Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
(V\

Pim blowin’ it

90F
SOF

The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010



TRY OUR
SWEET
TEA

LOW
t SUNNY WITH
avy FSTORM

Volume: 106 No.161

myth



Steak Is Back
Om isla r ile



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

—

TTT

aU a)

body’

SEE WOMAN SECTION

ex

Businessman’s

five-year

sentence

is overturned

THE Court of Appeal has
overturned a Bahamian busi-
nessman’s five-year sentence
for fraud and forgery because
of “perceived bias” on the
part of the Supreme Court
judge who handled the origi-
nal trial.

Ordering a re-trial for Bryan
Douglas Knowles, Court of
Appeal president Dame Joan
Sawyer said that while there
was “no allegation of actual
bias” against former acting jus-
tice Elliot Lockhart, he had
been a partner in the law firm

Bahamas aims

that initially handled some of
the matters central to the case.

Recording the grounds for
Knowles’ appeal, Dame Joan
said: “The appellant’s main
concern was that for some time
prior to some of the incidents
alleged in the information, he
had been a client of the law
firm in which the learned judge
was a partner, although he was
not a client of the learned judge
himself.”

“What is of concern in this

SEE page eight
to be ‘premier

destination’ for arbitration

WITH the Bahamas looking to become a “premier des-
tination” for domestic and international arbitration fol-
lowing the passage of the Commercial Arbitration Act
2009, the Bahamas chapter of the Chartered Institute of
Arbitrators of London was officially launched yesterday.

The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators of London (CIA-
RB) is the leading professional for promoting the settle-
ment of disputes by arbitration, mediation and other pri-
vate dispute resolution procedures.

The Bahamas Chapter was formally launched at the
British Colonial Hilton and Court of Appeal President
Dame Joan Sawyer and Attorney General John Delaney

SEE page eight

ge ec ee ee

3-TOPPING PIZZA



Clase... 1
OT ae

a!

SESE

ae

SS | eee |

‘Perceived fas (
Judge forces retrial

MURDER CASE FAST TRACKED TO SUPREME COURT





Felipé Major/Tribune staff ¥



23-YEAR-OLD Zyndall McKinney outside of
court yesterday.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



THE case of a 17-year-old Ameri-
can girl and a Bahamian man accused
of murder has been fast tracked to the
Supreme Court.

Zyndall McKinney, 23, of Isabella
Boulevard and a 17-year-old Ameri-
can girl, alleged to be his girlfriend
were back in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday. McKinney and the juvenile are
accused of the murder of Anna Garri-
son. It is alleged that the juvenile —
the daughter of the deceased — and
McKinney caused the death of Garri-
son between Sunday, February 25, and
Saturday, July 4, 2009. Ms Garrison's
badly decomposed body was discov-
ered by walkers in a bushy area off
Fox Hill Road south near the Blue
Water Cay development on Saturday,
July 4, 2009 at around 6.20 pm. She
had been shrouded in sheets and her
feet were wrapped in plastic bags. The
33-year-old first came to the attention

SEE page 12





Fast Track your plans...



Alleged police station

escapee appears in court

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A PRISONER who allegedly escaped
from the Central Police Station on Saturday :
was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yes- :

terday.

Wesley Forest, 21, of Fourth Street of :
Robinson Road was arraigned before Mag- :
istrate Derrence Rolle-Davis in Court 5, :
Bank Lane yesterday, charged with escaping :
lawful custody. Forest pleaded not guilty to :
the charge and was granted $2,000 bail. His :
case was adjourned to June 25. According to :
police, Forest had been arrested in connec- :
tion with stolen vehicles and may have made :

his escape during a bathroom break.

SEE page eight

with a Fast Track Loan.

Fidelity Bank Fast Track Loan

Decisions Fast = Money Fast = Plus Visa Credit Card Fast

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 357.3135 2]inaenne





NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER





Butler remains
TRC Tee

SEE PAGE NINE



TV show pulled off
air ‘after criticism
Of huiget cuts’

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net



THE popular ZNS
TV news show Press
Pass has been pulled
off the air, it was
revealed yesterday —
reportedly because
management of the
state-run channel
objected to criticism of
the government’s bud-

SEE page eight







Nottage hits out
at ‘new tariffs
on tax payers
without notice’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IT IS "sin-
fully wrong”
for govern-
ment to
spring new
tariffs on tax
payers with-
out notice,
argued



Opposition BERNARD
member Dr NOTTAGE
Bernard

Nottage while calling for an
end to the Protection of Rev-
enue statute that permits
this.

Dr Nottage, the represen-
tative for Bain and Grants
Town, wants this policy dis-

SEE page two

Twenty-two KFC
employees put on
indefinite ‘leave’

TWENTY-TWO Kentucky
Fried Chicken employees
were out of a job yesterday,
having been put on indefinite
“leave” by the fast food
restaurant’s executives.

Some of the workers gath-
ered outside the restaurant’s
headquarters in Oakes Field,
along with Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union representatives, to
protest what they believed is
their dismissal from their jobs.

However, Gabriel Sastre,
Vice President and General
Manager of Restaurant
Bahamas Limited, which
owns KFC, said the workers
have not been terminated, but
placed on leave after the com-

SEE page eight

HOME IMPROVEMENTS



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE









Fe eam ea aval

PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL issued a statement yesterday
afternoon apologising to clients, staff and the University of the
West Indies School of Clinical Medicine and Research for any “dis-
comfort” resulting from a sewerage leak near the hospital's front
entrance. “We would also like to assure the public that patient ser-
vices in the Oncology Building were not interrupted and that the
Water and Sewerage Corporation has been contacted to rectify this |
matter,” said chief hospital administrator Coralie Adderley.




| HOSPITAI
Nu ANC











Man acquitted of murder, armed robbery charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT —- Murder accused Leon
Rahming walked out of the Supreme Court
a free man yesterday after a jury acquitted
him of murder and armed robbery charges.

Rahming was on trial for the murder and
armed robbery of 20-year-old Roslyn Louis,
astore clerk at the Keeping Babies Covered
Until Two store in Eight Mile Rock.

The trial started last Monday.

It is alleged that on June 11, 2007, Louis
was attacked and fatally injured.

According to Pathologist Dr Cornelius
Kachali, Louis suffered a “sharp force injury”
and died after losing a significant amount
of blood.

Dr Kachali said he did not know what
kind of instrument caused the injury.

Attorney Brian Hanna represented Rah-
ming.

Vernal Collie and Erica Kemp of the
Attorney General’s Office appeared on
behalf of the Crown.

Toros

f im é Coes A
a" Ae cf hf

Check us out on

Peimsiee
se eet



needed.

MP: budget cuts

to help

country through

tough

By ALESHA CADET



FNM member of parliament
for Pinewood Byran Woodside
yesterday defended the gov-
ernment’s budget, saying the
administration has made the
“serious cuts” necessary to help
the country through tough
times.

“The budget represents real-
ity and we will survive; the
global recession will be
moved,” he said during the bud-
get debate in the House of
Assembly.

Mr Woodside, State Minister
for Lands and Local Govern-
ment, went on to criticise the opposition
PLP for referring to the budget as “a great
failure.”

“Others on the opposition have claimed
this budget is hopeless and it is visionless
— this budget is all about taxes and no
growth.

“T feel this is most irresponsible; this
opposition bunch is most irresponsible,”
Mr Woodside said, going on to describe

BYRAN WOODSIDE



times

PLP MPs as “a bunch of misfits”
who were spurned by the
Bahamian people in the 2007
general election.

Mr Woodside said: “They were
rejected in the best of times — if
the people couldn’t trust you in
the best of times to govern them,
what makes you believe they will
trust you in these tough times?

“The opposition should be
about telling Bahamian people
that it is time to tighten up their
belts. Those who are able to sur-
vive in the tough times, those are
the ones that will make it at the
end of this recession.

“This government has done
just that in the budget. The years of feast-
ing are over and only the tough will sur-
vive.

“We continue to build on the new lead-
ership that has been put in place.

“We continue to hold the fort as the
government.

“We are hopeful, nonetheless, that once
we see the light at the end of this reces-
sion, this too shall pass,” he said.

Nottage hits out at ‘new tariffs
on tax payers without notice’

FROM page one

continued so that new taxes
cannot be imposed before
the start of a new fiscal year.

He accused the govern-
ment of playing a game of
"gotcha" with the public by
catching them off guard with
new duty rates, referring to
the immediate increase in
customs charges on some
cars which went into effect
on May 26 — the same day
the prime minister revealed
the increases during the
2010/2011 budget communi-
cation.

After he was beseiged with
complaints from car dealers
and consumers about the tax
hike, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced last
week that the rates will not

ee
EXTERMINATORS
ed hey i)
PHONE: 322-2157



pay less for insuring your home!

Have you heard the good news?

You CAN save money!

Ask NIBA for a home insurance quote! Home insurance with

NIBA costs less AND you receive cover with a claims service

that lives up to its promise! For added convenience, yous

can choose to pay by interest free installments.

It’s time to pay less for insuring your

home!

go as high as planned this fis-
cal year.

Still, Dr Nottage said the
practice hinders the public's
ability to engage in proper
financial planning, forcing
those with limited budgets
to reorder spending to

accommodate the new
charges and sacrifice other
expenses.

"IT used to not have any
problem with this protection
of revenue order because I
thought that it was really
working to preserve the
integrity of new taxes. How-
ever, time has taught me, Mr
Speaker, that this is a prac-
tice that I think we should
dispense with,” said the MP.

The Protection of Rev-
enue, under chapter 294 of
the Bahamas Statute Law,
permits the government to
immediately impose varia-
tions to "all duties, tax or
fees levied under the Tariff
Act, the Stamp Act or any
other Act."

Dr Nottage continued:
"Because when I think that
in this day and age, when we
have all this technology
available to us that we
should have to play ‘gotcha’
with our citizens. I think it
is wrong, sinfully wrong to
put on people a tax at a time
when they have a reasonable
expectation to pay a differ-
ent tax,” said Dr Nottage.

"How are people, whether
they are civil servants, who
have to plan mortgages or
have to pay fees for their
children's education to make
plans for the short-term?
How can people in the pri-
vate sector plan, invest, and
operate (if) without warning
the government changes the
rules of the game?"

The import tax on cars was
levied on vehicles with
engines larger than 2 litres
or 2,000 cc's at a rate of 85
per cent for duty with small-

er engines 65 per cent. Some
of the tax increases revealed
in the budget communication
will go into effect on July 1,
however the import tax on
cars was mandated as a "pro-
tection of revenue" and
imposed with immediate
effect.

Rather than instituting
two flat rates of tax for vehi-
cles by engine size as pro-
posed in the budget commu-
nication —- 65 per cent for all
2000 cc engine cars, and 85
per cent for all larger vehi-
cles — Mr Ingraham said last
week that based on "strong
representation” from some
car dealerships the govern-
ment will also allow for a 75
per cent rate for cars
between 2000 cc and 2500cc.

He also pledged a 10 per
cent credit to all who paid
the 85 per cent duty for a car
between 2000cc and 2500cc —
after the new rate was
announced two weeks ago —
from the government for the
extra amount they paid over
what is now being charged.

Yesterday Dr Nottage also
pushed for reform of the
country's tax system,
explaining that the present
system — heavy reliance on
customs duty — is ineffectual.

"T honestly feel and I think
as do most right thinking
Bahamians that the current
tax regime is inadequate in a
21st century Bahamas.

“We have to change,
reform our system of taxa-
tion.

"The primary system does
not serve the Bahamas well
and is administratively bur-
densome in context and
another form of taxation will
not necessarily prevent us
from attracting high levels of
foreign direct investors or
investments, nor will it deter
high quality providers of
international services to our
shores."

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Pulp cece Orn eo lle

Tel.677-6422 or visit
www.nibaquote.com

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 3



Passport processing
times see ‘marked
improvement’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net__

THERE has been a
“marked improvement”
in the length of time it
takes for the Passport
Office to process appli-
cations for machine-
readable passports,
according to the Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs.

Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of For-
eign Affairs and Immi-
gration, Brent Symon- i
ette, told parliament that :
recently, the waiting :
time for such passports
had been reduced to just
two weeks — down from
around 10 weeks during
peak periods last year.

Waiting times have
now risen to four weeks,
he said, following an
increase in applications
being made for e-pass-
ports as Bahamians have
been encouraged to
apply early for the docu-
ment.

Nonetheless, Mr
Symonette called the ;
reduction in waiting time :
“perhaps the most :
important achievement
at the Passport Office in
the past year.” He was
addressing parliament
during the 2010/2011
Budget debate.

The minister attrib-
uted the Passport
Office’s success in min-
imising passport applica-
tion processing and pro-
duction to three factors:
the addition of new per- ;
sonnel and new shifts for :
workers at the office, the :
tripling of the number of
production machines
from two to six, which
has boosted passport
production from 300 dai-
ly to 900 daily; and the
benefit gained from the
services provided by
people who joined the
office under the auspices
of the government’s six
month temporary work
programme.

Mr Symonette added:
“Having achieved this
very important goal of
reducing passport pro-
cessing time, the Pass-
port Office remains
committed in the coming
fiscal year to once again
reducing the turnaround
and processing time and
will ensure the necessary
deployment of human
and physical resources to :
continue toimprove its:
service delivery to the
general public.

“This now includes the
implementation of the
machine readable Cer-
tificate of Identity, as
well as the Mobile Unit,
which was rolled out
earlier this year, as well
as a facility for online
passport applications,
which went live on June
1, 2010.

“This newest develop-
ment should serve to
greatly improve the
passport application
process and enhance the
working environment at
the Passport Office, for
the staff and clients
alike. It will help to
eliminate the long lines
at the Passport Office, as
well as shorten the
administrative process-
ing time.”

The minister noted
that the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs’ overseas
missions in Atlanta,
Miami, New York,
Ottawa and Washington
are now able to enrol
Bahamian applicants in
their respective jurisdic-
tions for e-passport pro-
cessing. The Bahamas
Embassy in Beijing, Chi-
na and the Bahamas
High Commission in
London, United King-
dom should begin issu-
ing electronic passports
early in the 2010/2011
fiscal year, he added.

“My ministry is pro-
jecting an increase in
overall revenue from
passports for 2010/2011
from $1,725,329 in
2009/2010 to $2,070,708
— an increase of
$345,379,” said Mr
Symonette.



Minister to meet with mail boat

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Works and
Transport Neko Grant yester-
day attempted to allay concerns
raised by mail boat operators
who worry that government’s
10 per cent subsidy cut will
push many in the industry to
the brink of financial ruin.

Speaking in Parliament dur-
ing his contribution to the
2010/2011 budget debate, the
Member for Lucaya promised
to meet with mail boat opera-
tors to discuss their fears and
the upcoming budget cut.

While noting the important
service mail boat operators pro-
vide to people in the Family
Islands, Mr Grant said the sub-
sidy reduction is not an "insur-
mountable challenge" for the
industry.

"We are cognizant of the
necessary service provided by
mail boats to our Family
Islands. At this time I acknowl-
edge with gratitude the contri-
bution of mail boat operators to
nation building. While there are
certain perceived challenges
associated with this subsidy
reduction, we do not consider
this challenge to be insur-
mountable.

"I will meet with mail boat
operators, I will work along





NEKO GRANT

with mail boat operators to
resolve any difficulties they may
have in operating within the
limits of the revised subsidy.
We in the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport will
ensure to the greatest extent
possible that the mail and
freight services to our Family
Islands are not adversely affect-
ed as a result of the subsidy
reduction," he said.

The subsidy to mail boat
operators was reduced by
$897,000 for the upcoming fiscal
year — from $8,988,201 in
2009/2010 to 8,090,381 in
2010/2011.

It is just one of several moves
to reduce public spending as

government scrambles to help
restore an ailing economy.

Opposition member of Par-
liament for the MICAL con-
stituency V Alfred Gray argued
that the subsidy cut will result
in mail boat operators passing
on the increased costs to con-
sumers who need the essential
service to transport food and
other goods to the Family
Islands.

When Mr Gray served as
Minister of Agriculture, Fish-
eries and Local Government
under the Christie administra-
tion he said that mail boat oper-
ators were crying out for an
increase in freight rates to help
them keep their businesses
afloat.

Yesterday, he also accused
the government of caring more
about capital works projects
than for the small man, citing
the government's commitment
to the $120 million New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
gramme at a time when it is
reducing funding to areas that
affect "poor people.”

After government
announced the subsidy cut
during the budget communi-
cation, several mail boat oper-
ators spoke out, expressing
fear that they will lose their
livelihoods.

One operator who spoke
with The Tribune claimed his

Govt in process of reaching settlement
with former National Youth Service staff

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government is still in
the process of reaching a finan-
cial settlement with about a
dozen former employees of the
National Youth Service pro-
gramme in Andros, which was
shut down last year.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles Maynard
described the National Youth
Service in the House of Assem-
bly as a “failed experiment”
which the present administra-
tion admittedly “stopped,
reviewed and cancelled”
because it was not cost effec-
tive.

It officially closed after the
2009 summer session of the
programme, said Mr Maynard
during his contribution to the
2010/2011 budget debate in par-
lament.

The NYS, most recently
based in Andros and launched
in 2004, had been designed as a
nine-month programme to
reform the behaviour and
achievement levels of boys con-
sidered uncontrollable by their
schools.

Mr Maynard noted that it
was allocated around $100,000
in 2004, $400,000 in 2005,
$700,000 in 2006, and the FNM
government, after its election
in 2007, provided the pro-
gramme $1 million. This fund-

AIRC

murder victim

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net





POLICE have identified the 27-
year-old Deveaux Street resident
who became the nation’s 37th
murder victim over the weekend.

Matthais Williams was sitting
outside a house in his neighbour-
hood when two masked men
approached him, one armed with a
handgun.

The man shot Mr Williams mul-
tiple times about the body. He died
of his injuries in hospital.

The police have taken one man
in for questioning in connection
with the murder, however the
masked gunman, his accomplice
and their motive are still unknown.

The area off East Street has
been described by police as a dan-
gerous "drug hot spot", claiming
the life of 24-year-old Wilson
Louisma in similar circumstances
in nearby Peter Street the previous
week. Superintendent Leon
Bethel, chief of the police's Central
Detective Unit (CDU), said a large
part of the community’s crime rate
is related to illegal drug trafficking.

He confirmed that police would
be increasing their presence and
intelligence in the area to coun-
teract the influence of the trade
on the community.

However, senior officers were
quick to say they will not let spec-
ulation prejudice their investiga-
tions.

Assistant Commissioner Glenn
Miller said the police will be “guid-
ed by facts.”

He encouraged anyone with
information about the shooting to
contact police immediately on 919,
328-TIPS, 502-9991 or 322-3337.





CHARLES MAYNARD

ing increase was based on a
submission made to the gov-
ernment by the administrators
of the programme.

However, the government
ultimately determined the mon-
ey could be better spent else-
where.

“Our good conscience would
not and could not allow us to
continue with a programme
that despite the increasing cost
could not reach and touch the
lives of more than a hundred
young men a year.

“IT would be the first to shout
on the mountain top that you
cannot put a price on the future
of our young men, but we have
major problems in our society
and one million dollars could
and should be spent more effec-
tively,” said Mr Maynard.

He later told The Tribune
that the government was con-





cerned that there was nothing
but anecdotal evidence of any
long-term beneficial impact the
programme had had on the
behaviour and academic
achievement.

And he claimed the govern-
ment was concerned that those
involved in administering the
programme were not specially
trained for such work and that
to expand the programme to
impact more children would
have required a large invest-
ment and an expansion of the
facilities, which they could not
adequately accommodate.

Mr Maynard said that the
“important thing” is that
“young, uncontrollable boys are
still being dealt with” through
the SURE programme, which is
located on Gladstone Road.

Meanwhile, he added that
the government’s planned
“strengthening and expansion”
of the Governor General’s
Youth Award — to be renamed
the “GOLD Initiative”, stand-
ing for Greatness, Opportunity,
Leadership and Development
— which is to be launched in
September will hopefully
diminish the number of stu-
dents who are deemed “uncon-
trollable” by the school system.

ee ee Bee
lati eeu ee Tae
Pare mM ia)

Tropical Exterminators
Errore by





FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT



business is struggling after a
nearly 50 per cent fall-off in
revenue last year due to the bad
economy.

A drop in customers coupled
with rising fuel prices, increased
operating costs and fixed freight
rates set by the government has
taken a toll on his business and
others in the industry, he said.

Operators over budget cut fears

"A couple mail boats are on
the verge of getting out, includ-
ing myself, with the economy
the way it is and the cost of
operating so high. It was a
shocker to say you're going to
do that (cut the subsidy) in
these kind of times when we
have no other recourse," said
the businessman.

"








Look Stunning
In A ;
Beautiful (

Selection Of ©
Designer Drom
Dresses!!






AC
eee



Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
° Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O, Box N-121

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

The Mot Tioaooon Riereaaniow & Claas Eve, o@ THe Jom bi Frm!
AAS OMY PROP, CET Soe Caacr & Lie sree Cape Series

* Gael Uphokdery: Sona and Marit Glaanieg 2 Resor
Brsonilial

* Peoohom Cloaning Syston rancves Deep & Hoo Bod,
Bockoria (ireasd, Wiainmafies and Stare tron Campating &
Funlure, restoring them io lke nerd ai a faction of rplacomant
Sirs

Camel Soa’, Lavesieks, Chaina, Diaing Chairs, Cass Boel
(guts Tad. Mere & Sona

Pecan, Wind i Sill Carpet iain Speake

+ habla Tia Restoration, Poishing, Saaling 4 ans

Marte Sounter-Top Aedoralion 4, Podshing

Authorised Soome Tech Profecsioea! Conrecnor
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-K083 o 323-1594

OALY WE CAN Of IT RABAT!

Be AA ce © Pe TORE Oe © ema: (re arg
© ne St pond bi’.coee

LL a oY FR

PROVCEIEM SV TEM (an



STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM

STILL ALIVE



¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald's Furniture

And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Better educated citizenry builds prosperity

PRESIDENT Barack Obama, like Col-
lege of the Bahamas president Janyne Hod-
der, stresses the need for a better educated
work force to keep a country competitive.

Mrs Hodder, in an address to a women’s
luncheon earlier this year, underscored the
threat to the Bahamas’ economic future with
fewer than “15 per cent of our young people
enrolled in higher education when every
prosperous nation around us is moving to
increase higher education participation rates,
as high as 50 per cent in some countries.”

Paying a surprise visit to a school in Kala-
mazoo, Michigan Monday, President Obama
told students that a better-educated work-
force will help the U.S. stay competitive
globally. Don't mimic Washington by mak-
ing excuses, the Associated Press reported
President Barack Obama as saying as he
advised graduating high school students and
encouraged them to take responsibility for
failure as well as success.

In remarks delivered Monday evening at
Kalamazoo Central High School, the Presi-
dent said it's easy to blame others when
problems arise. "We see it every day out in
Washington, with folks calling each other
names and making all sorts of accusations on
TV," the president said.

He said Kalamazoo high school students
can and have done better than that.

The 1,700-student school in southwest
Michigan landed President Obama as its
commencement speaker after winning the
national Race to the Top High School Com-
mencement Challenge. It was among three
finalists picked through public voting on the
schools’ videos and essays. The White House
made the final selection.

The administration cited Kalamazoo Cen-
tral's 80 per cent-plus graduation rate,
improvements in academic performance and
a culturally rich curriculum. Would that one
day the Bahamas could boast such an
achievement for its government schools.

About an hour before the Kalamazoo
ceremony, President Obama surprised the
280 graduates by dropping in on them in the
recreation centre at Western Michigan Uni-
versity as they prepared for the big moment.

Walking around with a hand-held micro-
phone, he told the students to work hard,
keep their eyes on the prize and continue
to carry with them a sense of excellence.

"There is nothing you can't accomplish,"
he said, suggesting they might consider pub-

' DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Ltd.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

BEAUTYGUARD
Free Estimates
_WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
\_ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |

lic service. "I might be warming up the seat
for you.” Students rushed from the bleachers
to shake the President’s hand and take cell
phone pictures after he spoke.

President Obama, who says a better-edu-
cated workforce will help the U.S. stay com-
petitive globally, said in his prepared remarks
that the school had set an example with its
level of community and parental involve-
ment and the high standards of its teachers.

"IT think that America has a lot to learn
from Kalamazoo Central about what makes
for a successful school in this new century,"
he said. "This is the key to our future.”

He advised the graduates to work hard
and take responsibility for their successes
and their failures.

"You could have made excuses — our
kids have fewer advantages, our schools have
fewer resources, so how can we compete?
You could have spent years pointing fingers
— blaming parents, blaming teachers, blam-
ing the principal or the superintendent or
the government,” the president said.

"But instead, you came together. You
were honest with yourselves about where
you were falling short. And you resolved to
do better."

Education is widely seen as one hope for
Michigan's long-struggling economy. The
state has had the nation's highest unem-
ployment rate for four consecutive years,
including a 14 per cent jobless rate in April.
Thousands of manufacturing jobs have been
lost, many connected to the auto industry,
and the state is trying to diversify its econo-
my with alternative energy, biomedical and
other jobs — most of which require educa-
tion beyond high school.

The White House said more than 170,000
people voted in the contest.

Kalamazoo Central's valedictorian, Cindy
Lee, said she was excited but jittery about
sharing the stage with the president.

"The whole school is excited about it. The
whole community is excited. It's on the news
every single day,” Lee, 18, said last week.

As for COB President Hodder “a high
school diploma is no longer the end point.
There is more learning to be done if we are
to have an informed, critical citizenry and to
have better control over the prosperity of
the nation. An expanded elite of well edu-
cated people build prosperity and where
such status is open to all who work hard and
want to, it also builds hope.”



A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Das weliggmierit Company

Why shouldn’t
our government
tighten its belt?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: PM Tough budget nec-
essary — The Tribune May
26, 2010

The Bahamas’ public debt
is astronomical and our
country is going broke, yet
government borrowing and
spending continue with little
restraint.

Recently, the Prime Min-
ister reportedly said that
“We have to get the revenue
from somewhere.”

However, the latest bud-
get will tell us that the
“somewhere” means new
taxes for us.

As usual, we will be told
that we must tighten our
belts. Wouldn’t it be refresh-
ing to see our government
tighten its belt(s) signifi-
cantly — just like the rest of
us?

When most governments
are in need of still more
money to squander, they
usually turn to the easiest,
quickest and, of course, the
least creative method with
which they are familiar —
namely, to raise taxes to pay
for loans and reckless spend-
ing. Cutting costs, reducing
waste and increasing effi-
ciency in government itself
seldom seem to be contem-
plated as revenue boosters.
Perhaps a few of the follow-
ing alternative measures,
although admittedly requir-
ing more imagination and
effort than simply raising
taxes, might be considered
for some government work-
ers and civil servants:

¢ Introducing a 9am to
5pm workday for at least
three days of the five day
work week, and possibly
also limiting “just stepping
out” to three days of the five
day week. (The Met Office
included). This and other
measures could reduce the
need for some of the costly
overtime work that we must
pay for.

¢ Use of time-recorders,
aka “time-clocks”, assuming
that unions don’t find this
punctuality requirement to
be too dehumanising.

e Fixing one’s hair and
nails, having breakfast and
placing a lunch order, at
home rather than on arrival
at the place of work.

¢ Compassionate leave to
attend no more than three
of a spouse’s great-grand-
mothers’ funerals in Florida
per year.

¢ Switching off all com-
mercial TV sets and radios,
etc, at government offices
for several hours a day.

Service Providers

Data, Voice & IP-based Television Services

Nassau Airport Development Company (MAD is
seeking local suppliers io provide one or more of the
following services for the new US. Departures
Taminal and subsequent terminal buildings al the
Linden Findling Intemational Ainort

« Data
* Voice

* IP-based Entertainment
Television Services

Injarasted companies should pick up an information
package fram NADS comporala offoa in the
Domestic Intemational Terminal at LPIA between the
hours of S200am - 4:00pm, Packages: must be
collected by Wednesday, June 76th, 2070,

Conlact: (7 & ELECTRONICS DEPARTMENT

Pc (ek) POD 1009 Fin: (2d) STP
Eon rigors bs

a Ae AP SO}

Nurssau, Hohe



LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



After all, inspirational pro-
grammes seldom seem to
actually inspire work.
(Police stations not to be
exempted).

¢ Reducing Internet shop-
ping, social e-mailing and
porn-surfing in the work-
place, to just a few hours per
day.

¢ Banning all cell ‘phone
use and any private calls
using landlines, for several
hours a day. On-site addic-
tion withdrawal facilities and
counseling could be estab-
lished for the many who
would need it.

¢ Abolishing all voice mail
facilities, bearing in mind
that voice mail simply gives
the user another convenient
way of avoiding work, an
excuse to be “away from the
desk”, or to “just step out”
of the workplace entirely.

¢ Permanent removal of
all automated greetings,
music and messages from
workplace telephones (we
know our calls are “impor-
tant”). Suspension might be
considered for any employ-
ee who repeatedly discon-
nects people, or mindlessly
wishes callers a “very pleas-
ant good morning or after-
noon” or that they “have a
good or blessed day.”

¢ Reducing all mectings
and seminars to no more
than two a day.

¢ Keeping all mobile food
vendors’ vehicles out of
workplace parking lots, and
requiring them to have valid
food-handler and business
licenses (even though they
may be friends, relatives or
colleagues).

¢ Curtail use of govern-
ment vehicles and gas, and
installation of timers on gov-
ernment vehicles that will
automatically shut off the
a/c and stereo after six hours
of continuous use, or within
50 feet of a web shop/num-
bers house, sweetheart’s
home, fast food outlet or the
Fish Fry during work
hours. Also, insisting that all
drivers have valid drivers’
licenses and insurance.

¢ Certain things may actu-
ally require an act of parlia-
ment, such as a reduction in
embassy staff, wining and
dining of VIP visitors felt to
be essential to the well-
being of The Bahamas, such
as TV, Hollywood and
sports celebrities, etc.

¢ Also, cutting down on

trips abroad and conferences
in exotic places, and limit-
ing the entourages to just a
few close friends, relatives,
colleagues and acquain-
tances. Encouragement for
giving government contracts
to the more honest, capable
and reasonable low-bidders,
and actually enforcing an
unfulfilled contract once in a
while, even though it’s a
friend, relative, colleague or
church-brother or sister.

Governments the world
over seem to have a geneti-
cally hard-wired predisposi-
tion towards self-bloating
growth, thereby increasing
their own anonymity, impor-
tance and power. It may be
unrealistic, but perhaps we
might hope for a short
moratorium on hiring -----
would a year be too long?
At least a few conditions
might be imposed such as:
Less hiring according to pol-
itics and no hiring of any-
one who achieved less than
a D-academically (including
the RBPF). Absolutely no
one should be hired if on
their application they
describe themselves as being
a “people person” or if their
list of hobbies includes
“watching TV”, “listening
to music” or “meeting peo-
ple.”

The government of The
Bahamas is the country’s
largest employer by far
(around one out of every
three workers). Assuming
that there are no insur-
mountable objections from
the Privy Council, the ILO,
UTEB, the BPSU or the
BCC etc, there is little doubt
that a substantial increase
of revenue could be
achieved through improving
our government’s efficiency
and reducing waste even if
only a few of the above sug-
gestions were put into place
as temporary emergency
measures. In turn, tax bur-
dens on the man in the
street may not even need to
be increased much for quite
a while in these tough eco-
nomic times.

However, it is essential to
remember that none of the
above measures would have
any hope for success unless
the employees are provided
with a healthy, pleasant and
safe work environment, and
are treated in an under-
standing, decent and
respectful manner by the
powers that be.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

May 26, 2010.

I can’t understand archbishop’s
reasoning on gambling issue

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write in reaction to our Roman Catholic Archbishop
Patrick Pinder’s response to the issue of legalised gambling
for Bahamians in The Bahamas.

Like the Anglican Bishop’s reply to the subject matter —
Ido not understand my archbishop’s reasoning.

For example, my Bishop stated the following: I as the
leader of the Roman Catholic community in the Bahamas do
not support a change in the current law which would allow

the legalisation of gambling.

So, His Grace has essentially said that: he does not support
a change in the current law which would allow the legalisa-
tion of gambling for Bahamians in their beloved country.

His Grace no doubt supports lawful gambling for tourists

— nonetheless.

Here is where both Anglican and Catholic Bishops’ per-
spectives on the gambling for Bahamians question lack
spiritual and honourable creditability.

To basically say to a member of the Catholic commu-
nion in The Bahamas that gambling is wrong for them, but
right for visitors to our shores — is a sinful insult.

How did the Bishops find themselves in such a morally
compromising position on a political matter that should
have been exclusively resolved in the Bahamian political are-
na in the first place — in my view?

Well, I believe that that answer could be found in their
apparent aversion and abandonment of the gospels in pub-

lic life.

In fact, everyone wants to be the chief politician nowadays
— who is dictator of all the land.

Yes, to be Caesar is more fashionable than to be Christ-
like nowadays; hence — the gospels are being abandoned; and
church leaders in The Bahamas have clearly forsaken their
divine roles according to God’s will, in my opinion.

The devil is truly busy and successful in his mission to
deceive church leaders in The Bahamas - in my humbled

estimation.

DENNIS A DAMES
Nassau,
May 26, 2010.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Govt calls for oil spill |
clean-up SOMOTCErS

THE government is encour-
aging Bahamians to show con-
cern for their environment and
volunteer for the oil spill clean-
up when the time comes.

“If you hear that a tar ball
hits Key West, then it’s time to
head for Cay Sal. Once it hits
Cay Sal, three or four days lat-
er, we want you in Bimini. And
after that, we would want you
in Abaco and West End. And
that’s the way we will approach
dealing with the effects of the
oil spill,” said Minister of the
Environment Dr Earl Deveaux.

“It is our prayer and hope
that it doesn’t come to our
shores, but we are preparing
against the worst.”

As the Bahamas prepares for
some impact from the disas-
trous oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico, environmentally con-
cerned Bahamians took to the
streets at 6.30am on Saturday to
participate in the World Envi-
ronment Day Fun Walk start-
ing at the Bahamas National
Trust on Village Road.

They joined staff from the



Ministry of the Environment
and walked to Eastern Road,
through Big and Little Blair,
and back to Village Road to
the BNT’s Retreat to com-
memorate the dawn of World
Environment Day which was
held under the United Nation’s
theme “Many Species, One
Planet, One Future.”

This year’s celebration coin-
cides with the oil spill in the
Gulf of Mexico which highlights
the importance of organising
volunteers for clean-ups.

“T think all of you would
recognise how common our
future is as a result of the Deep
Horizon oil spill that’s affect-
ing the Gulf of Mexico and the
struggle of our regulatory agen-
cies, our human resources, in
one respect, to keep up with
the technology other human
beings deploy and develop,”
said Dr Deveaux.

“The most likely potential
place the tar balls would come
through would require the



By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



SPARKS from high voltage
lines turned Montrose Avenue
into the site of a dangerous fire-
works display yesterday — in what
business owners and residents
claim was the third such incident
in a month.

The incident began when a
power line near the corner of
Royal Palm Street caught fire and
dropped into the street after
crossing with another line.

The contact sent a wave of elec-
trical sparks down the block and
residents claim the resulting pow-
er surge followed by a black-out
was an encore of an incident just

ABOVE: Minister of the Environment Dr Earl Deveaux, addressed
an audience of environmentally concerned Bahamians, celebrating
World Environment Day at the Bahamas National Trust Fair held at
the Retreat on Village Road. He gave a detailed outline about the
government’s action plan to train and motivate a hundred volun-

Sparks fly from
high voltage lines

teers to clean up Cay Sal, Bimini, and West End, Grand Bahama.

