some of the
awards he received during his first year
at Ridley College in Canada...

Photo by Tim Clarke

vious mark of 6.61 (21-8 1/4).

But he also went on to the private
schools championships and produced
another record of 6.89 (22-71/2) at the
public schools nationals. He eventu-
ally turned in a personal best of 7.21
(23-8).

“It was a different aspect because
you are in a different style of play from
the Bahamas,” Bullard Jr said. “At
home, you are just running and gun-
ning, but over there, you have to run a
lot more set plays.

“Everything was good because I got
a chance to play with players of dif-
ferent height. We had a seven footer
on our team and we had guys who
were coming right at you. You had to
play every game.”

When he first arrived, Bullard Jr
admitted that it wasn’t what he had
expected, but once he got into the sys-
tem, he was able to improve his game.

“My school work was also good,”
said Bullard, who passed a CPR course
in his major studies. “We also did
courses like cadets, which allowed me
to go anywhere like the Defence Force
and perform.”

Bullard Sr, who coached his son to
the junior boys championship at West-
minster before he transferred him to
Canada, said there were a lot of critics,
who didn’t feel that it was the best

move for him.

“He improved tremendously and
that was the reason for me sending
him to this school and this environ-
ment,” Bullard Sr said. “I wanted to
make sure that he had the total bal-
ance with education and sports.

“The school has made sure that his
education came first and he remained
on the top of his game. His athletics
only complemented his academics. So
I’m trying to prepare him for the next
level, which is to get into a good col-
lege.”

Already, Bullard Sr said there are
colleges and universities knocking on
his door trying to recruit his son, but he
said he’s not interested just yet because
he still has a lot more to achieve.

“T have no regrets. I think his per-
formance will open the door for many
other Bahamians to follow,” Bullard Sr
said.

“We’re looking at trying to get some
more students at Ridley College in
August. When he has started will only
help those who follow him as they all
seek a rich athletic background.”

Bullard Jr was home in time to cel-
ebrate Father’s Day with his dad. He
hopes to continue to participate in his
No Bull Basketball Programme this
summer before he and others head to
Canada at the end of the summer.

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



BLTA hosts ‘Double The Love Tennis Tournament’

58 to represent
Bahamas at the
Junior CAC track
championships

A 58-member team, the
largest ever selected, has been
named to represent the
Bahamas at the Junior Central
American and Caribbean Track
& Field Championships in San-
to Domingo, Dominican
Republic, July 2-4.

“This is the largest team ever
selected by the BAAA to com-
pete at the Jr CAC. The major-
ity of the members are athletes
who represented the Bahamas
at the recent 2010 Carifta
Games team which placed
third, doubled their gold medal







WINNERS (I-r) are Jonathon Taylor, Dr Moxey and Cameron Newry...

Thompson...



RUNNERS-UP (I-r) are Ricardo Demeritte, Dr Moxey and Danielle

THE Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association (BLTA) hosted
‘Double The Love Tennis
Tournament’ at the National
Tennis Center in Oakes Field.

The fun, family event was to
raise funds for junior tennis
development in the Bahamas
and a way to bring the tennis
community closer together.

Spearheaded by Dr Ellen
Moxey, second vice president,
and a committee of hardwork-
ing volunteers, the event was a
huge success and was won by
the doubles team of Jonathon
Taylor and Cameron Newry
over Danielle Thompson and
Ricardo Demeritte 9-7.



count and produced a number
of outstanding performances,”
according to a press release.

Over 32 countries, including
Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago,
Mexico, and Puerto Rico, will
be represented.

“All the athletes were
required to achieve the CAC
qualifying standards. The team
comprises athletes from New
Providence, Grand Bahama,
Eleuthera and Moore’s Island.

TEAM MEMBERS

Under 17 Girls — Shaunae
Miller, Dannielle Gibson, Mar-
var Etienne, Gregeria Higgs,
Devynne Charlton, Talia
Thompson, Ruddesha Stra-
chan, Rachante Colebrook

Under 20 Women -—-
V'Alonee Robinson, Rashan
Brown, Anthonique Strachan,
Deshan Burnside, Hughnique
Rolle, Ivanique Kemp, Devinn
Cartwright, Kenya Culmer,
Racquel Williams, Julianna
Duncanson, Tynia Gaither,
Katrina Seymour, Amara Jones

Under 17 Boys — Anthony
Farrington Jr, Julian Munroe,
Stephen Newbold, Andre
Wells, Andre Colebrook, Ash-
ley Riley, Terran Adderley,
Kirk Lewis, Lathone Minns,
Lathario Minns, Gerrio Rah-
ming, Anthony Adderley,
James Cash, Delano Davis,
Michael Lockhart, Teray Smith,
Charles Sealy, Khyle Higgs

Under 20 Boys — Trevorvano
Mackey, Warren Fraser, Laron
Heild, Cerio Rolle, James Aud-
ley Carey, Aaron Wilmore,
Nejmi Burnside, Raymond Hig-
gs, Troy Bullard, Terrane
Roker, Douglas Palicious,
Elvardo Carey, Tre Adderley,
Alfred Higgs, Delano Deveaux,
Earl Rahming, Glenwood Bail-
lou, Alonzo Russell, Trevon
Green

Coaching &

Management Team

Head Coach - Dianne Wood-
side, IAAF Level Sprints\Hur-
dles, Assistant Coaches - Fred-
erick Bastian, Grand Bahama
IAAF Level 2 Middle Distance,
Jason Edwards - IAAF Level 2
Jumps, Greg Cash - [AAF Lev-
ell Sprints\Relay Coordi-
nator, Anthony Williams -
Moores Island

Management Team - Man-
ager - Val Kemp, Assistant
Manager - Claudel McNabb,
Grand Bahama. Chaperones -
Lenora Conyers - BACO and
Linda Malcolm, Grand
Bahama



—

Drive one.

France, SAfrica eliminated, Argentina advances

By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer



JOHANNESBURG (AP) —
France's disastrous World Cup cam-
paign ended in a loss Tuesday, a result
that also dragged South Africa out of
the tournament and left Uruguay and
Mexico with places in the round of 16.

Argentina advanced as expected
from Group B later in the day, but it
took them most of the game to break
through a staunch Greece defense and
win 2-0 in Polokwane. South Korea
also made the round the 16 by holding
Nigeria to a 2-2 draw in Durban.

South Africa beat France 2-1 in
Bloemfontein, but the first-half goals
from Bongani Khumalo and Katlego
Mphela weren't enough to stop the
team from becoming the first host to be
eliminated from the first round.

In Rustenburg, two-time champion
Uruguay defeated Mexico 1-0 and won
Group A. Mexico and South Africa
each had four points, but the Mexicans
advanced on goal difference.

South Africans will be disappointed
with the result, but the French will be
furious. The 1998 World Cup champion
is in disarray.

France was held to a 0-0 draw by
Uruguay in its opening match, and then
lost to Mexico 2-0. The chaos started
shortly thereafter, when striker Nicolas
Anelka was sent home for refusing to
apologize to the coach after insulting
him.

Then the players decided to skip a
day of practice to protest that decision,
further disrupting an already faltering
World Cup campaign.

Tuesday's match just added to the
negative image most have of France
coach Raymond Domenech, who
benched captain Patrice Evra for his
final match in charge.

"The whole of France needs to have
an explanation for this disaster," Evra
said. "It's not the time to give them,
but I will personally give them ... what
I went through, just the truth, as quick-
ly as possible.”

Khumalo gave South Africa the lead
when he beat Abou Diaby in the 20th
minute and scored from Siphiwe Tsha-
balala's cross. Mphela added a second
in the 37th, scoring from Tsepo Masile-
la's cross.

"The early goal helped a lot," Khu-
malo said. "I really thought we could
pull through."

Both goals came after France was

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reduced to 10 men in the 25th when
Yoann Gourcuff was sent off for elbow-
ing Macbeth Sibaya.

Florent Malouda scored France's
only goal of the tournament in the 70th.
That goal gave them one more than in
2002, when the then defending cham-
pion French were also eliminated in
the first round.

Luis Suarez scored Uruguay's goal
against Mexico in the 43rd, heading in
a cross from Edinson Cavani.

"The important thing is that we qual-
ified in first place," Uruguay striker
Diego Forlan said. "They controlled
the ball well and in truth it was quite
hard for us.”

Uruguay didn't concede a goal in the
first round.

Martin Demichelis finally gave
Argentina the lead in the 77th minute
when he headed the ball off teammate
Diego Milito and then shot past Greece
goalkeeper Alexandros Tzorvas.

Martin Palermo added the second
goal in the 89th, knocking in a rebound
after Tzorvas saved a shot from Lionel
Messi, who served as Argentina's
youngest ever captain at 22 years old.
Regular captain Javier Mascherano was
rested by coach Diego Maradona, along
with several other starters from the first
two games.

"Now the road gets more difficult,
and the hierarchy of each team comes
into play," Maradona said. "You always
talk about Germany, Italy, Brazil, that
they're playing bad, but they're always
in the semifinals, in the final, in the
second round, in the quarters."

Lee Jung-soo and Park Chu-young
scored the goals for South Korea, which
advanced past the first round away
from home for the first time.

Lee equalized in the 38th and Park
scored in the 49th. Kalu Uche had giv-
en the Nigerians the lead in the 12th
and Ayegbeni Yakubu leveled in the
69th.

"Our goal was to reach the last 16.
We succeeded in doing this for the first
time away from home," South Korea
captain Park Ji-sung said. "So I'm very
happy we accomplished this in South
Africa. All of the players know how
important this is.”

Nigeria, which could have become
the first African team to advance at
the first World Cup in Africa, missed
several easy chances throughout the
match.

Also, charges against two Dutch
women who had faced prosecution for

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SOUTH AFRICA’S Macbeth Sibaya (left) competes for the ball with France's Franck Ribery
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allegedly taking part in an ambush mar-
keting campaign at a World Cup match
were dropped.

South Africa's home affairs minis-
ter said that the total of foreign visi-
tors this month had passed 682,000 —

up from more than 456,000 as of June
13.

"This is quite a sizable increase from
last year's figures," Nkosazana Dlami-
ni-Zuma said. "We are happy with the
way things are going.

Bucks acquire forward
Maggette from Warriors

= 3
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EMAIL: endl wretanrittotrread Loon
WEBSITE: Mendhymotorshahamas.com

By CHRIS JENKINS
AP Sports Writer

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The Milwaukee Bucks have acquired
forward Corey Maggette in a trade with the Golden State Warriors,
sending them guard Charlie Bell and center Dan Gadzuric in

return.

The Bucks also get a second-round pick from the Warriors in
Thursday night's NBA draft, leaving them with three selections in

the second round.

Maggette played in 70 games with 49 starts for Golden State last
season, averaging 19.8 points per game. He will be expected to pro-
vide scoring for a team that may lose free agent John Salmons.

Bell played in 71 games for Milwaukee last season, averaging 6.5
points, 1.5 assists and 1.9 rebounds per game. Gadzuric appeared
in 32 games for the Bucks last season and averaged 2.8 points
and 2.9 rebounds in 9.8 minutes per game.

Swimmers get
bronze medals

FROM page 1B

who served as the minister of
sports when the Pan Am
Games were held. “Never has
Bahamian women’s relay swim-
ming progressed this far.”
BSF president Algernon
Cargill, who served as the mas-
ter of ceremonies, said that
while they salute the women
last night, he acknowledged the
achievement of Jeremy
Knowles, who won the first
major medal for the Bahamas
with his bronze at the 2003
World University Games.
The swimming medal in
Brazil was added to the six
achieved by the track and field

team that brought the
Bahamas’ total to seven for a
two-way tie for 14th place with
Guatemala. Both countries
ended up with seven medals.
Chris Brown got a gold in the
men’s 400m and he anchored
the 4 x 400 relay team to the
other gold.

Silver

The silver medals were won
by Donald Thomas in the
men’s high jump and Christine
Amertil in the women’s 400,
while the bronze came from
Chandra Sturrup in the wom-
en’s 100 and veteran Lavern
Eve in the women's javelin.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 11



SIM cards ‘may be being
used in prison illegally _

FROM page one

technology. He said he pur-
chased a Batelco SIM card
in the airport and no one
asked him for identification.

“It would be great if the
carriers stepped forward to
assume responsibility to help
the authorities who don’t
have the resources to put the
technology in place. Carri-
ers know what is going on.
They have triangulation
techniques. They can elimi-
nate 50 per cent of the prob-
lem themselves by putting
an investigation unit in, but

RACARO CLARKE in his incubator and ventilator that an melee

they are not asked to; they
are not asked to profile their
customers,” said Mr
Melamed.

Mr Melamed explained
that telephone companies
can track where calls are
being made based on the
signals that are sent to vari-
ous cell phone towers.

In the case of St Lucia, he
said a telephone company
reported that inmates were
their best customers. He said
phone companies should
“assume responsibility” as
their actions were tanta-
mount to selling services to
criminals knowingly.

The Prison Department is
exploring the use of new
technology to assist in reduc-
ing the number of cell
phones in the prison and
blocking their use. They
recently acquired cell phone
sniffing dogs, and are pro-
cessing bids for a cell phone
jamming system.

Another option available
to the prison authorities is
called a “Pest Control Sys-
tem”, which is a new system
engineered in the US,
according to Mr Melamed,
that would be beneficial for
prison authorities operating
on budget constraints.



‘Breathe Easy’ campaign
raises almost $400,000

FROM page one

The cost of one ventilator is
$42,296.65, the cost of one
incubator is $19,087.02.

The equipment has imme-
diately made an impact on the
lives of neonatal infants like
Racaro Clarke, who was born
June 18 at 24 weeks, weighing
just two pounds and 12
ounces.

His parents, High Vista res-
idents, visit his incubator and
ventilator that keeps him alive
every day, marvelling at his
health and development.

Racaro’s mother, Venus
Clarke, a grade five teacher,
reached into the incubator
and touched her baby for the
first time yesterday.

She whispered: “It’s so
good to have this equipment
here.”

Launched in September last
year, the campaign aimed to

raise $300,000 for four venti-
lators and six incubators for
Princess Margaret Hospital's
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

However, after realizing the
critical need for new ventila-
tors at the hospital the cam-
paign organizers decided this
crucial equipment should be
the focus. An added bonus of
the ventilators is that they are
portable and can also be used
for other Intensive Care Unit
patients — a long term benefit
for PMH.

Individual donations ranged
from $25 to $45,000, and were
supplemented by internation-
al and local grants.

President of the Rotary
Club of East Nassau Michelle
Rassin said: “It is so impor-
tant that we have the
resources to keep our
neonates alive. We had a great
response from the Bahamian
community and we are
pleased to be able to offer

these infants their first
breath.”

With two successful nation-
wide campaigns, which col-
lectively raised more than
$700,000 in charitable funds,
the group shows no chance of
slowing down.

Ms Rassin said that orga-
nizers are currently in discus-
sion with hospital administra-
tion concerning major needs
of its new expansion.

She continued: “There are a
lot of companies, corporate
citizens who want to give
back. And unlike the US
where you do get concessions
for donations, these compa-
nies do it out of their hearts,
looking to help build a better
Bahamas.”

Although the Breathe Easy
campaign has concluded, any-
one interested in donating to
the hospital can make cheques
payable to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Foundation.

FNM: Opposition’s Director of Public
Prosecutions criticism is ‘hypocrisy’

FROM page one

under the PLP administration non-Bahami-
ans were appointed to top posts at the College
of the Bahamas and the Ministry of Public
Works & Transport.

It read: “It was the FNM which created the
post of DPP during the 1990s, a post that has
been filled by Bahamians up to this time. It is
not lost on the Bahamian people that the post
of Director of Legal Affairs (DLA) was peren-
nially held by a foreigner under the PLP. It
was the FNM that appointed the first Bahami-
an DLA during the 1990s.

“We note that the same hypocritical PLP,
which speaks endlessly about Caribbean coop-
eration and promotes the entry of The
Bahamas into the Caribbean Single Market
Economy, is now criticising the appointment of
a Caribbean national to help lead the country
and the region’s fight against serious and vio-
lent crime.”

The statement continued: “That the new
DPP has an outstanding track record in crim-
inal prosecutions is of no concern to the PLP.
They prefer to play politics rather than help the
country to marshal all available resources nec-
essary to fight crime.

“Bahamians generally understand that in a
small country such as ours, there will be
instances when a non-Bahamian may be

engaged for a period. Still, in the interest of the
ongoing preparation of Bahamians for vari-
ous posts, two Bahamians were appointed as
Deputy Directors of Public Prosecution, at
the same time that the new DPP was appoint-
ed. Of course, the PLP has hypocritically failed
to mention this fact.

“The PLP have also chosen to ignore the
fact that two Bahamians, including the indi-
vidual for whom they feign so much concern,
were also at the same time appointed to the
post of Deputy Law Reform Commissioner
by the JLSC.

“This post is slightly higher than that of the
Deputy DPP. It should be noted that the post
of Law Commissioner has always been held by
non-Bahamians. The appointment of two
Bahamians to the post of Deputy suggests that
in the future, Bahamians will be appointed to
this post that has always been filled by non-
Bahamians.”

The statement added: “Moreover, the most
recent statements on the matter by the Oppo-
sition, and specifically by the Leader of the
Opposition, were brought to the attention of
the Prime Minister who is travelling abroad.

Commenting on the timing of the Leader of
the Opposition’s statement, the Prime Minis-
ter noted: “I am not surprised that Mr. Christie
chose to attack me behind my back while I
am out of the country.”

Cell phones are “pests” in
the prison system, so a
sweep of the prison is done
in a similar spirit to the
cleaning exercise that is con-
ducted for eliminating tra-
ditional pests.

A company is hired to
come in once a month or
once a quarter to run “a
sweep”, or virtually scan of
the prison to locate cell
phones.

“We find them by the ser-
ial number as they are mak-
ing calls or turning them on
and off. That information is
provided to the carrier and
we tell them to unsubscribe
the phones. Batelco would
be obliged to turn off all the
phones,” said Mr Melamed.

In a sweep of a Texas
prison, Mr Melamed said
they found 239 cell phones
amongst 400 inmates. He
said the prison authorities
sent messages to the prison-
ers via their phones to give
them the option of turning
in the phone immediately
with no penalty. About 25
per cent of the inmates came
forward to turn over their
phones.

Mr Melamed said prison
officers have also been
caught with illegal phones
during a sweep.

“What you do depends on
what your philosophy is: to
suppress communication or
to punish criminals. It is
hard to punish a criminal
who is already behind bars.
The key is to suppress it and
eliminate the possibility of
the crime being committed.
That is a better use for
spending the public’s mon-
ey,” said Mr Melamed.

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- Govt schools set for major repairs

FROM page one

education official.

There are a total of about 12 government schools in the
Grand Bahama District. Necessary repairs and renovations
are carried out to administrative offices, classrooms, and
restroom facilities, among other things.

District Superintendent Hezekiah Dean said the scope of
works is finalised by the permanent secretary in New Prov-

idence.

“We are expecting to receive the scope of works this week
and put them out to tender for bids from local contractors,”

he told The Tribune.

Mr Dean said contractors must visit the various school
sites to check out repairs and submit their bids.

The bids are then reviewed by Island Administrator, the
District Superintendent, and the Local Government district

council.

“Some persons feel that we award contracts to whoever we
wish to, but we actually sit and review all the bids and then
offer a contract,” he explained.

This is expected to create employment for local contractors

on Grand Bahama.

Mum and son fight off home invaders

FROM page one

wrestling a handgun out of his
hand. This weapon was left at
the scene after the culprits
escaped.

"We retrieved a weapon
from the scene, a handgun, left
in the home as a result of the
struggle. Because of the strug-
gle the son disarmed the fel-
low," ASP Fernander told The
Tribune.

Police believe the thugs are
a pair of would-be robbers
whose plans were foiled by the
mother and son.

"We suspect, clearly it was
robbery,” Mr Fernander said,
adding that it appears that
nothing was taken from the
home.

No suspects were in custody
up to press time, but Mr Fer-
nander said police had per-
sons of interest in mind and
suspect the thugs could be res-
idents of the area.

Up to press time last night,
the mother was in hospital in a
stable condition.

She is being treated for
facial injuries she sustained
during the scuffle.

Her son, who was taken to
hospital for an injury to his
left arm, has been treated and
discharged.

As investigations continue,
police yesterday appealed to
the public with information to
call 919, the CDU at 502-
9991, or the Crime Stoppers
hotline at 328-TIPS.

PLP reportedly facing difficulties
in choosing election nominee

FROM page one

candidates are put forward to the Bahamian people.

Our source said: “We have a number of persons with
some questionable backgrounds who we have had to turn
around. Then there are others who you have to do your
background checks on and it looks like we need to have
papers in hand for some of these people.

“But the last thing we want to do is put out a candidate
who (Prime Minister Hubert) Ingraham could chew up.
That won’t do the party any good, cause from all accounts
this election will be a close one. Every seat counts. So we
have to do our homework this time around.”




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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

CARIBBEAN NEWS

Reports: Fugitive drug lord
surrenders in Jamaica

By HOWARD
CAMPBELL
Associated Press Writer

KINGSTON, Jamaica
(AP) — Reputed gang
leader Christopher "Dudus"
Coke, who eluded a bloody
police offensive in his slum
stronghold last month, was
arrested Tuesday by author-
ities outside Jamaica's capi-
tal, the island's top cop said.

Coke has been called one
of the world's most danger-
ous drug lords by U.S.
authorities and faces trial in
New York on drug and arms
trafficking charges. His

Arrest almost a month after
76 killed in slum assault

arrest came nearly a month
after 76 people were killed
during a four-day assault by
police and soldiers on the
West Kingston slum of
Tivoli Gardens, which is
Coke's base.

At a news conference,
Police Commissioner Owen
Ellington said Coke was in
good condition in police cus-
tody. He provided few
specifics, saying that "the cir-

cumstances of (Coke's)
arrest are being investigat-
ed."

Jamaican news media had
reported Coke turned him-
self in. But the Rev. Al
Miller, an influential evan-
gelical preacher who facili-
tated the surrender of
Coke's brother earlier this
month, told The Associated
Press that Coke was pre-
pared to surrender to

authorities at the U.S.
Embassy in Kingston when
police stopped his convoy on
a highway outside the capi-
tal.

"A contact was made on
his behalf that he wanted to
give himself in," Miller said.
"I therefore made arrange-
ments with his lawyers
because he wanted to go
ahead with the extradition
process, so we communicat-
ed with the U.S. Embassy
because that's where he
would feel more comfort-
able."

Miller said police cap-
tured Coke on the way to

BP may pipe oil to platforms if relief wells fail



OFFICIALS of BP, which owns the
well, and other government and industry
experts, have said the they expect to stop
the flow by drilling relief wells to inter-
cept the Macondo near the reservoir 13,000
feet below the Gulf floor and then plugging
it with cement, according to Associated
Press.

One of the drilling rigs has reached
10,677 feet, said retired Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen, the response comman-
der, and a backup relief well has reached
4,662 feet.

Engineers have looked at a number of
ways to proceed if the relief wells fail,
Allen said, including piping oil and gas
from the well to facilities nearby.

Allen said the idea, still in early stages of
evaluation, was discussed at an industry
meeting hosted last week by Interior Sec-
retary Ken Salazar and the Energy Secre-
tary Steven Chu.

The group identified a couple of plat-
forms in the area that could take some of
the oil and gas through pipelines along the
ocean floor. Then it could be brought to
the surface for processing or pumped back
into a reservoir.

Since early June, BP has been capturing
thousands of barrels of oil a day through
systems on the seafloor. But some of it is
being burned off because vessels on the
surface don't have capacity to contain it all.

Containment reached nearly 26,000 bar-





Neel Merenaccnurutcamnieen| lc (AP)

rels on Monday, more than a million gal-
lons and the highest since the spill began,
Allen said. Much of it is coming through a
containment cap installed after undersea
robots cut a leaking riser pipe that once
connected the wellhead on the seafloor to
the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig almost
a mile above.

Allen said Tuesday that teams are
retrieving the sheared-off portion of the
riser as evidence in the investigation into
the disaster.

When the Macondo well blew out April
20, it destroyed the Deepwater Horizon,
killed 11 workers and began spilling mil-
lions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mex-
ico.

Allen said the amount of oil being col-

lected could double by the end of June
with the arrival of another vessel that is
expected to catch 20,000 to 25,000 more
barrels a day.

But sending the oil through undersea
pipelines to existing production platforms
would reduce or eliminate the need for
collection operations on the surface right
above the well, which might have to be
suspended if a hurricane threatens. And it
could provide a backup plan if BP is
unable to plug the blown out well, or if
the process takes longer than expected.

The company has said it won't complete
the first relief well until at least sometime
in August.

In anew measure of the possible scope
of the disaster, a Texas A&M Uni-
versity researcher just back from an eight-
day trip through the Gulf waters sur-
rounding the spill site said his team found
far higher-than-normal levels of methane
gas in the area, as much as one million
times higher in a few places.

As a result, oceanographer John Kessler
said, oxygen levels in some deep-sea
regions are abnormally low, although it's
not yet clear what that means for sea life.

The low oxygen levels could lead to
another dead zone, Kessler said during a
briefing for reporters Tuesday. Most dead
zones - areas where oxygen levels are too
low to sustain fish and other sea life - are
caused by fertilizer runoff.





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the embassy and then took
him to the nearby Spanish
Town police headquarters.
He was then flown to
Kingston, the preacher said.

Last month, a U.S. law
enforcement official in New
York, speaking on condition
of anonymity, told The
Associated Press that a
lawyer for Coke was in nego-
tiations with the US. Justice
Department about his clien-
t's possible safe removal to
New York to face charges.

Coke is said to fear suf-
fering the same fate as his
father, a gang leader known
as Jim Brown, who died ina
prison fire in 1992 while
awaiting extradition to the
USS. on drug charges.

US. Embassy officials did
not immediately return calls.
A phone for Coke's lead
attorney, Don Foote, went
unanswered.

Prime Minister Bruce
Golding, whose Jamaica
Labour Party has long
counted on the support of
gunmen inside Coke's Tivoli
Gardens slum, opposed the
US. extradition request for
nine months before revers-
ing himself under growing
public pressure that threat-
ened his political career.

Earlier this month, the
main opposition party staged
a no-confidence vote against
Golding, which he survived
after promising a sustained
assault on the gangs that
control poor politicized
slums such as Tivoli Gar-
dens.

Coke is wanted in New
York on charges that he traf-
ficked cocaine and marijua-
na as well as weapons
between his Caribbean
island and the United States.

The reputed drug baron,
who typically avoids the

LOCATION:

Commonwealth Bank,

THE TRIBUNE





IN THIS UNDATED FILE PHOTO,
alleged drug gang leader Christo-
pher ‘Dudus’ Coke is shown.

AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner

limelight, has remained
silent. He faces life in prison
if convicted on charges filed
against him in New York.

Jamaica's political histo-
ry is intertwined with slum
gangs that the two main
parties helped organize —
and some say armed — in
Kingston's poor neigh-
bourhoods in the 1970s and
‘80s.

The gangs controlled the
streets and intimidated vot-
ers at election time. In recent
years political violence has
waned, and many of the
killings in Kingston now are
blamed on the active drug
and extortion trade.

Coke was born into
Jamaica's gangland. His
father was the leader of the
notorious Shower Posse
gang, a cocaine-trafficking
band with agents in Jamaica
and the U.S. that began
operating in the 1980s and
was named for its members’
tendency to spray victims
with bullets.

The son took over from
the father, U.S. authorities
allege.

In recent days, Jamaica's
government had offered a
$60,000 reward for informa-
tion leading to Coke's arrest.

Also known as "Presi-
dent” to the people of his
slum, Coke served as com-
munity leader and enforcer
in the gritty neighbourhood
in an area that the govern-
ment acknowledges it has
long neglected.

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THE TRIBUNE

usine

WEDNESDAY,

(oUEN Eos 2e: 2



2010

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

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MARSH HARBOUR
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$100m investment avoids ‘devastation’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

developer who

has already invest-

ed $20-$25 million

into his 43-acre
residential project yesterday
expressed relief that the Gov-
ernment did not end the first-
time home buyer Stamp Tax
exemption, telling Tribune
Business it would have been
“devastating” for the develop-
ment given that 30-40 per cent
of purchasers were coming
from this key market.

Jason Kinsale, principal of
The Balmoral Development,
located on Prospect Ridge near
the US Ambassador's resi-
dence, told this newspaper that
he was urging all potential
home buyers to exploit any tax
exemptions they could access,
pointing out how his first real
estate development - Hampton
Ridge - was thrown into tem-

* Developer with $20-$25m already in ground expresses relief first-time buyer tax exemption stays, as end would have hit 30-40% of clients
* About ‘50%’ of Balmoral’s infrastructure complete, with first homeowners moving in

* Stamp Tax change pushes buyers to respect closing dates, as recession extends development for one year
* ‘We're proceeding while a lot of people are dead in the water. It’s a first class community’

porary confusion when the
FNM previously ended the
first-time buyer Stamp Tax
exemption.

That was subsequently rein-
stated and extended, but Mr
Kinsale told Tribune Business:
“T glad they [the Government]
did not cancel the first time
buyer exemption. That would
have been devastating, with 30-
40 per cent of our buyers com-
ing from the first-time buyer
market.

“We actually got caught in
the middle at Hampton Ridge
when the FNM annulled the
earlier first-time buyer exemp-
tion. That was pretty serious
for us. One of the things buyers

Grand Bahama needs
infrastructure for arbitration

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

GRAND Bahama does not currently have the human or phys-
ical infrastructure to accommodate an international arbitration
centre for maritime alternative dispute settlement, the managing
director of a Bahamas-based forensic accounting and insolvency
practice told Tribune Business yesterday.

Edmund Rahming, of Krys Rahming and Associates (Bahamas),
said there were not enough qualified individuals to staff a centre
dedicated to arbitration and mediation. However, he believes
many of the more-than 1200 attorneys and 650 accountants living
in New Providence would be willing to travel to the island should
the Government build a centre there.

“We have to make sure there is the institutional support; that
government provides whatever support is needed,” he said. “We

need to ensure there are quali-
fied arbitrators here, and that

SEE page 2B

Stamp ‘amnesty’ fairness
called into question

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LEADING attorney yes-
terday questioned the fairness
in allowing persons seeking to
benefit from the Government’s
three-month Stamp Tax penal-
ty amnesty to pay duty at the
old rates, while purchasers who
have done nothing wrong - and
whose transactions fail to close
by June 30 - will be faced with
paying two percentage points
more.

