Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 5



Parents claim students jets in Grant Satan
‘unjustifiably expelled’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



CONTROVERSY has again hit the
Bimini All-Age School, with parents
claiming several students were unjus-
tifiably expelled just before their final
exams.

The Ministry of Education is looking
into the allegations, but a representa-
tive said no expulsions had been
authorised for the school. Parents said
this supports their suspicion that the
school did not follow proper protocol.

Education Director Lionel Sands
said: “The authority to expel a stu-
dent does not lie with the school. If
there is a request for expulsion it is
conveyed to the district superinten-
dent, then to me, and then it is passed
on to the minister for his considera-
tion. No such request has come to me
or the minister.

He added: “Nothing has come to me
officially and that is the challenge. Par-
ents are willing to go to the press with

Allegations of expulsions
just before final exams



their complaints, but I can only address
things when I know they are happen-
ing and I find out when everyone else
finds out - which is unfortunate
because we should be able to do these
things.”

An email purporting to have been
sent by concerned parents claimed two
grade 11 students and one grade 10
student were expelled without suffi-
cient reason.

It read: “These students are being
expelled from the school either with-
out proper procedure or were forced
to take a transfer to (a costly private
school). Some of these poor children
cannot afford to pay the fees and thus
have no other choices than quitting

education.”

The school came under the spotlight
earlier this month when an email from
the same account asked the media to
investigate why several students were
unable to take extended papers for
two BGCSE exams.

The problem turned out to be an
administrative miscommunication and
was resolved after The Tribune’s
inquiry.

The parents say they suspect that
some school officials who were found
to be at fault in the examination mix-
up might have now become vindictive.

Attempts to speak to senior officials
at the school were unsuccessful up to
press time yesterday.

OOS ORC OTe ee TOT





AS COMMONWEALTH
BANK celebrates its 50th
anniversary, the Bahamian
bank demonstrated its com-
mitment to protecting the her-
itage and environment of the
Bahamas by announcing a
major donation to the
Bahamas National Trust.

“Building our community
has always been a major pri-
ority for the bank, and studies
have shown how a positive
environment reflects on the
attitudes of the people, not to
mention protecting the beau-
ty of the Bahamas, which is
the attraction for so many of
our visitors,” said William

CE com

HUMAN ESS,



PICTURED FROM LEFT TO
RIGHT: Vice-president of inter-
nal audits Carole Strachan;
Commonwealth Bank’s presi-
dent and CEO, William B Sands
Jr; Eric Carey, executive direc-
tor, Bahamas National Trust;
and bank vice president and
ClO, Charles Knowles.

the Bahamas approved the
expansion of the Fowl Cays
National Park in Abaco, the
existing West Side National
Park in Andros, as well as the
valuable reef system which
surrounds the Conception
Island National Park. The
bank’s donation will assist

: By DENISE MAYCOCK
: Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

: housing remains high in Grand
: Bahama, according to Minister of
: Housing Kenneth Russell, who
: indicated that many requests have
: come in for government houses,
: especially in the Heritage Subdi-
: vision.

: also looking at moving up into the
: Heritage area where we have
: about 60 to 70 teachers and other
: civil servants looking for houses

Sands Jr, president and CEO
of Commonwealth Bank.

“Thus, the partnership we
are continuing today with the
Bahamas National Trust will
have a positive and lasting
impact on the environment
and will result in initiatives
that seek to improve the
health and quality of life for
Bahamians and tourists
alike.”

Since 1959, the Bahamas
National Trust has made vital

contributions to the manage-
ment and protection of the
country’s natural resources,
lands, parks and marine life.
In its 50 years, the Trust has
successfully created and pre-
served a national conserva-
tion strategy for the Bahamas
and is the only non-govern-
mental organisation in the
world with the responsibility
for managing the national
park system of a country.
“The Bahamas National

Trust is exceedingly grateful
to corporate citizens like
Commonwealth Bank which
recognise the importance of
protecting and sustaining our
environment,” said Eric
Carey, executive director,
BNT. “The Trust plays a sig-
nificant role in the protection
of marine and land ecosys-
tems in the Bahamas. In
October 2009, during our 50th
Anniversary Gala Ball cele-
bration, the government of

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greatly in supporting the
Trust’s ongoing conservation
efforts.”



FREEPORT - The demand for

“People are still coming forth
to purchase houses and we are

KENNETH RUSSELL



up in that area,” he said.
During a press conference at

FNM Headquarters on Saturday, Minister Russell gave
: an update on the housing project underway at Hawks-
: bill.

He said the project there is progressing well and

nearing completion, with 40 houses already finished
: and occupied.

He noted that an additional 10 houses are expected to

be built to complete the first phase.

The second phase will consist of another 40 houses, he
said.
The subdivision is expected to be officially opened in

another two months. It will be named Wellington Pin-
: der Heights in honour of the late Rev Dr Wellington
: Pinder, who past away in April.

Rev Pinder was considered one of Grand Bahama’s

: most influential leaders, having served as moderator for
: the Zion churches for 30 years, pastor of Upper Zion for
: 35 years, as a member of the local board of Works for
: 29 years, member of the Independence Committee,
: honorary president of the Grand Bahama Christian
: Council, and most worthy officer in the Grand United
: Order of Odd-fellows Lodge.

He was also a Justice of the Peace and a recipient of

the Queen’s Badge of Honour.

Minister Russell noted that the subdivision was sup-

posed to have been opened already, but problems
; delayed completion.

“We ran into some financial and contractor prob-

: lems and we are...more or less conducting some micro-
: management of some of the contractors so that we can
: finish,” he explained.

The subdivision at Hawksbill was initially intended for

the relocation of residents in Pinder’s Point, Mack
: Town, Hunters, and Lewis Yard following the devas-
: tation caused by Hurricane Wilma in those areas.

However, many of the residents there have had prob-

lems meeting the loan qualification at the Bahamas
: Mortgage Corporation.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

American and Bahamian
soldiers remembered in
Memorial Day ceremony

By LINDSAY THOMPSON



THE Bahamas joined the United
States in remembering the fallen sol-
diers who gave their lives for both
countries in war during a Memorial
Day Service on Monday.

The ceremony was held at the his-
toric Clifton Memorial at the western
shoreline of New Providence, where 10
men of Patrol Squadron 23 died on
May 7, 1954, while on a mission
designed to improve US defences
against enemy submarine attacks.

Sir Arthur Hanna, Governor Gen-
eral of the Bahamas, and Nicole
Avant, US Ambassador to the
Bahamas, brought remarks, which
underscored the importance of the day
to both countries.

“On this observation of Memorial
Day, the United States of America
remembers the valiant American men
and women who gave their lives in the
defence of their country and its allies
around the world,” Sir Arthur said.

“The achievement and defence of
the independence, territorial integrity
and freedom of a nation sometimes
demands a high cost and great sacri-
fice.”

The US, he said, is fortunate that
many of its sons and daughters have
always been prepared to pay that cost
and to make that sacrifice.

Hence, it is fitting that the day is set
aside to honour, commemorate and
give thanks for their sacrifice, he said.

“It is also fitting that the Govern-
ment and people of the Bahamas
should join with our American friends
in this observance since our two coun-
tries are allies and good neighbours
to each other.”

Sir Arthur said that in the struggle to
save humanity from the Nazis and fas-
cists in the last century, the Bahamas,
though still a colony, “gladly served” as
a base and training ground for Amer-
ica and Great Britain.

US and Bahamas
explore Underground
Railroad history

“A number of Bahamians and
Americans of Bahamian descent have
served in the armed forces of the Unit-
ed States and some have also made
the supreme sacrifice. We are proud to
include them in this memorialisation,”
he said.

Sir Arthur recalled that Bahamian-
born Private First Class Norman Dar-
ling of the US Army Field Artillery
Regiment in Baghdad, Iraq, was killed
in a bomb attack on April 29, 2004.
He was 29 years old.

“T know that the Bahamian people
join me today as I salute him, the
Americans who perished at this place,
and all those who have made the
supreme sacrifice,” Sir Arthur said.

Ambassador Avant said Memorial
Day is always a special day for Amer-
icans, but that it means more during
times when their country is at war.

She noted that she brought remarks
on a beautiful island nation known for
its beaches and tranquillity.

Beaches

“We both realised that on this day,
the beaches of our country attract mil-
lions of families who gather to cele-
brate the beginning of summer and
most importantly, they come together
in remembrance and appreciation of
the men and women of our armed
forces who lost their lives - many on
beaches around the world,” the ambas-
sador said.

Such sites were Omaha Beach in
Normandy to Guadalcanal and the
island battles throughout the pacific
theatre.

“The Bahamas belongs to a great
alliance, a union committed to democ-
racy, individual liberties and the rule of
law.

“During World War II, the
Bahamas served as an important air
and sea way-station in the Atlantic
and essential flight training and anti-





- a St oon | a r F FA te
GUN SALUTE by the Commando Squadron of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force during the US Memorial Day Ceremony at
the Clifton Memorial on Monday, May 31.





submarine operations were conduct-
ed,” the ambassador said.

She thanked the Bahamas for work-
ing together with the US to ensure the
safety and security of its citizens.

“Together we work on strategic pro-
grammes that protect our mutual eco-
nomic and national security interests,”
she said.

Ambassador Avant thanked the
American soldiers who died at Clifton,
and those buried at Arlington Nation-
al Cemetery in the US, who lost their
lives in war and in the line of duty.
She also encouraged their families to
continue to honour the memories of
their loved ones.

At the Clifton Memorial ceremony,
family members of the fallen heroes
paid tribute, and Patrol Squadron 23
survivor Chief Petty Officer David
Brillhart recalled the tragedy and paid
homage to his fallen comrades.

Two wreaths were released into the
ocean — one by Petty Officer Trevor
Glasgow of the United States Coast

Guard and the other by SFC Sh ; :
West. ame See Ae ater SIR ARTHUR FOULKES, Governor General of the Bahamas, brings remarks during

the Royal Bahamas Defence Force P- the US Memorial Day Ceremony for the 10 men of Patrol Squadron 23. The cere-
42. mony was held at the Clifton Memorial on Monday, May 31.







THE United States
Embassy in the Bahamas
and the Ministries of
Tourism, and Youth, Sports
and Culture sponsored an
Underground Railroad
Conference this month to
explore the history of
escaped slaves who settled
in the Bahamas in the 19th
century after fleeing the
US.

Held at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort from May 17-
20, the conference brought
together guests from the
Florida Senate, National
Park Service and colleges
and universities in the US.

The meeting was kicked
off with a cultural ceremony
on the opening night where
guests were treated to per-
formances by the CCDN
dancers, Belcanto singers,
Bahamas National Dance
School, National School
Drummers, RBDF Pop
Band and the Boy’s Choir.
The ceremony closed with a
grand junkanoo finale.

Minister of Youth Sports
and Culture Charles May-
nard impressed upon the
audience the importance of
preserving and recognising
this important history.

US Embassy Political and
Economic Counsellor Jeff
Dubel said: “We hope that



RITA PRATT, conference coordinator, makes presentations to Jeff

with this conference we will
further solidify the excellent
relationship our nations
share as we work to com-
memorate the history of the
Underground Railroad.”

On day two, participants
enjoyed a day of lectures by
noted Bahamian historians
and programme managers
from the National Park Ser-
vice Network to Freedom
Programme.

School children from
across New Providence were
told about the complex his-
tory of the Underground
Railroad connection with
the Bahamas, which was
illustrated by the experts
with pictures and docu-
ments.

Participants were then
invited to tour the sites con-
nected with this history on
New Providence and
Andros.

These site visits included
guided tours of Delancey
Town, Gambier Village,
Clifton Park and Red Bays,
Andros.

All the participants agreed
on the great potential for the
Underground Railroad to
serve as a catalyst for his-
toric education, preservation
and heritage tourism
between the US and the
Bahamas.

Dubel, Political/Economic Chief in the US Embassy, and Senator
Anthony C Hill, 1st District, Florida Senate.





Sep et aT ve = = . = ae are ee STs oo Sie

=

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD CONFERENCE delegates were taken on a tour of the Clifton Heritage Site on May 18. The participants included Senator
Anthony C Hill, 1st District, Florida Senate; Barbara Tagger, US Department of Interior National Park Service; Senator Jacinta Higgs, chairperson of the
Clifton Heritage Authority; Gladys Johnson-Sands, Bahamas Consul General, Miami, Florida; Dianne Miller, US Department of Interior National Park Ser-
vice; Rita Pratt, conference coordinator, former Speaker of the House of Assembly Italia Johnson and Wendy Rejan, Political Officer, US Embassy.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD.

has an immediate vacancy for three

Premier Banking Bankers

Applicants must hold the following:

Bachelor's Degree in Administration, Finance, Economics or related degree
A minimum of 3 years experience in private banking

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

Totally fluent in English and Spanish

Develop and manage a portfolio of private banking clients by analyzing the banking and
investment needs of corporate and high-net worth individuals and offering financial and
Investment alternatives.

Maintain existing client relationships by monitoring the financial condition of assigned
accounts, executing cliant instructions, and Keeping clients updated as to the changing
conditions of financial markets,

Travel to assigned countries to enhance current client relationships and develop new
business by meeting with representatives and clients.

Supervise a Private Banking Assistant.

Ensure that all private banking activities are in compliance with internal policies

and procedures and external regulatory requirements.

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed to the Human
Resources Manager. P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than June 10, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

Spo

WEDNESDAY, JUNE

PAGE 9



eG a eG aan

St. Augustine’s College
oraduate in record-
breaking form in
400m hurdles

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was such a historic per-
formance for Michelle Cum-
berbatch that she wasn’t even
quite aware of her achievement
at the NCAA Division II Out-
door Track and Field Champi-
onships.

“The feeling that I had
about my performance can not
be explained,” said the Lincoln
University freshman. “Coming
out on top as the champion is
such a wonderful feeling and a
great achievement for me.”

The St. Augustine’s College
graduate was referring to her
victory in the women’s 400
metres hurdles. She ran 56.85
seconds to erase both the meet
and the Bahamian national
records in the process.

“T know that I was going to
do well, but I didn’t know that I
was going to run such a won-
derful time,” she said. “I’ve
been running 59 seconds in the
hurdles all season and to drop
to 56 in a matter of weeks is
unreal.”

Shattered

The time shattered the meet
record of 58.18 that was posted
by Lynnsey Dailey of Fort Val-
ley State in 2006 and he
eclipsed the national record of
58.71 established by Carmel
Major of Boise State in 1986.

“After I had crossed the fin-
ish line in the race, the
announcer had said something
about me setting anew NCAA
record. But at that moment I
was so tired and worn out that I
was not focused,” Cumberbatch
said.

“About 20 seconds later
when I caught my breath, that’s
when it dawned on me. I was
ecstatic and filled with so much
joy. I felt as though I was on
cloud nine.”

As for the national record,
Cumberbatch said she wasbn’t
aware of it until her coach at
SAC, Dianne Woodside,
emailed her congratulating her
on her feat.

“Thefeeling of knowing that

Ssoorts

OTES

TENNIS
LUNN AT USTA TOURNEY



JUSTIN Lunn, seeded
number three, defeated Ste-
fan Cooper of Texas 6-4, 6-2
in the second round of the
USTA Tennis Tournament in
Florida over the weekend.

Lunn was defeated by
Gino Meeuwsen of Pembroke
Pines, Florida 7-6 (3), 6-2 in
the round of 16.

Lunn will compete in the
Coral Springs Open Men's
Designated tournament this
weekend.

TENNIS
GATORADE OPEN NATIONALS

THE Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association will continue its
Gatorade National Open Ten-
nis Tournament at the Nation-
al Tennis Center today at 4 p.m.

The organisers are playing
double matches today.

On Thursday, the remain-
ing of the men’s singles match-
es will be played.

The finals in both the men
and ladies singles as well as the
doubles are scheduled to be
played over the weekend.

TENNIS
‘DOUBLE THE LOVE’ TOURNEY

THE Bahamas Lawn Ten-
nis Association will be hold-
ing its ‘Double the Love’ Ten-
nis Tournament at the
National Tennis Tournament
beginning on Saturday, June
19

SEE page ten









RECORD-BREAKER: Michelle Cumberbatch

NCAA DIVISION 11 OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Thad achieved such a feat after © Caribbean Championships in

















m@ BERMUDA: ICC PEPSI DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM WORLD CRICKET LEAGUE

balamas crasi

to fourth deteat

c” Undefeated Canada win by 10 wickets

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



he struggles continue in Division I

for the Bahamas in the Interna-

tional Cricket Council's Pepsi

Development Program World
Cricket League.

The Bahamas dropped its fourth consecutive
game of the tournament in Bermuda when they
fell to the Canada yesterday by 10 wickets.

The Bahamas won the toss, elected to bat first
and in turn posted 98 runs in 36.5 overs.

The undefeated Canadian team easily sur-
passed with 101 runs in just 8.5 overs in response.

Naraendra Ekanayake was the leading scorer
for the Bahamas with 31 runs not out, while Greg
Taylor and Dwight Weakly each added 17 runs.

In Monday's match the Bahamas lost to the
United States by a total of 115 runs.

The USA won the toss, elected to bat first and
scored 307 runs with 8 wickets in 50 overs.

The Bahamas in their turn at bat scored 192
runs with 10 wickets in 47.4 overs.

Rohan Parks netted a team high 39 runs,J
ohnathan Barry finished with 37, Greg Taylor
added 33 and Marc Taylor chipped in with 31.

Ekanayake and Weakley took 2 wickets apiece.

The Bahamas lost to Bermuda in the opening
match last weekend as the host country won by
seven wickets in 28.1 overs.

Only two Bahamian batsmen reached double
figures, Ekanayake with 58 runs, and Weakley
with 28 runs.

In match two, the Bahamas fell by 111 runs to
the Cayman Islands.

Weakley, Ekanayake and Barry each took two
wickets in the loss.

Six

The tournament features six teams taking part:
Argentina, the Bahamas, host Bermuda, Canada,
Cayman Islands and defending champion the
United States, competing for the top spot and will
have both 50-over and Twenty20 matches.

Bermuda and Canada remain undefeated thus
far at 4-0, the United States stands at 2-2, the
Cayman Islands and Argentina are both 1-3 while
the Bahamas remains the tournaments only win-
less team at 0-4.

Following today's rest day, the Bahamas will
end 50-overs play against Argentina tomorrow.

The Twenty20 schedule begins June 4 when the
Bahamas is set to face the Cayman Islands and
the final pool match is set for the following day
against the host country Bermuda.

Playoff rounds begin on June 6.

Reporters News
and Sport

years of training and struggling
to get to where I am is amaz-
ing,” she said. “Although I have
done so well this past weekend,
I still have miles to go before I
get to my desired goal. That’s to
compete for my country on the
Olympic scene.”

Before she get there, Cum-
berbatch have a couple of inter-

July and the Commonwealth
Games in India in October.

“T didn’t not know that I
qualified for both of those
events. Knowing now that I did
is every good for me,” she said.
“But I may be in school during
the Commonwealth Games.

“Tf all goes as planned, I will
be able to make both events

national meets to look forward
to after qualifying for both the
Central American and

COB Summer Camp offers
something a little different

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SEE page ten



IF you’re looking for something a
little different for your child or chil-
dren to participate in this year, then
the College of the Bahamas second
annual Summer Camp is the event.

Camp director Sean ‘Bass’ Bastian
said they are offering an unique set up
with the focus on basketball, swim-
ming, track and field and soccer over
the four weeks from June 28 to July
23 between the hours of 9 a.m. to 2
p-m. “This camp is a little different
from the other camps in that the head
coaches of our various disciplines will
head the disciplines, except for swim-
ming,” Bastian said. “We don’t offer
swimming as a discipline at COB just yet.”

SEAN BASTIAN

Instructors

Instructors for the camp are Brio Stuart will serve as the head
instructor for swimming. Vandkye Bethel will head soccer, Edward
Clarke in track and field and Kirk Basden in basketball.

“It’s a little different in that we have these four disciplines that
we are offering,” said Bastian, who serves the head men’s basket-
ball coach, but will be working along with Basden, his assistant
coach. While from Monday to Thursday the campers will go
through the various drills and funadamentals of each of the sport,
Bastian said on Fridays they will go on a field trip to the Adastra
Gardens & Zoo, Mario’s Bowling & Entertainment Palace, Gal-
leria Cinema and a Fire and Prevention and Safety Presentation by
the Royal Bahamas Police Force’s Fire Department.

“Last year, we had in total about 65 campers but this year we
expect more because of what happened and the calibre of camp
that we are offering,” he said.

“This is the place to be. I’m sure that at the end of the four
weeks, the campers will all be very skilled in the four disciplines that
we are offering.”

For those persons interested in participating, the cost of the
camp will be $180, which will include a camp t-shirt. Interested per-
sons are urged to contact Bastian at 302-4591 or email sbast-
ian@cob.edu.bs for further information.

“This is the second year that we are hosting the camp and we are
really looking forward to the camp growing bigger and better
than it was the first year,” Bastian said. “So make sure that your
children get involved. It’s going to be a lot of fun.”



AN TED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
narratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers
who want to make a difference
at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We’re the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we’re on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience
e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour

Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet@tribunemedia.net
Or
drop in your applications at
our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,
Managing Editor, The Tribune.



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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Swift wins 3 medals at US

Master swimming nationals

Swift Swimming took three swimmers to the 40th Anniversary
of the US National Masters Swimming Championships at the
Georgia Tech University Olympic pool.

Percy Knowles came away with 3 medals in the 75-79 age
group while Andy and Nancy Knowles improved on their entry
times moving up in the rankings.

Percy won medals in the 50yd and 100yd breast and the
100yd free. He won a bronze in the 100yd breaststroke in
1:58.12, a Sth place medal in the 50yd breaststroke in 50.56, and
a 8th place medal in the 100yd free in 1:48.01.

Andy finished with a 14th place in the 500yd free in 5:41.06,
a 17th place in the 200yd Free in 2:04.19, and a 21st place in the
100yd free in 56.02.

Nancy finished with a 23rd place in 5Oyd fly in 37.57, a 28th
place in the 100yd free in 1:16.27.

The meet saw some 2,000 swimmers competing representing
all age groups from 18 to 90 years of age.

There were swimmers of all sizes and shapes, some from
Olympic background and some having just learnt to swim.

People fighting different health issues while experiencing
the sheer joy of swimming and meeting once again with friends.
It was the last time that the full body racing suits were worn with
FINA banning them at the beginning of the year and now the
US Masters Swimming following suit (pun intended).

I predict that some of the records set at this meet will last for
40 years. Swift now looks to the World Masters Swimming
Championships in Sweden in July and August.







IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(IN LIQUIDATION)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Official Liquidator of Clico
(Bahamas) Limited (In Liquidation), Mr. Craig A. (Tony)
Gomez, will convene a meeting of all Creditors of the
Company on Monday the 21st day of June A.D., 2010
at 11:00 o'clock in the forenoon at the Eritish Colonial
Hilton Nassau, Windsor Roam, No. 1 Bay Street, Nassau
Bahamas. The agenda for the meeting is as follows:

1. For the Official Liquidator to determine whether a
Creditors Committee should be established,

2. Ifitis agreed that a Creditors Committee be
constituted then the Official Liquidator will receive
nominations from the Creditors present and/or their
representatives for persons to be appointed to the
Creditors Committee.

3, The Official Liquidator will also provide an update on
the progress of the Liquidation,

Dated this 31st day of May A.D,, 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez

(Official Liquidator)

—— £010
FORD EXPLORER KIT

AI Irae Shnerican Joon

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lm CARTIE CO AND CHAMCEM BOATS 6TH ANNUAL GILBEY’S ALL TACKLE FISHING TOURNAMENT

Calm seas ... rough fishing!

Three days of fishing wound up at the
Cartie Co and Chamcem Boats 6th Annu-
al Gilbey’s All Tackle Fishing Tournament
at the Flying Fish Marina in Clarence
Town, Long Island on Saturday, with 5
boats entering no weight at all! The weath-
er was as near to perfect as it can get, but
the full moon (or so the anglers claimed)
wrecked havoc with the fishing. This tour-
nament normally sees weights close to 800
Ibs over the three days; this year top weight
was only 305lbs brought in by the D’Fish N
Sea Captained by Robert Wells, winning his
boat a whopping $9,500.00 cash. In sec-
ond place for the Greatest Combined
Weight Over the Three Day Period was
the Sunseeker with 221 lbs followed by
193lbs for local Long Island vessel Derelict.

In the Longest Fish category, Sunseeker
Captained by Brent Fox sealed the deal
on the second day with his 62” Wahoo that
won the grand prize of $9,500.00 cash. In
second place with a 55 ?” Wahoo was 2
Little 2 Late, Captained by Jason Edler,
and in third place was the D’Fish N Sea
with 542”.

A total of 11 boats competed this year,
with 42 anglers and 2 junior anglers; Jalen
Knowles fishing on Scorpio and Tyler
Cartwright on the Still Slunkin. Although
boat numbers were down this year, coor-
dinators Cathy Darville, Amanda
Cartwright and Francis Darville were
pleased to report that enthusiasm was at an
all time high and the sportsmanship was
outstanding!

With their focus on marine conservation
and awareness, the Committee invited
members of the Bahamas National Trust to
attend and provide information on the BNT
and sign up members for a Chapter on
Long Island. President Neil McKinney
spoke at the Closing Ceremonies address-
ing the Long Islanders particularly on the
lack of conch available in the surrounding
waters of the Island. His plea of preserva-
tion was met with mixed emotions and he
acknowledged that this change of mindset
is not an easy task, and it would take time
for people to understand the concept that a
fish (species) is worth more alive than dead.
Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries the
Honorable Lawrence “Larry” Cartwright
addressed the audience on the benefits of
the Tournament including the economic
boost brought to the community each year
by this event.

