Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
WEATHER

TRY a ‘VN

Pim blowin’ it

ae
LOW

oe FSTORM

Volume: 106 No.169

aU a)

90F
75F

PARTLY SUNNY,



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





Be

et

| J Awakening
y oy Sa)

f

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

fr

TNL ae
TT ial
Maa

FOS Se ye.



Crisp, Fresh & ire cooker

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Andre Rodgers
ational Baseball
Championship

SEE PAGE NINE

Minister disputes US
trafficking report

Turnquest: no
evidence to
support claims

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE number of people who
could be victims of human traf-
ficking in the Bahamas are “neg-
ligible”, according to Tommy
Turnquest, Minister of National
Security. At the same time, he
said: “If there is one there is too
many and we would like to
know.”

Without any evidence to sup-
port claims of human traffick-
ing, Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment could not expend
resources on something they do
not believe to be a problem.

The US government released
its 2010 Trafficking in Person
(TIP) report on the Bahamas
this week, ranking the Bahamas
as a Tier 2 nation (of three tiers),
based on the government’s fail-
ure to meet mmimum standards
for eliminating human traffick-
ing.

‘While Minister of Immigra-
tion and Foreign Affairs, Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette, said the Bahamas would
seek to be compliant with anti-
human trafficking standards, a
difference of opinion on the
validity of the report may influ-

ence the government’s view of
compliance.

“The US report is relevant in
that it is prepared by the US,
which is a world super power
and once they commit it to
record it is seen around the
world, but with respect to it
being accurate and it pertaining
to the Bahamas that is what we
take issue with,” said Tommy
Turnquest, Minister of National
Security, in an exclusive inter-
view with The Tribune.

Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment takes the issue “very
seriously”, and every year when
the report is released it is circu-
lated to senior officers for their
review and commentary. Despite
the government’s efforts, he said
there was “no evidence to sup-
port the claims.”

Officials from the US
Embassy noted in releasing the
Bahamas report that country
rankings do not correlate with
the number of trafficking cases,
but with efforts by governments
to combat trafficking. Tier 2
nations are classified for their
“minimal efforts to protect vic-
tims of trafficking” and “mini-

SEE page 11



HURRICANE INSURANCE

You Ba B

Away

Blown
urricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

dhe

Enum

Big PALER) sBOO Te MC) SETSMDOA Tek (DS) RR Ta 2



MORE LARS eT

AA Ta way through the flooded eee of the ean yesterday after Nassau was hit with cmiata heavy sem Cle E

Police withhold
cause of death for

interior designer

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AUTOPSY revealing the
cause of death for South Florida
interior designer James Wallace
Tutt IIL is being withheld by police
as investigations continue.

Superintendent Leon Bethel in
charge of the Central Detective
Unit said foul play has been ruled
out, but would not confirm what
may have led to the 53-year-old’s
death.

Relatives of the late designer
have said the cause of death
appears to be heart related on a
website set up in his memory
(www.jwallacetutt.com).

The owner of the boutique
Rock House hotel in Harbour
Island was found dead in a bushy
area known as “The Narrows”
near his home by his partner Don
Purdy on Saturday morning.

His body was flown to Nassau
for an autopsy on Saturday and
although police have received the
autopsy report Mr Bethel would

SEE page 11



NICU
Victim in

UTI Lt Cy
questioning

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



POLICE have taken the
recent victim of a drive-by
shooting into custody for
questioning concerning the
incident in which he and a
four-year-old boy were
injured.

Tyson Deveaux, 23, and
a toddler suffered gunshot
wounds Monday evening
when three gunmen, who
got out of a white Honda
driven to the area by
another man, opened fire
on a car wash at Brazillet-
ta Street, Pinewood Gar-
dens.

Fearing any information
leaked could possibly jeop-

SEE page eight









COB union
wants inquiry
into selection

of president

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@
tribunemedia. net



THE faculty union at
the College of the
Bahamas has called for an
inquiry into the process
and the criteria used in
the selection of Dr. Earla
Carey-Baines as President
of the institution. Citing
disbelief at what they
have deemed to be a

SEE page 11







Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Onlookers catch robber
who mugged realtor



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net











MUGGING VICTIM
Peter McP Christie

A REALTOR mugged for $3,000 will have
his cash returned to him thanks to the swift
actions of onlookers who chased the robber
and turned him over to police.

Elshadae Ellington Ferguson, 19, will be sen-
tenced today after he pleaded guilty to stealing
from a person and receiving stolen property

SEE page 11

Deputy PM: we cannot employ non-Bahtamian
labour and complain about unemployment

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS should take
a hard look at the realities
behind the immigration of for-
eigners into their country and
accept that their own behaviour
and choices sometimes play a
part in the situation about which
many complain, the Deputy
Prime Minister suggested.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Immigration, Brent

Symonette, said that Bahami-
ans “cannot continue to employ
non-Bahamian labour and com-
plain at the rate of unemploy-
ment.”

“We either have to accept
that there are certain jobs
Bahamians are unwilling, unable
or are not being suitably paid
to do or else we have to move
on,” he said.

“A Bahamian will work in a
hotel, but yet we’re importing

SEE page 11







NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS”

LEADING NEWSPAPER





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Man is questioned =—
after teenagers shot

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter:
dmaycock@tribunemedia. net :

FREEPORT- A 25-year-old :
man is being questioned by :
police in connection with the ;
shooting of two teenagers in the :
Eight Mile Rock area on Mon- :
day. :
ASP Mackey said the suspect, :
accompanied by his lawyer, :
turned himself into the Central :
Police Station around 3.30pm :
yesterday. According to reports, :
a 13-year-old girl was shot in :
the chest and a 19-year-old man :
was grazed in the head by a bul- :
let. :
The girl is at Rand Memorial :
Hospital in stable condition. The :
man was treated and dis-:
charged. Ms Mackey said police :
received a report after 11pm on :
Monday that a child and an :
adult man had been shot in the :
Hepburn Town area. Officers :
went to the area to investigate. :

According to initial reports, :
the 19-year-old man was :
involved in a confrontation with :
another man who pulled out a :
handgun. i

The gunman fired a shot in ;
the direction of the 19-year-old, :
who was grazed on the left side :
of the head. The bullet then hit :
the 13-year-old girl in the chest. :

Ms Mackey said police inves- :
tigations are continuing. :

BODY FOUND :

The body of a black man was :
found floating in waters near :
Banana Bay, Grand Bahama on :
Tuesday afternoon, police :
reported. ASP Loretta Mackey, :
police press officer, would not :
disclose the victim’s identity, but
said that the body is believed to :
be that of a Bahamian in his 40s. :

Police received a report :
around midnight of a body float- ;
ing in the Fortune Bayarea.

The body was retrieved from :
the water by persons in the area. :
There were no visible signs of :
injury. Ms Mackey said police :
are awaiting the results of an :
autopsy to determine the cause :
of death. i

veh
Rey

Medi)
PHONE: 322-2157

iscount Furniture &

ZNS to let go of 70
staff in cutbacks

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ZNS will let up to 70 staff
go in a move to deflate its
bloated wage bill and bring
expenditure into line as it faces
a 50 per cent budget cut, the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas announced yes-
terday.

BCB chairman Michael
Moss issued the statement
delivered by senior deputy gen-
eral manager of radio and tele-
vision Kaylessa Deveaux-Isaacs
in a press conference at ZNS
offices off Collins Avenue,
which Mr Moss was unable to
attend.

However, he sent a clear
message that cutbacks will be
effected in an effort to reduce
spending by the corporation
which is currently at an unsus-
tainable level. ZNS spends
twice as much as it earns while
it is unable to raise capital
funding.

The financial drain of salary
payments for the overstaffed
station amounts to about $8
million a year, with $10.5 mil-
lion in benefits and overtime
pay. Often line staff costs more
than executives.

=

al a

SENIOR DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER of radio and television





Kaylessa Deveaux-lsaacs at a press conference at ZNS offices.

Therefore, the 241 staff cur-
rently at ZNS will be cut from
between 170 to 200, meaning
41 to 71 staff will have to go,
Ms Isaacs-Dotson said.

However, no indication was
given of when the staff will go
and questions were not taken
in Mr Moss’ absence.

Among the 241 current staff,
including 70 managers, 149 per-
manent pensionable staff, 14
contractural staff and nine
executives, 72 employees are
eligible for pensions as they are
either approaching retirement
age or have worked at ZNS for
25 years or more.

“As things stand, ZNS regu-
larly spends twice as much as it
earns, supports scores of super-
fluous employees, owes mil-
lions in unfunded liabilities,
and is unable to raise capital
on its own,” Ms Deveaux-
Isaacs said.

“Tt’s a drain on the public
purse,” she added.

In spite of these well-known
and long-standing facts ZNS’
staffing was increased from 252
to 278 between 2002 and 2007
under the PLP administration.

Since 2007 staff have been
reduced to 241 and annual
spending has been cut by $3
million — from $18 million to
$15 million — in an effort to
tighten the budget and trans-
form ZNS into a public service
broadcaster as called for in the
FNM’s 2007 election manifesto,
Ms Deveaux-Isaacs said.

However, high staff salaries
have perpetuated an unsus-
tainable state of affairs forcing
ZNS to invest its multi-million
dollar annual government sub-
sidy earmarked for capital
expenditure to fund general
operations.

This leak in finances can no
longer be ignored now that the
Prime Minister has hit ZNS
with a 50 per cent reduction in

government funding this year,
bringing its annual subsidy
down from $8.5 million to $4.25
million.

As ZNS has been forced to
make tough decisions, the
board of directors is address-
ing the bloated and unsustain-
able staffing levels confirmed
in a number of studies, includ-
ing one by a Canadian broad-
caster in 2006.

Ms Deveaux-Isaacs said:
“The transformation of ZNS
into an independent public ser-
vice broadcaster has had its
share of challenges.

“Challenges have, at times,
even come from some who
were supposedly party to the
idea to effect the transforma-
tion.

“Some of these individuals
have come to realise the trans-
formation will deny them the
control they were once able to
exercise over content and
patronage at ZNS, which car-
ries with it the power to influ-
ence opinion.”

Annual accounts for 2003 to
2006 have been audited, the
2007 and 2008 accounts are
awaiting audit, and 2009 man-
agement accounts are ready for
audit, the BCB board con-
firmed.

Turnquest hits out at PLP MP’s defence of ZNS performance



MINISTER of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said he finds an
opposition MP’s attempts to defend the
performance of ZNS “ludicrous.”

In a statement issued yesterday, Mr
Turnquest said former minister in
charge of the Broadcasting Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas, Obie Wilchcombe,
was being “self-serving” in his positive
characterisation of the government-run
TV station’s “pathetic” record under
the former PLP government.

Mr Turnquest noted that under the
FNM’s first two terms in office from
1992 to 2002, ZNS met its statutory
obligation to produce annual audited
accounts and lay them before parlia-
ment.

He said: “The late-again and incom-
petent PLP failed to do likewise for
five years running.”

The minister said this “lax” attitude
towards ZNS is unsurprising coming
from the PLP.

“For decades the PLP treated ZNS as
its own private propaganda machine,
rather than as a properly run public
corporation, requiring good business
practices,” he said.

“The mismanagement at ZNS started
with the PLP government way before
1992.

“Tf he can find the time, the former
minister can easily review the financial
statements and see that the corpora-
tion’s accumulated deficit already stood

at $17,707,921.”

Mr Turnquest pointed out that audi-
tors in 1991 financial statements not-
ed: “The corporation has incurred sig-
nificant operating losses in the past five
years and, as at December 31, 1991, its
current liabilities exceed its current
assets by $3,718,589.”

He added: “The corporation’s oper-
ations during the FNM’s tenure were
opened to full public scrutiny when the
corporation’s accounts were laid before
the House. Yet the gross dereliction of
duty that prevailed with respect to the
preparation, auditing and tabling of
accounts during the PLP’s tenure result-
ed in acts of mismanagement being hid-
den.

“Again, this is not surprising. The
PLP is allergic to transparency and
accountability.

“This is why they were comfortable
with a state monopoly on the broad-
cast media, which the FNM removed
in its first term in office.”

Mr Turnquest said that because of
the time lapse that occurred before
the accounts could be reconstructed
once the FNM again became the gov-
ernment, and the loss or unavailabil-
ity of records that would enable a
proper audit to take place, the audi-
tors found it necessary to decline
rendering an opinion as to whether
or not malfeasance might have
occurred.



ea
Shipment
of Linens
eB TY

Calle Diy

EXTRAVAGANZA SALE
Tuesday June loth - Saturday June 19th

15% Off Storewide
10% Off Appliances

MULTI DISCOUNT FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES

APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE :
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 7;

tat oe eg TE

Oe et ee ee) ee)

it era

Bee oe Ds es ee eat LL es Pot ie Be i br





Andros family lose
their home in blaze

Fire engine had broken lever

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls @tripbunemedia.net

A BROKEN lever on a
fire engine may have pre-
vented a home in Andros
from being saved from a
fire.

Gilbert Kemp, the local
administrator, said he was
“saddened” the fire engine
was not working well
enough to assist the family
of Ruthnell Moxey of Man-
grove Cay, Andros. Their
home was completely
destroyed in a blaze over the
weekend.

“The lever that pumps the
water is not working
although the fire engine is
running. It is a problem we
are now addressing,” said
Mr Kemp.

The family of five is
appealing for help from the
community after losing
everything in the fire. Ms

Moxey said she was return-
ing home for lunch, from a
day spent washing sponges,
when someone stopped her
to say her house was on fire.
“When I got there I could-
n’t get too close because
everything was burning, and
now everything is burned
smack and smooth. No one
knows how it happened.

Documents

“T don’t know what to say.
All of my documents and
my kids’ stuff were in there
— stove, radio, voter’s card,
bank books, affidavits,
national insurance cards.
This is going to set me way
back. I mean, everything is
lost. Pll have to start back
from scrap,” said Ms Moxey.

Her three children were
at school when the fire
broke out. Mr Kemp said all
they are left with is the
school uniform they had on.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



Late last night the com-
munity held a meeting to co-
ordinate efforts to help the
family.

For the time being, the
Department of Social Ser-
vices has identified an apart-
ment to house the family.
Mr Kemp said he is not sure
how long they would be able
to stay there, adding that he
does not see the house being
rebuilt right now.

“IT am extremely pleased
with the response; I am
proud of the community of
Mangrove Cay. People have
been coming and dropping
off items, bringing food,
bringing towels, whatever
the family needs. The com-
munity is really coming
together,” said Mr Kemp.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 3



MP: Opposition may have to |
resort to ‘civil disobedience’ |

By ALESHA CADET

CIVIL disobedience may
be the only course of action
left to the opposition, MP
for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
warned at a PLP mini-rally
last night.

Discussing the opposi-
tion’s decision to walk out
of the House of Assembly
last week, Mr Mitchell said if
such actions prove to be the
only way to draw attention
to important issues, the par-
ty “must do more of this
kind of thing”.

During the committal
stage of the Budget Debate
last Thursday, when each
budget item was being scru-
tinised, Mr Mitchell moved
for an amendment but his
motion was defeated. Short-
ly after, all opposition mem-
bers left the chamber.

Mr Mitchell had been
attempting to amend the
social services subvention
for funeral payments from
its present $650 mark to
$1,300 per person for at least
1,000 people.

The governing FNM was
criticised by PLP leader Per-
ry Christie for rejecting the

“I intend to
continue to
push the
envelope even
further. Of
that you can be
assured. I speak
for me and

my house. I
congratulate all
colleagues for
their stand.”



idea outright.

Speaking at the rally last
night, Mr Mitchell said: “I
intend to continue to push
the envelope even further.
Of that you can be assured.
I speak for me and my
house. I congratulate all col-
leagues for their stand.

“This is not a complicated
story; why we are here
tonight. We are here to con-
tinue the fight for our core
constituency: those who can-

tM MRC a ae



not fight for themselves,” he
said.

Speaking about his pro-
posed amendment, Mr
Mitchell said: “My thinking
is that cremation costs
$1,300, and so at least the
subvention from the gov-
ernment ought to be able to
cover the cost of a crema-
tion.

“Just today, I received a
call from a family who can-
not afford to pay for a funer-

al. The cost of the burial will
be $5,000. They expect the
member of parliament to
pay.
“Clearly this is unsustain-
able for any member of par-
liament. It simply cannot be
resolved without some struc-
tural changes.

“No one should have been
surprised, then, that I would
move to get this matter of
support for the burial of the
dead in my constituency
resolved. I was able to con-
vince my colleagues to sup-
port it.”

Criticising Parliament for
failing to stand up to the
Executive, Mr Mitchell
described the PLP’s decision
to walk out of the House as
“democracy in its finest
form.”

He nevertheless said that
the party’s response to the
government’s method of
wielding power has to be
“structural”.

“T have been asked by the
leader to look at these gov-
ernance issues and how the
structures might be changed
now or in a PLP administra-
tion to strengthen Parlia-
ment vis-a-vis the executive.

Bahamasair union negotiations to hegin despite industrial action threat

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



NEGOTIATIONS between
Bahamasair and the embattled
Airline, Airport and Allied
Workers Union are set to begin
today despite a threat of indus-
trial action if the airline meets
with the union's secretary gen-
eral.

Bahamasair managing direc-
tor Henry Woods yesterday said
that the airline had put off nego-
tiations for a new contract with
the union — which represents
non-managerial staff and cabin
attendants — for nearly a year
in the hope that AAAWU
would settle its long-running
internal dispute.

With the in-fighting still con-
tinuing, Mr Woods said the air-
line needs to sit down with
union representatives to hash
out an agreement in the best
interests of its workers.

Former union president
Nellerene Harding last week
threatened that 300 union mem-







bers will walk off the job if man-
agement sits down with the
AAAWU secretary general and
interim president Anthony Bain
today for negotiations.

Mr Woods hopes the strike
will not materialise. He said it
could have serious conse-
quences for the airline.

"As far as I know we are
negotiating with the AAAWU
— whoever shows up that's
another story. It doesn't matter
who it is as long as its a repre-

sentative of AAAWU," he told
The Tribune yesterday.

"We are not in the business
of provocation; we have been
very patient, we have been wait-
ing a long time for them to
come to the table, we just sub-
mitted a proposal — there is
nothing final about it - we want
to negotiate.

“We are really hoping that
they wouldn't resort to that type
of illegal action (a strike)
because that has some serious

PoTCAKE say:

THE BAHAMAS’ VERY OWN STREET PHILOSOPHER













TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

consequences. . . It may have
some negative impact on us; I
won't say it will cripple us."

Last week, former union
president Nellerene Harding
and dozens of union workers
picketed outside the Ministry
of Labour's offices on East Hill
Street to protest the negotia-
tions scheduled for today.

At the time, Ms Harding
called on Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes to intervene in the dis-
pute and put a halt to the nego-
tiations, threatening that some
300 union members would walk
off the job otherwise.

Yesterday, Mr Foulkes said
he could not step in because the
union's fight was before the
courts.

"The registrar of trade unions
has scheduled an election with
the airport union. A faction of
that union filed an application
to the Supreme Court to stop
those elections and an injunc-
tion was granted," said the sen-
ator.

"Where we are now is that
injunction has to be lifted in
order for us to continue with
those elections. It’s an intra-
union fight and as I said before
when it goes to the court it takes
the matter out of my hands and
puts it in the hands of the
judges.

"So there’s really nothing that
I can do at this time until that
injunction is lifted," he said.

Ms Harding and Mr Bain
have been locked in a court-
room fight over the union's
leadership for nearly two years.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
OA dal
AMO
erie Pa MTEL
322-2197

“I believe in the absence
of local government this will
likely mean more members
of parliament as opposed to
less, so that the Cabinet does
not dominate the Parlia-
ment,” he said.

“I believe that there will
have to be an MP’s bill of
rights which will effectively
spell out in law the rights
and privileges of a member
of parliament including the
right to superintend and
control public works in his
constituency and matters of
social services support.”

Huppy

Money and
handbag taken
from bar in
armed robbery

JUST before 11pm on
Monday, police were
alerted to an armed rob-
bery at the Holiday Bar
in Coconut Grove.

Witnesses told the offi-
cers that two masked
men, wearing grey dickie
outfits, entered the bar
and demanded cash.

One of them had a gun.

The men robbed the
bar of an undetermined
amount of money and
snatched an employee’s
handbag.

They fled the scene on
foot heading south on
Market Street.

Police are investigat-
ing.

Fathers

Day

to ALL the
Great Men!!

Re!
for a Special

Lbwim ere TT
ME I ee

MORLEY

FOR

ME

%

‘i

nw!

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) Mi2hhsdih
Bayparl Building, Parliament Sireet
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 Fax: (242) F-S955
PuO. Fox -121, Sassou, WP, Bahamas
e-mail: info enlesolmnssailcon







Prestige Floors

a eo)

ori a Aa en
Pee Lee i |
Engineered FROM
Bet mig |

bea |

here is & wi
Te
m all fl
eae e re lod ea
Vice eet

aa oi

ate eae:











fe

BS .94 [RA TALIL ED

WO ee aD

Me

Ue ee aa od iG

MONDAY: FRIDAY
ee ete





PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Why fire Finance Minister Laing?

WE HAVE received an extraordinary let-
ter from a Bahamian who urges the PLP to
take this “golden opportunity” to demand
the resignation of Finance Minister Zhivargo
Laing for lying to the Bahamian people about
the state of the economy.

We do not know how any Bahamian who
reads newspapers, listens to the radio and
watches TV would not have known from at
least 2008 that world markets — including the
Bahamas — had started to soften. However,
despite these tell-tale signs the IMF did not
panic. Up until then their economic reports
were optimistic, although by 2008 a slight
shadow had started to appear in their fore-
casts.

In May, 2008, The Tribune reported that
there was an 18 per cent drop in foreign
direct investment in the Bahamas compared
with 2007, which according the United
Nations was equivalent to a decline of $126
million. That same month the Travel, Leisure
and Tourism sector of the financial consult-
ing firm KPMG in its fourth annual regional
banking survey of the Caribbean Hotel
Tourism and Investment conference in
Trinidad included the Bahamas in a list of
Caribbean countries that leading banks in
the region felt had the greatest tourism
growth potential for 2008.

However, in that same month local busi-
nessmen were not so certain. In the opinion
of Chamber of Commerce Dioniso D’ Aguilar
the escalating cost of energy, the slow down
in the tourism industry and the fear of a US
recession could lead to a 10 per cent down-
turn in the Bahamas’ retail sector for 2008.

A few months earlier — January, 2008—
Mr D’ Aguilar felt that the Bahamas govern-
ment’s forecasts were a “little optimistic”
with the Bahamas enjoying only “anemic
growth.” Standard & Poor downgraded the
Bahamas’ economic outlook from “positive”
to “stable” and this because to vacation in the
Bahamas was relatively more expensive than
other world destinations. Mr D’Aguilar was
keeping his eye on CNN, which was report-
ing the precarious state of the US economy.
For the Chamber president there was a lot of
uncertainty. “If I am a US consumer,” he
said, “and decide I’m going to pull back a bit,
one of the first items to go is likely to be an
expensive holiday, and the Bahamas is an
expensive holiday.”

No one in this country could have been
misled when Prime Minister Ingraham
announced that he did not have enough funds
to honour contractural agreements with the
nurses and doctors, but would do so as soon
as he could. Soon BORCO in Grand
Bahama was sold for $60 million and the
Prime Minister was in a position to pay the
doctors, nurses and other bills.

Any intelligent Bahamian hearing this
news should have understood that the econ-
omy was slipping. The Prime Minister had
already decided to take precautions. Any
intelligent Bahamian, understanding the
source of this country’s revenue, should have
known that the future outlook was precarious
when they heard all the chatter on US sta-
tions about fears of a serious economic
decline in that country. This did not look
good for the Bahamas, because investors
were already cutting back —it was becoming
increasingly more difficult to float a loan. In
November 2008 — two months after the
Lehman collapse —Arawak Homes presi-
dent Franklyn Wilson announced that for
that very reason he was putting his Eleuthera
project on hold.

So by early 2008 Bahamians should have
known — although they might not have
wanted to admit it — that this country was
walking on the edge of a precipice and that
great caution was necessary.

Suddenly in September 2008 the venerable
158-year-old Lehman Brothers collapsed,
quickly followed by the fire-sale of Merril
Lynch, the extinction of Bear Stears several
months later and five of America’s top invest-
ment banks.

As one newspaper commented: “The
global credit crisis has entered a new dimen-
sion.” A dimension that no one either antic-
ipated or understood. There was world pan-
ic. Hasty bank bail outs followed in an effort
to prevent a world economic collapse.

In November 2008 with unemployment
expected to rise to double digits, Mr Ingra-
ham announced a temporary assistance pro-
gramme for the unemployed, cautioning
Bahamians to live within their means.

By May of the following year already $1.5
million had been paid out and by July half of
the $20 million employment money had been
exhausted. The Bahamas had to borrow
heavily.

And now it is pay back time, and like every
country in the world — although we are not
as badly off as many others, especially those
in our region — the future will not be easy.

On Friday the new Japanese prime min-
ister warned that his country is at “risk of col-
lapse” under its huge mountain of debt.

At least at the moment, according to Mr
Laing, our financial system is fairly sound
with “some $900 million in foreign reserves
and $500 million in bank liquidity.”

So now is not the time to fire anyone, or
for the Opposition to be out there trying to
score brownie points on a misfortune that
they are very much a part of.

Now is the time for everyone who loves
this country to close ranks and save her and
themselves from disaster.

Outrage over
Cable Bahamas’
‘dive into digital’

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Cable Bahamas ‘Dive into
Digital’

Iam outraged by this dig-
ital move that Cable
Bahamas is implementing.
In my living room I have
one cable TV box which
allows me to get the other
channels in addition to basic.
My three bedrooms receive
basic cable only. I have
internet from Cable
Bahamas and I use a wire-
less router for my laptops to
connect. So for like $100 a
month I got cable TV in
four rooms and internet
throughout my house. I paid
a onetime fee of $149 for the
box in my living room. It
was a comfortable existence,
until this month, I was
informed by Cable Bahamas
that in order to receive basic
cable TV in these bedrooms
I have to purchase three
additional boxes. I was told
that I was not eligible to get
a free box because I already
have a box.

That just set hell in me.
Why do I need these addi-
tional boxes? It will cost me
almost $150 to purchase
these three boxes ($49 each)
or I could rent the boxes col-
lectively for $10 per month.
This is overselling. Right
now, if the family wants to
watch channels other than
basic we go to the living
room. The presence of cable
boxes in the bedrooms is a
constant subliminal message
encouraging the family to
spend more money -
“Check out the pay-per-
view channels, see some-
thing you like, just put in the
code”. My comfortable exis-
tence is now strained by hav-
ing to put blocks and lock-
outs on the boxes. But more
importantly, I have to
expend more money in
these particularly strained
economic times to continue
to make use of my TVs. If I
select the renting option,
Cable Bahamas would
receive $120 more for the
year. Multiply that by 40,000
consumers, then you talking
about just less than
$5,000,000 annually and you
can see why Cable does not
mind taking the Dive. This is
not accounting for the sub-
scribers who may be forced
to purchase two or three
boxes. This is making Cable
Bahamas richer. I have to
get the additional boxes if I

letters@triounemedia.net



giving Cable Bahamas more
revenue whether it is a one-
time payment or a recurring
payment. My alternative is
for the other TVs to remain
off because there is no signal
to receive.

I told Cable Bahamas how
I felt. They said this was a
Regulator imposed require-
ment. It was explained to
me that the Regulator wants
people who only want to
obtain internet to be able to
do so without having to get
cable television. If the Reg-
ulator did impose this, did
the Regulator think about
how much this “luxury” cost
the average consumer? Was
there any public consulta-
tion? I think this is an injus-
tice and an additional finan-
cial burden being borne by
the consumer. We really
need to do more research
and analysis before we come
up with these decisions.
These decisions impact the
basic cost of living. I am
okay with having to pur-
chase cable TV and internet
together. How many per-
sons am I making this sacri-
fice for who want to get
internet without cable TV?
Wasn't going to BTC an
option for these people?

Then to add insult to
injury, Cable Bahamas says
I am not eligible for a free
box because I already have a
digital box.

Yes, but I bought that box
for $149. It is just your basic
black decoder. It’s not the
shiny silver DVRs and it’s
not HD. Can someone
explain the basis for this dis-
crimination? Cable
Bahamas was not able to do

so. They say they reduced
the price of the box. All sub-
scribers should be treated
alike. All subscribers sub-
ject to this “dive into digi-
tal” should receive one box
or be credited the $100 dif-
ference. We are all being
inconvenienced and
imposed upon. In the USA,
the government gave
coupons with some mone-
tary value to consumers that
had to purchase a converter
box.

I am against this “dive
into digital”. If people did
not want to have to take
cable when they only want-
ed internet, then they should
have gone to BTC. The
Regulator or Cable
Bahamas should come up
with a better plan. If this is
the plan Cable Bahamas or
the Regulator (government)
decided on they both are
better able to absorb the
financial impact than the
consumer. In the USA the
digital transition related to
over the air transmissions
and not cable television. I
don’t see the connection. In
the USA you don’t have to
have cable to use your tele-
vision. I understand the
Regulator is supposed to be
making it better for con-
sumers.

Well, I cannot say this is
progress. It’s progress for
Cable Bahamas — more rev-
enues, but it is retrogress for
consumers — more money
for the same thing.

This is wrong and to add
insult to injury this is dis-
criminatory. Subscribers
beware; they are coming to a
neighbourhood near you
soon!

LINDA THOMAS
“the Cable-less Guy”
Nassau,

June 9, 2010.

The anniversary of the

PME STAC TS

EDITOR, The Tribune.





ns
it

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Lid.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

BEAUTYGUARD
Free Estimates

| | WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
\_ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |

want to use my other TVs

St. Ailban’s Drive

Newly refurbished 2 bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths Condo in Courtyard Setting.

Single Storey Building.
Kitchen Appliances, Granite Countertops,
Washer & Dryer.

$127,000
Bank Financing Available.
$6,500 Down

Tel: 325-1325, 422-4489, 477-0200

Sth - 30th July, 2010

gam - 3pm DAIL

Safe, positive and interactive learning,
leisure and fun for kids of all ages
Weekly Themes
* Emphasis on Things Bahamian
: Experienced Coordinators & Presenters
Crafts, Films, Computers, Personal Development

& More Lunch Prowided!!!!
$125.00 weekly

Sojourner-Douglass College + Gold Circle House
East Bay Street -Tel: 394-8570

Register Now! Space is Limited!



Last month was the 50th anniversary of the “pill”. In the
1960's the pill was heralded as a development that would lib-
erate women from male dominance and lead to fewer
divorces, fewer unwanted pregnancies, and fewer abortions.
It is now clear, however, that things did not turn out that
way.

As the pill became more widespread the number of
divorces and abortions soared. We saw a lowering of moral
standards and a rise in infidelity and promiscuity. In addition,
the well-being of children declined by a variety of mea-
sures, from depression to diet to the number living in pover-
ty and the number experiencing child abuse or neglect.

Though women now have access to places and positions
that once belonged to men they have never been seen more
as sex objects than they are today.

The major disconnect caused by the arrival of the pill
has been a loss of the idea that men and women make
babies. As technological advances in artificial reproduction
are made, the idea that God plays a role in procreation has
increasingly been lost.

Sadly, the horizon does not look promising for the fami-
ly. With the rapid increase of activist judges with a procliv-
ity to elitist social engineering we will soon be seeing count-
less forms of sexually bonded groups that are not only
unstable but seriously harmful to children.

May God help us.

FRANK HENDERSON
Nassau,
June, 2010.







f + , ' _ ff
_fteres f etdattenn ff friends

"MAY PEOPLE"

(Two One Act Mavs)
Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts
June 16th - 19th 2010 at §:00 p.m. nightly
Tickets: $20.00

BENEFIT PERFORMANCE

Andrew Curry Musie Edueation Foundation
Tuesday 15th June at 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $25.00 (includes alter theatre reception)

BOR. OFFICE: The Dundas,
Telephones 393-3728 34-7179
Opens Monday 7th Jone 2:00 a.m. 200 pom. daily
RESERVED TICKETS NOT COLLECTED BY
320) PAW. ON DAY OF PERFORMANCE
WILD, BE SOLD





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Prison bus

in traffic
accident

A PRISON bus was in a
minor traffic accident yes-
terday afternoon. The bus
was travelling along East
Bay Street near Scotia-
bank around 2.30pm when
the car in front of it
stopped suddenly.

Unable to brake in time,
the bus driver opted to
swerve off the road rather
than hit the car.

The bus incurred minor
damage to its left front
headlight.




Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN ABACO man won
his appeal against a convic-
tion on charges of assisting
with illegal landing of a
group of Asians on the Fam-
ily Island after Court of
Appeal judges agreed that
Magistrate Crawford McK-
ee made a “fundamental
error” in his case.

President of the Court of
Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer
allowed the appeal made by
Javargo Cooper, writing that

far from there being “suffi-
cient evidence” for the
appellant to answer in the
case, there was none at all.

“There was no evidence,
either direct or circumstan-
tial,” linking Mr Cooper to
the landing of the migrants
in the Bahamas, said Dame
Joan, adding that Magistrate
McKee had made a “funda-
mental error.” She handed
down the judgment, which
was recently posted at the
top court’s website, on June
9.

Mr Cooper was charged
with assisting with illegal

landing in Abaco in Novem-
ber 2007. He was convicted
on March 18, 2009 and sen-
tenced to two years impris-
onment. He was obtained
bail after his attorney, MP
for Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island, Acklins and
Long Cay, V Alfred Gray,
lodged an appeal on his
behalf.

Allowing the appeal,
Dame Joan said that the
Court of Appeal’s decision
that there was not “sufficient
evidence” against Mr Coop-
er “is not to say that he may
or may not be guilty” but

Two plead not guilty
to drugs charges

TWO men who pleaded not guilty to drugs
charges yesterday are expected back in court
today for a bail hearing.

Lance Jason Rose, 24, of Acklins and
Bernard Road; and Emilio Leonardo Beneby,
20, of Spring Point Acklins and Dignity Gar-
dens, Carmichael Road, have been charged
with possession of marijuana with intent to
supply.

It is alleged that on Friday, June 11 the two
were found in possession of 1.7 pounds of mar-
ijuana.

Both men were remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison and are expected back in court today for
a bail hearing.

¢ A man was granted $7,500 bail yesterday
after pleading not guilty to a marijuana pos-
session charge.

Richard Alexander, 30, of Elizabeth Estates,
is accused of being found on June 11 in pos-
session of 10 ounces of marijuana, which offi-
cers believed he intended to supply to anoth-

SPERRY.

TOP-S IDER

er. The case was adjourned to February 3,
2011.

e Prosecutors have recharged two men
accused in a stealing $16,000 from a woman by
reason of service.

The case against Gary Bain, 37; and Carlos
Perigord, 37, had been discharged on April
13.

The two men are once again accused of
stealing $16,000 cash from Kimberly Dean by
reason of service between April 24 and June
24, 2009.

It is alleged that Dean had paid the money
for a jeep she never received.

Bain, who appeared before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethell in Court Eight, Bank Lane, plead-
ed not guilty to the charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000.

The case has been adjourned to November
18 for trial.

A warrant of arrest was issued for Carlos
Perigord, who failed to appear in court.

A PASSION FOR
THE SEA

Remember Dad on Father's Day, June 20th
10% Off All Purchases for Dad

JOHN’S

SHOES AND ACCESSORIES

ROSETTA ST. 325-4944

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



CARMICHAEL ROAD 361-6876

Man wins appeal after judges
agree on ‘fundamental error’ |

relies on the fact that “sus-
picion in law is not suffi-
cient.”

“There must be evidence
upon which a tribunal of fact
can adjudicate in order to
arrive at some conclusion of
fact in this jurisdiction. Some
people may find this a tech-
nical argument, but the law
is bound in technicalities,
and where there is a techni-
cality that is in favour of an
accused person, the court
must always give the benefit
of the doubt to that accused
person.

“In this case the appellant
should have gotten the ben-
efit of the doubt raised by
the lack of evidence, direct
or circumstantial, of his
involvement in preparing for
the landing, assisting them
in the landing and so on,”
said Dame Joan.

Judges Christopher
Blackman and Stanley John
heard the appeal with Dame
Joan.



LOAN on the market!

Come in to Nassau
Motor Company today
or visit your nearest
Scotiabank branch for
more information.

‘Limited tle only.
‘Certain conditions apply,



§ scotiabank

On-the-spot financing and insurance.
24-month/24,000-mile factory warranty.

RATES EVER!

ACT NOW to get THE BEST

eo

Three charged in
connection with
stabbing death

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Three persons were charged in the
Freeport Magistrate’s Court yesterday in connection
with the stabbing death of a Coral Gardens man.

Meanwhile, police are still searching for 20-year-
old Abdul Rondon Burrows who is also wanted by
police for questioning in the stabbing.

Two men and one woman were arrested by police
last week and appeared in Court Three before
Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones on Monday on
charges of conspiracy to commit murder.

Jarreth Barry, 18, of Gambier Drive; and Darren
Pratt, 39 and Karen Janice Bowe, 24, both of Mallard
Street, were not required to enter a plea.

It is alleged that on June 8, the accused, being con-
cerned together, conspired to murder Troy Rolle.

Barry was also charged with Rolle’s murder and
causing harm to a second man. He was not required
to enter pleas to the charges.

Rolle, 31, and a 35-year-old man were attacked and
stabbed at an apartment complex in Coral Gardens
last Tuesday.

Injuries

They were taken to Rand Memorial Hospital,
where Rolle later died. The second man was treated
for his injuries and remained in hospital for several
days.

Rolle’s death has been classified as the sixth homi-
cide on Grand Bahama.

Pratt was represented by K Brian Hanna. Bowe
was represented by Rawle Maynard. Barry was not
represented by counsel.

They have been remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison
in Nassau until August 17, when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

Police are continuing to appeal to the public for
assistance in locating Burrows, whose last known
address is 21B Langton Circle, Freeport.

He is of dark brown complexion and about 5’ 8”
tall, of average build, and weighs between 160 and
170Ibs.

Police say Burrows should be considered armed
and dangerous and should be approached with cau-
tion.

Anyone with information concerning his where-
abouts is asked to contact the police in Grand
Bahama at 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-9991, 352-8351,
352-9076, 350-3125 or, 911.

Chevrolet
Aveo




Chevrolet
Malibu

Chevrolet
Silverado



Shirley Street « 302-0130 « Fax: 323-7272
info@nassaumotor.com « www.chevroletbahamas.com

CeO ae

CHEVROLET











PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Creative ideas on the
Bahamian economy

THE opposition PLP thinks
bad times have handed them
the next election on a platter.
Passing the most realistic bud-
get in recent history will do
nothing to help the FNM, they
say. In fact, they are confident
that most Bahamians will
blame the government for
their economic woes.

The statistics are dismal
indeed — a 6 per cent contrac-
tion of the economy over the
last two years, a 20 per cent
fall-off in stopover tourists, a
19 per cent drop in new mort-
gages, loan arrears of 18 per
cent, and a 22 per cent decline
in foreign investment — all

adding up to well over 14 per
cent unemployment.

Perry Christie says the
prime minister is "singing a sad
story, but without any ideas
and without accepting any
responsibility for the state we
are in. The poor will suffer
more with increased taxation
and the resultant depressed

Amazing ImmcK StepZ

Ss H ©

> TOR

SHOE SALE







effect there will be on spend-
ing.”

