Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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THE PEOPLE’S PAPER —- BIGGEST AND BEST



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drive-thru is now open

24 hours

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SUNNY AND
BREEZY

Volume: 106 No.172



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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

ATG a

HELP WANTED
AND REAL ESTATE



wader .:

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SES =

Experts to prove

oil Spill reports

PEE EUG a Eta TU a

Scientists to take
samples in Cay
Sal and Bimini











BOATS are seen along the oil damaged shoreline in the north-
ern reaches of Barataria Bay Thursday, June 17, 2010.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



SIGHTINGS of suspected oil in the seas around the Bahamas
from the spill in the Gulf of Mexico will be investigated by sci-
entists setting out on a five-day expedition to Cay Sal and
Bimini on Monday.

The team of IMO scientists and volunteers will take sediment
samples and test them on the Defence Force vessel HMS
Bahamas to confirm or deny the presence of oil in Bahamian
waters.

The National Oil Spill Committee is on alert as concerned cit-
izens have reported sightings of what they believe to be oil
sheens in Bahamian waters.

Director of the Bahamas Environment, Science and Tech-
nology Commission (BEST) Philip Weech said the dark patch-
es spotted in the ocean are more likely to be large clumps of
dark seaweed drifting in the ocean than the oil slicks in the Gulf
of Mexico, which they resemble.

“Tf there is oil in the Bahamas yet, we don’t know,” Mr
Weech said.

“We have been getting a lot of calls and concerns of that
nature and many are coming from the fact that people are

SEE page 11

Cheryl Grant-Bethel to file legal

action next week in law job row

By ALISON LOWE

and MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FORMER Deputy Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions
Cheryl Grant-Bethel will file
legal action early next week
questioning the decision to
choose a foreigner instead of
her for the Director’s post,
her attorney has confirmed.

Former bar president

SEE page 12





Cay melelimstalitey

|



\



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A POLICE officer wanted in the United
States on a rape charge was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison yesterday.

US authorities are seeking to have Corporal
Nyahuma Bastian, 34, stand trial for the alleged
rape of a woman in Texas back in April 2001.

Bastian appeared before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, yes-
terday where documents supporting his extra-
dition request were laid over to the court.

One of his attorneys, Davard Francis, told





:

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
COURT APPEARANCE: Corporal Nyahuma Bastian. US authorities want the 34-year-old to stand trial.

the magistrate that Bastian’s initial trial date
had been February 19, 2002. He told the court
Bastian had not been evading US authorities
and had appeared in a US court on four dif-
ferent occasions. Francis said the reason he
did not return to the US was because his Visa
had been cancelled.

He told the court that Bastian, a father of
two, had joined the Royal Bahamas Police
Force after the alleged incident took place.
Francis asked the magistrate to grant Bastian
bail, saying that he was not a flight risk and that
remanding him to her Majesty’s Prison would

SEE page 12



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Mitchell

aC
weighs options

SEE PAGE NINE



Homicide
count hits 41
after man
shot deat

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



POLICE were hunt-
ing a gunman yesterday
after a man was shot
dead in Montell
Heights.

Kendal Kenneth
Andrews, 22, was
attacked while walking
in Mantol Street with a
young man who was
related to him just after
1.30am.

It is believed some-
one approached the
pair on foot and
opened fire.

When police arrived,
Mr Andrews was lying
in the street with multi-
ple bullet wounds in his
head. Emergency Med-
ical Services staff pro-
nounced him dead at
the scene. His death
brings the national
homicide count to 41







this year.
; SEE page 12
Woe =
am New ‘laboratory
= : School’ seen as
pe revolutionary

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EDUCATION in the
Bahamas is set to be “revo-
lutionised” with the launch of
what officials believe may be
the first “laboratory school”
in the Caribbean region.

The new school, which will
showcase modern and
research-driven teaching tech-
niques, hi-tech equipment and
emphasise learning through
experience is intended to be a
catalyst for improved teach-
ing standards and academic
and social achievement levels
among students throughout
the country.

Considered a “professional
development“ or “demon-
stration” school for teachers,
the school will be run by the
Department of Education in
conjunction with the Teacher
Education division of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. Within
it, both trainee teachers and
in-service teachers aiming to
upgrade their skills will be
able to put education theory
into practice, while exposing
around 600 to 800 students
from pre-school to grade six
to non-traditional teaching
methods.

The Lab School will be
used as a platform for educa-
tion specialists to research
problems in education and
test solutions, according to
officials, and this, in combi-
nation with pre-service and
in-service teachers taking the
skills they have learned at the

SEE page 12





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Se ER CRU UN ARI aaa D) UL Veni U CG)









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St Andrew's Presbyterian Kirk celebrates
200 years and welcomes new Minister

THE congregation of St
Andrew's Presbyterian Kirk
packed the historic church on
June 6 to welcome a new minis-
ter, celebrate the church's bicen-
tennial anniversary and witness
the raising of the Bahamian flag
— marking the move from the
Church of Scotland to indepen-
dent governance.

It was the first time in 200
years that the national flag flew
above the high steeple, where
the blue and white flag of Scot-
land had flown since 1810.

Churchgoers — elders, regu-
lars and those who attend less frequently —
filled the sanctuary to witness the flag ceremo-
ny, a symbol of independence, and to roll out
the welcome mat for the man who will guide
them through the recently announced separa-
tion from the Church of Scotland.

He is Reverend Bryn MacPhail, a former
chairman of the board for the Renewal Fel-
lowship with the Presbyterian Church in Cana-
da, and who, for the past eight years, has served
as senior pastor of St Giles Kingsway Presby-
terian Church in Toronto.

It was a triple celebration for the religious
organisation, a stalwart of independent thinking
since it was founded in 1810 by Scottish ex-
patriots living in the Bahamas.

For 200 years, with its Scots flag flying and its
black wrought-iron pineapple railing, the struc-
ture — one of Nassau's most enduring symbols —
has been a staple on every taxi and surrey tour.

But it is what the church stands for and the
new minister who will help helm through
uncharted waters that drew near record num-
bers to the services. "The induction of our new
minister, Reverend McPhail, as we celebrate
our 200th anniversary and embark on a new
path of independent governance has imbued
members of the one of the oldest congrega-
tions in the Bahamas with a new enthusiasm
and a sense of spiritual renewal,” said a church
spokesperson. "For a church that was born by
Scottish ex-patriots living in the Bahamas in



REV. BRYN MACPHAIL

. 1810 to have come this far and
now reaching out to unite with
Lucaya Kirk in Freeport, Grand
Bahama under our the umbrel-
la of the Evangelical Presbyter-
ian Church (EPC), the history
is replete and the future is
bright.”

That future links the Kirk
(Scottish for church) in Nassau
with its sister church, Lucaya
Kirk, in Grand Bahama. Both
will now come under the Evan-
gelical Presbyterian Church, an
interim step on the path of both
churches forming the basis of an
independent Presbyterian Church of the
Bahamas.

Once the self-governing Presbyterian Church
of the Bahamas is fully established, other
churches, including the Kirk of the Pines, a sta-
tion in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, will be free to

oin.

"The Bahamas has been a free and indepen-
dent nation for nearly three decades and the
Kirk is very much a Bahamian institution,"
explained the spokesman. "The departure from
the Church of Scotland came as a result of nat-
ural growth and maturity.”

The Church of Scotland accepted the split
amicably, and in an official document, com-
mended the Kirk for its service and wished
them "God's continuing blessing as they take
forward their life and witness in the Bahamas.”

It was Rev Scott Kirkland of the Lucaya Kirk
who served in the delicate capacity of taking the
message of the Bahamian Kirks to Scotland.
Kirkland also lent his time to the Nassau Kirk as
it conducted a search for a new minister.

That search led the Kirk to Rev MacPhail.
With an education steeped in the traditions of
the church, Rev MacPhail proved himself a
passionate speaker on icons of the Presbyterian
Church when he delivered sermons as a visiting
minister prior to taking up his full-time position.

He arrived in Nassau last week with wife,
Allie, a registered family and marriage therapist,
and their 7-year-old daughter, Anya.





Ml MAGISTRATE’S COURT

Man faces firearm
charges in connection
with toddler shooting







TYSON DEVEAUX, 23

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tripunemedia.net



A 23-year-old Pinewood
Gardens man was arraigned
in the Magistrate Court yes-
terday on firearm charges in
connection with a shooting
which left a four-year-old
boy wounded.

Tyson Deveaux was
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez yester-
day along with his mother
Valderine Deveaux, 55;
Richard Higgs, 23; and Tevin
Richardson, 19; all of
Pinewood Gardens.

It is alleged that on Mon-
day June 14, Tyson Deveaux
was in possession of a hand-
gun with the intent to endan-
ger the life of Abigail
Whyms as well as Anthon
Whyms.

Deveaux was not required
to enter a plea to the charge.

He was also charged,
along with his mother, with
possession of seven live
rounds of 9mm ammunition
and 19 live rounds of .223
ammunition.

Both pleaded not guilty to
the charges.

Higgs, Richardson and
Tyson Deveaux are also
accused of possessing a black
9mm Smith and Wesson pis-
tol and 14 live rounds of
9mm ammunition.

Maybe he'll use it to buy a tie. Maybe not.

Father's Day Gift Cards.

No credit checks. Accepted everywhere. Apply today.

Heod Office: (242) 397-3000 | wew.BankBohamas.com



” BOB









TEVIN RICHARDSON, 19

All three men pleaded not
guilty to the charges.

The prosecution objected
to the three men being
granted bail but did not
object to bail being granted
to Valderine Deveaux.

Attorney Ian Cargill told
the court that there was no
reason why Higgs should not
be granted bail.

Mr Cargill told the court
that Higgs had been in police
custody since Monday.

He also told the court that
Tyson Deveaux had no mat-
ters pending before the
courts, no previous convic-





—$<—*_

RICHARD HIGGS, 23

tions and had been shot four
times.

According to Mr Cargill,
the same gun that was used
to shoot Deveaux, who was
injured during the incident,
was also used to shoot two
other persons.

Jeff Lloyd, attorney for
Richardson, told the court
that his client had merely
helped one of the parties in
question with seeking med-
ical attention.

He said that Richardson
has never been charged or
convicted.

Higgs and Richardson
were each granted $8,000
bail and ordered to report
to the nearest police station
every Wednesday and Sat-
urday before 6pm.

Valderine Deveaux was
granted $6,000 bail.

Tyson Deveaux was
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. He is expected back
in court on June 23 for a bail
hearing in Court Eight, Bank
Lane.

TROPICAL
Uy

SRR
PHONE: 322-2157





You're Happy As A Fairy
Tale, Enchanting As A

Magic Spell.



HAPPY 7TH BIRTHDAY
TO OUR PRINCESS

You're lovely as a ballroom dress majestic asa true
princess, brighter than a star-filled night, loved forever
at first sight.

From Your Parents Jamal & Dia, Sister , Grandparents
Terry & Barbara, Aunts Kell Carlisa, Prisca, Tara, Nessa,
Shay & Toya, Uncles Bernard, Nalda, Jerry, & Terrence,
Cousins, Godparents Especially Philip Brown,
Godsisters & Brothers and Grade | Storr
at Temple Christian School

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THE PLP has dropped plans to
challenge the prime minister’s
appointment of Michael Pintard as a
senator, according to Mr Pintard.

While calls to PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts were not returned
up to press time yesterday, Mr Pin-
tard released a statement in which he
suggested that “the new breed of
politicians” in the opposition party
in their

had “won the argument”
party over his appointment.

“From the outset I made the point
that key figures in the Progressive
Liberal Party, especially the new
generation of politicians had histor-
ically applauded my nationalism and
fair political commentary despite the
fact that we didn’t share the same

political persuasion.

“Therefore I was taken aback by
the initial opposition to my appoint-
ment. Clearly the new breed of
politicians have won the argument in

LOCAL NEWS

‘PLP drops plan to challenge |g
Michael Pintard as senator’



their party and have convinced the
initial objectors that the party is best
served by focusing on other matters
rather than an issue that the party is

MICHAEL PINTARD
being sworn in as
Senator. Pictured
with him is then
Governor General
Arthur Hanna.



FNM rips into Mitchell over
civil disobedience remarks

THE FNM has launched
another scathing attack on Fox
Hill MP Fred Mitchell follow-
ing his suggestion that the
opposition may have to resort
to more civil disobedience.

The governing party said Mr
Mitchell’s “bizarre” comments,
delivered at a PLP mini rally
on Tuesday, smack of

“hypocrisy, opportunism,
grandstanding and dema-
goguery”.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the party put Mr Mitchel-
Ps call for civil disobedience
down to an “insatiable hunger
for power” in the face of his
“ever-diminishing credibility”.

The party said Mr Mitchell
remains shell-shocked by his
party’s loss of power in 2007,
and accused him of having a
tendency to playact as if he is
still a Cabinet minister.

“He also continues to
demand that the duly elected
government consult with him,
as well as share executive pow-
er with the opposition,” the
FNM said. “In fact, he wants
to be a super minister with veto
power over Cabinet and minis-
terial decisions. The party
added: “The man who was
denied the right to speak at his
own party’s national conven-
tion last year is now lecturing
the government about democ-
racy. The man who claims that
he wants radical governmental
reform is now acting unconsti-
tutionally in parliament in pur-
suit of constitutional change.

Restructure

“The man who says he wants
to radically restructure the pow-
ers of the executive and parlia-
ment now that he is in opposi-
tion, did not vigorously push or
promote these proposals when
he sat around the Cabinet table
exercising executive power.

“The man who says the
opposition should be consult-
ed on just about every public
matter, existed quite happily in
a PLP administration which did
not do what they are now
demanding of the government.”

Mr Mitchell’s rally comments
followed the opposition’s deci-
sion to walk out of the House
of Assembly last week, in
protest of the government’s
block of Mr Mitchell’s attempt
to move an amendment.

After the FNM’s initial
response to his comments on
Wednesday, Mr Mitchell
accused them of making a
“mountain out of a mole hill”
and claimed the civil disobedi-
ence he suggested was akin to
that practised by Ghandi and
Martin Luther King.

Mr Mitchell went on to
explain that the row stemmed
from his attempt in parliament
to amend the regulations gov-
erning the level of assistance
offered to families unable to
pay for funerals.

The FNM responded to this
point as well, saying: “The man
whose government failed to
increase funeral assistance for
indigent families over the
course of five years has conve-
niently found compassion.
Rather than engaging in dema-
goguery and conduct unbe-
coming of the official opposi-
tion, he and his colleagues
should have increased assis-
tance to the poor when they
had the opportunity.”

“The man who preaches
about his concern for the poor
sat in a Cabinet which ignored
the Sea Hauler and United Star

tan intake



(ship crash) victims, allowed
infant mortality rates to climb,
failed to increase food, rental
and utilities assistance to those
in need, and failed to upgrade
the Princess Margaret and
Rand Memorial Hospitals.
“The FNM provided the Sea
Hauler and United Star victims
with compensation. The FNM
lowered the infant mortality
rate. The FNM significantly
increased social assistance to
the poor, including assistance
to widows, orphans and the
elderly. The FNM is upgrading
public hospitals in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama. If

66

The man who

was denied
the right to speak
at his own party’s
national conven-
tion last year is
now lecturing the
government about
democracy.”



FNM

Mr Mitchell is seeking a respon-
sive government he simply need
look across the aisle.

“Mr Mitchell knows one of
the reasons his government
failed to address most of the
needs of the Bahamian people.
In his own words: ‘Many PLPs
were dissatisfied with our work
ethic: our inability to get things
done on time, answer phone
calls and get to work on time
and to deal with requests to the
government in a timely fash-
ion’,” the FNM said. “Mr
Mitchell is promising more civ-
il disobedience because he can-
not get his own way.”

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less likely to win,” he said.

In March 2010, the PLP said Mr
Pintard’s appointment that month
was in “clear violation” of a ruling by

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 3

&y





Perry ho

former Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall _ tirelessly in and out of the Senate to
in relation to a dispute over how improve the condition of our peo-
many Senate seats each party should ple. “

have and showed Prime Minister “My commitment remains the
Hubert Ingraham "disrespects the same as it was when I was the
rule of law and the Bahamian peo- spokesman for the college of the
ple.” Bahamas student union more than

The PLP said it opposed the 25 years ago, and that is: to serve
appointment of Mr Pintard, whoasa the Bahamian people and residents
former FNM electoral candidate, the of the Bahamas without fear, self-
opposition regarded as "a partisanof _— lessly and appreciating that Bahami-
the FNM who is clearly subject to ans from all walks of life and politi-
the FNM whip". cal beliefs are needed if we are to

Perry Christie, PLP leader, said — successfully meet our national chal-
at the time that the party “has to lenges and seize the opportunities
challenge” the decision. at our fingers tips.

“We are very surprised by this “ Daily I will support efforts to
appointment... The only recourse I construct and bring to fruition a
strategic plan for our country. I
encourage each resident, regardless
of your station in life, to identify one
area of need or cause in our country
and commit themselves afresh to
addressing it.”

have is to pursue the matter in the
courts,” he added. Attempts to reach
Mr Christie for comment yesterday
were unsuccessful.

Mr Pintard, in his statement,
recommitted himself to “working




































BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK II - BANK RECONCILIATION
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II
Bank Reconciliation, in the Finance Division.
Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:
° Preparing bank reconciliation for assigned bank accounts;
Preparing journal entries for accounting adjustments and banking
transactions (e.g., transfers between bank accounts, bank charges, re

turned checks);

Entering cash receipts postings in journals for proper allocation within
the general ledger;

Providing source data with regards to employee and other returned
checks;

Acting as liaison between Customer Services departments to prepare
listings of returned cheques; and

Maintaining procedures filing system for such items as: canceled checks,
bank advice, memos and statements.
Job requirements include:

° A minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Accounting/Business or
equivalent in General Accounting/Fundamentals;

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of Check Reconciliation module within
the HTE environment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on

or before: Friday, June 25, 2010,

As Marked on the other half

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama wants presidency back from spill

WASHINGTON — BP chief executive
Tony Hayward committed a faux pas when
he admitted he wanted his life back. Presi-
dent Barack Obama is too smart to say it
aloud, but he wants his presidency back.

To that end, the president's team this
past week unilaterally declared an "inflection
point” in the Gulf of Mexico debacle. He
framed his Oval Office address and BP's
creation of a $20 billion compensation fund
as a turning point when the public regained
confidence in Obama's response to an envi-
ronmental disaster whose negative political
effects are spreading along with the gushing
crude. The crisis has cost Obama dearly, in
time and focus. He'd rather devote his time
to push for passage of jobs legislation, put in
place his new health care plan, develop an
energy package, tend to two wars and deal
with other priorities.

That doesn't just hurt him; it's a frustra-
tion to congressional Democrats anxious to
project a can-do image ahead of the fall elec-
tions.

Obama's address to the nation Tuesday
night was designed to reassure people that
he's in charge in the Gulf, thinking ahead to
the nation's broader energy needs and keep-
ing up with the myriad demands of office. He
also offered rosy talk that BP soon could
capture up to 90 per cent of the oil spewing
from the broken well. That's extremely iffy.

For all the hype attached to the speech,
Obama did himself far more good a day lat-
er when he delivered more than words — the
$20 billion BP-financed fund to cover the
mounting economic costs to those whose
lives the oily menace has upended.

Then, Obama tried to shift attention else-
where. The president, who began his week
on the Gulf's beaches, ended it at a govern-
ment-financed road project in Ohio, putting
his focus squarely on jobs and the econo-
my.

The administration is calling this "Recov-
ery Summer." That refers to an anticipated
spike in jobs created by last year's $862 bil-
lion economic stimulus package. But it could
just as well reflect the administration's hope-
ful thinking about public perceptions of Oba-
ma's handling of the spill, the economy and
more.

It will take more than a catchy title,
though, to make up for lost ground — on the
economy or in the Gulf.

Economic growth has rebounded in the
past year. Yet the unemployment rate still is
perilously close to 10 per cent. About 1 mil-
lion gallons or more of oil per day still are
spewing into the Gulf. An AP-Gfk poll
released midweek found that people are








weal
2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET

angry about the government's handling of
the spill, and many doubt Washington real-
ly could help them in a disaster.

For all of that, though, the president's
overall job performance rating is holding
steady at a respectable 50 per cent.

Obama has acknowledged that jobless-
ness probably will continue at high levels
into next year. He's spoken of the limits of
his power in responding to the Gulf spill.

He told people at a Louisiana bait shop:
"IT can't suck it up with a straw. All Ican do
is make sure that I put honest hardworking
smart people in place" to contain the oil
and do right by those it is harming.

And, he might add, put the screws to BP.

That's an important shift from Obama's
earlier, scattershot efforts to demonstrate
he's tuned in to public sentiment and in con-
trol. Admonished for seeming detached,
Obama pushed his anger level to DEFCON
1, promising to kick ass. Accused of being
remote, Obama atoned with his physical
presence — multiple trips to the Gulf, where
he adopted a just-folks vernacular by drop-
pin' Gs when eatin' and talkin' with
shrimpers and oystermen.

Eager to demonstrate not just command
but compassion, Obama invited relatives of
the 11 oil workers killed in the disaster to
meet him at the White House, where he
cuddled the newborn baby of one of those
lost. The $20 billion recovery fund helps
Obama pivot from empathy to concrete
problem-solving.

But there's still a risk that high expecta-
tions will give way to frustration with how
the fund is actually administered by an inde-
pendent arbiter — not the government.

Bill Galston, a former Clinton adminis-
tration domestic policy adviser now at the
Brookings Institution, said fund administra-
tor Kenneth Feinberg is highly regarded,
but also a very careful man. Careful admin-
istration of the fund may well mean a slow-
er pace of disbursements than affected fam-
ilies and businesses in the Gulf want. It also
could mean that BP isn't asked to pay for
everything that the government wants.

Whether the issue is damage claims from
the Gulf or jobs created in Ohio, the public
is hungry for tangible results.

"The single most important thing right
now is to show change that people can
believe in," says Galston. "And at this point,
the only change they'll believe in is change
that they can touch and see and feel — and
that's true both in the Gulf and in the econ-
omy."

(This article was written by Nancy Benac,
Associated Press Writer).



A matter of
grave concern at
Social Services

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open let-
ter to Mrs Loretta Butler-
Turner,

Minister of State Depart-
ment of Social Services.

Dear Mrs Butler-Turner

As a Bahamian tax payer, I
was most disturbed after vis-
iting Social Services and
requesting assistance for med-
ical services needed. My doc-
tor referred me to a facility
where I went and got a quote
for the needed services and
took it to Social Services.

I was seen by a Social Ser-
vice Officer who said that
they do not do any business
with that company and sent
me to another company.

I went to the other facility
that Social Service sent me to
who told me that the person
who needed to evaluate me
is an American and only
comes in when the need aris-
es.

Concerned with this, I
asked if when this person
evaluates me and I need fol-
low-up services what do I do
and who would service my
product if there is a problem.
The response was: “You will
have to wait until the individ-
ual comes back to Nassau.”

