Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim blowin’ it

The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

CARS FOR SALE,
TTS ee

AND REAL ESTATE

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Volume: 106 No.174

Broker blasted for
STMT CUB ELT

CFAL/FIRST BAHAMAS FINED

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SEE page eight

Bea CLUS EN CEU Ta SS

SOF
SOF



Steak Is Back
For Breaktast!



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Holding murder charged
for up to three years
‘may he unconstitutional’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net





THE Government’s intent to amend the law to hold
people charged with murder in Her Majesty's Prison for
up to three years without trial may be "unconstitutional",
with some in the legal community arguing it will violate
human rights.

Currently, a person charged with murder or another







Freeport Concrete is Trial of two

first publicly traded
company in the
Bahamas to go under

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT CONCRETE
last night became the first pub-
licly traded company in the
Bahamas to go out of business,
informing staff and sharehold-
ers that it had yesterday ceased
operations and was preparing
to voluntarily liquidate itself.

In a statement sent to The
Tribune, chief executive Ray-
mond Simpson said: “ Freeport
Concrete has been struggling
for quite some time with a lack
of cash.

“In spite of the present eco-
nomic conditions in Grand
Bahama we have done our best
to keep the business going,
reduce expenses, attract
investors, sell the 126 acres of
property on the North Shore,
and to request additional fund-
ing from the bank as well as
our shareholders. Unfortu-
nately, we have not been suc-

near future we will meet with
our shareholders in an Extra-
ordinary General Meeting to
consider placing the company
into voluntary liquidation and
to appoint a liquidator.”

Adding that he was “sad-
dened” by what had happened,
Mr Simpson added: “TI do want
to take this opportunity to first-
ly thank our 60 staff who are a
great group of people, and who
have stood by the company
through all the challenges and
given the extra mile without
being asked.

“And finally to all our share-
holders, customers, suppliers
and others who have continued
to work with us I personally
wish to thank you all.”

Without cash to fund Home
Centre inventory purchases,
and offers to acquire the com-
pany and/or its 127-acre North
Shore plot failing to materialise
into firm bids, the company had
little choice but to cease trad-



police officers
is adjourned

THE trial of two police offi-
cers charged in connection
with the death of a father-of-
six did not begin as expected
yesterday and will now com-
mence on a date to be fixed.

Family members of
Desmond Key and the two
officers as well as witnesses
showed up at the Supreme
Court complex yesterday,
however the case did not pro-
ceed. The case is being heard
before Supreme Court Justice
Vera Watkins. The Tribune
was informed that the matter
was adjourned to June 29,
when a date will be fixed for
the commencement of the tri-
al. The Tribune understands

SEE page 11

Major car
dealership
denies owing

cessful. ing.
Therefore, it is with regret Its chairman, former Grand thousands to
that we announce effective Bahama Port Authority

today we will cease operations
at the Concrete Plant and the
Home Centre due to this lack
of cash to continue running
these operations. In the very

ro

(GBPA) chair Hannes Babak,
who holds 43 per cent of the
firm's shares, also let it be

SEE page eight

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By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



CONCERNED parents and teachers
are demanding the dismantling of “dan-
gerous” playground equipment and stricter
regulation of play areas in public parks
and primary schools.

With claims of children’s lives being put
at risk, one of the public playgrounds that
has come under scrutiny is the popular
play area at Goodman’s Beach.

In the last few months, complaints about
the depreciation of the playground facili-
ties at the popular beach access have
flooded local talk shows.

rer “a

i THE popular play area at Goodman’s Beach has come under scrutiny.

A popular family location, the play-
ground is often crowded with children
under the age of 13 —- most without direct
supervision.

Parents report eroded monkey bars and
handles, deteriorating wood, and grounds
littered with used condoms and broken
beer bottles.

Upset by the “ill-quality” wooden play-
ground equipment used in public schools,
a primary school teacher claims children
are constantly at risk.

The teacher said: “I don’t understand
the proliferation of this wooden play-
ground equipment. Is it cheaper? Because

SEE page eight

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







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Customs dept

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAJOR car dealership
yesterday denied owing thou-
sands of dollars in duties to
the Customs department,
claiming they only paid what
they were asked to pay, while
the government revenue-col-
lection agency is adamant they
must hand over the funds.

PLP Jerome Fitzgerald
claimed in the Senate that the
Nassau Motor Company had
committed “an egregious
offence” against the Stamp
Act when it was able to clear
six Sports Utility Vehicles at a
rate of 60 per cent duty a day
after the Prime Minister
announced the duty rate on

SEE page 11

HOME IMPROVEMENTS





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





iT

THE Tribune article published on
Friday, June 18, under the headline
“Grieving families’ anguish at Coro-
ner’s Court backlog” incorrectly stat-
ed the February 2008 ruling in the
inquest into Christopher Esfakis’ death
was quashed by Chief Justice Sir Burton
Hall, who asserted Magistrate William
Campbell, the coroner, was biased in
the inquiry.

The Judicial Review Application to
quash the verdict was in fact made by a
doctor offended by the coroner’s sum-
ming up, Mr Esfakis’ sister Leandra
Esfakis’ said.

She also clarified that the Chief Jus-
tice did not make any assertion that Mr
Campbell was biased in his decision of
July 2008, but this was a submission
made by the doctor’s attorney.

Sir Burton had said it was wrong for
the coroner to leave only one verdict to
the jury as a matter of procedure, and
on that procedural basis he declared
the verdict had to be quashed.

When a verdict is quashed the inquest
must go before another coroner. This is



Ml MAGISTRATE'S COURT

Man charged with murder
after June 5 shooting death

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A MAN charged in the shooting
death of a 27-year-old Deveaux Street
man earlier this month was yesterday
arraigned in Magistrates Court on a
murder charge.

Police have charged Duran Horton,
26, of 6th Street and Palm Tree
Avenue, with the June 5 murder of
Matthias Williams.

According to reports, Williams was
shot and killed shortly before 11.30pm
on Saturday June 5 while sitting out-

side a home on Deveaux Street .
Horton, who was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court One, Bank Lane, was not
required to enter a plea to the charge.
He was informed by the magistrate
that a preliminary inquiry will be held
to determine whether there is suffi-
cient evidence against him to have him
stand trial in the Supreme Court.
Horton was not represented by an
attorney during his arraignment yes-
terday.
He was remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. His case was adjourned to June
28 for a fixture hearing in Court 10,

standard procedure.



Nassau Street.





Paes

Police called following double stabbing

At around 3am on Sunday, police were called to Egan’s
Apartments on Gladstone road where a double stabbing had
taken place.

Witnesses told responding officers that an argument had
broken out between a 26-year-old man and a woman who
knew each other, which resulted in both being stabbed sever-
al times.

Both were taken to the hospital, where they were treated and
discharged.

Police are investigating.

Armed men rob woman of car and cash

Just after 11.30pm on Saturday, police were alerted to an
armed robbery that took place on Sanford Street off Dolphin
Drive.

Responding officers were told that a woman sitting in a
parked car was approached by two men armed with guns.

They robbed the woman of her black 2008 Honda Accord,
licence plate number 219819, and an undetermined amount of
cash.

The culprits fled the area heading in an unknown direction.
Police are investigating.

Police name young man killed in Montel Heights

Police have identified the young man shot and killed on Fri-
day, June 18 in Montel Heights as Kendall Kenneth Andrews,
18, of Mantol Street.

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Peau iL
ere

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—/

lm POLICE REPORT

Police alerted after 77
suspected illegal immigrants
are found in Long Island

By ALESHA CADET

THE police were called to
the area of Lil Harbour in Ros-
es, Long Island when locals
found a boat that they suspect-
ed had been used to transport
illegal immigrants.

Press Liaison officer Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings said police
believe the 30-foot wooden ves-
sel landed on the island in the
early hours of Saturday morn-
ing.

Responding officers con-
ducted a search of the area and
rounded up 77 suspected ille-
gal immigrants — 13 women and
64 men.

Sgt Skippings said all the sus-
pects were transported to the
Community Centre in Clarence
Town, where they were exam-
ined by the local doctor and
handed over to Immigration
officials.

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Director of Immigration Jack
Thompson said: "They have
been flown into the capital by
small commercial air carriers.
Bahamasair assisted as well.

“It was an orderly process,
they all were transported to the
Detention Centre where they
were processed.

“Before the weekend they
will be repatriated.”

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

tale le
as teas

ey
PHONE: 822-2157

AG blasts
claims he is
‘intimidating’
Grant-Bethel





JOHN DELANEY CHERYL GRANT-BETHEL

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



ATTORNEY General John Delaney yesterday shot down
"fabricated" media reports that claimed he is "intimidating"
Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel.

He also denied a report that said he placed a gag order on
Mrs Grant-Bethel prohibiting her from speaking to the media
about not receiving the post of director of public prosecutions
in the Attorney General's Office.

According to her attorney Wayne Munroe, Mrs Grant-Bethel
plans to file a legal challenge of the Judicial and Legal Services
Commission's decision to award the job in question to Vinette
Graham-Allen, a Jamaican who served as a director of public
prosecutions in Bermuda and headed the Justice Training
Institute in Jamaica.

Mr Delaney said he was surprised to see the claims in anoth-
er local daily, and told The Tribune that while there is a policy
in the AG's office that forbids officers from speaking on inter-
nal matters — other than to discuss the official position of the
agency — that did not apply to Mrs Grant-Bethel's job row.

"Let me say this, I have had several discussions with her
about various matters (but) I certainly have not, in relation to
this, given her any direction that she should not speak to the
press,” he said yesterday.

Policy

"But generally speaking, in the AG's office there is a policy
that individual officers do not speak to the press without ensur-
ing that it is something that represents the position of the
AG’s office.

"If she speaks to the press on this, she would not be speak-
ing on behalf of the AG's office, it would be on behalf of her.
T have not issued any gag order.”

A second report published in the Bahama Journal also
claimed Mr Delaney is "intimidating" his subordinate.

Yesterday he explicitly denied this assertion, arguing that
browbeating is not characteristic of his leadership style, nor that
of the Ingraham administration.

"IT don't operate that way. There is nothing that the gov-
ernment is doing that is intimidating. I certainly will not intim-
idate anybody. That's something that’s out of the blue — that's
a fabrication,” said Mr Delaney.

Last week, while defending the decision of the Legal Services
Commission in Parliament, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
implied he had reasons for not supporting Mrs Grant-Bethel’s
appointment. He had earlier identified her as a worthy candi-
date. This revelation spawned speculation over whether or
not the nation's chief had any influence in the selection, with
some opposition members calling for the PM to disclose the
information that changed his mind.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 3



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Prison Department is
set to acquire new forms of
ammunition and weapons for
use in the correctional facili-
ties.

Dr Elliston Rahming, Super-
intendent of Prisons, said he
ordered a batch of products this
month from ALS Technologies
Inc, a company specialising in
less-than-lethal munitions.

ALS Technologies was one
of several exhibitors from the
United Kingdom, Canada and
the United States presenting at
the forth annual conference of
the Association of Caribbean
Heads of Corrections and
Prison Services (ACHCPS),
where Dr Rahming spoke.

Dr Rahming said with the
current resources, prison offi-
cers have to resort to lethal
force once negotiation fails to
resolve a crisis situation.

He said in the case of a
minor crisis situation — a riot, or
prison escape, for example —
the less-than-lethal munition
options can be used as a first
and second response to solving
a crisis, once negotiation fails.
He would not confirm the
specifics of the order.

Mike Aultman, senior vice
president of ALS Technologies,
said a quote was submitted to
the Bahamian government at
the start of the month for 15
different products offered by
the company.

One of their signature prod-
ucts is a bean-bag designed for
use in regular 12-guage shot
guns and 37-millimetre hand
guns. They discharge like a bul-
let, but create blunt trauma in
the form of bruising and pain
and can be shot from long
range.

LOCAL NEWS
Ml FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE ASSOCIATION OF CARIBBEAN HEADS OF CORRECTIONS AND PRISON SERVICES

Less-than-lethal weapons

Prison Department set to acquire new munitions











= WwW

(BIS Photo/Kris Ingraham)

ACTING PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette and Dr Elliston Rahming,
Superintendent of Her Majesty’s Prisons view an exhibition mounted at The Association of Caribbean
Heads of Corrections and Prisons Services Fourth Annual Conference, on Monday, June 21, 2010 at

SuperClubs Breezes.

already trained in the use of
several of the company’s tech-
nologies, having participated in
two training workshops over
the past two years. They are
scheduled to take part in a third
workshop this year.

The annual conference of the
ACHCPS aims to strengthen
the partnership between region-
al prison services and create
opportunities for professional
development in the sector.

“Throughout the Caribbean,
we are bedeviled by crime and
buffeted by violence. Histori-
cally, the penal system was seen
as part and parcel of the prob-
lem. The CHCPS rejects that
notion. We see ourselves as
part of the solution. Indeed I
go so far as to suggest that if
we are going to remediate bur-
geoning crime rates and if we

are going to ameliorate the vex-
ing levels of violence, we must
come to see corrections as inte-
gral, not tangential to the solu-
tion to crime,” said Dr Rah-
ming.

In his remarks, Brent Symon-
ette, Acting Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs,
said the focus of the ACHCPS
is “especially relevant” to the
prison reform agenda for the
region. He said it is important
that the association support “a
shift in culture from solely cus-
tody and control to corrections,
and for setting and maintain-
ing regional and international
corrections and prison stan-
dards.”

The regional heads were also
introduced to a Caribbean cus-
tomer service programme
offered by Fisher's Regalia &

Uniform Accouterments, which
is the company that supplies
uniforms for several Bahami-
an government agencies, such
as the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, and some regional bod-
ies.

Mark Tulloch, vice president
of sales and marketing at Fish-
er's, said the programme would
allow Caribbean countries to
pool their orders and harness
their collective purchasing pow-
er.

He said the system would
alert the regional block when-
ever an order is being placed
by one agency for an item such
as flags. Since cost is deter-
mined by the volume of cloth
purchased, each country would
be able to benefit from better
group rates, since flag colours
overlap in many instances.

Bahamian prison officers are

RBDF defends ‘integrity’
of recruit vetting process

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
Alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE Royal Bahamas Police Force “stands by the integrity” of
its recruit vetting process despite the emergence of a case involv-
ing a police corporal who has been called to face a nine-year-old
rape and battery-related charge in the US.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna suggested of the
vetting protocol that while it “may not be a perfect system, it is a
good system.” The senior officer added that the RBPF’s high
command nonetheless takes the Bastian case “very, very serious-
ly” and having only very recently become aware of the accusations
against the officer and request for his extradition to the US to face
the charges, “acted quickly and decisively” to play their part in
ensuring justice was served. ACP Hanna made these comments
days after 35-year-old Constable Nyahuma Anthony Bastian was
brought before a local magistrate on a US extradition request
relating to the alleged brutal beating and rape of a girl at the Uni-
versity of North Texas in 2001. An internet search for the Bahami-
an's name throws up a US Department of Justice “wanted” poster
for him, with a photograph and other identifying details, as its
first result. The beating Bastian is alleged to have inflicted on the
victim in the case was said to have been “brutal.”

ACP Hanna said the force goes to significant lengths to deter-
mine whether new recruits have in their backgrounds any similar
accusations, subjecting them to a “battery of vetting” prior to
completing the hiring process.

He noted that the allegations against Bastian emanate from
outside of the Bahamas and questioned whether the officer was on
the US-based “wanted” list at the time of his recruitment.

Nonetheless, ACP Hanna readily admitted the vetting system is
not “fail proof” — and pointed out that this is the case in countries
around the world.

Unfortunate

“While it’s unfortunate that all of these things have come up and
give an appearance that may besmirch the professionalism and
character of the force, we stand by the integrity of our system
and say we are doing the right thing — but it’s not a perfect system.

“To mislead the Bahamian public into believing the system is fail
proof would be grossly insulting to Bahamian public’s intelligence.

“However, when such things happen, it says to us as high com-
mand that we must step back, re-evaluate where there are missteps,
and if so where and what corrective action we need to take going
forward; how we can remediate the system so these things don’t
happen again.”

Asked what changes may be made to the process as a result of
the Nyahuma case, ACP Hanna said that he did not expect officers
to “panic and make radical changes, but to look at what we do.”

According to ACP Hanna, the current vetting process for offi-
cers includes the potential recruit having to produce a character ref-
erence, being run through the police’s criminal records system to
see if they have a prior record in the Bahamas or have come in con-
tact with the police in relation to any potential violation and then
having the police go into their local community to speak with
family, friends, neighbours and other acquaintances to gather
more background on the individual’s integrity and suitability for
police work. This final aspect of the vetting process, ACP Hanna
admitted, is “highly subjective” and subject to the whims of those
who are interviewed by police.

“You say this candidate has presented himself to be a member
of RBPF, what can you tell us about this person, and the member
of public can be forthright and say, ‘I think this person has some
challenges’. Or, the resident may decide, ‘He’s not the best person
but his grandmother is good, his mother, his family are good peo-
ple’, so you can see where the subjectivity comes in there.”

According to reports, Constable Bastian was on $10,000 bail for
the aggravated sexual assault case in the US when he failed to
return for the continuation of his hearing and left the country to
come to the Bahamas.

The "wanted" poster highlighting his case claims he "fled" the
US. His Bahamian attorney claimed he left because his visa had
expired. Appearing before a Bahamian magistrate on the US
extradition request last Friday, Bastian was denied bail and
remanded to Her Majesty‘s Prison, Fox Hill.




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Association of Caribbean Heads of Corrections and Prisons Services
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21,2010 at SuperClubs Breezes.





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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Without evidence Bahamas stays two-tiered

ANOTHER year has passed and the
Americans are back again with their Traf-
ficking in Person (TIP) report for 2010. The
Bahamas remains a “Tier-two” country —
out of a possible three tiers — leaving gov-
ernment officials scratching their collective
heads wondering where the human beings
supposedly being trafficked in this country
are being secreted.

According to the Americans, sitting on the
second tier means that this nation is “not ful-
ly compliant with minimum standards laid

that in fact they are victims and that there is an
Act to protect them.

The IOM social worker said that a worker
who is recruited from another country, could be
in a vulnerable position having been recruited
under false conditions and exploited for forced
labour. A housekeeper, a sex worker or a child
labourer could be in this category.

Over the years we have come across a few
cases in which employees have had their work
permits withheld by their employers. They are
either not paid a living wage, or in some
out in US anti-trafficking legislation, but is instances not paid at all. However, they are
making significant efforts to bring itself into too terrified to cry for help because they do
compliance with those standards.” One of not want to be returned to their country of ori-
those steps forward was the Trafficking in gin.

Persons (Prevention and Suppression) Act of Many years ago, in casual conversation with
2008, for which there are heavy penalties for an Immigration officer, we discovered that at
participating in this modern day slavery. that time it was usual for employers to keep an

Each time this report comes out The Tri- employee’s work permit. The officer expressed
bune contacts the US Embassy to try to get a surprised when told that we always gave the
tip as to where some of these abused persons employee the original permit, taking only a
might be found so that we can do our own copy for our files, and in case the original was
investigations. Are they among the prosti- lost.
tutes on the streets, do we examine the bars, Some employers explained that they with-
are they in the strip clubs, or are they house- held the permit so that it would not be stolen
keepers in certain homes? We get neither from the employee. However, over the years we
help, nor answers, only that America’s infor- came across a few that were held because in fact
mation is anecdotal and its sources cannot be the employee was a virtual prisoner.
revealed. No one is asking for sources. We are One day — again many years ago in the
just asking that our noses be pointed in the early days of the PLP administration — the
right direction so that our reporters can go out telephone on our desk rang. A terrified voice at
and find their own sources. the other end pleaded for our help. It was a

Apparently government has met the same woman with a Jamaican accent. She claimed
blank wall, from behind which come whis- that she was being held a prisoner by a Bahami-
pers, but no concrete evidence that anyone an. She gave his name. We could not help her
can pin down. Without evidence to support because this man was a big name in the PLP cir-
claims of human trafficking, said National cle and we knew of no official at that time who
Security Minister Tommy Turnquest, the gov- would have dared to take on the case. Today is
ernment cannot be expected to expend a new dawn. Receiving the same call today, we
resources on something they do not believe to would know exactly where to go and be assured
be a problem. of results. That is the difference between then

“The US report is relevant in that it is pre- and now.
pared by the US, which is a world super power However, we suggest that some abuses come
and once they commit it to record it is seen in marriage— possibly it is a marriage of conve-
around the world, but with respect to it being nience on the part of the foreign spouse. We
accurate and it pertaining to the Bahamas that knew of a case, again several years ago, of a
is what we take issue with,” Mr Turnquest said. marriage that started out happily, but turned

Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette sour when the Bahamian husband decided to
agreed that the Bahamas would seek to comply roam. The Jamaican wife wanted out when her
with anti-human trafficking standards, but the husband was bold enough to introduce the
validity of the US report, he said, might influ- sweetheart into their home. However, she want-
ence government’s view of compliance. ed to stay in the Bahamas to be with her

Mr Turnquest confirmed that the govern- Bahamian children. To her dismay she discov-
ment takes human trafficking “very serious- ered that her husband had not got her any
ly.” Every year that the report comes out, he “papers” and was refusing to regularise her
said, it is circulated to government’s senior offi- position with Immigration because he did not
cers for review and comment. Despite govern- want her to leave the home. We supposed she
ment’s efforts, the only reply it gets back: was the drudge doing the laundry and cooking
“There is no evidence to support the claims.” while the sweetheart was the queen of the roost.

According to a social worker at the Inter- We never knew what happened, except that
national Organisation for Migration (IOM), she was an extremely unhappy woman, who
there are victims of trafficking, who don’t even eventually died. Today it would have been easy
know they are victims. If they don’t know, then to have got her “straight.” But then, it was
how is government to know? impossible.

Maybe more should be written about what is The Bahamas must be doing something
classified as human trafficking so that the pub- right, because today there is help for those who
lic can be better informed and victims can learn make themselves known to the authorities.

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Officers should
be commended.
for restraint in
‘Rambo’ assault

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the aftermath of the
assault on Police Officers by
the American visitor nick-
named “Rambo” by our talk
media, I wish to make a few
observations.

The press, in particular
the talk media used the inci-
dent to criticise and joke
about the performance of
the police in this incident.
A reporter on a morning
radio show and his fans
appeared to have enjoyed
what happened and were
very critical of what they
termed to be the inability of
the police to subdue —
“Rambo”.

It is clear to me, that the
police officers involved in
the incident acted with
restraint and ought to be
commended. The officers
present with guns merit spe-
cial commendation for not
using deadly force during
this incident. With two of
their colleagues injured they
could have used excessive
force to subdue “Rambo”
which could have resulted
in his death or serious injury.
This man could have been
considered a threat to their

letters@triobunemedia.net



personal safety. Had this
man been the victim of a
police attack causing serious
injury or death the same
press and talk media would
have severely criticised the
police. The US media would
have had a field day and our
Ministry of Tourism would
have been making apologies.
I applaud the police officers
for taking the blows and
eventually subduing “Ram-
bo.”

The reporter on a popular
morning show interviewed
a prominent attorney on the
matter. I was very surprised
to hear that attorney state,
that the police did not have
the authority to arrest
“Rambo” and the police
could have been dealt with
for assault. We have been
taught, that police officers
responding to a call where
a person is being disorderly
in a public place is expected
to assist in having the person
removed from the place.
Should that person continue
to behave disorderly on the

street the police are expect-
ed to ask the person to
desist from such conduct
and leave the area. Failing to
obey the instructions of the
police that person could be
arrested for obstructing the
police officer in the execu-
tion of his duty. That duty is
to keep the peace and main-
tain good order.

One of the good things,
that emerged from the inci-
dent is the media support
for the “taser”, which is
being used effectively by
many Law Enforcement
Agencies in the Caribbean
and around the world. It is a
very effective weapon in cas-
es, such as this one. For
years I have been recom-
mending that the Police
Force acquire this weapon
and train its personnel to use
it.

I wish to add that from the
news reports it would
appear that the police erred
in not apprehending the
companions of “Rambo” for
obstruction and the abet-
ment of disorderly conduct.

PAUL THOMPSON
Nassau,
June 8, 2010.

Huge turnout of youngsters for baseball
event — but no Ministry of Youth and Sports

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This past weekend between 650 to 700
youngsters from all over the Bahamas con-
verged on Grand Bahama under the auspices
of the Bahamas Baseball Federation for the
eighth annual Andre Rodgers Baseball Cham-

pionship.

The games were shown live on two television
stations, while Spartacus was being advertised

on a foreign station.

After switching from station to station I
finally realised that baseball in Freeport and
Spartacus was one and the same.

Despite the huge turnout of youngsters there
was no Ministry of Youth, and the largest
grouping for a sporting event no Ministry of
Sport. Looking directly ahead I see a Berlin
wall facing all of these youngsters, can they
really be looking forward to the opening of

our sports stadium?

How can they or their leaders hope to share
in that facility when they are not even accord-

Bahamas stop being oppressed. The answer
is simple, we need to go back to 1984 when

Enoch Backford (BOA) conducted the BBA
elections when one candidate produced 16
proxies (contrary to the Constitution) caus-
ing the other candidate to leave, while the
others rowed until almost midnight two per-

sons including myself can attest to the fact

that no one was elected that night.
Therefore we need the good moderator to

be brave enough to announce to the Bahami-

an public the true results of that meeting.

Failing that (which I am sure will not hap-
pen, or if it did) the Ministry of Sports needs to
address the Constitution of the BBA in much
the same way they did the BOA, and let the
sunshine pour in and get the stench out.

Of course even with John the Baptist
preaching, nothing happened until the mas-
ter came along, so it’s extremely doubtful that

these youngsters participating in various

ed an audience from the powers that be.

Any thinking Bahamian who long for the
good old days when baseball was king is won-
dering when o when will baseball in the

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Nassau,



June 10, 2010.

leagues will get to strut their stuff in our sta-
dium any time soon. No ray of hope

JEFFREY WILLIAMS

Bahamas Welding And Fire Co.,
Ltd. #70 Wilton Street East

Will Be CLOSED
For Annual Stocktaking
Friday June 25th &
Saturday June 26th, 2010.

We apologize for any
Inconvenience caused,
Thanks for your patronage
throughout the year.

Management





THE TRIBUNE

Full-time mental health unit would
be ‘major leap’ in prison reform

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

PRISON reform would expe-
rience a “major leap” if author-
ities were able to bring about
the establishment of a full time
mental health unit at Her
Majesty’s Prison, Superinten-
dent Dr Elliston Rahming said.

Authorities are working
towards assigning a full time
psychiatrist to the prison, but
Dr Rahming, head of the
Prison Department, said more
is needed for the prison to
effectively carry out its man-
date.

“To be perfectly honest, I
know that there are efforts in
place right now to have a full
time psychiatrist assigned to the
prison. One of the needs is not







DR ELLISTON RAHMING

just a psychiatrist, but a mental
health unit, because we are
somewhat at a disadvantage
when officers are sort of diag-
nosing persons.



“We have psychiatrists that
come to the prison on a week-
ly basis, but I think the time
has come for a full time psy-
chiatric mental health unit.
That would be a major leap
toward prison reform,” said Dr
Rahming.

Responding to accusations
by a former inmate that inter-
nal divisions in the senior com-
mand are hampering prison
reform and efforts to focus on
rehabilitation, Dr Rahming
said there was no “division”.

The recently released inmate
said Dr Rahming “has a war
going on” with his staff over
rehabilitation plans for prison-
ers, and that “some are on his
side and some are on the side
of (Deputy Superintendent of
Prisons, Charles Rolle).”

Superintendent Rolle did not

return calls for comment. Dr
Rahming said: “I know that
people have different orienta-
tions, different backgrounds,
and different points of view.
And so if you grew up in an
era where there was a certain
ethos and then there is a new
path, a new ethos that is being
suggested, people looking at it
may interpret it as conflict.

“T imagine that Barrack
Obama and Joe Biden have
different views on a number of
things: Joe Biden having grown
up in politics, grown up in the
Democratic party; Barrack
Obama not having done so.
That doesn’t mean they are not
working together harmonious-
| ”

The government is working
on a Department of Correc-
tions Bill to replace the Prison

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS





Act that currently governs
operations at the prison.

Dr Rahming said he sub-
scribes to the government’s
agenda, which is “one of prison
reform, successful rehabilita-
tion and effective reintegra-
tion”.

“T think it is fair to say that
the prison is in transition. His-
torically there has been an
emphasis on containment and

| mul ie

eer LT ii



THE ENTRANCE to Her Majesty’s Prison.



more recently, while not dilut-
ing security and containment,
there has been an equal
emphasis on the need to ensure
we are more fully compliant
with the Prison Act, which says
we are to hold these persons,
but we also must at the same
time make every effort to effect
change within them. That has
been our mandate,” said Dr
Rahming.

Some PLPs protest Marco City cantitdate Selection process

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The PLP has chosen
two general election candidates for
Grand Bahama, but some supporters
are protesting the selection process in
the Marco City constituency.

Freeport Lawyer Gregory Moss and
Senator Dr Michael Darville were suc-
cessfully ratified last week as the PLP’s
candidates for Marco City and Piner-
idge, respectively.

However, according to reliable
sources within the party, Mr Moss was
appointed without the endorsement
of the Marco City Council.

“Mr Moss was appointed without
the support of members of the Marco
City Council and some members are
protesting the process which took
place,” said one PLP, who wished to
remain anonymous. “We think the
process is flawed and we believe that
the good and decent thing is to afford
members the opportunity as to who
they want run as the candidate for
Marco City.”

The Tribune has learned that busi-

nessmen Caleb Outten and
Rondi Tener Knowles,
who both applied to run as
candidates in Marco City,
were expected to meet
with party leader Perry
Christie yesterday to voice
their concerns about the |
process.

One source indicated
that many young PLPs on
Grand Bahama are becom-
ing frustrated and discour-
aged with the behaviour of
the party.

“There are some very
young, bright and loyal {pu

persons here in the party PERRY CHRISTIE (above)



Astwood — are being con-
sidered as possible candi-
dates for EMR.

Businessman Ricardo
Smith has expressed inter-
est in the Lucaya con-
stituency.

Mr Outten, a former PLP
Senator, ran as a candidate
for Eight Mile Rock in the
last general election, but
"| was defeated.
Mr Moss, 45, and Sena-
| tor Darville, 49, are well
known persons of good
| standing in the Grand
Bahama community.

Moss has his own private

who are being overlooked was yesterday expected to law practice, Moss & Asso-
by the leadership,” said the meet with Caleb Outten and ciates.

source.

With two candidates
already appointed in
Grand Bahama, the PLP will need to
ratify candidates in Lucaya, High Rock
and Eight Mile Rock.

There are reports that three persons
— Sandra Edgecombe, former Eight
Mile Rock High School principal; Dr
Leviticus Rolle; and Civic leader Lewis

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Dr Darville practices
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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010
LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





C NAVAL OFFICERS AT GOVT HOUSE

DOMINICAN REPUBL
Ee






a ae x
ABOVE: Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes welcomes the Naval officers from the Dominican Republic on Saturday at Government House.
BELOW: Captain Pena Acosta makes a presentation to Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes

4, iA de , Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.

Invites applications for the positions of:

GIFTSHOP MANAGER

MOST Tribune readers
who took part in our latest
online poll do not think the
poor state of the country’s
education system indicates
a need to import more for-
eign teachers.

In all, 420 readers
responded to the poll on tri-
bune242.com, 135 of them
agreeing that Public School
teachers have had more
than enough time to give it
their best shot, and 285
rejecting this argument.
They agreed instead that
teachers aren't the problem,
and that the education crisis
has much deeper roots.

Reader Tamika said:
“The nationality of the
teacher is not the problem
in our educational system.
What is the problem is the
parental lack of involve-
ment in their children's
educational experience.

“IT went to a private
school and can say that the
private school environment,
while different, does not
automatically create smart,
intelligent students. As in
any educational environ-
ment, parents must become
actively involved in their
children's learning experi-
ence and must also become
advocates for their chil-
dren.”

Exuma said: “We only
hear negative comments
concerning our Public
School education, but there
are bright, intelligent stu-
dents in the system and
some good, dedicated
teachers. A lot of improve-
ment is needed but teachers
are not the real problem.
The teachers and students
need to be given the proper
tools.”

Gail H agreed, asking:
“How can a doctor be
expected to perform
surgery with a dinner knife
and toilet paper? We have a
similar expectation of our
teachers. The system is poor
to say the very least, and
needs to be changed from
the ground up. The teachers
are in an education system
and curriculum that is
working at its optimal level
— which is failure.”

Jane Hudder said: “T do
believe that we need more
foreign-trained teachers,
but I also believe that it's
not just the teachers and
that the crisis has much
deeper roots that also need
to be addressed.

“Our Bahamian teachers,
especially those trained by
COB or Success Training

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SAUNDERS BEACH (West Bay St.)

Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

JOSE CARTELLOSE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES 5.4 would like to inform the motoring public that Saunders Beach (Wiest
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Fax or email résumé’s with proof of qualifications

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Fax 327-6961

Closing Jul 3, 2010



Asphalt paving wall be combed out during this hme and we kindly ask that ALL meterist trvvelling along this rovte make the following:
diversions to their destination:

"Minions! bravelling east alone Saunders Beach should divert onto GROVE AWE, ard follow the ssg5 podted "DIVERSION" through
DOLPHIN DR, JFK DR, FARRINGTON RD, EDEN ST, FOSTER ST, WORTH DUNSIORE AVE, CHIPPINGHAM RD and
cominus along West Bay Strest to their destination,

*Modorist travelling west towards Saunders Beach should followme the signs posted "DIVERSION® through CHIPPINGHAM Ri,
NORTH DUNATORE AVE, FOSTER AVE, EDEN ST, FARRINGTON BRD, JPR DR, DOLPHIN LINK DRGROVE AVE
ind continue along West Bay street

Detours wall be clearly marked to alle the sabe passage for pedestrians & motorist and proper signage wall be erected delineating
the work zone:

Fir paferce Mieeughows tile project is preaiy apprectited and we do apologize for te inconvenience d delays comsed.

For further information please conlact :

Jiae Cartellone Constreceiones Civile: $A
Ofice Hus: hlom-F ri BoM aa bo 2) pana
Offices( 242 )522-844 1922-2610

Fanwil: bahamasnekghborcarlellone.comar

The Project Execution Unit
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Hotline: (242) M2-971Hh

Fumail: publicworksha hamnas.evle

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MO ei eT NY
no need for more
foreign teachers



College, are the result of
the broken education sys-
tem. It's not "their" fault,
but they are not qualified
to be teachers, because we
have failed them when they
were students.

“T see this with my own
children. They come home
with notes from the teach-
ers all the time. Not a single
note is without spelling
errors and grammatical mis-
takes.”

Taylor said: “I am an
educator and though there
are educators that are
despondent, nonchalant
and in some respects jaded,
I posit that it comes from
their inability to effectively
cope with the gross lack of
personal and behavioral
development that parents
have failed to instill in chil-
dren.

“When I began teaching I
never anticipated having to
instruct, rehearse and prac-
tice the basic principles of
courtesy, respect, and man-
ners that are the key essen-
tials to being a social human
being.

“Furthermore, it was a
rude awakening when I
realised that it is not that
the children are inherently
rude, but it came from an
underdevelopment in being
structured and driven that
comes from being taught
responsibility and how to
have an abiding respect for
authority or being obedient
to the rules of an adult.

“Parents are so busy
being who they are that
they do not realise that
their child is growing up
without an internal compass
in a world filled with preda-
tory influences geared
towards exploiting the igno-
rant and extreme punish-
ment and disenfranchise-
ment from a society that is
limited in its diversity.

“If parents are not
installing and enhancing a
child's vision of self along
with an understanding of
their role as a human being
and citizen; the most dedi-
cated teacher will be able
to only inspire a limited
number to excel as the
desire to succeed comes
from the great expectations
of those that birthed us,
those that support us and
those that surround us in
our private lives.”

your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 7



Romeo Farrington:

Rider with a cause }/7

ONE of Nassau’s most famous
drivers is trading in his car keys
for the clean, healthy and traffic-
friendly option of a shiny new
bicycle.

Romeo Farrington, who
became a legend through his work
as a taxi driver and chauffeur, can
now be seen riding his new bicycle
through the streets of Nassau.

Mr Farrington has impressed
thousands of tourists with his hos-
pitality and driving skills.

He has won a Cacique Award
for transportation and another for
Lifetime Achievement in tourism.

As a former Bahamahost train-
er and a frequent guest speaker,
he earned a reputation for leading
the way in transportation and
tourism.

Now, he wants to lead the way
in helping to alleviate Nassau’s
traffic problem.

“T agree that the roads are too
congested,” Mr Farrington said
soon after purchasing his bicycle.
“And I decided that any day that
I don’t have to drive my car, I'll
ride my bike.”

Nostalgia

But Mr Farrington’s decision to
cycle was only in part due to his
environmental and traffic con-
cerns. It was also sparked by nos-
talgia. Cycling was once a large
part of his life.

In 1955 and 1956, Mr Farring-
ton was Nassau’s cycling champi-
on. At the time, cycling was a
major sport and races were always
hotly contested by dozens of ath-
letes.

Mr Farrington recalled that his
group consisted of at least 20 rid-
ers who would consistently prac-
tice together.

They were fiercely competitive,
and they seemed to derive their
entire identity from the race
course.

Mase D. GARDINER HURRICANE
AND BURGULAR PROTECTION

Local legend wants to help
alleviate Nassau’s traffic problem



Each rider earned an alias from
his fellow cyclists. They took on
colourful names such as Little
Caesar, Skinny, Deuce, The Brat,
and The Whip.

Even the name for which Mr
Farrington has become known is
really an alias.

He was called Romeo in cycling
circles because of his shy behavior
around girls at the time. It has
become better known than his
given name — Leviticus.

“When I got in the transporta-
tion business, I saw that the name
was so popular,” he said.

