Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
SWEET
TEA

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 106 No.171

Pen blowin’ it

91F
SOF

PARTLY
~ SUNNY



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





Bahamas tops
region’s urban
MON Ta
NaS SS

EX-lleputy ask im
allvice In FAW jou row

Family of Cheryl
Grant Bethel
‘mortified’ over
PM’s comments

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

alowe@
tribunemedia. net

FORMER Deputy
Director of Public
Prosecutions and one- | °
time acting Director,
Cheryl Grant Bethel,

is getting legal advice eenkcenacent!

from a top lawyer on
whether she can get
legal redress for having been
overlooked for the post of
Director of Public Prosecutions,
The Tribune has learned.

This comes as Mrs Grant
Bethel’s family are said to be



“mortified” at how the
Prime Minister
allegedly “trashed“
the public servant in
Parliament, according
to Fred Mitchell, MP
for Fox Hill.

Mrs Grant Bethel
confirmed to The Tri-
bune yesterday that
she has contracted the
services of former bar
president, attorney
Wayne Munroe, as
she looks into whether there is
any potential for legal redress
regarding the decision by the
Judicial and Legal Services

SEE page eight

Grieving families’ anguish
at Coroner’s Court backlog

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FAMILIES waiting for answers about the unnatural
deaths of their loved ones have spoken out about the anguish
of waiting for an inquest to be heard after The Tribune
revealed there are currently 129 matters pending at the

SEE page eight

FATHER’S DAY,

s 4 Pe. Chicken, 8 Wings, 2 Family Sides,
4 Biscuits & 7 Two Litre Pepsi

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

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Pastor reportedly
considers suing
INS for defamation

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net



A PASTOR is said to
be considering suing ZNS
for defamation following
a news report televised
on Tuesday which he
claims discredited his rep-
utation.

Reverend Terrance G
Morrison, of the Zion

SEE page 12







Felipé Major/Tribune staff



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS work on a mural project in downtown Nassau. The open studio space of the Love My Bahamas Down-

Attorney: lawyers should not he
faulted for AG's Office inefficiencies

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

PROMINENT attorney
Damian Gomez has hit
back at a government min-
ister's stinging criticisms of
criminal defence lawyers,
arguing that good counsel
should not be faulted for
inefficiencies in the Attor-
ney General's Office.

Mr Gomez defended his
work, and that of his col-
leagues, explaining it was a
lawyer's oath to give their





client the best representa-
tion and capitalise on
weaknesses in the prose-
cution's case.

"We live in a country
where it's convenient to go
on a pulpit and accuse peo-
ple of wrong-doing when
they are only doing their
duties -— I find that
absolutely mind blowing.

"It's the job of counsel
to take whatever advan-
tage there is on behalf of
his or her client. If the gov-
ernment doesn't do what
it is supposed to do, the

SEE page eight





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° SEE PAGE TWO

Mother desperately seeks
funds for hit-and-run baby

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AN unemployed mother is
desperately seeking financial
aid for her 16-month-old baby
after a near-fatal hit-and-run
accident destroyed his chances
for normal development.

Because both vehicles
involved were uninsured and
those at fault still at large,
Latrell Lewis, 19, faces medical
expenses in excess of $50,000
for her son Kilano Capron.

Kilano was only seven weeks
old when an S10 truck hit his
grandmother’s truck broadside
on March 29 last year. Ms Lewis

had been driving home from
work with her mother and son.
The occupants of the $10 truck
had stolen a boat engine and
were being chased by its owner.

SEE page 12
STUDENTS STABBED

THREE MALE STU-
DENTS were stabbed yester-
day afternoon after an alterca-
tion involving students from
Doris Johnson School. The stu-
dents were taken to hospital,
after the incident on Prince
Charles Drive, and they were
treated and discharged. Police
are investigating.

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Mural Art
All work Project

Fite local and international artists are involved in Love My
Bahamas Downtown Art Experience, a mural project that will
enliven downtown Nassau. People can stop by the open studio
space to see the artists at work. The LMB Art Studio on Parliament
Street is open Tuesdays and Fridays, 9 am to 6 pm.

LOCAL NEWS





PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff







FATHER’S DAY
SUMMER SWEEPSTAKES





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THE TRIBUNE

O In brief

Body found
off Banana
Bay named

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The body
discovered floating in
waters off Banana Bay has
been identified as that of
49-year-old Benjamin
Cooper of Mather Town.

ASP Loretta Mackey,
police press officer, said
that an autopsy report
revealed that the cause of
death was drowning.

Cooper, who according
to his family suffered from
seizures, may have been
fishing in waters near
Banana Bay.

Ms Mackey said police
do not suspect foul play.

In other matters, police
are still awaiting the autop-
sy report in the death of
Garth Roberts, who was
found dead at his home.

Roberts, a pastor, was
discovered by relatives on
Monday.

Police probe
armed robberies

THE police are investigat-
ing two armed robberies
which took place in Nassau
this week.

At around 3am on Tues-
day, police were called toa
home on Buntings Avenue
off Boyd Road, where two
men with handguns had
threatened and robbed the
homeowner of an assort-
ment of electronic items and
jewellery.

The culprits fled the area
on foot heading in an
unknown direction.

The police are calling on
members of the public who
have any information
regarding this incident to
kindly contact them.

Just before 10pm on
Wednesday, officers were
called to Williams Lane off
Kemp Road, where witness-
es said a 31-year-old man
was walking when he was
approached by three men,
one of whom was armed
with a handgun.

They robbed the victim of
an undetermined amount of
cash and fled the area on
foot heading in an unknown
direction.

Man stabbed on
Nassaul Street

JUST before lam on
Wednesday, a man was
stabbed at the junction of
Boyd Road and Nassau
Street.

Responding officers were
told that two men got into
an argument which resulted
in a 57-year-old man being
stabbed in the left shoulder.

The victim was taken to
hospital by ambulance and is
in serious condition.

Toddler still in serious
Condition after shooting

The 4-year-old child who
was shot at on Brazilletta
Street in Pinewood Gardens
this week remains in hospi-
tal in serious condition.
Police investigations contin-
ue.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



THE faculty union at the College of
the Bahamas is calling for the resigna-
tion of Chair and Vice-Chair of the col-
lege’s Advisory Search Committee over
what it claims is a clear conflict of interest.

The Union of Tertiary Educators of
the Bahamas (UTEB) has called into
question the fairness and integrity of the
search to replace outgoing college Presi-
dent Janyne Hodder and is also calling on
Education Minister Desmond Bannister
to have T. Baswell Donaldson, Chair-
man of the College Council and Deputy
Chair, Judith Whitehead, step down as
the Chair and Vice-Chair of COB’s pres-
idential Advisory Search Committee.

“The union is most concerned about
the fact that College Council Chairman,
Mr Donaldson and Council Deputy
Chair, Mrs Whitehead — who have direct
responsibility for hiring the next presi-
dent — are also Chair and Vice-Chair of
the search committee responsible for
short-listing applicants for the Council’s
approval.

“With the two primary persons respon-
sible for hiring the next president also
heading the crucial screening process, the
union sees this as a clear conflict of inter-





DESMOND
BANNISTER

est, particularly when recent decisions
made by the Council Chair are being
called into question as nothing more than
acts catering to a constituency whose
interests appear to be more political than
practical.

“These recent decisions demonstrate
that Mr Donaldson does not have the
willingness, the uprightness, or the
courage to make decisions that are in the
best interest of the wider college com-
munity,” UTEB stated in a press release
yesterday.

The union is also suggesting that if Mr
Donaldson and Mrs Whitehead wish to
continue being involved in the selection
and evaluation process, they can, with
some other voted members serving as

JANYNE
HODDER

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 3

ME UNION OF TERTIARY EDUCATORS OF THE BAHAMAS

COB union questions fairness
of search to replace Hodder

Calls for resignation of Chair, Vice-Chair of Advisory Search Committee

Chair and Vice-Chair of the committee.

“As first point of reference for the
international search firm hired by the
college to vet applicants, the Chair and
Vice-Chair of the Advisory Search Com-
mittee will most likely have the list of
candidates before any other member on
the committee. “The union feels that the
individuals sitting in those two positions
should not also be the same two individ-
uals responsible for hiring the next pres-
ident — again, a very clear conflict of inter-
est,” the press release stated.

Education Minister Desmond Ban-
nister declined to comment on the matter
yesterday. Attempts to reach Mr Don-
aldson also proved unsuccessful up to
press time.

Last week, Dean of Liberal and Fine
Arts Dr Earla Carey-Baines was con-
firmed as the institution's new interim
president beginning July 1. She will con-
tinue in the post until a new president is
installed, a process COB expects will not
be completed before the fall semester
this year.

Another vacancy has been left within
the COB following the retirement of Dr
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson last week. Dr
Chipman-Johnson who spent 31 years
with the institution had been the imme-
diate candidate for the presidential posi-
tion by government legislation.

O Court short

Man gets nine
months for drug
possession

A 46-year-old man has
been sentenced to nine
months imprisonment after
pleading guilty to marijuana
and cocaine possession
charges.

According to court dock-
ets, on June 14, Donnie Tay-
lor was found in possession
of a quantity of marijuana as
well as a quantity of cocaine
that authorities believe he
intended to supply to anoth-
er.

On Wednesday Taylor
pleaded guilty to both
charges. In addition to his
prison term, he was fined
$5,000. Failure to pay the
fine will result in an addi-
tional nine months in prison.
According to the prosecu-
tion, Taylor had been found
in possession of seven grams
of cocaine and nine ounces
of marijuana. He was also
found in possession of $971
cash. Magistrate Carolita
Bethell ordered that the
money be confiscated.

SE BRP Biles
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822-2197



Debate over proposed fee structure
for Supreme Court legal action

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A proposed new fee struc-
ture for pursuing legal action
in the Supreme Court has
sparked much debate among
attorneys, with some critical
of a move they suggest will
increase the cost of litigation
for average Bahamians, oth-
ers saying it will ease the
financial burden and yet oth-
ers saying it will make no dif-
ference at all.

The government claims the
new fee structure, replacing
a system implemented in
1971, will reform and “ratio-
nalise” the process of pursu-
ing matters in the Supreme
Court.

However, Fred Mitchell,
MP for Fox Hill, hit out at the
draft amendments to the
Supreme Court Rules yester-
day in a press conference, sug-
gesting that are “anti-poor
and anti-middle class” and
may stop some people from
pursuing grievances in the
courts.

The Rules Committee of
the Supreme Court is propos-
ing as of July 1 to institute a
new one-off filing fee for mat-
ters in the Supreme Court,
and a $50 fee to be paid by
litigants who already have
matter before the courts.

This would replace lower
initial fees of often less than
$10 that are normally supple-
mented by follow-up filing
fees throughout the process,
or in cases where damages are
being sought, by the litigant
having to pay a percentage of
the damages being claimed in
the form of “ad valorem
stamp duty“, which is also
intended to be abolished.

Pointing to the fact that at
present a litigant can choose
to file a generally endorsed
writ for a cost of just $9 in the
Supreme Court to initiate a
legal action, Mr Mitchell said
the fact that this cost will now
jump to $300 or more is
“unconscionable”. A gener-
ally endorsed writ is used in a
civil matter in which the dam-
ages being claimed are not
outlined.

He suggested that while
wealthy people who are mak-
ing large claims which would
have met significant stamp
duty charges may save money,
poorer people will smaller
claims will likely end up pay-
ing more — although this is a
disputed point.

“We all agree on reform.
But this is not reform, this is a
pure out-and-out revenue
raising measure,” said the
MP.

Mr Mitchell noted that
while there are provisions for
poor or indigent litigants to
have these new initial fees
waived, he regards the condi-
tions as too burdensome and
believes they may still act to



RAYNARD RIGBY

dissuade a potential litigant.
He called on the “powers that
be to review the matter.”

Ruth Bowe Darville, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Bar
Association said that the pro-
posed changes have generated
“much comment and discus-
sion” among Bar members,
with a strong arguments for
and against emerging. She
encouraged members to make
representation to the Bar if
they have a view on the pro-
posal so they can in turn make
a case on the issue to the
Rules Committee of the
Supreme Court on the mat-
ter. The government has sug-
gested the new fee structure
should come into effect on
July 1, 2010.

Suits

In stark contrast to Mr
Mitchell, Ms Bowe Darville
said that in her opinion the
new minimum $300 filing fee
for individuals filing civil suits,
in combination with the abo-
lition of the ad valorem stamp
duty on damages and the
potential for further filing
costs will in fact save most lit-
igants in this area money.

“They will benefit most,”
said Ms Bowe Darville,
adding that another bonus is
that litigants will have a clear-
er idea of what the cost of
pursuing the matter will be at
the start. However, she said
that she is concerned about
the rise in the cost of divorce
petitions and ancillary mat-
ters in particular, which she
described as “exorbitant”,
suggesting that for uncontest-

ed divorces in particular this
fee would be significantly
higher than what is already
being paid by most would-be
divorcees. “They should look
at that again in my view,” she
added. Presently, the cost of
filing a divorce petition is $21,
followed by smaller fees for
additional documents filed in
connection with the case.

Meanwhile, Ms Bowe
Darville, Mr Mitchell and
attorney Raynard Rigby all
said they believe the new $50
fee to be paid by all litigants
who currently have matters
before the courts is not nec-
essarily justified, given that
different litigants may be at
different stages in the process.

Mr Rigby said: “Although
the matter is still an existing
action in the court it may very
well be that that matter may
never proceed to trial because
parties are in the midst of dis-
cussions or the action was
filed to reserve plaintiffs right
to action before limitation
period expired. So there are
categories of matters where
it will not proceed and a
judge’s time may never have
to be assigned to that case.”

Carl Bethel, chairman of
the governing FNM, said the
move to amend the initial fees
and get rid of the subsequent
charges is not a “revenue rais-
ing” measure as Mr Mitchell
proposed. Instead the gov-
ernment may in fact lose
money from the changes in
the short term and “at the end
of the day it will be revenue
neutral.”

“It’s an attempt by the gov-
ernment to have a situation
where there is rationalism
brought to the way we file ini-
tial actions. It’s a higher initial
cost but at end of the day (the
overall cost to litigants) is not
going to be significantly dif-
ferent,” he said.

Mr Rigby, a former PLP
chairman, suggested that an
increase in initial filing fees
would be more justifiable if
it came with improvements in
the level of efficiency in the
court system.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS SECTION

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES





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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Confusion around the courts

NATIONAL Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest told Parliament Wednesday that
at least 252 persons charged with murder
are still awaiting trial. Of that number about
130 are out on bail.

It would be interesting to know how
many of those on bail have been charged
with a second murder, or have themselves
become the victim of another criminal’s dri-
ve-by shooting. Up to April 30, 130 murder
accused were still out on the streets waiting
to be called in to face justice.

Lawyer Philip Davis told the House that a
murder trial usually takes a month. He esti-
mated that it would take more than 20 years
to clear those now waiting for their cases to
be heard. “A near impossible” task to deal
with, he observed.

The courts are not only clogged with too
many cases, but also cases cannot move
smoothly and swiftly through the system
because of constant delays, either for lack of
witnesses, summonses that have not been
served, or lawyers who need adjournments
because of a conflict in their own calendars.

A businessman, who was to testify this
week for a theft at his office, after waiting
four hours outside court for the case to be
called, vowed that in future unless death
were involved, he would never again call in
the police to get entangled in the judicial
system. “It is ridiculous what happens at the
court,” he said.

He said his case was set down for Tuesday
and Wednesday this week. He arrived at
the court at 9.30am on Tuesday. There were
so many prisoners already there that every-
one was asked to leave the court to make
room for them.

He waited with the crowd under the
almond tree in front of Café Matisse to find
some shelter from the blistering sun. Later
he hurried under an awning to be protected
from the rain. “I am a middle aged man in
good health, but can you imagine what
would happen to an older person, not in
good health, under these conditions?” he
asked. He battled with the sun and rain for
four hours before his case was called. When
he entered the court room at 1.30pm he was
told: “Come back tomorrow.”

The next day, he went even earlier to
secure a seat at the back of the court. He said
that a sympathetic policeman who knew
what he had gone through the day before
helped him find the seat. His case was the
second to be called on Wednesday. He gave
his evidence, but believes that there will be
at least two more adjournments in the mag-
istrate’s court before the case can make it to
the Supreme Court.

In the two days that he was there only

DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

two cases went ahead. About 40 had to be
adjourned because either witnesses had not
shown up, or summonses had not been
served.

On Tuesday he said in one case alone 15
witnesses were called. Not one was present.
Of the 30 cases that day, no one had shown
up to give evidence. Each case had to be set
down for a new date.

Even a prisoner complained about the
non-functioning system. He told the court
that that day was the fifth time that he had
been brought before the court, but each time
his case had been adjourned because no one
was there. “This is ridiculous!” he exclaimed.

Also at no time did the businessman feel
secure. He said there should be somewhere
for witnesses to wait so that they do not
have to be so near to the prisoners.

He said all the staff and the police at the
court were friendly. However, it was obvious
that the court was under staffed.

“Tt was a total eye opener for me to our
criminal justice system,” he said as he vowed
never again to willingly expose himself to
such an experience.

As for murder cases, Mr Turnquest told
the House, government will specify an
amendment to a bill now before parliament
that three years is a reasonable time to hold
murder accused in prison to await trial. In
our own experience, we know of a case that
involved the brutal murder in 2006 of one of
our own staff members. The man accused of
her murder was back on the streets after
only 14 months. He is still a free man and no
more has been heard of her case.

Under the constitution, said Mr Turn-
quest, a person accused of murder has a
right to bail if they are not brought to trial in
a reasonable time. With the slow pace at
which many matters proceed before the
courts this has allowed many charged with
serious offences to be released on bail, some-
times coercing witnesses or committing oth-
er heinous crimes, he said.

"There's no question that the granting
of bail to persons charged with murder is
particularly controversial and emotive in
our country. The public is concerned and
rightly so that persons charged with mur-
der are given bail and remain free to coerce,
compel, and influence others and tragically
to kill again,” said Mr Turnquest.

"It is critical that more persons charged
with murder have their cases decided by the
courts and we believe that this Bill is a step
in the right direction,” he said.

We suggest that a court be designated just
for murder cases with its own staff to bring in
the witnesses and keep the cases moving
through the system.



Government
is far too big
and wasteful

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In spite of tariffs being
the major source of revenue,
when revenue drops gov-
ernment spending continues
at the same rate, or even
higher.

Where does the extra
money come from? You
guessed it — the tax shortfall
is covered by money bor-
rowed from the credit mar-
Kets.

The country is now
informed that taxes/revenue
are only 19 per cent as a per-
centage of GDP, and in the
scheme of things we're
under taxed compared to
other nations. However,
GDP has grown substantial-
ly over the years, so should-
n't government revenue
have done the same?

Well it did. From 2003
through 2008 government
revenues totalled just over
$7 billion. But spending was
over $8 billion.

So as the debate turns to
changing the tax regime
(read higher taxes), and cit-
izens are told that import
taxes are not enough to
maintain the country, it’s
worth remembering those
numbers for some fact
checking in the future.

But, isn't GDP declining
as a result of the economic
downturn since the fall of
2008? If so, shouldn't tax-
es/revenue as a percentage
of that GDP be rising since,

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



according to some reports,
revenue has been stable?

While all taxpayers
should fully understand the
economic troubles the coun-
try faces, should citizens be
required to pay more taxes
because of the profligacy of
successive governments?

The answer, that is well
known, is to reign govern-
ment in as Canada did in the
1990's. The Government of
The Bahamas is far too big
and it consumes and wastes
far too many valuable tax
dollars to be trusted with
even more of the proceeds
of picking taxpayer pockets,
just because they can.

In other words, higher
taxes are not the best idea in
these economic times. Win-
ston Churchill seemed to
know better. He's quoted as
saying:

"We contend that for a
nation to try to tax itself into
prosperity is like a man
standing in a bucket and try-
ing to lift himself up by the
handle."

With all that said, this
would be the perfect time
for the official opposition
PLP to prove their ability to
lead the country out of this
mess. Will the PLP show in
this matter as the Conserva-

tives supported the Liberals
in Canada with their initia-
tives to sort out their long
running fiscal problems. Or,
will the country get anything
other than eloquent polemic
debate from them? That's
what's been offered up so
far, and they say that's
what's required from the
official opposition.

They can read the score-
card (economy) as well as,
or better than most so why
can't they make suggestions
on what they would do if
they were the government
of the day? Are they bereft
of ideas or are they just hop-
ing the FNM will fall on its
proverbial sword?

Both political parties are
in a quandary over this
mess. If they say too much,
they'll be charged with mis-
handling the country for
decades.

But the governing party
has presented its ideas in the
form of the 2010/2011 Bud-
get. Shouldn't the country
expect a “shadow budget"
from the official opposition?

Maybe if Parliament were
to go on vacation for a year
or so, the patient just might
heal itself.

So, where to now Parlia-
ment? It's all in your hands.

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com
Nassau,

June 8, 2010.

An open letter to Craig Gomez

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open
letter to

Mr Craig A (Tony)
Gomez, Liquidator
CLICO (Bahamas) Ltd.

Dear Sir:

Our Prime Minister, the
Right Hon. Hubert Ingra-
ham, assured the policy-
holders of CLICO that as
soon as the various internal
problems were resolved,
such persons whose health
insurance policies were up
to date with legitimate
claims would be paid.

This procedure had been
carried through for several
months; however, much to
my dismay, this has not been
the case recently.

Sandals

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Applications are invited for the position of:

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a lifetime experience for couples in love while maximizing revenue

potentials for each resort.

Applicants should satisfy the following:

Must possess strong artistic, technical, sales and
communication skills with the ability to convey the night
message both internally and externally

Must be customer service oriented with a pleasant disposition
Must demonstrate a high level of professionalism

Must be a team player with the ability to work flexible hours

when required

My CLICO policy is paid
up to months in advance, as
it usually is.

Approximately ten weeks
ago, Isubmitted three claims
to CLICO for reimburse-
ment.

Unfortunately, I have yet
to be compensated for any
of the claims.

I have made various
queries regarding my claims.
T understand from your staff
that all claims are to be
processed within three
weeks of your receipt of the
same.

During one of my queries,
it was brought to my atten-
tion, by your staff, that the
cheques for my due com-
pensation have been sitting
on your desk for more than
eight weeks awaiting your
signature.

I would greatly appreci-
ate your signing and distrib-
uting my cheques in the
proper and timely manner

that I should expect as a pol-
icyholder in good standing
with my monetary obliga-
tions to CLICO.

Please note that it is
imperative that I receive
immediate compensation for
these claims, as I must bring
my child’s tuition back with-
in its proper standing such
that she might graduate as
scheduled in a few weeks
and go onto be an asset to
this wonderful country.

In light of the foregoing I
look forward to your
prompt action.

I should be happy to
answer any questions you
might have or to provide
any further information you
might require.

Thank you for your coop-
eration.

POLICY HOLDER
No 1-1300003920
Nassau,

June 10, 2010.

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Tel: 325-1325, 422-4489, 477-0200

[PRIME OFFICE SPACE

Must be able to perform all duties and responsibilities in a
timely and effective manner in accordance with established
company policies to achieve the overall objectives

Must possess excellent oral and written communication skills

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second

floor space is available in newly constructed
building at the corner of Marlborough and
Cumberland Streets. Two newly completed
bathrooms and ceiling with air conditioning
provided by Landlord.

Qualifications and Experience:

Prior video experience and or Multimedia Certificate
Knowledge of HDV workflows is an asset

Ability to learn documentary style video production.
Computer literacy is an asset.

Two (2) on-site car spaces included.
Ideal location for offshore bank, trust
company, law or accounting firm, or other
professions.

Only short listed candidates will be contacted. Interested persons
should submit their applications by July 2, 2010 with curriculum vitae
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Sandals Resorts International,
5 Kent Ave, PO Box 100,
Montego Bay.
Fax: 952-7581
E-mail: ybiek@grp.sandals.com AND hrd@grp.sandals.com

Contact Owner at 362-6006
q Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 }





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Police detain
man wanted in
connection with
Stabhing death

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Abdul
Rondon Burrows, who is
wanted for questioning in
connection with a stabbing
death, is in police custody
after a week-long search by
officers.

Burrows, 20, was turned in
by his father at around lpm
yesterday.

Asst Supt Loretta Mack-
ey, press liaison officer, said
police are continuing their
investigations into the mur-
der of 31-year-old Troy
Rolle, of Coral Gardens.

Three persons have
already been charged in
court in connection with the
matter. It is alleged that on
June 8, Jarreth Barry, 18, of
Gambier Drive; and Darren
Pratt, 39 and Karen Janice
Bowe, 24, both of Mallard
Street, being concerned
together, conspired to mur-
der Rolle and caused harm
to a second man.

Barry was also charged
with Rolle’s murder. They
were not required to enter a
plea to the charges.

Rolle, 31, and a 35-year-
old man, were attacked and
stabbed at an apartment
complex in Coral Gardens
last Tuesday.

They were taken to the
Rand Memorial Hospital,
where Rolle later died. The
second man was treated for
his injuries. Rolle’s death
has been classified as the
sixth homicide for the year
on Grand Bahama.

Following the incident,
police issued an all points
bulletin for Burrows and
sought the public’s assis-
tance in locating him.

Pair arraigned over
Shooting of teenagers

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Two men
were arraigned in the Eight
Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court
on Thursday in connection
with the shooting of two
teenagers at Hepburn Town.

Terrance Hanna, 25, of
Hepburn Town, EMR; and
Sean Francois, 19, of Holmes
Rock, appeared before Magis-
trate Gwen Claude.

The men were charged with
possession of a firearm with
intent to endanger life, caus-
ing harm and causing grievous
harm. It is alleged that on
June 14 at Hepburn Town,
the accused, being concerned
together, possessed a 9mm
pistol with intent to endanger
the life of Kelson Solomon
and a 13-year-old girl.

It is also alleged that on the
same date, the accused
intended to cause harm to
Kelson Solomon and grievous
harm to the 13-year-old girl.

The men were represented
by Carlson Shurland. They
pleaded not guilty and elected
summary trial in the Magis-
trate Court. The prosecutor
objected to bail, explaining
that the 13-year-old victim is
still detained in serious condi-
tion in hospital. Mr Shurland
said the fact that the victim
remains in hospital in serious
condition is not one of the cri-
teria for denying a person
bail.

“There must be a substan-
tial reason and the prosecu-
tion has not given the court
real information as to why
these men are not good candi-
dates for bail,” he said. He
noted that failing to appear
for trial, and interference with
witnesses or the course of jus-
tice are the categories the
court must consider when
denying a person bail.

Mr Shurland said that Ter-
rance Hanna is employed at
the container port as a strad-
dle carrier and has three chil-
dren to support. He also not-
ed that Hanna is related to
the 13-year-old victim and
that Francois lived with Kel-
son Solomon and has a close
knit relationship with his fam-
ily. Shurland asked the court
to consider granting bail with
conditions, such as ordering
the men to report to a police
station and restricting their
travel by ordering the surren-
der of their travel documents.

Magistrate Claude denied
the men bail and adjourned
the matter to November 24
for trial.

Mm ABACO BIG BIRD

Chicken farm seeks
protect family legacy

Poultry producer takes control of future after removal of import permits

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RATHER than wait for gov-
ernment to secure protection
for poultry farmers, one local
producer is taking control of
his economic future.

Challenging the public to
“buy Bahamian”, Abaco Big
Bird Chicken Farm has
launched an aggressive cam-
paign to brand their birds and
make their name as one of only
two local poultry farms.

After learning of the removal
of chicken import permits in
the 2010 budget, effective July
1, the owners of Abaco Big
Bird panicked.

And the thought of the
increased ease of access dis-
tributors would have to foreign
poultry — which already repre-
sents 99 per cent of the chicken
market in the Bahamas - ini-
tially angered them.

Abaco Big Bird has been
family owned and operated
since 1995, when Bahamians
Lewis Pinder and his wife, with
help from their sons, pursued
a “crazy dream” of raising
chickens.

Now daughters Caroljean
Lowe and Kandy Pinder have
taken the baton and are deter-
mined to keep the family busi-
ness no matter what it takes.

Mrs Lowe said: “I’ve thought

about it over the years. After
my father got sick we consid-
ered letting someone buy us
out. We’ve had offers. But you
know what this is our farm and
I am committed to seeing it
through. This is our family lega-
cy.”
Dedicated to adhering to the
highest standards of sanitation
and environmental health, the
farm boasts hormone and
steroid-free chickens, which are
the bird of choice on the island
due to its taste and unbeatable
freshness. Poultry scientist at
the College of the Bahamas
Jason Taylor is familiar with
the operation at Abaco Big
Bird and he attributed the qual-
ity of their birds to the use of all
natural corn/soy feed mix and
sensible housing structures.

Another resource employed
by the farm that undoubtedly
improves the quality of the
chicken is local pine chips.
Instead of newspaper shavings
or other artificial material often
used as bedding in other poul-
try farms, Abaco Big bid uses
fresh pine chips in each house,
and the bedding is completely
changed at regular intervals.

But local island business is
not enough to keep the farm
operational and now that it will
be even cheaper for distribu-



tors to bring in foreign chicken,
the farm will have to work
twice as hard to get its product
to the Bahamian people.

However, the sisters believe
in this economic climate — and
any other — a business must be
prepared to take the initiative
to secure success.

The farm has had its share
of hardships over the years,
however through stricter regu-
lations on expenses such as gas
and electricity consumption,
they have been able to secure
their position as one of the
largest producing farms in the
Bahamas. After the global eco-
nomic decline, the company
had to cut its staff of 42 full
time workers to 29, but still
maintains part-time shift work-
ers. Mrs Lowe added: “The
problem is, if you’re buying US,
the money is going out of the
country and it’s gone. We work
very hard to get tourists to
spend money here and we need
to keep that money here.”