Christie says the govern-
ment's policies are unfairly
painful to that legendary
"small man" of Bahamian pol-
itics. Of course, out of power
it's much easier to talk from
both sides of your mouth — a
skill known as "negative ambi-
guity."” But the PLP's lack of
coherence on the budget can
be easily demonstrated by
looking at recent comments
from their top economic advi-
sors.

Christie's respected former
finance minister, James Smith,
is on record as saying that a
deficit of 3 per cent of GDP is
unsustainable (it is now at 5.7
per cent). And he has acknowl-
edged that rising debt sends
entirely the wrong signal to
banks and investors.

Only a few months ago
Smith said the government had
to reverse its "perilous" course
and arrest the fiscal decline.
After the budget was present-
ed, he said it sent all the right
signals, noting that a down-
grade in the country's credit
rating would raise borrowing
costs from their present high
of 15 per cent.

Smith even went so far as
to call for a 10 per cent cut in
public sector spending across
the board, adding that "If you
don't do it now, it will have to
happen some time.” And top
PLP financier Frankie Wilson
has also called for a 10 per cent
cut in government spending.
We will have to take their
words as the clearest indica-
tion of what a PLP administra-
tion would be doing right now.

Why Rent Electricty?

YOU CAN OWN SOLAR
YI) SUA Us ah
SOE Wealtde ia

aA

Witaie

yy

ABP UIE UD ¢

“td

SOLAR WATER HEATING - Resideritial: 50), 80, 120 gallon options Commercial: Qver 500 gallons options
(Hotels, Spas, Gyms, Laundromats) -Solar Pool Heating: Residential & Lange Scale Applications.

Why is a Solar Water Heater a Good Investment?



1. Ownership:

Why rent your monthly energy

needs when you can own a lifetime of free hot

water?

?, Energy Independence: A Sela Woter Heater
provides anergy independance. Thawgh anergy
costs continee to risa at increasingly rapid
rates, you will he protected.

4, Savings:

Your Solar Water

Heater will

immediately reduce your cunremt omengy
expences, In most canes up to MS. The more
i you wee your Engh: Sen System, the more money

you save.

4, Eoo-Consciemce:
improving the environmeet for you
¢ family by taking advantage of a
energy source without sacnhicing co

Take responsability






P.O. Box N-8170 * CRAWFORD STREET * NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE (242) 328-8618 * FAX (242) 322-6969
Web: www.solarpowerbahamas.com

Last year Wilson noted that
economic advisors had made
the same 10 per cent cut rec-
ommendation to the PLP gov-
ernment in 1991, during the
recession caused by the first
Gulf War. And that recom-
mendation was as relevant now
as it was then, he said, argu-
ing that more government
spending would be “danger-
ous.”

But in opposition the PLP
sound more and more like the
Republicans in America,
reducing themselves to the par-
ty of no. They may well lam-
baste Hubert Ingraham for
both expanding the deficit and
then trying to rein it in; but
their inability to suggest real-
istic alternatives or to acknowl-
edge their own role in creat-
ing the problem makes them
rather less impressive — cynical
really.

And they have obviously
heeded the advice of the noto-
rious propagandists in their
midst by accusing their oppo-
nents of the very sins for which
they themselves are so well
known — poor governance, par-
tisan spitefulness and lack of
accountability.

As many others have point-
ed out, both parties share
responsibility for our current
economic circumstances. While
in power, both parties wasted
millions, handed jobs to the
boys, played politics with the
public corporations and
unions, and turned a deaf ear
to good advice from the pri-
vate sector. And both parties
will now have to contribute to
the solutions if we want to
maintain our way of life.

That brings us to the main
difficulty we have with the
budget.

Belt-tightening is one thing,
and this budget makes a start
on that. But what about some
creative ideas to build a bet-
ter future?

There are two broad pro-
posals for growing the econo-
my mentioned in this budget:
An aggressive investment pro-
motion tour of key world cities,
and a $10 million small busi-
ness development framework
to encourage private sector job
creation.

It is unclear what the latter
initiative will amount to, but
the government says the goal is
to reduce red tape, eliminate
duplication of services, and
give more support to entre-
preneurs.

Others have made more
radical suggestions.

Tribune Business Editor
Neil Hartnell called for a "nuts
and bolts study of the entire
public sector, probing into
every nook and cranny to
uncover inefficiency, over-
staffing, waste and fraud. The
savings that could be realised
might be substantial, and sur-

Mesto



prise a lot of people."

Former finance minister
James Smith wants to cut the
prime rate, to help businesses
and households meet loan pay-
ments. The average residential
interest rate is now 8.4 per
cent, while the commercial rate
is 8.8 per cent. And the budget
acknowledged that high unem-
ployment and a challenging
business environment were
"constraining" the ability of
borrowers to service their
debts.

However, changes in lend-
ing rates almost never occur
here.

John Rodgers, an entrepre-
neurial eye doctor with a rep-
utation as an economics com-
mentator, has also called for
the government to use mone-
tary tools to help the econo-
my. In a soon-to-be-published
book (Is it Better in the
Bahamas...For Bahamians? by
Media Enterprises) he calls for
the abolition of exchange con-
trols and the replacement of
Bahamian currency with the
US dollar, to end the long-
standing banking cartel and
allow greater access to capital
by cash-starved entrepreneurs.

Rodgers also says we should
embrace the vast potential of
medical tourism. "If we could
receive the $2 billion annually
that Cuba receives from med-
ical tourism, not only would
our national debt be reduced,
but Bahamians would have
true ownership of this segment
of the economy, which would
be virtually recession-proof.
All that would be required
would be a collaborative effort
between the medical commu-
nity and the ministers of health
and tourism.”

There has been renewed
interest in proposals to revamp
our 19th century tax regime.

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in the Bahamas, we are seeking a candidate
to work as a Service Manager to be able

to oversee the operations of the Service
Department. The Candidate should have the

following qualifications:

Be a graduate with a Bachelors Degree in
Mechanical Engineering;

Have post-graduate studies in Management;
Have Caterpillar training in Heavy Equipment

Machines;

Have Caterpillar training in power generation:
Have 5 years or more experience with
working with a Caterpillar dealer or a similar

Organization;

The candidate should have certification as an

ISO 9000 auditor and;

The candidate should have Six Sigma training
(a Black belt in 6-Sigma is preferred).

This candidate is required to be a professional
who thrives on the challenge of developing
outstanding customer relations and service

excellence.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Service Manager,

or email me@me-ltd.com

Only persons being interviewed for this
position will be contacted.



Several studies in recent years
have called for the introduc-
tion of a value-added (VAT)
tax to replace import duties,
which are too heavily linked
to international trade and fail
to capture revenue from the
services sector (especially well-
heeled doctors and lawyers).
However, no government has
had the will or energy to
embark on the long consulta-
tion and planning process that
would be needed to achieve
this.

And speaking of energy,
that sector is ripe for far-reach-
ing reform so as to lower costs,
improve efficiency and pro-
mote energy security.
Although fuel imports fell last
year to about $668 million as
oil prices and domestic
demand moderated, gasoline
and diesel prices have been ris-
ing again this year. And when
oil prices spike again — as most
experts say they will — we will
regret not having used the
intervening period to make
necessary changes to our
lifestyle and economy.

The record of the last three
years on this issue is not par-
ticularly hopeful. Although the
FNM initially embarked on
some major policy initiatives
—- including a national energy
policy, an invitation for pro-
duction of renewable energy
by the private sector, an
aggressive energy efficiency
programme and a regulatory
review, these efforts seem to
be floundering today.

BEC recently cancelled its
two-year renewable energy
tendering process with literal-
ly nothing to show for it. IDB-
financed studies are still under-
way to determine changes to
the legal and regulatory sys-
tem, and to promote energy
efficiency and conservation.
Meanwhile, the government is
making enormous investments
in conventional generating
plant on several islands that
will be in use for the next 20
years.

According to Glen Laville,
project manager at the Min-
istry of Environment for the
IDB-sponsored initiatives,
"Sector reform is a process.
We are presently completing
the necessary studies to ensure
the outcome is positive. This
takes time. The fact is there's a
helluva lot happening and a lot
will eventually come out of
this, but we are just not there
yet.”

The government seems to
be betting the future of energy
reform on a possible invest-
ment by the Canadian power
company, Emera, in BEC.
Emera has lately been con-
ducting a review of BEC's
operations to develop a turn-
around plan for the corpora-
tion, and is also a major share-
holder in the Grand Bahama
Power Company.

"We picked Emera as a
strategic partner to look at
what the IDB consultants were
doing from a practical, opera-
tional view," BEC Chairman
Michael Moss told me recent-
ly. "In addition to wind tur-
bines, we are looking at circu-
lating fluidised bed furnaces to
burn a variety of fuels, and also
considering wave energy, but
conservation is the only real
green energy at the moment
and we will be pushing that
angle strongly. We are some
distance away from any utility-
scale RE projects."

The slowdown --
if not collapse — of the gov-
ernment's energy initiatives is
most unfortunate in my view. I
fully agree with the view of
New York Times columnist
and author Tom Friedman, "In
this kind of world, leadership
at every level of government
and business matters more
than ever. We have no margin
of error anymore, no time for
politics as usual or suboptimal
legislation.

And as regards the PLP’s
expectation to benefit elec-
torally from the economic
downturn, I offer another
quote from Friedman: "In this
economic climate, people
know they need to be smarter,
more frugal and make tougher
choices in their private lives.
They know they can’t fake it or
fool themselves anymore, so
they have much less tolerance
for politicians who want to do
that in our public life."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

An archipelago of opportunities

An address by Governor Gen-
eral Sir Arthur Foulkes at the
graduation ceremony for Inagua
All Age School — Matthew Town,
Great Inagua

IT IS GOOD to return to the
island of my birth to celebrate
the milestone of the graduation
of the Class of 2010 at the Inagua
All Age School, the school
where I began my own life-long
quest for knowledge.

Though many of us continue
to talk about Inagua as one of
the best kept secrets in the
Bahamas, I suspect you already
know that many of this island's
best kept secrets are already out.

For me, it is a privilege to be
the first Inaguan to serve as gov-
ernor general. But, I have no
doubt that more Inaguans will
serve in national leadership
capacities in the future.

Indeed, Inaguans have already
made numerous contributions
around the world. From noted
educator T G Glover to musi-
cian Alphonso “Blind Blake”
Higgs to the world renowned
opera singer Randolph Symon-
ette, many of our best kept
secrets are now being shared
with a wider world.

There were other Bahamian
pioneers from Inagua, such as
Cyril Richardson who studied
medicine in Aberdeen, Scotland,
in the 1920s. There were the
Nixon brothers whose legendary
contributions to conservation
and environmentalism have led
to the repopulation of our arch-
ipelago with our wonderful
national bird, the flamingo.

Like these pioneers, I am sure
Class of 2010, that you will like-
wise do Inagua proud as you
continue your journey beyond
today's celebration. I know that
you will also do the Bahamas





CYRIL RICHARDSON



proud here in Inagua and wher-
ever else you should choose to
venture in the world.

No matter where you go,
remember this: Because of geog-
raphy and the determined indi-
viduals who took advantage of
the possibilities arising from this,
Inagua has always been at the
crossroads of our history. This is
also your history, graduates. It is
a part of your destiny.

Incidentally, may I invite the
community of Inagua to do more
to showcase and preserve the
rich cultural and built heritage
of Inagua. As you know, many
of our islands are doing this
important work, with Abaco,
Cat Island, Eleuthera and other
islands leading the way. There
is also significant work being
done in New Providence.

I invite you to consider the
development of an Inagua Her-
itage Committee which will co-
ordinate the preservation and
exposition of the rich history of
this island. There are a number
of persons and groups who may
assist in these efforts.

If we do not preserve the his-
tory, records, architecture and
artifacts of Inagua, they may pass
into history not as secrets, but
as history lost and never to be
found again.

You already have the histori-
cal triumph of the preservation
of our national bird and Inagua's
natural heritage to guide you in
the preservation of this island's
cultural and built heritage.

Class of 2010: You and I share
a common bond. We now share
the same alma mater. We also
share a deeper bond: The oppor-
tunity to use the gift of this edu-
cation to serve the country we
love.

The opportunity for every
Bahamian child to attend and
complete secondary school only
came about in my lifetime.
Today, many thousands of
Bahamians have advanced
degrees whether a Bachelors, a
Masters or Doctorate.

So, you are most fortunate to
have completed high school. I
beseech you to use this good for-
tune to help uplift the least for-
tunate in our country.

Today is a moment to be
proud. Yet, a deeper pride will
develop when you are able to
apply the knowledge you have
obtained to make life better for
yourselves and the wider com-
munity. In essence, it is impor-



SIR ARTHUR FOULKES



tant to make a living, but it is
equally important to make life
worth living.

As T just noted, the opportu-
nity to attend high school in the
Bahamas is a relatively recent
occurrence in the history of our
country.

Prior to 1967, most students
left school at the age at 14 to
enter the workplace as there
were precious few secondary
schools for them to attend.

This changed because of men
and women who decided to ded-
icate themselves to something
bigger than themselves.

Graduates: Our country is not
without its challenges. We have
significant social problems,
including a high incidence of vio-
lent crime.

The Bahamas, like many oth-
er countries, is experiencing one
of the worst economic down-
turns since the Great Depres-
sion of the 20s and 30s.

Fortunately, this world eco-
nomic crisis has not affected
Inagua as badly as it has the rest
of the country.

Another challenge is also the
need for us to return to greater
civic pride, civility, respect and
basic good manners. Good
morning, thank you and please
are not merely courtesies. They
are also a part of the social ties
and graces which bind us togeth-
er as One Bahamas.

We afford others basic cour-
tesies because they are a part of
our human and Bahamian fami-
ly These courtesies are a part of
the Golden Rule that we should
do unto others as we would have
them do unto us.

Dressing appropriately,
refraining from foul language in
public and driving courteously
demonstrate that we have
respect for our own person as
well as others.

Proper public behaviour, good
manners and simple kindness
are at the very heart of our
Bahamian way of life.

Our young people today are
bombarded with unwholesome
messages in the popular, social
and mass media from video
games to violent language and
images in film and on the Inter-
net.

Still, despite our national chal-
lenges, I remain hopeful. Things
are not as bad as some may sug-
gest. There is often too much
negativity and cynicism on the
part of many adults. If you listen
to some people, you would think
that these are the worst of times.

The media never tire of telling
us what is bad in our Bahamas
but they are not so anxious to
tell us the good things, especial-
ly the wonderful achievements
of many of our young people
who are the doing the right
things.

I am often amused that for
many older people, no matter
the decade, that in their minds
their times are always the worst
of times. I heard this when I was
a mere boy, then as a teenager,
then as an adult. I continue to
hear this even now as a senior
citizen.

So, allow me to say a word to
the parents, guardians, teachers
and community leaders here









TG GLOVER

tonight.

With the vantage point of age
and history, let me remind you
that not everything was better
yesteryear. Indeed, many things
were quite worse in terms of a
lack of opportunity, discrimina-
tion and inequality. Many doors
that are open today were shut
tight back then.

Also, our young people are
faced with challenges the likes
of which us older folks have nev-
er had to contend. So, even as
you provide a firm hand to our
children and youth, also provide
them with encouragement and
examples of hope.

We are often quick to con-
demn our young people for their
mistakes but slow to praise them
when they do good. Let's lift
them up more, and row them
out less. Let's lift them up with
stories of hope and examples of
success. And let us be generous
im our encouragement.

Most young people are not
engaging in anti-social behav-
iour. Most young people want
opportunities to succeed. Most
young people are hungry for a
chance to be truly involved in
life-giving pursuits which chal-
lenge their minds, engage their
hearts and touch their imagina-
tions.

From the National Children's
and Youth Choirs to community

RANDOLPH SYMONETTE



service to the National Spelling
Bee to church youth groups to
speech, debate and athletic com-
petitions, our young people are
excelling and contributing.

Our children and youth are
also excelling in various nation-
al arts and cultural activities and
programmes. I was most pleased
to listen to the renditions by your
students of “This Land Is My
Land” and “All a We is One
Family”, when I arrived. And, I
also appreciated the music
played by the Third Bahamas
Boys Brigade.

We need more such pro-
grammes and opportunities
where young people can be men-
tored by caring adults who lift

them up, who inspire them into
being and doing their best.

I marvel at the young people
who have had to go to work at a
young age to help take care of

their families and their younger
siblings. Indeed, more often than
not, it is not our young people
who are failing. Disturbingly, it
is too often the adult communi-

ty that is failing.
During my tenure as gover-
nor general I dedicate myself,

SEE page eight

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK Il - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II — Accounts Payable in

the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Processing invoices for payment by checking accuracy of calculations,
coding and authorized signatures;

Posting invoice disbursements and journal entry data into the accounts

payable system;

Reconciling statements of account for local vendors with balance due
in excess of $5,000.00. This involves generating open payables report to

ensure correctness of entries and vendor balance;

Maintaining and reporting on the Corporation’s meal voucher system;

Preparing schedules (source data for aged payables etc.) or other task
requested by Supervisor or Manager;

Assisting with maintenance of the cheque log and disbursing cheques for
vetting and approved signatures;

Assisting with the filing system of accounts payable documents and fol
lows up on outstanding obligations to local vendors; and

Assisting with resolving vendors disputes/queries.

Job requirements include:

Aminimum of an Associate Degree
(Accounts, Business Administration);
A minimum of 2-3 year experience;
Thorough working knowledge of the Disbursement Processing module
within the H TE environment;
Ability to operate the Call Accounting System and to post invoice data
for processing of payment;
Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and
Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas

on or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.



a

BAHAMAS nest

Fit? ik uEUEAROE. TOOAY TOMSEEHA

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT BAHAMAS FIRST GROUP OFFICES:

BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS INSURANCE AGENCY

WILL BE CLOSED ON FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010 FOR OUR STAFF
ANNUAL FUN DAY.

WE WILL REOPEN FOR BUSINESS AT 9:00 A.M. ON MONDAY, 21,
2010.

WE REGRET ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSE.

BAHAMUG FIRST ROLES LTS,

GAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL INSURANCE 00. LTO.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010





PLACE ART PCIE

| FART A
ZEW
| PROVIDESCE

CHEVRON
BAHALAS LTD,
(TEXACO)

DIESEL CML
LEAD FREE

PART C

RANI BAIA MA
(EAC UDG)
FREEPORT

CHEVRON
BAHAMAS LTD,
(TEXACO)

DIESEL OL
LEAD FREE

PART Db
| ABACO, ANDROS
ASD ELEUTHERA

CHEVRON
BAHMAS LTD,
(TEXACO)

| MESEL OWL
LEAD FREE

PART E

I
ASILY [SLASDS

CHEVRON
BAHMAS LTD.
(TEXACH)

DIESEL OFL
LEAD FREE



PLANT IMOLM
SUPPLIERS"
PRICE

IX CLUDING

maT

ALLOTHER ee |
F

MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE FRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) (

) REGULATIONS, 2002

SCHEDULE

MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING |
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON

MELANIN
DISTRIBUTORS’ |
PRICE

s | s

SEA

INCLUDING

IX CLUDING SEA

IA CLUDING SE A

PERMANENT SECRETARY

GN-1065

The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule below for DIESEL OFL sold by
CHEVRON BAHAMAS LIMITED (7 EXACO) will become effective on Tuesday, 15", 2010, and
LEAD FREE GASOLINE will become effective on Monday, 21" June, 2010.

LAAT MLM
RETAIL SELLING
PRICE PER US.
CALLON

5

FREIGHT

FREIGHT

FREIGHT











(AMENDMENT) [

ARTICLE

PARTA
NEW PROVIDENCE

ESS0 Standard Oil Limited Diesel Dill

Sun Oil (Shell)
PART C
GRAND BAHAMA
{Excluding FREEPORT)

__|__Lead Free

ESS0O Standard Oj) Limited Diesel Oi
Sun Oil (Stell)
PART D
ABACO, ANDROS
ELEUTHERA

Lead Free

E350 Standard Oil Limited Diesel Oil

Sun Oil (Sivell)

PARTE
ALL OTHER FAMILY ISLANDS

Lead Free

ESSO Standard Oil Limited Diesel Oil

Sun Oil (Shell) Lead Free





MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCL4L DEVELOPMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL
(GASOLINE & DIESEL OL}

) REGULATIONS, 2002

SCHEDULE

MASIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING

___ PRICE PER U.S. GALLON

LACT
SUPPLIERS’
PRICE PRICE
£ 5

MAXIMUM

IHNG@LUDING SEA

INCLUDING

3.43

421

INCLUDING
|

PERMANENT SECRETARY

DISTRIBUTORS’

GN-1066

The Publis is advised thal prices as shown in the Schedule for Diesel Oil sold by ESS0 Standard
Oil 5.4. Limited will become efective on Monday, June 14", 2010, and Lead Free Gasoline sold by Sun
hil Limited (Shell) will become effective on Thursday, June 77", 2070,

| (MAXIMUM RETAIL
SELLING PRICE
PER U.S. GALLON
$

FREIGHT

3.45

444

FREIGHT

ag
448

FREIGHT

3H
4.60

FREIGHT







THE TRIBUNE

Shooting victim in

custody for questioning

FROM page one

ardize investigations and future prosecution, police remained
tightlipped about whether or not the shoot-out could be a
retaliation against Deveaux who was the presumed target.

Deveaux was released from prison last week after a murder
charge against him was dismissed. This is the second time that
a murder charge against him has been dropped.

He had been accused of the murder of Marlon "Marley"
Smith on April 19, 2009, and was also accused of the murder of

Corrie Bethel on May 10, 2007.

Deveaux was taken to the hospital by private vehicle and then
into police custody the same night after he was treated and dis-

charged.

However the toddler, who suffered gunshot injuries to the
head as a result of the indiscriminate shooting, is in serious, but
stable condition in the Intensive Care Unit of the Princess

Margaret Hospital.

ICU staff confirmed the toddler is now breathing on his

own and in stable condition.

He had been put on a ventilator, upon admission Monday
night but the breathing tube was removed yesterday.

The child had not undergone any surgery as of yesterday,
however it may be necessary after further analysis.

It was not confirmed whether there is any connection
between Deveaux and the child.

Police investigations continue and persons with any infor-
mation that might prove useful are encouraged to contact the
police at 919, 328-TIPS, 502-9991 or 322-3337.

FROM page seven

among other things, to encour-
aging our young people. I want
to remind them of the possibili-
ties before them. This includes
the fine legacies of men and
women in whom they can find
inspiration.

I want our young people to
know about Dr Albert Forsythe,
a Bahamian. He was a medical
doctor and a pioneer in aviation
who was one of the first of two
men to ever land a plane on New
Providence.

I remind our young people
about Myron Rolle and other
Rolles hailing from Exuma who
have played in the National
Football League in the United
States.

Myron Rolle is also a Rhodes
Scholar who joins the ranks of
the other Rhodes Scholars we
are continuing to produce on a
regular basis. The brilliant musi-
cian and guitar player Joseph
Spence was from Andros.

Indeed, all of the islands in
the Bahamas archipelago have
contributed to national and
world history.

When I had the privilege of
serving as High Commissioner
to the United Kingdom, I met
many Bahamians from whom
our youth can draw inspiration.
In both Franz Hepburn and Dr
Cleveland Williams, they will
find world class musicians who
are excelling at home and
abroad.

For those young people inter-
ested in history and education,
they will find in Dr Gail Saun-
ders and Dr Keva Bethel, fine
Bahamians who have con-
tributed significantly to our
national development.

From athletics to the arts to
scholarship, Bahamians have
excelled way beyond the mea-
sure of our small country. We
are Golden Girls and Boys and
Men and Women from the
Olympics to the Grammy and
Academy Awards to other world
stages and awards.

Beyond our accomplishments,
there is also an entrepreneurial
spirit that is alive and well, and
becoming more vibrant. I think
of men like Israel Rolle, better
known to most of us as Bone-
fish Foley.

Mr Rolle represents the best
of the Bahamian Imagination.
He realised long ago how to use
the many gifts God has given us
a people. He used his talents to
pursue various careers which
brought him personal fulfillment.

He also used his talents to
care for his family and enrich his
community. In the process, he
taught us how to make use of
the extraordinary natural beau-
ty and beneficence of the
Bahamas. He taught us how to
drop our buckets where we are
and create something new and
wonderful. This is the Bahamian
way.

Graduates: It is this same
entrepreneurial spirit of enter-
prise and excellence that I invite
you to discover and make your
own. God has already provided
the Bahamas with the resources.
And, he has provided you with
the talents.

It is now your task to marry
your talents to those gifts. Think
of the riches we have as a coun-
try. The Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace likes to say that the
Bahamas is not only a country, it
is a region.

It takes a jetliner over two
hours to fly through the airspace
of the Bahamas from north to
south. If you fly over many
islands in the Caribbean it takes
approximately ten to twenty
minutes.

Andros is the fifth largest
island in the Caribbean. Little
Inagua is the largest uninhabited
island in the Caribbean.
Mayaguana is three or four times
bigger than Bermuda. Many of

Archipelago

our islands are bigger than Bar-
bados. Our marine resources are
extensive and extraordinary.

We used to think of such a
large archipelago as a develop-
ment challenge. We now recog-
nise ours as an archipelago of
opportunities. Remember that:
An archipelago of opportunities.

As we continue to celebrate
our nation's past and present
accomplishments, let us also look
to the unfolding dawn and new
horizons.

Graduates: We need your
ideas and energy to embrace
tomorrow's opportunities today.
We need you to help to continue
to diversify our tourism indus-
try in the areas of eco, heritage
and sports tourism. This will
include the ongoing develop-
ment of Bahamian boutique
tourism brands and establish-
ments.

We need you to gain the sci-
entific, technological and other
skills needed to make our coun-
try more environmentally con-
scious and sustainable. In
essence we need the scientists
and technicians who will help us
to harness the wind and the
waves. And, we need the dream-
ers who will help us to harness a
thousand tomorrows and
beyond.

Graduates: Your country also
needs the farmers who will pro-
duce niche agricultural products.
And, we will need competent
well-trained individuals in every
area of national life from teach-
ers to artists to engineers to civ-
ilservants to social and business
entrepreneurs.

The stakes are too high and
the opportunities too extraordi-
nary to waste our time with
bemoaning our troubles as a
country. Self-criticism is good
but self-abuse is destructive of
our national aspirations.

As we celebrate your gradua-
tion from primary to secondary
school and secondary school to
the next chapter in your lives, I
urge you to consider how your
individual goals and intentions
may impact the Bahamas.

In closing, I suggest to you
three life lessons:

e Business acumen without
values quite often leads to a full
bank account, but a bankrupt
spirit. So be business people
guided by values beyond the
mere accumulation of profits.

¢ Academic knowledge and
intelligence without character
typically leads to corruption of
heart and mind. So become peo-
ple of intelligence, guided by
virtues which allow you to apply
your knowledge to the common
good rather than simply person-
al interests.

¢ Power without conscience
leads to despotism of heart and
mind. So become men and
women for others guided by con-
science and compassion.

So even as you prepare for
tomorrow by making yourself
competent in whatever area you
choose to pursue, make sure that
you are also a person of charac-
ter, compassion and citizenship.

And remember that the only
life worth living is the life of ser-
vice to God through service to
God's people.

So, dear graduates, I invite
you as a fellow product of this
wonderful institution to get
ready for a life of adventure and
service. You will have many
challenges along the way.

When you come to the
evening of your life, you will be
able to look back with joy and
pride if you do your best, remain
honest and dedicate yourself to
causes larger than yourselves,
and give a full measure of service
to our beloved Bahamas.

Graduates: Congratulations.
May the Lord who has blessed
Inagua and the Bahamas with
so many riches, bless you tonight
and as you go on your way.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16,



“i





oT 4 nt + —- Ve
a fA =



2010



BBF’s eighth annual Andre Rodgers National Baseball Championship...

a 2.
a i! | a
et i
See eal

oh 1 7 =

a pon iw a

GOLD MEDAL WINNERS in the 16-18 division — Junior Baseball League of Nassau...

‘The greatest spectacie of baseball
| Nave ever seen in the Bahamas’

he Bahamas Baseball Federation’s

eighth annual Andre Rodgers

National Baseball Championship

was played over the Labour Day

holiday weekend in Grand
Bahama and according to all reports, it was a
resounding success.

“It was the greatest spectacle of baseball I
have ever seen in the Bahamas,” said baseball
historian Jeff Williams, who was instrumental in
the formation of the federation.

Here’s a look at the divisional winners:

Coach Pitch - Age 7/8

Gold medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League. Daunte Stuart was named the Most
Valuable Player.

Silver medallist - Legacy Baseball League -
Silver Medal

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau

9-10 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau. Jamal Davis was the MVP.

Silver medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League

Bronze medallist - Grand Bahama Little
League

11-12 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League. MVP - Anthony Villalon.

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Little
League.

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau

13-15 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League. MVP - Alex Martinborough

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Little
League.

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League
of Nassau.

16-18 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau. MVP - Lynden Pindling III

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Amateur
Baseball Association

Bronze medallist - Bimini Baseball League

25 & Under DIVISION

Gold medallist - Legacy Baseball League.
MVP - Desmond Russell

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Amateur
Baseball Association

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau

Here’s a breakdown on the composition of the
tournament.

Seven (7) Islands - Abaco, Bimini, Eleuthera,
Grand Bahama, Inagua, New Providence and
Spanish Wells - participated.

Ten members - All Abaco Baseball League,
Bimini Baseball League, Eleuthera Baseball
League, Grand Bahama Little League, Grand
Bahama Amateur Baseball League, Legacy
Baseball League, Inagua Baseball Association,
Freedom Farm Baseball League, Junior Baseball
League of Nassau and Spanish Well Baseball
League - were represented.

¢ Asmall version of the Bahamas Games.

¢ Baseball now has a national presence
throughout the Bahamas.

¢ Only BBF members not present were the
Long Island Baseball League, due to the Long
Island Regatta.

¢ Final Count: 680 participants

¢ 38 teams in 6 divisions competed, compris-
ing of the following:

Six teams - Coach pitch division (7/8)

Six teams - 9/10 division

Three teams - 11/12 division

Eight teams - 13-15 division

Seven teams - 16-18 high school division

Four teams - 25 & Under collegiate division

The BBF honoured the following deserving
baseball icons with its Lifetime Achievement
Award:

¢ Randy Rolle - Northern Bahamas (Bimini)

¢ George Weech - Northern Bahamas (Bimi-
ni

Ys Franklyn Rolle - Northern Bahamas -
(Grand Bahama)

¢ Fred "Papa" Smith - (New Providence).

The BBF selection committee chairman Jeff
Francis announced the prestigious High School
& College Award winners:

¢ Most Outstanding High School Player -
Theodore Trae Sweeting of Christ School,
Arden, North Carolina. Local League - Junior
Baseball League of Nassau.

¢ Most Outstanding High School Pitcher -
Leon Cooper Jr. of Sunrise Christian Acade-
my in Wichita, Kansas. Local League: Legacy
Baseball League.

¢ Most Outstanding College Player - Chris
Fox of Florida Tech in Melbourne, Florida.
Local League: Freedom Farm Baseball League.

¢ Most Outstanding College Player - Sean
Albury of Nova Southeastern University in
Davie, Florida. Local League - Freedom Farm
Baseball League.





GOLD MEDAL WINNERS in the Coach Pitch (Age 7/8) division — Freedom Farm Baseball League









Brazil breaks
through NKorean
defence to

win 2-1...
See page 10

a FL ae



$ SUZUKI

We Take any
Trade-Ins!

5-cioor Suzuki Grand Vitara» 2.4-lite fuel injected engine

¢ Keyless remote entry ° Roof Rails
¢ Front dual air bags e 17” Alloy wheels

¢ Power steering, ¢ Steering wheel audio
windows, locks, mirrors

¢ Anti-lock brakes
¢ Driver Select 2x4
¢ Air conditioning
° CD/radio/Aux

¢ Fog Lamps

A Comfortable and Affordable Compact SUV

The new Grand Vitara is fuel efficient, with more passenger room,
greater stability and reliable performance.

$ SUZUKI WAY OF LIFE!

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALITY:

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

On-the-spot financing



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Brazil breaks

through NKorean
defence to win 2-1

<2>7010

Drive one.

FORD EXPLORER XLT

ht True ' Simenican Soon

Shop & Compare

4U0L, Vi with aii iamie ie: Taman, eather interior, 5 or T paaciger
confipuradion, pawer seal wilh parr hark resi, power windews,
locks and mirrors, alley wheels, antemetic headlights, radin, CT
plaver, with oad question, the best vulue in ‘The Hahamas on a large
SUV, without exception, all this plus 5 pears MM mle warranty, 3
years puidside asec, 3 years rus precited, Liceace anil
irapeetinn i births, fall Lenk of an, fier mals firs five services,

you are LOOKING for the best value a
YOU OWE itto yourself to visit our showroom _—=—-——— .

“> 2010 -

Drive one.

Shop d& Compare
















































































Sone Optional
Equipment Shown

Automatic Tramiccen, dC pliegey, 23 Litre Epi, AA, dioted paper,
Daler MUNI), [oad Jin, oA ditions pia aay. fe ard
tide caetain ae bape, all of hie ples 2 per ON ole warranty, J innara
eater avrioece, 7 peer roe pradecien, dineice ed merci to beiielry,
fret rou of’ pars, floor erat, flere flee serrices,

PL RM aha Ly

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD « TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: trienclynehondiheimnal, cor
WEBSITE: tandlynotormhahaire con





GN-1067

MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

THE PRICE CONTROL ACT (1971)
(CHAPTER 339)
THE PRICE CONTROL (GENERAL) (AMENDMENT)
(NO. 12) REGULATIONS, 2010

NOTICE

The public is hereby advised that effective, Wednesday, 16 June,
2010, the Honourable Minister of Labour and Social Development have

ipproved prices for the following breadbasket commodities:

1. Sugar
7? Flour

PERMANENT SECRETARY















GN-1068

MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

THE PRICE CONTROL ACT (1971)
(CHAPTER 339)
THE PRICE CONTROL (GENERAL) (AMENDMENT)
(NO. 13) REGULATIONS, 2010

NOTICE

The public is hereby advised that effective, Wednesday, 16 June,
2010, the Honourable Minister of Labour and Social Development have
approved prices for the following breadbasket commodity:

By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer

JOHANNESBURG (AP)
— Brazil needed almost an
hour to break through the
North Korean defense before
pulling off a 2-1 win Tuesday,
and Didier Drogba and his bro-
ken right arm made their debut
at this year's World Cup in
Ivory Coast's 0-0 draw against
Portugal.

Maicon scored from an
almost impossible angle in the
55th minute and Elano added
the other in the 72nd to give
the five-time champion Brazil-
ians three points in their open-
ing Group G match at Ellis
Park.

But the win didn't come easy,
with the little-known North
Koreans playing almost the
entire team behind the ball to
stifle Brazil's potent attack for
most of the match.

"It is important to start with
a victory and we did it," Maicon
said. "It was a good step toward
our goal of being in the final
on July 11."

Also, Winston Reid headed
in an equalizing goal in injury
time to give New Zealand a 1-1
draw with Slovakia in Group
F.

Brazil struggled to get
through the clogged area in
front of North Korea goal-
keeper Ri Myong Guk, but
Maicon surprised Ri when he
ran down the right side and
kicked the ball toward the near
post just before it was going
out. Ri appeared to be expect-
ing a cross.

Elano later received a
threaded pass from Robinho
and needed only one touch to
shoot the ball past Ri.

"The opener is always hard-
er," Dunga said. "There is the
anxiety, the players are more
nervous than usual, trying to
do too much. But we are satis-
fied."

Ji Yun Nam pulled one back
in the 89th for North Korea,
which last played at the 1966
World Cup and reached the
quarterfinals.

Jong Tae Se played alone in
attack for North Korea and was
able to cause some trouble for
the Brazilian defenders, but the
"People's Rooney" couldn't get
one in the net.

"I thought we fought bravely.
We defended very well," North
Korea coach Kim Jong Hun
said. "I think we gained a lot
of experience and, for the
remaining two games, we have
gained confidence."

Drogba, the African Player
of the Year who broke his arm
during a friendly 11 days ago,
came on as a substitute in the
66th minute but had little
impact on the Group G game in



DIDIER DROGBA (left) greets
Ricardo Carvalho of Portugal at
the end of the World Cup group G
match which ended in a scoreless
draw.

(AP Photo)

Port Elizabeth.

Portugal captain Cristiano
Ronaldo hit the post early, but
Ivory Coast otherwise created
the chances in the rainy match.

"We created some more
chances than they did,” Ivory
Coast coach Sven-Goran Eriks-
son said. "If you think about
discipline and organisation, I
think we were organised for all
90 minutes."

Drogba played with a special
protective cast, approved by
FIFA, on his arm. But still he
was on the bench at the start.

"I spoke to him after training
yesterday evening and he said
he preferred to be on the
bench," Eriksson said. "He said
‘Boss, if you need me, I am
there.’ I hoped we would not
need him but we wanted to win
the game so we did what we
did.

"We did not put any pres-
sure on him.”

Reid scored in Rustenburg
from a cross by Shane Smeltz,
giving New Zealand its first
point at a World Cup after los-
ing all its games in its debut in
1982.

"It probably was the most
important goal of my life,” Reid
said. “I didn't see the ball until
late. I knew that if I got it on
target and didn't hit it too hard,
I could just guide it in.”

Robert Vittek had given Slo-
vakia the lead in the 50th
minute, heading in a cross from
Stanislav Sestak after Reid let
him move free.

Outside the World Cup sta-
diums, a strike over pay by the
security stewards spread to half
the tournament's 10 venues,
forcing police to step in and
assume their duties.

Several hundred guards
walked off the job at Soccer
City, the main World Cup sta-
dium in Johannesburg. There
was no match there Tuesday.

Police said they also have
taken over security at stadiums
in Durban, Cape Town and
Port Elizabeth.

NOopurlarse
ELM eli w els
TM RTC
yy eta ti
CUSTOM
Mela

Come see us at the
8th Annual Sunshine Auto & Ruff Ryders Show & Fair
at the Town Centre Mall - Saturday June 19th, 12pm - 9pm
or visit us at the
Mall at Marathon’s Father’s Day promotion featuring
“Daddy’s Toys” - Saturday June 19th, 10am - 9pm

TOP QUALITY
ee a=

WIDE RANGE OF
RIMS 17” - 28”

bed ={o7 \fe) so) ts

LOW PROFILE
TIRES

PAS
INSPECTION

SEWER ecm On LLIN

aa

| 10% OFF RIMS | fe
=

Poot

rt v4

—,

= -
atl
Nassau’s first complete rim rn

Tel: 326-1900 / 326-1901

www.customwheelsbahamas.com
Corner of Christie & Dowdeswell Streets

ahd

l. Mayonnaise Ee y _—
SERVICE

WIDE RANGE OF

PERMANENT SECRETARY ACCESSORIES









TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

mal anti-human trafficking law
enforcement efforts.”

However, the report com-
mended the Bahamas on being
“proactive” and “cooperative”
in its stance on the issue. Sever-
al colleagues of Bahamian social
workers and government offi-
cials have been trained in
counter-trafficking strategies,
based on International Organi-
zation for Migration (IOM) stan-
dards.

In the Bahamas, there may be
people who are victims of traf-
ficking, who do not even know,
according to an IOM trained
social worker. She said certain
practices that are normalized in
society are borderline traffick-
ing, and might be classifiable as
such with further investigation.

She spoke about the practice
of Bahamians hiring foreign
housekeepers, such as Jamaican
women. She said these workers
are sometimes brought to the
Bahamas on false premises and
forced to work in abusive condi-
tions.