In an effort to include children in the
Tournament, the Committee introduced
the “Ocean Mission” for children ages 6-12.
A total of 15 children participated in the
journey around the Clarence Town Harbor
and saw over 20 turtles, sting rays, coral,
sponge, fish, egrets, herons, and seagulls.
President of the BNT, Neil McKinney
accompanied the children, along with ZNS
cameraman Timothy Wilson and reporter
Vaughn Albury and witnessed the clean
up of a harbor beach that amounted to a 55
gal drum of plastic, metal and paper prod-
ucts. Mr. McKinney provided details of
developing marine eco-systems and habitats
while enjoying the cool ocean breeze.

Each evening the residents of Long



@ THE BOATS





LIST OF BOATS 2010 Length Weight
LION FISH — Danny, Ricky, Leslie Darville 47 89 Ibs
TROP EASE — Gavin, Brandon, Michael Cartwright 41 45 Ibs
Neil Knowles

DERELICT - Ricky & Andy Wells 49 193 Ibs
D’FISH N SEA — Robert & Barbara Wells, Bruce 54 305 Ibs
Pinder, Andrew Rahming, Divinci Rolle

BUSHMAN/SEAHAWK - Barry Knowles, Heather 38 50 Ibs
Bailey, Rob Edgar

SUNSEEKER — Brent Fox, Billy “Gruff” Pinder, 62 221 Ibs
Danny O’Leary, Luke Maillis, Chris Burrows

BIG DADDY — Marvin, Neil, Ranny Cartwright - -
JOBSITE — Gordon Ritchie, Greg Cartwright, Lou 44 73 Ibs
Carroll, Andrew “lron” Cartwright, Kevin Pratt

SCORPIO — Ben, Dutch Boy, Jalen Knowles 44 85 Ibs
2 LITTLE 2 LATE — Jason Edler, Rusty Watters, 55 73 Ibs
Lance Shaughnessy, Kyle Blakenship

STILL SLUNKIN — Duncan Love, Matthew Wells, 46 157l|bs
Andrew Knowles, Donnie Lisgaris, Tyler

Cartwright











Island came out to support this event, and
participate in Sponsor Trivia, a Guy Harvey
Auction and the overall excitement of the
Tournament.

The Committee wishes to Thank all
Anglers, Sponsors, Attendees, Flying Fish
Marina and Enthusiasts on an exceptional
event and a special Thanks to the team of
the D’Fish N Sea, who donated $2000.00 of
their winnings back to the Committee in
preparation for next year’s event!

LIST OF SPONSORS 2010

Gilbey’s; King & Co.; Darville Packaging;
Island Cellular; Carroll Shipping Co.;

Scotiabank; Professional Insurance Consul-
tants; Fox Locksmithing; Archipelago Painter's
& Developers; Henry F. Storr Electric; Con-
stantakis Sea Enterprise;

Outer Edge Grill; M&S Crane Rental; Ulti-
mate Door & Window; A.I.D; Bling Bling Car
Wash & Rental; Ministry of Tourism; Inter
Coastal Marine; Mia Dean; LMR Custom Rods &
Tackle; Burrows Trucking;

JWK Construction; Island Connections;
Baystreet Garage; Discount Tyre & Battery;
Under The Sun; Caballo Grande; Montagu
Motors; Over Yonder Holdings; Harbourside
Marine; Panama Jack; Caribbean Bottling Com-
pany; Echo Water; Guy Harvey Ocean Founda-
tion; In The Bite; Sun Oil Ltd.

Double boxing joy for Lester Brown Jr

THE first round of thel4th
Wellington ‘Sonny Boy’ Rah-
ming Silver Gloves Tourna-
ment got underway on Satur-
day at the Wulff Road Boxing
Square.

The tournament is being
organised by coach Ray Minus
Jr and his Champion Amateur
Boxing Club. It is being spon-

sored by D’Albenas Agency
Limited.

A number of matches were
contested with Lester Brown
Jr. leading the way as he won
both of his bouts. Brown Jr.
won a three round decision
over Moses Almonor and he
came back and beat Tyrone
Oliver in thee rounds as well.

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

In other bouts, Don Rolle
won a three round decision
over Mark Almonor; Javano
Collins won a third round TKO
over Anwar Davis; Marlon
Wallace win in three rounds
over Trevor Lowe; Theron
Smith beat Machano Fawkes in
three rounds; Anton Brown
pulled off a three round deci-
sion over Michael Lightbourn
and Dennis Smith got a three
round decision over Machano
Fawkes.

“The first day of the show
was very successful,” Minus Jr.
said. “All of the boys were
between the ages of 14-16,
except for one match. Don
Rolle was just 12 and Mark
Almonor is 13. All of the boys
performed very well.

“We had a lot of people who
came out to support the box-
ers. Our sponsors, D’Albenas
was represented and Ron’s
Auto Electric Motor. We had a
very good showing.”

The tournament was sched-

uled to continue this weekend,
but because of the holiday,
Minus Jr. said they will post-
pone the second round until
Saturday, June 12 when they
pick up the action at 6 p.m.

Originally, the tournament
was also scheduled to be an
elimination to the final, but
Minus Jr. said because the com-
petition was so keen in the first
round, they have decided to
extend the elimination so as to
give the competitors some more
action.

Boxers will be vying for the
most improved award, the fight
of the tournament and the most
outstanding boxer. Additional-
ly, Rahming will be on hand to
select a boxer whom he feel
deserve special recognition.

Rahming is a former ama-
teur boxer, who has turned a
coach. He has worked with a
number of amateur boxers in
the country and has assisted just
about all of the amateur coach-
es.

Magnificent Michelle

FROM page nine

and do well if God permits. ’ve never competed on the senior lev-
el before and to make those teams is going to be a wonderful
experience for me.”

Having attained such a goal all in one shot has Cumberbatch
yarnng for a lot more.

“For the remainder of the season, I’m going to continue to train
and work hard so that I can continue to decrease my time in the 400
hurdles,” she said. “Although that time was good, there is still
room for improvement and hopefully produce a time of 54 sec-
onds.”

Cumberbatch also competed in the 400, but she fell short of
advancing to the final. She got third in the first of three heats in
54.56 for ninth overall. The eighth and final qualifier did 54.48.

However, Cumberbatch ended the meet by running the opening
leg of the 4 x 400 relay that placed second in 3:40.25.

Cumberbatch, an economics major, said she’s now looking for-
ward to coming home to compete in the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ National Open Track and Field Champi-
onships over the weekend of June 25-26.

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FROM page nine

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THE TRIBUNE

Time Magazine article |)... =

on crimes against
tourists in Bahamas

FROM page one

important question: How safe are
you while on vacation?”

The inspiration for the article
came from contact made by a cruise
ship passenger and Bahamas armed
robbery victim Carly Milne, who
happened to have been one of the 18
tourists robbed at gun point while
on a Segway tour in the Earth Vil-
lage, Nassau, in November 2009.

“Milne reported the incident to
the police, and later contacted the
Avenger, hoping to get the word out
about the rising crime rate in a pop-
ular stop for American tourists,”
reads the article, which appeared in
the news magazine online travel sec-
tion, as part of a series of articles
written by “Time.com’s Travel
Avenger”, which follows up on read-
er’s travel-related complaints.

Exploring Ms Milne’s Bahamas

crime complaint, the reporter
records that while “crime in the
Bahamas has been generally con-
fined to residents, outside of a few
episodes of pickpocketing and other
petty offences” there has been a rise
in the overall crime rate in recent
years and a “troubling shift” may be
taking place that sees more tourists
being targetted by Bahamian crimi-
nals while visiting the islands.

After describing the robbery of
the 18 tourists at gunpoint in
November, the reporter states that
statistics from the Bahamas govern-
ment detailing crime against tourists
in 2009 “show one murder and 19
cases of armed robbery — 18 of
which came in the single November
Segway hijacking.”

However, the article contends
there is evidence that these were not
the only incidents that took place.

In support of this, it notes the rob-

bery of the 11 cruise passengers by
the Queen’s Staircase “in broad day-
light” and quotes both a Miami-
based Maritime attorney, Jim Walk-
er, “who represents cruise passen-
gers” and a report from the US gov-
ernment's Overseas Security Advi-
sory Council (OSAC) as providing
examples of other armed robberies
of tourists in the Bahamas, some “at
more remote locations.”

Tourists who are “planning a
Caribbean cruise and want to avoid
trouble” are advised to “use com-
mon sense.”

“Stay in groups, keep to the more
heavily trafficked parts of town and
don't do anything stupid, like try to
buy drugs,” states “The Avenger.”

And in what may be considered a
silver-lining in the cloud of bad pub-
licity for Bahamian tourism officials,
although not for their counterparts
in Jamaica, it ends with the final

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS





B ‘





18 TOURISTS were robbed at gunpoint while on a Segway tour in the Earth Vil-

lage in November 2009.

warning: “And do steer clear of
Jamaica. Experts agree that it’s cur-
rently the most dangerous country in
the Caribbean.”

Yesterday Basil Smith, Chief
Communications Officer at the
Ministry of Tourism told The Tri-
bune the Ministry is aware of the
article.

However, he downplayed the sug-
gestion made in it that visitors should
be wary of The Bahamas as a desti-
nation because of crime.

“We maintain The Bahamas is the
premier cruise destination in the
Caribbean and we are also safest
cruise destination in the region,” he
stated, adding that the Ministry

“continues to do what is necessary to
protect our visitors in partnership
with the security forces.”

As for suggestions that crime may
go “under-reported” by local author-
ities in order to protect the tourist
industry, the communications chief
said the Ministry of Tourism “is very
candid about our statements to the
local media about crime because we
are aware that the international
media has access to the local media
and often use them as a source.

“We make no attempt to obfus-
cate or disguise crime statistics,” he
said, adding, however, that police
are primarily responsible for releas-
ing such figures.

Oil could hit the Florida
Panhandle by Wednesday

PENSACOLA BEACH, Fla.

A FLORIDA beach might
get hit with oil from the Deep-
water Horizon accident for
the first time Wednesday as
sheen likely caused by the
accident was reported less
than 10 miles off Pensacola
Beach, according to Associat-
ed Press.

A charter boat captain
reported the oil Tuesday
afternoon and state and local
environmental officials con-
firmed that it was about 9.5
miles offshore. Winds are
forecast to blow from the
south and west, pushing the
outer edges of massive slick
from the spill closer to west-
ern Panhandle beaches.

Emergency crews began
Tuesday scouring the beaches
for oil and shoring up miles
of boom. Escambia County
will use it to block oil from
reaching inland waterways,
but plans to leave beaches
unprotected because they are
too difficult to protect and
easier to clean up.

The spill's arrival coincides
with the beginning of the Pan-
handle's summer tourism sea-
son, which normally brings
millions of dollars to the
region.

"It's inevitable that we will
see it on the beaches," said
Keith Wilkins, Escambia's
deputy chief of neighborhood

and community services.

The oil has been creeping
toward Florida since the
Deepwater Horizon rig
exploded on April 20, killing
11 workers and eventually col-
lapsing into the Gulf of Mex-
ico. An estimated 20 million
to 40 million gallons of oil has
spewed into the Gulf, eclips-
ing the 11 million that leaked
from the Exxon Valdez dis-
aster. The rig was being oper-
ated for petroleum giant BP,
which has tried unsuccessful-
ly for six week to stanch the
oil.

The Florida report followed
an orange and oily mess wash-
ing up on Alabama's beaches
earlier Tuesday. Crews
cleaned up the oil that they
described as having the con-
sistency of a "tarry mousse,"
but health officials closed the
beaches to swimming.

Pensacola Beach officials
said their request for about
$150,000 from BP to buy sift-
ing machines and a tractor to
help remove oil from the
beach's famous white sands
has lingered unanswered for
more than three weeks. BP
has promised it will pay any
expenses, but Panhandle offi-
cials say the bureaucracy has
been slow. Some think the
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency should be run-
ning the cleanup operation,
not BP.

"We need the sifters and
we haven't gotten them
approved yet," said W.A.
"Buck" Lee, Santa Rosa
Island Authority's executive
director. "It's been three
weeks and the oil is coming.
In my opinion, this entire
thing should have been a
FEMA project all along. If a
hurricane blows the roof off
your jail, you shouldn't have
to wait and send a letter to
BP to replace the roof on your
jail.”

Lee said BP has spent mon-
ey on public relations, but not
on preparations for beach
cleanup. The company has
provided the sate with $25
million to promote tourism.
Escambia approved $700,000
in emergency funding for
tourism promotion Tuesday,
with another $700,000 to be
allocated in 45 days.

Lee said the bureaucratic
process set up at the federal
staging centers in Alabama
and Louisiana have also made
it difficult to get information
about his pending request.

Coast Guard Chief Peter
Capelotti, spokesman for the
Mobile, Ala.-based command
center, did not have an imme-
diate answer late Tuesday
about the delay in approving
Escambia county's request for
the tractor and other equip-
ment.

Capelotti said command

t-te eel ime)

lacie @
ie eee en



center officials expect more
oil to make landfall in Alaba-
ma and the Florida Panhandle
through Friday.

On Pensacola Beach, emer-
gency crews are prepared for
along summer of oil clean up.











They plan to remove oil in
cycles after it is pushed
onshore and the winds shift.
Removing oil while it's mov-
ing onshore doesn't make
sense, Wilkins said.

"It would be like trying to

FLORIDA GOV.
CHARLIE
CRIST surveys
the Gulf of
Mexico oil spill
Tuesday May 4,
2010, as seen
from a Florida
Air National
Guard C-130
airplane several
miles from
where the
Deepwater
Horizon oil rig
blew up and
sank off the
coast of
Louisiana. (AP)

go out and clean up in the
middle of a hurricane," he
said. "We will wait until after
the bands make their way
onshore and the weather
shifts and then we will clean
up before the next band hits."

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Tribune Business Editor

THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY,

©
t
2 ie en — —

all

JUNE 2,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL FIDELITY

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$857m developer ‘avoids’ $4m in tax

By NEIL HARTNELL



* Leading Bahamian law firm’s partner sucessfully, and legally, advised



leading Bahamian

law firm successfully

advised the developer

of an $857 million

New Providence-

based resort project how he could
legally reduce his Stamp Duty expo-
sure by 40-50 per cent, given that the
initial $103 million transaction could
have created a $10.3 million exposure.
Documents lodged in the New York
State Supreme Court, which have been

obtained by Tribune Business, show

how attorneys at Higgs & Johnson
advised developers of the South Ocean
resort project how they could avoid
$4-$5 million in Stamp Duty payable
on real estate acquisitions by restruc-

turing the deal.

‘Royal battle’ over

taxes not needed



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day said it was not necessary to
have a “royal battle” between
the Government and the pri-
vate sector to reach a “middle
ground” on the former’s tax
increases, although he acknowl-
edged the hikes would be
“untenable” for some firms and
“really and truly could mean
job losses”.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness as he was heading to a
meeting of Bahamas-based
manufacturers, who were plan-
ning their response to the Gov-
ernment’s plan to end the
Industries Encouragement Act
incentives they were receiving,

* Chamber chief says
possible for ‘middle
ground’ to be reached
between government and
private sector over tax rises

* One firm says profits
‘wiped out’ and plunged
into $250k annual loss if
Industries Act changes
go through

* Investor in manufacturer
tells Tribune Business no
dividend taken in five years

Khaalis Rolle said one such

SEE page 3B

Benchmark ‘rosy’
despite net worth
slashed in half

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BENCHMARK (Bahamas)
yesterday said it was not con-
cerned that its $586,806 net loss
in the 2010 first quarter had
halved its net worth by almost
50 per cent, telling Tribune
Business it was “in good shape”
with a “rosy” outlook, now that
its Carmichael Road commer-
cial centre was close to com-
pletion.

Julian Brown, the BISX-list-
ed company’s president and
chief executive, said that
although net shareholder equi-
ty had been trimmed to around
$500,000 as a result of the first
quarter loss, the impending
revaluation of its real estate
development - in which it has
invested $2.5 million - would
alleviate any concerns in this
regard.

* BISX-listed firm sees worth
cut to around $500k by
$586,806 Q1 loss, but ‘in
good shape’ as it awaits
real estate revaluation

* Carmichael project ‘99%
there’ and 70% lease
commitments in, as
construction complete
and utilities to go
in by end-June

* Revenues up by 26%, but
firm continues to be hit
by market volatility

“We're in good shape,” Mr
Brown told Tribune Business.

SEE page 2B

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Michael Allen, an attorney and part-
ner at Higgs & Johnson, in an e-mail to
Roger Stein, the RHS Ventures prin-
cipal who is fighting a legal battle to

remain as the project’s general partner,
advised that Stamp Duty payments
could be minimised to “nominal” lev-
els if they were paid up front “in one
lump sum”, rather than spread out

over the course of the development
to reflect the transaction’s true value.

Higgs & Johnson, Mr Allen, Mr
Stein and all those involved in the
South Ocean development and the

South Ocean developer how he could minimise Stamp Duty by 40-50%
* Some $4-$5m avoided in tax on project’s real estate purchases
by paying ‘nominal’ amount in upfront lump sum
* Based on $103m deal, initial structure would have created $10.3m liability
* Attorney: ‘More we are perceived to be paying, the greater the likelihood
that the Treasurer will accept our determination of what is due’

Stamp Duty transaction have done
nothing wrong. Mr Allen’s advice
merely represents good advice on a

SEE page 2B

Outback owner explores options
to protect $400-S500k investment

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Other brand options eyed, while most employees will be transferred to airport
Kafé Kalik if Australian dining concept does not return to East Bay



THE Outback Steakhouse franchise
owner yesterday said he was exploring oth-
er brand options for the East Bay Street
restaurant while it is under renovation, as it
does not want to lose the $400,000-$500,000
invested in this if talks with the franchisor

go south.

Tyrone Nabbie told Tribune Business

User car imports left on the dock

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN USED Car
dealers yesterday said they
were praying the Prime Minis-
ter will reverse the 85 per cent
Excise Tax rate on cars with a
more than 2,000 cc engine
capacity, several having been
forced to leave imported vehi-
cles on the dock last week
because they had not budgeted
for the increased payments.

Partner in S&L Auto,
Solomon Uboh, told Tribune
Business he was surprised when
the Customs Department last
week sought an extra $7,000
from him to collect his cars

that while reopening OutBack Steakhouse
after the renovations were completed is
still being mulled, other ideas are being
floated for the East Bay Street location,
which is leased by the restaurant.

There have been suggestions that the

weeks away. Staff have been made aware
and placed on vacation in the interim.
“We are not trying to mislead anyone
or the staff,” he said. He added that the
Outback Steakhouse franchise, which is
Australian-themed, is having struggles of its

decision has already been made not to

from the dock.

And this was only hours after
the Prime Minister had
announced that the duty regime
for car imports had been con-
solidated to two rates, 65 per
cent and 85 per cent, with the
rate no longer determined by
size but engine capacity.

Mr Uboh said the new rates
will drastically alter his busi-
ness model, as he will have to
import cars with smaller
engines to keep his lot filled
and offer customers competi-
tive prices.

“T really bring in BMWs, but
now because of the increase I
have to bring in something
smaller to stay in the game,”
he said. “But I have to live

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

reopen, but Mr Nabbie said this was still

SEE page 2B

according to whatever they
[government] say.”

Antonio Forbes, operations
manager at Grace Auto, said
people do not typically invest
$30,000 to $40,000 on new cars,
making used cars their first
choice.

Yet the duty rate increase
has locked his latest vehicle
imports in limbo on Customs’
Dock, and he will likely slash
the amount of imports his com-
pany brings in.

“Now you have to get your
cars off the dock piece piece,
because you already budgeted
(60 per cent) for them,” said
Mr Forbes. “You get this one

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report





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Money at Work





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Enforce the laws already on books

PREVIOUSLY, I said the police
should be allowed to do policing. Eas-
ier said than done, especially if there is
no clear understanding of the con-
cept/role of policing. As with any con-
cept that comes to the Bahamas, it
becomes Bahamian because we devel-
op, manage and maintain the idea. We
must, however, be very careful - as
mentioned last week - not to ’copy’
and ‘paste’ the concept, then attempt
to publish it without the necessary edit-
ing and corrections. I am a firm believ-
er in not reinventing the wheel, but I
also realise that one wheel does not
fit every car.

Current Condition

With that said, it must first be under-
stood that our model of policing is
very different from that of the US.
Whereas US law enforcement has sev-
eral levels and divisions, the Bahamas
has one national police force that is
responsible for all islands. We are
familiar with American policing terms
such as city, county, state and federal.
All terms represent different policing
divisions and different jurisdictions.

Further, if circumstances become
very volatile, there is also the option of
calling in the National Guard. Here
in our Bahamas, we have the Royal



Safe &
Secure







by Gamal Newry





Bahamas Police Force, who do every-
thing from dignitary protection to
school policing to court security and
Central Bank escorts. All functions
are carried out by the same organisa-
tion. So here you have a national
organisation stretching from Grand
Bahama to Inagua, delivering a ser-
vice that is so wide and diverse in its
scope that, in my opinion, effective-
ness, efficiency and sustainability are
but ‘a faint illusion’.

Redeployment

Immediately upon reading this col-
umn Mr Minister of National Security
and Mr Commissioner of Police, get
trained police officers on the streets.
Officers assigned to clerical tasks, such
as accountants, secretaries, carpenters,
electricians, pump attendants, chauf-
feurs, mechanics and musicians, all of
whom make up the numbers, need to

be placed in frontline functions.

Additionally, support services such
as the Fire Department need to be
removed from the count. There should
be no reassignment here as there is a
shortage of personnel as it is, and this
function should not be tampered with.
Nevertheless, it is misleading when the
public is told that there are 100 hun-
dred officers, but 25 are firefighters
and another 25 are deployed to non-
policing functions such as those listed
above. Really, there are 50 officers
assigned to frontline policing, and that
is 50 divided by four given the time of
the day.

Sustainable Assignment

Can you say Z-E-R-O Tolerance? I
take you back to the events of Sep-
tember 4, 2001; September 11, 2001;
April 19, 1995. All events associated
with these dates were the result of
ignoring the little things. The minor
infractions left unattended will result in
disastrous consequences. It is the old
story that failing to attend to the cracks
in the dam will allow for a flood that is
much more difficult to manage.

The surge in crime in this country, in
my opinion, is a result of our toler-
ance of the little things. The officer
pulling you over for speeding being

met with: ‘Why you all do not go after
the real criminals?’ Well folks, Timo-
thy McVeigh and team were appre-
hended because of a traffic violation (a
broken tail light), not a real ‘criminal
act’.

Far too often motorists across New
Providence create a third and fourth
lane while talking on their cell phone.
If the police were to arm every officer
with fixed penalty booklets and traffic
management tools, then we will see a
reduction in this offence. The enforce-
ment of what is perceived to be minor
reduces and limits the opportunity for
major offences.

Why are cars driving without prop-
er lighting and specifications? Why
are motorcyclists riding without hel-
mets, many of them with no registra-
tion, and why are underage persons
allowed to purchase alcohol? These
are the roots. Why are we waiting to
tackle them when they become large
trees, bushes and forests? If this is not
criminal, then what is?

Further, the crimes committed by
offenders require them to move from
home to the point where the offence is
to be committed. This being the case,
a more aggressive approach to traffic
enforcement is necessary.

Nevertheless, to give credit to the

police we do sometimes see this zero
tolerance approach, but it is never
maintained. Case in point, Friday past
saw a swarm of police activity on var-
ious intersections throughout New
Providence during the evening hours.
Heavily armed officers could be seen
stopping and searching suspect vehicles
and issuing traffic citations.

Excellent, except that on Saturday
and Sunday, as I drove through these
same intersections, very little police.
We are all familiar with the various
flood stories that have occurred during
the ages; usually they only last for a
season. Consistent, sustainable
approaches are needed for effective
policing.

There is no magic bullet to policing
our country, but it is also not rocket
science. Simply, there are laws that
exist which need to be enforced.

NB: Gamal Newry is the president
of Preventative Measures, a loss pre-
vention and asset protection, training
and consulting company, specialising in
policy and procedure development,
business security reviews and audits,
and emergency and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to PO Box N-
3154 Nassau, Bahamas, or e-mail
info@preventativemeasures.net or vis-
it us at www.preventativemeasures.net



CAR, from 1B

this week and get the others the next
week, but if you keep it there too long
Customs will charge you for storage.”

He said the government should have
let businesses like his know before
imposing the new tax, or given it a July
1 start date like many of the other
increases and changes unveiled in the
Government’s 2010-2011 Budget.

“The Government needs to recon-
sider this and think about it,” said Mr
Forbes. “It causes you to cut back on a
lot of things, but mostly the [car] order
is not as big.”

He suggested the Government
should have cut its spending or taxed
the numbers houses instead of impos-
ing tax increase that are sure to hurt
business.

One used car lot partner, Ray
Thurston, said he only imports vehicles
with smaller engines.

Mr Thurston said the increase could
minimally affect him, but he had
always imported fuel efficient vehi-
cles.

“T try to keep the engines small,
especially with the gas situation,” he
said. “I'll feel it, but it won’t be as
severe.”

SUN OIL LIMITED
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Sun Oil Limited seeks to identify:
PROFESSIONAL TRACTOR TRAILER DRIVERS



Outback owner explores
options to protect the
$400-$500k investment

FROM page 1B

own internationally.

“We are at a point where it is midway through the fran-
chise,” said Mr Nabbie. “We are assessing the viability of
the business, so in good faith we closed with intent to ren-
ovate. Outback itself as a brand is having its own strug-

gles.”

Mr Nabbie suggested that the restaurant had also
became a victim of the recession, as lay-offs across the
island put a dent in its Bahamian customer base and
the “economy doesn’t help as it is now”.

However, Mr Nabbie said the best business decision
will be made in the next few weeks. He added that if Out-
back did not return following the renovations, most of the
employees will be relocated to his expanding Kafe Kalik

Franchise.