RIGHT: Minister of the Environment Dr Earl Deveaux and Mrs
Deveaux cross the finish line and walk into the gates of the Retreat
at the Bahamas National Trust on Village Road, after participating
in this year’s June 5th World Environment Day Fun Walk.

placement of about 200 metres
of booms.”

The Bahamas government is
preparing for “pancake or golf
ball sized tar balls”, expected
to wash up on the shores of Cay
Sal, Bimini, West End and oth-
er parts of the country.

“While we are not concerned
that the worst impact of the
spill will not hit our shores, it is
inevitable that some impact will
hit our shores,” said Dr
Deveaux.

The Royal Bahamas Defence

EDWARD SMITH of 21st Centu-
ry Welders shows The Tribunea
severely damaged transformer
which had to be replaced in St
George’s Anglican church.

Force, the Oil Spill Contin-
gency team, and the Royal
Bahamas Police Force are the
official team developing and
organising one hundred volun-
teers.

The government said it has
training programmes in place
and welcomes anyone who
wants to donate their time to
volunteer to help and save the
Bahamas.

Minister Deveaux shared the
reason why he felt it was impor-
tant to outline the process of





last week.

The recurring problem of touching wires has plagued the area for
nearly a decade, according to residents, and the resulting power
surges have wreaked havoc on electrical appliances and the com-
munity’s sense of security.

Business owner Edward Smith of 21st Century Welders believes
the problem recurs because of the poor quality materials used to
make the repairs following such incidents.

He noted that the lines are often held apart by scrap pieces of
wood or bits of PVC pipe secured with electrical tape.

A long time resident of the area, Mr Smith said he remembers
when the lines had proper bar separators made of higher quality
materials.

“Every time people come from BEC to patch it up, it is done
unprofessionally and cannot be compliant with any electrical code
standards. They tape around a piece of wood to keep the wires
spread out but they’re supposed to get a spreader bar to stabilise
each wire in the exact position,” he said.

Mr Smith believes that if the lines were secured correctly, they
wouldn’t be so vulnerable to strong winds, minor accidents and
heat.

He said in the summer months the electrical tape often melts,
which leads inevitably to power lines touching with explosive con-
sequences.

“It’s endangering lives. One of the cables dropped down and cars
were passing by unaware of what was going on. There is a nursery
here, where it was sparking so much some of the sparks caught the
grass in front of the building,” he said.

Mr Smith said over the years, he has lost thousands of dollars in
electrical equipment and is currently seeking compensation to
damage to his refrigerator, washer and dryer with little success.

Numerous companies in the area have submitted compensa-
tion requests to the power company. Many say if they are lucky
enough to get a response at all, it is usually: ‘We are not responsi-
ble for that’.

The operator of a daycare centre in the area said she is always
afraid that sparks from the lines will set the roof on fire.

St George’s Anglican Church, which immediately faces yester-
day’s downed line, has suffered as a result of such incidents many
times over the years.

An administrator said the church has repeatedly had to replace
electrical equipment with no compensation from BEC.

He said: “We just have to pray to God because you never know
what’s going to get ruined each time. Just turn everything off and
hope when you go to use something — like the microwave or com-
puter — it’s still working.”

Officials at BEC told The Tribune off the record they are famil-
iar with the concerns of the Montrose Avenue community, but the
company did not respond to requests for an official comment
before press time.

- Wife claims Jamaican
- Man who left her is ‘on
- expired work permit’

i : By MEGAN REYNOLDS
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

: ASINGLE mother whose
; Jamaican husband left her
: days after obtaining perma-











humanitarian efforts necessary
for the clean-up of Bahamian
shores.

“The environment that we
share really is at the heart of
our way of life. The things that
make us feel good about our-
selves, the conch salad you
enjoy and the lobster that
affords a good living for so
many of our people, the
grouper we all enjoy, these all
live in the turtle grass mead-
ows and the coral reefs and

: nent residency claims he is

; employed on an expired

: work permit despite their

: impending divorce.

: The 33-year-old Harbour

: Island mother of five told

: Immigration officials how

? her husband abandoned her

: and his children, one which

: has special needs, just days

: after she signed his final

: permanent residency appli-

: cation in February last year.
She asked the Immigra-

: tion Department to cancel

: his application following

: their separation and when

: nothing was done she spoke

? out about the case in The

: Tribune.

: Former Minister of State

: for Immigration Branville

: McCartney said the perma-

: nent residency application

? would be cancelled in

: August, but 10 months later

: the single mother claims the

: 28-year-old Jamaican is still

: working with a work permit

: that expired in January last

these things would be destroyed
by the oil,” he said.

“What you see on TV in the
wetlands of Louisiana, Alaba-
ma, where all of these species
live, are an important part of
protected systems in the man-
groves of West Andros, the
bight of Acklins, and the maars
of Abaco. If they are destroyed,
then you can appreciate how
the life of Bahamians would be
affected and our way of life
would be destroyed.”

A BEC worker
repairing the fallen
power line






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





: year.

When she contacted

: Immigration officials they

: said his permanent residen-
: cy application was pending
? until a conclusion was

; reached in their protracted
: divorce proceedings.

She said: “He’s now on an

: expired work permit but

; because we are still legally

: married he’s still working,

: and I don’t think that should
: be the case because it’s

: expired. Whether you are

: legally married or not, it’s

: expired.

“Meanwhile there are

Bahamians who can’t even
: get jobs in this economy.”

The struggling mother is a

: full-time caretaker for the

: couple’s five-year-old

: daughter who suffers from
: developmental difficulties
: and she continues to rely on
: financial support from the
: Department of Social Ser-
: vices as, she said, her for-

: eign husband does not pro-
: vide consistent financial

: support.

“The government is still

taking care of this special
: child while he’s in Nassau
; partying,” she said.

“And Immigration needs

to do something about it.

: They said they were going
: to stop him but they did

: nothing.

“T did everything they

: told me to do and I still feel
: it is just a waste of my time,
: and this is just the case of

; one man. It just shows how
: Slack Immigration is.”

The Tribune submitted

: several questions to the

; Immigration Department

? concerning the man’s status,
: however these were not

: answered before press time
: yesterday.

2010 FORD MUSTANG

an American Icon
Shop & Compare

All cow, all reir, oothieg like ft sealable in The
Haheoris, a true Arerican Sports car 4.00 V8
‘with Aglerialie Traian, clo 17 nek

dlgy whieli, seer windewi, lock and mind,

tide cnrlain air bapa, ple all elatelaeel Feature,
PLUS SD pears 000 mile waminiy, 5 pare
pawdhide aiaiihersa, 3 poard teal pestection,
iewtes dnd ieapeeiion bo birthelay, fell tank ef
jaa, Moor nals, ral Five dada

if you are lOOKiNg for the Dest value available
You owe it to yourself to visit our showroom

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

—

2010

(Avwp @ Compare

2.4L four cylinder engine with auiomatic tamsmission,
the most fuel efficient vehicle im its closs.6 disc od system,
power windows locks amd minors, side curtim air bags,
I7 inch allow wheck. completely new aeroditeames body
design, all of thas plas 3 years!3G000 mile warranty, 4
years Mudside assistance, 3 yeors rast protection, licence
fm inapechon bo binhday, fall tank of gas, Teor mats,
fire five services,

eee em utc s



THOMPSON BOULEVARD
TEL.: 356-7700 » FAX: 328-6084

EHAIL: anak eolseserineaiLoomn
WEEGITE: trienchyminorsbaharig. com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Governor-General
Sar Ur LAS |
CM TC aa Tr TT

CLARENCE TOWN, Long Island — Last
| week Thursday, Governor-General Sir Arthur
Foulkes laid a wreath at the grave of Sir Henry
Taylor the third Bahamian Governor General of
The Bahamas.

In Long Island for the 43rd annual Long
Island Regatta, Sir Arthur and Lady Foulkes,
upon landing at Deadman’s Cay Airport, went
to Sir Henry’s gravesite for the brief ceremony.

Sir Henry, a native of Long Island was a
| founder of the Progressive Liberal Party in 1953.
He served as Governor General from April 8,
1991 to January 1, 1992. Sir Henry died February
14, 1994 at the age of 91.








SIR HENRY TAYLOR

Unique Vacations
Limited

Worldwide representatives for

Sandals and Beaches Resorts

Invites applications for the following positions in our
Nassau, Bahamas office

I) Jr Network Engineer

Responsibilities:

¢ Provide 1st and 2nd-tier support for network devices and carrier
circuits

¢ Monitoring of system stability, time possible

e Assist in implementing new network technologies and equipment by
working with a team of network engineers.

¢ Perform documentation of procedures and keep them updated.

¢ Execute change management according to documented procedures.

Qualifications:

* Cisco Routers and Switching — CCNA Required but CCNP Preferred

* Bachelor’s degree in a technical discipline, or equivalent work in an IT
related field.

¢ Required: Hands on work experience with Cisco Routers and Switches

¢ Experience with Carriers (AT&T, Verizon, BTC, C&W, etc) preferred

* Routing Protocols: OSPE, BGP

¢ Must be familiar with assisting end users describe issues and work to
resolution

¢ Must be able to be on call 24/7 and be able to assist with problems
when needed

¢ Must be able to travel at least 40% and have a valid passport

2) Entry Level — E-Marketing Coordinator.

We are seeking an E-Marketing Coordinator to join our E-Marketing
Team. The E-marketing Coordinator will help manage online marketing
campaigns for the Hospitality Industry. Our ideal candidate will thrive
in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment and should possess strong
project management and interpersonal communication skills, with a
meticulous eye for detail. Must be proficient in MS Word, Excel and
PowerPoint.

Candidates who have the above experience and qualifications should
forward their resumes to hrrepori6@ gmail.com

Only candidates that have the experience and qualifications required will
be contacted for interviews.

- Western Air to begin

new direct service to

FOLLOWING the successful launch of
its Kingston route in April, Western Air
has announced that it will launch daily
flight services into Montego Bay on June
11.

Rex Rolle, CEO of Western Air said:
“There was no question about beginning
flight service into Montego Bay. We were
so elated by the positive response we
received from Kingston that we knew
almost instantaneously that Montego Bay
would be next on our agenda.”

Western Air intends to start the Mon-
tego Bay flights at an introductory rate of
$320 round trip.

Tickets are now on sale at the West-
ern Air Jamaica ticket counter (previ-
ously the Air Jamaica ticket counter),
any Western Air ticket counter, and at all
major travel agencies in the Bahamas and
Jamaica.

Expansion

Western Air has been preparing and
training their staff in both the Bahamas
and Jamaica for the expansion. Check-
in at the Montego Bay airport will be
conducted by Jamaica Dispatch services.

The flight will leave at 9.30am with a
scheduled arrival time in Montego Bay of
10.30am (Jamaica time) and will depart
from Montego Bay at 11.30am (Jamaica
time) with a scheduled arrival time in
Nassau of 2.30pm.

According to Mr Rolle, Western Air is
committed to committed to providing
safe, reliable and affordable air services

Montego Bay, Jamaica

to both its destinations in Jamaica.

The company recently signed a multi-
million dollar agreement to acquire three
additional aircraft.

The CEO explained that the new
SAAB 340-B models are better suited
for the Jamaica routes in particular, as
result of their ability to carry one thou-
sand more pounds, their higher cruising
speed and overall better performance
than the SAAB 340-A that the company
currently operates.

Aircraft

Delivery of the new aircraft is expected
in the next 60 to 90 days.

Western Air is the largest privately-
owned airline in the Bahamas. It is fully
Bahamian owned and operated with its
main headquarters in San Andros.

Western Air is currently constructing a
$4 million state-of-the-art terminal and
maintenance facility at the Grand
Bahama International Airport which is
scheduled to open at the end of summer,
2010.

Upon completion, the facility will serve
as the airline’s northern hub and will
facilitate the launch of Western Air’s
expansion into the South Florida and the
northern Bahamas.

Passengers travelling in from Jamaica
can connect to other destinations in the
Bahamas, as Western Air operates daily
flights from Nassau to: Freeport, Marsh
Harbour, Exuma, Congo Town, San
Andros and Bimini.

GRAYCLIFF AIRPORT BOUTIQUE JOINS
Fae UL









THE new Graycliff Bou-
tique and Divan at the Lin-
den Pindling International
Airport has become the
newest member of Priority
Pass, the world’s leading
independent airport lounge
programme.



Notice

MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
THE FRICE CONTROL ACT, 197Tl
CHAPTER 334
THE FRICE CONTROL (CO ASOLINE & DIESEL OL)
(AMENDMENT) ¢ | REGULATIONS, 2002

LIMITED will become cllcctive on Tuesday, June 08, 1610.

SCHEDULE

PER U4. 0. ALLOM

ARTICLE 41 AMAL!

SUPPLIERS PRICE
& PRICE
$

PART B
FREEPORT. G.B.

| Freepant Cril

Company Lad, INESEL CML, 43 | 3.51

FERMARNESNT SECRETARY



Government

The public is adviged that prices as shown in the Schedule for DIESEL O11 sold by FREEPORT O1L COMPANY

| MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING PRICE |

DAA TTL
DISTRIBUTORS

SE A

ACA A Bees uas



GN-1062

MAXIMUM RETAIL
SELLING PRICE PER |
- U5. GALLON

4

FREIGHT





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Travellers who are mem-
bers of the Priority Pass pro-
gramme will have an ele-
gant, relaxing way to spend
their airport time while
awaiting their departures to
the USA, the company
announced this week.

“It’s extremely exciting to
have become a part of the
Priority Pass programme,
and have a new destination
for members to enjoy,” said
Paolo Garzaroli, president
of Graycliff Cigar Compa-
ny, which owns the lounge.
“As a Priority Pass member
myself, I know the benefit
of membership, having
enjoyed the facilities at
many airports worldwide.”

The 1,200 square foot
lounge, which features both
smoking and non-smoking
areas, offers travellers a full
bar service, complimentary





Wi-Fi internet access and
flat-screen televisions to
keep up with the news or
their favourite sports.

A Graycliff Boutique sells
Graycliff cigars, cigarettes,
Graycliff coffee and choco-
lates and various gift items.

A state-of-the-art ventila-
tion system ensures the
cleanest atmosphere possi-
ble in the smoking room.

“We’re very pleased to
have this partnership with
Graycliff especially in Nas-
sau, Bahamas — a key loca-
tion in the Caribbean where
we have previously had no
lounge offering in our net-
work,” said Terry Evans,
president of Priority Pass.
“We look forward to this
new partnership extending
to other airport locations as
Graycliff grows their lounge
presence.”







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 7

SOE ULC LTE :



i

hal

emt 7









EMPLOYEES of the fptiies and Kelly law firm were frustrated yesterday with the trash littering their downtown parking lot following the
Labour Day parade on Friday. Owners said their property is left in this state after every parade that passes Bay Street and they want some-

thing to be done about it in future.

AWU resident claims
workers ‘denied
right to be unionised’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Industrial
unrest is festering at a major
yacht repair facility in Grand
Bahama, a union leader
revealed.

McKinley Jones, president
of the Airport Workers Union
(AWU), is accusing Bradford
Marine of denying its workers
their constitutional right to be
unionised.

The AWU has met the nec-
essary criteria to be recognised
as the bargaining agent for the
workers but management
refuses to accept this fact, he
claimed.

The union says it is awaiting
the reaction of Minister of
Labour Dion Foulkes.

Workers on Grand Bahama
turned out in large numbers on
Friday to participate in the
annual Labour Day motorcade
and march, which culminated
with a Family Fun Day at
Taino Beach.

In a display of solidarity,
union leaders from the various
labour organisations locked
arms as they entered the beach
park shortly after noon.

Minister of Housing Ken-
neth Russell brought remarks
on behalf of Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes. Minister of State
for Finance Zhivargo Laing
spoke on behalf of the FNM
and Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell
spoke on behalf of the PLP.

Mr Jones, who also spoke,
claimed Bradford Marine is
using “stalling tactics” to delay
the unionisation of its workers.

“This is unacceptable. I put
Bradford Marine on notice that
failure to come to the bargain-
ing table on July 30 will result
in industrial action,” he said.

“We call on government to
perform the duties that they

Industrial unrest ‘festering |
at yacht repair facility’



were elected to and ensure that
Bahamians are not taken
advantage of by foreign
employers.

“We will march through the
streets of Grand Bahama and
New Providence to ensure that
workers at Bradford Marine
are given the same opportuni-
ties as other workers in this
country.”

Mr Jones said that the union
will seek the support of affili-
ates in the National Congress
of Trade Unions to bring local,
national and international
attention to the issue.

Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) area vice president
Quinton LaRhoda and Petrel
Russell, vice president of the
Nurses’ Union, also brought
remarks.

The BUT is expected to
soon present its contract pro-
posal to the government.

Mr LaRhoda said the union
understands the country is fac-
ing challenges and will work
with the government.

“We are coming to the table
with good faith and we want
you to meet our good faith with
good will because working
together, even in terrible times,
people can achieve great
things.

“We also want to indicate
that anything we forego now
in the time of hardship, we will
be seeking reward for in the
time of plenty,” he said.

Minister of Housing Ken-
neth Russell said the govern-
ment is working to improve the
labour laws of the country.

He reminded workers of the
need to compromise where
possible, keeping in mind the
current economic situation.

The government expects the
economy of Freeport to
improve when two major mul-
ti-million dollar projects by Sta-
toil and Vopak get underway.

“Statoil is out to bid and
Vopak will start putting plans
together before the end of the
summer,” Mr Russell said.

Zhivargo Laing stated that
the FNM government is com-
mitted to reducing the unem-
ployment rate in the Bahamas.

“The FNM has (had) the
opportunity in some times past
to generate so much work that
we have been able to see the
unemployment rate in this
country come down to levels
of 6.9 per cent which was
unheard of 30 years prior.

“I think that is our aim and
objective going forward — to be
able to try and promote and
encourage this economy’s
growth in such a way as to
bring us to a place again where
people who want to work can
find work and enjoy the digni-
ty of work,” he said.

Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell
said Labour Day is an impor-
tant national holiday.

He reminded those in atten-
dance about the Burma Road
Riots of June 1, 1942 and their
significance in terms of the
fight for equality for working
class Bahamians.

“It is great day for working
people. Our party reaffirms our
support and faith in the work-

DONATION TO RANFURLY HOME





Ce



THE Bahamasair Pilots Association made a donation
to the Ranfurly Home for Children on Saturday to
assist the care facility with its operational costs.

Pictured are (I-r) pilot Camron Pratt, trustee of the
Association; Olga Clarke, director of the Ranfurly
Home; president of the Pilots Association Emil Saun-

ders and Ramin Hepburn.

HOM Ee

THE
RANFURLY
FOR

fo
if



\ i

The Ranfurly Home provides shelter and a new life
for children who have been orphaned, abused, neglect-
ed or abandoned.

Presently there are 32 children between the ages of
five and 19, who have been placed there by the Depart-
ment of Social Services.

CHILDREN



ie

we

7
= 7
ae ae
“ee

S

k

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ing people and our connection
with the working man and
woman of this country, he said.

Governor-General appointed
— to Most Distinguished Order
of St. Michael and SL George

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES



GOVERNMENT House
announced Wednesday, June 2, that
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth IT has
conferred upon Governor-General
Sir Arthur Foulkes the award of
Knight Grand Cross of the Most Dis-
tinguished Order of Saint Michael
and Saint George, (GCMG).

The conferment is in recognition
of Sir Arthur’s appointment as Gov-
ernor-General of The Bahamas,
according to a release from Govern-
ment House.

The Most Distinguished Order of
Saint Michael and Saint George is [SPW amiiP een dss
the highest of three classes with
Knight Commander (KCMG) or Dame Commander
(DCMG) being the second highest and Companion (CMG)
third.

The Order is named in honour of two military saints, St.
Michael and St. George and was founded on April 28, 1818 by
George Prince Regent, later George IV of the United King-
dom.

The GCMG recognises individuals who have rendered
important services in relation to foreign or Commonwealth
affairs. People are recognised by appointment to the Order
rather than award of it.

Sir Arthur was elected to Parliament in 1967 and the fol-
lowing year appointed to serve in the Cabinet as Minister of
Communications then as Minister of Tourism.

He was one of the founders of the Free National Movement
in 1971, the now governing party of The Bahamas.

He was appointed to the Senate in 1972 and 1977, and re-
elected to the House of Assembly in 1982.

Sir Arthur was one of the four Opposition delegates to
The Bahamas Independence Constitution Conference in Lon-
don in 1972.

When the FNM was elected the governing party, Sir Arthur
entered the diplomatic service of The Bahamas as High Com-
missioner to the United Kingdom (resident in London) and
Ambassador to France, Germany, Italy, Belgium and the
European Union.

He represented The Bahamas to the Commonwealth in
London, and the African Caribbean Pacific Group in Brussels,
was Permanent Representative to the International Maritime
Organisation and also Doyen of the Caribbean diplomatic
corps in the United Kingdom. He founded Friends of The
Bahamas, a London-based association.

In 1999 Sir Arthur was appointed the first Bahamas Ambas-
sador to the People’s Republic of China and Ambassador to
the Republic of Cuba. He is a founding member of the Chi-
na-Bahamas Friendship Association.

In recognition of his service to the country, in 2001 he was
appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael
and St George, by Queen Elizabeth II.

From 2007 until 2010 he served as Director General of
Bahamas Information Services, the Government’s information
and news agency, and was designated to act as Deputy to the
Governor General on every occasion His Excellency was
absent from The Bahamas.

Sir Arthur was sworn in as the Bahamas’ eighth Bahami-
an Governor-General on May 14 this year.



Reporters News
and Sport

ANTED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
narratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers
who want to make a difference

at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We're the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we're on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience

e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour



Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet @tribunemedia.net
Or

drop in your applications at

our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,

Managing Editor, The Tribune.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas ails
to be ‘premier
destination’
for arbitration

FROM page one

were scheduled to be the
principal speakers at the
event. Although Dame
Joan spoke, Mr Delaney
did not speak as he is
presently out of the
country.

Bertha Cooper-
Rousseau, chairperson
of the newly formed
Bahamas Chapter, said
that the Bahamas
branch of the respected
body will “play a pivotal
role in the training of
professionals in the dis-
ciplines including archi-
tecture, accounting,
engineering, financial
services, medicine,
quantity surveying,
insurance, maritime and
the legal profession.”

The president of the
institute, Joe Behan was
in attendance at the
event, along with dele-
gates from throughout
the Caribbean.

In creating its own
Chapter of the CIARB
in the Caribbean, the
Bahamas joins
Trinidad and Tobago
and Barbados. In a
statement released
announcing the launch
of the Bahamas
branch, John Bassie, a
Jamaican attorney-at-
law and Chairperson of
the new Caribbean
branch of the CIARB,
welcomed the new
branches to the
Caribbean Branch.

“We look forward to
working with all mem-
bers of the institute to
improve alternative
dispute resolution in
the Caribbean region,
and in particular, arbi-
tration,” he said.

show pulled off air ‘after
criticism of budget cuts’

FROM page one

get cuts as it related to ZNS.

The pre-taped 30-minute
programme — which is host-
ed by ZNS senior reporter
Shenique Miller and is a dis-
cussion between journalists
from various media houses
— was supposed to feature a
debate this week about the
recent Budget Communica-
tion, with particular empha-
sis on the 50 per cent cut to
ZNS’ allocation.

With this reporter as a
scheduled guest along with
ZNS reporters Clint Wat-
son, Altovese Munnings,
and Joy FM DJ Kevin Har-
ris, the show was taped on
Thursday, June 3, at ZNS
headquarters on Collins
Avenue.

During the taping, the dis-
cussion focused primarily on
the budget cuts to BCB and
highlighted how the salaries

of 70 managers at ZNS were
consuming more than $5
million of the corporation’s
$8.2 million allocation.

The remaining 142 line-
staff at ZNS, it was said,
were paid out of the remain-
ing funds.

Following the taping,
ZNS was reportedly “all
abuzz” with word of what
had transpired during the
show, with many staff mem-
bers being urged to tune-in
to Monday’s show. Howev-
er, this show was abruptly
pulled without explanation.

When contacted by The
Tribune yesterday for the
reason behind this decision,
the Senior Deputy General
Manager of Radio and Tele-
vision Kaylessa Deveaux-
Isaacs said that the corpo-
ration has a system whereby
they are given a list of the
topics that would be dis-
cussed in advance of any

Alleged police station
escapee appears in court

FROM page one

On May 4, two prisoners who were standing trial in the
Supreme Court escaped from the Central Police Station. Renar-
do Bastian, 20, and Ricardo Knowles, 22, reportedly made
their escape from Central Police Station during a bathroom
break around 3am on Tuesday, May 4. Knowles died after
being shot as he attempted to evade police in the Kemp Road
area later that day. Bastian was apprehended a short time lat-
er at Potter's Cay dock. Bastian has been charged with escape.
Two police officers have also been charged with aiding in that

escape.

Days following the escape, Superintendent Ellsworth Moss,
who had been in charge of the Central Police station, was relo-
cated to police headquarters and replaced by Superintendent
Wayne Miller who formerly headed the Strategic Policy and
Planning branch at police headquarters.

All New 2010



Features:
“4 cylinder 1.8L * CD/Radio wimp3 Plug

* Automatic
“Fog Lights
*|mmobilizer

* Air Condition

* Power Package

" Air Bags, Seat Belts

3 Year Factory Warranty

ALMERA

il

SHIFT _the way you move \MSSAN,

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED — ®7H:srorrnancinwn

#289 Well Rood
PO. Bow Nhl Pe

t (2d2| Pd? 62d) 3998298

Thompson Blvd, « Oakes Field
t. 242.326.6377 f, 242.326.6315

e.sanpin @hotmail.com

LOMMONMWEALTH BARK.

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE INSURARKE
BIKERS & GENTS LTD.



taping.

According to Mrs
Deveaux-Isaacs, the topics
that were approved were
not the ones discussed dur-
ing the show.

However, in an e-mail
sent by a senior ZNS
employee on June 2 to the
reporters who would be
appearing for the taping,
“budget allocations and cut
backs” were clearly outlined
as one of the points to be
addressed, along with, “Rift
in Cabinet, Jehovah’s Wit-
ness and others (in) NIB
fraud, Time Magazine’s
‘crime’ article, and new
prison legislation.”

When The _ Tribune
attempted to gain clarifica-
tion on this point, Mrs
Deveaux-Isaacs said that
any further comment would
have to come from general
manager Edwin Light-
bourne’s office.

The remainder of the
exchange was as follows:

Mrs Deveaux-Isaacs: “Is
this something you are sup-
posedly going to print?”

Reporter: “Yes, it is.”

Mrs Deveaux-Isaacs:
“OK. I have no further
comments then.”

However, repeated
attempts to reach Mr Light-
bourne for his comments on
the matter were unsuccess-
ful up to press time last
night.

A senior journalist yes-
terday told The Tribune that
ZNS’ handling of this issue
is reminiscent of by-gone
days when censorship was
the “order of the day.”

“You cannot appear, in
this day and age, to be
restricting what can be said
about a public corporation
that only survives on the
goodwill and blessings of
the Bahamian people. We

Mare Se |

judge forces retrial

FROM page one

tial.



case is the connection of the learned judge with the law firm
which, at a material time, represented the appellant [Knowles]
in some matters which the appellant alleged were connected to
some of the charges in the information,” Dame Joan found.
“While it is clear that no allegation of actual bias was being
made against the learned judge, we asked ourselves whether a
reasonable person, with full knowledge of the relevant facts,
would have a doubt as to whether the learned judge was impar-

“In the circumstances, we were of the view that we were not
satisfied that a reasonable member of the public in the
Bahamas, with full knowledge of the facts as they appear to us,
would not have had a doubt about the objectivity of the learned
judge, so we allowed the appeal and ordered a re-trial, as there
was evidence on which a trial could be held.”

¢ SEE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FOR FULL STORY









have a right, not only as
journalists, but as citizens
of this country to ask the
tough questions and be free
to ask them without fear.
Censoring the public from
this information will not
make the problem go
away,” he said.

Future instalments of
Press Pass are expected to
be broadcast starting next
week.

Twenty-two KFC
employees put on

indefinite ‘leave’
FROM page one

pany saw a slow down in busi-
ness.

“Tf it was based on our per-
formance I could see them
doing it, but I know I’m a
good worker,” said former
employee Donnell Forbes.
She said she is hoping the
restaurant will provide pack-
ages for those who have been
forced out of their jobs.

Another worker said she
was worried how she will now
afford to feed her 10-week old
baby.

BHCAWU executives who
gathered with the workers
outside KFC Headquarters
yesterday vowed to fight for
their members.

“This administration will
not stand idly by and let our
members be taken advantage
of,” said Ricardo Hepburn of
the BHCAWU.

KFC is reportedly imple-
menting other strategies to try
to rein in costs at this time,
including adjustments to oper-
ating hours and shifts.





Ps



BP CONTRACT WORKERS, working out of Avenida 13 base, Pensacola Beach, Fla., tape up the bag of
tar-covered sand they scooped up this afternoon, along the shore, Monday, June 7, 2010.
AP Photo/The Miami Herald, Marice Cohn Band

Well cap captures more oil,
but outlook is gloomy

NEW ORLEANS

THE cap on the blown-out
well in the Gulf is capturing a
half-million gallons a day, or
anywhere from one-third to
three-quarters of the oil spew-
ing from the bottom of the
sea, officials said Monday.
But the hopeful report was
offset by a warning that the
farflung slick has broken up
into hundreds and even thou-
sands of patches of oil that
may inflict damage that could
persist for years, according to
Associated Press.

Coast Guard Adm. Thad
Allen, the government's point
man for the crisis, said the
breakup has complicated the
cleanup.

"Dealing with the oil spill
on the surface is going to go

on for a couple of months,”
he said at a briefing in Wash-
ington. But "long-term issues
of restoring the environment
and the habitats and stuff will
be years.”

Allen said the containment
cap that was installed late last
week is now collecting about
460,000 gallons of oil a day
out of the approximately
600,000 to 1.2 million gallons
believed to be spewing from
the well a mile underwater.
In a tweet, BP said it collected
316,722 gallons from midnight
to noon Monday.

The amount of oil captured
is being slowly ramped up as
more vents on the cap are
closed.

Crews are moving carefully
to avoid a dangerous pressure
buildup and to prevent the

formation of the icy crystals
that thwarted a previous
effort to contain the leak.

The captured oil is being
pumped to a ship on the sur-
face.

"I think it's going fairly
well," Allen said.

BP said it plans to replace
the cap — perhaps later this
month or early next month —
with a slightly bigger one that
will provide a tighter fit and
thus collect more oil. It will
also be designed to allow the
company to suspend the
cleanup and then resume it
quickly if a hurricane threat-
ens the Gulf later this season.
The new cap is still being
designed.

e SEE PAGE FIVE

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE PAGE 9

be



Antoan
Richardson
is proving



OF



t



TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010 | a big hit

INSIDE ¢ Baseball news





Dianne Miller,
the first female
chef tle mission
of national team









DIANNE MILLER

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SHE’S been on board as
the first female executive of
the Bahamas Olympic Com-
mittee since 2002. Now
Dianne Miller has been ele-
vated to another historic posi-
tion as the first female chef de
mission of a national team.

When the BOC, formerly
called the Bahamas Olympic
Association, send its 100-plus
team to the 21st Central
American and Caribbean
Games in Mayagtiez, Puerto
Rico, from July 17, 2010 to
August 1, Miller will head the
delegation, a position that she
gladly embraces.

“It’s exciting, having being
the assistant chef de mission
on two separate occasions,”
said Miller, who served in
2002 in Santo Domingo and
2006 in Cali, Columbia.

“T’m just happy to be able
to step up to the plate lead the
charge for women in sports.
It’s a great honor, not just for
me, but for all women.”

When the games are com-
pleted, Miller said it’s her
hope that she can return
home and sing the praises of
the athletes as they win more
medals than have ever been
achieved at the four-yearly
games. “We’re looking to
take a good team down, even
though we haven’t sanctioned
any yet,” stressed Miller, who
will be assisted by Algernon
Cargill with Roy Colebrooke
as the team manager.

“We're hoping that the
various federations will give
us their best so that we can go
to Puerto Rico and turn ina
very good performance.”

Miller publicly thanked
BOC’s president Wellington
Miller for promoting her after
she traveled as his assistant at
the 2006 CAC Games. She
also noted that she’s pleased
to have both Cargill and Cole-
brooke traveling to assist her
in their capacities, forming
what they call a very good
“management team.”

The Bahamas, according to
Wellington Miller, is expected
to be represented in some
eight different disciplines in
athletics (track and field),
aquatic (swimming), boxing,
tennis, judo, bowling, sailing
and cycling. This year’s team
is slightly smaller than the
200-plus team that represent-
ed the Bahamas at the last
CAC Games in 2006 in Carta-
gena. The difference this time
around is simply. The
Bahamas won’t be participat-
ing in any team sports because
none of them have qualified.

“Softball didn’t qualify, nor
did basketball or volleyball,”
said BOC’s secretary general
Rommel Knowles. “Baseball
is not playing up to par to
compete in any qualifying
tournament. So we will just
have the individual sports.”

Nevertheless, Wellington
Miller said they are expecting
the athletes to perform very
well in their individual events.

“This is a good testing
ground for our athletes,”
Wellington Miller pointed
out. “We expect for them to
perform well because this is
also a qualifier for the Com-
monwealth Games.”

The 19th Commonwealth
Games is set for October 3-14
in New Delhi, India. Roy
Colebrooke has been selected
as the chef de mission for the
Bahamian team that is expect-
ed to compete in aquatics,
athletics, boxing, cycling, rug-
by and tennis.



GOLF FEDERATION NATIONAL AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS

Dutier shoots
72 to stay top

Veteran Chris Harris just one shot behind
@ SCOREBOARD

* Here’s a look at the performances of the
golfers after the first three days of competition at
the Bahamas Golf Federation’s National Amateur
Championships:







Names Three-Day Scores Totals
Oren Butler 69-72-72 213
Chris Harris 72-69-73 214
Richard Gibson Jr. 74-67-76 217
Rashad Ferguson 67-76-79 222
Benjamin Davis Jr. 78-70-77 235

















Kyle King 75-75-78 228
George Swann 74-76-79 229
Steve Watson 74-77-78 229
Shane Gibson 76-76-77 229
Peter McIntosh 77-70-83 230
Matthew Cox 75-74-81 230
Nolan Johnson 74-71-86 231
rh Charlie Butler 85-68-81 234
a Edrick Poitier 81-74-80 235
ead Devaughn Robinson 77-80-78 235
“i George Turnquest 78-76-85 239
Oswald Moore 74-83-85 242
Zorro Stubbs 79-74-91 244 ie
he nei Craig Flowers 79-77-90 246
aa eos Kelsey Rolle 84-78-85 247
' me ; Harcourt Poitier 76-78-100 254
a KON nlm LO depen Wa Ph eo @ Tehama thins
; By BRENT STUBBS my drive tomorrow and see how it go.”
Senior Sports Reporter On the 13th hole at two-under-par,
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net Butler went into an unplayable line. He



opted to hit the ball from the point of
entry instead of taking the two club

REN Butler, one of the col- —_ length relief.
legiate players coming Butler went on to bogey the hole, but
home, turned in a two- hestill managed to finish ahead of Har-
over-par 72 to remain on ris and Richard Gibson Jr., the other
top of the Bahamas Golf Federation’s member of their threesome that came
National Amateur Golf Championships into yesterday’s competition tied at 141.
after three days of competition. While the tournament will determine
Butler, a 25-year-old senior at the the best amateur golfer in the country, it
University of South Carolina, holds a _ will also serve as the final trial for the five
slim one-shot lead over veteran Chris players who will represent the Bahamas
Harris from Grand Bahama as they head on the Hoerman Cup team at the
into the final day of competition today at Caribbean Amateur Golf Championships
the Lyford Cay Golf Club. in Barbados at the end of the month. i
Yesterday as the third day of compe- Butler finds himself sitting in a pretty
tition was staged at the Ocean Club on — good position to achieve both. Harris,
Paradise Island, after the first two days on the other hand, is only vying for the
on Saturday and Sunday were played at top spot. He has already secured his
the Cable Beach Golf Course, Butler berth on the CAGC team as a member



managed to work himself out ofajamto of the Mid-Amateur, teaming up with : i
| extend his total to 213 with Harris trailing © Shane Gibson. Sraz i
| at 214. They clinched their berth in Grand j oe
“It was shaky,” said Butler about his | Bahama over the Easter holiday week- = a









performance yesterday. “I got the ball
in the hole, but I have to straighten up SEE page 10





Sess)
; aaa rn sieiaes re
ee x







PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



SHANE GIBSON lines up a putt. He has shot scores of 76-76-77 for a total of 229.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

SPORTS
CENTRE

Antoan Richardson proving a big hit

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

of .421. He currently leads the team in
batting average and on base percent-

age.



