Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

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Pim blowin’ it

90F
75F

> PARTLY
~~ SUNNY

Volume: 106 No.166

Sey
eS
AND REAL ESTATE

BAHAMAS BIGGEST



The Tribune E&

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

TRY OUR
SWEET
TEA

MWeDonald'’s downtown

POH mM ta med dy

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays

HIGH
LOW







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Knowles and Fish are
ousted in quarterfinals

SEE SPORTS ON PAGE NINE

_——

|

ay eal



opposition Progressive Liberal Par-
ty.

The PLP heavily criticised the
government during the recent bud-
get debate over high unemployment
rates, a rising national debt, and poor
management of the country’s eco-
nomic and social affairs.

Dr Rhonda
Chipman-Johnson
steps down

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE UNEXPECTED retire-
ment of long-time educator and
administrator at the College of
the Bahamas, Executive Vice-
president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson, shocked some at the
College, yesterday, when the
news broke.

Dr Chipman-Johnson said she
expected people to speculate,
but she wished not to comment
on her reasons, saying only that
she was “exercising (her) eligi-
bility to retire.”

Inside sources told the Tyri-
bune that Dr Earla Carey-
Baines, Dean of Liberal and
Fine Arts, was selected by the
COB Board to act as interim
president, in the wake of Janyne
Hodder’s retirement this month.
They claimed it was a “slap in
the face” to Dr Chipman-John-
son, who has served as interim-
president on at least three dif-
ferent occasions.

MONSIGNOR
PRESTON MOSS

SOL KERZNER



Dr Carey-Baines is also the
College’s lead negotiator, in the
contract negotiations with the
Union of Tertiary Educators of
The Bahamas (UTEB) that
have now gone to arbitration.

“Tt is quite a shock if it is true.
Once we are officially informed
we will issue a statement. The
union’s position was that Dr
Chipman-Johnson should have
been appointed acting president.
(Appointing Dr Carey-Baines
would be a) violation of the Col-
lege Act. The Act says in the
absence of the president or if
there is a vacancy it is to be filled
by the Executive Vice-presi-
dent,” claimed Jennifer Isaacs-
Dotson, UTEB president.

Mrs Isaacs-Dotson was refer-
ring to Section 6 of the College
of The Bahamas Act that states:
“Whenever the President is
absent from The Bahamas or is
for any reason unable to per-
form the functions of his office,

SEE page 11



Veta see

Sol Kerzner knighted



in Queen’s Honours

GOVERNMENT House announced yesterday that Her Majesty
the Queen has bestowed a knighthood on Kerzner International
President Sol Kerzner and a distinguished honour of Saint Michael
and Saint George on former MP Warren Levarity and Vicar Gen-
eral of the Archdiocese of Nassau Monsignor Preston Moss.

Mr Kerzner and 25 Bahamians were honoured for exemplary
services to the country by the Queen in her annual Birthday
Honours List.

Mr Alphonso Elliott was made a Commander of the British
Empire (CBE) and Rev Kenris Carey, Bishop Wenith Davis, Mr
William “Billy” Lowe and Rev Vernon Moses became Officers of
the British Empire (OBE).

Becoming Members of the Most Excellent Order of the British
Empire (MBE) were Mr Marvin Bethell, Mr Bismark Coakley, Mrs
Susan Holowesko-Larson, Mr David Pinder, Mrs Elaine Pinder,
Mrs Susan Roberts, and Rev Ralph Russell.

Receiving the British Empire Medal (BEM) - Civil Division
were Ms Cleomie Hilda Antonio, Ms Brenda Archer, Mr James
Dean, Ms Claretta Duncombe, Mr Emmett Munroe, Mrs Arlene
Nash Ferguson, Ms Olivia Turnquest, Rev John Wallace, and Ms

SEE page two





Laing defends govt
performance in
financial crisis

STATE Minister for Finance,
Zhivargo Laing, put the govern-
ment’s performance in the midst of
the global financial crisis in per-
spective, to rebut criticism from the



Minister Laing presented a num-

SEE page 11







GUNS SU ALU UIE

LEADER OF THE OPPO-
SITION Perry Christie
addresses the media
yesterday in a press
conference.

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia. net

CONDEMNING the
FNM and Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for fail-
ing to look out for the
interests of the poor and
downtrodden, Opposition
Leader Perry Christie
said yesterday that his
party was well within
their rights to walk out of
Parliament last night.

Pointing to the fact
that his Member of Par-
liament for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell had moved a
motion to amend the
social services subvention
for funeral payments
from its present $650
mark to $1,300 per per-
son for at least 1,000 peo-
ple, Mr Christie said that
the FNM outright reject-
ed the idea.

“The story for us then
is a simple one. This is
about an attempt by the
PLP to help the poor.
This is about our attempt
to fearlessly represent the
Bahamian people in the
House of Parliament. It
is our attempt to ensure
that in these times of lit-
tle, priority is given to
those who need help the
most. This is my way of
the highway philosophy
of the FNM has run its
course. Enough is
enough,” he said.

After the government
moved for the wrap up of
the debate and a vote on
the bill, the 2010/2011
Budget was passed in the
House of Assembly on
Thursday night. Accord-
ing to government busi-

SEE page 11



Meigs i

Govt projections for budget
year ‘may be too optimistic’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE GOVERNMENT?’S debt-cutting and revenue-
raising projections for the budget year may be too
optimistic and do not take into account the possibility
of a double-dip recession or an event like a major hur-
ricane, said a former minister of state for finance.

James Smith, a senator during the former PLP
administration, yesterday suggested an effective step to
boost the economy which has not yet been proposed
could be achieved by having the Central Bank of the
Bahamas lower the prime interest rate — simultaneously
lessening debt burdens for regular Bahamians and for
the country’s “biggest debtor”, the Government.

“The prime rate in The Bahamas has not changed
since February 2005 despite the fact the prime rate
has been dropping across world. In the same way you
go to astimulus package to increase aggregate demand
In a recession you also want to provide grease for the
private sector by lowering interest rates,” said Mr
Smith, Chairman of CFAL.

“T think Ministry of Finance should speak to the
Central Bank on monetary policy and ways it could

SEE page 11

all

Two students are stabbed at
_ Gh Walker Senior High School

AN argument at CR Walker Senior High
: School between a group of students resulted in
: the stabbing of two 17-year-old male students.
i Police are questioning a 16-year-old student
: in connection with this incident.
: Details were sketchy last night, but Tribune
: sources say the fight was over a pair of Oakley
; sunglasses.
: Around 1.40pm yesterday, police respond-
: ed to emergency calls from the Baillou Hill
: Road campus. Investigations are continuing.
i Police also responded to an armed robbery
: and shooting on Friday, which they are inves-
: tigating. The armed robbery occurred on Tyler
: Street off Boyd Road around 3am.
i Two men, both armed with shotguns,
: entered a residence on Tyler Street and robbed
: a woman of an undetermined amount of cash
: and other personal items, according to police
; reports. Both men are thought to have fled
: the area on foot.
: The shooting occurred around 1am at Toote
: Shop Corner off East Street. Reports indicate
; a 28-year-old male pedestrian was approached

SEE page 11



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





Suspected cemetery vandalism investigated

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
reports of suspected vandalism
at the Old Trail Cemetery,
according to a source within the
Ministry of Works.

This comes days after com-
plaints were raised about the
condition of the cemetery,
which is maintained by the gov-
ernment, and fears of possible
grave robbing. Reports
emerged this week that at least
one cadaver was seen floating
in its grave brought to the sur-
face by a spate of rainy weath-
er.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, a ministry offi-
cial remained tightlipped on the
reports, only saying the matter
has been turned over to police.

"The police are actually look-
ing into that now. I can't com-
ment on situation because its
under investigation. The report
was made to southern police
station,” he said.

Meantime the United
Funeral Directors Association
of the Bahamas plans to meet
with government to discuss,
among other things, concerns
regarding the upkeep of pub-
lic cemeteries, said Wendell
Dean the group's president.

"All the public cemeteries



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER



are in that condition not just
Old Trail," said Mr Dean, when
asked if the association had any
problems with the way govern-
ment grave yards are main-
tained.

"The public cemeteries are
just not properly managed," he
added.

He said he planned to meet
with other members of the
association to form a consen-
sus on the issue before meet-
ing with government to put
forth their concerns.

"It's a matter that has to be
addressed by the association to
the government (but) we're in
the process of having a meet-

"

ing.



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





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ALFRED COAKLEY Sowell

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Eccuiniiy politics amd other explinabory onles

Minagement's espa hiligy forthe Piece! Stateenta

Fhiecownd is espousiilc for the prepaniion amd Gir preseniniies of Wea: firincel sales mm
monroe wilh Intention] Finicinl ligponting Stucknds The mesponsitdlity imchides: desiguine
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dalicis ae: free from mater! missin

An audi mvolves performing procediines lo obtain pudij cuadense abou the ainguits and dickens in ihe
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The public may abimin a cope of die fol dt of thee dite cenesbalaicd Cinancil dntiemerde re Shante
Hing 2, Cais Wallage, host Ure Sinoubats EMule Bengal, PC Dies BPS, Pits, Maliaiias







a

MARVIN BETHELL

FROM page one

Erma Williams.

Receiving the Queen’s
Police Medal (QPM) were
Deputy Commissioner of Police
Marvin Dames and Assistant
Commissioner Quinn McCart-
ney.

Knight Commander
(KCMG) Honorary

A native of South Africa and
Permanent Resident of the
Bahamas, Mr. Solomon Kerzn-
er is the founder of the Kerzn-
er International franchise in the
Bahamas. He acquired Resort’s
International properties on Par-
adise Island in 1994. Over the
past 16 years, the resort has
been transformed into the pre-
mier vacation destination in the
Caribbean region, including the
signature Atlantis Resort, the
6-star One and Only Ocean
Club, spectacular marina facil-
ities, championship golf course,
high-end vacation residence
club and exclusive residential
enclave.

As owner and operator of
almost 25 per cent of all hotel
rooms in the Bahamas, Kerzn-
er International and its Atlantis
brand are the dominant force in
the tourism industry. It is also
the largest private sector
employer in the Bahamas
engaging some 5 per cent of the
employed labour force. Mr.
Kerzner and his corporation are
also important philanthropic
contributors to charities, cul-
tural festivals and other com-
munity and education develop-
ment projects in the Bahamas.

Solomon Kerzner’s career in
tourism began in his native
South Africa where he acquired
his first hotel in 1962. By 1979,
he was responsible for the most
ambitious resort development
in South Africa, the five-star
Sun City Resort. His hotel
holdings expanded to Mauri-
tius prior to his venture into the
Bahamas in 1994. Since then,
he has invested in resort and
gaming facilities in North
America, the Maldives, Moroc-
co and Dubai.

Recognized internationally
as a leader among tourist resort
and casino owners, developers
and operators, Mr. Kerzner was
the first non-American to be
admitted to the USA’s Family
Hall of Fame in 1992. In 1999,
he was awarded the FED-
HASA Lifetime Achievement
Award. This was followed by
the Anger Gabrielle Award for
distinguished corporate and
philanthropic leadership in
2003; the Innovation Award
granted by the Hotel Invest-
ment Conference Asia Pacific,
Hong Kong in 2004; the inter-
national Hotelier of the Year
Award, Las Vegas Hotel and
Restaurant Show and the Uni-
versity of Johannesburg Ellen
Kurwago Council Award, 2007,
and the HSMAT Albert E.
Koehl Lifetime Achievement
Award in 2010.

The Most Distinguished
Order of St Michael and St
George — Companion (CMG).

Mr Warren Levarity, an
accountant by profession,
entered politics in the 1960’s
during the Bahamas’ struggle
for majority rule. He became a
Member of Parliament in the
opposition party during which
time he gave excellent support
to his constituents in the Fami-
ly Islands. Later, when majori-
ty rule became a reality, Mr
Levarity was made Minister of
Out Island Affairs in the first
Cabinet of the governing party,
the Progressive Liberal Party.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Ga LE
AO TH

eat
rag ALY |



OLVIA TURNQUEST



NAAN BPA tit ste)

In 1971, he became one of the
founding fathers of the Free
National Movement. He went
on to serve his community for
some 20 more years before
retirement.

Monsignor Preston Moss

Monsignor Preston Moss was
ordained a priest in 1965 and
served as assistant pastor and
pastor in various parishes. He
also served as Chancellor of the
Diocese, Vicar General of the
Diocese and Rector of the
Cathedral. In addition to his
Church duties, Msgr. Moss has
held directorships in various
organisations, including the
Antilles Pastoral Institute, the
Pontifical Aids Society, the
Antilles Episcopal Ecumenical
Commission, the Diocesan
Family Life Commission and
the Diocesan Pastoral Team.
His civic contributions involve
Director of the Bank of The
Bahamas, membership in the
National Drug Council, the
National Tourism Awards
Committee, the Catholic School
Board and St. Augustine’s Col-
lege School Board, Co-Chair-
man of the Bahamas Order of
Merit Committee and Chaplain
of the Senate of The Bahamas.

Commander of the British
Empire (CBE)

Mr. Alphonso Elliot began
work as an electrician at Ray’s
Electric Company before join-
ing the Engineering Depart-
ment of the Princess Margaret
Hospital. Later, he was
employed as the Relief Man-
ager at Bahamas Industrial
Gases where he gained inter-
national experience when he
was sent to work in Antigua
and Barbuda, St. Kitts, Tortola
and the US Virgin Islands. Mr
Elliot and his business partner
established the Bahamas Weld-
ing and Fire Co. in 1972. He
also owns Island Gas Ltd.,
Freeport Gas Ltd. and Alarms
Ltd. Mr Elliot gives generously
to community and civic organi-
sations such as the Bahamas
Red Cross and contributes qui-
etly to many cultural organisa-
tions. He is an active member
of his church and is a Meritori-
ous Council Member of the
Free National Movement party.

Officer of the British Empire
(OBE)

Reverend Kenris Carey has
been a Lay Preacher in the
Methodist Church for more
than 30 years. She served as
Vice-President and the first
female President of the
Bahamas Conference of the
Methodist Church. She has also
served on the Presidium of the
World Council of Churches as a
Vice-President of Board of
Evangelism, and on the Juve-
nile Panel of the Bahamas Gov-
ernment for many years. Rev
Carey was ordained in January,
2009 and currently serves as the
Minister in charge of the South
Eleuthera Churches. She has
the distinction of being Presi-
dent Emeritus of the Bahamas
Conference of the Methodist
Church.

Bishop B. Wenith Davis
began his religious life as a
youngster in “Grant”, a little
town in the settlement of Man-
grove Cay, Andros. He started
the Zion South Beach Min-
istries in New Providence in
1979 after his seminary train-
ing and ordination in Novem-
ber, 1978. Bishop Davis’ pro-
fessional life has afforded him
the opportunity to extensively
serve the Bahamian people. He
has served as Customs Officer,
Customs Department; teacher
and Head of Department, Min-
istry of Education; Vice Prin-
cipal, Jordan Prince Williams
High School; founding member
and Vice-Principal, Bahamas
Baptist College; founding mem-
ber and Academic Dean,
Bahamas Baptist Community
College and evening lecturer at

COT ee =

Queen’s Honours

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Neen oe
aa eUSOlN



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local institutes. Bishop Davis is
a lecturer at the Annual Ses-
sion of The Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church Fellowship Confer-
ence. He has become well
known for his administrative
skills in Church Leadership
Conference and inter-church
workshops. He was officially
appointed to the position of
Bishop of Global Affairs for
the Full Gospel Baptist Fel-
lowship in February, 2005.

Zion South Beach Ministries
gives assistance to the commu-
nity and indeed to The
Bahamas, in the form of schol-
arships, medical care, mort-
gages, personal loans, the pro-
vision of school uniforms and
new and used clothing. Bishop
Davis’ wife, Pastor Ismae
Davis, works closely with the
Ministry. The Zion Christian
School was birthed out of the
vision of Bishop Davis and it
offers quality education to hun-
dreds of students. The Media
Ministry of Zion continues to
reach the masses with a weekly
radio broadcast.

Mr William E. “Billy” Lowe
began his career at a young age
when he saw the opportunity
and the need in the community
for a pharmacy that would car-
ry a variety of supplies includ-
ing prescription and non-pre-
scription drugs and other med-
ical supplies. Over the years,
he has expanded this successful
and well-known business to five
locations and has added a
wholesale drug agency. Addi-
tionally, he has ventured as a
partner in many other busi-
nesses in The Bahamas. Mr
Lowe is an active member of
his Church where he con-
tributes generously of his
resources. He is also known for
his generous contributions to
various charities.

Reverend Vernon Moses was
ordained in the Assemblies of
God Faith in 1959. He has
served in various capacities in
the Churches throughout the
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
and internationally. He has held
the positions of Pastor, Bible
Teacher, Director and Lecturer
at the Assemblies of God Bible
College, Presbyter, General
Presbyter, Secretary and Trea-
surer of the Assemblies of God,
and finally Superintendent of
the Assemblies of God in the
Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands. During his
tenure as Superintendent, Rev-
erend Moses initiated revisions
to the Church’s constitution
and worked to improve the
Church’s organisational struc-
ture, implemented a revision of
the school curriculum and
assisted in establishing the
national outreach radio min-
istry. In 2001, his contributions
were recognised by the Church
when he received an Honorary
Doctor of Divinity Degree from
Richmond Virginia Seminary.

The Most Excellent Order of
the British Empire— (MBE)

Marvin Vernon Bethell
joined J.S. Johnson & Co. Ltd.
in 1969 and became Managing
Director of that insurance com-
pany in 1989. He is a member
of Bahamas General Insurance
Association and a Director of
Insurance Company of The
Bahamas Ltd. Mr Bethel’s civic
contributions include his Direc-
torships in Bahamas Waste Ltd.
and the Bank of the Bahamas
Ltd. He is involved with the
Rotary Club of South East Nas-
sau, where he became a Paul
Harris Fellow, and is currently
the President-elect. Dedicated
to his Church, Mr. Bethell
serves as Trustee and Assistant
Chairperson of the Board of
Governors of the Church’s
school, Queen’s College. He is
Past Treasurer and Director of
the Board of Finance and Prop-
erty of the Bahamas Confer-
ence of the Methodist Church,

SEE page 12

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THE TRIBUNE






eet st}



(FROM LEFT) Assistant Administrator Ranfurly Horne Delano
Knowles, Administrator Ranfurly Home Dr. Clarke, Marketing Man-
ager Bristol Wines and Sprit Arame Strachan and Northern
Caribbean Manarger Donniash Armbristor.

Fiji Water Bristol Wines
flonate to Ranfurly Home

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A DONATION was pre-
sented to the Ranfurly Home
for Children yesterday to help
keep the Mackey Street
orphanage open following an
article in The Tribune.

Fiji Water and Bristol
Wines and Spirits made the
joint donation of $1,000 and
10 cases of bottled water to
be sold at Ranfurly Home’s
upcoming fundraiser.

Marketing manager for
Bristol Wines and Spirits
Arame Strachan said the
donation was prompted by
news the Ranfurly Home was
facing the biggest funding cri-
sis in its 54-year history and
could be forced to close the
boys’ dorm.

“We just had an over-
whelming desire to help,” Ms
Strachan said.

“The Ranfurly Home is in
problems financially at the
moment, to the point where
they are threatening to close
part of the property, and we
just wanted to do whatever we

her

could to not let this happen.”

A significant drop in dona-
tions over the last year and a
$5,600 reduction in govern-
ment funding next year will
make it difficult for the chil-
dren’s home to meet its
$300,000 annual operating cost
and care for the 32 children
currently at the home.

Board of directors president
Remelda Moxey said the
board may be forced to close
the boys dorm if more funding
is not found.

“Finances are the worst
they’ve ever been,” Ms Moxey
said.

“Tt's easier to feed girls than
to feed boys so the thinking
is we may have to close the
boys dorm and the govern-
ment (the Department of
Social Services) may have to
find alternative homes for
them.”

The Ranfurly Home will
host a fundraising steak-out
on Saturday, June 26 prior to
their annual raffle.

If you would like to make a
donation, log on to www.ran-
furlyhome.org or call the Ran-
furly Home on 393-3115.





as
Solar i Power

CONCEPTS

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

OLYMPIC champion
Pauline Davis-Thompson gave
the gold medal for which she
waited 10 years to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham in an
emotional scene at the House
of Assembly on Thursday
evening.

Fresh from receiving her
gold medal from Cuba’s 1976
Olympic 400m and 800m
champion Alberto Juantore-
na in a special ceremony at
Government House, the
sprinter and International
Association of Athletics Fed-
erations (IAAF) council mem-
ber hurried to the House of
Assembly where Mr Ingraham
was wrapping up the annual
budget debate.

Mrs Davis-Thompson, now
44, credited Mr Ingraham with
her success as she said he
saved her athletic career.

“In 1992 I had a difficult
time, I had given up sports,”
she said.

“Mr Ingraham searched for
me for some time.

“He took me to his office
and wanted to know what I
was up to.

“T then saw the gentle side
of him.

“When he saw the tears
start to pour from my eyes, he
looked me in my eyes and said
that I was not going to fail on
his watch.”

Mrs Davis-Thompson had
been cheated out of her gold
medal in the 200 metre race
at the 2000 Olympic Games in
Sydney by American Marion
Jones who was stripped of her

CORRECTION

IN Thursday’s edition of The
Tribune under the headline "Fra-
ternity names top male high
school student of the year’, the
student pictured was incorrectly
named as Salathial Williams.

Salathial Wells is the name of
the top male student of the year.





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medals when she admitted in
2007 to using steroids prior to
the Games.

But it was not until Decem-
ber that the International
Olympic Committee (IOC)
reallocated the 200m gold
medal, making Ms Davis-
Thompson a double gold
medalist as she was also a
member of the 4x400m
Bahamian relay team that won
in Sydney.

Ms Davis-Thompson
explained how she would not
have been able to achieve such
success if Mr Ingraham had
not offered to help her in 1992.

Comeback

When he asked her what
she wanted she said she want-
ed to return to training in
Atlanta and to her former job
in the Ministry of Tourism,
which he arranged for her.

“The prime minister is a
man of his word; everything

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010, PAGE 3

Davis-Thompson credits

Prime Minister for success

and accept this medal.”

Mr Ingraham smiled as he
stood up from his seat and
walked over to Mrs Davis-
Thompson, allowing her to
put the medal around his neck
before she held him in a long
and tearful embrace.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles Maynard
had announced at the award
ceremony that June 10 would
be ‘Pauline Davis-Thompson
Day’ as he presented her with
a $10,000 cheque marking the
difference between the
$30,000 silver medal prize and
the $40,000 gold she had right-
fully earned for the 200m race.

“T still cannot believe [am a
double gold medallist,” she
said.

“To the people of the
Bahamas, I hope I have made
you proud.

“Each time I went out there
to compete I never represent-
ed myself, I represented the
entire country, each and every
one of you.”



he said to me that day he did
expeditiously,” Mrs Davis-
Thompson said.

“Because he told me I was
not going to fail on his watch,
IT want him to continue to look
every Bahamian child in the
eye and tell them that they are
not to fail on his watch.”

Looking at the prime min-
ister, Ms Davis declared: “I
want you to know I love you.

“You are single-handedly
responsible for this gold
medal.

“T want to give it to you to
secure for the people of the
Bahamas.

“Prime minister Ingraham,
would you please come up

ee
US ea




















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The Wyndham
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Cocktails: 7:00 p.m.
Dinner: 8:30 p.m.

