Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 106 No.157

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Tribune worker
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Newspaper staff member
saves the day in airline
manager’s absence

A GROUP of fed up trav-
ellers just managed to dodge
a trans Atlantic nightmare
when a Tribune staff mem-
ber rescued them from
hunger pangs during a
British Airways flight from
Nassau to London.

Already mired in a series
of cabin crew strikes, the air-
line has now been hit with
onboard refrigeration woes
that threatened to leave 69
passengers on a recent flight
with nothing but cold com-
fort - specifically cold cereal
and muffins for breakfast
bought from a “tuck shop”
run by a member of the
Bahamian ground crew.

Luckily, a Tribune staff
member was booked on the
flight and = purchased
Wendy’s from the airport
terminal to feed the hungry
11-member flight crew.

In addition to the threat of
a gruclling nine hours of
hunger, some passengers
were upset by the absence of
an on-duty manager to
explain why there was no
food available.

"T felt I had to do my part
for Queen, God and country
because the manager was not
present,” said The Tribune
staff member who shelled

SEE page 11

Humane Society warns puppies,
kittens without homes face death

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



HEALTHY puppies, kittens, cats and dogs all face death if
homes cannot be found for them away from the “inundated”
Bahamas Humane Society, according to organisation presi-

dent Kim Aranha.

The Bahamas Humane Society (BHS) is in “crisis” at present
having seen an accelerated spike in the number of animals

SEE page two

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USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

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PLP Deputy Leader
denies meeting FBI over
Jamaican drug lord



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net







PLP Deputy Leader and MP for Cat
Island, Rum Cay, and San Salvador
Philip Davis, denied a tabloid report yes-
terday that he had met with agents from
the Federal Bureau of Investigations and
was assisting them in their investigation
into the finances of alleged Jamaican
drug lord Christopher “Dudus” Coke.

Coke, the reported leader of the noto-
rious “Shower Posse” gang in Tivoli Gar-

SEE page eight





PM AND AO 3) TOUR a eI

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



[=a







FROM LEFT: Vice president of airport development and project director, Nassau Airport Development Company, Stewart Steeves; Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham; President and CEO of NAD Craig Richmond and Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest tour Nassau
airport’s new US departure terminal yesterday.

PM quotes
Godfather

film in tax
hike row

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia. net



UNWILLING to accept
the blame for tax hikes in
the 2010 budget, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham
recalled a famous quote
from Hollywood film trilogy
The Godfather in Bahamian
terms.

As he defended himself
against complaints of higher
taxes for the local beer
industry, import of large
vehicles and hotel rooms,

SEE page eight







IMO team to assess Bahamas
emergency plans for oil spill

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

EXPERTS from the
International Maritime
Organisation are in
Nassau to liaise with
the National Oil Spill
Contingency Team to ensure
that the Bahamas’ emergency
plans are adequate should the
massive oil spill spreading in
the Gulf of Mexico enter our
waters.

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux said the two mem-
ber IMO team will work with
local officials until the week's
end, assessing the Bahamas’
risk of oil exposure and to

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provide expertise on
crafting an oil spill
response.

"They will quantify
the potential risk of
the oil coming ashore,
assess our capacity,
review the national
contingency plan,
| review the bilateral
and regional arrange-
ment to identify where
additional capacity is needed,
and to provide technical
advice and guidance on estab-
lished practices related to oil
spill response.

"They will also prepare a
report for us and standby and
assist us as the need arises,"
Mr Deveaux explained,
adding that his ministry was

SEE page 11

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ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

+ SEE PAGE THREE
- Cabinet Minister ‘was
On verge of quitting’

AFTER a particularly
: contentious exchange in
: Cabinet last week
: between Prime Minister
: Hubert Ingraham and his
: MP for Killarney, it is
: reported that Dr Hubert
: Minnis was on the verge
: of resigning his cabinet
: post, but changed his
: mind.

According to well-
: placed sources within the
: party, it is claimed that Mr
: Ingraham “belittled” his
: Minister of Health to the
: point that the minister felt
: he had no other option
: but to tender his resigna-
: tion,
: However, since this
: exchange it is said that Dr

SEE page 11

HOME IMPROVEMENTS



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Move to replace fire-hit
Cable Beach straw market

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



THE future of the fire-ravaged
Cable Beach straw market and more
than 40 straw vendors and workers
could depend on the success of a com-
mercial development deal.

In a press statement yesterday,
resort development company Baha
Mar revealed its intent to replace the
facility as well as upgrade the western
straw market on the same strip as soon
as it receives government approvals
for its commercial village project.

pany pledged construction would take
place during the early infrastructural
work for the overall resort project.

Baha Mar said: “The recent straw
market fire has created tremendous
hardship on those vendors who
depended on the facility for their liveli-
hood and to support their families.
Baha Mar greatly sympathises with
their situation.”

The flames started early Saturday
morning and completely consumed the
structure opposite the Wyndham
Hotel on the Cable Beach strip.

The 43-stall market was filled with
merchandise, all of which was
destroyed in the indiscriminate blaze.

Once the land is conveyed, the com-

Director of Fire Services Jeffrey
Deleveaux said the fire has been clas-
sified as arson, but officers are still in
the early stages of their investigation
and cannot confirm further details.

After the cutbacks and tax increas-
es revealed in last week’s budget com-
munication, straw vendors were scep-
tical about the possibility of govern-
ment assistance.

However, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham acknowledged the plight of
the displaced workers yesterday and
said the government would be looking
into the matter.

He said: “I’ve seen it driving by and
we will see what we can do to assist

THE TRIBUNE









them. We will also see if that is
involved in what Baha Mar proposes
to do in their initial phase of con-
struction; whether or not there is any
temporary arrangement.”

Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
THE CHARRED REMAINS of the Cable Beach straw market after Saturday’s blaze.

Police are urging anyone with rele-
vant information to call them on 919,
crime stoppers on 328-TIPS, the Cen-
tral Detective Unit on 502-9991 or Fire
Services on 322-1225.

Humane Society warns ey 0000331, 0) 7 ADOPTION

TUITE
WTS THRU



FROM page one

being surrendered, with “at
least 50 per cent” of the own-
ers dropping off the pets
telling the BHS they simply
cannot afford to keep them
anymore.

“We really don’t want to
start killing healthy animals
but we have run out of
space...we are desperate and
pleading to anybody who can
help,” said Mrs Aranha.

As of yesterday the soci-
ety’s facility in Chippingham
was housing 39 adult dogs, 52
puppies and over 80 cats and
kittens, all looking for loving
homes.

Talking of the selection of
“wonderful dogs” available,
Mrs Aranha said: “We have
the most amazing cross-sec-
tion of cross breeds. There
are Rottweiler crosses, Ger-
man Shepherd mixes, Collies,
they are beautiful dogs and
some are already house-
trained, used to walking on a

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leash, can sit and so on.”

The BHS has decided to
waive its usual $40 adoption
fee for anyone who is willing
to take on one or more of the
animals during its “adoption
blitz.”

It will also provide animal
food to anyone who can pro-
vide a temporary “foster”
home for any of the animals
to ease some of the pressure
on the facility until more per-
manent homes can be found.
Mrs Aranha expressed the
BHS’ appreciation to Light-
bourne Trading which have
recently donated a quantity
of dog food to the kennel to
help feed the animals.

Anyone interested in
adopting a dog must meet a
small number of require-
ments, including having a



fenced-in yard to keep the
animal from roaming and, in
the case of both cats and dogs,
be able to provide shelter for
the animal for rain and sun.

“Tf we don’t get them out,
one of two things will happen:
either we will have to start
killing healthy animals or
some kind of disease will
break out and kill them,” said
the BHS President.

Anyone wishing to find out
more can contact Mrs Aranha
on 362 4727 or Becky Arm-
brister at the BHS on 323
5138.



NOTICE
ST. MICHEL SPORTSWEAR LTD.

Take notice that with effect from the 8" day of
February, 2010, I accepted appointment as Liquidator

of the above company, pursuant to an Extra-Ordinary
Meeting of the Directors, held on the 8" day of February,
2010, at which the following Resolutions were passed:

That St. Michel Sportswear Ltd. be wound up

voluntarily.

NOTICE

ST. MICHEL SPORTSWEAR LID.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that all persons having claims
against the above-named Company are required on
or before the 30% day of June 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or
claims to the Liquidator of the Company, at P.O. Box
N-10144, Nassau, Bahamas, or in default thereof they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
















































That George Clifford Culmer be appointed Liquidator
of the company for the purposes of such wind up.

made before such debts are proved.
Dated this 26" day of May, 2010.
Dated this 26" day of May 2010.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator of the above named Company

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



COURTNEWS



Appeal judges order
release of ma
Sentenced to more
than 80 years

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

COURT of Appeal judges
have ordered that a man who
was sentenced to more than 80
years in prison for robbing
numerous churches, pre-
schools, stores and homes
should be released from jail
after serving five years.

Father of two Keith Nixon,
then aged 31, was handed the
heavy penalty for the crimes in
2005 by Magistrate Linda Vir-

ill.

. At that time, Magistrate Vir-
gill suggested the lengthy peri-
od of time in jail would allow
him time to change his life and
seek treatment for a drug prob-
lem he said fuelled his spree of
crimes and for which he said
he had previously sought, but
had not received help during
an earlier stay in jail.

Ultimately Nixon saw things
differently and went on to
appeal the sentence. On May
19, the thief’s wish was granted
by Court of Appeal President
Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice
George Newman and Justice
Stanley John.

Nixon had previously plead-
ed guilty to robbing the
Bahamas Christian Fellowship
Church, Golden Gates Church
of Christ, Golden Gates
Assembly, Southwest Cathe-
dral Church of God, Trinity
Baptist Church, New Provi-
dence Seventh-Day Adventist
Church, New Covenant Baptist
Church, Zion South Beach and
Church of God of Prophecy on
Blue Hill Road.

He was also charged with
breaking and entering the
Adventure Learning Centre on
two separate occasions, Guid-
ing Hands Nursery School and
Revere Academy School.

During the break-ins, Nixon
stole various items, including
cash, electronics, food items
and church equipment, accord-
ing to court documents.

Court records indicated that
cash stolen from the establish-
ments ranged from $50 to
$3,000 and the crimes took
place in Garden Hills, South
Beach, Soldier Road and
Carmichael Road.

In her judgment on the con-
vict’s appeal against the sen-
tence, Court President Dame
Joan Sawyer said she would
substitute the sentence of 81
years and six months given to
Mr Nixon with one of “five
years concurrent on each
count.”

“As the appellant has in fact
served nearly five calendar
years he is to be released imme-
diately,” she stated.

Date set for extradition
hearing of Maycock Sr

THE extradition hearing of
alleged drug kingpin Melvin
Maycock Sr has been set for
January 11 next year in Magis-
trate’s Court.

In 2004, US prosecutors
requested Maycock's extradi-
tion on allegations that he
headed the Caribbean arm of a
multi-national drug gang.

US prosecutors also request-
ed the extradition of 13 other
men alleged to be a part of the
operation. Maycock Sr was
arrested in February 2008 and
prosecutors allege he escaped
from a holding cell at the Eliz-
abeth Estates Police Station by
switching places with his son.

Maycock Sr was recaptured
on June 20, following a high-
speed chase.

Maycock Sr, who is on
$80,000 bail, was back before
Magistrate Carolita Bethell yes-
terday. His son Melvin May-
cock Jr, as well as Lynden
Dean, Bryan Deal, Tory Lock-
hart, Laron Lockhart, Wilfred
Ferguson, Carl Culmer, Derek
Rigby, Trevor Roberts Devroy
Moss, Sheldon Moore, Shanto
Curry and Gordon Newbold —
who are all on bail — are also
subject to US extradition
requests.

Their extradition hearings,
which have already started, are
set to continue on June 28.
Prosecutors indicated yester-
day that they are ready to pro-
ceed with the case.

The men’s hearing had been
halted pending a constitutional
challenge of the Listening
Devices Act. The evidence on
which US prosecutors are rely-
ing was gathered through
phone taps.

In January, the Court of
Appeal affirmed the constitu-
tionality of the Act and ordered
that the hearing proceed.

PM, Cabinet tour airport’
new US departure terminal

@ Construction ahead of schedule, under budget
@ Ingraham, Minister heap praise on development

hi me a i
PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and President and CEO of NAD, Craig Richmond, yesterday at | r

the new airport terminal.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE prime minister and his
cabinet toured Nassau airport’s
new US departure terminal yes-
terday as the Nassau Airport
Development Company press-
es on with construction ahead
of schedule and under budget.

Just 10 months away from
the terminal’s anticipated open-
ing next Spring, the tour
prompted nothing but praise
from Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, Minister of Tourism
and Aviation Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace and tourism
industry stakeholder George
Markantonis, president and
managing director of Kerzner
International.

The PM, minister and
Atlantis boss boasted how the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport will be the best in the
region and serve as a model for
developing airports around the
Bahamas.

At the end of the 30 minute
tour led by NAD’s CEO and
president Craig Richmond and
vice president of airport devel-
opment Stewart Steeves, Mr
Ingraham remarked: “The
leader of the opposition said
the other day that we borrowed
lots of money and you can’t see
it, you can’t feel it, you can’t
touch it. $50 million of it is right
here; you can see it, you can
feel it, you can touch it. You
are standing in it.”

Accelerate

The 247,000 sq ft US Depar-
ture Terminal currently has 300
workers on site, including 219
Bahamians, and is around half-
way complete with construction
expected to accelerate once the
hurricane wind tested walls are
installed this month.

As the airport reaches com-
pletion, the PM expects the
Bahamas will be propelled to
the forefront of Caribbean
tourism.

Mr Ingraham said: “We have
been behind and we are happy
that we are now catching up.

“T think this sends a message
to people coming to the
Bahamas they can see that we
are on the uptake, that we are
withstanding the economic
problems today, that we are
planning for the future, putting
in the infrastructure required
to sustain our economy.”

The international arrivals ter-
minal and departures pier is on
target for a 2012 opening, with
the new domestic and interna-
tional departures and domes-
tic arrivals terminals set to open
in 2013 marking the comple-
tion of a $409.5 million, 571,000
sq ft airport complex with one
million square feet of aircraft
operating surface.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
envisions a hub for the Family
Islands at the new airport,
spurring on development of the
entire archipelago.

“It’s very important for us in
the long-term to begin to focus
on developing all of the
Bahamas,” Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said. “And what this
airport is going to do is enable
us to provide a visitor experi-
ence we have never done
before and expand from just






Look @& Feel
Great ina
Fabulous
delection of
Dresses

by
Donna Morgan





Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







CRAIG RICHMOND, president and CEO of the Nassau Airport
Devolopment Company, speaks to the media yesterday.

Nassau and Paradise Island to
elsewhere.

“But George Markantonis
and NAD support this as they
will also get incremental busi-
ness as a result of people com-
ing in and spending some time
here, so we are able to attract a
market we weren’t able to
attract before.”

The Kerzner CEO added:
“It’s going to make a very big
difference for us. We frankly
can’t wait for the day we open
it.

“This is a dramatic step in
making the whole tourism
experience in the Bahamas one
better than anywhere else.”





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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

High-seas raid deepens Israeli isolation

JERUSALEM — Israel's bloody, bun-
gled takeover of a Gaza-bound Turkish aid
vessel is complicating U.S.-led Mideast peace
efforts, deepening Israel's international iso-
lation and threatening to destroy the Jewish
state's ties with key regional ally Turkey.

And while Israel had hoped to defend
its tight blockade of Hamas-ruled Gaza with
Monday's high-seas raid, it instead appeared
to be hastening the embargo's demise, judg-
ing by initial international condemnation.

The pre-dawn commando operation,
which killed nine pro-Palestinian activists,
was also sure to strengthen Gaza's Islamic
militant Hamas rulers at the expense of U.S.
allies in the region, key among them Hamas'
main rival, Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas, as well as Egypt and Jordan.

"The attack on a humanitarian mission ...
will only further alienate the international
community and isolate Israel while granting
added legitimacy to Hamas' claim to repre-
sent the plight of the Palestinian people,”
said Scott Atran, an analyst at the Universi-
ty of Michigan.

The Mediterranean bloodshed dealt
another blow to the Obama administration's
efforts to get peace talks back on track.

It raised new questions about one of the
pillars of U.S. policy — that Hamas can be
left unattended as Washington tries to bro-
ker a peace deal between Abbas and Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

The raid tested U.S.-Israeli ties that have
not yet fully recovered from their most seri-
ous dispute in decades, triggered by Israeli
construction plans in disputed east
Jerusalem.

In the most immediate fallout, the inter-
ception of the six-boat flotilla carrying 10,000
tons of supplies for Gaza trained the global
spotlight on the blockade of the territory.
Israel and Egypt sealed Gaza's borders after
Hamas overran the territory in 2007, wrest-
ing control from Abbas-loyal forces.

The blockade, under which Israel allows
in only essential humanitarian supplies, was
intended to squeeze the militants.

Instead, it has failed to dislodge Hamas,
driven ordinary Gazans deeper into poverty
and emerged as a constant source of fric-
tion and instability. In trying to shake off
the blockade, Hamas intensified rocket fire
on Israeli border towns, provoking Israel's
three-week military offensive against Gaza
16 months ago.

TRIBUTE TO

PENT M Puricelli Cemar i ar:]

After the war, the international commu-
nity remained reluctant to push hard for an
end to the blockade, for fear it could prolong
the rule of Hamas, branded a terrorist orga-
nization by the West.

But after Monday's deadly clash, Israel
may find itself under growing pressure to at
least ease the blockade significantly.

European diplomats on Monday demand-
ed a swift end to the border closure, while
US. officials said statements would call for
greater assistance to the people of Gaza.
The officials spoke on condition of anonymi-
ty due to the sensitivity of the situation.

The fate of U.S.-led indirect talks between
Israel and the Palestinians was uncertain.

Netanyahu cancelled a scheduled Tues-
day meeting with President Barack Obama
in Washington, and the status of a planned
visit to Washington by Abbas next week
was not immediately clear.

Abbas temporarily walked away from
the negotiations in March, after Israel
announced more housing for Jews in tradi-
tionally Arab east Jerusalem.

The Palestinian leader on Monday
denounced Israel's actions as a "sinful mas-
sacre" and met with aides to decide on his
next move.

Relations between Abbas and Hamas
have become increasingly vitriolic, and
extending Hamas rule by lifting the blockade
would run counter to Abbas’ objectives.

However, public outrage at home might
force Abbas’ hand — though pressure on
him to quit the talks appeared to be muted
by the fact that he is negotiating through a
USS. mediator, not directly with Israeli offi-
cials.

Abbas must now make a credible effort to
open Gaza's borders, said Palestinian analyst
Hani al-Masri. "Otherwise, he will be viewed
as weak or part of the siege and lose the
support of his people,” al-Masri said.

Israel dismissed the condemnation, saying
its forces came under attack when they tried
to board one of the Turkish-flagged aid ves-
sels. However, its point of view seemed to
fall on deaf ears.

"Militarily, we can feel quite safe, but not
regarding our political international stand-
ing,” said Alon Liel, a former Israeli diplo-
mat posted in Turkey.

(This article is by Karin Laub and
Matthew Lee of the Associated Press).



ur mail
facilities
need fixing

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Postal facilities and ser-
vices in the Bahamas are
stuck in 19th century tech-
nology with no indication
that long term planning is
being done. For many years
a shameful “third world”
shortage of mail boxes exist-
ed. New companies and
individuals in dire need of a
post office box were, and
possibly still are, simply told
“none available.” It isn’t as
if we are coping with need
for some high tech device.
Any administration should
be able to produce and
operate mail boxes galore
given a six-month lead time.

It would certainly require
only a couple of finish car-
penters to expand and reno-
vate the Shirley Street
office’s outgoing mail bins
so that on week ends and
other busy times the outgo-
ing mail would not pile-up
so high that the choked up
slot makes mail accessible
to any lurker inclined to
snatch a few envelopes. If
we really can’t afford the
carpentry, then let’s just
move the slot in the outside
12 or 18 inches higher so a
larger catch bin can be pro-
vided beneath the slots...If
someone bothered to think
about it there are no doubt
numerous ways to solve that
office's security problem.

At the Fox Hill post office

letters@triounemedia.net



the outgoing slot is located
only slightly above floor lev-
el, and so poorly marked a
stranger wouldn’t have a
clue where to drop his out-
going mail without asking
the friendly staff for guid-
ance.

We have excellent sign
makers in the community.
Why then must the Shirley
Street post office have only
a filthy, crudely scribbled,
faded marker pen on a dirty
wall designating “Foreign”
and “Domestic” mail slots?
At the main downtown post
office in particular where
parking is always inadequate
why not provide a pull-in
lane where outgoing mail
can be deposited from autos
into collection boxes.? Why
not at each post office?

Why not machine market
small booklets of stamps
using dollar bill reading
machines. The US imposes a
slight premium charge for
such convenient stamp
booklets. This could amor-
tise the machines in a drive
through lane. Why can’t
each post office have a post-
ed printed collection time
schedule so that customers
will know at what hours and
on what days their mail is
likely to be dispatched?

There used to be a number
of the typical handsome red
cast iron British P O collec-
tion boxes around town -
unless they’ve been aban-
doned. Could we not graph-
ically indicate the location
of them with expectation
that each will bear an updat-
ed collection schedule on its
side? Our North American
tourists would likely love to
dispatch their colour post
cards into some of these if
we have any on Bay Street;
perhaps with a special can-
cellation stamp bearing a
bold plug for the Bahamas.

Why can't each post office
clearly display an updated
listing of current postal
rates, charges and a com-
plete schedule of all services
available and the cost of
each with sufficient expla-
nation as to what approxi-
mate delivery time each
option will entail? All of the
foregoing might also be
nicely incorporated into
each year’s telephone book.
And maybe someone could
look into why a cross town
mailing should take a week
or two for delivery.

ONE WHO
BELIEVES
THERE IS
STILL A

NEED FOR
“SNAIL MAIL”
Nassau,

May, 2010.

Hubert Ingraham leads by example

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank God Hubert
Ingraham is Prime Minister
during these difficult times.
During his budget presenta-
tion he led by example in
cutting his own salary and
the salaries of his Cabinet
Ministers.

He is one of the best Min-
isters of Finance the country
has ever had. Even plenty
people in the PLP are glad
that Perry Christie is not in
the chair, because he can’t
even make easy decisions in
good times, much less tough
decisions in bad times.
Whereas Mr. Ingraham is a
man of action and strength,
Mr. Christie is a man of end-
less talk and weakness.

When the economic crisis
first hit, Mr. Ingraham took

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Have you ever wanted to run your
own Consignment Store?

the necessary measures to
stimulate our economy.
Now he is taking the mea-
sures needed to make sure
that our financial house
stays in order.

He is making sure that our
budget deficit is properly
reduced in order to sustain
our economy and provide
for a recovery.

Mr. Ingraham is a deci-
sive man. Without fear or
favour he has called us all
to sacrifice for the good of
the nation. Because of his
bold leadership, civil ser-
vants have not had their
salaries cut like in many
countries around the world.

Because he is a man of
compassion, he has made
sure that important areas
like health and education
are still provided with the
resources needed. This bud-
get and the budgets since
2007 also show his commit-
ment to the poor and to the
social needs of Bahamians.

Because he works day
and night to protect us, he
has made sure that national

is an extraordinary leader.

This budget is one of dis-
cipline and prudence. It is
also one of fortitude and
hope. These, of course, are
also the qualities of the man
whom we are fortunate to
have as Prime Minister and
Minister of Finance during
these tough times. Thank
God!

PROUD BAHAMIAN

Nassau,
May 29, 2010.

URE
Strides — but many of

ae
them still don't get it



EDITOR,
The Tribune.

Exactly one week and
one day ago, I telephoned
Police Control to inform
them that a black truck
had been abandoned off
the road on East Shirley

We are considering selling our well established
Consignment Boutique, Selling ladies fashions,
located on Shirley Street.

Street Gust west of Lake-
view Drive on the oppo-
site side). I provided the
name, licence number,
model of truck and so on.
I said the truck may have
broken down, but then
again, it may have been
used to commit a crime. I
was assured the police
would deal with it that
afternoon.

Of course, nothing
happened. So I called
Traffic Police the follow-
ing day and provided the
same info. I also stressed
that this truck posed a
danger to motorists at
night. Same assurances.
Again, of course, nothing
happened. The leaves are
piling up on the hood.
Another weekend's here.
Hopefully, none of the
late night partiers will
crash into the truck at
night.

As Mr. Paul Thomp-
son has repeatedly said,
it's the small things that
often lead to the big. Too
bad that in spite of all the
strides the police have
made under the new
command, so many of
them still don't get it.

security also gets the
resources needed. Mr. Ingra-
ham’s budget is tough but
fair. It is a budget produced
by a man who in good or
bad times has shown that he

LE Ree acs eh

FE a

ism]

eR Cee ae Ree)
een Om eam Cee eo
Cue is ese enL
friend because you felt you could help him with what he
was going through

Ue
1 Ed
Pt ele

Dae me ae

For more information, please call 424-8359

KIDZ CITY

ANNIVERSARY SALE
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(2 doors North of Multi-Discount)
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shales rude ae sa ia ome me neat Monday - Friday - 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM

Stephen Baptist Church, relatives and Friends. eee

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas among countries
PT CIEL




TT ee

By MATT MAURA



OFFICIALS from the
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) and the United States of
America recently signed a five-
year PEPFAR agreement that
will pave the way for 12
Caribbean countries — including
the Bahamas - to expand their
HIV/AIDS programmes.

The PEPFAR (President’s
Emergency Plan for AIDS
Relief) Programme was
launched in 2003 by then US
President George W Bush as a
five-year (2003-2008) commit-
ment of $15 billion to fight the
global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

It was renewed, revised and expanded in July 2008 in a move
that tripled the initial $15 billion to $45 billion through the
years 2009- 2013 to battle HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis
outside of the US.

PEPFAR has been called “the largest health initiative ever ini-
tiated by one country to address HIV/AIDS.”

HUBERT MINNIS

Education

Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis said the funds the
Bahamas receives will be used to ensure the continued educa-
tion and awareness, monitoring and evaluation and surveil-
lance of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, in addition to con-
tinuing to remove the stigma attached to HIV/AIDS.

“What this will do is to ensure that all the necessary moni-
toring and evaluation mechanisms are in place so that it will be
standardised throughout the Caribbean,” Dr Minnis said. Under
the agreement signed between CARICOM and PEPFAR, the
12 CARICOM countries will share $25 million annually, or up
to $125 million over the next five years, to assist with prevention,
testing, strategic information and counselling efforts.

Other regional beneficiaries are: Antigua and Barbuda, Bar-
bados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Trinidad and Toba-
go, St Kitts/Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines
and Suriname.

Haiti and the Dominican Republic were the lone beneficiaries
of the grant in the initial stages.

Dr Minnis said the Bahamas has had a very successful
HIV/AIDS programme and has met several of the Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) established by the 193 member
states of the United Nations.

“One such goal was to ensure that by 2010 those individuals
with HIV would have medication free of charge, which has
been accomplished in the Bahamas,” Dr Minnis said.

“Additionally, by the year 2015, we expect to see a decline in
the new cases of HIV/AIDS as a result of a comprehensive
programme that includes education and awareness, ensuring that
medications are available; that pregnant women are tested for
HIV/AIDS and once those results are positive, they receive
medication at the appropriate time so that the illness will not be
transmitted ‘in utero’, which means the infants are born HIV-
free,” he said.



COURT OF APPEAL PRESIDENT RAPS ATTORNEY

‘A rank abuse of the court’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunedmedia.net



THE President of the Court of Appeal
chastised an attorney for a “rank abuse of
the court” after he attempted to make an
appeal on behalf of a client he had “never
met”.

Wilbert H Moss Jr appeared in the Court
of Appeal on May 19, purporting to repre-
sent Khanaochi Knowles in an appeal
against the Commissioner of Police.

However, Mr Moss was swiftly castigat-

m@ 2010/2011 BUDGET

ed by Court of Appeal President Dame
Joan Sawyer who did not take kindly to
the fact that while claiming to represent
Mr Knowles, the lawyer, said Dame Joan,
admitted to the court that he had “never
seen him, cannot locate him and was
instructed (to carry out the appeal) by the
appellant’s sister, who has no locus standi
(authority) to instruct anybody to appeal
against somebody’s conviction or sentence.”

Dismissing the “purported appeal” for
“want of prosecution” Dame Joan said:
“Counsel must stop wasting the court’s
time and abusing the court’s process. This

is a rank abuse of the court’s process. It
must cease and must not happen again.”

The top judge noted that when an appeal
is made it “must be done by the person
himself (the convicted individual)”.

“There is no suggestion that the appel-
lant was incapable, and this is not an appli-
cation for habeas corpus, when he is being
kept away anda relative may give the affi-
davit. This is an appeal purported to be
brought by the person who was convict-
ed.”

Dame Joan issued a bench warrant for
the arrest of Mr Knowles.

Govt defends ‘tough and necessary’ measures





THE Government is defend-
ing its 2010/2011 Budget as one
which takes “the tough and dis-
ciplined measures necessary for
recovery and growth”.

Meanwhile, the administra-
tion is emphasising how its
management of the economy
in rough times has enabled the
country to proceed “on the
path to growth” in the upcom-
ing year “without a single pub-
lic service job lost”, unlike in
many other countries.

Shock

After a week in which indus-
try leaders and Opposition
politicians expressed shock and
dismay at tax increases set to
be levied in many areas when
the new fiscal cycle begins in
July, and some before then, the
FNM issued a statement on
Sunday in which it said that the
upcoming debate will provide
an opportunity to “demonstrate
to the Bahamian people that
the policies adopted to stimu-
late the economy and provide
for fiscal prudence are paving
the way for recovery and
growth.”

Meanwhile, hitting back at
the PLP, who called the bud-
get a “no growth, tax and pain
budget” which will hurt key
industries and already suffer-
ing Bahamians, the FNM in its
statement said it is looking for-
ward to “providing reality
checks on their poor record in
office” to the PLP in the

upcoming budget debate. “The
PLP is shameless when it comes
to the facts and to owning up to
their poor record in govern-
ment. The reduced allocation
for COB for 2010/11 is more
than the allocation received by
the College during each of the
five budgetary periods under
the PLP from 2002 to 2007,”
the FNM said.

The party’s statement further
said that Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has engaged in “pru-
dent management” of public
finances, “including during the
worst economic downturn since
the Great Depression.”

The government plans to
raise taxes on car imports, beer
and in the tourism and bank-
ing industries, among other

areas, as part of a drive to
reduce the country’s debt bur-
den which grew as the govern-
ment borrowed in large part to
fund what it termed employ-
ment stimulating capital works
projects during the economic
downturn.

The budget debate begins
tomorrow in Parliament.



CREDIT suisse
REDIT

ISSE AG, NASSAU BRANCH

APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch offers applications for an Apprenticeship
Program which is quilinad hearaatter. Full details and an application form can be

obtained from:

The Fragram Administrator
Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch

The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4" Floor
Shirley & Charlotte Streets
P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas

Appli

Alli

ion forms shoul return
Thur June 1

r than

As €@ corporate citizen desirous of making a positive contribution to the local
community, Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch plans to offer a scholarship to a
Bahamian student ta pursue a Bachelor's Degree at the College of The Bahamas

Course Schedule

UPCOMING COURSES - UPCOMING COURSES - UPCOMING COURSES
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Certified Project Risk Manager 3 Week Course

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Please contact us for pricing, availability and start-date details
Most classes are 2 nights per week, for the time penod listed and includes your
resgistration fees, textbooks and other class essentials.

Group rates are available upon request, as well as customized training for your
work- team employees.

(COB under its Apprenticeship Program

CONDITIONS

The candidate may select Business Administration or any banking related
field (Le. Business Management, Banking & Finance, Accounting, Finance or
Econamics majar) as their field of study

* A minimum grade point average of 2.6 must be maintained at all times.

Grades must be submitted to the Program Administrator at the Bank within
three weeks al the end of each semester.

The candidate must be willing to work twelve (12) hours per week (part lene)
and four (4) months per year (full time) at the Bank during MAY, JUNE, JULY,
AUGUST and any other month (or parts thereof) whilst pursuing full time
Studies at COB.

The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of a person employed
al the Bank.

The candidate will report to and consult with the Program Administrator who is
responsible for supervision, work assignments, advice, release of payments
and all other administrative and supervisory details.

The candidate must be “drug free’ throughout the entire four (4) year contract
penod,

The candidate should register for and successfully complete a minimum of
twelve (12) credits per semester as a full time student

* The candidate cannot be employed by a third party during the four (4) year

period
The candidate must besome PC literate by the end of year one of the program

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch will pay for the following costs whilst

the candidate

is enrolled as a student at College of The Bahamas:

Tuition and fees at College of The Bahamas [full tuitan).

* A Housing Allowance of $1,700.00 (year ome}, $1,800.00 (year two), and

32,000.00 (year three.

* A Transportation Allowance of 31,500.00 (year one}, $1,500.00 (year two), and

$1,600.00 (year three.

* Book Allowance: paid in full each semester,

4

a

Allowance for Miscellaneous expenses of $800.00 per annum (year one) and
$7,500.00 per annum (year two and three).

Special Allowance for candidates from the Family Islands $3,000.00 (year one!
$3,200.00 (year two), and $3,500.00 (year threci

Health Insurance (provided the candidate submits to a medical examination by
the Bank's medical doctor prior to commencing Aporentoeship Program)

No consideration will be given to the sex, race or religion of the candidate
during the selection process.

The Bank shall have no obligation towards the candidate vith regards to
employment or scholarships at the end of the four (4) year contract period.

‘Class Prices, Dates and Availability are subject to change.
“Payment plans are available, At least 50% of course price must be paid upfront.

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The Apprenticeship Program has a duration and contract period of four (4) years
as follows:

YEAR 1: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4
YEAR & Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4
YEAR 3: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4
YEAR 4: Full tine employment with the Bank at an entry-level jab at the Bank's
discretion.

In li@u of salary, the Benefits as per Paragraph ¢ are paid during the first three
years ofthe program. During the fourth year, a salary will be paed in lieu of
tuition, fees and allowances (adjusted for cost of living increases).

NOTE: Students who are currently enrolled in
COB are not eligible.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

S|

Budget communication was one of common sense

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW
ne,

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s Budget Communi-
cation in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday was one of
common sense, a measure of
political maturity and an indi-
cation, with his government’s
commitment to austerity, that
good, old-fashioned savvy still
prevails. The unveiling of what
appears to be an emergency
budget laid out the govern-
ment’s vision for averting finan-
cial Armageddon and pulling
the Bahamian economy out of
a fiscal hole.

In the face of a liquidity
crunch and rising gross nation-
al debt, the Prime Minister’s
revelations are clearly set-out
to stabilize and prevent a tee-
tering economy from going
over the cliff.

Due to soaring deficits and

ADRIA

a gap in the Budget, a down-
turn in foreign-direct invest-
ment and public debt wreaking
havoc on national public
accounts, tax hikes and pay-cuts
were inevitable. In attempting
to hedge an economy on its
deathbed, Prime Minister
Ingraham showed political will
in taking a year long pay-cut, a
move that undoubtedly stands
as a show of solidarity with the
Bahamian public and the civil
service, whose salaries will
remain frozen due to moratori-
um on increments and promo-
tions.

Leading the way in his
efforts to curb government
spending, Mr Ingraham took a



May - June



Re-Airing the 2008 National

Overcoming Crisis in
Challenging Times -
the Way Forward

| je S © IN



pay cut of 16 per cent whilst
announcing that Cabinet min-
isters (and the Speaker) will see
a pay-cut of seven per cent and
that the salaries of Members of
Parliament will decrease by five
per cent.

Further austerity measures
taken to restrain public spend-
ing are: the offering of retire-
ment packages to civil servants
with more than 40 years of ser-
vice; slashing allowances to
public officials; limiting the hir-
ing of new personnel in the
public service to critical areas;
reviewing costly medical insur-
ance schemes and inviting
bids—via the Ministry of
Finance—from insurance com-

a
HUBERT INGRAHAM

panies for various insurance
premiums; reducing the subsi-
dies to private schools and mail
boats; increasing stamp tax, air
and sea departure tax, hotel
room tax and raising the annu-
al fees payable by commercial





Proclamation

WHEREAS, the Cooperative Movement in the Bahamas is
celebrating thirty-six (36) years of sustained growth and positive
contribution to the economic and social development of the

country and its people;

AND WHEREAS, the Cooperative Movement continues to
improve itself as it seeks to address issues that are of critical
importance to encouraging entrepreneurship, economic diversi-
fication and competition, upward social mobility, self-reliance
and cooperation among Bahamians;

Hubert A. Ingraham
Prime Minister

June 12

Annual Fun/run/walk

AND WHEREAS, in recent years, members of Cooperative Societies of the Bahamas have
witnessed significant growth in their combined membership and assets, to the extent there
are at present approximately 32,000 active members with an asset base of roughly one
quarter of a billion dollars;

AND WHEREAS, in commemoration of the 36th Anniversary of the establishment of
Cooperative Movement in the Bahamas, the Department of Cooperative Development and
the Bahamas Cooperative League Limited have organized a full slate of events for the month
of June 2010, under the theme: "Overcoming Crisis in Challenging Times - the Way
Forward"; events that are all intended to heighten Public Awareness of the achievement of
the Bahamas Cooperative Movement;

NOW THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of June, 2010 as "Cooperative Month',

IN WITNESS WHEREOE, I have Hereunto set my Hand and Seal this 14th day of May, 2010



Activities planned for Co-operative Month

June 30







Launch Of Economic Impact

banks to 50 per cent; reducing
monies allocated for overtime
from $10 million to $1 million;
increasing the duty levied on
automobiles to 65 per cent for
engines of 2,000 c.c. or less and
85 per cent on those of higher
capacity; and increasing Nation-
al Insurance dues by one per
cent to fund unemployment
programmes. Furthermore,
BEC customers have been pre-
viously forewarned of five per
cent price hike beginning July 1.