Since his reintroduction to AA base-
ball in the MLB minor leagues late last
month, Antoan Richardson has been on
a tear at the plate with efficient hitting.

Richardson has impressed with his
play of late and has made his free agent
signing one of the most savvy signings by
the Mississippi Braves team this season.

In nine games since signing with the
Braves on May 27th, Richardson has hit
for a batting average of .364, 12 hits in 33

plate appearances.

Richardson has driven in two RBIs,
scored four runs, stolen a single base,
and has compiled an on base percentage

In his latest outing, a 6-3 loss to the
Montgomery Biscuits, RIchardson's
offense was in high gear early.

He drove in the game's opening score
and gave the Braves an early 1-0 lead on
an RBI single that scored Alejandro

Machado.

the win.

With a 4-0 advantage, Richardson
reached on an infield single and an error
allowed him to get second base.

Willie Cabrera then grounded to third

In a previous outing in a series open-
ing game against the Biscuits, Richard-
son scored the team’s final run of the
game late in the sixth inning to cement

stolen base.

and Richardson scored the run for a 5-0
lead. The Braves went on to win 5-2.
In his first outing with the team
against the Mobile BayBears, Richard-
son was immediately inserted into the
starting lineup and went 3-5 with one

Richardson loaded the bases late in
the ninth inning when he put a ground
ball in play to second and all runners
reached safely.

He set the stage for Cabrera who sin-
gled to right field and scored Juan Gon-
zalez, however the comeback attempt
ended there in the Braves' 8-4 loss.

In his second game, Richardson went
2-4, highlighted with his first RBI and
first run scored.

Again with late inning heroics,

Richardson hit a fly ball to left-center
field and was safe at second on a fielding
error and a pair of runners scored to tie
the game at six.

Cabrera doubled to score Richard-
son. In his previous stint in the AA

minors, Richardson spent two years with

the Connecticut Defenders.
In his first season with the Defenders
in 2008, Richardson hit .241 with five

home runs, 63 runs, 31 RBIs and 33

stolen bases in 123 games.

In 2009, he hit just .207 with six RBI
and six stolen bases and was released
by the Defenders in July.

The Mississippi Braves boast several
major league alumni to its credit, most
notably, Jeff Francoueur, who won a
Gold Glove Award in 2007.

Oren Butler shoots 72 to keep one shot ahead of Chris Harris

FROM page nine

end. So did the super senior
team of veteran Grand
Bahamians Vernon Wells and
Bobby Rose.

However, federation presi-
dent Jamers Gomez said they
will have to make a determina-

tion on who will travel on the
senior team as well as the
ladies.

Harris, who at age 47 is now
heading to his record 29th
CAGC appearance, said he was
pleased with his performance
so far, especially yesterday
against the youngsters when he





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00121
COMMON LAW & EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee NEWBOLD

AND
IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT Piece Parcel
or lot of Land Situate on Maxwell Lane bounded
North by Property of one Weir 96.51 feet, East
by property of one Lewis 51.53 feet, and again
by a loose stone wall 15.27 feet South, by
Maxwell Lane 107.58 feet, West by property
of one Johnson 75.53 feet, in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

NOTICE

The Petition of MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE
nee NEWBOLD, Retired, of Saunders Road off
Lightbourne Avenue situate in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas in respect of:

ALL THAT PIECE Parcel or lot of Land Situate
on Maxwell Lane bounded North by Property
of one Weir 96.51 feet, East by property of one
Lewis 51.53 feet, and again by loose stone
wall 15.27 feet South, by Maxwell Lane 107.58
feet, West by property of one Johnson 75.53
feet, in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, and is more particularly described
and delineated on the plan attached hereto
and is thereon coloured PINK.

MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee
NEWBOLD claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered fee simple estate in possession
of the said piece parcel or lot of land and made
application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section
Three (3) of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to
have her title to the said piece parcel or tract
of land investigated and the nature or extent
of it determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected
during the normal office hours at the following
places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joan Ferguson & Co.,
Avson House, Adelaide Village, New
Providence Bahamas.

(c) The Chambers of Newton R McDonald
& Co., Meeting Street, opposite St. John's
Baptist Church, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right of dower or any adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the said Petition
shall on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010 file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of
his claim on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010,
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 14th day of May, A.D. 2010

Joan Ferguson & Co
Chambers

Avson House

Adelaide Village

New Providence, Bahamas.

Attorneys for the Petitioner





shot a 73. “I’m playing very
well. I practised a lot. I trained
very hard for the tournament
and I can’t complain at all. I
right in the thick of things,” he
pointed out.

“These young guys are hit-
ting the ball 50 yards ahead of
me, but they are having hell
with me. I’m playing good
enough to bring in a good score
tomorrow (today). That’s my
goal.”

With a 76 yesterday, Richard
Gibson Jr. dropped three
strokes behind Harris at 217.
But the Florida Southern fresh-

man said he won’t complain
either.

“T got away with a lot of
stuff,” he said. “So I won’t com-
plain at all.”

As he look ahead to today’s
final round, Gibson Jr. said hie
just want to shoot as low as he
can and he know he will be in
contention.

Federation president James
Gomez said they have been
very pleased with the perfor-
mances, especially from the
number of yunior players who
have been participating in the
Nationals.

One important note at the
Nationals is that the players all
had to walk the entire 18-hole
course each day. however, an
exception was made for their
golf bags to be carried on carts
instead of the players taking
them on their backs.

Gomez said the idea is to
ensure that the regular players
making the Hoerman Cup team
are prepared for the journey
when they travel to Barbados
to compete.

Today’s final round at
Lyford Cay is scheduled to
begin at 1 p.m.



the Shorcholders ol

Bank) oe of December 31

Chur respeonsibality
ade We comdecned
thal we

whether

simply wit
bar reont~capreu lik
7 Sed Gece parce
cuieol ated aement of
ifthading the daemment ol
pesition, whethe
Pokeepart tn othe: Foemk's. prey

tt design sade per

SUE Gh OPC. om the

ramiigermastl, & cH a oe

PS neon

ASSETS
Cash ond due from banks

Re porches: agrocment
Loans and ad vars
Setilement halmess
Desivalive

Lier eer bs

OTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES
CUSLMTLETS’ de pais
Ler andl all
1 ee
Acct iiad iilineal payable
Den
Settlement balances
Oiher linbilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES
EOLATY
Share caqubal
Retained earn nips

TOTAL. EQMUTTY

Memornki um. accounts

20, 2010 and wothorized for

; VE i “



Vie oe Hine (hy secon

Slhical pequirenen:
ol) eee Of linn! POR

np procedures ke bain doadil et
linge! paostern. The

apipreprialctices ol acca e
ing Cie Pera

rh

Timon, the newer pebsies

mateo of the Flank ae of Drees ber

Wecrued interest rece Wahle
Acrued mands Geese lons Poor ab ke
Finangal investments held-bo-maturity

hnvesinsent on subeidiarpes

TOTAL LIABILITIES ANT EQUTTY

JAMES B. GOMEZ @ Co,

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

Piva Uiverseas Mank |amaiesl

aiclaberl size

7 aod a eury el ci eg Pe

rd! ir preseeiation of

Francil Reporting Sundands (“IHS
ay inter! cimirol mkvaar bo ihe poeparic

Wf financial px that i

pple NE Apo Aen, PAE

= CCS LSeS

Spe n opin oe this ni-ooneAidaled siete of finemcem! poe
oer audit in accombnee with let! Suimdands on Adin

ot abou

T due bo framed cr erect. [ni ink

Hn arel lair preec
ted ore if
Pores of F

pal bes

em we hove chisel & eelicion! aml appropri |

atomic of Cian ial pceeiticee

Can) anne Pe

iit id the anil Psion, Periormance ane ce

CHARTERED ACCC A TANTS

FIRST OVERSEAS BANK LIMITED
SON-CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POURS TIGR
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 205

Exerecesed in United States dinares

Financial aeoels. al Tar value through peo oF kee

nancial (ins Lrareenils

5

LIABILITIES ASD EOUP DY

ative financial instruments

id §

hee nodes in the non-consolidaled financial stalemendts.

These non-cocewlidated financial siemens. were appoowed on bell of ibe Board on January
aed aed capred on we behalf by:

Director

The complete financial statements of the Bank can be obtained at its registered office at Suite
E, SG Hambros Building, West Bay Street, or from its website at www.firstoverseasbank.com



af firme!) Smite Of Fira Ceseree Bank Loeniied ("th
bee Ei

this rane

id Plan ane peter the sucht
= [ree trom merc! missinignea

6 none: and dischosiees in the mp
teloctied dep
he nek= ol maigrul m or of Hee gap

reosis taety. op a meio
1), 2 i acoodance with IFRS

§ 135,70 200

MW other eoplaniory notes

miaciidsiol eialcmenl &
AS. Peper helaty
imal fi

> Erin imu 1a,
is; ond

Thies aadlirds neqiire

In obtain neasonable asurateo:

peevide o basis for cr

it. aan
Seary bo ohn &

cas Bank Linmined

i

1
1 oF

Po Dies

AMI §

fe ATS a2
6,187,226
1,452,760

S426, 7H3

4480) ] BS
Pr 24 64
444,015
1S 18 |
71490060
$1,693
75085
1,587

2 415,163
R211

| A 35 855

14S

1 q7T
7,415,163
SACS ES
1 O42 12

12S, 7H) DG 5B Ae

U1S5263 §
42 SSA
rl

7001 We -

fag tay Bo 23 Anos Aes

5.4] Pt515

97 04h, 72 |

1 S77 576
a

1e54
alk i !

OR 77h 540

10) Ooh Ot 1th
5 AGG 7 ROT 244

17 207 Sa4
£6 S38) AE

045 4S 04006 897





THE TRIBUNE

FE Cs
PITH a ORR O LA

aT



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

NEXT Saturday, the
renamed Bahamas
Olympic Committee is
expected to bring together
the largest mass of people
from all of their affiliated
sporting bodies to compete
in the Olympic Day Run.

It’s anticipated that
more than 700 people will
line up in Montagu Beach
at 6 a.m. to compete in the
worldwide event of the
Olympic Movement.

“Olympic Day is really
aimed at everyone, what-
ever their sporting ability,”
said BOC’s president
Wellington Miller at a
press conference yesterday
at the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture.

“We want everybody to
take part in this year’s fun
run and fun walk. It is
going to be an ‘Andros-
size’ event. This is an
opportunity for exercise
and for the fellowship of
coming out to walk or
run.”

BOC’s secretary general
Rommel Knowles said the
Olympic Day is celebrated
around the world in honor
of the organization of the
Olympic Games on June
23, 1894. “The Olympic
Day serves as a great
opportunity for everyone
to experience Olympic val-
ues and to live the Olympic
experience outside of game
times,” Knowles stressed.

This year’s event will
also take on a new route
from the previously held
run that started at the
Queen Elizabeth Sport
Center and end in Atlantis’
parking lot.

The six-mile run will
start from Fort Montagu
and travel west on Shirley
Street to Church Street,
over the new Paradise
Island bridge to the Golf
Course and back over the
old bridge to Montagu.

A three-mile walk will
leave Montagu Beach and
head west on Shirley
Street, north on Church
Street and east on East
Bay Street, ending up on
Montagu.

The registration is $15
for adults and $12 for chil-
dren 12-years and under.
Categories include 15-and-
under, 16-25, 26-35, 36-45,
46-59 and 60-and-over.

Participants will be eligi-
ble to win prizes, including
Bahamasair tickets, Bally’s
Gym memberships, Spa
certificates and many more
from other sponsors like
the Royal Bank of Canada,
National Insurance Board,
Doctor’s Hospital, Prime
Bahamas Limited, Nautilus
and Gatorade.

Persons can register at
the BOC’s office on Sol-
dier Road
north, tele-
phone 394-
8143 or
through the
Bahamas
Association
of Athletic
Associations’
office at the
entrance of
the Queen
Elizabeth
Sports Center, telephone
325-4433. Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard endorsed
the event. He also issued a
challenge to anyone in his
weight category who feel
they can beat him to com-
pete and if they are suc-
cessful, they will earn a
special prize.

Maya Nottage, the Mar-
keting and Public Rela-
tions Support Officer for
the Royal Bank of Canada,
said they are delighted to
be partnering with the
BOC in putting on this
year’s event. She noted
that while RBC has pride
itself on the physical wel-
fare of the Bahamian peo-
ple, don’t be surprise when
she show up dressed in her
short pants to compete.

Nottage encouraged as
many persons as possible
to come out and partici-
pate in the wholesome
sporting activity.



CHARLES
MAYNARD

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

wAmlON)O) N08

A feast of entertainment was on offer at the Culture
Explosion 2010 on Saturday. Among the attractions at John
F. Kennedy Drive were a Junkanoo Rush Out with choreo-
graphed dance, a fire dance and limbo. There was also a
Junkanoo Museum and Junkanoo Art Gallery and an art auc-
tion. The event was presented by the Valley Boys Junkanoo
Group and Kalik.


























FAMILY GUARDIAN zs,

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

Galendar contest

yeti Contest details listed on our Website

Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for
the company’s 2011 calendar will be “A Celebration of Nature”. Photographs may be of any Tg eel

subject (animate or inanimate), scene or histrocial structure that features a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas. entry | form

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 30, 2010. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk
and will not be returned.

Return this form with photos and CD to:

Calendar Contest

Family Guardian Corporate Centre
Village Road & East Bay Street, PO. Box SS-6232
Nassau, Bahamas





3 Allentries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and
East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00a.m and 5:00p.m weekdays only. Envelopes should
be marked “Calendar Contest”.

























4 Allentries must be accompanied by a signed and completed official entry form, available
at any Family Guardian office, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.
familyguardian.com).

5) Only colourimages will be considered. Images must be provided as digital files on CD. Digital
images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure

















the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality aa
G and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be Telephone: B H C

th colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints eMail

ail:

and photo location must be written on the reverse of the print. P.O. Box:

ies will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality Street:

iph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the ;

dian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Address:

The decision of the judges will be final. era:



0 will be presented for each of the photographs

oe oun in ie calendar. The number of entries per Number of Photos Entered (a maximum of 5):

Ali | agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as
a winner in the 2011 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the
property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all
rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos
entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have
not been previously published.











Signature Date



d without CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name,



NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE | FINANCIAL CENTRE | www.familyguardian.com

SPICY CHICKEN CRISP CHOWN WHOPPER JR DOUBLE BURGER W CHEESE RODEO BURGER 5 PC CHICKEN TENDERS

if



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

MURDER CASE FAST TRACKED TO SUPREME COURT

FROM page one

of police on February 25, 2009,
when they received a missing per-
sons report from the United States
Embassy in Nassau.

McKinney and the 17-year-old
girl appeared before Magistrate
Ancella Williams in Court 6, Par-
liament Street yesterday, where
prosecutor Darnell Dorsette pre-
sented a Voluntary Bill of Indict-

“tt feels good to choose a health plan
that takes care

99
and me.

Premiums have not been controlled by cutting

ment. The case against the
accused will now be fast-tracked
to the Supreme Court. McKin-
ney’s preliminary inquiry before
the magistrate began last Octo-
ber. His attorney Murrio Ducille
took issue with the Voluntary Bill
of Indictment, stating that the

Magistrate’s court is not the con-
duit to have the matter fast-
tracked without considering
whether there is a prima facie case
against his client. He said that his
reasoning was in keeping with the
function of the judiciary in making
a determination on the facts of

the case of every person brought
before the court. Ms Dorsette said
that Mr Ducille wanted the court
to take a course of action not in
line with the judiciary of the
Bahamas. She said that the Attor-
ney General’s Office was in com-
pliance with the required section

THE TRIBUNE

of the Criminal Procedure Code.
Magistrate Williams said that she
would continue with the prelimi-
nary inquiry.

McKinney and the 17-year-old
girl are expected to appear for
arraignment in the Supreme Court
on July 2.

| Maal (-lamecliae
of my business, my team

Health insurance premiums have continued to rise, so we



are all more sensitive to the levels of cover and service a

health plan provides.

Feeling good about choosing Premier Health for your
business, is knowing your employees receive more
service and cover for your premium dollar Premier
Health delivers state-of-the-art administration and claims
support to work for your business too. Less hassle on
service, care and price issues means more focus on doing

what you and your team do best.

Call 326-819 |
or visit www.cgigroup.bm

benefits and coverage for catastrophic illnesses



Premium increases have on average been lower

than the market rate

7a COLONIAL GROUP
j INTERNATIONAL

MEDICAL
ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box SS-5915, Nassau Tel. 326-819 |
Suite 5, Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, P.O. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.



2.
3.
4.

5.



Rote: only customers with 4587 top box can acess Billwiew and its Pectin
The Billview application provides inf
bo CUMOMeTSs On a OMEN tay is Cue

Cable Bahamas Ltd. Introduces

TAL) eae

ACCU aS le
A Ca Le MT KY



By following these easy steps you can now view your Cable Bahamas bill from your television!

Using your remote;-

1. enter the numbers 8-1-0 to qo to “Channel 810”

press “OK” to view your “Current Account Balance”

enter your “4 Digit Pin Number”

press the “Page up/Page down” buttons to scroll thru your purchases
and to view your “Total Balance Due”

press the “Channel +/Channel =" button on your remote to exit

> e
{ABLE BAHAMAS

wii cablebahamas.com

mation fram a daily date feed that is extracted maghth:. Therefore, the information presented
ntas of Billing system from the previous might’s tramsactions






TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TIGER BALLOON INC.

— 4,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TIGER BALLOON INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


















































facebook

THE TRIBUNE



SU

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a short, slow week of
trading in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in five
out of the 24 listed securities,
with three advancers, and the
other securities remaining
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 11,358 shares
changed hands last week, rep-
resenting a huge decline of
35,673 shares, compared to the
previous week's trading volume
of 47,031 shares.

¢ Colina Holdings (CHL)
was the volume leader and big
advancer, trading 9,200 shares
to see its stock close the week

ie

a Rae
CABLE BAHAMAS

www.cablebahamas.com

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity?

AVAILABLE POSITION:

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF COMPLIANCE

The Associate Director of Compliance will implement the compliance
strategy, ensuring acceptable levels of compliance and internal control

practices are maintained throughout the bank.

up $0.14 at $2.70.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB) fol-
lowe,d trading 1,090 shares and
closing up by $0.03 at $12.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

¢ Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) released
its unaudited financial results
for the quarter ending April 30,
2010.

DHS reported net income of
$976,000, a decrease of $1.3 mil-
lion or 58 per cent compared
to the $2.3 million reported dur-
ing the same period in 2009.

Total patient service rev-
enues of $10.4 million were also
down by $2 million or 16 per

cent from $12.4 million in the
comparative period, while total
expenses of $9.8 million
declined by $569,000 or 5.5 per
cent from $10.4 million.

Earnings per share for the
quarter stood at $0.10, repre-
senting a decrease of $0.13 or
57 per cent from $0.23 in 2009.

Total assets and liabilities
stood at $30.9 million and $2.9
million respectively, compared
to $30 million and $2.98 million
at DHS's year-end January 31,
2010.

Dividend Notes:

¢ Consolidated Water BDRs
(CWCB) has declared an ordi-
nary dividend of $0.015 per
share, payable on June 7, 2010,
to all ordinary shareholders of
record date May 1, 2010.

¢ Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corporation

(PRE) has declared a dividend
of $0.20 per share, payable on
July 5, 2010, to all sharehold-
ers of record date as at June 4,
2010.

AGM Notes:

— JS Johnson (JSJ) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel in the Governors
C Ball room, June 14, 2010, at
6pm.

— Cable Bahamas (CAB) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, June 15, 2010, at
6pm.

— Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) has
announced its AGM will be
held at Doctors Hospital - Con-
ference Room on Dowdeswell
Street on June 17, 2010, at
5.30pm.



CABLE, from page 1B

the company below the 25 per cent threshold to
ensure the FCC processed the deal faster, and
Anthony Butler, Cable Bahamas’ president and
chief executive, explained that the 22 per cent
threshold set in the proposed Articles amend-
ments was related to NIB’s equity stake in the
company.

Had Cable Bahamas ‘retired’ the 5,954,600
shares (30.2 per cent of its then-outstanding share
capital) purchased from Columbus Communi-
cations, the combined stakes held by NIB and the
Public Treasury would have increased from 20.2
per cent to 29.2 per cent.

This would have breached the 25 per cent
threshold and made speedy FCC approval of the
deal impossible, since given the Government’s
100 per cent ownership of the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC), Cable Bahamas
would have been transformed into a foreign car-
rier affiliate of BTC.

As a result, the Cable Shares Trust was creat-
ed to hold five million of those shares, or some
26.78 per cent of Cable Bahamas’ issued share
capital, with Dr Keva Bethel, the former Col-
lege of the Bahamas president, acting as trustee.
This has made the Cable Shares Trust the largest
shareholder in Cable Bahamas.

Mr Butler yesterday explained to Tribune
Business that the 22 per cent threshold had been
chosen because NIB’s stake would increase to
that level when the Cable Shares Trust eventually
terminated.

Recalling the history, Mr Butler said the com-
pany’s Articles were currently worded such that
no one investor, apart from Columbus Commu-
nications, BTC and the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC), could hold more than 5 per cent
of its issued ordinary shares.

Both BEC and BTC had taken 10 per cent
stake in Cable Bahamas at the outset, but since
then had sold these to other state-controlled enti-
ties. Some 75 per cent of these holdings had been

sold to NIB, hence its current 16.25 per cent
stake, with the Treasury receiving the remaining
25 per cent/

“We've still got this trust in place, and if and
when the trust disappears, NIB will go to 22 per
cent,” Mr Butler explained.

The maths was set out in Cable Bahamas’ cor-
respondence with the FCC, as a June 4, 2009,
letter from the company’s attorneys showed that
with the Cable Shares Trust, the Government’s
combined stake in the company would be 21.39
per cent. NIB’s share is 16.23 per cent, the letter
said, and the Public Treasury’s 5.16 per cent.

If the trust had not been created, NIB would
have been holding a 22.14 per cent stake, the
letter said.

Mr Butler told Tribune Business that the
amendments would “strengthen the Memoran-
dums and Articles for a public company”.

He added: “It’s looking at the Memorandum
and Articles, and bringing them up to whatever
the standard is in 2010.

“We think what we’re putting forward is real-
ly good for the company and shareholders, as
well as the future. We’re bringing ourselves into
line with whatever else is happening.”

The proposed amendments, which are to be
discussed and voted on by shareholders at next
week’s AGM, include expanding the Board to six
directors from the current five. Mr Butler himself
is being proposed as the additional director,
strengthening the link between management and
the Board.

Other proposals include ensuring the chair-
man is not part of Cable Bahamas’ management
team, and that at least four of the six directors are
independent.

Directors will also be rotated, it is proposed,
and serve a maximum three-year term. “It is
being proposed that directors are elected to serve
a three-year term and that at least two directors
must retire at an Annual General Meeting,” the
proxy statement said. “The object of this amend-
ment is to rotate the membership of the Board
while ensuring continuity.”

|BDO

BDO is a world wide network of public accounting firms,

called BDO

Member Firms. With more than 1,000 offices in over 100 countries, and
employing 46,000 people, BDO is the fifth largest such network in the world.

BDO’s Nassau office is now seeking applicants for assurance seniors/senior
accountants to work in the assurance and insolvencies departments. The
successful candidates will have a bachelor’s degree in accounting and a
CPA, ACCA, CA or any other qualification that is recognized by the Bahamas

Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Additionally, the candidates will have

3 years experience in auditing, and be able to work in a challenging team

driven environment.

Attention to detail is a must.

Individuals with the

above-mentioned qualifications should fax or email their resumés to:

info@ bdobahamas.com

Recruitment Manager

BDO Chartered Accountants & Advisors
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: 242-325-6592

Absolutely no phone calls please.Only the applicants with the above
mentioned qualifications will be contacted.

CAREER NT

ie

For further information on this and other
available positions, please visit our website:

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

ol LS
“a

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

ROO )/15)I NUON Milne
SOUNDS GOOD

TO RTI PTT ay Ie PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE











Scotiabank
unveils its
mobile
banking

SCOTIABANK is_ this
month introducing mobile
banking services for its Bahami-
an customers, allowing them to
perform banking functions
from web-enabled mobile
devices.

“We understand that
Bahamians rely on the conve-
nience of mobile devices to help
them manage their busy
lifestyles.

“Scotiabank customers have
asked for that convenience to
extend to banking services, and
that is exactly what we will be
delivering,” said Leah R Davis,
the bank’s senior manager for
marketing and public relations.

“Scotiabank has always prid-
ed itself on providing excellent
customer service in our branch-
es, over the phone and online.
With today’s announcement we
are extending our promise to
mobile devices.”

The bank said all mobile
banking transactions are secure
because Scotia Mobile Bank-
ing operates on the same
advanced security platform as
Scotia OnLine Banking.

“Mobile banking services will
allow our retail customers to
conveniently perform many
banking functions from their
mobile,” said Barry Malcom,
Scotiabank’s managing direc-
tor.

“Scotiabank customers with
web-enabled mobile devices are
going to gain time in their day
once they begin using Scotia-
bank’s mobile banking services
in June.”

DOCTORS, from 1B

eliminated its long-term debt
with Royal Bank of Canada.

The BISX-listed healthcare
provider confirmed in an e-mail
to Tribune Business that if it
had still been carrying that debt
on its balance sheet, it would
have incurred interest and prin-
cipal payments during the 2010
first quarter of $69,000 and
$236,000 respectively.

Total expenses were down
by $0.6 million or 5.5 per cent
year-over-year, aided by a 2.8
per cent or $0.2 million reduc-
tion in patient care expenses,
medical supplies and services,
and salaries and benefits. Bad
debt expense also fell by $0.37
million.

“With decreased activity we
have been able to capitalise and
secure decreases in overall
salaries. Similarly, savings are
being realised in medical sup-
plies,” Doctors Hospital said.

“We have worked on reduc-
ing receivables over the past
three years, and as we have not-
ed before it is due to a closer
working relationship with our
insurers, our information sys-
tem, and better up-front col-
lection for self-pay patients.”

As for its expansion plans,
Doctors Hospital told Tribune
Business it was currently assess-
ing the needed scope of growth,
and aimed to determine a
design by the 2011 fourth quar-
ter.

“We are at the early stage of
discussion with the knowledge
that to meet the increasing
demands of the Bahamian com-
munity we must expand. We
are presently conducting the
needs assessment to determine
the extent of expansion,” said
chief executive Charles Sealy

“We are hoping to commit
to a design by fourth quarter
so that we can determine the
relevant costs. I can safely
assure you that the expansion
will come with the need of addi-
tional staffing.”

Doctors Hospital also con-
firmed it was still in discussions
with two groups for the poten-
tial sale of its Blake Road-
based Western Medical Plaza
facility, telling this newspaper:
“To date we are unaware of
any local or foreign interest that
has all the necessary approvals
to move ahead.

“We continue to receive calls
of interest and conversations
are continuing with two groups
at this time. We presently have
three tenants at the facility.”

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE eliminated tariff on
aircraft parts came days too
late for Sky Bahamas, as its
scheduled maintenance in the
US had been booked for
weeks, but its head yesterday
said the move by the Govern-
ment was a step in the right
direction - though not enough
to stem rising costs.

Taxes

Captain Randy Butler said
that while the taxes associated
with airplane parts may have
gone away, civil aviation tax
increases have come into
force, some that many other
Bahamian private airlines say

“make no sense”.

Captain Butler said while
security costs associated with
baggage screening in domestic
terminals in Nassau and the
Family Islands increase, no
screening equipment is avail-
able or used, and “some
islands don’t have security”.

According to him, Civil Avi-
ation has increased the rent
for counter space in the air-
port terminals and are consid-
ering making the increases
retroactive.

He argued that while those
increases come into effect, not
much is being done to upgrade
and renovate those counters.

Captain Butler said while
there are other areas civil avi-
ation can raise taxes on, in
many instances airlines are
being charged for services they

are not receiving.

Besides being a strain on
the airlines, these taxes often
stagger the playing field for
local airlines that compete
against the Government-fund-
ed, unprofitable national flag
carrier, Bahamasair.

Reduction

“This (tariff reduction) was
one of the initiatives we were
fighting for and we are thank-
ful we got it,” said Captain
Butler.

However, Sky Bahamas will
not be able to use the tariff
decrease as the scheduled
maintenance of some of its
fleet at hangars in the US has
already been booked.

Captain Butler said Sky
Bahamas often sent its fleet





FRAUD, from 1B

judgment provided no details,
the conveyancings relate to
the Palms of Love Beach con-
dominium complex on West
Bay Street, with the compa-
ny being Nassau Industrial
Group Ltd.

Recording the grounds for
Knowles’ appeal, Dame Joan
said he “sought to have his
conviction overturned
because, it was alleged among
other things, that the trial
judge was perceived as being
biased against him because
the trial judge was a partner in
the law firm that initially rep-
resented [him] in several mat-
ters connected with some of
the alleged offences in this
case...

“The appellant’s main con-
cern was that for some time
prior to some of the incidents
alleged in the information, he
had been a client of the law
firm in which the learned
judge was a partner, although
he was not a client of the
learned judge himself.”

Although the judgment did
not identify the Supreme
Court justice involved, this
newspaper’s library showed
that it was then-Acting Jus-
tice Lockhart who handled
the trial and sentenced
Knowles. Presumably, the law
firm referred to was the for-
mer Lockhart & Munroe,
which no longer exists after
he and Wayne Munroe each

went their own separate ways.

Attorneys from the Attor-
ney General’s Office, who had
prosecuted Knowles, told the
Court of Appeal that Acting
Justice Lockhart had heard
Knowles’ application to
recuse himself in his cham-
bers, with the prosecution
asked to take notes. The judge
was also said to have given
reasons for deciding not to
recuse himself.

This did not cut much ice
with Dame Joan and her fel-
low justices of appeal, who
said none of this information
was placed before their court.
Jillian Williams, the prosecu-
tor, had asked for an adjourn-
ment so she could obtain the
information, but Dame Joan
said this request came too
late, especially since the
Attorney General’s Office
had known the issue formed
the basis of Knowles’ appeal.

“What is of concern in this
case is the connection of the
learned judge with the law
firm which, at a material time,
represented the appellant
[Knowles] in some matters
which the appellant alleged
were connected to some of
the charges in the informa-
tion,” Dame Joan found.

“While it is clear that no
allegation of actual bias was
being made against the
learned judge, we asked our-
selves whether a reasonable
person, with full knowledge
of the relevant facts, would

_fteres f ont tatlen (ri frietals

"MAY PEOPLE"

(Two One Act Plays)

Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts
Jtne Léth - 19th 2010 at 8:00 p.m. nightly
Tickets: $20.00

BENEFIT PERFORMANCE
Andrew Curry Music Education Foundation
Tuesday 15th June at 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $25.00 (includes after theatre reception)

BOA OFFICE: The Dundas,
Telephones 393-3 72839-7179
Opens Monday 7th June &:00 a.m. &00 p.m. daily
RESERVED TICKETS NOT COLLECTED BY
3000 PM. ON DAY OF PERFORMANCE
WILE BE SOnD

NOTICE

In The Estate WILLIAM LEO RUMNEY,
late of Water Street in the Town of Elizabethtown in
the Country of Essex in the States of New York, one
of the States of the United States of America.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the Undersigned on or before the 6th day of
July, 2010, after which date the Executirix will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having requard only to
the claims of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date hereinbe-

fore metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executrix

Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



have a doubt as to whether
the learned judge was impar-
tial.”

She added: “The issue was
further complicated by the
fact that the learned judge did
not deal with the application
for recusal in open court, and
did not have the official court
stenographer take the notes
of the hearing in chambers,
so we have no record of the
arguments for and against
recusal in relation to the appli-
cation that was presented
before him.

“In the circumstances, we
were of the view that we were
not satisfied that a reasonable
member of the public in the
Bahamas, with full knowledge
of the facts as they appear to
us, would not have had a
doubt about the objectivity of
the learned judge, so we
allowed the appeal and
ordered a re-trial, as there was
evidence on which a trial
could be held.

“There is a serious need for
the public aspect of the case to
be properly ventilated, as the
outcome could have far-reach-
ing effects on commerce in
the Bahamas.”

a
Cool response to aircraft
spare parts tariff end

to the US for heavy mainte-
nance because it was cheaper.
He said had he gotten news
that the tariff would be delet-
ed, his fleet could have been
worked on locally.

He added that it is his hope
the Government will sit down
with stakeholders in the indus-
try and listen to their concerns,
as it is becoming increasingly
expensive for local airlines to
operate.

COLINA, from 1B

equities market,

Net investment income rose
by more than $3 million, from
$5.301 million to $8.419 mil-
lion, helping to boost Colina
Holdings (Bahamas) total rev-
enues from $40.237 million to
$43.081 million.

Elsewhere, there was a
sharp 26.4 per cent spike in
general and administrative
costs to $7.679 million, com-
pared to $6.071 million the
year before, a rise that was
unexplained by Mr Hilts.

Yet he added: “Encourag-
ingly, reduced maturities and
surrenders have led to a
decrease in gross policyholder
benefits by $2.1 million to
$26.8 million compared to the
same period in the prior
year.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY LOUIS of P.O.
BOX GENERAL DELIVERY, Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1% day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
DAMISI LIMITED

N OTIC E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DAMISI LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 7th June, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Blue Seas
Administration Ltd., The Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 8th day of June, A. D. 2010

Blue Seas Administration Ltd.
Liquidator





NOTICE

TO SHAREHOLDERS OF

Doctors Hospital Health System

regarding

DIVIDEND DECLARATION

Whereas there are sufficient funds to provide a cash dividend

to the shareholders of Doctors Hospital Health System, and

Whereas the Directors have determined that after the

payment of such dividends the Company will be able to meet

all of its continuing obligations and provide adequate funds

for reinvestment in the business,

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors has

declared an extraordinary dividend of $0.02 per share

to be paid to shareholders of record on June 15, 2010.