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Honouring this year’s recipients of the
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For Tickets and Information
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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Cancer wins may be bigger than they seem

CHICAGO — Doctors reported gains
against nearly every form of cancer at a con-
ference that ended this week. Yet when Will
Thomas heard about an advance against
prostate cancer, he wanted to know just one
thing: "Is it a cure?"

"I see billions and billions done on
research, and it's all for treatment," said the
Alabama man who has several friends with the
disease. "When will they cure it?"

Many people share his frustration. The top
achievements reported at the American Soci-
ety of Clinical Oncology added an average
of just two to six months of life. One pricey
drug made headlines merely for delaying the
time until ovarian cancer got worse.

Progress has always been slow for cancer
treatment. New therapies are tested on people
who are so sick and out of options that any
extension of life is considered a success. A
cure is not usually possible.

But some of the victories reported this
week against breast and prostate cancer,
leukemia and the deadly skin cancer called
melanoma may be larger than they appear.
These trends offer reason for optimism:

¢ Newer drugs seem to be making a bigger
difference for small, specific groups of patients,
as companies develop treatments that more
precisely target genes behind subtypes of can-
cer.

Pfizer Inc. rushed into late-stage testing
one such drug: crizotinib, which is aimed at
only 4 per cent of lung cancer patients. More
than 90 per cent of them responded to the
drug in initial tests. High response rates also
have been reported for other novel drugs for
melanoma and breast cancer driven by certain
genes.

The hope: Develop enough of these spe-
cialized treatments that eventually every can-
cer patient will have something that works.

¢ Quicker answers from smaller, focused
studies. Pfizer's test of crizotinib will need
only 318 patients and will be finished early
next year. It also will test the drug earlier in the
course of illness rather than as a last-ditch
option.

"You don't really need big trials if it works
so well,” and the group of patients who stand
to benefit can be identified in advance, said
Dr. Roy Herbst, lung cancer chief at the Uni-
versity of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Cen-
tre in Houston.

¢ Big gains from novel combinations. All 66
patients testing a drug combo for the blood
disease multiple myeloma saw a reduction in
the amount of cancer they had by at least
half. A 100 per cent response rate is unheard
of for any cancer and would not have occurred
if two drugmakers had not teamed up to test
their treatments together instead of against
each other, said Dr. Paul Richardson of
Boston's Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, who
led the research.

The combo of Takeda Pharmaceutical
Co.'s Velcade, Celgene Corp.'s Revlimid and

the chemotherapy mainstay dexamethasone
allowed more than half of patients to delay
and perhaps avoid a bone marrow transplant
— a harsh and risky treatment for the dis-
ease.

¢ Comparison tests of long-used treatments.
For decades, men with cancer that has spread
beyond the prostate have been given hor-
mone treatments with or without radiation, yet
only a few studies have tested these against
each other or together. A Canadian study
found that combo treatment extended sur-
vival an average of six months in high-risk
cases, and the oncology society said it could
become a new standard of care.

"We're asking questions that should have
been answered decades ago," said Dr. Len
Lichtenfeld, the American Cancer Society's
deputy chief medical officer.

¢ Building on success. Since it was approved
in 2003, the Novartis drug Gleevec has been
the closest thing to a cure for any cancer. It has
transformed chronic myeloid leukemia from a
nearly-always fatal disease to one now man-
ageable with a daily pill.

Yet a second-generation drug from Novar-
tis — Tasigna — and Bristol-Myers Squibb
Co.'s Sprycel did even better than Gleevec
as initial treatment for those who are newly
diagnosed, studies found. Sprycel and Tasigna
are used now only when people fail on
Gleevec.

¢ New drugs from surprising sources. Eisai
Inc.'s eribulin, derived from a sea sponge,
improved survival for women with advanced
breast cancer and could fill some key treat-
ment gaps.

It comes "at a time when many of us
thought there weren't new chemotherapy
drugs being developed," because of all the
focus on gene-targeting drugs, said Dr. Eric
Winer, breast cancer chief at Dana-Farber.
"This may be one of the last ones."

¢ More hope that drugs for other condi-
tions also can fight cancer. The Novartis bone-
building drug Zometa improved survival for
people with multiple myeloma in one study.
Earlier research suggested it may help against
breast cancer, and results of a definitive test of
this are eagerly awaited.

¢ Gentler treatments. More of the drugs
being developed today are pills rather than
infusions. Shorter, more focused radiation
treatments are showing promise. Women need
to have fewer lymph nodes removed to check
for breast cancer. And new drugs have eased
the nausea and vomiting that have made many
cancer patients fear chemotherapy.

One issue is not improving: cost.

Personalized medicine will advance cancer
care, said Dr. John Mendelsohn, president of
the M.D. Anderson Cancer Centre and head
of a recent government panel on cancer
research. But it will not be cheap, he said.

(This article is by Marilynn Marchione,
AP medical writer).



Government’
cuts approach is
‘short-sighted’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE Bahamas Govern-
ment has recently made
announcements regarding
the pending budget cuts
and taxes which will affect
almost every sector of our
society.

Yes, times are extreme-
ly difficult for some; no one
can deny that.

However, the approach
of the current administra-
tion is short-sighted in that
the full impact of these
decisions on the Bahamian
populace at large has not
been explored.

Also, as much as the
country’s current debt has
been lamented, to date,
there were no proposals
regarding local revenue col-
lection (with the exception
of Immigration fees), or
increased judicial fines, or
measures to prevent mis-
management of available
ministerial funds.

As an example of the
above, take the Govern-
ment Guaranteed Loan
Scholarship Programme,
which has technically exist-
ed for the past decade or
So.

Many students have
utilised this service, and
many are now home in The
Bahamas making a positive
influence on society, and
dutifully repaying their
loans.

However, there were also
those who received their
designated cheques, and
instead of furthering their
education, spent the monies
on travel and luxury items.
According to a Ministry of
Education insider, this had
been going on for years,
and was common knowl-
edge.

So when the accounts
were assessed, the Ministry
in 2009 preferred to sus-
pend the provision of new
loans instead of actively
and publicly pursuing those
delinquent persons who
had signed iron-clad con-
tracts to repay all loans
with interest.

Judicial fines are a sure-
fire way for the State to
make money, with a bonus
that only convicted crimi-
nals have to pay.

However, did you know
that if a person was caught
driving without a license,
that the most they would
pay was $1000, and the
optional revocation of their
driver’s license?

If that same person also

LETTERS

KeUUCCLECUNAL OLN alelanlerO (eM ALedE



caused an accident, they
only paid $200, and if they
decided to speed off: a
meager $100 for “fleeing
the scene”.

To add further insult,
there are no legal provi-
sions for the negligent dri-
ver to pay the State the cost
of repairs to the other per-
son’s vehicle, once the oth-
er person’s insurance com-
pany already paid.

Does anyone else see
something horribly wrong
with this picture?

It’s no wonder that so
many persons drive reck-
lessly on our streets, and
worse, in vehicles with pol-
luting exhaust piping, with
broken tail lights, brake
lights which do not work,
and missing mirrors vital
for navigation.

Who allowed these vehi-
cles to pass inspection, and
are there fines for such
offences?

Furthermore, why hasn’t
anyone proposed increases
in traffic violation fines?

Also, there are many
men being fruitful and mul-
tiplying, but refuse to pay
child support, and the
tremendous effort to get
one dime is a great strain
to the single mother who
has little spare time, given
that she has the sole physi-
cal and financial burden of
caring for her child/chil-
dren.

If he cannot make his
required payments, the
delinquent father should be
made to “work off” his
debts at the various gov-
ernment institutions, in lieu
of jail time in an already
overpopulated prison.
Maybe then, these men
would begin to use more
safe sex practices.

The same can be said for
some single mothers, who
make up a considerable
portion of the Social Ser-
vices clientele.

Some of these women
are truly in need and have
no other options, but there
are also those who are
quite able-bodied, yet feel
as if they can take monies
as long as it’s made avail-
able.

Some are also frequent
fliers at the PMH’s Labour
Ward, but refuse any meth-
ods of pregnancy preven-

tion.

Why worry, if “da gov’-
ment ein guh let my chirren
starve” ? There are also
others who were accus-
tomed to a certain lifestyle,
and refuse to get a job that
is “beneath them” now that
they have fallen on hard
times.

If these women would
take responsibility, work to
feed their own children,
there would be far less clas-
sified ads, and more money
available for improvements
in the overworked, under-
staffed, and under appreci-
ated Department of Social
Services.

Sometimes the misman-
agement of ministry funds
is not necessarily the fault
of the institution, but of the
employees themselves.

How many Sundays have
you seen a vehicle with a
red license plate drive by,
and all the occupants were
in their church finery?

Even the DOTS Public
Health Workers, and Com-
munity Nurses do not usu-
ally work weekends, so
which government employ-
ees are being allowed to
drive these vehicles outside
of normal business hours,
and why should I, the tax-
payer, have to pay for their
gas?

These are but a few of
the many examples of
avenues which the govern-
ment can use for increas-
ing revenues and control-
ling budgets, without pun-
ishing productive, law-abid-
ing Bahamians.

Applying the above not
only calls for personal
accountability, but the will-
ingness of the government,
with the judicial system to
not only enforce existing
laws, but mandate legisla-
tion to deter those who are
tempted to “rob” the Trea-
sury.

Such actions may well
prove politically unpopu-
lar, especially with general
elections on the horizon,
but I trust that anyone who
is more interested in the
continued morale, produc-
tivity, and overall well
being of the Bahamian peo-
ple, would approach the
Budget debates with only
the best intentions for our
country.

A CONCERNED
CITIZEN
Nassau,

June 7, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





BISHOP RANDY FRASER



Police officers testify in



Bishop Fraser’s attorney
plans ‘no case submission’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



THE prosecution closed its case yes-
terday in the Bishop Randy Fraser
retrial after calling one final witness to
the stand.

Fraser’s attorney Wayne Munroe
indicated yesterday that he intends to
make a “no case submission” that will
be presented in writing to the court.

Taking the stand yesterday was
woman Sergeant Raquel Hanna.

She told the court that at around
12.45pm on April 9, 2006, while
attached to the Quakoo Street Police
Station, she received a complaint from
the mother of the young woman with
whom Fraser is alleged to have had
sexual relations.

Sergeant Hanna told the court that

Prosecution closes case in retrial



she recorded a six-page statement
from the virtual complainant in the
presence of her mother, who the offi-
cer described as being very angry and
having “lost it.”

She recalled that the virtual com-
plainant appeared to be somewhat dis-
turbed and was crying.

During cross-examination by Mr
Munroe, Sergeant Hanna recalled that
during the interview she had asked
the virtual complainant to tell her sto-
ry.
The officer told the court that she
was informed by the virtual com-
plainant that her aunt had in her pos-
session a cellular phone that contained

It’s

inquest into chase death

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO police officers testi-
fied this week in the Coroner’s
Inquest into the death of
Kristoff Cooper, who was
found dead with a gunshot
wound to the head following a
police chase that ended in a
car crash.

Officers Constable Corey
Barr and Corporal Arnold Fox
pursued Kristoff Cooper and
his brother Lavar in a high
speed chase through the
streets of New Providence on
the morning of May 3, 2009,
shortly before the siblings
crashed into Miracle Tours
Travel Agency and a neigh-
bouring house on Robinson
Road.

Both officers, who are
attached to the Mobile Patrol
Division, testified that they
began their chase after they
received information from the
police control room that offi-
cers from Wulff Road station
were pursuing the black Nis-
san Sentra the men were in,
and they were reported to be
“armed.”

Constable Barr testified that
the two patrolling officers had
each been issued with firearms
before they started their
patrols on Saturday, May, 2.
He received a tactical Smith
and Wesson .9mm pistol and
accompanying ammunition,
and his partner for the
evening, Corporal Fox,
received a Uzi sub-machine
gun.

Weapons

His partner later conflicted
with him in his account of the
weapons the pair were issued,
stating that he received an Uzi
and a revolver. Both officers
denied ever having fired their
weapons during the chase.

Constable Barr said he
thought he “heard shots” as
the black Nissan Sentra the
officers were in pursuit of
“swerved towards” two other
officers who were reportedly
standing in the street trying to
flag down the brothers’ speed-
ing vehicle.

Constable Barr was pressed
by attorney for the Cooper
family, Romauld Ferreira, as
to whether it was “standard

NOTICE TO ALL MEMBERS

Of

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Ltd.

The 24" Annual Gen

| Meetin

Will Be Held
On Wednesday, June 23, 2010

6:00 P.M.
At The British Colonial Hilton

#1 Bay Street
For The Following Purposes:
> To receive the Report of the Board of Directors for 2009
P Toreceive the Audited Accounts for 2009

> To take action on such matlers as may come before tha meating

» Toelect members of The Board of Directors, Supervisory

Commitiee & Credit Committee

THERE WILL BE NO SECOND CALL MEETING AS
PER THE CO-OPERATIVE ACT 2005 SECTION 22

police procedure” for an offi-
cer to fire at a “speeding vehi-
cle”. Constable Barr said offi-
cers “could if they were in fear
for their lives.”

Despite reports that the
men were armed, Constable
Barr and Corporal Fox both
testified that no weapons were
found around or on the per-
sons of either of the brothers
after the crash which saw them
thrown from their vehicle into
the yard of residence number
75, Robinson Road. They said
the damage to the Nissan was
too extensive to allow for a
full search of the car in which
they had been travelling.

Both officers testified that
a small package of suspected
marijuana was discovered on
Lavar Cooper, who was con-
scious but unable to speak,
suffering apparent injuries to
the arm and head, when police
found him on the ground in
front of the crashed car.

They recalled that the police
patrol car was travelling at 100
miles per hour as it chased the
pair through New Providence.
The Coroner, William Camp-
bell, questioned Constable
Barr on whether he meant 100
kilometres per hour, or miles
per hour. The officer admit-
ted he was not sure — telling
the inquest “I saw the gauge
go over 100” — and Magistrate
Campbell suggested this must
be verified as there is a “sig-

nificant difference.”

Corporal Fox told the court
the brothers were “driving
recklessly at a high rate of
speed.” He too testified that
he saw officers from another
police unit try to flag down the
car the brothers were in before
it crashed.

Road

He was accused of changing
his testimony as he at first sug-
gested the two other officers
approached the dividing line
in the middle of the road to
flag down the car, and then
said he was not sure if they
did so, suggesting they may
have simply been standing
“near their police vehicle”
which was parked on the
opposite side of the road as
the pursued car entered the
area.

Corporal Fox was asked by
Terry Archer, appearing for
the Attorney General’s Office,
if he was aware that “one of
the victims (the Coopers) was
shot at the scene.” Fox said he
was not and “only learnt that
afterwards.”

Corporal Fox, under ques-
tioning by Mr Ferreira, said
he did not hear or see any gun-
shots fired during the chase.

The inquest was adjourned
to July 5. It began on April 12,
2010.

NOTICE

Any person wit
TRANQUILLITY BAY

Please call

SORT Crooked Island

5579951

WU Laeet terse eee mile

5S2wk-Low

7.00 AML Foods Limited
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund
5.20 Bank of Bahamas

0.30 Benchmark
3.15 Bahamas Waste
2.14 Fidelity Bank
9.62 Cable Bahamas
2.56 Colina Holdings

Security










































Time to

Get
Connected

4.

text messages from Bishop Fraser.

Sergeant Hanna told the court that
the investigation was later turned over
to the Central Detective Unit, ending
her involvement in the matter.

Mr Munroe informed the court yes-
terday that his “no case submission”
would be a substantial one.

The matter was adjourned to June
29 for submissions. Bishop Fraser
remains on $10,000 bail.

He is accused of having a sexual
relationship with a 16-year-old girl
between July 2005 and February 2006.
He denies the charge.

His retrial began before Magistrate
Carolita Bethell last May.

:
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ROYAL FIDELITY

Money ot York

1.05
10.63
5.20
0.30
3.15
2.17
12.00
2.70

5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.30
2.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.41

1.45 Doctor's Hospital
5.94 Famguard
8.75 Finco

2.50
6.07
9.00

9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 9.85

3.75 Focol (S)

4.58

1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00

0.27 Freeport Concrete

5.00 ICD Utilities

9.95 J. S. Johnson

10.00

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

Premier Real Estate

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DB) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets

0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Bid $
10.06

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name NAV

1.3787
2.8266
1.4672
2.9343
12.6816

CFAL Bond Fund

93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund

0.35

Previous Close Today's Close

1.05

10.63

5.20
0.30
3.15
2.17

11.95

2.60
6.30
2.49
2.50
6.07
8.90
9.81
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95

10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Change

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Last Price

Ask $
11.06

6.25
0.40

Assembly Of God

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Rc ares KR Mere Se
SUEUR Mg Robie IIIa tiem

€

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 11 JUNE 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,516.03 | CHG -5.56 | %CHG -0.37 | YTD -49.35] YTD % -3.15

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

14.00
4.00
0.55

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.05
-0.10

0.00
0.08
0.00
0.00

-0.10
-0.04

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

= FG CAP

ITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

c2c+ Tite eT A TL

Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.250
0.050
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
1,000 0.952 10.5
0.156 64.1

Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
7% 19 October 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% 30 May 2013

Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945

Div $ P/E
0.000

Daily Vol.

0.000
0.001

0.480
0.000

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

1.4752
2.9020
1.5352
3.0368
13.6388
107.5706
105.7706
1.1080
1.0615
1.1050
9.5078

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

10.0000

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investr

10.2744

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

2.54
0.52
1.86
2.5TF
2.03
3.45
3.99
1.67

-0.61

1.31
1.78

-4.61

YTD%

Last 12 Months %

7.00
-0.11
4.63
-4.99
5.56
6.99
13.50
5.26
2.84
5.01
6.39

8.15

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

30-Apr-10
4-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

31-Mar-10

4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 B.235
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Golina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

58.37 31-Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Board Secratary
June 2010







PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Cua expands programe
cutting free lunches
HAVANA

NEARLY a quarter foillion i
Cuban workers are discovering :
there's so such thing as a free :
lunch, according to Associated :

Press.

island.

The Communist Party news- i
paper Granma reported Friday :
that a pilot program begun in :
October to eliminate free:
lunches for 2,800 government :
workers will grow to include :
another 225,000 as of July 1. :
The move will save the cash- :
strapped country $27 million. :

The reform is being extended :
to state bank workers, employ- :
ees at the tourism, transporta- :
tion, foreign investment, natur- :
al resources and foreign rela-
tions ministries, as well as work- :
ers at the government retail :
giant CIMEX and the Office :
of the City of Havana Historian :
and the Cuban Chamber of :

Commerce.

The government is dramati- i
cally expanding a program that :
shuts workplace cafeterias while :
giving people stipends to buy :
food on their own. It is part of a :
larger plan to chip away at the :
raft of daily subsidies that have :
long characterized life on the :

Dee 40 arrests and



"Tis vex with the govern-
ment's budget cutting sub-
sidies to private schools who
educate the nation's youths
by providing jobs, buildings,
religion, and facilities to
educate numerous Bahami-
an children that the govern-
ment could not otherwise
provide. Instead, the gov-
ernment should make the
government school parents
pay for their free and
expensive government
school education, when all
their children doing is stab-
bing and gang warfare."

— Tronic

“Tis vex cause der gov-
ernment taxing we locally
produced beers and ain't
taxing the rot gut hard
liquor, highfalutin wine and
the ‘cancer sticks’ cigarettes
that cause cancers and more
dangerous diseases to the
users and also to the peo-
ple around them”.

~— Local Beer Drinker

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
|

2010

N THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00170

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST of the Settlement of
Bahama Sound No. 11 of the Island of Great Exuma one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of-

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Reevers Turnquest claims
to be the owner of the fee simple estate in possession of the
said piece or parcel of land free from encumbrances. And the
Petitioner had made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said piece parcel or tract of
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

AND TAKE NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
a Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on before the thirtieth (30) day
after the last day of publication file a Notice in the Supreme Court
within the City of Nassau and serve on the Petitioner or the un-
dersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified
by an Affidavit to be titled therewith. Failure on any such person
to file and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the 22nd day of
July A.D., 2010 will operate as a bar to such claim.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that copies of the files plan
may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas on the Second Floor of the Ansbacher Build-
ing situate at East Street and Bank Lane on the Island of New
Providence;

2. The Chambers of Messrs Lewis & Longley Chambers, East
Bay Street Shopping Centre, East Bay Street, New Providence:
3. The Office of the Administrator at Queens Hwy, in the settle-
ment of George Town, on the Island of Exuma, The Bahamas.
Dated the 31st day of May, A.D., 2010

Lewis & Longley, Chambers
East Bay Shopping Centre, East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



"Tam vex that there are
so many political observers
criticising the government
for every wrong they see
instead of giving credit
where credit is due.

“The deals with the road
reversal on Baillou Hill
Road and Market Street
are done — while there
might be some hardship
now I am sure in the long-
run, things in those areas
will be better.

"Same thing with the
road construction at Saun-
ders Beach. People in this
country never seem to
want positive, upgraded
change; they just want the
same old thing that isn't
working. And the opposi-
tion is there to do one job
— oppose — but I would
love to see what good they
could have done during
these tough times."

— Wait and See

"Iam very happy to
have been served especial-
ly by WPC 3269 of the
Wulff Road Police Station
and two young police men.
WPC 3269 and the two
male officers were very
professional, they sympa-
thised and showed empa-
thy to a stressful ordeal
and did their police duties
with pride and sincerity in
recording a theft and visit-
ing the crime scene. That
left me knowing that the
image of the police is not
as bad as some may say."

— Crime Victim

Are you vex?

Fax complaints

to 328-2398 or e-mail
‘whyyouvex@
tribunemedia.net’.



ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

~—6§400 citations
in Operation
Touchdown

| By DENISE MAYCOCK
: Tribune Freeport Reporter
: dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



: FREEPORT - Assistant
: Commissioner of Police
: Willard Cunningham revealed
: that more than 40 arrests
: were made and 500 citations
: issued over the past several
: weeks as part of the police [
: initiative Operation Touch-
: down.
: “The operation was very
: successful,” said ACP Cun-
: ningham, who will be com-
; pleting his five-week tenure
: as acting officer in charge of
: the Grand Bahama District
: on Tuesday. }
: Operation Touchdown |
: started on May 4 with vehi-
: cle checks at various major
: intersections throughout the
: island.
: The fifth and final exercise was con-
: ducted on Thursday and resulted in 10
: arrests and 90 traffic citations.
: Mr Cunningham reported that in all, 42
: persons were for outstanding warrants,
: three for illegal drug possession, five as
: illegal immigrants, two for failing to give
: their name and address, and one for dis-
: orderly behavior.
: “I want to commend the officers in the
: Grand Bahama District, he said. They are
: doing a good job in performing their duties.
“The number one thing I wanted to



erence



accomplish was visibility and
I think we achieved that
through Operation Touch-
down and the various com-
munity walkabouts we held
on Grand Bahama.”

ACP Cunningham said
police also launched
increased patrols in residen-
tial areas of Freeport and
Lucaya, where a number of
house break-ins were report-
ed.

He said police are con-
cerned that several “cash for
4 gold” businesses which have
sprung up on the island are
acting as encouragement for
burglars to steal jewellery.

It is alleged that some
| criminals are recruiting
youngsters to break into peo-
ple’s homes in search of gold
items.

Mr Cunningham said
police will also deal with illegal gambling
houses on the island.

When asked about police officers buy-
ing numbers, he said if persons know of
any officer who gambles, they should
report it to the Police Complaints and
Corruption Unit.