According to IOM standards,
which are recognized by the

COB union

FROM page one

Minister

Bahamian government, a work-
er who is recruited from another
country, who may be in a posi-
tion of vulnerability, under false
conditions, and then exploited
for forced labour could be a vic-
tim of human trafficking. This
could apply to a housekeeper, a
sex worker, or a child labourer.
Mr Turnquest said he “‘reject-
ed the initial premise about (the
problem of) human trafficking”
in the Bahamas, because “most
of the persons who come to the
Bahamas come of their own free
will. There may be some
instances in which people are
sold the flawed bill of goods,
where someone may have mis-
represented something.”
However, according to the
IOM, “the consent of a victim”
of human trafficking to partici-
pate in the intended exploita-
tion is “irrelevant”, if the three
basic conditions of trafficking
are Satisfied, which are (for
adults) mobilization by way of
“recruitment, transportation,
transfer, habouring or receipt of
persons” by means of “threat,
force, coercion, abduction, fraud

or deception”, for the
purpose of exploita-
tion to the benefit of
the trafficker. An indi-
vidual who is traf-
ficked is a “victim of
a crime”; they are not
criminals.

An individual can
enter the country |
legally and possess
legal work papers, but



4

is a “crime against the
state”, and both the
person being smuggled
and the smuggler can
be found guilty of a
crime. According to
the IOM training man-
ual, illegal entry into a
country is a condition
of human smuggling,
sometimes using false
or stolen documents,

.

their identification JRQNIMM@IURIN@USSR to perform a voluntary

documents may be
seized and their movement
restricted or controlled, which is
the case with some housekeep-
ers, according to the social work-
er.

“With international traffick-
ing, victims may be mistaken for
irregular migrants, put in deten-
tion facilities and deported with-
out being properly identified.
Trafficked persons are likely to
have immediate and acute phys-
ical, sexual, and psychological
health needs that are not nor-
mally present in cases involving
smuggled or other irregular
migrants,” said a participant in a
local counter-trafficking work-
shop, of notes taken during a
session.

In contrast, human smuggling

FROM page one

"flurry of actions" by the "inner circle" of the College :

Council.

The Union of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas noted
that the practice of not including the faculty union in the :
decision-making processes at the institution was typical of :
the college council.Even though the president of the facul-
ty union sits on the College Council, UTEB President Jen- :
nifer Isaacs-Dotson said the union was never consulted on :
the decision to appoint Dr Earla Carey-Baines as the new :
COB president. The union said this was further evidence of :
the "lack of transparency and accountability that plagues :

this institution."

The 2001 College Act mandates that —in the absence of
a president — the executive vice president is to assume the :

post as an interim president.

Referring to the insistence by college officials to have Dr :
Carey-Baines referred to as "president" instead of interim :
or acting president, the union said the council was "skirting :
and reinterpreting” the legislation. :

Former Executive Vice President Dr Rhonda Chipman- :
Johnson has been tightlipped about her sudden retirement :
from the institution after 31 years. :

However, sources close to her said she was "near tears" :
after learning Dr Earla Carey-Baines, formerly the Dean of
Liberal and Fine Arts, would be appointed the new COB :
president. In a press statement yesterday, the union said: :
"The approach taken by the inner Council in the ‘installa- :
tion’ of a President — whether interim, acting, or permanent :
— again, appears to be an underhanded one, as even the Col- :
lege’s own accounting of Dr. Chipman Johnson’s record of:
service to the College indicates that she was deserving of :
more honourable treatment than the one she was given }

last week."

The union maintained the council has deeply injured con-_ :
fidence of faculty, staff and students that it can operate :
autonomous of political influence, highlighting the col- :
lege's release indicating Dr Chipman-Johnson had accept- :
ed a Government post — which was later found out to be :

Cause of death

untrue.

FROM page one

cle (SUV).



service for pay, or to
facilitate the movement of an
individual into another territory.

Mr Turnquest said if local
social workers had information
to suggest it was an area being
neglected by authorities, they
should activate the relevant pro-
tocols to have it addressed. He
encouraged them to file official
reports with the relevant min-
istries and government agencies
if they had evidence to shed light
on the situation

“Tf there are person (who are
victims of human-trafficking) I
would urge them to come for-
ward to the relevant authorities
and I can ensure them that their
cases will be dealt with fairly,
humanely and expeditiously,”
said Mr Turnquest.

-Onlookers catch robber

before Magistrate Ancella Evans-Williams on Monday.

He was caught by three men who gave chase after the teenager robbed
Mr. Peter McP Christie, president of HG Christie Ltd, of an envelope
near the Nassau Library on Bank Land Friday afternoon.

Mr Christie, who was with his wife Rosemary at the time, fell as he tried
to chase the robber.

“T automatically ran after them but I tripped and fell on the concrete and
got a black eye and lots of other scrapes and bruises,” Mr Christie said.

“But that fall could have been worse.”

As Mr Christie hit the ground, and his assailant ran up the hill towards the
Post Office, witnesses gave chase to ensure the robber did not get away.

Earl Mortimer, 43, was sitting near the library when he heard a woman
cry out that the man who had just run past him had robbed a “guest” and he
gave chase.

As he broke off running a man riding in the back of a pick-up truck asked
what had happened and jumped out to help when he explained the man he
was chasing had robbed a tourist.

As they ran up the hill towards the Post Office a third man joined the pair,
and the three strangers pursued the robber to the Post Office parking lot in
East Street where they found him hiding underneath a Sports Utility Vehi-

Mr Mortimer said they forced him out and took the envelope he had
stolen containing a stack of $100 bills.

They dragged him by his shirt and trousers down the hill to the Central
Police Station where he was booked by duty officers.

Mr Mortimer said: “I thought he was a tourist so I just broke off running,
but he could have been anyone.

“When I came back I saw him bleeding, and I told him and his wife, you
don’t worry about nothing, all you have to do is come by the police station
and get your property.”

Police insisted that Mr Christie was taken to hospital by ambulance

: Where he was given a head scan and x-rays to check for internal injuries. He

not reveal further details of the investigation as

it continues.

Supt Bethel said: “We have the autopsy
results, we know the cause of death but we are
not disclosing that, except to say that we do not

suspect foul play at this time.

“Tt would be inappropriate for us to do that
at this time while we are still looking into the

matter.”

Mr Bethel declined to comment on allega-
tions Mr Tutt had been a cocaine user stating
police were “not going to discuss the finer

details of the investigation.”

“We are still talking to people who we want-

NEW:

ed to talk to when we got the initial report.
“We still have to complete our work,” he
said. Tribune reader Bellamy Hoffman denied
Mr Tutt was a cocaine user, stating: “Wallace
Tutt was an amazing person who did not use

cocaine.”

An Innovative Product
from an
Innovative Company!

Storm Frame Windows Ltd. 74 Mount Royal Ave. * T 242.325.66
es ee a |

en ee



The interior designer born in Meridian,
Mississippi, is best known for transforming the
Miami mansion of the late Italian designer
Gianni Versace into a South Beach icon.

He also designed homes for Cher and had
celebrity friends, including Jack Nicholson and
model Elle McPherson.

own

was relieved to find he had not suffered any serious injuries.

Mr Christie, who was back at work yesterday, now intends to contact the
three good Samaritans and thank them for their efforts.

“Tt was a real citizen’s arrest, and they did a great job,” he said.

“T’m going to call them because I think they deserve a pat on the back.”

Mr Tutt moved to a private retreat near
Harbour Island in 2002, where he transformed

an old home into a nine-room luxury hotel.

Rock House staff declined to speak to
reporters, but said the hotel would be closed for
a week. North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith,
Speaker of the House of Assembly, said he
was shocked by Mr Tutt’s death because he

“seemed to be young and energetic.”

Mr Tutt is said to have recently published a
photographic tribute to Harbour Island with
Cookie Kinkhead and to have provided extra-
ordinary support to children in Harbour Island
on his memorial website.

Memorial services are being planned for

Harbour Island, Miami and Alabama.

RM FRAME

a |



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

_ Deputy Prime Minister

FROM page one

maids to work in private homes. What’s the difference between
them? Why are we prepared to do one and not the other?” asked
the Minister and MP for St Anne’s.

Under Bahamian immigration law, a foreign person can get a
work permit from the Department of Immigration to fill a job in
the Bahamas if no suitably qualified Bahamian can be found to do
the job. In some cases, this may mean those who apply for the job
are not necessarily holding the skills or qualifications the position
demands, and in others, foreigners are able to gain legal autho-
risation to work in The Bahamas when no Bahamians actually
apply for certain jobs when they are advertised.

He suggested that not only does the level of foreigners
employed to do these jobs in The Bahamas mean some Bahami-
ans remain unemployed while jobs exist that they could do, but
“you have to ask the question what other burdens do (immi-
grants) put on the system.”

Meanwhile, Mr Symonette said there has been a “gradually
growing” number of cases of suspected sham marriages between
Bahamians and foreigners seeking “papers” in The Bahamas — pri-
marily Haitians and Jamaicans.

“A number of persons of non-Bahamian citizenship come to
the Bahamas, overstay their welcome, when caught get deported
and coincidentally marry a Bahamian the next day in a country
south of us then come back as the spouse of a Bahamian. The cas-
es are far too common to be real. And that’s an issue we all have
to face. There are a number of marriages that we question,” said
Mr Symonette.

He said that where the Immigration Department suspects
that a marriage is one of “convenience”, lacking authenticity, it has
denied the right to the usual work and residency related benefits
that extend to the spouses of Bahamians and some fraudulent cas-
es have been prosecuted. However, he added that the situation is
a tricky one as the government must extend these benefits to the
spouses of Bahamians or else face the likelihood that Bahamians
who go abroad and marry will not return home. Referring to
the employment of foreigners, mainly Haitians and Jamaicans, in
relatively unskilled jobs such as housekeeping and gardening —
thousands of permits are approved each year for foreigners to
work in posts like these when Bahamians cannot be found to do
the work — and the fact that there is “on a daily basis a demand
for skilled labour at the Department of Labour.” Mr Symonette
said the Bahamas needs to “start looking at the whole immigra-
tion policy in this country.”



UTILITIES EEGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

| aa



al







ap



Xf ae
al Ve AY F

7 | ~
re Be

* a a F

oi]

PUBLIC HEARING for the
URCA ANNUAL REPORT & PLAN

June 23, 2010

Time: 6-8 pm
VT st Me A= COS am he
Resort Convention Centre

{o[0ms=10 (018

All interested parties are
welcome to attend.
TO CONFIRM YOUR
ATTENDANCE PLEASE

email info@urcabahamas.bs.

















THE TRIBUNE

US

ine

WEDNESDAY, JUNE





Iso hee S| 8)

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net







Kerzner: ‘Zero impact’
from debt restructure

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



erzner International last

night said the appoint-

ment of a private equity

firm to advise it on the

restructuring of its multi-
billion dollar debt would have “zero
impact” on its Paradise Island opera-
tions.

Ed Fields, Kerzner International
(Bahamas) spokesman, in response to
Tribune Business’s inquiries, confirmed
what the company had thus far not done,
namely that it had hired the Blackstone
Group to advise it on restructuring the
debt burden taken on when Sol Kerzner
and his fellow private equity investors
bought the company in 2006, taking it
private and removing it from the New
York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

“They were simply retained to advise
us on the restructuring of our debt in
2011,” Mr Fields told Tribune Business of
Blackstone Group. “It has no impact on
anything else. It has zero impact on any-
thing else.”

The latter statements were in response
to this newspaper’s inquiries about
whether the impending debt restructuring
would impact daily operations at Kerzn-
er International’s Paradise Island prop-
erties, which include Atlantis, the One &
Only Ocean Club, Marina Village, Har-
borside and Ocean Club Residences, and
the planned $100 million renovation and

Atlantis and One & Only Ocean Club owner
confirms private equity firm hired to advise
on restructure of $3.2bn buyout debt

expansion at the former that is planned to
take place over the next two years.

Reports about the Blackstone appoint-
ment and debt restructuring first sur-
faced in the Financial Times last week via
Debtwire, which said the collateralised
mortgage-backed securities issued as part
of the buyout’s $3.2 billion financing were
set to mature this September.

The article said it was likely that
investors would agree to a one-year
rollover of these debts, but alleged that
Mr Kerzner and his investor partners
were “between a rock and a hard place”
when it came to refinancing options.

This was because the London Inter-
Bank Offering Rate (LIBOR), which the
price/cost of foreign currency borrow-
ings is linked to, was set to rise, while
Kerzner International’s business levels,
the article claimed, would be unable to
support refinancing through fixed-inter-
est rate borrowings.

While the Atlantis owner was still in
compliance with the banking covenants
set by the buyout’s financing, the FT arti-
cle said its operating income fell by 15 per
cent in 2009, falling from $206 million to

$171 million. Net cash flow dropped by
$30 million between 2008 and 2009, with
occupancy dropping from 70 per cent to
61 per cent.

Debt service coverage, though, was
healthy, due to reduced operating
expenses and debt, plus lower borrowing
costs.

Research by Tribune Business showed
that the lion’s share of the $2.8 billion
financing was secured on Kerzner Inter-
national’s Paradise Island assets, includ-
ing Atlantis, the One & Only Ocean
Club, Harborside and the 62 acres ear-
marked for a future Phase IV expansion.

Kerzner International recently said it
would start recruiting in the “next nine to
12 months" for the 400 permanent jobs it
is planning to create at its Paradise Island
resorts, with its $100 million worth of
upgrades set to include a casino revamp
and 12,000 square foot 'Teens Club’.

George Markantonis, Kerzner Inter-
national (Bahamas) managing director,
said the majority of the 400 posts would
be created in the food and beverage sec-

SEE page 3B





ROYAL FIDELITY

Uae aL §

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company



NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Island festivals
‘must operate
as a business’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ISLAND
festivals and
regattas must
become more
business like,
generating
their own prof-
its to sustain |
growth and
innovation,
Bahamas Fer-
ries’ chief mar-
keting officer told Tribune
Business yesterday. He said
they needed to produce pro-
fessional event plans to add
more value and entertainment.

Khaalis Rolle said island fes-
tival committees often look to
the private sector for donations
in order to develop their events,
whether they be homecomings,
regattas or food-centred festi-
vals.

However, Mr Rolle lamented
the fact that many of the plan-
ners of these festivals are slight-
ed when companies like his
don’t write them “big cheques”,
but choose to contribute to the
development of the festival

RoyalFidelity wins $65m ‘Summer end’ for triple play

port financing contract

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust has won the contract
to act as placement agent/financial adviser for the $65 million
Arawak Cay port’s initial capital raising, Tribune Business can
reveal, having been informed of developments by capital mar-
kets sources.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity’s president, declined to com-
ment when contacted by Tribune Business yesterday, although
well-placed capital markets sources confirmed that the invest-
ment bank - owned 50/50 by Fidelity International Bank & Trust
and Royal Bank of Canada - had seen off competition from the
usual suspects, including CFAL, Providence Advisors and RC
Capital Markets.

It is unclear when any capital raising will take place, although the
Government and 19 private shareholders that form Arawak Port

Development Ltd (APD) have
already injected enough equity, SEE page 4B

Board ‘probably top
challenge’ for insurers

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN company
seeking to launch a ‘multiple
play’ bundle of communications
services via the Internet last
night said the first phase of its
core network infrastructure
build-out should be completed
by end-summer 2010, having
invested “in the millions of dol-
lars” in the project to date.

Edison Sumner, IP Solutions
International's president and
chief executive, told Tribune
Business that the company
planned to start recruiting its

own staff by the same deadline,
having “already identified the
senior management” it planned
to recruit.

IP Solutions, which was
forced to alter its plans after
failing to raise the targeted $16
million from Bahamian
investors, is currently focused
on completing core network
infrastructure on Abaco and
Guana Cay, the latter location
being where is plans to provide
services to real estate owners
at the Baker’s Bay Golf &
Ocean Club project.

Mr Sumner said IP Solutions
was still talking to “prospec-

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Board of Directors
make-up will be “probably the
biggest challenge” for most car-
riers and companies in the
Bahamian insurance industry
when it comes to complying
with the new Act’s regulations,
a leading executive said yester-
day.

Tom Duff, Insurance Com-
pany of the Bahamas (ICB)
general manager, said all the
sector’s companies were
already in shape to fully comply
with the Domestic Insurance
Act and its regulations when
they come into force on July 1,
2010, with no major effects
expected in areas such as

‘Economic climate’ rethink
hope for $600m LNG project

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE proponents of a multi-
million dollar liquefied natural
gas (LNG) terminal and
pipeline on Grand Bahama
have applied to US regulators
for an extension of time to com-
plete their project, hoping the
“current depressed economic
climate” might prompt the
Bahamian government to look
more favourably on the projec-
t’s potential revenue and
growth possibilities.

Suez Energy North Ameri-
ca (the former Tracetbel), in a
May 24, 2010, letter to the Fed-
eral Energy Regulatory Com-

SEE page 6B

accounting and insolvency
issues.

“Probably the biggest chal-
lenge for us, and this will be for
most companies, is the regula-
tions concerning the composi-
tion of the Board of Directors,”
Mr Duff said. “There is going
to be a requirement that a cer-
tain percentage of the Board
becomes independent.”

In ICB’s case, that meant a
majority of directors can no
longer be associated with J. S.
Johnson, the BISX-listed agent
and broker it receives the
majority of its business from,
and which holds a 40 per cent
stake in the general insurance
carrier.

SEE page 4B

* Suez executive hopes
approval hold-up ‘could
change as the country’s
leaders consider
economic growth
opportunities like an
LNG project during
the current depressed
economic climates’

* Suggests government
resolving ‘ownership
and regulatory issues’
with Grand Bahama
Port Authority

Money at Work

provider’s 1st phase build

tive” strategic partners, and was
in “advanced discussions” with
several as it moved forward on
the execution of its business
plans.

“Our major focus has been
on developing the core infra-
structure, the core network in
Abaco,” Mr Sumner told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re very
advanced in its installation. We
are currently going through the
testing phase, which will last us
for a couple of weeks as we iron
out any kinks in the system.

“Abaco is where we intend

SEE page 2B



through advertising and facili-
tating transportation.

He added that his company
spends $8,000 to $10,000 on
advertising per event, which
includes rotation for the festi-
vals the company services.

The amount of money the
service providers spend on
advertising these events often
releases the committee from
duplicating these efforts, which
is money they save on the mar-
keting front.

“In terms of the stress on the
organisation and outlay, it is
usually one of the most expen-
sive operation periods,” Mr
Rolle said of Andros’ Crabfest.

According to him, 5,000 to
7,000 people visited the
Crabfest, many of them using
the services of ferries and cargo
vessels as their primary trans-
portation.

Mr Rolle said his vessels
were fully booked last week-
end for the Andros festival, as
well as cargo vessels like the
Lady Roselyn, Island Link,
Legend, Lady Katrina and
Eastwind. And flights leaving
the domestic terminal at the

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

Sure you'll marry a millionaire!
Now what's Plan B?

We can get you there. Royal Fidelity.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
St. Michael:

246.435.1955





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



SS =<
Experts detail

eye) (Or WERK IU Cen




HIGGS & JOHNSON host-
ed its annual client seminar on
May 12 under the theme A
New Decade: The Evolving
Legal Landscape. It was
opened by the minister of the
environment, Earl Deveaux,
who commented on the illegal
excavation of land in the
Bahamas and the ongoing
struggles the Ministry of the
Environment is trying to over-
come.

The first session, The Plan-
ning & Subdivision Act: 2010:
What is the Plan, was presented
by Lyford Cay-based associate,
Adrian R. White. He discussed
the objects and purposes of the
plan, the various implications
of enforcing the plan and an
outline of what will be taken
into consideration during the
application process.

Higgs & Johnson partner
Vann P. Gaitor, and registered
associate Portia J. Nicholson,
of the Ocean Centre office,
detailed the advantages of the
new Arbitration Act and the
various avenues available for
persons seeking to resolve liti-
gation matters without the



MINISTER Earl Deveaux delivers
opening remarks...

necessity of a court battle.

Visiting associates from the
Higgs & Johnson Cayman
office, Benjamin Wrench and
Carolynn Vivian, spoke on the
challenges facing the funds
industry and the Cayman
islands, as a premier jurisdic-
tion for investment funds, and
discussed the advantages of
establishing funds there and
listing them on the local stock
exchange.







PARTNERS pose with faculty and students from the College of the Bahamas Law programme, and the Eugene Dupuch Law School...

Highlighting the fact that the
Bahamas was removed from
the OECD grey list while pro-
viding additional information
on the Tax Information
Exchange Treaties (TIEAs),
associates of the Ocean Cen-
tre office, Nadia J. Taylor and
Samantha Knowles-Pratt,
expanded on the topic Time to
Talk TIEAs — What you Need
to Know.

The seminar concluded with
an 'Ask the Experts’ segment
that gave attendees the oppor-
tunity to ask questions with
regards to litigation matters,
real estate concerns, trusts and



PARTNERS Earl Cash and Surinder Deal with Justice Jeanne Thompson

(retired)...

other private client issues, com-
mercial transactions and secu-
rities. The expert panel includ-
ed Justice Jeanne Thompson
(retired). along with the firm's
partners, Philip C. Dunkley
QC, Dr Earl A. Cash, Surinder
Deal, Sterling Cooke and
Christel Sands-Feaste.

In its ongoing effort to pro-
mote education in the
Bahamas, Higgs & Johnson
invited faculty and students of
both the College of The
Bahamas Law Degree program
and the Eugene Dupuch Law
School to attend the seminar, at
no cost.



‘Summer end’ for triple play provider’s 1st phase build

FROM page 1B

to begin. We always intended to
begin services from the north-
ern Bahamas, and then move
south and go west from there.”
Mr Sumner told Tribune
Business that IP Solutions was
“in the millions of dollars in
investment” in its system infra-
structure to date, adding: “Sig-
nificant capital has gone into
the development, and more
capital is being put into it.
“We have invested a signifi-
cant amount of money in the
system in place to date. There is
a significant amount of money
to come, as we invest in the
most robust and advanced
Internet Protocol system in this
country and across the region.”
While IP Solutions was still
outsourcing all its work to third

parties, such as Nassau-based
financial services provider, the
Montaque Group, Mr Sumner
confirmed: “We expect to begin
the process of getting staff in
by the end of summer.. We’ve
already identified the senior
management.

Working

“We’re working through the
summer, and by the end of the
summer expect to have this
phase of the development com-
pleted.”

He added that IP Solutions
was still eyeing expansion into
the Caribbean and Latin Amer-
ican region in the long-term,
describing it as “a major part
of our development”.

“That’s a key part of the

business plan, and we still have
plans now in this regard when
time permits and the schedule
allows,” Mr Sumner said. “We
are pretty much on schedule
with what we intend to do,
moving very deliberately. Latin
American, Caribbean expan-
sion is part of our business
development.”

IP Solutions International
was initially targeting business-
es such as hotels, plus gated
communities, as a customer
base for a variety of services it
will transmit down just one
Internet line, hence the 'Multi-
ple Play' description. The ser-
vices will include Internet, TV
via Internet Protocol, video-on-
demand (VOD) games, and
Voice over Internet Protocol
(VoIP) phone services.

“Reporting for The Tribune is a

responsibility and pi ivilege. We

respect and honour the people's

right to know everyday. I'm

proud to be a part of the leacking

print medium in The Bahamas.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

CHIEF REPORTER

RUPERT MISSICH, JR.
THE TRIBUNE



Island festivals ‘must operate as a business’

FROM page 1B

Lynden Pindling International Airport left with-
out available seats.

“People travel because we create the excite-
ment surrounding the event,” said Mr Rolle. “It
is almost a 24-hour operation for us outside of the
normal operating period. Certain things come
into play and the expenses associated with it.”

He suggested entities associated with the plan-
ning of many of the islands’ festivals, like the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, host an event
planning seminar for those islands’ event com-
mittees.

Mr Rolle said that in order to create a value-
added experience for the Bahamian public who
frequent these events, these committees have to
approach festivals as a business and force profits
out of each event in order to grow them and
make them much better in the future.

“They need to start approaching this as a busi-
ness,” he said. “I will recommend to tourism and
culture that they host an event-planning seminar
and they teach or help all these regatta and home-
coming committees to construct a business.

Organise this like a business, that is the model
that is needed.

“They complain that government reduced sup-
port, so they come to the private sector for more
money, but it doesn't work that way. We bring
the people, you get the money out of them.
Organise yourself a revenue streams committee,
then come to me and say sell a package for me.”

Mr Rolle said his business incurs very high
costs for events such as Crabfest, which requires
such massive people-moving support.

He said that with the declines in sea travel to
many events, Crabfest has become the game
changer for many maritime businesses. He called
it a period of economic boost.

According to him, Bahamas Ferries is willing to
co-sponsor a seminar to help festival commit-
tees develop their product into something sus-
tainable and expandable, as many festivals have
shrunk in past years.

“We want to see them become more value
added and a lot more popular,” said Mr Rolle.
“My organisation is willing to co-lead that process
with committee chairpersons.”

Purchase any Whirlpool washer or dryer and get a
1 month supply of Gain or Gain Fabric Softener FREE!
Plus a chance to win a year's supply of both!

Onen Manday thru Saturday, §

Walterely Siem eleteemese ria lety

cae eee A

ae ae payee |
airs TEL: a.
ae oe er

Datum aherti ia ead alelelalelei peal eL



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 3B



‘Frustration’ lingers
at Customs process

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

CHANGES to some of the
Customs Department’s process-
es still have freight forwarders
and brokerage firms “frustrat-
ed”, a consultant for Expert
Customs Brokers in Grand
Bahama said yesterday, while
the department moves fever-
ishly to make reforms and digi-
tise for greater efficiency.

Forrester Carroll said there
are still hang-ups in Customs
as a result of theGovernment
implementing the shift system
for its employees, lack of staff
and the removal of the 10-day
bond system.

City Markets

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY Markets’ chief execu-
tive yesterday denied grocery
industry rumours that the



TT a,
iit PEL

According to Mr Carroll,
individuals in the business of
freight forwarding often have
challenges with collecting ship-
ments during the day in Grand
Bahama, as the Customs office
is short-staffed and often found
unattended at periods during
the day.

“It’s a waste of time to do
the shift system here,” he said.
“They have never had enough
officers for a shift system.”

Aside from short staff woes,
Mr Carroll said the amount of
paperwork and the superfluous
entry processes at the Customs
department serve to frustrate
the business of collecting ship-
ments, and often holds up ship-
ments longer than usual.

struggling supermarket chain
was planning to sub-lease its
East-West Highway corporate
offices and relocate to new
headquarters on Village Road.

“Not at this time,” was the

tt ee ye see

i



inal
{ABLE BAHAMAS

MIARAE LUN

od

He added that the end to the
10-day bond system was detri-
mental to large shipments,
which in his experience can get
held for up to two weeks as
stacks of paperwork is sifted on
the side of both the freight for-
warder and the Customs
Department.

“It takes one of my girls a
week to prepare the entries (for
customs),” he said. “For the
21st century is that a way to do
business?”

The Customs Department is
working towards bringing all of
its forms to the Internet so they
can be filled out and submitted
electronically in order to speed
up processing and allow for a
quicker release of bonded

denies corporate HQ move

response of Derek Winford to
Tribune Business’s inquiries,
adding: “I don’t know where
that came from.”

Sources had suggested that
City Markets was planning the
relocation as part of its contin-
uing cost-cutting efforts. Mr
Winford had previously told
Tribune Business that the com-
pany was targeting increased
efficiencies at its head office
and warehouse.

The chief executive, though,
was more coy when asked
whether chief financial officer
and company secretary, Evan-
geline Rahming, was leaving
City Markets - a departure sub-
sequently confirmed by other
Tribune Business sources.

There is nothing to suggest
that Ms Rahming has done
anything wrong, or that it is a
forced departure.

When asked about the situa-
tion, Mr Winford replied: “If
that is so, we have to make a
statement about that.

“We'll have a prepared state-
ment for you about what is
going on.”

A leading communications company has the requirement for a
Marketing & Sales Executive to lead these functions. This person will
be required to create an integrated strategy and realistic business
plans for all customer market seqments, products, pricing and sales
programs. Timely implementation of the plans is essential as the
objectives of new service launches, revenue and profitability are

demanding.

goods.

Mr Carroll agreed that digi-
tizing the Customs process
could be helpful to persons in
his business, as he currently
uses a system that does just
that. According to him, he has
asked the Customs Department
to look at his system to judge its
compatibility against their
future system, but has not had a
reply as yet.

“Any improved system
should improve their system,”
he said. “I have a system here
that we bought that does every-
thing for you - we could tie in
with that same system. But the
automated thing should
improve the system.”

Kerzner: ‘Zero
impact’ from debt
restructure

FROM page 1B

tor. He emphasised that the
planned expansion/renovation
was not the Hurricane Hole
redevelopment, and nor was it
Phase IV, both of which are still
sitting on the shelf.

Mr Markantonis said the
upgrades were designed to
"refresh" the Atlantis and One
& Only Ocean Club products,
ensuring they never became
stale but continued to stimu-
late excitement and market
demand among both new and
returning customers.

"The expansion is going to
take place over the next two
years. It's not Phase IV and is
not the Hurricane Hole devel-
opment. The reality is we have
to keep refreshing the product.
There are certain facilities we
can do more with and refresh
for returning customers," Mr
Markantonis said.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY

wees

2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET
Lats of parking. Serious inquiries.

WEST BAY
? houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 557-5908

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Concierge for Office Building
Candidate must have excellent
customer service skills, and be
computer literate. Must have
experience in a customer service
related role. Candidate should

be well groomed, mature and
self-motivated.

Security Officer for
Office Building
Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and
have excellent verbal and written
communication skills. Candidate
must be willing to work weekends
and extended hours and have own

transportation.

Interested applicants should
respond by sending their resume to:
DA# 87768, c/o

The Tribune,

P.O. Box N-.3027,

Nassau, Bahamas



RPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Senior Manager, Accounts in the Finance

Division.

The Senior Manager - Accounts oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget &
Management Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective

delivery of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Compilation of the corporate budget;

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets;
Preparation of monthly management statements;

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation;
Preparation of performance reports for division ,department and sections;
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables

(capital contributions, rechargeable);

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices;
Liaison with internal and external audits;

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial Officer for the Board of Directors;

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required;
Preparation of the business plan for the department;

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department;

This person will be results focused and have proven achievements
including protecting existing revenues and growing new ones ina

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims;
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management;

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment;

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form
employee’s salaries;

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable;
Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts;

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle
repayments;

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule;

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans;

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to
ensure adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors;
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors;

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and
External Auditors;

Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline.

Conducting performance appraisals; and

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff,
manage and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations.

communications company; training and organizing a multi-channel
sales and marketing team to deliver results on time and to budget;
innovation in services marketing, product quality and customer
value; and demonstrating that the marketing concept works at all

levels.

This appointment require a Masters degree qualification, plus a

minimum of 10 years’ experience in the international telecoms

industry including executive level decision making and awareness of
regulatory aspects, Experience of working In an overseas

environment with empathy to develop skills and local management Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting
ACCA/CPA or equivalent qualifications;

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a
similar management position;

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices;

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications;

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing
systems;

Ability to analyze financial reports;

Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial
software and the system of internal control;

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability;

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; and
Good time management skills.

succession is also a requirement. This person will also have
extensive knowledge of the intemational communications market
and global expertise of other multi national communications

companies.

Resumes to be sent electronically to
rbadderley@cablebahamas.com to arrive by Tuesday, June 22, 2010.

Interested persons should apply by completing and_ returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

Friday, June 25, 2010.

cated
ABLE Bananas
Per eel Pie m |

Cable Bahamas (Ltd. Massau Baha
Robinson Ad, at Marathon



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

ee
VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED
The Anglican Central Education Authority

THE TRIBUNE

Fed adopts rules China and other
to protect credit



invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

TheApplicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and
include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands
Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.



card customers

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Federal Reserve adopted
new rules Tuesday aimed at
protecting credit card cus-
tomers from getting socked by
lofty late payment charges and
other penalty fees.

The rules respond to public
and congressional outrage over
practices by credit card compa-
nies. They bar credit card com-
panies from charging a penalty
fee of more than $25 for paying

a bill late. They prohibit credit
card companies from charging
penalty fees that are higher
than the dollar amount associ-
ated with the customer's viola-
tion. They also ban so-called
"inactivity" fees when cus-
tomers don't use the account
to make new purchases and
they prevent multiple penalty
fees on a single late payment.

The rules take effect on
August 22.



countries buy US
Treasury debt

WASHINGTON (AP) — China boosted its holdings of US
Treasury debt in April for the second straight month as total
foreign holdings of US government debt increased.

China's holdings of US Treasury securities rose by $5 bil-
lion to $900.2 billion in April, the Treasury Department said
Tuesday. Total foreign holdings rose by $72.8 billion to $3.96
trillion. The sizable gains are being driven by fears that
Greece and other European governments could default on
their debt. Worries over possible defaults have sparked a
flight to safety and that has benefited US Treasury securities.
Treasurys are considered the world's safest investment —
the US government has never defaulted on its debt.





RoyalFidelity wins $65m port financing contract

FROM page 1B

as the development’s two initial share-
holders, to get construction work started
and cover costs for several months.

Tribune Business reported earlier this
month that the Government had allocated
$16 million in the 2010-2011 Budget for
investing in the Arawak Cay port as a 50
per cent shareholder, and the Prime Min-
ister said both it and APD’s investors had
already committed $10 million each.

That will buy time for RoyalFidelity and
APD Ltd to raise the remaining balance of
anywhere between $25-$35 million. With
the initial public offering (TPO), which will
give Bahamian institutional and retail
investors a 20 per cent or $10 million stake,
some way off given the Prime Minister’s
comments about construction and opera-
tional progress being advisable before this
took place, it is likely the first capital rais-
ing efforts will concentrate on fixed income
securities - preference shares or bonds.

The Arawak Cay port will have a 75,000
twenty-foot equipment unit (TEU) capac-
ity, with APD Ltd and its contractors set to
enjoy some $4.75 million in Customs duty

exemptions for its construction. The port
site and Gladstone Road depot are to be
leased for 45 years, with construction com-
pleted by June 27, 2011.

Prior to the port's substantial comple-
tion, APD Ltd will pay an annual rent of
$40 per twenty foot equipment unit (TEU)
container and, following completion, the
rent will be the greater of $2 million per
annum or the $40 per container fee. An
internal rate of return on investment has
been set at 10 per cent.

There are also numerous ‘Reserved Mat-
ters’ upon which APD Ltd's Board of
Directors cannot take a decision or action
"unless the Government's prior approval in
writing has been obtained”.

The Reserved Matters include:

* Changes to APD Ltd's Memorandum
and Articles of Association

* Changes in APD Ltd's share capital

* Borrowings. APD Ltd and any sub-
sidiaries cannot, without government
approval, "incur any financial indebted-
ness which would result in the secure debt
exceeding an amount being equal to 3
times' EBITDA or a debt service coverage

ratio that is less than 1.25 times (or such
other amount or ratio as may be agreed in
writing from time to time)".

* No loans or advances to a person or
entity other than in the course of business

* Charges over any part of APD Ltd's
property or assets

* Disposing, via transfers, leases or
assignments, of any APD LTd assets or
property

* All fees and charges have to be
approved by the Government, apart from
those intended to “maintain a minimum
internal rate of return of 10 per cent, or
are consistent with a tariff amendment
model".

* There are to be no related party con-
tracts and deals with APD Ltd group affil-
jates without government approval, unless
the group "do not incur liabilities in any 12
month period exceeding in the aggregate $5
million between them".

* The winding-up of APD Ltd cannot
take place without government approval.

Construction work on the Arawak Cay
port is supposed to be completed by June
27, 2011, a total of 294 days.

Board ‘probably top challenge’ for insurers

FROM page 1B

“All the companies will be
challenged over a period of
time - the regulator will give us
several years - to have a cer-
tain percentage of independent
directors,” Mr Duff told Tri-
bune Business.

“Each Board has to have cer-
tain sub-committees, such as an

audit committee or remunera-
tion committee, and all of them
have to have a majority of inde-
pendent directors sitting on
them.”

Securing independent direc-
tors in a market such as the
Bahamas is a difficulty for both
public and private companies
in all industries, since the talent
pool they are drawing upon is
relatively shallow, not many
persons having the combina-

tion of talents firms are seeking
for their Boards - especially
expertise and experience in the
relevant industries.

Challenge

“That’s a challenge for the
industry, trying to get the right
persons and, compared to 10
years ago, that’s a bigger chal-
lenge for independent members
of because of the greater liabil-

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ity,” Mr Duff told Tribune
Business, in an apparent refer-
ence to the greater exposure
burden directors everywhere
have to shoulder as a result of
scandals such as Enron and
WorldCom.

“That’s going to be a chal-
lenge, but hopefully the regu-
lator will work with us and give
us an appropriate amount of
time, and he’s indicated that he
would.”

As for the wider impact of
the new Act and regulations,
Mr Duff told Tribune Business:
“All the companies are set up
for it already, but at this junc-
ture we’re waiting for the
Superintendent of Insurance to

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

come to us and release the final

VACANCY NOTICE

KATANA ASSETS LIMITED

FINANCE CLERK I - BANK RECONCILIATION

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II
Bank Reconciliation, in the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Preparing bank reconciliation for assigned bank accounts;

Preparing journal entries for accounting adjustments and banking
transactions (e.g., transfers between bank accounts, bank charges, re

turned checks);

Entering cash receipts postings in journals for proper allocation within

the general ledger;

Providing source data with regards to employee and other returned

checks;

Acting as liaison between Customer Services departments to prepare

listings of returned cheques; and

Maintaining procedures filing system for such items as: canceled checks,

bank advice, memos and statements.

Job requirements include:

° A minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Accounting/Business or

equivalent in General Accounting/Fundamentals;

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of Check Reconciliation module within

the HTE environment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation

and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff

and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on

or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.



NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) KATANA ASSETS LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 13th
May 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Peter Leppard of c/o
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393.

Dated this 15th day of June A. D. 2010

Peter Leppard
Liquidator



regulations to give the Act the
necessary teeth.

“As of right now, we’re still
waiting for that, and in the last
conversation I had with Lennox
McCartney he indicated what
he was proposing to do. Just
prior to the enforcement of the
regulations, he was planning to
hold an industry seminar to
explain the provisions and how
they would impact individual
companies.

“We're still waiting for the
final version of the regulations
to be released, although we’ve
seen drafts of them, and are
waiting for an industry seminar
to talk through the ramifica-
tions of them.

“I don’t think there’ll be as
major impact in terms of
accounting and solvency
issues.”

NOTICE OF LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

DISSOLUTION TO

ALL CREDITORS OF AND CLAIMANTS AGAINST

BIP Fund (1) LP

Notice is given that the General Partner of BIP Fund (I) LP, a limited
partnership formed pursuant to the EXEMPT LIMITED PARTNERSHIP
ACT, 1995 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas on 1* March, 2007
with its registered office at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Winterbotham Place, P.O. Box N-3026, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas, have been filed with the Registrar General’s
Department in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas. The Partnership requests that all claimants provide written proof
of their claim to the Liquidating Trustee to following address:

The Liquidating Trustee of BIP Fund (1) LP 1s:

Kyrene Kelty

CIT (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

One Marina Drive
Paradise Island
P.O. Box SS-19140
Bahamas

All claims must be in writing and must contain sufficient information
reasonably to inform the partnership of the identity of the claimant and the
substance of the claim on or before the 14th day of July, 2010



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ANTERNIQUCA

LOLA RENEE DAVIS of Farrington Road, P.O. Box N-
4052, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to ANTERNIQUCA LOLA RENEE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that Deandra Shandiea
Munnings of P.O. Box CB-11642 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9'" day of June, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODRIQUE POLYNICE
of Carmichael Road, P.O.Box CR-54802 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization



as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who Knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 9° day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Join Cititrust
(Bahamas) Limited,
one of the most
established trust

COBUSINESS
‘Economic climate’ rethink

hope for $600m LNG project

FROM page 1B

mission (FERC), said the Gov-
ernment was working with the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) to resolve issues relat-
ed to who would have ultimate
responsibility for governance
and regulatory oversight of the
estimated $600 million project.