T returned to Social Service
and voiced my concerns. I was
told outright, if I wanted
Social Services assistance I
would have to go to the com-
pany they sent me to because
as long as he is there the oth-
er company would not get
one patient from Social Ser-
vice.

As a Bahamian business
person, I found this rather dis-
turbing and discussed what
had happened with my doc-
tor who was very upset with
what I had told him. I went
back to the company who my
doctor sent me to, went to the
bank and got a loan to pay
for my services.

The service at the company
that I went with was so per-
sonal, professional and if I
need follow-up, I could get
the attention needed at any-
time.

While receiving service at
this company, I mentioned
what had transpired and the
young man humbly said:
“That’s ok let them do what

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



they like, I will continue to
do the best that I can to serve
those who want my service.”
He also said: “This is how we
treat each other and then
when things get out of hand,
they will be the same ones
expecting me to suck it up.
Miss, the things they expect
me to accept they cannot even
think it around others. I do
hope that those involved can
handle it when the bubble
bursts because everyday
patients come to be seen by
me and tell me what is going
on.”

More touching, to me and
those who I shared this expe-
rience with, this giant of a
man is one of the few profes-
sional, humble, honest,
respectful, Bahamian profes-
sional men I have come across
in a very long time, as his kind
is rare, extinct and should be
protected. Well, I guess not,
he is a Bahamian.

Most interesting, I got a call
from Social Service company
a few days later and I advised
her that I had gone to anoth-
er company and got the need-
ed services. The lady became
loud, rude and she was bold
enough to say to me: “If you
did not get your services with
us, Social Services would not
pay.” You know what is so
hurtful, this woman I discov-
ered, is a foreigner who in my
opinion should not even be
in the Bahamas.

As a Bahamian profession-
al business owner and having
experienced a similar situa-
tion, this did not sit well with
me and I decided to follow-up
on this and after all I had
experienced I was not sur-
prised at what I found....
Additionally, the lady at this
company had no difficulty or
concern with announcing that
they would send the quote
directly to Social Services
because she alleged that they
would have to make it less
than the other company’s
quote as Social Services Staff
graciously and willingly make
this information available to
them.

I had the opportunity to

speak with a number of
patients between the two
companies and four out of
five said their quotes were the
exact same amount of differ-
ence ($100) less than the oth-
er company and one person’s
bill was initially $14,000+ plus
and was later discounted by
$5,000 in order to be $100 less
than the other company’s
quote.

I also spoke to two other
customers who said that they
insisted on going to the com-
pany Social Services said they
were not doing any business
with because it has been
around, they could get service
whenever needed, and they
had always got good service
there and were not prepared
to go anywhere else, espe-
cially after checking out the
company Social Services had
sent them to and when they
went to collect the vouchers
after having their services pro-
vided the vouchers were
printed in the Social Service
company’s name.

Mrs Butler-Turner, this
cannot be right, I did a full
background check which
revealed the company trad-
ing as, who is who in the
Bahamas, employees,
employers, patients I met at
both companies and Social
Services involvement. I find
this to be most unacceptable
in 2010 in the Bahamas and I
will seek to have this matter
brought to light and correct-
ed.

You have been given the
responsibility of running our
public company, while so
many of our own Bahamian
people are experiencing finan-
cial hardship in these eco-
nomic hard times while some
of those accountable to you
are in my opinion wasting and
abusing the people’s funds
like it is nobody’s business. I
always ask the question if this
was your private account
would you spend it the way
you are spending it now?

I cry shame on Social Ser-
vice and those individuals
involved, this is a disgrace. I
hope this is addressed and
those responsible be held
accountable.

A PAULA ROLLE
Nassau,
2010.

Mr Forbes needs to learn House of Assembly decorum

EDITOR, The Tribune.
Can someone please pull
Mr Forbes aside and try to
educate him on proper
decorum in the Honourable

Share your news

from people who are

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ae

GENERAL MANAGER
OF MARKETING AND OPERATIONS

FLO Bahamas (8s looking to employ a general
Manager of marketing arid operations

Those individuals applying will need to demonstrate
the following experience and credentials:

e Must have worked withing the marketing sector of
the fly fishing travel industry for a minimum of ten
years.

¢ Should be abe to demonstrate a successful track
record in Sportfishing marketing and vacation sales.
Existing long term relationship with the major fly
fishing booking agents in North America and Europe.
Should have experience in teaching and hosting fly
fishing schools
Should have long term and well established client
base built around reputation of offering world class
Sportfishing holidays.

¢ Competent computer skills

e¢ The applicant will need to provide references to
demonstrate their qualifications and experience in
the marketing of International Fly Fishing travel.

Salary and benefits will be in line with experience
and qualifications. Please send a current résumé
and associate documentation to: HzO Bahamas,
P.O. Box 60-266, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

House of Assembly. I had
occasion to address this top-
ic in the past on Mr Forbes
after observing his actions.

Mr Forbes behaviour may
be fitting and accepted at
Mt Tabor, but he must
realise that he is in the Hon-
ourable House of Assembly,
where he should sit down,
keep his big mouth shut
until it is his time to speak
and learn something, you
can hear him in the back-
ground (yeah, yeah, yeah) it
makes one wonder.

If he ever takes the time
out to view the proceedings
and to hear himself, he

makes himself a nuisance to
the listening public.

He and a few others are
an embarrassment and dis-
grace to our country, after
his debacle at the conven-
tion.

One would have thought
this man would have learnt a
lesson, you can only take the
horse to the well, but you
can’t make him drink.

KELLY D
BURROWS
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
June 9, 2010.

Please note that Mr. Whitney
Shaundel Newbold is NO longer
employed with
Fox Locksmithing Ltd.
and can no longer do business on
our behalf.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



GB pharmacists Ue CRG Cee ah

praised by the
new council

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Seven pharmacies on Grand Bahama
passed inspection by the new Bahamas National Pharmacy
Council this week.

Philip Gray, council member and consultant for the Pub-
lic Hospitals Authority, reported that pharmacists here are
practicing at a “high standard” and adhering to the law.

The council has been on island for a week to ensure full
participation in the Prescription Drug Plan by pharmacy
owners, doctors and nurses.

An inspection was also carried out at eight pharmacy
facilities that have applied to be registered with the Drug
Plan.

“Seven of the eight facilities have passed inspection and we
are working with one facility to ensure that they too com-
ply,” said Mr Gray.

He said several criteria must be met during the inspection
process — starting with the legal requirement that a phar-
macist be present whenever medication is being issued.

Pharmacies must operate according to international stan-
dards, which require among other things, that all expired
products be removed from the shelves.

The council also requires that products be stored under
correct conditions and that controlled and psychotropic
substances, as well as those which can call cause depen-
dency, are properly labelled and documented.

“We comply with the Geneva Convention... we collect
and correlate all information as it relates to controlled nar-
cotic substances being documented,” Mr Gray said.

Sanitation

“We also look at the sanitation and cleanliness of the
facility and make sure that the necessary automation and
profiling of information is in place so we can look at a
patient history; what drugs need to be accessed and what
other drugs the patient is taking to look at drug on drug
interaction and contraindication, so that necessary phar-
maceutical care is being given which is inclusive of coun-
selling patients on the effects or side effects of medication.”

Mr Gray said the council fully endorses the National Pre-
scription Drug Plan that is being implemented by the gov-
ernment.

“We are pleased that the government is doing it,” he
said. “The plan is really similar to that of other countries in
the region and internationally.

“It is making available easy access for Bahamian con-
sumers to have medication for illnesses, and so we endorse
this initiative and partner with the government to make
sure it comes to full fruition.”

When asked about the importation of illegal pharmaceu-
tical drugs, bought on the international black market, Mr
Gray said the council is not aware any problems like that in
Grand Bahama.

“There are laws regarding the importation and exportation
of prescription drugs for which we are in dialogue with
Customs and pharmaceutical wholesalers, and they under-
stand the standards for what is acceptable and the criteria for
bringing in medication.

“Anyone outside of the authorised body bringing in med-
ication illegally through the black market is in breach of the



Peter Ramsay/BlS




ON THURSDAY, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham participated ina
ground-breaking cere-
mony for a new multi-
million dollar shopping
centre in Southwest-
ern New Providence,
at the junction of
Carmichael and Baillou
Hill Roads.

Pictured from left to
right are: Minister of
Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Charles Maynard;
Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis; Larry
Treco, John Treco,
Prime Minister Ingra-
ham, Angelo Treco
and Wesley Treco. The
Treco family is devel-
oping the shopping
centre.


























Ml FREEPORT MAGISTRATE’S COURT
Man, 20, in court

GREEN PARROT

Gather 4. Day Special ,

charged with murder Saad

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Abdul Ron-
don Burrows was charged
with murder in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on Friday.

Burrows, 20, appeared
before the Deputy Chief
Magistrate Helen Jones in
Court Three.

It is alleged that on June 8,
the accused intentionally
caused the death of 31-year-
old Troy Rolle by means of
unlawful harm.

Rolle, 31, and another man,
were attacked and stabbed at
an apartment complex at
Emerald Drive, Coral Gar-
dens.

Sixth

Rolle died of his injuries.
His death is listed as the sixth
homicide for the year on
Grand Bahama.

After the stabbing, Burrows
eluded police for a week, but
was turned in to police by his
father on Thursday.

He was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.

The matter was adjourned
to August 17, 2010 for a pre-

ee Re Bose
Fertilizer, Fungicide,

liminary inquiry. Three per-
sons were also charged on
Wednesday in connection
with the matter.

It is alleged that Jarreth
Barry, 18, of Gambier Drive;
and Darren Pratt, 39 and
Karen Janice Bowe, 24, both
of Mallard Street, being con-
cerned together, conspired to Or
murder Rolle and caused
harm to a second man.

Barry was also charged with
Rolle’s murder.

They were not required to
enter a plea to the charges.

Claw

For the stories

behind the news,



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on Mondays



aired
BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Senior Manager, Accounts in the Finance
Division.

NAO A

law and will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

“It is an unacceptable and dangerous practice and I ask
persons who may be involved to cease and desist immedi-
ately,” he said.

322-2157

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The Senior Manager - Accounts oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget &
Management Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective
delivery of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Compilation of the corporate budget;

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets;
Preparation of monthly management statements;

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation;
Preparation of performance reports for division ,department and sections;
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables

(capital contributions, rechargeable);

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices;
Liaison with internal and external audits;

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial Officer for the Board of Directors;

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required;
Preparation of the business plan for the department;

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department;
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims;
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management,

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment;

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form
employee’s salaries;

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable;
Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts;

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle
repayments,

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule;

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans;

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to
ensure adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors;
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors;

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and
External Auditors;

Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline.

Conducting performance appraisals; and

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff,
manage and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting
ACCA/CPA or equivalent qualifications;

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a
similar management position;

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices;

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications;

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing
systems;

Ability to analyze financial reports;

Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial
software and the system of internal control;

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability;

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; and
Good time management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and_ returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
hee Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

Friday, June 25, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Government awar

ds contract

for new Treasury Department

After nine years at its cur-
rent location on George
Street, the Treasury Depart-
ment is set to get a new
home.

On Thursday, Public
Works and Transport Min-
ister Neko Grant awarded a
contract for $675,000 to
Scottdale Industries Com-
pany to complete work at
the Scottdale Industries
building on East Street
across from the headquar-
ters of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.

“For any number of years
now the Treasury Depart-
ment has been operating
from a location and under
conditions that have been
less than favourable so we
are pleased to execute this
contract for the outfitting of
the building,” Mr Grant
said.

He said it is anticipated
that the new accommoda-
tions would provide an
improved working environ-
ment for the staff of the
Treasury Department.

Painting

The contract includes
painting of interior walls,
installation of carpet and
tiles, installation of drywall,
doors and window treat-
ments and construction of
desk and counters. Mechan-
ical, plumbing and electrical
works are also included.

Mr Grant explained that
as construction of the build-
ing is presently being com-
pleted, Scottdale Industries
Company (SIDC) was invit-
ed to submit a proposal for
construction works based on
drawings and specifications
prepared by the ministry’s
project technical staff. The
company responded with a
proposal to complete the fit-
out work.

“This proposal was found
to be suitable and accept-
able by the ministry’s tech-
nical officers who took into
consideration the current
construction rates from the
in-house Quantity Survey-
ing and Mechanical and
Engineering sections along
with the construction docu-
















ea

in hd
—

al

THE HANDSHAKE after the signing of the contract.

ments and project scope,”
Mr Grant said.

“This price is very com-
petitive and is due primarily
to SIDC’s agreement under
the Downtown Revitalisa-
tion Act that provides for
exemption from the pay-
ment of all Customs duties
and excise taxes which
would otherwise be payable
on materials imported into
the Bahamas,” he added.

He thanked the technical
officers of the Ministry of
Works for their work and
commended Tim Johnson,
project architect, and quan-

Telli too hard










4

for God

tity surveyor Eloise Fernan-
der for their efforts in
advancing the project to its
present stage.

The five-storey building
has 18,786 square feet of
floor space and will house
100 employees.

Treasurer Eugenia
Cartwright said the depart-
ment is very pleased to be
moving into more comfort-
able accommodations that
will offer more convenience
to the staff and the general
public. She thanked the
team from the Treasury
Department including Mary
Mitchell, senior deputy trea-
surer and Cyril Knowles,
finance officer, for their
assistance in bringing the
project to this point.





“For any num-
ber of years now
the Treasury
Department has
been operating
from a location
and under condi-
tions that have
been less than
favourable so we
are pleased to
execute this con-
tract for the out-
fitting of the
building.”

Neko Grant



Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)



| SUNDAY, JUNE 20TH, 2010

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Men's Fellowship
7:00 p.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Rev. Carla Culmer (HC)










NO ILLNESS I5
TOO DIFFICULT

| Theme: “As a wise master builder, I laid a foundation and another was building upon it."

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JUNE 20, 2010

11:30 A.M. Guest Speaker
Pastor Elder Brentford Isaacs
‘Happy Father’s Day To All Fathers”
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.

* Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
* Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)

=
BEHOLD, (AM THE LORD, THE GOO OF ALL FLESH:
IS THERE ABV THING TOO HARD FOR ME Jeremiah 32:27

z — #4
Come! Join us this sunday as we come together
_ ~~ - y
and explore & meet the God who heals

i a
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SUNDAY SERVICES

* Early Worship Service ose OM) aM,
* Sunday School for all ages... 45 am
* Worship Service .. 1100 am
* Spanish Service een 1am
* FADS Youth QiurchiGrades 7-12)
First & Third Suriday 1130 am E
"POWER CREW Church |Ages [+11 yrs.) 7
Second & Fourth Sunday ........... 11:30am. a.
. Evening SCTce oh pm

FRIDAY

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: lam & 7pm

WEDNESDAY Sunday School: 9:45am



Bahamas and Canada
Sign Tax Information
RET

Kris Ingraham/BIS



Se a ,
PICTURED, from left, are: Stephen Hallihan, High Commis-
sioner for Canada to the Bahamas; and Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette. Looking
on is Terry Archer, senior protocol officer, Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.

THE Commonwealth of the Bahamas and Canada have
signed a Tax Information Exchange Agreement, strengthening
an already established culture of co-operation, Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
announced.

Mr Symonette and Canadian High Commissioner to the
Bahamas Stephen Hallihan signed the TIEA at a ceremony on
Thursday at the House of Assembly.

It was the 22nd such agreement signed by the Bahamas — 16
with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Develop-
ment countries and nine with members of the G-20.

“The government of the Bahamas is satisfied that its expand-
ing network for tax information exchange proves the Bahamas’
ability to benefit from the changing global regulatory environ-
ment and to enjoy continued growth in its international business
industry,” Mr Symonette said. He said that the government wel-
comes the TIEA agreement with Canada, a fellow Common-
wealth country and member of the OECD Global Forum. He
thanked the Canadian negotiators for completing the negotia-
tions in a collaborative and co-operative manner.

The Bahamas, he said, takes particular note of its long-stand-
ing economic links Canada stemming back over a century,
which have provided mutual benefits for both countries, par-
ticularly in financial services and the hospitality sector.

“The Bahamas has also enjoyed a long-standing relation-
ship with Canada in the area of judicial co-operation in respect
of cross-border criminal activity, under our Mutual Legal Assis-
tance Treaty, which has been in place since the late 1990s.

“The TIEA between our two countries provides an important
complementary addition to an already established, robust base
of cooperation,” he said.

Dividends

Once the agreement enters into force, it will extend exempt
surplus treatment to dividends paid to a Canadian parent cor-
poration by its foreign affiliates resident and carrying on busi-
ness in the Bahamas, allowing such dividends to be exempted
from tax in Canada.

“The Bahamas looks forward to the continued expansion
of its economic relationship with Canada, as nations committed
to the effective implementation of accepted international stan-
dards for financial regulation and cross-border cooperation;
and from this new base forge even stronger links within the
scope of the new global financial norms,” Mr Symonette said.

High Commissioner Hallihan said that these agreements are
an important part of a commitment that has been made to
many countries around the world, to bring about transparency
and effectiveness to international financial systems and to tax
regimes which cross borders.

“In that regard, Canada is very pleased to be signing this
exchange agreement with the government of the Bahamas. It
will, quite simply, make our taxation regimes more transparent,
more effective and it will allow both countries to actually more
effectively implement the tax systems that we have in place,” he
said. “It also sends a very a powerful signal to other communi-
ties that responsible governments such as the one here and in
our Canada, insist on due diligence being undertaken when it
comes to issues of taxation and financial regulations.”

The High Commissioner said that it is also just another sign
of how strong the relationship is between Canada and the
Bahamas, regarded as one of its strongest partners in the region.

The Bahamas has signed Tax Information Exchange Agree-
ments with: the United States of America, the Principality of
Monaco, the Republic of San Marino, the United Kingdom,
New Zealand, the People’s Republic of China, Argentina, the
Netherlands, Belgium, France, Mexico, Denmark, The Faroe
Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Spain,
Australia, and Germany.





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at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective Bible Teaching

* Royal Rangers [Boys Club) 416 yrs,
* Missiomestters (Gurls Chuo) 416 yrs.

* Spanish Bible Study

at 7;30 p.m.
*fauth Miniiry Meeting
torades F-12]

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Assembly Of God

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Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira
Shopping Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard each
morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

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SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching = Tiam & 7:30pm EVANGELISTS
Radio Bible Hour:

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Ved. Prayer & Praise ?:30om

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| Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0663 = Gox M-S822 !

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Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O Tow Sk S63 1
Telephone number: 324-2738
Telefaa timber: 24-2487

COE TO WORSHIP LEAPE To SERVE



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

British engineer
appointed director
of Public Works



PHOTO: Letisha Henderson







PUBLIC WORKS director John Canton.

THE Ministry of Public Works and Transport has announced
the appointment of John Canton as director of Public Works.

A citizen of the United Kingdom, Mr Canton holds a bach-
elor of science degree in civil engineering and a master of sci-
ence degree in irrigation engineering.

He is a fellow of the Institute of Civil Engineers and a mem-
ber of the Chartered Institute of Water and Environmental
Management.

Mr Canton has more than 30 years of experience as a char-
tered engineer during which time he was employed on a wide
range of civil engineering projects in the United Kingdom and
internationally (Cyprus, Hong Kong, Australia, Bangladesh
and Ghana.)

Mr Canton and his wife Valerie are the parents of two chil-
dren.

Vacant

The post has remained vacant since April 17, 2008 when
the contract of former director Melanie Roach expired.

Gordon Major (former director of Housing) was appointed
acting director of Public Works during the interim period. Mr
Major has assumed new duties in the Office of the Prime Min-
ister.

The government issued a statement on the appointment yes-
terday, saying: “The search for the new director of Public
Works was very intensive. During 2008 and 2009, in addition to
its local publication, the advertisement for the post was pub-
lished in professional journals, on job search websites and in
leading newspapers in Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, Canada
and the UK. A total of 10 persons applied for the position,
including four Bahamians.

“The Public Service Commission interviewed nine of the
applicants for the post during September 2009 including the four
Bahamians.

“Mr Canton was selected as the most suitably qualified per-
son to fill the post of director of Public Works. He assumed
these duties with effect from June 7, 2010.”

ee
VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

The Applicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and
include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands

Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.

Summit Insurance Company Limited

(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)








































Balance Sheet
As of 31 December 2009
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

ASSETS
Cash in hand and at banks
Term deposits with banks
Due from reinsurers
Due trom agents
Deferred commission expense
Prepayments and other assets
Investments In securities:
Available-for-sale
Loans and receivables
Investment property
Plant and equipment

3317477
17,625,825
19,444
7,487,703
3,258,507
141,834

980.204
17,173,805
1.265.144
7,256,857
3,481,610
136,242

4,419,460
BU), BUA)
201,268
264,923

4.854.168
636,65)
206,117
442 443

Total assets 37,544,241 2,633,250

LLABILITIES

General inswmance fiends:

Unearmed premium reserve

Uneamed commission income

Outstanding claims reserve

9,885,921
2.375, 820
§,611,075

7,891,828
3,096,558
4 335,781
15,314,167 17,872,816
Oner fabilinies:
Due to reinsurers
Accounts payable and accrmed expenses

2 Bo) 926
414,245

2,419 842
386,818
Total liabilities

18,609,338 20,679,476

2009
+

EQUITY

Share capital:
Authonzed: 10,000 000 shares of 41 each
Issued and fully paid: 5,000,000 shares of $1 each
Treasury shares

General reserve

Fair value reserve

Retained carmings

5,000,008)
(910,000)
1,000,000
575,059
13,269, 804

§,000,000
(910,000)
1,000,000
1,120,007
9,743,747

Total equity 18,934,903 15,953,754

Total liabilities and equity 37,544,241 36,653,230

APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND SIGNED ON ITS BEHALF BY:

Di

AN a \ M ;

yh 1's =A = Ys Xx =e
Director ~’ ~—

» \

qk Tone oie

Date

Full Financial Statements are available at www.summitbhahamas.com

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 2: Work

E-3 FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
€

clTae fcae TA T.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 17 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.43 | CHG 0.00 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -51.95 | YTD % -3.32
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW_BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit_y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

Previous Close Today's Close

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate A
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Baan Sas Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust xia. ere The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol ds Last Price Daily Val. EPS $ Divs
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets oe 06 4 7 = 14.00 -2.945 0.000
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000
BISEX Listed h Mutual Funds
NA iY Last 12 Months % NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund
9.1005

41 SEE
2.9020
1.5352
3.0368
13.6388
107.5706
105.7706
1.1127
1.0917
1.1150
9.5078 1.78

2.8266
1.4672
2.9343

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment a

Principal Protected TIGRS, Serie:

10.0000 Fi 10.2744 -4.61 8.15

Paneipal Protected TIGR:

Royal Fidelity Intl Fund — ah ies Sub Fund 7.9664 3.25 58.37
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
lelity

Weekly Vol. - Tradi pri
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

7
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



Mm





VOLLEYBALL
CONYERS

VOLLEYBALL CAMP

e THE annual Jackie
Conyers Summer Volleyball
Camp will be held at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
from June 21-25. It will get
started at 9 a.m. daily.

Regstration will take
place on Monday at the gym
at 9 a.m.

The club is open to all stu-
dents and coaches.

Local coaches will include
Glen Rolle and Jackie
Conyers. The visiting inter-
national coaches are Arlene
and Del Hughes and Vanes-
sa Johnson-Henry.

Following the completion
of next week’s camp, Cony-
ers and the instructors will
travel to Grand Bahama
where they will conduct
another week’s camp from

BASKETBALL
SHERMAN
SMITH CAMP

¢ THE second annual
Sherman Smith Summer
Sporting Camp will be held
from June 28-July 23 at the
Carlton E. Francis Primary
School on Faith United
Way, off Blue Hill Road
South.

The camp will run from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. and will offer
basketball, volleyball and
soccer. It is opened to boys
and girls between the ages
of 5-17 years.

The registration fee is $20
per week or $80 per month.

EDINBURGH CUP

e Kerzner International
along with its corporate
sponsors will once again
raise thousands of dollars to
assist with the development
of the youth in the Bahamas
when its holds the 10th
Annual Duke of Edinburgh
Cup Semi Finals scheduled
for Sunday, June 27th, 2010
at the luxurious Ocean Club
Golf Course on Paradise
Island.

Members of your media
team are invited to attend
this highly popular and
major sporting attraction for
golf enthusiasts and the
“Who’s Who’ of both the
local sporting and business
communities.

The tournament climaxes
with a special Awards Pre-
sentation at 2 p.m.

Funds will be used to
assist the Governor General
Youth Awards. Since the
inception of the Duke of
Edinburgh Cup Semi Finals,
Kerzner International, along
with its corporate sponsors
have raised over $500,000
for the development of the
youth through the GGYA
here in The Bahamas.

For further information,
interested persons are
advised to contact Arnette
Wilson-Ingraham in
Atlantis’ Public Relations
Department at 363-2000
extension 66407.



PAGE 9

SATURDAY, JUNE 19,





2010










la

hihtcm tae



cr





JURELLE Nairn (standing fourth from left) along with Sailbury head coach Charisse Mapp (next to Nairn at right) pose above with the local and visiting Sea Gulls instructors who
participated in the Ballin’ on the Beach Girls Basketball Camp.

TU 1 i i
Ballin’ on the Beach a ‘smashing success

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FROM the time she came
home on Sunday with her Sal-
isbury Sea Gulls’ team-mates,
Jurelle Nairn had the feeling
that the Ballin’ on the Beach
Girls’ Basketball Camp was
going to be a smashing suc-
cess.

Yesterday at the three-day
camp came to a close at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
Nairn breathed a sigh of
relief.

Mission accomplished.

“The camp was a success,”
said Nairn after she watched a
srimmage game between
some of the older members
of the camp on the outdoor
courts at the gym.

“T think it was a great step
towards the improvement of
women of female basketball



“T think it was a great step towards
the improvement of women of
female basketball in the Bahamas.”



in the Bahamas. We had a
great turnout with more than
80 campers in attendance. So
the word was out there and
we had the numbers that we
had expected.”

A former member of the
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion’s junior national team,
Nairn is now serving as an
assistant coach at Salisbury
University, which is located
in Wicomico County in Mary-
land.

She brought along her head
coach Charise Mapp and five
of the Sea Gulls’ players,

Jurelle Nairn

Kylie Hall, a 5-10 graduating
forward; Nicole Sisco, a 6-1
sophomore forward; Meghan
Dunn, a 5-9 junior guard; KC
Curran, a 5-6 junior guard and
Katie McGahagan, a 6-0
sophomore guard.

They all participated as
instructors along with
Bahamian male counterparts
Marvin Henfield, Mitch John-
son, Terrance ‘Red Eye’
McSweeney and Dereck Cun-
ningham.

Anastacia Moultrie also
helped out with the adminis-
tration of the camp.

Johnson still weighing



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

HE had a brief stint with
the NBA Development
League before he ended up
playing in the first league in
Mexico.

Mitchell Johnson, back
home for a short stay, said
he intend to continue to live
out his dream of playing pro-
fessional basketball, even if it
isn’t in the NBA.

“[’m preparing to try out
for a few things in Europe,”

he said. “But if nothing
works out, then I always
have the option of going
back to Mexico.”

On December 16, Johnson
was waived as a guard with
the Tusla 66ers. He played
in seven games wirth an
average of 8.6 minutes. He
averaged just 0.9 rebounds
and 1.6 points per game.

Although his time spent
was very short, Johnson said
he cherished the moment
because he was in a position
where he could have had the
opportunity to move up to
the NBA.

“It was a good experi-
ence,” he said. “I didn’t get
as much time as I would
have liked because I was
playing behind Mustafa
Shakur, who was one of the
top fivep layers in the league.

“T was a bit impatient, but
it was a good experience. If I
get the opportunity to play
there again, I would defi-
nitely take it. I had no
regrets of my short time in
the league.”

Right after getting cut
from the 66ers, the 25-year-
old packed his bags and
headed off to Mexico where

“Tt was a great experience
to have my team-mates come
to my country,” Nairn said.
“T’ve been with them for the
past two years, but they final-
ly got a chance to see our cul-
ture and they had a good time
getting a chance to share with
our players.”

Mapp, who just completed
her third year at Salisbury,
said having seen the enthusi-
am from Nairn, she knew that
the players here would have
responded to what they
brought to the table.

Response

“They worked hard and
they tried to absorb the new
ideas that we presented to
them. If it wasn’t new, we just
tried to present it in a differ-
ent manner,” Mapp said.

Using both the in and out-
door courts, Mapp said they

options



he finished the rest of the
season.

The 6-foot-five swingman
played with the Tijuana Zon-
keys. In the 15 games he
played in, Johnson wracked
up a total of 551 minutes or
an average of 36.7 per game.

That resulted in him post-
ing an average of 20.7 points
per game from a total of 310
scored. Out of those num-
bers, he connected on 82-of-
137 from the field for a 59.9
percentage and 27-of-73

SEE page 10

had a chance to work on the
various aspects of the game
as they rotated the players
from one station to the next.

“It’s been phenomenal,”
she pointed out. “The only
problem was that for the first
couple of days, the players
were coming in and out
because the schools were not
all finished.

“But I would rather have
them do that than not attend
at all.”

The goal, according to
Mapp, was to make sure that
each camper left with some
further knowledge of the
game.

“We didn’t want them to
leave with a lot because we
taught them a lot,” she stated.
“We know that they would
not have absorbed everything.
But if they left with one thing

SEE page 10





THE 2010 Mr. Caribbean
Bahamas Fitness Challenge,
to be held July 17th to 24th,
2010, in Nassau, Bahamas, is
being organised this year by a
dynamic new team of five

bright, beautiful young
women.
The MCB Team consists of

Camille Kenny, Founder and
Chief Executive Officer of Ca
Mari, Tessa Lightbourne,
model, television host, and
fashion stylist, Candace Tre-
co, model, and entrepreneur,
Chavala Walker, professional
entertainer, model, and aspir-
ing finance specialist, and Leah
Treco, administrator, events
co-ordinator, and model.

The applicants for this year’s
competition will be inter-
viewed in an open audition
and screening by the talented
team of young women, on Fri-

day, July 18th, 2010, in the Sir
Harry Oakes Boardroom of
the British Colonial Hilton, at
8 p.m.

The young ladies will select
the competitors from the large
pool of applicants this year to
participate in the 2010 Fitness
Challenge Competition.

New Committee

This year’s competition has
been re-organised and re-
branded by the new commit-
tee, who was carefully selected
by Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald,
President and CEO of Trip-
pin’ Out Productions, the
Executive Producer of the fit-
ness and reality competition,
take over the organisation,
management, promotion, and
development of the competi-
tion, and the recruitment and

screening of the athletes.

In addition to promoting
healthy, physical lifestyles,
part proceeds from this year’s
competition will aid breast
cancer awareness and preven-
tion locally and the charities
and women’s support groups
that promote this heath chal-
lenge, namely the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas and
Sister-Sister Breast Cancer
Support Group.

The fitness challenge com-
petition will give the winner



bragging rights as the fastest,
fittest, strongest, and most
intelligent Bahamian man for
2010-2011

The format of the competi-
tion has changed dramatically
and competitors will now be
put to the ultimate test of
physical fitness, personality,
popular appeal, and intelli-
gence.

The Fitness Challenge
Competition, a series of
weightlifting, cardiovascular,
and strength exercises, will be

held indoors at a local gym on
Saturday, July 17th. The com-
petitors will then battle it out
on the beach, on Sunday, July
18th, in the Beach Boot
Camp, a military-style obsta-
cle course and sports event,
followed by the Physique
Competition. The gyms
where the winners of both
competition work out will
receive the MCB Floating
Trophy.

Besides undergoing a "Sur-
vivor” meets " The Amazing
Race" meets “The Bachelor”
type of reality competition this
year, the competitors will also
be judged on their intelligence
and mental stamina in private
closed sessions, before a pan-
el of international and local
celebrity judges and fitness
professionals.

The international and local

community will be able to
vote online for their favourite
competitor and the winner of
the Mr. Caribbean Bahamas
FanChoice Award at
www.mrcaribbahamas.com in
June.

A local reality show of the
competitors and the competi-
tion is currently being devel-
oped and will be filmed once
the competition begins.

The winner will be
announced at a special Cele-
bration Party to be held at a
popular club in Nassau, on
July 24th, 2010, hosted by our
surprise celebrity guests, and
local and international DJs.

There is $5,000 in cash and
prizes to be won this year, and
the winner will also win a spe-

SEE page 10

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PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian delegation attends 60th FIFA Congress

A DELEGATION from
the Bahamas Football Asso-
ciation, comprised of BFA
President Anton Sealey,
General Secretary Lionel
Haven and Vice President
Pierre Lafleur travelled to
Johannesburg, South Africa
for the 60th FIFA Congress
and the Opening Ceremonies
for the 2010 FIFA World
Cup South Africa.

As Is always done, CON-
CACAF took the opportu-
nity to convene a meeting of
its members present to dis-
cuss the agenda for the FIFA
Congress, and also to allow
nine of the countries bidding
for the 2018 and 2022 FIFA
World Cups.

Representatives from the
Bid Committees of Korea,
Spain and Portugal (joint
bid), Australia, Japan, Unit-
ed States, Holland and Bel-
gium, England, Qatar and
Russia all made presenta-
tions on their desire to be
considered as host for either
the 2018 or the 2022 FIFA
World Cup.

FIFA is scheduled to make
a decision on these in
December of this year.

The FIFA Congress fol-
lowed with an agenda absent
of controversial issues, and
instead contained informa-
tion regarding FIFA’s suc-
cess in its programming.

The FIFA President did
take the opportunity to
announce his desire to seek a
further term of office when
the elections are conducted
at the FIFA Congress of
2011, scheduled for Zurich,
Switzerland.

The delegates were then
treated to the 2010 FIFA
World Cup Kick-Off Concert
conducted in Orlando Stadi-
um in Johannesburg, fol-
lowed by the Opening Cere-
monies and Opening Match
of the 2010 FIFA World Cup
in Soccer City, Johannesburg
the next day.

This allowed them the
opportunity to witness the
Mexico-South Africa match.

The Bahamian delegation
returned home on Sunday,
June 13, 2010.

BFA Delegation to the 60th FIFA Congress, General Secretary Lionel Haven, President Anton Sealey and Vice President Pierre

Lafleur.

h English Superstar David Beckham.

BFA President Anton Sealey and General Secretary Lionel Haven wit

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK I -ACCOUNTS PAYABLE

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II — Accounts Payable in

the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Processing invoices for payment by checking accuracy of calculations,
coding and authorized signatures;

Posting invoice disbursements and journal entry data into the accounts

payable system;

Reconciling statements of account for local vendors with balance due
in excess of $5,000.00. This involves generating open payables report to
ensure correctness of entries and vendor balance;

Maintaining and reporting on the Corporation’s meal voucher system;

Preparing schedules (source data for aged payables etc.) or other task
requested by Supervisor or Manager;

Assisting with maintenance of the cheque log and disbursing cheques for
vetting and approved signatures;

Assisting with the filing system of accounts payable documents and fol
lows up on outstanding obligations to local vendors; and

Assisting with resolving vendors disputes/queries.

Job requirements include:

Aminimum of an Associate Degree

(Accounts, Business Administration);

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of the Disbursement Processing module
within the H TE environment;

Ability to operate the Call Accounting System and to post invoice data
for processing of payment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas

on or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.





Masters Soccer league
action heating up

THE Masters Soccer League action is heating up at the
National Developmental Center with just four more regular sea-

son games remaining.

Results from Thursday's games are as follows:
Baha Jrs FC 1 — Cavalier FC 6 def. Baha Jr’s 6-1 and Unit-

ed def. Dynamos 8-2.

Today’s matches are as follows:
7 p.m. Real Bahamas FC vs United FC; 8.15 p.m. Nassau Pot-

cakes vs Cavalier FC.

Next Wednesday will be the final night of the competition
before we go into the playoffs, which will feature the top

three (3) teams in each division.

Competition standings after last night look like this:



Group A GP W T L PTS GF GA
i —“CtwsSSCSSSCtiéaN
Cavalier FC 2 2 0 0 6 15 2
United FC 2 2 0 0 6 15 6
Baha Juniors 3 1 0 2 3 13 15
Dynamos 3 0 0 3. (0 5 25
Group B GP W T L PTS GF GA
Bears FC 0 1 8 4 2

2
Real Bahamas 2
Nassau Pot Cakes 2



Mr Caribbean

FROM page nine

cial photo shoot and editorial
feature in two popular wom-
en's magazines and an inter-
national men’s fitness/fashion
magazine.

He will also be the
spokesperson for Breast and
Prostate Cancer Awareness
and Prevention for 2010-2011,
and the ongoing MCB Pro-
ject, MVP: Men for Violence
Prevention, a domestic vio-
lence prevention initiative.

The Bahamas hopes to
make it a double win in Run-
away Bay, Jamaica at the Mr.
Caribbean International Com-
petition. October 11-18th,
2010 and bring the title back
home again. Freddie "Slug-
ger" Lightbourne, a police
officer and father, is the cur-
rent Mr. Caribbean Bahamas
and Mr. Caribbean Interna-
tional.

The Bahamas won first and
second place in the 2006 Mr.
Caribbean International Com-
petition, with Metellus Chip-
man winning the competition

and Donovan Rolle placing
first runner-up. Since com-
peting in the Mr. Caribbean
International Competition,
representatives from The
Bahamas have placed in the
top five finalists. Athletes
from the country have now
become the competitors to
benchmark and beat in the
international competition.
The deadline for applica-
tions has been extended to
Friday, June 18th, 2010, where
last minute applicants can sign
up, be interviewed, and hope-
fully be selected at the open
audition and screening.

There is an all expense paid
trip for two, to attend the
week-long activities at the Mr.
Caribbean International Com-
petition in Jamaica in Octo-
ber, for the person who nom-
inates and enters the winner
of this year's competition
(with his permission of
course).

Applications may be
obtained from local gyms or
downloaded from the website
www.mrcaribbahamas.com).
Fans may also follow the
competition on facebook and
twitter.

nna!
Ballin’ on
the Beach

FROM page nine

that they could work on,
then we know that it would
impact the other aspects of
their game.

“That was the goal of
each instructor for each
camper. When they finished
your station, you would
have taught them a couple
of things. But if we can hear
them say ‘I’m going to work
on this or that,’ we know
we would have accom-
plished our goal.”

Nairn, however, said the
camp is just one avenue for
the development of wom-
en’s basketball.

“This is just a camp, but
we need more leagues and
more games played here,”
said Nairn, a former one-
time coach at Queen’s Col-
lege.

“We need the heads of
both the private and gov-
ernment schools to come
together where these girls
can play together and play
more games because the
girls in the United States
play more than 30 games a
season and we only play
about ten here.”

Federation’s secretary
general Sean Bastian said
they were quite impressed
with what they saw from
Salisbury, but he hope that
other colleges can come
down and hold similar clin-
ics to improve the level of
women’s basketball in the
country.

“We are excited about
the turnout and I’m sure
that as we move forward,
we will only see the pro-
gramme continue to grow,”
Bastian summed up.

Johnson

FROM page nine

from the three-point arch
for 37%.

Johnson also hit 65-of-87
shots from the free throw
line for 74.7% and he had
74 rebounds for an average
of 4.9; 82 assists for a 5.5
average; 10 block shots for
a 0.7 average, 17 steals for a
1.1 average and he commit-
ted 30 turnovers for a 2.0
average.

Based on those numbers,
the former St. Anne’s High
Bluewaves standout, who
played under the late coach
Godfrey McQuay, said he
was pleased with the way
his season ended and he’s
looking forward to the
future.

“Tf I don’t get anything
in Europe, which I am con-
fident that I will, I will just
go back to South America
and probably Mexico,”
Johnson said. “It’s been a
good season there, even
though I didn’t play that
long.

“JT just want to keep
doing what I’m doing. It’s
very political, but once you
get in the right place and
you show your face to the
right people, it becomes al
ittle easier.”

Back home for a break,
Johnson helped out Jurelle
Nairn, who brought coach
Charisse Mapp and five of
the players from the Sea
Gulls women’s basketball
team for a three-day clinic
at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium.

“T didn’t realise that the
younger girls here have so
much talent,” Johnson said.
“They just need to get more
people to work with them.

“Who knows, we could
end up some day watching
one of them play profes-
sionally in Europe, South
America or even in the
WNBA.”

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or have won an award.

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Exnerts to probe oil Spill reports

FROM page one

seeing what they would normally see when they fly
over, which is seaweed, which looks like what you
see on the international news, but what we expect to
see here would be weathered black tar balls.

“We are almost 800 miles away from the oil head
so it’s going to be a completely different scenario.”

Oil sheens containing thousands of tar balls have
hit the south coast of the United States in Missis-
sippi, Louisianna, Alabama and Florida, and some
reports claim these sheens have already left the
Gulf.

The National Oil Spill Committee will spend five
days in Cay Sal Banks, the westernmost point of the
Bahamas 145km west of Andros Island, and Bimi-
ni, collecting oceanic and terrestrial samples to test
on the RBDF vessel and determine whether or not
oil has left the Gulf.

They will be assisted by trained volunteers from
the College of the Bahamas, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, the Department of Marine
Resources, other government departments and envi-
ronmental protection agencies who will continue
sampling work in the northern Abaco cays and
Grand Bahama.

More samples will be taken on the slower, more
detailed exercise than the previous two-day expe-
dition to Cay Sal last month which showed no signs
of oil from the spill and have been stored in a tam-
per-free US Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) certified laboratory.

Committee spokesman and Bahamas National
Trust (BNT) director Eric Carey said: “We are
hearing so many conflicting reports, depending
what website you look at, so we have spent a lot of
time trying to get the best information available to
us.

“One source said oil might be exiting the Gulf of
Mexico in the form of tar balls already, so we are
really anxious to see what the team finds when they
get to Cay Sal, because some of the reports suggest
tar might already be heading there.”

The team of scientists include leading marine
ecologist Dr Ethan Freid and marine biologist Kath-
leen Sealy from the International Maritime Organ-
isation (IMO).









(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
CLEAN BROWN PELICANS are seen at the Fort Jackson Bird Rehabilitation Center Friday,
June 18, 2010, in Buras, La. The birds were rescued and cleaned after being covered in
oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

TEMPORARY icdentifi-
cation tags are seen
on aclean brown peli-
can at the Fort Jack-
son Bird Rehabilita-
tion Center Friday,
June 18, 2010, in
Buras, La. The bird
was rescued and
cleaned after being
covered in oil from
the Deepwater Hori-
zon oil spill.



(AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, file)
IN THIS JUNE 8, 2010 FILE PHOTO, Elaine Jesmer, left, and
Heather Crosson, both of Los Angeles, hold signs during a
protest against BP PLC organized by Moveon.org outside an
ARCO gas station in Los Angeles. ARCO is a subsidiary of
British Petroleum.

(AP Photo/Charlie
Neibergall)







5-Day Forecast



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and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. Today 12:54 a.m. 27 f:20a.m. -0.3
1:41 p.m. 2.8 7:59 p.m. 0.3
> A a Sunday 1:54 a.m. 25 8:16am. -0.3
2:43 p.m. 2.9 9:06 p.m 0.3
ML Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 2:55 am. 25 9:13am. -0.1
. A Vv a ABACO _ A a Temperature 3:43 p.m. 3.0 10:10 p.m. 0.3
a os al High: 907 F/32°C ; ye eee Tuesday 3:56am. 2.4 10:08 a.m. -0.1
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— } A Oe ee ee : ‘ eae 6-12 knots Last year's low 75° F/24° C see p.m.
Low: 77° F/25°C 2 b Precipitation Thursday 5:47 a.m. 23 12:03am. 0.1
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT : As of 2 p.m. yesterday .... trace 62tpm 3.1 11:52am. -0.1
High: 91° F/33°C High: 89° F/32°C ; Year LO Dale ois sas ses oo 1244" Friday = «6:36am. 24 12:52a.m. 0.1
a eS tows F/24°C ; P Normal year to date : 7ZO7 pm. 3.1 12:39pm. -0.1
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4 MIAMI © i ELEUTHERA Forecasts and graphics provided by UN AND OON

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» © aa Lg NASSAU See LoerG eee je Sunrise...... 6:20 a.m. Moonrise .... 1:45 p.m.
pS -% High: 91° F/33°C ~__! ow: Sunset....... 8:02 p.m. Moonset... . 12:58 a.m.
= Low: 80° F/27°C > First Full Last New
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GREATEXUMA ~— High: 90° F/32°C
High: 89° F/32°C Low: 74° F/23°C
Low: 78° F/26° C .
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highs and tonights's lows. High: 92° F/33°C Oa » “i
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15 Sel SSNs ses SESS se ELEUTHERA Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
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AO NANA AeA eA Sa swaeassss ke ek *k * tes ate te” i cick anal lh



O INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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t-storm; breezy possible t-storms possible t-storms possible greater the need for eye and skin protection
High: 90° High: 90° High: 89° High: 89°

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The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure,





























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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
\ i
New ‘laboratory school’ seen as revolutionary teaching tool



FROM page one

school out into other school districts,
officials propose that the Lab School will
impact education standards in the sys-
tem as a whole.

“We want to be able to speak with
authority in education but we have not
been very good at doing research in edu-
cation in the past. With this we will have
hard data rather than anecdotes to base
our plans on,” said Director of Education
Lionel Sands.

In his budget speech, Minister of Edu-
cation Desmond Bannister said lectur-
ers and trainees at the school will “gain
new ideas and concepts, and deeper
insights and understanding of the whys
and why nots of education as they engage
in educational research, observe and par-
ticipate in demonstration lessons and
evaluate and train teachers in the same
setting.”

Students at the school will be afforded
an education experience that “fosters
critical thinking, cultivates an intrinsic
motivation to learn and active participa-
tion in the learning process, develops self
awareness, compassion for others and
appreciation for diversity and personal
leadership, uses an experiential approach
and values different ways of learning,”
according to Mr Bannister.

Mr Sands and Mr Bannister, along
with other education officials, are “very
excited” about the prospect of the new
initiative, which Mr Bannister expects



“set the
oe for anew
thrust in edu-
cation” in the
| country.

The school,
which will be
contained with-
}in the TG
Glover school
building which

is currently in
.| the final stages
of construction
in the Horse-
shoe Drive
area, is set to
be launched in

Mee is

September 2011.

The concept is based on other Labo-
ratory Schools in the United States of
America and elsewhere, most of which
are affiliated with a local university.

The first Lab School was launched in
1986 by University of Chicago Profes-
sor John Dewey, who wanted to create
an education experience which chal-
lenged conventional attitudes about edu-
cation being based on regimentation and
drills, and focus on a more “interactive”
or “experiential” form of learning.

The school is also expected to cater to
pre-school to grade 6 students of all abil-
ity levels within the catchment area which
involves students from T.G. Glover Pri-
mary School, Oakes Field Primary
School, Naomi Blatch Primary School
and Mable Walker Primary School.

Mr Bannister said: “The collaboration
between the Department of Education
and the College of the Bahamas in the
Lab/Demonstration initiative will pro-
vide opportunities for exchange in best
practices between the Department and
COB, observations of improved class-
room and COB teaching practices, edu-
cational research driven by both the
Department of Education and COB,
both partners to demonstrate what excel-
lence in education looks like and collab-
orative planning and collaborative teach-
ing and learning.”

The school will offer a state of the art
library, technology and media labs, Inter-
active boards and lab carts, an art studio,
drama, dance and music studios, and a
playground.

A curriculum that covers language arts,
mathematics, science and technology,
social studies, religious studies, health
and family life, personal development,
physical education, creative and per-
forming arts, and information technolo-
gy/mass media is set to be implement-
ed.

“The facilities will be generally more
high-tech than you’d see in a normal high
school situation,” said Mr Sands.

“We are all very excited about it. It’s
something that when new Minister (Mr
Bannister) came in he caught onto it and
he loved it and that’s driving us. Now
we have people responsible for the deci-
sion making behind it that’s given us the
impetus to push ahead.”

Cheryl Grant-Bethel to file legal action next week in law job row

FROM page one

Wayne Munroe will represent

The legal action will seek
legal redress regarding the
decision.

Bethel.

earlier assertion the job
should go to Mrs Grant-

some influence over the deci-
sion formally made by the
commission responsible for

Mrs Grant-Bethel in the legal
action calling for a review of
the Judicial and Legal Ser-
vices Commission’s (JLSC)
choice to overlook Mrs
Grant-Bethel and select
Jamaican Vinette Graham-
Allen as Director of Public
Prosecutions (DPP) in the
Attorney General’s office
instead.

Mrs Grant-Bethel served as
acting DPP in her role as
Deputy Director, and Mr
Munroe said she is better
qualified for the job than Ms
Graham-Allen, a former
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions in Bermuda and head of
the Justice Training Institute
in Jamaica.

“We expect we should be

“T started off believing I

filing sometime before had the person,” Mr Ingra-
Wednesday,” Mr Munroe ham told Parliament on
said. Wednesday.

“Tt will question whether
her application was fairly con-
sidered by the commission
and consequently question
the consideration of any oth-
er applications by the com-
mission.

“If the commission didn’t
act properly in terms of its
make up, and what it consid-
ered, then it couldn’t proper-
ly have considered the appli-
cation of this Jamaican
woman.”

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has defended the
JLSC appointment of Ms
Graham-Allen despite his

“T had no desire to go out-
side of the Bahamas and look
for a DPP, no desire whatso-
ever.”

But around three months
later Mr Ingraham changed
his mind about Mrs Grant-
Bethel’s suitability for the
post based on information he
had received, he said.

“T told her that as Prime
Minister of the Bahamas I
could not, and would not sup-
port her appointment,” Mr
Ingraham said.

His subsequent defence of
the JLSC choice indicates the
Prime Minister may have had

judicial appointments.

PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell told the press on
Thursday how Mrs Grant-
Bethel’s family are mortified
at the way Mr Ingraham
“trashed” her reputation in
Parliament and believes she
has been treated unfairly.

Mr Mitchell said: “The
Prime Minister has a duty to
disclose what made him
change his mind and not hide
behind innuendo without giv-
ing the individual the oppor-
tunity to answer to whatever
issues he has.”

Mrs Grant-Bethel has not
offered any comment on the
matter.

Homicide count hits 41
after man shot dead

FROM page one

Superintendent Leon Bethel, the officer in charge of
the Criminal Detective Unit, said police are not yet cer-
tain of a motive. “Two young men were walking and then
someone approached them and fired shots — killed one —
that is very serious, and we are very concerned about this
type of matter,” said Mr Bethel.

Assist

“We want the public to assist us to clear this matter up
quickly and bring this matter to justice.

“We believe someone can tell us who this individual
was who approached him.

“People would have been around and seen someone
approach him and the relative, and fire shots at them. We
are asking them to contact us.”

Any information regarding this incident should be
reported to police by calling CDU on 502-9991, the Grove
Police Station on 325-8431, or the police emergency num-
ber 919, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328
-TIPS (8477).







Police officer wanted in US

on rape charge is remanded



FROM page one

be to his detriment. The attorney noted that Bastian has made
numerous firearm and drug arrests while working undercover.

Attorney Neil Brathwaite who appeared for the requesting
state claimed that Bastian is a flight risk and that there are no
exceptional circumstances in his case that would warrant the
granting of bail. Brathwaite noted that the fact that he may be
endangered if remanded to prison is a fact to be considered, but
is not unusual.

Bastian pleaded to the magistrate to grant him bail claiming
that he had been working undercover for three quarters of
his career as a police officer and knew of an officer who was
gang raped in jail and is now in Sandilands.

Chief magistrate Gomez said the court was aware that police
officers could be more susceptible to such violence in prison.
Magistrate Gomez said he did not doubt that Bastian would
appear in court, he was bound to follow precedent set by the
Privy Council, which does not allow persons facing extradition
to be granted bail except in exceptional circumstances. He
noted that Bastian could make a bail application to the Supreme
Court.

Bastian then pleaded with the magistrate to allow him to
spend Father’s Day with his two daughters ages six and 12. Bas-
tian told the court that he is their sole provider. The magistrate
did not accede to this request, however. Bastian is expected
back in court on July 28.











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in

ee

JUNE



v TRIBUNE
FRIDAY,

18, 2010

FAMILY GUARDIAN



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net













By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE $16 million South-
west Shopping Plaza is
already 50 per cent leased, it
was revealed at yesterday’s
groundbreaking, and con-
struction could be complete -
and the complex ready for
occupancy - by the 2011 sec-
ond quarter, its principal
developer said yesterday.

Larry Treco, head of CGT
Construction, said the plaza
was expected to be one of the
largest retail complexes in
New Providence, with one of
the most upscale facades and
properly planned parking,



BREAKING GROUND — Shown (lI-r) are Mr Maynard, Dr Minnis, Larry Treco, John Treco, PM Hubert
Ingraham, Angela Treco and Wesley Treco...

Photos by Peter Ramsey

$16m project 50% leased

Multi-million shopping complex targets 2011
Q2 construction finish, with tenants set to
include Marco’s Pizza and Burger King





PRESS members speak with PM

entrances and exits.

He added that the 11.5
acre property at the north-
west corner of Carmichael
and Blue Hill roads was cho-

sen because it is one of the
fastest growing urban areas
on the island, and he and his
partners saw the need for a
proper shopping outlet.
“We think that we have
some very good tenants who
are seasoned retailers, and
we seek to get quality ten-
ants,” he said. “People have
to start up but we don’t want
a high turnover, so we think
we have some good, solid

SEE page 4B







INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





Bahamas tops region’s
urban unemployment

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas has

the highest urban

unemployment

rate in the

Caribbean region,
a joint report by the Interna-
tional Labour Organisation
(ILO) and a United Nations
(UN) body has revealed, caus-
ing one leading business exec-
utive to yesterday suggest this
nation was paying for its “folly”
in failing to diversify the econ-
omy.

Responding to findings that
pegged the Bahamas’ urban
unemployment rate at 12.4 per
cent at end-2009, compared to
11.3 per cent for Jamaica and 10
per cent for Barbados, Brian
Nutt, the Bahamas Employers
Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident, told Tribune Business
that this nation still “may have
not seen the worst of it” with
more companies preparing for
lay-offs.

While expressing surprise
that the Bahamas was “the
highest in the Caribbean” when
it came to urban unemploy-
ment, a figure that would
include most of its population
given the focus on Nassau and
Freeport, Mr Nutt estimated
that it would take a further 12-

* Nation suffering 12.4% urban unemployment rate,
ahead of Jamaica and Barbados, prompting BECon
chief to suggest paying for ‘folly’ in failing to diversify

* Warns Bahamas ‘may not have seen the
worst’ of unemployment, warning three
more firms carrying out lay-offs

* Suggests make take 12-18 months to get Bahamian
unemployment ‘back to acceptable levels’

18 months for this nation to see
unemployment start retreating
back to acceptable levels.

“T, of course, knew what the
Government’s figures were, but
would have thought that some
of the other Caribbean coun-
tries would have been higher
than us,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business. “The fact we’re the
highest is surprising, and does
not bode very well for us.

“It comes back to, I guess,
how hard we’ve been impacted
by this economic downturn.
Most of our eggs are in one bas-
ket, the tourism industry, so I
would imagine that although
the other Caribbean countries
are looking at growing tourism,
they’re much more diversified
than ourselves as far as the
economy goes.”

The joint ILO/Economic
Commission for Latin America

Fixed income’s ‘big appetite’ $30m public debt saving if rate cut

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A LEADING investment banker yes-
terday told Tribune Business that the
demand among Bahamian retail
investors for initial public offerings
(IPOs) was still questionable, although
there was “a big appetite” for fixed-
income securities due to declining bank
deposit rates.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity
Merchant Bank & Trust’s president,
said: “That’s a big appetite in the market
for fixed income securities. The banks
have been dropping deposit rates rela-
tive to liquidity in the system.”

With surplus liquidity (the amount of
available assets in the commercial bank-
ing sector for onward lending purpos-
es) standing at around $600 million cur-

BEC ‘a runaway train’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Attorney for $105m power
plant opponents questions

Deposit rate pressure raises attraction
for bonds, preference shares

rently, there has been downward pres-
sure on deposit rates, Mr Anderson say-
ing that rates which may have been 5.5
per cent six months ago may now be 4.5
per cent.

In a bid to achieve a greater return on
their funds, Mr Anderson said institu-
tional and retail investors were seeing
the average 7.5 per cent interest coupon
being offered by fixed income securi-
ties, such as bonds and preference
shares, as very attractive.

“There’s a fair amount of appetite
around,” he added. “There’s also a fair
amount of money sitting in bank

SEE page 4B

FEEL Good ABOUT

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net



IF GOVERNMENT lowers the
Bahamian prime rate by 0.5-1 per cent it
could save $30 million per year in inter-
est payments on its Bahamian dollar
debt, a former MP and minister said yes-
terday, lamenting that both the FNM
and PLP governments have not had
proper ministers of finance in the posi-
tion over the years.

Tennyson Wells, speaking at the
Rotary Club of West Nassau’s weekly
meeting, said successive governments
have not made the necessary changes to
fiscal and monetary policy that would
directly benefit Bahamians and the econ-
omy, and owed the oversight to the lack
of economists and people who under-

Ex-Minister and MP calls for
‘proper’ Ministers of Finance

stand business in government.

“Unfortunately, I think those person
who have been running government for
the past 25 years or so really don’t
understand the economy of this coun-
try and what will make it tick,” said Mr
Wells.

“They should get some persons to be
Minister of Finance who at least under-
stand something about business and eco-
nomic,s and how the economy works -
study, think about it and what can be
done to improve it.”

Mr Wells said government’s cutting
the Prime Rate would, in effect, keep

SEE page 4B

Bahama’ Health

Your HEALTHPLAN



THE Bahamas
Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC)
has been accused
of behaving like
“a runaway |
train” over pub- |
lic consultation
and permitting
for the $105 mil-
lion Wilson City
power plant, an
attorney for the project’s oppo-
nents questioning whether the
Government would have
allowed a private developer to
proceed in a similar fashion.

Fred Smith QC, attorney and
partner at Callender’s & Co, in
trial submissions filed with, and
read out, in the Supreme Court
in Freeport, said all key deci-
sions taken in relation to the
new Abaco power plant’s con-
struction had been “taken in
secret” - especially in autumn
2009, when construction began
in earnest.

In addition, Mr Smith alleged
that BEC had failed to consult
interested parties on the
planned use of Bunker C fuel at
Wilson City, despite the fact
that consultants hired by his
clients, Responsible Develop-
ment for Abaco (RDA), had
calculated it would cost an extra
$3.823 million per annum for
the state-owned Corporation to
use this fuel as opposed to
Automotive Diesel Oil (ADO).

“The NTH report compar-
ing the cost of using Bunker C
fuel at the Wilson City power
plant with diesel fuel costs con-
cludes that it will cost an extra
$3.823 million per year in capi-
tal and operating costs if the
plant uses Bunker C fuel, some-
thing that would make this fuel
far more expensive than
diesel,” Mr Smith alleged.

“While diesel would be more



whether government
would have allowed
private developer to
proceed as state-owned
power company did

* Claims use of ADO fuel,
which BEC has conceded,
will save more than
$3m per annum

* Accuses corporation
of making decisions
‘on the hoof’

expensive to purchase, costing
more than $21 million a year,
the additional capital and oper-
ating costs, combined with the
need to desulpherise the
Bunker C exhaust gases, would
make the latter anywhere from
$300,000 to $1.1 million more
expensive per annum.

“The Bunker C Report also
makes clear that once the min-
imum necessary emissions con-
trol systems are in place,
Bunker C actually turns out to
be more expensive than diesel.
The only way in which Bunker
C is cheaper is if corners are
cut on environmental stan-
dards.”

Mr Smith alleged that BEC
had never produced estimates
to show why Bunker C was the
best cost option, adding that
proper consultation with his
clients and other Abaco stake-
holders would have “fully
explored” this issue and
allowed the best choice to be
made.

Referring at an affidavit sub-
mitted by Kermit McCartney,
BEC’s Family Island project

SEE page 4B

with your he

nday at 396-1300 <=> [J

T | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STE

h

and the Caribbean (ECLAC)
study, using what it said were
national statistics that includ-
ed “hidden unemployment”,
showed that urban unemploy-
ment in the Bahamas had risen
markedly in 2009, growing from
8.7 per cent at 2008 year-end
to 12.4 per cent at the end of
2009 - a rise of some 3.7 per-
centage points.

This level, not surprisingly
given the recession’s severity,
was the highest for a decade,
surpassing the 10.8 per cent and
10.2 per cent urban unemploy-
ment rates seen by the
Bahamas in 2003 and 2005
respectively. The current urban
unemployment levels is more
than five percentage points
above the 6.9 per cent decade-
low experienced in 2001.

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
fromthe dailyrepor, —









[ customized group &

A DIVISION OF

individual health plans
[— uninterrupted coverage
[1 coverage after age 75
[ 24/7 customer service

q/all of the above

bE a

FAMILY GUARDIAN . 4

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





THE TRIBUNE

Shipping output mixed

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 3B

VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

despite Miami ‘records’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

INTERNATIONAL ship-
ping from South Florida ports
has seen an 18 per cent increase
that could hit record highs this
year, according to a recent Mia-
mi Herald article, which cites
the Bahamas as one of the des-
tinations that could set record
trade with Miami as a result.

However, Tropical Shipping
told Tribune Business yester-
day that it had not seen a sig-
nificant increase in shipping
volumes to the Bahamas.

“We have not seen any
noticeable change in the
Bahamas’ market volumes,”
said Tropical Shipping
spokesperson Mary Udry.

Oralee Deveaux, inside sales
coordinator for Seaboard
Marine, said that through last
year her company had
increased its client base despite
the recession, and thus enjoyed
an increase in shipping vol-
umes.

According to her, Seaboard
made a marginal reduction in
its rates, attracting competitors’
customers, and leaned on its
“dedicated” customer service.
She said the shipping company
has a 24-hour sales centre,
something the competition does
not.

The Miami Herald article
touted Miami’s $39.2 billion
first quarter results, saying
exports increased by more than
14 per cent, while imports
increased 26.2 per cent.

According to the article, Mia-
mi area ports could set new
records in trade this year, due
in great part it seems to multi-
million dollar shipping increas-
es to Haiti, which was struck
by a devastating earthquake in
January.

“Countries on track to set
new records for total trade with
the Miami district this year
include the Bahamas, Chile,
China, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Ecuador, Haiti, Panama,
Paraguay, Peru, Mexico and
Switzerland,” said Ken Roberts,
president of WorldCity, a Coral
Gables media company that
analyses US census numbers to
spot local trade trends.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
also saw strong export numbers
last year and in the 2010 first

quarter.

“Throughout the recession
we have gotten new clients,”
she said. “We give good cus-
tomer service and some of our
rates might be higher, but some
people believe more in good
customer service.”

In February, Tropical Ship-
ping reported declines of 30
per cent to the Bahamas and
wider Caribbean, forcing the
closure of the company’s port
of Palm Beach warehouse.

The closure caused the loss
of 35-40 jobs in the US. How-
ever, Tropical Shipping report-
ed no significant reductions in
staffing.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
had not made any cuts to staff
through in 2009 or in the first
half of 2010.

Canada deal offers ‘double tax’ benefit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Bahamas yesterday signed its 22nd
Tax Information Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with Canada, as Tribune Business
revealed exclusively this week, the deal
containing a clause that, just as this news-
paper predicted, places it on an equal foot-
ing with Barbados in terms of 'double tax’
benefits.

Brent Symonette, minister of foreign
affairs, confirmed that the Canada TIEA
contained a clause that the dividend profits
of Canadian companies based in the
Bahamas would not be taxed upon repa-
triation back home.

Several financial services industry ser-
vices had previously told Tribune Business
that if the final TIEA agreement stuck to
initial drafts seen last year, then the deal
with Canada was one of the best for this
country in terms of providing reciprocal
economic/trade benefits.

These sources told this newspaper that
the proposed Canadian TIEA they had
seen offered to place the Bahamas on an
equal footing with Barbados, effectively
giving it a ‘double taxation’ treaty with
Ottawa without entering a formalised
arrangement.

Currently, major Canadian-owned banks,
especially FirstCaribbean, have their
regional headquarters domiciled in Barba-

dos, largely because
of that nation's 'dou-
ble tax' treaty with
their homeland. The
treaty ensures their
profits are only taxed
once - at the lower
Barbadian rate -
rather than at the
higher Canadian
thresholds, and has
acted as a major draw
for Canadian compa-
nies seeking to do business in the region to
establish their bases there.

"Canada had proffered an agreement
last year that was more attractive than any-
one else's," one Bahamian financial indus-
try source told Tribune Business yester-
day, "so I hope they go with that.

"If the agreement is signed as it was
offered, as it was on the table, in 2009, we
are treated as having double taxation
[rights] even though we do not have an
agreement, so we will be in the same posi-
tion as Barbados. We'd get the same sort of
treatment when the Canadian-owned banks
repatriate their profits back home."

Another highly-placed Bahamian finan-
cial services executive confirmed to Tri-
bune Business: "I understand that the
TIEA with Canada was suppose to be one
of the better ones. "We have a double tax-
ation treaty, in effect, but also there was

SYMONETTE

=) FIDELITY.

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.

If you have it, we want you.

We are growing!
Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

Junior Accountant

Reporting directly to Manager, Accounting

Services the successful applicant’s main
duties and responsibilities will be:

® Posting accounting entries

Reconcilation of bank accounts

Reconciliation of intercompany accounts

Preparing daily/weekly and monthly reports

Minimum requirements / qualifications:

¢ Accounting degree and/or practical experience in a prior job

Willingness to work and learn

© Prior experience in a banking environment would be useful

HUMAN RESOURCES

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
June 25", 2010 to:

Re: Junior Accountant, 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108

careers@fidelitybahamas.com



ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

going to be an exchange of other things -
know how, and opportunities for Bahami-
an businesses to do business with Canadian
businesses. Certainly, there was a market
for Bahamian goods and services."

Yet the executive added: "T understand it
would be a good one, but until I see the
final signed document I just don't know. It's
just that in the art of negotiations, some
things fall away and others don't.

"This one has been talked about for quite
a while, and because of the linkages with
Canada, universities and other things,
everyone is waiting to see this one."

The Canada TIEA is also likely to have
linkages with current trade talks taking
place between Ottawa on the one hand,
and the Bahamas and CARICOM on the
other, over a replacement trade agreement
for CARIBCAN that would be WTO-com-
pliant.

The Bahamas has been a key destina-
tion for Canadian foreign direct investment
(FDI), especially in sectors such as banking,
tourism and construction, while a Canadi-
an firm, Vancouver Airport Services
(Y VRAS), is managing the transformation
of Lynden Pindling International Airport
(LPIA).

On the reverse, Canada remains an
important market for Bahamian exports
such as crawfish, while many Bahamians
receive their tertiary education at Canadi-
an colleges and universities.

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

TheApplicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.
and

Key job functions

include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands
Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.



JOB OPPORTUNITY

Marketing Manager

The successful candidate must possess the following:

« A creative thinker with a knack for advertising and a history of creating

big ideas.

A proven track record of driving sales and significant organizational

impact.

Must be adaptable toa changing, fast-pa ced environment.

Able to deal with a variety of personalities and situations with energy

and enthusiasm.

Able to work in a culture/environment that promotes an entrepreneu-
rial spirit and a “let's get it done now" attitude,
Focus on possibilities rather than problems.

Strong customer orientation.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
« Develop and execute effective local marketing plans that support

annual key initiatives.

Lead efforts to effectively plan, execute, measure and evaluate local

market achvities.

Direct media planning and graphic design.

Establish and cultivate PR/media relationships.

Develop and Manage budgets.

Customer Relations and management of complaint process.

Build community goodwill and manage relationships with influential

organizations

Serve as the local steward of the brand, ensuring all local marketing

activities are aligned with established brand standards,

REQUIREMENTS:

« Bachelors degree in Communications, Marketing or a closely related

field or equivalent work experience,

« Minimum five vears professional related experience

COMPETITIVE SALARY & ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.

Send résumé to: marketingmanagerwanted@gmiail.com

Deadline fora

plication is Wednesda

une 28th, 2010



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Full Text


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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

ATG a

HELP WANTED
AND REAL ESTATE



wader .:

Pah

SES =

Experts to prove

oil Spill reports

PEE EUG a Eta TU a

Scientists to take
samples in Cay
Sal and Bimini











BOATS are seen along the oil damaged shoreline in the north-
ern reaches of Barataria Bay Thursday, June 17, 2010.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



SIGHTINGS of suspected oil in the seas around the Bahamas
from the spill in the Gulf of Mexico will be investigated by sci-
entists setting out on a five-day expedition to Cay Sal and
Bimini on Monday.

The team of IMO scientists and volunteers will take sediment
samples and test them on the Defence Force vessel HMS
Bahamas to confirm or deny the presence of oil in Bahamian
waters.

The National Oil Spill Committee is on alert as concerned cit-
izens have reported sightings of what they believe to be oil
sheens in Bahamian waters.

Director of the Bahamas Environment, Science and Tech-
nology Commission (BEST) Philip Weech said the dark patch-
es spotted in the ocean are more likely to be large clumps of
dark seaweed drifting in the ocean than the oil slicks in the Gulf
of Mexico, which they resemble.

“Tf there is oil in the Bahamas yet, we don’t know,” Mr
Weech said.

“We have been getting a lot of calls and concerns of that
nature and many are coming from the fact that people are

SEE page 11

Cheryl Grant-Bethel to file legal

action next week in law job row

By ALISON LOWE

and MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FORMER Deputy Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions
Cheryl Grant-Bethel will file
legal action early next week
questioning the decision to
choose a foreigner instead of
her for the Director’s post,
her attorney has confirmed.

Former bar president

SEE page 12





Cay melelimstalitey

|



\



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A POLICE officer wanted in the United
States on a rape charge was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison yesterday.

US authorities are seeking to have Corporal
Nyahuma Bastian, 34, stand trial for the alleged
rape of a woman in Texas back in April 2001.

Bastian appeared before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, yes-
terday where documents supporting his extra-
dition request were laid over to the court.

One of his attorneys, Davard Francis, told





:

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
COURT APPEARANCE: Corporal Nyahuma Bastian. US authorities want the 34-year-old to stand trial.

the magistrate that Bastian’s initial trial date
had been February 19, 2002. He told the court
Bastian had not been evading US authorities
and had appeared in a US court on four dif-
ferent occasions. Francis said the reason he
did not return to the US was because his Visa
had been cancelled.

He told the court that Bastian, a father of
two, had joined the Royal Bahamas Police
Force after the alleged incident took place.
Francis asked the magistrate to grant Bastian
bail, saying that he was not a flight risk and that
remanding him to her Majesty’s Prison would

SEE page 12



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Mitchell

aC
weighs options

SEE PAGE NINE



Homicide
count hits 41
after man
shot deat

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



POLICE were hunt-
ing a gunman yesterday
after a man was shot
dead in Montell
Heights.

Kendal Kenneth
Andrews, 22, was
attacked while walking
in Mantol Street with a
young man who was
related to him just after
1.30am.

It is believed some-
one approached the
pair on foot and
opened fire.

When police arrived,
Mr Andrews was lying
in the street with multi-
ple bullet wounds in his
head. Emergency Med-
ical Services staff pro-
nounced him dead at
the scene. His death
brings the national
homicide count to 41







this year.
; SEE page 12
Woe =
am New ‘laboratory
= : School’ seen as
pe revolutionary

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EDUCATION in the
Bahamas is set to be “revo-
lutionised” with the launch of
what officials believe may be
the first “laboratory school”
in the Caribbean region.

The new school, which will
showcase modern and
research-driven teaching tech-
niques, hi-tech equipment and
emphasise learning through
experience is intended to be a
catalyst for improved teach-
ing standards and academic
and social achievement levels
among students throughout
the country.

Considered a “professional
development“ or “demon-
stration” school for teachers,
the school will be run by the
Department of Education in
conjunction with the Teacher
Education division of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. Within
it, both trainee teachers and
in-service teachers aiming to
upgrade their skills will be
able to put education theory
into practice, while exposing
around 600 to 800 students
from pre-school to grade six
to non-traditional teaching
methods.

The Lab School will be
used as a platform for educa-
tion specialists to research
problems in education and
test solutions, according to
officials, and this, in combi-
nation with pre-service and
in-service teachers taking the
skills they have learned at the

SEE page 12


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Se ER CRU UN ARI aaa D) UL Veni U CG)









a =

wv



St Andrew's Presbyterian Kirk celebrates
200 years and welcomes new Minister

THE congregation of St
Andrew's Presbyterian Kirk
packed the historic church on
June 6 to welcome a new minis-
ter, celebrate the church's bicen-
tennial anniversary and witness
the raising of the Bahamian flag
— marking the move from the
Church of Scotland to indepen-
dent governance.

It was the first time in 200
years that the national flag flew
above the high steeple, where
the blue and white flag of Scot-
land had flown since 1810.

Churchgoers — elders, regu-
lars and those who attend less frequently —
filled the sanctuary to witness the flag ceremo-
ny, a symbol of independence, and to roll out
the welcome mat for the man who will guide
them through the recently announced separa-
tion from the Church of Scotland.

He is Reverend Bryn MacPhail, a former
chairman of the board for the Renewal Fel-
lowship with the Presbyterian Church in Cana-
da, and who, for the past eight years, has served
as senior pastor of St Giles Kingsway Presby-
terian Church in Toronto.

It was a triple celebration for the religious
organisation, a stalwart of independent thinking
since it was founded in 1810 by Scottish ex-
patriots living in the Bahamas.

For 200 years, with its Scots flag flying and its
black wrought-iron pineapple railing, the struc-
ture — one of Nassau's most enduring symbols —
has been a staple on every taxi and surrey tour.

But it is what the church stands for and the
new minister who will help helm through
uncharted waters that drew near record num-
bers to the services. "The induction of our new
minister, Reverend McPhail, as we celebrate
our 200th anniversary and embark on a new
path of independent governance has imbued
members of the one of the oldest congrega-
tions in the Bahamas with a new enthusiasm
and a sense of spiritual renewal,” said a church
spokesperson. "For a church that was born by
Scottish ex-patriots living in the Bahamas in



REV. BRYN MACPHAIL

. 1810 to have come this far and
now reaching out to unite with
Lucaya Kirk in Freeport, Grand
Bahama under our the umbrel-
la of the Evangelical Presbyter-
ian Church (EPC), the history
is replete and the future is
bright.”

That future links the Kirk
(Scottish for church) in Nassau
with its sister church, Lucaya
Kirk, in Grand Bahama. Both
will now come under the Evan-
gelical Presbyterian Church, an
interim step on the path of both
churches forming the basis of an
independent Presbyterian Church of the
Bahamas.

Once the self-governing Presbyterian Church
of the Bahamas is fully established, other
churches, including the Kirk of the Pines, a sta-
tion in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, will be free to

oin.

"The Bahamas has been a free and indepen-
dent nation for nearly three decades and the
Kirk is very much a Bahamian institution,"
explained the spokesman. "The departure from
the Church of Scotland came as a result of nat-
ural growth and maturity.”

The Church of Scotland accepted the split
amicably, and in an official document, com-
mended the Kirk for its service and wished
them "God's continuing blessing as they take
forward their life and witness in the Bahamas.”

It was Rev Scott Kirkland of the Lucaya Kirk
who served in the delicate capacity of taking the
message of the Bahamian Kirks to Scotland.
Kirkland also lent his time to the Nassau Kirk as
it conducted a search for a new minister.

That search led the Kirk to Rev MacPhail.
With an education steeped in the traditions of
the church, Rev MacPhail proved himself a
passionate speaker on icons of the Presbyterian
Church when he delivered sermons as a visiting
minister prior to taking up his full-time position.

He arrived in Nassau last week with wife,
Allie, a registered family and marriage therapist,
and their 7-year-old daughter, Anya.





Ml MAGISTRATE’S COURT

Man faces firearm
charges in connection
with toddler shooting







TYSON DEVEAUX, 23

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tripunemedia.net



A 23-year-old Pinewood
Gardens man was arraigned
in the Magistrate Court yes-
terday on firearm charges in
connection with a shooting
which left a four-year-old
boy wounded.

Tyson Deveaux was
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez yester-
day along with his mother
Valderine Deveaux, 55;
Richard Higgs, 23; and Tevin
Richardson, 19; all of
Pinewood Gardens.

It is alleged that on Mon-
day June 14, Tyson Deveaux
was in possession of a hand-
gun with the intent to endan-
ger the life of Abigail
Whyms as well as Anthon
Whyms.

Deveaux was not required
to enter a plea to the charge.

He was also charged,
along with his mother, with
possession of seven live
rounds of 9mm ammunition
and 19 live rounds of .223
ammunition.

Both pleaded not guilty to
the charges.

Higgs, Richardson and
Tyson Deveaux are also
accused of possessing a black
9mm Smith and Wesson pis-
tol and 14 live rounds of
9mm ammunition.

Maybe he'll use it to buy a tie. Maybe not.

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TEVIN RICHARDSON, 19

All three men pleaded not
guilty to the charges.

The prosecution objected
to the three men being
granted bail but did not
object to bail being granted
to Valderine Deveaux.

Attorney Ian Cargill told
the court that there was no
reason why Higgs should not
be granted bail.

Mr Cargill told the court
that Higgs had been in police
custody since Monday.

He also told the court that
Tyson Deveaux had no mat-
ters pending before the
courts, no previous convic-





—$<—*_

RICHARD HIGGS, 23

tions and had been shot four
times.

According to Mr Cargill,
the same gun that was used
to shoot Deveaux, who was
injured during the incident,
was also used to shoot two
other persons.

Jeff Lloyd, attorney for
Richardson, told the court
that his client had merely
helped one of the parties in
question with seeking med-
ical attention.

He said that Richardson
has never been charged or
convicted.

Higgs and Richardson
were each granted $8,000
bail and ordered to report
to the nearest police station
every Wednesday and Sat-
urday before 6pm.

Valderine Deveaux was
granted $6,000 bail.

Tyson Deveaux was
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. He is expected back
in court on June 23 for a bail
hearing in Court Eight, Bank
Lane.

TROPICAL
Uy

SRR
PHONE: 322-2157





You're Happy As A Fairy
Tale, Enchanting As A

Magic Spell.



HAPPY 7TH BIRTHDAY
TO OUR PRINCESS

You're lovely as a ballroom dress majestic asa true
princess, brighter than a star-filled night, loved forever
at first sight.

From Your Parents Jamal & Dia, Sister , Grandparents
Terry & Barbara, Aunts Kell Carlisa, Prisca, Tara, Nessa,
Shay & Toya, Uncles Bernard, Nalda, Jerry, & Terrence,
Cousins, Godparents Especially Philip Brown,
Godsisters & Brothers and Grade | Storr
at Temple Christian School

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THE PLP has dropped plans to
challenge the prime minister’s
appointment of Michael Pintard as a
senator, according to Mr Pintard.

While calls to PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts were not returned
up to press time yesterday, Mr Pin-
tard released a statement in which he
suggested that “the new breed of
politicians” in the opposition party
in their

had “won the argument”
party over his appointment.

“From the outset I made the point
that key figures in the Progressive
Liberal Party, especially the new
generation of politicians had histor-
ically applauded my nationalism and
fair political commentary despite the
fact that we didn’t share the same

political persuasion.

“Therefore I was taken aback by
the initial opposition to my appoint-
ment. Clearly the new breed of
politicians have won the argument in

LOCAL NEWS

‘PLP drops plan to challenge |g
Michael Pintard as senator’



their party and have convinced the
initial objectors that the party is best
served by focusing on other matters
rather than an issue that the party is

MICHAEL PINTARD
being sworn in as
Senator. Pictured
with him is then
Governor General
Arthur Hanna.



FNM rips into Mitchell over
civil disobedience remarks

THE FNM has launched
another scathing attack on Fox
Hill MP Fred Mitchell follow-
ing his suggestion that the
opposition may have to resort
to more civil disobedience.

The governing party said Mr
Mitchell’s “bizarre” comments,
delivered at a PLP mini rally
on Tuesday, smack of

“hypocrisy, opportunism,
grandstanding and dema-
goguery”.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the party put Mr Mitchel-
Ps call for civil disobedience
down to an “insatiable hunger
for power” in the face of his
“ever-diminishing credibility”.

The party said Mr Mitchell
remains shell-shocked by his
party’s loss of power in 2007,
and accused him of having a
tendency to playact as if he is
still a Cabinet minister.

“He also continues to
demand that the duly elected
government consult with him,
as well as share executive pow-
er with the opposition,” the
FNM said. “In fact, he wants
to be a super minister with veto
power over Cabinet and minis-
terial decisions. The party
added: “The man who was
denied the right to speak at his
own party’s national conven-
tion last year is now lecturing
the government about democ-
racy. The man who claims that
he wants radical governmental
reform is now acting unconsti-
tutionally in parliament in pur-
suit of constitutional change.

Restructure

“The man who says he wants
to radically restructure the pow-
ers of the executive and parlia-
ment now that he is in opposi-
tion, did not vigorously push or
promote these proposals when
he sat around the Cabinet table
exercising executive power.

“The man who says the
opposition should be consult-
ed on just about every public
matter, existed quite happily in
a PLP administration which did
not do what they are now
demanding of the government.”

Mr Mitchell’s rally comments
followed the opposition’s deci-
sion to walk out of the House
of Assembly last week, in
protest of the government’s
block of Mr Mitchell’s attempt
to move an amendment.

After the FNM’s initial
response to his comments on
Wednesday, Mr Mitchell
accused them of making a
“mountain out of a mole hill”
and claimed the civil disobedi-
ence he suggested was akin to
that practised by Ghandi and
Martin Luther King.

Mr Mitchell went on to
explain that the row stemmed
from his attempt in parliament
to amend the regulations gov-
erning the level of assistance
offered to families unable to
pay for funerals.

The FNM responded to this
point as well, saying: “The man
whose government failed to
increase funeral assistance for
indigent families over the
course of five years has conve-
niently found compassion.
Rather than engaging in dema-
goguery and conduct unbe-
coming of the official opposi-
tion, he and his colleagues
should have increased assis-
tance to the poor when they
had the opportunity.”

“The man who preaches
about his concern for the poor
sat in a Cabinet which ignored
the Sea Hauler and United Star

tan intake



(ship crash) victims, allowed
infant mortality rates to climb,
failed to increase food, rental
and utilities assistance to those
in need, and failed to upgrade
the Princess Margaret and
Rand Memorial Hospitals.
“The FNM provided the Sea
Hauler and United Star victims
with compensation. The FNM
lowered the infant mortality
rate. The FNM significantly
increased social assistance to
the poor, including assistance
to widows, orphans and the
elderly. The FNM is upgrading
public hospitals in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama. If

66

The man who

was denied
the right to speak
at his own party’s
national conven-
tion last year is
now lecturing the
government about
democracy.”



FNM

Mr Mitchell is seeking a respon-
sive government he simply need
look across the aisle.

“Mr Mitchell knows one of
the reasons his government
failed to address most of the
needs of the Bahamian people.
In his own words: ‘Many PLPs
were dissatisfied with our work
ethic: our inability to get things
done on time, answer phone
calls and get to work on time
and to deal with requests to the
government in a timely fash-
ion’,” the FNM said. “Mr
Mitchell is promising more civ-
il disobedience because he can-
not get his own way.”

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less likely to win,” he said.

In March 2010, the PLP said Mr
Pintard’s appointment that month
was in “clear violation” of a ruling by

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 3

&y





Perry ho

former Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall _ tirelessly in and out of the Senate to
in relation to a dispute over how improve the condition of our peo-
many Senate seats each party should ple. “

have and showed Prime Minister “My commitment remains the
Hubert Ingraham "disrespects the same as it was when I was the
rule of law and the Bahamian peo- spokesman for the college of the
ple.” Bahamas student union more than

The PLP said it opposed the 25 years ago, and that is: to serve
appointment of Mr Pintard, whoasa the Bahamian people and residents
former FNM electoral candidate, the of the Bahamas without fear, self-
opposition regarded as "a partisanof _— lessly and appreciating that Bahami-
the FNM who is clearly subject to ans from all walks of life and politi-
the FNM whip". cal beliefs are needed if we are to

Perry Christie, PLP leader, said — successfully meet our national chal-
at the time that the party “has to lenges and seize the opportunities
challenge” the decision. at our fingers tips.

“We are very surprised by this “ Daily I will support efforts to
appointment... The only recourse I construct and bring to fruition a
strategic plan for our country. I
encourage each resident, regardless
of your station in life, to identify one
area of need or cause in our country
and commit themselves afresh to
addressing it.”

have is to pursue the matter in the
courts,” he added. Attempts to reach
Mr Christie for comment yesterday
were unsuccessful.

Mr Pintard, in his statement,
recommitted himself to “working




































BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK II - BANK RECONCILIATION
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II
Bank Reconciliation, in the Finance Division.
Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:
° Preparing bank reconciliation for assigned bank accounts;
Preparing journal entries for accounting adjustments and banking
transactions (e.g., transfers between bank accounts, bank charges, re

turned checks);

Entering cash receipts postings in journals for proper allocation within
the general ledger;

Providing source data with regards to employee and other returned
checks;

Acting as liaison between Customer Services departments to prepare
listings of returned cheques; and

Maintaining procedures filing system for such items as: canceled checks,
bank advice, memos and statements.
Job requirements include:

° A minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Accounting/Business or
equivalent in General Accounting/Fundamentals;

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of Check Reconciliation module within
the HTE environment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on

or before: Friday, June 25, 2010,

As Marked on the other half

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama wants presidency back from spill

WASHINGTON — BP chief executive
Tony Hayward committed a faux pas when
he admitted he wanted his life back. Presi-
dent Barack Obama is too smart to say it
aloud, but he wants his presidency back.

To that end, the president's team this
past week unilaterally declared an "inflection
point” in the Gulf of Mexico debacle. He
framed his Oval Office address and BP's
creation of a $20 billion compensation fund
as a turning point when the public regained
confidence in Obama's response to an envi-
ronmental disaster whose negative political
effects are spreading along with the gushing
crude. The crisis has cost Obama dearly, in
time and focus. He'd rather devote his time
to push for passage of jobs legislation, put in
place his new health care plan, develop an
energy package, tend to two wars and deal
with other priorities.

That doesn't just hurt him; it's a frustra-
tion to congressional Democrats anxious to
project a can-do image ahead of the fall elec-
tions.

Obama's address to the nation Tuesday
night was designed to reassure people that
he's in charge in the Gulf, thinking ahead to
the nation's broader energy needs and keep-
ing up with the myriad demands of office. He
also offered rosy talk that BP soon could
capture up to 90 per cent of the oil spewing
from the broken well. That's extremely iffy.

For all the hype attached to the speech,
Obama did himself far more good a day lat-
er when he delivered more than words — the
$20 billion BP-financed fund to cover the
mounting economic costs to those whose
lives the oily menace has upended.

Then, Obama tried to shift attention else-
where. The president, who began his week
on the Gulf's beaches, ended it at a govern-
ment-financed road project in Ohio, putting
his focus squarely on jobs and the econo-
my.

The administration is calling this "Recov-
ery Summer." That refers to an anticipated
spike in jobs created by last year's $862 bil-
lion economic stimulus package. But it could
just as well reflect the administration's hope-
ful thinking about public perceptions of Oba-
ma's handling of the spill, the economy and
more.

It will take more than a catchy title,
though, to make up for lost ground — on the
economy or in the Gulf.

Economic growth has rebounded in the
past year. Yet the unemployment rate still is
perilously close to 10 per cent. About 1 mil-
lion gallons or more of oil per day still are
spewing into the Gulf. An AP-Gfk poll
released midweek found that people are








weal
2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET

angry about the government's handling of
the spill, and many doubt Washington real-
ly could help them in a disaster.

For all of that, though, the president's
overall job performance rating is holding
steady at a respectable 50 per cent.

Obama has acknowledged that jobless-
ness probably will continue at high levels
into next year. He's spoken of the limits of
his power in responding to the Gulf spill.

He told people at a Louisiana bait shop:
"IT can't suck it up with a straw. All Ican do
is make sure that I put honest hardworking
smart people in place" to contain the oil
and do right by those it is harming.

And, he might add, put the screws to BP.

That's an important shift from Obama's
earlier, scattershot efforts to demonstrate
he's tuned in to public sentiment and in con-
trol. Admonished for seeming detached,
Obama pushed his anger level to DEFCON
1, promising to kick ass. Accused of being
remote, Obama atoned with his physical
presence — multiple trips to the Gulf, where
he adopted a just-folks vernacular by drop-
pin' Gs when eatin' and talkin' with
shrimpers and oystermen.

Eager to demonstrate not just command
but compassion, Obama invited relatives of
the 11 oil workers killed in the disaster to
meet him at the White House, where he
cuddled the newborn baby of one of those
lost. The $20 billion recovery fund helps
Obama pivot from empathy to concrete
problem-solving.

But there's still a risk that high expecta-
tions will give way to frustration with how
the fund is actually administered by an inde-
pendent arbiter — not the government.

Bill Galston, a former Clinton adminis-
tration domestic policy adviser now at the
Brookings Institution, said fund administra-
tor Kenneth Feinberg is highly regarded,
but also a very careful man. Careful admin-
istration of the fund may well mean a slow-
er pace of disbursements than affected fam-
ilies and businesses in the Gulf want. It also
could mean that BP isn't asked to pay for
everything that the government wants.

Whether the issue is damage claims from
the Gulf or jobs created in Ohio, the public
is hungry for tangible results.

"The single most important thing right
now is to show change that people can
believe in," says Galston. "And at this point,
the only change they'll believe in is change
that they can touch and see and feel — and
that's true both in the Gulf and in the econ-
omy."

(This article was written by Nancy Benac,
Associated Press Writer).



A matter of
grave concern at
Social Services

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open let-
ter to Mrs Loretta Butler-
Turner,

Minister of State Depart-
ment of Social Services.

Dear Mrs Butler-Turner

As a Bahamian tax payer, I
was most disturbed after vis-
iting Social Services and
requesting assistance for med-
ical services needed. My doc-
tor referred me to a facility
where I went and got a quote
for the needed services and
took it to Social Services.

I was seen by a Social Ser-
vice Officer who said that
they do not do any business
with that company and sent
me to another company.

I went to the other facility
that Social Service sent me to
who told me that the person
who needed to evaluate me
is an American and only
comes in when the need aris-
es.

Concerned with this, I
asked if when this person
evaluates me and I need fol-
low-up services what do I do
and who would service my
product if there is a problem.
The response was: “You will
have to wait until the individ-
ual comes back to Nassau.”

T returned to Social Service
and voiced my concerns. I was
told outright, if I wanted
Social Services assistance I
would have to go to the com-
pany they sent me to because
as long as he is there the oth-
er company would not get
one patient from Social Ser-
vice.

As a Bahamian business
person, I found this rather dis-
turbing and discussed what
had happened with my doc-
tor who was very upset with
what I had told him. I went
back to the company who my
doctor sent me to, went to the
bank and got a loan to pay
for my services.

The service at the company
that I went with was so per-
sonal, professional and if I
need follow-up, I could get
the attention needed at any-
time.

While receiving service at
this company, I mentioned
what had transpired and the
young man humbly said:
“That’s ok let them do what

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



they like, I will continue to
do the best that I can to serve
those who want my service.”
He also said: “This is how we
treat each other and then
when things get out of hand,
they will be the same ones
expecting me to suck it up.
Miss, the things they expect
me to accept they cannot even
think it around others. I do
hope that those involved can
handle it when the bubble
bursts because everyday
patients come to be seen by
me and tell me what is going
on.”

More touching, to me and
those who I shared this expe-
rience with, this giant of a
man is one of the few profes-
sional, humble, honest,
respectful, Bahamian profes-
sional men I have come across
in a very long time, as his kind
is rare, extinct and should be
protected. Well, I guess not,
he is a Bahamian.

Most interesting, I got a call
from Social Service company
a few days later and I advised
her that I had gone to anoth-
er company and got the need-
ed services. The lady became
loud, rude and she was bold
enough to say to me: “If you
did not get your services with
us, Social Services would not
pay.” You know what is so
hurtful, this woman I discov-
ered, is a foreigner who in my
opinion should not even be
in the Bahamas.

As a Bahamian profession-
al business owner and having
experienced a similar situa-
tion, this did not sit well with
me and I decided to follow-up
on this and after all I had
experienced I was not sur-
prised at what I found....
Additionally, the lady at this
company had no difficulty or
concern with announcing that
they would send the quote
directly to Social Services
because she alleged that they
would have to make it less
than the other company’s
quote as Social Services Staff
graciously and willingly make
this information available to
them.

I had the opportunity to

speak with a number of
patients between the two
companies and four out of
five said their quotes were the
exact same amount of differ-
ence ($100) less than the oth-
er company and one person’s
bill was initially $14,000+ plus
and was later discounted by
$5,000 in order to be $100 less
than the other company’s
quote.

I also spoke to two other
customers who said that they
insisted on going to the com-
pany Social Services said they
were not doing any business
with because it has been
around, they could get service
whenever needed, and they
had always got good service
there and were not prepared
to go anywhere else, espe-
cially after checking out the
company Social Services had
sent them to and when they
went to collect the vouchers
after having their services pro-
vided the vouchers were
printed in the Social Service
company’s name.

Mrs Butler-Turner, this
cannot be right, I did a full
background check which
revealed the company trad-
ing as, who is who in the
Bahamas, employees,
employers, patients I met at
both companies and Social
Services involvement. I find
this to be most unacceptable
in 2010 in the Bahamas and I
will seek to have this matter
brought to light and correct-
ed.

You have been given the
responsibility of running our
public company, while so
many of our own Bahamian
people are experiencing finan-
cial hardship in these eco-
nomic hard times while some
of those accountable to you
are in my opinion wasting and
abusing the people’s funds
like it is nobody’s business. I
always ask the question if this
was your private account
would you spend it the way
you are spending it now?

I cry shame on Social Ser-
vice and those individuals
involved, this is a disgrace. I
hope this is addressed and
those responsible be held
accountable.

A PAULA ROLLE
Nassau,
2010.

Mr Forbes needs to learn House of Assembly decorum

EDITOR, The Tribune.
Can someone please pull
Mr Forbes aside and try to
educate him on proper
decorum in the Honourable

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Sojourner-Douglaes Collage « Gold Cirele House
East Bay Street -Tel: 394-8570

Register Now! Space is Limited!

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.









—_

ae

GENERAL MANAGER
OF MARKETING AND OPERATIONS

FLO Bahamas (8s looking to employ a general
Manager of marketing arid operations

Those individuals applying will need to demonstrate
the following experience and credentials:

e Must have worked withing the marketing sector of
the fly fishing travel industry for a minimum of ten
years.

¢ Should be abe to demonstrate a successful track
record in Sportfishing marketing and vacation sales.
Existing long term relationship with the major fly
fishing booking agents in North America and Europe.
Should have experience in teaching and hosting fly
fishing schools
Should have long term and well established client
base built around reputation of offering world class
Sportfishing holidays.

¢ Competent computer skills

e¢ The applicant will need to provide references to
demonstrate their qualifications and experience in
the marketing of International Fly Fishing travel.

Salary and benefits will be in line with experience
and qualifications. Please send a current résumé
and associate documentation to: HzO Bahamas,
P.O. Box 60-266, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

House of Assembly. I had
occasion to address this top-
ic in the past on Mr Forbes
after observing his actions.

Mr Forbes behaviour may
be fitting and accepted at
Mt Tabor, but he must
realise that he is in the Hon-
ourable House of Assembly,
where he should sit down,
keep his big mouth shut
until it is his time to speak
and learn something, you
can hear him in the back-
ground (yeah, yeah, yeah) it
makes one wonder.

If he ever takes the time
out to view the proceedings
and to hear himself, he

makes himself a nuisance to
the listening public.

He and a few others are
an embarrassment and dis-
grace to our country, after
his debacle at the conven-
tion.

One would have thought
this man would have learnt a
lesson, you can only take the
horse to the well, but you
can’t make him drink.

KELLY D
BURROWS
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
June 9, 2010.

Please note that Mr. Whitney
Shaundel Newbold is NO longer
employed with
Fox Locksmithing Ltd.
and can no longer do business on
our behalf.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



GB pharmacists Ue CRG Cee ah

praised by the
new council

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Seven pharmacies on Grand Bahama
passed inspection by the new Bahamas National Pharmacy
Council this week.

Philip Gray, council member and consultant for the Pub-
lic Hospitals Authority, reported that pharmacists here are
practicing at a “high standard” and adhering to the law.

The council has been on island for a week to ensure full
participation in the Prescription Drug Plan by pharmacy
owners, doctors and nurses.

An inspection was also carried out at eight pharmacy
facilities that have applied to be registered with the Drug
Plan.

“Seven of the eight facilities have passed inspection and we
are working with one facility to ensure that they too com-
ply,” said Mr Gray.

He said several criteria must be met during the inspection
process — starting with the legal requirement that a phar-
macist be present whenever medication is being issued.

Pharmacies must operate according to international stan-
dards, which require among other things, that all expired
products be removed from the shelves.

The council also requires that products be stored under
correct conditions and that controlled and psychotropic
substances, as well as those which can call cause depen-
dency, are properly labelled and documented.

“We comply with the Geneva Convention... we collect
and correlate all information as it relates to controlled nar-
cotic substances being documented,” Mr Gray said.

Sanitation

“We also look at the sanitation and cleanliness of the
facility and make sure that the necessary automation and
profiling of information is in place so we can look at a
patient history; what drugs need to be accessed and what
other drugs the patient is taking to look at drug on drug
interaction and contraindication, so that necessary phar-
maceutical care is being given which is inclusive of coun-
selling patients on the effects or side effects of medication.”

Mr Gray said the council fully endorses the National Pre-
scription Drug Plan that is being implemented by the gov-
ernment.

“We are pleased that the government is doing it,” he
said. “The plan is really similar to that of other countries in
the region and internationally.

“It is making available easy access for Bahamian con-
sumers to have medication for illnesses, and so we endorse
this initiative and partner with the government to make
sure it comes to full fruition.”

When asked about the importation of illegal pharmaceu-
tical drugs, bought on the international black market, Mr
Gray said the council is not aware any problems like that in
Grand Bahama.

“There are laws regarding the importation and exportation
of prescription drugs for which we are in dialogue with
Customs and pharmaceutical wholesalers, and they under-
stand the standards for what is acceptable and the criteria for
bringing in medication.

“Anyone outside of the authorised body bringing in med-
ication illegally through the black market is in breach of the



Peter Ramsay/BlS




ON THURSDAY, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham participated ina
ground-breaking cere-
mony for a new multi-
million dollar shopping
centre in Southwest-
ern New Providence,
at the junction of
Carmichael and Baillou
Hill Roads.

Pictured from left to
right are: Minister of
Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Charles Maynard;
Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis; Larry
Treco, John Treco,
Prime Minister Ingra-
ham, Angelo Treco
and Wesley Treco. The
Treco family is devel-
oping the shopping
centre.


























Ml FREEPORT MAGISTRATE’S COURT
Man, 20, in court

GREEN PARROT

Gather 4. Day Special ,

charged with murder Saad

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Abdul Ron-
don Burrows was charged
with murder in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on Friday.

Burrows, 20, appeared
before the Deputy Chief
Magistrate Helen Jones in
Court Three.

It is alleged that on June 8,
the accused intentionally
caused the death of 31-year-
old Troy Rolle by means of
unlawful harm.

Rolle, 31, and another man,
were attacked and stabbed at
an apartment complex at
Emerald Drive, Coral Gar-
dens.

Sixth

Rolle died of his injuries.
His death is listed as the sixth
homicide for the year on
Grand Bahama.

After the stabbing, Burrows
eluded police for a week, but
was turned in to police by his
father on Thursday.

He was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.

The matter was adjourned
to August 17, 2010 for a pre-

ee Re Bose
Fertilizer, Fungicide,

liminary inquiry. Three per-
sons were also charged on
Wednesday in connection
with the matter.

It is alleged that Jarreth
Barry, 18, of Gambier Drive;
and Darren Pratt, 39 and
Karen Janice Bowe, 24, both
of Mallard Street, being con-
cerned together, conspired to Or
murder Rolle and caused
harm to a second man.

Barry was also charged with
Rolle’s murder.

They were not required to
enter a plea to the charges.

Claw

For the stories

behind the news,



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Rack of Lamb served with
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Key Lime Pie

Green Parrot Waterfront Restaurant
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For more information and/or reservations

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on Mondays



aired
BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Senior Manager, Accounts in the Finance
Division.

NAO A

law and will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

“It is an unacceptable and dangerous practice and I ask
persons who may be involved to cease and desist immedi-
ately,” he said.

322-2157

2 esl A

ie AS

mes |





° Tool Boxes
¢ Luggage
Briefcases
Tool Sets
Camping reine
Fishing & Diving Gear

our other tS

Father's Day Gift





Fi Fe us n k Now open 7am
acedoo L House

sale dates: Kelly Ss A nie

June 11th-19th, 2010 Nerd tom en



Mo a
. Tel: Bo 393-4002 = 7:00am, 9:06
*Except on net items Fax: (242) 393-4096 oT i achamasosm



Pr Pty






The Senior Manager - Accounts oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget &
Management Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective
delivery of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Compilation of the corporate budget;

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets;
Preparation of monthly management statements;

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation;
Preparation of performance reports for division ,department and sections;
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables

(capital contributions, rechargeable);

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices;
Liaison with internal and external audits;

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial Officer for the Board of Directors;

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required;
Preparation of the business plan for the department;

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department;
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims;
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management,

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment;

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form
employee’s salaries;

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable;
Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts;

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle
repayments,

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule;

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans;

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to
ensure adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors;
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors;

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and
External Auditors;

Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline.

Conducting performance appraisals; and

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff,
manage and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting
ACCA/CPA or equivalent qualifications;

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a
similar management position;

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices;

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications;

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing
systems;

Ability to analyze financial reports;

Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial
software and the system of internal control;

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability;

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; and
Good time management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and_ returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
hee Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

Friday, June 25, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Government awar

ds contract

for new Treasury Department

After nine years at its cur-
rent location on George
Street, the Treasury Depart-
ment is set to get a new
home.

On Thursday, Public
Works and Transport Min-
ister Neko Grant awarded a
contract for $675,000 to
Scottdale Industries Com-
pany to complete work at
the Scottdale Industries
building on East Street
across from the headquar-
ters of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.

“For any number of years
now the Treasury Depart-
ment has been operating
from a location and under
conditions that have been
less than favourable so we
are pleased to execute this
contract for the outfitting of
the building,” Mr Grant
said.

He said it is anticipated
that the new accommoda-
tions would provide an
improved working environ-
ment for the staff of the
Treasury Department.

Painting

The contract includes
painting of interior walls,
installation of carpet and
tiles, installation of drywall,
doors and window treat-
ments and construction of
desk and counters. Mechan-
ical, plumbing and electrical
works are also included.

Mr Grant explained that
as construction of the build-
ing is presently being com-
pleted, Scottdale Industries
Company (SIDC) was invit-
ed to submit a proposal for
construction works based on
drawings and specifications
prepared by the ministry’s
project technical staff. The
company responded with a
proposal to complete the fit-
out work.

“This proposal was found
to be suitable and accept-
able by the ministry’s tech-
nical officers who took into
consideration the current
construction rates from the
in-house Quantity Survey-
ing and Mechanical and
Engineering sections along
with the construction docu-
















ea

in hd
—

al

THE HANDSHAKE after the signing of the contract.

ments and project scope,”
Mr Grant said.

“This price is very com-
petitive and is due primarily
to SIDC’s agreement under
the Downtown Revitalisa-
tion Act that provides for
exemption from the pay-
ment of all Customs duties
and excise taxes which
would otherwise be payable
on materials imported into
the Bahamas,” he added.

He thanked the technical
officers of the Ministry of
Works for their work and
commended Tim Johnson,
project architect, and quan-

Telli too hard










4

for God

tity surveyor Eloise Fernan-
der for their efforts in
advancing the project to its
present stage.

The five-storey building
has 18,786 square feet of
floor space and will house
100 employees.

Treasurer Eugenia
Cartwright said the depart-
ment is very pleased to be
moving into more comfort-
able accommodations that
will offer more convenience
to the staff and the general
public. She thanked the
team from the Treasury
Department including Mary
Mitchell, senior deputy trea-
surer and Cyril Knowles,
finance officer, for their
assistance in bringing the
project to this point.





“For any num-
ber of years now
the Treasury
Department has
been operating
from a location
and under condi-
tions that have
been less than
favourable so we
are pleased to
execute this con-
tract for the out-
fitting of the
building.”

Neko Grant



Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)



| SUNDAY, JUNE 20TH, 2010

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Men's Fellowship
7:00 p.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Rev. Carla Culmer (HC)










NO ILLNESS I5
TOO DIFFICULT

| Theme: “As a wise master builder, I laid a foundation and another was building upon it."

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JUNE 20, 2010

11:30 A.M. Guest Speaker
Pastor Elder Brentford Isaacs
‘Happy Father’s Day To All Fathers”
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.

* Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
* Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)

=
BEHOLD, (AM THE LORD, THE GOO OF ALL FLESH:
IS THERE ABV THING TOO HARD FOR ME Jeremiah 32:27

z — #4
Come! Join us this sunday as we come together
_ ~~ - y
and explore & meet the God who heals

i a
pt ad

SUNDAY SERVICES

* Early Worship Service ose OM) aM,
* Sunday School for all ages... 45 am
* Worship Service .. 1100 am
* Spanish Service een 1am
* FADS Youth QiurchiGrades 7-12)
First & Third Suriday 1130 am E
"POWER CREW Church |Ages [+11 yrs.) 7
Second & Fourth Sunday ........... 11:30am. a.
. Evening SCTce oh pm

FRIDAY

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: lam & 7pm

WEDNESDAY Sunday School: 9:45am



Bahamas and Canada
Sign Tax Information
RET

Kris Ingraham/BIS



Se a ,
PICTURED, from left, are: Stephen Hallihan, High Commis-
sioner for Canada to the Bahamas; and Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette. Looking
on is Terry Archer, senior protocol officer, Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.

THE Commonwealth of the Bahamas and Canada have
signed a Tax Information Exchange Agreement, strengthening
an already established culture of co-operation, Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
announced.

Mr Symonette and Canadian High Commissioner to the
Bahamas Stephen Hallihan signed the TIEA at a ceremony on
Thursday at the House of Assembly.

It was the 22nd such agreement signed by the Bahamas — 16
with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Develop-
ment countries and nine with members of the G-20.

“The government of the Bahamas is satisfied that its expand-
ing network for tax information exchange proves the Bahamas’
ability to benefit from the changing global regulatory environ-
ment and to enjoy continued growth in its international business
industry,” Mr Symonette said. He said that the government wel-
comes the TIEA agreement with Canada, a fellow Common-
wealth country and member of the OECD Global Forum. He
thanked the Canadian negotiators for completing the negotia-
tions in a collaborative and co-operative manner.

The Bahamas, he said, takes particular note of its long-stand-
ing economic links Canada stemming back over a century,
which have provided mutual benefits for both countries, par-
ticularly in financial services and the hospitality sector.

“The Bahamas has also enjoyed a long-standing relation-
ship with Canada in the area of judicial co-operation in respect
of cross-border criminal activity, under our Mutual Legal Assis-
tance Treaty, which has been in place since the late 1990s.

“The TIEA between our two countries provides an important
complementary addition to an already established, robust base
of cooperation,” he said.

Dividends

Once the agreement enters into force, it will extend exempt
surplus treatment to dividends paid to a Canadian parent cor-
poration by its foreign affiliates resident and carrying on busi-
ness in the Bahamas, allowing such dividends to be exempted
from tax in Canada.

“The Bahamas looks forward to the continued expansion
of its economic relationship with Canada, as nations committed
to the effective implementation of accepted international stan-
dards for financial regulation and cross-border cooperation;
and from this new base forge even stronger links within the
scope of the new global financial norms,” Mr Symonette said.

High Commissioner Hallihan said that these agreements are
an important part of a commitment that has been made to
many countries around the world, to bring about transparency
and effectiveness to international financial systems and to tax
regimes which cross borders.

“In that regard, Canada is very pleased to be signing this
exchange agreement with the government of the Bahamas. It
will, quite simply, make our taxation regimes more transparent,
more effective and it will allow both countries to actually more
effectively implement the tax systems that we have in place,” he
said. “It also sends a very a powerful signal to other communi-
ties that responsible governments such as the one here and in
our Canada, insist on due diligence being undertaken when it
comes to issues of taxation and financial regulations.”

The High Commissioner said that it is also just another sign
of how strong the relationship is between Canada and the
Bahamas, regarded as one of its strongest partners in the region.

The Bahamas has signed Tax Information Exchange Agree-
ments with: the United States of America, the Principality of
Monaco, the Republic of San Marino, the United Kingdom,
New Zealand, the People’s Republic of China, Argentina, the
Netherlands, Belgium, France, Mexico, Denmark, The Faroe
Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Spain,
Australia, and Germany.





‘S o 4
|Sunday Schock iam

at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective Bible Teaching

* Royal Rangers [Boys Club) 416 yrs,
* Missiomestters (Gurls Chuo) 416 yrs.

* Spanish Bible Study

at 7;30 p.m.
*fauth Miniiry Meeting
torades F-12]

RADIO MINISTRY on Suncoys of 8:20 cum. -ZN5 1 - TEMPLE TUE
Visit Our Book Stere: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

ee emcee es ica lil
mere mere EUR gb
SFM agonist aa

Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira
Shopping Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard each
morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching = Tiam & 7:30pm EVANGELISTS
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday Gpm - 2NS 2

Ved. Prayer & Praise ?:30om

Pastor:H. Mile

“Preaching the Bible as is, to man as they are”

| Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0663 = Gox M-S822 !

Grace and eta Wesleyan eet
ee ee a ee
Horth &merica

4 En AND PPR OY oP a Pe
Weershiip Tien: Jf a om.

Proper Tomes Menu to O43 am,

Charch School during Worship Service

Place; Teyeam Heights aff Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O Tow Sk S63 1
Telephone number: 324-2738
Telefaa timber: 24-2487

COE TO WORSHIP LEAPE To SERVE
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

British engineer
appointed director
of Public Works



PHOTO: Letisha Henderson







PUBLIC WORKS director John Canton.

THE Ministry of Public Works and Transport has announced
the appointment of John Canton as director of Public Works.

A citizen of the United Kingdom, Mr Canton holds a bach-
elor of science degree in civil engineering and a master of sci-
ence degree in irrigation engineering.

He is a fellow of the Institute of Civil Engineers and a mem-
ber of the Chartered Institute of Water and Environmental
Management.

Mr Canton has more than 30 years of experience as a char-
tered engineer during which time he was employed on a wide
range of civil engineering projects in the United Kingdom and
internationally (Cyprus, Hong Kong, Australia, Bangladesh
and Ghana.)

Mr Canton and his wife Valerie are the parents of two chil-
dren.

Vacant

The post has remained vacant since April 17, 2008 when
the contract of former director Melanie Roach expired.

Gordon Major (former director of Housing) was appointed
acting director of Public Works during the interim period. Mr
Major has assumed new duties in the Office of the Prime Min-
ister.

The government issued a statement on the appointment yes-
terday, saying: “The search for the new director of Public
Works was very intensive. During 2008 and 2009, in addition to
its local publication, the advertisement for the post was pub-
lished in professional journals, on job search websites and in
leading newspapers in Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, Canada
and the UK. A total of 10 persons applied for the position,
including four Bahamians.

“The Public Service Commission interviewed nine of the
applicants for the post during September 2009 including the four
Bahamians.

“Mr Canton was selected as the most suitably qualified per-
son to fill the post of director of Public Works. He assumed
these duties with effect from June 7, 2010.”

ee
VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

The Applicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and
include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands

Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.

Summit Insurance Company Limited

(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)








































Balance Sheet
As of 31 December 2009
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)

ASSETS
Cash in hand and at banks
Term deposits with banks
Due from reinsurers
Due trom agents
Deferred commission expense
Prepayments and other assets
Investments In securities:
Available-for-sale
Loans and receivables
Investment property
Plant and equipment

3317477
17,625,825
19,444
7,487,703
3,258,507
141,834

980.204
17,173,805
1.265.144
7,256,857
3,481,610
136,242

4,419,460
BU), BUA)
201,268
264,923

4.854.168
636,65)
206,117
442 443

Total assets 37,544,241 2,633,250

LLABILITIES

General inswmance fiends:

Unearmed premium reserve

Uneamed commission income

Outstanding claims reserve

9,885,921
2.375, 820
§,611,075

7,891,828
3,096,558
4 335,781
15,314,167 17,872,816
Oner fabilinies:
Due to reinsurers
Accounts payable and accrmed expenses

2 Bo) 926
414,245

2,419 842
386,818
Total liabilities

18,609,338 20,679,476

2009
+

EQUITY

Share capital:
Authonzed: 10,000 000 shares of 41 each
Issued and fully paid: 5,000,000 shares of $1 each
Treasury shares

General reserve

Fair value reserve

Retained carmings

5,000,008)
(910,000)
1,000,000
575,059
13,269, 804

§,000,000
(910,000)
1,000,000
1,120,007
9,743,747

Total equity 18,934,903 15,953,754

Total liabilities and equity 37,544,241 36,653,230

APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND SIGNED ON ITS BEHALF BY:

Di

AN a \ M ;

yh 1's =A = Ys Xx =e
Director ~’ ~—

» \

qk Tone oie

Date

Full Financial Statements are available at www.summitbhahamas.com

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 2: Work

E-3 FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
€

clTae fcae TA T.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 17 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.43 | CHG 0.00 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -51.95 | YTD % -3.32
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW_BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit_y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

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Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate A
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Baan Sas Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust xia. ere The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol ds Last Price Daily Val. EPS $ Divs
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets oe 06 4 7 = 14.00 -2.945 0.000
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000
BISEX Listed h Mutual Funds
NA iY Last 12 Months % NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund
9.1005

41 SEE
2.9020
1.5352
3.0368
13.6388
107.5706
105.7706
1.1127
1.0917
1.1150
9.5078 1.78

2.8266
1.4672
2.9343

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment a

Principal Protected TIGRS, Serie:

10.0000 Fi 10.2744 -4.61 8.15

Paneipal Protected TIGR:

Royal Fidelity Intl Fund — ah ies Sub Fund 7.9664 3.25 58.37
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
lelity

Weekly Vol. - Tradi pri
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

7
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

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Mm





VOLLEYBALL
CONYERS

VOLLEYBALL CAMP

e THE annual Jackie
Conyers Summer Volleyball
Camp will be held at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
from June 21-25. It will get
started at 9 a.m. daily.

Regstration will take
place on Monday at the gym
at 9 a.m.

The club is open to all stu-
dents and coaches.

Local coaches will include
Glen Rolle and Jackie
Conyers. The visiting inter-
national coaches are Arlene
and Del Hughes and Vanes-
sa Johnson-Henry.

Following the completion
of next week’s camp, Cony-
ers and the instructors will
travel to Grand Bahama
where they will conduct
another week’s camp from

BASKETBALL
SHERMAN
SMITH CAMP

¢ THE second annual
Sherman Smith Summer
Sporting Camp will be held
from June 28-July 23 at the
Carlton E. Francis Primary
School on Faith United
Way, off Blue Hill Road
South.

The camp will run from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. and will offer
basketball, volleyball and
soccer. It is opened to boys
and girls between the ages
of 5-17 years.

The registration fee is $20
per week or $80 per month.

EDINBURGH CUP

e Kerzner International
along with its corporate
sponsors will once again
raise thousands of dollars to
assist with the development
of the youth in the Bahamas
when its holds the 10th
Annual Duke of Edinburgh
Cup Semi Finals scheduled
for Sunday, June 27th, 2010
at the luxurious Ocean Club
Golf Course on Paradise
Island.

Members of your media
team are invited to attend
this highly popular and
major sporting attraction for
golf enthusiasts and the
“Who’s Who’ of both the
local sporting and business
communities.

The tournament climaxes
with a special Awards Pre-
sentation at 2 p.m.

Funds will be used to
assist the Governor General
Youth Awards. Since the
inception of the Duke of
Edinburgh Cup Semi Finals,
Kerzner International, along
with its corporate sponsors
have raised over $500,000
for the development of the
youth through the GGYA
here in The Bahamas.

For further information,
interested persons are
advised to contact Arnette
Wilson-Ingraham in
Atlantis’ Public Relations
Department at 363-2000
extension 66407.



PAGE 9

SATURDAY, JUNE 19,





2010










la

hihtcm tae



cr





JURELLE Nairn (standing fourth from left) along with Sailbury head coach Charisse Mapp (next to Nairn at right) pose above with the local and visiting Sea Gulls instructors who
participated in the Ballin’ on the Beach Girls Basketball Camp.

TU 1 i i
Ballin’ on the Beach a ‘smashing success

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FROM the time she came
home on Sunday with her Sal-
isbury Sea Gulls’ team-mates,
Jurelle Nairn had the feeling
that the Ballin’ on the Beach
Girls’ Basketball Camp was
going to be a smashing suc-
cess.

Yesterday at the three-day
camp came to a close at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
Nairn breathed a sigh of
relief.

Mission accomplished.

“The camp was a success,”
said Nairn after she watched a
srimmage game between
some of the older members
of the camp on the outdoor
courts at the gym.

“T think it was a great step
towards the improvement of
women of female basketball



“T think it was a great step towards
the improvement of women of
female basketball in the Bahamas.”



in the Bahamas. We had a
great turnout with more than
80 campers in attendance. So
the word was out there and
we had the numbers that we
had expected.”

A former member of the
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion’s junior national team,
Nairn is now serving as an
assistant coach at Salisbury
University, which is located
in Wicomico County in Mary-
land.

She brought along her head
coach Charise Mapp and five
of the Sea Gulls’ players,

Jurelle Nairn

Kylie Hall, a 5-10 graduating
forward; Nicole Sisco, a 6-1
sophomore forward; Meghan
Dunn, a 5-9 junior guard; KC
Curran, a 5-6 junior guard and
Katie McGahagan, a 6-0
sophomore guard.

They all participated as
instructors along with
Bahamian male counterparts
Marvin Henfield, Mitch John-
son, Terrance ‘Red Eye’
McSweeney and Dereck Cun-
ningham.

Anastacia Moultrie also
helped out with the adminis-
tration of the camp.

Johnson still weighing



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

HE had a brief stint with
the NBA Development
League before he ended up
playing in the first league in
Mexico.

Mitchell Johnson, back
home for a short stay, said
he intend to continue to live
out his dream of playing pro-
fessional basketball, even if it
isn’t in the NBA.

“[’m preparing to try out
for a few things in Europe,”

he said. “But if nothing
works out, then I always
have the option of going
back to Mexico.”

On December 16, Johnson
was waived as a guard with
the Tusla 66ers. He played
in seven games wirth an
average of 8.6 minutes. He
averaged just 0.9 rebounds
and 1.6 points per game.

Although his time spent
was very short, Johnson said
he cherished the moment
because he was in a position
where he could have had the
opportunity to move up to
the NBA.

“It was a good experi-
ence,” he said. “I didn’t get
as much time as I would
have liked because I was
playing behind Mustafa
Shakur, who was one of the
top fivep layers in the league.

“T was a bit impatient, but
it was a good experience. If I
get the opportunity to play
there again, I would defi-
nitely take it. I had no
regrets of my short time in
the league.”

Right after getting cut
from the 66ers, the 25-year-
old packed his bags and
headed off to Mexico where

“Tt was a great experience
to have my team-mates come
to my country,” Nairn said.
“T’ve been with them for the
past two years, but they final-
ly got a chance to see our cul-
ture and they had a good time
getting a chance to share with
our players.”

Mapp, who just completed
her third year at Salisbury,
said having seen the enthusi-
am from Nairn, she knew that
the players here would have
responded to what they
brought to the table.

Response

“They worked hard and
they tried to absorb the new
ideas that we presented to
them. If it wasn’t new, we just
tried to present it in a differ-
ent manner,” Mapp said.

Using both the in and out-
door courts, Mapp said they

options



he finished the rest of the
season.

The 6-foot-five swingman
played with the Tijuana Zon-
keys. In the 15 games he
played in, Johnson wracked
up a total of 551 minutes or
an average of 36.7 per game.

That resulted in him post-
ing an average of 20.7 points
per game from a total of 310
scored. Out of those num-
bers, he connected on 82-of-
137 from the field for a 59.9
percentage and 27-of-73

SEE page 10

had a chance to work on the
various aspects of the game
as they rotated the players
from one station to the next.

“It’s been phenomenal,”
she pointed out. “The only
problem was that for the first
couple of days, the players
were coming in and out
because the schools were not
all finished.

“But I would rather have
them do that than not attend
at all.”

The goal, according to
Mapp, was to make sure that
each camper left with some
further knowledge of the
game.

“We didn’t want them to
leave with a lot because we
taught them a lot,” she stated.
“We know that they would
not have absorbed everything.
But if they left with one thing

SEE page 10





THE 2010 Mr. Caribbean
Bahamas Fitness Challenge,
to be held July 17th to 24th,
2010, in Nassau, Bahamas, is
being organised this year by a
dynamic new team of five

bright, beautiful young
women.
The MCB Team consists of

Camille Kenny, Founder and
Chief Executive Officer of Ca
Mari, Tessa Lightbourne,
model, television host, and
fashion stylist, Candace Tre-
co, model, and entrepreneur,
Chavala Walker, professional
entertainer, model, and aspir-
ing finance specialist, and Leah
Treco, administrator, events
co-ordinator, and model.

The applicants for this year’s
competition will be inter-
viewed in an open audition
and screening by the talented
team of young women, on Fri-

day, July 18th, 2010, in the Sir
Harry Oakes Boardroom of
the British Colonial Hilton, at
8 p.m.

The young ladies will select
the competitors from the large
pool of applicants this year to
participate in the 2010 Fitness
Challenge Competition.

New Committee

This year’s competition has
been re-organised and re-
branded by the new commit-
tee, who was carefully selected
by Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald,
President and CEO of Trip-
pin’ Out Productions, the
Executive Producer of the fit-
ness and reality competition,
take over the organisation,
management, promotion, and
development of the competi-
tion, and the recruitment and

screening of the athletes.

In addition to promoting
healthy, physical lifestyles,
part proceeds from this year’s
competition will aid breast
cancer awareness and preven-
tion locally and the charities
and women’s support groups
that promote this heath chal-
lenge, namely the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas and
Sister-Sister Breast Cancer
Support Group.

The fitness challenge com-
petition will give the winner



bragging rights as the fastest,
fittest, strongest, and most
intelligent Bahamian man for
2010-2011

The format of the competi-
tion has changed dramatically
and competitors will now be
put to the ultimate test of
physical fitness, personality,
popular appeal, and intelli-
gence.

The Fitness Challenge
Competition, a series of
weightlifting, cardiovascular,
and strength exercises, will be

held indoors at a local gym on
Saturday, July 17th. The com-
petitors will then battle it out
on the beach, on Sunday, July
18th, in the Beach Boot
Camp, a military-style obsta-
cle course and sports event,
followed by the Physique
Competition. The gyms
where the winners of both
competition work out will
receive the MCB Floating
Trophy.

Besides undergoing a "Sur-
vivor” meets " The Amazing
Race" meets “The Bachelor”
type of reality competition this
year, the competitors will also
be judged on their intelligence
and mental stamina in private
closed sessions, before a pan-
el of international and local
celebrity judges and fitness
professionals.

The international and local

community will be able to
vote online for their favourite
competitor and the winner of
the Mr. Caribbean Bahamas
FanChoice Award at
www.mrcaribbahamas.com in
June.

A local reality show of the
competitors and the competi-
tion is currently being devel-
oped and will be filmed once
the competition begins.

The winner will be
announced at a special Cele-
bration Party to be held at a
popular club in Nassau, on
July 24th, 2010, hosted by our
surprise celebrity guests, and
local and international DJs.

There is $5,000 in cash and
prizes to be won this year, and
the winner will also win a spe-

SEE page 10

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PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010

SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian delegation attends 60th FIFA Congress

A DELEGATION from
the Bahamas Football Asso-
ciation, comprised of BFA
President Anton Sealey,
General Secretary Lionel
Haven and Vice President
Pierre Lafleur travelled to
Johannesburg, South Africa
for the 60th FIFA Congress
and the Opening Ceremonies
for the 2010 FIFA World
Cup South Africa.

As Is always done, CON-
CACAF took the opportu-
nity to convene a meeting of
its members present to dis-
cuss the agenda for the FIFA
Congress, and also to allow
nine of the countries bidding
for the 2018 and 2022 FIFA
World Cups.

Representatives from the
Bid Committees of Korea,
Spain and Portugal (joint
bid), Australia, Japan, Unit-
ed States, Holland and Bel-
gium, England, Qatar and
Russia all made presenta-
tions on their desire to be
considered as host for either
the 2018 or the 2022 FIFA
World Cup.

FIFA is scheduled to make
a decision on these in
December of this year.

The FIFA Congress fol-
lowed with an agenda absent
of controversial issues, and
instead contained informa-
tion regarding FIFA’s suc-
cess in its programming.

The FIFA President did
take the opportunity to
announce his desire to seek a
further term of office when
the elections are conducted
at the FIFA Congress of
2011, scheduled for Zurich,
Switzerland.

The delegates were then
treated to the 2010 FIFA
World Cup Kick-Off Concert
conducted in Orlando Stadi-
um in Johannesburg, fol-
lowed by the Opening Cere-
monies and Opening Match
of the 2010 FIFA World Cup
in Soccer City, Johannesburg
the next day.

This allowed them the
opportunity to witness the
Mexico-South Africa match.

The Bahamian delegation
returned home on Sunday,
June 13, 2010.

BFA Delegation to the 60th FIFA Congress, General Secretary Lionel Haven, President Anton Sealey and Vice President Pierre

Lafleur.

h English Superstar David Beckham.

BFA President Anton Sealey and General Secretary Lionel Haven wit

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK I -ACCOUNTS PAYABLE

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II — Accounts Payable in

the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Processing invoices for payment by checking accuracy of calculations,
coding and authorized signatures;

Posting invoice disbursements and journal entry data into the accounts

payable system;

Reconciling statements of account for local vendors with balance due
in excess of $5,000.00. This involves generating open payables report to
ensure correctness of entries and vendor balance;

Maintaining and reporting on the Corporation’s meal voucher system;

Preparing schedules (source data for aged payables etc.) or other task
requested by Supervisor or Manager;

Assisting with maintenance of the cheque log and disbursing cheques for
vetting and approved signatures;

Assisting with the filing system of accounts payable documents and fol
lows up on outstanding obligations to local vendors; and

Assisting with resolving vendors disputes/queries.

Job requirements include:

Aminimum of an Associate Degree

(Accounts, Business Administration);

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of the Disbursement Processing module
within the H TE environment;

Ability to operate the Call Accounting System and to post invoice data
for processing of payment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas

on or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.





Masters Soccer league
action heating up

THE Masters Soccer League action is heating up at the
National Developmental Center with just four more regular sea-

son games remaining.

Results from Thursday's games are as follows:
Baha Jrs FC 1 — Cavalier FC 6 def. Baha Jr’s 6-1 and Unit-

ed def. Dynamos 8-2.

Today’s matches are as follows:
7 p.m. Real Bahamas FC vs United FC; 8.15 p.m. Nassau Pot-

cakes vs Cavalier FC.

Next Wednesday will be the final night of the competition
before we go into the playoffs, which will feature the top

three (3) teams in each division.

Competition standings after last night look like this:



Group A GP W T L PTS GF GA
i —“CtwsSSCSSSCtiéaN
Cavalier FC 2 2 0 0 6 15 2
United FC 2 2 0 0 6 15 6
Baha Juniors 3 1 0 2 3 13 15
Dynamos 3 0 0 3. (0 5 25
Group B GP W T L PTS GF GA
Bears FC 0 1 8 4 2

2
Real Bahamas 2
Nassau Pot Cakes 2



Mr Caribbean

FROM page nine

cial photo shoot and editorial
feature in two popular wom-
en's magazines and an inter-
national men’s fitness/fashion
magazine.

He will also be the
spokesperson for Breast and
Prostate Cancer Awareness
and Prevention for 2010-2011,
and the ongoing MCB Pro-
ject, MVP: Men for Violence
Prevention, a domestic vio-
lence prevention initiative.

The Bahamas hopes to
make it a double win in Run-
away Bay, Jamaica at the Mr.
Caribbean International Com-
petition. October 11-18th,
2010 and bring the title back
home again. Freddie "Slug-
ger" Lightbourne, a police
officer and father, is the cur-
rent Mr. Caribbean Bahamas
and Mr. Caribbean Interna-
tional.

The Bahamas won first and
second place in the 2006 Mr.
Caribbean International Com-
petition, with Metellus Chip-
man winning the competition

and Donovan Rolle placing
first runner-up. Since com-
peting in the Mr. Caribbean
International Competition,
representatives from The
Bahamas have placed in the
top five finalists. Athletes
from the country have now
become the competitors to
benchmark and beat in the
international competition.
The deadline for applica-
tions has been extended to
Friday, June 18th, 2010, where
last minute applicants can sign
up, be interviewed, and hope-
fully be selected at the open
audition and screening.

There is an all expense paid
trip for two, to attend the
week-long activities at the Mr.
Caribbean International Com-
petition in Jamaica in Octo-
ber, for the person who nom-
inates and enters the winner
of this year's competition
(with his permission of
course).

Applications may be
obtained from local gyms or
downloaded from the website
www.mrcaribbahamas.com).
Fans may also follow the
competition on facebook and
twitter.

nna!
Ballin’ on
the Beach

FROM page nine

that they could work on,
then we know that it would
impact the other aspects of
their game.

“That was the goal of
each instructor for each
camper. When they finished
your station, you would
have taught them a couple
of things. But if we can hear
them say ‘I’m going to work
on this or that,’ we know
we would have accom-
plished our goal.”

Nairn, however, said the
camp is just one avenue for
the development of wom-
en’s basketball.

“This is just a camp, but
we need more leagues and
more games played here,”
said Nairn, a former one-
time coach at Queen’s Col-
lege.

“We need the heads of
both the private and gov-
ernment schools to come
together where these girls
can play together and play
more games because the
girls in the United States
play more than 30 games a
season and we only play
about ten here.”

Federation’s secretary
general Sean Bastian said
they were quite impressed
with what they saw from
Salisbury, but he hope that
other colleges can come
down and hold similar clin-
ics to improve the level of
women’s basketball in the
country.

“We are excited about
the turnout and I’m sure
that as we move forward,
we will only see the pro-
gramme continue to grow,”
Bastian summed up.

Johnson

FROM page nine

from the three-point arch
for 37%.

Johnson also hit 65-of-87
shots from the free throw
line for 74.7% and he had
74 rebounds for an average
of 4.9; 82 assists for a 5.5
average; 10 block shots for
a 0.7 average, 17 steals for a
1.1 average and he commit-
ted 30 turnovers for a 2.0
average.

Based on those numbers,
the former St. Anne’s High
Bluewaves standout, who
played under the late coach
Godfrey McQuay, said he
was pleased with the way
his season ended and he’s
looking forward to the
future.

“Tf I don’t get anything
in Europe, which I am con-
fident that I will, I will just
go back to South America
and probably Mexico,”
Johnson said. “It’s been a
good season there, even
though I didn’t play that
long.

“JT just want to keep
doing what I’m doing. It’s
very political, but once you
get in the right place and
you show your face to the
right people, it becomes al
ittle easier.”

Back home for a break,
Johnson helped out Jurelle
Nairn, who brought coach
Charisse Mapp and five of
the players from the Sea
Gulls women’s basketball
team for a three-day clinic
at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium.

“T didn’t realise that the
younger girls here have so
much talent,” Johnson said.
“They just need to get more
people to work with them.

“Who knows, we could
end up some day watching
one of them play profes-
sionally in Europe, South
America or even in the
WNBA.”

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improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Exnerts to probe oil Spill reports

FROM page one

seeing what they would normally see when they fly
over, which is seaweed, which looks like what you
see on the international news, but what we expect to
see here would be weathered black tar balls.

“We are almost 800 miles away from the oil head
so it’s going to be a completely different scenario.”

Oil sheens containing thousands of tar balls have
hit the south coast of the United States in Missis-
sippi, Louisianna, Alabama and Florida, and some
reports claim these sheens have already left the
Gulf.

The National Oil Spill Committee will spend five
days in Cay Sal Banks, the westernmost point of the
Bahamas 145km west of Andros Island, and Bimi-
ni, collecting oceanic and terrestrial samples to test
on the RBDF vessel and determine whether or not
oil has left the Gulf.

They will be assisted by trained volunteers from
the College of the Bahamas, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, the Department of Marine
Resources, other government departments and envi-
ronmental protection agencies who will continue
sampling work in the northern Abaco cays and
Grand Bahama.

More samples will be taken on the slower, more
detailed exercise than the previous two-day expe-
dition to Cay Sal last month which showed no signs
of oil from the spill and have been stored in a tam-
per-free US Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) certified laboratory.

Committee spokesman and Bahamas National
Trust (BNT) director Eric Carey said: “We are
hearing so many conflicting reports, depending
what website you look at, so we have spent a lot of
time trying to get the best information available to
us.

“One source said oil might be exiting the Gulf of
Mexico in the form of tar balls already, so we are
really anxious to see what the team finds when they
get to Cay Sal, because some of the reports suggest
tar might already be heading there.”

The team of scientists include leading marine
ecologist Dr Ethan Freid and marine biologist Kath-
leen Sealy from the International Maritime Organ-
isation (IMO).









(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
CLEAN BROWN PELICANS are seen at the Fort Jackson Bird Rehabilitation Center Friday,
June 18, 2010, in Buras, La. The birds were rescued and cleaned after being covered in
oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

TEMPORARY icdentifi-
cation tags are seen
on aclean brown peli-
can at the Fort Jack-
son Bird Rehabilita-
tion Center Friday,
June 18, 2010, in
Buras, La. The bird
was rescued and
cleaned after being
covered in oil from
the Deepwater Hori-
zon oil spill.



(AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, file)
IN THIS JUNE 8, 2010 FILE PHOTO, Elaine Jesmer, left, and
Heather Crosson, both of Los Angeles, hold signs during a
protest against BP PLC organized by Moveon.org outside an
ARCO gas station in Los Angeles. ARCO is a subsidiary of
British Petroleum.

(AP Photo/Charlie
Neibergall)







5-Day Forecast



oo I ss XL »
Az . .
* ORLANDO
" _ High:92°F/33°C
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1:41 p.m. 2.8 7:59 p.m. 0.3
> A a Sunday 1:54 a.m. 25 8:16am. -0.3
2:43 p.m. 2.9 9:06 p.m 0.3
ML Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 2:55 am. 25 9:13am. -0.1
. A Vv a ABACO _ A a Temperature 3:43 p.m. 3.0 10:10 p.m. 0.3
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FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT : As of 2 p.m. yesterday .... trace 62tpm 3.1 11:52am. -0.1
High: 91° F/33°C High: 89° F/32°C ; Year LO Dale ois sas ses oo 1244" Friday = «6:36am. 24 12:52a.m. 0.1
a eS tows F/24°C ; P Normal year to date : 7ZO7 pm. 3.1 12:39pm. -0.1
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pS -% High: 91° F/33°C ~__! ow: Sunset....... 8:02 p.m. Moonset... . 12:58 a.m.
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High: 89° F/32°C Low: 74° F/23°C
Low: 78° F/26° C .
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15 Sel SSNs ses SESS se ELEUTHERA Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
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Warm Cold Stationary Showers Rain T-storms Flurries Snow Ice RAGGED ISLAND Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
a oe a. i, on. 2 3° 3° 3° , NNN ge ae yn en is oS 5 Sunday: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
AO NANA AeA eA Sa swaeassss ke ek *k * tes ate te” i cick anal lh



O INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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A = “ Smiz|EI4|>\¢/7'
atte i | | ala|: HIGH V. HIGH EXT.





Se Low
Sunny and breezy Clear and breezy Clouds and sun, a Windy with a t-storm Variable clouds, Mostly cloudy, The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
t-storm; breezy possible t-storms possible t-storms possible greater the need for eye and skin protection
High: 90° High: 90° High: 89° High: 89°

Peer Umar gtd .
96°-81° F 98°-83° F 103°-83° F 99°-86° F High HL(ft.) Low HL(ft.



The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure,





























Low: 73° F/23°C sae i
L Jun. 19 Jun. 26 Jul. 4 Jul. 14

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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
\ i
New ‘laboratory school’ seen as revolutionary teaching tool



FROM page one

school out into other school districts,
officials propose that the Lab School will
impact education standards in the sys-
tem as a whole.