“This police force led by Ellison
Greenslade and the executive team...
will not tolerate any corruption in the
organisation. If there are officers buying
numbers please report it so we can deal
with them,” said ACP Cunningham.







is accepting applications for the
2010-2011 ACADEMIC YEAR

Two persons - to teach Mathematics to all Grades seven through eleven. Experience
In preparing students tor external examinations (BIC, BOSE & SAT) is a require-

ment,

One { person - to tee sach English Damiana to the junior section of the school

(Grade 7 te 9),

One person-to teach English Language’ Literature to all grade levels. The ability to
prepare candidates for examinations (BJC, BGCSE and SAT) is a requirement.

One person - to teach Social Studies and History from grades eight to twelve. Expe-

nence In preparing for extemal examinations 1s a requirement.

OLOGY/GENE

One person - to teach General Science and Biology to all grade levels. The applicant

must have experience in

One person - to teach Economics to grades ten through twelve. Familiarity with the

National examination of

ERENCH

One person = bo teach French to grades se VET thraueh twelve Experience im pre [Kir
ing candidates for examinations (BIC, BOCSE and SAT) is a requirement.

One person to teach Computer Keyboarding, Basic Personal Computer Applications
and Computer Science to rades seven through twelve. The applicant must be proti-

clent in Microsott Word,

All applicants must bold a degree from an accredited university and a Teachers Cer-
titicate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certihicate
Ing experience and two passport size photos should be submitted, A commitment to
the values of Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers, Only those
who have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply.

preparing students for extemal examinations,

the Bahamas ts needed.

Excel, Access and PowerPoint.

Please submit application and required documents to

THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
P.O. BOX N-3940
NASSAL, BAHAMAS



, Proot of teach-

Thunder’
Father's
Day event

THE ANGLICAN
CHURCH men's choir
“The Sons of Thunder”
will host its second pre-
Father’s Day concert
on Saturday, June 19.

The concert will be
held at the Activity
Centre of the Parish
Church of the Most
Holy Trinity in Staple-
ton Gardens, beginning
at 7pm.

The concert this year
will feature tenors
Adrian Archer,
Cleophas Adderley and
Archdeacon James
Palacious.

Tickets can be pur-
chased from any mem-
ber of the choir or at
the various Anglican
churches in New Provi-
dence.







The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





SATURDAY, JUNE 12,



2010

THE 2010 WORLD CUP has finally arrived
and you can keep up with all the action on tri-
bune242.com. Just click on “Sports” on The
Tribune website and you will find a video fea-
ture with all the latest news from South Africa.





J Hi
r | Ny



SEATED from to right are Dr. Julian Stewart, committee member; BOC’s president Wellington Miller and BOC’s secretary general Rommel
Knowles.

Anti-doping seminar
to be held this weekend

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IF you’re an athlete, offi-
cial, coach or supporter and
you want to know more about
anti-doping in sports, then the
Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel
next Saturday is the place for
you.

That’s when the Bahamas
Olympic Committee, in con-
junction with the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture,
the World Anti Doping Orga-
nization (WADA), Caribbean

Anti Doping Organization
(RADO) and the National
Anti Doping Commission will
host an anti-doping seminar.

The one-day event will
begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday,
June 19 and will be used an
opportunity to educate and
make aware to all stake hold-
ers in sports the anti doping
processes and regulations
involved in international anti-
doping.

“This seminar on World
Ani-Doping comes at a time
when several Bahamian ath-
letes have had their perfor-
mances upgraded due to dop-

ing violations by others,” said
BOC’s president Wellington
Miller.

He was referring to Thurs-
day night’s gold medal pre-
sentation to Pauline Davis-
Thompson for the women’s
200 metres from the 2000
Olympic Games in Sydney,
Australia, after American
champion Marion Jones was
found guilty of testing posi-
tively for steroids.

Miller also drew attention
to the [AAF World Champi-
onships in Edmonton, Canada
in 2001 when two individual
Bahamian athletes and the

men’s 4 x 400 relay team
advanced in the medal stand-
ings as a result of doping
infractions by from other
countries.

In addition to the men’s 4 x
4 advancing to the gold medal
position, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie was elevated from
silver to gold in the 200
metres and Chandra Sturrup
went from fourth to bronze
in the women’s 100.

And Miller also noted how
the women’s relay team at the
Pan American Games in 2007
will now receive an unprece-
dented bronze medal as a
result of a doping infraction
by a swimmer from another
country.

The bronze medals, accord-
ing to Miller, is here, but the
BOC is just waiting to con-
firm a date with the Bahamas

SEE page 10

SPORTSNOTES

TRACK
DAVIS-THOMPSON

PRESENTS MEDAL

AFTER indicating that the gold
medal she received for her elevation
at the 2000 Olympic Games in the
women’s 200 metres was for the people
of the Bahamas, Pauline Davis-Thomp-
son made good on her statement.

Moments after she was presented
with the medal by Cuban 1976 Olympic
men’s 400 and 800 gold medalist Alber-
to Juantorena at Government House
on Thursday night, Davis-Thompson
went to the House of Assembly where
he handed the medal to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

Davis-Thompson had indicated that
Mr Ingraham was responsible for the
rejuvination of her athletic career. She
presented the medal to Ingraham at
the completion of the 2010 Budget
Debate.

Mr Ingraham embraced Davis-
Thompson, but he didn’t give any pub-
lic response. He then passed the medal
on to Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Charles Maynard.

TRACK

ATHLETES AT NCAA

AUBURN University’s sprint duo
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson and Grand
Bahamian Nivea Smith both advanced
to the final of the women’s 200 metres
after placing first and second in the same
heat at the NCAA Outdoor Champi-
onships on Thursday.

Ferguson won heat two in 23.31 sec-
onds and she was followed by Smith in
23.41 as they ended up with the third
and fifth fastest qualifying times respec-
tively in Eugene, Oregon.

They will run in the final today.

Also on Thursday, Cache Armbrister
ran the first leg of Auburn’s 4 x 400 relay
to help Auburn take second place in their
heat in 3:34.71. They ended up qualifying
with the sixth fastest time for today’s
final.

And in the men’s 4 x 400 relay,
Demetrius Pinder ran the second leg for
Texas A&M as they won their heat in
3:06.00. In that same heat, Latoy
Williams also ran the second leg for
Texas Tech as they finished fourth in
3:06.95.

However, while Pinder and Texas
A&M advanced to today’s final with the
third fastest time, Williams and Texas
Tech failed to move on with their ninth
place finish.

BASKETBALL

STREET LEGENDS

THE pre-season for the Street Leg-
ends Basketball Classic will continue
today with five games on tap at the
Carmichael Road basketball court
behind the Police Station.

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule:

6 p.m. Englerston vs Fort Charlotte;
7 p.m. Fox Hill vs St. Cecilia’s; 8 p.m.
Marathon vs Sea Breeze; 9 p.m. Pro-line
Shockers vs Carmichael; 10 p.m. Golden
Isles vs Pinewood.

On Sunday, five more games will be
played at the Killarney Court, opposite
Nesbitt.

¢ Here’s the fixtures:

6 p.m. Yamacraw vs Elizabeth; 7 p.m.
Garden Hills vs Kennedy Subdivision; 8
p.m. Montagu vs St. Anne’s; 9 p.m. Kil-
larney vs Clifton; 10 p.m. Bain Town vs
Carmichael.






Knowies, Fish
ousted in
quarterfinals

By BRENRT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



MIDWAY through the season and their sixth tour-
nament played so far, Mark Knowles and American
Mardy Fish are still trying to get over the injury bug.

Yesterday as they played in the quarterfinal of the
Aegon Championships in London, England, Knowles
suffered a recurring injury that hampered his perfor-
mance.

As a result, the number five seeded team went down
in straight sets to the top seeded team of Daniel Nestor
of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from Serbia.

The set scores were 6-4, 6-2.

“They played really well today. They were very
strong,” was how Knowles summed up the performance
of his former long-time partner Nestor and his partner
Zimonjic, the hottest team on the circuit right now.

“Obviously, they had a lot of confidence, having
just won the French Open. They played a very good
match.”

After blowing a couple of opportunities to win the
first set, Knowles and Fish went down a break at the
start of the second set.

At 1-0, Knowles reaggravated a knee injury limited
his mobility as Nestor and Zimonjic took advantage as
they cruised to an easy win.

“They were playing at an extremely high level, so I
don’t know if it would have made a difference,” said
Knowles, referring to his injury. “But that’s the way it
worked out.”

The good thing, according to Knowles, is that they
will have a week off so that he can rest and try to
rehab the knee.

“T just need to try to get healthy,” Knowles said.
“It’s not a major issue because I had this problem
before. I just need a couple days to rest and try to get
ready for Wimbledon.”

Wimbledon is the third Grand Slam Tournament
for the year. It’s scheduled to start on June 21 in Great
Britain.

“T would have liked for us to have played a few
more matches here,” Knowles reflected. “But at least
we played a couple of matches. We have just have to
get ready for Wimbledon.”

Wimbledon is the only one of the Grand slam titles
that has eluded Knowles. He and Nestor got to the final
in 2002, the same year that they clinched their first
Grand Slam at the Australian Open. They also won the
US Open in 2004 and French Open in 2007.

In the six tournaments they have played in their
first year together,

Knowles and Fish ——

turned in their a
best showing in
Memphis,
Tennessee
when _ they
reached the
semifinal in
February after
Knowles was
coming off an
injury just
before the start
of the Australian

SEE page 10-—



- Mark Knowles

Knowles, Heild to compete in the Continental Elite Championships



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

TWO of the Bahamas
Amateur Boxing Federation’s
top amateur boxers are off to
another major international
competition.

Accompanied by head
coach Andre Seymour,
Valentino Knowles and Carl
Hield are leaving for Ecuador
on Sunday where they will
compete in the Continental
Elite Championships from
June 15-19.

“We expect nothing but the
best from both of these box-
ers,” Seymour stated at a press
conference yesterday at the
office of the Bahamas
Olympic Committee.

“This level of competition
is no stranger to us. The most
important thing is to go down
there and medal because right
around the corner we have the
CAC Games and we find that
most of these countries that
are taking part in this Conti-
nental Championships will be
at the CAC Games.”

This is the first appearance
for the Bahamas at the cham-
pionships and Seymour said
this will definitely be a real
test to see what improvement
the two boxers have made
heading into the CAC.

“The Continental is main-
ly astepping stone or a warm
up for the CAC Games,” Sey-
mour said. “I expect nothing
but a medal from this Conti-
nental Championships.

“We're going up against the

best in the region, so one of
the most important thing for
us to medal, try to make it to
the final and if we can get a
gold medal, let’s go for the
gold medal.”

Both boxers, coming off
their training sessions in the
United States and Cuba, will
be fighting at heavier weight
classes, but they are all confi-
dent that they will be able to
perform at a high standard.

Hield, 22, is coming off a
silver medal performance at
a tournament in Cuba. He will
be moving up from the 64
kiloclass to 69, the same class
that he competed at in Cuba.

“T want to thank God for
giving me the strength and the
opportunity to go over there

SEE page 10

PICTURED above from left to right are Valentino Knowles, coach ee Seymour and Carl ee



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PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Anti-doping
FROM page nine

Swimming Federation, to
officially present them to
the swimmers.

“We in the Bahamas
intend to work hard in the
field of anti-doping, with
education, vigilance and
enforcement to promote
the proper vision and posi-
tive attitude toward clean
and healthy sport,” Miller
stated.

BOC’s secretary general
Rommel Knowles said the
Bahamas Government
recently passed legislation
to establish the Bahamas
Anti-Doping Commission.

The government has also
accepted the World Anti
Doping Code.

“The Anti Doping rules,
as adopted and implement-
ed in conformance with the
Bahamas Anti Doping
Commission’s responsibili-
ties under the code and are
in furtherance of the
National Olympic Commit-
tee of the Bahamas contin-
uing effort to eradicate dop-
ing in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas,” Knowles
stressed.

The chief facilitator for
the seminar will be Tom
May, the senior manager of
Programme Development
for WADA.

In attendance will be
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Charles May-
nard; Gertrude Simmons,
executive administrator for
the Bahamas National
Commission for UNESCO;
Neil Murrell of the
Caribbean Regional Anti
Doping Organization
(RADO); Dr. Jerome
Lightbourne, the chairman
of the Anti Doping Com-
mission; BOC’s president
Wellington Miller and
David Morley, vice presi-
dent of the BOC and a
member of the Caribbean
Anti Doping Organization.

Dr. Julian Stewart, a
member of the organizing
committee, said the
Bahamas has a long and
distinguished list of athletes
on the international scene
and they have been
exposed to competition at
all levels.

New budget presents interesting ,

projections for sports this year

r | VHERE were some
interesting projec-
tions for sports that

came out of the 2010 Budget
Debate in the House of
Assembly.

Now if only both Minister
of Education, Desmond Ban-
nister and Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture, Charles
Maynard, can see them come
to fruition, we would definite-
ly see more production from
the local administrators,
coaches, officials and athletes.
Most recently in his address,
Bannister, the immediate past
Minister of Sports, said com-
petitive schools sorting activi-
ties will undergo a drastic
change come September.

The former president of the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic

Associations revealed that
he intends to appoint both a
Commissioner and an Admin-
istrator of interscholastic
sports.

What he didn't mention was
whether or not these two per-
sonnel will be responsible for
all interscholastic sports,
including the private schools.

Remember the good old
days when both the govern-
ment and private schools com-
peted under one umbrella.

That was when we pro-
duced a lot more athletes who
went on to excel at the inter-
national level because they
had the competition across the
board throughout their sport-
ing disciplines. There's noth-
ing wrong with taking another
look at that idea.

All it needs is someone who
can properly oversee the
whole programme and that is
where both the commission-
er and administrator come
into play.

Sports is at the point where
administrators for all of our
core sports must be put in
place as a full time job. Both
the commissioner and admin-
istrator should be given the
full authority to properly reg-
ulate and conduct high school
sports in the manner that is
conducive for all. I fully sup-
port the move by Bannister
to ensure that high school
sports get on the right track.

As for Minister Maynard,
he mentioned the revision of
the National Spots Policy, as it
pertains to the operation of
sports in the country.

Maynard pointed out some
25 clauses that they intend to
implement in the new policy
that was presented to the
sporting body at large during a

Ministry of Sports’ Conclave
on May 15. The Policy high-
lighted a number of areas,
including the World Anti
Doping Code, a mandate for
sports bodies who are eligible
for both the receiving the dis-
bursement of funding, setting
the benchmark for national
teams when they travel, pro-
viding incentives for all inter-
national performances, the
encouragement of athletes to
train at home, as well as those
studying and competing for
the College of the Bahamas
and the incentives for Special
Olympians.

It's an interesting document
to peruse in your spare time, if
you are in any way connected
to a sorting body in the coun-
try. On top of that, it's some-
thing that I think every
Bahamian who shows their
appreciation to our athletes
whenever they succeed on the
international scene should
take the time to digest as well.

If we are all educated on
exactly what takes place in the
operation of sports in the
country, I think we will have a
better appreciation of the
efforts that go into the
achievements.

STRONG SUPPORT FOR BGF

Last week I sent out a clar-
ion call for more of our colle-
giate and elite athletes to
come home and support the
national programmes, espe-
cially those on subvention.

The youngsters in the
Bahamas Golf Federation
have heard the call because
they supported the National
Open Championships in full
force.

Had it not been for the 10-
plus golfers who came home
and participated, the nationals
would not have been as com-
petitive as it was.

In fact, federation president
James Gomez was smiling
from ear to ear as he watched
the youngsters dominate the
scoreboard.

Over the four days of com-
petition at the three different
golf courses, 25-year-old Oren
Butler and 18-year-old
Richard Gibson Jr., both col-
legians, went had-to-head with
Grand Bahamian veteran
golfer Chris Harris. Had it not
been for a shot here or there,
Butler could have easily won
his first national title.

But he made one or two
mistakes and the 47-year-old
Harris used his wealth of
experience to prevail in the
final 4-5 holes.



Pe

OPINION

It's not every day that the
Bahamian public get to see
the competition displayed
from Saturday to Tuesday.
But players such as Butler,
Gibson Jr., Benjamin Davis
Jr, Rashad Ferguson,
Matthew Cox, Nolan Johnson,
Charlie Butler and Devaughn
Robinson should be com-
mended.

They are certainly among
the future of golf in the coun-
try and Harris said he was
honoured to have been in
their company, even if he had
to go right down to the wire to
pull off a dramatic victory for
the ages.



Suzuki’s 2 HRs lead A’s
to 9-8 win over Red Sox

BASEBALL
BOSTON
Associated Press

KURT Suzuki and the Oak-
land Athletics put on a rare
power show and held off a
potent attack by the Boston Red
Sox. Suzuki had two of his
team's four homers as the A's
hit more than two for the first
time this season in a 9-8 win
Thursday that featured 32 hits,
two injured Oakland players

and two Boston runners thrown
out at home.

"Our game is more suited for
our ballpark,” where it's much
harder to hit homers, A's man-
ager Bob Geren said. "We pitch
well, we run the bases well,
spray our hits around. We do
timely, situational hitting. We're
not a real big home run team."

They were on Thursday.

Suzuki homered in his first
two at bats against Tim Wake-
field (1-4), a solo shot in the sec-

GN-1061

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS

Project:

Financing:

Abstract:
Contract/Bid Number:

Deadline for Submission:

NEW PROVIDENCE TRANSPORT PROGRAM

Inter-American Development Bank

BIG POND PARK PROJECT
Invitation for Pre-qualification

22 June 2010

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas has received a loan from the
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to finance the cost of improvements of public
roads on the island of New Providence. As part of the New Providence Road improvement
Project, the Big Pond Project has been chosen as a mitigation measure towards any
negative impact that may be caused by the road project.

The Government through the Ministry of Works & Transport (MOWT) is seeking to pre-qualify
interested contractors to present their completed pre-qualification document in sealed
envelopes for the construction of Phase 1 - Big Pond Park Development.

Companies should demonstrate that they have experience in successfully completing
similar projects including but not limited to the scope of works outlined below:

e Conduct a contaminated land study

e
e
e
e
e
°
r
o
o
®

Conduct and establish a boundary survey
Restoration of the open water portion
Develop a main park access point
Construct waiking trails and boardwalks
Removal of invasive species

Landscaping & introduction and management of native species
General clean-up of the perimeter of the pond and land
Lighting, Signage, Parking Lot/pavement markings
Park furniture and accommodation.works
Installation of security fencing and gates
Environmental management

The contract for the work will be based on the FDOT standard and FIDIC General Conditions

of Contract.

The total duration of the construction period should not exceed 180 days.

The results of the evaluation of the pre-qualification exercise will be used to prepare a
shortlist of contractors for issuing Bid Documents.

Interested companies/firrns are hereby invited to collect pre-qualification documents from
the address indicated below. Documents will be available for pick-up from 01 June 2010 to
15 June 2010 between the hours of 9:00am — 4:00om

Project Coordinator

Project Execution Unit

Ministry of Works & Transport

JFK Drive, 2"4 Floor North Wing
P.O. Box N-8156, Nassau Bahamas
Tel: (+1 242) 302-9538, Fax: (+1 242} 326-0470
Email: COLINHIGGS@BAHAMAS.GOV.BS

Applications must be placed in a sealed envelope marked “Pre-qualification Document for
Big Pond Park Project” and addressed and forwarded to the address above by 22 June
2010 between the hours of 9:00 am - 4:00 pm.

Signed
Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



ond inning and a two-run homer
in the four-run fourth. Then,
with Oakland leading 7-5 in the
eighth, Jack Cust and Kevin
Kouzmanoff hit homers on con-
secutive pitches by Manny Del-
carmen, who began the day as
the AL leader with a .128 bat-
ting average by opponents.

Not bad for a team that
entered the game with 33
homers, the third-fewest in the
majors, and just eight in their
15 previous games. Oakland had
14 hits, seven of them for extra
bases.

The loss left Red Sox catcher
Victor Martinez frustrated that
his team's 18 hits — 10 for extra
bases and three for homers —
weren't enough to win.

"We had a lot of hits, scored a
lot of runs and end up losing the
game,” he said, “but on the oth-
er side they put really good
swings on it and they end up
taking advantage.”

It didn't help that Martinez, in
the second, and Darnell
McDonald, in the fourth, were
tagged out at home by Suzuki
when they tried to score on hits
to the outfield.

"We had a lot of guys con-
tributing to help us win, but
Suzuki had a great day both
offensive and defensively,"
Geren said.





OAKLAND Athletics’ Kurt Suzuki singles off a pitch by Boston

Red Sox pitcher Scott Atchison in the ninth inning of a baseball
game at Boston's Fenway Park, Thursday, June 3, 2010. Suzuki
had two home runs Thursday helping the Athletics to a 9-8 vic-
tory over the Red Sox.



Knowles ousted

FROM page nine

Open.

Now he’s suffered another
slight injury.

“We had a horrific start to
the season and now I had a
relapse, so Mardy and I
haven’t had a chance to play
that many matches,” he point-
ed. “There’s not much you

can do when we’ve both been
injured for most of the year.

“But we’re trying to look
ahead. Obviously we have
another Grand Slam com-
ing up and there’s still a lot
of time left on the season.
So we’re not that con-
cerned.”

Knowles said they ran
into a “red hot” team in
Nestor and Zimonjic and if
they were to have been suc-
cessful, they definitely
would have had to be at

their best.

“We just have to go back
to the drawing board, try to
get healthy and hopefully
we will have better results
the next time we go out
there.”

At present, Knowles and
Fish are ranked as the No.26
team on the ATP computer
list, the lowest Knowles has
been over the past decade.
But individually, he is
ranked at No.8, while Fish
is pegged at 52.



Knowles, Heilt

FROM page nine

and perform in a different
weight class,” Hield said.

“Now this is my first tour-
nament in this weight class.
But this is a very tough tour-
nament because you have six
of the best Cubans in each of
the weight category. So it was-
mt easy.”

After a shaky start with a
9-1 win over an Australian in
his first match, Hield said he
went on to face the Cuban
bronze medalist in the nation-
al championship and he was
successful with an 18-8 deci-
sion.

In the final, Hield said he
faced the top Cuban and he
eventually lost, but he’s hop-
ing that the experience gained
will help him when he travel
to Ecuador.

“Tm willing to see if the
weight class I’m in is really the
weight class for me,” Hield
said. “Right now, the condi-

tion that I’m in with the finan-
cial support from the
Bahamas Government and
the Boxing Federation, I’m
feeling unbeatable.

“[’m going over there to
shine. ’m going to represent
my country.”

Knowles, 21, will be mov-
ing up from the 60 to the 64
kiloclass after he won the
Bahamas’ first medal at the
World Championships last
year.

He too is looking forward
to the change and is eager to
put on another spectacular
performance.

“Me and Carl both moved
up in weight category. We’re
feeling out the new weight
division because he feel more
stronger in his weight catego-
ry and I have a chance to
move up sop we won’t be los-
ing too much weight and be
more stronger in the fight,”
Knowles said.

“Usually, ’'m always men-
tally ready and physically
ready, so I’m just looking for-
ward to go down there and do
my best and bring it back.”

Federation president
Wellington Miller, who also
serves as president of the
Bahamas Olympic Commit-
tee, said since 2004, they have
put in place a ten-year pro-
gramme to get both fighters
ready for the next Olympic
Games in London, England.

“We strategised ourselves
in putting a 10-year pro-
gramme together and we con-
tinue to see the benefits from
it,” Miller pointed out. “Reno
(Johnson) made it to the quar-
terfinals at the Olympics from
that same programme.

“Valentino Knowles
became the first Bahamian to
win a fight at the World
Championships last year and
Carl Hield won a silver medal
at the Cuban Boxing
Olympics, which shows that
our programme is really grow-
ing and we continue to add to
it as we go along.”