As part of its efforts, Abaco
Big Bird has planned a “golden
coin” promotion; inspired by
the iconic film Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory, which fea-
tures Willie “Wonka’s golden
ticket.”

Abaco Big Bird will begin
placing “golden coins” bearing
serial numbers inside whole
chickens. Customers who find
them can call in to win prizes.

The first set of “coins” will
be placed in chickens today and
Nassau consumers should be
on the lookout for the lucky
birds as early as next week.

To fellow business owners,
Mrs Lowe said: “Don’t let any-
body get you down. I was real-
ly upset the first day when I
heard about it. But I said you
know what, we need to not let
this get us upset. We need to
fight to stay in business and find
a way to make it work for us.”



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ATA

10 Gres
FT

vi

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN INVESTIGA-
TION has been
launched to determine
what caused the smell of
smoke to permeate the
cabin on JetBlue flight
1757 prompting an
emergency landing.

Passengers on the
JetBlue Airbus A320
reported the smell of
smoke in the cabin
shortly after the flight
bound for San Juan,
Puerto Rico, took off
from Fort Lauderdale’s
Hollywood Internation-
al Airport at noon.



Safely

The captain landed
safely and without inci-
dent at the nearest air-
port, the Lynden Pin-
dling International Air-
port in Nassau at 1pm.

“Because the flight
diverted to an interna-
tional location on a
domestic flight, cus-
tomers remained within
the international termi-
nal's gate area due to
customs regulations.
Maintenance is inspect-
ing the aircraft,” said
JetBlue manager of cor-
porate communications
Alison Croyle.

“JetBlue ferried a
new aircraft to Nassau
to take customers to
their final destination
(San Juan, Puerto
Rico).”

The flight departed at
6.15pm on Wednesday
and arrived in San Juan
at 8.45pm local time.







a
RS



LANCE PINDER shows some of the fruit of the orchard which boasts Persian
limes and seven different types of avocado.

PHOTOS: Ava Turnquest

Weta hy
Hl rar bY)











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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Long Island: A Bahamian ‘cultural mecca’

YOUNG MAn’s VIEW

ADRIAN GIBSON

AMnazing mk StepZ
S H O E S$ T O RE

SEs alelosy Solace |

re

/ & Slippers

209 Wulff Road - Dorsett House Building
heading East 2 doors down from Epic Battery

Tel: 393-6224

NOTICE

Please note that Mr. Whitney
Shaundel Newbold is NO longer
employed with
Fox Locksmithing Ltd.
and can no longer do business on
our behalf.



By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

Long Island breeze, I
hear you calling; calling
me upon the sea — Pat
Rahming

N 2010 my home
town, Long Island,

remains an over-

looked gem on the archi-
pelagic chain, a splendid
refuge that has afforded
me blissful memories of an
idyllic life on this most
beautiful outcrop of rock.

Originally called Yuma
by the Arawaks and later
renamed Fernandina by
Christopher Columbus,
Long Island is a cultural
mecca, featuring unique
ecosystems, breathtaking
landscapes and a society of
people of distinction, many
of the Bahamas’ most
industrious inhabitants.

During a nail-biter of a
flight, I recently returned
home to celebrate the fes-
tivities of the island’s
annual regatta.

Travelling onboard an
early morning twin turbo
prop Pineapple Air flight,
my homecoming was noth-
ing short of bumpy, as
gusty winds and dark
clouds filled the aircraft’s
windscreen, lightning
streaks illuminated the
skies and the tempestuous
weather and air turbulence
left the plane rattling, bob-
bing and swaying back and
forth.

Pilots

Indeed, while the pilots’
very professional
demeanour throughout the
flight is laudable, the rocky
trip left wide-eyed passen-
gers hysterical with worry,
hugging seats each time
the plane was caught in the
strong updrafts of tower-
ing, dark grey cumulonim-
bus clouds and shaking
with fear and aero-anxiety.
If truth be told, this flight
featured a lot of praying
(and I did my share too),
celebratory cheers upon
safely landing and
affirmed, for me, Ronnie
Butler’s famous lyric that
“everybody wan’ go to
heaven, but nobody wan’
dead.”

Even today, Long Island
is a bush-strewn, subtropi-
cal paradise that has pro-
duced some of the nation’s

brightest minds.

Here, the residents still
share courteous salutations
and cheerfully toot their
vehicles’ horns while tra-
versing the island’s roads
and passing fellow
islanders.

Long Island is home to
countless treasures, includ-
ing an archive of birds and
spectacular wild life, first-
class craftwork and exquis-
ite creations, bush teas and
plants of potent medicinal
value, delectable jams and
foodstuffs, protected nat-
ural harbours and some of
the world’s deepest blue
holes.

Plantation ruins such as
Adderley’s plantation, his-
toric churches, mysterious





MY flight reminded me of
famous lyrics from Bahamian
entertainer Ronnie Butler
(pictured above).

caves, crabs crawling all
night in the middle of
Queen’s Highway and
peripheral roadways, bleat-
ing sheep and goats, the
chatter of roosting seabirds
and shrill chirping sounds
of crickets all add to the
island’s magnificent
panorama and warmth.
Although the music,
food and merriment of the
nation’s second largest sea-
side festival was a major
draw, it is the big-hearted
people, quiet harmony,
comaraderie and glorious-
ly simple life of this island
hideaway that resides in
the recesses of the minds
of so many of the island

~ BAHAMAS FIRST

FIRST IN INSURANCE. TODAY. TOMORROW.

Please be advised that Bahamas First Group Offices:

Bahamas First General Insurance
Company Limited
Nassau Underwriters Insurance Agency

Will be closed on Friday, June 18, 2010 for our staff

ANNUAL FUN DAY.

We will reopen for business at 9:00 a.m.
on Monday, 21, 2010.

We regret any inconvenience cause.

BAHAMAS FIRST HOLDINGS LTD.
BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.



folks who now live else-
where.

Glistening waters and
awe-inspiring beaches,
cloudless blue skies and
children playing in the nat-
ural environment (even
today) are facets of Long
Island nearly unseen in the
nation’s crime-ravaged
capital city.

I grew up in the late
1980s, 1990s and the early
part of this millennium
with grandparents who
maintained a truly disci-
plined, old-time environ-
ment.

Before the FNM electri-
fied the entire island in the
early °90s, like most Long
Islanders, we used an elec-
tric generator and, even
more, lamps and lanterns. I
vividly recall the sand flies
and mosquitoes being
chased away with
makeshift fires that pro-
duced a repellent “smoke”
and I remember, however
faintly, my folks using a
“goose iron” with charcoal
before electricity was
extended island-wide or
when the electric genera-
tor was off.

Handmiill

As a child growing up on
Long Island, an assigned
chore could include assist-
ing my grandparents in the
field; grinding corn by
handmill on Saturdays in
my grandparents’ old out-
side kitchen/farmhouse for
sale, export and personal
use; I retain delightful
memories of my grandpar-
ents’ banana, corn and
sweet potato breads (cov-
ered with the banana tree
leaves) and sometimes
baked on a traditional
rock oven for extra
flavour; and I bear in mind
that discipline was the
order of the day as we
were always taught to
respect others.

It was not unusual to be
sent to fetch our very own
“switch” before a whip-
ping! I hold dear all the joy
I experienced in picking
whelks off the island’s
northeastern coastal rocks
and eating varieties of
berries and plums (that
must be bought in New
Providence from street-
side vendors).

dishes — stew conch, com-
bined yellow and white
hominy, bean soup and
dumplings, fried fish, crab
and dough, boiled cabbage
and cassava, roast corn on
the beach, and even sup-
plementary products of the
island—such as sapodillas
and scarlet plums — were
major highlights of my
most recent trip.

While I intend to elabo-
rate on issues faced by
Long Islanders in a follow-
up column, it must be not-
ed that there is a dire need
for infrastructural devel-
opments and investment
on Long Island.

Water

There is also a desper-
ate need for improved
water quality throughout
the island.

As Water and Sewerage
can hardly be accounted
for on the island, there is a
need for government assis-
tance with providing a
water improvement solu-
tion or in providing and
distributing water purifi-
cation tablets throughout
the island to those resi-
dents relying upon water
pumps connected to salty
and/or brackish wells.

At my grandparents’
house in Bunches, the cor-
rosive effects of this hard,
salt/brackish water is obvi-
ous as it has taken a toll
on the bathroom and
kitchen fixtures.

Furthermore, a concert-
ed effort must be made to
clamp down on those busi-
ness and holders of liquor
licenses who uncon-
scionably peddle alcohol
and tobacco to the island’s
juvenile population, culti-
vating a group of young
alcoholics and nicotine
abusers whose addiction
puts them on the fast track
to becoming the island’s
social dregs.

Say what you may, Long
Islanders take great pride
in being called sheep run-
ners because in the end,
they know that happiness,
tranquility and feeling of
contentment—with or
without many resources
and devoid of the mad-
dash in materialistic pur-
suits—that has long been
lost in New Providence.

“Long Island is a
bush-strewn, subtropical
paradise that has produced
some of the nation’s
brightest minds.”



Growing up, there was
no internet (most islanders
got it in 1999 or so) or cell
phones although a number
of persons had satellite
dishes—there was no face-
book distraction and
youngsters daily interact-
ed with nature.

My upbringing on this
wonderful island consist-
ed of some television time,
but predominantly
involved assembling bikes
and go-carts, sometimes
forgetting the brakes or
another part; riding and
prancing these bikes;
shooting marbles; catch-
ing lizards, frogs and tad-
poles; playing tug-of-war;
using buckets, a stick, a
string and a few kernels
of corn to catch birds
whilst hiding behind a
rock or bush with my sis-
ter Shenell and anxiously
waiting to tug on the draw
string and trap a curious
bird; playing “catch and
freezers”; climbing trees;
and yes, among other
things, even chasing sheep
that had escaped the pas-
ture.

It’s still amazing that
Long Islanders, like many
other Family Island
dwellers, can continue to
live and sleep with their
house doors unlocked,
with family and friends
streaming in and out.

The native, down-home

Congratulations to a
pacesetter in the straw-
work industry and to the
North Long Island High
school’s graduating class!

At the 43rd annual
regatta, my grandmother
Lenora Gibson was hon-
oured as a pacesetter in
the craft industry.

She is a skilled artisan,
whose native plaits and
homemade items were
crafted with love and ded-
ication, unlike the cheap
knockoffs and foreign
imports that litter

the straw-market today.
My grandmother practised
her craft in the age of
authentically produced
straw and craftwork.

While I was taught how
to plait a few strings, I
remember assisting my
folks in harvesting and
chopping down “top
trees”, then letting them
dry only to later watch my
grandmother strip them
and plait as a pastime.

I also extend congratu-
lations to my first cousin
Rache and the entire grad-
uating class of the North
Long Island High school.
All of the ten graduates
received diplomas, in stark
contrast with many New
Providence-based gradu-
ates who merely obtain an
attendance certificate upon
leaving. Indeed, all is not
lost!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Study: student alcohol |
abuse on the increase

Binge drinking ‘considered
common among students’






































=

Stamps commemorate
70th anniversary of
the Battle of Britain

THE 70th anniversary of the Battle of
Britain will be recognised locally on Friday,
June 18, when the Bahamas Postal Service
will issue a new commemorative postage stamp
that highlights the leadership of Sir Winston
Churchill and Sir Douglas Bader.

Sir Winston served as the United Kingdom’s
prime minister during World War II from 1940
to 1945, and again from 1951 to 1955.

He was known chiefly for his role in the
successful defence of Britain from Nazi inva-
sion, and was a noted statesman, orator,
British Army officer, historian, artist and

writer.

The six-stamp series concentrates on famous

Mitchell ‘laughs’ at FNM chairman’s

THE already high incidence of alco-
hol abuse among Bahamian high school
students seems to have grown even worse
in recent years, according to a govern-
ment study.

Drinking was recognised as the most
prevalent form of drug abuse in 2002 and
the study found that rates increased
between that year and 2008 for each of
three recognised prevalence indicators.

Binge drinking — that is, having five or
more drinks on any one occasion — is con-
sidered common among students, it said.

The 2008 Secondary School Drug
Prevalence Survey conducted by the
National Anti-Drug Secretariat of the
Ministry of National Security, indicates
that after alcohol, cigarettes and marijua-
na, the substances tried most often by
students are solvents and inhalants.

Releasing the findings this week, Min-
ister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest said the abuse of prescription drugs,
including tranquilizers, stimulants, ecsta-
sy, and other synthetic drugs, is not pop-
ular among Bahamian students.

“The results of the survey indicate that
some of our young people are still using
narcotic drugs and psychotropic sub-
stances, and this is cause for serious con-
cern. It is also cause for concern that our

young people are experimenting with
dangerous substances such as solvents
and inhalants and that there is still sig-
nificant alcohol among them,” said Mr
Turnquest.

The survey indicated that cocaine use
by secondary students is experimental
rather than regular, as is the use of hallu-
cinogens, amphetamines and other illicit
substances.

Marijuana usage rates decreased slight-
ly when compared to 2002, with fewer
students having tried marijuana and less
continuing to use it, according to the sur-
vey.

“In the months ahead, the government
will be reviewing proposed policies and
programmes for the prevention of drug
abuse in young people, and for continuing
research in this area. We expect that par-
ents, schools and other stakeholders will
work together with government in this
endeavour,” Mr Turnquest said.

Just over 2,000 students in grades 8, 10
and 12 in selected public and private
schools on seven islands participated in the
survey.

Drug use was measured through three
primary indicators: lifetime prevalence,
prevalence in the last year and preva-
lence in the last month.











Se eee otc nee tes tee tnt
Pe dee eae we ot Boy |

in the summer of 1940.

months of the war.

Sir Douglas Bader joined the Royal Air
Force (RAF) in 1928 but in 1931 he lost both

legs in a flying accident.

Despite retiring in 1933 for medical reasons,
at the outbreak of war in 1939, Sir Douglas
won his fight with the RAF to be allowed to fly

with them again.

quotes from speeches made by Sir Winston

His speeches were important in lifting the
morale of the British people during the crucial

In 1940, along with other pilots, Sir Dou-
glas played a major part in defeating the Ger-
man air force during the Battle of Britain.



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_ Bahamas to observe
_UN International Day
against Drug Abuse
and Illicit Trafficking

THE Bahamas will observe
the United Nations Interna-
tional Day against Drug Abuse
and Illicit Trafficking on the
June 26, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest said
at a press conference on
Wednesday.

The objective of the Interna-
tional Day is to increase action
and co-operation against drug
abuse and illicit trafficking at
the national and international
levels.

This year’s international
theme, “Think Health — Not
Drugs”, has been obeernace A
into the Bahamas’ observance
plans.

The National Anti-Drug Sec-
retariat (NADS) of the Min-
istry of National Security, in co-operation with the multi-
sectoral planning committee for the International Day, has
chosen the theme, “Drugs and Crime — a Waste of Time”.

This topic recognises the inter-connectedness of drugs
and crime, including crimes of a very violent nature.

Several activities have been planned for the period
leading up to the International Day and for the Day
itself, including a panel discussion, a walk-a-thon, and
several public service announcements on the dangers of
drug abuse to be broadcast live on radio and television.



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response to disobedience call

By ALESHA CADET

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
“had a big laugh” when he
read FNM chairman Carl
Bethel’s response to his call
for more civil disobedience
from the opposition.

Accusing Mr Bethel of
“making a mole hill into a
mountain”, Mr Mitchell nev-
ertheless proceeded to com-
pare his suggestion to some of
the most dramatic and impor-
tant civil rights struggles of the
20th century.

He said: “They speak in
glowing terms of Mahatma
Ghandi and Martin Luther
King, who are the principal
advocates of civil disobedience,
yet they want to deny the
opposition's right to pursue
these tame measures that I am
advocating in the Bahamas.

“What they want is simply
for the opposition to lie down
and play dead — well it would-
n't happen with me.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Mr Mitchell said it is the
opposition’s role to “test the
government at each stage of
the game.” He said that what
he is suggesting is “quite mod-
erate.”

Responding to a speech Mr
Mitchell made at a PLP rally
on Tuesday, in which he sug-
gested that civil disobedience
may be the only course of
action left to the opposition,
the FNM chairman said: "Mr
Mitchell is well aware that any
government under our system
is accountable to the people in
free and fair elections. In fact,
all of these things are protect-
ed by appropriate mechanisms
and therefore the call for civil
disobedience is entirely irre-
sponsible and not to be expect-
ed of a seasoned member of
parliament such as the mem-
ber of Fox Hill.”

Mr Bethel said the sugges-
tion was especially irresponsi-
ble coming from a member of
parliament in a functioning

democracy where — unlike 40
or 50 years ago — “there are
no institutional, legal or con-
stitutional infringements of
anybody's rights.”

In response to this, Mr
Mitchell said: “He has to make
his case by saying that, because
if he does not, he condemns
himself.

“In fact, the vote of closure
in the House of Assembly was
improperly brought."

He was referring to last
week’s session of parliament,
when his attempt to move an
amendment was rejected and
the proceedings suspended
until this week. This prompted
opposition MPs to walk out of
the House.

The Fox Hill MP accused
the prime minister of acting in
an “undemocratic” fashion
with regard to the amendment.
“So the response was walking
out of the House of Assembly;
that is an act of civil disobedi-
ence" he said.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Ex-deputy seeks Grieving families’ anguish

legal advice in
law job row

FROM page one

Commission (JLSC) to hire Jamaican Vinette Graham-Allen
instead of herself for the post of Director of Public Prosecutions
in the Attorney General’s Office.

Having so far not spoken publicly on the issue, she said she
intends to make a statement today on the matter.

In a press conference in which he criticised Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for comments he made about Mrs Grant
Bethel and the manner in which the DPP appointment was
allegedly made, Mr Mitchell claimed Mrs Grant Bethel’s rela-
tives are “mortified that their daughter is being attacked by
innuendo ... having in their view grown up in this society as a
young woman doing, as far as they are concerned, all the right
things, getting good grades, serving faithfully the country for 20

ears.”
: “Then to be trashed in the space of three months by the man
who is the chief executive of the country with no effective
redress. I think they believe she’s been hard done by and treat-
ed unfairly,” said Mr Mitchell, when asked if he had spoken to
Ms Grant Bethel about the turn of events.

The Prime Minister recently confirmed the decision by the
JLSC to hire Ms Graham-Allen, a former DPP in Bermuda
and head of the Justice Training Institute in Jamaica as Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions in the Office of the Attorney General.
The JLSC is the Commission formally charged with the respon-
sibility of making the appointment of the DPP, along with judi-
cial posts, however the Prime Minister's defence of the decision
not to appoint Mrs Grant Bethel indicates he had a significant
say in the question of the DPP appointment.

Hitting back at criticisms of the decision to hire a foreigner for
the post, Mr Ingraham said he initially supported Bahamian Mrs
Grant Bethel for the job and regretted ultimately having felt it
necessary to change his mind on her suitability based on “infor-
mation” he had received.

“T started off believing that I had the person. That is my
belief. I had no desire to go outside The Bahamas and look for
a DPP; no desire whatsoever,” he told Parliament on Wednes-
day evening.

Mr Ingraham did not disclose the substance of this informa-
tion, but said he had “good and valid reasons” for changing his
mind. “I told her that as Prime Minister of the Bahamas I could
not and would not support her appointment,” he said.

In his press conference, Mr Mitchell accused the Prime Min-
ister of “attacking” the former Deputy Director of Public Pros-
ecutions, suggesting that his comments had been unfair and
would have given the lawyer the right to sue him had he said
them outside of Parliament, where an MP’s speech is legally pro-
tected.

He added that he felt Mr Ingraham had “a duty to disclose
what made him change his mind and not hide behind innuendo
without giving the individual the opportunity to answer whatever
issues he has”.

The MP questioned how Mrs Grant Bethel could “in the
space of three months” be considered “unfit” for the top post all
of a sudden, given her lengthy and apparently successful career
in the Attorney General’s office.

Share your news

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neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Cedar Crest Euneral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street * P.0.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P,, Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

Marcella Lolita
Musgrove, 45

aresident of St. Bart’s Road, Golden
Gates #2, will be held 10:00a.m.
Friday, June 18th 2010 at Salem
Union Baptist Church, Taylor
Street. Officiating will be Rev Dr
C W Saunders assisted by other
Ministers. Cremation will follow.

She was predeceased by her parents
Gladstone Kirk Musgrove and Marguerite Clarke Musgrove and her
sister Dianne Christine Musgrove.

Left with cherish memories are her daughter Alison Johnson;
brother, Julian Trevor Musgrove; sister-in-law, Brendalee Musgrove;
special friend Arlington Johnson and family; uncles, Arlington
Clarke; Gary Rolle; Kermit Smith; Rodney Musgrove; Rev. Elon
Musgrove and Edwin Young Musgrove of Homestead; Fla.; aunts,
Almetha Clarke-Smith; Verbilee Clarke; Norma Clarke-Wyhlly;
Eurella Clarke and Irene Clarke; Delphine and Minerva Musgrove
and Corinne Musgrove of Homestead; Fla.; grand uncle Hezekiah
Saunders of West Palm Beach; Fla.; and Hosea Musgrove; grand
aunts, Ida Clarke; Eurella Anderson of New York; Viola Bodie of
Miami; Fla. And Berniece Deveaux; and Iva Musgrove; nephew,
Jamal Anton Evans; step nephews, Ghandi Frazier; Amos; Eusias
and Israel Bodie; god mother, Maryann Clarke; god father, John
Victor (JB) Saunders; best friend, Vernie Rolle; cousins Jaqueline
and Pedric Clarke; Angelo and Anwar Lightbourne; Tarosha Russell;
Darrell Weir; Monique Robinson; Errol Clarke; Warren Rolle;
Dominque Rolle; Shekie Bowleg; Gary Rolle Jr.; Rev. Gelodin Rolle;
Michelle McKenzie; Lynden Clarke; Abanaqie Clarke; Brendon
Brown; Marco and Andrew Meadows; Devroy Colebrook; Odell
Ferguson; Sheba Whylly and Bglendaen Whylly; Jacqueline;
Shavaughn and Sherman Musgrove; other relatives and friends
include Elvin Forester Bodie and Family of Miami; Fla.; Preston
McPhee and family; Angette Pyform and family; Harriet Mather and
family; Cleomi Clarke and family; family of the late Neville Clarke
of The Hermitage; Exuma; family of the late L. B. Johnson; Prescola
Musgrove and family; Lydia Musgrove and family; John Musgrove
and family; Susanna Musgrove; Catherine Musgrove; Merle Sweeting;
Lydia Bullard and family; Jacqueline Rolle Sands; Beatrice Munroe
and family; Meredith Munroe and family; Sam Evans; Matherine
Williams; Rhonda Williams; the entire Clarke and Musgrove families
from The Hermitage; Exuma; the Rev. Dr. Charles W. Saunders;
(whom she felt a special affinity to) and family; as well as the
descendents of the late Prince Albert Saunders; Moss Town; Exuma;
neighbours and friends of Moonshine Drive; Sunshine Park; the
Golden Gates No. II community; C. V. Bethel High School; The
Central Bank of the Bahamas and Ramnant Revival International
Deliverance Ministries, Tony Saunders of West Palm Beach, Fl. and
others too numerous to mention

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral
Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Thursday from 12:00
noon to 6:00p.m. and at the church on friday from 8:30 a.m. until
service time.



FROM page one

Coroner’s Court.

For many families the
inquest is the only avenue
for closure by determining
the circumstances of their
relative’s death and whether
any party should be held
accountable.

But in waiting for the
inquest to open and as they
continue, often for several
months, their grieving con-
tinues unabated.

The inquest into the death
of teenager Brenton Smith,
who was shot dead by police
in July last year, continued
for six months after it
opened in November as it
was adjourned five times
before its conclusion in
April.

And the Esfakis family
waited five years for an
inquest into the death of
Christopher Esfakis, 42, who
died after he was admitted
to Doctors Hospital for
burns treatment in April
2002.

The 12-month inquest fea-
turing 22 witnesses suffered
a number of setbacks before
a verdict was delivered in
February 2008 and then
quashed by Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall who said Mag-
istrate William Campbell
wrongly directed the jury to
only one possible outcome:
that Mr Esfakis died from
natural causes “substantial-
ly and significantly con-
tributed to by neglect” on
the part of medical staff.

Now the Esfakis family
are waiting for a date for the
inquest to be heard again.

And as the Chief Justice
asserted Mr Campbell, the
only magistrate currently sit-
ting as a coroner, was biased



BRENTON SMITH



in the inquiry, they have
been told an inquest will not
be heard until a new coroner
has been appointed in a new
coroner’s court.

However, they have been
given no indication about
when that might be.

“Justice delayed is justice
denied,” said Mr Esfakis’
sister Leandra Esfakis.

“Tt’s like a wound that can
never close because it’s not
allowed to close and it’s pro-
longing mental anguish and
suffering.

“It feels like there’s a
knife in your chest and some
days it’s a good day if the
knife doesn’t turn, and some
days that knife is turning
and it’s ripping you apart.

“With my brother that’s
the end of my family, there
will be no more Esfakises.

“You can never obtain
justice in a situation like
that, it’s not a question of
justice, what you want is
accountability.”

For the Esfakis family,
the coroner’s court has
been their only avenue to
find accountability for her
brother’s death as the
Medical Association and
the Hospital and Health-
care Facilities Board have
not moved to investigate
their detailed formal com-
plaint, Ms Esfakis said.

“The state needs to
respond in the interest of
the individual because
your basic right as a
human being is to have
your life protected and in
this jurisdiction the gate-
way to that is the coroner’s
court — and the coroner’s
court must work if we as
individuals are going to
have some sense that our
deaths will not go unan-
swered if we have an
unnatural death,” she said.

“The state has to do that
otherwise we are nothing.

“We have to have a val-
ue on life no matter whose
life it is.”

Relatives of Preston Fer-
guson, who was found
dead in a car in Exuma last
year, are still waiting to
learn how he died as police
originally ruled he had
died as a result of a traffic
accident and later
launched a murder probe.

The family are now wait-
ing for police to file for an
inquest to be heard before
they are able to find
answers about the circum-
stances of his death.

Mr Ferguson’s sister
Eloise Moxey said: “We
feel once the inquest hap-
pens we will know whether
they will say whether it
was an accident or a mur-
der, so we are just waiting.

“It’s very painful, it’s

at Coroner’s Court backlog

extremely painful, and we
want answers.

“It’s difficult for us to
know there are people out
there getting on with their
lives who we feel they may
have something to do with
this, but we have every
confidence the new Com-
missioner of Police will try
to do something.”

When the inquest is
heard Mrs Moxey hopes it
will bring some closure,
but closure is still pending,
as it is for the Esfakis fam-
ily.

Ms Esfakis hopes the
Coroner’s Bill 2009, which
has yet to be debated in
Parliament and finalised,
will help process the back-
log of inquests more quick-
ly and deliver an opportu-
nity for accountability in
the interest of grieving
families and the public.

However, she also sees
room for further stream-
lining of the system in the
new Bill, as the Bill still
calls for a jury to sit in the
Coroner’s Court, while in
the UK a coroner can lead
an inquest and reacha
conclusion without a jury.

“If there’s no direct
criminal liability that
attaches to the coroner’s
court why have a jury?”
Ms Esfakis asked.

“The coroner has the
ability to ask questions, get
the evidence, evaluate it,
and come to a decision
about the circumstances in
which a person died.

“But a jury, with all its
prejudices and biases, is
almost an obstacle to the
purpose of the court,
which is to inquire, inves-
tigate and come to a con-
clusion.”

Attorney: lawyers should not be

faulted for AG’s Office inefficiencies

FROM page one

defence lawyer is supposed to bring
that to the attention of the court and
then exploit it to their advantage.

"T really expect more from politi-
cians, especially those who were elect-
ed to represent the people. They
should really understand the legal sys-
tem. For Mr (Charles) Maynard to
make that kind of statement is ridicu-
lous. He's an idiot," said Mr Gomez, a
former senator who has spent 21 years
practising civil and criminal litigation.

He was replying to comments made
in Parliament by Charles Maynard,
Minister of State for Culture, who rep-
rimanded criminal defence lawyers
who "manipulate" the legal system for
their clients’ advantage.

The founder and partner of law firm
Chilcott Chambers said the "more
responsible statement" from Mr May-

nard would have been to encourage
public prosecutors to be more prepared
in order to match wits with seasoned
lawyers.

It is widely known, Mr Maynard told
the House, that many successful
lawyers have profited from the over-
burdened judicial system — sometimes
stalling cases intentionally — by find-
ing loopholes in the law or technical
flaws in the prosecution's case thereby
allowing known criminals to walk free.

Mr Maynard, who directed most of
his criticism towards opposition MP
and lawyer Philip “Brave” Davis, said:
"Tt is a known fact in this country that
for many years the member for Cat
Island has been an attorney to which
when prisoners find themselves in trou-
ble they run to because he had the abil-
ity through technicality and otherwise
to ensure non-conviction of those crim-
inals.

"We talk about the backlog in the

NOTICE

system of justice there is a reality that
there are lawyers out there who just
feed on the slowness of the process.
When a case will take seven years and
finally reach trial in the Supreme Court
it works in the defendant's favour
because witnesses would have lost
interest, been bought out, died or can't
remember.

"And there are lawyers who spe-
cialise in dragging the process out —
that's a fact."

Mr Gomez said if there are flaws in
the legal system or a case is mishandled
by the Crown leading to an acquittal it
makes no sense to blame the defence.

"If it turns out your client is acquit-
ted as a result of a misstep of the pros-
ecution it does not lie in the mouth of
the prosecutor or anyone else for crit-
icising counsel for doing their job. If
that is not the case why have a trial in
the first place, why not just hang the
people?"

The Public is advised that Clifton Heritage National Park
and its Administrative Office

Will Be Closed

from

Wednesday, June 23, 2010 To Friday, June 25, 2010 for
grounds maintenance and staff training.

We will re-open for business at
9am on Monday, June 28, 2010.