Indeed, the upcoming bud-
get is one of sacrifice, service
and reform. With this budget,
Mr Ingraham has shown gravi-
tas in making the tough deci-
sions and implementing auster-
ity measures that, in the face
of a torrent of grim economic
news, is meant to rescue the
economy from going belly-up.

Whilst this job-shedding
recession has taken casualties
in the private sector, the
Bahamian economy has been
relatively sheltered as the
majority of working-class citi-
zens work for government enti-
ties. For scores of melancholy,
shiftless civil servants—whose
service quality oftentimes rate
somewhere between minus one
and zero—Mr Ingraham’s com-
ments signifies the end of the
free lunch!

In order to contain the bal-
looning deficit and strengthen
the economy, the government
must continue to streamline
expenditures and even more,
invest in teaching citizens new
skills and encourage entrepre-
neurship. Two of the main fac-
tors of production are human
capital and entrepreneurship,
with the former referring to
heightening of the knowledge
and skills of workers through
education and experience and
thereby widen employment
opportunities and, as is the case
with the latter, to develop new
ideas, take financial risks to
develop their ideas and coor-
dinate the production and sale
of goods and services.

With unemployment inch-
ing into stratospheric levels, and
in the government’s attempt to
promote sustainable growth
and reduce the national debt,
in time it may be advantageous
for the government.

Furthermore, as jobs vanish
across the archipelago, the gov-
ernment must swiftly move to
rid the Public Treasury of the
albatrosses—BEC, Bahamasair
and Water and Sewerage—
around its neck. The afore-
mentioned loss-making enti-
ties—particularly Water and
Sewerage and Bahamasair—
could be sold to stakeholders
and employees already within
each entity.

The Customs department,
the country's chief revenue
earner, is thought to have lost
millions per annum due to duty
avoidance, corruption and erro-
neous practices.

The government must imme-
diately close tax loopholes and

revenue leakages, particularly
to mitigate against those
unscrupulous Bahamian com-
panies that use phony invoices
and practice under-invoicing
and/or set-up wholly-owned US
"shell companies", to cheat the
government and honest tax-
payers of millions of dollars per
year.

Although the commercial
bank fee increased by 50 per
cent, banks remain profitable
exceptions to the economic
debacle and have, for too long,
got a free ride. Indeed, there
has long been a need for an
increase in corporate taxes.

In setting the direction for
the nation and its continued
development, we must face the
reality that taxation—value-
added or otherwise—is a must.

In widening our tax revenue
base, a value added tax should
be implemented locally. This
form of taxation has been
adopted by 140 countries
around the world and would
represent a prime candidate for
the Bahamas. Frankly, this
form of taxation — once effec-
tively administered — would be
comprehensive and difficult for
persons to circumvent since it
must be tacked on to all pur-
chases. As a recent IMF report
suggests, "sustainable revenue-
enhancing measures, including
VAT, would reduce the nation-
al debt by 30 per cent GDP
over the medium term."

It appears that the upcoming
budget debate will be tempes-
tuous, with a budding rift brew-
ing as Opposition and PLP
leader Perry Christie asserted in
the Opposition’s press confer-
ence that Mr Ingraham indi-
cated to him and Bain Town
MP Dr Bernard Nottage some-
thing other than his public posi-
tion on the legalization of num-
bers. Mr Ingraham has said that
a legislative undertaking rela-
tive to numbers and gaming will
not occur during this legislative
period and rather will be sub-
jected to a referendum if the
FNM wins the next election.

I am also hopeful that the
Opposition would — as any
credible Opposition would
across the globe — propose an
alternative budget to the gov-
ernment’s presentation during
their contribution to the budget
debate, rather than merely
advancing puerile, political flim-
flam.

As the economic storm
surges and continues to corrode
the Bahamas' badly prepared,
waning tourism and financial
services industries, Bahamians
must raise their standards of
service and improve their work
ethic and our government,
along with social leaders and
the private sector, must seek to
draft a national plan and an
updated and revised economic
model for the country in order
to ensure our long-term sus-
tainability.

SEE page seven

NOTICE
FOUR SEASONS HOLDINGS LTD.

Take notice that with effect from the 8" day of
February, 2010, [ accepted appointment as Liquidator
of the above company, pursuant to an Extra-Ordinary
Meeting of the Directors, held on the 8" day of February,
2010, at which the following Resolutions were passed:

That Four Seasons Holdings Ltd. be wound up

voluntarily.

That George Clifford Culmer be appointed Liquidator
of the company for the purposes of such wind up.



Congress Town Meeting & Health Screening Study Booklet

May 28 June 16 June 1 - 30 ye

Bahamas Cooperative Lecture & Annual Awards Radio Talk Show Davee unis co" Gay ona 2010:

League Workshop/Forum Reception June 1 - 30

May 29 June 17 Open House TBA _ GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Bahamas Cooperative Co-operatives Seminar/ Board of Directors Liquidator of the above named Company
League AGM National Congress Employees Family Fun Day

May 30 June 21 July 3

Annual Cooperative Month Youth Program Planning Giving back to the NOTICE

Church Service Session Community

June 1 June 26 July 4 FOUR SEASONS HOLDINGS LTD.
Proclamation Co-operative Mega Yard International Co-operative (In Voluntary Liquidation)
June10 Sale/Farmers Market in Day

conjunction with IICA &
BAIC

Financial Fitness Seminar

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 30" day of June 2010
to send their names and addresses and particulars
of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
Company, at P.O. Box N-10144, Nassau, Bahamas,
or in default thereof they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.

MISSION STATEMENT

To promote social and economic prosperity by empowering all Bahamians through
ownership of viable, competitive and adequately supervised co-operative enterprises

Department of Co-operative Development
Ministry of Lands & Local Government
P.O. Box N-3040, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242 356 3152 Fax: 242 356 4622
Email: coopbahamas@hotmail.com

JOIN A CO-OPERATIVE TODAY!

Dated this 26" day of May, 2010.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator











THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 7



GB Port Authority |
aims to stimulate
island’s economy |

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The Grand Bahama Port
Authority said it plans to unveil a new strat-
egy to stimulate the island’s suffering econ-
omy.

The plan will be presented in the next few
weeks during a series of meetings with the
business community, said GBPA president
Tan Rolle.

“Revitalisation of the Grand Bahama
economy is critical,” Mr Rolle said. “Many
businesses have been experiencing chal-
lenges. Yes, these are tough times but we
cannot sit by idly and dwell on it.”

According to Mr Rolle, the plan consists
of short and long-term initiatives aimed at
improving the economy.

“Over the last year we have been listening
to concerns of Grand Bahama and devel-
oping strategies to address them, and our
mission is to enhance the lives of our peo-
ple,” said Mr Rolle.

He said the GBPA has created three new
departments — customer relations, commu-
nity relations and business development.

Mr Rolle also reported that the share-
holders are committed to work together and
find the right buyer for the group.

“The shareholders have finally decided
to settle the dispute. I can confirm that there

is a Settlement agreement with conditions,
some of which were not met at the time of
the last hearing,” he said.

Mr Rolle also indicated that the Port
Authority is working on some new devel-
opments for Grand Bahama.

He noted that they are in “active discus-
sions” with three entities on the develop-
ment of a medical tourism facility on the
island.

“Within the next two weeks we will be
able to share further details on these pro-
jects,” he said.

Mr Rolle said the Port Lucaya Resort,
which closed early this year, is currently
under consideration for sale to facilitate the
development of another resort to be run by
a well-known operator.

He added: “We have also received great
news that International Distributors located
in the Sea/Air Business Centre will now be
fully maximising the island’s strength as a
logistic centre.

“The new model will allow the company
to acquire logistic services to fully take
advantage of what GBI has to offer, and
act as a catalyst for other companies to
have presence in the Sea/Air Business Cen-
tre.”

The Port Authority’s business develop-
ment team will travel to China this month to
attract foreign direct investment to Grand
Bahama, Mr Rolle also revealed.

RU Ue ESS



JEREMY MUTTON, general manager of Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort; Buzz Aldrin and Mike Norton,

vice-president of groups at Sandals Resorts.

FORMER NASA astro-
naut Buzz Aldrin, the second
man to set foot on the moon,
visited the Bahamas recently
as part of the Sea-Space Sym-
posium Dive Group who
were hosted to an evening on
Sandals Cay at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort.

Distinguished NASA astro-
nauts were among the atten-
dees, including Scott Carpen-
ter, Kathy Sullivan and Guy
Bluford.

Mr Aldrin, who was also a
contestant on this season’s
‘Dancing With the Stars’,
showed off his moves and
danced the night away to the
sounds of a junkanoo band.

The evening ‘lifted off? with
a champagne/cocktail recep-
tion on Sandals Cay and was
followed by a three-course
meal put together especially



BUZZ ALDRIN, the Lunar Mod-
ule pilot on the first manned
moon landing, is presented
with a Sandals necklace.

_No shelter from the storm for Haiti quake victims

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti



A HURRICANE season predicted to be one
of the wettest on record opens Tuesday in the
: Caribbean, where hundreds of thousands of
: Haitian earthquake victims have only tarps or
i fraying tents to protect them in a major storm,
| according to Associated Press.

The Haitian government, which had five
( mentic to prepare, says it's still working on

: emergency and evacuation plans. But it is unclear

where people will go with many churches,
schools and other potential shelters toppled by
the quake. Since the Jan. 12 earthquake killed up
to 300,000 people and left more than 1.5 mil-
lion homeless, there has been little progress on
clearing rubble so people can return to their
neighborhoods or building sturdier shelters.
Dr. Jean Pape, one of the country’s most
prominent public health experts, estimates that
only one per cent of the masses stuck in dan-
gerous flood zones have been relocated.

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

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j

Maritim

8th & 9th Graders

Interested in:

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Contact your Guidance
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of collect an application

the Dean, Faculty Pure &
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Telephone: 302-1400 or
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THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
FACULTY OF PURE & APPLIED SCIENCES

e Summer Camp -
28th June — 16th July, 2010

packet from the Office of /

CAMPBELL
SHIPPING

21) 10

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD.

has an immediate vacancy for three

Premier Banking Bankers

Applicants must hold the following:

Bachelor's Degree in Administration, Finance, Economics or related degree

for the event by the resort’s
executive chef.

The dive group were treat-
ed to a taste of Bahamian cul-
ture as a mini junkanoo

parade started up.

Mr Aldrin was presented
with a Sandals necklace which
he wore throughout the
evening.

A minimum of 3 years experience in private banking

Applicants should also be capable of the follawing:

Totally fluent in English and Spanish

Develop and manage a portfolio of private banking clients by analyzing the banking and
investment needs of corporate and high-net worth individuals and offering financial and
investment alternatives.

Maintain existing client relationships by monitoring the financial condition of assigned
accounts, executing client instructions, and keeping clients updated as to the changing
conditions of financial markets.

Travel to assigned countries to enhance current client relationships and develop new
business by meeting with representatives and clients.

Supervise a Private Banking Assistant.

Ensure that all private banking activities are in compliance with internal policies

and procedures and external regulatory requirements.

Budget communication
FROM page six

THE COST OF TICKETS FOR INTER-ISLAND FLIGHTS!



Travelling within the Bahamas is costly, as exorbitant inter-
island tickets oft-times cost more than a ticket to parts of the
eastern seaboard in the United States. Frankly, the travelling pub-
lic is being squeezed for every dollar and this is likely a reason why
domestic and foreign travellers are hesitant to venture off New
Providence and explore the Family Islands.

As I prepare to travel to my hometown—Long Island—for
our regatta next week, I am also perturbed by the fact that Bahama-
sair has refused to include Stella Maris in its published flight
schedule. Surely, Bahamasair knows that during such a festive
occasion where residents from the northern and southern tips of the
island will be returning to bask in the excitement of the regatta, it
is only fair to schedule flights for both Deadman’s Cay and Stella
Maris airports. Indeed, while some will mention the smaller carriers
that fly to Stella Maris, not only should the national flag carrier trav-
el there but it is also of note—tregardless of how trivial—that, as one
Family Islander asserted, some Bahamians are simply “scared of
small planes.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed to the Human
Resources Manager, P.O, Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than June [, 2010.





Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, The Bahamas, an archipelagic nation comprising some 700
islands, rocks and cays scattered across more than one hundred thousand
square miles of clear, blue-green waters, has rich biodiversity of marine and
terrestrial flora and fauna which provides an important ecological attraction
for the tourism industry;

AND WHEREAS, the future stainability of The Bahamas premier industry,
Tourism, has a direct correlation to the extent to which the country s unique
ecosystem and natural resources are conserved and protected;

AND WHEREAS, the natural flora and fauna of The Bahamas are
threatened by habitat loss due to human development, ecosystem
disruption, the introduction of alien or invasive species, over exploitation of
natural resources such as over fishing and over harvesting, air and water
pollution, contamination of biological systems, global warming and the
resultant climate change;

AND WHEREAS, the harmful effects of these threats to the ecosystem of

The Bahamas may result in loss of biological and cultural diversity, loss
of species, reduced availability of marine resources for food, loss of clean
water, less food and plants for human consumption and medicine, decline in
tourism, a negative impact on health and education, and less employment
opportunities;

AND WHEREAS, the Government of the Bahamas uses the occasion
of World Environment Week as a platform to encourage Bahamians to
become good stewards of the natural and man-made environment, to
support sustainable development practices by creating public awareness
of critical environmental issues inherent in protecting our rich ecological
biodiversity for the future generations;

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the week of
May 31st - June 6th, 2010 as “WORLD ENVIRONMENT WEEK”

promoting the theme “Many Species, One Planet, One Future”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
| have hereunto set my
Hand and Seal this 27th
day of May, 2010

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER





Employment Opportunity

OPERATIONS MANAGER (with oversight for compliance)

Summary of Key Responsibilities:

¢ Managing the day-to-day operations of the Banking Department focusing on overall
workflow, productivity improvement, timeliness, problem determination and resolution,
training and staff development, guidance and team leadership. Supervise, coach and train
employees, to include organizing, prioritizing and scheduling of work assignments.

e Play an integral part in the management and internal control flow process.

¢ Develop strong working rapport with clients to finalize creative ideas and establish strong
relationships. Promote a customer first culture and a policy of continuous improvement.

¢ Managing the relationship of various outside vendors/clients and supervising the com-
munication process, as the need arises, to correct any discrepancies.

¢ Evaluating and streamlining existing bank processes and formalize documentation of the
internal control processes within the banking and loan related areas, as well as compliance
and risk management.

¢ Maintaining up-to-date procedures consistent with the bank’s credit policies and bank-
ing prudential regulations, with regards to treasury management.

¢ Ensure compliance with established internal guidelines and external regulations affect-
ing the department. Oversee the bank’s overall compliance activities ensuring adherence
to policy and procedures. Liaise with Group Compliance.

¢ Review existing client files to ensure they are fully compliant. Monitor account opening
and the due diligence process as well as monitoring of client transactions for suspicious
activity.

* Implement effective systems to improve the compliance function and providing recom-
mendations/periodic assessments of the level of compliance to management.

* Identify compliance problems through compliance testing, analysis of audit reports, staff
meetings and on-going interaction with other compliance officers.

Perform other duties deemed necessary.
Requirements:

Knowledgeable of banking operations and daily procedures
Working knowledge of compliance requirements

Fair knowledge of financial services and products

Proficiency in the use of Microsoft Office products

Sufficient work experience as a professional in the financial sector
Strong communication skills and analytical abilities

Experience in managing and empowering people

Strong communication and interpersonal skills

Planning and Organizing skills

Qualified applicants should send their resume and cover letter to
Att: Operations Manager position

P.O. BOX N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for submission is June 11, 2010



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

PM quotes Godfather

film in tax hike row

FROM page one

Mr Ingraham compared the
people of the Bahamas to Mar-
lon Brando’s infamous charac-
ter Don Vito Corleone.

In The Godfather Part I Don
Vito warned his fellow mafia
bosses they would be held
accountable for any “unlucky
accident” that might befall his
family.

Mr Ingraham said Bahami-
ans are likewise willing to
blame him for everything.

“T get blamed for almost any-
thing,” the Prime Minister said.

“Like they say in the God-
father movie, if someone falls
down in the back of their yard,
they blame me.”

He said any complaints about
the 2010/2011 budget commu-
nicated in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday will be
addressed with interested par-
ties if they have not been
already, Mr Ingraham said yes-
terday.

“If anybody complains I
would be happy to talk to

them,” he added.

“T have spoken to some of
the people who have had diffi-
culties and concerns, I have
spoken to the beer manufac-
turers, I have spoken to the car
dealers, I met local chicken pro-
ducers this morning.

“Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace met with the cruise lines
on Friday, and I have got
another meeting set up to
review the situation.

“We have got representation
from the church operating
schools whose subsidies have
been cut.

“And we will take account
of all the representation which
has been made and make some
judgments.”

A rate of 65 per cent will be
levied on passenger vehicles
with an engine capacity of 2000
ce or less, and 85 per cent on
those with a higher capacity.

But criticism from the auto
industry will not deter govern-
ment from enforcing it in an
effort to discourage the import
of large vehicles to the islands.

Mr Ingraham said: “It’s the

THE TRIBUNE

determined position of the gov-
ernment in the Bahamas that
the larger cars the gas-guzzlers
pay a high rate of duty.

“The only issue for discus-
sion at the moment is whether
or not we leave it at 2000 cc’s or
whether we put it for similar
cars to come in at the lower rate
and if we do, for how long.

“But our intent is to have
encouragement for people to
buy smaller cars so we have less
gasoline consumption, less fuel
in the Bahamas.

“We are now consuming 78
million gallons of gasoline per
year, that’s humungous, and
while the government gets a
hefty amount of revenue for
it, it’s not the way we want to
go.”

Mr Ingraham said tax rises
would not have been as high if
gambling had been legalised so
the government could draw an
estimated $30 to $40 million a
year from numbers houses.

“But that is not the case,” Mr
Ingraham said.

“We still need the money so
we have got to get it.”

PLP Deputy Leader denies meeting
FBI over Jamaican drug lord

FROM page one

“What is worrying about this is

dens, Jamaica has been fighting
extradition to the United States.
His stronghold in West Kingston
was fortified by his supporters
who have engaged in a bloody
battle with Jamaican army and
police, leaving 73 civilians and
one solider dead.

Describing the report as noth-
ing more than political mischief,
Mr Davis said that he has had no
contact with anyone from the FBI
or any other agency for that mat-
ter. In fact, Mr Davis said he
knows nothing about “Mr Coke”
and blames The Punch for trying to loose-
ly connect him as the former criminal
lawyer for convicted drug trafficker
Samuel “Ninety” Knowles and the unfor-
tunate events unfolding in Jamaica at this
time.

ne PNA



not so much the story itself, but
when they put stories out there
like that like I am assisting the
FBI — and this fella; I don’t
know where his tentacles are, I
don’t know anything about it. It
exposes me to what?” he asked.

Having ceased from handling
any major criminal matters since
2002, Mr Davis said that he has
focused his expertise towards civ-
il court and questioned who could
be behind this latest attack on his
character.

“T think this is a part of a con-
tinued smear campaign to detract
from the real issues that are fac-
ing the country today; and this is politi-
cally motivated,” he said.

Mr Davis stopped short of directly blam-
ing the FNM for the report, stating only
that he will be doing his own research to
discover the genesis of the story.

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THE TRIBUNE

-
|
|
he

TUESDAY, JUNE 1,

Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



SIMONE PRATT

PAGE 9





2010

ts



Nygard
sponsoring
boxing
team...

See page 10

BLTA selects Simone Pratt for Fed Cup

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t age 14, Grand Bahamian
AsBinere Pratt is making
headlines in the Bahamas

Lawn Tennis Association (BLTA).

The rising young star, instead of two
of the top female players in the coun-
try, was recently selected by the BLTA
to represent the Bahamas at the Fed
Cup.

This weekend, when the BLTA
opened its Gatorade Open Nationals,
Pratt’s name surfaced again and it was
brought into question why she wasn’t
included in the draw of eight players.

Pratt, who attended the tournament
at the National Tennis Center, wasn’t
fazed at all about the attention she has
drawn.

In fact, she’s using it to her advan-
tage as she prepares for an historic
appearance on the European tour July
1 to August 4. She will have two warm
up tournaments on June 6 and July 1.

Based on her performance at the





TENNIS

recent South American Tour, Pratt
was afforded the opportunity to make
the trip by the International Tennis
Federation’s junior circuit.

“T feel that I’m playing well. There’s
just some things that I’m working on
right now,” Pratt said. “So when I
improve on those things, everything
should be great.”

She was referring to her serve and
her forehand. But she added that all of
the little things that a player takes for
granted are what she wants to con-
centrate on as she tries to get better
with each tournament.

“T feel I can get a lot better. There’s
just some things that I need to work
on,” she insisted. “If I can do that, I
think that my game will improve. But
it’s coming along.”

Two years shy of the legal age of 16
to participate in the Open Nationals,
Pratt said she would have liked to have
been invited to play, just to test her

skills against the older players.

“T heard it, but I just went and did
my best,” said Pratt about all of the
fuss about her being too young to play
on the Fed Cup team. “I felt that I
played to my best.

“T also got a lot of experience there
because there was a lot of top players
there. So it was a good experience for
me.”

BLTA president Steve Turnquest,
who took a lot of flack for defending
their decision to stick with Pratt, said
he’s thrilled to see how well she has
progressed to the point that the ITF is
recognising her achievement.

“It is a great accomplishment and
make our tennis programme and what
we are doing more visible to the
world,” Turnquest said.

“T think Simone has developed her-
self in all of her tournaments and her
performances have allowed them to
select her. She’s one of the top juniors
in the Caribbean in her age group. So
it is fitting for them to select her to
make that trip to Europe.”

Like most of the players playing in

the ITF’s junior circuit, Pratt is
enrolled in an on-line school where
she is forced to do her studies on her
own, without the support or distrac-
tions of any peers.

“T do my school work in the after-
noons and at night as well,” she point-
ed out. “I do about 3-4 hours of school
each day. I have my schedule planned
out, so I stay on track.”

At present, Pratt is in the ninth
grade and she has a B+ grade.

In the future, Pratt said her goal is to
become a professional tennis player
and she credits her father, Sidney Pratt,
for getting her to the level that she’s at
right now. “That’s what I really want to
be,” said Pratt, who gives herself about
two years to make it on the circuit.

When asked who is her idol in the
sport, Pratt quickly mentioned Amer-
ican Serena Williams, the top female
player in the world.

She was disappointed that Serena’s
sister, Venus, got eliminated, but she’s
confident that Serena should be able to
win the French Open tourney at
Roland Garros.



Richardson signs
with Braves in
minor league

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE long, winding road
towards a professional base-
ball contract is back on track
for one long-standing
Bahamian minor league play-
er.

Antoan Richardson was
signed as a free agent last
week to the Mississippi
Braves, the AA subsidiary of
Major League Baseball’s
Atlanta Braves.

Richardson spent his previ-
ous year with the Schaumburg
Flyers of the Northern

SPORTS

mr

WOMEN ONLY
CYCLING SERIES



ON Sunday, the Jeff
Auto Cycling Club is set to
hold a series for women
only. The club is inviting all
of their affiliated women
and their acquaintances to
come out and participate.

The event is slated to
begin 7:15am from Good-
man’s Bay, travelling west
to Coral Harbour and back
where an awards presenta-
tion will take place.

TRACK
NCAA WEST
OMISSIONS

IN The Tribune’s report
on Monday, there were a
couple athletes whose
names were not included in
the results posted, either
because they didn’t advance
to the final or they were not
identified.

Our Sports Department
apologises to the athletes
and their families for the
omissions.

In the men’s 4 x 400
metres, Karlton Rolle, a
sophomore at UCLA, ran
the second leg as the Bru-
ines clocked 39.43 seconds
to finish second to secure
their berth in the NCAA
Championships next month.

Natalya Beneby, a junior
at (Berkeley) California, ran
a personal best of 1:00.50
for 28th in the women’s 400
hurdles, but she just missed
qualifying for the NCAA
Championships.

Beneby was also an alter-
nate for California’s 4 x 400
relay team that qualified
10th in 3:36.81.

And Jeffery Gibson, a
freshman at Oral Roberts
University, ran 48.41 for
45th overall in the men’s
400 metres, but he didn’t
advance.







League, an independent
league in the Northern US not
affiliated with MLB.

The Flyers removed out-
fielder Lynden Poole from the
disabled list and placed him
on the active roster which
prompted the club to part
ways with Richardson.

They then sold his contract
to the Atlanta Braves organi-
sation and gave Richardson a
coveted return to the minor
leagues.

Since signing with the
Braves, Richardson has seen
immediate playing time and
has appeared in a pair of
games thus far with produc-
tive results.

In his first outing with the
team against the Mobile Bay-
Bears, Richardson was imme-
diately inserted into the start-
ing lineup and went 3-5 with
one stolen base.

Richardson loaded the
bases late in the ninth inning
when he put a ground ball in
play to second and all runners
reached safely.

He set the stage for Willie
Cabrera who singled to right
field and scored Juan Gonza-
lez, however the comeback
attempt ended there in the
Braves’ 8-4 loss.

In his second game,
Richardson went 2-4, high-
lighted with his first RBI and
first run scored.

Again with late inning
heroics, Richardson hit a fly
ball to left-center field and
was safe at second on a field-
ing error and a pair of runners
scored to tie the game at six.

Cabrera, who lengthened
his hit streak to 10 games,
doubled to score Richardson.

In his previous stint in the
AA minors, Richardson spent
two years with the Connecti-
cut Defenders.

In his first season with the
Defenders in 2008, Richard-
son hit .241 with five home
runs, 63 runs, 31 RBIs and 33
stolen bases in 123 games.

In 2009, he hit just .207 with
six RBI and six stolen bases
and was released by the
Defenders in July.

The Mississippi Braves
boast several major league
alumni to its credit, most
notably, Jeff Francoueur, who
won a Gold Glove Award in
2007.

TS

For the stories

TAT RUT Ca A
WAY)
SEES







Finalists for ‘Most Outstanding
High School Player’ award

WITH just days remaining before the
start of the 8th annual Andre Rodgers
National Baseball Championships,
which organisers anticipate will be the
largest to date, the most closely con-
tested race may take place off the field.

The high school division will feature
many of the 45 young men who received
high school scholarships to the US in
August 2009, making it an exciting divi-
sion, and the honour of “Most Out-
standing High School Player” should
produce just as much drama.

The Bahamas Baseball Federation
has named the three finalists for the
award amongst a plethora of hopefuls.

In a press statement, the BBF con-
gratulated the players on an outstanding
high school baseball season.

“Each of these young men are in con-
tention to win this prestigious awards
for 2010 - Most Outstanding High
School Player. The BBF is in full prepa-
ration mode for the upcoming eighth
edition of the Andre Rodgers National
Baseball Championships,” said the
statement.

The statement said the BBF wit-
nessed a milestone when 45 young
Bahamians entered high schools and



SWEETING STUART

colleges in the US to further their edu-
cation and represent their respective
schools on the baseball diamond.
“After their first seasons on the base-
ball diamond, some of these young men
are having and continue to have out-
standing baseball seasons,” said the
release. The three finalists are:

Theodore “Trae” Sweeting

Christ School - Ashville North Car-
olina

- Set a school record for underclass-
men with a batting average of .609

- Led the Western Carolina district

with the highest batting average

- Stockpiled 28 hits in 46 at bats
- Three Home Runs with a slugging

percentage of .679

- Totaled 21 runs, 16 RBI and stole 13

bases

Jervis Stuart
Christ School - Asheville North Car-

olina

- All State Selection for North Car-

olina 3A baseball (Desmond Russell and
Ali Knowles are previous Bahanuans
who have received the honor)

- Batting average of .510 with 25 hits in

49 at bats

- Two Home Runs with a slugging

percentage of .429

- Totaled 29 runs, seven RBI and 21

stolen bases

Chad Burrows (not pictured)
Faith Baptist Christian - Brandon,

Florida

- All Conference MVP
- Batting average of 561 with 23 hits in

41 at bats

- Two Home Runs and 17 RBI
- Led team with 26 runs scored



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PROPERTIES
ae) BYNES

ee a

e
Robinson Road
¢ Lot of Land and building, Robinson Road, Southern District, New
Providence

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land located on the southern side of
a road reservation known as Robinson Road and East of Pinedale and
West of Claridge Road situated in the Eastern District of the island of
New Providence-Bahamas which gross area is 22,400 Square Feet. The
property size is 140 Feet by 160 Feet approximately.

Total floor approximately is 3,000 Square Feet and Patio and Porch is
516 Square Feet

Located in an area zoned for “Commercialist’”. The subject property is
located in an area with a mixture of concrete-block single family,
apartment and business establishments.

All infrastructures including Water and Electricity services are in place.
Drainage is by Septic Tank.

Yamacraw Beach Estates
¢ Lot Number 39, Yamacraw Beach Estates

¢ ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot Number Thirty-nine
(39) in the Subdivision called and known as “Yamacraw Beach Estates”
situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence.

=F

Eastwood

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land in the Subdivision called and known
as “EASTWOOD?” situated in the Eastern District of New Providence and
being Lot No. 20. Situated thereon a Single Family Residence consisting
of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, Entry Foyer, Living Room, Dining
Area, Family Room, Kitchen and Utility room.

Property Size: 9,000

This property is being sold under the Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
dated 27th February, 2006.

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Lot 1, Block 4, Unit 2, Derby Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama

ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land being Lot Number One (1) in
Block Four (4) Unit Two (2) situate in the Subdivision called and known
as “DERBY SUBDIVISION?” lying to the East of Freeport on the Island
of Grand Bahama.

All offers must be submitted on or before Friday, June 18, 2010 in
a sealed envelope marked “Confidential” and addressed to:

The Risk Manager

P.O. Box N 3180
Nassau, Bahamas

The right is reserved to reject any or all offers.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Nygard sponsoring
team for ‘invitation only’
amateur boxing event

LYFORD
Cay businessman
Peter Nygard is
one of the main
sponsors of the
Amateur Boxing
Federation of the
Bahamas’ team



Carl Hield, Valentino Knowles
and coach Andre Seymour to
represent Bahamas in Ecuador



for Continental
Elite Boxing
Championships.
Wellington
Miller, president
of the Amateur
Boxing Federa-
tion of the
Bahamas
(ABFB),
thanked Nygard
for his support.
“Peter Nygard
has been one of
the main spon-
sors of our pro-
grammes for the
last several years.
It is a real help
in our efforts to
identify, train
and give the nec-
essary exposure
to young
Bahamian box-
ers at the top levels of interna-
tional competition to properly
represent the country.”
Standout Bahamian boxers
Carl Hield in the 64 kilo divi-
sion and Valentino Knowles in
the 60 kilo division are expect-
ed to travel with coach Andre
Seymour to take part in the
invitation only event slated for
June 13-19 in Quito, Ecuador.
“Invitations to these elite
championships are quite an
honour,” said Miller. “Because
they are issued only to coun-
tries with recognised elite box-
ers. Only the best boxers from
around this region of the Com-
monwealth of Nations have
been invited, with representa-
tives from Canada to Chile. The
Bahamas will do its best.”
Earlier this year, Valentino
Knowles won the silver medal
at the Commonwealth Boxing

NYGARD









MILLER











SEYMOUR



CARL HIELD (left) and VALENTINO KNOWLES

Championships in India. He
recently made history as the
first Bahamian to win a match
at the World Boxing Champi-
onships in Italy.

And just last week, Carl
Hield won the bronze medal at
the Cuban Boxing Olympics in
Havana.

Hield also took part in the
World Boxing Championships
in Italy and the Commonwealth
Boxing Championships in
India.

“Taking part at these events
is another step in helping to
prepare these talented boxers
for the 2012 Olympic Games in
London and we wish to again

thank Peter Nygard who has
always come through for boxing
and been one of our main spon-
sors since 2002.

“Nygard has been very keen
and helpful in supporting the
various programmes of the
Amateur Boxing Federation,
from our ground-level efforts
with very young boxers still in
primary school all the way up to
this elite level.

“His support has been a
great service to the many young
men who have learned life-
skills and otherwise benefited
from exposure to the discipline
of amateur boxing,” said Mr
Miller.



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THE TRIBUNE

Tribune worker
feeds BA crew

FROM page one

out the cash to take care of
the crew. There was enough
funds to care for the passen-
gers’ needs.

An employee at BA's desk
said yesterday morning that
he could not confirm or deny
the reports as he had not
heard of the passengers’
ordeal before being contact-
ed by The Tribune.

Further attempts to secure
an explanation from BA
were unsuccessful. A voice-
mail recording said that man-
ager at the BA desk at the
Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport, Nathaniel
Rappel, was out of office
until June 2.

A message left for his sub-
ordinate was not returned up
to press time. There was no
one at the office because
there were no BA flights yes-
terday.

Meanwhile, the Bahamas
Hotel Association said it
does not anticipate a signifi-
cant fallout from the contin-
uing BA cabin crew strike
but said it's too early to tell
how much their industry has
suffered.

"We haven't quantified
them (the numbers) but we
know based on what hap-
pened during the last (BA)
labour action that there was
an impact on bookings and
there was some cancella-
tions," said Frank Comito,
BHA's vice-president.

Although he could not
provide specific data —
because the numbers on can-
cellations and occupancy
rates are still being reviewed
— Mr Comito does not
expect the impact to be sig-
nificant.

"While the UK market
and the market in transit via
British Airways is very
important to us it's not a
huge segment of our busi-
ness, so while some proper-
ties are feeling the impact on
a small scale it's not a huge
impact,” he said.

However, BHA President
Robert Sands stressed that
any dip in air arrivals is cause
for worry, adding that the
country is lucky that a good
portion of our air travellers
enter through the United
States.

"The important point is
that any reduction in airlift
to the Bahamas is a concern,
but the Bahamas is also for-
tunate to have tremendous
airlift via Florida to Nassau,"
he said, when contacted by
The Tribune yesterday.
"British Airways provides
direct airlift out of Europe
which allows for connecting
flights from other destina-
tions in Europe so for us as a
destination this flight is very
important and the Ministry
of Tourism and the various
hotels are hoping that this
matter can be resolved as
quickly as possible so as to
have as minimal an impact

on our industry as possible."

One local hotelier said
some European visitors are
circumventing the problems
brought on by the BA cabin
crew strike and are travel-
ling to the Bahamas by way
of the US.

"It's got a little bit of an
impact on us. A lot of cus-
tomers coming on that direct
flight are primarily for the
Ocean Club (and) have
found alternate routes (to the
Bahamas) via the United
States. So we've mitigated
some of the loss," George
Markantonis, Atlantis’ CEO
told The Tribune during a
media tour of the new US
departure terminal at the
Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport yesterday.

Unite, BA’s union, is
protesting BA's cost-cutting
plans, including a wage
freeze and reduction of in-
flight staff. It rejected an
offer BA made two weeks
ago because it did not
include the restoration of
travel perks that manage-
ment had revoked for
employees who participated
in a previous walkout in
March. The strike is expected
to cost BA £105 million.

International reports indi-
cate that BA's 12,000 cabin
crew Started a five-day strike
at midnight Sunday. It is the
second in a series of three
five-day strikes: The first
ended Friday and the third
is scheduled to start June 5,
reported the Wall Street
Journal.

Last Wednesday a flight
crew flew an empty BA Boe-
ing 767, which can accom-
modate 189 passengers, on
its scheduled flight from
Heathrow to Nassau and
back again with no passen-
gers. Again on Friday, an
empty aircraft was flown
from Heathrow to Nassau. It
returned with a few passen-
gers. There was a repeat per-
formance on Saturday with
the aircraft arriving and leav-
ing on schedule, both trips
empty.

On Sunday, the aircraft
again arrived empty. It left
with 69 passengers, one
infant, and 11 crew members.

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

Cabinet Minister ‘was
on verge of quitting’

FROM page one

Minnis has been “talked
out” of his previous posi-
tion.

Sources claim the inci-
dent occurred during a
special cabinet meeting in
front of some 25 persons
last week.

Having always been per-
ceived as a “close friend”
and ally of the Prime Min-
ister, other sources with-
in the FNM said that even
if the Killarney MP was so
personally offended, he
would not have resigned
from his cabinet appoint-
ment as the MP has
always held future leader-
ship aspirations.

However, a well-placed
source within the govern-
ment claimed that Dr
Minnis and the Prime
Minister’s relationship has
been strained for over a
year.

“It would be political
suicide for him to leave.
In my opinion Minnis is
too Machiavellian for that.
So even if he was offended
to that degree I don’t see
him leaving.

“Once they had an
exchange in the Smokers
Room at the House (of
Assembly) and someone
asked, ‘Hey, isn’t that
your friend?’ And the
response I recall was that

‘there isn’t any friends in
here’.”

With one of his Mem-
bers of Parliament,
Branville McCartney hav-
ing already resigned from
the Cabinet earlier this
year, Mr Ingraham noted
at the time that it is always
regrettable for a Prime
Minister to lose a Minis-
ter or Minister of State.

As for Dr Minnis, it is
unknown what sparked
the disagreement or how
the incident will play itself
out as cabinet is expected
to meet today and the
Budget debate opens in
Parliament on Wednes-
day.

Repeated attempts to
reach the MP for Killar-
ney were unsuccessful up
to press time last night.

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FAMILY GUARDIAN |

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED ~——

A SUPPLY VESSEL passes through oil floating near the site of
the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico near the
coast of Louisiana, Monday, May 31, 2010. (AP)

A- Excellent

IMO team to assess
Bahamas emergency
plans for oil spill

FROM page one



currently reviewing an IMO report on conditions at Cay Sal
where they searched for evidence of oil contamination.

Mr Deveaux said the report found no indication of oil in
the Cay Sal area.

The experts, along with local environmental stakeholders,
are expected to hold a press conference today to brief the
media on emergency contingency plans related to the mas-
sive Gulf oil spill.

Meantime, international weather experts are anxiously
watching the movement of the spill. Michael Stubbs, chief
climatological officer at the Department of Meteorology,
said so far favourable weather conditions have kept the
spill near the Gulf of Mexico.

"We've been fortunate that the weather has been keeping
the oil confined to its present location in the Gulf of Mex-
ico. The wind patterns shifted slightly over the weekend
which sort of raised some concerns, however the wind pat-
terns have resumed their seasonal position which protects
the shores of the Bahamas from surface oil and residue
like tar balls."

Today marks the start of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane sea-
son — projected to be one of the most active seasons on
record — and weather watchers are concerned that cyclones
could exacerbate an already disastrous and unpredictable sit-
uation.

A hurricane or other storm system could stifle efforts in
the Gulf to contain and clean up the oil. It could also gen-
erate strong waves or wind that would spread surface oil, oil
residue or particles, and chemical disspersants into the area
of the north-western Bahamas.

International reports indicate that BP will launch anoth-
er attempt to plug the gushing oil well — triggered by an
April 20 explosion of its Deepwater Horizon drilling rig
which killed 11 workers — in the coming days after its recent
try failed.



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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian students learn about
agricultural sustainability practices





NEARLY 50 STUDENTS and chaperones from various gover





a









tures and took part in interactive exercises and presentations about agricultural sustainability for survival in rural and urban communities.

Nearly 50 Bahamian students on May 20,
at the Wyndham Nassau Resort, learned
about agricultural sustainability for oppor-
tunity creation.

Regional officials for the 40th anniver-
sary of the Caribbean Development Bank’s
(CDB) Youth Development Forum gave
lectures to make the young people aware
of the importance of agriculture to national
development.

“The CDB is aware that the Government
of The Bahamas has over the years placed its
youth at the centre of its development strate-
gies,” said Mark Taitt, CDB Director of IT
Solutions.

“In this regard, the bank looks forward to
working more closely with the Government
of The Bahamas to develop a set of youth
campaigns that can be readily incorporated
into its youth development agenda.”

Under the theme, “Sustainable Agricul-
ture and Regional Food Security,” the
CDB’s panelists outlined discussions to pro-
mote regional food security measures for
the survival of rural and urban populations.

The Ministry of Agriculture maintains
that food security gives citizens economic
and social protection and political indepen-
dence.





oo) ee
en

VYBZING PANELLISTS.

“The CDB chose its theme because of
the critical importance that agriculture has
rotated on in a global environment of
tremendous economic changes, challenges,
and pressures, which have impacted all coun-
tries regionally in a negative way,” said
Phillip Miller, Under Secretary in the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Fisheries.

“In the early 1970s, Caribbean agricul-
ture was in its golden age,” he said. “Little





did we know that the brilliance that we saw
was really the golden rays of a setting sun.”

Mr. Miller said policies for sustaining
national agriculture programmes have con-
tinuously been the strategy of The Bahamas
government since the early 1970s. Invest-
ments in meat and vegetable production
have been on the agenda as a critical nation-
al priority.

“Successive governments of The Bahamas

nment secondary institutions attended and participated in the CDB’s Vybzing youth forum, held at the Wyndham Nassau Resort on May 20. Students listened to lec-

made policy decisions by enunciating the
need to strengthen agricultural science in
all schools,” said Lionel Sands, Director of
Education in the Ministry of Education.

He said they are required to maintain
flower and vegetable gardens, followed by
the need for farmers to increase broader
mutton and pork production to meet nation-
al demands.

“These decisions can be viewed as gov-
ernment’s vision for sustainable agriculture
through the involvement of students repre-
sented here today,” he said.

The Ministry of Education stands by its
belief that sustainable agriculture and food
security could be realised in The Bahamas,
if practising farmers, educators and students
carry out the government’s mandate.

“We continue to place emphasis on
tourism, when in fact, being able to feed
ourselves and the tourists alike should be
high on our agenda,” said Mr. Sands.

“The Caribbean region and The Bahamas
in particular are fortunate that a regional
institution like the CDB has conceptual-
ized, developed, and is currently imple-
menting this outreach seminar, which is
designed to inspire, inform and engage youth
in the region,” said Mr Sands.



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THE TRIBUNE
RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

©
f
: oe I — —

TUESDAY,





JUNE 1,

2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



royalfidelity.com





$857m project: no funds

Fuel trucking
in account for two years

plan for ‘95%



ZHIVARGO LAING speaks to media members...

No flexibility on real
estate Stamp tax hike

alleged that “five separate findings of finan-
cial impropriety” against him are “utterly
contradicted by documentary evidence”.
Roger Stein and his RHS Ventures invest-
ment vehicle, in seeking to overturn an Amer-
ican Arbitration Association panel ruling
that removed him as managing/general part-
ner of the southwestern New Providence-
based resort redevelopment, alleged that the
judgment against him had “ignored clear and
convincing evidence” that a plan had been
concocted in advance to remove him.

when agreement
required him to
only put in $7.6m
of own money

* Alleges financial

impropriety findings
against him ‘utterly

= f

£ By NEIL HARTNELL * il pl I

2 Tribune Business Editor Ousted South Ocean one dll

a _ general partner claims

= he $857 million South Ocean :

S project has had no cash in its owed $1.72m in fees * BEC drops fuel dock and
x bank account “for nearly two : ali

x years”, it has been disclosed, as 7 Says invested $ 1 1m, pipeline plan lor $105m
= its ousted managing partner power plant project

=

* Says construction “90-95%
complete’, but operational
start pushed back to
Q3/Q4 border from
July/August due
to fuel change

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

contradicted by
documentary evidence’

Pressing his case for the New York
Supreme Court to set aside the ruling in
favour of his former financing partner, Plain-
field Asset Management, Mr Stein presented
evidence that he alleged disproved the Con-
necticut-based hedge fund’s claim that it had
“never held itself out” as South Ocean’s gen-
eral partner.

Other evidence, Mr Stein alleged, also dis-
proved the finding that he had taken monies
held in escrow to pay Stamp Tax on land
purchases at South Ocean without permis-
sion alleging that it showed Plainfield ‘“‘autho-
rising payment of Bahamian Stamp Tax”.

In addition, Mr Stein and RHS Ventures,
in papers filed in the New York courts,
alleged that the South Ocean project’s books
and financial records had been turned over to
Plainfield, in compliance with orders by both
the Bahamas Supreme Court and the New
York-based tribunal.

* Protection of Revenue Order already in effect, says minister
* Attorneys and realtors ‘desperately’ hoping for two-three
months window to allow deals in play now to close at old rates

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (BEC) is planning
to truck fuel to its controver-
sial $105 million Wilson City
power plant, abandoning plans
for a fuel dock and pipeline at
the project which is said to be
“90-95 per cent completed” on
construction.

Kevin Basden, BEC’s gener-
al manager, in an affidavit filed
with the Supreme Court on
May 28, 2010, also revealed that
the Wilson City plant’s opera-
tional start had been pushed
back to the end-third quar-
ter/start of the fourth quarter
2010, due to the change in fuel.

“There are no keys to the premises; it is
vacant land,” Mr Stein’s attorneys alleged.
“The partnership bank account has had no
funds on deposit for nearly two years.”

In a financial summary designed to show
the financial impropriety allegations against
him were unfounded, it was alleged that Mr
Stein “has committed $11 million of his own
personal funds to the New South Ocean pro-
ject”, a sum in excess of the minimum $7.6
million he had agreed to commit under the
partnership agreement with Plainfield.

“Over $2 million in cash has been spent by
Stein since Seaside Heights [Plainfield’s

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Government yesterday indicated it was unlikely to grant
a two-three month window post July 1 to allow real estate trans-
actions in play prior to the Budget announcement to close at the
existing Stamp Duty rates, something realtors and attorneys
had “desperately” been hoping for.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune
Business yesterday that if the Budget - and its tax increases - took
effect on July 1, all real estate transactions that had not closed and
had their conveyancings ‘Stamped’ would be “subject to the
new rates”.

“The law taxes effect on July 1,” Mr Laing said, adding that the

same process implemented for
previous changes in the rateof SBE page 5B





SEE page 4B



‘A matter of our survival’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

$3.37m profit recovery but
FINCO rejects dividend pay

* Manufacturers fear disaster from end to Industries
Encouragement Act incentives, as duty on raw materials

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FINANCE Corporation of
the Bahamas (FINCO) will not
pay a dividend to investors for
the third consecutive quarter,
despite generating a healthy
$3.366 million in 2010 second
quarter profit, its managing
director saying yesterday that
it was “too soon” to determine
if this was a “trend”.

Tanya McCartney said the
BISX-listed mortgage wanted
to be “prudent and conserva-
tive”, and retain as much capi-
tal on its books as possible to
guard against unexpected
downside risks, even though it
more than reversed the
$450,967 loss suffered during
the 2010 first quarter via its per-
formance in the three months
to end-April 2010.

Speaking as the bank, which
is 75 per cent majority-owned
by Royal Bank of Canada,
unveiled a $2.916 million prof-
it for the 2010 first half, Ms
McCartney said FINCO had
seen little change in the overall
operating environment facing
Bahamian commercial banks.
This continued to be dominated
by loan delinquencies, loss pro-
visioning, and the management
of existing credit portfolios.

“We're continuing to have a
more diligent approach around
the delinquent loans, following

Damianos |

Managing director says
‘too early to tell if trend’
emerging, even though
BISX-listed mortgage
lender turns Q1 loss
into first-half profit

up with clients, working with
them and assisting them where
we can,” Ms McCartney said,
identifying this as a key factor
behind the improved second
quarter showing.

“We're focused on reaching
out to customers, and being
able to assist them and restruc-
ture them, especially if they’re
showing consistency in making
payments. That’s what we’re
doing.

“It’s really around engaging
the client. We’re still encour-
aging them not to shy away
from the bank.”

A sharp reduction in the pro-
vision for loan losses was the
main reason for the year-over-
year improvement in FINCO’s
bottom line performance. For
the 2010 second quarter, loan
loss provisions dropped by 69.4
per cent, to $1.395 million com-
pared to $4.552 million the year
before, while for the half-year
there was a 36.5 per cent
decline - from $9.927 million to

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BAHAMIAN business own-
ers yesterday expressed major
concern as to whether their
businesses - and manufacturing
in general in this nation - could
survive the end to duty-free
incentives as envisioned in the
2010-2011 Budget, some hav-
ing to increase prices by up to
30 per cent, with one saying:
“This is a matter of survival for
us.”

Responding to the Govern-
ment’s decision to eliminate
duty-free import incentives
under the Industries Encour-
agement Act for businesses
who had received these for five

goes from 0-45%, forcing some to raise prices by 30%

* Many already unprofitable, as Bapak co-owner says
three businesses lost $100k in year to October 2009

* Adds that company moving into cooking oil and
five-gallon bottled water production, with Bahamas’ first
‘drive through’ for latter, creating some 10 extra jobs

* Concern that government ‘inflating’ local companies’
prices, leaving them unable to compete with finished
imports, and causing firms to fold or downsize

years, a selection of manufac-
turers interviewed by Tribune
Business all warned the move
would leave them unable to

compete with imported prod-
uct.

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

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SEE page 4B



The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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Learn more at royalfidelity.com

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BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010



BARBADOS
St. Michael: 246.435.1955



PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

OU eA eT



By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT WAS another fair week
of trading in the Bahamian
stock market.

Investors traded in nine out
of the 24 listed securities, with
four decliners and the other
securities remaining unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 47,031 shares
changed hands, representing a
decline of 3,667 shares com-
pared to last week’s trading vol-

ume of 50,698 shares.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the volume leader, trading
34,386 shares to see its stock
close the week down $0.10 at
$11.97.

¢ Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) followed,
trading 6,140 shares to see its
share price close down by $0.04
at $2.50.

¢ Focol Holdings (FCL) was
last week's big decliner, trad-
ing 1,000 shares to have its

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

International Stock Market Indexes:

DJTA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

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an
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NEW YORK












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Weekly % Change
0.9490 0.72
1.4461 -0.17
1.2269 -2.36
Weekly % Change
$74.09 5.60
$1,216.00 3.32
Weekly % Change
10,136.63 -0.56
1,089.41 0.16
2,257.04 1.26
9,762.98 -0.22

HAWAII



¢ Vacation for 4 to New York City
¢ Vacation for 2 to Hawaii

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stock end the week down $0.50
at $4.58.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no earnings
releases issued last week by any
of the listed companies.

Dividend Notes:

¢ Consolidated Water BDRs
(CWCB) has declared an ordi-
nary dividend of $0.015 per
share, payable on June 7, 2010,
to all ordinary shareholders of
record date May 1, 2010.

¢ FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) has declared an ordi-
nary dividend of $0.06 per
share, payable on May 25, 2010,
to all ordinary shareholders of
record date May 17th, 2010.

¢ Associated Bahamian Dis-
tillers and Brewers (ABDAB)
has declared an ordinary divi-

dend of $14 per share, payable
to all shareholders on or before
May 31, 2010, to all sharehold-
ers of record date May 21, 2010.

¢ Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corporation
(PRE) has declared a dividend
of $0.20 per share, payable on
July 5, 2010, to all sharehold-
ers of record as at June 4, 2010.

Dividend Notes:

¢ J S Johnson (JSJ) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel in the Governors
C Ball room on June 14, 2010,
at 6 pm.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel on June 15, 2010,
at 6pm.

¢ Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) has
announced its AGM will be
held at Doctors Hospital - Con-
ference Room on Dowdeswell
Street, June 17, 2010, at 5:30pm.

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The Bahamian Stock Market

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML $1.05 $-
BBL $0.33 $-
BOB $5.20 $-
BPF $10.63 $-
BSL $9.42 $-
BWL $3.15 $-
CAB $11.97 -$0.10
CBL $6.99 $-
CHL $2.46 -$0.38
CIB $9.85 $-
CWCB $2.40 -$0.02
DHS $2.50 -$-0.04
FAM $6.07 $-
FBB $2.17 $-
Eee $0.27 $-
FCL $4.58 -$0.50
FCLB $1.00 $-
FIN $9.00 $-
ICD $5.59 $-

JSJ $9.95 $-
PRE $10.00 $-

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

CHANGE

0 -10.26%
0 -47.62%
550 -11.86%
0 -1.02%
0 -6.36%
0 0.00%
34,386 19.94%
170 -0.14%
1,000 9.56%
1,500 -1.40%
0 -15.79%
6,140 -1.96%
-6.47%

0 -8.44%
0 0.00%
1,000 -3.98%
0 0.00%
2,251 -3.02%
0 0.00%
34 0.00%
31,238 0.00%



$3.37m profit recovery but
FINCO rejects dividend pay

FROM page 1B

$6.301 million.

But despite producing 2010
second quarter net income that
was almost $3 million more
than the year before period,
and turning a 2009 first half loss
of $300,327 into a $2.916 mil-
lion net profit, caution remains
the key word among FINCO’s
management and directors
when it comes to dividend pay-
ments.

“It’s too early to say whether
this is a trend,” Ms McCartney
told Tribune Business of the
second quarter results. “The
first quarter was not a
favourable one, so we have to
manage it and see how it pro-
gresses.

“Every quarter the Board
looks at it and determines, in
the overall circumstances,
whether it’s appropriate to
make a dividend payment.
There’s no real indication
there’s a trend here.”

Thus the $2.916 million in
2010 first half net income has
been ploughed back into FIN-
CO’s retained earnings, boost-
ing the mortgage lender’s net
shareholder equity to $85.053
million, compared to $82.138
million at year-end 2009.

Meanwhile, Ms McCartney
said FINCO was concentrating
on “organic growth” and the
professionals market to expand
its mortgage loan portfolio,
which grew by 2.6 per cent -
from $772.442 million to
$792.713 million - during the
2010 first half.

“We see it [growth] coming

iia Tart ‘nme lar}

for ad rates

from our existing good client
base, with good equity and
good credit histories,” Ms
McCartney told Tribune Busi-
ness. “So we’re focusing on
organic growth, and there’s
good room for growth in the
professionals market.”

Adding that there were “a
lot of opportunities” with FIN-
CO’s existing client base, she
added: “We continue to exe-
cute on our sales strategy,
where we focus on the existing
client base and reach out to
them, so we’re seeing some
returns from that.”

The conversion of the $34.7
million deposit held for its par-
ent, RBC Holdings (Bahamas),
into a note payable saw FIN-
CO’s deposit base contract
from $823.509 million at 2009
year-end to $803.259 million as
at April 30, 2010.

Asked about the impact of
the 50 per cent increase in com-
mercial bank licence fees, as
unveiled in the Budget, on FIN-
CO’s business, Ms McCartney
said this was simply another
business cost.

“We have to pay it. We’re
going to pay it. This is a price of
doing business. There’s noth-
ing we can say,” she said.

FINCO is now set to launch
its annual Blockbuster mort-
gage campaign on June 7, the
three-month promotion offer-
ing rates as low as 7.5 per cent.

“We're really focusing on
credit quality, putting good
loans on the books and on the
existing client base for the
remainder of the year,” Ms
McCartney said.

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Fmlovin' it





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE





Bahamian provider
attends global forum

BRIAN Quinn, deputy
chairman of IP Solutions
International, the Nassau-
based company newly
licensed to supply high-speed
broadband TV and data
across the Bahamas, attended
the internationally-recognised
Connected TV Summit in
London last week.

Connected TV is the term
used to denote the coming
integration of the domestic
television set with data access,
pay TV, video on demand,
and social networks such as

at this event as these are the
developments we are provid-
ing here in the Bahamas in
our deployment of state-of-
the-art transmission equip-
ment," said Edison Sumner,
president and chief executive
of IP Solutions Internation-
al.

“We are utilizing top
equipment from well recog-
nised global leaders in our ini-
tial rollout of IPSI infrastruc-
ture in Abaco and like them,
we know it is vital that rapid
change in user demands are

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 3B





Facebook and Twitter.
"We had a major presence

fully anticipated and catered
for."

Butterfield chief
in Bahamas visit

BANK of Butterfield’s new president
and chief executive, Brad Kopp, high-
lighted the strategic importance of the
Bahamas operation within the Butterfield
Group, and the bank’s continued commit-
ment to the jurisdiction, during a recent



: , Gi
MAKING ALL THE RIGHT CONNECTIONS — The deputy chair of
Nassau-based IP Solutions International recently attended the Con-
nected TV Summit in London to discuss the future of the global
home entertainment industry. (Pictured left to right: Brian Quinn,

deputy chairman IP Solutions; Harris Morris, president Harris Broad-
cast; Nick Fielibert, chief technical officer, Cisco IPTV)

visit.

Pictured above with the Prime Minis-
ter (from left to right) are:

Conor O’Dea - chairman of Butterfield
Bank (Bahamas) and managing director of
Butterfield Bank (Cayman); Brad Kopp -

president and chief executive, The Bank of
N.T. Butterfield & Son; Robert Lotmore -
managing director, Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas); Ian Fair - deputy chairman,
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas).





FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended April 30, 2010

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

Share Share General Retained

Capital Premium Reserve Earnings Total
$ $ $ $ $

Ohalrman's review of the unaudited results
For the six manths emded April 30, 2010

Balance at October 31, 2008
Net loss for the period
Dividends

Balance at April 30, 2009

5,333,334 2,552,258 500,000 83,056,040
(300,327)
6,933,334)

75,822,379

91,441,637

(300,327)
6,933,334)
84, 207,97]

We wish to report that the Bank eamed 32,915.578 im met prod for the ais months ended Apel Bl,
S010 compared to 8 loss for the corresponding period last wear of 3300,527. The Bank's fimamcial
performance for the Inst three months is an improvement over the performance of the first quarter amd
can be attribated to a continued Iocus on delinquency management, aa well ia clioetive coal
MAT apeteen

5,333,334 2,552,258 500,000
Balance at October 31, 2009
Net profit for the period
Balance at April 30, 2010

5,333,334 2,552,25§ 500,000 73,752,003
2,915,578

76,667,581

82,137,592
2,915,578
85,053,172

The Bank bas experienced good mortgage growth during the period, but continues to be challenged
by the Jewel of pon-perlorming loans. The Bank’s prowiioning policy is degre’ adeyiede bo guard
againal any negative impact from these loans. Delingeency management will continue io be a priority
of the Bonk for the immediaie fubure.

5,333,334 2,552,258 500,000

The Bank's risk profile comtinves io remain within fs risk appetite and its capital ratios remain
SIndne.

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended April 30, 2010
ne (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
ot
Managihg LF racks
1

C “helper —_

April 30, 2010 April 30, 2009
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income $
Adjustments for:
Depreciation
Provision for credit losses

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (Unaudited)

As of April 30, 2010 and

October 31, 2009

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

2,915,578 § (300,327

274,321
6,301,257
Loss on disposal of fixed assets 93
9,491,249

297,559
9,927,126

15,999
9,940,357



ASSETS April 30, 2010 October 31, 2009
Changes in operating assets and liabilities

Increase in loans and advances, net

(498,871)
(26,572,001)
(17,249,751)
(34,829,374)

(5,879, 636
(41,641,309
39,947,547
2,366,959

Cash
Statutory reserve account with

The Central Bank of The Bahamas
Investments
Loans - Net
Fixed assets - Net
Other assets
TOTAL
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Deposits
Other liabilities
Note payabale

Total liabilities

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital
Share premium
General reserve

48,803,265 45,330,690

Increase in deposits



36,343,388
48,519,591
792,713,147
2,169,905
1,819,457

930,368,753

37,589,768
49,596,040
712,442,403
2,369,819
645,351

907,974,071

Net cash from operating activities
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Purchase of fixed assets
Net Proceeds from investments
Net cash from investing activities
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITY
Note payable
Dividends paid



(74,500°
1,076,449

1,001,949

(219,741)
724,355

504,614









37,300,000

(1,733,334
(1,733,334



806,258,941
1,756,639
37,300,000

845,315,580

823,508,692

2,327,784 37,300,000





NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING OF THE PERIO

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, END OF THE PERIOD

3,472,575
45,330,690
48,803,265

1,138,239
28,028,462
29,166,701

825,836,476





5,333,334
2,552,258
500,000
76,667,581
85,053,173

930,368,753

5,333,334
2,552,258
500,000
73,752,003
82,137,595

907,974,071



Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL







FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
Notes to Unaudited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

Six Months Ended April 30, 2010
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended April 30, 2010
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These interim condensed financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies and
methods of calculation used in the preparation of these interim financial statements are consistent
with those used in the audited financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2009,

Three Months
Ended
April 30, 2010

Three Months
Ended
April 30, 2009

Six Months
Ended
April 30, 2010

Six Months
Ended
April 30, 2009

INCOME
Net interest income $
Provision for credit losses
Net interest after provision for credit losses
Fees and commissions
Total income
NON-INTEREST EXPENSES
Total non-interest expenses
NET COMPREHENSIVE INCOME $

6,931,287, | $
(1,395,002)
5,536,285
839,231
6,375,516

6,921,977 | $
(4,552,318)
2,369,659
794,270
3,163,929

13,617,153 | $
(6,301,257)
7,316,496
1,690,558
9,007,054

14,070,697
(9,927,126
4,143,571
1,698,453
5,842,024



2. NOTE PAYABLE





On November 2, 2009 the parent company of Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited (FINCO)
agreed to convert $34.7 million, which was held on deposit with FINCO into a note payable.
This note bears interest at 5.00% per annum and is due for repayment on or before August 1,
2012,

3,008,971
3,366,545 $

3,096,497
67,432 $

6,091,476
2,915,578

6,142,351
(300,327)







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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

This, they warned, could dri-
ve many Bahamian companies
out of business, costing the
Government a wide range of
tax revenues - from Business
Licence fees to National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) contribu-
tions - and further negatively
impact the unemployment rate,
as firms went out of business
and downsized.

Alec Knowles, a principal in
KLG Investments, owners of
Aquapure, the bottled water
supplier, told Tribune Business
of the proposed Budget change:
“It’s going to create a severe
problem. We’re not competing
against each other; we’re com-
peting against international
imports. If we have to increase
prices, we’re going to go out of
business.”

The Government appeared
not to recognise that the Act’s
incentives had enabled Bahami-
an manufacturers to compete
on a ‘level playing field’ against
imported products, rather than
domestic rivals, through allow-
ing them to import equipment
and raw materials duty-free, Mr
Knowles said.

He added that the end to
Industries Encouragement Act
incentives meant that, for estab-
lished Bahamas-based manu-
facturers, the Government was
effectively “inflating” their
prices while keeping those of
imported rivals the same.

Examining the impact on
Aquapure’s business if the
Government’s Budget propos-

‘A matter of our survival’

als remained the same, Mr
Knowles told Tribune Business
that the packed water business
would “be gone”.

Some $3 million of this prod-
uct was already imported into
the Bahamas annually, and his
business was now faced with an
immediate duty-rate increase
from 0 per cent to 45 per cent ,
as all equipment, bottles and
tops currently came in duty-
free.

It was the same for Aqua-
pure’s juice business, Mr
Knowles added, as the same
‘from 0 per cent to 45 per cent’
duty rates would now be added
to the cost of its base materials.
“It’s going to increase costs for
my juice by about 30 per cent.
There’s nothing I can do,” he
said.

Mr Knowles warned that the
Government’s planned amend-
ments to the Act would leave
many Bahamian manufactur-
ers unable to compete, espe-
cially if they imported more
than 80 per cent of their raw
materials. They would also, he
suggested, take away the incen-
tive for existing and new com-
panies to either remain or get
into the business.

“It’s going to put all manu-
facturers in a situation where
they will not be price competi-
tive with imports, particularly
in most things we manufacture
here,” Mr Knowles said.
“They’re putting us at a severe

NOTICE



In The Estate WILLIAM LEO RUMNEY,
late of Water Street in the Town of Elizabethtown in
the Country of Essex in the States of New York, one
of the States of the United States of America.




NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the Undersigned on or before the 6th day of
July, 2010, after which date the Executirix will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only to
the claims of which they shall then have had notice.













AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date hereinbe-








fore metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executrix






Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247




Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas


















S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1.00
9.67
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.56
5.00
2.21
1.45
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
9,95
10.00

Benchmark
Fidelity Bank

Colina Holdings

Famguard

Finco

Focol (S)

CD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Security
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Bahamas Waste
Cable Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

disadvantage when they could
do things to put us on the same
level. Don’t take one foot away
from the manufacturing indus-
try and do nothing about it.”

Mr Knowles was backed by
Glen Rogers, one of Bapak’s
owners, who told Tribune Busi-
ness that it was “a bad time”
to be raising taxes on the
Bahamian private sector, espe-
cially when most companies
were either incurring losses or
making minimal profits.

“Last year, up to October 31,
my three companies had total
losses of some $100,000,” Mr
Rogers said, indicating the
Government was being unreal-
istic in its expectation that
Bahamian manufacturers
would be able to ‘stand on their
own feet’ and pay import duties
after a five-year period under
the Industries Encouragement
Act.

“It’s going to impact us heav-
ily,” Mr Rogers said of the
Government’s planned
changes. “Just because we have
duty exemptions on our raw
materials, which most of us
import from the US, doesn’t
mean we can really compete.”

He, too, is faced with the
prospect of duty-rates on his
raw material, equipment and
other inputs going from 0 per
cent to 45 per cent, and told
Tribune Business: “What that
means is I’m going to have to
increase the cost of my prod-

uct to my customers to make
up for that. They’re going to
have to increase their prices
accordingly.”

Bapak, Mr Rogers said, had
enjoyed the Industries Encour-
agement Act’s incentives for
some 32 years, enabling it to
produce bottles for the
Bahamas’ bottled water suppli-
ers and, now, enter the bottled
water supply industry itself.

Expressing deep concern for
the fate of this sector, which he
estimated employed 1,200 per-
sons, if the Government pro-
ceeded with its plans for the
Act, Mr Rogers suggested that
the administration focus on col-
lecting revenues owed under
existing taxes, rather than
increasing rates.

“This is a bad time to be talk-
ing about raising taxes,” Mr
Rogers said. The end to the
incentives, which the Govern-
ment appears to be viewing as
taxpayers subsidies of large
businesses, comes just as Bapak
has invested in the produc-
tion/supply of five-gallon bot-
tled water, which it expects to
begin in a month’s time.

Mr Rogers said he went into
the water supply business after
Chelsea’s Choice and Aqua-
pure were given permission to
start manufacturing their own
bottles, and said his plans
included the Bahamas’ “first
drive through” for bottled
water.

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Finance
Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby
notifies its Shareholders that there will
be no interim dividends paid to
shareholders for the quarter ended 30th

April, 2010.

D. Burrows-Haines (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 1st June, 2010

ROYAL FIDELITY

Maney at Work

BISX LISTED & TRAD!







ED SECURITIES AS OF:







MONDAY, 31 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,554.76 | CHG 0.31 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -10.62 | YTD % -0.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.05
10.63
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.17
11.97
2.56
6.99
2.40
2.50
6.07
9.00
9.85
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.03
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
1.05
10.63
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.17
12.00
2.56
6.99
2.40
2.50
6.07
9.00
9.85
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9,95
10.00

EPS $

C2031. Co MT A LL

Div $ P/E Yield
0.250
0.050

0.598

-0.877

0.168
0.055
1.408
0.249
0.460
0.111
0.627

-0.003

0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952

0.156 64.1

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4674
2.9020
1.5327
3.0368
13.5654
107.5706
105.7706
1.1080
1.0615
1.1050
9.4839

52wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015



EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E

N/M

N/M
256.6

Yield

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3758
2.8266
1.4630
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.514105

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.501641

NAV Date
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

-0.11
477
-4.99
5.47
6.99
13.50
5.26
2.84
5.01
7.41

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

10.0000 10.6709 -0.93 12.33 31-Mar-10
7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS § - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

4.8105 58.37 31-Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Glose - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Ghange - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

He pledged that the facility
would sell both his and com-
petitors’ products, adding that
staff numbers would probably
expand from 70 to 80.

Bapak is also moving to next
month start the sale of cooking
oil, bringing in the raw materi-
al from the US and bottling it in
the Bahamas.

And Mr Rogers added that
his PVC piping business, which
he estimated had a 60 per cent
market share, would also suf-
fer a “high impact” from the
Government’s move on the
Industries Encouragement Act
incentives.

Another Bahamian manu-
facturer, who requested
anonymity, told Tribune Busi-
ness that his seven-figure
investment over more than a
decade was now in potential
jeopardy.

“This is a matter of survival
for us,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The raw materials are
going to cost me more than
what importers can bring the
finished product in for. You
can take away our concessions,
but at least keep the duty up
on finished imported products,
so we can at least have some
margins.

“There is no way we as an
industry in this country can
compete with our US counter-
parts. I’ve spoken to a number
of manufacturers, and they are
all claiming there are no profits.
No one is going to stay in busi-
ness if they’re not making any
money.”

“Tf this is going to affect stay-

ing in business, look at what
the Government can lose. All
the Business Licence fees, NIB
contributions. There are 4,000-
5,000 people employed in the
industry.”

Walter Wells, head of
Caribbean Bottling, the Coca-
Cola producer, told Tribune
Business the company was still
in talks with the Ministry of
Finance over the precise impact
the Industries Encouragement
Act reforms would have.

“Tf it means there is some sig-
nificant taxation added on to
our existing structure, it will
mean there is an [impact] to
our competitive edge, if there is
one today, and we will have to
see what that might be and how
we respond,” Mr Wells said.

Scott Farrington, head of
Sun-Tee, the Shirley Street-
based company, said that while
his company was unlikely to
suffer a major impact, as he had
“dramatically changed the busi-
ness” model in recent years, it
had been receiving Industries
Encouragement Act incentives
since 1983.

“We can’t compete down
here with the cost of doing busi-
ness,” Mr Farrington said,
pointing out that the new gov-
ernment policy would discour-
age new manufacturing
entrants and put some compa-
nies out of business.

He added that the 30-day
‘notice period’ given by the
Government in the Budget was
inadequate for businesses to
change their models and cost
structures.

Fuel trucking plan for
"95% done’ plant

FROM page 1B

“T confirm that BEC is
actively engaged in negotiations
with its supplier for an agree-
ment for the fuel required to
operate the Wilson City Power
Plant to be transported to the
plant site via fuel trucks, instead
of via the proposed pipeline
and docking facility,” Mr Bas-
den said.

“It is anticipated that these
negotiations will be concluded
very shortly. Should the nego-
tiations be successful there will
not be a need for the pipeline
and docking facility at this time.

“Circumstances and technol-
ogy may change in the future,
which might make it desirable
or even necessary to once again
pursue the pipeline option. As
circumstances and technology
may change in the future, we
do not rule out such possibility.
For example, should the option
of operating the plant on com-
pressed natural gas (CNG) or
liquefied natural gas (LNG)
arise, trucking will likely not be
a viable option.”

It is unclear how opponents
of the BEC power plant, espe-
cially Responsible Develop-
ment for Abaco (RDA) and
the environmental lobby, will
react to the prospect of fuel
being trucked to the site, rather
than being delivered by sea.
RDA’s case is currently being
tried in the Supreme Court

before Justice Hartman Long-
ley.

At present, the construction
of the power plant is now esti-
mated to be 90-95 per cent
completed,” Mr Basden added.

“Initially, it was anticipated
that construction of the power
plant would be in operation by
the end of July/early August of
2010. As a result of the deci-
sion being made to use a lighter
fuel oil (ADO) instead of the
heavy fuel oil (Bunker C).

Generators

“However, it became neces-
sary for the generators of the
power plant to be modified. As
a consequence of these modifi-
cations, the projected date for
the power plant to become
operational has been revised to
the end of the third quarter or
early fourth quarter 2010.”

Ms Basden’s affidavit also
disclosed that the Environ-
mental Management Plan
(EMP) for Wilson City was still
being developed, and was
scheduled for completion next
month.

This will then be submitted
to the Bahamas Environment,
Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission for
review, with a copy also pub-
lished on BEC’s website, Mr
Basden promised, so that
“interested parties” could sub-
mit their views and input on it.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, SONIA VERNELL
SMITH of ELEUTHERA, THE BAHAMAS, Mother of
Rashad Kristian Smith, a minor intend to change his
name to RASHAD KRISTIAN ROLLE. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY LOUIS of P.O.
BOX GENERAL DELIVERY, Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1% day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

this notice.

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice is hereby given to the rightful owner
of a31ft. Yellow Fin Center Console Speed
Boat “ Allons-Y”, License No. NP8565 to
come and retrieve your boat and to pay
outstanding bill within Thirty (30) days this
notice, Failure to do so will result in the

boat being sold to cover cost Contact Mr.

Daniel Taylor or Mr. Garvin Cartwright at
(242) 337-1036 or (242) 472-8008.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

Stamp Duty applied to real
estate transactions would be
used this time.

He confirmed, though, that
the Government had already
issued a Protection of Revenue
Order, and said: “On the issue
of raising taxes there’s seldom
pleasure. We’ve got to save the
country as best we can.”

The Stamp Duty changes
unveiled in the Budget involve
a two percentage point increase
in Stamp Duty across the board
for all real estate deal, apart
from those involving first-time
buyers. Thus for deals priced
between $0-$20,000, the rate
goes from 2 per cent to 4 per
cent; for between $20,000 to
$50,000, it goes to 6 per cent;
for between $50,000 to
$100,000, it goes to 8 per cent;

for between $100,000 to
$250,000, it goes to 10 per cent;
and from $250,000 and up, it
goes to 12 per cent.

Andrew O’Brien, chairman
of the Bahamas Bar Associa-
tion’s real estate section, told
Tribune Business that attorneys
and realtors were “desperately”
seeking clarification on whether
transactions currently in play -
in the 90-day closing period -
would have the new Stamp
Duty rates applied to them if
conveyancings were brought
forward for Stamping after July
1.

They were also “desperately”
hoping that a two-three months
window could be granted for
these transactions to close at
the old rates, fearing that the
Duty increase - worth several
thousand dollars and five-fig-
ure sums in some cases - could
act as ‘deal breakers’.

“A big concern is that the
Act will treat the new duty
rates for any document pre-
sented on July 1 or after,” Mr
O’Brien, an attorney and part-
ner at Glinton, Sweeting and
O’Brien said.

“That’s going to create a
huge burden on banks, pur-
chasers and vendors who are in
the middle of transactions right
now, and have agreed to pay a
rate that is 2 per cent less.”

Transactions that closed on
June 30, for example, would not
have an opportunity to get to
the Treasury for Stamping, and
“all of a sudden they have
another 2 per cent to pay.

“A way to combat that is for
the Treasury to recognise any
transaction that has a signed
agreement before July 1 or the
date of announcement of the
Act,” Mr O’Brien said.

However, the Protection of

$857m project:
no funds in account
for two years

FROM page 1B

financing vehicle] last provided
any funding at all to the pro-
ject in September 2008 over
one-and-a-half years ago,” Mr
Stein and his attorneys alleged.

“On top of the funds needed
to keep the project alive since
Seaside Heights ceased fund-
ing, Stein has been forced to
spend over $4 million defending
his investment against the
efforts of Seaside Heights to
strip him of his partnership
interest.”

In response to the Tribunal’s
finding that $1.1 million paid
to Mr Stein’s former partner,
Roy Stillman, should not have
come from the South Ocean
partnership’s funds, the former
alleged that the money “clearly
came” from his own bank
accounts.

And Mr Stein and his attor-
neys also alleged that Plain-
field/Seaside Heights approved
the South Ocean project’s infra-
structure budget prior to exe-
cuting their partnership agree-
ment, and that he “never
exceeded that budget”. The
items Plainfield later com-
plained about, namely travel
and expenses, Bahamian hous-
ing and offices, were shown as
specific items, they alleged, and
were never exceeded in terms
of budget.

It was also claimed that Mr
Stein was “clearly entitled to
compensation for his services”
via development fees, plus a 1
per cent acquisition fee based
on the cost of acquiring the
land parcels necessary to facili-
tate the South Ocean project.

“Over the course of the part-

nership period, even though
Stein was entitled to the pay-
ment of development fees far in
excess of those actually paid,
Stein chose not to collect such
fees from the partnership,”
Stein and his attorneys alleged.
“His thought process
throughout was that he didn’t
want to burden the partner-
ship’s cash flow any more than
necessary in getting the project
launched and completed.
“The end result of such
largess is that Stein is owed
development fees from the
partnership under the develop-
ment agreement in excess of
$650,000. Addition of the acqui-
sition fees due, which were
clearly earned upon closing of
the land parcels, would bring
the total amount of fees due to
Stein to over $1.72 million.”

Reporters News
and Sport

AN TED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
narratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers

who want to make a difference
at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We’re the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we’re on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience

e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour

Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet @tribunemedia.net

Or

drop in your applications at
our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,
Managing Editor, The Tribune.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Revenue Order signed by the
Governor-General effectively
means that the Stamp Duty rate
changes will take effect from
the date of the Budget, May 26.

Of this development, Mr
O’Brien said: “I hope not, but
there’s a lot of confusion in the
legal community and among
realtors also. I’ve got several
transactions where the potential
purchasers will not proceed if
they have to pay another 2 per

No flexibility on real estate Stamp tax hike

cent in tax.

“The most sensitive way to
deal with this is to have a two-
month window, have the Public
Treasury recognise any deal
completed and look at the date
of the document. If they recog-
nise the old rate for two to
three months, that gives peo-
ple time to clean up whatever is
in process now. It gives people
time to plan and prepare.”

Long-term, many attorneys

4
Uhanet wor

and realtors are waiting to see
how the real estate Stamp Duty
increases play out/.

One lawyer said yesterday
that the Government appeared
not to have taken a “nuanced”
approach to the issue, express-
ing concern that the tax increas-
es could impact most the
Bahamian middle and lower
income brackets, given that
they would face increases worth
several thousand dollars.

The National Insurance Board
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Boatd (NIB) is seeking to pire qualify contractors to

bid on works to provide furniture (fit out) for the Ministry of Tosrtsa Basiding,

John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas; the project is a joint venture of

NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in compliance with

the National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in good stand-

ine with Che reles AT Government deen Les,

Pre-qualitication documents may be collected trom the Security Booth at NIB’s

Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from Mav 41 oto June 7 POLO, or

downloaded trom NIB’s website at wwwiniib-bahamas.com.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and returned to the

Director's Offiee in an addeessed envelope with the caption “Parasite jar phy

Mig iffry al 1 aay Hawt? He Cog iPachr Pri fiualification

12:10) Noon on Monday, June

f, 2010.

i!

Worn 1 a f
Aen OTL OF before

SUN OIL LIMITED
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Sun Oil Limited seeks to identify:
PROFESSIONAL TRACTOR TRAILER DRIVERS

in New Providence and Exuma

The successful candidate(s) will assume the role of Driver/
Operator. This position is responsible for the daily execution of
key responsibilities within a bulk fuel facility. These responsibilities
include the safe receipt, storage and delivery of bulk petroleum
products in accordance with strict industry and company standards.
Successful candidates must be able to demonstrate a proven track
record of safe driving. Successful experience in the petroleum
industry would be plus.

Core Responsibilities

* Daily inspection of assigned truck(s) and associated equipment.
* Safe truck loading and delivery of petroleum products through

out the island.

* Provide exceptional customer service at all times.
* Adhere to company driving policies and the Highway Code of

the Bahamas.

* General fuel handling operations associated with the receipt,
storage and redistribution of petroleum products.

Job Requirements

* 5 years minimum work experience in a similar capacity.

* In depth knowledge of The Highway Code of The Bahamas.

*A strong safety record. Saftey related trainings would be a plus.

* Defensive driving training would be a strong plus.

*A mechanical aptitude with some experience with equipment
maintenance and repairs.

* Strong leadership skills with the ability to work as an effective

team member.

¢ Excellent verbal and written communications skills.
* The ability to work flexible hours and weekends.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package,
commensurate with work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than June 4, 2010 to:
jobs @sunoilbahamas.com





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

©





ith



The fight to break

a smoking habit

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

ank Barry is a chain smok-
Y= with a three pack a day
habit and in an ironic twist
also the head of a non-govern-

mental organisation against

tobacco.

Mr Barry has smoked since the age
of 19 and has tried to quit 11 times.
The last attempt was unsuccessful, and
so now he smokes up to three packs of
cigarettes on average.

“On a really bad day, Mr Barry will
smoke 60 cigarettes a day.

“On good days, I train with a per-
sonal trainer, who beats me up all the
time, about how I’m down to eight or
nine cigarettes with coffee. In a
stressed situation, that eight or nine
can become thirty.”

“When I stop that is not going to
go away but at least I’m not adding
fuel to the fire anymore,” said Mr Bar-
ry



“T train three hours a day, for five
days a week,” Mr Barry explained.
“In those three hours I don’t smoke.
But about an hour afterward, I start
coughing from exertion from weight
lifting and other exercises.”

This is a habit he has resolved he
may be unable to break. In fact, the
addiction has pushed him to seek help
at a drug clinic for rehabilitation in
October, which he hopes will be the
final attempt to a successful with-
drawal from smoking.






@x

ACCORDING to
Mr Barry, 38
per cent of adult
Bahamians
smoke.

His experience with tobacco com-
pelled him to form the Nassau-based
entity The People Against Tobacco
Foundation a local subsidiary to rep-
resent member countries to secure
damages for medical costs caused by
using tobacco products and for wide-
spread violation of import tax regula-
tions.

He is seeking to establish an advise-
ment arm in the Bahamas for persons
willing to stop smoking, or at least to
keep it under control.

This kind of initiative has been
neglected over the years, he said. One
of his first initiatives is to set up a non-
smoking rehab in Nassau where peo-
ple can get help for free.

“It’s important that people know
how addictive cigarettes can be,” said
Mr Barry. “Smoking is a difficult habit
to kick, once you start you can’t stop.”

“The tobacco companies never
admitted liability to the fact that they
knew that there were ingredients on
cigarette packages that aren’t listed
and could be harmful,” said Mr Barry.

“So we lobbied among foreign
countries, and even went through
Caricom where not one country signed
up,” he told Tribune Health.

“We still want them to verify the
terms of the agreement. I hope that
they settle down since tobacco is
admitting no liability there.

One of his organisation’s biggest
charges is that the ingredients found
on cigarettes are harmful; “the most
dangerous thing in cigarettes is the
paper used to roll them up,” said Mr
Barry. “Cigarette companies spray
the paper with porous elements that

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

are harmful, to
make it possible
to control the
speed of burning
that takes place
as the cigarette
is smoked.”

Recently, The
People Against
Tobacco Foun-
dation
announced that
it has concluded
negotiations
with four tobac-
co manufactur-
ers to settle
healthcare and
smuggling claims
of The People Against Tobacco Foun-
dation.

One of the organisation’s biggest
charges is that tobacco companies
don’t know what ingredients they are
using in their products.

A stakeholder in the organisation,
James Shelley called the settlement
“a major milestone in the global fight
for justice for an enormous commu-
nity of persons injured all over the
world by the callous behavior of tobac-
co companies."

Mr Barry, continuing about his
struggle to drop the habit said:

“Honestly, Ive tried taking it seri-
ously for 60 seconds, and there’s no
quick fix to stop smoking. It’s such an
addiction, and you’re never thinking,
that hey, I’m putting these harmful
fumes in your body.”

He recalls his first experience with
smoking at age 19. Mr Barry had just

YANK Barry was
recently nominat-
ed for his human-
itarian efforts by
the Gusi Awards.

Men and Sex: Power Position and Money

ALMOST every day, we seem to
be faced with stories of powerful men
being linked with new sexual partners.
In some instances, physical attrac-
tiveness seems to play very little in
the equation. Observers may either
use the term ‘gold digger’ or be in awe
with comments such as ‘good for him.’

Has the whole world become ‘sex
crazed,’ or is it that we just notice it
more in our small community? Have
we really become so materialistic and
grasping, or is it just in our genetic
makeup?

If we turn the clocks back, or flick
through history books we read about
‘sexual selection,’ as Charles Darwin
named it. He defined it as the effect of
the ‘struggle between the individual
of one sex, generally the males, for
the possession of the other sex’. In
fact power-seeking characteristics can
be seen in all social mammals.

The ‘Alpha Male’ exhibits not only
brute strength, wealth, cunning, polit-
ical skill, but experience to win over
his opponents. This enables him to
form alliances which increase his posi-



tion, and perhaps more importantly
his sexual power.

Even in each of the six independent
‘civilizations’ of early history that
include: Babylon, Egypt, India, China,
Aztec Mexico and Inca Peru; one man
ruled at a time. Power was arbitrary
and absolute, and subjects feared
death if they retaliated. The societal
hierarchy dictated the number of con-
cubines or wives each man of stature
could own. Interestingly, the emperors
of each civilization ruled their large
harems with similar methods. Wet
nurses were provided to enable the
women to resume ovulation,

and menstruation records were kept
to maximise fertility. These harems
were dedicated and designed for

reproduction and the passing on of
the emperor’s genes.

Even today, in some tribal or polyg-
amist communities, the more powerful
the man, the more wives he can afford.
However, it is worthy to note that usu-
ally the first wife has a unique place
and special arrangements often have
to be made for her to accept a second
wite.

For example, in some parts of
Africa it is written into the law that the
first wife inherits 70 per cent of the
man’s wealth. In these parts of the
world the young girls understand that
to be a second or third wife is still
more beneficial than being a poor
man’s only wife.

The dark side to power is the vio-
lence that often accompanies it. We
only have to read of captives of war,
who are often women, and the wide-
spread excessive force and rape. The
nature of the human man is to take
advantage of an opportunity and these
situations are often viewed as sex, and
not excessive power.

Powerful, successful and rich men



joined a rock and roll band called
‘Kingston’ in the US.

Today he is taking his message
across the world, promoting an anti-
smoking campaign that has expand-
ed its reach as far as Russia.

He recalls the breaking point in his
life, when he watched the face of Yul
Brynner come across his television.
It was a public service announcement
of Mr Brynner before dying from lung
cancer in the 1970s. That advertise-
ment was broadcasted as part of the
American Cancer Society’s anti-smok-
ing Campaign.

“Hi, ’m Yul Brynner, if you’re
watching this I am dead,” the adver-
tisement played. “The reason I am
dead is because I smoked 3 packs of
cigarettes a day. Do not smoke.”

Mr Barry said: “I got goose pim-
ples from that commercial; and I had
noticed from this that the message
had the same chilling effect on the
smoking community in the United
States.

“People were really catching on to
the message that they should think
twice about having a cigarette,” Mr
Barry said.

After doctors discovered that he
developed bronchitis, Mr Barry
stopped smoking for almost eight
years. During this period, he not only
experienced the onset of bronchial
pain, but withdrawal was a difficult
process as well.

“When you stop smoking you gain a
tremendous amount of weight because
you start eating, and then it takes
another year to lose all that weight,”
said Mr Barry.

“Smoking is definitely one of the
causes of lung cancer, heart disease
and emphysema-a constant cough, and
heart disease; and it can shorten your
life by 10 years or more,” he said.

“Tt’s important for people to know
that’s how addictive tobacco is,” said
Mr Barry. “I have to go to a Betty
Ford drug treatment center, where
people would go for alcohol and hero-
ine. But I’m going there for ciga-
rettes.”



have almost aphrodisiac properties,
and their confident manner is charis-
matic for women. They know what
they want and have a proven track
record, which then translates as being
sexually competent.

If this is the case and powerful men
can essentially ‘have it all’, then why
do they often jeopardise everything
for sex. The reality is that they feel
their resources can protect and shield
them. Because of this they feel invin-
cible and live in the moment. Person-
al and momentary pleasure out weigh
long-term consequences. Frequent
separation due to travel provides
ample opportunity, plus an adrena-
line driven personality, to take sexual
risks.

Power, position and money allow a
man to hire employees who maintain
the status quo, and in this way pro-
tect him from the real world full of
disappointments and rejections. All
of these things add to his charisma
and sexual attractiveness.

History continues on and probably
will maintain for generations to come.
The competitive drive between men to
win the ‘prize’ will always remain. The
means by which they achieve this may
vary, but the desire to be powerful,
successful and rich will always remain.



Dry, dehydrated skin

What can I do about my dry,
dehydrated skin?

Dry, dehydrated skin can
be temporary, or a lifelong
concern.

Dry skin can be genetically
determined, or it can be a
product of an increasingly
stressful lifestyle coupled with
continual exposure to the sun,
wind and chemicals in the
environment. It can also be
caused by inappropriate prod-
ucts on the skin.

Dry, or dehydrated?

Dry skin, or allipoid skin,
generally refers to skin that
is lacking in oil. Dehydrated
skin is characterised by lack of
moisture in the Stratum
Corneum.

Oily skin can experience
dehydration. As mentioned,
dehydration is a lack of water,
not oil. This means sebaceous
oil activity can still be normal
or even overactive in dehy-
drated skin.

Both dry and dehydrated
skin can experience:

¢ irritation, inflammation
and itchiness.

¢ A feeling of tightness

or tautness.

¢ A look or feel of roughness
¢ Slight to severe flaking
and scaling

¢ Fine lines, cracks that

can sometimes bleed

and severe redness.

One of the biggest conse-
quences is an increase in sen-
sitivity, as dryness and dehy-
dration are precursors to sen-
sitised skin.

The top three causes of dry,
dehydrated skin

e Intrinsic Aging

Intrinsic aging is the nor-
mal process of physical
change over time that's more
about genetics than lifestyle.
(Lifestyle-induced aging is
known as premature aging.)
Activity of the sebaceous
glands responsible for oil
secretions tend to decrease
with age, and the skin’s nat-
ural hydrators decline over
the years. Aging also may
cause blood flow to the skin
to decrease, causing a drop in
sebum production.

Weather/ Environmental
Elements

Prolonged exposure to the
sun causes water to evaporate
from skin, which is why sun
burnt skin requires more
moisturisation than unex-
posed areas. Likewise, cold
winds, air conditioning units,
forced air heating and low
temperatures can also dry out
skin, contributing to prema-
ture aging.

Lifestyle

The trend of fat-free diets
can deprive our bodies of
skin-friendly Essential Fatty
Acids (EFAs). This deficien-
cy can result in chronic itch-
ing, dryness, scaling, thinning
and can lead to an imbalance
in prostaglandins (chemical
messengers that do many
things, such as control inflam-
mation).

Excess intake of alcoholic
beverages and certain med-
ications (such as nasal decon-
gestants) can also contribute
to dry skin.

Proper treatment for results

Professional skin treat-
ments can deliver immediate
relief to dry or dehydrated
skin while improving texture
and tone. Before beginning,
your skin therapist will per-
form Face Mapping zone-by-
zone skin analysis to deter-
mine if skin is dry or dehy-
drated, and then create a cus-
tomised treatment around
your specific needs that very
day!

SEE page 10

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Gastroenteritis & You

(Editors Notes: Seasonal con-
ditions such as Fever, Colds the
Flu and Diarrhoea occur quite
often during the winter months;
often cause distress for parents
and caregivers of infants and
young children. Knowing how
to prevent these conditions and
treat their symptoms, should
they occur, goes a long way in
helping children remain in good
health. This article provides
basic information about gas-
troenteritis and its manage-
ment.)

WHAT IS GASTRO-ENTERITIS?

Gastroenteritis is a general
term referring to inflamma-
tion or infection of the gas-
trointestinal tract, primarily
the stomach and intestines. It
is sometimes also referred to
as gastro or stomach flu. If
inflammation is limited to the
stomach, the term gastritis is
used, and if the small bowel
alone is affected it is enteritis.

Gastroenteritis is also called
intestinal flu, traveler's diar-
rhea, viral enteritis, and food
poisoning. It is a self-limiting
disorder characterised by
diarrhea, nausea, vomiting,
and abdominal cramping. It
occurs in all age groups and is
a major cause of morbidity
(sickness) and mortality
(death) in developing coun-
tries.

CAUSES OF
GASTROENTERITIS

Gastroenteritis can be
caused by a number of things
such as infection with bacte-
ria, viruses, and other para-
sites, or less commonly reac-
tions to new foods or medica-
tions. It can also be caused by
contaminated food, water and
contaminated objects (toys,
surfaces).

One of the frequent causes
of gastroenteritis is the
ROTAVIRUS, which is a
common infection in children,
and usually occurs seasonally.
Often, twice-yearly outbreaks
of this infection are seen.

Gastroenteritis has many
possible causes. These

include:

* Bacteria (responsible for
acute food poisoning):
Staphylococcus aureus,
Salmonella, Shigella,
Clostridium botulinum,
Escherichia coli, Clostridi-
um peifringens.

e Amoebae: especially Enta-
moeba histolytica.

e Parasites: Ascaris, Entero-
bius, Trichinella spiralis.

* Viruses (may be responsi-
ble for traveller’s diar-
rhoea): adenovirus,
echovirus, or coxsackievirus.
e Ingestion of toxins: plants
or toadstools (mushrooms).
e Drug reactions: antibiotics.
e Enzyme deficiencies.

¢ Food allergens.

The bowel reacts to any of
these toxins with hyper motil-
ity (increased action or move-
ments), producing severe
diarrhoea and secondary
extra loss of fluid from the
cells in the body.

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
OF GASTROENTERITIS
Gastroenteritis usually has

an acute onset, normally last-
ing fewer than ten days. The
main symptoms are:
e Frequent vomiting usually
on the first day of the illness.
The vomiting
may or may not be accom-
panied by fever or signs of a
cough and cold.
¢ Diarrhea (3 or more loose
stools) usually follows on
days 2 through 5 and the loss
of fluid can make the child
very ill.
¢ It can also involve stomach
pain (sometimes to the point
of crippling).

WHO IS AFFECTED BY GAS-
TROENTERITIS?

Anyone can get it, it occurs
in people of all ages and back-
grounds. However, some
viruses tend to cause gastro-
enteritis primarily among peo-
ple in specific age groups.
Rotavirus and Norovirus
(Norwalk) infections are the
most common cause of diar-
rhea and vomiting in infants

and young children under 5
years old.

HOW IS GASTROENTERITIS
TREATED?

The only recognised treat-
ment of the condition is fluid
replacement given in small
amounts and frequently. It is
recommended that children
be given one teaspoon of flu-
ids at 2-3 minute intervals
until the child is better hydrat-
ed. Acceptable fluids include
oral re-hydration fluids
(which is usually in powder
form and has to be mixed
with water, pedialyte or rehy-
drolyte for older children and
Gatorade can also be helpful
in older children. In severe
cases, the child may require
intravenous fluids during re-
hydration, the child may con-
tinue to have vomiting or
loose stools, but it is impor-
tant to continue fluids with
frequent checks on the child’s
state of hydration. Signs of
good progress include pass-
ing urine, filling out of loose
skin areas, increased activity.

WHAT SHOULD BE
DONE WHEN THE
SYMPTOMS OF GASTRO-
ENTERITIS FIRST BEGIN?

It is recommended that
families with infants and
young children keep a supply
of oral rehydration solution
(ORS) at home at all times
and use the solution when
vomiting and diarrhea first
occurs in the child. ORS is
available at pharmacies with-
out a prescription. Follow the
written directions on the ORS
package, and use clean or
boiled water.

WHEN SHOULD THE CHILD
WITH GASTROENTERITIS BE
TAKEN TO A DOCTOR?

If the child is having per-
sistent vomiting or vomiting
and diarrhoea, medical atten-
tion should be sought imme-
diately. This is especially
important in infants because
they can become dehydrated
quickly. Take the child to the

clinic (nearest your home) if
he or she passes three or more
loose stools and is vomiting
and you have started giving
oral rehydration fluids (ORF)
but he/she
e Complains of being thirsty
e Has sunken eyes
* Has fever (100.4 O F) (use
a thermometer to check the
child’s temperature ) that is
not responding to medica-
tion ( Calpol/Tylenol)
e Is not eating or drinking
normally
e Seems not to be getting
better

In the older child with diar-
rhoea medical attention
should be sought if they are
refusing, or not responding to
oral rehydration fluids
(ORF), or if there is any sign
of dehydration (complaining
of being thirsty, wrinkling of
skin and sunken eyes).

WHAT IS DEHYDRATION?

Dehydration is a negative
balance of body fluids caused
by excessive fluid loss or inad-
equate fluid intake; it is usu-
ally expressed as mild mod-
erate or severe. Some of the
symptoms may include
sunken eyes, dry or patched
mucus membranes, and the
anterior fontanel (or ‘mold’)
may be sunken one of the fre-
quent causes of dehydration is
vomiting and diarrhoea.

HOW DOES ONE
TREAT DEHYDRATION?

The treatment for dehy-
dration is fluid replacement
as described earlier in the
treatment of vomiting and
diarrhoea. The fluid is given
in the presence of vomiting
and diarrhoea to prevent
dehydration. In some cases,
children may have to be
admitted to hospital for con-
tinued hydration and moni-
toring. These cases may
include those children:
e who refuse hydration flu-
ids and continue to vomit
(failed oral hydration),
¢ with abdominal distention,
¢ with loss of skin tone (skin

appears loose or does not
immediately go

back in place if pinched
between fingers),

¢ With severe weakness and
drowsiness.

DOES DEHYDRATION POSE A
THREAT TO A CHILD’S HEALTH?

Yes! It most certainly does,
and young children in partic-
ular can become ill very rapid-
ly. However, with treatment
most people recover without
any long-term problems.

WHAT SHOULD YOU NOT
GIVE THE CHILD WITH
GASTROENTERITIS?

Antibiotics (medicines used
for treating infection - left
over from a previous illness
of the same nature or other-
wise) is often prescribed by
the doctor. Antiemetics (med-
icine that stops vomiting like
gravol), or any other medi-
cine that can be bought over
the counter such as Kaopec-
tate, Lomotil, Pepto-Bismol,
Immodium is also helpful and
might be prescribed by the
doctor.

SHOULD THE CHILD BE GIVEN
FOOD WHILST SUFFERING
FROM GASTROENTERITIS?
Yes, the vomiting usually

decreases after the first 24

hours, if the child is over 6

months of age continue to

offer food, which are freshly
prepared and easy to digest.

The child can then be fed and

should be given replacement

fluids after each loose stool
depending on the age of the
child as follows:

e Children under 1 year - ?

to? cup (2-4 ounces) of

ORE after each vomit

and/or loose stool.

e Children 1 —2 years -? to

1 cup of ORF after each

vomit and/or loose stool.

e Children 2 years and older

— Drink as much fluids as they

would take. Do not stop

meals/feeds unless instructed
by a doctor. Breast fed chil-
dren should continue to be
breast fed (as usual) unless

@x GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack

June

THE Atlantic hurricane
season Officially begins today
but it will probably be three
months before The Bahamas
is threatened by a storm. The
latter part of August is usual-
ly when we start to follow
developments with a degree
of concern.

June is a winding-down
month in the vegetable gar-
den. Most tomatoes set fruit
at temperatures lower than 68
degrees F and our June night-
time temperatures rarely get
that low. Fortunately, cherry
tomatoes set fruit at higher
temperatures and the large-
fruited varieties are particu-
larly handy in late spring and
early summer.

Sweet pepper plants can
last and produce fruit for a
whole year but with greatly
diminished returns. A spring-
time sowing of Cubanelle
peppers, a sweet Italian type,
will boost your pepper sup-
ply. Consider too the large
hot peppers such as Anaheim
and Poblano.

Most popular vegetables in
the garden will be suffering
and not doing well at all. Two
that will thrive into the sum-
mer are okra and snake
beans. Okra is one of those
veggies you love or hate, with
no in-between ground. If you
like them then June is a good
time to get them established.
Bush types bear more quick-
ly but tall types give a far
greater yield over a much
longer season.

Snake beans are sometimes
called ‘yard-long’ beans. The
pods can grow to this length
but are best picked when less
than one-foot long. Snake bean
pods have fewer beans than
regular snap beans but have a
taste that is almost sweet.
Snake beans are sometimes
called asparagus beans because
of their similarity in taste.

Snake beans are best grown
on a trellis. Lacking a trellis, I
plant them below pigeon pea
trees for support. They can
be allowed to sprawl along
the ground but need a few
plastic milk crates to give
them a degree of aeration.
Snake bean vines are dense

and heavy and are prolific
bearers once they get under
way. The beans need to be
picked every day because
pods that are 6-inches long
one day can be 24-inches long
the next.

Summer bedding flowers
should already have been
established but get some in
quickly if you have not sown
any yet. Zinnias are the old
reliables of summer and come
in a wondrous array of
colours and sizes, as well as
being single flowered and
double. Cosmos grows very
quickly and the yellow-flow-
ered varieties are cheerful,
though I would recommend
the red-flowered as they do
not get so ‘leggy’. The big
problem with cosmos is that
they tend to turn into weeds.
Pretty weeds, but weeds
nonetheless.

Portulaca makes a fine
hanging basket but can also
be used in beds. The fleshy
succulent leaves help the plant
through drought periods and
the flowers — single and dou-
ble — come in all the cardinal
colours. Double flowered por-
tulaca blooms look almost like
miniature roses, while the sin-
gle blossoms show to best
effect the watered-silk shim-
mer of the petals.

Mexican sunflowers are
reliable summer producers,
bearing flowers that look
identical to the Bolivian sun-
flower tree. The big problem
with these is that the seed
heads need to be pruned
away once a flower has died
or the whole plant will look
unsightly.

Marigolds used to be one
colour; now marigolds come
in lemon yellow and red and
are far more appealing,
though that awful marigold
smell remains. Marigolds can
take a degree of shade during
the summer months as long
as they receive some full sun.

The plants that can really
be relied upon to produce
well in the summer are weeds.
Whether shepherd needle or
pussley, weeds will thrive and
be one of our biggest
heartaches.









CUBANELLE peppers can take more heat than regular bell peppers and Me well into summer.

otherwise instructed by the
doctor when examined.

IS GASTROENTERITIS
PREVENTABLE?

If a virus causes the gas-
troenteritis, it probably can-
not be prevented. We know,
however, that most of the
organisms (germs) that cause
gastroenteritis are spread by
contact particularly through
direct or indirect contact with
infected stool. Therefore,
good hand washing with soap
and water after a bowel
movement is the most effec-
tive means of prevention. The
proper disposal of soiled dia-
pers is also important. In nurs-
ery environments particularly,
toys should be
cleaned/washed regularly to
prevent cross infection. The
cleaning of surfaces such as
tabletop and play areas with
soap and water and 70 per
cent alcohol or other disin-
fectants helps to reduce the
level of germs in the area
where children play, eat and
sleep. If your child attends a
preschool, seek to ensure
these practices are observed.

CONCLUSION

If the information provid-
ed is followed, the child will
be protected from gastroen-
teritis and the possible dan-
gers this condition poses. The
most important thing to
remember is to practice fre-
quent and proper hand wash-
ing and keep a supply of ORF
at home for the emergency
treatment of vomiting and
diarrhoea.

The health of you and your
child is of most importance to
the Maternal and Child
Health Department of the
Ministry of Health. For addi-
tional information on gas-
troenteritis and other child-
hood diseases please contact
the community clinic nearest
your home or the Maternal
and Child Health Secretariat
of the Department of Public
Health, Ministry of Health at
telephone number 502-4778.



Dry, dehydrated skin
FROM page nine

¢ Overuse of moisturisers can
contribute to dead skin cell
build up, clogged pores and a
lackluster appearance. Pro-
fessional exfoliation will
remove dead skin cells and
debris, helping to bring newer
cells to the surface while prep-
ping skin for subsequent
product application.

¢ Galvanic current is a pro-
fessional device that helps dri-
ve nourishing, hydrating and
replenishing ingredients deep
into the layers of the epider-
mis, where dry, dehydrated
skin starts.

A consistent home care reg-
imen prescribed by your skin
therapist will dramatically
impact the health of your skin.
Along with your regimen, keep
the following tips in mind:
¢ Do not use hot water when
cleansing.

e Perform gentle, upward cir-
cles with the hands when
cleansing, applying moisturiz-
er or SPF, etc.

¢ Steer clear of products with
artificial fragrances, colors
and S.D. alcohol.

¢ Be aware of hormones,
stress levels, and alcohol and
nicotine intake, as these will
affect dryness of skin.

e This information was taken
from dermalogica.com. Nakita
Lowe is a Dermalogica Skin
Care Therapist at The Dermal
Clinic in Sandyport. Please call
327-6788 for more information
or visit www.dermal-clinic.com.

Share
your
news

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neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 11B



Evans finds success
after losing her sight

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

FTER a horrifying
mishap in 1971,
young Genevieve

Evans faced the challenge of
having to start life over again.

Before a life altering inci-
dent Genevieve was a cheer-
ful young lady who had a pas-
sion for cooking. She loved
everything about it, especial-
ly making creative dishes with
a flair for flavour and presen-
tation. She was good at what
she did, slicing and dicing her
way to the top of the culinary
field.

And even though she was
only 24 years old with three
dependents at ages 9, 2, and
18 months, with no support,
she was hopeful and lived a
life of positive expectancy.

Then tragedy struck. A
blunt object was thrown at
Ms Evans hitting her in the
centre of her face leaving her
permanently blind. “It was a
horrifying unfortunate
mishap. This changed things
and made life much harder
for me,” Ms Evans told Tri-
bune Woman.

Her dream, her will pow-
er, her hope, her everything
shattered like glass into a mil-
lion pieces. She wondered
how she would move forward
from the devastation that rid-
dled her life. And in the
despair of her reality Ms
Evans began picking up the

pieces.

“T did not know what to do
or where to turn. I could no
longer work as a chef and I
had three children to take
care of. It was a lot on me
because there was no daddy
to help out with things. But
when I thought about my
children I knew I had to do
something so that I can pro-
vide for them," she said.

In 1972, a year after she lost
her sight, she went to the Sal-
vation Army to learn to read
in Braille. And though she
made progressive steps, her
past continued to play a toll
on her emotionally. She said
sometimes she thought to
herself “what did I do wrong
to get the bad deal in life.”
She could not see it at the
time, but her misfortune was
a blessing in disguise.

“In 1973 I was asked by the
Ministry of Education if I was
interested in teaching Braille
at the School of the Blind and
I accepted the offer,” Ms
Evans told Tribune Woman.

"Teaching was one of my
last career choices. I really
didn't want to teach. But I
think that is where the Lord
leadeth me and I am enjoying
what I am doing now," she
said.

Ms Evans went back to
school in 1975 to enhance her
skills. She took a few courses
in teaching. In 1983 she
obtained a teaching certifi-
cate and in 1984 she attended
the Hadley School of the

Blind in Illinois where she
studied personal psychology.

When she returned to the
Bahamas she was approached
once again by the Ministry of
Education. “They asked me
to go to Freeport to organise
a center for deaf and blind
students. I taught there for 11
years. After the school closed
I was transferred to Sir Jack
Hayward. Then I came back
to Nassau in 2006 to teach at
the School of the Blind,” she
said.

Today Ms Evans teaches at
the E.H Gilmour School for
the Blind on Mackey Street.

She was also recently hon-
ored by the Primary Princi-
pal’s Association for 37 years
of excellence in teaching.

“This achievement is a
wonderful feeling. I worked
very hard to get where I am
today. People who have faced
a situation like mine, I want
them to know that all is not
lost and they must love them-
selves, stand up for them-
selves because they can make
it,” she said.

Traveling is one of her
favourite things to do. She
has traveled to England, Bar-
bados, Trinidad, Jamaica,
Haiti, Las Vegas, Mexico,
Colorado, Belize, and Cana-
da.

At age 65 she is preparing
for retirement. She told Tri-
bune Woman that she is more
than ready to relax, sip on
pina coladas and travel the
world.







Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



DESPITE the difficulties, Ms Evans made something of her life and now many people use her story as
inspiration for their personal endeavours.




































































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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010











By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

LYNN Jackson and
(5% team from Beauty

Schools of America
are back to host an enrollment
seminar at the Sheraton Beach
Resorts this month. So those
persons who were inspired to
seek careers in the cosmetol-
ogy industry at the “Evolution
of Beauty” hair show present-
ed by Beauty Schools of
America, now have an oppor-
tunity to turn their spare time
activities into professional
careers.

The last time the Beauty
School team came to the
Bahamas they were impressed
by the skills and artistry dis-
played by some of the local
stylists. They also found that
there are a great number of
persons who wish to pursue
careers in beauty but don’t
know how to jump start their
careers.

To give those persons an
opportunity to finesse their
skills, Beauty Schools of
America is offering an oppor-
tunity for aspiring beauticians
to develop a lifetime passion
that can spawn a rewarding,
creative, lucrative career.

“This seminar is for pro-
gressive serious students who
are looking to study abroad.
The enrollment seminar pro-
vides a platform for them to
exchange with international
programs,” said Glynn Jack-
son global ambassador of
Beauty Schools of America.

An industry that is usually
overlooked by many people,
professionals in the business
have dubbed it a financial
goldmine.

Mr Jackson said money is
not and should not be para-
mount to a career in beauty,
but reminded persons to be
mindful that the field requires
hard work.

“Some people are in jobs
where they don’t see growth.
People don’t realise it but this
is the only industry that is
thriving during a down turn in
the economy. The salons are
still filled with customers, and
people everywhere still want
to look beautiful despite a
declining economy,” said Mr

TWIT)
Teg RT
OUEST

Jackson.

“There is a financial gold-
mine in the industry. I have
heard many stories of stylists
who have said after six months
out of beauty schools they
were making six figures,” Mr
Jackson said.

During the seminar that is
scheduled for Friday, June 11
attendees will be in an inti-
mate setting. They will get a
chance to speak one on one
with professionals as well as
the Beauty School team for
any questions they may have
about the field and Beauty
Schools of America.

Additionally, applications
for enrollment along with a
picture, high school or college
transcript, and application fee
will be collected during that
time. Those individuals who
are accepted into Beauty
Schools of America will go on
a one day group tour to see
the campus in Florida.

“People have been emailing
us about how they are inter-
ested in furthering their edu-
cation. We have seen that the
Bahamas is further than so
many other countries and the
people here have a passion for
this industry,” Mr Jackson told
Tribune Woman.

During their time here they
will also be hosting a teacher’s
appreciation luncheon and a
celebrity style high fashion
photo shoot at the Sheraton
Beach Resorts by invitation
only.

Additionally, the beauty
team will be releasing a hair
book for marketing purposes
only, featuring the work of
local stylists. “Each stylist will
have one model to show off
one of their creations and it
will be featured in the hair
book,” he said.

“The book is free because
we want to market the local
stylists in the Bahamas who
are very talented,” Mr Jack-
son said.

The seminar starts from 6 -
9.30 pm. The luncheon will be
held on Saturday, June 12, at
4.30 pm and the photo shoot
will take place on Sunday,
June 13 at from 10am - Spm.

For more information and
to RSVP for the seminar call
242-380-8935 or 301-437-2658.























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Tribune worker
ees oh CreW

Newspaper staff member
saves the day in airline
manager’s absence

A GROUP of fed up trav-
ellers just managed to dodge
a trans Atlantic nightmare
when a Tribune staff mem-
ber rescued them from
hunger pangs during a
British Airways flight from
Nassau to London.

Already mired in a series
of cabin crew strikes, the air-
line has now been hit with
onboard refrigeration woes
that threatened to leave 69
passengers on a recent flight
with nothing but cold com-
fort - specifically cold cereal
and muffins for breakfast
bought from a “tuck shop”
run by a member of the
Bahamian ground crew.

Luckily, a Tribune staff
member was booked on the
flight and = purchased
Wendy’s from the airport
terminal to feed the hungry
11-member flight crew.

In addition to the threat of
a gruclling nine hours of
hunger, some passengers
were upset by the absence of
an on-duty manager to
explain why there was no
food available.

"T felt I had to do my part
for Queen, God and country
because the manager was not
present,” said The Tribune
staff member who shelled

SEE page 11

Humane Society warns puppies,
kittens without homes face death

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



HEALTHY puppies, kittens, cats and dogs all face death if
homes cannot be found for them away from the “inundated”
Bahamas Humane Society, according to organisation presi-

dent Kim Aranha.

The Bahamas Humane Society (BHS) is in “crisis” at present
having seen an accelerated spike in the number of animals

SEE page two

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TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

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PLP Deputy Leader
denies meeting FBI over
Jamaican drug lord



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net







PLP Deputy Leader and MP for Cat
Island, Rum Cay, and San Salvador
Philip Davis, denied a tabloid report yes-
terday that he had met with agents from
the Federal Bureau of Investigations and
was assisting them in their investigation
into the finances of alleged Jamaican
drug lord Christopher “Dudus” Coke.

Coke, the reported leader of the noto-
rious “Shower Posse” gang in Tivoli Gar-

SEE page eight





PM AND AO 3) TOUR a eI

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



[=a







FROM LEFT: Vice president of airport development and project director, Nassau Airport Development Company, Stewart Steeves; Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham; President and CEO of NAD Craig Richmond and Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest tour Nassau
airport’s new US departure terminal yesterday.

PM quotes
Godfather

film in tax
hike row

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia. net



UNWILLING to accept
the blame for tax hikes in
the 2010 budget, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham
recalled a famous quote
from Hollywood film trilogy
The Godfather in Bahamian
terms.

As he defended himself
against complaints of higher
taxes for the local beer
industry, import of large
vehicles and hotel rooms,

SEE page eight







IMO team to assess Bahamas
emergency plans for oil spill

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

EXPERTS from the
International Maritime
Organisation are in
Nassau to liaise with
the National Oil Spill
Contingency Team to ensure
that the Bahamas’ emergency
plans are adequate should the
massive oil spill spreading in
the Gulf of Mexico enter our
waters.

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux said the two mem-
ber IMO team will work with
local officials until the week's
end, assessing the Bahamas’
risk of oil exposure and to

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provide expertise on
crafting an oil spill
response.

"They will quantify
the potential risk of
the oil coming ashore,
assess our capacity,
review the national
contingency plan,
| review the bilateral
and regional arrange-
ment to identify where
additional capacity is needed,
and to provide technical
advice and guidance on estab-
lished practices related to oil
spill response.

"They will also prepare a
report for us and standby and
assist us as the need arises,"
Mr Deveaux explained,
adding that his ministry was

SEE page 11

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ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

+ SEE PAGE THREE
- Cabinet Minister ‘was
On verge of quitting’

AFTER a particularly
: contentious exchange in
: Cabinet last week
: between Prime Minister
: Hubert Ingraham and his
: MP for Killarney, it is
: reported that Dr Hubert
: Minnis was on the verge
: of resigning his cabinet
: post, but changed his
: mind.

According to well-
: placed sources within the
: party, it is claimed that Mr
: Ingraham “belittled” his
: Minister of Health to the
: point that the minister felt
: he had no other option
: but to tender his resigna-
: tion,
: However, since this
: exchange it is said that Dr

SEE page 11

HOME IMPROVEMENTS
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Move to replace fire-hit
Cable Beach straw market

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



THE future of the fire-ravaged
Cable Beach straw market and more
than 40 straw vendors and workers
could depend on the success of a com-
mercial development deal.

In a press statement yesterday,
resort development company Baha
Mar revealed its intent to replace the
facility as well as upgrade the western
straw market on the same strip as soon
as it receives government approvals
for its commercial village project.

pany pledged construction would take
place during the early infrastructural
work for the overall resort project.

Baha Mar said: “The recent straw
market fire has created tremendous
hardship on those vendors who
depended on the facility for their liveli-
hood and to support their families.
Baha Mar greatly sympathises with
their situation.”

The flames started early Saturday
morning and completely consumed the
structure opposite the Wyndham
Hotel on the Cable Beach strip.

The 43-stall market was filled with
merchandise, all of which was
destroyed in the indiscriminate blaze.

Once the land is conveyed, the com-

Director of Fire Services Jeffrey
Deleveaux said the fire has been clas-
sified as arson, but officers are still in
the early stages of their investigation
and cannot confirm further details.

After the cutbacks and tax increas-
es revealed in last week’s budget com-
munication, straw vendors were scep-
tical about the possibility of govern-
ment assistance.

However, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham acknowledged the plight of
the displaced workers yesterday and
said the government would be looking
into the matter.

He said: “I’ve seen it driving by and
we will see what we can do to assist

THE TRIBUNE









them. We will also see if that is
involved in what Baha Mar proposes
to do in their initial phase of con-
struction; whether or not there is any
temporary arrangement.”

Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
THE CHARRED REMAINS of the Cable Beach straw market after Saturday’s blaze.

Police are urging anyone with rele-
vant information to call them on 919,
crime stoppers on 328-TIPS, the Cen-
tral Detective Unit on 502-9991 or Fire
Services on 322-1225.

Humane Society warns ey 0000331, 0) 7 ADOPTION

TUITE
WTS THRU



FROM page one

being surrendered, with “at
least 50 per cent” of the own-
ers dropping off the pets
telling the BHS they simply
cannot afford to keep them
anymore.

“We really don’t want to
start killing healthy animals
but we have run out of
space...we are desperate and
pleading to anybody who can
help,” said Mrs Aranha.

As of yesterday the soci-
ety’s facility in Chippingham
was housing 39 adult dogs, 52
puppies and over 80 cats and
kittens, all looking for loving
homes.

Talking of the selection of
“wonderful dogs” available,
Mrs Aranha said: “We have
the most amazing cross-sec-
tion of cross breeds. There
are Rottweiler crosses, Ger-
man Shepherd mixes, Collies,
they are beautiful dogs and
some are already house-
trained, used to walking on a

ele i
Us

SRE
PHONE: 822-2157



leash, can sit and so on.”

The BHS has decided to
waive its usual $40 adoption
fee for anyone who is willing
to take on one or more of the
animals during its “adoption
blitz.”

It will also provide animal
food to anyone who can pro-
vide a temporary “foster”
home for any of the animals
to ease some of the pressure
on the facility until more per-
manent homes can be found.
Mrs Aranha expressed the
BHS’ appreciation to Light-
bourne Trading which have
recently donated a quantity
of dog food to the kennel to
help feed the animals.

Anyone interested in
adopting a dog must meet a
small number of require-
ments, including having a



fenced-in yard to keep the
animal from roaming and, in
the case of both cats and dogs,
be able to provide shelter for
the animal for rain and sun.

“Tf we don’t get them out,
one of two things will happen:
either we will have to start
killing healthy animals or
some kind of disease will
break out and kill them,” said
the BHS President.

Anyone wishing to find out
more can contact Mrs Aranha
on 362 4727 or Becky Arm-
brister at the BHS on 323
5138.



NOTICE
ST. MICHEL SPORTSWEAR LTD.

Take notice that with effect from the 8" day of
February, 2010, I accepted appointment as Liquidator

of the above company, pursuant to an Extra-Ordinary
Meeting of the Directors, held on the 8" day of February,
2010, at which the following Resolutions were passed:

That St. Michel Sportswear Ltd. be wound up

voluntarily.

NOTICE

ST. MICHEL SPORTSWEAR LID.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that all persons having claims
against the above-named Company are required on
or before the 30% day of June 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or
claims to the Liquidator of the Company, at P.O. Box
N-10144, Nassau, Bahamas, or in default thereof they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
















































That George Clifford Culmer be appointed Liquidator
of the company for the purposes of such wind up.

made before such debts are proved.
Dated this 26" day of May, 2010.
Dated this 26" day of May 2010.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator of the above named Company

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



COURTNEWS



Appeal judges order
release of ma
Sentenced to more
than 80 years

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

COURT of Appeal judges
have ordered that a man who
was sentenced to more than 80
years in prison for robbing
numerous churches, pre-
schools, stores and homes
should be released from jail
after serving five years.

Father of two Keith Nixon,
then aged 31, was handed the
heavy penalty for the crimes in
2005 by Magistrate Linda Vir-

ill.

. At that time, Magistrate Vir-
gill suggested the lengthy peri-
od of time in jail would allow
him time to change his life and
seek treatment for a drug prob-
lem he said fuelled his spree of
crimes and for which he said
he had previously sought, but
had not received help during
an earlier stay in jail.

Ultimately Nixon saw things
differently and went on to
appeal the sentence. On May
19, the thief’s wish was granted
by Court of Appeal President
Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice
George Newman and Justice
Stanley John.

Nixon had previously plead-
ed guilty to robbing the
Bahamas Christian Fellowship
Church, Golden Gates Church
of Christ, Golden Gates
Assembly, Southwest Cathe-
dral Church of God, Trinity
Baptist Church, New Provi-
dence Seventh-Day Adventist
Church, New Covenant Baptist
Church, Zion South Beach and
Church of God of Prophecy on
Blue Hill Road.

He was also charged with
breaking and entering the
Adventure Learning Centre on
two separate occasions, Guid-
ing Hands Nursery School and
Revere Academy School.

During the break-ins, Nixon
stole various items, including
cash, electronics, food items
and church equipment, accord-
ing to court documents.

Court records indicated that
cash stolen from the establish-
ments ranged from $50 to
$3,000 and the crimes took
place in Garden Hills, South
Beach, Soldier Road and
Carmichael Road.

In her judgment on the con-
vict’s appeal against the sen-
tence, Court President Dame
Joan Sawyer said she would
substitute the sentence of 81
years and six months given to
Mr Nixon with one of “five
years concurrent on each
count.”

“As the appellant has in fact
served nearly five calendar
years he is to be released imme-
diately,” she stated.

Date set for extradition
hearing of Maycock Sr

THE extradition hearing of
alleged drug kingpin Melvin
Maycock Sr has been set for
January 11 next year in Magis-
trate’s Court.

In 2004, US prosecutors
requested Maycock's extradi-
tion on allegations that he
headed the Caribbean arm of a
multi-national drug gang.

US prosecutors also request-
ed the extradition of 13 other
men alleged to be a part of the
operation. Maycock Sr was
arrested in February 2008 and
prosecutors allege he escaped
from a holding cell at the Eliz-
abeth Estates Police Station by
switching places with his son.

Maycock Sr was recaptured
on June 20, following a high-
speed chase.

Maycock Sr, who is on
$80,000 bail, was back before
Magistrate Carolita Bethell yes-
terday. His son Melvin May-
cock Jr, as well as Lynden
Dean, Bryan Deal, Tory Lock-
hart, Laron Lockhart, Wilfred
Ferguson, Carl Culmer, Derek
Rigby, Trevor Roberts Devroy
Moss, Sheldon Moore, Shanto
Curry and Gordon Newbold —
who are all on bail — are also
subject to US extradition
requests.

Their extradition hearings,
which have already started, are
set to continue on June 28.
Prosecutors indicated yester-
day that they are ready to pro-
ceed with the case.

The men’s hearing had been
halted pending a constitutional
challenge of the Listening
Devices Act. The evidence on
which US prosecutors are rely-
ing was gathered through
phone taps.

In January, the Court of
Appeal affirmed the constitu-
tionality of the Act and ordered
that the hearing proceed.

PM, Cabinet tour airport’
new US departure terminal

@ Construction ahead of schedule, under budget
@ Ingraham, Minister heap praise on development

hi me a i
PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and President and CEO of NAD, Craig Richmond, yesterday at | r

the new airport terminal.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE prime minister and his
cabinet toured Nassau airport’s
new US departure terminal yes-
terday as the Nassau Airport
Development Company press-
es on with construction ahead
of schedule and under budget.

Just 10 months away from
the terminal’s anticipated open-
ing next Spring, the tour
prompted nothing but praise
from Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, Minister of Tourism
and Aviation Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace and tourism
industry stakeholder George
Markantonis, president and
managing director of Kerzner
International.

The PM, minister and
Atlantis boss boasted how the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport will be the best in the
region and serve as a model for
developing airports around the
Bahamas.

At the end of the 30 minute
tour led by NAD’s CEO and
president Craig Richmond and
vice president of airport devel-
opment Stewart Steeves, Mr
Ingraham remarked: “The
leader of the opposition said
the other day that we borrowed
lots of money and you can’t see
it, you can’t feel it, you can’t
touch it. $50 million of it is right
here; you can see it, you can
feel it, you can touch it. You
are standing in it.”

Accelerate

The 247,000 sq ft US Depar-
ture Terminal currently has 300
workers on site, including 219
Bahamians, and is around half-
way complete with construction
expected to accelerate once the
hurricane wind tested walls are
installed this month.

As the airport reaches com-
pletion, the PM expects the
Bahamas will be propelled to
the forefront of Caribbean
tourism.

Mr Ingraham said: “We have
been behind and we are happy
that we are now catching up.

“T think this sends a message
to people coming to the
Bahamas they can see that we
are on the uptake, that we are
withstanding the economic
problems today, that we are
planning for the future, putting
in the infrastructure required
to sustain our economy.”

The international arrivals ter-
minal and departures pier is on
target for a 2012 opening, with
the new domestic and interna-
tional departures and domes-
tic arrivals terminals set to open
in 2013 marking the comple-
tion of a $409.5 million, 571,000
sq ft airport complex with one
million square feet of aircraft
operating surface.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
envisions a hub for the Family
Islands at the new airport,
spurring on development of the
entire archipelago.

“It’s very important for us in
the long-term to begin to focus
on developing all of the
Bahamas,” Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said. “And what this
airport is going to do is enable
us to provide a visitor experi-
ence we have never done
before and expand from just






Look @& Feel
Great ina
Fabulous
delection of
Dresses

by
Donna Morgan





Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







CRAIG RICHMOND, president and CEO of the Nassau Airport
Devolopment Company, speaks to the media yesterday.

Nassau and Paradise Island to
elsewhere.

“But George Markantonis
and NAD support this as they
will also get incremental busi-
ness as a result of people com-
ing in and spending some time
here, so we are able to attract a
market we weren’t able to
attract before.”

The Kerzner CEO added:
“It’s going to make a very big
difference for us. We frankly
can’t wait for the day we open
it.

“This is a dramatic step in
making the whole tourism
experience in the Bahamas one
better than anywhere else.”





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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

High-seas raid deepens Israeli isolation

JERUSALEM — Israel's bloody, bun-
gled takeover of a Gaza-bound Turkish aid
vessel is complicating U.S.-led Mideast peace
efforts, deepening Israel's international iso-
lation and threatening to destroy the Jewish
state's ties with key regional ally Turkey.

And while Israel had hoped to defend
its tight blockade of Hamas-ruled Gaza with
Monday's high-seas raid, it instead appeared
to be hastening the embargo's demise, judg-
ing by initial international condemnation.

The pre-dawn commando operation,
which killed nine pro-Palestinian activists,
was also sure to strengthen Gaza's Islamic
militant Hamas rulers at the expense of U.S.
allies in the region, key among them Hamas'
main rival, Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas, as well as Egypt and Jordan.

"The attack on a humanitarian mission ...
will only further alienate the international
community and isolate Israel while granting
added legitimacy to Hamas' claim to repre-
sent the plight of the Palestinian people,”
said Scott Atran, an analyst at the Universi-
ty of Michigan.

The Mediterranean bloodshed dealt
another blow to the Obama administration's
efforts to get peace talks back on track.

It raised new questions about one of the
pillars of U.S. policy — that Hamas can be
left unattended as Washington tries to bro-
ker a peace deal between Abbas and Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

The raid tested U.S.-Israeli ties that have
not yet fully recovered from their most seri-
ous dispute in decades, triggered by Israeli
construction plans in disputed east
Jerusalem.

In the most immediate fallout, the inter-
ception of the six-boat flotilla carrying 10,000
tons of supplies for Gaza trained the global
spotlight on the blockade of the territory.
Israel and Egypt sealed Gaza's borders after
Hamas overran the territory in 2007, wrest-
ing control from Abbas-loyal forces.

The blockade, under which Israel allows
in only essential humanitarian supplies, was
intended to squeeze the militants.

Instead, it has failed to dislodge Hamas,
driven ordinary Gazans deeper into poverty
and emerged as a constant source of fric-
tion and instability. In trying to shake off
the blockade, Hamas intensified rocket fire
on Israeli border towns, provoking Israel's
three-week military offensive against Gaza
16 months ago.

TRIBUTE TO

PENT M Puricelli Cemar i ar:]

After the war, the international commu-
nity remained reluctant to push hard for an
end to the blockade, for fear it could prolong
the rule of Hamas, branded a terrorist orga-
nization by the West.

But after Monday's deadly clash, Israel
may find itself under growing pressure to at
least ease the blockade significantly.

European diplomats on Monday demand-
ed a swift end to the border closure, while
US. officials said statements would call for
greater assistance to the people of Gaza.
The officials spoke on condition of anonymi-
ty due to the sensitivity of the situation.

The fate of U.S.-led indirect talks between
Israel and the Palestinians was uncertain.

Netanyahu cancelled a scheduled Tues-
day meeting with President Barack Obama
in Washington, and the status of a planned
visit to Washington by Abbas next week
was not immediately clear.

Abbas temporarily walked away from
the negotiations in March, after Israel
announced more housing for Jews in tradi-
tionally Arab east Jerusalem.

The Palestinian leader on Monday
denounced Israel's actions as a "sinful mas-
sacre" and met with aides to decide on his
next move.

Relations between Abbas and Hamas
have become increasingly vitriolic, and
extending Hamas rule by lifting the blockade
would run counter to Abbas’ objectives.

However, public outrage at home might
force Abbas’ hand — though pressure on
him to quit the talks appeared to be muted
by the fact that he is negotiating through a
USS. mediator, not directly with Israeli offi-
cials.

Abbas must now make a credible effort to
open Gaza's borders, said Palestinian analyst
Hani al-Masri. "Otherwise, he will be viewed
as weak or part of the siege and lose the
support of his people,” al-Masri said.

Israel dismissed the condemnation, saying
its forces came under attack when they tried
to board one of the Turkish-flagged aid ves-
sels. However, its point of view seemed to
fall on deaf ears.

"Militarily, we can feel quite safe, but not
regarding our political international stand-
ing,” said Alon Liel, a former Israeli diplo-
mat posted in Turkey.

(This article is by Karin Laub and
Matthew Lee of the Associated Press).



ur mail
facilities
need fixing

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Postal facilities and ser-
vices in the Bahamas are
stuck in 19th century tech-
nology with no indication
that long term planning is
being done. For many years
a shameful “third world”
shortage of mail boxes exist-
ed. New companies and
individuals in dire need of a
post office box were, and
possibly still are, simply told
“none available.” It isn’t as
if we are coping with need
for some high tech device.
Any administration should
be able to produce and
operate mail boxes galore
given a six-month lead time.

It would certainly require
only a couple of finish car-
penters to expand and reno-
vate the Shirley Street
office’s outgoing mail bins
so that on week ends and
other busy times the outgo-
ing mail would not pile-up
so high that the choked up
slot makes mail accessible
to any lurker inclined to
snatch a few envelopes. If
we really can’t afford the
carpentry, then let’s just
move the slot in the outside
12 or 18 inches higher so a
larger catch bin can be pro-
vided beneath the slots...If
someone bothered to think
about it there are no doubt
numerous ways to solve that
office's security problem.

At the Fox Hill post office

letters@triounemedia.net



the outgoing slot is located
only slightly above floor lev-
el, and so poorly marked a
stranger wouldn’t have a
clue where to drop his out-
going mail without asking
the friendly staff for guid-
ance.

We have excellent sign
makers in the community.
Why then must the Shirley
Street post office have only
a filthy, crudely scribbled,
faded marker pen on a dirty
wall designating “Foreign”
and “Domestic” mail slots?
At the main downtown post
office in particular where
parking is always inadequate
why not provide a pull-in
lane where outgoing mail
can be deposited from autos
into collection boxes.? Why
not at each post office?

Why not machine market
small booklets of stamps
using dollar bill reading
machines. The US imposes a
slight premium charge for
such convenient stamp
booklets. This could amor-
tise the machines in a drive
through lane. Why can’t
each post office have a post-
ed printed collection time
schedule so that customers
will know at what hours and
on what days their mail is
likely to be dispatched?

There used to be a number
of the typical handsome red
cast iron British P O collec-
tion boxes around town -
unless they’ve been aban-
doned. Could we not graph-
ically indicate the location
of them with expectation
that each will bear an updat-
ed collection schedule on its
side? Our North American
tourists would likely love to
dispatch their colour post
cards into some of these if
we have any on Bay Street;
perhaps with a special can-
cellation stamp bearing a
bold plug for the Bahamas.

Why can't each post office
clearly display an updated
listing of current postal
rates, charges and a com-
plete schedule of all services
available and the cost of
each with sufficient expla-
nation as to what approxi-
mate delivery time each
option will entail? All of the
foregoing might also be
nicely incorporated into
each year’s telephone book.
And maybe someone could
look into why a cross town
mailing should take a week
or two for delivery.

ONE WHO
BELIEVES
THERE IS
STILL A

NEED FOR
“SNAIL MAIL”
Nassau,

May, 2010.

Hubert Ingraham leads by example

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank God Hubert
Ingraham is Prime Minister
during these difficult times.
During his budget presenta-
tion he led by example in
cutting his own salary and
the salaries of his Cabinet
Ministers.

He is one of the best Min-
isters of Finance the country
has ever had. Even plenty
people in the PLP are glad
that Perry Christie is not in
the chair, because he can’t
even make easy decisions in
good times, much less tough
decisions in bad times.
Whereas Mr. Ingraham is a
man of action and strength,
Mr. Christie is a man of end-
less talk and weakness.

When the economic crisis
first hit, Mr. Ingraham took

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Have you ever wanted to run your
own Consignment Store?

the necessary measures to
stimulate our economy.
Now he is taking the mea-
sures needed to make sure
that our financial house
stays in order.

He is making sure that our
budget deficit is properly
reduced in order to sustain
our economy and provide
for a recovery.

Mr. Ingraham is a deci-
sive man. Without fear or
favour he has called us all
to sacrifice for the good of
the nation. Because of his
bold leadership, civil ser-
vants have not had their
salaries cut like in many
countries around the world.

Because he is a man of
compassion, he has made
sure that important areas
like health and education
are still provided with the
resources needed. This bud-
get and the budgets since
2007 also show his commit-
ment to the poor and to the
social needs of Bahamians.

Because he works day
and night to protect us, he
has made sure that national

is an extraordinary leader.

This budget is one of dis-
cipline and prudence. It is
also one of fortitude and
hope. These, of course, are
also the qualities of the man
whom we are fortunate to
have as Prime Minister and
Minister of Finance during
these tough times. Thank
God!

PROUD BAHAMIAN

Nassau,
May 29, 2010.

URE
Strides — but many of

ae
them still don't get it



EDITOR,
The Tribune.

Exactly one week and
one day ago, I telephoned
Police Control to inform
them that a black truck
had been abandoned off
the road on East Shirley

We are considering selling our well established
Consignment Boutique, Selling ladies fashions,
located on Shirley Street.

Street Gust west of Lake-
view Drive on the oppo-
site side). I provided the
name, licence number,
model of truck and so on.
I said the truck may have
broken down, but then
again, it may have been
used to commit a crime. I
was assured the police
would deal with it that
afternoon.

Of course, nothing
happened. So I called
Traffic Police the follow-
ing day and provided the
same info. I also stressed
that this truck posed a
danger to motorists at
night. Same assurances.
Again, of course, nothing
happened. The leaves are
piling up on the hood.
Another weekend's here.
Hopefully, none of the
late night partiers will
crash into the truck at
night.

As Mr. Paul Thomp-
son has repeatedly said,
it's the small things that
often lead to the big. Too
bad that in spite of all the
strides the police have
made under the new
command, so many of
them still don't get it.

security also gets the
resources needed. Mr. Ingra-
ham’s budget is tough but
fair. It is a budget produced
by a man who in good or
bad times has shown that he

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Ue
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas among countries
PT CIEL




TT ee

By MATT MAURA



OFFICIALS from the
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) and the United States of
America recently signed a five-
year PEPFAR agreement that
will pave the way for 12
Caribbean countries — including
the Bahamas - to expand their
HIV/AIDS programmes.

The PEPFAR (President’s
Emergency Plan for AIDS
Relief) Programme was
launched in 2003 by then US
President George W Bush as a
five-year (2003-2008) commit-
ment of $15 billion to fight the
global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

It was renewed, revised and expanded in July 2008 in a move
that tripled the initial $15 billion to $45 billion through the
years 2009- 2013 to battle HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis
outside of the US.

PEPFAR has been called “the largest health initiative ever ini-
tiated by one country to address HIV/AIDS.”

HUBERT MINNIS

Education

Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis said the funds the
Bahamas receives will be used to ensure the continued educa-
tion and awareness, monitoring and evaluation and surveil-
lance of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, in addition to con-
tinuing to remove the stigma attached to HIV/AIDS.

“What this will do is to ensure that all the necessary moni-
toring and evaluation mechanisms are in place so that it will be
standardised throughout the Caribbean,” Dr Minnis said. Under
the agreement signed between CARICOM and PEPFAR, the
12 CARICOM countries will share $25 million annually, or up
to $125 million over the next five years, to assist with prevention,
testing, strategic information and counselling efforts.

Other regional beneficiaries are: Antigua and Barbuda, Bar-
bados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Trinidad and Toba-
go, St Kitts/Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines
and Suriname.

Haiti and the Dominican Republic were the lone beneficiaries
of the grant in the initial stages.

Dr Minnis said the Bahamas has had a very successful
HIV/AIDS programme and has met several of the Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) established by the 193 member
states of the United Nations.

“One such goal was to ensure that by 2010 those individuals
with HIV would have medication free of charge, which has
been accomplished in the Bahamas,” Dr Minnis said.

“Additionally, by the year 2015, we expect to see a decline in
the new cases of HIV/AIDS as a result of a comprehensive
programme that includes education and awareness, ensuring that
medications are available; that pregnant women are tested for
HIV/AIDS and once those results are positive, they receive
medication at the appropriate time so that the illness will not be
transmitted ‘in utero’, which means the infants are born HIV-
free,” he said.



COURT OF APPEAL PRESIDENT RAPS ATTORNEY

‘A rank abuse of the court’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunedmedia.net



THE President of the Court of Appeal
chastised an attorney for a “rank abuse of
the court” after he attempted to make an
appeal on behalf of a client he had “never
met”.

Wilbert H Moss Jr appeared in the Court
of Appeal on May 19, purporting to repre-
sent Khanaochi Knowles in an appeal
against the Commissioner of Police.

However, Mr Moss was swiftly castigat-

m@ 2010/2011 BUDGET

ed by Court of Appeal President Dame
Joan Sawyer who did not take kindly to
the fact that while claiming to represent
Mr Knowles, the lawyer, said Dame Joan,
admitted to the court that he had “never
seen him, cannot locate him and was
instructed (to carry out the appeal) by the
appellant’s sister, who has no locus standi
(authority) to instruct anybody to appeal
against somebody’s conviction or sentence.”

Dismissing the “purported appeal” for
“want of prosecution” Dame Joan said:
“Counsel must stop wasting the court’s
time and abusing the court’s process. This

is a rank abuse of the court’s process. It
must cease and must not happen again.”

The top judge noted that when an appeal
is made it “must be done by the person
himself (the convicted individual)”.

“There is no suggestion that the appel-
lant was incapable, and this is not an appli-
cation for habeas corpus, when he is being
kept away anda relative may give the affi-
davit. This is an appeal purported to be
brought by the person who was convict-
ed.”

Dame Joan issued a bench warrant for
the arrest of Mr Knowles.

Govt defends ‘tough and necessary’ measures





THE Government is defend-
ing its 2010/2011 Budget as one
which takes “the tough and dis-
ciplined measures necessary for
recovery and growth”.

Meanwhile, the administra-
tion is emphasising how its
management of the economy
in rough times has enabled the
country to proceed “on the
path to growth” in the upcom-
ing year “without a single pub-
lic service job lost”, unlike in
many other countries.

Shock

After a week in which indus-
try leaders and Opposition
politicians expressed shock and
dismay at tax increases set to
be levied in many areas when
the new fiscal cycle begins in
July, and some before then, the
FNM issued a statement on
Sunday in which it said that the
upcoming debate will provide
an opportunity to “demonstrate
to the Bahamian people that
the policies adopted to stimu-
late the economy and provide
for fiscal prudence are paving
the way for recovery and
growth.”

Meanwhile, hitting back at
the PLP, who called the bud-
get a “no growth, tax and pain
budget” which will hurt key
industries and already suffer-
ing Bahamians, the FNM in its
statement said it is looking for-
ward to “providing reality
checks on their poor record in
office” to the PLP in the

upcoming budget debate. “The
PLP is shameless when it comes
to the facts and to owning up to
their poor record in govern-
ment. The reduced allocation
for COB for 2010/11 is more
than the allocation received by
the College during each of the
five budgetary periods under
the PLP from 2002 to 2007,”
the FNM said.

The party’s statement further
said that Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has engaged in “pru-
dent management” of public
finances, “including during the
worst economic downturn since
the Great Depression.”

The government plans to
raise taxes on car imports, beer
and in the tourism and bank-
ing industries, among other

areas, as part of a drive to
reduce the country’s debt bur-
den which grew as the govern-
ment borrowed in large part to
fund what it termed employ-
ment stimulating capital works
projects during the economic
downturn.

The budget debate begins
tomorrow in Parliament.



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CONDITIONS

The candidate may select Business Administration or any banking related
field (Le. Business Management, Banking & Finance, Accounting, Finance or
Econamics majar) as their field of study

* A minimum grade point average of 2.6 must be maintained at all times.

Grades must be submitted to the Program Administrator at the Bank within
three weeks al the end of each semester.

The candidate must be willing to work twelve (12) hours per week (part lene)
and four (4) months per year (full time) at the Bank during MAY, JUNE, JULY,
AUGUST and any other month (or parts thereof) whilst pursuing full time
Studies at COB.

The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of a person employed
al the Bank.

The candidate will report to and consult with the Program Administrator who is
responsible for supervision, work assignments, advice, release of payments
and all other administrative and supervisory details.

The candidate must be “drug free’ throughout the entire four (4) year contract
penod,

The candidate should register for and successfully complete a minimum of
twelve (12) credits per semester as a full time student

* The candidate cannot be employed by a third party during the four (4) year

period
The candidate must besome PC literate by the end of year one of the program

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch will pay for the following costs whilst

the candidate

is enrolled as a student at College of The Bahamas:

Tuition and fees at College of The Bahamas [full tuitan).

* A Housing Allowance of $1,700.00 (year ome}, $1,800.00 (year two), and

32,000.00 (year three.

* A Transportation Allowance of 31,500.00 (year one}, $1,500.00 (year two), and

$1,600.00 (year three.

* Book Allowance: paid in full each semester,

4

a

Allowance for Miscellaneous expenses of $800.00 per annum (year one) and
$7,500.00 per annum (year two and three).

Special Allowance for candidates from the Family Islands $3,000.00 (year one!
$3,200.00 (year two), and $3,500.00 (year threci

Health Insurance (provided the candidate submits to a medical examination by
the Bank's medical doctor prior to commencing Aporentoeship Program)

No consideration will be given to the sex, race or religion of the candidate
during the selection process.

The Bank shall have no obligation towards the candidate vith regards to
employment or scholarships at the end of the four (4) year contract period.

‘Class Prices, Dates and Availability are subject to change.
“Payment plans are available, At least 50% of course price must be paid upfront.

Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
East Bay Street

RO, Bow 556295
— Mastau, Bahamas

Ie) Give us a call at 93-2704
ITM Send us a fax at 394-4971

For more info, please contact
Merlande Desmangles

Training Coordinator

Send us an email at info@LignumTech.com



The Apprenticeship Program has a duration and contract period of four (4) years
as follows:

YEAR 1: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4
YEAR & Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4
YEAR 3: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4
YEAR 4: Full tine employment with the Bank at an entry-level jab at the Bank's
discretion.

In li@u of salary, the Benefits as per Paragraph ¢ are paid during the first three
years ofthe program. During the fourth year, a salary will be paed in lieu of
tuition, fees and allowances (adjusted for cost of living increases).

NOTE: Students who are currently enrolled in
COB are not eligible.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

S|

Budget communication was one of common sense

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW
ne,

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s Budget Communi-
cation in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday was one of
common sense, a measure of
political maturity and an indi-
cation, with his government’s
commitment to austerity, that
good, old-fashioned savvy still
prevails. The unveiling of what
appears to be an emergency
budget laid out the govern-
ment’s vision for averting finan-
cial Armageddon and pulling
the Bahamian economy out of
a fiscal hole.

In the face of a liquidity
crunch and rising gross nation-
al debt, the Prime Minister’s
revelations are clearly set-out
to stabilize and prevent a tee-
tering economy from going
over the cliff.

Due to soaring deficits and

ADRIA

a gap in the Budget, a down-
turn in foreign-direct invest-
ment and public debt wreaking
havoc on national public
accounts, tax hikes and pay-cuts
were inevitable. In attempting
to hedge an economy on its
deathbed, Prime Minister
Ingraham showed political will
in taking a year long pay-cut, a
move that undoubtedly stands
as a show of solidarity with the
Bahamian public and the civil
service, whose salaries will
remain frozen due to moratori-
um on increments and promo-
tions.

Leading the way in his
efforts to curb government
spending, Mr Ingraham took a



May - June



Re-Airing the 2008 National

Overcoming Crisis in
Challenging Times -
the Way Forward

| je S © IN



pay cut of 16 per cent whilst
announcing that Cabinet min-
isters (and the Speaker) will see
a pay-cut of seven per cent and
that the salaries of Members of
Parliament will decrease by five
per cent.

Further austerity measures
taken to restrain public spend-
ing are: the offering of retire-
ment packages to civil servants
with more than 40 years of ser-
vice; slashing allowances to
public officials; limiting the hir-
ing of new personnel in the
public service to critical areas;
reviewing costly medical insur-
ance schemes and inviting
bids—via the Ministry of
Finance—from insurance com-

a
HUBERT INGRAHAM

panies for various insurance
premiums; reducing the subsi-
dies to private schools and mail
boats; increasing stamp tax, air
and sea departure tax, hotel
room tax and raising the annu-
al fees payable by commercial





Proclamation

WHEREAS, the Cooperative Movement in the Bahamas is
celebrating thirty-six (36) years of sustained growth and positive
contribution to the economic and social development of the

country and its people;

AND WHEREAS, the Cooperative Movement continues to
improve itself as it seeks to address issues that are of critical
importance to encouraging entrepreneurship, economic diversi-
fication and competition, upward social mobility, self-reliance
and cooperation among Bahamians;

Hubert A. Ingraham
Prime Minister

June 12

Annual Fun/run/walk

AND WHEREAS, in recent years, members of Cooperative Societies of the Bahamas have
witnessed significant growth in their combined membership and assets, to the extent there
are at present approximately 32,000 active members with an asset base of roughly one
quarter of a billion dollars;

AND WHEREAS, in commemoration of the 36th Anniversary of the establishment of
Cooperative Movement in the Bahamas, the Department of Cooperative Development and
the Bahamas Cooperative League Limited have organized a full slate of events for the month
of June 2010, under the theme: "Overcoming Crisis in Challenging Times - the Way
Forward"; events that are all intended to heighten Public Awareness of the achievement of
the Bahamas Cooperative Movement;

NOW THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of June, 2010 as "Cooperative Month',

IN WITNESS WHEREOE, I have Hereunto set my Hand and Seal this 14th day of May, 2010



Activities planned for Co-operative Month

June 30







Launch Of Economic Impact

banks to 50 per cent; reducing
monies allocated for overtime
from $10 million to $1 million;
increasing the duty levied on
automobiles to 65 per cent for
engines of 2,000 c.c. or less and
85 per cent on those of higher
capacity; and increasing Nation-
al Insurance dues by one per
cent to fund unemployment
programmes. Furthermore,
BEC customers have been pre-
viously forewarned of five per
cent price hike beginning July 1.

Indeed, the upcoming bud-
get is one of sacrifice, service
and reform. With this budget,
Mr Ingraham has shown gravi-
tas in making the tough deci-
sions and implementing auster-
ity measures that, in the face
of a torrent of grim economic
news, is meant to rescue the
economy from going belly-up.

Whilst this job-shedding
recession has taken casualties
in the private sector, the
Bahamian economy has been
relatively sheltered as the
majority of working-class citi-
zens work for government enti-
ties. For scores of melancholy,
shiftless civil servants—whose
service quality oftentimes rate
somewhere between minus one
and zero—Mr Ingraham’s com-
ments signifies the end of the
free lunch!

In order to contain the bal-
looning deficit and strengthen
the economy, the government
must continue to streamline
expenditures and even more,
invest in teaching citizens new
skills and encourage entrepre-
neurship. Two of the main fac-
tors of production are human
capital and entrepreneurship,
with the former referring to
heightening of the knowledge
and skills of workers through
education and experience and
thereby widen employment
opportunities and, as is the case
with the latter, to develop new
ideas, take financial risks to
develop their ideas and coor-
dinate the production and sale
of goods and services.

With unemployment inch-
ing into stratospheric levels, and
in the government’s attempt to
promote sustainable growth
and reduce the national debt,
in time it may be advantageous
for the government.

Furthermore, as jobs vanish
across the archipelago, the gov-
ernment must swiftly move to
rid the Public Treasury of the
albatrosses—BEC, Bahamasair
and Water and Sewerage—
around its neck. The afore-
mentioned loss-making enti-
ties—particularly Water and
Sewerage and Bahamasair—
could be sold to stakeholders
and employees already within
each entity.

The Customs department,
the country's chief revenue
earner, is thought to have lost
millions per annum due to duty
avoidance, corruption and erro-
neous practices.

The government must imme-
diately close tax loopholes and

revenue leakages, particularly
to mitigate against those
unscrupulous Bahamian com-
panies that use phony invoices
and practice under-invoicing
and/or set-up wholly-owned US
"shell companies", to cheat the
government and honest tax-
payers of millions of dollars per
year.

Although the commercial
bank fee increased by 50 per
cent, banks remain profitable
exceptions to the economic
debacle and have, for too long,
got a free ride. Indeed, there
has long been a need for an
increase in corporate taxes.

In setting the direction for
the nation and its continued
development, we must face the
reality that taxation—value-
added or otherwise—is a must.

In widening our tax revenue
base, a value added tax should
be implemented locally. This
form of taxation has been
adopted by 140 countries
around the world and would
represent a prime candidate for
the Bahamas. Frankly, this
form of taxation — once effec-
tively administered — would be
comprehensive and difficult for
persons to circumvent since it
must be tacked on to all pur-
chases. As a recent IMF report
suggests, "sustainable revenue-
enhancing measures, including
VAT, would reduce the nation-
al debt by 30 per cent GDP
over the medium term."

It appears that the upcoming
budget debate will be tempes-
tuous, with a budding rift brew-
ing as Opposition and PLP
leader Perry Christie asserted in
the Opposition’s press confer-
ence that Mr Ingraham indi-
cated to him and Bain Town
MP Dr Bernard Nottage some-
thing other than his public posi-
tion on the legalization of num-
bers. Mr Ingraham has said that
a legislative undertaking rela-
tive to numbers and gaming will
not occur during this legislative
period and rather will be sub-
jected to a referendum if the
FNM wins the next election.

I am also hopeful that the
Opposition would — as any
credible Opposition would
across the globe — propose an
alternative budget to the gov-
ernment’s presentation during
their contribution to the budget
debate, rather than merely
advancing puerile, political flim-
flam.

As the economic storm
surges and continues to corrode
the Bahamas' badly prepared,
waning tourism and financial
services industries, Bahamians
must raise their standards of
service and improve their work
ethic and our government,
along with social leaders and
the private sector, must seek to
draft a national plan and an
updated and revised economic
model for the country in order
to ensure our long-term sus-
tainability.

SEE page seven

NOTICE
FOUR SEASONS HOLDINGS LTD.

Take notice that with effect from the 8" day of
February, 2010, [ accepted appointment as Liquidator
of the above company, pursuant to an Extra-Ordinary
Meeting of the Directors, held on the 8" day of February,
2010, at which the following Resolutions were passed:

That Four Seasons Holdings Ltd. be wound up

voluntarily.

That George Clifford Culmer be appointed Liquidator
of the company for the purposes of such wind up.



Congress Town Meeting & Health Screening Study Booklet

May 28 June 16 June 1 - 30 ye

Bahamas Cooperative Lecture & Annual Awards Radio Talk Show Davee unis co" Gay ona 2010:

League Workshop/Forum Reception June 1 - 30

May 29 June 17 Open House TBA _ GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Bahamas Cooperative Co-operatives Seminar/ Board of Directors Liquidator of the above named Company
League AGM National Congress Employees Family Fun Day

May 30 June 21 July 3

Annual Cooperative Month Youth Program Planning Giving back to the NOTICE

Church Service Session Community

June 1 June 26 July 4 FOUR SEASONS HOLDINGS LTD.
Proclamation Co-operative Mega Yard International Co-operative (In Voluntary Liquidation)
June10 Sale/Farmers Market in Day

conjunction with IICA &
BAIC

Financial Fitness Seminar

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 30" day of June 2010
to send their names and addresses and particulars
of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
Company, at P.O. Box N-10144, Nassau, Bahamas,
or in default thereof they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.

MISSION STATEMENT

To promote social and economic prosperity by empowering all Bahamians through
ownership of viable, competitive and adequately supervised co-operative enterprises

Department of Co-operative Development
Ministry of Lands & Local Government
P.O. Box N-3040, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242 356 3152 Fax: 242 356 4622
Email: coopbahamas@hotmail.com

JOIN A CO-OPERATIVE TODAY!

Dated this 26" day of May, 2010.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator








THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 7



GB Port Authority |
aims to stimulate
island’s economy |

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - The Grand Bahama Port
Authority said it plans to unveil a new strat-
egy to stimulate the island’s suffering econ-
omy.

The plan will be presented in the next few
weeks during a series of meetings with the
business community, said GBPA president
Tan Rolle.

“Revitalisation of the Grand Bahama
economy is critical,” Mr Rolle said. “Many
businesses have been experiencing chal-
lenges. Yes, these are tough times but we
cannot sit by idly and dwell on it.”

According to Mr Rolle, the plan consists
of short and long-term initiatives aimed at
improving the economy.

“Over the last year we have been listening
to concerns of Grand Bahama and devel-
oping strategies to address them, and our
mission is to enhance the lives of our peo-
ple,” said Mr Rolle.

He said the GBPA has created three new
departments — customer relations, commu-
nity relations and business development.

Mr Rolle also reported that the share-
holders are committed to work together and
find the right buyer for the group.

“The shareholders have finally decided
to settle the dispute. I can confirm that there

is a Settlement agreement with conditions,
some of which were not met at the time of
the last hearing,” he said.

Mr Rolle also indicated that the Port
Authority is working on some new devel-
opments for Grand Bahama.

He noted that they are in “active discus-
sions” with three entities on the develop-
ment of a medical tourism facility on the
island.

“Within the next two weeks we will be
able to share further details on these pro-
jects,” he said.

Mr Rolle said the Port Lucaya Resort,
which closed early this year, is currently
under consideration for sale to facilitate the
development of another resort to be run by
a well-known operator.

He added: “We have also received great
news that International Distributors located
in the Sea/Air Business Centre will now be
fully maximising the island’s strength as a
logistic centre.

“The new model will allow the company
to acquire logistic services to fully take
advantage of what GBI has to offer, and
act as a catalyst for other companies to
have presence in the Sea/Air Business Cen-
tre.”

The Port Authority’s business develop-
ment team will travel to China this month to
attract foreign direct investment to Grand
Bahama, Mr Rolle also revealed.

RU Ue ESS



JEREMY MUTTON, general manager of Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort; Buzz Aldrin and Mike Norton,

vice-president of groups at Sandals Resorts.

FORMER NASA astro-
naut Buzz Aldrin, the second
man to set foot on the moon,
visited the Bahamas recently
as part of the Sea-Space Sym-
posium Dive Group who
were hosted to an evening on
Sandals Cay at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort.

Distinguished NASA astro-
nauts were among the atten-
dees, including Scott Carpen-
ter, Kathy Sullivan and Guy
Bluford.

Mr Aldrin, who was also a
contestant on this season’s
‘Dancing With the Stars’,
showed off his moves and
danced the night away to the
sounds of a junkanoo band.

The evening ‘lifted off? with
a champagne/cocktail recep-
tion on Sandals Cay and was
followed by a three-course
meal put together especially



BUZZ ALDRIN, the Lunar Mod-
ule pilot on the first manned
moon landing, is presented
with a Sandals necklace.

_No shelter from the storm for Haiti quake victims

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti



A HURRICANE season predicted to be one
of the wettest on record opens Tuesday in the
: Caribbean, where hundreds of thousands of
: Haitian earthquake victims have only tarps or
i fraying tents to protect them in a major storm,
| according to Associated Press.

The Haitian government, which had five
( mentic to prepare, says it's still working on

: emergency and evacuation plans. But it is unclear

where people will go with many churches,
schools and other potential shelters toppled by
the quake. Since the Jan. 12 earthquake killed up
to 300,000 people and left more than 1.5 mil-
lion homeless, there has been little progress on
clearing rubble so people can return to their
neighborhoods or building sturdier shelters.
Dr. Jean Pape, one of the country’s most
prominent public health experts, estimates that
only one per cent of the masses stuck in dan-
gerous flood zones have been relocated.

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

"hy

i
j

Maritim

8th & 9th Graders

Interested in:

Marine Transportation
Marine Science
Marine Engineering

Contact your Guidance
counsellor for information
of collect an application

the Dean, Faculty Pure &
Applied Sciences,

Roon 4-0 at the

College of The Bahamas -
Telephone: 302-1400 or
3024306

Application dead] ine:
Friday, 4th June, 2010 |

Canip Fea: $50,00

Space is limited

OLOZ - dINV) ASININNsS SINILIYVIA



© Santander

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
FACULTY OF PURE & APPLIED SCIENCES

e Summer Camp -
28th June — 16th July, 2010

packet from the Office of /

CAMPBELL
SHIPPING

21) 10

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD.

has an immediate vacancy for three

Premier Banking Bankers

Applicants must hold the following:

Bachelor's Degree in Administration, Finance, Economics or related degree

for the event by the resort’s
executive chef.

The dive group were treat-
ed to a taste of Bahamian cul-
ture as a mini junkanoo

parade started up.

Mr Aldrin was presented
with a Sandals necklace which
he wore throughout the
evening.

A minimum of 3 years experience in private banking

Applicants should also be capable of the follawing:

Totally fluent in English and Spanish

Develop and manage a portfolio of private banking clients by analyzing the banking and
investment needs of corporate and high-net worth individuals and offering financial and
investment alternatives.

Maintain existing client relationships by monitoring the financial condition of assigned
accounts, executing client instructions, and keeping clients updated as to the changing
conditions of financial markets.

Travel to assigned countries to enhance current client relationships and develop new
business by meeting with representatives and clients.

Supervise a Private Banking Assistant.

Ensure that all private banking activities are in compliance with internal policies

and procedures and external regulatory requirements.

Budget communication
FROM page six

THE COST OF TICKETS FOR INTER-ISLAND FLIGHTS!



Travelling within the Bahamas is costly, as exorbitant inter-
island tickets oft-times cost more than a ticket to parts of the
eastern seaboard in the United States. Frankly, the travelling pub-
lic is being squeezed for every dollar and this is likely a reason why
domestic and foreign travellers are hesitant to venture off New
Providence and explore the Family Islands.

As I prepare to travel to my hometown—Long Island—for
our regatta next week, I am also perturbed by the fact that Bahama-
sair has refused to include Stella Maris in its published flight
schedule. Surely, Bahamasair knows that during such a festive
occasion where residents from the northern and southern tips of the
island will be returning to bask in the excitement of the regatta, it
is only fair to schedule flights for both Deadman’s Cay and Stella
Maris airports. Indeed, while some will mention the smaller carriers
that fly to Stella Maris, not only should the national flag carrier trav-
el there but it is also of note—tregardless of how trivial—that, as one
Family Islander asserted, some Bahamians are simply “scared of
small planes.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed to the Human
Resources Manager, P.O, Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than June [, 2010.


Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, The Bahamas, an archipelagic nation comprising some 700
islands, rocks and cays scattered across more than one hundred thousand
square miles of clear, blue-green waters, has rich biodiversity of marine and
terrestrial flora and fauna which provides an important ecological attraction
for the tourism industry;

AND WHEREAS, the future stainability of The Bahamas premier industry,
Tourism, has a direct correlation to the extent to which the country s unique
ecosystem and natural resources are conserved and protected;

AND WHEREAS, the natural flora and fauna of The Bahamas are
threatened by habitat loss due to human development, ecosystem
disruption, the introduction of alien or invasive species, over exploitation of
natural resources such as over fishing and over harvesting, air and water
pollution, contamination of biological systems, global warming and the
resultant climate change;

AND WHEREAS, the harmful effects of these threats to the ecosystem of

The Bahamas may result in loss of biological and cultural diversity, loss
of species, reduced availability of marine resources for food, loss of clean
water, less food and plants for human consumption and medicine, decline in
tourism, a negative impact on health and education, and less employment
opportunities;

AND WHEREAS, the Government of the Bahamas uses the occasion
of World Environment Week as a platform to encourage Bahamians to
become good stewards of the natural and man-made environment, to
support sustainable development practices by creating public awareness
of critical environmental issues inherent in protecting our rich ecological
biodiversity for the future generations;

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the week of
May 31st - June 6th, 2010 as “WORLD ENVIRONMENT WEEK”

promoting the theme “Many Species, One Planet, One Future”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
| have hereunto set my
Hand and Seal this 27th
day of May, 2010

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER





Employment Opportunity

OPERATIONS MANAGER (with oversight for compliance)

Summary of Key Responsibilities:

¢ Managing the day-to-day operations of the Banking Department focusing on overall
workflow, productivity improvement, timeliness, problem determination and resolution,
training and staff development, guidance and team leadership. Supervise, coach and train
employees, to include organizing, prioritizing and scheduling of work assignments.

e Play an integral part in the management and internal control flow process.

¢ Develop strong working rapport with clients to finalize creative ideas and establish strong
relationships. Promote a customer first culture and a policy of continuous improvement.

¢ Managing the relationship of various outside vendors/clients and supervising the com-
munication process, as the need arises, to correct any discrepancies.

¢ Evaluating and streamlining existing bank processes and formalize documentation of the
internal control processes within the banking and loan related areas, as well as compliance
and risk management.

¢ Maintaining up-to-date procedures consistent with the bank’s credit policies and bank-
ing prudential regulations, with regards to treasury management.

¢ Ensure compliance with established internal guidelines and external regulations affect-
ing the department. Oversee the bank’s overall compliance activities ensuring adherence
to policy and procedures. Liaise with Group Compliance.

¢ Review existing client files to ensure they are fully compliant. Monitor account opening
and the due diligence process as well as monitoring of client transactions for suspicious
activity.

* Implement effective systems to improve the compliance function and providing recom-
mendations/periodic assessments of the level of compliance to management.

* Identify compliance problems through compliance testing, analysis of audit reports, staff
meetings and on-going interaction with other compliance officers.

Perform other duties deemed necessary.
Requirements:

Knowledgeable of banking operations and daily procedures
Working knowledge of compliance requirements

Fair knowledge of financial services and products

Proficiency in the use of Microsoft Office products

Sufficient work experience as a professional in the financial sector
Strong communication skills and analytical abilities

Experience in managing and empowering people

Strong communication and interpersonal skills

Planning and Organizing skills

Qualified applicants should send their resume and cover letter to
Att: Operations Manager position

P.O. BOX N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for submission is June 11, 2010



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

PM quotes Godfather

film in tax hike row

FROM page one

Mr Ingraham compared the
people of the Bahamas to Mar-
lon Brando’s infamous charac-
ter Don Vito Corleone.

In The Godfather Part I Don
Vito warned his fellow mafia
bosses they would be held
accountable for any “unlucky
accident” that might befall his
family.

Mr Ingraham said Bahami-
ans are likewise willing to
blame him for everything.

“T get blamed for almost any-
thing,” the Prime Minister said.

“Like they say in the God-
father movie, if someone falls
down in the back of their yard,
they blame me.”

He said any complaints about
the 2010/2011 budget commu-
nicated in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday will be
addressed with interested par-
ties if they have not been
already, Mr Ingraham said yes-
terday.

“If anybody complains I
would be happy to talk to

them,” he added.

“T have spoken to some of
the people who have had diffi-
culties and concerns, I have
spoken to the beer manufac-
turers, I have spoken to the car
dealers, I met local chicken pro-
ducers this morning.

“Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace met with the cruise lines
on Friday, and I have got
another meeting set up to
review the situation.

“We have got representation
from the church operating
schools whose subsidies have
been cut.

“And we will take account
of all the representation which
has been made and make some
judgments.”

A rate of 65 per cent will be
levied on passenger vehicles
with an engine capacity of 2000
ce or less, and 85 per cent on
those with a higher capacity.

But criticism from the auto
industry will not deter govern-
ment from enforcing it in an
effort to discourage the import
of large vehicles to the islands.

Mr Ingraham said: “It’s the

THE TRIBUNE

determined position of the gov-
ernment in the Bahamas that
the larger cars the gas-guzzlers
pay a high rate of duty.

“The only issue for discus-
sion at the moment is whether
or not we leave it at 2000 cc’s or
whether we put it for similar
cars to come in at the lower rate
and if we do, for how long.

“But our intent is to have
encouragement for people to
buy smaller cars so we have less
gasoline consumption, less fuel
in the Bahamas.

“We are now consuming 78
million gallons of gasoline per
year, that’s humungous, and
while the government gets a
hefty amount of revenue for
it, it’s not the way we want to
go.”

Mr Ingraham said tax rises
would not have been as high if
gambling had been legalised so
the government could draw an
estimated $30 to $40 million a
year from numbers houses.

“But that is not the case,” Mr
Ingraham said.

“We still need the money so
we have got to get it.”

PLP Deputy Leader denies meeting
FBI over Jamaican drug lord

FROM page one

“What is worrying about this is

dens, Jamaica has been fighting
extradition to the United States.
His stronghold in West Kingston
was fortified by his supporters
who have engaged in a bloody
battle with Jamaican army and
police, leaving 73 civilians and
one solider dead.

Describing the report as noth-
ing more than political mischief,
Mr Davis said that he has had no
contact with anyone from the FBI
or any other agency for that mat-
ter. In fact, Mr Davis said he
knows nothing about “Mr Coke”
and blames The Punch for trying to loose-
ly connect him as the former criminal
lawyer for convicted drug trafficker
Samuel “Ninety” Knowles and the unfor-
tunate events unfolding in Jamaica at this
time.

ne PNA



not so much the story itself, but
when they put stories out there
like that like I am assisting the
FBI — and this fella; I don’t
know where his tentacles are, I
don’t know anything about it. It
exposes me to what?” he asked.

Having ceased from handling
any major criminal matters since
2002, Mr Davis said that he has
focused his expertise towards civ-
il court and questioned who could
be behind this latest attack on his
character.

“T think this is a part of a con-
tinued smear campaign to detract
from the real issues that are fac-
ing the country today; and this is politi-
cally motivated,” he said.

Mr Davis stopped short of directly blam-
ing the FNM for the report, stating only
that he will be doing his own research to
discover the genesis of the story.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

-
|
|
he

TUESDAY, JUNE 1,

Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



SIMONE PRATT

PAGE 9





2010

ts



Nygard
sponsoring
boxing
team...

See page 10

BLTA selects Simone Pratt for Fed Cup

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t age 14, Grand Bahamian
AsBinere Pratt is making
headlines in the Bahamas

Lawn Tennis Association (BLTA).

The rising young star, instead of two
of the top female players in the coun-
try, was recently selected by the BLTA
to represent the Bahamas at the Fed
Cup.

This weekend, when the BLTA
opened its Gatorade Open Nationals,
Pratt’s name surfaced again and it was
brought into question why she wasn’t
included in the draw of eight players.

Pratt, who attended the tournament
at the National Tennis Center, wasn’t
fazed at all about the attention she has
drawn.

In fact, she’s using it to her advan-
tage as she prepares for an historic
appearance on the European tour July
1 to August 4. She will have two warm
up tournaments on June 6 and July 1.

Based on her performance at the





TENNIS

recent South American Tour, Pratt
was afforded the opportunity to make
the trip by the International Tennis
Federation’s junior circuit.

“T feel that I’m playing well. There’s
just some things that I’m working on
right now,” Pratt said. “So when I
improve on those things, everything
should be great.”

She was referring to her serve and
her forehand. But she added that all of
the little things that a player takes for
granted are what she wants to con-
centrate on as she tries to get better
with each tournament.

“T feel I can get a lot better. There’s
just some things that I need to work
on,” she insisted. “If I can do that, I
think that my game will improve. But
it’s coming along.”

Two years shy of the legal age of 16
to participate in the Open Nationals,
Pratt said she would have liked to have
been invited to play, just to test her

skills against the older players.

“T heard it, but I just went and did
my best,” said Pratt about all of the
fuss about her being too young to play
on the Fed Cup team. “I felt that I
played to my best.

“T also got a lot of experience there
because there was a lot of top players
there. So it was a good experience for
me.”

BLTA president Steve Turnquest,
who took a lot of flack for defending
their decision to stick with Pratt, said
he’s thrilled to see how well she has
progressed to the point that the ITF is
recognising her achievement.

“It is a great accomplishment and
make our tennis programme and what
we are doing more visible to the
world,” Turnquest said.

“T think Simone has developed her-
self in all of her tournaments and her
performances have allowed them to
select her. She’s one of the top juniors
in the Caribbean in her age group. So
it is fitting for them to select her to
make that trip to Europe.”

Like most of the players playing in

the ITF’s junior circuit, Pratt is
enrolled in an on-line school where
she is forced to do her studies on her
own, without the support or distrac-
tions of any peers.

“T do my school work in the after-
noons and at night as well,” she point-
ed out. “I do about 3-4 hours of school
each day. I have my schedule planned
out, so I stay on track.”

At present, Pratt is in the ninth
grade and she has a B+ grade.

In the future, Pratt said her goal is to
become a professional tennis player
and she credits her father, Sidney Pratt,
for getting her to the level that she’s at
right now. “That’s what I really want to
be,” said Pratt, who gives herself about
two years to make it on the circuit.

When asked who is her idol in the
sport, Pratt quickly mentioned Amer-
ican Serena Williams, the top female
player in the world.

She was disappointed that Serena’s
sister, Venus, got eliminated, but she’s
confident that Serena should be able to
win the French Open tourney at
Roland Garros.



Richardson signs
with Braves in
minor league

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE long, winding road
towards a professional base-
ball contract is back on track
for one long-standing
Bahamian minor league play-
er.

Antoan Richardson was
signed as a free agent last
week to the Mississippi
Braves, the AA subsidiary of
Major League Baseball’s
Atlanta Braves.

Richardson spent his previ-
ous year with the Schaumburg
Flyers of the Northern

SPORTS

mr

WOMEN ONLY
CYCLING SERIES



ON Sunday, the Jeff
Auto Cycling Club is set to
hold a series for women
only. The club is inviting all
of their affiliated women
and their acquaintances to
come out and participate.

The event is slated to
begin 7:15am from Good-
man’s Bay, travelling west
to Coral Harbour and back
where an awards presenta-
tion will take place.

TRACK
NCAA WEST
OMISSIONS

IN The Tribune’s report
on Monday, there were a
couple athletes whose
names were not included in
the results posted, either
because they didn’t advance
to the final or they were not
identified.

Our Sports Department
apologises to the athletes
and their families for the
omissions.

In the men’s 4 x 400
metres, Karlton Rolle, a
sophomore at UCLA, ran
the second leg as the Bru-
ines clocked 39.43 seconds
to finish second to secure
their berth in the NCAA
Championships next month.

Natalya Beneby, a junior
at (Berkeley) California, ran
a personal best of 1:00.50
for 28th in the women’s 400
hurdles, but she just missed
qualifying for the NCAA
Championships.

Beneby was also an alter-
nate for California’s 4 x 400
relay team that qualified
10th in 3:36.81.

And Jeffery Gibson, a
freshman at Oral Roberts
University, ran 48.41 for
45th overall in the men’s
400 metres, but he didn’t
advance.







League, an independent
league in the Northern US not
affiliated with MLB.

The Flyers removed out-
fielder Lynden Poole from the
disabled list and placed him
on the active roster which
prompted the club to part
ways with Richardson.

They then sold his contract
to the Atlanta Braves organi-
sation and gave Richardson a
coveted return to the minor
leagues.

Since signing with the
Braves, Richardson has seen
immediate playing time and
has appeared in a pair of
games thus far with produc-
tive results.

In his first outing with the
team against the Mobile Bay-
Bears, Richardson was imme-
diately inserted into the start-
ing lineup and went 3-5 with
one stolen base.

Richardson loaded the
bases late in the ninth inning
when he put a ground ball in
play to second and all runners
reached safely.

He set the stage for Willie
Cabrera who singled to right
field and scored Juan Gonza-
lez, however the comeback
attempt ended there in the
Braves’ 8-4 loss.

In his second game,
Richardson went 2-4, high-
lighted with his first RBI and
first run scored.

Again with late inning
heroics, Richardson hit a fly
ball to left-center field and
was safe at second on a field-
ing error and a pair of runners
scored to tie the game at six.

Cabrera, who lengthened
his hit streak to 10 games,
doubled to score Richardson.

In his previous stint in the
AA minors, Richardson spent
two years with the Connecti-
cut Defenders.

In his first season with the
Defenders in 2008, Richard-
son hit .241 with five home
runs, 63 runs, 31 RBIs and 33
stolen bases in 123 games.

In 2009, he hit just .207 with
six RBI and six stolen bases
and was released by the
Defenders in July.

The Mississippi Braves
boast several major league
alumni to its credit, most
notably, Jeff Francoueur, who
won a Gold Glove Award in
2007.

TS

For the stories

TAT RUT Ca A
WAY)
SEES







Finalists for ‘Most Outstanding
High School Player’ award

WITH just days remaining before the
start of the 8th annual Andre Rodgers
National Baseball Championships,
which organisers anticipate will be the
largest to date, the most closely con-
tested race may take place off the field.

The high school division will feature
many of the 45 young men who received
high school scholarships to the US in
August 2009, making it an exciting divi-
sion, and the honour of “Most Out-
standing High School Player” should
produce just as much drama.

The Bahamas Baseball Federation
has named the three finalists for the
award amongst a plethora of hopefuls.

In a press statement, the BBF con-
gratulated the players on an outstanding
high school baseball season.

“Each of these young men are in con-
tention to win this prestigious awards
for 2010 - Most Outstanding High
School Player. The BBF is in full prepa-
ration mode for the upcoming eighth
edition of the Andre Rodgers National
Baseball Championships,” said the
statement.

The statement said the BBF wit-
nessed a milestone when 45 young
Bahamians entered high schools and



SWEETING STUART

colleges in the US to further their edu-
cation and represent their respective
schools on the baseball diamond.
“After their first seasons on the base-
ball diamond, some of these young men
are having and continue to have out-
standing baseball seasons,” said the
release. The three finalists are:

Theodore “Trae” Sweeting

Christ School - Ashville North Car-
olina

- Set a school record for underclass-
men with a batting average of .609

- Led the Western Carolina district

with the highest batting average

- Stockpiled 28 hits in 46 at bats
- Three Home Runs with a slugging

percentage of .679

- Totaled 21 runs, 16 RBI and stole 13

bases

Jervis Stuart
Christ School - Asheville North Car-

olina

- All State Selection for North Car-

olina 3A baseball (Desmond Russell and
Ali Knowles are previous Bahanuans
who have received the honor)

- Batting average of .510 with 25 hits in

49 at bats

- Two Home Runs with a slugging

percentage of .429

- Totaled 29 runs, seven RBI and 21

stolen bases

Chad Burrows (not pictured)
Faith Baptist Christian - Brandon,

Florida

- All Conference MVP
- Batting average of 561 with 23 hits in

41 at bats

- Two Home Runs and 17 RBI
- Led team with 26 runs scored



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PROPERTIES
ae) BYNES

ee a

e
Robinson Road
¢ Lot of Land and building, Robinson Road, Southern District, New
Providence

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land located on the southern side of
a road reservation known as Robinson Road and East of Pinedale and
West of Claridge Road situated in the Eastern District of the island of
New Providence-Bahamas which gross area is 22,400 Square Feet. The
property size is 140 Feet by 160 Feet approximately.

Total floor approximately is 3,000 Square Feet and Patio and Porch is
516 Square Feet

Located in an area zoned for “Commercialist’”. The subject property is
located in an area with a mixture of concrete-block single family,
apartment and business establishments.

All infrastructures including Water and Electricity services are in place.
Drainage is by Septic Tank.

Yamacraw Beach Estates
¢ Lot Number 39, Yamacraw Beach Estates

¢ ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot Number Thirty-nine
(39) in the Subdivision called and known as “Yamacraw Beach Estates”
situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence.

=F

Eastwood

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land in the Subdivision called and known
as “EASTWOOD?” situated in the Eastern District of New Providence and
being Lot No. 20. Situated thereon a Single Family Residence consisting
of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, Entry Foyer, Living Room, Dining
Area, Family Room, Kitchen and Utility room.

Property Size: 9,000

This property is being sold under the Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
dated 27th February, 2006.

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Lot 1, Block 4, Unit 2, Derby Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama

ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land being Lot Number One (1) in
Block Four (4) Unit Two (2) situate in the Subdivision called and known
as “DERBY SUBDIVISION?” lying to the East of Freeport on the Island
of Grand Bahama.

All offers must be submitted on or before Friday, June 18, 2010 in
a sealed envelope marked “Confidential” and addressed to:

The Risk Manager

P.O. Box N 3180
Nassau, Bahamas

The right is reserved to reject any or all offers.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Nygard sponsoring
team for ‘invitation only’
amateur boxing event

LYFORD
Cay businessman
Peter Nygard is
one of the main
sponsors of the
Amateur Boxing
Federation of the
Bahamas’ team



Carl Hield, Valentino Knowles
and coach Andre Seymour to
represent Bahamas in Ecuador



for Continental
Elite Boxing
Championships.
Wellington
Miller, president
of the Amateur
Boxing Federa-
tion of the
Bahamas
(ABFB),
thanked Nygard
for his support.
“Peter Nygard
has been one of
the main spon-
sors of our pro-
grammes for the
last several years.
It is a real help
in our efforts to
identify, train
and give the nec-
essary exposure
to young
Bahamian box-
ers at the top levels of interna-
tional competition to properly
represent the country.”
Standout Bahamian boxers
Carl Hield in the 64 kilo divi-
sion and Valentino Knowles in
the 60 kilo division are expect-
ed to travel with coach Andre
Seymour to take part in the
invitation only event slated for
June 13-19 in Quito, Ecuador.
“Invitations to these elite
championships are quite an
honour,” said Miller. “Because
they are issued only to coun-
tries with recognised elite box-
ers. Only the best boxers from
around this region of the Com-
monwealth of Nations have
been invited, with representa-
tives from Canada to Chile. The
Bahamas will do its best.”
Earlier this year, Valentino
Knowles won the silver medal
at the Commonwealth Boxing

NYGARD









MILLER











SEYMOUR



CARL HIELD (left) and VALENTINO KNOWLES

Championships in India. He
recently made history as the
first Bahamian to win a match
at the World Boxing Champi-
onships in Italy.

And just last week, Carl
Hield won the bronze medal at
the Cuban Boxing Olympics in
Havana.

Hield also took part in the
World Boxing Championships
in Italy and the Commonwealth
Boxing Championships in
India.

“Taking part at these events
is another step in helping to
prepare these talented boxers
for the 2012 Olympic Games in
London and we wish to again

thank Peter Nygard who has
always come through for boxing
and been one of our main spon-
sors since 2002.

“Nygard has been very keen
and helpful in supporting the
various programmes of the
Amateur Boxing Federation,
from our ground-level efforts
with very young boxers still in
primary school all the way up to
this elite level.

“His support has been a
great service to the many young
men who have learned life-
skills and otherwise benefited
from exposure to the discipline
of amateur boxing,” said Mr
Miller.



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THE TRIBUNE

Tribune worker
feeds BA crew

FROM page one

out the cash to take care of
the crew. There was enough
funds to care for the passen-
gers’ needs.

An employee at BA's desk
said yesterday morning that
he could not confirm or deny
the reports as he had not
heard of the passengers’
ordeal before being contact-
ed by The Tribune.

Further attempts to secure
an explanation from BA
were unsuccessful. A voice-
mail recording said that man-
ager at the BA desk at the
Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport, Nathaniel
Rappel, was out of office
until June 2.

A message left for his sub-
ordinate was not returned up
to press time. There was no
one at the office because
there were no BA flights yes-
terday.

Meanwhile, the Bahamas
Hotel Association said it
does not anticipate a signifi-
cant fallout from the contin-
uing BA cabin crew strike
but said it's too early to tell
how much their industry has
suffered.

"We haven't quantified
them (the numbers) but we
know based on what hap-
pened during the last (BA)
labour action that there was
an impact on bookings and
there was some cancella-
tions," said Frank Comito,
BHA's vice-president.

Although he could not
provide specific data —
because the numbers on can-
cellations and occupancy
rates are still being reviewed
— Mr Comito does not
expect the impact to be sig-
nificant.

"While the UK market
and the market in transit via
British Airways is very
important to us it's not a
huge segment of our busi-
ness, so while some proper-
ties are feeling the impact on
a small scale it's not a huge
impact,” he said.

However, BHA President
Robert Sands stressed that
any dip in air arrivals is cause
for worry, adding that the
country is lucky that a good
portion of our air travellers
enter through the United
States.

"The important point is
that any reduction in airlift
to the Bahamas is a concern,
but the Bahamas is also for-
tunate to have tremendous
airlift via Florida to Nassau,"
he said, when contacted by
The Tribune yesterday.
"British Airways provides
direct airlift out of Europe
which allows for connecting
flights from other destina-
tions in Europe so for us as a
destination this flight is very
important and the Ministry
of Tourism and the various
hotels are hoping that this
matter can be resolved as
quickly as possible so as to
have as minimal an impact

on our industry as possible."

One local hotelier said
some European visitors are
circumventing the problems
brought on by the BA cabin
crew strike and are travel-
ling to the Bahamas by way
of the US.

"It's got a little bit of an
impact on us. A lot of cus-
tomers coming on that direct
flight are primarily for the
Ocean Club (and) have
found alternate routes (to the
Bahamas) via the United
States. So we've mitigated
some of the loss," George
Markantonis, Atlantis’ CEO
told The Tribune during a
media tour of the new US
departure terminal at the
Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport yesterday.

Unite, BA’s union, is
protesting BA's cost-cutting
plans, including a wage
freeze and reduction of in-
flight staff. It rejected an
offer BA made two weeks
ago because it did not
include the restoration of
travel perks that manage-
ment had revoked for
employees who participated
in a previous walkout in
March. The strike is expected
to cost BA £105 million.

International reports indi-
cate that BA's 12,000 cabin
crew Started a five-day strike
at midnight Sunday. It is the
second in a series of three
five-day strikes: The first
ended Friday and the third
is scheduled to start June 5,
reported the Wall Street
Journal.

Last Wednesday a flight
crew flew an empty BA Boe-
ing 767, which can accom-
modate 189 passengers, on
its scheduled flight from
Heathrow to Nassau and
back again with no passen-
gers. Again on Friday, an
empty aircraft was flown
from Heathrow to Nassau. It
returned with a few passen-
gers. There was a repeat per-
formance on Saturday with
the aircraft arriving and leav-
ing on schedule, both trips
empty.

On Sunday, the aircraft
again arrived empty. It left
with 69 passengers, one
infant, and 11 crew members.

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

Cabinet Minister ‘was
on verge of quitting’

FROM page one

Minnis has been “talked
out” of his previous posi-
tion.

Sources claim the inci-
dent occurred during a
special cabinet meeting in
front of some 25 persons
last week.

Having always been per-
ceived as a “close friend”
and ally of the Prime Min-
ister, other sources with-
in the FNM said that even
if the Killarney MP was so
personally offended, he
would not have resigned
from his cabinet appoint-
ment as the MP has
always held future leader-
ship aspirations.

However, a well-placed
source within the govern-
ment claimed that Dr
Minnis and the Prime
Minister’s relationship has
been strained for over a
year.

“It would be political
suicide for him to leave.
In my opinion Minnis is
too Machiavellian for that.
So even if he was offended
to that degree I don’t see
him leaving.

“Once they had an
exchange in the Smokers
Room at the House (of
Assembly) and someone
asked, ‘Hey, isn’t that
your friend?’ And the
response I recall was that

‘there isn’t any friends in
here’.”

With one of his Mem-
bers of Parliament,
Branville McCartney hav-
ing already resigned from
the Cabinet earlier this
year, Mr Ingraham noted
at the time that it is always
regrettable for a Prime
Minister to lose a Minis-
ter or Minister of State.

As for Dr Minnis, it is
unknown what sparked
the disagreement or how
the incident will play itself
out as cabinet is expected
to meet today and the
Budget debate opens in
Parliament on Wednes-
day.

Repeated attempts to
reach the MP for Killar-
ney were unsuccessful up
to press time last night.

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A SUPPLY VESSEL passes through oil floating near the site of
the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico near the
coast of Louisiana, Monday, May 31, 2010. (AP)

A- Excellent

IMO team to assess
Bahamas emergency
plans for oil spill

FROM page one



currently reviewing an IMO report on conditions at Cay Sal
where they searched for evidence of oil contamination.

Mr Deveaux said the report found no indication of oil in
the Cay Sal area.

The experts, along with local environmental stakeholders,
are expected to hold a press conference today to brief the
media on emergency contingency plans related to the mas-
sive Gulf oil spill.

Meantime, international weather experts are anxiously
watching the movement of the spill. Michael Stubbs, chief
climatological officer at the Department of Meteorology,
said so far favourable weather conditions have kept the
spill near the Gulf of Mexico.

"We've been fortunate that the weather has been keeping
the oil confined to its present location in the Gulf of Mex-
ico. The wind patterns shifted slightly over the weekend
which sort of raised some concerns, however the wind pat-
terns have resumed their seasonal position which protects
the shores of the Bahamas from surface oil and residue
like tar balls."

Today marks the start of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane sea-
son — projected to be one of the most active seasons on
record — and weather watchers are concerned that cyclones
could exacerbate an already disastrous and unpredictable sit-
uation.

A hurricane or other storm system could stifle efforts in
the Gulf to contain and clean up the oil. It could also gen-
erate strong waves or wind that would spread surface oil, oil
residue or particles, and chemical disspersants into the area
of the north-western Bahamas.

International reports indicate that BP will launch anoth-
er attempt to plug the gushing oil well — triggered by an
April 20 explosion of its Deepwater Horizon drilling rig
which killed 11 workers — in the coming days after its recent
try failed.



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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian students learn about
agricultural sustainability practices





NEARLY 50 STUDENTS and chaperones from various gover





a









tures and took part in interactive exercises and presentations about agricultural sustainability for survival in rural and urban communities.

Nearly 50 Bahamian students on May 20,
at the Wyndham Nassau Resort, learned
about agricultural sustainability for oppor-
tunity creation.

Regional officials for the 40th anniver-
sary of the Caribbean Development Bank’s
(CDB) Youth Development Forum gave
lectures to make the young people aware
of the importance of agriculture to national
development.

“The CDB is aware that the Government
of The Bahamas has over the years placed its
youth at the centre of its development strate-
gies,” said Mark Taitt, CDB Director of IT
Solutions.

“In this regard, the bank looks forward to
working more closely with the Government
of The Bahamas to develop a set of youth
campaigns that can be readily incorporated
into its youth development agenda.”

Under the theme, “Sustainable Agricul-
ture and Regional Food Security,” the
CDB’s panelists outlined discussions to pro-
mote regional food security measures for
the survival of rural and urban populations.

The Ministry of Agriculture maintains
that food security gives citizens economic
and social protection and political indepen-
dence.





oo) ee
en

VYBZING PANELLISTS.

“The CDB chose its theme because of
the critical importance that agriculture has
rotated on in a global environment of
tremendous economic changes, challenges,
and pressures, which have impacted all coun-
tries regionally in a negative way,” said
Phillip Miller, Under Secretary in the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Fisheries.

“In the early 1970s, Caribbean agricul-
ture was in its golden age,” he said. “Little





did we know that the brilliance that we saw
was really the golden rays of a setting sun.”

Mr. Miller said policies for sustaining
national agriculture programmes have con-
tinuously been the strategy of The Bahamas
government since the early 1970s. Invest-
ments in meat and vegetable production
have been on the agenda as a critical nation-
al priority.

“Successive governments of The Bahamas

nment secondary institutions attended and participated in the CDB’s Vybzing youth forum, held at the Wyndham Nassau Resort on May 20. Students listened to lec-

made policy decisions by enunciating the
need to strengthen agricultural science in
all schools,” said Lionel Sands, Director of
Education in the Ministry of Education.

He said they are required to maintain
flower and vegetable gardens, followed by
the need for farmers to increase broader
mutton and pork production to meet nation-
al demands.

“These decisions can be viewed as gov-
ernment’s vision for sustainable agriculture
through the involvement of students repre-
sented here today,” he said.

The Ministry of Education stands by its
belief that sustainable agriculture and food
security could be realised in The Bahamas,
if practising farmers, educators and students
carry out the government’s mandate.

“We continue to place emphasis on
tourism, when in fact, being able to feed
ourselves and the tourists alike should be
high on our agenda,” said Mr. Sands.

“The Caribbean region and The Bahamas
in particular are fortunate that a regional
institution like the CDB has conceptual-
ized, developed, and is currently imple-
menting this outreach seminar, which is
designed to inspire, inform and engage youth
in the region,” said Mr Sands.



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ROYAL FIDELITY

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THE TRIBUNE
RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

©
f
: oe I — —

TUESDAY,





JUNE 1,

2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



royalfidelity.com





$857m project: no funds

Fuel trucking
in account for two years

plan for ‘95%



ZHIVARGO LAING speaks to media members...

No flexibility on real
estate Stamp tax hike

alleged that “five separate findings of finan-
cial impropriety” against him are “utterly
contradicted by documentary evidence”.
Roger Stein and his RHS Ventures invest-
ment vehicle, in seeking to overturn an Amer-
ican Arbitration Association panel ruling
that removed him as managing/general part-
ner of the southwestern New Providence-
based resort redevelopment, alleged that the
judgment against him had “ignored clear and
convincing evidence” that a plan had been
concocted in advance to remove him.

when agreement
required him to
only put in $7.6m
of own money

* Alleges financial

impropriety findings
against him ‘utterly

= f

£ By NEIL HARTNELL * il pl I

2 Tribune Business Editor Ousted South Ocean one dll

a _ general partner claims

= he $857 million South Ocean :

S project has had no cash in its owed $1.72m in fees * BEC drops fuel dock and
x bank account “for nearly two : ali

x years”, it has been disclosed, as 7 Says invested $ 1 1m, pipeline plan lor $105m
= its ousted managing partner power plant project

=

* Says construction “90-95%
complete’, but operational
start pushed back to
Q3/Q4 border from
July/August due
to fuel change

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

contradicted by
documentary evidence’

Pressing his case for the New York
Supreme Court to set aside the ruling in
favour of his former financing partner, Plain-
field Asset Management, Mr Stein presented
evidence that he alleged disproved the Con-
necticut-based hedge fund’s claim that it had
“never held itself out” as South Ocean’s gen-
eral partner.

Other evidence, Mr Stein alleged, also dis-
proved the finding that he had taken monies
held in escrow to pay Stamp Tax on land
purchases at South Ocean without permis-
sion alleging that it showed Plainfield ‘“‘autho-
rising payment of Bahamian Stamp Tax”.

In addition, Mr Stein and RHS Ventures,
in papers filed in the New York courts,
alleged that the South Ocean project’s books
and financial records had been turned over to
Plainfield, in compliance with orders by both
the Bahamas Supreme Court and the New
York-based tribunal.

* Protection of Revenue Order already in effect, says minister
* Attorneys and realtors ‘desperately’ hoping for two-three
months window to allow deals in play now to close at old rates

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (BEC) is planning
to truck fuel to its controver-
sial $105 million Wilson City
power plant, abandoning plans
for a fuel dock and pipeline at
the project which is said to be
“90-95 per cent completed” on
construction.

Kevin Basden, BEC’s gener-
al manager, in an affidavit filed
with the Supreme Court on
May 28, 2010, also revealed that
the Wilson City plant’s opera-
tional start had been pushed
back to the end-third quar-
ter/start of the fourth quarter
2010, due to the change in fuel.

“There are no keys to the premises; it is
vacant land,” Mr Stein’s attorneys alleged.
“The partnership bank account has had no
funds on deposit for nearly two years.”

In a financial summary designed to show
the financial impropriety allegations against
him were unfounded, it was alleged that Mr
Stein “has committed $11 million of his own
personal funds to the New South Ocean pro-
ject”, a sum in excess of the minimum $7.6
million he had agreed to commit under the
partnership agreement with Plainfield.

“Over $2 million in cash has been spent by
Stein since Seaside Heights [Plainfield’s

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Government yesterday indicated it was unlikely to grant
a two-three month window post July 1 to allow real estate trans-
actions in play prior to the Budget announcement to close at the
existing Stamp Duty rates, something realtors and attorneys
had “desperately” been hoping for.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune
Business yesterday that if the Budget - and its tax increases - took
effect on July 1, all real estate transactions that had not closed and
had their conveyancings ‘Stamped’ would be “subject to the
new rates”.

“The law taxes effect on July 1,” Mr Laing said, adding that the

same process implemented for
previous changes in the rateof SBE page 5B





SEE page 4B



‘A matter of our survival’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

$3.37m profit recovery but
FINCO rejects dividend pay

* Manufacturers fear disaster from end to Industries
Encouragement Act incentives, as duty on raw materials

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FINANCE Corporation of
the Bahamas (FINCO) will not
pay a dividend to investors for
the third consecutive quarter,
despite generating a healthy
$3.366 million in 2010 second
quarter profit, its managing
director saying yesterday that
it was “too soon” to determine
if this was a “trend”.

Tanya McCartney said the
BISX-listed mortgage wanted
to be “prudent and conserva-
tive”, and retain as much capi-
tal on its books as possible to
guard against unexpected
downside risks, even though it
more than reversed the
$450,967 loss suffered during
the 2010 first quarter via its per-
formance in the three months
to end-April 2010.

Speaking as the bank, which
is 75 per cent majority-owned
by Royal Bank of Canada,
unveiled a $2.916 million prof-
it for the 2010 first half, Ms
McCartney said FINCO had
seen little change in the overall
operating environment facing
Bahamian commercial banks.
This continued to be dominated
by loan delinquencies, loss pro-
visioning, and the management
of existing credit portfolios.

“We're continuing to have a
more diligent approach around
the delinquent loans, following

Damianos |

Managing director says
‘too early to tell if trend’
emerging, even though
BISX-listed mortgage
lender turns Q1 loss
into first-half profit

up with clients, working with
them and assisting them where
we can,” Ms McCartney said,
identifying this as a key factor
behind the improved second
quarter showing.

“We're focused on reaching
out to customers, and being
able to assist them and restruc-
ture them, especially if they’re
showing consistency in making
payments. That’s what we’re
doing.

“It’s really around engaging
the client. We’re still encour-
aging them not to shy away
from the bank.”

A sharp reduction in the pro-
vision for loan losses was the
main reason for the year-over-
year improvement in FINCO’s
bottom line performance. For
the 2010 second quarter, loan
loss provisions dropped by 69.4
per cent, to $1.395 million com-
pared to $4.552 million the year
before, while for the half-year
there was a 36.5 per cent
decline - from $9.927 million to

SEE page 2B

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BAHAMIAN business own-
ers yesterday expressed major
concern as to whether their
businesses - and manufacturing
in general in this nation - could
survive the end to duty-free
incentives as envisioned in the
2010-2011 Budget, some hav-
ing to increase prices by up to
30 per cent, with one saying:
“This is a matter of survival for
us.”

Responding to the Govern-
ment’s decision to eliminate
duty-free import incentives
under the Industries Encour-
agement Act for businesses
who had received these for five

goes from 0-45%, forcing some to raise prices by 30%

* Many already unprofitable, as Bapak co-owner says
three businesses lost $100k in year to October 2009

* Adds that company moving into cooking oil and
five-gallon bottled water production, with Bahamas’ first
‘drive through’ for latter, creating some 10 extra jobs

* Concern that government ‘inflating’ local companies’
prices, leaving them unable to compete with finished
imports, and causing firms to fold or downsize

years, a selection of manufac-
turers interviewed by Tribune
Business all warned the move
would leave them unable to

compete with imported prod-
uct.

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

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——

Sure you'll win the Lotto!

SEE page 4B



The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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Learn more at royalfidelity.com

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BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
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BARBADOS
St. Michael: 246.435.1955
PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

OU eA eT



By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT WAS another fair week
of trading in the Bahamian
stock market.

Investors traded in nine out
of the 24 listed securities, with
four decliners and the other
securities remaining unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 47,031 shares
changed hands, representing a
decline of 3,667 shares com-
pared to last week’s trading vol-

ume of 50,698 shares.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the volume leader, trading
34,386 shares to see its stock
close the week down $0.10 at
$11.97.

¢ Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) followed,
trading 6,140 shares to see its
share price close down by $0.04
at $2.50.

¢ Focol Holdings (FCL) was
last week's big decliner, trad-
ing 1,000 shares to have its

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

International Stock Market Indexes:

DJTA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

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te

an
re!

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Weekly % Change
0.9490 0.72
1.4461 -0.17
1.2269 -2.36
Weekly % Change
$74.09 5.60
$1,216.00 3.32
Weekly % Change
10,136.63 -0.56
1,089.41 0.16
2,257.04 1.26
9,762.98 -0.22

HAWAII



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¢ Vacation for 2 to Hawaii

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stock end the week down $0.50
at $4.58.

BOND MARKET
There was no activity in the
bond market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no earnings
releases issued last week by any
of the listed companies.

Dividend Notes:

¢ Consolidated Water BDRs
(CWCB) has declared an ordi-
nary dividend of $0.015 per
share, payable on June 7, 2010,
to all ordinary shareholders of
record date May 1, 2010.

¢ FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) has declared an ordi-
nary dividend of $0.06 per
share, payable on May 25, 2010,
to all ordinary shareholders of
record date May 17th, 2010.

¢ Associated Bahamian Dis-
tillers and Brewers (ABDAB)
has declared an ordinary divi-

dend of $14 per share, payable
to all shareholders on or before
May 31, 2010, to all sharehold-
ers of record date May 21, 2010.

¢ Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corporation
(PRE) has declared a dividend
of $0.20 per share, payable on
July 5, 2010, to all sharehold-
ers of record as at June 4, 2010.

Dividend Notes:

¢ J S Johnson (JSJ) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel in the Governors
C Ball room on June 14, 2010,
at 6 pm.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB) has
announced its AGM will be
held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel on June 15, 2010,
at 6pm.

¢ Doctors Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) has
announced its AGM will be
held at Doctors Hospital - Con-
ference Room on Dowdeswell
Street, June 17, 2010, at 5:30pm.

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The Bahamian Stock Market

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML $1.05 $-
BBL $0.33 $-
BOB $5.20 $-
BPF $10.63 $-
BSL $9.42 $-
BWL $3.15 $-
CAB $11.97 -$0.10
CBL $6.99 $-
CHL $2.46 -$0.38
CIB $9.85 $-
CWCB $2.40 -$0.02
DHS $2.50 -$-0.04
FAM $6.07 $-
FBB $2.17 $-
Eee $0.27 $-
FCL $4.58 -$0.50
FCLB $1.00 $-
FIN $9.00 $-
ICD $5.59 $-

JSJ $9.95 $-
PRE $10.00 $-

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

CHANGE

0 -10.26%
0 -47.62%
550 -11.86%
0 -1.02%
0 -6.36%
0 0.00%
34,386 19.94%
170 -0.14%
1,000 9.56%
1,500 -1.40%
0 -15.79%
6,140 -1.96%
-6.47%

0 -8.44%
0 0.00%
1,000 -3.98%
0 0.00%
2,251 -3.02%
0 0.00%
34 0.00%
31,238 0.00%



$3.37m profit recovery but
FINCO rejects dividend pay

FROM page 1B

$6.301 million.

But despite producing 2010
second quarter net income that
was almost $3 million more
than the year before period,
and turning a 2009 first half loss
of $300,327 into a $2.916 mil-
lion net profit, caution remains
the key word among FINCO’s
management and directors
when it comes to dividend pay-
ments.

“It’s too early to say whether
this is a trend,” Ms McCartney
told Tribune Business of the
second quarter results. “The
first quarter was not a
favourable one, so we have to
manage it and see how it pro-
gresses.

“Every quarter the Board
looks at it and determines, in
the overall circumstances,
whether it’s appropriate to
make a dividend payment.
There’s no real indication
there’s a trend here.”

Thus the $2.916 million in
2010 first half net income has
been ploughed back into FIN-
CO’s retained earnings, boost-
ing the mortgage lender’s net
shareholder equity to $85.053
million, compared to $82.138
million at year-end 2009.

Meanwhile, Ms McCartney
said FINCO was concentrating
on “organic growth” and the
professionals market to expand
its mortgage loan portfolio,
which grew by 2.6 per cent -
from $772.442 million to
$792.713 million - during the
2010 first half.

“We see it [growth] coming

iia Tart ‘nme lar}

for ad rates

from our existing good client
base, with good equity and
good credit histories,” Ms
McCartney told Tribune Busi-
ness. “So we’re focusing on
organic growth, and there’s
good room for growth in the
professionals market.”

Adding that there were “a
lot of opportunities” with FIN-
CO’s existing client base, she
added: “We continue to exe-
cute on our sales strategy,
where we focus on the existing
client base and reach out to
them, so we’re seeing some
returns from that.”

The conversion of the $34.7
million deposit held for its par-
ent, RBC Holdings (Bahamas),
into a note payable saw FIN-
CO’s deposit base contract
from $823.509 million at 2009
year-end to $803.259 million as
at April 30, 2010.

Asked about the impact of
the 50 per cent increase in com-
mercial bank licence fees, as
unveiled in the Budget, on FIN-
CO’s business, Ms McCartney
said this was simply another
business cost.

“We have to pay it. We’re
going to pay it. This is a price of
doing business. There’s noth-
ing we can say,” she said.

FINCO is now set to launch
its annual Blockbuster mort-
gage campaign on June 7, the
three-month promotion offer-
ing rates as low as 7.5 per cent.

“We're really focusing on
credit quality, putting good
loans on the books and on the
existing client base for the
remainder of the year,” Ms
McCartney said.

ae ae ae Tate cal 7a













Y)

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THE TRIBUNE





Bahamian provider
attends global forum

BRIAN Quinn, deputy
chairman of IP Solutions
International, the Nassau-
based company newly
licensed to supply high-speed
broadband TV and data
across the Bahamas, attended
the internationally-recognised
Connected TV Summit in
London last week.

Connected TV is the term
used to denote the coming
integration of the domestic
television set with data access,
pay TV, video on demand,
and social networks such as

at this event as these are the
developments we are provid-
ing here in the Bahamas in
our deployment of state-of-
the-art transmission equip-
ment," said Edison Sumner,
president and chief executive
of IP Solutions Internation-
al.

“We are utilizing top
equipment from well recog-
nised global leaders in our ini-
tial rollout of IPSI infrastruc-
ture in Abaco and like them,
we know it is vital that rapid
change in user demands are

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 3B





Facebook and Twitter.
"We had a major presence

fully anticipated and catered
for."

Butterfield chief
in Bahamas visit

BANK of Butterfield’s new president
and chief executive, Brad Kopp, high-
lighted the strategic importance of the
Bahamas operation within the Butterfield
Group, and the bank’s continued commit-
ment to the jurisdiction, during a recent



: , Gi
MAKING ALL THE RIGHT CONNECTIONS — The deputy chair of
Nassau-based IP Solutions International recently attended the Con-
nected TV Summit in London to discuss the future of the global
home entertainment industry. (Pictured left to right: Brian Quinn,

deputy chairman IP Solutions; Harris Morris, president Harris Broad-
cast; Nick Fielibert, chief technical officer, Cisco IPTV)

visit.

Pictured above with the Prime Minis-
ter (from left to right) are:

Conor O’Dea - chairman of Butterfield
Bank (Bahamas) and managing director of
Butterfield Bank (Cayman); Brad Kopp -

president and chief executive, The Bank of
N.T. Butterfield & Son; Robert Lotmore -
managing director, Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas); Ian Fair - deputy chairman,
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas).





FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended April 30, 2010

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

Share Share General Retained

Capital Premium Reserve Earnings Total
$ $ $ $ $

Ohalrman's review of the unaudited results
For the six manths emded April 30, 2010

Balance at October 31, 2008
Net loss for the period
Dividends

Balance at April 30, 2009

5,333,334 2,552,258 500,000 83,056,040
(300,327)
6,933,334)

75,822,379

91,441,637

(300,327)
6,933,334)
84, 207,97]

We wish to report that the Bank eamed 32,915.578 im met prod for the ais months ended Apel Bl,
S010 compared to 8 loss for the corresponding period last wear of 3300,527. The Bank's fimamcial
performance for the Inst three months is an improvement over the performance of the first quarter amd
can be attribated to a continued Iocus on delinquency management, aa well ia clioetive coal
MAT apeteen

5,333,334 2,552,258 500,000
Balance at October 31, 2009
Net profit for the period
Balance at April 30, 2010

5,333,334 2,552,25§ 500,000 73,752,003
2,915,578

76,667,581

82,137,592
2,915,578
85,053,172

The Bank bas experienced good mortgage growth during the period, but continues to be challenged
by the Jewel of pon-perlorming loans. The Bank’s prowiioning policy is degre’ adeyiede bo guard
againal any negative impact from these loans. Delingeency management will continue io be a priority
of the Bonk for the immediaie fubure.

5,333,334 2,552,258 500,000

The Bank's risk profile comtinves io remain within fs risk appetite and its capital ratios remain
SIndne.

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended April 30, 2010
ne (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
ot
Managihg LF racks
1

C “helper —_

April 30, 2010 April 30, 2009
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income $
Adjustments for:
Depreciation
Provision for credit losses

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (Unaudited)

As of April 30, 2010 and

October 31, 2009

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

2,915,578 § (300,327

274,321
6,301,257
Loss on disposal of fixed assets 93
9,491,249

297,559
9,927,126

15,999
9,940,357



ASSETS April 30, 2010 October 31, 2009
Changes in operating assets and liabilities

Increase in loans and advances, net

(498,871)
(26,572,001)
(17,249,751)
(34,829,374)

(5,879, 636
(41,641,309
39,947,547
2,366,959

Cash
Statutory reserve account with

The Central Bank of The Bahamas
Investments
Loans - Net
Fixed assets - Net
Other assets
TOTAL
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Deposits
Other liabilities
Note payabale

Total liabilities

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital
Share premium
General reserve

48,803,265 45,330,690

Increase in deposits



36,343,388
48,519,591
792,713,147
2,169,905
1,819,457

930,368,753

37,589,768
49,596,040
712,442,403
2,369,819
645,351

907,974,071

Net cash from operating activities
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Purchase of fixed assets
Net Proceeds from investments
Net cash from investing activities
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITY
Note payable
Dividends paid



(74,500°
1,076,449

1,001,949

(219,741)
724,355

504,614









37,300,000

(1,733,334
(1,733,334



806,258,941
1,756,639
37,300,000

845,315,580

823,508,692

2,327,784 37,300,000





NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING OF THE PERIO

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, END OF THE PERIOD

3,472,575
45,330,690
48,803,265

1,138,239
28,028,462
29,166,701

825,836,476





5,333,334
2,552,258
500,000
76,667,581
85,053,173

930,368,753

5,333,334
2,552,258
500,000
73,752,003
82,137,595

907,974,071



Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL







FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
Notes to Unaudited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

Six Months Ended April 30, 2010
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended April 30, 2010
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These interim condensed financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies and
methods of calculation used in the preparation of these interim financial statements are consistent
with those used in the audited financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2009,

Three Months
Ended
April 30, 2010

Three Months
Ended
April 30, 2009

Six Months
Ended
April 30, 2010

Six Months
Ended
April 30, 2009

INCOME
Net interest income $
Provision for credit losses
Net interest after provision for credit losses
Fees and commissions
Total income
NON-INTEREST EXPENSES
Total non-interest expenses
NET COMPREHENSIVE INCOME $

6,931,287, | $
(1,395,002)
5,536,285
839,231
6,375,516

6,921,977 | $
(4,552,318)
2,369,659
794,270
3,163,929

13,617,153 | $
(6,301,257)
7,316,496
1,690,558
9,007,054

14,070,697
(9,927,126
4,143,571
1,698,453
5,842,024



2. NOTE PAYABLE





On November 2, 2009 the parent company of Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited (FINCO)
agreed to convert $34.7 million, which was held on deposit with FINCO into a note payable.
This note bears interest at 5.00% per annum and is due for repayment on or before August 1,
2012,

3,008,971
3,366,545 $

3,096,497
67,432 $

6,091,476
2,915,578

6,142,351
(300,327)







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

This, they warned, could dri-
ve many Bahamian companies
out of business, costing the
Government a wide range of
tax revenues - from Business
Licence fees to National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) contribu-
tions - and further negatively
impact the unemployment rate,
as firms went out of business
and downsized.

Alec Knowles, a principal in
KLG Investments, owners of
Aquapure, the bottled water
supplier, told Tribune Business
of the proposed Budget change:
“It’s going to create a severe
problem. We’re not competing
against each other; we’re com-
peting against international
imports. If we have to increase
prices, we’re going to go out of
business.”

The Government appeared
not to recognise that the Act’s
incentives had enabled Bahami-
an manufacturers to compete
on a ‘level playing field’ against
imported products, rather than
domestic rivals, through allow-
ing them to import equipment
and raw materials duty-free, Mr
Knowles said.

He added that the end to
Industries Encouragement Act
incentives meant that, for estab-
lished Bahamas-based manu-
facturers, the Government was
effectively “inflating” their
prices while keeping those of
imported rivals the same.

Examining the impact on
Aquapure’s business if the
Government’s Budget propos-

‘A matter of our survival’

als remained the same, Mr
Knowles told Tribune Business
that the packed water business
would “be gone”.

Some $3 million of this prod-
uct was already imported into
the Bahamas annually, and his
business was now faced with an
immediate duty-rate increase
from 0 per cent to 45 per cent ,
as all equipment, bottles and
tops currently came in duty-
free.

It was the same for Aqua-
pure’s juice business, Mr
Knowles added, as the same
‘from 0 per cent to 45 per cent’
duty rates would now be added
to the cost of its base materials.
“It’s going to increase costs for
my juice by about 30 per cent.
There’s nothing I can do,” he
said.

Mr Knowles warned that the
Government’s planned amend-
ments to the Act would leave
many Bahamian manufactur-
ers unable to compete, espe-
cially if they imported more
than 80 per cent of their raw
materials. They would also, he
suggested, take away the incen-
tive for existing and new com-
panies to either remain or get
into the business.

“It’s going to put all manu-
facturers in a situation where
they will not be price competi-
tive with imports, particularly
in most things we manufacture
here,” Mr Knowles said.
“They’re putting us at a severe

NOTICE



In The Estate WILLIAM LEO RUMNEY,
late of Water Street in the Town of Elizabethtown in
the Country of Essex in the States of New York, one
of the States of the United States of America.




NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the Undersigned on or before the 6th day of
July, 2010, after which date the Executirix will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only to
the claims of which they shall then have had notice.













AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date hereinbe-








fore metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executrix






Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247




Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas


















S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1.00
9.67
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.56
5.00
2.21
1.45
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
9,95
10.00

Benchmark
Fidelity Bank

Colina Holdings

Famguard

Finco

Focol (S)

CD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Security
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Bahamas Waste
Cable Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

disadvantage when they could
do things to put us on the same
level. Don’t take one foot away
from the manufacturing indus-
try and do nothing about it.”

Mr Knowles was backed by
Glen Rogers, one of Bapak’s
owners, who told Tribune Busi-
ness that it was “a bad time”
to be raising taxes on the
Bahamian private sector, espe-
cially when most companies
were either incurring losses or
making minimal profits.

“Last year, up to October 31,
my three companies had total
losses of some $100,000,” Mr
Rogers said, indicating the
Government was being unreal-
istic in its expectation that
Bahamian manufacturers
would be able to ‘stand on their
own feet’ and pay import duties
after a five-year period under
the Industries Encouragement
Act.

“It’s going to impact us heav-
ily,” Mr Rogers said of the
Government’s planned
changes. “Just because we have
duty exemptions on our raw
materials, which most of us
import from the US, doesn’t
mean we can really compete.”

He, too, is faced with the
prospect of duty-rates on his
raw material, equipment and
other inputs going from 0 per
cent to 45 per cent, and told
Tribune Business: “What that
means is I’m going to have to
increase the cost of my prod-

uct to my customers to make
up for that. They’re going to
have to increase their prices
accordingly.”

Bapak, Mr Rogers said, had
enjoyed the Industries Encour-
agement Act’s incentives for
some 32 years, enabling it to
produce bottles for the
Bahamas’ bottled water suppli-
ers and, now, enter the bottled
water supply industry itself.

Expressing deep concern for
the fate of this sector, which he
estimated employed 1,200 per-
sons, if the Government pro-
ceeded with its plans for the
Act, Mr Rogers suggested that
the administration focus on col-
lecting revenues owed under
existing taxes, rather than
increasing rates.

“This is a bad time to be talk-
ing about raising taxes,” Mr
Rogers said. The end to the
incentives, which the Govern-
ment appears to be viewing as
taxpayers subsidies of large
businesses, comes just as Bapak
has invested in the produc-
tion/supply of five-gallon bot-
tled water, which it expects to
begin in a month’s time.

Mr Rogers said he went into
the water supply business after
Chelsea’s Choice and Aqua-
pure were given permission to
start manufacturing their own
bottles, and said his plans
included the Bahamas’ “first
drive through” for bottled
water.

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Finance
Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby
notifies its Shareholders that there will
be no interim dividends paid to
shareholders for the quarter ended 30th

April, 2010.

D. Burrows-Haines (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary

Dated this 1st June, 2010

ROYAL FIDELITY

Maney at Work

BISX LISTED & TRAD!







ED SECURITIES AS OF:







MONDAY, 31 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,554.76 | CHG 0.31 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -10.62 | YTD % -0.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.05
10.63
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.17
11.97
2.56
6.99
2.40
2.50
6.07
9.00
9.85
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.03
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
1.05
10.63
5.20
0.33
3.15
2.17
12.00
2.56
6.99
2.40
2.50
6.07
9.00
9.85
4.58
1.00
0.27
5.59
9,95
10.00

EPS $

C2031. Co MT A LL

Div $ P/E Yield
0.250
0.050

0.598

-0.877

0.168
0.055
1.408
0.249
0.460
0.111
0.627

-0.003

0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952

0.156 64.1

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4674
2.9020
1.5327
3.0368
13.5654
107.5706
105.7706
1.1080
1.0615
1.1050
9.4839

52wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015



EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E

N/M

N/M
256.6

Yield

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3758
2.8266
1.4630
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.514105

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.501641

NAV Date
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

-0.11
477
-4.99
5.47
6.99
13.50
5.26
2.84
5.01
7.41

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

10.0000 10.6709 -0.93 12.33 31-Mar-10
7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS § - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

4.8105 58.37 31-Mar-10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Glose - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Ghange - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

He pledged that the facility
would sell both his and com-
petitors’ products, adding that
staff numbers would probably
expand from 70 to 80.

Bapak is also moving to next
month start the sale of cooking
oil, bringing in the raw materi-
al from the US and bottling it in
the Bahamas.

And Mr Rogers added that
his PVC piping business, which
he estimated had a 60 per cent
market share, would also suf-
fer a “high impact” from the
Government’s move on the
Industries Encouragement Act
incentives.

Another Bahamian manu-
facturer, who requested
anonymity, told Tribune Busi-
ness that his seven-figure
investment over more than a
decade was now in potential
jeopardy.

“This is a matter of survival
for us,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The raw materials are
going to cost me more than
what importers can bring the
finished product in for. You
can take away our concessions,
but at least keep the duty up
on finished imported products,
so we can at least have some
margins.

“There is no way we as an
industry in this country can
compete with our US counter-
parts. I’ve spoken to a number
of manufacturers, and they are
all claiming there are no profits.
No one is going to stay in busi-
ness if they’re not making any
money.”

“Tf this is going to affect stay-

ing in business, look at what
the Government can lose. All
the Business Licence fees, NIB
contributions. There are 4,000-
5,000 people employed in the
industry.”

Walter Wells, head of
Caribbean Bottling, the Coca-
Cola producer, told Tribune
Business the company was still
in talks with the Ministry of
Finance over the precise impact
the Industries Encouragement
Act reforms would have.

“Tf it means there is some sig-
nificant taxation added on to
our existing structure, it will
mean there is an [impact] to
our competitive edge, if there is
one today, and we will have to
see what that might be and how
we respond,” Mr Wells said.

Scott Farrington, head of
Sun-Tee, the Shirley Street-
based company, said that while
his company was unlikely to
suffer a major impact, as he had
“dramatically changed the busi-
ness” model in recent years, it
had been receiving Industries
Encouragement Act incentives
since 1983.

“We can’t compete down
here with the cost of doing busi-
ness,” Mr Farrington said,
pointing out that the new gov-
ernment policy would discour-
age new manufacturing
entrants and put some compa-
nies out of business.

He added that the 30-day
‘notice period’ given by the
Government in the Budget was
inadequate for businesses to
change their models and cost
structures.

Fuel trucking plan for
"95% done’ plant

FROM page 1B

“T confirm that BEC is
actively engaged in negotiations
with its supplier for an agree-
ment for the fuel required to
operate the Wilson City Power
Plant to be transported to the
plant site via fuel trucks, instead
of via the proposed pipeline
and docking facility,” Mr Bas-
den said.

“It is anticipated that these
negotiations will be concluded
very shortly. Should the nego-
tiations be successful there will
not be a need for the pipeline
and docking facility at this time.

“Circumstances and technol-
ogy may change in the future,
which might make it desirable
or even necessary to once again
pursue the pipeline option. As
circumstances and technology
may change in the future, we
do not rule out such possibility.
For example, should the option
of operating the plant on com-
pressed natural gas (CNG) or
liquefied natural gas (LNG)
arise, trucking will likely not be
a viable option.”

It is unclear how opponents
of the BEC power plant, espe-
cially Responsible Develop-
ment for Abaco (RDA) and
the environmental lobby, will
react to the prospect of fuel
being trucked to the site, rather
than being delivered by sea.
RDA’s case is currently being
tried in the Supreme Court

before Justice Hartman Long-
ley.

At present, the construction
of the power plant is now esti-
mated to be 90-95 per cent
completed,” Mr Basden added.

“Initially, it was anticipated
that construction of the power
plant would be in operation by
the end of July/early August of
2010. As a result of the deci-
sion being made to use a lighter
fuel oil (ADO) instead of the
heavy fuel oil (Bunker C).

Generators

“However, it became neces-
sary for the generators of the
power plant to be modified. As
a consequence of these modifi-
cations, the projected date for
the power plant to become
operational has been revised to
the end of the third quarter or
early fourth quarter 2010.”

Ms Basden’s affidavit also
disclosed that the Environ-
mental Management Plan
(EMP) for Wilson City was still
being developed, and was
scheduled for completion next
month.

This will then be submitted
to the Bahamas Environment,
Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission for
review, with a copy also pub-
lished on BEC’s website, Mr
Basden promised, so that
“interested parties” could sub-
mit their views and input on it.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, SONIA VERNELL
SMITH of ELEUTHERA, THE BAHAMAS, Mother of
Rashad Kristian Smith, a minor intend to change his
name to RASHAD KRISTIAN ROLLE. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY LOUIS of P.O.
BOX GENERAL DELIVERY, Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1% day of JUNE, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

this notice.

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice is hereby given to the rightful owner
of a31ft. Yellow Fin Center Console Speed
Boat “ Allons-Y”, License No. NP8565 to
come and retrieve your boat and to pay
outstanding bill within Thirty (30) days this
notice, Failure to do so will result in the

boat being sold to cover cost Contact Mr.

Daniel Taylor or Mr. Garvin Cartwright at
(242) 337-1036 or (242) 472-8008.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

Stamp Duty applied to real
estate transactions would be
used this time.

He confirmed, though, that
the Government had already
issued a Protection of Revenue
Order, and said: “On the issue
of raising taxes there’s seldom
pleasure. We’ve got to save the
country as best we can.”

The Stamp Duty changes
unveiled in the Budget involve
a two percentage point increase
in Stamp Duty across the board
for all real estate deal, apart
from those involving first-time
buyers. Thus for deals priced
between $0-$20,000, the rate
goes from 2 per cent to 4 per
cent; for between $20,000 to
$50,000, it goes to 6 per cent;
for between $50,000 to
$100,000, it goes to 8 per cent;

for between $100,000 to
$250,000, it goes to 10 per cent;
and from $250,000 and up, it
goes to 12 per cent.

Andrew O’Brien, chairman
of the Bahamas Bar Associa-
tion’s real estate section, told
Tribune Business that attorneys
and realtors were “desperately”
seeking clarification on whether
transactions currently in play -
in the 90-day closing period -
would have the new Stamp
Duty rates applied to them if
conveyancings were brought
forward for Stamping after July
1.

They were also “desperately”
hoping that a two-three months
window could be granted for
these transactions to close at
the old rates, fearing that the
Duty increase - worth several
thousand dollars and five-fig-
ure sums in some cases - could
act as ‘deal breakers’.

“A big concern is that the
Act will treat the new duty
rates for any document pre-
sented on July 1 or after,” Mr
O’Brien, an attorney and part-
ner at Glinton, Sweeting and
O’Brien said.

“That’s going to create a
huge burden on banks, pur-
chasers and vendors who are in
the middle of transactions right
now, and have agreed to pay a
rate that is 2 per cent less.”

Transactions that closed on
June 30, for example, would not
have an opportunity to get to
the Treasury for Stamping, and
“all of a sudden they have
another 2 per cent to pay.

“A way to combat that is for
the Treasury to recognise any
transaction that has a signed
agreement before July 1 or the
date of announcement of the
Act,” Mr O’Brien said.

However, the Protection of

$857m project:
no funds in account
for two years

FROM page 1B

financing vehicle] last provided
any funding at all to the pro-
ject in September 2008 over
one-and-a-half years ago,” Mr
Stein and his attorneys alleged.

“On top of the funds needed
to keep the project alive since
Seaside Heights ceased fund-
ing, Stein has been forced to
spend over $4 million defending
his investment against the
efforts of Seaside Heights to
strip him of his partnership
interest.”

In response to the Tribunal’s
finding that $1.1 million paid
to Mr Stein’s former partner,
Roy Stillman, should not have
come from the South Ocean
partnership’s funds, the former
alleged that the money “clearly
came” from his own bank
accounts.

And Mr Stein and his attor-
neys also alleged that Plain-
field/Seaside Heights approved
the South Ocean project’s infra-
structure budget prior to exe-
cuting their partnership agree-
ment, and that he “never
exceeded that budget”. The
items Plainfield later com-
plained about, namely travel
and expenses, Bahamian hous-
ing and offices, were shown as
specific items, they alleged, and
were never exceeded in terms
of budget.

It was also claimed that Mr
Stein was “clearly entitled to
compensation for his services”
via development fees, plus a 1
per cent acquisition fee based
on the cost of acquiring the
land parcels necessary to facili-
tate the South Ocean project.

“Over the course of the part-

nership period, even though
Stein was entitled to the pay-
ment of development fees far in
excess of those actually paid,
Stein chose not to collect such
fees from the partnership,”
Stein and his attorneys alleged.
“His thought process
throughout was that he didn’t
want to burden the partner-
ship’s cash flow any more than
necessary in getting the project
launched and completed.
“The end result of such
largess is that Stein is owed
development fees from the
partnership under the develop-
ment agreement in excess of
$650,000. Addition of the acqui-
sition fees due, which were
clearly earned upon closing of
the land parcels, would bring
the total amount of fees due to
Stein to over $1.72 million.”

Reporters News
and Sport

AN TED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
narratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers

who want to make a difference
at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We’re the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we’re on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience

e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour

Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet @tribunemedia.net

Or

drop in your applications at
our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,
Managing Editor, The Tribune.

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Revenue Order signed by the
Governor-General effectively
means that the Stamp Duty rate
changes will take effect from
the date of the Budget, May 26.

Of this development, Mr
O’Brien said: “I hope not, but
there’s a lot of confusion in the
legal community and among
realtors also. I’ve got several
transactions where the potential
purchasers will not proceed if
they have to pay another 2 per

No flexibility on real estate Stamp tax hike

cent in tax.

“The most sensitive way to
deal with this is to have a two-
month window, have the Public
Treasury recognise any deal
completed and look at the date
of the document. If they recog-
nise the old rate for two to
three months, that gives peo-
ple time to clean up whatever is
in process now. It gives people
time to plan and prepare.”

Long-term, many attorneys

4
Uhanet wor

and realtors are waiting to see
how the real estate Stamp Duty
increases play out/.

One lawyer said yesterday
that the Government appeared
not to have taken a “nuanced”
approach to the issue, express-
ing concern that the tax increas-
es could impact most the
Bahamian middle and lower
income brackets, given that
they would face increases worth
several thousand dollars.

The National Insurance Board
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Boatd (NIB) is seeking to pire qualify contractors to

bid on works to provide furniture (fit out) for the Ministry of Tosrtsa Basiding,

John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas; the project is a joint venture of

NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in compliance with

the National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in good stand-

ine with Che reles AT Government deen Les,

Pre-qualitication documents may be collected trom the Security Booth at NIB’s

Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from Mav 41 oto June 7 POLO, or

downloaded trom NIB’s website at wwwiniib-bahamas.com.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and returned to the

Director's Offiee in an addeessed envelope with the caption “Parasite jar phy

Mig iffry al 1 aay Hawt? He Cog iPachr Pri fiualification

12:10) Noon on Monday, June

f, 2010.

i!

Worn 1 a f
Aen OTL OF before

SUN OIL LIMITED
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Sun Oil Limited seeks to identify:
PROFESSIONAL TRACTOR TRAILER DRIVERS

in New Providence and Exuma

The successful candidate(s) will assume the role of Driver/
Operator. This position is responsible for the daily execution of
key responsibilities within a bulk fuel facility. These responsibilities
include the safe receipt, storage and delivery of bulk petroleum
products in accordance with strict industry and company standards.
Successful candidates must be able to demonstrate a proven track
record of safe driving. Successful experience in the petroleum
industry would be plus.

Core Responsibilities

* Daily inspection of assigned truck(s) and associated equipment.
* Safe truck loading and delivery of petroleum products through

out the island.

* Provide exceptional customer service at all times.
* Adhere to company driving policies and the Highway Code of

the Bahamas.

* General fuel handling operations associated with the receipt,
storage and redistribution of petroleum products.

Job Requirements

* 5 years minimum work experience in a similar capacity.

* In depth knowledge of The Highway Code of The Bahamas.

*A strong safety record. Saftey related trainings would be a plus.

* Defensive driving training would be a strong plus.

*A mechanical aptitude with some experience with equipment
maintenance and repairs.

* Strong leadership skills with the ability to work as an effective

team member.

¢ Excellent verbal and written communications skills.
* The ability to work flexible hours and weekends.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package,
commensurate with work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than June 4, 2010 to:
jobs @sunoilbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

©





ith



The fight to break

a smoking habit

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

ank Barry is a chain smok-
Y= with a three pack a day
habit and in an ironic twist
also the head of a non-govern-

mental organisation against

tobacco.

Mr Barry has smoked since the age
of 19 and has tried to quit 11 times.
The last attempt was unsuccessful, and
so now he smokes up to three packs of
cigarettes on average.

“On a really bad day, Mr Barry will
smoke 60 cigarettes a day.

“On good days, I train with a per-
sonal trainer, who beats me up all the
time, about how I’m down to eight or
nine cigarettes with coffee. In a
stressed situation, that eight or nine
can become thirty.”

“When I stop that is not going to
go away but at least I’m not adding
fuel to the fire anymore,” said Mr Bar-
ry



“T train three hours a day, for five
days a week,” Mr Barry explained.
“In those three hours I don’t smoke.
But about an hour afterward, I start
coughing from exertion from weight
lifting and other exercises.”

This is a habit he has resolved he
may be unable to break. In fact, the
addiction has pushed him to seek help
at a drug clinic for rehabilitation in
October, which he hopes will be the
final attempt to a successful with-
drawal from smoking.






@x

ACCORDING to
Mr Barry, 38
per cent of adult
Bahamians
smoke.

His experience with tobacco com-
pelled him to form the Nassau-based
entity The People Against Tobacco
Foundation a local subsidiary to rep-
resent member countries to secure
damages for medical costs caused by
using tobacco products and for wide-
spread violation of import tax regula-
tions.

He is seeking to establish an advise-
ment arm in the Bahamas for persons
willing to stop smoking, or at least to
keep it under control.

This kind of initiative has been
neglected over the years, he said. One
of his first initiatives is to set up a non-
smoking rehab in Nassau where peo-
ple can get help for free.

“It’s important that people know
how addictive cigarettes can be,” said
Mr Barry. “Smoking is a difficult habit
to kick, once you start you can’t stop.”

“The tobacco companies never
admitted liability to the fact that they
knew that there were ingredients on
cigarette packages that aren’t listed
and could be harmful,” said Mr Barry.

“So we lobbied among foreign
countries, and even went through
Caricom where not one country signed
up,” he told Tribune Health.

“We still want them to verify the
terms of the agreement. I hope that
they settle down since tobacco is
admitting no liability there.

One of his organisation’s biggest
charges is that the ingredients found
on cigarettes are harmful; “the most
dangerous thing in cigarettes is the
paper used to roll them up,” said Mr
Barry. “Cigarette companies spray
the paper with porous elements that

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

are harmful, to
make it possible
to control the
speed of burning
that takes place
as the cigarette
is smoked.”

Recently, The
People Against
Tobacco Foun-
dation
announced that
it has concluded
negotiations
with four tobac-
co manufactur-
ers to settle
healthcare and
smuggling claims
of The People Against Tobacco Foun-
dation.

One of the organisation’s biggest
charges is that tobacco companies
don’t know what ingredients they are
using in their products.

A stakeholder in the organisation,
James Shelley called the settlement
“a major milestone in the global fight
for justice for an enormous commu-
nity of persons injured all over the
world by the callous behavior of tobac-
co companies."

Mr Barry, continuing about his
struggle to drop the habit said:

“Honestly, Ive tried taking it seri-
ously for 60 seconds, and there’s no
quick fix to stop smoking. It’s such an
addiction, and you’re never thinking,
that hey, I’m putting these harmful
fumes in your body.”

He recalls his first experience with
smoking at age 19. Mr Barry had just

YANK Barry was
recently nominat-
ed for his human-
itarian efforts by
the Gusi Awards.

Men and Sex: Power Position and Money

ALMOST every day, we seem to
be faced with stories of powerful men
being linked with new sexual partners.
In some instances, physical attrac-
tiveness seems to play very little in
the equation. Observers may either
use the term ‘gold digger’ or be in awe
with comments such as ‘good for him.’

Has the whole world become ‘sex
crazed,’ or is it that we just notice it
more in our small community? Have
we really become so materialistic and
grasping, or is it just in our genetic
makeup?

If we turn the clocks back, or flick
through history books we read about
‘sexual selection,’ as Charles Darwin
named it. He defined it as the effect of
the ‘struggle between the individual
of one sex, generally the males, for
the possession of the other sex’. In
fact power-seeking characteristics can
be seen in all social mammals.

The ‘Alpha Male’ exhibits not only
brute strength, wealth, cunning, polit-
ical skill, but experience to win over
his opponents. This enables him to
form alliances which increase his posi-



tion, and perhaps more importantly
his sexual power.

Even in each of the six independent
‘civilizations’ of early history that
include: Babylon, Egypt, India, China,
Aztec Mexico and Inca Peru; one man
ruled at a time. Power was arbitrary
and absolute, and subjects feared
death if they retaliated. The societal
hierarchy dictated the number of con-
cubines or wives each man of stature
could own. Interestingly, the emperors
of each civilization ruled their large
harems with similar methods. Wet
nurses were provided to enable the
women to resume ovulation,

and menstruation records were kept
to maximise fertility. These harems
were dedicated and designed for

reproduction and the passing on of
the emperor’s genes.

Even today, in some tribal or polyg-
amist communities, the more powerful
the man, the more wives he can afford.
However, it is worthy to note that usu-
ally the first wife has a unique place
and special arrangements often have
to be made for her to accept a second
wite.

For example, in some parts of
Africa it is written into the law that the
first wife inherits 70 per cent of the
man’s wealth. In these parts of the
world the young girls understand that
to be a second or third wife is still
more beneficial than being a poor
man’s only wife.

The dark side to power is the vio-
lence that often accompanies it. We
only have to read of captives of war,
who are often women, and the wide-
spread excessive force and rape. The
nature of the human man is to take
advantage of an opportunity and these
situations are often viewed as sex, and
not excessive power.

Powerful, successful and rich men



joined a rock and roll band called
‘Kingston’ in the US.

Today he is taking his message
across the world, promoting an anti-
smoking campaign that has expand-
ed its reach as far as Russia.

He recalls the breaking point in his
life, when he watched the face of Yul
Brynner come across his television.
It was a public service announcement
of Mr Brynner before dying from lung
cancer in the 1970s. That advertise-
ment was broadcasted as part of the
American Cancer Society’s anti-smok-
ing Campaign.

“Hi, ’m Yul Brynner, if you’re
watching this I am dead,” the adver-
tisement played. “The reason I am
dead is because I smoked 3 packs of
cigarettes a day. Do not smoke.”

Mr Barry said: “I got goose pim-
ples from that commercial; and I had
noticed from this that the message
had the same chilling effect on the
smoking community in the United
States.

“People were really catching on to
the message that they should think
twice about having a cigarette,” Mr
Barry said.

After doctors discovered that he
developed bronchitis, Mr Barry
stopped smoking for almost eight
years. During this period, he not only
experienced the onset of bronchial
pain, but withdrawal was a difficult
process as well.

“When you stop smoking you gain a
tremendous amount of weight because
you start eating, and then it takes
another year to lose all that weight,”
said Mr Barry.

“Smoking is definitely one of the
causes of lung cancer, heart disease
and emphysema-a constant cough, and
heart disease; and it can shorten your
life by 10 years or more,” he said.

“Tt’s important for people to know
that’s how addictive tobacco is,” said
Mr Barry. “I have to go to a Betty
Ford drug treatment center, where
people would go for alcohol and hero-
ine. But I’m going there for ciga-
rettes.”



have almost aphrodisiac properties,
and their confident manner is charis-
matic for women. They know what
they want and have a proven track
record, which then translates as being
sexually competent.

If this is the case and powerful men
can essentially ‘have it all’, then why
do they often jeopardise everything
for sex. The reality is that they feel
their resources can protect and shield
them. Because of this they feel invin-
cible and live in the moment. Person-
al and momentary pleasure out weigh
long-term consequences. Frequent
separation due to travel provides
ample opportunity, plus an adrena-
line driven personality, to take sexual
risks.

Power, position and money allow a
man to hire employees who maintain
the status quo, and in this way pro-
tect him from the real world full of
disappointments and rejections. All
of these things add to his charisma
and sexual attractiveness.

History continues on and probably
will maintain for generations to come.
The competitive drive between men to
win the ‘prize’ will always remain. The
means by which they achieve this may
vary, but the desire to be powerful,
successful and rich will always remain.



Dry, dehydrated skin

What can I do about my dry,
dehydrated skin?

Dry, dehydrated skin can
be temporary, or a lifelong
concern.

Dry skin can be genetically
determined, or it can be a
product of an increasingly
stressful lifestyle coupled with
continual exposure to the sun,
wind and chemicals in the
environment. It can also be
caused by inappropriate prod-
ucts on the skin.

Dry, or dehydrated?

Dry skin, or allipoid skin,
generally refers to skin that
is lacking in oil. Dehydrated
skin is characterised by lack of
moisture in the Stratum
Corneum.

Oily skin can experience
dehydration. As mentioned,
dehydration is a lack of water,
not oil. This means sebaceous
oil activity can still be normal
or even overactive in dehy-
drated skin.

Both dry and dehydrated
skin can experience:

¢ irritation, inflammation
and itchiness.

¢ A feeling of tightness

or tautness.

¢ A look or feel of roughness
¢ Slight to severe flaking
and scaling

¢ Fine lines, cracks that

can sometimes bleed

and severe redness.

One of the biggest conse-
quences is an increase in sen-
sitivity, as dryness and dehy-
dration are precursors to sen-
sitised skin.

The top three causes of dry,
dehydrated skin

e Intrinsic Aging

Intrinsic aging is the nor-
mal process of physical
change over time that's more
about genetics than lifestyle.
(Lifestyle-induced aging is
known as premature aging.)
Activity of the sebaceous
glands responsible for oil
secretions tend to decrease
with age, and the skin’s nat-
ural hydrators decline over
the years. Aging also may
cause blood flow to the skin
to decrease, causing a drop in
sebum production.

Weather/ Environmental
Elements

Prolonged exposure to the
sun causes water to evaporate
from skin, which is why sun
burnt skin requires more
moisturisation than unex-
posed areas. Likewise, cold
winds, air conditioning units,
forced air heating and low
temperatures can also dry out
skin, contributing to prema-
ture aging.

Lifestyle

The trend of fat-free diets
can deprive our bodies of
skin-friendly Essential Fatty
Acids (EFAs). This deficien-
cy can result in chronic itch-
ing, dryness, scaling, thinning
and can lead to an imbalance
in prostaglandins (chemical
messengers that do many
things, such as control inflam-
mation).

Excess intake of alcoholic
beverages and certain med-
ications (such as nasal decon-
gestants) can also contribute
to dry skin.

Proper treatment for results

Professional skin treat-
ments can deliver immediate
relief to dry or dehydrated
skin while improving texture
and tone. Before beginning,
your skin therapist will per-
form Face Mapping zone-by-
zone skin analysis to deter-
mine if skin is dry or dehy-
drated, and then create a cus-
tomised treatment around
your specific needs that very
day!

SEE page 10

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Gastroenteritis & You

(Editors Notes: Seasonal con-
ditions such as Fever, Colds the
Flu and Diarrhoea occur quite
often during the winter months;
often cause distress for parents
and caregivers of infants and
young children. Knowing how
to prevent these conditions and
treat their symptoms, should
they occur, goes a long way in
helping children remain in good
health. This article provides
basic information about gas-
troenteritis and its manage-
ment.)

WHAT IS GASTRO-ENTERITIS?

Gastroenteritis is a general
term referring to inflamma-
tion or infection of the gas-
trointestinal tract, primarily
the stomach and intestines. It
is sometimes also referred to
as gastro or stomach flu. If
inflammation is limited to the
stomach, the term gastritis is
used, and if the small bowel
alone is affected it is enteritis.

Gastroenteritis is also called
intestinal flu, traveler's diar-
rhea, viral enteritis, and food
poisoning. It is a self-limiting
disorder characterised by
diarrhea, nausea, vomiting,
and abdominal cramping. It
occurs in all age groups and is
a major cause of morbidity
(sickness) and mortality
(death) in developing coun-
tries.

CAUSES OF
GASTROENTERITIS

Gastroenteritis can be
caused by a number of things
such as infection with bacte-
ria, viruses, and other para-
sites, or less commonly reac-
tions to new foods or medica-
tions. It can also be caused by
contaminated food, water and
contaminated objects (toys,
surfaces).

One of the frequent causes
of gastroenteritis is the
ROTAVIRUS, which is a
common infection in children,
and usually occurs seasonally.
Often, twice-yearly outbreaks
of this infection are seen.

Gastroenteritis has many
possible causes. These

include:

* Bacteria (responsible for
acute food poisoning):
Staphylococcus aureus,
Salmonella, Shigella,
Clostridium botulinum,
Escherichia coli, Clostridi-
um peifringens.

e Amoebae: especially Enta-
moeba histolytica.

e Parasites: Ascaris, Entero-
bius, Trichinella spiralis.

* Viruses (may be responsi-
ble for traveller’s diar-
rhoea): adenovirus,
echovirus, or coxsackievirus.
e Ingestion of toxins: plants
or toadstools (mushrooms).
e Drug reactions: antibiotics.
e Enzyme deficiencies.

¢ Food allergens.

The bowel reacts to any of
these toxins with hyper motil-
ity (increased action or move-
ments), producing severe
diarrhoea and secondary
extra loss of fluid from the
cells in the body.

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
OF GASTROENTERITIS
Gastroenteritis usually has

an acute onset, normally last-
ing fewer than ten days. The
main symptoms are:
e Frequent vomiting usually
on the first day of the illness.
The vomiting
may or may not be accom-
panied by fever or signs of a
cough and cold.
¢ Diarrhea (3 or more loose
stools) usually follows on
days 2 through 5 and the loss
of fluid can make the child
very ill.
¢ It can also involve stomach
pain (sometimes to the point
of crippling).

WHO IS AFFECTED BY GAS-
TROENTERITIS?

Anyone can get it, it occurs
in people of all ages and back-
grounds. However, some
viruses tend to cause gastro-
enteritis primarily among peo-
ple in specific age groups.
Rotavirus and Norovirus
(Norwalk) infections are the
most common cause of diar-
rhea and vomiting in infants

and young children under 5
years old.

HOW IS GASTROENTERITIS
TREATED?

The only recognised treat-
ment of the condition is fluid
replacement given in small
amounts and frequently. It is
recommended that children
be given one teaspoon of flu-
ids at 2-3 minute intervals
until the child is better hydrat-
ed. Acceptable fluids include
oral re-hydration fluids
(which is usually in powder
form and has to be mixed
with water, pedialyte or rehy-
drolyte for older children and
Gatorade can also be helpful
in older children. In severe
cases, the child may require
intravenous fluids during re-
hydration, the child may con-
tinue to have vomiting or
loose stools, but it is impor-
tant to continue fluids with
frequent checks on the child’s
state of hydration. Signs of
good progress include pass-
ing urine, filling out of loose
skin areas, increased activity.

WHAT SHOULD BE
DONE WHEN THE
SYMPTOMS OF GASTRO-
ENTERITIS FIRST BEGIN?

It is recommended that
families with infants and
young children keep a supply
of oral rehydration solution
(ORS) at home at all times
and use the solution when
vomiting and diarrhea first
occurs in the child. ORS is
available at pharmacies with-
out a prescription. Follow the
written directions on the ORS
package, and use clean or
boiled water.

WHEN SHOULD THE CHILD
WITH GASTROENTERITIS BE
TAKEN TO A DOCTOR?

If the child is having per-
sistent vomiting or vomiting
and diarrhoea, medical atten-
tion should be sought imme-
diately. This is especially
important in infants because
they can become dehydrated
quickly. Take the child to the

clinic (nearest your home) if
he or she passes three or more
loose stools and is vomiting
and you have started giving
oral rehydration fluids (ORF)
but he/she
e Complains of being thirsty
e Has sunken eyes
* Has fever (100.4 O F) (use
a thermometer to check the
child’s temperature ) that is
not responding to medica-
tion ( Calpol/Tylenol)
e Is not eating or drinking
normally
e Seems not to be getting
better

In the older child with diar-
rhoea medical attention
should be sought if they are
refusing, or not responding to
oral rehydration fluids
(ORF), or if there is any sign
of dehydration (complaining
of being thirsty, wrinkling of
skin and sunken eyes).

WHAT IS DEHYDRATION?

Dehydration is a negative
balance of body fluids caused
by excessive fluid loss or inad-
equate fluid intake; it is usu-
ally expressed as mild mod-
erate or severe. Some of the
symptoms may include
sunken eyes, dry or patched
mucus membranes, and the
anterior fontanel (or ‘mold’)
may be sunken one of the fre-
quent causes of dehydration is
vomiting and diarrhoea.

HOW DOES ONE
TREAT DEHYDRATION?

The treatment for dehy-
dration is fluid replacement
as described earlier in the
treatment of vomiting and
diarrhoea. The fluid is given
in the presence of vomiting
and diarrhoea to prevent
dehydration. In some cases,
children may have to be
admitted to hospital for con-
tinued hydration and moni-
toring. These cases may
include those children:
e who refuse hydration flu-
ids and continue to vomit
(failed oral hydration),
¢ with abdominal distention,
¢ with loss of skin tone (skin

appears loose or does not
immediately go

back in place if pinched
between fingers),

¢ With severe weakness and
drowsiness.

DOES DEHYDRATION POSE A
THREAT TO A CHILD’S HEALTH?

Yes! It most certainly does,
and young children in partic-
ular can become ill very rapid-
ly. However, with treatment
most people recover without
any long-term problems.

WHAT SHOULD YOU NOT
GIVE THE CHILD WITH
GASTROENTERITIS?

Antibiotics (medicines used
for treating infection - left
over from a previous illness
of the same nature or other-
wise) is often prescribed by
the doctor. Antiemetics (med-
icine that stops vomiting like
gravol), or any other medi-
cine that can be bought over
the counter such as Kaopec-
tate, Lomotil, Pepto-Bismol,
Immodium is also helpful and
might be prescribed by the
doctor.

SHOULD THE CHILD BE GIVEN
FOOD WHILST SUFFERING
FROM GASTROENTERITIS?
Yes, the vomiting usually

decreases after the first 24

hours, if the child is over 6

months of age continue to

offer food, which are freshly
prepared and easy to digest.

The child can then be fed and

should be given replacement

fluids after each loose stool
depending on the age of the
child as follows:

e Children under 1 year - ?

to? cup (2-4 ounces) of

ORE after each vomit

and/or loose stool.

e Children 1 —2 years -? to

1 cup of ORF after each

vomit and/or loose stool.

e Children 2 years and older

— Drink as much fluids as they

would take. Do not stop

meals/feeds unless instructed
by a doctor. Breast fed chil-
dren should continue to be
breast fed (as usual) unless

@x GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack

June

THE Atlantic hurricane
season Officially begins today
but it will probably be three
months before The Bahamas
is threatened by a storm. The
latter part of August is usual-
ly when we start to follow
developments with a degree
of concern.

June is a winding-down
month in the vegetable gar-
den. Most tomatoes set fruit
at temperatures lower than 68
degrees F and our June night-
time temperatures rarely get
that low. Fortunately, cherry
tomatoes set fruit at higher
temperatures and the large-
fruited varieties are particu-
larly handy in late spring and
early summer.

Sweet pepper plants can
last and produce fruit for a
whole year but with greatly
diminished returns. A spring-
time sowing of Cubanelle
peppers, a sweet Italian type,
will boost your pepper sup-
ply. Consider too the large
hot peppers such as Anaheim
and Poblano.

Most popular vegetables in
the garden will be suffering
and not doing well at all. Two
that will thrive into the sum-
mer are okra and snake
beans. Okra is one of those
veggies you love or hate, with
no in-between ground. If you
like them then June is a good
time to get them established.
Bush types bear more quick-
ly but tall types give a far
greater yield over a much
longer season.

Snake beans are sometimes
called ‘yard-long’ beans. The
pods can grow to this length
but are best picked when less
than one-foot long. Snake bean
pods have fewer beans than
regular snap beans but have a
taste that is almost sweet.
Snake beans are sometimes
called asparagus beans because
of their similarity in taste.

Snake beans are best grown
on a trellis. Lacking a trellis, I
plant them below pigeon pea
trees for support. They can
be allowed to sprawl along
the ground but need a few
plastic milk crates to give
them a degree of aeration.
Snake bean vines are dense

and heavy and are prolific
bearers once they get under
way. The beans need to be
picked every day because
pods that are 6-inches long
one day can be 24-inches long
the next.

Summer bedding flowers
should already have been
established but get some in
quickly if you have not sown
any yet. Zinnias are the old
reliables of summer and come
in a wondrous array of
colours and sizes, as well as
being single flowered and
double. Cosmos grows very
quickly and the yellow-flow-
ered varieties are cheerful,
though I would recommend
the red-flowered as they do
not get so ‘leggy’. The big
problem with cosmos is that
they tend to turn into weeds.
Pretty weeds, but weeds
nonetheless.

Portulaca makes a fine
hanging basket but can also
be used in beds. The fleshy
succulent leaves help the plant
through drought periods and
the flowers — single and dou-
ble — come in all the cardinal
colours. Double flowered por-
tulaca blooms look almost like
miniature roses, while the sin-
gle blossoms show to best
effect the watered-silk shim-
mer of the petals.

Mexican sunflowers are
reliable summer producers,
bearing flowers that look
identical to the Bolivian sun-
flower tree. The big problem
with these is that the seed
heads need to be pruned
away once a flower has died
or the whole plant will look
unsightly.

Marigolds used to be one
colour; now marigolds come
in lemon yellow and red and
are far more appealing,
though that awful marigold
smell remains. Marigolds can
take a degree of shade during
the summer months as long
as they receive some full sun.

The plants that can really
be relied upon to produce
well in the summer are weeds.
Whether shepherd needle or
pussley, weeds will thrive and
be one of our biggest
heartaches.









CUBANELLE peppers can take more heat than regular bell peppers and Me well into summer.

otherwise instructed by the
doctor when examined.

IS GASTROENTERITIS
PREVENTABLE?

If a virus causes the gas-
troenteritis, it probably can-
not be prevented. We know,
however, that most of the
organisms (germs) that cause
gastroenteritis are spread by
contact particularly through
direct or indirect contact with
infected stool. Therefore,
good hand washing with soap
and water after a bowel
movement is the most effec-
tive means of prevention. The
proper disposal of soiled dia-
pers is also important. In nurs-
ery environments particularly,
toys should be
cleaned/washed regularly to
prevent cross infection. The
cleaning of surfaces such as
tabletop and play areas with
soap and water and 70 per
cent alcohol or other disin-
fectants helps to reduce the
level of germs in the area
where children play, eat and
sleep. If your child attends a
preschool, seek to ensure
these practices are observed.

CONCLUSION

If the information provid-
ed is followed, the child will
be protected from gastroen-
teritis and the possible dan-
gers this condition poses. The
most important thing to
remember is to practice fre-
quent and proper hand wash-
ing and keep a supply of ORF
at home for the emergency
treatment of vomiting and
diarrhoea.

The health of you and your
child is of most importance to
the Maternal and Child
Health Department of the
Ministry of Health. For addi-
tional information on gas-
troenteritis and other child-
hood diseases please contact
the community clinic nearest
your home or the Maternal
and Child Health Secretariat
of the Department of Public
Health, Ministry of Health at
telephone number 502-4778.



Dry, dehydrated skin
FROM page nine

¢ Overuse of moisturisers can
contribute to dead skin cell
build up, clogged pores and a
lackluster appearance. Pro-
fessional exfoliation will
remove dead skin cells and
debris, helping to bring newer
cells to the surface while prep-
ping skin for subsequent
product application.

¢ Galvanic current is a pro-
fessional device that helps dri-
ve nourishing, hydrating and
replenishing ingredients deep
into the layers of the epider-
mis, where dry, dehydrated
skin starts.

A consistent home care reg-
imen prescribed by your skin
therapist will dramatically
impact the health of your skin.
Along with your regimen, keep
the following tips in mind:
¢ Do not use hot water when
cleansing.

e Perform gentle, upward cir-
cles with the hands when
cleansing, applying moisturiz-
er or SPF, etc.

¢ Steer clear of products with
artificial fragrances, colors
and S.D. alcohol.

¢ Be aware of hormones,
stress levels, and alcohol and
nicotine intake, as these will
affect dryness of skin.

e This information was taken
from dermalogica.com. Nakita
Lowe is a Dermalogica Skin
Care Therapist at The Dermal
Clinic in Sandyport. Please call
327-6788 for more information
or visit www.dermal-clinic.com.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010, PAGE 11B



Evans finds success
after losing her sight

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

FTER a horrifying
mishap in 1971,
young Genevieve

Evans faced the challenge of
having to start life over again.

Before a life altering inci-
dent Genevieve was a cheer-
ful young lady who had a pas-
sion for cooking. She loved
everything about it, especial-
ly making creative dishes with
a flair for flavour and presen-
tation. She was good at what
she did, slicing and dicing her
way to the top of the culinary
field.

And even though she was
only 24 years old with three
dependents at ages 9, 2, and
18 months, with no support,
she was hopeful and lived a
life of positive expectancy.

Then tragedy struck. A
blunt object was thrown at
Ms Evans hitting her in the
centre of her face leaving her
permanently blind. “It was a
horrifying unfortunate
mishap. This changed things
and made life much harder
for me,” Ms Evans told Tri-
bune Woman.

Her dream, her will pow-
er, her hope, her everything
shattered like glass into a mil-
lion pieces. She wondered
how she would move forward
from the devastation that rid-
dled her life. And in the
despair of her reality Ms
Evans began picking up the

pieces.

“T did not know what to do
or where to turn. I could no
longer work as a chef and I
had three children to take
care of. It was a lot on me
because there was no daddy
to help out with things. But
when I thought about my
children I knew I had to do
something so that I can pro-
vide for them," she said.

In 1972, a year after she lost
her sight, she went to the Sal-
vation Army to learn to read
in Braille. And though she
made progressive steps, her
past continued to play a toll
on her emotionally. She said
sometimes she thought to
herself “what did I do wrong
to get the bad deal in life.”
She could not see it at the
time, but her misfortune was
a blessing in disguise.

“In 1973 I was asked by the
Ministry of Education if I was
interested in teaching Braille
at the School of the Blind and
I accepted the offer,” Ms
Evans told Tribune Woman.

"Teaching was one of my
last career choices. I really
didn't want to teach. But I
think that is where the Lord
leadeth me and I am enjoying
what I am doing now," she
said.

Ms Evans went back to
school in 1975 to enhance her
skills. She took a few courses
in teaching. In 1983 she
obtained a teaching certifi-
cate and in 1984 she attended
the Hadley School of the

Blind in Illinois where she
studied personal psychology.

When she returned to the
Bahamas she was approached
once again by the Ministry of
Education. “They asked me
to go to Freeport to organise
a center for deaf and blind
students. I taught there for 11
years. After the school closed
I was transferred to Sir Jack
Hayward. Then I came back
to Nassau in 2006 to teach at
the School of the Blind,” she
said.

Today Ms Evans teaches at
the E.H Gilmour School for
the Blind on Mackey Street.

She was also recently hon-
ored by the Primary Princi-
pal’s Association for 37 years
of excellence in teaching.

“This achievement is a
wonderful feeling. I worked
very hard to get where I am
today. People who have faced
a situation like mine, I want
them to know that all is not
lost and they must love them-
selves, stand up for them-
selves because they can make
it,” she said.

Traveling is one of her
favourite things to do. She
has traveled to England, Bar-
bados, Trinidad, Jamaica,
Haiti, Las Vegas, Mexico,
Colorado, Belize, and Cana-
da.

At age 65 she is preparing
for retirement. She told Tri-
bune Woman that she is more
than ready to relax, sip on
pina coladas and travel the
world.







Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



DESPITE the difficulties, Ms Evans made something of her life and now many people use her story as
inspiration for their personal endeavours.




































































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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2010











By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

LYNN Jackson and
(5% team from Beauty

Schools of America
are back to host an enrollment
seminar at the Sheraton Beach
Resorts this month. So those
persons who were inspired to
seek careers in the cosmetol-
ogy industry at the “Evolution
of Beauty” hair show present-
ed by Beauty Schools of
America, now have an oppor-
tunity to turn their spare time
activities into professional
careers.

The last time the Beauty
School team came to the
Bahamas they were impressed
by the skills and artistry dis-
played by some of the local
stylists. They also found that
there are a great number of
persons who wish to pursue
careers in beauty but don’t
know how to jump start their
careers.

To give those persons an
opportunity to finesse their
skills, Beauty Schools of
America is offering an oppor-
tunity for aspiring beauticians
to develop a lifetime passion
that can spawn a rewarding,
creative, lucrative career.

“This seminar is for pro-
gressive serious students who
are looking to study abroad.
The enrollment seminar pro-
vides a platform for them to
exchange with international
programs,” said Glynn Jack-
son global ambassador of
Beauty Schools of America.

An industry that is usually
overlooked by many people,
professionals in the business
have dubbed it a financial
goldmine.

Mr Jackson said money is
not and should not be para-
mount to a career in beauty,
but reminded persons to be
mindful that the field requires
hard work.

“Some people are in jobs
where they don’t see growth.
People don’t realise it but this
is the only industry that is
thriving during a down turn in
the economy. The salons are
still filled with customers, and
people everywhere still want
to look beautiful despite a
declining economy,” said Mr

TWIT)
Teg RT
OUEST

Jackson.

“There is a financial gold-
mine in the industry. I have
heard many stories of stylists
who have said after six months
out of beauty schools they
were making six figures,” Mr
Jackson said.

During the seminar that is
scheduled for Friday, June 11
attendees will be in an inti-
mate setting. They will get a
chance to speak one on one
with professionals as well as
the Beauty School team for
any questions they may have
about the field and Beauty
Schools of America.

Additionally, applications
for enrollment along with a
picture, high school or college
transcript, and application fee
will be collected during that
time. Those individuals who
are accepted into Beauty
Schools of America will go on
a one day group tour to see
the campus in Florida.

“People have been emailing
us about how they are inter-
ested in furthering their edu-
cation. We have seen that the
Bahamas is further than so
many other countries and the
people here have a passion for
this industry,” Mr Jackson told
Tribune Woman.

During their time here they
will also be hosting a teacher’s
appreciation luncheon and a
celebrity style high fashion
photo shoot at the Sheraton
Beach Resorts by invitation
only.

Additionally, the beauty
team will be releasing a hair
book for marketing purposes
only, featuring the work of
local stylists. “Each stylist will
have one model to show off
one of their creations and it
will be featured in the hair
book,” he said.

“The book is free because
we want to market the local
stylists in the Bahamas who
are very talented,” Mr Jack-
son said.

The seminar starts from 6 -
9.30 pm. The luncheon will be
held on Saturday, June 12, at
4.30 pm and the photo shoot
will take place on Sunday,
June 13 at from 10am - Spm.

For more information and
to RSVP for the seminar call
242-380-8935 or 301-437-2658.























| MODELS showoff
dazzling designs
by Bernard
Cedric, who
received the 2010
Supermodel of
the Bahamas
Designer Award.



ah









Video/Photos

aughn Scriven and McKenzie’s Photo &











Look for Festival in
your favorite store.

erect: Bahu Wholesale Agemebes, East Weel Hay * tel: 242-004-1759 * fan: 249-354-1059 * ermal: bwabahamasecomberscom * Freeport: 1 (Milion St * bet 242-051-221" * fax: 242-051-2215 * omait bwalpoecoralvint.com