Miller said it shows that
their programme is right on
track for the 2012 Olympics
where they are hoping that
either or both Knowles and
Hield will win a medal.

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

ber of charts in the House of
Assembly Thursday that com-
pared the Bahamas’ economic
performance to regional and
global counterparts “at the tail
end of the worst global finan-
cial and economic crisis” since
the 1930s.

“The world is emerging out
of a global economic recession
of colossal proportions, the
impact of which many
economies continue to reel,
including ours. We ignore this
reality to our peril and we insult
the intelligence of others to jux-
tapose it against some foolish
notion of ‘stop, review and can-
cel,’” said Mr Laing.

“The growth rate of practi-
cally all economies were
adversely affected by the global
financial and economic crisis.
Our decisive and necessary
action in the crisis enabled us
to survive the onslaught. The

Laing

necessary extraordinary
efforts made in
between 2008 and now
have served their pur-
pose and cannot be sus-
tained without causing
us great harm in the
long-term; and our
efforts to realign our
fiscal position must
take into consideration
the fact that the global recov-
ery on which we depend is tak-
ing place in a modest fashion
and with downside risk,” he said.

The comparative charts indi-
cated the Bahamas was per-
forming on par or above average
in many of the areas of finan-
cial and economic performance.

On the matter of unemploy-
ment, Mr Laing pointed out that
countries around the world are
experiencing record levels of

ATR Tey ICMR LIT Ca

FROM page one

of the President.”

or whenever there is a vacancy in the office of President, the
Executive Vice-president shall exercise and perform the functions

Dr Chipman-Johnson was Executive Vice-president and Vice
President of Academic Affairs. Sources said she was also being
considered for the presidency, among others, as she still main-
tained popular support within the college.

Board Chairman Baswell Donaldson said any information he
possessed was “privileged information” that he was not at liberty
to discuss. “I have no doubt the public has a right to know. The
public will know when the Council makes a decision,” he said.

The departure of Dr Chipman-Johnson now leaves three
vacancies at the vice presidential level. Dr Linda Davis is set to

resign her post as Vice President of Research, Graduate Pro-
grammes and International Relations, at the end of the month.
She plans to take an unpaid leave of absence for one year before
returning to work at the college.

Dr Pandora Johnson, Vice President of Outreach, is current-
ly on a two-year leave of absence.

“The way has been cleared of almost all vice presidents. That
is a very serious void for the college,” said Mrs Isaacs-Dotson.
While the union was not backing Dr Chipman-Johnson, or any
other candidates, in the selection process for a new president, Mrs
Isaacs-Dotson said, “We are losing someone with a wealth of
knowledge and experience. I think it is not good for the College
of the Bahamas. I don’t know how that void is going to be
filled.”

ZHIVARGO LAING



unemployment, includ-
ing mostly G-7 coun-
tries. Unemployment
in Spain climaxed at
about 20 per cent in
2010.

Mr Laing said Spain
was a relatively well
managed economy. He
said Ireland was one of
the best management
countries in the world
and they experienced
an unemployment rate
of almost 14 per cent in
2010.

He said the Bahamas’ unem-
ployment rate that skyrocketed
i 2009 was consistent with glob-
al trends, and there was no
amount of policies or initiatives
that the government could have
implemented to isolate the
Bahamas from the international
trend.

He also pointed out that
under the PLP led government
from 2002 - 2006 almost 20,000

people were unemployed for
three of their five years in office.

“Thousands upon thousands
of our people who have been
badly affected by the crisis have
been assisted through the
Unemployment Benefit
Scheme, the six-month employ-
ment programme and massive
increases in social assistance
spending. We did what was
appropriate and necessary,” said
Mr Laing.

“We in The Bahamas were
and are no different than most
throughout the world; we had to
take extraordinary measures in
the crisis to reduce its impact,
including extraordinary bor-
rowings and we now have to
rebalance our public finances
in order to be in a position to
properly offer services in the
future, support the growth of
the economy and re-establish
as much fiscal space as possible
in the event a new crisis hits,”
he said.

Two students are stabbed

FROM page one

by two men armed with handguns.

The pedestrian was shot multiple times in his body and was
taken to hospital by emergency personnel. He was listed in serious
but stable condition yesterday afternoon.

CHRISTIE: PLP WITHIN RIGHTS 10 WALK OUT OF HOUSE

FROM page one

ness leader Tommy Turnquest,
what the PLP were seeking to
do with their amendment was
unconstitutional.

However, Mr Christie said
that the governing system in
the Bahamas makes allowances
for Ministers to be examined
during the budget time about
their offices, the budget, and
their spending priorities. By
shutting down the debate, he
said, the government has
“shortchanged” the public and
its right to know.

“We will continue to do our
job for and on the behalf of the
Bahamian people. We will not
hesitate to take strong and deci-

sive positions when necessary
in the interest of the prolifera-
tion of our democracy and a
better Bahamas for all Bahami-
ans. He (Mr Ingraham) and his
colleagues must learn the
lessons of good governance.

“We abstained on all votes
to send the matter to commit-
tee because we did not want to
stop the forward progress of
the bill to a stage where we
would be allowed to offer con-
structive criticisms.

“The Opposition was denied
that opportunity to make mean-
ingful change, therefore, the no
vote was even more justified.
Our Senators will now take up
the people’s battle when it
meets to discuss the budget,”
he said.

FROM page one

: assist us in this crisis. They tend
: to err on side of caution so unless
: you nudge them they’ll not
? move,” he added.

Speaking during the wrap-up
of the Budget debate for
2010/2011, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the mea-
sures it contains — including an
expenditure reduction of 2.6 per

: cent or four per cent in real
terms, enhanced revenue collec-
: tion measures and some
: increased taxes — are “designed
: and intended to correct an imbal-
ance which left alone would cre-
ate an enduring economic crisis
of enormous proportions.”
: Having “borrowed to sustain
: living standards to the extent we
: could” the Bahamas has a “high
: level of debt” which is unsus-
: tainable, he has said. In his Bud-
: get presentation he said the gov-
: ernment plans to reduce, through
: its budgetary measures, the coun-
: try’s GFS deficit from 5.7 to 3
: per cent by July of 2011. Speak-
? ing on Thursday, he described
: the steps being taken to achieve
: this as “not a painless medicine”
: but said “the alternative is
: demonstrably worse”, pointing
: to recent economic crises in
Greece, Spain and other Euro-
pean countries.
For 2010-2011, the Govern-
: ment is projecting that it will cut
: its recurrent deficit (fixed rev-
: enues minus fixed costs) to just
$62 million, compared to $259
million for 2010, a reduction of
: more than 76 per cent. With cap-
: ital spending set to exceed capital
: revenues by $240 million, the
Government is projecting a total

Govt projections

2009-2010.

Stripping out the cost of debt
principal redemption for both
years shows that the Govern-
ment's targeted GFS fiscal deficit
for 2010-2011 is $227 million, a
46.4 per cent reduction on this
year's $425 million deficit. As a
percentage of GDP, the target
GFS deficit for 2010-2011 is 3 per
cent.

Mr Smith said he believes the
government is “sending the right
message” to international credit
rating agencies — who determine
at what rate the Bahamas can
borrow money on the interna-
tional market — when it shows
“recognition that debt and the
deficit are rising too rapidly.”

However, he said, he would
have preferred to see “a more
realistic timeline” for reduction in
these figures than that proposed
by the Prime Minister of “two to
three years.” He said that he feels
it is unlikely the deficit can be
reduced by $200 million in the
next year unless “some external
event” like the privatisation of
BTC comes into play.

“By increasing a number of
taxes you might really slow down
the economic growth rate in the
country which depends primarily
on imports for its revenue base,
having an unintended negative
effect,” he said.

Meanwhile, he said such opti-
mistic revenue projections do not
take into account the possibility
that the Bahamas may see a rip-
ple effect from the economic
woes plaguing the Euro zone at
present — exemplified by the
Greek crisis — or the likelihood

that a hurricane could hit, tak-

deficit of $302 million in 2010-. :
ing up precious resources.

2011, compared to $514 million in

Govt housing to expand by 1000 homes

: ‘THE Grand Bahama and New Providence government housing
: market is set to expand by more than 1000 homes, according to
: Kenneth Russell, Minister of Housing. Mr Russell announced
: that the National Insurance Board cleared its $10 million debt
: with the ministry, and this money would be used to expedite plans
: on the books for housing expansion. Over 300 lots in the
: Carmichael Road area are also set for repairs. Mr Russell said Fox
: Hill was among the areas designated for work. About 50 lots are
: also set to be developed on the site of the old Sugar Mill Estate.



























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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



BAIC officials in Exuma
to follow up and check
on planned projects

THE Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation’s
executive chairman Edison
Key travelled to Exuma to fol-
low up on a few projects the
corporation has planned for
that island.

The trip was also in line
with the corporation’s man-
date to stimulate and encour-
age the creation, expansion
and promotion of small and
medium sized businesses,
thereby facilitating employ-
ment and import substitution.

BAIC’s general manager,
Benjamin Rahming; assistant
general manager, Arnold
Dorsett, and human resources
manager, Vernita Rhoden-
walt, accompanied Mr Key on
the trip on Tuesday, June 8.

Everette Hart, the corpora-
tion’s investment officer sta-
tioned in Exuma and Althea
Ferguson, president of the
Exuma Farmers’ Association,
met the team at the airport.

Mr Key explained that
BAIC’s officials involved in
agriculture and handicraft
travel to the islands almost
every week because they have
a mission to empower
Bahamians to create a country
that is diversified and can ful-
fil its own agricultural needs.

“Eventually, I hope we can
make a difference in every
island, so they can at least get
to a point where they could
produce, even if is enough just
for the island itself to bring a
sense of food security for the
country in general,” he said.

“This is the time to do it
because of the downturn in
the economy; it is very impor-
tant now to try to diversify as
much as possible,” Mr Key
added.

Eventually, Bahamians
should look into large-scale
agriculture on islands like
Abaco, Andros and maybe
Grand Bahama to target the
export market, he said.

“Those three islands have
the good land and an abun-
dance of fresh water.

“Hopefully, one day we will
develop those islands for the
export market as well as the
local market,” he said.

“There is so much we can
grow and hopefully we will
move to another level of food
security with canneries, food
packaging and refrigeration.
The sky is the limit.”

Mr Key explained that one
of the main reasons for the
trip was to check the site of
the future BAIC office in
Exuma. He said BAIC will
rent space in a building on
property owned by the Exuma
Foundation in George Town.

The team toured the prop-
erty and spoke with the foun-
dation’s manager, Christopher
Kettel.

The Exuma Foundation
exists to support education in
all of its aspects on Exuma
and to enhance the quality of
life there. Established in 1998
with a gift from the Benjamin
Family Foundation, it is a US
non-profit community foun-
dation that raises funds and
issues grants to fulfil its mis-
sion.

The foundation has allowed
the government to operate a
school for special needs chil-
dren on its premises and sup-
ports the community by act-
ing as a resource centre. It
also has a trail and reserva-
tion and vegetable and fruits
trees are grown on the prop-
erty.

Mr Key said BAIC would
like to partner with the foun-
dation in creating spaces for
greenhouses and other pro-
jects.

The team also visited the L
N Coakley Senior High
School to observe land being
used by the agriculture stu-
dents to raise pigs and grow
crops like broccoli.

They also spoke with the
instructors to find out what
they need to keep the class
afloat.

They also visited a struc-
ture, which they hoped to
refurbish for use by the Exu-
ma Farmers’ Association.

But Mr Key said, “We
looked at the old house there
and it looked as if it had dete-
riorated to such a point it may
cost more than it is worth to
repair; it may be less expen-
sive to replace the building.”

The association represents
the Exuma farmers and Ms
Ferguson its president
explained that cleared land for









BAIC’S EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key (front) and BAIC’s general manager Benjamin Rah-
ming inspect the building being considered for refurbishment for the Exuma Farmers’ Associa-
tion. Due to the poor state of the building, Mr Key said it may be more advantageous to rebuild.



farming has already been
acquired through BAIC,
which was also responsible for
its creation.

The corporation has also
provided $20,000 in funding
that went towards fertilisers
and insecticides and there are
more funds to come, said Ms
Ferguson.

Exuma farmers plant crops
such as onions, peppers, Irish
potatoes, corn, cabbages and
bananas.

However, she did admit
that Exuma farmers could use
equipment to help them culti-
vate and clear land.

“After farming land for a
while, the soil gets harder to
till and equipment like I saw
in Andros would be helpful to
us,” Ms Ferguson said.

BAIC’S EXECUTIVE CHAIR-
MAN Edison Key (third from
left) looks at little cassava
plants grown at the Exuma
Foundation. Also pictured from
left: Assistant general manag-
er, BAIC, Arnold Dorsett; the
foundation’s manager, Christo-
pher Kettel; BAIC’s general
manager, Benjamin Rahming
and BAIC’s investment officer,
Everette Hart.







Queen’s Honours

FROM page two

and currently serves as a Member of
its Finance Division.

Mr Alfred Bismark Coakley is one
of the founding members of the Sun-
shine Group of Companies (Sunshine
Boys) which was established in 1969.
He is a member of St. Agnes Angli-
can Church, Baillou Hill Road. Mr
Coakley is also Chairman of the Crip-
pled Children’s Committee; Past Pres-
ident of the Rotary Club, West Nas-
sau; the Anglican Church Men’s
Council; and Past Grand Master,
Prince Hall Masonic Lodge. He is the
recipient of the Paul Harris Fellow-
ship Award.

Mrs Susan Gail Holowesko-Lar-
son began her stellar career at the
Bahamas National Trust where she
served as Education Officer, Director
of Education and Deputy Director of
the Trust. Over a 24-year period, she
participated in strategic planning,
developed grant proposals, provided
guidance for Government policies rel-
ative to the environment and imple-
mented the highly acclaimed Nation-
al Conservation Educational Pro-
gramme for Bahamian youth. Mrs
Larson is currently the co-founder
and coordinator of the Ride for Hope
Bahamas, which benefits cancer
patients and cancer research in The
Bahamas. In addition, she chaired
several fora on various aspects of the
environment, has authored and been
a co-editor for several publications;
and serves on several civic and com-
munity organiations, including the
Board of Directors of St. Andrew’s
School, President of the
Parents/Teachers’ Association of the
St. Andrew’s School; the Board of
Director of Port New Providence
Owners Association; Member of the
Communication and Education Com-
mission and World Commission on
Protected Areas and IUCN - the
International Union for the Conser-
vation of Nature.

Mr David Pinder worked in his
father’s business before realising his
dream to become an entrepreneur in
a virtually new market in the con-
struction industry. Over the years,
he has developed and operated a
thriving business and was the first
person to produce pre-cast concrete
septic tanks and expanded the tile
industry, roofing and ornamental
block industry. An unassuming indi-
vidual, he has quietly contributed to
many charities and cultural and com-
munity organisations over the years.
His business, known for quality prod-
ucts at affordable prices, has assist-
ed many to find employment as well
as to build homes at reasonable costs.

Mrs Elaine Ann Pinder began her
illustrious career as a teacher and
guidance counselor in the public
school system. However, armed with
a new idea, she left the profession to
enter the field of business which today
includes two exclusive clothing stores,
a well known fast food business at
five locations that is set to become

international, and a five star gourmet
restaurant scheduled to opening in
September 2010. Mrs Pinder is as gen-
erous as she is successful. In an effort
to assist, and in gratitude to long-serv-
ing employees, Mrs. Pinder conveyed
real estate with utilities in place, as
gifts to each of the employees. Fur-
ther, she is a contributor to such
organisations as The Red Cross, The
Ranfurly Home for Children, The
Gentleman’s Club, The Police Asso-
ciation, churches, schools and vari-
ous junkanoo groups. She is particu-
larly concerned with helping the dis-
advantaged and has contributed to
agencies that assist children with
AIDS, with transforming youth gangs
into “gangs of achievers”, as well as to
individual families. Her latest initia-
tive, “Women Who Care”, will be
instrumental in urban renewal pro-
jects. She is an active member of her
Church in which she participates in
the outreach ministries.

Mrs Susan Roberts has been a
founding member, the President, and
now, the guiding light of the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas for more
than 33 years. She has selflessly given
of her financial resources to create
and sustain an organisation which has
become one of the most important
associations in the country. Her work
with the sick and dying is known
throughout the country. Her work in
Harbour Island and Eleuthera as well
as other islands, brought aid and
comfort to countless people in need.
She is loved, admired and well-
respected.

Reverend Ralph Russell has con-
tributed invaluably to the country in
the area of business and religion. He
is the co-founder of the first Funeral
Home, Russell’s and Pinder’s Funer-
al Home in Grand Bahama, which
was established in 1962.

The British Empire Medal- Civil
Division - (BEM)

Ms Cleomie Hilda Antonio has
served for many years in numerous
Catholic charities such as the Roman
Catholic Benevolent Association, the
Sisters of Charity and with the Bene-
dictine Fathers. She has received
many awards for her charitable ser-
vice to the Church. Ms. Antonio is
also an accomplished musician and
played the clarinet as a member of
the Roman Catholic Band. Despite
being very active in the Church, Ms.
Antonio has found time to make civic
contributions and is a founding mem-
ber and Past President of the Wom-
an’s Association of the Free National
Movement Party and Meritorious
Council Member of that organisation.

Ms Betty Brenda Archer began
her career at a very young age and
remained in business until she retired
as the Director of Human Resources

in a company in which she had
worked for 26 years. In addition to
her professional career, Mrs. Archer
is very active in the life of her Church
as an organist with responsibility for
all parish services, weddings and
funerals. She has also been instru-
mental in the development of the
choirs and the music ministry of the
Parish and currently serves as Presi-
dent of the Music Ministry. She has
served as secretary to the Vestry,
Diocesan Synod delegate, and Chair-
man of the Church’s annual bazaar.
Mrs Archer is involved in civic organ-
isations, including Past President of
the Women’s Association of the Free
National Movement, Vice-Chairman
and Past Executive of the Party. She
has worked in the administration at
the Party’s Headquarters. She is also
a member of the Rum Cay Associa-
tion and past President.

Mr James Wilfred Dean began
working as a seaman on his father’s
boats at the age of 13. In The
Bahamas, which is an archipelago,
fishing and the mailboat system were
critical to the livelihood of Family
Island communities. It is through
mailboats that Family Islanders made
a living and had a means of trans-
portation and communication with
other islands.

Over the course of his career, Mr.
Dean has worked on, owned and cap-
tained mail boats, and has created a
thriving fishing and processing busi-
ness which exports seafood to coun-
tries outside of The Bahamas. His
businesses have provided jobs for
many persons in the community. He
has served on various Governmental
Boards and Committees and has been
a Councilor on the Sandy Point Aba-
co Local Government Council. He
is currently a member of the Fish-
eries Advisory Board.

Ms. Claretta Duncombe began her
career as a Registered Nurse. She sub-
sequently left nursing and became an
Office Administrator in Deloitte and
Touche where she worked for 32
years. Ms. Duncombe has been recog-
nised as a person who works tireless-
ly for the advancement of women in
every aspect of business, professional
and public life. She is one of the
founding members of the Women’s
Association of the Free National
Movement.

Mr. Emmett Munroe was born in
Ragged Island and has sailed vessels
trading between Ragged Island, Cuba
and Haiti. He worked for the late Sir
Roland Symonette, transporting
materials for road works in the 1970’s.
He operated a tugboat for Sir Dur-
ward Knowles in Nassau Harbour in
1987. Captain Munroe and his uncle
purchased their first mail boat and
named it the “Emmett and Cephas”.
In 1995, he and his two sons formed
the Munson Shipping Company at

which time they purchased the m.v.
Cherise. They acquired the mailboat
the “Island Link” in 2004. Captain
Munroe is the owner of the “Wash
Bowl” on Ida Street, which has been
in operation for many years. Since
his retirement in 2006, his two sons
operate the business.

Mrs. Arlene Nash Ferguson, a vet-
eran educator, served in the field of
education for more than 24 years, dur-
ing which time she held the positions
of Senior Mistress at the Government
High School, lecturer in History and
Assistant Chairperson of the Social
Sciences Division of the College of
The Bahamas, and Vice Principal of
both the Preparatory and Secondary
Department of St. John’s College.
The last nine years of her service in
the field of education were spent as
Principal of St. John’s College, the
largest school operated by the Angli-
can Diocese in The Bahamas. Mrs.
Ferguson has impacted the lives of
thousands of young Bahamians. She
has shared with students her belief in
the importance of developing the
whole person, the Christian obliga-
tion to use all talents to the fullest,
and an appreciation for the culture
of the Bahamas.

Mrs. Ferguson is an avid proponent
of Bahamian culture and has partici-
pated in the Junkanoo parades from
the age of four. She served on the
National Junkanoo Committee for 24
years and is the founding Secretary
of the One Family Junkanoo and
Community Organisation.

She has been an active participant
in One Family’s Community Out-
reach Programme and has co-chaired
the One Family Book Fair “Rush to
Read”. Mrs Ferguson was the recip-
ient of the Links Inc. ‘Unsung Hero in
the Arts’ Award and has been recog-
nised by the Ministry of Tourism for
her long service to the National
Junkanoo Committee and her out-
standing participation in the People to
People Programme. In 1997, she was
selected by the Ministry of Tourism to
represent The Bahamas on the
Bahamas Customs Inspection Sticker.

Ms. Olivia Turnquest has given
over 40 years of dedicated service in
the field of education. She served as
Charter Member of Kiwanis Club and
Supervisor of the Community Based
Rehabilitation Programme for the
learning disabled. She was the leader
of the Bahamas Red Cross on Long
Island and the Ladies Friendship Club
of Long Island. Ms. Turnquest was
instrumental in the building of the
self help project — “The Senior Citi-
zens” Recreational Centre.

Reverend John C. Wallace has
been the Pastor of the New Mt. Olivet
Baptist Church, Grand Bahama, since
1994. As a result of his ministry,
many person’s lives have been
changed and there has been very sig-

nificant church growth and develop-
ment. Reverend Wallace was instru-
mental in the commissioning of seven
ordained Ministers to the Gospel min-
istry, namely four Deaconess and
three Evangelists. Reverend Wallace
and his wife are actively involved in
community outreach programmes,
including the distribution of break-
fast to the elderly on weekends.

Ms. Erma Williams has owned her
own catering business for many years
during which time she has served at
some of the most prestigious national
events. Throughout her adult life, she
has been a social activist and has
worked tirelessly for the advancement
of women. Ms. Williams is a member
of several women’s organisations and
has represented The Bahamas at
international conferences in the USA
and Latin America. She is currently a
senior member of the Women’s Asso-
ciation of the Free National Move-
ment Party. She is an active member
of her Church.

The Queen’s Police Medal (QPM)

Mr. Marvin Dames, Deputy Com-
missioner of Police, has a long and
distinguished career in the Royal
Bahamas Police Force. During the
early years of his career, he worked in
the Uniformed Branches. Since 1995,
he worked in the Plain Clothes Divi-
sion, where he was Commander for
the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU),
and Officer-In-Charge of the Central
Detective Unit (CDU) from 1998 to
2007. In June 2007, he assumed com-
mand of the New Providence District.
Mr. Dames was promoted to the post
of Deputy Commissioner of Police in
January, 2010. He is a dedicated and
committed officer, who has consis-
tently performed at the highest stan-
dard. He possesses strong leadership
traits and is able to take command of
assigned areas of responsibility. Mr.
Dames is an officer of integrity who
provides exceptional service to the
Royal Bahamas Police Force.