We Regret Any Inconvenience Caused.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







FRIDAY, JUNE 18,

2010







Eve set to compete at BIC Nationals

Meet will mark her
final appearance

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



WITH the eagerly anticipated
BTC National Championships
expected to be a changing of the
guard with rising stars vying for
national titles against established
veterans, it is also expected to be a
swan song for one of the country's
longest serving ambassadors of the
sport.

Veteran thrower Laverne Eve will
compete before the home crowd for
the final time in her illustrious career
when she takes the field next week-
end at the BTC Nationals.

BAAAs Public Relations Officer,
Alpheus “Hawk” Finlayson, said the
meet would be one to remember
because of the high level of compe-
tition expected.

"We have had many exciting
meets over the course of the year,
athletes have performed well on the

collegiate circuit and our elite ath-
letes have performed well on their
circuit as well,” he said. "So this will
be a meet you will remember for
quite a long time”

Finlayson said he wishes to see
support for the meet extending to
Eve, in her final contest in the
Bahamas.

“We wish for the general public
to not only support the meet, but to
come out and support one of the
greatest competitors in Bahamian
history, Laverne Eve, in her final
competition here in the Bahamas,”
he said. “We know people wont nor-
mally focus much attention on the

javelin as events go on around the
track, but in this instance we will
make our main focus and turn our
attention towards the javelin throw
and pause as we honour Laverne for
a stellar career.”

With an international career which
has spanned more than two decades,
Eve has represented the Bahamas
in virtually every regional and inter-
national competition.

She captured a gold medal at the
2002 Commonwealth Games in
Manchester, United Kingdom and
four years later took silver at the
2006 edition in Melbourne Australia.

At the Pan American Games, Eve

has been stellar with a silver medal in
1995 in Mar del Plata, Argentina,
bronze in 1999 in Winnipeg, Canada,
silver in 2003 in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic and bronze in
2007 in Rio De Janeiro Brazil.

She has had her most productive
finishes and trips to the medal podi-
um at the Central American and
Caribbean Championships where
she has captured 11 medals over the
course of her career.

She has qualified for four IAAF
World Championships, with her
highest finish, 15th in Helsinki, Fin-
land in 2005 and three [AAF World
Athletics Finals.

Eve has represented the Bahamas
at five Olympiads, with her best fin-
ish in 2004 at the Athens Olympics
when she barely missed the medal
stand in sixth place.

The BAAAs National Champi-
onships sponsored by BTC take

place June 25-26 at the Thomas A. _a

Robinson Stadium.





NT aici aL)



Competition tight
at Bahamas Snipe
Junior National
Championship



IF YOU were driving along
Eastern Road this past Satur-
day and noticed the action of
several small sailboats maneu-
vering among the buoys, then
you were treated to a glimpse
of the hotly contested 2010
Snipe Junior Championships.
Great sailing conditions com-
bined with eager and competi-
tive spirits made this event an
extremely exciting series,
despite the small number of
competitors.

Donico Brown with crew
Michael Gibson and Christo-
pher Sands with crew David
Russell pushed each other to
their limits in every race. So
great was the desire to win, that
after five races, there was only
one point separating the two
teams and the championship
was to be decided by the final
race. Who would persevere and
come out the victor? Donico
and Michael got off to a great
start in the deciding race and
held on, rounding the wind-
ward mark ahead of the fleet.
From there, they were able to
control the race and protect
their position all the want to
the finish line, taking the cham-
pionship on a tiebreaker away
from the Sands team. This put

( RENALDO'S RAMBLINGS .
Final exam: 15 Lessons we

Chris and David in second
place overall, with Shaqueel
Dean and crew Daniel Gibson
third, Pedro Rahming and crew
Dustin Smith fourth and
Misheal Taffin and crew
Thomas Treco fifth.

This marked Donico’s fourth
time in the top spot of this
event — twice as a skipper and
twice in crew position. Last
year Donico crewed for Chris
Sands, so this time he was all
smiles in having beaten his for-
mer skipper and friend.

It is impressive and truly
gratifying to see the level of
talent being developed with
these young sailors. They are
all a product of the Bahamas
Sailing Association’s junior sail-
ing programme run by Instruc-
tor Maria Aaboe. They start
off learning to sail in the Opti-
mist dinghy (those little square
boats with square sails one
often sees out in front of Mon-
tagu Beach) and then gradu-
ate to the Sunfish, Laser and
Snipe Classes. In this Snipe
event their ages ranged from
13 to 20.

The Snipe Junior Nationals
is held annually on Montagu
Bay for sailors up to the age of
20. Although the Snipe class

* a
=

ABOVE: Chris Sands & david
Russell crossing in front of Don-
ico Brown and Michael Gibson.

has been in existence in the
Bahamas since 1954, this junior
event was not started until the
late 1990’s when members of
the class decided it was time to
get more youngsters interest-
ed in sailing with the hope that
at some point they would be
representing the Bahamas at
major international events.
This has become a reality
through the efforts of The
Bahamas Sailing Association,
Nassau Yacht Club and Royal
Nassau Sailing Club as seen by
the junior’s these days partici-
pation in events such as the
ISAF Youth World Champi-
onships, Sunfish World Cham-
pionships and the upcoming
Central American Caribbean




learned from the 2010 NBA Finals

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

15. Jumpshooters are more
inconsistent and harder to
understand than women

14. Irrespective of the sport,
replays can do absolutely
nothing to trump the power
of idiotic human error

13. Bahamians have an
inexplicable love for Shannon
Brown

12. Sasha Vujacic is easily
the most annoying player in
the NBA and I'm not the only
person that thinks so

11. Diehard Laker fans hate
the bandwagon jumpers more
than Laker haters hate the
Lakers

10. Rajon Rondo can't be
the best point guard in the
league if he’s neutralised by
his defender conceding jump-
shots on every possession and
playing five feet off the ball.
You're not playing off Chris
Paul and Derron Williams
like that.

9, According to Bahamians

... teams in the NBA never
win outright by outplaying
their opponents. All losses are
attributed to the "the NBA
being fixed" or "the NBA
extending the series to make
more money"

8. Kobe Bryant can stop the
Oil Spill in the Gulf Coast if he
really wants to. In fact, win or
lose, the whole disaster should
be done today now that Kobe
has some free time

7. Kendrick Perkins can't
finish on offence, commits too
many turnovers, and makes
too many extra passes ...
Kendrick Perkins is also more
important to the Celtics than
any of us realised.

6. “KOBE” has transformed
to more than just a name. To
Bahamians its used with dual
meanings like Hawaiians use
“aloha.” Only rather than
using it to say hello or goodbye
... We use it to begin or end an
argument with emphasis. Try it
today now that it’s all over.
Turn to the person sitting next
to you and say “Kobe,” guar-
anteed reaction one way or
another. Now find an argu-
ment already in progress and
interrupt by yelling “Kobe” ...

that argument just ended.

5. Game seven yesterday
was a surprise to no one in the
Bahamas. Everyone you talk
to today already knew that was
going to happen

4. Even if the Celtics lose
this series, Big Baby Davis and
Nate Robinson walk away
from the Finals as winners ...
they just earned themselves a
reality show.

3. If NBA players walked
into the stadium holding the
hands of little kids like they
did in soccer ... we would all
think it was really weird. Just
for clarification, its also weird
in soccer isn’t it?

2. Derek Fisher has this
whole professional basketball
thing worked out to an exact
science. Have one or two good
games during the playoffs to
magnify your importance and
earn contract extensions.
Coast for the remainder of the
year and shoot 25 percent.
Genius.

1. Mario's Bowling Alley
and Entertainment Palace
wished the NBA Finals hap-
pened 365 days a year.



















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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010 TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

a bi





wawreubcroyaliankcom/ caribbean



ST geared bepebemsget ot pe gray agro, ~ Mh le (erp sara abet Mla eo maa



RBC FINCO Prince Charles

Mortgage Centre celebrates
years of service with
a creative twist.

REC ARCO Prince Charles Mortgage Centre is proud to mark it fourth anniversary by sponsoring
the REC Summer Art Workshog, Far 30 years the workshop has expoded young Bahamians
to the broader world of art and to working artists. Working with and leaming from established,
professional artists from The Bahamas and beyond provides an environment charged with
creativity and promise—a promise that has bed many to sucoessful camors, Art is a powerhl
toal for leaming that enhances critical thinking, communication skills and cultural awamnmss.
Ar RBC FING we are proud to support it.

RAC FINCO Prince Charles Mortgage Cente extends great appreciation to all of our clients
and business associates who have partnered with us ower the years,

The branch is open on weekdays from aa:ooam - 7200pm with additional hours on Saturdays
from 14:00am = 3:00pm,

Pictured feces lefts Ederard Strachan, Manoger, Mortgages, REE FINCO Prince Chokes Mortgage Center;
Palrice Richie, Sankar Manages, Mortgages, REC FICO; Pamela Chaneber, Education OMe - Ar & Design,
Ministry of Education.

CRT MUL mame lt me). del tt Ce



| RBC FINCO





Felipé Major/Tribune staff



rt

LATRELL LEWIS holds a picture of her son Kilano Capron



Mother desperately
seeking funds for
hit-and-run baby

FROM page one

The impact pushed the truck,
occupied by Ms Lewis and fam-
ily, off the road and onto a wall,
causing Kilano to fall from his
car seat onto the floor.

Ms Lewis’ mother pulled her
unconscious daughter and
grandson from the smoking
wreck while the two thieves fled
the scene on foot.

Rather than risk waiting for
an ambulance, police officers
transported the severely injured
and presumed dead infant to
Princess Margaret Hospital.
There, doctors told Ms Lewis
that her son had “a one out of
ten chances” for survival.

Later Ms Lewis would learn
that the S10 truck that hit her
was reported stolen two hours
after the accident. It’s owner
was in Eleuthera and had lent
the car to his nephews.

Kilano spent the next three
weeks in hospital, suffering
from a broken leg, swollen
heart, and lung and internal
bleeding in his skull.

Diagnosed with cystic
encephalomalacia, “legal retar-
dation” according to his mother,
he had to be referred to a neu-
ro-developmental facility out-
side of the Bahamas.

Kilano and his family travel
to Joe Dimaggio Children’s
Hospital in Miami, Florida
every six weeks for checkups — if
not sooner.

In April, he spent 14 days at
the Miami hospital. He had to
have a feeding tube inserted
because food was travelling to
his lungs instead of his stom-
ach.

Ms Lewis was a part of a gov-
ernment temporary employ-
ment programme that ended
last month.

She will have to wait six
months before Kilano can do
another swallow test to deter-
mine whether or not he can
begin eating on his own again.

Although the family’s med-
ical insurance covers 80 per cent
of the baby’s medical fees, the
insurance company is still
querying Kilano’s fees and have
yet to make any payments to
the hospital.

Additionally, the medical
insurance does not cover cost
for flights, hotel rooms and spe-
cialists that do not accept insur-
ance — like Kilano’s gastroen-
terologist.

Born healthy and without any
complications, Kilano will have
to undergo an intense series of
therapy for his physical and
mental development. And as he
gets older his chances for a full
recovery lessens.

With no recourse available
and at their wit’s end, the fami-
ly finally decided to break their
silence over the issue. They had
been convinced there was no
hope because of their lack of
insurance, however friends and
legal advisers suggested they
shouldn’t let the matter be dis-
missed.

In an effort to raise funds, the
family will be hosting a gospel
explosion tonight at Bahamas
Harvest Church, Prince Charles
Drive at 7 pm. Any financial
contribution, legal advice or
support would be greatly appre-
ciated, persons can contact
Latrell Lewis for details at 448-
9180.

Pastor reportedly considers
Suing ZNS for defamation

FROM page one

















Baptist Church on East and Shirley Streets, is currently engaged in
legal proceedings stemming from an originating summons filed by
the Zion United Baptist Convention calling for an audit of the
church’s finances over nine years.

But a report about the legal proceedings televised by ZNS was
inaccurate and libellous, according to Rev Morrison’s attorney J
Henry Bostwick who obtained a transcript of the television report
yesterday.

“What they (ZNS) said is totally unfounded and in my view,
libellous,” Mr Bostwick said.

“We are going to have to take ZNS to task.”

However, Mr Bostwick did not offer comment on the current sta-
tus of the case.

The Supreme Court summons obtained by The Tribune yester-
day includes seven claims against Rev Morrison filed on August 26,
2009.

Zion United Baptist Convention claims Rev Morrison failed to
have the finances of the church audited and the results reported to
the general membership of the Church, and that this constitutes a
breach of Zion Baptist Church’s Constitution.

The summons further declares the purported election and selec-
tion of a new Trustee Board in December 2008, is ultra vires,
“beyond the powers”, of the Constitution of the Zion Baptist
Church.

The Convention calls for the court to appoint a certified public
accountant to audit the books and finances of the church for the
period 2001 to 2009, and for Rev Morrison, the purported newly-
elected Trustee Board, and other officers of the Church, to co-oper-
ate fully with the court appointed accountant in the execution of his
duty.

Tine further orders detailed in the summons call for a new elec-
tion of members of the Board of Trustees to be conducted and
supervised by the Zion United Baptist Convention under the
direction of the court; for further and other relief and directions as
the court sees just, and that the costs be provided for by the defen-
dant, Rev Morrison.

Calls to Rev Morrison, Zion United Baptist Convention pres-
ident Bishop Samuel Green, and attorney for the Zion United Bap-
tist Convention Sidney Collie, were not returned before The Tri-
bune went to press.

The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB) and ZNS
general manager Edwin Lightbourne declined to comment.





in

ee

JUNE



v TRIBUNE
FRIDAY,

18, 2010

FAMILY GUARDIAN



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net













By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE $16 million South-
west Shopping Plaza is
already 50 per cent leased, it
was revealed at yesterday’s
groundbreaking, and con-
struction could be complete -
and the complex ready for
occupancy - by the 2011 sec-
ond quarter, its principal
developer said yesterday.

Larry Treco, head of CGT
Construction, said the plaza
was expected to be one of the
largest retail complexes in
New Providence, with one of
the most upscale facades and
properly planned parking,



BREAKING GROUND — Shown (lI-r) are Mr Maynard, Dr Minnis, Larry Treco, John Treco, PM Hubert
Ingraham, Angela Treco and Wesley Treco...

Photos by Peter Ramsey

$16m project 50% leased

Multi-million shopping complex targets 2011
Q2 construction finish, with tenants set to
include Marco’s Pizza and Burger King





PRESS members speak with PM

entrances and exits.

He added that the 11.5
acre property at the north-
west corner of Carmichael
and Blue Hill roads was cho-

sen because it is one of the
fastest growing urban areas
on the island, and he and his
partners saw the need for a
proper shopping outlet.
“We think that we have
some very good tenants who
are seasoned retailers, and
we seek to get quality ten-
ants,” he said. “People have
to start up but we don’t want
a high turnover, so we think
we have some good, solid

SEE page 4B







INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





Bahamas tops region’s
urban unemployment

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas has

the highest urban

unemployment

rate in the

Caribbean region,
a joint report by the Interna-
tional Labour Organisation
(ILO) and a United Nations
(UN) body has revealed, caus-
ing one leading business exec-
utive to yesterday suggest this
nation was paying for its “folly”
in failing to diversify the econ-
omy.

Responding to findings that
pegged the Bahamas’ urban
unemployment rate at 12.4 per
cent at end-2009, compared to
11.3 per cent for Jamaica and 10
per cent for Barbados, Brian
Nutt, the Bahamas Employers
Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident, told Tribune Business
that this nation still “may have
not seen the worst of it” with
more companies preparing for
lay-offs.

While expressing surprise
that the Bahamas was “the
highest in the Caribbean” when
it came to urban unemploy-
ment, a figure that would
include most of its population
given the focus on Nassau and
Freeport, Mr Nutt estimated
that it would take a further 12-

* Nation suffering 12.4% urban unemployment rate,
ahead of Jamaica and Barbados, prompting BECon
chief to suggest paying for ‘folly’ in failing to diversify

* Warns Bahamas ‘may not have seen the
worst’ of unemployment, warning three
more firms carrying out lay-offs

* Suggests make take 12-18 months to get Bahamian
unemployment ‘back to acceptable levels’

18 months for this nation to see
unemployment start retreating
back to acceptable levels.

“T, of course, knew what the
Government’s figures were, but
would have thought that some
of the other Caribbean coun-
tries would have been higher
than us,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business. “The fact we’re the
highest is surprising, and does
not bode very well for us.

“It comes back to, I guess,
how hard we’ve been impacted
by this economic downturn.
Most of our eggs are in one bas-
ket, the tourism industry, so I
would imagine that although
the other Caribbean countries
are looking at growing tourism,
they’re much more diversified
than ourselves as far as the
economy goes.”

The joint ILO/Economic
Commission for Latin America

Fixed income’s ‘big appetite’ $30m public debt saving if rate cut

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A LEADING investment banker yes-
terday told Tribune Business that the
demand among Bahamian retail
investors for initial public offerings
(IPOs) was still questionable, although
there was “a big appetite” for fixed-
income securities due to declining bank
deposit rates.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity
Merchant Bank & Trust’s president,
said: “That’s a big appetite in the market
for fixed income securities. The banks
have been dropping deposit rates rela-
tive to liquidity in the system.”

With surplus liquidity (the amount of
available assets in the commercial bank-
ing sector for onward lending purpos-
es) standing at around $600 million cur-

BEC ‘a runaway train’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Attorney for $105m power
plant opponents questions

Deposit rate pressure raises attraction
for bonds, preference shares

rently, there has been downward pres-
sure on deposit rates, Mr Anderson say-
ing that rates which may have been 5.5
per cent six months ago may now be 4.5
per cent.

In a bid to achieve a greater return on
their funds, Mr Anderson said institu-
tional and retail investors were seeing
the average 7.5 per cent interest coupon
being offered by fixed income securi-
ties, such as bonds and preference
shares, as very attractive.

“There’s a fair amount of appetite
around,” he added. “There’s also a fair
amount of money sitting in bank

SEE page 4B

FEEL Good ABOUT

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net



IF GOVERNMENT lowers the
Bahamian prime rate by 0.5-1 per cent it
could save $30 million per year in inter-
est payments on its Bahamian dollar
debt, a former MP and minister said yes-
terday, lamenting that both the FNM
and PLP governments have not had
proper ministers of finance in the posi-
tion over the years.

Tennyson Wells, speaking at the
Rotary Club of West Nassau’s weekly
meeting, said successive governments
have not made the necessary changes to
fiscal and monetary policy that would
directly benefit Bahamians and the econ-
omy, and owed the oversight to the lack
of economists and people who under-

Ex-Minister and MP calls for
‘proper’ Ministers of Finance

stand business in government.

“Unfortunately, I think those person
who have been running government for
the past 25 years or so really don’t
understand the economy of this coun-
try and what will make it tick,” said Mr
Wells.

“They should get some persons to be
Minister of Finance who at least under-
stand something about business and eco-
nomic,s and how the economy works -
study, think about it and what can be
done to improve it.”

Mr Wells said government’s cutting
the Prime Rate would, in effect, keep

SEE page 4B

Bahama’ Health

Your HEALTHPLAN



THE Bahamas
Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC)
has been accused
of behaving like
“a runaway |
train” over pub- |
lic consultation
and permitting
for the $105 mil-
lion Wilson City
power plant, an
attorney for the project’s oppo-
nents questioning whether the
Government would have
allowed a private developer to
proceed in a similar fashion.

Fred Smith QC, attorney and
partner at Callender’s & Co, in
trial submissions filed with, and
read out, in the Supreme Court
in Freeport, said all key deci-
sions taken in relation to the
new Abaco power plant’s con-
struction had been “taken in
secret” - especially in autumn
2009, when construction began
in earnest.

In addition, Mr Smith alleged
that BEC had failed to consult
interested parties on the
planned use of Bunker C fuel at
Wilson City, despite the fact
that consultants hired by his
clients, Responsible Develop-
ment for Abaco (RDA), had
calculated it would cost an extra
$3.823 million per annum for
the state-owned Corporation to
use this fuel as opposed to
Automotive Diesel Oil (ADO).

“The NTH report compar-
ing the cost of using Bunker C
fuel at the Wilson City power
plant with diesel fuel costs con-
cludes that it will cost an extra
$3.823 million per year in capi-
tal and operating costs if the
plant uses Bunker C fuel, some-
thing that would make this fuel
far more expensive than
diesel,” Mr Smith alleged.

“While diesel would be more



whether government
would have allowed
private developer to
proceed as state-owned
power company did

* Claims use of ADO fuel,
which BEC has conceded,
will save more than
$3m per annum

* Accuses corporation
of making decisions
‘on the hoof’

expensive to purchase, costing
more than $21 million a year,
the additional capital and oper-
ating costs, combined with the
need to desulpherise the
Bunker C exhaust gases, would
make the latter anywhere from
$300,000 to $1.1 million more
expensive per annum.

“The Bunker C Report also
makes clear that once the min-
imum necessary emissions con-
trol systems are in place,
Bunker C actually turns out to
be more expensive than diesel.
The only way in which Bunker
C is cheaper is if corners are
cut on environmental stan-
dards.”

Mr Smith alleged that BEC
had never produced estimates
to show why Bunker C was the
best cost option, adding that
proper consultation with his
clients and other Abaco stake-
holders would have “fully
explored” this issue and
allowed the best choice to be
made.

Referring at an affidavit sub-
mitted by Kermit McCartney,
BEC’s Family Island project

SEE page 4B

with your he

nday at 396-1300 <=> [J

T | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STE

h

and the Caribbean (ECLAC)
study, using what it said were
national statistics that includ-
ed “hidden unemployment”,
showed that urban unemploy-
ment in the Bahamas had risen
markedly in 2009, growing from
8.7 per cent at 2008 year-end
to 12.4 per cent at the end of
2009 - a rise of some 3.7 per-
centage points.

This level, not surprisingly
given the recession’s severity,
was the highest for a decade,
surpassing the 10.8 per cent and
10.2 per cent urban unemploy-
ment rates seen by the
Bahamas in 2003 and 2005
respectively. The current urban
unemployment levels is more
than five percentage points
above the 6.9 per cent decade-
low experienced in 2001.

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
fromthe dailyrepor, —









[ customized group &

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Celebrating 90 years of service to the Bahamas.





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



=~) =
Teachers to learn about
careers, opportunities
in tourism sector

BHA’s educator internship begins June 28

SOME 100 Bahamian teach-
ers will spend a week in the
tourism industry this summer
to learn about the range of
careers and business opportu-
nities, and how to better pre-
pare young people for them.

The initiative is part of the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
seventh annual Summer Edu-
cator Internship Programme,
beginning on June 28, in col-
laboration with the Ministry of
Education, the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation and the
College of the Bahamas’
(COB) Culinary Hospitality
Management Institute.

Public and private school
teachers, principals, counsellors
and subject specialists will join
with Bahamian business part-
ners to get a hands-on “snap-
shot” of the tourism industry,
and better understand how crit-
ical their roles are in preparing
the workforce to make a mean-
ingful difference in this nation’s
largest industry.

“We are thrilled to be able
to once again create this oppor-
tunity to strengthen and build
on the relationship we have
with the Ministry of Education
and educators throughout the
Bahamas. While tourism is the

lifeblood of our economy,
teachers are its soul, who touch
and influence our potential
employees in profound ways,”
said Beverly Saunders, chair-
person of workforce develop-
ment at the Bahamas Hotel
Association. With more than
1,000 job classifications within
the tourism industry in the
Bahamas, and countless entre-
preneurial possibilities, the
internship programme presents
a key development opportunity
for educators to enhance their
understanding of the industry.

The internship programme
will be held on Grand Bahama
later in the summer. About 50
teachers participated last year
and organisers expect to exceed
that number this year.

The private sector is partici-
pating at several levels, con-
ducting workshops and a ‘con-
versation with industry leaders’
on the opening day. About 15
hotels and tourism-related busi-
nesses will operate as place-
ment and training sites for
interns for three days, and the
internship experience will finish
with a final-day feedback and

brainstorming session on
strengthening the partnership
between education and indus-
try.

The BHA’s workforce devel-
opment manager, Bridget Mur-
ray, said: “We are delighted to
be celebrating our seventh year
of internships for our educa-
tors.

“We applaud the more than
600 educators who have invest-
ed in their time and profes-
sional development over the
summer to learn how to better
connect tourism to their school
experience. Having worked
with our educators over the
years, we are assured from their
comments and commitment to
the programme that they have
benefited tremendously from
the exposure”.

The programme has evolved
over the years to include more
properties and allied businesses,
as well as teachers participat-
ing in the one-week immersion.

“We are indebted to our host
properties, and take this oppor-
tunity to encourage others to
join us in hosting our esteemed
educators,” adds Ms Murray.

Domino’s Pizza to open 10th
store in Coral Harbour

DOMINO’S Pizza yesterday confirmed it will
open its 10th Bahamian store at the new Coral
Harbour Shopping Centre in August, creating
some 25 badly-needed jobs.

The outlet, which will be located in the plaza
west of the Coral Harbour Roundabout, will
enable the pizza chain, which is owned by BISX-
listed AML Foods, to better serve customers in
western New Providence - covering areas such as
Bacardi Road, Coral Harbour, Adelaide, South
Ocean, Mount Pleasant and Lyford Cay.

Domino’s added that the new store’s addition
would enable it to reconfigure its existing stores

at Carmichael and Cable Beach, improving ser-
vice.

“We are constantly listening to feedback from
our customers. Based on this we saw the need to
open a new location in the west, and we are
pleased to be able to meet their demands,” said
Shervin Stuart, executive vice-president of AML
Foods, with responsibility for Domino’s opera-
tions.

“Opening our 10th store is a milestone that
we are looking forward to. Our goal is to continue
to develop a loyal customer following by deliv-
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THE TRIBUNE

Shipping output mixed

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 3B

VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

despite Miami ‘records’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

INTERNATIONAL ship-
ping from South Florida ports
has seen an 18 per cent increase
that could hit record highs this
year, according to a recent Mia-
mi Herald article, which cites
the Bahamas as one of the des-
tinations that could set record
trade with Miami as a result.

However, Tropical Shipping
told Tribune Business yester-
day that it had not seen a sig-
nificant increase in shipping
volumes to the Bahamas.

“We have not seen any
noticeable change in the
Bahamas’ market volumes,”
said Tropical Shipping
spokesperson Mary Udry.

Oralee Deveaux, inside sales
coordinator for Seaboard
Marine, said that through last
year her company had
increased its client base despite
the recession, and thus enjoyed
an increase in shipping vol-
umes.

According to her, Seaboard
made a marginal reduction in
its rates, attracting competitors’
customers, and leaned on its
“dedicated” customer service.
She said the shipping company
has a 24-hour sales centre,
something the competition does
not.

The Miami Herald article
touted Miami’s $39.2 billion
first quarter results, saying
exports increased by more than
14 per cent, while imports
increased 26.2 per cent.

According to the article, Mia-
mi area ports could set new
records in trade this year, due
in great part it seems to multi-
million dollar shipping increas-
es to Haiti, which was struck
by a devastating earthquake in
January.

“Countries on track to set
new records for total trade with
the Miami district this year
include the Bahamas, Chile,
China, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Ecuador, Haiti, Panama,
Paraguay, Peru, Mexico and
Switzerland,” said Ken Roberts,
president of WorldCity, a Coral
Gables media company that
analyses US census numbers to
spot local trade trends.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
also saw strong export numbers
last year and in the 2010 first

quarter.

“Throughout the recession
we have gotten new clients,”
she said. “We give good cus-
tomer service and some of our
rates might be higher, but some
people believe more in good
customer service.”

In February, Tropical Ship-
ping reported declines of 30
per cent to the Bahamas and
wider Caribbean, forcing the
closure of the company’s port
of Palm Beach warehouse.

The closure caused the loss
of 35-40 jobs in the US. How-
ever, Tropical Shipping report-
ed no significant reductions in
staffing.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
had not made any cuts to staff
through in 2009 or in the first
half of 2010.

Canada deal offers ‘double tax’ benefit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Bahamas yesterday signed its 22nd
Tax Information Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with Canada, as Tribune Business
revealed exclusively this week, the deal
containing a clause that, just as this news-
paper predicted, places it on an equal foot-
ing with Barbados in terms of 'double tax’
benefits.

Brent Symonette, minister of foreign
affairs, confirmed that the Canada TIEA
contained a clause that the dividend profits
of Canadian companies based in the
Bahamas would not be taxed upon repa-
triation back home.

Several financial services industry ser-
vices had previously told Tribune Business
that if the final TIEA agreement stuck to
initial drafts seen last year, then the deal
with Canada was one of the best for this
country in terms of providing reciprocal
economic/trade benefits.

These sources told this newspaper that
the proposed Canadian TIEA they had
seen offered to place the Bahamas on an
equal footing with Barbados, effectively
giving it a ‘double taxation’ treaty with
Ottawa without entering a formalised
arrangement.

Currently, major Canadian-owned banks,
especially FirstCaribbean, have their
regional headquarters domiciled in Barba-

dos, largely because
of that nation's 'dou-
ble tax' treaty with
their homeland. The
treaty ensures their
profits are only taxed
once - at the lower
Barbadian rate -
rather than at the
higher Canadian
thresholds, and has
acted as a major draw
for Canadian compa-
nies seeking to do business in the region to
establish their bases there.

"Canada had proffered an agreement
last year that was more attractive than any-
one else's," one Bahamian financial indus-
try source told Tribune Business yester-
day, "so I hope they go with that.

"If the agreement is signed as it was
offered, as it was on the table, in 2009, we
are treated as having double taxation
[rights] even though we do not have an
agreement, so we will be in the same posi-
tion as Barbados. We'd get the same sort of
treatment when the Canadian-owned banks
repatriate their profits back home."

