Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY a fV

Pim blowin’ it

The Tribune



S6F

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



LOW

73F

CLOUDS
AND SUN

Volume: 106 No.152





=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

mY A

SUE UR aa a RUNS gaa iM

S14 at 3

fearful as street
battles intensify





AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner/lan Allen







A POLICE OFFICER monitors Park Lane, a thoroughfare
adjacent to Red Hills Road in the capital city of Kingston,
Jamaica, Monday May 24, 2010. Thousands of police and sol-
diers stormed the Jamaican ghettos in search of a reputed
drug kingpin wanted by the United States, intensifying a
third day of street battles that have killed at least 30 people.

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIAN students are “terrified” by the civil unrest
turning some areas of Jamaica into a combat zone.

The unrest is isolated to Downtown Kingston, and in some
instances, immediately neighbouring communities, but has not
spread to the university district, resort areas or the rest of the
country, where Bahamians predominantly reside, according
to Keva Hylton, Bahamian honorary counsel.

She said she initiated contact with medical students at the
University of the West Indies (UWI), who indicated “everyone
is okay”, although “people are tense because of the uncer-
tainty.”

“Tf there is no necessity to travel to Kingston it is advanta-
geous not to travel, but there are other parts of Jamaica where
it is perfectly safe to travel to. We are asking Bahamians who
are living in Jamaica to register so we know exact numbers and
know where they are. We are going to monitor the situation on

SEE page 11



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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ZNS WORKERS walked off the job for a few minutes in protest yesterday after reports surfaced that a substantial cut to the corporation’s sub-
sidy is included in this year’s government budget, to be revealed today. Some of the workers said they heard that ZNS funding could be cut

by as much as 50 per cent.

Arhitration committee

to oversee stalled COB

AN arbitration committee :
has been appointed to over- :
see the stalled negotiations :
between College of the :
Bahamas management and :
union officials over a new :
industrial agreement for }

COB faculty.

Heading the committee is :
Rector of St Matthew’s :
Anglican Church, Father :
James Palacious. Represent- :
ing the college is Higgs & :
Johnson attorney Earl Cash :
and representing the Union :

Bahamas (UTEB) is BCPOU

president Robert Farquhar-

son.

ations endured for more than

two years with little progress :
as the talks repeatedly broke :

down amid accusations from

UTEB that COB had been

negotiating in “bad faith.”
The union has also ques-

SEE page eight

PM: Tough budget necessary

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham expects many peo-
ple will be unhappy with the
budget his administration will
present to Parliament today
but said the tough measures
are necessary to restore finan-
cial headroom for the ailing





economy. Without getting into
specifics, Mr Ingraham told
The Tribune that "significant"
tax increases will be included
in the 2010/2011 Budget pre-
sentation — presumably meant
to put a dent in the country's
hefty debt estimated by the
Central Bank to be around
$3.9 billion at the end of 2009.

SEE page eight



Wilchcombe: PLP not opposed to salary cuts

of Tertiary Educators of the : By PAUL G TURNQUEST

: Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



Stormy bi-partisan negoti-

OPPOSITION business leader in
: the House of Assembly Obie Wilch-
combe said the PLP would not be
: opposed to the planned salary cuts
: for Parliamentarians and Ministers
: of the government which are expect-
: ed to be presented before Parliament
: today.

SEE page eight

OBIE WILCHCOMBE





TV reporter fired
after alleged assault of

ambassador's chauffeur

A New York City TV
reporter has been fired from
his job after he was charged
with assaulting the chaffeur
of the Bahamian Ambas-
sador to the United Nations.

Vince DeMentri, 46, an
employee of WPIX/Chan-
nel 11, surrendered to the
New York Police Depart-
ment after Hurley
Senanayake, 54, driver for
Dr Paulette Bethel, told offi-
cers the ex-news reporter
slapped him across the face
during a dispute over a park-
ing space near the U.N.

Mr Senanyake was report-
edly waiting in a “press
only” parking zone to pick
up Dr Bethel last Friday
when former NBC10 anchor
Mr DeMentri became angry
that he could not find any-
where to stop, according to
several New York City

SEE page eight





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Rayan

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te en eee renee
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4 eh SE







NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Pr ae
MCT a

ST Re

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



DESPITE coming under
heavy fire from critics over sev-
eral controversial government
projects, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said he has no regrets
about his administration's deci-
sion to relocate
the container
port to Arawak
Cay, to limit the
flow of traffic on
Baillou Hill Road
to a one-way sys-
tem and to con-
struct new road-
ways near Saun-
ders Beach.

" (I'm)
absolutely satis-
fied. Saunders Beach will be a
wonderful thing, I had great
opposition to Goodman's Bay
and when it's done, it's beauti-
ful — not a word (said) about
what a wonderful thing it is.
And the same thing will hap-
pen at Saunders Beach, same
thing is happening at the Bail-
lou Hill Road improvement
programme they're doing, same
thing will happen at Arawak
Cay," Mr Ingraham told The
Tribune when asked if he
feared the “noise in the mar-
ket” over the projects could
cost his party votes in the next
general election.

He continued: "The reason
why I'm here is presumably
because people believe that I
have a vision, that I am willing
to consider different points of
view and that we are willing to
do what we think is best for the
Bahamas and take account of
views that are contrary to ours,
but at the end of the day to
make decisions that we per-
ceive to be in the national inter-
est."

In the past few weeks, sev-
eral disgruntled business own-
ers and residents of the Bail-
lou Hill Road area have called
for the reversal of a one-way
system for Baillou Hill Road
and Market Street — part of the
New Providence Road
Improvement Project — claim-
ing they are suffering inconve-
niences and a significant
decrease in profits due to the
construction.

Government's decision to
relocate the downtown con-
tainer port to Arawak Cay and
the roadwork at Saunders
Beach have also elicited some
outcry, most notably from
members of the Opposition, the
Progressive Liberal Party.



Hubert
Ingraham

Fine Threads

oh comer











Mies



said they “absolutely” do not have
plans to go ahead with cutting
through the beach.





BAHA Mar has confirmed that
it has ditched plans to cut a canal
through Cable Beach for its multi-
billion dollar resort property.

Despite recent artistic renderings
of the project in the media clearly
showing a canal through the beach
entering the property, and state-
ments from senior management
that the project would be built
largely in accordance with “origi-
nal” designs, the resort’s developers

Senior vice-president of external
affairs for Baha Mar Robert Sands
told The Tribune yesterday:

Waterways

“There will be internal water-
ways (within the resort) but there
will be absolutely no cutting
through the shoreline to create
access to the waterways.”

Mr Sands said the resort in fact

Baha Mar: No plans to cut canal through Cable Beach

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

dropped plans to create the canal
“very early on in the project” after
the government “said it would be a
difficult position to support.”

Any renderings being used in the
local media which show canal
access to the hotel property — such
as on ZNS during its recent live
broadcasts from the Cable Beach
property — are outdated, he
explained.

The government has previously
stated that for environmental rea-
sons it would no longer support the
creation of canals by cutting
through beaches in the Bahamas.





REDUNDANT WORKERS WITHOUT SEVERANCE PAY FOR MORE THAN A YEAR

Former Clico
employees to
march on
Parliament

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Clico employ-
ees suffering without sever-
ance pay for more than a year
will march on Parliament
today demanding attention
from Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham as he discloses the
2010/11 budget.

The 248 workers were
issued promissory notes
detailing the severance pay-
ment they were entitled to
when the company was forced
into liquidation in April 2009.
They have yet to receive a
cent of the $3 million they are
collectively owed.

Many have been unable to
find employment since losing
their jobs 13 months ago and
have been struggling to make
ends meet, former employees
said at a press conference yes-
terday.

They described how many
of them lost their homes when
they were unable to make
mortgage payments, their cars
were reclaimed, and they
were forced to pull their chil-

a
Us

We tis)
Ml aaa



dren out of private schools
because they were no longer
able to pay the fees.

Yet the redundant workers
have been ignored by the
prime minister, his govern-
ment and the opposition,
despite the fact their penni-
less fate was no fault of their
own, they said.

“Clico took away our jobs,
our earning powers, our liveli-
hood, and simply threw us to
the side,” said Clico execu-
tive of 17 years Jackline Brice.

Watchdog

“It was the government’s
responsibility to be our watch-
dog, so we hold them totally
responsible.

“Yet we are the ones who
are suffering, while they add
insult to injury by refusing to
communicate with us.

“They are standing in the
House of Assembly talking
about wetlands and stray
dogs, and we are hurting.

“We want the prime min-
ister to know we are serious
and if we have to be radical,





|
a 6d

ert

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



FORMER CLICO MANAGER Virginia Outten yesterday called on the Bahamian public to support their march

on Parliment.

we will be radical.” Liquidator
Craig Gomez warned last
month that the liquidation of
Clico (Bahamas) and its Clico
Enterprises affiliate in
Trinidad will be complex
owing partly to poor record
keeping by the latter.

However New National
Development Party (NDP)
member Paul Moss said he
understands Mr Gomez has
made payments to those
affected by the Clico closure
during the liquidation process
and should therefore be able
to give former employees
interim payments at the very
least.

“This is a good opportunity
for the government, in its
budget, to speak to these peo-
ple, comfort these people,”
Mr Moss said.

“And to speak to the banks
and mortgage houses and let
them know these are difficult

Christian Council
not to legalise the numbers business

ie eel mel)

facebook
ieee een



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Christian
Council expressed its pleasure
yesterday at the government’s
decision not to legalise the
numbers business at this time.

In a statement issued after
the government announced it
had shelved plans to legalise
the numbers business despite
initial assessments determining
that it could bring $30 million to
$40 million in revenue into the
public treasury annually, the
BCC said the decision is “a
good step” and one “in the
right direction.”

The church organisation also
stressed that “fundamental
long-term changes” are need-
ed if the country is to get
through its present economic
predicament, which Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham has indi-

times and they cannot put
people out on the streets.”

He said a commission of
inquiry should be held to
determine how Clico’s melt-
down came to pass.

Former Clico executive
David Turnquest noted the
irony of his 26 years spent
protecting Clico policyhold-
ers, only to be left stranded
without a safety net.

Criminality

He said: “I have been com-
mitted to ensuring clients
have something to fall back
on, and that has been pulled
from beneath me and there
has been nothing from the
government.

“This type of environment
will breed criminality — when
aman can’t feed his children,
what would he do?”

Virginia Outten, a former

applauds

cated to be quite dire, with the
government having difficulty
finding the money to fund
essential services.

Referring to the gambling
question, the Bahamas Christ-
ian Council (BCC) held that a
country addicted to gambling
and “all the social ills that are
inextricably tied to it” con-
demns its people and genera-
tions to come to a society “void
of creativity and productivity.”

Evil

As an “instrument created
by God”, government should
“secure each person and their
property, equality of justice
between individuals, and con-
strain the forces of evil in civil
society,” the BCC said.

Suggesting that the legalisa-
tion of the numbers business
would encourage more

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



Clico manager, added: “We
are demanding the prime
minister pay us some atten-
tion. We are prepared to fight
and we are going to fight until
we can’t fight no more — we
want the money we’re enti-
tled to.”

Thomas Bastian of the
Trade Union Congress
(TUC) said foreign compa-
nies should be required to put
down bonds to cover their
assets and protect Bahamian
workers in the event of the
company’s demise.

“T think it’s time to demon-
strate that enough is enough,
and do not stop until your
money is delivered, because
what you are striving for is
what you already worked
for,” he said.

“There is no question that
they owe you — the question is
when you will receive what
they owe you.”

decision

Bahamians to gamble —-
although it is widely recognised
that thousands of Bahamians
from all areas of society do so
at present, and generally with
impunity — the BCC said that
“laws shape society” and
“human beings generally fol-
low the laws that are set in a
society.”

The government stated over
the weekend that it has encoun-
tered strong opinions on both
sides of the debate for and
against the legalisation of num-
bers and would put off further
consideration of the issue until
a referendum can be held after
the next general election. The
prime minister met with the
BCC last month to discuss the
possibility of legalising the
numbers business.

Speaking to the country’s
financial situation, the BCC
said: “There are some funda-
mental long-term changes that
are required. These adjust-
ments may not be considered
favourable in the short-term
but are critical to our overall
long-term well-being and sus-
tainability.”

“The Bahamas Christian
Council pledges our support to
the government to assist with
the sensitising of our people to
the need for such measures to
be implemented.

“We would also be very will-
ing to participate in any nation-
al discussion to devise a nation-
al plan for the long-term sus-
tainability of the Bahamian
economy,” the BCC said.

The organisation suggested
that think-tanks with a diverse
membership could also help
devise solutions to the coun-
try’s economic challenges by
“coming up with alternative
solutions to produce and cre-
ate wealth in our country.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



PROSECUTION and defence attor-
neys presented their closing arguments
yesterday in the trial of two brothers
charged in the June 2002 murder of
Mario Miller.

Senior Justice Jon Isaacs is expected
to give his summation this morning
before sending the jury to deliberate.

Ricardo Miller, alias "Tamar Lee";
and Ryan Miller, alias "Manny", are
charged with the murder. The victim,
son of businessman and former MP
Leslie Miller, was found dead in bushes
near the Winton Super Value food store
on Saturday, June 22, 2002, his body
having suffered multiple stab and chop
wounds.

In her closing argument, Deputy
Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethell said the prosecution had
presented sufficient evidence to prove



"I Ryan and Ricardo
es tee. Miller's guilt
beyond a reason-
able doubt. She
described Mario’s
murder as
“heinous, tragic
and senseless
killing”.

Mrs Bethell said
the accused had
told a series of
“lies” when giving
their unsworn
statements last Fri-
day.

She noted that the prosecution’s case
is based on circumstantial evidence
which fits together like a jigsaw puzzle.

Mrs Bethell described Ricardo Miller
as a “pathological liar” and said the
Jamaican assailant he referred to in his
unsworn statement simply does not exist.

She also said that during his state-
ment, Ricardo Miller had been “bold”

AS) | 3 mina

and “brassy” when speaking about his
drug transactions.

The prosecutor went on to affirm that
Ryan Miller was also responsible for
Mario’s murder, noting that the victim’s
blood was found in his car — the same car
believed to have been seen at Yamacraw
on the day of the murder.

Mrs Bethell described Ryan Miller as
the “facilitator and negotiator,” stating
that the two brothers had planned to
take drugs from Mario, who they
described as “soft.”

She pointed out that according to a
statement Ryan Miller gave police, his
brother had placed brown taped pack-
ages of cocaine in the trunk of the car
and had given Ryan a “key” of cocaine
— which the prosecutor claimed was pay-
ment for taking part in the murder.

Dorsey McPhee, attorney for Ricardo
Miller, reminded the jury that the pros-
ecution has to prove its case beyond a
reasonable doubt.

Noting that the prosecution’s case is

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 3

Closing arguments in Mario Miller tria

built on circumstantial evidence, he stat-
ed: “Our circumstances are better than
their circumstances.”

Mr McPhee claimed that police had
been under pressure to solve the murder
of a Cabinet Minister’s son and accused
lead investigator Sergeant Michelet
Meronard of fabricating the accuseds’
statements, and mixing bits and pieces of
fact to make a case.

Attorney Richard Bootle, who rep-
resents Ryan Miller, said: “Mario
deserves justice, his family deserves jus-
tice. Justice can only come if we get the
truth.”

He said his client should not be con-
demned solely because he has been
charged and now sits in the prisoner’s
dock.

Mr Bootle submitted that the prose-
cution did not even come close to prov-
ing its case against his client. He claimed
prosecution witness Nadia Rolle lied to
police and questioned which of the two
statements she gave officers was true.

Students expected to he
charged over stabbing

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO students are expected
to be charged shortly in con-
nection with the stabbing of
three fellow CI Gibson Senior
High School students last week,
police have confirmed.

The three injured students —
two 16-year-olds and one 15-
year-old — all survived the
ordeal which took place at
around 11.20am last Thursday
and have now been discharged
from hospital. Three 11th grade
students were taken into cus-
tody in connection with the
attack, which allegedly
stemmed from an argument
over a girl to whom two of the
boys may have been “connect-
ed”, acccording to Director of
Education Lionel Sands.

Another 10 students from
grade eleven were arrested for

fighting on the day in question.
All have now been released
“pending further inquiries”,
said police liaison officer
Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings.
Sgt Skippings said the stu-
dents are likely to be charged,

Police quiz three men
about double murder

OT CAKE say:

—| CRIME “it not this week then some
THE BAHAMAS’ VERY OVVN STREET PHILOSOPHER SCENE: | time early next week”.
Inquiries CI Gibson was put on lock-
continue own by its Principal Elaine
into the Williams shortly after the stab-
double bings took place.

der i Concerned parents gathered
Murder in | outside the school gates calling
: or the release of their children,

Baharia, | {ot the release of their child

fearing they may get caught up
in retaliatory attacks when the
school day came to a close.



By | DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Transform Any Bedroom
With A Beautiful Selections Of
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ing them with their investiga-
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South Bahamia.

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known as Sylvano Blanc, or f#

“American”, 37, and Kenrick eee = —
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SUP

were shot dead early Sunday
morning.

Police are still trying to
determine the motive for the
shooting.

Both victims were discov-
ered in a blue Ford Expedi-
tion SUV with multiple gun-
shot injuries.

According to reports, the
shooting occurred around
6am near the Hamptons
Apartments.

When officers arrived at the
scene, they found a blue SUV
parked at the entrance gate
to the apartment complex
with the engine still running.

The driver of the SUV was
pronounced dead at the scene
and the passenger died later
at the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital. Their deaths bring
Grand Bahama’s murder
count to five for the year. The
murder count for the entire
Bahamas currently stands at
35.







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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Lessons to be learned from Jamaica

THERE ARE many lessons that
Bahamians, including politicians, can
learn from the alarming situation in
Jamaica. It was reported late yesterday
that at least 30 persons were killed by
that country’s well armed criminal ele-
ment, now challenging the state’s
attempt to arrest their drug lord “pres-
ident.”

For too long the Jamaican police and
the government have turned a blind eye
to Jamaica’s slums. Known as garrisons
they have been taken over by criminal
dons, who have turned them into their
personal kingdoms.

Everything came crashing down last
year when the US government moved to
have Dudus Coke extradited to the
United States on charges of drug and
gun running. For nine months Prime
Minister Bruce Golding’s government
fought off the request, finally capitulat-
ing and agreeing that Coke should face
a Jamaican court where the charges
against him would be evaluated for
extradition.

“Dudus” was the don, who delivered
the votes for Golding’s party from West
Kingston, so, it is obvious that he expect-
ed his “main man” to protect him in his
Tivoli Gardens fiefdom.

“Along the pitted and trash-strewn
streets of West Kingston,” reported
Associated Press yesterday, “residents
say Coke is feared for his strong-arm
tactics, but also is known for helping
out slum dwellers with grocery bills,
jobs and school fees.

“Coke solidified his authority by tak-
ing charge of punishing thieves and oth-
er criminals in the ghettos, where the
government has little presence and
police rarely, if ever, patrol.”

Today Tivoli Gardens is fortified with
barricades, protected by gangsters with
high powered rifles and supporters car-
rying placards declaring that “Jesus died
for us; we will die for Dudus.”

Here is a lesson for our own police
force. There should be no area in New

DON STAINTON»

Providence or any of our islands where
the Royal Bahamas Police Force cannot,
or do not enter frequently.

And as for our politicians if they were
wise they would be very careful of the
company they keep. In the past some of
them have had very embarrassing expe-
riences.

We recall the support that our own
home grown drug lord had when the
Americans sent for him. It was surpris-
ing the following “Ninety” Knowles had
and who were among those who turned
out to protest when he was taken to
court for his extradition hearing. Every-
one knew of his illegal activities, of his
own gangs and his own orders that were
executed, yet when the time came to
pay the piper, all we heard was how
Ninety fed his neighbours, paid the
school fees and took care of his com-
munity. And so, like Dudus, when the
time came his supporters gathered
round, and marched to the court. Nine-
ty’s generosity had solidified him in their
hearts and their community, and despite
their proud boast that this is a “God
fearing” nation, Ninety was one man
who could break the Ten Command-
ments, yet still demand their loyalty.
Today he is all but forgotten in a prison
cell in the US.

We also recall how drug dealers under
the Pindling administration, rightly or
wrongly, considered the PLP their par-
ty. They agitated for the day when the
PLP would be returned to power so that
they could get back to “the trade.” As a
matter of fact the rumour around
Eleuthera during the 2002 election was
that as soon as the PLP won, the deal-
ers’ fast-boats would be in the water,
and they would return to their illicit
trade. Fortunately, it did not work out
that way. But, it certainly should have
taught the politicians a lesson.

What is now happening to Prime Min-
ister Golding in Jamaica should under-
score for all what can happen when one
plays fast and loose with law breakers.



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THE TRIBUNE

Responding to
Bishop Laish Boyd
ambling

On

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write in response to the
Anglican Church’s position
on legalising the numbers
business in The Bahamas that
was expressed recently by
Bishop Laish Boyd.

The Bishop said that: “By
enacting legislation legalising
numbers, the government
would be ‘opening the flood-
gates’ to the lowering of stan-
dards and values, and it would
be doing so for financial rea-
sons, so that it can make mon-
ey from the numbers busi-
ness.”

He stated further in a pas-
toral letter dated May 12 that:
“In short, it promotes values
that are harmful to the moral
fiber of our communities. It
would be a mistake to affirm
this subculture by legalising
it at a time when there are so
many negative influences on
the society, and when our
community is suffering from a
lack of values.

“In matters of this kind the
government has the constitu-
tional and moral responsibili-
ty to protect the value base
of the country.

“Many persons who play
numbers regularly become
obsessed with finding the
right number and wait anx-
iously to see which number
will fall. It becomes a con-
suming force, often dictating
every other area of that per-
son's life. Most Christian
moralists agree that the real
danger in gambling lies exact-
ly in this kind of excess.

“Persons who can ill afford
to are often the biggest users,
abusers, and losers,” Bishop
Boyd said. “It forms a false
and unreliable foundation
upon which to base one’s per-
sonal finances. It encourages
what seems to be a short cut
approach to financial security
rather than through the prin-
ciples of Christian or other
forms of stewardship.”

“Tt preys on those who can-
not discipline themselves in
these areas. Often there is a
higher call to the funds used,
ie, persons need to spend that
money on more basic and
important things, but do not.

“Tt goes against the princi-
ples of Christian stewardship.
Life cannot be simply about
chance where so many peo-
ple lose and only a few win.
This is what the numbers
game typifies. We need to be
promoting culture and activi-
ties that are based on plan-
ning and productivity, pur-
pose and positive advance-
ment. Stewardship calls us to
acknowledge what we have,
and to build on it construc-
tively and incrementally to
accomplish higher goals.

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



“To argue that such a law
cannot be enforced is to
recognise that some of the
things that we say about our-
selves are sadly true; in other
words, how can we enforce it
by an across the board multi-
agency, multi-department
effort when too many of our
best beloved citizens are lazy,
dishonest, unwilling to do a
full day’s work for a full day’s
pay, unwilling to stand for
principle, too willing to look
the other way, too easily
bought for a few dollars, and
are prepared to accept medi-
ocrity.

“Tn spite of the widespread
acceptance of playing num-
bers, the Anglican Church
opposes it, never mind how
many persons see no harm in
legalising it. In spite of how
many persons there are who
support it, we say that such
would be a bad move for the
moral fabric of our society
and far more devastating in
its long-term effects than any
monetary or taxation advan-
tage that can be gained in the
short-term.”

I really don’t understand
the Bishop’s logic and sense
of reasoning in this instance.
How moral is it to have gam-
bling legalised for tourists in
The Bahamas, and not for
Bahamians?

How moral is it to have an
unconstitutional law on our
books that sanctions casino
gambling for guests of our
country, and not for Bahami-
ans?

How moral is it to allow the
illegal numbers business in
The Bahamas to flourish for
decades unabated and virtu-
ally unchallenged, and to the
point of no return — because
of protection and condona-
tion in high places; and to sud-
denly wake up on day and say
it’s immoral to make a wrong
right?

This is a secular society
Bishop, and the government
has a duty to do the right
things in the interest of the
people and the social order.
The time has come to legalise

the culture of number buying
and gambling generally in The
Bahamas. It’s the decent thing
to do, Bishop, and the major-
ity of the Bahamian public
agrees with it in my view.

We all need to take respon-
sibility for our actions, and be
wise in our daily living. If the
man who works all week
wants to drink out his pay —
that’s his business; if he wants
to gamble it out, so be it.

If he wants to spend it all
on women — that’s his pre-
rogative. If a woman who
works all month wants to buy
clothes and shoes with her
salary — then let her live with
her new attire, Bishop.

Yes, Bishop, we all will
have to account eventually for
our deeds; and Jesus Christ
did not come here to over-
throw the worldly authority.
My understanding of Christ’s
mission here on earth — is to
offer us a better way and eter-
nal life in his name.

He did not come here to
tell us what to do or how to
live, because free choice is
God’s greatest gift to man in
my opinion. Therefore, no
bishop, priest, rabbi and so
on are ethically qualified to
dictate to a people on how
they should live. Rather, the
sharing and dispersion of the
good news of Jesus Christ
should be their focus.

If the church in The
Bahamas was spiritually,
socially and morally effective,
we would have a more peace-
ful, respectable and civilly
upright society. We appear to
have a nation of mullahs and
ayatollahs who want to tell us
how to govern our society and
life. The Bishop and other
prominent religious leaders
in The Bahamas are on the
wrong tract as it relates to the
work of God; because Jesus
Christ has stated that his king-
dom is not of this world.
Preach and demonstrate the
good news of the gospels, and
render to Caesar all that’s
Caesar’s, Bishop.

We the people want to
gamble legally in our beloved
country and we want our gov-
ernment to facilitate this.
Amen.

DENNIS A DAMES
Nassau,
May 21, 2010.

Jamaica must embrace Christianity

WT TMU Dat Tt

EDITOR, The Tribune.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

May 21, 2010.



Re: Time to get control of the ‘garrisons’.
The Tribune, May 20, 2010

Jamaica cannot hope for its crime situation to improve,
until it becomes a Christian country — like The Bahamas.







OO
JOB VACANCY

Bahamas Hot Mix Co. Limited seeks to fill the

position of Entry

Level

Accounting Clerk.

All applicants should posses the following:

« Accounting/booking experience.
* The ability to assist with various accounting

transactions

¢ Strong computer skills and experience in
accounting software programs.

* Working knowledge of Microsoft office
programs especially Microsoft Excel.

* The ability to learn quickly.

* An outgoing, friendly personality

* Excellent communication and team work

skills.

¢ Strong organizational and analytical skills with the
ability to work independently.

* The ability to manage multiple projects and
responsibilities simultaneously.

Interested persons should submit their resumes to:

Bahamas Hot Mix Co. Limited
HR Department
P.O. Box CB-10990
Nassau, Bahamas

Or via e-mail to:

tmunnings@bhm.bs and dlane@bhm.bs
All resumes must be received by_2nd_ June 2010.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 5

Ga

POLICE REPORTS

Arawak Cay
Shooting: Two
discharged
from hospital

TWO of the three peo-
ple shot at Arawak Cay on
Monday evening were dis-
charged from hospital yes-
terday, while a 41-year-old
woman is still receiving
medical treatment and
remains in “stable condi-
tion”.

Police yesterday con-
firmed that two women
and one man all received
gun shot wounds to their
legs while at the “Wet and
Mad” party at Arawak
Cay.

According to police
press liaison Sergeant
Chrislyn Skippings, two
women - 26 and 41 years
old - and one 18-year-old
man were the victims.

Police were unable to
provide anymore details on
the circumstances of the
shooting that resulted in
their injuries, and up to
press time no one had been
taken into custody in con-
nection with the matter.

Police investigations
continue.

Three teens and
man in hospital
after stabbings

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

THREE teenagers and
one man are in hospital fol-
lowing two separate stab-
bing incidents on New Prov-
idence and Grand Bahama.

In Nassau, police were
called to the scene of a stab-
bing on Frederick Street, off
Bay Street, at around
3.30am yesterday.

According to reports, the
victim got into an altercation
with a group of men, which
resulted in him being
stabbed to the right side of
his neck.

Stable

The man was taken to
hospital via private vehicle,
where he is listed in stable
condition.

Police are questioning
two men in connection with
this incident.

In Freeport, three
teenagers were injured in a
stabbing incident at Taino
Beach on Monday.

Sometime around 8.25pm
police received reports that
a fight broke out and that
three young men were
stabbed “about the body”.

The victims, aged 18 and
19, were taken to the Rand
Memorial Hospital for treat-
ment.

Two are listed in stable
condition and one is listed in
“guarded” condition.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said police are investigating
the matter.



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your
story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Demonstration planned today

against one-way roa

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



FRUSTRATED residents and busi-
ness owners on Baillou Hill Road and
Market Street are planning to hold a
demonstration against the new one-way
road system today.

Yesterday, the National Development
Party (NDP) threw its support behind
the protesters — saying the changes
“don’t make any sense”; have made the
area less safe; and are wreaking havoc
on small businesses.

At a press conference held in the
area yesterday morning, NDP deputy
chairman Rashad Amahad said: “We
warn the FNM and the PLP that we will
not sit by while this is going on and be
silent. Parliament, as a result of the arro-
gance and seemingly self-serving inter-
ests of the parliamentarians, has lost its
way and seems not to be interested in
the people that are affected by this
change.”

Despite several public demonstrations
against the road changes organised by







ee



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MOTORISTS experience frustration with the one-way system.

the newly formed Coconut Grove Busi-
ness League, which boasts a member-
ship of more than 60 business owners,
the government has remained resolute —
saying the changes are vital to its strat-
egy for alleviating the traffic jams that
plague the capital.

Today’s demonstration is expected to
begin at 8.15am at the Southern Recre-
ation Ground and end with a march on
parliament.

At a town meeting held last month
to discuss the new road system, Minister
of Works and Transport Neko Grant

system

made it clear that the government would
not reverse the changes.

He blamed the problems being faced
by businesses on the ongoing roadworks,
and said business would improve once
the work is done.

But the NDP is demanding the imme-
diate reversal of the one-way system.
Mr Amahad said: “To continue bull-
headed is contrary to good governance.
In fact, government ought to be for the
people by the people. And it is the peo-
ple’s will to have two-way traffic flows.”

NDP officials said that if elected, the
party would reverse the changes, and
replace them with a dual-carriageway
system in another area where it will be
less disruptive to the community.

The party is currently focused on gath-
ering resources and recruiting candi-
dates for the next general election. The
NDP expects to challenge all 41 seats.

Mr Amahad implored interested per-
sons to get involved with the party so
they can participate in its primary
debates, which will precede the first-
ever NDP convention later this year.

Tommy Turnquest to attend high-level Caribbean-US Summit

By MATT MAURA



NATIONAL Security Min-
ister Tommy Turnquest will be
one of 15 national security
and/or home affairs ministers
from the Caribbean Communi-
ty who will meet with US offi-
cials in Washington, DC,
tomorrow for the inaugural
Caribbean-United States High-
Level Security Cooperation
Dialogue.

He will join CARICOM
counterparts to discuss three
“strategic priorities.”

—-

a

wt

ft." ee ae pee +

Le. “LAL AL _
_ al fer Fee
tag

They are scheduled to meet
with US Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham-Clinton, US
Attorney-General Eric Hold-
er, US Secretary of the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security
Janet Napolitano, and US
Assistant Secretary of State for
Western Hemispheric Affairs
Arturo Valenzuela.

The three strategic priorities
that have been identified by
both sides to be discussed
encompass ways on which to
substantively reduce illicit traf-
ficking, including the illicit traf-

a

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/

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ficking of narcotic drugs and
small arms and light weapons,
money-laundering and human
trafficking.

Safety

Also on the agenda are the
issues of advancing public safe-
ty and security — including
crime and violence, border
security, counter-terrorism,
criminal gangs, criminal depor-
tees, and natural and other dis-
asters — and establishing efforts
to further promote social jus-
tice.

Observers representing part-
ner nations and international
organisations, including Cana-
da, Colombia, France, the
Netherlands, the United King-
dom and the United Nations
Office on Drugs and Crime
(UNODC) will also participate
in the Dialogue.

“Plans for the Dialogue
gained momentum from the

pronouncement by United
States President Barack Oba-
ma during the Fifth Summit of
the Americas held in Trinidad
and Tobago in April, 2009,”
national security officials said
yesterday. “President Obama
indicated that, through practical
initiatives based on a mutually
beneficial partnership, the Unit-
ed States would seek to develop
a more balanced relationship
with the Caribbean region.”

National Security officials
said Caribbean and US gov-
ernment officials have met four
times since President Obama’s
announcement to “jointly
define and develop the goals
and scope of the Dialogue.”

The Dialogue is intended to
create a framework in which
the undertaking “may be car-
ried forward” in the area of
security cooperation.

Mr Turnquest and Perma-
nent Secretary Missouri Sher-
man-Peter will return to New





Tommy Turnquest



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P.0.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-323-1865

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CANADIANS
RESIDING ABROAD

The Canadian High Commission in Jamaica offers a
registration for Canadians who expect to be living in
or already are living in The Bahamas for three months
or more. The service is provided in the event there is
a need to contact Canadians to offer urgent advice
during a natural disaster or civil unrest or of a family
emergency at home. The registration is voluntary and
is used for your protection and wellbeing in accordance
with The Privacy Act. If you are not yet registered
we encourage you to do so as soon as possible. You
should register online at www.voyage.gc.ca . Knowing
accurately the number of Canadian Citizens in a given
country is a critical element in establishing contingency
plans to be used during any crisis.

Always remember to obtain and protect your passport
which you should use to enter Canada.

CANADIENS
RESIDANT a LETRANGER

Le Haut Commissariat du Canada en Jamaique offre
la possibilite de s’enregistrer aux Canadiens qui
prevoient de vivre ou qui vivent deja aux Bahamas
pour une periode de trois mois et plus.Le service est
particulierement utilie dans le cas ou il y a un besoin
de communiquer urgemment avec les canadiens afin
de leur offrir des conseils lors d’une catastrophe
naturelle,de troubles civils ou d’une urgence familiale
au Canada. L’inscription est volontaire et n’est utilisee
que pour votre protection et bien-etre en conformite
avec la Loi sur la Protection des regseigements
personnels.Si vous n’etes pas encore inscrit nous vous
encourageons a le faire des que possible. Vous devez
vous inscrire en ligne a l’adresse www.voyage.gc.ca
.Connaitre avec exactitude le nombre de citoyens
canadiens dans un pays donne est un element critique
dans 1’etablissement des plans d’urgence utilises au
cours d’une crise.

Rappelez-vous toujours d’avoir en votre possesion
et de proteger votre passport Il s’agit d’un document
essentiel qui vous permet d’entrer au Canada.

The Consulate of Canada
Shirley Street Shopping Plaza
Shirley Street
P.O. Box SS-6371
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 393-2123/4
Fax: (242) 393-1305
email: cdncon@batelnet.bs



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

House blaze causes
about $35,000 damage




KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

HTM sarc
TICATR Rie
gate Peo [ets

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Employees to benefit from




























22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Memorial Service

Mrs. Jane Sandra Treco, 65

of Baycroft
Apartments, Eastern
Road, Nassau, The
Bahamas, will be held
at Chapel of Love,
Kemp's Funeral
Home Limited,
Palmdale Avenue and
Bradley Street,
Nassau, on Friday,
28th May, 2010 at

The Service will be conducted by Bahamas
Metaphysical Society Incorported.

Mrs. Treco is survived by her brothers,
Neil Hamilton and his wife Ann of Canada
and Greg Hamilton and his wife Sharon of
Canada, her aunt, Pamela Greaves of
Australia, the Treco family and many other
relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to Bahamas Metaphysical
Society Incorporated, P.O. Box N. 4182,
Nassau in memory of Mrs. Jane Sandra
Treco.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.

GREAT

B
yea.
ine/estiva



18 per cent raise over five years

FREEPORT - Firemen quickly extinguished a fire which
caused about $35,000 damage to a home on Monday.

The damage was confined to the bedroom and bathroom of
an 18-room single family home at Cross Bones Close and Booty
Drive.

According to reports, officials received a report of a fire at
about 11am and dispatched a fire truck to the area.

Smoke

On arrival, firemen observed smoke coming from a western
bedroom of the house. Two persons were attempting to extin-
guish the fire.

A vehicle that was parked outside near the bedroom was also
damaged. The home and contents were insured.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said investigations are continuing
into the cause of the fire.

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

i rs

= | Mr. Kirkwood

Malcolm, 75

of Ilsley Compound, East
|Bay Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas, died peacefully
at his residence, on
Sunday, 23rd May, 2010.



PRESIDENT of the Bahamas Commercial Stores
Supermarkets and Warehouse Workers Union, Elgin
Douglas, has welcomed the signing of a contract between
his union and Armored Car Services.

About 50 employees of Armoured Car Services will
: ; : benefit from an 18 per cent raise over a five year period
Mr. Malcolm is survived by his nephew, Malcolm | as a result of this few agreement. —
R. McKay and many friends.

Benefits
A Memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's
Presbyterian Kirk, Princes Street, Nassau, on
Saturday, 29th May, 2010 at 4:00p.m.

The industrial agreement also includes other benefits,
which cannot be disclosed due to the nature of the
armoured car industry.

However, Mr Douglas expressed his commitment to
ensuring that armoured car employees are properly rep-
resented.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.

(Calling all Seasoned (ooks, Grill
Masters & Professional (hefs:

Do you make the best Conch Fritters in The Bahamas?
Do you make a mean Grilled Conch or Fish?
Is your signature Seafood Dish the talk of the town?

Then enter your name into one of three exciting culinary competitions that are
a part of the Great Bahamian Seafood & Wine Festival on Saturday, May 29th,
2010.Win Cash Prizes and bragging rights of being the best in The Bahamas!

Entry ‘Form ——————cK«

Name:

Organization (if applicable}:
Tal: (primary {cell
Email;

Category of Competition (check one 1 category only)

__ Conch Fritters _ Gill Masters ___ Signature Dish
Name of Dish:

Featured Ingredient:

My signature below indicates my compliance with the rules

aed policies of the Great Eahartian Seafead & Wine Festival
Signature:
Date

FESTIVAL ENTRY CHECKLIST
__ Reviewed Rules and Procedures

Entry is Free!
Win Cash Prizes!

Win Medals and
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_— Completed Entry Fonm
_ Copy of Valid Health Certificate

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



(Conch fritter |Gr
COMPETITION

QPEM TG:
ALL SEASONED COOKS

ull “Masters | Signature ‘Dish

COMPETITION COMPETITION

OPEN TO: OPEN TO
ALL SEASONED COOKS PROFESSIONAL CHEFS ONLY

Entry Form and Rules & Procedures are also available online for download at
www.downtownnassau.org or at www.tourismtoday.com.

Or for a hard copy, please contact the Downtown Nassau Partnership Office on
Market Street (North) at Tel. (242) 326-0992 or the Culinary & Hospitality
Management Institute on Thompson Blvd. at Tel: (242) 323-5804 or 323-6804.

Please return completed Entry Form to: Downtown Nassau Partnership Offices
on Market Street (North) by hand or by Fax at (242) 323-2998 or by Email at
seafood@downtownnassau.org.

ms MUST be

ted on or before Thursday,







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Sushi — the ultimate seafood experience

By LARRY SMITH

Pores Nassau restau-
rants are showcasing spe-
cial dishes and offering fixed-
price menus this week as part of
the Great Bahamian Seafood
Festival, which climaxes on Fri-
day and Saturday downtown.

My assignment was to
review a couple of them.
Options ranged from the casu-
al (Da Fish Fry and Traveller's
Rest) to the opulent (Greycliff
and the Bahamian Club). I set-
tled on Seafront Sushi and
Aqua at the British Colonial
Hilton.

For purists, the ultimate
seafood experience is Japanese.

Sashimi and sushi both
require a variety of high grade,
very fresh, raw fish — anything
from octopus to tuna. And it's
damn good for your cholesterol
level. Sashimi is thinly sliced
raw fish served with garnishes
and soy sauce. Sushi pairs the
fish with vinegared rice, and
other ingredients.

The earliest reference to
sushi in Japan was in 718, when
it was fermented fish that
smelled like blue cheese. The
sushi we are familiar with today
was created in the 1800s — a
small piece of fish served on a
pad of seasoned rice.

In Japan, sushi was sold by
street vendors until after the
Second World War, when
restaurants became popular. By
the 1960s, articles on sushi were
being published in American
lifestyle magazines. The Cali-
fornia Roll was invented by a
Los Angeles chef in 1970, and
the New York Times covered
the gala opening of a sushi bar
in 1972.

Over the past 30 years, sushi
has gradually transformed itself
from an exotic ethnic specialty
into rarefied haute cuisine, and
has lately become one of the
most ubiquitous culinary choic-
es around the world. In Nassau
there are now four sushi restau-
rants (Nobu, Ichiban, Indigo
and Seafront).

But many Bahamians still
roll their eyes at the mere men-
tion of the word — including
some of the staff at Seafront.
This has always seemed rather
strange to me, considering that
strombus gigas sashimi (or
scorched conch) is one of our
most popular delicacies.

Although Seafront Sushi is
barely a decade old, its new
location on East Bay Street has
a much longer history. The
original house was built around
1900 and called Seaway. Its 18-
inch thick, cut limestone exte-
rior walls are almost the only
part of the original house (built
by a merchant named John Pin-
der) that remains.

Ron Lightbourn's family
owned Seaway from the 1930s
until the early 1950s, when
famed photographer Stanley
Toogood bought it. After oper-
ating a studio and camera store
on Bay Street for a number of
years, Toogood moved his busi-
ness to Seaway in the early
1980s. After his death in 1987,
the business was operated by
his sons — Andrew and Mike.

Tom and Debbie Wong
acquired the property in 2005
and invested hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars to convert it
into the "dress casual" Japan-
ese restaurant it is today.

Tom's father came to the
Bahamas in the 1950s from Chi-
na, as a chef for the old Golden
Dragon Restaurant. Although
born in Nassau, Tom was raised
in California and when he
returned in the 1990s to take
over the family food store busi-
ness, he was disappointed at the
lack of restaurant choices.

"T always liked cooking, and
my wife's brother, who man-
aged restaurants in Florida,
agreed to help set things up and
train staff," he recalled. "We
opened just before 9/11 and had
a real struggle for the first three
years. Bahamians were not into
sushi back then, so we were
throwing food away. When
Nobu opened on Atlantis, sushi
became chic and demand
picked up."

During the festival week,
Seafront is offering a fixed price
menu at lunch and dinner. For
$30 you can get an appetizer
with a sushi platter (featuring
cooked or raw ingredients),
tempura ice cream and a glass
of sweet Japanese Umeshu
(plum wine).

FEE AEE

Preena McCLEAN,
of Yellow Elder, has
been working in the dining
room at the British Colonial
Hilton for the past 10 years and
will be able to guide you
through their interesting menu.
Now re-branded as Aqua, the
restaurant underwent a full
makeover last fall, together
with the adjacent Bullion
Lounge — which claims to have





—_— a

FOR PURISTS,

al

the ultimate seafood experience is Japan





ese. Many

Bahamians, however, still roll their eyes at the mention of the word

sushi.



Over the past 30
years, sushi has
gradually trans-
formed itself from
an exotic ethnic spe-
cialty into rarefied
haute cuisine, and
has lately become
one of the most
ubiquitous culinary
choices around the
world.



the largest rum selection in the
country.

One of Aqua's pluses is the
fact that you can choose
between an extensive Bahami-
an buffet as well as a variety of
a la carte seafood entrees.
Select a table by the window
and you can enjoy an interest-
ing harbour view while you
dine. The expansive dining area
features restrained art deco
styling.

In fact, the entire experience
at the British Colonial is remi-
niscent of a time when
steamships anchored off the bar
and white-jacketed gentlemen
cooled off with Colony cock-
tails while the ladies sipped
champagne punch. Back in the
1920s this hotel was the epi-
centre of Nassau society dur-
ing the heyday of prohibition
and upscale winter tourism.

Managed by Hilton Hotels
since the late 1990s, the British
Colonial is one of the most his-
toric properties on the island. It
was occupied by Fort Nassau
from 1695 and later used as a
barracks for the West india
Regiment. The site was
acquired in 1898 by Florida
developer Henry Flaglar who
built a large wooden hotel
called the Colonial.

Fire

When that building was
destroyed by fire in 1922 the
hotel was quickly reconstructed
by the New York-based Mun-
son Steamship Line, which
hired hundreds of Bahamian
and West Indian artisans. It re-
opened with great fanfare in
1923 as the New Colonial
Hotel.

As a 1926 advertisement
proclaimed, the hotel was "The
centre of Nassau's social life
(with) hundreds of rooms com-
manding magnificent panora-
mas of islands, sea and sky—
and the society of people of dis-
tinction.”

Canadian millionaire Sir
Harry Oakes acquired the hotel
on a whim in 1932, and follow-
ing his celebrated — and still
unsolved — murder in 1943 it
was owned by the Oakes estate
for more than half a century,
operating under various hospi-
tality brands. In 1997 new
Canadian owners invested
more than $70 million to
restore the iconic building to
its original grandeur.

Aqua's assistant manager is
Steve Glasgow, who arrived
four years ago from Tobago via
Grand Cayman and supervises
a staff of about 30. Since 2005,
culinary production at the
Hilton has been under the over-
all command of executive chef
Kabuti Lockhart, who received
his grounding in the industry at
The Bahamas Hotel Training
College.

Kabuti's guava ice cream
was a big hit at the recent
Hands For Hunger fundraiser
called Paradise Plates. The
Hilton team attracted a lot of
attention by making the ice
cream on the spot using liquid
nitrogen. The guava ice cream
was topped with a mini guava
duff and drizzled with guava
sauce.

Aqua's fixed price menu for
the seafood festival is out-
standing. For $50 (plus tip) you

can feast on their signature
seafood chowder (laden with
conch, clams, shrimp and lob-
ster and spiced with bird pepper
sherry. The entree is shrimp
scampi simmered in a wine,
lemon, garlic, basil and cream
sauce served with basmati rice
and grilled baby carrots and
asparagus. Dessert is Kaluha
Ice cream topped with cherries
and whipped cream in a Kaluha
reduction. A glass of wine is
included with the meal.

According to Vaughn
Roberts of the Downtown Nas-
sau Partnership, the idea was
"to create a signature activity in
the downtown area that could
quickly become a destination
event, drawing in thousands of
visitors and residents. We saw
seafood and wine as great
themes to build on. Other food
and wine festivals internation-
ally have become quite suc-
cessful.”

The goals of the festival are
to provide a great experience
downtown for a wide range of
people, to promote culinary
tourism and our rich marine
resources, and to develop a sus-
tainable event to help finance
other downtown activities.

This week's selection of
restaurant specials is only one
aspect of the festival. On Fri-
day, $125 will get you in to the
gala event at Jacaranda House
(circa 1840) where you can
enjoy "amazing seafood dishes
created by top chefs and a vari-
ety of wines."

This event includes music,
dancing, fireworks, an art
exhibit and a silent auction.

Saturday is festival day —a
family-friendly event at the
British Colonial waterfront site
just west of the Hilton that will
include interactive experiences,
live music performances and
culinary displays, including a
farmer's market and a kids



zone. There will also be conch
cracking, fish scaling, culinary
and mixology competitions.

The Bahamas is one of the
few territories where indige-
nous fisheries survive on a com-
mercial scale. In most other
countries of the region, for
example, conch and grouper
are commercially extinct. And
catching spiny lobster is pro-
hibited in the Florida Keys.
Industrial fishing is not allowed
in Bahamian waters.

This state of affairs provides
a good foundation for a seafood



festival to help kickstart the
redevelopment of the city of
Nassau both as a tourist attrac-
tion and as a living Bahamian
community.

APOLOGY

In the Tough Call column
of The Tribune published on
August 16, 2006 the writer used
words from which it might have
been inferred that Mrs. Ruth
Millar, Chairman of BTC’s






giftitc

» Bab



|

Evaluation and Negotiation
Team, was a participant in the
attempted “obstruction” of the
BTC Limited Privatisation
process. However, The Tribune
is satisfied that this was not the
case. We have no information
or reason to believe that Mrs
Millar acted in any manner
inconsistent with her duties as
Chairman. Accordingly, The
Tribune apologises unre-
servedly for any damage,
embarrassment or inconve-
nience caused to Mrs Millar by
the said publication.

Discount) furniture’s
aye Department

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Wilchcombe: PLP not opposed to salary cuts

Tough budget
necessary — PM

FROM page one

He also revealed plans to take a 16 per cent pay cut for one year
— along with a seven per cent cut to government ministers, and a
proposed five per cent cut for members of Parliament — as well as
promotion, hiring, increment freezes and other restrictions in the
public service which will be announced during today's budget
communication.

"This budget will not be popular with a
number of people but that's a different
story. But in terms of what we must do
for the economy of the Bahamas we are
doing the right thing, I'm absolutely satis-
fied of that. One might argue that if we
wanted to be more political we wouldn't do
some of the things we are going to do, but
we are seeking to do what we think is best
for the Bahamas and let the politics take
care of itself.”

Along with raising taxes, the new budget
will show restraint in public spending.

"We're going to seek to keep spending
at the same level as it was in this fiscal
period, which in itself is a reduction,
because when you take into account infla-



HUBERT tion, etceteras,” Mr Ingraham told The Tri-
INGRAHAM bune ahead of the Budget communication
during an interview at the Ministry of

Finance.

He noted that the stringent measures are a necessary evil to
ensuring financial stability in the long-term.

"We did the best we could to sustain the economy when the
recession hit, we're now at a stage where we have exhausted our
headroom, we must now pay and return the Bahamas to a state
where it is having less debt — less meaning as a per centum as
opposed to in absolute terms," the Free National Movement
(FNM) leader said.

When asked why government did not institute these hard-line
tactics when the recession first hit, Mr Ingraham said his adminis-
tration was lucky to be in a position to offer stimulus packages to
offset the economic turbulence.

"We were in a fortunate position that we were able to increase
government borrowing for short term, sustain living standards to
the extent we could, create as much employment as we could,
improve the infrastructure of the country to the maximum extent
possible under the circumstances and now we are going to have to
pay for it.

"We've done as much as we think we can do and now we think
we need to reverse what we've been doing,” Mr Ingraham said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LEES PARTON INVESTMENTS
LID.

— - _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LEES PARTON INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VINSON CORPORATION

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VINSON CORPORATION has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMELAND HOLDINGS
LIMITED

— *——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PRIMELAND HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FROM page one

Stressing the seriousness of the finan-
cial predicament in which the country
now finds itself, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said yesterday he would be
taking a 16 per cent pay cut in his own
salary for one year, and is calling fora
seven per cent cut for Cabinet Minis-
ters and five per cent for all other
Members of Parliament.

“If ’m willing to take a 16 per cent
cut for a year, I hope the public under-
stands that we mean business, serious
business,” Mr Ingraham said.

However, while underlining the
importance and seriousness of the cur-
rent financial situation, Mr Wilch-
combe said Mr Ingraham could also
send a strong message by reducing the
size of his “gussie mae” Cabinet.

“T think what the Prime Minister is

stating by his action is the severity of
the problems we are facing in this
country and perhaps this is a last ditch
effort to try to save an economy that is
in a critical stage and that is on its
death bed.

“You know you have four Members
of Parliament on the Opposition side
making $28,000 a year that’s just over
$100,000.

Minister

“The truth is you have a Cabinet
Minister with his cabinet salary, with
his MP salary, and with his benefits is
well over $100,000. So why don’t you
reduce some of your Cabinet Minis-
ters?

“And you have in some circum-
stances a Cabinet Minister and a Par-
liamentary Secretary — unnecessary.
You have a Cabinet Minster and a



junior minister — unnecessary. And you
have ministers who are sitting in the
Prime Minister’s office; why? You have
sO many ministers when he could
reduce the Cabinet by at least seven to
eight ministers and arrive at a workable
number that allows him to manage the
economy,” he said.

At a salary of $28,000 a year, this
five per cent cut to MPs’ salaries would
amount to a savings of $1,400 per year
per constituency.

Cabinet Ministers at a salary of
$66,000 would be cut by $4,620 on their
seven per cent marker. At a 16 per
cent cut, Mr Ingraham himself at his
Prime Minister’s salary of $86,000
would lose $13,760.

It is unknown at this time if these
cuts would be compounded to a Min-
ister’s salary and his MP’s salary or if
the government would be seeking to
use only one or the other.

Arbitration committee to oversee
Stalled COB dispute negotiations

FROM page one

tioned the accuracy of the college’s financial records, and said
last week it will not abandon its campaign for "transparency and
accountability” — even after the industrial agreement is finalised.

The college has repeatedly denied any financial misman-
agement but refused the union’s call for a forensic audit, claim-
ing that acceding to the demand would be tantamount to an
admission of wrongdoing.

Negotiations were halted on May 14 pending the appointment
of external arbitrators, in accordance with an earlier agreement
struck between the two parties and Department of Labour
officials.

It has been mutually agreed that the arbitrators should try to
conclude a final deal within seven working days, and sources say
the negotiations will resume under their supervision next week
Monday.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KIMPLEMEER INVESTMENTS
LTD.

— -,——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KIMPLEMEER INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TSAR VENTURE LIMITED

—_— -,—

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TSAR VENTURES LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OAKTREE ASSETS LTD.

— *——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OAKTREE ASSETS LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





TV reporter fired after alleged
assault of ambassador's chauffeur

FROM page one

media outlets.

The Bahamian ambassador’s limo driver stood his
ground in the altercation, but allegedly got whacked
across the face by DeMentri in response. Mr DeMentri
then “sped off” in his Audi.

The reporter was written up after Mr Senanyake
recorded his vehicle’s license plate number.

The limo driver had to be treated for a cut lip. Mr
DeMentri was charged with third degree assault and lat-
er on the same day, fired from his news job.

Mr DeMentri’s attorney, Joseph Tacopina, told the
Philadelphia Daily News that the allegations against the
ex-news reporter “are false.”





Legal Notice

NOTICE
KABARDA VENTURES LTD.

—_— -——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KABARDA VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MISTY INVESTMENTS
GROUP LTD.

— ——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MISTY INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORRSTOWN INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD.

— + —_

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of ORRSTOWN INVESTMENTS PTE.
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE
r
|
}
i
bs :
WEDNESDAY, MAY 26,

PAGE 10° Asue Draw donates $2,500 for regatta...

'O' Ferguson to
headline at NCAA
East Regional

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

Melinda
making a
name for
herself...

See page 10

a
SPORTS





2010





le

VOLLEYBALL

BAISS FINALS SET

ST Augustine’s College Big
Red Machine will play for both
the Bahamas Association of



Independent Secondary
Schools’ junior girls and boys
volleyball titles today at St
Augustine’s College.

Yesterday in the sudden
death playoffs, the Big Red
Machine rolled past the Nas-
sau Christian Academy Cru-
saders 17-15 and 17-12, while
St Andrew’s Hurricanes out-
lasted the Kingsway Academy
Saints 17-12, 12-17 and 15-9.

That sets up the one-game
junior girls championship
between St Augustine’s and St
Andrew’s.

In the junior boys sudden
death playoffs, SAC won 17-
15, 15-17 and 15-10 over St
Andrew’s, while Jordan Prince
Williams Falcons got by the
Queen’s college Comets 5-17,
17-15 and 15-12.

The junior boys champi-
onship will be played between
St Augustine’s and Jordan
Prince Williams.

The two winners will join St
Augustine’s, who captured the
senior girls title and Queen’s
College, the senior boys cham-
pions. The seniors’ series was
completed last month.

BASKETBALL

BGDBA MEETING

A MEETING pertaining to
the start of the 2010 season is
scheduled for 7pm Thursday at
D W Davis Gymnasium for all
coaches and clubs.

BASEBALL

JBLN ACTION

RESULTS of games played
over the weekend in the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau are
posted below:

Tee Ball:

The Seagrapes swept their
series against the Guineps by
beating them 18-9 Saturday.

Coach Pitch:

Sandflies defeated the Bees
14-7 on Saturday to capture

As for Smith, Rolle said
her emphasis will be on
the 200. But he said she
will be using the century
as a tune-up to ensure that
she’s ready for the longer
race.

“In my opinion, her
performance at the Con-
ference wasn’t what I had
anticipated,” said Rolle of
Smith.

“T just haven’t been
able to put my finger on what went wrong,
despite the fact that we had some bad weath-
er. But that is something we hope we can
turn around this weekend.”

Gerard Brown, the other member of the
Auburn connection, is also out with an
injury and according to Rolle, he won’t be
competing anymore for the year.

In the 4x 1 relay, White is expected to run
on the second leg in lane one of the second
of three heats for Miami with Ferguson and
Smith listed on the third and fourth legs for
Auburn in lane seven in the same heat.

And in the 4 x 4 relay, Armbrister is
pegged to run the opening leg for Auburn in
lane three in the second of three heats.

In Austin, Texas, two Grand Bahamians
could end up clashing in the men’s 400
before they come home for the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associations’
National Open Championships in June.

Demetrius, a junior at Texas A&M, is set
to run out of lane five in the first of six heats
and Latoy Williams, a junior at Texas Tech,
will be in lane one in heat four.

Karlton Rolle, a sophomore, is scheduled
to run the second leg for UCLA in lane
eight in the first of three heats in the men’s



ae

ith the NCAA Outdoor

Championships two

weeks away, a number

of Bahamian athletes

will have to go through
their regional meets in order to qualify for Fl ‘ i
the biggest collegiate meet this year.

This weekend, the athletes will be com- FERGUSON
peting at NCAA East Regional in Greens-
boro, North Carolina, and at the NCAA
West Regional in Austin, Texas.

If they qualify by finishing in the top 12 in
their respective individual events and in the
top eight as a relay team, they will advance
to the NCAA Championships that is set for
Eugene, Oregon, June 9-12.

Fresh off earning the Southeastern Con-
ference Female Runner of the Year award
after a sprint double victory last month,
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson is expected to head-
line the list of Bahamians participating in
North Carolina.

The junior, who became the third Auburn
Tiger to win the SEC Female/Athlete of the
Year award, is set to run in lane seven in the
fourth of six 100m heats.

She will be joined by her team-mate,
Grand Bahamian Nivea Smith, and Kristy
White, a senior from Miami who is all set to
open up in lane one of the first heat.

In their specialties in the 200, Smith is
slated to run out of lane four in the second
of six heats and Ferguson will be in lane six
in heat five.

Cache Armbrister and Krystal Bodie are
not entered in their individual events, the
400 and 100 hurdles respectively, and that

ae





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=>
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=
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was because of specific reasons, according to 4x1 relay. Pinder is listed to run for Texas championship
Auburn’s Bahamian assistant coach Henry A&M on the third leg in lane six in heat three games to one.
Rolle. “Krystal is hurt and Cache isjustrun- three. In the 4x 4, Williams and Texas Tech 9-10:

will run out of lane two in the first of three
heats with Pinder and Texas A&M in lane
three in the same heat.

Expected to do double duties is Lamar
Delaney, a senior at Houston, in the men’s
long and triple jumps. In the long jump, he
will be the third competitor in the third of
four flights and in the triple jump, he will be
the 10th competitor in the second of four
flights.

Rounding out the Bahamian participa-
tion will be Jamal Wilson, a junior at Texas,
in the men’s high jump. He is scheduled to
be the 15th of 24 jumpers in the first of two
flights.

ning the 4 x 4,” Rolle said. “It’s unfortu-
nate that Krystal had the hamstring injury at
the SECs, which will sideline her for the
rest of the year. She’s done for the season.

“With Cache just coming back in January,
she didn’t have the off-season training that
she needed and being ranked 39th going
into this meet, we didn’t want to push her
too hard to qualify. So she will just run on
the 4 x 4 team that is ranked at number
eight.”

Rolle said if Ferguson can duplicate the
type of performance she had at the SEC,
she should not have any problem in quali-
fying for the NCAA.

The Octopus lead the cham-
pionship series against the Bar-
racudas 2-1. Game four is set
for Spm today.

11-12:

The Conchs defeated the
Wild Dogs three games to one
to take the title.

13-15:

The Owlz beat the Falcons
on Friday 7-6 to sweep their
series three games to none

16-20:

The Arawaks knocked off
the Caribs 7-0 Saturday to close
the door and take the title three
games to zip.



OVERALL WINNER Vincent Paul (top) and runner-up Meko
Evans (above) pose at the 24th Bahamas Bodybuilding & Fitness
Federation Novice Championships at the National Centre for the
Performing Arts, Shirley Street, on Saturday night. Paul won the
middleweight and most muscular titles. Evans was 2nd overall
and won the welterweight division...

Rising stars at
the 24th Novice
Body Fitness
Championships



















THE country’s local body-
building scene welcomed two
rising stars to the fold, while
honouring one of the stalwarts
of the sport at its first event of
the year.

At the 24th Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federa-
tion Novice Championships,
the federation renamed the
event the Raymond Tucker
Novice Championships in hon-
our of the legendary body-
builder and saw Vincent Paul
and Tanisha Bethel dominate
the competition.

Paul was crowned the men’s
overall winner in the event. He
also took first place in the mid-
dleweight division and was
named Most Muscular.

Meko Evans finished sec-
ond following the men’s over-
all pose down, but took first
place in the welterweight divi-
sion.

Jaheel Butler took the title
in the junior division and fin-
ished second behind Paul
amongst the Middleweights.

Ranaldo Smith finished sec-
ond in the welterweight divi-

sion, while Tarino Stubbs was
third in middleweights.

Bethel took home a pletho-
ra of awards on the women’s
side of the event.

She won the junior, light-
weight, women’s lightweight
open, body fitness junior, body
fitness open, overall body-
building female and overall fit-
ness titles.

The event serves as a show-
case to the sport’s newcomers
and gives the federation a
sound impression of its future
stars.

Federation executives say
the Novice Championships
provide an opportunity for the
federation to showcase its stars
of the future and also its yunior
programme - entrants under
the age of 21.

The second event on the
BBFF calendar this year will
be the Grand Bahama Body-
building Association Body-
building and Fitness Champi-
onships on June 26.

The 37th Annual BBFF
National Championships is set
for July 3 in the capital.

GBPA SUPPORTS TRACK & FIELD — GBPA’s director of community
relations Geneva Rutherford makes a donation to Frederick Bastian, head
coach of the Kenyan Knights Track Club...

DWAYNE JENNINGS, head coach of Golden Eagles Track Club, accepts
a cheque donation from Geneva Rutherford...

Track clubs get money for athletes

FREEPORT, BAHAMAS - Grand
Bahamian athletes continue to excel on
national and international levels.

To aid with the athletic development
and growth of many of our island’s talent-
ed youngsters, The Grand Bahama Port
Authority Limited (GBPA) recently made
cheque donations to two track clubs on
the island.

“GBPA is keen to assist with various
types of sports and we have always done so
over the years because we realize that
youngsters need the type of discipline and
positive activities provided through
sports,” said Geneva Rutherford, GBPA’s
director of community relations.

Accepting a cheque donation on behalf
of the Golden Eagles Track Club was head
coach Dwayne Jennings.

The club is seeking corporate support to
purchase uniforms for its 65 athletes and
also to host a major meet on Grand

Bahama. With many of its members finan-
cially challenged, the GBPA donation was
most welcomed.

“We thank GBPA for their donation
and kind consideration. We have several
clubs visiting for an upcoming meet, so
this cheque will definitely help to defray
some of the costs associated with the event.
It will also go towards the purchase of new
uniforms and cover some of our club’s
expenses as we travel to Junior Nationals
in Nassau. We’re definitely looking for-
ward to a continued relationship with the
Port Authority,” said Jennings.

Also benefiting from GBPA’s corpo-
rate generosity was the Kenyan Knights
Track Club. Head coach Frederick Bast-
jan was similarly thankful. “I’m grateful to
GBPA and its management team for their
kindness towards the development of our
kids. Every contribution received helps to
cover the many expenses associated with

the expansion of track and field,” Bastian
said.

The Kenyan Knights Track Club is a
non-profit organisation whose primary
objective is to cultivate and develop young
athletes on Grand Bahama. With club
members training vigorously for upcoming
meets, including the BayTaf Track & Field
Classics, as well as Junior and Senior
Nationals, the club relies heavily on the
support of individuals and local area busi-
nesses.

“Great self-esteem is built through
sports and we know that once youths are
involved in something positive, then they
are less likely to be involved in negative
behaviour,” Rutherford said. “GBPA real-
ly seeks to better the lives of everyone
throughout the island of Grand Bahama,
and by extension the Bahamas, and one of
the best ways we think we can do this is
through sports.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



Asue Draw donates $2,500 for Labour Day regatta

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ORGANISERS are getting
set to stage the annual South
Andros Regatta, which has
been in existence for more than
20 years, over the Labour Day
holiday weekend.

Asue Draw, one of the major
sponsors of this year’s event,
gave a $2,500 cheque to the
organising committee last week,
coming off the $10,000 that they
donated to the National Fami-
ly Island Regatta in April.

“We believe that sloop sail-
ing in our country has become
the number one drawing card

in terms of pulling Bahamians
and families together,” said
Rev Dr Philip McPhee, whose
Thunderbird is sponsored by
the Asue Draw.

McPhee, who is working
along with the organising com-
mittee for the regatta, sched-
uled for June 3-6, said they are
delighted that the Asue Draw

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has agreed to step forward and
assist them.

“We are appreciative to Mr
Kenny Fountain, Mr Shawn
Kemp, marketing director, Mr
Levin Wilson and Mr Trevor
Smith, the operating manager,
for coming forth and assisting
us in this venture.”

It’s anticipated that there will
be about 20 boats competing
in the Class C, D and E divi-
sions.

Levin Wilson, the marketing
manager at Asue Draw, said
they look at “regattas and sloop
sailing as one of the biggest
forms of camaraderie in
Bahamian sportsmanship and
we see this as an opportunity
to reach Bahamians on all dif-
ferent levels by assisting sloop
sailing.

“As we go through the com-
munity, we try to see the dif-
ferent needs and we try to
address them with the help of
Dr McPhee, who has been very
helpful in trying to identify the
needs that we can assist with.”

Wilson said after leaving a
lasting impact on the island of
Exuma during the National
Family Island Regatta, they
intend to do the same thing in
Andros.

At the regatta, Rev McPhee
said they will be doing some-
thing very unique in that the
winner of the C Class will be
presented with an orange jack-
et, which will bear the name of
Asue Draw, indicating that they
were the champions of that par-

Melinda
making a

jeVbentomcO)h
herself in
college

THE VERSATILE Melinda
Bastian (right), one of the
Bahamas’ most multi-talented
young female athletes, is defi-
nitely making a name for her-
self on the college scene.

In the most recent Southern
Intercollegiate Athletic Con-
ference (SAIC) track and field
championships, Melinda Bast-
ian has won three Ist team
awards in javelin, shotput and
the heptathlon.

She was also named the
Field MVP in the champi-
onships and Most Outstanding
Athlete of the Year in the con-
ference.

Having an outstanding year,
she has also secured a number
of awards, including a silver
medal in high jump, Ist team
all SIAC in softball for short-
stop, MVP for volleyball and
track and field at Benedict Col-
lege, All-American and AIll-
Academics.








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ORGANISERS of the South Andros Regatta received a $2,500 cheque from
Asue Draw. Shown (I-r) are Levin Wilson, marketing manager of Asue
Draw, committee co-chairman Kendal Taylor and Rev Philip McPhee, an
unidentified salesperson at Asue Draw, committee co-chairman Basil
Rolle and Trevor Smith, the operating manager at Asue Draw...

ticular event.

Basil Rolle, a co-chairman of
the organising committee, said
with the assistance of Asue
Draw, they can now properly
plan the regatta.

“At first things were looking
a little bleak, but we can now
go back to South Andros and
put on a decade regatta, start-
ing with the Ocean Race on
Thursday, May 3,” Rolle said.

Kendal Taylor, the other co-
chairman, said while this is just
their third year in forefront of
both the regatta and the home-
coming celebrations, they are
grateful to Rev McPhee and
Asue Draw for assisting them
this year.

“IT can assure them that their

contribution wouldn’t be in
vain, but it will be well spent
and accounted for,” he said.

“We will represent them in
South Andros highly. For them
being one of the major spon-
sors, we say thank you because
with the economy as sluggish
as it is, it is hard for sponsors to
come on board. So it’s a
tremendous boost to South
Andros.”

Taylor said they are looking
forward to putting on a spec-
tacular event this year, includ-
ing a performance by the high
school dance troop, the prima-
ry school platting the maypole
and there will also be some
rake-n-scrape and the popular
crab races.








‘Lefty’ Leighton Gibson
on JBLN All-Stars

FIFTEEN-year-old Leighton Gibson, a sophomore at the
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for the Cadets.

Gibson, a lefty, led the team with a .484 batting average and
39 runs batted in. He also blasted five home runs during the
season as the Cadets posted a 26-4 overall record - winning
both the Ohio Valley Athletic Conference AA Division regular
season pennant and the Playoff Championships.

Gibson will be playing for the JBLN All-Stars in the upcom-
ing BBF 8th Annual Andre Rodgers National Baseball Cham-
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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamian
students
fearful over
unrest

FROM page one

an ongoing basis,” said Brent
Symonette, Minister of For-
eign Affairs.

The government does not
have an estimate of the num-
ber of Bahamians currently
in Jamaica. However, all
Bahamians are being advised
to be “cautious and careful”
of their whereabouts.

Most Bahamian students at
the University of the West
Indies, Mona, are medical stu-
dents, currently engaged in
exams. Although exams have
concluded for other faculties,
examinations scheduled for
the Faculty of Medical Sci-
ences yesterday, took place
as planned. The UWI issued
an advisory to say operations
on campus were normal.

It advised staff members to
consider their personal safety
and security first in determin-
ing whether to report to work.
Some staff members live in
areas affected by the violence.

The Norman Manley Law
School, which is located on
the Mona campus, postponed
exams on Tuesday and
Wednesday. A Norman Man-
ley student said: “Generally
it takes a toll on you psycho-
logically. Yesterday I could
not do anything except
research what is going on. I
was constantly trying to get
news, news, news. Honestly, it
is hard to concentrate on
studying.

“There is no immediate or
direct threat to anyone’s life
on this side, but there is the




potential because the place is
unrest. There is just the fear,”
said the Jamaican student.

In the wake of a declara-
tion of a state of emergency in
the country’s capital Kingston
and St Andrew parish, police
and military officials have
been engaged in armed con-
flict with militias.

They launched an opera-
tion in Tivoli Gardens on
Monday morning to appre-
hended alleged drug kingpin
Christopher “Dudus” Coke,
who was charged last year in
US federal court with con-
spiracy to distribute marijua-
na and cocaine and with con-
spiracy to illegally traffic in
firearms.

Months

After months of uncertain-
ty, Prime Minister Bruce
Golding announced on May
17 he was directing the attor-
ney general to authorise the
extradition request allowing
for the arrest of Coke.

Following the announce-
ment, West Kingston com-
munities staged non-violent
protests, sporting placards
that read, “Next to God is
Dudus”. Some neighbour-
hoods fortified their streets
with road blocks made from
sandbags, improvised explo-
sive devices and electrified
fencing.

“You are afraid even if you
are removed from it. There is
something very serious going
on. Persons, particularly those

a



. ao

~—







(AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner,Norman Grindley)

POLICEMEN go into action at the Central Police Station gate in downtown Kingston after gunmen open fire on them on Monday May 24, 2010.
Thousands of police and soldiers stormed the Jamaican ghettos in search of a reputed drug kingpin wanted by the United States, intensify-
ing a third day of street battles that have killed at least 30 people.

rified, mainly because there
were reports of road blocks
and a few civilians had been
shot the day before. The fact
that you had to venture out
was terrifying. You don’t
know how to get to school,
which route to take to get to
school, whether public trans-
portation is running.”

Some Air Jamaica and
American Airlines flights out
of Jamaica were cancelled
yesterday, although airport
services was still fully opera-
tional. One of the several
access roads to airport, Moun-
tain View, is inaccessible
because of the unrest. Also,
one of the main highways,
Spanish Town bypass, that
carries traffic outside of the
capital into other regions was
blocked. Based on reports
from Jamaican officials, at
least three members of the
security forces were killed and
several others injured; at least
26 civilians - all men - were
killed, and at least 200 peo-
ple were arrested since Mon-
day. Unofficial reports from
other news sources indicate
additional civilian casualties,
including children.



from outside of JA were ter-

(AP Photo/APTN)

THIS FRAME GRAB from video provided by APTN shows soldiers on guard in Kingston, Jamaica, Mon-
day, May 24, 2010. Thousands of armed police and soldiers barged past barricades into the capital’s most
violent slums, clashing with defenders of a gang leader sought by the United States.





ONS SY











+

ih he

TA





(AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner,Ricardo Makyn)
POLICEMEN conduct an operation along West Parade, in downtown Kingston, Jamaica, Monday May 24,
2010.



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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Caribbean emergency experts meeting in Nassau

BIS Photo: Derek Smith



By LINDSAY THOMPSON



WITH the region experiencing
“unprecedented” natural disasters,
Caribbean emergency experts are coming
together in Nassau this week to pool
resources and design more effective ways
relating to disaster mitigation.

Captain Stephen Russell, director of the
National Emergency Management Agency
(NEMA), said the Bahamas is pleased to
be hosting the first Technical Advisory
Committee (TAC) meeting of the
Caribbean Disaster Management Agency
(CDEMA).

Starting today and continuing until Fri-
day, it is the first meeting of the organisa-
tion since the transition from the

CAPTAIN Stephen
Russell, director of
National Emergency
Management Agency.

Caribbean Disaster Emergency Response
Agency (CDERA) to the CDEMA on
September 1, 2009.

TAC is a new organ under the gover-
nance mechanism of CDEMA. This com-
mittee sets the tone for strengthening pro-
gramme development and implementa-
tion. CDEMA says that TAC is about
embracing a full participatory approach
to building synergies between the CDE-
MA coordinating unit and the 18 partici-
pating states in all aspects of the technical
work, from design to implementation.

Participants at the TAC meeting will
examine the enabling environment in each
country to deliver the Comprehensive Dis-
aster Management (CDM) mandate. The
CDM is an integrated and proactive

approach to disaster management, which
seeks to reduce the risk and loss associat-
ed with the natural and technological haz-
ards and the effects of climate change to
enhance regional sustainable development.

Elizabeth Riley, deputy director of
CDEMA who has responsibility for pro-
gramming said, “We are going to be dis-
cussing and looking for agreement on the
way forward with respect to policy and
legislation on disaster office structures,
instruments and tools that we need, to
monitor the progress of CDM at the
national level.”

Also high on the agenda will be mat-
ters pertaining to the strengthening of
CDEMA’s operational mechanisms to
effectively function under the new man-

date. The meeting will also discuss guide-
lines to strengthen the operations of CDE-
MA’s sub-regional focal point mechanism.
Participants will use this opportunity to
identify initial lessons learnt by the region-
al system through the recent Haiti earth-
quake event and the region wide drought.
A significant event during the meeting will
be the signing of a Memorandum of
Understanding between the Pan American
Health Organisation and CDEMA tomor-
row.

“This will broaden the scope to partner
and support the mainstreaming of disaster
risk reduction at national levels and pro-
mote its incorporation in the health sector
within Caribbean countries,” Ms Riley
said.



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REPRESENTATIVES and resource managers from the
Bahamas National Trust, BREEF, College of the Bahamas,
Department of Marine Resources and The Nature Conservancy
will come together at the Bahamas National Trust this week to par-
ticipate in a special workshop designed to share the findings of the
Bahamas Biocomplexity Project ( BBP).

Connecting Marine Science to Conservation in The Bahamas is
a workshop for resource managers, educators and administrators
that will explore recent research results about coral reef ecosystems,
marine protected areas, and other dimensions of marine conser-
vation. The information gleaned through this workshop will help
participants apply this knowledge and related tools to conservation
work.

The workshop will be facilitated by Bahamian and US
researchers and hosted by the Bahamas Biocomplexity Project, the
Bahamas National Trust, and American Museum of Natural His-
tory's Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC).

Dan Brumbaugh, CBC Senior Conservation Scientist, who has
led the BBP since its inception, said: “This workshop will give us
a chance to provide an interactive exploration of selected research
areas. We'll also be able to work with the participants to enhance
the practical application of the science to their conservation work.

Excited

“We are very excited about the knowledge that will be shared at
this workshop,” said Tamica Rahming, Director of Parks and Sci-
ence for the BNT. “One of sessions, Learning from the Exuma
Cays Land and Sea Park, highlights marine reserves as a scientif-
ic tool for studying key interactions in reef systems, reserve effects
on populations, and community interactions.”

The BBP (bbp.amnh.org) is an interdisciplinary partnership for
improved understanding and management of The Bahamas’ marine
environment. For the last nine years, BBP researchers have con-
ducted studies across the Bahamian seascape to understand how
marine habitats and biodiversity are distributed, how these func-
tion within coral reef ecosystems, and how local human commu-
nities use their marine resources, thereby also affecting ecosystem
function.

The BNT also partnered with the American Museum of Natur-
al History as part of the Biocomplexity Project to produce Trea-
sures in the Sea: A Teachers Resource, a resource book that pro-
vides teachers with scientific information and engaging, hands-
on activities that encourage students to discover, cherish, and pro-
tect the sea and all of its treasures. Designed especially for edu-
cators in The Bahamas, the book complements curriculum guide-
lines for grades three to six.

Treasures in the Sea introduces marine conservation concepts by
focusing on some of The Bahamas’ most important marine species,
and helps students understand life cycles, critical habitats, cultur-
al and economic connections, and also the urgency of conservation
and management.

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WEDNESDAY,

MAY 26,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

‘consumed’ by debt interest

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME $0.15 of every $1 in
revenue collected by the Gov-
ernment is being eaten up in
servicing interest payments on
its $3.3 billion-plus direct debt,
something Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham described to
Tribune Business as an “unsus-
tainable position”.

Speaking to this newspaper
ahead of today’s 2010-2011
Budget, the Prime Minister,
while declining to go into
specifics, said he was “very con-
fident” that the combination of

SEE page 5B

* PM warns of ‘sharp medicine

Eg

Eo

Eo

intended to cure’ in today’s
Budget, as debt servicing
in ‘unsustainable position’
Says action needed now to
prevent fiscal position
being ‘nearly impossible’
to tackle in future
Bankers say given ‘heads
up’ of significant rise in
commercial banking fees
Fiscal deficit likely bigger
than projected, due to
major ‘deterioration’

in January-April period

Government ‘never

had high hopes’ for
$857m development

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government “never
had high hopes in the first
place” for the $857 million
South Ocean redevelopment,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-

*

South Ocean financier
accuses former partner
of conducting ‘smear’
campaign to force

it to settle



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Scotia loan key to Baha
Mar ‘49 deal conditions’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

aha Mar has 49
“conditions
precedent” that
it must fulfill to
consummate its
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment, the Prime Minister
confirmed to Tribune Business,
the most important being to
resolve negotiations with Sco-
tiabank over its outstanding
$170-$180 million loan.

Mr Ingraham confirmed the
number of conditions still to be
fulfilled by the resort develop-
er, Tribune Business having
been told this number by one of
its contacts, with the Govern-

PM confirms numerous ‘to do’ list before $2.6bn project
can get going, with $170-$180m loan resolution critical



HUBERT INGRAHAM

ment awaiting approval of the
project by the Chinese govern-
ment before it starts to move
on its own process.

“There are 49 conditions
precedent, the most important
of which is the Scotiabank
loan,” Mr Ingraham confirmed
to Tribune Business. “Notwith-
standing this, the Chinese gov-
ernment has to approve the
project, and that has not hap-
pened yet.

“Once that happens, all those
conditions precedent can be

Hotels maintain improvements through April

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian hotel indus-
try maintained its “stabilisa-
tion” trend during April, Tri-
bune Business has been told,

* Nassau occupancies up by average 2.6 percentage points, while
room rates rise 1% year-over-year, as air arrivals up 4.3%

* Hotels to analyse oil exploration in Bahamas more closely,
as ‘concern’ remains about Gulf of Mexico disaster

* Hope alternative connections via Miami

ham told Tribune Business, as * Alleges that this even NEN er ees makes a will mitigate effects of BA strike

the project’s financier accused extended to lobbying up by 2.6 percentage points and

its former partner of conducting Bahamian eovernment average daily room rates potential business andenviron- ground compared to last year.

a ‘smear’ campaign against it . 8 oo (ADRs) some 1.1 per cent mental impact if oil leaking into That would be the best way to

pode oN force it out or ministers against it ahead of 2009 comparatives. the Gulf of Mexico reached characterise our situation.

settle litigation. . ce . : ;
The aa ons contained = * Hedge fund admits that ae Ne err eee

in court filings in the New York
State Supreme Court that have
been obtained by Tribune Busi-

SEE page 4B



Local firm
unveils its
mobile
website

BahamasLocal.com, the
online Bahamian information
resource, has launched a mobile
version of its website to enable
persons to access it while on
the road via the likes of Black-
berry, I-phone and other Inter-
net-enabled devices.

The company, in a statement
issued yesterday, said mobile
computing was a growing part
of overall user traffic on the
Internet, and it had to move to
meet this demand.

BahamasLocal.com said it
currently received over 100
users daily on its mobile web-
site version, with this traffic set
to increase. It added that Gart-
ner Inc, a leading information
technology research company,
found that the total number of
Internet-enabled mobile
devices sold in the first quarter
of 2010 was 54.3 million units,
an increase of 48.7 per cent.

The Apple I-phone alone

SEE page 3B









373-acre project in south-

western New Providence
‘continues to languish
without direction’





New car
sales down
11% in year

to April

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

DESPITE receiving a
temporary boost from the
March car show, Bahamian
new car dealers yesterday
said year-over-year sales for
the January-April 2010 peri-
od were still down by 11.04
per cent, with industry exec-
utives expecting the sector
to be on the “tail end” of
any economic recovery.

Speaking to Tribune
Business after the Bahamas
Motor Dealers Association
(BMDA) released figures
to Tribune Business show-
ing that year-over-year car
sales for April were down
by 15.07 per cent compared
to 2009, Andrew Barr,
Friendly Ford’s general
manager, said a “consistent,
sustainable” recovery was
key to both banks and con-
sumers recovering vital con-
fidence.

Adding that most
Bahamian new car dealers’
sales were down on average
by 40 per cent compared to
pre-2009 levels, Mr Barr
said the industry’s recovery
would not happen this year,
and was more likely to
occur in 2011 - especially if
Baha Mar’s $2.6 billion
Cable Beach redevelop-
ment started.

He pointed out that many
hotel workers, who were
currently working three to
four-day weeks, would “not
be eligible to get a bank

SEE page 5B





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Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president, told Tribune Busi-
ness that while the industry -
the largest private sector
employer in this nation - had
“not lost any ground” com-
pared to its 2009 performance,
it was concerned about the

Adding that the hotel indus-
try would provide whatever
support it could to the Govern-
ment’s efforts to counter the oil
spill fall-out, if it came to that,
Mr Sands said of the industry’s
current condition: “We’re still
stabilised and have not lost any

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tion for April suggests that
while occupancies were basi-
cally flat and stabilised, there
was a slight increase in the
amount of room nights sold,
and the ADR generated was

SEE page 6B



worked through. The Govern-
ment of the Bahamas is wait-
ing for confirmation that the
government of China has
approved the deal with Baha
Mar, the China Export-Import
Bank and China State Con-
struction.”

With such a lengthy ‘to do’
list on Baha Mar’s part, the
Government’s relative silence
on the project is understand-
able, with the Prime Minister

SEE page 3B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and
implementation of a strategic public relations and communication program together
with the effective and efficient planning and execution of all corporate events and
activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

¢ Assisting with the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate
Programs plan to support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;

* Overseeing the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations
programs, plan and budget;

¢ Assisting with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation
and, where necessary, the wider community;
Preparing and distributing the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directing press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press
releases, photographs, fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management
and Media Representatives;
Coordinating the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion
surveys;
Providing assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in
writing speeches, preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluating and assessing customer complaints, queries and disseminating
information to management;
Assisting with the development, implementation and management of external
communication efforts;
Coordinating marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the
external Public Relations Firms and the Media;
Identifying and liaising with service providers to secure speakers, presenters
and entertainment for Corporate events;
Liaising with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e.
awards, invitations, prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as
necessary and maintaining an inventory of the same;
Preparing and distributing all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices)
relative to Corporate activities, as necessary;
Creating and updating all standard operation procedures for all activities, as
necessary;
Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of
bills for all events and activities as necessary;
Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate
activities;
Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company
newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information
relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business
Communication, or equivalent.

¢ A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level

¢ Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;

¢ Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management
and public groups;

¢ Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing

* Experience in managing special events and activities

¢ Excellent time management and organizational skills

* Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

¢ Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications

* Good analytical skills

* Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.



The disgrace of
our Post Office

HOW long does it take for
a delivery truck to drive from a
bank on Frederick Street in
downtown Nassau to Cable
Beach? Maybe 45 minutes on a
bad traffic day. How long does
it take for the Bahamas Post
Office to deliver an ordinary
letter that distance? How about
20 days. And from the BEC
office on Baillou Hill Road to
Cable Beach? How about 21
days via our Government-run
postal service?

These examples come from
comparing the postmark date
with the first date the letter was
found in my mail box. I hap-
pened to use the private Mail
Boxes facility rather than the
Cable Beach branch post office,
but that should add another day
at most, since Mail Boxes pick
up from the nearby branch
three times a week, and the
branch gets two deliveries a day
from the central Post Office.

And these delays do not even
represent true delivery periods,
since it is not known how long
letters dropped in any post
office sit around the central
office before the postmark is
affixed. These unbelievable
delivery times are typical of all
my mail I have checked in
recent weeks, and my experi-
ence is typical of every other
person I have questioned. And
this is local mail, in the 21-mile
long island of New Providence,

Let’s not even discuss inter-
island mail (despite daily flights
to most locations) and, even
worse, international mail,
where months can pass for
inbound and outbound deliv-
ery, and complete untraceable
loss is not uncommon. The
unreliability has caused a local
club with many overseas mem-
bers to advise them not to
address mail to the club’s Nas-
sau P.O. Box, but to use a spe-
cial convenience address estab-
lished in Miami - a solution
used by many establishments,
together with the ubiquitous,
but expensive, reliance on
FedEx and DHL couriers.

Mail service is not a glam-
orous subject, but it is a public
utility as much as electricity,
telecommunications, and water
and sewerage. Because the Post
Office is not set up as a sepa-
rate corporation but simply
buried as a department of the
Ministry of Works, it has not
received the public scrutiny of a
BEC or BTC, but its capabili-
ties are just as essential to an
efficient public sector, and pro-
vide a guide as to whether a
nation has escaped “third-
world” status. By this standard,
the Bahamas is failing abysmal-
ly.
What is the effect on our
economy? Thousands of bills
are late in arriving, and pay-
ments are equally late, putting a
squeeze on the billers’ cash-
flow. Some private companies
have virtually abandoned the
post office, relying on local



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messengers for specific com-
munications. But this is not an
option open to private citizens,
or to the public utilities, banks
and insurance companies, who
send out thousands of bulk-mail
monthly mailings. Of course,
the deficiency is intensified
because our lethargic Central
Bank and financial industry
have not taken the steps, nor-
mal in other counties, to initiate
on-line payment systems (said
to be coming soon, hopefully).

For comparative experience
in the “real world”, I consulted
the websites of the UK’s Royal
Mail and USPS (United States
Postal Service), particularly to
learn their assured delivery
times. For the cost of a 41
pence stamp (about $0.60), let-
ters are delivered anywhere in
the United Kingdom within one
or two days; a 32 pence stamp
brings three-day delivery.
Despite well-publicised bud-
getary constraints, USPS still
offers six-day per week service
and three-day standard deliv-
ery for a $0.44 stamp, increased
by 10 cents during the last 10
years.

And, of course, this means
delivery directly to a sub-
scriber’s home or office box,
requiring thousands of staffers,
trucks and bikes whose expense
we do not bear in the Bahamas.

By contrast, our website
(ww.bahamas.gov.bs/postalser-
vice), says nothing — perhaps
wisely — about assured delivery
dates for our standard $0.15
New Providence stamp. It con-
tains the grandiloquent mission
statement “to be recognised
and respected for its timely col-
lection and transmittal, and of
postal products”, as well as pho-
tographs of smiling employees
operating computers and
stamping machines, or strug-
gling with huge sacks of mail
in the cavernous central sort-
ing hall. We can also find infor-
mation about branch offices,
box rental and philatelic offer-
ings.

We learn about 10 main and
branch post offices in New
Providence, with a total of
24,750 boxes and 900 more
planned “in the future”. But all
this information may be out-of-
date, since the website appears
to have been prepared in 2005
and still bears the handsome
portrait photograph of Post-
master-General Godfrey
Clarke, who happens to have
retired over a year ago. I was
informed that he was replaced
by his deputy, Leslie
Cartwright, whose appointment
has never been officially
announced. My attempts to
reach him by telephone or via
his designated e-mail address
proved fruitless.

The greatest irony of the




The Tribune

Real Estate |

WAR eM cia Aen GAA ait oe

website is (the retired) Mr
Clarke’s proud announcement
that, as a member of the Uni-
versal Postal Union (UPU)
since 1974, the Bahamas Post
Office adheres to a “quality of
service policy that focuses on
meeting and exceeding cus-
tomer expectations”. The UPU,
a little-known affiliate of the
United Nations, cannot compel
any member nation to follow
its strictures but does its best
to draft standards and encour-
age compliance. One does not
realise the complexity of inter-
national regulations, protocols
and technical research required
for efficient international mail
until one reads the voluminous
reports churned out by the
UPU at its quadrennial Con-
gresses, prepared by its 150
headquarters staff in Berne,
Switzerland. At its 2004 and
2008 meetings, the UPO adopt-
ed the important ‘J-5 World-
wide Standard for Internation-
al Postal Service Quality’, set-
ting five days for normal mail
delivery, with an objective of
80 per cent worldwide compli-
ance.

Clearly, the Bahamas is far
from meeting this standard.
Even in New Providence, with
all its geographic advantages
for prompt service and about
30,000 widely-scattered mail
boxes (if we include Mail Box-
es Ltd and other licensed pri-
vate operators), good roads,
none of the jungles, deserts,
mountains and poor infrastruc-
ture that impede delivery in,
say, African nations, the stan-
dard is a disgraceful two to
three weeks.

The private citizen, and even
the press, cannot penetrate the
hermetic post office bureau-
cracy to discover the problems.
As with other failing organisa-
tions, the problem probably
does not lie with the low-level
employees, who act as they are
directed. It is likely to start at
the leadership (government)
and senior management level
and then filter down, perhaps
some combination of aversion
to modern technology and
indifference to customer ser-
vice. The retirement of Mr
Clarke and the ambiguous posi-
tion of Mr Cartwight cannot
help but worsen the situation.

If money is the problem, the
Government might well be jus-
tified in raising the long-frozen
price of the standard $0.15
stamp. But this would only be
acceptable if accompanied by
visible signs of improved effi-
ciency.

In our view, the only solu-
tion is for the chief executives
of our banks, insurance com-
panies and public utilities — the
major parties victimised by the
postal catastrophe — to come
together and make a unified
complaint to the Prime Minis-
ter, demanding a revolutionary
change to the status quo. This
should then lead to an investi-
gation and report by an inde-
pendent consultant in postal
services — there are many — fol-
lowed by not only a restructur-
ing of management but also a
modernisation of the doubtless
archaic systems presently used
in the receipt, sorting and deliv-
ery of mail.

There is no reason why the
Bahamas needs to struggle with
a third-world postal system.




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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 3B





Airline eyes south
Florida expansion

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

WESTERN Air is eyeing
South Florida routes for future
expansion even as it settles into
its new Jamaica route, which
represents 10 per cent of its
income. It also plans to add an
extra leg to that country next
month, the airline’s director of
operations told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

Meanwhile, Captain Wolf
Seyfret added that the unrest
in Jamaica has not affected
Western Air’s daily flights to
Kingston, though the US and
UK have issued travel warn-
ings for their citizens urging
them not to travel to the coun-
try. The Bahamas has not
issued such a warning.

“We have had a few trav-
ellers ask us about the situa-
tion, but we have assured them
that they [Jamaican authorities]
will keep all the airports open
at any cost,” he said.

According to him, Western
Air continues to fly its daily
flights into Kingston, and hopes
to begin additional flights to
Montego Bay by next month.

Captain Seyfret said book-
ings have been solid for the
month, and the future looks
good. He added that the addi-
tion of the Jamaica leg has
boosted Western Air’s business
substantially.

* Jamaica routes represent 10%
of income for Western Air, with
Montego Bay expansion also on cards
* $1m Grand Bahama facility
set for August completion

“Jamaica has contributed
quite largely; it represents
about 10 per cent of overall
income,” said Captain Seyfret.

“We were going to start
additional service into Mon-
tego Bay in June, and the two
points will be serviced concur-
rently.”

The airline is also completing
a $1 million facility at Grand
Bahama Internatinal Airport
in anticipation of a turnaround
in the island’s economy.

Captain Seyfret said the
company hopes to start direct
service to Jamaica from Grand
Bahama in the future, and
hopes to open up the US mar-
ket to the first Bahamian, pri-
vately-owned airline since Lak-
er Airways - which had
Bahamian interests.

“We are looking at the build-
ing being finished in August,
and we want to be ready for
the inevitable turnaround of
the Freepeort economy,” he
said. “We are looking at start-
ing service out of Freeport to

the US, and possibly Kingston.”

When the renovations to the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport are complete, it is
hoped that the Bahamas could
become a hub for certain
transatlantic connections, as it
is for British Airway’s (BA) leg
to the Cayman Islands.

“We hope that Nassau would
become a hub for the
Caribbean,” said Captain
Seyfret.

He added that BA’s strike
could present an opportunity
for Western Air to provide con-
nection services to Jamaica and
other destinations, as BA staff
are not expected to go back to
work for some time. “I hope
that will happen, but we would
have to see how that develops,”
he said.

Capotain Seyfret said the air-
line can fly into many more
locations in the US than larger
airlines and, to remain com-
petitive, offers special rates on
Wednesdays and Saturday to
Jamaica.

Scotia loan key to Baha Mar ‘49 deal conditions’

FROM page 1B

seeking to manage public
expectations and not get hopes
up before the deal is finally
signed, sealed and delivered.

It seems likely that there will
be no ‘ground breaking’ on
Baha Mar in the immediate
future, even though many con-
ditions are likely to be relative-
ly easy to meet and were prob-
ably in the previous deal with
Harrah’s.

Baha Mar, though, has gone
out to tender on the $200 mil-
lion Commercial Village work,
a project set to create 320 con-
struction jobs.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s
senior vice-president of external
and governmental affairs, told
Tribune Business yesterday that
discussions between Scotiabank
and the developer were ongo-
ing, although he declined to
provide details.

“We continue to have dis-
cussions with them,” Mr Sands
said of Scotiabank. “The dis-
cussions are continuing. We are
satisfied the Baha Mar project
will go forward. This is an intri-
cate and large project, and the
two important elements of this
are receiving the approval of
the Government of the
Bahamas and the government
of China.

“We are satisfied the project
will go ahead, and we are wait-
ing to hear from the govern-
ments.”

However, sources close to
the situation told Tribune Busi-
ness that Baha Mar and Sco-
tiabank were making “good

Local firm unveils
its mobile website
FROM page 1B

sold 8.3 million units over the
same period, an increase of
112.2 per cent. This mobile
computing trend, BahamasLo-
cal.com said, will also impact
the Bahamas, particularly com-
bined with the recent decrease
in the monthly prices of the
data (mobile internet) packages
provided by the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC).

Jason McDowall, chief exec-
utive of BahamasLocal.com,
said: “We see this as another
convenient way for our users
to access BahamasLocal.com.
Our system automatically
detects that you are visiting us
from a mobile device, and you
are instantly diverted to the
mobile version of our website.

“Almost every day I have
someone tell me that they use
our mobile site when they are
on the road or away from their
computers to check for local
information.”

BahamasLocal.com is an
online information resource for
the Bahamas, including infor-
mation pertaining to Bahamian
businesses, news, classifieds,
movie listings, jobs and events.

BahamasLocal.com, which
officially launched in April
2009, is located in the New
Providence Financial Centre.



progress” in resolving the situ-
ation regarding the outstand-
ing $170-$180 million syndicat-
ed loan, which was issued to
finance the acquisition of the
existing Cable Beach Resorts
from Philip Ruffin.

As revealed by this newspa-
per previously, Baha Mar needs
to successfully resolve the situ-
ation over the Scotiabank loan,
as it is said to be secured on the
existing Sheraton Cable Beach,
Wyndham Nassau and Crystal
Palace Casino and associated
real estate parcels at Cable
Beach.

The potential complication
is that this real estate also
includes parcels upon which
China Ex-Im Bank will take
security for its $2.5 billion loan.

The Chinese bank will need
those assets delivered ‘free of
encumberances’, to quote legal
parlance, which is why Baha
Mar and Scotiabank need to
resolve their loan situation.

Scotiabank has already
extended the due date twice -
from December 31, 2009, to
end-January 2010, and then to
March 31, 2010 - to give the
developer time to seal the deal
with Beijing. That was con-
cluded on March 30, 2010, and
possibly explains Baha Mar's
haste to seal the deal with the
China Export-Import Bank and
China State Construction by
that date.

Tribune Business has been
told that if the talks do not bear
fruit, Scotiabank could poten-
tially foreclose on the two exist-
ing resorts at Cable Beach.

However, this is unlikely to



happen, given that the bank
would inherit and take over two
loss-making resorts, thereby
increasing its Cable Beach
exposure. It is also unlikely to
be able to find a buyer for them
for much more than $100 mil-
lion, meaning it would be
unable to recover the full value
of its loan.

Some sources have expressed
surprise to Tribune Business
that Scotiabank’s loan collater-
al does not include the golf
course at Cable Beach, a key
cash flow generator for the
resorts.

Some have suggested that the
likeliest solution to the impasse
would be for Scotiabank to take
an equity stake in the Baha Mar
project.

Tribune Business also previ-
ously reported how Baha Mar
and its principals, the Lyford
Cay-based Izmirlian family, had
offered to make Scotiabank
"whole" and repay the entire
loan, having previously offered
to pay down $85 million or 50
per cent during proposals that
were swapped between the two
sides.

Meanwhile, Mr Ingraham
confirmed that Kerzner Inter-
national had obtained all the
necessary permits for its $100
million Paradise Island
upgrades, a project expected to
create 400 permanent jobs over
a three-year period.

“They’re going to do major
renovations to the existing pro-
jects,” the Prime Minister con-
firmed. “He’s [Kerzner] sought
and obtained approvals from
the Investment Board.”

Trust still missing on cheque posting

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS are still seeing their deposited
cheques take several days to clear despite the
launch of the Bahamas Automated Clearing
House (ACH), but its general manager told Tri-
bune Business yesterday that the system was
running fine.

Brian Smith said the ACH was not to blame
for the length of time some cheques take to clear.
He added that some commercial banks simply
impose their own rules on their cheque clearing
system. And while depositors should see money
credited to their accounts by the end of the sec-
ond business day after making the cheque
deposit, some banks still have longer holds on
cheques. One banking official, who spoke on
condition of anonymity, said banks still can’t
trust their account holders to not overdraw their
accounts or write a bad cheque, so longer holds
are still necessary despite the ACH.

Mr Smith said the commercial banks are often

extremely competitive and therefore advance-
ments, such as the advent of the ACH, are stag-
gered in their use. “People need to ask their
banks,” he said. “It has nothing to do with ACH.”
He added that the ACH’s next big move is to
facilitate bulk direct credit.

According to him, they are awaiting on the
commercial banks to complete their final cus-
tomer agreements in order to bring online a
direct deposit system that can be used by employ-
ers to electronically pay their employees, greatly
reducing the need for paper cheques.

While it is not know how long it will take for
the direct deposit system to become functional,
the ACH is also focused on developing a com-
prehensive network Internet banking portal that
will allow the transfer of funds through the Inter-
net from one bank to another. “Internet banking
is not ready yet, but all the banks are looking into
getting that ready,” said Mr Smith. “The next
thing to come online will be bulk payments. If we
can do bulk payments that’s a huge step for-
ward.”

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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Government ‘never had high
hopes’ for $857m development

FROM page 1B

ness, allege that Roger Stein
and his RHS Ventures compa-
ny effectively orchestrated neg-
ative media articles against, and
investigations by US federal
and state authorities, into their
financing partner on the South
Ocean project, Plainfield Asset
Management.

Once relations between the
two soured, and the Connecti-
cut-based hedge fund attempt-
ed to remove Mr Stein/RHS
Ventures as the South Ocean

project’s managing partner,
Plainfield alleged that their
campaign against it even
extended to lobbying Bahamian
government ministers.

A transcript of the Ameri-
can Arbitration Association
hearing, at which Plainfield
comprehensively trounced Mr
Stein and RHS Ventures,
details how the latter allegedly
approached Earl Deveaux,
minister of the environment,
with its complaints and claims
against the hedge fund.

Mr Deveaux could not be

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAINTREE INVESTMENTS
LIMITED

ee

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RAINTREE INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ZONTERCREST INVESTMENTS
LID.

ee

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ZONTERCREST INVESTMENT LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WRITMONT INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WRITMONT INVESTMENT LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GIMSON FIELD
HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 1st day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

contacted by Tribune Business
for comment yesterday, despite
a message left on his cell phone,
but there is nothing to suggest
he acted improperly in relation
to the protracted Stein/Plain-
field affair at South Ocean.

The November 17, 2009,
hearing transcript details how
Howard Kaplan, Plainfield’s
attorney, asked Mr Stein, who
was testifying as a witness,
whether he had contacted any
government agency in the
Bahamas or US regarding his
client. The exchange went as
follows:

Kaplan: Let’s go to the
Bahamas. Since October 2008,
have you had any contacts with
any governmental entities or
people concerning Plainfield?

Stein: Yes

Kaplan: Which ones?

Stein: Minister of the Envi-
ronment

Kaplan: Who is that?

Stein: A gentleman named
Earl Deveaux, which is D-e-v-e-
a-U-X.

No details of these “contacts”
were provided in the court tran-
script, which was filed as part of
a batch of documents by Plain-
field and its attorneys. The
hedge fund is seeking ratifica-
tion of the Arbitration Award
by the New York Supreme
State Court to make it legally
binding on Mr Stein and RHS
Ventures, who as Tribune Busi-
ness previously reported are
seeking to have the award set
aside or “vacated”.

The long-running legal battle,
which began some 18 months
ago in October 2008, has effec-

tively tied the 373-acre South
Ocean project up in knots, with
its resort buildings still closed
and deteriorating daily. Golf
course maintenance has also
been impacted, and Plainfield
acknowledged that the project
“continues to languish without
direction”.

With a potentially key asset
and attractive real estate parcel
still out of commission, the
Prime Minister indicated that
his government had not set any
great store by the South Ocean
project due to the developers’
lack of a track record on similar
developments.

Point

“From my point of view, we
never had high expectations for
that project in the first place,”
Mr Ingraham told Tribune
Business. He contrasted South
Ocean with Albany, which
included among its major share-
holders and backers, the Tavis-
tock Group, the controlling
vehicle for worldwide invest-
ments made by Lyford Cay-
based billionaire Joe Lewis.

While Mr Stein, according to
Tribune Business’s research,
had been an investor in the
developer of the Trump Tower
in Fort Lauderdale, Mr Ingra-
ham pointed to Mr Lewis’s and
the Tavistock Group’s track
record when it came to devel-
oping similar communities to
Albany, plus their deep pock-
ets.

Meanwhile, responding to
Mr Stein’s efforts to have the
arbitration award against him
overturned, Plainfield alleged

that his claims of having uncov-
ered ‘new evidence’ against the
hedge fund were “disingenu-
ous” - because he and his pri-
vate investigator, Robert Sei-
den, “have tried for more than
one year to instigate a criminal
investigation of Plainfield”.

This was done, Plainfield
alleged, in a bid to force it to
settle prior to the Arbitration
Association panel issuing its
ruling. “[Stein and RHS Ven-
tures] sought to extract a set-
tlement from Plainfield shortly
after one particularly obnox-
ious article referring to an
alleged criminal investigation
was published,” the hedge fund
alleged.

“On March 29, 2010, 10 days
before the award was issued,
Stein’s arbitration counsel
invites a ‘sit down’ to discuss
settlement and writes to Plain-
field’s counsel: “Your friends
are not doing well in the
papers..... your side seems to
be at risk of much more dam-
aging reports’ if the Tribunal
ruled in Stein’s favour.”

Plainfield alleged that Mr
Stein’s claims of predatory
lending by it were “all reject-
ed” by the arbitration tribunal,
which found its loans were what
enabled the South Ocean pro-
ject to go forward.

And arguing that an investi-
gation proved nothing, Plain-
field alleged that the probes by
the Manhattan District Attor-
ney and Connecticut Attorney-
General “had not bearing” on
the arbitration finding.

This, the hedge fund alleged,
found that Mr Stein and his
entities “misappropriated

funds, committed misrepresen-
tation and other acts of willful
misconduct, damaging [Plain-
field] in the amount of approx-
imately $2.9 million, and that
RHS Ventures was properly
removed as general partner of
New South Ocean Ventures”.

Describing Mr Stein’s argu-
ment for overturning the arbi-
tration award as “kitchen sink”
allegations, Plainfield argued:
“Stein’s continuing intransi-
gence has been prejudicial and
harmful” to it.

Following its issuance of the
November 11, 2008, notice
removing Mr Stein and RHS
Ventures as South Ocean’s gen-
eral partner, Plainfield alleged:
“Stein fought to delay removal
through proceedings com-
menced in the Bahamas and
New York.

Months

“After 18 months of arbitra-
tion, the Tribunal held that
petitioners’ removal of Stein
and his companies for cause
was justified, and that [Plain-
field] is the proper general part-
ner of the partnership.

“Stein, however, continues
to ignore the Tribunal’s award
and refuses to turn over the
books, records, bank accounts
and other assets of the [South
Ocean] partnership, or other-
wise recognise Plainfield as the
general partner.

“In the interim, the [South
Ocean] partnership continues
to languish without direction,
and [Plainfield] is denied its
rightful role as general part-
ner.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THOMLINSON COMPANY LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THOMLINSON COMPANY LID. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WILLOWTREE ASSETS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WILLOWTREE ASSETS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THE IPHIGENIA CO. LTD.

— + ——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THE IPHIGENIA CO. LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIPIZZAN INVESTMENTS INC.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LIPIZZAN INVESTMENTS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMROSE VISTA
INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PRIMROSE VISTA INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TARAN VENTURES LIMITED

— ——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TARAN VENTURES LIMITED. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 5B



New car sales down 11
per cent in year to April

FROM page 1B

loan” for new auto purchases, due to
the perceived high risk that their
incomes might be cut further or, in a
worst case scenario, they may be laid-
off.

And Mr Barr said those already
laid-off and unemployed would need
to re-establish themselves in a new job
for about a year before banks regained
the confidence to advance new credit
to them - another factor likely to delay
any recovery in new car sales.

“Tf we see an upturn in the econo-
my, our business will be on the tail-
end of that,” Mr Barr told Tribune
Business. “It will take a while for the
economy to improve, be seen to be
improving, and for the banks to regain
confidence that it’s sustainable.

“Across the board, we’ve got to see

Government: 15 per cent

improvement in the economy, it’s got
to be a sustainable improvement, and
people have got to re-establish them-
selves in a job. All these things have
got to be re-established.”

Expressing his optimism in the
Bahamas’ long-term economic future
and ability to recover from the cur-
rent downturn, Mr Barr said many
other countries were in far worse
shape than this nation.

However, he warned that the
“motor industry and transportation
industry have got a long way to go to
get back to where they were” pre-
recession”.

“The last couple of years have been
a struggle for dealers,” Mr Barr told
Tribune Business. ““There’s no consis-
tency. Some months have been very
good, and other months you hardly
see any sales.

“Right now we’re staying in busi-
ness, doing the best we can, keeping
service customers happy and having
the right product for those buying. It
will get better. The question is when
that transpires, but there are things
that could nudge us in the right direc-
tion.”

Chief among these was consumma-
tion of the Baha Mar project, Mr Barr,
adding that if it did not come to
fruition the economy “could be in for
the long haul”.

With many car dealers having “high
overheads” as a result of millions of
dollars worth of inventory, Mr Barr
still said: “I feel very positive about
the future. Business has been a strug-
gle for everybody.

“But I still maintain there’s a lot of
places worse off. We have a stable gov-
ernment, we are in recession, but we

of revenue ‘consumed’

have a lot going for us in this coun-
try. As time marches on, there’s a
brighter future. It’s a struggle, but
there’s light at the end of the tunnel.”

BMDA members saw a 10.93 per
cent month-over-month increase in
new car sales in April, compared to
March, largely due to the annual boost
received from the New Car Show.

“Tt was a boost, but not as much as
in past years,” Rick Lowe, operations
manager at Nassau Motor Company
(NMC), told Tribune Business. He
added that there had been suggestions
recovery in the sector could take
another year, and “other people sug-
gest it could be longer”.

With dealers seeking to match
inventory to sales levels, Mr Lowe said
it would take some companies a while
to bring stock back up if a recovery
took place.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & EQUITY DIVISION

dS A

For the stories

aR CaS
Br ES
Tees



2009
CLE/qui/00121

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of

by debt interest

FROM page 1B

proposed tax increases and
spending restraints would sat-
isfy the austerity demands of
major international credit rating
agencies, Standard & Poor’s
(S&P) and Moody’s, setting the
Bahamas’ key fiscal ratios back
on the right path.

Labelling today’s Budget as
arguably the “most challeng-
ing” he has had to deliver in 13
years as a Prime Minister, Mr
Ingraham said the measures he
is introducing had to be done
now, before the Government
would find it “nearly impossi-
ble” to turn its fiscal deficit and
national debt-to-gross domes-
tic product (GDP) ratios
around.

Warning that some “sharp
medicine” would be unveiled,
the Prime Minister said this was
necessary to prevent the
Bahamas’ national debt rising
to levels that would be unsus-
tainable for future generations,
and to enable the economy to
maximise returns from recov-
ery when it came.

“This is probably the most
important,” Mr Ingraham said
of the 2010-2011 Budget, “but
when we came in 1992 it was
challenging at that time, and
also challenging in 2001.

“But this year is the most
challenging, the most difficult,
where we have to give serious
consideration to some hereto-
fore unthinkable propositions.”

He added: “It has to be done
now before we arrive at a point
where it’s nearly impossible to
turn back. Some 15 per cent of
revenue is being consumed by
interest payments in a society
such as the Bahamas, and the
largest impact is on the level of

services the Government can
afford to provide for the popu-
lation.”

With some $0.15 out of every
dollar being eaten up by inter-
ests on the Government’s $3.3
billion-plus direct debt, the
Prime Minister indicated he
was concerned that funds avail-
able for “essential public ser-
vices” would be increasingly
limited if the fiscal deficit and
debt-to-GDP ratios were not
placed on a more sustainable
path.

Asked whether he believed
the Government’s 2010-2011
Budget would be enough to sat-
isfy the demands of Moody’s
and S&P, both of which have
indicated that maintaining its
current sovereign credit rating
will depend to a large extent
on austerity measures being
taken by the Bahamas, the
Prime Minister replied: “I’m
very confident that what we are
doing will find favour with them
and all persons of goodwill,
including businesses.

“We’ve sought to impose
revenue measures in a way that
will not weigh that is not going
to weigh too burdensome for
any particular segment of the
economy.”

While the Prime Minister did
not disclose any specific tax
increases, banking industry
sources yesterday told Tribune
Business that the Bahamian
commercial banking sector was
braced for substantial increases
in banking fees.

One source told this news-
paper: “They’re effectively dou-
bling our fees.” Another added:
“We've been given a heads up
that fees are going up. A lot of
things are going up. I don’t
think the Government has a lot

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENNETH PRATT JUNIOR
of FIRST STREET, COCONUT GROVE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19â„¢* DAY OF
MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.Q. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
MEONA SKYE, LIMITED
IBC No. 140564B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 137(1)(g) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 46 of 2000, MEONA
SKYE, LIMITED has been dissolved and has been struck off Reg-
ister of Companies with effect from the 12th day April of 2010.

7
AL la
iquidator

of choice.”

Tribune Business under-
stands that the bulk of the Bud-
get’s planned tax increases will
largely be borne directly by dif-
ferent segments of the economy
in the first instance. The con-
cern, though, will be that ulti-
mately any tax increases will be
borne by the consumer and liv-
ing costs, as companies pass tax
and fee rises on to consumers.
Another potential worry is that
the increased tax/cost burden
could force some businesses,
already struggling, to further
downsize staff.

Still, the Prime Minister indi-
cated he was prepared to take
the hard decisions he believes
are in the best interests of the
Bahamas long-term. There
were also hints that the Gov-
ernment’s 2009-2010 fiscal
deficit is likely to be sharply
higher than previous forecasts,
given that the January-April
period saw a “substantial dete-
rioration in government rev-
enues year-over-year”, with
March “especially devastating”.

“The borrowing has been
substantial, and interest pay-
ments of the order of $0.15 on
each revenue $1, that’s an
unsustainable position,” the
Prime Minister told Tribune
Business. “We are most uncom-
fortable to have to borrow
money to pay for recurrent
expenditure.”

The Government has opted
for the tax increases/spending
restraint combination in a bid
to hold employment levels in
the public sector, fearing that
any mass downsizing there
would further setback recovery
and depress an already weak
economy. It also knows that
economic recovery is still some
way off, so the private sector

will be unable to ‘grow’ the
public finances out of their cur-
rent position.

Describing the Government’s
plans as “sharp medicine; it’s
intended to cure”, the Prime
Minister said: “We are seeking
to do a real and realistic Bud-
get, and take account of what is
expected and make the hard
decisions in relation to that, to
the benefit of the economy lat-
er on.

“If we’re going to put our-
selves in a position to maximise
any returns from an improved
economy, and not burden
future generations with any
increase in debt, we’ve got to
now put ourselves in a healthy
position.”

The objectives, he added,
were “to sustain as much public
sector employment as possible,
to improve the infrastructure,
to promote and attract addi-
tional investment to the
Bahamas, and make the busi-
ness environment more con-
ducive, effective and efficient
to operations. To have a tax
regime that’s reasonably low,
but takes care of public services
of the Bahamas.”

The Prime Minister is thus
preparing both the public sector
and the Bahamian people at
large for any pain that results
from today’s Budget, and is
leading by example via the 16
per cent salary cut he is taking.
Ministers and MPs are also like-
ly to see their salaries cut by 7
per cent and 5 per cent.

“We are truly seeking to do
what is the best for the
Bahamas in these circum-
stances, and [regardless] of the
political consequences. This is
what the Bahamas needs,
requires at this point in time,
and doing so is our duty.”

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Or ols email breopculting rm ayshes com



MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee NEWBOLD
AND

IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT Piece Parcel
or lot of Land Situate on Maxwell Lane bounded
North by Property of one Weir 96.51 feet, East
by property of one Lewis 51.53 feet, and again
by a loose stone wall 15.27 feet South, by
Maxwell Lane 107.58 feet, West by property
of one Johnson 75.53 feet, in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

NOTICE

The Petition of MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE
nee NEWBOLD, Retired, of Saunders Road off
Lightbourne Avenue situate in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas in respect of:

ALL THAT PIECE Parcel or lot of Land Situate
on Maxwell Lane bounded North by Property
of one Weir 96.51 feet, East by property of one
Lewis 51.53 feet, and again by loose stone
wall 15.27 feet South, by Maxwell Lane 107.58
feet, West by property of one Johnson 75.53
feet, in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, and is more particularly described
and delineated on the plan attached hereto
and is thereon coloured PINK.

MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee
NEWBOLD claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered fee simple estate in possession
of the said piece parcel or lot of land and made
application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section
Three (8) of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to
have her title to the said piece parcel or tract
of land investigated and the nature or extent
of it determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected
during the normal office hours at the following
places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joan Ferguson & Co.,
Avson House, Adelaide Village, New
Providence Bahamas.

(c) The Chambers of Newton R McDonald
& Co., Meeting Street, opposite St. John's
Baptist Church, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right of dower or any adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the said Petition
shall on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010 file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of
his claim on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010,
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 14th day of May, A.D. 2010

Joan Ferguson & Co
Chambers

Avson House

Adelaide Village

New Providence, Bahamas.

Attorneys for the Petitioner



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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



OOO eS INES eee
Hotels maintain improvements through April

FROM page 1B

almost flat for the period.”
Average occupancies for the
month of April 2010 at the 14
Nassau/New Providence hotels
surveyed stood at 68.6 per cent,
compared to 66 per cent for

2009.

As for ADRs, they stood at
$263 this year, compared to
$260 in 2009. And there was
also improving news when it
came to air arrivals for 2010,
Mr Sands telling Tribune Busi-
ness: “Air arrivals to Nassau to
the end of March 2010 were up




PUBLIC NOTICE






INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL



The Public is hereby advised that | Joyann S. D. Stuart





mother of

of Mussaenda

Avenue, Garden Hills #2,Nassau, New Providence, The



Bahamas, intend to change my child’s name to JABARI




MATTHEW STUART. If there are any objections to this




change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections



to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, The



Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of







publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

4.3 per cent.”

However, the Bahamas and
its tourism/hotel industries
remain vulnerable to outside
forces they cannot control, and
not just the global economy.
One of these is the potential
disastrous consequences if oil
from British Petroleum’s (BP)
leaking Deepwater Horizon oil
rig arrives on these shores, cre-
ating an environmental night-
mare.

Asked about the hotel indus-
try’s perspective on the situa-
tion, Mr Sands said: “The fact
of the matter that we have to be
concerned, because one of the
primary reasons persons travel
to the Bahamas is for a beach
vacation.

“Tt appears the Government
has been proactive in monitor-
ing and addressing this particu-

lar situation, and we’re going
to give them all the support we
can to address this situation as
best we can.”

While the situation with BP’s
leaking oil platform, currently
spewing thousands of barrels
of oil into the Gulf of Mexico,
was outside many people’s con-
trol and dependent on whether
sea currents carried it towards
the Bahamas, Mr Sands said
the BHA would continue to
monitor the situation and hope
the “liable parties” did what
was necessary to secure the sit-
uation and prevent damage to
this nation’s “beaches, wetlands
and sanctuaries”.

The BHA president also told
Tribune Business that there had
been no discussions as an Asso-
ciation about the potential
implications for tourism if oil

NOTICE




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHELDA FERTIL OF GOLD COIN




RIVERSIDE VALLEY CORP.

LANE, SOUTH BAHAMIA, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality






—_— -—

and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days





#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RIVERSIDE VALLEY CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TAPPAN DOBBS INC.

—

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TAPPAN DOBBS INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

from the 19TH day of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, The

Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CATHRINE
DORSETTE of Walton Street, PO. Box GT 2389,
Nassau, The Bahamas, intend to change my name to
THESRENE GREY. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-
742, Nassau, The Bahamas, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TETHYS VENTURE LIMITED

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TETHY VENTURES LIMITED. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money ot Work

i ee ee

exploration and drilling was
conducted in the Bahamas, as
several companies are seeking
licences to do.

The Statoil/BPC Ltd consor-
tium have already applied for
licences to conduct oil explo-
ration in the southern
Bahamas, although the start of
such work is likely to be some
way Off, given that the territor-
ial boundaries with Cuba are
still being worked out under
United Nations (UN) auspices.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of state for the environment,
said recently that no oil drilling
would take place in Bahamian
waters for a decade. However,
Mr Sands said the fallout from
the BP oil rig explosion and
leak had brought the issue to
the forefront, given the notion
that tourism - especially the
environmentally-based variety -
was incompatible with the oil
industry.

“This particular accident may
have raised the profile of this
situation, and requires some
debate among us,” Mr Sands
said. “We’ve not given it any
major consideration to date.

“We’re going to have to
weigh the economic, national
interest with environmental
issues. There’s always a very
fine line, but it’s always fair to
say environmental concerns are

always uppermost in our busi-
ness with regard to new devel-
opments. Environmental
Impact Assessments are
required for all situations, and
this particular issue has high-
lighted that need to take some
of these things a little bit fur-
ther.”

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said
that while the British Airways
(BA) strike might impact a UK
traveller market to the
Bahamas that was starting to
grow again, the effects would
likely be mitigated by alterna-
tive airlift options to Miami.

“We’re always concerned
when airlift, especially direct
airlift to this destination, is
reduced,” the BHA president
said. “For the Bahamas, there’s
tremendous airlift out of the
UK to Miami on Virgin or oth-
er carriers, with the opportuni-
ty for connecting flights.

“We believe that during this
period, some if not all of the
slack will be taken up by other
carriers, but that does not com-
pensate for the shortfall in
direct airlift out of that desti-
nation.

“Certainly, while British trav-
el has I think decreased, it’s
beginning to grow again. The
numbers are not significant to
the overall airlift mix into New
Providence.”

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT T

HANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that | Joyann S. D. Stuart
mother of JELANI JAVIER ALEXANDER, of Mussaenda
Avenue, Garden Hills #2,Nassau, New Providence, The
Bahamas, intend to change my child’s name to JELANI
JAVIER STUART. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, The Bahamas,
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GYPSY INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GYPSY INVESTMENTS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 25 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,568.17 | CHG -0.03 | % CHG 0.00 | YTD 2.79 | YTD % 0.18
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 0.250 0.040
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 0.050 0.200
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 0.598 0.260
0.33 Benchmark -0.877 0.000
3.15 Bahamas Waste 0.168 0.090
2.14 Fidelity Bank 0.055 0.040
9.62 Cable Bahamas 1.408 0.290
2.69 Colina Holdings 0.249 0.040
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 0.460 0.230
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 0.111 0.052
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 0.627 0.110
5.94 Famguard -0.003 0.240
8.75 Finco 0.168 0.520
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 0.678 0.350
3.75 Focol ($) 0.366 0.170
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 0.000 0.000
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.035 0.000
5.00 ICD Utilities 0.407 0.240
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952 0.640
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 0.000
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months %











The Family Cert of the State of Delainare

S2wk-Hi Previous Close Today's Close
1.05 1.05
10.63 10.63
5.20 5.20
0.33 0.33
3.15 3.15
2.17 2.17
12.07 12.07
2.84 2.84
6.99 6.99
2.42 2.39
2.54 2.54
6.07 6.07
9.00 9.00
9.85 9.85
5.08 5.08
1.00 1.00
0.27 0.27
5.59 5.59

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.03
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

NOTICE OF
GUARDIANSHIP ACTION

TO: Darren Hall

FROM: Clerk of Court - At Risk
New Castle County

Christopher Gibson, Petitioner, has brought suit against
you for Guardianship in the Family Court of the State of
Delaware for New Castle County, United States, petition
number 10-04911. If you do not serve a response to the
petition to the Court and to the Petitioner’s Attorney or

the petitioner if not represented at the following address:

52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity

19 October 2017
19 October 2022

30 May 2013

29 May 2015
EPS $ Yield
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

2825 Squirrel Drive
Bear, DE 19701

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.515417

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.499936

NAV Date
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

52wk-Low
1.3758
2.8266
1.4611
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

Within 20 days after publication of this notice, exclusive
of the date of publication, as required by statute, this
action will be heard without further notice at Family
Court.

2.57
1.48
3.45

-4.99
5.47
6.99
13.50

13.5654
107.5706
105.7706 3.99

1.1080 1.67 5.26
1.0615 -0.61 2.84
1.1050 1.31 5.01
9.4839 1.52 7.41

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Reply to:

410.0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund 10.6709 -0.93 12.33 31-Mar-10

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Int] Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 3.23 31-Mar-10
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

NIM - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

4.8105 58.37

NEW CASTLE COUNTY FAMILY COURT
CIVIL CASE PROCESSING
500 NORTH KING STREET / SUITE 400
WILMINGTON DE 19801
(302) 255-0359
ATTN: Lynn Peters

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Teday's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 7B



Financial advice from the
top graduates in America

By CHIP CUTTER
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — It's
graduation season. That means
hordes of newly-minted MBA
students and undergraduate
business majors will soon be
entering the work force.

They've spent years studying
the intricacies of business and
finance. Now, they're ready to
start dispensing that financial
wisdom on Wall Street and
everywhere else.

What will they say? And
what tips do they have for the
rest of us?

To find out, The Associated
Press reached out to some of
the top grads at colleges around
the country. They shared their
advice for saving, managing
money and investing during
volatile times.

Embrace college frugality

College students excel at liv-
ing on the cheap. Low-cost
meals such as cereal, ramen
noodles and macaroni and
cheese are staples. And stu-
dents develop a knack for zero-
ing in on everything from the
cheapest place to do laundry to
the best happy hour deal.

Young adults, and everyone
else for that matter, shouldn't
forget those thrifty philosophies
after they move into a higher
income bracket, said Brandon
Garrett, 22. He recently gradu-
ated with the highest grade
point average from Texas Tech
University's personal financial
planning program.

"Frugality shouldn't end with

career security,” he said.

Garrett keeps a handle on
his discretionary expenses by
following the "envelope bud-
get." With his wife, he devel-
ops a budget every month for
things like groceries and enter-
tainment, and places cash for
those items in separate
envelopes. "Once those
envelopes are empty," he said,
"then we're done spending
money on those things."

Rachel Nabatian, an under-
graduate finance and account-
ing major at New York Uni-
versity's Stern School of Busi-
ness, also uses cash and sets a
daily budget to make sure she
sticks to her goals.

Take the long-term view

Saving is one thing, but
investing is another.

The Standard & Poor's 500
stock index is down 11.4 per-
cent from the high it reached
April 26, and some young
adults remain skittish about get-
ting into stocks after watching
the market tank from 2008 to
early 2009.

But Sarah McGinty, a 29-
year-old MBA student at the
University of Chicago's Booth
School of Business, has some
advice. She threw out the pass-
words to her retirement
accounts with Fidelity Invest-
ments, and stopped checking
the daily price fluctuations.

That's helped her to stay
calm during volatility and
remember that investments are
meant for the long-term.

"If you put money into the
markets with the goal of it

growing over time, you have to
honor the spirit of that invest-
ment," she said.

Others agree. Mike Ragan,
an MBA student from MIT's
Sloan School of Management,
said investors are much more
attune to losses than gains. So
declines of 10 percent or more
can feel painful, motivating
people to sell their shares.

His tip: Don't panic if a stock
price drops if you still feel com-
fortable about the company's
business.

"If nothing has changed, and
it's actually cheaper, you should
buy more," he said. "You
shouldn't necessarily think that
you did something wrong and
sell out of it.”

Beware of individual stocks

Yet even business students
say it's risky to buy individual
stocks, unless you have time to
dig into a company's earnings
and do plenty of research.

Alan Rich, 29, will graduate
with an MBA from Dart-

mouth's Tuck School of Busi-
ness next month. He says most
Americans should look to low-
cost mutual funds that track a
broad market index such as the
S&P 500.

Those funds may seem bor-
ing, but they carry less risk than
buying shares of individual
companies. "It takes a lot of
work to understand how to pick
stocks," said Ian Sexsmith, who
graduated with an MBA from
University of California Berke-
ley's Haas School of Business
about a week ago. "That's a
full-time job for a mutual fund
manager."

Remember your

college curiosity

And, if you still don't think
you're ready to start investing,
think back to your college days.

On campus, students often
felt empowered to question
everything — from hard-to-
understand lecture topics to the
menu selections in the dining
halls. That same curiosity

should apply to personal
finance and investing, said
Tanya Louneva, who recently
graduated with a bachelor's
degree from the University of
Pennsylvania's Wharton
School.

If you don't understand
something, speak up or ask
questions. Louneva recently did
that while helping her parents
secure a new mortgage, and
found it helpful.

"The best financial advice is



to be a sponge,” she said. "This
is the time for us to learn.”

That's an enduring lesson,
even for those students who
attended the top business
schoools, said Tom Fazzio, a
26-year-old MBA student from
MIT's Sloan School of Man-
agement. To be smart investors,
it's essential for consumers to
keep asking questions.

"You have to know what you
don't know," Fazzio said. "I
think that's real intelligence."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAR FOCUS VENTURES LTD.










— + —_.






Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section



138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of STAR FOCUS VENTURES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.















PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that|, ANTHONY LESLIE
SMITH intend to change my name to ANTHONY
HARRIS SMITH. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box

N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MT. PINOTAGE HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MT. PINOTAGE HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAREFORD INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD.

— *——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of BAREFORD IN-
VESTMENTS PTE. LID. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and_ the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DARNBROUGH PLAINES LTD.

——

-
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DARNBROUGH PLAINES LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AZTECA VENTURES LTD.

— §——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AZTECA VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AMORGOS LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of AMORGOS LIMITED. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPPY PARADISE ASSETS
LIMITED

— + ——.

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HAPPY PARADISE ASSETS LIMITED.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



(Liquidator)





Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLIFTON HEIGHTS HILLS
CO. LTD.

— - _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLIFTON HEIGHT HILLS CoO. LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW CENTURY GROUP LTD.

—_— -,——

a

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW CENTURY GROUP LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HUCUL HOLDINGS LTD.

—_— -,——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HUCUL HOLDINGS LTD.. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 9B

eS





The Tribune

‘Taste



Something’s Different Novelty Cookies & Cakes
to provide scholarship to attend Sugar Fling

omething's Differ-
S=: Cookie and
Cake Boutique will

hold “Sugar Fling
2010” a series of work-
shops designed to give
kids 13 years and older
and adults a hands on
experience in cake dec-
orating and design June
28 to July 10 The store
will also provide a schol-
arship for one student to
attend the workshop and
intern at the company.

Ian and Samantha Moree,
Bahamian artists and husband
and wife team at Something's
Different will facilitate ten 4
hour sessions to showcase a
range of cake decorating skills.
Classes will be held Monday-
Thursday and on Saturday
from 1-5 pm. The 4 courses
will include Gumpaste, Fon-
dant, Buttercream and Royal
Icing.

“Sugar Fling” was created
in response to overwhelming

One seat will be reserved for the
Recipient of a Scholarship to
Attend “Sugar Fling” and will
Culminate in the Opportunity to
Intern at Something's Different

requests for cake decorating
instruction by the general pub-
lic. In recent months, Some-
thing's Different has attracted
a fan base of over three thou-
sand persons on the social util-
ity Facebook and it continues
to climb rapidly. Its popular-
ity has resulted in the need for
advance booking to secure
dates.

Something's Different is not
a bakery but rather an “out
of the box” approach to bak-
ing, decorating and packaging
that caters to events including
weddings and showers with a
special emphasis on corporate
amenity gifts and favours.

“This is an incredible
opportunity,” said Ian Moree,
artist and partner at Some-

thing's Different. “Not only
will they receive this instruc-
tion and course materials val-
ued at over $1000 but they will
also be eligible to gain even
more exposure by interning
with us for the rest of the sum-
mer. It's an opportunity for us
assist some one to pursue their
dream in the same way people
have done for us.”

“Our Palmdale location, 2
doors down from the corner
of Alexander and Rosetta
Sts,” said Samantha Moree,
“seemed perfectly suited for a
smaller class but because of
the interest we are looking at
a few other locations so that
we can accommodate more
students. In any event classes
will be limited to 10 persons.”

These experiential work-
shops are fashioned closely
on classes the artists them-
selves attended at the begin-
ning of their careers. The
“Sugar Fling” experience is
designed to be deliberately
casual, yet a very practical and
intentional environment to
acquire hands on experience
that can easily translate into a
viable career, business or hob-
by.
“We have for now,” said
Mrs Moree, “made the deci-
sion to offer the scholarship to
public school students and
those attending private
schools on scholarship only”.
She continued, “We hope to
offer 1 day workshops
through out the year as our
schedule allows. We would
love to make “Sugar Fling”
an annual event.”

Deadline for scholarship
applications is Friday June 11.
Registration for classes begins
May 25, 2010. Details of both
the workshops and scholar-
ship are available at Some-
thing's Different website at
www.somethingsdifferent.biz.













+.
- tort t+
ee A ee
babe
eh ee
To



SEXMPCITY





MAY 27, 2010 AT
GALLERIA CINEMAS,
JFK DRIVE AT 7PM.

$30 GENERAL ADMISS ION, $50 VIF

Sponsored by:



A SAMPLE of
the design
techniques stu-
dents attending
the Sugar Fling
2010 will learn
from cake dec-
orators lan and
Samantha
Moree





Echo Water
CDM Group
Havanias
Dermal Clinic

Tickets @
Clippendales, Mackey Street
or
The Workshop

Call: 356-2751 for more info



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

TASTE

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune



a





‘Buy The Book’ bookstore off to great start

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia.net



ITHIN the first four

weeks of operation at

Buy The Book book-
store on West Bay Street, over
one-third of the store’s inventory
was sold out.

Customers have come to love its
friendly atmosphere- small aisles that
don’t overwhelm you which makes it all
worth the while as you peruse through
book titles and US prices.

Janice Cartwright, the bookstore’s
accountant said the public’s reaction
about the bookstore’s location, hours,
book selection, and extensive selection
of school and office supplies, teaching
resources, Hallmark products, gift
wrapping and party supplies are excep-
tional.

“Everyone of our customers, you
would think they live nearby,” said Ms
Cartwright. “But when we talk to them
we discover that they all live beyond
the boundaries hailing from Lyford
Cay, the Grove, Centreville, and other

places in town--and they all feel part of
the neighborhood,” said Ms
Cartwright.

Residents of the Cable Beach area
were really the ones who pushed for
the bookstore to open before its pro-
jected date. According to Ms
Cartwright, customers came in and lit-
erally opened up the establishment
ahead of time. They were so persistent,
she got tired of promising that the
bookstore would open soon.

Buzz surrounding the opening
became so intense that Ms Cartwright
had told customers to come in and pick
out their material while they were still
working out the fine details.

This was how book hungry patrons
were; it didn’t matter that the material
wasn’t on the shelves, they reached
into the box orders to pick out their
material.

“We didn’t even have a cash register
up and running yet,” said Ms
Cartwright. Ms Cartwright says they
began compiling a database of their
customers, with their customer’s
anniversaries, children’s birthdays, and
even pet names.

To date they have over 400 book
orders. Some of them are very difficult
to find. Persons have requested unusu-

al books on topics such as classical gui-
tar music, and techniques in water
colour.

Perhaps one of her favourite things
to do is to sit down and talk to people
from different walks of life.

“Many fathers have come in with
their children, and purchased books
for the family,” she explained. “It’s a
situation where mom is home cooking
dinner, and dad brings them to the
store.”

Delivering on time is one of the most
satisfying things in their business; they
continue to develop a reputation of
being customer proactive.

Ms Cartwright loves to hear when
customers say they’ve been trying to
order something they couldn’t find in
another book store, and they have the
opportunity to order it online for them.

“People are hungry for non-fiction
books and the classics,” said Ms
Cartwright. Older people and young-
sters are requesting them everyday.”

She says they are very satisfied with
the store and it’s setup. “This is the
store that we envisioned,” she
explained. “I don’t worry about the
constraints, timing or priorities. This is
supposed to hire more people, and it’s
not going to happen overnight.”

There are many things Ms
Cartwright wants to do with the store in
the future, Already persons from the
community to hold classes such as yoga
and dance at the store.

“We will evolve with our cus-
tomers,” she said.

Sharon Bethel, manager of the store
says, “just to see a little girl around
four years old looking through a book
at the pictures because she can’t read
evokes a feeling I can’t describe.

“And since a little girl can’t read
the words, she would make up a story
as she goes along that would probably
be better than the book version.”

These are just some of the “special”
day to day moments that Ms Bethel
lives for.

Out on the front porch is a sitting
area with umbrellas designed for
patrons to sit and read their books
with a perfect view of the waters on
Saunders’ beach.

This month, Buy The Book is fea-
turing Joann Behagg’s pottery, and
next month a leading photographer
will showcase her work. This is an
ongoing feature of the bookstore. Buy
The Book also sell the crafts of
Bahamian artisans, showcased month-
ly on a display near the checkout desk.



Down Too Earth



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia.net



WHEN persons visit "Down Too
Earth" Adventure Farm Road, they
leave with a better appreciation for
what a typical farm has to offer with a
twist to their experience, says Sidney
St Claire.

He and his business partner, Kevin
Ferguson have designed a man-made
island, cultivated from the ground-up
where a swamp once existed.

The process to create their haven
was atask. After dredging the prop-
erty, and two landfills later, the nine-
acre block is the perfect facility for
raising livestock, and growing pro-
duce.

Mr St Claire, probably has one of
the dirtiest jobs in the nation. After
gathering the dung from his birds and
four-legged animals, he piles the waste
onto the land, and layers strips of
paper over it.

This is something to see, as he
explained to Tribune Entertainment.
The stench of fresh manure every isn’t
too pleasant, but he is able to put up
with it.

After he gathers the manure in a
compost heap, he layers paper on top
and waits a few weeks for it to disin-
tegrate. Then, he mixes the manure
with fertile soil.

Mr St Claire grows watermelon,
guava, and the Bay Jerina fruit, Tai-
wan tamarind, figs, raspberry, mul-
berry, pink guavas, lemon, peach, and
walnuts.

As you walk around the property,
one of your first stops will be St
Claire's Island, marked by a board-
walk and three bridges that connect
each other around the first pond.
Benches are stationed along the
boardwalks for you to enjoy your
packed lunch, or food bought onsite.

"St Claire's Island"- an S-shaped
murky green man-made pool is filled
with thousands of fish and turtle
species.

Back on land, the sheep do say
‘bah’, and the wild boars give that
excruciating snorting sound that lets
you know that you have entered their
territory.

Several pens on the site hold both
domestic and wild pigs. But don’t be
too surprised if a piglet runs out of its
pen to say hello. According to Mr St
Claire, this is something that children
especially love to see when they come
on field trips.

If you hear a choir of chickens mak-
ing noise, stop by the chicken coop,
and take a good look. The habitats
provide shelter to exotic birds you’ve

never heard of like the Dominican
and Polish chickens. There's even the
unusual rasta chicken, with a beard-
like bridle that resembles dreadlocks.

In the ponds across the way, you
may see a Japanese carp dancing in
and out of the water, or a turtle
emerging from the water to catch a
breath of fresh air. Thousands of
tilapia fish, native to the cool waters of
Africa are also farmed in the waters of
the pond.

Although none of this fish is grilled,
you may be able to request the staff to
whip you up a grilled fish meal.
Grilled chicken is prepared everyday,
and pizza is baked in a rock oven.
They also offer fabulous grilled corn
sold at reasonable rates and grow
tremendous beets.

At the very rear of the property is a
camping site with special features like
a swimming pool and hot tub which is
under construction. Progress has
already been made with new bath-
rooms that hold shower facilities, with
water supplied through a large water
tank stationed at the top of the roof.

GCENE@ FROM STEPPIN TO DA SHORES ©




























competed.

Greek Fraternities
and Sororities
from the Bahamas
and all across the

event presented by
KO Productions
this Saturday on
Luna Beach by
Saunders’ Beach.
In addition several
high school step-
ping teams also

United States as nat
competed in ‘Step- on 4 ar
pin’ On Da Shores’



i. + em
























¢ GREAT BAHAMIAN
SEAFOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

“Restaurant Week” kicks
off at The Seafood and
Wine Festival with three
special events. “Restaurant
Week” showcases seafood
and wine in 15 fine dining
restaurants in Nassau and
Paradise Island all week
long. “A Night at Jacaran-
da” allows guests to enjoy
amazing seafood dishes cre-
ated by top chefs at Jacaran-
da House on Parliament
Street, May 28, 7pm-11pm.
Cost: $125 (inclusive). “Fes-
tival Day” on May 29 at
Junkanoo Beach provides
fun family entertainment all
day long! Admission:
$3/adults; $1/children (under
12). T: 326-0992. See
www.downtownnassau.org/s
eafoodfestival

¢ DOWN HOME
GOSPEL CONCERT

The Hatchet Bay Festival
Committee hosts a “Down
Home Gospel Concert” and
invites the public to enjoy a
night of down home gospel
music. Free admission.
Donations welcomed. Sun-
day, May 30. 7pm-9pm at
Bethel Baptist Church,
Meeting Street. T: 356-1842.
E: mario.smith@wi.cibe.com

Pecessecssseccsseccsseccesaecse e

© THE LITTLE PINK PARTY

The Little Pink Party Sum-
mer Paradise invites you to
a 4 hour event experience
featuring the créme da la
créme of all things fabulous
Bahamian women love!
Thursday, May 27, 5.30pm-
8.30pm at the Collins Estate,
Collins Avenue and Shirley
Street.

© STAN BURNSIDE'S
“THE OPTICAL AND THE
SYNTHETIC” EXHIBITION:
OPENING RECEPTION

Stan Burnside invites you to
the opening reception of his
new exhibit “The Optical
and the Synthetic”, a collec-
tion of recent paintings. Fri-
day, May 28,

6pm-10pm at the Stan Burn-
side Gallery, Eastern Road
at Tower Heights. T: 324-
7937. E:
stanburnside@coralwave.co

© INTRODUCTION
TO YOGA CLASSES BY
DAVE REVINGTON

Expert yoga teacher, Dave
Revington will hold an
"Introduction to Yoga" class
beginning Saturday, June 5,
continuing the first Saturday
of every month from 1.30
pm to 3.30 pm. This class is
designed to introduce the
practice of yoga to anyone
who has never attended a
yoga class and wants to dis-
cover the benefits of this
time-honoured practice in a
safe, supportive environ-
ment. Spaces are at a special
price of $35 and are limited.
Call Providence Pilates Stu-
dio at: 323-0121.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 11B



ARTS

Hokemelir hosts Father's Day Fine Art Photography Show

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

s Richard Hoke-

meir looks back at

his body of work
over the years, he is sur-
prised by how his style
and methods have
evolved, due fo changes
in the industry, and his

own experience.

Last week, Mr Hokemeir
spoke to Tribune Arts about
his life as a photographer.

“Photographers aren’t as
respected as they should be,”
he said. “Over the years, pho-
tography hasn’t been a field
that is up there with other
careers in the media.

“ve taken the time to
meet with some of our young
professionals in the field who
believe that their field isn’t
taken seriously. But their
work is outstanding, and
patrons tend to see more in a
picture than they do,” said Mr
Hokemeir.

Conforming to new cam-
eras models and their features
haven’t been an easy thing for
Mr Hokemeir to adjust to in
his old age.

Learning how to use your
equipment is very important,
said Mr Hokemeir. “I think
the equipment will always be
smarter than the person who
controls it, and I’m constantly
trying to get as smart as the
equipment, but I haven’t got-
ten there yet.

“At my age, I hate adopt-
ing to anything, said Mr
Hokemeir. “I’m a stubborn
old goat, but when the digi-
tal came out, I liked it. I

thought I could go through
ten boxes of film and that’s a
lot of money. I could shoot
millions of pictures with my
digital camera, and not have
to pay anything,” said Mr
Hokemeir.

Experience has taught him
a few tricks of the trade in the
photography business. He
points out that photos aren’t
as they seem these days. For
example, photos of oven
baked turkeys are usually shot
with a raw bird spray painted
to look golden brown. Pour-
ing Elmer’s glue into a cup of
coffee will give it picture per-
fect foam.

Working with natural
papers to print custom colour
photos affords photographers
the convenience of no longer
needing a frame with a glass
to showcase their work, he
added.

Highlights of Mr Hoke-
meir’s career have been
extensive. Included in his
portfolio are photos from the
John Travolta case, and
Anna-Nicole Smith’s funeral.
He has also shot some of the
landscaped photographs
found in the Bahamas Hand-
book.

In order to perfect his craft,
he’s had to learn the way
nature operates.

Mr Hokemeir classifies
each aspect of nature as either
‘male’ or ‘female.’ Pictures
that feature sharper straight
lines are classified as
‘stronger’ or male in form.
Pictures with softer lines are
‘female’ in form.

Some pictures represent
historic moments in the
nation. A photo of an opened
window shutter with a piece
of wood engraved with the
name ‘Jackson’ holds up a

window shutter at Graycliff
Hotel and Restaurant. It rep-
resents of a slave who went
by that name and engraved
his name on the peice of
wood. According to Mr
Hokeimer’s interpretation, it
gives the impression that
there’s life just because the
curtain is pulled up. But
besides that, he says “he likes
windows, because they talk to
me at times.”

That window can be found
in the washing room of the
hotel, and was pointed out to
him by a cleaning lady.

Mr Hokeimer has been par-
ticularly drawn to ocean
themes within the past years.
As he walks through the
gallery, he points to one of
his photos: a side profile of
the chamber nautilus shell
which once housed the rare
octopus species.

The chamber nautilas shell
is a seashell that Mr Hoke-
meir shot in a lightbox that
he uses to take photos of
whiskey bottles, and newspa-
per spots advertising mer-
chandise for stores on the
island.

For taking photos such as
the chamber nautilus shell,
Mr Hokeimer drapes a light
table with a piece of blue felt,
and pokes a hole in the mid-
dle of the material. There,
you have one beam of light
coming out of the table.

“The light bounces off all
of the angles of the glass, and
the whole glass comes alive,”
said Mr Hokemeir.

Mr Hokemeir’s photo of
men in a boat on the river
captures a scene reminiscent
of The Ancient Mariner, the
only book he said he’s ever
liked in high school.

In this photo, there is a boat

in the harbor, boarded by sev-
eral men on a dark evening,
with an eerie figure of an
albatross in the background.
But to make it more Bahami-
an, there is a Haitian sloop
with a police boat right
behind it.

Mr Hokemeir says this pho-
to is a modern Ancient
Mariner meets the olden day
Ancient Mariner. It reminds
him of a scene from this clas-
sic book.

Mr Hokemeir used various
filters to shoot these kinds of
pictures which are shot in var-
ious ways and with different
filters to ensure that the tones
are soft and sharp in differ-
ent spots.

In shooting his subjects, Mr
Hokemeir watches out for
clean lines, and contortions
in his photos. One of his most
sought after pictures feature
two flamingos, with the reflec-
tion of the animals in the
water. This was shot at Adas-
tra Gardens. He says animals
are difficult to shoot, so he
had to pay several times to
get in just to get the right shot.

He likes to take shots that
makes the viewer feel good.
Some of the pictures take him
months and even years to cap-
ture because of the changing
direction of the sun or some
element of nature that may
not emerge at that particular
time.

Among his favourites from
the collection, is a photo of
the horizon, with the sun glis-
tening over the water as the
main focus.

At 69, Mr Hokemerir still
has many ideas that he wants
to get out. He told Tribune
Arts that sometimes his vision
for a picture is far from his
original vision.

FI
Richard Hokemeir

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



tion in the Bahamas struggled, and the only

[)ienin the mid 20th century fine art apprecia-

thing Nicholas Zervos could do was trade in
his dream of becoming a professional artist for law

school.

Mr Zervos, like most peo-
ple wanted to live comfort-
ably. He wanted to get mar-
ried, he wanted a family and
most importantly he wanted
to be able to support that fam-
ily.

He felt that a career in art
could not do this. It could not
put food on the table, pay the

bills, or send the kids to
school. If he had chosen art
as a profession, he believed
he would have subjected him-
self to a life of limited means.

This outlook on life denied
him the chance to become a
professional in this field.

"The life of an artist was a
difficult one in terms of finan-
cial stability. During those
years people did not appreci-
ate art because it was actually
just developing. Bahamian
people were not willing to pay
the amount of money artists
were asking for a piece of
work. When I thought about
all of this, I realised that it
was in my best interest to seek
a career that could actually
support me and the family I
wanted to have," Mr Zervos
said.

Propelled by prosperity and
success Mr Zervos put his
canvas and paint brushes
away for a white wig and a
black robe turning instead to
a career in law instead of his
passion for art

"Twas determined to study
seriously so my focus was
diverted to mastering my law
practice. It occupied most of
time so I did not have time to
do art," Mr Zervos told Tri-
bune Arts.

Though most of his time
was preoccupied by the
books, a piece of him was still
with his art. He recalled times
feeling bombarded with the
urge to just paint.

When he returned to the
Bahamas as a lawyer, the art
community had not develop
fully, but it did made pro-
gressive steps. There were
exhibits popping up and there
were artists who had ventured
into different genres like
social realism, and expres-
sions.

He paid close attention to
the work. He was inspired by
the techniques, the colour

schemes, and the concepts
each artist communicated in
their body of work.

"T would go to view exhi-
bitions and I would observe
everything about the art. I
learned a lot by just looking
because I looked at the tech-
niques the artists used. And
after viewing those exhibits I
had reached a bursting point
where I just had to paint,” Mr
Zervos said.

When Mr Zervos pulled
out his canvas and paint he
was surprised by the skill he
had even though he did not
paint for a long time.

He said one would actually
think after being disconnected
from their art work they
would lose their skills. "Sur-
prisingly this was not the case
with me. I was much better
than I was when I stopped
painting. I guess it was all that
built up urge over the years,”
he said.

Today, Mr Zervos has been
spending more than enough
time with his art work. His
work

has been showcased in a
number of exhibitions in the
past. His work has been
entered in exhibits on Par-
adise Island and Cable Beach.

He describes his artwork
as realism. He loves making
images come to life on paper.
Most of his work encompass-
es portraits, seascapes, land-
scapes and still life.

"In terms of seascapes I
love the pretty colours. There
are different shades of blue,
and if you mix the colours
correctly it is easy to get the
exact look. I try my hand at
almost everything but I love
to paint these types of images
the most,” he explained.

"I try to spend more time
with the thing that I love and
I want to let people know that
Tam still here," he said.

The sight of the still blue
seas meeting the horizon
inspires him. The sight of old
historical points on the island
fuels his passion, and creating
a replica of a still life or a per-
son challenges his precision.

Person interested in work
by Nicholas Zervos may con-
tact the artist at 394-4777 or
324-3718.



; Se
Pe a



NICHOLAS
Zervos has found
his niche in art real-
ism. He enjoys paint-
ing landscapes,
seascapes, portraits
and still life.



Full Text
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TRY a fV

Pim blowin’ it

The Tribune



S6F

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



LOW

73F

CLOUDS
AND SUN

Volume: 106 No.152





=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

mY A

SUE UR aa a RUNS gaa iM

S14 at 3

fearful as street
battles intensify





AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner/lan Allen







A POLICE OFFICER monitors Park Lane, a thoroughfare
adjacent to Red Hills Road in the capital city of Kingston,
Jamaica, Monday May 24, 2010. Thousands of police and sol-
diers stormed the Jamaican ghettos in search of a reputed
drug kingpin wanted by the United States, intensifying a
third day of street battles that have killed at least 30 people.

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIAN students are “terrified” by the civil unrest
turning some areas of Jamaica into a combat zone.

The unrest is isolated to Downtown Kingston, and in some
instances, immediately neighbouring communities, but has not
spread to the university district, resort areas or the rest of the
country, where Bahamians predominantly reside, according
to Keva Hylton, Bahamian honorary counsel.

She said she initiated contact with medical students at the
University of the West Indies (UWI), who indicated “everyone
is okay”, although “people are tense because of the uncer-
tainty.”

“Tf there is no necessity to travel to Kingston it is advanta-
geous not to travel, but there are other parts of Jamaica where
it is perfectly safe to travel to. We are asking Bahamians who
are living in Jamaica to register so we know exact numbers and
know where they are. We are going to monitor the situation on

SEE page 11



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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ZNS WORKERS walked off the job for a few minutes in protest yesterday after reports surfaced that a substantial cut to the corporation’s sub-
sidy is included in this year’s government budget, to be revealed today. Some of the workers said they heard that ZNS funding could be cut

by as much as 50 per cent.

Arhitration committee

to oversee stalled COB

AN arbitration committee :
has been appointed to over- :
see the stalled negotiations :
between College of the :
Bahamas management and :
union officials over a new :
industrial agreement for }

COB faculty.

Heading the committee is :
Rector of St Matthew’s :
Anglican Church, Father :
James Palacious. Represent- :
ing the college is Higgs & :
Johnson attorney Earl Cash :
and representing the Union :

Bahamas (UTEB) is BCPOU

president Robert Farquhar-

son.

ations endured for more than

two years with little progress :
as the talks repeatedly broke :

down amid accusations from

UTEB that COB had been

negotiating in “bad faith.”
The union has also ques-

SEE page eight

PM: Tough budget necessary

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham expects many peo-
ple will be unhappy with the
budget his administration will
present to Parliament today
but said the tough measures
are necessary to restore finan-
cial headroom for the ailing





economy. Without getting into
specifics, Mr Ingraham told
The Tribune that "significant"
tax increases will be included
in the 2010/2011 Budget pre-
sentation — presumably meant
to put a dent in the country's
hefty debt estimated by the
Central Bank to be around
$3.9 billion at the end of 2009.

SEE page eight



Wilchcombe: PLP not opposed to salary cuts

of Tertiary Educators of the : By PAUL G TURNQUEST

: Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



Stormy bi-partisan negoti-

OPPOSITION business leader in
: the House of Assembly Obie Wilch-
combe said the PLP would not be
: opposed to the planned salary cuts
: for Parliamentarians and Ministers
: of the government which are expect-
: ed to be presented before Parliament
: today.

SEE page eight

OBIE WILCHCOMBE





TV reporter fired
after alleged assault of

ambassador's chauffeur

A New York City TV
reporter has been fired from
his job after he was charged
with assaulting the chaffeur
of the Bahamian Ambas-
sador to the United Nations.

Vince DeMentri, 46, an
employee of WPIX/Chan-
nel 11, surrendered to the
New York Police Depart-
ment after Hurley
Senanayake, 54, driver for
Dr Paulette Bethel, told offi-
cers the ex-news reporter
slapped him across the face
during a dispute over a park-
ing space near the U.N.

Mr Senanyake was report-
edly waiting in a “press
only” parking zone to pick
up Dr Bethel last Friday
when former NBC10 anchor
Mr DeMentri became angry
that he could not find any-
where to stop, according to
several New York City

SEE page eight





New Arrivals

Rayan

By

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Tent mesr tatu eden Cee nee) Cte



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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Pr ae
MCT a

ST Re

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



DESPITE coming under
heavy fire from critics over sev-
eral controversial government
projects, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said he has no regrets
about his administration's deci-
sion to relocate
the container
port to Arawak
Cay, to limit the
flow of traffic on
Baillou Hill Road
to a one-way sys-
tem and to con-
struct new road-
ways near Saun-
ders Beach.

" (I'm)
absolutely satis-
fied. Saunders Beach will be a
wonderful thing, I had great
opposition to Goodman's Bay
and when it's done, it's beauti-
ful — not a word (said) about
what a wonderful thing it is.
And the same thing will hap-
pen at Saunders Beach, same
thing is happening at the Bail-
lou Hill Road improvement
programme they're doing, same
thing will happen at Arawak
Cay," Mr Ingraham told The
Tribune when asked if he
feared the “noise in the mar-
ket” over the projects could
cost his party votes in the next
general election.

He continued: "The reason
why I'm here is presumably
because people believe that I
have a vision, that I am willing
to consider different points of
view and that we are willing to
do what we think is best for the
Bahamas and take account of
views that are contrary to ours,
but at the end of the day to
make decisions that we per-
ceive to be in the national inter-
est."

In the past few weeks, sev-
eral disgruntled business own-
ers and residents of the Bail-
lou Hill Road area have called
for the reversal of a one-way
system for Baillou Hill Road
and Market Street — part of the
New Providence Road
Improvement Project — claim-
ing they are suffering inconve-
niences and a significant
decrease in profits due to the
construction.

Government's decision to
relocate the downtown con-
tainer port to Arawak Cay and
the roadwork at Saunders
Beach have also elicited some
outcry, most notably from
members of the Opposition, the
Progressive Liberal Party.



Hubert
Ingraham

Fine Threads

oh comer











Mies



said they “absolutely” do not have
plans to go ahead with cutting
through the beach.





BAHA Mar has confirmed that
it has ditched plans to cut a canal
through Cable Beach for its multi-
billion dollar resort property.

Despite recent artistic renderings
of the project in the media clearly
showing a canal through the beach
entering the property, and state-
ments from senior management
that the project would be built
largely in accordance with “origi-
nal” designs, the resort’s developers

Senior vice-president of external
affairs for Baha Mar Robert Sands
told The Tribune yesterday:

Waterways

“There will be internal water-
ways (within the resort) but there
will be absolutely no cutting
through the shoreline to create
access to the waterways.”

Mr Sands said the resort in fact

Baha Mar: No plans to cut canal through Cable Beach

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

dropped plans to create the canal
“very early on in the project” after
the government “said it would be a
difficult position to support.”

Any renderings being used in the
local media which show canal
access to the hotel property — such
as on ZNS during its recent live
broadcasts from the Cable Beach
property — are outdated, he
explained.

The government has previously
stated that for environmental rea-
sons it would no longer support the
creation of canals by cutting
through beaches in the Bahamas.





REDUNDANT WORKERS WITHOUT SEVERANCE PAY FOR MORE THAN A YEAR

Former Clico
employees to
march on
Parliament

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Clico employ-
ees suffering without sever-
ance pay for more than a year
will march on Parliament
today demanding attention
from Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham as he discloses the
2010/11 budget.

The 248 workers were
issued promissory notes
detailing the severance pay-
ment they were entitled to
when the company was forced
into liquidation in April 2009.
They have yet to receive a
cent of the $3 million they are
collectively owed.

Many have been unable to
find employment since losing
their jobs 13 months ago and
have been struggling to make
ends meet, former employees
said at a press conference yes-
terday.

They described how many
of them lost their homes when
they were unable to make
mortgage payments, their cars
were reclaimed, and they
were forced to pull their chil-

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Ml aaa



dren out of private schools
because they were no longer
able to pay the fees.

Yet the redundant workers
have been ignored by the
prime minister, his govern-
ment and the opposition,
despite the fact their penni-
less fate was no fault of their
own, they said.

“Clico took away our jobs,
our earning powers, our liveli-
hood, and simply threw us to
the side,” said Clico execu-
tive of 17 years Jackline Brice.

Watchdog

“It was the government’s
responsibility to be our watch-
dog, so we hold them totally
responsible.

“Yet we are the ones who
are suffering, while they add
insult to injury by refusing to
communicate with us.

“They are standing in the
House of Assembly talking
about wetlands and stray
dogs, and we are hurting.

“We want the prime min-
ister to know we are serious
and if we have to be radical,





|
a 6d

ert

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



FORMER CLICO MANAGER Virginia Outten yesterday called on the Bahamian public to support their march

on Parliment.

we will be radical.” Liquidator
Craig Gomez warned last
month that the liquidation of
Clico (Bahamas) and its Clico
Enterprises affiliate in
Trinidad will be complex
owing partly to poor record
keeping by the latter.

However New National
Development Party (NDP)
member Paul Moss said he
understands Mr Gomez has
made payments to those
affected by the Clico closure
during the liquidation process
and should therefore be able
to give former employees
interim payments at the very
least.

“This is a good opportunity
for the government, in its
budget, to speak to these peo-
ple, comfort these people,”
Mr Moss said.

“And to speak to the banks
and mortgage houses and let
them know these are difficult

Christian Council
not to legalise the numbers business

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facebook
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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Christian
Council expressed its pleasure
yesterday at the government’s
decision not to legalise the
numbers business at this time.

In a statement issued after
the government announced it
had shelved plans to legalise
the numbers business despite
initial assessments determining
that it could bring $30 million to
$40 million in revenue into the
public treasury annually, the
BCC said the decision is “a
good step” and one “in the
right direction.”

The church organisation also
stressed that “fundamental
long-term changes” are need-
ed if the country is to get
through its present economic
predicament, which Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham has indi-

times and they cannot put
people out on the streets.”

He said a commission of
inquiry should be held to
determine how Clico’s melt-
down came to pass.

Former Clico executive
David Turnquest noted the
irony of his 26 years spent
protecting Clico policyhold-
ers, only to be left stranded
without a safety net.

Criminality

He said: “I have been com-
mitted to ensuring clients
have something to fall back
on, and that has been pulled
from beneath me and there
has been nothing from the
government.

“This type of environment
will breed criminality — when
aman can’t feed his children,
what would he do?”

Virginia Outten, a former

applauds

cated to be quite dire, with the
government having difficulty
finding the money to fund
essential services.

Referring to the gambling
question, the Bahamas Christ-
ian Council (BCC) held that a
country addicted to gambling
and “all the social ills that are
inextricably tied to it” con-
demns its people and genera-
tions to come to a society “void
of creativity and productivity.”

Evil

As an “instrument created
by God”, government should
“secure each person and their
property, equality of justice
between individuals, and con-
strain the forces of evil in civil
society,” the BCC said.

Suggesting that the legalisa-
tion of the numbers business
would encourage more

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



Clico manager, added: “We
are demanding the prime
minister pay us some atten-
tion. We are prepared to fight
and we are going to fight until
we can’t fight no more — we
want the money we’re enti-
tled to.”

Thomas Bastian of the
Trade Union Congress
(TUC) said foreign compa-
nies should be required to put
down bonds to cover their
assets and protect Bahamian
workers in the event of the
company’s demise.

“T think it’s time to demon-
strate that enough is enough,
and do not stop until your
money is delivered, because
what you are striving for is
what you already worked
for,” he said.

“There is no question that
they owe you — the question is
when you will receive what
they owe you.”

decision

Bahamians to gamble —-
although it is widely recognised
that thousands of Bahamians
from all areas of society do so
at present, and generally with
impunity — the BCC said that
“laws shape society” and
“human beings generally fol-
low the laws that are set in a
society.”

The government stated over
the weekend that it has encoun-
tered strong opinions on both
sides of the debate for and
against the legalisation of num-
bers and would put off further
consideration of the issue until
a referendum can be held after
the next general election. The
prime minister met with the
BCC last month to discuss the
possibility of legalising the
numbers business.

Speaking to the country’s
financial situation, the BCC
said: “There are some funda-
mental long-term changes that
are required. These adjust-
ments may not be considered
favourable in the short-term
but are critical to our overall
long-term well-being and sus-
tainability.”

“The Bahamas Christian
Council pledges our support to
the government to assist with
the sensitising of our people to
the need for such measures to
be implemented.

“We would also be very will-
ing to participate in any nation-
al discussion to devise a nation-
al plan for the long-term sus-
tainability of the Bahamian
economy,” the BCC said.

The organisation suggested
that think-tanks with a diverse
membership could also help
devise solutions to the coun-
try’s economic challenges by
“coming up with alternative
solutions to produce and cre-
ate wealth in our country.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



PROSECUTION and defence attor-
neys presented their closing arguments
yesterday in the trial of two brothers
charged in the June 2002 murder of
Mario Miller.

Senior Justice Jon Isaacs is expected
to give his summation this morning
before sending the jury to deliberate.

Ricardo Miller, alias "Tamar Lee";
and Ryan Miller, alias "Manny", are
charged with the murder. The victim,
son of businessman and former MP
Leslie Miller, was found dead in bushes
near the Winton Super Value food store
on Saturday, June 22, 2002, his body
having suffered multiple stab and chop
wounds.

In her closing argument, Deputy
Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethell said the prosecution had
presented sufficient evidence to prove



"I Ryan and Ricardo
es tee. Miller's guilt
beyond a reason-
able doubt. She
described Mario’s
murder as
“heinous, tragic
and senseless
killing”.

Mrs Bethell said
the accused had
told a series of
“lies” when giving
their unsworn
statements last Fri-
day.

She noted that the prosecution’s case
is based on circumstantial evidence
which fits together like a jigsaw puzzle.

Mrs Bethell described Ricardo Miller
as a “pathological liar” and said the
Jamaican assailant he referred to in his
unsworn statement simply does not exist.

She also said that during his state-
ment, Ricardo Miller had been “bold”

AS) | 3 mina

and “brassy” when speaking about his
drug transactions.

The prosecutor went on to affirm that
Ryan Miller was also responsible for
Mario’s murder, noting that the victim’s
blood was found in his car — the same car
believed to have been seen at Yamacraw
on the day of the murder.

Mrs Bethell described Ryan Miller as
the “facilitator and negotiator,” stating
that the two brothers had planned to
take drugs from Mario, who they
described as “soft.”

She pointed out that according to a
statement Ryan Miller gave police, his
brother had placed brown taped pack-
ages of cocaine in the trunk of the car
and had given Ryan a “key” of cocaine
— which the prosecutor claimed was pay-
ment for taking part in the murder.

Dorsey McPhee, attorney for Ricardo
Miller, reminded the jury that the pros-
ecution has to prove its case beyond a
reasonable doubt.

Noting that the prosecution’s case is

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 3

Closing arguments in Mario Miller tria

built on circumstantial evidence, he stat-
ed: “Our circumstances are better than
their circumstances.”

Mr McPhee claimed that police had
been under pressure to solve the murder
of a Cabinet Minister’s son and accused
lead investigator Sergeant Michelet
Meronard of fabricating the accuseds’
statements, and mixing bits and pieces of
fact to make a case.

Attorney Richard Bootle, who rep-
resents Ryan Miller, said: “Mario
deserves justice, his family deserves jus-
tice. Justice can only come if we get the
truth.”

He said his client should not be con-
demned solely because he has been
charged and now sits in the prisoner’s
dock.

Mr Bootle submitted that the prose-
cution did not even come close to prov-
ing its case against his client. He claimed
prosecution witness Nadia Rolle lied to
police and questioned which of the two
statements she gave officers was true.

Students expected to he
charged over stabbing

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO students are expected
to be charged shortly in con-
nection with the stabbing of
three fellow CI Gibson Senior
High School students last week,
police have confirmed.

The three injured students —
two 16-year-olds and one 15-
year-old — all survived the
ordeal which took place at
around 11.20am last Thursday
and have now been discharged
from hospital. Three 11th grade
students were taken into cus-
tody in connection with the
attack, which allegedly
stemmed from an argument
over a girl to whom two of the
boys may have been “connect-
ed”, acccording to Director of
Education Lionel Sands.

Another 10 students from
grade eleven were arrested for

fighting on the day in question.
All have now been released
“pending further inquiries”,
said police liaison officer
Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings.
Sgt Skippings said the stu-
dents are likely to be charged,

Police quiz three men
about double murder

OT CAKE say:

—| CRIME “it not this week then some
THE BAHAMAS’ VERY OVVN STREET PHILOSOPHER SCENE: | time early next week”.
Inquiries CI Gibson was put on lock-
continue own by its Principal Elaine
into the Williams shortly after the stab-
double bings took place.

der i Concerned parents gathered
Murder in | outside the school gates calling
: or the release of their children,

Baharia, | {ot the release of their child

fearing they may get caught up
in retaliatory attacks when the
school day came to a close.



By | DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

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were shot dead early Sunday
morning.

Police are still trying to
determine the motive for the
shooting.

Both victims were discov-
ered in a blue Ford Expedi-
tion SUV with multiple gun-
shot injuries.

According to reports, the
shooting occurred around
6am near the Hamptons
Apartments.

When officers arrived at the
scene, they found a blue SUV
parked at the entrance gate
to the apartment complex
with the engine still running.

The driver of the SUV was
pronounced dead at the scene
and the passenger died later
at the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital. Their deaths bring
Grand Bahama’s murder
count to five for the year. The
murder count for the entire
Bahamas currently stands at
35.







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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Lessons to be learned from Jamaica

THERE ARE many lessons that
Bahamians, including politicians, can
learn from the alarming situation in
Jamaica. It was reported late yesterday
that at least 30 persons were killed by
that country’s well armed criminal ele-
ment, now challenging the state’s
attempt to arrest their drug lord “pres-
ident.”

For too long the Jamaican police and
the government have turned a blind eye
to Jamaica’s slums. Known as garrisons
they have been taken over by criminal
dons, who have turned them into their
personal kingdoms.

Everything came crashing down last
year when the US government moved to
have Dudus Coke extradited to the
United States on charges of drug and
gun running. For nine months Prime
Minister Bruce Golding’s government
fought off the request, finally capitulat-
ing and agreeing that Coke should face
a Jamaican court where the charges
against him would be evaluated for
extradition.

“Dudus” was the don, who delivered
the votes for Golding’s party from West
Kingston, so, it is obvious that he expect-
ed his “main man” to protect him in his
Tivoli Gardens fiefdom.

“Along the pitted and trash-strewn
streets of West Kingston,” reported
Associated Press yesterday, “residents
say Coke is feared for his strong-arm
tactics, but also is known for helping
out slum dwellers with grocery bills,
jobs and school fees.

“Coke solidified his authority by tak-
ing charge of punishing thieves and oth-
er criminals in the ghettos, where the
government has little presence and
police rarely, if ever, patrol.”

Today Tivoli Gardens is fortified with
barricades, protected by gangsters with
high powered rifles and supporters car-
rying placards declaring that “Jesus died
for us; we will die for Dudus.”

Here is a lesson for our own police
force. There should be no area in New

DON STAINTON»

Providence or any of our islands where
the Royal Bahamas Police Force cannot,
or do not enter frequently.

And as for our politicians if they were
wise they would be very careful of the
company they keep. In the past some of
them have had very embarrassing expe-
riences.

We recall the support that our own
home grown drug lord had when the
Americans sent for him. It was surpris-
ing the following “Ninety” Knowles had
and who were among those who turned
out to protest when he was taken to
court for his extradition hearing. Every-
one knew of his illegal activities, of his
own gangs and his own orders that were
executed, yet when the time came to
pay the piper, all we heard was how
Ninety fed his neighbours, paid the
school fees and took care of his com-
munity. And so, like Dudus, when the
time came his supporters gathered
round, and marched to the court. Nine-
ty’s generosity had solidified him in their
hearts and their community, and despite
their proud boast that this is a “God
fearing” nation, Ninety was one man
who could break the Ten Command-
ments, yet still demand their loyalty.
Today he is all but forgotten in a prison
cell in the US.

We also recall how drug dealers under
the Pindling administration, rightly or
wrongly, considered the PLP their par-
ty. They agitated for the day when the
PLP would be returned to power so that
they could get back to “the trade.” As a
matter of fact the rumour around
Eleuthera during the 2002 election was
that as soon as the PLP won, the deal-
ers’ fast-boats would be in the water,
and they would return to their illicit
trade. Fortunately, it did not work out
that way. But, it certainly should have
taught the politicians a lesson.

What is now happening to Prime Min-
ister Golding in Jamaica should under-
score for all what can happen when one
plays fast and loose with law breakers.



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THE TRIBUNE

Responding to
Bishop Laish Boyd
ambling

On

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write in response to the
Anglican Church’s position
on legalising the numbers
business in The Bahamas that
was expressed recently by
Bishop Laish Boyd.

The Bishop said that: “By
enacting legislation legalising
numbers, the government
would be ‘opening the flood-
gates’ to the lowering of stan-
dards and values, and it would
be doing so for financial rea-
sons, so that it can make mon-
ey from the numbers busi-
ness.”

He stated further in a pas-
toral letter dated May 12 that:
“In short, it promotes values
that are harmful to the moral
fiber of our communities. It
would be a mistake to affirm
this subculture by legalising
it at a time when there are so
many negative influences on
the society, and when our
community is suffering from a
lack of values.

“In matters of this kind the
government has the constitu-
tional and moral responsibili-
ty to protect the value base
of the country.

“Many persons who play
numbers regularly become
obsessed with finding the
right number and wait anx-
iously to see which number
will fall. It becomes a con-
suming force, often dictating
every other area of that per-
son's life. Most Christian
moralists agree that the real
danger in gambling lies exact-
ly in this kind of excess.

“Persons who can ill afford
to are often the biggest users,
abusers, and losers,” Bishop
Boyd said. “It forms a false
and unreliable foundation
upon which to base one’s per-
sonal finances. It encourages
what seems to be a short cut
approach to financial security
rather than through the prin-
ciples of Christian or other
forms of stewardship.”

“Tt preys on those who can-
not discipline themselves in
these areas. Often there is a
higher call to the funds used,
ie, persons need to spend that
money on more basic and
important things, but do not.

“Tt goes against the princi-
ples of Christian stewardship.
Life cannot be simply about
chance where so many peo-
ple lose and only a few win.
This is what the numbers
game typifies. We need to be
promoting culture and activi-
ties that are based on plan-
ning and productivity, pur-
pose and positive advance-
ment. Stewardship calls us to
acknowledge what we have,
and to build on it construc-
tively and incrementally to
accomplish higher goals.

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



“To argue that such a law
cannot be enforced is to
recognise that some of the
things that we say about our-
selves are sadly true; in other
words, how can we enforce it
by an across the board multi-
agency, multi-department
effort when too many of our
best beloved citizens are lazy,
dishonest, unwilling to do a
full day’s work for a full day’s
pay, unwilling to stand for
principle, too willing to look
the other way, too easily
bought for a few dollars, and
are prepared to accept medi-
ocrity.

“Tn spite of the widespread
acceptance of playing num-
bers, the Anglican Church
opposes it, never mind how
many persons see no harm in
legalising it. In spite of how
many persons there are who
support it, we say that such
would be a bad move for the
moral fabric of our society
and far more devastating in
its long-term effects than any
monetary or taxation advan-
tage that can be gained in the
short-term.”

I really don’t understand
the Bishop’s logic and sense
of reasoning in this instance.
How moral is it to have gam-
bling legalised for tourists in
The Bahamas, and not for
Bahamians?

How moral is it to have an
unconstitutional law on our
books that sanctions casino
gambling for guests of our
country, and not for Bahami-
ans?

How moral is it to allow the
illegal numbers business in
The Bahamas to flourish for
decades unabated and virtu-
ally unchallenged, and to the
point of no return — because
of protection and condona-
tion in high places; and to sud-
denly wake up on day and say
it’s immoral to make a wrong
right?

This is a secular society
Bishop, and the government
has a duty to do the right
things in the interest of the
people and the social order.
The time has come to legalise

the culture of number buying
and gambling generally in The
Bahamas. It’s the decent thing
to do, Bishop, and the major-
ity of the Bahamian public
agrees with it in my view.

We all need to take respon-
sibility for our actions, and be
wise in our daily living. If the
man who works all week
wants to drink out his pay —
that’s his business; if he wants
to gamble it out, so be it.

If he wants to spend it all
on women — that’s his pre-
rogative. If a woman who
works all month wants to buy
clothes and shoes with her
salary — then let her live with
her new attire, Bishop.

Yes, Bishop, we all will
have to account eventually for
our deeds; and Jesus Christ
did not come here to over-
throw the worldly authority.
My understanding of Christ’s
mission here on earth — is to
offer us a better way and eter-
nal life in his name.

He did not come here to
tell us what to do or how to
live, because free choice is
God’s greatest gift to man in
my opinion. Therefore, no
bishop, priest, rabbi and so
on are ethically qualified to
dictate to a people on how
they should live. Rather, the
sharing and dispersion of the
good news of Jesus Christ
should be their focus.

If the church in The
Bahamas was spiritually,
socially and morally effective,
we would have a more peace-
ful, respectable and civilly
upright society. We appear to
have a nation of mullahs and
ayatollahs who want to tell us
how to govern our society and
life. The Bishop and other
prominent religious leaders
in The Bahamas are on the
wrong tract as it relates to the
work of God; because Jesus
Christ has stated that his king-
dom is not of this world.
Preach and demonstrate the
good news of the gospels, and
render to Caesar all that’s
Caesar’s, Bishop.

We the people want to
gamble legally in our beloved
country and we want our gov-
ernment to facilitate this.
Amen.

DENNIS A DAMES
Nassau,
May 21, 2010.

Jamaica must embrace Christianity

WT TMU Dat Tt

EDITOR, The Tribune.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

May 21, 2010.



Re: Time to get control of the ‘garrisons’.
The Tribune, May 20, 2010

Jamaica cannot hope for its crime situation to improve,
until it becomes a Christian country — like The Bahamas.







OO
JOB VACANCY

Bahamas Hot Mix Co. Limited seeks to fill the

position of Entry

Level

Accounting Clerk.

All applicants should posses the following:

« Accounting/booking experience.
* The ability to assist with various accounting

transactions

¢ Strong computer skills and experience in
accounting software programs.

* Working knowledge of Microsoft office
programs especially Microsoft Excel.

* The ability to learn quickly.

* An outgoing, friendly personality

* Excellent communication and team work

skills.

¢ Strong organizational and analytical skills with the
ability to work independently.

* The ability to manage multiple projects and
responsibilities simultaneously.

Interested persons should submit their resumes to:

Bahamas Hot Mix Co. Limited
HR Department
P.O. Box CB-10990
Nassau, Bahamas

Or via e-mail to:

tmunnings@bhm.bs and dlane@bhm.bs
All resumes must be received by_2nd_ June 2010.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 5

Ga

POLICE REPORTS

Arawak Cay
Shooting: Two
discharged
from hospital

TWO of the three peo-
ple shot at Arawak Cay on
Monday evening were dis-
charged from hospital yes-
terday, while a 41-year-old
woman is still receiving
medical treatment and
remains in “stable condi-
tion”.

Police yesterday con-
firmed that two women
and one man all received
gun shot wounds to their
legs while at the “Wet and
Mad” party at Arawak
Cay.

According to police
press liaison Sergeant
Chrislyn Skippings, two
women - 26 and 41 years
old - and one 18-year-old
man were the victims.

Police were unable to
provide anymore details on
the circumstances of the
shooting that resulted in
their injuries, and up to
press time no one had been
taken into custody in con-
nection with the matter.

Police investigations
continue.

Three teens and
man in hospital
after stabbings

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

THREE teenagers and
one man are in hospital fol-
lowing two separate stab-
bing incidents on New Prov-
idence and Grand Bahama.

In Nassau, police were
called to the scene of a stab-
bing on Frederick Street, off
Bay Street, at around
3.30am yesterday.

According to reports, the
victim got into an altercation
with a group of men, which
resulted in him being
stabbed to the right side of
his neck.

Stable

The man was taken to
hospital via private vehicle,
where he is listed in stable
condition.

Police are questioning
two men in connection with
this incident.

In Freeport, three
teenagers were injured in a
stabbing incident at Taino
Beach on Monday.

Sometime around 8.25pm
police received reports that
a fight broke out and that
three young men were
stabbed “about the body”.

The victims, aged 18 and
19, were taken to the Rand
Memorial Hospital for treat-
ment.

Two are listed in stable
condition and one is listed in
“guarded” condition.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said police are investigating
the matter.



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your
story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Demonstration planned today

against one-way roa

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



FRUSTRATED residents and busi-
ness owners on Baillou Hill Road and
Market Street are planning to hold a
demonstration against the new one-way
road system today.

Yesterday, the National Development
Party (NDP) threw its support behind
the protesters — saying the changes
“don’t make any sense”; have made the
area less safe; and are wreaking havoc
on small businesses.

At a press conference held in the
area yesterday morning, NDP deputy
chairman Rashad Amahad said: “We
warn the FNM and the PLP that we will
not sit by while this is going on and be
silent. Parliament, as a result of the arro-
gance and seemingly self-serving inter-
ests of the parliamentarians, has lost its
way and seems not to be interested in
the people that are affected by this
change.”

Despite several public demonstrations
against the road changes organised by







ee



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MOTORISTS experience frustration with the one-way system.

the newly formed Coconut Grove Busi-
ness League, which boasts a member-
ship of more than 60 business owners,
the government has remained resolute —
saying the changes are vital to its strat-
egy for alleviating the traffic jams that
plague the capital.

Today’s demonstration is expected to
begin at 8.15am at the Southern Recre-
ation Ground and end with a march on
parliament.

At a town meeting held last month
to discuss the new road system, Minister
of Works and Transport Neko Grant

system

made it clear that the government would
not reverse the changes.

He blamed the problems being faced
by businesses on the ongoing roadworks,
and said business would improve once
the work is done.

But the NDP is demanding the imme-
diate reversal of the one-way system.
Mr Amahad said: “To continue bull-
headed is contrary to good governance.
In fact, government ought to be for the
people by the people. And it is the peo-
ple’s will to have two-way traffic flows.”

NDP officials said that if elected, the
party would reverse the changes, and
replace them with a dual-carriageway
system in another area where it will be
less disruptive to the community.

The party is currently focused on gath-
ering resources and recruiting candi-
dates for the next general election. The
NDP expects to challenge all 41 seats.

Mr Amahad implored interested per-
sons to get involved with the party so
they can participate in its primary
debates, which will precede the first-
ever NDP convention later this year.

Tommy Turnquest to attend high-level Caribbean-US Summit

By MATT MAURA



NATIONAL Security Min-
ister Tommy Turnquest will be
one of 15 national security
and/or home affairs ministers
from the Caribbean Communi-
ty who will meet with US offi-
cials in Washington, DC,
tomorrow for the inaugural
Caribbean-United States High-
Level Security Cooperation
Dialogue.

He will join CARICOM
counterparts to discuss three
“strategic priorities.”

—-

a

wt

ft." ee ae pee +

Le. “LAL AL _
_ al fer Fee
tag

They are scheduled to meet
with US Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham-Clinton, US
Attorney-General Eric Hold-
er, US Secretary of the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security
Janet Napolitano, and US
Assistant Secretary of State for
Western Hemispheric Affairs
Arturo Valenzuela.

The three strategic priorities
that have been identified by
both sides to be discussed
encompass ways on which to
substantively reduce illicit traf-
ficking, including the illicit traf-

a

=

/

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Marlborough St., Shop #1

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ficking of narcotic drugs and
small arms and light weapons,
money-laundering and human
trafficking.

Safety

Also on the agenda are the
issues of advancing public safe-
ty and security — including
crime and violence, border
security, counter-terrorism,
criminal gangs, criminal depor-
tees, and natural and other dis-
asters — and establishing efforts
to further promote social jus-
tice.

Observers representing part-
ner nations and international
organisations, including Cana-
da, Colombia, France, the
Netherlands, the United King-
dom and the United Nations
Office on Drugs and Crime
(UNODC) will also participate
in the Dialogue.

“Plans for the Dialogue
gained momentum from the

pronouncement by United
States President Barack Oba-
ma during the Fifth Summit of
the Americas held in Trinidad
and Tobago in April, 2009,”
national security officials said
yesterday. “President Obama
indicated that, through practical
initiatives based on a mutually
beneficial partnership, the Unit-
ed States would seek to develop
a more balanced relationship
with the Caribbean region.”

National Security officials
said Caribbean and US gov-
ernment officials have met four
times since President Obama’s
announcement to “jointly
define and develop the goals
and scope of the Dialogue.”

The Dialogue is intended to
create a framework in which
the undertaking “may be car-
ried forward” in the area of
security cooperation.

Mr Turnquest and Perma-
nent Secretary Missouri Sher-
man-Peter will return to New





Tommy Turnquest



STOREWIDE SALE

sale Ends May 31, 2010
Selected Balls $20.00

SIGN UP FOR CLASSES NOW

P.0.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-323-1865

Emall: gems-pearls@hotmall.com

Free parking at The Hilton



CANADIANS
RESIDING ABROAD

The Canadian High Commission in Jamaica offers a
registration for Canadians who expect to be living in
or already are living in The Bahamas for three months
or more. The service is provided in the event there is
a need to contact Canadians to offer urgent advice
during a natural disaster or civil unrest or of a family
emergency at home. The registration is voluntary and
is used for your protection and wellbeing in accordance
with The Privacy Act. If you are not yet registered
we encourage you to do so as soon as possible. You
should register online at www.voyage.gc.ca . Knowing
accurately the number of Canadian Citizens in a given
country is a critical element in establishing contingency
plans to be used during any crisis.

Always remember to obtain and protect your passport
which you should use to enter Canada.

CANADIENS
RESIDANT a LETRANGER

Le Haut Commissariat du Canada en Jamaique offre
la possibilite de s’enregistrer aux Canadiens qui
prevoient de vivre ou qui vivent deja aux Bahamas
pour une periode de trois mois et plus.Le service est
particulierement utilie dans le cas ou il y a un besoin
de communiquer urgemment avec les canadiens afin
de leur offrir des conseils lors d’une catastrophe
naturelle,de troubles civils ou d’une urgence familiale
au Canada. L’inscription est volontaire et n’est utilisee
que pour votre protection et bien-etre en conformite
avec la Loi sur la Protection des regseigements
personnels.Si vous n’etes pas encore inscrit nous vous
encourageons a le faire des que possible. Vous devez
vous inscrire en ligne a l’adresse www.voyage.gc.ca
.Connaitre avec exactitude le nombre de citoyens
canadiens dans un pays donne est un element critique
dans 1’etablissement des plans d’urgence utilises au
cours d’une crise.

Rappelez-vous toujours d’avoir en votre possesion
et de proteger votre passport Il s’agit d’un document
essentiel qui vous permet d’entrer au Canada.

The Consulate of Canada
Shirley Street Shopping Plaza
Shirley Street
P.O. Box SS-6371
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 393-2123/4
Fax: (242) 393-1305
email: cdncon@batelnet.bs



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

House blaze causes
about $35,000 damage




KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

HTM sarc
TICATR Rie
gate Peo [ets

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Employees to benefit from




























22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Memorial Service

Mrs. Jane Sandra Treco, 65

of Baycroft
Apartments, Eastern
Road, Nassau, The
Bahamas, will be held
at Chapel of Love,
Kemp's Funeral
Home Limited,
Palmdale Avenue and
Bradley Street,
Nassau, on Friday,
28th May, 2010 at

The Service will be conducted by Bahamas
Metaphysical Society Incorported.

Mrs. Treco is survived by her brothers,
Neil Hamilton and his wife Ann of Canada
and Greg Hamilton and his wife Sharon of
Canada, her aunt, Pamela Greaves of
Australia, the Treco family and many other
relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to Bahamas Metaphysical
Society Incorporated, P.O. Box N. 4182,
Nassau in memory of Mrs. Jane Sandra
Treco.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.

GREAT

B
yea.
ine/estiva



18 per cent raise over five years

FREEPORT - Firemen quickly extinguished a fire which
caused about $35,000 damage to a home on Monday.

The damage was confined to the bedroom and bathroom of
an 18-room single family home at Cross Bones Close and Booty
Drive.

According to reports, officials received a report of a fire at
about 11am and dispatched a fire truck to the area.

Smoke

On arrival, firemen observed smoke coming from a western
bedroom of the house. Two persons were attempting to extin-
guish the fire.

A vehicle that was parked outside near the bedroom was also
damaged. The home and contents were insured.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said investigations are continuing
into the cause of the fire.

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

i rs

= | Mr. Kirkwood

Malcolm, 75

of Ilsley Compound, East
|Bay Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas, died peacefully
at his residence, on
Sunday, 23rd May, 2010.



PRESIDENT of the Bahamas Commercial Stores
Supermarkets and Warehouse Workers Union, Elgin
Douglas, has welcomed the signing of a contract between
his union and Armored Car Services.

About 50 employees of Armoured Car Services will
: ; : benefit from an 18 per cent raise over a five year period
Mr. Malcolm is survived by his nephew, Malcolm | as a result of this few agreement. —
R. McKay and many friends.

Benefits
A Memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's
Presbyterian Kirk, Princes Street, Nassau, on
Saturday, 29th May, 2010 at 4:00p.m.

The industrial agreement also includes other benefits,
which cannot be disclosed due to the nature of the
armoured car industry.

However, Mr Douglas expressed his commitment to
ensuring that armoured car employees are properly rep-
resented.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.

(Calling all Seasoned (ooks, Grill
Masters & Professional (hefs:

Do you make the best Conch Fritters in The Bahamas?
Do you make a mean Grilled Conch or Fish?
Is your signature Seafood Dish the talk of the town?

Then enter your name into one of three exciting culinary competitions that are
a part of the Great Bahamian Seafood & Wine Festival on Saturday, May 29th,
2010.Win Cash Prizes and bragging rights of being the best in The Bahamas!

Entry ‘Form ——————cK«

Name:

Organization (if applicable}:
Tal: (primary {cell
Email;

Category of Competition (check one 1 category only)

__ Conch Fritters _ Gill Masters ___ Signature Dish
Name of Dish:

Featured Ingredient:

My signature below indicates my compliance with the rules

aed policies of the Great Eahartian Seafead & Wine Festival
Signature:
Date

FESTIVAL ENTRY CHECKLIST
__ Reviewed Rules and Procedures

Entry is Free!
Win Cash Prizes!

Win Medals and
Bragging Rights!

_— Completed Entry Fonm
_ Copy of Valid Health Certificate

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



(Conch fritter |Gr
COMPETITION

QPEM TG:
ALL SEASONED COOKS

ull “Masters | Signature ‘Dish

COMPETITION COMPETITION

OPEN TO: OPEN TO
ALL SEASONED COOKS PROFESSIONAL CHEFS ONLY

Entry Form and Rules & Procedures are also available online for download at
www.downtownnassau.org or at www.tourismtoday.com.

Or for a hard copy, please contact the Downtown Nassau Partnership Office on
Market Street (North) at Tel. (242) 326-0992 or the Culinary & Hospitality
Management Institute on Thompson Blvd. at Tel: (242) 323-5804 or 323-6804.

Please return completed Entry Form to: Downtown Nassau Partnership Offices
on Market Street (North) by hand or by Fax at (242) 323-2998 or by Email at
seafood@downtownnassau.org.

ms MUST be

ted on or before Thursday,




THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Sushi — the ultimate seafood experience

By LARRY SMITH

Pores Nassau restau-
rants are showcasing spe-
cial dishes and offering fixed-
price menus this week as part of
the Great Bahamian Seafood
Festival, which climaxes on Fri-
day and Saturday downtown.

My assignment was to
review a couple of them.
Options ranged from the casu-
al (Da Fish Fry and Traveller's
Rest) to the opulent (Greycliff
and the Bahamian Club). I set-
tled on Seafront Sushi and
Aqua at the British Colonial
Hilton.

For purists, the ultimate
seafood experience is Japanese.

Sashimi and sushi both
require a variety of high grade,
very fresh, raw fish — anything
from octopus to tuna. And it's
damn good for your cholesterol
level. Sashimi is thinly sliced
raw fish served with garnishes
and soy sauce. Sushi pairs the
fish with vinegared rice, and
other ingredients.

The earliest reference to
sushi in Japan was in 718, when
it was fermented fish that
smelled like blue cheese. The
sushi we are familiar with today
was created in the 1800s — a
small piece of fish served on a
pad of seasoned rice.

In Japan, sushi was sold by
street vendors until after the
Second World War, when
restaurants became popular. By
the 1960s, articles on sushi were
being published in American
lifestyle magazines. The Cali-
fornia Roll was invented by a
Los Angeles chef in 1970, and
the New York Times covered
the gala opening of a sushi bar
in 1972.

Over the past 30 years, sushi
has gradually transformed itself
from an exotic ethnic specialty
into rarefied haute cuisine, and
has lately become one of the
most ubiquitous culinary choic-
es around the world. In Nassau
there are now four sushi restau-
rants (Nobu, Ichiban, Indigo
and Seafront).

But many Bahamians still
roll their eyes at the mere men-
tion of the word — including
some of the staff at Seafront.
This has always seemed rather
strange to me, considering that
strombus gigas sashimi (or
scorched conch) is one of our
most popular delicacies.

Although Seafront Sushi is
barely a decade old, its new
location on East Bay Street has
a much longer history. The
original house was built around
1900 and called Seaway. Its 18-
inch thick, cut limestone exte-
rior walls are almost the only
part of the original house (built
by a merchant named John Pin-
der) that remains.

Ron Lightbourn's family
owned Seaway from the 1930s
until the early 1950s, when
famed photographer Stanley
Toogood bought it. After oper-
ating a studio and camera store
on Bay Street for a number of
years, Toogood moved his busi-
ness to Seaway in the early
1980s. After his death in 1987,
the business was operated by
his sons — Andrew and Mike.

Tom and Debbie Wong
acquired the property in 2005
and invested hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars to convert it
into the "dress casual" Japan-
ese restaurant it is today.

Tom's father came to the
Bahamas in the 1950s from Chi-
na, as a chef for the old Golden
Dragon Restaurant. Although
born in Nassau, Tom was raised
in California and when he
returned in the 1990s to take
over the family food store busi-
ness, he was disappointed at the
lack of restaurant choices.

"T always liked cooking, and
my wife's brother, who man-
aged restaurants in Florida,
agreed to help set things up and
train staff," he recalled. "We
opened just before 9/11 and had
a real struggle for the first three
years. Bahamians were not into
sushi back then, so we were
throwing food away. When
Nobu opened on Atlantis, sushi
became chic and demand
picked up."

During the festival week,
Seafront is offering a fixed price
menu at lunch and dinner. For
$30 you can get an appetizer
with a sushi platter (featuring
cooked or raw ingredients),
tempura ice cream and a glass
of sweet Japanese Umeshu
(plum wine).

FEE AEE

Preena McCLEAN,
of Yellow Elder, has
been working in the dining
room at the British Colonial
Hilton for the past 10 years and
will be able to guide you
through their interesting menu.
Now re-branded as Aqua, the
restaurant underwent a full
makeover last fall, together
with the adjacent Bullion
Lounge — which claims to have





—_— a

FOR PURISTS,

al

the ultimate seafood experience is Japan





ese. Many

Bahamians, however, still roll their eyes at the mention of the word

sushi.



Over the past 30
years, sushi has
gradually trans-
formed itself from
an exotic ethnic spe-
cialty into rarefied
haute cuisine, and
has lately become
one of the most
ubiquitous culinary
choices around the
world.



the largest rum selection in the
country.

One of Aqua's pluses is the
fact that you can choose
between an extensive Bahami-
an buffet as well as a variety of
a la carte seafood entrees.
Select a table by the window
and you can enjoy an interest-
ing harbour view while you
dine. The expansive dining area
features restrained art deco
styling.

In fact, the entire experience
at the British Colonial is remi-
niscent of a time when
steamships anchored off the bar
and white-jacketed gentlemen
cooled off with Colony cock-
tails while the ladies sipped
champagne punch. Back in the
1920s this hotel was the epi-
centre of Nassau society dur-
ing the heyday of prohibition
and upscale winter tourism.

Managed by Hilton Hotels
since the late 1990s, the British
Colonial is one of the most his-
toric properties on the island. It
was occupied by Fort Nassau
from 1695 and later used as a
barracks for the West india
Regiment. The site was
acquired in 1898 by Florida
developer Henry Flaglar who
built a large wooden hotel
called the Colonial.

Fire

When that building was
destroyed by fire in 1922 the
hotel was quickly reconstructed
by the New York-based Mun-
son Steamship Line, which
hired hundreds of Bahamian
and West Indian artisans. It re-
opened with great fanfare in
1923 as the New Colonial
Hotel.

As a 1926 advertisement
proclaimed, the hotel was "The
centre of Nassau's social life
(with) hundreds of rooms com-
manding magnificent panora-
mas of islands, sea and sky—
and the society of people of dis-
tinction.”

Canadian millionaire Sir
Harry Oakes acquired the hotel
on a whim in 1932, and follow-
ing his celebrated — and still
unsolved — murder in 1943 it
was owned by the Oakes estate
for more than half a century,
operating under various hospi-
tality brands. In 1997 new
Canadian owners invested
more than $70 million to
restore the iconic building to
its original grandeur.

Aqua's assistant manager is
Steve Glasgow, who arrived
four years ago from Tobago via
Grand Cayman and supervises
a staff of about 30. Since 2005,
culinary production at the
Hilton has been under the over-
all command of executive chef
Kabuti Lockhart, who received
his grounding in the industry at
The Bahamas Hotel Training
College.

Kabuti's guava ice cream
was a big hit at the recent
Hands For Hunger fundraiser
called Paradise Plates. The
Hilton team attracted a lot of
attention by making the ice
cream on the spot using liquid
nitrogen. The guava ice cream
was topped with a mini guava
duff and drizzled with guava
sauce.

Aqua's fixed price menu for
the seafood festival is out-
standing. For $50 (plus tip) you

can feast on their signature
seafood chowder (laden with
conch, clams, shrimp and lob-
ster and spiced with bird pepper
sherry. The entree is shrimp
scampi simmered in a wine,
lemon, garlic, basil and cream
sauce served with basmati rice
and grilled baby carrots and
asparagus. Dessert is Kaluha
Ice cream topped with cherries
and whipped cream in a Kaluha
reduction. A glass of wine is
included with the meal.

According to Vaughn
Roberts of the Downtown Nas-
sau Partnership, the idea was
"to create a signature activity in
the downtown area that could
quickly become a destination
event, drawing in thousands of
visitors and residents. We saw
seafood and wine as great
themes to build on. Other food
and wine festivals internation-
ally have become quite suc-
cessful.”

The goals of the festival are
to provide a great experience
downtown for a wide range of
people, to promote culinary
tourism and our rich marine
resources, and to develop a sus-
tainable event to help finance
other downtown activities.

This week's selection of
restaurant specials is only one
aspect of the festival. On Fri-
day, $125 will get you in to the
gala event at Jacaranda House
(circa 1840) where you can
enjoy "amazing seafood dishes
created by top chefs and a vari-
ety of wines."

This event includes music,
dancing, fireworks, an art
exhibit and a silent auction.

Saturday is festival day —a
family-friendly event at the
British Colonial waterfront site
just west of the Hilton that will
include interactive experiences,
live music performances and
culinary displays, including a
farmer's market and a kids



zone. There will also be conch
cracking, fish scaling, culinary
and mixology competitions.

The Bahamas is one of the
few territories where indige-
nous fisheries survive on a com-
mercial scale. In most other
countries of the region, for
example, conch and grouper
are commercially extinct. And
catching spiny lobster is pro-
hibited in the Florida Keys.
Industrial fishing is not allowed
in Bahamian waters.

This state of affairs provides
a good foundation for a seafood



festival to help kickstart the
redevelopment of the city of
Nassau both as a tourist attrac-
tion and as a living Bahamian
community.

APOLOGY

In the Tough Call column
of The Tribune published on
August 16, 2006 the writer used
words from which it might have
been inferred that Mrs. Ruth
Millar, Chairman of BTC’s






giftitc

» Bab



|

Evaluation and Negotiation
Team, was a participant in the
attempted “obstruction” of the
BTC Limited Privatisation
process. However, The Tribune
is satisfied that this was not the
case. We have no information
or reason to believe that Mrs
Millar acted in any manner
inconsistent with her duties as
Chairman. Accordingly, The
Tribune apologises unre-
servedly for any damage,
embarrassment or inconve-
nience caused to Mrs Millar by
the said publication.

Discount) furniture’s
aye Department

To enter: » Purchase 1 pack of eligible Huggies Diapers and



Contest ends June 11, 2010.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Wilchcombe: PLP not opposed to salary cuts

Tough budget
necessary — PM

FROM page one

He also revealed plans to take a 16 per cent pay cut for one year
— along with a seven per cent cut to government ministers, and a
proposed five per cent cut for members of Parliament — as well as
promotion, hiring, increment freezes and other restrictions in the
public service which will be announced during today's budget
communication.

"This budget will not be popular with a
number of people but that's a different
story. But in terms of what we must do
for the economy of the Bahamas we are
doing the right thing, I'm absolutely satis-
fied of that. One might argue that if we
wanted to be more political we wouldn't do
some of the things we are going to do, but
we are seeking to do what we think is best
for the Bahamas and let the politics take
care of itself.”

Along with raising taxes, the new budget
will show restraint in public spending.

"We're going to seek to keep spending
at the same level as it was in this fiscal
period, which in itself is a reduction,
because when you take into account infla-



HUBERT tion, etceteras,” Mr Ingraham told The Tri-
INGRAHAM bune ahead of the Budget communication
during an interview at the Ministry of

Finance.

He noted that the stringent measures are a necessary evil to
ensuring financial stability in the long-term.

"We did the best we could to sustain the economy when the
recession hit, we're now at a stage where we have exhausted our
headroom, we must now pay and return the Bahamas to a state
where it is having less debt — less meaning as a per centum as
opposed to in absolute terms," the Free National Movement
(FNM) leader said.

When asked why government did not institute these hard-line
tactics when the recession first hit, Mr Ingraham said his adminis-
tration was lucky to be in a position to offer stimulus packages to
offset the economic turbulence.

"We were in a fortunate position that we were able to increase
government borrowing for short term, sustain living standards to
the extent we could, create as much employment as we could,
improve the infrastructure of the country to the maximum extent
possible under the circumstances and now we are going to have to
pay for it.

"We've done as much as we think we can do and now we think
we need to reverse what we've been doing,” Mr Ingraham said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LEES PARTON INVESTMENTS
LID.

— - _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LEES PARTON INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VINSON CORPORATION

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VINSON CORPORATION has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMELAND HOLDINGS
LIMITED

— *——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PRIMELAND HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FROM page one

Stressing the seriousness of the finan-
cial predicament in which the country
now finds itself, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said yesterday he would be
taking a 16 per cent pay cut in his own
salary for one year, and is calling fora
seven per cent cut for Cabinet Minis-
ters and five per cent for all other
Members of Parliament.

“If ’m willing to take a 16 per cent
cut for a year, I hope the public under-
stands that we mean business, serious
business,” Mr Ingraham said.

However, while underlining the
importance and seriousness of the cur-
rent financial situation, Mr Wilch-
combe said Mr Ingraham could also
send a strong message by reducing the
size of his “gussie mae” Cabinet.

“T think what the Prime Minister is

stating by his action is the severity of
the problems we are facing in this
country and perhaps this is a last ditch
effort to try to save an economy that is
in a critical stage and that is on its
death bed.

“You know you have four Members
of Parliament on the Opposition side
making $28,000 a year that’s just over
$100,000.

Minister

“The truth is you have a Cabinet
Minister with his cabinet salary, with
his MP salary, and with his benefits is
well over $100,000. So why don’t you
reduce some of your Cabinet Minis-
ters?

“And you have in some circum-
stances a Cabinet Minister and a Par-
liamentary Secretary — unnecessary.
You have a Cabinet Minster and a



junior minister — unnecessary. And you
have ministers who are sitting in the
Prime Minister’s office; why? You have
sO many ministers when he could
reduce the Cabinet by at least seven to
eight ministers and arrive at a workable
number that allows him to manage the
economy,” he said.

At a salary of $28,000 a year, this
five per cent cut to MPs’ salaries would
amount to a savings of $1,400 per year
per constituency.

Cabinet Ministers at a salary of
$66,000 would be cut by $4,620 on their
seven per cent marker. At a 16 per
cent cut, Mr Ingraham himself at his
Prime Minister’s salary of $86,000
would lose $13,760.

It is unknown at this time if these
cuts would be compounded to a Min-
ister’s salary and his MP’s salary or if
the government would be seeking to
use only one or the other.

Arbitration committee to oversee
Stalled COB dispute negotiations

FROM page one

tioned the accuracy of the college’s financial records, and said
last week it will not abandon its campaign for "transparency and
accountability” — even after the industrial agreement is finalised.

The college has repeatedly denied any financial misman-
agement but refused the union’s call for a forensic audit, claim-
ing that acceding to the demand would be tantamount to an
admission of wrongdoing.

Negotiations were halted on May 14 pending the appointment
of external arbitrators, in accordance with an earlier agreement
struck between the two parties and Department of Labour
officials.

It has been mutually agreed that the arbitrators should try to
conclude a final deal within seven working days, and sources say
the negotiations will resume under their supervision next week
Monday.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KIMPLEMEER INVESTMENTS
LTD.

— -,——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KIMPLEMEER INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TSAR VENTURE LIMITED

—_— -,—

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TSAR VENTURES LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OAKTREE ASSETS LTD.

— *——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OAKTREE ASSETS LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





TV reporter fired after alleged
assault of ambassador's chauffeur

FROM page one

media outlets.

The Bahamian ambassador’s limo driver stood his
ground in the altercation, but allegedly got whacked
across the face by DeMentri in response. Mr DeMentri
then “sped off” in his Audi.

The reporter was written up after Mr Senanyake
recorded his vehicle’s license plate number.

The limo driver had to be treated for a cut lip. Mr
DeMentri was charged with third degree assault and lat-
er on the same day, fired from his news job.

Mr DeMentri’s attorney, Joseph Tacopina, told the
Philadelphia Daily News that the allegations against the
ex-news reporter “are false.”





Legal Notice

NOTICE
KABARDA VENTURES LTD.

—_— -——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KABARDA VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MISTY INVESTMENTS
GROUP LTD.

— ——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MISTY INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORRSTOWN INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD.

— + —_

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of ORRSTOWN INVESTMENTS PTE.
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE
r
|
}
i
bs :
WEDNESDAY, MAY 26,

PAGE 10° Asue Draw donates $2,500 for regatta...

'O' Ferguson to
headline at NCAA
East Regional

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

Melinda
making a
name for
herself...

See page 10

a
SPORTS





2010





le

VOLLEYBALL

BAISS FINALS SET

ST Augustine’s College Big
Red Machine will play for both
the Bahamas Association of



Independent Secondary
Schools’ junior girls and boys
volleyball titles today at St
Augustine’s College.

Yesterday in the sudden
death playoffs, the Big Red
Machine rolled past the Nas-
sau Christian Academy Cru-
saders 17-15 and 17-12, while
St Andrew’s Hurricanes out-
lasted the Kingsway Academy
Saints 17-12, 12-17 and 15-9.

That sets up the one-game
junior girls championship
between St Augustine’s and St
Andrew’s.

In the junior boys sudden
death playoffs, SAC won 17-
15, 15-17 and 15-10 over St
Andrew’s, while Jordan Prince
Williams Falcons got by the
Queen’s college Comets 5-17,
17-15 and 15-12.

The junior boys champi-
onship will be played between
St Augustine’s and Jordan
Prince Williams.

The two winners will join St
Augustine’s, who captured the
senior girls title and Queen’s
College, the senior boys cham-
pions. The seniors’ series was
completed last month.

BASKETBALL

BGDBA MEETING

A MEETING pertaining to
the start of the 2010 season is
scheduled for 7pm Thursday at
D W Davis Gymnasium for all
coaches and clubs.

BASEBALL

JBLN ACTION

RESULTS of games played
over the weekend in the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau are
posted below:

Tee Ball:

The Seagrapes swept their
series against the Guineps by
beating them 18-9 Saturday.

Coach Pitch:

Sandflies defeated the Bees
14-7 on Saturday to capture

As for Smith, Rolle said
her emphasis will be on
the 200. But he said she
will be using the century
as a tune-up to ensure that
she’s ready for the longer
race.

“In my opinion, her
performance at the Con-
ference wasn’t what I had
anticipated,” said Rolle of
Smith.

“T just haven’t been
able to put my finger on what went wrong,
despite the fact that we had some bad weath-
er. But that is something we hope we can
turn around this weekend.”

Gerard Brown, the other member of the
Auburn connection, is also out with an
injury and according to Rolle, he won’t be
competing anymore for the year.

In the 4x 1 relay, White is expected to run
on the second leg in lane one of the second
of three heats for Miami with Ferguson and
Smith listed on the third and fourth legs for
Auburn in lane seven in the same heat.

And in the 4 x 4 relay, Armbrister is
pegged to run the opening leg for Auburn in
lane three in the second of three heats.

In Austin, Texas, two Grand Bahamians
could end up clashing in the men’s 400
before they come home for the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associations’
National Open Championships in June.

Demetrius, a junior at Texas A&M, is set
to run out of lane five in the first of six heats
and Latoy Williams, a junior at Texas Tech,
will be in lane one in heat four.

Karlton Rolle, a sophomore, is scheduled
to run the second leg for UCLA in lane
eight in the first of three heats in the men’s



ae

ith the NCAA Outdoor

Championships two

weeks away, a number

of Bahamian athletes

will have to go through
their regional meets in order to qualify for Fl ‘ i
the biggest collegiate meet this year.

This weekend, the athletes will be com- FERGUSON
peting at NCAA East Regional in Greens-
boro, North Carolina, and at the NCAA
West Regional in Austin, Texas.

If they qualify by finishing in the top 12 in
their respective individual events and in the
top eight as a relay team, they will advance
to the NCAA Championships that is set for
Eugene, Oregon, June 9-12.

Fresh off earning the Southeastern Con-
ference Female Runner of the Year award
after a sprint double victory last month,
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson is expected to head-
line the list of Bahamians participating in
North Carolina.

The junior, who became the third Auburn
Tiger to win the SEC Female/Athlete of the
Year award, is set to run in lane seven in the
fourth of six 100m heats.

She will be joined by her team-mate,
Grand Bahamian Nivea Smith, and Kristy
White, a senior from Miami who is all set to
open up in lane one of the first heat.

In their specialties in the 200, Smith is
slated to run out of lane four in the second
of six heats and Ferguson will be in lane six
in heat five.

Cache Armbrister and Krystal Bodie are
not entered in their individual events, the
400 and 100 hurdles respectively, and that

ae





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=
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was because of specific reasons, according to 4x1 relay. Pinder is listed to run for Texas championship
Auburn’s Bahamian assistant coach Henry A&M on the third leg in lane six in heat three games to one.
Rolle. “Krystal is hurt and Cache isjustrun- three. In the 4x 4, Williams and Texas Tech 9-10:

will run out of lane two in the first of three
heats with Pinder and Texas A&M in lane
three in the same heat.

Expected to do double duties is Lamar
Delaney, a senior at Houston, in the men’s
long and triple jumps. In the long jump, he
will be the third competitor in the third of
four flights and in the triple jump, he will be
the 10th competitor in the second of four
flights.

Rounding out the Bahamian participa-
tion will be Jamal Wilson, a junior at Texas,
in the men’s high jump. He is scheduled to
be the 15th of 24 jumpers in the first of two
flights.

ning the 4 x 4,” Rolle said. “It’s unfortu-
nate that Krystal had the hamstring injury at
the SECs, which will sideline her for the
rest of the year. She’s done for the season.

“With Cache just coming back in January,
she didn’t have the off-season training that
she needed and being ranked 39th going
into this meet, we didn’t want to push her
too hard to qualify. So she will just run on
the 4 x 4 team that is ranked at number
eight.”

Rolle said if Ferguson can duplicate the
type of performance she had at the SEC,
she should not have any problem in quali-
fying for the NCAA.

The Octopus lead the cham-
pionship series against the Bar-
racudas 2-1. Game four is set
for Spm today.

11-12:

The Conchs defeated the
Wild Dogs three games to one
to take the title.

13-15:

The Owlz beat the Falcons
on Friday 7-6 to sweep their
series three games to none

16-20:

The Arawaks knocked off
the Caribs 7-0 Saturday to close
the door and take the title three
games to zip.



OVERALL WINNER Vincent Paul (top) and runner-up Meko
Evans (above) pose at the 24th Bahamas Bodybuilding & Fitness
Federation Novice Championships at the National Centre for the
Performing Arts, Shirley Street, on Saturday night. Paul won the
middleweight and most muscular titles. Evans was 2nd overall
and won the welterweight division...

Rising stars at
the 24th Novice
Body Fitness
Championships



















THE country’s local body-
building scene welcomed two
rising stars to the fold, while
honouring one of the stalwarts
of the sport at its first event of
the year.

At the 24th Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federa-
tion Novice Championships,
the federation renamed the
event the Raymond Tucker
Novice Championships in hon-
our of the legendary body-
builder and saw Vincent Paul
and Tanisha Bethel dominate
the competition.

Paul was crowned the men’s
overall winner in the event. He
also took first place in the mid-
dleweight division and was
named Most Muscular.

Meko Evans finished sec-
ond following the men’s over-
all pose down, but took first
place in the welterweight divi-
sion.

Jaheel Butler took the title
in the junior division and fin-
ished second behind Paul
amongst the Middleweights.

Ranaldo Smith finished sec-
ond in the welterweight divi-

sion, while Tarino Stubbs was
third in middleweights.

Bethel took home a pletho-
ra of awards on the women’s
side of the event.

She won the junior, light-
weight, women’s lightweight
open, body fitness junior, body
fitness open, overall body-
building female and overall fit-
ness titles.

The event serves as a show-
case to the sport’s newcomers
and gives the federation a
sound impression of its future
stars.

Federation executives say
the Novice Championships
provide an opportunity for the
federation to showcase its stars
of the future and also its yunior
programme - entrants under
the age of 21.

The second event on the
BBFF calendar this year will
be the Grand Bahama Body-
building Association Body-
building and Fitness Champi-
onships on June 26.

The 37th Annual BBFF
National Championships is set
for July 3 in the capital.

GBPA SUPPORTS TRACK & FIELD — GBPA’s director of community
relations Geneva Rutherford makes a donation to Frederick Bastian, head
coach of the Kenyan Knights Track Club...

DWAYNE JENNINGS, head coach of Golden Eagles Track Club, accepts
a cheque donation from Geneva Rutherford...

Track clubs get money for athletes

FREEPORT, BAHAMAS - Grand
Bahamian athletes continue to excel on
national and international levels.

To aid with the athletic development
and growth of many of our island’s talent-
ed youngsters, The Grand Bahama Port
Authority Limited (GBPA) recently made
cheque donations to two track clubs on
the island.

“GBPA is keen to assist with various
types of sports and we have always done so
over the years because we realize that
youngsters need the type of discipline and
positive activities provided through
sports,” said Geneva Rutherford, GBPA’s
director of community relations.

Accepting a cheque donation on behalf
of the Golden Eagles Track Club was head
coach Dwayne Jennings.

The club is seeking corporate support to
purchase uniforms for its 65 athletes and
also to host a major meet on Grand

Bahama. With many of its members finan-
cially challenged, the GBPA donation was
most welcomed.

“We thank GBPA for their donation
and kind consideration. We have several
clubs visiting for an upcoming meet, so
this cheque will definitely help to defray
some of the costs associated with the event.
It will also go towards the purchase of new
uniforms and cover some of our club’s
expenses as we travel to Junior Nationals
in Nassau. We’re definitely looking for-
ward to a continued relationship with the
Port Authority,” said Jennings.

Also benefiting from GBPA’s corpo-
rate generosity was the Kenyan Knights
Track Club. Head coach Frederick Bast-
jan was similarly thankful. “I’m grateful to
GBPA and its management team for their
kindness towards the development of our
kids. Every contribution received helps to
cover the many expenses associated with

the expansion of track and field,” Bastian
said.

The Kenyan Knights Track Club is a
non-profit organisation whose primary
objective is to cultivate and develop young
athletes on Grand Bahama. With club
members training vigorously for upcoming
meets, including the BayTaf Track & Field
Classics, as well as Junior and Senior
Nationals, the club relies heavily on the
support of individuals and local area busi-
nesses.

“Great self-esteem is built through
sports and we know that once youths are
involved in something positive, then they
are less likely to be involved in negative
behaviour,” Rutherford said. “GBPA real-
ly seeks to better the lives of everyone
throughout the island of Grand Bahama,
and by extension the Bahamas, and one of
the best ways we think we can do this is
through sports.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



Asue Draw donates $2,500 for Labour Day regatta

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ORGANISERS are getting
set to stage the annual South
Andros Regatta, which has
been in existence for more than
20 years, over the Labour Day
holiday weekend.

Asue Draw, one of the major
sponsors of this year’s event,
gave a $2,500 cheque to the
organising committee last week,
coming off the $10,000 that they
donated to the National Fami-
ly Island Regatta in April.

“We believe that sloop sail-
ing in our country has become
the number one drawing card

in terms of pulling Bahamians
and families together,” said
Rev Dr Philip McPhee, whose
Thunderbird is sponsored by
the Asue Draw.

McPhee, who is working
along with the organising com-
mittee for the regatta, sched-
uled for June 3-6, said they are
delighted that the Asue Draw

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has agreed to step forward and
assist them.

“We are appreciative to Mr
Kenny Fountain, Mr Shawn
Kemp, marketing director, Mr
Levin Wilson and Mr Trevor
Smith, the operating manager,
for coming forth and assisting
us in this venture.”

It’s anticipated that there will
be about 20 boats competing
in the Class C, D and E divi-
sions.

Levin Wilson, the marketing
manager at Asue Draw, said
they look at “regattas and sloop
sailing as one of the biggest
forms of camaraderie in
Bahamian sportsmanship and
we see this as an opportunity
to reach Bahamians on all dif-
ferent levels by assisting sloop
sailing.

“As we go through the com-
munity, we try to see the dif-
ferent needs and we try to
address them with the help of
Dr McPhee, who has been very
helpful in trying to identify the
needs that we can assist with.”

Wilson said after leaving a
lasting impact on the island of
Exuma during the National
Family Island Regatta, they
intend to do the same thing in
Andros.

At the regatta, Rev McPhee
said they will be doing some-
thing very unique in that the
winner of the C Class will be
presented with an orange jack-
et, which will bear the name of
Asue Draw, indicating that they
were the champions of that par-

Melinda
making a

jeVbentomcO)h
herself in
college

THE VERSATILE Melinda
Bastian (right), one of the
Bahamas’ most multi-talented
young female athletes, is defi-
nitely making a name for her-
self on the college scene.

In the most recent Southern
Intercollegiate Athletic Con-
ference (SAIC) track and field
championships, Melinda Bast-
ian has won three Ist team
awards in javelin, shotput and
the heptathlon.

She was also named the
Field MVP in the champi-
onships and Most Outstanding
Athlete of the Year in the con-
ference.

Having an outstanding year,
she has also secured a number
of awards, including a silver
medal in high jump, Ist team
all SIAC in softball for short-
stop, MVP for volleyball and
track and field at Benedict Col-
lege, All-American and AIll-
Academics.








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ORGANISERS of the South Andros Regatta received a $2,500 cheque from
Asue Draw. Shown (I-r) are Levin Wilson, marketing manager of Asue
Draw, committee co-chairman Kendal Taylor and Rev Philip McPhee, an
unidentified salesperson at Asue Draw, committee co-chairman Basil
Rolle and Trevor Smith, the operating manager at Asue Draw...

ticular event.

Basil Rolle, a co-chairman of
the organising committee, said
with the assistance of Asue
Draw, they can now properly
plan the regatta.

“At first things were looking
a little bleak, but we can now
go back to South Andros and
put on a decade regatta, start-
ing with the Ocean Race on
Thursday, May 3,” Rolle said.

Kendal Taylor, the other co-
chairman, said while this is just
their third year in forefront of
both the regatta and the home-
coming celebrations, they are
grateful to Rev McPhee and
Asue Draw for assisting them
this year.

“IT can assure them that their

contribution wouldn’t be in
vain, but it will be well spent
and accounted for,” he said.

“We will represent them in
South Andros highly. For them
being one of the major spon-
sors, we say thank you because
with the economy as sluggish
as it is, it is hard for sponsors to
come on board. So it’s a
tremendous boost to South
Andros.”

Taylor said they are looking
forward to putting on a spec-
tacular event this year, includ-
ing a performance by the high
school dance troop, the prima-
ry school platting the maypole
and there will also be some
rake-n-scrape and the popular
crab races.








‘Lefty’ Leighton Gibson
on JBLN All-Stars

FIFTEEN-year-old Leighton Gibson, a sophomore at the
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for the Cadets.

Gibson, a lefty, led the team with a .484 batting average and
39 runs batted in. He also blasted five home runs during the
season as the Cadets posted a 26-4 overall record - winning
both the Ohio Valley Athletic Conference AA Division regular
season pennant and the Playoff Championships.

Gibson will be playing for the JBLN All-Stars in the upcom-
ing BBF 8th Annual Andre Rodgers National Baseball Cham-
pionships to be held in Freeport June 4-6.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamian
students
fearful over
unrest

FROM page one

an ongoing basis,” said Brent
Symonette, Minister of For-
eign Affairs.

The government does not
have an estimate of the num-
ber of Bahamians currently
in Jamaica. However, all
Bahamians are being advised
to be “cautious and careful”
of their whereabouts.

Most Bahamian students at
the University of the West
Indies, Mona, are medical stu-
dents, currently engaged in
exams. Although exams have
concluded for other faculties,
examinations scheduled for
the Faculty of Medical Sci-
ences yesterday, took place
as planned. The UWI issued
an advisory to say operations
on campus were normal.

It advised staff members to
consider their personal safety
and security first in determin-
ing whether to report to work.
Some staff members live in
areas affected by the violence.

The Norman Manley Law
School, which is located on
the Mona campus, postponed
exams on Tuesday and
Wednesday. A Norman Man-
ley student said: “Generally
it takes a toll on you psycho-
logically. Yesterday I could
not do anything except
research what is going on. I
was constantly trying to get
news, news, news. Honestly, it
is hard to concentrate on
studying.

“There is no immediate or
direct threat to anyone’s life
on this side, but there is the




potential because the place is
unrest. There is just the fear,”
said the Jamaican student.

In the wake of a declara-
tion of a state of emergency in
the country’s capital Kingston
and St Andrew parish, police
and military officials have
been engaged in armed con-
flict with militias.

They launched an opera-
tion in Tivoli Gardens on
Monday morning to appre-
hended alleged drug kingpin
Christopher “Dudus” Coke,
who was charged last year in
US federal court with con-
spiracy to distribute marijua-
na and cocaine and with con-
spiracy to illegally traffic in
firearms.

Months

After months of uncertain-
ty, Prime Minister Bruce
Golding announced on May
17 he was directing the attor-
ney general to authorise the
extradition request allowing
for the arrest of Coke.

Following the announce-
ment, West Kingston com-
munities staged non-violent
protests, sporting placards
that read, “Next to God is
Dudus”. Some neighbour-
hoods fortified their streets
with road blocks made from
sandbags, improvised explo-
sive devices and electrified
fencing.

“You are afraid even if you
are removed from it. There is
something very serious going
on. Persons, particularly those

a



. ao

~—







(AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner,Norman Grindley)

POLICEMEN go into action at the Central Police Station gate in downtown Kingston after gunmen open fire on them on Monday May 24, 2010.
Thousands of police and soldiers stormed the Jamaican ghettos in search of a reputed drug kingpin wanted by the United States, intensify-
ing a third day of street battles that have killed at least 30 people.

rified, mainly because there
were reports of road blocks
and a few civilians had been
shot the day before. The fact
that you had to venture out
was terrifying. You don’t
know how to get to school,
which route to take to get to
school, whether public trans-
portation is running.”

Some Air Jamaica and
American Airlines flights out
of Jamaica were cancelled
yesterday, although airport
services was still fully opera-
tional. One of the several
access roads to airport, Moun-
tain View, is inaccessible
because of the unrest. Also,
one of the main highways,
Spanish Town bypass, that
carries traffic outside of the
capital into other regions was
blocked. Based on reports
from Jamaican officials, at
least three members of the
security forces were killed and
several others injured; at least
26 civilians - all men - were
killed, and at least 200 peo-
ple were arrested since Mon-
day. Unofficial reports from
other news sources indicate
additional civilian casualties,
including children.



from outside of JA were ter-

(AP Photo/APTN)

THIS FRAME GRAB from video provided by APTN shows soldiers on guard in Kingston, Jamaica, Mon-
day, May 24, 2010. Thousands of armed police and soldiers barged past barricades into the capital’s most
violent slums, clashing with defenders of a gang leader sought by the United States.





ONS SY











+

ih he

TA





(AP Photo/The Jamaica Gleaner,Ricardo Makyn)
POLICEMEN conduct an operation along West Parade, in downtown Kingston, Jamaica, Monday May 24,
2010.



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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Caribbean emergency experts meeting in Nassau

BIS Photo: Derek Smith



By LINDSAY THOMPSON



WITH the region experiencing
“unprecedented” natural disasters,
Caribbean emergency experts are coming
together in Nassau this week to pool
resources and design more effective ways
relating to disaster mitigation.

Captain Stephen Russell, director of the
National Emergency Management Agency
(NEMA), said the Bahamas is pleased to
be hosting the first Technical Advisory
Committee (TAC) meeting of the
Caribbean Disaster Management Agency
(CDEMA).

Starting today and continuing until Fri-
day, it is the first meeting of the organisa-
tion since the transition from the

CAPTAIN Stephen
Russell, director of
National Emergency
Management Agency.

Caribbean Disaster Emergency Response
Agency (CDERA) to the CDEMA on
September 1, 2009.

TAC is a new organ under the gover-
nance mechanism of CDEMA. This com-
mittee sets the tone for strengthening pro-
gramme development and implementa-
tion. CDEMA says that TAC is about
embracing a full participatory approach
to building synergies between the CDE-
MA coordinating unit and the 18 partici-
pating states in all aspects of the technical
work, from design to implementation.

Participants at the TAC meeting will
examine the enabling environment in each
country to deliver the Comprehensive Dis-
aster Management (CDM) mandate. The
CDM is an integrated and proactive

approach to disaster management, which
seeks to reduce the risk and loss associat-
ed with the natural and technological haz-
ards and the effects of climate change to
enhance regional sustainable development.

Elizabeth Riley, deputy director of
CDEMA who has responsibility for pro-
gramming said, “We are going to be dis-
cussing and looking for agreement on the
way forward with respect to policy and
legislation on disaster office structures,
instruments and tools that we need, to
monitor the progress of CDM at the
national level.”

Also high on the agenda will be mat-
ters pertaining to the strengthening of
CDEMA’s operational mechanisms to
effectively function under the new man-

date. The meeting will also discuss guide-
lines to strengthen the operations of CDE-
MA’s sub-regional focal point mechanism.
Participants will use this opportunity to
identify initial lessons learnt by the region-
al system through the recent Haiti earth-
quake event and the region wide drought.
A significant event during the meeting will
be the signing of a Memorandum of
Understanding between the Pan American
Health Organisation and CDEMA tomor-
row.

“This will broaden the scope to partner
and support the mainstreaming of disaster
risk reduction at national levels and pro-
mote its incorporation in the health sector
within Caribbean countries,” Ms Riley
said.



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REPRESENTATIVES and resource managers from the
Bahamas National Trust, BREEF, College of the Bahamas,
Department of Marine Resources and The Nature Conservancy
will come together at the Bahamas National Trust this week to par-
ticipate in a special workshop designed to share the findings of the
Bahamas Biocomplexity Project ( BBP).

Connecting Marine Science to Conservation in The Bahamas is
a workshop for resource managers, educators and administrators
that will explore recent research results about coral reef ecosystems,
marine protected areas, and other dimensions of marine conser-
vation. The information gleaned through this workshop will help
participants apply this knowledge and related tools to conservation
work.

The workshop will be facilitated by Bahamian and US
researchers and hosted by the Bahamas Biocomplexity Project, the
Bahamas National Trust, and American Museum of Natural His-
tory's Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC).

Dan Brumbaugh, CBC Senior Conservation Scientist, who has
led the BBP since its inception, said: “This workshop will give us
a chance to provide an interactive exploration of selected research
areas. We'll also be able to work with the participants to enhance
the practical application of the science to their conservation work.

Excited

“We are very excited about the knowledge that will be shared at
this workshop,” said Tamica Rahming, Director of Parks and Sci-
ence for the BNT. “One of sessions, Learning from the Exuma
Cays Land and Sea Park, highlights marine reserves as a scientif-
ic tool for studying key interactions in reef systems, reserve effects
on populations, and community interactions.”

The BBP (bbp.amnh.org) is an interdisciplinary partnership for
improved understanding and management of The Bahamas’ marine
environment. For the last nine years, BBP researchers have con-
ducted studies across the Bahamian seascape to understand how
marine habitats and biodiversity are distributed, how these func-
tion within coral reef ecosystems, and how local human commu-
nities use their marine resources, thereby also affecting ecosystem
function.

The BNT also partnered with the American Museum of Natur-
al History as part of the Biocomplexity Project to produce Trea-
sures in the Sea: A Teachers Resource, a resource book that pro-
vides teachers with scientific information and engaging, hands-
on activities that encourage students to discover, cherish, and pro-
tect the sea and all of its treasures. Designed especially for edu-
cators in The Bahamas, the book complements curriculum guide-
lines for grades three to six.

Treasures in the Sea introduces marine conservation concepts by
focusing on some of The Bahamas’ most important marine species,
and helps students understand life cycles, critical habitats, cultur-
al and economic connections, and also the urgency of conservation
and management.

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WEDNESDAY,

MAY 26,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

‘consumed’ by debt interest

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME $0.15 of every $1 in
revenue collected by the Gov-
ernment is being eaten up in
servicing interest payments on
its $3.3 billion-plus direct debt,
something Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham described to
Tribune Business as an “unsus-
tainable position”.

Speaking to this newspaper
ahead of today’s 2010-2011
Budget, the Prime Minister,
while declining to go into
specifics, said he was “very con-
fident” that the combination of

SEE page 5B

* PM warns of ‘sharp medicine

Eg

Eo

Eo

intended to cure’ in today’s
Budget, as debt servicing
in ‘unsustainable position’
Says action needed now to
prevent fiscal position
being ‘nearly impossible’
to tackle in future
Bankers say given ‘heads
up’ of significant rise in
commercial banking fees
Fiscal deficit likely bigger
than projected, due to
major ‘deterioration’

in January-April period

Government ‘never

had high hopes’ for
$857m development

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government “never
had high hopes in the first
place” for the $857 million
South Ocean redevelopment,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-

*

South Ocean financier
accuses former partner
of conducting ‘smear’
campaign to force

it to settle



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Scotia loan key to Baha
Mar ‘49 deal conditions’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

aha Mar has 49
“conditions
precedent” that
it must fulfill to
consummate its
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment, the Prime Minister
confirmed to Tribune Business,
the most important being to
resolve negotiations with Sco-
tiabank over its outstanding
$170-$180 million loan.

Mr Ingraham confirmed the
number of conditions still to be
fulfilled by the resort develop-
er, Tribune Business having
been told this number by one of
its contacts, with the Govern-

PM confirms numerous ‘to do’ list before $2.6bn project
can get going, with $170-$180m loan resolution critical



HUBERT INGRAHAM

ment awaiting approval of the
project by the Chinese govern-
ment before it starts to move
on its own process.

“There are 49 conditions
precedent, the most important
of which is the Scotiabank
loan,” Mr Ingraham confirmed
to Tribune Business. “Notwith-
standing this, the Chinese gov-
ernment has to approve the
project, and that has not hap-
pened yet.

“Once that happens, all those
conditions precedent can be

Hotels maintain improvements through April

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian hotel indus-
try maintained its “stabilisa-
tion” trend during April, Tri-
bune Business has been told,

* Nassau occupancies up by average 2.6 percentage points, while
room rates rise 1% year-over-year, as air arrivals up 4.3%

* Hotels to analyse oil exploration in Bahamas more closely,
as ‘concern’ remains about Gulf of Mexico disaster

* Hope alternative connections via Miami

ham told Tribune Business, as * Alleges that this even NEN er ees makes a will mitigate effects of BA strike

the project’s financier accused extended to lobbying up by 2.6 percentage points and

its former partner of conducting Bahamian eovernment average daily room rates potential business andenviron- ground compared to last year.

a ‘smear’ campaign against it . 8 oo (ADRs) some 1.1 per cent mental impact if oil leaking into That would be the best way to

pode oN force it out or ministers against it ahead of 2009 comparatives. the Gulf of Mexico reached characterise our situation.

settle litigation. . ce . : ;
The aa ons contained = * Hedge fund admits that ae Ne err eee

in court filings in the New York
State Supreme Court that have
been obtained by Tribune Busi-

SEE page 4B



Local firm
unveils its
mobile
website

BahamasLocal.com, the
online Bahamian information
resource, has launched a mobile
version of its website to enable
persons to access it while on
the road via the likes of Black-
berry, I-phone and other Inter-
net-enabled devices.

The company, in a statement
issued yesterday, said mobile
computing was a growing part
of overall user traffic on the
Internet, and it had to move to
meet this demand.

BahamasLocal.com said it
currently received over 100
users daily on its mobile web-
site version, with this traffic set
to increase. It added that Gart-
ner Inc, a leading information
technology research company,
found that the total number of
Internet-enabled mobile
devices sold in the first quarter
of 2010 was 54.3 million units,
an increase of 48.7 per cent.

The Apple I-phone alone

SEE page 3B









373-acre project in south-

western New Providence
‘continues to languish
without direction’





New car
sales down
11% in year

to April

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

DESPITE receiving a
temporary boost from the
March car show, Bahamian
new car dealers yesterday
said year-over-year sales for
the January-April 2010 peri-
od were still down by 11.04
per cent, with industry exec-
utives expecting the sector
to be on the “tail end” of
any economic recovery.

Speaking to Tribune
Business after the Bahamas
Motor Dealers Association
(BMDA) released figures
to Tribune Business show-
ing that year-over-year car
sales for April were down
by 15.07 per cent compared
to 2009, Andrew Barr,
Friendly Ford’s general
manager, said a “consistent,
sustainable” recovery was
key to both banks and con-
sumers recovering vital con-
fidence.

Adding that most
Bahamian new car dealers’
sales were down on average
by 40 per cent compared to
pre-2009 levels, Mr Barr
said the industry’s recovery
would not happen this year,
and was more likely to
occur in 2011 - especially if
Baha Mar’s $2.6 billion
Cable Beach redevelop-
ment started.

He pointed out that many
hotel workers, who were
currently working three to
four-day weeks, would “not
be eligible to get a bank

SEE page 5B





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Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president, told Tribune Busi-
ness that while the industry -
the largest private sector
employer in this nation - had
“not lost any ground” com-
pared to its 2009 performance,
it was concerned about the

Adding that the hotel indus-
try would provide whatever
support it could to the Govern-
ment’s efforts to counter the oil
spill fall-out, if it came to that,
Mr Sands said of the industry’s
current condition: “We’re still
stabilised and have not lost any

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tion for April suggests that
while occupancies were basi-
cally flat and stabilised, there
was a slight increase in the
amount of room nights sold,
and the ADR generated was

SEE page 6B



worked through. The Govern-
ment of the Bahamas is wait-
ing for confirmation that the
government of China has
approved the deal with Baha
Mar, the China Export-Import
Bank and China State Con-
struction.”

With such a lengthy ‘to do’
list on Baha Mar’s part, the
Government’s relative silence
on the project is understand-
able, with the Prime Minister

SEE page 3B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and
implementation of a strategic public relations and communication program together
with the effective and efficient planning and execution of all corporate events and
activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

¢ Assisting with the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate
Programs plan to support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;

* Overseeing the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations
programs, plan and budget;

¢ Assisting with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation
and, where necessary, the wider community;
Preparing and distributing the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directing press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press
releases, photographs, fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management
and Media Representatives;
Coordinating the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion
surveys;
Providing assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in
writing speeches, preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluating and assessing customer complaints, queries and disseminating
information to management;
Assisting with the development, implementation and management of external
communication efforts;
Coordinating marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the
external Public Relations Firms and the Media;
Identifying and liaising with service providers to secure speakers, presenters
and entertainment for Corporate events;
Liaising with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e.
awards, invitations, prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as
necessary and maintaining an inventory of the same;
Preparing and distributing all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices)
relative to Corporate activities, as necessary;
Creating and updating all standard operation procedures for all activities, as
necessary;
Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of
bills for all events and activities as necessary;
Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate
activities;
Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company
newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information
relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business
Communication, or equivalent.

¢ A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level

¢ Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;

¢ Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management
and public groups;

¢ Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing

* Experience in managing special events and activities

¢ Excellent time management and organizational skills

* Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

¢ Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications

* Good analytical skills

* Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.



The disgrace of
our Post Office

HOW long does it take for
a delivery truck to drive from a
bank on Frederick Street in
downtown Nassau to Cable
Beach? Maybe 45 minutes on a
bad traffic day. How long does
it take for the Bahamas Post
Office to deliver an ordinary
letter that distance? How about
20 days. And from the BEC
office on Baillou Hill Road to
Cable Beach? How about 21
days via our Government-run
postal service?

These examples come from
comparing the postmark date
with the first date the letter was
found in my mail box. I hap-
pened to use the private Mail
Boxes facility rather than the
Cable Beach branch post office,
but that should add another day
at most, since Mail Boxes pick
up from the nearby branch
three times a week, and the
branch gets two deliveries a day
from the central Post Office.

And these delays do not even
represent true delivery periods,
since it is not known how long
letters dropped in any post
office sit around the central
office before the postmark is
affixed. These unbelievable
delivery times are typical of all
my mail I have checked in
recent weeks, and my experi-
ence is typical of every other
person I have questioned. And
this is local mail, in the 21-mile
long island of New Providence,

Let’s not even discuss inter-
island mail (despite daily flights
to most locations) and, even
worse, international mail,
where months can pass for
inbound and outbound deliv-
ery, and complete untraceable
loss is not uncommon. The
unreliability has caused a local
club with many overseas mem-
bers to advise them not to
address mail to the club’s Nas-
sau P.O. Box, but to use a spe-
cial convenience address estab-
lished in Miami - a solution
used by many establishments,
together with the ubiquitous,
but expensive, reliance on
FedEx and DHL couriers.

Mail service is not a glam-
orous subject, but it is a public
utility as much as electricity,
telecommunications, and water
and sewerage. Because the Post
Office is not set up as a sepa-
rate corporation but simply
buried as a department of the
Ministry of Works, it has not
received the public scrutiny of a
BEC or BTC, but its capabili-
ties are just as essential to an
efficient public sector, and pro-
vide a guide as to whether a
nation has escaped “third-
world” status. By this standard,
the Bahamas is failing abysmal-
ly.
What is the effect on our
economy? Thousands of bills
are late in arriving, and pay-
ments are equally late, putting a
squeeze on the billers’ cash-
flow. Some private companies
have virtually abandoned the
post office, relying on local



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messengers for specific com-
munications. But this is not an
option open to private citizens,
or to the public utilities, banks
and insurance companies, who
send out thousands of bulk-mail
monthly mailings. Of course,
the deficiency is intensified
because our lethargic Central
Bank and financial industry
have not taken the steps, nor-
mal in other counties, to initiate
on-line payment systems (said
to be coming soon, hopefully).

For comparative experience
in the “real world”, I consulted
the websites of the UK’s Royal
Mail and USPS (United States
Postal Service), particularly to
learn their assured delivery
times. For the cost of a 41
pence stamp (about $0.60), let-
ters are delivered anywhere in
the United Kingdom within one
or two days; a 32 pence stamp
brings three-day delivery.
Despite well-publicised bud-
getary constraints, USPS still
offers six-day per week service
and three-day standard deliv-
ery for a $0.44 stamp, increased
by 10 cents during the last 10
years.

And, of course, this means
delivery directly to a sub-
scriber’s home or office box,
requiring thousands of staffers,
trucks and bikes whose expense
we do not bear in the Bahamas.

By contrast, our website
(ww.bahamas.gov.bs/postalser-
vice), says nothing — perhaps
wisely — about assured delivery
dates for our standard $0.15
New Providence stamp. It con-
tains the grandiloquent mission
statement “to be recognised
and respected for its timely col-
lection and transmittal, and of
postal products”, as well as pho-
tographs of smiling employees
operating computers and
stamping machines, or strug-
gling with huge sacks of mail
in the cavernous central sort-
ing hall. We can also find infor-
mation about branch offices,
box rental and philatelic offer-
ings.

We learn about 10 main and
branch post offices in New
Providence, with a total of
24,750 boxes and 900 more
planned “in the future”. But all
this information may be out-of-
date, since the website appears
to have been prepared in 2005
and still bears the handsome
portrait photograph of Post-
master-General Godfrey
Clarke, who happens to have
retired over a year ago. I was
informed that he was replaced
by his deputy, Leslie
Cartwright, whose appointment
has never been officially
announced. My attempts to
reach him by telephone or via
his designated e-mail address
proved fruitless.

The greatest irony of the




The Tribune

Real Estate |

WAR eM cia Aen GAA ait oe

website is (the retired) Mr
Clarke’s proud announcement
that, as a member of the Uni-
versal Postal Union (UPU)
since 1974, the Bahamas Post
Office adheres to a “quality of
service policy that focuses on
meeting and exceeding cus-
tomer expectations”. The UPU,
a little-known affiliate of the
United Nations, cannot compel
any member nation to follow
its strictures but does its best
to draft standards and encour-
age compliance. One does not
realise the complexity of inter-
national regulations, protocols
and technical research required
for efficient international mail
until one reads the voluminous
reports churned out by the
UPU at its quadrennial Con-
gresses, prepared by its 150
headquarters staff in Berne,
Switzerland. At its 2004 and
2008 meetings, the UPO adopt-
ed the important ‘J-5 World-
wide Standard for Internation-
al Postal Service Quality’, set-
ting five days for normal mail
delivery, with an objective of
80 per cent worldwide compli-
ance.

Clearly, the Bahamas is far
from meeting this standard.
Even in New Providence, with
all its geographic advantages
for prompt service and about
30,000 widely-scattered mail
boxes (if we include Mail Box-
es Ltd and other licensed pri-
vate operators), good roads,
none of the jungles, deserts,
mountains and poor infrastruc-
ture that impede delivery in,
say, African nations, the stan-
dard is a disgraceful two to
three weeks.

The private citizen, and even
the press, cannot penetrate the
hermetic post office bureau-
cracy to discover the problems.
As with other failing organisa-
tions, the problem probably
does not lie with the low-level
employees, who act as they are
directed. It is likely to start at
the leadership (government)
and senior management level
and then filter down, perhaps
some combination of aversion
to modern technology and
indifference to customer ser-
vice. The retirement of Mr
Clarke and the ambiguous posi-
tion of Mr Cartwight cannot
help but worsen the situation.

If money is the problem, the
Government might well be jus-
tified in raising the long-frozen
price of the standard $0.15
stamp. But this would only be
acceptable if accompanied by
visible signs of improved effi-
ciency.

In our view, the only solu-
tion is for the chief executives
of our banks, insurance com-
panies and public utilities — the
major parties victimised by the
postal catastrophe — to come
together and make a unified
complaint to the Prime Minis-
ter, demanding a revolutionary
change to the status quo. This
should then lead to an investi-
gation and report by an inde-
pendent consultant in postal
services — there are many — fol-
lowed by not only a restructur-
ing of management but also a
modernisation of the doubtless
archaic systems presently used
in the receipt, sorting and deliv-
ery of mail.

There is no reason why the
Bahamas needs to struggle with
a third-world postal system.




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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 3B





Airline eyes south
Florida expansion

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

WESTERN Air is eyeing
South Florida routes for future
expansion even as it settles into
its new Jamaica route, which
represents 10 per cent of its
income. It also plans to add an
extra leg to that country next
month, the airline’s director of
operations told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

Meanwhile, Captain Wolf
Seyfret added that the unrest
in Jamaica has not affected
Western Air’s daily flights to
Kingston, though the US and
UK have issued travel warn-
ings for their citizens urging
them not to travel to the coun-
try. The Bahamas has not
issued such a warning.

“We have had a few trav-
ellers ask us about the situa-
tion, but we have assured them
that they [Jamaican authorities]
will keep all the airports open
at any cost,” he said.

According to him, Western
Air continues to fly its daily
flights into Kingston, and hopes
to begin additional flights to
Montego Bay by next month.

Captain Seyfret said book-
ings have been solid for the
month, and the future looks
good. He added that the addi-
tion of the Jamaica leg has
boosted Western Air’s business
substantially.

* Jamaica routes represent 10%
of income for Western Air, with
Montego Bay expansion also on cards
* $1m Grand Bahama facility
set for August completion

“Jamaica has contributed
quite largely; it represents
about 10 per cent of overall
income,” said Captain Seyfret.

“We were going to start
additional service into Mon-
tego Bay in June, and the two
points will be serviced concur-
rently.”

The airline is also completing
a $1 million facility at Grand
Bahama Internatinal Airport
in anticipation of a turnaround
in the island’s economy.

Captain Seyfret said the
company hopes to start direct
service to Jamaica from Grand
Bahama in the future, and
hopes to open up the US mar-
ket to the first Bahamian, pri-
vately-owned airline since Lak-
er Airways - which had
Bahamian interests.

“We are looking at the build-
ing being finished in August,
and we want to be ready for
the inevitable turnaround of
the Freepeort economy,” he
said. “We are looking at start-
ing service out of Freeport to

the US, and possibly Kingston.”

When the renovations to the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport are complete, it is
hoped that the Bahamas could
become a hub for certain
transatlantic connections, as it
is for British Airway’s (BA) leg
to the Cayman Islands.

“We hope that Nassau would
become a hub for the
Caribbean,” said Captain
Seyfret.

He added that BA’s strike
could present an opportunity
for Western Air to provide con-
nection services to Jamaica and
other destinations, as BA staff
are not expected to go back to
work for some time. “I hope
that will happen, but we would
have to see how that develops,”
he said.

Capotain Seyfret said the air-
line can fly into many more
locations in the US than larger
airlines and, to remain com-
petitive, offers special rates on
Wednesdays and Saturday to
Jamaica.

Scotia loan key to Baha Mar ‘49 deal conditions’

FROM page 1B

seeking to manage public
expectations and not get hopes
up before the deal is finally
signed, sealed and delivered.

It seems likely that there will
be no ‘ground breaking’ on
Baha Mar in the immediate
future, even though many con-
ditions are likely to be relative-
ly easy to meet and were prob-
ably in the previous deal with
Harrah’s.

Baha Mar, though, has gone
out to tender on the $200 mil-
lion Commercial Village work,
a project set to create 320 con-
struction jobs.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s
senior vice-president of external
and governmental affairs, told
Tribune Business yesterday that
discussions between Scotiabank
and the developer were ongo-
ing, although he declined to
provide details.

“We continue to have dis-
cussions with them,” Mr Sands
said of Scotiabank. “The dis-
cussions are continuing. We are
satisfied the Baha Mar project
will go forward. This is an intri-
cate and large project, and the
two important elements of this
are receiving the approval of
the Government of the
Bahamas and the government
of China.

“We are satisfied the project
will go ahead, and we are wait-
ing to hear from the govern-
ments.”

However, sources close to
the situation told Tribune Busi-
ness that Baha Mar and Sco-
tiabank were making “good

Local firm unveils
its mobile website
FROM page 1B

sold 8.3 million units over the
same period, an increase of
112.2 per cent. This mobile
computing trend, BahamasLo-
cal.com said, will also impact
the Bahamas, particularly com-
bined with the recent decrease
in the monthly prices of the
data (mobile internet) packages
provided by the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC).

Jason McDowall, chief exec-
utive of BahamasLocal.com,
said: “We see this as another
convenient way for our users
to access BahamasLocal.com.
Our system automatically
detects that you are visiting us
from a mobile device, and you
are instantly diverted to the
mobile version of our website.

“Almost every day I have
someone tell me that they use
our mobile site when they are
on the road or away from their
computers to check for local
information.”

BahamasLocal.com is an
online information resource for
the Bahamas, including infor-
mation pertaining to Bahamian
businesses, news, classifieds,
movie listings, jobs and events.

BahamasLocal.com, which
officially launched in April
2009, is located in the New
Providence Financial Centre.



progress” in resolving the situ-
ation regarding the outstand-
ing $170-$180 million syndicat-
ed loan, which was issued to
finance the acquisition of the
existing Cable Beach Resorts
from Philip Ruffin.

As revealed by this newspa-
per previously, Baha Mar needs
to successfully resolve the situ-
ation over the Scotiabank loan,
as it is said to be secured on the
existing Sheraton Cable Beach,
Wyndham Nassau and Crystal
Palace Casino and associated
real estate parcels at Cable
Beach.

The potential complication
is that this real estate also
includes parcels upon which
China Ex-Im Bank will take
security for its $2.5 billion loan.

The Chinese bank will need
those assets delivered ‘free of
encumberances’, to quote legal
parlance, which is why Baha
Mar and Scotiabank need to
resolve their loan situation.

Scotiabank has already
extended the due date twice -
from December 31, 2009, to
end-January 2010, and then to
March 31, 2010 - to give the
developer time to seal the deal
with Beijing. That was con-
cluded on March 30, 2010, and
possibly explains Baha Mar's
haste to seal the deal with the
China Export-Import Bank and
China State Construction by
that date.

Tribune Business has been
told that if the talks do not bear
fruit, Scotiabank could poten-
tially foreclose on the two exist-
ing resorts at Cable Beach.

However, this is unlikely to



happen, given that the bank
would inherit and take over two
loss-making resorts, thereby
increasing its Cable Beach
exposure. It is also unlikely to
be able to find a buyer for them
for much more than $100 mil-
lion, meaning it would be
unable to recover the full value
of its loan.

Some sources have expressed
surprise to Tribune Business
that Scotiabank’s loan collater-
al does not include the golf
course at Cable Beach, a key
cash flow generator for the
resorts.

Some have suggested that the
likeliest solution to the impasse
would be for Scotiabank to take
an equity stake in the Baha Mar
project.

Tribune Business also previ-
ously reported how Baha Mar
and its principals, the Lyford
Cay-based Izmirlian family, had
offered to make Scotiabank
"whole" and repay the entire
loan, having previously offered
to pay down $85 million or 50
per cent during proposals that
were swapped between the two
sides.

Meanwhile, Mr Ingraham
confirmed that Kerzner Inter-
national had obtained all the
necessary permits for its $100
million Paradise Island
upgrades, a project expected to
create 400 permanent jobs over
a three-year period.

“They’re going to do major
renovations to the existing pro-
jects,” the Prime Minister con-
firmed. “He’s [Kerzner] sought
and obtained approvals from
the Investment Board.”

Trust still missing on cheque posting

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS are still seeing their deposited
cheques take several days to clear despite the
launch of the Bahamas Automated Clearing
House (ACH), but its general manager told Tri-
bune Business yesterday that the system was
running fine.

Brian Smith said the ACH was not to blame
for the length of time some cheques take to clear.
He added that some commercial banks simply
impose their own rules on their cheque clearing
system. And while depositors should see money
credited to their accounts by the end of the sec-
ond business day after making the cheque
deposit, some banks still have longer holds on
cheques. One banking official, who spoke on
condition of anonymity, said banks still can’t
trust their account holders to not overdraw their
accounts or write a bad cheque, so longer holds
are still necessary despite the ACH.

Mr Smith said the commercial banks are often

extremely competitive and therefore advance-
ments, such as the advent of the ACH, are stag-
gered in their use. “People need to ask their
banks,” he said. “It has nothing to do with ACH.”
He added that the ACH’s next big move is to
facilitate bulk direct credit.

According to him, they are awaiting on the
commercial banks to complete their final cus-
tomer agreements in order to bring online a
direct deposit system that can be used by employ-
ers to electronically pay their employees, greatly
reducing the need for paper cheques.

While it is not know how long it will take for
the direct deposit system to become functional,
the ACH is also focused on developing a com-
prehensive network Internet banking portal that
will allow the transfer of funds through the Inter-
net from one bank to another. “Internet banking
is not ready yet, but all the banks are looking into
getting that ready,” said Mr Smith. “The next
thing to come online will be bulk payments. If we
can do bulk payments that’s a huge step for-
ward.”

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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Government ‘never had high
hopes’ for $857m development

FROM page 1B

ness, allege that Roger Stein
and his RHS Ventures compa-
ny effectively orchestrated neg-
ative media articles against, and
investigations by US federal
and state authorities, into their
financing partner on the South
Ocean project, Plainfield Asset
Management.

Once relations between the
two soured, and the Connecti-
cut-based hedge fund attempt-
ed to remove Mr Stein/RHS
Ventures as the South Ocean

project’s managing partner,
Plainfield alleged that their
campaign against it even
extended to lobbying Bahamian
government ministers.

A transcript of the Ameri-
can Arbitration Association
hearing, at which Plainfield
comprehensively trounced Mr
Stein and RHS Ventures,
details how the latter allegedly
approached Earl Deveaux,
minister of the environment,
with its complaints and claims
against the hedge fund.

Mr Deveaux could not be

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAINTREE INVESTMENTS
LIMITED

ee

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RAINTREE INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ZONTERCREST INVESTMENTS
LID.

ee

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ZONTERCREST INVESTMENT LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WRITMONT INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WRITMONT INVESTMENT LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GIMSON FIELD
HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 1st day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

contacted by Tribune Business
for comment yesterday, despite
a message left on his cell phone,
but there is nothing to suggest
he acted improperly in relation
to the protracted Stein/Plain-
field affair at South Ocean.

The November 17, 2009,
hearing transcript details how
Howard Kaplan, Plainfield’s
attorney, asked Mr Stein, who
was testifying as a witness,
whether he had contacted any
government agency in the
Bahamas or US regarding his
client. The exchange went as
follows:

Kaplan: Let’s go to the
Bahamas. Since October 2008,
have you had any contacts with
any governmental entities or
people concerning Plainfield?

Stein: Yes

Kaplan: Which ones?

Stein: Minister of the Envi-
ronment

Kaplan: Who is that?

Stein: A gentleman named
Earl Deveaux, which is D-e-v-e-
a-U-X.

No details of these “contacts”
were provided in the court tran-
script, which was filed as part of
a batch of documents by Plain-
field and its attorneys. The
hedge fund is seeking ratifica-
tion of the Arbitration Award
by the New York Supreme
State Court to make it legally
binding on Mr Stein and RHS
Ventures, who as Tribune Busi-
ness previously reported are
seeking to have the award set
aside or “vacated”.

The long-running legal battle,
which began some 18 months
ago in October 2008, has effec-

tively tied the 373-acre South
Ocean project up in knots, with
its resort buildings still closed
and deteriorating daily. Golf
course maintenance has also
been impacted, and Plainfield
acknowledged that the project
“continues to languish without
direction”.

With a potentially key asset
and attractive real estate parcel
still out of commission, the
Prime Minister indicated that
his government had not set any
great store by the South Ocean
project due to the developers’
lack of a track record on similar
developments.

Point

“From my point of view, we
never had high expectations for
that project in the first place,”
Mr Ingraham told Tribune
Business. He contrasted South
Ocean with Albany, which
included among its major share-
holders and backers, the Tavis-
tock Group, the controlling
vehicle for worldwide invest-
ments made by Lyford Cay-
based billionaire Joe Lewis.

While Mr Stein, according to
Tribune Business’s research,
had been an investor in the
developer of the Trump Tower
in Fort Lauderdale, Mr Ingra-
ham pointed to Mr Lewis’s and
the Tavistock Group’s track
record when it came to devel-
oping similar communities to
Albany, plus their deep pock-
ets.

Meanwhile, responding to
Mr Stein’s efforts to have the
arbitration award against him
overturned, Plainfield alleged

that his claims of having uncov-
ered ‘new evidence’ against the
hedge fund were “disingenu-
ous” - because he and his pri-
vate investigator, Robert Sei-
den, “have tried for more than
one year to instigate a criminal
investigation of Plainfield”.

This was done, Plainfield
alleged, in a bid to force it to
settle prior to the Arbitration
Association panel issuing its
ruling. “[Stein and RHS Ven-
tures] sought to extract a set-
tlement from Plainfield shortly
after one particularly obnox-
ious article referring to an
alleged criminal investigation
was published,” the hedge fund
alleged.

“On March 29, 2010, 10 days
before the award was issued,
Stein’s arbitration counsel
invites a ‘sit down’ to discuss
settlement and writes to Plain-
field’s counsel: “Your friends
are not doing well in the
papers..... your side seems to
be at risk of much more dam-
aging reports’ if the Tribunal
ruled in Stein’s favour.”

Plainfield alleged that Mr
Stein’s claims of predatory
lending by it were “all reject-
ed” by the arbitration tribunal,
which found its loans were what
enabled the South Ocean pro-
ject to go forward.

And arguing that an investi-
gation proved nothing, Plain-
field alleged that the probes by
the Manhattan District Attor-
ney and Connecticut Attorney-
General “had not bearing” on
the arbitration finding.

This, the hedge fund alleged,
found that Mr Stein and his
entities “misappropriated

funds, committed misrepresen-
tation and other acts of willful
misconduct, damaging [Plain-
field] in the amount of approx-
imately $2.9 million, and that
RHS Ventures was properly
removed as general partner of
New South Ocean Ventures”.

Describing Mr Stein’s argu-
ment for overturning the arbi-
tration award as “kitchen sink”
allegations, Plainfield argued:
“Stein’s continuing intransi-
gence has been prejudicial and
harmful” to it.

Following its issuance of the
November 11, 2008, notice
removing Mr Stein and RHS
Ventures as South Ocean’s gen-
eral partner, Plainfield alleged:
“Stein fought to delay removal
through proceedings com-
menced in the Bahamas and
New York.

Months

“After 18 months of arbitra-
tion, the Tribunal held that
petitioners’ removal of Stein
and his companies for cause
was justified, and that [Plain-
field] is the proper general part-
ner of the partnership.

“Stein, however, continues
to ignore the Tribunal’s award
and refuses to turn over the
books, records, bank accounts
and other assets of the [South
Ocean] partnership, or other-
wise recognise Plainfield as the
general partner.

“In the interim, the [South
Ocean] partnership continues
to languish without direction,
and [Plainfield] is denied its
rightful role as general part-
ner.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THOMLINSON COMPANY LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THOMLINSON COMPANY LID. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WILLOWTREE ASSETS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WILLOWTREE ASSETS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THE IPHIGENIA CO. LTD.

— + ——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THE IPHIGENIA CO. LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIPIZZAN INVESTMENTS INC.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LIPIZZAN INVESTMENTS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMROSE VISTA
INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PRIMROSE VISTA INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TARAN VENTURES LIMITED

— ——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TARAN VENTURES LIMITED. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 5B



New car sales down 11
per cent in year to April

FROM page 1B

loan” for new auto purchases, due to
the perceived high risk that their
incomes might be cut further or, in a
worst case scenario, they may be laid-
off.

And Mr Barr said those already
laid-off and unemployed would need
to re-establish themselves in a new job
for about a year before banks regained
the confidence to advance new credit
to them - another factor likely to delay
any recovery in new car sales.

“Tf we see an upturn in the econo-
my, our business will be on the tail-
end of that,” Mr Barr told Tribune
Business. “It will take a while for the
economy to improve, be seen to be
improving, and for the banks to regain
confidence that it’s sustainable.

“Across the board, we’ve got to see

Government: 15 per cent

improvement in the economy, it’s got
to be a sustainable improvement, and
people have got to re-establish them-
selves in a job. All these things have
got to be re-established.”

Expressing his optimism in the
Bahamas’ long-term economic future
and ability to recover from the cur-
rent downturn, Mr Barr said many
other countries were in far worse
shape than this nation.

However, he warned that the
“motor industry and transportation
industry have got a long way to go to
get back to where they were” pre-
recession”.

“The last couple of years have been
a struggle for dealers,” Mr Barr told
Tribune Business. ““There’s no consis-
tency. Some months have been very
good, and other months you hardly
see any sales.

“Right now we’re staying in busi-
ness, doing the best we can, keeping
service customers happy and having
the right product for those buying. It
will get better. The question is when
that transpires, but there are things
that could nudge us in the right direc-
tion.”

Chief among these was consumma-
tion of the Baha Mar project, Mr Barr,
adding that if it did not come to
fruition the economy “could be in for
the long haul”.

With many car dealers having “high
overheads” as a result of millions of
dollars worth of inventory, Mr Barr
still said: “I feel very positive about
the future. Business has been a strug-
gle for everybody.

“But I still maintain there’s a lot of
places worse off. We have a stable gov-
ernment, we are in recession, but we

of revenue ‘consumed’

have a lot going for us in this coun-
try. As time marches on, there’s a
brighter future. It’s a struggle, but
there’s light at the end of the tunnel.”

BMDA members saw a 10.93 per
cent month-over-month increase in
new car sales in April, compared to
March, largely due to the annual boost
received from the New Car Show.

“Tt was a boost, but not as much as
in past years,” Rick Lowe, operations
manager at Nassau Motor Company
(NMC), told Tribune Business. He
added that there had been suggestions
recovery in the sector could take
another year, and “other people sug-
gest it could be longer”.

With dealers seeking to match
inventory to sales levels, Mr Lowe said
it would take some companies a while
to bring stock back up if a recovery
took place.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & EQUITY DIVISION

dS A

For the stories

aR CaS
Br ES
Tees



2009
CLE/qui/00121

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of

by debt interest

FROM page 1B

proposed tax increases and
spending restraints would sat-
isfy the austerity demands of
major international credit rating
agencies, Standard & Poor’s
(S&P) and Moody’s, setting the
Bahamas’ key fiscal ratios back
on the right path.

Labelling today’s Budget as
arguably the “most challeng-
ing” he has had to deliver in 13
years as a Prime Minister, Mr
Ingraham said the measures he
is introducing had to be done
now, before the Government
would find it “nearly impossi-
ble” to turn its fiscal deficit and
national debt-to-gross domes-
tic product (GDP) ratios
around.

Warning that some “sharp
medicine” would be unveiled,
the Prime Minister said this was
necessary to prevent the
Bahamas’ national debt rising
to levels that would be unsus-
tainable for future generations,
and to enable the economy to
maximise returns from recov-
ery when it came.

“This is probably the most
important,” Mr Ingraham said
of the 2010-2011 Budget, “but
when we came in 1992 it was
challenging at that time, and
also challenging in 2001.

“But this year is the most
challenging, the most difficult,
where we have to give serious
consideration to some hereto-
fore unthinkable propositions.”

He added: “It has to be done
now before we arrive at a point
where it’s nearly impossible to
turn back. Some 15 per cent of
revenue is being consumed by
interest payments in a society
such as the Bahamas, and the
largest impact is on the level of

services the Government can
afford to provide for the popu-
lation.”

With some $0.15 out of every
dollar being eaten up by inter-
ests on the Government’s $3.3
billion-plus direct debt, the
Prime Minister indicated he
was concerned that funds avail-
able for “essential public ser-
vices” would be increasingly
limited if the fiscal deficit and
debt-to-GDP ratios were not
placed on a more sustainable
path.

Asked whether he believed
the Government’s 2010-2011
Budget would be enough to sat-
isfy the demands of Moody’s
and S&P, both of which have
indicated that maintaining its
current sovereign credit rating
will depend to a large extent
on austerity measures being
taken by the Bahamas, the
Prime Minister replied: “I’m
very confident that what we are
doing will find favour with them
and all persons of goodwill,
including businesses.

“We’ve sought to impose
revenue measures in a way that
will not weigh that is not going
to weigh too burdensome for
any particular segment of the
economy.”

While the Prime Minister did
not disclose any specific tax
increases, banking industry
sources yesterday told Tribune
Business that the Bahamian
commercial banking sector was
braced for substantial increases
in banking fees.

One source told this news-
paper: “They’re effectively dou-
bling our fees.” Another added:
“We've been given a heads up
that fees are going up. A lot of
things are going up. I don’t
think the Government has a lot

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENNETH PRATT JUNIOR
of FIRST STREET, COCONUT GROVE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19â„¢* DAY OF
MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.Q. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
MEONA SKYE, LIMITED
IBC No. 140564B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 137(1)(g) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 46 of 2000, MEONA
SKYE, LIMITED has been dissolved and has been struck off Reg-
ister of Companies with effect from the 12th day April of 2010.

7
AL la
iquidator

of choice.”

Tribune Business under-
stands that the bulk of the Bud-
get’s planned tax increases will
largely be borne directly by dif-
ferent segments of the economy
in the first instance. The con-
cern, though, will be that ulti-
mately any tax increases will be
borne by the consumer and liv-
ing costs, as companies pass tax
and fee rises on to consumers.
Another potential worry is that
the increased tax/cost burden
could force some businesses,
already struggling, to further
downsize staff.

Still, the Prime Minister indi-
cated he was prepared to take
the hard decisions he believes
are in the best interests of the
Bahamas long-term. There
were also hints that the Gov-
ernment’s 2009-2010 fiscal
deficit is likely to be sharply
higher than previous forecasts,
given that the January-April
period saw a “substantial dete-
rioration in government rev-
enues year-over-year”, with
March “especially devastating”.

“The borrowing has been
substantial, and interest pay-
ments of the order of $0.15 on
each revenue $1, that’s an
unsustainable position,” the
Prime Minister told Tribune
Business. “We are most uncom-
fortable to have to borrow
money to pay for recurrent
expenditure.”

The Government has opted
for the tax increases/spending
restraint combination in a bid
to hold employment levels in
the public sector, fearing that
any mass downsizing there
would further setback recovery
and depress an already weak
economy. It also knows that
economic recovery is still some
way off, so the private sector

will be unable to ‘grow’ the
public finances out of their cur-
rent position.

Describing the Government’s
plans as “sharp medicine; it’s
intended to cure”, the Prime
Minister said: “We are seeking
to do a real and realistic Bud-
get, and take account of what is
expected and make the hard
decisions in relation to that, to
the benefit of the economy lat-
er on.

“If we’re going to put our-
selves in a position to maximise
any returns from an improved
economy, and not burden
future generations with any
increase in debt, we’ve got to
now put ourselves in a healthy
position.”

The objectives, he added,
were “to sustain as much public
sector employment as possible,
to improve the infrastructure,
to promote and attract addi-
tional investment to the
Bahamas, and make the busi-
ness environment more con-
ducive, effective and efficient
to operations. To have a tax
regime that’s reasonably low,
but takes care of public services
of the Bahamas.”

The Prime Minister is thus
preparing both the public sector
and the Bahamian people at
large for any pain that results
from today’s Budget, and is
leading by example via the 16
per cent salary cut he is taking.
Ministers and MPs are also like-
ly to see their salaries cut by 7
per cent and 5 per cent.

“We are truly seeking to do
what is the best for the
Bahamas in these circum-
stances, and [regardless] of the
political consequences. This is
what the Bahamas needs,
requires at this point in time,
and doing so is our duty.”

Meneger Operation: end Inventory Control

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EKILLE AND SILITIES

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$5. Pax H-297]
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Or ols email breopculting rm ayshes com



MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee NEWBOLD
AND

IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT Piece Parcel
or lot of Land Situate on Maxwell Lane bounded
North by Property of one Weir 96.51 feet, East
by property of one Lewis 51.53 feet, and again
by a loose stone wall 15.27 feet South, by
Maxwell Lane 107.58 feet, West by property
of one Johnson 75.53 feet, in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

NOTICE

The Petition of MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE
nee NEWBOLD, Retired, of Saunders Road off
Lightbourne Avenue situate in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas in respect of:

ALL THAT PIECE Parcel or lot of Land Situate
on Maxwell Lane bounded North by Property
of one Weir 96.51 feet, East by property of one
Lewis 51.53 feet, and again by loose stone
wall 15.27 feet South, by Maxwell Lane 107.58
feet, West by property of one Johnson 75.53
feet, in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, and is more particularly described
and delineated on the plan attached hereto
and is thereon coloured PINK.

MIRIAM MAGNOLA WALLACE nee
NEWBOLD claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered fee simple estate in possession
of the said piece parcel or lot of land and made
application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section
Three (8) of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to
have her title to the said piece parcel or tract
of land investigated and the nature or extent
of it determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected
during the normal office hours at the following
places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joan Ferguson & Co.,
Avson House, Adelaide Village, New
Providence Bahamas.

(c) The Chambers of Newton R McDonald
& Co., Meeting Street, opposite St. John's
Baptist Church, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right of dower or any adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the said Petition
shall on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010 file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of
his claim on or before the 30th June A.D., 2010,
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 14th day of May, A.D. 2010

Joan Ferguson & Co
Chambers

Avson House

Adelaide Village

New Providence, Bahamas.

Attorneys for the Petitioner



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



OOO eS INES eee
Hotels maintain improvements through April

FROM page 1B

almost flat for the period.”
Average occupancies for the
month of April 2010 at the 14
Nassau/New Providence hotels
surveyed stood at 68.6 per cent,
compared to 66 per cent for

2009.

As for ADRs, they stood at
$263 this year, compared to
$260 in 2009. And there was
also improving news when it
came to air arrivals for 2010,
Mr Sands telling Tribune Busi-
ness: “Air arrivals to Nassau to
the end of March 2010 were up




PUBLIC NOTICE






INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL



The Public is hereby advised that | Joyann S. D. Stuart





mother of

of Mussaenda

Avenue, Garden Hills #2,Nassau, New Providence, The



Bahamas, intend to change my child’s name to JABARI




MATTHEW STUART. If there are any objections to this




change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections



to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, The



Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of







publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

4.3 per cent.”

However, the Bahamas and
its tourism/hotel industries
remain vulnerable to outside
forces they cannot control, and
not just the global economy.
One of these is the potential
disastrous consequences if oil
from British Petroleum’s (BP)
leaking Deepwater Horizon oil
rig arrives on these shores, cre-
ating an environmental night-
mare.

Asked about the hotel indus-
try’s perspective on the situa-
tion, Mr Sands said: “The fact
of the matter that we have to be
concerned, because one of the
primary reasons persons travel
to the Bahamas is for a beach
vacation.

“Tt appears the Government
has been proactive in monitor-
ing and addressing this particu-

lar situation, and we’re going
to give them all the support we
can to address this situation as
best we can.”

While the situation with BP’s
leaking oil platform, currently
spewing thousands of barrels
of oil into the Gulf of Mexico,
was outside many people’s con-
trol and dependent on whether
sea currents carried it towards
the Bahamas, Mr Sands said
the BHA would continue to
monitor the situation and hope
the “liable parties” did what
was necessary to secure the sit-
uation and prevent damage to
this nation’s “beaches, wetlands
and sanctuaries”.

The BHA president also told
Tribune Business that there had
been no discussions as an Asso-
ciation about the potential
implications for tourism if oil

NOTICE




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHELDA FERTIL OF GOLD COIN




RIVERSIDE VALLEY CORP.

LANE, SOUTH BAHAMIA, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality






—_— -—

and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days





#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RIVERSIDE VALLEY CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TAPPAN DOBBS INC.

—

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TAPPAN DOBBS INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

from the 19TH day of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, The

Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CATHRINE
DORSETTE of Walton Street, PO. Box GT 2389,
Nassau, The Bahamas, intend to change my name to
THESRENE GREY. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-
742, Nassau, The Bahamas, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TETHYS VENTURE LIMITED

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TETHY VENTURES LIMITED. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money ot Work

i ee ee

exploration and drilling was
conducted in the Bahamas, as
several companies are seeking
licences to do.

The Statoil/BPC Ltd consor-
tium have already applied for
licences to conduct oil explo-
ration in the southern
Bahamas, although the start of
such work is likely to be some
way Off, given that the territor-
ial boundaries with Cuba are
still being worked out under
United Nations (UN) auspices.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of state for the environment,
said recently that no oil drilling
would take place in Bahamian
waters for a decade. However,
Mr Sands said the fallout from
the BP oil rig explosion and
leak had brought the issue to
the forefront, given the notion
that tourism - especially the
environmentally-based variety -
was incompatible with the oil
industry.

“This particular accident may
have raised the profile of this
situation, and requires some
debate among us,” Mr Sands
said. “We’ve not given it any
major consideration to date.

“We’re going to have to
weigh the economic, national
interest with environmental
issues. There’s always a very
fine line, but it’s always fair to
say environmental concerns are

always uppermost in our busi-
ness with regard to new devel-
opments. Environmental
Impact Assessments are
required for all situations, and
this particular issue has high-
lighted that need to take some
of these things a little bit fur-
ther.”

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said
that while the British Airways
(BA) strike might impact a UK
traveller market to the
Bahamas that was starting to
grow again, the effects would
likely be mitigated by alterna-
tive airlift options to Miami.

“We’re always concerned
when airlift, especially direct
airlift to this destination, is
reduced,” the BHA president
said. “For the Bahamas, there’s
tremendous airlift out of the
UK to Miami on Virgin or oth-
er carriers, with the opportuni-
ty for connecting flights.

“We believe that during this
period, some if not all of the
slack will be taken up by other
carriers, but that does not com-
pensate for the shortfall in
direct airlift out of that desti-
nation.

“Certainly, while British trav-
el has I think decreased, it’s
beginning to grow again. The
numbers are not significant to
the overall airlift mix into New
Providence.”

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT T

HANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that | Joyann S. D. Stuart
mother of JELANI JAVIER ALEXANDER, of Mussaenda
Avenue, Garden Hills #2,Nassau, New Providence, The
Bahamas, intend to change my child’s name to JELANI
JAVIER STUART. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, The Bahamas,
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GYPSY INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GYPSY INVESTMENTS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 25 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,568.17 | CHG -0.03 | % CHG 0.00 | YTD 2.79 | YTD % 0.18
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 0.250 0.040
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 0.050 0.200
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 0.598 0.260
0.33 Benchmark -0.877 0.000
3.15 Bahamas Waste 0.168 0.090
2.14 Fidelity Bank 0.055 0.040
9.62 Cable Bahamas 1.408 0.290
2.69 Colina Holdings 0.249 0.040
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 0.460 0.230
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 0.111 0.052
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 0.627 0.110
5.94 Famguard -0.003 0.240
8.75 Finco 0.168 0.520
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 0.678 0.350
3.75 Focol ($) 0.366 0.170
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 0.000 0.000
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.035 0.000
5.00 ICD Utilities 0.407 0.240
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952 0.640
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 0.000
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months %











The Family Cert of the State of Delainare

S2wk-Hi Previous Close Today's Close
1.05 1.05
10.63 10.63
5.20 5.20
0.33 0.33
3.15 3.15
2.17 2.17
12.07 12.07
2.84 2.84
6.99 6.99
2.42 2.39
2.54 2.54
6.07 6.07
9.00 9.00
9.85 9.85
5.08 5.08
1.00 1.00
0.27 0.27
5.59 5.59

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.03
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

NOTICE OF
GUARDIANSHIP ACTION

TO: Darren Hall

FROM: Clerk of Court - At Risk
New Castle County

Christopher Gibson, Petitioner, has brought suit against
you for Guardianship in the Family Court of the State of
Delaware for New Castle County, United States, petition
number 10-04911. If you do not serve a response to the
petition to the Court and to the Petitioner’s Attorney or

the petitioner if not represented at the following address:

52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity

19 October 2017
19 October 2022

30 May 2013

29 May 2015
EPS $ Yield
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

2825 Squirrel Drive
Bear, DE 19701

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.515417

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.499936

NAV Date
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

52wk-Low
1.3758
2.8266
1.4611
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

Within 20 days after publication of this notice, exclusive
of the date of publication, as required by statute, this
action will be heard without further notice at Family
Court.

2.57
1.48
3.45

-4.99
5.47
6.99
13.50

13.5654
107.5706
105.7706 3.99

1.1080 1.67 5.26
1.0615 -0.61 2.84
1.1050 1.31 5.01
9.4839 1.52 7.41

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Reply to:

410.0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund 10.6709 -0.93 12.33 31-Mar-10

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Int] Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 3.23 31-Mar-10
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

NIM - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

4.8105 58.37

NEW CASTLE COUNTY FAMILY COURT
CIVIL CASE PROCESSING
500 NORTH KING STREET / SUITE 400
WILMINGTON DE 19801
(302) 255-0359
ATTN: Lynn Peters

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Teday's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 7B



Financial advice from the
top graduates in America

By CHIP CUTTER
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — It's
graduation season. That means
hordes of newly-minted MBA
students and undergraduate
business majors will soon be
entering the work force.

They've spent years studying
the intricacies of business and
finance. Now, they're ready to
start dispensing that financial
wisdom on Wall Street and
everywhere else.

What will they say? And
what tips do they have for the
rest of us?

To find out, The Associated
Press reached out to some of
the top grads at colleges around
the country. They shared their
advice for saving, managing
money and investing during
volatile times.

Embrace college frugality

College students excel at liv-
ing on the cheap. Low-cost
meals such as cereal, ramen
noodles and macaroni and
cheese are staples. And stu-
dents develop a knack for zero-
ing in on everything from the
cheapest place to do laundry to
the best happy hour deal.

Young adults, and everyone
else for that matter, shouldn't
forget those thrifty philosophies
after they move into a higher
income bracket, said Brandon
Garrett, 22. He recently gradu-
ated with the highest grade
point average from Texas Tech
University's personal financial
planning program.

"Frugality shouldn't end with

career security,” he said.

Garrett keeps a handle on
his discretionary expenses by
following the "envelope bud-
get." With his wife, he devel-
ops a budget every month for
things like groceries and enter-
tainment, and places cash for
those items in separate
envelopes. "Once those
envelopes are empty," he said,
"then we're done spending
money on those things."

Rachel Nabatian, an under-
graduate finance and account-
ing major at New York Uni-
versity's Stern School of Busi-
ness, also uses cash and sets a
daily budget to make sure she
sticks to her goals.

Take the long-term view

Saving is one thing, but
investing is another.

The Standard & Poor's 500
stock index is down 11.4 per-
cent from the high it reached
April 26, and some young
adults remain skittish about get-
ting into stocks after watching
the market tank from 2008 to
early 2009.

But Sarah McGinty, a 29-
year-old MBA student at the
University of Chicago's Booth
School of Business, has some
advice. She threw out the pass-
words to her retirement
accounts with Fidelity Invest-
ments, and stopped checking
the daily price fluctuations.

That's helped her to stay
calm during volatility and
remember that investments are
meant for the long-term.

"If you put money into the
markets with the goal of it

growing over time, you have to
honor the spirit of that invest-
ment," she said.

Others agree. Mike Ragan,
an MBA student from MIT's
Sloan School of Management,
said investors are much more
attune to losses than gains. So
declines of 10 percent or more
can feel painful, motivating
people to sell their shares.

His tip: Don't panic if a stock
price drops if you still feel com-
fortable about the company's
business.

"If nothing has changed, and
it's actually cheaper, you should
buy more," he said. "You
shouldn't necessarily think that
you did something wrong and
sell out of it.”

Beware of individual stocks

Yet even business students
say it's risky to buy individual
stocks, unless you have time to
dig into a company's earnings
and do plenty of research.

Alan Rich, 29, will graduate
with an MBA from Dart-

mouth's Tuck School of Busi-
ness next month. He says most
Americans should look to low-
cost mutual funds that track a
broad market index such as the
S&P 500.

Those funds may seem bor-
ing, but they carry less risk than
buying shares of individual
companies. "It takes a lot of
work to understand how to pick
stocks," said Ian Sexsmith, who
graduated with an MBA from
University of California Berke-
ley's Haas School of Business
about a week ago. "That's a
full-time job for a mutual fund
manager."

Remember your

college curiosity

And, if you still don't think
you're ready to start investing,
think back to your college days.

On campus, students often
felt empowered to question
everything — from hard-to-
understand lecture topics to the
menu selections in the dining
halls. That same curiosity

should apply to personal
finance and investing, said
Tanya Louneva, who recently
graduated with a bachelor's
degree from the University of
Pennsylvania's Wharton
School.

If you don't understand
something, speak up or ask
questions. Louneva recently did
that while helping her parents
secure a new mortgage, and
found it helpful.

"The best financial advice is



to be a sponge,” she said. "This
is the time for us to learn.”

That's an enduring lesson,
even for those students who
attended the top business
schoools, said Tom Fazzio, a
26-year-old MBA student from
MIT's Sloan School of Man-
agement. To be smart investors,
it's essential for consumers to
keep asking questions.

"You have to know what you
don't know," Fazzio said. "I
think that's real intelligence."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAR FOCUS VENTURES LTD.










— + —_.






Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section



138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of STAR FOCUS VENTURES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.















PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that|, ANTHONY LESLIE
SMITH intend to change my name to ANTHONY
HARRIS SMITH. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box

N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MT. PINOTAGE HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MT. PINOTAGE HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAREFORD INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD.

— *——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of BAREFORD IN-
VESTMENTS PTE. LID. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and_ the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DARNBROUGH PLAINES LTD.

——

-
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DARNBROUGH PLAINES LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AZTECA VENTURES LTD.

— §——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AZTECA VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AMORGOS LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of AMORGOS LIMITED. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPPY PARADISE ASSETS
LIMITED

— + ——.

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HAPPY PARADISE ASSETS LIMITED.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



(Liquidator)





Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLIFTON HEIGHTS HILLS
CO. LTD.

— - _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLIFTON HEIGHT HILLS CoO. LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW CENTURY GROUP LTD.

—_— -,——

a

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW CENTURY GROUP LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HUCUL HOLDINGS LTD.

—_— -,——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HUCUL HOLDINGS LTD.. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 9B

eS





The Tribune

‘Taste



Something’s Different Novelty Cookies & Cakes
to provide scholarship to attend Sugar Fling

omething's Differ-
S=: Cookie and
Cake Boutique will

hold “Sugar Fling
2010” a series of work-
shops designed to give
kids 13 years and older
and adults a hands on
experience in cake dec-
orating and design June
28 to July 10 The store
will also provide a schol-
arship for one student to
attend the workshop and
intern at the company.

Ian and Samantha Moree,
Bahamian artists and husband
and wife team at Something's
Different will facilitate ten 4
hour sessions to showcase a
range of cake decorating skills.
Classes will be held Monday-
Thursday and on Saturday
from 1-5 pm. The 4 courses
will include Gumpaste, Fon-
dant, Buttercream and Royal
Icing.

“Sugar Fling” was created
in response to overwhelming

One seat will be reserved for the
Recipient of a Scholarship to
Attend “Sugar Fling” and will
Culminate in the Opportunity to
Intern at Something's Different

requests for cake decorating
instruction by the general pub-
lic. In recent months, Some-
thing's Different has attracted
a fan base of over three thou-
sand persons on the social util-
ity Facebook and it continues
to climb rapidly. Its popular-
ity has resulted in the need for
advance booking to secure
dates.

Something's Different is not
a bakery but rather an “out
of the box” approach to bak-
ing, decorating and packaging
that caters to events including
weddings and showers with a
special emphasis on corporate
amenity gifts and favours.

“This is an incredible
opportunity,” said Ian Moree,
artist and partner at Some-

thing's Different. “Not only
will they receive this instruc-
tion and course materials val-
ued at over $1000 but they will
also be eligible to gain even
more exposure by interning
with us for the rest of the sum-
mer. It's an opportunity for us
assist some one to pursue their
dream in the same way people
have done for us.”

“Our Palmdale location, 2
doors down from the corner
of Alexander and Rosetta
Sts,” said Samantha Moree,
“seemed perfectly suited for a
smaller class but because of
the interest we are looking at
a few other locations so that
we can accommodate more
students. In any event classes
will be limited to 10 persons.”

These experiential work-
shops are fashioned closely
on classes the artists them-
selves attended at the begin-
ning of their careers. The
“Sugar Fling” experience is
designed to be deliberately
casual, yet a very practical and
intentional environment to
acquire hands on experience
that can easily translate into a
viable career, business or hob-
by.
“We have for now,” said
Mrs Moree, “made the deci-
sion to offer the scholarship to
public school students and
those attending private
schools on scholarship only”.
She continued, “We hope to
offer 1 day workshops
through out the year as our
schedule allows. We would
love to make “Sugar Fling”
an annual event.”

Deadline for scholarship
applications is Friday June 11.
Registration for classes begins
May 25, 2010. Details of both
the workshops and scholar-
ship are available at Some-
thing's Different website at
www.somethingsdifferent.biz.













+.
- tort t+
ee A ee
babe
eh ee
To



SEXMPCITY





MAY 27, 2010 AT
GALLERIA CINEMAS,
JFK DRIVE AT 7PM.

$30 GENERAL ADMISS ION, $50 VIF

Sponsored by:



A SAMPLE of
the design
techniques stu-
dents attending
the Sugar Fling
2010 will learn
from cake dec-
orators lan and
Samantha
Moree





Echo Water
CDM Group
Havanias
Dermal Clinic

Tickets @
Clippendales, Mackey Street
or
The Workshop

Call: 356-2751 for more info



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010

TASTE

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune



a





‘Buy The Book’ bookstore off to great start

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia.net



ITHIN the first four

weeks of operation at

Buy The Book book-
store on West Bay Street, over
one-third of the store’s inventory
was sold out.

Customers have come to love its
friendly atmosphere- small aisles that
don’t overwhelm you which makes it all
worth the while as you peruse through
book titles and US prices.

Janice Cartwright, the bookstore’s
accountant said the public’s reaction
about the bookstore’s location, hours,
book selection, and extensive selection
of school and office supplies, teaching
resources, Hallmark products, gift
wrapping and party supplies are excep-
tional.

“Everyone of our customers, you
would think they live nearby,” said Ms
Cartwright. “But when we talk to them
we discover that they all live beyond
the boundaries hailing from Lyford
Cay, the Grove, Centreville, and other

places in town--and they all feel part of
the neighborhood,” said Ms
Cartwright.

Residents of the Cable Beach area
were really the ones who pushed for
the bookstore to open before its pro-
jected date. According to Ms
Cartwright, customers came in and lit-
erally opened up the establishment
ahead of time. They were so persistent,
she got tired of promising that the
bookstore would open soon.

Buzz surrounding the opening
became so intense that Ms Cartwright
had told customers to come in and pick
out their material while they were still
working out the fine details.

This was how book hungry patrons
were; it didn’t matter that the material
wasn’t on the shelves, they reached
into the box orders to pick out their
material.

“We didn’t even have a cash register
up and running yet,” said Ms
Cartwright. Ms Cartwright says they
began compiling a database of their
customers, with their customer’s
anniversaries, children’s birthdays, and
even pet names.

To date they have over 400 book
orders. Some of them are very difficult
to find. Persons have requested unusu-

al books on topics such as classical gui-
tar music, and techniques in water
colour.

Perhaps one of her favourite things
to do is to sit down and talk to people
from different walks of life.

“Many fathers have come in with
their children, and purchased books
for the family,” she explained. “It’s a
situation where mom is home cooking
dinner, and dad brings them to the
store.”

Delivering on time is one of the most
satisfying things in their business; they
continue to develop a reputation of
being customer proactive.

Ms Cartwright loves to hear when
customers say they’ve been trying to
order something they couldn’t find in
another book store, and they have the
opportunity to order it online for them.

“People are hungry for non-fiction
books and the classics,” said Ms
Cartwright. Older people and young-
sters are requesting them everyday.”

She says they are very satisfied with
the store and it’s setup. “This is the
store that we envisioned,” she
explained. “I don’t worry about the
constraints, timing or priorities. This is
supposed to hire more people, and it’s
not going to happen overnight.”

There are many things Ms
Cartwright wants to do with the store in
the future, Already persons from the
community to hold classes such as yoga
and dance at the store.

“We will evolve with our cus-
tomers,” she said.

Sharon Bethel, manager of the store
says, “just to see a little girl around
four years old looking through a book
at the pictures because she can’t read
evokes a feeling I can’t describe.

“And since a little girl can’t read
the words, she would make up a story
as she goes along that would probably
be better than the book version.”

These are just some of the “special”
day to day moments that Ms Bethel
lives for.

Out on the front porch is a sitting
area with umbrellas designed for
patrons to sit and read their books
with a perfect view of the waters on
Saunders’ beach.

This month, Buy The Book is fea-
turing Joann Behagg’s pottery, and
next month a leading photographer
will showcase her work. This is an
ongoing feature of the bookstore. Buy
The Book also sell the crafts of
Bahamian artisans, showcased month-
ly on a display near the checkout desk.



Down Too Earth



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

rshearer@tribunemedia.net



WHEN persons visit "Down Too
Earth" Adventure Farm Road, they
leave with a better appreciation for
what a typical farm has to offer with a
twist to their experience, says Sidney
St Claire.

He and his business partner, Kevin
Ferguson have designed a man-made
island, cultivated from the ground-up
where a swamp once existed.

The process to create their haven
was atask. After dredging the prop-
erty, and two landfills later, the nine-
acre block is the perfect facility for
raising livestock, and growing pro-
duce.

Mr St Claire, probably has one of
the dirtiest jobs in the nation. After
gathering the dung from his birds and
four-legged animals, he piles the waste
onto the land, and layers strips of
paper over it.

This is something to see, as he
explained to Tribune Entertainment.
The stench of fresh manure every isn’t
too pleasant, but he is able to put up
with it.

After he gathers the manure in a
compost heap, he layers paper on top
and waits a few weeks for it to disin-
tegrate. Then, he mixes the manure
with fertile soil.

Mr St Claire grows watermelon,
guava, and the Bay Jerina fruit, Tai-
wan tamarind, figs, raspberry, mul-
berry, pink guavas, lemon, peach, and
walnuts.

As you walk around the property,
one of your first stops will be St
Claire's Island, marked by a board-
walk and three bridges that connect
each other around the first pond.
Benches are stationed along the
boardwalks for you to enjoy your
packed lunch, or food bought onsite.

"St Claire's Island"- an S-shaped
murky green man-made pool is filled
with thousands of fish and turtle
species.

Back on land, the sheep do say
‘bah’, and the wild boars give that
excruciating snorting sound that lets
you know that you have entered their
territory.

Several pens on the site hold both
domestic and wild pigs. But don’t be
too surprised if a piglet runs out of its
pen to say hello. According to Mr St
Claire, this is something that children
especially love to see when they come
on field trips.

If you hear a choir of chickens mak-
ing noise, stop by the chicken coop,
and take a good look. The habitats
provide shelter to exotic birds you’ve

never heard of like the Dominican
and Polish chickens. There's even the
unusual rasta chicken, with a beard-
like bridle that resembles dreadlocks.

In the ponds across the way, you
may see a Japanese carp dancing in
and out of the water, or a turtle
emerging from the water to catch a
breath of fresh air. Thousands of
tilapia fish, native to the cool waters of
Africa are also farmed in the waters of
the pond.

Although none of this fish is grilled,
you may be able to request the staff to
whip you up a grilled fish meal.
Grilled chicken is prepared everyday,
and pizza is baked in a rock oven.
They also offer fabulous grilled corn
sold at reasonable rates and grow
tremendous beets.

At the very rear of the property is a
camping site with special features like
a swimming pool and hot tub which is
under construction. Progress has
already been made with new bath-
rooms that hold shower facilities, with
water supplied through a large water
tank stationed at the top of the roof.

GCENE@ FROM STEPPIN TO DA SHORES ©




























competed.

Greek Fraternities
and Sororities
from the Bahamas
and all across the

event presented by
KO Productions
this Saturday on
Luna Beach by
Saunders’ Beach.
In addition several
high school step-
ping teams also

United States as nat
competed in ‘Step- on 4 ar
pin’ On Da Shores’



i. + em
























¢ GREAT BAHAMIAN
SEAFOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

“Restaurant Week” kicks
off at The Seafood and
Wine Festival with three
special events. “Restaurant
Week” showcases seafood
and wine in 15 fine dining
restaurants in Nassau and
Paradise Island all week
long. “A Night at Jacaran-
da” allows guests to enjoy
amazing seafood dishes cre-
ated by top chefs at Jacaran-
da House on Parliament
Street, May 28, 7pm-11pm.
Cost: $125 (inclusive). “Fes-
tival Day” on May 29 at
Junkanoo Beach provides
fun family entertainment all
day long! Admission:
$3/adults; $1/children (under
12). T: 326-0992. See
www.downtownnassau.org/s
eafoodfestival

¢ DOWN HOME
GOSPEL CONCERT

The Hatchet Bay Festival
Committee hosts a “Down
Home Gospel Concert” and
invites the public to enjoy a
night of down home gospel
music. Free admission.
Donations welcomed. Sun-
day, May 30. 7pm-9pm at
Bethel Baptist Church,
Meeting Street. T: 356-1842.
E: mario.smith@wi.cibe.com

Pecessecssseccsseccsseccesaecse e

© THE LITTLE PINK PARTY

The Little Pink Party Sum-
mer Paradise invites you to
a 4 hour event experience
featuring the créme da la
créme of all things fabulous
Bahamian women love!
Thursday, May 27, 5.30pm-
8.30pm at the Collins Estate,
Collins Avenue and Shirley
Street.

© STAN BURNSIDE'S
“THE OPTICAL AND THE
SYNTHETIC” EXHIBITION:
OPENING RECEPTION

Stan Burnside invites you to
the opening reception of his
new exhibit “The Optical
and the Synthetic”, a collec-
tion of recent paintings. Fri-
day, May 28,

6pm-10pm at the Stan Burn-
side Gallery, Eastern Road
at Tower Heights. T: 324-
7937. E:
stanburnside@coralwave.co

© INTRODUCTION
TO YOGA CLASSES BY
DAVE REVINGTON

Expert yoga teacher, Dave
Revington will hold an
"Introduction to Yoga" class
beginning Saturday, June 5,
continuing the first Saturday
of every month from 1.30
pm to 3.30 pm. This class is
designed to introduce the
practice of yoga to anyone
who has never attended a
yoga class and wants to dis-
cover the benefits of this
time-honoured practice in a
safe, supportive environ-
ment. Spaces are at a special
price of $35 and are limited.
Call Providence Pilates Stu-
dio at: 323-0121.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 2010, PAGE 11B



ARTS

Hokemelir hosts Father's Day Fine Art Photography Show

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

s Richard Hoke-

meir looks back at

his body of work
over the years, he is sur-
prised by how his style
and methods have
evolved, due fo changes
in the industry, and his

own experience.

Last week, Mr Hokemeir
spoke to Tribune Arts about
his life as a photographer.

“Photographers aren’t as
respected as they should be,”
he said. “Over the years, pho-
tography hasn’t been a field
that is up there with other
careers in the media.

“ve taken the time to
meet with some of our young
professionals in the field who
believe that their field isn’t
taken seriously. But their
work is outstanding, and
patrons tend to see more in a
picture than they do,” said Mr
Hokemeir.

Conforming to new cam-
eras models and their features
haven’t been an easy thing for
Mr Hokemeir to adjust to in
his old age.

Learning how to use your
equipment is very important,
said Mr Hokemeir. “I think
the equipment will always be
smarter than the person who
controls it, and I’m constantly
trying to get as smart as the
equipment, but I haven’t got-
ten there yet.

“At my age, I hate adopt-
ing to anything, said Mr
Hokemeir. “I’m a stubborn
old goat, but when the digi-
tal came out, I liked it. I

thought I could go through
ten boxes of film and that’s a
lot of money. I could shoot
millions of pictures with my
digital camera, and not have
to pay anything,” said Mr
Hokemeir.

Experience has taught him
a few tricks of the trade in the
photography business. He
points out that photos aren’t
as they seem these days. For
example, photos of oven
baked turkeys are usually shot
with a raw bird spray painted
to look golden brown. Pour-
ing Elmer’s glue into a cup of
coffee will give it picture per-
fect foam.

Working with natural
papers to print custom colour
photos affords photographers
the convenience of no longer
needing a frame with a glass
to showcase their work, he
added.

Highlights of Mr Hoke-
meir’s career have been
extensive. Included in his
portfolio are photos from the
John Travolta case, and
Anna-Nicole Smith’s funeral.
He has also shot some of the
landscaped photographs
found in the Bahamas Hand-
book.

In order to perfect his craft,
he’s had to learn the way
nature operates.

Mr Hokemeir classifies
each aspect of nature as either
‘male’ or ‘female.’ Pictures
that feature sharper straight
lines are classified as
‘stronger’ or male in form.
Pictures with softer lines are
‘female’ in form.

Some pictures represent
historic moments in the
nation. A photo of an opened
window shutter with a piece
of wood engraved with the
name ‘Jackson’ holds up a

window shutter at Graycliff
Hotel and Restaurant. It rep-
resents of a slave who went
by that name and engraved
his name on the peice of
wood. According to Mr
Hokeimer’s interpretation, it
gives the impression that
there’s life just because the
curtain is pulled up. But
besides that, he says “he likes
windows, because they talk to
me at times.”

That window can be found
in the washing room of the
hotel, and was pointed out to
him by a cleaning lady.

Mr Hokeimer has been par-
ticularly drawn to ocean
themes within the past years.
As he walks through the
gallery, he points to one of
his photos: a side profile of
the chamber nautilus shell
which once housed the rare
octopus species.

The chamber nautilas shell
is a seashell that Mr Hoke-
meir shot in a lightbox that
he uses to take photos of
whiskey bottles, and newspa-
per spots advertising mer-
chandise for stores on the
island.

For taking photos such as
the chamber nautilus shell,
Mr Hokeimer drapes a light
table with a piece of blue felt,
and pokes a hole in the mid-
dle of the material. There,
you have one beam of light
coming out of the table.

“The light bounces off all
of the angles of the glass, and
the whole glass comes alive,”
said Mr Hokemeir.

Mr Hokemeir’s photo of
men in a boat on the river
captures a scene reminiscent
of The Ancient Mariner, the
only book he said he’s ever
liked in high school.

In this photo, there is a boat

in the harbor, boarded by sev-
eral men on a dark evening,
with an eerie figure of an
albatross in the background.
But to make it more Bahami-
an, there is a Haitian sloop
with a police boat right
behind it.

Mr Hokemeir says this pho-
to is a modern Ancient
Mariner meets the olden day
Ancient Mariner. It reminds
him of a scene from this clas-
sic book.

Mr Hokemeir used various
filters to shoot these kinds of
pictures which are shot in var-
ious ways and with different
filters to ensure that the tones
are soft and sharp in differ-
ent spots.

In shooting his subjects, Mr
Hokemeir watches out for
clean lines, and contortions
in his photos. One of his most
sought after pictures feature
two flamingos, with the reflec-
tion of the animals in the
water. This was shot at Adas-
tra Gardens. He says animals
are difficult to shoot, so he
had to pay several times to
get in just to get the right shot.

He likes to take shots that
makes the viewer feel good.
Some of the pictures take him
months and even years to cap-
ture because of the changing
direction of the sun or some
element of nature that may
not emerge at that particular
time.

Among his favourites from
the collection, is a photo of
the horizon, with the sun glis-
tening over the water as the
main focus.

At 69, Mr Hokemerir still
has many ideas that he wants
to get out. He told Tribune
Arts that sometimes his vision
for a picture is far from his
original vision.

FI
Richard Hokemeir

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



tion in the Bahamas struggled, and the only

[)ienin the mid 20th century fine art apprecia-

thing Nicholas Zervos could do was trade in
his dream of becoming a professional artist for law

school.

Mr Zervos, like most peo-
ple wanted to live comfort-
ably. He wanted to get mar-
ried, he wanted a family and
most importantly he wanted
to be able to support that fam-
ily.

He felt that a career in art
could not do this. It could not
put food on the table, pay the

bills, or send the kids to
school. If he had chosen art
as a profession, he believed
he would have subjected him-
self to a life of limited means.

This outlook on life denied
him the chance to become a
professional in this field.

"The life of an artist was a
difficult one in terms of finan-
cial stability. During those
years people did not appreci-
ate art because it was actually
just developing. Bahamian
people were not willing to pay
the amount of money artists
were asking for a piece of
work. When I thought about
all of this, I realised that it
was in my best interest to seek
a career that could actually
support me and the family I
wanted to have," Mr Zervos
said.

Propelled by prosperity and
success Mr Zervos put his
canvas and paint brushes
away for a white wig and a
black robe turning instead to
a career in law instead of his
passion for art

"Twas determined to study
seriously so my focus was
diverted to mastering my law
practice. It occupied most of
time so I did not have time to
do art," Mr Zervos told Tri-
bune Arts.

Though most of his time
was preoccupied by the
books, a piece of him was still
with his art. He recalled times
feeling bombarded with the
urge to just paint.

When he returned to the
Bahamas as a lawyer, the art
community had not develop
fully, but it did made pro-
gressive steps. There were
exhibits popping up and there
were artists who had ventured
into different genres like
social realism, and expres-
sions.

He paid close attention to
the work. He was inspired by
the techniques, the colour

schemes, and the concepts
each artist communicated in
their body of work.

"T would go to view exhi-
bitions and I would observe
everything about the art. I
learned a lot by just looking
because I looked at the tech-
niques the artists used. And
after viewing those exhibits I
had reached a bursting point
where I just had to paint,” Mr
Zervos said.

When Mr Zervos pulled
out his canvas and paint he
was surprised by the skill he
had even though he did not
paint for a long time.

He said one would actually
think after being disconnected
from their art work they
would lose their skills. "Sur-
prisingly this was not the case
with me. I was much better
than I was when I stopped
painting. I guess it was all that
built up urge over the years,”
he said.

Today, Mr Zervos has been
spending more than enough
time with his art work. His
work

has been showcased in a
number of exhibitions in the
past. His work has been
entered in exhibits on Par-
adise Island and Cable Beach.

He describes his artwork
as realism. He loves making
images come to life on paper.
Most of his work encompass-
es portraits, seascapes, land-
scapes and still life.

"In terms of seascapes I
love the pretty colours. There
are different shades of blue,
and if you mix the colours
correctly it is easy to get the
exact look. I try my hand at
almost everything but I love
to paint these types of images
the most,” he explained.

"I try to spend more time
with the thing that I love and
I want to let people know that
Tam still here," he said.

The sight of the still blue
seas meeting the horizon
inspires him. The sight of old
historical points on the island
fuels his passion, and creating
a replica of a still life or a per-
son challenges his precision.

Person interested in work
by Nicholas Zervos may con-
tact the artist at 394-4777 or
324-3718.



; Se
Pe a



NICHOLAS
Zervos has found
his niche in art real-
ism. He enjoys paint-
ing landscapes,
seascapes, portraits
and still life.