Andrew O’Brien, head of the
Bahamas Bar Association’s real
estate committee, told Tribune
Business he was querying the

SEE page 2B

* Leading attorney questions
why defaulters allowed to
pay old duty rate, when
transactions in play
faced with paying two
percentage points more

* Rush to close existing
deals by June 30, causing
queries over why ‘window’
for them not permitted

* Bahamas going in ‘opposite
direction’ to others by
making real estate
transaction costs and home
ownership more expensive

Investors urged: ‘Shake
off your complacency’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN shareholders
need to shake off their “com-
placency” and make themselves
heard if they have concerns
about how public companies
they have invested in are being
run, a leading investment
banker said yesterday, while
acknowledging that existing
capital markets legislation did
not give the minority’s repre-
sentation enough clout.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFi-
delity Merchant Bank & Trust’s
president, told Tribune Busi-
ness that as the Bahamian cap-
ital markets evolved there had
to be a focus on “enhancing
measures to give minority
investors a greater voice”, given

that most BISX-listed and pub-
lic companies were controlled
by one majority shareholder or
group of like-minded interests.

Speaking in the wake of
Freeport Concrete becoming
the first BISX-listed and public
company to move for liquida-
tion, Mr Anderson said: “As
minority shareholders, while
they might have a voice, they’re
not adequately represented to
make changes to the way the
company is being run.

“As we move forward, it’s
something we have to focus on.
Overall, it’s part of the devel-
opment of the market, enhanc-
ing measures to give the minor-
ity a greater voice.”

By the same token, he added:

SEE page 3B

have to recognise is that the
Government can cancel these
programmes at any time they
want. I’m telling buyers to take
advantage of it, because they
might not be around in six
months’ time. That’s reality.”

Balmoral has focused on the
singles and professionals mar-
kets as being critical to its suc-
cess, and Mr Kinsale said the
two percentage point increase
in Stamp Duty rates across the
board, due to come into effect
on July 1, 2010, had prompted
many Balmoral buyers with
transactions in play to “respond
to closing dates much more
assiduously” in a bid to min-
imise taxes.

The “first set of homeown-
ers” is currently moving into
Balmoral’s completed 26-unit
first phase, which has one unit
remaining on the market, and
the developers have moved on
to phase two. This features 16
three and four-bedroom Grand
Town Homes and three single
family homes, Mr Kinsale
telling Tribune Business that
seven of the former have
already been sold.

“Our next phase is well
underway,” he added. “What’s
been interesting as well is that
the last few buyers have been
cash buyers with no mortgages,
so there’s a lot of money sitting
n the sidelines waiting for things

to do. The money’s out there;
it’s Just trying to get it out of
people’s pockets. But there’s
been $600,000 in cash,
$500,0000.”

Mr Kinsale said the develop-
ers were “well over $20-$25 mil-
lion” in terms of their invest-
ment into what is expected to
be a $100 million project, hav-
ing installed key infrastructure
up front.

He estimated that they were
“about 50 per cent of the way
through” on infrastructure, hav-
ing completed the roads,
paving, water and electricity for
the town home section, with the
latter two utilities now going
into the lot area.

CLICO liquidator close to
portfolio due diligence end

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) liquidator this week indi-
cated he had “substantially” completed his due
diligence on who should purchase the insolvent
insurer’s remaining life and health policy port-
folio, telling a creditors’ meeting that two candi-

dates remained in the running.

Sources who attended Monday’s meeting,
called by Baker Tilly Gomez partner, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez, told Tribune Business that the lig-
uidator indicated to the roughly 100 creditors
and their representatives who attended that he
was getting closer to deciding who would acquire

the insurer’s policies.

source told Tribune Business. “He [Mr Gomez]
said there were two potential purchasers for the
portfolio. He didn’t disclose who they were.”

Colina Insurance Company, the BISX-listed
life and health insurer, which is the market leader
by balance sheet and asset size, has long been
regarded as the front runner to acquire CLICO
(Bahamas) portfolio. It is not known who the

potential rival is, although BAF Financial &

Insurance (Bahamas) has long spoken of its inter-
est, and has been acquiring parts of the former
CL Financial empire around the Caribbean.

Mr Gomez could not be reached by Tribune
Business for comment yesterday, and is still
understood to be ‘gagged’ by the Supreme Court

from speaking to the media.

“It seemed as if he had substantially closed

his due diligence in terms of the life portfolio,” a

ROYAL FIDELITY

tela ae ola 4

SEE page 5B

“The reality is that everyone
has been hit by the recession,”
Mr Kinsale told Tribune Busi-
ness. “It’s definitely added a
year on to this project. To say it
hasn’t would be a lie. But things
are moving and selling. Every
time someone comes by there’s
something new. We’re pro-
ceeding while a lot of people
are dead in the water. It’s a first
class community.”

Balmoral, which will feature
275 units at full build-out, typi-
cally prices its properties in the
middle market $300,00-
$500,000 range - a category that
Mr Kinsale believes is under-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010



$100m
investment

avoids
‘devastation’

FROM page 1B

served.

“There really aren’t a lot of
choices; there’s not a lot out
there,” he explained. “Nauti-
ca’s at $550,000, and to go into
Sandyport with a small condo-
minium is $400,000. That’s a
nice community but very
expensive. A lot of profession-
als don’t have that money, and
are only putting 10-15 per cent
down.”

Given the current market
environment, Mr Kinsale said
the key was for Balmoral to be
“adaptable” to whatever buyers
demanded, possessing four to

THE TRIBUNE



Expert: Commercial fraud
on the rise in the Bahamas

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



COMMERCIAL fraud is on the rise
in the region and in the Bahamas as a
direct result of the global recession,
the managing director of forensic
accounting, corporate recovery and
insolvency firm, Krys Rahming and
Associates (Bahamas), said yesterday,
as it prepares to host a seminar on
related topics next Friday.

Edmund Rahming said unemploy-
ment in the economy produces an
increase in fraudulent activities as fam-
ilies and individuals fall on hard times,
often choosing to justify fraud over
more ethical activities.

“Anytime you see there is unem-
ployment or the economy goes down

hill or people hit hard times, there will
be an increase in fraud,” he said.
“Fraud has always been something
people rationalise.”

Countries

Mr Rahming said countries like the
UK reported an increase in fraud in
2009 and 2010 to-date over 2008.

A BBC online article on Online
Banking Fraud reported phishing
attacks (where people are tricked into
entering personal data online) were
up 16 per cent in 2009 over 2008. and
online banking losses reaching £59.7
million, an increase of 14 per cent over
2008.

In the Bahamian context, the
National Insurance Board saw fraud
increases when it launched its unem-

ployment benefit programme.

Mr Rahming’s firm, though only six
months in business, is slated to partner
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force’s
fraud unit to share their corporate
fraud expertise.

Mr Rahming’s firm is a dedicated
forensic accounting firm that is
equipped to extract sensitive data from
computer hard drives, and as an
accounting firm, analyse and document
the data. According to him, the firm
also has the experience to handle myr-
iad matters regarding insolvency,
forensic accounting and financial mat-
ters, having handled international mat-
ters involving Viacom, Ingersoll Rand,
Erikson and Lucent Technology.

He said insolvencies and liquida-
tions have also been on the increase
across the world, and the Bahamas is

seeing its share as well. “There are
pressures on the [Bahamas’ Financial]
system, but it is still holding its private
wealth and trust business in that par-
ticular niche market,” said Mr Rah-
ming. “Therefore there should be work
in what we do.”

Timing

“It is good timing for the Caribbean
in general for someone who only does
this to enter the marketplace.”

The insolvency and dispute consul-
tation seminar being hosted by Mr
Rahming’s company at the British
Colonial Hilton is expected to cover
topical issues of arbitration in the
Bahamas, and the hot-button issue of
the Bernard Madoff scandal and cross-
border insolvency.



five home options it could offer.







FREEPORT, from page 1B

folks who are a support part of the process do all they can to
obtain training and put themselves out there as being able to par-
ticipate in these proceedings.

“In my humble opinion, the infrastructure isn’t there in Grand
Bahama and we may not have sufficient professionals, but Bahami-
ans have always been very open to moving throughout the
Bahamas.”

Mr Rahming said, meanwhile, that the Cayman Islands was fol-
lowing the Bahamas’ lead and moving forward aggressively on pass-
ing arbitration laws, enabling it to become an immediate and
strong competitor to this nation’s arbitration centre plans.

According to him, the large financial and offshore centre that
Cayman is will give it an edge over the Bahamas’ smaller sector, but
he touted the Bahamas’ extensive Maritime Registry as a positive
building block for this country if the infrastructure can be devel-
oped.

A recent paper penned by the Global Arbitration Review 2010
cites Hurricane Ivan and Hurricane Paloma for the initial growth
in arbitration proceedings in the Cayman Islands. Recently, the
global financial crisis and the changes to financial regimes across
the world as a result of iron-fisted G-20 intervention in the sector
have created the need for arbitration centres.

The Bahamas saw the need to capture arbitration business as the
global recession bore down, and introduced upgrades to the Com-
mercial Arbitration Act, while a Bahamas chapter of the Chartered
Institute of Arbitrators (CLARB) of London was subsequently
launched.

A recent Tribune article placed the Bahamas with Trinidad
and Tobago and Barbados as one of only two Caribbean countries
to join the CIARB.

The legislation introduced by the Bahamas in 2009 to upgrade
the existing act, while not enabling it to go head-to-head directly
with the world’s major arbitration centres, such as New York,
London and Paris, enables it to offer similar services - but on a
niche basis.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DEREK JULIAN
TRENT SANDS intend io change my name to TRENT

ELLIOT YIU KWOK LAM. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.



Stamp ‘amnesty’ fairness called into question

FROM page 1B

equity in allowing Stamp Tax
defaulters, who may be facing
anywhere from a 15-30 per cent
surcharge on the duty they owe,
to pay their tax at the old rates
which expire on July 1, 2010.

The Government announced
a three-month surcharge
amnesty in its Budget for per-
sons who had yet to bring real
estate conveyancings forward
for Stamping, and the payment
of due tax, and the only real
estate-related amendment
made to its fiscal plans was to
clarify that those who came for-
ward would pay the old duty
rates.

“My understanding is that
the only change that was made
is that anyone who owed a sur-
charge for filing late has until
October 1,” Mr O’Brien, a
Glinton, Sweeting & O’Brien
partner, told Tribune Business.

“What they clarified was that
there was some question as to
whether the new rate or old
rate would be applied, and they
clarified in the amendments to
the Stamp Tax amendments
that the old rate would still
apply [ to surcharge exemption
seekers].”

He added: “It’s kind of inter-
esting that the people who have
delayed for so long are able to
benefit from the old rates and
everyone else isn’t. I don’t
understand why they’re getting
the benefit. It doesn’t make a
whole lot of sense. I’m disap-
pointed, but it seems that’s the
way it’s going to go.”

The Stamp Duty changes
unveiled in the Budget involve
a two percentage point increase
in Stamp Duty across the board

for all real estate deal, apart
from those involving first-time
buyers. Thus for deals priced
between $0-$20,000, the rate
goes from 2 per cent to 4 per
cent; for between $20,000 to
$50,000, it goes to 6 per cent;
for between $50,000 to
$100,000, it goes to 8 per cent;
for between $100,000 to
$250,000, it goes to 10 per cent;
and from $250,000 and up, it
goes to 12 per cent.

Thus the savings for those
exploiting the surcharge
amnesty could be significant.
Mr O’Brien had previously
urged the Government to
implement a two-three month
window after July 1 that would
allow real estate deals, which
had been signed prior to the
Budget’s unveiling to close at
the old rates, but these pleas
appear to have fallen on deaf
ears.

“Everyone is trying to close
up before July 1,” he said yes-
terday of those deals, and for
those people who have been
caught, I’ve heard from one
that the bank is extending the
additional funds, but will that
mean that someone has loan
payments beyond their means?

“Fortunately, I didn’t get
caught by having a client who
just signed. We’re pushing, and
hoping to get the banks to
release funds before next week.
There’s undoubtedly going to
be many people who are in the
middle of a transaction that
have to come up with money
somehow, and it’s going to be
uncomfortable.”

Mr O’Brien said questions
may arise as to who ponies up
the extra Stamp Duty, espe-
cially if the sales agreement

calls for a 50/50 split between
buyer and seller, and if attor-
neys are late in getting con-
veyancings stamped, would
they be liable to pay the differ-
ence.

The attorney added that the
Treasury was likely to receive
large sums of money over the
next week as real estate trans-
actions rushed to close, and
questioned why the Govern-
ment had not created a month-
long window for the old rates,
since this would mean “more
money coming in as opposed
to people walking away from
transactions”.

Mr O’Brien also questioned
why the Bahamas appeared to
be going in the “opposite direc-
tion” to the US and other coun-
tries by raising the transaction
costs associated with home
ownership, rather than trying
to reduce these.

“I would think that as costs
go up, fewer people are eligible
to enter the market, so it might
shrink,” he explained. “Will
that shrinkage counter higher
land prices down the road? I
don’t know.

“T see the US making more
money available for people to
buy houses, and we’re taking
the opposite approach. There’s
been no reduction in interest
rates on mortgages. I don’t
understand why we have not
used the monetary system to
reduce the cost of money, and
allow people to buy homes and

start building, instead of
increasing the cost.”

Tribune Business previously
showed that, for example, a
$500,000 house purchase cur-
rently would attract a 10 per
cent Stamp Duty rate, mean-
ing that $50,000 is paid to the
Treasury when the transaction
closes. If split 50/50 between
buyer and seller, each pays
$25,000, or otherwise the buyer
or seller pays the $50,000 them-
selves.

Now, with a 12 per cent
Stamp Duty rate coming into
effect as of July 1, 2010, such a
transaction would require
$60,000 to be paid to the Public
Treasury. If the seller or pur-
chaser agrees to pay this 100
per cent, then their tax burden
has risen by $10,000, whereas
if split 50/50 it goes to $30,000
each. Either way, this repre-
sents a significant $5,000-
$10,000 increase associated with
the cost of real estate transac-
tions.

Then take a $240,000 prop-
erty, which currently attracts
Stamp Duty at 8 per cent. This
requires $19,200 to be paid to
the Treasury, which translates
into a $9,600 payment by both
sides if split 50/50 between buy-
er and seller.

Now, at the new 10 per cent
rate, some $24,000 will be paid
in Stamp Duty to the Govern-
ment - an increase of $4,800, or
$2,400 for both sides if split
50/50.



IAA

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BORROMEO FUND LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on June 22, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 4th day of August, 2010 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

June 23, 2010
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HSBC INTERNATIONAL
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the winding up
and dissolution of HSBC INTERNATIONAL

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED has been completed
and the Company was

May, 2010.

Dated this 23:day of June, 2010
Maria M. Férére
Liquidator



removed from the
Register of Companies on the 25th Day of

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OBLIX SHIPPING
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act (No. 45 of 2000). OBLIX SHIPPING IN-
TERNATIONAL LIMITED, is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the
22nd day of June, 2010.

Mayo Secretaries Limited,
Akara Building, 24 De Castro Street,
Wickhams Cay I, Road Town, Tortola, BVI,
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
WILLARD SERVICES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, WILLARD SERVICES LIMITED,
has been dissolved and struck off the Register ac-
cording to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by
the Registrar General on the 10th day

of May, 2010.

Epsilon Management Ltd.,

Suite 13, First Floor, Oliaji Trade Centre,
Francis Rachel Street, Victoria, Mahe,
Republic of Seychelles
Liquidator





Drivers Needed.

Please apply in person
eM

Spotless Cleaners Madeira Street.
Please No Telephone Calls.

NOTICE

To All Our Valued Customers

Bahamas Welding And Fire Co.,
Ltd. #70 Wilton Street East

Will Be CLOSED
For Annual Stocktaking
Friday June 25th &
Saturday June 26th, 2010.

We apologize for any
Inconvenience caused,
Thanks for your patronage
throughout the year.

Management



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THE TRIBUNE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

STUDENT “learning and
understanding” of economics
will be “far greater” due to
their text book employing
examples set in a truly Bahami-
an environment, its authors
believe, adding that its contents
will provide knowledge on
“what the country needs to do
to ensure its survival”.

Dr Nikolaos Karagiannis and
Dale McHardy, authors of
Principles of Economics: A
Bahanuan Perspective, told Tri-
bune Business it was “critical”
that economics and commerce
be taught in a way that allowed
students to relate the subjects to
the Bahamian environment, as
this enhanced their under-
standing and speeded up learn-
ing.
The book, which is being for-
mally launched today and is

published by McGraw Hill, is
targeted chiefly and last-year
high school students and first-
year college students, but the
authors believe it can also help
the “average” Bahamian to
understand the forces currently
impacting this country’s econo-
my.
Mrs McHardy, who is also
manager for business advisory
services at the Bahamas Devel-
opment Bank, said the inspira-
tion for the book came from
realising, while tutoring stu-
dents for BGCSE economics
and commerce, that there was
no true Bahamian text book on
this subject.

A British-based textbook
was being used, and she
explained: “Bahamian kids
relate better to Bahamian
things. Every Bahamian knows
about conch salad, grouper fin-
gers, rum cake and so on. Once
you start to relate these eco-

nomic concepts to things
Bahamian can relate to, you
find the chance for an under-
standing of the concept may be

quicker.
Fact

“The mere fact that you’ve
already related theories and
data to Bahamian things, half
the battle is won. I’ve seen that
once you relate what is in a text
book to a Bahamian environ-
ment, the student will say: ‘Now
I understand it’. We have to
find a way to teach Bahamian
economic concepts in a
Bahamian world.

“It’s so important that I can’t
stress how important it is in
learning a subject that is per-
ceived to be difficult. Once you
put it into a Bahamian context,
and base it on Bahamian exam-
ples, the learning and under-
standing is greater.”

The Bahamian-oriented text
book is a reworking of the book
that Dr Karagiannis and Mrs
McHardy published in April
this year, and the pair said it
was targeted at students at insti-
tutions such as the College of
the Bahamas (COB), Omega
and Success Training College.

They argued that “every
household” should purchase
the book, which they are due
to present to all public school
business teachers at the Min-
istry of Education next week.

Dr Karagiannis said the def-
nitions in the book were “‘accu-
rate, appropriate, student
friendly and everyone under-
stands them”. He added that
all the data in the book, such as
Labour Force Statistics and
projections up until 2011, was
sourced from Bahamian
sources such as the Central
Bank of the Bahamas and
Department of Statistics.

Investors urged: ‘Shake off your complacency’

FROM page 1B

“T think there’s generally a complacency
among shareholders in this market that
what happens will happen, and they don’t
need to be involved. There’s no real mech-
anism to get them involved, but they don’t
step up and make their voices heard.”

Mr Anderson said that often, those who
did speak out were effectively mavericks,
taking companies and Boards on over
issues that did not make sense. “We need
responsible people to get up at [annual
general] meetings and say the right thing,”
he added.

“People need to get out there, criticise,
complain and get things to change. People
would find that, if they did voice their con-
cerns, that they have a much larger voice
than they think, even though it’s not
enshrined in the Securities Industry Act.
Chief executives and chairman are more
likely to listen to sensible persons from the
floor than people might think.

“Generally speaking, I think it’s com-
placency on the part of Bahamian investors
because minority investors in other markets
have stronger protection through their secu-
rities laws, takeover laws. We still do not
have anything here.”

That situation might change soon, given
that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
last month that the Government planned to
bring the Securities Industry Act and its

accompanying regulations to Parliament
before the summer recess - a timetable that
might be somewhat optimistic.

Mr Anderson was backed by Kenwood
Kerr, Providence Advisors’ chief execu-
tive, who told Tribune Business that
Freeport Concrete’s demise might impact
investor sentiment - especially on the retail
side - towards upcoming initial public offer-
ings (IPOs) such as the $60-$65 million
Burns House/Heineken deal, and the $10
million Arawak Cay port offering.

Freeport Concrete was the last true [PO
to come to market in the Bahamas back
in 2001, and Mr Kerr said of the potential
investor impact: “It’s a reality of how these
things work in mature markets. It shouldn’t
[impact future IPOs], but it may linger in
the back of people’s minds that something
similar could happen.”

Still, Mr Kerr suggested that Freeport
Concrete “may have been dead for a long
time”, adding that many Nassau-based
investors might ignore its demise because of
the geographical differences.

“When you’re looking at these busi-
nesses, nothing beats doing research, under-
standing the nature of the business, its com-
petition and the markets in which it’s doing
business,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business.
Nothing beats it.

“Nothing is foolproof, but understanding
that is the key element. Seek professional
help.”

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Marketing Manager

The successful candidate must possess the following:

Mr Anderson agreed, telling this news-
paper that “there are good and bad IPOs in
this market and other markets”, and sug-
gesting that investors bought into Freeport
Concrete’s offering simply because it was
such a thing and “assumed to be good”.

Equity investments, though, had to be
“judged on their merits” respectively, he
explained, adding that the Freeport Con-
crete situation was another learning process
for Bahamian investors and would “make
them more circumspect about where they
invest”.

Mr Anderson acknowledged that the
company’s failure “may add to the negative
sentiment” in the Bahamian equities mar-
ket, although “it shouldn’t” because it was
just one company. He added that it did not
fail because it was an IPO, but rather due to
the economy and bad decisions taken in
past years.

Bahamian public company stocks rarely
trade on fundamentals, but rather on
investor “sentiment”, and Mr Anderson
said current selling pressure on BISX was
“not warranted”.

UY MTSU RUC

MeO ES



A creative thinker with a knack for advertising and a history of creating

big ideas,

A proven track record of driving sales and significant organizational

Impact.

Must be adaptable to a changing, fast-paced environment.
Able to deal with a variety of personalities and situations with energy

and enthusiasin,

on now at

Able to work in a culture/environment that promotes an entrepreneu-

rial spirit and a “let's get it done now" attitude,

Focus on possibilities rather than problems.

Strong customer orientation,

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

« Develop and execute effective local marketing plans that support

annual key initiatives.

Lead efforts to effectively plan, execute, measure and evaluate local

market activites.

Direct media planning and graphic design.

Establish and cultivate PR/media relationships.

Develop and Manage budgets.

Customer Relations and management of complaint process,
Build community goodwill and manage relationships with influential

organizations.

Serve as the local steward of the brand, ensuring all local marketing

activities are aligned with established brand standards,

REQUIREMENTS:

« Bachelors degree in Communications, Marketing or a closely related

field or equivalent work experience.

* Minimum five years professional related experience

COMPETITIVE SALARY & ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT

Send resume to: marketingmanagerwanted@gmail.com

Deaclline for a

lication is Wednesday

une 28th, 2010

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 3B
Bahamian context key to ‘greater’ learning

“Even though we’re target-
ing the high school students,
the college students, we feel the
concepts in this book are pretty
critical to the average Bahami-
an,” Mrs McHardy said.

“In times of economic [cri-
sis], we feel this book is detailed
enough that once hey read it,
what is happening around them
will not be such a puzzle.”

And she added: “Now the
world’s a global village, it’s

important Bahamian students
have an understanding of basic
economics and commerce so
that when the other global chal-
lenges come into play, they will
have an understanding of what
the Bahamas as a country needs
to do to ensure survival.”

Dr Karagiannis is associate
professor of economics at Win-
ston-Salem State University’s
school of business and eco-
nomics in North Carolina.

POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Receptionist for Office Building

Candidate must have excellent customer
service skills, and be computer literate.
Must have experience in a customer

service related

role. Candidate

should be well groomed, mature and

self-motivated.

Security Officer for
Office Building

Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and

have excellent verbal

and_ written

communication skills. Candidate must be
willing to work weekends and extended
hours and have own transportation.

Interested applicants should respond by
sending their resume to:

DA# 87780, c/o
The Tribune,
P.O. Box N-.3027,

Nassau, Bahamas



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GN 1071

SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMIAS
THE SUPREME Coma T
PROBATE DIVISION

Mo SPR On pe a2

Whereas TRIAS WaAWAE MLLER of Marigek! Farm Roned im ibe Exec Deine
of the Ishind of New Prowidened ona of the Ishanda of the Conemorwealihy ol’ Tie Bahamas
has made apalication te fhe Supreme Cour of The Gahaonas. for keiters of admiasiragion of the
Real and Personal Estate of WILLIAM MILLER abo WILLIE MILLER maka
WILLA CAMPBELL WIILILER laie of Pee Rogers Home in the West Chsiier of
Ihe Idan of Mew Prowikence, one of the Islands if the Comomeenecakh of the Gahames.
deccmend

Natice is hereby given thal sech applicaibons will be heard by ihe said Cori at the

exqniration of 14 dave from ibe date herent.

{for} Registrar

COOMSPON WEALTH CF THE BALA AS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DW ISMOM

hao, | BOA PRO pe
Wheres LECIA LYNETTE RUSSELL of No. 19 Argel Rood Eosranod
Subdivision in the Basrtenn District of the bland of Mew Providemce one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahaenas has made application to the Sopreme Court of The Bahamas,
for kuers of adeeinisiauion of the Real and Persone! Estate of LENT FE. RUSSELL oko.
LINDA ELIZABETH RUSSELL oka LINDA RUSSELL Inte of New 1% Agee Rael,
Easecod Subdivision in the Eestern District of the Isto of Kew Providence, ome of ibe

Idlandsl the Commonweal of Tee Baleares, decead
Notice is herghy given that such applications wall be heard by the said Cour at the

equpiraiion of L4 dans from the datc hereol
Nigage be it

oa:
haat _

(feed Riepisorar

OOMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHARLAS
THE SUPREME CouRT
PROBATE DIVISION

No 20M PR OMopr Hae?

Wier INELL RUTH SMITH of Sea Beach Essanee in the [sland of Mew
Providence coo af the likens of tke Comeaonweslch of The Bahamas hes made epolication 1
ihe Suprams Cowet of The Bahamas, for lemers of admimirotion of the Real aed Personal Eooee
of MELSON PF. SMITH late of Sea Beach Estetes in the Isdand of New Providence, one of
tbe Islands of the Ceonmeconventth of The Fechamas. decemsod

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard bry the said Court et the

expiration of 4 deqa fren the dete herent

ee N, Gegap. tS Ug...

{for Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE. DI TSION

No. TIPO PRAMS

Wheres CASSIETTA 2 MCINTOSH, of the Cy af Fraspert on the Iekanad af
Grom’ Rahema, one ofihe Iedands of dhe Commonwealth of The Aghomas, ihe Auiomey by
Deed af Power of for Theade Meclntess, the lawful widee of the deceased bes made
application io the Sepreme Count of The Fahertes, for Lemers of Adinwinistration of the Real ead
Persona! Esate of SEAN DELANO MCINTOSH, lune of #5 Sandoombe Drive in the City of
Freeport on ihe island of Grand Aahema, one of the Islands of The Cocmmonvwealth of The
Baas

Motio is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at che

expiration of 2) daya from the dete hereof



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 5B



SNES
Oil falls as 4-week rally stalls

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices fell Tuesday as the
euphoria over China’s decision
to let its currency appreciate
waned.

A stronger yuan would cut
oil prices in China and, pre-
sumably, boost consumption.
Some analysts feared, though,
that a higher yuan could mean
fewer exports, which could slow
the Chinese economy.

The world’s oil producers
have been selling more crude
to China, India and other fast-
growing economies as demand
in the US continues to be weak
coming out of the Great Reces-
sion.

Benchmark crude for July
delivery lost 61 cents to settle at
$77.21 on the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange.

Tuesday was the last day of
trading in July oil and most
interest had moved to the
August contract, which
dropped 76 cents to settle at
$77.85 a barrel.

Oil has jumped from $64 a
barrel on May 25 on optimism
Europe’s debt crisis won’t
stymie the global economic
recovery.

Goldman Sachs cut its crude
forecasts, but still expects prices
to rise this year as the global
economy grows an estimated
4.9 per cent in 2010. Goldman
now expects prices to rise to
$87 a barrel in three months,
down from last month’s fore-
cast of $96.

Prices advanced to as high as
$78.92 a barrel Monday on





A CHINESE WOMAN, who sells clothes on the roadside, holds tens of
Yuan, while dealing with a customer in a Hutong or a traditional alleyway
in Beijing, China. Proving that flexibility is a two-way street, the Chinese
yuan edged lower against the US dollar in spot trading on Tuesday, a day
after surging to a new high following the central bank's decision to let the
currency trade in a wider range.

investor expectations China’s
move over the weekend to
strengthen its currency would
boost crude demand.

Societe Generale said it
expects the yuan to gain
between three per cent and five
per cent by the end of the year,
not enough to spark significant
new consumption in China.

“Chinese demand has
already exceeded expectations;
it has been strong and we had
already forecast it to continue
that way,” the firm said in a
report. “We simply do not
expect a modest appreciation
in the yuan to make any appre-

(AP Photo)

ciable difference in demand.”

Societe Generale forecasts
crude will average $80 a barrel
in the third quarter and $85 in
the fourth.

In other trading, heating oil
fell 3.30 cents to settle at
$2.1129 a gallon, and gasoline
gave up 0.93 cent to settle at
$2.1335 a gallon.

Natural gas fell 11.7 cents to
settle at $4.756 per 1,000 cubic
feet. It hit a four-month high
of $5.20 per 1,000 cubic feet last
week.

Brent crude lost 78 cents to
settle at $78.04 on the ICE
futures exchange.



Europe austerity moves boost risk of rift with US

By ALAN CLENDENNING
and DAVID STRINGER
Associated Press Writers



LONDON (AP) — A trans-Atlantic rift over
the right medicine for Europe's financial crisis is
brewing as world leaders prepare for the G-20
meeting in Canada — with Britain on Tuesday
announcing its steepest cuts in decades and Ger-
many defending its tough austerity measures
after a warning by President Obama that too
much budget slashing could threaten the global
recovery.

Britain's emergency budget is the latest in a
string of savage public spending cuts and reflects
Europe's newfound resolve — since markets
pushed Greece to the brink of bankruptcy and
even threatened the bloc'’s economic union —
to tackle debt before worrying about growth.