“When I said Romeo, every-
body remembered it. So I
legalised it.”

At 75 years of age, he got a sud-
den urge to cycle again. Riding
now, he said, brings back memo-
ries of his racing days.

He recalled that he first became
interested in cycling in 1954, when
Carl Blades won the cycling cham-
pionship. Mr Blades, he said, was
small in size — far smaller than he
was.

After seeing how a much small-
er man was able to win the cham-
pionship race, his confidence was
boosted, and Mr Farrington was
determined to win the race the
following year.

In 1955, he did win, and he did
it in grand style. Along the route
from McPherson Bend at the east-
ern end of the island to Hobby
Horse Hall at Cable Beach, race
organisers had set up 10 spot
prizes worth £5 each.

The leader at each spot won the
money. Mr Farrington ended up
taking nine of the 10 spot prizes.
Combined with the £50 prize for

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the overall win, he rode away with
£95 that day.

He was in top form to defend
his championship the following
year.

Near the finish line, he recalled,
he and sporting legend Leonard
“Boston Blackie” Miller were
fighting for the win when their
handlebars collided.

They locked into each other on
impact.

“We realised that if we tried to
move, we would fall,” Mr Far-
rington said. “Since everybody
was so far behind us, we just held
hands and coasted over the fin-
ish line. They shared first and sec-
ond prize with us.”

Output

Not long after that race, Mr
Farrington retired from competi-
tive cycling. He suffered from
severe leg cramps. One doctor’s
educated guess was that his legs
could not sustain the massive out-
put from his heart once he began
his adrenaline-filled push.

After walking away from
cycling, Mr Farrington found ful-
fillment in his taxi and limousine
business.

He knows that many people
have forgotten that he was once
on top of the cycling community.
Many younger Bahamians never
had any idea of his cycling history
because they only knew his work
in tourism.

“That’s a part of me that you
have to be past 50 to appreciate,”
he said with a smile. “If you are
not 50 years or older, you would





\

Ville

eat FARRINGTON on his brand new bicycle.

not appreciate that.”

Mr Farrington was content as a
taxi and limousine driver. He built
a thriving enterprise that he is
now turning over to his children.
However, when he saw a collec-
tion of bicycles in a shop window
recently, he impulsively bought
one to relive his glory days. He
also knew that riding the bicycle
would be good for the environ-
ment and for his health.

“T hope more people would see
the wisdom in riding because you







are lessening the traffic on the
street and it is good exercise,” he
said. “I hope the day will come in
the country where there will be
cycle clubs where a group of
senior people will get together
and ride a couple of miles or so. I
hope something like that will
develop.”

He especially hopes to see his
old cycling friends and foes. He
hopes to convince those who are
still alive and well to ride with
him again.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Public firm goes
out of business

FROM page one

known that he was unwilling :
to invest any more of his per- :
sonal funds. :

Mr Simpson previously said :
Mr Babak "is not prepared to :
subscribe for more shares as :
he has already assisted the :
company financially with :
regards to personal bank :
guarantees for the company's :
line of credit at the bank, as :
well as allowing the Home :
Centre to remain in his build- :
ing without paying any rent }
for the past 16 months." i

Mr Babak owns the Home :
Centre, and among the senior :
creditors in any liquidation :
are likely to be First- :
Caribbean International Bank :
(Bahamas), which has secured :
its $2 million exposure, and }
the Government. Everyone :
else will have to waitin line. :

Freeport Concrete suffered :
a $636,000 net loss in its 2010 :
second quarter that leaves it :
with negative net worth of :
$855,000. i

In a previous message, Mr :
Simpson said: “Currently, our :
inventory value at the Home :
Centre is only $575,000 and :
our daily sales are insufficient :
to cover our expenses result- :
ing in losses every day. With :
the cash to be able to buy all :
of the inventory that we know :
will move quickly off our :
shelves, we will see an imme- }
diate increase in our daily :
sales. i

"We have proven this can :
be done because in April one :
of our suppliers shipped us :
several containers of building :
materials, and we saw our :
sales increase by 63 per cent :
over the previous two :
months' sales. :

“If we had been able to :
purchase other inventory such :
as major appliances, ac mini :
splits, plumbing and electri- :
cal supplies, carpet, laminate :
flooring, lighting, fans, hard- :
ware, etc, etc our daily sales :
average would have increased :
substantially.” i

¢ SEE TRIBUNE |
BUSINESS FOR |
FULL STORY |



|
[ay



a!
*
—



=. > ml
ew SW taal —
; ——

rm af

i Lee |

eet rx hh]

THE TRIBUNE

Dangerous
playground
fears raised

FROM page one

it seems as though they are poorly constructed and I
wonder if they are even inspected?

“Then there is the termite factor, there sticking
these wooden structures directly into the ground, so
termites eventually eat out the footing of the equip-
ment.

Familiar with facilities and regulations at public
schools in the United States, the teacher also ques-
tioned whether routine inspections are performed to
ensure the integrity of equipment.

The teacher also pointed out the absence of weight
limitation notices, which would alert guardians to
proper equipment use.

In 2003, seven-year-old Kyiel Clarke-Munroe fell to
his death when the monkey bars at Carlton E Francis
Primary School collapsed.

His tragic death severely traumatised numerous
primary school children who witnessed the fall — some
unable to sleep afterwards.

The teacher continued: “The kids are at risk. Safe-

THE popular play area at Goodman’s Beach has come under scrutiny.



ority.”

ty should be the priority, not cheapness.
“The safety of the children should be the main pri-

The installation and maintenance of public play-
ground equipment is regulated under the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture.

Officials were unable to provide response to com-
plaints up to press time.

Holding murder charged for up to three years may be ‘unconstitutional’

FROM page one

brought to trial in a reasonable
amount of time. Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham has indicated that
his administration plans to specify in
law that a reasonable amount of time
would be three years.

It's a move by the Government to
cut down on the number of offenders
committing crimes while on bail, and
assuage public outcry over those
accused of murder being granted bail.

However, the decision has garnered
criticism in the legal community.

Damian Gomez, partner in the law
firm Chilcott Chambers, told The Tri-
bune: "It's a violation of Article 20, it’s
a violation of Article 19 (of the con-
stitution) and it's a violation of the
common law which says that all citi-
zens have the right not to be deprived

of the late

Ja,

of their liberty without some cause."

Mr Gomez, a former senator who
has been practising law for more than
20 years, added that it is the fault of
the police and prosecution for charg-
ing persons with serious offences with-
out sufficient evidence in hand to try
them quickly.

"If you charge someone with mur-
der you ought to have enough evi-
dence to proceed immediately. If you
know the evidence that you have is
insufficient to obtain a conviction,
you have no basis then for charging
them.

"The real issue is why haven't these
people been tried within a reasonable
amount of time?"

Attorney Paul Moss believes such a
practice violates the human rights of

innocent people who may be brought
up on murder charges and are forced
to languish behind bars for years
while police and prosecution search
for further evidence.

"Everyone wants a criminal to be
locked up, but certainly people don't
want the innocent to be locked up.
Extending (holding) time to three
years is not reasonable. I'm not sure
that it’s constitutional but certainly it
is not the answer because all it means
is that they are not on bail but after
three years they will get bail and what
do you do then, extend it to five
years?

"If the government, because of its
own failure, is unable to get people to
court in a timely fashion, the consti-
tution will not bend to them."

Last month, when speaking to Par-
liament about proposed amendments
to the Bail Act and the issue of crime,
Mr Ingraham said he is confident the
changes will be lawful and stand up in
court.

"The only time you cannot deny
bail is when the person has not been
tried within a reasonable period of
time, but there is no such thing as an
absolute right to bail, notwithstanding
what anybody else says.

"And it is our intention in the
Bahamas to propose that in the con-
text of the Bahamas, a reasonable
period of time is three years. We are
satisfied that such a provision will
withstand any challenge before all
competent courts of jurisdiction for
the Bahamas."

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK II - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II — Accounts Payable in
the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Processing invoices for payment by checking accuracy of calculations,
coding and authorized signatures;

Posting invoice disbursements and journal entry data into the accounts
payable system;

Reconciling statements of account for local vendors with balance due
in excess of $5,000.00. This involves generating open payables report to
ensure correctness of entries and vendor balance;

Maintaining and reporting on the Corporation’s meal voucher system;

Preparing schedules (source data for aged payables etc.) or other task
requested by Supervisor or Manager;

Assisting with maintenance of the cheque log and disbursing cheques for
vetting and approved signatures;

Assisting with the filing system of accounts payable documents and fol
lows up on outstanding obligations to local vendors; and

Assisting with resolving vendors disputes/queries.

GAIUS C. BETHEL

Job requirements include:

A minimum of an Associate Degree

(Accounts, Business Administration);

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of the Disbursement Processing module
within the H TE environment;

Ability to operate the Call Accounting System and to post invoice data
for processing of payment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

May 16th, 1964 - June 22nd, 2009

You’re on our minds and in our hearts that’s
a natural place to be.
“For someone who was so special.”
We will ever love you.
“Rest continually forever with the Lord.”

Loving remembered by his parents, Pastor Hon. Philip M.

Bethel. Sc. & Elder Yvonne Bethel: sisters. Deborah & Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
} u 5 4

Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas

on or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.

ra

> =, of family and friends.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







TUESDAY, JUNE 22,



2010





Multt-talented Melinda intends
‘to be the next Lavern Eve’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he multi-talented

athlete had a

promising colle-

giate career when

she graduated
from C R Walker.

But after putting it on hold
for another four years due to
the birth of her two daughters,
Melinda Bastian is now fulfill-
ing her goals and aspirations at
Benedict College.

Having just completed her
junior year, Bastian had a stel-
lar year in volleyball, softball
and track and field where she
has earned All-American and
All-Conference honours and
set numerous records in all
three disciplines.

The major is back after tak-
ing a four-year break in 2002,
and she’s performing at the lev-
el that she expected, especially
in track and field.

“My season was pretty
decent,” said Bastian, an All-
Academic student, who is now
back home for the summer
break. “Last year, I finished
second in the javelin, but this
year I was third.

“T won our conference. I won
the MVP title for the region.
In fact, this past semester, I
took home 21 individual awards
in the javelin, heptathlon, shot
put, high jump. I’ve done it all.”

In track and field alone, Bas-
tian scored a record 53 points
while participating in seven
events for the Tigers as they
finished second at the NCAA
Division IT Outdoor Track and
Field Championships.

That earned her the Wom-
en’s Field Athlete of the Year
honour.

In softball, Bastian helped

SPORTS

INBRIEF

BASKETBALL
BBF INDEPENDENCE
TOURNEY



THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation (BBF), in its effort
to continuously promote and
develop local basketball, is
scheduled to host its annual
Independence Basketball Tour-
nament.

The tournament will take on
a double elimination format
and will be played July 9-10 at
Sir Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
This fun-filled event will be
comprised of local men’s and
women’s teams from the asso-
ciation’s leagues along with
teams made up of Bahamian
college players who came home
for the summer break.

There is a registration fee per
team to cover the cost of tro-
phies and officials due on or
before July 2. No team will be
allowed to register after July 2,
2010.

In this regard, the BBF is
requesting that two represen-
tatives from your team attend a
6pm meeting July 2 at the gym
to further discuss this venture.

ROAD RACE
FASHION HALL FUN
WALK 2010

FASHION Hall is slated to
hold their Fun Walk 2010 6am
Saturday, starting from their
branch on the Top-Of-The-Hill,
Mackey Street.

Proceeds of the event will be
donated to the Bahamas Heart
Association. And there is a
registration fee. For further
information, interested persons





Felipé Major/Tribune staff







MELINDA BASTIAN demonstrates how to spike the ball during the Jackie Conyers Volleyball Camp...

the Tigers to complete the sea-
son with a 25-7 win-loss record
and 16-6 in their conference
before they got eliminated from
the SIAC Softball Champi-
onships with a 9-8 loss to Ken-
tucky State University.
Playing shortstop, Bastian
was named to the SIAC AIl-
Conference Softball team.
And in volleyball, Bastian
was joined by Bahamian Camil-
la Miller on the SIAC Volley-
ball All-Tournament team.
Bastian was also on the
SIAC Volleyball All-Confer-

ence team as a member of the
first team and she was named
the Offensive Player of the
Year. She and Miller assisted
the Tigers in posting a 13-4
record and 10-4 in conference
play.

At the end of it all, Bastian
earned her second consecutive
MVP honour.

“[’m just excited that I’m
back playing again,” said Bast-
ian, who took a break from col-
lege. “Throughout my high
school years, I did a fantastic
year and even when I was in

Kansas, I got All-American in
my freshman year.

“My inspiration is the fact
that I have two daughters now.
I just wanted to be able to do
something for them. I really
want to inspire them.”

Her daughters, six-year-old
Dashawana Bastian and four-
year-old Vanessa Sawyer, have
motivated their mother to the
point that she now feels that
with her ability, she can go all
the way and represent the
Bahamas at the Olympic
Games, either in the javelin or

the heptathlon.

This weekend, Bastian
intends to compete at the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ BTC Nation-
al Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships. And she is looking
to make her presence felt in the
javelin as she provides some
competition to retiring veteran
national record holder Lavern
Eve.

“T look forward to competing
with Lavern,” said Bastian, who

SEE NEXT page

‘Valuable lessons’ at Jackie Conyers v-ball camp

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



THE sixth annual Jackie Conyers Vol-
leyball Camp kicked off yesterday at the

Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

And although the numbers have not
been what organiser Jackie Conyers had
anticipated, she’s convinced that those who
come out and participate for the rest of
the week will be taught some valuable

lessons.

“The coaches are using some new tech-
niques as they step it up a notch,” said









Make a Statement

A YOUNG MAN spikes the ball...

Conyers of the cadet of visiting coaches,
inclusive of husband and wife Del and
Arlene Harris and Bahamian Vanessa
Johnson-Henry of Atlanta, Georgia.

“They will be going through some drills
as we hope to build character through
sports and improve their skills so that when
they return to school, they will be able to
help their volleyball teams.”

Under the theme, “Back to Basics”, the
camp is set to run through Friday between
the hours of 9am and 3pm with the campers
separated based on their level of play.

SEE NEXT page

Trade-ins are always welcome

Portugal scores
7 on NKorea
at the WCup,

Spain wins...
See page 10

Jason and
Jessica win
their divisions
in Olympic
Day run

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

IT was a different route but
the same result for Jason
Williams and Jessica Murray.

Saturday morning, the new
executive board of the
Bahamas Olympic Committee
changed its annual Olympic
Day run from the Queen Eliz-
abeth Sports Centre ending up
at the Paradise Island parking
lot to Montagu Beach and back
after going over the two Par-
adise Island bridges.

For Williams and Murray,
they welcomed the change as
they once again won another
title in the men’s and women’s
divisions.

“It was good. I expected the
route to be the same, but they
changed it. It's not the Olympic
Day run that I'm used too, but
everybody has to adjust to the
changes," said Williams, who
easily dominated the depleted
field of top runners to finish in
36.36 seconds. "It was okay.”

The only difference with the
new route, as opposed to the
old one, was the fact that you
had to go over the new bridge
and head all the way to the turn
at the Ocean Club Golf Club
before heading back over the
old bridge and to the finish line
at Montagu.

"It wasn't as fast as the old

race because we just had the
one bridge to run,” Williams
said. "But I was expecting more
participants to give me some
competition. But none of the
top distance runners showed
up.
Williams was mainly refer-
ring to his brother, Oneil
Williams, the defending cham-
pion and former champion
Mackey Williams, their arch-
rivals.

Although she didn't have any
competition either, Murray was
the second finisher in the run,
chasing Williams about two
minutes later in 38.19. She too
was pleased with the new
course.

"It was really nice. The
weather was nice too,” Murray
stated. "I wished we had more
competitors. But the course was
nice. It's a course I'm used to
running, so I really didn't have
any problem. We just had more
hills as opposed to the old
Olympic Day run. But it wasn't
a problem once you came off
the bridge.”

The organisers of the BOC,
formerly the Bahamas Olympic
Association, attracted a large

SEE NEXT page

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Portugal scores 7 on NKorea at WCup, Spain wins



HONDURAS’ Sergio Mendoza (left) vies
for the ball with Spain’s Xabi Alonso during
the World Cup group H match at Ellis Park
Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa,
Monday...

(AP Photo)

‘Valuable lessons’ at Jackie

Conyers v-ball camp



By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer



JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Por-
tugal exploded for seven goals in its
second match at the World Cup, dom-
inating North Korea and knocking the
Asian team out of the tournament,
and Spain got back on track with a 2-0
win over Honduras on Monday.

The 2006 World Cup semifinalist
Portuguese finally got a goal from Cris-
tiano Ronaldo in the 7-0 rout in Cape
Town. It was the Real Madrid winger's
first goal for his country in two years in
competitive games.

Also, Spain got its first win of the
tournament at Ellis Park in Johannes-
burg, but it was Chile that moved into
first place in Group H with six points
by beating 10-man Switzerland 1-0.

Portugal was held to a 0-0 draw by
Ivory Coast in its opening Group G
match, but the goals poured forth on
Monday.

Raul Meireles gave the Portuguese
a 1-0 halftime lead, and Tiago added
two in the second half to complement
Ronaldo's strike and those from Simao
Sabrosa, Hugo Almeida and Liedson.

"It was a great day for Portugal and
Portuguese football," Portugal coach
Carlos Queiroz said "The players are
really happy with the way they played,
the attitude for the game, the beautiful
football, the beautiful goals."

Portugal still has to play Brazil to get
into the round of 16. The five-time
champions have already qualified.

The 7-0 rout was the most one-sided
World Cup match since Germany beat
Saudi Arabia 8-0 at the 2002 tourna-
ment in South Korea and Japan.

Spain was also disappointing in its
opener, losing to Switzerland 1-0, but
David Villa took care of things against
the Hondurans, scoring in the 17th
and 51st minutes.

Villa, who has now scored five
career World Cup goals for his coun-

try, had a chance for a hat trick in the
62nd but his penalty shot went wide of
the right post with the goalkeeper div-
ing the opposite direction.

Spain will face Chile in its final
group match, and will likely need to
win convincingly in order to avoid fac-
ing Brazil in the round of 16.

Winners

"If we beat Chile we're practically
group winners, so we're happy," Villa
said. "The good thing is that this result
means we depend on ourselves."

In Port Elizabeth, substitute Mark
Gonzalez scored the only goal in the
75th, heading in a pass from Esteban
Paredes to give the Chileans a perfect
record through two matches in the
group. "We had some good luck near
the end when we got the goal,” Gon-
zalez said. "We just kept trying our
best, trying hard, and we got the goal.
This was a great moment for me and

for our team."

Switzerland played most of the
match with 10 men because midfielder
Valon Behrami was red-carded for
violent conduct.

Also, the football fan who walked
into the England dressing room after
its 0-0 draw against Algeria will go on
trial on Friday. Pavlos Joseph
appeared in a Cape Town court for
the second time Monday to face tres-
passing charges.

In Paris, French bank Credit Agri-
cole SA suspended a television adver-
tisement featuring some of France's
best players because the national team
refused to train on Sunday.

The players said they didn't want
to practice because striker Nicolas
Anelka was sent home for insulting
the French coach.

The fast-food chain Quick also said
it is canceling an advertising campaign
with Anelka because of the player's
poor image.



FROM page 9

“Everyone, at the end of the
day, would have improved their
skills,” Conyers said. “We have
seen the improvements in the
kids who return. So we know
that those who are here this
year will also improve.”

Del Harris said the camp
seems to have participants who
are younger than in the past,
but as the camp progresses, he
anticipates that more of the old-
er campers will be coming out.

“We will be working on the
fundamentals and as we get

been here before, we will work
more on their fundamentals,”
he said.

Additionally, the visiting
coaches will also be working
with the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation’s junior national
team practice that will be held
in the afternoons.

Arlene Harris said they are
hoping to make the camp an
exciting one.

“From the people who are
here, we’re going to work with
them so that they can get better
and eventually they will encour-
age more people to come out.
That’s how we can grow the

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Chinese making progress on $30m national stadium

ed i
cli ab Ta cee
ee Be me a:

Multi-talented
Melinda intends
‘to be the next
Lavern Eve’

FROM page 9

admitted that she only went up
against the 44-year-old once in
her career.

As Eve starts to wind down
her career, Bastian said she
hopes that “I can learn some
things from her.”

“She still has a lot of tech-
nique that I can get from her.
But from me to her, I just want
her to know that I intend to be
the next Lavern Eve.”

And while she’s willing to
learn from the Bahamas’ best,
Bastian said she hopes that oth-
er Bahamian athletes will take a






























Tribune staff







WORKERS are making progress on the $30 million National Stadium. In fact, this photograph shows
how some of the steel being used to construct the stadium is being removed. Work got started on the
stadium in March, 2009, and has been going very well. The new state-of-the-art complex is being built
by the Chinese government as a gift to the Bahamian people. The stadium is expected to be completed
by next year...







sport,”

defence,”

work,”

sport.”

she said.

She said that although a lot
of the campers can run fast,
jump high and hit hard, they
want to ensure that they instill
the discipline of the game.

“We want to teach them the
fundamentals of passing, set-
ting and hitting, serving and
then running and playing some
she said. “Hopeful-
ly, if they can learn these fun-
damentals, they will be better.”

Johnson-Henry, a former
national team member who
played along side Conyers, said
she’s delighted to be back home
to assist her long-time friend.

“Tt’s always a plus for me
because I don’t look at this as
she insisted. “Tt’s always
a joy to be able to come back
and make a contribution to the

Over the years, Johnson-
Henry said those campers who
return have shown their
improvement and that makes
their job easier because they
know that they are making an
impression on the campers.

“We just want to encourage
the campers here to bring out
more of their team-mates,”
stated. “I think if they can do _ year.
that, they will see a difference

in their teams next year.”

team player Glen Rolle.

skills to succeed.”

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A number of local coaches
are also assisting in the camp.
One of them is men’s national

“We’re trying to teach all of
the skills to the youngsters,”
Rolle said. “We want to teach
them the fundamentals so that
when they start to play the
game, they will have all of the

Rolle said that the crowd
could be a lot better, but he’s
confident that as the week pro-
gresses, the numbers should
increase.

This year, Mt Carmel’s coach
Kirkwood Greene has brought
in a number of his players
because he said he saw the dif-

she ference in those who played last

“T like the fundamentals that
they are teaching,” he said.
“These younger kids can learn
the basics so when they move
up, you don’t have to teach
them so much.”

Greene said he was particu-
larly pleased with the progress
of his son, Kirkwood Jr. He’s
now trying out for the junior
national team and trying to
ensure that other players are
taking advantage of the camp.

FROM page 9

number of competitors, who
either ran or participated in two
different segments of the walk.

In the competitive walk,
perennial kingpin Philip Moss
captured another title in the
men's division, while former
volleyball standout Kimberly
Saunders left her mark on the
women's division.

"T really didn't train. This
was my first race since Atlantic
Medical,” Moss pointed out. "I
haven't walked for one month.
I was just jogging. So I'm not
100 per cent yet. So I just went
out there and walked. There
wasn't any pressure or any-
thing, so I took my time."

Without any water stops on
the course, Moss said he had
no other choice but to take his
time so that he would not have
dehydrated before he got back
in.

For Saunders, she noted that
she was able to achieve her
goal, which was to put in a good
performance.

"T went out fast, as I intended

page out of her book.

“T just want them to know
that they should not let any-
thing stop them from achieving
their goals,” she pointed out.
“Only you can determine how
far you can go in correcting
your error.

“You might fail here and
there, but failure is not the end
of your life. When one door
closes, another one will open
up. So be prepared to use what-
ever avenue you are presented
with.”

At age 26, Bastian said it’s
not hard for her to adjust to
competing with and against the
younger athletes in college. At
5-feet, 11-inches, she’s holding
her own and doing it well.

“It’s an inspiration for me.
It’s spectacular,” she summed
up. “A lot of people have been
telling me that my career in
sports was over after I had my
first child. But here I am, doing
it and doing it at a high level. I
have no regrets.”

While home, in addition to
working with the Jackie Cony-
ers Volleyball Camp this week
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, Bastian intends to also
work as an instructor with the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s summer programme
in July.

Jason and Jessica win their
divisions in Olympic Day run

Here's a look at the top three
finishers in each category:

Male Walker

16-25 - Baysie Dennis

36-45 - Ryan Bethel, Mario
Bethel and Neil Murrell.

46-59 - Philip Moss, James
Bodie and Peter Delancy

60-and-over - George Smith,
Eric Seymour and Wellington
Braynen

Male Runners

15-and-under - Rashad Rolle,
Reagan Cartwright and Rashad
Cartwright

16-25 - Ashlany Murray Jr,
Gabriel Rahming and
Lavaughn Ferguson

26-35 - Jason Williams,
Edward Fritz and Denzel Sirra

36-45 - Roy Sanchez, Carl-
ton Russell and Derek Fergu-
son

46-59 - Randy Thurston,
Ashland Murray Sr and Ray-
mond Rudon

Female Walkers

15-and-under - Doreth Stra-
chan and Pamala Pratt

26-35 - Joycelyn Scarlett,
Toosdai Smith and Okera
Johnson-Simms

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to do, but when I was going
over the bridge, I sort of
relaxed and coming back I sort
of picked it up," said Saunders, 46-59 - Kimberly Saunders,
whose aim was to catch any and Margo Strachan and Ruth Not-
all of the men walking in the tage

36-45 - Arnett Cash, Undell
Stuart and Avis Bullard

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front of her because she didn't
have any female counterparts
to challenge her.

"T wasn't able to catch the
two males in front of me, but I
won the female category. I
guess one of these days, it will
happen. I really want to beat
the number one guy, Phil Moss.
So I just have to continue to
train harder. Maybe one of
these days I will beat him."

Female Runners

16-25 - Rikesh Thompson

26-35 - Jessica Murray, Eliz-
abeth Shaddock, Kirsten Sweet-
in

36-45 - Rayvonne Bethel,
Janice Smith and Shavaughn
Blades

46-59 - Pam Richardson,
Norma Miller and Patrice Chea

Wheelchair - Theron Far-
rington

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

Major car dealership
denies owing thousands
to Customs department

FROM page one

such cars had been raised to
85 per cent.

Mr Fitzgerald said he would
not “necessarily have a prob-
lem with the fact that the low-
er rate of duty was paid if
every single Bahamian whose
car was brought in on or
around the 25th of May was
allowed to pay that same rate.”

“Somebody must explain
this, somebody must be held
responsible,” said the Senator.

However, as was reported
at that time, many members
of the public who had import-
ed vehicles around that time
were caught off guard when
they found themselves having
to pay more duty on their
vehicle than they had expect-
ed, once the old duty structure
was scrapped and a new one
introduced in the 2010/2011
budget on May 26.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s operations man-
ager, told The Tribune that
NMC submitted documenta-
tion for the six vehicles in
question prior to the Prime
Minister announcing the duty
rate changes in Parliament.

The cars would have
attracted a 60 per cent duty
rate under the old duty rate
structure, and an 85 per cent
rate under the new one — sub-
sequently reduced to 75 per
cent after Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham consulted
with local auto importers.

The Department of Cus-
toms approved the vehicles for
a 60 per cent duty rate, accord-
ing to Mr Lowe, and on May
27 — the day after the Prime
Minister announced the
increases, which went into
effect immediately — the car
dealer paid $67,237.20 to clear
the vehicles. This was $28,000
less than would have been
paid if the 85 per cent duty
rate had been charged, and
$17,000 less than the rate when
it was subsequently reduced
to 75 per cent.

Mr Lowe said he was con-
tacted for the first time about
the matter yesterday morning
after an article appeared in a
newspaper claiming the com-
pany had paid a lower rate of
duty than it should have. He
said he told Assistant Comp-
troller Charles Turner that
NMC would not be paying the
difference, as he felt the com-
pany had done everything it
was required to do by the
Department at the time.

“T don’t know how Cus-
toms can approve an entry and
then we’re the ones in the
wrong, so I’ve suggested he
contact those clients (who
bought the cars) and get the
money back from them. It’s
outside our responsibility. Cus-

toms approved the entry we
put it in, we paid it once it was
approved, took the cars off the
dock and they were sold short-
ly after.

“The NMC is above
reproach. I would never stand
for anything like that. The
owners would never stand for
anything like that. I would be
fired immediately if I were to
even attempt anything like
that. So I don’t know how we
can be responsible for — I don’t
know what to call it — mis-
communication between the
Prime Minister’s office and
their office.”

However, Comptroller of
Customs Glenn Gomez said it
is not as simple as that.

“Tt’s amazing what people
will say to try to get around
doing what they should do,”
he said when asked to respond
to Mr Lowe's position.

Mr Gomez alleged that the
broker for NMC was only able
to pay the 60 per cent rate of
duty on May 27 because they
did not go to the Departmen-
t’s “query line” upon return
to the dock to pay for the
items, instead heading directly
to the cashier, who would not
have known to question the
lower rate being applied.

Asked whether in this case
this may be a weakness in the
system, whereby brokers or
individuals can bypass paying
the correct rate by avoiding
the “query line”, Mr Gomez
said “yes, but it does not usu-
ally happen. Only if there’s
some familiarity.”

Mr Gomez claimed it
would be NMC, not the bro-
ker acting on NMC’s behalf,
who would be responsible for
paying up the $17,000 as “they
are one in the same” as NMC
contracts the broker to “work
on their behalf.”

Meanwhile, as for Mr
Lowe’s suggestion that the rev-
enue-collection agency should
go directly to the people who
bought the cars for the money,
rather than the car dealership,
Mr Gomez dismissed that as
“ridiculous.”

“The people who pur-
chased the cars were not the
ones who came to Customs to
pay the duty,” he said.

The Customs Comptroller
said that he was informed
about the incident in question
later on the day it took place
and instructed officers to con-
tact NMC about paying the
difference. “I know I gave
instructions for that to happen
two weeks ago,” he said,
responding to Mr Lowe’s
statement that the department
only called after the incident
received publicity in the press.

“The next step will be for us
to see what steps can be taken
to collect the revenue,” he
added.

Trial of two police officers is adjourned

FROM page one

that the matter could commence sometime in August.

Key, 28, died in hospital on January 19, 2008, from injuries
claimed to have been suffered during an alleged beating at
the Grove Police Station on June 17, 2007. He had spent several
months in a coma at the Princess Margaret and Jackson Memo-
rial hospitals. Mr Key had reportedly been arrested on a traf-
fic violation and was in a holding cell at the station at the time
of the alleged attack. Cpl Donovan Gardiner and Constable
Tavares Bowleg, who were arraigned in the Supreme Court in
June 2008 are on bail. Gardiner is charged with manslaughter
and Bowleg faces an abetment charge.

IN THIS heat, the one

: thing you may be longing
: for most is something cool.

Ben & Jerry’s at Atlantis,

: Paradise Island is offering
: a double dose — In addition
: to their world famous
: flavours, you can check out
: their Junka “moo” video
: currently streaming on You
: Tube.

The Ben & Jerry’s team

: at Atlantis hopes Bahami-
: ans stop by for a cool
: refresher but also that they
: hunt down the video on the
: popular You Tube site as
: they are in a competition
: that could bring more fame
: to the local store and also
: aid some local organisa-
: tions.

Unique

Ben & Jerry’s Interna-

: tional has asked each of its
: franchisees to submit a
: video of how they can pro-
: mote the company with
: something unique from
: their town, city or — in this
: case — country.

All videos are on You

! Tube and are running for
: the entire month of June.
: The store that has the
: most “hits” for their video
: will be the winner.

Kerzner International

: senior executive pastry
: chef Paul Hayward says

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TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 11

Ben & Jerry’s aiming for

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that while they’d also like
to beat out more than 170
franchisees with stores
scattered across North
America, Europe and
Australia, they have a larg-
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Chef Paul says there’s a
total of $5,000 up for
grabs. Half will go towards
a charity of the winner’s



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ben and jams atlantis

Subaeribe



— Welcome to Ben ard Jerry's Moving Willige version of

itil aT ean Wen Anee on youtube.com

choice and the other
$2,500 will go to the store
itself.

“Tf our Atlantis Ben &
Jerry’s franchise is the
winner, we will be donat-
ing the funds to Junior
Junkanoo and to the Ran-
furly Home,” he said.

“Our version is called
Junka "moo" — a celebra-

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To see the video, visit
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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Legac

Ball



THE SIR LYNDEN PINDLING FOUNDATION’S Lega-
cy Ball 2010 took place on Saturday at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort. The event was held under the patronage of Dame
Marguerite Pindling. As well as Dame Marguerite, dignitaries
such as Sir Arthur Foulkes and Perry Christie were in atten-
dance.

PHOTOS: Peter Ramsay

















1

9
10



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

palondar contest

ori contest latais listed Of our website Visit www.familyguardian.com for

Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for
the company’s 2011 calendar will be “A Celebration of Nature”. Photographs may be of any
subject (animate or inanimate), scene or histrocial structure that features a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas.

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 30, 2010. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk
and will not be returned.

All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village Road and
East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00a.m and 5:00p.m weekdays only. Envelopes should
be marked “Calendar Contest”.

All entries must be accompanied by a signed and completed official entry form, available
at any Family Guardian office, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.
familyguardian.com).

Only colour images will be considered. Images must be provided as digital files on CD. Digital
images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure
the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality
JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be
supplied with colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints
submitted without CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name,
photo subject and photo location must be written on the reverse of the print.

Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality
and quality of photograph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the
website (www-familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family
Guardian’s 2011 calendar. The decision of the judges will be final.

A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs
selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per
photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos.

The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached
thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company reserves the right to
use such in the future. Photos will not be returned.

Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.

Previously published photos are not eligible.

A Exeetont




inancial SHRGHh Rating

special hints and contest details!

entry form
leading jane 30, 2010

Return this form with photos and CD to:
Calendar Contest

Family Guardian Corporate Centre

Village Road & East Bay Street, PO. Box SS-6232
Nassau, Bahamas

Name:

Telephone: B H C



EMail:



P.0. Box:



Street:



Address:



Island:



Number of Photos Entered (a maximum of 5):

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as
a winner in the 2011 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the
property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all
rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos
entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have
not been previously published.



Signature Date



NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE | FINANCIAL CENTRE | www-familyguardian.com























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THE TRIBUNE



















RANDY BUTLER

Private
airline
assessing
IPO

* Sky Bahamas chief
says $9.7m revenue
airline mulling IPO
or attracting in private
investors, current
owners having invested
$16m over two years

* Carrier investing
$1.25m in new
maintenance hangar
and $1.4m in new
plane, as it moves
on ‘winter’ start to
scheduled US flights
from three Bahamian
islands and upcoming
Andros service

* Hoping government
realises sector’s value,
as carrier employs
more than 90 full-time
with monthly wage
bill exceeding $218k

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

A LEADING Bahami-
an private airline yesterday
said it was mulling either
an initial public offering
(IPO) next year or attract-
ing in new private investor
groups, its current owners
having invested $16 million
over two years into a busi-
ness that has grown rev-
enues to just shy of $10 mil-
lion per annum.

Captain Randy Butler,
chief executive and presi-
dent of Sky Bahamas, said
the carrier, which is cur-
rently undertaking some 31
flights per day, was aiming
to begin scheduled service
into the US from three
Bahamian islands by this
winter, in addition to break-
ing ground on its $1.25 mil-
hon new maintenance
hangar at Lynden Pindling
International Airport
(LPIA) this August.

Captain Butler, who is
also the Bahamas Chamber

SEE page 4B





Damianos

ine

TUESDAY,

{UNE 2-2.



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL FIDELITY

eae a Ld

Pleo A gr me Moe ML Ll



NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Broker blasted for supervision failing

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Securities

Commission

disciplinary

panel has fined

CFAL, the
broker/dealer arm of the for-
mer Colina Financial Group
(CFG), $10,000 after finding it
breached the Securities Indus-
try Act’s regulations by failing
to properly supervise a former
employee who effected an
improper share trading scheme
involving Commonwealth Bank
stock.

The three-man panel, whose
decision has been obtained by
Tribune Business, found that
CFAL Securities, under its for-
mer name First Bahamas Cap-
ital, either did not have “sub-
stantive controls” in place, or
was not following them, allow-
ing ex-broker Hiram Cox to
engage in a scheme that
allegedly financed the purchase
of Commonwealth Bank shares
by seven of that institution’s
managers.

The panel, which was chaired
by former registrar general,
Sterling Quant, and included
current Insurance Commis-
sioner, Lennox McCartney,
found that “various checks and
balances were not in place” at
First Bahamas/CFAL, as con-
firmed by the latter’s March 6,
2006, report to the Securities
Commission outlining the
action taken to tighten internal

Royal
Bank sees
bad loan
slowing

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

ROYAL Bank of Canada
(RBC) is seeing a slowdown in
the growth of its non-accrual
loans, although the bank’s vice-
president and country head said
yesterday: “We are not out of
the woods yet.” He added that
the economy and unemploy-
ment would need to turnaround
to see arrears decrease.

Nathaniel Beneby said RBC
was profitable with a strong
capital base, and is in no danger
of destabilisation. This, despite
a 50 per cent increase in the
bank’s licence fees, which were
increased by $800,000 to $2.4
million per year.

“The country has experi-
enced challenging economic
times,” said Mr Beneby. “There
is a Budget deficit and the Gov-
ernment is endeavouring to bal-
ance that budget and reduce
the deficit.

“One of the ways they pro-
pose to raise more revenue is to
increase bank license fees, and
the banks can absorb those
fees.”

SEE page 7B

Sotheby's

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

* Securities Commission panel fines CFAL/First Bahamas $10,000

for breaching Act’s regulations by failing to monitor ex-broker

* Finds ‘substantive controls were either not in place, or were not
being followed’, and ‘various checks and balances were not in place’
* But broker pledged to have implemented ‘corrective action’ to deal with defects
* Ruling relates to share trading scheme involving Commonwealth Bank ESOP stock



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Securities Industry
Act does not allow the capital
markets regulator to take reg-
ulatory action over provisions
that also carry criminal penal-
ties, a disciplinary panel find-
ing that this forced it to “dis-
continue” proceedings against



‘Criminal penalties’
bar to Commission
regulatory actions

an ex-First Bahamas Capi-
tal/CFAL broker for alleged
violations.