The payment date shall be June 22, 2070,

* DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Ffeatch For fie



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









THE TRIBUNE

‘Suit your body’

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

r | Nhere are few areas where most
women go wrong when trying to find
a perfectly fitting swim suit.

1. They are not aware of their bodies

2. They go into stores with a trend in mind
that doesn’t suit their body type

3. They want a swim suit that camouflages
most of their undesirable areas

It’s fine if you can’t rock a monokini this
summer, which is one of the hottest trends in
swim wear presently but that doesn’t mean
you won’t be fashion forward if you settle for
a chic one piece or a sassy tankini.

To correct all the swimwear fashion
wrongs, Tribune Woman sat down with
Vivian Maroney, owner of Splashdance, to
discuss the perfect swimwear for your body
type.

“The majority of customers come in the
store wanting to wear a certain trend that
does not fit their the body type and this is not
a good idea,” she said. “We want to educate
the public on what suits to wear the actually
flatters their figure.”

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010
















1. Boy Shorts

“Woman usually come into the store say-
ing they want a swim suit that covers up their
thighs. They think boy shorts actually cover
up areas they don’t want to expose. The
truth is boy shorts don’t cover anything they
accentuate the thighs and make them look
broader than they actually might be,” Ms
Maroney explained. She said boy shorts are
for women who are tall and slim, and not a
good choice for someone who wants to look
smaller on the bottom.

2. One Piece

Women with a large bust must be careful
with their choice of swim wear. When select-
ing a suit, the heavy bust women should be
concerned with their breast being exposed in
the front and on the sides. “Therefore it is
important for them to purchase a suit that has
a supportive band in the front and on both
sides,” Ms Maroney said.

3. Crisscross one piece

Women that are heavy all over have a
number of suits to choose from. They can
stick to a simple one piece or if they want to
be a little sexier than can purchase one that
has a crisscross style in the front. This type of
swim suit is good for the voluptuous, curvy
women because it has a slimming effect.

“This suit is good for a woman who wants
to slim herself. The crisscross slenderises the
body and the body doesn’t look that heavy,”
she said.



4. Monokini

As mentioned before monokini are the
hottest trends in swim suit wear right now.
They are sexy, cute, and cut the torso into
perfect portions. Just because they are in
fashion magazines and are becoming more
and more popular every summer season
doesn’t mean anyone can wear it. If you opt
for a monokini your physique must be in tip
top shape. “Not every one can wear a
monokini. You must be the right height to
wear this. The connecting pieces of the swim
suit must lay flat against the torso and there
must not be a gap in between the connecting
pieces and the torso,” Ms Maroney said.

5. Halter Tankini, Bikini, or One piece

There are a variety of swim suit trends
that can suit a variety of body types. And
then again there are a number of trends that
some women should stay away from. A hal-
ter tankini, bikini, or one piece swim suit is
suitable for women who are small on top.
“Women who have small shoulders and a
small firm bust can wear a swim suit with a
deep plunge down the center,” Ms Maroney
said.

Those who are heavy busted with broad
shoulders should stir clear from this trend
because it is not flattering on heavier bodies
and the last thing a heavy chest woman want
is her “goodies” exposed.

Vivian Maroney has been in the business
for 30 years and said she strongly believes
women should feel comfortable and look
beautiful in their swim wear.









,_ ae
«
Cine Carbkeos Baby hargeode
Freahness Breame Buence Potpoard of Ploears
S : 3 Look for Festival in
r a ;
ae your favorite store.

tetbeecty: Bahu Wholesale Agemetes, East Weel Hay * bel: 242-004-1759 * faa: 249-354-1059 * emal: bwabahamaecoriberscom * Freeport: (Milion St * bet 242-051-221" * fax: 242-051-2295 * onal bwalpoecoralvint.com









THE TRIBUNE

Ne

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 5B



Gran
to spend
$1.5bn on

women’s
health

By ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security
Writer



WASHINGTON (AP)
— Philanthropist Melinda
Gates announced Monday
that the Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation will
spend $1.5 billion over five
years to support maternal
and child health projects
abroad.

Gates, whose husband
Bill is co-founder of
Microsoft Corp. and one
of the world's richest peo-
ple, made her announce-
ment at an international
conference on women's
health attended by UN
Secretary-General Ban Ki-
moon. The event was
billed as the largest-ever
conference on women's
health.

Gates said the world is
not lacking in know-how
to reduce the number of
deaths in childbirth.

"It's that we haven't
tried hard enough," she
said.

"Policymakers in both
rich and poor countries
have treated women and
children, quite frankly, as
if they matter less than
men,” Gates said. "They
have squandered opportu-
nities to improve the
health of women and
babies."

Ban said he senses a
new momentum among
governments, foundations,
businesses and humanitar-
ian groups for forging a
more comprehensive and
coordinated approach to
improving women's and
children's health.

"We are seeing a global
movement for an end to
the silent scandal of
women dying in child-
birth,” he said, according
to a text of his prepared
remarks. "We can stop
this, and we will."

Ban touted what he
called a joint action plan
to accelerate programs
designed to improve wom-
en's and children’s health.
The UN chief called on
government officials, busi-
ness executives, health
professionals and others
to submit ideas and pro-
posals before the action
plan is finalized in coming
months.

In her speech, Gates
said the greatest obstacle
to improving the health of
women and newborns is
not a disease or a logistical
challenge like keeping vac-
cines cold.

"This obstacle is a belief
— the belief that we just
have to accept the fact that
mothers and children die,"
she said, adding that the
world has the know-how
and capacity to save
women and children.

"Yet in many countries
the belief that death is
inevitable, and therefore
acceptable, hasn't yet
changed," she said. "We
don't have to tolerate
fatalism."

Gates said the $1.5 bil-
lion that the Gates Foun-
dation will invest through
2014 will support projects
addressing family plan-
ning, nutrition and health
care for pregnant women,
newborns and children.

A significant portion of
the new money will sup-
port programmes in India,
Ethiopia and other coun-
tries that have relatively
high rates of maternal and
child mortality, she said.



Home safety: In case of fire or
crime, things to keep in mind

By REUBEN SHEARER
Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

Things To Keep In Mind
(from the National Crime
Prevention Unit & Fire Ser-
vices)

e Ensure that both emer-
gency numbers, 911 and 919
are written down in the home,
for your child to refer to this
summer

¢ Lock all doors and secure
windows

e Tell your children not to
fool with matches, or to both-
er with the stove. Don’t leave
the iron unattended.

e Tell your children not to
tell strangers that they are
home alone.

e Teach your child direc-
tions to their home, and a
landmark central to where
they live that they can have
on hand if they must report
an incident by telephone

Important numbers to have
at you and your child’s dis-
posal in the home:

(These numbers are only to
be dialed in the event of an
emergency)

¢ 919 and 911

e Fire Control Room hot-
line: 322 1225

¢ The number(s) of your
neighbourhood police station

e Exchange numbers with
your neighbor, and inform



TELL YOUR CHILDREN not to play with matches and not to bother with the stove...



PART ONE

One whiff of these substances
can “knock you out,” said Mr
Moss.

And let’s just say that your
child stops breathing or for
any other reason finds him-
self unconscious, Mr Taylor
said knowledge of CPR could
save their lives if executed
correctly.

For the person who knows
CPR, the first thing to
remember is to keep calm.
Then you can proceed with
performing the resuscitating
technique, which can sustain
life to some degree or revive
the individual until help
arrives.

“When somebody stops
breathing, you want to plant
your mouth on the distressed
person, give them two quick
breaths, and thirty chest com-
pressions (you’re expected to
give 100 within a minute peri-
od),” said Mr Taylor.

“In the meantime, you will
want to call for help, and try
to get somebody like an EMS
person who can assist you
because you don’t know what
the person is experiencing at
the time.”

According to a child safety
brochure from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, toy
parts pose as choking hazards.
A rule of thumb is that any

your child of the information
in case your child, or babysit-
ter may have to contact them
for any reason.

ith school about
to close for the
summer more

children will be at home with
the potential to get into trou-
ble or have accidents.

To ease your worries, Tri-
bune Health spoke with police
to gather tips on how to
ensure your children have a
safe summer. They stress the
importance of your child
knowing how to call the
police in the event of an
emergency.

“We have cases where
young children may be home
with a parent or grandparents
and may have to call for
emergency attention,” said
Constable 3152 Taylor.
“They call in to report inci-

dences and are able to
because they were taught
important emergency infor-
mation.”

Constable 1404 Moss who
is herself the mother of a five
year said it is very important
that parents leave their chil-
dren in the care of a respon-
sible adult or teen at least 14
years old. Her daughter will
be attending a summer camp
this summer.

If you do leave your child at
home Ms Moss suggests going
home periodically and calling
several times through out the
day.

Fire safety is also extreme-
ly important Mr Taylor said.
“Working in the fire depart-
ment, we’re called to many
scenes where pots were left
unattended with children who
were left alone at home.”

In such cases, a smoke
detector can work to your

advantage he explained.
“That way, any fire activity
would be alerted in the home
through the smoke detector.
The ideal situation is to have
at least one working smoking
detector in the home. A lot of
people who died in fires did
not have a smoke detector
installed in their homes.”

“In general safety we try to
teach kids that the basic rules
in fire fighting and fire safety
is not to play with matches,”
said Mr Taylor. “Don’t even
touch them if you see them.”

If there is a fire, the most
useful thing is to keep in mind
is that everything else in the
home can be replaced except
for your life, Sargeant 952
Moss explains.

Sargeant Moss advises par-
ents to keep pots and pans
out of reach of their children;
its important for pot handles
to be turned inside the stove

so that your youngsters can-
not easily access them.

To lessen the event of any
fire caused by an unattended
stove he advises parents to
prepare a meal ahead of time
for children before leaving in
the mornings.

D Mr Taylor also warned
parents that basic household
cleaning supplies can also
pose a threat to children.

For example, mopping
buckets are a toddler’s dream.
“Kids are very much attracted
to water, so if they see a mop-
ping bucket, they may try to
climb into the bucket and top-
ple over into the water. And
depending on the water level,
the child can drown.”

Furthermore, cleaning
products like Ajax, Joy, and
bleach are a deadly and
potent mix by your child who
may not consider the proper
use of these cleaning agents.

part smaller than a paper roll,
can put your child at risk.

For children younger than
three years old, toys should
be smaller than 1 1/4 inches in
diameter or 2 1/4 inches long.
“Tt is imperative that you stow
toys meant for older children
out of reach from your baby
or toddler,” said Mr Taylor.

He suggests that parents
consider having their babysit-
ter learn CPR, even if it is
through the use of an instruc-
tional book. This life-pre-
serving technique can save a
child if they are choking, or
in some sort of distressed
state. Unfortunately, most
persons are clueless when it
comes to administering CPR.

Instructional classes are
available at Doctors Hospital
and the Red Cross. CPR class
will teach you the universal
signs of choking, Mr Taylor
said.





Summer heat and your feet!

IT IS quite a challenge to keep your
feet cool when walking around in
extremely hot weather. Therefore,
your feet need some special care and
attention during the summer months.
Heat and humidity will aid in the
growth of bacteria, so taking measures
to reduce these will help enormously.

During the summer, foot injuries
are also more prevalent - the increased
level of outdoor athletic activities also
increase the chances of muscle pain,
heel pain, shin splints, plantar fasciitis,
Morton’s neuroma, achilles tendini-
tis, hip pain/bursitis, runner’s knee,
illiotibial band syndrome(ITB) and
the list goes on.......

How do we deal with summer heat
and our feet?

Moisture Management:

The most important thing is to man-
age moisture in order to decrease the
risk of athlete’s foot and pronounced
foot odour. Excessive perspiration has
been seen as a significant contributor
to these conditions. In technical terms,
this excessive perspiration is known
as hyperridrosis-a rapid production of
sweat that cannot be evaporated as
fast as it is produced. When this hap-
pens, the shoe’s material becomes sat-
urated with moisture. In the perspi-





BERNADETTE D GIBSON

ration there is also bacterial waste.
You may ask what is this bacterial
waste? Perspiration is body “waste”
and has an abundance of bacteria. In
addition, it is believed that approxi-
mately 98 per cent of this perspira-
tion is moisture and 2 per cent is solids
— mostly acids and salts. These bacte-

ria thrive on moisture, warmth and
darkness — just like the bacteria that
causes toe fungus.

Solutions:

In terms of cleanliness and hygiene
habits, wash your feet daily and dry
thoroughly before putting on
footwear. Always, use a clean pair of
socks, preferably, specially-designed
cotton or synthetic perspiration wick-
ing fabric to get rid of foot odour. For
example, ‘Thorlos’ and ‘Balega’ brand
of cushioned socks are especially
designed to provide insulation and air
flow and wicks away moisture and
keep your foot from getting too hot.
Refrain from wearing yesterday’s gym
socks just because they smell clean.
One wear is enough to leave behind
sufficient foot perspiration for odour-
causing bacteria to thrive on. It will be
enough to leave feet stinky and dirty.
Footwear is another important factor.
When selecting shoes it is important to
avoid shoes or boots with non-breath-
able upper materials, especially closed-
type shoes or simply tight-fitting shoes.
For example, leather with its unique
internal structure of fibers and inter-
fiber air spaces, plus its surface pores,
has excellent breathing capacity.

2. Foot Pain and injury:

To alleviate such pain and avoid
further injury, consider custom

“As a reporter, [ respecte and

honour the people's right

to know, The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.

CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

Ama,

VAY Mites
i] ih
Vi \ ah ht

3) Vie ie

I
n

he

\

To report the news, call our
Newe Tips Line at 502-2359.

orthotics or inserts with proper arch
support for your foot type. Such items
can be purchased at specialty footwear
stores or pedorthic facilities. If you
want to continue running, walking or
remain active for many more years,
you need to ensure that there is
enough support between your foot
and flat and hard surfaces. Depending
on the activity to which you are doing,
you need to seek the appropriate
footwear and support for that pur-
pose. Avoid injury and pain by seek-
ing professional help to assist you with
the correct footwear and support
(orthotic) to not only support your
body and foot type but to adequately
off load the pressure presented by the
underlying terrain.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified and Licensed Pedorthist, is
the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a
health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper shoe
fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza,
Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of
the author and does not necessarily
represent those of Foot Solutions Incor-
porated or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please direct any
questions or comments to nassau@foot-
solutions.com or 327-FEET (3338).

The Tribune



Wy Vows. Wy Plowspeper!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



a =eeN

and diarrhoea

Pets: Vomitin

UNDOUBTEDLY there has nev-
er been a full day in most veterinary
practices where they have not had
one or more telephone calls regard-
ing vomiting and or diarrhoea in a
cat or dog.

Since most dogs and cats are not
very discriminating as to what they
might eat, and since many owners
feed their pets tidbits, leftovers,etc
that are unacceptable to the canine
and feline digestive tracts, it is easi-
ly understood why these problems
are so frequent in number.

Vomiting is the forcible expulsion
of the stomach’s contents up the ani-
mal’s throat and out of the mouth.
Dogs tend to vomit more readily
than almost all other animals.

Diarrhoea is the frequent passage
of soft or fluid stools. Diarrhoea is
not a disease, it is sign of illness, and
it is typical of a variety of health con-
ditions. Any change of bowel habits
that continues for more than twenty
four hours should be addressed by
the veterinarian.

In addition to some of the causes
mentioned earlier, very serious infec-
tious diseases such as the dreaded



PARVO and CORONO virus infec-
tion in dogs and the Distemper virus
in cats produce acute vomiting and
diarrhoea.

Intestinal parasites also can be
very irritating to the intestines, as
can be various foreign non food sub-
stances such as needles and thread,
whistles, pieces of bones , plastic,

fruit pits, flowers, weeds and a host
of others. And of course there are
organic dysfunctions and /or infec-
tions such as pancreatitis, prostatitis,
intussuception, [telescoping of one
section of bowel over another], and
tumors of one or more of the diges-
tive system organs.

Considering the number of causes
mentioned, and there are many
more, and considering the fact that
often we really do not know what
our pets have eaten you can realise
how difficult it is to arrive at an
instant diagnosis and cure.

It is also extremely important to
obtain from our clients in each case
a full and accurate history of the
problem. You should be observing
such symptoms as how long and how
frequent has he been vomiting and is
there blood in the vomitus?

Does he/she also have diarrhoea
and has he had it often? Is he up
and about and playful or is he lethar-
gic, weak and feverish?

In many instances we may simply
suggest Pepto-Bismol, ice cubes, a
bland diet and close observation.
Our old standby Pepto Bismol and

Kaopectate are still good home care
remedies and should be in your
home medicine cabinets at all times.

Since there is such a variety of
causes and conditions involving vom-
iting and diarrhoea, as veterinarians
we too must have a variety of
approaches to these problems. Many
times we can handle them by instruc-
tions and suggestions via the tele-
phone and others simply as an office
visit dispensing medication for treat-
ment at home.

However, there are some cases
that are much more serious and
require more sophisticated diagnos-
tic and treatment regiments such as
barium x- rays, laboratory blood pro-
files, cultures, hospitalization and
intravenous fluids.

Having read this article, surely you
can understand the wide spectrum
of causes and effects of diarrhoea
and vomiting in your pets. Conse-
quently, we urge you to seek early
help when this type of problem
occurs. We are as near as your tele-
phone. Call us and let us help you
decide how to treat the situation.
Your pets will love you for it!



Hooray for heticonias!

a

eliconias are amongst the
He stunning of all tropi-
cal plants and are very
rewarding to grow in large gardens.
Once a suitable area has been des-
ignated for heliconias they virtually
look after themselves, the larger ones
flowering in late spring and early
summer.

There are old world and new
world heliconias but in this article I
will refer only to new world varieties
as these are the ones that are readi-
ly available to us. The name comes
from Mount Helicon in Greece
where the muses held residence.

Heliconia leaves look like
bananas, gingers or cannas, accord-
ing to the variety. The largest heli-
conias are banana-leafed and can
grow to 50 feet.

The largest I have seen in The
Bahamas are Heliconia jaquinii and
these grow to 20 feet. Heliconias are
distinguished by their bract clusters
that may stand upright (lobster claw)
or hang down (pendent). These
bracts are usually red and yellow but
often have other coloured markings.

In the wild heliconias grow in trop-
ical rainforests wherever there is a
break to allow sun to penetrate. This
most often occurs on riverbanks in
tropical rainforest areas and gives
us a clue as where to plant heliconias
to best effect.

Heliconias can take quite a bit of
shade but this makes them grow tall
and deters flowering. For regular
seasonal flowering the plants should
receive over 60 per cent sunlight,
even higher being better. That said,
full sun is not as beneficial as a cer-
tain amount of shade, preferably
dappled is required.

Heliconias grow from rhizomes
that should be planted about six
inches deep in rich, fertile soil. The
planting hole should be kept open
and gradually filled as the suckers
develop. Heliconias are fast grow-
ers and a healthy clump can be
established within two years.

For a long time heliconias were
classed as bananas but now have
their own designation — Heliconi-
aceae. They are closely related to
bananas, of course, as well as gin-
gers, bird of paradise and travelers
palm.

In my garden I have three vari-
eties of heliconia — a lobster claw H.
jaquinii, a pendent H. rostrata, and
small Parrot’s Beak, H. psittacorum.
The lobster claw grows on the north-
west corner of my house and receives
some early light in the morning and
then few more full sun hours in the
afternoon and evening. In two years
the clump has become firmly estab-
lished without very much in the way
of fertilising or watering. When you
choose the right position, everything
else follows naturally.

I have my H. rostrata on the
northeast corner of the house and
that gets full sun until midday. The
H. psittacorum grows in planters on
the north side and these I will prob-
ably have to move as they are clear-
ly not getting enough sunlight.

The bracts hold the true flowers
within their cups and these flowers
are pollinated by hummingbirds. It is
very difficult to grow heliconias from
seed but this is of little moment to
most home gardeners because heli-
conias propagate very readily from a
spreading underground rhizome net-
work. Suckers come up, just as with
bananas. Once the plants have flow-
ered they should be cut away at



THE BRACTS of the Heliconia
ristrata (here) are pendent and
hang down from the parent
En aoe

BOTTOM - These lobster-claw
heliconias (Heliconia jaquinii)
are two years old from rhizomes
planted in 2008...



ground level as they only flower once
then die.

There are recipes that call for
wrapping portions of food in banana
leaves and placing them on coals or
a barbecue.



Banana leaves in the windy
Bahamas are often in tatters before
they can be used for culinary pur-
poses. I always figured heliconia
leaves should be a good substitute
but I had to research long and hard



before confirming that — yes — heli-
conia leaves are good substitutes for
banana leaves. They resist the wind
far better than banana leaves and
are somewhat thicker.
gardenerjack@corlwave.com



Study: Radiation
hoosts prostate
cancer survival

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer



CHICAGO (AP) — Doctors
are reporting a key advance in
treating men with cancer that has
started to spread beyond the
prostate: survival is significantly
better if radiation is added to stan-
dard hormone treatments.

Results of the study were given
Sunday at a cancer conference,
where other research showed that
an experimental drug boosted sur-
vival for women with very
advanced breast cancer. The drug
is being reviewed by the federal
Food and Drug Administration.

The prostate study has the
potential to change care right
away. About 20 per cent of the
nearly 200,000 men diagnosed with
the disease each year in the Unit-
ed States are like those in the
study — with cancer that has
spread to the area around the
prostate.

"It is this group of patients in
whom many of the deaths from
prostate cancer occur,” because
the condition is usually incurable,
said study leader Dr Padraig
Warde, a radiation expert from
the University of Toronto's
Princess Margaret Hospital.

These men are treated with
drugs that block testosterone, a
hormone that helps prostate can-
cer grow. Only about half also get
radiation because of concerns
about urinary problems it can
cause. Even though these treat-
ments have been used for decades,
few studies have been done to
establish their value alone or in
combination.

The new study assigned 1,200
men to get hormones plus radia-
tion or hormones alone. After sev-
en years, 74 per cent of men
receiving both treatments were
alive versus 66 percent of the oth-
ers. Those on both treatments
lived an average of six months
longer than those given just hor-
mones.

Serious side effects occurred in
less than two per cent of men in
either group. The study was spon-
sored by the National Cancer
Institute of Canada.

The results show that "radiation
is an indispensable element in the
treatment of patients with high-
risk prostate cancer," said Dr Jen-
nifer Obel, a cancer specialist at
Northshore University Health Sys-
tem in suburban Chicago who had
no role in the study.

Dr Otis Brawley, the American
Cancer Society's chief medical offi-
cer, praised the survival advantage
but said he wished it were larger.

"It's a practice-changing study in
certain countries,” especially in
Europe, where more men are
diagnosed with locally advanced
tumors than in the United States,
he said.

In the US, about 192,280 new
cases of prostate cancer were diag-
nosed last year, and it claimed
27,360 lives.

The breast cancer study tested
eribulin, a drug derived from a sea
sponge. Unlike Herceptin and oth-
er gene-targeted drugs that have
been the focus of cancer research
for the past decade, this one is a
chemotherapy — a drug that kills
cancer cells, in this case by attack-
ing cell division in a novel way.

The study tested it in 762
women whose cancer had either
recurred after initial treatment or
had spread beyond the breast. All
were getting worse despite having
tried an average of four previous
drugs.

Two-thirds were given eribulin,
and the others received whatever
treatment their doctors wanted to
try, since there is no standard of
care in this situation.

Median survival was just over
13 months for those on eribulin
versus less than 11 months for the
others, said study leader Dr
Christopher Twelves, of St James's
Institute of Oncology in Leeds,
England.

About half of the women on
eribulin had typical chemotherapy
side effects — fatigue, low white
blood cell counts, loss of hair,
numbness and tingling in differ-
ent parts of the body. About one-
fourth of women in each group
had serious side effects related to
their treatments.

The study was sponsored by
Japan-based Eisai Inc., which last
week received a promise of quick
review from the FDA. A company
spokesman said no price has yet
been set for the drug.

"There aren't many drugs that
show a survival advantage in this
setting,” and the amount of bene-
fit seen in this study gives eribulin
"a reasonable chance" of being
approved, said Dr Eric Winer,
breast cancer chief at the Dana-
Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

More than one million women
worldwide are diagnosed with
breast cancer each year. In the
United States last year, there were
an estimated 194,280 new cases
and 40,610 deaths from the dis-
ease.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 7B





‘Immobilised leaders’

manager recently exclaimed in a
Atsion “Leadership theory is

fallacious!” Based on her experi-
ence, it seems to be impossible to be a leader
in her organisation which she characterised
as dishonest, abusive and highly controlling.
From her perspective, her attempts at being
an effective leader are futile because demon-
strating leadership competencies is not val-
ued or even possible.

I thought about this indictment and my
response was that leadership theory can be
applied when your office culture is a healthy
one, characterised by integrity, effective
communication and trust. Otherwise your
environment can lead you down the path to
immobility.

Toxic Environments that Immobilise

After my conversation I started thinking
about the different types of environments
that can slow down or completely immo-
bilise leaders, causing ineffectiveness:

Centralised Authority: In these organisa-
tions, authority is centralised with one per-
son or among a chosen few. This can occur
in family businesses, companies with interna-
tional headquarters, or where there is an
autocratic executive or business owner who
controls everything that happens within the
organisation because they don’t trust their
employees. In cases like these, managers sel-
dom have any decision making authority or
opportunities to contribute so they are
forced to wait until a decision is made and
communicated.

Deliberate Withholding: Some bureaucrat-
ic environments require layers and layers of
authorisation and some senior players in this
process use their signing authority as a pow-
er tool that can cause managers to miss
deadlines or delay important projects.

There are other executives who intentionally
withhold information in order to frustrate
targeted managers, attempting to show them
who is in charge. Unfortunately, these strate-
gies are short-sighted as they decelerate the
progress of not only the targeted managers;
they negatively affect the withholders and
the results of the entire team.

Bullying: There are some environments
where bullies are allowed to thrive. Harass-

ment by bullies
includes behav-
iours like ignoring
employees, with-
holding informa-
tion, and profanity.
Whether bullying
exists at executive
or entry levels,
middle managers
can become immo-
bilised by the fear
of the perpetual
threat of an aggres-
sive encounter.
When there is a
bully boss, man-
agers are usually
unwilling or unable
to do anything
without the boss’ consent because they pre-
fer not to be exposed to the threat of attack
so the probability of delays is high.

Indecision: Indecision can occur when a
manager tends to overanalyse. They are
unable to efficiently and effectively distill
information and make a decision. Some-
times this is based on fear, and at other times
it is based on a predisposition to perfection-
ism. Indecision can also occur when there is
incompetence. Incompetent managers are
either ill equipped to manage their authority
and make a decision or they are paralyzed
by the fear of making another mistake.

Disorganisation: Some leaders are immo-
bilised by a lack of organization. They don’t
have an effective system of follow up, nor do
they have a filing system that allows them to
locate files. They are unresponsive to e-mails
and voice mails so assigned work falls
through the cracks with these executives and
business owners and this impacts managers
who wait interminably for feedback before
taking action.

Dishonesty: If executives and business
owners are dishonest, it is uncommon for
them to involve front-line managers in their
exploitative activities. As a result, deceitful
leaders conceal information for fear of
unwanted publicity. Consequently, their
front line managers are immobilised either
because there is a lack of relevant informa-



“By taking the path of patience, it is
important to develop your survival skills.
Alternatively, if you are frustrated by the
lack of productivity and your attempts to
influence change are unsuccessful, you
can always exercise your choice to find

a new employer that mobilises leaders
and supports employee development.”
— Yvette Bethel

tion or because the managers may be the
ones forced to deal with the consequences.

Whether or not a middle manager is com-
petent, they can be rendered entirely useless
in undermining, toxic environments. There
are others who are immobilised purely
because they lack the competencies to keep
work flowing. No matter the reason for
immobility, immobilised managers have far
reaching effects on the business like
turnover, compromised results, personality
conflicts and absenteeism.

The Link Between

Immobility and Culture

Author Gabrielle O’Donovan asserts,
“Corporate culture evolves during workers’
and leaders’ learning and development at
company start-up stage, and over time will
be shaped by influences in the internal and
external environment. Thus, corporate cul-
ture is created by a company's founders and
is shaped by leaders and employees. As new
staff join, they imbibe the culture of the
company, but at the same time bring in their
own values and attitudes that also influence
and change the corporate culture.”

O’Donovan goes on to say that, “Corpo-
rate culture is leader-led and facilitated. This
means it can be controlled, changed and
managed to ensure it is healthy and works
for the success of a company.” With this in
mind, it is apparent that corporate culture
appears to be influenced by many sources
but despite this, it is shaped by leaders. So

in order to migrate from an immobilised
state to a productive one, changes need to
start at the top.

What to do if you are immobilised

Some immobilized managers attempt to
rely heavily on strategies like avoidance,
accommodation and compromise which are
low on the assertiveness scale.

In toxic environments, these leadership
styles become a necessity for survival and
are probably undergirded by a toxic emo-
tion: fear.

Unfortunately, if fear is your motivation,
employees perceive these behaviours as
powerless, undermined or weak because
they are rendered voiceless because you are.

In reality managers take the less assertive
route because demonstrating more assertive
styles can lead to behaviours like bullying or
exclusion.

So what do you do? If you are one of the
leader architects of the culture of your orga-
nization you may decide that change needs
to happen. If change is needed, you can
commit to personal change and growth. You
can also set up a system of accountability for
the desired behaviours.

If you are not in a position to influence the
culture of your organization and you feel
immobilised by the environment, you may
decide to take your chances and be patient.
If you make this decision, you understand
there are no guarantees because the situa-
tion is what it is and in some circumstances,
the probability that positive change can be
motivated is low.

By taking the path of patience, it is impor-
tant to develop your survival skills. Alterna-
tively, if you are frustrated by the lack of
productivity and your attempts to influence
change are unsuccessful, you can always
exercise your choice to find a new employer
that mobilises leaders and supports employ-
ee development.

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational
Soul, an HR Consulting and Leadership
Development company. If you are interested
in exploring how you can create higher per-
forming team leaders, you contact her at
www.orgsoul.com


























INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
i (BAHAMAS) LIMITED LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS BROKERS & AGENTS
ee esa lg
o|1|2/3|4|5|6|7
2 LOW MUCIRAE
- Partly su ie: 4 =! We Kametieaings Ly ikea
- pp tg 7 muads ceva Te isi Lenin pce fie ink a 1 i i a
i Lowe 1) ; ie ; High: es Hilieghn: 7" ah
Me i = a 1 High: 7 Low: a Low: 5" Low: 7 Tioes FoR Wassau
TAMPA, Lew ¥ Tee ar eae High HEIN) Lew LPL
Le TS" BMG an a —— a patil, 7 ‘xi att = as —= = . Today 4am. $2 Witham. a
z . = 7 1120 gin 14
% I oe A Weetrencbyy i 5 a
i i z a Wes ms
= rs ee cl ae Sialisiios ars for hase Meaegs Zp S hondins Tharsdy 5 1-254
y a WV ABACO A Temperaios: E
r - ; High: Or” Fy” r a 7
q _ et 14 bn C Lona TE" FS E rg z a
= sa @ WEST PALM BEACH ~_ i y Saterday 25 iam 4
% poe ave ee i 2a t4pn a
. Lose 7a" F244" ey i. Suneiy Etdaur
‘ FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ‘ ziorch hd 2pm ds
ih ot High BFE High og" Rec P ca = Masaay 2 kan
ail = Lise: Fa" Fy" C C Lana: 7S" 24" tl — 2 256 pn 1.4
. ed AccuWeather. com
Â¥ = wun et Fomecasta abd geaphics poo RT BLL
—— « a. ee HASSAU High: S1" Frag" Aveamieather. tes . w Sunrise E19 9m Moore Tom
i, oa . High: 907 Faz" Loree BO" Fae" Sarcke! fam Miamne 125 6
Â¥ Rar fun
KEY WEST - a a = i :
i Fi CAT ISLAND
High: Ber Faz" ic ee at eights Frc ee @ er D
Leer 6" eT" G - th i Low: 77" FS" C
= oF ye «i b - jon. 20 dom 19 dn. 2B
— oe es a i SAN SALVADOR
=. VY soGREATEXUMA 7 High BS" FZ"
” iy 3-4 keane High: 907 Foca" C Looe: Ta" Fae" G
—— Low 75" Fee"
Saipan is dotky'S weather. Tem pecoiere:: are fore: : :
—_ al <1
? LONG ISLAND ¥
eae eer tae mtg ee as
+ & et Law: 7" Freer C
t Cape Hatteras ns MAYAGUANA
a5 Charlotte © Highs: 81"Fr2rc Shown ig : ecay's & eG
Highs: 85°Fes°c waather Tamperahires P
Atlanta * > oe Be eee CROOKED 1 /ACKLINS
Highs: 80° Fra2°C . Highs: 90°FS2°C = are bodes highs an Hiphe 1" FC
: x aoe tonight's inws Lowa: 7" F265"
Pensacola Savannah Ss aes ——a— y
Highs: 82°R/33"C Highs: 90° F/a2°C =e = oe Se a (>
a0 , Daytona Beach te an —
Highs: S6° RSC sa A meer A
Tarnpa - Freepoct » » 2 -
Highs: 93°R/34"C_- i a
a = 5 + 4 rk = % 4 We a_i. W
Plier a a a Hassan ss a Ao ber 4-8 boo oe:
25 Hig Highs: so°Frazc * So oe teh = -
eS
Havana a = EAA .
Highs: 80°FIS2°C "s « - Marine FORECAST
Sa ntiage Ge Caulbes RES WIStEI LIT? BAAPER TEMPS.
. Highs: 86°F20°C Pex Pri AmACO Toeks 1-3 Poet TMi ies BT
20 Cozumel * Hi eat seer San Juan Mecinesdie” 5 oa Ps DM ies Ba" F
Highs: 91°Faa°C i «Highs: Bg" Fra" ema a =
= = Santa AniausA i SLA to nr
* Belize Kingston | Bamin mvt : ; Merino oF
areal : ae eo Highs: &7°F 15 Wier eck_E eh
Highs: SB°F 31°C Highs: BE°F a1” i i} Highs: 86°F/S0°C = _ a ‘ as" F
* I .- ELEUTSERA ~ a 1) ah wT
15 po SO22""" 3 partecton Dials Be
* hy iy hy Aruba Curacao Highs? 86°F 0CC «4 a a no FREEPOET es BE :
Managua = Highs: 81°Faac £% kkk & ek & & i be
* Migtts 0 \F2az"C The tts sissiseies . a
ah fein es ha Tobago = & & > i GEEAT AGUA BE" F
= = = < - * + 7 a a. Ea" F
|| Limore = 5 sa ee oe Carec & ea bghss Ba Fac LOA Lalo Bf
= re a = BcAt E % a HS me
Haan, 6 2Fyap i. . & Petia City . Highs: rg ec aie ae MAYA BULAN Ha E
tthe ee eet + + +Hghe: BERS chee ee ee ee ee ee sess gen i i= F
teh ehh le cae he ene “£kntkaitt & 4 St kt ett te 2 I Besa BE" fF
SRR Be RBRER RRR EEE ee BBR EER EE SERB BEE . mr F
yo : & & ty ly ty ty hy ly * oe & = & Ty ty |, ly i i Jy semen & : —
Sees oe oe oe ed oe eae ed 75 ae | ae eds Bites Ss oe es a SAN SADR Mowirat Sch a
Warm Criri Soricnry Bae Rain Trion Flarriss Sree ie BBGGED Lam [rel EE F
i . 4-a4 . - = = = a - Aarine DL EE" EF






























INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EFE76EYDK_1G7JDF INGEST_TIME 2011-07-27T00:42:59Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01588
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES




(V\

Pim blowin’ it

90F
SOF

The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER - BIGGEST AND BEST

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010



TRY OUR
SWEET
TEA

LOW
t SUNNY WITH
avy FSTORM

Volume: 106 No.161

myth



Steak Is Back
Om isla r ile



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

—

TTT

aU a)

body’

SEE WOMAN SECTION

ex

Businessman’s

five-year

sentence

is overturned

THE Court of Appeal has
overturned a Bahamian busi-
nessman’s five-year sentence
for fraud and forgery because
of “perceived bias” on the
part of the Supreme Court
judge who handled the origi-
nal trial.