Mr. Quinn McCartney, Assistant
Commissioner, is an outstanding
young Bahamian who is truly an asset
to the Royal Bahamas Police Force.
He is competent, industrious, loyal
and remains fully engaged in making
the best contributions to The
Bahamas so that we have a safer place
to visit, live, work and play.

Since joining the Force, he has
demonstrated abilities which have
earned him the admiration and
respect of his peers and the public at
large.

He has led and successfully imple-
mented many impressive projects in
Law Enforcement and is currently
leading significant change initiative
within The Royal Bahamas Police
Force. Assistant Commissioner
McCartney is the recipient of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force Long
Service and Good Conduct Medal,
and the Meritorious Service Medal.
He was promoted to Senior Assistant
Commissioner of Police in January,
2010.

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Full Text


WEATHER

(V\

Pim blowin’ it

90F
75F

> PARTLY
~~ SUNNY

Volume: 106 No.166

Sey
eS
AND REAL ESTATE

BAHAMAS BIGGEST



The Tribune E&

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

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SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

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SWEET
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MWeDonald'’s downtown

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24 hours

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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Knowles and Fish are
ousted in quarterfinals

SEE SPORTS ON PAGE NINE

_——

|

ay eal



opposition Progressive Liberal Par-
ty.

The PLP heavily criticised the
government during the recent bud-
get debate over high unemployment
rates, a rising national debt, and poor
management of the country’s eco-
nomic and social affairs.

Dr Rhonda
Chipman-Johnson
steps down

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE UNEXPECTED retire-
ment of long-time educator and
administrator at the College of
the Bahamas, Executive Vice-
president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson, shocked some at the
College, yesterday, when the
news broke.

Dr Chipman-Johnson said she
expected people to speculate,
but she wished not to comment
on her reasons, saying only that
she was “exercising (her) eligi-
bility to retire.”

Inside sources told the Tyri-
bune that Dr Earla Carey-
Baines, Dean of Liberal and
Fine Arts, was selected by the
COB Board to act as interim
president, in the wake of Janyne
Hodder’s retirement this month.
They claimed it was a “slap in
the face” to Dr Chipman-John-
son, who has served as interim-
president on at least three dif-
ferent occasions.

MONSIGNOR
PRESTON MOSS

SOL KERZNER



Dr Carey-Baines is also the
College’s lead negotiator, in the
contract negotiations with the
Union of Tertiary Educators of
The Bahamas (UTEB) that
have now gone to arbitration.

“Tt is quite a shock if it is true.
Once we are officially informed
we will issue a statement. The
union’s position was that Dr
Chipman-Johnson should have
been appointed acting president.
(Appointing Dr Carey-Baines
would be a) violation of the Col-
lege Act. The Act says in the
absence of the president or if
there is a vacancy it is to be filled
by the Executive Vice-presi-
dent,” claimed Jennifer Isaacs-
Dotson, UTEB president.

Mrs Isaacs-Dotson was refer-
ring to Section 6 of the College
of The Bahamas Act that states:
“Whenever the President is
absent from The Bahamas or is
for any reason unable to per-
form the functions of his office,

SEE page 11



Veta see

Sol Kerzner knighted



in Queen’s Honours

GOVERNMENT House announced yesterday that Her Majesty
the Queen has bestowed a knighthood on Kerzner International
President Sol Kerzner and a distinguished honour of Saint Michael
and Saint George on former MP Warren Levarity and Vicar Gen-
eral of the Archdiocese of Nassau Monsignor Preston Moss.

Mr Kerzner and 25 Bahamians were honoured for exemplary
services to the country by the Queen in her annual Birthday
Honours List.

Mr Alphonso Elliott was made a Commander of the British
Empire (CBE) and Rev Kenris Carey, Bishop Wenith Davis, Mr
William “Billy” Lowe and Rev Vernon Moses became Officers of
the British Empire (OBE).

Becoming Members of the Most Excellent Order of the British
Empire (MBE) were Mr Marvin Bethell, Mr Bismark Coakley, Mrs
Susan Holowesko-Larson, Mr David Pinder, Mrs Elaine Pinder,
Mrs Susan Roberts, and Rev Ralph Russell.

Receiving the British Empire Medal (BEM) - Civil Division
were Ms Cleomie Hilda Antonio, Ms Brenda Archer, Mr James
Dean, Ms Claretta Duncombe, Mr Emmett Munroe, Mrs Arlene
Nash Ferguson, Ms Olivia Turnquest, Rev John Wallace, and Ms

SEE page two





Laing defends govt
performance in
financial crisis

STATE Minister for Finance,
Zhivargo Laing, put the govern-
ment’s performance in the midst of
the global financial crisis in per-
spective, to rebut criticism from the



Minister Laing presented a num-

SEE page 11







GUNS SU ALU UIE

LEADER OF THE OPPO-
SITION Perry Christie
addresses the media
yesterday in a press
conference.

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia. net

CONDEMNING the
FNM and Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for fail-
ing to look out for the
interests of the poor and
downtrodden, Opposition
Leader Perry Christie
said yesterday that his
party was well within
their rights to walk out of
Parliament last night.

Pointing to the fact
that his Member of Par-
liament for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell had moved a
motion to amend the
social services subvention
for funeral payments
from its present $650
mark to $1,300 per per-
son for at least 1,000 peo-
ple, Mr Christie said that
the FNM outright reject-
ed the idea.

“The story for us then
is a simple one. This is
about an attempt by the
PLP to help the poor.
This is about our attempt
to fearlessly represent the
Bahamian people in the
House of Parliament. It
is our attempt to ensure
that in these times of lit-
tle, priority is given to
those who need help the
most. This is my way of
the highway philosophy
of the FNM has run its
course. Enough is
enough,” he said.

After the government
moved for the wrap up of
the debate and a vote on
the bill, the 2010/2011
Budget was passed in the
House of Assembly on
Thursday night. Accord-
ing to government busi-

SEE page 11



Meigs i

Govt projections for budget
year ‘may be too optimistic’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE GOVERNMENT?’S debt-cutting and revenue-
raising projections for the budget year may be too
optimistic and do not take into account the possibility
of a double-dip recession or an event like a major hur-
ricane, said a former minister of state for finance.

James Smith, a senator during the former PLP
administration, yesterday suggested an effective step to
boost the economy which has not yet been proposed
could be achieved by having the Central Bank of the
Bahamas lower the prime interest rate — simultaneously
lessening debt burdens for regular Bahamians and for
the country’s “biggest debtor”, the Government.

“The prime rate in The Bahamas has not changed
since February 2005 despite the fact the prime rate
has been dropping across world. In the same way you
go to astimulus package to increase aggregate demand
In a recession you also want to provide grease for the
private sector by lowering interest rates,” said Mr
Smith, Chairman of CFAL.

“T think Ministry of Finance should speak to the
Central Bank on monetary policy and ways it could

SEE page 11

all

Two students are stabbed at
_ Gh Walker Senior High School

AN argument at CR Walker Senior High
: School between a group of students resulted in
: the stabbing of two 17-year-old male students.
i Police are questioning a 16-year-old student
: in connection with this incident.
: Details were sketchy last night, but Tribune
: sources say the fight was over a pair of Oakley
; sunglasses.
: Around 1.40pm yesterday, police respond-
: ed to emergency calls from the Baillou Hill
: Road campus. Investigations are continuing.
i Police also responded to an armed robbery
: and shooting on Friday, which they are inves-
: tigating. The armed robbery occurred on Tyler
: Street off Boyd Road around 3am.
i Two men, both armed with shotguns,
: entered a residence on Tyler Street and robbed
: a woman of an undetermined amount of cash
: and other personal items, according to police
; reports. Both men are thought to have fled
: the area on foot.
: The shooting occurred around 1am at Toote
: Shop Corner off East Street. Reports indicate
; a 28-year-old male pedestrian was approached

SEE page 11



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





Suspected cemetery vandalism investigated

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
reports of suspected vandalism
at the Old Trail Cemetery,
according to a source within the
Ministry of Works.

This comes days after com-
plaints were raised about the
condition of the cemetery,
which is maintained by the gov-
ernment, and fears of possible
grave robbing. Reports
emerged this week that at least
one cadaver was seen floating
in its grave brought to the sur-
face by a spate of rainy weath-
er.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, a ministry offi-
cial remained tightlipped on the
reports, only saying the matter
has been turned over to police.

"The police are actually look-
ing into that now. I can't com-
ment on situation because its
under investigation. The report
was made to southern police
station,” he said.

Meantime the United
Funeral Directors Association
of the Bahamas plans to meet
with government to discuss,
among other things, concerns
regarding the upkeep of pub-
lic cemeteries, said Wendell
Dean the group's president.

"All the public cemeteries



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER



are in that condition not just
Old Trail," said Mr Dean, when
asked if the association had any
problems with the way govern-
ment grave yards are main-
tained.

"The public cemeteries are
just not properly managed," he
added.

He said he planned to meet
with other members of the
association to form a consen-
sus on the issue before meet-
ing with government to put
forth their concerns.

"It's a matter that has to be
addressed by the association to
the government (but) we're in
the process of having a meet-

"

ing.
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





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ALFRED COAKLEY Sowell

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MARVIN BETHELL

FROM page one

Erma Williams.

Receiving the Queen’s
Police Medal (QPM) were
Deputy Commissioner of Police
Marvin Dames and Assistant
Commissioner Quinn McCart-
ney.

Knight Commander
(KCMG) Honorary

A native of South Africa and
Permanent Resident of the
Bahamas, Mr. Solomon Kerzn-
er is the founder of the Kerzn-
er International franchise in the
Bahamas. He acquired Resort’s
International properties on Par-
adise Island in 1994. Over the
past 16 years, the resort has
been transformed into the pre-
mier vacation destination in the
Caribbean region, including the
signature Atlantis Resort, the
6-star One and Only Ocean
Club, spectacular marina facil-
ities, championship golf course,
high-end vacation residence
club and exclusive residential
enclave.

As owner and operator of
almost 25 per cent of all hotel
rooms in the Bahamas, Kerzn-
er International and its Atlantis
brand are the dominant force in
the tourism industry. It is also
the largest private sector
employer in the Bahamas
engaging some 5 per cent of the
employed labour force. Mr.
Kerzner and his corporation are
also important philanthropic
contributors to charities, cul-
tural festivals and other com-
munity and education develop-
ment projects in the Bahamas.

Solomon Kerzner’s career in
tourism began in his native
South Africa where he acquired
his first hotel in 1962. By 1979,
he was responsible for the most
ambitious resort development
in South Africa, the five-star
Sun City Resort. His hotel
holdings expanded to Mauri-
tius prior to his venture into the
Bahamas in 1994. Since then,
he has invested in resort and
gaming facilities in North
America, the Maldives, Moroc-
co and Dubai.

Recognized internationally
as a leader among tourist resort
and casino owners, developers
and operators, Mr. Kerzner was
the first non-American to be
admitted to the USA’s Family
Hall of Fame in 1992. In 1999,
he was awarded the FED-
HASA Lifetime Achievement
Award. This was followed by
the Anger Gabrielle Award for
distinguished corporate and
philanthropic leadership in
2003; the Innovation Award
granted by the Hotel Invest-
ment Conference Asia Pacific,
Hong Kong in 2004; the inter-
national Hotelier of the Year
Award, Las Vegas Hotel and
Restaurant Show and the Uni-
versity of Johannesburg Ellen
Kurwago Council Award, 2007,
and the HSMAT Albert E.
Koehl Lifetime Achievement
Award in 2010.

The Most Distinguished
Order of St Michael and St
George — Companion (CMG).

Mr Warren Levarity, an
accountant by profession,
entered politics in the 1960’s
during the Bahamas’ struggle
for majority rule. He became a
Member of Parliament in the
opposition party during which
time he gave excellent support
to his constituents in the Fami-
ly Islands. Later, when majori-
ty rule became a reality, Mr
Levarity was made Minister of
Out Island Affairs in the first
Cabinet of the governing party,
the Progressive Liberal Party.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Ga LE
AO TH

eat
rag ALY |



OLVIA TURNQUEST



NAAN BPA tit ste)

In 1971, he became one of the
founding fathers of the Free
National Movement. He went
on to serve his community for
some 20 more years before
retirement.

Monsignor Preston Moss

Monsignor Preston Moss was
ordained a priest in 1965 and
served as assistant pastor and
pastor in various parishes. He
also served as Chancellor of the
Diocese, Vicar General of the
Diocese and Rector of the
Cathedral. In addition to his
Church duties, Msgr. Moss has
held directorships in various
organisations, including the
Antilles Pastoral Institute, the
Pontifical Aids Society, the
Antilles Episcopal Ecumenical
Commission, the Diocesan
Family Life Commission and
the Diocesan Pastoral Team.
His civic contributions involve
Director of the Bank of The
Bahamas, membership in the
National Drug Council, the
National Tourism Awards
Committee, the Catholic School
Board and St. Augustine’s Col-
lege School Board, Co-Chair-
man of the Bahamas Order of
Merit Committee and Chaplain
of the Senate of The Bahamas.

Commander of the British
Empire (CBE)

Mr. Alphonso Elliot began
work as an electrician at Ray’s
Electric Company before join-
ing the Engineering Depart-
ment of the Princess Margaret
Hospital. Later, he was
employed as the Relief Man-
ager at Bahamas Industrial
Gases where he gained inter-
national experience when he
was sent to work in Antigua
and Barbuda, St. Kitts, Tortola
and the US Virgin Islands. Mr
Elliot and his business partner
established the Bahamas Weld-
ing and Fire Co. in 1972. He
also owns Island Gas Ltd.,
Freeport Gas Ltd. and Alarms
Ltd. Mr Elliot gives generously
to community and civic organi-
sations such as the Bahamas
Red Cross and contributes qui-
etly to many cultural organisa-
tions. He is an active member
of his church and is a Meritori-
ous Council Member of the
Free National Movement party.

Officer of the British Empire
(OBE)

Reverend Kenris Carey has
been a Lay Preacher in the
Methodist Church for more
than 30 years. She served as
Vice-President and the first
female President of the
Bahamas Conference of the
Methodist Church. She has also
served on the Presidium of the
World Council of Churches as a
Vice-President of Board of
Evangelism, and on the Juve-
nile Panel of the Bahamas Gov-
ernment for many years. Rev
Carey was ordained in January,
2009 and currently serves as the
Minister in charge of the South
Eleuthera Churches. She has
the distinction of being Presi-
dent Emeritus of the Bahamas
Conference of the Methodist
Church.

Bishop B. Wenith Davis
began his religious life as a
youngster in “Grant”, a little
town in the settlement of Man-
grove Cay, Andros. He started
the Zion South Beach Min-
istries in New Providence in
1979 after his seminary train-
ing and ordination in Novem-
ber, 1978. Bishop Davis’ pro-
fessional life has afforded him
the opportunity to extensively
serve the Bahamian people. He
has served as Customs Officer,
Customs Department; teacher
and Head of Department, Min-
istry of Education; Vice Prin-
cipal, Jordan Prince Williams
High School; founding member
and Vice-Principal, Bahamas
Baptist College; founding mem-
ber and Academic Dean,
Bahamas Baptist Community
College and evening lecturer at

COT ee =

Queen’s Honours

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Neen oe
aa eUSOlN



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local institutes. Bishop Davis is
a lecturer at the Annual Ses-
sion of The Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church Fellowship Confer-
ence. He has become well
known for his administrative
skills in Church Leadership
Conference and inter-church
workshops. He was officially
appointed to the position of
Bishop of Global Affairs for
the Full Gospel Baptist Fel-
lowship in February, 2005.

Zion South Beach Ministries
gives assistance to the commu-
nity and indeed to The
Bahamas, in the form of schol-
arships, medical care, mort-
gages, personal loans, the pro-
vision of school uniforms and
new and used clothing. Bishop
Davis’ wife, Pastor Ismae
Davis, works closely with the
Ministry. The Zion Christian
School was birthed out of the
vision of Bishop Davis and it
offers quality education to hun-
dreds of students. The Media
Ministry of Zion continues to
reach the masses with a weekly
radio broadcast.

Mr William E. “Billy” Lowe
began his career at a young age
when he saw the opportunity
and the need in the community
for a pharmacy that would car-
ry a variety of supplies includ-
ing prescription and non-pre-
scription drugs and other med-
ical supplies. Over the years,
he has expanded this successful
and well-known business to five
locations and has added a
wholesale drug agency. Addi-
tionally, he has ventured as a
partner in many other busi-
nesses in The Bahamas. Mr
Lowe is an active member of
his Church where he con-
tributes generously of his
resources. He is also known for
his generous contributions to
various charities.

Reverend Vernon Moses was
ordained in the Assemblies of
God Faith in 1959. He has
served in various capacities in
the Churches throughout the
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
and internationally. He has held
the positions of Pastor, Bible
Teacher, Director and Lecturer
at the Assemblies of God Bible
College, Presbyter, General
Presbyter, Secretary and Trea-
surer of the Assemblies of God,
and finally Superintendent of
the Assemblies of God in the
Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands. During his
tenure as Superintendent, Rev-
erend Moses initiated revisions
to the Church’s constitution
and worked to improve the
Church’s organisational struc-
ture, implemented a revision of
the school curriculum and
assisted in establishing the
national outreach radio min-
istry. In 2001, his contributions
were recognised by the Church
when he received an Honorary
Doctor of Divinity Degree from
Richmond Virginia Seminary.

The Most Excellent Order of
the British Empire— (MBE)

Marvin Vernon Bethell
joined J.S. Johnson & Co. Ltd.
in 1969 and became Managing
Director of that insurance com-
pany in 1989. He is a member
of Bahamas General Insurance
Association and a Director of
Insurance Company of The
Bahamas Ltd. Mr Bethel’s civic
contributions include his Direc-
torships in Bahamas Waste Ltd.
and the Bank of the Bahamas
Ltd. He is involved with the
Rotary Club of South East Nas-
sau, where he became a Paul
Harris Fellow, and is currently
the President-elect. Dedicated
to his Church, Mr. Bethell
serves as Trustee and Assistant
Chairperson of the Board of
Governors of the Church’s
school, Queen’s College. He is
Past Treasurer and Director of
the Board of Finance and Prop-
erty of the Bahamas Confer-
ence of the Methodist Church,

SEE page 12

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THE TRIBUNE






eet st}



(FROM LEFT) Assistant Administrator Ranfurly Horne Delano
Knowles, Administrator Ranfurly Home Dr. Clarke, Marketing Man-
ager Bristol Wines and Sprit Arame Strachan and Northern
Caribbean Manarger Donniash Armbristor.

Fiji Water Bristol Wines
flonate to Ranfurly Home

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A DONATION was pre-
sented to the Ranfurly Home
for Children yesterday to help
keep the Mackey Street
orphanage open following an
article in The Tribune.

Fiji Water and Bristol
Wines and Spirits made the
joint donation of $1,000 and
10 cases of bottled water to
be sold at Ranfurly Home’s
upcoming fundraiser.

Marketing manager for
Bristol Wines and Spirits
Arame Strachan said the
donation was prompted by
news the Ranfurly Home was
facing the biggest funding cri-
sis in its 54-year history and
could be forced to close the
boys’ dorm.

“We just had an over-
whelming desire to help,” Ms
Strachan said.

“The Ranfurly Home is in
problems financially at the
moment, to the point where
they are threatening to close
part of the property, and we
just wanted to do whatever we

her

could to not let this happen.”

A significant drop in dona-
tions over the last year and a
$5,600 reduction in govern-
ment funding next year will
make it difficult for the chil-
dren’s home to meet its
$300,000 annual operating cost
and care for the 32 children
currently at the home.

Board of directors president
Remelda Moxey said the
board may be forced to close
the boys dorm if more funding
is not found.

“Finances are the worst
they’ve ever been,” Ms Moxey
said.

“Tt's easier to feed girls than
to feed boys so the thinking
is we may have to close the
boys dorm and the govern-
ment (the Department of
Social Services) may have to
find alternative homes for
them.”

The Ranfurly Home will
host a fundraising steak-out
on Saturday, June 26 prior to
their annual raffle.

If you would like to make a
donation, log on to www.ran-
furlyhome.org or call the Ran-
furly Home on 393-3115.





as
Solar i Power

CONCEPTS

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

OLYMPIC champion
Pauline Davis-Thompson gave
the gold medal for which she
waited 10 years to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham in an
emotional scene at the House
of Assembly on Thursday
evening.

Fresh from receiving her
gold medal from Cuba’s 1976
Olympic 400m and 800m
champion Alberto Juantore-
na in a special ceremony at
Government House, the
sprinter and International
Association of Athletics Fed-
erations (IAAF) council mem-
ber hurried to the House of
Assembly where Mr Ingraham
was wrapping up the annual
budget debate.

Mrs Davis-Thompson, now
44, credited Mr Ingraham with
her success as she said he
saved her athletic career.

“In 1992 I had a difficult
time, I had given up sports,”
she said.

“Mr Ingraham searched for
me for some time.

“He took me to his office
and wanted to know what I
was up to.

“T then saw the gentle side
of him.

“When he saw the tears
start to pour from my eyes, he
looked me in my eyes and said
that I was not going to fail on
his watch.”

Mrs Davis-Thompson had
been cheated out of her gold
medal in the 200 metre race
at the 2000 Olympic Games in
Sydney by American Marion
Jones who was stripped of her

CORRECTION

IN Thursday’s edition of The
Tribune under the headline "Fra-
ternity names top male high
school student of the year’, the
student pictured was incorrectly
named as Salathial Williams.

Salathial Wells is the name of
the top male student of the year.





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medals when she admitted in
2007 to using steroids prior to
the Games.

But it was not until Decem-
ber that the International
Olympic Committee (IOC)
reallocated the 200m gold
medal, making Ms Davis-
Thompson a double gold
medalist as she was also a
member of the 4x400m
Bahamian relay team that won
in Sydney.

Ms Davis-Thompson
explained how she would not
have been able to achieve such
success if Mr Ingraham had
not offered to help her in 1992.

Comeback

When he asked her what
she wanted she said she want-
ed to return to training in
Atlanta and to her former job
in the Ministry of Tourism,
which he arranged for her.

“The prime minister is a
man of his word; everything

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010, PAGE 3

Davis-Thompson credits

Prime Minister for success

and accept this medal.”

Mr Ingraham smiled as he
stood up from his seat and
walked over to Mrs Davis-
Thompson, allowing her to
put the medal around his neck
before she held him in a long
and tearful embrace.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles Maynard
had announced at the award
ceremony that June 10 would
be ‘Pauline Davis-Thompson
Day’ as he presented her with
a $10,000 cheque marking the
difference between the
$30,000 silver medal prize and
the $40,000 gold she had right-
fully earned for the 200m race.

“T still cannot believe [am a
double gold medallist,” she
said.

“To the people of the
Bahamas, I hope I have made
you proud.

“Each time I went out there
to compete I never represent-
ed myself, I represented the
entire country, each and every
one of you.”



he said to me that day he did
expeditiously,” Mrs Davis-
Thompson said.

“Because he told me I was
not going to fail on his watch,
IT want him to continue to look
every Bahamian child in the
eye and tell them that they are
not to fail on his watch.”

Looking at the prime min-
ister, Ms Davis declared: “I
want you to know I love you.

“You are single-handedly
responsible for this gold
medal.

“T want to give it to you to
secure for the people of the
Bahamas.

“Prime minister Ingraham,
would you please come up

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Under the
Distinguished Patronage
of

Dame Marguerite Pindling

presents
Saturday,
June 19, 2010
The Wyndham
Nassau Resort,

| | ! Cable Beach

Cocktails: 7:00 p.m.
Dinner: 8:30 p.m.