Another highly-placed Bahamian finan-
cial services executive confirmed to Tri-
bune Business: "I understand that the
TIEA with Canada was suppose to be one
of the better ones. "We have a double tax-
ation treaty, in effect, but also there was

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Reconcilation of bank accounts

Reconciliation of intercompany accounts

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Minimum requirements / qualifications:

¢ Accounting degree and/or practical experience in a prior job

Willingness to work and learn

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HUMAN RESOURCES

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
June 25", 2010 to:

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going to be an exchange of other things -
know how, and opportunities for Bahami-
an businesses to do business with Canadian
businesses. Certainly, there was a market
for Bahamian goods and services."

Yet the executive added: "T understand it
would be a good one, but until I see the
final signed document I just don't know. It's
just that in the art of negotiations, some
things fall away and others don't.

"This one has been talked about for quite
a while, and because of the linkages with
Canada, universities and other things,
everyone is waiting to see this one."

The Canada TIEA is also likely to have
linkages with current trade talks taking
place between Ottawa on the one hand,
and the Bahamas and CARICOM on the
other, over a replacement trade agreement
for CARIBCAN that would be WTO-com-
pliant.

The Bahamas has been a key destina-
tion for Canadian foreign direct investment
(FDI), especially in sectors such as banking,
tourism and construction, while a Canadi-
an firm, Vancouver Airport Services
(Y VRAS), is managing the transformation
of Lynden Pindling International Airport
(LPIA).

On the reverse, Canada remains an
important market for Bahamian exports
such as crawfish, while many Bahamians
receive their tertiary education at Canadi-
an colleges and universities.

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

TheApplicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.
and

Key job functions

include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands
Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.



JOB OPPORTUNITY

Marketing Manager

The successful candidate must possess the following:

« A creative thinker with a knack for advertising and a history of creating

big ideas.

A proven track record of driving sales and significant organizational

impact.

Must be adaptable toa changing, fast-pa ced environment.

Able to deal with a variety of personalities and situations with energy

and enthusiasm.

Able to work in a culture/environment that promotes an entrepreneu-
rial spirit and a “let's get it done now" attitude,
Focus on possibilities rather than problems.

Strong customer orientation.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
« Develop and execute effective local marketing plans that support

annual key initiatives.

Lead efforts to effectively plan, execute, measure and evaluate local

market achvities.

Direct media planning and graphic design.

Establish and cultivate PR/media relationships.

Develop and Manage budgets.

Customer Relations and management of complaint process.

Build community goodwill and manage relationships with influential

organizations

Serve as the local steward of the brand, ensuring all local marketing

activities are aligned with established brand standards,

REQUIREMENTS:

« Bachelors degree in Communications, Marketing or a closely related

field or equivalent work experience,

« Minimum five vears professional related experience

COMPETITIVE SALARY & ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.

Send résumé to: marketingmanagerwanted@gmiail.com

Deadline fora

plication is Wednesda

une 28th, 2010



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



= S
Bahamas Electricity Corporation ‘a runaway train’

FROM page 1B

manager, on March 30, 2010, Mr Smith
alleged that the power producer had
made a complete u-turn and was now
proposing to use ADO as Wilson
City’s fuel rather than Bunker C.

Based on this evidence, the QC
claimed: “It is apparent that BEC is
making fundamental decisions affect-
ing this plant on the hoof.” Acknowl-
edging that his clients were not unhap-
py about BEC’s volte face, Mr Smith
added: “Without looking a gift horse in
the mouth, however, this seemingly
arbitrary decision making process is
precisely what the applicants complain
of.

“They cannot be sure that without
protective court orders BEC may
revert to Heavy Fuel Oil. In addition,
this is not simply a BEC decision. It is
one which must be permitted by the

relevant statutory authority.”

Meanwhile, Mr Smith alleged that
BEC and the Government had pre-
sented the power plant project as a
“done deal” in the only Town Meeting
held on it, in September 2009. He
claimed they then “scurried away” to
obtain the various construction
approvals and permits required after
being unable to confirm publicly that
all these were in place, and after build-
ing work had already begun.

To further support his allegation
“that BEC is a runaway train”, Mr
Smith claimed that the Corporation
was using two real estate parcels for
the project - one 50 acres in size,
another 25 acres - despite this land not
being formally granted to it by the
Crown respectively. The larger land
parcel is supposed to have been con-
veyed to it, the latter leased.

“Despite the appearance of attempt-
ed compliance with regulatory author-
ities, despite the appearance of regu-
latory authorities purporting to exer-
cise some supervision and control,
BEC is proceeding with construction
and operation of the plant in complete
disregard of due process or even
attempted observance of attempted
regulatory control or oversight,” Mr
Smith alleged.

“Unfortunately, because this is a
public corporation the relevant author-
ities have turned a blind eye to this
behaviour. One only has to posit the
question: “If BEC were not a public
corporation doing the will of the exec-
utive branch of government, would all
of the relevant authorities permit a
private company to embark upon and
construct and proceed to operate a
project in this fashion?’”

Mr Smith alleged that the Wilson
City plant was being constructed adja-
cent to a community that held “the
largest concentration of renewable
energy users in the Bahamas”, and
questioned whether BEC had ever
seriously explored the use of renew-
able energy on Abaco as an alterna-
tive.

The trial, which is being held before
Justice Hartman Longley, has been
adjourned so that attorneys acting for
BEC and the Government can file
revised trial submissions by June 15,
2010. The hearings are due to resume
on July 9 and July 16.

Mr Smith alleged that the Govern-
ment and BEC would petition the
court not to grant RDA the relief it
was seeking because the Wilson City
plant was now more than 80 per cent
complete.

While it now seemed impractical for
the Wilson City power plant to be relo-
cated elsewhere, Mr Smith said RDA
was now seeking a Supreme Court
order requiring that consultation “may
now take place even at this late stage”
to ensure its views on fuel type and
other issues were accounted for.

“Unfortunately, given that BEC is
effectively an arm of the executive,
this incestuous relationship has
deprived the applicants and the public
in general in the Bahamas of the super-
vision and protection of the rule of
law, which the regulatory authorities
would have guarded if BEC was a pri-
vate development company,” Mr
Smith alleged.

“The result is that the applicants are
pitted against, not only BEC but also
the authorities that in fact should be on
RDA’s side. Not against it! “

Bahamas tops region’s urban unemployment

FROM page 1B

Describing current unem-
ployment levels as “‘a very seri-
ous problem”, Mr Nutt added:
“T think that, unfortunately,
there are certain companies
right now that are in the
process of doing lay-offs. It may
be that we have not seen the
worst of it.

“I know there of three com-
panies right now that are doing
lay-offs. I’m hoping that as
some companies are still in the
process of doing lay-offs, some
companies will be able to start
picking up. Yet I see this as tak-
ing 12-18 months to get us back
to ‘acceptable’ unemployment
rates.”

Mr Nutt and Obie Ferguson,
the Trades Union Congress
(TUC) president and labour
attorney, both found common
ground in telling Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that many
Bahamian companies were like-
ly to delay hiring back - or tak-
ing on - new staff to start grow-
ing again as they needed to
regain losses suffered during
the past two years of economic
contraction.

“It’s very bad,” Mr Ferguson
said of the Bahamas’ unem-
ployment rate, “and looks like
it’s going to get worse before
it gets better. Most of the hotels
are working managers two and
three days a week, that type of

thing.

“Even though things are
picking up a bit, companies are
still trying to recoup some of
the money they’ve lost in the
last couple of years before they
start hiring again.”

Mr Ferguson also expressed
surprise that the Bahamas had
the highest urban unemploy-
ment rate in the Caribbean,
telling Tribune Business that
this might be related to the
ECLAC/ILO survey account-
ing for the numerous undocu-
mented workers in the Bahami-
an labour force.

And Mr Nutt added: “I think
Bahamians generally started to
take it for granted that we were

always going to do well, and
that’s proven not to be the case.
It’s a situation right now, look-
ing at how we have the highest
unemployment rate in the
Caribbean, we are paying for
our folly.”

Apart from overspending
and taking on too much debt,
Mr Nutt said this also related to
the Bahamas’ failure to diver-
sify its economy beyond one
that was largely still reliant on
banking and tourism.

While diversification would
be almost impossible to achieve
in a recessionary environment,
the BECon president told Tri-
bune Business this needed to
be explored as soon as recovery

Fixed income’s ‘big appetite’

FROM page 1B

deposits, so if we get good deals
like the dock [Arawak Cay
port], they’ll be very attractive
to the market.” RoyalFidelity
has won the contract to act as
the placement agent/financial
adviser to the $65 million port
project, which could be look-
ing to raise up to $30 million in
financing via a preference share
or bond issue.

Mr Anderson, though, hada
different outlook on equities.
There had been no ‘true’ [POs
in the Bahamas since 2001, and
there was “still a reasonable
amount of selling pressure”
among stocks listed on the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX).

This was happening despite
the Bahamian stock market
having “bottomed out” in Octo-

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POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Concierge for Office Building
Candidate must have excellent
customer service skills, and be

computer

literate.

Must have

experience in a customer service

related

role. Candidate should

be well groomed, mature and

self-motivated.

Security Officer for
Office Building
Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and
have excellent verbal and written
communication skills. Candidate
must be willing to work weekends
and extended hours and have own

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Interested

applicants

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The Tribune,

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Nassau, Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



ber 2009, then “bumping along
the bottom for six to nine
months”.

“T believe the market is more
set for recovery,” Mr Ander-
son told Tribune Business,
adding that the selling pressure
was likely being generated by
Bahamian retail investors who
needed to raise money because
of economic difficulties.

“T think people are still under
a lot of employment pressure,
cost related issues at home,” he
added. “A lot of people are
struggling at home with the
economy.”

Apart from the Arawak Cay
port, impending IPOs include
the potential $60-$65 million
offering of a 25 per cent stake
in the Commonwealth Brew-
ery/Burns House group, which
the company is hoping to place
before year-end. Other poten-
tial IPOs include one for the














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a =
r
r

‘

Real Estate

Aa a

Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway dump, as the reces-
sion forces both the Govern-
ment and some businesses to
contemplate actions they would
otherwise have not done or
delayed indefinitely.

“There’s a possibility of IPOs
coming to market and being
fairly successful. ’'m not sure
what the appetite for IPOs is,
but there is appetite for fixed
income,” Mr Anderson told
Tribune Business.

“There’s a kind of latent IPO
appetite, but ’'m not sure. The
economy, in terms of equities, is
still a bit weak, but a good IPO
will sell. Institutions have a rea-
sonable amount of money to
invest, and there’s not a lot
coming to market. There’s a
greater amount of money sit-
ting in institutional hands than
there was seven to eight months
ago.”

Fr en oes ee

GENERAL MANAGER
OF MARKETING AND OPERATIONS

FLO Bahamas 1s looking to employ a general
Manager of marketing arid operations

Those individuals applying will need to demonstrate
the following experience and credentials:

e Must have worked withing the marketing sector of
the fly fishing travel industry for a minimum of ten

years.

¢ Should be abe to demonstrate a successful track
record in Sportfishing marketing and vacation sales.
Existing long term relationship with the major fly
fishing booking agents in North America and Europe.
Should have experience in teaching and hosting fly

fishing schools

Should have long term and well established client
base built around reputation of offering world class

Sportfishing holidays.

¢ Competent computer skills

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the marketing of International Fly Fishing travel.

Salary and benefits will be in line with experience
and qualifications. Please send a current résumé
and associate documentation to: HzO Bahamas,
P.O. Box 60-266, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

took hold, and “what more we
can do, what we can do differ-
ently to put some meat on our
economy”.

Given the Bahamas’ rela-
tively small population and
spread out geography, Mr Nutt
said freight costs were high and
it was difficult to achieve
economies of scale.

He added that it needed to
be an international services
provider, and told Tribune
Business he had hoped that this
nation would have used the
past decade to become a “mec-
ca” for the Internet, focusing
on areas such as web page
design.

Just as the Bahamas used
sun, sand and sea to lure
tourists, Mr Nutt said it needed
to use the same to attract com-
panies that could base them-
selves anywhere in the world.

“Another area we can look
at is providing the services of
education, tertiary education,
with people coming from the
rest of the Caribbean,” Mr Nutt
said, adding that there had been
some movement on medical
education and tourism.

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour, yesterday said he want-
ed to withhold comment on the
ILO/ECLAC report because
he had not seen it.

$16m project 50% leased

FROM page 1B

tenants.”

According to Mr Treco, they

hope to entice a bank to move into one of the available spaces, but
those plans are still in on the table.

He said some of the tenants who have already entered into
agreements are Shoe Village, Burger King, Marco’s Pizza, Outdoor
Sportsman, Fashion Hall, Body Beautiful, Dairy Queen and anchor
store Commonwealth Building Supplies.

“We are speaking to a few others that are interested at this
point but they haven’t signed,” said Mr Treco. “These are people

we have deposits from.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who attended the ground-
breaking ceremony, said the erection of the plaza proves that
Bahamian investor interest is still peaking, especially in the south-

west area of New Providence.

“It’s good to see Bahamians putting their money where our

mouths are,” said Mr Ingraham.

He lauded the Treco family for being significant contributors to
the Bahamian economy over the years.

According to Mr Treco, now was a good time to start the project
as the economy begins to rebound and consumers regain their

confidence.

“We think the economy is about to turn around and we have
seen indications of it, so we feel confident that this is the time,” he
said. “I think that by the time we get this completed we will have

a much stronger economy.”

$30m public debt
saving if rate cut

FROM page 1B

dollars that would normally be
repatriated by banks whose
headquartered are in other
countries, here in the Bahamas.

He also suggested govern-
ment cut interest rates to
encourage borrowing and spur
small business growth, espe-
cially in the agriculture, fishing
and light manufacturing indus-
tries.

Mr Wells said that when it
comes to doing business, poli-
tics should have no part except
to positively support it. And
seasoned business people have

to step up and speak out against
any government that would vic-
itmise businesses for their own-
ers speaking out against gov-
ernment policy.

“There ought to be some
think-tanks, people who under-
stand the economy and under-
stand business, called into to
give the appropriate advice to
the Minister of Finance,” said
Mr Wells. “Because the last two
ministers of finance, they don’t
know anything about business.
I don’t know why the Prime
Ministers think they have to be
ministers of finance.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WARM WIND SECURITIES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 16th day
of June, 2010. The Liquidator is BdS Corporate
Services Limited, George House, George Street,
P.O. Box N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas.

BdS Corporate Services Ltd.
(Liquidator)

To advertise, call
502-2371





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 5B



BFSB unveils financial services’ future Vision

By the Bahamas Financial
Services Board

THE Bahamas government
and the financial services indus-
try have a long history as
engaged partners. This part-
nership has facilitated the
development of the industry,
providing high-paying employ-
ment opportunities for Bahami-
ans and establishing a modern
platform for integrating the
Bahamas into the global finan-
cial system.

Public-private partnership
continues to be evident in the
consultation process that has
taken place to arrive at a Vision
that is now the guiding force
for the industry. The Vision
positions the Bahamas for the
transformation occurring in the
industry, and gives rise to a cer-
tain set of actions required to
secure and maintain this status:

The Vision is thus: “The
Bahamas is a globally competi-
tive international business juris-
diction for private wealth man-
agement, international invest-
ment into the Americas and
emerging markets and residen-
cy for high net worth individu-
als and families, creating high
value jobs and business oppor-
tunities on a sustainable basis.”

“To sustain our leadership in
wealth management, the
Bahamas must not only serve
wealthy clients in every aspect
of the asset management and
protection business,” said Sen-
ator John Delaney, Attorney
General and minister of legal
affairs. “Moreover, the
Bahamas must respond to the
fast-changing dynamics of inter-
national wealth management
and global business, where to
be competitive in the future a

WENDY WARREN

sustained high quality of invest-
ment services and associated
expertise is crucial to the
nation's success. This strategy
statement provides the right
framework.”

Both the Government and
the private sector recognise that
to ensure this vision is fully
understood, attention must be
paid to four key components.

* To be globally competitive,
the Bahamas must serve the
needs of private and corporate
entities by providing a superior
legal, fiscal and regulatory foun-
dation. It must also minimise
risk, effort, time and cost to
clients, whether they are pri-
vate wealth managers or
regional capital investors.

* To be a leader in wealth
management, the Bahamas
must serve wealthy clients in
every aspect of the asset man-
agement and protection busi-
ness.

* To attract international
investment, the Bahamas must

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MICHAEL GORDON
CLARE of Rosena Drive off Faith Gardens, P.O. Box
N-SP 60495, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my
name to MARCIAN MICHAEL BETHEL. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.









ZHIVARGO LAING

provide a favourable jurisdic-
tion for locating and servicing
of operational subsidiaries and
assets of corporate entities
wishing to undertake business
or make private capital invest-
ment in the Americas and
emerging markets.

* To facilitate residency for
clients requires accentuating
and marketing the quality
lifestyle offering of the
Bahamas, continuing to stream-
line immigration procedures
and defining and targeting ben-
efits for high net worth individ-
uals through their presence in
the Bahamas.

There are 10 identified areas
of opportunity that can be sup-
ported through the Vision, and
whose potential should be
viewed from an integrated per-
spective.

1. Private Wealth Manage-
ment

2. International Insurance

3. Fund Management and
Administration

JOHN DELANEY

4. Private Equity

5. Corporate Headquarters
(international companies with a
physical presence)

6. E-commerce/Data Services

7. Arbitration Centre

8. International Maritime
Services (Yacht Registry)

9. International Aviation Ser-
vices (Aircraft Registry)

10. Fulfillment Centre
(Freeport Air/Sea Port)

“The country and the indus-
try both stand to benefit from
the realisation of our Vision,”
said minister of state for
finance, Zhivargo Laing. The
benefits to a holistic approach
to growing the various interna-
tional business sectors include:

* Sustaining and growing the
existing financial services con-
tribution to the economy.

* Promoting overall eco-
nomic growth within the coun-
try.

* Creating high quality jobs
for Bahamians.

* Expanding opportunities

MUA

NOTICE is hereby given that MARJORIE MOLTIMER
of SUNSHINE PARK, P.O.BOX-CR55083, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PRICEWATERHOUSE( COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SPA SENIOR ASSOCIATES

Job Description

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified Senior Associates
within our Systems and Process Assurance (SPA) practice. As a member
of the SPA team, you will provide services related to controls around the
financial reporting process, including business process and information
technology management controls.

Requirements

* Proven experience in identifying, evaluating and testing information
technology and or business process controls, having worked in
the accountancy profession for a minimum of three (3) years.

* A strong academic record and has a professional accountancy
qualification and/or the CISA qualification.

* Sound business awareness, excellent communication skills and
personal initiative.

* The ability to work as part of a team, as well as independently.

* The ability to build and manage internal and external relationships.

* Proficient understanding of security and control for some of the
following technologies and/or enterprise applications: Unix, Windows
Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, OS/400, SQL Server, Oracle
database, SAP, Peoplesoft, and JD Edwards.

* Working knowledge of information technology general controls
concepts in the areas of systems development, change management,
computer operations and access to programs and data.

* Working knowledge of controls and controls standards (Sarbanes
Oxley, COSO, and COBIT) and testing strategies.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry
and other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which
recognizes different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward
high performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical
insurance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

ae

for skills development among
Bahamians.

* Broadening opportunities
for Bahamians to become
entrepreneurs in the financial
services and international ser-
vices sectors.

* Further integrating the
Bahamas into the global econ-
omy while encouraging its
expanded modernisation.

* Increasing opportunities for
charitable and development
contributions to further our
advancement

* Increasing potential rev-
enue for the Government.

Our history, physical
resources and location are
strengths that will be leveraged
to secure the opportunities we
have identified.

Historical strengths embrace
several factors:

* A ‘store’ of skills and expe-
rience that is trusted by the
international financial commu-
nity.

* A ‘brand position’ as a
committed partner to interna-
tional business.

* A sovereign territory with a
sound constitution, an efficient
basis of common law and an
outstanding record of political
stability, progress and steward-
ship.

* A commitment by Gov-
ernment to reinforce the long-
held view that the Bahamas 1s
an excellent jurisdiction for
conducting financial services
business.

* An English speaking cul-
ture which aids in integration
into the global financial services
industry

Physical resources include
the availability of land, office
space, support facilities, fit-for-
purpose infrastructure and



communications.

From a location perspective,
the proximity of the Bahamas
to the US, Central and South
America makes it an enviable
position from which to facili-
tate and support regional capi-
tal investment. Furthermore,
the ease of access, air linkages
and the existence of Freeport
adds strongly to the advantage
of our location that is matched
by very few competitive juris-
dictions.

Strategic priorities have also
been identified, and steps are
underway to more clearly
define the opportunities avail-
able to the Bahamas as it pur-
sues its vision statement. The
next installment in this series
of articles will focus on the
approach to identify these
opportunities.

Wendy Warren, the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board’s (BFSB) chief execu-
tive and executive director, said
government and industry know
the challenges ahead, including
evolving international standards
and an extremely competitive
environment. “We recognise
nonetheless that change is a
reality, not an option,” said Ms
Warren. “The Vision we have
embraced for financial services
in the Bahamas takes into
account these challenges.”

JS

URC sm TU
AS OE
ticks

PEA ae ee
ALBURY LANE OFF SHIKLEY STREET
Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.
WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.

3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 557-5908

— fe
{ABLE BAHAMAS

LAR

VACANCY

A leading communications company has the requirement for a
Marketing & Sales Executive to lead these functions. This person will
be required to create an integrated strategy and realistic business

plans for all customer market seqments, products, pricing and sales
programs. Timely implementation of the plans is essential as the
objectives of new service launches, revenue and profitability are

demanding.

This person will be results focused and have proven achievements

including protecting existing revenues and growing new ones ina

communications company; training and organizing a multi-channel

sales and marketing team to deliver results on time and to budget;
innovation in services marketing, product quality and customer
value; and demonstrating that the marketing concept works at all

levels,

This appointment require a Masters degree qualification, plus a

minimum of 10 years experience in the international telecoms

industry including executive level decision making and awareness of

requlatory aspects, Experience of working in an overseas

environment with empathy to develop skills and local management
succession is also a requirement, This person will also have

extensive knowledge of the international communications market
and global expertise of other multi national communications

companies.

Resumes to be sent electronically to

rhadderleya@cablebahamas.com to arrive by Tuesday, June 22, 2010.



weld.
[a ToT oe evrey ee C4
Pee tel t-te





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 7B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS





Dollar slips as Spain’s bond auction eases worries

By ERIN CONROY
AP Business Writer



NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar slipped against the euro
and the pound Thursday after a
bond offering by Spain's govern-
ment drew solid demand, easing
worries about the country's debt
problems.

At a summit in Brussels, Euro-
pean leaders insisted they are not
worried about Spain. They also
agreed to publish the results of
"stress tests" on European banks
in their latest attempt to restore
investor confidence.

The euro edged up to $1.2379
in late trading in New York from
$1.2314 late Wednesday. The
euro has been gaining this week
as some positive economic data
from around the world seems to

reassure investors that Europe's
debt crisis has not yet affected
global trade.

Worries about European debt
and faltering growth prospects in
several countries using the euro
have weighed on the euro this
year. The currency shared by 16
nations hit a four-year low below



$1.19 last week and has dropped
more than 15 per cent this year
against the dollar.

Spain successfully raised near-
ly 3.5 billion euros in an auction
of 10- and 30-year bonds,
although at high interest rates.

That helped allay some recent
questions about Spain's financial
stability, brought on by the coun-
try's high debt and rumors about
a Shaky banking system.

The results of the auction were
"reassuring," Chiara Cremonesi,
an analyst with UniCredit in Lon-
don, wrote in a research note.
"Spain has been under the spot-
light over the last few days due to
reported strains in its banking sys-
tem and its bleak fiscal outlook.”

Spain is trying to stem specu-
lation that it could follow Greece
in requiring help to rescue its

banking system. The country said
it would test how well its major
banks could cope with more loss-
es if the economy worsens and
house prices tumble further. That
move inspired the broader deci-
sion to publish the results of
European stress tests on banks.

US regulators released results
of their own stress tests on banks
in 2009 to show how much capital
the country’s 19 biggest banks
needed to raise to cope with more
losses.

In other late trading Thursday,
the British pound rose to $1.4810
from $1.4793, while the dollar
inched up to 90.82 Japanese yen
from 91.40 yen.

The dollar fell to 1.1126 Swiss
francs from 1.1293 francs, but
rose to 1.0284 Canadian dollars
from 1.0242 Canadian dollars.

Texas gasoline
price fall in
8th week

IRVING, Texas (AP) — It's Week 8 of the unsu-
al pre-summer slide in retail gasoline prices across
Texas.

The weekly AAA Texas price survey released
Thursday shows the average price of regular unlead-
ed gasoline across Texas fell by an average of a pen-
ny this week to $2.58 per gallon. Nationally, the aver-
age price remained unchanged at $2.71 per gallon.

The state's cheapest gas again was found in the Fort
Worth-Arlington area, where the average price of
regular unleaded fell a penny to $2.52 per gallon.
The most expensive regular unleaded gasoline aver-
aged $2.65 per gallon in both El Paso and Corpus
Christi, down two cents in El Paso and three cents in
Corpus Christi.

The auto club statement notes that crude oil prices
remain fairly stable around the $75 per barrel level,



$12 less than seven weeks ago.































































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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



New jobless claims up sharply as layolfs persist

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people
filing new claims for jobless benefits jumped last week
after three straight declines, another sign that the pace
of layoffs has not slowed.

Initial claims for jobless benefits rose by 12,000 to a
seasonally adjusted 472,000, the Labour Department
said Thursday. It was the highest level in a month and
overshadowed a report that showed consumer prices
remain essentially flat.

The rise in jobless claims highlighted concerns about
the economic rebound — especially after a report ear-
lier this week said home construction plunged in May
after government tax credits expired.

If layoffs persist, there's a concern that the June
employment numbers may show a decline in private-
sector jobs after five straight months of gains, said
Jennifer Lee, an economist with BMO Capital Markets.

"We've definitely seen the economic recovery hit a
wall," Lee said.

First-time jobless claims have hovered near 450,000
since the beginning of the year after falling steadily in
the second half of 2009. That has raised concerns that
hiring is lackluster and could slow the recovery.

The four-week average for unemployment claims,
which smooths volatility, dipped slightly to 463,500.
That's down by 3,750 from the start of January.

Kevin Logan, an economist with HSBC Securities,
said many economists have been expecting claims to fall
below 450,000 for several weeks now.

"The wait is getting longer and longer,” said Logan.
"As each week goes by, doubts about the underlying
strength of the economic expansion grow."

A separate labour report said consumer prices fell for
the second straight month. The 0.2 decline in the Con-
sumer Price Index was pulled down by falling energy
prices — most notably a 5.2 per cent drop in gasoline
prices.

But core consumer prices, which strip out volatile
energy and food, edged up 0.1 per cent in May, after
being flat in April. Core prices are up only 0.9 per





Fe

to Your New
Career in

WV easleta










7 Yeors Experience
in fhe Healing Ards

American



HAROLD THOMPSON fills out an application at the National
Career Fair in Fort Lauderdale, Florida...

(AP Photo)

cent over the past year — below the Fed's inflation tar-
get.

Additionally, the Commerce Department said Thurs-
day that the broadest measure of US trade rose during
the first quarter to the highest point in more than a
year. Much of the widening deficit was due to higher
prices on imported oil during the first three months of
the year. Those prices have since come down.

Anda private research group said its gauge of future
economic activity rose 0.4 per cent in May, signaling
slow growth in the US economy through the fall. Tur-
moil in stock markets and a troubled housing market
weighed on the Conference Board's leading econom-
ic index, while measures related to interest rates and an
increasing amount of money in the economy tugged it



=







higher. The index is designed to forecast activity in
the next three to six months.

Still, layoffs remain one of the biggest concerns for
the recovery. Just this week, casino owner Wynn
Resorts laid off more than 260 workers in its two Las
Vegas casino hotels in a move expected to save nearly
$8 million.

Julia Coronado, senior US economist with BNP
Paribas in New York, said current economic condi-
tions suggest initial claims will stay at around 450,000
for some time. That's because weaker segments of the
economy are shedding jobs while stronger sectors are
hiring.

Economists have said they don't expect to see sus-
tained job creation until first-time jobless claims drop
below 425,000 per week.

The number of people continuing to claim benefits
rose by 88,000 to 4.57 million. That doesn't include
about 5.2 million people who receive extended benefits
paid for by the federal government.

Congress has added 73 weeks of extra benefits on top
of the 26 weeks typically provided by states. All told,
about 9.7 million people received unemployment insur-
ance in the week ending May 29, the most recent data
available.

The extended benefit programme expired this
month. The House has approved an extension of the
benefits through November. The Senate has yet to
act.

On Wednesday, Senate Republicans and a dozen
Democratic defectors rejected a catchall measure com-
bining jobless aid for the long-term unemployed, aid to
cash-strapped state governments and the renewal of
dozens of popular tax breaks. Despite the loss, Demo-
cratic leaders predicted that a scaled-back version of the
measure could pass, possibly later this week.

Adding to worries about the job market, the Labour
Department said earlier this month that the economy
generated only 41,000 private-sector jobs in May. That
was down from 218,000 in April. Temporary hiring by
the Census Bureau added another 411,000 jobs. The
unemployment rate fell to 9.7 per cent from 9.9 per
cent.

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Stock market
manages
Slender gain

By TIM PARADIS

NEW YORK (AP) —
The stock market has shak-
en off a pair of disappoint-
ing economic reports and
managed a slender gain
after being in the red for
much of the day.

The Dow Jones industri-
al average has ended the
day up about 24 points after
falling 90 earlier.

Investors were troubled
by news that the number of
people seeking unemploy-
ment benefits rose unex-
pectedly last week (story on
this page). A drop in the
Philadelphia Federal
Reserve's index of regional
manufacturing also hit
stocks. The reports are
reminders that the econo-
my isn't bouncing back
quickly.

The Dow closed at
10,434. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose more
than a point to 1,116. The
Nasdaq composite index
rose more than a point to
2,307. Losing issues were
slightly ahead of gainers on
the New York Stock
Exchange. Volume came to
a light 1.16 billion shares.