Ordering a re-trial for Bryan
Douglas Knowles, Court of
Appeal president Dame Joan
Sawyer said that while there
was “no allegation of actual
bias” against former acting jus-
tice Elliot Lockhart, he had
been a partner in the law firm

Bahamas aims

that initially handled some of
the matters central to the case.

Recording the grounds for
Knowles’ appeal, Dame Joan
said: “The appellant’s main
concern was that for some time
prior to some of the incidents
alleged in the information, he
had been a client of the law
firm in which the learned judge
was a partner, although he was
not a client of the learned judge
himself.”

“What is of concern in this

SEE page eight
to be ‘premier

destination’ for arbitration

WITH the Bahamas looking to become a “premier des-
tination” for domestic and international arbitration fol-
lowing the passage of the Commercial Arbitration Act
2009, the Bahamas chapter of the Chartered Institute of
Arbitrators of London was officially launched yesterday.

The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators of London (CIA-
RB) is the leading professional for promoting the settle-
ment of disputes by arbitration, mediation and other pri-
vate dispute resolution procedures.

The Bahamas Chapter was formally launched at the
British Colonial Hilton and Court of Appeal President
Dame Joan Sawyer and Attorney General John Delaney

SEE page eight

ge ec ee ee

3-TOPPING PIZZA



Clase... 1
OT ae

a!

SESE

ae

SS | eee |

‘Perceived fas (
Judge forces retrial

MURDER CASE FAST TRACKED TO SUPREME COURT





Felipé Major/Tribune staff ¥



23-YEAR-OLD Zyndall McKinney outside of
court yesterday.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



THE case of a 17-year-old Ameri-
can girl and a Bahamian man accused
of murder has been fast tracked to the
Supreme Court.

Zyndall McKinney, 23, of Isabella
Boulevard and a 17-year-old Ameri-
can girl, alleged to be his girlfriend
were back in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday. McKinney and the juvenile are
accused of the murder of Anna Garri-
son. It is alleged that the juvenile —
the daughter of the deceased — and
McKinney caused the death of Garri-
son between Sunday, February 25, and
Saturday, July 4, 2009. Ms Garrison's
badly decomposed body was discov-
ered by walkers in a bushy area off
Fox Hill Road south near the Blue
Water Cay development on Saturday,
July 4, 2009 at around 6.20 pm. She
had been shrouded in sheets and her
feet were wrapped in plastic bags. The
33-year-old first came to the attention

SEE page 12





Fast Track your plans...



Alleged police station

escapee appears in court

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A PRISONER who allegedly escaped
from the Central Police Station on Saturday :
was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yes- :

terday.

Wesley Forest, 21, of Fourth Street of :
Robinson Road was arraigned before Mag- :
istrate Derrence Rolle-Davis in Court 5, :
Bank Lane yesterday, charged with escaping :
lawful custody. Forest pleaded not guilty to :
the charge and was granted $2,000 bail. His :
case was adjourned to June 25. According to :
police, Forest had been arrested in connec- :
tion with stolen vehicles and may have made :

his escape during a bathroom break.

SEE page eight

with a Fast Track Loan.

Fidelity Bank Fast Track Loan

Decisions Fast = Money Fast = Plus Visa Credit Card Fast

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 357.3135 2]inaenne





NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER





Butler remains
TRC Tee

SEE PAGE NINE



TV show pulled off
air ‘after criticism
Of huiget cuts’

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net



THE popular ZNS
TV news show Press
Pass has been pulled
off the air, it was
revealed yesterday —
reportedly because
management of the
state-run channel
objected to criticism of
the government’s bud-

SEE page eight







Nottage hits out
at ‘new tariffs
on tax payers
without notice’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IT IS "sin-
fully wrong”
for govern-
ment to
spring new
tariffs on tax
payers with-
out notice,
argued



Opposition BERNARD
member Dr NOTTAGE
Bernard

Nottage while calling for an
end to the Protection of Rev-
enue statute that permits
this.

Dr Nottage, the represen-
tative for Bain and Grants
Town, wants this policy dis-

SEE page two

Twenty-two KFC
employees put on
indefinite ‘leave’

TWENTY-TWO Kentucky
Fried Chicken employees
were out of a job yesterday,
having been put on indefinite
“leave” by the fast food
restaurant’s executives.

Some of the workers gath-
ered outside the restaurant’s
headquarters in Oakes Field,
along with Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union representatives, to
protest what they believed is
their dismissal from their jobs.

However, Gabriel Sastre,
Vice President and General
Manager of Restaurant
Bahamas Limited, which
owns KFC, said the workers
have not been terminated, but
placed on leave after the com-

SEE page eight

HOME IMPROVEMENTS
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE









Fe eam ea aval

PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL issued a statement yesterday
afternoon apologising to clients, staff and the University of the
West Indies School of Clinical Medicine and Research for any “dis-
comfort” resulting from a sewerage leak near the hospital's front
entrance. “We would also like to assure the public that patient ser-
vices in the Oncology Building were not interrupted and that the
Water and Sewerage Corporation has been contacted to rectify this |
matter,” said chief hospital administrator Coralie Adderley.




| HOSPITAI
Nu ANC











Man acquitted of murder, armed robbery charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT —- Murder accused Leon
Rahming walked out of the Supreme Court
a free man yesterday after a jury acquitted
him of murder and armed robbery charges.

Rahming was on trial for the murder and
armed robbery of 20-year-old Roslyn Louis,
astore clerk at the Keeping Babies Covered
Until Two store in Eight Mile Rock.

The trial started last Monday.

It is alleged that on June 11, 2007, Louis
was attacked and fatally injured.

According to Pathologist Dr Cornelius
Kachali, Louis suffered a “sharp force injury”
and died after losing a significant amount
of blood.

Dr Kachali said he did not know what
kind of instrument caused the injury.

Attorney Brian Hanna represented Rah-
ming.

Vernal Collie and Erica Kemp of the
Attorney General’s Office appeared on
behalf of the Crown.

Toros

f im é Coes A
a" Ae cf hf

Check us out on

Peimsiee
se eet



needed.

MP: budget cuts

to help

country through

tough

By ALESHA CADET



FNM member of parliament
for Pinewood Byran Woodside
yesterday defended the gov-
ernment’s budget, saying the
administration has made the
“serious cuts” necessary to help
the country through tough
times.

“The budget represents real-
ity and we will survive; the
global recession will be
moved,” he said during the bud-
get debate in the House of
Assembly.

Mr Woodside, State Minister
for Lands and Local Govern-
ment, went on to criticise the opposition
PLP for referring to the budget as “a great
failure.”

“Others on the opposition have claimed
this budget is hopeless and it is visionless
— this budget is all about taxes and no
growth.

“T feel this is most irresponsible; this
opposition bunch is most irresponsible,”
Mr Woodside said, going on to describe

BYRAN WOODSIDE



times

PLP MPs as “a bunch of misfits”
who were spurned by the
Bahamian people in the 2007
general election.

Mr Woodside said: “They were
rejected in the best of times — if
the people couldn’t trust you in
the best of times to govern them,
what makes you believe they will
trust you in these tough times?

“The opposition should be
about telling Bahamian people
that it is time to tighten up their
belts. Those who are able to sur-
vive in the tough times, those are
the ones that will make it at the
end of this recession.

“This government has done
just that in the budget. The years of feast-
ing are over and only the tough will sur-
vive.

“We continue to build on the new lead-
ership that has been put in place.

“We continue to hold the fort as the
government.

“We are hopeful, nonetheless, that once
we see the light at the end of this reces-
sion, this too shall pass,” he said.

Nottage hits out at ‘new tariffs
on tax payers without notice’

FROM page one

continued so that new taxes
cannot be imposed before
the start of a new fiscal year.

He accused the govern-
ment of playing a game of
"gotcha" with the public by
catching them off guard with
new duty rates, referring to
the immediate increase in
customs charges on some
cars which went into effect
on May 26 — the same day
the prime minister revealed
the increases during the
2010/2011 budget communi-
cation.

After he was beseiged with
complaints from car dealers
and consumers about the tax
hike, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced last
week that the rates will not

ee
EXTERMINATORS
ed hey i)
PHONE: 322-2157



pay less for insuring your home!

Have you heard the good news?

You CAN save money!

Ask NIBA for a home insurance quote! Home insurance with

NIBA costs less AND you receive cover with a claims service

that lives up to its promise! For added convenience, yous

can choose to pay by interest free installments.

It’s time to pay less for insuring your

home!

go as high as planned this fis-
cal year.

Still, Dr Nottage said the
practice hinders the public's
ability to engage in proper
financial planning, forcing
those with limited budgets
to reorder spending to

accommodate the new
charges and sacrifice other
expenses.

"IT used to not have any
problem with this protection
of revenue order because I
thought that it was really
working to preserve the
integrity of new taxes. How-
ever, time has taught me, Mr
Speaker, that this is a prac-
tice that I think we should
dispense with,” said the MP.

The Protection of Rev-
enue, under chapter 294 of
the Bahamas Statute Law,
permits the government to
immediately impose varia-
tions to "all duties, tax or
fees levied under the Tariff
Act, the Stamp Act or any
other Act."

Dr Nottage continued:
"Because when I think that
in this day and age, when we
have all this technology
available to us that we
should have to play ‘gotcha’
with our citizens. I think it
is wrong, sinfully wrong to
put on people a tax at a time
when they have a reasonable
expectation to pay a differ-
ent tax,” said Dr Nottage.

"How are people, whether
they are civil servants, who
have to plan mortgages or
have to pay fees for their
children's education to make
plans for the short-term?
How can people in the pri-
vate sector plan, invest, and
operate (if) without warning
the government changes the
rules of the game?"

The import tax on cars was
levied on vehicles with
engines larger than 2 litres
or 2,000 cc's at a rate of 85
per cent for duty with small-

er engines 65 per cent. Some
of the tax increases revealed
in the budget communication
will go into effect on July 1,
however the import tax on
cars was mandated as a "pro-
tection of revenue" and
imposed with immediate
effect.

Rather than instituting
two flat rates of tax for vehi-
cles by engine size as pro-
posed in the budget commu-
nication —- 65 per cent for all
2000 cc engine cars, and 85
per cent for all larger vehi-
cles — Mr Ingraham said last
week that based on "strong
representation” from some
car dealerships the govern-
ment will also allow for a 75
per cent rate for cars
between 2000 cc and 2500cc.

He also pledged a 10 per
cent credit to all who paid
the 85 per cent duty for a car
between 2000cc and 2500cc —
after the new rate was
announced two weeks ago —
from the government for the
extra amount they paid over
what is now being charged.

Yesterday Dr Nottage also
pushed for reform of the
country's tax system,
explaining that the present
system — heavy reliance on
customs duty — is ineffectual.

"T honestly feel and I think
as do most right thinking
Bahamians that the current
tax regime is inadequate in a
21st century Bahamas.

“We have to change,
reform our system of taxa-
tion.

"The primary system does
not serve the Bahamas well
and is administratively bur-
densome in context and
another form of taxation will
not necessarily prevent us
from attracting high levels of
foreign direct investors or
investments, nor will it deter
high quality providers of
international services to our
shores."

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Pulp cece Orn eo lle

Tel.677-6422 or visit
www.nibaquote.com

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 3



Passport processing
times see ‘marked
improvement’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net__

THERE has been a
“marked improvement”
in the length of time it
takes for the Passport
Office to process appli-
cations for machine-
readable passports,
according to the Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs.

Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of For-
eign Affairs and Immi-
gration, Brent Symon- i
ette, told parliament that :
recently, the waiting :
time for such passports
had been reduced to just
two weeks — down from
around 10 weeks during
peak periods last year.

Waiting times have
now risen to four weeks,
he said, following an
increase in applications
being made for e-pass-
ports as Bahamians have
been encouraged to
apply early for the docu-
ment.

Nonetheless, Mr
Symonette called the ;
reduction in waiting time :
“perhaps the most :
important achievement
at the Passport Office in
the past year.” He was
addressing parliament
during the 2010/2011
Budget debate.

The minister attrib-
uted the Passport
Office’s success in min-
imising passport applica-
tion processing and pro-
duction to three factors:
the addition of new per- ;
sonnel and new shifts for :
workers at the office, the :
tripling of the number of
production machines
from two to six, which
has boosted passport
production from 300 dai-
ly to 900 daily; and the
benefit gained from the
services provided by
people who joined the
office under the auspices
of the government’s six
month temporary work
programme.

Mr Symonette added:
“Having achieved this
very important goal of
reducing passport pro-
cessing time, the Pass-
port Office remains
committed in the coming
fiscal year to once again
reducing the turnaround
and processing time and
will ensure the necessary
deployment of human
and physical resources to :
continue toimprove its:
service delivery to the
general public.

“This now includes the
implementation of the
machine readable Cer-
tificate of Identity, as
well as the Mobile Unit,
which was rolled out
earlier this year, as well
as a facility for online
passport applications,
which went live on June
1, 2010.

“This newest develop-
ment should serve to
greatly improve the
passport application
process and enhance the
working environment at
the Passport Office, for
the staff and clients
alike. It will help to
eliminate the long lines
at the Passport Office, as
well as shorten the
administrative process-
ing time.”

The minister noted
that the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs’ overseas
missions in Atlanta,
Miami, New York,
Ottawa and Washington
are now able to enrol
Bahamian applicants in
their respective jurisdic-
tions for e-passport pro-
cessing. The Bahamas
Embassy in Beijing, Chi-
na and the Bahamas
High Commission in
London, United King-
dom should begin issu-
ing electronic passports
early in the 2010/2011
fiscal year, he added.

“My ministry is pro-
jecting an increase in
overall revenue from
passports for 2010/2011
from $1,725,329 in
2009/2010 to $2,070,708
— an increase of
$345,379,” said Mr
Symonette.



Minister to meet with mail boat

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Works and
Transport Neko Grant yester-
day attempted to allay concerns
raised by mail boat operators
who worry that government’s
10 per cent subsidy cut will
push many in the industry to
the brink of financial ruin.

Speaking in Parliament dur-
ing his contribution to the
2010/2011 budget debate, the
Member for Lucaya promised
to meet with mail boat opera-
tors to discuss their fears and
the upcoming budget cut.

While noting the important
service mail boat operators pro-
vide to people in the Family
Islands, Mr Grant said the sub-
sidy reduction is not an "insur-
mountable challenge" for the
industry.

"We are cognizant of the
necessary service provided by
mail boats to our Family
Islands. At this time I acknowl-
edge with gratitude the contri-
bution of mail boat operators to
nation building. While there are
certain perceived challenges
associated with this subsidy
reduction, we do not consider
this challenge to be insur-
mountable.

"I will meet with mail boat
operators, I will work along





NEKO GRANT

with mail boat operators to
resolve any difficulties they may
have in operating within the
limits of the revised subsidy.
We in the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport will
ensure to the greatest extent
possible that the mail and
freight services to our Family
Islands are not adversely affect-
ed as a result of the subsidy
reduction," he said.

The subsidy to mail boat
operators was reduced by
$897,000 for the upcoming fiscal
year — from $8,988,201 in
2009/2010 to 8,090,381 in
2010/2011.

It is just one of several moves
to reduce public spending as

government scrambles to help
restore an ailing economy.

Opposition member of Par-
liament for the MICAL con-
stituency V Alfred Gray argued
that the subsidy cut will result
in mail boat operators passing
on the increased costs to con-
sumers who need the essential
service to transport food and
other goods to the Family
Islands.

When Mr Gray served as
Minister of Agriculture, Fish-
eries and Local Government
under the Christie administra-
tion he said that mail boat oper-
ators were crying out for an
increase in freight rates to help
them keep their businesses
afloat.

Yesterday, he also accused
the government of caring more
about capital works projects
than for the small man, citing
the government's commitment
to the $120 million New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
gramme at a time when it is
reducing funding to areas that
affect "poor people.”

After government
announced the subsidy cut
during the budget communi-
cation, several mail boat oper-
ators spoke out, expressing
fear that they will lose their
livelihoods.

One operator who spoke
with The Tribune claimed his

Govt in process of reaching settlement
with former National Youth Service staff

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government is still in
the process of reaching a finan-
cial settlement with about a
dozen former employees of the
National Youth Service pro-
gramme in Andros, which was
shut down last year.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles Maynard
described the National Youth
Service in the House of Assem-
bly as a “failed experiment”
which the present administra-
tion admittedly “stopped,
reviewed and cancelled”
because it was not cost effec-
tive.

It officially closed after the
2009 summer session of the
programme, said Mr Maynard
during his contribution to the
2010/2011 budget debate in par-
lament.

The NYS, most recently
based in Andros and launched
in 2004, had been designed as a
nine-month programme to
reform the behaviour and
achievement levels of boys con-
sidered uncontrollable by their
schools.

Mr Maynard noted that it
was allocated around $100,000
in 2004, $400,000 in 2005,
$700,000 in 2006, and the FNM
government, after its election
in 2007, provided the pro-
gramme $1 million. This fund-

AIRC

murder victim

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net





POLICE have identified the 27-
year-old Deveaux Street resident
who became the nation’s 37th
murder victim over the weekend.

Matthais Williams was sitting
outside a house in his neighbour-
hood when two masked men
approached him, one armed with a
handgun.

The man shot Mr Williams mul-
tiple times about the body. He died
of his injuries in hospital.

The police have taken one man
in for questioning in connection
with the murder, however the
masked gunman, his accomplice
and their motive are still unknown.

The area off East Street has
been described by police as a dan-
gerous "drug hot spot", claiming
the life of 24-year-old Wilson
Louisma in similar circumstances
in nearby Peter Street the previous
week. Superintendent Leon
Bethel, chief of the police's Central
Detective Unit (CDU), said a large
part of the community’s crime rate
is related to illegal drug trafficking.

He confirmed that police would
be increasing their presence and
intelligence in the area to coun-
teract the influence of the trade
on the community.

However, senior officers were
quick to say they will not let spec-
ulation prejudice their investiga-
tions.

Assistant Commissioner Glenn
Miller said the police will be “guid-
ed by facts.”

He encouraged anyone with
information about the shooting to
contact police immediately on 919,
328-TIPS, 502-9991 or 322-3337.





CHARLES MAYNARD

ing increase was based on a
submission made to the gov-
ernment by the administrators
of the programme.

However, the government
ultimately determined the mon-
ey could be better spent else-
where.

“Our good conscience would
not and could not allow us to
continue with a programme
that despite the increasing cost
could not reach and touch the
lives of more than a hundred
young men a year.

“IT would be the first to shout
on the mountain top that you
cannot put a price on the future
of our young men, but we have
major problems in our society
and one million dollars could
and should be spent more effec-
tively,” said Mr Maynard.

He later told The Tribune
that the government was con-





cerned that there was nothing
but anecdotal evidence of any
long-term beneficial impact the
programme had had on the
behaviour and academic
achievement.

And he claimed the govern-
ment was concerned that those
involved in administering the
programme were not specially
trained for such work and that
to expand the programme to
impact more children would
have required a large invest-
ment and an expansion of the
facilities, which they could not
adequately accommodate.

Mr Maynard said that the
“important thing” is that
“young, uncontrollable boys are
still being dealt with” through
the SURE programme, which is
located on Gladstone Road.

Meanwhile, he added that
the government’s planned
“strengthening and expansion”
of the Governor General’s
Youth Award — to be renamed
the “GOLD Initiative”, stand-
ing for Greatness, Opportunity,
Leadership and Development
— which is to be launched in
September will hopefully
diminish the number of stu-
dents who are deemed “uncon-
trollable” by the school system.

ee ee Bee
lati eeu ee Tae
Pare mM ia)

Tropical Exterminators
Errore by





FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT



business is struggling after a
nearly 50 per cent fall-off in
revenue last year due to the bad
economy.

A drop in customers coupled
with rising fuel prices, increased
operating costs and fixed freight
rates set by the government has
taken a toll on his business and
others in the industry, he said.

Operators over budget cut fears

"A couple mail boats are on
the verge of getting out, includ-
ing myself, with the economy
the way it is and the cost of
operating so high. It was a
shocker to say you're going to
do that (cut the subsidy) in
these kind of times when we
have no other recourse," said
the businessman.

"








Look Stunning
In A ;
Beautiful (

Selection Of ©
Designer Drom
Dresses!!






AC
eee



Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
° Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O, Box N-121

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

The Mot Tioaooon Riereaaniow & Claas Eve, o@ THe Jom bi Frm!
AAS OMY PROP, CET Soe Caacr & Lie sree Cape Series

* Gael Uphokdery: Sona and Marit Glaanieg 2 Resor
Brsonilial

* Peoohom Cloaning Syston rancves Deep & Hoo Bod,
Bockoria (ireasd, Wiainmafies and Stare tron Campating &
Funlure, restoring them io lke nerd ai a faction of rplacomant
Sirs

Camel Soa’, Lavesieks, Chaina, Diaing Chairs, Cass Boel
(guts Tad. Mere & Sona

Pecan, Wind i Sill Carpet iain Speake

+ habla Tia Restoration, Poishing, Saaling 4 ans

Marte Sounter-Top Aedoralion 4, Podshing

Authorised Soome Tech Profecsioea! Conrecnor
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-K083 o 323-1594

OALY WE CAN Of IT RABAT!

Be AA ce © Pe TORE Oe © ema: (re arg
© ne St pond bi’.coee

LL a oY FR

PROVCEIEM SV TEM (an



STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM

STILL ALIVE



¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald's Furniture

And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Better educated citizenry builds prosperity

PRESIDENT Barack Obama, like Col-
lege of the Bahamas president Janyne Hod-
der, stresses the need for a better educated
work force to keep a country competitive.

Mrs Hodder, in an address to a women’s
luncheon earlier this year, underscored the
threat to the Bahamas’ economic future with
fewer than “15 per cent of our young people
enrolled in higher education when every
prosperous nation around us is moving to
increase higher education participation rates,
as high as 50 per cent in some countries.”

Paying a surprise visit to a school in Kala-
mazoo, Michigan Monday, President Obama
told students that a better-educated work-
force will help the U.S. stay competitive
globally. Don't mimic Washington by mak-
ing excuses, the Associated Press reported
President Barack Obama as saying as he
advised graduating high school students and
encouraged them to take responsibility for
failure as well as success.

In remarks delivered Monday evening at
Kalamazoo Central High School, the Presi-
dent said it's easy to blame others when
problems arise. "We see it every day out in
Washington, with folks calling each other
names and making all sorts of accusations on
TV," the president said.

He said Kalamazoo high school students
can and have done better than that.

The 1,700-student school in southwest
Michigan landed President Obama as its
commencement speaker after winning the
national Race to the Top High School Com-
mencement Challenge. It was among three
finalists picked through public voting on the
schools’ videos and essays. The White House
made the final selection.

The administration cited Kalamazoo Cen-
tral's 80 per cent-plus graduation rate,
improvements in academic performance and
a culturally rich curriculum. Would that one
day the Bahamas could boast such an
achievement for its government schools.

About an hour before the Kalamazoo
ceremony, President Obama surprised the
280 graduates by dropping in on them in the
recreation centre at Western Michigan Uni-
versity as they prepared for the big moment.

Walking around with a hand-held micro-
phone, he told the students to work hard,
keep their eyes on the prize and continue
to carry with them a sense of excellence.

"There is nothing you can't accomplish,"
he said, suggesting they might consider pub-

' DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Ltd.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

BEAUTYGUARD
Free Estimates
_WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
\_ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |

lic service. "I might be warming up the seat
for you.” Students rushed from the bleachers
to shake the President’s hand and take cell
phone pictures after he spoke.

President Obama, who says a better-edu-
cated workforce will help the U.S. stay com-
petitive globally, said in his prepared remarks
that the school had set an example with its
level of community and parental involve-
ment and the high standards of its teachers.

"IT think that America has a lot to learn
from Kalamazoo Central about what makes
for a successful school in this new century,"
he said. "This is the key to our future.”

He advised the graduates to work hard
and take responsibility for their successes
and their failures.

"You could have made excuses — our
kids have fewer advantages, our schools have
fewer resources, so how can we compete?
You could have spent years pointing fingers
— blaming parents, blaming teachers, blam-
ing the principal or the superintendent or
the government,” the president said.

"But instead, you came together. You
were honest with yourselves about where
you were falling short. And you resolved to
do better."

Education is widely seen as one hope for
Michigan's long-struggling economy. The
state has had the nation's highest unem-
ployment rate for four consecutive years,
including a 14 per cent jobless rate in April.
Thousands of manufacturing jobs have been
lost, many connected to the auto industry,
and the state is trying to diversify its econo-
my with alternative energy, biomedical and
other jobs — most of which require educa-
tion beyond high school.

The White House said more than 170,000
people voted in the contest.

Kalamazoo Central's valedictorian, Cindy
Lee, said she was excited but jittery about
sharing the stage with the president.

"The whole school is excited about it. The
whole community is excited. It's on the news
every single day,” Lee, 18, said last week.

As for COB President Hodder “a high
school diploma is no longer the end point.
There is more learning to be done if we are
to have an informed, critical citizenry and to
have better control over the prosperity of
the nation. An expanded elite of well edu-
cated people build prosperity and where
such status is open to all who work hard and
want to, it also builds hope.”



A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Das weliggmierit Company

Why shouldn’t
our government
tighten its belt?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: PM Tough budget nec-
essary — The Tribune May
26, 2010

The Bahamas’ public debt
is astronomical and our
country is going broke, yet
government borrowing and
spending continue with little
restraint.

Recently, the Prime Min-
ister reportedly said that
“We have to get the revenue
from somewhere.”

However, the latest bud-
get will tell us that the
“somewhere” means new
taxes for us.

As usual, we will be told
that we must tighten our
belts. Wouldn’t it be refresh-
ing to see our government
tighten its belt(s) signifi-
cantly — just like the rest of
us?

When most governments
are in need of still more
money to squander, they
usually turn to the easiest,
quickest and, of course, the
least creative method with
which they are familiar —
namely, to raise taxes to pay
for loans and reckless spend-
ing. Cutting costs, reducing
waste and increasing effi-
ciency in government itself
seldom seem to be contem-
plated as revenue boosters.
Perhaps a few of the follow-
ing alternative measures,
although admittedly requir-
ing more imagination and
effort than simply raising
taxes, might be considered
for some government work-
ers and civil servants:

¢ Introducing a 9am to
5pm workday for at least
three days of the five day
work week, and possibly
also limiting “just stepping
out” to three days of the five
day week. (The Met Office
included). This and other
measures could reduce the
need for some of the costly
overtime work that we must
pay for.

¢ Use of time-recorders,
aka “time-clocks”, assuming
that unions don’t find this
punctuality requirement to
be too dehumanising.

e Fixing one’s hair and
nails, having breakfast and
placing a lunch order, at
home rather than on arrival
at the place of work.

¢ Compassionate leave to
attend no more than three
of a spouse’s great-grand-
mothers’ funerals in Florida
per year.

¢ Switching off all com-
mercial TV sets and radios,
etc, at government offices
for several hours a day.

Service Providers

Data, Voice & IP-based Television Services

Nassau Airport Development Company (MAD is
seeking local suppliers io provide one or more of the
following services for the new US. Departures
Taminal and subsequent terminal buildings al the
Linden Findling Intemational Ainort

« Data
* Voice

* IP-based Entertainment
Television Services

Injarasted companies should pick up an information
package fram NADS comporala offoa in the
Domestic Intemational Terminal at LPIA between the
hours of S200am - 4:00pm, Packages: must be
collected by Wednesday, June 76th, 2070,

Conlact: (7 & ELECTRONICS DEPARTMENT

Pc (ek) POD 1009 Fin: (2d) STP
Eon rigors bs

a Ae AP SO}

Nurssau, Hohe



LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



After all, inspirational pro-
grammes seldom seem to
actually inspire work.
(Police stations not to be
exempted).

¢ Reducing Internet shop-
ping, social e-mailing and
porn-surfing in the work-
place, to just a few hours per
day.

¢ Banning all cell ‘phone
use and any private calls
using landlines, for several
hours a day. On-site addic-
tion withdrawal facilities and
counseling could be estab-
lished for the many who
would need it.

¢ Abolishing all voice mail
facilities, bearing in mind
that voice mail simply gives
the user another convenient
way of avoiding work, an
excuse to be “away from the
desk”, or to “just step out”
of the workplace entirely.

¢ Permanent removal of
all automated greetings,
music and messages from
workplace telephones (we
know our calls are “impor-
tant”). Suspension might be
considered for any employ-
ee who repeatedly discon-
nects people, or mindlessly
wishes callers a “very pleas-
ant good morning or after-
noon” or that they “have a
good or blessed day.”

¢ Reducing all mectings
and seminars to no more
than two a day.

¢ Keeping all mobile food
vendors’ vehicles out of
workplace parking lots, and
requiring them to have valid
food-handler and business
licenses (even though they
may be friends, relatives or
colleagues).

¢ Curtail use of govern-
ment vehicles and gas, and
installation of timers on gov-
ernment vehicles that will
automatically shut off the
a/c and stereo after six hours
of continuous use, or within
50 feet of a web shop/num-
bers house, sweetheart’s
home, fast food outlet or the
Fish Fry during work
hours. Also, insisting that all
drivers have valid drivers’
licenses and insurance.

¢ Certain things may actu-
ally require an act of parlia-
ment, such as a reduction in
embassy staff, wining and
dining of VIP visitors felt to
be essential to the well-
being of The Bahamas, such
as TV, Hollywood and
sports celebrities, etc.

¢ Also, cutting down on

trips abroad and conferences
in exotic places, and limit-
ing the entourages to just a
few close friends, relatives,
colleagues and acquain-
tances. Encouragement for
giving government contracts
to the more honest, capable
and reasonable low-bidders,
and actually enforcing an
unfulfilled contract once in a
while, even though it’s a
friend, relative, colleague or
church-brother or sister.

Governments the world
over seem to have a geneti-
cally hard-wired predisposi-
tion towards self-bloating
growth, thereby increasing
their own anonymity, impor-
tance and power. It may be
unrealistic, but perhaps we
might hope for a short
moratorium on hiring -----
would a year be too long?
At least a few conditions
might be imposed such as:
Less hiring according to pol-
itics and no hiring of any-
one who achieved less than
a D-academically (including
the RBPF). Absolutely no
one should be hired if on
their application they
describe themselves as being
a “people person” or if their
list of hobbies includes
“watching TV”, “listening
to music” or “meeting peo-
ple.”

The government of The
Bahamas is the country’s
largest employer by far
(around one out of every
three workers). Assuming
that there are no insur-
mountable objections from
the Privy Council, the ILO,
UTEB, the BPSU or the
BCC etc, there is little doubt
that a substantial increase
of revenue could be
achieved through improving
our government’s efficiency
and reducing waste even if
only a few of the above sug-
gestions were put into place
as temporary emergency
measures. In turn, tax bur-
dens on the man in the
street may not even need to
be increased much for quite
a while in these tough eco-
nomic times.

However, it is essential to
remember that none of the
above measures would have
any hope for success unless
the employees are provided
with a healthy, pleasant and
safe work environment, and
are treated in an under-
standing, decent and
respectful manner by the
powers that be.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

May 26, 2010.

I can’t understand archbishop’s
reasoning on gambling issue

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write in reaction to our Roman Catholic Archbishop
Patrick Pinder’s response to the issue of legalised gambling
for Bahamians in The Bahamas.

Like the Anglican Bishop’s reply to the subject matter —
Ido not understand my archbishop’s reasoning.

For example, my Bishop stated the following: I as the
leader of the Roman Catholic community in the Bahamas do
not support a change in the current law which would allow

the legalisation of gambling.

So, His Grace has essentially said that: he does not support
a change in the current law which would allow the legalisa-
tion of gambling for Bahamians in their beloved country.

His Grace no doubt supports lawful gambling for tourists

— nonetheless.

Here is where both Anglican and Catholic Bishops’ per-
spectives on the gambling for Bahamians question lack
spiritual and honourable creditability.

To basically say to a member of the Catholic commu-
nion in The Bahamas that gambling is wrong for them, but
right for visitors to our shores — is a sinful insult.

How did the Bishops find themselves in such a morally
compromising position on a political matter that should
have been exclusively resolved in the Bahamian political are-
na in the first place — in my view?

Well, I believe that that answer could be found in their
apparent aversion and abandonment of the gospels in pub-

lic life.

In fact, everyone wants to be the chief politician nowadays
— who is dictator of all the land.

Yes, to be Caesar is more fashionable than to be Christ-
like nowadays; hence — the gospels are being abandoned; and
church leaders in The Bahamas have clearly forsaken their
divine roles according to God’s will, in my opinion.

The devil is truly busy and successful in his mission to
deceive church leaders in The Bahamas - in my humbled

estimation.

DENNIS A DAMES
Nassau,
May 26, 2010.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Govt calls for oil spill |
clean-up SOMOTCErS

THE government is encour-
aging Bahamians to show con-
cern for their environment and
volunteer for the oil spill clean-
up when the time comes.

“If you hear that a tar ball
hits Key West, then it’s time to
head for Cay Sal. Once it hits
Cay Sal, three or four days lat-
er, we want you in Bimini. And
after that, we would want you
in Abaco and West End. And
that’s the way we will approach
dealing with the effects of the
oil spill,” said Minister of the
Environment Dr Earl Deveaux.

“It is our prayer and hope
that it doesn’t come to our
shores, but we are preparing
against the worst.”

As the Bahamas prepares for
some impact from the disas-
trous oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico, environmentally con-
cerned Bahamians took to the
streets at 6.30am on Saturday to
participate in the World Envi-
ronment Day Fun Walk start-
ing at the Bahamas National
Trust on Village Road.

They joined staff from the



Ministry of the Environment
and walked to Eastern Road,
through Big and Little Blair,
and back to Village Road to
the BNT’s Retreat to com-
memorate the dawn of World
Environment Day which was
held under the United Nation’s
theme “Many Species, One
Planet, One Future.”

This year’s celebration coin-
cides with the oil spill in the
Gulf of Mexico which highlights
the importance of organising
volunteers for clean-ups.

“T think all of you would
recognise how common our
future is as a result of the Deep
Horizon oil spill that’s affect-
ing the Gulf of Mexico and the
struggle of our regulatory agen-
cies, our human resources, in
one respect, to keep up with
the technology other human
beings deploy and develop,”
said Dr Deveaux.

“The most likely potential
place the tar balls would come
through would require the



By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



SPARKS from high voltage
lines turned Montrose Avenue
into the site of a dangerous fire-
works display yesterday — in what
business owners and residents
claim was the third such incident
in a month.

The incident began when a
power line near the corner of
Royal Palm Street caught fire and
dropped into the street after
crossing with another line.

The contact sent a wave of elec-
trical sparks down the block and
residents claim the resulting pow-
er surge followed by a black-out
was an encore of an incident just

ABOVE: Minister of the Environment Dr Earl Deveaux, addressed
an audience of environmentally concerned Bahamians, celebrating
World Environment Day at the Bahamas National Trust Fair held at
the Retreat on Village Road. He gave a detailed outline about the
government’s action plan to train and motivate a hundred volun-

Sparks fly from
high voltage lines

teers to clean up Cay Sal, Bimini, and West End, Grand Bahama.