A three-man Securities
Commission panel, chaired by
former registrar general Ster-
ling Quant, and also includ-
ing Insurance Commissioner
Lennox McCartney, in ruling

SEE page 4B





controls.

First Bahamas had further
referred to these actions in its
November 17, 2008, response
to the Securities Commission’s
formal complaint against it, and
the panel ruled: “These are not

insubstantial changes, and they
were not in place at the time
this incident took place.”

The Commission’s panel, in
its late-September 2009 ruling,
said interviews with First
Bahamas/CFAL employees fur-

ther backed the capital markets
regulator’s case, adding: “The
evidence demonstrated that
there was either none or very
little supervision of the activi-
ties of First Bahamas Capital
broker, Hiram Cox.

“Existing procedures, such
as the signatories on trade
cheques and the review of all
supporting trade documenta-
tion, were insufficient in pre-
venting the activity engaged in
by Mr Cox.”

Gawaine Ward, the Securi-
ties Commission’s in-house
legal counsel, in his submissions
to the disciplinary panel
referred to interviews given by
Anthony Ferguson, CFAL/First
Bahamas president, and senior
executives Tamara Evans and
Sean Longley, “which further
confirmed that substantive con-
trols were either not in place, or
were not being followed.

“It is therefore our conclu-
sion that First Bahamas Capital
breached regulation 71 (1) of
the regulations, and it failed to

‘We have no cash to stay in business’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete last
night became the first BISX-
listed company to announce it
had ceased operations and was
seeking shareholder permission
to go into liquidation, its chief
executive telling Tribune Busi-
ness: “I have no cash to keep
running the business.”

With no investors respond-
ing to last month’s last ditch
plea to raise $3 million for the
public company to prevent it
from going bankrupt, Raymond
Simpson said he had no choice
but to yesterday inform 55 staff
that they were being released,
with just five of the 60-strong
complement staying on to pro-

* Freeport Concrete becomes first public and BISX-listed
company to cease operations and move into liquidation
* $3m cash plea not heard, with 55 staff let go immediately

tect Freeport Concrete’s
remaining assets.

Adding that he was now call-
ing an Extraordinary General
Meeting (EGM) to get share-
holder approval to put the com-
pany into liquidation, and
appointing at liquidator, Mr
Simpson told Tribune Business:
“T can’t keep running the oper-
ation without cash.

“We have no cash. We have
no inventory to sell, maybe a
couple of thousand dollars of
inventory a day, but it’s dribs
and drabs. We have no cash to

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

meet payroll unless we sell
$5,000-$6,000 a day [at the
Home Centre], $30,000 a week.

“There’s got to come an end
to it, and as there are no poten-
tial investors or bidders out
there, there’s no eye in the nee-
dle I can thread this thing
through.... Right now, I’ve
ceased operations today and
have got to call an EGM.”

He added of yesterday’s
meeting with Freeport Con-
crete staff: “It was a hard day.

SEE page 3B



properly supervise its employ-
ee, namely Hiram Cox,” the
Commission’s panel ruled.

“The panel has considered
that any penalty imposed ought
to reflect the seriousness of the
breach, and we also take into
consideration the fact that First
Bahamas Capital has taken cor-
rective action and incorporated
procedures aimed at prevent-
ing a recurrence of such an inci-
dent.

“We recommend that a fine
in the amount of $10,000 dollars
be imposed on First Bahamas
Capital, which is to be paid
within 30 days after the receipt
of this decision.”

Neither Anthony Ferguson,
CFAL’s president and princi-
pal, not Securities Commission
executive director Hillary
Deveaux, returned Tribune
Business’s calls for comment
before press deadline last night,
despite messages being left for
both men.

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS eee
Chamber unveils leading honourees

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is this week cele-
brating its Chamber Week 2010
under the theme Business
Unusual. The week-long activ-
ities will be held at the British
Colonial Hilton, starting with
a Mix ‘N Mingle Cocktail
Reception on Tuesday at
6:30pm.

The following day, the
Chamber will hold its Annual
General Meeting and luncheon,
where the keynote speaker will
be Franklyn Wilson.

Friday will see the Cham-
ber’s 39th annual awards pre-
sentation to recognize the
Chamber’s 2010 Lifetime
Achievement Recipient,
Rupert Roberts; Businessper-
sons of the Year, Christopher
and Eleutherios Tsavourssis;
Entrepreneur of the Year,
Randy Butler; and the Business
of the Year, which will be
selected from a group of distin-
guished finalists.

LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT

AWARD RECIPIENT:

Veteran businessman Rupert
Roberts will be heralded as the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s 2010 Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award recipient for his
contributions to business in the
areas of food, retail, banking
and real estate. His career and
accomplishments span over 50

|







RUPERT ROBERTS

years.
Mr Roberts opened his first
Super Value on East Street in
April 1965, with the mission of
“putting food on the Bahamian
table at the best possible price”.
The chain grew along with the
Bahamas to 11 stores and a
staff of over 550 employees.
Numerous endeavours fol-
lowed, including banking, real
estate and the Bimini Sands
Resort & Marina development.
He has assisted in many chari-
table causes and received
awards including a Paul Harris
Fellow Award from Rotary, the
Distinguished Citizen’s Award
from the Chamber of Com-
merce and also the Silver









RANDY BUTLER

Jubilee Award in Business from
the Government.

In January 2004, Mr Roberts
received the Honour Officer of
the Most Excellent Order of
the British Empire (OBE), and
in May 2005 he received the
CEE Global Awards for Ethics
and Excellence.

In June 2005, he received the
Outstanding Service Award by
the Margaret McDonald Policy
Management and Administra-
tion Centre.

ENTREPRENEUR OF

THE YEAR:

Captain Randy Butler is an
outstanding pilot who has
worked in numerous roles in
civil aviation.









FRANKLYN WILSON

Mr Butler has achieved a
‘first’? in two career paths. In
1996, he became the first
Bahamian practicing in the
Bahamas to be designated by
the Bahamas Civil Aviation
Authority as a pilot examiner,
and from 2007 to 2008 he was
the first ever manager of public
safety at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

During more than 22 years
in the aviation industry, Mr
Butler has spent seven work-
ing in the Flight Standards
Inspectorate as an aviation safe-
ty inspector. He holds US,
Canadian and Bahamas Airline
Transport Pilot Licenses with
type-ratings on the Boeing 737,



Create your future with our experience.



Lester Cox encourages

persistence.

As Lester Cox begins his day not only does he begin it early, but he begins it with the

determination to overcome any obstacles that come his way.

His love of figures and dedication to the field has led him to spend almost 23 years in
banking, with seven years spent with Royal Bank. Today he serves as RBC Director, Real

Estate Markets and Deputy, Commercial Financial Services.

Mr. Cox is responsible for RBC’s relationship management of commercial real estate clients
and also plays a key leadership role by providing coaching and managerial oversight of

the entire Commercial Financial Services Centre.

One of his biggest on-the-job challenges is being supportive and fair while advising
clients sufficiently during these tough economic times, encouraging them to use sound

judgment when managing finances.

Before joining Royal Bank, Mr. Cox worked within the banking industry as a Commercial
Account Manager, Project Manager, Branch Manager and Country Head, St. Lucia and

Retail Banking Director, Windward Islands.

Mr. Cox believes the key to a long-standing career in his field is commitment and loyalty.
“Very early on | decided that whatever happens, | would stick with it and not cut comers
and not compromise.” He advises young people considering the field of banking to,
“Take pride in your job: don’t be comfortable with mediocrity and be consistent and

persistent.”

Mr. Cox is a Fellow of the Institute of Canadian Bankers and Certified Internal Auditor
(Inactive). Married to wife, Joan, he enjoys traveling, walking, chess, board games, family
activities and speaking French. Mr. Cox attends St. Thomas More Roman Catholic Church.

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

® Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada.
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

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of Canada

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EE







CHRISTOPHER TSAVOUSSIS

Dash 8, Cessna Citation, Beech
1900 and seaplane aircraft, and
has earned eight distinctions
amongst his diplomas and cer-
tificates.

As an owner and sharehold-
er of SkyBahamas, Mr Buter is
currently the chief executive
and president with responsibil-
ity for the company’s day-to-
day management. He reports
directly to the Board, and leads
a team of highly skilled avia-
tion professionals to ensure
SkyBahamas continues to suc-
ceed in the challenging and
highly-competitive climate of
commercial aviation.

BUSINESS PERSONS OF

THE YEAR:

Brothers Christopher P.
Tsavoussis and Eleutherios
‘Terry’ Tsavoussis are seasoned
entrepreneurs and management
professionals. Their back-
grounds include new business
and human resources develop-
ment, plus strategic marketing
and planning.

They currently own and
operate Wendy’s (Bahamas)
and Marco’s Pizza. Their indi-
vidual careers span decades.
and include the successful oper-
ation of a variety of businesses
such as Dunkin Donuts, Domi-
no’s Pizza, Atlantic Satellite,
Caribbean Franchise Holdings,
Premier Homes and Aetos
Holdings.

In the past five years they
have grown the Wendy’s fran-
chise to eight locations, increas-
ing the company’s profitability
while creating numerous
employment and career oppor-
tunities for a staff boasting
some 400 persons.

They are also the Caribbean
Franchisee license holders for
Marco’s Pizza. The duo share a
vision for increased growth and



TERRY TSAVOUSSIS

sustainability, while continuing
in their commitment to con-
tribute positively to the devel-
opment of the economy of the
Bahamas.

OUTSTANDING

BUSINESS OF THE

YEAR FINALISTS:

In the category of 50 or more
employees, the nominees are:
AID - Automated Industrial
Distributors, the Bamboo
Shack and Robin Hood Enter-
prises, while in the category of
less than 50 employees, those
businesses include Glinton,
Sweeting, O’Brien, Rubins and
the Bahamas Orthodontic Cen-
tre.

LUNCHEON SPEAKER:

Franklyn Wilson, the Cham-
ber’s 2008 Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award Recipient, will be
its special guest speaker at this
year’s Annual General Meet-
ing.

Given the current economic
environment and the state of
the Bahamian economy, Mr
Wilson has been asked to
address the topic chosen for the
Week — BUSINESS UNUSU-
AL - and to provide his insight
and perspective on our current
economic dilemma and the way
forward.

As a visionary and a pioneer
of the Sunshine Boys, Mr. Wil-
son is the most constant link to
the group that has gone on to
create or manage many busi-
nesses, including but not limit-
ed to Arawak Homes; Sunshine
Insurance (Agents & Brokers);
Royal & Sun Alliance Insur-
ance (Bahamas); Purity Bak-
ery; Snack Food Wholesale;
Eleuthera Properties (owners
of over 4,600 acres of land,
including Davis Harbour Mari-
na at South Eleuthera) and
Freeport Oil.

Broker blasted for supervision...

FROM page 1B

Tracing the share trading
scheme’s origins, the Commis-
sion panel’s ruling recalled how
Commonwealth Bank had
established an Employee Stock
Option Plan (ESOP), granting
members of its management
team options to acquire the
bank’s stock at a $6 per share
price. These options were due
to expire on April 30, 2006.

During November 2005,
Wayde Bethel, a Common-
wealth Bank branch manager,
exercised his option at a time
when the bank’s shares were
trading on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX) within a price range of
$8.50-$9. Mr Bethel than
approached Mr Cox who, using
his First Bahamas Capital post,
allegedly sold the stock
acquired for $6 per share at the
higher prevailing market price,
netting Mr Bethel a profit.

He then informed other
Commonwealth Bank man-
agers of what he had done, and
the Commission panel’s ruling
found: “The Commission was
advised that sometime between
November 2005 and February
2006, Mr Cox and Mr Bethel
allegedly facilitated, and par-
ticipated in, a scheme whereby
other managers of Common-
wealth Bank (seven in total)
were able to exercise their
options under their respective
ESOPs and sell their shares to
third party purchasers, who had
unknowingly financed the exer-
cise of the options by the Com-
monwealth Bank managers.”

Outlining the scheme’s intri-
cate details, once contacted by
other managers, Mr Bethel
would advise them that their
stock options would be sold for
$8 per share, allowing them to
pocket the $2 difference
between the option price.

Once this happened, Mr
Bethel would advise Mr Cox of
how many shares would be
available, with the latter then
charged with finding buyers for
the ESOP stock. After this was
achieved, Mr Bethel would
then obtain a Power of Attor-
ney from the relevant manager
to authorise the transfer of their
shares to FirstBahamas Capi-

tal, signing himself as the Com-
monwealth Bank representa-
tive.

“Once the purported sale of
shares to the third party pur-
chaser had been conducted, the
Commonwealth Bank manager
would go through the process
of formally exercising his ESOP
with Commonwealth Bank,”
the Securities Commission’s
panel found.

“The trades in the shares
executed by Mr Cox with the
buyer, however, were execut-
ed at the prevailing market
price of the shares, which was
always above the $8 per share
agreed between the manager
and Mr Bethel.”

Once the transaction pro-
ceeds were received by Mr
Bethel, the panel found he
would then instruct his bank to
write a cheque to Common-
wealth Bank for the sum
required by each manager to
purchase his ESOP stock.

“Each Commonwealth Bank
manager would then be
instructed to provide confirma-
tion that his/her option had
been exercised,” the Commis-
sion’s panel found. “Once Mr
Bethel had received confirma-
tion of the transfer of shares to
the COmmonwealth Bank man-
ager, the confirmation would
be forwarded to FirstBahamas
Capital, and Mr Bethel would
give the Commonwealth Bank
manager a second cheque rep-
resentative of the $2 per share
profit agreed to from the sale of
the shares.

“Mr Bethel would then keep
for his own account any differ-
ence between the cost of selling
the shares at $8 per share, the
amount paid to Mr Cox, and
the market price at which the
shares were actually sold.”

The Securities Commission
panel noted that First Bahamas
Capital had its registered office
at the Alexiou, Knowles & Co
law firm, and that its directors
at the time of these events were
Anthony Ferguson and
Emanuel Alexiou.

Mr Alexiou is the principal at
Alexiou, Knowles & Co, and
both men are the principals of
A.F. Holdings, the former Col-
ina Financial Group, which is
CFAL/First Bahamas’ ultimate
parent company.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 3B



Royal Bank products
targeting 20% savings

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



ROYAL Bank of Canada yesterday
launched new products that could save
its customers who use chequing account
services as much as 20 per cent per
month, its vice-president and country
head said.

Nathaniel Beneby said RBC was the
first to bundle its packages and offer
them for a flat monthly fee.

The Royal Certified Service and Roy-
al Premier Banking packages are
designed to help those who purchase

‘We have no cash to stay in business’

them save and get the most out of those
hidden fees.

“Each package is specifically targeted
towards the needs of the individual cus-
tomer,” said RBC’s official release.

“Royal Certified Service and Royal
Premier Banking are available for a flat
fee each month, giving the client access
to RBC bank services without the sep-
arate and fluctuating bank charges.”

Mr Beneby said some of the services
that come along with the $36 Royal Cer-
tified Service are unlimited cheque
transactions, free ATM withdrawals, a
$20 rebate on annual membership fees
for an RBC credit card, preferred inter-

est rates and an annual discount on safe-
ty deposit boxes.

The $31 Royal Premier Banking
package includes 10 free cheque trans-
actions and four free ATM withdrawals
per month, and offers a discounted rate
for new Royal Premier Personal loans.

“RBC is the only bank in the
Bahamas currently offering customers
the ability to pay one flat fee for a bun-
dle of banking services,” Mr Beneby
said.

“The introduction of the Royal Cer-
tified Service and Royal Premier Bank-
ing comes at a time when there is height-
ened awareness and concern surround-

ing the rising cost of living.

“We recognise and empathiae with
this concern, and constantly seek ways
to deliver our services to clients more
efficiently while keeping fees reason-
able.”

Individuals who choose to purchase
RBC’s Royal Certified Service and Roy-
al Premier Banking package are eligible
for as much as 1.5 per cent and one
quarter respectively off of a Royal Pre-
mier Personal Loan.

“The Royal Certified Service and
Royal Premier Banking is less than cus-
tomers would normally pay for all sep-
arate services,” said Mr Beneby.

FROM page 1B

It’s stressful days. The majority
of them took it well.

“T’ve done my best. I didn’t
want it to come to this today,
but we’ve got to be practical.
It’s very sad that 55 people
have been told today: ‘Don’t
come to work any more’. That’s
going to affect a lot of lives
here, and when all this is over I
hope to help them find new
jobs.”

Mr Simpson said some two
staff would be retained to pro-
tect inventory at the Home
Centre, with another three act-
ing in a security capacity at the
company’s concrete plant. The
company’s main asset is a 127-
acre tract of land in Freeport,
which has been valued at $4.95
million, based on a forecast that
it could generate $6.6 million
in revenues per annum if used
for a limestone aggregate quar-

“Even though I’m not get-
ting paid I’m staying on,” Mr
Simpson said. “I’ve got to get a

few things sorted out while
going through this EGM and
voluntary liquidation process.

“We're going to do our best
by Friday this week to pay the
staff everything they’re owed
up to today. There’s no sever-
ance pay, there’s no vacation
pay. That will all be worked out
and the liquidator will take care
of that need. They’ve all been
terminated today with a termi-
nation letter. You have to have
a cut off period.”

In reality, the writing has
been on the wall for Freeport
Concrete for some time, as pre-
viously revealed by Tribune
Business, which detailed both
the $3 million fund raising plea
and the “zero interest” from
the company’s shareholders in
investing any more funds.

Without cash to fund Home
Centre inventory purchases,
and offers to acquire the com-
pany and/or its 127-acre plot
failing to materialise into firm
bids, the company had little
choice but to cease trading.

Its chairman, former Grand

Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) chair Hannes Babak,
who holds 43 per cent of the
firm's shares, also let it be
known that he was unwilling to
invest any more of his personal
funds.

Mr Simpson previously said
Mr Babak "is not prepared to
subscribe for more shares as he
has already assisted the com-
pany financially with regards to
personal bank guarantees for
the company's line of credit at
the bank, as well as allowing
the Home Centre to remain in
his building without paying any
rent for the past 16 months”.

Mr Babak owns the Home
Centre, and among the senior
creditors in any liquidation are
likely to be FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas),
which has secured its $2 mil-
lion exposure, and the Govern-
ment. Everyone else will have
to wait in line.

Freeport Concrete suffered
a $636,000 net loss in its 2010
second quarter that leaves it
with negative net worth of

$855,000.

In a previous message, Mr
Simpson said: “Currently, our
inventory value at the Home
Centre is only $575,000 and our
daily sales are insufficient to
cover our expenses resulting in
losses every day. With the cash
to be able to buy all of the
inventory that we know will
move quickly off our shelves,
we will see an immediate
increase in our daily sales.

"We have proven this can be
done because in April one of
our suppliers shipped us sever-
al containers of building mate-
rials, and we saw our sales
increase by 63 per cent over the
previous two months’ sales. If
we had been able to purchase
other inventory such as major
appliances, ac mini splits,
plumbing and electrical sup-
plies, carpet, laminate flooring,
lighting, fans, hardware etc, etc
our daily sales average would
have increased substantially.”



Copper jumps
after China eases
currency policy

By The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Cop-
per prices are rising as traders
anticipate that demand for the
industrial metal will increase
because of China's decision to
ease its currency policy.

Copper for September deliv-
ery gained 5.8 cents to settle at
$2.9595 a pound Monday after
jumping as much as 15 cents
earlier in the day.

Most commodities are fol-
lowing a similar pattern, giving
up some or all of their early
gains to settle either slightly
higher or lower.

China says it will allow the
yuan to appreciate against the
dollar. That could help spur
demand for commodities since
they are priced in dollars, mak-
ing them relatively cheaper to
foreign investors when the dol-
lar weakens.

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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Senior Manager, Accounts in the Finance
Division.

The Senior Manager - Accounts oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget &
Management Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective
delivery of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Compilation of the corporate budget;

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets;
Preparation of monthly management statements;

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation;
Preparation of performance reports for division ,department and sections;
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables

(capital contributions, rechargeable);

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices;
Liaison with internal and external audits;

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial Officer for the Board of Directors;

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required;
Preparation of the business plan for the department;

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department;
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims;
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management,

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment;

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form
employee’s salaries;

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable;
Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts;

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle
repayments,

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule;

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans;

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to
ensure adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors;
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors;

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and
External Auditors;

Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline.

Conducting performance appraisals; and

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff,
manage and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting
ACCA/CPA or equivalent qualifications;

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a
similar management position;

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices;

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications;

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing
systems;

Ability to analyze financial reports;

Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial
software and the system of internal control;

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability;

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; and
Good time management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and_ returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

Friday, June 25, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
































COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
I

2010

N THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00170

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST of the Settlement of
Bahama Sound No. 11 of the Island of Great Exuma one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of-

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a

PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





Private airline
assessing initial
public offering

FROM page 1B

of Commerce’s 2010 Entrepre-
neur of the Year, added that
Sky Bahamas was also set to
expand its fleet from five to six
aircraft in the next month, with
the acquisition of a $1.4 million
33-seater Saab-340 in July.

He told Tribune Business of
the airline’s revenue perfor-
mance: “We went $9.7 million
this last year, and while the cap-
ital projects - the hangar and
the new aircraft - will change
the books a bit, other than that
we’re really going to grow.

“We're hoping to do an IPO
next year. We had a meeting
about that on Saturday, and
we’ve just got a group coming
in to do an evaluation and price
it.”

Mr Butler explained that he
and Sky Bahamas’ ownership
group would await the evalua-
tion’s results, assess the market
and potential investor demand,
and then decide whether they
retained a majority share or

effectively handed over control
to another group or public
investors via an IPO.

“We've already plotted the
course for the next six months,”
Mr Butler added. “We hope the
Government looks and sees the
importance of these private air-
lines, how many people they
employ and how they develop
the economy.”

Sky Bahamas’ monthly wage
bill was some $218,000, some
$2.616 million per year for the
company’s 91 full-time and
eight part-time staff, and Mr
Butler said he and the other
owners were “definitely over
$16 million into this now” in
terms of their collective invest-
ment.

They took over operational-
ly at Sky Bahamas on Septem-
ber 1, 2008, having completed
its purchase from the Rolle
family in July/August that year,
and are now “continuing what
they dreamed of. They decided
to sell out, and we came along
and took it to new levels”.

Mr Butler said at the time of
the acquisition, Sky Bahamas
was mainly focused on provid-
ing charters for Bahamasair and
the Georgetown, Exuma route.
Now it had expanded to 31
flights per day, and the carrier
had either obtained, or was
close to obtaining, demand and
scheduled approvals to provide
charter/regular flights from the
Bahamas to the US.

Demand approvals for char-
ter flights have been in hand
for six months, and Mr Butler
told Tribune Business: “We’re
about to get scheduled approval
from the Bahamas for the US,
and then we will be doing reg-
ular scheduled flights from Cat
Island, Exuma and Abaco to
Fort Lauderdale [for the for-
mer two destinations] and West
Palm Beach respectively.

“We’re looking at winter
2010 for the start of these, and
are negotiating with hotels and
tour groups.”

Sky Bahamas is already fly-
ing direct from Freeport to

Providenciales in the Turks &
Caicos twice a week, and pro-
viding twice monthly charters
for the Sandals resort chain
between Exuma and Jamaica.

“We have approvals to fly to
Andros, Eleuthera and Long
Island, but have not started
them,” Captain Butler said.
“We will launch Andros very
soon with the All-Andros
Regatta on July 8, 9 and 10. We
have another new airplane that
will be here on July 12.”

Sky Bahamas’ new 140 feet
by 140 feet maintenance
hangar, which will be con-
structed over its existing LPIA
site, will have its groundbreak-
ing in August. Captain Butler
said this investment was part
of a strategy to keep heavy duty
maintenance of Sky Bahamas’
planes in the Bahamas, keep-
ing money in the economy and
helping the company’s appren-
ticeship programme, which
aims to get more young
Bahamians involved in the
industry.
































Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Receptionist for Office Building

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Reevers Turnquest claims
to be the owner of the fee simple estate in possession of the
said piece or parcel of land free from encumbrances. And the
Petitioner had made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said piece parcel or tract of
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Candidate must have excellent customer
service skills, and be computer literate.
Must have experience in a customer
service related role. Candidate
should be well groomed, mature and
self-motivated.

AND TAKE NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
a Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on before the thirtieth (30) day
after the last day of publication file a Notice in the Supreme Court
within the City of Nassau and serve on the Petitioner or the un-
dersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified
by an Affidavit to be titled therewith. Failure on any such person
to file and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the 22nd day of
July A.D., 2010 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Security Officer for
Office Building

Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and
have excellent verbal and _ written
communication skills. Candidate must be
willing to work weekends and extended
hours and have own transportation.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that copies of the files plan
may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas on the Second Floor of the Ansbacher Build-
ing situate at East Street and Bank Lane on the Island of New
Providence;

2. The Chambers of Messrs Lewis & Longley Chambers, East
Bay Street Shopping Centre, East Bay Street, New Providence:
3. The Office of the Administrator at Queens Hwy, in the settle-
ment of George Town, on the Island of Exuma, The Bahamas.
Dated the 31st day of May, A.D., 2010

Interested applicants should respond by
sending their resume to:

DA# 87780, c/o
The Tribune,

P.O. Box N-.3027,
Nassau, Bahamas

Lewis & Longley, Chambers
East Bay Shopping Centre, East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

. FG CAP

[TAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

¥T. £3 I 1 AA Te

ROYAL FIDELITY

onde an ark

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 21 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.32 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -51.06 | YTD % -3.33
FINDEX: CLOSE 0600.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.250
0.050
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S$)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 5
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid & Ask & Last Price, Daily Valk.
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months %
2.54 7.00
0.52 -0.11
1.86 4.63
2.57 -4.99
2.03 5.56
3.45
3.99
2.10
2.22
2.23
1.78

Previous Close Today's Close Change

0.27
5.59

0.27
5.59
10.00

5S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

52wkiLow EPS $
-2.945

Div S
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E Yield

0.000
0.001

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV
1.4752
2.9020
1.5352
3.0368

13.6388
107.5706
105.7706

1.1127

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, q

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve: Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

1.3787
2.8266
1.4672
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000

31-May-10
30-Apr-10
4-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-Mar-10

6.99
13.50
5.19

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

1.0917
1.1150
9.5078

6.29
5.65
6.39
10.0000 10.2744 -4.61

8.15 31-Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

58.37 31-Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - C1
Change - Change i
Daily Vol. - Number

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

jay's weighted price for daily volume

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

fal shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends py re paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

‘Criminal penalties’ bar to
Commission regulatory actions

on the regulator’s complaint against former broker Hiram Cox,
decided to end the proceedings on a point raised by neither of the
parties.

In reviewing its authority to hear a complaint about alleged
breaches of Securities Industry Act provisions that carried crimi-
nal penalties, the finding stated: “The panel considered whether
there could be administrative hearings of matters concerning
breaches provisions that carry criminal penalties.

“The panel concluded that it may only do so provided that the
Act expressly authorises the same. As the Act does not include an
express provision authorising the Commission to also institute
regulatory action for provisions that carry criminal penalties, the
formal complaint against Hiram Cox is hereby discontinued.”

Charles Mackay, Mr Cox’s attorney, had also challenged the
Securities Commission panel’s jurisdiction to hear the matter,
arguing that it was “not a court empowered to hear criminal mat-
ters”, given that the alleged breach carried criminal penalties.

In response, Gawaine Ward, the Securities Commission’s in-
house legal counsel, argued that the panel was authorised by the
Securities Industry Act to conduct hearings involving alleged
breaches of the Act and/or its regulations.

With the Act as the main legislation, he argued that the panel
was “well within its jurisdiction” to hear complaints, with the
Securities Commission authorised to hold regulatory hearings on
alleged breaches.

On this point, the panel found in favour of Mr Ward, ruling that
it was empowered to conduct regulatory hearings “concerning
breaches of the Act or regulations”.

awa
2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING
ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET

Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.
WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 Li? bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 557-5908

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VIRGINA CHAN of
VILLAGE ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15" day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

LOULOUTTE NOIRE LTD.

with
International Busi-
ness Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), the
Dissoluton of LOULOUTTE NOIRE LTD. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of
the dissolution was the 20th Day of April, 2010

Notice is hereby given in accordance

Section 137 (8) of the

ee, ee

PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Liquidator

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

Fed to keep rates
at record lows
as risks loom

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 5B



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LMA Investment Fund Ltd. (BC No. 157581 B) is in
dissolution. Mrs. AlrenaMoxeyis in the Liquidator and can be contact-
ed at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough
& Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons

having claims against the above-named company are required to send

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON — Feder-
al Reserve policymakers open a
two-day meeting Tuesday amid
signs of caution for the recov-
ery: Europe's debt crisis, an
edgy Wall Street, cautious con-
sumers, a fragile housing mar-
ket and high unemployment.

That's why the Fed is sure to
leave its key bank lending rate
at record lows, keeping rates
on certain credit cards and con-
sumer loans low, too.

At the same time, the econ-
omy is offering some cause for
optimism. The economy has
been growing again for nearly a
year. Manufacturing activity is
strengthening. Businesses are
spending more. And Fed Chair-
man Ben Bernanke has
expressed confidence that coun-
try won't fall back into a "dou-
ble dip” recession.

Yet he and other Fed offi-
cials acknowledge the recovery
remains vulnerable to shocks.
Mindful of the risks, the Fed is
all but certain to keep its bank
lending rate between zero and
0.25 per cent. It's remained at
that level since December 2008.

Assuming the Fed leaves
rates alone, commercial banks'
prime lending rate, used to peg
rates on consumer loans, will
stay about 3.25 per cent. That's
its lowest point in decades.

Super-low rates serve bor-
rowers who qualify for loans
and are willing to take on more
debt. But they hurt savers. Low
rates are especially hard on
people living on fixed incomes
who are earning scant returns
on their savings.

Still, if rock-bottom rates
spur Americans to spend more,
they will help invigorate the
economy. That's why the Fed
also is expected to repeat its
pledge — in place for more
than a year — to keep rates at
record lows for an "extended
period.”

"The Fed is looking at a
struggling, not a booming,
economy,” said Kurt Karl, chief
US economist at Swiss Re. “It
will be on hold indefinitely,"
he predicts.

With inflation tame, the Fed
has leeway to Keep rates at
rates at record lows. In fact, giv-
en the risks to the recovery
both at home and overseas,
economists increasingly say the
Fed probably won't start boost-
ing rates until next year — or
possibly into 2012. That's a
change from just a few months
ago, when economists thought
the Fed would begin raising
rates at the end of this year.

China's decision to let it cur-
rency, the yuan, rise in value
could help sales of US exports
by making them less expensive
to Chinese buyers. Doing so

would help support the US
recovery and could help offset a
decline in US export growth to
Europe. Still, questions remain
about how much Beijing is will-
ing to let its currency rise —
and how quickly.

If the US recovery were to
flash signs of a relapse, the Fed
would likely take other steps
to get it back on course. The
Fed has left the door open to
resuming purchases of mort-
gage securities, a move that
would drive down mortgage
rates and bolster the housing
market. It ended a $1.25 tril-
lion mortgage-buying pro-
gramme in March.

A less likely step would be
for the Fed to resume buying
Treasury securities, a step it
took during the crisis. Critics
on Capitol Hill and elsewhere
alleged the Fed was doing this
to bankroll the federal govern-
ment's record high deficits. The
Fed said its government-debt
buying programme was aimed
at lowering a range of rates to
help revive the economy.

"There are still some arrows
in the Fed's easing quiver," said
Sherry Cooper, chief economist
at BMO Capital Markets and
BMO Nesbitt Burns.

But the economy would have
to face a major threat for the
Fed to roll them out. Some
inside the Fed who worry that
easy money could spur infla-

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK I - BANK RECONCILIATION

FINANCE DIVISION

tion are already uneasy. One
of them, Thomas Hoenig, pres-
ident of the Federal Reserve
Bank of Kansas City, has dis-
sented for three straight meet-
ings from the Fed's decision to
retain the "extended period"
pledge.

Besides inflation, Hoenig has
said he fears keeping rates too
low for too long could lead to
excessive risk-taking by
investors, feeding speculative
bubbles in the prices of assets
like stocks, bonds and com-
modities.

After suffering the worst
recession since the 1930s, the
economy has been growing for
about a year. Yet the pace has-
n't been robust enough to drive
down unemployment, now at
9.7 per cent. The rate is expect-
ed to stay high through this
year and next. As a result, con-
sumers have been cautious
about spending. In May, retail
spending fell by the largest
amount in eight months.

On top of that, debt woes by
overextended countries in
Europe have rattled Wall Street
investors. Stock market losses
are likely to keep consumers
cautious.

"The Fed will strike an opti-
mistic tone that the recovery is
unfolding, but it will balance
that message with all the risks,"
said James O'Sullivan, econo-
mist at MF Global.

their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before June 24th, 2010.

Alrena Moxey
Liquidator

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000

No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, (No. 45 of 2000), ARKUS OVERSEAS LIMITED
is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the
Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box
1906, Belize City, Belize. All persons having claims against the
above to the Liquidator before June 28th, 2010.

J ohn B. Forester
Liquidator



White

BR feiatxeton

complete
with tub, round basin
& round toilet

starting from

68 £9

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II
Bank Reconciliation, in the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:
° Preparing bank reconciliation for assigned bank accounts;

Preparing journal entries for accounting adjustments and banking
transactions (e.g., transfers between bank accounts, bank charges, re
turned checks);

Entering cash receipts postings in journals for proper allocation within
the general ledger;

Providing source data with regards to employee and other returned
checks;

Acting as liaison between Customer Services departments to prepare
listings of returned cheques; and

Elongated Toilet
complete/white

15138

Maintaining procedures filing system for such items as: canceled checks,

bank advice, memos and statements. Round Toilet complete

[Os 2
Job requirements include:

° A minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Accounting/Business or
equivalent in General Accounting/Fundamentals;

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of Check Reconciliation module within

the HTE environment; =

6” Double Sink Set
complete

ree helo

A” spread Pedestal Bowl
& Base complete/white

ae eo

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on

or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.

Ensemble Vikrell Gibraltar White

Soaker White Tub (5’X36”) Tub only

L/H& R/H 499 29 S) 7520
| me
Kelly’s "Ss.

Feo L waa eo aeia)
Monday-Friday 7:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 7:00am-9:00pm
RSET Ce ley Poor re |
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#018-5000-00
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ark ECS 393-4002
Fax: (242) 393-4096







GN 1071

SUPREME COURT

COMBOS 4 EAL TH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVTSEOM

hie EDP ROW prea?

Wher BIRLA WAWAR MLLER of Marigsh! Fars Peed in the Eel District
of the [sland of Mew Prowidemce onc of the Islands of the (Conm=erencalth of The Geahomeas
bas moe applecaiion io ihe Supreme Court of The Bohaones. for letters of achministoutiom of thee
Keal ant Pesoral Esiaic of WILLLAM MILLER ata. WILLIE MILLER aka
WHA CAMIMEEL I. MILLER lave of Persis Rogers Home io the Westen Disunes of
the [sland of Hew Providence, one of the Islands of che Commonwealch of [Ube Hohanes,
deceas ch

Maio: is Rerchy given thal aach applicagions will be heand by the aad) Court ol the

eqnirstiog of 14 dovs from the date hereof.

pels Macy

tS come
Ls

(for) Repistrar

COMMONWEALTH CF THE BAR ARLAS
THE sUTREME COURT
PROBATE DVIStOM

els, AP EO fin pers

Whereas LECIA LYNETTE RUSSELL of Bo. 19 Argel Heed, Eastwood
Subdivision in the Fasten District of the Island of Many Poreience ore of the islands of the
Commonwealeh of The Aoheenos has: made application lode Seprems Court of The Bakers,
for ietiors of administration oF the Real om Personal Fee of LINDA E. RUSSELL oe.
LINDA ELIZAARETH RUSSELL aka LINDA KIPSSELL Its of Mo. 09 tounge! Pood.
Eestwend Sebdivicaen in the Esai Distinct of the [sland of Bew Protence., one ol che

ldlands cl the Camemrnnnwealis of The Gahan. deceased.

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 7B



aS
France, Germany want

ereater financial regulation

PARIS (AP) — The leaders
of France and Germany teamed
up Monday to present a joint
position on how rich and
emerging nations should work
toward greater regulation of the
financial sector at a summit in
Toronto this weekend.

"Recent turbulence has
demonstrated that there is still
much to be done to ensure
financial stability,” French Pres-
ident Nicolas Sarkozy and Ger-
man Chancellor Angela Merkel
wrote in a joint letter to Cana-
dian Prime Minister Stephen
Harper, whose country is host-
ing the G-20 summit June 26-27
in Toronto.

Sarkozy and Merkel have
recently taken pains to high-
light their common ground in

fighting to increase stability in
financial markets, despite their
recent differences over the
bailout packages for Greece
and the eurozone.

Basing their letter in large
part on the conclusions of a
European Union summit last
week, Sarkozy and Merkel
pushed for G-20 leaders to
work on a global tax on finan-
cial transactions. The tax isn't
popular outside Europe, and it
is still unclear how it would
work worldwide.

Sarkozy and Merkel also
want G-20 leaders to work on
an international levy on banks,
in part to "encourage the pre-
vention of systematic risks," the
letter said.

EU leaders have already

decided in principle to intro-
duce such a levy on banks in
Europe.

Leaders should also go pub-
lic with the results of "stress
tests" checking the stability of
banks, a move the European
Union plans to make next
month, Sarkozy and Merkel
said.