THIS HURRICANE SEASON YOU CANNOT
AFFORD TO BE LEFT IN THE DARK.

Wetec ea Bel 8]
HOUSE HAVE DURACELL BATTERIES ON.

asia eee eee

TO 6 TIMES LONGER’.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





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TRY OUR
SWEET
TEA

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 106 No.171

Pen blowin’ it

91F
SOF

PARTLY
~ SUNNY



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





Bahamas tops
region’s urban
MON Ta
NaS SS

EX-lleputy ask im
allvice In FAW jou row

Family of Cheryl
Grant Bethel
‘mortified’ over
PM’s comments

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

alowe@
tribunemedia. net

FORMER Deputy
Director of Public
Prosecutions and one- | °
time acting Director,
Cheryl Grant Bethel,

is getting legal advice eenkcenacent!

from a top lawyer on
whether she can get
legal redress for having been
overlooked for the post of
Director of Public Prosecutions,
The Tribune has learned.

This comes as Mrs Grant
Bethel’s family are said to be



“mortified” at how the
Prime Minister
allegedly “trashed“
the public servant in
Parliament, according
to Fred Mitchell, MP
for Fox Hill.

Mrs Grant Bethel
confirmed to The Tri-
bune yesterday that
she has contracted the
services of former bar
president, attorney
Wayne Munroe, as
she looks into whether there is
any potential for legal redress
regarding the decision by the
Judicial and Legal Services

SEE page eight

Grieving families’ anguish
at Coroner’s Court backlog

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FAMILIES waiting for answers about the unnatural
deaths of their loved ones have spoken out about the anguish
of waiting for an inquest to be heard after The Tribune
revealed there are currently 129 matters pending at the

SEE page eight

FATHER’S DAY,

s 4 Pe. Chicken, 8 Wings, 2 Family Sides,
4 Biscuits & 7 Two Litre Pepsi

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

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Pastor reportedly
considers suing
INS for defamation

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net



A PASTOR is said to
be considering suing ZNS
for defamation following
a news report televised
on Tuesday which he
claims discredited his rep-
utation.

Reverend Terrance G
Morrison, of the Zion

SEE page 12







Felipé Major/Tribune staff



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS work on a mural project in downtown Nassau. The open studio space of the Love My Bahamas Down-

Attorney: lawyers should not he
faulted for AG's Office inefficiencies

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

PROMINENT attorney
Damian Gomez has hit
back at a government min-
ister's stinging criticisms of
criminal defence lawyers,
arguing that good counsel
should not be faulted for
inefficiencies in the Attor-
ney General's Office.

Mr Gomez defended his
work, and that of his col-
leagues, explaining it was a
lawyer's oath to give their





client the best representa-
tion and capitalise on
weaknesses in the prose-
cution's case.

"We live in a country
where it's convenient to go
on a pulpit and accuse peo-
ple of wrong-doing when
they are only doing their
duties -— I find that
absolutely mind blowing.

"It's the job of counsel
to take whatever advan-
tage there is on behalf of
his or her client. If the gov-
ernment doesn't do what
it is supposed to do, the

SEE page eight





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° SEE PAGE TWO

Mother desperately seeks
funds for hit-and-run baby

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AN unemployed mother is
desperately seeking financial
aid for her 16-month-old baby
after a near-fatal hit-and-run
accident destroyed his chances
for normal development.

Because both vehicles
involved were uninsured and
those at fault still at large,
Latrell Lewis, 19, faces medical
expenses in excess of $50,000
for her son Kilano Capron.

Kilano was only seven weeks
old when an S10 truck hit his
grandmother’s truck broadside
on March 29 last year. Ms Lewis

had been driving home from
work with her mother and son.
The occupants of the $10 truck
had stolen a boat engine and
were being chased by its owner.

SEE page 12
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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Mural Art
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Bahamas Downtown Art Experience, a mural project that will
enliven downtown Nassau. People can stop by the open studio
space to see the artists at work. The LMB Art Studio on Parliament
Street is open Tuesdays and Fridays, 9 am to 6 pm.

LOCAL NEWS





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THE TRIBUNE

O In brief

Body found
off Banana
Bay named

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The body
discovered floating in
waters off Banana Bay has
been identified as that of
49-year-old Benjamin
Cooper of Mather Town.

ASP Loretta Mackey,
police press officer, said
that an autopsy report
revealed that the cause of
death was drowning.

Cooper, who according
to his family suffered from
seizures, may have been
fishing in waters near
Banana Bay.

Ms Mackey said police
do not suspect foul play.

In other matters, police
are still awaiting the autop-
sy report in the death of
Garth Roberts, who was
found dead at his home.

Roberts, a pastor, was
discovered by relatives on
Monday.

Police probe
armed robberies

THE police are investigat-
ing two armed robberies
which took place in Nassau
this week.

At around 3am on Tues-
day, police were called toa
home on Buntings Avenue
off Boyd Road, where two
men with handguns had
threatened and robbed the
homeowner of an assort-
ment of electronic items and
jewellery.

The culprits fled the area
on foot heading in an
unknown direction.

The police are calling on
members of the public who
have any information
regarding this incident to
kindly contact them.

Just before 10pm on
Wednesday, officers were
called to Williams Lane off
Kemp Road, where witness-
es said a 31-year-old man
was walking when he was
approached by three men,
one of whom was armed
with a handgun.

They robbed the victim of
an undetermined amount of
cash and fled the area on
foot heading in an unknown
direction.

Man stabbed on
Nassaul Street

JUST before lam on
Wednesday, a man was
stabbed at the junction of
Boyd Road and Nassau
Street.

Responding officers were
told that two men got into
an argument which resulted
in a 57-year-old man being
stabbed in the left shoulder.

The victim was taken to
hospital by ambulance and is
in serious condition.

Toddler still in serious
Condition after shooting

The 4-year-old child who
was shot at on Brazilletta
Street in Pinewood Gardens
this week remains in hospi-
tal in serious condition.
Police investigations contin-
ue.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



THE faculty union at the College of
the Bahamas is calling for the resigna-
tion of Chair and Vice-Chair of the col-
lege’s Advisory Search Committee over
what it claims is a clear conflict of interest.

The Union of Tertiary Educators of
the Bahamas (UTEB) has called into
question the fairness and integrity of the
search to replace outgoing college Presi-
dent Janyne Hodder and is also calling on
Education Minister Desmond Bannister
to have T. Baswell Donaldson, Chair-
man of the College Council and Deputy
Chair, Judith Whitehead, step down as
the Chair and Vice-Chair of COB’s pres-
idential Advisory Search Committee.

“The union is most concerned about
the fact that College Council Chairman,
Mr Donaldson and Council Deputy
Chair, Mrs Whitehead — who have direct
responsibility for hiring the next presi-
dent — are also Chair and Vice-Chair of
the search committee responsible for
short-listing applicants for the Council’s
approval.

“With the two primary persons respon-
sible for hiring the next president also
heading the crucial screening process, the
union sees this as a clear conflict of inter-





DESMOND
BANNISTER

est, particularly when recent decisions
made by the Council Chair are being
called into question as nothing more than
acts catering to a constituency whose
interests appear to be more political than
practical.

“These recent decisions demonstrate
that Mr Donaldson does not have the
willingness, the uprightness, or the
courage to make decisions that are in the
best interest of the wider college com-
munity,” UTEB stated in a press release
yesterday.

The union is also suggesting that if Mr
Donaldson and Mrs Whitehead wish to
continue being involved in the selection
and evaluation process, they can, with
some other voted members serving as

JANYNE
HODDER

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 3

ME UNION OF TERTIARY EDUCATORS OF THE BAHAMAS

COB union questions fairness
of search to replace Hodder

Calls for resignation of Chair, Vice-Chair of Advisory Search Committee

Chair and Vice-Chair of the committee.

“As first point of reference for the
international search firm hired by the
college to vet applicants, the Chair and
Vice-Chair of the Advisory Search Com-
mittee will most likely have the list of
candidates before any other member on
the committee. “The union feels that the
individuals sitting in those two positions
should not also be the same two individ-
uals responsible for hiring the next pres-
ident — again, a very clear conflict of inter-
est,” the press release stated.

Education Minister Desmond Ban-
nister declined to comment on the matter
yesterday. Attempts to reach Mr Don-
aldson also proved unsuccessful up to
press time.

Last week, Dean of Liberal and Fine
Arts Dr Earla Carey-Baines was con-
firmed as the institution's new interim
president beginning July 1. She will con-
tinue in the post until a new president is
installed, a process COB expects will not
be completed before the fall semester
this year.

Another vacancy has been left within
the COB following the retirement of Dr
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson last week. Dr
Chipman-Johnson who spent 31 years
with the institution had been the imme-
diate candidate for the presidential posi-
tion by government legislation.

O Court short

Man gets nine
months for drug
possession

A 46-year-old man has
been sentenced to nine
months imprisonment after
pleading guilty to marijuana
and cocaine possession
charges.

According to court dock-
ets, on June 14, Donnie Tay-
lor was found in possession
of a quantity of marijuana as
well as a quantity of cocaine
that authorities believe he
intended to supply to anoth-
er.

On Wednesday Taylor
pleaded guilty to both
charges. In addition to his
prison term, he was fined
$5,000. Failure to pay the
fine will result in an addi-
tional nine months in prison.
According to the prosecu-
tion, Taylor had been found
in possession of seven grams
of cocaine and nine ounces
of marijuana. He was also
found in possession of $971
cash. Magistrate Carolita
Bethell ordered that the
money be confiscated.

SE BRP Biles
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822-2197



Debate over proposed fee structure
for Supreme Court legal action

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A proposed new fee struc-
ture for pursuing legal action
in the Supreme Court has
sparked much debate among
attorneys, with some critical
of a move they suggest will
increase the cost of litigation
for average Bahamians, oth-
ers saying it will ease the
financial burden and yet oth-
ers saying it will make no dif-
ference at all.

The government claims the
new fee structure, replacing
a system implemented in
1971, will reform and “ratio-
nalise” the process of pursu-
ing matters in the Supreme
Court.

However, Fred Mitchell,
MP for Fox Hill, hit out at the
draft amendments to the
Supreme Court Rules yester-
day in a press conference, sug-
gesting that are “anti-poor
and anti-middle class” and
may stop some people from
pursuing grievances in the
courts.

The Rules Committee of
the Supreme Court is propos-
ing as of July 1 to institute a
new one-off filing fee for mat-
ters in the Supreme Court,
and a $50 fee to be paid by
litigants who already have
matter before the courts.

This would replace lower
initial fees of often less than
$10 that are normally supple-
mented by follow-up filing
fees throughout the process,
or in cases where damages are
being sought, by the litigant
having to pay a percentage of
the damages being claimed in
the form of “ad valorem
stamp duty“, which is also
intended to be abolished.

Pointing to the fact that at
present a litigant can choose
to file a generally endorsed
writ for a cost of just $9 in the
Supreme Court to initiate a
legal action, Mr Mitchell said
the fact that this cost will now
jump to $300 or more is
“unconscionable”. A gener-
ally endorsed writ is used in a
civil matter in which the dam-
ages being claimed are not
outlined.

He suggested that while
wealthy people who are mak-
ing large claims which would
have met significant stamp
duty charges may save money,
poorer people will smaller
claims will likely end up pay-
ing more — although this is a
disputed point.

“We all agree on reform.
But this is not reform, this is a
pure out-and-out revenue
raising measure,” said the
MP.

Mr Mitchell noted that
while there are provisions for
poor or indigent litigants to
have these new initial fees
waived, he regards the condi-
tions as too burdensome and
believes they may still act to



RAYNARD RIGBY

dissuade a potential litigant.
He called on the “powers that
be to review the matter.”

Ruth Bowe Darville, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Bar
Association said that the pro-
posed changes have generated
“much comment and discus-
sion” among Bar members,
with a strong arguments for
and against emerging. She
encouraged members to make
representation to the Bar if
they have a view on the pro-
posal so they can in turn make
a case on the issue to the
Rules Committee of the
Supreme Court on the mat-
ter. The government has sug-
gested the new fee structure
should come into effect on
July 1, 2010.

Suits

In stark contrast to Mr
Mitchell, Ms Bowe Darville
said that in her opinion the
new minimum $300 filing fee
for individuals filing civil suits,
in combination with the abo-
lition of the ad valorem stamp
duty on damages and the
potential for further filing
costs will in fact save most lit-
igants in this area money.

“They will benefit most,”
said Ms Bowe Darville,
adding that another bonus is
that litigants will have a clear-
er idea of what the cost of
pursuing the matter will be at
the start. However, she said
that she is concerned about
the rise in the cost of divorce
petitions and ancillary mat-
ters in particular, which she
described as “exorbitant”,
suggesting that for uncontest-

ed divorces in particular this
fee would be significantly
higher than what is already
being paid by most would-be
divorcees. “They should look
at that again in my view,” she
added. Presently, the cost of
filing a divorce petition is $21,
followed by smaller fees for
additional documents filed in
connection with the case.

Meanwhile, Ms Bowe
Darville, Mr Mitchell and
attorney Raynard Rigby all
said they believe the new $50
fee to be paid by all litigants
who currently have matters
before the courts is not nec-
essarily justified, given that
different litigants may be at
different stages in the process.

Mr Rigby said: “Although
the matter is still an existing
action in the court it may very
well be that that matter may
never proceed to trial because
parties are in the midst of dis-
cussions or the action was
filed to reserve plaintiffs right
to action before limitation
period expired. So there are
categories of matters where
it will not proceed and a
judge’s time may never have
to be assigned to that case.”

Carl Bethel, chairman of
the governing FNM, said the
move to amend the initial fees
and get rid of the subsequent
charges is not a “revenue rais-
ing” measure as Mr Mitchell
proposed. Instead the gov-
ernment may in fact lose
money from the changes in
the short term and “at the end
of the day it will be revenue
neutral.”

“It’s an attempt by the gov-
ernment to have a situation
where there is rationalism
brought to the way we file ini-
tial actions. It’s a higher initial
cost but at end of the day (the
overall cost to litigants) is not
going to be significantly dif-
ferent,” he said.

Mr Rigby, a former PLP
chairman, suggested that an
increase in initial filing fees
would be more justifiable if
it came with improvements in
the level of efficiency in the
court system.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS SECTION

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES





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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Confusion around the courts

NATIONAL Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest told Parliament Wednesday that
at least 252 persons charged with murder
are still awaiting trial. Of that number about
130 are out on bail.

It would be interesting to know how
many of those on bail have been charged
with a second murder, or have themselves
become the victim of another criminal’s dri-
ve-by shooting. Up to April 30, 130 murder
accused were still out on the streets waiting
to be called in to face justice.

Lawyer Philip Davis told the House that a
murder trial usually takes a month. He esti-
mated that it would take more than 20 years
to clear those now waiting for their cases to
be heard. “A near impossible” task to deal
with, he observed.

The courts are not only clogged with too
many cases, but also cases cannot move
smoothly and swiftly through the system
because of constant delays, either for lack of
witnesses, summonses that have not been
served, or lawyers who need adjournments
because of a conflict in their own calendars.

A businessman, who was to testify this
week for a theft at his office, after waiting
four hours outside court for the case to be
called, vowed that in future unless death
were involved, he would never again call in
the police to get entangled in the judicial
system. “It is ridiculous what happens at the
court,” he said.

He said his case was set down for Tuesday
and Wednesday this week. He arrived at
the court at 9.30am on Tuesday. There were
so many prisoners already there that every-
one was asked to leave the court to make
room for them.

He waited with the crowd under the
almond tree in front of Café Matisse to find
some shelter from the blistering sun. Later
he hurried under an awning to be protected
from the rain. “I am a middle aged man in
good health, but can you imagine what
would happen to an older person, not in
good health, under these conditions?” he
asked. He battled with the sun and rain for
four hours before his case was called. When
he entered the court room at 1.30pm he was
told: “Come back tomorrow.”

The next day, he went even earlier to
secure a seat at the back of the court. He said
that a sympathetic policeman who knew
what he had gone through the day before
helped him find the seat. His case was the
second to be called on Wednesday. He gave
his evidence, but believes that there will be
at least two more adjournments in the mag-
istrate’s court before the case can make it to
the Supreme Court.

In the two days that he was there only

DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

two cases went ahead. About 40 had to be
adjourned because either witnesses had not
shown up, or summonses had not been
served.

On Tuesday he said in one case alone 15
witnesses were called. Not one was present.
Of the 30 cases that day, no one had shown
up to give evidence. Each case had to be set
down for a new date.

Even a prisoner complained about the
non-functioning system. He told the court
that that day was the fifth time that he had
been brought before the court, but each time
his case had been adjourned because no one
was there. “This is ridiculous!” he exclaimed.

Also at no time did the businessman feel
secure. He said there should be somewhere
for witnesses to wait so that they do not
have to be so near to the prisoners.

He said all the staff and the police at the
court were friendly. However, it was obvious
that the court was under staffed.

“Tt was a total eye opener for me to our
criminal justice system,” he said as he vowed
never again to willingly expose himself to
such an experience.

As for murder cases, Mr Turnquest told
the House, government will specify an
amendment to a bill now before parliament
that three years is a reasonable time to hold
murder accused in prison to await trial. In
our own experience, we know of a case that
involved the brutal murder in 2006 of one of
our own staff members. The man accused of
her murder was back on the streets after
only 14 months. He is still a free man and no
more has been heard of her case.

Under the constitution, said Mr Turn-
quest, a person accused of murder has a
right to bail if they are not brought to trial in
a reasonable time. With the slow pace at
which many matters proceed before the
courts this has allowed many charged with
serious offences to be released on bail, some-
times coercing witnesses or committing oth-
er heinous crimes, he said.

"There's no question that the granting
of bail to persons charged with murder is
particularly controversial and emotive in
our country. The public is concerned and
rightly so that persons charged with mur-
der are given bail and remain free to coerce,
compel, and influence others and tragically
to kill again,” said Mr Turnquest.

"It is critical that more persons charged
with murder have their cases decided by the
courts and we believe that this Bill is a step
in the right direction,” he said.

We suggest that a court be designated just
for murder cases with its own staff to bring in
the witnesses and keep the cases moving
through the system.



Government
is far too big
and wasteful

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In spite of tariffs being
the major source of revenue,
when revenue drops gov-
ernment spending continues
at the same rate, or even
higher.

Where does the extra
money come from? You
guessed it — the tax shortfall
is covered by money bor-
rowed from the credit mar-
Kets.

The country is now
informed that taxes/revenue
are only 19 per cent as a per-
centage of GDP, and in the
scheme of things we're
under taxed compared to
other nations. However,
GDP has grown substantial-
ly over the years, so should-
n't government revenue
have done the same?

Well it did. From 2003
through 2008 government
revenues totalled just over
$7 billion. But spending was
over $8 billion.

So as the debate turns to
changing the tax regime
(read higher taxes), and cit-
izens are told that import
taxes are not enough to
maintain the country, it’s
worth remembering those
numbers for some fact
checking in the future.

But, isn't GDP declining
as a result of the economic
downturn since the fall of
2008? If so, shouldn't tax-
es/revenue as a percentage
of that GDP be rising since,

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



according to some reports,
revenue has been stable?

While all taxpayers
should fully understand the
economic troubles the coun-
try faces, should citizens be
required to pay more taxes
because of the profligacy of
successive governments?

The answer, that is well
known, is to reign govern-
ment in as Canada did in the
1990's. The Government of
The Bahamas is far too big
and it consumes and wastes
far too many valuable tax
dollars to be trusted with
even more of the proceeds
of picking taxpayer pockets,
just because they can.

In other words, higher
taxes are not the best idea in
these economic times. Win-
ston Churchill seemed to
know better. He's quoted as
saying:

"We contend that for a
nation to try to tax itself into
prosperity is like a man
standing in a bucket and try-
ing to lift himself up by the
handle."

With all that said, this
would be the perfect time
for the official opposition
PLP to prove their ability to
lead the country out of this
mess. Will the PLP show in
this matter as the Conserva-

tives supported the Liberals
in Canada with their initia-
tives to sort out their long
running fiscal problems. Or,
will the country get anything
other than eloquent polemic
debate from them? That's
what's been offered up so
far, and they say that's
what's required from the
official opposition.

They can read the score-
card (economy) as well as,
or better than most so why
can't they make suggestions
on what they would do if
they were the government
of the day? Are they bereft
of ideas or are they just hop-
ing the FNM will fall on its
proverbial sword?

Both political parties are
in a quandary over this
mess. If they say too much,
they'll be charged with mis-
handling the country for
decades.

But the governing party
has presented its ideas in the
form of the 2010/2011 Bud-
get. Shouldn't the country
expect a “shadow budget"
from the official opposition?

Maybe if Parliament were
to go on vacation for a year
or so, the patient just might
heal itself.

So, where to now Parlia-
ment? It's all in your hands.

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com
Nassau,

June 8, 2010.

An open letter to Craig Gomez

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open
letter to

Mr Craig A (Tony)
Gomez, Liquidator
CLICO (Bahamas) Ltd.

Dear Sir:

Our Prime Minister, the
Right Hon. Hubert Ingra-
ham, assured the policy-
holders of CLICO that as
soon as the various internal
problems were resolved,
such persons whose health
insurance policies were up
to date with legitimate
claims would be paid.

This procedure had been
carried through for several
months; however, much to
my dismay, this has not been
the case recently.

Sandals

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Must demonstrate a high level of professionalism

Must be a team player with the ability to work flexible hours

when required

My CLICO policy is paid
up to months in advance, as
it usually is.

Approximately ten weeks
ago, Isubmitted three claims
to CLICO for reimburse-
ment.

Unfortunately, I have yet
to be compensated for any
of the claims.

I have made various
queries regarding my claims.
T understand from your staff
that all claims are to be
processed within three
weeks of your receipt of the
same.

During one of my queries,
it was brought to my atten-
tion, by your staff, that the
cheques for my due com-
pensation have been sitting
on your desk for more than
eight weeks awaiting your
signature.

I would greatly appreci-
ate your signing and distrib-
uting my cheques in the
proper and timely manner

that I should expect as a pol-
icyholder in good standing
with my monetary obliga-
tions to CLICO.

Please note that it is
imperative that I receive
immediate compensation for
these claims, as I must bring
my child’s tuition back with-
in its proper standing such
that she might graduate as
scheduled in a few weeks
and go onto be an asset to
this wonderful country.

In light of the foregoing I
look forward to your
prompt action.

I should be happy to
answer any questions you
might have or to provide
any further information you
might require.

Thank you for your coop-
eration.

POLICY HOLDER
No 1-1300003920
Nassau,

June 10, 2010.

St. Ailban’s Drive

Newly refurbished 2 bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths Condo in Courtyard Setting.
Single Storey Building.
Kitchen Appliances, Granite Countertops,
Washer & Dryer.

$127,000
Bank Financing Available.
$6,500 Down

Tel: 325-1325, 422-4489, 477-0200

[PRIME OFFICE SPACE

Must be able to perform all duties and responsibilities in a
timely and effective manner in accordance with established
company policies to achieve the overall objectives

Must possess excellent oral and written communication skills

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second

floor space is available in newly constructed
building at the corner of Marlborough and
Cumberland Streets. Two newly completed
bathrooms and ceiling with air conditioning
provided by Landlord.

Qualifications and Experience:

Prior video experience and or Multimedia Certificate
Knowledge of HDV workflows is an asset

Ability to learn documentary style video production.
Computer literacy is an asset.

Two (2) on-site car spaces included.
Ideal location for offshore bank, trust
company, law or accounting firm, or other
professions.

Only short listed candidates will be contacted. Interested persons
should submit their applications by July 2, 2010 with curriculum vitae
via E-mail or faxed to:

Director of Human Resources, Training and Service Standards,
Sandals Resorts International,
5 Kent Ave, PO Box 100,
Montego Bay.
Fax: 952-7581
E-mail: ybiek@grp.sandals.com AND hrd@grp.sandals.com

Contact Owner at 362-6006
q Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 }


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Police detain
man wanted in
connection with
Stabhing death

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Abdul
Rondon Burrows, who is
wanted for questioning in
connection with a stabbing
death, is in police custody
after a week-long search by
officers.

Burrows, 20, was turned in
by his father at around lpm
yesterday.

Asst Supt Loretta Mack-
ey, press liaison officer, said
police are continuing their
investigations into the mur-
der of 31-year-old Troy
Rolle, of Coral Gardens.

Three persons have
already been charged in
court in connection with the
matter. It is alleged that on
June 8, Jarreth Barry, 18, of
Gambier Drive; and Darren
Pratt, 39 and Karen Janice
Bowe, 24, both of Mallard
Street, being concerned
together, conspired to mur-
der Rolle and caused harm
to a second man.

Barry was also charged
with Rolle’s murder. They
were not required to enter a
plea to the charges.

Rolle, 31, and a 35-year-
old man, were attacked and
stabbed at an apartment
complex in Coral Gardens
last Tuesday.

They were taken to the
Rand Memorial Hospital,
where Rolle later died. The
second man was treated for
his injuries. Rolle’s death
has been classified as the
sixth homicide for the year
on Grand Bahama.

Following the incident,
police issued an all points
bulletin for Burrows and
sought the public’s assis-
tance in locating him.

Pair arraigned over
Shooting of teenagers

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Two men
were arraigned in the Eight
Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court
on Thursday in connection
with the shooting of two
teenagers at Hepburn Town.

Terrance Hanna, 25, of
Hepburn Town, EMR; and
Sean Francois, 19, of Holmes
Rock, appeared before Magis-
trate Gwen Claude.

The men were charged with
possession of a firearm with
intent to endanger life, caus-
ing harm and causing grievous
harm. It is alleged that on
June 14 at Hepburn Town,
the accused, being concerned
together, possessed a 9mm
pistol with intent to endanger
the life of Kelson Solomon
and a 13-year-old girl.

It is also alleged that on the
same date, the accused
intended to cause harm to
Kelson Solomon and grievous
harm to the 13-year-old girl.

The men were represented
by Carlson Shurland. They
pleaded not guilty and elected
summary trial in the Magis-
trate Court. The prosecutor
objected to bail, explaining
that the 13-year-old victim is
still detained in serious condi-
tion in hospital. Mr Shurland
said the fact that the victim
remains in hospital in serious
condition is not one of the cri-
teria for denying a person
bail.

“There must be a substan-
tial reason and the prosecu-
tion has not given the court
real information as to why
these men are not good candi-
dates for bail,” he said. He
noted that failing to appear
for trial, and interference with
witnesses or the course of jus-
tice are the categories the
court must consider when
denying a person bail.

Mr Shurland said that Ter-
rance Hanna is employed at
the container port as a strad-
dle carrier and has three chil-
dren to support. He also not-
ed that Hanna is related to
the 13-year-old victim and
that Francois lived with Kel-
son Solomon and has a close
knit relationship with his fam-
ily. Shurland asked the court
to consider granting bail with
conditions, such as ordering
the men to report to a police
station and restricting their
travel by ordering the surren-
der of their travel documents.

Magistrate Claude denied
the men bail and adjourned
the matter to November 24
for trial.

Mm ABACO BIG BIRD

Chicken farm seeks
protect family legacy

Poultry producer takes control of future after removal of import permits

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RATHER than wait for gov-
ernment to secure protection
for poultry farmers, one local
producer is taking control of
his economic future.

Challenging the public to
“buy Bahamian”, Abaco Big
Bird Chicken Farm has
launched an aggressive cam-
paign to brand their birds and
make their name as one of only
two local poultry farms.

After learning of the removal
of chicken import permits in
the 2010 budget, effective July
1, the owners of Abaco Big
Bird panicked.

And the thought of the
increased ease of access dis-
tributors would have to foreign
poultry — which already repre-
sents 99 per cent of the chicken
market in the Bahamas - ini-
tially angered them.

Abaco Big Bird has been
family owned and operated
since 1995, when Bahamians
Lewis Pinder and his wife, with
help from their sons, pursued
a “crazy dream” of raising
chickens.

Now daughters Caroljean
Lowe and Kandy Pinder have
taken the baton and are deter-
mined to keep the family busi-
ness no matter what it takes.

Mrs Lowe said: “I’ve thought

about it over the years. After
my father got sick we consid-
ered letting someone buy us
out. We’ve had offers. But you
know what this is our farm and
I am committed to seeing it
through. This is our family lega-
cy.”
Dedicated to adhering to the
highest standards of sanitation
and environmental health, the
farm boasts hormone and
steroid-free chickens, which are
the bird of choice on the island
due to its taste and unbeatable
freshness. Poultry scientist at
the College of the Bahamas
Jason Taylor is familiar with
the operation at Abaco Big
Bird and he attributed the qual-
ity of their birds to the use of all
natural corn/soy feed mix and
sensible housing structures.

Another resource employed
by the farm that undoubtedly
improves the quality of the
chicken is local pine chips.
Instead of newspaper shavings
or other artificial material often
used as bedding in other poul-
try farms, Abaco Big bid uses
fresh pine chips in each house,
and the bedding is completely
changed at regular intervals.

But local island business is
not enough to keep the farm
operational and now that it will
be even cheaper for distribu-



tors to bring in foreign chicken,
the farm will have to work
twice as hard to get its product
to the Bahamian people.

However, the sisters believe
in this economic climate — and
any other — a business must be
prepared to take the initiative
to secure success.

The farm has had its share
of hardships over the years,
however through stricter regu-
lations on expenses such as gas
and electricity consumption,
they have been able to secure
their position as one of the
largest producing farms in the
Bahamas. After the global eco-
nomic decline, the company
had to cut its staff of 42 full
time workers to 29, but still
maintains part-time shift work-
ers. Mrs Lowe added: “The
problem is, if you’re buying US,
the money is going out of the
country and it’s gone. We work
very hard to get tourists to
spend money here and we need
to keep that money here.”

As part of its efforts, Abaco
Big Bird has planned a “golden
coin” promotion; inspired by
the iconic film Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory, which fea-
tures Willie “Wonka’s golden
ticket.”