But Europe's single-minded focus is worrying
the US, prompting Obama to write a letter to
world leaders on Friday warning against excessive
spending cuts.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel fought
back this week, defending her government's $80
billion (euro65 billion) savings plan even as
British Treasury chief George Osborne forged
ahead with his own grim austerity budget.

Many European analysts agree the more
urgent priority is taming deficits.

Obama "has a point, but there are some coun-
tries that don't have a luxury of a choice, they
have got to get a grip and start cutting quickly
because the alternative of becoming the next
Greece is not palatable to them,” said Jonathan
Loynes, chief European economist at Capital
Economics in London.

Britain's emergency budget aims to sharply
reduce record public debt and fall hard on most
people. Shoppers will pay higher sales taxes,
wealthy people will be hit for higher capital gains
taxes and banks will be charged a new levy on
profits, a move that has already been approved by
France and Germany. Even Queen Elizabeth IT
accepted a freeze in her support from taxpay-
ers.

In Germany, a spokesman for Chancellor
Angela Merkel said she talked on Monday with
US President Barack Obama on the phone about
a letter he wrote to the G-20 leaders in which he
cautioned against hurting a fragile global eco-
nomic recovery by trimming spending prema-
turely.

The letter was seen as a criticism of Germany's
plan to reduce the country's deficit, but the
spokesman said Obama did not pressure Ger-
many to continue stimulus spending by piling up
more debt. He spoke on condition of anonymity
in keeping with government policy.

Europe's leaders are struck in a quandary:
They must bring down mammoth debt through
spending cuts to ward off economic panic, but the
measures are bound to stunt growth. And no
one will likely know for years whether they chose
the right medicine and the right dosage.

"My suspicion is that it will be a major drag on
the economy for a few years, and it may be we
decide in the future whether they went too
aggressively, but the political and market climate
right now is such that they had no choice," said
Loynes from Capital Economics.

The realization that Europe is bound to imple-
ment spending cuts that will hurt growth for
years to come has weighed on the euro, pushing
it to four-year lows below $1.19 earlier this
month. On Tuesday it traded at $1.2274, down
somewhat from Monday.

Economic stagnation in Europe would hurt
the US by crimping its exports just as America is
trying to limp its way out of its own slump. But
Obama's concerns are trumped by Europe's
desire to stabilize the European Union and the
euro.

"The EU accords priority to budget-cutting,
because that is what its leaders believe is needed
to preserve the euro and the political construction
of a united Europe," said Stephen Lewis of Lon-
don's Monument Securities.

The new bank fee authorized that Britain,
France and Germany committed to on Tuesday
will charge banks based how much they earn to
shield taxpayers from the cost of resolving finan-
cial crises. But their call for a global tax is unlike-
ly to find much response at the G-20 summit.

In a joint statement, the three nations said
they aimed to ensure that financial institutions are
making a “fair contribution" to reflect the risks
they pose to the financial system and "to encour-
age banks to adjust their balance sheets to reduce
this risk." Germany is already drafting legislation
for such a tax, and France promised to do so in its
next budget.

Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy
are expected to lobby hard at the G-20 meeting in
Toronto for a separate global financial transac-
tions tax, but Loynes said there is little chance of
approval and that their effort is aimed at shoring
up their political support at home.

"They are fully aware that their stance has lit-
tle chance of influencing the course of global
economic policy," he said.

"This is in line with the Continental European
tendency to assert the primacy of political over
economic concerns in policymaking. This, indeed,
underlies the division between the US adminis-
tration and EU authorities over fiscal policy."

But Obama expressed support this week for a
Spanish proposal passed in parliament Tuesday to
shake up the labour market by making it easier
for companies to lay off workers. Spain had
already pushed through an austerity plan to con-
vince markets it will not need a bailout to manage
its debt, as happened with Greece.

Some are not convinced the Spanish reforms
will prompt companies to hire en masse, which is
what Europe's fourth largest economy needs
desperately after recently crawling out of two
years of recession.

Unemployment now stands 20 per cent in the
nation of 45 million.

Bank of Spain governor Miguel Fernandez
Ordonez welcomed the labour reforms as a good
first step but said they do not go far enough.

Sandalio Gomez, professor of management at
IESE Business School in Madrid, said the gov-
ernment is trying to conceal that it is making it
easier and cheaper to lay off workers — some-
thing it had repeatedly said it would not do.

"They've missed a perfect opportunity — and
there are few like this — to transmit confidence
to the labor market, a push forward that would
allow jobs to be created," he said.

CLICO liquidator close to portfolio due diligence end

FROM page 1B

However, this newspaper
understands from sources close
to the situation that Mr Gomez
is now awaiting completion of
an updated actuarial valuation
of the liabilities - and benefit
provisions required to meet
them - which could be in his
hands within a matter of weeks.

Once that happens, and the
choice is made, the portfolio’s
purchase and transfer will
require the approval of both
the Supreme Court and the
Insurance Commission. The
Government is also awaiting
the actuarial report’s comple-
tion, as this will determine the
size of any guarantee it gives
to underpin any buyer.

Little new information was
divulged at the creditors’ meet-
ing, but Tribune Business also
understands that negotiations
with the Hines Group for the

sale of Wellington Preserve,
CLICO (Bahamas) main asset,
may also have hit an impasse
due to its attempts to secure a
‘low ball’ price from Mr
Gomez.

The Hines Group is still at
the negotiating table, though,
and Tribune Business under-
stands there are at least two
other serious potential buyers
in play, too. There is also anoth-
er group thought to have a
Bahamian representative which
has expressed an interest.

The meeting also took a vote
on whether to establish a CLI-
CO (Bahamas) creditors com-
mittee, although the outcome
is not yet known. The compa-
ny’s former employees opposed
the creation of such a body,
believing it would add another
layer of bureaucracy that would
slow down the liquidation
process and their receipt of

some $3 million due in sever-
ance pay.

“The meeting was called to
determine if a creditors com-
mittee should be established,”
Tribune Business’s source said.
“The liquidator took a vote, but
he did not disclose the result of
the vote. He wanted to check
those who voted, their rela-
tionship to the register, and
take into consideration their
weight as well as their number,
then let us know.

“The employees were against
acommittee. They didn’t seem
to appreciate the functions of a
committee. That view was
expressed quite strongly by the
employees, but what I was able
to determine was the other
creditors seemed to favour a
committee because it could
facilitate decision-making by
the liquidator and give them
input.”



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23,















2010

a - %

love my
Bahamas

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



photos in front of five unique murals and

sculptures on Frederick Street, that emerge
live in Technicolor. This is an early indication
that the Love My Bahamas Downtown Art Expe-
rience is definitely attracting a lot of buzz.

Vaughn Roberts, managing director of the Downtown Nassau
Partnership took the media and some of the artists from the pro-
ject on a street tour showcasing the final products of five of 15
murals that renew the scene of what is known as historic Nassau.
From what Tribune Arts noticed, it has definitely made an imme-
diate and visible difference in the downtown landscape.

“We are excited about the transformation that has already
taken place in this area, thanks to the diverse styles and talent
showcased by local and international professionals,” said Mr
Roberts.

“We look forward to continuing unveiling over the next few
weeks and would like to encourage everyone to visit downtown
and bask in the positive energy that the artwork is bringing to the
city.”

The pieces, including sculptures by Antonius Roberts titled
‘Down Home Gals’ and Tyrone Ferguson titled ‘Rake N Scrape’
and murals by Toby Lunn, Maya Hayuk and Daniel Weise of the
Urban Art Community, run south along Frederick Street from
Woodes Rogers Wharf to St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church steps
on Shirley Street.

The intent is to create a new awareness of the place we are in,
said Mr Roberts. “It’s meant to show the spirit of the people.”

Starting the art tour lineup was aymural called ‘Hello Nassau,’
designed by Brooklyn artist Thurdereut, who toiled day and night
for me, |

Testes have already been spotted posing for





A relaxing
experience

at Chives ;
Restaurant =

see page seven

The Tribune SECTION B ¢









‘dolly’ good
works of art

see page nine . |

























amazing; moments when the city was alive, and
moments when he felt like he and his team owned
the city.

“This painting was inspired by Junkanoo,” said
Maya Hayuk, an American painter, who said she want-
ed to create a universal Junkanoo theme, as some-
thing that everybody can enjoy.

Ms Hayuk, who expressed an affinity with mural
painting, said that her mural and others will add a
special touch to downtown because it is a type of art
that everyone connects with.

She said pictures of the mural have gone viral on
photography websites, including pictures of Junkanoo
Phoenix Rise, which features a Junkanoo bird woven
into the pattern..

“To aid some of the problem with persons putting
their dirty shoes on the wall, we painted the bottom of
the mural in dark colours to stop the possibility of
persons resting their foot on the wall,” said Ms Hayuk.

“Mural painting is outside of the gallery and market
of art. That’s what I love about it,” she said. “It is
outside of the boundaries of a glass case, as a piece that
is precious that can’t be touched.”

Along Frederick Street, up the hill, and along the
steps leading to an historic passageway is an art space
that people can relate to. Antonius Roberts and
Tyrone Ferguson are the masterminds behind these
works, which have attracted attention from passers
by.
“T wanted to do something that was in your face,”
said Mr Ferguson. “I wanted to celebrate the ingenuity
and creativity of the Bahamian spirit.

“My piece is all about rake and scrape,” said Anto-
nius Roberts. “The shapes and symbols are used to
celebrate Bahamian culture and heritage is what makes
it so appealing.”

He created Down Home Gals, an art piece about
Bahamian women, bringing the concept of Sacred
Spaces from the Western end of New Providence to
downtown.

In these sculptures, flowers are made from beer
bottles, and hats are carved from the wood. They are
ladies in natural form, said Mr Roberts, and their
character takes on the aura of women here.

“Tt invites the viewer to be apart of the installa-
tion,” he said.

“By the time the project is completed, it will be
worth up to $100,000,” said Vaughn Roberts. Maps
will be distributed at Festival Place for visitors to do
self guided tours.. Schooliand evening tours are! in



_ the works. The artists’ goa “i put thei iy ouch-





THE TRIBUNE

eS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 7B



The Tribune









SWEET potato, baby beet, toasted

almond and goat cheese on baby greens.



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net



lunch experience, satisfy-

ing the needs of your
appetite and mood, look no
further than Chives Restau-
rant in the New Providence
Community Centre on Blake
Road.

The entire restaurant nourishes the
body, mind, and spirit, giving you a
much needed break from the busy
workplace.

As you sit out on the patio, experi-
ence an open space with access to
fresh air flowing from nature’s gifts--
trees and flowers--with an overhead
concrete covering that shades you
from the hot sun.

I you desire a relaxing

Satisfying

It’s amazing that it can be 90
degrees outside, but on the patio,
where customers dine, it feels 20
degrees less than the actual tempera-
ture.

And besides the sitting area, com-

Enjoy a relaxing

Chives Restaurant



plimented by beautiful place settings,
table accents, and a black and white
mural; the food is divine. Perhaps it
received an extra blessing by operating
as an eatery outside of a house of wor-
ship.

Lise Russell, head chef, does a good
job at putting exotic ingredients
together and making them taste top of
the line. Yesterday, Tribune Taste
caught up with the busy restauran-
teur, who we discovered was making
deliveries to businesses in the west-
ern area while customers raved about
the food service.

Marie Souder, a staff member at
First Trust Bank had just received
refreshment platters from Chives; just
in time for a series of all day meet-
ings

“T love food from Chives, especial-
ly the spread that she made for us
today because it is something nicely
prepared,” said Ms Souder. “It’s a
working lunch, and it’s not finger food,
which is what I appreciate.”

The office brunch platters includ-
ed chicken and tuna dishes, with salad
and cookies. Ms Souder who is a fre-
quent customer appreciates that the
service is on time. On a given day,
she orders a whole wheat spicy tuna
wrap, which she calls “healthy and
light and creative.”

experience at



“Lise seems to use a combination of
things in her food,” raved Ms Souder.
“It’s always a surprise, as she may use
a series of things like sun dried toma-
toes, or feta cheese in her dishes.”

Spring mixed salad, made with
spinach, arugula, and friscee are pre-
pared fresh daily, supplied by Lucayan
Tropical Produce; an organic farm.

To incorporate some of Chives’
fresh ingredients into your home
cooked meals, you can purchase items
such as mango vinaigrette, quinoa and
amaranth organic grains at a counter
near the checkout line.

Healthy dishes

Continuing in this vein, a series of
organic ingredients, like chick peas,
wild rice, and Ragged Island sauce are
specially made by them.

With freshly made dishes like yel-
lowfin tuna bites, proscuitto wrapped
dates, salmon ceviche, mushroom feta
mini quiche, fresh seared yellow fin
tuna, and blackened chicken salad; you
won't have a difficulty ordering a deli-
cious meal.

Christy Winners, a frequent customer
of Chives is particularly fond of their
sandwiches. “It’s an alternative to the
sandwiches that other places sell,” she

PAN seared ginger grouper loin
with sesame and fresh cilantro.



told Tribune Taste.

“My kids love it, which is always a
plus, and we like the fact that it’s some-
thing different, fresh, and delicious.”

Tomato and feta kieche is an oven
baked delight, which is served by the
slice with a side salad, or can be ordered
as a pie. At Chives, they do at least
two vegan and vegetarian dishes every-
day.

In the mornings, muffins and crois-
sants, coffee, capuccinos, expressos, are
on tap daily. Sundays is Family Market,
where lunches like panini and lasagna,
served during the week are packaged
and ordered to-go discounted prices.
The markdown in price is their way of
giving back to the community says Lise.

During the week soothing music--
they call it ‘Chives Mix’--plays in your
ears, including Frank Sinatra and even
reggae favourites. Staff say that it’s
mellow enough for customers to have a
casual conversation without interrup-
tions.

Chives restaurant offers the perfect
atmosphere, with a kid friendly envi-
ronment featuring weekly story time
with Rosy.

According to Lise, “people shouldn’t
have to be afraid of healthy because
healthy can taste good. The food does-
n’t taste like cardboard here,” she
assures. We agree.



By ALESHA CADET

THE three day 13th
annual Crab Fest that
took place in Fresh Creek,
Andros embraced all visi-
tors and the thousands of
Bahamians from through-
out the family islands,
were all welcomed to this
“heritage event.”

The flashy coloured
Crab Fest site at Queen’s
Park was indeed the
“place to be” June 10 - 13.

The Androsians were
sent into a dancing session
Friday and Saturday night
when the lively Funky D
amused the crowd, along
with Elon Moxey who
performed his hits " Oh
My Andros" and "“Catch
The Crab". Stilletto was
also among the perform-
ers who kept the rake-n-
scrape beats going
throughout the night.

In the meantime,
natives took the time to
browse the colourful Crab
Fest site.

The mouth watering
scent of the well known
crab and rice surrounded
the entire area. There
were delicious choices of
crab and dough, stuffed
crab, crab salad, baked
crab, and crab soup, along
with fast food picks such
as crab patties, crab frit-
ters, and crab tarts.

The crowd that gath-
ered on the Crab Fest site
Saturday afternoon was
massive, boat-loads of
islanders came to support,
making the number of
people twice as much as
Friday.

Among the festivities
were a variety of contests
involving crabs and a pul-
sating Junkanoo parade
where everyone in the
crowd could not help but
join in. Members of Par-
liament such as Perry
Christie and Ryan Pinder
graced the crowd with
their appearance.

All aspects of the event
justified that whether it
was your first time, sec-
ond time or third time at
crab fest, " you will be
back next year.”

“The festival was defi-
nitely Bahamian culture
at its best.

And like every other
island in the Bahamas, the
lengthy beaches were the
ideal spots to have "fun
in the sun" in Andros.

‘@iesnuwece:

Tofu “ Chicken” Salad

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



FROM time to time, people curi-
ous about adding vegetarian meals to
their diets ask me for creative, tasty
ways to prepare tofu - a sometimes
daunting ingredient. Being the food-
ie that I am, I can riddle off a long list
of ways to prepare it: Blended in a
smoothie, in a breakfast scramble,
stir fried with fresh vegetables, crum-
bled into spaghetti sauce or with veg-
etables in a curry.

But truthfully, it's been a long time
since I've kicked my lazy butt in gear
and ventured outside of my own culi-
nary comfort zone and tried new
ways to eat one my staple foods.

So when a friend asked me to
make a tofu "chicken" salad, I admit
I was a little hesitant. Could I really
make a dish as good, or better, than
the real thing?

Would it be delicious enough to
rival my standby bean curd curry?



With these thoughts in mind, I
made a beeline for my kitchen and
whipped up a tasty, albeit simple,
dish that I am proud to add to my
repertoire.

The recipe, dubbed my Cruelty-
Free 'Chick'n’ Salad, is chock full of
goodness. Walnuts add crunch,
omega-3 fatty acids and an antioxi-
dant that boosts the immune system.
The nutritional yeast, a Vegan sup-
plement found in most health food
stores, adds a subtle cheesy flavor
and essential B vitamins (I use the
Red Star brand). And tofu, made
from coagulated soy milk which is
pressed into blocks, is packed with
protein and calcium.

For the first time ever, I even made
my own mayo which turned out to be
one of the easiest things to make and
tastes just like its processed and pack-
aged counterpart.

If you want to kick it up a notch,
add some cayenne pepper to the mix-
ture.

Serve the salad on whole grain

bread, in a wrap, or on a bed of your
favorite greens.

CRUELTY-FREE
‘CHICK’N’ SALAD

(recipe adapted from justthefood.com)
INGREDIENTS:

1 package extra firm tofu (drained
and cut into small cubes)

2-3 cloves of garlic, minced

2 ths coconut oil

1/2 cup shredded carrots

1/2 medium red onion, finely chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped

1/2 cup walnut pieces, chopped

1 cup raisins

1 cup Vegan mayonnaise (you can
usually find this in organic specialty
stores or better yet make it yourself)
1 ths nutritional yeast

sea salt and black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:
Chop up the tofu into little pieces.



Add olive oil to a skillet on medium high

heat and add garlic being careful not to

let it burn. After one minute add tofu.
Sauté until golden, about 7-10 min-

utes. Remove from heat and let cool.
Transfer tofu to a large bowl, then

add all other ingredients and mix well.
Chill before serving.

Vegan Mayonnaise
1 package silken tofu
1 tbs cider vinegar

1 tbs lemon juice

1 tbs sugar

1 tbs sea salt

1/3 - 1/2 cup olive oil

Place all ingredients except oil in a
food processor or blender and mix on
high speed a few minutes, until smooth.
Add the oil slowly, a little at a time until
desired texture. Makes about 2 cups.
Keep refrigerated, should last for a
week.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune



Pil





Mental Tears

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

‘When | need an escape | find
comfort in my writing,

My Words create an ambiance,
calm and enlightening.

But it’s more than just words,
More Than Just A Poem

It’s my heart, mind and soul in
metaphorical form."

IT’S amazing what a few
lines of poetry can do. It can
effect human emotions even
in the slightest way. It pro-
vokes meaningful reflection, it
can make one cry, make one,
happy, sad, lonely, or angry.

After the passing of his
grandmother, Domek D
Rolle found the inspiration to
compile an original collection
of poems in "My Mental
Tears: A Book of Poetry"
which brings out all of these
emotions. He reflects on the
trials and tribulations, mat-
ters of the heart, and some of
life's most happy moments.

"My Mental Tears is a pro-
ject that is born out of the
idea that all tears link all
human beings together emo-
tionally. We shed tears when
we are sad, angry, in love,
broken hearted, or even when
we find something extremely
funny. I believe that My Men-
tal Tears: A book of Poetry
is an honest depiction of raw
human emotion present in all
of us," he said.

His poems were inspired by
the people he came into con-

tact with over the years.

Their stories are at the
heart of this book and Mr
Rolle placed himself in their
shoes and tried to see life
through their eyes for that
moment. He found the inspi-
ration he needed and after-
wards he spoke with his pen.

"IT would be inspired just by
having a conversation with
someone and I would try to
imagine me going through the
same thing. I have a few
poems in there where I write
from a perspective of a slave.
So it is basically my past expe-
riences along with inspiration
from others," he explained.

His poems come from some
place deep. And when his
emotions are involved, his
poetic language is fluent. "I
don't just sit down and try to
write about something. It has
to come to me. If I am in my
car driving and something hits
me I will stop on the side of
the road and write it down,"
he said.

Mr Rolle has a way with
words. He uses them in a
smooth lyrical fashion that
leaves a subliminal imprint on
the mind.

Those who have heard his
poems have responded posi-
tively to his work. They were
impressed with the way he
used words and they nick-
named him Bahamian Shake-
speare.

"After my grandmother
passed away the next day I
started writing. I became

inspired and I started sharing
some of the poems with some
of my friends and they would
tell me that the poems were
good. And some of my inter-
national friends started call-
ing me the Bahamian Shake-
speare," he said.

"The student union shared
my work to the student body
and I was amazed by the
response I was getting from
persons from different coun-
tries. Many of them said they
could relate to the poems and
they encouraged me to pub-
lish," Mr Rolle told Tribune
Entertainment.

One of his most memorable
poems in the book is Father
Figure. "I wrote that when my
father passed away last year.
It is just speaking about me
now having to find the
answers for my self. My father
was always there and I looked
to him for all the answers.
Now I have to find the
answers for myself."

Another poem he said he
favours is Middle Passage, a
poem where he takes a walk
through history.

"There is a poem in there
for everyone. Most of the
poems in there, the average
person can relate to because
it’s real and it’s honest and I
use all human emotions in this
book," Mr Rolle said.

He has presented the book
to the former Governor Gen-
eral, the Prime Minister and
the Minister of Youth Sports
and Culture.





ra

DOMEK and his wife Cyprianna Rolle a present a copy of "My
Mental Tears: A Book Of Poetry" to the then Governor General

3

of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas Arthur D Hanna.

Domek D Rolle is a native
of Grand Bahama. He was
the president of Toastmaster
Club 602485, an alumnus of
the College of the Bahamas, a
law graduate of the Univer-
sity of Buckingham, and is
presently enrolled at the
Eugene Dupuch Law School.

Mr Rolle writes in such a
way that his poems break all
barriers, and his work appeals

to people of all classes:

When | put pen to paper I'm
amazed by the results,

As words come alive with a
heartbeat and a pulse,

It’s More Than Just A Poem,
more than just a rhyme

It's my characteristics and feel-
ings frozen in time.

— Domek D Rolle



Under a Summer Moon

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



THERE is no better setting than a
cloudless sky and a big bright full moon
to kick off the Summer Moon live
music party, a celebration and fundrais-
er wrapped in one.

When Noelle Nichols one of organ-
isers of the event, sat down with Tri-
bune Entertainment to explain the idea
behind the Summer Moon Party, I
thought to myself wow what an inter-
esting concept.

The idea alone will probably make
you want to go out and see what this
summer moon madness is all about.

She explained that the moon influ-
ences many things in life for instance
weather patterns, ocean tides and nat-
ural disaster. Its mystical energy has
now influenced and become the inspi-
ration behind Summer Moon Party.

There is a ten day countdown for
the event and based on the energies
of the moon the organisers are asking
the question "What's you moon vibra-
tion?"

"The moon has meaning beyond its
beauty and mysticism. The full moon is
admired in away a sunrise or sunset is
admired. But beyond that sort of face
value, the moon has a lot of meaning
and it impacts our lives in a lot of dif-
ferent ways.

Take sensuality for example the
moon represents a sensual feminine
energy. This sensual energy represents
the moon energy. Sensuality is one of
the things that we focus on when we
say what’s your moon vibration, anoth-
er thing is passion.

"When the moon is full, that's like
the peak of it’s cycle and at the peak is
when passion is most full. So the full
moon representing passion is based on

xo) aesiali

our understanding of how the moon
cycles and when it is at the peak of it’s
cycle that’s when the energy of pas-
sion is at it greatest," she said.

Ms Nichols said the event is based
around this concept because they want-
ed to do something out of the ordi-
nary.

"We just wanted to bring back a kind
of cultural consciousness about the
moon even though its really being done
in subliminal way. We understand what
we are doing. We understand what the
moon is about and why the party is
called Summer Moon and why it is
falling on the same day as the summer
solstice.

“So we just wanted to bring back a
cultural consciousness to celebrate
these energies of the moon,” Ms
Nichols said.

The night will be a night of celebra-
tion since there will be a signature
entertainment hour called the "Red-
stripe Midnight Mystics Hour" which
features two live performances by
Willis & The Illest Reggae Band, and
Rhthym Revolution Drummers. Selec-
tor Ty will also be the DJ for the night.

"This is going to be a party where
people will be having a good time.
Because that is what we are all about.
People can expect to be thoroughly
entertained both by the band and the
DJ," she said.

While they are all up for a good time
Ms Nichols said the main reason they
are hosting the event is to raise funds
that will go towards supporting victims
of child abuse.

"The party is a fundraiser and the
funds will go towards supporting vic-
tims of child abuse and sexual violence
through various charitable organisa-
tions including one that I am in the
process of creating called the Woman

A

=

ec meeg iter’:

of Steel Safe House Initiative which is
a plan to create emergency shelter for
victims of sexual violence and child
abuse,” she explained.

There will be giveaways, free food,
free sangria, free redstripe which will be
available during the midnight mystic
hour. “Person will leave the event as

Atlantis Live: Taylor Swift

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor



LONG before she was infamously
interrupted at the MTV music
awards last year, a then 17-year-old
Taylor Swift dazzled country music
fans with a sweet debut song called
Tim McGraw which propelled her
into super stardom.

When I told a friend that I would
be attending her concert at Atlantis
on Saturday evening, their response
was “oh that’s the girl that Kayne
West dissed, what’s the big deal
about her.”

While that may have been her
introduction to many people, to

many more, Taylor is a big deal and
very talented. After all she writes
her own songs, plays her guitar and
is refreshly young. Not a young girl
trying to be more adult than she is,
like some other tween stars. Instead
she writes about things she has expe-
rienced - having a crush on her
friend who tells her about his girl-
friend, being fifteen and learning
about love. It endears her to not only
the younger generation but their
parents as well. There’s a reason why
she has hit it big at so many award
shows- a lot of people like country
music and a lot of people love Taylor
Swift.

Her sold out concert attracted
hordes of young screaming fans

dressed head to toe in Taylor gear all
singing along with her at the top of
their lungs in between the shouts of
“We love you Taylor.” It was defi-
nitely a loud night.

Taylor wearing a “ sparkly” purple
dress and black knee boots rocked
the crowd singing all her best hits
such as Fearless, Teardrops on my
Guitar, Our Song, Fifteen, White
Horse, Shoulda Said No, Today Was
A Fairytale, Tim McGraw, You
Belong With me and ending the night
with a hot-blooded performance of
her angry ex-girlfriend anthem Pic-
ture to Burn.

Fans were not disappointed, to her
credit she puts on an engerisied show
singing her ballads with sweetness

B10) |= Xone





Togs cot tie me Spiele ney es

full as the moon in the sky."

The Summer Moon Party will be
held at Rockers Island located in the
back of the Taj

Mahal on Parliament Street. The
event begins at 10pm this Saturday.

Ticket are $6 for ladies before 12am
and $8 for men.

and feeling
and then
rocking out
her uptempo
songs, danc-
ing all over
the stage and
into the
crowd. From
the scream-
ing ovation,
she recieved
at the end of
the concert,
the night was
obviously a hit.

This event was a continuation of
the concert series Atlantis Live
which features a hot artist from a
variety of musical genres in concert
at the resort each month.

On July 17, Katy Perry is sched-
uled to perform, followed by Lady
Antebellum on September 19.



Taylor Swift





© 397TH RBC BAHAMAS
NATIONAL SWIMMING
CHAMPIONSHIPS

The Bahamas Swimming
Federation presents the
39th RBC Bahamas
National Swimming Cham-
pionships at the Betty Kel-
ly Kenning Swimming
Complex from June 23 -
June 26. Cost: $3/children
10-and-under; $5/prelimi-
nary sessions; $10/champi-
onship finals admission;
$5/programme;$2/heat
sheets; $50/supporter's
package. See
www.bahamasswim-
mingfederation.com for
more information.

© SUMMER MOON (THE
ULTIMATE) FULL MOON PARTY

Kick off the summer
with the ultimate full moon
party, ‘Summer Moon,’
Saturday, June 26, 10pm-
3am at Rocker's Island,
also known as the Taj-
Mahal. Sip free Sangria,
munch free food and enjoy
free Red Stripe during the
Red Stripe Midnight Mys-
tic hour. Cost: $6/ladies,
$8/gents. Email: noelleni-
colisteemail, com

* AIDS FOUNDATION'S MID-

SUMMER'S WHITE PARTY
The AIDS Foundation
of The Bahamas presents
a Mid-Summer's White
Party, Saturday, June 26,
7pm at The Balmoral Club.
Donation: $150, includes
drinks, food and entertain-
ment. Telephone: 325-9326.

© SAC ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION'S 10TH
ANNUAL STEAK OUT

St. Augustine's College
Alumni Association hosts
its 10th annual steak out
with succulent steaks, ice
colds beers and SAC
Alumni merchandise on
sale. Saturday, June 26,
12pm-6pm on Western
Esplanade. Tickets: $10.
Proceeds in aid of Campus
Development.

© SPARTY ENTERTAINERS’
SPA-PARTY

Sparty Entertainers
invites you to a Spa-Party,
the event of a lifetime for
all exclusive ladies, mothers
and daughters that includes
a total spa experience,
mini-facials, manicures,
pedicures and massages.
Sunday, June 27,

lpm-9pm at Garden of
Eden. Cost: $170, includes
complimentary appetizers
and wine. RSVP, T: 636-
5474, 434-9421 or 324-2978.
Email: alisey_tynes@hot-
mail.com

© JOTH ANNUAL DUKE
OF EDINBURGH CUP
GOLF TOURNAMENT

Kerzner International
presents the 10th annual
Duke of Edinburgh Cup
Golf Tournament, begin-
ning 8am at the One and
Only Ocean Club Golf
Course, Sunday, June 27.
Donation: $2,500/four-man
team. Tee sponsorship:
$1,000. Proceeds in aid of
Governor-General's Youth
Award. T: 326-1760. Email:
ggya@coralwave.com

* GGYA BAHAMAS AWARD
SCHEME EXPEDITION'S 2010
SUMMER CHALLENGE

The Governor-General's
Youth Award Bahamas
Award Scheme Expedition
presents the 2010 summer
challenge in Long Island
that includes 5, 4 and 3 day
adventurous journey for
bronze, silver and gold par-
ticipants ages 14-25, explo-
ration of caves, blue holes
and rugged cliffs, and train-
ing in award work and
leadership skills, from June
29 - July 8. Telephone:
326-1760.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 9B














"JOLLY"

~ m= GOOD WORKS OF

ART

we By REUBEN SHEARER
— Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net







all Franklyn Jolly, a master recyclist who
takes the conch shells fishermen and ven-
dors toss aside and turns them into conch
souvenirs which perfectly capture the essence

of a Bahamain vacation.