Many had believed the
prospect of Suez’s Calypso pro-
ject ever arriving in Freeport
was dead, but the company’s
letter, which requested the
FERC extend its approval cer-
tificate until June 30, 2012,
shows there is a possibility -
however remote - that it may
be revived.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



“The Government of the
Bahamas is working to resolve
ownership and governance
issues with the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, in whose juris-
diction the Bahamas LNG pro-
ject is proposed,” the letter
from Daniel McGinnis, vice-
president of the Calypso
pipeline, said.

“GDF Suez has been moni-
toring this situation for several
years. The situation remains
uncertain, but could change as
the country’s leaders consider
economic growth opportunities
like an LNG project during the
current depressed economic cli-
mates.”

Suez’s letter may also revive
the hopes of Grand Bahama’s
leading industrial companies
and manufacturers, all of whom
have been pressing for alterna-
tive energy forms, such as
LNG, to be incorporated in the
island’s energy infrastructure
as a way to reduce sky-high
electricity costs.

These costs have already
prompted one company, Fen-
estration & Glass Services, to
leave Grand Bahama, where
electricity prices range from
four to six times’ as much as
those in major industrialised

RISK & CONTROL OFFICER

nations.

Greg Ebelhar, head of Poly-
mers International's Freeport
operations, last year described
the electricity tariffs charged by
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny as "a huge issue” for his
company and other manufac-
turers, as the relatively high
prices were taking a huge
chunk out of their bottom line
and making their prices/oper-
ations uncompetitive compared
to their global rivals. The com-
pany’s monthly power bill
peaked at $700,000.

Apart from the Freeport
Container Port, Grand Bahama
Shipyard and Polymers Inter-
national, other major industrial
concerns on the island include
Vopak (Bahamas) and Phar-
maChem Technologies.

Sources familiar with the sit-
uation last year told Tribune
Business that, behind the
scenes, some of Freeport's
major industrial companies and
power consumers had been dis-
cussing a "big push" to resolve
the high cost of electricity.

This, the sources suggested,
would involve ultimately
"breaking the power compa-
ny's monopoly and producing
their own electricity". It is
understood that Chris Gray, the
former chief executive of
Freeport Harbour Company
and Freeport Container Port,
was particularly interested in
this prior to his retirement.

Grand Bahama Power Com-

pany itself has been exploring
alternative fuel sources, includ-
ing wind, methane gas gener-
ated by the landfill and LNG.

Suez has already obtained
one FERC extension to its
approval certificate, having pre-
viously extended its life to June
30, 2010, due to “the delay in
approval by the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas for the
Bahamas LNG project”.

The Freeport-based project
involved the construction of a
regasification terminal, which
would convert LNG brought in
by ship back into its gas form. It
would then be transported to
Florida via pipeline to drive
that state’s electricity grid.

Many Bahamian businesses
had hoped this nation would
also enjoy the benefits of LNG
in its own power system.
“Extending the FERC-required
in-service date allows time for
the Bahamas LNG project or
Calypso LNG deepwater pro-
ject in Florida to obtain neces-
sary approvals such that con-
struction of the project may
commence prior to the expira-
tion of the state permit and
county license,” Mr McGinnis
said.

Expressing optimism, he
added that the southern Florida
market would still require “sig-
nificant incremental volumes of
natural gas in the coming
years”, as the state’s power
needs would increase with eco-
nomic recovery.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PIPO INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

organizations in the
world.

We invite outstanding
individuals, wanting to build a
career in trust and estate
management services, to be part
of our dynamic global team. You
will interact with colleagues from
around the world and across the
organization, providing
specialized services to our high
net worth clients and their
families.

Interested Bahamian candidates
should forward a copy of their
resume by June 30, 2010 to:
Human Resources, Cititrust
(Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-
1576, Nassau, Bahamas OR
Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR Email:

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES

Reporting to the Head of Business Risk Management, the positon
is responsible for managing the Risk and Control Self Assessment
programs for our trust and investment funds units locally, Key
responsibilities include ensuring robust intemal testing programs
are executed that validate compliance with policies and
procedures and legaliregulatory requirements as well as
identifying actualipotential control breaks. Additional
rasponsibilitias include facilitating and tracking Corrective Action
Plans, management reporting, participating on local and global risk
committees, supporting related projects, working with partners in
other Campliance and Contral functians and liaising with internal
and extemal auditors.

KNOWLEDGE SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate will possess an undergraduate degree in
business administration or a related field and a CPA designation.
This will be complimented with a minimum of five years of related
expenence in an audit or risk control function. Additionally, a
strong understanding of the local regulatory environment and of
ongoing intematonal initiatives is required. STEP qualification is
an asset. Prior experience managing staff, strong oral and written
communications skills, strong systems competencies ¢.g. banking
platfomms and Microsoft applications, excellent organizational
skills, the ability to work with minimal supervision and an aptitude

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 27th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULL HOUSE HOLDING S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of November 2009. The Liquidator

betty.robarts@citi.com for analyzing and solving problems, are also required. is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.



Challenge
yourself to a career like no other

. FG CAP

[ITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Pare

Corl 1 A TT.

ROVAL = FIDELITY

¢€
Arie an ek

cr AL ct} 1.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 15 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.51 | CHG 18.77 | %CHG 1.26 | YTD -51.87 | YTD % -3.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit_y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.05 1.05 0.00 0.250
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 5.20 5.20 0.00 0.598
0.30 Benchmark 0.30 0.30 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.17 2.17 0.00
9.62 Cable Bahamas 11.95 11.95 0.00
2.56 Colina Holdings 2.60 2.60 0.00

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.93 6.30 0.37
2.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.49 2.54 0.05
1.60 Doctor's Hospital 2.00 2.00 0.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00
8.75 Finco 8.90 8.90 0.00
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 9.81 9.81 0.00
3.75 Focol (S$) 4.58 4.58 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid & Ask & Last Price Daily Val.
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55

5S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

79 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div S P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Yield

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4752 2.54 7.00
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9020 0.52 -0.11
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5352 1.86 4.63
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0368 2.57 -4.99
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.6388 2.03 5.56
107.5706 3.45 6.99
105.7706 3.99 13.50
1.1127 2.10 5.19
1.0917 2.22 6.29
1.1150 2.23 5.65
9.5078 1.78 6.39

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV GMTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

31-May-10
30-Apr-10
4-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-Mar-10

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, 4

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve: Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Ser 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Please note that Mr. Whitney
shaundel Newbold is NO longer
employed with
Fox Locksmithing Ltd.
and can no longer do business on
our behalf.

10.0000 10.2744 -4.61 8.15 31-Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

58.37 31-Mar-10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

weighted price for daily volume
eighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

Weekly Vol. - Tradii rior
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

ee
A look at global economic developments

By The Associated Press



A LOOK at economic devel-
opments and activity in major
stock markets around the world
Tuesday:

GENEVA — The Swiss par-
liament approved a treaty with
the United States that will hand
thousands of files on suspect-
ed tax cheats to US authorities,
but obstacles remain that could
delay the deal for several more
months.

The government hopes the
agreement will eventually end
UBS AG's three-year battle
with US tax authorities that cul-
minated in revelations the bank
had for years helped American
clients hide millions of dollars
in offshore accounts.

BRUSSELS — The Euro-
pean Union's statistics agency
says exports from the 16 nations
that use the euro rose 18 per
cent in April from a year earli-

er, helped by the euro's sharp
fall against the US dollar and
resurgent global trade. The
eurozone sold 121.6 billion
euros worth of goods in April,
outweighing imports. The trade
surplus was 1.8 billion euros.

BERLIN — German
investor confidence fell sharply
this month on worries about
the persistent eurozone debt
crisis and the impact of spend-
ing cuts by European govern-
ments. The ZEW institute's
index, which measures
investors’ expectations for the
next six months, sank to 28.7
points in June from 45.8 in
May.

LONDON — British con-
sumer price inflation fell to 3.4
per cent in May from April's
17-month high of 3.7 per cent,
but remains well above the offi-
cial target. Consumer price
inflation has been above the
Bank of England's target of two

Important

Notice




+ ABM

* Internet Banking
* Telephone Bonking

SERVICE INTERRUPTION *

From 10:00pm June 19th
to 6:00am June 20th.

FirtCarbbean would lilo: bo.acvee the public that the iolicwing
Bectronic Barking Services vill be unavadable during the Girne listed
shove while we conduct routine maintenance. The bank apologizes for
ihe service inberruption, and lor ary incorneenience cauced

During the. perkod the Iollewing services will be unavailable:

«VISA transections via ABM
« FCIB Debit Point of Sole transactions









per cent since November, wor-
rying some about the impact of
record low interest rates.

TOKYO — Japan's central
bank unveiled details of a new
$33 billion low-interest lending
programme intended to fuel
economic growth and fight
deflation. The plan accompa-
nied the Bank of Japan's deci-
sion to keep its key interest rate
near zero. As widely expected,
the eight-member policy board
voted unanimously to leave the
overnight call rate target at 0.1
per cent. The bank has not
touched the rate since Decem-
ber 2008.

BRUSSELS — The Euro-
pean Union's executive warned
Spain and Portugal that they
will have to keep up budget
cuts in 2012 to curb their
deficits and rein in a debt crisis
that has sapped investor confi-
dence in Europe's economy.
The European Commission
says Spain may have to draft
“further sizable corrective
efforts" in coming years and
Portugal may also have to do
more to bring budget deficits
down to the EU's maximum of
three per cent of gross domestic
product by 2013.

MADRID — Unions angry
over labour market reform
plans called Spain's first gen-
eral strike in nearly a decade
— but not until after the sum-
mer vacation — breaking with a
Socialist government desperate
to restore confidence among
investors wary of its debt-laden
finances.

Union leaders said the hir-
ing-and-firing changes in the
labour market favour business-
es, not workers, as they

announced the September 29
walkout.

ATHENS, Greece — The
government of debt-ridden
Greece said it had struck a pre-
liminary deal to pay off billions
owed to drug and medical sup-
pliers, ending a standoff that
caused severe shortages at state
hospitals and forced operations
to be suspended.

Finance Minister George
Papaconstantinou said a meet-
ing with suppliers "led to an
agreement in principle" regard-
ing payment of 5.7 billion euros,
or $7 billion, in debts accrued
since 2005.

He said he expected compa-
nies to resume suspended sup-
plies immediately.

DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates — The World Bank urged
Mideast countries to invest
more in their impoverished rur-
al areas instead of relying on
subsidies and mega-projects to
alleviate inequalities in the
region.

ROME — The economies of
Brazil, China and India will see
strong growth in their agricul-
tural sectors in the next decade
as output remains stagnant
among big importers in West-
ern Europe, according to a
report by the UN Food and
Agriculture Organisation and
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development.

DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates — Credit agency Moody's
Investors Service says its out-
look for banks in the United
Arab Emirates remains nega-
tive largely because of ongoing
concerns about Dubai's credit
woes.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that

|, FREDERICK

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 7B

NOTICE
FINARTIS CAPITAL
MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FINARTIS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LTD. is
in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 14th June
2010 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Dayan Bourne of Ocean
Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3247,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated the 14th day of June, 2010.

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

NOTICE

FINARTIS CAPITAL

MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned at Ocean Centre, Montagu
Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3247, Nassau,
Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 28th
day of June, 2010. In default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by
the Liquidator.

Dated the 14th day of June, 2010.
DAYAN BOURNE

LIQUIDATOR









CLEARE of McKinney Drive, off Carmichael Road,

Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
FREDERICK DELANCY. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

PURESE plain your weekend finances to cater for this necesary maintenance.

@ FIRSTLARIBBEAN
INTHEHATEONML BAA

CT THOSE, TOCETHOE





ween can bot ean Coa













PR CEVAIERH OUSE{ COPERS iS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SPA SENIOR ASSOCIATES

Job Description

=) FIDELITY

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified Senior Associates If you have it, we want you.

within our Systems and Process Assurance (SPA) practice. As a member
We are growing!

of the SPA team, you will provide services related to controls around the Oo yee 7
Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

financial reporting process, including business process and information
technology management controls.

Requirements
¢ Proven experience in identifying, evaluating and testing information J unIOor Accou nta nt
technology and or business process controls, having worked in
the accountancy profession for a minimum of three (3) years. Reporting directly to Manager, Accounting
Services the successful applicant's main
duties and responsibilities will be:

¢ A strong academic record and has a professional accountancy
qualification and/or the CISA qualification.

¢ Sound business awareness, excellent communication skills and * Posting accounting entries
personal initiative.

¢ The ability to work as part of a team, as well as independently.

¢ The ability to build and manage internal and external relationships.

¢ Proficient understanding of security and control for some of the
following technologies and/or enterprise applications: Unix, Windows
Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, OS/400, SQL Server, Oracle
database, SAP, Peoplesoft, and JD Edwards.

* Working knowledge of information technology general controls

Reconcilation of bank accounts
Reconciliation of intercompany accounts

Preparing dailyAveekly and monthly reports

Minimum requirements / qualifications:

¢ Accounting degree and/or practical experience in a prior job

concepts in the areas of systems development, change management, © Willingness to work and learn
computer operations and access to programs and data.
* Working knowledge of controls and controls standards (Sarbanes

Oxley, COSO, and COBIT) and testing strategies.

© Prior experience in a banking environment would be useful

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry
The salary scale, which

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: Junior Accountant, 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE

and other areas of industry and commerce.
June 25", 2010 to:

recognizes different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward

high performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical

insurance and provident fund benefits. A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









P . _ Chef Todd
=], <2? © serves up
Te | =" > traditional
a > sushi

|

see page nine







By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



will view aquatic themes, and other elements of nature
that emerge in bright colour during the summer sea-
son, at the Bahamas National Trust.

‘Awakening,’ is Tucker’s newest exhibit, featuring a few
pieces like Embrace, Mermaid, and Freefall; the latter of
which will be shown in a silent auction that will precede
the main event which is in aid of the environmental pro-
tection agency.

I: Trevor Tucker’s solo art show this Thursday, viewers








é

Vay




Waters edge
Ms e



Ludacris hack in
Nassau with new |
rink Conjure = uns

See page 11





Tucker, an art teacher at St
Augustine’s high school,
seems to bring a much sim-
pler approach to this art
exhibit, which officially opens
at 7 pm. The 25-piece collec-
tion has bright colours that
emerge in a real way on can-
vas to the viewer.

‘Awakening’ includes pieces
like Water’s Edge, Early
Bloomer, Embrace and
Freefall; and a few works from
previous shows. “These new
pieces are based mainly on
nature and the natural colours
and patterns that they create,”
said Tucker.

“Natural beauty can be seen
anywhere and sometimes an
entire scene captivates the
eye, but my work usually
focuses on sections or details
that are not always visible.”

Tucker explained that his
goal was to create a show
based on parts and combina-
tions of nature, blending them
together in many ways like a
puzzle.

But although his work
comes from realistic refer-
ences, Tucker doesn't restrict
himself to the literal repre-
sentation of art forms. He has
found it more enjoyable to see
how different elements work
together while still creating a
strong composition.

“Awakening is a show with-
out restrictions in that I start-





ed painting without a set
deadline allowing myself to
paint what I wanted, how I
wanted and when I wanted
to,” said Tucker.

He loves the creative
process, and described his
love for the accentuating
quality that vivid colour
brings to a painting with the
use of expressive brush
strokes. Thus, he tends to
choose themes that have a
natural flow or rhythm to
them.

Tucker told Tribune Art,
“IT would hope that these
pieces not only give a new
appreciation for nature but
also give a small window into
the way that I see the world
around me.”

Tucker is inspired by his
environment, and appreciates
living in a country that is
“filled to the brim with life,”
whether it is in the air, on the
ground, or in the sea. He
said that in many ways his
paintings control him and he
“just goes along for the ride.”

Tucker prefers medium
acrylics and he does have an
appreciation for the brighter
side of the colour spectrum.
“It is my hope that when
looking at my pieces, the
viewer is able to sense the
essence of the subject that I
have tried to capture,”he
said.



THE TRIBUNE



ar

~

Junkanoo Roll

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

na Sunday afternoon,
@) or during a hectic day

when you're in traffic
and don’t feel like cooking,
consider eating sushi, says
Chef Todd Eldon. This may
sound far from your typical
food choices, but at Munchie
Lab , the menu is endless,
threaded with soups, salads,
appetizers, sashimi, nigiri,
and many other gourmet
foods.

Munchie Lab is open seven days a
week, serving lunch from 10.30 am to
1.30 pm, and dinner from 4pm to Spm,
but their delivery and curb side pick-
up service is limited to the Cable
Beach area.

Chef Todd Eldon, emphasised the
difference between sushi and other
meal choices. “It’s healthy, trendy,
and it’s art,” said he said.

“We have a lot of food franchises
that sell finger foods like Domino’s
Pizza, but that provides limitations to
the regular fare in town. And there’s
only so much pizza one can eat,” said
Chef Todd.

“You can take our sushi home if
you like, and transfer your plates for
your dinner party, serving up sushi to
your guests,” said Chef Todd.

Yesterday, Balduccino Fine Foods,
a deli with a full selection of meats
and cheeses served up Munchie Lab’s
quality food for the second time
around. And Balduccino’s head chef
was impressed by Munchie Lab’s pre-
sentation.

“Munchie Lab seems to have a very
traditional way of serving sushi,” she
told Tribune Taste, “with wasabi, pick-
led ginger, soy and garnish.”

Getting back to the original way of
preparing the Japanese food, Chef
Todd said sushi is often confused with
raw fish and rice. This is correct if
referring to the Edo style sushi, but
originally, sushi was a term for fer-
mented meat or fish, which was pre-
pared for the sole purpose of preser-
vation.

Munchie Lab’s menu includes Edo
style sushi served up in six and nine
pieces on platters, or you can pur-
chase them individually as a single
roll order.

Spicy Tuna, Spicy Smoked Salmon,
Shrimp & Seaweed, Hamachi (Yel-
lowtail), Seared Scallop, Tuna & Avo-
cado, Florida, California and Boston
rolls are options on the menu.

Munchie Lab’s lobster tempura roll
is delectable with mango, avocado,
cucumber, and cream cheese. Also



The Tribune



‘Taste

MATTOS

THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON

eS

Mango Roll

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 9B



on the menu lineup is a Fire Dragon
Roll and the Green Envy Roll, which
is unusual in flavour.

The Green Envy Roll has salmon,
tuna, a key lime ponze nuiowi, with a
wasabi pea crust, which are all com-
monly known in the sushi world. “It’s
one of the more popular buys,” says
Chef Todd.

He calls his Green Envy Roll real-
ly “cool looking,” because of its bright
red and orange colour, with asparagus,
and key lime ayoli (a white mayo
sauce), and wasabi peas which are
pan-fried and coated in horse raddish.

The Fire Dragon Roll has salmon,
tuna, mango, sriracha, and tempura.
The Junkanoo roll has mango, aspara-
gus, alfalfa sprouts, and pickled gin-
ger.

Odyssey Aviation, and several of
the yachting centres, including resi-
dents in Hope Town, Abaco, students
and teachers of Tambearly School
comprise the extensive list of some
of Munchie Lab’s biggest clients.

Once or twice a week, an aircraft
flies down to Marsh Harbor to deliv-
er the sushi, and then ferries the food
product over to Hope Town, Abaco.

Munchie Lab is Chef Todd’s main
kitchen in a condo next to the Bayroc
Exclusive Beach Residential Devel-
opment. There, he prepares his foods
and will rendezvous (or curb-side
pickup) to customers to meet them
up for delivery.

Inside of his professional kitchen
is an Open space that was extensively
transformed and outfitted with loads
of sushi knives, and first class cook-
ware.

According to Chef Todd, the idea
of sushi is to taste the actual flavors in
the roll. And in their California roll,
in particular, you will taste crab, avo-
cado and cucumber bits wrapped
together for delicious flavor.

Chef Todd’s sushi dipping sauce
demands an acquired taste, but he
says most people prefer wasabi and
soy mixed together in an eel dipping
sauce which has a sweet and thick
base.

Pickled ginger is served as a side
order on your plate serving as a pal-
lette cleanser, so that if you go and eat
salmon next, or spicy smoked salmon,
the taste won’t linger.

Munchie Lab delivers with their
exquisite sushi and excellent presen-
tation garnished with vegetables and
even fruit strips. The restaurant offers
elegant food platters for parties, office
meetings, luncheons, and much more
in platters.

Platters are available and sold in
up to five rolls. To compliment your
sushi roll, try Munchie Lab’s soups,
salads, and appetizers, like Asian
inspired crab cakes, stone crab claws,
steamed edamame, shrimp tempura,
shrimp cocktail, and seaweed salad.



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

SS

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune

(





Bringing a Poetic Breeze

By CHESTER ROBARDS



symbols, percussion

radiates under smooth
hands as they press the skins
of congo drums and smooth
words cascade from artists’
lips: “What is your fear? / How
could something so pure and
true scare you?”

A beautiful poetry spot is digging
in its roots and blossoming under-
neath the shabby old Mayfair hotel
and patrons are loving the vibes of as
yet-unknown Bahamian singers,
songwriters and poets.

The matriarch of ‘Poetic Breeze’
which takes place at Babalu
Caribbean Bar and Grill, is Michelle
Hanna, who along with the Poetic
Breeze Band, Mario Lord and Earl
Forbes, hosts poets, musicians and
almost any other artist who cares to
take the stage.

Michelle, a sublime spoken word
artist herself, transforms words to
melodies to the lucid tones of the
Poetic Breeze Band her poem con-
tinuing: "Fear is a thief, stealing all
that is precious / It will have you
thinking of pain when there is none."

And there is no fear in the quaint
setting and muted lighting in the
recesses of Babalu. Poets are com-
fortable crooning their craft for riv-
eted crowds.

Poetic Breeze recently received
singer/cctor Ludacris, where he chose
to debut to the Bahamian market his
newest cognac, Conjure.

Ludacris posed with his fans and
his newly released cognac, the place

Dontasve: lightly rap



PICTURED above is Michelle Hanna during a performance.

erupting in applause and screams as
he entered the back doors of the
restaurant with girlfriend.

Premium Discount Liquors, also
used Babalu's venue and Poetic
Breeze's event to hold a wine tasting,
where they debuted a array of wines
ranging from sweet dessert wines to
a drier Shiraz and just about every

taste in between. They even poured a
pomegranate wine and champagne.

Some frequent contributors to
Poetic Breeze's vibes are Rashad
"Rash" Davis, Alvin Lightbourne,
Eric Sands, Bigga Tea, Red Eye, Zee
Thompson, Daria Del and Corey
Fox. But all other artists are wel-
come to come every Monday and

eT eee LAL
1g



ee

DEM ile wart a



share.

Lines of Michelle's poem "Divine
Love" typify what she and her
entourage have etched out of the Old
Mayfair: "What we have is a rare
occurrence / Something that was
foretold / Precious like stones from
beneath the earth / Priceless in
worth."



The 2011 Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Ball Committee held its first meeting to begin preparations for the Heart
Foundations’ Golden Anniversary which will be held next February 19th. Pictured l-r, Claire Howorth, Marilyn Cambridge,
Coretta Owen, co-Chair, Portia Nottage, co-Chair, Rosemarie Thompson, Michelangiolo Bacelli, Lady Butler (Sheila) and

Linda LaFleur.

GEMS

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



MOST Bahamians have probably
heard their parents, grand parents, and
other relatives reminisce on the “good
old days.”

According to their stories, this was
a time when there was no indoor
plumbing so the water needed for
cooking, and cleaning, had to be col-
lected from a well.

This was a time when the crack of
dawn met some of them on the corn
fields harvesting their crops and a time
when you couldn’t run to McDonald’s
fora pancakes, eggs, and bacon break-
fast. Instead you had bread spread with
butter or jam.

A new book titled “GEMS From
The Island” released by Bahamian
author Clara Williams has preserved
these island life experiences, leaving
readers with a greater appreciation for
life as they know it today.

A young Eleutheran girl named
Claire is the novel’s main character.

The book, which consists of 18 short

chapters tells the story of her life living

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

on the island settlement and how she
handled the transition from the tran-
quility in Eleuthera to the fast pace
upbeat life in Nassau. The book
encompasses a time period from the
1940’s to the 1970’s.

Many Bahamians born during that
time frame may classify those years as
hard. However, Williams’ light heart-
ed presentation of those experiences
highlights the good times, and the hap-
py moments, when children didn’t
need Nintendo Wii or play station to
have fun. The only thing they needed
was each other.

Their limited means did not stop
them from engaging in family fun. On
holidays Claire’s mother would plan
beach picnics where they would carry
an assortment of food like flour cakes,
benny cakes, tarts, pies, potatoes, cas-
sava and much more.

At social gatherings the children
played games as the adults engaged in
harmless gossip about happenings
around the settlement.

The short novel is a refreshing look
at a past experienced by many
Bahamians.

Tribune Entertainment spoke to the
author of “GEMS From The Island”
who said her main reason for writing
the book is to shine light on a past that
could possibly make a better future.

“As we look at the situation in the

Bahamas we hear people talk
about the good old days. I said
maybe if some of the young peo-
ple knew more about how we live
back in the day they would learn

how to live better,” Ms Williams

said.

"Talking simply wasn't get-
ting us nowhere. So instead of
just talking I said to myself what
better way to reach others than
writing a book.”

The book is based on real
life experiences but the names
and places have been changed.

“The book is really about
the hardship that we faced and
how we dealt with those hard-
ships. The book speaks of
friendships, respect, manners,
and the patriotism we had
back in the day," Ms
Williams said.

A few of the chapters in the book
includes Godly principles, and she
hopes readers apply them to their lives.

Ms Williams is hoping to get the
book into the schools, so that younger
persons can have a opportunity learn
about it.

"Tt might not be the answer to the
ills of society, but if people get their
kids to read the book then I would
have done my job,” she said. "The
book is for both children and adults. It









makes
for good summer reading.”

Mrs Williams has taught for 45
years. She became an assistant teacher
at age fifteen. She later enrolled in the
Bahamas Teaching College. Back in
the day Mrs Williams taught at South-
ern Prep, Windsor Lane, Wilton
Albury, Columbus Primary, Golden
Gates and others.

Persons interested in obtaining a
copy of the book can call 242-341-5027.



¢ Chamber Institute
Presents: Public
Relations

The Chamber Institute
presents a workshop on
the topic of ‘Public Rela-
tions: The Driving Force,’
9Yam-1pm. Learn the fun-
damentals of public rela-
tions, advertising, market-
ing and crisis manage-
ment. Cost: $150/Chamber
and BECon members;
$200/non-members. Tele-
phone: 322-2145. Email:
rabrams@thebaham-
aschamber.com. See
www.thebahamascham-
ber.com

¢ National Trust Art
Exhibition, Reception
and Silent Auction
Trevor Tucker holds an
opening reception for his
exhibition Awakening a
collection of recent paint-
ings, from 7pm at the
Bahamas National Trust.
Silent auction at 6.30pm,
Thursday, June 17. Pro-
ceeds in aid of the Trust.
Telephone: 364-0641 or
428-1878. Email:
trevor.tucker@gmail.com
See
www.trevortuckerart.com

¢ Youth Gathering:
‘Youth Ablaze:

Shine Ya Light’

Take part in this exciting
and inspirational gathering
for youth 7.30pm, Friday,
June 18, in the Church of
God of Prophecy East
Street Southern parking
lot. Features DJ Counsel-
lor, Christian Massive,
Royal T and Mr Beeds.
Telephone: 394-3445, 361-
3817 or 466-7631. Email:
yablazeitup@gmail.com

¢ Elevation Album &
DVD Release Event
Don't miss this special
double release of V-
MAC's album and Lenelle
Michelle's DVD, 7pm at
the National Centre for
the Performing Arts. Tick-
ets: $5/in advance; $10/at
the door, Friday, June 18.
Part proceeds in aid of the
Bahamas Foundation for
Blind and Visually

¢ St Francis Xavier’s
Men’s Association:
Men’s Month

St Francis Xavier Cathe-
dral Men's Association
invites men and boys of
the Catholic archdiocese
to join them for a month
of exciting activities to cel-
ebrate men's month.
Activities include a
Father's Honouree Din-
ner, Friday, June 18, 8pm
at Sheraton Nassau Beach,
Father and Son Basketball
Tournament, Saturday,
June 19, 8am-8pm at Sir
Kendal Isaacs Gym, an
Award Presentation Mass,
Sunday, June 20, 11am at
St Francis Xavier, and a
discussion on the history
of the Catholic Church in
The Bahamas, Friday,
June 25, 7.30pm-9.30pm at
St Francis Xavier Tele-
phone: 356-3008.

Tennis Tournament
The Bahamas Lawn Ten-
nis Association holds its
‘Double the Love’ tennis
tournament at the Nation-
al Tennis Tournament,
Saturday, June 19.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the
news, read
aE [e lad
on Mondays







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 11B



ENTERTAINMENT

Conjure up good times





AMERICAN rapper Christopher ‘Ludacris’ Bridges talks to
reporters about his new liquor ‘Conjure’.









By JEFFARAH GIBSON and
CARA BRENNEN BETHEL
Tribune Features



L

Bahamas.

said.

He made sure the cognac was per-
fectly blended as he flew to France to
take part in the crafting process. "I
was there and I helped handcraft the
entire thing, I had to pick from thir- l
teen different distilled Cognacs and _ they can be part of the experience.
we picked about three. Conjure is
made up of VS (very special) VSOP
(Very Special Old Pale) and XO
(Extra Old).” my business partner,” Ludacris said.

It blends naturally with anything
Ludacris said. And though he prefers
his on the rocks he said the best way to
drink it is with pineapple juice. ;

Conjure's taste stands out alone. It pete in the market.
is an epicurean delight when mixed
with fruit juices. And with the cre-
atively designed bottles featuring the
silhouettes of women it is nothing less
than outstanding. Ludacris said he
wanted the bottle to stand out just
like his music does.

presence in the community.

So far it has been received well by
Bahamians, and with the new release
of the Conjure brand, Cognac lovers
now have another option to choose

UXURIOUSLY refined, ftom.
smooth, sophisticated
and affordable
describes hip hop artist
Christopher "Ludacris”
Bridges’ new liquor, Conjure
cognac that "Conjures up
good times” and will soon hit

liquor stores and clubs in the no longer limited.”
Ludacris said this is perfect for

The American rapper "tagged women who prefer something soft and
team" with the famed cognac house ‘not over powering.
Birkedal Hartmann to carefully hand-
craft this new creative smooth blend.

Sitting down in an exclusive inter-
view with Tribune Entertainment at udacl
the Cove Atlantis, the rapper the new Cognac. "Pricewise we try to
expressed his passion about the high-
ly innovative new spirit. "I am in love
with and very passionate about this
blend. I can only be that in love and )
passionate about it if wanted people = Unique. — . :
to buy it and taste it themselves," he "I decided to partner with this man
because of the history and how pres-
tigious his company has been. But we
wanted to come up with something
new and basically I wanted to not just
endorse a product but I wanted to
own it so that when everyone taste it
' It
not just me attaching myself to a brand
that was already made but I wanted to
be apart of and make the brand with

"Tt is being received well especially
in the Bahamas. I am ecstatic at the
response and I just actually went out
to a club last night and it same there
are a lot of great cognac drinkers here
in the Bahamas. They only had a cou-
ple options to drink and naturally they
will only drink what is available. But
now with Conjure their options are

Kim Birkedal Hartmann's family
has been in the spirits business for
four generations and they were ecsta-
tic to partner with Ludacris to create

make it affordable for everybody and
that is what is important,” he said. He
went on to say that Conjure Cognac is
a party drink that is innovative and

He chose a Cognac because while
there have been a lot of new vodka
and other liquor products there hasn't
been a cognac to come out and com-

Skye High Spirits will be the local
distributor of Conjure Cognac. Sean
Andrews the company's head
explained that Conjure has special sig-
nificance because it a top brand they
want to promote by giving it an active |

if







A
=< i >
v

2:6 knots

Show i bode a mica er, Tea pera are ted ap
highs and tonight = Ios





Be oa

Panky samme @
eT i Se






















Most sunny

High: a9"
Lima 7a"

Party Sonny Gn
shrerer | ri cps
High: a0"
Log; 7"

Pailig choedy, a

eho in serie is



Low: 75°





k | n"Fare
a rere

~.
â„¢

*® >
VW

feb knots

tae a

wi os
SE af f-10 Koats
5 af E-10 Kerk



Lone: PE" Fa?
ETO eet ie erg
ee. Lae Cape Hatteras
. ae aa Chariotin * Highs: 46°F Shown is today's
. i =|* a r E
AHants # Hire Fa Cc Re a meralher. ape
Highs: 82°F/aa°c - Highs 2% nae Highs: B1°F/f2rsc am today’s highs and =.
a: 6 2 ee
Pensacala * Savannah diet OT aes =a =ake
Highs: SAS" Highs: 24° F34"¢ 4
30 2, Gaytona Beach
x Highs: 82°F/33"C ~
Tams = &t Freeport
Highs: ara en anc
Bliami - (H)
: as lene a » Massau
25 reghe: SoC rae Highe: 90°F a2"C:
Havana * :
Highs: 94° Fasc
- Santlage de Cuba
Highs: ase
20 ¥ a4 a Port-au-Prince snares
Cazumel.. .. Highs: sor a4°c San Jue
. , Highs: eeraac shin ope » Highs: so" Fac ia a
aie * ' Santa ~ + Mita, Arrtigiia eo
2 @ Belize Kingston Dominga ~*~" = 1h
.& * 2 = 5 z = : c Highs: 89°F a2" *
fs . Highs: BF "Fd c Highs: 8e°Fad ac Highs: as"F2o'C | =e * : a: :
15 = i ERE liste ELERTHERA
Py Sa % re as a - Barbados: fe ye ee
fy “hel fay) ty. “Be. ey te ly yy Oe
ee a es ek Aruba Curacas Highs: Be°Fa0C - FREEPORT
* * =e . - Managua = ee ' Highs: @0°R4k2C:
= Se ee ; ;
a Ps : a4 Mighis a7 Fransc. = Trini
“4GD>: ee a — Tobago ERES? AGA
i: Li keke kh tk ek & “hh ) & Et ' z na
- 10 “Linon a ~ 2 a at bs eee ee = LOG AAD
ta Highs: ao°Fa2 "Cc" * + Panama City Highs: se Rast > Stee
ae hk I 5: S07ERS2C 5 te ee ee
ee _. -. Highs. 883Fadc gat as ae ee ey Oe al
gE} © 2h & : F het he ee ee Ree hbth et ret & ~ MASA
: & & a otk ee ee ek EY ctk kh re REE EEE ES
- 88. $000 x PRN* TIDES FT" 6S ota BO SEEEISR SII SH: sees
Wer Enid Shfincany | Bain T-iorr Florrice: Sore ka Baie) ELASD
TTT h(*,_ Saeate waata Reese es Tae a = * oe

Part: Sanity an

High: aa"
Lem: 74"









THE WEATHER REPORT (22

ae ay




Path 560
eho: bres
High: Be
Low: 7a"



fe dees! Pleased Teo pecsiure” if. go ice ied cornbdes. Ge elles of peed, ed, bere dais, carding Gee i Chines, precipita, pec,
and sivetion en fhe bores boip—eeery thing teed effects ow pom or cold a )pereca leek Pergperioees retiect che high ged the eto en

Penta

=a i> Bs: ae do A egh 2 pi. eae ay
] Fiz" 1c ' lich a here
4-8 nets oT wl > Lew ar
Maree high ar
WEST Pal ml : Kamal knw i
= Fick MEA W Law ers high or
Love 77" F2S" 4-10 knots: Lar pours kre are
a Ree Freceritstian
Beal 2 Ban. estore d41g
Year io dam 2H
Marna Wear fo dane S11

AccuWeather.com
BLEUTHERA Forecasts aed gephics proetcied by

dptoWeather, lee. Gio

om Hine 3°98" C
eee Ta" Fea"










INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

es eg

= ¥
Midia}a|+\5\0|7|s| 9]
LEW E | soa LHe fl

The beghee the BocoWfeedieer U0 bee” 2 oreber, fhe
qreaien thee mad lor eye ang) iin preaciian

Tipes For Massa

Hii Low Hid

Tiachary TG ain
1B pn
Theredesy 11:22am
1137 pm.

Fredany 12h pa

Shay Ian
Te pom.

Bowigy §=2 D5 am 2
S4S pate cI

esidap 158 are aa
440 pam ALD

mL yt, |

Wicewies 10c-S0 am
Boareel . TiS oom

Seana
Sang

€€d@

dam 25

don. 1

SAN SALVADOR
High: 3° Fos G
Low: TSF" G

6-16 erots

Uhgrsacbay
Totar

Tota
Thinaetalhaay
Tha

Thue:

Tea
Uhocbaay



ERE gf 612 Ratha
Bit af G-12 Kats:
SE al f-10 Kooks
Bal 5-10 Keoki

SE al f-14 Kote
Epe gf 8-16 Karts
Eat 2-16 Bireats
Eat 2030) Krana
ESE af 0-16 Kacts
Eat 120 Knot
ERE af 1-14 Racts
ES af 10-230 Keon
EGE af 6-12 Rack
ESE a 6-12 Kati
E at 6-16 Enos
Eat 1-20 Kno
Cr abt? Kade
Cea gi T-14 Kacts



‘
a a
Vv

6-12 kant

MAYAGUANA,
High: 50° Fez" C

Sak pm

620 im
EN on

hese

1 Foss

4-16 nota

MEieeLiTY

10) tebikesy
10) felis
TE) felis
TED ihe
1) bebikess
10 bikes
Tir
10 belies
7 bbs
TE ihe
10) babikesy

TO) fide
10) eb bess
6 bes
is lebokes:
10) tel ies
TO) Babskcss

Tt) Mi hee.



a —

48
1

1%
m Of
1%
7
13
oz
4135
ox
. 1
a:
Ham ALi
1iidpm. od

Jul 10

A
Â¥

WATS TERPS.
me
ga" F
ar F
are
36°F
aa" F
me
ga" F
an" F
aa*



(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TO DISCUSS Tye ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Full Text


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E1CCUNNR3_UTG846 INGEST_TIME 2011-07-26T19:44:47Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01593
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


WEATHER

TRY a ‘VN

Pim blowin’ it

ae
LOW

oe FSTORM

Volume: 106 No.169

aU a)

90F
75F

PARTLY SUNNY,



The Tribune



THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST





Be

et

| J Awakening
y oy Sa)

f

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

fr

TNL ae
TT ial
Maa

FOS Se ye.



Crisp, Fresh & ire cooker

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Andre Rodgers
ational Baseball
Championship

SEE PAGE NINE

Minister disputes US
trafficking report

Turnquest: no
evidence to
support claims

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE number of people who
could be victims of human traf-
ficking in the Bahamas are “neg-
ligible”, according to Tommy
Turnquest, Minister of National
Security. At the same time, he
said: “If there is one there is too
many and we would like to
know.”