“We want to be able to speak with
authority in education but we have not
been very good at doing research in edu-
cation in the past. With this we will have
hard data rather than anecdotes to base
our plans on,” said Director of Education
Lionel Sands.

In his budget speech, Minister of Edu-
cation Desmond Bannister said lectur-
ers and trainees at the school will “gain
new ideas and concepts, and deeper
insights and understanding of the whys
and why nots of education as they engage
in educational research, observe and par-
ticipate in demonstration lessons and
evaluate and train teachers in the same
setting.”

Students at the school will be afforded
an education experience that “fosters
critical thinking, cultivates an intrinsic
motivation to learn and active participa-
tion in the learning process, develops self
awareness, compassion for others and
appreciation for diversity and personal
leadership, uses an experiential approach
and values different ways of learning,”
according to Mr Bannister.

Mr Sands and Mr Bannister, along
with other education officials, are “very
excited” about the prospect of the new
initiative, which Mr Bannister expects



“set the
oe for anew
thrust in edu-
cation” in the
| country.

The school,
which will be
contained with-
}in the TG
Glover school
building which

is currently in
.| the final stages
of construction
in the Horse-
shoe Drive
area, is set to
be launched in

Mee is

September 2011.

The concept is based on other Labo-
ratory Schools in the United States of
America and elsewhere, most of which
are affiliated with a local university.

The first Lab School was launched in
1986 by University of Chicago Profes-
sor John Dewey, who wanted to create
an education experience which chal-
lenged conventional attitudes about edu-
cation being based on regimentation and
drills, and focus on a more “interactive”
or “experiential” form of learning.

The school is also expected to cater to
pre-school to grade 6 students of all abil-
ity levels within the catchment area which
involves students from T.G. Glover Pri-
mary School, Oakes Field Primary
School, Naomi Blatch Primary School
and Mable Walker Primary School.

Mr Bannister said: “The collaboration
between the Department of Education
and the College of the Bahamas in the
Lab/Demonstration initiative will pro-
vide opportunities for exchange in best
practices between the Department and
COB, observations of improved class-
room and COB teaching practices, edu-
cational research driven by both the
Department of Education and COB,
both partners to demonstrate what excel-
lence in education looks like and collab-
orative planning and collaborative teach-
ing and learning.”

The school will offer a state of the art
library, technology and media labs, Inter-
active boards and lab carts, an art studio,
drama, dance and music studios, and a
playground.

A curriculum that covers language arts,
mathematics, science and technology,
social studies, religious studies, health
and family life, personal development,
physical education, creative and per-
forming arts, and information technolo-
gy/mass media is set to be implement-
ed.

“The facilities will be generally more
high-tech than you’d see in a normal high
school situation,” said Mr Sands.

“We are all very excited about it. It’s
something that when new Minister (Mr
Bannister) came in he caught onto it and
he loved it and that’s driving us. Now
we have people responsible for the deci-
sion making behind it that’s given us the
impetus to push ahead.”

Cheryl Grant-Bethel to file legal action next week in law job row

FROM page one

Wayne Munroe will represent

The legal action will seek
legal redress regarding the
decision.

Bethel.

earlier assertion the job
should go to Mrs Grant-

some influence over the deci-
sion formally made by the
commission responsible for

Mrs Grant-Bethel in the legal
action calling for a review of
the Judicial and Legal Ser-
vices Commission’s (JLSC)
choice to overlook Mrs
Grant-Bethel and select
Jamaican Vinette Graham-
Allen as Director of Public
Prosecutions (DPP) in the
Attorney General’s office
instead.

Mrs Grant-Bethel served as
acting DPP in her role as
Deputy Director, and Mr
Munroe said she is better
qualified for the job than Ms
Graham-Allen, a former
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions in Bermuda and head of
the Justice Training Institute
in Jamaica.

“We expect we should be

“T started off believing I

filing sometime before had the person,” Mr Ingra-
Wednesday,” Mr Munroe ham told Parliament on
said. Wednesday.

“Tt will question whether
her application was fairly con-
sidered by the commission
and consequently question
the consideration of any oth-
er applications by the com-
mission.

“If the commission didn’t
act properly in terms of its
make up, and what it consid-
ered, then it couldn’t proper-
ly have considered the appli-
cation of this Jamaican
woman.”

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has defended the
JLSC appointment of Ms
Graham-Allen despite his

“T had no desire to go out-
side of the Bahamas and look
for a DPP, no desire whatso-
ever.”

But around three months
later Mr Ingraham changed
his mind about Mrs Grant-
Bethel’s suitability for the
post based on information he
had received, he said.

“T told her that as Prime
Minister of the Bahamas I
could not, and would not sup-
port her appointment,” Mr
Ingraham said.

His subsequent defence of
the JLSC choice indicates the
Prime Minister may have had

judicial appointments.

PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell told the press on
Thursday how Mrs Grant-
Bethel’s family are mortified
at the way Mr Ingraham
“trashed” her reputation in
Parliament and believes she
has been treated unfairly.

Mr Mitchell said: “The
Prime Minister has a duty to
disclose what made him
change his mind and not hide
behind innuendo without giv-
ing the individual the oppor-
tunity to answer to whatever
issues he has.”

Mrs Grant-Bethel has not
offered any comment on the
matter.

Homicide count hits 41
after man shot dead

FROM page one

Superintendent Leon Bethel, the officer in charge of
the Criminal Detective Unit, said police are not yet cer-
tain of a motive. “Two young men were walking and then
someone approached them and fired shots — killed one —
that is very serious, and we are very concerned about this
type of matter,” said Mr Bethel.

Assist

“We want the public to assist us to clear this matter up
quickly and bring this matter to justice.

“We believe someone can tell us who this individual
was who approached him.

“People would have been around and seen someone
approach him and the relative, and fire shots at them. We
are asking them to contact us.”

Any information regarding this incident should be
reported to police by calling CDU on 502-9991, the Grove
Police Station on 325-8431, or the police emergency num-
ber 919, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328
-TIPS (8477).







Police officer wanted in US

on rape charge is remanded



FROM page one

be to his detriment. The attorney noted that Bastian has made
numerous firearm and drug arrests while working undercover.

Attorney Neil Brathwaite who appeared for the requesting
state claimed that Bastian is a flight risk and that there are no
exceptional circumstances in his case that would warrant the
granting of bail. Brathwaite noted that the fact that he may be
endangered if remanded to prison is a fact to be considered, but
is not unusual.

Bastian pleaded to the magistrate to grant him bail claiming
that he had been working undercover for three quarters of
his career as a police officer and knew of an officer who was
gang raped in jail and is now in Sandilands.

Chief magistrate Gomez said the court was aware that police
officers could be more susceptible to such violence in prison.
Magistrate Gomez said he did not doubt that Bastian would
appear in court, he was bound to follow precedent set by the
Privy Council, which does not allow persons facing extradition
to be granted bail except in exceptional circumstances. He
noted that Bastian could make a bail application to the Supreme
Court.

Bastian then pleaded with the magistrate to allow him to
spend Father’s Day with his two daughters ages six and 12. Bas-
tian told the court that he is their sole provider. The magistrate
did not accede to this request, however. Bastian is expected
back in court on July 28.











TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


in

ee

JUNE



v TRIBUNE
FRIDAY,

18, 2010

FAMILY GUARDIAN



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net













By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE $16 million South-
west Shopping Plaza is
already 50 per cent leased, it
was revealed at yesterday’s
groundbreaking, and con-
struction could be complete -
and the complex ready for
occupancy - by the 2011 sec-
ond quarter, its principal
developer said yesterday.

Larry Treco, head of CGT
Construction, said the plaza
was expected to be one of the
largest retail complexes in
New Providence, with one of
the most upscale facades and
properly planned parking,



BREAKING GROUND — Shown (lI-r) are Mr Maynard, Dr Minnis, Larry Treco, John Treco, PM Hubert
Ingraham, Angela Treco and Wesley Treco...

Photos by Peter Ramsey

$16m project 50% leased

Multi-million shopping complex targets 2011
Q2 construction finish, with tenants set to
include Marco’s Pizza and Burger King





PRESS members speak with PM

entrances and exits.

He added that the 11.5
acre property at the north-
west corner of Carmichael
and Blue Hill roads was cho-

sen because it is one of the
fastest growing urban areas
on the island, and he and his
partners saw the need for a
proper shopping outlet.
“We think that we have
some very good tenants who
are seasoned retailers, and
we seek to get quality ten-
ants,” he said. “People have
to start up but we don’t want
a high turnover, so we think
we have some good, solid

SEE page 4B







INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





Bahamas tops region’s
urban unemployment

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas has

the highest urban

unemployment

rate in the

Caribbean region,
a joint report by the Interna-
tional Labour Organisation
(ILO) and a United Nations
(UN) body has revealed, caus-
ing one leading business exec-
utive to yesterday suggest this
nation was paying for its “folly”
in failing to diversify the econ-
omy.

Responding to findings that
pegged the Bahamas’ urban
unemployment rate at 12.4 per
cent at end-2009, compared to
11.3 per cent for Jamaica and 10
per cent for Barbados, Brian
Nutt, the Bahamas Employers
Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident, told Tribune Business
that this nation still “may have
not seen the worst of it” with
more companies preparing for
lay-offs.

While expressing surprise
that the Bahamas was “the
highest in the Caribbean” when
it came to urban unemploy-
ment, a figure that would
include most of its population
given the focus on Nassau and
Freeport, Mr Nutt estimated
that it would take a further 12-

* Nation suffering 12.4% urban unemployment rate,
ahead of Jamaica and Barbados, prompting BECon
chief to suggest paying for ‘folly’ in failing to diversify

* Warns Bahamas ‘may not have seen the
worst’ of unemployment, warning three
more firms carrying out lay-offs

* Suggests make take 12-18 months to get Bahamian
unemployment ‘back to acceptable levels’

18 months for this nation to see
unemployment start retreating
back to acceptable levels.

“T, of course, knew what the
Government’s figures were, but
would have thought that some
of the other Caribbean coun-
tries would have been higher
than us,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business. “The fact we’re the
highest is surprising, and does
not bode very well for us.

“It comes back to, I guess,
how hard we’ve been impacted
by this economic downturn.
Most of our eggs are in one bas-
ket, the tourism industry, so I
would imagine that although
the other Caribbean countries
are looking at growing tourism,
they’re much more diversified
than ourselves as far as the
economy goes.”

The joint ILO/Economic
Commission for Latin America

Fixed income’s ‘big appetite’ $30m public debt saving if rate cut

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A LEADING investment banker yes-
terday told Tribune Business that the
demand among Bahamian retail
investors for initial public offerings
(IPOs) was still questionable, although
there was “a big appetite” for fixed-
income securities due to declining bank
deposit rates.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity
Merchant Bank & Trust’s president,
said: “That’s a big appetite in the market
for fixed income securities. The banks
have been dropping deposit rates rela-
tive to liquidity in the system.”

With surplus liquidity (the amount of
available assets in the commercial bank-
ing sector for onward lending purpos-
es) standing at around $600 million cur-

BEC ‘a runaway train’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Attorney for $105m power
plant opponents questions

Deposit rate pressure raises attraction
for bonds, preference shares

rently, there has been downward pres-
sure on deposit rates, Mr Anderson say-
ing that rates which may have been 5.5
per cent six months ago may now be 4.5
per cent.

In a bid to achieve a greater return on
their funds, Mr Anderson said institu-
tional and retail investors were seeing
the average 7.5 per cent interest coupon
being offered by fixed income securi-
ties, such as bonds and preference
shares, as very attractive.

“There’s a fair amount of appetite
around,” he added. “There’s also a fair
amount of money sitting in bank

SEE page 4B

FEEL Good ABOUT

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net



IF GOVERNMENT lowers the
Bahamian prime rate by 0.5-1 per cent it
could save $30 million per year in inter-
est payments on its Bahamian dollar
debt, a former MP and minister said yes-
terday, lamenting that both the FNM
and PLP governments have not had
proper ministers of finance in the posi-
tion over the years.

Tennyson Wells, speaking at the
Rotary Club of West Nassau’s weekly
meeting, said successive governments
have not made the necessary changes to
fiscal and monetary policy that would
directly benefit Bahamians and the econ-
omy, and owed the oversight to the lack
of economists and people who under-

Ex-Minister and MP calls for
‘proper’ Ministers of Finance

stand business in government.

“Unfortunately, I think those person
who have been running government for
the past 25 years or so really don’t
understand the economy of this coun-
try and what will make it tick,” said Mr
Wells.

“They should get some persons to be
Minister of Finance who at least under-
stand something about business and eco-
nomic,s and how the economy works -
study, think about it and what can be
done to improve it.”

Mr Wells said government’s cutting
the Prime Rate would, in effect, keep

SEE page 4B

Bahama’ Health

Your HEALTHPLAN



THE Bahamas
Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC)
has been accused
of behaving like
“a runaway |
train” over pub- |
lic consultation
and permitting
for the $105 mil-
lion Wilson City
power plant, an
attorney for the project’s oppo-
nents questioning whether the
Government would have
allowed a private developer to
proceed in a similar fashion.

Fred Smith QC, attorney and
partner at Callender’s & Co, in
trial submissions filed with, and
read out, in the Supreme Court
in Freeport, said all key deci-
sions taken in relation to the
new Abaco power plant’s con-
struction had been “taken in
secret” - especially in autumn
2009, when construction began
in earnest.

In addition, Mr Smith alleged
that BEC had failed to consult
interested parties on the
planned use of Bunker C fuel at
Wilson City, despite the fact
that consultants hired by his
clients, Responsible Develop-
ment for Abaco (RDA), had
calculated it would cost an extra
$3.823 million per annum for
the state-owned Corporation to
use this fuel as opposed to
Automotive Diesel Oil (ADO).

“The NTH report compar-
ing the cost of using Bunker C
fuel at the Wilson City power
plant with diesel fuel costs con-
cludes that it will cost an extra
$3.823 million per year in capi-
tal and operating costs if the
plant uses Bunker C fuel, some-
thing that would make this fuel
far more expensive than
diesel,” Mr Smith alleged.

“While diesel would be more



whether government
would have allowed
private developer to
proceed as state-owned
power company did

* Claims use of ADO fuel,
which BEC has conceded,
will save more than
$3m per annum

* Accuses corporation
of making decisions
‘on the hoof’

expensive to purchase, costing
more than $21 million a year,
the additional capital and oper-
ating costs, combined with the
need to desulpherise the
Bunker C exhaust gases, would
make the latter anywhere from
$300,000 to $1.1 million more
expensive per annum.

“The Bunker C Report also
makes clear that once the min-
imum necessary emissions con-
trol systems are in place,
Bunker C actually turns out to
be more expensive than diesel.
The only way in which Bunker
C is cheaper is if corners are
cut on environmental stan-
dards.”

Mr Smith alleged that BEC
had never produced estimates
to show why Bunker C was the
best cost option, adding that
proper consultation with his
clients and other Abaco stake-
holders would have “fully
explored” this issue and
allowed the best choice to be
made.

Referring at an affidavit sub-
mitted by Kermit McCartney,
BEC’s Family Island project

SEE page 4B

with your he

nday at 396-1300 <=> [J

T | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STE

h

and the Caribbean (ECLAC)
study, using what it said were
national statistics that includ-
ed “hidden unemployment”,
showed that urban unemploy-
ment in the Bahamas had risen
markedly in 2009, growing from
8.7 per cent at 2008 year-end
to 12.4 per cent at the end of
2009 - a rise of some 3.7 per-
centage points.

This level, not surprisingly
given the recession’s severity,
was the highest for a decade,
surpassing the 10.8 per cent and
10.2 per cent urban unemploy-
ment rates seen by the
Bahamas in 2003 and 2005
respectively. The current urban
unemployment levels is more
than five percentage points
above the 6.9 per cent decade-
low experienced in 2001.

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
fromthe dailyrepor, —









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FAMILY GUARDIAN . 4

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED


THE TRIBUNE

Shipping output mixed

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 3B

VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

despite Miami ‘records’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

INTERNATIONAL ship-
ping from South Florida ports
has seen an 18 per cent increase
that could hit record highs this
year, according to a recent Mia-
mi Herald article, which cites
the Bahamas as one of the des-
tinations that could set record
trade with Miami as a result.

However, Tropical Shipping
told Tribune Business yester-
day that it had not seen a sig-
nificant increase in shipping
volumes to the Bahamas.

“We have not seen any
noticeable change in the
Bahamas’ market volumes,”
said Tropical Shipping
spokesperson Mary Udry.

Oralee Deveaux, inside sales
coordinator for Seaboard
Marine, said that through last
year her company had
increased its client base despite
the recession, and thus enjoyed
an increase in shipping vol-
umes.

According to her, Seaboard
made a marginal reduction in
its rates, attracting competitors’
customers, and leaned on its
“dedicated” customer service.
She said the shipping company
has a 24-hour sales centre,
something the competition does
not.

The Miami Herald article
touted Miami’s $39.2 billion
first quarter results, saying
exports increased by more than
14 per cent, while imports
increased 26.2 per cent.

According to the article, Mia-
mi area ports could set new
records in trade this year, due
in great part it seems to multi-
million dollar shipping increas-
es to Haiti, which was struck
by a devastating earthquake in
January.

“Countries on track to set
new records for total trade with
the Miami district this year
include the Bahamas, Chile,
China, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Ecuador, Haiti, Panama,
Paraguay, Peru, Mexico and
Switzerland,” said Ken Roberts,
president of WorldCity, a Coral
Gables media company that
analyses US census numbers to
spot local trade trends.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
also saw strong export numbers
last year and in the 2010 first

quarter.

“Throughout the recession
we have gotten new clients,”
she said. “We give good cus-
tomer service and some of our
rates might be higher, but some
people believe more in good
customer service.”

In February, Tropical Ship-
ping reported declines of 30
per cent to the Bahamas and
wider Caribbean, forcing the
closure of the company’s port
of Palm Beach warehouse.

The closure caused the loss
of 35-40 jobs in the US. How-
ever, Tropical Shipping report-
ed no significant reductions in
staffing.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
had not made any cuts to staff
through in 2009 or in the first
half of 2010.

Canada deal offers ‘double tax’ benefit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Bahamas yesterday signed its 22nd
Tax Information Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with Canada, as Tribune Business
revealed exclusively this week, the deal
containing a clause that, just as this news-
paper predicted, places it on an equal foot-
ing with Barbados in terms of 'double tax’
benefits.

Brent Symonette, minister of foreign
affairs, confirmed that the Canada TIEA
contained a clause that the dividend profits
of Canadian companies based in the
Bahamas would not be taxed upon repa-
triation back home.

Several financial services industry ser-
vices had previously told Tribune Business
that if the final TIEA agreement stuck to
initial drafts seen last year, then the deal
with Canada was one of the best for this
country in terms of providing reciprocal
economic/trade benefits.

These sources told this newspaper that
the proposed Canadian TIEA they had
seen offered to place the Bahamas on an
equal footing with Barbados, effectively
giving it a ‘double taxation’ treaty with
Ottawa without entering a formalised
arrangement.

Currently, major Canadian-owned banks,
especially FirstCaribbean, have their
regional headquarters domiciled in Barba-

dos, largely because
of that nation's 'dou-
ble tax' treaty with
their homeland. The
treaty ensures their
profits are only taxed
once - at the lower
Barbadian rate -
rather than at the
higher Canadian
thresholds, and has
acted as a major draw
for Canadian compa-
nies seeking to do business in the region to
establish their bases there.

"Canada had proffered an agreement
last year that was more attractive than any-
one else's," one Bahamian financial indus-
try source told Tribune Business yester-
day, "so I hope they go with that.

"If the agreement is signed as it was
offered, as it was on the table, in 2009, we
are treated as having double taxation
[rights] even though we do not have an
agreement, so we will be in the same posi-
tion as Barbados. We'd get the same sort of
treatment when the Canadian-owned banks
repatriate their profits back home."

Another highly-placed Bahamian finan-
cial services executive confirmed to Tri-
bune Business: "I understand that the
TIEA with Canada was suppose to be one
of the better ones. "We have a double tax-
ation treaty, in effect, but also there was

SYMONETTE

=) FIDELITY.

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.

If you have it, we want you.

We are growing!
Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

Junior Accountant

Reporting directly to Manager, Accounting

Services the successful applicant’s main
duties and responsibilities will be:

® Posting accounting entries

Reconcilation of bank accounts

Reconciliation of intercompany accounts

Preparing daily/weekly and monthly reports

Minimum requirements / qualifications:

¢ Accounting degree and/or practical experience in a prior job

Willingness to work and learn

© Prior experience in a banking environment would be useful

HUMAN RESOURCES

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
June 25", 2010 to:

Re: Junior Accountant, 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108

careers@fidelitybahamas.com



ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

going to be an exchange of other things -
know how, and opportunities for Bahami-
an businesses to do business with Canadian
businesses. Certainly, there was a market
for Bahamian goods and services."

Yet the executive added: "T understand it
would be a good one, but until I see the
final signed document I just don't know. It's
just that in the art of negotiations, some
things fall away and others don't.

"This one has been talked about for quite
a while, and because of the linkages with
Canada, universities and other things,
everyone is waiting to see this one."

The Canada TIEA is also likely to have
linkages with current trade talks taking
place between Ottawa on the one hand,
and the Bahamas and CARICOM on the
other, over a replacement trade agreement
for CARIBCAN that would be WTO-com-
pliant.

The Bahamas has been a key destina-
tion for Canadian foreign direct investment
(FDI), especially in sectors such as banking,
tourism and construction, while a Canadi-
an firm, Vancouver Airport Services
(Y VRAS), is managing the transformation
of Lynden Pindling International Airport
(LPIA).

On the reverse, Canada remains an
important market for Bahamian exports
such as crawfish, while many Bahamians
receive their tertiary education at Canadi-
an colleges and universities.

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

TheApplicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.
and

Key job functions

include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands
Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.



JOB OPPORTUNITY

Marketing Manager

The successful candidate must possess the following:

« A creative thinker with a knack for advertising and a history of creating

big ideas.

A proven track record of driving sales and significant organizational

impact.

Must be adaptable toa changing, fast-pa ced environment.

Able to deal with a variety of personalities and situations with energy

and enthusiasm.

Able to work in a culture/environment that promotes an entrepreneu-
rial spirit and a “let's get it done now" attitude,
Focus on possibilities rather than problems.

Strong customer orientation.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
« Develop and execute effective local marketing plans that support

annual key initiatives.

Lead efforts to effectively plan, execute, measure and evaluate local

market achvities.

Direct media planning and graphic design.

Establish and cultivate PR/media relationships.

Develop and Manage budgets.

Customer Relations and management of complaint process.

Build community goodwill and manage relationships with influential

organizations

Serve as the local steward of the brand, ensuring all local marketing

activities are aligned with established brand standards,

REQUIREMENTS:

« Bachelors degree in Communications, Marketing or a closely related

field or equivalent work experience,

« Minimum five vears professional related experience

COMPETITIVE SALARY & ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.

Send résumé to: marketingmanagerwanted@gmiail.com

Deadline fora

plication is Wednesda

une 28th, 2010



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