Mr Jolly has made a business of designing conch souvenirs
which are sold in his stall at Festival Place Welcome Center and
Jewels By The Sea store in Cable Beach.

Everything he creates is quintessentially Bahamian. Blue
marlin, hibiscus, flamingo, grouper, palm tree, sailboat, and sea-
horse sculptures, and junkanoo masks and dishes and spoons

are all cut out from the conch shell and sold as Mr Jolly’s

creations. He also makes carvings of the Bahamian Nassau

grouper, star fish, stingray, sea turtle, and angel fish as

well as conch shell trophies that businesses like The Lyford
Cay Tennis Club purchase for competitions and tourna-
ments throughout the year.

The Lyford Cay Club’s tennis director Sarah Disston told
Tribune arts that the tennis club has become the biggest sup-
porters of Mr Jolly’s work, requesting his trophies as awards for
individual prizes at their tournaments.

“Basically how it came about is that we wanted for our
junior tournament something like an award that had a Bahami-
an feel to it,” said Ms Disston.

“Mr Jolly took his conch shell and put it on a trophy base,
and it looked beautiful,” she added. “We wanted it to take on
a Bahamian feeling rather than a plastic trophy that doesn’t
look unique and certainly does not represent the Bahamas in
anyway.” Ms Disston, and Betty Jane Dean-owner of Jewels By
The Sea store on West Bay St-are grateful toMr Jolly for tak-
ing the ‘junk’ that fisherman dispose of and turning it into
natural ‘national’ treasures.











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FILES




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Pin blowin’ it

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Volume: 106 No.175

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SUNNY AND
ot ESTORM





The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST





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A oct aOR

Culprits flee

after struggle a

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER and her son
fought off two home invaders
who broke into their home ear-
ly yesterday.

The drama began when the
sleeping mother awoke and
found two men in dark clothing
and hooded jackets, allegedly
armed with a firearm, in her
bedroom at their Infant View
Road home.

She screamed for help, and
her son, who was sleeping in
another room, rushed to her
aid.

Assistant Superintendent

Clayton Fernander, of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit, said: "They
entered the home. We suspect
they picked the lock, jimmied
the lock of the kitchen door.

"There was a struggle. It
started in the mother's bed-
room and ended up in the front
room area. She screamed and
alerted the son, the son came in
and there was a struggle from
there."

Police were called to the
scene around 3am and were
told that during the confronta-
tion the son, said to be in his
early to mid-20s, was able to
disarm one of the thugs by

SEE page 11

FNM: Opposition’s Director of Public
Prosecutions criticism is ‘hypocrisy’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



LABELLING as “hysteria and hypocrisy” the Opposition’s
growing criticism of the appointment of a foreigner as the new
Director of Public Prosecutions, the FNM says the PLP’s past
actions conflict with their current argument.

In a press statement yesterday, the party pointed out that

SEE page 11



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BAHAMAS EDITION

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

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SEE PAGE SEVEN



BAHAMAS BIGGEST fiir

Mum anit Son fight
Off home invaders

Government
schools set for
major repairs

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net





FREEPORT -— The Ministry
of Education is preparing to
start major repairs at various
government schools here this
summer.

The scope of works for
school repairs is expected to
be released this week and sent
out to tender by the Ministry
of Education, according to an

SEE page 11









Da ud RAISES aaa Sy Wt

RACARO CLARKE, who was
born June 18 at 24 weeks,
weighing just two pounds
and 12 ounces, touches the
hand of his mother yester-
day.

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

DESPITE the current
economic climate, over
150 private and corporate
entities nation-wide con-
tributed to a life-saving
fundraiser for high risk,
premature, or critically ill
new borns.

Organized by the
Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation, The
Rotary Club of East Nas-
sau, Doctors Hospital,
The Tribune Media, and
Tile King, the “Breathe
Easy Campaign” raised
nearly $400,000.

The funds purchased
eight ventilators and
three incubators for
Princess Margaret Hos-
pital’s Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit, the only
NICU in the region.

SEE page 11





a
als

SIM cards ‘ may

be being used in

prison illegally’
By NOELLE NICOLLS

Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



in cell phones, it was said yesterday.

International consultant Howard :
Melamed made the claim at the fourth :
annual conference of the Association of
Caribbean Heads of Corrections and :

Prison Services (ACHCPS), presently
underway in the Bahamas.

SEE page 11



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“PLP reportetly facing difficulties
in choosing election nominee

WITH former representatives, new candi-

: dates, and Senators waiting in the wings, the
: PLP is reportedly facing some difficulty in choos-
: ing which nominee will get a chance to represent
: the party in the next general election.

According to information received by The
Tribune, the PLP has actually taken to asking

SIM cards being sold by vendors near to : persons who had expressed an interest in run-

Her Majesty’s Prison are probably get- :

ting into the prison and being used illegally overwhelming in some Key “black belt” seats.

ning to possibly withdraw their nomination and
“wait” for another term as the interest has been

However, there has also been reports that in
some instances, this offer by the candidates com-
mittee was not always as altruistic as one would
believe.

In one “die-hard” PLP seat, an up-and-coming

: young PLP nominee was reportedly asked not to
: run as his perceived “lifestyle choices” could

Lax regulations around the sale of SIM :
cards is a worldwide problem contributing :
to the illegal use of cell phones inside pris- ;
ons, said Mr Melamed, who is also presi- :
dent of Cell Antenna, a US-based com- :
pany specializing in cell phone jamming :

hinder his chances and that of the party of win-
ning the seat.

With this nominee having the perceived back-
ing of influential members within the party, the
candidates committee is said to be working
“overtime” to ensure that the “absolute best”

SEE page 11





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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Thirteen candidates emerge from first
round COB presidential search process

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THIRTEEN candidates
have emerged from the first
elimination round of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas’ presi-
dential search process.

The candidates were short-
listed from a pool of 82
Bahamian and non-Bahami-
an applicants, in accordance
with the skills and expertise
guidelines established by the
college (http://www.cob.
edu.bs/ Administration/Pres-
identSearch/PositionPro-
file.pdf).

With the help of US search
consultants Academic Search
Inc, the search committee has
begun a series of reference
checks from which they will
select no more than eight
candidates to move into the
evaluation phase of the
process.

These semi-finalists will
each be interviewed by the
ASC and a maximum of four
finalists chosen.

In a letter to the academic
community, Chair of the Col-
lege Council and the Advi-
sory Search Committee T
Baswell Donaldson
explained: “During the open-
ing weeks of the Fall 2010
semester, finalists will be
invited to visit the campus an
d meet with the college com-
munity at large.
Based on these visits, mem-
bers of the college commu-
nity will be invited to share th
eir views on each finalist’s suit
ability for the position. All fe
edback shared will be held in
strict confidence.”

The college president’s
areas of responsibility
include:

¢ Relations with the exter-
nal community

¢ Hiring faculty and staff

¢ Working effectively with
the leadership team

¢ Organising funding

¢ Effectively leading a
developing institution.

In terms of education cre-
dentials and professional

experience, the successful
candidate must have:

¢ A masters degree (doc-
torate or the equivalent is
preferred)

¢ Seven to 10 years of
senior administrative/ lead-
ership experience in pro-
gressively more responsible
positions, with a strong
record of achievement (at
the higher education level is
preferred).

¢ Demonstrated under-
standing of and sensitivity to
diversity in academic, socioe-
conomic, cultural, and eth-
nic backgrounds, and tireless
support for multicultural sen-
sitivity.

According to the position
profile, all applicants should
be available for appointment
by early fall this year.

Mr Donaldson encouraged
community feedback on the
process and urged persons to
visit the college’s website
(http:/Awww.cob.edu.bs/Admi
nistration/PresidentSearch/)
to keep informed on the
progress of the search.








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Neymour dismisses
criticism from Roberts
over handling of BEC

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State for
the Environment Phenton
Neymour dismissed criti-
cism of his handling of the
Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration by PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts as nothing
more than a “cheap”
attempt to gain “political
brownie points.”

Over the weekend, BEC
issued a statement advising
the public that due to the
high temperatures and con-
sequent increase in demand
for power to run air condi-
tioners, some of its genera-
tors at Clifton Pier experi-
enced problems that result-
ed in power cuts.

Making reference to Mr
Neymour’s budget commu-

a
aU es
Wes te)
PHONE: 822-2157



T 242.325.6633 ¢ F 242.325-6638

c oOo m

nication in the House of
Assembly, in which he
assured the public that BEC
had made the necessary
preparations for the sum-
mer months and that power
outages were not foresee-
able, Mr Roberts said the
junior minister has been
noticeably silent on this
matter.

“Information coming to
the attention of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party
strongly advises that the
summer of 2010 is likely to
be a very miserable one and
will bring further hardship
to residences, in particular
the elderly and the young.

“The PLP is very sad-
dened by the large number
of families (estimated at
some 10,000, including
Grand Bahama) who are
without electricity. Further,
the numbers of homes being
disconnected by BEC with-
out any hope of reinstate-
ment are growing daily as
unemployment continues to
escalate,” Mr Roberts said.

However, Mr Neymour
was quick to rebuff the
PLP’s chairman’s comments
as utter nonsense — point-
ing out that as the Minister
of State for the Environ-
ment he has no direct
responsibility for the Grand
Bahama Power Company
which regulates the elec-
tricity needs of residents on
that island.

Further, Mr Neymour
said, the financial difficul-
ties that BEC currently
finds itself in — which are
reportedly hindering repairs
to the damaged generators —
are a direct result of the
mismanagement by Mr
Roberts himself, who served
as the minister with respon-
sibility for BEC during the
last PLP administration
when electricity rates were
lowered in 2003.

As for the damaged gen-
erators at Clifton Pier, Mr





gO Dee a OL

Neymour was proud to
report that some have now
been brought back online,
and will soon be producing
260 megawatts - 57
megawatts over the current
level of demand.

“What had happened was
that BEC’s capacity
dropped down to approxi-
mately 214 megawatts,
which is below the peak
demand of 230 megawatts
and so we had to load shed
during peak periods. We
were able to repair some of
the generators and bring
BEC’s capacity yesterday
up to 238 megawatts by
repairing a number of those
generators. We are now
repairing generator DAQ,
generator DAO, and DA11.
We expect to be up to 260
megawatts which is more
than sufficient at peak time.

“What happened essen-
tially is that we had run into
challenges on a number of
generators on consecutive
days that were unforeseen
and unexpected. So we do
not foresee any additional
challenges. As for Mr
Roberts’ comments, I find
them irresponsible and I do
not regard him as one with
much knowledge in this
area anyway,” Mr Neymour
said.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

PN Ae l8- (eel Ip lZ

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 3



Man and wife

are charged in
connection with
Marijuana seizure

A MAN and his wife
arrested in connection
with the seizure of $48,000
worth of marijuana have
been formally charged in
Magistrates Court.

Alfred Marvin Dawkins,
32; and his wife Rene
Dawkins, 30; of West
Ridge Estates, are accused
of possessing marijuana

with the intent to supply it.

It is alleged that on Fri-
day, June 8, the couple
was found with 48 pounds
of marijuana.

Mr Dawkins, who was
arraigned on Monday
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethell, entered a not
guilty plea. He was
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

His wife, who was
arraigned yesterday, also
pleaded not guilty to the
charge.

Both are expected back
in court on Monday for a
bail hearing.

A man who had a war-
rant outstanding for 16
years on a drug charge has
been sentenced to nine
months in prison.

Vinslo Billups was
charged in 1994 with pos-
session of dangerous
drugs and possession of
drugs with the intent to
supply.

He was reportedly
found in possession of two
and a quarter pounds of
marijuana.

Billups was convicted
and a warrant for his
arrest was issued in
November 1995 after he
failed to appear in court
for sentencing.

At the time, his lawyer
indicated that he was
imprisoned in the United
States.

Billups, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethell on Monday,
claimed that he had been
imprisoned in the US for
four years before return-
ing to the Bahamas.

Magistrate Bethell sen-
tenced Billups to nine
months in prison along

with a $10,000 fine. Failure |

to pay the fine will result
in an additional year of
imprisonment.

A 21-YEAR-OLD man
was arraigned in Magis-
trates Court on Monday
on attempted murder
charges.

Carl Fisher of Bacardi
Road is accused of the
April 2 attempted murder
of Michael Conti and
Justin Munroe.

Fisher is also accused of
causing harm to Justin
Major.

The accused, who was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Derrence Rolle-
Davis in Court Five, Bank
Lane, was not required to
enter a plea.

He was granted bail in
the sum of $30,000 and
ordered to surrender all
travel documents.

Fisher was also ordered
to report to the
Carmichael Road Police
Station every day.

His case was adjourned
to October 5 and 6.



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Prison Department is
reviewing bids submitted by cell
phone jamming specialists in an
open tender process, said Dr
Elliston Rahming, Superinten-
dent of Prisons.

Once a service provider is
selected, the prison intends to
use the technology to block the
illegal use of cell phones.

“Like prisons everywhere
around the world, we are chal-
lenged by the importation of
cellular phones. There are
clearly too many that come in —
one cell phone is too many —
and it is my resolve to bring
those numbers to an irreducible
minimum. But failing that we
will jam them, including my
phone,” said Dr Rahming.

Last month the prison
acquired six service dogs includ-
ing attack dogs, drug sniffing
dogs and cell phone sniffing
dogs.

Prisoners use cell phones to
alert criminal counterparts on
the outside of upcoming court
dates and thereby arrange for
the intimidation of witnesses,
according to Leslie Campbell
from the Jamaica Department
of Correctional Services. He
said, “Cell phones are rampant
in every corner of the prison in
Jamaica”, and corrupt prison
officers bring them in.

Dr Rahming said the
Jamaican experience is applic-
able to the Bahamas. “Once
they get use of the cell phones
(they use them for) whatever
use they can imagine, whatever
needs they can fulfill,” he said.

The Prison Act states that
communication between
inmates and outsiders must be
made within the “sight and
sound” of an officer. If an
inmate uses a cell phone, he or
she is in violation of the Prison
Act.

As for prison officers, it is
against regulations for all
guards to have cell phones with-
in the living confines of
inmates.

There are many criminal uses
prisoners find for cell phones,
according to Howard Melamed,
president of Cell Antenna, a
US-based company specialising
in cell phone jamming technol-
ogy. Mr Melamed was a pre-
senter at the forth annual con-
ference of the Association of
Caribbean Heads of Correc-
tions and Prison Services
(ACHCPS), presently under-
way in the Bahamas.








Kris Ingraham/BIS



Mana of Her Nocona Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming

He said prisoners can oper-
ate cell phones as servers, and
conduct business online. When
they have access to credit cards,
he said they order products and
have them sent to the prison as
gifts. He said they also use cell
phones to intimidate witness-
es, and to operate gambling,
extortion and prostitution rings
on the outside.

There are examples of pris-
oners charged with rape, using
their cell phones to “constantly
harass” victims by making
repeated late night phone calls
and sending text messages, said
Mr Melamed.

One prisoner, who had under
two years left to serve on his
sentence, continued to operate
as a pimp from inside the
prison.

He used the money collected
to “buy drugs and other ser-
vices” inside the prison, he said.

In his experience, Mr
Melamed said, the few prison
officers who are involved in
trafficking cell phones into pris-
ons hide it from authorities and
are disciplined once they are
discovered. However, he said
every one has a price, and pris-
ons should implement regula-
tions to reduce the possibility of
officers being corrupted.

“No guard should have a cell
phone. It is too much of a sweet
habit, worse than cocaine. Sell-
ing cell phones in prison can
turn some of the best. You
don’t want it to be something
they think of,” said Mr
Melamed.

“Everyone has the same
problems. The politicians only
get on the bandwagon when
something happens,” he said.

Dr Rahming said he suspect-
ed a cell phone jamming sys-
tem would also be “tremen-
dously relevant” to the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, recalling an incident
where a former prison officer

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called him while being detained
there.

He said the former employee
was detained by immigration
officials and scheduled for
deportation to Jamaica. He said
he got a call early in the morn-
ing from the former employee
asking for help. “I asked, how
are you calling me? She said
someone down here has a cell
phone”.

He said the incident revealed
the problem extended beyond
the prison into other security
agencies.

A cell phone jamming device
was purchased over four years
ago; however that device was
a military unit and knocked out
cell phones from Yamacraw to
Sea Breeze.

Despite attempts to recali-
brate the device, it had to be
discarded.

Dr Rahming said the prison
is trying to get “a more circuital
system to be contained within
the prison environment”.




ee Bee Biles
aR LL
sa AW icy
gute Da ECs
322-2197

Prison dept looks into cell
phone jamming technology








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Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
¢ Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121





CARL G, TRECO, OBE

1923-2010

After a long illness, Carl G. Treco, OBE
passed away peacefully on the morning
of Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010. He will be
greatly missed by his family and friends.
Funeral arrangements to follow.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

General’s remarks echo troubled Afghan war

WASHINGTON (AP) — The war in
Afghanistan appears in disarray.

The commanding general's disrespectful
remarks about President Barack Obama and
his team are the latest setback for a nine-
year war rocked by rising casualties, declining
public support, growing doubts among allies
and feuding between Washington and Kabul.

Whether he fires Gen. Stanley McChrystal
or lets him survive with a harsh scolding,
Obama opens himself to further political
attack as he struggles to keep his balance in
the midst of the nation's economic woes and
the environmental devastation from the Gulf
oil spill.

The Republican opposition will likely seize
on the McChrystal flap as evidence of Oba-
ma's weakness as commander in chief, even
though the party supports the president's
Afghan policy.

Liberal Democrats were already disen-
chanted with Obama for continuing to fight
the war against daunting odds and at huge
cost.

The White House would not say on Tues-
day if McChrystal will be fired, but declared
he had made an “enormous mistake" in the
unflattering Rolling Stone magazine article
and that "all options are on the table."

McChrystal's immediate boss, Defence
Secretary Robert Gates, called the com-
manding general's remarks a "distraction"
from the United States’ "singular focus” of
"fighting a war against al-Qaida and its
extremist allies, who directly threaten the
United States, Afghanistan, and our friends
and allies around the world."

McChrystal's troubles with Obama are
not new and began shortly after he was
named commander in May 2009. The gener-
al sent Gates a report that concluded the
Afghan mission required 40,000 more troops
or the United States faced mission failure.

The assessment was leaked and deeply
angered the White House that was in the
midst of a protracted study of how to prose-
cute the war. Some said McChrystal was bul-
lying the administration. In the end, Obama
agreed to send 30,000 additional troops, giv-
ing McChrystal nearly all the resources he
wanted.

McChrystal had already been called to
account once by Obama after the commander
publicly derided Vice President Joe Biden's
position that called for a small troop increase
with a heavy emphasis on counter-insurgency
efforts to win over the Afghan people.

Since then U.S. troop deaths in the war
crossed the 1,000 mark late last month. A
mission to take control of the city of Marja in
the south has not been the clear success
promised by the military. Rolling Stone said
McChrystal calls it a "bleeding ulcer."

And McChrystal seems to have sided with
Afghan President Hamid Karzai — who is
clearly on the outs with the administration —

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on how to conduct a long-promised offen-
sive on Kandahar, the biggest city in the
south and a Taliban stronghold. The Kan-
dahar operation is considered crucial to the
US. strategy to turn back the Taliban.

A statement from Karzai's office on Tues-
day defended McChrystal.

"The president believes that Gen.
McChrystal is the best commander that
NATO and coalition forces have had in
Afghanistan over the past nine years," the
statement said.

But that is likely to do McChrystal more
harm than good given the Karzai's falling
stock at the White House.

Obama's troubles in Afghanistan, as bad
as McChrystal public complaints have now
made them, do not stop with internal USS. dis-
putes.

The US. war effort, which has always been
tinged with the bad odour of America's
defeat in Vietnam, also has caused troubles
for Washington's allies in the fight.

On Monday, Britain marked the 300th
death among its Afghan forces, and new
Prime Minister David Cameron called that
"desperately bad news."

The same day, Britain's Foreign Office
confirmed that its outspoken special envoy to
Afghanistan and Pakistan had taken an
extended leave of absence after reports of
rifts with his U.S. colleagues in the region.

Sherard Cowper-Coles has long had a rep-
utation for frank talk and was once quoted as
saying the war in Afghanistan was doomed to
fail.

Canada, another key ally in the conflict,
removed its top military commander in
Afghanistan for allegedly having an inap-
propriate relationship with a female subor-
dinate. Canada is withdrawing all its forces
next year.

Poland's interim president said Tuesday he
will end his country's military mission in
Afghanistan in 2012, if he wins next month's
runoff election.

Bronislaw Komorowski said he would
start scaling back Poland's force of some
2,600 troops in 2011, and end the mission the
following year. That, he said, only echoes
Obama's promise to start bringing U.S.
troops home in July 2011.

The Netherlands will withdraw all its
forces on August 1.

McChrystal took command in Afghanistan
after Obama fired Gen. David McKiernan
13 months ago.

That was the first presidential dismissal of
a wartime general since President Harry Tru-
man ousted Gen. Douglas MacArthur during
the Korean War.

History may be repeating itself more
quickly this time.

(This article was written by Steven R. Hurst,
Associated Press Writer).



Bran McCartney —
a politician with
popular appeal

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There have been many
incidences these days that
has begun to distinguish the
difference between the
politicians who are hell bent
on keeping power in the
same families and genu-
flecting to special interest
groups instead of a new kind
of sensitive politician who is
genuine in, not only their
words, but their actions.
None in leadership these
days seem to remember the
people who are not con-
nected to anyone.

Since November of last
year much has happened
politically in both parties.
There were many interest-
ing “musical chairs” events.
People were shuffled
around. The PLP saw the re-
emergence of a stale politi-
cian who was chased off the
scene apparently from pres-
sure of his own party. The
deputy leader’s race was
hyped and lived up to the
hype.

The FNM also had their
share of drama, the much
anticipated chairman’s race
ended with mystery, drama
and political horse-trading
and manoeuvrings
unmatched. Then months
later there was a great
crescendo with the resigna-
tion from the Cabinet by the

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



Hon Branville McCartney.
There was no shortage of
speculations as to why and
why now, but as they say the
rest is history.

Since then, Mr McCart-
ney has been focusing on his
constituency. Doing what he
always has been doing and
that is serving. He has grad-
ually caught the attention of
many Bahamians who could
see clearly how sincere this
man really is. The children
know his goodness and the
precious pearls are singing
his praises. People in Bam-
boo Town could care less
about party colours; it is
Bran who lifts their spirits.

There is no politician in
history that can erase the
imaginary line of division
between parties.

He is being well sought
after as a public speaker
because most organisations
know that he possesses what
all of the potential leaders
in the PLP and FNM do not
have, and that’s popular
appeal. He has distinguished
himself from the likes of
Tommy Turnquest, who lost
the 2002 election in an
embarrassing way, and

Brave Davis who simply
does not matchup. So he has
more political currency than
all of the potential leaders
today.

His most recent address
to the Commencement Cer-
emony at Sojourner-Dou-
glass College showed that
he is encouraging us to be
educated, enabled and
empowered. This would
help us to be employers
rather than employees.

Mr McCartney is strong,
yet he captures the attention
of the children and the
seniors. He is compassion-
ate and will appreciate the
sensitive nature of things as
it relates to people’s feeling.
But he has already displayed
that he would make a tough
decision.

PLP more than anyone
else want Mr McCartney,
even though he is an FNM.
This speaks volumes.
Recently we have been hol-
lering a new kind of leader-
ship, to take this country in
another direction, now we
have a powerful candidate
that fits the bill. FNM had
better take note, because
they know what happened
when they chose a candidate
that had no popular appeal.

SEAN THOMPSON
Nassau,
June 18, 2010.

Drug prohibition and violence in Jamaica

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The violence in Jamaica
is because of drug prohibi-
tion, not in spite of it.

The US drug war has
done little other than to give
the land of the free the high-
est incarceration rate in the
world.

Zero tolerance hasn’t
deterred use, in fact the US
has higher rates of drug use
than European Union coun-
tries that have decrimi-
nalised.

Drug prohibition finances
organised crime at home
and terrorism abroad, which
is then used to justify
increased drug war spend-
ing.

It’s time to end this mad-
ness and instead treat all
substance abuse, legal or
otherwise, as the public
health problem it is.

Thanks to public educa-
tion efforts, tobacco use has
declined considerably in

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recent years. Apparently
mandatory minimum prison
sentences, civil asset forfei-
ture, random drug testing
and racial profiling are not
necessarily the most cost-
effective means of discour-
aging unhealthy choices.

United Nations drug stats:

http://www.unodc.org/

Comparative analysis of
US vs Dutch rates of drug
use:

http://www.drugwar-
facts.org/thenethe.htm

ROBERT SHARPE

Policy Analyst

Common Sense for Drug
Policy

www.csdp.org

PO Box 59181

Washington, DC 20012

USA

May 27, 2010.

Pm Ch TT

It doesn't appear so!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

free lunch after all!

KEN W
KNOWLES MD
Nassau,

June 13, 2010.



Re: House to vote on Chinese workers.
The Tribune June 11, 2010.

It was very kind of them when our Chinese friends gave us
the wonderful gift of a new stadium. However, it now seems
they may be expecting a little payback in the form of 5,000
Chinese workers being employed at the Baha Mar resort.
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 5



FNM expects ‘interesting
batch of new candidates’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Free National Move-
ment expects to be able to
offer “an interesting batch
of new candidates” to the
public in the next general
election, having had “a num-
ber of good, new” prospec-
tive MPs expressing interest
in running.

According to FNM chair-
man Carl Bethel, MP for
Seabreeze, the party has not
yet begun its formal selec-
tion process but this has not
stopped people from putting
themselves forward as
potential candidates.

“It’s not under way yet.
Some persons may have
indicated an interest but the
Candidates Committee has
not yet met,” said Mr
Bethel.

“We’ve had a number of

FNM chairman Carl Bethel

good new prospective can-
didates offering themselves.
We’re sure the party will
certainly have an interesting
batch of new candidates.”
Asked whether he expects
most or all of the party’s cur-
rent incumbents MPs to run
again in the next general
election, Mr Bethel said he
“sees no reason why an





incumbent would not wish
to stay on” adding that from
among the seats currently
held by PLP MPs, there will
be “enough vacancies to
take on all new comers” in
the FNM’s slate of candi-
dates.

However, he added that
“not all would want to stay
on merely because they’re

an incumbent.”

“We'll see,” said Mr
Bethel, who noted that when
the party decides to
announce its candidates is
down to its leadership. The
FNM currently holds 24 Of
the 41 seats in the House of
Assembly. The PLP holds
17.

It is not yet clear when the
general election will be held,
although it must be called
no later than May 2012. This
is at the discretion of the
prime minister.

In contrast to the relative-
ly late announcement of can-
didates by the PLP prior to
the 2007 general election,
the opposition party has
already announced six can-
didates for the next general
election. These are: Kendal
Major (Garden Hills), Sena-
tor Hope Strachan
(Seabreeze), Senator
Michael Halkitis (Golden

Load shedding and heavy rain
may be affecting traffic signals

NEKO GRANT





SEVERAL traffic lights in New Providence
have been affected by the load shedding
being conducted by the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Ministry of Works permanent
secretary Colin Higgs said.

Minister of Works Neko Grant confirmed
that this and the heavy rain are the most like-
ly explanations of why traffic signals have
been failing in several areas of the island
over the past few days.

Mr Grant explained that power surges
cause the lights to automatically switch to
“flash mode” to guard against being dam-
aged.

He said he was not aware of any systemic

lights.

problems and believed the authorities “have
been doing a fairly good job” at managing the

Mr Grant advised members of the public to

call the ministry’s hotline, 302-9700, to report

any downed lights.

A team of private contractors from High
Power and Campbell’s Electric has been
assembled to maintain the lights and bring

any which malfunction back online.

Mr Higgs said whenever a report is made
through the hotline, or on the ministry’s web-
site, it is forwarded to a mobile team.

He said the length of time needed to fix a

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Isles), Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald (Marathon), Sen-
ator Dr Michael Darville
and Gregory Moss

PLP Chairman Bradley
Roberts says the party
intends to announce another
five next month.

“We are committed to
putting candidates out in the

field early,” said Mr
Roberts.
The party’s website,

myplp.com, has an election
countdown ticker which yes-
terday said there are 679
days until the next general
election. This would suggest
the party expects it to be
called around May 2012,
although with only the prime
minister able to make this
determination, it is as yet
unknown if Bahamians will
go to the polls at an earlier
date.

MOLT

mC
Tiel

A WOMAN was robbed



: of her jewellery while walk-
: ing in the busy Palmdale dis-
: trict in broad daylight on

: Monday.

Police were told that the

: victim was walking along

? Collins Avenue at around

: 4pm when she was

: approached by three men —
: one of whom was armed

: with a handgun.

After demanding her jew-

: ellery, the culprits ran off on
: foot.

Two teenage boys aged 16

: and 19 years old are report-
: edly assisting police with
: their investigation.

TOURISTS ARRESTED

A COUPLE from New

: Mexico were arrested at the
: Lynden Pindling Interna-

: tional Airport after a small

: quantity of a substance sus-
; pected to be marijuana was

; found.

The arrests were made at

? around 5pm on Monday,

: after Drug Enforcement

: Unit officers, acting on a tip,
: searched a 55-year-old man
: and a 48-year-old woman.