“We will pay their vacation pay while we make our
considerations,” he said. “We'll find other things to do
with the employees. Some of them don’t understand the
business decision we have to make, but we will find oth-
er places for most of them as the airport [Kafe Kalik]

opens.”

in New Providence and Exuma

The successful candidate(s) will assume the role of Driver/
Operator. This position is responsible for the daily execution of
key responsibilities within a bulk fuel facility. These responsibilities
include the safe receipt, storage and delivery of bulk petroleum
products in accordance with strict industry and company standards.
Successful candidates must be able to demonstrate a proven track
record of safe driving. Successful experience in the petroleum

industry would be plus.

Core Responsibilities

* Daily inspection of assigned truck(s) and associated equipment.
* Safe truck loading and delivery of petroleum products through

out the island.

* Provide exceptional customer service at all times.

« Adhere to company driving policies and the Highway Code of

the Bahamas.

* General fuel handling operations associated with the receipt,

storage and redistribution of petroleum products.

Job Requirements

* 5 years minimum work experience in a similar capacity.
* In depth knowledge of The Highway Code of The Bahamas.
«A strong safety record. Saftey related trainings would be a plus.

* Defensive driving training would be a strong plus.

*A mechanical aptitude with some experience with equipment

maintenance and repairs.

* Strong leadership skills with the ability to work as an effective

team member.

¢ Excellent verbal and written communications skills.
* The ability to work flexible hours and weekends.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package,
commensurate with work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than June 4, 2010 to:

jobs @sunoilbahamas.com



BENCHMARK, from 1B

which it is holding and has not sold.
The company attributed its $586,806 net loss

“When we have the [Carmichael Road] project
fully completed, we will do the revaluation.

“We will try and get it done in the second
quarter, and if that does not happen, then in the
third quarter. We’re not concerned about it in
terms of valuation issues, as we know we have an
asset that is not fully accounted for at this time.

“We don’t want to do it prematurely; we want
to do it when it’s complete. We’re 99 per cent of
the way there.”

Mr Brown told Tribune Business that Bench-
mark (Bahamas) first foray into the commercial
real estate market, which is situated at the corners
of Carmichael and Fire Trail Roads, was “just
about complete” with commitments already in
hand to lease about 70 per cent of the available
retail space.

A Bank of the Bahamas International branch
is acting as the anchor tenant, and Mr Brown
said: “Carmichael Road looks good. The pro-
ject is just about done. Construction is complete.
We’re just waiting for utilities to come into the
property.

“That should be done by the end of June.
Water is already in. We’re no waiting on elec-
tricity and cable. We have leases out to various
tenants and hope to get them back signed, and
have them occupy the space as soon as possible.

“We have had some very good inquiries from
potential new persons as well. Hopefully we can
nail those down, and then things will be looking
splendid at Carmichael Road. I don’t see any
roadblocks to prevent us from getting that fully
leased before the end of the year.”

Benchmark (Bahamas) moved away from its
investments roots and branched into real estate
development to diversify its revenue/earnings
streams, in particular seeking to mitigate the
negative impact on the bottom line of ‘unrealised
losses’ incurred by its portfolio.

The unrealised profits/losses refer to changes in
the value of Benchmark’s investments, such as

during the three months to March 31, 2010, toa
$528,585 depreciation in the value of its invest-
ment portfolio. In turn, it blamed this on the
“volatility” of the Bahamian and global markets.

“One of these days I’m going to be able to
tell you it’s changed. The volatility of the market
and the direction of the market is very difficult for
us. Everything else is looking very rosy,” Mr
Brown told Tribune Business.

On the positive side, he pointed to the 26 per
cent year-over-year revenue increase for the 2010
first quarter to $324,917, and added: “On the
top end things are going OK. We’re seeing an
improvement in our revenue streams, but we’re
taking it on the unrealised losses/gains in the
portfolio because of the exposure we have.

“At some point, that should change and have
a Significant impact on the bottom line.”

On the revenue increase, Mr Brown said this
was “primarily” due to earnings streams gener-
ated by Benchmark (Bahamas) offshore bro-
ker/dealer subsidiary, Alliance Investment Man-
agement, plus a special dividend paid by Com-
monwealth Bank.

Alliance, he explained, had benefited from its
existing client base enjoying growth in assets,
along with an infusion of new clients. With fees
linked to the value of assets under management,
Alliance had reaped the rewards.

May, though, had been a bad month for the
global stock markets, Mr Brown said, impacting
upon both Benchmark (Bahamas) and Alliance
Investment Management.

Expenses, meanwhile, had increased by 9 per
cent to $282,538 during the 2010 first quarter,
something that had left Mr Brown “kind or sur-
prised”. He was uncertain of the cause, but
believed it might relate to the fact that Bench-
mark (Bahamas) had “paid for certain items we
wanted to be in Carmichael ahead of time”.

On an operational footing, Alliance Invest-
ment Management suffered a $478,471 net loss in
the 2010 first quarter. Benchmark Advisors lost

equity shares and fixed-income instruments,

$5,812, and Benchmark (Bahamas) $102,523.



TAX, from 1B

legal way to ‘avoid’ or minimise
a client’s tax exposure, some-
thing all attorneys do, and does
not amount to tax evasion.

However, the situation again
highlights the Government’s
difficulty in maximising its rev-
enues in the face of clever
lawyering, particularly when
there are numerous legal loop-
holes that can be exploited.
This is one reason why the
Ingraham administration is now
so desperate for revenues.

In his Wednesday, April 16,
2008 e-mail to Mr Stein, Mr

rer Ce

Ste im se Bae) pete es
‘Must have excellent oral
ate ea ae La
SME amor oe
Sa eco aL
Ser lcm coke
Semele)

Allen placed the total value of
the New South Ocean project’s
Stamp Duty obligations as $5.03
million.

“Per our ongoing discussions
on stamp transfer tax savings,
both counsel for South Ocean
Development Company and I
strongly believe there is a defi-
nite strategic advantage to pay-
ing funds for Stamp Duty oblig-
ations on all the land purchases
now in one lump sum, rather
than in part over the next few
months as originally contem-
plated, as we expect this will
result in significant savings on
the obligation connected specif-

Employment Opportunity

Shift Operators

Pit telre elmo ie cree Se mL

Sete
mide)

nights, weekends and holidays

eet ue ecm
humresources.hr@gmail.com



ically with the South Ocean
Development Company trans-
action of approximately $4 mil-
lion,” Mr Allen wrote.

There were three land pur-
chases involved in the deal,
namely the acquisition of the
South Ocean resort properties
themselves from the Canadian
Commercial Workers Industry
Pension Plan (CCWIPP); the
purchase of the golf course and
surrounding land from New
Providence Development Com-
pany; and a final land parcel
from a private citizen.

In his e-mail, Mr Allen
informed Mr Stein: “I note that
the Government is intently
looking for revenue, and the
more we are perceived to be
paying, the greater the likeli-
hood that the Treasurer will
accept our determination of
what is due. All parties will, of
course, appreciate that our
position on Stamp Duty is sub-
ject to review by the Treasurer.

“The Stamp Act provides for
Stamp Duty to be paid on the
total ‘value’ of the transaction.
Based on the previous struc-
ture of the South Ocean Devel-
opment Company agreement,
which represented a total con-
sideration of approximately
$103 million, it would have
been open for the Treasurer to
argue that the Stamp Duty
obligation on the South Ocean
Development Company trans-
action alone would have been
$10.3 million.

“New South Ocean would
have had to pay 50 per cent of
that amount; ie, approximately
$5.15 million. The projected
savings that we anticipate is
based on the fact that we have
restructured the transaction to
appropriately apportion specif-
ic amounts of funds to aspects
of the transaction which attract
a nominal Stamp Duty.”

In response, Mr Stein e-
mailed his then-financing part-
ners on April 17, 2008, to sug-
gest that they paid the $5 mil-
lion in accordance with Mr
Allen’s advice, “as it provides
the highest likelihood of sav-
ing approximately $4 million”.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 3B



a > =:
Microsoft seeking public sector work

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



MICROSOFT aims to aid the
Bahamas Government in improving
and expanding its online portal and
Information Technology (IT) within
various ministries, an account manag-
er for the company told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

Jaun Carlos Mejia, who spoke at
conference at the Hilton on new prod-
ucts and technologies, said Microsoft,
along with its partners at Inova Solu-

tions, were interested in expanding
and improving IT solutions for gov-
ernment, education, and small and
medium-sized businesses in the
Bahamas.

And because Mr Mejia’s Microsoft
office is based in Fort Lauderdale, and
Inova offices and be found throughout
the Caribbean, they boast fast and reli-
able access to the Bahamian market.

Commercial director for Inova,
Hans Kruithof, said his company was
integral in migrating the National
Insurance Board (NIB) from an IBM
platform to Microsoft Exchange.

According to him, executives at NIB
were pleased with the software acces-
sion and by Inova’s timing in institut-
ing the applications and training staff.

Microsoft and Inova (which is
Microsoft’s partner in the region) said
the Bahamian market was a develop-
ing market for IT Solutions.

Luis Souchet, Microsoft’s account
technology specialist for Bermuda,
Bahamas and Cayman, said many
countries in the region do not use IT
solutions to their full potential. If used
to such a degree, they can save a busi-
ness money.

During the seminar, the Microsoft
and Inova representatives spoke to
business owners about developments
in IT and how to incorporate them in
order to make businesses more com-
petitive. “Developments in informa-
tion technology give companies
numerous growth opportunities,” the
seminat’s official release said.

Inova is working on several projects
on New Providence, having completed
tasks for the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration, Central Bank and the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation.

According to Mr Kruithof, that

improved IT can make firms much
more efficient and streamline expen-
diture on IT-related issues.

“The example right now that is
appealing to this conversation is the
project with the NIB, where we
upgraded them from the IBM logic
notes to Microsoft exchange, and that
saved a lot of money, especially right
now while government resources are
scarce,” said Mr Mejia. “Cost saving is
something we want to offer to our cus-
tomers through technology and
through the partnership we have with
Inova.”

‘Royal battle’

FROM page 1B

company had shown how this
would “wipe out” their profits
and impose a $250,000 per
annum loss upon them.

Saying that the Chamber was
working “feverishly” to arrange
emergency meetings between
the Government and business-
es impacted by the proposed
2010-2011 Budget tax increases,
Mr Rolle hinted that on the
Industries Encouragement Act,
a possible compromise was for
the Government not to go
straight to the imposition of a
45 per cent duty rate on these
manufacturers.

For those companies that
could demonstrate they would
“suffer losses” from the imme-
diate imposition of a 45 per
cent duty rate, Mr Rolle sug-
gested that the Government
instead apply a rate that would
“bring them to the break even
stage”, giving these firms time
to adjust their cost structures
and develop new revenue
strategies to compensate.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham previously indicated
to Tribune Business that the
Government did not want, via
the Act’s duty-free import
incentives, to effectively run a
‘welfare subsidy system’ for
large Bahamas-based manu-
facturers indefinitely.

The proposed Industries
Encouragement Act amend-
ments would impose a five-year
term limit on these incentives,
meaning that those companies
who have already received
them for such a period will
graduate immediately. And
those firms who have received
these incentives for a period of,
say three years, will only
receive them for another two.

As revealed by Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday, a variety of
manufacturers reacted with
horror to the Government’s
plans, believing it could be a
potentially fatal blow for the
industry in this country, lead-
ing to firm closures and mass
lay-offs.

One equity investor in a well-

known Bahamian manufactur-
er told Tribune Business yes-
terday that he and fellow share-
holders had not received a div-
idend from the business for five
years, putting their cash into
upgrading the plant.

Pointing to the fact that
Freeport-based manufacturers
will still enjoy duty-free incen-
tives on their raw materials for
another 40 years, via the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement,
the investor said of the Act’s
incentives: “It’s very critical.
Why destroy jobs in Nassau?
There are a few. I don’t think
he’s [the Prime Minister]
thought that one through.

“T don’t know anyone who’s
rich under the Industries
Encouragement Act. It’s all
hell. The country’s on the
bone.”

For his part, the Prime Min-
ister was keen to bring the
Industries Encouragement
Act’s duration into line with
the five-year Tariff Act incen-
tives enjoyed by Bahamian
small business, as well as imple-
ment the Bahamas’ commit-
ments under the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
and World Trade Organisation
(WTO).

Tribune Business was yes-
terday told by informed sources
that while he has made no
promises, the Prime Minister
and his revenue team have
been rapidly crunching the
numbers in the Ministry of
Finance and asking for finan-
cial data from businesses
impacted by the 2010-2011
Budget’s tax hikes, indicating
there may be some flexibility
in some areas.

However, the Government -
at most - is only likely to tweak
some rates and their determi-
nants, observers believe, and
those targeted industries should
not believe they will escape
increased taxation.

In a bid to reach a compro-
mise between the Government
and private sector, Mr Rolle
told Tribune Business: “We’re
working feverishly. The Cham-
ber has not been sleeping.

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We've been actively involved
in trying to get some dialogue
going on this.

“This is going to mean job
losses. It really and truly could
mean job losses in some indus-
tries. There was one company
able to demonstrate that its
profits would be wiped out, and
that it would suffer an addi-
tional $250,000 loss per annum
if it was graduated from the
Industries Encouragement Act.

“I think the combination of
the tax increases and cost
increases will be untenable in
some instances. I would also
have to say the general public
will feel the pinch also.”

Acknowledging that there
was “tremendous potential” for
the cost of living to further
increase, Mr Rolle said it was
incumbent upon Bahamian
consumers to adjust their high-
spending, debt intensive behav-
iour to the new realities.

“In a country like the
Bahamas where we believe in
conspicuous consumption and
having all the comforts, and
cost not being an issue, we now
need to check ourselves and
make determinations as to how
we plan for the future. There
will be some behavioural
adjustments,” Mr Rolle said.

Warning that “if we do not
make the hard decisions now
we will pay for it later”, Mr
Rolle added that there were
some companies that “can
afford to be taxed a little more,
and they will have to bear the
responsibility”.

The Government and private
sector, Mr Rolle said, needed to
understand the dilemma each
other was in. While the Bud-
get “is what it is”, there were
going to be consequences in
terms of the effect on business,
while “the need for structural
reform” had been exposed by

the fiscal crisis.

“It’s important that we
demonstrate good leadership
on this and establish proper dia-
logue. There does not need to
be a battle royal. There are
some issues at stake that we
need to reach some middle
ground on,” Mr Rolle told Tri-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

N THE SUPREME COURT

over taxes not needed

bune Business.

“Tt’s a give and take. We
have to recognise that we’re in
a bad fiscal state as a country,
and any way you look at it
there is an impact we all have to
absorb and see whether there
are methods available to reduce
the impact on both sides.”

2010

CLE/qui/00170

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DANA TELISNOR of

KEYWEST STREET, PO. BOX GT-2923, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2"° DAY of JUNE, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OPHNY ALIEN of GIBBS
LANE, off NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 28° DAY OF JUNE, 2010
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,

P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, RANDY RANADO

GREENSLADE of EAST ST. P.O.BOX CR 55207,

BAHAMAS, intend to change my name to RANADO

GREENSLADE. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

= FG CAPITAL MARKETS
_ 5 BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
E€

cr AL 9 P11 A LT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 1 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,554.71 | CHG -0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -10.67| YTD % -0.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 0600.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.05
10.63
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.17
12.00
2.56
6.99
2.40
2.50
6.07
9.00
9.85
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Symbol
FBBI7
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

10.63

12.00

10.00 id
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

EPS $
0.250
0.050
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.249
0.460
0.114
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035 Tot
0.407 13.7
0.952 10.5
0.156 64.1

Change Daily Vol. Div $

1.05

5.20
0.33
3.15
2.17

2.56
6.99
2.35
2.50
6.07
9.00
9.85
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95

ooggg99959090099099
ecoocece|ce|ooeoeoeoeoo?
eoo00o0o0onooo0o0000d

Change Interest
0.00

0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%

0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

Bid

10.06
2.00
0.35

Ask &
11.06

6.25
0.40

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div S P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price Yield
14.00
4.00

0.55

Daily Val..

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV
1.4674
2.9020
1.5327
3.0368

13.5654
107.5706
105.7706

1.1080
1.0615
1.1050
9.4839

Principal Protected TIGRS, Se: 4

10.0000

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investm:

10.6709

Principal Protected TIGRS, Se:

4.8105

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

7.9664

YTD%

1.99
0.52
1.70
20T
1.48
3.45
3.99
1.67

-0.61

1.31
1.52

-0.93

3.23

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.514105

NAV G6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.501641

Last 12 Months %
6.66
-0.11
4.77
-4.99
5.47

30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

6.99
13.50
5.26

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

2.84
5.01
7.41
12.33 31-Mar-10

58.37 31-Mar-10

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

ghted price for daily volume
ighted price for daily volume

from day to day
aded today

per share paid in the last 12 months
led by the last 12 month earnings

P/E - Closing ed
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

gs per share for the last 12 mths

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST of the Settlement of
Bahama Sound No. 11 of the Island of Great Exuma one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and

Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Reevers Turnquest claims
to be the owner of the fee simple estate in possession of the
said piece or parcel of land free from encumbrances. And the
Petitioner had made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said piece parcel or tract of
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

AND TAKE NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
a Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on before the thirtieth (30) day
after the last day of publication file a Notice in the Supreme Court
within the City of Nassau and serve on the Petitioner or the un-
dersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified
by an Affidavit to be titled therewith. Failure on any such person
to file and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the 22nd day of
July A.D., 2010 will operate as a bar to such claim.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that copies of the files plan
may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas on the Second Floor of the Ansbacher Build-
ing situate at East Street and Bank Lane on the Island of New
Providence;

2. The Chambers of Messrs Lewis & Longley Chambers, East
Bay Street Shopping Centre, East Bay Street, New Providence:
3. The Office of the Administrator at Queens Hwy, in the settle-
ment of George Town, on the Island of Exuma, The Bahamas.
Dated the 31st day of May, A.D., 2010

Lewis & Longley, Chambers
East Bay Shopping Centre, East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner















WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2,

The Tribune SECTION C e

2010



Tingum Bem
Band to perform
at Caribbean

Tourism Ball...





Offering authentic
ltalian dishes ‘made
from scratch’...

see page five



Jessica's Hileworks Studio
leading ceramic maker

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia. net



essica Colebrooke began

her career as a young

ceramist with a desire to

make ‘unusual’ designs, but

decided to fall into a more
practical form of artistic expression
on the advice of her mentor Betty
Jane Dean, the owner of Andeana
Designs who first introduced Ms Cole-
brooke’s works to the Bahamian art
scene.

Years later, Ms Colebrooke has
quickly emerged onto the Bahamian
art scene as the first Bahamian female
tile manufacturer. She began her busi-
ness making coasters, soap dishes, and
useful everyday items.

She describes the pieces as the per-
fect souvenir- good quality at a good
price point.

Perhaps what really makes her work
standout is her refrain of using a
“Made in the Bahamas” attribution
on the front of her products. She was
advised by artwork producers that this
cheapens the purchase. Therefore,
Ms Colebrooke includes an attribu-
tion on the back of her products.

Today, Jessica’s Tileworks Studio
has evolved into the leading ceramic
manufacturing company in the
Bahamas, producing art tiles, fine art
pottery, as well as amenity souvenirs.

She has imparted her skill to stu-
dents at the College of the Bahamas,
and has put on a few summer work-
shops with the Ministry of Education
for High School students. She soon
decided to follow leads in the ceramics
discipline that she trained for at
Rhode Island School of Design.

There, Ms Colebrooke learned the
intricacies of her craft and soon
became an art instructor at the Inter-
American Development Bank, and
Finco, conducting art workshops for
interested students.

In the early stages of Ms Cole-
brooke’s design is her ‘Ripple’ series
that will be unveiled in the month of
May. This will be the most recent
addition to her fine art collection, and
is definitely mind boggling in form, in
warm and medium tones.

‘Ripple’ is a different take on her
usual work, where Ms Colebrooke
molds clay into tri-bowls, round coast-
ers, oval soap dishes, sgraffito mugs,
junkanoo masks, hot (souvenir) plates,
vases, and grape leaf plates.

She says today her business has
grown, showing that her products are
becoming more popular on the island



TEAPOT WITH COFFEE MUG by Jessica Colebrooke...

and especially amongst visitors. “For
me, I really appreciate that people
know that they are getting a good
product, and that they are repeat cus-
tomers,” said Ms Colebrooke.

Today, not only has her product
line grown to a more diverse supply,
but also her buyers include not only
locals but tourists who have expanded
her customer base through word of
mouth advertising.

This kind of recommendation and
customer loyalty has solidified her cus-
tomer base.

“We try to produce pieces of work
that are affordable,” said Ms Cole-
brooke. “You can get a really nice
wall hanging from Jessica’s Tileworks
at $300.”

Ms Colebrooke claims to produce
the best Bahamian ceramic products
on the market.

“Tf a tourist purchases an item from
me, they know they are getting a high
quality product, and they know how
much its worth,” said Ms Colebrooke.

She says that when she returned to
New Providence after attending col-
lege abroad, persons said Bahamians
couldn’t make anything of worth.

The same material that she sold
back then has caught on today, which
shows how trends just catch on with
time.

Ms Colebrooke’s molding tech-
niques can take anywhere from a few
days to a few weeks, depending on
whether it’s a small or large tile.

“She has two assistants who assist
her in molding the clay. Afterward,
she gives them enough ‘air time’ to
dry and fires the pieces into account.
Draining out all the water through
bisque firing, she follows up with a
glaze firing which gives the ceramic
piece a nice finish before painting each
piece in vibrant colours.

Competition is growing stiff among
the ceramics field, but she is glad for
this change; she feels it is in the best
interest of Bahamians who are becom-
ing more involved in the art world.

“Tt shows you that art in this coun-
try is evolving,” she said. “I’m glad to
see that there are a lot of persons
interested in this growing industry.
Hopefully, a lot of persons will be
interested in this industry in the com-
ing years.”

Visit Jessica’s Tilework and Studio
Gallery in Sea Breeze, Gleniston Park
Avenue. It’s opened from 10 am to 5
pm daily, based on an appointment
only policy.

Bahamian Art, Jewels By the Sea,
The Blue Pearl and Doongalik Stu-
dios also carry her designs.

















SEA BISCUIT TILE by Jessica Colebrooke...



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 5B



eS



Offering authentic Italian
dishes ‘made from scratch’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



mmanuel Tsakkos, owns

the oldest Italian establish-

ment around, called Cap-

pricio Ristorante, nestled

by the round-a-bout on
West Bay Street, opposite Sandals, offer-
ing authentic Italian dishes made from
scratch.

Its a family business that stems from a
long line of Italian chefs.

“You go to other restaurants to have
the same dish as our restaurant and it’s
like day and night,” said Mr Tsakkos.

“We have more seafood that anybody
else. We have veal, chicken, and pastas,
and we cook to order everyday.”

As you peruse through the menu of
Cappricio’s, you will come across an array
of options including : “cernia capro-
ciosa,” “cernia capril,” “cernia cesare,”
and “lobster santa luia,” all Italian
grouper and lobster dishes.

Tribune Taste sampled cernia alla
cesare (grouper in wine and herb sauce)
with French bread, based with garlic but-
ter and parsley, tossed in the toaster oven
to get a crisped fresh flavor.

Two workers from hotels nearby
enjoyed a basket of this bread, the first
appetiser to their main course at Cap-
priccio Ristorante Italiano.

“We didn’t want to do the normal run
for lunch at Subway, or Wendy’s,” said
one of the lunch partners. “I was really
hoping they had a meatball sub with sala-
mi which would’ve been nice.”

Soups include luinestrone, pasta fagio-
lo, all based with creamy and sweet tasting
medleys, including fried calamari, and
prosciuto melon dishes.

If you like cream sauce you can try one
dishes prepared with one of three pastas,
linguine, angel hair, and penne pasta. All
of them are very big sellers.

Mr Tsakkos said that most of his cus-
tomers come in the evening, and many
of them leave with good words about the
restaurant.

The bar provides a wide selection of
wines, and other alcoholic beverage
brands and soft drinks like iced tea.

For dessert, there is a delightful Ital-
ian coffee cake confection called tiramusu,
a big favourite at the resturant.

Murals painted on the walls from the
isle of Capri, Naples and Venice derived
from a picture taken by Mr Tsakkos give
Cappriccio Ristorante a nice Italian bistro
feel. The food was delicious, and the
atmosphere on point, but I would have
preferred to hear classical Italian music to
further set the mood rather than the jazz
music the resturant played.











CERNIA SICILIANA/GROUPER with peppers,onions and tomatoes...









CAPPRICCIO RISTORANTE’S cernia with red tomato sauce...









A CARIBBEAN CONCH SALAD — Brides and grooms hoping to add
some good fortune to their marriages have some interesting options to
consider when planning a wedding feast.

Cake, crickets
and other ‘lucky’
wedding foods

By MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON



Brides and grooms hoping to add some good fortune to their
marriages have some interesting options when planning a wedding
feast.

Many cultures around the globe have identified foods for new-
lyweds that supposedly will bring good luck, fertility or other
blessings.

The foods range from fried crickets to candied almonds to fish.

Attaching symbolism to food is a common practice throughout
the world, said Amy Bentley, associate professor of food studies at
New York University.

"All rituals and holidays and celebrations involve food," she said.
"This is somewhat universal."

In Mexico, brides and grooms sometimes dine on fried crickets,
lentil soup, and a bean, rice and agave dish, said Beatriz Mejia,
director of celebrations at One and Only Palmilla resort in Los
Cabos, Mexico. The crickets and the rice dish are said to bring fer-
tility and good luck, and the soup is associated with good luck and
good fortune, she said.

The resort has seen growing interest from couples outside of
Mexico in the foods and traditions of the region, she said.

"Couples today are seeking a more personalized and authentic
experience when they host a destination wedding that is reflected
in both the food and venue," she said.

Brides and grooms discussing their celebrations on the wed-
ding website TheKnot.com also seem more interested than before
in incorporating traditional elements into their plans, said Rebec-
ca Dolgin, an executive editor for the site. "Couples reaching into
their own culture is more popular now," she said. "Incorporating
culture is creating a buzz on the message boards."