RIGHT: Minister of the Environment Dr Earl Deveaux and Mrs
Deveaux cross the finish line and walk into the gates of the Retreat
at the Bahamas National Trust on Village Road, after participating
in this year’s June 5th World Environment Day Fun Walk.

placement of about 200 metres
of booms.”

The Bahamas government is
preparing for “pancake or golf
ball sized tar balls”, expected
to wash up on the shores of Cay
Sal, Bimini, West End and oth-
er parts of the country.

“While we are not concerned
that the worst impact of the
spill will not hit our shores, it is
inevitable that some impact will
hit our shores,” said Dr
Deveaux.

The Royal Bahamas Defence

EDWARD SMITH of 21st Centu-
ry Welders shows The Tribunea
severely damaged transformer
which had to be replaced in St
George’s Anglican church.

Force, the Oil Spill Contin-
gency team, and the Royal
Bahamas Police Force are the
official team developing and
organising one hundred volun-
teers.

The government said it has
training programmes in place
and welcomes anyone who
wants to donate their time to
volunteer to help and save the
Bahamas.

Minister Deveaux shared the
reason why he felt it was impor-
tant to outline the process of





last week.

The recurring problem of touching wires has plagued the area for
nearly a decade, according to residents, and the resulting power
surges have wreaked havoc on electrical appliances and the com-
munity’s sense of security.

Business owner Edward Smith of 21st Century Welders believes
the problem recurs because of the poor quality materials used to
make the repairs following such incidents.

He noted that the lines are often held apart by scrap pieces of
wood or bits of PVC pipe secured with electrical tape.

A long time resident of the area, Mr Smith said he remembers
when the lines had proper bar separators made of higher quality
materials.

“Every time people come from BEC to patch it up, it is done
unprofessionally and cannot be compliant with any electrical code
standards. They tape around a piece of wood to keep the wires
spread out but they’re supposed to get a spreader bar to stabilise
each wire in the exact position,” he said.

Mr Smith believes that if the lines were secured correctly, they
wouldn’t be so vulnerable to strong winds, minor accidents and
heat.

He said in the summer months the electrical tape often melts,
which leads inevitably to power lines touching with explosive con-
sequences.

“It’s endangering lives. One of the cables dropped down and cars
were passing by unaware of what was going on. There is a nursery
here, where it was sparking so much some of the sparks caught the
grass in front of the building,” he said.

Mr Smith said over the years, he has lost thousands of dollars in
electrical equipment and is currently seeking compensation to
damage to his refrigerator, washer and dryer with little success.

Numerous companies in the area have submitted compensa-
tion requests to the power company. Many say if they are lucky
enough to get a response at all, it is usually: ‘We are not responsi-
ble for that’.

The operator of a daycare centre in the area said she is always
afraid that sparks from the lines will set the roof on fire.

St George’s Anglican Church, which immediately faces yester-
day’s downed line, has suffered as a result of such incidents many
times over the years.

An administrator said the church has repeatedly had to replace
electrical equipment with no compensation from BEC.

He said: “We just have to pray to God because you never know
what’s going to get ruined each time. Just turn everything off and
hope when you go to use something — like the microwave or com-
puter — it’s still working.”

Officials at BEC told The Tribune off the record they are famil-
iar with the concerns of the Montrose Avenue community, but the
company did not respond to requests for an official comment
before press time.

- Wife claims Jamaican
- Man who left her is ‘on
- expired work permit’

i : By MEGAN REYNOLDS
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

: ASINGLE mother whose
; Jamaican husband left her
: days after obtaining perma-











humanitarian efforts necessary
for the clean-up of Bahamian
shores.

“The environment that we
share really is at the heart of
our way of life. The things that
make us feel good about our-
selves, the conch salad you
enjoy and the lobster that
affords a good living for so
many of our people, the
grouper we all enjoy, these all
live in the turtle grass mead-
ows and the coral reefs and

: nent residency claims he is

; employed on an expired

: work permit despite their

: impending divorce.

: The 33-year-old Harbour

: Island mother of five told

: Immigration officials how

? her husband abandoned her

: and his children, one which

: has special needs, just days

: after she signed his final

: permanent residency appli-

: cation in February last year.
She asked the Immigra-

: tion Department to cancel

: his application following

: their separation and when

: nothing was done she spoke

? out about the case in The

: Tribune.

: Former Minister of State

: for Immigration Branville

: McCartney said the perma-

: nent residency application

? would be cancelled in

: August, but 10 months later

: the single mother claims the

: 28-year-old Jamaican is still

: working with a work permit

: that expired in January last

these things would be destroyed
by the oil,” he said.

“What you see on TV in the
wetlands of Louisiana, Alaba-
ma, where all of these species
live, are an important part of
protected systems in the man-
groves of West Andros, the
bight of Acklins, and the maars
of Abaco. If they are destroyed,
then you can appreciate how
the life of Bahamians would be
affected and our way of life
would be destroyed.”

A BEC worker
repairing the fallen
power line






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





: year.

When she contacted

: Immigration officials they

: said his permanent residen-
: cy application was pending
? until a conclusion was

; reached in their protracted
: divorce proceedings.

She said: “He’s now on an

: expired work permit but

; because we are still legally

: married he’s still working,

: and I don’t think that should
: be the case because it’s

: expired. Whether you are

: legally married or not, it’s

: expired.

“Meanwhile there are

Bahamians who can’t even
: get jobs in this economy.”

The struggling mother is a

: full-time caretaker for the

: couple’s five-year-old

: daughter who suffers from
: developmental difficulties
: and she continues to rely on
: financial support from the
: Department of Social Ser-
: vices as, she said, her for-

: eign husband does not pro-
: vide consistent financial

: support.

“The government is still

taking care of this special
: child while he’s in Nassau
; partying,” she said.

“And Immigration needs

to do something about it.

: They said they were going
: to stop him but they did

: nothing.

“T did everything they

: told me to do and I still feel
: it is just a waste of my time,
: and this is just the case of

; one man. It just shows how
: Slack Immigration is.”

The Tribune submitted

: several questions to the

; Immigration Department

? concerning the man’s status,
: however these were not

: answered before press time
: yesterday.

2010 FORD MUSTANG

an American Icon
Shop & Compare

All cow, all reir, oothieg like ft sealable in The
Haheoris, a true Arerican Sports car 4.00 V8
‘with Aglerialie Traian, clo 17 nek

dlgy whieli, seer windewi, lock and mind,

tide cnrlain air bapa, ple all elatelaeel Feature,
PLUS SD pears 000 mile waminiy, 5 pare
pawdhide aiaiihersa, 3 poard teal pestection,
iewtes dnd ieapeeiion bo birthelay, fell tank ef
jaa, Moor nals, ral Five dada

if you are lOOKiNg for the Dest value available
You owe it to yourself to visit our showroom

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

—

2010

(Avwp @ Compare

2.4L four cylinder engine with auiomatic tamsmission,
the most fuel efficient vehicle im its closs.6 disc od system,
power windows locks amd minors, side curtim air bags,
I7 inch allow wheck. completely new aeroditeames body
design, all of thas plas 3 years!3G000 mile warranty, 4
years Mudside assistance, 3 yeors rast protection, licence
fm inapechon bo binhday, fall tank of gas, Teor mats,
fire five services,

eee em utc s



THOMPSON BOULEVARD
TEL.: 356-7700 » FAX: 328-6084

EHAIL: anak eolseserineaiLoomn
WEEGITE: trienchyminorsbaharig. com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Governor-General
Sar Ur LAS |
CM TC aa Tr TT

CLARENCE TOWN, Long Island — Last
| week Thursday, Governor-General Sir Arthur
Foulkes laid a wreath at the grave of Sir Henry
Taylor the third Bahamian Governor General of
The Bahamas.

In Long Island for the 43rd annual Long
Island Regatta, Sir Arthur and Lady Foulkes,
upon landing at Deadman’s Cay Airport, went
to Sir Henry’s gravesite for the brief ceremony.

Sir Henry, a native of Long Island was a
| founder of the Progressive Liberal Party in 1953.
He served as Governor General from April 8,
1991 to January 1, 1992. Sir Henry died February
14, 1994 at the age of 91.








SIR HENRY TAYLOR

Unique Vacations
Limited

Worldwide representatives for

Sandals and Beaches Resorts

Invites applications for the following positions in our
Nassau, Bahamas office

I) Jr Network Engineer

Responsibilities:

¢ Provide 1st and 2nd-tier support for network devices and carrier
circuits

¢ Monitoring of system stability, time possible

e Assist in implementing new network technologies and equipment by
working with a team of network engineers.

¢ Perform documentation of procedures and keep them updated.

¢ Execute change management according to documented procedures.

Qualifications:

* Cisco Routers and Switching — CCNA Required but CCNP Preferred

* Bachelor’s degree in a technical discipline, or equivalent work in an IT
related field.

¢ Required: Hands on work experience with Cisco Routers and Switches

¢ Experience with Carriers (AT&T, Verizon, BTC, C&W, etc) preferred

* Routing Protocols: OSPE, BGP

¢ Must be familiar with assisting end users describe issues and work to
resolution

¢ Must be able to be on call 24/7 and be able to assist with problems
when needed

¢ Must be able to travel at least 40% and have a valid passport

2) Entry Level — E-Marketing Coordinator.

We are seeking an E-Marketing Coordinator to join our E-Marketing
Team. The E-marketing Coordinator will help manage online marketing
campaigns for the Hospitality Industry. Our ideal candidate will thrive
in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment and should possess strong
project management and interpersonal communication skills, with a
meticulous eye for detail. Must be proficient in MS Word, Excel and
PowerPoint.

Candidates who have the above experience and qualifications should
forward their resumes to hrrepori6@ gmail.com

Only candidates that have the experience and qualifications required will
be contacted for interviews.

- Western Air to begin

new direct service to

FOLLOWING the successful launch of
its Kingston route in April, Western Air
has announced that it will launch daily
flight services into Montego Bay on June
11.

Rex Rolle, CEO of Western Air said:
“There was no question about beginning
flight service into Montego Bay. We were
so elated by the positive response we
received from Kingston that we knew
almost instantaneously that Montego Bay
would be next on our agenda.”

Western Air intends to start the Mon-
tego Bay flights at an introductory rate of
$320 round trip.

Tickets are now on sale at the West-
ern Air Jamaica ticket counter (previ-
ously the Air Jamaica ticket counter),
any Western Air ticket counter, and at all
major travel agencies in the Bahamas and
Jamaica.

Expansion

Western Air has been preparing and
training their staff in both the Bahamas
and Jamaica for the expansion. Check-
in at the Montego Bay airport will be
conducted by Jamaica Dispatch services.

The flight will leave at 9.30am with a
scheduled arrival time in Montego Bay of
10.30am (Jamaica time) and will depart
from Montego Bay at 11.30am (Jamaica
time) with a scheduled arrival time in
Nassau of 2.30pm.

According to Mr Rolle, Western Air is
committed to committed to providing
safe, reliable and affordable air services

Montego Bay, Jamaica

to both its destinations in Jamaica.

The company recently signed a multi-
million dollar agreement to acquire three
additional aircraft.

The CEO explained that the new
SAAB 340-B models are better suited
for the Jamaica routes in particular, as
result of their ability to carry one thou-
sand more pounds, their higher cruising
speed and overall better performance
than the SAAB 340-A that the company
currently operates.

Aircraft

Delivery of the new aircraft is expected
in the next 60 to 90 days.

Western Air is the largest privately-
owned airline in the Bahamas. It is fully
Bahamian owned and operated with its
main headquarters in San Andros.

Western Air is currently constructing a
$4 million state-of-the-art terminal and
maintenance facility at the Grand
Bahama International Airport which is
scheduled to open at the end of summer,
2010.

Upon completion, the facility will serve
as the airline’s northern hub and will
facilitate the launch of Western Air’s
expansion into the South Florida and the
northern Bahamas.

Passengers travelling in from Jamaica
can connect to other destinations in the
Bahamas, as Western Air operates daily
flights from Nassau to: Freeport, Marsh
Harbour, Exuma, Congo Town, San
Andros and Bimini.

GRAYCLIFF AIRPORT BOUTIQUE JOINS
Fae UL









THE new Graycliff Bou-
tique and Divan at the Lin-
den Pindling International
Airport has become the
newest member of Priority
Pass, the world’s leading
independent airport lounge
programme.



Notice

MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
THE FRICE CONTROL ACT, 197Tl
CHAPTER 334
THE FRICE CONTROL (CO ASOLINE & DIESEL OL)
(AMENDMENT) ¢ | REGULATIONS, 2002

LIMITED will become cllcctive on Tuesday, June 08, 1610.

SCHEDULE

PER U4. 0. ALLOM

ARTICLE 41 AMAL!

SUPPLIERS PRICE
& PRICE
$

PART B
FREEPORT. G.B.

| Freepant Cril

Company Lad, INESEL CML, 43 | 3.51

FERMARNESNT SECRETARY



Government

The public is adviged that prices as shown in the Schedule for DIESEL O11 sold by FREEPORT O1L COMPANY

| MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING PRICE |

DAA TTL
DISTRIBUTORS

SE A

ACA A Bees uas



GN-1062

MAXIMUM RETAIL
SELLING PRICE PER |
- U5. GALLON

4

FREIGHT





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Travellers who are mem-
bers of the Priority Pass pro-
gramme will have an ele-
gant, relaxing way to spend
their airport time while
awaiting their departures to
the USA, the company
announced this week.

“It’s extremely exciting to
have become a part of the
Priority Pass programme,
and have a new destination
for members to enjoy,” said
Paolo Garzaroli, president
of Graycliff Cigar Compa-
ny, which owns the lounge.
“As a Priority Pass member
myself, I know the benefit
of membership, having
enjoyed the facilities at
many airports worldwide.”

The 1,200 square foot
lounge, which features both
smoking and non-smoking
areas, offers travellers a full
bar service, complimentary





Wi-Fi internet access and
flat-screen televisions to
keep up with the news or
their favourite sports.

A Graycliff Boutique sells
Graycliff cigars, cigarettes,
Graycliff coffee and choco-
lates and various gift items.

A state-of-the-art ventila-
tion system ensures the
cleanest atmosphere possi-
ble in the smoking room.

“We’re very pleased to
have this partnership with
Graycliff especially in Nas-
sau, Bahamas — a key loca-
tion in the Caribbean where
we have previously had no
lounge offering in our net-
work,” said Terry Evans,
president of Priority Pass.
“We look forward to this
new partnership extending
to other airport locations as
Graycliff grows their lounge
presence.”




THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 7

SOE ULC LTE :



i

hal

emt 7









EMPLOYEES of the fptiies and Kelly law firm were frustrated yesterday with the trash littering their downtown parking lot following the
Labour Day parade on Friday. Owners said their property is left in this state after every parade that passes Bay Street and they want some-

thing to be done about it in future.

AWU resident claims
workers ‘denied
right to be unionised’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Industrial
unrest is festering at a major
yacht repair facility in Grand
Bahama, a union leader
revealed.

McKinley Jones, president
of the Airport Workers Union
(AWU), is accusing Bradford
Marine of denying its workers
their constitutional right to be
unionised.

The AWU has met the nec-
essary criteria to be recognised
as the bargaining agent for the
workers but management
refuses to accept this fact, he
claimed.

The union says it is awaiting
the reaction of Minister of
Labour Dion Foulkes.

Workers on Grand Bahama
turned out in large numbers on
Friday to participate in the
annual Labour Day motorcade
and march, which culminated
with a Family Fun Day at
Taino Beach.

In a display of solidarity,
union leaders from the various
labour organisations locked
arms as they entered the beach
park shortly after noon.

Minister of Housing Ken-
neth Russell brought remarks
on behalf of Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes. Minister of State
for Finance Zhivargo Laing
spoke on behalf of the FNM
and Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell
spoke on behalf of the PLP.

Mr Jones, who also spoke,
claimed Bradford Marine is
using “stalling tactics” to delay
the unionisation of its workers.

“This is unacceptable. I put
Bradford Marine on notice that
failure to come to the bargain-
ing table on July 30 will result
in industrial action,” he said.

“We call on government to
perform the duties that they

Industrial unrest ‘festering |
at yacht repair facility’



were elected to and ensure that
Bahamians are not taken
advantage of by foreign
employers.

“We will march through the
streets of Grand Bahama and
New Providence to ensure that
workers at Bradford Marine
are given the same opportuni-
ties as other workers in this
country.”

Mr Jones said that the union
will seek the support of affili-
ates in the National Congress
of Trade Unions to bring local,
national and international
attention to the issue.

Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) area vice president
Quinton LaRhoda and Petrel
Russell, vice president of the
Nurses’ Union, also brought
remarks.

The BUT is expected to
soon present its contract pro-
posal to the government.

Mr LaRhoda said the union
understands the country is fac-
ing challenges and will work
with the government.

“We are coming to the table
with good faith and we want
you to meet our good faith with
good will because working
together, even in terrible times,
people can achieve great
things.

“We also want to indicate
that anything we forego now
in the time of hardship, we will
be seeking reward for in the
time of plenty,” he said.

Minister of Housing Ken-
neth Russell said the govern-
ment is working to improve the
labour laws of the country.

He reminded workers of the
need to compromise where
possible, keeping in mind the
current economic situation.

The government expects the
economy of Freeport to
improve when two major mul-
ti-million dollar projects by Sta-
toil and Vopak get underway.

“Statoil is out to bid and
Vopak will start putting plans
together before the end of the
summer,” Mr Russell said.

Zhivargo Laing stated that
the FNM government is com-
mitted to reducing the unem-
ployment rate in the Bahamas.

“The FNM has (had) the
opportunity in some times past
to generate so much work that
we have been able to see the
unemployment rate in this
country come down to levels
of 6.9 per cent which was
unheard of 30 years prior.

“I think that is our aim and
objective going forward — to be
able to try and promote and
encourage this economy’s
growth in such a way as to
bring us to a place again where
people who want to work can
find work and enjoy the digni-
ty of work,” he said.

Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell
said Labour Day is an impor-
tant national holiday.

He reminded those in atten-
dance about the Burma Road
Riots of June 1, 1942 and their
significance in terms of the
fight for equality for working
class Bahamians.

“It is great day for working
people. Our party reaffirms our
support and faith in the work-

DONATION TO RANFURLY HOME





Ce



THE Bahamasair Pilots Association made a donation
to the Ranfurly Home for Children on Saturday to
assist the care facility with its operational costs.

Pictured are (I-r) pilot Camron Pratt, trustee of the
Association; Olga Clarke, director of the Ranfurly
Home; president of the Pilots Association Emil Saun-

ders and Ramin Hepburn.

HOM Ee

THE
RANFURLY
FOR

fo
if



\ i

The Ranfurly Home provides shelter and a new life
for children who have been orphaned, abused, neglect-
ed or abandoned.

Presently there are 32 children between the ages of
five and 19, who have been placed there by the Depart-
ment of Social Services.

CHILDREN



ie

we

7
= 7
ae ae
“ee

S

k

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ing people and our connection
with the working man and
woman of this country, he said.

Governor-General appointed
— to Most Distinguished Order
of St. Michael and SL George

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES



GOVERNMENT House
announced Wednesday, June 2, that
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth IT has
conferred upon Governor-General
Sir Arthur Foulkes the award of
Knight Grand Cross of the Most Dis-
tinguished Order of Saint Michael
and Saint George, (GCMG).

The conferment is in recognition
of Sir Arthur’s appointment as Gov-
ernor-General of The Bahamas,
according to a release from Govern-
ment House.

The Most Distinguished Order of
Saint Michael and Saint George is [SPW amiiP een dss
the highest of three classes with
Knight Commander (KCMG) or Dame Commander
(DCMG) being the second highest and Companion (CMG)
third.

The Order is named in honour of two military saints, St.
Michael and St. George and was founded on April 28, 1818 by
George Prince Regent, later George IV of the United King-
dom.

The GCMG recognises individuals who have rendered
important services in relation to foreign or Commonwealth
affairs. People are recognised by appointment to the Order
rather than award of it.

Sir Arthur was elected to Parliament in 1967 and the fol-
lowing year appointed to serve in the Cabinet as Minister of
Communications then as Minister of Tourism.

He was one of the founders of the Free National Movement
in 1971, the now governing party of The Bahamas.

He was appointed to the Senate in 1972 and 1977, and re-
elected to the House of Assembly in 1982.

Sir Arthur was one of the four Opposition delegates to
The Bahamas Independence Constitution Conference in Lon-
don in 1972.

When the FNM was elected the governing party, Sir Arthur
entered the diplomatic service of The Bahamas as High Com-
missioner to the United Kingdom (resident in London) and
Ambassador to France, Germany, Italy, Belgium and the
European Union.

He represented The Bahamas to the Commonwealth in
London, and the African Caribbean Pacific Group in Brussels,
was Permanent Representative to the International Maritime
Organisation and also Doyen of the Caribbean diplomatic
corps in the United Kingdom. He founded Friends of The
Bahamas, a London-based association.

In 1999 Sir Arthur was appointed the first Bahamas Ambas-
sador to the People’s Republic of China and Ambassador to
the Republic of Cuba. He is a founding member of the Chi-
na-Bahamas Friendship Association.

In recognition of his service to the country, in 2001 he was
appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael
and St George, by Queen Elizabeth II.

From 2007 until 2010 he served as Director General of
Bahamas Information Services, the Government’s information
and news agency, and was designated to act as Deputy to the
Governor General on every occasion His Excellency was
absent from The Bahamas.

Sir Arthur was sworn in as the Bahamas’ eighth Bahami-
an Governor-General on May 14 this year.



Reporters News
and Sport

ANTED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
narratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers
who want to make a difference

at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We're the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we're on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience

e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour



Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet @tribunemedia.net
Or

drop in your applications at

our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,

Managing Editor, The Tribune.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas ails
to be ‘premier
destination’
for arbitration

FROM page one

were scheduled to be the
principal speakers at the
event. Although Dame
Joan spoke, Mr Delaney
did not speak as he is
presently out of the
country.

Bertha Cooper-
Rousseau, chairperson
of the newly formed
Bahamas Chapter, said
that the Bahamas
branch of the respected
body will “play a pivotal
role in the training of
professionals in the dis-
ciplines including archi-
tecture, accounting,
engineering, financial
services, medicine,
quantity surveying,
insurance, maritime and
the legal profession.”

The president of the
institute, Joe Behan was
in attendance at the
event, along with dele-
gates from throughout
the Caribbean.

In creating its own
Chapter of the CIARB
in the Caribbean, the
Bahamas joins
Trinidad and Tobago
and Barbados. In a
statement released
announcing the launch
of the Bahamas
branch, John Bassie, a
Jamaican attorney-at-
law and Chairperson of
the new Caribbean
branch of the CIARB,
welcomed the new
branches to the
Caribbean Branch.

“We look forward to
working with all mem-
bers of the institute to
improve alternative
dispute resolution in
the Caribbean region,
and in particular, arbi-
tration,” he said.

show pulled off air ‘after
criticism of budget cuts’

FROM page one

get cuts as it related to ZNS.

The pre-taped 30-minute
programme — which is host-
ed by ZNS senior reporter
Shenique Miller and is a dis-
cussion between journalists
from various media houses
— was supposed to feature a
debate this week about the
recent Budget Communica-
tion, with particular empha-
sis on the 50 per cent cut to
ZNS’ allocation.

With this reporter as a
scheduled guest along with
ZNS reporters Clint Wat-
son, Altovese Munnings,
and Joy FM DJ Kevin Har-
ris, the show was taped on
Thursday, June 3, at ZNS
headquarters on Collins
Avenue.

During the taping, the dis-
cussion focused primarily on
the budget cuts to BCB and
highlighted how the salaries

of 70 managers at ZNS were
consuming more than $5
million of the corporation’s
$8.2 million allocation.

The remaining 142 line-
staff at ZNS, it was said,
were paid out of the remain-
ing funds.

Following the taping,
ZNS was reportedly “all
abuzz” with word of what
had transpired during the
show, with many staff mem-
bers being urged to tune-in
to Monday’s show. Howev-
er, this show was abruptly
pulled without explanation.

When contacted by The
Tribune yesterday for the
reason behind this decision,
the Senior Deputy General
Manager of Radio and Tele-
vision Kaylessa Deveaux-
Isaacs said that the corpo-
ration has a system whereby
they are given a list of the
topics that would be dis-
cussed in advance of any

Alleged police station
escapee appears in court

FROM page one

On May 4, two prisoners who were standing trial in the
Supreme Court escaped from the Central Police Station. Renar-
do Bastian, 20, and Ricardo Knowles, 22, reportedly made
their escape from Central Police Station during a bathroom
break around 3am on Tuesday, May 4. Knowles died after
being shot as he attempted to evade police in the Kemp Road
area later that day. Bastian was apprehended a short time lat-
er at Potter's Cay dock. Bastian has been charged with escape.
Two police officers have also been charged with aiding in that

escape.

Days following the escape, Superintendent Ellsworth Moss,
who had been in charge of the Central Police station, was relo-
cated to police headquarters and replaced by Superintendent
Wayne Miller who formerly headed the Strategic Policy and
Planning branch at police headquarters.

All New 2010



Features:
“4 cylinder 1.8L * CD/Radio wimp3 Plug

* Automatic
“Fog Lights
*|mmobilizer

* Air Condition

* Power Package

" Air Bags, Seat Belts

3 Year Factory Warranty

ALMERA

il

SHIFT _the way you move \MSSAN,

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED — ®7H:srorrnancinwn

#289 Well Rood
PO. Bow Nhl Pe

t (2d2| Pd? 62d) 3998298

Thompson Blvd, « Oakes Field
t. 242.326.6377 f, 242.326.6315

e.sanpin @hotmail.com

LOMMONMWEALTH BARK.

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE INSURARKE
BIKERS & GENTS LTD.



taping.

According to Mrs
Deveaux-Isaacs, the topics
that were approved were
not the ones discussed dur-
ing the show.

However, in an e-mail
sent by a senior ZNS
employee on June 2 to the
reporters who would be
appearing for the taping,
“budget allocations and cut
backs” were clearly outlined
as one of the points to be
addressed, along with, “Rift
in Cabinet, Jehovah’s Wit-
ness and others (in) NIB
fraud, Time Magazine’s
‘crime’ article, and new
prison legislation.”

When The _ Tribune
attempted to gain clarifica-
tion on this point, Mrs
Deveaux-Isaacs said that
any further comment would
have to come from general
manager Edwin Light-
bourne’s office.

The remainder of the
exchange was as follows:

Mrs Deveaux-Isaacs: “Is
this something you are sup-
posedly going to print?”

Reporter: “Yes, it is.”

Mrs Deveaux-Isaacs:
“OK. I have no further
comments then.”

However, repeated
attempts to reach Mr Light-
bourne for his comments on
the matter were unsuccess-
ful up to press time last
night.

A senior journalist yes-
terday told The Tribune that
ZNS’ handling of this issue
is reminiscent of by-gone
days when censorship was
the “order of the day.”

“You cannot appear, in
this day and age, to be
restricting what can be said
about a public corporation
that only survives on the
goodwill and blessings of
the Bahamian people. We

Mare Se |

judge forces retrial

FROM page one

tial.



case is the connection of the learned judge with the law firm
which, at a material time, represented the appellant [Knowles]
in some matters which the appellant alleged were connected to
some of the charges in the information,” Dame Joan found.
“While it is clear that no allegation of actual bias was being
made against the learned judge, we asked ourselves whether a
reasonable person, with full knowledge of the relevant facts,
would have a doubt as to whether the learned judge was impar-

“In the circumstances, we were of the view that we were not
satisfied that a reasonable member of the public in the
Bahamas, with full knowledge of the facts as they appear to us,
would not have had a doubt about the objectivity of the learned
judge, so we allowed the appeal and ordered a re-trial, as there
was evidence on which a trial could be held.”

¢ SEE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FOR FULL STORY









have a right, not only as
journalists, but as citizens
of this country to ask the
tough questions and be free
to ask them without fear.
Censoring the public from
this information will not
make the problem go
away,” he said.

Future instalments of
Press Pass are expected to
be broadcast starting next
week.

Twenty-two KFC
employees put on

indefinite ‘leave’
FROM page one

pany saw a slow down in busi-
ness.

“Tf it was based on our per-
formance I could see them
doing it, but I know I’m a
good worker,” said former
employee Donnell Forbes.
She said she is hoping the
restaurant will provide pack-
ages for those who have been
forced out of their jobs.

Another worker said she
was worried how she will now
afford to feed her 10-week old
baby.

BHCAWU executives who
gathered with the workers
outside KFC Headquarters
yesterday vowed to fight for
their members.

“This administration will
not stand idly by and let our
members be taken advantage
of,” said Ricardo Hepburn of
the BHCAWU.

KFC is reportedly imple-
menting other strategies to try
to rein in costs at this time,
including adjustments to oper-
ating hours and shifts.





Ps



BP CONTRACT WORKERS, working out of Avenida 13 base, Pensacola Beach, Fla., tape up the bag of
tar-covered sand they scooped up this afternoon, along the shore, Monday, June 7, 2010.
AP Photo/The Miami Herald, Marice Cohn Band

Well cap captures more oil,
but outlook is gloomy

NEW ORLEANS

THE cap on the blown-out
well in the Gulf is capturing a
half-million gallons a day, or
anywhere from one-third to
three-quarters of the oil spew-
ing from the bottom of the
sea, officials said Monday.
But the hopeful report was
offset by a warning that the
farflung slick has broken up
into hundreds and even thou-
sands of patches of oil that
may inflict damage that could
persist for years, according to
Associated Press.

Coast Guard Adm. Thad
Allen, the government's point
man for the crisis, said the
breakup has complicated the
cleanup.

"Dealing with the oil spill
on the surface is going to go

on for a couple of months,”
he said at a briefing in Wash-
ington. But "long-term issues
of restoring the environment
and the habitats and stuff will
be years.”

Allen said the containment
cap that was installed late last
week is now collecting about
460,000 gallons of oil a day
out of the approximately
600,000 to 1.2 million gallons
believed to be spewing from
the well a mile underwater.
In a tweet, BP said it collected
316,722 gallons from midnight
to noon Monday.

The amount of oil captured
is being slowly ramped up as
more vents on the cap are
closed.

Crews are moving carefully
to avoid a dangerous pressure
buildup and to prevent the

formation of the icy crystals
that thwarted a previous
effort to contain the leak.

The captured oil is being
pumped to a ship on the sur-
face.

"I think it's going fairly
well," Allen said.

BP said it plans to replace
the cap — perhaps later this
month or early next month —
with a slightly bigger one that
will provide a tighter fit and
thus collect more oil. It will
also be designed to allow the
company to suspend the
cleanup and then resume it
quickly if a hurricane threat-
ens the Gulf later this season.
The new cap is still being
designed.

e SEE PAGE FIVE

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE PAGE 9

be



Antoan
Richardson
is proving



OF



t



TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010 | a big hit

INSIDE ¢ Baseball news





Dianne Miller,
the first female
chef tle mission
of national team









DIANNE MILLER

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SHE’S been on board as
the first female executive of
the Bahamas Olympic Com-
mittee since 2002. Now
Dianne Miller has been ele-
vated to another historic posi-
tion as the first female chef de
mission of a national team.

When the BOC, formerly
called the Bahamas Olympic
Association, send its 100-plus
team to the 21st Central
American and Caribbean
Games in Mayagtiez, Puerto
Rico, from July 17, 2010 to
August 1, Miller will head the
delegation, a position that she
gladly embraces.

“It’s exciting, having being
the assistant chef de mission
on two separate occasions,”
said Miller, who served in
2002 in Santo Domingo and
2006 in Cali, Columbia.

“T’m just happy to be able
to step up to the plate lead the
charge for women in sports.
It’s a great honor, not just for
me, but for all women.”

When the games are com-
pleted, Miller said it’s her
hope that she can return
home and sing the praises of
the athletes as they win more
medals than have ever been
achieved at the four-yearly
games. “We’re looking to
take a good team down, even
though we haven’t sanctioned
any yet,” stressed Miller, who
will be assisted by Algernon
Cargill with Roy Colebrooke
as the team manager.

“We're hoping that the
various federations will give
us their best so that we can go
to Puerto Rico and turn ina
very good performance.”

Miller publicly thanked
BOC’s president Wellington
Miller for promoting her after
she traveled as his assistant at
the 2006 CAC Games. She
also noted that she’s pleased
to have both Cargill and Cole-
brooke traveling to assist her
in their capacities, forming
what they call a very good
“management team.”

The Bahamas, according to
Wellington Miller, is expected
to be represented in some
eight different disciplines in
athletics (track and field),
aquatic (swimming), boxing,
tennis, judo, bowling, sailing
and cycling. This year’s team
is slightly smaller than the
200-plus team that represent-
ed the Bahamas at the last
CAC Games in 2006 in Carta-
gena. The difference this time
around is simply. The
Bahamas won’t be participat-
ing in any team sports because
none of them have qualified.

“Softball didn’t qualify, nor
did basketball or volleyball,”
said BOC’s secretary general
Rommel Knowles. “Baseball
is not playing up to par to
compete in any qualifying
tournament. So we will just
have the individual sports.”

Nevertheless, Wellington
Miller said they are expecting
the athletes to perform very
well in their individual events.

“This is a good testing
ground for our athletes,”
Wellington Miller pointed
out. “We expect for them to
perform well because this is
also a qualifier for the Com-
monwealth Games.”

The 19th Commonwealth
Games is set for October 3-14
in New Delhi, India. Roy
Colebrooke has been selected
as the chef de mission for the
Bahamian team that is expect-
ed to compete in aquatics,
athletics, boxing, cycling, rug-
by and tennis.



GOLF FEDERATION NATIONAL AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS

Dutier shoots
72 to stay top

Veteran Chris Harris just one shot behind
@ SCOREBOARD

* Here’s a look at the performances of the
golfers after the first three days of competition at
the Bahamas Golf Federation’s National Amateur
Championships:







Names Three-Day Scores Totals
Oren Butler 69-72-72 213
Chris Harris 72-69-73 214
Richard Gibson Jr. 74-67-76 217
Rashad Ferguson 67-76-79 222
Benjamin Davis Jr. 78-70-77 235

















Kyle King 75-75-78 228
George Swann 74-76-79 229
Steve Watson 74-77-78 229
Shane Gibson 76-76-77 229
Peter McIntosh 77-70-83 230
Matthew Cox 75-74-81 230
Nolan Johnson 74-71-86 231
rh Charlie Butler 85-68-81 234
a Edrick Poitier 81-74-80 235
ead Devaughn Robinson 77-80-78 235
“i George Turnquest 78-76-85 239
Oswald Moore 74-83-85 242
Zorro Stubbs 79-74-91 244 ie
he nei Craig Flowers 79-77-90 246
aa eos Kelsey Rolle 84-78-85 247
' me ; Harcourt Poitier 76-78-100 254
a KON nlm LO depen Wa Ph eo @ Tehama thins
; By BRENT STUBBS my drive tomorrow and see how it go.”
Senior Sports Reporter On the 13th hole at two-under-par,
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net Butler went into an unplayable line. He



opted to hit the ball from the point of
entry instead of taking the two club

REN Butler, one of the col- —_ length relief.
legiate players coming Butler went on to bogey the hole, but
home, turned in a two- hestill managed to finish ahead of Har-
over-par 72 to remain on ris and Richard Gibson Jr., the other
top of the Bahamas Golf Federation’s member of their threesome that came
National Amateur Golf Championships into yesterday’s competition tied at 141.
after three days of competition. While the tournament will determine
Butler, a 25-year-old senior at the the best amateur golfer in the country, it
University of South Carolina, holds a _ will also serve as the final trial for the five
slim one-shot lead over veteran Chris players who will represent the Bahamas
Harris from Grand Bahama as they head on the Hoerman Cup team at the
into the final day of competition today at Caribbean Amateur Golf Championships
the Lyford Cay Golf Club. in Barbados at the end of the month. i
Yesterday as the third day of compe- Butler finds himself sitting in a pretty
tition was staged at the Ocean Club on — good position to achieve both. Harris,
Paradise Island, after the first two days on the other hand, is only vying for the
on Saturday and Sunday were played at top spot. He has already secured his
the Cable Beach Golf Course, Butler berth on the CAGC team as a member



managed to work himself out ofajamto of the Mid-Amateur, teaming up with : i
| extend his total to 213 with Harris trailing © Shane Gibson. Sraz i
| at 214. They clinched their berth in Grand j oe
“It was shaky,” said Butler about his | Bahama over the Easter holiday week- = a









performance yesterday. “I got the ball
in the hole, but I have to straighten up SEE page 10





Sess)
; aaa rn sieiaes re
ee x







PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



SHANE GIBSON lines up a putt. He has shot scores of 76-76-77 for a total of 229.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

SPORTS
CENTRE

Antoan Richardson proving a big hit

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

of .421. He currently leads the team in
batting average and on base percent-

age.