Without any evidence to sup-
port claims of human traffick-
ing, Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment could not expend
resources on something they do
not believe to be a problem.

The US government released
its 2010 Trafficking in Person
(TIP) report on the Bahamas
this week, ranking the Bahamas
as a Tier 2 nation (of three tiers),
based on the government’s fail-
ure to meet mmimum standards
for eliminating human traffick-
ing.

‘While Minister of Immigra-
tion and Foreign Affairs, Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette, said the Bahamas would
seek to be compliant with anti-
human trafficking standards, a
difference of opinion on the
validity of the report may influ-

ence the government’s view of
compliance.

“The US report is relevant in
that it is prepared by the US,
which is a world super power
and once they commit it to
record it is seen around the
world, but with respect to it
being accurate and it pertaining
to the Bahamas that is what we
take issue with,” said Tommy
Turnquest, Minister of National
Security, in an exclusive inter-
view with The Tribune.

Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment takes the issue “very
seriously”, and every year when
the report is released it is circu-
lated to senior officers for their
review and commentary. Despite
the government’s efforts, he said
there was “no evidence to sup-
port the claims.”

Officials from the US
Embassy noted in releasing the
Bahamas report that country
rankings do not correlate with
the number of trafficking cases,
but with efforts by governments
to combat trafficking. Tier 2
nations are classified for their
“minimal efforts to protect vic-
tims of trafficking” and “mini-

SEE page 11



HURRICANE INSURANCE

You Ba B

Away

Blown
urricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

dhe

Enum

Big PALER) sBOO Te MC) SETSMDOA Tek (DS) RR Ta 2



MORE LARS eT

AA Ta way through the flooded eee of the ean yesterday after Nassau was hit with cmiata heavy sem Cle E

Police withhold
cause of death for

interior designer

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AUTOPSY revealing the
cause of death for South Florida
interior designer James Wallace
Tutt IIL is being withheld by police
as investigations continue.

Superintendent Leon Bethel in
charge of the Central Detective
Unit said foul play has been ruled
out, but would not confirm what
may have led to the 53-year-old’s
death.

Relatives of the late designer
have said the cause of death
appears to be heart related on a
website set up in his memory
(www.jwallacetutt.com).

The owner of the boutique
Rock House hotel in Harbour
Island was found dead in a bushy
area known as “The Narrows”
near his home by his partner Don
Purdy on Saturday morning.

His body was flown to Nassau
for an autopsy on Saturday and
although police have received the
autopsy report Mr Bethel would

SEE page 11



NICU
Victim in

UTI Lt Cy
questioning

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



POLICE have taken the
recent victim of a drive-by
shooting into custody for
questioning concerning the
incident in which he and a
four-year-old boy were
injured.

Tyson Deveaux, 23, and
a toddler suffered gunshot
wounds Monday evening
when three gunmen, who
got out of a white Honda
driven to the area by
another man, opened fire
on a car wash at Brazillet-
ta Street, Pinewood Gar-
dens.

Fearing any information
leaked could possibly jeop-

SEE page eight









COB union
wants inquiry
into selection

of president

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@
tribunemedia. net



THE faculty union at
the College of the
Bahamas has called for an
inquiry into the process
and the criteria used in
the selection of Dr. Earla
Carey-Baines as President
of the institution. Citing
disbelief at what they
have deemed to be a

SEE page 11







Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Onlookers catch robber
who mugged realtor



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net











MUGGING VICTIM
Peter McP Christie

A REALTOR mugged for $3,000 will have
his cash returned to him thanks to the swift
actions of onlookers who chased the robber
and turned him over to police.

Elshadae Ellington Ferguson, 19, will be sen-
tenced today after he pleaded guilty to stealing
from a person and receiving stolen property

SEE page 11

Deputy PM: we cannot employ non-Bahtamian
labour and complain about unemployment

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS should take
a hard look at the realities
behind the immigration of for-
eigners into their country and
accept that their own behaviour
and choices sometimes play a
part in the situation about which
many complain, the Deputy
Prime Minister suggested.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Immigration, Brent

Symonette, said that Bahami-
ans “cannot continue to employ
non-Bahamian labour and com-
plain at the rate of unemploy-
ment.”

“We either have to accept
that there are certain jobs
Bahamians are unwilling, unable
or are not being suitably paid
to do or else we have to move
on,” he said.

“A Bahamian will work in a
hotel, but yet we’re importing

SEE page 11







NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS”

LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Man is questioned =—
after teenagers shot

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter:
dmaycock@tribunemedia. net :

FREEPORT- A 25-year-old :
man is being questioned by :
police in connection with the ;
shooting of two teenagers in the :
Eight Mile Rock area on Mon- :
day. :
ASP Mackey said the suspect, :
accompanied by his lawyer, :
turned himself into the Central :
Police Station around 3.30pm :
yesterday. According to reports, :
a 13-year-old girl was shot in :
the chest and a 19-year-old man :
was grazed in the head by a bul- :
let. :
The girl is at Rand Memorial :
Hospital in stable condition. The :
man was treated and dis-:
charged. Ms Mackey said police :
received a report after 11pm on :
Monday that a child and an :
adult man had been shot in the :
Hepburn Town area. Officers :
went to the area to investigate. :

According to initial reports, :
the 19-year-old man was :
involved in a confrontation with :
another man who pulled out a :
handgun. i

The gunman fired a shot in ;
the direction of the 19-year-old, :
who was grazed on the left side :
of the head. The bullet then hit :
the 13-year-old girl in the chest. :

Ms Mackey said police inves- :
tigations are continuing. :

BODY FOUND :

The body of a black man was :
found floating in waters near :
Banana Bay, Grand Bahama on :
Tuesday afternoon, police :
reported. ASP Loretta Mackey, :
police press officer, would not :
disclose the victim’s identity, but
said that the body is believed to :
be that of a Bahamian in his 40s. :

Police received a report :
around midnight of a body float- ;
ing in the Fortune Bayarea.

The body was retrieved from :
the water by persons in the area. :
There were no visible signs of :
injury. Ms Mackey said police :
are awaiting the results of an :
autopsy to determine the cause :
of death. i

veh
Rey

Medi)
PHONE: 322-2157

iscount Furniture &

ZNS to let go of 70
staff in cutbacks

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ZNS will let up to 70 staff
go in a move to deflate its
bloated wage bill and bring
expenditure into line as it faces
a 50 per cent budget cut, the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas announced yes-
terday.

BCB chairman Michael
Moss issued the statement
delivered by senior deputy gen-
eral manager of radio and tele-
vision Kaylessa Deveaux-Isaacs
in a press conference at ZNS
offices off Collins Avenue,
which Mr Moss was unable to
attend.

However, he sent a clear
message that cutbacks will be
effected in an effort to reduce
spending by the corporation
which is currently at an unsus-
tainable level. ZNS spends
twice as much as it earns while
it is unable to raise capital
funding.

The financial drain of salary
payments for the overstaffed
station amounts to about $8
million a year, with $10.5 mil-
lion in benefits and overtime
pay. Often line staff costs more
than executives.

=

al a

SENIOR DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER of radio and television





Kaylessa Deveaux-lsaacs at a press conference at ZNS offices.

Therefore, the 241 staff cur-
rently at ZNS will be cut from
between 170 to 200, meaning
41 to 71 staff will have to go,
Ms Isaacs-Dotson said.

However, no indication was
given of when the staff will go
and questions were not taken
in Mr Moss’ absence.

Among the 241 current staff,
including 70 managers, 149 per-
manent pensionable staff, 14
contractural staff and nine
executives, 72 employees are
eligible for pensions as they are
either approaching retirement
age or have worked at ZNS for
25 years or more.

“As things stand, ZNS regu-
larly spends twice as much as it
earns, supports scores of super-
fluous employees, owes mil-
lions in unfunded liabilities,
and is unable to raise capital
on its own,” Ms Deveaux-
Isaacs said.

“Tt’s a drain on the public
purse,” she added.

In spite of these well-known
and long-standing facts ZNS’
staffing was increased from 252
to 278 between 2002 and 2007
under the PLP administration.

Since 2007 staff have been
reduced to 241 and annual
spending has been cut by $3
million — from $18 million to
$15 million — in an effort to
tighten the budget and trans-
form ZNS into a public service
broadcaster as called for in the
FNM’s 2007 election manifesto,
Ms Deveaux-Isaacs said.

However, high staff salaries
have perpetuated an unsus-
tainable state of affairs forcing
ZNS to invest its multi-million
dollar annual government sub-
sidy earmarked for capital
expenditure to fund general
operations.

This leak in finances can no
longer be ignored now that the
Prime Minister has hit ZNS
with a 50 per cent reduction in

government funding this year,
bringing its annual subsidy
down from $8.5 million to $4.25
million.

As ZNS has been forced to
make tough decisions, the
board of directors is address-
ing the bloated and unsustain-
able staffing levels confirmed
in a number of studies, includ-
ing one by a Canadian broad-
caster in 2006.

Ms Deveaux-Isaacs said:
“The transformation of ZNS
into an independent public ser-
vice broadcaster has had its
share of challenges.

“Challenges have, at times,
even come from some who
were supposedly party to the
idea to effect the transforma-
tion.

“Some of these individuals
have come to realise the trans-
formation will deny them the
control they were once able to
exercise over content and
patronage at ZNS, which car-
ries with it the power to influ-
ence opinion.”

Annual accounts for 2003 to
2006 have been audited, the
2007 and 2008 accounts are
awaiting audit, and 2009 man-
agement accounts are ready for
audit, the BCB board con-
firmed.

Turnquest hits out at PLP MP’s defence of ZNS performance



MINISTER of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said he finds an
opposition MP’s attempts to defend the
performance of ZNS “ludicrous.”

In a statement issued yesterday, Mr
Turnquest said former minister in
charge of the Broadcasting Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas, Obie Wilchcombe,
was being “self-serving” in his positive
characterisation of the government-run
TV station’s “pathetic” record under
the former PLP government.

Mr Turnquest noted that under the
FNM’s first two terms in office from
1992 to 2002, ZNS met its statutory
obligation to produce annual audited
accounts and lay them before parlia-
ment.

He said: “The late-again and incom-
petent PLP failed to do likewise for
five years running.”

The minister said this “lax” attitude
towards ZNS is unsurprising coming
from the PLP.

“For decades the PLP treated ZNS as
its own private propaganda machine,
rather than as a properly run public
corporation, requiring good business
practices,” he said.

“The mismanagement at ZNS started
with the PLP government way before
1992.

“Tf he can find the time, the former
minister can easily review the financial
statements and see that the corpora-
tion’s accumulated deficit already stood

at $17,707,921.”

Mr Turnquest pointed out that audi-
tors in 1991 financial statements not-
ed: “The corporation has incurred sig-
nificant operating losses in the past five
years and, as at December 31, 1991, its
current liabilities exceed its current
assets by $3,718,589.”

He added: “The corporation’s oper-
ations during the FNM’s tenure were
opened to full public scrutiny when the
corporation’s accounts were laid before
the House. Yet the gross dereliction of
duty that prevailed with respect to the
preparation, auditing and tabling of
accounts during the PLP’s tenure result-
ed in acts of mismanagement being hid-
den.

“Again, this is not surprising. The
PLP is allergic to transparency and
accountability.

“This is why they were comfortable
with a state monopoly on the broad-
cast media, which the FNM removed
in its first term in office.”

Mr Turnquest said that because of
the time lapse that occurred before
the accounts could be reconstructed
once the FNM again became the gov-
ernment, and the loss or unavailabil-
ity of records that would enable a
proper audit to take place, the audi-
tors found it necessary to decline
rendering an opinion as to whether
or not malfeasance might have
occurred.



ea
Shipment
of Linens
eB TY

Calle Diy

EXTRAVAGANZA SALE
Tuesday June loth - Saturday June 19th

15% Off Storewide
10% Off Appliances

MULTI DISCOUNT FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES

APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE :
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 7;

tat oe eg TE

Oe et ee ee) ee)

it era

Bee oe Ds es ee eat LL es Pot ie Be i br





Andros family lose
their home in blaze

Fire engine had broken lever

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls @tripbunemedia.net

A BROKEN lever on a
fire engine may have pre-
vented a home in Andros
from being saved from a
fire.

Gilbert Kemp, the local
administrator, said he was
“saddened” the fire engine
was not working well
enough to assist the family
of Ruthnell Moxey of Man-
grove Cay, Andros. Their
home was completely
destroyed in a blaze over the
weekend.

“The lever that pumps the
water is not working
although the fire engine is
running. It is a problem we
are now addressing,” said
Mr Kemp.

The family of five is
appealing for help from the
community after losing
everything in the fire. Ms

Moxey said she was return-
ing home for lunch, from a
day spent washing sponges,
when someone stopped her
to say her house was on fire.
“When I got there I could-
n’t get too close because
everything was burning, and
now everything is burned
smack and smooth. No one
knows how it happened.

Documents

“T don’t know what to say.
All of my documents and
my kids’ stuff were in there
— stove, radio, voter’s card,
bank books, affidavits,
national insurance cards.
This is going to set me way
back. I mean, everything is
lost. Pll have to start back
from scrap,” said Ms Moxey.

Her three children were
at school when the fire
broke out. Mr Kemp said all
they are left with is the
school uniform they had on.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



Late last night the com-
munity held a meeting to co-
ordinate efforts to help the
family.

For the time being, the
Department of Social Ser-
vices has identified an apart-
ment to house the family.
Mr Kemp said he is not sure
how long they would be able
to stay there, adding that he
does not see the house being
rebuilt right now.

“IT am extremely pleased
with the response; I am
proud of the community of
Mangrove Cay. People have
been coming and dropping
off items, bringing food,
bringing towels, whatever
the family needs. The com-
munity is really coming
together,” said Mr Kemp.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 3



MP: Opposition may have to |
resort to ‘civil disobedience’ |

By ALESHA CADET

CIVIL disobedience may
be the only course of action
left to the opposition, MP
for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
warned at a PLP mini-rally
last night.

Discussing the opposi-
tion’s decision to walk out
of the House of Assembly
last week, Mr Mitchell said if
such actions prove to be the
only way to draw attention
to important issues, the par-
ty “must do more of this
kind of thing”.

During the committal
stage of the Budget Debate
last Thursday, when each
budget item was being scru-
tinised, Mr Mitchell moved
for an amendment but his
motion was defeated. Short-
ly after, all opposition mem-
bers left the chamber.

Mr Mitchell had been
attempting to amend the
social services subvention
for funeral payments from
its present $650 mark to
$1,300 per person for at least
1,000 people.

The governing FNM was
criticised by PLP leader Per-
ry Christie for rejecting the

“I intend to
continue to
push the
envelope even
further. Of
that you can be
assured. I speak
for me and

my house. I
congratulate all
colleagues for
their stand.”



idea outright.

Speaking at the rally last
night, Mr Mitchell said: “I
intend to continue to push
the envelope even further.
Of that you can be assured.
I speak for me and my
house. I congratulate all col-
leagues for their stand.

“This is not a complicated
story; why we are here
tonight. We are here to con-
tinue the fight for our core
constituency: those who can-

tM MRC a ae



not fight for themselves,” he
said.

Speaking about his pro-
posed amendment, Mr
Mitchell said: “My thinking
is that cremation costs
$1,300, and so at least the
subvention from the gov-
ernment ought to be able to
cover the cost of a crema-
tion.

“Just today, I received a
call from a family who can-
not afford to pay for a funer-

al. The cost of the burial will
be $5,000. They expect the
member of parliament to
pay.
“Clearly this is unsustain-
able for any member of par-
liament. It simply cannot be
resolved without some struc-
tural changes.

“No one should have been
surprised, then, that I would
move to get this matter of
support for the burial of the
dead in my constituency
resolved. I was able to con-
vince my colleagues to sup-
port it.”

Criticising Parliament for
failing to stand up to the
Executive, Mr Mitchell
described the PLP’s decision
to walk out of the House as
“democracy in its finest
form.”

He nevertheless said that
the party’s response to the
government’s method of
wielding power has to be
“structural”.

“T have been asked by the
leader to look at these gov-
ernance issues and how the
structures might be changed
now or in a PLP administra-
tion to strengthen Parlia-
ment vis-a-vis the executive.

Bahamasair union negotiations to hegin despite industrial action threat

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



NEGOTIATIONS between
Bahamasair and the embattled
Airline, Airport and Allied
Workers Union are set to begin
today despite a threat of indus-
trial action if the airline meets
with the union's secretary gen-
eral.

Bahamasair managing direc-
tor Henry Woods yesterday said
that the airline had put off nego-
tiations for a new contract with
the union — which represents
non-managerial staff and cabin
attendants — for nearly a year
in the hope that AAAWU
would settle its long-running
internal dispute.

With the in-fighting still con-
tinuing, Mr Woods said the air-
line needs to sit down with
union representatives to hash
out an agreement in the best
interests of its workers.

Former union president
Nellerene Harding last week
threatened that 300 union mem-







bers will walk off the job if man-
agement sits down with the
AAAWU secretary general and
interim president Anthony Bain
today for negotiations.

Mr Woods hopes the strike
will not materialise. He said it
could have serious conse-
quences for the airline.

"As far as I know we are
negotiating with the AAAWU
— whoever shows up that's
another story. It doesn't matter
who it is as long as its a repre-

sentative of AAAWU," he told
The Tribune yesterday.

"We are not in the business
of provocation; we have been
very patient, we have been wait-
ing a long time for them to
come to the table, we just sub-
mitted a proposal — there is
nothing final about it - we want
to negotiate.

“We are really hoping that
they wouldn't resort to that type
of illegal action (a strike)
because that has some serious

PoTCAKE say:

THE BAHAMAS’ VERY OWN STREET PHILOSOPHER













TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

consequences. . . It may have
some negative impact on us; I
won't say it will cripple us."

Last week, former union
president Nellerene Harding
and dozens of union workers
picketed outside the Ministry
of Labour's offices on East Hill
Street to protest the negotia-
tions scheduled for today.

At the time, Ms Harding
called on Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes to intervene in the dis-
pute and put a halt to the nego-
tiations, threatening that some
300 union members would walk
off the job otherwise.

Yesterday, Mr Foulkes said
he could not step in because the
union's fight was before the
courts.

"The registrar of trade unions
has scheduled an election with
the airport union. A faction of
that union filed an application
to the Supreme Court to stop
those elections and an injunc-
tion was granted," said the sen-
ator.

"Where we are now is that
injunction has to be lifted in
order for us to continue with
those elections. It’s an intra-
union fight and as I said before
when it goes to the court it takes
the matter out of my hands and
puts it in the hands of the
judges.

"So there’s really nothing that
I can do at this time until that
injunction is lifted," he said.

Ms Harding and Mr Bain
have been locked in a court-
room fight over the union's
leadership for nearly two years.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
OA dal
AMO
erie Pa MTEL
322-2197

“I believe in the absence
of local government this will
likely mean more members
of parliament as opposed to
less, so that the Cabinet does
not dominate the Parlia-
ment,” he said.

“I believe that there will
have to be an MP’s bill of
rights which will effectively
spell out in law the rights
and privileges of a member
of parliament including the
right to superintend and
control public works in his
constituency and matters of
social services support.”

Huppy

Money and
handbag taken
from bar in
armed robbery

JUST before 11pm on
Monday, police were
alerted to an armed rob-
bery at the Holiday Bar
in Coconut Grove.

Witnesses told the offi-
cers that two masked
men, wearing grey dickie
outfits, entered the bar
and demanded cash.

One of them had a gun.

The men robbed the
bar of an undetermined
amount of money and
snatched an employee’s
handbag.

They fled the scene on
foot heading south on
Market Street.

Police are investigat-
ing.

Fathers

Day

to ALL the
Great Men!!

Re!
for a Special

Lbwim ere TT
ME I ee

MORLEY

FOR

ME

%

‘i

nw!

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) Mi2hhsdih
Bayparl Building, Parliament Sireet
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 Fax: (242) F-S955
PuO. Fox -121, Sassou, WP, Bahamas
e-mail: info enlesolmnssailcon







Prestige Floors

a eo)

ori a Aa en
Pee Lee i |
Engineered FROM
Bet mig |

bea |

here is & wi
Te
m all fl
eae e re lod ea
Vice eet

aa oi

ate eae:











fe

BS .94 [RA TALIL ED

WO ee aD

Me

Ue ee aa od iG

MONDAY: FRIDAY
ee ete


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Why fire Finance Minister Laing?

WE HAVE received an extraordinary let-
ter from a Bahamian who urges the PLP to
take this “golden opportunity” to demand
the resignation of Finance Minister Zhivargo
Laing for lying to the Bahamian people about
the state of the economy.

We do not know how any Bahamian who
reads newspapers, listens to the radio and
watches TV would not have known from at
least 2008 that world markets — including the
Bahamas — had started to soften. However,
despite these tell-tale signs the IMF did not
panic. Up until then their economic reports
were optimistic, although by 2008 a slight
shadow had started to appear in their fore-
casts.

In May, 2008, The Tribune reported that
there was an 18 per cent drop in foreign
direct investment in the Bahamas compared
with 2007, which according the United
Nations was equivalent to a decline of $126
million. That same month the Travel, Leisure
and Tourism sector of the financial consult-
ing firm KPMG in its fourth annual regional
banking survey of the Caribbean Hotel
Tourism and Investment conference in
Trinidad included the Bahamas in a list of
Caribbean countries that leading banks in
the region felt had the greatest tourism
growth potential for 2008.

However, in that same month local busi-
nessmen were not so certain. In the opinion
of Chamber of Commerce Dioniso D’ Aguilar
the escalating cost of energy, the slow down
in the tourism industry and the fear of a US
recession could lead to a 10 per cent down-
turn in the Bahamas’ retail sector for 2008.

A few months earlier — January, 2008—
Mr D’ Aguilar felt that the Bahamas govern-
ment’s forecasts were a “little optimistic”
with the Bahamas enjoying only “anemic
growth.” Standard & Poor downgraded the
Bahamas’ economic outlook from “positive”
to “stable” and this because to vacation in the
Bahamas was relatively more expensive than
other world destinations. Mr D’Aguilar was
keeping his eye on CNN, which was report-
ing the precarious state of the US economy.
For the Chamber president there was a lot of
uncertainty. “If I am a US consumer,” he
said, “and decide I’m going to pull back a bit,
one of the first items to go is likely to be an
expensive holiday, and the Bahamas is an
expensive holiday.”

No one in this country could have been
misled when Prime Minister Ingraham
announced that he did not have enough funds
to honour contractural agreements with the
nurses and doctors, but would do so as soon
as he could. Soon BORCO in Grand
Bahama was sold for $60 million and the
Prime Minister was in a position to pay the
doctors, nurses and other bills.

Any intelligent Bahamian hearing this
news should have understood that the econ-
omy was slipping. The Prime Minister had
already decided to take precautions. Any
intelligent Bahamian, understanding the
source of this country’s revenue, should have
known that the future outlook was precarious
when they heard all the chatter on US sta-
tions about fears of a serious economic
decline in that country. This did not look
good for the Bahamas, because investors
were already cutting back —it was becoming
increasingly more difficult to float a loan. In
November 2008 — two months after the
Lehman collapse —Arawak Homes presi-
dent Franklyn Wilson announced that for
that very reason he was putting his Eleuthera
project on hold.

So by early 2008 Bahamians should have
known — although they might not have
wanted to admit it — that this country was
walking on the edge of a precipice and that
great caution was necessary.

Suddenly in September 2008 the venerable
158-year-old Lehman Brothers collapsed,
quickly followed by the fire-sale of Merril
Lynch, the extinction of Bear Stears several
months later and five of America’s top invest-
ment banks.

As one newspaper commented: “The
global credit crisis has entered a new dimen-
sion.” A dimension that no one either antic-
ipated or understood. There was world pan-
ic. Hasty bank bail outs followed in an effort
to prevent a world economic collapse.

In November 2008 with unemployment
expected to rise to double digits, Mr Ingra-
ham announced a temporary assistance pro-
gramme for the unemployed, cautioning
Bahamians to live within their means.

By May of the following year already $1.5
million had been paid out and by July half of
the $20 million employment money had been
exhausted. The Bahamas had to borrow
heavily.

And now it is pay back time, and like every
country in the world — although we are not
as badly off as many others, especially those
in our region — the future will not be easy.

On Friday the new Japanese prime min-
ister warned that his country is at “risk of col-
lapse” under its huge mountain of debt.

At least at the moment, according to Mr
Laing, our financial system is fairly sound
with “some $900 million in foreign reserves
and $500 million in bank liquidity.”

So now is not the time to fire anyone, or
for the Opposition to be out there trying to
score brownie points on a misfortune that
they are very much a part of.

Now is the time for everyone who loves
this country to close ranks and save her and
themselves from disaster.

Outrage over
Cable Bahamas’
‘dive into digital’

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Cable Bahamas ‘Dive into
Digital’

Iam outraged by this dig-
ital move that Cable
Bahamas is implementing.
In my living room I have
one cable TV box which
allows me to get the other
channels in addition to basic.
My three bedrooms receive
basic cable only. I have
internet from Cable
Bahamas and I use a wire-
less router for my laptops to
connect. So for like $100 a
month I got cable TV in
four rooms and internet
throughout my house. I paid
a onetime fee of $149 for the
box in my living room. It
was a comfortable existence,
until this month, I was
informed by Cable Bahamas
that in order to receive basic
cable TV in these bedrooms
I have to purchase three
additional boxes. I was told
that I was not eligible to get
a free box because I already
have a box.

That just set hell in me.
Why do I need these addi-
tional boxes? It will cost me
almost $150 to purchase
these three boxes ($49 each)
or I could rent the boxes col-
lectively for $10 per month.
This is overselling. Right
now, if the family wants to
watch channels other than
basic we go to the living
room. The presence of cable
boxes in the bedrooms is a
constant subliminal message
encouraging the family to
spend more money -
“Check out the pay-per-
view channels, see some-
thing you like, just put in the
code”. My comfortable exis-
tence is now strained by hav-
ing to put blocks and lock-
outs on the boxes. But more
importantly, I have to
expend more money in
these particularly strained
economic times to continue
to make use of my TVs. If I
select the renting option,
Cable Bahamas would
receive $120 more for the
year. Multiply that by 40,000
consumers, then you talking
about just less than
$5,000,000 annually and you
can see why Cable does not
mind taking the Dive. This is
not accounting for the sub-
scribers who may be forced
to purchase two or three
boxes. This is making Cable
Bahamas richer. I have to
get the additional boxes if I

letters@triounemedia.net



giving Cable Bahamas more
revenue whether it is a one-
time payment or a recurring
payment. My alternative is
for the other TVs to remain
off because there is no signal
to receive.

I told Cable Bahamas how
I felt. They said this was a
Regulator imposed require-
ment. It was explained to
me that the Regulator wants
people who only want to
obtain internet to be able to
do so without having to get
cable television. If the Reg-
ulator did impose this, did
the Regulator think about
how much this “luxury” cost
the average consumer? Was
there any public consulta-
tion? I think this is an injus-
tice and an additional finan-
cial burden being borne by
the consumer. We really
need to do more research
and analysis before we come
up with these decisions.
These decisions impact the
basic cost of living. I am
okay with having to pur-
chase cable TV and internet
together. How many per-
sons am I making this sacri-
fice for who want to get
internet without cable TV?
Wasn't going to BTC an
option for these people?

Then to add insult to
injury, Cable Bahamas says
I am not eligible for a free
box because I already have a
digital box.

Yes, but I bought that box
for $149. It is just your basic
black decoder. It’s not the
shiny silver DVRs and it’s
not HD. Can someone
explain the basis for this dis-
crimination? Cable
Bahamas was not able to do

so. They say they reduced
the price of the box. All sub-
scribers should be treated
alike. All subscribers sub-
ject to this “dive into digi-
tal” should receive one box
or be credited the $100 dif-
ference. We are all being
inconvenienced and
imposed upon. In the USA,
the government gave
coupons with some mone-
tary value to consumers that
had to purchase a converter
box.

I am against this “dive
into digital”. If people did
not want to have to take
cable when they only want-
ed internet, then they should
have gone to BTC. The
Regulator or Cable
Bahamas should come up
with a better plan. If this is
the plan Cable Bahamas or
the Regulator (government)
decided on they both are
better able to absorb the
financial impact than the
consumer. In the USA the
digital transition related to
over the air transmissions
and not cable television. I
don’t see the connection. In
the USA you don’t have to
have cable to use your tele-
vision. I understand the
Regulator is supposed to be
making it better for con-
sumers.

Well, I cannot say this is
progress. It’s progress for
Cable Bahamas — more rev-
enues, but it is retrogress for
consumers — more money
for the same thing.

This is wrong and to add
insult to injury this is dis-
criminatory. Subscribers
beware; they are coming to a
neighbourhood near you
soon!

LINDA THOMAS
“the Cable-less Guy”
Nassau,

June 9, 2010.

The anniversary of the

PME STAC TS

EDITOR, The Tribune.





ns
it

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Lid.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

BEAUTYGUARD
Free Estimates

| | WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
\_ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |

want to use my other TVs

St. Ailban’s Drive

Newly refurbished 2 bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths Condo in Courtyard Setting.

Single Storey Building.
Kitchen Appliances, Granite Countertops,
Washer & Dryer.

$127,000
Bank Financing Available.
$6,500 Down

Tel: 325-1325, 422-4489, 477-0200

Sth - 30th July, 2010

gam - 3pm DAIL

Safe, positive and interactive learning,
leisure and fun for kids of all ages
Weekly Themes
* Emphasis on Things Bahamian
: Experienced Coordinators & Presenters
Crafts, Films, Computers, Personal Development

& More Lunch Prowided!!!!
$125.00 weekly

Sojourner-Douglass College + Gold Circle House
East Bay Street -Tel: 394-8570

Register Now! Space is Limited!



Last month was the 50th anniversary of the “pill”. In the
1960's the pill was heralded as a development that would lib-
erate women from male dominance and lead to fewer
divorces, fewer unwanted pregnancies, and fewer abortions.
It is now clear, however, that things did not turn out that
way.

As the pill became more widespread the number of
divorces and abortions soared. We saw a lowering of moral
standards and a rise in infidelity and promiscuity. In addition,
the well-being of children declined by a variety of mea-
sures, from depression to diet to the number living in pover-
ty and the number experiencing child abuse or neglect.

Though women now have access to places and positions
that once belonged to men they have never been seen more
as sex objects than they are today.

The major disconnect caused by the arrival of the pill
has been a loss of the idea that men and women make
babies. As technological advances in artificial reproduction
are made, the idea that God plays a role in procreation has
increasingly been lost.

Sadly, the horizon does not look promising for the fami-
ly. With the rapid increase of activist judges with a procliv-
ity to elitist social engineering we will soon be seeing count-
less forms of sexually bonded groups that are not only
unstable but seriously harmful to children.

May God help us.

FRANK HENDERSON
Nassau,
June, 2010.







f + , ' _ ff
_fteres f etdattenn ff friends

"MAY PEOPLE"

(Two One Act Mavs)
Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts
June 16th - 19th 2010 at §:00 p.m. nightly
Tickets: $20.00

BENEFIT PERFORMANCE

Andrew Curry Musie Edueation Foundation
Tuesday 15th June at 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $25.00 (includes alter theatre reception)

BOR. OFFICE: The Dundas,
Telephones 393-3728 34-7179
Opens Monday 7th Jone 2:00 a.m. 200 pom. daily
RESERVED TICKETS NOT COLLECTED BY
320) PAW. ON DAY OF PERFORMANCE
WILD, BE SOLD


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Prison bus

in traffic
accident

A PRISON bus was in a
minor traffic accident yes-
terday afternoon. The bus
was travelling along East
Bay Street near Scotia-
bank around 2.30pm when
the car in front of it
stopped suddenly.

Unable to brake in time,
the bus driver opted to
swerve off the road rather
than hit the car.

The bus incurred minor
damage to its left front
headlight.




Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN ABACO man won
his appeal against a convic-
tion on charges of assisting
with illegal landing of a
group of Asians on the Fam-
ily Island after Court of
Appeal judges agreed that
Magistrate Crawford McK-
ee made a “fundamental
error” in his case.

President of the Court of
Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer
allowed the appeal made by
Javargo Cooper, writing that

far from there being “suffi-
cient evidence” for the
appellant to answer in the
case, there was none at all.

“There was no evidence,
either direct or circumstan-
tial,” linking Mr Cooper to
the landing of the migrants
in the Bahamas, said Dame
Joan, adding that Magistrate
McKee had made a “funda-
mental error.” She handed
down the judgment, which
was recently posted at the
top court’s website, on June
9.

Mr Cooper was charged
with assisting with illegal

landing in Abaco in Novem-
ber 2007. He was convicted
on March 18, 2009 and sen-
tenced to two years impris-
onment. He was obtained
bail after his attorney, MP
for Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island, Acklins and
Long Cay, V Alfred Gray,
lodged an appeal on his
behalf.

Allowing the appeal,
Dame Joan said that the
Court of Appeal’s decision
that there was not “sufficient
evidence” against Mr Coop-
er “is not to say that he may
or may not be guilty” but

Two plead not guilty
to drugs charges

TWO men who pleaded not guilty to drugs
charges yesterday are expected back in court
today for a bail hearing.

Lance Jason Rose, 24, of Acklins and
Bernard Road; and Emilio Leonardo Beneby,
20, of Spring Point Acklins and Dignity Gar-
dens, Carmichael Road, have been charged
with possession of marijuana with intent to
supply.

It is alleged that on Friday, June 11 the two
were found in possession of 1.7 pounds of mar-
ijuana.

Both men were remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison and are expected back in court today for
a bail hearing.

¢ A man was granted $7,500 bail yesterday
after pleading not guilty to a marijuana pos-
session charge.

Richard Alexander, 30, of Elizabeth Estates,
is accused of being found on June 11 in pos-
session of 10 ounces of marijuana, which offi-
cers believed he intended to supply to anoth-

SPERRY.

TOP-S IDER

er. The case was adjourned to February 3,
2011.

e Prosecutors have recharged two men
accused in a stealing $16,000 from a woman by
reason of service.

The case against Gary Bain, 37; and Carlos
Perigord, 37, had been discharged on April
13.

The two men are once again accused of
stealing $16,000 cash from Kimberly Dean by
reason of service between April 24 and June
24, 2009.

It is alleged that Dean had paid the money
for a jeep she never received.

Bain, who appeared before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethell in Court Eight, Bank Lane, plead-
ed not guilty to the charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000.

The case has been adjourned to November
18 for trial.

A warrant of arrest was issued for Carlos
Perigord, who failed to appear in court.

A PASSION FOR
THE SEA

Remember Dad on Father's Day, June 20th
10% Off All Purchases for Dad

JOHN’S

SHOES AND ACCESSORIES

ROSETTA ST. 325-4944

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



CARMICHAEL ROAD 361-6876

Man wins appeal after judges
agree on ‘fundamental error’ |

relies on the fact that “sus-
picion in law is not suffi-
cient.”

“There must be evidence
upon which a tribunal of fact
can adjudicate in order to
arrive at some conclusion of
fact in this jurisdiction. Some
people may find this a tech-
nical argument, but the law
is bound in technicalities,
and where there is a techni-
cality that is in favour of an
accused person, the court
must always give the benefit
of the doubt to that accused
person.

“In this case the appellant
should have gotten the ben-
efit of the doubt raised by
the lack of evidence, direct
or circumstantial, of his
involvement in preparing for
the landing, assisting them
in the landing and so on,”
said Dame Joan.

Judges Christopher
Blackman and Stanley John
heard the appeal with Dame
Joan.



LOAN on the market!

Come in to Nassau
Motor Company today
or visit your nearest
Scotiabank branch for
more information.

‘Limited tle only.
‘Certain conditions apply,



§ scotiabank

On-the-spot financing and insurance.
24-month/24,000-mile factory warranty.

RATES EVER!

ACT NOW to get THE BEST

eo

Three charged in
connection with
stabbing death

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Three persons were charged in the
Freeport Magistrate’s Court yesterday in connection
with the stabbing death of a Coral Gardens man.

Meanwhile, police are still searching for 20-year-
old Abdul Rondon Burrows who is also wanted by
police for questioning in the stabbing.

Two men and one woman were arrested by police
last week and appeared in Court Three before
Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones on Monday on
charges of conspiracy to commit murder.

Jarreth Barry, 18, of Gambier Drive; and Darren
Pratt, 39 and Karen Janice Bowe, 24, both of Mallard
Street, were not required to enter a plea.

It is alleged that on June 8, the accused, being con-
cerned together, conspired to murder Troy Rolle.

Barry was also charged with Rolle’s murder and
causing harm to a second man. He was not required
to enter pleas to the charges.

Rolle, 31, and a 35-year-old man were attacked and
stabbed at an apartment complex in Coral Gardens
last Tuesday.

Injuries

They were taken to Rand Memorial Hospital,
where Rolle later died. The second man was treated
for his injuries and remained in hospital for several
days.

Rolle’s death has been classified as the sixth homi-
cide on Grand Bahama.

Pratt was represented by K Brian Hanna. Bowe
was represented by Rawle Maynard. Barry was not
represented by counsel.

They have been remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison
in Nassau until August 17, when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

Police are continuing to appeal to the public for
assistance in locating Burrows, whose last known
address is 21B Langton Circle, Freeport.

He is of dark brown complexion and about 5’ 8”
tall, of average build, and weighs between 160 and
170Ibs.

Police say Burrows should be considered armed
and dangerous and should be approached with cau-
tion.

Anyone with information concerning his where-
abouts is asked to contact the police in Grand
Bahama at 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-9991, 352-8351,
352-9076, 350-3125 or, 911.

Chevrolet
Aveo




Chevrolet
Malibu

Chevrolet
Silverado



Shirley Street « 302-0130 « Fax: 323-7272
info@nassaumotor.com « www.chevroletbahamas.com

CeO ae

CHEVROLET








PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Creative ideas on the
Bahamian economy

THE opposition PLP thinks
bad times have handed them
the next election on a platter.
Passing the most realistic bud-
get in recent history will do
nothing to help the FNM, they
say. In fact, they are confident
that most Bahamians will
blame the government for
their economic woes.

The statistics are dismal
indeed — a 6 per cent contrac-
tion of the economy over the
last two years, a 20 per cent
fall-off in stopover tourists, a
19 per cent drop in new mort-
gages, loan arrears of 18 per
cent, and a 22 per cent decline
in foreign investment — all

adding up to well over 14 per
cent unemployment.

Perry Christie says the
prime minister is "singing a sad
story, but without any ideas
and without accepting any
responsibility for the state we
are in. The poor will suffer
more with increased taxation
and the resultant depressed

Amazing ImmcK StepZ

Ss H ©

> TOR

SHOE SALE







effect there will be on spend-
ing.”

Christie says the govern-
ment's policies are unfairly
painful to that legendary
"small man" of Bahamian pol-
itics. Of course, out of power
it's much easier to talk from
both sides of your mouth — a
skill known as "negative ambi-
guity."” But the PLP's lack of
coherence on the budget can
be easily demonstrated by
looking at recent comments
from their top economic advi-
sors.

Christie's respected former
finance minister, James Smith,
is on record as saying that a
deficit of 3 per cent of GDP is
unsustainable (it is now at 5.7
per cent). And he has acknowl-
edged that rising debt sends
entirely the wrong signal to
banks and investors.

Only a few months ago
Smith said the government had
to reverse its "perilous" course
and arrest the fiscal decline.
After the budget was present-
ed, he said it sent all the right
signals, noting that a down-
grade in the country's credit
rating would raise borrowing
costs from their present high
of 15 per cent.