Abaco Big Bird will begin
placing “golden coins” bearing
serial numbers inside whole
chickens. Customers who find
them can call in to win prizes.

The first set of “coins” will
be placed in chickens today and
Nassau consumers should be
on the lookout for the lucky
birds as early as next week.

To fellow business owners,
Mrs Lowe said: “Don’t let any-
body get you down. I was real-
ly upset the first day when I
heard about it. But I said you
know what, we need to not let
this get us upset. We need to
fight to stay in business and find
a way to make it work for us.”



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ATA

10 Gres
FT

vi

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN INVESTIGA-
TION has been
launched to determine
what caused the smell of
smoke to permeate the
cabin on JetBlue flight
1757 prompting an
emergency landing.

Passengers on the
JetBlue Airbus A320
reported the smell of
smoke in the cabin
shortly after the flight
bound for San Juan,
Puerto Rico, took off
from Fort Lauderdale’s
Hollywood Internation-
al Airport at noon.



Safely

The captain landed
safely and without inci-
dent at the nearest air-
port, the Lynden Pin-
dling International Air-
port in Nassau at 1pm.

“Because the flight
diverted to an interna-
tional location on a
domestic flight, cus-
tomers remained within
the international termi-
nal's gate area due to
customs regulations.
Maintenance is inspect-
ing the aircraft,” said
JetBlue manager of cor-
porate communications
Alison Croyle.

“JetBlue ferried a
new aircraft to Nassau
to take customers to
their final destination
(San Juan, Puerto
Rico).”

The flight departed at
6.15pm on Wednesday
and arrived in San Juan
at 8.45pm local time.







a
RS



LANCE PINDER shows some of the fruit of the orchard which boasts Persian
limes and seven different types of avocado.

PHOTOS: Ava Turnquest

Weta hy
Hl rar bY)











SPERRY.

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A PASSION FOR
THE SEA

Remember Dad on Father’s Day, June 20th

10% Off All Purchases for Dad

JOHN’S

SHOES AND ACCESSORIES
ROSETTA ST. 325-4944 CARMICHAEL ROAD 361-6876

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Long Island: A Bahamian ‘cultural mecca’

YOUNG MAn’s VIEW

ADRIAN GIBSON

AMnazing mk StepZ
S H O E S$ T O RE

SEs alelosy Solace |

re

/ & Slippers

209 Wulff Road - Dorsett House Building
heading East 2 doors down from Epic Battery

Tel: 393-6224

NOTICE

Please note that Mr. Whitney
Shaundel Newbold is NO longer
employed with
Fox Locksmithing Ltd.
and can no longer do business on
our behalf.



By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

Long Island breeze, I
hear you calling; calling
me upon the sea — Pat
Rahming

N 2010 my home
town, Long Island,

remains an over-

looked gem on the archi-
pelagic chain, a splendid
refuge that has afforded
me blissful memories of an
idyllic life on this most
beautiful outcrop of rock.

Originally called Yuma
by the Arawaks and later
renamed Fernandina by
Christopher Columbus,
Long Island is a cultural
mecca, featuring unique
ecosystems, breathtaking
landscapes and a society of
people of distinction, many
of the Bahamas’ most
industrious inhabitants.

During a nail-biter of a
flight, I recently returned
home to celebrate the fes-
tivities of the island’s
annual regatta.

Travelling onboard an
early morning twin turbo
prop Pineapple Air flight,
my homecoming was noth-
ing short of bumpy, as
gusty winds and dark
clouds filled the aircraft’s
windscreen, lightning
streaks illuminated the
skies and the tempestuous
weather and air turbulence
left the plane rattling, bob-
bing and swaying back and
forth.

Pilots

Indeed, while the pilots’
very professional
demeanour throughout the
flight is laudable, the rocky
trip left wide-eyed passen-
gers hysterical with worry,
hugging seats each time
the plane was caught in the
strong updrafts of tower-
ing, dark grey cumulonim-
bus clouds and shaking
with fear and aero-anxiety.
If truth be told, this flight
featured a lot of praying
(and I did my share too),
celebratory cheers upon
safely landing and
affirmed, for me, Ronnie
Butler’s famous lyric that
“everybody wan’ go to
heaven, but nobody wan’
dead.”

Even today, Long Island
is a bush-strewn, subtropi-
cal paradise that has pro-
duced some of the nation’s

brightest minds.

Here, the residents still
share courteous salutations
and cheerfully toot their
vehicles’ horns while tra-
versing the island’s roads
and passing fellow
islanders.

Long Island is home to
countless treasures, includ-
ing an archive of birds and
spectacular wild life, first-
class craftwork and exquis-
ite creations, bush teas and
plants of potent medicinal
value, delectable jams and
foodstuffs, protected nat-
ural harbours and some of
the world’s deepest blue
holes.

Plantation ruins such as
Adderley’s plantation, his-
toric churches, mysterious





MY flight reminded me of
famous lyrics from Bahamian
entertainer Ronnie Butler
(pictured above).

caves, crabs crawling all
night in the middle of
Queen’s Highway and
peripheral roadways, bleat-
ing sheep and goats, the
chatter of roosting seabirds
and shrill chirping sounds
of crickets all add to the
island’s magnificent
panorama and warmth.
Although the music,
food and merriment of the
nation’s second largest sea-
side festival was a major
draw, it is the big-hearted
people, quiet harmony,
comaraderie and glorious-
ly simple life of this island
hideaway that resides in
the recesses of the minds
of so many of the island

~ BAHAMAS FIRST

FIRST IN INSURANCE. TODAY. TOMORROW.

Please be advised that Bahamas First Group Offices:

Bahamas First General Insurance
Company Limited
Nassau Underwriters Insurance Agency

Will be closed on Friday, June 18, 2010 for our staff

ANNUAL FUN DAY.

We will reopen for business at 9:00 a.m.
on Monday, 21, 2010.

We regret any inconvenience cause.

BAHAMAS FIRST HOLDINGS LTD.
BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.



folks who now live else-
where.

Glistening waters and
awe-inspiring beaches,
cloudless blue skies and
children playing in the nat-
ural environment (even
today) are facets of Long
Island nearly unseen in the
nation’s crime-ravaged
capital city.

I grew up in the late
1980s, 1990s and the early
part of this millennium
with grandparents who
maintained a truly disci-
plined, old-time environ-
ment.

Before the FNM electri-
fied the entire island in the
early °90s, like most Long
Islanders, we used an elec-
tric generator and, even
more, lamps and lanterns. I
vividly recall the sand flies
and mosquitoes being
chased away with
makeshift fires that pro-
duced a repellent “smoke”
and I remember, however
faintly, my folks using a
“goose iron” with charcoal
before electricity was
extended island-wide or
when the electric genera-
tor was off.

Handmiill

As a child growing up on
Long Island, an assigned
chore could include assist-
ing my grandparents in the
field; grinding corn by
handmill on Saturdays in
my grandparents’ old out-
side kitchen/farmhouse for
sale, export and personal
use; I retain delightful
memories of my grandpar-
ents’ banana, corn and
sweet potato breads (cov-
ered with the banana tree
leaves) and sometimes
baked on a traditional
rock oven for extra
flavour; and I bear in mind
that discipline was the
order of the day as we
were always taught to
respect others.

It was not unusual to be
sent to fetch our very own
“switch” before a whip-
ping! I hold dear all the joy
I experienced in picking
whelks off the island’s
northeastern coastal rocks
and eating varieties of
berries and plums (that
must be bought in New
Providence from street-
side vendors).

dishes — stew conch, com-
bined yellow and white
hominy, bean soup and
dumplings, fried fish, crab
and dough, boiled cabbage
and cassava, roast corn on
the beach, and even sup-
plementary products of the
island—such as sapodillas
and scarlet plums — were
major highlights of my
most recent trip.

While I intend to elabo-
rate on issues faced by
Long Islanders in a follow-
up column, it must be not-
ed that there is a dire need
for infrastructural devel-
opments and investment
on Long Island.

Water

There is also a desper-
ate need for improved
water quality throughout
the island.

As Water and Sewerage
can hardly be accounted
for on the island, there is a
need for government assis-
tance with providing a
water improvement solu-
tion or in providing and
distributing water purifi-
cation tablets throughout
the island to those resi-
dents relying upon water
pumps connected to salty
and/or brackish wells.

At my grandparents’
house in Bunches, the cor-
rosive effects of this hard,
salt/brackish water is obvi-
ous as it has taken a toll
on the bathroom and
kitchen fixtures.

Furthermore, a concert-
ed effort must be made to
clamp down on those busi-
ness and holders of liquor
licenses who uncon-
scionably peddle alcohol
and tobacco to the island’s
juvenile population, culti-
vating a group of young
alcoholics and nicotine
abusers whose addiction
puts them on the fast track
to becoming the island’s
social dregs.

Say what you may, Long
Islanders take great pride
in being called sheep run-
ners because in the end,
they know that happiness,
tranquility and feeling of
contentment—with or
without many resources
and devoid of the mad-
dash in materialistic pur-
suits—that has long been
lost in New Providence.

“Long Island is a
bush-strewn, subtropical
paradise that has produced
some of the nation’s
brightest minds.”



Growing up, there was
no internet (most islanders
got it in 1999 or so) or cell
phones although a number
of persons had satellite
dishes—there was no face-
book distraction and
youngsters daily interact-
ed with nature.

My upbringing on this
wonderful island consist-
ed of some television time,
but predominantly
involved assembling bikes
and go-carts, sometimes
forgetting the brakes or
another part; riding and
prancing these bikes;
shooting marbles; catch-
ing lizards, frogs and tad-
poles; playing tug-of-war;
using buckets, a stick, a
string and a few kernels
of corn to catch birds
whilst hiding behind a
rock or bush with my sis-
ter Shenell and anxiously
waiting to tug on the draw
string and trap a curious
bird; playing “catch and
freezers”; climbing trees;
and yes, among other
things, even chasing sheep
that had escaped the pas-
ture.

It’s still amazing that
Long Islanders, like many
other Family Island
dwellers, can continue to
live and sleep with their
house doors unlocked,
with family and friends
streaming in and out.

The native, down-home

Congratulations to a
pacesetter in the straw-
work industry and to the
North Long Island High
school’s graduating class!

At the 43rd annual
regatta, my grandmother
Lenora Gibson was hon-
oured as a pacesetter in
the craft industry.

She is a skilled artisan,
whose native plaits and
homemade items were
crafted with love and ded-
ication, unlike the cheap
knockoffs and foreign
imports that litter

the straw-market today.
My grandmother practised
her craft in the age of
authentically produced
straw and craftwork.

While I was taught how
to plait a few strings, I
remember assisting my
folks in harvesting and
chopping down “top
trees”, then letting them
dry only to later watch my
grandmother strip them
and plait as a pastime.

I also extend congratu-
lations to my first cousin
Rache and the entire grad-
uating class of the North
Long Island High school.
All of the ten graduates
received diplomas, in stark
contrast with many New
Providence-based gradu-
ates who merely obtain an
attendance certificate upon
leaving. Indeed, all is not
lost!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Study: student alcohol |
abuse on the increase

Binge drinking ‘considered
common among students’






































=

Stamps commemorate
70th anniversary of
the Battle of Britain

THE 70th anniversary of the Battle of
Britain will be recognised locally on Friday,
June 18, when the Bahamas Postal Service
will issue a new commemorative postage stamp
that highlights the leadership of Sir Winston
Churchill and Sir Douglas Bader.

Sir Winston served as the United Kingdom’s
prime minister during World War II from 1940
to 1945, and again from 1951 to 1955.

He was known chiefly for his role in the
successful defence of Britain from Nazi inva-
sion, and was a noted statesman, orator,
British Army officer, historian, artist and

writer.

The six-stamp series concentrates on famous

Mitchell ‘laughs’ at FNM chairman’s

THE already high incidence of alco-
hol abuse among Bahamian high school
students seems to have grown even worse
in recent years, according to a govern-
ment study.

Drinking was recognised as the most
prevalent form of drug abuse in 2002 and
the study found that rates increased
between that year and 2008 for each of
three recognised prevalence indicators.

Binge drinking — that is, having five or
more drinks on any one occasion — is con-
sidered common among students, it said.

The 2008 Secondary School Drug
Prevalence Survey conducted by the
National Anti-Drug Secretariat of the
Ministry of National Security, indicates
that after alcohol, cigarettes and marijua-
na, the substances tried most often by
students are solvents and inhalants.

Releasing the findings this week, Min-
ister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest said the abuse of prescription drugs,
including tranquilizers, stimulants, ecsta-
sy, and other synthetic drugs, is not pop-
ular among Bahamian students.

“The results of the survey indicate that
some of our young people are still using
narcotic drugs and psychotropic sub-
stances, and this is cause for serious con-
cern. It is also cause for concern that our

young people are experimenting with
dangerous substances such as solvents
and inhalants and that there is still sig-
nificant alcohol among them,” said Mr
Turnquest.

The survey indicated that cocaine use
by secondary students is experimental
rather than regular, as is the use of hallu-
cinogens, amphetamines and other illicit
substances.

Marijuana usage rates decreased slight-
ly when compared to 2002, with fewer
students having tried marijuana and less
continuing to use it, according to the sur-
vey.

“In the months ahead, the government
will be reviewing proposed policies and
programmes for the prevention of drug
abuse in young people, and for continuing
research in this area. We expect that par-
ents, schools and other stakeholders will
work together with government in this
endeavour,” Mr Turnquest said.

Just over 2,000 students in grades 8, 10
and 12 in selected public and private
schools on seven islands participated in the
survey.

Drug use was measured through three
primary indicators: lifetime prevalence,
prevalence in the last year and preva-
lence in the last month.











Se eee otc nee tes tee tnt
Pe dee eae we ot Boy |

in the summer of 1940.

months of the war.

Sir Douglas Bader joined the Royal Air
Force (RAF) in 1928 but in 1931 he lost both

legs in a flying accident.

Despite retiring in 1933 for medical reasons,
at the outbreak of war in 1939, Sir Douglas
won his fight with the RAF to be allowed to fly

with them again.

quotes from speeches made by Sir Winston

His speeches were important in lifting the
morale of the British people during the crucial

In 1940, along with other pilots, Sir Dou-
glas played a major part in defeating the Ger-
man air force during the Battle of Britain.



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more information.

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_ Bahamas to observe
_UN International Day
against Drug Abuse
and Illicit Trafficking

THE Bahamas will observe
the United Nations Interna-
tional Day against Drug Abuse
and Illicit Trafficking on the
June 26, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest said
at a press conference on
Wednesday.

The objective of the Interna-
tional Day is to increase action
and co-operation against drug
abuse and illicit trafficking at
the national and international
levels.

This year’s international
theme, “Think Health — Not
Drugs”, has been obeernace A
into the Bahamas’ observance
plans.

The National Anti-Drug Sec-
retariat (NADS) of the Min-
istry of National Security, in co-operation with the multi-
sectoral planning committee for the International Day, has
chosen the theme, “Drugs and Crime — a Waste of Time”.

This topic recognises the inter-connectedness of drugs
and crime, including crimes of a very violent nature.

Several activities have been planned for the period
leading up to the International Day and for the Day
itself, including a panel discussion, a walk-a-thon, and
several public service announcements on the dangers of
drug abuse to be broadcast live on radio and television.



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response to disobedience call

By ALESHA CADET

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
“had a big laugh” when he
read FNM chairman Carl
Bethel’s response to his call
for more civil disobedience
from the opposition.

Accusing Mr Bethel of
“making a mole hill into a
mountain”, Mr Mitchell nev-
ertheless proceeded to com-
pare his suggestion to some of
the most dramatic and impor-
tant civil rights struggles of the
20th century.

He said: “They speak in
glowing terms of Mahatma
Ghandi and Martin Luther
King, who are the principal
advocates of civil disobedience,
yet they want to deny the
opposition's right to pursue
these tame measures that I am
advocating in the Bahamas.

“What they want is simply
for the opposition to lie down
and play dead — well it would-
n't happen with me.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Mr Mitchell said it is the
opposition’s role to “test the
government at each stage of
the game.” He said that what
he is suggesting is “quite mod-
erate.”

Responding to a speech Mr
Mitchell made at a PLP rally
on Tuesday, in which he sug-
gested that civil disobedience
may be the only course of
action left to the opposition,
the FNM chairman said: "Mr
Mitchell is well aware that any
government under our system
is accountable to the people in
free and fair elections. In fact,
all of these things are protect-
ed by appropriate mechanisms
and therefore the call for civil
disobedience is entirely irre-
sponsible and not to be expect-
ed of a seasoned member of
parliament such as the mem-
ber of Fox Hill.”

Mr Bethel said the sugges-
tion was especially irresponsi-
ble coming from a member of
parliament in a functioning

democracy where — unlike 40
or 50 years ago — “there are
no institutional, legal or con-
stitutional infringements of
anybody's rights.”

In response to this, Mr
Mitchell said: “He has to make
his case by saying that, because
if he does not, he condemns
himself.

“In fact, the vote of closure
in the House of Assembly was
improperly brought."

He was referring to last
week’s session of parliament,
when his attempt to move an
amendment was rejected and
the proceedings suspended
until this week. This prompted
opposition MPs to walk out of
the House.

The Fox Hill MP accused
the prime minister of acting in
an “undemocratic” fashion
with regard to the amendment.
“So the response was walking
out of the House of Assembly;
that is an act of civil disobedi-
ence" he said.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Ex-deputy seeks Grieving families’ anguish

legal advice in
law job row

FROM page one

Commission (JLSC) to hire Jamaican Vinette Graham-Allen
instead of herself for the post of Director of Public Prosecutions
in the Attorney General’s Office.

Having so far not spoken publicly on the issue, she said she
intends to make a statement today on the matter.

In a press conference in which he criticised Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for comments he made about Mrs Grant
Bethel and the manner in which the DPP appointment was
allegedly made, Mr Mitchell claimed Mrs Grant Bethel’s rela-
tives are “mortified that their daughter is being attacked by
innuendo ... having in their view grown up in this society as a
young woman doing, as far as they are concerned, all the right
things, getting good grades, serving faithfully the country for 20

ears.”
: “Then to be trashed in the space of three months by the man
who is the chief executive of the country with no effective
redress. I think they believe she’s been hard done by and treat-
ed unfairly,” said Mr Mitchell, when asked if he had spoken to
Ms Grant Bethel about the turn of events.

The Prime Minister recently confirmed the decision by the
JLSC to hire Ms Graham-Allen, a former DPP in Bermuda
and head of the Justice Training Institute in Jamaica as Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions in the Office of the Attorney General.
The JLSC is the Commission formally charged with the respon-
sibility of making the appointment of the DPP, along with judi-
cial posts, however the Prime Minister's defence of the decision
not to appoint Mrs Grant Bethel indicates he had a significant
say in the question of the DPP appointment.

Hitting back at criticisms of the decision to hire a foreigner for
the post, Mr Ingraham said he initially supported Bahamian Mrs
Grant Bethel for the job and regretted ultimately having felt it
necessary to change his mind on her suitability based on “infor-
mation” he had received.

“T started off believing that I had the person. That is my
belief. I had no desire to go outside The Bahamas and look for
a DPP; no desire whatsoever,” he told Parliament on Wednes-
day evening.

Mr Ingraham did not disclose the substance of this informa-
tion, but said he had “good and valid reasons” for changing his
mind. “I told her that as Prime Minister of the Bahamas I could
not and would not support her appointment,” he said.

In his press conference, Mr Mitchell accused the Prime Min-
ister of “attacking” the former Deputy Director of Public Pros-
ecutions, suggesting that his comments had been unfair and
would have given the lawyer the right to sue him had he said
them outside of Parliament, where an MP’s speech is legally pro-
tected.

He added that he felt Mr Ingraham had “a duty to disclose
what made him change his mind and not hide behind innuendo
without giving the individual the opportunity to answer whatever
issues he has”.

The MP questioned how Mrs Grant Bethel could “in the
space of three months” be considered “unfit” for the top post all
of a sudden, given her lengthy and apparently successful career
in the Attorney General’s office.

Share your news

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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Cedar Crest Euneral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street * P.0.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P,, Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

Marcella Lolita
Musgrove, 45

aresident of St. Bart’s Road, Golden
Gates #2, will be held 10:00a.m.
Friday, June 18th 2010 at Salem
Union Baptist Church, Taylor
Street. Officiating will be Rev Dr
C W Saunders assisted by other
Ministers. Cremation will follow.

She was predeceased by her parents
Gladstone Kirk Musgrove and Marguerite Clarke Musgrove and her
sister Dianne Christine Musgrove.

Left with cherish memories are her daughter Alison Johnson;
brother, Julian Trevor Musgrove; sister-in-law, Brendalee Musgrove;
special friend Arlington Johnson and family; uncles, Arlington
Clarke; Gary Rolle; Kermit Smith; Rodney Musgrove; Rev. Elon
Musgrove and Edwin Young Musgrove of Homestead; Fla.; aunts,
Almetha Clarke-Smith; Verbilee Clarke; Norma Clarke-Wyhlly;
Eurella Clarke and Irene Clarke; Delphine and Minerva Musgrove
and Corinne Musgrove of Homestead; Fla.; grand uncle Hezekiah
Saunders of West Palm Beach; Fla.; and Hosea Musgrove; grand
aunts, Ida Clarke; Eurella Anderson of New York; Viola Bodie of
Miami; Fla. And Berniece Deveaux; and Iva Musgrove; nephew,
Jamal Anton Evans; step nephews, Ghandi Frazier; Amos; Eusias
and Israel Bodie; god mother, Maryann Clarke; god father, John
Victor (JB) Saunders; best friend, Vernie Rolle; cousins Jaqueline
and Pedric Clarke; Angelo and Anwar Lightbourne; Tarosha Russell;
Darrell Weir; Monique Robinson; Errol Clarke; Warren Rolle;
Dominque Rolle; Shekie Bowleg; Gary Rolle Jr.; Rev. Gelodin Rolle;
Michelle McKenzie; Lynden Clarke; Abanaqie Clarke; Brendon
Brown; Marco and Andrew Meadows; Devroy Colebrook; Odell
Ferguson; Sheba Whylly and Bglendaen Whylly; Jacqueline;
Shavaughn and Sherman Musgrove; other relatives and friends
include Elvin Forester Bodie and Family of Miami; Fla.; Preston
McPhee and family; Angette Pyform and family; Harriet Mather and
family; Cleomi Clarke and family; family of the late Neville Clarke
of The Hermitage; Exuma; family of the late L. B. Johnson; Prescola
Musgrove and family; Lydia Musgrove and family; John Musgrove
and family; Susanna Musgrove; Catherine Musgrove; Merle Sweeting;
Lydia Bullard and family; Jacqueline Rolle Sands; Beatrice Munroe
and family; Meredith Munroe and family; Sam Evans; Matherine
Williams; Rhonda Williams; the entire Clarke and Musgrove families
from The Hermitage; Exuma; the Rev. Dr. Charles W. Saunders;
(whom she felt a special affinity to) and family; as well as the
descendents of the late Prince Albert Saunders; Moss Town; Exuma;
neighbours and friends of Moonshine Drive; Sunshine Park; the
Golden Gates No. II community; C. V. Bethel High School; The
Central Bank of the Bahamas and Ramnant Revival International
Deliverance Ministries, Tony Saunders of West Palm Beach, Fl. and
others too numerous to mention

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral
Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Thursday from 12:00
noon to 6:00p.m. and at the church on friday from 8:30 a.m. until
service time.



FROM page one

Coroner’s Court.

For many families the
inquest is the only avenue
for closure by determining
the circumstances of their
relative’s death and whether
any party should be held
accountable.

But in waiting for the
inquest to open and as they
continue, often for several
months, their grieving con-
tinues unabated.

The inquest into the death
of teenager Brenton Smith,
who was shot dead by police
in July last year, continued
for six months after it
opened in November as it
was adjourned five times
before its conclusion in
April.

And the Esfakis family
waited five years for an
inquest into the death of
Christopher Esfakis, 42, who
died after he was admitted
to Doctors Hospital for
burns treatment in April
2002.

The 12-month inquest fea-
turing 22 witnesses suffered
a number of setbacks before
a verdict was delivered in
February 2008 and then
quashed by Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall who said Mag-
istrate William Campbell
wrongly directed the jury to
only one possible outcome:
that Mr Esfakis died from
natural causes “substantial-
ly and significantly con-
tributed to by neglect” on
the part of medical staff.

Now the Esfakis family
are waiting for a date for the
inquest to be heard again.

And as the Chief Justice
asserted Mr Campbell, the
only magistrate currently sit-
ting as a coroner, was biased



BRENTON SMITH



in the inquiry, they have
been told an inquest will not
be heard until a new coroner
has been appointed in a new
coroner’s court.

However, they have been
given no indication about
when that might be.

“Justice delayed is justice
denied,” said Mr Esfakis’
sister Leandra Esfakis.

“Tt’s like a wound that can
never close because it’s not
allowed to close and it’s pro-
longing mental anguish and
suffering.

“It feels like there’s a
knife in your chest and some
days it’s a good day if the
knife doesn’t turn, and some
days that knife is turning
and it’s ripping you apart.

“With my brother that’s
the end of my family, there
will be no more Esfakises.

“You can never obtain
justice in a situation like
that, it’s not a question of
justice, what you want is
accountability.”

For the Esfakis family,
the coroner’s court has
been their only avenue to
find accountability for her
brother’s death as the
Medical Association and
the Hospital and Health-
care Facilities Board have
not moved to investigate
their detailed formal com-
plaint, Ms Esfakis said.

“The state needs to
respond in the interest of
the individual because
your basic right as a
human being is to have
your life protected and in
this jurisdiction the gate-
way to that is the coroner’s
court — and the coroner’s
court must work if we as
individuals are going to
have some sense that our
deaths will not go unan-
swered if we have an
unnatural death,” she said.

“The state has to do that
otherwise we are nothing.

“We have to have a val-
ue on life no matter whose
life it is.”

Relatives of Preston Fer-
guson, who was found
dead in a car in Exuma last
year, are still waiting to
learn how he died as police
originally ruled he had
died as a result of a traffic
accident and later
launched a murder probe.

The family are now wait-
ing for police to file for an
inquest to be heard before
they are able to find
answers about the circum-
stances of his death.

Mr Ferguson’s sister
Eloise Moxey said: “We
feel once the inquest hap-
pens we will know whether
they will say whether it
was an accident or a mur-
der, so we are just waiting.

“It’s very painful, it’s

at Coroner’s Court backlog

extremely painful, and we
want answers.

“It’s difficult for us to
know there are people out
there getting on with their
lives who we feel they may
have something to do with
this, but we have every
confidence the new Com-
missioner of Police will try
to do something.”

When the inquest is
heard Mrs Moxey hopes it
will bring some closure,
but closure is still pending,
as it is for the Esfakis fam-
ily.

Ms Esfakis hopes the
Coroner’s Bill 2009, which
has yet to be debated in
Parliament and finalised,
will help process the back-
log of inquests more quick-
ly and deliver an opportu-
nity for accountability in
the interest of grieving
families and the public.

However, she also sees
room for further stream-
lining of the system in the
new Bill, as the Bill still
calls for a jury to sit in the
Coroner’s Court, while in
the UK a coroner can lead
an inquest and reacha
conclusion without a jury.

“If there’s no direct
criminal liability that
attaches to the coroner’s
court why have a jury?”
Ms Esfakis asked.

“The coroner has the
ability to ask questions, get
the evidence, evaluate it,
and come to a decision
about the circumstances in
which a person died.

“But a jury, with all its
prejudices and biases, is
almost an obstacle to the
purpose of the court,
which is to inquire, inves-
tigate and come to a con-
clusion.”

Attorney: lawyers should not be

faulted for AG’s Office inefficiencies

FROM page one

defence lawyer is supposed to bring
that to the attention of the court and
then exploit it to their advantage.

"T really expect more from politi-
cians, especially those who were elect-
ed to represent the people. They
should really understand the legal sys-
tem. For Mr (Charles) Maynard to
make that kind of statement is ridicu-
lous. He's an idiot," said Mr Gomez, a
former senator who has spent 21 years
practising civil and criminal litigation.

He was replying to comments made
in Parliament by Charles Maynard,
Minister of State for Culture, who rep-
rimanded criminal defence lawyers
who "manipulate" the legal system for
their clients’ advantage.

The founder and partner of law firm
Chilcott Chambers said the "more
responsible statement" from Mr May-

nard would have been to encourage
public prosecutors to be more prepared
in order to match wits with seasoned
lawyers.

It is widely known, Mr Maynard told
the House, that many successful
lawyers have profited from the over-
burdened judicial system — sometimes
stalling cases intentionally — by find-
ing loopholes in the law or technical
flaws in the prosecution's case thereby
allowing known criminals to walk free.

Mr Maynard, who directed most of
his criticism towards opposition MP
and lawyer Philip “Brave” Davis, said:
"Tt is a known fact in this country that
for many years the member for Cat
Island has been an attorney to which
when prisoners find themselves in trou-
ble they run to because he had the abil-
ity through technicality and otherwise
to ensure non-conviction of those crim-
inals.

"We talk about the backlog in the

NOTICE

system of justice there is a reality that
there are lawyers out there who just
feed on the slowness of the process.
When a case will take seven years and
finally reach trial in the Supreme Court
it works in the defendant's favour
because witnesses would have lost
interest, been bought out, died or can't
remember.

"And there are lawyers who spe-
cialise in dragging the process out —
that's a fact."

Mr Gomez said if there are flaws in
the legal system or a case is mishandled
by the Crown leading to an acquittal it
makes no sense to blame the defence.

"If it turns out your client is acquit-
ted as a result of a misstep of the pros-
ecution it does not lie in the mouth of
the prosecutor or anyone else for crit-
icising counsel for doing their job. If
that is not the case why have a trial in
the first place, why not just hang the
people?"