Investigations continue.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Cuban dissident found guilty, then freed

HAVANA black-market building materials and then :
ordered released. He is supposed to serve :
the roughly four months remaining on his 15- :
month sentence at the couple's Havana home. :

"I think what happened inside was the fair :
outcome. It's what we've waited for since the :
beginning,” Jorge told reporters outside the :
courthouse in the Cuban capital's 10 de :
Octubre district. "We only wanted to repair :
our home." :

Ferrer was taken to a police station for :



A CUBAN court found prominent opposi-
tion leader Darsy Ferrer guilty of purchasing
black-market cement Tuesday, but he was
released on time served since it took nearly a
year for his case to go to trial, according to
Associated Press.

Human rights officials say Ferrer was
arrested for a common crime that officials
usually overlook — or punish with a simple
fine — in an attempt to silence his criticism of processing then driven home, saying: "I'm ;
the government. going to enjoy this with my friends and fam- :

Ferrer's trial was closed to the media and ily." :
most of the public, but his wife, Yusnaimy From his Havana home, Ferrer said he was :
Jorge Soca, said he was found guilty of buying _—_not giving up his activism for political change. :

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PERMANENT SECRETARY in the Ministry of National Security Ms A Missouri Sherman-Peter
(centre) outlines the course of action of the United Nations Firearm Destruction and Stockpile
Management Assessment Mission to the Bahamas which opened on Monday. Also pictured (from
left) are: Marvin Dames, Commissioner of Police (Acting), and Raymond Gibson of the Ministry

of National Security.

Key UN small arms and
light weapons mission
opens in New Providence

SENIOR law enforce-
ment officials from six
agencies are participating
in a workshop aimed at
addressing ways to reduce
the number of illegal small
arms and light weapons
being used to commit vio-
lent crimes in the Bahamas.

The discussions will also
address firearm destruction
and stockpile management
assessment.

Officials from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, the Department of
Immigration, the Depart-
ment of Customs, Her
Majesty’s Prisons and the
Airport Authority are par-
ticipating in the workshop,
which officials say should
serve to assist law enforce-
ment efforts to decrease
the number of illegal
firearms in circulation,
while reducing the inci-
dences of armed violence.

Crimes

National security and law
enforcement officials con-
tend that a proliferation of
small arms and light
weapons trafficking and
the use of these weapons
in the perpetration of vio-
lent crimes —- including
murder, armed robbery
and burglary — are “a most
serious threat to national
and regional security.”

“While the Bahamas has

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the strictest gun laws, the
availability of illegal small
arms also contributes to
the perpetration of violent
crime in our country,” Per-
manent Secretary in the
Ministry of National Secu-
rity Ms Missouri Sherman-
Peter said.

Ms Sherman-Peter said
regional statistics show that
“upwards of 70 per cent of
all homicides committed in
the Caribbean are commit-
ted using illegal firearms.”

She said the elimination
of small arms trafficking
and the related challenges
are matters that are high
on the agenda of the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas
and other Caribbean Com-
munity countries.

Both matters have been
placed on the agenda of
the CARICOM Imple-
mentation Agency for
Crime and Security, which
was established at the 27th
Meeting of the Conference
of Heads of Government
of CARICOM in July,
2006.

The Agency is headed by
an executive director and
reports to the CARICOM
Council of Ministers
responsible for national
security and law enforce-
ment.

“We regard a compre-
hensive approach as critical
to promoting public secu-
rity and transparency in
this area, and to reduce —
to the fullest extent — the
diversion of small arms and
light weapons to criminal
networks,” Ms Sherman-
Peter said.

“This assessment mission
will contribute to our ini-
tiatives to ensure that our
stockpile management
policies and procedures are
comprehensive and effec-
tive, including our periodic
destruction of confiscated

and surplus weapons.”

Ms Sherman-Peter said
national security officials
expect the assessment mis-
sion will “inform our
national policy on firearms
destruction and stockpiles
management.”

“This mission under-
scores two important mat-
ters in particular. The first
is the key role that the
United Nations Pro-
gramme of Action to Pre-
vent, Combat and Eradi-
cate the Illicit Trade in
Small Arms and Light
Weapons in All its
Aspects, can play in this
area of critical concern for
governments,” Ms Sher-
man-Peter said.

Standards

“The second matter this
mission underscores is that
it is open to the countries
of our region to gain from
the review of international
standards, including the
United Nations Pro-
gramme of Action, the
CIFTA Convention and
the Palermo Proposal.

“We stand to gain from
the insights, exchange of
information and ideas and
best practices in these
areas the UN-LiRec
experts will share with us
in reviewing our own sys-
tems for firearms destruc-
tion and stockpile manage-
ment,” Ms Sherman-Peter
added.

UN-LiRec is the United
Nations Regional Centre
for Peace and Disarma-
ment and Development in
Latin America and the
Caribbean.

“We view this mission as
an important step in the
Bahamas’ co-operative
partnership with UN-
LiRec,” Ms Sherman-Peter
added.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Rae

nie anaiad wait OXI Saal} PHILOSOPHER







LEG-WAS Y
BETTER

MUG,







Govt seeking Bahamian
leaders of tomorrow

THE government has
launched an ambitious pro-
gramme to identify and sup-
port the development of the
Bahamian leaders of the
future.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles Maynard
told the first group of co-ordi-
nators for the National High
School Leaders Programme
that the government expects
their work to be instrumental
in the cultivating the country’s
next generation of trailblaz-
ers.

“We are expecting that
coming out of this, that this
programme will start to bear
the fruit and that our young
people throughout the islands
will get this early exposure to
the kind of influence that will
cause them to become the
leaders in the country that we
all would want them to be,”
Mr Maynard said at a press
conference on June 18.

“Tt is a programme designed
to serve as a training mecha-
nism in leadership and pro-
fessional development for
youths who lead their peers, to
provide an avenue for stu-
dents leaders to develop their
social skills and networking
capabilities, to assist student
leaders in the development of
a strong personal brand that
will allow them to stand out
in their leadership roles,” he
said.

Assistant Youth Officer at
the ministry John Darville
explained that the National
High School Leaders Pro-
gramme aims to become a
nation-wide effort to develop
young leaders in Bahamian
high schools, and the govern-
ment has provided resources
to this end on eight pilot
islands.

The co-ordinators, who
received training this week,
hail from Andros, Grand
Bahama, Long Island,
Eleuthera, Exuma, Abaco,
Cat Island and Bimini.

Mr Darville encouraged the
principals of schools on those
islands to prepare their stu-
dents and staff to participate
in the programme, as the co-
ordinators will begin as soon
as they return.

“These persons, who in
some cases are educators
themselves, will not just be
responsible for co-ordinating
this programme for their
school; but they will be
responsible, on behalf of the
ministry, to co-ordinate the
programme for all schools in
that specific jurisdiction,” Mr
Darville said.

Programme aims to identify and
support next generation of trailblazers

“We encourage you to
please note that these persons
will be certified.

“They will be equipped and
ready to co-ordinate holistic
activities that will enhance the
development of the leadership
brand of the students they will
be entrusted with in the

incoming year.

Mr Maynard added: “These
persons will serve as the first
co-ordinators of this national
programme and I am happy
to say that, as a pilot in the
first year, if we are successful,
we expect to expand it
through the whole country.”

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Co-operative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)
The 24" Annual General Meeting
Originally Scheduled For

Wednesday, June 23, 2010
HAS BEEN POSTPONED

And Will Now Be Held At 6:30 PM
On Wednesday, July 7, 2010

At The British Colonial Hilton
#1 Bay Street

For The Following Purposes

>» To receive the Report of the Board of Direchors for 2009

» To receive the Audiled Accounts for 2009

* To take action on such matiers es may come before the meeting
* To elec members of The Board of Directors, Supervisory

Commitige & Credit Committee

THERE WILL BE NO SECOND CALL MEETING AS PER THE
CO-OPERATIVE ACT 2005 SECTION 22

Board Secretary
June 2010



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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Rotarians take on world's major challenges

By LARRY SMITH

MONTREAL, Canada —
This week I attended one of
the world's greatest gather-
ings of downright decent,
mostly middle-aged, and
thoroughly middle class folks.

It was a tough call for an
old cynic like me. To borrow
a quote, I usually lump orga-
nized religion, organized
labour, and service clubs
together. But Rotarians do
get points for having the
most entertaining meetings.

More than 18,000 of them
from around the world
clogged the streets of Mon-
treal for their annual inter-
national conference this
week. Everywhere you
turned there were earnest
Africans, Asians, Latinos,
North Americans and Euro-
peans flashing their logo
shirts, badges, pins, flags and
business cards.

This was a major event by
any standard, and is reck-
oned to have pumped some
$28 million into Montreal's
economy. It was so big they
had to have a mini-conven-
tion for first-time convention
goers. And after that, you
were eligible to join the
International Fellowship of

Convention-goers, one of
scores of networking groups
for like-minded Rotarians.

There are fellowships for
bird watchers, pilots, yachts-
men, golfers, environmental-
ists, internet users, skiers,
gourmets, quilters, singles
and even Esperanto speak-
ers (in case you were won-
dering, there are only about
100 in that particular fellow-
ship.) Esperanto was a 19th
century attempt to create a
politically neutral world lan-
guage.

Many of these groups
enable Rotarians to use their
hobbies or skills to help oth-
ers. For example, the Fel-
lowship of Canoeing Rotari-
ans has organized cleanups
of polluted rivers. In fact,
that tells you a lot about this
huge service organisation.
Just puree business, pleasure
and philanthropy together in
a blender — and out pops a
Rotarian working on a pro-
ject somewhere.

WTILITIES FEGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

“" 4 a]
i i

Ps ME, ry

i? a






























June 23, 2010

Time: 6-8 om
Venue: Sheraton Nassau Beach

Resort Convention Centre

NB alisi=si(=18 6 ele ail=i

qre

‘ome to attend.
TO CONFIRM YOUR
ATTENDANCE PLEASE

email info@urcabahamas.bs.



There are some 500
Bahamian Rotarians in 13
clubs on New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco,
Eleuthera and Cat Island.
And a few of them were at
the Montreal conference —
including Lindsey Cancino of
Bahamas Realty, Felix
Stubbs of IBM and Barry
Rassin of Doctors Hospital.
All three are big Rotary
cheeses.

Members of the fellowship
groups stood guard at booths
in the Great Hall of Friend-
ship, a huge meeting space
in Montreal's Palais des Con-
gres, where many of the
smaller conference events
took place. Here you could
order suits custom-tailored
in Hong Kong, buy foot mas-
sagers and books about
Rotary, and talk to some of
the folks involved in dozens
of humanitarian projects
around the world.

Like Prince Abraham
Appiah-Fei of the Kumasi-
East Rotary Club in Ghana,
for example. He was on hand
with his Canadian partners
from the Rotary Club of
Cornwall Sunrise to promote
the Sustainable Villages Pro-
gramme. Appiah-Fei grew up
on a cocoa farm and studied
electrical engineering in
Canada before becoming
administrator of this rural
communities project near his
hometown.

Supplies

"We are bringing basic
sanitation to these villages,”
he told me enthusiastically.
"They don't even have run-
ning water and it helps to
stop them from moving to
overcrowded cities like
Kumasi, which has 2.5 mil-
lion people. We also focus on
reducing infant mortality as
well as providing school sup-
plies."

Building wells, giving
scholarships, or supporting
local charities at cookouts
and fairs is the more mun-
dane level of Rotary. But at
the other end of the scale are
such global programmes as
the multi-billion-dollar cam-
paign to eradicate polio. This
might seem like a ho-hum
goal to us, who have only dis-
tant memories of what polio
was like. But this incurable
yet easily prevented disease

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

still cripples children in
developing countries.

In 1980 smallpox was
eradicated after a 10-
year global effort,
and polio was next
on the list. There
were 350,000 cas-
es a year when the
programme was
launched in the
1980s, with the last
holdouts today in
Central Asia and
Africa. According
to Dr Bruce Ayl-
ward, who is in charge
of the World Health
Organisation effort, "If
we do not end polio now,
another 20 million children
will be permanently paral-
ysed by Rotary's next cente-
nary in 2105."

Over the past 25 years the
1.2 million Rotarians around
the world have contributed
hundreds of millions of dol-
lars to polio eradication, as
well as tens of thousands of
volunteer-hours. Lindsey
Cancino says the 13 Bahami-
an clubs have raised more
than $25,000 for the effort.
It means a lot, because in
1985, one child was being
crippled by polio every two
minutes.

Despite setbacks, the inci-
dence of the disease has fall-
en by more than 90 per cent
and Aylward is convinced it
will be wiped out early in this
decade. "You have funda-
mentally changed the game,”
he told thousands of cheering
Rotarians at Montreal's Bell
Centre hockey stadium on
Tuesday. "Rotary is now
reaching more children than
ever before for less than 25
cents each. And eradicating
polio will deliver tens of mil-
lions of net dolars to the
poorest countries. Rotarians
have inspired the world as
the heart and soul of the
largest global health effort in
history."

With the war on polio
about to be won, what's next
on the list for Rotary?

Well, Nobel Peace Prize
nominee Greg Mortenson
was a keynote speaker at the
convention on Monday.
Mortenson is co-founder of
the nonprofit Central Asia
Institute, founder of Pennies
For Peace, and author of two
bestselling books: Three Cups
of Tea and Stones into
Schools on promoting peace
through education.

For the past 15 years he
has been working in Pakistan
and Afghanistan to educate
the illiterate, especially
women and girls. Only a few
years ago, less than 800,000
children went to school in











Afghanistan,
and hardly any were girls.
Today, there are 9 million
schoolchildren there, and 2.8
million are girls.

"We could use the polio
campaign as a model to erad-
icate illiteracy in a decade
just by raising pennies,"
Mortenson urged Rotarians.
"While a penny is virtually
worthless, in poor countries it
buys a pencil and opens the
door to literacy."

Literacy

In fact, Rotary already
supports a variety of litera-
cy projects in local commu-
nities. For example, the
Bahamian clubs established
Project Read, which teaches
adults how to read. It's esti-
mated that a quarter of the
world’s population is func-
tionally illiterate, and in
many developing countries
women are unable to learn
to read and write.

Calling young women the
single biggest potential
agents of change in the devel-
oping world, Mortenson said
the bad news was that the
Taliban shut thousands of
schools, to stop girls getting
an education. "Their great-
est fear is the pen, not the
bullet. They realise that if
you educate a girl, you edu-
cate a community. The good
news is that lately
Afghanistan has seen the
greatest increase in school
enrolment for girls in mod-
ern history."

The prospect for peace
and security in the 21st cen-
tury was the theme of a
keynote speech on Tuesday
by Queen Noor of Jordan.
An Arab-American who is
the widow of King Hussein,
Queen Noor co-founded the
Global Zero movement, a
coalition of political, busi-
ness, military, faith and civic
leaders working for the elim-

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18

SAUNDERS BEACH (West Bay St.)

Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

ination of nuclear weapons.

She called on Rotarians to
support what she con-
sidered to be the
world's two greatest
challenges — envi-
ronmental degrada-
tion and nuclear

proliferation.

"We are
already feeling the
effects of climate
change in the Mid-
dle East," she said.
"Migration caused
by desertification has
fueled the conflict in
Sudan, for example.
Environmental issues need
to be on a par with other
global macro issues because
what could be more of a pri-
ority than human survival on
our planet? We need to tran-
sition to a green economy
and we need a coalition to
act as a foundation for urgent

international action."

She said some 40 countries
had the ability to produce
nuclear weapons and it was
critical to prevent such
weapons from getting into
the hands of terrorists. She
urged American Rotarians to
support Congressional ratifi-
cation of the Strategic Arms
Limitation Treaty. "There is
no challenge that coalitions
of concerned global citizens
cannot surmount, and Rotary
has pioneered such
alliances."

Frankly, it's a little hard
to believe that Rotary began
in 1905 when four lonely guys
got together to make new
friends in the big windy city
of Chicago. One of the first
names proposed for the new
organisation was "Food,
Friends, and Fun", and it was
expected that members
would "let their hair down,
engage in horseplay, call one
another by first names and
in general have a grand
time."

And that's just what they
do at their weekly luncheons
around the world. But the
organisation has also taken
on amore purposeful air, by
leveraging the not insignifi-
cant skills, resources and
energy of elite professionals
and business people to
advance worthwhile causes.
Yes, they may be boy scouts
in long pants, as Sinclair
Lewis once disparagingly
wrote, but what boy scout
ever gets the chance to erad-
icate a killer disease?

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

WC
Co

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES 8.4 would like to inform the motoring public that Saunders Beach (West
Bay 30) pads will be closed bo the motonne public effective Wednesday June 23, 2010 between the bourse of Tpm to 12pm.

Asphalt paving will be carried out during this. time and we kindly ask that ALL motorist travelling along this rowie make the following

diversions to their destination:

"Motorist travelling enst along Saunders Beach showkd divert onto GROVE AVE. and folkew the signs posted "DIVERSION" through
DOLPHIN DR, JFK DR, FARRINGTON RD, EDEN ST, POSTER ST, NORTH DUNMORE AVE, CHIFPINGHAM ED and

cominue along West Ray Street to their destination.

*Mintorist travelling west towards Saunders Reach should fallowing the signe posted "DIVERSION" through CHIFPINGHAM RD,
SORTH DUNMORE AVE, POSTER AWE, EDEN ST, FARRINGTON RD, JFK DR. DOLPHIN LINK DRAGROVE AVE

and comtinwe along Weel Hay street.

Detours will be clearly marked te allow the safe passage for pedestrians & motorist and proper signage will be erected delineating

the work zone.

Your poticnce Minanghout this project is pready appreciated and we de apelegice for Me inconvenience & delays coursed.



















For further inhormation please contact 3

Jose Cartellone Constrocciones Civiles S.A
(Tice Hers: Mon-Fri Bele ae dae fod orn

CMTices( 242) 322-04 S22- Dall)

Fanuc: bahaoasnekph bore cartel ene. com. a

‘The Project Execothon Uni
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotlines (242) 12-7 70Hb

Email: pulviicworksithahamuas.giv les

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

spor

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23,

PAGE 9





ts

2010

PAGE 10 e Junior CAC track team members...










France, SAfrica
eliminated,
Argentina

advances...
See page 10

Swimmers get bronze medals

Women’s 4 x 1 medley relay team in ‘07 PanAm Games awarded

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



Ibeit three years later, the
team of Alana Dillette,
Alica Lightbourne, Ari-
ana Vanderpool-Wallace
and journalist Nikia Deveaux had a
night to celebrate as bronze medal-
lists in the 2007 Pan American Games.

The quartet were last night pre-
sented with the medals by Governor
General Arthur Foulkes at Govern-
ment House after they were elevated
from fourth to third place in the wom-
en’s 4x 100m medley relay.

The race took place at the Maria
Lenk Aquatic Park in Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, on July 22, 2007, but due to the
disqualification of the third place
Brazilian team last year as a result of
the positive doping testing of Rebeca
Gusmao, the Bahamians finally got
the medals.

The Bahamas clocked four minutes
and 18.97 seconds to now sit in third
place on the games website behind
gold medallists United States (4: 4.60)
and silver medallists Canada (4:07.85).

Dillette, one of two swimmers
speaking on behalf of their teammates,
said it was a gratifying feeling for all of
them because “their years and months
of hard work has finally paid off.”

The Auburn University senior
thanked the Bahamas Government,
the Bahamas Olympic Committee, the
Bahamas Swimming Federation and
their parents and family for their
tremendous support of their accom-
plishments to enable them to be where
they are today.

She also thanked the Royal Bank
of Canada, whose managing director





cll

a Li F om

ALL SMILES (I-r) are Alana Dillette, Alica Lightbourne, Ariana Vanderpool-Wallace and Nikia

Deveaux...

Tanya McCartney presented with the
Leo Award, the highest award pre-
sented by the bank, for their continued
commitment and sponsorship of the
BSF.

Then she turned to her teammates
and said without their “support and
dedication,” none of them would have
been in the position that they were in.

Deveaux, now retired and working
as a journalist at Jones Communica-
tions, echoed the sentiments of Dil-
lette and even went a bit further in
thanking the coaches for “taking four
girls from the island and making us
the Pan American Games bronze
medallists.”

Although they have specialized in
different events, Deveaux said over
the years, all four girls have been
“rivals,” but most importantly, they
have been “friends.”

In fact, she said they have been able
to develop such a bond that sometimes
they think they are actually sisters, but
when reality sets in, they realize that

Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

they “aren’t.”

Asking and answering the question
as to what has been their success,
Deveaux said it has been a combina-
tion of all of the attributes she men-
tioned.

With some many younger swim-
mers, including Ariel Weech, who
swum with Deveaux, Vanderpool-Wal-
lace and Dillette at the Central Amer-
ican and Caribbean Games in 2006
when they won a gold, Deveaux
advised them never to “give up on
their goals and their dreams because
it’s moments, friends and teammates
like these that make it all worthwhile.”

The medal presentation followed
the presentation to retired track queen
Pauline Davis-Thompson two weeks
ago when she got the gold for the
200m at the 2000 Olympic Games in
Sydney, Australia, after American
Marion Jones was disqualified for test-
ing positive for steroids.

BOC president Wellington Miller
said after it was proven that the Brazil-

ians were disqualified, they immedi-
ately sprung into action to pursue the
medal. “The wheels of justice some-
times turns slowly, but we continued to
push those wheels and now, your
medals are here tonight,” Miller said.
“This is just the latest of several
Bahamian medals that have now right-
fully come home.”

Miller warned all nations that “once
it has been discovered and proven that
your athletes have defrauded Bahami-
an athletes out of any medal, we don’t
care about your military might, we’re
coming to get our medal.

“We don’t care what your position is
with NATO, we’re coming to get our



medal. We don’t care what your posi-
tion is in the G8 or the G20 nations,
we’re coming to our get medal.”

Minister of Education Desmond
Bannister, who was acting as the Min-
ister of Sport for Charles Maynard,
who was attending the FIFA World
Cup with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, said he’s so pleased to see
the relay bronze medal in the Bahamas
where it belongs.

“It’s been an exciting journey. Our
country is pleased with your progress
and the progress of your sport in the
international scene,” said Bannister,

SEE NEXT page

Motors Magnum enters 64th NBA Draft

ITXX Caribbean Island Swimming
Championships June 28 to July 2

THE Bahamas Swimming Federation (BSF) will be sending a 27-
member team to the ITXX Caribbean Island Swimming Champi-
onships in Havana, Cuba.

The event is to be held at the Pan American Water Sports
Complex June 28 to July 2. Albert Bell is the head coach, John
Bradley and Dr Susana Campbell are team managers and Laura
Williams the team chaperone.

The team is scheduled to depart the day after the 39th RBC
Nationals and the swimmers are looking to swim best times and
bring home records and medals.

“This team is a strong team that has a lot of experience and
should do well at representing the Bahamas,” according to a press
release. “There are several relay teams that should do very well and
hopefully the RBC Nationals will be a great warm up competition
for CISC.”

The team includes the following swimmers:

Female

11-12 — Simone Sturrup and Leslie Campbell

13-14 — Gabrielle Greene, Laura Morley, Berchadette Moss,
Taryn Smith, Ashley Butler and Bria Deveaux

18 & over — Jenna Chaplin, Alicia Lightbourne, Ariel Weech and
Teisha Lightbourne

Male

11-12 — Dionisio Carey, Farion Cooper, Zach Moses

13-14 — Zarian Cleare, Peter Farquharson, Dustin Tynes, Evante
Gibson, Matthew Lowe, Toby McCarroll, Armando Moss and
Mancer Roberts

18 & over — Vereance Burrows, Inoa Charlton, Michael McIn-
tosh, Chadeau Wilson

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

NOT since the 1978 National
Basketball Association (NBA)
Draft has a native Bahamian
been selected among the list of
amateur hopefuls looking to
join the ranks of the world’s
most elite basketball league.
But on Thursday night, one
Grand Bahamian looks to
make history.

After a stellar collegiate
career spanning four years and
a pair of top tier NCAA Divi-
sion I institutions, Magnum
Rolle has entered his name into
the 64th edition of the NBA
Draft.

Scheduled for 7pm Thursday
(June 24) at the world famous
Madison Square Garden Arena
in New York City, New York,
Rolle hopes to hear his name
called as a selection by one of
the 30 NBA franchises.

Rolle, the 6°11” 225-pound
forward/center, has been pro-
jected by several scouting ser-
vices, including ESPN.com,
www.nbadraft.net and
www.draftexpress.com as a pos-





MAGNUM ROLLE

sible mid-to-late second round
pick.

Rolle has been invited to sev-
en workouts over the course of
the evaluation period since the
NCAA season ended.

The senior out of Louisiana
Tech University has gone
through workouts with the
Washington Wizards, Phoenix
Suns, Milwaukee Bucks, Char-

lotte Bobcats and most recent-
ly, the Indiana Pacers.

Rolle declared for the 2009
NBA draft as an early entrant
following his junior season
when he averaged 12.2 points
and 7.2 rebounds per game. He
rescinded the entry, and with-
out hiring an agent, was eligible
to return for his senior season
when he averaged 13.9 points to
finish second on the team in
scoring and first with 8.4
rebounds per game.

Rolle starred on the Grand
Bahama high school basketball
scene before relocating to the
Laurinburg Institute in North
Carolina. After a standout high
school senior season, Rolle was
signed by SEC powerhouse
Louisiana State University.

At LSU, Rolle was a part of
an historic Tigers team in the
2005-06 season which advanced
all the way to the NCAA
Championship game before
they fell to the UCLA Bruins.

Rolle averaged 2.2 points and
2.5 rebounds per game and
appeared in 33 of the 36 games
for the eventual runners- up on
a team which featured future
NBA standouts Glen “Big

Baby” Davis
Thomas.

With a depleted roster fol-
lowing the loss of its major
superstars, Rolle returned to
average 4 points and 4.1
rebounds per game with 31
blocks during his sophomore
season.

Rolle transferred the follow-
ing season and transferred to
Louisiana Tech where he
became one of the top front-
court players in the WAC Con-
ference. He became a two time
all-WAC Defensive team play-
er and was named to the Lefty
Driesell All-America Defen-
sive Team.

Rolle looks to become the
first native Bahamian since
Mychal Thompson to be draft-
ed into the NBA since the Port-
land Trailblazers took him with
the first overall selection in
1978.

Dexter Cambridge and Jan
Lockhart were the others to
advance to the league, however
they were acquired by their
teams through free agency.
Rolle could not be reached for
comment up to press time last
night.

and Tyrus

Talented Mr Bullard Jr is Ridley College standout

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



GENO Bullard Jr, arguably one of
the most versatile high school athletes,
is proving just how talented he is at
Ridley College in St Catherine,
Ontario, Canada.

Last year, Bullard Jr’s father, Geno
Sr, sent him off to Canada instead of
letting his son complete his final two
years at Westminster College.

In just one year, Bullard Jr has made
a tremendous impact at the indepen-
dent co-educational institution for
boarding and day students from grade
five through to university (entrance).

“The year started with soccer, then
it was basketball and I ended it with
track and field,” said Bullard Jr, who
managed to star on all three varsity
teams.

Although he was just a freshman,
Bullard Jr said he was able to make the
necessary adjustments and fit right into
the system.

While soccer wasn’t as high profiled,
Bullard Jr said it was good for him to
get his feet wet at the school. Once he
did, he said he went on to really excel
in basketball.

Bullard Jr said he was able to take
Ridley College all the way to the State

Championships where he had an aver-
age of 18.3 points per game, 11 assists
and five rebounds per game.

Ridley College finished with a 31-2
win-loss record during the season, but
in total, Bullard Jr ended up playing at
least 60 games, counting the various
tournaments they played in.

The 17-year-old also went on to play
with the St Catherines Rebels AAU
team that travelled throughout Cana-
da where they finished fourth in the
Nationals, losing by one point to get to
the finals.

Before his basketball season was
done, Bullard Jr ended up winning
quite a number of individual awards,
including the Standard Tournament
All-Tournament, All-Star and Most
Improved Player for Ridley College.

Bullard Jr was also considered for
the MVP honour at Ridley College,
but during the awards presentation, it
was given to one of the senior players
as a graduation gift.

However, he was awarded a plaque
that was presented in honour of a
Bahamian who helped out Ridley Col-
lege as the ‘Rookie of the Year.’

In track and field, Bullard Jr was
just as impressive. He managed to
break a Ridley College long jump
record with a leap of 6.9 metres or 22-
feet, 73/4-inches, surpassing the pre-











GENO BULLARD JR with some of the
awards he received during his first year
at Ridley College in Canada...

Photo by Tim Clarke

vious mark of 6.61 (21-8 1/4).

But he also went on to the private
schools championships and produced
another record of 6.89 (22-71/2) at the
public schools nationals. He eventu-
ally turned in a personal best of 7.21
(23-8).

“It was a different aspect because
you are in a different style of play from
the Bahamas,” Bullard Jr said. “At
home, you are just running and gun-
ning, but over there, you have to run a
lot more set plays.

“Everything was good because I got
a chance to play with players of dif-
ferent height. We had a seven footer
on our team and we had guys who
were coming right at you. You had to
play every game.”

When he first arrived, Bullard Jr
admitted that it wasn’t what he had
expected, but once he got into the sys-
tem, he was able to improve his game.

“My school work was also good,”
said Bullard, who passed a CPR course
in his major studies. “We also did
courses like cadets, which allowed me
to go anywhere like the Defence Force
and perform.”

Bullard Sr, who coached his son to
the junior boys championship at West-
minster before he transferred him to
Canada, said there were a lot of critics,
who didn’t feel that it was the best

move for him.

“He improved tremendously and
that was the reason for me sending
him to this school and this environ-
ment,” Bullard Sr said. “I wanted to
make sure that he had the total bal-
ance with education and sports.

“The school has made sure that his
education came first and he remained
on the top of his game. His athletics
only complemented his academics. So
I’m trying to prepare him for the next
level, which is to get into a good col-
lege.”

Already, Bullard Sr said there are
colleges and universities knocking on
his door trying to recruit his son, but he
said he’s not interested just yet because
he still has a lot more to achieve.

“T have no regrets. I think his per-
formance will open the door for many
other Bahamians to follow,” Bullard Sr
said.

“We’re looking at trying to get some
more students at Ridley College in
August. When he has started will only
help those who follow him as they all
seek a rich athletic background.”

Bullard Jr was home in time to cel-
ebrate Father’s Day with his dad. He
hopes to continue to participate in his
No Bull Basketball Programme this
summer before he and others head to
Canada at the end of the summer.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



BLTA hosts ‘Double The Love Tennis Tournament’

58 to represent
Bahamas at the
Junior CAC track
championships

A 58-member team, the
largest ever selected, has been
named to represent the
Bahamas at the Junior Central
American and Caribbean Track
& Field Championships in San-
to Domingo, Dominican
Republic, July 2-4.