Since his reintroduction to AA base-
ball in the MLB minor leagues late last
month, Antoan Richardson has been on
a tear at the plate with efficient hitting.

Richardson has impressed with his
play of late and has made his free agent
signing one of the most savvy signings by
the Mississippi Braves team this season.

In nine games since signing with the
Braves on May 27th, Richardson has hit
for a batting average of .364, 12 hits in 33

plate appearances.

Richardson has driven in two RBIs,
scored four runs, stolen a single base,
and has compiled an on base percentage

In his latest outing, a 6-3 loss to the
Montgomery Biscuits, RIchardson's
offense was in high gear early.

He drove in the game's opening score
and gave the Braves an early 1-0 lead on
an RBI single that scored Alejandro

Machado.

the win.

With a 4-0 advantage, Richardson
reached on an infield single and an error
allowed him to get second base.

Willie Cabrera then grounded to third

In a previous outing in a series open-
ing game against the Biscuits, Richard-
son scored the team’s final run of the
game late in the sixth inning to cement

stolen base.

and Richardson scored the run for a 5-0
lead. The Braves went on to win 5-2.
In his first outing with the team
against the Mobile BayBears, Richard-
son was immediately inserted into the
starting lineup and went 3-5 with one

Richardson loaded the bases late in
the ninth inning when he put a ground
ball in play to second and all runners
reached safely.

He set the stage for Cabrera who sin-
gled to right field and scored Juan Gon-
zalez, however the comeback attempt
ended there in the Braves' 8-4 loss.

In his second game, Richardson went
2-4, highlighted with his first RBI and
first run scored.

Again with late inning heroics,

Richardson hit a fly ball to left-center
field and was safe at second on a fielding
error and a pair of runners scored to tie
the game at six.

Cabrera doubled to score Richard-
son. In his previous stint in the AA

minors, Richardson spent two years with

the Connecticut Defenders.
In his first season with the Defenders
in 2008, Richardson hit .241 with five

home runs, 63 runs, 31 RBIs and 33

stolen bases in 123 games.

In 2009, he hit just .207 with six RBI
and six stolen bases and was released
by the Defenders in July.

The Mississippi Braves boast several
major league alumni to its credit, most
notably, Jeff Francoueur, who won a
Gold Glove Award in 2007.

Oren Butler shoots 72 to keep one shot ahead of Chris Harris

FROM page nine

end. So did the super senior
team of veteran Grand
Bahamians Vernon Wells and
Bobby Rose.

However, federation presi-
dent Jamers Gomez said they
will have to make a determina-

tion on who will travel on the
senior team as well as the
ladies.

Harris, who at age 47 is now
heading to his record 29th
CAGC appearance, said he was
pleased with his performance
so far, especially yesterday
against the youngsters when he





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00121
COMMON LAW & EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee NEWBOLD

AND
IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT Piece Parcel
or lot of Land Situate on Maxwell Lane bounded
North by Property of one Weir 96.51 feet, East
by property of one Lewis 51.53 feet, and again
by a loose stone wall 15.27 feet South, by
Maxwell Lane 107.58 feet, West by property
of one Johnson 75.53 feet, in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

NOTICE

The Petition of MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE
nee NEWBOLD, Retired, of Saunders Road off
Lightbourne Avenue situate in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas in respect of:

ALL THAT PIECE Parcel or lot of Land Situate
on Maxwell Lane bounded North by Property
of one Weir 96.51 feet, East by property of one
Lewis 51.53 feet, and again by loose stone
wall 15.27 feet South, by Maxwell Lane 107.58
feet, West by property of one Johnson 75.53
feet, in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, and is more particularly described
and delineated on the plan attached hereto
and is thereon coloured PINK.

MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee
NEWBOLD claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered fee simple estate in possession
of the said piece parcel or lot of land and made
application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section
Three (3) of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to
have her title to the said piece parcel or tract
of land investigated and the nature or extent
of it determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected
during the normal office hours at the following
places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joan Ferguson & Co.,
Avson House, Adelaide Village, New
Providence Bahamas.

(c) The Chambers of Newton R McDonald
& Co., Meeting Street, opposite St. John's
Baptist Church, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right of dower or any adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the said Petition
shall on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010 file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of
his claim on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010,
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 14th day of May, A.D. 2010

Joan Ferguson & Co
Chambers

Avson House

Adelaide Village

New Providence, Bahamas.

Attorneys for the Petitioner





shot a 73. “I’m playing very
well. I practised a lot. I trained
very hard for the tournament
and I can’t complain at all. I
right in the thick of things,” he
pointed out.

“These young guys are hit-
ting the ball 50 yards ahead of
me, but they are having hell
with me. I’m playing good
enough to bring in a good score
tomorrow (today). That’s my
goal.”

With a 76 yesterday, Richard
Gibson Jr. dropped three
strokes behind Harris at 217.
But the Florida Southern fresh-

man said he won’t complain
either.

“T got away with a lot of
stuff,” he said. “So I won’t com-
plain at all.”

As he look ahead to today’s
final round, Gibson Jr. said hie
just want to shoot as low as he
can and he know he will be in
contention.

Federation president James
Gomez said they have been
very pleased with the perfor-
mances, especially from the
number of yunior players who
have been participating in the
Nationals.

One important note at the
Nationals is that the players all
had to walk the entire 18-hole
course each day. however, an
exception was made for their
golf bags to be carried on carts
instead of the players taking
them on their backs.

Gomez said the idea is to
ensure that the regular players
making the Hoerman Cup team
are prepared for the journey
when they travel to Barbados
to compete.

Today’s final round at
Lyford Cay is scheduled to
begin at 1 p.m.



the Shorcholders ol

Bank) oe of December 31

Chur respeonsibality
ade We comdecned
thal we

whether

simply wit
bar reont~capreu lik
7 Sed Gece parce
cuieol ated aement of
ifthading the daemment ol
pesition, whethe
Pokeepart tn othe: Foemk's. prey

tt design sade per

SUE Gh OPC. om the

ramiigermastl, & cH a oe

PS neon

ASSETS
Cash ond due from banks

Re porches: agrocment
Loans and ad vars
Setilement halmess
Desivalive

Lier eer bs

OTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES
CUSLMTLETS’ de pais
Ler andl all
1 ee
Acct iiad iilineal payable
Den
Settlement balances
Oiher linbilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES
EOLATY
Share caqubal
Retained earn nips

TOTAL. EQMUTTY

Memornki um. accounts

20, 2010 and wothorized for

; VE i “



Vie oe Hine (hy secon

Slhical pequirenen:
ol) eee Of linn! POR

np procedures ke bain doadil et
linge! paostern. The

apipreprialctices ol acca e
ing Cie Pera

rh

Timon, the newer pebsies

mateo of the Flank ae of Drees ber

Wecrued interest rece Wahle
Acrued mands Geese lons Poor ab ke
Finangal investments held-bo-maturity

hnvesinsent on subeidiarpes

TOTAL LIABILITIES ANT EQUTTY

JAMES B. GOMEZ @ Co,

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

Piva Uiverseas Mank |amaiesl

aiclaberl size

7 aod a eury el ci eg Pe

rd! ir preseeiation of

Francil Reporting Sundands (“IHS
ay inter! cimirol mkvaar bo ihe poeparic

Wf financial px that i

pple NE Apo Aen, PAE

= CCS LSeS

Spe n opin oe this ni-ooneAidaled siete of finemcem! poe
oer audit in accombnee with let! Suimdands on Adin

ot abou

T due bo framed cr erect. [ni ink

Hn arel lair preec
ted ore if
Pores of F

pal bes

em we hove chisel & eelicion! aml appropri |

atomic of Cian ial pceeiticee

Can) anne Pe

iit id the anil Psion, Periormance ane ce

CHARTERED ACCC A TANTS

FIRST OVERSEAS BANK LIMITED
SON-CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POURS TIGR
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 205

Exerecesed in United States dinares

Financial aeoels. al Tar value through peo oF kee

nancial (ins Lrareenils

5

LIABILITIES ASD EOUP DY

ative financial instruments

id §

hee nodes in the non-consolidaled financial stalemendts.

These non-cocewlidated financial siemens. were appoowed on bell of ibe Board on January
aed aed capred on we behalf by:

Director

The complete financial statements of the Bank can be obtained at its registered office at Suite
E, SG Hambros Building, West Bay Street, or from its website at www.firstoverseasbank.com



af firme!) Smite Of Fira Ceseree Bank Loeniied ("th
bee Ei

this rane

id Plan ane peter the sucht
= [ree trom merc! missinignea

6 none: and dischosiees in the mp
teloctied dep
he nek= ol maigrul m or of Hee gap

reosis taety. op a meio
1), 2 i acoodance with IFRS

§ 135,70 200

MW other eoplaniory notes

miaciidsiol eialcmenl &
AS. Peper helaty
imal fi

> Erin imu 1a,
is; ond

Thies aadlirds neqiire

In obtain neasonable asurateo:

peevide o basis for cr

it. aan
Seary bo ohn &

cas Bank Linmined

i

1
1 oF

Po Dies

AMI §

fe ATS a2
6,187,226
1,452,760

S426, 7H3

4480) ] BS
Pr 24 64
444,015
1S 18 |
71490060
$1,693
75085
1,587

2 415,163
R211

| A 35 855

14S

1 q7T
7,415,163
SACS ES
1 O42 12

12S, 7H) DG 5B Ae

U1S5263 §
42 SSA
rl

7001 We -

fag tay Bo 23 Anos Aes

5.4] Pt515

97 04h, 72 |

1 S77 576
a

1e54
alk i !

OR 77h 540

10) Ooh Ot 1th
5 AGG 7 ROT 244

17 207 Sa4
£6 S38) AE

045 4S 04006 897





THE TRIBUNE

FE Cs
PITH a ORR O LA

aT



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

NEXT Saturday, the
renamed Bahamas
Olympic Committee is
expected to bring together
the largest mass of people
from all of their affiliated
sporting bodies to compete
in the Olympic Day Run.

It’s anticipated that
more than 700 people will
line up in Montagu Beach
at 6 a.m. to compete in the
worldwide event of the
Olympic Movement.

“Olympic Day is really
aimed at everyone, what-
ever their sporting ability,”
said BOC’s president
Wellington Miller at a
press conference yesterday
at the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture.

“We want everybody to
take part in this year’s fun
run and fun walk. It is
going to be an ‘Andros-
size’ event. This is an
opportunity for exercise
and for the fellowship of
coming out to walk or
run.”

BOC’s secretary general
Rommel Knowles said the
Olympic Day is celebrated
around the world in honor
of the organization of the
Olympic Games on June
23, 1894. “The Olympic
Day serves as a great
opportunity for everyone
to experience Olympic val-
ues and to live the Olympic
experience outside of game
times,” Knowles stressed.

This year’s event will
also take on a new route
from the previously held
run that started at the
Queen Elizabeth Sport
Center and end in Atlantis’
parking lot.

The six-mile run will
start from Fort Montagu
and travel west on Shirley
Street to Church Street,
over the new Paradise
Island bridge to the Golf
Course and back over the
old bridge to Montagu.

A three-mile walk will
leave Montagu Beach and
head west on Shirley
Street, north on Church
Street and east on East
Bay Street, ending up on
Montagu.

The registration is $15
for adults and $12 for chil-
dren 12-years and under.
Categories include 15-and-
under, 16-25, 26-35, 36-45,
46-59 and 60-and-over.

Participants will be eligi-
ble to win prizes, including
Bahamasair tickets, Bally’s
Gym memberships, Spa
certificates and many more
from other sponsors like
the Royal Bank of Canada,
National Insurance Board,
Doctor’s Hospital, Prime
Bahamas Limited, Nautilus
and Gatorade.

Persons can register at
the BOC’s office on Sol-
dier Road
north, tele-
phone 394-
8143 or
through the
Bahamas
Association
of Athletic
Associations’
office at the
entrance of
the Queen
Elizabeth
Sports Center, telephone
325-4433. Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard endorsed
the event. He also issued a
challenge to anyone in his
weight category who feel
they can beat him to com-
pete and if they are suc-
cessful, they will earn a
special prize.

Maya Nottage, the Mar-
keting and Public Rela-
tions Support Officer for
the Royal Bank of Canada,
said they are delighted to
be partnering with the
BOC in putting on this
year’s event. She noted
that while RBC has pride
itself on the physical wel-
fare of the Bahamian peo-
ple, don’t be surprise when
she show up dressed in her
short pants to compete.

Nottage encouraged as
many persons as possible
to come out and partici-
pate in the wholesome
sporting activity.



CHARLES
MAYNARD

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

wAmlON)O) N08

A feast of entertainment was on offer at the Culture
Explosion 2010 on Saturday. Among the attractions at John
F. Kennedy Drive were a Junkanoo Rush Out with choreo-
graphed dance, a fire dance and limbo. There was also a
Junkanoo Museum and Junkanoo Art Gallery and an art auc-
tion. The event was presented by the Valley Boys Junkanoo
Group and Kalik.


























FAMILY GUARDIAN zs,

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

Galendar contest

yeti Contest details listed on our Website

Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for
the company’s 2011 calendar will be “A Celebration of Nature”. Photographs may be of any Tg eel

subject (animate or inanimate), scene or histrocial structure that features a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas. entry | form

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 30, 2010. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk
and will not be returned.

Return this form with photos and CD to:

Calendar Contest

Family Guardian Corporate Centre
Village Road & East Bay Street, PO. Box SS-6232
Nassau, Bahamas





3 Allentries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and
East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00a.m and 5:00p.m weekdays only. Envelopes should
be marked “Calendar Contest”.

























4 Allentries must be accompanied by a signed and completed official entry form, available
at any Family Guardian office, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.
familyguardian.com).

5) Only colourimages will be considered. Images must be provided as digital files on CD. Digital
images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure

















the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality aa
G and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be Telephone: B H C

th colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints eMail

ail:

and photo location must be written on the reverse of the print. P.O. Box:

ies will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality Street:

iph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the ;

dian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Address:

The decision of the judges will be final. era:



0 will be presented for each of the photographs

oe oun in ie calendar. The number of entries per Number of Photos Entered (a maximum of 5):

Ali | agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as
a winner in the 2011 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the
property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all
rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos
entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have
not been previously published.











Signature Date



d without CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name,



NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE | FINANCIAL CENTRE | www.familyguardian.com

SPICY CHICKEN CRISP CHOWN WHOPPER JR DOUBLE BURGER W CHEESE RODEO BURGER 5 PC CHICKEN TENDERS

if



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

MURDER CASE FAST TRACKED TO SUPREME COURT

FROM page one

of police on February 25, 2009,
when they received a missing per-
sons report from the United States
Embassy in Nassau.

McKinney and the 17-year-old
girl appeared before Magistrate
Ancella Williams in Court 6, Par-
liament Street yesterday, where
prosecutor Darnell Dorsette pre-
sented a Voluntary Bill of Indict-

“tt feels good to choose a health plan
that takes care

99
and me.

Premiums have not been controlled by cutting

ment. The case against the
accused will now be fast-tracked
to the Supreme Court. McKin-
ney’s preliminary inquiry before
the magistrate began last Octo-
ber. His attorney Murrio Ducille
took issue with the Voluntary Bill
of Indictment, stating that the

Magistrate’s court is not the con-
duit to have the matter fast-
tracked without considering
whether there is a prima facie case
against his client. He said that his
reasoning was in keeping with the
function of the judiciary in making
a determination on the facts of

the case of every person brought
before the court. Ms Dorsette said
that Mr Ducille wanted the court
to take a course of action not in
line with the judiciary of the
Bahamas. She said that the Attor-
ney General’s Office was in com-
pliance with the required section

THE TRIBUNE

of the Criminal Procedure Code.
Magistrate Williams said that she
would continue with the prelimi-
nary inquiry.

McKinney and the 17-year-old
girl are expected to appear for
arraignment in the Supreme Court
on July 2.

| Maal (-lamecliae
of my business, my team

Health insurance premiums have continued to rise, so we



are all more sensitive to the levels of cover and service a

health plan provides.

Feeling good about choosing Premier Health for your
business, is knowing your employees receive more
service and cover for your premium dollar Premier
Health delivers state-of-the-art administration and claims
support to work for your business too. Less hassle on
service, care and price issues means more focus on doing

what you and your team do best.

Call 326-819 |
or visit www.cgigroup.bm

benefits and coverage for catastrophic illnesses



Premium increases have on average been lower

than the market rate

7a COLONIAL GROUP
j INTERNATIONAL

MEDICAL
ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box SS-5915, Nassau Tel. 326-819 |
Suite 5, Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, P.O. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.



2.
3.
4.

5.



Rote: only customers with 4587 top box can acess Billwiew and its Pectin
The Billview application provides inf
bo CUMOMeTSs On a OMEN tay is Cue

Cable Bahamas Ltd. Introduces

TAL) eae

ACCU aS le
A Ca Le MT KY



By following these easy steps you can now view your Cable Bahamas bill from your television!

Using your remote;-

1. enter the numbers 8-1-0 to qo to “Channel 810”

press “OK” to view your “Current Account Balance”

enter your “4 Digit Pin Number”

press the “Page up/Page down” buttons to scroll thru your purchases
and to view your “Total Balance Due”

press the “Channel +/Channel =" button on your remote to exit

> e
{ABLE BAHAMAS

wii cablebahamas.com

mation fram a daily date feed that is extracted maghth:. Therefore, the information presented
ntas of Billing system from the previous might’s tramsactions






TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TIGER BALLOON INC.

— 4,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TIGER BALLOON INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


















































facebook

THE TRIBUNE



SU

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a short, slow week of
trading in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in five
out of the 24 listed securities,
with three advancers, and the
other securities remaining
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 11,358 shares
changed hands last week, rep-
resenting a huge decline of
35,673 shares, compared to the
previous week's trading volume
of 47,031 shares.

¢ Colina Holdings (CHL)
was the volume leader and big
advancer, trading 9,200 shares
to see its stock close the week

ie

a Rae
CABLE BAHAMAS

www.cablebahamas.com

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity?

AVAILABLE POSITION:

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF COMPLIANCE

The Associate Director of Compliance will implement the compliance
strategy, ensuring acceptable levels of compliance and internal control

practices are maintained throughout the bank.

up $0.14 at $2.70.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB) fol-
lowe,d trading 1,090 shares and
closing up by $0.03 at $12.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

¢ Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) released
its unaudited financial results
for the quarter ending April 30,
2010.

DHS reported net income of
$976,000, a decrease of $1.3 mil-
lion or 58 per cent compared
to the $2.3 million reported dur-
ing the same period in 2009.

Total patient service rev-
enues of $10.4 million were also
down by $2 million or 16 per

cent from $12.4 million in the
comparative period, while total
expenses of $9.8 million
declined by $569,000 or 5.5 per
cent from $10.4 million.

Earnings per share for the
quarter stood at $0.10, repre-
senting a decrease of $0.13 or
57 per cent from $0.23 in 2009.

Total assets and liabilities
stood at $30.9 million and $2.9
million respectively, compared
to $30 million and $2.98 million
at DHS's year-end January 31,
2010.

Dividend Notes:

¢ Consolidated Water BDRs
(CWCB) has declared an ordi-
nary dividend of $0.015 per
share, payable on June 7, 2010,
to all ordinary shareholders of
record date May 1, 2010.

¢ Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corporation

(PRE) has declared a dividend
of $0.20 per share, payable on
July 5, 2010, to all sharehold-
ers of record date as at June 4,
2010.

AGM Notes:

— JS Johnson (JSJ) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel in the Governors
C Ball room, June 14, 2010, at
6pm.

— Cable Bahamas (CAB) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, June 15, 2010, at
6pm.

— Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) has
announced its AGM will be
held at Doctors Hospital - Con-
ference Room on Dowdeswell
Street on June 17, 2010, at
5.30pm.



CABLE, from page 1B

the company below the 25 per cent threshold to
ensure the FCC processed the deal faster, and
Anthony Butler, Cable Bahamas’ president and
chief executive, explained that the 22 per cent
threshold set in the proposed Articles amend-
ments was related to NIB’s equity stake in the
company.

Had Cable Bahamas ‘retired’ the 5,954,600
shares (30.2 per cent of its then-outstanding share
capital) purchased from Columbus Communi-
cations, the combined stakes held by NIB and the
Public Treasury would have increased from 20.2
per cent to 29.2 per cent.

This would have breached the 25 per cent
threshold and made speedy FCC approval of the
deal impossible, since given the Government’s
100 per cent ownership of the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC), Cable Bahamas
would have been transformed into a foreign car-
rier affiliate of BTC.

As a result, the Cable Shares Trust was creat-
ed to hold five million of those shares, or some
26.78 per cent of Cable Bahamas’ issued share
capital, with Dr Keva Bethel, the former Col-
lege of the Bahamas president, acting as trustee.
This has made the Cable Shares Trust the largest
shareholder in Cable Bahamas.

Mr Butler yesterday explained to Tribune
Business that the 22 per cent threshold had been
chosen because NIB’s stake would increase to
that level when the Cable Shares Trust eventually
terminated.

Recalling the history, Mr Butler said the com-
pany’s Articles were currently worded such that
no one investor, apart from Columbus Commu-
nications, BTC and the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC), could hold more than 5 per cent
of its issued ordinary shares.

Both BEC and BTC had taken 10 per cent
stake in Cable Bahamas at the outset, but since
then had sold these to other state-controlled enti-
ties. Some 75 per cent of these holdings had been

sold to NIB, hence its current 16.25 per cent
stake, with the Treasury receiving the remaining
25 per cent/

“We've still got this trust in place, and if and
when the trust disappears, NIB will go to 22 per
cent,” Mr Butler explained.

The maths was set out in Cable Bahamas’ cor-
respondence with the FCC, as a June 4, 2009,
letter from the company’s attorneys showed that
with the Cable Shares Trust, the Government’s
combined stake in the company would be 21.39
per cent. NIB’s share is 16.23 per cent, the letter
said, and the Public Treasury’s 5.16 per cent.

If the trust had not been created, NIB would
have been holding a 22.14 per cent stake, the
letter said.

Mr Butler told Tribune Business that the
amendments would “strengthen the Memoran-
dums and Articles for a public company”.

He added: “It’s looking at the Memorandum
and Articles, and bringing them up to whatever
the standard is in 2010.

“We think what we’re putting forward is real-
ly good for the company and shareholders, as
well as the future. We’re bringing ourselves into
line with whatever else is happening.”

The proposed amendments, which are to be
discussed and voted on by shareholders at next
week’s AGM, include expanding the Board to six
directors from the current five. Mr Butler himself
is being proposed as the additional director,
strengthening the link between management and
the Board.

Other proposals include ensuring the chair-
man is not part of Cable Bahamas’ management
team, and that at least four of the six directors are
independent.

Directors will also be rotated, it is proposed,
and serve a maximum three-year term. “It is
being proposed that directors are elected to serve
a three-year term and that at least two directors
must retire at an Annual General Meeting,” the
proxy statement said. “The object of this amend-
ment is to rotate the membership of the Board
while ensuring continuity.”

|BDO

BDO is a world wide network of public accounting firms,

called BDO

Member Firms. With more than 1,000 offices in over 100 countries, and
employing 46,000 people, BDO is the fifth largest such network in the world.

BDO’s Nassau office is now seeking applicants for assurance seniors/senior
accountants to work in the assurance and insolvencies departments. The
successful candidates will have a bachelor’s degree in accounting and a
CPA, ACCA, CA or any other qualification that is recognized by the Bahamas

Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Additionally, the candidates will have

3 years experience in auditing, and be able to work in a challenging team

driven environment.

Attention to detail is a must.

Individuals with the

above-mentioned qualifications should fax or email their resumés to:

info@ bdobahamas.com

Recruitment Manager

BDO Chartered Accountants & Advisors
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: 242-325-6592

Absolutely no phone calls please.Only the applicants with the above
mentioned qualifications will be contacted.

CAREER NT

ie

For further information on this and other
available positions, please visit our website:

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

ol LS
“a

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

ROO )/15)I NUON Milne
SOUNDS GOOD

TO RTI PTT ay Ie PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE











Scotiabank
unveils its
mobile
banking

SCOTIABANK is_ this
month introducing mobile
banking services for its Bahami-
an customers, allowing them to
perform banking functions
from web-enabled mobile
devices.

“We understand that
Bahamians rely on the conve-
nience of mobile devices to help
them manage their busy
lifestyles.

“Scotiabank customers have
asked for that convenience to
extend to banking services, and
that is exactly what we will be
delivering,” said Leah R Davis,
the bank’s senior manager for
marketing and public relations.

“Scotiabank has always prid-
ed itself on providing excellent
customer service in our branch-
es, over the phone and online.
With today’s announcement we
are extending our promise to
mobile devices.”

The bank said all mobile
banking transactions are secure
because Scotia Mobile Bank-
ing operates on the same
advanced security platform as
Scotia OnLine Banking.

“Mobile banking services will
allow our retail customers to
conveniently perform many
banking functions from their
mobile,” said Barry Malcom,
Scotiabank’s managing direc-
tor.

“Scotiabank customers with
web-enabled mobile devices are
going to gain time in their day
once they begin using Scotia-
bank’s mobile banking services
in June.”

DOCTORS, from 1B

eliminated its long-term debt
with Royal Bank of Canada.

The BISX-listed healthcare
provider confirmed in an e-mail
to Tribune Business that if it
had still been carrying that debt
on its balance sheet, it would
have incurred interest and prin-
cipal payments during the 2010
first quarter of $69,000 and
$236,000 respectively.

Total expenses were down
by $0.6 million or 5.5 per cent
year-over-year, aided by a 2.8
per cent or $0.2 million reduc-
tion in patient care expenses,
medical supplies and services,
and salaries and benefits. Bad
debt expense also fell by $0.37
million.

“With decreased activity we
have been able to capitalise and
secure decreases in overall
salaries. Similarly, savings are
being realised in medical sup-
plies,” Doctors Hospital said.

“We have worked on reduc-
ing receivables over the past
three years, and as we have not-
ed before it is due to a closer
working relationship with our
insurers, our information sys-
tem, and better up-front col-
lection for self-pay patients.”

As for its expansion plans,
Doctors Hospital told Tribune
Business it was currently assess-
ing the needed scope of growth,
and aimed to determine a
design by the 2011 fourth quar-
ter.

“We are at the early stage of
discussion with the knowledge
that to meet the increasing
demands of the Bahamian com-
munity we must expand. We
are presently conducting the
needs assessment to determine
the extent of expansion,” said
chief executive Charles Sealy

“We are hoping to commit
to a design by fourth quarter
so that we can determine the
relevant costs. I can safely
assure you that the expansion
will come with the need of addi-
tional staffing.”

Doctors Hospital also con-
firmed it was still in discussions
with two groups for the poten-
tial sale of its Blake Road-
based Western Medical Plaza
facility, telling this newspaper:
“To date we are unaware of
any local or foreign interest that
has all the necessary approvals
to move ahead.

“We continue to receive calls
of interest and conversations
are continuing with two groups
at this time. We presently have
three tenants at the facility.”

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE eliminated tariff on
aircraft parts came days too
late for Sky Bahamas, as its
scheduled maintenance in the
US had been booked for
weeks, but its head yesterday
said the move by the Govern-
ment was a step in the right
direction - though not enough
to stem rising costs.

Taxes

Captain Randy Butler said
that while the taxes associated
with airplane parts may have
gone away, civil aviation tax
increases have come into
force, some that many other
Bahamian private airlines say

“make no sense”.

Captain Butler said while
security costs associated with
baggage screening in domestic
terminals in Nassau and the
Family Islands increase, no
screening equipment is avail-
able or used, and “some
islands don’t have security”.

According to him, Civil Avi-
ation has increased the rent
for counter space in the air-
port terminals and are consid-
ering making the increases
retroactive.

He argued that while those
increases come into effect, not
much is being done to upgrade
and renovate those counters.

Captain Butler said while
there are other areas civil avi-
ation can raise taxes on, in
many instances airlines are
being charged for services they

are not receiving.

Besides being a strain on
the airlines, these taxes often
stagger the playing field for
local airlines that compete
against the Government-fund-
ed, unprofitable national flag
carrier, Bahamasair.

Reduction

“This (tariff reduction) was
one of the initiatives we were
fighting for and we are thank-
ful we got it,” said Captain
Butler.

However, Sky Bahamas will
not be able to use the tariff
decrease as the scheduled
maintenance of some of its
fleet at hangars in the US has
already been booked.

Captain Butler said Sky
Bahamas often sent its fleet





FRAUD, from 1B

judgment provided no details,
the conveyancings relate to
the Palms of Love Beach con-
dominium complex on West
Bay Street, with the compa-
ny being Nassau Industrial
Group Ltd.

Recording the grounds for
Knowles’ appeal, Dame Joan
said he “sought to have his
conviction overturned
because, it was alleged among
other things, that the trial
judge was perceived as being
biased against him because
the trial judge was a partner in
the law firm that initially rep-
resented [him] in several mat-
ters connected with some of
the alleged offences in this
case...

“The appellant’s main con-
cern was that for some time
prior to some of the incidents
alleged in the information, he
had been a client of the law
firm in which the learned
judge was a partner, although
he was not a client of the
learned judge himself.”

Although the judgment did
not identify the Supreme
Court justice involved, this
newspaper’s library showed
that it was then-Acting Jus-
tice Lockhart who handled
the trial and sentenced
Knowles. Presumably, the law
firm referred to was the for-
mer Lockhart & Munroe,
which no longer exists after
he and Wayne Munroe each

went their own separate ways.

Attorneys from the Attor-
ney General’s Office, who had
prosecuted Knowles, told the
Court of Appeal that Acting
Justice Lockhart had heard
Knowles’ application to
recuse himself in his cham-
bers, with the prosecution
asked to take notes. The judge
was also said to have given
reasons for deciding not to
recuse himself.

This did not cut much ice
with Dame Joan and her fel-
low justices of appeal, who
said none of this information
was placed before their court.
Jillian Williams, the prosecu-
tor, had asked for an adjourn-
ment so she could obtain the
information, but Dame Joan
said this request came too
late, especially since the
Attorney General’s Office
had known the issue formed
the basis of Knowles’ appeal.

“What is of concern in this
case is the connection of the
learned judge with the law
firm which, at a material time,
represented the appellant
[Knowles] in some matters
which the appellant alleged
were connected to some of
the charges in the informa-
tion,” Dame Joan found.

“While it is clear that no
allegation of actual bias was
being made against the
learned judge, we asked our-
selves whether a reasonable
person, with full knowledge
of the relevant facts, would

_fteres f ont tatlen (ri frietals

"MAY PEOPLE"

(Two One Act Plays)

Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts
Jtne Léth - 19th 2010 at 8:00 p.m. nightly
Tickets: $20.00

BENEFIT PERFORMANCE
Andrew Curry Music Education Foundation
Tuesday 15th June at 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $25.00 (includes after theatre reception)

BOA OFFICE: The Dundas,
Telephones 393-3 72839-7179
Opens Monday 7th June &:00 a.m. &00 p.m. daily
RESERVED TICKETS NOT COLLECTED BY
3000 PM. ON DAY OF PERFORMANCE
WILE BE SOnD

NOTICE

In The Estate WILLIAM LEO RUMNEY,
late of Water Street in the Town of Elizabethtown in
the Country of Essex in the States of New York, one
of the States of the United States of America.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the Undersigned on or before the 6th day of
July, 2010, after which date the Executirix will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having requard only to
the claims of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date hereinbe-

fore metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executrix

Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



have a doubt as to whether
the learned judge was impar-
tial.”

She added: “The issue was
further complicated by the
fact that the learned judge did
not deal with the application
for recusal in open court, and
did not have the official court
stenographer take the notes
of the hearing in chambers,
so we have no record of the
arguments for and against
recusal in relation to the appli-
cation that was presented
before him.

“In the circumstances, we
were of the view that we were
not satisfied that a reasonable
member of the public in the
Bahamas, with full knowledge
of the facts as they appear to
us, would not have had a
doubt about the objectivity of
the learned judge, so we
allowed the appeal and
ordered a re-trial, as there was
evidence on which a trial
could be held.

“There is a serious need for
the public aspect of the case to
be properly ventilated, as the
outcome could have far-reach-
ing effects on commerce in
the Bahamas.”

a
Cool response to aircraft
spare parts tariff end

to the US for heavy mainte-
nance because it was cheaper.
He said had he gotten news
that the tariff would be delet-
ed, his fleet could have been
worked on locally.

He added that it is his hope
the Government will sit down
with stakeholders in the indus-
try and listen to their concerns,
as it is becoming increasingly
expensive for local airlines to
operate.

COLINA, from 1B

equities market,

Net investment income rose
by more than $3 million, from
$5.301 million to $8.419 mil-
lion, helping to boost Colina
Holdings (Bahamas) total rev-
enues from $40.237 million to
$43.081 million.

Elsewhere, there was a
sharp 26.4 per cent spike in
general and administrative
costs to $7.679 million, com-
pared to $6.071 million the
year before, a rise that was
unexplained by Mr Hilts.

Yet he added: “Encourag-
ingly, reduced maturities and
surrenders have led to a
decrease in gross policyholder
benefits by $2.1 million to
$26.8 million compared to the
same period in the prior
year.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY LOUIS of P.O.
BOX GENERAL DELIVERY, Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1% day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
DAMISI LIMITED

N OTIC E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DAMISI LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 7th June, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Blue Seas
Administration Ltd., The Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 8th day of June, A. D. 2010

Blue Seas Administration Ltd.
Liquidator





NOTICE

TO SHAREHOLDERS OF

Doctors Hospital Health System

regarding

DIVIDEND DECLARATION

Whereas there are sufficient funds to provide a cash dividend

to the shareholders of Doctors Hospital Health System, and

Whereas the Directors have determined that after the

payment of such dividends the Company will be able to meet

all of its continuing obligations and provide adequate funds

for reinvestment in the business,

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors has

declared an extraordinary dividend of $0.02 per share

to be paid to shareholders of record on June 15, 2010.