The Public is advised that Clifton Heritage National Park
and its Administrative Office

Will Be Closed

from

Wednesday, June 23, 2010 To Friday, June 25, 2010 for
grounds maintenance and staff training.

We will re-open for business at
9am on Monday, June 28, 2010.

We Regret Any Inconvenience Caused.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




FRIDAY, JUNE 18,

2010







Eve set to compete at BIC Nationals

Meet will mark her
final appearance

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



WITH the eagerly anticipated
BTC National Championships
expected to be a changing of the
guard with rising stars vying for
national titles against established
veterans, it is also expected to be a
swan song for one of the country's
longest serving ambassadors of the
sport.

Veteran thrower Laverne Eve will
compete before the home crowd for
the final time in her illustrious career
when she takes the field next week-
end at the BTC Nationals.

BAAAs Public Relations Officer,
Alpheus “Hawk” Finlayson, said the
meet would be one to remember
because of the high level of compe-
tition expected.

"We have had many exciting
meets over the course of the year,
athletes have performed well on the

collegiate circuit and our elite ath-
letes have performed well on their
circuit as well,” he said. "So this will
be a meet you will remember for
quite a long time”

Finlayson said he wishes to see
support for the meet extending to
Eve, in her final contest in the
Bahamas.

“We wish for the general public
to not only support the meet, but to
come out and support one of the
greatest competitors in Bahamian
history, Laverne Eve, in her final
competition here in the Bahamas,”
he said. “We know people wont nor-
mally focus much attention on the

javelin as events go on around the
track, but in this instance we will
make our main focus and turn our
attention towards the javelin throw
and pause as we honour Laverne for
a stellar career.”

With an international career which
has spanned more than two decades,
Eve has represented the Bahamas
in virtually every regional and inter-
national competition.

She captured a gold medal at the
2002 Commonwealth Games in
Manchester, United Kingdom and
four years later took silver at the
2006 edition in Melbourne Australia.

At the Pan American Games, Eve

has been stellar with a silver medal in
1995 in Mar del Plata, Argentina,
bronze in 1999 in Winnipeg, Canada,
silver in 2003 in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic and bronze in
2007 in Rio De Janeiro Brazil.

She has had her most productive
finishes and trips to the medal podi-
um at the Central American and
Caribbean Championships where
she has captured 11 medals over the
course of her career.

She has qualified for four IAAF
World Championships, with her
highest finish, 15th in Helsinki, Fin-
land in 2005 and three [AAF World
Athletics Finals.

Eve has represented the Bahamas
at five Olympiads, with her best fin-
ish in 2004 at the Athens Olympics
when she barely missed the medal
stand in sixth place.

The BAAAs National Champi-
onships sponsored by BTC take

place June 25-26 at the Thomas A. _a

Robinson Stadium.





NT aici aL)



Competition tight
at Bahamas Snipe
Junior National
Championship



IF YOU were driving along
Eastern Road this past Satur-
day and noticed the action of
several small sailboats maneu-
vering among the buoys, then
you were treated to a glimpse
of the hotly contested 2010
Snipe Junior Championships.
Great sailing conditions com-
bined with eager and competi-
tive spirits made this event an
extremely exciting series,
despite the small number of
competitors.

Donico Brown with crew
Michael Gibson and Christo-
pher Sands with crew David
Russell pushed each other to
their limits in every race. So
great was the desire to win, that
after five races, there was only
one point separating the two
teams and the championship
was to be decided by the final
race. Who would persevere and
come out the victor? Donico
and Michael got off to a great
start in the deciding race and
held on, rounding the wind-
ward mark ahead of the fleet.
From there, they were able to
control the race and protect
their position all the want to
the finish line, taking the cham-
pionship on a tiebreaker away
from the Sands team. This put

( RENALDO'S RAMBLINGS .
Final exam: 15 Lessons we

Chris and David in second
place overall, with Shaqueel
Dean and crew Daniel Gibson
third, Pedro Rahming and crew
Dustin Smith fourth and
Misheal Taffin and crew
Thomas Treco fifth.

This marked Donico’s fourth
time in the top spot of this
event — twice as a skipper and
twice in crew position. Last
year Donico crewed for Chris
Sands, so this time he was all
smiles in having beaten his for-
mer skipper and friend.

It is impressive and truly
gratifying to see the level of
talent being developed with
these young sailors. They are
all a product of the Bahamas
Sailing Association’s junior sail-
ing programme run by Instruc-
tor Maria Aaboe. They start
off learning to sail in the Opti-
mist dinghy (those little square
boats with square sails one
often sees out in front of Mon-
tagu Beach) and then gradu-
ate to the Sunfish, Laser and
Snipe Classes. In this Snipe
event their ages ranged from
13 to 20.

The Snipe Junior Nationals
is held annually on Montagu
Bay for sailors up to the age of
20. Although the Snipe class

* a
=

ABOVE: Chris Sands & david
Russell crossing in front of Don-
ico Brown and Michael Gibson.

has been in existence in the
Bahamas since 1954, this junior
event was not started until the
late 1990’s when members of
the class decided it was time to
get more youngsters interest-
ed in sailing with the hope that
at some point they would be
representing the Bahamas at
major international events.
This has become a reality
through the efforts of The
Bahamas Sailing Association,
Nassau Yacht Club and Royal
Nassau Sailing Club as seen by
the junior’s these days partici-
pation in events such as the
ISAF Youth World Champi-
onships, Sunfish World Cham-
pionships and the upcoming
Central American Caribbean




learned from the 2010 NBA Finals

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

15. Jumpshooters are more
inconsistent and harder to
understand than women

14. Irrespective of the sport,
replays can do absolutely
nothing to trump the power
of idiotic human error

13. Bahamians have an
inexplicable love for Shannon
Brown

12. Sasha Vujacic is easily
the most annoying player in
the NBA and I'm not the only
person that thinks so

11. Diehard Laker fans hate
the bandwagon jumpers more
than Laker haters hate the
Lakers

10. Rajon Rondo can't be
the best point guard in the
league if he’s neutralised by
his defender conceding jump-
shots on every possession and
playing five feet off the ball.
You're not playing off Chris
Paul and Derron Williams
like that.

9, According to Bahamians

... teams in the NBA never
win outright by outplaying
their opponents. All losses are
attributed to the "the NBA
being fixed" or "the NBA
extending the series to make
more money"

8. Kobe Bryant can stop the
Oil Spill in the Gulf Coast if he
really wants to. In fact, win or
lose, the whole disaster should
be done today now that Kobe
has some free time

7. Kendrick Perkins can't
finish on offence, commits too
many turnovers, and makes
too many extra passes ...
Kendrick Perkins is also more
important to the Celtics than
any of us realised.

6. “KOBE” has transformed
to more than just a name. To
Bahamians its used with dual
meanings like Hawaiians use
“aloha.” Only rather than
using it to say hello or goodbye
... We use it to begin or end an
argument with emphasis. Try it
today now that it’s all over.
Turn to the person sitting next
to you and say “Kobe,” guar-
anteed reaction one way or
another. Now find an argu-
ment already in progress and
interrupt by yelling “Kobe” ...

that argument just ended.

5. Game seven yesterday
was a surprise to no one in the
Bahamas. Everyone you talk
to today already knew that was
going to happen

4. Even if the Celtics lose
this series, Big Baby Davis and
Nate Robinson walk away
from the Finals as winners ...
they just earned themselves a
reality show.

3. If NBA players walked
into the stadium holding the
hands of little kids like they
did in soccer ... we would all
think it was really weird. Just
for clarification, its also weird
in soccer isn’t it?

2. Derek Fisher has this
whole professional basketball
thing worked out to an exact
science. Have one or two good
games during the playoffs to
magnify your importance and
earn contract extensions.
Coast for the remainder of the
year and shoot 25 percent.
Genius.

1. Mario's Bowling Alley
and Entertainment Palace
wished the NBA Finals hap-
pened 365 days a year.



















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LOCAL NEWS

a bi





wawreubcroyaliankcom/ caribbean



ST geared bepebemsget ot pe gray agro, ~ Mh le (erp sara abet Mla eo maa



RBC FINCO Prince Charles

Mortgage Centre celebrates
years of service with
a creative twist.

REC ARCO Prince Charles Mortgage Centre is proud to mark it fourth anniversary by sponsoring
the REC Summer Art Workshog, Far 30 years the workshop has expoded young Bahamians
to the broader world of art and to working artists. Working with and leaming from established,
professional artists from The Bahamas and beyond provides an environment charged with
creativity and promise—a promise that has bed many to sucoessful camors, Art is a powerhl
toal for leaming that enhances critical thinking, communication skills and cultural awamnmss.
Ar RBC FING we are proud to support it.

RAC FINCO Prince Charles Mortgage Cente extends great appreciation to all of our clients
and business associates who have partnered with us ower the years,

The branch is open on weekdays from aa:ooam - 7200pm with additional hours on Saturdays
from 14:00am = 3:00pm,

Pictured feces lefts Ederard Strachan, Manoger, Mortgages, REE FINCO Prince Chokes Mortgage Center;
Palrice Richie, Sankar Manages, Mortgages, REC FICO; Pamela Chaneber, Education OMe - Ar & Design,
Ministry of Education.

CRT MUL mame lt me). del tt Ce



| RBC FINCO





Felipé Major/Tribune staff



rt

LATRELL LEWIS holds a picture of her son Kilano Capron



Mother desperately
seeking funds for
hit-and-run baby

FROM page one

The impact pushed the truck,
occupied by Ms Lewis and fam-
ily, off the road and onto a wall,
causing Kilano to fall from his
car seat onto the floor.

Ms Lewis’ mother pulled her
unconscious daughter and
grandson from the smoking
wreck while the two thieves fled
the scene on foot.

Rather than risk waiting for
an ambulance, police officers
transported the severely injured
and presumed dead infant to
Princess Margaret Hospital.
There, doctors told Ms Lewis
that her son had “a one out of
ten chances” for survival.

Later Ms Lewis would learn
that the S10 truck that hit her
was reported stolen two hours
after the accident. It’s owner
was in Eleuthera and had lent
the car to his nephews.

Kilano spent the next three
weeks in hospital, suffering
from a broken leg, swollen
heart, and lung and internal
bleeding in his skull.

Diagnosed with cystic
encephalomalacia, “legal retar-
dation” according to his mother,
he had to be referred to a neu-
ro-developmental facility out-
side of the Bahamas.

Kilano and his family travel
to Joe Dimaggio Children’s
Hospital in Miami, Florida
every six weeks for checkups — if
not sooner.

In April, he spent 14 days at
the Miami hospital. He had to
have a feeding tube inserted
because food was travelling to
his lungs instead of his stom-
ach.

Ms Lewis was a part of a gov-
ernment temporary employ-
ment programme that ended
last month.

She will have to wait six
months before Kilano can do
another swallow test to deter-
mine whether or not he can
begin eating on his own again.

Although the family’s med-
ical insurance covers 80 per cent
of the baby’s medical fees, the
insurance company is still
querying Kilano’s fees and have
yet to make any payments to
the hospital.

Additionally, the medical
insurance does not cover cost
for flights, hotel rooms and spe-
cialists that do not accept insur-
ance — like Kilano’s gastroen-
terologist.

Born healthy and without any
complications, Kilano will have
to undergo an intense series of
therapy for his physical and
mental development. And as he
gets older his chances for a full
recovery lessens.

With no recourse available
and at their wit’s end, the fami-
ly finally decided to break their
silence over the issue. They had
been convinced there was no
hope because of their lack of
insurance, however friends and
legal advisers suggested they
shouldn’t let the matter be dis-
missed.

In an effort to raise funds, the
family will be hosting a gospel
explosion tonight at Bahamas
Harvest Church, Prince Charles
Drive at 7 pm. Any financial
contribution, legal advice or
support would be greatly appre-
ciated, persons can contact
Latrell Lewis for details at 448-
9180.

Pastor reportedly considers
Suing ZNS for defamation

FROM page one

















Baptist Church on East and Shirley Streets, is currently engaged in
legal proceedings stemming from an originating summons filed by
the Zion United Baptist Convention calling for an audit of the
church’s finances over nine years.

But a report about the legal proceedings televised by ZNS was
inaccurate and libellous, according to Rev Morrison’s attorney J
Henry Bostwick who obtained a transcript of the television report
yesterday.

“What they (ZNS) said is totally unfounded and in my view,
libellous,” Mr Bostwick said.

“We are going to have to take ZNS to task.”

However, Mr Bostwick did not offer comment on the current sta-
tus of the case.

The Supreme Court summons obtained by The Tribune yester-
day includes seven claims against Rev Morrison filed on August 26,
2009.

Zion United Baptist Convention claims Rev Morrison failed to
have the finances of the church audited and the results reported to
the general membership of the Church, and that this constitutes a
breach of Zion Baptist Church’s Constitution.

The summons further declares the purported election and selec-
tion of a new Trustee Board in December 2008, is ultra vires,
“beyond the powers”, of the Constitution of the Zion Baptist
Church.

The Convention calls for the court to appoint a certified public
accountant to audit the books and finances of the church for the
period 2001 to 2009, and for Rev Morrison, the purported newly-
elected Trustee Board, and other officers of the Church, to co-oper-
ate fully with the court appointed accountant in the execution of his
duty.

Tine further orders detailed in the summons call for a new elec-
tion of members of the Board of Trustees to be conducted and
supervised by the Zion United Baptist Convention under the
direction of the court; for further and other relief and directions as
the court sees just, and that the costs be provided for by the defen-
dant, Rev Morrison.

Calls to Rev Morrison, Zion United Baptist Convention pres-
ident Bishop Samuel Green, and attorney for the Zion United Bap-
tist Convention Sidney Collie, were not returned before The Tri-
bune went to press.

The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB) and ZNS
general manager Edwin Lightbourne declined to comment.


in

ee

JUNE



v TRIBUNE
FRIDAY,

18, 2010

FAMILY GUARDIAN



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net













By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE $16 million South-
west Shopping Plaza is
already 50 per cent leased, it
was revealed at yesterday’s
groundbreaking, and con-
struction could be complete -
and the complex ready for
occupancy - by the 2011 sec-
ond quarter, its principal
developer said yesterday.

Larry Treco, head of CGT
Construction, said the plaza
was expected to be one of the
largest retail complexes in
New Providence, with one of
the most upscale facades and
properly planned parking,



BREAKING GROUND — Shown (lI-r) are Mr Maynard, Dr Minnis, Larry Treco, John Treco, PM Hubert
Ingraham, Angela Treco and Wesley Treco...

Photos by Peter Ramsey

$16m project 50% leased

Multi-million shopping complex targets 2011
Q2 construction finish, with tenants set to
include Marco’s Pizza and Burger King





PRESS members speak with PM

entrances and exits.

He added that the 11.5
acre property at the north-
west corner of Carmichael
and Blue Hill roads was cho-

sen because it is one of the
fastest growing urban areas
on the island, and he and his
partners saw the need for a
proper shopping outlet.
“We think that we have
some very good tenants who
are seasoned retailers, and
we seek to get quality ten-
ants,” he said. “People have
to start up but we don’t want
a high turnover, so we think
we have some good, solid

SEE page 4B







INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





Bahamas tops region’s
urban unemployment

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas has

the highest urban

unemployment

rate in the

Caribbean region,
a joint report by the Interna-
tional Labour Organisation
(ILO) and a United Nations
(UN) body has revealed, caus-
ing one leading business exec-
utive to yesterday suggest this
nation was paying for its “folly”
in failing to diversify the econ-
omy.

Responding to findings that
pegged the Bahamas’ urban
unemployment rate at 12.4 per
cent at end-2009, compared to
11.3 per cent for Jamaica and 10
per cent for Barbados, Brian
Nutt, the Bahamas Employers
Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident, told Tribune Business
that this nation still “may have
not seen the worst of it” with
more companies preparing for
lay-offs.

While expressing surprise
that the Bahamas was “the
highest in the Caribbean” when
it came to urban unemploy-
ment, a figure that would
include most of its population
given the focus on Nassau and
Freeport, Mr Nutt estimated
that it would take a further 12-

* Nation suffering 12.4% urban unemployment rate,
ahead of Jamaica and Barbados, prompting BECon
chief to suggest paying for ‘folly’ in failing to diversify

* Warns Bahamas ‘may not have seen the
worst’ of unemployment, warning three
more firms carrying out lay-offs

* Suggests make take 12-18 months to get Bahamian
unemployment ‘back to acceptable levels’

18 months for this nation to see
unemployment start retreating
back to acceptable levels.

“T, of course, knew what the
Government’s figures were, but
would have thought that some
of the other Caribbean coun-
tries would have been higher
than us,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business. “The fact we’re the
highest is surprising, and does
not bode very well for us.

“It comes back to, I guess,
how hard we’ve been impacted
by this economic downturn.
Most of our eggs are in one bas-
ket, the tourism industry, so I
would imagine that although
the other Caribbean countries
are looking at growing tourism,
they’re much more diversified
than ourselves as far as the
economy goes.”

The joint ILO/Economic
Commission for Latin America

Fixed income’s ‘big appetite’ $30m public debt saving if rate cut

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A LEADING investment banker yes-
terday told Tribune Business that the
demand among Bahamian retail
investors for initial public offerings
(IPOs) was still questionable, although
there was “a big appetite” for fixed-
income securities due to declining bank
deposit rates.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity
Merchant Bank & Trust’s president,
said: “That’s a big appetite in the market
for fixed income securities. The banks
have been dropping deposit rates rela-
tive to liquidity in the system.”

With surplus liquidity (the amount of
available assets in the commercial bank-
ing sector for onward lending purpos-
es) standing at around $600 million cur-

BEC ‘a runaway train’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Attorney for $105m power
plant opponents questions

Deposit rate pressure raises attraction
for bonds, preference shares

rently, there has been downward pres-
sure on deposit rates, Mr Anderson say-
ing that rates which may have been 5.5
per cent six months ago may now be 4.5
per cent.

In a bid to achieve a greater return on
their funds, Mr Anderson said institu-
tional and retail investors were seeing
the average 7.5 per cent interest coupon
being offered by fixed income securi-
ties, such as bonds and preference
shares, as very attractive.

“There’s a fair amount of appetite
around,” he added. “There’s also a fair
amount of money sitting in bank

SEE page 4B

FEEL Good ABOUT

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net



IF GOVERNMENT lowers the
Bahamian prime rate by 0.5-1 per cent it
could save $30 million per year in inter-
est payments on its Bahamian dollar
debt, a former MP and minister said yes-
terday, lamenting that both the FNM
and PLP governments have not had
proper ministers of finance in the posi-
tion over the years.

Tennyson Wells, speaking at the
Rotary Club of West Nassau’s weekly
meeting, said successive governments
have not made the necessary changes to
fiscal and monetary policy that would
directly benefit Bahamians and the econ-
omy, and owed the oversight to the lack
of economists and people who under-

Ex-Minister and MP calls for
‘proper’ Ministers of Finance

stand business in government.

“Unfortunately, I think those person
who have been running government for
the past 25 years or so really don’t
understand the economy of this coun-
try and what will make it tick,” said Mr
Wells.

“They should get some persons to be
Minister of Finance who at least under-
stand something about business and eco-
nomic,s and how the economy works -
study, think about it and what can be
done to improve it.”

Mr Wells said government’s cutting
the Prime Rate would, in effect, keep

SEE page 4B

Bahama’ Health

Your HEALTHPLAN



THE Bahamas
Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC)
has been accused
of behaving like
“a runaway |
train” over pub- |
lic consultation
and permitting
for the $105 mil-
lion Wilson City
power plant, an
attorney for the project’s oppo-
nents questioning whether the
Government would have
allowed a private developer to
proceed in a similar fashion.

Fred Smith QC, attorney and
partner at Callender’s & Co, in
trial submissions filed with, and
read out, in the Supreme Court
in Freeport, said all key deci-
sions taken in relation to the
new Abaco power plant’s con-
struction had been “taken in
secret” - especially in autumn
2009, when construction began
in earnest.

In addition, Mr Smith alleged
that BEC had failed to consult
interested parties on the
planned use of Bunker C fuel at
Wilson City, despite the fact
that consultants hired by his
clients, Responsible Develop-
ment for Abaco (RDA), had
calculated it would cost an extra
$3.823 million per annum for
the state-owned Corporation to
use this fuel as opposed to
Automotive Diesel Oil (ADO).

“The NTH report compar-
ing the cost of using Bunker C
fuel at the Wilson City power
plant with diesel fuel costs con-
cludes that it will cost an extra
$3.823 million per year in capi-
tal and operating costs if the
plant uses Bunker C fuel, some-
thing that would make this fuel
far more expensive than
diesel,” Mr Smith alleged.

“While diesel would be more



whether government
would have allowed
private developer to
proceed as state-owned
power company did

* Claims use of ADO fuel,
which BEC has conceded,
will save more than
$3m per annum

* Accuses corporation
of making decisions
‘on the hoof’

expensive to purchase, costing
more than $21 million a year,
the additional capital and oper-
ating costs, combined with the
need to desulpherise the
Bunker C exhaust gases, would
make the latter anywhere from
$300,000 to $1.1 million more
expensive per annum.

“The Bunker C Report also
makes clear that once the min-
imum necessary emissions con-
trol systems are in place,
Bunker C actually turns out to
be more expensive than diesel.
The only way in which Bunker
C is cheaper is if corners are
cut on environmental stan-
dards.”

Mr Smith alleged that BEC
had never produced estimates
to show why Bunker C was the
best cost option, adding that
proper consultation with his
clients and other Abaco stake-
holders would have “fully
explored” this issue and
allowed the best choice to be
made.

Referring at an affidavit sub-
mitted by Kermit McCartney,
BEC’s Family Island project

SEE page 4B

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and the Caribbean (ECLAC)
study, using what it said were
national statistics that includ-
ed “hidden unemployment”,
showed that urban unemploy-
ment in the Bahamas had risen
markedly in 2009, growing from
8.7 per cent at 2008 year-end
to 12.4 per cent at the end of
2009 - a rise of some 3.7 per-
centage points.

This level, not surprisingly
given the recession’s severity,
was the highest for a decade,
surpassing the 10.8 per cent and
10.2 per cent urban unemploy-
ment rates seen by the
Bahamas in 2003 and 2005
respectively. The current urban
unemployment levels is more
than five percentage points
above the 6.9 per cent decade-
low experienced in 2001.

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
fromthe dailyrepor, —









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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



=~) =
Teachers to learn about
careers, opportunities
in tourism sector

BHA’s educator internship begins June 28

SOME 100 Bahamian teach-
ers will spend a week in the
tourism industry this summer
to learn about the range of
careers and business opportu-
nities, and how to better pre-
pare young people for them.

The initiative is part of the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
seventh annual Summer Edu-
cator Internship Programme,
beginning on June 28, in col-
laboration with the Ministry of
Education, the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation and the
College of the Bahamas’
(COB) Culinary Hospitality
Management Institute.

Public and private school
teachers, principals, counsellors
and subject specialists will join
with Bahamian business part-
ners to get a hands-on “snap-
shot” of the tourism industry,
and better understand how crit-
ical their roles are in preparing
the workforce to make a mean-
ingful difference in this nation’s
largest industry.

“We are thrilled to be able
to once again create this oppor-
tunity to strengthen and build
on the relationship we have
with the Ministry of Education
and educators throughout the
Bahamas. While tourism is the

lifeblood of our economy,
teachers are its soul, who touch
and influence our potential
employees in profound ways,”
said Beverly Saunders, chair-
person of workforce develop-
ment at the Bahamas Hotel
Association. With more than
1,000 job classifications within
the tourism industry in the
Bahamas, and countless entre-
preneurial possibilities, the
internship programme presents
a key development opportunity
for educators to enhance their
understanding of the industry.

The internship programme
will be held on Grand Bahama
later in the summer. About 50
teachers participated last year
and organisers expect to exceed
that number this year.

The private sector is partici-
pating at several levels, con-
ducting workshops and a ‘con-
versation with industry leaders’
on the opening day. About 15
hotels and tourism-related busi-
nesses will operate as place-
ment and training sites for
interns for three days, and the
internship experience will finish
with a final-day feedback and

brainstorming session on
strengthening the partnership
between education and indus-
try.

The BHA’s workforce devel-
opment manager, Bridget Mur-
ray, said: “We are delighted to
be celebrating our seventh year
of internships for our educa-
tors.

“We applaud the more than
600 educators who have invest-
ed in their time and profes-
sional development over the
summer to learn how to better
connect tourism to their school
experience. Having worked
with our educators over the
years, we are assured from their
comments and commitment to
the programme that they have
benefited tremendously from
the exposure”.

The programme has evolved
over the years to include more
properties and allied businesses,
as well as teachers participat-
ing in the one-week immersion.

“We are indebted to our host
properties, and take this oppor-
tunity to encourage others to
join us in hosting our esteemed
educators,” adds Ms Murray.

Domino’s Pizza to open 10th
store in Coral Harbour

DOMINO’S Pizza yesterday confirmed it will
open its 10th Bahamian store at the new Coral
Harbour Shopping Centre in August, creating
some 25 badly-needed jobs.

The outlet, which will be located in the plaza
west of the Coral Harbour Roundabout, will
enable the pizza chain, which is owned by BISX-
listed AML Foods, to better serve customers in
western New Providence - covering areas such as
Bacardi Road, Coral Harbour, Adelaide, South
Ocean, Mount Pleasant and Lyford Cay.

Domino’s added that the new store’s addition
would enable it to reconfigure its existing stores

at Carmichael and Cable Beach, improving ser-
vice.

“We are constantly listening to feedback from
our customers. Based on this we saw the need to
open a new location in the west, and we are
pleased to be able to meet their demands,” said
Shervin Stuart, executive vice-president of AML
Foods, with responsibility for Domino’s opera-
tions.

“Opening our 10th store is a milestone that
we are looking forward to. Our goal is to continue
to develop a loyal customer following by deliv-
ering hot, great-tasting pizza at a great price”.



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THE TRIBUNE

Shipping output mixed

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 3B

VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

despite Miami ‘records’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

INTERNATIONAL ship-
ping from South Florida ports
has seen an 18 per cent increase
that could hit record highs this
year, according to a recent Mia-
mi Herald article, which cites
the Bahamas as one of the des-
tinations that could set record
trade with Miami as a result.

However, Tropical Shipping
told Tribune Business yester-
day that it had not seen a sig-
nificant increase in shipping
volumes to the Bahamas.

“We have not seen any
noticeable change in the
Bahamas’ market volumes,”
said Tropical Shipping
spokesperson Mary Udry.

Oralee Deveaux, inside sales
coordinator for Seaboard
Marine, said that through last
year her company had
increased its client base despite
the recession, and thus enjoyed
an increase in shipping vol-
umes.

According to her, Seaboard
made a marginal reduction in
its rates, attracting competitors’
customers, and leaned on its
“dedicated” customer service.
She said the shipping company
has a 24-hour sales centre,
something the competition does
not.

The Miami Herald article
touted Miami’s $39.2 billion
first quarter results, saying
exports increased by more than
14 per cent, while imports
increased 26.2 per cent.

According to the article, Mia-
mi area ports could set new
records in trade this year, due
in great part it seems to multi-
million dollar shipping increas-
es to Haiti, which was struck
by a devastating earthquake in
January.

“Countries on track to set
new records for total trade with
the Miami district this year
include the Bahamas, Chile,
China, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Ecuador, Haiti, Panama,
Paraguay, Peru, Mexico and
Switzerland,” said Ken Roberts,
president of WorldCity, a Coral
Gables media company that
analyses US census numbers to
spot local trade trends.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
also saw strong export numbers
last year and in the 2010 first

quarter.

“Throughout the recession
we have gotten new clients,”
she said. “We give good cus-
tomer service and some of our
rates might be higher, but some
people believe more in good
customer service.”

In February, Tropical Ship-
ping reported declines of 30
per cent to the Bahamas and
wider Caribbean, forcing the
closure of the company’s port
of Palm Beach warehouse.

The closure caused the loss
of 35-40 jobs in the US. How-
ever, Tropical Shipping report-
ed no significant reductions in
staffing.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
had not made any cuts to staff
through in 2009 or in the first
half of 2010.

Canada deal offers ‘double tax’ benefit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Bahamas yesterday signed its 22nd
Tax Information Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with Canada, as Tribune Business
revealed exclusively this week, the deal
containing a clause that, just as this news-
paper predicted, places it on an equal foot-
ing with Barbados in terms of 'double tax’
benefits.

Brent Symonette, minister of foreign
affairs, confirmed that the Canada TIEA
contained a clause that the dividend profits
of Canadian companies based in the
Bahamas would not be taxed upon repa-
triation back home.

Several financial services industry ser-
vices had previously told Tribune Business
that if the final TIEA agreement stuck to
initial drafts seen last year, then the deal
with Canada was one of the best for this
country in terms of providing reciprocal
economic/trade benefits.

These sources told this newspaper that
the proposed Canadian TIEA they had
seen offered to place the Bahamas on an
equal footing with Barbados, effectively
giving it a ‘double taxation’ treaty with
Ottawa without entering a formalised
arrangement.

Currently, major Canadian-owned banks,
especially FirstCaribbean, have their
regional headquarters domiciled in Barba-

dos, largely because
of that nation's 'dou-
ble tax' treaty with
their homeland. The
treaty ensures their
profits are only taxed
once - at the lower
Barbadian rate -
rather than at the
higher Canadian
thresholds, and has
acted as a major draw
for Canadian compa-
nies seeking to do business in the region to
establish their bases there.

"Canada had proffered an agreement
last year that was more attractive than any-
one else's," one Bahamian financial indus-
try source told Tribune Business yester-
day, "so I hope they go with that.

"If the agreement is signed as it was
offered, as it was on the table, in 2009, we
are treated as having double taxation
[rights] even though we do not have an
agreement, so we will be in the same posi-
tion as Barbados. We'd get the same sort of
treatment when the Canadian-owned banks
repatriate their profits back home."