“This is the largest team ever
selected by the BAAA to com-
pete at the Jr CAC. The major-
ity of the members are athletes
who represented the Bahamas
at the recent 2010 Carifta
Games team which placed
third, doubled their gold medal







WINNERS (I-r) are Jonathon Taylor, Dr Moxey and Cameron Newry...

Thompson...



RUNNERS-UP (I-r) are Ricardo Demeritte, Dr Moxey and Danielle

THE Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association (BLTA) hosted
‘Double The Love Tennis
Tournament’ at the National
Tennis Center in Oakes Field.

The fun, family event was to
raise funds for junior tennis
development in the Bahamas
and a way to bring the tennis
community closer together.

Spearheaded by Dr Ellen
Moxey, second vice president,
and a committee of hardwork-
ing volunteers, the event was a
huge success and was won by
the doubles team of Jonathon
Taylor and Cameron Newry
over Danielle Thompson and
Ricardo Demeritte 9-7.



count and produced a number
of outstanding performances,”
according to a press release.

Over 32 countries, including
Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago,
Mexico, and Puerto Rico, will
be represented.

“All the athletes were
required to achieve the CAC
qualifying standards. The team
comprises athletes from New
Providence, Grand Bahama,
Eleuthera and Moore’s Island.

TEAM MEMBERS

Under 17 Girls — Shaunae
Miller, Dannielle Gibson, Mar-
var Etienne, Gregeria Higgs,
Devynne Charlton, Talia
Thompson, Ruddesha Stra-
chan, Rachante Colebrook

Under 20 Women -—-
V'Alonee Robinson, Rashan
Brown, Anthonique Strachan,
Deshan Burnside, Hughnique
Rolle, Ivanique Kemp, Devinn
Cartwright, Kenya Culmer,
Racquel Williams, Julianna
Duncanson, Tynia Gaither,
Katrina Seymour, Amara Jones

Under 17 Boys — Anthony
Farrington Jr, Julian Munroe,
Stephen Newbold, Andre
Wells, Andre Colebrook, Ash-
ley Riley, Terran Adderley,
Kirk Lewis, Lathone Minns,
Lathario Minns, Gerrio Rah-
ming, Anthony Adderley,
James Cash, Delano Davis,
Michael Lockhart, Teray Smith,
Charles Sealy, Khyle Higgs

Under 20 Boys — Trevorvano
Mackey, Warren Fraser, Laron
Heild, Cerio Rolle, James Aud-
ley Carey, Aaron Wilmore,
Nejmi Burnside, Raymond Hig-
gs, Troy Bullard, Terrane
Roker, Douglas Palicious,
Elvardo Carey, Tre Adderley,
Alfred Higgs, Delano Deveaux,
Earl Rahming, Glenwood Bail-
lou, Alonzo Russell, Trevon
Green

Coaching &

Management Team

Head Coach - Dianne Wood-
side, IAAF Level Sprints\Hur-
dles, Assistant Coaches - Fred-
erick Bastian, Grand Bahama
IAAF Level 2 Middle Distance,
Jason Edwards - IAAF Level 2
Jumps, Greg Cash - [AAF Lev-
ell Sprints\Relay Coordi-
nator, Anthony Williams -
Moores Island

Management Team - Man-
ager - Val Kemp, Assistant
Manager - Claudel McNabb,
Grand Bahama. Chaperones -
Lenora Conyers - BACO and
Linda Malcolm, Grand
Bahama



—

Drive one.

France, SAfrica eliminated, Argentina advances

By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer



JOHANNESBURG (AP) —
France's disastrous World Cup cam-
paign ended in a loss Tuesday, a result
that also dragged South Africa out of
the tournament and left Uruguay and
Mexico with places in the round of 16.

Argentina advanced as expected
from Group B later in the day, but it
took them most of the game to break
through a staunch Greece defense and
win 2-0 in Polokwane. South Korea
also made the round the 16 by holding
Nigeria to a 2-2 draw in Durban.

South Africa beat France 2-1 in
Bloemfontein, but the first-half goals
from Bongani Khumalo and Katlego
Mphela weren't enough to stop the
team from becoming the first host to be
eliminated from the first round.

In Rustenburg, two-time champion
Uruguay defeated Mexico 1-0 and won
Group A. Mexico and South Africa
each had four points, but the Mexicans
advanced on goal difference.

South Africans will be disappointed
with the result, but the French will be
furious. The 1998 World Cup champion
is in disarray.

France was held to a 0-0 draw by
Uruguay in its opening match, and then
lost to Mexico 2-0. The chaos started
shortly thereafter, when striker Nicolas
Anelka was sent home for refusing to
apologize to the coach after insulting
him.

Then the players decided to skip a
day of practice to protest that decision,
further disrupting an already faltering
World Cup campaign.

Tuesday's match just added to the
negative image most have of France
coach Raymond Domenech, who
benched captain Patrice Evra for his
final match in charge.

"The whole of France needs to have
an explanation for this disaster," Evra
said. "It's not the time to give them,
but I will personally give them ... what
I went through, just the truth, as quick-
ly as possible.”

Khumalo gave South Africa the lead
when he beat Abou Diaby in the 20th
minute and scored from Siphiwe Tsha-
balala's cross. Mphela added a second
in the 37th, scoring from Tsepo Masile-
la's cross.

"The early goal helped a lot," Khu-
malo said. "I really thought we could
pull through."

Both goals came after France was

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reduced to 10 men in the 25th when
Yoann Gourcuff was sent off for elbow-
ing Macbeth Sibaya.

Florent Malouda scored France's
only goal of the tournament in the 70th.
That goal gave them one more than in
2002, when the then defending cham-
pion French were also eliminated in
the first round.

Luis Suarez scored Uruguay's goal
against Mexico in the 43rd, heading in
a cross from Edinson Cavani.

"The important thing is that we qual-
ified in first place," Uruguay striker
Diego Forlan said. "They controlled
the ball well and in truth it was quite
hard for us.”

Uruguay didn't concede a goal in the
first round.

Martin Demichelis finally gave
Argentina the lead in the 77th minute
when he headed the ball off teammate
Diego Milito and then shot past Greece
goalkeeper Alexandros Tzorvas.

Martin Palermo added the second
goal in the 89th, knocking in a rebound
after Tzorvas saved a shot from Lionel
Messi, who served as Argentina's
youngest ever captain at 22 years old.
Regular captain Javier Mascherano was
rested by coach Diego Maradona, along
with several other starters from the first
two games.

"Now the road gets more difficult,
and the hierarchy of each team comes
into play," Maradona said. "You always
talk about Germany, Italy, Brazil, that
they're playing bad, but they're always
in the semifinals, in the final, in the
second round, in the quarters."

Lee Jung-soo and Park Chu-young
scored the goals for South Korea, which
advanced past the first round away
from home for the first time.

Lee equalized in the 38th and Park
scored in the 49th. Kalu Uche had giv-
en the Nigerians the lead in the 12th
and Ayegbeni Yakubu leveled in the
69th.

"Our goal was to reach the last 16.
We succeeded in doing this for the first
time away from home," South Korea
captain Park Ji-sung said. "So I'm very
happy we accomplished this in South
Africa. All of the players know how
important this is.”

Nigeria, which could have become
the first African team to advance at
the first World Cup in Africa, missed
several easy chances throughout the
match.

Also, charges against two Dutch
women who had faced prosecution for

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SOUTH AFRICA’S Macbeth Sibaya (left) competes for the ball with France's Franck Ribery
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allegedly taking part in an ambush mar-
keting campaign at a World Cup match
were dropped.

South Africa's home affairs minis-
ter said that the total of foreign visi-
tors this month had passed 682,000 —

up from more than 456,000 as of June
13.

"This is quite a sizable increase from
last year's figures," Nkosazana Dlami-
ni-Zuma said. "We are happy with the
way things are going.

Bucks acquire forward
Maggette from Warriors

= 3
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EMAIL: endl wretanrittotrread Loon
WEBSITE: Mendhymotorshahamas.com

By CHRIS JENKINS
AP Sports Writer

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The Milwaukee Bucks have acquired
forward Corey Maggette in a trade with the Golden State Warriors,
sending them guard Charlie Bell and center Dan Gadzuric in

return.

The Bucks also get a second-round pick from the Warriors in
Thursday night's NBA draft, leaving them with three selections in

the second round.

Maggette played in 70 games with 49 starts for Golden State last
season, averaging 19.8 points per game. He will be expected to pro-
vide scoring for a team that may lose free agent John Salmons.

Bell played in 71 games for Milwaukee last season, averaging 6.5
points, 1.5 assists and 1.9 rebounds per game. Gadzuric appeared
in 32 games for the Bucks last season and averaged 2.8 points
and 2.9 rebounds in 9.8 minutes per game.

Swimmers get
bronze medals

FROM page 1B

who served as the minister of
sports when the Pan Am
Games were held. “Never has
Bahamian women’s relay swim-
ming progressed this far.”
BSF president Algernon
Cargill, who served as the mas-
ter of ceremonies, said that
while they salute the women
last night, he acknowledged the
achievement of Jeremy
Knowles, who won the first
major medal for the Bahamas
with his bronze at the 2003
World University Games.
The swimming medal in
Brazil was added to the six
achieved by the track and field

team that brought the
Bahamas’ total to seven for a
two-way tie for 14th place with
Guatemala. Both countries
ended up with seven medals.
Chris Brown got a gold in the
men’s 400m and he anchored
the 4 x 400 relay team to the
other gold.

Silver

The silver medals were won
by Donald Thomas in the
men’s high jump and Christine
Amertil in the women’s 400,
while the bronze came from
Chandra Sturrup in the wom-
en’s 100 and veteran Lavern
Eve in the women's javelin.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 11



SIM cards ‘may be being
used in prison illegally _

FROM page one

technology. He said he pur-
chased a Batelco SIM card
in the airport and no one
asked him for identification.

“It would be great if the
carriers stepped forward to
assume responsibility to help
the authorities who don’t
have the resources to put the
technology in place. Carri-
ers know what is going on.
They have triangulation
techniques. They can elimi-
nate 50 per cent of the prob-
lem themselves by putting
an investigation unit in, but

RACARO CLARKE in his incubator and ventilator that an melee

they are not asked to; they
are not asked to profile their
customers,” said Mr
Melamed.

Mr Melamed explained
that telephone companies
can track where calls are
being made based on the
signals that are sent to vari-
ous cell phone towers.

In the case of St Lucia, he
said a telephone company
reported that inmates were
their best customers. He said
phone companies should
“assume responsibility” as
their actions were tanta-
mount to selling services to
criminals knowingly.

The Prison Department is
exploring the use of new
technology to assist in reduc-
ing the number of cell
phones in the prison and
blocking their use. They
recently acquired cell phone
sniffing dogs, and are pro-
cessing bids for a cell phone
jamming system.

Another option available
to the prison authorities is
called a “Pest Control Sys-
tem”, which is a new system
engineered in the US,
according to Mr Melamed,
that would be beneficial for
prison authorities operating
on budget constraints.



‘Breathe Easy’ campaign
raises almost $400,000

FROM page one

The cost of one ventilator is
$42,296.65, the cost of one
incubator is $19,087.02.

The equipment has imme-
diately made an impact on the
lives of neonatal infants like
Racaro Clarke, who was born
June 18 at 24 weeks, weighing
just two pounds and 12
ounces.

His parents, High Vista res-
idents, visit his incubator and
ventilator that keeps him alive
every day, marvelling at his
health and development.

Racaro’s mother, Venus
Clarke, a grade five teacher,
reached into the incubator
and touched her baby for the
first time yesterday.

She whispered: “It’s so
good to have this equipment
here.”

Launched in September last
year, the campaign aimed to

raise $300,000 for four venti-
lators and six incubators for
Princess Margaret Hospital's
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

However, after realizing the
critical need for new ventila-
tors at the hospital the cam-
paign organizers decided this
crucial equipment should be
the focus. An added bonus of
the ventilators is that they are
portable and can also be used
for other Intensive Care Unit
patients — a long term benefit
for PMH.

Individual donations ranged
from $25 to $45,000, and were
supplemented by internation-
al and local grants.

President of the Rotary
Club of East Nassau Michelle
Rassin said: “It is so impor-
tant that we have the
resources to keep our
neonates alive. We had a great
response from the Bahamian
community and we are
pleased to be able to offer

these infants their first
breath.”

With two successful nation-
wide campaigns, which col-
lectively raised more than
$700,000 in charitable funds,
the group shows no chance of
slowing down.

Ms Rassin said that orga-
nizers are currently in discus-
sion with hospital administra-
tion concerning major needs
of its new expansion.

She continued: “There are a
lot of companies, corporate
citizens who want to give
back. And unlike the US
where you do get concessions
for donations, these compa-
nies do it out of their hearts,
looking to help build a better
Bahamas.”

Although the Breathe Easy
campaign has concluded, any-
one interested in donating to
the hospital can make cheques
payable to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Foundation.

FNM: Opposition’s Director of Public
Prosecutions criticism is ‘hypocrisy’

FROM page one

under the PLP administration non-Bahami-
ans were appointed to top posts at the College
of the Bahamas and the Ministry of Public
Works & Transport.

It read: “It was the FNM which created the
post of DPP during the 1990s, a post that has
been filled by Bahamians up to this time. It is
not lost on the Bahamian people that the post
of Director of Legal Affairs (DLA) was peren-
nially held by a foreigner under the PLP. It
was the FNM that appointed the first Bahami-
an DLA during the 1990s.

“We note that the same hypocritical PLP,
which speaks endlessly about Caribbean coop-
eration and promotes the entry of The
Bahamas into the Caribbean Single Market
Economy, is now criticising the appointment of
a Caribbean national to help lead the country
and the region’s fight against serious and vio-
lent crime.”

The statement continued: “That the new
DPP has an outstanding track record in crim-
inal prosecutions is of no concern to the PLP.
They prefer to play politics rather than help the
country to marshal all available resources nec-
essary to fight crime.

“Bahamians generally understand that in a
small country such as ours, there will be
instances when a non-Bahamian may be

engaged for a period. Still, in the interest of the
ongoing preparation of Bahamians for vari-
ous posts, two Bahamians were appointed as
Deputy Directors of Public Prosecution, at
the same time that the new DPP was appoint-
ed. Of course, the PLP has hypocritically failed
to mention this fact.

“The PLP have also chosen to ignore the
fact that two Bahamians, including the indi-
vidual for whom they feign so much concern,
were also at the same time appointed to the
post of Deputy Law Reform Commissioner
by the JLSC.

“This post is slightly higher than that of the
Deputy DPP. It should be noted that the post
of Law Commissioner has always been held by
non-Bahamians. The appointment of two
Bahamians to the post of Deputy suggests that
in the future, Bahamians will be appointed to
this post that has always been filled by non-
Bahamians.”

The statement added: “Moreover, the most
recent statements on the matter by the Oppo-
sition, and specifically by the Leader of the
Opposition, were brought to the attention of
the Prime Minister who is travelling abroad.

Commenting on the timing of the Leader of
the Opposition’s statement, the Prime Minis-
ter noted: “I am not surprised that Mr. Christie
chose to attack me behind my back while I
am out of the country.”

Cell phones are “pests” in
the prison system, so a
sweep of the prison is done
in a similar spirit to the
cleaning exercise that is con-
ducted for eliminating tra-
ditional pests.

A company is hired to
come in once a month or
once a quarter to run “a
sweep”, or virtually scan of
the prison to locate cell
phones.

“We find them by the ser-
ial number as they are mak-
ing calls or turning them on
and off. That information is
provided to the carrier and
we tell them to unsubscribe
the phones. Batelco would
be obliged to turn off all the
phones,” said Mr Melamed.

In a sweep of a Texas
prison, Mr Melamed said
they found 239 cell phones
amongst 400 inmates. He
said the prison authorities
sent messages to the prison-
ers via their phones to give
them the option of turning
in the phone immediately
with no penalty. About 25
per cent of the inmates came
forward to turn over their
phones.

Mr Melamed said prison
officers have also been
caught with illegal phones
during a sweep.

“What you do depends on
what your philosophy is: to
suppress communication or
to punish criminals. It is
hard to punish a criminal
who is already behind bars.
The key is to suppress it and
eliminate the possibility of
the crime being committed.
That is a better use for
spending the public’s mon-
ey,” said Mr Melamed.

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- Govt schools set for major repairs

FROM page one

education official.

There are a total of about 12 government schools in the
Grand Bahama District. Necessary repairs and renovations
are carried out to administrative offices, classrooms, and
restroom facilities, among other things.

District Superintendent Hezekiah Dean said the scope of
works is finalised by the permanent secretary in New Prov-

idence.

“We are expecting to receive the scope of works this week
and put them out to tender for bids from local contractors,”

he told The Tribune.

Mr Dean said contractors must visit the various school
sites to check out repairs and submit their bids.

The bids are then reviewed by Island Administrator, the
District Superintendent, and the Local Government district

council.

“Some persons feel that we award contracts to whoever we
wish to, but we actually sit and review all the bids and then
offer a contract,” he explained.

This is expected to create employment for local contractors

on Grand Bahama.

Mum and son fight off home invaders

FROM page one

wrestling a handgun out of his
hand. This weapon was left at
the scene after the culprits
escaped.

"We retrieved a weapon
from the scene, a handgun, left
in the home as a result of the
struggle. Because of the strug-
gle the son disarmed the fel-
low," ASP Fernander told The
Tribune.

Police believe the thugs are
a pair of would-be robbers
whose plans were foiled by the
mother and son.

"We suspect, clearly it was
robbery,” Mr Fernander said,
adding that it appears that
nothing was taken from the
home.

No suspects were in custody
up to press time, but Mr Fer-
nander said police had per-
sons of interest in mind and
suspect the thugs could be res-
idents of the area.

Up to press time last night,
the mother was in hospital in a
stable condition.

She is being treated for
facial injuries she sustained
during the scuffle.

Her son, who was taken to
hospital for an injury to his
left arm, has been treated and
discharged.

As investigations continue,
police yesterday appealed to
the public with information to
call 919, the CDU at 502-
9991, or the Crime Stoppers
hotline at 328-TIPS.

PLP reportedly facing difficulties
in choosing election nominee

FROM page one

candidates are put forward to the Bahamian people.

Our source said: “We have a number of persons with
some questionable backgrounds who we have had to turn
around. Then there are others who you have to do your
background checks on and it looks like we need to have
papers in hand for some of these people.

“But the last thing we want to do is put out a candidate
who (Prime Minister Hubert) Ingraham could chew up.
That won’t do the party any good, cause from all accounts
this election will be a close one. Every seat counts. So we
have to do our homework this time around.”




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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

CARIBBEAN NEWS

Reports: Fugitive drug lord
surrenders in Jamaica

By HOWARD
CAMPBELL
Associated Press Writer

KINGSTON, Jamaica
(AP) — Reputed gang
leader Christopher "Dudus"
Coke, who eluded a bloody
police offensive in his slum
stronghold last month, was
arrested Tuesday by author-
ities outside Jamaica's capi-
tal, the island's top cop said.

Coke has been called one
of the world's most danger-
ous drug lords by U.S.
authorities and faces trial in
New York on drug and arms
trafficking charges. His

Arrest almost a month after
76 killed in slum assault

arrest came nearly a month
after 76 people were killed
during a four-day assault by
police and soldiers on the
West Kingston slum of
Tivoli Gardens, which is
Coke's base.

At a news conference,
Police Commissioner Owen
Ellington said Coke was in
good condition in police cus-
tody. He provided few
specifics, saying that "the cir-

cumstances of (Coke's)
arrest are being investigat-
ed."

Jamaican news media had
reported Coke turned him-
self in. But the Rev. Al
Miller, an influential evan-
gelical preacher who facili-
tated the surrender of
Coke's brother earlier this
month, told The Associated
Press that Coke was pre-
pared to surrender to

authorities at the U.S.
Embassy in Kingston when
police stopped his convoy on
a highway outside the capi-
tal.

"A contact was made on
his behalf that he wanted to
give himself in," Miller said.
"I therefore made arrange-
ments with his lawyers
because he wanted to go
ahead with the extradition
process, so we communicat-
ed with the U.S. Embassy
because that's where he
would feel more comfort-
able."

Miller said police cap-
tured Coke on the way to

BP may pipe oil to platforms if relief wells fail



OFFICIALS of BP, which owns the
well, and other government and industry
experts, have said the they expect to stop
the flow by drilling relief wells to inter-
cept the Macondo near the reservoir 13,000
feet below the Gulf floor and then plugging
it with cement, according to Associated
Press.

One of the drilling rigs has reached
10,677 feet, said retired Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen, the response comman-
der, and a backup relief well has reached
4,662 feet.

Engineers have looked at a number of
ways to proceed if the relief wells fail,
Allen said, including piping oil and gas
from the well to facilities nearby.

Allen said the idea, still in early stages of
evaluation, was discussed at an industry
meeting hosted last week by Interior Sec-
retary Ken Salazar and the Energy Secre-
tary Steven Chu.

The group identified a couple of plat-
forms in the area that could take some of
the oil and gas through pipelines along the
ocean floor. Then it could be brought to
the surface for processing or pumped back
into a reservoir.

Since early June, BP has been capturing
thousands of barrels of oil a day through
systems on the seafloor. But some of it is
being burned off because vessels on the
surface don't have capacity to contain it all.

Containment reached nearly 26,000 bar-





Neel Merenaccnurutcamnieen| lc (AP)

rels on Monday, more than a million gal-
lons and the highest since the spill began,
Allen said. Much of it is coming through a
containment cap installed after undersea
robots cut a leaking riser pipe that once
connected the wellhead on the seafloor to
the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig almost
a mile above.

Allen said Tuesday that teams are
retrieving the sheared-off portion of the
riser as evidence in the investigation into
the disaster.

When the Macondo well blew out April
20, it destroyed the Deepwater Horizon,
killed 11 workers and began spilling mil-
lions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mex-
ico.

Allen said the amount of oil being col-

lected could double by the end of June
with the arrival of another vessel that is
expected to catch 20,000 to 25,000 more
barrels a day.

But sending the oil through undersea
pipelines to existing production platforms
would reduce or eliminate the need for
collection operations on the surface right
above the well, which might have to be
suspended if a hurricane threatens. And it
could provide a backup plan if BP is
unable to plug the blown out well, or if
the process takes longer than expected.

The company has said it won't complete
the first relief well until at least sometime
in August.

In anew measure of the possible scope
of the disaster, a Texas A&M Uni-
versity researcher just back from an eight-
day trip through the Gulf waters sur-
rounding the spill site said his team found
far higher-than-normal levels of methane
gas in the area, as much as one million
times higher in a few places.

As a result, oceanographer John Kessler
said, oxygen levels in some deep-sea
regions are abnormally low, although it's
not yet clear what that means for sea life.

The low oxygen levels could lead to
another dead zone, Kessler said during a
briefing for reporters Tuesday. Most dead
zones - areas where oxygen levels are too
low to sustain fish and other sea life - are
caused by fertilizer runoff.





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DATE:

Saturday, June 26", 2010

the embassy and then took
him to the nearby Spanish
Town police headquarters.
He was then flown to
Kingston, the preacher said.

Last month, a U.S. law
enforcement official in New
York, speaking on condition
of anonymity, told The
Associated Press that a
lawyer for Coke was in nego-
tiations with the US. Justice
Department about his clien-
t's possible safe removal to
New York to face charges.

Coke is said to fear suf-
fering the same fate as his
father, a gang leader known
as Jim Brown, who died ina
prison fire in 1992 while
awaiting extradition to the
USS. on drug charges.

US. Embassy officials did
not immediately return calls.
A phone for Coke's lead
attorney, Don Foote, went
unanswered.

Prime Minister Bruce
Golding, whose Jamaica
Labour Party has long
counted on the support of
gunmen inside Coke's Tivoli
Gardens slum, opposed the
US. extradition request for
nine months before revers-
ing himself under growing
public pressure that threat-
ened his political career.

Earlier this month, the
main opposition party staged
a no-confidence vote against
Golding, which he survived
after promising a sustained
assault on the gangs that
control poor politicized
slums such as Tivoli Gar-
dens.

Coke is wanted in New
York on charges that he traf-
ficked cocaine and marijua-
na as well as weapons
between his Caribbean
island and the United States.

The reputed drug baron,
who typically avoids the

LOCATION:

Commonwealth Bank,

THE TRIBUNE





IN THIS UNDATED FILE PHOTO,
alleged drug gang leader Christo-
pher ‘Dudus’ Coke is shown.

AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner

limelight, has remained
silent. He faces life in prison
if convicted on charges filed
against him in New York.

Jamaica's political histo-
ry is intertwined with slum
gangs that the two main
parties helped organize —
and some say armed — in
Kingston's poor neigh-
bourhoods in the 1970s and
‘80s.

The gangs controlled the
streets and intimidated vot-
ers at election time. In recent
years political violence has
waned, and many of the
killings in Kingston now are
blamed on the active drug
and extortion trade.

Coke was born into
Jamaica's gangland. His
father was the leader of the
notorious Shower Posse
gang, a cocaine-trafficking
band with agents in Jamaica
and the U.S. that began
operating in the 1980s and
was named for its members’
tendency to spray victims
with bullets.

The son took over from
the father, U.S. authorities
allege.

In recent days, Jamaica's
government had offered a
$60,000 reward for informa-
tion leading to Coke's arrest.

Also known as "Presi-
dent” to the people of his
slum, Coke served as com-
munity leader and enforcer
in the gritty neighbourhood
in an area that the govern-
ment acknowledges it has
long neglected.

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usine

WEDNESDAY,

(oUEN Eos 2e: 2



2010

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net





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$100m investment avoids ‘devastation’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

developer who

has already invest-

ed $20-$25 million

into his 43-acre
residential project yesterday
expressed relief that the Gov-
ernment did not end the first-
time home buyer Stamp Tax
exemption, telling Tribune
Business it would have been
“devastating” for the develop-
ment given that 30-40 per cent
of purchasers were coming
from this key market.

Jason Kinsale, principal of
The Balmoral Development,
located on Prospect Ridge near
the US Ambassador's resi-
dence, told this newspaper that
he was urging all potential
home buyers to exploit any tax
exemptions they could access,
pointing out how his first real
estate development - Hampton
Ridge - was thrown into tem-

* Developer with $20-$25m already in ground expresses relief first-time buyer tax exemption stays, as end would have hit 30-40% of clients
* About ‘50%’ of Balmoral’s infrastructure complete, with first homeowners moving in

* Stamp Tax change pushes buyers to respect closing dates, as recession extends development for one year
* ‘We're proceeding while a lot of people are dead in the water. It’s a first class community’

porary confusion when the
FNM previously ended the
first-time buyer Stamp Tax
exemption.

That was subsequently rein-
stated and extended, but Mr
Kinsale told Tribune Business:
“T glad they [the Government]
did not cancel the first time
buyer exemption. That would
have been devastating, with 30-
40 per cent of our buyers com-
ing from the first-time buyer
market.

“We actually got caught in
the middle at Hampton Ridge
when the FNM annulled the
earlier first-time buyer exemp-
tion. That was pretty serious
for us. One of the things buyers

Grand Bahama needs
infrastructure for arbitration

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

GRAND Bahama does not currently have the human or phys-
ical infrastructure to accommodate an international arbitration
centre for maritime alternative dispute settlement, the managing
director of a Bahamas-based forensic accounting and insolvency
practice told Tribune Business yesterday.

Edmund Rahming, of Krys Rahming and Associates (Bahamas),
said there were not enough qualified individuals to staff a centre
dedicated to arbitration and mediation. However, he believes
many of the more-than 1200 attorneys and 650 accountants living
in New Providence would be willing to travel to the island should
the Government build a centre there.

“We have to make sure there is the institutional support; that
government provides whatever support is needed,” he said. “We

need to ensure there are quali-
fied arbitrators here, and that

SEE page 2B

Stamp ‘amnesty’ fairness
called into question

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LEADING attorney yes-
terday questioned the fairness
in allowing persons seeking to
benefit from the Government’s
three-month Stamp Tax penal-
ty amnesty to pay duty at the
old rates, while purchasers who
have done nothing wrong - and
whose transactions fail to close
by June 30 - will be faced with
paying two percentage points
more.

Andrew O’Brien, head of the
Bahamas Bar Association’s real
estate committee, told Tribune
Business he was querying the

SEE page 2B

* Leading attorney questions
why defaulters allowed to
pay old duty rate, when
transactions in play
faced with paying two
percentage points more

* Rush to close existing
deals by June 30, causing
queries over why ‘window’
for them not permitted

* Bahamas going in ‘opposite
direction’ to others by
making real estate
transaction costs and home
ownership more expensive

Investors urged: ‘Shake
off your complacency’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN shareholders
need to shake off their “com-
placency” and make themselves
heard if they have concerns
about how public companies
they have invested in are being
run, a leading investment
banker said yesterday, while
acknowledging that existing
capital markets legislation did
not give the minority’s repre-
sentation enough clout.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFi-
delity Merchant Bank & Trust’s
president, told Tribune Busi-
ness that as the Bahamian cap-
ital markets evolved there had
to be a focus on “enhancing
measures to give minority
investors a greater voice”, given

that most BISX-listed and pub-
lic companies were controlled
by one majority shareholder or
group of like-minded interests.

Speaking in the wake of
Freeport Concrete becoming
the first BISX-listed and public
company to move for liquida-
tion, Mr Anderson said: “As
minority shareholders, while
they might have a voice, they’re
not adequately represented to
make changes to the way the
company is being run.

“As we move forward, it’s
something we have to focus on.
Overall, it’s part of the devel-
opment of the market, enhanc-
ing measures to give the minor-
ity a greater voice.”

By the same token, he added:

SEE page 3B

have to recognise is that the
Government can cancel these
programmes at any time they
want. I’m telling buyers to take
advantage of it, because they
might not be around in six
months’ time. That’s reality.”

Balmoral has focused on the
singles and professionals mar-
kets as being critical to its suc-
cess, and Mr Kinsale said the
two percentage point increase
in Stamp Duty rates across the
board, due to come into effect
on July 1, 2010, had prompted
many Balmoral buyers with
transactions in play to “respond
to closing dates much more
assiduously” in a bid to min-
imise taxes.