Dress: Black Tie
Donation: $200

Honouring this year’s recipients of the
Sir Lynden Pindling Award for Excellence

Nurse Rosa Mae Bain Dr. Perry Gomez

For Tickets and Information
Call: La Rose Boutique 356-3467
or the Home Store 362-5201




PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Cancer wins may be bigger than they seem

CHICAGO — Doctors reported gains
against nearly every form of cancer at a con-
ference that ended this week. Yet when Will
Thomas heard about an advance against
prostate cancer, he wanted to know just one
thing: "Is it a cure?"

"I see billions and billions done on
research, and it's all for treatment," said the
Alabama man who has several friends with the
disease. "When will they cure it?"

Many people share his frustration. The top
achievements reported at the American Soci-
ety of Clinical Oncology added an average
of just two to six months of life. One pricey
drug made headlines merely for delaying the
time until ovarian cancer got worse.

Progress has always been slow for cancer
treatment. New therapies are tested on people
who are so sick and out of options that any
extension of life is considered a success. A
cure is not usually possible.

But some of the victories reported this
week against breast and prostate cancer,
leukemia and the deadly skin cancer called
melanoma may be larger than they appear.
These trends offer reason for optimism:

¢ Newer drugs seem to be making a bigger
difference for small, specific groups of patients,
as companies develop treatments that more
precisely target genes behind subtypes of can-
cer.

Pfizer Inc. rushed into late-stage testing
one such drug: crizotinib, which is aimed at
only 4 per cent of lung cancer patients. More
than 90 per cent of them responded to the
drug in initial tests. High response rates also
have been reported for other novel drugs for
melanoma and breast cancer driven by certain
genes.

The hope: Develop enough of these spe-
cialized treatments that eventually every can-
cer patient will have something that works.

¢ Quicker answers from smaller, focused
studies. Pfizer's test of crizotinib will need
only 318 patients and will be finished early
next year. It also will test the drug earlier in the
course of illness rather than as a last-ditch
option.

"You don't really need big trials if it works
so well,” and the group of patients who stand
to benefit can be identified in advance, said
Dr. Roy Herbst, lung cancer chief at the Uni-
versity of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Cen-
tre in Houston.

¢ Big gains from novel combinations. All 66
patients testing a drug combo for the blood
disease multiple myeloma saw a reduction in
the amount of cancer they had by at least
half. A 100 per cent response rate is unheard
of for any cancer and would not have occurred
if two drugmakers had not teamed up to test
their treatments together instead of against
each other, said Dr. Paul Richardson of
Boston's Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, who
led the research.

The combo of Takeda Pharmaceutical
Co.'s Velcade, Celgene Corp.'s Revlimid and

the chemotherapy mainstay dexamethasone
allowed more than half of patients to delay
and perhaps avoid a bone marrow transplant
— a harsh and risky treatment for the dis-
ease.

¢ Comparison tests of long-used treatments.
For decades, men with cancer that has spread
beyond the prostate have been given hor-
mone treatments with or without radiation, yet
only a few studies have tested these against
each other or together. A Canadian study
found that combo treatment extended sur-
vival an average of six months in high-risk
cases, and the oncology society said it could
become a new standard of care.

"We're asking questions that should have
been answered decades ago," said Dr. Len
Lichtenfeld, the American Cancer Society's
deputy chief medical officer.

¢ Building on success. Since it was approved
in 2003, the Novartis drug Gleevec has been
the closest thing to a cure for any cancer. It has
transformed chronic myeloid leukemia from a
nearly-always fatal disease to one now man-
ageable with a daily pill.

Yet a second-generation drug from Novar-
tis — Tasigna — and Bristol-Myers Squibb
Co.'s Sprycel did even better than Gleevec
as initial treatment for those who are newly
diagnosed, studies found. Sprycel and Tasigna
are used now only when people fail on
Gleevec.

¢ New drugs from surprising sources. Eisai
Inc.'s eribulin, derived from a sea sponge,
improved survival for women with advanced
breast cancer and could fill some key treat-
ment gaps.

It comes "at a time when many of us
thought there weren't new chemotherapy
drugs being developed," because of all the
focus on gene-targeting drugs, said Dr. Eric
Winer, breast cancer chief at Dana-Farber.
"This may be one of the last ones."

¢ More hope that drugs for other condi-
tions also can fight cancer. The Novartis bone-
building drug Zometa improved survival for
people with multiple myeloma in one study.
Earlier research suggested it may help against
breast cancer, and results of a definitive test of
this are eagerly awaited.

¢ Gentler treatments. More of the drugs
being developed today are pills rather than
infusions. Shorter, more focused radiation
treatments are showing promise. Women need
to have fewer lymph nodes removed to check
for breast cancer. And new drugs have eased
the nausea and vomiting that have made many
cancer patients fear chemotherapy.

One issue is not improving: cost.

Personalized medicine will advance cancer
care, said Dr. John Mendelsohn, president of
the M.D. Anderson Cancer Centre and head
of a recent government panel on cancer
research. But it will not be cheap, he said.

(This article is by Marilynn Marchione,
AP medical writer).



Government’
cuts approach is
‘short-sighted’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE Bahamas Govern-
ment has recently made
announcements regarding
the pending budget cuts
and taxes which will affect
almost every sector of our
society.

Yes, times are extreme-
ly difficult for some; no one
can deny that.

However, the approach
of the current administra-
tion is short-sighted in that
the full impact of these
decisions on the Bahamian
populace at large has not
been explored.

Also, as much as the
country’s current debt has
been lamented, to date,
there were no proposals
regarding local revenue col-
lection (with the exception
of Immigration fees), or
increased judicial fines, or
measures to prevent mis-
management of available
ministerial funds.

As an example of the
above, take the Govern-
ment Guaranteed Loan
Scholarship Programme,
which has technically exist-
ed for the past decade or
So.

Many students have
utilised this service, and
many are now home in The
Bahamas making a positive
influence on society, and
dutifully repaying their
loans.

However, there were also
those who received their
designated cheques, and
instead of furthering their
education, spent the monies
on travel and luxury items.
According to a Ministry of
Education insider, this had
been going on for years,
and was common knowl-
edge.

So when the accounts
were assessed, the Ministry
in 2009 preferred to sus-
pend the provision of new
loans instead of actively
and publicly pursuing those
delinquent persons who
had signed iron-clad con-
tracts to repay all loans
with interest.

Judicial fines are a sure-
fire way for the State to
make money, with a bonus
that only convicted crimi-
nals have to pay.

However, did you know
that if a person was caught
driving without a license,
that the most they would
pay was $1000, and the
optional revocation of their
driver’s license?

If that same person also

LETTERS

KeUUCCLECUNAL OLN alelanlerO (eM ALedE



caused an accident, they
only paid $200, and if they
decided to speed off: a
meager $100 for “fleeing
the scene”.

To add further insult,
there are no legal provi-
sions for the negligent dri-
ver to pay the State the cost
of repairs to the other per-
son’s vehicle, once the oth-
er person’s insurance com-
pany already paid.

Does anyone else see
something horribly wrong
with this picture?

It’s no wonder that so
many persons drive reck-
lessly on our streets, and
worse, in vehicles with pol-
luting exhaust piping, with
broken tail lights, brake
lights which do not work,
and missing mirrors vital
for navigation.

Who allowed these vehi-
cles to pass inspection, and
are there fines for such
offences?

Furthermore, why hasn’t
anyone proposed increases
in traffic violation fines?

Also, there are many
men being fruitful and mul-
tiplying, but refuse to pay
child support, and the
tremendous effort to get
one dime is a great strain
to the single mother who
has little spare time, given
that she has the sole physi-
cal and financial burden of
caring for her child/chil-
dren.

If he cannot make his
required payments, the
delinquent father should be
made to “work off” his
debts at the various gov-
ernment institutions, in lieu
of jail time in an already
overpopulated prison.
Maybe then, these men
would begin to use more
safe sex practices.

The same can be said for
some single mothers, who
make up a considerable
portion of the Social Ser-
vices clientele.

Some of these women
are truly in need and have
no other options, but there
are also those who are
quite able-bodied, yet feel
as if they can take monies
as long as it’s made avail-
able.

Some are also frequent
fliers at the PMH’s Labour
Ward, but refuse any meth-
ods of pregnancy preven-

tion.

Why worry, if “da gov’-
ment ein guh let my chirren
starve” ? There are also
others who were accus-
tomed to a certain lifestyle,
and refuse to get a job that
is “beneath them” now that
they have fallen on hard
times.

If these women would
take responsibility, work to
feed their own children,
there would be far less clas-
sified ads, and more money
available for improvements
in the overworked, under-
staffed, and under appreci-
ated Department of Social
Services.

Sometimes the misman-
agement of ministry funds
is not necessarily the fault
of the institution, but of the
employees themselves.

How many Sundays have
you seen a vehicle with a
red license plate drive by,
and all the occupants were
in their church finery?

Even the DOTS Public
Health Workers, and Com-
munity Nurses do not usu-
ally work weekends, so
which government employ-
ees are being allowed to
drive these vehicles outside
of normal business hours,
and why should I, the tax-
payer, have to pay for their
gas?

These are but a few of
the many examples of
avenues which the govern-
ment can use for increas-
ing revenues and control-
ling budgets, without pun-
ishing productive, law-abid-
ing Bahamians.

Applying the above not
only calls for personal
accountability, but the will-
ingness of the government,
with the judicial system to
not only enforce existing
laws, but mandate legisla-
tion to deter those who are
tempted to “rob” the Trea-
sury.

Such actions may well
prove politically unpopu-
lar, especially with general
elections on the horizon,
but I trust that anyone who
is more interested in the
continued morale, produc-
tivity, and overall well
being of the Bahamian peo-
ple, would approach the
Budget debates with only
the best intentions for our
country.

A CONCERNED
CITIZEN
Nassau,

June 7, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





BISHOP RANDY FRASER



Police officers testify in



Bishop Fraser’s attorney
plans ‘no case submission’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



THE prosecution closed its case yes-
terday in the Bishop Randy Fraser
retrial after calling one final witness to
the stand.

Fraser’s attorney Wayne Munroe
indicated yesterday that he intends to
make a “no case submission” that will
be presented in writing to the court.

Taking the stand yesterday was
woman Sergeant Raquel Hanna.

She told the court that at around
12.45pm on April 9, 2006, while
attached to the Quakoo Street Police
Station, she received a complaint from
the mother of the young woman with
whom Fraser is alleged to have had
sexual relations.

Sergeant Hanna told the court that

Prosecution closes case in retrial



she recorded a six-page statement
from the virtual complainant in the
presence of her mother, who the offi-
cer described as being very angry and
having “lost it.”

She recalled that the virtual com-
plainant appeared to be somewhat dis-
turbed and was crying.

During cross-examination by Mr
Munroe, Sergeant Hanna recalled that
during the interview she had asked
the virtual complainant to tell her sto-
ry.
The officer told the court that she
was informed by the virtual com-
plainant that her aunt had in her pos-
session a cellular phone that contained

It’s

inquest into chase death

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO police officers testi-
fied this week in the Coroner’s
Inquest into the death of
Kristoff Cooper, who was
found dead with a gunshot
wound to the head following a
police chase that ended in a
car crash.

Officers Constable Corey
Barr and Corporal Arnold Fox
pursued Kristoff Cooper and
his brother Lavar in a high
speed chase through the
streets of New Providence on
the morning of May 3, 2009,
shortly before the siblings
crashed into Miracle Tours
Travel Agency and a neigh-
bouring house on Robinson
Road.

Both officers, who are
attached to the Mobile Patrol
Division, testified that they
began their chase after they
received information from the
police control room that offi-
cers from Wulff Road station
were pursuing the black Nis-
san Sentra the men were in,
and they were reported to be
“armed.”

Constable Barr testified that
the two patrolling officers had
each been issued with firearms
before they started their
patrols on Saturday, May, 2.
He received a tactical Smith
and Wesson .9mm pistol and
accompanying ammunition,
and his partner for the
evening, Corporal Fox,
received a Uzi sub-machine
gun.

Weapons

His partner later conflicted
with him in his account of the
weapons the pair were issued,
stating that he received an Uzi
and a revolver. Both officers
denied ever having fired their
weapons during the chase.

Constable Barr said he
thought he “heard shots” as
the black Nissan Sentra the
officers were in pursuit of
“swerved towards” two other
officers who were reportedly
standing in the street trying to
flag down the brothers’ speed-
ing vehicle.

Constable Barr was pressed
by attorney for the Cooper
family, Romauld Ferreira, as
to whether it was “standard

NOTICE TO ALL MEMBERS

Of

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Ltd.

The 24" Annual Gen

| Meetin

Will Be Held
On Wednesday, June 23, 2010

6:00 P.M.
At The British Colonial Hilton

#1 Bay Street
For The Following Purposes:
> To receive the Report of the Board of Directors for 2009
P Toreceive the Audited Accounts for 2009

> To take action on such matlers as may come before tha meating

» Toelect members of The Board of Directors, Supervisory

Commitiee & Credit Committee

THERE WILL BE NO SECOND CALL MEETING AS
PER THE CO-OPERATIVE ACT 2005 SECTION 22

police procedure” for an offi-
cer to fire at a “speeding vehi-
cle”. Constable Barr said offi-
cers “could if they were in fear
for their lives.”

Despite reports that the
men were armed, Constable
Barr and Corporal Fox both
testified that no weapons were
found around or on the per-
sons of either of the brothers
after the crash which saw them
thrown from their vehicle into
the yard of residence number
75, Robinson Road. They said
the damage to the Nissan was
too extensive to allow for a
full search of the car in which
they had been travelling.

Both officers testified that
a small package of suspected
marijuana was discovered on
Lavar Cooper, who was con-
scious but unable to speak,
suffering apparent injuries to
the arm and head, when police
found him on the ground in
front of the crashed car.

They recalled that the police
patrol car was travelling at 100
miles per hour as it chased the
pair through New Providence.
The Coroner, William Camp-
bell, questioned Constable
Barr on whether he meant 100
kilometres per hour, or miles
per hour. The officer admit-
ted he was not sure — telling
the inquest “I saw the gauge
go over 100” — and Magistrate
Campbell suggested this must
be verified as there is a “sig-

nificant difference.”

Corporal Fox told the court
the brothers were “driving
recklessly at a high rate of
speed.” He too testified that
he saw officers from another
police unit try to flag down the
car the brothers were in before
it crashed.

Road

He was accused of changing
his testimony as he at first sug-
gested the two other officers
approached the dividing line
in the middle of the road to
flag down the car, and then
said he was not sure if they
did so, suggesting they may
have simply been standing
“near their police vehicle”
which was parked on the
opposite side of the road as
the pursued car entered the
area.

Corporal Fox was asked by
Terry Archer, appearing for
the Attorney General’s Office,
if he was aware that “one of
the victims (the Coopers) was
shot at the scene.” Fox said he
was not and “only learnt that
afterwards.”

Corporal Fox, under ques-
tioning by Mr Ferreira, said
he did not hear or see any gun-
shots fired during the chase.

The inquest was adjourned
to July 5. It began on April 12,
2010.

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Security










































Time to

Get
Connected

4.

text messages from Bishop Fraser.

Sergeant Hanna told the court that
the investigation was later turned over
to the Central Detective Unit, ending
her involvement in the matter.

Mr Munroe informed the court yes-
terday that his “no case submission”
would be a substantial one.

The matter was adjourned to June
29 for submissions. Bishop Fraser
remains on $10,000 bail.

He is accused of having a sexual
relationship with a 16-year-old girl
between July 2005 and February 2006.
He denies the charge.

His retrial began before Magistrate
Carolita Bethell last May.

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9.1005

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund

0.35

Previous Close Today's Close

1.05

10.63

5.20
0.30
3.15
2.17

11.95

2.60
6.30
2.49
2.50
6.07
8.90
9.81
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95

10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Change

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Last Price

Ask $
11.06

6.25
0.40

Assembly Of God

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Rc ares KR Mere Se
SUEUR Mg Robie IIIa tiem

€

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 11 JUNE 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,516.03 | CHG -5.56 | %CHG -0.37 | YTD -49.35] YTD % -3.15

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

14.00
4.00
0.55

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.05
-0.10

0.00
0.08
0.00
0.00

-0.10
-0.04

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

= FG CAP

ITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

c2c+ Tite eT A TL

Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.250
0.050
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.511
0.460
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
1,000 0.952 10.5
0.156 64.1

Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
7% 19 October 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% 30 May 2013

Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-2.945

Div $ P/E
0.000

Daily Vol.

0.000
0.001

0.480
0.000

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

1.4752
2.9020
1.5352
3.0368
13.6388
107.5706
105.7706
1.1080
1.0615
1.1050
9.5078

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

10.0000

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investr

10.2744

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

2.54
0.52
1.86
2.5TF
2.03
3.45
3.99
1.67

-0.61

1.31
1.78

-4.61

YTD%

Last 12 Months %

7.00
-0.11
4.63
-4.99
5.56
6.99
13.50
5.26
2.84
5.01
6.39

8.15

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.452500
2.886947
1.518097

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.505009

30-Apr-10
4-Jun-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

31-Mar-10

4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 B.235
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Golina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

58.37 31-Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Board Secratary
June 2010




PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Cua expands programe
cutting free lunches
HAVANA

NEARLY a quarter foillion i
Cuban workers are discovering :
there's so such thing as a free :
lunch, according to Associated :

Press.

island.

The Communist Party news- i
paper Granma reported Friday :
that a pilot program begun in :
October to eliminate free:
lunches for 2,800 government :
workers will grow to include :
another 225,000 as of July 1. :
The move will save the cash- :
strapped country $27 million. :

The reform is being extended :
to state bank workers, employ- :
ees at the tourism, transporta- :
tion, foreign investment, natur- :
al resources and foreign rela-
tions ministries, as well as work- :
ers at the government retail :
giant CIMEX and the Office :
of the City of Havana Historian :
and the Cuban Chamber of :

Commerce.

The government is dramati- i
cally expanding a program that :
shuts workplace cafeterias while :
giving people stipends to buy :
food on their own. It is part of a :
larger plan to chip away at the :
raft of daily subsidies that have :
long characterized life on the :

Dee 40 arrests and



"Tis vex with the govern-
ment's budget cutting sub-
sidies to private schools who
educate the nation's youths
by providing jobs, buildings,
religion, and facilities to
educate numerous Bahami-
an children that the govern-
ment could not otherwise
provide. Instead, the gov-
ernment should make the
government school parents
pay for their free and
expensive government
school education, when all
their children doing is stab-
bing and gang warfare."

— Tronic

“Tis vex cause der gov-
ernment taxing we locally
produced beers and ain't
taxing the rot gut hard
liquor, highfalutin wine and
the ‘cancer sticks’ cigarettes
that cause cancers and more
dangerous diseases to the
users and also to the peo-
ple around them”.

~— Local Beer Drinker

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
|

2010

N THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00170

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST of the Settlement of
Bahama Sound No. 11 of the Island of Great Exuma one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of-

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Reevers Turnquest claims
to be the owner of the fee simple estate in possession of the
said piece or parcel of land free from encumbrances. And the
Petitioner had made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said piece parcel or tract of
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

AND TAKE NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
a Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on before the thirtieth (30) day
after the last day of publication file a Notice in the Supreme Court
within the City of Nassau and serve on the Petitioner or the un-
dersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified
by an Affidavit to be titled therewith. Failure on any such person
to file and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the 22nd day of
July A.D., 2010 will operate as a bar to such claim.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that copies of the files plan
may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas on the Second Floor of the Ansbacher Build-
ing situate at East Street and Bank Lane on the Island of New
Providence;

2. The Chambers of Messrs Lewis & Longley Chambers, East
Bay Street Shopping Centre, East Bay Street, New Providence:
3. The Office of the Administrator at Queens Hwy, in the settle-
ment of George Town, on the Island of Exuma, The Bahamas.
Dated the 31st day of May, A.D., 2010

Lewis & Longley, Chambers
East Bay Shopping Centre, East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



"Tam vex that there are
so many political observers
criticising the government
for every wrong they see
instead of giving credit
where credit is due.

“The deals with the road
reversal on Baillou Hill
Road and Market Street
are done — while there
might be some hardship
now I am sure in the long-
run, things in those areas
will be better.

"Same thing with the
road construction at Saun-
ders Beach. People in this
country never seem to
want positive, upgraded
change; they just want the
same old thing that isn't
working. And the opposi-
tion is there to do one job
— oppose — but I would
love to see what good they
could have done during
these tough times."

— Wait and See

"Iam very happy to
have been served especial-
ly by WPC 3269 of the
Wulff Road Police Station
and two young police men.
WPC 3269 and the two
male officers were very
professional, they sympa-
thised and showed empa-
thy to a stressful ordeal
and did their police duties
with pride and sincerity in
recording a theft and visit-
ing the crime scene. That
left me knowing that the
image of the police is not
as bad as some may say."

— Crime Victim

Are you vex?

Fax complaints

to 328-2398 or e-mail
‘whyyouvex@
tribunemedia.net’.



ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

~—6§400 citations
in Operation
Touchdown

| By DENISE MAYCOCK
: Tribune Freeport Reporter
: dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



: FREEPORT - Assistant
: Commissioner of Police
: Willard Cunningham revealed
: that more than 40 arrests
: were made and 500 citations
: issued over the past several
: weeks as part of the police [
: initiative Operation Touch-
: down.
: “The operation was very
: successful,” said ACP Cun-
: ningham, who will be com-
; pleting his five-week tenure
: as acting officer in charge of
: the Grand Bahama District
: on Tuesday. }
: Operation Touchdown |
: started on May 4 with vehi-
: cle checks at various major
: intersections throughout the
: island.
: The fifth and final exercise was con-
: ducted on Thursday and resulted in 10
: arrests and 90 traffic citations.
: Mr Cunningham reported that in all, 42
: persons were for outstanding warrants,
: three for illegal drug possession, five as
: illegal immigrants, two for failing to give
: their name and address, and one for dis-
: orderly behavior.
: “I want to commend the officers in the
: Grand Bahama District, he said. They are
: doing a good job in performing their duties.
“The number one thing I wanted to



erence



accomplish was visibility and
I think we achieved that
through Operation Touch-
down and the various com-
munity walkabouts we held
on Grand Bahama.”

ACP Cunningham said
police also launched
increased patrols in residen-
tial areas of Freeport and
Lucaya, where a number of
house break-ins were report-
ed.

He said police are con-
cerned that several “cash for
4 gold” businesses which have
sprung up on the island are
acting as encouragement for
burglars to steal jewellery.

It is alleged that some
| criminals are recruiting
youngsters to break into peo-
ple’s homes in search of gold
items.

Mr Cunningham said
police will also deal with illegal gambling
houses on the island.

When asked about police officers buy-
ing numbers, he said if persons know of
any officer who gambles, they should
report it to the Police Complaints and
Corruption Unit.

“This police force led by Ellison
Greenslade and the executive team...
will not tolerate any corruption in the
organisation. If there are officers buying
numbers please report it so we can deal
with them,” said ACP Cunningham.







is accepting applications for the
2010-2011 ACADEMIC YEAR

Two persons - to teach Mathematics to all Grades seven through eleven. Experience
In preparing students tor external examinations (BIC, BOSE & SAT) is a require-

ment,

One { person - to tee sach English Damiana to the junior section of the school

(Grade 7 te 9),

One person-to teach English Language’ Literature to all grade levels. The ability to
prepare candidates for examinations (BJC, BGCSE and SAT) is a requirement.

One person - to teach Social Studies and History from grades eight to twelve. Expe-

nence In preparing for extemal examinations 1s a requirement.

OLOGY/GENE

One person - to teach General Science and Biology to all grade levels. The applicant

must have experience in

One person - to teach Economics to grades ten through twelve. Familiarity with the

National examination of

ERENCH

One person = bo teach French to grades se VET thraueh twelve Experience im pre [Kir
ing candidates for examinations (BIC, BOCSE and SAT) is a requirement.

One person to teach Computer Keyboarding, Basic Personal Computer Applications
and Computer Science to rades seven through twelve. The applicant must be proti-

clent in Microsott Word,

All applicants must bold a degree from an accredited university and a Teachers Cer-
titicate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certihicate
Ing experience and two passport size photos should be submitted, A commitment to
the values of Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers, Only those
who have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply.

preparing students for extemal examinations,

the Bahamas ts needed.

Excel, Access and PowerPoint.

Please submit application and required documents to

THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
P.O. BOX N-3940
NASSAL, BAHAMAS



, Proot of teach-

Thunder’
Father's
Day event

THE ANGLICAN
CHURCH men's choir
“The Sons of Thunder”
will host its second pre-
Father’s Day concert
on Saturday, June 19.

The concert will be
held at the Activity
Centre of the Parish
Church of the Most
Holy Trinity in Staple-
ton Gardens, beginning
at 7pm.

The concert this year
will feature tenors
Adrian Archer,
Cleophas Adderley and
Archdeacon James
Palacious.

Tickets can be pur-
chased from any mem-
ber of the choir or at
the various Anglican
churches in New Provi-
dence.







The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


SATURDAY, JUNE 12,



2010

THE 2010 WORLD CUP has finally arrived
and you can keep up with all the action on tri-
bune242.com. Just click on “Sports” on The
Tribune website and you will find a video fea-
ture with all the latest news from South Africa.





J Hi
r | Ny



SEATED from to right are Dr. Julian Stewart, committee member; BOC’s president Wellington Miller and BOC’s secretary general Rommel
Knowles.

Anti-doping seminar
to be held this weekend

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IF you’re an athlete, offi-
cial, coach or supporter and
you want to know more about
anti-doping in sports, then the
Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel
next Saturday is the place for
you.

That’s when the Bahamas
Olympic Committee, in con-
junction with the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture,
the World Anti Doping Orga-
nization (WADA), Caribbean

Anti Doping Organization
(RADO) and the National
Anti Doping Commission will
host an anti-doping seminar.

The one-day event will
begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday,
June 19 and will be used an
opportunity to educate and
make aware to all stake hold-
ers in sports the anti doping
processes and regulations
involved in international anti-
doping.

“This seminar on World
Ani-Doping comes at a time
when several Bahamian ath-
letes have had their perfor-
mances upgraded due to dop-

ing violations by others,” said
BOC’s president Wellington
Miller.

He was referring to Thurs-
day night’s gold medal pre-
sentation to Pauline Davis-
Thompson for the women’s
200 metres from the 2000
Olympic Games in Sydney,
Australia, after American
champion Marion Jones was
found guilty of testing posi-
tively for steroids.

Miller also drew attention
to the [AAF World Champi-
onships in Edmonton, Canada
in 2001 when two individual
Bahamian athletes and the

men’s 4 x 400 relay team
advanced in the medal stand-
ings as a result of doping
infractions by from other
countries.

In addition to the men’s 4 x
4 advancing to the gold medal
position, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie was elevated from
silver to gold in the 200
metres and Chandra Sturrup
went from fourth to bronze
in the women’s 100.

And Miller also noted how
the women’s relay team at the
Pan American Games in 2007
will now receive an unprece-
dented bronze medal as a
result of a doping infraction
by a swimmer from another
country.

The bronze medals, accord-
ing to Miller, is here, but the
BOC is just waiting to con-
firm a date with the Bahamas

SEE page 10

SPORTSNOTES

TRACK
DAVIS-THOMPSON

PRESENTS MEDAL

AFTER indicating that the gold
medal she received for her elevation
at the 2000 Olympic Games in the
women’s 200 metres was for the people
of the Bahamas, Pauline Davis-Thomp-
son made good on her statement.

Moments after she was presented
with the medal by Cuban 1976 Olympic
men’s 400 and 800 gold medalist Alber-
to Juantorena at Government House
on Thursday night, Davis-Thompson
went to the House of Assembly where
he handed the medal to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

Davis-Thompson had indicated that
Mr Ingraham was responsible for the
rejuvination of her athletic career. She
presented the medal to Ingraham at
the completion of the 2010 Budget
Debate.

Mr Ingraham embraced Davis-
Thompson, but he didn’t give any pub-
lic response. He then passed the medal
on to Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Charles Maynard.

TRACK

ATHLETES AT NCAA

AUBURN University’s sprint duo
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson and Grand
Bahamian Nivea Smith both advanced
to the final of the women’s 200 metres
after placing first and second in the same
heat at the NCAA Outdoor Champi-
onships on Thursday.

Ferguson won heat two in 23.31 sec-
onds and she was followed by Smith in
23.41 as they ended up with the third
and fifth fastest qualifying times respec-
tively in Eugene, Oregon.

They will run in the final today.

Also on Thursday, Cache Armbrister
ran the first leg of Auburn’s 4 x 400 relay
to help Auburn take second place in their
heat in 3:34.71. They ended up qualifying
with the sixth fastest time for today’s
final.

And in the men’s 4 x 400 relay,
Demetrius Pinder ran the second leg for
Texas A&M as they won their heat in
3:06.00. In that same heat, Latoy
Williams also ran the second leg for
Texas Tech as they finished fourth in
3:06.95.

However, while Pinder and Texas
A&M advanced to today’s final with the
third fastest time, Williams and Texas
Tech failed to move on with their ninth
place finish.

BASKETBALL

STREET LEGENDS

THE pre-season for the Street Leg-
ends Basketball Classic will continue
today with five games on tap at the
Carmichael Road basketball court
behind the Police Station.

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule:

6 p.m. Englerston vs Fort Charlotte;
7 p.m. Fox Hill vs St. Cecilia’s; 8 p.m.
Marathon vs Sea Breeze; 9 p.m. Pro-line
Shockers vs Carmichael; 10 p.m. Golden
Isles vs Pinewood.

On Sunday, five more games will be
played at the Killarney Court, opposite
Nesbitt.

¢ Here’s the fixtures:

6 p.m. Yamacraw vs Elizabeth; 7 p.m.
Garden Hills vs Kennedy Subdivision; 8
p.m. Montagu vs St. Anne’s; 9 p.m. Kil-
larney vs Clifton; 10 p.m. Bain Town vs
Carmichael.






Knowies, Fish
ousted in
quarterfinals

By BRENRT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



MIDWAY through the season and their sixth tour-
nament played so far, Mark Knowles and American
Mardy Fish are still trying to get over the injury bug.

Yesterday as they played in the quarterfinal of the
Aegon Championships in London, England, Knowles
suffered a recurring injury that hampered his perfor-
mance.

As a result, the number five seeded team went down
in straight sets to the top seeded team of Daniel Nestor
of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from Serbia.

The set scores were 6-4, 6-2.

“They played really well today. They were very
strong,” was how Knowles summed up the performance
of his former long-time partner Nestor and his partner
Zimonjic, the hottest team on the circuit right now.

“Obviously, they had a lot of confidence, having
just won the French Open. They played a very good
match.”

After blowing a couple of opportunities to win the
first set, Knowles and Fish went down a break at the
start of the second set.

At 1-0, Knowles reaggravated a knee injury limited
his mobility as Nestor and Zimonjic took advantage as
they cruised to an easy win.

“They were playing at an extremely high level, so I
don’t know if it would have made a difference,” said
Knowles, referring to his injury. “But that’s the way it
worked out.”

The good thing, according to Knowles, is that they
will have a week off so that he can rest and try to
rehab the knee.

“T just need to try to get healthy,” Knowles said.
“It’s not a major issue because I had this problem
before. I just need a couple days to rest and try to get
ready for Wimbledon.”

Wimbledon is the third Grand Slam Tournament
for the year. It’s scheduled to start on June 21 in Great
Britain.

“T would have liked for us to have played a few
more matches here,” Knowles reflected. “But at least
we played a couple of matches. We have just have to
get ready for Wimbledon.”

Wimbledon is the only one of the Grand slam titles
that has eluded Knowles. He and Nestor got to the final
in 2002, the same year that they clinched their first
Grand Slam at the Australian Open. They also won the
US Open in 2004 and French Open in 2007.

In the six tournaments they have played in their
first year together,

Knowles and Fish ——

turned in their a
best showing in
Memphis,
Tennessee
when _ they
reached the
semifinal in
February after
Knowles was
coming off an
injury just
before the start
of the Australian

SEE page 10-—



- Mark Knowles

Knowles, Heild to compete in the Continental Elite Championships



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

TWO of the Bahamas
Amateur Boxing Federation’s
top amateur boxers are off to
another major international
competition.

Accompanied by head
coach Andre Seymour,
Valentino Knowles and Carl
Hield are leaving for Ecuador
on Sunday where they will
compete in the Continental
Elite Championships from
June 15-19.

“We expect nothing but the
best from both of these box-
ers,” Seymour stated at a press
conference yesterday at the
office of the Bahamas
Olympic Committee.

“This level of competition
is no stranger to us. The most
important thing is to go down
there and medal because right
around the corner we have the
CAC Games and we find that
most of these countries that
are taking part in this Conti-
nental Championships will be
at the CAC Games.”

This is the first appearance
for the Bahamas at the cham-
pionships and Seymour said
this will definitely be a real
test to see what improvement
the two boxers have made
heading into the CAC.

“The Continental is main-
ly astepping stone or a warm
up for the CAC Games,” Sey-
mour said. “I expect nothing
but a medal from this Conti-
nental Championships.

“We're going up against the

best in the region, so one of
the most important thing for
us to medal, try to make it to
the final and if we can get a
gold medal, let’s go for the
gold medal.”

Both boxers, coming off
their training sessions in the
United States and Cuba, will
be fighting at heavier weight
classes, but they are all confi-
dent that they will be able to
perform at a high standard.

Hield, 22, is coming off a
silver medal performance at
a tournament in Cuba. He will
be moving up from the 64
kiloclass to 69, the same class
that he competed at in Cuba.

“T want to thank God for
giving me the strength and the
opportunity to go over there

SEE page 10

PICTURED above from left to right are Valentino Knowles, coach ee Seymour and Carl ee



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PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Anti-doping
FROM page nine

Swimming Federation, to
officially present them to
the swimmers.

“We in the Bahamas
intend to work hard in the
field of anti-doping, with
education, vigilance and
enforcement to promote
the proper vision and posi-
tive attitude toward clean
and healthy sport,” Miller
stated.

BOC’s secretary general
Rommel Knowles said the
Bahamas Government
recently passed legislation
to establish the Bahamas
Anti-Doping Commission.

The government has also
accepted the World Anti
Doping Code.

“The Anti Doping rules,
as adopted and implement-
ed in conformance with the
Bahamas Anti Doping
Commission’s responsibili-
ties under the code and are
in furtherance of the
National Olympic Commit-
tee of the Bahamas contin-
uing effort to eradicate dop-
ing in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas,” Knowles
stressed.

The chief facilitator for
the seminar will be Tom
May, the senior manager of
Programme Development
for WADA.

In attendance will be
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Charles May-
nard; Gertrude Simmons,
executive administrator for
the Bahamas National
Commission for UNESCO;
Neil Murrell of the
Caribbean Regional Anti
Doping Organization
(RADO); Dr. Jerome
Lightbourne, the chairman
of the Anti Doping Com-
mission; BOC’s president
Wellington Miller and
David Morley, vice presi-
dent of the BOC and a
member of the Caribbean
Anti Doping Organization.

Dr. Julian Stewart, a
member of the organizing
committee, said the
Bahamas has a long and
distinguished list of athletes
on the international scene
and they have been
exposed to competition at
all levels.

New budget presents interesting ,

projections for sports this year

r | VHERE were some
interesting projec-
tions for sports that

came out of the 2010 Budget
Debate in the House of
Assembly.

Now if only both Minister
of Education, Desmond Ban-
nister and Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture, Charles
Maynard, can see them come
to fruition, we would definite-
ly see more production from
the local administrators,
coaches, officials and athletes.
Most recently in his address,
Bannister, the immediate past
Minister of Sports, said com-
petitive schools sorting activi-
ties will undergo a drastic
change come September.

The former president of the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic

Associations revealed that
he intends to appoint both a
Commissioner and an Admin-
istrator of interscholastic
sports.

What he didn't mention was
whether or not these two per-
sonnel will be responsible for
all interscholastic sports,
including the private schools.

Remember the good old
days when both the govern-
ment and private schools com-
peted under one umbrella.

That was when we pro-
duced a lot more athletes who
went on to excel at the inter-
national level because they
had the competition across the
board throughout their sport-
ing disciplines. There's noth-
ing wrong with taking another
look at that idea.

All it needs is someone who
can properly oversee the
whole programme and that is
where both the commission-
er and administrator come
into play.

Sports is at the point where
administrators for all of our
core sports must be put in
place as a full time job. Both
the commissioner and admin-
istrator should be given the
full authority to properly reg-
ulate and conduct high school
sports in the manner that is
conducive for all. I fully sup-
port the move by Bannister
to ensure that high school
sports get on the right track.

As for Minister Maynard,
he mentioned the revision of
the National Spots Policy, as it
pertains to the operation of
sports in the country.

Maynard pointed out some
25 clauses that they intend to
implement in the new policy
that was presented to the
sporting body at large during a

Ministry of Sports’ Conclave
on May 15. The Policy high-
lighted a number of areas,
including the World Anti
Doping Code, a mandate for
sports bodies who are eligible
for both the receiving the dis-
bursement of funding, setting
the benchmark for national
teams when they travel, pro-
viding incentives for all inter-
national performances, the
encouragement of athletes to
train at home, as well as those
studying and competing for
the College of the Bahamas
and the incentives for Special
Olympians.

It's an interesting document
to peruse in your spare time, if
you are in any way connected
to a sorting body in the coun-
try. On top of that, it's some-
thing that I think every
Bahamian who shows their
appreciation to our athletes
whenever they succeed on the
international scene should
take the time to digest as well.

If we are all educated on
exactly what takes place in the
operation of sports in the
country, I think we will have a
better appreciation of the
efforts that go into the
achievements.

STRONG SUPPORT FOR BGF

Last week I sent out a clar-
ion call for more of our colle-
giate and elite athletes to
come home and support the
national programmes, espe-
cially those on subvention.

The youngsters in the
Bahamas Golf Federation
have heard the call because
they supported the National
Open Championships in full
force.

Had it not been for the 10-
plus golfers who came home
and participated, the nationals
would not have been as com-
petitive as it was.

In fact, federation president
James Gomez was smiling
from ear to ear as he watched
the youngsters dominate the
scoreboard.

Over the four days of com-
petition at the three different
golf courses, 25-year-old Oren
Butler and 18-year-old
Richard Gibson Jr., both col-
legians, went had-to-head with
Grand Bahamian veteran
golfer Chris Harris. Had it not
been for a shot here or there,
Butler could have easily won
his first national title.

But he made one or two
mistakes and the 47-year-old
Harris used his wealth of
experience to prevail in the
final 4-5 holes.



Pe

OPINION

It's not every day that the
Bahamian public get to see
the competition displayed
from Saturday to Tuesday.
But players such as Butler,
Gibson Jr., Benjamin Davis
Jr, Rashad Ferguson,
Matthew Cox, Nolan Johnson,
Charlie Butler and Devaughn
Robinson should be com-
mended.

They are certainly among
the future of golf in the coun-
try and Harris said he was
honoured to have been in
their company, even if he had
to go right down to the wire to
pull off a dramatic victory for
the ages.



Suzuki’s 2 HRs lead A’s
to 9-8 win over Red Sox

BASEBALL
BOSTON
Associated Press

KURT Suzuki and the Oak-
land Athletics put on a rare
power show and held off a
potent attack by the Boston Red
Sox. Suzuki had two of his
team's four homers as the A's
hit more than two for the first
time this season in a 9-8 win
Thursday that featured 32 hits,
two injured Oakland players

and two Boston runners thrown
out at home.

"Our game is more suited for
our ballpark,” where it's much
harder to hit homers, A's man-
ager Bob Geren said. "We pitch
well, we run the bases well,
spray our hits around. We do
timely, situational hitting. We're
not a real big home run team."

They were on Thursday.

Suzuki homered in his first
two at bats against Tim Wake-
field (1-4), a solo shot in the sec-

GN-1061

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS

Project:

Financing:

Abstract:
Contract/Bid Number:

Deadline for Submission:

NEW PROVIDENCE TRANSPORT PROGRAM

Inter-American Development Bank

BIG POND PARK PROJECT
Invitation for Pre-qualification

22 June 2010

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas has received a loan from the
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to finance the cost of improvements of public
roads on the island of New Providence. As part of the New Providence Road improvement
Project, the Big Pond Project has been chosen as a mitigation measure towards any
negative impact that may be caused by the road project.

The Government through the Ministry of Works & Transport (MOWT) is seeking to pre-qualify
interested contractors to present their completed pre-qualification document in sealed
envelopes for the construction of Phase 1 - Big Pond Park Development.

Companies should demonstrate that they have experience in successfully completing
similar projects including but not limited to the scope of works outlined below:

e Conduct a contaminated land study

e
e
e
e
e
°
r
o
o
®

Conduct and establish a boundary survey
Restoration of the open water portion
Develop a main park access point
Construct waiking trails and boardwalks
Removal of invasive species

Landscaping & introduction and management of native species
General clean-up of the perimeter of the pond and land
Lighting, Signage, Parking Lot/pavement markings
Park furniture and accommodation.works
Installation of security fencing and gates
Environmental management

The contract for the work will be based on the FDOT standard and FIDIC General Conditions

of Contract.

The total duration of the construction period should not exceed 180 days.

The results of the evaluation of the pre-qualification exercise will be used to prepare a
shortlist of contractors for issuing Bid Documents.

Interested companies/firrns are hereby invited to collect pre-qualification documents from
the address indicated below. Documents will be available for pick-up from 01 June 2010 to
15 June 2010 between the hours of 9:00am — 4:00om

Project Coordinator

Project Execution Unit

Ministry of Works & Transport

JFK Drive, 2"4 Floor North Wing
P.O. Box N-8156, Nassau Bahamas
Tel: (+1 242) 302-9538, Fax: (+1 242} 326-0470
Email: COLINHIGGS@BAHAMAS.GOV.BS

Applications must be placed in a sealed envelope marked “Pre-qualification Document for
Big Pond Park Project” and addressed and forwarded to the address above by 22 June
2010 between the hours of 9:00 am - 4:00 pm.

Signed
Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



ond inning and a two-run homer
in the four-run fourth. Then,
with Oakland leading 7-5 in the
eighth, Jack Cust and Kevin
Kouzmanoff hit homers on con-
secutive pitches by Manny Del-
carmen, who began the day as
the AL leader with a .128 bat-
ting average by opponents.

Not bad for a team that
entered the game with 33
homers, the third-fewest in the
majors, and just eight in their
15 previous games. Oakland had
14 hits, seven of them for extra
bases.

The loss left Red Sox catcher
Victor Martinez frustrated that
his team's 18 hits — 10 for extra
bases and three for homers —
weren't enough to win.

"We had a lot of hits, scored a
lot of runs and end up losing the
game,” he said, “but on the oth-
er side they put really good
swings on it and they end up
taking advantage.”

It didn't help that Martinez, in
the second, and Darnell
McDonald, in the fourth, were
tagged out at home by Suzuki
when they tried to score on hits
to the outfield.

"We had a lot of guys con-
tributing to help us win, but
Suzuki had a great day both
offensive and defensively,"
Geren said.





OAKLAND Athletics’ Kurt Suzuki singles off a pitch by Boston

Red Sox pitcher Scott Atchison in the ninth inning of a baseball
game at Boston's Fenway Park, Thursday, June 3, 2010. Suzuki
had two home runs Thursday helping the Athletics to a 9-8 vic-
tory over the Red Sox.



Knowles ousted

FROM page nine

Open.

Now he’s suffered another
slight injury.

“We had a horrific start to
the season and now I had a
relapse, so Mardy and I
haven’t had a chance to play
that many matches,” he point-
ed. “There’s not much you

can do when we’ve both been
injured for most of the year.

“But we’re trying to look
ahead. Obviously we have
another Grand Slam com-
ing up and there’s still a lot
of time left on the season.
So we’re not that con-
cerned.”

Knowles said they ran
into a “red hot” team in
Nestor and Zimonjic and if
they were to have been suc-
cessful, they definitely
would have had to be at

their best.

“We just have to go back
to the drawing board, try to
get healthy and hopefully
we will have better results
the next time we go out
there.”

At present, Knowles and
Fish are ranked as the No.26
team on the ATP computer
list, the lowest Knowles has
been over the past decade.
But individually, he is
ranked at No.8, while Fish
is pegged at 52.



Knowles, Heilt

FROM page nine

and perform in a different
weight class,” Hield said.

“Now this is my first tour-
nament in this weight class.
But this is a very tough tour-
nament because you have six
of the best Cubans in each of
the weight category. So it was-
mt easy.”

After a shaky start with a
9-1 win over an Australian in
his first match, Hield said he
went on to face the Cuban
bronze medalist in the nation-
al championship and he was
successful with an 18-8 deci-
sion.

In the final, Hield said he
faced the top Cuban and he
eventually lost, but he’s hop-
ing that the experience gained
will help him when he travel
to Ecuador.

“Tm willing to see if the
weight class I’m in is really the
weight class for me,” Hield
said. “Right now, the condi-

tion that I’m in with the finan-
cial support from the
Bahamas Government and
the Boxing Federation, I’m
feeling unbeatable.

“[’m going over there to
shine. ’m going to represent
my country.”

Knowles, 21, will be mov-
ing up from the 60 to the 64
kiloclass after he won the
Bahamas’ first medal at the
World Championships last
year.

He too is looking forward
to the change and is eager to
put on another spectacular
performance.

“Me and Carl both moved
up in weight category. We’re
feeling out the new weight
division because he feel more
stronger in his weight catego-
ry and I have a chance to
move up sop we won’t be los-
ing too much weight and be
more stronger in the fight,”
Knowles said.

“Usually, ’'m always men-
tally ready and physically
ready, so I’m just looking for-
ward to go down there and do
my best and bring it back.”

Federation president
Wellington Miller, who also
serves as president of the
Bahamas Olympic Commit-
tee, said since 2004, they have
put in place a ten-year pro-
gramme to get both fighters
ready for the next Olympic
Games in London, England.

“We strategised ourselves
in putting a 10-year pro-
gramme together and we con-
tinue to see the benefits from
it,” Miller pointed out. “Reno
(Johnson) made it to the quar-
terfinals at the Olympics from
that same programme.

“Valentino Knowles
became the first Bahamian to
win a fight at the World
Championships last year and
Carl Hield won a silver medal
at the Cuban Boxing
Olympics, which shows that
our programme is really grow-
ing and we continue to add to
it as we go along.”

Miller said it shows that
their programme is right on
track for the 2012 Olympics
where they are hoping that
either or both Knowles and
Hield will win a medal.

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

ber of charts in the House of
Assembly Thursday that com-
pared the Bahamas’ economic
performance to regional and
global counterparts “at the tail
end of the worst global finan-
cial and economic crisis” since
the 1930s.

“The world is emerging out
of a global economic recession
of colossal proportions, the
impact of which many
economies continue to reel,
including ours. We ignore this
reality to our peril and we insult
the intelligence of others to jux-
tapose it against some foolish
notion of ‘stop, review and can-
cel,’” said Mr Laing.

“The growth rate of practi-
cally all economies were
adversely affected by the global
financial and economic crisis.
Our decisive and necessary
action in the crisis enabled us
to survive the onslaught. The

Laing

necessary extraordinary
efforts made in
between 2008 and now
have served their pur-
pose and cannot be sus-
tained without causing
us great harm in the
long-term; and our
efforts to realign our
fiscal position must
take into consideration
the fact that the global recov-
ery on which we depend is tak-
ing place in a modest fashion
and with downside risk,” he said.

The comparative charts indi-
cated the Bahamas was per-
forming on par or above average
in many of the areas of finan-
cial and economic performance.

On the matter of unemploy-
ment, Mr Laing pointed out that
countries around the world are
experiencing record levels of

ATR Tey ICMR LIT Ca

FROM page one

of the President.”

or whenever there is a vacancy in the office of President, the
Executive Vice-president shall exercise and perform the functions

Dr Chipman-Johnson was Executive Vice-president and Vice
President of Academic Affairs. Sources said she was also being
considered for the presidency, among others, as she still main-
tained popular support within the college.

Board Chairman Baswell Donaldson said any information he
possessed was “privileged information” that he was not at liberty
to discuss. “I have no doubt the public has a right to know. The
public will know when the Council makes a decision,” he said.

The departure of Dr Chipman-Johnson now leaves three
vacancies at the vice presidential level. Dr Linda Davis is set to

resign her post as Vice President of Research, Graduate Pro-
grammes and International Relations, at the end of the month.
She plans to take an unpaid leave of absence for one year before
returning to work at the college.

Dr Pandora Johnson, Vice President of Outreach, is current-
ly on a two-year leave of absence.

“The way has been cleared of almost all vice presidents. That
is a very serious void for the college,” said Mrs Isaacs-Dotson.
While the union was not backing Dr Chipman-Johnson, or any
other candidates, in the selection process for a new president, Mrs
Isaacs-Dotson said, “We are losing someone with a wealth of
knowledge and experience. I think it is not good for the College
of the Bahamas. I don’t know how that void is going to be
filled.”

ZHIVARGO LAING



unemployment, includ-
ing mostly G-7 coun-
tries. Unemployment
in Spain climaxed at
about 20 per cent in
2010.

Mr Laing said Spain
was a relatively well
managed economy. He
said Ireland was one of
the best management
countries in the world
and they experienced
an unemployment rate
of almost 14 per cent in
2010.

He said the Bahamas’ unem-
ployment rate that skyrocketed
i 2009 was consistent with glob-
al trends, and there was no
amount of policies or initiatives
that the government could have
implemented to isolate the
Bahamas from the international
trend.

He also pointed out that
under the PLP led government
from 2002 - 2006 almost 20,000

people were unemployed for
three of their five years in office.

“Thousands upon thousands
of our people who have been
badly affected by the crisis have
been assisted through the
Unemployment Benefit
Scheme, the six-month employ-
ment programme and massive
increases in social assistance
spending. We did what was
appropriate and necessary,” said
Mr Laing.

“We in The Bahamas were
and are no different than most
throughout the world; we had to
take extraordinary measures in
the crisis to reduce its impact,
including extraordinary bor-
rowings and we now have to
rebalance our public finances
in order to be in a position to
properly offer services in the
future, support the growth of
the economy and re-establish
as much fiscal space as possible
in the event a new crisis hits,”
he said.

Two students are stabbed

FROM page one

by two men armed with handguns.

The pedestrian was shot multiple times in his body and was
taken to hospital by emergency personnel. He was listed in serious
but stable condition yesterday afternoon.

CHRISTIE: PLP WITHIN RIGHTS 10 WALK OUT OF HOUSE

FROM page one

ness leader Tommy Turnquest,
what the PLP were seeking to
do with their amendment was
unconstitutional.

However, Mr Christie said
that the governing system in
the Bahamas makes allowances
for Ministers to be examined
during the budget time about
their offices, the budget, and
their spending priorities. By
shutting down the debate, he
said, the government has
“shortchanged” the public and
its right to know.

“We will continue to do our
job for and on the behalf of the
Bahamian people. We will not
hesitate to take strong and deci-

sive positions when necessary
in the interest of the prolifera-
tion of our democracy and a
better Bahamas for all Bahami-
ans. He (Mr Ingraham) and his
colleagues must learn the
lessons of good governance.

“We abstained on all votes
to send the matter to commit-
tee because we did not want to
stop the forward progress of
the bill to a stage where we
would be allowed to offer con-
structive criticisms.

“The Opposition was denied
that opportunity to make mean-
ingful change, therefore, the no
vote was even more justified.
Our Senators will now take up
the people’s battle when it
meets to discuss the budget,”
he said.

FROM page one

: assist us in this crisis. They tend
: to err on side of caution so unless
: you nudge them they’ll not
? move,” he added.

Speaking during the wrap-up
of the Budget debate for
2010/2011, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the mea-
sures it contains — including an
expenditure reduction of 2.6 per

: cent or four per cent in real
terms, enhanced revenue collec-
: tion measures and some
: increased taxes — are “designed
: and intended to correct an imbal-
ance which left alone would cre-
ate an enduring economic crisis
of enormous proportions.”
: Having “borrowed to sustain
: living standards to the extent we
: could” the Bahamas has a “high
: level of debt” which is unsus-
: tainable, he has said. In his Bud-
: get presentation he said the gov-
: ernment plans to reduce, through
: its budgetary measures, the coun-
: try’s GFS deficit from 5.7 to 3
: per cent by July of 2011. Speak-
? ing on Thursday, he described
: the steps being taken to achieve
: this as “not a painless medicine”
: but said “the alternative is
: demonstrably worse”, pointing
: to recent economic crises in
Greece, Spain and other Euro-
pean countries.
For 2010-2011, the Govern-
: ment is projecting that it will cut
: its recurrent deficit (fixed rev-
: enues minus fixed costs) to just
$62 million, compared to $259
million for 2010, a reduction of
: more than 76 per cent. With cap-
: ital spending set to exceed capital
: revenues by $240 million, the
Government is projecting a total

Govt projections

2009-2010.

Stripping out the cost of debt
principal redemption for both
years shows that the Govern-
ment's targeted GFS fiscal deficit
for 2010-2011 is $227 million, a
46.4 per cent reduction on this
year's $425 million deficit. As a
percentage of GDP, the target
GFS deficit for 2010-2011 is 3 per
cent.

Mr Smith said he believes the
government is “sending the right
message” to international credit
rating agencies — who determine
at what rate the Bahamas can
borrow money on the interna-
tional market — when it shows
“recognition that debt and the
deficit are rising too rapidly.”

However, he said, he would
have preferred to see “a more
realistic timeline” for reduction in
these figures than that proposed
by the Prime Minister of “two to
three years.” He said that he feels
it is unlikely the deficit can be
reduced by $200 million in the
next year unless “some external
event” like the privatisation of
BTC comes into play.

“By increasing a number of
taxes you might really slow down
the economic growth rate in the
country which depends primarily
on imports for its revenue base,
having an unintended negative
effect,” he said.

Meanwhile, he said such opti-
mistic revenue projections do not
take into account the possibility
that the Bahamas may see a rip-
ple effect from the economic
woes plaguing the Euro zone at
present — exemplified by the
Greek crisis — or the likelihood

that a hurricane could hit, tak-

deficit of $302 million in 2010-. :
ing up precious resources.

2011, compared to $514 million in

Govt housing to expand by 1000 homes

: ‘THE Grand Bahama and New Providence government housing
: market is set to expand by more than 1000 homes, according to
: Kenneth Russell, Minister of Housing. Mr Russell announced
: that the National Insurance Board cleared its $10 million debt
: with the ministry, and this money would be used to expedite plans
: on the books for housing expansion. Over 300 lots in the
: Carmichael Road area are also set for repairs. Mr Russell said Fox
: Hill was among the areas designated for work. About 50 lots are
: also set to be developed on the site of the old Sugar Mill Estate.



























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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



BAIC officials in Exuma
to follow up and check
on planned projects

THE Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation’s
executive chairman Edison
Key travelled to Exuma to fol-
low up on a few projects the
corporation has planned for
that island.

The trip was also in line
with the corporation’s man-
date to stimulate and encour-
age the creation, expansion
and promotion of small and
medium sized businesses,
thereby facilitating employ-
ment and import substitution.

BAIC’s general manager,
Benjamin Rahming; assistant
general manager, Arnold
Dorsett, and human resources
manager, Vernita Rhoden-
walt, accompanied Mr Key on
the trip on Tuesday, June 8.

Everette Hart, the corpora-
tion’s investment officer sta-
tioned in Exuma and Althea
Ferguson, president of the
Exuma Farmers’ Association,
met the team at the airport.

Mr Key explained that
BAIC’s officials involved in
agriculture and handicraft
travel to the islands almost
every week because they have
a mission to empower
Bahamians to create a country
that is diversified and can ful-
fil its own agricultural needs.

“Eventually, I hope we can
make a difference in every
island, so they can at least get
to a point where they could
produce, even if is enough just
for the island itself to bring a
sense of food security for the
country in general,” he said.

“This is the time to do it
because of the downturn in
the economy; it is very impor-
tant now to try to diversify as
much as possible,” Mr Key
added.

Eventually, Bahamians
should look into large-scale
agriculture on islands like
Abaco, Andros and maybe
Grand Bahama to target the
export market, he said.

“Those three islands have
the good land and an abun-
dance of fresh water.

“Hopefully, one day we will
develop those islands for the
export market as well as the
local market,” he said.

“There is so much we can
grow and hopefully we will
move to another level of food
security with canneries, food
packaging and refrigeration.
The sky is the limit.”

Mr Key explained that one
of the main reasons for the
trip was to check the site of
the future BAIC office in
Exuma. He said BAIC will
rent space in a building on
property owned by the Exuma
Foundation in George Town.

The team toured the prop-
erty and spoke with the foun-
dation’s manager, Christopher
Kettel.

The Exuma Foundation
exists to support education in
all of its aspects on Exuma
and to enhance the quality of
life there. Established in 1998
with a gift from the Benjamin
Family Foundation, it is a US
non-profit community foun-
dation that raises funds and
issues grants to fulfil its mis-
sion.

The foundation has allowed
the government to operate a
school for special needs chil-
dren on its premises and sup-
ports the community by act-
ing as a resource centre. It
also has a trail and reserva-
tion and vegetable and fruits
trees are grown on the prop-
erty.

Mr Key said BAIC would
like to partner with the foun-
dation in creating spaces for
greenhouses and other pro-
jects.

The team also visited the L
N Coakley Senior High
School to observe land being
used by the agriculture stu-
dents to raise pigs and grow
crops like broccoli.

They also spoke with the
instructors to find out what
they need to keep the class
afloat.

They also visited a struc-
ture, which they hoped to
refurbish for use by the Exu-
ma Farmers’ Association.

But Mr Key said, “We
looked at the old house there
and it looked as if it had dete-
riorated to such a point it may
cost more than it is worth to
repair; it may be less expen-
sive to replace the building.”

The association represents
the Exuma farmers and Ms
Ferguson its president
explained that cleared land for









BAIC’S EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key (front) and BAIC’s general manager Benjamin Rah-
ming inspect the building being considered for refurbishment for the Exuma Farmers’ Associa-
tion. Due to the poor state of the building, Mr Key said it may be more advantageous to rebuild.



farming has already been
acquired through BAIC,
which was also responsible for
its creation.

The corporation has also
provided $20,000 in funding
that went towards fertilisers
and insecticides and there are
more funds to come, said Ms
Ferguson.

Exuma farmers plant crops
such as onions, peppers, Irish
potatoes, corn, cabbages and
bananas.

However, she did admit
that Exuma farmers could use
equipment to help them culti-
vate and clear land.

“After farming land for a
while, the soil gets harder to
till and equipment like I saw
in Andros would be helpful to
us,” Ms Ferguson said.

BAIC’S EXECUTIVE CHAIR-
MAN Edison Key (third from
left) looks at little cassava
plants grown at the Exuma
Foundation. Also pictured from
left: Assistant general manag-
er, BAIC, Arnold Dorsett; the
foundation’s manager, Christo-
pher Kettel; BAIC’s general
manager, Benjamin Rahming
and BAIC’s investment officer,
Everette Hart.







Queen’s Honours

FROM page two

and currently serves as a Member of
its Finance Division.

Mr Alfred Bismark Coakley is one
of the founding members of the Sun-
shine Group of Companies (Sunshine
Boys) which was established in 1969.
He is a member of St. Agnes Angli-
can Church, Baillou Hill Road. Mr
Coakley is also Chairman of the Crip-
pled Children’s Committee; Past Pres-
ident of the Rotary Club, West Nas-
sau; the Anglican Church Men’s
Council; and Past Grand Master,
Prince Hall Masonic Lodge. He is the
recipient of the Paul Harris Fellow-
ship Award.

Mrs Susan Gail Holowesko-Lar-
son began her stellar career at the
Bahamas National Trust where she
served as Education Officer, Director
of Education and Deputy Director of
the Trust. Over a 24-year period, she
participated in strategic planning,
developed grant proposals, provided
guidance for Government policies rel-
ative to the environment and imple-
mented the highly acclaimed Nation-
al Conservation Educational Pro-
gramme for Bahamian youth. Mrs
Larson is currently the co-founder
and coordinator of the Ride for Hope
Bahamas, which benefits cancer
patients and cancer research in The
Bahamas. In addition, she chaired
several fora on various aspects of the
environment, has authored and been
a co-editor for several publications;
and serves on several civic and com-
munity organiations, including the
Board of Directors of St. Andrew’s
School, President of the
Parents/Teachers’ Association of the
St. Andrew’s School; the Board of
Director of Port New Providence
Owners Association; Member of the
Communication and Education Com-
mission and World Commission on
Protected Areas and IUCN - the
International Union for the Conser-
vation of Nature.

Mr David Pinder worked in his
father’s business before realising his
dream to become an entrepreneur in
a virtually new market in the con-
struction industry. Over the years,
he has developed and operated a
thriving business and was the first
person to produce pre-cast concrete
septic tanks and expanded the tile
industry, roofing and ornamental
block industry. An unassuming indi-
vidual, he has quietly contributed to
many charities and cultural and com-
munity organisations over the years.
His business, known for quality prod-
ucts at affordable prices, has assist-
ed many to find employment as well
as to build homes at reasonable costs.

Mrs Elaine Ann Pinder began her
illustrious career as a teacher and
guidance counselor in the public
school system. However, armed with
a new idea, she left the profession to
enter the field of business which today
includes two exclusive clothing stores,
a well known fast food business at
five locations that is set to become

international, and a five star gourmet
restaurant scheduled to opening in
September 2010. Mrs Pinder is as gen-
erous as she is successful. In an effort
to assist, and in gratitude to long-serv-
ing employees, Mrs. Pinder conveyed
real estate with utilities in place, as
gifts to each of the employees. Fur-
ther, she is a contributor to such
organisations as The Red Cross, The
Ranfurly Home for Children, The
Gentleman’s Club, The Police Asso-
ciation, churches, schools and vari-
ous junkanoo groups. She is particu-
larly concerned with helping the dis-
advantaged and has contributed to
agencies that assist children with
AIDS, with transforming youth gangs
into “gangs of achievers”, as well as to
individual families. Her latest initia-
tive, “Women Who Care”, will be
instrumental in urban renewal pro-
jects. She is an active member of her
Church in which she participates in
the outreach ministries.

Mrs Susan Roberts has been a
founding member, the President, and
now, the guiding light of the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas for more
than 33 years. She has selflessly given
of her financial resources to create
and sustain an organisation which has
become one of the most important
associations in the country. Her work
with the sick and dying is known
throughout the country. Her work in
Harbour Island and Eleuthera as well
as other islands, brought aid and
comfort to countless people in need.
She is loved, admired and well-
respected.

Reverend Ralph Russell has con-
tributed invaluably to the country in
the area of business and religion. He
is the co-founder of the first Funeral
Home, Russell’s and Pinder’s Funer-
al Home in Grand Bahama, which
was established in 1962.

The British Empire Medal- Civil
Division - (BEM)

Ms Cleomie Hilda Antonio has
served for many years in numerous
Catholic charities such as the Roman
Catholic Benevolent Association, the
Sisters of Charity and with the Bene-
dictine Fathers. She has received
many awards for her charitable ser-
vice to the Church. Ms. Antonio is
also an accomplished musician and
played the clarinet as a member of
the Roman Catholic Band. Despite
being very active in the Church, Ms.
Antonio has found time to make civic
contributions and is a founding mem-
ber and Past President of the Wom-
an’s Association of the Free National
Movement Party and Meritorious
Council Member of that organisation.

Ms Betty Brenda Archer began
her career at a very young age and
remained in business until she retired
as the Director of Human Resources

in a company in which she had
worked for 26 years. In addition to
her professional career, Mrs. Archer
is very active in the life of her Church
as an organist with responsibility for
all parish services, weddings and
funerals. She has also been instru-
mental in the development of the
choirs and the music ministry of the
Parish and currently serves as Presi-
dent of the Music Ministry. She has
served as secretary to the Vestry,
Diocesan Synod delegate, and Chair-
man of the Church’s annual bazaar.
Mrs Archer is involved in civic organ-
isations, including Past President of
the Women’s Association of the Free
National Movement, Vice-Chairman
and Past Executive of the Party. She
has worked in the administration at
the Party’s Headquarters. She is also
a member of the Rum Cay Associa-
tion and past President.

Mr James Wilfred Dean began
working as a seaman on his father’s
boats at the age of 13. In The
Bahamas, which is an archipelago,
fishing and the mailboat system were
critical to the livelihood of Family
Island communities. It is through
mailboats that Family Islanders made
a living and had a means of trans-
portation and communication with
other islands.

Over the course of his career, Mr.
Dean has worked on, owned and cap-
tained mail boats, and has created a
thriving fishing and processing busi-
ness which exports seafood to coun-
tries outside of The Bahamas. His
businesses have provided jobs for
many persons in the community. He
has served on various Governmental
Boards and Committees and has been
a Councilor on the Sandy Point Aba-
co Local Government Council. He
is currently a member of the Fish-
eries Advisory Board.

Ms. Claretta Duncombe began her
career as a Registered Nurse. She sub-
sequently left nursing and became an
Office Administrator in Deloitte and
Touche where she worked for 32
years. Ms. Duncombe has been recog-
nised as a person who works tireless-
ly for the advancement of women in
every aspect of business, professional
and public life. She is one of the
founding members of the Women’s
Association of the Free National
Movement.

Mr. Emmett Munroe was born in
Ragged Island and has sailed vessels
trading between Ragged Island, Cuba
and Haiti. He worked for the late Sir
Roland Symonette, transporting
materials for road works in the 1970’s.
He operated a tugboat for Sir Dur-
ward Knowles in Nassau Harbour in
1987. Captain Munroe and his uncle
purchased their first mail boat and
named it the “Emmett and Cephas”.
In 1995, he and his two sons formed
the Munson Shipping Company at

which time they purchased the m.v.
Cherise. They acquired the mailboat
the “Island Link” in 2004. Captain
Munroe is the owner of the “Wash
Bowl” on Ida Street, which has been
in operation for many years. Since
his retirement in 2006, his two sons
operate the business.

Mrs. Arlene Nash Ferguson, a vet-
eran educator, served in the field of
education for more than 24 years, dur-
ing which time she held the positions
of Senior Mistress at the Government
High School, lecturer in History and
Assistant Chairperson of the Social
Sciences Division of the College of
The Bahamas, and Vice Principal of
both the Preparatory and Secondary
Department of St. John’s College.
The last nine years of her service in
the field of education were spent as
Principal of St. John’s College, the
largest school operated by the Angli-
can Diocese in The Bahamas. Mrs.
Ferguson has impacted the lives of
thousands of young Bahamians. She
has shared with students her belief in
the importance of developing the
whole person, the Christian obliga-
tion to use all talents to the fullest,
and an appreciation for the culture
of the Bahamas.

Mrs. Ferguson is an avid proponent
of Bahamian culture and has partici-
pated in the Junkanoo parades from
the age of four. She served on the
National Junkanoo Committee for 24
years and is the founding Secretary
of the One Family Junkanoo and
Community Organisation.

She has been an active participant
in One Family’s Community Out-
reach Programme and has co-chaired
the One Family Book Fair “Rush to
Read”. Mrs Ferguson was the recip-
ient of the Links Inc. ‘Unsung Hero in
the Arts’ Award and has been recog-
nised by the Ministry of Tourism for
her long service to the National
Junkanoo Committee and her out-
standing participation in the People to
People Programme. In 1997, she was
selected by the Ministry of Tourism to
represent The Bahamas on the
Bahamas Customs Inspection Sticker.

Ms. Olivia Turnquest has given
over 40 years of dedicated service in
the field of education. She served as
Charter Member of Kiwanis Club and
Supervisor of the Community Based
Rehabilitation Programme for the
learning disabled. She was the leader
of the Bahamas Red Cross on Long
Island and the Ladies Friendship Club
of Long Island. Ms. Turnquest was
instrumental in the building of the
self help project — “The Senior Citi-
zens” Recreational Centre.

Reverend John C. Wallace has
been the Pastor of the New Mt. Olivet
Baptist Church, Grand Bahama, since
1994. As a result of his ministry,
many person’s lives have been
changed and there has been very sig-

nificant church growth and develop-
ment. Reverend Wallace was instru-
mental in the commissioning of seven
ordained Ministers to the Gospel min-
istry, namely four Deaconess and
three Evangelists. Reverend Wallace
and his wife are actively involved in
community outreach programmes,
including the distribution of break-
fast to the elderly on weekends.

Ms. Erma Williams has owned her
own catering business for many years
during which time she has served at
some of the most prestigious national
events. Throughout her adult life, she
has been a social activist and has
worked tirelessly for the advancement
of women. Ms. Williams is a member
of several women’s organisations and
has represented The Bahamas at
international conferences in the USA
and Latin America. She is currently a
senior member of the Women’s Asso-
ciation of the Free National Move-
ment Party. She is an active member
of her Church.

The Queen’s Police Medal (QPM)

Mr. Marvin Dames, Deputy Com-
missioner of Police, has a long and
distinguished career in the Royal
Bahamas Police Force. During the
early years of his career, he worked in
the Uniformed Branches. Since 1995,
he worked in the Plain Clothes Divi-
sion, where he was Commander for
the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU),
and Officer-In-Charge of the Central
Detective Unit (CDU) from 1998 to
2007. In June 2007, he assumed com-
mand of the New Providence District.
Mr. Dames was promoted to the post
of Deputy Commissioner of Police in
January, 2010. He is a dedicated and
committed officer, who has consis-
tently performed at the highest stan-
dard. He possesses strong leadership
traits and is able to take command of
assigned areas of responsibility. Mr.
Dames is an officer of integrity who
provides exceptional service to the
Royal Bahamas Police Force.

Mr. Quinn McCartney, Assistant
Commissioner, is an outstanding
young Bahamian who is truly an asset
to the Royal Bahamas Police Force.
He is competent, industrious, loyal
and remains fully engaged in making
the best contributions to The
Bahamas so that we have a safer place
to visit, live, work and play.

Since joining the Force, he has
demonstrated abilities which have
earned him the admiration and
respect of his peers and the public at
large.

He has led and successfully imple-
mented many impressive projects in
Law Enforcement and is currently
leading significant change initiative
within The Royal Bahamas Police
Force. Assistant Commissioner
McCartney is the recipient of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force Long
Service and Good Conduct Medal,
and the Meritorious Service Medal.
He was promoted to Senior Assistant
Commissioner of Police in January,
2010.

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