Smith even went so far as
to call for a 10 per cent cut in
public sector spending across
the board, adding that "If you
don't do it now, it will have to
happen some time.” And top
PLP financier Frankie Wilson
has also called for a 10 per cent
cut in government spending.
We will have to take their
words as the clearest indica-
tion of what a PLP administra-
tion would be doing right now.

Why Rent Electricty?

YOU CAN OWN SOLAR
YI) SUA Us ah
SOE Wealtde ia

aA

Witaie

yy

ABP UIE UD ¢

“td

SOLAR WATER HEATING - Resideritial: 50), 80, 120 gallon options Commercial: Qver 500 gallons options
(Hotels, Spas, Gyms, Laundromats) -Solar Pool Heating: Residential & Lange Scale Applications.

Why is a Solar Water Heater a Good Investment?



1. Ownership:

Why rent your monthly energy

needs when you can own a lifetime of free hot

water?

?, Energy Independence: A Sela Woter Heater
provides anergy independance. Thawgh anergy
costs continee to risa at increasingly rapid
rates, you will he protected.

4, Savings:

Your Solar Water

Heater will

immediately reduce your cunremt omengy
expences, In most canes up to MS. The more
i you wee your Engh: Sen System, the more money

you save.

4, Eoo-Consciemce:
improving the environmeet for you
¢ family by taking advantage of a
energy source without sacnhicing co

Take responsability






P.O. Box N-8170 * CRAWFORD STREET * NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE (242) 328-8618 * FAX (242) 322-6969
Web: www.solarpowerbahamas.com

Last year Wilson noted that
economic advisors had made
the same 10 per cent cut rec-
ommendation to the PLP gov-
ernment in 1991, during the
recession caused by the first
Gulf War. And that recom-
mendation was as relevant now
as it was then, he said, argu-
ing that more government
spending would be “danger-
ous.”

But in opposition the PLP
sound more and more like the
Republicans in America,
reducing themselves to the par-
ty of no. They may well lam-
baste Hubert Ingraham for
both expanding the deficit and
then trying to rein it in; but
their inability to suggest real-
istic alternatives or to acknowl-
edge their own role in creat-
ing the problem makes them
rather less impressive — cynical
really.

And they have obviously
heeded the advice of the noto-
rious propagandists in their
midst by accusing their oppo-
nents of the very sins for which
they themselves are so well
known — poor governance, par-
tisan spitefulness and lack of
accountability.

As many others have point-
ed out, both parties share
responsibility for our current
economic circumstances. While
in power, both parties wasted
millions, handed jobs to the
boys, played politics with the
public corporations and
unions, and turned a deaf ear
to good advice from the pri-
vate sector. And both parties
will now have to contribute to
the solutions if we want to
maintain our way of life.

That brings us to the main
difficulty we have with the
budget.

Belt-tightening is one thing,
and this budget makes a start
on that. But what about some
creative ideas to build a bet-
ter future?

There are two broad pro-
posals for growing the econo-
my mentioned in this budget:
An aggressive investment pro-
motion tour of key world cities,
and a $10 million small busi-
ness development framework
to encourage private sector job
creation.

It is unclear what the latter
initiative will amount to, but
the government says the goal is
to reduce red tape, eliminate
duplication of services, and
give more support to entre-
preneurs.

Others have made more
radical suggestions.

Tribune Business Editor
Neil Hartnell called for a "nuts
and bolts study of the entire
public sector, probing into
every nook and cranny to
uncover inefficiency, over-
staffing, waste and fraud. The
savings that could be realised
might be substantial, and sur-

Mesto



prise a lot of people."

Former finance minister
James Smith wants to cut the
prime rate, to help businesses
and households meet loan pay-
ments. The average residential
interest rate is now 8.4 per
cent, while the commercial rate
is 8.8 per cent. And the budget
acknowledged that high unem-
ployment and a challenging
business environment were
"constraining" the ability of
borrowers to service their
debts.

However, changes in lend-
ing rates almost never occur
here.

John Rodgers, an entrepre-
neurial eye doctor with a rep-
utation as an economics com-
mentator, has also called for
the government to use mone-
tary tools to help the econo-
my. In a soon-to-be-published
book (Is it Better in the
Bahamas...For Bahamians? by
Media Enterprises) he calls for
the abolition of exchange con-
trols and the replacement of
Bahamian currency with the
US dollar, to end the long-
standing banking cartel and
allow greater access to capital
by cash-starved entrepreneurs.

Rodgers also says we should
embrace the vast potential of
medical tourism. "If we could
receive the $2 billion annually
that Cuba receives from med-
ical tourism, not only would
our national debt be reduced,
but Bahamians would have
true ownership of this segment
of the economy, which would
be virtually recession-proof.
All that would be required
would be a collaborative effort
between the medical commu-
nity and the ministers of health
and tourism.”

There has been renewed
interest in proposals to revamp
our 19th century tax regime.

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in the Bahamas, we are seeking a candidate
to work as a Service Manager to be able

to oversee the operations of the Service
Department. The Candidate should have the

following qualifications:

Be a graduate with a Bachelors Degree in
Mechanical Engineering;

Have post-graduate studies in Management;
Have Caterpillar training in Heavy Equipment

Machines;

Have Caterpillar training in power generation:
Have 5 years or more experience with
working with a Caterpillar dealer or a similar

Organization;

The candidate should have certification as an

ISO 9000 auditor and;

The candidate should have Six Sigma training
(a Black belt in 6-Sigma is preferred).

This candidate is required to be a professional
who thrives on the challenge of developing
outstanding customer relations and service

excellence.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Service Manager,

or email me@me-ltd.com

Only persons being interviewed for this
position will be contacted.



Several studies in recent years
have called for the introduc-
tion of a value-added (VAT)
tax to replace import duties,
which are too heavily linked
to international trade and fail
to capture revenue from the
services sector (especially well-
heeled doctors and lawyers).
However, no government has
had the will or energy to
embark on the long consulta-
tion and planning process that
would be needed to achieve
this.

And speaking of energy,
that sector is ripe for far-reach-
ing reform so as to lower costs,
improve efficiency and pro-
mote energy security.
Although fuel imports fell last
year to about $668 million as
oil prices and domestic
demand moderated, gasoline
and diesel prices have been ris-
ing again this year. And when
oil prices spike again — as most
experts say they will — we will
regret not having used the
intervening period to make
necessary changes to our
lifestyle and economy.

The record of the last three
years on this issue is not par-
ticularly hopeful. Although the
FNM initially embarked on
some major policy initiatives
—- including a national energy
policy, an invitation for pro-
duction of renewable energy
by the private sector, an
aggressive energy efficiency
programme and a regulatory
review, these efforts seem to
be floundering today.

BEC recently cancelled its
two-year renewable energy
tendering process with literal-
ly nothing to show for it. IDB-
financed studies are still under-
way to determine changes to
the legal and regulatory sys-
tem, and to promote energy
efficiency and conservation.
Meanwhile, the government is
making enormous investments
in conventional generating
plant on several islands that
will be in use for the next 20
years.

According to Glen Laville,
project manager at the Min-
istry of Environment for the
IDB-sponsored initiatives,
"Sector reform is a process.
We are presently completing
the necessary studies to ensure
the outcome is positive. This
takes time. The fact is there's a
helluva lot happening and a lot
will eventually come out of
this, but we are just not there
yet.”

The government seems to
be betting the future of energy
reform on a possible invest-
ment by the Canadian power
company, Emera, in BEC.
Emera has lately been con-
ducting a review of BEC's
operations to develop a turn-
around plan for the corpora-
tion, and is also a major share-
holder in the Grand Bahama
Power Company.

"We picked Emera as a
strategic partner to look at
what the IDB consultants were
doing from a practical, opera-
tional view," BEC Chairman
Michael Moss told me recent-
ly. "In addition to wind tur-
bines, we are looking at circu-
lating fluidised bed furnaces to
burn a variety of fuels, and also
considering wave energy, but
conservation is the only real
green energy at the moment
and we will be pushing that
angle strongly. We are some
distance away from any utility-
scale RE projects."

The slowdown --
if not collapse — of the gov-
ernment's energy initiatives is
most unfortunate in my view. I
fully agree with the view of
New York Times columnist
and author Tom Friedman, "In
this kind of world, leadership
at every level of government
and business matters more
than ever. We have no margin
of error anymore, no time for
politics as usual or suboptimal
legislation.

And as regards the PLP’s
expectation to benefit elec-
torally from the economic
downturn, I offer another
quote from Friedman: "In this
economic climate, people
know they need to be smarter,
more frugal and make tougher
choices in their private lives.
They know they can’t fake it or
fool themselves anymore, so
they have much less tolerance
for politicians who want to do
that in our public life."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

An archipelago of opportunities

An address by Governor Gen-
eral Sir Arthur Foulkes at the
graduation ceremony for Inagua
All Age School — Matthew Town,
Great Inagua

IT IS GOOD to return to the
island of my birth to celebrate
the milestone of the graduation
of the Class of 2010 at the Inagua
All Age School, the school
where I began my own life-long
quest for knowledge.

Though many of us continue
to talk about Inagua as one of
the best kept secrets in the
Bahamas, I suspect you already
know that many of this island's
best kept secrets are already out.

For me, it is a privilege to be
the first Inaguan to serve as gov-
ernor general. But, I have no
doubt that more Inaguans will
serve in national leadership
capacities in the future.

Indeed, Inaguans have already
made numerous contributions
around the world. From noted
educator T G Glover to musi-
cian Alphonso “Blind Blake”
Higgs to the world renowned
opera singer Randolph Symon-
ette, many of our best kept
secrets are now being shared
with a wider world.

There were other Bahamian
pioneers from Inagua, such as
Cyril Richardson who studied
medicine in Aberdeen, Scotland,
in the 1920s. There were the
Nixon brothers whose legendary
contributions to conservation
and environmentalism have led
to the repopulation of our arch-
ipelago with our wonderful
national bird, the flamingo.

Like these pioneers, I am sure
Class of 2010, that you will like-
wise do Inagua proud as you
continue your journey beyond
today's celebration. I know that
you will also do the Bahamas





CYRIL RICHARDSON



proud here in Inagua and wher-
ever else you should choose to
venture in the world.

No matter where you go,
remember this: Because of geog-
raphy and the determined indi-
viduals who took advantage of
the possibilities arising from this,
Inagua has always been at the
crossroads of our history. This is
also your history, graduates. It is
a part of your destiny.

Incidentally, may I invite the
community of Inagua to do more
to showcase and preserve the
rich cultural and built heritage
of Inagua. As you know, many
of our islands are doing this
important work, with Abaco,
Cat Island, Eleuthera and other
islands leading the way. There
is also significant work being
done in New Providence.

I invite you to consider the
development of an Inagua Her-
itage Committee which will co-
ordinate the preservation and
exposition of the rich history of
this island. There are a number
of persons and groups who may
assist in these efforts.

If we do not preserve the his-
tory, records, architecture and
artifacts of Inagua, they may pass
into history not as secrets, but
as history lost and never to be
found again.

You already have the histori-
cal triumph of the preservation
of our national bird and Inagua's
natural heritage to guide you in
the preservation of this island's
cultural and built heritage.

Class of 2010: You and I share
a common bond. We now share
the same alma mater. We also
share a deeper bond: The oppor-
tunity to use the gift of this edu-
cation to serve the country we
love.

The opportunity for every
Bahamian child to attend and
complete secondary school only
came about in my lifetime.
Today, many thousands of
Bahamians have advanced
degrees whether a Bachelors, a
Masters or Doctorate.

So, you are most fortunate to
have completed high school. I
beseech you to use this good for-
tune to help uplift the least for-
tunate in our country.

Today is a moment to be
proud. Yet, a deeper pride will
develop when you are able to
apply the knowledge you have
obtained to make life better for
yourselves and the wider com-
munity. In essence, it is impor-



SIR ARTHUR FOULKES



tant to make a living, but it is
equally important to make life
worth living.

As T just noted, the opportu-
nity to attend high school in the
Bahamas is a relatively recent
occurrence in the history of our
country.

Prior to 1967, most students
left school at the age at 14 to
enter the workplace as there
were precious few secondary
schools for them to attend.

This changed because of men
and women who decided to ded-
icate themselves to something
bigger than themselves.

Graduates: Our country is not
without its challenges. We have
significant social problems,
including a high incidence of vio-
lent crime.

The Bahamas, like many oth-
er countries, is experiencing one
of the worst economic down-
turns since the Great Depres-
sion of the 20s and 30s.

Fortunately, this world eco-
nomic crisis has not affected
Inagua as badly as it has the rest
of the country.

Another challenge is also the
need for us to return to greater
civic pride, civility, respect and
basic good manners. Good
morning, thank you and please
are not merely courtesies. They
are also a part of the social ties
and graces which bind us togeth-
er as One Bahamas.

We afford others basic cour-
tesies because they are a part of
our human and Bahamian fami-
ly These courtesies are a part of
the Golden Rule that we should
do unto others as we would have
them do unto us.

Dressing appropriately,
refraining from foul language in
public and driving courteously
demonstrate that we have
respect for our own person as
well as others.

Proper public behaviour, good
manners and simple kindness
are at the very heart of our
Bahamian way of life.

Our young people today are
bombarded with unwholesome
messages in the popular, social
and mass media from video
games to violent language and
images in film and on the Inter-
net.

Still, despite our national chal-
lenges, I remain hopeful. Things
are not as bad as some may sug-
gest. There is often too much
negativity and cynicism on the
part of many adults. If you listen
to some people, you would think
that these are the worst of times.

The media never tire of telling
us what is bad in our Bahamas
but they are not so anxious to
tell us the good things, especial-
ly the wonderful achievements
of many of our young people
who are the doing the right
things.

I am often amused that for
many older people, no matter
the decade, that in their minds
their times are always the worst
of times. I heard this when I was
a mere boy, then as a teenager,
then as an adult. I continue to
hear this even now as a senior
citizen.

So, allow me to say a word to
the parents, guardians, teachers
and community leaders here









TG GLOVER

tonight.

With the vantage point of age
and history, let me remind you
that not everything was better
yesteryear. Indeed, many things
were quite worse in terms of a
lack of opportunity, discrimina-
tion and inequality. Many doors
that are open today were shut
tight back then.

Also, our young people are
faced with challenges the likes
of which us older folks have nev-
er had to contend. So, even as
you provide a firm hand to our
children and youth, also provide
them with encouragement and
examples of hope.

We are often quick to con-
demn our young people for their
mistakes but slow to praise them
when they do good. Let's lift
them up more, and row them
out less. Let's lift them up with
stories of hope and examples of
success. And let us be generous
im our encouragement.

Most young people are not
engaging in anti-social behav-
iour. Most young people want
opportunities to succeed. Most
young people are hungry for a
chance to be truly involved in
life-giving pursuits which chal-
lenge their minds, engage their
hearts and touch their imagina-
tions.

From the National Children's
and Youth Choirs to community

RANDOLPH SYMONETTE



service to the National Spelling
Bee to church youth groups to
speech, debate and athletic com-
petitions, our young people are
excelling and contributing.

Our children and youth are
also excelling in various nation-
al arts and cultural activities and
programmes. I was most pleased
to listen to the renditions by your
students of “This Land Is My
Land” and “All a We is One
Family”, when I arrived. And, I
also appreciated the music
played by the Third Bahamas
Boys Brigade.

We need more such pro-
grammes and opportunities
where young people can be men-
tored by caring adults who lift

them up, who inspire them into
being and doing their best.

I marvel at the young people
who have had to go to work at a
young age to help take care of

their families and their younger
siblings. Indeed, more often than
not, it is not our young people
who are failing. Disturbingly, it
is too often the adult communi-

ty that is failing.
During my tenure as gover-
nor general I dedicate myself,

SEE page eight

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

FINANCE CLERK Il - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II — Accounts Payable in

the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Processing invoices for payment by checking accuracy of calculations,
coding and authorized signatures;

Posting invoice disbursements and journal entry data into the accounts

payable system;

Reconciling statements of account for local vendors with balance due
in excess of $5,000.00. This involves generating open payables report to

ensure correctness of entries and vendor balance;

Maintaining and reporting on the Corporation’s meal voucher system;

Preparing schedules (source data for aged payables etc.) or other task
requested by Supervisor or Manager;

Assisting with maintenance of the cheque log and disbursing cheques for
vetting and approved signatures;

Assisting with the filing system of accounts payable documents and fol
lows up on outstanding obligations to local vendors; and

Assisting with resolving vendors disputes/queries.

Job requirements include:

Aminimum of an Associate Degree
(Accounts, Business Administration);
A minimum of 2-3 year experience;
Thorough working knowledge of the Disbursement Processing module
within the H TE environment;
Ability to operate the Call Accounting System and to post invoice data
for processing of payment;
Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation
and bank transfer schedules; and
Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff
and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas

on or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.



a

BAHAMAS nest

Fit? ik uEUEAROE. TOOAY TOMSEEHA

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT BAHAMAS FIRST GROUP OFFICES:

BAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

NASSAU UNDERWRITERS INSURANCE AGENCY

WILL BE CLOSED ON FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010 FOR OUR STAFF
ANNUAL FUN DAY.

WE WILL REOPEN FOR BUSINESS AT 9:00 A.M. ON MONDAY, 21,
2010.

WE REGRET ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSE.

BAHAMUG FIRST ROLES LTS,

GAHAMAS FIRST GENERAL INSURANCE 00. LTO.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010





PLACE ART PCIE

| FART A
ZEW
| PROVIDESCE

CHEVRON
BAHALAS LTD,
(TEXACO)

DIESEL CML
LEAD FREE

PART C

RANI BAIA MA
(EAC UDG)
FREEPORT

CHEVRON
BAHAMAS LTD,
(TEXACO)

DIESEL OL
LEAD FREE

PART Db
| ABACO, ANDROS
ASD ELEUTHERA

CHEVRON
BAHMAS LTD,
(TEXACO)

| MESEL OWL
LEAD FREE

PART E

I
ASILY [SLASDS

CHEVRON
BAHMAS LTD.
(TEXACH)

DIESEL OFL
LEAD FREE



PLANT IMOLM
SUPPLIERS"
PRICE

IX CLUDING

maT

ALLOTHER ee |
F

MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE FRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) (

) REGULATIONS, 2002

SCHEDULE

MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING |
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON

MELANIN
DISTRIBUTORS’ |
PRICE

s | s

SEA

INCLUDING

IX CLUDING SEA

IA CLUDING SE A

PERMANENT SECRETARY

GN-1065

The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule below for DIESEL OFL sold by
CHEVRON BAHAMAS LIMITED (7 EXACO) will become effective on Tuesday, 15", 2010, and
LEAD FREE GASOLINE will become effective on Monday, 21" June, 2010.

LAAT MLM
RETAIL SELLING
PRICE PER US.
CALLON

5

FREIGHT

FREIGHT

FREIGHT











(AMENDMENT) [

ARTICLE

PARTA
NEW PROVIDENCE

ESS0 Standard Oil Limited Diesel Dill

Sun Oil (Shell)
PART C
GRAND BAHAMA
{Excluding FREEPORT)

__|__Lead Free

ESS0O Standard Oj) Limited Diesel Oi
Sun Oil (Stell)
PART D
ABACO, ANDROS
ELEUTHERA

Lead Free

E350 Standard Oil Limited Diesel Oil

Sun Oil (Sivell)

PARTE
ALL OTHER FAMILY ISLANDS

Lead Free

ESSO Standard Oil Limited Diesel Oil

Sun Oil (Shell) Lead Free





MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCL4L DEVELOPMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL
(GASOLINE & DIESEL OL}

) REGULATIONS, 2002

SCHEDULE

MASIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING

___ PRICE PER U.S. GALLON

LACT
SUPPLIERS’
PRICE PRICE
£ 5

MAXIMUM

IHNG@LUDING SEA

INCLUDING

3.43

421

INCLUDING
|

PERMANENT SECRETARY

DISTRIBUTORS’

GN-1066

The Publis is advised thal prices as shown in the Schedule for Diesel Oil sold by ESS0 Standard
Oil 5.4. Limited will become efective on Monday, June 14", 2010, and Lead Free Gasoline sold by Sun
hil Limited (Shell) will become effective on Thursday, June 77", 2070,

| (MAXIMUM RETAIL
SELLING PRICE
PER U.S. GALLON
$

FREIGHT

3.45

444

FREIGHT

ag
448

FREIGHT

3H
4.60

FREIGHT







THE TRIBUNE

Shooting victim in

custody for questioning

FROM page one

ardize investigations and future prosecution, police remained
tightlipped about whether or not the shoot-out could be a
retaliation against Deveaux who was the presumed target.

Deveaux was released from prison last week after a murder
charge against him was dismissed. This is the second time that
a murder charge against him has been dropped.

He had been accused of the murder of Marlon "Marley"
Smith on April 19, 2009, and was also accused of the murder of

Corrie Bethel on May 10, 2007.

Deveaux was taken to the hospital by private vehicle and then
into police custody the same night after he was treated and dis-

charged.

However the toddler, who suffered gunshot injuries to the
head as a result of the indiscriminate shooting, is in serious, but
stable condition in the Intensive Care Unit of the Princess

Margaret Hospital.

ICU staff confirmed the toddler is now breathing on his

own and in stable condition.

He had been put on a ventilator, upon admission Monday
night but the breathing tube was removed yesterday.

The child had not undergone any surgery as of yesterday,
however it may be necessary after further analysis.

It was not confirmed whether there is any connection
between Deveaux and the child.

Police investigations continue and persons with any infor-
mation that might prove useful are encouraged to contact the
police at 919, 328-TIPS, 502-9991 or 322-3337.

FROM page seven

among other things, to encour-
aging our young people. I want
to remind them of the possibili-
ties before them. This includes
the fine legacies of men and
women in whom they can find
inspiration.

I want our young people to
know about Dr Albert Forsythe,
a Bahamian. He was a medical
doctor and a pioneer in aviation
who was one of the first of two
men to ever land a plane on New
Providence.

I remind our young people
about Myron Rolle and other
Rolles hailing from Exuma who
have played in the National
Football League in the United
States.

Myron Rolle is also a Rhodes
Scholar who joins the ranks of
the other Rhodes Scholars we
are continuing to produce on a
regular basis. The brilliant musi-
cian and guitar player Joseph
Spence was from Andros.

Indeed, all of the islands in
the Bahamas archipelago have
contributed to national and
world history.

When I had the privilege of
serving as High Commissioner
to the United Kingdom, I met
many Bahamians from whom
our youth can draw inspiration.
In both Franz Hepburn and Dr
Cleveland Williams, they will
find world class musicians who
are excelling at home and
abroad.

For those young people inter-
ested in history and education,
they will find in Dr Gail Saun-
ders and Dr Keva Bethel, fine
Bahamians who have con-
tributed significantly to our
national development.

From athletics to the arts to
scholarship, Bahamians have
excelled way beyond the mea-
sure of our small country. We
are Golden Girls and Boys and
Men and Women from the
Olympics to the Grammy and
Academy Awards to other world
stages and awards.

Beyond our accomplishments,
there is also an entrepreneurial
spirit that is alive and well, and
becoming more vibrant. I think
of men like Israel Rolle, better
known to most of us as Bone-
fish Foley.

Mr Rolle represents the best
of the Bahamian Imagination.
He realised long ago how to use
the many gifts God has given us
a people. He used his talents to
pursue various careers which
brought him personal fulfillment.

He also used his talents to
care for his family and enrich his
community. In the process, he
taught us how to make use of
the extraordinary natural beau-
ty and beneficence of the
Bahamas. He taught us how to
drop our buckets where we are
and create something new and
wonderful. This is the Bahamian
way.

Graduates: It is this same
entrepreneurial spirit of enter-
prise and excellence that I invite
you to discover and make your
own. God has already provided
the Bahamas with the resources.
And, he has provided you with
the talents.

It is now your task to marry
your talents to those gifts. Think
of the riches we have as a coun-
try. The Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace likes to say that the
Bahamas is not only a country, it
is a region.

It takes a jetliner over two
hours to fly through the airspace
of the Bahamas from north to
south. If you fly over many
islands in the Caribbean it takes
approximately ten to twenty
minutes.

Andros is the fifth largest
island in the Caribbean. Little
Inagua is the largest uninhabited
island in the Caribbean.
Mayaguana is three or four times
bigger than Bermuda. Many of

Archipelago

our islands are bigger than Bar-
bados. Our marine resources are
extensive and extraordinary.

We used to think of such a
large archipelago as a develop-
ment challenge. We now recog-
nise ours as an archipelago of
opportunities. Remember that:
An archipelago of opportunities.

As we continue to celebrate
our nation's past and present
accomplishments, let us also look
to the unfolding dawn and new
horizons.

Graduates: We need your
ideas and energy to embrace
tomorrow's opportunities today.
We need you to help to continue
to diversify our tourism indus-
try in the areas of eco, heritage
and sports tourism. This will
include the ongoing develop-
ment of Bahamian boutique
tourism brands and establish-
ments.

We need you to gain the sci-
entific, technological and other
skills needed to make our coun-
try more environmentally con-
scious and sustainable. In
essence we need the scientists
and technicians who will help us
to harness the wind and the
waves. And, we need the dream-
ers who will help us to harness a
thousand tomorrows and
beyond.

Graduates: Your country also
needs the farmers who will pro-
duce niche agricultural products.
And, we will need competent
well-trained individuals in every
area of national life from teach-
ers to artists to engineers to civ-
ilservants to social and business
entrepreneurs.

The stakes are too high and
the opportunities too extraordi-
nary to waste our time with
bemoaning our troubles as a
country. Self-criticism is good
but self-abuse is destructive of
our national aspirations.

As we celebrate your gradua-
tion from primary to secondary
school and secondary school to
the next chapter in your lives, I
urge you to consider how your
individual goals and intentions
may impact the Bahamas.

In closing, I suggest to you
three life lessons:

e Business acumen without
values quite often leads to a full
bank account, but a bankrupt
spirit. So be business people
guided by values beyond the
mere accumulation of profits.

¢ Academic knowledge and
intelligence without character
typically leads to corruption of
heart and mind. So become peo-
ple of intelligence, guided by
virtues which allow you to apply
your knowledge to the common
good rather than simply person-
al interests.

¢ Power without conscience
leads to despotism of heart and
mind. So become men and
women for others guided by con-
science and compassion.

So even as you prepare for
tomorrow by making yourself
competent in whatever area you
choose to pursue, make sure that
you are also a person of charac-
ter, compassion and citizenship.

And remember that the only
life worth living is the life of ser-
vice to God through service to
God's people.

So, dear graduates, I invite
you as a fellow product of this
wonderful institution to get
ready for a life of adventure and
service. You will have many
challenges along the way.

When you come to the
evening of your life, you will be
able to look back with joy and
pride if you do your best, remain
honest and dedicate yourself to
causes larger than yourselves,
and give a full measure of service
to our beloved Bahamas.

Graduates: Congratulations.
May the Lord who has blessed
Inagua and the Bahamas with
so many riches, bless you tonight
and as you go on your way.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16,



“i





oT 4 nt + —- Ve
a fA =



2010



BBF’s eighth annual Andre Rodgers National Baseball Championship...

a 2.
a i! | a
et i
See eal

oh 1 7 =

a pon iw a

GOLD MEDAL WINNERS in the 16-18 division — Junior Baseball League of Nassau...

‘The greatest spectacie of baseball
| Nave ever seen in the Bahamas’

he Bahamas Baseball Federation’s

eighth annual Andre Rodgers

National Baseball Championship

was played over the Labour Day

holiday weekend in Grand
Bahama and according to all reports, it was a
resounding success.

“It was the greatest spectacle of baseball I
have ever seen in the Bahamas,” said baseball
historian Jeff Williams, who was instrumental in
the formation of the federation.

Here’s a look at the divisional winners:

Coach Pitch - Age 7/8

Gold medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League. Daunte Stuart was named the Most
Valuable Player.

Silver medallist - Legacy Baseball League -
Silver Medal

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau

9-10 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau. Jamal Davis was the MVP.

Silver medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League

Bronze medallist - Grand Bahama Little
League

11-12 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League. MVP - Anthony Villalon.

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Little
League.

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau

13-15 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Freedom Farm Baseball
League. MVP - Alex Martinborough

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Little
League.

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League
of Nassau.

16-18 DIVISION

Gold medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau. MVP - Lynden Pindling III

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Amateur
Baseball Association

Bronze medallist - Bimini Baseball League

25 & Under DIVISION

Gold medallist - Legacy Baseball League.
MVP - Desmond Russell

Silver medallist - Grand Bahama Amateur
Baseball Association

Bronze medallist - Junior Baseball League of
Nassau

Here’s a breakdown on the composition of the
tournament.

Seven (7) Islands - Abaco, Bimini, Eleuthera,
Grand Bahama, Inagua, New Providence and
Spanish Wells - participated.

Ten members - All Abaco Baseball League,
Bimini Baseball League, Eleuthera Baseball
League, Grand Bahama Little League, Grand
Bahama Amateur Baseball League, Legacy
Baseball League, Inagua Baseball Association,
Freedom Farm Baseball League, Junior Baseball
League of Nassau and Spanish Well Baseball
League - were represented.

¢ Asmall version of the Bahamas Games.

¢ Baseball now has a national presence
throughout the Bahamas.

¢ Only BBF members not present were the
Long Island Baseball League, due to the Long
Island Regatta.

¢ Final Count: 680 participants

¢ 38 teams in 6 divisions competed, compris-
ing of the following:

Six teams - Coach pitch division (7/8)

Six teams - 9/10 division

Three teams - 11/12 division

Eight teams - 13-15 division

Seven teams - 16-18 high school division

Four teams - 25 & Under collegiate division

The BBF honoured the following deserving
baseball icons with its Lifetime Achievement
Award:

¢ Randy Rolle - Northern Bahamas (Bimini)

¢ George Weech - Northern Bahamas (Bimi-
ni

Ys Franklyn Rolle - Northern Bahamas -
(Grand Bahama)

¢ Fred "Papa" Smith - (New Providence).

The BBF selection committee chairman Jeff
Francis announced the prestigious High School
& College Award winners:

¢ Most Outstanding High School Player -
Theodore Trae Sweeting of Christ School,
Arden, North Carolina. Local League - Junior
Baseball League of Nassau.

¢ Most Outstanding High School Pitcher -
Leon Cooper Jr. of Sunrise Christian Acade-
my in Wichita, Kansas. Local League: Legacy
Baseball League.

¢ Most Outstanding College Player - Chris
Fox of Florida Tech in Melbourne, Florida.
Local League: Freedom Farm Baseball League.

¢ Most Outstanding College Player - Sean
Albury of Nova Southeastern University in
Davie, Florida. Local League - Freedom Farm
Baseball League.





GOLD MEDAL WINNERS in the Coach Pitch (Age 7/8) division — Freedom Farm Baseball League









Brazil breaks
through NKorean
defence to

win 2-1...
See page 10

a FL ae



$ SUZUKI

We Take any
Trade-Ins!

5-cioor Suzuki Grand Vitara» 2.4-lite fuel injected engine

¢ Keyless remote entry ° Roof Rails
¢ Front dual air bags e 17” Alloy wheels

¢ Power steering, ¢ Steering wheel audio
windows, locks, mirrors

¢ Anti-lock brakes
¢ Driver Select 2x4
¢ Air conditioning
° CD/radio/Aux

¢ Fog Lamps

A Comfortable and Affordable Compact SUV

The new Grand Vitara is fuel efficient, with more passenger room,
greater stability and reliable performance.

$ SUZUKI WAY OF LIFE!

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALITY:

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

On-the-spot financing



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Brazil breaks

through NKorean
defence to win 2-1

<2>7010

Drive one.

FORD EXPLORER XLT

ht True ' Simenican Soon

Shop & Compare

4U0L, Vi with aii iamie ie: Taman, eather interior, 5 or T paaciger
confipuradion, pawer seal wilh parr hark resi, power windews,
locks and mirrors, alley wheels, antemetic headlights, radin, CT
plaver, with oad question, the best vulue in ‘The Hahamas on a large
SUV, without exception, all this plus 5 pears MM mle warranty, 3
years puidside asec, 3 years rus precited, Liceace anil
irapeetinn i births, fall Lenk of an, fier mals firs five services,

you are LOOKING for the best value a
YOU OWE itto yourself to visit our showroom _—=—-——— .

“> 2010 -

Drive one.

Shop d& Compare
















































































Sone Optional
Equipment Shown

Automatic Tramiccen, dC pliegey, 23 Litre Epi, AA, dioted paper,
Daler MUNI), [oad Jin, oA ditions pia aay. fe ard
tide caetain ae bape, all of hie ples 2 per ON ole warranty, J innara
eater avrioece, 7 peer roe pradecien, dineice ed merci to beiielry,
fret rou of’ pars, floor erat, flere flee serrices,

PL RM aha Ly

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD « TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: trienclynehondiheimnal, cor
WEBSITE: tandlynotormhahaire con





GN-1067

MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

THE PRICE CONTROL ACT (1971)
(CHAPTER 339)
THE PRICE CONTROL (GENERAL) (AMENDMENT)
(NO. 12) REGULATIONS, 2010

NOTICE

The public is hereby advised that effective, Wednesday, 16 June,
2010, the Honourable Minister of Labour and Social Development have

ipproved prices for the following breadbasket commodities:

1. Sugar
7? Flour

PERMANENT SECRETARY















GN-1068

MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

THE PRICE CONTROL ACT (1971)
(CHAPTER 339)
THE PRICE CONTROL (GENERAL) (AMENDMENT)
(NO. 13) REGULATIONS, 2010

NOTICE

The public is hereby advised that effective, Wednesday, 16 June,
2010, the Honourable Minister of Labour and Social Development have
approved prices for the following breadbasket commodity:

By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer

JOHANNESBURG (AP)
— Brazil needed almost an
hour to break through the
North Korean defense before
pulling off a 2-1 win Tuesday,
and Didier Drogba and his bro-
ken right arm made their debut
at this year's World Cup in
Ivory Coast's 0-0 draw against
Portugal.

Maicon scored from an
almost impossible angle in the
55th minute and Elano added
the other in the 72nd to give
the five-time champion Brazil-
ians three points in their open-
ing Group G match at Ellis
Park.

But the win didn't come easy,
with the little-known North
Koreans playing almost the
entire team behind the ball to
stifle Brazil's potent attack for
most of the match.

"It is important to start with
a victory and we did it," Maicon
said. "It was a good step toward
our goal of being in the final
on July 11."

Also, Winston Reid headed
in an equalizing goal in injury
time to give New Zealand a 1-1
draw with Slovakia in Group
F.

Brazil struggled to get
through the clogged area in
front of North Korea goal-
keeper Ri Myong Guk, but
Maicon surprised Ri when he
ran down the right side and
kicked the ball toward the near
post just before it was going
out. Ri appeared to be expect-
ing a cross.

Elano later received a
threaded pass from Robinho
and needed only one touch to
shoot the ball past Ri.

"The opener is always hard-
er," Dunga said. "There is the
anxiety, the players are more
nervous than usual, trying to
do too much. But we are satis-
fied."

Ji Yun Nam pulled one back
in the 89th for North Korea,
which last played at the 1966
World Cup and reached the
quarterfinals.

Jong Tae Se played alone in
attack for North Korea and was
able to cause some trouble for
the Brazilian defenders, but the
"People's Rooney" couldn't get
one in the net.

"I thought we fought bravely.
We defended very well," North
Korea coach Kim Jong Hun
said. "I think we gained a lot
of experience and, for the
remaining two games, we have
gained confidence."

Drogba, the African Player
of the Year who broke his arm
during a friendly 11 days ago,
came on as a substitute in the
66th minute but had little
impact on the Group G game in



DIDIER DROGBA (left) greets
Ricardo Carvalho of Portugal at
the end of the World Cup group G
match which ended in a scoreless
draw.

(AP Photo)

Port Elizabeth.

Portugal captain Cristiano
Ronaldo hit the post early, but
Ivory Coast otherwise created
the chances in the rainy match.

"We created some more
chances than they did,” Ivory
Coast coach Sven-Goran Eriks-
son said. "If you think about
discipline and organisation, I
think we were organised for all
90 minutes."

Drogba played with a special
protective cast, approved by
FIFA, on his arm. But still he
was on the bench at the start.

"I spoke to him after training
yesterday evening and he said
he preferred to be on the
bench," Eriksson said. "He said
‘Boss, if you need me, I am
there.’ I hoped we would not
need him but we wanted to win
the game so we did what we
did.

"We did not put any pres-
sure on him.”

Reid scored in Rustenburg
from a cross by Shane Smeltz,
giving New Zealand its first
point at a World Cup after los-
ing all its games in its debut in
1982.

"It probably was the most
important goal of my life,” Reid
said. “I didn't see the ball until
late. I knew that if I got it on
target and didn't hit it too hard,
I could just guide it in.”

Robert Vittek had given Slo-
vakia the lead in the 50th
minute, heading in a cross from
Stanislav Sestak after Reid let
him move free.

Outside the World Cup sta-
diums, a strike over pay by the
security stewards spread to half
the tournament's 10 venues,
forcing police to step in and
assume their duties.

Several hundred guards
walked off the job at Soccer
City, the main World Cup sta-
dium in Johannesburg. There
was no match there Tuesday.

Police said they also have
taken over security at stadiums
in Durban, Cape Town and
Port Elizabeth.

NOopurlarse
ELM eli w els
TM RTC
yy eta ti
CUSTOM
Mela

Come see us at the
8th Annual Sunshine Auto & Ruff Ryders Show & Fair
at the Town Centre Mall - Saturday June 19th, 12pm - 9pm
or visit us at the
Mall at Marathon’s Father’s Day promotion featuring
“Daddy’s Toys” - Saturday June 19th, 10am - 9pm

TOP QUALITY
ee a=

WIDE RANGE OF
RIMS 17” - 28”

bed ={o7 \fe) so) ts

LOW PROFILE
TIRES

PAS
INSPECTION

SEWER ecm On LLIN

aa

| 10% OFF RIMS | fe
=

Poot

rt v4

—,

= -
atl
Nassau’s first complete rim rn

Tel: 326-1900 / 326-1901

www.customwheelsbahamas.com
Corner of Christie & Dowdeswell Streets

ahd

l. Mayonnaise Ee y _—
SERVICE

WIDE RANGE OF

PERMANENT SECRETARY ACCESSORIES









TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

mal anti-human trafficking law
enforcement efforts.”

However, the report com-
mended the Bahamas on being
“proactive” and “cooperative”
in its stance on the issue. Sever-
al colleagues of Bahamian social
workers and government offi-
cials have been trained in
counter-trafficking strategies,
based on International Organi-
zation for Migration (IOM) stan-
dards.

In the Bahamas, there may be
people who are victims of traf-
ficking, who do not even know,
according to an IOM trained
social worker. She said certain
practices that are normalized in
society are borderline traffick-
ing, and might be classifiable as
such with further investigation.

She spoke about the practice
of Bahamians hiring foreign
housekeepers, such as Jamaican
women. She said these workers
are sometimes brought to the
Bahamas on false premises and
forced to work in abusive condi-
tions.