G-20 countries should craft
a joint response on the chal-
lenges posed by credit default
swaps, and work on a "frame-
work for supervision and rules
to improve the process of cred-
it rating,” the letter said.

The letter also suggests push-
ing for an updated list of global
tax havens and a list of financial
centers that refuse to meet
international standards.



Royal Bank sees bad loan slowing

FROM page 1B

increase and Citibank a $150,000 increase.

Mr Beneby said there was effective oversight
by the Central Bank, and enough capital in the
sector, to ensure that the Government’s fee
increases will not adversely affect banks.

He added that the original fees paid by
Bahamian banks have been some of the lowest in
the region.

Both ScotiaBank and FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) have seen imposed on
them the highest increase of the eight retail
banks, now paying $3.75 million each in fees, up
$1.2 million from the 2009-2010 Budget year.

Royal Bank of Canada saw an increase of
$800,000 to $2.4 million, while Commonwealth
Bank saw a $600,000 increase.

The Finance Corporation of the Bahamas and
Bank of the Bahamas both saw increases of
$400,000, while Fidelity received a $200,000

SONAL

id

Mr Beneby said, however, that the stabilisation
of growth in RBC’s non-accrual loan portfolio
could mean that the worst of the economic prob-
lems could be “behind us”, though no trend to
support that has emerged.

“We see some settling down of the non-per-
forming loans, but it is too early to say that the
recession is behind us and we are out of the
woods with these impaired assets because trends
have not been established yet,” he said. “Of
course we (The Bahamas) are still challenged
with high rates of unemployment.”

Mr Beneby said some customers have taken
advantage of concessions RBC put in place to
assist them in keeping their loans current.

“However, to see an improvement in the over-
all non-accrual loans we will have to see an
improvement in the economy,” he said.

NOTICE TO PENSIONERS

iN re July pension payments will not be made to
ANCE

pensioners who are overdue for verification

The National Insurance Act requires all pensioners = 1e., recipients of monthly benefit

Notice iz berchy given thar seach applications will be heard by dhe sad Lice at the

andl assistance payments = to preluce evidence of theit continuing eligibility to receive

expingion of 14 days from the date bereo!, : : a; 7 ;
such payments twice each year — during their birth month and six months thereafter. In

this regard, pensioners who have not been verified within the last seven months are

My test ta

(Gor) Barpisorar

advised that after the June PALETTE Pe fed, no further pension cheques will be issued to
them - either through bank accounts or through pay stations in the Famuly Islands - until
they have submitted themselves to the verification process.

OOMAONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

In order te avoid the suspension of payments, pensioners are urged to submit to the
verification process on or before June 30,2010. Payments to pensioners who fal to be
ho. 201 PROM AMISBT verlfied on of before this date will be suspended, and will be resumed only after they have

been verified. Pensioners whose PATA au dep sited to hank accounts who ate verified
Wheres IDELL RUTH SMITH of Sea Beech Estaces im che Island of New

after the deadline, will not get a payment during the July payment period but will have to
Providence one of the Isiandk: of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas bas made application to wait instead for the August deposits.

the Sapreme Cour.of The Bahames. for leteers of adeninisination of tee Heal and Personal Estnte

/ To be verified, Pensioners inaly present themselves to any One of NIB’s Local Offices, or,
of NELSON PL SMITH late of Sea Beach Estces in the Island of New Prowiderme, ome of

preferably, they may download a Form B75b (for those 1 in teceipt of Benefit) or BT 5a (for

dhe: Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahacniet, decrsecd

those in receipt of Assistance) from NIB's website, , complete it

Notice is hereby given that sach applications will be leard bby che said Comm ot the and have it validated by any one of a number of “Sanetioged Anthwrites. “Tn addition to an

Officer of the National Insurance Board, a Sanctioned Authority can be a Counsel or

expirm@ion of 14 dows Grom the date erect
Attorney of the Supreme Court; a Public Officer above the rank of Assistant Head of

Department; an ordained Minster of Religion; a Bank Manager; Magistrate; or Justice of
the Peace, who is not a member of the Pensioner’s immediate family. In the case of
Pensioners who reside outside The Bahamas, a sanctioned anthony may also be a Notary
Public, a Lawyer, or a Chief of Police.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BATAMAS.
THE SUPREME COURT
FRGRATE OY TSTCh

Or Estate )

ie Ce Om eM CCU ema |] bs

Whereas CASSIETTA Z. MCINTOSH, of the Ciy of Frosput on the Is! of Everywhere The Buyers Are!
Grind Ratuma. one of the Islnd of the Commonwealth of The Ashames, the Adiomey by 7 "a 5 oa

Deed of Power of for Thenda Mellninsh, the lavdel widew of the deoousnd has made
application te the Sapreme Couct of The Bahamas, for Lenere of Administration af the Real ond
Personal Estete of SEAN DELANO MCINTOSH, lite of 82 Sandecrsbe Drive im the Cloy of
Fregport om the Ialind of Grand Bahama, one of the lalemds of The Commonwealth of The
Babamnes

Notice is hereby given thet such applications will be bicard by the sabd Cowart at the

exparétion of 20 daya from the dabe heresf - —

Tel: Mere

for ad rates

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 9B



The Tribune



neaith



Taking care of your pets €>

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

ousehold pets can
H make you feel all

warm and cozy
inside, and become your
best friend. They provide
irresistible love when you
come home after a long
day, and can teach you the
importance of nurturing,
even though they can’t
speak.

It’s for these reasons and more
that these furry friends can be a won-
derful addition to your household,
said Dr Dwight Dorsett of Nassau
Pet Clinic.

But once they are yours, you must
invest time and money into ensuring
their overall well-being, that is, feed-
ing, cleaning, and routine checkups is
taken care of.

What goes into your pet’s body is
vital. They must be given an appro-
priate diet and you must invest
proper time in feeding and cleaning



them.

Keep in mind that animals can
only eat what is made for them. A
dog should eat food that is specially
mixed for them. Cats can have
canned tuna, and dry cat food.

“Pay attention to signs that they
may be sick,” said Dr Dorsett. And
this can happen if you are feeding
them what is not recommended, like
the scrapings from last night’s din-
ner.

Fleas and ticks are the most com-
mon problems pet owners complain
about, said Dr Dorsett. With dogs,
you should treat their coat for these
pests with dog dip for at least three
days.

Heartworm is a major disease that
is preventable in dogs, but is one of
the main causes of death in these
animals.

According to Dr Dorsett, dogs
should get two meals a day. They
should be given bottled water, or
tap water that has been properly dis-
tilled or sanitised through boiling.

At the onset, dogs and cats do
need milk to sip on, but once they’ve
outgrown the infantile stage, having
milk is unnecessary on a regular
basis. At this point, milk is offered

as a treat, said Dr Dorsett.

“For their nutritional needs, I
advocate giving them dry dog food,”
said Dr Dorsett. “This is important
because a lot of times we prepare
foods that have a lot of greasy stuff
which is unnecessary,” he explained.

Dr Dorsett says pet owners
shouldn’t think for a second that
their pets will get tired of dog food.
“Tf you eat crackers everyday, you
won’t eat it enthusiastically, but you
will eat it,” said Dr Dorsett.

As far as cleaning their fur coats,
bathing your dog once every 10 to 14
days is recommended, unless you
have an infestation of external par-
asites, where it is recommended that
you bathe them on a modified sched-
ule on a weekly basis.

House animals should have access
to green spaces to excrete and elim-
inate their waste. If you do that,
you reduce the number of accidents
that occur in your home.

“The rule of thumb is that if the
pet is sleeping in your room, you
should know whether or not it is safe
to have them sleeping with you,”
said Dr Dorsett.

The possibility of your dog or cat
getting into mischief like chewing

on your couch and on your shoes,
is always likely if they are not
trained. If this is the case, these ani-
mals should be kept away until they
have matured, where they can roam
freely through your house.

But if your dog can’t be left home
alone, then you should consider con-
finement, putting them in a kennel
or some holding space where they
will have proper air control.

Cats

Getting a cat to eat rodents, specif-
ically mice and lizards, is not a rea-
son to have them in your home, said
Dr Dorsett; but cats are less high
maintenance than dogs are.

For cats, water and dry cat food
are essential for daily living. Giving
them tuna is a personal choice, and
as a treat is optional as well. But
for the most part, once a cat has
reached adulthood they should be
weaned off of milk.

Studies suggest that healthy cats
spend § to 15 per cent of their wak-
ing time grooming themselves.

“Being depressed is one of the red
flags that they may have an infec-
tion,” said Dr Dorsett. “When you



aL

discover this change in your cat’s
mood, just feel for any tension in
their abdomen. That can be sugges-
tive of an animal who may be
blocked.”

Male cats are predisposed to get-
ting urinary tract infections, where
they have problems urinating on a
regular basis.

“Cats groom themselves,” said Dr
Dorsett. “You don’t have to bathe a
cat as you would a dog, but you have
to make sure you have measures in
place to control external parasites.
And it’s better to use residual prod-
ucts to control ticks.

“Advantage and Frontline Plus
products for cats are necessary in
cleaning your cat,” said Dr Dorsett.
What’s more is that while these
products are made for cats, they can
be used on dogs as well by applying
to the skin and repel insects for up to
a month.

Pet owners are recommended to
look over their animals everyday to
get accustomed to what is normal
and abnormal. “Feel your animal
and take note of any change. It takes
less than five minutes, says Dr
Dorsett.



JACK'S favourite bromeliad is
Archmea fulgens, also called Coral.



Bromeliads

MOST home gardeners grow a little of
whatever they fancy while others tend to
specialise and grow a great number of
varieties of one particular plant. Orchids
are very popular in this respect, as are
roses and African violets.

In The Bahamas, I have noted that
bromeliads are popular specialty plants.
You can only appreciate the tremen-
dous range within a particular species
when you collect and grow many.

All wild bromeliads in The Bahamas
are epiphytic, the main ones being
Tillandsias: shallot (T. caput-medusae,
found mostly in arid coastal areas); spi-
ral airplant (T flexuosa, also found in
coastal areas); T. utriculata, a large trif-
fid-like denizen of coppice land; and
Spanish moss (T. usneoides) which is
also found in the same areas as the shal-
lot and spiral airplant. It must be said
that native Bahamian bromeliads are
not as spectacular as many of the exotic
varieties but they do have their own
charm.

Bromeliads are divided into several
species and cultivars such as Aechmea,
Ananas, Billbergia, Cryptanthus, Guz-
mania, Neorelgia, Pitcairnia, Puya,
Tillandsia and Vriesia, all of which are
native to the Americas with the excep-
tion of Pitcairnia. As you might expect,

this comes from the Pitcairn Islands.

It is convenient to refer to the inflo-
rescences of bromeliads as flowers but
they are really composed of bracts, or
modified leaves. The true flowers are
often diminutive and usually blue. Epi-
phytic bromeliads use their roots to fix
themselves in place and these roots do
not absorb water and nutrients. This is
done through specialised cells in the low-
er parts of the plant and in particular
those with a cylindrical shape designed
to trap rainwater.

Those bromeliads that grow in the
ground need good drainage and very lit-
tle in the way of fertiliser. If bromeli-
ads are grown under trees they usually
receive enough in the way of nutrients
from effluvia washed down by rain.

Some bromeliads aficionados soak
dead leaves in water to make a ‘tea’ that
satisfies the needs of most bromeliads. It
is very easy to over-fertilise bromeliads.
A half-strength soluble orchid fertiliser
can be used very sparingly.

The prime requirement for bromeliads
is shade. They should be grown under
(or in) trees or on the north side of a
wall or building.

When you buy a bromeliad from a
nursery it will probably be in flower, no
matter what time of the year. Nurseries

(SY GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack





are able to regulate light and nutritional
bromeliads will be governed by prevail-

ing natural conditions and tend to
flower in late spring and early summer.

to be spectacular. The really attractive

these are the A. fasciata or Silver Vase

that has a very large red inflorescence.

shade there are exceptions. Pineapple

plants that are ideal for growing in gar-
den conditions.
Large bromeliads have a life cycle of

size to the mother plant.

taken from the ground and separated,

eee deere eeeaeesesanenerenseenenseeneee

Dily skin and acne

WHAT can I do about my
oily skin and breakouts? Acne
and oily skin are some of the
most alienating skin condi-
tions.

They can cause frustration,
irritation, physical and even
emotional scars. Don't think
these issues are just for teens:
eighty-five per cent of people
suffer from adult acne, mak-
ing it one of the most com-
mon skin disorders in the
United States. Before diving

: into treatments for oily skin
: and acne, it's critical to under-
* stand their root causes so
* proper treatment can be
: delivered for targeted results.

: What causes oily skin?

Sebum (oil) production is

: controlled by androgen hor-

} ! mones. Oils help lubricate

: skin, protecting it from envi-
+ ronmental assaults (such as
: extreme weather conditions).
: Excess androgen hormones
: (due to puberty, monthly
: cycles or menopause) trigger
: an overproduction of oil, cre-
: ating a shiny appearance.

: How does oily skin con-
: tribute to acne?

When sebaceous (oil)

: glands produce too much oil,
: it spills onto the skin's sur-
: face, creating a slick, greasy
+ appearance. This excess oil
acts as a binder, holding on
: to dead skin cells that were
* meant to be shed.

The follicle becomes

: clogged with a mixture of oil
: and dead skin cells, prohibit-
* ing oxygen from entering.

requirements. Once in the yard your p Eis Creat hep re bro
4 7 yam 2 : ing ground for bacteria, which

: leads to swelling, redness and
: inflammation around the fol-

Bromeliad lovers often dote on + licle, resulting in acne.

obscure and unattractive specimens but : Olvelianlacneadhs
most of the rest of us like our bromeliads + y y

bromeliads are often Aechmeas. Among : ll fe ae

that has a dramatic pink inflorescence : oe suelras
protruding from a leaf base with silver : :

markings, and A. fulgens or Coral Berry : skin to produce even more oil

Although most bromeliads prefer : than before, as the sebaceous
: glands go into overdrive in

(Ananas) is a bromeliad and in addition + ee oe us eta yes ue
to the large edible varieties there are : cereals thee aon a
many attractive miniature pineapple Day often lelt dehydrated, irri-

Ironically, this can cause

: tated and sensitised.

two to three years. After flowering they : aan A qee eae is actu-
die but before doing so they produce : any CES GS Is HAS:

small offspring called ‘pups’ that will car- ¢

ry on the family name. It is best to leave : ae eect = see
these pups in place until they are close in: Wilteneads that have reache
: the skin's surface and opened

At this point mother and pups can be ; up, allowing oxygen to enter

: the follicle. This causes the

the pups being replanted. Use a sterile + debris within the follicle to

knife when separating mother and pups ; undergo a chemical reaction

as well as a long-sleeved shirt — most : known as oxidation (think of

bromeliads have leaves with spiky edges. : browa when exposed (o-ain),

Blackheads, also known as

a freshly cut apple turning

Se eestecs see preeste teeta es eee erect ees : leading to the dark colour.

¢ gardenerjack@coralwave.com

Whiteheads, also known as





closed comedones, are folli-
cles that are filled with the
same debris, but have only
microscopic opening to the
skin's surface. Since the air
cannot reach the follicle, the
debris is not oxicated, and
remains white.

Myth#3: Sugary, refined
foods contribute to acne.

Many people accept the
myth that what they're eating
causes their skin condition.
This is a misinterpretation-
these foods don't directly
cause acne, but they do feed
the breeding ground for acne
by increasing sebum produc-
tion.

Proper treatment for results
A professional skin thera-
pist can help jumpstart skin
clearing and recover skin
health. Before beginning,
your skin therapist will per-
form Face Mapping zone-by-
zone skin analysis to deter-
mine if skin is dry or dehy-
drated, and then create a cus-
tomised treatment around
your specific needs that very
day!
Ultrasonic: This professional
device delivers advanced deep
cleaning to prep skin for exfo-
liation and extractions.
Exfoliation: Acneic skin pro-
duces five times more dead
skin cells than a healthy skin,
meaning the sloughing of cells
through exfoliation can great-
ly benefit this condition.
Hydroxy acids (chemical
exfoliants), in general, will be
effective, as they help detach
dead skin cells that contribute
to clogged follicles. Physical
exfoliants may not be appro-
priate for acneic skin, but may
be recommended for oily
skin.

Galvanic and High Frequen-
cy: This professional tool uses
a mild electrical current to
help soften impacted debris
for easier removal.

A consistent home care regi-
men prescribed by your skin
therapist will dramatically
impact the health of your skin
and success of professional
treatments.

¢ This information was taken
from dermalogica.com. Nakita
Lowe is a Dermalogica Skin
Care Therapist at The Dermal
Clinic in Sandyport. Please call
327-6788 for more information
or visit www.dermal-
clinic.com.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



(JOINING HANDS FOR HEALTH

Think health not drugs

The Bahamas joins the rest of the world in observance of the ‘Internation-
al Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking’ under the theme “Think

Health Not Drugs.”

Around 200 million people take drugs at least once a year. Of these, 25
million are regarded as drug dependent. Every year, 200,000 people die
from drug-related illnesses. Young people are more susceptible to drug
use. Prevalence of drug use among young people is more than twice as
high as drug use among the general population: three times as high in the
case of cannabis marijuana. Much more needs to be done to provide
young people with the skills, information and opportunities to lead

healthy and fulfilling lives.

Tune in to Joining Hands for Health this and every Wednesday evening at
7.30 pm. on ZNS 1540 A.M. to be informed about health issues that mat-
ter to the health of you and your loved ones and you.)

June 26 is The International Day
Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Traf-
ficking. Established by The United
Nation General Assembly in 1987,
this day serves as a reminder of the
goal of creating an international soci-
ety free of drug abuse, agreed upon
by Member States, which includes
The Bahamas,.

The United Nations Office on
Drugs and Crime (UNODC) is lead-
ing the international campaign to
raise awareness about the major
challenge that illicit drugs represent
to society as a whole, and especially
to the young. Health is the ongoing

theme of the world drug campaign.
Each year, a theme is selected for
the international day and campaigns
are launched to raise awareness
about the global drug problem.

The goal of the campaign is to
gain public support and to inspire
people to act against drug abuse.
The campaign encourages young
people to put their health first and
not to take drugs.

Drugs have the power both to
improve and to damage health,
depending on the type of drug used,
the quantity consumed and the pur-
pose for which they are taken. For

example, while morphine can relieve
pain, heroin can be highly addictive;
therefore there is the need to control
drugs.

Teenagers and young adults are
more likely to use illicit drugs than
adults. The number of persons that
use drugs among young people is
more than twice as high as that
among the general population. Peer
pressure to experiment with illicit
drugs can be strong and self-esteem
is often low. Also, those who take
illicit drugs tend to either have the
wrong information or not enough
facts about them and the health risks
linked to their use and abuse.

United Nations Office on Drugs
and Crime (UNODC) campaign
only focus on those drugs under
international control, as specified in
the three multilateral treaties that
from the backbones of the interna-
tional drug control system. These
illicit drugs include amphetamine-
type stimulants, coca/cocaine,
cannabis, hallucinogens, opiates and
sedative hypnotics, all of which have
immediate physical effects.

While some of the physical effects
of drugs such as marijuana might
sound pleasant, they do not last long.

Drugs can severely hinder psycho-
logical and emotional development,
particularly in young people.

The world drug campaign calls
young people to get the facts about
drugs. The campaign targets young
people, because young people often
talk about the “highs” induced by
illicit drugs but may not be aware
of the many “lows.”

Illicit drug use is a concern because
it poses a threat to health. The neg-
ative effects of drugs vary depending
on the type of drug used, the doses
taken and the frequency of use. All
illicit drugs have immediate physi-
cal effects, but they can also severe-
ly hinder psychological and emo-
tional development.

Leading a healthy lifestyle which
includes staying away from drugs
requires making choices that are
respectful of body and mind. To
make these choices, young people
need guidance from role models and
need to get the right facts about
drugs use. The international cam-
paign provides young people and
others with tools to inform them-
selves about the health risks associ-
ated with illicit drug use. Locally, this
work is done by The Bahamas

National Drug Council which serves
as a major stakeholder of the Nation-
al Anti-Drug Council.

Parents, teachers and other inter-
ested individuals can also join the
campaign. There are a number of
ways to get involved. These include
spreading the word about the cam-
paign and organising outreach or
institutional events to mark The
International Day Against Drug
Abuse and Illicit Trafficking on 26
June. We can all play a role in pro-
moting health in our communities.

The Ministry of Health as a key
stakeholder in the health of the
nation invites every resident to get
involved. Together we can fight the
scourge of drugs. By uniting our
efforts, we indirectly tackle crime
and other related ills including phys-
ical and mental illness that are direct-
ly linked to drug use and abuse.

¢ For more information on drug
prevention efforts and education
contact the National Drug Coun-
cil at telephone number 326-5340 or
325-4633 or the National Anti-
Drug Council at telephone number
326-4123.



Grooming your Do

GROOMING refers to the prop-
er cleaning and conditioning of the
body, Grooming keeps your dog
looking and felling good. It requires
attention to the hair coat, ears, eyes,
toe nails, anal glands and teeth.
Grooming not only addresses the
dog’s physical needs, but promotes
bonding between the owner and pet
because the contact and attention
simply feels good.

Grooming promotes healthy skin.
The sebaceous glands at the base of
each hair root secretes an oily sub-
stance, called sebum, which is spread
over the hair during grooming.
Sebum helps waterproof the fur and
gives the hair coat its healthy shine.

Grooming also removes loose hair
that can tangle the fur and produce
painful mats. A healthy coat is not
only attractive; it is the dog’s first
line of defense against injury, fur lies
in loose protective layers that shield
skin from damage and provide insu-
lation from temperature extremes.

Benefits

A properly groomed coat is
weather resistant and sheds rain, and
it keeps the dog warm in the winter
and cool in the summer. Dogs basi-
cally do not sweat. Their sweat
glands are not particularly effective
for cooling. The dog primarily uses
panting to cool off and the coat must
remain free of mats to allow air to
pass between the hairs when it is
hot.

Dogs attempt to some grooming
themselves. They scratch with rear
toe nails, use their teeth to nibble
dirt or parasites (fleas, ticks) and
clean their genitals by licking.

Begin grooming your dog during
puppy hood so he learns to antici-
pate and enjoy the attention. We
recommend bathing your puppy by 3
months. Before then, you can use
baby wipes to clean them off. If you
have to bathe them before 3 months
ensure that they are dried off prop-
erly.

For routine care, always begin by
allowing your dog to sniff and inves-
tigate the grooming tools especially
if the experience is new to him. Start
with petting your dog to familiarise
yourself with the contours of his
body and to discover any problem
areas, like mats or hot spots, ahead
of time. Thick long hair needs to be



combed before brushing. Create a
grooming ritual that is always the
same, so your dog knows what to
expect.

Regular grooming can prevent
mats from developing. A badly mat-
ted coat may require electric clip-
pers and is best addressed by a pro-
fessional groomer. We recommend
professional grooming maybe every
8 to 12 weeks.

Clipping your Dog’s Nails- most
active dogs allowed to run outside
wear their nails to a manageable
length naturally and may not need
frequent trimming. However, dogs
that spend most of their times inside
often require monthly nail attention.

Overgrown nails tend to curl, can
become caught in bedding and car-
pets, and may split or tear. Keeping
the toenail trimmed is healthy for
the pet and helps reduce the inap-
propriate digging some dogs are
prone to indulge in. Dewclaws on
the inside of the lower leg need par-
ticular attention since they never
contact the ground. A variety of
commercial nail trimmers are avail-
able from your veterinarian or pet
supply store.

When the nails are white or clear,
the pink quick is visible and makes it
easy to avoid the danger zone. Clip
just outside the pink line showing in
white nails. In toenails that are dark
or opaque, rather than trimming
blindly and taking to much, clip off
only the tips — the hoof like portion
that turns down. Always reward
your dog after a nail trim.

Baths

Bathing your Dog- we tend to
bathe our dogs more often than is
necessary. Excessive bathes can strip
the natural oil from the coat and dry
the skin. We recommend bathing
once or twice a month. Puppies
should not be bathed until three
months. Old or sick dogs can be
stressed by bathing. Use only sham-

poos approved for pets. People prod-
ucts — even human baby shampoo
are much too harsh and will dry the
dog’s skin and possibly cause allergic
reactions. Do not use dish washing
soap, laundry detergent, turpentine,
gasoline, kerosene, diesel or other
household cleansers. They can be
toxic to your dog. Should your dog
get paint, tar or glue on his coat, try
soaking the area in mineral or veg-
etable oil for 24 hours then wash out





with dog shampoo. Some sticky sub-
stances like chewing gum or rat glue,
may be removed by rubbing peanut
butter into the mass and then wash-
ing it out.

Dogs object to baths when they
are frightened, so prepare ahead of
time. You will need dog shampoo, a
wash cloth or sponge and towels.
The most critical part of bathing
your dog is the rinse cycle. Leaving
soap in the coat can cause an allergic

on
.

s

reaction, can attract dirt and make
the fur look dull and dingy.

After you thoroughly rinse off the
dog, do it once more before calling it
quits. Then allow your dog to do
what he had been yearning for the
whole time, have a good shake. As
much as dogs may dislike the bath,
they often relish the toweling off
afterwards. Some dogs will tolerate a
blow dryer on a low setting, which
will help fluff up the fur.



(CY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Men and Sex: The Testosterone Man

“MEN are from Mars and Women
are from Venus”-don't we hear it
all the time? You may have even
used it as your personal mantra. At
those split-second moments, when
you look at that person and think,
‘where did they come from?’ or ‘is it
possible we are even in the same
time zone?’ the whole concept seems
plausible.

Knowing this, it may astonish you
even more to learn that we all start
life as female embryos. Either we
continue to develop into a female
fetus or we are bombarded by testos-
terone and the identifying charac-
teristics of a male are formed. So, if
we all start from the same place,
then how do we end up on separate
planets?

Our gender specific make-up
palette is a blend of several sex hor-
mones, but perhaps the most well-
known and significant one is testos-





terone. Since the 'in utero period’,
testosterone has been lying low for
many years, but now the child's
growth has reached puberty, and it is
time to wake up. Here you may be
surprised again to learn that both
genders have testosterone. Small
amounts are produced in the adren-
al glands, ovaries in girls, but the
main production plant is in each tes-
ticle. Present, are the little Leydig
cells that are responsible for the
manufacturing of testosterone. Due
to efficient mechanics, men are able
to make 20-40 per cent greater

amounts of testosterone than
females, and also a steady supply of
sperm.

The transformation, before our
very eyes, from boy to young man,
are not just the physical changes but
also psychological. This powerful
hormone is ultimately responsible
for our sexual drive or libido,
throughout our lives. This is why
pubescent girls, even with their small
amount of testosterone, become sex-
ually interested. During menopause,
she may find her testosterone lev-
els have declined along with estro-
gen, which would explain the com-
mon complaint of low sexual desire.

Sexual drive really means appetite,
attention, motivation and action.
What is really interesting is that it is
primarily drawn to ‘self’, meaning
the natural force behind masturba-
tion. Men can actually voluntarily
increase their own testosterone by

sexual thoughts, actions, aggressive/
competitive behavior, exercise and a
meat diet. Consequently, we then
understand why testosterone can
fluctuate sometimes every 15-20
minutes, daily and even seasonally.

Today, we understand testos-
terone's role in promoting desire,
but it is still the circuitry elements in
the male pelvis that are principally
responsible for an erection.

We can often identify the high-
testosterone male because his per-
sonality is often selfish, self-centered
and not unlike a psychotic. On the
other hand, there are also men who
are born with an extra Y gene, and
subsequently have a double dose of
testosterone. This has been con-
firmed in many cases by DNA sam-
pling of criminals of violent crimes.
Medicine has found that manipulat-
ing testosterone and serotonin levels,
which alters mood, can in some cas-

es change behavior.

Now that we know the level of
testosterone accounts for the 'aggres-
sive' sex drive of men, we also need
to appreciate the ‘receptive’ sex dri-
ve of women. The more we come to
understand the role that our sex hor-
mones play in our relationships the
better we come to understand the
opposite sex.

Our individual drive is first deter-
mined by our hormones, and then
by our interaction with our partners.
If conflicting sexual drives becomes
an issue, then measuring blood levels
and taking supplements may help.
However, we should not overlook
the path that each gender takes to
reach the point of arousal; it is pre-
determined by many contributing
factors.

¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock’ with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM102.9. For appointments call
364-7230, email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 11B



NN ee
(ey THE COACH APPROACH

Building girls’ leadership & confidence!









“Leadership begins with self.”

The leadership struggle facing most
girls today is mainly due to the lack of
a sense of self-worth; which causes
many to be driven by outer ideals
that inadvertently become the bench-
mark by which they measure their
sense of value.

By Michelle
M Miller, CC






quintet He tals 7 |



MA ee Com Sa Be



Tel: 502 2356| “

for ad rates







For younger girls, this is more mag-
nified by the fact that such self-deplet-
ing ideals are commonplace amongst
grown-up girls in every pocket of our
society; in pursuit of external valida-
tion via accolades.

And while these accolades may
solidify job title or career position;
often time they are at the detriment
of a healthy disposition. This sacrifice
of the inner- self for the outer-self
may seem like a fair trade off; but
take a sincere look at our social con-
sciousness; is the prize worth the
price?

Regardless of who she is; leader-
ship confidence is a fundamental skill
that every girl needs to confidently
navigate her way through her choices.

We live in a wonderful and crazy
world, which is always changing. To
effectively build a new generation of
leaders, self depleting ideals must be
replaced by uplifting concepts of
inspiration.

Younger girls must not only hear
women speak truth to power but see
them be about something more than
mere small things; like house, car,
bags, jewelry etc.

Today’s young girls are not listen-
ing to what we say instead they are
observing how we live and interact
with each other. Sadly, in most cases,
grown-up girls are in fierce competi-
tion rather than collaboration.

Take a look at Karin, a well edu-
cated, professional who still believes
that she has to compete with Char-
lene to prove her worth. So, she is
determined to get it ‘right’ and by
that she means, the right job, right
house, right brand etc.; all to ensure
that Charlene quickly recognises that
she is out of her league.

Charlene on the other hand, will
not take this showing off lying down;
and so she has to try to outdo Karin
to prove that is the better woman.
Hence, she does whatever it takes so

that she too can get it ‘right’; trading
her self-worth for the price tag of the
latest, most up to date gadget.

This silly drama eventually leads
to an all out vindictive vendetta, in
which grown up girls relentlessly tear
each other down with sheer emo-
tional force. This demeaning inter-
action is the sad reality of many rela-
tionships amongst the women of
today; mainly due to insecurity, low
self-esteem and lack of confidence.

This is a serious concern on many
fronts, particularly for the younger
girl who is trying to find her way and
finds herself saddled with an out-
wardly focused society of women.
Therefore, there is a sincere need to
help girls build their leadership con-
fidence; recognising that they will
soon become the wives and mothers
responsible for the nurturing of the
children of tomorrow.

Final Thoughts

There is only one way to teach or
help someone learn something, and
that is to first learn it yourself. This is
a key piece of the puzzle that many
parents often neglect; they presume
that by virtue of the fact that they
have endured the birthing process,
that the elements of leadership and
confidence for example, will some-
how miraculously appear for them
to readily impart it to their children.

This misleading notion is preva-
lent across the spectrum of society.
The harsh reality is if you do not
know how to speak Spanish, you can-
not teach your child to speak Span-
ish. Similarly, if you have never been
exposed to the concepts of leader-
ship; you cannot adequately impart
these skills to your child. The bot-
tom line is you cannot give to anoth-
er, that which you do not possess.

As a parent/guardian or teacher,
the best that you can do for your
child/student is to see yourself as the

facilitator of their growth and devel-
opment. Ultimately your goal is not
to make them like you; for they pos-
sess their own identity and more than
anything else in this world, they are
eager to be like themselves.

Overridingly, the goal is to pro-
vide them with the tools for them to
carve out their own greatness. The
concept of leadership skills involved
the essential principles of Self-Disci-
pline, Self-Knowledge and Self-
Love.

These are critical to ensure that
the young girls today become confi-
dent and collaborative women of
tomorrow; with the discipline and
fortitude to be true to self.

Remember, girls are the vessels
through which human life is brought
into expression.

Our goals must be to find ways in
to help them understand and accept
that self-worth and self-value are
inherent qualities. Get involved; be
yourself, be a leader and change the
world.

¢ Register Your Child for Girls Leader-
ship Coaching (G.L.C.) Summer Pro-
gram, June

21, through July 30, 2010; a life-skills
program for girls 9-13yrs. It is based
on four principles of leadership that
builds a girl’s leadership and confi-
dence. Register Now!

For more details — call 326-3332 or
429-6770 — or send an email to
lifeskills242@yahoo.com

Michelle M Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Con-
sultant. She is the Principal Coach of
the Coaching Studio, which located in
the Jovan Plaza,

Madeira Street. Questions or com-
ments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-
13060 - email -
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone
429-6770.



THE WEATHER REPORT 2

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TO DISCUSS TTT ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE



="
























































MOST of the
women who
said they won't
date a guy with
kids were con-
(erslmatsVOmNarcli

ii LANES
to take the
back seat since
SMe NI Cele NATIT
be top priority.

TUESDAY, JUNE 22,

2010

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

Me Gh

y





njoying the delicious food, and soothing sounds of

Va and your guy decide to go out for dinner. You are
e

waves lightly splashing, while basking in the ambiance
of romanticism. Then his phone rings, its his baby’s mother!

On finding out their potential mate
has kids, some women are left with
the decision “Do I stay or do I go?”

Tribune Woman wanted to know if
dating a guy with kids is really big
issue. A few ladies told Tribune
Woman that dating a man who has
kids can make a relationship com-
plicated especially if he has a “baby
mama” that causes a lot of “drama”.
However two of the women said dat-
ing a guy with kids is not an issue
once his time is balanced equally
between her and his kids.

Most of the women who said they
won't date a guy with kids were con-
cerned that they will have to take
the back seat since his children will
be top priority.

Shakira Cartwright* said there are
a hundred and one reasons why she
won’t consider dating a guy with chil-
dren. “Personally I don't like the idea
of getting involved with someone
with kids. For one, I think for the
most part dating a guy with kids
comes with baby mother drama. His
kids will always be top priority, which
will make me feel second priority to
him,” she said.

I'm not trying to be selfish or any-
thing, but I prefer to be in a rela-
tionship with someone who doesn't
come with extra baggage.”

Baggage

Dericka Mcdonald shared a similar
view with Ms Cartwright. She said
along with being second priority in
his life, the trust factor might just be
the biggest of all issues.

“T wouldn't date him if he has kids,
because I wouldn't be able to trust
him around his baby's mother espe-
cially if the baby is still young and
they see each other often. I'm pos-
sessive so I can’t share him with any-
one because I will need him, and his
child will need him, and that is where
the conflict arises. It may sound a
tad bit selfish but that’s why I won’t
waste my time being with someone
who has a child or children,” she said.
Farika Grant* has a bright future

ahead. She has almost completed her
bachelor’s degree in criminal justice
and she said she is taking steps to
secure her career in the near future.
She said children don’t fit in that
bright picture and she is not ready for
what that type of union brings.

“T prefer not to date guys with kids
because there would be too many
strings attached on the guy’s part.
When kids are involved in a rela-
tionship, it makes things much hard-
er. When we are all together and he
is playing daddy then I will feel as
though I have to take on the role of
their mother which is something I
am not ready for,” Ms Grant said.

Maturity

Michela Hepburn had the experi-
ence of dating a guy with kids and
said, in contrast to what many
women believe, their relationship
was free from intrusions.

“We were mature about the situa-
tion, I knew he had a child so I dealt
with it. The child’s mother knew that
I was in the picture and she knew
that I would be apart of the child’s
life so she dealt with it. We never
bickered and argue about the situa-
tion because we all knew it was our
reality at the time.”

“T knew the situation I was getting
in. I really liked him a lot and I want-
ed him in my future. I never once
felt neglected by my partner because
he did everything he could to make
sure I was satisfied and happy. As
for doing it again I probably would,”
she said.

Alesha Cadet said: “I would date a
guy that has a kid, not so much
"kids" though. It doesn't change any-
thing about the relationship we
would have, as long as his baby's
mother respects our relationship then
Tam cool with it.”

To voice your opinions on this top-
ic, e-mail features@tribunemedia.net,
leave a comment at www.tribune-
media.net/features/woman.

*Names have been changed





Civ Cerbhesn Baby Saranode
Frestiresa = Breeze Euaece = Potpoerd of Flowers
= =
Fret j Levaredar
Exnence § - - Poin

Look for Festival in

your favorite store.





a.
a

thirtued by: Bahomos Wholesale Agencies, East West Hwy, * to: 282-394-1759 * fax: 42-04-1860 * email: bwabshamasecoravincom * Freeport: 1 Milton St. * bel: 242-351-2207 * fax: 242-051-2215 * emaik braiposccraivave.com









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TRY ll ‘VN

Pim blowin’ it

The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

CARS FOR SALE,
TTS ee

AND REAL ESTATE

ae Ae ee ay iy



ae
LOW

oo SUNNY,
+t ESTORMS

Volume: 106 No.174

Broker blasted for
STMT CUB ELT

CFAL/FIRST BAHAMAS FINED

(} iil (} [ i | G | 2 G G serious offence can be granted bail if they have not been
SEE page eight

Bea CLUS EN CEU Ta SS

SOF
SOF



Steak Is Back
For Breaktast!



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Holding murder charged
for up to three years
‘may he unconstitutional’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net





THE Government’s intent to amend the law to hold
people charged with murder in Her Majesty's Prison for
up to three years without trial may be "unconstitutional",
with some in the legal community arguing it will violate
human rights.