The payment date shall be June 22, 2070,

* DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Ffeatch For fie



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






THE TRIBUNE

‘Suit your body’

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

r | Nhere are few areas where most
women go wrong when trying to find
a perfectly fitting swim suit.

1. They are not aware of their bodies

2. They go into stores with a trend in mind
that doesn’t suit their body type

3. They want a swim suit that camouflages
most of their undesirable areas

It’s fine if you can’t rock a monokini this
summer, which is one of the hottest trends in
swim wear presently but that doesn’t mean
you won’t be fashion forward if you settle for
a chic one piece or a sassy tankini.

To correct all the swimwear fashion
wrongs, Tribune Woman sat down with
Vivian Maroney, owner of Splashdance, to
discuss the perfect swimwear for your body
type.

“The majority of customers come in the
store wanting to wear a certain trend that
does not fit their the body type and this is not
a good idea,” she said. “We want to educate
the public on what suits to wear the actually
flatters their figure.”

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010
















1. Boy Shorts

“Woman usually come into the store say-
ing they want a swim suit that covers up their
thighs. They think boy shorts actually cover
up areas they don’t want to expose. The
truth is boy shorts don’t cover anything they
accentuate the thighs and make them look
broader than they actually might be,” Ms
Maroney explained. She said boy shorts are
for women who are tall and slim, and not a
good choice for someone who wants to look
smaller on the bottom.

2. One Piece

Women with a large bust must be careful
with their choice of swim wear. When select-
ing a suit, the heavy bust women should be
concerned with their breast being exposed in
the front and on the sides. “Therefore it is
important for them to purchase a suit that has
a supportive band in the front and on both
sides,” Ms Maroney said.

3. Crisscross one piece

Women that are heavy all over have a
number of suits to choose from. They can
stick to a simple one piece or if they want to
be a little sexier than can purchase one that
has a crisscross style in the front. This type of
swim suit is good for the voluptuous, curvy
women because it has a slimming effect.

“This suit is good for a woman who wants
to slim herself. The crisscross slenderises the
body and the body doesn’t look that heavy,”
she said.



4. Monokini

As mentioned before monokini are the
hottest trends in swim suit wear right now.
They are sexy, cute, and cut the torso into
perfect portions. Just because they are in
fashion magazines and are becoming more
and more popular every summer season
doesn’t mean anyone can wear it. If you opt
for a monokini your physique must be in tip
top shape. “Not every one can wear a
monokini. You must be the right height to
wear this. The connecting pieces of the swim
suit must lay flat against the torso and there
must not be a gap in between the connecting
pieces and the torso,” Ms Maroney said.

5. Halter Tankini, Bikini, or One piece

There are a variety of swim suit trends
that can suit a variety of body types. And
then again there are a number of trends that
some women should stay away from. A hal-
ter tankini, bikini, or one piece swim suit is
suitable for women who are small on top.
“Women who have small shoulders and a
small firm bust can wear a swim suit with a
deep plunge down the center,” Ms Maroney
said.

Those who are heavy busted with broad
shoulders should stir clear from this trend
because it is not flattering on heavier bodies
and the last thing a heavy chest woman want
is her “goodies” exposed.

Vivian Maroney has been in the business
for 30 years and said she strongly believes
women should feel comfortable and look
beautiful in their swim wear.









,_ ae
«
Cine Carbkeos Baby hargeode
Freahness Breame Buence Potpoard of Ploears
S : 3 Look for Festival in
r a ;
ae your favorite store.

tetbeecty: Bahu Wholesale Agemetes, East Weel Hay * bel: 242-004-1759 * faa: 249-354-1059 * emal: bwabahamaecoriberscom * Freeport: (Milion St * bet 242-051-221" * fax: 242-051-2295 * onal bwalpoecoralvint.com






THE TRIBUNE

Ne

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 5B



Gran
to spend
$1.5bn on

women’s
health

By ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security
Writer



WASHINGTON (AP)
— Philanthropist Melinda
Gates announced Monday
that the Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation will
spend $1.5 billion over five
years to support maternal
and child health projects
abroad.

Gates, whose husband
Bill is co-founder of
Microsoft Corp. and one
of the world's richest peo-
ple, made her announce-
ment at an international
conference on women's
health attended by UN
Secretary-General Ban Ki-
moon. The event was
billed as the largest-ever
conference on women's
health.

Gates said the world is
not lacking in know-how
to reduce the number of
deaths in childbirth.

"It's that we haven't
tried hard enough," she
said.

"Policymakers in both
rich and poor countries
have treated women and
children, quite frankly, as
if they matter less than
men,” Gates said. "They
have squandered opportu-
nities to improve the
health of women and
babies."

Ban said he senses a
new momentum among
governments, foundations,
businesses and humanitar-
ian groups for forging a
more comprehensive and
coordinated approach to
improving women's and
children's health.

"We are seeing a global
movement for an end to
the silent scandal of
women dying in child-
birth,” he said, according
to a text of his prepared
remarks. "We can stop
this, and we will."

Ban touted what he
called a joint action plan
to accelerate programs
designed to improve wom-
en's and children’s health.
The UN chief called on
government officials, busi-
ness executives, health
professionals and others
to submit ideas and pro-
posals before the action
plan is finalized in coming
months.

In her speech, Gates
said the greatest obstacle
to improving the health of
women and newborns is
not a disease or a logistical
challenge like keeping vac-
cines cold.

"This obstacle is a belief
— the belief that we just
have to accept the fact that
mothers and children die,"
she said, adding that the
world has the know-how
and capacity to save
women and children.

"Yet in many countries
the belief that death is
inevitable, and therefore
acceptable, hasn't yet
changed," she said. "We
don't have to tolerate
fatalism."

Gates said the $1.5 bil-
lion that the Gates Foun-
dation will invest through
2014 will support projects
addressing family plan-
ning, nutrition and health
care for pregnant women,
newborns and children.

A significant portion of
the new money will sup-
port programmes in India,
Ethiopia and other coun-
tries that have relatively
high rates of maternal and
child mortality, she said.



Home safety: In case of fire or
crime, things to keep in mind

By REUBEN SHEARER
Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

Things To Keep In Mind
(from the National Crime
Prevention Unit & Fire Ser-
vices)

e Ensure that both emer-
gency numbers, 911 and 919
are written down in the home,
for your child to refer to this
summer

¢ Lock all doors and secure
windows

e Tell your children not to
fool with matches, or to both-
er with the stove. Don’t leave
the iron unattended.

e Tell your children not to
tell strangers that they are
home alone.

e Teach your child direc-
tions to their home, and a
landmark central to where
they live that they can have
on hand if they must report
an incident by telephone

Important numbers to have
at you and your child’s dis-
posal in the home:

(These numbers are only to
be dialed in the event of an
emergency)

¢ 919 and 911

e Fire Control Room hot-
line: 322 1225

¢ The number(s) of your
neighbourhood police station

e Exchange numbers with
your neighbor, and inform



TELL YOUR CHILDREN not to play with matches and not to bother with the stove...



PART ONE

One whiff of these substances
can “knock you out,” said Mr
Moss.

And let’s just say that your
child stops breathing or for
any other reason finds him-
self unconscious, Mr Taylor
said knowledge of CPR could
save their lives if executed
correctly.

For the person who knows
CPR, the first thing to
remember is to keep calm.
Then you can proceed with
performing the resuscitating
technique, which can sustain
life to some degree or revive
the individual until help
arrives.

“When somebody stops
breathing, you want to plant
your mouth on the distressed
person, give them two quick
breaths, and thirty chest com-
pressions (you’re expected to
give 100 within a minute peri-
od),” said Mr Taylor.

“In the meantime, you will
want to call for help, and try
to get somebody like an EMS
person who can assist you
because you don’t know what
the person is experiencing at
the time.”

According to a child safety
brochure from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, toy
parts pose as choking hazards.
A rule of thumb is that any

your child of the information
in case your child, or babysit-
ter may have to contact them
for any reason.

ith school about
to close for the
summer more

children will be at home with
the potential to get into trou-
ble or have accidents.

To ease your worries, Tri-
bune Health spoke with police
to gather tips on how to
ensure your children have a
safe summer. They stress the
importance of your child
knowing how to call the
police in the event of an
emergency.

“We have cases where
young children may be home
with a parent or grandparents
and may have to call for
emergency attention,” said
Constable 3152 Taylor.
“They call in to report inci-

dences and are able to
because they were taught
important emergency infor-
mation.”

Constable 1404 Moss who
is herself the mother of a five
year said it is very important
that parents leave their chil-
dren in the care of a respon-
sible adult or teen at least 14
years old. Her daughter will
be attending a summer camp
this summer.

If you do leave your child at
home Ms Moss suggests going
home periodically and calling
several times through out the
day.

Fire safety is also extreme-
ly important Mr Taylor said.
“Working in the fire depart-
ment, we’re called to many
scenes where pots were left
unattended with children who
were left alone at home.”

In such cases, a smoke
detector can work to your

advantage he explained.
“That way, any fire activity
would be alerted in the home
through the smoke detector.
The ideal situation is to have
at least one working smoking
detector in the home. A lot of
people who died in fires did
not have a smoke detector
installed in their homes.”

“In general safety we try to
teach kids that the basic rules
in fire fighting and fire safety
is not to play with matches,”
said Mr Taylor. “Don’t even
touch them if you see them.”

If there is a fire, the most
useful thing is to keep in mind
is that everything else in the
home can be replaced except
for your life, Sargeant 952
Moss explains.

Sargeant Moss advises par-
ents to keep pots and pans
out of reach of their children;
its important for pot handles
to be turned inside the stove

so that your youngsters can-
not easily access them.

To lessen the event of any
fire caused by an unattended
stove he advises parents to
prepare a meal ahead of time
for children before leaving in
the mornings.

D Mr Taylor also warned
parents that basic household
cleaning supplies can also
pose a threat to children.

For example, mopping
buckets are a toddler’s dream.
“Kids are very much attracted
to water, so if they see a mop-
ping bucket, they may try to
climb into the bucket and top-
ple over into the water. And
depending on the water level,
the child can drown.”

Furthermore, cleaning
products like Ajax, Joy, and
bleach are a deadly and
potent mix by your child who
may not consider the proper
use of these cleaning agents.

part smaller than a paper roll,
can put your child at risk.

For children younger than
three years old, toys should
be smaller than 1 1/4 inches in
diameter or 2 1/4 inches long.
“Tt is imperative that you stow
toys meant for older children
out of reach from your baby
or toddler,” said Mr Taylor.

He suggests that parents
consider having their babysit-
ter learn CPR, even if it is
through the use of an instruc-
tional book. This life-pre-
serving technique can save a
child if they are choking, or
in some sort of distressed
state. Unfortunately, most
persons are clueless when it
comes to administering CPR.

Instructional classes are
available at Doctors Hospital
and the Red Cross. CPR class
will teach you the universal
signs of choking, Mr Taylor
said.





Summer heat and your feet!

IT IS quite a challenge to keep your
feet cool when walking around in
extremely hot weather. Therefore,
your feet need some special care and
attention during the summer months.
Heat and humidity will aid in the
growth of bacteria, so taking measures
to reduce these will help enormously.

During the summer, foot injuries
are also more prevalent - the increased
level of outdoor athletic activities also
increase the chances of muscle pain,
heel pain, shin splints, plantar fasciitis,
Morton’s neuroma, achilles tendini-
tis, hip pain/bursitis, runner’s knee,
illiotibial band syndrome(ITB) and
the list goes on.......

How do we deal with summer heat
and our feet?

Moisture Management:

The most important thing is to man-
age moisture in order to decrease the
risk of athlete’s foot and pronounced
foot odour. Excessive perspiration has
been seen as a significant contributor
to these conditions. In technical terms,
this excessive perspiration is known
as hyperridrosis-a rapid production of
sweat that cannot be evaporated as
fast as it is produced. When this hap-
pens, the shoe’s material becomes sat-
urated with moisture. In the perspi-





BERNADETTE D GIBSON

ration there is also bacterial waste.
You may ask what is this bacterial
waste? Perspiration is body “waste”
and has an abundance of bacteria. In
addition, it is believed that approxi-
mately 98 per cent of this perspira-
tion is moisture and 2 per cent is solids
— mostly acids and salts. These bacte-

ria thrive on moisture, warmth and
darkness — just like the bacteria that
causes toe fungus.

Solutions:

In terms of cleanliness and hygiene
habits, wash your feet daily and dry
thoroughly before putting on
footwear. Always, use a clean pair of
socks, preferably, specially-designed
cotton or synthetic perspiration wick-
ing fabric to get rid of foot odour. For
example, ‘Thorlos’ and ‘Balega’ brand
of cushioned socks are especially
designed to provide insulation and air
flow and wicks away moisture and
keep your foot from getting too hot.
Refrain from wearing yesterday’s gym
socks just because they smell clean.
One wear is enough to leave behind
sufficient foot perspiration for odour-
causing bacteria to thrive on. It will be
enough to leave feet stinky and dirty.
Footwear is another important factor.
When selecting shoes it is important to
avoid shoes or boots with non-breath-
able upper materials, especially closed-
type shoes or simply tight-fitting shoes.
For example, leather with its unique
internal structure of fibers and inter-
fiber air spaces, plus its surface pores,
has excellent breathing capacity.

2. Foot Pain and injury:

To alleviate such pain and avoid
further injury, consider custom

“As a reporter, [ respecte and

honour the people's right

to know, The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.

CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

Ama,

VAY Mites
i] ih
Vi \ ah ht

3) Vie ie

I
n

he

\

To report the news, call our
Newe Tips Line at 502-2359.

orthotics or inserts with proper arch
support for your foot type. Such items
can be purchased at specialty footwear
stores or pedorthic facilities. If you
want to continue running, walking or
remain active for many more years,
you need to ensure that there is
enough support between your foot
and flat and hard surfaces. Depending
on the activity to which you are doing,
you need to seek the appropriate
footwear and support for that pur-
pose. Avoid injury and pain by seek-
ing professional help to assist you with
the correct footwear and support
(orthotic) to not only support your
body and foot type but to adequately
off load the pressure presented by the
underlying terrain.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified and Licensed Pedorthist, is
the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a
health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper shoe
fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza,
Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of
the author and does not necessarily
represent those of Foot Solutions Incor-
porated or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please direct any
questions or comments to nassau@foot-
solutions.com or 327-FEET (3338).

The Tribune



Wy Vows. Wy Plowspeper!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



a =eeN

and diarrhoea

Pets: Vomitin

UNDOUBTEDLY there has nev-
er been a full day in most veterinary
practices where they have not had
one or more telephone calls regard-
ing vomiting and or diarrhoea in a
cat or dog.

Since most dogs and cats are not
very discriminating as to what they
might eat, and since many owners
feed their pets tidbits, leftovers,etc
that are unacceptable to the canine
and feline digestive tracts, it is easi-
ly understood why these problems
are so frequent in number.

Vomiting is the forcible expulsion
of the stomach’s contents up the ani-
mal’s throat and out of the mouth.
Dogs tend to vomit more readily
than almost all other animals.

Diarrhoea is the frequent passage
of soft or fluid stools. Diarrhoea is
not a disease, it is sign of illness, and
it is typical of a variety of health con-
ditions. Any change of bowel habits
that continues for more than twenty
four hours should be addressed by
the veterinarian.

In addition to some of the causes
mentioned earlier, very serious infec-
tious diseases such as the dreaded



PARVO and CORONO virus infec-
tion in dogs and the Distemper virus
in cats produce acute vomiting and
diarrhoea.

Intestinal parasites also can be
very irritating to the intestines, as
can be various foreign non food sub-
stances such as needles and thread,
whistles, pieces of bones , plastic,

fruit pits, flowers, weeds and a host
of others. And of course there are
organic dysfunctions and /or infec-
tions such as pancreatitis, prostatitis,
intussuception, [telescoping of one
section of bowel over another], and
tumors of one or more of the diges-
tive system organs.

Considering the number of causes
mentioned, and there are many
more, and considering the fact that
often we really do not know what
our pets have eaten you can realise
how difficult it is to arrive at an
instant diagnosis and cure.

It is also extremely important to
obtain from our clients in each case
a full and accurate history of the
problem. You should be observing
such symptoms as how long and how
frequent has he been vomiting and is
there blood in the vomitus?

Does he/she also have diarrhoea
and has he had it often? Is he up
and about and playful or is he lethar-
gic, weak and feverish?

In many instances we may simply
suggest Pepto-Bismol, ice cubes, a
bland diet and close observation.
Our old standby Pepto Bismol and

Kaopectate are still good home care
remedies and should be in your
home medicine cabinets at all times.

Since there is such a variety of
causes and conditions involving vom-
iting and diarrhoea, as veterinarians
we too must have a variety of
approaches to these problems. Many
times we can handle them by instruc-
tions and suggestions via the tele-
phone and others simply as an office
visit dispensing medication for treat-
ment at home.

However, there are some cases
that are much more serious and
require more sophisticated diagnos-
tic and treatment regiments such as
barium x- rays, laboratory blood pro-
files, cultures, hospitalization and
intravenous fluids.

Having read this article, surely you
can understand the wide spectrum
of causes and effects of diarrhoea
and vomiting in your pets. Conse-
quently, we urge you to seek early
help when this type of problem
occurs. We are as near as your tele-
phone. Call us and let us help you
decide how to treat the situation.
Your pets will love you for it!



Hooray for heticonias!

a

eliconias are amongst the
He stunning of all tropi-
cal plants and are very
rewarding to grow in large gardens.
Once a suitable area has been des-
ignated for heliconias they virtually
look after themselves, the larger ones
flowering in late spring and early
summer.

There are old world and new
world heliconias but in this article I
will refer only to new world varieties
as these are the ones that are readi-
ly available to us. The name comes
from Mount Helicon in Greece
where the muses held residence.

Heliconia leaves look like
bananas, gingers or cannas, accord-
ing to the variety. The largest heli-
conias are banana-leafed and can
grow to 50 feet.

The largest I have seen in The
Bahamas are Heliconia jaquinii and
these grow to 20 feet. Heliconias are
distinguished by their bract clusters
that may stand upright (lobster claw)
or hang down (pendent). These
bracts are usually red and yellow but
often have other coloured markings.

In the wild heliconias grow in trop-
ical rainforests wherever there is a
break to allow sun to penetrate. This
most often occurs on riverbanks in
tropical rainforest areas and gives
us a clue as where to plant heliconias
to best effect.

Heliconias can take quite a bit of
shade but this makes them grow tall
and deters flowering. For regular
seasonal flowering the plants should
receive over 60 per cent sunlight,
even higher being better. That said,
full sun is not as beneficial as a cer-
tain amount of shade, preferably
dappled is required.

Heliconias grow from rhizomes
that should be planted about six
inches deep in rich, fertile soil. The
planting hole should be kept open
and gradually filled as the suckers
develop. Heliconias are fast grow-
ers and a healthy clump can be
established within two years.

For a long time heliconias were
classed as bananas but now have
their own designation — Heliconi-
aceae. They are closely related to
bananas, of course, as well as gin-
gers, bird of paradise and travelers
palm.

In my garden I have three vari-
eties of heliconia — a lobster claw H.
jaquinii, a pendent H. rostrata, and
small Parrot’s Beak, H. psittacorum.
The lobster claw grows on the north-
west corner of my house and receives
some early light in the morning and
then few more full sun hours in the
afternoon and evening. In two years
the clump has become firmly estab-
lished without very much in the way
of fertilising or watering. When you
choose the right position, everything
else follows naturally.

I have my H. rostrata on the
northeast corner of the house and
that gets full sun until midday. The
H. psittacorum grows in planters on
the north side and these I will prob-
ably have to move as they are clear-
ly not getting enough sunlight.

The bracts hold the true flowers
within their cups and these flowers
are pollinated by hummingbirds. It is
very difficult to grow heliconias from
seed but this is of little moment to
most home gardeners because heli-
conias propagate very readily from a
spreading underground rhizome net-
work. Suckers come up, just as with
bananas. Once the plants have flow-
ered they should be cut away at



THE BRACTS of the Heliconia
ristrata (here) are pendent and
hang down from the parent
En aoe

BOTTOM - These lobster-claw
heliconias (Heliconia jaquinii)
are two years old from rhizomes
planted in 2008...



ground level as they only flower once
then die.

There are recipes that call for
wrapping portions of food in banana
leaves and placing them on coals or
a barbecue.



Banana leaves in the windy
Bahamas are often in tatters before
they can be used for culinary pur-
poses. I always figured heliconia
leaves should be a good substitute
but I had to research long and hard



before confirming that — yes — heli-
conia leaves are good substitutes for
banana leaves. They resist the wind
far better than banana leaves and
are somewhat thicker.
gardenerjack@corlwave.com



Study: Radiation
hoosts prostate
cancer survival

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer



CHICAGO (AP) — Doctors
are reporting a key advance in
treating men with cancer that has
started to spread beyond the
prostate: survival is significantly
better if radiation is added to stan-
dard hormone treatments.

Results of the study were given
Sunday at a cancer conference,
where other research showed that
an experimental drug boosted sur-
vival for women with very
advanced breast cancer. The drug
is being reviewed by the federal
Food and Drug Administration.

The prostate study has the
potential to change care right
away. About 20 per cent of the
nearly 200,000 men diagnosed with
the disease each year in the Unit-
ed States are like those in the
study — with cancer that has
spread to the area around the
prostate.

"It is this group of patients in
whom many of the deaths from
prostate cancer occur,” because
the condition is usually incurable,
said study leader Dr Padraig
Warde, a radiation expert from
the University of Toronto's
Princess Margaret Hospital.

These men are treated with
drugs that block testosterone, a
hormone that helps prostate can-
cer grow. Only about half also get
radiation because of concerns
about urinary problems it can
cause. Even though these treat-
ments have been used for decades,
few studies have been done to
establish their value alone or in
combination.

The new study assigned 1,200
men to get hormones plus radia-
tion or hormones alone. After sev-
en years, 74 per cent of men
receiving both treatments were
alive versus 66 percent of the oth-
ers. Those on both treatments
lived an average of six months
longer than those given just hor-
mones.

Serious side effects occurred in
less than two per cent of men in
either group. The study was spon-
sored by the National Cancer
Institute of Canada.

The results show that "radiation
is an indispensable element in the
treatment of patients with high-
risk prostate cancer," said Dr Jen-
nifer Obel, a cancer specialist at
Northshore University Health Sys-
tem in suburban Chicago who had
no role in the study.

Dr Otis Brawley, the American
Cancer Society's chief medical offi-
cer, praised the survival advantage
but said he wished it were larger.

"It's a practice-changing study in
certain countries,” especially in
Europe, where more men are
diagnosed with locally advanced
tumors than in the United States,
he said.

In the US, about 192,280 new
cases of prostate cancer were diag-
nosed last year, and it claimed
27,360 lives.

The breast cancer study tested
eribulin, a drug derived from a sea
sponge. Unlike Herceptin and oth-
er gene-targeted drugs that have
been the focus of cancer research
for the past decade, this one is a
chemotherapy — a drug that kills
cancer cells, in this case by attack-
ing cell division in a novel way.

The study tested it in 762
women whose cancer had either
recurred after initial treatment or
had spread beyond the breast. All
were getting worse despite having
tried an average of four previous
drugs.

Two-thirds were given eribulin,
and the others received whatever
treatment their doctors wanted to
try, since there is no standard of
care in this situation.

Median survival was just over
13 months for those on eribulin
versus less than 11 months for the
others, said study leader Dr
Christopher Twelves, of St James's
Institute of Oncology in Leeds,
England.

About half of the women on
eribulin had typical chemotherapy
side effects — fatigue, low white
blood cell counts, loss of hair,
numbness and tingling in differ-
ent parts of the body. About one-
fourth of women in each group
had serious side effects related to
their treatments.

The study was sponsored by
Japan-based Eisai Inc., which last
week received a promise of quick
review from the FDA. A company
spokesman said no price has yet
been set for the drug.

"There aren't many drugs that
show a survival advantage in this
setting,” and the amount of bene-
fit seen in this study gives eribulin
"a reasonable chance" of being
approved, said Dr Eric Winer,
breast cancer chief at the Dana-
Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

More than one million women
worldwide are diagnosed with
breast cancer each year. In the
United States last year, there were
an estimated 194,280 new cases
and 40,610 deaths from the dis-
ease.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010, PAGE 7B





‘Immobilised leaders’

manager recently exclaimed in a
Atsion “Leadership theory is

fallacious!” Based on her experi-
ence, it seems to be impossible to be a leader
in her organisation which she characterised
as dishonest, abusive and highly controlling.
From her perspective, her attempts at being
an effective leader are futile because demon-
strating leadership competencies is not val-
ued or even possible.

I thought about this indictment and my
response was that leadership theory can be
applied when your office culture is a healthy
one, characterised by integrity, effective
communication and trust. Otherwise your
environment can lead you down the path to
immobility.

Toxic Environments that Immobilise

After my conversation I started thinking
about the different types of environments
that can slow down or completely immo-
bilise leaders, causing ineffectiveness:

Centralised Authority: In these organisa-
tions, authority is centralised with one per-
son or among a chosen few. This can occur
in family businesses, companies with interna-
tional headquarters, or where there is an
autocratic executive or business owner who
controls everything that happens within the
organisation because they don’t trust their
employees. In cases like these, managers sel-
dom have any decision making authority or
opportunities to contribute so they are
forced to wait until a decision is made and
communicated.

Deliberate Withholding: Some bureaucrat-
ic environments require layers and layers of
authorisation and some senior players in this
process use their signing authority as a pow-
er tool that can cause managers to miss
deadlines or delay important projects.

There are other executives who intentionally
withhold information in order to frustrate
targeted managers, attempting to show them
who is in charge. Unfortunately, these strate-
gies are short-sighted as they decelerate the
progress of not only the targeted managers;
they negatively affect the withholders and
the results of the entire team.

Bullying: There are some environments
where bullies are allowed to thrive. Harass-

ment by bullies
includes behav-
iours like ignoring
employees, with-
holding informa-
tion, and profanity.
Whether bullying
exists at executive
or entry levels,
middle managers
can become immo-
bilised by the fear
of the perpetual
threat of an aggres-
sive encounter.
When there is a
bully boss, man-
agers are usually
unwilling or unable
to do anything
without the boss’ consent because they pre-
fer not to be exposed to the threat of attack
so the probability of delays is high.

Indecision: Indecision can occur when a
manager tends to overanalyse. They are
unable to efficiently and effectively distill
information and make a decision. Some-
times this is based on fear, and at other times
it is based on a predisposition to perfection-
ism. Indecision can also occur when there is
incompetence. Incompetent managers are
either ill equipped to manage their authority
and make a decision or they are paralyzed
by the fear of making another mistake.

Disorganisation: Some leaders are immo-
bilised by a lack of organization. They don’t
have an effective system of follow up, nor do
they have a filing system that allows them to
locate files. They are unresponsive to e-mails
and voice mails so assigned work falls
through the cracks with these executives and
business owners and this impacts managers
who wait interminably for feedback before
taking action.

Dishonesty: If executives and business
owners are dishonest, it is uncommon for
them to involve front-line managers in their
exploitative activities. As a result, deceitful
leaders conceal information for fear of
unwanted publicity. Consequently, their
front line managers are immobilised either
because there is a lack of relevant informa-



“By taking the path of patience, it is
important to develop your survival skills.
Alternatively, if you are frustrated by the
lack of productivity and your attempts to
influence change are unsuccessful, you
can always exercise your choice to find

a new employer that mobilises leaders
and supports employee development.”
— Yvette Bethel

tion or because the managers may be the
ones forced to deal with the consequences.

Whether or not a middle manager is com-
petent, they can be rendered entirely useless
in undermining, toxic environments. There
are others who are immobilised purely
because they lack the competencies to keep
work flowing. No matter the reason for
immobility, immobilised managers have far
reaching effects on the business like
turnover, compromised results, personality
conflicts and absenteeism.

The Link Between

Immobility and Culture

Author Gabrielle O’Donovan asserts,
“Corporate culture evolves during workers’
and leaders’ learning and development at
company start-up stage, and over time will
be shaped by influences in the internal and
external environment. Thus, corporate cul-
ture is created by a company's founders and
is shaped by leaders and employees. As new
staff join, they imbibe the culture of the
company, but at the same time bring in their
own values and attitudes that also influence
and change the corporate culture.”

O’Donovan goes on to say that, “Corpo-
rate culture is leader-led and facilitated. This
means it can be controlled, changed and
managed to ensure it is healthy and works
for the success of a company.” With this in
mind, it is apparent that corporate culture
appears to be influenced by many sources
but despite this, it is shaped by leaders. So

in order to migrate from an immobilised
state to a productive one, changes need to
start at the top.

What to do if you are immobilised

Some immobilized managers attempt to
rely heavily on strategies like avoidance,
accommodation and compromise which are
low on the assertiveness scale.

In toxic environments, these leadership
styles become a necessity for survival and
are probably undergirded by a toxic emo-
tion: fear.

Unfortunately, if fear is your motivation,
employees perceive these behaviours as
powerless, undermined or weak because
they are rendered voiceless because you are.

In reality managers take the less assertive
route because demonstrating more assertive
styles can lead to behaviours like bullying or
exclusion.

So what do you do? If you are one of the
leader architects of the culture of your orga-
nization you may decide that change needs
to happen. If change is needed, you can
commit to personal change and growth. You
can also set up a system of accountability for
the desired behaviours.

If you are not in a position to influence the
culture of your organization and you feel
immobilised by the environment, you may
decide to take your chances and be patient.
If you make this decision, you understand
there are no guarantees because the situa-
tion is what it is and in some circumstances,
the probability that positive change can be
motivated is low.

By taking the path of patience, it is impor-
tant to develop your survival skills. Alterna-
tively, if you are frustrated by the lack of
productivity and your attempts to influence
change are unsuccessful, you can always
exercise your choice to find a new employer
that mobilises leaders and supports employ-
ee development.

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational
Soul, an HR Consulting and Leadership
Development company. If you are interested
in exploring how you can create higher per-
forming team leaders, you contact her at
www.orgsoul.com


























INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
i (BAHAMAS) LIMITED LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS BROKERS & AGENTS
ee esa lg
o|1|2/3|4|5|6|7
2 LOW MUCIRAE
- Partly su ie: 4 =! We Kametieaings Ly ikea
- pp tg 7 muads ceva Te isi Lenin pce fie ink a 1 i i a
i Lowe 1) ; ie ; High: es Hilieghn: 7" ah
Me i = a 1 High: 7 Low: a Low: 5" Low: 7 Tioes FoR Wassau
TAMPA, Lew ¥ Tee ar eae High HEIN) Lew LPL
Le TS" BMG an a —— a patil, 7 ‘xi att = as —= = . Today 4am. $2 Witham. a
z . = 7 1120 gin 14
% I oe A Weetrencbyy i 5 a
i i z a Wes ms
= rs ee cl ae Sialisiios ars for hase Meaegs Zp S hondins Tharsdy 5 1-254
y a WV ABACO A Temperaios: E
r - ; High: Or” Fy” r a 7
q _ et 14 bn C Lona TE" FS E rg z a
= sa @ WEST PALM BEACH ~_ i y Saterday 25 iam 4
% poe ave ee i 2a t4pn a
. Lose 7a" F244" ey i. Suneiy Etdaur
‘ FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ‘ ziorch hd 2pm ds
ih ot High BFE High og" Rec P ca = Masaay 2 kan
ail = Lise: Fa" Fy" C C Lana: 7S" 24" tl — 2 256 pn 1.4
. ed AccuWeather. com
Â¥ = wun et Fomecasta abd geaphics poo RT BLL
—— « a. ee HASSAU High: S1" Frag" Aveamieather. tes . w Sunrise E19 9m Moore Tom
i, oa . High: 907 Faz" Loree BO" Fae" Sarcke! fam Miamne 125 6
Â¥ Rar fun
KEY WEST - a a = i :
i Fi CAT ISLAND
High: Ber Faz" ic ee at eights Frc ee @ er D
Leer 6" eT" G - th i Low: 77" FS" C
= oF ye «i b - jon. 20 dom 19 dn. 2B
— oe es a i SAN SALVADOR
=. VY soGREATEXUMA 7 High BS" FZ"
” iy 3-4 keane High: 907 Foca" C Looe: Ta" Fae" G
—— Low 75" Fee"
Saipan is dotky'S weather. Tem pecoiere:: are fore: : :
—_ al <1
? LONG ISLAND ¥
eae eer tae mtg ee as
+ & et Law: 7" Freer C
t Cape Hatteras ns MAYAGUANA
a5 Charlotte © Highs: 81"Fr2rc Shown ig : ecay's & eG
Highs: 85°Fes°c waather Tamperahires P
Atlanta * > oe Be eee CROOKED 1 /ACKLINS
Highs: 80° Fra2°C . Highs: 90°FS2°C = are bodes highs an Hiphe 1" FC
: x aoe tonight's inws Lowa: 7" F265"
Pensacola Savannah Ss aes ——a— y
Highs: 82°R/33"C Highs: 90° F/a2°C =e = oe Se a (>
a0 , Daytona Beach te an —
Highs: S6° RSC sa A meer A
Tarnpa - Freepoct » » 2 -
Highs: 93°R/34"C_- i a
a = 5 + 4 rk = % 4 We a_i. W
Plier a a a Hassan ss a Ao ber 4-8 boo oe:
25 Hig Highs: so°Frazc * So oe teh = -
eS
Havana a = EAA .
Highs: 80°FIS2°C "s « - Marine FORECAST
Sa ntiage Ge Caulbes RES WIStEI LIT? BAAPER TEMPS.
. Highs: 86°F20°C Pex Pri AmACO Toeks 1-3 Poet TMi ies BT
20 Cozumel * Hi eat seer San Juan Mecinesdie” 5 oa Ps DM ies Ba" F
Highs: 91°Faa°C i «Highs: Bg" Fra" ema a =
= = Santa AniausA i SLA to nr
* Belize Kingston | Bamin mvt : ; Merino oF
areal : ae eo Highs: &7°F 15 Wier eck_E eh
Highs: SB°F 31°C Highs: BE°F a1” i i} Highs: 86°F/S0°C = _ a ‘ as" F
* I .- ELEUTSERA ~ a 1) ah wT
15 po SO22""" 3 partecton Dials Be
* hy iy hy Aruba Curacao Highs? 86°F 0CC «4 a a no FREEPOET es BE :
Managua = Highs: 81°Faac £% kkk & ek & & i be
* Migtts 0 \F2az"C The tts sissiseies . a
ah fein es ha Tobago = & & > i GEEAT AGUA BE" F
= = = < - * + 7 a a. Ea" F
|| Limore = 5 sa ee oe Carec & ea bghss Ba Fac LOA Lalo Bf
= re a = BcAt E % a HS me
Haan, 6 2Fyap i. . & Petia City . Highs: rg ec aie ae MAYA BULAN Ha E
tthe ee eet + + +Hghe: BERS chee ee ee ee ee ee sess gen i i= F
teh ehh le cae he ene “£kntkaitt & 4 St kt ett te 2 I Besa BE" fF
SRR Be RBRER RRR EEE ee BBR EER EE SERB BEE . mr F
yo : & & ty ly ty ty hy ly * oe & = & Ty ty |, ly i i Jy semen & : —
Sees oe oe oe ed oe eae ed 75 ae | ae eds Bites Ss oe es a SAN SADR Mowirat Sch a
Warm Criri Soricnry Bae Rain Trion Flarriss Sree ie BBGGED Lam [rel EE F
i . 4-a4 . - = = = a - Aarine DL EE" EF






























INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM