Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Cool Vibes!

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

HIGH S8F
AND SUN BAHAMAS EDITION

ym Lhe Tribune &

nm lovin’ it
cams USA TODAY
MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010



Volume: 106 No.156

Our futile
war on

crime
SSAC Ee et







USE



Reports: Righy a

possible candidate
for St Cecilia
By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



FORMER _ PLP
chairman Raynard

A Rigby has reportedly
thrown his hat into the
ring as a possible can-
didate for the St Cecil-
ia constituency.

In the past Mr Rigby
has gone on the record
to criticise both his
party and its leader

SEE page 8







Boys’ dorm under
threat in cash crisis

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





THE Ranfurly Home may be facing partial closure as it
stares down its hardest financial test in its 54-year history.

The Board of Directors, who have concluded that it might
be “easier to feed girls than to feed boys”, say they may
have to close the boys’ dorm and have the government find
alternative homes for them.

They fear that this closure of a portion of the children’s

SEE page ten

Atlantis CEO hails
airfare programme

By PAUL G TURNQUEST _ Tourism’s free-
Tribune Staff Reporter companion air-
turnquest@tribunemedia.net fare pro-
gramme as one

ATLANTIS CEO, of the most suc-
George Markantonis cessful promo- George

applauded the Ministry of tions that the wiv itonis

country has

ever had, citing a substan-

tial “up-tick” in bookings j

from the scheme. Photo by Malcolm Jamal Davis
Noting how any number FIREFIGHTERS tackle the blaze which destroyed the Cable Beach straw market on Saturday morning.

of hotels around the world By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net











As today is Memorial Day
in the US, a public holiday,

there is no USA Today in the .
Tribune. z SEE page nine





























MORE than 40 straw vendors and their work-
ers are jobless after a suspicious fire razed one of

= - the Cable Beach straw markets over the week-
WRaltamaslOthicerc) Me

The blaze completely engulfed the market
directly across the street from the Wyndham hotel

Selo! Supplies shortly before 2 am on Saturday, with six fire

engines responding to the flames. The heat also





damaged a vehicle parked nearby.
The surrounding posts were the only markers of

(ger al
en 2 a the 43-stall market six hours later as fire officers

continued to rummage through the blackened
remains of a collapsed ceiling and thousands of dol-
Hanging Folders Legal, lars of charred souvenirs.

Vendors circled the site, and directed the fire
officers to dig through hot ash piles — hoping to
recover untarnished goods or at least keepsakes
from the fire. Others sat and watched apathetically.

Workers, hired by some vendors to help with

2 Hole ma Electric

PHOTO: Malcolm Jamal Davis

SEE page two



Maderla St* Paradise Island = 2 locations in Freeport













NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Fire razes Cable Beach straw market

FROM page one

their stalls, showed up later. They
had heard about the fire but had
to see it for themselves.

Displaced vendor Janet Pros-
per, 44, of Bamboo Town said:
“This was our livelihood. Where
can we go now? Everything we
had we put into our business. It’s
a serious blow to all of us. We
came out here to work and we
find this. We have bills, kids,
mortgages — we need help
a.s.a.p.”

Like so many of the vendors at
the Cable Beach market, Ms
Prosper did not take her goods
home with her each night, but
instead kept them packed up
neatly in her stall.

It was customary, as most ven-
dors did not have personal trans-
portation, and even those who
did, did not carry every single
item off-site, evidenced by the T-
shirts, Androsia print wraps,
mangled jewellery and burnt plas-
tic that littered the site.

One vendor recovered two
oven mitts, seemingly unharmed
in their still hot packaging —
another three wooden jewellery
boxes.

Like many, Deborah Ewing,
48-year-old straw vendor of
Mount Moriah, lost everything.

Though undefeated and res-
olute to continue working, she
said: “That’s my stall. Every sin-
gle thing I owned was in there.
This is not a loss this is a devas-
tation.”

Vendors struggled to remain

positive, highlighting their per-
sonal safety as a silver lining to
the smoke cloud still burning
from one corner of the structure
later that morning. Some
attempted to detach themselves
from the situation as a way of
managing the harsh reality of the
loss. However, despite the char-
acteristically light-hearted per-
sonalities of the few opportunists
who sought instead to focus on
what could be gleaned from the
wreckage — the majority of the
vendors stood jaded, staring into
the ruins.

Straw vendor Samantha
Brown bemused: “Today we
can’t say ‘morning morning’,
we’re saying ‘nightmare night-
mare’. Everyone was preparing
for the Memorial Day weekend.
Thousands and thousands and
thousands of dollars...”

The scene for some was a
ghastly echo of the September 4,
2001 arson that ravaged the
famous Nassau straw market on
Bay Street and displaced hun-
dreds of vendors.

Cable Beach vendors believe
the same is true of this incident
which reduced their livelihood to
ash but affected no other build-
ings. Police are still investigating.

Responding to what immedi-
ate action she intends to take
now, one vendor said: “I’ve got to
keep a level head some sort of
how. I’m going to take it easy.
What can I do? Just relax myself
and trust God. He’s been faithful
all these years — why shouldn’t
he be faithful now?”





THE TRIBUNE






































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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 3

CRIMENEWS

POLICE REPORTS

Gunshot victim
is country's
Sbth homicide

POLICE are investigating
the nation’s 36th homicide
after a man was found with
multiple gunshot injuries to
the body yesterday morning.

Responding to a shooting
at Peter Street East, off East
Street, police discovered the
victim’s body around
12.30am Sunday and emer-
gency medical services pro-
nounced him dead on the
scene.

Police suspect he is a 24-
year-old resident of
Brougham Street, however
they could not confirm the
man’s identity up to press
time. The man was wearing
a pair of blue jeans, a black
and white striped shirt and
brown shoes.

Informed persons are
encouraged to contact the
police at 919, crime stoppers
328 TIPS, CDU 502-9991 or
Southern Police Station at
322-3337.

Police probe
armed robberies
and stabbing

POLICE are investigating
two armed robberies and a
stabbing incident that
occurred over the weekend.

The first robbery took
place at the Mall at
Marathon Friday afternoon.
While getting out of his
vehicle in the parking lot,
the driver was approached
by a man armed with a
handgun who demanded
cash. The gunman escaped
onto Grace Avenue with an
undisclosed amount of cash
ina 1995 Honda Accord,
license plate 3270.

The next robbery
occurred shortly after 1 pm
at Leeward Estate west.
Upon arrival at a residence
in the area, two men anda
woman were approached by
two men, one with a hand-
gun. The gunman demanded
their vehicle. The culprits,
dressed in white tee shirts
and short blue jeans,
escaped in the vehicle,
license plate 221490, with an
undetermined amount of
cash and personal items.

Fight

Later that day, police
responded to a stabbing at
Tonique Williams Darling
Highway. While in the area,
aman got into a fight with
another man and as a result
was stabbed in his neck and
head. The 26-year-old victim
was taken to hospital by
ambulance where he was
treated and discharged.
Police are questioning a 26-
year-old man of Market
Street in connection with
this incident.

The public is asked to
contact the police with any
information regarding the
above incidents at 919,
CDU at 502-9991 or North-
eastern Division at 394-
4540/1.



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BACCALAUREATE SERVICE AT THE SOUTHWEST CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF GOD

Learning —a

journey

that

must not end

Graduates receive lesson for life

MORE than 400 graduates
of the College of the Bahamas,
from both the New Providence
and the Grand Bahama cam-
puses, ended this phase of their
academic career with advice to
never stop learning and to pur-
sue their life’s purpose with pas-
sion.

At the Baccalaureate Ser-
vice held at the Southwest
Cathedral Church of God on
Tuesday, May 25, the first in a
series of graduation activities
for the 2009-2010 academic
year, President of The College
of The Bahamas Janyne M.
Hodder told graduates that
learning is a journey that must
not end. “By challenging your-
self and by exploring other
ways of looking at the world,
by believing that a problem is
just a reality calling out for a
new mindset, you will be a con-
tinuous learner,” she told the
graduates.

President Hodder also urged
them to challenge the known
and embrace the unknown and
new possibilities will reveal
themselves.

“T hope you will always con-
tinue to challenge both what
you think you know and what
you know you don’t know,”
President Hodder told them.
“When you challenge what is
already known, what is already
in practice, you force yourself
and those around you to con-
sider how the world you live in
can be made better or differ-
ent. Thinking, solving problems,
making sense of the world
around us, having better ideas —
all of this is what your educa-
tion has prepared you to do.”

The Baccalaureate Service
was a special opportunity for
President Hodder to address
the Commencement Class as
she prepares for her retirement
in June. She has come full cir-
cle, both beginning and ending
her career in education in The
Bahamas.

For the third consecutive
year, more than 50 per cent of
the graduating class of 434, has
earned baccalaureate degrees.

The 2010 Commencement
Class was made up of gradu-
ates from the Schools of Busi-







GRADUATES of the 201 0 Commencement Class sing during the Baccalaureate Service at the South-

west Cathedral Church of God.

ness; Communication and Cre-
ative Arts; Education; English
Studies; Social Sciences; Math-
ematics, Physics and Technolo-
gy, Nursing and Allied Health
Professions and the Culinary
and Hospitality Management
Institute.

Southwest Cathedral Senior
Pastor Bishop Donnie Storr, in
his address, shared the benefits
of living a life infused with pas-
sion. “Whatever our purpose in
life, we must execute it with
passion,” he said. “Passion is
the indicator that one has found
his or her purpose in life.”

Hundreds of family members

and friends of the graduates
attended the service to give
God thanks for their accom-
plishments and invoke His spir-
itual guidance as they embark
upon a new journey.



COLLEGE PRESIDENT Janyne Hodder aieeaes the Baccalaureate
Service.

Major projects should give GB economy a major boost — FNM

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT -— The Free
National Movement
announced that Grand
Bahama can expect to see a
significant boost in the local
economy as a result of major
projects underway here on the
island.

FNM MPs and Senators on
Grand Bahama held a press
conference on Saturday at
FNM Headquarters to give
an update on the progress of
several private and govern-
ment projects.

Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing
reported that half a billion
dollars in spending will be
made in the Grand Bahama
economy due to the multi-mil-
lion dollar investments
approved by the government.

He was referring to the
$300 million investment at the

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Zhivargo Laing

BORCO terminal in
Freeport, and the $200 mil-
lion investment at the South
Riding Point oil terminal in
East End.

“These projects will pro-
vide a major boost to the
economy here,” Mr Laing
said.

Vopak’s $350 million
expansion project at BORCO

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will increase oil storage capac-
ity at the plant, which has a
current capacity of 21 million
barrels.

Statoil plans to upgrade the
terminal at South Riding
Point so it can start blending
crude oil.

The first phase of the pro-
ject involves a major clean up
of the facility and upgrading
safety levels at the terminal.
The second phase will involve
installing new pipelines and
equipment to begin blending
operations.

Kenneth Russell, Minister
of Housing and National
Insurance, also noted that the
sale of Deep Water Cay in
East Grand Bahama has been
finalized.

“Tt is expected that some
$20-$40 million will be invest-
ed to upgrade the facility
there,” he reported.

Public Works Minister
Neko Grant also discussed the
progress of government pro-

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jects that are underway on
Grand Bahama. He stated
that work is proceeding well
on the new $16 million gov-
ernment complex in Freeport.

Mr Grant stated that public
restroom facilities are being
built at the Post Office Build-
ing downtown.

He also added that eight
new classrooms will be con-
structed at the new Sister
Mary Patricia Junior High
School.

Mr Grant was also pleased
with the progress of work at












the new ferry dock at
McCleans Town in East End.

Mr Grant said the social
assessment of the Pinder’s
Point and Lewis Yard settle-
ments has been completed.

He said the government
will review the report so that
a decision can be made
regarding what steps will be
taken regarding the welfare
of residents and the students
of the Lewis Yard Primary
who are affected by emissions
from the nearby industrial
plants.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

British Airways flies to Nassau empty

BRITISH AIRWAYS is in trouble —
plenty of trouble. We have not been follow-
ing the strike against the airline, but if what
has been happening with flights to New
Providence in the past few days is any indi-
cation, those within the union who have said
they would not be “sad to see BA fail” might
yet get their wish.

Talks between the airline and the union
broke down again on Friday with the
announcement that the strike will continue
until June 9. Apparently the crunch is now
over concessions.

British Executive Officer Willie Walsh
has made it clear that the airline will never
reinstate concessions to staff who went on
strike. Derek Simpson, the striking Unite’s
joint leader replied: “He has refused to rein-
state travel concessions in full despite Unite
making it clear that the union would sus-
pend the strike if he did so.”

The strike is estimated to cost BA £105
million.

“British Airways seems resigned to facing
the short-term losses in order to secure
changes in working practices and cost savings
in the longer term,” said Jonathan Wober, an
analyst at Societe Generale SA in London
with a “hold” recommendation on the stock.
“Shareholders seem to be regarding this as a
one-off cost, as long as the results that are
realized are in BA management’s favour.”

Union and management have locked
horns over pay and staffing levels for BA’s
12,000 cabin crew.

Derek Simpson now wants the negotia-
tions to be in front of the cameras. “Let the
world see what this is all about,” he said.
“If people could see what he (Walsh) is
doing, they would know who to blame.”

Mr Simpson might be embarrassed by
the cameras if there is a repeat of the loud-
mouthed protesters who interrupted deli-
cate union-management negotiations in sup-
port of the cabin crew last week. Even an
angry union leader had to shout them down,
telling them that if in fact they supported
the cabin crew they would leave the building
immediately. Their behaviour certainly did
not help the union’s cause — certainly not
with the public who witnessed their skin-
head behaviour.

According to BA more flights were
planned in the coming days during the indus-









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Bes —

trial action because more cabin crews were
reporting for duty. On the Internet, in the
meantime, BA is advertising round-trip fares
to London as low as $296 return.

Now this is what has been happening
here in New Providence.

A BA Boeing 767, which can accommo-
date 189 passengers, arrived at Lynden Pin-
dling airport on Wednesday with only the
flight deck on board — three persons. There
were no passengers, although, we under-
stand, the aircraft was fully catered for pas-
sengers. It arrived at its 3.25pm scheduled
time Wednesday, and left, again on schedule,
at 9.40 the same evening. This is what we
have confirmed.

We tried to find out why the company
would waste so much fuel flying both ways
empty, rather than remaining at Heathrow.
The person asked was not certain, but pre-
sumed that it was a slotting problem at
Heathrow airport. In other words an air-
craft has a parking time slot, which it has to
vacate when its time is up. We were not able
to confirm this report.

And why was an empty aircraft fully
catered for non-existent passengers? Again
the person did not know, but believed it was
something to do with union agreements that
an aircraft cannot get airborne unless it is ful-
ly catered. Again this report has not been
confirmed.

And what happened to the food? We
understand it had to be dumped in Nassau.
The rules say food cannot be given to the
poor after a certain number of hours. Again
the dumping of the food is an unconfirmed
report.

However, what is confirmed is that BA
flew its Boeing to Nassau again on schedule
Friday.

It was empty. It returned to London with
a handful of passengers. The same thing
happened on Saturday — the Boeing arrived
empty and left empty.

There was a repeat performance yester-
day, Sunday, except that it left with a few
passengers. The same is expected to hap-
pen again tomorrow.

Not only is BA losing financially, but just
imagine the number of passengers who are
not arriving in the Bahamas.

It is now a matter of who blinks first
before there is an end to this test of wills.



Either legalise
vambling or
shut it down

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kindly allow me space in
your daily to express my opin-
ion on a topical issue. The
Prime Minister, Rt Hon Hubert
Ingraham recently declared that
after consultation the govern-
ment has decided not to pur-
sue legalising gambling in The
Bahamas.

I would love to know who
they consulted with because I
live here and have a voter’s
card and no one asked me any-
thing. Perhaps I might not be
important enough to have a say
in their opinion. But as we all
know, once again, the mighty
Christian Council of our
beloved “Christian” nation pre-
vails.

My problem is this — how
come no one (namely the
Christian Council) makes a fuss
about tourists coming here to
gamble? If it’s so abominable
then why don’t we stop them
from gambling too? Why not
abolish it completely? Huh?
Oh, of course not, there isn’t
any hypocrisy in that decision!

So you’re telling me the
church doesn’t hold raffles to
make profits for positive bene-
fits? Then what’s wrong with
the government legalising gam-
bling to make some money for
this economy which our Prime
Minister candidly referred to
as a “sick patient”?

There is nothing wrong with
having the Christian Council
and religious community as a
moral compass for the nation;
however, when their actions
begin to impede positive
progress then the government
should exercise more sternly its
right to have the final say and
do what it thinks best for the
advancement of the country on
the advice of the majority.

Ironically, the Florida lottery
that a considerable number of
Bahamians love to run off to
Florida and play has donated
more than $21 billion toward

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



education in the state of Flori-
da, the New York lottery over
$36 billion and the Illinois lot-
tery has given over $15 billion
to its state. You’re telling me
we can’t do the same and use
this money to build new hospi-
tals, fund education, combat
crime fighting, develop social
programmes and cut down that
national deficit that is spiraling
out of control? No, let’s fund
the education of others first I
suppose.

I was amused, but not at all
surprised, to see one of our
local television stations playing
a commercial boldly to adver-
tise a popular numbers game
available in New Providence.
These people don’t care; it is
just like it is already legal.
Moreover, the Prime Minister
says the government can’t
police it and yet they still aren’t
ready to legalise it. So what in
Sam Hill do they propose? ’'m
absolutely confused right now!

On a humorous note, one of
the local Revs was broadcast
on the evening news as captain
of a sailboat which is proudly
sponsored by a local numbers
house as the logo was even con-
spicuously displayed on said
boat for all to see. Welcome to
comedy central!

This doesn’t make an iota of
sense to me. Why do we con-
tinue to allow some of these
already filthy rich politicians
and police officers (well they
aren’t as rich) to accept dona-
tions from these numbers boss-
es while the treasury remains
broke? Confused again!

Conversely, I agree that it
would not be wise to put
Bahamians in casinos as this
might spell disaster, but defi-
nitely the government might
want to allow them to play the

numbers game legally. Then we
can tax these number houses
and watch the cash line the gov-
ernment’s dusty pockets instead
for a change.

Let the Bahamian people
have their say, Mr Prime Min-
ister. This is our country. Let
the people speak and boldly put
their mark to the “yes” or “no”
toward regulating this industry.
No one can dispute that the
government urgently needs this
cash injection.

Tam not advocating for legal-
ising gambling or abolishing it.
My stance is this — If you’re not
going to legalise the business
then shut it down. Why do we
always need these people with
law degrees (who work for us
anyway) to tell us what to do?

Mr Ingraham has communi-
cated that he will be taking a
pay cut but as far as I under-
stand, the man collects a salary
and a pension. How foolish do
these people think we are? If
he is really concerned he will
give up either his salary or pen-
sion completely.

Quite frankly I am disgust-
ed to see that a handful of peo-
ple make money from this “‘ille-
gal” game while the country
cries out desperately to have its
needs met.

Now the money that the
country needs will have to
come from somewhere else. So
guess what? Higher taxes for
the already struggling middle
class man!

If the church opposes it so
vehemently, when the new tax-
es rain down let’s start with
them.

This now makes room for
another controversial yet perti-
nent and equally timely subject
—should there be greater sepa-
ration of church and state in
our beloved Bahamaland?

D ANDERSON
Bahamian
Nassau,

May 26, 2010.

An open letter to Lloyd Turnquest
and Town Planning Committee

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open
letter to Mr. Lloyd Turn-
quest and the Town Plan-
ning Committee who have
not replied to owners’ con-
cerns about planned Trecon
construction in front of
homes 27-29 in Delaporte
Point.

To Lloyd Turnquest and
the Town Planning Com-
mittee:

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Have you ever wanted to run your
own Consignment Store?

We are considering selling our well established
Consignment Boutique, Selling ladies fashions,
located on Shirley Street.

For more information, please call 424-8359

HELP WANTED

During your site visit to
Delaporte Point, several
owners showed you an area
in front of houses 27-29
selected by Trecon Con-
struction to build more
homes.

You said there was no
application for the area. In
justifying the controversial
garden units that were
opposed by most Delaporte
Point owners, your depart-
ment claimed they were on
an old 1960’s plan.

That plan shows there are
no units in front of homes
27-29. In addition, the gar-
den in front of the homes
has been maintained at the
expense of owners since
before Trecon purchased in
Delaporte.

For the same reason that

the controversial garden
permit was approved (plan-
ning claims they had to go
by an old plan), homeown-
ers request that the Town
Planning Committee refuses
any application for building
in front of homes 27-29
because they are not on the
same plan.

As Town Planning Chair-
man, you told Delaporte
owners you could stop the
construction in front of
homes 27-29. We expect
you to live up to your word.

Please stop the proposed
construction before it is too
late.

DELAPORTE
POINT OWNERS
Delaporte,

May 27, 2010

Oe
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 5



Doubts about % <>
legal teeth of |

nt i |



animal control law

Resident fears legislation will not protect people

A resident, who says his
community in the eastern area
of the island, is terrorised by a
dangerous dog does not

by another
resident of
the area
that is left

bune the matter was “before
the courts” but this newspa-
per was unable to find a
record of this at the Police

believe the new Animal Con- | “free to Prosecutions Office and the
trol and Protection Act 2010 roam” the dog continues to live in the
has the legal teeth to protect neighbour- area.
people in such situations. hood. Agriculture and Marine
After years of police inac- The dog, Resources Minister Larr
tion despite promises from itis alleged, Cortwright, who put fervat
the Fox Hill police station has “not ek 8 1 P ein d
that the owner of the ram- been kept Die imal Prolecvon, a
paging dog would be prose- under prop- Control Act on behalf of the

cuted for letting her dog roam
freely in the area, the resident
said the wording of the new
Act appears too weak to
encourage enforcement of the
law.

A major purpose of the

Bill, passed by parliamentari- _ ten by the dog.” Child maintenance
ans last week in the House of The dog “attempted to kill” ee .
Assembly, is to increase mea- a two-year-old girl, and was application against
sures to reduce the likelihood — only stopped by the interven- oo

of attacks on the public by _ tion of the girl’s grandmother, Senator (lismissed

dangerous dogs and the
opportunity for victims of
such attacks to claim damages
from dog owners.

But, according to the resi-
dent, the fact that the new Act
only states that in the case of
a person contravening the Act
a police officer “may”, rather
than “must” or “should” issue
a summons to the person
allegedly responsible to
appear before a magistrate
gives the police too much lee-
way to ignore situations
where the public is left at risk
of attack, as has happened in
his neighbourhood, he said.

In a March 2010 letter writ-
ten to Commissioner of Police
Ellison Greenslade over the
question of the inaction of the
Fox Hill police station with
respect to the situation, the
resident explained how peo-
ple living in the area have
been “terrorised by a vicious
and dangerous dog” owned



er control

“LARRY

since June
CARTWRIGHT 2008” and

since Janu-
ary 2009 “six or more neigh-
bours have been seriously
attacked and repeatedly bit-

who was then herself “almost
killed” by the animal who had
to be wrestled off her by oth-
ers, it was alleged.

Complaints

“Within the last year five
or more written complaints
by neighbours who have been
attacked or bitten by this dog,
along with the relevant med-
ical evidence, have been given
to the Fox Hill police station,”
said the resident, who added
that he had not received a
response from the police to
his letter.

Neighbours wanted to see
the “ferocious” dog removed
and destroyed and the owner
prosecuted and denied the
right to keep dogs for some-
time, the resident said.

When contacted about the
matter, an officer at Fox Hill
Police station told The Tri-

TA MCU EDA

THE Royal Bank of Canada apologised to its clients over the
weekend for a malfunction in one of its ATM card printing

machines.

According to Jan Knowles, the regional manager of Public
Relations and Communications for RBC, this temporary issue
was resolved earlier in the week and to date requests for cards
are being fulfilled within their regular turn around period and
prior requests have been fulfilled.

“Clients were advised via our branch network of the situation
and we again apologise to them for any inconvenience,” she

said.

government — now before the
Senate — said he “noted” the
suggestions with respect to
the Act, but had no comment
to make.



A child maintenance
application against Free
National Movement
Senator Anthony Mus-
grove was dismissed by
a Magistrate Friday.

The claimant, who
according to her attor-
ney Romona Farquhar-
son, gave birth to twin
girls allegedly for the
Senator last September,
was not present in court
Friday afternoon.

Magistrate Carolyn
Voigt Evans subse-
quently dismissed the
application. Senator
Musgrove who was pre-
sent in Court 3, Victoria
Gardens Friday, was
represented by lawyer
Don Saunders.







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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

The man who believes he
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man who builds his
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and BGCSE passes will be considered.

Interested persons should apply via Email
to: jobsearch2421@hotmail.com, or via post
DA-85001 (Sales Assistant)

PO Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Wl GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S YOUTH AWARD: 19TH ANNUAL BAHAMAS AWARD SCHEME EXPEDITION

Summer challeng

The Governor-General’s Youth
Award announces its 19th annual
Bahamas Award Scheme Expedition
schedule for Long Island, June 29 to July
8.

Bahamas Award Scheme Expedition
(BASE) is open to all Governor-Gen-
eral’s Youth Award (GGYA) Bronze,
Silver and Gold participants and affords
them the opportunity to:

e Experience adventure and discov-
ery on a different Bahamian Family
Island.

e Create an opportunity for partici-
pants from different islands to share skills
and experiences.

¢ Opportunities for achievement and
fulfilment in challenging situations.

Long Island will prove another chal-
lenge for these aspiring young adven-
tures. They will explore Long Island’s
magnificent cliffs, blue holes, caves and
Clarence Town’s spectacular architec-
ture.

Supervisors and Gold Award holders
attending will have the opportunity to
complete the International Award Asso-
ciation certificate course geared for those
interest in becoming Award unit lead-
ers.

“Yuma”, Long Island’s original name,
will enlighten their curiosity and chal-
lenge their fitness and spirit.





oars
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PARTICIPANTS are pictured here at BASE 2009 on Crooked Island.

The GGYA is an exciting self-devel-
opment programme available to all
young people equipping them with life
skills to make a difference to themselves,
their communities and the world.

To date over six million people from
over 125 countries have been motivated

to undertake a variety of voluntary and
challenging activities. In the Bahamas,
there are 39 units with over 800 partici-
pants. For more information on BASE
and the GGYA contact 326-1760/1;
email: ggya@coralwave.com or go online:
www.bahamasgegya.org



By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

Fees: time buy-
ers...excited to find
a good deal, afraid of overex-
tending themselves, confused
by all the conflicting reports
about the Bahamas real

estate market. Well, that



for it and take advantage of
the bargains that are out
there. Those of us in Nassau
should remember there are
some very good opportuni-
ties in the Out Islands.

Set aside your uncertain-
ties. Chat with a BREA
agent who can help you

might describe any or all buy-
ers right now, but those mak-
ing their very first purchase
may feel elevated levels of
all these emotions. It helps
to have someone offer you
some guidance.

Don’t be afraid to make
your move now, regardless
of what you’ve been hearing
about the market. With
affordability so high, you’ll
find a flurry of activity out
there, so youre not alone in
making the right decision to




begin your home or vacant
property search.

Just try not to exercise
excessive caution, or you may
suffer what has been termed
“paralysis by analysis.” Your
Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation (BREA) representa-

tive will present you with all
the facts and figures you
need, and help you to inter-
pret the data so that you can
make a sound choice.

Now is not the time to vac-
illate. Vacant subdivision
properties are plentiful so the
choice is excellent. There are
a goodly number of home
sellers who have become
realistic about the value of
their homes as determined
by the market. It is time to go



determine your financial
footing, and show you an
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matched to your particular
goals.

(Mike Lightbourn is presi-
dent of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty)

Questions or comments? E-
mail me at ask@Coldwell-
BankerBahamas.com.





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The Department of Statistics is conducting its Annual Business Establishment
Survey from May until the end of September, The survey requires
that businesses and institutions provide the following information;

|. Number of employees

2. Wages & salaries

3. Annual hours worked

4, Revenues & expenditures
5. Depreciation & acquisitions

The data generated from the survey is used to measure each sector's
contribution of national output, and provide information essential to the
estimation of national income and the gross national product of The
Bahamas.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Jamaica’s business is the
Caribbean’s business

insight

WORLD VIEW

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is an International
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

| he widely publicised

bloody clashes over
the last few days between law
enforcement agencies and
armed gangs in Jamaica are as
bad for the economic and social
well-being of the people of
Caribbean countries as they are
for Jamaicans.

While the members of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM) see themselves as a
“Community of Independent
Sovereign States”, most of the
rest of the world regard them as
one area. Only the most knowl-
edgeable make a distinction
between them. So, events in
Jamaica impact all other CARI-
COM countries whether they
like it or not.

In meaningful terms, there-
fore, Jamaica’s business is
CARICOM’s business. Neither
CARICOM governments nor
the people of CARICOM can
sit back and pretend that events
in Jamaica in which criminals
defy the authority of the State
are not relevant to them.
CARICOM countries are tied
together and none can deny
cross-border relationships in
trade, investment and people.

Jamaica is the biggest of the
CARICOM countries in pop-
ulation terms and it impresses
and influences the world far
more than other CARICOM
countries. Of course, the
impression and influence have
been both beneficial and inim-
ical to Jamaica and the wider
region.

On the positive side, the
vibrant music of Jamaica and
its musicians, led by the iconic
Bob Marley, have clearly given
Jamaica global recognition. So
too have its holiday resorts
which are playgrounds for
tourists from all over Europe
and North America. Jamaican
agricultural products, such as
its Blue Mountain Coffee, and
many of its manufactured goods
have been able to penetrate for-
eign markets more deeply than
those from other regional coun-
tries.

And, CARICOM’s negotia-
tions with large countries and
groups of countries would be
much weaker and far less effec-
tive without the participation
of Jamaica. Its relatively large
population of close to three mil-
lion people makes Jamaica a
more attractive market than the
majority of CARICOM coun-
tries which, with the exception
of Trinidad and Tobago, each
number less than a million peo-
ple. Because of the size of its
population, even with the limi-
tations of educational opportu-
nities, Jamaica also has more
qualified technical people for
bargaining internationally than
its partner countries in CARI-
COM. Therefore, the partici-
pation of Jamaican negotiators
in CARICOM teams is
extremely valuable.

Jamaicans also constitute the
largest number of the West
Indian Diaspora in the United
Kingdom, the United States
and Canada. To the extent that
the West Indian Diaspora is a
group whose votes are wooed
by political parties in these
countries, much is owed to
Jamaicans for the attention
paid to Caribbean concerns.

On the negative side,
Jamaica’s internal crime, and
organised crime that its gangs
have exported to Britain, Cana-
da and the United States have
created an unwholesome image
for the country and severely
damaged it economically. In the
process, CARICOM has been
weakened economically as well,
for an economically weak
Jamaica is unable to serve as a
dynamo for economic activity
and growth throughout the

SIR RONALD SANDERS



Jamaica’s high crime level
has been bad for business and
bad for its economy. A 2003
study found that the total costs
of crime came to J$12.4 billion
which was 3.7 per cent of GDP,
and a 2007 UN report projected
that if Jamaica could reduce
violent crime to Costa Rica’s
low level, the economy would
grow by 5.4 per cent. In a
World Bank survey, 39 per cent
of Jamaica’s business managers
said they were less likely to
expand their businesses because
of crime, and 37 per cent
reported that crime discourages
investment that would have
encouraged greater productivi-

ty.
Investment

Apart from scaring away
investment, high crime in
Jamaica has also caused many
of its professionals and middle-
class families to flee the country
seeking safer environments
abroad. More than 80 per cent
of Jamaica’s tertiary educated
people have migrated to the
world’s industrialized nations.

It doesn’t take much imagi-
nation to work out how much
more socially and economically
developed Jamaica would have
been today had it not been
plagued by over 30 years of
escalating crime and its debili-
tating consequences.

From time to time, outbursts
of violent crime have affected
the country’s tourism which
contributes about 10 per cent
of the country’s GDP. It is only
because of expensive and
extensive advertising and pub-
lic relations campaigns in the
main tourist markets that
Jamaica has managed to keep
its tourism arrivals by air fairly
stable.

This latest, globally-publi-
cized, bloody confrontation
between security forces and
criminal gangs protecting a
Drugs Don, Christopher
“Dudus” Coke, from being
served with an order for extra-
dition to the United States and
arrested, will damage the
tourism industry harshly, and,
again, once it is over, Jamaica
will be forced to spend large
sums repairing its image and
assuring tourists of its safety.

Other CARICOM countries
will not be immune from the
Jamaica disturbances. On the
basis that tourists see the
Caribbean as one place, other
Caribbean destinations will also
have to spend more on pro-
moting themselves.

The fact that “Dudus” could
be protected by well-armed,
criminal gangs who have nei-
ther respect for, nor fear of,
Jamaica’s security forces or the
authority of the State, is a direct
consequence of governance
gone badly wrong. From the

mid-1970s the two main politi-
cal parties in Jamaica, the
Jamaica Labour Party (JLP)
and the Peoples National Party
(PNP) have formed alliances
with gangs that have been well-
armed and in many cases are
involved in the drugs trade.
Having taken that step that ren-
ders politicians beholden to
criminals, the political hierar-
chy began an inexorable down-
ward spiral to disaster.

In effect, part of the State
has been captured by leaders
of criminal gangs to whom
political parties are obligated.
Nothing else but this sense of
obligation to “Dudus” Coke
can explain why Jamaica’s
Prime Minister Bruce Golding,
as Leader of the JLP, would
have intervened at party level
to influence a law enforcement
matter between his government
and the government of the US.

The Jamaican government
now has to assert the authority
of the State over “Dudus” and
his gang, and it must be done if
Jamaica is to be freed from the
captivity of criminal gangs.

And, when this particular
confrontation is over, Jamaica
must start the gruelling process
of openly and transparently dis-
mantling all party political con-
nections with gangs, reassert-
ing the supremacy of the State,
and weeding out gangs that are
the scourge of the society. Any
alternative scenario is too ter-
rifying to contemplate but it
does include Jamaica being
plunged into the status of a
failed State.

This is why it behoves the
current party political leaders
to set to the task of recovering
the State from the influence of
criminals and establishing
broad based institutions
empowered by law to oversee
public services and political
practices. Jamaica will be eco-
nomically stronger, socially bet-
ter and politically more stable
than it has been for decades
and, as a consequence, CARI-
COM will benefit.

Responses and previous com-
mentaries: www.sirronald-
sanders.com

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(AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
ASOLDIER stands guard above a
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

FROM page one

Perry Christie. At the time
such actions were openly
condemned by many within
the hierarchy of the party.

However this “fearlessness”
to break party ranks has
endeared the young lawyer
with some within the orga-
nization.

One of these such sup-

LOCAL NEWS

henorts: Righy a possible candidate for St Cecilia

porters, a former Cabinet
Minister and PLP MP for
Exuma, George Smith said
that he would “enthusiasti-
cally” support Mr Rigby for
the St Cecilia nomination.

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Describing Mr Rigby as
“the new kind of candidate”
that the party ought to be
running, Mr Smith said that
Mr Rigby has already dis-
tinguished himself as a
strong advocate and lawyer
and has already proven his
tenacity as a very effective
party chairman.

“T have always believed
he was destined for front-
line politics and I think if he
emerges as the party’s front
line candidate for St Cecilia
he will be a very effective
voice for that area. He can
greatly assist the local busi-
ness people in that area who
also have this great battle
with the road reversal.

“He is a man of tremen-
dous intellect. He fits the bill
of the kind of candidate that
the PLP and by far all polit-
ical parties should be putting
forward,” Mr Smith argued.

Having leant his voice in
support of this would-be
candidate, Mr Smith encour-
aged other PLPs to do like-

wise stating that the time has
come for persons with abili-
ty to step forward and be
counted.

Support

“T would support him
enthusiastically and I would
encourage other people to
do so.

“He can be a part of the
solution and not just be
someone sitting on the side-
lines doing nothing about it.
He has distinguished him-
self as a young advocate and
lawyer. I am _ greatly
impressed with Raynard
Rigby,” he said.

Along with Mr Rigby, the
PLP’s former Senator
Paulette Zonicle has also
been reported to be seeking
the party’s nomination to
run in St Cecilia for some
time.

As a close ally to the con-
stituency’s current repre-
sentative and former deputy

THE TRIBUNE

unknown at this time
whether Mrs Zonicle, or Mr
Rigby would be the party’s
front-runner for the nomi-
nation.

However, there is one
thing that cither candidate
can be assured of, and that is
that they will face a consid-
erable challenge for the seat
from a former PLP support-
er, now National Develop-
ment Party member Paul
Moss.

Mr Moss has been cam-
paigning in the area for over
two years and has reported-
ly created a sizable base in
the constituency.

However, as what would
be normally characterized
as a traditional “PLP seat,”
it is unclear if this support
would continue to be car-
ried over now that Mr Moss
has changed his political
alliance.

Attempts to reach Mr
Rigby for comment on this
report were unsuccessful up
to press time last night.



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NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS
A prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
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by June 9th, 2010. Nominations, inquiries and applications are treated confi-
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Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained
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CREDIT SUISSE AG, NASSAU BRANCH
APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch offers applications for an Apprenticeship
Program which is outlined hereafter. Full details and an application form can be
obtained from:

The Program Administrator

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch

The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4‘ Floor
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas

Application forms should be returned no later than
Thursday, June 10, 2010.

AIM

As a corporate citizen desirous of making a positive contribution to the local
community, Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch plans to offer a scholarship to a
Bahamian student to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree at the College of The Bahamas
(‘COB’) under its Apprenticeship Program.

CONDITIONS

* The candidate may select Business Administration or any banking related
field (i.e. Business Management, Banking & Finance, Accounting, Finance or
Economics major) as their field of study.
A minimum grade point average of 2.6 must be maintained at all times.
Grades must be submitted to the Program Administrator at the Bank within
three weeks at the end of each semester.
The candidate must be willing to work twelve (12) hours per week (part time)
and four (4) months per year (full time) at the Bank during MAY, JUNE, JULY,
AUGUST and any other month (or parts thereof) whilst pursuing full time
studies at COB.
The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of a person employed
at the Bank.
The candidate will report to and consult with the Program Administrator who is
responsible for supervision, work assignments, advice, release of payments
and all other administrative and supervisory details.
The candidate must be “drug free” throughout the entire four (4) year contract
period.
The candidate should register for and successfully complete a minimum of
twelve (12) credits per semester as a full time student.
The candidate cannot be employed by a third party during the four (4) year
period.
The candidate must become PC literate by the end of year one of the program.

BENEFITS
Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch will pay for the following costs whilst
the candidate is enrolled as a student at College of The Bahamas:

Tuition and fees at College of The Bahamas [full tuition].

A Housing Allowance of $1,700.00 (year one), $1,800.00 (year two), and
$2,000.00 (year three).

A Transportation Allowance of $1,500.00 (year one), $1,500.00 (year two), and
$1,600.00 (year three).

Book Allowance; paid in full each semester.

Allowance for Miscellaneous expenses of $800.00 per annum (year one) and
$1,500.00 per annum (year two and three).

Special Allowance for candidates from the Family Islands $3,000.00 (year one),
$3,200.00 (year two), and $3,500.00 (year three)

Health Insurance (provided the candidate submits to a medical examination by
the Bank’s medical doctor prior to commencing Apprenticeship Program).

COVENANTS

* No consideration will be given to the sex, race or religion of the candidate
during the selection process.

* The Bank shall have no obligation towards the candidate with regards to
employment or scholarships at the end of the four (4) year contract period.

PROGRAM OUTLINE

The Apprenticeship Program has a duration and contract period of four (4) years
as follows:

YEAR 1: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4.
YEAR 2: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4.
YEAR 3: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4.
YEAR 4: Full time employment with the Bank at an entry-level job at the Bank’s
discretion.

In lieu of salary, the Benefits as per Paragraph C are paid during the first three

years of the program. During the fourth year, a salary will be paid in lieu of
tuition, fees and allowances (adjusted for cost of living increases).

NOTE: Students who are currently enrolled in
COB are not eligible.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Atlantis CEO hails airfare programme

FROM page one

can offer a fourth night stay
for free to their guests Mr
Markantonis said that there
are not too many places that
can do a free companion air-
fare deal. This, he said, was
due largely to the collabo-
ration between the govern-
ment and the private sector
to be able to put something
like this forward.

“T hope we will be able to
continue it further even after
the funds are used because
obviously we have budgeted
funds for this as a country
and we will see how that
works out.”

Ideas

Currently, Atlantis has a
number of promotional
ideas they are working on
for the fall season.

With these months of Sep-
tember, October and
November being notorious-
ly bad for the local tourism
industry, Mr Markantonis
said that they cannot take
the attitude that with this



oF

Sash



Warts Number of a ideas.

to continue to experiment
with how to change the fall
into a peak period for us
too,” he said.

Mr Markantonis also
added that Atlantis is work-

ing on some exciting fall
promotions which they hope
to roll-out within two weeks.

@ (See more stories from
the press conference in busi-
ness).































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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Ranfurly Home may face partial closure

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

ee a

INEZ
ADELAIDE
BANISTER

March 23, 1915 — May 22, 2010

It is with profound sadness

that the Banister family

announces the passing of our

beautiful mother and

matriarch, Inez Banister.

Mum was predeceased by

" her loving husband Ronald,

and her youngest daughter Mary Johnston. Mum was

born in Okotoks, Alberta and was a resident of the
Bahamas for the past 40 years.

She leaves behind her children, daughter Laureen and her
husband Robert Kinnear of Toronto, Ontario, her son
Rodger Banister and his wife Hanne of Nassau, Bahamas
and her son Harold Banister and his wife Linda and son-
in-law Bill Johnston of Edmonton, Alberta. She also
leaves behind her two brothers Arne Thorson and his wife
Evelyn of Calgary, Alberta, and Talbert Thorson of
Invermere, British Columbia, 17 grandchildren, 19 great
grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

Mum’s ashes will be laid down beside those of our father
in Okotoks, Alberta. According to mum’s wishes there
will only be a graveside service with the immediate family.

The Banister family would like to thank the staff, doctors
and nurses at Doctor’s Hospital in Nassau for the
professional and compassionate care they extended to
mum. The Family also thanks mum’s loyal and dedicated
staff, Shirley Armbrister, Marlene Barnes and Miriam
Rolle and the doormen at Sulgrave Manor for their help
and kindness to mum. We thank the many friends who
have helped us through this period, and for the countless
good wishes and prayers given to our mother. She was
deeply loved, and will be forever missed.

Instead of flowers, friends who wish to remember Mrs.
Banister, may make a donation to The Salvation Army,
P.O.Box N.205, Nassau, The Bahamas in her memory.

Ch Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Gregory P. O’Brien, 58

of Masons
Addition, will be
held on
Wednesday, June
2nd at 11am at St
Agnes Anglican
Church, Baillou
Hill Road. The
Venerable
Archdeacon I.
Ranfurly Brown,
Rev’d, Bernard Been and Rev’d Fr Neil
Nairn. Interment will be made in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F.
Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish memories of Gregory
are his; one daughter, Karen O’Brien
Knowles; one step son, Anwar
Williams; one grandson, Arlington
Knowles Jr; two grand daughters,
Davette Hanna and Kadesha Knowles;
three sisters, Yvonne Bethel, Janet Cox
and Ethel O’ Brien-Bowe; five brothers,
Basil, Hugh, Kenneth, Edmund and
Neil O’Brien; brother-in-law, Canon
Leopold Cox; sisters-in-law, Marlene,
Perky, Mercelita and Kishlane O’Brien;
nephews, Mark and Marcian Bethel,
Michael, Drs David and Keith, Tariq,
Gavin, Edmund Jr and Cyril O’Brien;
nieces, Dr Carla Bethel, Maria O’Brien,
Margueritte Grant, Patrice Antonio,
Deidre Edgecombe; Nicole & Nicara
and Opal O’Brien; aunt, Mrs Majorie
McKinney; numerous cousins
including, Winston and Stephanie
Varence, Antoine Wallace, Brent and
Andre Williams; special friends,
Michelle Fox, Wanda, Louise, Astrid,
Pandora and Gaynor Johnson.





Friends may pay their last respects at

Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Tuesday from 10am
to 5pm and on Wednesday at the church
from 10am until service time.



FROM page one

care facility may be the only
way to keep it operating in
the long term if donations
cannot be found.

“We had some discussions
last year of what we would
do if the finances of the
Home do not pick up.

“Certainly we cannot
allow Lady Ranfurly’s lega-
cy to die. She worked tire-
lessly to have this home built
and she’s turning over in her
grave in England saying
‘God, all this work I did, and




now to come to nought!’

“We said (before we allow
this to happen) we may have
to close a dorm. It’s easier to
feed girls than to feed boys
so the thinking is we may
have to close the boys dorm
and the government may
have to find alternative
homes for them,” President
of the Board of Directors,
Remelda Moxey told The
Tribune.

Ms Moxey, a 25-year vet-
eran of the Ranfurly Home,
said that finances at the
institution are “definitely the

m IN SUBANCE COMPANY LOKI TED



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SALE STARTS

worst they’ve ever been.”

The Home’s founder and
longtime patron, the late
Lady Hermione Ranfurly,
was the wife of the Earl of
Ranfurly, governor of the
Bahamas from 1953 to 1957.

“People are not giving like
they used to. Donations are
down significantly over the
last couple of years. Usually
you'd send out some beg-
ging letters and get a few
thousand dollars but things
are at a standstill now,” she
said.

The Ranfurly Home pro-
vides shelter and a new life
for children who have been
orphaned, abused, neglected
or abandoned.

Presently there are 32 chil-
dren between the ages of
five and 19, who have been
placed there by the Depart-
ment of Social Services.

Cutbacks

Part of the challenge fac-
ing the Home is that the
perennially slim funding
provided by the government
has this year dropped by
$5,600 — as cutbacks across
the board kick in as the
economy continues to limp.

Last year, the Govern-
ment’s records show the
administration provided
$60,000 to the home towards
its operational costs, which
Mrs Moxey pegs at around
$300,000 a year, primarily
for food and electricity. Mrs
Moxey suggests the funding
in fact also fell short of the
allocated amount last year.
“It was never that much,”
said the Board President.

Meanwhile, the Home lost
a great proportion of its
funding over the past year
as a result of a number of
sources of private funding
“drying up” almost simulta-
neously, or becoming uncer-
tain.

These include a $100,000



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donation from the estate of
a generous deceased
Bahamian which was dis-
bursed to the home in sums
of $25,000 a year for the last
five years, $26,000 which
came from a foundation in
the United States which is
now demanding for the first
time that the Home apply
for the funds, and saying
they are no longer a given
and further thousands from
an American woman who
has now retired and is
unable to give as she did in
the past.

Also in view of the eco-
nomic recession, smaller
donations from the general
public and other regular
donors have fallen off
sharply. A raffle held last
year netted just $6,000 for
the home after related costs
were paid off, after previous
year’s raffles brought in an
average of $30,000 to
$40,000.

Another factor that has
affected the Ranfurly
Home’s bottom line is the
growth in the number of
other children’s homes oper-
ating on the island. Since it
opened, the Bilney Lane
Children’s home, Elizabeth
Estates children’s home and
the Nazareth Centre have
all become operational.
Some of these also seek pri-
vate donations and extra
funds from the government
to assist with operational
costs.

“There’s a perception out
there I think that Ranfurly
has money. Maybe because
it is the oldest home and
when people think of
Homes they think of Ran-
furly. But there’s so many
other Homes now and costs
continue to rise,” said Mrs
Moxey.

The Home presently owes
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation $25,000 in over-
due fees — a cost which Mrs
Moxey suggested the Gov-
ernment should consider
writing off for charitable
organisations like the Ran-
furly.

Given the continuing
deterioration in the Home’s
finances, Mrs Moxey said
that the worst case scenario
will be the closure of one of
the Home’s dormitories with
the result that some of the
32 children would have to
be separated from their
friends and siblings they
may have in the facility.

“Now that is something I
would really, really wish to
avoid. I would have to go
into fasting and praying for
God to send some donors
before that happened
because I do not want to
close any wing of the home,
because the closure of any
wing would require dis-
placement and in some
instances separation of sib-
lings. And you don’t want
to displace these children.
For some of them that’s the
only home they know,” said
Mrs Moxey.

The Ranfurly Home will
be having a fundraising
Steak Out on June 26th, and
soon after that, their annual
raffle for which tickets will
soon go on sale. Anyone
wishing to donate can visit
www.ranfurlyhome.org or
contact the Ranfurly Home
at 393-3115.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Jamaican slum dwellers

angry at troops after raid



a military check point
in Tivoli Gardens
neighborhood,
Kingston, Sunday,
May 30, 2010.







will





a
AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd



CHILDREN PLAY soccer at Tivoli Gardens neighborhood, Kingston,
Saturday, May 29, 2010.

By David McFadden

Associated Press Writer

KINGSTON, Jamaica



Security forces with M-16s and rotating machine guns at the
ready on Sunday patrolled a hostile slum in Jamaica's capital
where angry defenders of a fugitive underworld boss complained
of unprovoked attacks and the deaths of innocents.

Nearly a week after security forces started a deadly four-day
assault in search of reputed drug lord Christopher "Dudus" Coke,
residents of the Tivoli Gardens slum, nicknamed the "wild, wild
West," were trying to live their lives amid concertina wire and mil-
itary checkpoints.

Children played on trash-strewn streets, as mostly older women
headed to church in their Sunday best past soldiers and police in
camouflage fatigues. The scent of marijuana mixed with the stench
of urine and rotting garbage.

Slum dwellers across the bullet-pocked complex voiced rage and
frustration at having to live alongside security forces who they
see as an occupying army and accuse of killing innocent people dur-
ing the fighting. They insist the death toll is higher than the official
tally of 73.

"We are thankful that God spared our lives, but we are fearful
of the soldiers," a woman who identified herself only as Lilleth told
The Associated Press on Sunday as a military helicopter buzzed
overhead. "I'm not saying everybody was innocent here, but we
don't deserve this. More than 100 people died, many for nothing,
no matter what they say."

Nearby, a small congregation gathered inside an evangelical
church and reflected on the ordeals of the neighbourhood, where
the 41-year-old Coke solidified his authority by providing handouts,
jobs and protection in a poor downtown area where the govern-
ment and police typically have little presence.

Members of Coke's Shower Posse — a reputed drug gang with
members in Jamaica and New York — and others began barri-
cading his slum stronghold about two weeks ago following a tele-
vised announcement by Prime Minister Bruce Golding that he
would approve Coke's extradition to the U.S. on drug- and gun-
running charges. Golding had previously blocked the extradition
for nine months. He represents the Tivoli Gardens area in parlia-
ment, and Coke has helped the party receive a large number of
votes from the slum. Despite the connection, Golding claimed the
US. indictment relied on illegal wiretap evidence and that that was
the reason for his opposition. soilless mE ' a rang

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HE TRIBUNE €
AF 42S) BE

MONDAY,



MAY 31,

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net



Attorney ‘amazed’ at
being target for ‘hit’ 35% year-to-date

Bahamian
attorney was
“amazed” after
Tribune Busi-
ness told him
he had been the target of an
alleged ‘contract hit’, telling this
newspaper he had no part in -
and new nothing about - a pur-
ported $170 million investment
scam said to have provoked the
assassination plot.

Arnold Forbes, of Arnold
Forbes & Co, said he did not
know, and never had any busi-
ness dealings with, Nicholas
Djokich and Eginardo DeAn-
gelis, two Canadian men
charged with allegedly trying
to hire a hitman to assassinate
him and another Bahamas res-
ident, Freeport-based Canadian

Denies any role in, or knowledge of, alleged $170m
investment ‘scam’ that sparked assassination plot
targeting him and another Bahamas resident

attorney Richard Devries.

Upon being contacted about
the case, which is now being
tried in the Boston courts, Mr
Forbes said the main player -
Djokich - had never been a
client of his, and the only pos-
sible connection to him was that
his law firm had once acted as
the registered office/agent for a
Bahamian company beneficial-
ly owned by two of Djokich’s
friends.

“That’s news to me. I’m sur-
prised and amazed,” Mr Forbes
said, when told by Tribune
Business that both himself and
Mr Devries had been named
by Djokich as targets he wanted
to assassinate.

“He’s never been a client of
mine. I knew two guys he was
involved with who were clients
of mine at some point. They
had lost some money, but that
had nothing to do with me. I

don’t get involved in client
investments. I just represented
their company in the Bahamas.

“IT don’t know who Devries
is. I did represent GSF [the
company owned by Djokich’s
friends’. We don’t hold client
funds, get involved in client
investments or anything like
that. We incorporated a com-
pany for those guys, charged a

SEE page 2B

Atlantis casino suffering 15% fall ‘every year’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ATLANTIS’S casino busi-
ness is falling “15 per cent year-
over-year every year” due to
increased competition from
many US states, its managing
director underscoring the need
for the Bahamas to reform its
casino gaming laws, while
group business for many
Bahamian hotels is unlikely to
return until “late 2011”.

Sounding a note of caution
amid much optimism coming
from the company’s Paradise
Island properties, George
Markantonis, Kerzner Interna-
tional (Bahamas) managing
director, said part of the rea-
son the company was investing
$20-$25 million in upgrading
Atlantis’s casino was to “make
it state-of-the art and able to
compete with any other casino
offering”.

The rapid expansion of casi-
no and gaming facilities in





spon: 0
from the daily report,

Kerzner head says group business unlikely to recover until
‘latter half of 2011’, pushing back earlier rebound estimates

many US states, especially in
Florida and the north-east
states, key markets for Atlantis
and the Bahamas, meant it was
vital the resort - and the coun-
try - “make it easier, more
attractive to bring people here”.

Thinking of the high-roller,
high-end clientele the Atlantis
casino is aimed at, Mr Markan-
tonis pointed to the rapid
expansion of casino gaming in
Florida, in particular, via the
Seminole and Hard Rock casi-
no, plus the installation of slot
machines at facilities such as
race tracks.

“This has a serious impact on
us,” the Atlantis chief said,
questioning why a Florida resi-
dent wanting to gamble in a
casino would choose the added
time and inconvenience of dri-
ving to the airport, going
through various security and
immigration checkpoints and
then flying to the Bahamas,
when they could virtually pur-

Kerzner targets
sports tourism

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

KERZNER International is
aiming to break into the sports
tourism market by hosting two
NCAA basketball tournaments
at its Atlantis property over the
next two years, and is working
with the Ministry of Tourism
to enable the Bahamas to
obtain ‘exempt status’ from that
sporting organisation.

SEE page 6B

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their doorstep.

“We have to stay competi-
tive,” Mr Markantonis said.
“Our gaming business is down
15 per cent year-over-year
every year, because there’s so
much competition around us.
Every US state is opening up
casinos.”

He added that Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, the minister
of tourism and aviation, had
told him last week that the
reforms to the Bahamas’ casino
gaming laws suggested by
Atlantis, the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) and others
were “being looked at very
carefully. It’s not an easy
process”.

Among the reforms pro-
posed were allowing Bahami-
an casino staff to multi-task and
deal several games at once,
rather than being restricted to
the one game as they are cur-
rently.

Meanwhile, while Atlantis
had seen a 35 per cent increase
in its leisure travel bookings for
2010 year-to-date, the same did
not apply to its groups/conven-
tions/meetings business.

“We have not seen the same
upturn in groups and conven-
tions. That business remains
flat,’ Mr Markantonis said,
pointing out that Atlantis was
no different from Atlantic City
or Las Vegas in this respect.

Kerzner International was
“doing everything possible to
stimulate that demand”, but Mr
Markantonis conceded that ear-
lier estimates of an early 2011
recovery in the groups and con-
ventions market were unlikely
to hold true.

“T think we were probably to
optimistic as an industry,” he
added, emphasising that he
could not speak for the sector
as a whole. “If it’s going to

SEE page 2B

Atlantis leisure
bookings grow

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ATLANTIS has seen book-
ings by leisure travellers
increase by 35 per cent year-
to-date compared to 2009, its
managing director said this
weekend, expressing optimism
that the improving demand
showed there was “light at the
end of the tunnel” for the des-
tination resort.

George Markantonis, man-
aging director of Kerzner Inter-
national (Bahamas), owner of
Paradise Island’s Atlantis and
One & Only Ocean Club
resorts, told reporters that the
former was targeting a 67 per
cent average occupancy for the
year, and was on course to meet

SEE page 6B





GEORGE MARKANTONIS

Photo by Tim Clarke

Kerzner to split $100m
between five upgrades

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

KERZNER International is
likely to start recruiting in the
“next nine to 12 months” for
the 400 permanent jobs it is
planning to create at its Par-
adise Island resorts, with its
$100 million worth of upgrades
set to include a casino revamp
and 12,000 square foot ‘Teens
Club’.

George Markantonis, Kerzn-
er International (Bahamas)
managing director, said the
majority of the 400 posts would
be created in the food and bev-
erage sector. He emphasised
that the planned expansion/ren-
ovation was not the Hurricane
Hole redevelopment, and nor
was it Phase IV, both of which
are still sitting on the shelf.

Mr Markantonis said the
upgrades were designed to
“refresh” the Atlantis and One
& Only Ocean Club products,
ensuring they never became
stale but continued to stimu-
late excitement and market

Project to include
three restaurants,
casino and Teen Club

demand among both new and
returning customers.

“The expansion is going to
take place over the next two
years. It’s not Phase IV and is
not the Hurricane Hole devel-
opment. The reality is we have
to keep refreshing the product.
There are certain facilities we
can do more with and refresh
for returning customers,” Mr
Markantonis said.

To ensure Atlantis stood out
as a one-of-a-kind, destination
resort, in the manner of a Dis-
ney orLas Vegas, it had to keep
reinventing itself, Mr Markan-
tonis said, explaining that
Kerzner International planned
to “create three more restau-
rants in the existing facilities”.

Broken down, these, and the

SEE page 4B



—



CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF ARBITRATORS

LONDON

WILE CONDUCT THE FOLLOWING CERTIFICATION COURSES

Introduction to Arbitration (Group A)
Monday 7th June 2010 10am-6pm

Introduction to Arbitration (Group B)
Tuesday, 8th June 2010 10am-6pm

Introduction to Mediation

Wednesday 9th June 2010 10am-5:30pm

Instructors: The President & Trustees of CLArb London

Venue: The British Colonial Hilton

Cost $750 per course (includes course materials and lunch)

For Further Inftonmation, contact the Secretariat
Email: bererousseaulaw.com

Tel: (2427) 325-3693
Fax: (2427) 325-7688

The Bahamas .
Shipowners Association

—— ae



Chartered
Institute of
Arbitrators

ClArb





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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Attorney
‘amazed’ at being
target for ‘hit’

FROM page 1B

fee for that and acted as a reg-
istered agent. That’s it.”

Mr Forbes echoed a previ-
ous interview Mr Devries gave
to Tribune Business, both men
denying any involvement or
Knowledge of the alleged $170
million “investment scam” Djo-
kich was complaining of. Mr
Devries also said he did not
know Djokich, or what his
motivation was.

“We're in a climate where
people do those things,” Mr
Forbes said of the alleged assas-
sination plot. “What I can say is
that we are not involved in that
kind of business. We’re not
involved in business, and do not
make investments on behalf of
clients. We just acted as the reg-
istered office.”

The US government’s trial
brief, filed in the Massachusetts
district court on April 9, 2010,
lays out the alleged plot in
graphic detail, using testimony
provided by undercover agents
and informants.

The saga began on July 3,
2008, when an informant tipped
an Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE) agent to
the alleged plot, following a
meeting with Djokich and his
co-accused, which he attended.

“Djokich said he was a busi-
nessman from Calgary and that
Deangelis was a friend of his,”
the US government’s trial brief
alleged. “He claimed that he
had been defrauded of tens of
millions of dollars in an invest-
ment scheme by Richard
Devries, who was currently liv-
ing in the Bahamas, and he
asked the informant if he would
be willing to travel to the
Bahamas to kidnap Devries
and force him to wire transfer
as much of the money as possi-
ble back to him.

“Djokich stated that after the
money was wired, he did not
mind if the informant took
Devries fishing and he never
came back. He provided the
informant with numerous doc-
uments supporting his claim
that Devries had swindled him,
as well as a photo of Devries
and Devries’s home address in

Freeport, Bahamas.”

At a subsequent July 17,
2008, meeting, Djokich played
an alleged tape of a conversa-
tion with Mr Devries, in which
the latter admitted receiving
the money but did not know
what had happened to it. Djo-
kich, in response to accusations
he had kidnapped Mr Devries’s
partner, William Lenz, con-
firmed this to the informant,
adding that the latter’s thumb
had been cut off.

The US government’s trial
brief confirmed that Djokich
had kidnapped Lenz in June
2006, and attempted to force
him to authorise a $15 million
wire transfer. In the process, he
purportedly attempted to cut
off Lenz’s little finger with
pruning shears, and threatened
to castrate him.

The informant put Djokich
in touch with an alleged ‘hit-
man’, who was in fact an under-
cover ICE agent. Ata July 23,
2008, meeting at Boston Air-
port, the US trial brief alleged:
“Djokich extensively discussed
the basis for his dispute with
Devries and Lenz, asserting
that he and others had been
scammed out of at least $170
million by them and others,
including a man named Arnold
Forbes.....

“Djokich indicated that after
Devries was dealt with there
were others that he wanted to
attend to in a similar way,
including Lenz, Forbes, a
‘Frenchman’ who was suppos-
edly involved in Devries’ swin-
dle, and a man in Detroit anda
man in London.”

The plot allegedly progressed
over the following months, and
the US government’s trial brief
alleged: “For example, Djokich
told the undercover officer: ‘TI
tell you one thing after this,
there’s a couple of jobs. You’re
going to love these.’

“Later, they discussed
Forbes. The undercover agent
indicated that because Forbes
was seriously ill, Djokich would
have to deal with him soon if he
intended to do so, and Djokich
responded: ‘Oh, immediately.’
Djokich indicated that Devries
and Forbes were ‘the two’ to
be dealt with immediately.”

Atlantis casino suffering
15% fall ‘every year’

FROM page 1B

come back, it will probably be
in the latter half of 2011. We
have a lot of tentative groups
for next year, people who have
not signed contracts. I’d feel a
lot better if we could get those
thousands of tentative room
nights signed.”

Mr Markantonis said many
meeting planners, who directed
where conventions business

went, were biding their time to
exploit the number of deals cur-
rently in the market.

Atlantis was still continuing
to extract efficiencies and cost
savings from its business, Mr
Markantonis saying the instal-
lation of additional meters had
uncovered further “weak spots”
in its energy efficiency cover-
age. With the resort’s electrici-
ty bill having peaked at $60 mil-
lion two years ago, he added:
“The fine tuning never stops.”

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 3B

‘No promises’ to car dealers

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham “made no promises”
to Bahamian new car dealers
at their Thursday night meeting
on the tax increases many fear
could cripple their industry,
although both sides understood
“the dilemma” each was in.

Declining to discuss specific
details, Rick Lowe, operations
manager at Nassau Motor
Company, who met with the
Prime Minister along with oth-
er Bahamian car dealers,
described the meeting as
“excellent”.

“T think we had a reasonable
meeting, and he understood the
dilemma we’re in,” Mr Lowe
told Tribune Business. “He said
he couldn’t promise anything,
and said there’s some tough
decisions to make and that we
all need to tighten our belts.

“We indicated that we under-
stood the country’s in deep
trouble, and that he has got to
bring fiscal prudence to bear.
We were told that we’ve got to
get our fiscal house in order,
and he made no promises, as
the Government needs as much
revenue as it can get.”

In his 2010-2011 Budget com-
munication, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the Gov-
ernment aimed to "promote the
use of more fuel-efficient vehi-
cles" and simplify taxation on
the auto industry by consoli-
dating Excise Tax rates down to
two. In addition, the base for
taxation is switching to engine
size from the price of the vehi-
cle.

* Banker says 50% tax rise comes at time when industry giving up $150m
in lost interest, write-offs and provisioning on non-performing loans

* Argues that Government ‘missed opportunity’ to tackle spending
problems and tax numbers industry in 2010-2011 Budget



HUBERT INGRAHAM

A rate of 65 per cent will be
levied on passenger vehicles
with an engine capacity of 2,000
c.c. or less, and 85 per cent on
those with a higher capacity.

This contrasts with the for-
mer duty regime, where a duty
rate of 55 per cent was levied
on vehicles with a value of $0-
$9,999. For vehicles valued at
$10,000-$19,999, the duty rate
was 60 per cent, and for those
valued between $20,000-
$24,999, 75 per cent. Only vehi-
cles worth more than $25,000
carried a duty rate of 85 per
cent.

Commercial vehicles were
taxed at 60 per cent, and it now
appears they will attract an 85

per cent duty rate - a 25 per-
centage point increase set to
impact taxi drivers, the jitney
industry, construction compa-
nies and all firms that operated
commercial vehicle fleets.

Many new car dealers do not
carry vehicles with an engine
capacity of 2,000 c. c. or less,
automatically placing all their
vehicles in the higher duty cat-
egory.

It is understood that Bahami-
an Motor Dealers Association
(BMDA) members have pre-
sented data showing the Prime
Minister the impact the tax
increases are likely to have on
their businesses.

With new car sales already
40 per cent below pre-recession
levels, the fear among BMDA
members - and even used car
dealers - is that the tax increase
will depress sales even further
in a contracting economy, low-
ering both the top and bottom
lines. This, it is feared, could
lead to downsizing of staff and
even some going out of busi-
ness, aS consumers switch to
smaller, cheaper cars.

In addition, dealers will also
have to contend with even
greater overheads and sums
tied up in inventory, as the
Excise Tax on new car imports
will have increased.

SEE page 6B

NOTICE

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

* JACKLIN BRICE
P.O. BOX CB 13622

* SCOTT SMITH
P.O.BOX GT 2006

* DEBBIE FERGUSON
clo PAUL A, WELLS, THE BIGHT

* NAKIA COOPER

* SHELDON SMITH
P.O. BOX EE 15079

« KRYSTAL LORD
P.O.BOX SP 60786

* IRENE TUCKER
P.O.BOX GT. 2915

EMD M UCL em ms iia
NER meme ciel emer

Clarity sought on Stamp Tax

THE Government has been urged to clarify the impact of the
Budget’s Stamp Duty changes on real estate transactions cur-
rently in process, amid fears that the new rates could act as ‘deal
breakers’ for these purchasers.

Realtors and attorneys are seeking clarification as to whether the
two percentage point increases for all transactions apart from
those involving first-time buyers will apply to those deals cur-
rently in the ‘90-day closing period’, as many will be completed after
the July 1, 2010, deadline when the new rates take effect.

See Tribune Business Tuesday for full story...










































Internal Auditor

Large firm of Insurance Agents & Brokers is presently considering
applications for the position of Internal Auditor.

Responsibilities include:

¢ Performing financial, operational and compliance audits in accordance
with International Accounting Standards.
Examination and evaluation of the company’s financial and
information systems, management procedures, and internal controls
to ensure that records are accurate and controls are adequate.
Review of the company’s operations, evaluating its effeciency,
effectiveness, and compliance with corporate policies and statutory
regulations.
Coordinating the internal audit programme with outside examiners
and/or external auditors.
Assistance with the implementation and conduct of test control
procedures to determine effectiveness.
Evaluation of both administrative and accounting controls and
preparation of reports for the Managing Director on compliance with
company standards and matters which require strengthening of internal
controls.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

CPA, ACA, or ACCA qualification

Strong analytical and communication skills (oral & written)
Minimum of three (3) years managerial experience

Good Customer relations and interpersonal skills

Be a team player with positive attitude

Work independently with initiative

The successful candidate will receive an excellent benefits package
including medical insurance and pension plan. Salary commensurate with
experience.

All applications will be handled in the strictest confidence and should be
submitted on or before 25th June 2010 to:

P.O. Box N3207
c/o The Tribune
DA 83920
Nassau, The Bahamas

Employment Opportunity

OPERATIONS MANAGER (with oversight for compliance)

Summary of Key Responsibilities:

¢ Managing the day-to-day operations of the Banking Department focusing on overall
workflow, productivity improvement, timeliness, problem determination and resolution,
training and staff development, guidance and team leadership. Supervise, coach and train
employees, to include organizing, prioritizing and scheduling of work assignments.

SJ Ce) ber)
Soldier Road
eee em lite) trys
Telephone: 393-0964

e Play an integral part in the management and internal control flow process.

* Develop strong working rapport with clients to finalize creative ideas and establish strong
relationships. Promote a customer first culture and a policy of continuous improvement.

¢ Managing the relationship of various outside vendors/clients and supervising the com-
munication process, as the need arises, to correct any discrepancies.

¢ Evaluating and streamlining existing bank processes and formalize documentation of the
internal control processes within the banking and loan related areas, as well as compliance
and risk management.

¢ Maintaining up-to-date procedures consistent with the bank’s credit policies and bank-
ing prudential regulations, with regards to treasury management.

i, er ¢ Ensure compliance with established internal guidelines and external regulations affect-
ANCE ing the department. Oversee the bank’s overall compliance activities ensuring adherence
to policy and procedures. Liaise with Group Compliance.

The National Insurance Board
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

¢ Review existing client files to ensure they are fully compliant. Monitor account opening
and the due diligence process as well as monitoring of client transactions for suspicious
activity.

¢ Implement effective systems to improve the compliance function and providing recom-
mendations/periodic assessments of the level of compliance to management.

¢ Identify compliance problems through compliance testing, analysis of audit reports, staff
meetings and on-going interaction with other compliance officers.

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

Perform other duties deemed necessary.

The National Insurance Board (NIB) 1s seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to complete the renovations of The JL Centre, Blake Road, Nassau, Bahamas;
the project is a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors

Requirements:

Knowledgeable of banking operations and daily procedures
Working knowledge of compliance requirements

Fair knowledge of financial services and products

Proficiency in the use of Microsoft Office products

Sufficient work experience as a professional in the financial sector
Strong communication skills and analytical abilities

Experience in managing and empowering people

Strong communication and interpersonal skills

Planning and Organizing skills

must be in compliance with the National Insurance Act (soctal security programme),
and in good standing with the relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Securtty Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from May 27 to June 3, 2010, or
downloaded from the Board’s website at www.nitb-bahamas.com.

Qualified applicants should send their resume and cover letter to
Att: Operations Manager position

P.O. BOX N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and returned to the Security
Booth, Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, in an envelope addressed to The
Director, The National Insurance Board, with the caption Pre-Qualification
Document - JL Centre, Blake Road, on or before 12:00 Noon on June 3, 2010.

Deadline for submission is June 11, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

(a) GOVINDARAJU LTD.is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 23rd day of April, A.D., 2010 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice















INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
TAYNOL CORPORATION

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), TAYNOL
CORPORATION is in Dissolution’

The date of commencement of dissolution is the
27th day of May 2010.

Mr. Luis Maria Pineyrua Pittaluga
Ruta 8, Km. 17.500, Local 115 A,
CP 91.600 Montevideo,
Uruguay
Liquidator

NOTICE
MENDES LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

MENDES LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company
commenced on the 27th May, 2010 when the
Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit
Suisse Trust Ltd, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis,
Geneva.

Dated this 31st day of May, A. D. 2010

Credit Suisse Trust Ltd
Liquidator

ASSOCIATED BAHAMIAN DISTILLERS AND BREWERS LIMITED
(ABDAB)

DIVIDEND NOTICE

TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS

We ore pleased to advise that o Final Dividend for 2009 of
$14.00 per share shall be paid on or betore 31st May
2010 to Ordinary Shoreholders of record as of 21st May
7010.

The payment will be mode in the usual morines thraugh
Bahames Central Securities Depository (formally CFAL
Limited,’Colina Financial Advisors Limited), our Registrar and
Tronster agents.

Barry Newman
Company Secretary

FirstCari

THE TRIBUNE

KERZNER, from 1B

other upgrades are as follows:

* The “redesign and re-open-
ing, in a completely new fash-
ion” of the Fathoms restaurant.
This will be transformed into a
‘state-of-the-art” fish restaurant
with a celebrity chef from the
US, a personality Kerzner
International is in negotiations
with.

The design for the new Fath-
oms is scheduled to be com-
pleted in the 2010 third quarter,
with construction starting next
year. The restaurant, which has
been closed for a year-and-a-
half apart from special ban-
quets, will have an indoor and







COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

outdoor dining experience, and
be open for lunch.

The Water’s Edge in the
Coral Towers will be trans-
formed into an indoor and out-
door barbecue experience,
again with a celebrity chef from
New York. The brand and
design is in the advanced plan-
ning stages, and Mr Markanto-
nis said the new concept would
have no competition in either
Atlantis or Nassau.

The Great Hall - Water’s
Edge will also be transformed
into an upscale tea and bever-
age lounge, serving chocolates
and cakes, and acting as a loca-
tion for after-dinner conversa-
tion.

Mr Markantonis said kitchen
facilities in that area previously

2004

IN THE SUPREME COURT




COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION CLE/GEN/00035

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

Plaintiff

RYAN CARTWRIGHT

Defendant

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that the Summons filed on

the 8" day of October, A.D., 2008 and set down
to be heard on Tuesday the 28" day of April, A.D.,
2009 at 12:00 o’clock in the afternoon will now be
heard before the Registrar, of the Supreme Court,
Mrs. Donna Newton, at of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The
Bahamas on Friday the 25 day of, June A.D.,
2010 at 11:30 o'clock inthe forenoon.

Dated this 15" day of March, A.D., 2010

REGISTRAR

This Notice was taken out by Messrs. Gibson, Rigby & Co., Chambers,
KI-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorneys
for the Plaintiff.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/gen/FP/00276
Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN
ALBERT H. HAIGHT

AND

THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT
AUTHORITY, LTD

First Defendant
AND

THE GRAND BAHAMA DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY LTD.

Second Defendant
AND
CARRICK LIMITED
Third Defendant
AND
PORT GROUP LIMITED
Fourth Defendant

Albert Haight
c/o 88B Tamarind Street
Freeport, Grand Bahama

TAKE NOTICE that by Order of the Court made on
the 11th day of May, A.D., 2010, the Court ordered that
unless the Plaintiff provide security for the Defendants’
costs pursuant to Order dated the 21st day of July, A.D.,
2009 within 21 days of the date of this Order, this action
shall stand dismissed; and that the Plaintiff pay the
Defendants’ costs of this application, such costs to be
taxed, if not agreed.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Chambers
Chancery Court
The Mall
Freeport, Grand Bahama
The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Defendants

bbean

had not been what Kerzner
International wanted, and the
revamp would potentially cre-
ate several new employment
shifts in an area where current-
ly no one was employed.

The three restaurant
upgrades are expected to cost
between $20-$25 million.

* A further $20-$25 million
will be spent on the complete
revamp of some 110 suites in
the Royal Towers, and 60 in
the Coral Towers, as Kerzner
International moves to retain
existing customers and attract
new ones, particularly the more
“discerning” high-rollers in the
casino.

* Building on the success of
its Atlantis Kids Adventure
opening, Atlantis will introduce
a 12,000 square foot Teens Club
for 13-17 year-olds, spending
$10-$12 million on this.

Mr Markantonis said this was
being done so Atlantis “does
not lose sight of another big
chunk of our business”. Many
of the 400 new jobs will be cre-
ated by the shifts required for
this facility, which will feature
the latest interactive video
games.

Promised

The Atlantis chief promised
this facility would “lift the cus-
tomer experience to a new lev-
el. That’s how we are doing it:
The World’s greatest Teen
Club.”

* Another $20-$25 million
will be invested in the Atlantis

casino, including the creation
of a high-end gaming lounge.
Atlas and Dragons will also be
revamped, with “creative
designs and creative names to
provide a whole new overall
element, bringing people to the
centre of the property and mak-
ing them want to stay there”.

Invested

* The final $10 million will
be invested in the redevelop-
ment of the One & Only Ocean
Club’s Crescent Wing, with
some job opportunities being
created for butlers. That pro-
ject is set to start in Septem-
ber, with a November comple-
tion.

“We’re able to get these pro-
jects on the drawing board and
are moving very fast on them.
We don’t want to let moss
grow,” Mr Markantonis said.

He added that most of the
work would go to Bahamian
contractors, although he was
currently unable to say how
many, and how many construc-
tion jobs would be required, as
the scope of the work had not
yet been determined.

Meanwhile, Mr Markantonis
said Kerzner International still
intended to move forward at
some stage with the Hurricane
Hole redevelopment, plus a
Phase IV expansion on the old
Club Med site.

However, the company did
not want to be “premature”
and assume “the economic
uncertainty” was over.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance minis-
ter has urged the Central Bank
to cut its discount rate on the
grounds that a 1 per cent reduc-
tion would reduce the public
sector’s debt servicing costs by
$20-$230 million, freeing up
money for essential public ser-
vices and subsidies to private
schools/charities.

James Smith, former minister
of state for finance in the 2002-
2007 Christie administration,
also joined Standard & Poor’s
(S&P) analysts in questioning
whether the $200 million rev-
enue increase the Government
is projecting for its 2010-2011
fiscal year - the key element in
reducing the GFS fiscal deficit
by 76 per cent - is achievable
in a contracting economy.

Analysing the 2010-2011
Budget, Mr Smith also ques-
tioned the gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) statistics being used
to calculate the fiscal deficit and
national debt-to-GDP ratios,
given that they increased
throughout 2008 and 2009, even
though the Bahamian econo-
my was in recession.

And he also echoed the con-
cerns of auto industry execu-
tives, who previously told Tri-
bune Business that the
increased tax rates might actu-
ally reduce total government
revenues, and expressed “con-
cern” that the tax increases
imposed on the hotel sector
would retard that industry at a
time when it was needed to lead
economic growth.

While agreeing that the Gov-
ernment had sent the right belt-
tightening signals to both
Bahamians and the interna-
tional credit rating agencies, Mr
Smith said: “What I find con-
cerning is that the entire adjust-
ment for this [recessionary]

period has fallen on the fiscal
side. There’s been no notice-
able accommodation, it seems
to me, on the monetary side.”

Calling on the Ministry of
Finance to discuss a cut in the
existing 5.25 per cent discount
rate with the Central Bank of
the Bahamas, Mr Smith said
the foreign currency reserves,
which stood at $822 million as
at March 20 this year, were at a
very healthy level after being
bolstered by the Governmen-
t’s foreign borrowing and IMF
special drawing rights.

“The Central Bank now has
more than 20 weeks of import
cover, when it has largely exist-
ed on 12 weeks,” the former
minister said.

With the commercial bank-
ing sector “clawing back” on its
loan portfolio and credit avail-
ability, due to the high level of
non-performing loans, but small
Bahamian businesses needing
access to debt financing more
than ever, Mr Smith said: “This
would seem to me an oppor-
tune time to lower the discount
rate without the risk of a run
on the reserves.”

This was because the
increased level of unemploy-
ment meant many Bahamians
would not qualify for credit,
while the commercial banks
had tightened lending policies.
In addition, the lower level of
economic activity also meant
there would be fewer imports
coming into this nation.

If the discount rate was
slashed, Mr Smith said this
would likely lead to a cut in
commercial bank lending rates
by the same proportion, reliev-
ing the pressure on hard-
pressed borrowers - business-
es, consumer and the Govern-
ment.

“The Government stands to
benefit from lower borrowing
rates,” the former minister said,

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pointing out that the interest
payable on its more than $3 bil-
lion domestically-held debt,
including Registered Stock and
Treasury Bills, would also be
lowered.

A 1 per cent reduction in the
interest rate on its debt would
free up $20-$30 million cur-
rently used by the Government
for debt servicing, “which could
easily be used to soften the
blow on some critical areas;
subsidies to charities, subsidies
to school, without imperiling
your fiscal plans.”

The tax hikes come at a time
when many Bahamians have
seen their incomes either
reduced or remain flat, mean-
ing that there are likely to be
some cost of living rises,
induced by lower purcashing
power - which might reduce the
standard of living for some.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith
echoed the comments of Stan-
dard & Poor’s (S&P) leading
country analyst for the
Bahamas, Lisa Schineller, who
said the key to reducing the fis-
cal deficit in 2010-2011 was
whether the Government
would achieve its $200 million
revenue increase goal in a con-
tracting economy.

The Government is forecast-
ing that revenues will rise from
$1.295 billion in 2009-2010 to
$1.492 billion in 2010-2011, and
with recurrent spending being
held flat at $1.554 billion, the
revenue rise is key in reducing
the recurrent deficit from $259
million to $62 million, and the
overall GFS deficit from $425
million to $227 million.

“T think it’s going to be very
difficult,” Mr Smith said of the
Government’s revenue projec-
tions. “The major issue will be
whether the projections, par-
ticularly on revenue, will be
achievable over that particular
time.

“Tf that does not happen,
addressing the two major issues,
the deficit and the debt, will be
more challenging in the next
fiscal period. It’s very difficult
call.”

Mr Smith said the Govern-
ment’s main revenue earners,
particularly customs/import
duties and Stamp Duty, were
determined by the level of con-
sumption, aggregate demand
and economic activity in the
Bahamian economy.

He pointed out, though, that
these were likely to be impact-
ed negatively by a further
icrease in unemployment, cou-
pled by a further tightening of
the economy. He added that,
in relation to the tax increases
unveiled in the 2010-2011 Bud-
get, “some of the measures are
likely to weaken the economy
further”.

Mr Smith also pointed out
that some measures, such as the
two duty rates of 65 per cent
and 85 per cent imposed on the
auto industry, were unlikely to
generate increased revenues for
the Government.

He suggested that while
some 1,000 cars, for example,
were likely to have been
imported at the previous 65 per
cent rate, the increase to 85 per
cent might lead to just 500 now
being imported. While the
overall outturn depended on
“elasticity”, it is uncertain
whether the yield increase will
be enough to offset the drop in
import volume.

“The thing that bothers me a
little, if one looks at the GDP
data being used, is that we
clearly have had a 6 per cent
or more reduction in GDP
since the recession started, but
looking at the 2010-2011 Bud-
get GDP projections, they’re
showing it at $7.59 billion for
2009, whereas in 2008 it was
$7.34 billion,” Mr Smith said.

NOTICE

West Winds Property
ey PPEE TET Tae een
Limited

CoB RB toca aa koi m ser LMT
Extra-ordinary Meeting for the
West Winds Property Owners
GELB Bit

Me as
Monday the 14th day of June,
re ae ii
at the Pavilion, West Winds
Subdivision, New Providence.

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MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 5B
SS
Rate cut urged to lower government borrowing costs

“If you take 6 per cent from
that, it’s going to take you down
more to $7.1 billion, so that
GFS deficit and debt-to-GDP
ratio is going to be different
from the ones reported. That
has implications in either case
for borrowing costs.”

Mr Smith said he also had
“some concerns” about the
hotel room tax and departure
tax increases being imposed on
the tourism sector, at a time
when it was required to lead
economic growth.

“Prior to the recession we
were losing our competitive-
ness, and I think what we real-
ly need to do is lower the cost
of a vacation in the Bahamas. I
would want to be careful about
how we put tax increases on the
main sector,” the former min-
ister added.

He said a recent report he
had seen showed the US con-
sumer was spending less on

vacations, staying closer to
home and looking for dis-
counted hotel rooms.
Agreeing that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s Budget had
sent the right signals, Mr Smith
said: “The argument is in the
level of dosage the patient
needs. I hope we get out of this
without too many casualties.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
sree Melle ltt y
on Mondays







COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHMAS
2009/CLE/qui/0192
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISON
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING
TITLES ACT, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or bot of land
being Lot No. 244 in Kennedy Subdivision in the
Eastern District on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of Commonwealth of the Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Genevieve Brown
Richards

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of Genevieve Brown Richards of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commanwvealth of The Bahamas in respect of:

“ALL THAT piece or parcel of land comprising of Lot
Number 244 inthe Kennedy Subdivision in the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions a5 are shown
on the plan filed in this matter and is delineated on
that part of the said plan coloured Pink.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Genevieve
Brown Richards claim to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the said land and have made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas pursuant to the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
(Chapter 393) to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and a
plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:

The Registry of the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas on the second floor
of the Ansbacher Building situate at East Street and
Bank Lane on the island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the said Commonwealth of The Bahamas
The Chambers of Serville & Co. #13 East Avenue North,
Centreville in the Eastern District of Nassau, New
Providence aforesaid,

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that any person having
dower or right to dower, an adverse of an claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 17th
day of July, A.D, 2010 file in the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioners or their Attorneys and Adverse
Claim in the prescribed form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an Adverse
Claim on or before the 17th day of July A.D, 2010 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 26th day of May A.D., 2010

MESSRS. SERVILLE & CO.
Chambers
#13 East Avenue, North
Centreville
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

ATLANTIS, from 1B

expectations.

“We have seen our leisure
bookings pace [increase] con-
siderably this year versus last
year, running 35 per cent ahead
of pace,” Mr Markantonis said.
“If leisure bookings indicate
what is ahead in the future,
there’s light at the end of the
tunnel, and we’re very
pleased.”

Atlantis’s occupancy levels
for the year-to-date had “met
expectations”, Mr Markanto-
nis said, although the resort was
“disappointed” with April
2010’s performance compared
to last year. He suggested this
may have been because Easter
and the Passover fell in two dif-

ferent weeks in 2009, whereas
this year they were condensed
into the same week.

“May has been average, but
we’re very pleased with what
we have seen for June, July and
August,” the Kerzner Interna-
tional (Bahamas) chief added.
“The summer looks very good,
and we don’t expect any fall-
off. We’re trying to put the
summer beyond doubt. We’ve
very confident.”

Adding further to the grow-
ing sense of cautious optimism
at Atlantis, Mr Markantonis
said the resort’s guest satisfac-
tion scores had set “new
records” for every month of
2010 to date. “Our staff are
working even harder. We real-
ly have to have a service edge,”
he added.

British Colonial Hilton

NigS-5auL

Turning to the performance
of The Reef, the 480-unit con-
do-hotel built as part of the $1
billion Phase IIT expansion, and
whose units are included in the
hotel inventory pool, Mr
Markantonis said some 60 per
cent were now “sold out”.

“The sales were going
exceedingly well until late 2008
and, frankly, all condo-hotels
have suffered,” he added.

“The pleasant surprise for
2010 is that The Reef’s occu-
pancies have more than tripled
from where they were last year.
People are slowly understand-
ing what The Reef is.”

Mr Markantonis pointed to
the Reef’s kitchenette design
intended to appeal to families,
and added that the Cove - the
other tower constructed in
Phase II] as part of a joint ven-
ture with Turnberry Associates
- was “sold out” over the week-
end.

Atlantis had also moved to
cater to the increased trend of
Internet/on-line bookings, Mr
Markantonis telling reporters
that these had increased from 5-
7 per cent of total bookings to

35.7 per cent.

Increasingly educated and
savvy consumers were increas-
ingly using the Atlantis website
to assess whether they wanted
to vacation there, “taking
advantage of the specials” the
resort has and also using the
site to compare it, and the
Bahamas, to other destinations
and hotels.

Atlantis was ranked number
one among North American
hotels for its use of social net-
working, such as Facebook and
Twitter, which were garnering
“a huge amount of feedback.

“We're getting an incredible
amount of website visits from
people of all ages. Our conver-
sion rates are up considerably
more than what we were doing
before,” Mr Markantonis said,
pointing to further promotions,
such as Atlantis’s ‘Fourth Night
Free’, as examples of what
Kerzner International was
doing to stimulate excitement
in the marketplace, and thus
desire/demand for its products.

The Kerzner International
(Bahamas) managing director
also credited the Companion

Fly Free promotion, a joint ven-
ture between the Ministry of
Tourism and private sector Pro-
motion Boards, for generating
“a serious upturn in bookings”.

Describing Companion Fly
Free as “one of the most suc-
cessful” tourism promotions
ever undertaken by the
Bahamas, Mr Markantonis said
it had created “value” in cus-
tomers’ minds. He also
expressed doubt as to whether
other destinations would have
been able to arrange such a
promotion, and hoped it would
continue beyond the deadline
when existing funds are due to
run out.

In a bid to keep the momen-
tum going, Mr Markantonis
said Atlantis and Kerzner Inter-
national were working on a
“major promotion” designed to
counter the traditional Sep-
tember-November ‘slow peri-
od’ in the Bahamian tourism
calendar.

“T don’t think we can sit back
in September, October and
November, throw our hands
back and say this is hurricane
season,” Mr Markantonis said.

THE TRIBUNE

Others had successfully
changed similar perceptions, he
said, referring to Las Vegas,
which had countered its ‘slow
season’ through promotional
campaigns designed to create
value, the offering of conces-
sions, and staging of more
shows.

The autumn promotion, Mr
Markantonis added, would be
unveiled in two weeks, and he
said: “We’ve got something
pretty exciting to separate us
from the noise out there.”

Central to Kerzner Interna-
tional’s occupancy maintenance
strategy over the summer is its
Atlantis Live concert series,
which has “truly generated
bookings for the hotel”, with
concert tickets available at a
discount for room bookers.

Mr Markantonis said that fol-
lowing behind Sheryl Crow at
the weekend, the Atlantis
Imperial Ballroom will play
host to Justin Bieber on June
10, followed by Taylor Swift a
week later. The July 10 week-
end will see another top act,
with Lady Antebellum sched-
uled for September 18.



The British Colonial Hilton invites applications
from individuals who are highly energetic and
efficient to fill the following positions:

Butcher
Barboy
Waiter/Waitress
Bartender
Supervisor of Coffee Shop

SPORTS, from 1B

Announcing that the resort owner was
“working on a lot of initiatives to do with
sports tourism”, and that it “agreed 100
per cent” with the Ministry’s drive to break
into this market niche, George Markanto-
nis, Kerzner International (Bahamas) man-
aging director, said it had been negotiating
with “two major organisations” over the
last nine months.

Adding that there was “something won-
derful” coming to the Bahamas, Mr
Markantonis said Atlantis planned to host
a four-team National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) championship bas-
ketball series on December 18 this year in
its Imperial Ballroom. “The goal is to get
for the Bahamas an ‘exempt status’ from
the NCAA,” Mr Markantonis explained,
something that was currently enjoyed only

by Canada and Mexico. He added that he
would be representing Atlantis when the
Bahamas went before the NCAA in Janu-
ary. If all went to plan, in November-
December 2011, Atlantis then planned to
“stage the biggest NCAA pre-season tour-
nament in existence”, complete with wide-
spread US TV coverage and attendance
by alumni of all the teams.

Responding to the impact of the Bud-
get’s hotel room tax increase on Atlantis’s
business, Mr Markantonis said that while
any tax measure that impacted your busi-
ness was cause for concern, the Govern-
ment needed to raise funds for social and
infrastructure spending from somewhere.

Taxes raised, he added, were “being put
back into the nation” in the form of the
Lynden Pindling International Airport
(LPIA) expansion, improvements to the
roads and Bay Street, all of which benefit-

ed Kerzner International’s Paradise Island
resorts.

Pointing out that the community’s well-
being benefited Kerzner International,
which had invested some $25 million in
community projects since coming to the
Bahamas in 1994, Mr Markantonis said the
company had not been thrown “a curve
ball” despite everything seemingly coming
at once - tax increases, NIB contribution
rate rises and BEC tariff rate hikes.

As to whether Kerzner International was
concerned at the prospect of competition
from Baha Mar’s $2.6 billion project at
Cable Beach, Mr Markantonis said: “A
destination is made up of more than one
place.” If Baha Mar proved successful, and
the likes of Albany and the Bay Street
redevelopment did, too, there would be
more attractions in the Bahamas to entice
new customers and keep old ones returning.

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IN THE ESTATE OF BISHOP
HARCOURT PINDER, late of
Soldier Road in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all
persons having claim or demand
against the above Estate are
required to send their names,
addressed and the particulars of
their debts or claims duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 4th day of June, A. D.,
2010 after which date the Executrix
will proceed to distribute the estate
having regard only to proved debts
or claims of which notice would have
been given.

Notice is also hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate
are requested to make full settlement
on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

Corporate Legal Services
Chambers
110 Pickstock Place
Robinson Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Executrix of the
Estates of
BISHOP HARCOURT PINDER





DEALERS, from 3B

“Reality is here. Reality

bites,” Mr Lowe said of the
Government’s fiscal situation.
“My main concern is that we’ve









































LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.4 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LOCHMABEN HOLDINGS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at The
Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough &
Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All person having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator
before June 27th, 2010.

Alrena Moxey
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(N*°45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
NICE MANAGEMENT COMPANY LIMITED is in dis-
solution. Francisco Vasconcellos is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Alameda Inglaterra, 633. Municipio de Barueri,
Estado de Sao Paul, Brazil. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their names
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liqui-
dator before the 25th day of June, 2010.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FATOS VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of May 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

got to find a way to cut spend-
ing.

“T agree that the subsidies
have to stop. The country as a
whole needs to get spending
under control. Government
spending is the key to all of this,
and when we see year after year
the government spending more
than it is earning, more than it
has Budgeted for, something is
out of kilter. Another couple
of years of profligacy and we
will have a crisis.”

Mr Lowe’s comments were
echoed by a banking industry
source, who told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Government had
missed a “golden opportunity”
via the 2010-2011 Budget to cut
spending, and warned that the
50 per cent fee increases on the
commercial banks were com-
ing at a time when the industry
had taken an estimated $150
million hit.

The source, who requested
anonymity, said that based on
some $600 million in non-per-
forming loans, which were 90
days or more past due and not
accruing any interest, the
Bahamian commercial banking
industry had lost some $60 mil-
lion in annual interest pay-
ments, based on an average
yield per loan of 10 per cent.

Then there was the provi-
sioning and write-offs associat-
ed with the non-performing
loans. The source said it was
“not unreasonable” to assume
20 per cent of that $600 million

a
NAD
Nassau Airport
Deeg ogni Company

number would be written-off,
a sum worth $120 million, tak-
ing the sum lost by the sector to
$150-$180 million.

This, the source said, would
eat into banking industry prof-
its, which collectively were said
to have peaked at $300 million.

The banker, though, told Tri-
bune Business that the Gov-
ernment had merely tinkered
around the edges with its 2010-
2011 spending plans, and the
Prime Minister had missed an
opportunity to cut out the
excess and waste in the public
sector, having seized the morale
high ground with his salary cut.

“T think it didn’t go far
enough,” the source said. “I
think we have an expenditure
problem, but the deficit will not
be addressed by expenditure
cuts, but by revenue and tax
increases. There wasn’t enough
of a knife taken to the expen-
diture side. He should have put
some pain on now.”

Describing the Budget as a
“missed opportunity”, the
source also criticised the Gov-
ernment for backing away from
taxing the numbers business,
something it estimated could
generate $30-$40 million in
extra revenues.

“The Government said:
“We'll go back to the rest of the
economy by taxing you, when
the guys who are pocketing tens
of millions are getting a free
pass. I thought that was
inequitable,” the source said.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 7B



en |") =:
Structural reform for

‘inadequate’ tax system urged

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day said the 2010-2011 Budget
showed this nation needed to
urgently reform and broaden
its tax base, telling Tribune
Business: “The current system
is inadequate, and the crisis
exposed that.”

Khaalis Rolle told this news-
paper that the Government’s
fiscal difficulties, and the prob-
lems it was experiencing in
reducing the fiscal deficit and
national debt to pre-recession
levels, again showed the need
to restructure the Bahamian tax
system to one that was reliant
on an alternative, such as a val-
ue-added (VAT) or sales tax.

Pointing out that the
Bahamas would have to
restructure its import duty-
reliant system anyway as a
result of its commitments under
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) and World
Trade Organisation (WTO),
Mr Rolle said the number - and
level - of tax increases levied
in the 2010-2011 Budget did
“not bode well” for the private
sector and its ability to drag the
Bahamian economy out of
recession.

Bahamian companies, he
warned, were being placed at
“a serious disadvantage”, as
industries directly impacted by
the tax increases were also
being hit by the impending rise
in National Insurance Board
(NIB) contribution rates and
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) rates.

Expressing particular con-
cern for the hotel industry, with
many resorts already suffering
net losses due to the global
recession and high operating
cost base, Mr Rolle said that
while the Government had
“front-loaded taxes” on to the
private sector, it had done little
to create growth incentives in
the Budget.

While it was easy to increase
a company’s expenses, the
Chamber president warned that
it was much harder to generate
revenue rises, especially in a
depressed economy. He warned
that it would take Bahamian
companies directly impacted by

the Budget tax increases
between 24 to 36 months to
counter the increased costs with
new revenue streams.

“When I calculate all the
increases in taxes, it does not
bode well,” Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business. “Factoring all
of that in, and you’ve had far
more taxes thrust upon you
than in any one single period
of history.

“Tt now puts businesses at a
serious disadvantage - NIB is
going up, BEC is going up. It’s
going to be a difficult pill to
swallow.”

Emphasising that he did not
mind taxes, Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business: “At least there
should have been something on
the other side of the coin that
puts businesses in a better posi-
tion to absorb those taxes.”

Through the Budget, Mr
Rolle said taxes were being
“front-loaded” on the Bahami-
an business community, while
any investment incentives to
encourage growth, productivity
and efficiency would be “back
loaded” - and unlikely to be
implemented with the same
speed.

“It’s easier to execute the
expenses side than it is the rev-
enue side,” the Chamber pres-
ident said, warning of the
immediate impact to the bot-
tom line for many companies.
“Revenues do not grow at the
same rate as expenses. There’s
a direct correlation to business
failures if we use that current
model.”

With little to no warning hav-
ing been given, Mr Rolle said
Bahamian companies had no
time to plan for ways to
increase their top lines.

“Tt will take a 24-month peri-
od, in the most aggressive cycle,
to get up and running to gener-
ate additional revenue,” Mr
Rolle said. “We’re looking at
a horizon 36 months away
before businesses are comfort-
able with revenue-generating
measures; 36 months of addi-
tional expenses.”

Looking at the broader pic-
ture of the Government’s
finances, Mr Rolle told Tribune
Business: “I believe there is a
need for us to reform our entire
tax structure, rather than
increase the Budget’s taxation.

“One thing that was mani-
festly evident in this Budget is
that there is no room for cre-
ativity, no room for flexibility,
because we have such a narrow
tax regime. We would have far
more flexibility if we had an
alternative taxation system that
was far wider in scope than the
current one.”

Mr Rolle said the Chamber
had long been advocating that
the existing tax structure, heav-
ily reliant on import and Stamp
duties, be replaced by a VAT.
This option, which levies a tax
at each part of the production
chain, would capture the ser-
vices side of the Bahamian
economy - a sector that largely
goes untaxed.

“We are missing the critical
mass from which government
revenue could be generated,”
the Chamber president said.
“We need to broaden our tax
base, we need to reform the
structure, and this should be a
clear message to government
that the current system is inad-
equate. The crisis exposed
that.”

With many already respond-
ing negatively to the Budget’s
$100 million-plus tax increases,
Mr Rolle said there was no bet-
ter time than now to seriously
begin the tax reform process.

While the Government had
attempted to bring some under-
taxed industries up to “an
acceptable tax level”, the
Chamber chief added that the
“perfect balance” between get-
ting the public finances back
on a sustainable path and not
dampening economic growth
prospects had been struck.

This would have been diffi-
cult to achieve, he added,
because the Government had
“so little to work with”.

“This was the doom and
gloom Budget we anticipated,”
Mr Rolle said. “We went into
deficit spending to save what
was a weak economy and the
social fabric. We created a host
of other problems.

“T can’t say the Government
was wrong to go into deficit
spending. There were some
benefits.

“We need creative ways to
get ourselves back into line, and
I didn’t get a strong sense of
that.”



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MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

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2

The stories behind the news



Our futile war on crime

NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



ow here is a bright
idea: If Hubert Ingra-
ham and Perry
Christie would just
work together, the
whole country would be united
against crime. Maybe that is what it
will take to solve the problem. What
a laughable thought, to say the least.

Honestly, if our present leaders
mustered all of their intellectual
capacities I am willing to bet any
wager they would still be clueless
and ineffective in abating crime. The
math is simple. We will not solve
crime by fighting crime. We will only
solve crime by eliminating the con-
ditions that give rise to crime.

So what if we stopped asking the
government what their crime plan
is and stop holding the police
responsible for stopping crime. The
problems we currently face are only
allowed to thrive because there is
an absence of community. Let us
stop expending so much energy cry-
ing over crime, and focus on reclaim-
ing and restoring community.

This may sound callous, but last
year’s murder count of 77 is dwarfed
by all of the other social ills. Our
fixation on the murder count — the
endless comparison between annual
figures — is pointless. The conditions
in society are not static; they are
deteriorating while our population is
increasing, so naturally there will be
an increase in crime. It has nothing
to do with whether the Free Nation-
al Movement or the Progressive Lib-
eral Party is in power, or which
Commissioner of Police the govern-
ment installs.

Fact: A large percentage of our
murders stem from interpersonal
conflicts. This is an example of how
our dysfunctional behaviour trans-
lates into a proliferation of crime.
Look around at all of the incestu-
ous relationships Bahamian fathers
have with their children, or the num-
ber of children living in fear of being
molested by their pastors or the shop
owner down the street. In fact, look
at an ordinary day in the House of
Assembly. We have drifted so far
away from the true spirit of com-
munity that our society has become
a production house of criminality
and dysfunction.

Most of the largest town criers
are not even exposed to a real threat
of violent crime, but in a state of
fear created by the manipulation of
a perception of crime, they are over-
come with paranoia. The average
middle class Bahamian in their mid-
40s would probably struggle to name
more than five incidents of violent
crime that have directly impacted
their lives (child abuse not with-
standing). The fear they experience
is more of an illusion.

Those that we should really be
concerned about are the children in
our society. The threat to them is
real. Their lives are invariably
shaped by the intense trauma that
results from their exposure to vio-
lence and a host of other social ills.

On a regular basis I work with
children from “Over the Hill”; they
average about eight years old. Ina
weekly Monday exercise called
“sharing the news”, they tell stories
about the people they know that got
“jook up”, “locked up”, “beat up” or
“killed”. In this forum we often
remind them that “the news” does
not always have to be about the vio-
lence in their community. But with-

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ABOVE AND BELOW — In these file photos, detectives and officers remove unidentified bodies from crime scenes...

out fail, every week they return with
war stories. Imagine what their lev-
el of direct exposure will be by age
40.

What is most alarming is that the
dysfunction they speak of has
become so normalized within their
neighbourhoods that they are inca-
pable of realising how it is adversely
shaping their perceptions of reality.

These children do not need a
crime plan. They need a community,
and what we have in the Bahamas,
as Baba Shango rightly articulated, is

a group of individuals stuck on the
same rock. A true community is not
a group of individuals living in a spe-
cific location, sharing a government
and a common heritage.

A true community enables the
healthy development of its children,
helping them to discover their pur-
pose and understand who they are.
The community supports the healing

of all children, nurtures their talents
and welcomes their contributions.

In a holistic community, each gen-
eration is the link to the one that
precedes it and the one that follows.
A reciprocal relationship is fostered
as they inspire each other. What we
have today is a situation in which
no one is being inspired. Few are
pulling from the past and fewer still
are giving to the future.

In a holistic community, the bless-
ings bestowed on individuals in the
form of skills, talents and personal









wealth are no more the possession of
individuals than the air they breathe.
The whole notion of the self made
person is an illusion. This thinking is
what Albert Einstein calls “a kind of
optical delusion of (one’s) con-
sciousness”. It is the kind of delu-
sion that negates community. No
one survives or thrives without a
form of community.

So much has been lost of our
understanding of the world, our tra-
ditions, customs, rites of passage and
initiations. At one time these served
as a guide for the development and
structuring of our communities.
Often times we perceive our tradi-
tional ways as dead, perhaps that is
the very reason our society is in a
state of decay. Our present practices
are materialistic, superficial and
commercially oriented. They lack
meaning and purpose.

For example, we have lost the
essence of what it means to name a
child. A name is supposed to call
out the destiny of a child and remind
a child of his or her purpose. It is
not simply a form of identification.
The popular practice of compound-
ing the names of two parents to label
a child is not rooted in an under-
standing of community. It is a glitch
in the system derived from individ-
ualistic Western ideals.

The naming ceremony is a sacred
event. It is where the community
discovers the child’s purpose and is
made responsible for helping the
child to fulfil his or her destiny. It is
where the community unites to cel-
ebrate the arrival of the child, who is
the bearer of news from the same
realm to which the rest of the com-
munity must prepare to return one
day.

In a holistic community, this is

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

After another failure, BP scrambles to stem leak

By BEN NUCKOLS
Associated Press Writer

ROBERT, La. (AP) —
After failing again to stem the
flow of oil into the Gulf of
Mexico, BP scrambled Sun-
day to make some progress
in ending the spill that the
president’s top energy adviser
said was the biggest environ-
mental disaster the US has
ever faced.

Six weeks after the spill, oil
giant BP PLC said that its lat-
est plan to cap the well would-
mt capture all the crude foul-
ing the Gulf. And the relief
wells currently being drilled
— which are supposed to be a
better long-term solution —
won't be done for at least two
months. “Well, the relief well
at the end of August is cer-
tainly the end — the end
point on this game,” Robert
Dudley, BP’s managing direc-
tor, said Sunday on ABC’s
“This Week.” “But we failed
to wrestle the beast to the
ground yesterday.”

That would be in the mid-
dle of the Atlantic hurricane
season, which begins Tues-
day. The crude likely won’t
affect the formation of storms,
but the cyclones could push
the oil deeper into coastal
marshes and estuaries and
turn the oil into a crashing
black surf.

White House energy advis-









A MAN runs along the beach with his dog as workers gather to clean
Sunday, May 30...

er Carol Browner said Sun-
day on NBC’s “Meet the
Press” that there was more
oil spilling into the Gulf than
at any other time in history.

“This is probably the
biggest environmental disas-
ter we’ve ever faced in this
country,” Browner said.

The effort to curb that dis-
aster known as the “top kill”
failed after engineers tried for
three days to overwhelm the
crippled well with heavy
drilling mud and junk 5,000

feet underwater.

And skepticism is growing
that BP can solve the crisis.

Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass.,
who leads a congressional
committee investigating the
disaster, told CBS’ “Face the
Nation” on Sunday that he
had “no confidence whatso-
ever in BP.”

“So I don’t think that peo-
ple should really believe what
BP is saying in terms of the
likelihood of anything that
they’re doing is going to turn



up oil residue in Grand Isle, La., on

(AP Photo)

out as they’re predicting,” he
said.

BP hopes to saw through a
pipe leading out from the well
and cap it with a funnel-like
device using the same remote-
ly guided undersea robots that
have failed in other tries to
stop the gusher. Even that
effort won’t end the disaster
— BP officials have only
pledged it will capture a
majority of the oil. None of
the remaining options would
stop the flow entirely or cap-

ture all the crude before it
reaches the Gulf’s waters.

Engineers will use remote-
ly guided undersea robots to
try to lower a cap onto the
leak after cutting off part of a
busted pipe leading out from
the well. The funnel-like
device is similar to a huge
containment box that failed
before when it became
clogged with icelike slush.
Dudley said officials learned a
lot from that failure and will
pump warm water through
the pipes to prevent the ice
problems.

The spill is the worst in US
history — exceeding even the
1989 Exxon Valdez disaster
— and has dumped between
18 million and 40 million gal-
lons into the Gulf, according
to government estimates. The
leak began after the Deepwa-
ter Horizon drilling rig
exploded in April, killing 11
people. “This scares every-
body, the fact that we can’t
make this well stop flowing,
the fact that we haven’t suc-
ceeded so far,” BP Chief
Operating Officer Doug Sut-
tles said Saturday. “Many of
the things we’re trying have
been done on the surface
before, but have never been
tried at 5,000 feet.”

He said cutting off the dam-
aged riser isn’t expected to
cause the flow rate of leaking
oil to increase significantly.

THE TRIBUNE

However, Browner said
Sunday on CBS’ “Face the
Nation” that cutting the pipe
could send more oil flowing
into the Gulf — up to 20 per
cent more than is currently
spewing. That’s because engi-
neers will cut off a kink in the
pipe that currently seems to
be holding back some of the
gusher, Browner said.

Browner also said how
much oil the new cap can col-
lect depends on how well it’s
fitted over the leak. Other
experts also have said
installing the new contain-
ment valve is risky because of
the bend in the riser pipe.

“Tf they can’t get that valve
on, things will get much
worse,” said Philip W John-
son, an engineering professor
at the University of Alabama.

Word that the top kill had
failed hit hard in fishing com-
munities along Louisiana’s
coast, where the impact has
been underscored by oil-coat-
ed marshes and wildlife.

The top official in coastal
Plaquemines Parish said news
of the top kill failure brought
tears to his eyes. “They are
going to destroy south
Louisiana. We are dying a
slow death here,” said Billy
Nungesser, the parish presi-
dent. “We don’t have time to
wait while they try solutions.
Hurricane season starts on
Tuesday.”

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THE TRIBUNE

By JUAN CARLOS
LLORCA
Associated Press Writer

GUATEMALA CITY
(AP) — Torrential rains
brought by the first tropical
storm of the 2010 season
pounded Central America
and southern Mexico, trig-
gering deadly landslides. The
death toll stood at 16 Sunday,

From inmates
to employees:
Coup plotters
hired at prison
Where they
(lid time

ST GEORGE’S, Grenada
(AP) — Two men convicted
of killing Grenada’s leader
during a 1983 coup that trig-
gered a US invasion are back
at the prison where they
served long sentences. Only
this time, they’re on the pay-
roll.

Former army chief General
Hudson Austin and Leon
Cornwall were released from
Richmond Hill Prison in Sep-
tember along with five oth-
ers, the last to be freed of the
so-called Grenada 17.

While behind bars, Austin
had helped renovate several
buildings damaged by Hurri-
cane Ivan in 2004, and Corn-
wall, a former high school
teacher, reformed the prison's
education system.

According to documents
presented in Parliament on
Friday, Austin has been hired
as a building supervisor at the
lockup, while Cornwall will
be paid to continue develop-
ing educational programmes.

Leftist Prime Minister
Maurice Bishop, four Cabi-
net ministers and six support-
ers were dragged before a fir-
ing squad and shot dead on
October 19, 1983, by the
Grenada 17 — members of
Bishop’s own New Jewel
movement who demanded
more radical policies.

US troops invaded about a
week later and captured the
17 on orders of President
Ronald Reagan, who worried
about Grenada’s growing ties
with communist Cuba.

The bodies of Bishop and
the 10 others killed have nev-
er been found.

but authorities said the num-
ber could rise.

Tropical Storm Agatha was
dissipating over the moun-
tains of western Guatemala, a
day after it made landfall near
the nation’s border with Mex-
ico with winds up to 45 mph
(75 kph).

Although no longer even a
tropical depression, Agatha
still posed trouble for the
region: Remnants of the
storm were expected to deliv-
er 10 to 20 inches (25 to 50
centimeters) of rain over
southeastern Mexico,
Guatemala and parts of El
Salvador, creating the possi-
bility of “life-threatening flash
floods and mudslides,” the US
National Hurricane Center in
Miami said in an advisory.

Guatemalan President
Alvaro Colom said Saturday
night that the rivers in the
country’s south were flooding
or close to it.

Colom said 4.3 inches (10.8
centimeters) of rain had fallen
in Guatemala City’s valley in
12 hours, the most since 1949,

As of Sunday morning,
69,000 people in Guatemala
had been evacuated, many to
shelters. Some lost their
homes the previous day in a
landslide on a hillside settle-









AGIRL tries to drain rain water out of a street in Amatitlan, south of

Guatemala City, on Saturday...

ment in Guatemala City that
killed four people and left 11
missing, disaster relief
spokesman David de Leon
said.

Four children were killed
by another slide in the town
of Santa Catarina Pinula,
about six miles (10 kilome-
ters) outside the capital. And
in the department of Quet-
zaltenango, 125 miles (200
kilometers) west of
Guatemala City, a boulder
loosened by rains crushed a
house, killing two children
and two adults, de Leon said.

Other evacuees were
moved from their homes to

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avoid potential slides officials
feared might still come.

Callers to local radio sta-
tions described more land-
slides and possible deaths, but
those reports could not be
immediately confirmed.

A three-story building in
northern Guatemala City fell
into a sinkhole but there were
no reports of victims.

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 3C

Tropical Storm Agatha kills 16 in Central America

Cesar George of
Guatemala’s meteorological
institute said the community
of Champerico had received
11.8 inches (30 centimeters)
of rain in 30 hours.

“Tt rained in one day what
it usually gets in a month,”
George said.

Colom said authorities have
not been able to reach Cham-
perico by “air, land or sea.”

In El Salvador, President
Mauricio Funes declared a
“red alert,” the highest level
of emergency, after rains
delivered by Agatha triggered
at least 140 landslides
throughout the country and
killed two adults and a 10-
year-old child. The exact
cause of their deaths was
unclear.

Civil defense officials said
the Acelhuate River that
passes through the capital,
San Salvador, had risen to
dangerous levels and was
threatening to overflow into
city streets.

In Honduras, national
emergency agency Copeco
reported one man was
crushed to death by a wall
that collapsed in the town of
Santa Ana, near the capital
of Tegucigalpa.

Flooding and _ slides
destroyed 45 homes in the
country and prompted
authorities to evacuate 1,800
people, according to figures
released by the agency.

Agatha formed as a tropical
storm early Saturday in the
East Pacific.

Before the rains,
Guatemala already was con-
tending with heavy eruptions
from its Pacaya volcano that
blanketed the capital in ash
and destroyed 800 homes.

The volcano, which is just
south of the capital, started
spewing lava and rocks Thurs-
day afternoon, forcing the clo-
sure of Guatemala City’s
international airport. A TV
reporter was killed by a show-
er of burning rocks.

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

INSIGHT

CRIME, from 1C

one of the many structures
that provide a firm founda-
tion for the growth and devel-
opment of the child. In our
society, many of these essen-
tial structures have been cor-
rupted or outright abandoned.

Another prime example is
the relationship between our
children and our elders. The






need for the connection
between children and elders is
much more fundamental than
our current practices would
suggest. A visit to grammy in
our culture has become a non-
chalant activity that we do in
our spare time. We margin-
alize our elders, based on our
Western world view. Gener-
ally, elders are viewed as eco-

Head of
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NY

nomically unproductive,
because they do not work in
the economy, while they con-
tinually consume resources.
They are considered dispens-
able, worthless even.

In traditional African cul-
ture, where a holistic under-
standing of community mani-
fests, there is an unspoken
language between children

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MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

CHEVROLET

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 1A
Bamboo and Zion Boulevard
TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSIONS

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES $.4. would like to inform the motoring public that East Street South
will be permanently open to the motoring public, effective Thursday June 3, 2010 while road works will be carried out on
sections of Bamboo & Zion Blvd for approximately two (2) weeks.

and elders. This is why elders
take a great interest in the
birth of a child. The elders
prepare the children for the
journey ahead, sharing with
them the secrets of life. The
children share with the elders
news of the next realm,
preparing them for their
upcoming journey.
“Throughout children’s
lives in the village there is a
strong message that they
belong to a community of
people who value them
almost beyond anything else.
It starts when grandparents
participate in the birthing and
are the first to hold the new-
born. Because the newborn is
considered a villager who has
just arrived from a long trip
that started in the land of the
ancestors, the people most
recognizable to them are the
old ones,” according to
Malidoma Some, in the
“Healing Wisdom of Africa”.
If it is not clear as yet that
we have far greater problems
than crime then perhaps you
are not seeing the crux of the

pet ling
: hy,
F %
5 *
——

matter. In our absence of
community, we are inevitably
damned, because we live by a
destructive separatist agenda
that is safeguarded by a belief
in armed force.

In material terms this looks
like a proliferation of gated
communities, “shanty towns”
and prisons; a flood of police
on the streets; an increase in
police raids, civilian arma-
ment and private security; and
an increase in gangs. Surprise.
Surprise. We are creating an
increasingly segregated soci-
ety with “strong people” who
get by and “weak people”
who don’t.

All of this stems from our
linear way of thinking. In this
model everything is perceived
through a dichotomous para-
digm: good, bad; ally, enemy;
old, young; black, white; male,
female; straight, gay. In this
two dimensional world view
it is hard to see the inherent
connections in all things. All
reality is polarized; all knowl-
edge is externalized, and if
something cannot be proven

THE TRIBUNE

with empirical evidence it
does not exist. This lends to
materialism and an imbal-
anced left-sided way of think-
ing, which cuts one off from
the world of spirit.

Imagine our predicament
when the entire education sys-
tem is designed on this model.
It breeds a society of highly
materialistic, technocratic
individuals with little self-
knowledge. Our children are
not taught to learn from with-
in and they develop a sense
of dependency. Ultimately,
western education suppress-
es our children’s intuition and
causes it to atrophy.

Our linear way of thinking
has manifested in everything
around us, from our thoughts
on life and death, to the way
we design our so-called com-
munities.

Often we hear people use
the following phrases: “Here
today, gone tomorrow”, or “T
only have one life to live.”
These are symbolic of our

SEE next page

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh, edi hg

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE GRAPHIC DESIGN & LAYOUT

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of The
College of The Bahamas Alumm Magazine. Through a high quality graphic tormat,
ithe alumni magazine provides key information about The College, its graduates, stu-
dents, researchers, friends and supporters and has become a pivotal publication for
The College in the last two-and-a-half years.

The look, feel and general format for the magazine 1s consistent from issue to issue
with variations to suit the level and detail of the content of each issue.

Proposals: Vendors should deliver one (1) original and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one orginal signature to the following

address:

Atin: Ma. Gabriella Fraser

Associate Vice President, External Affairs
The College of The Bahamas

PO ox § 4072
Oakes Field Campus
Nassau, The Bahanas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 00 p.m. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request For Proposal (RFP) document,
requested attachments, and any amendments if issued. The proposal must contain
the signature of a duly authorized officer or agent of the company submitting the
proposal. Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST, Friday June 25, 2010, will not be
considered and will be returned unopened,

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept or reject any or all pespons-

es to this RFP.

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of External
Affairs al (242) 302-4304, Technical questions may be directed to Ms. Maelynn
Seymour-Major, Office of Communication at (242) 302-4353,

You may download a copy of the REP at: bttpyweww.cob.edu.bs/rip_alumnimag.php

‘Motorist travelling through Buttercup Drive onte Bamboo Blvd. will be affected and are axked to use an alternate route to

their destination,

*Matorist travelling north & south towards Ziow Bhd onto East St. should following the signs posted "DIVERSION" through

Antonio Drive.

Detours. will be clearly marked to allow the sate passage for pedestrians & motorist and proper signage will be erected delineating the work zone.
haar patie diraghont hike pecpeed i greatly apinecianal oad we de apalogiie for the incomveniaice & delays coed.

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Dior Hewrar Walon fii SM arte 0 per
Or ARE EE! BS

ive) dhore che eet kero

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 5C



Our futile war on crime

FROM page 4C

thoughts on life and death.
The Christian view suggests
a person is born, dies, and
goes to heaven or hell. An
atheist’s view suggests a per-
son is born and dies. In
essence, it is the same linear
model of thinking that gives
rise to both of these world
views. This is in complete
opposition to what we see in
nature.

In traditional African cul-
ture the person is born into
the community to serve a spe-
cific function or role. They
leave the community through
the doorway of death, enter
the ancestral realm, where
they continue to play a sup-
portive role, and then are
reborn into the community.
Africans have developed this
understanding by observing
nature: the cycle of the sea-
sons, the cycle of the moon,
the ebb and flow of the tides,
and the cyclical transfer of
energy in the ecosystem.

In Bahamian society we
recognize the cyclical nature
of certain things in our
speech, primarily in an uncon-
scious way. When we say,
“you killing ya granddaddy”,
or when we remark that a
child has inherited a particular
skill or trait from a deceased
relative, these are unconscious
revelations of reality. Unfor-
tunately for us, living uncon-
sciously, without purpose, has
disconnected us from our very
nature. This is why we are so
destructive to ourselves and
the external environment.

Our linear way of thinking
has even manifested in the
way we construct our neigh-
bourhoods. Examine any
modern neighbourhood and
you will notice that our hous-
es are lined up on streets.
What you are actually seeing
are houses arranged in paral-
lel lines that never meet. This
is further compounded by the
walls and fences we erect to
delineate boundaries and cre-
ate division. This is a tangi-
ble example of a segregative

way of being: each unit is
compartmentalized and
excluded from the other.

In a holistic model, com-
munities are designed based
on a unified way of being. The
cosmological principle of
community creates a physical
blueprint for designing our
dwellings, reminding us daily
of who we are. For example,
the dwellings in a compound
are generally arranged in con-
centric circles. Elders and chil-
dren are located at the core.
Women form the inner
perimeter and men form the
outer circle.

Children

This ties back into the rela-
tionship between children and
elders, and the role of every-
one in the community. The
African model shows us that
at the heart of community is
wisdom, ancestral knowledge
represented by the seed and
the ripening fruit. The women
represent the nurturing force
that supports the core. The
men represent the external
boundary, the hard exterior
that protects that which is
most important.

Unfortunately, based on
our current level of con-
sciousness, it is virtually
impossible for us to create a
true community. Individual-
ly and collectively, we do not
identify with the requisite
higher levels of consciousness
in our being needed to devel-
op community.

Consciousness is the
underlying essence that flows
through nature. It is our abil-
ity to understand ourselves,
each other, and the world we
live in; it is our awareness of
the connectivity of all things.

When consciousness is
directed in a linear way it
manifests in the identification
with the material aspects of
our being. When it is focused
in a balance manner, in both
hemispheres of our brain, it
manifests in a holistic way of
being. When we operate on a
higher plane of consciousness

we have greater wisdom and
foresight; we access our abili-
ty to see through the third
eye.

“No problem can be solved
at the same level of con-
sciousness that created it,” as
my mother often says in quot-
ing Albert Einstein. This type
of thinking is consistent with
the old adage, “A man can-
not be above his mind.” Basi-
cally, a person with pink glass-
es lives in a pink world.

If we raise the level of con-
sciousness in our people, par-
ticularly in our children, then
new ways of being will
emerge. If every strategy we
employed to solve our social
problems was infused with
this inner knowledge, the
essence of who we are, it
would transform the way we
live. Because everything
occurring internally manifests
externally, higher conscious-
ness would inevitably give
birth to community.

If we really want to solve
the problem of crime we have
to fill the void created by a
lack of community. Raising
our consciousness as a peo-
ple is our best hope for
reclaiming and restoring com-
munity.

The power to arrest the
problem is in the hands of
each individual, but most
relinquish their power by
denying individual responsi-
bility. The next time you look
outside of yourself for the
answer to the crime problem,
ask yourself these questions:
What is my state of con-
sciousness, and what am I
doing to build a true commu-
nity?

But first, we must exam-
ine, are we really interested
in forming a community with
the other people stuck on this

For the stories
behind the news,

To MET fe lira
on Mondays



Reporters News
and Sport

AN TED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
natratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers

who want to make a difference
at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We’re the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we’re on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience

e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour



Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet@tribunemedia.net

Or

drop in your applications at
our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,
Managing Editor, The Tribune.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

rock, or are we content with
Western illusions of security,
prosperity, Godliness, and
identity.

I suspect our greatest prob-
lem is the fact that we are not
truly interested in forming a
community. Rather, we are

satisfied with living a life
based on the illusions that we
construct, chief among them is
our futile war on crime.


































































\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE PRINT PRODUCTION

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of
The College of The Bahamas Alumni Magazine. Through a high quality graph-
ic format, the alumni magazine provides key information about The College, its
graduates, students, researchers, friends and supporters and has become a piv-
otal publication for The Collewe in the last two-and-a-half years.

The look, feel and general format for the magazine is consistent from issue to
issue With variations to suit the level ane detail of the content of each issue,

Proposals: Vendors should deliver one (1) orginal and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one origimal signature to the tollowing
address:

Attn Ms. Gabriella Fraser

Associate Viee President, External Affairs
The College of The Bahamas

PO Box NW 4912

Oakes Field Campus

Nassau, The Bahamas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 5:p.m. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request for Proposal (RFP) document.
requested allachments, and any amendments if issued. The proposal must con-
tain the signature of a duly authorized officer or agent of the company submit-
ting the proposal, Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST, Friday June 25, 2010,
will not be considered and will be returned unopened.

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
responses to this REP,

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of
External Affairs, at (242) 302-4504. Technical questions may be directed to Ms.

Maelynn Seymour-Major, Office of Communication at (242) 302-4353.

You may download a copy of the RFP at: biipe!wawe

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department’s Triage, Registration and Patient Waiting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic,

Effective Tuesday May 11th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed,

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services,

For more information please call 502-7885 for AGE Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic,

Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused,

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT









THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 7C

INSIGHT



1,000th GI killed in Afghan
war was on 2nd tour

By PAUL J WEBER
Associated Press Writer

KERRVILLE, Texas (AP)
— The 1,000th American ser-
viceman killed in Afghanistan
was born on July 4. He died
several days before Ameri-
cans honour fallen troops on
Memorial Day.

Marine Cpl. Jacob C Leicht
was killed Thursday when he
stepped on a land mine in
Helmand province that ripped
off his right arm. It was the
24-year-old Texan’s second
deployment overseas.

Leicht had begged to return
to the battlefield after a bomb
took out his Humvee in Iraq.
He spent two painful years
recovering from face and leg
injuries, all the while pining
for combat in letters from his
hospital bed.

He finally got back to the
front lines in southern
Afghanistan, but was killed
less than a month into the
tour of duty he desperately
wanted.

“He said he always wanted
to die for his country and be
remembered,” said Jesse
Leicht, his younger brother.
“He didn’t want to die hav-
ing a heart attack or just being
an old man. He wanted to die
for something.”

An Associated Press tally
shows Leicht is the 1,000th
US serviceman killed in the
Afghan conflict. The first
death — nearly nine years ago
— was also a soldier from the
San Antonio area.

The AP bases its tally on
Defense Department reports
of deaths suffered as a direct
result of the Afghan conflict,
including personnel assigned
to units in Afghanistan, Pak-

JONATHAN Leicht poses with a
photo of his brother, Marine Cpl.

Jacob Leicht... (AP Photo)

istan or Uzbekistan.

Other news organisations
count deaths suffered by ser-
vice members assigned else-
where as part of Operation
Enduring Freedom, which
includes operations in the
Philippines, the Horn of
Africa and at the US deten-
tion facility at Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.

Leicht’s brothers told the
AP the military also told the
family that his death put the
toll at 1,000.

When military officers went
to tell Leicht’s parents their
adopted son had died in com-
bat, sheriff’s deputies had to
help navigate them to the 130-
acre (53-hectare) family ranch
tucked deep in the Texas Hill
Country.

It was here that Jacob
Leicht chopped thick cedar
trees and hiked the rugged
limestone peaks, growing up
into an imposing 6-5 (1.96-
meter), 200-pound (90-kilo-
gram) Marine with a soft
heart. He watched “Dora the



Explorer” with his brother’s
children and confided to fam-
ily that he was troubled by
the thought of young civilians
being killed in battle.

But for Leicht, born in a
Lemoore, California, Navy
hospital, the battlefield was
the destination. He threw
away a college Reserve Offi-
cers’ Training Corps scholar-
ship after just one semester
because he feared it would
lead away from the front
lines.

“His greatest fear was that
they would tell him he would
have to sit at a desk for the
rest of his life,” said Jonathan
Leicht, his older brother.

When Jacob Leicht’s wish
finally came true, it didn’t last
long.

His first deployment was to
Traq in 2007, but he was there
just three weeks when Jesse
Leicht said his brother drove
over two 500-pound (227-kilo-
gram) bombs beneath the
road.

One detonated, the other
didn’t. The blast tore through
the Humvee, shooting the
radio into Leicht’s face and
knocking him unconscious.
He felt something pinch his
thumb, and the gunner’s face
was filleted so badly by shrap-
nel that medics couldn’t keep
water in his mouth.

None of the five people
inside the vehicle died. Jesse
Leicht said an Iraqi inter-
preter, the only one on board
who wasn’t seriously injured,
dragged his brother from the
mangled vehicle. The blast
snapped Jacob Leicht’s fibula
and tibula, and the recovery
was an agonising ordeal of
pins and rods and bolts drilled
into his bones.

FOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR
DATA WAREHOUSE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lid. (BTC) is

pleased to invite Tenders to provide a Data Warehouse for
the company.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender $pectifica-
tion from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before 5:00 pm
Friday, June 18th, 2010. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “Data Warehouse” and should be delivered fo the
attention of the “Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO."

BIC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.






















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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



Full Text






Cool Vibes!

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

HIGH S8F
AND SUN BAHAMAS EDITION

ym Lhe Tribune &

nm lovin’ it
cams USA TODAY
MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010



Volume: 106 No.156

Our futile
war on

crime
SSAC Ee et







USE



Reports: Righy a

possible candidate
for St Cecilia
By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



FORMER _ PLP
chairman Raynard

A Rigby has reportedly
thrown his hat into the
ring as a possible can-
didate for the St Cecil-
ia constituency.

In the past Mr Rigby
has gone on the record
to criticise both his
party and its leader

SEE page 8







Boys’ dorm under
threat in cash crisis

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





THE Ranfurly Home may be facing partial closure as it
stares down its hardest financial test in its 54-year history.

The Board of Directors, who have concluded that it might
be “easier to feed girls than to feed boys”, say they may
have to close the boys’ dorm and have the government find
alternative homes for them.

They fear that this closure of a portion of the children’s

SEE page ten

Atlantis CEO hails
airfare programme

By PAUL G TURNQUEST _ Tourism’s free-
Tribune Staff Reporter companion air-
turnquest@tribunemedia.net fare pro-
gramme as one

ATLANTIS CEO, of the most suc-
George Markantonis cessful promo- George

applauded the Ministry of tions that the wiv itonis

country has

ever had, citing a substan-

tial “up-tick” in bookings j

from the scheme. Photo by Malcolm Jamal Davis
Noting how any number FIREFIGHTERS tackle the blaze which destroyed the Cable Beach straw market on Saturday morning.

of hotels around the world By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net











As today is Memorial Day
in the US, a public holiday,

there is no USA Today in the .
Tribune. z SEE page nine





























MORE than 40 straw vendors and their work-
ers are jobless after a suspicious fire razed one of

= - the Cable Beach straw markets over the week-
WRaltamaslOthicerc) Me

The blaze completely engulfed the market
directly across the street from the Wyndham hotel

Selo! Supplies shortly before 2 am on Saturday, with six fire

engines responding to the flames. The heat also





damaged a vehicle parked nearby.
The surrounding posts were the only markers of

(ger al
en 2 a the 43-stall market six hours later as fire officers

continued to rummage through the blackened
remains of a collapsed ceiling and thousands of dol-
Hanging Folders Legal, lars of charred souvenirs.

Vendors circled the site, and directed the fire
officers to dig through hot ash piles — hoping to
recover untarnished goods or at least keepsakes
from the fire. Others sat and watched apathetically.

Workers, hired by some vendors to help with

2 Hole ma Electric

PHOTO: Malcolm Jamal Davis

SEE page two



Maderla St* Paradise Island = 2 locations in Freeport













NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Fire razes Cable Beach straw market

FROM page one

their stalls, showed up later. They
had heard about the fire but had
to see it for themselves.

Displaced vendor Janet Pros-
per, 44, of Bamboo Town said:
“This was our livelihood. Where
can we go now? Everything we
had we put into our business. It’s
a serious blow to all of us. We
came out here to work and we
find this. We have bills, kids,
mortgages — we need help
a.s.a.p.”

Like so many of the vendors at
the Cable Beach market, Ms
Prosper did not take her goods
home with her each night, but
instead kept them packed up
neatly in her stall.

It was customary, as most ven-
dors did not have personal trans-
portation, and even those who
did, did not carry every single
item off-site, evidenced by the T-
shirts, Androsia print wraps,
mangled jewellery and burnt plas-
tic that littered the site.

One vendor recovered two
oven mitts, seemingly unharmed
in their still hot packaging —
another three wooden jewellery
boxes.

Like many, Deborah Ewing,
48-year-old straw vendor of
Mount Moriah, lost everything.

Though undefeated and res-
olute to continue working, she
said: “That’s my stall. Every sin-
gle thing I owned was in there.
This is not a loss this is a devas-
tation.”

Vendors struggled to remain

positive, highlighting their per-
sonal safety as a silver lining to
the smoke cloud still burning
from one corner of the structure
later that morning. Some
attempted to detach themselves
from the situation as a way of
managing the harsh reality of the
loss. However, despite the char-
acteristically light-hearted per-
sonalities of the few opportunists
who sought instead to focus on
what could be gleaned from the
wreckage — the majority of the
vendors stood jaded, staring into
the ruins.

Straw vendor Samantha
Brown bemused: “Today we
can’t say ‘morning morning’,
we’re saying ‘nightmare night-
mare’. Everyone was preparing
for the Memorial Day weekend.
Thousands and thousands and
thousands of dollars...”

The scene for some was a
ghastly echo of the September 4,
2001 arson that ravaged the
famous Nassau straw market on
Bay Street and displaced hun-
dreds of vendors.

Cable Beach vendors believe
the same is true of this incident
which reduced their livelihood to
ash but affected no other build-
ings. Police are still investigating.

Responding to what immedi-
ate action she intends to take
now, one vendor said: “I’ve got to
keep a level head some sort of
how. I’m going to take it easy.
What can I do? Just relax myself
and trust God. He’s been faithful
all these years — why shouldn’t
he be faithful now?”





THE TRIBUNE






































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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 3

CRIMENEWS

POLICE REPORTS

Gunshot victim
is country's
Sbth homicide

POLICE are investigating
the nation’s 36th homicide
after a man was found with
multiple gunshot injuries to
the body yesterday morning.

Responding to a shooting
at Peter Street East, off East
Street, police discovered the
victim’s body around
12.30am Sunday and emer-
gency medical services pro-
nounced him dead on the
scene.

Police suspect he is a 24-
year-old resident of
Brougham Street, however
they could not confirm the
man’s identity up to press
time. The man was wearing
a pair of blue jeans, a black
and white striped shirt and
brown shoes.

Informed persons are
encouraged to contact the
police at 919, crime stoppers
328 TIPS, CDU 502-9991 or
Southern Police Station at
322-3337.

Police probe
armed robberies
and stabbing

POLICE are investigating
two armed robberies and a
stabbing incident that
occurred over the weekend.

The first robbery took
place at the Mall at
Marathon Friday afternoon.
While getting out of his
vehicle in the parking lot,
the driver was approached
by a man armed with a
handgun who demanded
cash. The gunman escaped
onto Grace Avenue with an
undisclosed amount of cash
ina 1995 Honda Accord,
license plate 3270.

The next robbery
occurred shortly after 1 pm
at Leeward Estate west.
Upon arrival at a residence
in the area, two men anda
woman were approached by
two men, one with a hand-
gun. The gunman demanded
their vehicle. The culprits,
dressed in white tee shirts
and short blue jeans,
escaped in the vehicle,
license plate 221490, with an
undetermined amount of
cash and personal items.

Fight

Later that day, police
responded to a stabbing at
Tonique Williams Darling
Highway. While in the area,
aman got into a fight with
another man and as a result
was stabbed in his neck and
head. The 26-year-old victim
was taken to hospital by
ambulance where he was
treated and discharged.
Police are questioning a 26-
year-old man of Market
Street in connection with
this incident.

The public is asked to
contact the police with any
information regarding the
above incidents at 919,
CDU at 502-9991 or North-
eastern Division at 394-
4540/1.



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

ee ci
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BACCALAUREATE SERVICE AT THE SOUTHWEST CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF GOD

Learning —a

journey

that

must not end

Graduates receive lesson for life

MORE than 400 graduates
of the College of the Bahamas,
from both the New Providence
and the Grand Bahama cam-
puses, ended this phase of their
academic career with advice to
never stop learning and to pur-
sue their life’s purpose with pas-
sion.

At the Baccalaureate Ser-
vice held at the Southwest
Cathedral Church of God on
Tuesday, May 25, the first in a
series of graduation activities
for the 2009-2010 academic
year, President of The College
of The Bahamas Janyne M.
Hodder told graduates that
learning is a journey that must
not end. “By challenging your-
self and by exploring other
ways of looking at the world,
by believing that a problem is
just a reality calling out for a
new mindset, you will be a con-
tinuous learner,” she told the
graduates.

President Hodder also urged
them to challenge the known
and embrace the unknown and
new possibilities will reveal
themselves.

“T hope you will always con-
tinue to challenge both what
you think you know and what
you know you don’t know,”
President Hodder told them.
“When you challenge what is
already known, what is already
in practice, you force yourself
and those around you to con-
sider how the world you live in
can be made better or differ-
ent. Thinking, solving problems,
making sense of the world
around us, having better ideas —
all of this is what your educa-
tion has prepared you to do.”

The Baccalaureate Service
was a special opportunity for
President Hodder to address
the Commencement Class as
she prepares for her retirement
in June. She has come full cir-
cle, both beginning and ending
her career in education in The
Bahamas.

For the third consecutive
year, more than 50 per cent of
the graduating class of 434, has
earned baccalaureate degrees.

The 2010 Commencement
Class was made up of gradu-
ates from the Schools of Busi-







GRADUATES of the 201 0 Commencement Class sing during the Baccalaureate Service at the South-

west Cathedral Church of God.

ness; Communication and Cre-
ative Arts; Education; English
Studies; Social Sciences; Math-
ematics, Physics and Technolo-
gy, Nursing and Allied Health
Professions and the Culinary
and Hospitality Management
Institute.

Southwest Cathedral Senior
Pastor Bishop Donnie Storr, in
his address, shared the benefits
of living a life infused with pas-
sion. “Whatever our purpose in
life, we must execute it with
passion,” he said. “Passion is
the indicator that one has found
his or her purpose in life.”

Hundreds of family members

and friends of the graduates
attended the service to give
God thanks for their accom-
plishments and invoke His spir-
itual guidance as they embark
upon a new journey.



COLLEGE PRESIDENT Janyne Hodder aieeaes the Baccalaureate
Service.

Major projects should give GB economy a major boost — FNM

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT -— The Free
National Movement
announced that Grand
Bahama can expect to see a
significant boost in the local
economy as a result of major
projects underway here on the
island.

FNM MPs and Senators on
Grand Bahama held a press
conference on Saturday at
FNM Headquarters to give
an update on the progress of
several private and govern-
ment projects.

Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing
reported that half a billion
dollars in spending will be
made in the Grand Bahama
economy due to the multi-mil-
lion dollar investments
approved by the government.

He was referring to the
$300 million investment at the

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Zhivargo Laing

BORCO terminal in
Freeport, and the $200 mil-
lion investment at the South
Riding Point oil terminal in
East End.

“These projects will pro-
vide a major boost to the
economy here,” Mr Laing
said.

Vopak’s $350 million
expansion project at BORCO

Penn

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will increase oil storage capac-
ity at the plant, which has a
current capacity of 21 million
barrels.

Statoil plans to upgrade the
terminal at South Riding
Point so it can start blending
crude oil.

The first phase of the pro-
ject involves a major clean up
of the facility and upgrading
safety levels at the terminal.
The second phase will involve
installing new pipelines and
equipment to begin blending
operations.

Kenneth Russell, Minister
of Housing and National
Insurance, also noted that the
sale of Deep Water Cay in
East Grand Bahama has been
finalized.

“Tt is expected that some
$20-$40 million will be invest-
ed to upgrade the facility
there,” he reported.

Public Works Minister
Neko Grant also discussed the
progress of government pro-

ee

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jects that are underway on
Grand Bahama. He stated
that work is proceeding well
on the new $16 million gov-
ernment complex in Freeport.

Mr Grant stated that public
restroom facilities are being
built at the Post Office Build-
ing downtown.

He also added that eight
new classrooms will be con-
structed at the new Sister
Mary Patricia Junior High
School.

Mr Grant was also pleased
with the progress of work at












the new ferry dock at
McCleans Town in East End.

Mr Grant said the social
assessment of the Pinder’s
Point and Lewis Yard settle-
ments has been completed.

He said the government
will review the report so that
a decision can be made
regarding what steps will be
taken regarding the welfare
of residents and the students
of the Lewis Yard Primary
who are affected by emissions
from the nearby industrial
plants.

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Us your cecmnd to nsara Hokebs at S60-9549 or visit us ot
www. bahamas local oom


PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

British Airways flies to Nassau empty

BRITISH AIRWAYS is in trouble —
plenty of trouble. We have not been follow-
ing the strike against the airline, but if what
has been happening with flights to New
Providence in the past few days is any indi-
cation, those within the union who have said
they would not be “sad to see BA fail” might
yet get their wish.

Talks between the airline and the union
broke down again on Friday with the
announcement that the strike will continue
until June 9. Apparently the crunch is now
over concessions.

British Executive Officer Willie Walsh
has made it clear that the airline will never
reinstate concessions to staff who went on
strike. Derek Simpson, the striking Unite’s
joint leader replied: “He has refused to rein-
state travel concessions in full despite Unite
making it clear that the union would sus-
pend the strike if he did so.”

The strike is estimated to cost BA £105
million.

“British Airways seems resigned to facing
the short-term losses in order to secure
changes in working practices and cost savings
in the longer term,” said Jonathan Wober, an
analyst at Societe Generale SA in London
with a “hold” recommendation on the stock.
“Shareholders seem to be regarding this as a
one-off cost, as long as the results that are
realized are in BA management’s favour.”

Union and management have locked
horns over pay and staffing levels for BA’s
12,000 cabin crew.

Derek Simpson now wants the negotia-
tions to be in front of the cameras. “Let the
world see what this is all about,” he said.
“If people could see what he (Walsh) is
doing, they would know who to blame.”

Mr Simpson might be embarrassed by
the cameras if there is a repeat of the loud-
mouthed protesters who interrupted deli-
cate union-management negotiations in sup-
port of the cabin crew last week. Even an
angry union leader had to shout them down,
telling them that if in fact they supported
the cabin crew they would leave the building
immediately. Their behaviour certainly did
not help the union’s cause — certainly not
with the public who witnessed their skin-
head behaviour.

According to BA more flights were
planned in the coming days during the indus-









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trial action because more cabin crews were
reporting for duty. On the Internet, in the
meantime, BA is advertising round-trip fares
to London as low as $296 return.

Now this is what has been happening
here in New Providence.

A BA Boeing 767, which can accommo-
date 189 passengers, arrived at Lynden Pin-
dling airport on Wednesday with only the
flight deck on board — three persons. There
were no passengers, although, we under-
stand, the aircraft was fully catered for pas-
sengers. It arrived at its 3.25pm scheduled
time Wednesday, and left, again on schedule,
at 9.40 the same evening. This is what we
have confirmed.

We tried to find out why the company
would waste so much fuel flying both ways
empty, rather than remaining at Heathrow.
The person asked was not certain, but pre-
sumed that it was a slotting problem at
Heathrow airport. In other words an air-
craft has a parking time slot, which it has to
vacate when its time is up. We were not able
to confirm this report.

And why was an empty aircraft fully
catered for non-existent passengers? Again
the person did not know, but believed it was
something to do with union agreements that
an aircraft cannot get airborne unless it is ful-
ly catered. Again this report has not been
confirmed.

And what happened to the food? We
understand it had to be dumped in Nassau.
The rules say food cannot be given to the
poor after a certain number of hours. Again
the dumping of the food is an unconfirmed
report.

However, what is confirmed is that BA
flew its Boeing to Nassau again on schedule
Friday.

It was empty. It returned to London with
a handful of passengers. The same thing
happened on Saturday — the Boeing arrived
empty and left empty.

There was a repeat performance yester-
day, Sunday, except that it left with a few
passengers. The same is expected to hap-
pen again tomorrow.

Not only is BA losing financially, but just
imagine the number of passengers who are
not arriving in the Bahamas.

It is now a matter of who blinks first
before there is an end to this test of wills.



Either legalise
vambling or
shut it down

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kindly allow me space in
your daily to express my opin-
ion on a topical issue. The
Prime Minister, Rt Hon Hubert
Ingraham recently declared that
after consultation the govern-
ment has decided not to pur-
sue legalising gambling in The
Bahamas.

I would love to know who
they consulted with because I
live here and have a voter’s
card and no one asked me any-
thing. Perhaps I might not be
important enough to have a say
in their opinion. But as we all
know, once again, the mighty
Christian Council of our
beloved “Christian” nation pre-
vails.

My problem is this — how
come no one (namely the
Christian Council) makes a fuss
about tourists coming here to
gamble? If it’s so abominable
then why don’t we stop them
from gambling too? Why not
abolish it completely? Huh?
Oh, of course not, there isn’t
any hypocrisy in that decision!

So you’re telling me the
church doesn’t hold raffles to
make profits for positive bene-
fits? Then what’s wrong with
the government legalising gam-
bling to make some money for
this economy which our Prime
Minister candidly referred to
as a “sick patient”?

There is nothing wrong with
having the Christian Council
and religious community as a
moral compass for the nation;
however, when their actions
begin to impede positive
progress then the government
should exercise more sternly its
right to have the final say and
do what it thinks best for the
advancement of the country on
the advice of the majority.

Ironically, the Florida lottery
that a considerable number of
Bahamians love to run off to
Florida and play has donated
more than $21 billion toward

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



education in the state of Flori-
da, the New York lottery over
$36 billion and the Illinois lot-
tery has given over $15 billion
to its state. You’re telling me
we can’t do the same and use
this money to build new hospi-
tals, fund education, combat
crime fighting, develop social
programmes and cut down that
national deficit that is spiraling
out of control? No, let’s fund
the education of others first I
suppose.

I was amused, but not at all
surprised, to see one of our
local television stations playing
a commercial boldly to adver-
tise a popular numbers game
available in New Providence.
These people don’t care; it is
just like it is already legal.
Moreover, the Prime Minister
says the government can’t
police it and yet they still aren’t
ready to legalise it. So what in
Sam Hill do they propose? ’'m
absolutely confused right now!

On a humorous note, one of
the local Revs was broadcast
on the evening news as captain
of a sailboat which is proudly
sponsored by a local numbers
house as the logo was even con-
spicuously displayed on said
boat for all to see. Welcome to
comedy central!

This doesn’t make an iota of
sense to me. Why do we con-
tinue to allow some of these
already filthy rich politicians
and police officers (well they
aren’t as rich) to accept dona-
tions from these numbers boss-
es while the treasury remains
broke? Confused again!

Conversely, I agree that it
would not be wise to put
Bahamians in casinos as this
might spell disaster, but defi-
nitely the government might
want to allow them to play the

numbers game legally. Then we
can tax these number houses
and watch the cash line the gov-
ernment’s dusty pockets instead
for a change.

Let the Bahamian people
have their say, Mr Prime Min-
ister. This is our country. Let
the people speak and boldly put
their mark to the “yes” or “no”
toward regulating this industry.
No one can dispute that the
government urgently needs this
cash injection.

Tam not advocating for legal-
ising gambling or abolishing it.
My stance is this — If you’re not
going to legalise the business
then shut it down. Why do we
always need these people with
law degrees (who work for us
anyway) to tell us what to do?

Mr Ingraham has communi-
cated that he will be taking a
pay cut but as far as I under-
stand, the man collects a salary
and a pension. How foolish do
these people think we are? If
he is really concerned he will
give up either his salary or pen-
sion completely.

Quite frankly I am disgust-
ed to see that a handful of peo-
ple make money from this “‘ille-
gal” game while the country
cries out desperately to have its
needs met.

Now the money that the
country needs will have to
come from somewhere else. So
guess what? Higher taxes for
the already struggling middle
class man!

If the church opposes it so
vehemently, when the new tax-
es rain down let’s start with
them.

This now makes room for
another controversial yet perti-
nent and equally timely subject
—should there be greater sepa-
ration of church and state in
our beloved Bahamaland?

D ANDERSON
Bahamian
Nassau,

May 26, 2010.

An open letter to Lloyd Turnquest
and Town Planning Committee

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open
letter to Mr. Lloyd Turn-
quest and the Town Plan-
ning Committee who have
not replied to owners’ con-
cerns about planned Trecon
construction in front of
homes 27-29 in Delaporte
Point.

To Lloyd Turnquest and
the Town Planning Com-
mittee:

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Have you ever wanted to run your
own Consignment Store?

We are considering selling our well established
Consignment Boutique, Selling ladies fashions,
located on Shirley Street.

For more information, please call 424-8359

HELP WANTED

During your site visit to
Delaporte Point, several
owners showed you an area
in front of houses 27-29
selected by Trecon Con-
struction to build more
homes.

You said there was no
application for the area. In
justifying the controversial
garden units that were
opposed by most Delaporte
Point owners, your depart-
ment claimed they were on
an old 1960’s plan.

That plan shows there are
no units in front of homes
27-29. In addition, the gar-
den in front of the homes
has been maintained at the
expense of owners since
before Trecon purchased in
Delaporte.

For the same reason that

the controversial garden
permit was approved (plan-
ning claims they had to go
by an old plan), homeown-
ers request that the Town
Planning Committee refuses
any application for building
in front of homes 27-29
because they are not on the
same plan.

As Town Planning Chair-
man, you told Delaporte
owners you could stop the
construction in front of
homes 27-29. We expect
you to live up to your word.

Please stop the proposed
construction before it is too
late.

DELAPORTE
POINT OWNERS
Delaporte,

May 27, 2010

Oe
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 5



Doubts about % <>
legal teeth of |

nt i |



animal control law

Resident fears legislation will not protect people

A resident, who says his
community in the eastern area
of the island, is terrorised by a
dangerous dog does not

by another
resident of
the area
that is left

bune the matter was “before
the courts” but this newspa-
per was unable to find a
record of this at the Police

believe the new Animal Con- | “free to Prosecutions Office and the
trol and Protection Act 2010 roam” the dog continues to live in the
has the legal teeth to protect neighbour- area.
people in such situations. hood. Agriculture and Marine
After years of police inac- The dog, Resources Minister Larr
tion despite promises from itis alleged, Cortwright, who put fervat
the Fox Hill police station has “not ek 8 1 P ein d
that the owner of the ram- been kept Die imal Prolecvon, a
paging dog would be prose- under prop- Control Act on behalf of the

cuted for letting her dog roam
freely in the area, the resident
said the wording of the new
Act appears too weak to
encourage enforcement of the
law.

A major purpose of the

Bill, passed by parliamentari- _ ten by the dog.” Child maintenance
ans last week in the House of The dog “attempted to kill” ee .
Assembly, is to increase mea- a two-year-old girl, and was application against
sures to reduce the likelihood — only stopped by the interven- oo

of attacks on the public by _ tion of the girl’s grandmother, Senator (lismissed

dangerous dogs and the
opportunity for victims of
such attacks to claim damages
from dog owners.

But, according to the resi-
dent, the fact that the new Act
only states that in the case of
a person contravening the Act
a police officer “may”, rather
than “must” or “should” issue
a summons to the person
allegedly responsible to
appear before a magistrate
gives the police too much lee-
way to ignore situations
where the public is left at risk
of attack, as has happened in
his neighbourhood, he said.

In a March 2010 letter writ-
ten to Commissioner of Police
Ellison Greenslade over the
question of the inaction of the
Fox Hill police station with
respect to the situation, the
resident explained how peo-
ple living in the area have
been “terrorised by a vicious
and dangerous dog” owned



er control

“LARRY

since June
CARTWRIGHT 2008” and

since Janu-
ary 2009 “six or more neigh-
bours have been seriously
attacked and repeatedly bit-

who was then herself “almost
killed” by the animal who had
to be wrestled off her by oth-
ers, it was alleged.

Complaints

“Within the last year five
or more written complaints
by neighbours who have been
attacked or bitten by this dog,
along with the relevant med-
ical evidence, have been given
to the Fox Hill police station,”
said the resident, who added
that he had not received a
response from the police to
his letter.

Neighbours wanted to see
the “ferocious” dog removed
and destroyed and the owner
prosecuted and denied the
right to keep dogs for some-
time, the resident said.

When contacted about the
matter, an officer at Fox Hill
Police station told The Tri-

TA MCU EDA

THE Royal Bank of Canada apologised to its clients over the
weekend for a malfunction in one of its ATM card printing

machines.

According to Jan Knowles, the regional manager of Public
Relations and Communications for RBC, this temporary issue
was resolved earlier in the week and to date requests for cards
are being fulfilled within their regular turn around period and
prior requests have been fulfilled.

“Clients were advised via our branch network of the situation
and we again apologise to them for any inconvenience,” she

said.

government — now before the
Senate — said he “noted” the
suggestions with respect to
the Act, but had no comment
to make.



A child maintenance
application against Free
National Movement
Senator Anthony Mus-
grove was dismissed by
a Magistrate Friday.

The claimant, who
according to her attor-
ney Romona Farquhar-
son, gave birth to twin
girls allegedly for the
Senator last September,
was not present in court
Friday afternoon.

Magistrate Carolyn
Voigt Evans subse-
quently dismissed the
application. Senator
Musgrove who was pre-
sent in Court 3, Victoria
Gardens Friday, was
represented by lawyer
Don Saunders.







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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

The man who believes he
can do anything, is the

man who builds his
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~ Belly Taylor



HELP WANTED
SALES ASSISTANTS

Needed for busy multi-store retail
company. Must have a passion for
customer service, along with computer
skills, excellent communications skills
and a positive attitude, Applicants with

merchandising experience or artistic

flair will be viewed favourably. All
interested persons must be physically fit
and available to work flexible hours.
Only those with a clean police record
and BGCSE passes will be considered.

Interested persons should apply via Email
to: jobsearch2421@hotmail.com, or via post
DA-85001 (Sales Assistant)

PO Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Wl GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S YOUTH AWARD: 19TH ANNUAL BAHAMAS AWARD SCHEME EXPEDITION

Summer challeng

The Governor-General’s Youth
Award announces its 19th annual
Bahamas Award Scheme Expedition
schedule for Long Island, June 29 to July
8.

Bahamas Award Scheme Expedition
(BASE) is open to all Governor-Gen-
eral’s Youth Award (GGYA) Bronze,
Silver and Gold participants and affords
them the opportunity to:

e Experience adventure and discov-
ery on a different Bahamian Family
Island.

e Create an opportunity for partici-
pants from different islands to share skills
and experiences.

¢ Opportunities for achievement and
fulfilment in challenging situations.

Long Island will prove another chal-
lenge for these aspiring young adven-
tures. They will explore Long Island’s
magnificent cliffs, blue holes, caves and
Clarence Town’s spectacular architec-
ture.

Supervisors and Gold Award holders
attending will have the opportunity to
complete the International Award Asso-
ciation certificate course geared for those
interest in becoming Award unit lead-
ers.

“Yuma”, Long Island’s original name,
will enlighten their curiosity and chal-
lenge their fitness and spirit.





oars
i,

ie
=



e for young thrill-seekers



PARTICIPANTS are pictured here at BASE 2009 on Crooked Island.

The GGYA is an exciting self-devel-
opment programme available to all
young people equipping them with life
skills to make a difference to themselves,
their communities and the world.

To date over six million people from
over 125 countries have been motivated

to undertake a variety of voluntary and
challenging activities. In the Bahamas,
there are 39 units with over 800 partici-
pants. For more information on BASE
and the GGYA contact 326-1760/1;
email: ggya@coralwave.com or go online:
www.bahamasgegya.org



By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

Fees: time buy-
ers...excited to find
a good deal, afraid of overex-
tending themselves, confused
by all the conflicting reports
about the Bahamas real

estate market. Well, that



for it and take advantage of
the bargains that are out
there. Those of us in Nassau
should remember there are
some very good opportuni-
ties in the Out Islands.

Set aside your uncertain-
ties. Chat with a BREA
agent who can help you

might describe any or all buy-
ers right now, but those mak-
ing their very first purchase
may feel elevated levels of
all these emotions. It helps
to have someone offer you
some guidance.

Don’t be afraid to make
your move now, regardless
of what you’ve been hearing
about the market. With
affordability so high, you’ll
find a flurry of activity out
there, so youre not alone in
making the right decision to




begin your home or vacant
property search.

Just try not to exercise
excessive caution, or you may
suffer what has been termed
“paralysis by analysis.” Your
Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation (BREA) representa-

tive will present you with all
the facts and figures you
need, and help you to inter-
pret the data so that you can
make a sound choice.

Now is not the time to vac-
illate. Vacant subdivision
properties are plentiful so the
choice is excellent. There are
a goodly number of home
sellers who have become
realistic about the value of
their homes as determined
by the market. It is time to go



determine your financial
footing, and show you an
inventory of well-suited
homes or vacant properties
matched to your particular
goals.

(Mike Lightbourn is presi-
dent of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty)

Questions or comments? E-
mail me at ask@Coldwell-
BankerBahamas.com.





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The Department of Statistics is conducting its Annual Business Establishment
Survey from May until the end of September, The survey requires
that businesses and institutions provide the following information;

|. Number of employees

2. Wages & salaries

3. Annual hours worked

4, Revenues & expenditures
5. Depreciation & acquisitions

The data generated from the survey is used to measure each sector's
contribution of national output, and provide information essential to the
estimation of national income and the gross national product of The
Bahamas.

Hf you are involved in the the production of goods and services, you can help
contribute to our national income by completing the Annual Business
Establishment Survey questionnaire accurately and in a timely fashion.

GRAND BAHAMA
Fall if ;
Speer naa nd Li gh
Department of Statistics
gee ta ett The Mall Grive
a tS PO. Be: F-42561
ee a Freeport, Grand Bahania

ie teeia te

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Jamaica’s business is the
Caribbean’s business

insight

WORLD VIEW

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is an International
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

| he widely publicised

bloody clashes over
the last few days between law
enforcement agencies and
armed gangs in Jamaica are as
bad for the economic and social
well-being of the people of
Caribbean countries as they are
for Jamaicans.

While the members of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM) see themselves as a
“Community of Independent
Sovereign States”, most of the
rest of the world regard them as
one area. Only the most knowl-
edgeable make a distinction
between them. So, events in
Jamaica impact all other CARI-
COM countries whether they
like it or not.

In meaningful terms, there-
fore, Jamaica’s business is
CARICOM’s business. Neither
CARICOM governments nor
the people of CARICOM can
sit back and pretend that events
in Jamaica in which criminals
defy the authority of the State
are not relevant to them.
CARICOM countries are tied
together and none can deny
cross-border relationships in
trade, investment and people.

Jamaica is the biggest of the
CARICOM countries in pop-
ulation terms and it impresses
and influences the world far
more than other CARICOM
countries. Of course, the
impression and influence have
been both beneficial and inim-
ical to Jamaica and the wider
region.

On the positive side, the
vibrant music of Jamaica and
its musicians, led by the iconic
Bob Marley, have clearly given
Jamaica global recognition. So
too have its holiday resorts
which are playgrounds for
tourists from all over Europe
and North America. Jamaican
agricultural products, such as
its Blue Mountain Coffee, and
many of its manufactured goods
have been able to penetrate for-
eign markets more deeply than
those from other regional coun-
tries.

And, CARICOM’s negotia-
tions with large countries and
groups of countries would be
much weaker and far less effec-
tive without the participation
of Jamaica. Its relatively large
population of close to three mil-
lion people makes Jamaica a
more attractive market than the
majority of CARICOM coun-
tries which, with the exception
of Trinidad and Tobago, each
number less than a million peo-
ple. Because of the size of its
population, even with the limi-
tations of educational opportu-
nities, Jamaica also has more
qualified technical people for
bargaining internationally than
its partner countries in CARI-
COM. Therefore, the partici-
pation of Jamaican negotiators
in CARICOM teams is
extremely valuable.

Jamaicans also constitute the
largest number of the West
Indian Diaspora in the United
Kingdom, the United States
and Canada. To the extent that
the West Indian Diaspora is a
group whose votes are wooed
by political parties in these
countries, much is owed to
Jamaicans for the attention
paid to Caribbean concerns.

On the negative side,
Jamaica’s internal crime, and
organised crime that its gangs
have exported to Britain, Cana-
da and the United States have
created an unwholesome image
for the country and severely
damaged it economically. In the
process, CARICOM has been
weakened economically as well,
for an economically weak
Jamaica is unable to serve as a
dynamo for economic activity
and growth throughout the

SIR RONALD SANDERS



Jamaica’s high crime level
has been bad for business and
bad for its economy. A 2003
study found that the total costs
of crime came to J$12.4 billion
which was 3.7 per cent of GDP,
and a 2007 UN report projected
that if Jamaica could reduce
violent crime to Costa Rica’s
low level, the economy would
grow by 5.4 per cent. In a
World Bank survey, 39 per cent
of Jamaica’s business managers
said they were less likely to
expand their businesses because
of crime, and 37 per cent
reported that crime discourages
investment that would have
encouraged greater productivi-

ty.
Investment

Apart from scaring away
investment, high crime in
Jamaica has also caused many
of its professionals and middle-
class families to flee the country
seeking safer environments
abroad. More than 80 per cent
of Jamaica’s tertiary educated
people have migrated to the
world’s industrialized nations.

It doesn’t take much imagi-
nation to work out how much
more socially and economically
developed Jamaica would have
been today had it not been
plagued by over 30 years of
escalating crime and its debili-
tating consequences.

From time to time, outbursts
of violent crime have affected
the country’s tourism which
contributes about 10 per cent
of the country’s GDP. It is only
because of expensive and
extensive advertising and pub-
lic relations campaigns in the
main tourist markets that
Jamaica has managed to keep
its tourism arrivals by air fairly
stable.

This latest, globally-publi-
cized, bloody confrontation
between security forces and
criminal gangs protecting a
Drugs Don, Christopher
“Dudus” Coke, from being
served with an order for extra-
dition to the United States and
arrested, will damage the
tourism industry harshly, and,
again, once it is over, Jamaica
will be forced to spend large
sums repairing its image and
assuring tourists of its safety.

Other CARICOM countries
will not be immune from the
Jamaica disturbances. On the
basis that tourists see the
Caribbean as one place, other
Caribbean destinations will also
have to spend more on pro-
moting themselves.

The fact that “Dudus” could
be protected by well-armed,
criminal gangs who have nei-
ther respect for, nor fear of,
Jamaica’s security forces or the
authority of the State, is a direct
consequence of governance
gone badly wrong. From the

mid-1970s the two main politi-
cal parties in Jamaica, the
Jamaica Labour Party (JLP)
and the Peoples National Party
(PNP) have formed alliances
with gangs that have been well-
armed and in many cases are
involved in the drugs trade.
Having taken that step that ren-
ders politicians beholden to
criminals, the political hierar-
chy began an inexorable down-
ward spiral to disaster.

In effect, part of the State
has been captured by leaders
of criminal gangs to whom
political parties are obligated.
Nothing else but this sense of
obligation to “Dudus” Coke
can explain why Jamaica’s
Prime Minister Bruce Golding,
as Leader of the JLP, would
have intervened at party level
to influence a law enforcement
matter between his government
and the government of the US.

The Jamaican government
now has to assert the authority
of the State over “Dudus” and
his gang, and it must be done if
Jamaica is to be freed from the
captivity of criminal gangs.

And, when this particular
confrontation is over, Jamaica
must start the gruelling process
of openly and transparently dis-
mantling all party political con-
nections with gangs, reassert-
ing the supremacy of the State,
and weeding out gangs that are
the scourge of the society. Any
alternative scenario is too ter-
rifying to contemplate but it
does include Jamaica being
plunged into the status of a
failed State.

This is why it behoves the
current party political leaders
to set to the task of recovering
the State from the influence of
criminals and establishing
broad based institutions
empowered by law to oversee
public services and political
practices. Jamaica will be eco-
nomically stronger, socially bet-
ter and politically more stable
than it has been for decades
and, as a consequence, CARI-
COM will benefit.

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A raid in this slum left dozens
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

FROM page one

Perry Christie. At the time
such actions were openly
condemned by many within
the hierarchy of the party.

However this “fearlessness”
to break party ranks has
endeared the young lawyer
with some within the orga-
nization.

One of these such sup-

LOCAL NEWS

henorts: Righy a possible candidate for St Cecilia

porters, a former Cabinet
Minister and PLP MP for
Exuma, George Smith said
that he would “enthusiasti-
cally” support Mr Rigby for
the St Cecilia nomination.

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Describing Mr Rigby as
“the new kind of candidate”
that the party ought to be
running, Mr Smith said that
Mr Rigby has already dis-
tinguished himself as a
strong advocate and lawyer
and has already proven his
tenacity as a very effective
party chairman.

“T have always believed
he was destined for front-
line politics and I think if he
emerges as the party’s front
line candidate for St Cecilia
he will be a very effective
voice for that area. He can
greatly assist the local busi-
ness people in that area who
also have this great battle
with the road reversal.

“He is a man of tremen-
dous intellect. He fits the bill
of the kind of candidate that
the PLP and by far all polit-
ical parties should be putting
forward,” Mr Smith argued.

Having leant his voice in
support of this would-be
candidate, Mr Smith encour-
aged other PLPs to do like-

wise stating that the time has
come for persons with abili-
ty to step forward and be
counted.

Support

“T would support him
enthusiastically and I would
encourage other people to
do so.

“He can be a part of the
solution and not just be
someone sitting on the side-
lines doing nothing about it.
He has distinguished him-
self as a young advocate and
lawyer. I am _ greatly
impressed with Raynard
Rigby,” he said.

Along with Mr Rigby, the
PLP’s former Senator
Paulette Zonicle has also
been reported to be seeking
the party’s nomination to
run in St Cecilia for some
time.

As a close ally to the con-
stituency’s current repre-
sentative and former deputy

THE TRIBUNE

unknown at this time
whether Mrs Zonicle, or Mr
Rigby would be the party’s
front-runner for the nomi-
nation.

However, there is one
thing that cither candidate
can be assured of, and that is
that they will face a consid-
erable challenge for the seat
from a former PLP support-
er, now National Develop-
ment Party member Paul
Moss.

Mr Moss has been cam-
paigning in the area for over
two years and has reported-
ly created a sizable base in
the constituency.

However, as what would
be normally characterized
as a traditional “PLP seat,”
it is unclear if this support
would continue to be car-
ried over now that Mr Moss
has changed his political
alliance.

Attempts to reach Mr
Rigby for comment on this
report were unsuccessful up
to press time last night.



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THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.ds

THE SEARCH FOR A PRESIDENT

The College Council of The College of The Bahamas (COB) 1s pleased to
announce a search for a new President and invites nominations and expres-
sions of interest in this outstanding opportunity for leadership at a truly
unique institution. After nearly thirty-five years of serving The Bahamas,
first as a two-year institution, then as a four-year degree-granting College,
COB expects to become The University of The Bahamas. As it moves to
solidify its university status, COB will continue to deliver excellent under-
graduate teaching While developing new undergraduate and graduate pro-
frams, increasing research and innovation activities, and focusing its work in
areas crucial to national development.

Since its founding in 1974, The College of The Bahamas has grown in repu-
tation and currently enrolls over S000 students in undergraduate and gradu-
ate education. The institution grants primarily bachelor’s degrees, and will
launch its first master’s degree later this year. Currently, COB offers joint
master’s degrees in conjunction with other accredited universities and col-
leges within the United States and enjoys extensive links with higher educa-
tion institutions in the Caribbean, North America and Great Britain.

NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS
A prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
ities for the new president, a full enumeration of qualifications for the posi-
ion, and instructions for submitting applications or nominations may be
found under “Current Searches” at wwwacademic-search.com. Those con-
sidering becoming candidates are urged to visit this Web site before submit-
ting application materials. A complete application shall include a thoughtful
letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and a list of at least five professional ref-
erences (with email addresses and telephone numbers) and must be received
by June 9th, 2010. Nominations, inquiries and applications are treated confi-
dentially and should be submitted clectronically (MS Word or PDF) to:
COBPresident@academic-search.com
Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained
from The College's website, http:''www.cob.edu.
Maya Kirkhope and Bill Franklin of Academic Search, Inc. are assisting with
this search. Nominations and expressions of interest will be treated in confi-
dence and may be directed to:

Maya Ranchod Kirkhope
Scnior Consultant

Dr. Bill Franklin

Scnior Consultant

Academic Search, Ine. Academic Search, Ine.

Washington, DIC, USA Washington, D.C, USA
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The College of The Bahamas is committed to providing equal educational
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leader Cynthia Pratt, it is

*
CREDIT SUISSE

CREDIT SUISSE AG, NASSAU BRANCH
APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch offers applications for an Apprenticeship
Program which is outlined hereafter. Full details and an application form can be
obtained from:

The Program Administrator

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch

The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4‘ Floor
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas

Application forms should be returned no later than
Thursday, June 10, 2010.

AIM

As a corporate citizen desirous of making a positive contribution to the local
community, Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch plans to offer a scholarship to a
Bahamian student to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree at the College of The Bahamas
(‘COB’) under its Apprenticeship Program.

CONDITIONS

* The candidate may select Business Administration or any banking related
field (i.e. Business Management, Banking & Finance, Accounting, Finance or
Economics major) as their field of study.
A minimum grade point average of 2.6 must be maintained at all times.
Grades must be submitted to the Program Administrator at the Bank within
three weeks at the end of each semester.
The candidate must be willing to work twelve (12) hours per week (part time)
and four (4) months per year (full time) at the Bank during MAY, JUNE, JULY,
AUGUST and any other month (or parts thereof) whilst pursuing full time
studies at COB.
The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of a person employed
at the Bank.
The candidate will report to and consult with the Program Administrator who is
responsible for supervision, work assignments, advice, release of payments
and all other administrative and supervisory details.
The candidate must be “drug free” throughout the entire four (4) year contract
period.
The candidate should register for and successfully complete a minimum of
twelve (12) credits per semester as a full time student.
The candidate cannot be employed by a third party during the four (4) year
period.
The candidate must become PC literate by the end of year one of the program.

BENEFITS
Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch will pay for the following costs whilst
the candidate is enrolled as a student at College of The Bahamas:

Tuition and fees at College of The Bahamas [full tuition].

A Housing Allowance of $1,700.00 (year one), $1,800.00 (year two), and
$2,000.00 (year three).

A Transportation Allowance of $1,500.00 (year one), $1,500.00 (year two), and
$1,600.00 (year three).

Book Allowance; paid in full each semester.

Allowance for Miscellaneous expenses of $800.00 per annum (year one) and
$1,500.00 per annum (year two and three).

Special Allowance for candidates from the Family Islands $3,000.00 (year one),
$3,200.00 (year two), and $3,500.00 (year three)

Health Insurance (provided the candidate submits to a medical examination by
the Bank’s medical doctor prior to commencing Apprenticeship Program).

COVENANTS

* No consideration will be given to the sex, race or religion of the candidate
during the selection process.

* The Bank shall have no obligation towards the candidate with regards to
employment or scholarships at the end of the four (4) year contract period.

PROGRAM OUTLINE

The Apprenticeship Program has a duration and contract period of four (4) years
as follows:

YEAR 1: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4.
YEAR 2: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4.
YEAR 3: Full time study at COB and part time employment per paragraph B) 4.
YEAR 4: Full time employment with the Bank at an entry-level job at the Bank’s
discretion.

In lieu of salary, the Benefits as per Paragraph C are paid during the first three

years of the program. During the fourth year, a salary will be paid in lieu of
tuition, fees and allowances (adjusted for cost of living increases).

NOTE: Students who are currently enrolled in
COB are not eligible.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Atlantis CEO hails airfare programme

FROM page one

can offer a fourth night stay
for free to their guests Mr
Markantonis said that there
are not too many places that
can do a free companion air-
fare deal. This, he said, was
due largely to the collabo-
ration between the govern-
ment and the private sector
to be able to put something
like this forward.

“T hope we will be able to
continue it further even after
the funds are used because
obviously we have budgeted
funds for this as a country
and we will see how that
works out.”

Ideas

Currently, Atlantis has a
number of promotional
ideas they are working on
for the fall season.

With these months of Sep-
tember, October and
November being notorious-
ly bad for the local tourism
industry, Mr Markantonis
said that they cannot take
the attitude that with this



oF

Sash



Warts Number of a ideas.

to continue to experiment
with how to change the fall
into a peak period for us
too,” he said.

Mr Markantonis also
added that Atlantis is work-

ing on some exciting fall
promotions which they hope
to roll-out within two weeks.

@ (See more stories from
the press conference in busi-
ness).































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no one would be flying any-
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Ranfurly Home may face partial closure

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

ee a

INEZ
ADELAIDE
BANISTER

March 23, 1915 — May 22, 2010

It is with profound sadness

that the Banister family

announces the passing of our

beautiful mother and

matriarch, Inez Banister.

Mum was predeceased by

" her loving husband Ronald,

and her youngest daughter Mary Johnston. Mum was

born in Okotoks, Alberta and was a resident of the
Bahamas for the past 40 years.

She leaves behind her children, daughter Laureen and her
husband Robert Kinnear of Toronto, Ontario, her son
Rodger Banister and his wife Hanne of Nassau, Bahamas
and her son Harold Banister and his wife Linda and son-
in-law Bill Johnston of Edmonton, Alberta. She also
leaves behind her two brothers Arne Thorson and his wife
Evelyn of Calgary, Alberta, and Talbert Thorson of
Invermere, British Columbia, 17 grandchildren, 19 great
grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

Mum’s ashes will be laid down beside those of our father
in Okotoks, Alberta. According to mum’s wishes there
will only be a graveside service with the immediate family.

The Banister family would like to thank the staff, doctors
and nurses at Doctor’s Hospital in Nassau for the
professional and compassionate care they extended to
mum. The Family also thanks mum’s loyal and dedicated
staff, Shirley Armbrister, Marlene Barnes and Miriam
Rolle and the doormen at Sulgrave Manor for their help
and kindness to mum. We thank the many friends who
have helped us through this period, and for the countless
good wishes and prayers given to our mother. She was
deeply loved, and will be forever missed.

Instead of flowers, friends who wish to remember Mrs.
Banister, may make a donation to The Salvation Army,
P.O.Box N.205, Nassau, The Bahamas in her memory.

Ch Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Gregory P. O’Brien, 58

of Masons
Addition, will be
held on
Wednesday, June
2nd at 11am at St
Agnes Anglican
Church, Baillou
Hill Road. The
Venerable
Archdeacon I.
Ranfurly Brown,
Rev’d, Bernard Been and Rev’d Fr Neil
Nairn. Interment will be made in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F.
Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish memories of Gregory
are his; one daughter, Karen O’Brien
Knowles; one step son, Anwar
Williams; one grandson, Arlington
Knowles Jr; two grand daughters,
Davette Hanna and Kadesha Knowles;
three sisters, Yvonne Bethel, Janet Cox
and Ethel O’ Brien-Bowe; five brothers,
Basil, Hugh, Kenneth, Edmund and
Neil O’Brien; brother-in-law, Canon
Leopold Cox; sisters-in-law, Marlene,
Perky, Mercelita and Kishlane O’Brien;
nephews, Mark and Marcian Bethel,
Michael, Drs David and Keith, Tariq,
Gavin, Edmund Jr and Cyril O’Brien;
nieces, Dr Carla Bethel, Maria O’Brien,
Margueritte Grant, Patrice Antonio,
Deidre Edgecombe; Nicole & Nicara
and Opal O’Brien; aunt, Mrs Majorie
McKinney; numerous cousins
including, Winston and Stephanie
Varence, Antoine Wallace, Brent and
Andre Williams; special friends,
Michelle Fox, Wanda, Louise, Astrid,
Pandora and Gaynor Johnson.





Friends may pay their last respects at

Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Tuesday from 10am
to 5pm and on Wednesday at the church
from 10am until service time.



FROM page one

care facility may be the only
way to keep it operating in
the long term if donations
cannot be found.

“We had some discussions
last year of what we would
do if the finances of the
Home do not pick up.

“Certainly we cannot
allow Lady Ranfurly’s lega-
cy to die. She worked tire-
lessly to have this home built
and she’s turning over in her
grave in England saying
‘God, all this work I did, and




now to come to nought!’

“We said (before we allow
this to happen) we may have
to close a dorm. It’s easier to
feed girls than to feed boys
so the thinking is we may
have to close the boys dorm
and the government may
have to find alternative
homes for them,” President
of the Board of Directors,
Remelda Moxey told The
Tribune.

Ms Moxey, a 25-year vet-
eran of the Ranfurly Home,
said that finances at the
institution are “definitely the

m IN SUBANCE COMPANY LOKI TED



Ge rssotacer GUARDIAN





CAREER OPPORTUNITY
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email to careersitamilyguardian.com by June §, D010.
Family Guardian thanks all applicants: however, only those
short-listed will he comlactedd,








SALE STARTS

worst they’ve ever been.”

The Home’s founder and
longtime patron, the late
Lady Hermione Ranfurly,
was the wife of the Earl of
Ranfurly, governor of the
Bahamas from 1953 to 1957.

“People are not giving like
they used to. Donations are
down significantly over the
last couple of years. Usually
you'd send out some beg-
ging letters and get a few
thousand dollars but things
are at a standstill now,” she
said.

The Ranfurly Home pro-
vides shelter and a new life
for children who have been
orphaned, abused, neglected
or abandoned.

Presently there are 32 chil-
dren between the ages of
five and 19, who have been
placed there by the Depart-
ment of Social Services.

Cutbacks

Part of the challenge fac-
ing the Home is that the
perennially slim funding
provided by the government
has this year dropped by
$5,600 — as cutbacks across
the board kick in as the
economy continues to limp.

Last year, the Govern-
ment’s records show the
administration provided
$60,000 to the home towards
its operational costs, which
Mrs Moxey pegs at around
$300,000 a year, primarily
for food and electricity. Mrs
Moxey suggests the funding
in fact also fell short of the
allocated amount last year.
“It was never that much,”
said the Board President.

Meanwhile, the Home lost
a great proportion of its
funding over the past year
as a result of a number of
sources of private funding
“drying up” almost simulta-
neously, or becoming uncer-
tain.

These include a $100,000



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donation from the estate of
a generous deceased
Bahamian which was dis-
bursed to the home in sums
of $25,000 a year for the last
five years, $26,000 which
came from a foundation in
the United States which is
now demanding for the first
time that the Home apply
for the funds, and saying
they are no longer a given
and further thousands from
an American woman who
has now retired and is
unable to give as she did in
the past.

Also in view of the eco-
nomic recession, smaller
donations from the general
public and other regular
donors have fallen off
sharply. A raffle held last
year netted just $6,000 for
the home after related costs
were paid off, after previous
year’s raffles brought in an
average of $30,000 to
$40,000.

Another factor that has
affected the Ranfurly
Home’s bottom line is the
growth in the number of
other children’s homes oper-
ating on the island. Since it
opened, the Bilney Lane
Children’s home, Elizabeth
Estates children’s home and
the Nazareth Centre have
all become operational.
Some of these also seek pri-
vate donations and extra
funds from the government
to assist with operational
costs.

“There’s a perception out
there I think that Ranfurly
has money. Maybe because
it is the oldest home and
when people think of
Homes they think of Ran-
furly. But there’s so many
other Homes now and costs
continue to rise,” said Mrs
Moxey.

The Home presently owes
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation $25,000 in over-
due fees — a cost which Mrs
Moxey suggested the Gov-
ernment should consider
writing off for charitable
organisations like the Ran-
furly.

Given the continuing
deterioration in the Home’s
finances, Mrs Moxey said
that the worst case scenario
will be the closure of one of
the Home’s dormitories with
the result that some of the
32 children would have to
be separated from their
friends and siblings they
may have in the facility.

“Now that is something I
would really, really wish to
avoid. I would have to go
into fasting and praying for
God to send some donors
before that happened
because I do not want to
close any wing of the home,
because the closure of any
wing would require dis-
placement and in some
instances separation of sib-
lings. And you don’t want
to displace these children.
For some of them that’s the
only home they know,” said
Mrs Moxey.

The Ranfurly Home will
be having a fundraising
Steak Out on June 26th, and
soon after that, their annual
raffle for which tickets will
soon go on sale. Anyone
wishing to donate can visit
www.ranfurlyhome.org or
contact the Ranfurly Home
at 393-3115.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Jamaican slum dwellers

angry at troops after raid



a military check point
in Tivoli Gardens
neighborhood,
Kingston, Sunday,
May 30, 2010.







will





a
AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd



CHILDREN PLAY soccer at Tivoli Gardens neighborhood, Kingston,
Saturday, May 29, 2010.

By David McFadden

Associated Press Writer

KINGSTON, Jamaica



Security forces with M-16s and rotating machine guns at the
ready on Sunday patrolled a hostile slum in Jamaica's capital
where angry defenders of a fugitive underworld boss complained
of unprovoked attacks and the deaths of innocents.

Nearly a week after security forces started a deadly four-day
assault in search of reputed drug lord Christopher "Dudus" Coke,
residents of the Tivoli Gardens slum, nicknamed the "wild, wild
West," were trying to live their lives amid concertina wire and mil-
itary checkpoints.

Children played on trash-strewn streets, as mostly older women
headed to church in their Sunday best past soldiers and police in
camouflage fatigues. The scent of marijuana mixed with the stench
of urine and rotting garbage.

Slum dwellers across the bullet-pocked complex voiced rage and
frustration at having to live alongside security forces who they
see as an occupying army and accuse of killing innocent people dur-
ing the fighting. They insist the death toll is higher than the official
tally of 73.

"We are thankful that God spared our lives, but we are fearful
of the soldiers," a woman who identified herself only as Lilleth told
The Associated Press on Sunday as a military helicopter buzzed
overhead. "I'm not saying everybody was innocent here, but we
don't deserve this. More than 100 people died, many for nothing,
no matter what they say."

Nearby, a small congregation gathered inside an evangelical
church and reflected on the ordeals of the neighbourhood, where
the 41-year-old Coke solidified his authority by providing handouts,
jobs and protection in a poor downtown area where the govern-
ment and police typically have little presence.

Members of Coke's Shower Posse — a reputed drug gang with
members in Jamaica and New York — and others began barri-
cading his slum stronghold about two weeks ago following a tele-
vised announcement by Prime Minister Bruce Golding that he
would approve Coke's extradition to the U.S. on drug- and gun-
running charges. Golding had previously blocked the extradition
for nine months. He represents the Tivoli Gardens area in parlia-
ment, and Coke has helped the party receive a large number of
votes from the slum. Despite the connection, Golding claimed the
US. indictment relied on illegal wiretap evidence and that that was
the reason for his opposition. soilless mE ' a rang

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HE TRIBUNE €
AF 42S) BE

MONDAY,



MAY 31,

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net



Attorney ‘amazed’ at
being target for ‘hit’ 35% year-to-date

Bahamian
attorney was
“amazed” after
Tribune Busi-
ness told him
he had been the target of an
alleged ‘contract hit’, telling this
newspaper he had no part in -
and new nothing about - a pur-
ported $170 million investment
scam said to have provoked the
assassination plot.

Arnold Forbes, of Arnold
Forbes & Co, said he did not
know, and never had any busi-
ness dealings with, Nicholas
Djokich and Eginardo DeAn-
gelis, two Canadian men
charged with allegedly trying
to hire a hitman to assassinate
him and another Bahamas res-
ident, Freeport-based Canadian

Denies any role in, or knowledge of, alleged $170m
investment ‘scam’ that sparked assassination plot
targeting him and another Bahamas resident

attorney Richard Devries.

Upon being contacted about
the case, which is now being
tried in the Boston courts, Mr
Forbes said the main player -
Djokich - had never been a
client of his, and the only pos-
sible connection to him was that
his law firm had once acted as
the registered office/agent for a
Bahamian company beneficial-
ly owned by two of Djokich’s
friends.

“That’s news to me. I’m sur-
prised and amazed,” Mr Forbes
said, when told by Tribune
Business that both himself and
Mr Devries had been named
by Djokich as targets he wanted
to assassinate.

“He’s never been a client of
mine. I knew two guys he was
involved with who were clients
of mine at some point. They
had lost some money, but that
had nothing to do with me. I

don’t get involved in client
investments. I just represented
their company in the Bahamas.

“IT don’t know who Devries
is. I did represent GSF [the
company owned by Djokich’s
friends’. We don’t hold client
funds, get involved in client
investments or anything like
that. We incorporated a com-
pany for those guys, charged a

SEE page 2B

Atlantis casino suffering 15% fall ‘every year’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ATLANTIS’S casino busi-
ness is falling “15 per cent year-
over-year every year” due to
increased competition from
many US states, its managing
director underscoring the need
for the Bahamas to reform its
casino gaming laws, while
group business for many
Bahamian hotels is unlikely to
return until “late 2011”.

Sounding a note of caution
amid much optimism coming
from the company’s Paradise
Island properties, George
Markantonis, Kerzner Interna-
tional (Bahamas) managing
director, said part of the rea-
son the company was investing
$20-$25 million in upgrading
Atlantis’s casino was to “make
it state-of-the art and able to
compete with any other casino
offering”.

The rapid expansion of casi-
no and gaming facilities in





spon: 0
from the daily report,

Kerzner head says group business unlikely to recover until
‘latter half of 2011’, pushing back earlier rebound estimates

many US states, especially in
Florida and the north-east
states, key markets for Atlantis
and the Bahamas, meant it was
vital the resort - and the coun-
try - “make it easier, more
attractive to bring people here”.

Thinking of the high-roller,
high-end clientele the Atlantis
casino is aimed at, Mr Markan-
tonis pointed to the rapid
expansion of casino gaming in
Florida, in particular, via the
Seminole and Hard Rock casi-
no, plus the installation of slot
machines at facilities such as
race tracks.

“This has a serious impact on
us,” the Atlantis chief said,
questioning why a Florida resi-
dent wanting to gamble in a
casino would choose the added
time and inconvenience of dri-
ving to the airport, going
through various security and
immigration checkpoints and
then flying to the Bahamas,
when they could virtually pur-

Kerzner targets
sports tourism

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

KERZNER International is
aiming to break into the sports
tourism market by hosting two
NCAA basketball tournaments
at its Atlantis property over the
next two years, and is working
with the Ministry of Tourism
to enable the Bahamas to
obtain ‘exempt status’ from that
sporting organisation.

SEE page 6B

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their doorstep.

“We have to stay competi-
tive,” Mr Markantonis said.
“Our gaming business is down
15 per cent year-over-year
every year, because there’s so
much competition around us.
Every US state is opening up
casinos.”

He added that Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, the minister
of tourism and aviation, had
told him last week that the
reforms to the Bahamas’ casino
gaming laws suggested by
Atlantis, the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) and others
were “being looked at very
carefully. It’s not an easy
process”.

Among the reforms pro-
posed were allowing Bahami-
an casino staff to multi-task and
deal several games at once,
rather than being restricted to
the one game as they are cur-
rently.

Meanwhile, while Atlantis
had seen a 35 per cent increase
in its leisure travel bookings for
2010 year-to-date, the same did
not apply to its groups/conven-
tions/meetings business.

“We have not seen the same
upturn in groups and conven-
tions. That business remains
flat,’ Mr Markantonis said,
pointing out that Atlantis was
no different from Atlantic City
or Las Vegas in this respect.

Kerzner International was
“doing everything possible to
stimulate that demand”, but Mr
Markantonis conceded that ear-
lier estimates of an early 2011
recovery in the groups and con-
ventions market were unlikely
to hold true.

“T think we were probably to
optimistic as an industry,” he
added, emphasising that he
could not speak for the sector
as a whole. “If it’s going to

SEE page 2B

Atlantis leisure
bookings grow

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ATLANTIS has seen book-
ings by leisure travellers
increase by 35 per cent year-
to-date compared to 2009, its
managing director said this
weekend, expressing optimism
that the improving demand
showed there was “light at the
end of the tunnel” for the des-
tination resort.

George Markantonis, man-
aging director of Kerzner Inter-
national (Bahamas), owner of
Paradise Island’s Atlantis and
One & Only Ocean Club
resorts, told reporters that the
former was targeting a 67 per
cent average occupancy for the
year, and was on course to meet

SEE page 6B





GEORGE MARKANTONIS

Photo by Tim Clarke

Kerzner to split $100m
between five upgrades

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

KERZNER International is
likely to start recruiting in the
“next nine to 12 months” for
the 400 permanent jobs it is
planning to create at its Par-
adise Island resorts, with its
$100 million worth of upgrades
set to include a casino revamp
and 12,000 square foot ‘Teens
Club’.

George Markantonis, Kerzn-
er International (Bahamas)
managing director, said the
majority of the 400 posts would
be created in the food and bev-
erage sector. He emphasised
that the planned expansion/ren-
ovation was not the Hurricane
Hole redevelopment, and nor
was it Phase IV, both of which
are still sitting on the shelf.

Mr Markantonis said the
upgrades were designed to
“refresh” the Atlantis and One
& Only Ocean Club products,
ensuring they never became
stale but continued to stimu-
late excitement and market

Project to include
three restaurants,
casino and Teen Club

demand among both new and
returning customers.

“The expansion is going to
take place over the next two
years. It’s not Phase IV and is
not the Hurricane Hole devel-
opment. The reality is we have
to keep refreshing the product.
There are certain facilities we
can do more with and refresh
for returning customers,” Mr
Markantonis said.

To ensure Atlantis stood out
as a one-of-a-kind, destination
resort, in the manner of a Dis-
ney orLas Vegas, it had to keep
reinventing itself, Mr Markan-
tonis said, explaining that
Kerzner International planned
to “create three more restau-
rants in the existing facilities”.

Broken down, these, and the

SEE page 4B



—



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WILE CONDUCT THE FOLLOWING CERTIFICATION COURSES

Introduction to Arbitration (Group A)
Monday 7th June 2010 10am-6pm

Introduction to Arbitration (Group B)
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Instructors: The President & Trustees of CLArb London

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Cost $750 per course (includes course materials and lunch)

For Further Inftonmation, contact the Secretariat
Email: bererousseaulaw.com

Tel: (2427) 325-3693
Fax: (2427) 325-7688

The Bahamas .
Shipowners Association

—— ae



Chartered
Institute of
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ClArb


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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Attorney
‘amazed’ at being
target for ‘hit’

FROM page 1B

fee for that and acted as a reg-
istered agent. That’s it.”

Mr Forbes echoed a previ-
ous interview Mr Devries gave
to Tribune Business, both men
denying any involvement or
Knowledge of the alleged $170
million “investment scam” Djo-
kich was complaining of. Mr
Devries also said he did not
know Djokich, or what his
motivation was.

“We're in a climate where
people do those things,” Mr
Forbes said of the alleged assas-
sination plot. “What I can say is
that we are not involved in that
kind of business. We’re not
involved in business, and do not
make investments on behalf of
clients. We just acted as the reg-
istered office.”

The US government’s trial
brief, filed in the Massachusetts
district court on April 9, 2010,
lays out the alleged plot in
graphic detail, using testimony
provided by undercover agents
and informants.

The saga began on July 3,
2008, when an informant tipped
an Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE) agent to
the alleged plot, following a
meeting with Djokich and his
co-accused, which he attended.

“Djokich said he was a busi-
nessman from Calgary and that
Deangelis was a friend of his,”
the US government’s trial brief
alleged. “He claimed that he
had been defrauded of tens of
millions of dollars in an invest-
ment scheme by Richard
Devries, who was currently liv-
ing in the Bahamas, and he
asked the informant if he would
be willing to travel to the
Bahamas to kidnap Devries
and force him to wire transfer
as much of the money as possi-
ble back to him.

“Djokich stated that after the
money was wired, he did not
mind if the informant took
Devries fishing and he never
came back. He provided the
informant with numerous doc-
uments supporting his claim
that Devries had swindled him,
as well as a photo of Devries
and Devries’s home address in

Freeport, Bahamas.”

At a subsequent July 17,
2008, meeting, Djokich played
an alleged tape of a conversa-
tion with Mr Devries, in which
the latter admitted receiving
the money but did not know
what had happened to it. Djo-
kich, in response to accusations
he had kidnapped Mr Devries’s
partner, William Lenz, con-
firmed this to the informant,
adding that the latter’s thumb
had been cut off.

The US government’s trial
brief confirmed that Djokich
had kidnapped Lenz in June
2006, and attempted to force
him to authorise a $15 million
wire transfer. In the process, he
purportedly attempted to cut
off Lenz’s little finger with
pruning shears, and threatened
to castrate him.

The informant put Djokich
in touch with an alleged ‘hit-
man’, who was in fact an under-
cover ICE agent. Ata July 23,
2008, meeting at Boston Air-
port, the US trial brief alleged:
“Djokich extensively discussed
the basis for his dispute with
Devries and Lenz, asserting
that he and others had been
scammed out of at least $170
million by them and others,
including a man named Arnold
Forbes.....

“Djokich indicated that after
Devries was dealt with there
were others that he wanted to
attend to in a similar way,
including Lenz, Forbes, a
‘Frenchman’ who was suppos-
edly involved in Devries’ swin-
dle, and a man in Detroit anda
man in London.”

The plot allegedly progressed
over the following months, and
the US government’s trial brief
alleged: “For example, Djokich
told the undercover officer: ‘TI
tell you one thing after this,
there’s a couple of jobs. You’re
going to love these.’

“Later, they discussed
Forbes. The undercover agent
indicated that because Forbes
was seriously ill, Djokich would
have to deal with him soon if he
intended to do so, and Djokich
responded: ‘Oh, immediately.’
Djokich indicated that Devries
and Forbes were ‘the two’ to
be dealt with immediately.”

Atlantis casino suffering
15% fall ‘every year’

FROM page 1B

come back, it will probably be
in the latter half of 2011. We
have a lot of tentative groups
for next year, people who have
not signed contracts. I’d feel a
lot better if we could get those
thousands of tentative room
nights signed.”

Mr Markantonis said many
meeting planners, who directed
where conventions business

went, were biding their time to
exploit the number of deals cur-
rently in the market.

Atlantis was still continuing
to extract efficiencies and cost
savings from its business, Mr
Markantonis saying the instal-
lation of additional meters had
uncovered further “weak spots”
in its energy efficiency cover-
age. With the resort’s electrici-
ty bill having peaked at $60 mil-
lion two years ago, he added:
“The fine tuning never stops.”

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 3B

‘No promises’ to car dealers

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham “made no promises”
to Bahamian new car dealers
at their Thursday night meeting
on the tax increases many fear
could cripple their industry,
although both sides understood
“the dilemma” each was in.

Declining to discuss specific
details, Rick Lowe, operations
manager at Nassau Motor
Company, who met with the
Prime Minister along with oth-
er Bahamian car dealers,
described the meeting as
“excellent”.

“T think we had a reasonable
meeting, and he understood the
dilemma we’re in,” Mr Lowe
told Tribune Business. “He said
he couldn’t promise anything,
and said there’s some tough
decisions to make and that we
all need to tighten our belts.

“We indicated that we under-
stood the country’s in deep
trouble, and that he has got to
bring fiscal prudence to bear.
We were told that we’ve got to
get our fiscal house in order,
and he made no promises, as
the Government needs as much
revenue as it can get.”

In his 2010-2011 Budget com-
munication, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the Gov-
ernment aimed to "promote the
use of more fuel-efficient vehi-
cles" and simplify taxation on
the auto industry by consoli-
dating Excise Tax rates down to
two. In addition, the base for
taxation is switching to engine
size from the price of the vehi-
cle.

* Banker says 50% tax rise comes at time when industry giving up $150m
in lost interest, write-offs and provisioning on non-performing loans

* Argues that Government ‘missed opportunity’ to tackle spending
problems and tax numbers industry in 2010-2011 Budget



HUBERT INGRAHAM

A rate of 65 per cent will be
levied on passenger vehicles
with an engine capacity of 2,000
c.c. or less, and 85 per cent on
those with a higher capacity.

This contrasts with the for-
mer duty regime, where a duty
rate of 55 per cent was levied
on vehicles with a value of $0-
$9,999. For vehicles valued at
$10,000-$19,999, the duty rate
was 60 per cent, and for those
valued between $20,000-
$24,999, 75 per cent. Only vehi-
cles worth more than $25,000
carried a duty rate of 85 per
cent.

Commercial vehicles were
taxed at 60 per cent, and it now
appears they will attract an 85

per cent duty rate - a 25 per-
centage point increase set to
impact taxi drivers, the jitney
industry, construction compa-
nies and all firms that operated
commercial vehicle fleets.

Many new car dealers do not
carry vehicles with an engine
capacity of 2,000 c. c. or less,
automatically placing all their
vehicles in the higher duty cat-
egory.

It is understood that Bahami-
an Motor Dealers Association
(BMDA) members have pre-
sented data showing the Prime
Minister the impact the tax
increases are likely to have on
their businesses.

With new car sales already
40 per cent below pre-recession
levels, the fear among BMDA
members - and even used car
dealers - is that the tax increase
will depress sales even further
in a contracting economy, low-
ering both the top and bottom
lines. This, it is feared, could
lead to downsizing of staff and
even some going out of busi-
ness, aS consumers switch to
smaller, cheaper cars.

In addition, dealers will also
have to contend with even
greater overheads and sums
tied up in inventory, as the
Excise Tax on new car imports
will have increased.

SEE page 6B

NOTICE

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

* JACKLIN BRICE
P.O. BOX CB 13622

* SCOTT SMITH
P.O.BOX GT 2006

* DEBBIE FERGUSON
clo PAUL A, WELLS, THE BIGHT

* NAKIA COOPER

* SHELDON SMITH
P.O. BOX EE 15079

« KRYSTAL LORD
P.O.BOX SP 60786

* IRENE TUCKER
P.O.BOX GT. 2915

EMD M UCL em ms iia
NER meme ciel emer

Clarity sought on Stamp Tax

THE Government has been urged to clarify the impact of the
Budget’s Stamp Duty changes on real estate transactions cur-
rently in process, amid fears that the new rates could act as ‘deal
breakers’ for these purchasers.

Realtors and attorneys are seeking clarification as to whether the
two percentage point increases for all transactions apart from
those involving first-time buyers will apply to those deals cur-
rently in the ‘90-day closing period’, as many will be completed after
the July 1, 2010, deadline when the new rates take effect.

See Tribune Business Tuesday for full story...










































Internal Auditor

Large firm of Insurance Agents & Brokers is presently considering
applications for the position of Internal Auditor.

Responsibilities include:

¢ Performing financial, operational and compliance audits in accordance
with International Accounting Standards.
Examination and evaluation of the company’s financial and
information systems, management procedures, and internal controls
to ensure that records are accurate and controls are adequate.
Review of the company’s operations, evaluating its effeciency,
effectiveness, and compliance with corporate policies and statutory
regulations.
Coordinating the internal audit programme with outside examiners
and/or external auditors.
Assistance with the implementation and conduct of test control
procedures to determine effectiveness.
Evaluation of both administrative and accounting controls and
preparation of reports for the Managing Director on compliance with
company standards and matters which require strengthening of internal
controls.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

CPA, ACA, or ACCA qualification

Strong analytical and communication skills (oral & written)
Minimum of three (3) years managerial experience

Good Customer relations and interpersonal skills

Be a team player with positive attitude

Work independently with initiative

The successful candidate will receive an excellent benefits package
including medical insurance and pension plan. Salary commensurate with
experience.

All applications will be handled in the strictest confidence and should be
submitted on or before 25th June 2010 to:

P.O. Box N3207
c/o The Tribune
DA 83920
Nassau, The Bahamas

Employment Opportunity

OPERATIONS MANAGER (with oversight for compliance)

Summary of Key Responsibilities:

¢ Managing the day-to-day operations of the Banking Department focusing on overall
workflow, productivity improvement, timeliness, problem determination and resolution,
training and staff development, guidance and team leadership. Supervise, coach and train
employees, to include organizing, prioritizing and scheduling of work assignments.

SJ Ce) ber)
Soldier Road
eee em lite) trys
Telephone: 393-0964

e Play an integral part in the management and internal control flow process.

* Develop strong working rapport with clients to finalize creative ideas and establish strong
relationships. Promote a customer first culture and a policy of continuous improvement.

¢ Managing the relationship of various outside vendors/clients and supervising the com-
munication process, as the need arises, to correct any discrepancies.

¢ Evaluating and streamlining existing bank processes and formalize documentation of the
internal control processes within the banking and loan related areas, as well as compliance
and risk management.

¢ Maintaining up-to-date procedures consistent with the bank’s credit policies and bank-
ing prudential regulations, with regards to treasury management.

i, er ¢ Ensure compliance with established internal guidelines and external regulations affect-
ANCE ing the department. Oversee the bank’s overall compliance activities ensuring adherence
to policy and procedures. Liaise with Group Compliance.

The National Insurance Board
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

¢ Review existing client files to ensure they are fully compliant. Monitor account opening
and the due diligence process as well as monitoring of client transactions for suspicious
activity.

¢ Implement effective systems to improve the compliance function and providing recom-
mendations/periodic assessments of the level of compliance to management.

¢ Identify compliance problems through compliance testing, analysis of audit reports, staff
meetings and on-going interaction with other compliance officers.

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

Perform other duties deemed necessary.

The National Insurance Board (NIB) 1s seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to complete the renovations of The JL Centre, Blake Road, Nassau, Bahamas;
the project is a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors

Requirements:

Knowledgeable of banking operations and daily procedures
Working knowledge of compliance requirements

Fair knowledge of financial services and products

Proficiency in the use of Microsoft Office products

Sufficient work experience as a professional in the financial sector
Strong communication skills and analytical abilities

Experience in managing and empowering people

Strong communication and interpersonal skills

Planning and Organizing skills

must be in compliance with the National Insurance Act (soctal security programme),
and in good standing with the relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Securtty Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from May 27 to June 3, 2010, or
downloaded from the Board’s website at www.nitb-bahamas.com.

Qualified applicants should send their resume and cover letter to
Att: Operations Manager position

P.O. BOX N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and returned to the Security
Booth, Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, in an envelope addressed to The
Director, The National Insurance Board, with the caption Pre-Qualification
Document - JL Centre, Blake Road, on or before 12:00 Noon on June 3, 2010.

Deadline for submission is June 11, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

(a) GOVINDARAJU LTD.is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 23rd day of April, A.D., 2010 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice















INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
TAYNOL CORPORATION

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), TAYNOL
CORPORATION is in Dissolution’

The date of commencement of dissolution is the
27th day of May 2010.

Mr. Luis Maria Pineyrua Pittaluga
Ruta 8, Km. 17.500, Local 115 A,
CP 91.600 Montevideo,
Uruguay
Liquidator

NOTICE
MENDES LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

MENDES LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company
commenced on the 27th May, 2010 when the
Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit
Suisse Trust Ltd, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis,
Geneva.

Dated this 31st day of May, A. D. 2010

Credit Suisse Trust Ltd
Liquidator

ASSOCIATED BAHAMIAN DISTILLERS AND BREWERS LIMITED
(ABDAB)

DIVIDEND NOTICE

TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS

We ore pleased to advise that o Final Dividend for 2009 of
$14.00 per share shall be paid on or betore 31st May
2010 to Ordinary Shoreholders of record as of 21st May
7010.

The payment will be mode in the usual morines thraugh
Bahames Central Securities Depository (formally CFAL
Limited,’Colina Financial Advisors Limited), our Registrar and
Tronster agents.

Barry Newman
Company Secretary

FirstCari

THE TRIBUNE

KERZNER, from 1B

other upgrades are as follows:

* The “redesign and re-open-
ing, in a completely new fash-
ion” of the Fathoms restaurant.
This will be transformed into a
‘state-of-the-art” fish restaurant
with a celebrity chef from the
US, a personality Kerzner
International is in negotiations
with.

The design for the new Fath-
oms is scheduled to be com-
pleted in the 2010 third quarter,
with construction starting next
year. The restaurant, which has
been closed for a year-and-a-
half apart from special ban-
quets, will have an indoor and







COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

outdoor dining experience, and
be open for lunch.

The Water’s Edge in the
Coral Towers will be trans-
formed into an indoor and out-
door barbecue experience,
again with a celebrity chef from
New York. The brand and
design is in the advanced plan-
ning stages, and Mr Markanto-
nis said the new concept would
have no competition in either
Atlantis or Nassau.

The Great Hall - Water’s
Edge will also be transformed
into an upscale tea and bever-
age lounge, serving chocolates
and cakes, and acting as a loca-
tion for after-dinner conversa-
tion.

Mr Markantonis said kitchen
facilities in that area previously

2004

IN THE SUPREME COURT




COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION CLE/GEN/00035

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

Plaintiff

RYAN CARTWRIGHT

Defendant

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that the Summons filed on

the 8" day of October, A.D., 2008 and set down
to be heard on Tuesday the 28" day of April, A.D.,
2009 at 12:00 o’clock in the afternoon will now be
heard before the Registrar, of the Supreme Court,
Mrs. Donna Newton, at of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The
Bahamas on Friday the 25 day of, June A.D.,
2010 at 11:30 o'clock inthe forenoon.

Dated this 15" day of March, A.D., 2010

REGISTRAR

This Notice was taken out by Messrs. Gibson, Rigby & Co., Chambers,
KI-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorneys
for the Plaintiff.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/gen/FP/00276
Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN
ALBERT H. HAIGHT

AND

THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT
AUTHORITY, LTD

First Defendant
AND

THE GRAND BAHAMA DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY LTD.

Second Defendant
AND
CARRICK LIMITED
Third Defendant
AND
PORT GROUP LIMITED
Fourth Defendant

Albert Haight
c/o 88B Tamarind Street
Freeport, Grand Bahama

TAKE NOTICE that by Order of the Court made on
the 11th day of May, A.D., 2010, the Court ordered that
unless the Plaintiff provide security for the Defendants’
costs pursuant to Order dated the 21st day of July, A.D.,
2009 within 21 days of the date of this Order, this action
shall stand dismissed; and that the Plaintiff pay the
Defendants’ costs of this application, such costs to be
taxed, if not agreed.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Chambers
Chancery Court
The Mall
Freeport, Grand Bahama
The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Defendants

bbean

had not been what Kerzner
International wanted, and the
revamp would potentially cre-
ate several new employment
shifts in an area where current-
ly no one was employed.

The three restaurant
upgrades are expected to cost
between $20-$25 million.

* A further $20-$25 million
will be spent on the complete
revamp of some 110 suites in
the Royal Towers, and 60 in
the Coral Towers, as Kerzner
International moves to retain
existing customers and attract
new ones, particularly the more
“discerning” high-rollers in the
casino.

* Building on the success of
its Atlantis Kids Adventure
opening, Atlantis will introduce
a 12,000 square foot Teens Club
for 13-17 year-olds, spending
$10-$12 million on this.

Mr Markantonis said this was
being done so Atlantis “does
not lose sight of another big
chunk of our business”. Many
of the 400 new jobs will be cre-
ated by the shifts required for
this facility, which will feature
the latest interactive video
games.

Promised

The Atlantis chief promised
this facility would “lift the cus-
tomer experience to a new lev-
el. That’s how we are doing it:
The World’s greatest Teen
Club.”

* Another $20-$25 million
will be invested in the Atlantis

casino, including the creation
of a high-end gaming lounge.
Atlas and Dragons will also be
revamped, with “creative
designs and creative names to
provide a whole new overall
element, bringing people to the
centre of the property and mak-
ing them want to stay there”.

Invested

* The final $10 million will
be invested in the redevelop-
ment of the One & Only Ocean
Club’s Crescent Wing, with
some job opportunities being
created for butlers. That pro-
ject is set to start in Septem-
ber, with a November comple-
tion.

“We’re able to get these pro-
jects on the drawing board and
are moving very fast on them.
We don’t want to let moss
grow,” Mr Markantonis said.

He added that most of the
work would go to Bahamian
contractors, although he was
currently unable to say how
many, and how many construc-
tion jobs would be required, as
the scope of the work had not
yet been determined.

Meanwhile, Mr Markantonis
said Kerzner International still
intended to move forward at
some stage with the Hurricane
Hole redevelopment, plus a
Phase IV expansion on the old
Club Med site.

However, the company did
not want to be “premature”
and assume “the economic
uncertainty” was over.

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Treasury Products and Sales, Regional Treasurers and
Relationship Managers to develop appropriate hedging solutions
for corporate clients.

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance minis-
ter has urged the Central Bank
to cut its discount rate on the
grounds that a 1 per cent reduc-
tion would reduce the public
sector’s debt servicing costs by
$20-$230 million, freeing up
money for essential public ser-
vices and subsidies to private
schools/charities.

James Smith, former minister
of state for finance in the 2002-
2007 Christie administration,
also joined Standard & Poor’s
(S&P) analysts in questioning
whether the $200 million rev-
enue increase the Government
is projecting for its 2010-2011
fiscal year - the key element in
reducing the GFS fiscal deficit
by 76 per cent - is achievable
in a contracting economy.

Analysing the 2010-2011
Budget, Mr Smith also ques-
tioned the gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) statistics being used
to calculate the fiscal deficit and
national debt-to-GDP ratios,
given that they increased
throughout 2008 and 2009, even
though the Bahamian econo-
my was in recession.

And he also echoed the con-
cerns of auto industry execu-
tives, who previously told Tri-
bune Business that the
increased tax rates might actu-
ally reduce total government
revenues, and expressed “con-
cern” that the tax increases
imposed on the hotel sector
would retard that industry at a
time when it was needed to lead
economic growth.

While agreeing that the Gov-
ernment had sent the right belt-
tightening signals to both
Bahamians and the interna-
tional credit rating agencies, Mr
Smith said: “What I find con-
cerning is that the entire adjust-
ment for this [recessionary]

period has fallen on the fiscal
side. There’s been no notice-
able accommodation, it seems
to me, on the monetary side.”

Calling on the Ministry of
Finance to discuss a cut in the
existing 5.25 per cent discount
rate with the Central Bank of
the Bahamas, Mr Smith said
the foreign currency reserves,
which stood at $822 million as
at March 20 this year, were at a
very healthy level after being
bolstered by the Governmen-
t’s foreign borrowing and IMF
special drawing rights.

“The Central Bank now has
more than 20 weeks of import
cover, when it has largely exist-
ed on 12 weeks,” the former
minister said.

With the commercial bank-
ing sector “clawing back” on its
loan portfolio and credit avail-
ability, due to the high level of
non-performing loans, but small
Bahamian businesses needing
access to debt financing more
than ever, Mr Smith said: “This
would seem to me an oppor-
tune time to lower the discount
rate without the risk of a run
on the reserves.”

This was because the
increased level of unemploy-
ment meant many Bahamians
would not qualify for credit,
while the commercial banks
had tightened lending policies.
In addition, the lower level of
economic activity also meant
there would be fewer imports
coming into this nation.

If the discount rate was
slashed, Mr Smith said this
would likely lead to a cut in
commercial bank lending rates
by the same proportion, reliev-
ing the pressure on hard-
pressed borrowers - business-
es, consumer and the Govern-
ment.

“The Government stands to
benefit from lower borrowing
rates,” the former minister said,

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pointing out that the interest
payable on its more than $3 bil-
lion domestically-held debt,
including Registered Stock and
Treasury Bills, would also be
lowered.

A 1 per cent reduction in the
interest rate on its debt would
free up $20-$30 million cur-
rently used by the Government
for debt servicing, “which could
easily be used to soften the
blow on some critical areas;
subsidies to charities, subsidies
to school, without imperiling
your fiscal plans.”

The tax hikes come at a time
when many Bahamians have
seen their incomes either
reduced or remain flat, mean-
ing that there are likely to be
some cost of living rises,
induced by lower purcashing
power - which might reduce the
standard of living for some.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith
echoed the comments of Stan-
dard & Poor’s (S&P) leading
country analyst for the
Bahamas, Lisa Schineller, who
said the key to reducing the fis-
cal deficit in 2010-2011 was
whether the Government
would achieve its $200 million
revenue increase goal in a con-
tracting economy.

The Government is forecast-
ing that revenues will rise from
$1.295 billion in 2009-2010 to
$1.492 billion in 2010-2011, and
with recurrent spending being
held flat at $1.554 billion, the
revenue rise is key in reducing
the recurrent deficit from $259
million to $62 million, and the
overall GFS deficit from $425
million to $227 million.

“T think it’s going to be very
difficult,” Mr Smith said of the
Government’s revenue projec-
tions. “The major issue will be
whether the projections, par-
ticularly on revenue, will be
achievable over that particular
time.

“Tf that does not happen,
addressing the two major issues,
the deficit and the debt, will be
more challenging in the next
fiscal period. It’s very difficult
call.”

Mr Smith said the Govern-
ment’s main revenue earners,
particularly customs/import
duties and Stamp Duty, were
determined by the level of con-
sumption, aggregate demand
and economic activity in the
Bahamian economy.

He pointed out, though, that
these were likely to be impact-
ed negatively by a further
icrease in unemployment, cou-
pled by a further tightening of
the economy. He added that,
in relation to the tax increases
unveiled in the 2010-2011 Bud-
get, “some of the measures are
likely to weaken the economy
further”.

Mr Smith also pointed out
that some measures, such as the
two duty rates of 65 per cent
and 85 per cent imposed on the
auto industry, were unlikely to
generate increased revenues for
the Government.

He suggested that while
some 1,000 cars, for example,
were likely to have been
imported at the previous 65 per
cent rate, the increase to 85 per
cent might lead to just 500 now
being imported. While the
overall outturn depended on
“elasticity”, it is uncertain
whether the yield increase will
be enough to offset the drop in
import volume.

“The thing that bothers me a
little, if one looks at the GDP
data being used, is that we
clearly have had a 6 per cent
or more reduction in GDP
since the recession started, but
looking at the 2010-2011 Bud-
get GDP projections, they’re
showing it at $7.59 billion for
2009, whereas in 2008 it was
$7.34 billion,” Mr Smith said.

NOTICE

West Winds Property
ey PPEE TET Tae een
Limited

CoB RB toca aa koi m ser LMT
Extra-ordinary Meeting for the
West Winds Property Owners
GELB Bit

Me as
Monday the 14th day of June,
re ae ii
at the Pavilion, West Winds
Subdivision, New Providence.

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MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 5B
SS
Rate cut urged to lower government borrowing costs

“If you take 6 per cent from
that, it’s going to take you down
more to $7.1 billion, so that
GFS deficit and debt-to-GDP
ratio is going to be different
from the ones reported. That
has implications in either case
for borrowing costs.”

Mr Smith said he also had
“some concerns” about the
hotel room tax and departure
tax increases being imposed on
the tourism sector, at a time
when it was required to lead
economic growth.

“Prior to the recession we
were losing our competitive-
ness, and I think what we real-
ly need to do is lower the cost
of a vacation in the Bahamas. I
would want to be careful about
how we put tax increases on the
main sector,” the former min-
ister added.

He said a recent report he
had seen showed the US con-
sumer was spending less on

vacations, staying closer to
home and looking for dis-
counted hotel rooms.
Agreeing that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s Budget had
sent the right signals, Mr Smith
said: “The argument is in the
level of dosage the patient
needs. I hope we get out of this
without too many casualties.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
sree Melle ltt y
on Mondays







COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHMAS
2009/CLE/qui/0192
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISON
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING
TITLES ACT, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or bot of land
being Lot No. 244 in Kennedy Subdivision in the
Eastern District on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of Commonwealth of the Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Genevieve Brown
Richards

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of Genevieve Brown Richards of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commanwvealth of The Bahamas in respect of:

“ALL THAT piece or parcel of land comprising of Lot
Number 244 inthe Kennedy Subdivision in the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions a5 are shown
on the plan filed in this matter and is delineated on
that part of the said plan coloured Pink.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Genevieve
Brown Richards claim to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the said land and have made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas pursuant to the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
(Chapter 393) to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and a
plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:

The Registry of the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas on the second floor
of the Ansbacher Building situate at East Street and
Bank Lane on the island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the said Commonwealth of The Bahamas
The Chambers of Serville & Co. #13 East Avenue North,
Centreville in the Eastern District of Nassau, New
Providence aforesaid,

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that any person having
dower or right to dower, an adverse of an claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 17th
day of July, A.D, 2010 file in the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioners or their Attorneys and Adverse
Claim in the prescribed form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an Adverse
Claim on or before the 17th day of July A.D, 2010 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 26th day of May A.D., 2010

MESSRS. SERVILLE & CO.
Chambers
#13 East Avenue, North
Centreville
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

ATLANTIS, from 1B

expectations.

“We have seen our leisure
bookings pace [increase] con-
siderably this year versus last
year, running 35 per cent ahead
of pace,” Mr Markantonis said.
“If leisure bookings indicate
what is ahead in the future,
there’s light at the end of the
tunnel, and we’re very
pleased.”

Atlantis’s occupancy levels
for the year-to-date had “met
expectations”, Mr Markanto-
nis said, although the resort was
“disappointed” with April
2010’s performance compared
to last year. He suggested this
may have been because Easter
and the Passover fell in two dif-

ferent weeks in 2009, whereas
this year they were condensed
into the same week.

“May has been average, but
we’re very pleased with what
we have seen for June, July and
August,” the Kerzner Interna-
tional (Bahamas) chief added.
“The summer looks very good,
and we don’t expect any fall-
off. We’re trying to put the
summer beyond doubt. We’ve
very confident.”

Adding further to the grow-
ing sense of cautious optimism
at Atlantis, Mr Markantonis
said the resort’s guest satisfac-
tion scores had set “new
records” for every month of
2010 to date. “Our staff are
working even harder. We real-
ly have to have a service edge,”
he added.

British Colonial Hilton

NigS-5auL

Turning to the performance
of The Reef, the 480-unit con-
do-hotel built as part of the $1
billion Phase IIT expansion, and
whose units are included in the
hotel inventory pool, Mr
Markantonis said some 60 per
cent were now “sold out”.

“The sales were going
exceedingly well until late 2008
and, frankly, all condo-hotels
have suffered,” he added.

“The pleasant surprise for
2010 is that The Reef’s occu-
pancies have more than tripled
from where they were last year.
People are slowly understand-
ing what The Reef is.”

Mr Markantonis pointed to
the Reef’s kitchenette design
intended to appeal to families,
and added that the Cove - the
other tower constructed in
Phase II] as part of a joint ven-
ture with Turnberry Associates
- was “sold out” over the week-
end.

Atlantis had also moved to
cater to the increased trend of
Internet/on-line bookings, Mr
Markantonis telling reporters
that these had increased from 5-
7 per cent of total bookings to

35.7 per cent.

Increasingly educated and
savvy consumers were increas-
ingly using the Atlantis website
to assess whether they wanted
to vacation there, “taking
advantage of the specials” the
resort has and also using the
site to compare it, and the
Bahamas, to other destinations
and hotels.

Atlantis was ranked number
one among North American
hotels for its use of social net-
working, such as Facebook and
Twitter, which were garnering
“a huge amount of feedback.

“We're getting an incredible
amount of website visits from
people of all ages. Our conver-
sion rates are up considerably
more than what we were doing
before,” Mr Markantonis said,
pointing to further promotions,
such as Atlantis’s ‘Fourth Night
Free’, as examples of what
Kerzner International was
doing to stimulate excitement
in the marketplace, and thus
desire/demand for its products.

The Kerzner International
(Bahamas) managing director
also credited the Companion

Fly Free promotion, a joint ven-
ture between the Ministry of
Tourism and private sector Pro-
motion Boards, for generating
“a serious upturn in bookings”.

Describing Companion Fly
Free as “one of the most suc-
cessful” tourism promotions
ever undertaken by the
Bahamas, Mr Markantonis said
it had created “value” in cus-
tomers’ minds. He also
expressed doubt as to whether
other destinations would have
been able to arrange such a
promotion, and hoped it would
continue beyond the deadline
when existing funds are due to
run out.

In a bid to keep the momen-
tum going, Mr Markantonis
said Atlantis and Kerzner Inter-
national were working on a
“major promotion” designed to
counter the traditional Sep-
tember-November ‘slow peri-
od’ in the Bahamian tourism
calendar.

“T don’t think we can sit back
in September, October and
November, throw our hands
back and say this is hurricane
season,” Mr Markantonis said.

THE TRIBUNE

Others had successfully
changed similar perceptions, he
said, referring to Las Vegas,
which had countered its ‘slow
season’ through promotional
campaigns designed to create
value, the offering of conces-
sions, and staging of more
shows.

The autumn promotion, Mr
Markantonis added, would be
unveiled in two weeks, and he
said: “We’ve got something
pretty exciting to separate us
from the noise out there.”

Central to Kerzner Interna-
tional’s occupancy maintenance
strategy over the summer is its
Atlantis Live concert series,
which has “truly generated
bookings for the hotel”, with
concert tickets available at a
discount for room bookers.

Mr Markantonis said that fol-
lowing behind Sheryl Crow at
the weekend, the Atlantis
Imperial Ballroom will play
host to Justin Bieber on June
10, followed by Taylor Swift a
week later. The July 10 week-
end will see another top act,
with Lady Antebellum sched-
uled for September 18.



The British Colonial Hilton invites applications
from individuals who are highly energetic and
efficient to fill the following positions:

Butcher
Barboy
Waiter/Waitress
Bartender
Supervisor of Coffee Shop

SPORTS, from 1B

Announcing that the resort owner was
“working on a lot of initiatives to do with
sports tourism”, and that it “agreed 100
per cent” with the Ministry’s drive to break
into this market niche, George Markanto-
nis, Kerzner International (Bahamas) man-
aging director, said it had been negotiating
with “two major organisations” over the
last nine months.

Adding that there was “something won-
derful” coming to the Bahamas, Mr
Markantonis said Atlantis planned to host
a four-team National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) championship bas-
ketball series on December 18 this year in
its Imperial Ballroom. “The goal is to get
for the Bahamas an ‘exempt status’ from
the NCAA,” Mr Markantonis explained,
something that was currently enjoyed only

by Canada and Mexico. He added that he
would be representing Atlantis when the
Bahamas went before the NCAA in Janu-
ary. If all went to plan, in November-
December 2011, Atlantis then planned to
“stage the biggest NCAA pre-season tour-
nament in existence”, complete with wide-
spread US TV coverage and attendance
by alumni of all the teams.

Responding to the impact of the Bud-
get’s hotel room tax increase on Atlantis’s
business, Mr Markantonis said that while
any tax measure that impacted your busi-
ness was cause for concern, the Govern-
ment needed to raise funds for social and
infrastructure spending from somewhere.

Taxes raised, he added, were “being put
back into the nation” in the form of the
Lynden Pindling International Airport
(LPIA) expansion, improvements to the
roads and Bay Street, all of which benefit-

ed Kerzner International’s Paradise Island
resorts.

Pointing out that the community’s well-
being benefited Kerzner International,
which had invested some $25 million in
community projects since coming to the
Bahamas in 1994, Mr Markantonis said the
company had not been thrown “a curve
ball” despite everything seemingly coming
at once - tax increases, NIB contribution
rate rises and BEC tariff rate hikes.

As to whether Kerzner International was
concerned at the prospect of competition
from Baha Mar’s $2.6 billion project at
Cable Beach, Mr Markantonis said: “A
destination is made up of more than one
place.” If Baha Mar proved successful, and
the likes of Albany and the Bay Street
redevelopment did, too, there would be
more attractions in the Bahamas to entice
new customers and keep old ones returning.

Guest Service Representative
Air Condition Ref. Tech
Kitchen Steward
Laundry Worker

Interested persons must apply at
www.careersathilton.com

N.B. Once at the website, go to Latin America
and the Caribbean, and then Nassau where
vacant jobs will be listed ...



IN THE ESTATE OF BISHOP
HARCOURT PINDER, late of
Soldier Road in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all
persons having claim or demand
against the above Estate are
required to send their names,
addressed and the particulars of
their debts or claims duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 4th day of June, A. D.,
2010 after which date the Executrix
will proceed to distribute the estate
having regard only to proved debts
or claims of which notice would have
been given.

Notice is also hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate
are requested to make full settlement
on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

Corporate Legal Services
Chambers
110 Pickstock Place
Robinson Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Executrix of the
Estates of
BISHOP HARCOURT PINDER





DEALERS, from 3B

“Reality is here. Reality

bites,” Mr Lowe said of the
Government’s fiscal situation.
“My main concern is that we’ve









































LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.4 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LOCHMABEN HOLDINGS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at The
Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough &
Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All person having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator
before June 27th, 2010.

Alrena Moxey
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(N*°45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
NICE MANAGEMENT COMPANY LIMITED is in dis-
solution. Francisco Vasconcellos is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Alameda Inglaterra, 633. Municipio de Barueri,
Estado de Sao Paul, Brazil. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their names
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liqui-
dator before the 25th day of June, 2010.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FATOS VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of May 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

got to find a way to cut spend-
ing.

“T agree that the subsidies
have to stop. The country as a
whole needs to get spending
under control. Government
spending is the key to all of this,
and when we see year after year
the government spending more
than it is earning, more than it
has Budgeted for, something is
out of kilter. Another couple
of years of profligacy and we
will have a crisis.”

Mr Lowe’s comments were
echoed by a banking industry
source, who told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Government had
missed a “golden opportunity”
via the 2010-2011 Budget to cut
spending, and warned that the
50 per cent fee increases on the
commercial banks were com-
ing at a time when the industry
had taken an estimated $150
million hit.

The source, who requested
anonymity, said that based on
some $600 million in non-per-
forming loans, which were 90
days or more past due and not
accruing any interest, the
Bahamian commercial banking
industry had lost some $60 mil-
lion in annual interest pay-
ments, based on an average
yield per loan of 10 per cent.

Then there was the provi-
sioning and write-offs associat-
ed with the non-performing
loans. The source said it was
“not unreasonable” to assume
20 per cent of that $600 million

a
NAD
Nassau Airport
Deeg ogni Company

number would be written-off,
a sum worth $120 million, tak-
ing the sum lost by the sector to
$150-$180 million.

This, the source said, would
eat into banking industry prof-
its, which collectively were said
to have peaked at $300 million.

The banker, though, told Tri-
bune Business that the Gov-
ernment had merely tinkered
around the edges with its 2010-
2011 spending plans, and the
Prime Minister had missed an
opportunity to cut out the
excess and waste in the public
sector, having seized the morale
high ground with his salary cut.

“T think it didn’t go far
enough,” the source said. “I
think we have an expenditure
problem, but the deficit will not
be addressed by expenditure
cuts, but by revenue and tax
increases. There wasn’t enough
of a knife taken to the expen-
diture side. He should have put
some pain on now.”

Describing the Budget as a
“missed opportunity”, the
source also criticised the Gov-
ernment for backing away from
taxing the numbers business,
something it estimated could
generate $30-$40 million in
extra revenues.

“The Government said:
“We'll go back to the rest of the
economy by taxing you, when
the guys who are pocketing tens
of millions are getting a free
pass. I thought that was
inequitable,” the source said.

Landscaping Maintenance Services

Naseai Alpert Development Company (MAD) iris
landers for provision of Landscaping Maintenance
Services at Lymdan Finding Intemational Ainpart

Mandatory qualifications:

Proponents must be 100% Bahamian-oaned &

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Must be commilled 16 providing exaelient serine

RPP documents will be available for pick up at MATS
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Contact: VANDETTAMOORSHESD

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 7B



en |") =:
Structural reform for

‘inadequate’ tax system urged

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day said the 2010-2011 Budget
showed this nation needed to
urgently reform and broaden
its tax base, telling Tribune
Business: “The current system
is inadequate, and the crisis
exposed that.”

Khaalis Rolle told this news-
paper that the Government’s
fiscal difficulties, and the prob-
lems it was experiencing in
reducing the fiscal deficit and
national debt to pre-recession
levels, again showed the need
to restructure the Bahamian tax
system to one that was reliant
on an alternative, such as a val-
ue-added (VAT) or sales tax.

Pointing out that the
Bahamas would have to
restructure its import duty-
reliant system anyway as a
result of its commitments under
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) and World
Trade Organisation (WTO),
Mr Rolle said the number - and
level - of tax increases levied
in the 2010-2011 Budget did
“not bode well” for the private
sector and its ability to drag the
Bahamian economy out of
recession.

Bahamian companies, he
warned, were being placed at
“a serious disadvantage”, as
industries directly impacted by
the tax increases were also
being hit by the impending rise
in National Insurance Board
(NIB) contribution rates and
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) rates.

Expressing particular con-
cern for the hotel industry, with
many resorts already suffering
net losses due to the global
recession and high operating
cost base, Mr Rolle said that
while the Government had
“front-loaded taxes” on to the
private sector, it had done little
to create growth incentives in
the Budget.

While it was easy to increase
a company’s expenses, the
Chamber president warned that
it was much harder to generate
revenue rises, especially in a
depressed economy. He warned
that it would take Bahamian
companies directly impacted by

the Budget tax increases
between 24 to 36 months to
counter the increased costs with
new revenue streams.

“When I calculate all the
increases in taxes, it does not
bode well,” Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business. “Factoring all
of that in, and you’ve had far
more taxes thrust upon you
than in any one single period
of history.

“Tt now puts businesses at a
serious disadvantage - NIB is
going up, BEC is going up. It’s
going to be a difficult pill to
swallow.”

Emphasising that he did not
mind taxes, Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business: “At least there
should have been something on
the other side of the coin that
puts businesses in a better posi-
tion to absorb those taxes.”

Through the Budget, Mr
Rolle said taxes were being
“front-loaded” on the Bahami-
an business community, while
any investment incentives to
encourage growth, productivity
and efficiency would be “back
loaded” - and unlikely to be
implemented with the same
speed.

“It’s easier to execute the
expenses side than it is the rev-
enue side,” the Chamber pres-
ident said, warning of the
immediate impact to the bot-
tom line for many companies.
“Revenues do not grow at the
same rate as expenses. There’s
a direct correlation to business
failures if we use that current
model.”

With little to no warning hav-
ing been given, Mr Rolle said
Bahamian companies had no
time to plan for ways to
increase their top lines.

“Tt will take a 24-month peri-
od, in the most aggressive cycle,
to get up and running to gener-
ate additional revenue,” Mr
Rolle said. “We’re looking at
a horizon 36 months away
before businesses are comfort-
able with revenue-generating
measures; 36 months of addi-
tional expenses.”

Looking at the broader pic-
ture of the Government’s
finances, Mr Rolle told Tribune
Business: “I believe there is a
need for us to reform our entire
tax structure, rather than
increase the Budget’s taxation.

“One thing that was mani-
festly evident in this Budget is
that there is no room for cre-
ativity, no room for flexibility,
because we have such a narrow
tax regime. We would have far
more flexibility if we had an
alternative taxation system that
was far wider in scope than the
current one.”

Mr Rolle said the Chamber
had long been advocating that
the existing tax structure, heav-
ily reliant on import and Stamp
duties, be replaced by a VAT.
This option, which levies a tax
at each part of the production
chain, would capture the ser-
vices side of the Bahamian
economy - a sector that largely
goes untaxed.

“We are missing the critical
mass from which government
revenue could be generated,”
the Chamber president said.
“We need to broaden our tax
base, we need to reform the
structure, and this should be a
clear message to government
that the current system is inad-
equate. The crisis exposed
that.”

With many already respond-
ing negatively to the Budget’s
$100 million-plus tax increases,
Mr Rolle said there was no bet-
ter time than now to seriously
begin the tax reform process.

While the Government had
attempted to bring some under-
taxed industries up to “an
acceptable tax level”, the
Chamber chief added that the
“perfect balance” between get-
ting the public finances back
on a sustainable path and not
dampening economic growth
prospects had been struck.

This would have been diffi-
cult to achieve, he added,
because the Government had
“so little to work with”.

“This was the doom and
gloom Budget we anticipated,”
Mr Rolle said. “We went into
deficit spending to save what
was a weak economy and the
social fabric. We created a host
of other problems.

“T can’t say the Government
was wrong to go into deficit
spending. There were some
benefits.

“We need creative ways to
get ourselves back into line, and
I didn’t get a strong sense of
that.”



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MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

bk



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The stories behind the news



Our futile war on crime

NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



ow here is a bright
idea: If Hubert Ingra-
ham and Perry
Christie would just
work together, the
whole country would be united
against crime. Maybe that is what it
will take to solve the problem. What
a laughable thought, to say the least.

Honestly, if our present leaders
mustered all of their intellectual
capacities I am willing to bet any
wager they would still be clueless
and ineffective in abating crime. The
math is simple. We will not solve
crime by fighting crime. We will only
solve crime by eliminating the con-
ditions that give rise to crime.

So what if we stopped asking the
government what their crime plan
is and stop holding the police
responsible for stopping crime. The
problems we currently face are only
allowed to thrive because there is
an absence of community. Let us
stop expending so much energy cry-
ing over crime, and focus on reclaim-
ing and restoring community.

This may sound callous, but last
year’s murder count of 77 is dwarfed
by all of the other social ills. Our
fixation on the murder count — the
endless comparison between annual
figures — is pointless. The conditions
in society are not static; they are
deteriorating while our population is
increasing, so naturally there will be
an increase in crime. It has nothing
to do with whether the Free Nation-
al Movement or the Progressive Lib-
eral Party is in power, or which
Commissioner of Police the govern-
ment installs.

Fact: A large percentage of our
murders stem from interpersonal
conflicts. This is an example of how
our dysfunctional behaviour trans-
lates into a proliferation of crime.
Look around at all of the incestu-
ous relationships Bahamian fathers
have with their children, or the num-
ber of children living in fear of being
molested by their pastors or the shop
owner down the street. In fact, look
at an ordinary day in the House of
Assembly. We have drifted so far
away from the true spirit of com-
munity that our society has become
a production house of criminality
and dysfunction.

Most of the largest town criers
are not even exposed to a real threat
of violent crime, but in a state of
fear created by the manipulation of
a perception of crime, they are over-
come with paranoia. The average
middle class Bahamian in their mid-
40s would probably struggle to name
more than five incidents of violent
crime that have directly impacted
their lives (child abuse not with-
standing). The fear they experience
is more of an illusion.

Those that we should really be
concerned about are the children in
our society. The threat to them is
real. Their lives are invariably
shaped by the intense trauma that
results from their exposure to vio-
lence and a host of other social ills.

On a regular basis I work with
children from “Over the Hill”; they
average about eight years old. Ina
weekly Monday exercise called
“sharing the news”, they tell stories
about the people they know that got
“jook up”, “locked up”, “beat up” or
“killed”. In this forum we often
remind them that “the news” does
not always have to be about the vio-
lence in their community. But with-

$ SUZUKI

ec




Grand Vitara features:
ee ele
RL Ly

* Dual front air bags









ABOVE AND BELOW — In these file photos, detectives and officers remove unidentified bodies from crime scenes...

out fail, every week they return with
war stories. Imagine what their lev-
el of direct exposure will be by age
40.

What is most alarming is that the
dysfunction they speak of has
become so normalized within their
neighbourhoods that they are inca-
pable of realising how it is adversely
shaping their perceptions of reality.

These children do not need a
crime plan. They need a community,
and what we have in the Bahamas,
as Baba Shango rightly articulated, is

a group of individuals stuck on the
same rock. A true community is not
a group of individuals living in a spe-
cific location, sharing a government
and a common heritage.

A true community enables the
healthy development of its children,
helping them to discover their pur-
pose and understand who they are.
The community supports the healing

of all children, nurtures their talents
and welcomes their contributions.

In a holistic community, each gen-
eration is the link to the one that
precedes it and the one that follows.
A reciprocal relationship is fostered
as they inspire each other. What we
have today is a situation in which
no one is being inspired. Few are
pulling from the past and fewer still
are giving to the future.

In a holistic community, the bless-
ings bestowed on individuals in the
form of skills, talents and personal









wealth are no more the possession of
individuals than the air they breathe.
The whole notion of the self made
person is an illusion. This thinking is
what Albert Einstein calls “a kind of
optical delusion of (one’s) con-
sciousness”. It is the kind of delu-
sion that negates community. No
one survives or thrives without a
form of community.

So much has been lost of our
understanding of the world, our tra-
ditions, customs, rites of passage and
initiations. At one time these served
as a guide for the development and
structuring of our communities.
Often times we perceive our tradi-
tional ways as dead, perhaps that is
the very reason our society is in a
state of decay. Our present practices
are materialistic, superficial and
commercially oriented. They lack
meaning and purpose.

For example, we have lost the
essence of what it means to name a
child. A name is supposed to call
out the destiny of a child and remind
a child of his or her purpose. It is
not simply a form of identification.
The popular practice of compound-
ing the names of two parents to label
a child is not rooted in an under-
standing of community. It is a glitch
in the system derived from individ-
ualistic Western ideals.

The naming ceremony is a sacred
event. It is where the community
discovers the child’s purpose and is
made responsible for helping the
child to fulfil his or her destiny. It is
where the community unites to cel-
ebrate the arrival of the child, who is
the bearer of news from the same
realm to which the rest of the com-
munity must prepare to return one
day.

In a holistic community, this is

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

After another failure, BP scrambles to stem leak

By BEN NUCKOLS
Associated Press Writer

ROBERT, La. (AP) —
After failing again to stem the
flow of oil into the Gulf of
Mexico, BP scrambled Sun-
day to make some progress
in ending the spill that the
president’s top energy adviser
said was the biggest environ-
mental disaster the US has
ever faced.

Six weeks after the spill, oil
giant BP PLC said that its lat-
est plan to cap the well would-
mt capture all the crude foul-
ing the Gulf. And the relief
wells currently being drilled
— which are supposed to be a
better long-term solution —
won't be done for at least two
months. “Well, the relief well
at the end of August is cer-
tainly the end — the end
point on this game,” Robert
Dudley, BP’s managing direc-
tor, said Sunday on ABC’s
“This Week.” “But we failed
to wrestle the beast to the
ground yesterday.”

That would be in the mid-
dle of the Atlantic hurricane
season, which begins Tues-
day. The crude likely won’t
affect the formation of storms,
but the cyclones could push
the oil deeper into coastal
marshes and estuaries and
turn the oil into a crashing
black surf.

White House energy advis-









A MAN runs along the beach with his dog as workers gather to clean
Sunday, May 30...

er Carol Browner said Sun-
day on NBC’s “Meet the
Press” that there was more
oil spilling into the Gulf than
at any other time in history.

“This is probably the
biggest environmental disas-
ter we’ve ever faced in this
country,” Browner said.

The effort to curb that dis-
aster known as the “top kill”
failed after engineers tried for
three days to overwhelm the
crippled well with heavy
drilling mud and junk 5,000

feet underwater.

And skepticism is growing
that BP can solve the crisis.

Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass.,
who leads a congressional
committee investigating the
disaster, told CBS’ “Face the
Nation” on Sunday that he
had “no confidence whatso-
ever in BP.”

“So I don’t think that peo-
ple should really believe what
BP is saying in terms of the
likelihood of anything that
they’re doing is going to turn



up oil residue in Grand Isle, La., on

(AP Photo)

out as they’re predicting,” he
said.

BP hopes to saw through a
pipe leading out from the well
and cap it with a funnel-like
device using the same remote-
ly guided undersea robots that
have failed in other tries to
stop the gusher. Even that
effort won’t end the disaster
— BP officials have only
pledged it will capture a
majority of the oil. None of
the remaining options would
stop the flow entirely or cap-

ture all the crude before it
reaches the Gulf’s waters.

Engineers will use remote-
ly guided undersea robots to
try to lower a cap onto the
leak after cutting off part of a
busted pipe leading out from
the well. The funnel-like
device is similar to a huge
containment box that failed
before when it became
clogged with icelike slush.
Dudley said officials learned a
lot from that failure and will
pump warm water through
the pipes to prevent the ice
problems.

The spill is the worst in US
history — exceeding even the
1989 Exxon Valdez disaster
— and has dumped between
18 million and 40 million gal-
lons into the Gulf, according
to government estimates. The
leak began after the Deepwa-
ter Horizon drilling rig
exploded in April, killing 11
people. “This scares every-
body, the fact that we can’t
make this well stop flowing,
the fact that we haven’t suc-
ceeded so far,” BP Chief
Operating Officer Doug Sut-
tles said Saturday. “Many of
the things we’re trying have
been done on the surface
before, but have never been
tried at 5,000 feet.”

He said cutting off the dam-
aged riser isn’t expected to
cause the flow rate of leaking
oil to increase significantly.

THE TRIBUNE

However, Browner said
Sunday on CBS’ “Face the
Nation” that cutting the pipe
could send more oil flowing
into the Gulf — up to 20 per
cent more than is currently
spewing. That’s because engi-
neers will cut off a kink in the
pipe that currently seems to
be holding back some of the
gusher, Browner said.

Browner also said how
much oil the new cap can col-
lect depends on how well it’s
fitted over the leak. Other
experts also have said
installing the new contain-
ment valve is risky because of
the bend in the riser pipe.

“Tf they can’t get that valve
on, things will get much
worse,” said Philip W John-
son, an engineering professor
at the University of Alabama.

Word that the top kill had
failed hit hard in fishing com-
munities along Louisiana’s
coast, where the impact has
been underscored by oil-coat-
ed marshes and wildlife.

The top official in coastal
Plaquemines Parish said news
of the top kill failure brought
tears to his eyes. “They are
going to destroy south
Louisiana. We are dying a
slow death here,” said Billy
Nungesser, the parish presi-
dent. “We don’t have time to
wait while they try solutions.
Hurricane season starts on
Tuesday.”

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THE TRIBUNE

By JUAN CARLOS
LLORCA
Associated Press Writer

GUATEMALA CITY
(AP) — Torrential rains
brought by the first tropical
storm of the 2010 season
pounded Central America
and southern Mexico, trig-
gering deadly landslides. The
death toll stood at 16 Sunday,

From inmates
to employees:
Coup plotters
hired at prison
Where they
(lid time

ST GEORGE’S, Grenada
(AP) — Two men convicted
of killing Grenada’s leader
during a 1983 coup that trig-
gered a US invasion are back
at the prison where they
served long sentences. Only
this time, they’re on the pay-
roll.

Former army chief General
Hudson Austin and Leon
Cornwall were released from
Richmond Hill Prison in Sep-
tember along with five oth-
ers, the last to be freed of the
so-called Grenada 17.

While behind bars, Austin
had helped renovate several
buildings damaged by Hurri-
cane Ivan in 2004, and Corn-
wall, a former high school
teacher, reformed the prison's
education system.

According to documents
presented in Parliament on
Friday, Austin has been hired
as a building supervisor at the
lockup, while Cornwall will
be paid to continue develop-
ing educational programmes.

Leftist Prime Minister
Maurice Bishop, four Cabi-
net ministers and six support-
ers were dragged before a fir-
ing squad and shot dead on
October 19, 1983, by the
Grenada 17 — members of
Bishop’s own New Jewel
movement who demanded
more radical policies.

US troops invaded about a
week later and captured the
17 on orders of President
Ronald Reagan, who worried
about Grenada’s growing ties
with communist Cuba.

The bodies of Bishop and
the 10 others killed have nev-
er been found.

but authorities said the num-
ber could rise.

Tropical Storm Agatha was
dissipating over the moun-
tains of western Guatemala, a
day after it made landfall near
the nation’s border with Mex-
ico with winds up to 45 mph
(75 kph).

Although no longer even a
tropical depression, Agatha
still posed trouble for the
region: Remnants of the
storm were expected to deliv-
er 10 to 20 inches (25 to 50
centimeters) of rain over
southeastern Mexico,
Guatemala and parts of El
Salvador, creating the possi-
bility of “life-threatening flash
floods and mudslides,” the US
National Hurricane Center in
Miami said in an advisory.

Guatemalan President
Alvaro Colom said Saturday
night that the rivers in the
country’s south were flooding
or close to it.

Colom said 4.3 inches (10.8
centimeters) of rain had fallen
in Guatemala City’s valley in
12 hours, the most since 1949,

As of Sunday morning,
69,000 people in Guatemala
had been evacuated, many to
shelters. Some lost their
homes the previous day in a
landslide on a hillside settle-









AGIRL tries to drain rain water out of a street in Amatitlan, south of

Guatemala City, on Saturday...

ment in Guatemala City that
killed four people and left 11
missing, disaster relief
spokesman David de Leon
said.

Four children were killed
by another slide in the town
of Santa Catarina Pinula,
about six miles (10 kilome-
ters) outside the capital. And
in the department of Quet-
zaltenango, 125 miles (200
kilometers) west of
Guatemala City, a boulder
loosened by rains crushed a
house, killing two children
and two adults, de Leon said.

Other evacuees were
moved from their homes to

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avoid potential slides officials
feared might still come.

Callers to local radio sta-
tions described more land-
slides and possible deaths, but
those reports could not be
immediately confirmed.

A three-story building in
northern Guatemala City fell
into a sinkhole but there were
no reports of victims.

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 3C

Tropical Storm Agatha kills 16 in Central America

Cesar George of
Guatemala’s meteorological
institute said the community
of Champerico had received
11.8 inches (30 centimeters)
of rain in 30 hours.

“Tt rained in one day what
it usually gets in a month,”
George said.

Colom said authorities have
not been able to reach Cham-
perico by “air, land or sea.”

In El Salvador, President
Mauricio Funes declared a
“red alert,” the highest level
of emergency, after rains
delivered by Agatha triggered
at least 140 landslides
throughout the country and
killed two adults and a 10-
year-old child. The exact
cause of their deaths was
unclear.

Civil defense officials said
the Acelhuate River that
passes through the capital,
San Salvador, had risen to
dangerous levels and was
threatening to overflow into
city streets.

In Honduras, national
emergency agency Copeco
reported one man was
crushed to death by a wall
that collapsed in the town of
Santa Ana, near the capital
of Tegucigalpa.

Flooding and _ slides
destroyed 45 homes in the
country and prompted
authorities to evacuate 1,800
people, according to figures
released by the agency.

Agatha formed as a tropical
storm early Saturday in the
East Pacific.

Before the rains,
Guatemala already was con-
tending with heavy eruptions
from its Pacaya volcano that
blanketed the capital in ash
and destroyed 800 homes.

The volcano, which is just
south of the capital, started
spewing lava and rocks Thurs-
day afternoon, forcing the clo-
sure of Guatemala City’s
international airport. A TV
reporter was killed by a show-
er of burning rocks.

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

INSIGHT

CRIME, from 1C

one of the many structures
that provide a firm founda-
tion for the growth and devel-
opment of the child. In our
society, many of these essen-
tial structures have been cor-
rupted or outright abandoned.

Another prime example is
the relationship between our
children and our elders. The






need for the connection
between children and elders is
much more fundamental than
our current practices would
suggest. A visit to grammy in
our culture has become a non-
chalant activity that we do in
our spare time. We margin-
alize our elders, based on our
Western world view. Gener-
ally, elders are viewed as eco-

Head of
the Class!


















NY

nomically unproductive,
because they do not work in
the economy, while they con-
tinually consume resources.
They are considered dispens-
able, worthless even.

In traditional African cul-
ture, where a holistic under-
standing of community mani-
fests, there is an unspoken
language between children

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MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

CHEVROLET

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 1A
Bamboo and Zion Boulevard
TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSIONS

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES $.4. would like to inform the motoring public that East Street South
will be permanently open to the motoring public, effective Thursday June 3, 2010 while road works will be carried out on
sections of Bamboo & Zion Blvd for approximately two (2) weeks.

and elders. This is why elders
take a great interest in the
birth of a child. The elders
prepare the children for the
journey ahead, sharing with
them the secrets of life. The
children share with the elders
news of the next realm,
preparing them for their
upcoming journey.
“Throughout children’s
lives in the village there is a
strong message that they
belong to a community of
people who value them
almost beyond anything else.
It starts when grandparents
participate in the birthing and
are the first to hold the new-
born. Because the newborn is
considered a villager who has
just arrived from a long trip
that started in the land of the
ancestors, the people most
recognizable to them are the
old ones,” according to
Malidoma Some, in the
“Healing Wisdom of Africa”.
If it is not clear as yet that
we have far greater problems
than crime then perhaps you
are not seeing the crux of the

pet ling
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5 *
——

matter. In our absence of
community, we are inevitably
damned, because we live by a
destructive separatist agenda
that is safeguarded by a belief
in armed force.

In material terms this looks
like a proliferation of gated
communities, “shanty towns”
and prisons; a flood of police
on the streets; an increase in
police raids, civilian arma-
ment and private security; and
an increase in gangs. Surprise.
Surprise. We are creating an
increasingly segregated soci-
ety with “strong people” who
get by and “weak people”
who don’t.

All of this stems from our
linear way of thinking. In this
model everything is perceived
through a dichotomous para-
digm: good, bad; ally, enemy;
old, young; black, white; male,
female; straight, gay. In this
two dimensional world view
it is hard to see the inherent
connections in all things. All
reality is polarized; all knowl-
edge is externalized, and if
something cannot be proven

THE TRIBUNE

with empirical evidence it
does not exist. This lends to
materialism and an imbal-
anced left-sided way of think-
ing, which cuts one off from
the world of spirit.

Imagine our predicament
when the entire education sys-
tem is designed on this model.
It breeds a society of highly
materialistic, technocratic
individuals with little self-
knowledge. Our children are
not taught to learn from with-
in and they develop a sense
of dependency. Ultimately,
western education suppress-
es our children’s intuition and
causes it to atrophy.

Our linear way of thinking
has manifested in everything
around us, from our thoughts
on life and death, to the way
we design our so-called com-
munities.

Often we hear people use
the following phrases: “Here
today, gone tomorrow”, or “T
only have one life to live.”
These are symbolic of our

SEE next page

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh, edi hg

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE GRAPHIC DESIGN & LAYOUT

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of The
College of The Bahamas Alumm Magazine. Through a high quality graphic tormat,
ithe alumni magazine provides key information about The College, its graduates, stu-
dents, researchers, friends and supporters and has become a pivotal publication for
The College in the last two-and-a-half years.

The look, feel and general format for the magazine 1s consistent from issue to issue
with variations to suit the level and detail of the content of each issue.

Proposals: Vendors should deliver one (1) original and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one orginal signature to the following

address:

Atin: Ma. Gabriella Fraser

Associate Vice President, External Affairs
The College of The Bahamas

PO ox § 4072
Oakes Field Campus
Nassau, The Bahanas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 00 p.m. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request For Proposal (RFP) document,
requested attachments, and any amendments if issued. The proposal must contain
the signature of a duly authorized officer or agent of the company submitting the
proposal. Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST, Friday June 25, 2010, will not be
considered and will be returned unopened,

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept or reject any or all pespons-

es to this RFP.

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of External
Affairs al (242) 302-4304, Technical questions may be directed to Ms. Maelynn
Seymour-Major, Office of Communication at (242) 302-4353,

You may download a copy of the REP at: bttpyweww.cob.edu.bs/rip_alumnimag.php

‘Motorist travelling through Buttercup Drive onte Bamboo Blvd. will be affected and are axked to use an alternate route to

their destination,

*Matorist travelling north & south towards Ziow Bhd onto East St. should following the signs posted "DIVERSION" through

Antonio Drive.

Detours. will be clearly marked to allow the sate passage for pedestrians & motorist and proper signage will be erected delineating the work zone.
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 5C



Our futile war on crime

FROM page 4C

thoughts on life and death.
The Christian view suggests
a person is born, dies, and
goes to heaven or hell. An
atheist’s view suggests a per-
son is born and dies. In
essence, it is the same linear
model of thinking that gives
rise to both of these world
views. This is in complete
opposition to what we see in
nature.

In traditional African cul-
ture the person is born into
the community to serve a spe-
cific function or role. They
leave the community through
the doorway of death, enter
the ancestral realm, where
they continue to play a sup-
portive role, and then are
reborn into the community.
Africans have developed this
understanding by observing
nature: the cycle of the sea-
sons, the cycle of the moon,
the ebb and flow of the tides,
and the cyclical transfer of
energy in the ecosystem.

In Bahamian society we
recognize the cyclical nature
of certain things in our
speech, primarily in an uncon-
scious way. When we say,
“you killing ya granddaddy”,
or when we remark that a
child has inherited a particular
skill or trait from a deceased
relative, these are unconscious
revelations of reality. Unfor-
tunately for us, living uncon-
sciously, without purpose, has
disconnected us from our very
nature. This is why we are so
destructive to ourselves and
the external environment.

Our linear way of thinking
has even manifested in the
way we construct our neigh-
bourhoods. Examine any
modern neighbourhood and
you will notice that our hous-
es are lined up on streets.
What you are actually seeing
are houses arranged in paral-
lel lines that never meet. This
is further compounded by the
walls and fences we erect to
delineate boundaries and cre-
ate division. This is a tangi-
ble example of a segregative

way of being: each unit is
compartmentalized and
excluded from the other.

In a holistic model, com-
munities are designed based
on a unified way of being. The
cosmological principle of
community creates a physical
blueprint for designing our
dwellings, reminding us daily
of who we are. For example,
the dwellings in a compound
are generally arranged in con-
centric circles. Elders and chil-
dren are located at the core.
Women form the inner
perimeter and men form the
outer circle.

Children

This ties back into the rela-
tionship between children and
elders, and the role of every-
one in the community. The
African model shows us that
at the heart of community is
wisdom, ancestral knowledge
represented by the seed and
the ripening fruit. The women
represent the nurturing force
that supports the core. The
men represent the external
boundary, the hard exterior
that protects that which is
most important.

Unfortunately, based on
our current level of con-
sciousness, it is virtually
impossible for us to create a
true community. Individual-
ly and collectively, we do not
identify with the requisite
higher levels of consciousness
in our being needed to devel-
op community.

Consciousness is the
underlying essence that flows
through nature. It is our abil-
ity to understand ourselves,
each other, and the world we
live in; it is our awareness of
the connectivity of all things.

When consciousness is
directed in a linear way it
manifests in the identification
with the material aspects of
our being. When it is focused
in a balance manner, in both
hemispheres of our brain, it
manifests in a holistic way of
being. When we operate on a
higher plane of consciousness

we have greater wisdom and
foresight; we access our abili-
ty to see through the third
eye.

“No problem can be solved
at the same level of con-
sciousness that created it,” as
my mother often says in quot-
ing Albert Einstein. This type
of thinking is consistent with
the old adage, “A man can-
not be above his mind.” Basi-
cally, a person with pink glass-
es lives in a pink world.

If we raise the level of con-
sciousness in our people, par-
ticularly in our children, then
new ways of being will
emerge. If every strategy we
employed to solve our social
problems was infused with
this inner knowledge, the
essence of who we are, it
would transform the way we
live. Because everything
occurring internally manifests
externally, higher conscious-
ness would inevitably give
birth to community.

If we really want to solve
the problem of crime we have
to fill the void created by a
lack of community. Raising
our consciousness as a peo-
ple is our best hope for
reclaiming and restoring com-
munity.

The power to arrest the
problem is in the hands of
each individual, but most
relinquish their power by
denying individual responsi-
bility. The next time you look
outside of yourself for the
answer to the crime problem,
ask yourself these questions:
What is my state of con-
sciousness, and what am I
doing to build a true commu-
nity?

But first, we must exam-
ine, are we really interested
in forming a community with
the other people stuck on this

For the stories
behind the news,

To MET fe lira
on Mondays



Reporters News
and Sport

AN TED

ARE you curious enough to find out
what's going on behind the scenes; literate
enough to tell stories in a compelling
way; hard-working enough to balance
beat coverage with magazine-style
natratives; tech-literate enough to make
a strong contribution to our growing
website and flexible enough to contribute
features as well as hard news?

The Tribune

is looking for

News and Sports Writers

who want to make a difference
at the country's largest
circulation newspaper.

We’re the BIGGEST, the BEST and
we’re on the move AGAIN!

Ideal candidate should have:

e Newsroom experience

e Strong writing and reporting skills
e Multi-tasking abilities,

e And a good sense of humour



Send email with resume
and writing samples to:

jfleet@tribunemedia.net

Or

drop in your applications at
our front counter marked
FAO John Fleet,
Managing Editor, The Tribune.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

rock, or are we content with
Western illusions of security,
prosperity, Godliness, and
identity.

I suspect our greatest prob-
lem is the fact that we are not
truly interested in forming a
community. Rather, we are

satisfied with living a life
based on the illusions that we
construct, chief among them is
our futile war on crime.


































































\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE PRINT PRODUCTION

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of
The College of The Bahamas Alumni Magazine. Through a high quality graph-
ic format, the alumni magazine provides key information about The College, its
graduates, students, researchers, friends and supporters and has become a piv-
otal publication for The Collewe in the last two-and-a-half years.

The look, feel and general format for the magazine is consistent from issue to
issue With variations to suit the level ane detail of the content of each issue,

Proposals: Vendors should deliver one (1) orginal and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one origimal signature to the tollowing
address:

Attn Ms. Gabriella Fraser

Associate Viee President, External Affairs
The College of The Bahamas

PO Box NW 4912

Oakes Field Campus

Nassau, The Bahamas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 5:p.m. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request for Proposal (RFP) document.
requested allachments, and any amendments if issued. The proposal must con-
tain the signature of a duly authorized officer or agent of the company submit-
ting the proposal, Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST, Friday June 25, 2010,
will not be considered and will be returned unopened.

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
responses to this REP,

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of
External Affairs, at (242) 302-4504. Technical questions may be directed to Ms.

Maelynn Seymour-Major, Office of Communication at (242) 302-4353.

You may download a copy of the RFP at: biipe!wawe

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department’s Triage, Registration and Patient Waiting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic,

Effective Tuesday May 11th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed,

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services,

For more information please call 502-7885 for AGE Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic,

Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused,

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT






THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010, PAGE 7C

INSIGHT



1,000th GI killed in Afghan
war was on 2nd tour

By PAUL J WEBER
Associated Press Writer

KERRVILLE, Texas (AP)
— The 1,000th American ser-
viceman killed in Afghanistan
was born on July 4. He died
several days before Ameri-
cans honour fallen troops on
Memorial Day.

Marine Cpl. Jacob C Leicht
was killed Thursday when he
stepped on a land mine in
Helmand province that ripped
off his right arm. It was the
24-year-old Texan’s second
deployment overseas.

Leicht had begged to return
to the battlefield after a bomb
took out his Humvee in Iraq.
He spent two painful years
recovering from face and leg
injuries, all the while pining
for combat in letters from his
hospital bed.

He finally got back to the
front lines in southern
Afghanistan, but was killed
less than a month into the
tour of duty he desperately
wanted.

“He said he always wanted
to die for his country and be
remembered,” said Jesse
Leicht, his younger brother.
“He didn’t want to die hav-
ing a heart attack or just being
an old man. He wanted to die
for something.”

An Associated Press tally
shows Leicht is the 1,000th
US serviceman killed in the
Afghan conflict. The first
death — nearly nine years ago
— was also a soldier from the
San Antonio area.

The AP bases its tally on
Defense Department reports
of deaths suffered as a direct
result of the Afghan conflict,
including personnel assigned
to units in Afghanistan, Pak-

JONATHAN Leicht poses with a
photo of his brother, Marine Cpl.

Jacob Leicht... (AP Photo)

istan or Uzbekistan.

Other news organisations
count deaths suffered by ser-
vice members assigned else-
where as part of Operation
Enduring Freedom, which
includes operations in the
Philippines, the Horn of
Africa and at the US deten-
tion facility at Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.

Leicht’s brothers told the
AP the military also told the
family that his death put the
toll at 1,000.

When military officers went
to tell Leicht’s parents their
adopted son had died in com-
bat, sheriff’s deputies had to
help navigate them to the 130-
acre (53-hectare) family ranch
tucked deep in the Texas Hill
Country.

It was here that Jacob
Leicht chopped thick cedar
trees and hiked the rugged
limestone peaks, growing up
into an imposing 6-5 (1.96-
meter), 200-pound (90-kilo-
gram) Marine with a soft
heart. He watched “Dora the



Explorer” with his brother’s
children and confided to fam-
ily that he was troubled by
the thought of young civilians
being killed in battle.

But for Leicht, born in a
Lemoore, California, Navy
hospital, the battlefield was
the destination. He threw
away a college Reserve Offi-
cers’ Training Corps scholar-
ship after just one semester
because he feared it would
lead away from the front
lines.

“His greatest fear was that
they would tell him he would
have to sit at a desk for the
rest of his life,” said Jonathan
Leicht, his older brother.

When Jacob Leicht’s wish
finally came true, it didn’t last
long.

His first deployment was to
Traq in 2007, but he was there
just three weeks when Jesse
Leicht said his brother drove
over two 500-pound (227-kilo-
gram) bombs beneath the
road.

One detonated, the other
didn’t. The blast tore through
the Humvee, shooting the
radio into Leicht’s face and
knocking him unconscious.
He felt something pinch his
thumb, and the gunner’s face
was filleted so badly by shrap-
nel that medics couldn’t keep
water in his mouth.

None of the five people
inside the vehicle died. Jesse
Leicht said an Iraqi inter-
preter, the only one on board
who wasn’t seriously injured,
dragged his brother from the
mangled vehicle. The blast
snapped Jacob Leicht’s fibula
and tibula, and the recovery
was an agonising ordeal of
pins and rods and bolts drilled
into his bones.

FOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR
DATA WAREHOUSE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lid. (BTC) is

pleased to invite Tenders to provide a Data Warehouse for
the company.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender $pectifica-
tion from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before 5:00 pm
Friday, June 18th, 2010. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “Data Warehouse” and should be delivered fo the
attention of the “Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO."

BIC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.






















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ali

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





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