Often, foods are considered lucky because of shape, color or
taste, Dolgin explained.

Italians serve almonds at weddings because their bittersweet taste
represents life, she said. The almonds are sugarcoated to wish the
couple more sweetness than bitterness.

Common at a Chinese wedding is whole fish, because the Chi-
nese word for fish sounds similar to the word for abundance, Dol-
gin said.

"The Chinese also believe that eating spring rolls will bring
wealth and prosperity,” she said. "Due to its color and size, it is also
thought to resemble gold bars."

Moroccan couples also eat fish because it's an ancient symbol of
fertility, she said.

Fish appears on the menu at many weddings, added Pam Frese,
a professor of anthropology at the College of Wooster in Ohio. Fish
and other white meats, such as turkey and chicken, are common
wedding foods because of old beliefs that women had whiter blood
than men, she said. White meats were thought to strengthen wom-
en's blood, so they were served at weddings to energize the bride.

"It was extra strength to her on her wedding night so she can
become a mother," Frese said.

In Caribbean countries, special attention is paid to the groom's
sexual performance on the wedding night, said Caitlin Austin, a
spokeswoman for Grace Bay Club in the Turks and Caicos.
Grooms are encouraged to eat the pistil of a conch "to increase
their drive," she said. "The conch's pistil is viewed by locals as
nature's Viagra."

Conch meat also is commonly served to wedding guests because
islanders believe it's an aphrodisiac, she said.

Wedding cake, one of the oldest elements of a wedding banquet,
also has connections to luck and fertility. "The traditionally accept-
ed practice is for the bride to have the first bite; otherwise, she'd be
childless and barren," Dolgin said.

Early English cakes were fruit cakes, and brides used to count the
number of raisins in their piece of cake to see how many children
they would bear, Frese said.

"The cake has power," she said. "It promises reproductivity."

Wedding cakes changed in texture and appearance in the 1920s,
when lighter cakes with fluffy, creamy frosting became more pop-
ular. But the symbolism remained, Dolgin said. The white cake rep-
resented the bride's purity. The decorations of flowers and other
signs of spring are meant to represent birth and new life, she said.

"It's this little bubble of nature in the middle of a wedding,"
Frese said. "It's the promise of fertility that's embedded in spring.”



For real refreshment, spike it with simple syrup

By ALISON LADMAN



PUTTING your own artisanal touch
on summer refreshment is simple. Lit-
erally.

Simple syrups are an often over-
looked — but as the name suggests,
incredibly easy — way of adding sweet
panache to a wide variety of drinks.
And summer's demand for tall and
cool beverages is an excellent excuse to
get acquainted with them.

Simple syrup is a standard bartend-
ing ingredient used as a sweetener in
many cocktails (it dissolves more read-
ily than dry sugar), as well as for soak-
ing or glazing some baked goods.
While it can be purchased, a simple
syrup is easily made by combining
water and granulated sugar, heating
until dissolved, then cooling.

The syrups also can be flavored by
adding fruit, herbs, citrus zest or other
ingredients and allowing them to steep
overnight. Once strained, the syrups
can be used as a beautiful, flavorful
way to spike seltzer water (creating
your own soda), cocktails or even cof-
fee (especially iced).

A traditional ratio for simple syrup
is equal parts sugar and water. But
when the syrup is intended for cock-
tails and other drinks, it's more com-
mon to use two parts sugar to one part
water. This ratio creates a thicker
syrup that both sweetens and adds



A RASBERRY-LEMON RICKEY (shown)
has gin and vodka along with a simple
syrup of raspberry and lemon.

(AP Photo)

body to a drink.

To help you get started, we've cre-
ated eight flavored simple syrups, as
well as drink recipes to use them in. Six
of the syrups follow the same basic
method, and have been condensed into
one recipe. The remaining two have
individual approaches.

BASIC FLAVOURED
SIMPLE SYRUP

Start to finish: 10 minutes active
(plus steeping overnight)

Makes 2 to 2 1/2 cups (depending on
added ingredients)

2 cups sugar

1 cup water

In a small saucepan over medium,
combine the sugar and water. Bring
to a boil, then remove from the heat.
Add flavoring ingredients (see options
below), then set aside until cooled.
Transfer to an air-tight jar, cover and
let sit overnight.

Use a mesh strainer to strain the
syrup, discarding any solids. Return
the syrup to the jar and refrigerate for
up to 2 months.

FLAVORING SUGGESTIONS
— Chili-saffron:

1 large pinch saffron threads

1 jalapeno chili, chopped

— Orange-star anise:

2 whole star anise

Zest from 1 orange

— Cranberry-ginger:

6-ounce package (1 1/3 cups) dried
cranberries

2-inch chunk fresh ginger, sliced

— Lemon-thyme:

Zest of 2 lemons

1 package (3/4 ounce) fresh thyme
sprigs

— Raspberry-lemon:

Zest of 2 lemons

10 ounces frozen raspberries,
thawed

— Cardamom-vanilla-berry:

1 vanilla bean, split and seeds
scraped into the syrup

6 ounces dried mixed berries

6 cardamom pods, crushed

POMEGRANATE-
PINEAPPLE
SIMPLE SYRUP

Start to finish: 10 minutes active
(plus steeping overnight)

Makes about 4 cups

16-ounce bottle pomegranate juice

3 1/2 cups sugar

6 whole cloves

6 ounces dried pineapple

In a medium saucepan over medi-
um, combine all ingredients. Bring to a
boil, then remove from the heat and let

cool. Transfer to an air-tight jar, cover
and let sit overnight.

Use a mesh strainer to strain the
syrup, discarding any solids. Return
the syrup to the jar and refrigerate for
up to 2 months.

CARAMEL-ROOT
BEER SIMPLE
SYRUP

Start to finish: 1 hour (plus cooling
time)

Makes 2 cups

1/4 cup water

1 cup sugar

Four 12-ounce cans root beer

1 vanilla bean, split and seeds
scraped into the syrup

In a large saucepan over medium-
high, combine the water and sugar.
Bring to a low boil and cook, without
stirring, until the syrup is a deep
amber.

One at a time, slowly pour in the
root beer. The mixture will sputter
and froth.

Add the vanilla bean, then bring the
mixture to a simmer and cook until
reduced to 2 cups.

Remove from the heat and let cool.
Remove the vanilla bean. Pour the
syrup into an airtight jar and refriger-
ate for up to 2 months.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010



ENTERTAINMENT

THE TRIBUNE





BEYONCE (left) is joined by her
husband, Jay-Z, as she arrives at
the 66th Annual Golden Globe
Awards in Beverly Hills, California

(AP Photo}

Jay-Z and
Beyonce to
compete at

2010 BET

awards

NEW YORK (AP) — Rap-
per Jay-Z and his wife, Bey-
once, will compete in three cat-
egories at the 2010 BET
Awards.

They're both nominated for
video of the year, best collabo-
ration and viewers’ choice. Jay-
Z received two nominations in
the video of the year category,
which includes newcomers
B.o.B and Melanie Fiona.

Jay-Z is the top contender
with five nominations; he's also
up for best male hip-hop artist.
Beyonce, Fiona and Alicia
Keys, who follow with four
nods each, are all up for best
R&B female artist. R&B
crooner Trey Songz also
received four nominations.

Other multiple nominees
include Rihanna, Maxwell,
Drake and Fabolous.

Queen Latifah will host the
awards show, which airs live on
June 27 from the Shrine Audi-
torium in Los Angeles.

US library
honours Paul

Cram
UU UB IIL Ce



By BRETT ZONGKER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP)
— When it comes to popu-
lar music, it doesn't get
much bigger than the tunes
Paul McCartney has written
and sung over the past five
decades with the Beatles
and on his own.

McCartney, who has been
knighted by the queen of
England, will be honoured
with Washington's highest
award for pop music this
week by the Library of Con-
gress.

On Tuesday, the 67-year-
old discussed his first major



PAUL McCartney performs in
his "Up and Coming" tour at the
Foro Sol in Mexico City on May
27

(AP Photo)

lifetime achievement award
from the U.S. government
at the library.

President Barack Obama
will present the Gershwin
Prize for Popular Song on
Wednesday at a concert in
the East Room of the White
House.

The Jonas Brothers, Faith
Hill, Stevie Wonder and
Jerry Seinfeld are part of an
all-star lineup that will hon-
or McCartney. The concert
will be televised July 28
nationwide on PBS.







Tingum Dem Band to pertorm
at Caribbean Tourism Ball

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

embers of the

Tingum Dem

Band are getting

ready to pack
their guitars, trumpets, drums
and keyboards and make their
way to New York City for the
Caribbean Tourism Ball to be
held next week.

The band, which was invited
by the Ministry of Tourism, will
perform at the event which is
scheduled for June 11.

Undaunted by the thought
of performing in front of big
crowd at this prestigious occa-
sion, Fred Ferguson band
leader told Tribune Entertain-
ment they are ready to show
off “wat dey gat”.

“We are honoured to be
hired by the Ministry of
Tourism to represent the coun-
try at the Caribbean Tourism
Conference Ball event,” Mr
Ferguson said.

While most Bahamians will
not be in attendance, Mr Fer-
guson said followers of their
band can expect nothing less
than a stellar performance.

“We are very happy for the
opportunity and we will per-
form our hearts out ...because
we want to show others that
our country too can produce
talented musicians.”

Bahamians familiar with the
music of Tingum Dem Band
know that this is a band which
usually performs soul and jazz



THIS WILL MARK the second time Tingum Dem Band performed in New York. Their first performance in New
York was at the famous Apollo Theater...

music from the 70’s and 80’s.
This is basically their signature
as a local Bahamian band.
However, they add their own
expressive cultural style to the
music.

“At the event, we will be
playing Bahamian music with
our flair to it. Then we will play
other music of course to satisfy
the dinner dance.

“So people can expect to
hear a little jazz, a little soul
music, some Bahamian music,
and music from the 70’s and
80’s,” he said.

Tingum Dem Band was
formed in 2003 to perform as
the house band for the
Bahamas’ 30th Anniversary
Independence Celebration.

Since then, the band has
been performing at a number of
events including Junkanoo in
June, the Cacique Awards and
various island festivals. The
band has previously performed
in some major cities in the
United States, Guyana, Suri-
nam, and other Caribbean
nations.

Tingum Dem Band was most
recently the house band at Da
Tambrin Tree Night club.
Presently, the band entertains
their loyal fans at Club Water-
loo’s “Old School Saturdays”
every Saturday evening where
music of the 70’s and 80’s
Junkanoo, Rake, and Scrape,
Soca, and Reggae Music is per-
formed live by the band.

The band is made up of ten
devoted and talented musicians.
They include Trent Carter, and
Shacara Newton who are the
band’s vocalists, Byron Thomp-
son keyboard player, Fred Fer-
guson lead guitarist, D’ Angelo
Moss trumpet player, Dion
Turnquest tenor saxophonist,
Earl Forbes, bass guitarist,
Colyn Grant drummer,
Andrew ‘Tino’ Richardson alto
saxophonist and Nat Williams
audio engineer.

Tingum Dem Band seeks the
support of their fellow Bahami-
ans as the head to New York
City. “We love what we do and
we are happy that others are
pleased with our music,” he
said.

Sex and The City 2 ‘is just great on many levels’

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

Sex and The City 2

Starring : Sarah Jessica Park-
er, Kim Cattrell, Cynthia
Nixon, Kristen Davis

YES, the lovely ladies are
back in the highly anticipated
Sex and the City sequel. This
time around everyone seems to
be exactly where they want to
be and looking as fabulous as
ever.

The movie takes place two
years after the first film. Carrie
is finally Mrs Big, Miranda has
realised that her fast-paced law
career may not be all it’s
cracked up to be, Charlotte’s
seeming perfect life is moving
along with the latest addition
to the family, and Samantha is,
well, still Samantha.

Still, what would SATC be
without a little bit of drama.
Carrie feels her marriage may
be losing its sparkle, Miranda
struggles with leaving her job,
Charlotte is feeling the pres-
sure of motherhood and the
affect a sexy new nanny may
have on her marriage, and
Samantha wants new worlds to



SARAH Jessica Parker (left) and
Kristin Davis look on upon arrival
for the Japan Premiere of the film
"Sex and the City 2" in Tokyo on
Tuesday...

(AP Photo)

conquer.

In need of a reality break,
the four ladies pack their
Manolos and turbans and head
to exotic Abu Dhabi for an all-
expenses-paid vacation at the
invitation of a wealthy sheikh
who wants Samantha to do PR
for his hotel.

The movie then goes on a
whirlwind of what you would
expect- the four friends having
the time of their lives. Like
Samantha says, the quartet are
soul mates despite their jobs,
children and husbands.

The tension mounts when
Carrie runs into her long lost
love Aiden in a spice market,
Samantha can’t conform to the
societal expectations of the
Middle East, and Charlotte
admits that her perfect life may
be a little less than ideal.

For true SATC fans, this
movie is like a visit from a real-
ly good friend you haven’t seen
in a long time.

It’s great to get dressed up
and see how everyone is doing,
reminisce about good times and
share some new adventures.

Unlike the first movie, which
focused so much on the Big and
Carrie drama, this film is light-
hearted; it’s like cotton candy -
pretty to look at and super
sweet.

Yes, the plot may sometimes
veer off into politically incor-
rect territory, mainly in the way
it portrays the women of Abu
Dhabi and their burga-wearing
traditions.

This drew early criticism, but

Dunst reprises her role
as witness in NYC trial

By JENNIFER PELTZ
Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — It was
witness stand, the sequel, for
Kirsten Dunst.

The "Spider-Man" star
reprised her role Tuesday as a
star witness against a mechanic
being tried — for the second
time — on charges of helping
steal her designer purse from a
Manhattan hotel suite during a
2007 movie shoot.

Wearing a demure, loose
black dress and a sometimes
weary expression, the actress
gave jurors a clipped, subdued
account of returning from film-
ing to find her $2,000 Balencia-
ga handbag gone from a SoHo
Grand Hotel penthouse suite.

Her assistant's bag and co-
star Simon Pegg's cell phone
and other possessions also were
taken from the room, which
was being used as an actors’
lounge while the 2008 comedy
"How to Lose Friends & Alien-
ate People" was shot down-
stairs.

"All our belongings were
gone. I thought that my assis-
tant had taken them and put
them somewhere else, but
everything was gone,” Dunst
testified. Inside the bag were
her wallet, credit and other
cards, vintage Ray-Ban Way-
farer sunglasses and $2,000 in
cash, she said.

Besides calling hotel security
staffers and police, "We even
went outside to look for our
bags, like maybe it was dumped











ACTRESS Kirsten Dunst arrives at
63rd Cannes international film fes-
tival, in Cap d’Antibes, southern
France, on May 20...

AP Photo)

in a Dumpster," she added.

The mechanic, James
Jimenez, was convicted last fall
of trespassing, but jurors dead-
locked on a more serious bur-
glary charge. He's being retried
on that charge. Defense lawyer
Robert Parker said Jimenez, 36,
just tagged along with a co-
defendant he believed had per-
mission to be there.

Dunst, 28, played her part in
the real-life court drama Tues-
day in a noticeably more
somber, matter-of-fact manner

than she did at Jimenez’ first
trial in September, when she
greeted judge and jurors with a
chipper "Hi!"

She rebuffed Parker's sug-
gestion of a party atmosphere
surrounding the overnight
shoot on Aug. 8 and Aug. 9,
2007, which concluded her film-
ing obligations for the movie.

Parker has noted that co-
defendant Jarrod Beinerman
has a drug history, including
pleading guilty in the 1990s to
playing a part in a drug-deal-
ing ring. Beinerman wasn't
charged with any drug-related
offenses in the SoHo Grand
episode; he pleaded guilty in
2008 to attempted burglary and
was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in
prison. His lawyer didn't imme-
diately return a call Tuesday.

Dunst's assistant, Liat
Baruch, testified last week that
she had a small amount of mar-
iyuana in her own bag and was
planning to smoke it after the
shoot. But she and Dunst testi-
fied that Dunst knew nothing of
that, and Dunst said she doesn't
smoke the drug in general.

"We wrapped at 5:30 in the
morning and found our bags
were stolen, so we went home,"
having celebrated with nothing
more decadent than a takeout
dinner order from the posh
sushi restaurant Nobu, the
actress said.

Her bag, wallet and cards
were eventually returned to her
manager's office, but she never
recovered the cash and sun-
glasses, she said.



MOVIE REVIEW

let’s face it - SATC gained its
reputation for being sexually
irreverent.

It’s part of the appeal and
why the franchise is so popu-
lar. I must say I was disap-
pointed with the Carrie/Aiden
story line.

It was badly developed and
wasted a potentially good plot
opportunity. It was frankly just
a little too corny for my liking.

The movie also focused less
on sexual escapades, probably
as a nod to its location, than
the series did. And honestly,
the sex scenes were not missed.

SATC2 is just great on many
levels, there are many laughs
to be had and it’s a refreshing
juxtaposition with the girls all
grown up in New York City
and the decadence and fun we
have come to expect of them
in Abu Dhabi.

* Fine Arts Explosions &
Youth Talent Jam

Don't miss this night filled
with explosive talents from
Living Waters Kingdom
Ministries’ youth, fine arts
and local artists such as T-
Mac and Lyrically Blessed.
Thursday, June 3, starting
at 7pm at Living Waters
Kingdom Ministries.
Admission: free. Tele-
phone: 326-4292.



¢ Introduction to Yoga
Classes by Dave Reving-
ton

Expert yoga teacher, Dave
Revington will hold an
"Introduction to Yoga"
class this Saturday, June 5
continuing through the
first Saturday of every
month from 1.30 pm to
3.30 pm at Providence
Pilates Studio.

This class is designed to
introduce the practice of
yoga to anyone who have
never attended a yoga
class and want to discover
the benefits of this time-
honoured practice in a
safe, supportive environ-
ment. Spaces at a special
price of $35 and are limit-
ed. Telephone: 323-0121.

¢ RM Bailey's Homecom-
ing King and Queen Com-
petition

RM Bailey Senior High
School invites you to the
Homecoming King and
Queen competition, Sun-
day, June 6, Spm at the
National Performing Arts
Centre. Cost: $10/students
and $20/adults in
advanced; $15/students
and $25/adults at the door.
Telephone: 393-2295.

* 10th Anniversary of The
Allegro Singers

World Premiere OPUS 1
arranged by Geoffrey
Sturrup, conducted by
Antoine C Wallace, fea-
turing the Opus 1 ensem-
ble, June 11 and 12,at 8pm.
College of the Bahamas
Centre of the Performing
Arts featuring Bahamian
music by Blind Blake,
Joseph Spence, E.
Clement Bethel, Edmund
Moxey, Eric Cash and Lou
Adams Sr.

¢ Bahamas Gospel Party
Marlin and Cacique
Award winners, Vanessa
Clarke along with Shauna
Joseph are taking this
year’s Bahamas Gospel
Party to Coconut Grove, ,
Florida, on Friday, June 4,
for the big Bahamas
Goombay Festival Cele-
bration. The duo will
launch their new CD,
‘Bahamas Gospel Party.’



The Temptations’
Ali-Ollie Woodson
dies at 58 after
battling cancer







THE TEMPTATIONS (from left to right) Theo Peoples, Otis
Williams, Melvin Franklin, and Ali-Ollie Woodson, pose after
being given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the Holly-
wood area of Los Angeles on September 14, 1994. Woodson, who
led the legendary Motown quintet The Temptations in the 1980s
and ‘90s and restored them to their hit-making glory with the song
"Treat Her Like A Lady," has died. He was 58. Motown Alumni
Association President Billy Wilson says Woodson died Sunday,
May 30, 2010 in southern California after battling cancer.

(AP Photo)



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 7B



ARTS





New murder mystery
‘Island Salt’ released

LOVE, murder and mys-
tery are the themes of a new
book by Grand Bahama resi-
dent Sydney Watson. ‘Island
Salt’ is the author’s first island
fiction and stems from her
original goal to write a novel
while living in the Bahamas.

This goal, however, was
quickly delayed when Ms
Watson arrived in Grand
Bahama just three weeks
before the devastating hurri-
canes of 2004.

“We were oceanfront at the
time between Viva Fortuna
and Club Caribe,” said Ms
Watson. “We left our cottage
in a paradise setting and
returned to find total devas-
tation as well as looters.”

Ms Watson, a former Eng-
lish Professor and Florida
native, moved to Grand
Bahama six years ago to begin
writing this novel while her
husband worked in the yacht
industry. During this time she
returned to teaching locally,
working on the novel in the
summers. “TI can’t create when
I’m teaching. My students
become my priority, and all
my energy is invested into
their success.”

So, a few years later she fin-
ished the manuscript and has
spent the past year rewriting
and proofing her book, ‘Island
Salt.’

On June 2 Ms Watson will
launch her book to the public
at the well-known Garden of
the Groves at 6pm. “It’s excit-
ing finally having ‘Island Salt’
released! The characters and
Island Salt itself really did take
on a life of their own, and get-




‘ISLAND SALT’ is the first island
fiction novel for Sydney Watson,
a local teacher in Grand Bahama.
Her book is set in Grand Bahama
at a legendary bonefishing lodge
where love, murder and mystery
abound. Ms Watson’s heroine,
Kit MacKane - a woman strug-
gling to keep her business afloat
and love life intact - must unrav-
el all the secrets in her life to
solve the ultimate mystery — her
brother’s disappearance. The
author will have a launch of her
book on June 2 but the book is
currently available on barne-
sandnoble.com and amazon.com

ting it all out to the reading
public is quite a thrill!” she
exclaimed.

The event is an open invita-
tion to all interested readers
and Watson will also read
small excerpts from the novel
- aiming not to give away the
ending of this fast paced island
thriller.

‘Island Salt’ is set in Grand
Bahama at a legendary bone-
fishing lodge where love, mur-

der and mys-

tery abound.
Based around
her heroine,
Kit MacKane,
a women
struggling to
keep her busi-
ness afloat and
love life intact,
Kit must unrav-
el all the secrets in her life to
solve the ultimate mystery —
her brother’s disappearance.

Ms Watson describes her
book as a “fun, tongue-in-
cheek read with a dash of
romance and suspense!” But
she also hopes to give readers
a glimpse into island life,
something she has experi-
enced her whole life, especial-
ly as a Florida Keys native.

“Really, Grand Bahama is
much like the Florida where I
grew up. South Florida was
not much more than a strip of
isolated beaches, orange
groves and west of Federal
Highway (U.S.1) - swamp and
alligator wrestling! We had no
AC.

“We really did sleep out on
the porches under the ceiling
fans in the summer to catch
the ocean breeze.”

Watson will be selling her
book at the launch but ‘Island
Salt’ is currently available on
barnesandnoble.com and ama-
zon.com, the worlds’ leading
book sales websites.

The first review of her book
was released by P. Callan of
Independent Book Reviewers
and it was noted “Watson
needs to keep writing! We

$7

want more Kit MacKane!





Artist unveils exclusive
‘By Sea’ exhibition

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia. net

JONATHAN Bethel
unveiled a year’s worth of work
at an exclusive exhibit last
Thursday at the Nassau Yacht
Club called ‘By Sea’; the title
coined from the Bahamian say-
ing ‘by land or by sea.’

His inspiration came from
island hopping through the
country.

His piece, ‘Passing by Chip
Channel,’ showcases the wide
expanse between the two cays
by Tahiti Beach. This is a vivid
painting that you can walk right
through, “because it’s got that
feeling of space,” he explained.

‘Passing by Chip Channel’
takes a view from the dock of
the beautiful shallow waters off
Ship Channel Cay, Exuma
where a shark swims harmless-
ly by.

In this painting, the use of a
bright red-coloured life pre-
server projects the background
of the Abaco waters. It’s this
particular accent that makes
the painting “pop.” ‘Passing
by Chip Channel’ is a repeat
from January’s ‘Arts in the
Parks’ in Abaco.

K Smith, one of the leading
pencil artist in the Bahamas
who works with the graphite
and coloured pencil artist says:
“Jonathan is a realistic land-
scape mechanical painter.

“His use of light and shad-
ow is good, which is something
that I use in my work,” said Mr
Smith. “It’s this use of light
and shadow that creates the
realism, depth, and dimension.”

Mr Bethel’s ability to pro-
duce lifelike images captures





JONATHAN BETHEL with the latest collection of paintings from his pri-
vate showing at Nassau Yacht Club last week...

the essence of the natural envi-
ronment as well as the authen-
ticity of historical architecture
such as landmark hotels, pres-
tigious private clubs, and pri-
vate residences.

Mr Bethel is quickly emerg-
ing as a formidable artist, with
a sizeable following, represent-
ed by a crowd of some fifty-
strong persons Thursday night

He says ‘By Sea’ covers sum-
mer themes, defined by ocean-
ic backgrounds, including land
mass, coconuts, sea grapes and
sea flowers surrounding land
as far as Exuma, Harbour
Island, and Nassau.

“You can’t re-create a pho-
tograph 100 per cent, and you
don’t necessarily want to

because you don’t want to com-
pete with it. I’d say these paint-
ings are 80 per cent accurate,
even though I do my own
embellishment and put my own
spin on things.”

See photos from Mr Bethel’s
new exhibit in this month’s Par-
adise Magazine, which gives
him a lot of exposure to inter-
national visitors; featuring his
amazling detailed depiction of
Bahamian destinations like
Treasure Cay and Harbor
Island.

Seven pieces were sold out
of the twenty piece collection
on the night of the exhibit.
View Jonathan Bethel’s latest
and past works at www.bethel-
gallery.com




































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Full Text


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 5



Parents claim students jets in Grant Satan
‘unjustifiably expelled’

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



CONTROVERSY has again hit the
Bimini All-Age School, with parents
claiming several students were unjus-
tifiably expelled just before their final
exams.

The Ministry of Education is looking
into the allegations, but a representa-
tive said no expulsions had been
authorised for the school. Parents said
this supports their suspicion that the
school did not follow proper protocol.

Education Director Lionel Sands
said: “The authority to expel a stu-
dent does not lie with the school. If
there is a request for expulsion it is
conveyed to the district superinten-
dent, then to me, and then it is passed
on to the minister for his considera-
tion. No such request has come to me
or the minister.

He added: “Nothing has come to me
officially and that is the challenge. Par-
ents are willing to go to the press with

Allegations of expulsions
just before final exams



their complaints, but I can only address
things when I know they are happen-
ing and I find out when everyone else
finds out - which is unfortunate
because we should be able to do these
things.”

An email purporting to have been
sent by concerned parents claimed two
grade 11 students and one grade 10
student were expelled without suffi-
cient reason.

It read: “These students are being
expelled from the school either with-
out proper procedure or were forced
to take a transfer to (a costly private
school). Some of these poor children
cannot afford to pay the fees and thus
have no other choices than quitting

education.”

The school came under the spotlight
earlier this month when an email from
the same account asked the media to
investigate why several students were
unable to take extended papers for
two BGCSE exams.

The problem turned out to be an
administrative miscommunication and
was resolved after The Tribune’s
inquiry.

The parents say they suspect that
some school officials who were found
to be at fault in the examination mix-
up might have now become vindictive.

Attempts to speak to senior officials
at the school were unsuccessful up to
press time yesterday.

OOS ORC OTe ee TOT





AS COMMONWEALTH
BANK celebrates its 50th
anniversary, the Bahamian
bank demonstrated its com-
mitment to protecting the her-
itage and environment of the
Bahamas by announcing a
major donation to the
Bahamas National Trust.

“Building our community
has always been a major pri-
ority for the bank, and studies
have shown how a positive
environment reflects on the
attitudes of the people, not to
mention protecting the beau-
ty of the Bahamas, which is
the attraction for so many of
our visitors,” said William

CE com

HUMAN ESS,



PICTURED FROM LEFT TO
RIGHT: Vice-president of inter-
nal audits Carole Strachan;
Commonwealth Bank’s presi-
dent and CEO, William B Sands
Jr; Eric Carey, executive direc-
tor, Bahamas National Trust;
and bank vice president and
ClO, Charles Knowles.

the Bahamas approved the
expansion of the Fowl Cays
National Park in Abaco, the
existing West Side National
Park in Andros, as well as the
valuable reef system which
surrounds the Conception
Island National Park. The
bank’s donation will assist

: By DENISE MAYCOCK
: Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

: housing remains high in Grand
: Bahama, according to Minister of
: Housing Kenneth Russell, who
: indicated that many requests have
: come in for government houses,
: especially in the Heritage Subdi-
: vision.

: also looking at moving up into the
: Heritage area where we have
: about 60 to 70 teachers and other
: civil servants looking for houses

Sands Jr, president and CEO
of Commonwealth Bank.

“Thus, the partnership we
are continuing today with the
Bahamas National Trust will
have a positive and lasting
impact on the environment
and will result in initiatives
that seek to improve the
health and quality of life for
Bahamians and tourists
alike.”

Since 1959, the Bahamas
National Trust has made vital

contributions to the manage-
ment and protection of the
country’s natural resources,
lands, parks and marine life.
In its 50 years, the Trust has
successfully created and pre-
served a national conserva-
tion strategy for the Bahamas
and is the only non-govern-
mental organisation in the
world with the responsibility
for managing the national
park system of a country.
“The Bahamas National

Trust is exceedingly grateful
to corporate citizens like
Commonwealth Bank which
recognise the importance of
protecting and sustaining our
environment,” said Eric
Carey, executive director,
BNT. “The Trust plays a sig-
nificant role in the protection
of marine and land ecosys-
tems in the Bahamas. In
October 2009, during our 50th
Anniversary Gala Ball cele-
bration, the government of

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greatly in supporting the
Trust’s ongoing conservation
efforts.”



FREEPORT - The demand for

“People are still coming forth
to purchase houses and we are

KENNETH RUSSELL



up in that area,” he said.
During a press conference at

FNM Headquarters on Saturday, Minister Russell gave
: an update on the housing project underway at Hawks-
: bill.

He said the project there is progressing well and

nearing completion, with 40 houses already finished
: and occupied.

He noted that an additional 10 houses are expected to

be built to complete the first phase.

The second phase will consist of another 40 houses, he
said.
The subdivision is expected to be officially opened in

another two months. It will be named Wellington Pin-
: der Heights in honour of the late Rev Dr Wellington
: Pinder, who past away in April.

Rev Pinder was considered one of Grand Bahama’s

: most influential leaders, having served as moderator for
: the Zion churches for 30 years, pastor of Upper Zion for
: 35 years, as a member of the local board of Works for
: 29 years, member of the Independence Committee,
: honorary president of the Grand Bahama Christian
: Council, and most worthy officer in the Grand United
: Order of Odd-fellows Lodge.

He was also a Justice of the Peace and a recipient of

the Queen’s Badge of Honour.

Minister Russell noted that the subdivision was sup-

posed to have been opened already, but problems
; delayed completion.

“We ran into some financial and contractor prob-

: lems and we are...more or less conducting some micro-
: management of some of the contractors so that we can
: finish,” he explained.

The subdivision at Hawksbill was initially intended for

the relocation of residents in Pinder’s Point, Mack
: Town, Hunters, and Lewis Yard following the devas-
: tation caused by Hurricane Wilma in those areas.

However, many of the residents there have had prob-

lems meeting the loan qualification at the Bahamas
: Mortgage Corporation.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

American and Bahamian
soldiers remembered in
Memorial Day ceremony

By LINDSAY THOMPSON



THE Bahamas joined the United
States in remembering the fallen sol-
diers who gave their lives for both
countries in war during a Memorial
Day Service on Monday.

The ceremony was held at the his-
toric Clifton Memorial at the western
shoreline of New Providence, where 10
men of Patrol Squadron 23 died on
May 7, 1954, while on a mission
designed to improve US defences
against enemy submarine attacks.

Sir Arthur Hanna, Governor Gen-
eral of the Bahamas, and Nicole
Avant, US Ambassador to the
Bahamas, brought remarks, which
underscored the importance of the day
to both countries.

“On this observation of Memorial
Day, the United States of America
remembers the valiant American men
and women who gave their lives in the
defence of their country and its allies
around the world,” Sir Arthur said.

“The achievement and defence of
the independence, territorial integrity
and freedom of a nation sometimes
demands a high cost and great sacri-
fice.”

The US, he said, is fortunate that
many of its sons and daughters have
always been prepared to pay that cost
and to make that sacrifice.

Hence, it is fitting that the day is set
aside to honour, commemorate and
give thanks for their sacrifice, he said.

“It is also fitting that the Govern-
ment and people of the Bahamas
should join with our American friends
in this observance since our two coun-
tries are allies and good neighbours
to each other.”

Sir Arthur said that in the struggle to
save humanity from the Nazis and fas-
cists in the last century, the Bahamas,
though still a colony, “gladly served” as
a base and training ground for Amer-
ica and Great Britain.

US and Bahamas
explore Underground
Railroad history

“A number of Bahamians and
Americans of Bahamian descent have
served in the armed forces of the Unit-
ed States and some have also made
the supreme sacrifice. We are proud to
include them in this memorialisation,”
he said.

Sir Arthur recalled that Bahamian-
born Private First Class Norman Dar-
ling of the US Army Field Artillery
Regiment in Baghdad, Iraq, was killed
in a bomb attack on April 29, 2004.
He was 29 years old.

“T know that the Bahamian people
join me today as I salute him, the
Americans who perished at this place,
and all those who have made the
supreme sacrifice,” Sir Arthur said.

Ambassador Avant said Memorial
Day is always a special day for Amer-
icans, but that it means more during
times when their country is at war.

She noted that she brought remarks
on a beautiful island nation known for
its beaches and tranquillity.

Beaches

“We both realised that on this day,
the beaches of our country attract mil-
lions of families who gather to cele-
brate the beginning of summer and
most importantly, they come together
in remembrance and appreciation of
the men and women of our armed
forces who lost their lives - many on
beaches around the world,” the ambas-
sador said.

Such sites were Omaha Beach in
Normandy to Guadalcanal and the
island battles throughout the pacific
theatre.

“The Bahamas belongs to a great
alliance, a union committed to democ-
racy, individual liberties and the rule of
law.

“During World War II, the
Bahamas served as an important air
and sea way-station in the Atlantic
and essential flight training and anti-





- a St oon | a r F FA te
GUN SALUTE by the Commando Squadron of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force during the US Memorial Day Ceremony at
the Clifton Memorial on Monday, May 31.





submarine operations were conduct-
ed,” the ambassador said.

She thanked the Bahamas for work-
ing together with the US to ensure the
safety and security of its citizens.

“Together we work on strategic pro-
grammes that protect our mutual eco-
nomic and national security interests,”
she said.

Ambassador Avant thanked the
American soldiers who died at Clifton,
and those buried at Arlington Nation-
al Cemetery in the US, who lost their
lives in war and in the line of duty.
She also encouraged their families to
continue to honour the memories of
their loved ones.

At the Clifton Memorial ceremony,
family members of the fallen heroes
paid tribute, and Patrol Squadron 23
survivor Chief Petty Officer David
Brillhart recalled the tragedy and paid
homage to his fallen comrades.

Two wreaths were released into the
ocean — one by Petty Officer Trevor
Glasgow of the United States Coast

Guard and the other by SFC Sh ; :
West. ame See Ae ater SIR ARTHUR FOULKES, Governor General of the Bahamas, brings remarks during

the Royal Bahamas Defence Force P- the US Memorial Day Ceremony for the 10 men of Patrol Squadron 23. The cere-
42. mony was held at the Clifton Memorial on Monday, May 31.







THE United States
Embassy in the Bahamas
and the Ministries of
Tourism, and Youth, Sports
and Culture sponsored an
Underground Railroad
Conference this month to
explore the history of
escaped slaves who settled
in the Bahamas in the 19th
century after fleeing the
US.

Held at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort from May 17-
20, the conference brought
together guests from the
Florida Senate, National
Park Service and colleges
and universities in the US.

The meeting was kicked
off with a cultural ceremony
on the opening night where
guests were treated to per-
formances by the CCDN
dancers, Belcanto singers,
Bahamas National Dance
School, National School
Drummers, RBDF Pop
Band and the Boy’s Choir.
The ceremony closed with a
grand junkanoo finale.

Minister of Youth Sports
and Culture Charles May-
nard impressed upon the
audience the importance of
preserving and recognising
this important history.

US Embassy Political and
Economic Counsellor Jeff
Dubel said: “We hope that



RITA PRATT, conference coordinator, makes presentations to Jeff

with this conference we will
further solidify the excellent
relationship our nations
share as we work to com-
memorate the history of the
Underground Railroad.”

On day two, participants
enjoyed a day of lectures by
noted Bahamian historians
and programme managers
from the National Park Ser-
vice Network to Freedom
Programme.

School children from
across New Providence were
told about the complex his-
tory of the Underground
Railroad connection with
the Bahamas, which was
illustrated by the experts
with pictures and docu-
ments.

Participants were then
invited to tour the sites con-
nected with this history on
New Providence and
Andros.

These site visits included
guided tours of Delancey
Town, Gambier Village,
Clifton Park and Red Bays,
Andros.

All the participants agreed
on the great potential for the
Underground Railroad to
serve as a catalyst for his-
toric education, preservation
and heritage tourism
between the US and the
Bahamas.

Dubel, Political/Economic Chief in the US Embassy, and Senator
Anthony C Hill, 1st District, Florida Senate.





Sep et aT ve = = . = ae are ee STs oo Sie

=

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD CONFERENCE delegates were taken on a tour of the Clifton Heritage Site on May 18. The participants included Senator
Anthony C Hill, 1st District, Florida Senate; Barbara Tagger, US Department of Interior National Park Service; Senator Jacinta Higgs, chairperson of the
Clifton Heritage Authority; Gladys Johnson-Sands, Bahamas Consul General, Miami, Florida; Dianne Miller, US Department of Interior National Park Ser-
vice; Rita Pratt, conference coordinator, former Speaker of the House of Assembly Italia Johnson and Wendy Rejan, Political Officer, US Embassy.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD.

has an immediate vacancy for three

Premier Banking Bankers

Applicants must hold the following:

Bachelor's Degree in Administration, Finance, Economics or related degree
A minimum of 3 years experience in private banking

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

Totally fluent in English and Spanish

Develop and manage a portfolio of private banking clients by analyzing the banking and
investment needs of corporate and high-net worth individuals and offering financial and
Investment alternatives.

Maintain existing client relationships by monitoring the financial condition of assigned
accounts, executing cliant instructions, and Keeping clients updated as to the changing
conditions of financial markets,

Travel to assigned countries to enhance current client relationships and develop new
business by meeting with representatives and clients.

Supervise a Private Banking Assistant.

Ensure that all private banking activities are in compliance with internal policies

and procedures and external regulatory requirements.

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed to the Human
Resources Manager. P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than June 10, 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

Spo

WEDNESDAY, JUNE

PAGE 9



eG a eG aan

St. Augustine’s College
oraduate in record-
breaking form in
400m hurdles

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was such a historic per-
formance for Michelle Cum-
berbatch that she wasn’t even
quite aware of her achievement
at the NCAA Division II Out-
door Track and Field Champi-
onships.

“The feeling that I had
about my performance can not
be explained,” said the Lincoln
University freshman. “Coming
out on top as the champion is
such a wonderful feeling and a
great achievement for me.”

The St. Augustine’s College
graduate was referring to her
victory in the women’s 400
metres hurdles. She ran 56.85
seconds to erase both the meet
and the Bahamian national
records in the process.

“T know that I was going to
do well, but I didn’t know that I
was going to run such a won-
derful time,” she said. “I’ve
been running 59 seconds in the
hurdles all season and to drop
to 56 in a matter of weeks is
unreal.”

Shattered

The time shattered the meet
record of 58.18 that was posted
by Lynnsey Dailey of Fort Val-
ley State in 2006 and he
eclipsed the national record of
58.71 established by Carmel
Major of Boise State in 1986.

“After I had crossed the fin-
ish line in the race, the
announcer had said something
about me setting anew NCAA
record. But at that moment I
was so tired and worn out that I
was not focused,” Cumberbatch
said.

“About 20 seconds later
when I caught my breath, that’s
when it dawned on me. I was
ecstatic and filled with so much
joy. I felt as though I was on
cloud nine.”

As for the national record,
Cumberbatch said she wasbn’t
aware of it until her coach at
SAC, Dianne Woodside,
emailed her congratulating her
on her feat.

“Thefeeling of knowing that

Ssoorts

OTES

TENNIS
LUNN AT USTA TOURNEY



JUSTIN Lunn, seeded
number three, defeated Ste-
fan Cooper of Texas 6-4, 6-2
in the second round of the
USTA Tennis Tournament in
Florida over the weekend.

Lunn was defeated by
Gino Meeuwsen of Pembroke
Pines, Florida 7-6 (3), 6-2 in
the round of 16.

Lunn will compete in the
Coral Springs Open Men's
Designated tournament this
weekend.

TENNIS
GATORADE OPEN NATIONALS

THE Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association will continue its
Gatorade National Open Ten-
nis Tournament at the Nation-
al Tennis Center today at 4 p.m.

The organisers are playing
double matches today.

On Thursday, the remain-
ing of the men’s singles match-
es will be played.

The finals in both the men
and ladies singles as well as the
doubles are scheduled to be
played over the weekend.

TENNIS
‘DOUBLE THE LOVE’ TOURNEY

THE Bahamas Lawn Ten-
nis Association will be hold-
ing its ‘Double the Love’ Ten-
nis Tournament at the
National Tennis Tournament
beginning on Saturday, June
19

SEE page ten









RECORD-BREAKER: Michelle Cumberbatch

NCAA DIVISION 11 OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Thad achieved such a feat after © Caribbean Championships in

















m@ BERMUDA: ICC PEPSI DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM WORLD CRICKET LEAGUE

balamas crasi

to fourth deteat

c” Undefeated Canada win by 10 wickets

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



he struggles continue in Division I

for the Bahamas in the Interna-

tional Cricket Council's Pepsi

Development Program World
Cricket League.

The Bahamas dropped its fourth consecutive
game of the tournament in Bermuda when they
fell to the Canada yesterday by 10 wickets.

The Bahamas won the toss, elected to bat first
and in turn posted 98 runs in 36.5 overs.

The undefeated Canadian team easily sur-
passed with 101 runs in just 8.5 overs in response.

Naraendra Ekanayake was the leading scorer
for the Bahamas with 31 runs not out, while Greg
Taylor and Dwight Weakly each added 17 runs.

In Monday's match the Bahamas lost to the
United States by a total of 115 runs.

The USA won the toss, elected to bat first and
scored 307 runs with 8 wickets in 50 overs.

The Bahamas in their turn at bat scored 192
runs with 10 wickets in 47.4 overs.

Rohan Parks netted a team high 39 runs,J
ohnathan Barry finished with 37, Greg Taylor
added 33 and Marc Taylor chipped in with 31.

Ekanayake and Weakley took 2 wickets apiece.

The Bahamas lost to Bermuda in the opening
match last weekend as the host country won by
seven wickets in 28.1 overs.

Only two Bahamian batsmen reached double
figures, Ekanayake with 58 runs, and Weakley
with 28 runs.

In match two, the Bahamas fell by 111 runs to
the Cayman Islands.

Weakley, Ekanayake and Barry each took two
wickets in the loss.

Six

The tournament features six teams taking part:
Argentina, the Bahamas, host Bermuda, Canada,
Cayman Islands and defending champion the
United States, competing for the top spot and will
have both 50-over and Twenty20 matches.

Bermuda and Canada remain undefeated thus
far at 4-0, the United States stands at 2-2, the
Cayman Islands and Argentina are both 1-3 while
the Bahamas remains the tournaments only win-
less team at 0-4.

Following today's rest day, the Bahamas will
end 50-overs play against Argentina tomorrow.

The Twenty20 schedule begins June 4 when the
Bahamas is set to face the Cayman Islands and
the final pool match is set for the following day
against the host country Bermuda.

Playoff rounds begin on June 6.

Reporters News
and Sport

years of training and struggling
to get to where I am is amaz-
ing,” she said. “Although I have
done so well this past weekend,
I still have miles to go before I
get to my desired goal. That’s to
compete for my country on the
Olympic scene.”

Before she get there, Cum-
berbatch have a couple of inter-

July and the Commonwealth
Games in India in October.

“T didn’t not know that I
qualified for both of those
events. Knowing now that I did
is every good for me,” she said.
“But I may be in school during
the Commonwealth Games.

“Tf all goes as planned, I will
be able to make both events

national meets to look forward
to after qualifying for both the
Central American and

COB Summer Camp offers
something a little different

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SEE page ten



IF you’re looking for something a
little different for your child or chil-
dren to participate in this year, then
the College of the Bahamas second
annual Summer Camp is the event.

Camp director Sean ‘Bass’ Bastian
said they are offering an unique set up
with the focus on basketball, swim-
ming, track and field and soccer over
the four weeks from June 28 to July
23 between the hours of 9 a.m. to 2
p-m. “This camp is a little different
from the other camps in that the head
coaches of our various disciplines will
head the disciplines, except for swim-
ming,” Bastian said. “We don’t offer
swimming as a discipline at COB just yet.”

SEAN BASTIAN

Instructors

Instructors for the camp are Brio Stuart will serve as the head
instructor for swimming. Vandkye Bethel will head soccer, Edward
Clarke in track and field and Kirk Basden in basketball.

“It’s a little different in that we have these four disciplines that
we are offering,” said Bastian, who serves the head men’s basket-
ball coach, but will be working along with Basden, his assistant
coach. While from Monday to Thursday the campers will go
through the various drills and funadamentals of each of the sport,
Bastian said on Fridays they will go on a field trip to the Adastra
Gardens & Zoo, Mario’s Bowling & Entertainment Palace, Gal-
leria Cinema and a Fire and Prevention and Safety Presentation by
the Royal Bahamas Police Force’s Fire Department.

“Last year, we had in total about 65 campers but this year we
expect more because of what happened and the calibre of camp
that we are offering,” he said.

“This is the place to be. I’m sure that at the end of the four
weeks, the campers will all be very skilled in the four disciplines that
we are offering.”

For those persons interested in participating, the cost of the
camp will be $180, which will include a camp t-shirt. Interested per-
sons are urged to contact Bastian at 302-4591 or email sbast-
ian@cob.edu.bs for further information.

“This is the second year that we are hosting the camp and we are
really looking forward to the camp growing bigger and better
than it was the first year,” Bastian said. “So make sure that your
children get involved. It’s going to be a lot of fun.”



AN TED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
narratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers
who want to make a difference
at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We’re the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we’re on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience
e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour

Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet@tribunemedia.net
Or
drop in your applications at
our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,
Managing Editor, The Tribune.



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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Swift wins 3 medals at US

Master swimming nationals

Swift Swimming took three swimmers to the 40th Anniversary
of the US National Masters Swimming Championships at the
Georgia Tech University Olympic pool.

Percy Knowles came away with 3 medals in the 75-79 age
group while Andy and Nancy Knowles improved on their entry
times moving up in the rankings.

Percy won medals in the 50yd and 100yd breast and the
100yd free. He won a bronze in the 100yd breaststroke in
1:58.12, a Sth place medal in the 50yd breaststroke in 50.56, and
a 8th place medal in the 100yd free in 1:48.01.

Andy finished with a 14th place in the 500yd free in 5:41.06,
a 17th place in the 200yd Free in 2:04.19, and a 21st place in the
100yd free in 56.02.

Nancy finished with a 23rd place in 5Oyd fly in 37.57, a 28th
place in the 100yd free in 1:16.27.

The meet saw some 2,000 swimmers competing representing
all age groups from 18 to 90 years of age.

There were swimmers of all sizes and shapes, some from
Olympic background and some having just learnt to swim.

People fighting different health issues while experiencing
the sheer joy of swimming and meeting once again with friends.
It was the last time that the full body racing suits were worn with
FINA banning them at the beginning of the year and now the
US Masters Swimming following suit (pun intended).

I predict that some of the records set at this meet will last for
40 years. Swift now looks to the World Masters Swimming
Championships in Sweden in July and August.







IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(IN LIQUIDATION)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Official Liquidator of Clico
(Bahamas) Limited (In Liquidation), Mr. Craig A. (Tony)
Gomez, will convene a meeting of all Creditors of the
Company on Monday the 21st day of June A.D., 2010
at 11:00 o'clock in the forenoon at the Eritish Colonial
Hilton Nassau, Windsor Roam, No. 1 Bay Street, Nassau
Bahamas. The agenda for the meeting is as follows:

1. For the Official Liquidator to determine whether a
Creditors Committee should be established,

2. Ifitis agreed that a Creditors Committee be
constituted then the Official Liquidator will receive
nominations from the Creditors present and/or their
representatives for persons to be appointed to the
Creditors Committee.

3, The Official Liquidator will also provide an update on
the progress of the Liquidation,

Dated this 31st day of May A.D,, 2010

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez

(Official Liquidator)

—— £010
FORD EXPLORER KIT

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lm CARTIE CO AND CHAMCEM BOATS 6TH ANNUAL GILBEY’S ALL TACKLE FISHING TOURNAMENT

Calm seas ... rough fishing!

Three days of fishing wound up at the
Cartie Co and Chamcem Boats 6th Annu-
al Gilbey’s All Tackle Fishing Tournament
at the Flying Fish Marina in Clarence
Town, Long Island on Saturday, with 5
boats entering no weight at all! The weath-
er was as near to perfect as it can get, but
the full moon (or so the anglers claimed)
wrecked havoc with the fishing. This tour-
nament normally sees weights close to 800
Ibs over the three days; this year top weight
was only 305lbs brought in by the D’Fish N
Sea Captained by Robert Wells, winning his
boat a whopping $9,500.00 cash. In sec-
ond place for the Greatest Combined
Weight Over the Three Day Period was
the Sunseeker with 221 lbs followed by
193lbs for local Long Island vessel Derelict.

In the Longest Fish category, Sunseeker
Captained by Brent Fox sealed the deal
on the second day with his 62” Wahoo that
won the grand prize of $9,500.00 cash. In
second place with a 55 ?” Wahoo was 2
Little 2 Late, Captained by Jason Edler,
and in third place was the D’Fish N Sea
with 542”.

A total of 11 boats competed this year,
with 42 anglers and 2 junior anglers; Jalen
Knowles fishing on Scorpio and Tyler
Cartwright on the Still Slunkin. Although
boat numbers were down this year, coor-
dinators Cathy Darville, Amanda
Cartwright and Francis Darville were
pleased to report that enthusiasm was at an
all time high and the sportsmanship was
outstanding!

With their focus on marine conservation
and awareness, the Committee invited
members of the Bahamas National Trust to
attend and provide information on the BNT
and sign up members for a Chapter on
Long Island. President Neil McKinney
spoke at the Closing Ceremonies address-
ing the Long Islanders particularly on the
lack of conch available in the surrounding
waters of the Island. His plea of preserva-
tion was met with mixed emotions and he
acknowledged that this change of mindset
is not an easy task, and it would take time
for people to understand the concept that a
fish (species) is worth more alive than dead.
Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries the
Honorable Lawrence “Larry” Cartwright
addressed the audience on the benefits of
the Tournament including the economic
boost brought to the community each year
by this event.

In an effort to include children in the
Tournament, the Committee introduced
the “Ocean Mission” for children ages 6-12.
A total of 15 children participated in the
journey around the Clarence Town Harbor
and saw over 20 turtles, sting rays, coral,
sponge, fish, egrets, herons, and seagulls.
President of the BNT, Neil McKinney
accompanied the children, along with ZNS
cameraman Timothy Wilson and reporter
Vaughn Albury and witnessed the clean
up of a harbor beach that amounted to a 55
gal drum of plastic, metal and paper prod-
ucts. Mr. McKinney provided details of
developing marine eco-systems and habitats
while enjoying the cool ocean breeze.

Each evening the residents of Long



@ THE BOATS





LIST OF BOATS 2010 Length Weight
LION FISH — Danny, Ricky, Leslie Darville 47 89 Ibs
TROP EASE — Gavin, Brandon, Michael Cartwright 41 45 Ibs
Neil Knowles

DERELICT - Ricky & Andy Wells 49 193 Ibs
D’FISH N SEA — Robert & Barbara Wells, Bruce 54 305 Ibs
Pinder, Andrew Rahming, Divinci Rolle

BUSHMAN/SEAHAWK - Barry Knowles, Heather 38 50 Ibs
Bailey, Rob Edgar

SUNSEEKER — Brent Fox, Billy “Gruff” Pinder, 62 221 Ibs
Danny O’Leary, Luke Maillis, Chris Burrows

BIG DADDY — Marvin, Neil, Ranny Cartwright - -
JOBSITE — Gordon Ritchie, Greg Cartwright, Lou 44 73 Ibs
Carroll, Andrew “lron” Cartwright, Kevin Pratt

SCORPIO — Ben, Dutch Boy, Jalen Knowles 44 85 Ibs
2 LITTLE 2 LATE — Jason Edler, Rusty Watters, 55 73 Ibs
Lance Shaughnessy, Kyle Blakenship

STILL SLUNKIN — Duncan Love, Matthew Wells, 46 157l|bs
Andrew Knowles, Donnie Lisgaris, Tyler

Cartwright











Island came out to support this event, and
participate in Sponsor Trivia, a Guy Harvey
Auction and the overall excitement of the
Tournament.

The Committee wishes to Thank all
Anglers, Sponsors, Attendees, Flying Fish
Marina and Enthusiasts on an exceptional
event and a special Thanks to the team of
the D’Fish N Sea, who donated $2000.00 of
their winnings back to the Committee in
preparation for next year’s event!

LIST OF SPONSORS 2010

Gilbey’s; King & Co.; Darville Packaging;
Island Cellular; Carroll Shipping Co.;

Scotiabank; Professional Insurance Consul-
tants; Fox Locksmithing; Archipelago Painter's
& Developers; Henry F. Storr Electric; Con-
stantakis Sea Enterprise;

Outer Edge Grill; M&S Crane Rental; Ulti-
mate Door & Window; A.I.D; Bling Bling Car
Wash & Rental; Ministry of Tourism; Inter
Coastal Marine; Mia Dean; LMR Custom Rods &
Tackle; Burrows Trucking;

JWK Construction; Island Connections;
Baystreet Garage; Discount Tyre & Battery;
Under The Sun; Caballo Grande; Montagu
Motors; Over Yonder Holdings; Harbourside
Marine; Panama Jack; Caribbean Bottling Com-
pany; Echo Water; Guy Harvey Ocean Founda-
tion; In The Bite; Sun Oil Ltd.

Double boxing joy for Lester Brown Jr

THE first round of thel4th
Wellington ‘Sonny Boy’ Rah-
ming Silver Gloves Tourna-
ment got underway on Satur-
day at the Wulff Road Boxing
Square.

The tournament is being
organised by coach Ray Minus
Jr and his Champion Amateur
Boxing Club. It is being spon-

sored by D’Albenas Agency
Limited.

A number of matches were
contested with Lester Brown
Jr. leading the way as he won
both of his bouts. Brown Jr.
won a three round decision
over Moses Almonor and he
came back and beat Tyrone
Oliver in thee rounds as well.

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

In other bouts, Don Rolle
won a three round decision
over Mark Almonor; Javano
Collins won a third round TKO
over Anwar Davis; Marlon
Wallace win in three rounds
over Trevor Lowe; Theron
Smith beat Machano Fawkes in
three rounds; Anton Brown
pulled off a three round deci-
sion over Michael Lightbourn
and Dennis Smith got a three
round decision over Machano
Fawkes.

“The first day of the show
was very successful,” Minus Jr.
said. “All of the boys were
between the ages of 14-16,
except for one match. Don
Rolle was just 12 and Mark
Almonor is 13. All of the boys
performed very well.

“We had a lot of people who
came out to support the box-
ers. Our sponsors, D’Albenas
was represented and Ron’s
Auto Electric Motor. We had a
very good showing.”

The tournament was sched-

uled to continue this weekend,
but because of the holiday,
Minus Jr. said they will post-
pone the second round until
Saturday, June 12 when they
pick up the action at 6 p.m.

Originally, the tournament
was also scheduled to be an
elimination to the final, but
Minus Jr. said because the com-
petition was so keen in the first
round, they have decided to
extend the elimination so as to
give the competitors some more
action.

Boxers will be vying for the
most improved award, the fight
of the tournament and the most
outstanding boxer. Additional-
ly, Rahming will be on hand to
select a boxer whom he feel
deserve special recognition.

Rahming is a former ama-
teur boxer, who has turned a
coach. He has worked with a
number of amateur boxers in
the country and has assisted just
about all of the amateur coach-
es.

Magnificent Michelle

FROM page nine

and do well if God permits. ’ve never competed on the senior lev-
el before and to make those teams is going to be a wonderful
experience for me.”

Having attained such a goal all in one shot has Cumberbatch
yarnng for a lot more.

“For the remainder of the season, I’m going to continue to train
and work hard so that I can continue to decrease my time in the 400
hurdles,” she said. “Although that time was good, there is still
room for improvement and hopefully produce a time of 54 sec-
onds.”

Cumberbatch also competed in the 400, but she fell short of
advancing to the final. She got third in the first of three heats in
54.56 for ninth overall. The eighth and final qualifier did 54.48.

However, Cumberbatch ended the meet by running the opening
leg of the 4 x 400 relay that placed second in 3:40.25.

Cumberbatch, an economics major, said she’s now looking for-
ward to coming home to compete in the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ National Open Track and Field Champi-
onships over the weekend of June 25-26.

sporis notes

FROM page nine

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THE TRIBUNE

Time Magazine article |)... =

on crimes against
tourists in Bahamas

FROM page one

important question: How safe are
you while on vacation?”

The inspiration for the article
came from contact made by a cruise
ship passenger and Bahamas armed
robbery victim Carly Milne, who
happened to have been one of the 18
tourists robbed at gun point while
on a Segway tour in the Earth Vil-
lage, Nassau, in November 2009.

“Milne reported the incident to
the police, and later contacted the
Avenger, hoping to get the word out
about the rising crime rate in a pop-
ular stop for American tourists,”
reads the article, which appeared in
the news magazine online travel sec-
tion, as part of a series of articles
written by “Time.com’s Travel
Avenger”, which follows up on read-
er’s travel-related complaints.

Exploring Ms Milne’s Bahamas

crime complaint, the reporter
records that while “crime in the
Bahamas has been generally con-
fined to residents, outside of a few
episodes of pickpocketing and other
petty offences” there has been a rise
in the overall crime rate in recent
years and a “troubling shift” may be
taking place that sees more tourists
being targetted by Bahamian crimi-
nals while visiting the islands.

After describing the robbery of
the 18 tourists at gunpoint in
November, the reporter states that
statistics from the Bahamas govern-
ment detailing crime against tourists
in 2009 “show one murder and 19
cases of armed robbery — 18 of
which came in the single November
Segway hijacking.”

However, the article contends
there is evidence that these were not
the only incidents that took place.

In support of this, it notes the rob-

bery of the 11 cruise passengers by
the Queen’s Staircase “in broad day-
light” and quotes both a Miami-
based Maritime attorney, Jim Walk-
er, “who represents cruise passen-
gers” and a report from the US gov-
ernment's Overseas Security Advi-
sory Council (OSAC) as providing
examples of other armed robberies
of tourists in the Bahamas, some “at
more remote locations.”

Tourists who are “planning a
Caribbean cruise and want to avoid
trouble” are advised to “use com-
mon sense.”

“Stay in groups, keep to the more
heavily trafficked parts of town and
don't do anything stupid, like try to
buy drugs,” states “The Avenger.”

And in what may be considered a
silver-lining in the cloud of bad pub-
licity for Bahamian tourism officials,
although not for their counterparts
in Jamaica, it ends with the final

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS





B ‘





18 TOURISTS were robbed at gunpoint while on a Segway tour in the Earth Vil-

lage in November 2009.

warning: “And do steer clear of
Jamaica. Experts agree that it’s cur-
rently the most dangerous country in
the Caribbean.”

Yesterday Basil Smith, Chief
Communications Officer at the
Ministry of Tourism told The Tri-
bune the Ministry is aware of the
article.

However, he downplayed the sug-
gestion made in it that visitors should
be wary of The Bahamas as a desti-
nation because of crime.

“We maintain The Bahamas is the
premier cruise destination in the
Caribbean and we are also safest
cruise destination in the region,” he
stated, adding that the Ministry

“continues to do what is necessary to
protect our visitors in partnership
with the security forces.”

As for suggestions that crime may
go “under-reported” by local author-
ities in order to protect the tourist
industry, the communications chief
said the Ministry of Tourism “is very
candid about our statements to the
local media about crime because we
are aware that the international
media has access to the local media
and often use them as a source.

“We make no attempt to obfus-
cate or disguise crime statistics,” he
said, adding, however, that police
are primarily responsible for releas-
ing such figures.

Oil could hit the Florida
Panhandle by Wednesday

PENSACOLA BEACH, Fla.

A FLORIDA beach might
get hit with oil from the Deep-
water Horizon accident for
the first time Wednesday as
sheen likely caused by the
accident was reported less
than 10 miles off Pensacola
Beach, according to Associat-
ed Press.

A charter boat captain
reported the oil Tuesday
afternoon and state and local
environmental officials con-
firmed that it was about 9.5
miles offshore. Winds are
forecast to blow from the
south and west, pushing the
outer edges of massive slick
from the spill closer to west-
ern Panhandle beaches.

Emergency crews began
Tuesday scouring the beaches
for oil and shoring up miles
of boom. Escambia County
will use it to block oil from
reaching inland waterways,
but plans to leave beaches
unprotected because they are
too difficult to protect and
easier to clean up.

The spill's arrival coincides
with the beginning of the Pan-
handle's summer tourism sea-
son, which normally brings
millions of dollars to the
region.

"It's inevitable that we will
see it on the beaches," said
Keith Wilkins, Escambia's
deputy chief of neighborhood

and community services.

The oil has been creeping
toward Florida since the
Deepwater Horizon rig
exploded on April 20, killing
11 workers and eventually col-
lapsing into the Gulf of Mex-
ico. An estimated 20 million
to 40 million gallons of oil has
spewed into the Gulf, eclips-
ing the 11 million that leaked
from the Exxon Valdez dis-
aster. The rig was being oper-
ated for petroleum giant BP,
which has tried unsuccessful-
ly for six week to stanch the
oil.

The Florida report followed
an orange and oily mess wash-
ing up on Alabama's beaches
earlier Tuesday. Crews
cleaned up the oil that they
described as having the con-
sistency of a "tarry mousse,"
but health officials closed the
beaches to swimming.

Pensacola Beach officials
said their request for about
$150,000 from BP to buy sift-
ing machines and a tractor to
help remove oil from the
beach's famous white sands
has lingered unanswered for
more than three weeks. BP
has promised it will pay any
expenses, but Panhandle offi-
cials say the bureaucracy has
been slow. Some think the
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency should be run-
ning the cleanup operation,
not BP.

"We need the sifters and
we haven't gotten them
approved yet," said W.A.
"Buck" Lee, Santa Rosa
Island Authority's executive
director. "It's been three
weeks and the oil is coming.
In my opinion, this entire
thing should have been a
FEMA project all along. If a
hurricane blows the roof off
your jail, you shouldn't have
to wait and send a letter to
BP to replace the roof on your
jail.”

Lee said BP has spent mon-
ey on public relations, but not
on preparations for beach
cleanup. The company has
provided the sate with $25
million to promote tourism.
Escambia approved $700,000
in emergency funding for
tourism promotion Tuesday,
with another $700,000 to be
allocated in 45 days.

Lee said the bureaucratic
process set up at the federal
staging centers in Alabama
and Louisiana have also made
it difficult to get information
about his pending request.

Coast Guard Chief Peter
Capelotti, spokesman for the
Mobile, Ala.-based command
center, did not have an imme-
diate answer late Tuesday
about the delay in approving
Escambia county's request for
the tractor and other equip-
ment.

Capelotti said command

t-te eel ime)

lacie @
ie eee en



center officials expect more
oil to make landfall in Alaba-
ma and the Florida Panhandle
through Friday.

On Pensacola Beach, emer-
gency crews are prepared for
along summer of oil clean up.











They plan to remove oil in
cycles after it is pushed
onshore and the winds shift.
Removing oil while it's mov-
ing onshore doesn't make
sense, Wilkins said.

"It would be like trying to

FLORIDA GOV.
CHARLIE
CRIST surveys
the Gulf of
Mexico oil spill
Tuesday May 4,
2010, as seen
from a Florida
Air National
Guard C-130
airplane several
miles from
where the
Deepwater
Horizon oil rig
blew up and
sank off the
coast of
Louisiana. (AP)

go out and clean up in the
middle of a hurricane," he
said. "We will wait until after
the bands make their way
onshore and the weather
shifts and then we will clean
up before the next band hits."

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Tribune Business Editor

THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY,

©
t
2 ie en — —

all

JUNE 2,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL FIDELITY

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RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

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$857m developer ‘avoids’ $4m in tax

By NEIL HARTNELL



* Leading Bahamian law firm’s partner sucessfully, and legally, advised



leading Bahamian

law firm successfully

advised the developer

of an $857 million

New Providence-

based resort project how he could
legally reduce his Stamp Duty expo-
sure by 40-50 per cent, given that the
initial $103 million transaction could
have created a $10.3 million exposure.
Documents lodged in the New York
State Supreme Court, which have been

obtained by Tribune Business, show

how attorneys at Higgs & Johnson
advised developers of the South Ocean
resort project how they could avoid
$4-$5 million in Stamp Duty payable
on real estate acquisitions by restruc-

turing the deal.

‘Royal battle’ over

taxes not needed



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day said it was not necessary to
have a “royal battle” between
the Government and the pri-
vate sector to reach a “middle
ground” on the former’s tax
increases, although he acknowl-
edged the hikes would be
“untenable” for some firms and
“really and truly could mean
job losses”.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness as he was heading to a
meeting of Bahamas-based
manufacturers, who were plan-
ning their response to the Gov-
ernment’s plan to end the
Industries Encouragement Act
incentives they were receiving,

* Chamber chief says
possible for ‘middle
ground’ to be reached
between government and
private sector over tax rises

* One firm says profits
‘wiped out’ and plunged
into $250k annual loss if
Industries Act changes
go through

* Investor in manufacturer
tells Tribune Business no
dividend taken in five years

Khaalis Rolle said one such

SEE page 3B

Benchmark ‘rosy’
despite net worth
slashed in half

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BENCHMARK (Bahamas)
yesterday said it was not con-
cerned that its $586,806 net loss
in the 2010 first quarter had
halved its net worth by almost
50 per cent, telling Tribune
Business it was “in good shape”
with a “rosy” outlook, now that
its Carmichael Road commer-
cial centre was close to com-
pletion.

Julian Brown, the BISX-list-
ed company’s president and
chief executive, said that
although net shareholder equi-
ty had been trimmed to around
$500,000 as a result of the first
quarter loss, the impending
revaluation of its real estate
development - in which it has
invested $2.5 million - would
alleviate any concerns in this
regard.

* BISX-listed firm sees worth
cut to around $500k by
$586,806 Q1 loss, but ‘in
good shape’ as it awaits
real estate revaluation

* Carmichael project ‘99%
there’ and 70% lease
commitments in, as
construction complete
and utilities to go
in by end-June

* Revenues up by 26%, but
firm continues to be hit
by market volatility

“We're in good shape,” Mr
Brown told Tribune Business.

SEE page 2B

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Michael Allen, an attorney and part-
ner at Higgs & Johnson, in an e-mail to
Roger Stein, the RHS Ventures prin-
cipal who is fighting a legal battle to

remain as the project’s general partner,
advised that Stamp Duty payments
could be minimised to “nominal” lev-
els if they were paid up front “in one
lump sum”, rather than spread out

over the course of the development
to reflect the transaction’s true value.

Higgs & Johnson, Mr Allen, Mr
Stein and all those involved in the
South Ocean development and the

South Ocean developer how he could minimise Stamp Duty by 40-50%
* Some $4-$5m avoided in tax on project’s real estate purchases
by paying ‘nominal’ amount in upfront lump sum
* Based on $103m deal, initial structure would have created $10.3m liability
* Attorney: ‘More we are perceived to be paying, the greater the likelihood
that the Treasurer will accept our determination of what is due’

Stamp Duty transaction have done
nothing wrong. Mr Allen’s advice
merely represents good advice on a

SEE page 2B

Outback owner explores options
to protect $400-S500k investment

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Other brand options eyed, while most employees will be transferred to airport
Kafé Kalik if Australian dining concept does not return to East Bay



THE Outback Steakhouse franchise
owner yesterday said he was exploring oth-
er brand options for the East Bay Street
restaurant while it is under renovation, as it
does not want to lose the $400,000-$500,000
invested in this if talks with the franchisor

go south.

Tyrone Nabbie told Tribune Business

User car imports left on the dock

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN USED Car
dealers yesterday said they
were praying the Prime Minis-
ter will reverse the 85 per cent
Excise Tax rate on cars with a
more than 2,000 cc engine
capacity, several having been
forced to leave imported vehi-
cles on the dock last week
because they had not budgeted
for the increased payments.

Partner in S&L Auto,
Solomon Uboh, told Tribune
Business he was surprised when
the Customs Department last
week sought an extra $7,000
from him to collect his cars

that while reopening OutBack Steakhouse
after the renovations were completed is
still being mulled, other ideas are being
floated for the East Bay Street location,
which is leased by the restaurant.

There have been suggestions that the

weeks away. Staff have been made aware
and placed on vacation in the interim.
“We are not trying to mislead anyone
or the staff,” he said. He added that the
Outback Steakhouse franchise, which is
Australian-themed, is having struggles of its

decision has already been made not to

from the dock.

And this was only hours after
the Prime Minister had
announced that the duty regime
for car imports had been con-
solidated to two rates, 65 per
cent and 85 per cent, with the
rate no longer determined by
size but engine capacity.

Mr Uboh said the new rates
will drastically alter his busi-
ness model, as he will have to
import cars with smaller
engines to keep his lot filled
and offer customers competi-
tive prices.

“T really bring in BMWs, but
now because of the increase I
have to bring in something
smaller to stay in the game,”
he said. “But I have to live

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

reopen, but Mr Nabbie said this was still

SEE page 2B

according to whatever they
[government] say.”

Antonio Forbes, operations
manager at Grace Auto, said
people do not typically invest
$30,000 to $40,000 on new cars,
making used cars their first
choice.

Yet the duty rate increase
has locked his latest vehicle
imports in limbo on Customs’
Dock, and he will likely slash
the amount of imports his com-
pany brings in.

“Now you have to get your
cars off the dock piece piece,
because you already budgeted
(60 per cent) for them,” said
Mr Forbes. “You get this one

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report





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Money at Work


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Enforce the laws already on books

PREVIOUSLY, I said the police
should be allowed to do policing. Eas-
ier said than done, especially if there is
no clear understanding of the con-
cept/role of policing. As with any con-
cept that comes to the Bahamas, it
becomes Bahamian because we devel-
op, manage and maintain the idea. We
must, however, be very careful - as
mentioned last week - not to ’copy’
and ‘paste’ the concept, then attempt
to publish it without the necessary edit-
ing and corrections. I am a firm believ-
er in not reinventing the wheel, but I
also realise that one wheel does not
fit every car.

Current Condition

With that said, it must first be under-
stood that our model of policing is
very different from that of the US.
Whereas US law enforcement has sev-
eral levels and divisions, the Bahamas
has one national police force that is
responsible for all islands. We are
familiar with American policing terms
such as city, county, state and federal.
All terms represent different policing
divisions and different jurisdictions.

Further, if circumstances become
very volatile, there is also the option of
calling in the National Guard. Here
in our Bahamas, we have the Royal



Safe &
Secure







by Gamal Newry





Bahamas Police Force, who do every-
thing from dignitary protection to
school policing to court security and
Central Bank escorts. All functions
are carried out by the same organisa-
tion. So here you have a national
organisation stretching from Grand
Bahama to Inagua, delivering a ser-
vice that is so wide and diverse in its
scope that, in my opinion, effective-
ness, efficiency and sustainability are
but ‘a faint illusion’.

Redeployment

Immediately upon reading this col-
umn Mr Minister of National Security
and Mr Commissioner of Police, get
trained police officers on the streets.
Officers assigned to clerical tasks, such
as accountants, secretaries, carpenters,
electricians, pump attendants, chauf-
feurs, mechanics and musicians, all of
whom make up the numbers, need to

be placed in frontline functions.

Additionally, support services such
as the Fire Department need to be
removed from the count. There should
be no reassignment here as there is a
shortage of personnel as it is, and this
function should not be tampered with.
Nevertheless, it is misleading when the
public is told that there are 100 hun-
dred officers, but 25 are firefighters
and another 25 are deployed to non-
policing functions such as those listed
above. Really, there are 50 officers
assigned to frontline policing, and that
is 50 divided by four given the time of
the day.

Sustainable Assignment

Can you say Z-E-R-O Tolerance? I
take you back to the events of Sep-
tember 4, 2001; September 11, 2001;
April 19, 1995. All events associated
with these dates were the result of
ignoring the little things. The minor
infractions left unattended will result in
disastrous consequences. It is the old
story that failing to attend to the cracks
in the dam will allow for a flood that is
much more difficult to manage.

The surge in crime in this country, in
my opinion, is a result of our toler-
ance of the little things. The officer
pulling you over for speeding being

met with: ‘Why you all do not go after
the real criminals?’ Well folks, Timo-
thy McVeigh and team were appre-
hended because of a traffic violation (a
broken tail light), not a real ‘criminal
act’.

Far too often motorists across New
Providence create a third and fourth
lane while talking on their cell phone.
If the police were to arm every officer
with fixed penalty booklets and traffic
management tools, then we will see a
reduction in this offence. The enforce-
ment of what is perceived to be minor
reduces and limits the opportunity for
major offences.

Why are cars driving without prop-
er lighting and specifications? Why
are motorcyclists riding without hel-
mets, many of them with no registra-
tion, and why are underage persons
allowed to purchase alcohol? These
are the roots. Why are we waiting to
tackle them when they become large
trees, bushes and forests? If this is not
criminal, then what is?

Further, the crimes committed by
offenders require them to move from
home to the point where the offence is
to be committed. This being the case,
a more aggressive approach to traffic
enforcement is necessary.

Nevertheless, to give credit to the

police we do sometimes see this zero
tolerance approach, but it is never
maintained. Case in point, Friday past
saw a swarm of police activity on var-
ious intersections throughout New
Providence during the evening hours.
Heavily armed officers could be seen
stopping and searching suspect vehicles
and issuing traffic citations.

Excellent, except that on Saturday
and Sunday, as I drove through these
same intersections, very little police.
We are all familiar with the various
flood stories that have occurred during
the ages; usually they only last for a
season. Consistent, sustainable
approaches are needed for effective
policing.

There is no magic bullet to policing
our country, but it is also not rocket
science. Simply, there are laws that
exist which need to be enforced.

NB: Gamal Newry is the president
of Preventative Measures, a loss pre-
vention and asset protection, training
and consulting company, specialising in
policy and procedure development,
business security reviews and audits,
and emergency and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to PO Box N-
3154 Nassau, Bahamas, or e-mail
info@preventativemeasures.net or vis-
it us at www.preventativemeasures.net



CAR, from 1B

this week and get the others the next
week, but if you keep it there too long
Customs will charge you for storage.”

He said the government should have
let businesses like his know before
imposing the new tax, or given it a July
1 start date like many of the other
increases and changes unveiled in the
Government’s 2010-2011 Budget.

“The Government needs to recon-
sider this and think about it,” said Mr
Forbes. “It causes you to cut back on a
lot of things, but mostly the [car] order
is not as big.”

He suggested the Government
should have cut its spending or taxed
the numbers houses instead of impos-
ing tax increase that are sure to hurt
business.

One used car lot partner, Ray
Thurston, said he only imports vehicles
with smaller engines.

Mr Thurston said the increase could
minimally affect him, but he had
always imported fuel efficient vehi-
cles.

“T try to keep the engines small,
especially with the gas situation,” he
said. “I'll feel it, but it won’t be as
severe.”

SUN OIL LIMITED
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Sun Oil Limited seeks to identify:
PROFESSIONAL TRACTOR TRAILER DRIVERS



Outback owner explores
options to protect the
$400-$500k investment

FROM page 1B

own internationally.

“We are at a point where it is midway through the fran-
chise,” said Mr Nabbie. “We are assessing the viability of
the business, so in good faith we closed with intent to ren-
ovate. Outback itself as a brand is having its own strug-

gles.”

Mr Nabbie suggested that the restaurant had also
became a victim of the recession, as lay-offs across the
island put a dent in its Bahamian customer base and
the “economy doesn’t help as it is now”.

However, Mr Nabbie said the best business decision
will be made in the next few weeks. He added that if Out-
back did not return following the renovations, most of the
employees will be relocated to his expanding Kafe Kalik

Franchise.

“We will pay their vacation pay while we make our
considerations,” he said. “We'll find other things to do
with the employees. Some of them don’t understand the
business decision we have to make, but we will find oth-
er places for most of them as the airport [Kafe Kalik]

opens.”

in New Providence and Exuma

The successful candidate(s) will assume the role of Driver/
Operator. This position is responsible for the daily execution of
key responsibilities within a bulk fuel facility. These responsibilities
include the safe receipt, storage and delivery of bulk petroleum
products in accordance with strict industry and company standards.
Successful candidates must be able to demonstrate a proven track
record of safe driving. Successful experience in the petroleum

industry would be plus.

Core Responsibilities

* Daily inspection of assigned truck(s) and associated equipment.
* Safe truck loading and delivery of petroleum products through

out the island.

* Provide exceptional customer service at all times.

« Adhere to company driving policies and the Highway Code of

the Bahamas.

* General fuel handling operations associated with the receipt,

storage and redistribution of petroleum products.

Job Requirements

* 5 years minimum work experience in a similar capacity.
* In depth knowledge of The Highway Code of The Bahamas.
«A strong safety record. Saftey related trainings would be a plus.

* Defensive driving training would be a strong plus.

*A mechanical aptitude with some experience with equipment

maintenance and repairs.

* Strong leadership skills with the ability to work as an effective

team member.

¢ Excellent verbal and written communications skills.
* The ability to work flexible hours and weekends.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package,
commensurate with work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than June 4, 2010 to:

jobs @sunoilbahamas.com



BENCHMARK, from 1B

which it is holding and has not sold.
The company attributed its $586,806 net loss

“When we have the [Carmichael Road] project
fully completed, we will do the revaluation.

“We will try and get it done in the second
quarter, and if that does not happen, then in the
third quarter. We’re not concerned about it in
terms of valuation issues, as we know we have an
asset that is not fully accounted for at this time.

“We don’t want to do it prematurely; we want
to do it when it’s complete. We’re 99 per cent of
the way there.”

Mr Brown told Tribune Business that Bench-
mark (Bahamas) first foray into the commercial
real estate market, which is situated at the corners
of Carmichael and Fire Trail Roads, was “just
about complete” with commitments already in
hand to lease about 70 per cent of the available
retail space.

A Bank of the Bahamas International branch
is acting as the anchor tenant, and Mr Brown
said: “Carmichael Road looks good. The pro-
ject is just about done. Construction is complete.
We’re just waiting for utilities to come into the
property.

“That should be done by the end of June.
Water is already in. We’re no waiting on elec-
tricity and cable. We have leases out to various
tenants and hope to get them back signed, and
have them occupy the space as soon as possible.

“We have had some very good inquiries from
potential new persons as well. Hopefully we can
nail those down, and then things will be looking
splendid at Carmichael Road. I don’t see any
roadblocks to prevent us from getting that fully
leased before the end of the year.”

Benchmark (Bahamas) moved away from its
investments roots and branched into real estate
development to diversify its revenue/earnings
streams, in particular seeking to mitigate the
negative impact on the bottom line of ‘unrealised
losses’ incurred by its portfolio.

The unrealised profits/losses refer to changes in
the value of Benchmark’s investments, such as

during the three months to March 31, 2010, toa
$528,585 depreciation in the value of its invest-
ment portfolio. In turn, it blamed this on the
“volatility” of the Bahamian and global markets.

“One of these days I’m going to be able to
tell you it’s changed. The volatility of the market
and the direction of the market is very difficult for
us. Everything else is looking very rosy,” Mr
Brown told Tribune Business.

On the positive side, he pointed to the 26 per
cent year-over-year revenue increase for the 2010
first quarter to $324,917, and added: “On the
top end things are going OK. We’re seeing an
improvement in our revenue streams, but we’re
taking it on the unrealised losses/gains in the
portfolio because of the exposure we have.

“At some point, that should change and have
a Significant impact on the bottom line.”

On the revenue increase, Mr Brown said this
was “primarily” due to earnings streams gener-
ated by Benchmark (Bahamas) offshore bro-
ker/dealer subsidiary, Alliance Investment Man-
agement, plus a special dividend paid by Com-
monwealth Bank.

Alliance, he explained, had benefited from its
existing client base enjoying growth in assets,
along with an infusion of new clients. With fees
linked to the value of assets under management,
Alliance had reaped the rewards.

May, though, had been a bad month for the
global stock markets, Mr Brown said, impacting
upon both Benchmark (Bahamas) and Alliance
Investment Management.

Expenses, meanwhile, had increased by 9 per
cent to $282,538 during the 2010 first quarter,
something that had left Mr Brown “kind or sur-
prised”. He was uncertain of the cause, but
believed it might relate to the fact that Bench-
mark (Bahamas) had “paid for certain items we
wanted to be in Carmichael ahead of time”.

On an operational footing, Alliance Invest-
ment Management suffered a $478,471 net loss in
the 2010 first quarter. Benchmark Advisors lost

equity shares and fixed-income instruments,

$5,812, and Benchmark (Bahamas) $102,523.



TAX, from 1B

legal way to ‘avoid’ or minimise
a client’s tax exposure, some-
thing all attorneys do, and does
not amount to tax evasion.

However, the situation again
highlights the Government’s
difficulty in maximising its rev-
enues in the face of clever
lawyering, particularly when
there are numerous legal loop-
holes that can be exploited.
This is one reason why the
Ingraham administration is now
so desperate for revenues.

In his Wednesday, April 16,
2008 e-mail to Mr Stein, Mr

rer Ce

Ste im se Bae) pete es
‘Must have excellent oral
ate ea ae La
SME amor oe
Sa eco aL
Ser lcm coke
Semele)

Allen placed the total value of
the New South Ocean project’s
Stamp Duty obligations as $5.03
million.

“Per our ongoing discussions
on stamp transfer tax savings,
both counsel for South Ocean
Development Company and I
strongly believe there is a defi-
nite strategic advantage to pay-
ing funds for Stamp Duty oblig-
ations on all the land purchases
now in one lump sum, rather
than in part over the next few
months as originally contem-
plated, as we expect this will
result in significant savings on
the obligation connected specif-

Employment Opportunity

Shift Operators

Pit telre elmo ie cree Se mL

Sete
mide)

nights, weekends and holidays

eet ue ecm
humresources.hr@gmail.com



ically with the South Ocean
Development Company trans-
action of approximately $4 mil-
lion,” Mr Allen wrote.

There were three land pur-
chases involved in the deal,
namely the acquisition of the
South Ocean resort properties
themselves from the Canadian
Commercial Workers Industry
Pension Plan (CCWIPP); the
purchase of the golf course and
surrounding land from New
Providence Development Com-
pany; and a final land parcel
from a private citizen.

In his e-mail, Mr Allen
informed Mr Stein: “I note that
the Government is intently
looking for revenue, and the
more we are perceived to be
paying, the greater the likeli-
hood that the Treasurer will
accept our determination of
what is due. All parties will, of
course, appreciate that our
position on Stamp Duty is sub-
ject to review by the Treasurer.

“The Stamp Act provides for
Stamp Duty to be paid on the
total ‘value’ of the transaction.
Based on the previous struc-
ture of the South Ocean Devel-
opment Company agreement,
which represented a total con-
sideration of approximately
$103 million, it would have
been open for the Treasurer to
argue that the Stamp Duty
obligation on the South Ocean
Development Company trans-
action alone would have been
$10.3 million.

“New South Ocean would
have had to pay 50 per cent of
that amount; ie, approximately
$5.15 million. The projected
savings that we anticipate is
based on the fact that we have
restructured the transaction to
appropriately apportion specif-
ic amounts of funds to aspects
of the transaction which attract
a nominal Stamp Duty.”

In response, Mr Stein e-
mailed his then-financing part-
ners on April 17, 2008, to sug-
gest that they paid the $5 mil-
lion in accordance with Mr
Allen’s advice, “as it provides
the highest likelihood of sav-
ing approximately $4 million”.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 3B



a > =:
Microsoft seeking public sector work

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



MICROSOFT aims to aid the
Bahamas Government in improving
and expanding its online portal and
Information Technology (IT) within
various ministries, an account manag-
er for the company told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

Jaun Carlos Mejia, who spoke at
conference at the Hilton on new prod-
ucts and technologies, said Microsoft,
along with its partners at Inova Solu-

tions, were interested in expanding
and improving IT solutions for gov-
ernment, education, and small and
medium-sized businesses in the
Bahamas.

And because Mr Mejia’s Microsoft
office is based in Fort Lauderdale, and
Inova offices and be found throughout
the Caribbean, they boast fast and reli-
able access to the Bahamian market.

Commercial director for Inova,
Hans Kruithof, said his company was
integral in migrating the National
Insurance Board (NIB) from an IBM
platform to Microsoft Exchange.

According to him, executives at NIB
were pleased with the software acces-
sion and by Inova’s timing in institut-
ing the applications and training staff.

Microsoft and Inova (which is
Microsoft’s partner in the region) said
the Bahamian market was a develop-
ing market for IT Solutions.

Luis Souchet, Microsoft’s account
technology specialist for Bermuda,
Bahamas and Cayman, said many
countries in the region do not use IT
solutions to their full potential. If used
to such a degree, they can save a busi-
ness money.

During the seminar, the Microsoft
and Inova representatives spoke to
business owners about developments
in IT and how to incorporate them in
order to make businesses more com-
petitive. “Developments in informa-
tion technology give companies
numerous growth opportunities,” the
seminat’s official release said.

Inova is working on several projects
on New Providence, having completed
tasks for the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration, Central Bank and the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation.

According to Mr Kruithof, that

improved IT can make firms much
more efficient and streamline expen-
diture on IT-related issues.

“The example right now that is
appealing to this conversation is the
project with the NIB, where we
upgraded them from the IBM logic
notes to Microsoft exchange, and that
saved a lot of money, especially right
now while government resources are
scarce,” said Mr Mejia. “Cost saving is
something we want to offer to our cus-
tomers through technology and
through the partnership we have with
Inova.”

‘Royal battle’

FROM page 1B

company had shown how this
would “wipe out” their profits
and impose a $250,000 per
annum loss upon them.

Saying that the Chamber was
working “feverishly” to arrange
emergency meetings between
the Government and business-
es impacted by the proposed
2010-2011 Budget tax increases,
Mr Rolle hinted that on the
Industries Encouragement Act,
a possible compromise was for
the Government not to go
straight to the imposition of a
45 per cent duty rate on these
manufacturers.

For those companies that
could demonstrate they would
“suffer losses” from the imme-
diate imposition of a 45 per
cent duty rate, Mr Rolle sug-
gested that the Government
instead apply a rate that would
“bring them to the break even
stage”, giving these firms time
to adjust their cost structures
and develop new revenue
strategies to compensate.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham previously indicated
to Tribune Business that the
Government did not want, via
the Act’s duty-free import
incentives, to effectively run a
‘welfare subsidy system’ for
large Bahamas-based manu-
facturers indefinitely.

The proposed Industries
Encouragement Act amend-
ments would impose a five-year
term limit on these incentives,
meaning that those companies
who have already received
them for such a period will
graduate immediately. And
those firms who have received
these incentives for a period of,
say three years, will only
receive them for another two.

As revealed by Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday, a variety of
manufacturers reacted with
horror to the Government’s
plans, believing it could be a
potentially fatal blow for the
industry in this country, lead-
ing to firm closures and mass
lay-offs.

One equity investor in a well-

known Bahamian manufactur-
er told Tribune Business yes-
terday that he and fellow share-
holders had not received a div-
idend from the business for five
years, putting their cash into
upgrading the plant.

Pointing to the fact that
Freeport-based manufacturers
will still enjoy duty-free incen-
tives on their raw materials for
another 40 years, via the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement,
the investor said of the Act’s
incentives: “It’s very critical.
Why destroy jobs in Nassau?
There are a few. I don’t think
he’s [the Prime Minister]
thought that one through.

“T don’t know anyone who’s
rich under the Industries
Encouragement Act. It’s all
hell. The country’s on the
bone.”

For his part, the Prime Min-
ister was keen to bring the
Industries Encouragement
Act’s duration into line with
the five-year Tariff Act incen-
tives enjoyed by Bahamian
small business, as well as imple-
ment the Bahamas’ commit-
ments under the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
and World Trade Organisation
(WTO).

Tribune Business was yes-
terday told by informed sources
that while he has made no
promises, the Prime Minister
and his revenue team have
been rapidly crunching the
numbers in the Ministry of
Finance and asking for finan-
cial data from businesses
impacted by the 2010-2011
Budget’s tax hikes, indicating
there may be some flexibility
in some areas.

However, the Government -
at most - is only likely to tweak
some rates and their determi-
nants, observers believe, and
those targeted industries should
not believe they will escape
increased taxation.

In a bid to reach a compro-
mise between the Government
and private sector, Mr Rolle
told Tribune Business: “We’re
working feverishly. The Cham-
ber has not been sleeping.

UE aS
MAN RR CLL
US eR are ALC

52wk-Low
1.00
9.67
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.56
5.00
2.21
1.45
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
9.95
10.00

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S$)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

S2wk-Hi 5S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Eund Name
CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund

Securit_y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

ROVAL FIDELITY

ide an Arh

We've been actively involved
in trying to get some dialogue
going on this.

“This is going to mean job
losses. It really and truly could
mean job losses in some indus-
tries. There was one company
able to demonstrate that its
profits would be wiped out, and
that it would suffer an addi-
tional $250,000 loss per annum
if it was graduated from the
Industries Encouragement Act.

“I think the combination of
the tax increases and cost
increases will be untenable in
some instances. I would also
have to say the general public
will feel the pinch also.”

Acknowledging that there
was “tremendous potential” for
the cost of living to further
increase, Mr Rolle said it was
incumbent upon Bahamian
consumers to adjust their high-
spending, debt intensive behav-
iour to the new realities.

“In a country like the
Bahamas where we believe in
conspicuous consumption and
having all the comforts, and
cost not being an issue, we now
need to check ourselves and
make determinations as to how
we plan for the future. There
will be some behavioural
adjustments,” Mr Rolle said.

Warning that “if we do not
make the hard decisions now
we will pay for it later”, Mr
Rolle added that there were
some companies that “can
afford to be taxed a little more,
and they will have to bear the
responsibility”.

The Government and private
sector, Mr Rolle said, needed to
understand the dilemma each
other was in. While the Bud-
get “is what it is”, there were
going to be consequences in
terms of the effect on business,
while “the need for structural
reform” had been exposed by

the fiscal crisis.

“It’s important that we
demonstrate good leadership
on this and establish proper dia-
logue. There does not need to
be a battle royal. There are
some issues at stake that we
need to reach some middle
ground on,” Mr Rolle told Tri-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

N THE SUPREME COURT

over taxes not needed

bune Business.

“Tt’s a give and take. We
have to recognise that we’re in
a bad fiscal state as a country,
and any way you look at it
there is an impact we all have to
absorb and see whether there
are methods available to reduce
the impact on both sides.”

2010

CLE/qui/00170

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DANA TELISNOR of

KEYWEST STREET, PO. BOX GT-2923, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2"° DAY of JUNE, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OPHNY ALIEN of GIBBS
LANE, off NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 28° DAY OF JUNE, 2010
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,

P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, RANDY RANADO

GREENSLADE of EAST ST. P.O.BOX CR 55207,

BAHAMAS, intend to change my name to RANADO

GREENSLADE. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

= FG CAPITAL MARKETS
_ 5 BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
E€

cr AL 9 P11 A LT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 1 JUNE 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,554.71 | CHG -0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -10.67| YTD % -0.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 0600.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

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6.07
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9.85
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0.27
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10.00

Symbol
FBBI7
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FBB15

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-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.249
0.460
0.114
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035 Tot
0.407 13.7
0.952 10.5
0.156 64.1

Change Daily Vol. Div $

1.05

5.20
0.33
3.15
2.17

2.56
6.99
2.35
2.50
6.07
9.00
9.85
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95

ooggg99959090099099
ecoocece|ce|ooeoeoeoeoo?
eoo00o0o0onooo0o0000d

Change Interest
0.00

0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%

0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

Bid

10.06
2.00
0.35

Ask &
11.06

6.25
0.40

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div S P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price Yield
14.00
4.00

0.55

Daily Val..

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV
1.4674
2.9020
1.5327
3.0368

13.5654
107.5706
105.7706

1.1080
1.0615
1.1050
9.4839

Principal Protected TIGRS, Se: 4

10.0000

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investm:

10.6709

Principal Protected TIGRS, Se:

4.8105

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

7.9664

YTD%

1.99
0.52
1.70
20T
1.48
3.45
3.99
1.67

-0.61

1.31
1.52

-0.93

3.23

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.514105

NAV G6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.501641

Last 12 Months %
6.66
-0.11
4.77
-4.99
5.47

30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

6.99
13.50
5.26

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

2.84
5.01
7.41
12.33 31-Mar-10

58.37 31-Mar-10

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

ghted price for daily volume
ighted price for daily volume

from day to day
aded today

per share paid in the last 12 months
led by the last 12 month earnings

P/E - Closing ed
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

gs per share for the last 12 mths

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and
Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of REEVERS TURNQUEST of the Settlement of
Bahama Sound No. 11 of the Island of Great Exuma one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THAT tract of land situate on the South-Western side of the
main public road in George Town on the Island of Exuma one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas comprising
12,306 square feet and bounded on the North by property be-
longing to the Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and
Twenty feet bounded on the East by a property belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon One Hundred and Five and Thirty-
four hundredths feet bounded on the South by a Ten foot wide
right of way and running thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and

Twenty-three hundredths feet and bounded on the West by a
Twenty foot wide right of way and running thereon One Hundred
and Five feet.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Reevers Turnquest claims
to be the owner of the fee simple estate in possession of the
said piece or parcel of land free from encumbrances. And the
Petitioner had made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said piece parcel or tract of
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

AND TAKE NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
a Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on before the thirtieth (30) day
after the last day of publication file a Notice in the Supreme Court
within the City of Nassau and serve on the Petitioner or the un-
dersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified
by an Affidavit to be titled therewith. Failure on any such person
to file and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the 22nd day of
July A.D., 2010 will operate as a bar to such claim.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that copies of the files plan
may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas on the Second Floor of the Ansbacher Build-
ing situate at East Street and Bank Lane on the Island of New
Providence;

2. The Chambers of Messrs Lewis & Longley Chambers, East
Bay Street Shopping Centre, East Bay Street, New Providence:
3. The Office of the Administrator at Queens Hwy, in the settle-
ment of George Town, on the Island of Exuma, The Bahamas.
Dated the 31st day of May, A.D., 2010

Lewis & Longley, Chambers
East Bay Shopping Centre, East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner












WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2,

The Tribune SECTION C e

2010



Tingum Bem
Band to perform
at Caribbean

Tourism Ball...





Offering authentic
ltalian dishes ‘made
from scratch’...

see page five



Jessica's Hileworks Studio
leading ceramic maker

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia. net



essica Colebrooke began

her career as a young

ceramist with a desire to

make ‘unusual’ designs, but

decided to fall into a more
practical form of artistic expression
on the advice of her mentor Betty
Jane Dean, the owner of Andeana
Designs who first introduced Ms Cole-
brooke’s works to the Bahamian art
scene.

Years later, Ms Colebrooke has
quickly emerged onto the Bahamian
art scene as the first Bahamian female
tile manufacturer. She began her busi-
ness making coasters, soap dishes, and
useful everyday items.

She describes the pieces as the per-
fect souvenir- good quality at a good
price point.

Perhaps what really makes her work
standout is her refrain of using a
“Made in the Bahamas” attribution
on the front of her products. She was
advised by artwork producers that this
cheapens the purchase. Therefore,
Ms Colebrooke includes an attribu-
tion on the back of her products.

Today, Jessica’s Tileworks Studio
has evolved into the leading ceramic
manufacturing company in the
Bahamas, producing art tiles, fine art
pottery, as well as amenity souvenirs.

She has imparted her skill to stu-
dents at the College of the Bahamas,
and has put on a few summer work-
shops with the Ministry of Education
for High School students. She soon
decided to follow leads in the ceramics
discipline that she trained for at
Rhode Island School of Design.

There, Ms Colebrooke learned the
intricacies of her craft and soon
became an art instructor at the Inter-
American Development Bank, and
Finco, conducting art workshops for
interested students.

In the early stages of Ms Cole-
brooke’s design is her ‘Ripple’ series
that will be unveiled in the month of
May. This will be the most recent
addition to her fine art collection, and
is definitely mind boggling in form, in
warm and medium tones.

‘Ripple’ is a different take on her
usual work, where Ms Colebrooke
molds clay into tri-bowls, round coast-
ers, oval soap dishes, sgraffito mugs,
junkanoo masks, hot (souvenir) plates,
vases, and grape leaf plates.

She says today her business has
grown, showing that her products are
becoming more popular on the island



TEAPOT WITH COFFEE MUG by Jessica Colebrooke...

and especially amongst visitors. “For
me, I really appreciate that people
know that they are getting a good
product, and that they are repeat cus-
tomers,” said Ms Colebrooke.

Today, not only has her product
line grown to a more diverse supply,
but also her buyers include not only
locals but tourists who have expanded
her customer base through word of
mouth advertising.

This kind of recommendation and
customer loyalty has solidified her cus-
tomer base.

“We try to produce pieces of work
that are affordable,” said Ms Cole-
brooke. “You can get a really nice
wall hanging from Jessica’s Tileworks
at $300.”

Ms Colebrooke claims to produce
the best Bahamian ceramic products
on the market.

“Tf a tourist purchases an item from
me, they know they are getting a high
quality product, and they know how
much its worth,” said Ms Colebrooke.

She says that when she returned to
New Providence after attending col-
lege abroad, persons said Bahamians
couldn’t make anything of worth.

The same material that she sold
back then has caught on today, which
shows how trends just catch on with
time.

Ms Colebrooke’s molding tech-
niques can take anywhere from a few
days to a few weeks, depending on
whether it’s a small or large tile.

“She has two assistants who assist
her in molding the clay. Afterward,
she gives them enough ‘air time’ to
dry and fires the pieces into account.
Draining out all the water through
bisque firing, she follows up with a
glaze firing which gives the ceramic
piece a nice finish before painting each
piece in vibrant colours.

Competition is growing stiff among
the ceramics field, but she is glad for
this change; she feels it is in the best
interest of Bahamians who are becom-
ing more involved in the art world.

“Tt shows you that art in this coun-
try is evolving,” she said. “I’m glad to
see that there are a lot of persons
interested in this growing industry.
Hopefully, a lot of persons will be
interested in this industry in the com-
ing years.”

Visit Jessica’s Tilework and Studio
Gallery in Sea Breeze, Gleniston Park
Avenue. It’s opened from 10 am to 5
pm daily, based on an appointment
only policy.

Bahamian Art, Jewels By the Sea,
The Blue Pearl and Doongalik Stu-
dios also carry her designs.

















SEA BISCUIT TILE by Jessica Colebrooke...
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 5B



eS



Offering authentic Italian
dishes ‘made from scratch’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



mmanuel Tsakkos, owns

the oldest Italian establish-

ment around, called Cap-

pricio Ristorante, nestled

by the round-a-bout on
West Bay Street, opposite Sandals, offer-
ing authentic Italian dishes made from
scratch.

Its a family business that stems from a
long line of Italian chefs.

“You go to other restaurants to have
the same dish as our restaurant and it’s
like day and night,” said Mr Tsakkos.

“We have more seafood that anybody
else. We have veal, chicken, and pastas,
and we cook to order everyday.”

As you peruse through the menu of
Cappricio’s, you will come across an array
of options including : “cernia capro-
ciosa,” “cernia capril,” “cernia cesare,”
and “lobster santa luia,” all Italian
grouper and lobster dishes.

Tribune Taste sampled cernia alla
cesare (grouper in wine and herb sauce)
with French bread, based with garlic but-
ter and parsley, tossed in the toaster oven
to get a crisped fresh flavor.

Two workers from hotels nearby
enjoyed a basket of this bread, the first
appetiser to their main course at Cap-
priccio Ristorante Italiano.

“We didn’t want to do the normal run
for lunch at Subway, or Wendy’s,” said
one of the lunch partners. “I was really
hoping they had a meatball sub with sala-
mi which would’ve been nice.”

Soups include luinestrone, pasta fagio-
lo, all based with creamy and sweet tasting
medleys, including fried calamari, and
prosciuto melon dishes.

If you like cream sauce you can try one
dishes prepared with one of three pastas,
linguine, angel hair, and penne pasta. All
of them are very big sellers.

Mr Tsakkos said that most of his cus-
tomers come in the evening, and many
of them leave with good words about the
restaurant.

The bar provides a wide selection of
wines, and other alcoholic beverage
brands and soft drinks like iced tea.

For dessert, there is a delightful Ital-
ian coffee cake confection called tiramusu,
a big favourite at the resturant.

Murals painted on the walls from the
isle of Capri, Naples and Venice derived
from a picture taken by Mr Tsakkos give
Cappriccio Ristorante a nice Italian bistro
feel. The food was delicious, and the
atmosphere on point, but I would have
preferred to hear classical Italian music to
further set the mood rather than the jazz
music the resturant played.











CERNIA SICILIANA/GROUPER with peppers,onions and tomatoes...









CAPPRICCIO RISTORANTE’S cernia with red tomato sauce...









A CARIBBEAN CONCH SALAD — Brides and grooms hoping to add
some good fortune to their marriages have some interesting options to
consider when planning a wedding feast.

Cake, crickets
and other ‘lucky’
wedding foods

By MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON



Brides and grooms hoping to add some good fortune to their
marriages have some interesting options when planning a wedding
feast.

Many cultures around the globe have identified foods for new-
lyweds that supposedly will bring good luck, fertility or other
blessings.

The foods range from fried crickets to candied almonds to fish.

Attaching symbolism to food is a common practice throughout
the world, said Amy Bentley, associate professor of food studies at
New York University.

"All rituals and holidays and celebrations involve food," she said.
"This is somewhat universal."

In Mexico, brides and grooms sometimes dine on fried crickets,
lentil soup, and a bean, rice and agave dish, said Beatriz Mejia,
director of celebrations at One and Only Palmilla resort in Los
Cabos, Mexico. The crickets and the rice dish are said to bring fer-
tility and good luck, and the soup is associated with good luck and
good fortune, she said.

The resort has seen growing interest from couples outside of
Mexico in the foods and traditions of the region, she said.

"Couples today are seeking a more personalized and authentic
experience when they host a destination wedding that is reflected
in both the food and venue," she said.

Brides and grooms discussing their celebrations on the wed-
ding website TheKnot.com also seem more interested than before
in incorporating traditional elements into their plans, said Rebec-
ca Dolgin, an executive editor for the site. "Couples reaching into
their own culture is more popular now," she said. "Incorporating
culture is creating a buzz on the message boards."

Often, foods are considered lucky because of shape, color or
taste, Dolgin explained.

Italians serve almonds at weddings because their bittersweet taste
represents life, she said. The almonds are sugarcoated to wish the
couple more sweetness than bitterness.

Common at a Chinese wedding is whole fish, because the Chi-
nese word for fish sounds similar to the word for abundance, Dol-
gin said.

"The Chinese also believe that eating spring rolls will bring
wealth and prosperity,” she said. "Due to its color and size, it is also
thought to resemble gold bars."

Moroccan couples also eat fish because it's an ancient symbol of
fertility, she said.

Fish appears on the menu at many weddings, added Pam Frese,
a professor of anthropology at the College of Wooster in Ohio. Fish
and other white meats, such as turkey and chicken, are common
wedding foods because of old beliefs that women had whiter blood
than men, she said. White meats were thought to strengthen wom-
en's blood, so they were served at weddings to energize the bride.

"It was extra strength to her on her wedding night so she can
become a mother," Frese said.

In Caribbean countries, special attention is paid to the groom's
sexual performance on the wedding night, said Caitlin Austin, a
spokeswoman for Grace Bay Club in the Turks and Caicos.
Grooms are encouraged to eat the pistil of a conch "to increase
their drive," she said. "The conch's pistil is viewed by locals as
nature's Viagra."

Conch meat also is commonly served to wedding guests because
islanders believe it's an aphrodisiac, she said.

Wedding cake, one of the oldest elements of a wedding banquet,
also has connections to luck and fertility. "The traditionally accept-
ed practice is for the bride to have the first bite; otherwise, she'd be
childless and barren," Dolgin said.

Early English cakes were fruit cakes, and brides used to count the
number of raisins in their piece of cake to see how many children
they would bear, Frese said.

"The cake has power," she said. "It promises reproductivity."

Wedding cakes changed in texture and appearance in the 1920s,
when lighter cakes with fluffy, creamy frosting became more pop-
ular. But the symbolism remained, Dolgin said. The white cake rep-
resented the bride's purity. The decorations of flowers and other
signs of spring are meant to represent birth and new life, she said.

"It's this little bubble of nature in the middle of a wedding,"
Frese said. "It's the promise of fertility that's embedded in spring.”



For real refreshment, spike it with simple syrup

By ALISON LADMAN



PUTTING your own artisanal touch
on summer refreshment is simple. Lit-
erally.

Simple syrups are an often over-
looked — but as the name suggests,
incredibly easy — way of adding sweet
panache to a wide variety of drinks.
And summer's demand for tall and
cool beverages is an excellent excuse to
get acquainted with them.

Simple syrup is a standard bartend-
ing ingredient used as a sweetener in
many cocktails (it dissolves more read-
ily than dry sugar), as well as for soak-
ing or glazing some baked goods.
While it can be purchased, a simple
syrup is easily made by combining
water and granulated sugar, heating
until dissolved, then cooling.

The syrups also can be flavored by
adding fruit, herbs, citrus zest or other
ingredients and allowing them to steep
overnight. Once strained, the syrups
can be used as a beautiful, flavorful
way to spike seltzer water (creating
your own soda), cocktails or even cof-
fee (especially iced).

A traditional ratio for simple syrup
is equal parts sugar and water. But
when the syrup is intended for cock-
tails and other drinks, it's more com-
mon to use two parts sugar to one part
water. This ratio creates a thicker
syrup that both sweetens and adds



A RASBERRY-LEMON RICKEY (shown)
has gin and vodka along with a simple
syrup of raspberry and lemon.

(AP Photo)

body to a drink.

To help you get started, we've cre-
ated eight flavored simple syrups, as
well as drink recipes to use them in. Six
of the syrups follow the same basic
method, and have been condensed into
one recipe. The remaining two have
individual approaches.

BASIC FLAVOURED
SIMPLE SYRUP

Start to finish: 10 minutes active
(plus steeping overnight)

Makes 2 to 2 1/2 cups (depending on
added ingredients)

2 cups sugar

1 cup water

In a small saucepan over medium,
combine the sugar and water. Bring
to a boil, then remove from the heat.
Add flavoring ingredients (see options
below), then set aside until cooled.
Transfer to an air-tight jar, cover and
let sit overnight.

Use a mesh strainer to strain the
syrup, discarding any solids. Return
the syrup to the jar and refrigerate for
up to 2 months.

FLAVORING SUGGESTIONS
— Chili-saffron:

1 large pinch saffron threads

1 jalapeno chili, chopped

— Orange-star anise:

2 whole star anise

Zest from 1 orange

— Cranberry-ginger:

6-ounce package (1 1/3 cups) dried
cranberries

2-inch chunk fresh ginger, sliced

— Lemon-thyme:

Zest of 2 lemons

1 package (3/4 ounce) fresh thyme
sprigs

— Raspberry-lemon:

Zest of 2 lemons

10 ounces frozen raspberries,
thawed

— Cardamom-vanilla-berry:

1 vanilla bean, split and seeds
scraped into the syrup

6 ounces dried mixed berries

6 cardamom pods, crushed

POMEGRANATE-
PINEAPPLE
SIMPLE SYRUP

Start to finish: 10 minutes active
(plus steeping overnight)

Makes about 4 cups

16-ounce bottle pomegranate juice

3 1/2 cups sugar

6 whole cloves

6 ounces dried pineapple

In a medium saucepan over medi-
um, combine all ingredients. Bring to a
boil, then remove from the heat and let

cool. Transfer to an air-tight jar, cover
and let sit overnight.

Use a mesh strainer to strain the
syrup, discarding any solids. Return
the syrup to the jar and refrigerate for
up to 2 months.

CARAMEL-ROOT
BEER SIMPLE
SYRUP

Start to finish: 1 hour (plus cooling
time)

Makes 2 cups

1/4 cup water

1 cup sugar

Four 12-ounce cans root beer

1 vanilla bean, split and seeds
scraped into the syrup

In a large saucepan over medium-
high, combine the water and sugar.
Bring to a low boil and cook, without
stirring, until the syrup is a deep
amber.

One at a time, slowly pour in the
root beer. The mixture will sputter
and froth.

Add the vanilla bean, then bring the
mixture to a simmer and cook until
reduced to 2 cups.

Remove from the heat and let cool.
Remove the vanilla bean. Pour the
syrup into an airtight jar and refriger-
ate for up to 2 months.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010



ENTERTAINMENT

THE TRIBUNE





BEYONCE (left) is joined by her
husband, Jay-Z, as she arrives at
the 66th Annual Golden Globe
Awards in Beverly Hills, California

(AP Photo}

Jay-Z and
Beyonce to
compete at

2010 BET

awards

NEW YORK (AP) — Rap-
per Jay-Z and his wife, Bey-
once, will compete in three cat-
egories at the 2010 BET
Awards.

They're both nominated for
video of the year, best collabo-
ration and viewers’ choice. Jay-
Z received two nominations in
the video of the year category,
which includes newcomers
B.o.B and Melanie Fiona.

Jay-Z is the top contender
with five nominations; he's also
up for best male hip-hop artist.
Beyonce, Fiona and Alicia
Keys, who follow with four
nods each, are all up for best
R&B female artist. R&B
crooner Trey Songz also
received four nominations.

Other multiple nominees
include Rihanna, Maxwell,
Drake and Fabolous.

Queen Latifah will host the
awards show, which airs live on
June 27 from the Shrine Audi-
torium in Los Angeles.

US library
honours Paul

Cram
UU UB IIL Ce



By BRETT ZONGKER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP)
— When it comes to popu-
lar music, it doesn't get
much bigger than the tunes
Paul McCartney has written
and sung over the past five
decades with the Beatles
and on his own.

McCartney, who has been
knighted by the queen of
England, will be honoured
with Washington's highest
award for pop music this
week by the Library of Con-
gress.

On Tuesday, the 67-year-
old discussed his first major



PAUL McCartney performs in
his "Up and Coming" tour at the
Foro Sol in Mexico City on May
27

(AP Photo)

lifetime achievement award
from the U.S. government
at the library.

President Barack Obama
will present the Gershwin
Prize for Popular Song on
Wednesday at a concert in
the East Room of the White
House.

The Jonas Brothers, Faith
Hill, Stevie Wonder and
Jerry Seinfeld are part of an
all-star lineup that will hon-
or McCartney. The concert
will be televised July 28
nationwide on PBS.







Tingum Dem Band to pertorm
at Caribbean Tourism Ball

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

embers of the

Tingum Dem

Band are getting

ready to pack
their guitars, trumpets, drums
and keyboards and make their
way to New York City for the
Caribbean Tourism Ball to be
held next week.

The band, which was invited
by the Ministry of Tourism, will
perform at the event which is
scheduled for June 11.

Undaunted by the thought
of performing in front of big
crowd at this prestigious occa-
sion, Fred Ferguson band
leader told Tribune Entertain-
ment they are ready to show
off “wat dey gat”.

“We are honoured to be
hired by the Ministry of
Tourism to represent the coun-
try at the Caribbean Tourism
Conference Ball event,” Mr
Ferguson said.

While most Bahamians will
not be in attendance, Mr Fer-
guson said followers of their
band can expect nothing less
than a stellar performance.

“We are very happy for the
opportunity and we will per-
form our hearts out ...because
we want to show others that
our country too can produce
talented musicians.”

Bahamians familiar with the
music of Tingum Dem Band
know that this is a band which
usually performs soul and jazz



THIS WILL MARK the second time Tingum Dem Band performed in New York. Their first performance in New
York was at the famous Apollo Theater...

music from the 70’s and 80’s.
This is basically their signature
as a local Bahamian band.
However, they add their own
expressive cultural style to the
music.

“At the event, we will be
playing Bahamian music with
our flair to it. Then we will play
other music of course to satisfy
the dinner dance.

“So people can expect to
hear a little jazz, a little soul
music, some Bahamian music,
and music from the 70’s and
80’s,” he said.

Tingum Dem Band was
formed in 2003 to perform as
the house band for the
Bahamas’ 30th Anniversary
Independence Celebration.

Since then, the band has
been performing at a number of
events including Junkanoo in
June, the Cacique Awards and
various island festivals. The
band has previously performed
in some major cities in the
United States, Guyana, Suri-
nam, and other Caribbean
nations.

Tingum Dem Band was most
recently the house band at Da
Tambrin Tree Night club.
Presently, the band entertains
their loyal fans at Club Water-
loo’s “Old School Saturdays”
every Saturday evening where
music of the 70’s and 80’s
Junkanoo, Rake, and Scrape,
Soca, and Reggae Music is per-
formed live by the band.

The band is made up of ten
devoted and talented musicians.
They include Trent Carter, and
Shacara Newton who are the
band’s vocalists, Byron Thomp-
son keyboard player, Fred Fer-
guson lead guitarist, D’ Angelo
Moss trumpet player, Dion
Turnquest tenor saxophonist,
Earl Forbes, bass guitarist,
Colyn Grant drummer,
Andrew ‘Tino’ Richardson alto
saxophonist and Nat Williams
audio engineer.

Tingum Dem Band seeks the
support of their fellow Bahami-
ans as the head to New York
City. “We love what we do and
we are happy that others are
pleased with our music,” he
said.

Sex and The City 2 ‘is just great on many levels’

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

Sex and The City 2

Starring : Sarah Jessica Park-
er, Kim Cattrell, Cynthia
Nixon, Kristen Davis

YES, the lovely ladies are
back in the highly anticipated
Sex and the City sequel. This
time around everyone seems to
be exactly where they want to
be and looking as fabulous as
ever.

The movie takes place two
years after the first film. Carrie
is finally Mrs Big, Miranda has
realised that her fast-paced law
career may not be all it’s
cracked up to be, Charlotte’s
seeming perfect life is moving
along with the latest addition
to the family, and Samantha is,
well, still Samantha.

Still, what would SATC be
without a little bit of drama.
Carrie feels her marriage may
be losing its sparkle, Miranda
struggles with leaving her job,
Charlotte is feeling the pres-
sure of motherhood and the
affect a sexy new nanny may
have on her marriage, and
Samantha wants new worlds to



SARAH Jessica Parker (left) and
Kristin Davis look on upon arrival
for the Japan Premiere of the film
"Sex and the City 2" in Tokyo on
Tuesday...

(AP Photo)

conquer.

In need of a reality break,
the four ladies pack their
Manolos and turbans and head
to exotic Abu Dhabi for an all-
expenses-paid vacation at the
invitation of a wealthy sheikh
who wants Samantha to do PR
for his hotel.

The movie then goes on a
whirlwind of what you would
expect- the four friends having
the time of their lives. Like
Samantha says, the quartet are
soul mates despite their jobs,
children and husbands.

The tension mounts when
Carrie runs into her long lost
love Aiden in a spice market,
Samantha can’t conform to the
societal expectations of the
Middle East, and Charlotte
admits that her perfect life may
be a little less than ideal.

For true SATC fans, this
movie is like a visit from a real-
ly good friend you haven’t seen
in a long time.

It’s great to get dressed up
and see how everyone is doing,
reminisce about good times and
share some new adventures.

Unlike the first movie, which
focused so much on the Big and
Carrie drama, this film is light-
hearted; it’s like cotton candy -
pretty to look at and super
sweet.

Yes, the plot may sometimes
veer off into politically incor-
rect territory, mainly in the way
it portrays the women of Abu
Dhabi and their burga-wearing
traditions.

This drew early criticism, but

Dunst reprises her role
as witness in NYC trial

By JENNIFER PELTZ
Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — It was
witness stand, the sequel, for
Kirsten Dunst.

The "Spider-Man" star
reprised her role Tuesday as a
star witness against a mechanic
being tried — for the second
time — on charges of helping
steal her designer purse from a
Manhattan hotel suite during a
2007 movie shoot.

Wearing a demure, loose
black dress and a sometimes
weary expression, the actress
gave jurors a clipped, subdued
account of returning from film-
ing to find her $2,000 Balencia-
ga handbag gone from a SoHo
Grand Hotel penthouse suite.

Her assistant's bag and co-
star Simon Pegg's cell phone
and other possessions also were
taken from the room, which
was being used as an actors’
lounge while the 2008 comedy
"How to Lose Friends & Alien-
ate People" was shot down-
stairs.

"All our belongings were
gone. I thought that my assis-
tant had taken them and put
them somewhere else, but
everything was gone,” Dunst
testified. Inside the bag were
her wallet, credit and other
cards, vintage Ray-Ban Way-
farer sunglasses and $2,000 in
cash, she said.

Besides calling hotel security
staffers and police, "We even
went outside to look for our
bags, like maybe it was dumped











ACTRESS Kirsten Dunst arrives at
63rd Cannes international film fes-
tival, in Cap d’Antibes, southern
France, on May 20...

AP Photo)

in a Dumpster," she added.

The mechanic, James
Jimenez, was convicted last fall
of trespassing, but jurors dead-
locked on a more serious bur-
glary charge. He's being retried
on that charge. Defense lawyer
Robert Parker said Jimenez, 36,
just tagged along with a co-
defendant he believed had per-
mission to be there.

Dunst, 28, played her part in
the real-life court drama Tues-
day in a noticeably more
somber, matter-of-fact manner

than she did at Jimenez’ first
trial in September, when she
greeted judge and jurors with a
chipper "Hi!"

She rebuffed Parker's sug-
gestion of a party atmosphere
surrounding the overnight
shoot on Aug. 8 and Aug. 9,
2007, which concluded her film-
ing obligations for the movie.

Parker has noted that co-
defendant Jarrod Beinerman
has a drug history, including
pleading guilty in the 1990s to
playing a part in a drug-deal-
ing ring. Beinerman wasn't
charged with any drug-related
offenses in the SoHo Grand
episode; he pleaded guilty in
2008 to attempted burglary and
was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in
prison. His lawyer didn't imme-
diately return a call Tuesday.

Dunst's assistant, Liat
Baruch, testified last week that
she had a small amount of mar-
iyuana in her own bag and was
planning to smoke it after the
shoot. But she and Dunst testi-
fied that Dunst knew nothing of
that, and Dunst said she doesn't
smoke the drug in general.

"We wrapped at 5:30 in the
morning and found our bags
were stolen, so we went home,"
having celebrated with nothing
more decadent than a takeout
dinner order from the posh
sushi restaurant Nobu, the
actress said.

Her bag, wallet and cards
were eventually returned to her
manager's office, but she never
recovered the cash and sun-
glasses, she said.



MOVIE REVIEW

let’s face it - SATC gained its
reputation for being sexually
irreverent.

It’s part of the appeal and
why the franchise is so popu-
lar. I must say I was disap-
pointed with the Carrie/Aiden
story line.

It was badly developed and
wasted a potentially good plot
opportunity. It was frankly just
a little too corny for my liking.

The movie also focused less
on sexual escapades, probably
as a nod to its location, than
the series did. And honestly,
the sex scenes were not missed.

SATC2 is just great on many
levels, there are many laughs
to be had and it’s a refreshing
juxtaposition with the girls all
grown up in New York City
and the decadence and fun we
have come to expect of them
in Abu Dhabi.

* Fine Arts Explosions &
Youth Talent Jam

Don't miss this night filled
with explosive talents from
Living Waters Kingdom
Ministries’ youth, fine arts
and local artists such as T-
Mac and Lyrically Blessed.
Thursday, June 3, starting
at 7pm at Living Waters
Kingdom Ministries.
Admission: free. Tele-
phone: 326-4292.



¢ Introduction to Yoga
Classes by Dave Reving-
ton

Expert yoga teacher, Dave
Revington will hold an
"Introduction to Yoga"
class this Saturday, June 5
continuing through the
first Saturday of every
month from 1.30 pm to
3.30 pm at Providence
Pilates Studio.

This class is designed to
introduce the practice of
yoga to anyone who have
never attended a yoga
class and want to discover
the benefits of this time-
honoured practice in a
safe, supportive environ-
ment. Spaces at a special
price of $35 and are limit-
ed. Telephone: 323-0121.

¢ RM Bailey's Homecom-
ing King and Queen Com-
petition

RM Bailey Senior High
School invites you to the
Homecoming King and
Queen competition, Sun-
day, June 6, Spm at the
National Performing Arts
Centre. Cost: $10/students
and $20/adults in
advanced; $15/students
and $25/adults at the door.
Telephone: 393-2295.

* 10th Anniversary of The
Allegro Singers

World Premiere OPUS 1
arranged by Geoffrey
Sturrup, conducted by
Antoine C Wallace, fea-
turing the Opus 1 ensem-
ble, June 11 and 12,at 8pm.
College of the Bahamas
Centre of the Performing
Arts featuring Bahamian
music by Blind Blake,
Joseph Spence, E.
Clement Bethel, Edmund
Moxey, Eric Cash and Lou
Adams Sr.

¢ Bahamas Gospel Party
Marlin and Cacique
Award winners, Vanessa
Clarke along with Shauna
Joseph are taking this
year’s Bahamas Gospel
Party to Coconut Grove, ,
Florida, on Friday, June 4,
for the big Bahamas
Goombay Festival Cele-
bration. The duo will
launch their new CD,
‘Bahamas Gospel Party.’



The Temptations’
Ali-Ollie Woodson
dies at 58 after
battling cancer







THE TEMPTATIONS (from left to right) Theo Peoples, Otis
Williams, Melvin Franklin, and Ali-Ollie Woodson, pose after
being given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the Holly-
wood area of Los Angeles on September 14, 1994. Woodson, who
led the legendary Motown quintet The Temptations in the 1980s
and ‘90s and restored them to their hit-making glory with the song
"Treat Her Like A Lady," has died. He was 58. Motown Alumni
Association President Billy Wilson says Woodson died Sunday,
May 30, 2010 in southern California after battling cancer.

(AP Photo)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, PAGE 7B



ARTS





New murder mystery
‘Island Salt’ released

LOVE, murder and mys-
tery are the themes of a new
book by Grand Bahama resi-
dent Sydney Watson. ‘Island
Salt’ is the author’s first island
fiction and stems from her
original goal to write a novel
while living in the Bahamas.

This goal, however, was
quickly delayed when Ms
Watson arrived in Grand
Bahama just three weeks
before the devastating hurri-
canes of 2004.

“We were oceanfront at the
time between Viva Fortuna
and Club Caribe,” said Ms
Watson. “We left our cottage
in a paradise setting and
returned to find total devas-
tation as well as looters.”

Ms Watson, a former Eng-
lish Professor and Florida
native, moved to Grand
Bahama six years ago to begin
writing this novel while her
husband worked in the yacht
industry. During this time she
returned to teaching locally,
working on the novel in the
summers. “TI can’t create when
I’m teaching. My students
become my priority, and all
my energy is invested into
their success.”

So, a few years later she fin-
ished the manuscript and has
spent the past year rewriting
and proofing her book, ‘Island
Salt.’

On June 2 Ms Watson will
launch her book to the public
at the well-known Garden of
the Groves at 6pm. “It’s excit-
ing finally having ‘Island Salt’
released! The characters and
Island Salt itself really did take
on a life of their own, and get-




‘ISLAND SALT’ is the first island
fiction novel for Sydney Watson,
a local teacher in Grand Bahama.
Her book is set in Grand Bahama
at a legendary bonefishing lodge
where love, murder and mystery
abound. Ms Watson’s heroine,
Kit MacKane - a woman strug-
gling to keep her business afloat
and love life intact - must unrav-
el all the secrets in her life to
solve the ultimate mystery — her
brother’s disappearance. The
author will have a launch of her
book on June 2 but the book is
currently available on barne-
sandnoble.com and amazon.com

ting it all out to the reading
public is quite a thrill!” she
exclaimed.

The event is an open invita-
tion to all interested readers
and Watson will also read
small excerpts from the novel
- aiming not to give away the
ending of this fast paced island
thriller.

‘Island Salt’ is set in Grand
Bahama at a legendary bone-
fishing lodge where love, mur-

der and mys-

tery abound.
Based around
her heroine,
Kit MacKane,
a women
struggling to
keep her busi-
ness afloat and
love life intact,
Kit must unrav-
el all the secrets in her life to
solve the ultimate mystery —
her brother’s disappearance.

Ms Watson describes her
book as a “fun, tongue-in-
cheek read with a dash of
romance and suspense!” But
she also hopes to give readers
a glimpse into island life,
something she has experi-
enced her whole life, especial-
ly as a Florida Keys native.

“Really, Grand Bahama is
much like the Florida where I
grew up. South Florida was
not much more than a strip of
isolated beaches, orange
groves and west of Federal
Highway (U.S.1) - swamp and
alligator wrestling! We had no
AC.

“We really did sleep out on
the porches under the ceiling
fans in the summer to catch
the ocean breeze.”

Watson will be selling her
book at the launch but ‘Island
Salt’ is currently available on
barnesandnoble.com and ama-
zon.com, the worlds’ leading
book sales websites.

The first review of her book
was released by P. Callan of
Independent Book Reviewers
and it was noted “Watson
needs to keep writing! We

$7

want more Kit MacKane!





Artist unveils exclusive
‘By Sea’ exhibition

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia. net

JONATHAN Bethel
unveiled a year’s worth of work
at an exclusive exhibit last
Thursday at the Nassau Yacht
Club called ‘By Sea’; the title
coined from the Bahamian say-
ing ‘by land or by sea.’

His inspiration came from
island hopping through the
country.

His piece, ‘Passing by Chip
Channel,’ showcases the wide
expanse between the two cays
by Tahiti Beach. This is a vivid
painting that you can walk right
through, “because it’s got that
feeling of space,” he explained.

‘Passing by Chip Channel’
takes a view from the dock of
the beautiful shallow waters off
Ship Channel Cay, Exuma
where a shark swims harmless-
ly by.

In this painting, the use of a
bright red-coloured life pre-
server projects the background
of the Abaco waters. It’s this
particular accent that makes
the painting “pop.” ‘Passing
by Chip Channel’ is a repeat
from January’s ‘Arts in the
Parks’ in Abaco.

K Smith, one of the leading
pencil artist in the Bahamas
who works with the graphite
and coloured pencil artist says:
“Jonathan is a realistic land-
scape mechanical painter.

“His use of light and shad-
ow is good, which is something
that I use in my work,” said Mr
Smith. “It’s this use of light
and shadow that creates the
realism, depth, and dimension.”

Mr Bethel’s ability to pro-
duce lifelike images captures





JONATHAN BETHEL with the latest collection of paintings from his pri-
vate showing at Nassau Yacht Club last week...

the essence of the natural envi-
ronment as well as the authen-
ticity of historical architecture
such as landmark hotels, pres-
tigious private clubs, and pri-
vate residences.

Mr Bethel is quickly emerg-
ing as a formidable artist, with
a sizeable following, represent-
ed by a crowd of some fifty-
strong persons Thursday night

He says ‘By Sea’ covers sum-
mer themes, defined by ocean-
ic backgrounds, including land
mass, coconuts, sea grapes and
sea flowers surrounding land
as far as Exuma, Harbour
Island, and Nassau.

“You can’t re-create a pho-
tograph 100 per cent, and you
don’t necessarily want to

because you don’t want to com-
pete with it. I’d say these paint-
ings are 80 per cent accurate,
even though I do my own
embellishment and put my own
spin on things.”

See photos from Mr Bethel’s
new exhibit in this month’s Par-
adise Magazine, which gives
him a lot of exposure to inter-
national visitors; featuring his
amazling detailed depiction of
Bahamian destinations like
Treasure Cay and Harbor
Island.

Seven pieces were sold out
of the twenty piece collection
on the night of the exhibit.
View Jonathan Bethel’s latest
and past works at www.bethel-
gallery.com




































INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
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