Currently, a person charged with murder or another







Freeport Concrete is Trial of two

first publicly traded
company in the
Bahamas to go under

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT CONCRETE
last night became the first pub-
licly traded company in the
Bahamas to go out of business,
informing staff and sharehold-
ers that it had yesterday ceased
operations and was preparing
to voluntarily liquidate itself.

In a statement sent to The
Tribune, chief executive Ray-
mond Simpson said: “ Freeport
Concrete has been struggling
for quite some time with a lack
of cash.

“In spite of the present eco-
nomic conditions in Grand
Bahama we have done our best
to keep the business going,
reduce expenses, attract
investors, sell the 126 acres of
property on the North Shore,
and to request additional fund-
ing from the bank as well as
our shareholders. Unfortu-
nately, we have not been suc-

near future we will meet with
our shareholders in an Extra-
ordinary General Meeting to
consider placing the company
into voluntary liquidation and
to appoint a liquidator.”

Adding that he was “sad-
dened” by what had happened,
Mr Simpson added: “TI do want
to take this opportunity to first-
ly thank our 60 staff who are a
great group of people, and who
have stood by the company
through all the challenges and
given the extra mile without
being asked.

“And finally to all our share-
holders, customers, suppliers
and others who have continued
to work with us I personally
wish to thank you all.”

Without cash to fund Home
Centre inventory purchases,
and offers to acquire the com-
pany and/or its 127-acre North
Shore plot failing to materialise
into firm bids, the company had
little choice but to cease trad-



police officers
is adjourned

THE trial of two police offi-
cers charged in connection
with the death of a father-of-
six did not begin as expected
yesterday and will now com-
mence on a date to be fixed.

Family members of
Desmond Key and the two
officers as well as witnesses
showed up at the Supreme
Court complex yesterday,
however the case did not pro-
ceed. The case is being heard
before Supreme Court Justice
Vera Watkins. The Tribune
was informed that the matter
was adjourned to June 29,
when a date will be fixed for
the commencement of the tri-
al. The Tribune understands

SEE page 11

Major car
dealership
denies owing

cessful. ing.
Therefore, it is with regret Its chairman, former Grand thousands to
that we announce effective Bahama Port Authority

today we will cease operations
at the Concrete Plant and the
Home Centre due to this lack
of cash to continue running
these operations. In the very

ro

(GBPA) chair Hannes Babak,
who holds 43 per cent of the
firm's shares, also let it be

SEE page eight

ON te

= — Peat

T De cious Nee |

i. Ll
ETF Tut B14

it 9 et | ey i

brie r bei}

99







By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



CONCERNED parents and teachers
are demanding the dismantling of “dan-
gerous” playground equipment and stricter
regulation of play areas in public parks
and primary schools.

With claims of children’s lives being put
at risk, one of the public playgrounds that
has come under scrutiny is the popular
play area at Goodman’s Beach.

In the last few months, complaints about
the depreciation of the playground facili-
ties at the popular beach access have
flooded local talk shows.

rer “a

i THE popular play area at Goodman’s Beach has come under scrutiny.

A popular family location, the play-
ground is often crowded with children
under the age of 13 —- most without direct
supervision.

Parents report eroded monkey bars and
handles, deteriorating wood, and grounds
littered with used condoms and broken
beer bottles.

Upset by the “ill-quality” wooden play-
ground equipment used in public schools,
a primary school teacher claims children
are constantly at risk.

The teacher said: “I don’t understand
the proliferation of this wooden play-
ground equipment. Is it cheaper? Because

SEE page eight

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







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Customs dept

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAJOR car dealership
yesterday denied owing thou-
sands of dollars in duties to
the Customs department,
claiming they only paid what
they were asked to pay, while
the government revenue-col-
lection agency is adamant they
must hand over the funds.

PLP Jerome Fitzgerald
claimed in the Senate that the
Nassau Motor Company had
committed “an egregious
offence” against the Stamp
Act when it was able to clear
six Sports Utility Vehicles at a
rate of 60 per cent duty a day
after the Prime Minister
announced the duty rate on

SEE page 11

HOME IMPROVEMENTS


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





iT

THE Tribune article published on
Friday, June 18, under the headline
“Grieving families’ anguish at Coro-
ner’s Court backlog” incorrectly stat-
ed the February 2008 ruling in the
inquest into Christopher Esfakis’ death
was quashed by Chief Justice Sir Burton
Hall, who asserted Magistrate William
Campbell, the coroner, was biased in
the inquiry.

The Judicial Review Application to
quash the verdict was in fact made by a
doctor offended by the coroner’s sum-
ming up, Mr Esfakis’ sister Leandra
Esfakis’ said.

She also clarified that the Chief Jus-
tice did not make any assertion that Mr
Campbell was biased in his decision of
July 2008, but this was a submission
made by the doctor’s attorney.

Sir Burton had said it was wrong for
the coroner to leave only one verdict to
the jury as a matter of procedure, and
on that procedural basis he declared
the verdict had to be quashed.

When a verdict is quashed the inquest
must go before another coroner. This is



Ml MAGISTRATE'S COURT

Man charged with murder
after June 5 shooting death

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A MAN charged in the shooting
death of a 27-year-old Deveaux Street
man earlier this month was yesterday
arraigned in Magistrates Court on a
murder charge.

Police have charged Duran Horton,
26, of 6th Street and Palm Tree
Avenue, with the June 5 murder of
Matthias Williams.

According to reports, Williams was
shot and killed shortly before 11.30pm
on Saturday June 5 while sitting out-

side a home on Deveaux Street .
Horton, who was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court One, Bank Lane, was not
required to enter a plea to the charge.
He was informed by the magistrate
that a preliminary inquiry will be held
to determine whether there is suffi-
cient evidence against him to have him
stand trial in the Supreme Court.
Horton was not represented by an
attorney during his arraignment yes-
terday.
He was remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. His case was adjourned to June
28 for a fixture hearing in Court 10,

standard procedure.



Nassau Street.





Paes

Police called following double stabbing

At around 3am on Sunday, police were called to Egan’s
Apartments on Gladstone road where a double stabbing had
taken place.

Witnesses told responding officers that an argument had
broken out between a 26-year-old man and a woman who
knew each other, which resulted in both being stabbed sever-
al times.

Both were taken to the hospital, where they were treated and
discharged.

Police are investigating.

Armed men rob woman of car and cash

Just after 11.30pm on Saturday, police were alerted to an
armed robbery that took place on Sanford Street off Dolphin
Drive.

Responding officers were told that a woman sitting in a
parked car was approached by two men armed with guns.

They robbed the woman of her black 2008 Honda Accord,
licence plate number 219819, and an undetermined amount of
cash.

The culprits fled the area heading in an unknown direction.
Police are investigating.

Police name young man killed in Montel Heights

Police have identified the young man shot and killed on Fri-
day, June 18 in Montel Heights as Kendall Kenneth Andrews,
18, of Mantol Street.

Ph ie) a
ae
as
Peau iL
ere

0 | Rh
—/

lm POLICE REPORT

Police alerted after 77
suspected illegal immigrants
are found in Long Island

By ALESHA CADET

THE police were called to
the area of Lil Harbour in Ros-
es, Long Island when locals
found a boat that they suspect-
ed had been used to transport
illegal immigrants.

Press Liaison officer Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings said police
believe the 30-foot wooden ves-
sel landed on the island in the
early hours of Saturday morn-
ing.

Responding officers con-
ducted a search of the area and
rounded up 77 suspected ille-
gal immigrants — 13 women and
64 men.

Sgt Skippings said all the sus-
pects were transported to the
Community Centre in Clarence
Town, where they were exam-
ined by the local doctor and
handed over to Immigration
officials.

Tee
rata
erty a

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=

SS





Director of Immigration Jack
Thompson said: "They have
been flown into the capital by
small commercial air carriers.
Bahamasair assisted as well.

“It was an orderly process,
they all were transported to the
Detention Centre where they
were processed.

“Before the weekend they
will be repatriated.”

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

tale le
as teas

ey
PHONE: 822-2157

AG blasts
claims he is
‘intimidating’
Grant-Bethel





JOHN DELANEY CHERYL GRANT-BETHEL

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



ATTORNEY General John Delaney yesterday shot down
"fabricated" media reports that claimed he is "intimidating"
Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel.

He also denied a report that said he placed a gag order on
Mrs Grant-Bethel prohibiting her from speaking to the media
about not receiving the post of director of public prosecutions
in the Attorney General's Office.

According to her attorney Wayne Munroe, Mrs Grant-Bethel
plans to file a legal challenge of the Judicial and Legal Services
Commission's decision to award the job in question to Vinette
Graham-Allen, a Jamaican who served as a director of public
prosecutions in Bermuda and headed the Justice Training
Institute in Jamaica.

Mr Delaney said he was surprised to see the claims in anoth-
er local daily, and told The Tribune that while there is a policy
in the AG's office that forbids officers from speaking on inter-
nal matters — other than to discuss the official position of the
agency — that did not apply to Mrs Grant-Bethel's job row.

"Let me say this, I have had several discussions with her
about various matters (but) I certainly have not, in relation to
this, given her any direction that she should not speak to the
press,” he said yesterday.

Policy

"But generally speaking, in the AG's office there is a policy
that individual officers do not speak to the press without ensur-
ing that it is something that represents the position of the
AG’s office.

"If she speaks to the press on this, she would not be speak-
ing on behalf of the AG's office, it would be on behalf of her.
T have not issued any gag order.”

A second report published in the Bahama Journal also
claimed Mr Delaney is "intimidating" his subordinate.

Yesterday he explicitly denied this assertion, arguing that
browbeating is not characteristic of his leadership style, nor that
of the Ingraham administration.

"IT don't operate that way. There is nothing that the gov-
ernment is doing that is intimidating. I certainly will not intim-
idate anybody. That's something that’s out of the blue — that's
a fabrication,” said Mr Delaney.

Last week, while defending the decision of the Legal Services
Commission in Parliament, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
implied he had reasons for not supporting Mrs Grant-Bethel’s
appointment. He had earlier identified her as a worthy candi-
date. This revelation spawned speculation over whether or
not the nation's chief had any influence in the selection, with
some opposition members calling for the PM to disclose the
information that changed his mind.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 3



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Prison Department is
set to acquire new forms of
ammunition and weapons for
use in the correctional facili-
ties.

Dr Elliston Rahming, Super-
intendent of Prisons, said he
ordered a batch of products this
month from ALS Technologies
Inc, a company specialising in
less-than-lethal munitions.

ALS Technologies was one
of several exhibitors from the
United Kingdom, Canada and
the United States presenting at
the forth annual conference of
the Association of Caribbean
Heads of Corrections and
Prison Services (ACHCPS),
where Dr Rahming spoke.

Dr Rahming said with the
current resources, prison offi-
cers have to resort to lethal
force once negotiation fails to
resolve a crisis situation.

He said in the case of a
minor crisis situation — a riot, or
prison escape, for example —
the less-than-lethal munition
options can be used as a first
and second response to solving
a crisis, once negotiation fails.
He would not confirm the
specifics of the order.

Mike Aultman, senior vice
president of ALS Technologies,
said a quote was submitted to
the Bahamian government at
the start of the month for 15
different products offered by
the company.

One of their signature prod-
ucts is a bean-bag designed for
use in regular 12-guage shot
guns and 37-millimetre hand
guns. They discharge like a bul-
let, but create blunt trauma in
the form of bruising and pain
and can be shot from long
range.

LOCAL NEWS
Ml FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE ASSOCIATION OF CARIBBEAN HEADS OF CORRECTIONS AND PRISON SERVICES

Less-than-lethal weapons

Prison Department set to acquire new munitions











= WwW

(BIS Photo/Kris Ingraham)

ACTING PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette and Dr Elliston Rahming,
Superintendent of Her Majesty’s Prisons view an exhibition mounted at The Association of Caribbean
Heads of Corrections and Prisons Services Fourth Annual Conference, on Monday, June 21, 2010 at

SuperClubs Breezes.

already trained in the use of
several of the company’s tech-
nologies, having participated in
two training workshops over
the past two years. They are
scheduled to take part in a third
workshop this year.

The annual conference of the
ACHCPS aims to strengthen
the partnership between region-
al prison services and create
opportunities for professional
development in the sector.

“Throughout the Caribbean,
we are bedeviled by crime and
buffeted by violence. Histori-
cally, the penal system was seen
as part and parcel of the prob-
lem. The CHCPS rejects that
notion. We see ourselves as
part of the solution. Indeed I
go so far as to suggest that if
we are going to remediate bur-
geoning crime rates and if we

are going to ameliorate the vex-
ing levels of violence, we must
come to see corrections as inte-
gral, not tangential to the solu-
tion to crime,” said Dr Rah-
ming.

In his remarks, Brent Symon-
ette, Acting Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs,
said the focus of the ACHCPS
is “especially relevant” to the
prison reform agenda for the
region. He said it is important
that the association support “a
shift in culture from solely cus-
tody and control to corrections,
and for setting and maintain-
ing regional and international
corrections and prison stan-
dards.”

The regional heads were also
introduced to a Caribbean cus-
tomer service programme
offered by Fisher's Regalia &

Uniform Accouterments, which
is the company that supplies
uniforms for several Bahami-
an government agencies, such
as the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, and some regional bod-
ies.

Mark Tulloch, vice president
of sales and marketing at Fish-
er's, said the programme would
allow Caribbean countries to
pool their orders and harness
their collective purchasing pow-
er.

He said the system would
alert the regional block when-
ever an order is being placed
by one agency for an item such
as flags. Since cost is deter-
mined by the volume of cloth
purchased, each country would
be able to benefit from better
group rates, since flag colours
overlap in many instances.

Bahamian prison officers are

RBDF defends ‘integrity’
of recruit vetting process

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
Alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE Royal Bahamas Police Force “stands by the integrity” of
its recruit vetting process despite the emergence of a case involv-
ing a police corporal who has been called to face a nine-year-old
rape and battery-related charge in the US.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna suggested of the
vetting protocol that while it “may not be a perfect system, it is a
good system.” The senior officer added that the RBPF’s high
command nonetheless takes the Bastian case “very, very serious-
ly” and having only very recently become aware of the accusations
against the officer and request for his extradition to the US to face
the charges, “acted quickly and decisively” to play their part in
ensuring justice was served. ACP Hanna made these comments
days after 35-year-old Constable Nyahuma Anthony Bastian was
brought before a local magistrate on a US extradition request
relating to the alleged brutal beating and rape of a girl at the Uni-
versity of North Texas in 2001. An internet search for the Bahami-
an's name throws up a US Department of Justice “wanted” poster
for him, with a photograph and other identifying details, as its
first result. The beating Bastian is alleged to have inflicted on the
victim in the case was said to have been “brutal.”

ACP Hanna said the force goes to significant lengths to deter-
mine whether new recruits have in their backgrounds any similar
accusations, subjecting them to a “battery of vetting” prior to
completing the hiring process.

He noted that the allegations against Bastian emanate from
outside of the Bahamas and questioned whether the officer was on
the US-based “wanted” list at the time of his recruitment.

Nonetheless, ACP Hanna readily admitted the vetting system is
not “fail proof” — and pointed out that this is the case in countries
around the world.

Unfortunate

“While it’s unfortunate that all of these things have come up and
give an appearance that may besmirch the professionalism and
character of the force, we stand by the integrity of our system
and say we are doing the right thing — but it’s not a perfect system.

“To mislead the Bahamian public into believing the system is fail
proof would be grossly insulting to Bahamian public’s intelligence.

“However, when such things happen, it says to us as high com-
mand that we must step back, re-evaluate where there are missteps,
and if so where and what corrective action we need to take going
forward; how we can remediate the system so these things don’t
happen again.”

Asked what changes may be made to the process as a result of
the Nyahuma case, ACP Hanna said that he did not expect officers
to “panic and make radical changes, but to look at what we do.”

According to ACP Hanna, the current vetting process for offi-
cers includes the potential recruit having to produce a character ref-
erence, being run through the police’s criminal records system to
see if they have a prior record in the Bahamas or have come in con-
tact with the police in relation to any potential violation and then
having the police go into their local community to speak with
family, friends, neighbours and other acquaintances to gather
more background on the individual’s integrity and suitability for
police work. This final aspect of the vetting process, ACP Hanna
admitted, is “highly subjective” and subject to the whims of those
who are interviewed by police.

“You say this candidate has presented himself to be a member
of RBPF, what can you tell us about this person, and the member
of public can be forthright and say, ‘I think this person has some
challenges’. Or, the resident may decide, ‘He’s not the best person
but his grandmother is good, his mother, his family are good peo-
ple’, so you can see where the subjectivity comes in there.”

According to reports, Constable Bastian was on $10,000 bail for
the aggravated sexual assault case in the US when he failed to
return for the continuation of his hearing and left the country to
come to the Bahamas.

The "wanted" poster highlighting his case claims he "fled" the
US. His Bahamian attorney claimed he left because his visa had
expired. Appearing before a Bahamian magistrate on the US
extradition request last Friday, Bastian was denied bail and
remanded to Her Majesty‘s Prison, Fox Hill.




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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Without evidence Bahamas stays two-tiered

ANOTHER year has passed and the
Americans are back again with their Traf-
ficking in Person (TIP) report for 2010. The
Bahamas remains a “Tier-two” country —
out of a possible three tiers — leaving gov-
ernment officials scratching their collective
heads wondering where the human beings
supposedly being trafficked in this country
are being secreted.

According to the Americans, sitting on the
second tier means that this nation is “not ful-
ly compliant with minimum standards laid

that in fact they are victims and that there is an
Act to protect them.

The IOM social worker said that a worker
who is recruited from another country, could be
in a vulnerable position having been recruited
under false conditions and exploited for forced
labour. A housekeeper, a sex worker or a child
labourer could be in this category.

Over the years we have come across a few
cases in which employees have had their work
permits withheld by their employers. They are
either not paid a living wage, or in some
out in US anti-trafficking legislation, but is instances not paid at all. However, they are
making significant efforts to bring itself into too terrified to cry for help because they do
compliance with those standards.” One of not want to be returned to their country of ori-
those steps forward was the Trafficking in gin.

Persons (Prevention and Suppression) Act of Many years ago, in casual conversation with
2008, for which there are heavy penalties for an Immigration officer, we discovered that at
participating in this modern day slavery. that time it was usual for employers to keep an

Each time this report comes out The Tri- employee’s work permit. The officer expressed
bune contacts the US Embassy to try to get a surprised when told that we always gave the
tip as to where some of these abused persons employee the original permit, taking only a
might be found so that we can do our own copy for our files, and in case the original was
investigations. Are they among the prosti- lost.
tutes on the streets, do we examine the bars, Some employers explained that they with-
are they in the strip clubs, or are they house- held the permit so that it would not be stolen
keepers in certain homes? We get neither from the employee. However, over the years we
help, nor answers, only that America’s infor- came across a few that were held because in fact
mation is anecdotal and its sources cannot be the employee was a virtual prisoner.
revealed. No one is asking for sources. We are One day — again many years ago in the
just asking that our noses be pointed in the early days of the PLP administration — the
right direction so that our reporters can go out telephone on our desk rang. A terrified voice at
and find their own sources. the other end pleaded for our help. It was a

Apparently government has met the same woman with a Jamaican accent. She claimed
blank wall, from behind which come whis- that she was being held a prisoner by a Bahami-
pers, but no concrete evidence that anyone an. She gave his name. We could not help her
can pin down. Without evidence to support because this man was a big name in the PLP cir-
claims of human trafficking, said National cle and we knew of no official at that time who
Security Minister Tommy Turnquest, the gov- would have dared to take on the case. Today is
ernment cannot be expected to expend a new dawn. Receiving the same call today, we
resources on something they do not believe to would know exactly where to go and be assured
be a problem. of results. That is the difference between then

“The US report is relevant in that it is pre- and now.
pared by the US, which is a world super power However, we suggest that some abuses come
and once they commit it to record it is seen in marriage— possibly it is a marriage of conve-
around the world, but with respect to it being nience on the part of the foreign spouse. We
accurate and it pertaining to the Bahamas that knew of a case, again several years ago, of a
is what we take issue with,” Mr Turnquest said. marriage that started out happily, but turned

Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette sour when the Bahamian husband decided to
agreed that the Bahamas would seek to comply roam. The Jamaican wife wanted out when her
with anti-human trafficking standards, but the husband was bold enough to introduce the
validity of the US report, he said, might influ- sweetheart into their home. However, she want-
ence government’s view of compliance. ed to stay in the Bahamas to be with her

Mr Turnquest confirmed that the govern- Bahamian children. To her dismay she discov-
ment takes human trafficking “very serious- ered that her husband had not got her any
ly.” Every year that the report comes out, he “papers” and was refusing to regularise her
said, it is circulated to government’s senior offi- position with Immigration because he did not
cers for review and comment. Despite govern- want her to leave the home. We supposed she
ment’s efforts, the only reply it gets back: was the drudge doing the laundry and cooking
“There is no evidence to support the claims.” while the sweetheart was the queen of the roost.

According to a social worker at the Inter- We never knew what happened, except that
national Organisation for Migration (IOM), she was an extremely unhappy woman, who
there are victims of trafficking, who don’t even eventually died. Today it would have been easy
know they are victims. If they don’t know, then to have got her “straight.” But then, it was
how is government to know? impossible.

Maybe more should be written about what is The Bahamas must be doing something
classified as human trafficking so that the pub- right, because today there is help for those who
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Officers should
be commended.
for restraint in
‘Rambo’ assault

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the aftermath of the
assault on Police Officers by
the American visitor nick-
named “Rambo” by our talk
media, I wish to make a few
observations.

The press, in particular
the talk media used the inci-
dent to criticise and joke
about the performance of
the police in this incident.
A reporter on a morning
radio show and his fans
appeared to have enjoyed
what happened and were
very critical of what they
termed to be the inability of
the police to subdue —
“Rambo”.

It is clear to me, that the
police officers involved in
the incident acted with
restraint and ought to be
commended. The officers
present with guns merit spe-
cial commendation for not
using deadly force during
this incident. With two of
their colleagues injured they
could have used excessive
force to subdue “Rambo”
which could have resulted
in his death or serious injury.
This man could have been
considered a threat to their

letters@triobunemedia.net



personal safety. Had this
man been the victim of a
police attack causing serious
injury or death the same
press and talk media would
have severely criticised the
police. The US media would
have had a field day and our
Ministry of Tourism would
have been making apologies.
I applaud the police officers
for taking the blows and
eventually subduing “Ram-
bo.”

The reporter on a popular
morning show interviewed
a prominent attorney on the
matter. I was very surprised
to hear that attorney state,
that the police did not have
the authority to arrest
“Rambo” and the police
could have been dealt with
for assault. We have been
taught, that police officers
responding to a call where
a person is being disorderly
in a public place is expected
to assist in having the person
removed from the place.
Should that person continue
to behave disorderly on the

street the police are expect-
ed to ask the person to
desist from such conduct
and leave the area. Failing to
obey the instructions of the
police that person could be
arrested for obstructing the
police officer in the execu-
tion of his duty. That duty is
to keep the peace and main-
tain good order.

One of the good things,
that emerged from the inci-
dent is the media support
for the “taser”, which is
being used effectively by
many Law Enforcement
Agencies in the Caribbean
and around the world. It is a
very effective weapon in cas-
es, such as this one. For
years I have been recom-
mending that the Police
Force acquire this weapon
and train its personnel to use
it.

I wish to add that from the
news reports it would
appear that the police erred
in not apprehending the
companions of “Rambo” for
obstruction and the abet-
ment of disorderly conduct.

PAUL THOMPSON
Nassau,
June 8, 2010.

Huge turnout of youngsters for baseball
event — but no Ministry of Youth and Sports

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This past weekend between 650 to 700
youngsters from all over the Bahamas con-
verged on Grand Bahama under the auspices
of the Bahamas Baseball Federation for the
eighth annual Andre Rodgers Baseball Cham-

pionship.

The games were shown live on two television
stations, while Spartacus was being advertised

on a foreign station.

After switching from station to station I
finally realised that baseball in Freeport and
Spartacus was one and the same.

Despite the huge turnout of youngsters there
was no Ministry of Youth, and the largest
grouping for a sporting event no Ministry of
Sport. Looking directly ahead I see a Berlin
wall facing all of these youngsters, can they
really be looking forward to the opening of

our sports stadium?

How can they or their leaders hope to share
in that facility when they are not even accord-

Bahamas stop being oppressed. The answer
is simple, we need to go back to 1984 when

Enoch Backford (BOA) conducted the BBA
elections when one candidate produced 16
proxies (contrary to the Constitution) caus-
ing the other candidate to leave, while the
others rowed until almost midnight two per-

sons including myself can attest to the fact

that no one was elected that night.
Therefore we need the good moderator to

be brave enough to announce to the Bahami-

an public the true results of that meeting.

Failing that (which I am sure will not hap-
pen, or if it did) the Ministry of Sports needs to
address the Constitution of the BBA in much
the same way they did the BOA, and let the
sunshine pour in and get the stench out.

Of course even with John the Baptist
preaching, nothing happened until the mas-
ter came along, so it’s extremely doubtful that

these youngsters participating in various

ed an audience from the powers that be.

Any thinking Bahamian who long for the
good old days when baseball was king is won-
dering when o when will baseball in the

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E-mail: cmajor@grp.sandals.com AND hrd@¢grp.sandals.com

Nassau,



June 10, 2010.

leagues will get to strut their stuff in our sta-
dium any time soon. No ray of hope

JEFFREY WILLIAMS

Bahamas Welding And Fire Co.,
Ltd. #70 Wilton Street East

Will Be CLOSED
For Annual Stocktaking
Friday June 25th &
Saturday June 26th, 2010.

We apologize for any
Inconvenience caused,
Thanks for your patronage
throughout the year.

Management


THE TRIBUNE

Full-time mental health unit would
be ‘major leap’ in prison reform

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

PRISON reform would expe-
rience a “major leap” if author-
ities were able to bring about
the establishment of a full time
mental health unit at Her
Majesty’s Prison, Superinten-
dent Dr Elliston Rahming said.

Authorities are working
towards assigning a full time
psychiatrist to the prison, but
Dr Rahming, head of the
Prison Department, said more
is needed for the prison to
effectively carry out its man-
date.

“To be perfectly honest, I
know that there are efforts in
place right now to have a full
time psychiatrist assigned to the
prison. One of the needs is not







DR ELLISTON RAHMING

just a psychiatrist, but a mental
health unit, because we are
somewhat at a disadvantage
when officers are sort of diag-
nosing persons.



“We have psychiatrists that
come to the prison on a week-
ly basis, but I think the time
has come for a full time psy-
chiatric mental health unit.
That would be a major leap
toward prison reform,” said Dr
Rahming.

Responding to accusations
by a former inmate that inter-
nal divisions in the senior com-
mand are hampering prison
reform and efforts to focus on
rehabilitation, Dr Rahming
said there was no “division”.

The recently released inmate
said Dr Rahming “has a war
going on” with his staff over
rehabilitation plans for prison-
ers, and that “some are on his
side and some are on the side
of (Deputy Superintendent of
Prisons, Charles Rolle).”

Superintendent Rolle did not

return calls for comment. Dr
Rahming said: “I know that
people have different orienta-
tions, different backgrounds,
and different points of view.
And so if you grew up in an
era where there was a certain
ethos and then there is a new
path, a new ethos that is being
suggested, people looking at it
may interpret it as conflict.

“T imagine that Barrack
Obama and Joe Biden have
different views on a number of
things: Joe Biden having grown
up in politics, grown up in the
Democratic party; Barrack
Obama not having done so.
That doesn’t mean they are not
working together harmonious-
| ”

The government is working
on a Department of Correc-
tions Bill to replace the Prison

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS





Act that currently governs
operations at the prison.

Dr Rahming said he sub-
scribes to the government’s
agenda, which is “one of prison
reform, successful rehabilita-
tion and effective reintegra-
tion”.

“T think it is fair to say that
the prison is in transition. His-
torically there has been an
emphasis on containment and

| mul ie

eer LT ii



THE ENTRANCE to Her Majesty’s Prison.



more recently, while not dilut-
ing security and containment,
there has been an equal
emphasis on the need to ensure
we are more fully compliant
with the Prison Act, which says
we are to hold these persons,
but we also must at the same
time make every effort to effect
change within them. That has
been our mandate,” said Dr
Rahming.

Some PLPs protest Marco City cantitdate Selection process

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The PLP has chosen
two general election candidates for
Grand Bahama, but some supporters
are protesting the selection process in
the Marco City constituency.

Freeport Lawyer Gregory Moss and
Senator Dr Michael Darville were suc-
cessfully ratified last week as the PLP’s
candidates for Marco City and Piner-
idge, respectively.

However, according to reliable
sources within the party, Mr Moss was
appointed without the endorsement
of the Marco City Council.

“Mr Moss was appointed without
the support of members of the Marco
City Council and some members are
protesting the process which took
place,” said one PLP, who wished to
remain anonymous. “We think the
process is flawed and we believe that
the good and decent thing is to afford
members the opportunity as to who
they want run as the candidate for
Marco City.”

The Tribune has learned that busi-

nessmen Caleb Outten and
Rondi Tener Knowles,
who both applied to run as
candidates in Marco City,
were expected to meet
with party leader Perry
Christie yesterday to voice
their concerns about the |
process.

One source indicated
that many young PLPs on
Grand Bahama are becom-
ing frustrated and discour-
aged with the behaviour of
the party.

“There are some very
young, bright and loyal {pu

persons here in the party PERRY CHRISTIE (above)



Astwood — are being con-
sidered as possible candi-
dates for EMR.

Businessman Ricardo
Smith has expressed inter-
est in the Lucaya con-
stituency.

Mr Outten, a former PLP
Senator, ran as a candidate
for Eight Mile Rock in the
last general election, but
"| was defeated.
Mr Moss, 45, and Sena-
| tor Darville, 49, are well
known persons of good
| standing in the Grand
Bahama community.

Moss has his own private

who are being overlooked was yesterday expected to law practice, Moss & Asso-
by the leadership,” said the meet with Caleb Outten and ciates.

source.

With two candidates
already appointed in
Grand Bahama, the PLP will need to
ratify candidates in Lucaya, High Rock
and Eight Mile Rock.

There are reports that three persons
— Sandra Edgecombe, former Eight
Mile Rock High School principal; Dr
Leviticus Rolle; and Civic leader Lewis

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010
LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





C NAVAL OFFICERS AT GOVT HOUSE

DOMINICAN REPUBL
Ee






a ae x
ABOVE: Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes welcomes the Naval officers from the Dominican Republic on Saturday at Government House.
BELOW: Captain Pena Acosta makes a presentation to Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes

4, iA de , Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.

Invites applications for the positions of:

GIFTSHOP MANAGER

MOST Tribune readers
who took part in our latest
online poll do not think the
poor state of the country’s
education system indicates
a need to import more for-
eign teachers.

In all, 420 readers
responded to the poll on tri-
bune242.com, 135 of them
agreeing that Public School
teachers have had more
than enough time to give it
their best shot, and 285
rejecting this argument.
They agreed instead that
teachers aren't the problem,
and that the education crisis
has much deeper roots.

Reader Tamika said:
“The nationality of the
teacher is not the problem
in our educational system.
What is the problem is the
parental lack of involve-
ment in their children's
educational experience.

“IT went to a private
school and can say that the
private school environment,
while different, does not
automatically create smart,
intelligent students. As in
any educational environ-
ment, parents must become
actively involved in their
children's learning experi-
ence and must also become
advocates for their chil-
dren.”

Exuma said: “We only
hear negative comments
concerning our Public
School education, but there
are bright, intelligent stu-
dents in the system and
some good, dedicated
teachers. A lot of improve-
ment is needed but teachers
are not the real problem.
The teachers and students
need to be given the proper
tools.”

Gail H agreed, asking:
“How can a doctor be
expected to perform
surgery with a dinner knife
and toilet paper? We have a
similar expectation of our
teachers. The system is poor
to say the very least, and
needs to be changed from
the ground up. The teachers
are in an education system
and curriculum that is
working at its optimal level
— which is failure.”

Jane Hudder said: “T do
believe that we need more
foreign-trained teachers,
but I also believe that it's
not just the teachers and
that the crisis has much
deeper roots that also need
to be addressed.

“Our Bahamian teachers,
especially those trained by
COB or Success Training

Applicant must have at least five years
experience as the Manager of a Large Boutique/
Gift Shop must have excellent management skills,
written and oral communication organizational and
interpersonal skills able to train and motivate team
members, good track recordin Managing peopleableto
establish and maintain high standards. Formal
qualifications and computer skills desirable, be able
to work flexible and long hours.



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NOTICE
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CORRIDOR 18
SAUNDERS BEACH (West Bay St.)

Temporary Road Closure & Diversions

JOSE CARTELLOSE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES 5.4 would like to inform the motoring public that Saunders Beach (Wiest
Bay S42.) roads will be closed to the motoring public effective Wednesday June 23, 2000 bereven the hours of Tpo to 12pm.

























































Fax or email résumé’s with proof of qualifications

and experience to: cmajor@egrp.sandals.com
Fax 327-6961

Closing Jul 3, 2010



Asphalt paving wall be combed out during this hme and we kindly ask that ALL meterist trvvelling along this rovte make the following:
diversions to their destination:

"Minions! bravelling east alone Saunders Beach should divert onto GROVE AWE, ard follow the ssg5 podted "DIVERSION" through
DOLPHIN DR, JFK DR, FARRINGTON RD, EDEN ST, FOSTER ST, WORTH DUNSIORE AVE, CHIPPINGHAM RD and
cominus along West Bay Strest to their destination,

*Modorist travelling west towards Saunders Beach should followme the signs posted "DIVERSION® through CHIPPINGHAM Ri,
NORTH DUNATORE AVE, FOSTER AVE, EDEN ST, FARRINGTON BRD, JPR DR, DOLPHIN LINK DRGROVE AVE
ind continue along West Bay street

Detours wall be clearly marked to alle the sabe passage for pedestrians & motorist and proper signage wall be erected delineating
the work zone:

Fir paferce Mieeughows tile project is preaiy apprectited and we do apologize for te inconvenience d delays comsed.

For further information please conlact :

Jiae Cartellone Constreceiones Civile: $A
Ofice Hus: hlom-F ri BoM aa bo 2) pana
Offices( 242 )522-844 1922-2610

Fanwil: bahamasnekghborcarlellone.comar

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Trameparrt
Hotline: (242) M2-971Hh

Fumail: publicworksha hamnas.evle

Grab your discount
out of the Bag!

Extra 5% off for Privilege Cards
& Corporate Partners

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Harbour bay 394-5767 aebahamas.com

MO ei eT NY
no need for more
foreign teachers



College, are the result of
the broken education sys-
tem. It's not "their" fault,
but they are not qualified
to be teachers, because we
have failed them when they
were students.

“T see this with my own
children. They come home
with notes from the teach-
ers all the time. Not a single
note is without spelling
errors and grammatical mis-
takes.”

Taylor said: “I am an
educator and though there
are educators that are
despondent, nonchalant
and in some respects jaded,
I posit that it comes from
their inability to effectively
cope with the gross lack of
personal and behavioral
development that parents
have failed to instill in chil-
dren.

“When I began teaching I
never anticipated having to
instruct, rehearse and prac-
tice the basic principles of
courtesy, respect, and man-
ners that are the key essen-
tials to being a social human
being.

“Furthermore, it was a
rude awakening when I
realised that it is not that
the children are inherently
rude, but it came from an
underdevelopment in being
structured and driven that
comes from being taught
responsibility and how to
have an abiding respect for
authority or being obedient
to the rules of an adult.

“Parents are so busy
being who they are that
they do not realise that
their child is growing up
without an internal compass
in a world filled with preda-
tory influences geared
towards exploiting the igno-
rant and extreme punish-
ment and disenfranchise-
ment from a society that is
limited in its diversity.

“If parents are not
installing and enhancing a
child's vision of self along
with an understanding of
their role as a human being
and citizen; the most dedi-
cated teacher will be able
to only inspire a limited
number to excel as the
desire to succeed comes
from the great expectations
of those that birthed us,
those that support us and
those that surround us in
our private lives.”

your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 7



Romeo Farrington:

Rider with a cause }/7

ONE of Nassau’s most famous
drivers is trading in his car keys
for the clean, healthy and traffic-
friendly option of a shiny new
bicycle.

Romeo Farrington, who
became a legend through his work
as a taxi driver and chauffeur, can
now be seen riding his new bicycle
through the streets of Nassau.

Mr Farrington has impressed
thousands of tourists with his hos-
pitality and driving skills.

He has won a Cacique Award
for transportation and another for
Lifetime Achievement in tourism.

As a former Bahamahost train-
er and a frequent guest speaker,
he earned a reputation for leading
the way in transportation and
tourism.

Now, he wants to lead the way
in helping to alleviate Nassau’s
traffic problem.

“T agree that the roads are too
congested,” Mr Farrington said
soon after purchasing his bicycle.
“And I decided that any day that
I don’t have to drive my car, I'll
ride my bike.”

Nostalgia

But Mr Farrington’s decision to
cycle was only in part due to his
environmental and traffic con-
cerns. It was also sparked by nos-
talgia. Cycling was once a large
part of his life.

In 1955 and 1956, Mr Farring-
ton was Nassau’s cycling champi-
on. At the time, cycling was a
major sport and races were always
hotly contested by dozens of ath-
letes.

Mr Farrington recalled that his
group consisted of at least 20 rid-
ers who would consistently prac-
tice together.

They were fiercely competitive,
and they seemed to derive their
entire identity from the race
course.

Mase D. GARDINER HURRICANE
AND BURGULAR PROTECTION

Local legend wants to help
alleviate Nassau’s traffic problem



Each rider earned an alias from
his fellow cyclists. They took on
colourful names such as Little
Caesar, Skinny, Deuce, The Brat,
and The Whip.

Even the name for which Mr
Farrington has become known is
really an alias.

He was called Romeo in cycling
circles because of his shy behavior
around girls at the time. It has
become better known than his
given name — Leviticus.

“When I got in the transporta-
tion business, I saw that the name
was so popular,” he said.

“When I said Romeo, every-
body remembered it. So I
legalised it.”

At 75 years of age, he got a sud-
den urge to cycle again. Riding
now, he said, brings back memo-
ries of his racing days.

He recalled that he first became
interested in cycling in 1954, when
Carl Blades won the cycling cham-
pionship. Mr Blades, he said, was
small in size — far smaller than he
was.

After seeing how a much small-
er man was able to win the cham-
pionship race, his confidence was
boosted, and Mr Farrington was
determined to win the race the
following year.

In 1955, he did win, and he did
it in grand style. Along the route
from McPherson Bend at the east-
ern end of the island to Hobby
Horse Hall at Cable Beach, race
organisers had set up 10 spot
prizes worth £5 each.

The leader at each spot won the
money. Mr Farrington ended up
taking nine of the 10 spot prizes.
Combined with the £50 prize for

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the overall win, he rode away with
£95 that day.

He was in top form to defend
his championship the following
year.

Near the finish line, he recalled,
he and sporting legend Leonard
“Boston Blackie” Miller were
fighting for the win when their
handlebars collided.

They locked into each other on
impact.

“We realised that if we tried to
move, we would fall,” Mr Far-
rington said. “Since everybody
was so far behind us, we just held
hands and coasted over the fin-
ish line. They shared first and sec-
ond prize with us.”

Output

Not long after that race, Mr
Farrington retired from competi-
tive cycling. He suffered from
severe leg cramps. One doctor’s
educated guess was that his legs
could not sustain the massive out-
put from his heart once he began
his adrenaline-filled push.

After walking away from
cycling, Mr Farrington found ful-
fillment in his taxi and limousine
business.

He knows that many people
have forgotten that he was once
on top of the cycling community.
Many younger Bahamians never
had any idea of his cycling history
because they only knew his work
in tourism.

“That’s a part of me that you
have to be past 50 to appreciate,”
he said with a smile. “If you are
not 50 years or older, you would





\

Ville

eat FARRINGTON on his brand new bicycle.

not appreciate that.”

Mr Farrington was content as a
taxi and limousine driver. He built
a thriving enterprise that he is
now turning over to his children.
However, when he saw a collec-
tion of bicycles in a shop window
recently, he impulsively bought
one to relive his glory days. He
also knew that riding the bicycle
would be good for the environ-
ment and for his health.

“T hope more people would see
the wisdom in riding because you







are lessening the traffic on the
street and it is good exercise,” he
said. “I hope the day will come in
the country where there will be
cycle clubs where a group of
senior people will get together
and ride a couple of miles or so. I
hope something like that will
develop.”

He especially hopes to see his
old cycling friends and foes. He
hopes to convince those who are
still alive and well to ride with
him again.

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CLOSED FOR STOCKTAKING JULY 2” & JULY 382

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Public firm goes
out of business

FROM page one

known that he was unwilling :
to invest any more of his per- :
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Mr Simpson previously said :
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regards to personal bank :
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well as allowing the Home :
Centre to remain in his build- :
ing without paying any rent }
for the past 16 months." i

Mr Babak owns the Home :
Centre, and among the senior :
creditors in any liquidation :
are likely to be First- :
Caribbean International Bank :
(Bahamas), which has secured :
its $2 million exposure, and }
the Government. Everyone :
else will have to waitin line. :

Freeport Concrete suffered :
a $636,000 net loss in its 2010 :
second quarter that leaves it :
with negative net worth of :
$855,000. i

In a previous message, Mr :
Simpson said: “Currently, our :
inventory value at the Home :
Centre is only $575,000 and :
our daily sales are insufficient :
to cover our expenses result- :
ing in losses every day. With :
the cash to be able to buy all :
of the inventory that we know :
will move quickly off our :
shelves, we will see an imme- }
diate increase in our daily :
sales. i

"We have proven this can :
be done because in April one :
of our suppliers shipped us :
several containers of building :
materials, and we saw our :
sales increase by 63 per cent :
over the previous two :
months' sales. :

“If we had been able to :
purchase other inventory such :
as major appliances, ac mini :
splits, plumbing and electri- :
cal supplies, carpet, laminate :
flooring, lighting, fans, hard- :
ware, etc, etc our daily sales :
average would have increased :
substantially.” i

¢ SEE TRIBUNE |
BUSINESS FOR |
FULL STORY |



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THE TRIBUNE

Dangerous
playground
fears raised

FROM page one

it seems as though they are poorly constructed and I
wonder if they are even inspected?

“Then there is the termite factor, there sticking
these wooden structures directly into the ground, so
termites eventually eat out the footing of the equip-
ment.

Familiar with facilities and regulations at public
schools in the United States, the teacher also ques-
tioned whether routine inspections are performed to
ensure the integrity of equipment.

The teacher also pointed out the absence of weight
limitation notices, which would alert guardians to
proper equipment use.

In 2003, seven-year-old Kyiel Clarke-Munroe fell to
his death when the monkey bars at Carlton E Francis
Primary School collapsed.

His tragic death severely traumatised numerous
primary school children who witnessed the fall — some
unable to sleep afterwards.

The teacher continued: “The kids are at risk. Safe-

THE popular play area at Goodman’s Beach has come under scrutiny.



ority.”

ty should be the priority, not cheapness.
“The safety of the children should be the main pri-

The installation and maintenance of public play-
ground equipment is regulated under the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture.

Officials were unable to provide response to com-
plaints up to press time.

Holding murder charged for up to three years may be ‘unconstitutional’

FROM page one

brought to trial in a reasonable
amount of time. Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham has indicated that
his administration plans to specify in
law that a reasonable amount of time
would be three years.

It's a move by the Government to
cut down on the number of offenders
committing crimes while on bail, and
assuage public outcry over those
accused of murder being granted bail.

However, the decision has garnered
criticism in the legal community.

Damian Gomez, partner in the law
firm Chilcott Chambers, told The Tri-
bune: "It's a violation of Article 20, it’s
a violation of Article 19 (of the con-
stitution) and it's a violation of the
common law which says that all citi-
zens have the right not to be deprived

of the late

Ja,

of their liberty without some cause."

Mr Gomez, a former senator who
has been practising law for more than
20 years, added that it is the fault of
the police and prosecution for charg-
ing persons with serious offences with-
out sufficient evidence in hand to try
them quickly.

"If you charge someone with mur-
der you ought to have enough evi-
dence to proceed immediately. If you
know the evidence that you have is
insufficient to obtain a conviction,
you have no basis then for charging
them.

"The real issue is why haven't these
people been tried within a reasonable
amount of time?"

Attorney Paul Moss believes such a
practice violates the human rights of

innocent people who may be brought
up on murder charges and are forced
to languish behind bars for years
while police and prosecution search
for further evidence.

"Everyone wants a criminal to be
locked up, but certainly people don't
want the innocent to be locked up.
Extending (holding) time to three
years is not reasonable. I'm not sure
that it’s constitutional but certainly it
is not the answer because all it means
is that they are not on bail but after
three years they will get bail and what
do you do then, extend it to five
years?

"If the government, because of its
own failure, is unable to get people to
court in a timely fashion, the consti-
tution will not bend to them."

Last month, when speaking to Par-
liament about proposed amendments
to the Bail Act and the issue of crime,
Mr Ingraham said he is confident the
changes will be lawful and stand up in
court.

"The only time you cannot deny
bail is when the person has not been
tried within a reasonable period of
time, but there is no such thing as an
absolute right to bail, notwithstanding
what anybody else says.

"And it is our intention in the
Bahamas to propose that in the con-
text of the Bahamas, a reasonable
period of time is three years. We are
satisfied that such a provision will
withstand any challenge before all
competent courts of jurisdiction for
the Bahamas."

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK II - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II — Accounts Payable in
the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Processing invoices for payment by checking accuracy of calculations,
coding and authorized signatures;

Posting invoice disbursements and journal entry data into the accounts
payable system;

Reconciling statements of account for local vendors with balance due
in excess of $5,000.00. This involves generating open payables report to
ensure correctness of entries and vendor balance;

Maintaining and reporting on the Corporation’s meal voucher system;

Preparing schedules (source data for aged payables etc.) or other task
requested by Supervisor or Manager;

Assisting with maintenance of the cheque log and disbursing cheques for
vetting and approved signatures;

Assisting with the filing system of accounts payable documents and fol
lows up on outstanding obligations to local vendors; and

Assisting with resolving vendors disputes/queries.

GAIUS C. BETHEL

Job requirements include:

A minimum of an Associate Degree

(Accounts, Business Administration);

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of the Disbursement Processing module
within the H TE environment;

Ability to operate the Call Accounting System and to post invoice data
for processing of payment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

May 16th, 1964 - June 22nd, 2009

You’re on our minds and in our hearts that’s
a natural place to be.
“For someone who was so special.”
We will ever love you.
“Rest continually forever with the Lord.”

Loving remembered by his parents, Pastor Hon. Philip M.

Bethel. Sc. & Elder Yvonne Bethel: sisters. Deborah & Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
} u 5 4

Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas

on or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.

ra

> =, of family and friends.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




TUESDAY, JUNE 22,



2010





Multt-talented Melinda intends
‘to be the next Lavern Eve’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he multi-talented

athlete had a

promising colle-

giate career when

she graduated
from C R Walker.

But after putting it on hold
for another four years due to
the birth of her two daughters,
Melinda Bastian is now fulfill-
ing her goals and aspirations at
Benedict College.

Having just completed her
junior year, Bastian had a stel-
lar year in volleyball, softball
and track and field where she
has earned All-American and
All-Conference honours and
set numerous records in all
three disciplines.

The major is back after tak-
ing a four-year break in 2002,
and she’s performing at the lev-
el that she expected, especially
in track and field.

“My season was pretty
decent,” said Bastian, an All-
Academic student, who is now
back home for the summer
break. “Last year, I finished
second in the javelin, but this
year I was third.

“T won our conference. I won
the MVP title for the region.
In fact, this past semester, I
took home 21 individual awards
in the javelin, heptathlon, shot
put, high jump. I’ve done it all.”

In track and field alone, Bas-
tian scored a record 53 points
while participating in seven
events for the Tigers as they
finished second at the NCAA
Division IT Outdoor Track and
Field Championships.

That earned her the Wom-
en’s Field Athlete of the Year
honour.

In softball, Bastian helped

SPORTS

INBRIEF

BASKETBALL
BBF INDEPENDENCE
TOURNEY



THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation (BBF), in its effort
to continuously promote and
develop local basketball, is
scheduled to host its annual
Independence Basketball Tour-
nament.

The tournament will take on
a double elimination format
and will be played July 9-10 at
Sir Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
This fun-filled event will be
comprised of local men’s and
women’s teams from the asso-
ciation’s leagues along with
teams made up of Bahamian
college players who came home
for the summer break.

There is a registration fee per
team to cover the cost of tro-
phies and officials due on or
before July 2. No team will be
allowed to register after July 2,
2010.

In this regard, the BBF is
requesting that two represen-
tatives from your team attend a
6pm meeting July 2 at the gym
to further discuss this venture.

ROAD RACE
FASHION HALL FUN
WALK 2010

FASHION Hall is slated to
hold their Fun Walk 2010 6am
Saturday, starting from their
branch on the Top-Of-The-Hill,
Mackey Street.

Proceeds of the event will be
donated to the Bahamas Heart
Association. And there is a
registration fee. For further
information, interested persons





Felipé Major/Tribune staff







MELINDA BASTIAN demonstrates how to spike the ball during the Jackie Conyers Volleyball Camp...

the Tigers to complete the sea-
son with a 25-7 win-loss record
and 16-6 in their conference
before they got eliminated from
the SIAC Softball Champi-
onships with a 9-8 loss to Ken-
tucky State University.
Playing shortstop, Bastian
was named to the SIAC AIl-
Conference Softball team.
And in volleyball, Bastian
was joined by Bahamian Camil-
la Miller on the SIAC Volley-
ball All-Tournament team.
Bastian was also on the
SIAC Volleyball All-Confer-

ence team as a member of the
first team and she was named
the Offensive Player of the
Year. She and Miller assisted
the Tigers in posting a 13-4
record and 10-4 in conference
play.

At the end of it all, Bastian
earned her second consecutive
MVP honour.

“[’m just excited that I’m
back playing again,” said Bast-
ian, who took a break from col-
lege. “Throughout my high
school years, I did a fantastic
year and even when I was in

Kansas, I got All-American in
my freshman year.

“My inspiration is the fact
that I have two daughters now.
I just wanted to be able to do
something for them. I really
want to inspire them.”

Her daughters, six-year-old
Dashawana Bastian and four-
year-old Vanessa Sawyer, have
motivated their mother to the
point that she now feels that
with her ability, she can go all
the way and represent the
Bahamas at the Olympic
Games, either in the javelin or

the heptathlon.

This weekend, Bastian
intends to compete at the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ BTC Nation-
al Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships. And she is looking
to make her presence felt in the
javelin as she provides some
competition to retiring veteran
national record holder Lavern
Eve.

“T look forward to competing
with Lavern,” said Bastian, who

SEE NEXT page

‘Valuable lessons’ at Jackie Conyers v-ball camp

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



THE sixth annual Jackie Conyers Vol-
leyball Camp kicked off yesterday at the

Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

And although the numbers have not
been what organiser Jackie Conyers had
anticipated, she’s convinced that those who
come out and participate for the rest of
the week will be taught some valuable

lessons.

“The coaches are using some new tech-
niques as they step it up a notch,” said









Make a Statement

A YOUNG MAN spikes the ball...

Conyers of the cadet of visiting coaches,
inclusive of husband and wife Del and
Arlene Harris and Bahamian Vanessa
Johnson-Henry of Atlanta, Georgia.

“They will be going through some drills
as we hope to build character through
sports and improve their skills so that when
they return to school, they will be able to
help their volleyball teams.”

Under the theme, “Back to Basics”, the
camp is set to run through Friday between
the hours of 9am and 3pm with the campers
separated based on their level of play.

SEE NEXT page

Trade-ins are always welcome

Portugal scores
7 on NKorea
at the WCup,

Spain wins...
See page 10

Jason and
Jessica win
their divisions
in Olympic
Day run

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

IT was a different route but
the same result for Jason
Williams and Jessica Murray.

Saturday morning, the new
executive board of the
Bahamas Olympic Committee
changed its annual Olympic
Day run from the Queen Eliz-
abeth Sports Centre ending up
at the Paradise Island parking
lot to Montagu Beach and back
after going over the two Par-
adise Island bridges.

For Williams and Murray,
they welcomed the change as
they once again won another
title in the men’s and women’s
divisions.

“It was good. I expected the
route to be the same, but they
changed it. It's not the Olympic
Day run that I'm used too, but
everybody has to adjust to the
changes," said Williams, who
easily dominated the depleted
field of top runners to finish in
36.36 seconds. "It was okay.”

The only difference with the
new route, as opposed to the
old one, was the fact that you
had to go over the new bridge
and head all the way to the turn
at the Ocean Club Golf Club
before heading back over the
old bridge and to the finish line
at Montagu.

"It wasn't as fast as the old

race because we just had the
one bridge to run,” Williams
said. "But I was expecting more
participants to give me some
competition. But none of the
top distance runners showed
up.
Williams was mainly refer-
ring to his brother, Oneil
Williams, the defending cham-
pion and former champion
Mackey Williams, their arch-
rivals.

Although she didn't have any
competition either, Murray was
the second finisher in the run,
chasing Williams about two
minutes later in 38.19. She too
was pleased with the new
course.

"It was really nice. The
weather was nice too,” Murray
stated. "I wished we had more
competitors. But the course was
nice. It's a course I'm used to
running, so I really didn't have
any problem. We just had more
hills as opposed to the old
Olympic Day run. But it wasn't
a problem once you came off
the bridge.”

The organisers of the BOC,
formerly the Bahamas Olympic
Association, attracted a large

SEE NEXT page

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Portugal scores 7 on NKorea at WCup, Spain wins



HONDURAS’ Sergio Mendoza (left) vies
for the ball with Spain’s Xabi Alonso during
the World Cup group H match at Ellis Park
Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa,
Monday...

(AP Photo)

‘Valuable lessons’ at Jackie

Conyers v-ball camp



By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer



JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Por-
tugal exploded for seven goals in its
second match at the World Cup, dom-
inating North Korea and knocking the
Asian team out of the tournament,
and Spain got back on track with a 2-0
win over Honduras on Monday.

The 2006 World Cup semifinalist
Portuguese finally got a goal from Cris-
tiano Ronaldo in the 7-0 rout in Cape
Town. It was the Real Madrid winger's
first goal for his country in two years in
competitive games.

Also, Spain got its first win of the
tournament at Ellis Park in Johannes-
burg, but it was Chile that moved into
first place in Group H with six points
by beating 10-man Switzerland 1-0.

Portugal was held to a 0-0 draw by
Ivory Coast in its opening Group G
match, but the goals poured forth on
Monday.

Raul Meireles gave the Portuguese
a 1-0 halftime lead, and Tiago added
two in the second half to complement
Ronaldo's strike and those from Simao
Sabrosa, Hugo Almeida and Liedson.

"It was a great day for Portugal and
Portuguese football," Portugal coach
Carlos Queiroz said "The players are
really happy with the way they played,
the attitude for the game, the beautiful
football, the beautiful goals."

Portugal still has to play Brazil to get
into the round of 16. The five-time
champions have already qualified.

The 7-0 rout was the most one-sided
World Cup match since Germany beat
Saudi Arabia 8-0 at the 2002 tourna-
ment in South Korea and Japan.

Spain was also disappointing in its
opener, losing to Switzerland 1-0, but
David Villa took care of things against
the Hondurans, scoring in the 17th
and 51st minutes.

Villa, who has now scored five
career World Cup goals for his coun-

try, had a chance for a hat trick in the
62nd but his penalty shot went wide of
the right post with the goalkeeper div-
ing the opposite direction.

Spain will face Chile in its final
group match, and will likely need to
win convincingly in order to avoid fac-
ing Brazil in the round of 16.

Winners

"If we beat Chile we're practically
group winners, so we're happy," Villa
said. "The good thing is that this result
means we depend on ourselves."

In Port Elizabeth, substitute Mark
Gonzalez scored the only goal in the
75th, heading in a pass from Esteban
Paredes to give the Chileans a perfect
record through two matches in the
group. "We had some good luck near
the end when we got the goal,” Gon-
zalez said. "We just kept trying our
best, trying hard, and we got the goal.
This was a great moment for me and

for our team."

Switzerland played most of the
match with 10 men because midfielder
Valon Behrami was red-carded for
violent conduct.

Also, the football fan who walked
into the England dressing room after
its 0-0 draw against Algeria will go on
trial on Friday. Pavlos Joseph
appeared in a Cape Town court for
the second time Monday to face tres-
passing charges.

In Paris, French bank Credit Agri-
cole SA suspended a television adver-
tisement featuring some of France's
best players because the national team
refused to train on Sunday.

The players said they didn't want
to practice because striker Nicolas
Anelka was sent home for insulting
the French coach.

The fast-food chain Quick also said
it is canceling an advertising campaign
with Anelka because of the player's
poor image.



FROM page 9

“Everyone, at the end of the
day, would have improved their
skills,” Conyers said. “We have
seen the improvements in the
kids who return. So we know
that those who are here this
year will also improve.”

Del Harris said the camp
seems to have participants who
are younger than in the past,
but as the camp progresses, he
anticipates that more of the old-
er campers will be coming out.

“We will be working on the
fundamentals and as we get

been here before, we will work
more on their fundamentals,”
he said.

Additionally, the visiting
coaches will also be working
with the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation’s junior national
team practice that will be held
in the afternoons.

Arlene Harris said they are
hoping to make the camp an
exciting one.

“From the people who are
here, we’re going to work with
them so that they can get better
and eventually they will encour-
age more people to come out.
That’s how we can grow the

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Chinese making progress on $30m national stadium

ed i
cli ab Ta cee
ee Be me a:

Multi-talented
Melinda intends
‘to be the next
Lavern Eve’

FROM page 9

admitted that she only went up
against the 44-year-old once in
her career.

As Eve starts to wind down
her career, Bastian said she
hopes that “I can learn some
things from her.”

“She still has a lot of tech-
nique that I can get from her.
But from me to her, I just want
her to know that I intend to be
the next Lavern Eve.”

And while she’s willing to
learn from the Bahamas’ best,
Bastian said she hopes that oth-
er Bahamian athletes will take a






























Tribune staff







WORKERS are making progress on the $30 million National Stadium. In fact, this photograph shows
how some of the steel being used to construct the stadium is being removed. Work got started on the
stadium in March, 2009, and has been going very well. The new state-of-the-art complex is being built
by the Chinese government as a gift to the Bahamian people. The stadium is expected to be completed
by next year...







sport,”

defence,”

work,”

sport.”

she said.

She said that although a lot
of the campers can run fast,
jump high and hit hard, they
want to ensure that they instill
the discipline of the game.

“We want to teach them the
fundamentals of passing, set-
ting and hitting, serving and
then running and playing some
she said. “Hopeful-
ly, if they can learn these fun-
damentals, they will be better.”

Johnson-Henry, a former
national team member who
played along side Conyers, said
she’s delighted to be back home
to assist her long-time friend.

“Tt’s always a plus for me
because I don’t look at this as
she insisted. “Tt’s always
a joy to be able to come back
and make a contribution to the

Over the years, Johnson-
Henry said those campers who
return have shown their
improvement and that makes
their job easier because they
know that they are making an
impression on the campers.

“We just want to encourage
the campers here to bring out
more of their team-mates,”
stated. “I think if they can do _ year.
that, they will see a difference

in their teams next year.”

team player Glen Rolle.

skills to succeed.”

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A number of local coaches
are also assisting in the camp.
One of them is men’s national

“We’re trying to teach all of
the skills to the youngsters,”
Rolle said. “We want to teach
them the fundamentals so that
when they start to play the
game, they will have all of the

Rolle said that the crowd
could be a lot better, but he’s
confident that as the week pro-
gresses, the numbers should
increase.

This year, Mt Carmel’s coach
Kirkwood Greene has brought
in a number of his players
because he said he saw the dif-

she ference in those who played last

“T like the fundamentals that
they are teaching,” he said.
“These younger kids can learn
the basics so when they move
up, you don’t have to teach
them so much.”

Greene said he was particu-
larly pleased with the progress
of his son, Kirkwood Jr. He’s
now trying out for the junior
national team and trying to
ensure that other players are
taking advantage of the camp.

FROM page 9

number of competitors, who
either ran or participated in two
different segments of the walk.

In the competitive walk,
perennial kingpin Philip Moss
captured another title in the
men's division, while former
volleyball standout Kimberly
Saunders left her mark on the
women's division.

"T really didn't train. This
was my first race since Atlantic
Medical,” Moss pointed out. "I
haven't walked for one month.
I was just jogging. So I'm not
100 per cent yet. So I just went
out there and walked. There
wasn't any pressure or any-
thing, so I took my time."

Without any water stops on
the course, Moss said he had
no other choice but to take his
time so that he would not have
dehydrated before he got back
in.

For Saunders, she noted that
she was able to achieve her
goal, which was to put in a good
performance.

"T went out fast, as I intended

page out of her book.

“T just want them to know
that they should not let any-
thing stop them from achieving
their goals,” she pointed out.
“Only you can determine how
far you can go in correcting
your error.

“You might fail here and
there, but failure is not the end
of your life. When one door
closes, another one will open
up. So be prepared to use what-
ever avenue you are presented
with.”

At age 26, Bastian said it’s
not hard for her to adjust to
competing with and against the
younger athletes in college. At
5-feet, 11-inches, she’s holding
her own and doing it well.

“It’s an inspiration for me.
It’s spectacular,” she summed
up. “A lot of people have been
telling me that my career in
sports was over after I had my
first child. But here I am, doing
it and doing it at a high level. I
have no regrets.”

While home, in addition to
working with the Jackie Cony-
ers Volleyball Camp this week
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, Bastian intends to also
work as an instructor with the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s summer programme
in July.

Jason and Jessica win their
divisions in Olympic Day run

Here's a look at the top three
finishers in each category:

Male Walker

16-25 - Baysie Dennis

36-45 - Ryan Bethel, Mario
Bethel and Neil Murrell.

46-59 - Philip Moss, James
Bodie and Peter Delancy

60-and-over - George Smith,
Eric Seymour and Wellington
Braynen

Male Runners

15-and-under - Rashad Rolle,
Reagan Cartwright and Rashad
Cartwright

16-25 - Ashlany Murray Jr,
Gabriel Rahming and
Lavaughn Ferguson

26-35 - Jason Williams,
Edward Fritz and Denzel Sirra

36-45 - Roy Sanchez, Carl-
ton Russell and Derek Fergu-
son

46-59 - Randy Thurston,
Ashland Murray Sr and Ray-
mond Rudon

Female Walkers

15-and-under - Doreth Stra-
chan and Pamala Pratt

26-35 - Joycelyn Scarlett,
Toosdai Smith and Okera
Johnson-Simms

231 four cylinder engine wiih auiomatic transmission,
the: epost hoch efthiesem vehocks in ts class. 6 chee od syanein,
power Wirkkews kaecks ancl mirrors, see curtain aar bags,
[Finch allow wheels, completely new aeradymamic body

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Fire PRK: Are, 3 POT Pe th, Nhoiee

and mepection to birthday, Poll tank of pees, Dkeer mals,

to do, but when I was going
over the bridge, I sort of
relaxed and coming back I sort
of picked it up," said Saunders, 46-59 - Kimberly Saunders,
whose aim was to catch any and Margo Strachan and Ruth Not-
all of the men walking in the tage

36-45 - Arnett Cash, Undell
Stuart and Avis Bullard

aes

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front of her because she didn't
have any female counterparts
to challenge her.

"T wasn't able to catch the
two males in front of me, but I
won the female category. I
guess one of these days, it will
happen. I really want to beat
the number one guy, Phil Moss.
So I just have to continue to
train harder. Maybe one of
these days I will beat him."

Female Runners

16-25 - Rikesh Thompson

26-35 - Jessica Murray, Eliz-
abeth Shaddock, Kirsten Sweet-
in

36-45 - Rayvonne Bethel,
Janice Smith and Shavaughn
Blades

46-59 - Pam Richardson,
Norma Miller and Patrice Chea

Wheelchair - Theron Far-
rington

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

Major car dealership
denies owing thousands
to Customs department

FROM page one

such cars had been raised to
85 per cent.

Mr Fitzgerald said he would
not “necessarily have a prob-
lem with the fact that the low-
er rate of duty was paid if
every single Bahamian whose
car was brought in on or
around the 25th of May was
allowed to pay that same rate.”

“Somebody must explain
this, somebody must be held
responsible,” said the Senator.

However, as was reported
at that time, many members
of the public who had import-
ed vehicles around that time
were caught off guard when
they found themselves having
to pay more duty on their
vehicle than they had expect-
ed, once the old duty structure
was scrapped and a new one
introduced in the 2010/2011
budget on May 26.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s operations man-
ager, told The Tribune that
NMC submitted documenta-
tion for the six vehicles in
question prior to the Prime
Minister announcing the duty
rate changes in Parliament.

The cars would have
attracted a 60 per cent duty
rate under the old duty rate
structure, and an 85 per cent
rate under the new one — sub-
sequently reduced to 75 per
cent after Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham consulted
with local auto importers.

The Department of Cus-
toms approved the vehicles for
a 60 per cent duty rate, accord-
ing to Mr Lowe, and on May
27 — the day after the Prime
Minister announced the
increases, which went into
effect immediately — the car
dealer paid $67,237.20 to clear
the vehicles. This was $28,000
less than would have been
paid if the 85 per cent duty
rate had been charged, and
$17,000 less than the rate when
it was subsequently reduced
to 75 per cent.

Mr Lowe said he was con-
tacted for the first time about
the matter yesterday morning
after an article appeared in a
newspaper claiming the com-
pany had paid a lower rate of
duty than it should have. He
said he told Assistant Comp-
troller Charles Turner that
NMC would not be paying the
difference, as he felt the com-
pany had done everything it
was required to do by the
Department at the time.

“T don’t know how Cus-
toms can approve an entry and
then we’re the ones in the
wrong, so I’ve suggested he
contact those clients (who
bought the cars) and get the
money back from them. It’s
outside our responsibility. Cus-

toms approved the entry we
put it in, we paid it once it was
approved, took the cars off the
dock and they were sold short-
ly after.

“The NMC is above
reproach. I would never stand
for anything like that. The
owners would never stand for
anything like that. I would be
fired immediately if I were to
even attempt anything like
that. So I don’t know how we
can be responsible for — I don’t
know what to call it — mis-
communication between the
Prime Minister’s office and
their office.”

However, Comptroller of
Customs Glenn Gomez said it
is not as simple as that.

“Tt’s amazing what people
will say to try to get around
doing what they should do,”
he said when asked to respond
to Mr Lowe's position.

Mr Gomez alleged that the
broker for NMC was only able
to pay the 60 per cent rate of
duty on May 27 because they
did not go to the Departmen-
t’s “query line” upon return
to the dock to pay for the
items, instead heading directly
to the cashier, who would not
have known to question the
lower rate being applied.

Asked whether in this case
this may be a weakness in the
system, whereby brokers or
individuals can bypass paying
the correct rate by avoiding
the “query line”, Mr Gomez
said “yes, but it does not usu-
ally happen. Only if there’s
some familiarity.”

Mr Gomez claimed it
would be NMC, not the bro-
ker acting on NMC’s behalf,
who would be responsible for
paying up the $17,000 as “they
are one in the same” as NMC
contracts the broker to “work
on their behalf.”

Meanwhile, as for Mr
Lowe’s suggestion that the rev-
enue-collection agency should
go directly to the people who
bought the cars for the money,
rather than the car dealership,
Mr Gomez dismissed that as
“ridiculous.”

“The people who pur-
chased the cars were not the
ones who came to Customs to
pay the duty,” he said.

The Customs Comptroller
said that he was informed
about the incident in question
later on the day it took place
and instructed officers to con-
tact NMC about paying the
difference. “I know I gave
instructions for that to happen
two weeks ago,” he said,
responding to Mr Lowe’s
statement that the department
only called after the incident
received publicity in the press.

“The next step will be for us
to see what steps can be taken
to collect the revenue,” he
added.

Trial of two police officers is adjourned

FROM page one

that the matter could commence sometime in August.

Key, 28, died in hospital on January 19, 2008, from injuries
claimed to have been suffered during an alleged beating at
the Grove Police Station on June 17, 2007. He had spent several
months in a coma at the Princess Margaret and Jackson Memo-
rial hospitals. Mr Key had reportedly been arrested on a traf-
fic violation and was in a holding cell at the station at the time
of the alleged attack. Cpl Donovan Gardiner and Constable
Tavares Bowleg, who were arraigned in the Supreme Court in
June 2008 are on bail. Gardiner is charged with manslaughter
and Bowleg faces an abetment charge.

IN THIS heat, the one

: thing you may be longing
: for most is something cool.

Ben & Jerry’s at Atlantis,

: Paradise Island is offering
: a double dose — In addition
: to their world famous
: flavours, you can check out
: their Junka “moo” video
: currently streaming on You
: Tube.

The Ben & Jerry’s team

: at Atlantis hopes Bahami-
: ans stop by for a cool
: refresher but also that they
: hunt down the video on the
: popular You Tube site as
: they are in a competition
: that could bring more fame
: to the local store and also
: aid some local organisa-
: tions.

Unique

Ben & Jerry’s Interna-

: tional has asked each of its
: franchisees to submit a
: video of how they can pro-
: mote the company with
: something unique from
: their town, city or — in this
: case — country.

All videos are on You

! Tube and are running for
: the entire month of June.
: The store that has the
: most “hits” for their video
: will be the winner.

Kerzner International

: senior executive pastry
: chef Paul Hayward says

pay less for insuring your home!

Have you heard the good news?

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 11

Ben & Jerry’s aiming for

votes for Junka ‘moo’ video



You
Ben and Jerry's Bahamas JUNKAMOO.mov

ErichHal 1 wdece =



Erie all—



that while they’d also like
to beat out more than 170
franchisees with stores
scattered across North
America, Europe and
Australia, they have a larg-
er goal in mind.

Chef Paul says there’s a
total of $5,000 up for
grabs. Half will go towards
a charity of the winner’s



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re.
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pi.

7 7 :
: 2 -
oe ; id } ne i J a
4 '

| 4 WHOPPE RR : , : )
1 i . 5 - |

ben and jams atlantis

Subaeribe



— Welcome to Ben ard Jerry's Moving Willige version of

itil aT ean Wen Anee on youtube.com

choice and the other
$2,500 will go to the store
itself.

“Tf our Atlantis Ben &
Jerry’s franchise is the
winner, we will be donat-
ing the funds to Junior
Junkanoo and to the Ran-
furly Home,” he said.

“Our version is called
Junka "moo" — a celebra-

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Search

Snore a edo



1,306 =




tion of freedom, great Ben
& Jerry's Ice Cream, and
fun, making it a twist on
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dancing with a truly fes-
tive atmosphere.”

To see the video, visit
www.youtube.com and
type in “Ben & Jerry’s
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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Legac

Ball



THE SIR LYNDEN PINDLING FOUNDATION’S Lega-
cy Ball 2010 took place on Saturday at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort. The event was held under the patronage of Dame
Marguerite Pindling. As well as Dame Marguerite, dignitaries
such as Sir Arthur Foulkes and Perry Christie were in atten-
dance.

PHOTOS: Peter Ramsay

















1

9
10



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

palondar contest

ori contest latais listed Of our website Visit www.familyguardian.com for

Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for
the company’s 2011 calendar will be “A Celebration of Nature”. Photographs may be of any
subject (animate or inanimate), scene or histrocial structure that features a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas.

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 30, 2010. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk
and will not be returned.

All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village Road and
East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00a.m and 5:00p.m weekdays only. Envelopes should
be marked “Calendar Contest”.

All entries must be accompanied by a signed and completed official entry form, available
at any Family Guardian office, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.
familyguardian.com).

Only colour images will be considered. Images must be provided as digital files on CD. Digital
images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure
the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality
JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be
supplied with colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints
submitted without CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name,
photo subject and photo location must be written on the reverse of the print.

Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality
and quality of photograph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the
website (www-familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family
Guardian’s 2011 calendar. The decision of the judges will be final.

A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs
selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per
photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos.

The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached
thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company reserves the right to
use such in the future. Photos will not be returned.

Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.

Previously published photos are not eligible.

A Exeetont




inancial SHRGHh Rating

special hints and contest details!

entry form
leading jane 30, 2010

Return this form with photos and CD to:
Calendar Contest

Family Guardian Corporate Centre

Village Road & East Bay Street, PO. Box SS-6232
Nassau, Bahamas

Name:

Telephone: B H C



EMail:



P.0. Box:



Street:



Address:



Island:



Number of Photos Entered (a maximum of 5):

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as
a winner in the 2011 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the
property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all
rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos
entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have
not been previously published.



Signature Date



NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE | FINANCIAL CENTRE | www-familyguardian.com























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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



















RANDY BUTLER

Private
airline
assessing
IPO

* Sky Bahamas chief
says $9.7m revenue
airline mulling IPO
or attracting in private
investors, current
owners having invested
$16m over two years

* Carrier investing
$1.25m in new
maintenance hangar
and $1.4m in new
plane, as it moves
on ‘winter’ start to
scheduled US flights
from three Bahamian
islands and upcoming
Andros service

* Hoping government
realises sector’s value,
as carrier employs
more than 90 full-time
with monthly wage
bill exceeding $218k

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

A LEADING Bahami-
an private airline yesterday
said it was mulling either
an initial public offering
(IPO) next year or attract-
ing in new private investor
groups, its current owners
having invested $16 million
over two years into a busi-
ness that has grown rev-
enues to just shy of $10 mil-
lion per annum.

Captain Randy Butler,
chief executive and presi-
dent of Sky Bahamas, said
the carrier, which is cur-
rently undertaking some 31
flights per day, was aiming
to begin scheduled service
into the US from three
Bahamian islands by this
winter, in addition to break-
ing ground on its $1.25 mil-
hon new maintenance
hangar at Lynden Pindling
International Airport
(LPIA) this August.

Captain Butler, who is
also the Bahamas Chamber

SEE page 4B





Damianos

ine

TUESDAY,

{UNE 2-2.



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL FIDELITY

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(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

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(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Broker blasted for supervision failing

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Securities

Commission

disciplinary

panel has fined

CFAL, the
broker/dealer arm of the for-
mer Colina Financial Group
(CFG), $10,000 after finding it
breached the Securities Indus-
try Act’s regulations by failing
to properly supervise a former
employee who effected an
improper share trading scheme
involving Commonwealth Bank
stock.

The three-man panel, whose
decision has been obtained by
Tribune Business, found that
CFAL Securities, under its for-
mer name First Bahamas Cap-
ital, either did not have “sub-
stantive controls” in place, or
was not following them, allow-
ing ex-broker Hiram Cox to
engage in a scheme that
allegedly financed the purchase
of Commonwealth Bank shares
by seven of that institution’s
managers.

The panel, which was chaired
by former registrar general,
Sterling Quant, and included
current Insurance Commis-
sioner, Lennox McCartney,
found that “various checks and
balances were not in place” at
First Bahamas/CFAL, as con-
firmed by the latter’s March 6,
2006, report to the Securities
Commission outlining the
action taken to tighten internal

Royal
Bank sees
bad loan
slowing

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

ROYAL Bank of Canada
(RBC) is seeing a slowdown in
the growth of its non-accrual
loans, although the bank’s vice-
president and country head said
yesterday: “We are not out of
the woods yet.” He added that
the economy and unemploy-
ment would need to turnaround
to see arrears decrease.

Nathaniel Beneby said RBC
was profitable with a strong
capital base, and is in no danger
of destabilisation. This, despite
a 50 per cent increase in the
bank’s licence fees, which were
increased by $800,000 to $2.4
million per year.

“The country has experi-
enced challenging economic
times,” said Mr Beneby. “There
is a Budget deficit and the Gov-
ernment is endeavouring to bal-
ance that budget and reduce
the deficit.

“One of the ways they pro-
pose to raise more revenue is to
increase bank license fees, and
the banks can absorb those
fees.”

SEE page 7B

Sotheby's

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

* Securities Commission panel fines CFAL/First Bahamas $10,000

for breaching Act’s regulations by failing to monitor ex-broker

* Finds ‘substantive controls were either not in place, or were not
being followed’, and ‘various checks and balances were not in place’
* But broker pledged to have implemented ‘corrective action’ to deal with defects
* Ruling relates to share trading scheme involving Commonwealth Bank ESOP stock



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Securities Industry
Act does not allow the capital
markets regulator to take reg-
ulatory action over provisions
that also carry criminal penal-
ties, a disciplinary panel find-
ing that this forced it to “dis-
continue” proceedings against



‘Criminal penalties’
bar to Commission
regulatory actions

an ex-First Bahamas Capi-
tal/CFAL broker for alleged
violations.

A three-man Securities
Commission panel, chaired by
former registrar general Ster-
ling Quant, and also includ-
ing Insurance Commissioner
Lennox McCartney, in ruling

SEE page 4B





controls.

First Bahamas had further
referred to these actions in its
November 17, 2008, response
to the Securities Commission’s
formal complaint against it, and
the panel ruled: “These are not

insubstantial changes, and they
were not in place at the time
this incident took place.”

The Commission’s panel, in
its late-September 2009 ruling,
said interviews with First
Bahamas/CFAL employees fur-

ther backed the capital markets
regulator’s case, adding: “The
evidence demonstrated that
there was either none or very
little supervision of the activi-
ties of First Bahamas Capital
broker, Hiram Cox.

“Existing procedures, such
as the signatories on trade
cheques and the review of all
supporting trade documenta-
tion, were insufficient in pre-
venting the activity engaged in
by Mr Cox.”

Gawaine Ward, the Securi-
ties Commission’s in-house
legal counsel, in his submissions
to the disciplinary panel
referred to interviews given by
Anthony Ferguson, CFAL/First
Bahamas president, and senior
executives Tamara Evans and
Sean Longley, “which further
confirmed that substantive con-
trols were either not in place, or
were not being followed.

“It is therefore our conclu-
sion that First Bahamas Capital
breached regulation 71 (1) of
the regulations, and it failed to

‘We have no cash to stay in business’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete last
night became the first BISX-
listed company to announce it
had ceased operations and was
seeking shareholder permission
to go into liquidation, its chief
executive telling Tribune Busi-
ness: “I have no cash to keep
running the business.”

With no investors respond-
ing to last month’s last ditch
plea to raise $3 million for the
public company to prevent it
from going bankrupt, Raymond
Simpson said he had no choice
but to yesterday inform 55 staff
that they were being released,
with just five of the 60-strong
complement staying on to pro-

* Freeport Concrete becomes first public and BISX-listed
company to cease operations and move into liquidation
* $3m cash plea not heard, with 55 staff let go immediately

tect Freeport Concrete’s
remaining assets.

Adding that he was now call-
ing an Extraordinary General
Meeting (EGM) to get share-
holder approval to put the com-
pany into liquidation, and
appointing at liquidator, Mr
Simpson told Tribune Business:
“T can’t keep running the oper-
ation without cash.

“We have no cash. We have
no inventory to sell, maybe a
couple of thousand dollars of
inventory a day, but it’s dribs
and drabs. We have no cash to

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

meet payroll unless we sell
$5,000-$6,000 a day [at the
Home Centre], $30,000 a week.

“There’s got to come an end
to it, and as there are no poten-
tial investors or bidders out
there, there’s no eye in the nee-
dle I can thread this thing
through.... Right now, I’ve
ceased operations today and
have got to call an EGM.”

He added of yesterday’s
meeting with Freeport Con-
crete staff: “It was a hard day.

SEE page 3B



properly supervise its employ-
ee, namely Hiram Cox,” the
Commission’s panel ruled.

“The panel has considered
that any penalty imposed ought
to reflect the seriousness of the
breach, and we also take into
consideration the fact that First
Bahamas Capital has taken cor-
rective action and incorporated
procedures aimed at prevent-
ing a recurrence of such an inci-
dent.

“We recommend that a fine
in the amount of $10,000 dollars
be imposed on First Bahamas
Capital, which is to be paid
within 30 days after the receipt
of this decision.”

Neither Anthony Ferguson,
CFAL’s president and princi-
pal, not Securities Commission
executive director Hillary
Deveaux, returned Tribune
Business’s calls for comment
before press deadline last night,
despite messages being left for
both men.

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS eee
Chamber unveils leading honourees

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is this week cele-
brating its Chamber Week 2010
under the theme Business
Unusual. The week-long activ-
ities will be held at the British
Colonial Hilton, starting with
a Mix ‘N Mingle Cocktail
Reception on Tuesday at
6:30pm.

The following day, the
Chamber will hold its Annual
General Meeting and luncheon,
where the keynote speaker will
be Franklyn Wilson.

Friday will see the Cham-
ber’s 39th annual awards pre-
sentation to recognize the
Chamber’s 2010 Lifetime
Achievement Recipient,
Rupert Roberts; Businessper-
sons of the Year, Christopher
and Eleutherios Tsavourssis;
Entrepreneur of the Year,
Randy Butler; and the Business
of the Year, which will be
selected from a group of distin-
guished finalists.

LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT

AWARD RECIPIENT:

Veteran businessman Rupert
Roberts will be heralded as the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s 2010 Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award recipient for his
contributions to business in the
areas of food, retail, banking
and real estate. His career and
accomplishments span over 50

|







RUPERT ROBERTS

years.
Mr Roberts opened his first
Super Value on East Street in
April 1965, with the mission of
“putting food on the Bahamian
table at the best possible price”.
The chain grew along with the
Bahamas to 11 stores and a
staff of over 550 employees.
Numerous endeavours fol-
lowed, including banking, real
estate and the Bimini Sands
Resort & Marina development.
He has assisted in many chari-
table causes and received
awards including a Paul Harris
Fellow Award from Rotary, the
Distinguished Citizen’s Award
from the Chamber of Com-
merce and also the Silver









RANDY BUTLER

Jubilee Award in Business from
the Government.

In January 2004, Mr Roberts
received the Honour Officer of
the Most Excellent Order of
the British Empire (OBE), and
in May 2005 he received the
CEE Global Awards for Ethics
and Excellence.

In June 2005, he received the
Outstanding Service Award by
the Margaret McDonald Policy
Management and Administra-
tion Centre.

ENTREPRENEUR OF

THE YEAR:

Captain Randy Butler is an
outstanding pilot who has
worked in numerous roles in
civil aviation.









FRANKLYN WILSON

Mr Butler has achieved a
‘first’? in two career paths. In
1996, he became the first
Bahamian practicing in the
Bahamas to be designated by
the Bahamas Civil Aviation
Authority as a pilot examiner,
and from 2007 to 2008 he was
the first ever manager of public
safety at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

During more than 22 years
in the aviation industry, Mr
Butler has spent seven work-
ing in the Flight Standards
Inspectorate as an aviation safe-
ty inspector. He holds US,
Canadian and Bahamas Airline
Transport Pilot Licenses with
type-ratings on the Boeing 737,



Create your future with our experience.



Lester Cox encourages

persistence.

As Lester Cox begins his day not only does he begin it early, but he begins it with the

determination to overcome any obstacles that come his way.

His love of figures and dedication to the field has led him to spend almost 23 years in
banking, with seven years spent with Royal Bank. Today he serves as RBC Director, Real

Estate Markets and Deputy, Commercial Financial Services.

Mr. Cox is responsible for RBC’s relationship management of commercial real estate clients
and also plays a key leadership role by providing coaching and managerial oversight of

the entire Commercial Financial Services Centre.

One of his biggest on-the-job challenges is being supportive and fair while advising
clients sufficiently during these tough economic times, encouraging them to use sound

judgment when managing finances.

Before joining Royal Bank, Mr. Cox worked within the banking industry as a Commercial
Account Manager, Project Manager, Branch Manager and Country Head, St. Lucia and

Retail Banking Director, Windward Islands.

Mr. Cox believes the key to a long-standing career in his field is commitment and loyalty.
“Very early on | decided that whatever happens, | would stick with it and not cut comers
and not compromise.” He advises young people considering the field of banking to,
“Take pride in your job: don’t be comfortable with mediocrity and be consistent and

persistent.”

Mr. Cox is a Fellow of the Institute of Canadian Bankers and Certified Internal Auditor
(Inactive). Married to wife, Joan, he enjoys traveling, walking, chess, board games, family
activities and speaking French. Mr. Cox attends St. Thomas More Roman Catholic Church.

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

® Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada.
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

RBC Royal Bank
of Canada

KuXe,





Â¥
i : e
(a «&/
7 ,
_ \
EE







CHRISTOPHER TSAVOUSSIS

Dash 8, Cessna Citation, Beech
1900 and seaplane aircraft, and
has earned eight distinctions
amongst his diplomas and cer-
tificates.

As an owner and sharehold-
er of SkyBahamas, Mr Buter is
currently the chief executive
and president with responsibil-
ity for the company’s day-to-
day management. He reports
directly to the Board, and leads
a team of highly skilled avia-
tion professionals to ensure
SkyBahamas continues to suc-
ceed in the challenging and
highly-competitive climate of
commercial aviation.

BUSINESS PERSONS OF

THE YEAR:

Brothers Christopher P.
Tsavoussis and Eleutherios
‘Terry’ Tsavoussis are seasoned
entrepreneurs and management
professionals. Their back-
grounds include new business
and human resources develop-
ment, plus strategic marketing
and planning.

They currently own and
operate Wendy’s (Bahamas)
and Marco’s Pizza. Their indi-
vidual careers span decades.
and include the successful oper-
ation of a variety of businesses
such as Dunkin Donuts, Domi-
no’s Pizza, Atlantic Satellite,
Caribbean Franchise Holdings,
Premier Homes and Aetos
Holdings.

In the past five years they
have grown the Wendy’s fran-
chise to eight locations, increas-
ing the company’s profitability
while creating numerous
employment and career oppor-
tunities for a staff boasting
some 400 persons.

They are also the Caribbean
Franchisee license holders for
Marco’s Pizza. The duo share a
vision for increased growth and



TERRY TSAVOUSSIS

sustainability, while continuing
in their commitment to con-
tribute positively to the devel-
opment of the economy of the
Bahamas.

OUTSTANDING

BUSINESS OF THE

YEAR FINALISTS:

In the category of 50 or more
employees, the nominees are:
AID - Automated Industrial
Distributors, the Bamboo
Shack and Robin Hood Enter-
prises, while in the category of
less than 50 employees, those
businesses include Glinton,
Sweeting, O’Brien, Rubins and
the Bahamas Orthodontic Cen-
tre.

LUNCHEON SPEAKER:

Franklyn Wilson, the Cham-
ber’s 2008 Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award Recipient, will be
its special guest speaker at this
year’s Annual General Meet-
ing.

Given the current economic
environment and the state of
the Bahamian economy, Mr
Wilson has been asked to
address the topic chosen for the
Week — BUSINESS UNUSU-
AL - and to provide his insight
and perspective on our current
economic dilemma and the way
forward.

As a visionary and a pioneer
of the Sunshine Boys, Mr. Wil-
son is the most constant link to
the group that has gone on to
create or manage many busi-
nesses, including but not limit-
ed to Arawak Homes; Sunshine
Insurance (Agents & Brokers);
Royal & Sun Alliance Insur-
ance (Bahamas); Purity Bak-
ery; Snack Food Wholesale;
Eleuthera Properties (owners
of over 4,600 acres of land,
including Davis Harbour Mari-
na at South Eleuthera) and
Freeport Oil.

Broker blasted for supervision...

FROM page 1B

Tracing the share trading
scheme’s origins, the Commis-
sion panel’s ruling recalled how
Commonwealth Bank had
established an Employee Stock
Option Plan (ESOP), granting
members of its management
team options to acquire the
bank’s stock at a $6 per share
price. These options were due
to expire on April 30, 2006.

During November 2005,
Wayde Bethel, a Common-
wealth Bank branch manager,
exercised his option at a time
when the bank’s shares were
trading on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX) within a price range of
$8.50-$9. Mr Bethel than
approached Mr Cox who, using
his First Bahamas Capital post,
allegedly sold the stock
acquired for $6 per share at the
higher prevailing market price,
netting Mr Bethel a profit.

He then informed other
Commonwealth Bank man-
agers of what he had done, and
the Commission panel’s ruling
found: “The Commission was
advised that sometime between
November 2005 and February
2006, Mr Cox and Mr Bethel
allegedly facilitated, and par-
ticipated in, a scheme whereby
other managers of Common-
wealth Bank (seven in total)
were able to exercise their
options under their respective
ESOPs and sell their shares to
third party purchasers, who had
unknowingly financed the exer-
cise of the options by the Com-
monwealth Bank managers.”

Outlining the scheme’s intri-
cate details, once contacted by
other managers, Mr Bethel
would advise them that their
stock options would be sold for
$8 per share, allowing them to
pocket the $2 difference
between the option price.

Once this happened, Mr
Bethel would advise Mr Cox of
how many shares would be
available, with the latter then
charged with finding buyers for
the ESOP stock. After this was
achieved, Mr Bethel would
then obtain a Power of Attor-
ney from the relevant manager
to authorise the transfer of their
shares to FirstBahamas Capi-

tal, signing himself as the Com-
monwealth Bank representa-
tive.

“Once the purported sale of
shares to the third party pur-
chaser had been conducted, the
Commonwealth Bank manager
would go through the process
of formally exercising his ESOP
with Commonwealth Bank,”
the Securities Commission’s
panel found.

“The trades in the shares
executed by Mr Cox with the
buyer, however, were execut-
ed at the prevailing market
price of the shares, which was
always above the $8 per share
agreed between the manager
and Mr Bethel.”

Once the transaction pro-
ceeds were received by Mr
Bethel, the panel found he
would then instruct his bank to
write a cheque to Common-
wealth Bank for the sum
required by each manager to
purchase his ESOP stock.

“Each Commonwealth Bank
manager would then be
instructed to provide confirma-
tion that his/her option had
been exercised,” the Commis-
sion’s panel found. “Once Mr
Bethel had received confirma-
tion of the transfer of shares to
the COmmonwealth Bank man-
ager, the confirmation would
be forwarded to FirstBahamas
Capital, and Mr Bethel would
give the Commonwealth Bank
manager a second cheque rep-
resentative of the $2 per share
profit agreed to from the sale of
the shares.

“Mr Bethel would then keep
for his own account any differ-
ence between the cost of selling
the shares at $8 per share, the
amount paid to Mr Cox, and
the market price at which the
shares were actually sold.”

The Securities Commission
panel noted that First Bahamas
Capital had its registered office
at the Alexiou, Knowles & Co
law firm, and that its directors
at the time of these events were
Anthony Ferguson and
Emanuel Alexiou.

Mr Alexiou is the principal at
Alexiou, Knowles & Co, and
both men are the principals of
A.F. Holdings, the former Col-
ina Financial Group, which is
CFAL/First Bahamas’ ultimate
parent company.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 3B



Royal Bank products
targeting 20% savings

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



ROYAL Bank of Canada yesterday
launched new products that could save
its customers who use chequing account
services as much as 20 per cent per
month, its vice-president and country
head said.

Nathaniel Beneby said RBC was the
first to bundle its packages and offer
them for a flat monthly fee.

The Royal Certified Service and Roy-
al Premier Banking packages are
designed to help those who purchase

‘We have no cash to stay in business’

them save and get the most out of those
hidden fees.

“Each package is specifically targeted
towards the needs of the individual cus-
tomer,” said RBC’s official release.

“Royal Certified Service and Royal
Premier Banking are available for a flat
fee each month, giving the client access
to RBC bank services without the sep-
arate and fluctuating bank charges.”

Mr Beneby said some of the services
that come along with the $36 Royal Cer-
tified Service are unlimited cheque
transactions, free ATM withdrawals, a
$20 rebate on annual membership fees
for an RBC credit card, preferred inter-

est rates and an annual discount on safe-
ty deposit boxes.

The $31 Royal Premier Banking
package includes 10 free cheque trans-
actions and four free ATM withdrawals
per month, and offers a discounted rate
for new Royal Premier Personal loans.

“RBC is the only bank in the
Bahamas currently offering customers
the ability to pay one flat fee for a bun-
dle of banking services,” Mr Beneby
said.

“The introduction of the Royal Cer-
tified Service and Royal Premier Bank-
ing comes at a time when there is height-
ened awareness and concern surround-

ing the rising cost of living.

“We recognise and empathiae with
this concern, and constantly seek ways
to deliver our services to clients more
efficiently while keeping fees reason-
able.”

Individuals who choose to purchase
RBC’s Royal Certified Service and Roy-
al Premier Banking package are eligible
for as much as 1.5 per cent and one
quarter respectively off of a Royal Pre-
mier Personal Loan.

“The Royal Certified Service and
Royal Premier Banking is less than cus-
tomers would normally pay for all sep-
arate services,” said Mr Beneby.

FROM page 1B

It’s stressful days. The majority
of them took it well.

“T’ve done my best. I didn’t
want it to come to this today,
but we’ve got to be practical.
It’s very sad that 55 people
have been told today: ‘Don’t
come to work any more’. That’s
going to affect a lot of lives
here, and when all this is over I
hope to help them find new
jobs.”

Mr Simpson said some two
staff would be retained to pro-
tect inventory at the Home
Centre, with another three act-
ing in a security capacity at the
company’s concrete plant. The
company’s main asset is a 127-
acre tract of land in Freeport,
which has been valued at $4.95
million, based on a forecast that
it could generate $6.6 million
in revenues per annum if used
for a limestone aggregate quar-

“Even though I’m not get-
ting paid I’m staying on,” Mr
Simpson said. “I’ve got to get a

few things sorted out while
going through this EGM and
voluntary liquidation process.

“We're going to do our best
by Friday this week to pay the
staff everything they’re owed
up to today. There’s no sever-
ance pay, there’s no vacation
pay. That will all be worked out
and the liquidator will take care
of that need. They’ve all been
terminated today with a termi-
nation letter. You have to have
a cut off period.”

In reality, the writing has
been on the wall for Freeport
Concrete for some time, as pre-
viously revealed by Tribune
Business, which detailed both
the $3 million fund raising plea
and the “zero interest” from
the company’s shareholders in
investing any more funds.

Without cash to fund Home
Centre inventory purchases,
and offers to acquire the com-
pany and/or its 127-acre plot
failing to materialise into firm
bids, the company had little
choice but to cease trading.

Its chairman, former Grand

Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) chair Hannes Babak,
who holds 43 per cent of the
firm's shares, also let it be
known that he was unwilling to
invest any more of his personal
funds.

Mr Simpson previously said
Mr Babak "is not prepared to
subscribe for more shares as he
has already assisted the com-
pany financially with regards to
personal bank guarantees for
the company's line of credit at
the bank, as well as allowing
the Home Centre to remain in
his building without paying any
rent for the past 16 months”.

Mr Babak owns the Home
Centre, and among the senior
creditors in any liquidation are
likely to be FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas),
which has secured its $2 mil-
lion exposure, and the Govern-
ment. Everyone else will have
to wait in line.

Freeport Concrete suffered
a $636,000 net loss in its 2010
second quarter that leaves it
with negative net worth of

$855,000.

In a previous message, Mr
Simpson said: “Currently, our
inventory value at the Home
Centre is only $575,000 and our
daily sales are insufficient to
cover our expenses resulting in
losses every day. With the cash
to be able to buy all of the
inventory that we know will
move quickly off our shelves,
we will see an immediate
increase in our daily sales.

"We have proven this can be
done because in April one of
our suppliers shipped us sever-
al containers of building mate-
rials, and we saw our sales
increase by 63 per cent over the
previous two months’ sales. If
we had been able to purchase
other inventory such as major
appliances, ac mini splits,
plumbing and electrical sup-
plies, carpet, laminate flooring,
lighting, fans, hardware etc, etc
our daily sales average would
have increased substantially.”



Copper jumps
after China eases
currency policy

By The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Cop-
per prices are rising as traders
anticipate that demand for the
industrial metal will increase
because of China's decision to
ease its currency policy.

Copper for September deliv-
ery gained 5.8 cents to settle at
$2.9595 a pound Monday after
jumping as much as 15 cents
earlier in the day.

Most commodities are fol-
lowing a similar pattern, giving
up some or all of their early
gains to settle either slightly
higher or lower.

China says it will allow the
yuan to appreciate against the
dollar. That could help spur
demand for commodities since
they are priced in dollars, mak-
ing them relatively cheaper to
foreign investors when the dol-
lar weakens.

Hotel $4,900,000
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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Senior Manager, Accounts in the Finance
Division.

The Senior Manager - Accounts oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget &
Management Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective
delivery of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Compilation of the corporate budget;

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets;
Preparation of monthly management statements;

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation;
Preparation of performance reports for division ,department and sections;
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables

(capital contributions, rechargeable);

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices;
Liaison with internal and external audits;

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial Officer for the Board of Directors;

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required;
Preparation of the business plan for the department;

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department;
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims;
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management,

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment;

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form
employee’s salaries;

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable;
Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts;

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle
repayments,

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule;

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans;

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to
ensure adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors;
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors;

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and
External Auditors;

Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline.

Conducting performance appraisals; and

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff,
manage and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting
ACCA/CPA or equivalent qualifications;

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a
similar management position;

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices;

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications;

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing
systems;

Ability to analyze financial reports;

Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial
software and the system of internal control;

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability;

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; and
Good time management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and_ returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

Friday, June 25, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





























COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
I

2010

N THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00170

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST of the Settlement of
Bahama Sound No. 11 of the Island of Great Exuma one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of-

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a

PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





Private airline
assessing initial
public offering

FROM page 1B

of Commerce’s 2010 Entrepre-
neur of the Year, added that
Sky Bahamas was also set to
expand its fleet from five to six
aircraft in the next month, with
the acquisition of a $1.4 million
33-seater Saab-340 in July.

He told Tribune Business of
the airline’s revenue perfor-
mance: “We went $9.7 million
this last year, and while the cap-
ital projects - the hangar and
the new aircraft - will change
the books a bit, other than that
we’re really going to grow.

“We're hoping to do an IPO
next year. We had a meeting
about that on Saturday, and
we’ve just got a group coming
in to do an evaluation and price
it.”

Mr Butler explained that he
and Sky Bahamas’ ownership
group would await the evalua-
tion’s results, assess the market
and potential investor demand,
and then decide whether they
retained a majority share or

effectively handed over control
to another group or public
investors via an IPO.

“We've already plotted the
course for the next six months,”
Mr Butler added. “We hope the
Government looks and sees the
importance of these private air-
lines, how many people they
employ and how they develop
the economy.”

Sky Bahamas’ monthly wage
bill was some $218,000, some
$2.616 million per year for the
company’s 91 full-time and
eight part-time staff, and Mr
Butler said he and the other
owners were “definitely over
$16 million into this now” in
terms of their collective invest-
ment.

They took over operational-
ly at Sky Bahamas on Septem-
ber 1, 2008, having completed
its purchase from the Rolle
family in July/August that year,
and are now “continuing what
they dreamed of. They decided
to sell out, and we came along
and took it to new levels”.

Mr Butler said at the time of
the acquisition, Sky Bahamas
was mainly focused on provid-
ing charters for Bahamasair and
the Georgetown, Exuma route.
Now it had expanded to 31
flights per day, and the carrier
had either obtained, or was
close to obtaining, demand and
scheduled approvals to provide
charter/regular flights from the
Bahamas to the US.

Demand approvals for char-
ter flights have been in hand
for six months, and Mr Butler
told Tribune Business: “We’re
about to get scheduled approval
from the Bahamas for the US,
and then we will be doing reg-
ular scheduled flights from Cat
Island, Exuma and Abaco to
Fort Lauderdale [for the for-
mer two destinations] and West
Palm Beach respectively.

“We’re looking at winter
2010 for the start of these, and
are negotiating with hotels and
tour groups.”

Sky Bahamas is already fly-
ing direct from Freeport to

Providenciales in the Turks &
Caicos twice a week, and pro-
viding twice monthly charters
for the Sandals resort chain
between Exuma and Jamaica.

“We have approvals to fly to
Andros, Eleuthera and Long
Island, but have not started
them,” Captain Butler said.
“We will launch Andros very
soon with the All-Andros
Regatta on July 8, 9 and 10. We
have another new airplane that
will be here on July 12.”

Sky Bahamas’ new 140 feet
by 140 feet maintenance
hangar, which will be con-
structed over its existing LPIA
site, will have its groundbreak-
ing in August. Captain Butler
said this investment was part
of a strategy to keep heavy duty
maintenance of Sky Bahamas’
planes in the Bahamas, keep-
ing money in the economy and
helping the company’s appren-
ticeship programme, which
aims to get more young
Bahamians involved in the
industry.
































Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Receptionist for Office Building

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Reevers Turnquest claims
to be the owner of the fee simple estate in possession of the
said piece or parcel of land free from encumbrances. And the
Petitioner had made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said piece parcel or tract of
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Candidate must have excellent customer
service skills, and be computer literate.
Must have experience in a customer
service related role. Candidate
should be well groomed, mature and
self-motivated.

AND TAKE NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
a Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on before the thirtieth (30) day
after the last day of publication file a Notice in the Supreme Court
within the City of Nassau and serve on the Petitioner or the un-
dersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified
by an Affidavit to be titled therewith. Failure on any such person
to file and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the 22nd day of
July A.D., 2010 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Security Officer for
Office Building

Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and
have excellent verbal and _ written
communication skills. Candidate must be
willing to work weekends and extended
hours and have own transportation.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that copies of the files plan
may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas on the Second Floor of the Ansbacher Build-
ing situate at East Street and Bank Lane on the Island of New
Providence;

2. The Chambers of Messrs Lewis & Longley Chambers, East
Bay Street Shopping Centre, East Bay Street, New Providence:
3. The Office of the Administrator at Queens Hwy, in the settle-
ment of George Town, on the Island of Exuma, The Bahamas.
Dated the 31st day of May, A.D., 2010

Interested applicants should respond by
sending their resume to:

DA# 87780, c/o
The Tribune,

P.O. Box N-.3027,
Nassau, Bahamas

Lewis & Longley, Chambers
East Bay Shopping Centre, East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

. FG CAP

[TAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

¥T. £3 I 1 AA Te

ROYAL FIDELITY

onde an ark

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 21 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.32 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -51.06 | YTD % -3.33
FINDEX: CLOSE 0600.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.250
0.050
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S$)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 5
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid & Ask & Last Price, Daily Valk.
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months %
2.54 7.00
0.52 -0.11
1.86 4.63
2.57 -4.99
2.03 5.56
3.45
3.99
2.10
2.22
2.23
1.78

Previous Close Today's Close Change

0.27
5.59

0.27
5.59
10.00

5S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

52wkiLow EPS $
-2.945

Div S
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E Yield

0.000
0.001

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV
1.4752
2.9020
1.5352
3.0368

13.6388
107.5706
105.7706

1.1127

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, q

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve: Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

1.3787
2.8266
1.4672
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000

31-May-10
30-Apr-10
4-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-Mar-10

6.99
13.50
5.19

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

1.0917
1.1150
9.5078

6.29
5.65
6.39
10.0000 10.2744 -4.61

8.15 31-Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

58.37 31-Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - C1
Change - Change i
Daily Vol. - Number

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

jay's weighted price for daily volume

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

fal shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends py re paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

‘Criminal penalties’ bar to
Commission regulatory actions

on the regulator’s complaint against former broker Hiram Cox,
decided to end the proceedings on a point raised by neither of the
parties.

In reviewing its authority to hear a complaint about alleged
breaches of Securities Industry Act provisions that carried crimi-
nal penalties, the finding stated: “The panel considered whether
there could be administrative hearings of matters concerning
breaches provisions that carry criminal penalties.

“The panel concluded that it may only do so provided that the
Act expressly authorises the same. As the Act does not include an
express provision authorising the Commission to also institute
regulatory action for provisions that carry criminal penalties, the
formal complaint against Hiram Cox is hereby discontinued.”

Charles Mackay, Mr Cox’s attorney, had also challenged the
Securities Commission panel’s jurisdiction to hear the matter,
arguing that it was “not a court empowered to hear criminal mat-
ters”, given that the alleged breach carried criminal penalties.

In response, Gawaine Ward, the Securities Commission’s in-
house legal counsel, argued that the panel was authorised by the
Securities Industry Act to conduct hearings involving alleged
breaches of the Act and/or its regulations.

With the Act as the main legislation, he argued that the panel
was “well within its jurisdiction” to hear complaints, with the
Securities Commission authorised to hold regulatory hearings on
alleged breaches.

On this point, the panel found in favour of Mr Ward, ruling that
it was empowered to conduct regulatory hearings “concerning
breaches of the Act or regulations”.

awa
2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING
ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET

Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.
WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 Li? bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 557-5908

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VIRGINA CHAN of
VILLAGE ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15" day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

LOULOUTTE NOIRE LTD.

with
International Busi-
ness Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), the
Dissoluton of LOULOUTTE NOIRE LTD. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of
the dissolution was the 20th Day of April, 2010

Notice is hereby given in accordance

Section 137 (8) of the

ee, ee

PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Liquidator

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

Fed to keep rates
at record lows
as risks loom

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 5B



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LMA Investment Fund Ltd. (BC No. 157581 B) is in
dissolution. Mrs. AlrenaMoxeyis in the Liquidator and can be contact-
ed at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough
& Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons

having claims against the above-named company are required to send

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON — Feder-
al Reserve policymakers open a
two-day meeting Tuesday amid
signs of caution for the recov-
ery: Europe's debt crisis, an
edgy Wall Street, cautious con-
sumers, a fragile housing mar-
ket and high unemployment.

That's why the Fed is sure to
leave its key bank lending rate
at record lows, keeping rates
on certain credit cards and con-
sumer loans low, too.

At the same time, the econ-
omy is offering some cause for
optimism. The economy has
been growing again for nearly a
year. Manufacturing activity is
strengthening. Businesses are
spending more. And Fed Chair-
man Ben Bernanke has
expressed confidence that coun-
try won't fall back into a "dou-
ble dip” recession.

Yet he and other Fed offi-
cials acknowledge the recovery
remains vulnerable to shocks.
Mindful of the risks, the Fed is
all but certain to keep its bank
lending rate between zero and
0.25 per cent. It's remained at
that level since December 2008.

Assuming the Fed leaves
rates alone, commercial banks'
prime lending rate, used to peg
rates on consumer loans, will
stay about 3.25 per cent. That's
its lowest point in decades.

Super-low rates serve bor-
rowers who qualify for loans
and are willing to take on more
debt. But they hurt savers. Low
rates are especially hard on
people living on fixed incomes
who are earning scant returns
on their savings.

Still, if rock-bottom rates
spur Americans to spend more,
they will help invigorate the
economy. That's why the Fed
also is expected to repeat its
pledge — in place for more
than a year — to keep rates at
record lows for an "extended
period.”

"The Fed is looking at a
struggling, not a booming,
economy,” said Kurt Karl, chief
US economist at Swiss Re. “It
will be on hold indefinitely,"
he predicts.

With inflation tame, the Fed
has leeway to Keep rates at
rates at record lows. In fact, giv-
en the risks to the recovery
both at home and overseas,
economists increasingly say the
Fed probably won't start boost-
ing rates until next year — or
possibly into 2012. That's a
change from just a few months
ago, when economists thought
the Fed would begin raising
rates at the end of this year.

China's decision to let it cur-
rency, the yuan, rise in value
could help sales of US exports
by making them less expensive
to Chinese buyers. Doing so

would help support the US
recovery and could help offset a
decline in US export growth to
Europe. Still, questions remain
about how much Beijing is will-
ing to let its currency rise —
and how quickly.

If the US recovery were to
flash signs of a relapse, the Fed
would likely take other steps
to get it back on course. The
Fed has left the door open to
resuming purchases of mort-
gage securities, a move that
would drive down mortgage
rates and bolster the housing
market. It ended a $1.25 tril-
lion mortgage-buying pro-
gramme in March.

A less likely step would be
for the Fed to resume buying
Treasury securities, a step it
took during the crisis. Critics
on Capitol Hill and elsewhere
alleged the Fed was doing this
to bankroll the federal govern-
ment's record high deficits. The
Fed said its government-debt
buying programme was aimed
at lowering a range of rates to
help revive the economy.

"There are still some arrows
in the Fed's easing quiver," said
Sherry Cooper, chief economist
at BMO Capital Markets and
BMO Nesbitt Burns.

But the economy would have
to face a major threat for the
Fed to roll them out. Some
inside the Fed who worry that
easy money could spur infla-

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK I - BANK RECONCILIATION

FINANCE DIVISION

tion are already uneasy. One
of them, Thomas Hoenig, pres-
ident of the Federal Reserve
Bank of Kansas City, has dis-
sented for three straight meet-
ings from the Fed's decision to
retain the "extended period"
pledge.

Besides inflation, Hoenig has
said he fears keeping rates too
low for too long could lead to
excessive risk-taking by
investors, feeding speculative
bubbles in the prices of assets
like stocks, bonds and com-
modities.

After suffering the worst
recession since the 1930s, the
economy has been growing for
about a year. Yet the pace has-
n't been robust enough to drive
down unemployment, now at
9.7 per cent. The rate is expect-
ed to stay high through this
year and next. As a result, con-
sumers have been cautious
about spending. In May, retail
spending fell by the largest
amount in eight months.

On top of that, debt woes by
overextended countries in
Europe have rattled Wall Street
investors. Stock market losses
are likely to keep consumers
cautious.

"The Fed will strike an opti-
mistic tone that the recovery is
unfolding, but it will balance
that message with all the risks,"
said James O'Sullivan, econo-
mist at MF Global.

their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before June 24th, 2010.

Alrena Moxey
Liquidator

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000

No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, (No. 45 of 2000), ARKUS OVERSEAS LIMITED
is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the
Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box
1906, Belize City, Belize. All persons having claims against the
above to the Liquidator before June 28th, 2010.

J ohn B. Forester
Liquidator



White

BR feiatxeton

complete
with tub, round basin
& round toilet

starting from

68 £9

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II
Bank Reconciliation, in the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:
° Preparing bank reconciliation for assigned bank accounts;

Preparing journal entries for accounting adjustments and banking
transactions (e.g., transfers between bank accounts, bank charges, re
turned checks);

Entering cash receipts postings in journals for proper allocation within
the general ledger;

Providing source data with regards to employee and other returned
checks;

Acting as liaison between Customer Services departments to prepare
listings of returned cheques; and

Elongated Toilet
complete/white

15138

Maintaining procedures filing system for such items as: canceled checks,

bank advice, memos and statements. Round Toilet complete

[Os 2
Job requirements include:

° A minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Accounting/Business or
equivalent in General Accounting/Fundamentals;

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of Check Reconciliation module within

the HTE environment; =

6” Double Sink Set
complete

ree helo

A” spread Pedestal Bowl
& Base complete/white

ae eo

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on

or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.

Ensemble Vikrell Gibraltar White

Soaker White Tub (5’X36”) Tub only

L/H& R/H 499 29 S) 7520
| me
Kelly’s "Ss.

Feo L waa eo aeia)
Monday-Friday 7:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 7:00am-9:00pm
RSET Ce ley Poor re |
See Acleico leo te male a]

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

#018-5000-00
#018-5025-00

ark ECS 393-4002
Fax: (242) 393-4096




GN 1071

SUPREME COURT

COMBOS 4 EAL TH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVTSEOM

hie EDP ROW prea?

Wher BIRLA WAWAR MLLER of Marigsh! Fars Peed in the Eel District
of the [sland of Mew Prowidemce onc of the Islands of the (Conm=erencalth of The Geahomeas
bas moe applecaiion io ihe Supreme Court of The Bohaones. for letters of achministoutiom of thee
Keal ant Pesoral Esiaic of WILLLAM MILLER ata. WILLIE MILLER aka
WHA CAMIMEEL I. MILLER lave of Persis Rogers Home io the Westen Disunes of
the [sland of Hew Providence, one of the Islands of che Commonwealch of [Ube Hohanes,
deceas ch

Maio: is Rerchy given thal aach applicagions will be heand by the aad) Court ol the

eqnirstiog of 14 dovs from the date hereof.

pels Macy

tS come
Ls

(for) Repistrar

COMMONWEALTH CF THE BAR ARLAS
THE sUTREME COURT
PROBATE DVIStOM

els, AP EO fin pers

Whereas LECIA LYNETTE RUSSELL of Bo. 19 Argel Heed, Eastwood
Subdivision in the Fasten District of the Island of Many Poreience ore of the islands of the
Commonwealeh of The Aoheenos has: made application lode Seprems Court of The Bakers,
for ietiors of administration oF the Real om Personal Fee of LINDA E. RUSSELL oe.
LINDA ELIZAARETH RUSSELL aka LINDA KIPSSELL Its of Mo. 09 tounge! Pood.
Eestwend Sebdivicaen in the Esai Distinct of the [sland of Bew Protence., one ol che

ldlands cl the Camemrnnnwealis of The Gahan. deceased.

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 7B



aS
France, Germany want

ereater financial regulation

PARIS (AP) — The leaders
of France and Germany teamed
up Monday to present a joint
position on how rich and
emerging nations should work
toward greater regulation of the
financial sector at a summit in
Toronto this weekend.

"Recent turbulence has
demonstrated that there is still
much to be done to ensure
financial stability,” French Pres-
ident Nicolas Sarkozy and Ger-
man Chancellor Angela Merkel
wrote in a joint letter to Cana-
dian Prime Minister Stephen
Harper, whose country is host-
ing the G-20 summit June 26-27
in Toronto.

Sarkozy and Merkel have
recently taken pains to high-
light their common ground in

fighting to increase stability in
financial markets, despite their
recent differences over the
bailout packages for Greece
and the eurozone.

Basing their letter in large
part on the conclusions of a
European Union summit last
week, Sarkozy and Merkel
pushed for G-20 leaders to
work on a global tax on finan-
cial transactions. The tax isn't
popular outside Europe, and it
is still unclear how it would
work worldwide.

Sarkozy and Merkel also
want G-20 leaders to work on
an international levy on banks,
in part to "encourage the pre-
vention of systematic risks," the
letter said.

EU leaders have already

decided in principle to intro-
duce such a levy on banks in
Europe.

Leaders should also go pub-
lic with the results of "stress
tests" checking the stability of
banks, a move the European
Union plans to make next
month, Sarkozy and Merkel
said.

G-20 countries should craft
a joint response on the chal-
lenges posed by credit default
swaps, and work on a "frame-
work for supervision and rules
to improve the process of cred-
it rating,” the letter said.

The letter also suggests push-
ing for an updated list of global
tax havens and a list of financial
centers that refuse to meet
international standards.



Royal Bank sees bad loan slowing

FROM page 1B

increase and Citibank a $150,000 increase.

Mr Beneby said there was effective oversight
by the Central Bank, and enough capital in the
sector, to ensure that the Government’s fee
increases will not adversely affect banks.

He added that the original fees paid by
Bahamian banks have been some of the lowest in
the region.

Both ScotiaBank and FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) have seen imposed on
them the highest increase of the eight retail
banks, now paying $3.75 million each in fees, up
$1.2 million from the 2009-2010 Budget year.

Royal Bank of Canada saw an increase of
$800,000 to $2.4 million, while Commonwealth
Bank saw a $600,000 increase.

The Finance Corporation of the Bahamas and
Bank of the Bahamas both saw increases of
$400,000, while Fidelity received a $200,000

SONAL

id

Mr Beneby said, however, that the stabilisation
of growth in RBC’s non-accrual loan portfolio
could mean that the worst of the economic prob-
lems could be “behind us”, though no trend to
support that has emerged.

“We see some settling down of the non-per-
forming loans, but it is too early to say that the
recession is behind us and we are out of the
woods with these impaired assets because trends
have not been established yet,” he said. “Of
course we (The Bahamas) are still challenged
with high rates of unemployment.”

Mr Beneby said some customers have taken
advantage of concessions RBC put in place to
assist them in keeping their loans current.

“However, to see an improvement in the over-
all non-accrual loans we will have to see an
improvement in the economy,” he said.

NOTICE TO PENSIONERS

iN re July pension payments will not be made to
ANCE

pensioners who are overdue for verification

The National Insurance Act requires all pensioners = 1e., recipients of monthly benefit

Notice iz berchy given thar seach applications will be heard by dhe sad Lice at the

andl assistance payments = to preluce evidence of theit continuing eligibility to receive

expingion of 14 days from the date bereo!, : : a; 7 ;
such payments twice each year — during their birth month and six months thereafter. In

this regard, pensioners who have not been verified within the last seven months are

My test ta

(Gor) Barpisorar

advised that after the June PALETTE Pe fed, no further pension cheques will be issued to
them - either through bank accounts or through pay stations in the Famuly Islands - until
they have submitted themselves to the verification process.

OOMAONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

In order te avoid the suspension of payments, pensioners are urged to submit to the
verification process on or before June 30,2010. Payments to pensioners who fal to be
ho. 201 PROM AMISBT verlfied on of before this date will be suspended, and will be resumed only after they have

been verified. Pensioners whose PATA au dep sited to hank accounts who ate verified
Wheres IDELL RUTH SMITH of Sea Beech Estaces im che Island of New

after the deadline, will not get a payment during the July payment period but will have to
Providence one of the Isiandk: of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas bas made application to wait instead for the August deposits.

the Sapreme Cour.of The Bahames. for leteers of adeninisination of tee Heal and Personal Estnte

/ To be verified, Pensioners inaly present themselves to any One of NIB’s Local Offices, or,
of NELSON PL SMITH late of Sea Beach Estces in the Island of New Prowiderme, ome of

preferably, they may download a Form B75b (for those 1 in teceipt of Benefit) or BT 5a (for

dhe: Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahacniet, decrsecd

those in receipt of Assistance) from NIB's website, , complete it

Notice is hereby given that sach applications will be leard bby che said Comm ot the and have it validated by any one of a number of “Sanetioged Anthwrites. “Tn addition to an

Officer of the National Insurance Board, a Sanctioned Authority can be a Counsel or

expirm@ion of 14 dows Grom the date erect
Attorney of the Supreme Court; a Public Officer above the rank of Assistant Head of

Department; an ordained Minster of Religion; a Bank Manager; Magistrate; or Justice of
the Peace, who is not a member of the Pensioner’s immediate family. In the case of
Pensioners who reside outside The Bahamas, a sanctioned anthony may also be a Notary
Public, a Lawyer, or a Chief of Police.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BATAMAS.
THE SUPREME COURT
FRGRATE OY TSTCh

Or Estate )

ie Ce Om eM CCU ema |] bs

Whereas CASSIETTA Z. MCINTOSH, of the Ciy of Frosput on the Is! of Everywhere The Buyers Are!
Grind Ratuma. one of the Islnd of the Commonwealth of The Ashames, the Adiomey by 7 "a 5 oa

Deed of Power of for Thenda Mellninsh, the lavdel widew of the deoousnd has made
application te the Sapreme Couct of The Bahamas, for Lenere of Administration af the Real ond
Personal Estete of SEAN DELANO MCINTOSH, lite of 82 Sandecrsbe Drive im the Cloy of
Fregport om the Ialind of Grand Bahama, one of the lalemds of The Commonwealth of The
Babamnes

Notice is hereby given thet such applications will be bicard by the sabd Cowart at the

exparétion of 20 daya from the dabe heresf - —

Tel: Mere

for ad rates

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 9B



The Tribune



neaith



Taking care of your pets €>

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

ousehold pets can
H make you feel all

warm and cozy
inside, and become your
best friend. They provide
irresistible love when you
come home after a long
day, and can teach you the
importance of nurturing,
even though they can’t
speak.

It’s for these reasons and more
that these furry friends can be a won-
derful addition to your household,
said Dr Dwight Dorsett of Nassau
Pet Clinic.

But once they are yours, you must
invest time and money into ensuring
their overall well-being, that is, feed-
ing, cleaning, and routine checkups is
taken care of.

What goes into your pet’s body is
vital. They must be given an appro-
priate diet and you must invest
proper time in feeding and cleaning



them.

Keep in mind that animals can
only eat what is made for them. A
dog should eat food that is specially
mixed for them. Cats can have
canned tuna, and dry cat food.

“Pay attention to signs that they
may be sick,” said Dr Dorsett. And
this can happen if you are feeding
them what is not recommended, like
the scrapings from last night’s din-
ner.

Fleas and ticks are the most com-
mon problems pet owners complain
about, said Dr Dorsett. With dogs,
you should treat their coat for these
pests with dog dip for at least three
days.

Heartworm is a major disease that
is preventable in dogs, but is one of
the main causes of death in these
animals.

According to Dr Dorsett, dogs
should get two meals a day. They
should be given bottled water, or
tap water that has been properly dis-
tilled or sanitised through boiling.

At the onset, dogs and cats do
need milk to sip on, but once they’ve
outgrown the infantile stage, having
milk is unnecessary on a regular
basis. At this point, milk is offered

as a treat, said Dr Dorsett.

“For their nutritional needs, I
advocate giving them dry dog food,”
said Dr Dorsett. “This is important
because a lot of times we prepare
foods that have a lot of greasy stuff
which is unnecessary,” he explained.

Dr Dorsett says pet owners
shouldn’t think for a second that
their pets will get tired of dog food.
“Tf you eat crackers everyday, you
won’t eat it enthusiastically, but you
will eat it,” said Dr Dorsett.

As far as cleaning their fur coats,
bathing your dog once every 10 to 14
days is recommended, unless you
have an infestation of external par-
asites, where it is recommended that
you bathe them on a modified sched-
ule on a weekly basis.

House animals should have access
to green spaces to excrete and elim-
inate their waste. If you do that,
you reduce the number of accidents
that occur in your home.

“The rule of thumb is that if the
pet is sleeping in your room, you
should know whether or not it is safe
to have them sleeping with you,”
said Dr Dorsett.

The possibility of your dog or cat
getting into mischief like chewing

on your couch and on your shoes,
is always likely if they are not
trained. If this is the case, these ani-
mals should be kept away until they
have matured, where they can roam
freely through your house.

But if your dog can’t be left home
alone, then you should consider con-
finement, putting them in a kennel
or some holding space where they
will have proper air control.

Cats

Getting a cat to eat rodents, specif-
ically mice and lizards, is not a rea-
son to have them in your home, said
Dr Dorsett; but cats are less high
maintenance than dogs are.

For cats, water and dry cat food
are essential for daily living. Giving
them tuna is a personal choice, and
as a treat is optional as well. But
for the most part, once a cat has
reached adulthood they should be
weaned off of milk.

Studies suggest that healthy cats
spend § to 15 per cent of their wak-
ing time grooming themselves.

“Being depressed is one of the red
flags that they may have an infec-
tion,” said Dr Dorsett. “When you



aL

discover this change in your cat’s
mood, just feel for any tension in
their abdomen. That can be sugges-
tive of an animal who may be
blocked.”

Male cats are predisposed to get-
ting urinary tract infections, where
they have problems urinating on a
regular basis.

“Cats groom themselves,” said Dr
Dorsett. “You don’t have to bathe a
cat as you would a dog, but you have
to make sure you have measures in
place to control external parasites.
And it’s better to use residual prod-
ucts to control ticks.

“Advantage and Frontline Plus
products for cats are necessary in
cleaning your cat,” said Dr Dorsett.
What’s more is that while these
products are made for cats, they can
be used on dogs as well by applying
to the skin and repel insects for up to
a month.

Pet owners are recommended to
look over their animals everyday to
get accustomed to what is normal
and abnormal. “Feel your animal
and take note of any change. It takes
less than five minutes, says Dr
Dorsett.



JACK'S favourite bromeliad is
Archmea fulgens, also called Coral.



Bromeliads

MOST home gardeners grow a little of
whatever they fancy while others tend to
specialise and grow a great number of
varieties of one particular plant. Orchids
are very popular in this respect, as are
roses and African violets.

In The Bahamas, I have noted that
bromeliads are popular specialty plants.
You can only appreciate the tremen-
dous range within a particular species
when you collect and grow many.

All wild bromeliads in The Bahamas
are epiphytic, the main ones being
Tillandsias: shallot (T. caput-medusae,
found mostly in arid coastal areas); spi-
ral airplant (T flexuosa, also found in
coastal areas); T. utriculata, a large trif-
fid-like denizen of coppice land; and
Spanish moss (T. usneoides) which is
also found in the same areas as the shal-
lot and spiral airplant. It must be said
that native Bahamian bromeliads are
not as spectacular as many of the exotic
varieties but they do have their own
charm.

Bromeliads are divided into several
species and cultivars such as Aechmea,
Ananas, Billbergia, Cryptanthus, Guz-
mania, Neorelgia, Pitcairnia, Puya,
Tillandsia and Vriesia, all of which are
native to the Americas with the excep-
tion of Pitcairnia. As you might expect,

this comes from the Pitcairn Islands.

It is convenient to refer to the inflo-
rescences of bromeliads as flowers but
they are really composed of bracts, or
modified leaves. The true flowers are
often diminutive and usually blue. Epi-
phytic bromeliads use their roots to fix
themselves in place and these roots do
not absorb water and nutrients. This is
done through specialised cells in the low-
er parts of the plant and in particular
those with a cylindrical shape designed
to trap rainwater.

Those bromeliads that grow in the
ground need good drainage and very lit-
tle in the way of fertiliser. If bromeli-
ads are grown under trees they usually
receive enough in the way of nutrients
from effluvia washed down by rain.

Some bromeliads aficionados soak
dead leaves in water to make a ‘tea’ that
satisfies the needs of most bromeliads. It
is very easy to over-fertilise bromeliads.
A half-strength soluble orchid fertiliser
can be used very sparingly.

The prime requirement for bromeliads
is shade. They should be grown under
(or in) trees or on the north side of a
wall or building.

When you buy a bromeliad from a
nursery it will probably be in flower, no
matter what time of the year. Nurseries

(SY GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack





are able to regulate light and nutritional
bromeliads will be governed by prevail-

ing natural conditions and tend to
flower in late spring and early summer.

to be spectacular. The really attractive

these are the A. fasciata or Silver Vase

that has a very large red inflorescence.

shade there are exceptions. Pineapple

plants that are ideal for growing in gar-
den conditions.
Large bromeliads have a life cycle of

size to the mother plant.

taken from the ground and separated,

eee deere eeeaeesesanenerenseenenseeneee

Dily skin and acne

WHAT can I do about my
oily skin and breakouts? Acne
and oily skin are some of the
most alienating skin condi-
tions.

They can cause frustration,
irritation, physical and even
emotional scars. Don't think
these issues are just for teens:
eighty-five per cent of people
suffer from adult acne, mak-
ing it one of the most com-
mon skin disorders in the
United States. Before diving

: into treatments for oily skin
: and acne, it's critical to under-
* stand their root causes so
* proper treatment can be
: delivered for targeted results.

: What causes oily skin?

Sebum (oil) production is

: controlled by androgen hor-

} ! mones. Oils help lubricate

: skin, protecting it from envi-
+ ronmental assaults (such as
: extreme weather conditions).
: Excess androgen hormones
: (due to puberty, monthly
: cycles or menopause) trigger
: an overproduction of oil, cre-
: ating a shiny appearance.

: How does oily skin con-
: tribute to acne?

When sebaceous (oil)

: glands produce too much oil,
: it spills onto the skin's sur-
: face, creating a slick, greasy
+ appearance. This excess oil
acts as a binder, holding on
: to dead skin cells that were
* meant to be shed.

The follicle becomes

: clogged with a mixture of oil
: and dead skin cells, prohibit-
* ing oxygen from entering.

requirements. Once in the yard your p Eis Creat hep re bro
4 7 yam 2 : ing ground for bacteria, which

: leads to swelling, redness and
: inflammation around the fol-

Bromeliad lovers often dote on + licle, resulting in acne.

obscure and unattractive specimens but : Olvelianlacneadhs
most of the rest of us like our bromeliads + y y

bromeliads are often Aechmeas. Among : ll fe ae

that has a dramatic pink inflorescence : oe suelras
protruding from a leaf base with silver : :

markings, and A. fulgens or Coral Berry : skin to produce even more oil

Although most bromeliads prefer : than before, as the sebaceous
: glands go into overdrive in

(Ananas) is a bromeliad and in addition + ee oe us eta yes ue
to the large edible varieties there are : cereals thee aon a
many attractive miniature pineapple Day often lelt dehydrated, irri-

Ironically, this can cause

: tated and sensitised.

two to three years. After flowering they : aan A qee eae is actu-
die but before doing so they produce : any CES GS Is HAS:

small offspring called ‘pups’ that will car- ¢

ry on the family name. It is best to leave : ae eect = see
these pups in place until they are close in: Wilteneads that have reache
: the skin's surface and opened

At this point mother and pups can be ; up, allowing oxygen to enter

: the follicle. This causes the

the pups being replanted. Use a sterile + debris within the follicle to

knife when separating mother and pups ; undergo a chemical reaction

as well as a long-sleeved shirt — most : known as oxidation (think of

bromeliads have leaves with spiky edges. : browa when exposed (o-ain),

Blackheads, also known as

a freshly cut apple turning

Se eestecs see preeste teeta es eee erect ees : leading to the dark colour.

¢ gardenerjack@coralwave.com

Whiteheads, also known as





closed comedones, are folli-
cles that are filled with the
same debris, but have only
microscopic opening to the
skin's surface. Since the air
cannot reach the follicle, the
debris is not oxicated, and
remains white.

Myth#3: Sugary, refined
foods contribute to acne.

Many people accept the
myth that what they're eating
causes their skin condition.
This is a misinterpretation-
these foods don't directly
cause acne, but they do feed
the breeding ground for acne
by increasing sebum produc-
tion.

Proper treatment for results
A professional skin thera-
pist can help jumpstart skin
clearing and recover skin
health. Before beginning,
your skin therapist will per-
form Face Mapping zone-by-
zone skin analysis to deter-
mine if skin is dry or dehy-
drated, and then create a cus-
tomised treatment around
your specific needs that very
day!
Ultrasonic: This professional
device delivers advanced deep
cleaning to prep skin for exfo-
liation and extractions.
Exfoliation: Acneic skin pro-
duces five times more dead
skin cells than a healthy skin,
meaning the sloughing of cells
through exfoliation can great-
ly benefit this condition.
Hydroxy acids (chemical
exfoliants), in general, will be
effective, as they help detach
dead skin cells that contribute
to clogged follicles. Physical
exfoliants may not be appro-
priate for acneic skin, but may
be recommended for oily
skin.

Galvanic and High Frequen-
cy: This professional tool uses
a mild electrical current to
help soften impacted debris
for easier removal.

A consistent home care regi-
men prescribed by your skin
therapist will dramatically
impact the health of your skin
and success of professional
treatments.

¢ This information was taken
from dermalogica.com. Nakita
Lowe is a Dermalogica Skin
Care Therapist at The Dermal
Clinic in Sandyport. Please call
327-6788 for more information
or visit www.dermal-
clinic.com.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



(JOINING HANDS FOR HEALTH

Think health not drugs

The Bahamas joins the rest of the world in observance of the ‘Internation-
al Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking’ under the theme “Think

Health Not Drugs.”

Around 200 million people take drugs at least once a year. Of these, 25
million are regarded as drug dependent. Every year, 200,000 people die
from drug-related illnesses. Young people are more susceptible to drug
use. Prevalence of drug use among young people is more than twice as
high as drug use among the general population: three times as high in the
case of cannabis marijuana. Much more needs to be done to provide
young people with the skills, information and opportunities to lead

healthy and fulfilling lives.

Tune in to Joining Hands for Health this and every Wednesday evening at
7.30 pm. on ZNS 1540 A.M. to be informed about health issues that mat-
ter to the health of you and your loved ones and you.)

June 26 is The International Day
Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Traf-
ficking. Established by The United
Nation General Assembly in 1987,
this day serves as a reminder of the
goal of creating an international soci-
ety free of drug abuse, agreed upon
by Member States, which includes
The Bahamas,.

The United Nations Office on
Drugs and Crime (UNODC) is lead-
ing the international campaign to
raise awareness about the major
challenge that illicit drugs represent
to society as a whole, and especially
to the young. Health is the ongoing

theme of the world drug campaign.
Each year, a theme is selected for
the international day and campaigns
are launched to raise awareness
about the global drug problem.

The goal of the campaign is to
gain public support and to inspire
people to act against drug abuse.
The campaign encourages young
people to put their health first and
not to take drugs.

Drugs have the power both to
improve and to damage health,
depending on the type of drug used,
the quantity consumed and the pur-
pose for which they are taken. For

example, while morphine can relieve
pain, heroin can be highly addictive;
therefore there is the need to control
drugs.

Teenagers and young adults are
more likely to use illicit drugs than
adults. The number of persons that
use drugs among young people is
more than twice as high as that
among the general population. Peer
pressure to experiment with illicit
drugs can be strong and self-esteem
is often low. Also, those who take
illicit drugs tend to either have the
wrong information or not enough
facts about them and the health risks
linked to their use and abuse.

United Nations Office on Drugs
and Crime (UNODC) campaign
only focus on those drugs under
international control, as specified in
the three multilateral treaties that
from the backbones of the interna-
tional drug control system. These
illicit drugs include amphetamine-
type stimulants, coca/cocaine,
cannabis, hallucinogens, opiates and
sedative hypnotics, all of which have
immediate physical effects.

While some of the physical effects
of drugs such as marijuana might
sound pleasant, they do not last long.

Drugs can severely hinder psycho-
logical and emotional development,
particularly in young people.

The world drug campaign calls
young people to get the facts about
drugs. The campaign targets young
people, because young people often
talk about the “highs” induced by
illicit drugs but may not be aware
of the many “lows.”

Illicit drug use is a concern because
it poses a threat to health. The neg-
ative effects of drugs vary depending
on the type of drug used, the doses
taken and the frequency of use. All
illicit drugs have immediate physi-
cal effects, but they can also severe-
ly hinder psychological and emo-
tional development.

Leading a healthy lifestyle which
includes staying away from drugs
requires making choices that are
respectful of body and mind. To
make these choices, young people
need guidance from role models and
need to get the right facts about
drugs use. The international cam-
paign provides young people and
others with tools to inform them-
selves about the health risks associ-
ated with illicit drug use. Locally, this
work is done by The Bahamas

National Drug Council which serves
as a major stakeholder of the Nation-
al Anti-Drug Council.

Parents, teachers and other inter-
ested individuals can also join the
campaign. There are a number of
ways to get involved. These include
spreading the word about the cam-
paign and organising outreach or
institutional events to mark The
International Day Against Drug
Abuse and Illicit Trafficking on 26
June. We can all play a role in pro-
moting health in our communities.

The Ministry of Health as a key
stakeholder in the health of the
nation invites every resident to get
involved. Together we can fight the
scourge of drugs. By uniting our
efforts, we indirectly tackle crime
and other related ills including phys-
ical and mental illness that are direct-
ly linked to drug use and abuse.

¢ For more information on drug
prevention efforts and education
contact the National Drug Coun-
cil at telephone number 326-5340 or
325-4633 or the National Anti-
Drug Council at telephone number
326-4123.



Grooming your Do

GROOMING refers to the prop-
er cleaning and conditioning of the
body, Grooming keeps your dog
looking and felling good. It requires
attention to the hair coat, ears, eyes,
toe nails, anal glands and teeth.
Grooming not only addresses the
dog’s physical needs, but promotes
bonding between the owner and pet
because the contact and attention
simply feels good.

Grooming promotes healthy skin.
The sebaceous glands at the base of
each hair root secretes an oily sub-
stance, called sebum, which is spread
over the hair during grooming.
Sebum helps waterproof the fur and
gives the hair coat its healthy shine.

Grooming also removes loose hair
that can tangle the fur and produce
painful mats. A healthy coat is not
only attractive; it is the dog’s first
line of defense against injury, fur lies
in loose protective layers that shield
skin from damage and provide insu-
lation from temperature extremes.

Benefits

A properly groomed coat is
weather resistant and sheds rain, and
it keeps the dog warm in the winter
and cool in the summer. Dogs basi-
cally do not sweat. Their sweat
glands are not particularly effective
for cooling. The dog primarily uses
panting to cool off and the coat must
remain free of mats to allow air to
pass between the hairs when it is
hot.

Dogs attempt to some grooming
themselves. They scratch with rear
toe nails, use their teeth to nibble
dirt or parasites (fleas, ticks) and
clean their genitals by licking.

Begin grooming your dog during
puppy hood so he learns to antici-
pate and enjoy the attention. We
recommend bathing your puppy by 3
months. Before then, you can use
baby wipes to clean them off. If you
have to bathe them before 3 months
ensure that they are dried off prop-
erly.

For routine care, always begin by
allowing your dog to sniff and inves-
tigate the grooming tools especially
if the experience is new to him. Start
with petting your dog to familiarise
yourself with the contours of his
body and to discover any problem
areas, like mats or hot spots, ahead
of time. Thick long hair needs to be



combed before brushing. Create a
grooming ritual that is always the
same, so your dog knows what to
expect.

Regular grooming can prevent
mats from developing. A badly mat-
ted coat may require electric clip-
pers and is best addressed by a pro-
fessional groomer. We recommend
professional grooming maybe every
8 to 12 weeks.

Clipping your Dog’s Nails- most
active dogs allowed to run outside
wear their nails to a manageable
length naturally and may not need
frequent trimming. However, dogs
that spend most of their times inside
often require monthly nail attention.

Overgrown nails tend to curl, can
become caught in bedding and car-
pets, and may split or tear. Keeping
the toenail trimmed is healthy for
the pet and helps reduce the inap-
propriate digging some dogs are
prone to indulge in. Dewclaws on
the inside of the lower leg need par-
ticular attention since they never
contact the ground. A variety of
commercial nail trimmers are avail-
able from your veterinarian or pet
supply store.

When the nails are white or clear,
the pink quick is visible and makes it
easy to avoid the danger zone. Clip
just outside the pink line showing in
white nails. In toenails that are dark
or opaque, rather than trimming
blindly and taking to much, clip off
only the tips — the hoof like portion
that turns down. Always reward
your dog after a nail trim.

Baths

Bathing your Dog- we tend to
bathe our dogs more often than is
necessary. Excessive bathes can strip
the natural oil from the coat and dry
the skin. We recommend bathing
once or twice a month. Puppies
should not be bathed until three
months. Old or sick dogs can be
stressed by bathing. Use only sham-

poos approved for pets. People prod-
ucts — even human baby shampoo
are much too harsh and will dry the
dog’s skin and possibly cause allergic
reactions. Do not use dish washing
soap, laundry detergent, turpentine,
gasoline, kerosene, diesel or other
household cleansers. They can be
toxic to your dog. Should your dog
get paint, tar or glue on his coat, try
soaking the area in mineral or veg-
etable oil for 24 hours then wash out





with dog shampoo. Some sticky sub-
stances like chewing gum or rat glue,
may be removed by rubbing peanut
butter into the mass and then wash-
ing it out.

Dogs object to baths when they
are frightened, so prepare ahead of
time. You will need dog shampoo, a
wash cloth or sponge and towels.
The most critical part of bathing
your dog is the rinse cycle. Leaving
soap in the coat can cause an allergic

on
.

s

reaction, can attract dirt and make
the fur look dull and dingy.

After you thoroughly rinse off the
dog, do it once more before calling it
quits. Then allow your dog to do
what he had been yearning for the
whole time, have a good shake. As
much as dogs may dislike the bath,
they often relish the toweling off
afterwards. Some dogs will tolerate a
blow dryer on a low setting, which
will help fluff up the fur.



(CY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Men and Sex: The Testosterone Man

“MEN are from Mars and Women
are from Venus”-don't we hear it
all the time? You may have even
used it as your personal mantra. At
those split-second moments, when
you look at that person and think,
‘where did they come from?’ or ‘is it
possible we are even in the same
time zone?’ the whole concept seems
plausible.

Knowing this, it may astonish you
even more to learn that we all start
life as female embryos. Either we
continue to develop into a female
fetus or we are bombarded by testos-
terone and the identifying charac-
teristics of a male are formed. So, if
we all start from the same place,
then how do we end up on separate
planets?

Our gender specific make-up
palette is a blend of several sex hor-
mones, but perhaps the most well-
known and significant one is testos-





terone. Since the 'in utero period’,
testosterone has been lying low for
many years, but now the child's
growth has reached puberty, and it is
time to wake up. Here you may be
surprised again to learn that both
genders have testosterone. Small
amounts are produced in the adren-
al glands, ovaries in girls, but the
main production plant is in each tes-
ticle. Present, are the little Leydig
cells that are responsible for the
manufacturing of testosterone. Due
to efficient mechanics, men are able
to make 20-40 per cent greater

amounts of testosterone than
females, and also a steady supply of
sperm.

The transformation, before our
very eyes, from boy to young man,
are not just the physical changes but
also psychological. This powerful
hormone is ultimately responsible
for our sexual drive or libido,
throughout our lives. This is why
pubescent girls, even with their small
amount of testosterone, become sex-
ually interested. During menopause,
she may find her testosterone lev-
els have declined along with estro-
gen, which would explain the com-
mon complaint of low sexual desire.

Sexual drive really means appetite,
attention, motivation and action.
What is really interesting is that it is
primarily drawn to ‘self’, meaning
the natural force behind masturba-
tion. Men can actually voluntarily
increase their own testosterone by

sexual thoughts, actions, aggressive/
competitive behavior, exercise and a
meat diet. Consequently, we then
understand why testosterone can
fluctuate sometimes every 15-20
minutes, daily and even seasonally.

Today, we understand testos-
terone's role in promoting desire,
but it is still the circuitry elements in
the male pelvis that are principally
responsible for an erection.

We can often identify the high-
testosterone male because his per-
sonality is often selfish, self-centered
and not unlike a psychotic. On the
other hand, there are also men who
are born with an extra Y gene, and
subsequently have a double dose of
testosterone. This has been con-
firmed in many cases by DNA sam-
pling of criminals of violent crimes.
Medicine has found that manipulat-
ing testosterone and serotonin levels,
which alters mood, can in some cas-

es change behavior.

Now that we know the level of
testosterone accounts for the 'aggres-
sive' sex drive of men, we also need
to appreciate the ‘receptive’ sex dri-
ve of women. The more we come to
understand the role that our sex hor-
mones play in our relationships the
better we come to understand the
opposite sex.

Our individual drive is first deter-
mined by our hormones, and then
by our interaction with our partners.
If conflicting sexual drives becomes
an issue, then measuring blood levels
and taking supplements may help.
However, we should not overlook
the path that each gender takes to
reach the point of arousal; it is pre-
determined by many contributing
factors.

¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock’ with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM102.9. For appointments call
364-7230, email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010, PAGE 11B



NN ee
(ey THE COACH APPROACH

Building girls’ leadership & confidence!









“Leadership begins with self.”

The leadership struggle facing most
girls today is mainly due to the lack of
a sense of self-worth; which causes
many to be driven by outer ideals
that inadvertently become the bench-
mark by which they measure their
sense of value.

By Michelle
M Miller, CC






quintet He tals 7 |



MA ee Com Sa Be



Tel: 502 2356| “

for ad rates







For younger girls, this is more mag-
nified by the fact that such self-deplet-
ing ideals are commonplace amongst
grown-up girls in every pocket of our
society; in pursuit of external valida-
tion via accolades.

And while these accolades may
solidify job title or career position;
often time they are at the detriment
of a healthy disposition. This sacrifice
of the inner- self for the outer-self
may seem like a fair trade off; but
take a sincere look at our social con-
sciousness; is the prize worth the
price?

Regardless of who she is; leader-
ship confidence is a fundamental skill
that every girl needs to confidently
navigate her way through her choices.

We live in a wonderful and crazy
world, which is always changing. To
effectively build a new generation of
leaders, self depleting ideals must be
replaced by uplifting concepts of
inspiration.

Younger girls must not only hear
women speak truth to power but see
them be about something more than
mere small things; like house, car,
bags, jewelry etc.

Today’s young girls are not listen-
ing to what we say instead they are
observing how we live and interact
with each other. Sadly, in most cases,
grown-up girls are in fierce competi-
tion rather than collaboration.

Take a look at Karin, a well edu-
cated, professional who still believes
that she has to compete with Char-
lene to prove her worth. So, she is
determined to get it ‘right’ and by
that she means, the right job, right
house, right brand etc.; all to ensure
that Charlene quickly recognises that
she is out of her league.

Charlene on the other hand, will
not take this showing off lying down;
and so she has to try to outdo Karin
to prove that is the better woman.
Hence, she does whatever it takes so

that she too can get it ‘right’; trading
her self-worth for the price tag of the
latest, most up to date gadget.

This silly drama eventually leads
to an all out vindictive vendetta, in
which grown up girls relentlessly tear
each other down with sheer emo-
tional force. This demeaning inter-
action is the sad reality of many rela-
tionships amongst the women of
today; mainly due to insecurity, low
self-esteem and lack of confidence.

This is a serious concern on many
fronts, particularly for the younger
girl who is trying to find her way and
finds herself saddled with an out-
wardly focused society of women.
Therefore, there is a sincere need to
help girls build their leadership con-
fidence; recognising that they will
soon become the wives and mothers
responsible for the nurturing of the
children of tomorrow.

Final Thoughts

There is only one way to teach or
help someone learn something, and
that is to first learn it yourself. This is
a key piece of the puzzle that many
parents often neglect; they presume
that by virtue of the fact that they
have endured the birthing process,
that the elements of leadership and
confidence for example, will some-
how miraculously appear for them
to readily impart it to their children.

This misleading notion is preva-
lent across the spectrum of society.
The harsh reality is if you do not
know how to speak Spanish, you can-
not teach your child to speak Span-
ish. Similarly, if you have never been
exposed to the concepts of leader-
ship; you cannot adequately impart
these skills to your child. The bot-
tom line is you cannot give to anoth-
er, that which you do not possess.

As a parent/guardian or teacher,
the best that you can do for your
child/student is to see yourself as the

facilitator of their growth and devel-
opment. Ultimately your goal is not
to make them like you; for they pos-
sess their own identity and more than
anything else in this world, they are
eager to be like themselves.

Overridingly, the goal is to pro-
vide them with the tools for them to
carve out their own greatness. The
concept of leadership skills involved
the essential principles of Self-Disci-
pline, Self-Knowledge and Self-
Love.

These are critical to ensure that
the young girls today become confi-
dent and collaborative women of
tomorrow; with the discipline and
fortitude to be true to self.

Remember, girls are the vessels
through which human life is brought
into expression.

Our goals must be to find ways in
to help them understand and accept
that self-worth and self-value are
inherent qualities. Get involved; be
yourself, be a leader and change the
world.

¢ Register Your Child for Girls Leader-
ship Coaching (G.L.C.) Summer Pro-
gram, June

21, through July 30, 2010; a life-skills
program for girls 9-13yrs. It is based
on four principles of leadership that
builds a girl’s leadership and confi-
dence. Register Now!

For more details — call 326-3332 or
429-6770 — or send an email to
lifeskills242@yahoo.com

Michelle M Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Con-
sultant. She is the Principal Coach of
the Coaching Studio, which located in
the Jovan Plaza,

Madeira Street. Questions or com-
ments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-
13060 - email -
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone
429-6770.



THE WEATHER REPORT 2

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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TO DISCUSS TTT ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE



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MOST of the
women who
said they won't
date a guy with
kids were con-
(erslmatsVOmNarcli

ii LANES
to take the
back seat since
SMe NI Cele NATIT
be top priority.

TUESDAY, JUNE 22,

2010

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

Me Gh

y





njoying the delicious food, and soothing sounds of

Va and your guy decide to go out for dinner. You are
e

waves lightly splashing, while basking in the ambiance
of romanticism. Then his phone rings, its his baby’s mother!

On finding out their potential mate
has kids, some women are left with
the decision “Do I stay or do I go?”

Tribune Woman wanted to know if
dating a guy with kids is really big
issue. A few ladies told Tribune
Woman that dating a man who has
kids can make a relationship com-
plicated especially if he has a “baby
mama” that causes a lot of “drama”.
However two of the women said dat-
ing a guy with kids is not an issue
once his time is balanced equally
between her and his kids.

Most of the women who said they
won't date a guy with kids were con-
cerned that they will have to take
the back seat since his children will
be top priority.

Shakira Cartwright* said there are
a hundred and one reasons why she
won’t consider dating a guy with chil-
dren. “Personally I don't like the idea
of getting involved with someone
with kids. For one, I think for the
most part dating a guy with kids
comes with baby mother drama. His
kids will always be top priority, which
will make me feel second priority to
him,” she said.

I'm not trying to be selfish or any-
thing, but I prefer to be in a rela-
tionship with someone who doesn't
come with extra baggage.”

Baggage

Dericka Mcdonald shared a similar
view with Ms Cartwright. She said
along with being second priority in
his life, the trust factor might just be
the biggest of all issues.

“T wouldn't date him if he has kids,
because I wouldn't be able to trust
him around his baby's mother espe-
cially if the baby is still young and
they see each other often. I'm pos-
sessive so I can’t share him with any-
one because I will need him, and his
child will need him, and that is where
the conflict arises. It may sound a
tad bit selfish but that’s why I won’t
waste my time being with someone
who has a child or children,” she said.
Farika Grant* has a bright future

ahead. She has almost completed her
bachelor’s degree in criminal justice
and she said she is taking steps to
secure her career in the near future.
She said children don’t fit in that
bright picture and she is not ready for
what that type of union brings.

“T prefer not to date guys with kids
because there would be too many
strings attached on the guy’s part.
When kids are involved in a rela-
tionship, it makes things much hard-
er. When we are all together and he
is playing daddy then I will feel as
though I have to take on the role of
their mother which is something I
am not ready for,” Ms Grant said.

Maturity

Michela Hepburn had the experi-
ence of dating a guy with kids and
said, in contrast to what many
women believe, their relationship
was free from intrusions.

“We were mature about the situa-
tion, I knew he had a child so I dealt
with it. The child’s mother knew that
I was in the picture and she knew
that I would be apart of the child’s
life so she dealt with it. We never
bickered and argue about the situa-
tion because we all knew it was our
reality at the time.”

“T knew the situation I was getting
in. I really liked him a lot and I want-
ed him in my future. I never once
felt neglected by my partner because
he did everything he could to make
sure I was satisfied and happy. As
for doing it again I probably would,”
she said.

Alesha Cadet said: “I would date a
guy that has a kid, not so much
"kids" though. It doesn't change any-
thing about the relationship we
would have, as long as his baby's
mother respects our relationship then
Tam cool with it.”

To voice your opinions on this top-
ic, e-mail features@tribunemedia.net,
leave a comment at www.tribune-
media.net/features/woman.

*Names have been changed





Civ Cerbhesn Baby Saranode
Frestiresa = Breeze Euaece = Potpoerd of Flowers
= =
Fret j Levaredar
Exnence § - - Poin

Look for Festival in

your favorite store.





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a

thirtued by: Bahomos Wholesale Agencies, East West Hwy, * to: 282-394-1759 * fax: 42-04-1860 * email: bwabshamasecoravincom * Freeport: 1 Milton St. * bel: 242-351-2207 * fax: 242-051-2215 * emaik braiposccraivave.com