According to IOM standards,
which are recognized by the

COB union

FROM page one

Minister

Bahamian government, a work-
er who is recruited from another
country, who may be in a posi-
tion of vulnerability, under false
conditions, and then exploited
for forced labour could be a vic-
tim of human trafficking. This
could apply to a housekeeper, a
sex worker, or a child labourer.
Mr Turnquest said he “‘reject-
ed the initial premise about (the
problem of) human trafficking”
in the Bahamas, because “most
of the persons who come to the
Bahamas come of their own free
will. There may be some
instances in which people are
sold the flawed bill of goods,
where someone may have mis-
represented something.”
However, according to the
IOM, “the consent of a victim”
of human trafficking to partici-
pate in the intended exploita-
tion is “irrelevant”, if the three
basic conditions of trafficking
are Satisfied, which are (for
adults) mobilization by way of
“recruitment, transportation,
transfer, habouring or receipt of
persons” by means of “threat,
force, coercion, abduction, fraud

or deception”, for the
purpose of exploita-
tion to the benefit of
the trafficker. An indi-
vidual who is traf-
ficked is a “victim of
a crime”; they are not
criminals.

An individual can
enter the country |
legally and possess
legal work papers, but



4

is a “crime against the
state”, and both the
person being smuggled
and the smuggler can
be found guilty of a
crime. According to
the IOM training man-
ual, illegal entry into a
country is a condition
of human smuggling,
sometimes using false
or stolen documents,

.

their identification JRQNIMM@IURIN@USSR to perform a voluntary

documents may be
seized and their movement
restricted or controlled, which is
the case with some housekeep-
ers, according to the social work-
er.

“With international traffick-
ing, victims may be mistaken for
irregular migrants, put in deten-
tion facilities and deported with-
out being properly identified.
Trafficked persons are likely to
have immediate and acute phys-
ical, sexual, and psychological
health needs that are not nor-
mally present in cases involving
smuggled or other irregular
migrants,” said a participant in a
local counter-trafficking work-
shop, of notes taken during a
session.

In contrast, human smuggling

FROM page one

"flurry of actions" by the "inner circle" of the College :

Council.

The Union of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas noted
that the practice of not including the faculty union in the :
decision-making processes at the institution was typical of :
the college council.Even though the president of the facul-
ty union sits on the College Council, UTEB President Jen- :
nifer Isaacs-Dotson said the union was never consulted on :
the decision to appoint Dr Earla Carey-Baines as the new :
COB president. The union said this was further evidence of :
the "lack of transparency and accountability that plagues :

this institution."

The 2001 College Act mandates that —in the absence of
a president — the executive vice president is to assume the :

post as an interim president.

Referring to the insistence by college officials to have Dr :
Carey-Baines referred to as "president" instead of interim :
or acting president, the union said the council was "skirting :
and reinterpreting” the legislation. :

Former Executive Vice President Dr Rhonda Chipman- :
Johnson has been tightlipped about her sudden retirement :
from the institution after 31 years. :

However, sources close to her said she was "near tears" :
after learning Dr Earla Carey-Baines, formerly the Dean of
Liberal and Fine Arts, would be appointed the new COB :
president. In a press statement yesterday, the union said: :
"The approach taken by the inner Council in the ‘installa- :
tion’ of a President — whether interim, acting, or permanent :
— again, appears to be an underhanded one, as even the Col- :
lege’s own accounting of Dr. Chipman Johnson’s record of:
service to the College indicates that she was deserving of :
more honourable treatment than the one she was given }

last week."

The union maintained the council has deeply injured con-_ :
fidence of faculty, staff and students that it can operate :
autonomous of political influence, highlighting the col- :
lege's release indicating Dr Chipman-Johnson had accept- :
ed a Government post — which was later found out to be :

Cause of death

untrue.

FROM page one

cle (SUV).



service for pay, or to
facilitate the movement of an
individual into another territory.

Mr Turnquest said if local
social workers had information
to suggest it was an area being
neglected by authorities, they
should activate the relevant pro-
tocols to have it addressed. He
encouraged them to file official
reports with the relevant min-
istries and government agencies
if they had evidence to shed light
on the situation

“Tf there are person (who are
victims of human-trafficking) I
would urge them to come for-
ward to the relevant authorities
and I can ensure them that their
cases will be dealt with fairly,
humanely and expeditiously,”
said Mr Turnquest.

-Onlookers catch robber

before Magistrate Ancella Evans-Williams on Monday.

He was caught by three men who gave chase after the teenager robbed
Mr. Peter McP Christie, president of HG Christie Ltd, of an envelope
near the Nassau Library on Bank Land Friday afternoon.

Mr Christie, who was with his wife Rosemary at the time, fell as he tried
to chase the robber.

“T automatically ran after them but I tripped and fell on the concrete and
got a black eye and lots of other scrapes and bruises,” Mr Christie said.

“But that fall could have been worse.”

As Mr Christie hit the ground, and his assailant ran up the hill towards the
Post Office, witnesses gave chase to ensure the robber did not get away.

Earl Mortimer, 43, was sitting near the library when he heard a woman
cry out that the man who had just run past him had robbed a “guest” and he
gave chase.

As he broke off running a man riding in the back of a pick-up truck asked
what had happened and jumped out to help when he explained the man he
was chasing had robbed a tourist.

As they ran up the hill towards the Post Office a third man joined the pair,
and the three strangers pursued the robber to the Post Office parking lot in
East Street where they found him hiding underneath a Sports Utility Vehi-

Mr Mortimer said they forced him out and took the envelope he had
stolen containing a stack of $100 bills.

They dragged him by his shirt and trousers down the hill to the Central
Police Station where he was booked by duty officers.

Mr Mortimer said: “I thought he was a tourist so I just broke off running,
but he could have been anyone.

“When I came back I saw him bleeding, and I told him and his wife, you
don’t worry about nothing, all you have to do is come by the police station
and get your property.”

Police insisted that Mr Christie was taken to hospital by ambulance

: Where he was given a head scan and x-rays to check for internal injuries. He

not reveal further details of the investigation as

it continues.

Supt Bethel said: “We have the autopsy
results, we know the cause of death but we are
not disclosing that, except to say that we do not

suspect foul play at this time.

“Tt would be inappropriate for us to do that
at this time while we are still looking into the

matter.”

Mr Bethel declined to comment on allega-
tions Mr Tutt had been a cocaine user stating
police were “not going to discuss the finer

details of the investigation.”

“We are still talking to people who we want-

NEW:

ed to talk to when we got the initial report.
“We still have to complete our work,” he
said. Tribune reader Bellamy Hoffman denied
Mr Tutt was a cocaine user, stating: “Wallace
Tutt was an amazing person who did not use

cocaine.”

An Innovative Product
from an
Innovative Company!

Storm Frame Windows Ltd. 74 Mount Royal Ave. * T 242.325.66
es ee a |

en ee



The interior designer born in Meridian,
Mississippi, is best known for transforming the
Miami mansion of the late Italian designer
Gianni Versace into a South Beach icon.

He also designed homes for Cher and had
celebrity friends, including Jack Nicholson and
model Elle McPherson.

own

was relieved to find he had not suffered any serious injuries.

Mr Christie, who was back at work yesterday, now intends to contact the
three good Samaritans and thank them for their efforts.

“Tt was a real citizen’s arrest, and they did a great job,” he said.

“T’m going to call them because I think they deserve a pat on the back.”

Mr Tutt moved to a private retreat near
Harbour Island in 2002, where he transformed

an old home into a nine-room luxury hotel.

Rock House staff declined to speak to
reporters, but said the hotel would be closed for
a week. North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith,
Speaker of the House of Assembly, said he
was shocked by Mr Tutt’s death because he

“seemed to be young and energetic.”

Mr Tutt is said to have recently published a
photographic tribute to Harbour Island with
Cookie Kinkhead and to have provided extra-
ordinary support to children in Harbour Island
on his memorial website.

Memorial services are being planned for

Harbour Island, Miami and Alabama.

RM FRAME

a |



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

_ Deputy Prime Minister

FROM page one

maids to work in private homes. What’s the difference between
them? Why are we prepared to do one and not the other?” asked
the Minister and MP for St Anne’s.

Under Bahamian immigration law, a foreign person can get a
work permit from the Department of Immigration to fill a job in
the Bahamas if no suitably qualified Bahamian can be found to do
the job. In some cases, this may mean those who apply for the job
are not necessarily holding the skills or qualifications the position
demands, and in others, foreigners are able to gain legal autho-
risation to work in The Bahamas when no Bahamians actually
apply for certain jobs when they are advertised.

He suggested that not only does the level of foreigners
employed to do these jobs in The Bahamas mean some Bahami-
ans remain unemployed while jobs exist that they could do, but
“you have to ask the question what other burdens do (immi-
grants) put on the system.”

Meanwhile, Mr Symonette said there has been a “gradually
growing” number of cases of suspected sham marriages between
Bahamians and foreigners seeking “papers” in The Bahamas — pri-
marily Haitians and Jamaicans.

“A number of persons of non-Bahamian citizenship come to
the Bahamas, overstay their welcome, when caught get deported
and coincidentally marry a Bahamian the next day in a country
south of us then come back as the spouse of a Bahamian. The cas-
es are far too common to be real. And that’s an issue we all have
to face. There are a number of marriages that we question,” said
Mr Symonette.

He said that where the Immigration Department suspects
that a marriage is one of “convenience”, lacking authenticity, it has
denied the right to the usual work and residency related benefits
that extend to the spouses of Bahamians and some fraudulent cas-
es have been prosecuted. However, he added that the situation is
a tricky one as the government must extend these benefits to the
spouses of Bahamians or else face the likelihood that Bahamians
who go abroad and marry will not return home. Referring to
the employment of foreigners, mainly Haitians and Jamaicans, in
relatively unskilled jobs such as housekeeping and gardening —
thousands of permits are approved each year for foreigners to
work in posts like these when Bahamians cannot be found to do
the work — and the fact that there is “on a daily basis a demand
for skilled labour at the Department of Labour.” Mr Symonette
said the Bahamas needs to “start looking at the whole immigra-
tion policy in this country.”



UTILITIES EEGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

| aa



al







ap



Xf ae
al Ve AY F

7 | ~
re Be

* a a F

oi]

PUBLIC HEARING for the
URCA ANNUAL REPORT & PLAN

June 23, 2010

Time: 6-8 pm
VT st Me A= COS am he
Resort Convention Centre

{o[0ms=10 (018

All interested parties are
welcome to attend.
TO CONFIRM YOUR
ATTENDANCE PLEASE

email info@urcabahamas.bs.














THE TRIBUNE

US

ine

WEDNESDAY, JUNE





Iso hee S| 8)

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net







Kerzner: ‘Zero impact’
from debt restructure

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



erzner International last

night said the appoint-

ment of a private equity

firm to advise it on the

restructuring of its multi-
billion dollar debt would have “zero
impact” on its Paradise Island opera-
tions.

Ed Fields, Kerzner International
(Bahamas) spokesman, in response to
Tribune Business’s inquiries, confirmed
what the company had thus far not done,
namely that it had hired the Blackstone
Group to advise it on restructuring the
debt burden taken on when Sol Kerzner
and his fellow private equity investors
bought the company in 2006, taking it
private and removing it from the New
York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

“They were simply retained to advise
us on the restructuring of our debt in
2011,” Mr Fields told Tribune Business of
Blackstone Group. “It has no impact on
anything else. It has zero impact on any-
thing else.”

The latter statements were in response
to this newspaper’s inquiries about
whether the impending debt restructuring
would impact daily operations at Kerzn-
er International’s Paradise Island prop-
erties, which include Atlantis, the One &
Only Ocean Club, Marina Village, Har-
borside and Ocean Club Residences, and
the planned $100 million renovation and

Atlantis and One & Only Ocean Club owner
confirms private equity firm hired to advise
on restructure of $3.2bn buyout debt

expansion at the former that is planned to
take place over the next two years.

Reports about the Blackstone appoint-
ment and debt restructuring first sur-
faced in the Financial Times last week via
Debtwire, which said the collateralised
mortgage-backed securities issued as part
of the buyout’s $3.2 billion financing were
set to mature this September.

The article said it was likely that
investors would agree to a one-year
rollover of these debts, but alleged that
Mr Kerzner and his investor partners
were “between a rock and a hard place”
when it came to refinancing options.

This was because the London Inter-
Bank Offering Rate (LIBOR), which the
price/cost of foreign currency borrow-
ings is linked to, was set to rise, while
Kerzner International’s business levels,
the article claimed, would be unable to
support refinancing through fixed-inter-
est rate borrowings.

While the Atlantis owner was still in
compliance with the banking covenants
set by the buyout’s financing, the FT arti-
cle said its operating income fell by 15 per
cent in 2009, falling from $206 million to

$171 million. Net cash flow dropped by
$30 million between 2008 and 2009, with
occupancy dropping from 70 per cent to
61 per cent.

Debt service coverage, though, was
healthy, due to reduced operating
expenses and debt, plus lower borrowing
costs.

Research by Tribune Business showed
that the lion’s share of the $2.8 billion
financing was secured on Kerzner Inter-
national’s Paradise Island assets, includ-
ing Atlantis, the One & Only Ocean
Club, Harborside and the 62 acres ear-
marked for a future Phase IV expansion.

Kerzner International recently said it
would start recruiting in the “next nine to
12 months" for the 400 permanent jobs it
is planning to create at its Paradise Island
resorts, with its $100 million worth of
upgrades set to include a casino revamp
and 12,000 square foot 'Teens Club’.

George Markantonis, Kerzner Inter-
national (Bahamas) managing director,
said the majority of the 400 posts would
be created in the food and beverage sec-

SEE page 3B





ROYAL FIDELITY

Uae aL §

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company



NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Island festivals
‘must operate
as a business’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ISLAND
festivals and
regattas must
become more
business like,
generating
their own prof-
its to sustain |
growth and
innovation,
Bahamas Fer-
ries’ chief mar-
keting officer told Tribune
Business yesterday. He said
they needed to produce pro-
fessional event plans to add
more value and entertainment.

Khaalis Rolle said island fes-
tival committees often look to
the private sector for donations
in order to develop their events,
whether they be homecomings,
regattas or food-centred festi-
vals.

However, Mr Rolle lamented
the fact that many of the plan-
ners of these festivals are slight-
ed when companies like his
don’t write them “big cheques”,
but choose to contribute to the
development of the festival

RoyalFidelity wins $65m ‘Summer end’ for triple play

port financing contract

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust has won the contract
to act as placement agent/financial adviser for the $65 million
Arawak Cay port’s initial capital raising, Tribune Business can
reveal, having been informed of developments by capital mar-
kets sources.

Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity’s president, declined to com-
ment when contacted by Tribune Business yesterday, although
well-placed capital markets sources confirmed that the invest-
ment bank - owned 50/50 by Fidelity International Bank & Trust
and Royal Bank of Canada - had seen off competition from the
usual suspects, including CFAL, Providence Advisors and RC
Capital Markets.

It is unclear when any capital raising will take place, although the
Government and 19 private shareholders that form Arawak Port

Development Ltd (APD) have
already injected enough equity, SEE page 4B

Board ‘probably top
challenge’ for insurers

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN company
seeking to launch a ‘multiple
play’ bundle of communications
services via the Internet last
night said the first phase of its
core network infrastructure
build-out should be completed
by end-summer 2010, having
invested “in the millions of dol-
lars” in the project to date.

Edison Sumner, IP Solutions
International's president and
chief executive, told Tribune
Business that the company
planned to start recruiting its

own staff by the same deadline,
having “already identified the
senior management” it planned
to recruit.

IP Solutions, which was
forced to alter its plans after
failing to raise the targeted $16
million from Bahamian
investors, is currently focused
on completing core network
infrastructure on Abaco and
Guana Cay, the latter location
being where is plans to provide
services to real estate owners
at the Baker’s Bay Golf &
Ocean Club project.

Mr Sumner said IP Solutions
was still talking to “prospec-

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Board of Directors
make-up will be “probably the
biggest challenge” for most car-
riers and companies in the
Bahamian insurance industry
when it comes to complying
with the new Act’s regulations,
a leading executive said yester-
day.

Tom Duff, Insurance Com-
pany of the Bahamas (ICB)
general manager, said all the
sector’s companies were
already in shape to fully comply
with the Domestic Insurance
Act and its regulations when
they come into force on July 1,
2010, with no major effects
expected in areas such as

‘Economic climate’ rethink
hope for $600m LNG project

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE proponents of a multi-
million dollar liquefied natural
gas (LNG) terminal and
pipeline on Grand Bahama
have applied to US regulators
for an extension of time to com-
plete their project, hoping the
“current depressed economic
climate” might prompt the
Bahamian government to look
more favourably on the projec-
t’s potential revenue and
growth possibilities.

Suez Energy North Ameri-
ca (the former Tracetbel), in a
May 24, 2010, letter to the Fed-
eral Energy Regulatory Com-

SEE page 6B

accounting and insolvency
issues.

“Probably the biggest chal-
lenge for us, and this will be for
most companies, is the regula-
tions concerning the composi-
tion of the Board of Directors,”
Mr Duff said. “There is going
to be a requirement that a cer-
tain percentage of the Board
becomes independent.”

In ICB’s case, that meant a
majority of directors can no
longer be associated with J. S.
Johnson, the BISX-listed agent
and broker it receives the
majority of its business from,
and which holds a 40 per cent
stake in the general insurance
carrier.

SEE page 4B

* Suez executive hopes
approval hold-up ‘could
change as the country’s
leaders consider
economic growth
opportunities like an
LNG project during
the current depressed
economic climates’

* Suggests government
resolving ‘ownership
and regulatory issues’
with Grand Bahama
Port Authority

Money at Work

provider’s 1st phase build

tive” strategic partners, and was
in “advanced discussions” with
several as it moved forward on
the execution of its business
plans.

“Our major focus has been
on developing the core infra-
structure, the core network in
Abaco,” Mr Sumner told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re very
advanced in its installation. We
are currently going through the
testing phase, which will last us
for a couple of weeks as we iron
out any kinks in the system.

“Abaco is where we intend

SEE page 2B



through advertising and facili-
tating transportation.

He added that his company
spends $8,000 to $10,000 on
advertising per event, which
includes rotation for the festi-
vals the company services.

The amount of money the
service providers spend on
advertising these events often
releases the committee from
duplicating these efforts, which
is money they save on the mar-
keting front.

“In terms of the stress on the
organisation and outlay, it is
usually one of the most expen-
sive operation periods,” Mr
Rolle said of Andros’ Crabfest.

According to him, 5,000 to
7,000 people visited the
Crabfest, many of them using
the services of ferries and cargo
vessels as their primary trans-
portation.

Mr Rolle said his vessels
were fully booked last week-
end for the Andros festival, as
well as cargo vessels like the
Lady Roselyn, Island Link,
Legend, Lady Katrina and
Eastwind. And flights leaving
the domestic terminal at the

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

Sure you'll marry a millionaire!
Now what's Plan B?

We can get you there. Royal Fidelity.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
St. Michael:

246.435.1955


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



SS =<
Experts detail

eye) (Or WERK IU Cen




HIGGS & JOHNSON host-
ed its annual client seminar on
May 12 under the theme A
New Decade: The Evolving
Legal Landscape. It was
opened by the minister of the
environment, Earl Deveaux,
who commented on the illegal
excavation of land in the
Bahamas and the ongoing
struggles the Ministry of the
Environment is trying to over-
come.

The first session, The Plan-
ning & Subdivision Act: 2010:
What is the Plan, was presented
by Lyford Cay-based associate,
Adrian R. White. He discussed
the objects and purposes of the
plan, the various implications
of enforcing the plan and an
outline of what will be taken
into consideration during the
application process.

Higgs & Johnson partner
Vann P. Gaitor, and registered
associate Portia J. Nicholson,
of the Ocean Centre office,
detailed the advantages of the
new Arbitration Act and the
various avenues available for
persons seeking to resolve liti-
gation matters without the



MINISTER Earl Deveaux delivers
opening remarks...

necessity of a court battle.

Visiting associates from the
Higgs & Johnson Cayman
office, Benjamin Wrench and
Carolynn Vivian, spoke on the
challenges facing the funds
industry and the Cayman
islands, as a premier jurisdic-
tion for investment funds, and
discussed the advantages of
establishing funds there and
listing them on the local stock
exchange.







PARTNERS pose with faculty and students from the College of the Bahamas Law programme, and the Eugene Dupuch Law School...

Highlighting the fact that the
Bahamas was removed from
the OECD grey list while pro-
viding additional information
on the Tax Information
Exchange Treaties (TIEAs),
associates of the Ocean Cen-
tre office, Nadia J. Taylor and
Samantha Knowles-Pratt,
expanded on the topic Time to
Talk TIEAs — What you Need
to Know.

The seminar concluded with
an 'Ask the Experts’ segment
that gave attendees the oppor-
tunity to ask questions with
regards to litigation matters,
real estate concerns, trusts and



PARTNERS Earl Cash and Surinder Deal with Justice Jeanne Thompson

(retired)...

other private client issues, com-
mercial transactions and secu-
rities. The expert panel includ-
ed Justice Jeanne Thompson
(retired). along with the firm's
partners, Philip C. Dunkley
QC, Dr Earl A. Cash, Surinder
Deal, Sterling Cooke and
Christel Sands-Feaste.

In its ongoing effort to pro-
mote education in the
Bahamas, Higgs & Johnson
invited faculty and students of
both the College of The
Bahamas Law Degree program
and the Eugene Dupuch Law
School to attend the seminar, at
no cost.



‘Summer end’ for triple play provider’s 1st phase build

FROM page 1B

to begin. We always intended to
begin services from the north-
ern Bahamas, and then move
south and go west from there.”
Mr Sumner told Tribune
Business that IP Solutions was
“in the millions of dollars in
investment” in its system infra-
structure to date, adding: “Sig-
nificant capital has gone into
the development, and more
capital is being put into it.
“We have invested a signifi-
cant amount of money in the
system in place to date. There is
a significant amount of money
to come, as we invest in the
most robust and advanced
Internet Protocol system in this
country and across the region.”
While IP Solutions was still
outsourcing all its work to third

parties, such as Nassau-based
financial services provider, the
Montaque Group, Mr Sumner
confirmed: “We expect to begin
the process of getting staff in
by the end of summer.. We’ve
already identified the senior
management.

Working

“We’re working through the
summer, and by the end of the
summer expect to have this
phase of the development com-
pleted.”

He added that IP Solutions
was still eyeing expansion into
the Caribbean and Latin Amer-
ican region in the long-term,
describing it as “a major part
of our development”.

“That’s a key part of the

business plan, and we still have
plans now in this regard when
time permits and the schedule
allows,” Mr Sumner said. “We
are pretty much on schedule
with what we intend to do,
moving very deliberately. Latin
American, Caribbean expan-
sion is part of our business
development.”

IP Solutions International
was initially targeting business-
es such as hotels, plus gated
communities, as a customer
base for a variety of services it
will transmit down just one
Internet line, hence the 'Multi-
ple Play' description. The ser-
vices will include Internet, TV
via Internet Protocol, video-on-
demand (VOD) games, and
Voice over Internet Protocol
(VoIP) phone services.

“Reporting for The Tribune is a

responsibility and pi ivilege. We

respect and honour the people's

right to know everyday. I'm

proud to be a part of the leacking

print medium in The Bahamas.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

CHIEF REPORTER

RUPERT MISSICH, JR.
THE TRIBUNE



Island festivals ‘must operate as a business’

FROM page 1B

Lynden Pindling International Airport left with-
out available seats.

“People travel because we create the excite-
ment surrounding the event,” said Mr Rolle. “It
is almost a 24-hour operation for us outside of the
normal operating period. Certain things come
into play and the expenses associated with it.”

He suggested entities associated with the plan-
ning of many of the islands’ festivals, like the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, host an event
planning seminar for those islands’ event com-
mittees.

Mr Rolle said that in order to create a value-
added experience for the Bahamian public who
frequent these events, these committees have to
approach festivals as a business and force profits
out of each event in order to grow them and
make them much better in the future.

“They need to start approaching this as a busi-
ness,” he said. “I will recommend to tourism and
culture that they host an event-planning seminar
and they teach or help all these regatta and home-
coming committees to construct a business.

Organise this like a business, that is the model
that is needed.

“They complain that government reduced sup-
port, so they come to the private sector for more
money, but it doesn't work that way. We bring
the people, you get the money out of them.
Organise yourself a revenue streams committee,
then come to me and say sell a package for me.”

Mr Rolle said his business incurs very high
costs for events such as Crabfest, which requires
such massive people-moving support.

He said that with the declines in sea travel to
many events, Crabfest has become the game
changer for many maritime businesses. He called
it a period of economic boost.

According to him, Bahamas Ferries is willing to
co-sponsor a seminar to help festival commit-
tees develop their product into something sus-
tainable and expandable, as many festivals have
shrunk in past years.

“We want to see them become more value
added and a lot more popular,” said Mr Rolle.
“My organisation is willing to co-lead that process
with committee chairpersons.”

Purchase any Whirlpool washer or dryer and get a
1 month supply of Gain or Gain Fabric Softener FREE!
Plus a chance to win a year's supply of both!

Onen Manday thru Saturday, §

Walterely Siem eleteemese ria lety

cae eee A

ae ae payee |
airs TEL: a.
ae oe er

Datum aherti ia ead alelelalelei peal eL



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 3B



‘Frustration’ lingers
at Customs process

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

CHANGES to some of the
Customs Department’s process-
es still have freight forwarders
and brokerage firms “frustrat-
ed”, a consultant for Expert
Customs Brokers in Grand
Bahama said yesterday, while
the department moves fever-
ishly to make reforms and digi-
tise for greater efficiency.

Forrester Carroll said there
are still hang-ups in Customs
as a result of theGovernment
implementing the shift system
for its employees, lack of staff
and the removal of the 10-day
bond system.

City Markets

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY Markets’ chief execu-
tive yesterday denied grocery
industry rumours that the



TT a,
iit PEL

According to Mr Carroll,
individuals in the business of
freight forwarding often have
challenges with collecting ship-
ments during the day in Grand
Bahama, as the Customs office
is short-staffed and often found
unattended at periods during
the day.

“It’s a waste of time to do
the shift system here,” he said.
“They have never had enough
officers for a shift system.”

Aside from short staff woes,
Mr Carroll said the amount of
paperwork and the superfluous
entry processes at the Customs
department serve to frustrate
the business of collecting ship-
ments, and often holds up ship-
ments longer than usual.

struggling supermarket chain
was planning to sub-lease its
East-West Highway corporate
offices and relocate to new
headquarters on Village Road.

“Not at this time,” was the

tt ee ye see

i



inal
{ABLE BAHAMAS

MIARAE LUN

od

He added that the end to the
10-day bond system was detri-
mental to large shipments,
which in his experience can get
held for up to two weeks as
stacks of paperwork is sifted on
the side of both the freight for-
warder and the Customs
Department.

“It takes one of my girls a
week to prepare the entries (for
customs),” he said. “For the
21st century is that a way to do
business?”

The Customs Department is
working towards bringing all of
its forms to the Internet so they
can be filled out and submitted
electronically in order to speed
up processing and allow for a
quicker release of bonded

denies corporate HQ move

response of Derek Winford to
Tribune Business’s inquiries,
adding: “I don’t know where
that came from.”

Sources had suggested that
City Markets was planning the
relocation as part of its contin-
uing cost-cutting efforts. Mr
Winford had previously told
Tribune Business that the com-
pany was targeting increased
efficiencies at its head office
and warehouse.

The chief executive, though,
was more coy when asked
whether chief financial officer
and company secretary, Evan-
geline Rahming, was leaving
City Markets - a departure sub-
sequently confirmed by other
Tribune Business sources.

There is nothing to suggest
that Ms Rahming has done
anything wrong, or that it is a
forced departure.

When asked about the situa-
tion, Mr Winford replied: “If
that is so, we have to make a
statement about that.

“We'll have a prepared state-
ment for you about what is
going on.”

A leading communications company has the requirement for a
Marketing & Sales Executive to lead these functions. This person will
be required to create an integrated strategy and realistic business
plans for all customer market seqments, products, pricing and sales
programs. Timely implementation of the plans is essential as the
objectives of new service launches, revenue and profitability are

demanding.

goods.

Mr Carroll agreed that digi-
tizing the Customs process
could be helpful to persons in
his business, as he currently
uses a system that does just
that. According to him, he has
asked the Customs Department
to look at his system to judge its
compatibility against their
future system, but has not had a
reply as yet.

“Any improved system
should improve their system,”
he said. “I have a system here
that we bought that does every-
thing for you - we could tie in
with that same system. But the
automated thing should
improve the system.”

Kerzner: ‘Zero
impact’ from debt
restructure

FROM page 1B

tor. He emphasised that the
planned expansion/renovation
was not the Hurricane Hole
redevelopment, and nor was it
Phase IV, both of which are still
sitting on the shelf.

Mr Markantonis said the
upgrades were designed to
"refresh" the Atlantis and One
& Only Ocean Club products,
ensuring they never became
stale but continued to stimu-
late excitement and market
demand among both new and
returning customers.

"The expansion is going to
take place over the next two
years. It's not Phase IV and is
not the Hurricane Hole devel-
opment. The reality is we have
to keep refreshing the product.
There are certain facilities we
can do more with and refresh
for returning customers," Mr
Markantonis said.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY

wees

2 STOREY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

ALBURY LANE OFF SHIRLEY STREET
Lats of parking. Serious inquiries.

WEST BAY
? houses for rent, gated community.
3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, pool, 2 minutes from beach,
generator and hurricane shutters.

Telephone: 557-5908

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Concierge for Office Building
Candidate must have excellent
customer service skills, and be
computer literate. Must have
experience in a customer service
related role. Candidate should

be well groomed, mature and
self-motivated.

Security Officer for
Office Building
Candidate must be mature, have a
minimum of two years experience,
possess a clean Police record, and
have excellent verbal and written
communication skills. Candidate
must be willing to work weekends
and extended hours and have own

transportation.

Interested applicants should
respond by sending their resume to:
DA# 87768, c/o

The Tribune,

P.O. Box N-.3027,

Nassau, Bahamas



RPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Senior Manager, Accounts in the Finance

Division.

The Senior Manager - Accounts oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget &
Management Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective

delivery of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Compilation of the corporate budget;

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets;
Preparation of monthly management statements;

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation;
Preparation of performance reports for division ,department and sections;
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables

(capital contributions, rechargeable);

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices;
Liaison with internal and external audits;

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial Officer for the Board of Directors;

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required;
Preparation of the business plan for the department;

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department;

This person will be results focused and have proven achievements
including protecting existing revenues and growing new ones ina

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims;
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management;

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment;

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form
employee’s salaries;

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable;
Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts;

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle
repayments;

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule;

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans;

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to
ensure adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors;
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors;

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and
External Auditors;

Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline.

Conducting performance appraisals; and

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff,
manage and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations.

communications company; training and organizing a multi-channel
sales and marketing team to deliver results on time and to budget;
innovation in services marketing, product quality and customer
value; and demonstrating that the marketing concept works at all

levels.

This appointment require a Masters degree qualification, plus a

minimum of 10 years’ experience in the international telecoms

industry including executive level decision making and awareness of
regulatory aspects, Experience of working In an overseas

environment with empathy to develop skills and local management Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting
ACCA/CPA or equivalent qualifications;

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a
similar management position;

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices;

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications;

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing
systems;

Ability to analyze financial reports;

Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial
software and the system of internal control;

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability;

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; and
Good time management skills.

succession is also a requirement. This person will also have
extensive knowledge of the intemational communications market
and global expertise of other multi national communications

companies.

Resumes to be sent electronically to
rbadderley@cablebahamas.com to arrive by Tuesday, June 22, 2010.

Interested persons should apply by completing and_ returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

Friday, June 25, 2010.

cated
ABLE Bananas
Per eel Pie m |

Cable Bahamas (Ltd. Massau Baha
Robinson Ad, at Marathon



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

ee
VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED
The Anglican Central Education Authority

THE TRIBUNE

Fed adopts rules China and other
to protect credit



invites applications from qualified Bahamians
for the position of VICE PRINCIPAL of
St. John’s College High School beginning
September 2010.

TheApplicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5
years accumulative experience. The applicant
must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and
include:

responsibilities

- Assisting with staff supervision and
evaluation

- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)

- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic
programmes

- Assisting with Curriculum Development

- Administration of School and External
examinations

- Oversee Inventory

- Oversee Requisitions

- Share responsibility for sustaining culture
of excellence throughout the school

- Share responsibility for providing a
climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from
the Anglican Diocese office on Sands
Road off East Street. The completed
application together with a cover letter,
statement of educational philosophy and
a recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION Authority
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, June 25th, 2010.



card customers

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Federal Reserve adopted
new rules Tuesday aimed at
protecting credit card cus-
tomers from getting socked by
lofty late payment charges and
other penalty fees.

The rules respond to public
and congressional outrage over
practices by credit card compa-
nies. They bar credit card com-
panies from charging a penalty
fee of more than $25 for paying

a bill late. They prohibit credit
card companies from charging
penalty fees that are higher
than the dollar amount associ-
ated with the customer's viola-
tion. They also ban so-called
"inactivity" fees when cus-
tomers don't use the account
to make new purchases and
they prevent multiple penalty
fees on a single late payment.

The rules take effect on
August 22.



countries buy US
Treasury debt

WASHINGTON (AP) — China boosted its holdings of US
Treasury debt in April for the second straight month as total
foreign holdings of US government debt increased.

China's holdings of US Treasury securities rose by $5 bil-
lion to $900.2 billion in April, the Treasury Department said
Tuesday. Total foreign holdings rose by $72.8 billion to $3.96
trillion. The sizable gains are being driven by fears that
Greece and other European governments could default on
their debt. Worries over possible defaults have sparked a
flight to safety and that has benefited US Treasury securities.
Treasurys are considered the world's safest investment —
the US government has never defaulted on its debt.





RoyalFidelity wins $65m port financing contract

FROM page 1B

as the development’s two initial share-
holders, to get construction work started
and cover costs for several months.

Tribune Business reported earlier this
month that the Government had allocated
$16 million in the 2010-2011 Budget for
investing in the Arawak Cay port as a 50
per cent shareholder, and the Prime Min-
ister said both it and APD’s investors had
already committed $10 million each.

That will buy time for RoyalFidelity and
APD Ltd to raise the remaining balance of
anywhere between $25-$35 million. With
the initial public offering (TPO), which will
give Bahamian institutional and retail
investors a 20 per cent or $10 million stake,
some way off given the Prime Minister’s
comments about construction and opera-
tional progress being advisable before this
took place, it is likely the first capital rais-
ing efforts will concentrate on fixed income
securities - preference shares or bonds.

The Arawak Cay port will have a 75,000
twenty-foot equipment unit (TEU) capac-
ity, with APD Ltd and its contractors set to
enjoy some $4.75 million in Customs duty

exemptions for its construction. The port
site and Gladstone Road depot are to be
leased for 45 years, with construction com-
pleted by June 27, 2011.

Prior to the port's substantial comple-
tion, APD Ltd will pay an annual rent of
$40 per twenty foot equipment unit (TEU)
container and, following completion, the
rent will be the greater of $2 million per
annum or the $40 per container fee. An
internal rate of return on investment has
been set at 10 per cent.

There are also numerous ‘Reserved Mat-
ters’ upon which APD Ltd's Board of
Directors cannot take a decision or action
"unless the Government's prior approval in
writing has been obtained”.

The Reserved Matters include:

* Changes to APD Ltd's Memorandum
and Articles of Association

* Changes in APD Ltd's share capital

* Borrowings. APD Ltd and any sub-
sidiaries cannot, without government
approval, "incur any financial indebted-
ness which would result in the secure debt
exceeding an amount being equal to 3
times' EBITDA or a debt service coverage

ratio that is less than 1.25 times (or such
other amount or ratio as may be agreed in
writing from time to time)".

* No loans or advances to a person or
entity other than in the course of business

* Charges over any part of APD Ltd's
property or assets

* Disposing, via transfers, leases or
assignments, of any APD LTd assets or
property

* All fees and charges have to be
approved by the Government, apart from
those intended to “maintain a minimum
internal rate of return of 10 per cent, or
are consistent with a tariff amendment
model".

* There are to be no related party con-
tracts and deals with APD Ltd group affil-
jates without government approval, unless
the group "do not incur liabilities in any 12
month period exceeding in the aggregate $5
million between them".

* The winding-up of APD Ltd cannot
take place without government approval.

Construction work on the Arawak Cay
port is supposed to be completed by June
27, 2011, a total of 294 days.

Board ‘probably top challenge’ for insurers

FROM page 1B

“All the companies will be
challenged over a period of
time - the regulator will give us
several years - to have a cer-
tain percentage of independent
directors,” Mr Duff told Tri-
bune Business.

“Each Board has to have cer-
tain sub-committees, such as an

audit committee or remunera-
tion committee, and all of them
have to have a majority of inde-
pendent directors sitting on
them.”

Securing independent direc-
tors in a market such as the
Bahamas is a difficulty for both
public and private companies
in all industries, since the talent
pool they are drawing upon is
relatively shallow, not many
persons having the combina-

tion of talents firms are seeking
for their Boards - especially
expertise and experience in the
relevant industries.

Challenge

“That’s a challenge for the
industry, trying to get the right
persons and, compared to 10
years ago, that’s a bigger chal-
lenge for independent members
of because of the greater liabil-

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ity,” Mr Duff told Tribune
Business, in an apparent refer-
ence to the greater exposure
burden directors everywhere
have to shoulder as a result of
scandals such as Enron and
WorldCom.

“That’s going to be a chal-
lenge, but hopefully the regu-
lator will work with us and give
us an appropriate amount of
time, and he’s indicated that he
would.”

As for the wider impact of
the new Act and regulations,
Mr Duff told Tribune Business:
“All the companies are set up
for it already, but at this junc-
ture we’re waiting for the
Superintendent of Insurance to

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

come to us and release the final

VACANCY NOTICE

KATANA ASSETS LIMITED

FINANCE CLERK I - BANK RECONCILIATION

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Finance Clerk II
Bank Reconciliation, in the Finance Division.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

° Preparing bank reconciliation for assigned bank accounts;

Preparing journal entries for accounting adjustments and banking
transactions (e.g., transfers between bank accounts, bank charges, re

turned checks);

Entering cash receipts postings in journals for proper allocation within

the general ledger;

Providing source data with regards to employee and other returned

checks;

Acting as liaison between Customer Services departments to prepare

listings of returned cheques; and

Maintaining procedures filing system for such items as: canceled checks,

bank advice, memos and statements.

Job requirements include:

° A minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Accounting/Business or

equivalent in General Accounting/Fundamentals;

A minimum of 2-3 year experience;

Thorough working knowledge of Check Reconciliation module within

the HTE environment;

Computer skills and the use of related software (e.g., Cash Management
Software) and computerized spreadsheet tools to prepare reconciliation

and bank transfer schedules; and

Verbal and written communication skills to interact effectively with staff

and the general public.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on

or before: Friday, June 25, 2010.



NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) KATANA ASSETS LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 13th
May 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Peter Leppard of c/o
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393.

Dated this 15th day of June A. D. 2010

Peter Leppard
Liquidator



regulations to give the Act the
necessary teeth.

“As of right now, we’re still
waiting for that, and in the last
conversation I had with Lennox
McCartney he indicated what
he was proposing to do. Just
prior to the enforcement of the
regulations, he was planning to
hold an industry seminar to
explain the provisions and how
they would impact individual
companies.

“We're still waiting for the
final version of the regulations
to be released, although we’ve
seen drafts of them, and are
waiting for an industry seminar
to talk through the ramifica-
tions of them.

“I don’t think there’ll be as
major impact in terms of
accounting and solvency
issues.”