The “first set of homeown-
ers” is currently moving into
Balmoral’s completed 26-unit
first phase, which has one unit
remaining on the market, and
the developers have moved on
to phase two. This features 16
three and four-bedroom Grand
Town Homes and three single
family homes, Mr Kinsale
telling Tribune Business that
seven of the former have
already been sold.

“Our next phase is well
underway,” he added. “What’s
been interesting as well is that
the last few buyers have been
cash buyers with no mortgages,
so there’s a lot of money sitting
n the sidelines waiting for things

to do. The money’s out there;
it’s Just trying to get it out of
people’s pockets. But there’s
been $600,000 in cash,
$500,0000.”

Mr Kinsale said the develop-
ers were “well over $20-$25 mil-
lion” in terms of their invest-
ment into what is expected to
be a $100 million project, hav-
ing installed key infrastructure
up front.

He estimated that they were
“about 50 per cent of the way
through” on infrastructure, hav-
ing completed the roads,
paving, water and electricity for
the town home section, with the
latter two utilities now going
into the lot area.

CLICO liquidator close to
portfolio due diligence end

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) liquidator this week indi-
cated he had “substantially” completed his due
diligence on who should purchase the insolvent
insurer’s remaining life and health policy port-
folio, telling a creditors’ meeting that two candi-

dates remained in the running.

Sources who attended Monday’s meeting,
called by Baker Tilly Gomez partner, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez, told Tribune Business that the lig-
uidator indicated to the roughly 100 creditors
and their representatives who attended that he
was getting closer to deciding who would acquire

the insurer’s policies.

source told Tribune Business. “He [Mr Gomez]
said there were two potential purchasers for the
portfolio. He didn’t disclose who they were.”

Colina Insurance Company, the BISX-listed
life and health insurer, which is the market leader
by balance sheet and asset size, has long been
regarded as the front runner to acquire CLICO
(Bahamas) portfolio. It is not known who the

potential rival is, although BAF Financial &

Insurance (Bahamas) has long spoken of its inter-
est, and has been acquiring parts of the former
CL Financial empire around the Caribbean.

Mr Gomez could not be reached by Tribune
Business for comment yesterday, and is still
understood to be ‘gagged’ by the Supreme Court

from speaking to the media.

“It seemed as if he had substantially closed

his due diligence in terms of the life portfolio,” a

ROYAL FIDELITY

tela ae ola 4

SEE page 5B

“The reality is that everyone
has been hit by the recession,”
Mr Kinsale told Tribune Busi-
ness. “It’s definitely added a
year on to this project. To say it
hasn’t would be a lie. But things
are moving and selling. Every
time someone comes by there’s
something new. We’re pro-
ceeding while a lot of people
are dead in the water. It’s a first
class community.”

Balmoral, which will feature
275 units at full build-out, typi-
cally prices its properties in the
middle market $300,00-
$500,000 range - a category that
Mr Kinsale believes is under-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010



$100m
investment

avoids
‘devastation’

FROM page 1B

served.

“There really aren’t a lot of
choices; there’s not a lot out
there,” he explained. “Nauti-
ca’s at $550,000, and to go into
Sandyport with a small condo-
minium is $400,000. That’s a
nice community but very
expensive. A lot of profession-
als don’t have that money, and
are only putting 10-15 per cent
down.”

Given the current market
environment, Mr Kinsale said
the key was for Balmoral to be
“adaptable” to whatever buyers
demanded, possessing four to

THE TRIBUNE



Expert: Commercial fraud
on the rise in the Bahamas

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



COMMERCIAL fraud is on the rise
in the region and in the Bahamas as a
direct result of the global recession,
the managing director of forensic
accounting, corporate recovery and
insolvency firm, Krys Rahming and
Associates (Bahamas), said yesterday,
as it prepares to host a seminar on
related topics next Friday.

Edmund Rahming said unemploy-
ment in the economy produces an
increase in fraudulent activities as fam-
ilies and individuals fall on hard times,
often choosing to justify fraud over
more ethical activities.

“Anytime you see there is unem-
ployment or the economy goes down

hill or people hit hard times, there will
be an increase in fraud,” he said.
“Fraud has always been something
people rationalise.”

Countries

Mr Rahming said countries like the
UK reported an increase in fraud in
2009 and 2010 to-date over 2008.

A BBC online article on Online
Banking Fraud reported phishing
attacks (where people are tricked into
entering personal data online) were
up 16 per cent in 2009 over 2008. and
online banking losses reaching £59.7
million, an increase of 14 per cent over
2008.

In the Bahamian context, the
National Insurance Board saw fraud
increases when it launched its unem-

ployment benefit programme.

Mr Rahming’s firm, though only six
months in business, is slated to partner
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force’s
fraud unit to share their corporate
fraud expertise.

Mr Rahming’s firm is a dedicated
forensic accounting firm that is
equipped to extract sensitive data from
computer hard drives, and as an
accounting firm, analyse and document
the data. According to him, the firm
also has the experience to handle myr-
iad matters regarding insolvency,
forensic accounting and financial mat-
ters, having handled international mat-
ters involving Viacom, Ingersoll Rand,
Erikson and Lucent Technology.

He said insolvencies and liquida-
tions have also been on the increase
across the world, and the Bahamas is

seeing its share as well. “There are
pressures on the [Bahamas’ Financial]
system, but it is still holding its private
wealth and trust business in that par-
ticular niche market,” said Mr Rah-
ming. “Therefore there should be work
in what we do.”

Timing

“It is good timing for the Caribbean
in general for someone who only does
this to enter the marketplace.”

The insolvency and dispute consul-
tation seminar being hosted by Mr
Rahming’s company at the British
Colonial Hilton is expected to cover
topical issues of arbitration in the
Bahamas, and the hot-button issue of
the Bernard Madoff scandal and cross-
border insolvency.



five home options it could offer.







FREEPORT, from page 1B

folks who are a support part of the process do all they can to
obtain training and put themselves out there as being able to par-
ticipate in these proceedings.

“In my humble opinion, the infrastructure isn’t there in Grand
Bahama and we may not have sufficient professionals, but Bahami-
ans have always been very open to moving throughout the
Bahamas.”

Mr Rahming said, meanwhile, that the Cayman Islands was fol-
lowing the Bahamas’ lead and moving forward aggressively on pass-
ing arbitration laws, enabling it to become an immediate and
strong competitor to this nation’s arbitration centre plans.

According to him, the large financial and offshore centre that
Cayman is will give it an edge over the Bahamas’ smaller sector, but
he touted the Bahamas’ extensive Maritime Registry as a positive
building block for this country if the infrastructure can be devel-
oped.

A recent paper penned by the Global Arbitration Review 2010
cites Hurricane Ivan and Hurricane Paloma for the initial growth
in arbitration proceedings in the Cayman Islands. Recently, the
global financial crisis and the changes to financial regimes across
the world as a result of iron-fisted G-20 intervention in the sector
have created the need for arbitration centres.

The Bahamas saw the need to capture arbitration business as the
global recession bore down, and introduced upgrades to the Com-
mercial Arbitration Act, while a Bahamas chapter of the Chartered
Institute of Arbitrators (CLARB) of London was subsequently
launched.

A recent Tribune article placed the Bahamas with Trinidad
and Tobago and Barbados as one of only two Caribbean countries
to join the CIARB.

The legislation introduced by the Bahamas in 2009 to upgrade
the existing act, while not enabling it to go head-to-head directly
with the world’s major arbitration centres, such as New York,
London and Paris, enables it to offer similar services - but on a
niche basis.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DEREK JULIAN
TRENT SANDS intend io change my name to TRENT

ELLIOT YIU KWOK LAM. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.



Stamp ‘amnesty’ fairness called into question

FROM page 1B

equity in allowing Stamp Tax
defaulters, who may be facing
anywhere from a 15-30 per cent
surcharge on the duty they owe,
to pay their tax at the old rates
which expire on July 1, 2010.

The Government announced
a three-month surcharge
amnesty in its Budget for per-
sons who had yet to bring real
estate conveyancings forward
for Stamping, and the payment
of due tax, and the only real
estate-related amendment
made to its fiscal plans was to
clarify that those who came for-
ward would pay the old duty
rates.

“My understanding is that
the only change that was made
is that anyone who owed a sur-
charge for filing late has until
October 1,” Mr O’Brien, a
Glinton, Sweeting & O’Brien
partner, told Tribune Business.

“What they clarified was that
there was some question as to
whether the new rate or old
rate would be applied, and they
clarified in the amendments to
the Stamp Tax amendments
that the old rate would still
apply [ to surcharge exemption
seekers].”

He added: “It’s kind of inter-
esting that the people who have
delayed for so long are able to
benefit from the old rates and
everyone else isn’t. I don’t
understand why they’re getting
the benefit. It doesn’t make a
whole lot of sense. I’m disap-
pointed, but it seems that’s the
way it’s going to go.”

The Stamp Duty changes
unveiled in the Budget involve
a two percentage point increase
in Stamp Duty across the board

for all real estate deal, apart
from those involving first-time
buyers. Thus for deals priced
between $0-$20,000, the rate
goes from 2 per cent to 4 per
cent; for between $20,000 to
$50,000, it goes to 6 per cent;
for between $50,000 to
$100,000, it goes to 8 per cent;
for between $100,000 to
$250,000, it goes to 10 per cent;
and from $250,000 and up, it
goes to 12 per cent.

Thus the savings for those
exploiting the surcharge
amnesty could be significant.
Mr O’Brien had previously
urged the Government to
implement a two-three month
window after July 1 that would
allow real estate deals, which
had been signed prior to the
Budget’s unveiling to close at
the old rates, but these pleas
appear to have fallen on deaf
ears.

“Everyone is trying to close
up before July 1,” he said yes-
terday of those deals, and for
those people who have been
caught, I’ve heard from one
that the bank is extending the
additional funds, but will that
mean that someone has loan
payments beyond their means?

“Fortunately, I didn’t get
caught by having a client who
just signed. We’re pushing, and
hoping to get the banks to
release funds before next week.
There’s undoubtedly going to
be many people who are in the
middle of a transaction that
have to come up with money
somehow, and it’s going to be
uncomfortable.”

Mr O’Brien said questions
may arise as to who ponies up
the extra Stamp Duty, espe-
cially if the sales agreement

calls for a 50/50 split between
buyer and seller, and if attor-
neys are late in getting con-
veyancings stamped, would
they be liable to pay the differ-
ence.

The attorney added that the
Treasury was likely to receive
large sums of money over the
next week as real estate trans-
actions rushed to close, and
questioned why the Govern-
ment had not created a month-
long window for the old rates,
since this would mean “more
money coming in as opposed
to people walking away from
transactions”.

Mr O’Brien also questioned
why the Bahamas appeared to
be going in the “opposite direc-
tion” to the US and other coun-
tries by raising the transaction
costs associated with home
ownership, rather than trying
to reduce these.

“I would think that as costs
go up, fewer people are eligible
to enter the market, so it might
shrink,” he explained. “Will
that shrinkage counter higher
land prices down the road? I
don’t know.

“T see the US making more
money available for people to
buy houses, and we’re taking
the opposite approach. There’s
been no reduction in interest
rates on mortgages. I don’t
understand why we have not
used the monetary system to
reduce the cost of money, and
allow people to buy homes and

start building, instead of
increasing the cost.”

Tribune Business previously
showed that, for example, a
$500,000 house purchase cur-
rently would attract a 10 per
cent Stamp Duty rate, mean-
ing that $50,000 is paid to the
Treasury when the transaction
closes. If split 50/50 between
buyer and seller, each pays
$25,000, or otherwise the buyer
or seller pays the $50,000 them-
selves.

Now, with a 12 per cent
Stamp Duty rate coming into
effect as of July 1, 2010, such a
transaction would require
$60,000 to be paid to the Public
Treasury. If the seller or pur-
chaser agrees to pay this 100
per cent, then their tax burden
has risen by $10,000, whereas
if split 50/50 it goes to $30,000
each. Either way, this repre-
sents a significant $5,000-
$10,000 increase associated with
the cost of real estate transac-
tions.

Then take a $240,000 prop-
erty, which currently attracts
Stamp Duty at 8 per cent. This
requires $19,200 to be paid to
the Treasury, which translates
into a $9,600 payment by both
sides if split 50/50 between buy-
er and seller.

Now, at the new 10 per cent
rate, some $24,000 will be paid
in Stamp Duty to the Govern-
ment - an increase of $4,800, or
$2,400 for both sides if split
50/50.



IAA

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NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BORROMEO FUND LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on June 22, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 4th day of August, 2010 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

June 23, 2010
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HSBC INTERNATIONAL
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the winding up
and dissolution of HSBC INTERNATIONAL

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED has been completed
and the Company was

May, 2010.

Dated this 23:day of June, 2010
Maria M. Férére
Liquidator



removed from the
Register of Companies on the 25th Day of

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OBLIX SHIPPING
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act (No. 45 of 2000). OBLIX SHIPPING IN-
TERNATIONAL LIMITED, is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the
22nd day of June, 2010.

Mayo Secretaries Limited,
Akara Building, 24 De Castro Street,
Wickhams Cay I, Road Town, Tortola, BVI,
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
WILLARD SERVICES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, WILLARD SERVICES LIMITED,
has been dissolved and struck off the Register ac-
cording to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by
the Registrar General on the 10th day

of May, 2010.

Epsilon Management Ltd.,

Suite 13, First Floor, Oliaji Trade Centre,
Francis Rachel Street, Victoria, Mahe,
Republic of Seychelles
Liquidator





Drivers Needed.

Please apply in person
eM

Spotless Cleaners Madeira Street.
Please No Telephone Calls.

NOTICE

To All Our Valued Customers

Bahamas Welding And Fire Co.,
Ltd. #70 Wilton Street East

Will Be CLOSED
For Annual Stocktaking
Friday June 25th &
Saturday June 26th, 2010.

We apologize for any
Inconvenience caused,
Thanks for your patronage
throughout the year.

Management



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

STUDENT “learning and
understanding” of economics
will be “far greater” due to
their text book employing
examples set in a truly Bahami-
an environment, its authors
believe, adding that its contents
will provide knowledge on
“what the country needs to do
to ensure its survival”.

Dr Nikolaos Karagiannis and
Dale McHardy, authors of
Principles of Economics: A
Bahanuan Perspective, told Tri-
bune Business it was “critical”
that economics and commerce
be taught in a way that allowed
students to relate the subjects to
the Bahamian environment, as
this enhanced their under-
standing and speeded up learn-
ing.
The book, which is being for-
mally launched today and is

published by McGraw Hill, is
targeted chiefly and last-year
high school students and first-
year college students, but the
authors believe it can also help
the “average” Bahamian to
understand the forces currently
impacting this country’s econo-
my.
Mrs McHardy, who is also
manager for business advisory
services at the Bahamas Devel-
opment Bank, said the inspira-
tion for the book came from
realising, while tutoring stu-
dents for BGCSE economics
and commerce, that there was
no true Bahamian text book on
this subject.

A British-based textbook
was being used, and she
explained: “Bahamian kids
relate better to Bahamian
things. Every Bahamian knows
about conch salad, grouper fin-
gers, rum cake and so on. Once
you start to relate these eco-

nomic concepts to things
Bahamian can relate to, you
find the chance for an under-
standing of the concept may be

quicker.
Fact

“The mere fact that you’ve
already related theories and
data to Bahamian things, half
the battle is won. I’ve seen that
once you relate what is in a text
book to a Bahamian environ-
ment, the student will say: ‘Now
I understand it’. We have to
find a way to teach Bahamian
economic concepts in a
Bahamian world.

“It’s so important that I can’t
stress how important it is in
learning a subject that is per-
ceived to be difficult. Once you
put it into a Bahamian context,
and base it on Bahamian exam-
ples, the learning and under-
standing is greater.”

The Bahamian-oriented text
book is a reworking of the book
that Dr Karagiannis and Mrs
McHardy published in April
this year, and the pair said it
was targeted at students at insti-
tutions such as the College of
the Bahamas (COB), Omega
and Success Training College.

They argued that “every
household” should purchase
the book, which they are due
to present to all public school
business teachers at the Min-
istry of Education next week.

Dr Karagiannis said the def-
nitions in the book were “‘accu-
rate, appropriate, student
friendly and everyone under-
stands them”. He added that
all the data in the book, such as
Labour Force Statistics and
projections up until 2011, was
sourced from Bahamian
sources such as the Central
Bank of the Bahamas and
Department of Statistics.

Investors urged: ‘Shake off your complacency’

FROM page 1B

“T think there’s generally a complacency
among shareholders in this market that
what happens will happen, and they don’t
need to be involved. There’s no real mech-
anism to get them involved, but they don’t
step up and make their voices heard.”

Mr Anderson said that often, those who
did speak out were effectively mavericks,
taking companies and Boards on over
issues that did not make sense. “We need
responsible people to get up at [annual
general] meetings and say the right thing,”
he added.

“People need to get out there, criticise,
complain and get things to change. People
would find that, if they did voice their con-
cerns, that they have a much larger voice
than they think, even though it’s not
enshrined in the Securities Industry Act.
Chief executives and chairman are more
likely to listen to sensible persons from the
floor than people might think.

“Generally speaking, I think it’s com-
placency on the part of Bahamian investors
because minority investors in other markets
have stronger protection through their secu-
rities laws, takeover laws. We still do not
have anything here.”

That situation might change soon, given
that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
last month that the Government planned to
bring the Securities Industry Act and its

accompanying regulations to Parliament
before the summer recess - a timetable that
might be somewhat optimistic.

Mr Anderson was backed by Kenwood
Kerr, Providence Advisors’ chief execu-
tive, who told Tribune Business that
Freeport Concrete’s demise might impact
investor sentiment - especially on the retail
side - towards upcoming initial public offer-
ings (IPOs) such as the $60-$65 million
Burns House/Heineken deal, and the $10
million Arawak Cay port offering.

Freeport Concrete was the last true [PO
to come to market in the Bahamas back
in 2001, and Mr Kerr said of the potential
investor impact: “It’s a reality of how these
things work in mature markets. It shouldn’t
[impact future IPOs], but it may linger in
the back of people’s minds that something
similar could happen.”

Still, Mr Kerr suggested that Freeport
Concrete “may have been dead for a long
time”, adding that many Nassau-based
investors might ignore its demise because of
the geographical differences.

“When you’re looking at these busi-
nesses, nothing beats doing research, under-
standing the nature of the business, its com-
petition and the markets in which it’s doing
business,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business.
Nothing beats it.

“Nothing is foolproof, but understanding
that is the key element. Seek professional
help.”

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Marketing Manager

The successful candidate must possess the following:

Mr Anderson agreed, telling this news-
paper that “there are good and bad IPOs in
this market and other markets”, and sug-
gesting that investors bought into Freeport
Concrete’s offering simply because it was
such a thing and “assumed to be good”.

Equity investments, though, had to be
“judged on their merits” respectively, he
explained, adding that the Freeport Con-
crete situation was another learning process
for Bahamian investors and would “make
them more circumspect about where they
invest”.

Mr Anderson acknowledged that the
company’s failure “may add to the negative
sentiment” in the Bahamian equities mar-
ket, although “it shouldn’t” because it was
just one company. He added that it did not
fail because it was an IPO, but rather due to
the economy and bad decisions taken in
past years.

Bahamian public company stocks rarely
trade on fundamentals, but rather on
investor “sentiment”, and Mr Anderson
said current selling pressure on BISX was
“not warranted”.

UY MTSU RUC

MeO ES



A creative thinker with a knack for advertising and a history of creating

big ideas,

A proven track record of driving sales and significant organizational

Impact.

Must be adaptable to a changing, fast-paced environment.
Able to deal with a variety of personalities and situations with energy

and enthusiasin,

on now at

Able to work in a culture/environment that promotes an entrepreneu-

rial spirit and a “let's get it done now" attitude,

Focus on possibilities rather than problems.

Strong customer orientation,

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

« Develop and execute effective local marketing plans that support

annual key initiatives.

Lead efforts to effectively plan, execute, measure and evaluate local

market activites.

Direct media planning and graphic design.

Establish and cultivate PR/media relationships.

Develop and Manage budgets.

Customer Relations and management of complaint process,
Build community goodwill and manage relationships with influential

organizations.

Serve as the local steward of the brand, ensuring all local marketing

activities are aligned with established brand standards,

REQUIREMENTS:

« Bachelors degree in Communications, Marketing or a closely related

field or equivalent work experience.

* Minimum five years professional related experience

COMPETITIVE SALARY & ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT

Send resume to: marketingmanagerwanted@gmail.com

Deaclline for a

lication is Wednesday

une 28th, 2010

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 3B
Bahamian context key to ‘greater’ learning

“Even though we’re target-
ing the high school students,
the college students, we feel the
concepts in this book are pretty
critical to the average Bahami-
an,” Mrs McHardy said.

“In times of economic [cri-
sis], we feel this book is detailed
enough that once hey read it,
what is happening around them
will not be such a puzzle.”

And she added: “Now the
world’s a global village, it’s

important Bahamian students
have an understanding of basic
economics and commerce so
that when the other global chal-
lenges come into play, they will
have an understanding of what
the Bahamas as a country needs
to do to ensure survival.”

Dr Karagiannis is associate
professor of economics at Win-
ston-Salem State University’s
school of business and eco-
nomics in North Carolina.

POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Receptionist for Office Building

Candidate must have excellent customer
service skills, and be computer literate.
Must have experience in a customer

service related

role. Candidate

should be well groomed, mature and

self-motivated.

Security Officer for
Office Building

Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and

have excellent verbal

and_ written

communication skills. Candidate must be
willing to work weekends and extended
hours and have own transportation.

Interested applicants should respond by
sending their resume to:

DA# 87780, c/o
The Tribune,
P.O. Box N-.3027,

Nassau, Bahamas



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GN 1071

SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMIAS
THE SUPREME Coma T
PROBATE DIVISION

Mo SPR On pe a2

Whereas TRIAS WaAWAE MLLER of Marigek! Farm Roned im ibe Exec Deine
of the Ishind of New Prowidened ona of the Ishanda of the Conemorwealihy ol’ Tie Bahamas
has made apalication te fhe Supreme Cour of The Gahaonas. for keiters of admiasiragion of the
Real and Personal Estate of WILLIAM MILLER abo WILLIE MILLER maka
WILLA CAMPBELL WIILILER laie of Pee Rogers Home in the West Chsiier of
Ihe Idan of Mew Prowikence, one of the Islands if the Comomeenecakh of the Gahames.
deccmend

Natice is hereby given thal sech applicaibons will be heard by ihe said Cori at the

exqniration of 14 dave from ibe date herent.

{for} Registrar

COOMSPON WEALTH CF THE BALA AS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DW ISMOM

hao, | BOA PRO pe
Wheres LECIA LYNETTE RUSSELL of No. 19 Argel Rood Eosranod
Subdivision in the Basrtenn District of the bland of Mew Providemce one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahaenas has made application to the Sopreme Court of The Bahamas,
for kuers of adeeinisiauion of the Real and Persone! Estate of LENT FE. RUSSELL oko.
LINDA ELIZABETH RUSSELL oka LINDA RUSSELL Inte of New 1% Agee Rael,
Easecod Subdivision in the Eestern District of the Isto of Kew Providence, ome of ibe

Idlandsl the Commonweal of Tee Baleares, decead
Notice is herghy given that such applications wall be heard by the said Cour at the

equpiraiion of L4 dans from the datc hereol
Nigage be it

oa:
haat _

(feed Riepisorar

OOMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHARLAS
THE SUPREME CouRT
PROBATE DIVISION

No 20M PR OMopr Hae?

Wier INELL RUTH SMITH of Sea Beach Essanee in the [sland of Mew
Providence coo af the likens of tke Comeaonweslch of The Bahamas hes made epolication 1
ihe Suprams Cowet of The Bahamas, for lemers of admimirotion of the Real aed Personal Eooee
of MELSON PF. SMITH late of Sea Beach Estetes in the Isdand of New Providence, one of
tbe Islands of the Ceonmeconventth of The Fechamas. decemsod

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard bry the said Court et the

expiration of 4 deqa fren the dete herent

ee N, Gegap. tS Ug...

{for Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE. DI TSION

No. TIPO PRAMS

Wheres CASSIETTA 2 MCINTOSH, of the Cy af Fraspert on the Iekanad af
Grom’ Rahema, one ofihe Iedands of dhe Commonwealth of The Aghomas, ihe Auiomey by
Deed af Power of for Theade Meclntess, the lawful widee of the deceased bes made
application io the Sepreme Count of The Fahertes, for Lemers of Adinwinistration of the Real ead
Persona! Esate of SEAN DELANO MCINTOSH, lune of #5 Sandoombe Drive in the City of
Freeport on ihe island of Grand Aahema, one of the Islands of The Cocmmonvwealth of The
Baas

Motio is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at che

expiration of 2) daya from the dete hereof



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 5B



SNES
Oil falls as 4-week rally stalls

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices fell Tuesday as the
euphoria over China’s decision
to let its currency appreciate
waned.

A stronger yuan would cut
oil prices in China and, pre-
sumably, boost consumption.
Some analysts feared, though,
that a higher yuan could mean
fewer exports, which could slow
the Chinese economy.

The world’s oil producers
have been selling more crude
to China, India and other fast-
growing economies as demand
in the US continues to be weak
coming out of the Great Reces-
sion.

Benchmark crude for July
delivery lost 61 cents to settle at
$77.21 on the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange.

Tuesday was the last day of
trading in July oil and most
interest had moved to the
August contract, which
dropped 76 cents to settle at
$77.85 a barrel.

Oil has jumped from $64 a
barrel on May 25 on optimism
Europe’s debt crisis won’t
stymie the global economic
recovery.

Goldman Sachs cut its crude
forecasts, but still expects prices
to rise this year as the global
economy grows an estimated
4.9 per cent in 2010. Goldman
now expects prices to rise to
$87 a barrel in three months,
down from last month’s fore-
cast of $96.

Prices advanced to as high as
$78.92 a barrel Monday on





A CHINESE WOMAN, who sells clothes on the roadside, holds tens of
Yuan, while dealing with a customer in a Hutong or a traditional alleyway
in Beijing, China. Proving that flexibility is a two-way street, the Chinese
yuan edged lower against the US dollar in spot trading on Tuesday, a day
after surging to a new high following the central bank's decision to let the
currency trade in a wider range.

investor expectations China’s
move over the weekend to
strengthen its currency would
boost crude demand.

Societe Generale said it
expects the yuan to gain
between three per cent and five
per cent by the end of the year,
not enough to spark significant
new consumption in China.

“Chinese demand has
already exceeded expectations;
it has been strong and we had
already forecast it to continue
that way,” the firm said in a
report. “We simply do not
expect a modest appreciation
in the yuan to make any appre-

(AP Photo)

ciable difference in demand.”

Societe Generale forecasts
crude will average $80 a barrel
in the third quarter and $85 in
the fourth.

In other trading, heating oil
fell 3.30 cents to settle at
$2.1129 a gallon, and gasoline
gave up 0.93 cent to settle at
$2.1335 a gallon.

Natural gas fell 11.7 cents to
settle at $4.756 per 1,000 cubic
feet. It hit a four-month high
of $5.20 per 1,000 cubic feet last
week.

Brent crude lost 78 cents to
settle at $78.04 on the ICE
futures exchange.



Europe austerity moves boost risk of rift with US

By ALAN CLENDENNING
and DAVID STRINGER
Associated Press Writers



LONDON (AP) — A trans-Atlantic rift over
the right medicine for Europe's financial crisis is
brewing as world leaders prepare for the G-20
meeting in Canada — with Britain on Tuesday
announcing its steepest cuts in decades and Ger-
many defending its tough austerity measures
after a warning by President Obama that too
much budget slashing could threaten the global
recovery.

Britain's emergency budget is the latest in a
string of savage public spending cuts and reflects
Europe's newfound resolve — since markets
pushed Greece to the brink of bankruptcy and
even threatened the bloc'’s economic union —
to tackle debt before worrying about growth.

But Europe's single-minded focus is worrying
the US, prompting Obama to write a letter to
world leaders on Friday warning against excessive
spending cuts.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel fought
back this week, defending her government's $80
billion (euro65 billion) savings plan even as
British Treasury chief George Osborne forged
ahead with his own grim austerity budget.

Many European analysts agree the more
urgent priority is taming deficits.

Obama "has a point, but there are some coun-
tries that don't have a luxury of a choice, they
have got to get a grip and start cutting quickly
because the alternative of becoming the next
Greece is not palatable to them,” said Jonathan
Loynes, chief European economist at Capital
Economics in London.

Britain's emergency budget aims to sharply
reduce record public debt and fall hard on most
people. Shoppers will pay higher sales taxes,
wealthy people will be hit for higher capital gains
taxes and banks will be charged a new levy on
profits, a move that has already been approved by
France and Germany. Even Queen Elizabeth IT
accepted a freeze in her support from taxpay-
ers.

In Germany, a spokesman for Chancellor
Angela Merkel said she talked on Monday with
US President Barack Obama on the phone about
a letter he wrote to the G-20 leaders in which he
cautioned against hurting a fragile global eco-
nomic recovery by trimming spending prema-
turely.

The letter was seen as a criticism of Germany's
plan to reduce the country's deficit, but the
spokesman said Obama did not pressure Ger-
many to continue stimulus spending by piling up
more debt. He spoke on condition of anonymity
in keeping with government policy.

Europe's leaders are struck in a quandary:
They must bring down mammoth debt through
spending cuts to ward off economic panic, but the
measures are bound to stunt growth. And no
one will likely know for years whether they chose
the right medicine and the right dosage.

"My suspicion is that it will be a major drag on
the economy for a few years, and it may be we
decide in the future whether they went too
aggressively, but the political and market climate
right now is such that they had no choice," said
Loynes from Capital Economics.

The realization that Europe is bound to imple-
ment spending cuts that will hurt growth for
years to come has weighed on the euro, pushing
it to four-year lows below $1.19 earlier this
month. On Tuesday it traded at $1.2274, down
somewhat from Monday.

Economic stagnation in Europe would hurt
the US by crimping its exports just as America is
trying to limp its way out of its own slump. But
Obama's concerns are trumped by Europe's
desire to stabilize the European Union and the
euro.

"The EU accords priority to budget-cutting,
because that is what its leaders believe is needed
to preserve the euro and the political construction
of a united Europe," said Stephen Lewis of Lon-
don's Monument Securities.

The new bank fee authorized that Britain,
France and Germany committed to on Tuesday
will charge banks based how much they earn to
shield taxpayers from the cost of resolving finan-
cial crises. But their call for a global tax is unlike-
ly to find much response at the G-20 summit.

In a joint statement, the three nations said
they aimed to ensure that financial institutions are
making a “fair contribution" to reflect the risks
they pose to the financial system and "to encour-
age banks to adjust their balance sheets to reduce
this risk." Germany is already drafting legislation
for such a tax, and France promised to do so in its
next budget.

Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy
are expected to lobby hard at the G-20 meeting in
Toronto for a separate global financial transac-
tions tax, but Loynes said there is little chance of
approval and that their effort is aimed at shoring
up their political support at home.

"They are fully aware that their stance has lit-
tle chance of influencing the course of global
economic policy," he said.

"This is in line with the Continental European
tendency to assert the primacy of political over
economic concerns in policymaking. This, indeed,
underlies the division between the US adminis-
tration and EU authorities over fiscal policy."

But Obama expressed support this week for a
Spanish proposal passed in parliament Tuesday to
shake up the labour market by making it easier
for companies to lay off workers. Spain had
already pushed through an austerity plan to con-
vince markets it will not need a bailout to manage
its debt, as happened with Greece.

Some are not convinced the Spanish reforms
will prompt companies to hire en masse, which is
what Europe's fourth largest economy needs
desperately after recently crawling out of two
years of recession.

Unemployment now stands 20 per cent in the
nation of 45 million.

Bank of Spain governor Miguel Fernandez
Ordonez welcomed the labour reforms as a good
first step but said they do not go far enough.

Sandalio Gomez, professor of management at
IESE Business School in Madrid, said the gov-
ernment is trying to conceal that it is making it
easier and cheaper to lay off workers — some-
thing it had repeatedly said it would not do.

"They've missed a perfect opportunity — and
there are few like this — to transmit confidence
to the labor market, a push forward that would
allow jobs to be created," he said.

CLICO liquidator close to portfolio due diligence end

FROM page 1B

However, this newspaper
understands from sources close
to the situation that Mr Gomez
is now awaiting completion of
an updated actuarial valuation
of the liabilities - and benefit
provisions required to meet
them - which could be in his
hands within a matter of weeks.

Once that happens, and the
choice is made, the portfolio’s
purchase and transfer will
require the approval of both
the Supreme Court and the
Insurance Commission. The
Government is also awaiting
the actuarial report’s comple-
tion, as this will determine the
size of any guarantee it gives
to underpin any buyer.

Little new information was
divulged at the creditors’ meet-
ing, but Tribune Business also
understands that negotiations
with the Hines Group for the

sale of Wellington Preserve,
CLICO (Bahamas) main asset,
may also have hit an impasse
due to its attempts to secure a
‘low ball’ price from Mr
Gomez.

The Hines Group is still at
the negotiating table, though,
and Tribune Business under-
stands there are at least two
other serious potential buyers
in play, too. There is also anoth-
er group thought to have a
Bahamian representative which
has expressed an interest.

The meeting also took a vote
on whether to establish a CLI-
CO (Bahamas) creditors com-
mittee, although the outcome
is not yet known. The compa-
ny’s former employees opposed
the creation of such a body,
believing it would add another
layer of bureaucracy that would
slow down the liquidation
process and their receipt of

some $3 million due in sever-
ance pay.

“The meeting was called to
determine if a creditors com-
mittee should be established,”
Tribune Business’s source said.
“The liquidator took a vote, but
he did not disclose the result of
the vote. He wanted to check
those who voted, their rela-
tionship to the register, and
take into consideration their
weight as well as their number,
then let us know.

“The employees were against
acommittee. They didn’t seem
to appreciate the functions of a
committee. That view was
expressed quite strongly by the
employees, but what I was able
to determine was the other
creditors seemed to favour a
committee because it could
facilitate decision-making by
the liquidator and give them
input.”
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23,















2010

a - %

love my
Bahamas

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



photos in front of five unique murals and

sculptures on Frederick Street, that emerge
live in Technicolor. This is an early indication
that the Love My Bahamas Downtown Art Expe-
rience is definitely attracting a lot of buzz.

Vaughn Roberts, managing director of the Downtown Nassau
Partnership took the media and some of the artists from the pro-
ject on a street tour showcasing the final products of five of 15
murals that renew the scene of what is known as historic Nassau.
From what Tribune Arts noticed, it has definitely made an imme-
diate and visible difference in the downtown landscape.

“We are excited about the transformation that has already
taken place in this area, thanks to the diverse styles and talent
showcased by local and international professionals,” said Mr
Roberts.

“We look forward to continuing unveiling over the next few
weeks and would like to encourage everyone to visit downtown
and bask in the positive energy that the artwork is bringing to the
city.”

The pieces, including sculptures by Antonius Roberts titled
‘Down Home Gals’ and Tyrone Ferguson titled ‘Rake N Scrape’
and murals by Toby Lunn, Maya Hayuk and Daniel Weise of the
Urban Art Community, run south along Frederick Street from
Woodes Rogers Wharf to St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church steps
on Shirley Street.

The intent is to create a new awareness of the place we are in,
said Mr Roberts. “It’s meant to show the spirit of the people.”

Starting the art tour lineup was aymural called ‘Hello Nassau,’
designed by Brooklyn artist Thurdereut, who toiled day and night
for me, |

Testes have already been spotted posing for





A relaxing
experience

at Chives ;
Restaurant =

see page seven

The Tribune SECTION B ¢









‘dolly’ good
works of art

see page nine . |

























amazing; moments when the city was alive, and
moments when he felt like he and his team owned
the city.

“This painting was inspired by Junkanoo,” said
Maya Hayuk, an American painter, who said she want-
ed to create a universal Junkanoo theme, as some-
thing that everybody can enjoy.

Ms Hayuk, who expressed an affinity with mural
painting, said that her mural and others will add a
special touch to downtown because it is a type of art
that everyone connects with.

She said pictures of the mural have gone viral on
photography websites, including pictures of Junkanoo
Phoenix Rise, which features a Junkanoo bird woven
into the pattern..

“To aid some of the problem with persons putting
their dirty shoes on the wall, we painted the bottom of
the mural in dark colours to stop the possibility of
persons resting their foot on the wall,” said Ms Hayuk.

“Mural painting is outside of the gallery and market
of art. That’s what I love about it,” she said. “It is
outside of the boundaries of a glass case, as a piece that
is precious that can’t be touched.”

Along Frederick Street, up the hill, and along the
steps leading to an historic passageway is an art space
that people can relate to. Antonius Roberts and
Tyrone Ferguson are the masterminds behind these
works, which have attracted attention from passers
by.
“T wanted to do something that was in your face,”
said Mr Ferguson. “I wanted to celebrate the ingenuity
and creativity of the Bahamian spirit.

“My piece is all about rake and scrape,” said Anto-
nius Roberts. “The shapes and symbols are used to
celebrate Bahamian culture and heritage is what makes
it so appealing.”

He created Down Home Gals, an art piece about
Bahamian women, bringing the concept of Sacred
Spaces from the Western end of New Providence to
downtown.

In these sculptures, flowers are made from beer
bottles, and hats are carved from the wood. They are
ladies in natural form, said Mr Roberts, and their
character takes on the aura of women here.

“Tt invites the viewer to be apart of the installa-
tion,” he said.

“By the time the project is completed, it will be
worth up to $100,000,” said Vaughn Roberts. Maps
will be distributed at Festival Place for visitors to do
self guided tours.. Schooliand evening tours are! in



_ the works. The artists’ goa “i put thei iy ouch-


THE TRIBUNE

eS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 7B



The Tribune









SWEET potato, baby beet, toasted

almond and goat cheese on baby greens.



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net



lunch experience, satisfy-

ing the needs of your
appetite and mood, look no
further than Chives Restau-
rant in the New Providence
Community Centre on Blake
Road.

The entire restaurant nourishes the
body, mind, and spirit, giving you a
much needed break from the busy
workplace.

As you sit out on the patio, experi-
ence an open space with access to
fresh air flowing from nature’s gifts--
trees and flowers--with an overhead
concrete covering that shades you
from the hot sun.

I you desire a relaxing

Satisfying

It’s amazing that it can be 90
degrees outside, but on the patio,
where customers dine, it feels 20
degrees less than the actual tempera-
ture.

And besides the sitting area, com-

Enjoy a relaxing

Chives Restaurant



plimented by beautiful place settings,
table accents, and a black and white
mural; the food is divine. Perhaps it
received an extra blessing by operating
as an eatery outside of a house of wor-
ship.

Lise Russell, head chef, does a good
job at putting exotic ingredients
together and making them taste top of
the line. Yesterday, Tribune Taste
caught up with the busy restauran-
teur, who we discovered was making
deliveries to businesses in the west-
ern area while customers raved about
the food service.

Marie Souder, a staff member at
First Trust Bank had just received
refreshment platters from Chives; just
in time for a series of all day meet-
ings

“T love food from Chives, especial-
ly the spread that she made for us
today because it is something nicely
prepared,” said Ms Souder. “It’s a
working lunch, and it’s not finger food,
which is what I appreciate.”

The office brunch platters includ-
ed chicken and tuna dishes, with salad
and cookies. Ms Souder who is a fre-
quent customer appreciates that the
service is on time. On a given day,
she orders a whole wheat spicy tuna
wrap, which she calls “healthy and
light and creative.”

experience at



“Lise seems to use a combination of
things in her food,” raved Ms Souder.
“It’s always a surprise, as she may use
a series of things like sun dried toma-
toes, or feta cheese in her dishes.”

Spring mixed salad, made with
spinach, arugula, and friscee are pre-
pared fresh daily, supplied by Lucayan
Tropical Produce; an organic farm.

To incorporate some of Chives’
fresh ingredients into your home
cooked meals, you can purchase items
such as mango vinaigrette, quinoa and
amaranth organic grains at a counter
near the checkout line.

Healthy dishes

Continuing in this vein, a series of
organic ingredients, like chick peas,
wild rice, and Ragged Island sauce are
specially made by them.

With freshly made dishes like yel-
lowfin tuna bites, proscuitto wrapped
dates, salmon ceviche, mushroom feta
mini quiche, fresh seared yellow fin
tuna, and blackened chicken salad; you
won't have a difficulty ordering a deli-
cious meal.

Christy Winners, a frequent customer
of Chives is particularly fond of their
sandwiches. “It’s an alternative to the
sandwiches that other places sell,” she

PAN seared ginger grouper loin
with sesame and fresh cilantro.



told Tribune Taste.

“My kids love it, which is always a
plus, and we like the fact that it’s some-
thing different, fresh, and delicious.”

Tomato and feta kieche is an oven
baked delight, which is served by the
slice with a side salad, or can be ordered
as a pie. At Chives, they do at least
two vegan and vegetarian dishes every-
day.

In the mornings, muffins and crois-
sants, coffee, capuccinos, expressos, are
on tap daily. Sundays is Family Market,
where lunches like panini and lasagna,
served during the week are packaged
and ordered to-go discounted prices.
The markdown in price is their way of
giving back to the community says Lise.

During the week soothing music--
they call it ‘Chives Mix’--plays in your
ears, including Frank Sinatra and even
reggae favourites. Staff say that it’s
mellow enough for customers to have a
casual conversation without interrup-
tions.

Chives restaurant offers the perfect
atmosphere, with a kid friendly envi-
ronment featuring weekly story time
with Rosy.

According to Lise, “people shouldn’t
have to be afraid of healthy because
healthy can taste good. The food does-
n’t taste like cardboard here,” she
assures. We agree.



By ALESHA CADET

THE three day 13th
annual Crab Fest that
took place in Fresh Creek,
Andros embraced all visi-
tors and the thousands of
Bahamians from through-
out the family islands,
were all welcomed to this
“heritage event.”

The flashy coloured
Crab Fest site at Queen’s
Park was indeed the
“place to be” June 10 - 13.

The Androsians were
sent into a dancing session
Friday and Saturday night
when the lively Funky D
amused the crowd, along
with Elon Moxey who
performed his hits " Oh
My Andros" and "“Catch
The Crab". Stilletto was
also among the perform-
ers who kept the rake-n-
scrape beats going
throughout the night.

In the meantime,
natives took the time to
browse the colourful Crab
Fest site.

The mouth watering
scent of the well known
crab and rice surrounded
the entire area. There
were delicious choices of
crab and dough, stuffed
crab, crab salad, baked
crab, and crab soup, along
with fast food picks such
as crab patties, crab frit-
ters, and crab tarts.

The crowd that gath-
ered on the Crab Fest site
Saturday afternoon was
massive, boat-loads of
islanders came to support,
making the number of
people twice as much as
Friday.

Among the festivities
were a variety of contests
involving crabs and a pul-
sating Junkanoo parade
where everyone in the
crowd could not help but
join in. Members of Par-
liament such as Perry
Christie and Ryan Pinder
graced the crowd with
their appearance.

All aspects of the event
justified that whether it
was your first time, sec-
ond time or third time at
crab fest, " you will be
back next year.”

“The festival was defi-
nitely Bahamian culture
at its best.

And like every other
island in the Bahamas, the
lengthy beaches were the
ideal spots to have "fun
in the sun" in Andros.

‘@iesnuwece:

Tofu “ Chicken” Salad

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



FROM time to time, people curi-
ous about adding vegetarian meals to
their diets ask me for creative, tasty
ways to prepare tofu - a sometimes
daunting ingredient. Being the food-
ie that I am, I can riddle off a long list
of ways to prepare it: Blended in a
smoothie, in a breakfast scramble,
stir fried with fresh vegetables, crum-
bled into spaghetti sauce or with veg-
etables in a curry.

But truthfully, it's been a long time
since I've kicked my lazy butt in gear
and ventured outside of my own culi-
nary comfort zone and tried new
ways to eat one my staple foods.

So when a friend asked me to
make a tofu "chicken" salad, I admit
I was a little hesitant. Could I really
make a dish as good, or better, than
the real thing?

Would it be delicious enough to
rival my standby bean curd curry?



With these thoughts in mind, I
made a beeline for my kitchen and
whipped up a tasty, albeit simple,
dish that I am proud to add to my
repertoire.

The recipe, dubbed my Cruelty-
Free 'Chick'n’ Salad, is chock full of
goodness. Walnuts add crunch,
omega-3 fatty acids and an antioxi-
dant that boosts the immune system.
The nutritional yeast, a Vegan sup-
plement found in most health food
stores, adds a subtle cheesy flavor
and essential B vitamins (I use the
Red Star brand). And tofu, made
from coagulated soy milk which is
pressed into blocks, is packed with
protein and calcium.

For the first time ever, I even made
my own mayo which turned out to be
one of the easiest things to make and
tastes just like its processed and pack-
aged counterpart.

If you want to kick it up a notch,
add some cayenne pepper to the mix-
ture.

Serve the salad on whole grain

bread, in a wrap, or on a bed of your
favorite greens.

CRUELTY-FREE
‘CHICK’N’ SALAD

(recipe adapted from justthefood.com)
INGREDIENTS:

1 package extra firm tofu (drained
and cut into small cubes)

2-3 cloves of garlic, minced

2 ths coconut oil

1/2 cup shredded carrots

1/2 medium red onion, finely chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped

1/2 cup walnut pieces, chopped

1 cup raisins

1 cup Vegan mayonnaise (you can
usually find this in organic specialty
stores or better yet make it yourself)
1 ths nutritional yeast

sea salt and black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:
Chop up the tofu into little pieces.



Add olive oil to a skillet on medium high

heat and add garlic being careful not to

let it burn. After one minute add tofu.
Sauté until golden, about 7-10 min-

utes. Remove from heat and let cool.
Transfer tofu to a large bowl, then

add all other ingredients and mix well.
Chill before serving.

Vegan Mayonnaise
1 package silken tofu
1 tbs cider vinegar

1 tbs lemon juice

1 tbs sugar

1 tbs sea salt

1/3 - 1/2 cup olive oil

Place all ingredients except oil in a
food processor or blender and mix on
high speed a few minutes, until smooth.
Add the oil slowly, a little at a time until
desired texture. Makes about 2 cups.
Keep refrigerated, should last for a
week.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune



Pil





Mental Tears

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

‘When | need an escape | find
comfort in my writing,

My Words create an ambiance,
calm and enlightening.

But it’s more than just words,
More Than Just A Poem

It’s my heart, mind and soul in
metaphorical form."

IT’S amazing what a few
lines of poetry can do. It can
effect human emotions even
in the slightest way. It pro-
vokes meaningful reflection, it
can make one cry, make one,
happy, sad, lonely, or angry.

After the passing of his
grandmother, Domek D
Rolle found the inspiration to
compile an original collection
of poems in "My Mental
Tears: A Book of Poetry"
which brings out all of these
emotions. He reflects on the
trials and tribulations, mat-
ters of the heart, and some of
life's most happy moments.

"My Mental Tears is a pro-
ject that is born out of the
idea that all tears link all
human beings together emo-
tionally. We shed tears when
we are sad, angry, in love,
broken hearted, or even when
we find something extremely
funny. I believe that My Men-
tal Tears: A book of Poetry
is an honest depiction of raw
human emotion present in all
of us," he said.

His poems were inspired by
the people he came into con-

tact with over the years.

Their stories are at the
heart of this book and Mr
Rolle placed himself in their
shoes and tried to see life
through their eyes for that
moment. He found the inspi-
ration he needed and after-
wards he spoke with his pen.

"IT would be inspired just by
having a conversation with
someone and I would try to
imagine me going through the
same thing. I have a few
poems in there where I write
from a perspective of a slave.
So it is basically my past expe-
riences along with inspiration
from others," he explained.

His poems come from some
place deep. And when his
emotions are involved, his
poetic language is fluent. "I
don't just sit down and try to
write about something. It has
to come to me. If I am in my
car driving and something hits
me I will stop on the side of
the road and write it down,"
he said.

Mr Rolle has a way with
words. He uses them in a
smooth lyrical fashion that
leaves a subliminal imprint on
the mind.

Those who have heard his
poems have responded posi-
tively to his work. They were
impressed with the way he
used words and they nick-
named him Bahamian Shake-
speare.

"After my grandmother
passed away the next day I
started writing. I became

inspired and I started sharing
some of the poems with some
of my friends and they would
tell me that the poems were
good. And some of my inter-
national friends started call-
ing me the Bahamian Shake-
speare," he said.

"The student union shared
my work to the student body
and I was amazed by the
response I was getting from
persons from different coun-
tries. Many of them said they
could relate to the poems and
they encouraged me to pub-
lish," Mr Rolle told Tribune
Entertainment.

One of his most memorable
poems in the book is Father
Figure. "I wrote that when my
father passed away last year.
It is just speaking about me
now having to find the
answers for my self. My father
was always there and I looked
to him for all the answers.
Now I have to find the
answers for myself."

Another poem he said he
favours is Middle Passage, a
poem where he takes a walk
through history.

"There is a poem in there
for everyone. Most of the
poems in there, the average
person can relate to because
it’s real and it’s honest and I
use all human emotions in this
book," Mr Rolle said.

He has presented the book
to the former Governor Gen-
eral, the Prime Minister and
the Minister of Youth Sports
and Culture.





ra

DOMEK and his wife Cyprianna Rolle a present a copy of "My
Mental Tears: A Book Of Poetry" to the then Governor General

3

of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas Arthur D Hanna.

Domek D Rolle is a native
of Grand Bahama. He was
the president of Toastmaster
Club 602485, an alumnus of
the College of the Bahamas, a
law graduate of the Univer-
sity of Buckingham, and is
presently enrolled at the
Eugene Dupuch Law School.

Mr Rolle writes in such a
way that his poems break all
barriers, and his work appeals

to people of all classes:

When | put pen to paper I'm
amazed by the results,

As words come alive with a
heartbeat and a pulse,

It’s More Than Just A Poem,
more than just a rhyme

It's my characteristics and feel-
ings frozen in time.

— Domek D Rolle



Under a Summer Moon

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



THERE is no better setting than a
cloudless sky and a big bright full moon
to kick off the Summer Moon live
music party, a celebration and fundrais-
er wrapped in one.

When Noelle Nichols one of organ-
isers of the event, sat down with Tri-
bune Entertainment to explain the idea
behind the Summer Moon Party, I
thought to myself wow what an inter-
esting concept.

The idea alone will probably make
you want to go out and see what this
summer moon madness is all about.

She explained that the moon influ-
ences many things in life for instance
weather patterns, ocean tides and nat-
ural disaster. Its mystical energy has
now influenced and become the inspi-
ration behind Summer Moon Party.

There is a ten day countdown for
the event and based on the energies
of the moon the organisers are asking
the question "What's you moon vibra-
tion?"

"The moon has meaning beyond its
beauty and mysticism. The full moon is
admired in away a sunrise or sunset is
admired. But beyond that sort of face
value, the moon has a lot of meaning
and it impacts our lives in a lot of dif-
ferent ways.

Take sensuality for example the
moon represents a sensual feminine
energy. This sensual energy represents
the moon energy. Sensuality is one of
the things that we focus on when we
say what’s your moon vibration, anoth-
er thing is passion.

"When the moon is full, that's like
the peak of it’s cycle and at the peak is
when passion is most full. So the full
moon representing passion is based on

xo) aesiali

our understanding of how the moon
cycles and when it is at the peak of it’s
cycle that’s when the energy of pas-
sion is at it greatest," she said.

Ms Nichols said the event is based
around this concept because they want-
ed to do something out of the ordi-
nary.

"We just wanted to bring back a kind
of cultural consciousness about the
moon even though its really being done
in subliminal way. We understand what
we are doing. We understand what the
moon is about and why the party is
called Summer Moon and why it is
falling on the same day as the summer
solstice.

“So we just wanted to bring back a
cultural consciousness to celebrate
these energies of the moon,” Ms
Nichols said.

The night will be a night of celebra-
tion since there will be a signature
entertainment hour called the "Red-
stripe Midnight Mystics Hour" which
features two live performances by
Willis & The Illest Reggae Band, and
Rhthym Revolution Drummers. Selec-
tor Ty will also be the DJ for the night.

"This is going to be a party where
people will be having a good time.
Because that is what we are all about.
People can expect to be thoroughly
entertained both by the band and the
DJ," she said.

While they are all up for a good time
Ms Nichols said the main reason they
are hosting the event is to raise funds
that will go towards supporting victims
of child abuse.

"The party is a fundraiser and the
funds will go towards supporting vic-
tims of child abuse and sexual violence
through various charitable organisa-
tions including one that I am in the
process of creating called the Woman

A

=

ec meeg iter’:

of Steel Safe House Initiative which is
a plan to create emergency shelter for
victims of sexual violence and child
abuse,” she explained.

There will be giveaways, free food,
free sangria, free redstripe which will be
available during the midnight mystic
hour. “Person will leave the event as

Atlantis Live: Taylor Swift

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor



LONG before she was infamously
interrupted at the MTV music
awards last year, a then 17-year-old
Taylor Swift dazzled country music
fans with a sweet debut song called
Tim McGraw which propelled her
into super stardom.

When I told a friend that I would
be attending her concert at Atlantis
on Saturday evening, their response
was “oh that’s the girl that Kayne
West dissed, what’s the big deal
about her.”

While that may have been her
introduction to many people, to

many more, Taylor is a big deal and
very talented. After all she writes
her own songs, plays her guitar and
is refreshly young. Not a young girl
trying to be more adult than she is,
like some other tween stars. Instead
she writes about things she has expe-
rienced - having a crush on her
friend who tells her about his girl-
friend, being fifteen and learning
about love. It endears her to not only
the younger generation but their
parents as well. There’s a reason why
she has hit it big at so many award
shows- a lot of people like country
music and a lot of people love Taylor
Swift.

Her sold out concert attracted
hordes of young screaming fans

dressed head to toe in Taylor gear all
singing along with her at the top of
their lungs in between the shouts of
“We love you Taylor.” It was defi-
nitely a loud night.

Taylor wearing a “ sparkly” purple
dress and black knee boots rocked
the crowd singing all her best hits
such as Fearless, Teardrops on my
Guitar, Our Song, Fifteen, White
Horse, Shoulda Said No, Today Was
A Fairytale, Tim McGraw, You
Belong With me and ending the night
with a hot-blooded performance of
her angry ex-girlfriend anthem Pic-
ture to Burn.

Fans were not disappointed, to her
credit she puts on an engerisied show
singing her ballads with sweetness

B10) |= Xone





Togs cot tie me Spiele ney es

full as the moon in the sky."

The Summer Moon Party will be
held at Rockers Island located in the
back of the Taj

Mahal on Parliament Street. The
event begins at 10pm this Saturday.

Ticket are $6 for ladies before 12am
and $8 for men.

and feeling
and then
rocking out
her uptempo
songs, danc-
ing all over
the stage and
into the
crowd. From
the scream-
ing ovation,
she recieved
at the end of
the concert,
the night was
obviously a hit.

This event was a continuation of
the concert series Atlantis Live
which features a hot artist from a
variety of musical genres in concert
at the resort each month.

On July 17, Katy Perry is sched-
uled to perform, followed by Lady
Antebellum on September 19.



Taylor Swift





© 397TH RBC BAHAMAS
NATIONAL SWIMMING
CHAMPIONSHIPS

The Bahamas Swimming
Federation presents the
39th RBC Bahamas
National Swimming Cham-
pionships at the Betty Kel-
ly Kenning Swimming
Complex from June 23 -
June 26. Cost: $3/children
10-and-under; $5/prelimi-
nary sessions; $10/champi-
onship finals admission;
$5/programme;$2/heat
sheets; $50/supporter's
package. See
www.bahamasswim-
mingfederation.com for
more information.

© SUMMER MOON (THE
ULTIMATE) FULL MOON PARTY

Kick off the summer
with the ultimate full moon
party, ‘Summer Moon,’
Saturday, June 26, 10pm-
3am at Rocker's Island,
also known as the Taj-
Mahal. Sip free Sangria,
munch free food and enjoy
free Red Stripe during the
Red Stripe Midnight Mys-
tic hour. Cost: $6/ladies,
$8/gents. Email: noelleni-
colisteemail, com

* AIDS FOUNDATION'S MID-

SUMMER'S WHITE PARTY
The AIDS Foundation
of The Bahamas presents
a Mid-Summer's White
Party, Saturday, June 26,
7pm at The Balmoral Club.
Donation: $150, includes
drinks, food and entertain-
ment. Telephone: 325-9326.

© SAC ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION'S 10TH
ANNUAL STEAK OUT

St. Augustine's College
Alumni Association hosts
its 10th annual steak out
with succulent steaks, ice
colds beers and SAC
Alumni merchandise on
sale. Saturday, June 26,
12pm-6pm on Western
Esplanade. Tickets: $10.
Proceeds in aid of Campus
Development.

© SPARTY ENTERTAINERS’
SPA-PARTY

Sparty Entertainers
invites you to a Spa-Party,
the event of a lifetime for
all exclusive ladies, mothers
and daughters that includes
a total spa experience,
mini-facials, manicures,
pedicures and massages.
Sunday, June 27,

lpm-9pm at Garden of
Eden. Cost: $170, includes
complimentary appetizers
and wine. RSVP, T: 636-
5474, 434-9421 or 324-2978.
Email: alisey_tynes@hot-
mail.com

© JOTH ANNUAL DUKE
OF EDINBURGH CUP
GOLF TOURNAMENT

Kerzner International
presents the 10th annual
Duke of Edinburgh Cup
Golf Tournament, begin-
ning 8am at the One and
Only Ocean Club Golf
Course, Sunday, June 27.
Donation: $2,500/four-man
team. Tee sponsorship:
$1,000. Proceeds in aid of
Governor-General's Youth
Award. T: 326-1760. Email:
ggya@coralwave.com

* GGYA BAHAMAS AWARD
SCHEME EXPEDITION'S 2010
SUMMER CHALLENGE

The Governor-General's
Youth Award Bahamas
Award Scheme Expedition
presents the 2010 summer
challenge in Long Island
that includes 5, 4 and 3 day
adventurous journey for
bronze, silver and gold par-
ticipants ages 14-25, explo-
ration of caves, blue holes
and rugged cliffs, and train-
ing in award work and
leadership skills, from June
29 - July 8. Telephone:
326-1760.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010, PAGE 9B














"JOLLY"

~ m= GOOD WORKS OF

ART

we By REUBEN SHEARER
— Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net







all Franklyn Jolly, a master recyclist who
takes the conch shells fishermen and ven-
dors toss aside and turns them into conch
souvenirs which perfectly capture the essence

of a Bahamain vacation.

Mr Jolly has made a business of designing conch souvenirs
which are sold in his stall at Festival Place Welcome Center and
Jewels By The Sea store in Cable Beach.

Everything he creates is quintessentially Bahamian. Blue
marlin, hibiscus, flamingo, grouper, palm tree, sailboat, and sea-
horse sculptures, and junkanoo masks and dishes and spoons

are all cut out from the conch shell and sold as Mr Jolly’s

creations. He also makes carvings of the Bahamian Nassau

grouper, star fish, stingray, sea turtle, and angel fish as

well as conch shell trophies that businesses like The Lyford
Cay Tennis Club purchase for competitions and tourna-
ments throughout the year.

The Lyford Cay Club’s tennis director Sarah Disston told
Tribune arts that the tennis club has become the biggest sup-
porters of Mr Jolly’s work, requesting his trophies as awards for
individual prizes at their tournaments.

“Basically how it came about is that we wanted for our
junior tournament something like an award that had a Bahami-
an feel to it,” said Ms Disston.

“Mr Jolly took his conch shell and put it on a trophy base,
and it looked beautiful,” she added. “We wanted it to take on
a Bahamian feeling rather than a plastic trophy that doesn’t
look unique and certainly does not represent the Bahamas in
anyway.” Ms Disston, and Betty Jane Dean-owner of Jewels By
The Sea store on West Bay St-are grateful toMr Jolly for tak-
ing the ‘junk’ that fisherman dispose of and turning it into
natural ‘national’ treasures.











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