Another highly-placed Bahamian finan-
cial services executive confirmed to Tri-
bune Business: "I understand that the
TIEA with Canada was suppose to be one
of the better ones. "We have a double tax-
ation treaty, in effect, but also there was

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HUMAN RESOURCES

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
June 25", 2010 to:

Re: Junior Accountant, 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108

careers@fidelitybahamas.com



ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

going to be an exchange of other things -
know how, and opportunities for Bahami-
an businesses to do business with Canadian
businesses. Certainly, there was a market
for Bahamian goods and services."

Yet the executive added: "T understand it
would be a good one, but until I see the
final signed document I just don't know. It's
just that in the art of negotiations, some
things fall away and others don't.

"This one has been talked about for quite
a while, and because of the linkages with
Canada, universities and other things,
everyone is waiting to see this one."

The Canada TIEA is also likely to have
linkages with current trade talks taking
place between Ottawa on the one hand,
and the Bahamas and CARICOM on the
other, over a replacement trade agreement
for CARIBCAN that would be WTO-com-
pliant.

The Bahamas has been a key destina-
tion for Canadian foreign direct investment
(FDI), especially in sectors such as banking,
tourism and construction, while a Canadi-
an firm, Vancouver Airport Services
(Y VRAS), is managing the transformation
of Lynden Pindling International Airport
(LPIA).

On the reverse, Canada remains an
important market for Bahamian exports
such as crawfish, while many Bahamians
receive their tertiary education at Canadi-
an colleges and universities.

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

TheApplicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.
and

Key job functions

include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands
Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.



JOB OPPORTUNITY

Marketing Manager

The successful candidate must possess the following:

« A creative thinker with a knack for advertising and a history of creating

big ideas.

A proven track record of driving sales and significant organizational

impact.

Must be adaptable toa changing, fast-pa ced environment.

Able to deal with a variety of personalities and situations with energy

and enthusiasm.

Able to work in a culture/environment that promotes an entrepreneu-
rial spirit and a “let's get it done now" attitude,
Focus on possibilities rather than problems.

Strong customer orientation.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
« Develop and execute effective local marketing plans that support

annual key initiatives.

Lead efforts to effectively plan, execute, measure and evaluate local

market achvities.

Direct media planning and graphic design.

Establish and cultivate PR/media relationships.

Develop and Manage budgets.

Customer Relations and management of complaint process.

Build community goodwill and manage relationships with influential

organizations

Serve as the local steward of the brand, ensuring all local marketing

activities are aligned with established brand standards,

REQUIREMENTS:

« Bachelors degree in Communications, Marketing or a closely related

field or equivalent work experience,

« Minimum five vears professional related experience

COMPETITIVE SALARY & ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.

Send résumé to: marketingmanagerwanted@gmiail.com

Deadline fora

plication is Wednesda

une 28th, 2010



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



= S
Bahamas Electricity Corporation ‘a runaway train’

FROM page 1B

manager, on March 30, 2010, Mr Smith
alleged that the power producer had
made a complete u-turn and was now
proposing to use ADO as Wilson
City’s fuel rather than Bunker C.

Based on this evidence, the QC
claimed: “It is apparent that BEC is
making fundamental decisions affect-
ing this plant on the hoof.” Acknowl-
edging that his clients were not unhap-
py about BEC’s volte face, Mr Smith
added: “Without looking a gift horse in
the mouth, however, this seemingly
arbitrary decision making process is
precisely what the applicants complain
of.

“They cannot be sure that without
protective court orders BEC may
revert to Heavy Fuel Oil. In addition,
this is not simply a BEC decision. It is
one which must be permitted by the

relevant statutory authority.”

Meanwhile, Mr Smith alleged that
BEC and the Government had pre-
sented the power plant project as a
“done deal” in the only Town Meeting
held on it, in September 2009. He
claimed they then “scurried away” to
obtain the various construction
approvals and permits required after
being unable to confirm publicly that
all these were in place, and after build-
ing work had already begun.

To further support his allegation
“that BEC is a runaway train”, Mr
Smith claimed that the Corporation
was using two real estate parcels for
the project - one 50 acres in size,
another 25 acres - despite this land not
being formally granted to it by the
Crown respectively. The larger land
parcel is supposed to have been con-
veyed to it, the latter leased.

“Despite the appearance of attempt-
ed compliance with regulatory author-
ities, despite the appearance of regu-
latory authorities purporting to exer-
cise some supervision and control,
BEC is proceeding with construction
and operation of the plant in complete
disregard of due process or even
attempted observance of attempted
regulatory control or oversight,” Mr
Smith alleged.

“Unfortunately, because this is a
public corporation the relevant author-
ities have turned a blind eye to this
behaviour. One only has to posit the
question: “If BEC were not a public
corporation doing the will of the exec-
utive branch of government, would all
of the relevant authorities permit a
private company to embark upon and
construct and proceed to operate a
project in this fashion?’”

Mr Smith alleged that the Wilson
City plant was being constructed adja-
cent to a community that held “the
largest concentration of renewable
energy users in the Bahamas”, and
questioned whether BEC had ever
seriously explored the use of renew-
able energy on Abaco as an alterna-
tive.

The trial, which is being held before
Justice Hartman Longley, has been
adjourned so that attorneys acting for
BEC and the Government can file
revised trial submissions by June 15,
2010. The hearings are due to resume
on July 9 and July 16.

Mr Smith alleged that the Govern-
ment and BEC would petition the
court not to grant RDA the relief it
was seeking because the Wilson City
plant was now more than 80 per cent
complete.

While it now seemed impractical for
the Wilson City power plant to be relo-
cated elsewhere, Mr Smith said RDA
was now seeking a Supreme Court
order requiring that consultation “may
now take place even at this late stage”
to ensure its views on fuel type and
other issues were accounted for.

“Unfortunately, given that BEC is
effectively an arm of the executive,
this incestuous relationship has
deprived the applicants and the public
in general in the Bahamas of the super-
vision and protection of the rule of
law, which the regulatory authorities
would have guarded if BEC was a pri-
vate development company,” Mr
Smith alleged.

“The result is that the applicants are
pitted against, not only BEC but also
the authorities that in fact should be on
RDA’s side. Not against it! “

Bahamas tops region’s urban unemployment

FROM page 1B

Describing current unem-
ployment levels as “‘a very seri-
ous problem”, Mr Nutt added:
“T think that, unfortunately,
there are certain companies
right now that are in the
process of doing lay-offs. It may
be that we have not seen the
worst of it.

“I know there of three com-
panies right now that are doing
lay-offs. I’m hoping that as
some companies are still in the
process of doing lay-offs, some
companies will be able to start
picking up. Yet I see this as tak-
ing 12-18 months to get us back
to ‘acceptable’ unemployment
rates.”

Mr Nutt and Obie Ferguson,
the Trades Union Congress
(TUC) president and labour
attorney, both found common
ground in telling Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that many
Bahamian companies were like-
ly to delay hiring back - or tak-
ing on - new staff to start grow-
ing again as they needed to
regain losses suffered during
the past two years of economic
contraction.

“It’s very bad,” Mr Ferguson
said of the Bahamas’ unem-
ployment rate, “and looks like
it’s going to get worse before
it gets better. Most of the hotels
are working managers two and
three days a week, that type of

thing.

“Even though things are
picking up a bit, companies are
still trying to recoup some of
the money they’ve lost in the
last couple of years before they
start hiring again.”

Mr Ferguson also expressed
surprise that the Bahamas had
the highest urban unemploy-
ment rate in the Caribbean,
telling Tribune Business that
this might be related to the
ECLAC/ILO survey account-
ing for the numerous undocu-
mented workers in the Bahami-
an labour force.

And Mr Nutt added: “I think
Bahamians generally started to
take it for granted that we were

always going to do well, and
that’s proven not to be the case.
It’s a situation right now, look-
ing at how we have the highest
unemployment rate in the
Caribbean, we are paying for
our folly.”

Apart from overspending
and taking on too much debt,
Mr Nutt said this also related to
the Bahamas’ failure to diver-
sify its economy beyond one
that was largely still reliant on
banking and tourism.

While diversification would
be almost impossible to achieve
in a recessionary environment,
the BECon president told Tri-
bune Business this needed to
be explored as soon as recovery

Fixed income’s ‘big appetite’

FROM page 1B

deposits, so if we get good deals
like the dock [Arawak Cay
port], they’ll be very attractive
to the market.” RoyalFidelity
has won the contract to act as
the placement agent/financial
adviser to the $65 million port
project, which could be look-
ing to raise up to $30 million in
financing via a preference share
or bond issue.

Mr Anderson, though, hada
different outlook on equities.
There had been no ‘true’ [POs
in the Bahamas since 2001, and
there was “still a reasonable
amount of selling pressure”
among stocks listed on the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX).

This was happening despite
the Bahamian stock market
having “bottomed out” in Octo-

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POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Concierge for Office Building
Candidate must have excellent
customer service skills, and be

computer

literate.

Must have

experience in a customer service

related

role. Candidate should

be well groomed, mature and

self-motivated.

Security Officer for
Office Building
Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and
have excellent verbal and written
communication skills. Candidate
must be willing to work weekends
and extended hours and have own

transportation.

Interested

applicants

should

respond by sending their resume to:
DA# 87768, c/o

The Tribune,

P.O. Box N-.3027,
Nassau, Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



ber 2009, then “bumping along
the bottom for six to nine
months”.

“T believe the market is more
set for recovery,” Mr Ander-
son told Tribune Business,
adding that the selling pressure
was likely being generated by
Bahamian retail investors who
needed to raise money because
of economic difficulties.

“T think people are still under
a lot of employment pressure,
cost related issues at home,” he
added. “A lot of people are
struggling at home with the
economy.”

Apart from the Arawak Cay
port, impending IPOs include
the potential $60-$65 million
offering of a 25 per cent stake
in the Commonwealth Brew-
ery/Burns House group, which
the company is hoping to place
before year-end. Other poten-
tial IPOs include one for the














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a =
r
r

‘

Real Estate

Aa a

Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway dump, as the reces-
sion forces both the Govern-
ment and some businesses to
contemplate actions they would
otherwise have not done or
delayed indefinitely.

“There’s a possibility of IPOs
coming to market and being
fairly successful. ’'m not sure
what the appetite for IPOs is,
but there is appetite for fixed
income,” Mr Anderson told
Tribune Business.

“There’s a kind of latent IPO
appetite, but ’'m not sure. The
economy, in terms of equities, is
still a bit weak, but a good IPO
will sell. Institutions have a rea-
sonable amount of money to
invest, and there’s not a lot
coming to market. There’s a
greater amount of money sit-
ting in institutional hands than
there was seven to eight months
ago.”

Fr en oes ee

GENERAL MANAGER
OF MARKETING AND OPERATIONS

FLO Bahamas 1s looking to employ a general
Manager of marketing arid operations

Those individuals applying will need to demonstrate
the following experience and credentials:

e Must have worked withing the marketing sector of
the fly fishing travel industry for a minimum of ten

years.

¢ Should be abe to demonstrate a successful track
record in Sportfishing marketing and vacation sales.
Existing long term relationship with the major fly
fishing booking agents in North America and Europe.
Should have experience in teaching and hosting fly

fishing schools

Should have long term and well established client
base built around reputation of offering world class

Sportfishing holidays.

¢ Competent computer skills

e The applicant will need to provide references to
demonstrate their qualifications and experience in
the marketing of International Fly Fishing travel.

Salary and benefits will be in line with experience
and qualifications. Please send a current résumé
and associate documentation to: HzO Bahamas,
P.O. Box 60-266, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

took hold, and “what more we
can do, what we can do differ-
ently to put some meat on our
economy”.

Given the Bahamas’ rela-
tively small population and
spread out geography, Mr Nutt
said freight costs were high and
it was difficult to achieve
economies of scale.

He added that it needed to
be an international services
provider, and told Tribune
Business he had hoped that this
nation would have used the
past decade to become a “mec-
ca” for the Internet, focusing
on areas such as web page
design.

Just as the Bahamas used
sun, sand and sea to lure
tourists, Mr Nutt said it needed
to use the same to attract com-
panies that could base them-
selves anywhere in the world.

“Another area we can look
at is providing the services of
education, tertiary education,
with people coming from the
rest of the Caribbean,” Mr Nutt
said, adding that there had been
some movement on medical
education and tourism.

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour, yesterday said he want-
ed to withhold comment on the
ILO/ECLAC report because
he had not seen it.

$16m project 50% leased

FROM page 1B

tenants.”

According to Mr Treco, they

hope to entice a bank to move into one of the available spaces, but
those plans are still in on the table.

He said some of the tenants who have already entered into
agreements are Shoe Village, Burger King, Marco’s Pizza, Outdoor
Sportsman, Fashion Hall, Body Beautiful, Dairy Queen and anchor
store Commonwealth Building Supplies.

“We are speaking to a few others that are interested at this
point but they haven’t signed,” said Mr Treco. “These are people

we have deposits from.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who attended the ground-
breaking ceremony, said the erection of the plaza proves that
Bahamian investor interest is still peaking, especially in the south-

west area of New Providence.

“It’s good to see Bahamians putting their money where our

mouths are,” said Mr Ingraham.

He lauded the Treco family for being significant contributors to
the Bahamian economy over the years.

According to Mr Treco, now was a good time to start the project
as the economy begins to rebound and consumers regain their

confidence.

“We think the economy is about to turn around and we have
seen indications of it, so we feel confident that this is the time,” he
said. “I think that by the time we get this completed we will have

a much stronger economy.”

$30m public debt
saving if rate cut

FROM page 1B

dollars that would normally be
repatriated by banks whose
headquartered are in other
countries, here in the Bahamas.

He also suggested govern-
ment cut interest rates to
encourage borrowing and spur
small business growth, espe-
cially in the agriculture, fishing
and light manufacturing indus-
tries.

Mr Wells said that when it
comes to doing business, poli-
tics should have no part except
to positively support it. And
seasoned business people have

to step up and speak out against
any government that would vic-
itmise businesses for their own-
ers speaking out against gov-
ernment policy.

“There ought to be some
think-tanks, people who under-
stand the economy and under-
stand business, called into to
give the appropriate advice to
the Minister of Finance,” said
Mr Wells. “Because the last two
ministers of finance, they don’t
know anything about business.
I don’t know why the Prime
Ministers think they have to be
ministers of finance.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WARM WIND SECURITIES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 16th day
of June, 2010. The Liquidator is BdS Corporate
Services Limited, George House, George Street,
P.O. Box N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas.

BdS Corporate Services Ltd.
(Liquidator)

To advertise, call
502-2371


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 5B



BFSB unveils financial services’ future Vision

By the Bahamas Financial
Services Board

THE Bahamas government
and the financial services indus-
try have a long history as
engaged partners. This part-
nership has facilitated the
development of the industry,
providing high-paying employ-
ment opportunities for Bahami-
ans and establishing a modern
platform for integrating the
Bahamas into the global finan-
cial system.

Public-private partnership
continues to be evident in the
consultation process that has
taken place to arrive at a Vision
that is now the guiding force
for the industry. The Vision
positions the Bahamas for the
transformation occurring in the
industry, and gives rise to a cer-
tain set of actions required to
secure and maintain this status:

The Vision is thus: “The
Bahamas is a globally competi-
tive international business juris-
diction for private wealth man-
agement, international invest-
ment into the Americas and
emerging markets and residen-
cy for high net worth individu-
als and families, creating high
value jobs and business oppor-
tunities on a sustainable basis.”

“To sustain our leadership in
wealth management, the
Bahamas must not only serve
wealthy clients in every aspect
of the asset management and
protection business,” said Sen-
ator John Delaney, Attorney
General and minister of legal
affairs. “Moreover, the
Bahamas must respond to the
fast-changing dynamics of inter-
national wealth management
and global business, where to
be competitive in the future a

WENDY WARREN

sustained high quality of invest-
ment services and associated
expertise is crucial to the
nation's success. This strategy
statement provides the right
framework.”

Both the Government and
the private sector recognise that
to ensure this vision is fully
understood, attention must be
paid to four key components.

* To be globally competitive,
the Bahamas must serve the
needs of private and corporate
entities by providing a superior
legal, fiscal and regulatory foun-
dation. It must also minimise
risk, effort, time and cost to
clients, whether they are pri-
vate wealth managers or
regional capital investors.

* To be a leader in wealth
management, the Bahamas
must serve wealthy clients in
every aspect of the asset man-
agement and protection busi-
ness.

* To attract international
investment, the Bahamas must

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MICHAEL GORDON
CLARE of Rosena Drive off Faith Gardens, P.O. Box
N-SP 60495, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my
name to MARCIAN MICHAEL BETHEL. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.









ZHIVARGO LAING

provide a favourable jurisdic-
tion for locating and servicing
of operational subsidiaries and
assets of corporate entities
wishing to undertake business
or make private capital invest-
ment in the Americas and
emerging markets.

* To facilitate residency for
clients requires accentuating
and marketing the quality
lifestyle offering of the
Bahamas, continuing to stream-
line immigration procedures
and defining and targeting ben-
efits for high net worth individ-
uals through their presence in
the Bahamas.

There are 10 identified areas
of opportunity that can be sup-
ported through the Vision, and
whose potential should be
viewed from an integrated per-
spective.

1. Private Wealth Manage-
ment

2. International Insurance

3. Fund Management and
Administration

JOHN DELANEY

4. Private Equity

5. Corporate Headquarters
(international companies with a
physical presence)

6. E-commerce/Data Services

7. Arbitration Centre

8. International Maritime
Services (Yacht Registry)

9. International Aviation Ser-
vices (Aircraft Registry)

10. Fulfillment Centre
(Freeport Air/Sea Port)

“The country and the indus-
try both stand to benefit from
the realisation of our Vision,”
said minister of state for
finance, Zhivargo Laing. The
benefits to a holistic approach
to growing the various interna-
tional business sectors include:

* Sustaining and growing the
existing financial services con-
tribution to the economy.

* Promoting overall eco-
nomic growth within the coun-
try.

* Creating high quality jobs
for Bahamians.

* Expanding opportunities

MUA

NOTICE is hereby given that MARJORIE MOLTIMER
of SUNSHINE PARK, P.O.BOX-CR55083, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PRICEWATERHOUSE( COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SPA SENIOR ASSOCIATES

Job Description

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified Senior Associates
within our Systems and Process Assurance (SPA) practice. As a member
of the SPA team, you will provide services related to controls around the
financial reporting process, including business process and information
technology management controls.

Requirements

* Proven experience in identifying, evaluating and testing information
technology and or business process controls, having worked in
the accountancy profession for a minimum of three (3) years.

* A strong academic record and has a professional accountancy
qualification and/or the CISA qualification.

* Sound business awareness, excellent communication skills and
personal initiative.

* The ability to work as part of a team, as well as independently.

* The ability to build and manage internal and external relationships.

* Proficient understanding of security and control for some of the
following technologies and/or enterprise applications: Unix, Windows
Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, OS/400, SQL Server, Oracle
database, SAP, Peoplesoft, and JD Edwards.

* Working knowledge of information technology general controls
concepts in the areas of systems development, change management,
computer operations and access to programs and data.

* Working knowledge of controls and controls standards (Sarbanes
Oxley, COSO, and COBIT) and testing strategies.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry
and other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which
recognizes different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward
high performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical
insurance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

ae

for skills development among
Bahamians.

* Broadening opportunities
for Bahamians to become
entrepreneurs in the financial
services and international ser-
vices sectors.

* Further integrating the
Bahamas into the global econ-
omy while encouraging its
expanded modernisation.

* Increasing opportunities for
charitable and development
contributions to further our
advancement

* Increasing potential rev-
enue for the Government.

Our history, physical
resources and location are
strengths that will be leveraged
to secure the opportunities we
have identified.

Historical strengths embrace
several factors:

* A ‘store’ of skills and expe-
rience that is trusted by the
international financial commu-
nity.

* A ‘brand position’ as a
committed partner to interna-
tional business.

* A sovereign territory with a
sound constitution, an efficient
basis of common law and an
outstanding record of political
stability, progress and steward-
ship.

* A commitment by Gov-
ernment to reinforce the long-
held view that the Bahamas 1s
an excellent jurisdiction for
conducting financial services
business.

* An English speaking cul-
ture which aids in integration
into the global financial services
industry

Physical resources include
the availability of land, office
space, support facilities, fit-for-
purpose infrastructure and



communications.

From a location perspective,
the proximity of the Bahamas
to the US, Central and South
America makes it an enviable
position from which to facili-
tate and support regional capi-
tal investment. Furthermore,
the ease of access, air linkages
and the existence of Freeport
adds strongly to the advantage
of our location that is matched
by very few competitive juris-
dictions.

Strategic priorities have also
been identified, and steps are
underway to more clearly
define the opportunities avail-
able to the Bahamas as it pur-
sues its vision statement. The
next installment in this series
of articles will focus on the
approach to identify these
opportunities.

Wendy Warren, the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board’s (BFSB) chief execu-
tive and executive director, said
government and industry know
the challenges ahead, including
evolving international standards
and an extremely competitive
environment. “We recognise
nonetheless that change is a
reality, not an option,” said Ms
Warren. “The Vision we have
embraced for financial services
in the Bahamas takes into
account these challenges.”

JS

URC sm TU
AS OE
ticks

PEA ae ee
ALBURY LANE OFF SHIKLEY STREET
Lots of parking. Serious inquiries.
WEST BAY
2 houses for rent, gated community.

3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 557-5908

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A leading communications company has the requirement for a
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be required to create an integrated strategy and realistic business

plans for all customer market seqments, products, pricing and sales
programs. Timely implementation of the plans is essential as the
objectives of new service launches, revenue and profitability are

demanding.

This person will be results focused and have proven achievements

including protecting existing revenues and growing new ones ina

communications company; training and organizing a multi-channel

sales and marketing team to deliver results on time and to budget;
innovation in services marketing, product quality and customer
value; and demonstrating that the marketing concept works at all

levels,

This appointment require a Masters degree qualification, plus a

minimum of 10 years experience in the international telecoms

industry including executive level decision making and awareness of

requlatory aspects, Experience of working in an overseas

environment with empathy to develop skills and local management
succession is also a requirement, This person will also have

extensive knowledge of the international communications market
and global expertise of other multi national communications

companies.

Resumes to be sent electronically to

rhadderleya@cablebahamas.com to arrive by Tuesday, June 22, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010, PAGE 7B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS





Dollar slips as Spain’s bond auction eases worries

By ERIN CONROY
AP Business Writer



NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar slipped against the euro
and the pound Thursday after a
bond offering by Spain's govern-
ment drew solid demand, easing
worries about the country's debt
problems.

At a summit in Brussels, Euro-
pean leaders insisted they are not
worried about Spain. They also
agreed to publish the results of
"stress tests" on European banks
in their latest attempt to restore
investor confidence.

The euro edged up to $1.2379
in late trading in New York from
$1.2314 late Wednesday. The
euro has been gaining this week
as some positive economic data
from around the world seems to

reassure investors that Europe's
debt crisis has not yet affected
global trade.

Worries about European debt
and faltering growth prospects in
several countries using the euro
have weighed on the euro this
year. The currency shared by 16
nations hit a four-year low below



$1.19 last week and has dropped
more than 15 per cent this year
against the dollar.

Spain successfully raised near-
ly 3.5 billion euros in an auction
of 10- and 30-year bonds,
although at high interest rates.

That helped allay some recent
questions about Spain's financial
stability, brought on by the coun-
try's high debt and rumors about
a Shaky banking system.

The results of the auction were
"reassuring," Chiara Cremonesi,
an analyst with UniCredit in Lon-
don, wrote in a research note.
"Spain has been under the spot-
light over the last few days due to
reported strains in its banking sys-
tem and its bleak fiscal outlook.”

Spain is trying to stem specu-
lation that it could follow Greece
in requiring help to rescue its

banking system. The country said
it would test how well its major
banks could cope with more loss-
es if the economy worsens and
house prices tumble further. That
move inspired the broader deci-
sion to publish the results of
European stress tests on banks.

US regulators released results
of their own stress tests on banks
in 2009 to show how much capital
the country’s 19 biggest banks
needed to raise to cope with more
losses.

In other late trading Thursday,
the British pound rose to $1.4810
from $1.4793, while the dollar
inched up to 90.82 Japanese yen
from 91.40 yen.

The dollar fell to 1.1126 Swiss
francs from 1.1293 francs, but
rose to 1.0284 Canadian dollars
from 1.0242 Canadian dollars.

Texas gasoline
price fall in
8th week

IRVING, Texas (AP) — It's Week 8 of the unsu-
al pre-summer slide in retail gasoline prices across
Texas.

The weekly AAA Texas price survey released
Thursday shows the average price of regular unlead-
ed gasoline across Texas fell by an average of a pen-
ny this week to $2.58 per gallon. Nationally, the aver-
age price remained unchanged at $2.71 per gallon.

The state's cheapest gas again was found in the Fort
Worth-Arlington area, where the average price of
regular unleaded fell a penny to $2.52 per gallon.
The most expensive regular unleaded gasoline aver-
aged $2.65 per gallon in both El Paso and Corpus
Christi, down two cents in El Paso and three cents in
Corpus Christi.

The auto club statement notes that crude oil prices
remain fairly stable around the $75 per barrel level,



$12 less than seven weeks ago.































































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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



New jobless claims up sharply as layolfs persist

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people
filing new claims for jobless benefits jumped last week
after three straight declines, another sign that the pace
of layoffs has not slowed.

Initial claims for jobless benefits rose by 12,000 to a
seasonally adjusted 472,000, the Labour Department
said Thursday. It was the highest level in a month and
overshadowed a report that showed consumer prices
remain essentially flat.

The rise in jobless claims highlighted concerns about
the economic rebound — especially after a report ear-
lier this week said home construction plunged in May
after government tax credits expired.

If layoffs persist, there's a concern that the June
employment numbers may show a decline in private-
sector jobs after five straight months of gains, said
Jennifer Lee, an economist with BMO Capital Markets.

"We've definitely seen the economic recovery hit a
wall," Lee said.

First-time jobless claims have hovered near 450,000
since the beginning of the year after falling steadily in
the second half of 2009. That has raised concerns that
hiring is lackluster and could slow the recovery.

The four-week average for unemployment claims,
which smooths volatility, dipped slightly to 463,500.
That's down by 3,750 from the start of January.

Kevin Logan, an economist with HSBC Securities,
said many economists have been expecting claims to fall
below 450,000 for several weeks now.

"The wait is getting longer and longer,” said Logan.
"As each week goes by, doubts about the underlying
strength of the economic expansion grow."

A separate labour report said consumer prices fell for
the second straight month. The 0.2 decline in the Con-
sumer Price Index was pulled down by falling energy
prices — most notably a 5.2 per cent drop in gasoline
prices.

But core consumer prices, which strip out volatile
energy and food, edged up 0.1 per cent in May, after
being flat in April. Core prices are up only 0.9 per





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cent over the past year — below the Fed's inflation tar-
get.

Additionally, the Commerce Department said Thurs-
day that the broadest measure of US trade rose during
the first quarter to the highest point in more than a
year. Much of the widening deficit was due to higher
prices on imported oil during the first three months of
the year. Those prices have since come down.

Anda private research group said its gauge of future
economic activity rose 0.4 per cent in May, signaling
slow growth in the US economy through the fall. Tur-
moil in stock markets and a troubled housing market
weighed on the Conference Board's leading econom-
ic index, while measures related to interest rates and an
increasing amount of money in the economy tugged it



=







higher. The index is designed to forecast activity in
the next three to six months.

Still, layoffs remain one of the biggest concerns for
the recovery. Just this week, casino owner Wynn
Resorts laid off more than 260 workers in its two Las
Vegas casino hotels in a move expected to save nearly
$8 million.

Julia Coronado, senior US economist with BNP
Paribas in New York, said current economic condi-
tions suggest initial claims will stay at around 450,000
for some time. That's because weaker segments of the
economy are shedding jobs while stronger sectors are
hiring.

Economists have said they don't expect to see sus-
tained job creation until first-time jobless claims drop
below 425,000 per week.

The number of people continuing to claim benefits
rose by 88,000 to 4.57 million. That doesn't include
about 5.2 million people who receive extended benefits
paid for by the federal government.

Congress has added 73 weeks of extra benefits on top
of the 26 weeks typically provided by states. All told,
about 9.7 million people received unemployment insur-
ance in the week ending May 29, the most recent data
available.

The extended benefit programme expired this
month. The House has approved an extension of the
benefits through November. The Senate has yet to
act.

On Wednesday, Senate Republicans and a dozen
Democratic defectors rejected a catchall measure com-
bining jobless aid for the long-term unemployed, aid to
cash-strapped state governments and the renewal of
dozens of popular tax breaks. Despite the loss, Demo-
cratic leaders predicted that a scaled-back version of the
measure could pass, possibly later this week.

Adding to worries about the job market, the Labour
Department said earlier this month that the economy
generated only 41,000 private-sector jobs in May. That
was down from 218,000 in April. Temporary hiring by
the Census Bureau added another 411,000 jobs. The
unemployment rate fell to 9.7 per cent from 9.9 per
cent.

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AP Business Writer



Stock market
manages
Slender gain

By TIM PARADIS

NEW YORK (AP) —
The stock market has shak-
en off a pair of disappoint-
ing economic reports and
managed a slender gain
after being in the red for
much of the day.

The Dow Jones industri-
al average has ended the
day up about 24 points after
falling 90 earlier.

Investors were troubled
by news that the number of
people seeking unemploy-
ment benefits rose unex-
pectedly last week (story on
this page). A drop in the
Philadelphia Federal
Reserve's index of regional
manufacturing also hit
stocks. The reports are
reminders that the econo-
my isn't bouncing back
quickly.

The Dow closed at
10,434. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose more
than a point to 1,116. The
Nasdaq composite index
rose more than a point to
2,307. Losing issues were
slightly ahead of gainers on
the New York Stock
Exchange. Volume came to
a light 1.16 billion shares.









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