NOTICE OF LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

DISSOLUTION TO

ALL CREDITORS OF AND CLAIMANTS AGAINST

BIP Fund (1) LP

Notice is given that the General Partner of BIP Fund (I) LP, a limited
partnership formed pursuant to the EXEMPT LIMITED PARTNERSHIP
ACT, 1995 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas on 1* March, 2007
with its registered office at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Winterbotham Place, P.O. Box N-3026, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas, have been filed with the Registrar General’s
Department in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas. The Partnership requests that all claimants provide written proof
of their claim to the Liquidating Trustee to following address:

The Liquidating Trustee of BIP Fund (1) LP 1s:

Kyrene Kelty

CIT (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

One Marina Drive
Paradise Island
P.O. Box SS-19140
Bahamas

All claims must be in writing and must contain sufficient information
reasonably to inform the partnership of the identity of the claimant and the
substance of the claim on or before the 14th day of July, 2010



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ANTERNIQUCA

LOLA RENEE DAVIS of Farrington Road, P.O. Box N-
4052, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to ANTERNIQUCA LOLA RENEE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that Deandra Shandiea
Munnings of P.O. Box CB-11642 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9'" day of June, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODRIQUE POLYNICE
of Carmichael Road, P.O.Box CR-54802 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization



as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who Knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 9° day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Join Cititrust
(Bahamas) Limited,
one of the most
established trust

COBUSINESS
‘Economic climate’ rethink

hope for $600m LNG project

FROM page 1B

mission (FERC), said the Gov-
ernment was working with the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) to resolve issues relat-
ed to who would have ultimate
responsibility for governance
and regulatory oversight of the
estimated $600 million project.

Many had believed the
prospect of Suez’s Calypso pro-
ject ever arriving in Freeport
was dead, but the company’s
letter, which requested the
FERC extend its approval cer-
tificate until June 30, 2012,
shows there is a possibility -
however remote - that it may
be revived.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



“The Government of the
Bahamas is working to resolve
ownership and governance
issues with the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, in whose juris-
diction the Bahamas LNG pro-
ject is proposed,” the letter
from Daniel McGinnis, vice-
president of the Calypso
pipeline, said.

“GDF Suez has been moni-
toring this situation for several
years. The situation remains
uncertain, but could change as
the country’s leaders consider
economic growth opportunities
like an LNG project during the
current depressed economic cli-
mates.”

Suez’s letter may also revive
the hopes of Grand Bahama’s
leading industrial companies
and manufacturers, all of whom
have been pressing for alterna-
tive energy forms, such as
LNG, to be incorporated in the
island’s energy infrastructure
as a way to reduce sky-high
electricity costs.

These costs have already
prompted one company, Fen-
estration & Glass Services, to
leave Grand Bahama, where
electricity prices range from
four to six times’ as much as
those in major industrialised

RISK & CONTROL OFFICER

nations.

Greg Ebelhar, head of Poly-
mers International's Freeport
operations, last year described
the electricity tariffs charged by
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny as "a huge issue” for his
company and other manufac-
turers, as the relatively high
prices were taking a huge
chunk out of their bottom line
and making their prices/oper-
ations uncompetitive compared
to their global rivals. The com-
pany’s monthly power bill
peaked at $700,000.

Apart from the Freeport
Container Port, Grand Bahama
Shipyard and Polymers Inter-
national, other major industrial
concerns on the island include
Vopak (Bahamas) and Phar-
maChem Technologies.

Sources familiar with the sit-
uation last year told Tribune
Business that, behind the
scenes, some of Freeport's
major industrial companies and
power consumers had been dis-
cussing a "big push" to resolve
the high cost of electricity.

This, the sources suggested,
would involve ultimately
"breaking the power compa-
ny's monopoly and producing
their own electricity". It is
understood that Chris Gray, the
former chief executive of
Freeport Harbour Company
and Freeport Container Port,
was particularly interested in
this prior to his retirement.

Grand Bahama Power Com-

pany itself has been exploring
alternative fuel sources, includ-
ing wind, methane gas gener-
ated by the landfill and LNG.

Suez has already obtained
one FERC extension to its
approval certificate, having pre-
viously extended its life to June
30, 2010, due to “the delay in
approval by the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas for the
Bahamas LNG project”.

The Freeport-based project
involved the construction of a
regasification terminal, which
would convert LNG brought in
by ship back into its gas form. It
would then be transported to
Florida via pipeline to drive
that state’s electricity grid.

Many Bahamian businesses
had hoped this nation would
also enjoy the benefits of LNG
in its own power system.
“Extending the FERC-required
in-service date allows time for
the Bahamas LNG project or
Calypso LNG deepwater pro-
ject in Florida to obtain neces-
sary approvals such that con-
struction of the project may
commence prior to the expira-
tion of the state permit and
county license,” Mr McGinnis
said.

Expressing optimism, he
added that the southern Florida
market would still require “sig-
nificant incremental volumes of
natural gas in the coming
years”, as the state’s power
needs would increase with eco-
nomic recovery.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PIPO INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

organizations in the
world.

We invite outstanding
individuals, wanting to build a
career in trust and estate
management services, to be part
of our dynamic global team. You
will interact with colleagues from
around the world and across the
organization, providing
specialized services to our high
net worth clients and their
families.

Interested Bahamian candidates
should forward a copy of their
resume by June 30, 2010 to:
Human Resources, Cititrust
(Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-
1576, Nassau, Bahamas OR
Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR Email:

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES

Reporting to the Head of Business Risk Management, the positon
is responsible for managing the Risk and Control Self Assessment
programs for our trust and investment funds units locally, Key
responsibilities include ensuring robust intemal testing programs
are executed that validate compliance with policies and
procedures and legaliregulatory requirements as well as
identifying actualipotential control breaks. Additional
rasponsibilitias include facilitating and tracking Corrective Action
Plans, management reporting, participating on local and global risk
committees, supporting related projects, working with partners in
other Campliance and Contral functians and liaising with internal
and extemal auditors.

KNOWLEDGE SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate will possess an undergraduate degree in
business administration or a related field and a CPA designation.
This will be complimented with a minimum of five years of related
expenence in an audit or risk control function. Additionally, a
strong understanding of the local regulatory environment and of
ongoing intematonal initiatives is required. STEP qualification is
an asset. Prior experience managing staff, strong oral and written
communications skills, strong systems competencies ¢.g. banking
platfomms and Microsoft applications, excellent organizational
skills, the ability to work with minimal supervision and an aptitude

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 27th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULL HOUSE HOLDING S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of November 2009. The Liquidator

betty.robarts@citi.com for analyzing and solving problems, are also required. is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.



Challenge
yourself to a career like no other

. FG CAP

[ITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Pare

Corl 1 A TT.

ROVAL = FIDELITY

¢€
Arie an ek

cr AL ct} 1.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 15 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.51 | CHG 18.77 | %CHG 1.26 | YTD -51.87 | YTD % -3.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit_y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.05 1.05 0.00 0.250
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 5.20 5.20 0.00 0.598
0.30 Benchmark 0.30 0.30 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.17 2.17 0.00
9.62 Cable Bahamas 11.95 11.95 0.00
2.56 Colina Holdings 2.60 2.60 0.00

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.93 6.30 0.37
2.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.49 2.54 0.05
1.60 Doctor's Hospital 2.00 2.00 0.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00
8.75 Finco 8.90 8.90 0.00
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 9.81 9.81 0.00
3.75 Focol (S$) 4.58 4.58 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid & Ask & Last Price Daily Val.
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55

5S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

79 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div S P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Yield

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4752 2.54 7.00
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9020 0.52 -0.11
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5352 1.86 4.63
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0368 2.57 -4.99
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.6388 2.03 5.56
107.5706 3.45 6.99
105.7706 3.99 13.50
1.1127 2.10 5.19
1.0917 2.22 6.29
1.1150 2.23 5.65
9.5078 1.78 6.39

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV GMTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

31-May-10
30-Apr-10
4-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-May-10
31-Mar-10

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, 4

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve: Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Ser 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Please note that Mr. Whitney
shaundel Newbold is NO longer
employed with
Fox Locksmithing Ltd.
and can no longer do business on
our behalf.

10.0000 10.2744 -4.61 8.15 31-Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

58.37 31-Mar-10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

weighted price for daily volume
eighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

Weekly Vol. - Tradii rior
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

ee
A look at global economic developments

By The Associated Press



A LOOK at economic devel-
opments and activity in major
stock markets around the world
Tuesday:

GENEVA — The Swiss par-
liament approved a treaty with
the United States that will hand
thousands of files on suspect-
ed tax cheats to US authorities,
but obstacles remain that could
delay the deal for several more
months.

The government hopes the
agreement will eventually end
UBS AG's three-year battle
with US tax authorities that cul-
minated in revelations the bank
had for years helped American
clients hide millions of dollars
in offshore accounts.

BRUSSELS — The Euro-
pean Union's statistics agency
says exports from the 16 nations
that use the euro rose 18 per
cent in April from a year earli-

er, helped by the euro's sharp
fall against the US dollar and
resurgent global trade. The
eurozone sold 121.6 billion
euros worth of goods in April,
outweighing imports. The trade
surplus was 1.8 billion euros.

BERLIN — German
investor confidence fell sharply
this month on worries about
the persistent eurozone debt
crisis and the impact of spend-
ing cuts by European govern-
ments. The ZEW institute's
index, which measures
investors’ expectations for the
next six months, sank to 28.7
points in June from 45.8 in
May.

LONDON — British con-
sumer price inflation fell to 3.4
per cent in May from April's
17-month high of 3.7 per cent,
but remains well above the offi-
cial target. Consumer price
inflation has been above the
Bank of England's target of two

Important

Notice




+ ABM

* Internet Banking
* Telephone Bonking

SERVICE INTERRUPTION *

From 10:00pm June 19th
to 6:00am June 20th.

FirtCarbbean would lilo: bo.acvee the public that the iolicwing
Bectronic Barking Services vill be unavadable during the Girne listed
shove while we conduct routine maintenance. The bank apologizes for
ihe service inberruption, and lor ary incorneenience cauced

During the. perkod the Iollewing services will be unavailable:

«VISA transections via ABM
« FCIB Debit Point of Sole transactions









per cent since November, wor-
rying some about the impact of
record low interest rates.

TOKYO — Japan's central
bank unveiled details of a new
$33 billion low-interest lending
programme intended to fuel
economic growth and fight
deflation. The plan accompa-
nied the Bank of Japan's deci-
sion to keep its key interest rate
near zero. As widely expected,
the eight-member policy board
voted unanimously to leave the
overnight call rate target at 0.1
per cent. The bank has not
touched the rate since Decem-
ber 2008.

BRUSSELS — The Euro-
pean Union's executive warned
Spain and Portugal that they
will have to keep up budget
cuts in 2012 to curb their
deficits and rein in a debt crisis
that has sapped investor confi-
dence in Europe's economy.
The European Commission
says Spain may have to draft
“further sizable corrective
efforts" in coming years and
Portugal may also have to do
more to bring budget deficits
down to the EU's maximum of
three per cent of gross domestic
product by 2013.

MADRID — Unions angry
over labour market reform
plans called Spain's first gen-
eral strike in nearly a decade
— but not until after the sum-
mer vacation — breaking with a
Socialist government desperate
to restore confidence among
investors wary of its debt-laden
finances.

Union leaders said the hir-
ing-and-firing changes in the
labour market favour business-
es, not workers, as they

announced the September 29
walkout.

ATHENS, Greece — The
government of debt-ridden
Greece said it had struck a pre-
liminary deal to pay off billions
owed to drug and medical sup-
pliers, ending a standoff that
caused severe shortages at state
hospitals and forced operations
to be suspended.

Finance Minister George
Papaconstantinou said a meet-
ing with suppliers "led to an
agreement in principle" regard-
ing payment of 5.7 billion euros,
or $7 billion, in debts accrued
since 2005.

He said he expected compa-
nies to resume suspended sup-
plies immediately.

DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates — The World Bank urged
Mideast countries to invest
more in their impoverished rur-
al areas instead of relying on
subsidies and mega-projects to
alleviate inequalities in the
region.

ROME — The economies of
Brazil, China and India will see
strong growth in their agricul-
tural sectors in the next decade
as output remains stagnant
among big importers in West-
ern Europe, according to a
report by the UN Food and
Agriculture Organisation and
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development.

DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates — Credit agency Moody's
Investors Service says its out-
look for banks in the United
Arab Emirates remains nega-
tive largely because of ongoing
concerns about Dubai's credit
woes.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that

|, FREDERICK

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 7B

NOTICE
FINARTIS CAPITAL
MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FINARTIS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LTD. is
in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 14th June
2010 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Dayan Bourne of Ocean
Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3247,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated the 14th day of June, 2010.

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

NOTICE

FINARTIS CAPITAL

MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned at Ocean Centre, Montagu
Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3247, Nassau,
Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 28th
day of June, 2010. In default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by
the Liquidator.

Dated the 14th day of June, 2010.
DAYAN BOURNE

LIQUIDATOR









CLEARE of McKinney Drive, off Carmichael Road,

Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
FREDERICK DELANCY. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

PURESE plain your weekend finances to cater for this necesary maintenance.

@ FIRSTLARIBBEAN
INTHEHATEONML BAA

CT THOSE, TOCETHOE





ween can bot ean Coa













PR CEVAIERH OUSE{ COPERS iS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SPA SENIOR ASSOCIATES

Job Description

=) FIDELITY

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified Senior Associates If you have it, we want you.

within our Systems and Process Assurance (SPA) practice. As a member
We are growing!

of the SPA team, you will provide services related to controls around the Oo yee 7
Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

financial reporting process, including business process and information
technology management controls.

Requirements
¢ Proven experience in identifying, evaluating and testing information J unIOor Accou nta nt
technology and or business process controls, having worked in
the accountancy profession for a minimum of three (3) years. Reporting directly to Manager, Accounting
Services the successful applicant's main
duties and responsibilities will be:

¢ A strong academic record and has a professional accountancy
qualification and/or the CISA qualification.

¢ Sound business awareness, excellent communication skills and * Posting accounting entries
personal initiative.

¢ The ability to work as part of a team, as well as independently.

¢ The ability to build and manage internal and external relationships.

¢ Proficient understanding of security and control for some of the
following technologies and/or enterprise applications: Unix, Windows
Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, OS/400, SQL Server, Oracle
database, SAP, Peoplesoft, and JD Edwards.

* Working knowledge of information technology general controls

Reconcilation of bank accounts
Reconciliation of intercompany accounts

Preparing dailyAveekly and monthly reports

Minimum requirements / qualifications:

¢ Accounting degree and/or practical experience in a prior job

concepts in the areas of systems development, change management, © Willingness to work and learn
computer operations and access to programs and data.
* Working knowledge of controls and controls standards (Sarbanes

Oxley, COSO, and COBIT) and testing strategies.

© Prior experience in a banking environment would be useful

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry
The salary scale, which

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: Junior Accountant, 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE

and other areas of industry and commerce.
June 25", 2010 to:

recognizes different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward

high performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical

insurance and provident fund benefits. A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






P . _ Chef Todd
=], <2? © serves up
Te | =" > traditional
a > sushi

|

see page nine







By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



will view aquatic themes, and other elements of nature
that emerge in bright colour during the summer sea-
son, at the Bahamas National Trust.

‘Awakening,’ is Tucker’s newest exhibit, featuring a few
pieces like Embrace, Mermaid, and Freefall; the latter of
which will be shown in a silent auction that will precede
the main event which is in aid of the environmental pro-
tection agency.

I: Trevor Tucker’s solo art show this Thursday, viewers








é

Vay




Waters edge
Ms e



Ludacris hack in
Nassau with new |
rink Conjure = uns

See page 11





Tucker, an art teacher at St
Augustine’s high school,
seems to bring a much sim-
pler approach to this art
exhibit, which officially opens
at 7 pm. The 25-piece collec-
tion has bright colours that
emerge in a real way on can-
vas to the viewer.

‘Awakening’ includes pieces
like Water’s Edge, Early
Bloomer, Embrace and
Freefall; and a few works from
previous shows. “These new
pieces are based mainly on
nature and the natural colours
and patterns that they create,”
said Tucker.

“Natural beauty can be seen
anywhere and sometimes an
entire scene captivates the
eye, but my work usually
focuses on sections or details
that are not always visible.”

Tucker explained that his
goal was to create a show
based on parts and combina-
tions of nature, blending them
together in many ways like a
puzzle.

But although his work
comes from realistic refer-
ences, Tucker doesn't restrict
himself to the literal repre-
sentation of art forms. He has
found it more enjoyable to see
how different elements work
together while still creating a
strong composition.

“Awakening is a show with-
out restrictions in that I start-





ed painting without a set
deadline allowing myself to
paint what I wanted, how I
wanted and when I wanted
to,” said Tucker.

He loves the creative
process, and described his
love for the accentuating
quality that vivid colour
brings to a painting with the
use of expressive brush
strokes. Thus, he tends to
choose themes that have a
natural flow or rhythm to
them.

Tucker told Tribune Art,
“IT would hope that these
pieces not only give a new
appreciation for nature but
also give a small window into
the way that I see the world
around me.”

Tucker is inspired by his
environment, and appreciates
living in a country that is
“filled to the brim with life,”
whether it is in the air, on the
ground, or in the sea. He
said that in many ways his
paintings control him and he
“just goes along for the ride.”

Tucker prefers medium
acrylics and he does have an
appreciation for the brighter
side of the colour spectrum.
“It is my hope that when
looking at my pieces, the
viewer is able to sense the
essence of the subject that I
have tried to capture,”he
said.
THE TRIBUNE



ar

~

Junkanoo Roll

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

na Sunday afternoon,
@) or during a hectic day

when you're in traffic
and don’t feel like cooking,
consider eating sushi, says
Chef Todd Eldon. This may
sound far from your typical
food choices, but at Munchie
Lab , the menu is endless,
threaded with soups, salads,
appetizers, sashimi, nigiri,
and many other gourmet
foods.

Munchie Lab is open seven days a
week, serving lunch from 10.30 am to
1.30 pm, and dinner from 4pm to Spm,
but their delivery and curb side pick-
up service is limited to the Cable
Beach area.

Chef Todd Eldon, emphasised the
difference between sushi and other
meal choices. “It’s healthy, trendy,
and it’s art,” said he said.

“We have a lot of food franchises
that sell finger foods like Domino’s
Pizza, but that provides limitations to
the regular fare in town. And there’s
only so much pizza one can eat,” said
Chef Todd.

“You can take our sushi home if
you like, and transfer your plates for
your dinner party, serving up sushi to
your guests,” said Chef Todd.

Yesterday, Balduccino Fine Foods,
a deli with a full selection of meats
and cheeses served up Munchie Lab’s
quality food for the second time
around. And Balduccino’s head chef
was impressed by Munchie Lab’s pre-
sentation.

“Munchie Lab seems to have a very
traditional way of serving sushi,” she
told Tribune Taste, “with wasabi, pick-
led ginger, soy and garnish.”

Getting back to the original way of
preparing the Japanese food, Chef
Todd said sushi is often confused with
raw fish and rice. This is correct if
referring to the Edo style sushi, but
originally, sushi was a term for fer-
mented meat or fish, which was pre-
pared for the sole purpose of preser-
vation.

Munchie Lab’s menu includes Edo
style sushi served up in six and nine
pieces on platters, or you can pur-
chase them individually as a single
roll order.

Spicy Tuna, Spicy Smoked Salmon,
Shrimp & Seaweed, Hamachi (Yel-
lowtail), Seared Scallop, Tuna & Avo-
cado, Florida, California and Boston
rolls are options on the menu.

Munchie Lab’s lobster tempura roll
is delectable with mango, avocado,
cucumber, and cream cheese. Also



The Tribune



‘Taste

MATTOS

THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON

eS

Mango Roll

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 9B



on the menu lineup is a Fire Dragon
Roll and the Green Envy Roll, which
is unusual in flavour.

The Green Envy Roll has salmon,
tuna, a key lime ponze nuiowi, with a
wasabi pea crust, which are all com-
monly known in the sushi world. “It’s
one of the more popular buys,” says
Chef Todd.

He calls his Green Envy Roll real-
ly “cool looking,” because of its bright
red and orange colour, with asparagus,
and key lime ayoli (a white mayo
sauce), and wasabi peas which are
pan-fried and coated in horse raddish.

The Fire Dragon Roll has salmon,
tuna, mango, sriracha, and tempura.
The Junkanoo roll has mango, aspara-
gus, alfalfa sprouts, and pickled gin-
ger.

Odyssey Aviation, and several of
the yachting centres, including resi-
dents in Hope Town, Abaco, students
and teachers of Tambearly School
comprise the extensive list of some
of Munchie Lab’s biggest clients.

Once or twice a week, an aircraft
flies down to Marsh Harbor to deliv-
er the sushi, and then ferries the food
product over to Hope Town, Abaco.

Munchie Lab is Chef Todd’s main
kitchen in a condo next to the Bayroc
Exclusive Beach Residential Devel-
opment. There, he prepares his foods
and will rendezvous (or curb-side
pickup) to customers to meet them
up for delivery.

Inside of his professional kitchen
is an Open space that was extensively
transformed and outfitted with loads
of sushi knives, and first class cook-
ware.

According to Chef Todd, the idea
of sushi is to taste the actual flavors in
the roll. And in their California roll,
in particular, you will taste crab, avo-
cado and cucumber bits wrapped
together for delicious flavor.

Chef Todd’s sushi dipping sauce
demands an acquired taste, but he
says most people prefer wasabi and
soy mixed together in an eel dipping
sauce which has a sweet and thick
base.

Pickled ginger is served as a side
order on your plate serving as a pal-
lette cleanser, so that if you go and eat
salmon next, or spicy smoked salmon,
the taste won’t linger.

Munchie Lab delivers with their
exquisite sushi and excellent presen-
tation garnished with vegetables and
even fruit strips. The restaurant offers
elegant food platters for parties, office
meetings, luncheons, and much more
in platters.

Platters are available and sold in
up to five rolls. To compliment your
sushi roll, try Munchie Lab’s soups,
salads, and appetizers, like Asian
inspired crab cakes, stone crab claws,
steamed edamame, shrimp tempura,
shrimp cocktail, and seaweed salad.
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010

SS

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune

(





Bringing a Poetic Breeze

By CHESTER ROBARDS



symbols, percussion

radiates under smooth
hands as they press the skins
of congo drums and smooth
words cascade from artists’
lips: “What is your fear? / How
could something so pure and
true scare you?”

A beautiful poetry spot is digging
in its roots and blossoming under-
neath the shabby old Mayfair hotel
and patrons are loving the vibes of as
yet-unknown Bahamian singers,
songwriters and poets.

The matriarch of ‘Poetic Breeze’
which takes place at Babalu
Caribbean Bar and Grill, is Michelle
Hanna, who along with the Poetic
Breeze Band, Mario Lord and Earl
Forbes, hosts poets, musicians and
almost any other artist who cares to
take the stage.

Michelle, a sublime spoken word
artist herself, transforms words to
melodies to the lucid tones of the
Poetic Breeze Band her poem con-
tinuing: "Fear is a thief, stealing all
that is precious / It will have you
thinking of pain when there is none."

And there is no fear in the quaint
setting and muted lighting in the
recesses of Babalu. Poets are com-
fortable crooning their craft for riv-
eted crowds.

Poetic Breeze recently received
singer/cctor Ludacris, where he chose
to debut to the Bahamian market his
newest cognac, Conjure.

Ludacris posed with his fans and
his newly released cognac, the place

Dontasve: lightly rap



PICTURED above is Michelle Hanna during a performance.

erupting in applause and screams as
he entered the back doors of the
restaurant with girlfriend.

Premium Discount Liquors, also
used Babalu's venue and Poetic
Breeze's event to hold a wine tasting,
where they debuted a array of wines
ranging from sweet dessert wines to
a drier Shiraz and just about every

taste in between. They even poured a
pomegranate wine and champagne.

Some frequent contributors to
Poetic Breeze's vibes are Rashad
"Rash" Davis, Alvin Lightbourne,
Eric Sands, Bigga Tea, Red Eye, Zee
Thompson, Daria Del and Corey
Fox. But all other artists are wel-
come to come every Monday and

eT eee LAL
1g



ee

DEM ile wart a



share.

Lines of Michelle's poem "Divine
Love" typify what she and her
entourage have etched out of the Old
Mayfair: "What we have is a rare
occurrence / Something that was
foretold / Precious like stones from
beneath the earth / Priceless in
worth."



The 2011 Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Ball Committee held its first meeting to begin preparations for the Heart
Foundations’ Golden Anniversary which will be held next February 19th. Pictured l-r, Claire Howorth, Marilyn Cambridge,
Coretta Owen, co-Chair, Portia Nottage, co-Chair, Rosemarie Thompson, Michelangiolo Bacelli, Lady Butler (Sheila) and

Linda LaFleur.

GEMS

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



MOST Bahamians have probably
heard their parents, grand parents, and
other relatives reminisce on the “good
old days.”

According to their stories, this was
a time when there was no indoor
plumbing so the water needed for
cooking, and cleaning, had to be col-
lected from a well.

This was a time when the crack of
dawn met some of them on the corn
fields harvesting their crops and a time
when you couldn’t run to McDonald’s
fora pancakes, eggs, and bacon break-
fast. Instead you had bread spread with
butter or jam.

A new book titled “GEMS From
The Island” released by Bahamian
author Clara Williams has preserved
these island life experiences, leaving
readers with a greater appreciation for
life as they know it today.

A young Eleutheran girl named
Claire is the novel’s main character.

The book, which consists of 18 short

chapters tells the story of her life living

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

on the island settlement and how she
handled the transition from the tran-
quility in Eleuthera to the fast pace
upbeat life in Nassau. The book
encompasses a time period from the
1940’s to the 1970’s.

Many Bahamians born during that
time frame may classify those years as
hard. However, Williams’ light heart-
ed presentation of those experiences
highlights the good times, and the hap-
py moments, when children didn’t
need Nintendo Wii or play station to
have fun. The only thing they needed
was each other.

Their limited means did not stop
them from engaging in family fun. On
holidays Claire’s mother would plan
beach picnics where they would carry
an assortment of food like flour cakes,
benny cakes, tarts, pies, potatoes, cas-
sava and much more.

At social gatherings the children
played games as the adults engaged in
harmless gossip about happenings
around the settlement.

The short novel is a refreshing look
at a past experienced by many
Bahamians.

Tribune Entertainment spoke to the
author of “GEMS From The Island”
who said her main reason for writing
the book is to shine light on a past that
could possibly make a better future.

“As we look at the situation in the

Bahamas we hear people talk
about the good old days. I said
maybe if some of the young peo-
ple knew more about how we live
back in the day they would learn

how to live better,” Ms Williams

said.

"Talking simply wasn't get-
ting us nowhere. So instead of
just talking I said to myself what
better way to reach others than
writing a book.”

The book is based on real
life experiences but the names
and places have been changed.

“The book is really about
the hardship that we faced and
how we dealt with those hard-
ships. The book speaks of
friendships, respect, manners,
and the patriotism we had
back in the day," Ms
Williams said.

A few of the chapters in the book
includes Godly principles, and she
hopes readers apply them to their lives.

Ms Williams is hoping to get the
book into the schools, so that younger
persons can have a opportunity learn
about it.

"Tt might not be the answer to the
ills of society, but if people get their
kids to read the book then I would
have done my job,” she said. "The
book is for both children and adults. It









makes
for good summer reading.”

Mrs Williams has taught for 45
years. She became an assistant teacher
at age fifteen. She later enrolled in the
Bahamas Teaching College. Back in
the day Mrs Williams taught at South-
ern Prep, Windsor Lane, Wilton
Albury, Columbus Primary, Golden
Gates and others.

Persons interested in obtaining a
copy of the book can call 242-341-5027.



¢ Chamber Institute
Presents: Public
Relations

The Chamber Institute
presents a workshop on
the topic of ‘Public Rela-
tions: The Driving Force,’
9Yam-1pm. Learn the fun-
damentals of public rela-
tions, advertising, market-
ing and crisis manage-
ment. Cost: $150/Chamber
and BECon members;
$200/non-members. Tele-
phone: 322-2145. Email:
rabrams@thebaham-
aschamber.com. See
www.thebahamascham-
ber.com

¢ National Trust Art
Exhibition, Reception
and Silent Auction
Trevor Tucker holds an
opening reception for his
exhibition Awakening a
collection of recent paint-
ings, from 7pm at the
Bahamas National Trust.
Silent auction at 6.30pm,
Thursday, June 17. Pro-
ceeds in aid of the Trust.
Telephone: 364-0641 or
428-1878. Email:
trevor.tucker@gmail.com
See
www.trevortuckerart.com

¢ Youth Gathering:
‘Youth Ablaze:

Shine Ya Light’

Take part in this exciting
and inspirational gathering
for youth 7.30pm, Friday,
June 18, in the Church of
God of Prophecy East
Street Southern parking
lot. Features DJ Counsel-
lor, Christian Massive,
Royal T and Mr Beeds.
Telephone: 394-3445, 361-
3817 or 466-7631. Email:
yablazeitup@gmail.com

¢ Elevation Album &
DVD Release Event
Don't miss this special
double release of V-
MAC's album and Lenelle
Michelle's DVD, 7pm at
the National Centre for
the Performing Arts. Tick-
ets: $5/in advance; $10/at
the door, Friday, June 18.
Part proceeds in aid of the
Bahamas Foundation for
Blind and Visually

¢ St Francis Xavier’s
Men’s Association:
Men’s Month

St Francis Xavier Cathe-
dral Men's Association
invites men and boys of
the Catholic archdiocese
to join them for a month
of exciting activities to cel-
ebrate men's month.
Activities include a
Father's Honouree Din-
ner, Friday, June 18, 8pm
at Sheraton Nassau Beach,
Father and Son Basketball
Tournament, Saturday,
June 19, 8am-8pm at Sir
Kendal Isaacs Gym, an
Award Presentation Mass,
Sunday, June 20, 11am at
St Francis Xavier, and a
discussion on the history
of the Catholic Church in
The Bahamas, Friday,
June 25, 7.30pm-9.30pm at
St Francis Xavier Tele-
phone: 356-3008.

Tennis Tournament
The Bahamas Lawn Ten-
nis Association holds its
‘Double the Love’ tennis
tournament at the Nation-
al Tennis Tournament,
Saturday, June 19.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the
news, read
aE [e lad
on Mondays




THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, PAGE 11B



ENTERTAINMENT

Conjure up good times





AMERICAN rapper Christopher ‘Ludacris’ Bridges talks to
reporters about his new liquor ‘Conjure’.









By JEFFARAH GIBSON and
CARA BRENNEN BETHEL
Tribune Features



L

Bahamas.

said.

He made sure the cognac was per-
fectly blended as he flew to France to
take part in the crafting process. "I
was there and I helped handcraft the
entire thing, I had to pick from thir- l
teen different distilled Cognacs and _ they can be part of the experience.
we picked about three. Conjure is
made up of VS (very special) VSOP
(Very Special Old Pale) and XO
(Extra Old).” my business partner,” Ludacris said.

It blends naturally with anything
Ludacris said. And though he prefers
his on the rocks he said the best way to
drink it is with pineapple juice. ;

Conjure's taste stands out alone. It pete in the market.
is an epicurean delight when mixed
with fruit juices. And with the cre-
atively designed bottles featuring the
silhouettes of women it is nothing less
than outstanding. Ludacris said he
wanted the bottle to stand out just
like his music does.

presence in the community.

So far it has been received well by
Bahamians, and with the new release
of the Conjure brand, Cognac lovers
now have another option to choose

UXURIOUSLY refined, ftom.
smooth, sophisticated
and affordable
describes hip hop artist
Christopher "Ludacris”
Bridges’ new liquor, Conjure
cognac that "Conjures up
good times” and will soon hit

liquor stores and clubs in the no longer limited.”
Ludacris said this is perfect for

The American rapper "tagged women who prefer something soft and
team" with the famed cognac house ‘not over powering.
Birkedal Hartmann to carefully hand-
craft this new creative smooth blend.

Sitting down in an exclusive inter-
view with Tribune Entertainment at udacl
the Cove Atlantis, the rapper the new Cognac. "Pricewise we try to
expressed his passion about the high-
ly innovative new spirit. "I am in love
with and very passionate about this
blend. I can only be that in love and )
passionate about it if wanted people = Unique. — . :
to buy it and taste it themselves," he "I decided to partner with this man
because of the history and how pres-
tigious his company has been. But we
wanted to come up with something
new and basically I wanted to not just
endorse a product but I wanted to
own it so that when everyone taste it
' It
not just me attaching myself to a brand
that was already made but I wanted to
be apart of and make the brand with

"Tt is being received well especially
in the Bahamas. I am ecstatic at the
response and I just actually went out
to a club last night and it same there
are a lot of great cognac drinkers here
in the Bahamas. They only had a cou-
ple options to drink and naturally they
will only drink what is available. But
now with Conjure their options are

Kim Birkedal Hartmann's family
has been in the spirits business for
four generations and they were ecsta-
tic to partner with Ludacris to create

make it affordable for everybody and
that is what is important,” he said. He
went on to say that Conjure Cognac is
a party drink that is innovative and

He chose a Cognac because while
there have been a lot of new vodka
and other liquor products there hasn't
been a cognac to come out and com-

Skye High Spirits will be the local
distributor of Conjure Cognac. Sean
Andrews the company's head
explained that Conjure has special sig-
nificance because it a top brand they
want to promote by giving it an active |

if







A
=< i >
v

2:6 knots

Show i bode a mica er, Tea pera are ted ap
highs and tonight = Ios





Be oa

Panky samme @
eT i Se






















Most sunny

High: a9"
Lima 7a"

Party Sonny Gn
shrerer | ri cps
High: a0"
Log; 7"

Pailig choedy, a

eho in serie is



Low: 75°





k | n"Fare
a rere

~.
â„¢

*® >
VW

feb knots

tae a

wi os
SE af f-10 Koats
5 af E-10 Kerk



Lone: PE" Fa?
ETO eet ie erg
ee. Lae Cape Hatteras
. ae aa Chariotin * Highs: 46°F Shown is today's
. i =|* a r E
AHants # Hire Fa Cc Re a meralher. ape
Highs: 82°F/aa°c - Highs 2% nae Highs: B1°F/f2rsc am today’s highs and =.
a: 6 2 ee
Pensacala * Savannah diet OT aes =a =ake
Highs: SAS" Highs: 24° F34"¢ 4
30 2, Gaytona Beach
x Highs: 82°F/33"C ~
Tams = &t Freeport
Highs: ara en anc
Bliami - (H)
: as lene a » Massau
25 reghe: SoC rae Highe: 90°F a2"C:
Havana * :
Highs: 94° Fasc
- Santlage de Cuba
Highs: ase
20 ¥ a4 a Port-au-Prince snares
Cazumel.. .. Highs: sor a4°c San Jue
. , Highs: eeraac shin ope » Highs: so" Fac ia a
aie * ' Santa ~ + Mita, Arrtigiia eo
2 @ Belize Kingston Dominga ~*~" = 1h
.& * 2 = 5 z = : c Highs: 89°F a2" *
fs . Highs: BF "Fd c Highs: 8e°Fad ac Highs: as"F2o'C | =e * : a: :
15 = i ERE liste ELERTHERA
Py Sa % re as a - Barbados: fe ye ee
fy “hel fay) ty. “Be. ey te ly yy Oe
ee a es ek Aruba Curacas Highs: Be°Fa0C - FREEPORT
* * =e . - Managua = ee ' Highs: @0°R4k2C:
= Se ee ; ;
a Ps : a4 Mighis a7 Fransc. = Trini
“4GD>: ee a — Tobago ERES? AGA
i: Li keke kh tk ek & “hh ) & Et ' z na
- 10 “Linon a ~ 2 a at bs eee ee = LOG AAD
ta Highs: ao°Fa2 "Cc" * + Panama City Highs: se Rast > Stee
ae hk I 5: S07ERS2C 5 te ee ee
ee _. -. Highs. 883Fadc gat as ae ee ey Oe al
gE} © 2h & : F het he ee ee Ree hbth et ret & ~ MASA
: & & a otk ee ee ek EY ctk kh re REE EEE ES
- 88. $000 x PRN* TIDES FT" 6S ota BO SEEEISR SII SH: sees
Wer Enid Shfincany | Bain T-iorr Florrice: Sore ka Baie) ELASD
TTT h(*,_ Saeate waata Reese es Tae a = * oe

Part: Sanity an

High: aa"
Lem: 74"









THE WEATHER REPORT (22

ae ay




Path 560
eho: bres
High: Be
Low: 7a"



fe dees! Pleased Teo pecsiure” if. go ice ied cornbdes. Ge elles of peed, ed, bere dais, carding Gee i Chines, precipita, pec,
and sivetion en fhe bores boip—eeery thing teed effects ow pom or cold a )pereca leek Pergperioees retiect che high ged the eto en

Penta

=a i> Bs: ae do A egh 2 pi. eae ay
] Fiz" 1c ' lich a here
4-8 nets oT wl > Lew ar
Maree high ar
WEST Pal ml : Kamal knw i
= Fick MEA W Law ers high or
Love 77" F2S" 4-10 knots: Lar pours kre are
a Ree Freceritstian
Beal 2 Ban. estore d41g
Year io dam 2H
Marna Wear fo dane S11

AccuWeather.com
BLEUTHERA Forecasts aed gephics proetcied by

dptoWeather, lee. Gio

om Hine 3°98" C
eee Ta" Fea"










INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

es eg

= ¥
Midia}a|+\5\0|7|s| 9]
LEW E | soa LHe fl

The beghee the BocoWfeedieer U0 bee” 2 oreber, fhe
qreaien thee mad lor eye ang) iin preaciian

Tipes For Massa

Hii Low Hid

Tiachary TG ain
1B pn
Theredesy 11:22am
1137 pm.

Fredany 12h pa

Shay Ian
Te pom.

Bowigy §=2 D5 am 2
S4S pate cI

esidap 158 are aa
440 pam ALD

mL yt, |

Wicewies 10c-S0 am
Boareel . TiS oom

Seana
Sang

€€d@

dam 25

don. 1

SAN SALVADOR
High: 3° Fos G
Low: TSF" G

6-16 erots

Uhgrsacbay
Totar

Tota
Thinaetalhaay
Tha

Thue:

Tea
Uhocbaay



ERE gf 612 Ratha
Bit af G-12 Kats:
SE al f-10 Kooks
Bal 5-10 Keoki

SE al f-14 Kote
Epe gf 8-16 Karts
Eat 2-16 Bireats
Eat 2030) Krana
ESE af 0-16 Kacts
Eat 120 Knot
ERE af 1-14 Racts
ES af 10-230 Keon
EGE af 6-12 Rack
ESE a 6-12 Kati
E at 6-16 Enos
Eat 1-20 Kno
Cr abt? Kade
Cea gi T-14 Kacts



‘
a a
Vv

6-12 kant

MAYAGUANA,
High: 50° Fez" C

Sak pm

620 im
EN on

hese

1 Foss

4-16 nota

MEieeLiTY

10) tebikesy
10) felis
TE) felis
TED ihe
1) bebikess
10 bikes
Tir
10 belies
7 bbs
TE ihe
10) babikesy

TO) fide
10) eb bess
6 bes
is lebokes:
10) tel ies
TO) Babskcss

Tt) Mi hee.



a —

48
1

1%
m Of
1%
7
13
oz
4135
ox
. 1
a:
Ham ALi
1iidpm. od

Jul 10

A
Â¥

WATS TERPS.
me
ga" F
ar F
are
36°F
aa" F
me
ga" F
an" F
aa*



(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TO DISCUSS Tye ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM