Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ARCHBISHOP Patrick Pin-
der, leader of the Roman
Catholic community in the
Bahamas, does not think the
law should be changed to sup-
port legalised gambling

is the tendency of human
nature to go to excess and to
extremes. Thus what may be
harmless in the beginning can,
without proper restraints
become quite harmful later on.

The wisdom of the law as it
now stands seems to under-
stand this reality.

“The law as it now stands,”
said the Archbishop, “appears

The Archbishop pointed out
that although the Church’s
longstanding tradition that
games of chance are not in
themselves morally evil, “there



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Archbishop says no to legalised gambling

intended to exercise an abun-
dance of necessary caution for
the good of individuals and the
community as a whole.

“Permitting the harmless use
of games of chance while pro-
tecting against their harmful
excess is indeed the value which
the current law appears to pro-
tect and promote.”

It was on these grounds that
the Archbishop felt that the law
should be upheld and gambling
not be legalised.

Following is the text of the
Archbishop’s statement:

“The Bahamian communi-
ty is currently engaged in much
discussion surrounding the pos-
sibility of the legalisation of
gambling. Surely this matter
calls for much serious thought
and research as part of an in-
depth, national conversation.
Such conversation is a neces-
sary aspect of the formation of
public policy in a strong democ-
racy. I wish here to offer an ini-

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tial contribu-
tion to that
conversation.

“The ques-
tion of legali-
sation of gam-

a bling is a chal-
C lenging one
Archbishop for one

Patrick Pinder Bahamian
community as

a whole. It is
particularly challenging for our
Roman Catholic community.
At the risk of being quoted out
of context, I must indicate at
the outset the Church’s long-
standing tradition that games
of chance are not in themselves
morally evil. This finds official
expression in the Catechism of
the Catholic Church in these
words: ‘Games of chance or
wagers are not in themselves
contrary to justice.’ (CCC2413).
It is on this basis that there is a
well known practice of utilising
various games of chance, in par-



ticular raffles, as a staple fea-
ture of parish fund raising.
“However, the same section of
the Catechism goes on to say:
‘(Games of chance) become
morally unacceptable when
they deprive someone of what
is necessary to provide for his
needs or those of others. The
passion for gambling risks
becoming an enslavement.’
(CCC 2431).

“Our Catholic tradition
recognised that while gambling
is not inherently evil there is
the tendency of human nature
to go to excess and to extremes.
Thus what may be harmless in
the beginning can, without
proper restraints become quite
harmful later on. The wisdom
of the law as it now stands
seems to understand this reali-
ty. The law as it now stands
appears intended to exercise an
abundance of necessary caution
for the good of individuals and
the community as a whole.”





Investigation into toddler drowning

AN investigation has begun after a toddler drowned off a
beach near the Coral Harbour Defence Force base on Sun-
day. According to police reports, the two-year-old girl was at
a family function at the beach when it is believed she went
into the water. Police and emergency medical personnel were
dispatched to the scene at around 6.10pm where they found
her lifeless body floating in the water.





ST ET HUTA

PT eh

CLOSING submissions will
be presented today in the trial
of two brothers accused of the
June 2002 murder of Mario
Miller.

On Friday, the brothers
Ricardo Miller, alias "Tamar
Lee", and Ryan Miller, alias
"Manny", who are charged with
Mario's murder, both opted to
make unsworn statements from
the prisoner’s dock, meaning
that they were not subject to
cross-examination by the pros-
ecution. Mario Miller, the son
of businessman and former MP
Leslie Miller, was found dead
with multiple stab and chop
wounds on various parts of his
body in bushes near the Super
Value food store in Winton on
Saturday, June 22, 2002.

Ricardo Miller during his
unsworn statement claimed that
he and Mario, who
he claimed had been his busi-
ness partner and friend, had
been ambushed in a drug deal
but stated he was not responsi-
ble for the 28-year-old's death.

Ricardo Milller is being rep-
resented by attorney Dorsey
McPhee. His brother Ryan
Miller, in a brief unsworn state-
ment from the prisoner's dock,
claimed he to was not involved
in Mario's murder and also
denied being involved in a drug
deal.



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THE TRIBUNE

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Two Haitian-Bahamian
men are dead following a shooting in the
South Bahamia area early Sunday morning.

Silvano Yasmin, also known as “Ameri-
can Boy” and Kendrick Dolphy, ages
unknown, were discovered with multiple
gunshot body wounds inside a SUV parked
at a gated apartment complex on Pinta
Avenue. The driver was pronounced dead
at the scene. The passenger in the front
seat was taken by ambulance to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he died around
8.25am. Police are conducting investiga-
tions into the double homicide, which
brings Grand Bahamas’ homicides to five
for the year.

According to Asst Supt Loretta Mackey,
police received a report around 6am of
gunshots being fired near The Hamptons
Apartments.

When police arrived at the scene, they
discovered a dark-blue Ford Expedition

Teenage girl abducted

A TEENAGE girl was
abducted in Nassau Village
when a thug forced her into his
car at gunpoint. The incident
occurred shortly before 8pm on
Saturday when the 15-year-old
was walking along Alexandria
Boulevard. A dark-coloured
Nissan Sentra pulled up along-
side her. The driver reportedly
produced a handgun and
threatened the girl with it, forc-
ing her to get into his vehicle.

She was eventually released
and taken to hospital.

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 3

Police probe double murder







MURDER SCENE: Gathering evidence.

SUV parked at the entrance gate of the
apartment complex with the engine run-
ning. Ms Mackey said a black male was sit-
ting motionless in the driver’s seat with
multiple gunshot wounds to his body. A
second black male was lying on the ground
near the rear passenger door, which was
open. Portions of Pinta Avenue were cor-
doned off by police when The Tribune
arrived at the scene sometime after 9.30am.

Several officers were still processing the
scene. The body of one victim had not been
removed yet from the vehicle. It had been

riddled with gunshots. Gunshots had also
damaged several apartments and a vehi-
cle. Numerous bullet markers were seen
on the ground where a number of bullet
casings were discovered around the vehicle.

ASP Mackey said police believe that at
least two gunmen were involved in the
shooting. She reported that Yasmin and
Dolphy were residents of The Hamptons
Apartments, which is a secure gated com-
plex in South Bahamia. According to
reports, the two men were seen earlier
attending a reggae concert, which had end-
ed sometime around 6am.

“The exact ages of the men are not
known at this time, but they appear to be in
their late thirties, early forties.

“We don’t know what the motive is for
this homicide, but police are continuing
their investigations,” said ASP Mackey.

“Police are following some leads into
this latest incident, but we are appealing to
persons who were in the area when this
incident occurred to call the police at 350-
3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911 to assist us in our
investigations.”

Maderia St. ONLY
MAY 16 - 29



Stabbing incidents

A MAN and two women are
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iday weekend. The man was
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nard Road, off Cowpen Road.
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The second — stabbing
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Ex-PLP leadership contender
Paul Moss joining the NDP

A FORMER PLP leadership
contender has announced he is
joined forces with the National
Development Party (NDP).

Attorney Paul Moss said his
decision is a “last ditch attempt”
to save the country, and he
implored all Bahamians to
change their political direction
at the next General Election
before it is too late.

He said: “I am humbled to
be in the NDP, for it truly has
the characteristics of a true
democracy where talent is
respected and appreciated. It is
not a party of petty jealousies
or insecurities. I am pleased to
be in a party that is truly interest
in the well being of people and
one that is prepared to win the
right way not win at any costs.”

Mr Moss said he met with the
NDP, along with several other
individuals, for several weeks
and was satisfied with the inten-
tions shared.

Under the PLP, Mr Moss had
been adamant that a change of
leadership was instrumental to
the progression of the party and
its success in the next General
Election. He challenged Leader
Perry Christie unsuccessfully at
last year’s convention under his
campaign “The New Bahamas:
We Can Do Better”, and in
March officially resigned.

Rather than continue his
political journey alone in the
face of the “tremendous bur-
den in the country”, Mr Moss
said it “made sense” to join the
NDP as they held the same
vision.





PAUL MOSS

He said: “I met with a group
of people who see the NDP as a
vehicle to be used to put the
Bahamas on the right footing
and to wrestle away the author-
ity from those that currently
have it, and give it back to the
Bahamian people.

“We have to invest in our
people, trust our people, put the
ownership of this economy in
the hands of the people. This
isn’t a party that’s only inter-
ested in winning so their sup-
porters can get contracts from
the governement. We’re inter-
ested in reformation, putting
Bahamians back to work, ensur-
ing the next generation is a bet-
ter generation.”

Renward Wells, chairman of
the NDP, said: "Paul brings
tremendous talent and an arse-
nal of tools that we in the NDP
are please to have in our party's
tent. We know that he is a fight-
er for the people and like us in
the NDP, wants to see the coun-
try rescued from the malaise it is
in as a result of failed govern-
ments particularly since the lat-
ter half of the 1980s. We antici-
pate that Paul will play an inte-

gral role in the party in the
months to come as we move
from strength to strength.”

The party is soliciting Parlia-
mentary candidates for the next
General Election and is expect-
ed to be very proactive in the
upcoming months promoting
party awareness.

Mr Moss said the party would
be appealing to FNMs, PLPs,
and “in-betweens who feel this
country can do much better”,
and he identified persons such
as Tennison Wells, Pierre
Dupuch, Algernon Allen, and
Omar Smith as favorable can-
didates. He continued: “People
that really see the country could
be better but because of the
political culture, there is no
movement for direction, per-
sons who feel they have assets
and treasures - to really come
together so we can save this
country. I really believe that if
this country does not change at
the next opportunity - it will be
the end of this country.”

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THE TRIBUNE



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By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean diplo-
mat)

I: is not often that a book
comes along that should
be in the Library of every
school and on the list of civics
reading material. “Living my
Dreams”, the recently pub-
lished biography of West Indi-
an Cricket commentator,
Joseph “Reds” Perreira is such
a book.

The book’s importance is
that it shows that there is no
obstacle to realizing dreams
and achieving ambitions if one
has self-belief, determination,
and unrelenting capacity for
hard work. Every obstacle can
be overcome.

In relating his life in a very
unassuming and matter-of-fact
manner, Reds Perreira has set
an example that should inspire
young people throughout the
world, but especially so in his
native West Indies. I say
“native West Indies” for while
Reds was born in Guyana’s
interior in an area called
Pomeroon, he belongs to the
West Indian region as a whole,
having spent most of his adult
life faithfully and enthusiasti-
cally serving the area in one
capacity or another.

Reds is perhaps best known
as a Cricket Commentator, but
he is much more besides. He
has also been a successful sports
administrator in Guyana and
for the seven islands that form
the Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS), and
there is no sport in the region
that his life has not touched in
some measure.

He came from very humble
beginnings. In the Pomeroon,
Reds and his family travelled
around by boat and went to
Church barefooted. When he
moved to Guyana’s capital
Georgetown at the age of six,
he had never heard a radio or
knew that a world existed
beyond the Pomeroon river and





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Se emi



LOCAL NEWS

Overcoming the Odds:
Reds Perreira’s Biography





SIR RONALD SANDERS

feeding the pigs on his father’s
farm. In his boyhood in
Georgetown, he learned of dis-
tant places via the radio but he
could have had no idea that he
would tour the world as the
eyes and ears of the West Indi-
an people in the majestic game
of cricket, particularly as for
the first twenty years of his life
he was afflicted by a terrible
stammer.

Nonetheless, he dreamt of
it. Reds recalls lying in bed at
night doing “imaginary com-
mentaries of cricket coming
from Australia, and from Eng-
land at Lords” and doing so
without a stammer. This stam-
mering affected his perfor-
mance at school. As he tells it:
“T had a major problem trying
to get through my schooling at
a time when the world was not
sympathetic to handicaps.
Invariably, I would be afraid if
the teacher were to ask me a
question during any given
class.” Even though Reds
moved through school to fifth
standard passing his exams
every year and finishing in the
top ten, his recurring problem
was his “inability to be able to
speak fluently and confident-
ly.”

Reds did not finish sec-
ondary school. He went to
work at the age of sixteen and
immediately showed both his
gift for organizing sports events
and his love for them. All his
wages were spent on arranging
competition between cricket

and football teams he helped
to set up. The rest of his time
was spent haunting Guyana’s
cricket grounds watching the
performances of local players
and exulting in the clashes with
visiting touring teams such as
Australia in 1955 when he saw
the young Guyanese batsman,
Rohan Kanhai, smash a mag-
nificent century.

What Reds lacked in fluent
speech was more than balanced
by his abundance of determi-
nation. In 1962, he went to live
in England. His anchor there
as it was for many other young
West Indians was the West
Indian Student Centre. Pre-
dictably, Reds became the Cen-
tre’s sports coordinator and,
this young man of limited edu-
cation, made good friends with
able West Indian students who,
like him, were later to distin-
guish themselves in their fields.

Two of them Lester Bird of
Antigua and Barbuda and JMG
“Tom” Adams of Barbados
became Prime Ministers of
their countries. Gerry Watt
(now Sir Gerald) and David
Simmons (now Sir David) were
later to become Attorneys-
General of Antigua and Bar-
buda and Barbados respective-
ly.

Recalling Reds’ capacity for
sports organization and his
deep commitment to the devel-
opment of sports, Lester Bird
(the Deputy Prime Minister of
Antigua and Barbuda) was
instrumental in Reds’ appoint-
ment as Head of the OECS
Sports Desk in 1984 despite the
fact that Reds was not from any
of the OECS countries and
there was some opposition to
his appointment on those
parochial grounds. After twen-
ty-six years of sterling and
unselfish service to almost
every sport in the OECS, few

now remember that Reds was
born in Guyana. In a note in
the book, Bird says of Reds’
work at the OECS: “You set a
great example which will be dif-
ficult to emulate.”

David Simmons, who for
four years captained the West
Indian Students Centre Cricket
team of which Reds was open-
ing batsman, also helped to
secure Reds a work permit in
Barbados in the early days of
his long stint as a Cricket com-
mentator alongside the Doyen
of West Indian Cricket Com-
mentators, Barbados’ Tony
Cozier. But, first Reds had to
overcome his stammer. And,
he recounts in this book how
he did so. Discipline, determi-
nation and dedication were the
things that did it. He wanted
desperately to be a Cricket
Commentator and to do it, he
had to put stammering behind
him. A remarkable career fol-
lowed in which he encountered
at first hand and reported on
the great successes and miser-
able failures of many West Indi-
an sports people, particularly
its cricketers. And, then, yet
another obstacle intruded upon
his life. A stroke on New Year’s
Day 1996 as he was about to
cover the West Indies cricket
tour of Australia paralyzed his
left hand side.

Again, it was only determi-
nation, discipline and dedica-
tion that pulled Reds back from
the bed-ridden existence of a
stroke victim to the full life he
lives today. It has been a
remarkable life in which huge
obstacles were overcome;
obstacles that would have
stopped a lesser man, but in
Reds Perreira’s case drove him
to further heights of achieve-
ment. The book, which tells
many behind the scenes stories
particularly about West Indian
Cricket and cricketers, is ulti-
mately a moving tale that
should inspire every young per-
son to set their goals, work hard
to achieve them and live their
dreams.

Responses and previous
commentaries:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website af wew.cob.edubs

THE SEARCH FOR A PRESIDENT

The College Council of The College of The Bahamas (COB) is pleased to

| annonce

a scarch for a new President and invites nominations and expres-

jsions of interest in this outstanding opportunity for leadership at a truly
unique institution, After nearly thirty-five years of serving The Bahamas,
first as a two-year institution, then as a four-year degree-granting College,

|COB expects to become The University of The Bahamas.

As it moves to

solidify its university status, COB will continue to deliver excellent under-
jeraduate teaching while developing new undergraduate and graduate pro-
| grams, increasing research and innovation activities, and focusing its work in
areas crucial to national development.

| Since its founding in 1974, The College of The Bahamas has grown in repu-
tation and currently enrolls over 5000 students in undergraduate and gradu-
ate education. The institution grants primarily bachelor’s degrees, and will
launch its first master’s degree later this year. Currently, COB offers joint
)master’s degrees in conjunction with other accredited universities and col
leges within the United States and enjoys extensive links with higher educa-
tion institutions in the Caribbean, North America and Great Britain.

NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS

VA prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
jities for the new president, a full enumeration of qualifications for the posi-
tion, and instructions for submitting applications or nominations may be

‘tound under

“Current Searches”

at wwwacademic-search.com. Those

On

sidering becoming candidates are urged to visit this Web site before submit-
j ting application materials. A complete application shall include a thoughtful
letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and a list of at least five professional ref-
erences (with email addresses and telephone numbers) and must be received
by June 9th, 2010, Nominations, inquiries and applications are treated confi-
[dentially and should be submitted electronically (MS Word or PDF) to:

| COBPresident@academic-search.com

| Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained

from The College's

5 website, |

(haw cob ed

ine ava Kirkhope and Bill Franklin of Academic Search, Inc. are assisting with

| Maya Ranchod Kirkhope

| Senior Consultant
| Academic Search, Inc.
| Washington, DAC., USA

| ma akirkhope@academic-search.com

| (703) Hi) 9195

this search. Nominations and expressions of interest will be treated in confi-
dence and may be directed to:

Dr. Bill Franklin

Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Ine.
Washington, D.C., USA

hjf@academic-search.com

(830) 249-1444

The College of The Bahamas is committed to providing equal educational
}and employment opportunity.





THE TRIBUNE



intensifyi

DAVID McFADDEN,
Associated Press Writer
KINGSTON, Jamaica

Jamaica's security forces
clashed with masked gunmen
allied with an alleged drug king-
pin for a second consecutive
day on Monday as an intensify-
ing multi-front battle against
gangs spread to volatile slums
outside the capital, according
to Associated Press.

Police and soldiers came
under heavy fire in barricaded
battle zones in the West
Kingston stronghold of Christo-
pher "Dudus” Coke, who is try-
ing to avoid extradition to the
USS. on drug and arms traffick-
ing charges. Military helicopters
with mounted guns buzzed
above the impoverished area,
between plumes of black
smoke. West Kingston, which
includes the Trenchtown slum
where reggae superstar Bob
Marley was raised, is the epi-
center of the violence. But on
Monday, security agents were
also under attack in troubled
areas outside that patchwork
of gritty slums.

Gunmen shot at police while
trying to erect barricades in a
poor section of St. Catherine
parish, which is just outside the
two parishes where the gov-
ernment on Sunday imple-
mented a monthlong state of
emergency. A police station in
an outlying area of Kingston
parish also was showered with
bullets by a roving band of gun-
men with high-powered rifles.

Security Minister Dwight
Nelson said "police are on top
of the situation,” but gunfire
was reported in several poor
communities and brazen gun-
men shot up Kingston's central
police station.

Killed

The Jamaica Constabulary
Force said two officers have
been killed and six injured dur-
ing firefights with criminal
gangs whose arsenals rival
police firepower.

"The loss of these two offi-
cers and the injury to the six,
while difficult to deal with, will
only serve as a rallying call for
the police to remain strong,
committed and firm as we con-
tinue to encounter brazen crim-
inals," said Police Commis-
sioner Owen Ellington.

Ellington said "scores of
criminals" from gangs across
the Caribbean island had joined
the fighting in the Kingston
area, where the fear of gun vio-
lence has driven many to live
behind gated walls with key-
pad entry systems and 24-hour
security.In a sun-splashed island
known more for reggae music
and all-inclusive resorts, the
violence erupted Sunday after-
noon after nearly a week of ris-
ing tensions over the possible
extradition of Coke to the Unit-
ed States, where he faces a pos-
sible sentence of life in prison.

Coke is described as one of
the world's most dangerous
drug lords by the USS. Justice
Department.

Coke leads one of the gangs
that control politicized slums
known as "garrisons." Political
parties created the gangs in the
1970s to rustle up votes. The
gangs have since turned to drug
trafficking, but each remains
closely tied to a political party.
Coke's gang is tied to the gov-
erning Labor Party.

Prime Minister Bruce Gold-
ing had stalled Coke's extradi-
tion request for nine months
with claims the U.S. indictment
relied on illegal wiretap evi-
dence. After Golding reversed
himself last Monday amid
growing public discontent,
Coke's supporters began bar-
ricading streets and preparing
for battle.

On Friday, the U.S. State
Department warned in a travel
alert that access roads to the
airport could be blocked by civ-
il unrest, but Jamaica's Civil
Aviation Authority said Mon-
day that flights were arriving
and departing on schedule at
Kingston's Norman Manley
International Airport.

The USS. State Department
said Monday it was "the
responsibility of the Jamaican
government to locate and arrest
Mr. Coke." A U.S. Embassy
spokeswoman denied wide-
spread rumors that USS. offi-
cials were meeting with Coke's
lawyers. Coke's lead attorney,
Don Foote, refused to disclose
to The Associated Press
whether Coke was hunkered
down in his stronghold in the
barricaded Tivoli Gardens slum





TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 7

CARIBBEAN NEWS

Jamaica: Gun battles are



(AP Photos/The Jamaica Gleaner, Norman Grindley

LEFT: In this photo taken Wednesday, May 19, 2010 a Jamaica
Defense Force armoured vehicle make its way into a barricaded
street in Hannah Town, West Kingston. Jamaica. RIGHT: A demon-
strator displays a cardboard with a message in support of Christopher
“Dudus” Coke during a march on May 20 in Kingston. Jamaican
Police have an arrest warrant for Christopher “Dudus” Coke, who
allegedly leads one of Jamaica’s drug gangs and is sought by U.S.
authorities on drug and arms trafficking charges but residents of West
Kingston neighborhoods have set up barricades to prevent the police
for entering the slums to execute the order.

or was somewhere else in the
Caribbean country. In a nation-
al address Sunday night, Gold-
ing said the state of emergency
order for Kingston and St.

Andrew parish gives authori-
ties the power to restrict move-
ment. Security forces will also
be able to conduct searches and
detain people without warrants.

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a a ru nk a
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ALLEGED drug gang leader

Christopher “Dudus” Coke.



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TUESDAY, MAY 25,

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

n contrasting perfor-
mances, Jermaine
“Choo Choo” Mackey
and Jerome ‘The
Bahamian Bronze
Bomber’ Ellis pulled off victo-
ries to gear themselves up for a
possible clash for the Bahamian
super middleweight title.
Highlighting First Class Pro-
motions’ “In Your Face, Ready
to Rumble” professional boxing
card Saturday night at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
Mackey needed just one and-a-
half rounds to dispose of Amer-
ican Alex ‘Undertaker’ Lubo.
The fight was so lopsided
with Mackey, one minute and
40 seconds into the second
round, using his towering height
to simply out-class the veteran
Colombian fighting out of

Miramar, Florida.

The scheduled eight-round
main event fight was simply
over as soon as it got started.
“He came out strong, but I just
decided to take it to his body
and not try to make it a slug
fest,” said Mackey, who really
didn’t give Lubo a chance to
mount any serious attack.

Mackey, making his return
to the local scene since May 30,
2009, when he won a third
round TKO over Emiliano
Cayetano in defense of his
WBC Caribbean Boxing Fed-
eration (CABOFE) title, said
he was out to prove to the
Bahamian public that he’s still
the champion.

The Bahamian super mid-
dleweight champion was refer-
ring to the critics who indicated
that he took two ill-advised
fights, one on September 25
against Adonis Stevenson in
Montreal, Canada, and the oth-



rts

2010

er against Kirt ‘The Technician’
Sinnette December 12 in
Trinidad & Tobago, only to
lose by TKO in the Sth and
11th rounds respectively.

“Tt was nerve racking fighting
a guy with over 30 fights, so
basically because he had the
experience on his side, I just
decided to keep my guard up
and not get over excited,” said
Mackey, who noted that he just
went to the body and then the
head to easily win the fight.

Improving his record to 19-5
with his sixth TKO, Mackey
was simply too much for Lubo
to handle. He knocked him
down twice, the last with an on-
slaught that dropped both fight-
ers to the canvas.

Mackey, 30, was able to get
back up, but when Lubo tried,
he knelt on one knee, signalling
that he had suffered enough.

As he reflected on his per-
formance, Mackey turned to
the trash-talking from Ellis,
who is waiting in the wings for a
showdown for the Bahamian
middleweight title at the end

CT CME PAN ALOU RESULT



ALEX ‘Undertaker’ Lubo (left above and kneeling top right) connects with a punch to the face of Jermaine “Choo

Bodybuilder honoured

of the year.

“T’m going to go down to the
middleweight and he’s going to
come up to the middleweight,
so it should be a good fight,”
Mackey projected.

To his opponent, Mackey
had this warning: “I’m looking
forward to that title. Hey
Jerome Ellis, bring it on. I’m
going to trip your breaker.”

Ellis, who hasn’t fought at
home since he defeated Wilson
Theophile on February 25,
2005, for the Bahamas light
middleweight title, had to go
four rounds before he forced
Jamaican Testie ‘Neck Breaker’
Davis into submission at the

Choo” Mackey on Saturday night...

2:05 mark.

“It was all right. I got a little
injury in training, but I’m used
to it. The fight must go on.
Even though I couldn’t use my
right hand like I wanted to, I
knew I had enough talent and
enough power to take him out
with my left hand,” Ellis said.

The 31-year-old who went to
Florida where he fought his last
17 fights (posting a 6-9-2 win-
loss-draw record) over the past
six years, said he wasn’t con-
cerned about Davis, despite

that he put up a challenge at
the beginning.

Davis, a virtually unknown
competitor, kept Ellis on the
ropes for the first three rounds
as he threw a series of combi-
nations. But he didn’t have the
power to put Ellis away at any
time.

“Everybody’s going to get
hit, but at the end of the day,
mine was a little harder than
his,” said Ellis, referring to the
series of left body shots that he
connected to Davis, forcing him

SEE more pictures on page 14

to call it quits.

With his record now
improved to 13-11-2 and a fight
pending on June 13 against
Ossie Duran at the Hyatt
Regency in Philadelphia, Ellis
said he’s eager for the much
anticipated match-up against
Mackey. “Baby work, baby
work,” was how Ellis described
the showdown. “All I need to
do is get my right hand as sharp
as it used to be and he will drop
within four. Seeing is believing.
That’s what it’s all about.”



ws



PROFESSIONAL bodybuilder Joel Stubbs congratulates his long-
time teammate Raymond Tucker (right) at the Bahamas Bodybuilding
and Fitness Federation’s Novice Bodybuilding and Fitness Champi-
onships Saturday night at the National Centre for the Performing
Arts. Tucker (right) was honoured by the federation for his out-
standing performance over the years.

(Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

‘Big Daddy’ Butler cuts ‘Mountain’ down

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



ONE look at American James ‘Moun-
tain’ Pratt when he stepped into the ring on
Saturday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium and you would wonder if he wasn’t
getting ready to play basketball instead of
box.

Although he came from Charlotte, North
Carolina, for the latter, Pratt’s trip to the
Bahamas was short lived as Jerry ‘Big Dad-
dy’ Butler wasted little time in cutting him
down like timber.

In what turned out to be his second
longest appearance in the ring, Pratt didn’t
have any defense for the on-slaught that
Butler threw at him in the third round.

One minute and 32 seconds and it was all
over as Pratt came crashing to the canvas in
the heavyweight bout of the First Class
Promotions’ undercard of the “In Your
Face, Ready To Rumble” professional box-
ing show.

“At first I was a little disappointed
because (Friday) the fighter didn’t come.

Then this morning (Saturday), they called
me and told me the fighter was here,” But-
ler said.

“When I saw him this evening (Satur-
day), I said ‘man, I have some work cut
out for me.’ So I decided to put him to the
test: Either he feel me, or I feel him.”

For the first two rounds, neither fighter
seemed to have the initiative to go after
the other as they played it safe. But in the
third, Butler finally got inside and he went
to work on Pratt’s body.

Having shed some 15 pounds with about
30 to go, the 280 pound 29-year-old Butler
said he’s hoping that the Bahamas Boxing
Commission will give him a chance to take
on Sherman ‘The Tank’ Williams for the
Bahamas heavyweight title.

“That might be the biggest fight the
Bahamas has ever seen since Ray Minus
and Quincy Pratt and (Jermaine Mackey)
Choo Choo and Marvin (Smith),” Butler
said. “They want to see the big boys.”

And 5-foot-9 Butler warned the 5711, 37-
year-old Williams that if he’s not careful, he
could end up just like the 38-year-old Pratt,
who dropped to 2-8.

Also on the undercard, in what turned
out to be another lopsided match, Elkeno
‘Punisher’ Saunders stopped American
Robert Marsh 1:15 in the first round.

“It was very exciting,” said Saunders,
who moved up from the middleweight to
the heavyweight class. “I was very
impressed with myself in this fight.”

Saunders, fighting for the first time at
home since he won the WBA FedeCaribe
middleweight title over Floyd Trumpet on
August 10, 2007, was all over Marsh.

In fact Saunders, whose last fight was
on April 25, 2008, when he lost to Renan St
Juste in Quebec, Canada, pounded Marsh
to the canvas twice.

On the last on-slaught, Marsh fell flat
on his back. After he was given the stand-
ing eight count with one knee still on the
canvas, he got up arguing with referee Gre-
gory Storr to no avail.

“T didn’t experience what I wanted to
experience in this fight,” Saunders said. “I
was looking to get pushed around and try to
get my body beat up a bit.

SEE page 14

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TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 13



Arnett wins
title in 400mH

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FORMER St Augustine’s
College standout Nathan
Arnett began his tenure at Iowa
Central on a high note, while
Tasman Evans ended his on a
disappointing one over the
weekend.

At the National Junior Col-
lege Athletic Association,
Arnett won the title in the
men’s 400 metre hurdles in
51.47 seconds.

Arnett, who has rebounded
well from an injury that ham-
pered his process prior to this
year, came into the final with
the fastest qualifying time of
51.92.

“He had a fantastic race. It
was windier than it could have
been. Had it not been so windy,
I really believe that Nathan
would have ran under 50 sec-
onds,” said Denny Myers, the
head coach for the Tritons at
Iowa Central.

“It’s really taken him until
now to get back to where he
was, but he’s definitely there
and he’s ready to run fast. I
expect he will come home and
run at the championships there
and see what happens from
there.”

His team-mate Tasman
Evans of Government High
School finished eighth in the
preliminaries in 53.36. Howev-



KOBE BRYANT (AP)

Tasman Evans pulls quad, not able
to compete in final of his event

er, he didn’t contest the final
after pulling his quad leading
off the Tritons’ 4 x 100 relay
team, bringing the curtain down
on his career at lowa Central.

“That was quite disappoint-
ing because he was going to
have a great meet,” coach
Myers pointed out. “Tasman
worked really hard this year to
get to the level that he was. I
felt really bad for him.”

Arnett also competed in the
110 hurdles where he was
fourth in 14.20 with Dennis
Bain of Rend Lake sixth in
14.59. Evans also qualified for
the final because of the injury.

In the preliminary rounds,
Arnett posted the fourth fastest
time of 14.55 with Evans sixth
in 14.61 and Bain eighth in
14.64.

Bain is a freshman from Jack
Hayward High School in Grand
Bahama and a team-mate of
JPVente Deveaux, a freshman
from the Church of God High
School, who didn’t get to com-
pete.

In the 4 x 400 relay, Arnett
helped Iowa Central to third
place finish as he ran on the
third leg. The Tritons ran
3:12.09.





NATHAN ARNETT (centre) and TASMAN EVANS (far right) in action...

Two females represented
their respective in their spe-
cialties.

Shelleyeka Rolle of Barton
County was sixth in the 800
final in 2:17.31. The winning
time was 2:08.50. Rolle had the
sixth fastest qualifying time of
2:15.75.

Rolle also competed on Bar-
ton County’s 4 x 4 relay team
that ended up third.

And Keithra Richards, com-
peting for Allen County Com-
munity College, was 11th in the
long jump with her leap of 5.45
metres or 17-feet, 10 3/4-inches.
The winning leap was 20-5.

Richards also contested the
triple jump, but she failed to
post a mark in the field of 12
that saw the winning leap
recorded at 13.06 m or 42-10
4.

Bahamian athletes
shine in Brazil

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

TREVOR Barry is certainly
making the best of his exposure
on the international circuit.

After placing second in the
men’s high jump at the Fort-
aleza Grand Prix last week with
a leap of 2.22 metres or 7-feet, 3
1/3-inches, Barry improved to
2.25m or 7-41/2 to win at the
Brazilian Grand Prix on Sun-
day.

In that meet, Barry was able
to turn the tables on American
Jamie Nieto, who won in Fort-
aleza with 2.25m or 7-41/2, but
had to settle for second in
Brazil with 2.23m or 7-4.

Another victory in Brazil
came from Christine Amertil
in the women’s 400 metres in
a time of 51.67 seconds, just
ahead of Guyana’s Aliann
Pompey, who ran 51.76. Brazil-
ian Jailma Sales de Lima was
third in 52.70.

It was the second straight vic-
tory for Amertil, although the
first came in the shorter dis-
tance when she took the 200 at
Fortaleza in 23.48 with Brialian
Ana Claudia Lemos Silva com-
ing behind in 23.49.

Also from Brazil, former
IAAF World champion Der-
rick Atkins, working his way
back to his original form after a
series of injuries, had to settle
for sixth place in the men’s 100
in 10.21.

The race was won by Amer-
ican Mike Rodgers in 10.06, fol-
lowed by Great Britain’s Dwain
Chambers, who is making his
comeback after a drug suspen-
sion, in 10.11. Jamaican Lerone

Clarke was third in the same
time.

Atkins ended up eighth over-
all in the standings after the two
races were combined.

Like Barry and Amertil,
Atkins also competed at Fort-
aleza where he was fifth in the
century in 10.57. The winning
time was 10.46 by American
Leroy Dixon with Trinidad &
Tobago’s Emmanuel Callander
second in 10.47 and Frenchman
Martial Mbandjock third in
10.55.

Also in Fortaleza was Grand
Bahamian quarter-miler
Michael Mathieu, who finished
fourth in the men’s one-lapper
in 46.10. Brazil’s Eduardo de
Oliveira Vasconcelos won the
race in 45.62.

Meanwhile at the Shanghai
Meeting in China on Sunday,
sprinter Chandra Sturrup and
quarter-miler Andrea Williams
from Grand Bahama compet-
ed.

Sturrup, 38, showed that she
can still compete with the
youngsters as the veteran
pulled through with a third
place in the straight away race
in 11.38.

American Carmelita Jeter
took the tape in 11.09 with
Jamaican World champion
Shelly-Ann Fraser a little dis-
tant behind in 11.29.

And in the men’s 400,
Williams ended up ninth in
48.03.

The race was won by Amer-
ican Jeremy Wariner in a sea-
son’s best of 45.41, pulling
through his compatriot David
Neville in 45.70. Great Britain’s
Michael Bingham took third in
45.84.

Lakers look to dismantle Suns’ zone in Game 4

By BOB BAUM
AP Sports Writer



PHOENIX (AP) — Losing one game
in Phoenix was tolerable for the Los
Angeles Lakers. Two losses and things
start to get uncomfortable for the reign-
ing NBA champions.

It’s safe to say that coach Phil Jackson

was giving his team a refresher course on
how to beat a zone defense when the
Lakers worked out at US Airways Cen-
ter on Monday after Phoenix employed
the strategy to great success in its 118-
109 victory on Sunday night. The Suns
can square the series at 2-2 with anoth-
er home win in Game 4 tonight.
Jackson said he had never seen a team

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When asked if a day of practice would
be enough to work out how to attack
the zone, he answered sarcastically.
"Nah," he said. "We're doomed."
The Suns used the zone much of the

Features:

second quarter and the entire second
half.

Phoenix coach Alvin Gentry said that
was more than he anticipated but he
stuck with it because it worked when
nothing else had against the Lakers.

Los Angeles averaged 126 points and
shot 58 per cent in the series’ first two
games.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

Hitmen blow away Dorsey Park Boyz



By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



CONTRASTING finishes in this
weekend’s New Providence Softball
Association action at the Blue Hills
Sporting Complex saw one team con-
tinue their offensive dominance while
another came out on top in another
close game.

In Saturday night’s opening game, the
Dorin United Hitmen blew away last
year’s powerhouse, the Dorsey Park
Boyz, 16-1, while the New Breed took
down John’s Buccaneers 4-1.

Kieron Munroe dominated both on
the mound and at the plate and was the
catalyst for his team’s lopsided win. He
pitched a complete game and in four
Innings, gave up just a single hit, one
earned run and struck out seven bat-
ters. At the plate, he went 1-3 with three
runs scored and one RBI.

The Hitmen began the offensive
onslaught in the first inning as they
mounted four runs to take an early
advantage.



SOFTBALL

Munroe, William Delancey, Richard
Bain and Alcott Forbes each crossed
the plate.

Munroe struck out two of three bat-
ters in the first as he held the Dorsey
Park Boyz scoreless for the first of three
innings.

The Hitmen followed with another
four-run inning, this time with Vincent
Seymour Jr and Darren Stevens joining
Munroe and Delancey in the runs col-
umn.

With an 8-0 lead in hand, Munroe
struck out the side to keep his shutout
intact through two innings.

Bain and Munroe added a pair of runs
for the Hitmen in the third as they took
a 10-0 lead.

The Hitmen had their most produc-
tive offensive output in the fourth inning
with six runs. The inning was highlight-
ed by home runs from Everette Neely
and Seymour.

The Dorsey Park Boyz lone run came

late in the fourth inning when Rudy Fox
crossed home plate.

Offensively for the Hitmen, Richard
Bain led the way with a perfect night at
the plate, 3-3 with three runs scored and
three RBI.

Delancey was 2-2 with the three runs
scored and one RBI, Forbes was 1-2
with two runs, Stevens was 1-2 with one
run scored, and Seymour was 1-2 with
two runs scored and two RBI.

For the Dorsey Park Boyz, Fox was 1-
1 with one run scored and one RBI.
Daniel Storr was tagged with the loss.

In the feature contest, the New Breed
held the Buccaneers to a single late
game run in the final inning and walked
away with their second consecutive 4-1
win in a defensive struggle.

The New Breed took a 1-0 lead in the
top half of the first inning when a sac fly
by Greg Gardiner plated Ken Wood.

Daniel Gonzalez pitched a complete

game in seven innings and routinely
overpowered the Buccaneers lineup as
he allowed just five hits and recorded 17
strikeouts.

He struck out the side in both the first
and second innings and both teams
remained scoreless until Gardiner scored
in the fourth to give the New Breed a 2-
0 lead.

The New Breed added a run each in
the fifth and sixth innings for a 4-0 lead.

Marcellas Hall scored the lone run
for the Buccaneers in the bottom of the
seventh inning for the game’s final mar-
gin.

Offensively for the New Breed, Wood
was 1-3 with one run scored, Gardiner
was 2-3 with one run scored and one
RBI and Garfield Bethel was 2-4.

For the Buccaneers, Cordero Pinder
was 2-2 and Hall was 1-3 with one run
scored. Charles Caroll was tagged with
the loss.







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FROM page 1B

“Unfortunately, I was able
to move around and didn’t
allow him to hit me. From the
first punch, I realised that I was
in control of the fight. From we
touched gloves, I could see the
fear in his eyes. I was ready.”

And in the other fight on the
card, Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woods
kept moving around and he
out-boxed Richard ‘The Ham-
mer’ Pitt for four rounds in an
all-Bahamian light welterweight
opener.

“T trained hard for this fight,
but coach told me not to knock
him out,” Woods said. “So I
just tried to stay away from him
and every chance I got to go
inside and box.”

There was also scheduled to
be a female boxing match
between Saunders’ wife,
Altonique ‘Lady Punisher’
Saunders and American Mia
‘Just Do It? Henderson.

But according to promoter
Michelle Minus, Henderson
wasn’t able to secure her pass-
port in time to make the trip.

She assured the fans that
when First Class puts on its
next show, they hope to have
Saunders in the ring.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS
INBRIEF

TENNIS

KNOWLES/FISH AT

ROLAND GARROS

BAHAMIAN touring
pro and his American part-
ner Mardy Fish are seeded
at No. 13 at the Roland
Garros 2010 Men’s Doubles
Championships in France
this week.

The duo have gotten a
bye in the first round. They
are not due to start playing
until Wednesday or Thurs-
day. If they are successful,
they could eventually play
the No. 2 seeded team of
Daniel Nestor and Nenad
Zimonjic in the quarter-final
and the No.5 seeds of
Mahesh Bhupathi and Max
Mirnyi in the semifinal.

Both Nestor and Bhu-
pathi are former partners of
Knowles.

The top seeds in the tour-
nament are American iden-
tical twin brothers Bob and
Mike Bryan.



SOFTBALL

NPSA ACTION

THE New Providence
Softball Association played
a double header on Satur-
day night at the Banker’s
Field at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex as the
John’s Buccaneers blanked
the Y-II Shipping New
Breed 3-0 and the Dorin
United Hitmen routed the
Dorsey Park Boyz 16-1.

Action is scheduled to
continue tonight with anoth-
er double header on tap.

In the women’s 7pm
opener, the Proper Care
Pool Lady Sharks are set to
face the Bommer G Opera-
tors and in the men’s fea-
ture contest, it will be New
Breed against the Dorsey
Park Boyz.

VOLLEYBALL

BAISS PLAYOFFS

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools are slated
to play their sudden death
junior girls and boys play-
offs 4pm today at St
Augustine’s College.

The winners from the
respective match-ups will
advance to the one-game
championship that is sched-
uled to take place 4pm
Wednesday at SAC.

Volleyball is the final
event on the sporting calen-
dar for the BAISS.

SOFTBALL

GSSSA PLAYOFFS

THE Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association is slated to play
its softball playoffs starting
4pm today at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.

The playoffs were post-
poned last week because of
the rain.

It is the final event on the
GSSSA sporting calendar
for the year.

VOLLEYBALL

BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council is scheduled to hold
a meeting 10am Saturday at
the Tom ‘The Bird’ Grant
Park for all churches inter-
ested in participating in the
2010 volleyball classic.

All interested teams are
urged to have two repre-
sentatives present as the
rules for the classic will be
discussed. The divisions will
include men, women and
17-and-under. There is a
registration fee per team in
each division.

BASKETBALL

RODGERS CAMP

“BUILDING Healthy
Bodies With Positive
minds” is what the 23rd
annual Jeff Rodgers Bas-
ketball Camp intends to do
this year.

This camp will expose
young people to talented
skilled instructors, inspiring
guest speakers, qualified
college coaches and NBA
players who will interact,
inform and perform for the
campers.

The camp has assisted
with promoting positive
character traits, instilling
good sportsmanship skills
and building teamwork
while developing the sound
fundamentals of basketball
in each camper.

The camp kicks off on
Monday, July 5, and is set
to run Friday, July 30, from
9am to 1pm at the HD Col-
burn Gymnatorium at
Bahamas Academy, Wulff
Road.

The camp is designed for
players between the ages of
5-19. Interested persons can
call 393-3381 for further
details.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 15

French Ambassador visits Balamas and

decorates former Honorary French Consul

















El al! : 4
MARC-OLIVIER GENDRY, French Ambassador to the Bahamas with residence in Kingston, Jamaica, recently
visited Nassau and took the opportunity to call on the Brent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister
of Foreign Affairs, John Delaney, Attorney General and Alvin Smith, Speaker of the House of Assembly, as
well as his counterparts from the American, Brazilian and Haitian embassies.

Irene Graham, formerly Iréne von Honingen Huene, Honorary Consul for France in the Bahamas from
1988 to 2003, was honoured by the French Republic for her dedication and work in this function. She
received the insignia of Officier de Ordre National du Mérite from Ambassador Gendry at a reception offered
by Alec Head at Lyford Cay. Ambassador Gendry thanked her for 15 years of loyal and dedicated service to
France and French citizens residing in The Bahamas. Dominique Lefevre, the new Honorary French Consul to
the Bahamas and Peter Graham, spouse of Irene Graham were among guests at the reception.

Pictured (left to right) are: Dominique Lefevre, Ghislaine Head, Ambassador Marc-Olivier Gendry, Irene
Graham, Alec Head, Peter Graham.

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





unancial SHENG Hating

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

palondar contest

speci contest latais listed of our Wwelisite Visit www.fami yguardian.com for

Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for special hints and contest details!

the company’s 2011 calendar will be “A Celebration of Nature”. Photographs may be of any Tita aaa RRR ERROR RRR RTE RTI mR aR |

subject (animate or inanimate), scene or histrocial structure that features a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas. entry 10 f) rll

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 30, 2010. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk
and will not be returned.

Return this form with photos and CD to:

Calendar Contest

Family Guardian Corporate Centre
Village Road & East Bay Street, P.O. Box SS-6232
Nassau, Bahamas




~—__A+ Exepilont

3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village Road and
East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00a.m and 5:00p.m weekdays only. Envelopes should
be marked “Calendar Contest”.

4 Allentries must be accompanied by a signed and completed official entry form, available
at any Family Guardian office, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.
familyguardian.com).








































5 Only colour images willbe considered. Images must be provided as digital files on CD. Digital
images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure















the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality Se
_ JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be Telephone: B H G -
with colour prints (8x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints i LOBSTER TAILS
itted without CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name, EMail:
ject and photo location must be written on the reverse of the print. P.O. Box: MANY of the top restau-
ntries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality Reise i. at = Paradise
hotograph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the s open oe tee ee
; Restaurant Week all this week
ilyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Address: : : :
Mctnedecision of the iud il be final with signature dishes and
I eee uon te Wages will be minal. Island: seafood specialties on a fixed-



ued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs
dits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per

of 5 photos.

Il publication and reproduction rights attached

1 and the company reserves the right to

price menu for one week.

It's all part of the lead-up to
the Great Bahamian Seafood
& Wine Festival set for May 28
and 29.

Fifteen of the top restaurants
in Nassau and Paradise Island
will flex their culinary muscles
during the Great Bahamian
Seafood and Wine Festival with
a range of unique menus.

"The restaurants are going
all out, creating menus that

Number of Photos Entered (a maximum of 5):

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as
a winner in the 2011 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the
property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all
rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos
entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have
not been previously published.



Signature Date



— .



eee
neath

MPN
ACCIDENT
aia

PEACE
OF MIND

Tr: }
MOTOR ’
TRAVEL





ae
siz Ao AGENTS ‘& ye
a jwW.|sjohnson.com

Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 § d Ne 3 6286
Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420

Ne)
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Week

Top restaurants

prepare to show
off seafood skills

Te Sy VD)



offer mouth-watering dishes
made from local seafood --
conch, grouper, crawfish, tuna,
mahi-mahi and stone crab,"
said De Anne Gibson, Ministry
of Tourism, which is partner-
ing with the Downtown Nassau
Partnership and the Ministry of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources for the event.

"In these challenging times,
what makes it even more
appealing is that the best of
Bahamian seafood in the finest
of Bahamian restaurants is
being offered on a greatly dis-
counted pre-fixe menu. What
we truly hope is that our visitors
will take home wonderful mem-
ories of The Bahamas that will
whet their appetite for a return
visit."

According to Downtown
Nassau Partnership managing
director Vaughn Roberts, the
response from restaurants has
been "overwhelming."

"For the first of its kind, I
think we've put together an
impressive list of participating
eateries for restaurant week
and they in turn have assem-
bled an equally impressive
assortment of exotic dishes,"
Roberts said. "Their response
has been overwhelming.”

Some of the best-known
restaurants from August Moon
in Lyford Cay to The Bahami-
an Club at Atlantis, from Gray-
cliff in the heart of historic Nas-
sau to Drifters at Arawak Cay
and nearly a dozen more, chefs
are planning to showcase their
kitchen wizardry with morsels
of the sea.

Conch

Additionally on Saturday,
May 29, thousands are expected
to flock to a full-day of festival
activities including chef demon-
strations, conch cracking con-
test, conch fritter competition,
dozens of seafood stalls, live
musical performances and a
blessing of the fleet. The official
day-long festival that will
include a children's section is
set for Junkanoo Beach East,
just west of the British Colo-
nial Hilton on West Bay Street.
Tickets are $3 and available at
the gate. Bank of The Bahamas
is providing festival dollars for
a cashless, secure environment.

Festival sponsors include
Bank of The Bahamas, Bristol
Cellars, British Colonial Hilton,
Burns House, Caribbean Bot-
tling Co. (Coca-Cola), Diane
Phillips & Associates, Geneva
Brass, Graycliff, John Bull Ltd,
Paradise Fisheries, Phil's Food
Service, Smith & Benjamin and
The Sign Man.

Details about the festival and
restaurant week can be made
available by contacting the
DNP at 326-0992 or e-mail
vroberts@downtownnassau.org
or check out www.downtown-
nassau.org/seafoodfestival html









A SERVING of delicious crab
claws served with peppers, diced
tomato, dill and lemon. Crab
cracker in the background for
breaking in to the hard shells.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY,

ine

MAY 25,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net







KEITH DAVIES

BISX to use UK
recognition as
‘launching pad

)

* UK tax authority designation
to act as marketing tool in
garnering new business for
exchange, granting listed
securities certain
tax exemptions

* Move shows potential
benefits to Bahamas from
TIEA signing, as BISX seeks
other international
designations

* Move seen as ‘validation’ of
exchange’s work, as it moves
to close on two new listings

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) is aiming to use
‘recognition’ from Great
Britain’s tax authority as a
“launch pad” to both attract
new UK business/fund listings
and a similar status with oth-
er countries, the development
proving there are beneficial
spin-offs from signing Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs).

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness that becoming a desig-
nated ‘recognised stock
exchange’ with the UK’s HM
Revenue and Customs
(HMRC) was “a validation of
the work we’re doing”.

He explained that this sta-
tus would enable certain secu-
rities and investment struc-
tures to obtain various tax-
related exemptions from the
UK by virtue of listing on
BISX as a ‘recognised stock
exchange’, a feature that
could prove very attractive in
gaining new business for the
Bahamian exchange.

Pledging that BISX
planned to “go out and mar-
ket it, and let people know
that we have this designa-
tion”, Mr Davies told Tribune
Business: “It’s excellent news
when you get this type of
recognition. It’s a validation
of things that you’re doing. It
indicates you’re on the right
track and of international

SEE page 4B



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Kerzner plans $100m
worth of PI upgrades

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



erzner International

will this year begin a

$100 million project to

renovate its existing

Paradise Island proper-
ties, which include Atlantis and the
One & Only Ocean Club, a move that
is set to create some 400 jobs.

It is unclear whether those posts are
permanent or temporary, although
sources familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business they could be per-
manent, full-time jobs. Regardless, the
move is likely to be seen as a shot of
much-needed confidence for the
Bahamian economy, providing imme-
diate work for the construction indus-
try.

Approvals for the renovations have
been obtained from the Government,
it is understood, with one source telling
Tribune Business: “Kerzner is going to
do $100 million worth of stuff on Par-
adise Island, with some of the work
to start this year.”

Neither George Markantonis,
Kerzner International (Bahamas)
managing director, nor company
spokesman Ed Fields, have returned
Tribune Business calls seeking com-
ment on the issue over the past week,
this newspaper having learned of the
project 10 days ago.

Project could create up to 400 jobs,
sources tell Tribune Business

It is also unclear whether the Par-
adise Island upgrades include the pro-
posed Hurricane Hole project, which
was shelved by Kerzner International
when the recession took hold in 2008-
2009. That project included redevel-
oping the former Hurricane Hole
Shopping Plaza and Marina into a sec-
ond Marina Village-style development,
plus timeshare offering. Such a pro-
ject would certainly create something
close top 400 full-time jobs.

Tribune Business previously report-
ed that Stephen Wrinkle, the Bahami-
an Contractors Association’s (BCA)
president, said he "understood" that
Kerzner International was in the
process of applying for permits so it
could both renovate its existing Par-
adise Island properties and revive its
Hurricane Hole project.

"They're trying to get their approval
process complete so they can get
scheduled work, to my understanding,
on the Hurricane Hole project and
some renovation work. They were
talking about a January start,” Mr
Wrinkle said. "There will be a big
boom, which will make a pleasant
change."

Meanwhile, over at Cable Beach,
the $2.6 billion Baha Mar project is
still awaiting approval from both the
Bahamian and Chinese governments,
Tribune Business has been informed.

It is understood that there are
numerous conditions precedent that
still have to be fulfilled, many of them
similar to Baha Mar’s previous agree-
ments with Harrah’s Entertainment.

The key issue, Tribune Business has
been told, is for Baha Mar to success-
fully resolve the issue over Scotia-
bank’s $170 million syndicated loan
that financed the developer’s acquisi-
tion of the existing Cable Beach prop-
erties.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar's senior
vice-president for governmental and
external affairs, last week confirmed
that talks between the two parties were
continuing, although he provided no
details.

As revealed by this newspaper pre-
viously, Baha Mar needs to success-
fully resolve the situation over the Sco-
tiabank loan, as it is said to be secured
on the existing Sheraton Cable Beach,

SEE page 7B

Police protie
‘more than’ 100
suspected henefit
fraud cases

* NIB amendments
to be tabled in House
in next 60-90 days

* Some $24.24m paid out
to 16,700 unemployed
Bahamians since
programme started,
although monthly
claimants taper
off to just 400

* Benefits paid out $1m
below projections, while
contribution income
ahead of target
year-to-date at $53m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

POLICE are currently
investigating “more than” 100
cases of suspected unemploy-
ment benefit fraud, the
National Insurance Board’s
(NIB) director has told Tri-
bune Business, with some 22



SEE page 6B



and ‘mainstay

Fix revenues

9

of economy

THE Customs Department

Automated plans to slash Customs clearance time

By NEIL HARTNELL

. . :
Tribune Business Editor Department testing new system It

hopes to go live with ‘within a month’

* Ex-finance minister
expresses concern revenue
forecasts too optimistic,
with recession-hit 2009-
2010 predictions
above previous year

* Says Bahamas has greater
medium and long-term
problem than 2010-2011
Budget - ‘fixing an economy
not performing to potential’

* Government likely to use
mixture of revenue
enhancements/spending
freezes to get public
finances back in line,
with suggestions politicians
to lead by example

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance minis-
ter has expressed concern that
the Government’s revenue
forecasts have been too opti-
mistic and failed to account for
the recession, while warning
that the Bahamas needed to
tackle “fundamental structur-

SEE page 8B

is aiming to slash the time tak-
en to clear/process imports
even further once it initiates an
automated process which,
“within a month”, will allow
brokers and frequent importers
access to its computer system
to input goods and duty
amounts.

Responding to assertions by
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president that small
businesses, in particular,
endured an “ordeal” that lasted
one-and-half days in getting
necessary equipment and goods
cleared through Customs,
Comptroller Glenn Gomez

* Comptroller describes Chamber chief’s
Customs complaints as ‘not true’

denied this was true.

“That’s not true,” he told Tri-
bune Business of Khaalis
Rolle’s comments. “That may
have been true a year ago, but
not so now; that’s definitely not
the case now.”

Pointing out that problems
experienced before a broker or
company got to the Customs
Department were not its
responsibility, Mr Gomez said
the process of getting through
its procedures took “‘a matter of

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

hours” if everything was in
order.

While it may take brokers
with multiple entries a day or so
to get everything cleared in
Customs, Mr Gomez said: “The
time taken may be in prepar-
ing the documents to come to
Customs, but once they come
to Customs it’s not a long
process - it’s a couple of hours.”

The Comptroller also

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

OU eA eT



advancer and the other secu-
rities remaining unchanged.
EQUITY MARKET
A total of 50,698 shares

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

trading in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in
11 out of the 24 listed securi-
ties, with three decliners, one

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changed hands, representing
an increase of 6,465 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
44,233 shares.

Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Company
(PRE) was the volume leader,
trading 31,238 shares to see
its stock close the week
unchanged at $10.

First Caribbean Interna-
tional Bank (BAH) (CIB) was
last week's big decliner, trad-
ing 1,300 shares to end the
week with its share price
down $0.75 at $9.85.

AML Foods (AML) was
the sole advancer for the
week, trading 5,000 shares to
end the week with its stock
up $0.01 at $1.05.

BOND MARKET

One FBB Series D Due
May 30, 2015, traded in the
bond market at a total value
of $1,000.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Cable Bahamas (CAB)
released its unaudited finan-
cial results for the quarter
ending March 31, 2010. Net
income and comprehensive
income fell from $7.5 million
in the 2009 first quarter to
$4.7 million, down by $2.8
million or 37.3 per cent.

Total revenues of $22 mil-
lion were up slightly by
$987,000 or 4.7 per cent from
$21.1 million in the 2009 first
quarter, while operating
expenses of $11.9 million
increased by $2 million or 21.2
per cent. Management attrib-
uted this to increased regula-
tory costs associated with the
liberalisation of the telecom-
munications industry, as well
as increased hiring by the
company in anticipation of
new growth opportunities.

It was also noted that both
interest expense, as well as
dividends paid on preferred
shares, totalling $1.8 million,
increased significantly by $1.2
million quarter-over-quarter,
with management indicating
that the higher costs were a
direct result of financing
arrangements relating to the



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e

The Bahamian Stock Market
FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.05 $0.01 5,000 -10.26%
BBL $0.33 -$0.07 2,000 -47 62%
BOB $5.20 -$0.04 1,500 -11.86%
BPF $10.63 $- 0 -1.02%
BSL $9.42 $- 0 -6.36%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $12.07 $- 830 20.94%
CBL $6.99 $- 0 -0.14%
CHL $2.84 $- 0 441%
CIB $9.85 -$0.75 1,300 -1.40%
CWCB $2.42 -$0.22 0 -15.09%
DHS $2.54 $ 6,000 -0.39%
FAM $6.07 $- 150 -6.47%
FBB $2.17 $- 0 -8.44%
FCC $0.27 $- 0 0.00%
FCL $5.08 iS 2,000 6.50%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $9.00 $- 680 -3.02%
ICD $5.59 $- 0 0.00%
JSJ $9.95 $- 0 0.00%
PRE $10.00 $- 31,238 0.00%





International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

Columbus Communications
buy out. Earnings per share
for the quarter were $0.34
compared to $0.38 in the 2009
first quarter, a decline of $0.04
or 10.5 per cent.

Dividend Notes:
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Weekly % Change
10,193.39 -4.02
1,087.69 -4.23
2,229.04 -5.02
9,784.54 -6.48

(CWCB) declared an ordi-
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share, payable on June 7,
2010, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date May 1,
2010.

FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) has declared an ordi-
nary dividend of $0.06 per
share, payable on May 25,
2010, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date May
17, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

OO BUSINESS
Public procurement

reform ‘long overdue’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contrac-
tors Association’s (BCA)
president has praised pro-
posed reforms to the Gov-
ernment’s public procurement
process as bringing “‘a sense of
parity and legitimacy” to pub-
lic construction contract ten-
ders, but urged that they must
be complemented by licens-
ing and certification for the
industry.

Stephen Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business that the pro-
posed reforms to public pro-
curement in the Bahamas,
which have been detailed by
this newspaper over the past
week, were “long overdue”,
and he expressed hope that it
would alleviate problems
experienced by local govern-
ment administrations in the
Family Islands when it came
to evaluating planning/con-
struction submissions.

“Tt’s wonderful,” Mr Wrin-
kle said of the reform plans.
“Tt will certainly instill a sense
of parity and legitimacy to the
tender process for our indus-
try.

“T think in recent times we
have seen a little more trans-
parency in the tender process,
but there’s definitely room for
improvement, and as we
move forward and the scope
of work is enlarged, it’s
important we have this trans-

* Contractors chief says proposals will aid Family Island local
governments in evaluating planning/construction submissions

* But warns that changes can only work in harmony with legislation to govern industry

* Praises FNM for clearing up perceived unfairness/corruption

that has persisted in public construction contracts

parency element to it.”

The reforms, as detailed by
Tribune Business previously,
under the guise of regulations
are designed to comply with
the Bahamas’ obligations
under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) and
the World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO), and introduce
"international best practices"
into the Bahamas.

While the award of many
contracts would still be decen-
tralised, with Procurement
Units and Tenders Commit-
tees much in evidence, the
consultants have recom-
mended the creation of a Pub-
lic Procurement Department,
headed by a Chief Procure-
ment Officer, which would
engage in centralised pro-
curement for goods and ser-
vices used across government
departments.

The recommendations also
involve the creation of a Pub-
lic Procurement Board, which
will be formed from members
appointed by the private sec-
tor and Ministry of Finance,
to oversee all government
procurement.

And, unlike the current

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |,

FLORENTINA

GABRIELLA MARIA HANNA-JOSHI of Stapledon Gardens,
PO. BOX 55-5217, Nassau. Bahamas intend to change

my name to FLORENTINA GABRIELLA MARIA HANNA.
If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Cheet
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
ater than thirty (30) days aller the date of publication ol

This notice



GOVERNM
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

structure, an Independent
Procurement Review Tri-
bunal will be created to
"determine all appeals, mat-
ters and disputes" relating to
government contracts that
come under its jurisdiction.
This will provide a formal
avenue of appeal to disgrun-
tled bidders that currently
does not exist.

Mr Wrinkle told Tribune
Business that the Public Pro-
curement Department could
provide a cadre of “experts
that can better analyse the
tenders”, and provide sound
advice to local government
administrations in the Family
Islands.

“As it stands now, we have
a significant problem in the
Family Islands,” the BCA
president said. “Many times,
local governments are review-
ing these proposals, and in
some instances they don’t
have the knowledge to evalu-
ate them properly from a con-
struction standpoint.

“Tf this [reform] process
moves forward, it will help
alleviate these problems and
give local councils access to
expert opinion and expert
advice, which they seem to
have difficulty in getting. If
they have a Public Procure-
ment Department, it will give
them a good avenue to expert
advice.”

When asked how much
perceived unfairness/corrup-
tion there had been when it
came to construction con-
tracts issued by the public sec-
tor, Mr Wrinkle told Tribune
Business: “I would say that in
the past there’s been a lot of
it, but in recent times the
work I’ve observed being car-

Procurement for Cleaning Supplies for the Year 2010

1.0 The Ministry of Education (hereafter called the “Purchaser”’) now
invites sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement Cleaning
Supplies for the School Year 2010.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from
the Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education,
Headquarters, The Teacher’s Credit Union Building, East Street,
from Monday 3%May, 2010, and obtain further information, at the
second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a
sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed
with the subject bided on (“Cleaning Supplies” ).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first
address, on or before Friday, 21st May, 2010 by 5:00 p.m (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since It may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of
those Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend,
at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th May, 2010 at the first address

below.

(1) The Chairman Tender’
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-2700

6.0 The Ministry reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tender.



ried out has been a lot better
controlled and administered.

“This [FNM] administra-
tion has demonstrated a will-
ingness to provide trans-
parency measures to the point
where the quality of work is
improving. I’ve seen it in the
court buildings in Nassau
Street, the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.”

In addition, Mr Wrinkle
said the tender/bid documents
for the ground floor recon-
struction of the former Ans-
bacher building on down-
town’s Bank Lane, aiming to
turn it into the Supreme
Court building, had been pre-
sented in a “comprehensive
package” that was well-
researched.

The Government, the BCA
president added, was moving
to get ‘value for money’ and
ensure “investment up front is
paying dividends at the back
end. They don’t want to issue
contracts to people who are
not qualified”.

However, Mr Wrinkle said
the proposed public procure-
ment reforms could only work
if his favourite tool, the Con-
tractors Bill, was passed into
law to certify, licence and reg-
ulate the industry.

“All these other things are
spokes to the wheel, but the
actual hub must be licensing
for contractors, and it is only
by passing measures to
licence, regulate and control
the industry, and therefore
the standards, that we will see
best practices applied in the
field,” the BCA president
said, adding that the Bahamas
had been tinkering “around
the edges” of this issue for too
long.

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 3B

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issued by the Registrar General on the 7th day
of May A.D, 2010

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NOTICE

In The Estate WILLIAM LEO RUMNEY,
late of Water Street in the Town of Elizabethtown in
the Country of Essex in the States of New York, one
of the States of the United States of America.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the Undersigned on or before the 6th day of
July, 2010, after which date the Executirix will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only to

the claims of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date hereinbe-
fore metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executrix
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010
SINE
BISX to use UK recognition as ‘launching pad’

FROM page 1B

standard. It’s also important
for the jurisdiction; let’s make
that clear.”

The BISX chief executive
explained that obtaining the
HMRC designation had “tak-
en us a while”, the exchange
having approached the UK
government’s chief customs
and tax authority over the
issue in early to mid-2009.
One of the initial issues, espe-
cially given that the designa-
tion conferred certain tax
benefits on listed entities, was
the absence of a TIEA
between the UK and the
Bahamas.

“One of the stumbling
blocks was that the Bahamas
did not have a TIEA with the
UK, as it does now,” Mr
Davies explained. “When we
initially approached them, it
was made very clear to us that
any recognition would hinge

wre
PUBLIGNOTICE (Gy

~ RELOCATION OF THE SAN SALVADOR &
NORTH ELEUTHERA LOCAL OFFICES ~

For the information of residents in the affected communities, the
National Insurance Board wishes to advise that effective June 1,
2010, its San Salvador Local Office in San Salvador, and North

Eleuthera Local Office in Lower Bogue,

Eleuthera, will be

relocated. The San Salvador office will move from ils current
location in the Carter Williams Building, Queens Highway, to “The
Plaza,” which ts situated near the San Salvador Community Clinic,
also on Queens Highway in Cockburn Town. The North Eleuthera
office will move from its current location in the Glen Albury

Building in Lower Bogue, to “Builders Square,”

Lower Bogue.

Queens Highway,

Minit deca x Marine esol boo

ts

7

at itt



PHD

WAY

on whether the Bahamas ini-
tialled a TIEA with the UK.
Upon the Bahamas signing
with the UK, we were able to
submit our updated applica-
tion and met all the require-
ments the HMRC had to be a
recognised stock exchange.”

Detailing the background
that led to BISX’s initial
approach, the BISX chief
executive added: “We were
approached by an entity that
was seeking to list a number
of securities with us interna-
tionally, and they queried us
on whether they have certain
recognitions.

“We had already looked at
it from another angle, but had
a direct approach from a
client interested in using the
exchange and decided to pur-
sue it further.”

Under the HMRC designa-
tion, securities listed and trad-
ed on BISX meet certain
requirements of the UK’s
Income Tax Act 2007, with
the exchange also regarded
as a recognised stock
exchange for Inheritance Tax
purposes.

“Part of the designation

means that for securities
claiming certain exemptions
and standards in the UK, by
the fact they have their secu-
rities in the Bahamas listed
on our exchange, they will
receive certain designations
and exemptions afforded
them by HMRC for certain
types of investments,” Mr
Davies said. “We qualify to
meet certain exemptions
under their tax code asa
result of entities being listed
on a recognised exchange.”
In turn, this would allow
investment structures and
securities to “set up shop
here, comfortably list here
and comply with home coun-
try” tax laws. In short, a per-
fect tool for BISX to attract
additional business from the

“We’re able to attract busi-
ness that has been precluded
or prevented from using the
exchange, because we did not
qualify for the specific exemp-
tions,” Mr Davies said. “All
the securities listed on our
exchange meet their qualifi-
cations for being listed on a
recognised stock exchange.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Please be informed that

MS. KASHAN DURHAM

is no longer employed with
Advantage Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd.
and is therfore not authorized to do business
in any way on behalf of the company.



THE TRIBUNE

“That is an added feature
we did not have, that we’re
able to offer to structures and
investment vehicles in the
Bahamas. It behooves us to
go out and market it, and let
people know we have the des-
ignation in the Bahamas.”

BISX is hoping the
Bahamian investment funds
industry, plus its internation-
al contacts and service
providers, will assist it in these
efforts.

“We hope this will be a
launch pad for other interna-
tional recognitions, and we
are pursuing others as we
speak,” Mr Davies said.

“There are benefits that
accrue to structures for inher-
itance tax purposes and other
exemptions specific to the UK
tax code. We’re going to go
out there and try and make
this worth our while.”

He praised the work done
by BISX executive Holland
Grant in obtaining the
HMRC designation.

HMRC required BISX “to
have rules and regulations
that are of a standard that
meets international norms of
transparency” when it came
to listings and their gover-
nance. Those regulations also
needed to be “clear and con-
cise”, modern and allow BISX
to proactively regulate the
market and its participants.

“They must have found our
rules met the minimum stan-
dards they had for proper reg-
ulation of a jurisdiction,” Mr
Davies told Tribune Business.
“Tt allows them to look quite
deeply into what you do, and
ask deep questions about how
you operate. We were able to
provide them with concise dis-
closure covering all aspects of
the market and all aspects of
operations, and what we do
day-to-day.”

Meanwhile, Mr Davies said
BISX hoped to announce
another new listing this week,
which is believed to be the
Government’s recent $300
million US dollar-denominat-
ed bond issue. He did not
confirm this, but added that
the exchange was also work-
ing “to close an extra one”.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
IMPORTANT NOTICE

NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY

ALL PERSONS WHO HAVE COMPLETED HIGH SCHOOL IN THE BAHAMAS

AND WHO HAVE OBTAINED

FIVE (£2) BGOCSE AT GRADES A, BL OR C

(inclusive of Wathenmaties anid

ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE A NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY TO ATTEND THE

COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.

ALL AWARDS WILL COVER TUITION AND LAB FEES AND WILL ONLY BE
PAYABLE TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

TO QUALIFY, PERSONS MUST:

- SUBMIT A COMPLETED APPLICATION FORM (ON OR BEFORE MAY 28, 2010)

- MUST BE BAHAMIAN CITIZEN

- HAWE BGCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND MATHEMATICS AT GRADES
4, 6,08 G INCLUDED IN THE FIVE SUBJECTS REQUIRED

- HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

INTO AN APPROVED COLLEGE LEVEL PROGRAMME

- PURSUE 4

1 ITH

- MAINTAIN A 3.0 GPA PER SEMESTER AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TERTIARY DEPARTMENT
TEACHERS & SALARIED WORKERS COOPERATIVE CREDIT UNION BUILDING

EAST STREET SOUTH & EAST-WEST ADGA AW

P.0. BOX S-F91a'14
ASSAD, BAHAMAS

Tel: 302-2700

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MAY 28, 2010

Application forms can also be downloaded
from www. bahamaseducation.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

explained that not everyone
who came to Customs had to
go through its Valuation
Department, which largely
dealt with high-end, luxury
goods that attracted the major
tariffs, such as cars.

And he took issue with Mr
Rolle’s complaints about long
queues to pay the duty due,
telling Tribune Business that
there were always three
cashiers on duty and “no need
for long lines. There’s no need
for people to be hanging
around here”. There were also
three to four windows where
entries were submitted, with
one allocated for dealing with
queries.

“In fact, we’re looking with-
in a month or so, once we get
the electronic processing, at cut-
ting that [waiting time] even
more,” Mr Gomez told this
newspaper.

“What that would mean is
that persons who frequent cus-
toms, brokers and frequent
importers, are given a password
to access our system and key
in the information” on their
imports and the duty payable.

Once that is picked up by
Customs personnel and veri-
fied, Mr Gomez said the busi-
nesses and brokers involved
would be able to come in, pay
and then pick-up the relevant
shipments.

“We’re looking to that to
give us tremendous turn-
around,” the Comptroller
added. “We’ve been working
on it for a couple of months,
and just about worked out all
the bugs. In a week or so, we’ll
be doing live testing with a cou-
ple of brokers and large
importers, and once complete,
we’ll go public with it.

“Tm not content with what
we’re doing now. The thing is
to modernise and move
processes forward. This is not
the 80s and 90s. This is 2010.”

With the new automated sys-
tem, Mr Gomez said brokers
and large importers would just
have to leave their offices to
pay the required duty, before
going to collect the shipment,
thus cutting time spent in deal-
ing with Customs.

And while paying the
required duty, Mr Gomez said
the importer could dispatch
personnel to the dock to pick

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 5B

Automated plans to slash Customs clearance time

up the goods at the same time.
Customs officers there would
be able to tell via computer
once the required duty was
paid.

In his comments to Tribune
Business last week, Mr Rolle
told this newspaper that the
process of clearing imported
goods and equipment (for use
in a business) could be "an
ordeal in and of itself", espe-
cially for small businesses, as
clearance could take up to one-
and-a-half days.

"That's a cost, a direct cost,
and I'd like that to be min-
imised and the processes of
Customs to be more transpar-
ent, predictable and efficient,"
he added.

Currently, Mr Rolle said
many small Bahamian compa-
nies were unable to afford to

hire customs brokers to handle
their imports. They had to first
fill out the relevant forms, take
them to a broker to determine
the applicable duty rates, and
then go to the Valuation
Department at Customs.

Once Valuation had accept-
ed the forms and duty rates,
businesses then had to go to
another section of Customs
which then accepted/rejected
whatever Valuation had done.
Finally, businesses had to stand
in “a long line" to pay their
bills, then return to another sec-
tion to claim their products.

"It's burdensome, anda
nightmare for small business-
es," Mr Rolle said. "Big busi-
nesses can manage because
they can afford brokers, but for
small businesses it becomes a
real burden.

NOTICE

In The Estate Anne C. Doyle
late of 3640 North Ocean Drive in the
City of Singer Island in the Country of
Palm Beach in the State of Florida one
of the States of the United States of

America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send before the 24th day of June,
2010, after which date the Administrators will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only
to the claims of which they shall then have had

notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date herein-
before metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators

Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas



ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE









SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department’s Triage, Registration and Patient Walting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic.

Effective Tuesday May !/th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed.

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services.

For more information please call 502-7885 for A&E Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic,

al i



THE INSURANCE COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Analyst

The newly formed Insurance Commission (a statutory corporation) is seeking analysts

to assist with the on-site and off-site examination of insurance companies and
intermediaries.

Responsibilities

* Reports to the Chief Analyst/Superintendent

* Responsible for the supervision of other analysts /directly responsible for
the examination of licensees to ensure that licensees are compliant with
prudential requirements through on-site and off-site examinations

¢ Prepare/vet the preparation of examination reports

* Prepare/vet/approve on-site/off-site financial analysis, letters and other
correspondence as necessary

* Ensure that licensees databases are maintained

¢ Supervision of other analysts/directly responsible for the assessment of new

applications for licensees

* Contributes to the refining of supervisory methodology, policy development

and the formulation of new/revised legislation and the related guidelines
* Provide advice and information to licensees and the wider public regarding
complaints and questions about licensees’ performance

Qualifications/Skills

* Professional Accountant / MBA in accounting /Certification in Insurance/
experience in the insurance industry

¢ Financial analysis skills

¢ Excellent leadership, communications, teamwork and organization skills

* Proficient in Microsoft office products to intermediate level

* Ability to work independently and multi-task

* Excellent written and oral communications skills

* Knowledge of insurance industry an asset

Compensation
A competitive compensation package commensurate with relevant experience and

qualifications.

Deadline
31 May 2010

Application including comprehensive resume to be submitted by e-mail addresses to:
info@icb.gov.bs



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and
implementation of a strategic public relations and communication program together
with the effective and efficient planning and execution of all corporate events and
activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

Assisting with the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate
Programs plan to support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Overseeing the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations
programs, plan and budget;

Assisting with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation
and, where necessary, the wider community;

Preparing and distributing the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directing press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press
releases, photographs, fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management
and Media Representatives;

Coordinating the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion
surveys;

Providing assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in
writing speeches, preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluating and assessing customer complaints, queries and disseminating
information to management;

Assisting with the development, implementation and management of external
communication efforts;

Coordinating marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the
external Public Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifying and liaising with service providers to secure speakers, presenters
and entertainment for Corporate events;

Liaising with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e.
awards, invitations, prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as
necessary and maintaining an inventory of the same;

Preparing and distributing all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices)
relative to Corporate activities, as necessary;

Creating and updating all standard operation procedures for all activities, as
necessary;

Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of
bills for all events and activities as necessary;

Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate
activities;

Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company
newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information
relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business
Communication, or equivalent.

A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;

Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management
and public groups;

Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities

Excellent time management and organizational skills

Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications
Good analytical skills

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Police probe ‘more than’ 100
suspected benefit fraud cases

FROM page 1B

amendments to the NIB Act
and accompanying regulations
expected to be tabled in the

House of Assembly within the
next 60-90 days.

Confirming that NIB exec-
utives had met recently with
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force on the issue, Algernon

IN THE ESTATE OF LAGLORIA
MILLER nee RUSSELL a.k.a.
LAGLORIA ELOUISE RUSSELL
a.k.a. GLORIA ELOUISE RUSSELL
late of Water Street, Big Pond in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is herby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 9th day of June, A.D. 2010,

after which date the Executrix will proceed
to distribute the estate having regard only
to the claims of which she shall have had

notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make
full settlement on or before the date
hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 24th day of May, A.D. 2010

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas



“Mieceting the needs of advertisers

and readers motivates me to da

a good job. The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PROOUCTION MANAGER

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune
My Voice. My Hewspaper!

Cargill said: “They are cur-
rently investigating more than
100 cases of unemployment
benefit fraud.

“Once we detect fraud we
pass things over to the police.
Fraud is detected when con-
tributions come in for benefit
claimants, so we know they
must be working.”

Still, Mr Cargill said the
unemployment benefit initia-
tive had, in NIB’s view, ful-
filled its aim of providing
much-needed income support
to Bahamians struggling to
make ends meet after being
laid-off, or unable to find
work, as a consequence of the
recession.

Since the Government
started the initiative last year,
Mr Cargill said some 16,168
Bahamians had received
unemployment benefit, with
NIB paying out a collective
$24.24 million to date. That
has been funded by the $20
million transfer from NIB’s
medical branch that was
effected last year, and going
forward will be financed by
the collective 1 per cent
increase in contribution rates
- split evenly between
employer and employee - that
will take effect imminently.

Mr Cargill, though, con-
firmed that the number of
new registrants for the unem-

TECHNOLOGY

COMPANY LIMITED

New Office Hours

Monday - Friday

9am -

6pm

Saturdays
10am - 4pm



ployment benefit had
“tapered off significantly” -
possibly reflecting the
reduced pace of lay-offs. The
average number of monthly
claimants in 2010 had
declined to 400 per month,
compared to 1,500 a month
in 2009.

“People are graduating, and
very few new people are
being added on,” Mr Cargill
said. “The new qualifying
rules will apply to newly-qual-
ified unemployed persons.”

Reflecting on the unem-
ployment benefit initiative as
a whole, the NIB director
said: “It has gone better than
expected in terms of manage-
ment of the programme.
We’ve been able to provide
assistance for 16,000.

“We estimated that total
expenditure would be $20 mil-
lion last year, and it was
approximately $20.7 million
last year, so in terms of expen-
diture we were pretty close to
expectations.”

Besides dealing with short-
term issues, NIB has also
been looking towards the
Fund’s long-term sustainabil-
ity, and in line with recom-
mendations from its eighth
actuarial review and 2005
Social Security Reform Com-
mission report, is moving to
implement 22 amendments to
achieve that effect.

Confirming that discussions
had been held on the issue
with the Chamber of Com-
merce, employer groups and
the trade unions, Mr Cargill
told Tribune Business: “We
are in the present stages of
drafting the amendments to
the NIB Act, and expect that
in 60-90 days that the minister
will table those in the House

of Assembly.”
Mr Cargill said two critical
amendments were the

changes in the insurable wage
ceiling and the number of
weekly contributions required

to be eligible for retirement
benefit.

On the former, NIB will
raise the insurable wage ceil-
ing from $400 per week to
$500 per week in January
2011, followed by a further
rise from $500 to $600 in July
2012. Thereafter, the insur-
able wage ceiling will be
increased every two years in
July, using a formula calcu-
lated by the change in the
Bahamas Retail Price Index
over that time plus 2 per cent.

On the retirement benefit
side, NIB is moving to
increase the number of con-
tributions required from 150
weeks or three years to 500
weeks or 10 years.

“These changes also mean
higher benefits and more rel-
evant benefits,” Mr Cargill
said. “We want to make sure
benefits are relevant.”

For 2010 to-date, the NIB
director said benefits paid out
were $1 million below fore-
cast, largely due to the intro-
duction of the Med-4 form
last year, requiring employ-
ers to confirm that workers
were genuinely off work sick
or injured. That resulted in a
$3 million reduction in such
claims in 2009, a trend that
has continued into 2010.

On the contributions side,
NIB was ahead of forecast for
year-to-date with some $53
million received, having beat-
en its predictions for last year
also.

Mr Cargill added that NIB
was committed to imple-
menting the changes to guar-
antee its long-term relevancy
today.

“We want to continue to
reduce the operating expense
base and, even more impor-
tantly, we want to improve
customer service. The higher
the level of customer service
is, the more pleased the
Bahamian public will be with
NIB,” Mr Cargill said.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Procurement for School Furniture for the Year 2010

1.0 The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’) now
invites sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School
Furniture for the School Year 2010.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from
the Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education,
Headquarters, The Teacher’s Credit Union Building, from Monday
3%May, 2010, and obtain further information, at the second
address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a
sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed

with the subject bided on (“School Furniture” ).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first
address, on or before Friday, 21st May, 2010 by 5:00 p.m (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since It may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of
those Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend,
at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th May, 2010 at the first address

below.

(1) The Chairman Tender’
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-2700

6.0 The Ministry reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tender.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 7B



Kerzner plans $100m
worth of PI upgrades

FROM page 1B

Wyndham Nassau and Crystal
Palace Casino and associated
real estate parcels at Cable
Beach.

Potential

The potential complication
is that real estate also includes
parcels upon which China Ex-
Im Bank will take security for
its $2.5 billion loan.

The Chinese bank will need

those assets delivered ‘free of
encumberances’', to quote
legal parlance, which is why
Baha Mar and Scotiabank
need to resolve their loan sit-
uation.

Scotiabank has already
extended the due date twice -
from December 31, 2009, to
end-January 2010, and then
to March 31, 2010 - to give
the developer time to seal the
deal with Beijing. That was
concluded on March 30, 2010,
and possibly explains Baha
Mar's haste to seal the deal

with the China Export-Import
Bank and China State Con-
struction by that date.

Tribune Business also pre-
viously reported how Baha
Mar and its principals, the

Lyford Cay-based Izmirlian
family, had offered to make
Scotiabank "whole" and
repay the entire loan, having
previously offered to pay
down $85 million or 50 per
cent during proposals that
were swapped between the
two sides.

Reported

UU TT 0/7 UT
















an
ane

NAD

Nassau Airport

Devslopment Company

Manager, Commercial Properties

The Nassau Aiport Development Company [MAD is seeking
candd aie for the powtion of Manager Comnencal Peapertes. The
position ig eeaponsitie for the eanagarent and development of
commarcdal operations [ratal, food and beverage, services and
space leases) al fhe Lynden Pinding Iniematonal farport

Key Penile induce Butane peat lide lee Managerial af all
tenant leases, devclooing the danaitment’s annual business plan
and budget, participate in land usaidevelopment plan for te airport,
anahzing key performance measures for concessionaines and work
wih congoraics to develop shekegee iy masini revenues

SiG.

BEA, Aviation

SUPERVISOR

Aircraft Service International Inc., a leading global
aviation service company has an opportunity for a
Supervisor responsible for supervising and coordinat-
ing operational functions of the fuel facility at our
Nassau, Bahamas location. Duties will include staff
supervision, ensuring effective operation of air car-
rier fueling functions and operation of the fuel facili-
ties and administrative functions.

This is a hands-on position requiring attention to de-
tail and safety while also requiring a great deal of
physical demand. The successful candidate will
have a minimum of 2 years related experience or
equivalent combination of education and experi-
ence. Must have the ability to communicate well
both verbally and written, excellent problem solving
skills, computer literate and possess a valid driver's
license as well as any required Airport identification.

To apply, please email resume to asignassau@ya-
hoo.com.

Please no phone calls or agencies

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/1852
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY SIDE

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Four hundred and Seventy-six and Sixty-one
hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister Rock Road north
of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE of the Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon

Rolle
NOTICE

The Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle of the Smith Hill
Settlement of the Island of Andros one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate comprising Four hundred and Seventy-
six and Sixty-one hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister
Rock Road north of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas bounded Northwardly
by land now or formerly the property of James Brisbane and
running Four Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy-three and
Seventy-eight Hundredths (4,973.78) feet on the Eastwardly by
the Sea and running thereon Four thousand Eight hundred and
Fifty-seven and Eighty-seven Hundredths (4,857.87) feet on the
Southwardly by 130 feet wide Road Reservation and running
thereon Three thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety-seven and
Forty-four Hundredths (3,997.44) feet on the Westwardly by
land now or formerly the property of Joseph Johnson and running
thereon One thousand Four Hundred and Forty-eight and Seventy
Hundredths (1,448.70) feet and by land now or formerly the
property of A. Speirs and running thereon Three thousand Three
Hundred and Three Hundredths (3,300.03) feet which said piece
parcel or plot of land describe above has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimension as are shown on the diagram or plan
recorded at the Department of Land of Surveys under the Land
Surveyors Act 1975 as Plan Number 537 AN of the said diagram
or plan which is coloured pink and prepared by Hubert Williams
in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the Cityof Nassau
on the Island of New Providence.

The Petitioners Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle, claim to be the
owner in of the fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and have applied to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas under S.
3 of the Quieting Titles, Act in the above to have her title to the
said land investigated and declared.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street, N.P., and
at the Chambers of Michelle Y. Roberts & Co., Christie Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or any adverse claims not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of Twenty-one (21) days after the final
publication of these presents file in the said Registry of the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of their claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed in the said Registry of the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the above Michelle Y. Roberts &
Co. statement of such claim. Failure of any such to file and serve
a statement of such claim by the above time will operate as a bar
to such claim.
Dated the 25th day of November A. D., 2009

MICHELLE Y. ROBERTS & CO.
Attorney for the Petitioners



GUALIFICATIONS

«Posi secondary education in business, commerce, commercial
a6 oF equivalent

* Five Wears MNSSEMeA Oe Super ory epee noe if a girrilay
aoe LGN

* Experience in tha analysis. of slatishoal and fnarcml dita

* Ability to handle mulbple lasks and interact professionally with staf,
takehoders and chants

* Retel industry and / or commercal lew experience would be an

Meer =

For more details, please visit the PEOPLE section of
NOTICE is hereby given that JIFEMA RAPHAEL of #23 our website al wind i,
PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18" DAY OF MAY, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

RMR BRC
just call 902-2371 today!

Fyou are quaidied and iniwesiod, ploose cabin your
sume by Mary 26, 20410 io

Manager, People

Nassau Alport Developement Company
Fo. Box AF 6228

Nassau. Bahamas

of @fhail peophginad.ba

Julius Bar

abides

Julius Bae Groug, the laading dedicated Waalh Manapar ia siabing cardielatan Tex
the position of ;

KINGSWAY ACADEMY

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER FOR EXTERNAL ASSET MANAGERS -
FRENCH & SPANISH SPEAKING DESH

Core Ries pores (bilities:

ELEMENTARY
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS

Markel EAMs and Boers leit:

Negotiate and conclude coopecaion apmeenents

Gat-un of coopacaion (Oeerations, Conplianca, Logedics, Docenentation |
Susser EAMG in fer da By Paths, eh aed Pee Leg
Exstableh, verty, conbol rebocensios naports

Polow-up on Eas, agent, inirocucars, naport bo hererchy

Endabdeshy per tinagsaiy ie Gurkpatira) preci ered HAL prgepetcters

Cooperate Gosely with hierchy and Ak! desks

(Cooperaie and sapped local management and PH wails

hold
Entrance Examinations for all elementary
grade levels:- K4 to Grade 6 from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon on Saturday, May 29, 2010. Parents

Kingsway Academy Elementary will

Privat Clarita

Agung (eierohip marcperend by prea chants onlrselyoed thy raaperinn
Tarkers:

- Assume Advan for seca prvi cans

- Market private chenis suilabla thesa markets

are asked to collect application forms from

the Elementary Desk in the Administration Sih
Excebent openi@abional Headership and compunecrdon stills
Exleraia caper oe in bani fig ares
Minirtun 5 paar eeperience in cherd paiadirtiy peereagerren| (EA's aed peri

before the testing date. Application forms may —

Sobd knowsindge and mxpenonoa in iniiment acvisory

building between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. daily,

also be accessed from the school’s website

www.kingswayacademy.com (see Document
Downloads).

Feraign Languages
Fiusel (eriten are Geel) in Fisich, Eaghea 4h Sperigh, Geran aa aaeel

Wheeesied Candeeke: shoukd ore) 8 cope of ese eecuree bey di lunes 2072, 0 She tention it

BY HAND: By BAIL:

Parvceal 4 Confidenty Pessoal & Covideria
doar-Hace F nile; Aiuto! Versace
dalvs Baer Bank 4 rest Banaraa| Lid P.O. Boe Hela
Lingac Lender Montague Foreshore Fim, geri.
Egel Bay GesHe

Key, Hahareg

For further information, kindly contact the school at

telephone numbers:- 324 - 5049 or 324 - 2158

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Maries an hark

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 21 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,568.20 | CHG -0.34 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD 2.82 | YTD % 0.18
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.05 1.05 0.00 0.250
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050,
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 5.24 5.20 -0.04 0.598
0.33: Benchmark o.33 O.33 0.00 O.8FF
a. 1S Bahamas Waste 1S 3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.1F 2.1F 0.00 0.055,
9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07 12.07 0.00 1.408
2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84 2.84 0.00 0.249
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.99 6.99 0.00 0.460
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.44 2.42 -0.02 0.111

0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
o.13e

Previous Close Today's Close Change

1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00
8.75 Finca 9.00 9.00 0.00
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 9.85 9.85 0.00
3.75 Focol (S$) 5.08 5.08 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 O27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00 -2.945 0.000
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000

S2wk-Hi Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

S2wk-Low

CFAL Securities Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD%
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4674 1.99
2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9020 0.52
1.4611 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5315 1.62
2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.0368 2.57
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.5654 1.48
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, s1

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.515417

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.499936

Last 12 Months %
1.3758
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

107.5706 3.45
105.7706 3.99
1.1080 4 .eF

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.4176380

1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

41.0615: -0.61
1.1050 Aaa
9.43839 1.52

10.0000, 10.6709 -0.SS 31-Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 31-Mar-10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Ask $ - Selling
Last Price - La:

Weekly Vol. - Trad
EPS $ - A compan

ahted price for daily volume
ighted prise for daily volume

Change - Cha fi day to day
Daily Vol. -N d today

hare paid in the last 12 months

jed by the last 12 month earnin: as
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

FROM page 1B

al” problems that were pre-
venting its economy perform-
ing to potential.

James Smith, who was min-
ister of state for finance in the
2002-2007 Christie administra-
tion, questioned whether offi-
cials were following revenue
trends from previous years, giv-
en that according to Central
Bank of the Bahamas data, the
Government’s 2009-20210 Bud-
get projected it would earn $14
billion from revenue and grants.

That projection was calculat-
ed at a time when the Bahami-
an economy was already in
deep recession, and during a

2008-2009 financial year in
when revenue was already com-
ing in below target - it finished
the year at $1.324 billion, some
$245 million short of forecast.

Yet 2009-2010 revenues were
projected to be almost $76 mil-
lion higher than the previous
year, according to the Central
Bank, and Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business: “TI think it has
been kind of a feature of the
Budget over the last several
years that the revenue projec-
tions have always been the
problem.......

“T think that whoever is pro-
viding the revenue forecasts is
over-optimistic, which might be
a bit charitable, or not following
revenue trends over the previ-

ous year.”

Mr Smith said it was prob-
lematic to continue projecting
revenue growth in an economy
where the tax base had shrunk
as a result of the recession, as
there was “no buoyancy” in
revenues due to the lack of eco-
nomic activity and trade.

Even increased or new taxes
would have minimal to no pos-
itive impact on the Govern-
ment’s revenues for the same
reason - a reduced tax base and
economic activity.

Pointing out that all Bahami-
ans knew the economy had
been mired in recession for
some 18 months, contracting by
between 4-5 per cent in 2009,
Mr Smith said of the revenue








> NCE re

The National Insurance Board



of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas





Reminder to Employers

The National Insurance Board wishes to remind all Employers when completing



the monthly Contribution Statements (C10 Forms), to please ensure that the following




information is provided for each employee:

First and last name;



National Insurance number;



Number of weeks worked dunng the month;



The insurable earnings (salary) for the month up to the ceiling, and whether

the salary/ wages are paid weekly (WV) or monthly (M).




The above information will ensure the accurate and timely posting of employees’



contribution records to their accounts. Your cooperation in this regatd will be

appreciated. If you need further assistance, please feel free to contact the

Inspectorate or Contabutions Departments, located in the Board’s Clittord Darling

Complex, Ballou Hill Road, or at telephone number 502-1500,



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Procurement for General Supplies for the Year 2010

1.0 The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser”) now
invites sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement Cleaning
Supplies for the School Year 2010.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from
the Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education,
Headquarters, The Teacher’s Credit Union Building, East Street
from Monday 3May, 2010, and obtain further information, at the
second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a
sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed
with the subject bided on (“General Supplies” ).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first
address, on or before Friday, 21st May, 2010 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since It may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of
those Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend,
at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th May, 2010 at the first address

below.

(1) The Chairman Tender’

forecasts: “The danger of that is
that if the revenue projections
are off too much, you can real-
ly dig a hole for yourself
because revenue projections are
what you base expenditure on

“Government might want to
revisit that, take a closer look at
that, so they no not overshoot,
which could have the impact of
widening the deficit. All the ele-
ments that generate revenue
are down, and consequently
even if you put taxes up you
may get diminishing returns as
a result of a lower tax base.”

In fairness to the Govern-
ment, revenue forecasting is not
a precise science, and adminis-
trations throughout the world
have had difficulty in predicting
the depth and breadth of this
current recession - not to men-
tion its impact on the public
finances.

Tomorrow’s 2011-2012 Bud-
get is likely to see the Ingra-
ham administration undertake

a combination of revenue
enhancing/expenditure freez-
ing measures in a bid to set the
Bahamas’ key fiscal ratios,
namely the debt-to-GDP and
deficit ratios, back on a more
sustainable path.

The Government will likely
be seeking to avoid any public
sector lay-offs via a combina-
tion of freezes on pay, promo-
tions and increments, amid
speculation that the Prime Min-
ister and members of his Cabi-
net, plus MPs, will lead by
example in taking salary cuts
themselves - driving home the
reality of the situation to the
Bahamian people, and showing
the Government’s serious
intent.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith sug-
gested that besides being con-
cerned about the 2010-2011
Budget, the Bahamas also
needed to raise its head to the
medium and long-term, and
address the structural problems

THE TRIBUNE

that were holding the economy
- and, by extension, government
revenues - back.

“What we are faced with is
more of a medium and long-
term problem, because while
we’re looking at the Budget
and what’s going to happen in
the near-term, there’s some
fundamental structural issues
we have to address,” he
explained.

“There’s been no real growth
in air arrivals in the last decade,
and that’s the mainstay of the
economy. That has to be fixed,
and that could be a question of
service or the cost of a vaca-
tion, which brings into utilities
and airlift costs.

“So while we’re dealing with
this [Budget], you’re really
dealing with larger and more
structural problems - an econ-
omy that’s not performing to
its potential. We’re all in this
together. We’ve got our work
cut out for us.”





NOTICE

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT ALL
BAF FINANCIAL NASSAU
OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED ON
WEDNESDAY MAY 26 , 2010 FROM
9:00 A.M. — 1:00 P.M.

FOR THE COMPANY’S ANNUAL
AWARDS CEREMONY

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED.

BA= BAF FINANCIAL





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at wew.cob.edu.bs

FACULTY OF PURE & APPLIED SCIENCES

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS CAMPBELL

Maritime Summer Camp - 2010

28th June -

16th July, 2010

Sth & 9th Graders

Interested in:

Marine Transportation
Marine Stiance
Marine Engineering

Contact your guidance
counsellor for information
of collect an application
packet tram the Office of

SHIPPING

the Dean, Faculty Pure &
Applied Sciences,

Room 4-80 at the

College of The Bahamas -
Telephone: 302-1400 or
302-4 D065

Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Application deadline:

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section Friday, 4th June, 2010

Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-2700

Camp Fee: $90.00

Space is limited

6.0 The Ministry reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tender.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 9B



The Tribune









E

: Pe
ee

AN ENVIRONMENTALLY
FRESH EXPERIENCE

‘My Ocean’ soaps will add a healthy and unique experience to a bubble bath

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



ANYA Klonaris Azevedo

and her husband Eduardo

Azevedo brought their
artistic capabilities, love, and
respect for the ocean together
to form a company that spe-
cialises in crafting beautiful
handmade glycerin soap bars
that are healthy for the skin and
add a unique experience to a

bubble bath.

So instead of lathering with Amer-
ican made soap bars, giving these glyc-
erin environmentally friendly bars
made by My Ocean a try will leave
the skin looking and feeling great.

The exclusion of animal by prod-
ucts, sticking only to vegetable base
combinations is what leaves the skin
healthy, soft, and ravishing.

Tribune Health spoke to Tanya
Klonaris, owner of My Ocean, who
explained why it is better to use soaps

that are made mainly with vegetable
byproducts.

“The main differences between ani-
mal byproduct soaps and vegetable
soaps are that vegetable oil soaps are
chemically superior and can be of
higher quality than soaps made with
animal fats. Vegetable oils are much
more readily absorbed by the skin
while animal oils have been found to
clog pores and aggravate certain skin
conditions, such as Eczema,” Mrs
Klonaris said.

Their use of all natural coconut oils,
safia oils, glycerin and natural fra-
grances is what makes soap made by
My Ocean better to use on the skin
than some of the store bought brands.

However, the presence of glycerin
along with other chemicals is what
locks moisture into the skin. It also
aids in relieving symptoms of skin con-
ditions including eczema and psoriasis.

Glycerin is a colourless neutral
sweet tasting thick liquid that helps
to attract moisture to the skin. Most
commercial soaps remove this chemi-
cal for profiting purposes.

“There are many benefits to using

glycerin soaps. Commercial soaps (the
ones you get in the foodstore) remove
the glycerin which is a natural by-
product of the soap making process
for use in more profit producing
lotions and creams etc. Our soaps have
extra glycerin added to them. This
helps to make it clear, and also makes
it a lot more moisturising,” Mrs
Klonaris said.

Mrs Klonaris said some of the ben-
efits of glycerin are:

¢ Moisturising Aid- Glycerin soap
helps to attract moisture to the skin by
absorbing the moisture in the air,
causing your skin it to stay softer.

¢ Sensitive Skin - People with sensitive
skin find that glycerin is gentle on
their complexion.

¢ Dissolves Easily - This soap quickly
dissolves in water, making it easy to
wash off. It doesn't leave behind a
film like heavier soaps do.

Men and Sex: Why do men pay for sex?

"WHY do men pay for sex?’ is such
an interesting question and one that
usually provokes an impassioned
debate. Today, even amongst
researchers, psychologists and partici-
pants of the sex trade, there are still
varying theories; despite it being an
age-old practice.

We only have to look around the
world, and view different cultures to
see that the acceptance of buying and
selling sex varies considerably.

In countries where prostitution,
pimping and ownership of a brothel
are illegal, participants can find them-
selves facing prosecution. A few exam-
ples of such countries are: China, South
Africa, and Saudi Arabia. Interesting-
ly, in Sweden, it is not against the law
to sell sex, but it is illegal to buy. The
rational being that it is not the women
who are the driving force behind the
trade, but the demand from men.

Other cultures legalise prostitution
but add some restrictions. They require
the women to register and have regu-
lar health examinations, but prohibit
pimping and brothel ownership.

Then, there are countries that
legalise but regulate all sex services.
Registration, health examinations, and
age limits are usually included with a
ban on forced prostitution. These
countries include Germany, The



ay
Netherlands, New Zealand, and
Turkey.

Despite legal discrepancies, all seem
to agree that there is not a specific
type of man who pays for sex. All con-
cur that there is no particular profes-
sion or socioeconomic group that
would accurately describe a typical
‘john’. However, there seems to be a
general theme of 'risk taking’, and for
the man who is secure in his invinci-
bility, this is often demonstrated by
the refusal to use condoms.

“Why pay for sex when you can get
it for free?” is often the argument put
forth by those trying to understand
the motivation. Two of the most hot-
ly contested arguments are intimacy
issues versus dominance over women.
Critics describe it as an immoral,
aggressive patriarchal behaviour that
exploits women as a commodity.
Described by many as ‘the ultimate
antifeminism act’ to make a woman

powerless, and force her to complete
submission. Others suggest that we
pay for other pleasurable activities
and that this is just harmless role-play
for a fee.

Research, however, confirms that
for many prostitutes it is not harm-
less’, and psychological and physical
abuse accompanies their work. Very
few choose the profession, but are
drawn in due to poverty, fear, and
addictions. Knowing this, it would
seem not only compassionate, but also
humanitarian to provide help to these
women.

In sex therapy, we know that the
role of the sex worker often soothes
many common psychological prob-
lems. Being paid for emotional com-
fort, empathy and sexual fulfillment on
demand, makes her services very
appealing. Men, who have relation-
ship problems, have a desire to exper-
iment, or perhaps feel continuously
rejected might find it easier in such a
setting. Romance and love may also
be missing and for some men this tem-
porarily fills an emptiness. This can
be seen by the fact that many return to
the same woman time and time again.

“But is it not the same as cheat-
ing?” is another question put forward,
particularly by women. Certainly,
secrecy and deception often accom-

¢ Skin Disorders - Those who suffer
from such skin disorders, such as

symptoms by washing with glycerin
All-Ages Cleanser because it's
gentle on the skin.

My Ocean has taken a different :
approach to soap making, ensuring :
that each bar is infused with products :

that unlock the richness of natural : ae :
: arthritis are the following:

resources in the Bahamas.

With their creamy coconut base :

combinations like the original Bahami- +” .
an soap scroll, Bay Rum Coconut, Jas- ¢ Pal and swelling around the
mine Coconut, Rice Flower Shea and : crc
Bahama Cherry, that literally looks ; C@US¢ pain with every step.
and smells like their name suggests,the =

product will leave a sensational fin- : ‘ ee
: mation of the joints that can

ish.

Art is definitely part of this process. !

The soaps are made in cute decorative : : :
: on the degree of inflammation

shapes, colors and sizes.

“We have been cultivating a com- + :
pany whose mission has been to use ! results in slow, steady destruc-
our creativity in the service of original :
and high quality products that are :

infused with the particular smells, =

colours, textures, shapes, and spirit of : as hard various sized bumps

> on toes, heels or toe joints that

The Bahamas,” she said.

“T think that people deserve to !
make themselves feel good, and our +
soaps are designed for that purpose. :

They smell divine, they look beautiful + :
and most importantly they are really : C4” be addressed with a rock-
good for the skin. They make a great :

gift for yourself or someone else,” she * the pressure off the big toe.

: The right combination of

said.

My Ocean is a Bahamian grown :!
bath, body and home manufacturing :
company with retail outlets in down- ¢ the pressure off the nodules,
town Nassau and at the Lynden O ;
Pindling International Airport. They ¢
have expanded to produce soap bars, ° :
body ie ere a ae range of can- ¢ cardiovascular problems. Ask

dles, ceramics, textiles and home décor ° ee
: about footwear specifically

: designed for the arthritic feet.

(SY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS 2

> toanimproved quality of life,
pany such behaviour, and depending :
on the state of the relationship, it can :
have far reaching consequences. Feel- :
ings of anger, betrayal, lack of trust are !
similar to discovering any type of infi- :
delity. However, there are some cou- }
ples that reach a mutual understanding +
in order to preserve the relationship. :
They may have decided that this is :
the best way for both of their needs to !

accessories.

be met, and it works for them.

Buying sex can become very addic- :
tive, particularly for those who have a :
compulsive nature. Loss of income, :
productivity at work, neglecting per- ¢
sonal health and relationships are +
often the first signs of loss of control. ?
By that time, professional help is :
strongly suggested to refocus, and also :
because denial stands in the way of !

healing.

If we open our minds, push our atti- :
tudes to the side for a moment; we :

can then carry all this insight into our ? * :
own relationships. Finding out your ¢ is the proprietor of Foot Solu-
partners true needs, and in turn being : franchise that focuses on foot
able to express them, will help to nur- ?

ed the ni et ae make it : ed in the Sandyport Plaza, Nas-
OMe ANSE ie ea WAlene er Te NOM Sail, Please uirect any ques
est, trust grows and a deeper intimacy : tigne gr comments to nas-
: sau@footsolutions.com or 327-
: FEET,www.footsolutions.com/N

¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock’ with Mag- : oe

develops.

gie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM102.9. For appointments call
364-7230, email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.



: Common foot
: pain and arthritis

ARTHRITIS, which has

: been clinically described as,
: ‘conditions that result in loss
: or destruction of the cartilage
: lining the ends of the bones
: that make up a joint’, affects
: an astonishing number of peo-

ple.
In fact it is assumed that

? about 50 per cent of persons
: aged 65 or older suffer from it,
: along with a significant por-
: tion of younger people. If you
: have arthritis, read on to find
: out more about a few of the
: common foot pains associated
: with it, and how footwear can
: not only help you feel better
: but also allow for better
: mobility.

In brief, arthritis has been

: divided into two main cate-
: gories, mechanical and inflam-
: matory. In mechanical arthri-
ee ; : tis, the main abnormality is
eczema and psoriasis, can help relieve : disease of cartilage which is
: most often age-related wear-
: ing of
> (osteoarthritis). Inflammato-
: ry arthritis is inflammation of

the cartilage

the synovial lining of the joint

(rheumatoid arthritis).
Among some of the most

common foot pains related to

Big Toe Joint Pain: Appears as

base of the big toe and can

Rheumatoid Arthritis: Inflam-

affect any joints in the foot.
Stiffness may occur depending

of the joint. This condition
tion of joint cartilage.

Rheumatoid Nodules: Appear

cause discomforts when pres-
sure is put on them.

Solutions: Big toe joint pains

er-sole shoe to take some of

padding, inserts and arthritic
approved shoes can help take

making them less sensitive.
There are specially designed
socks and stockings to address

your healthcare professional

In sum, arthritis of the feet
can limit mobility which is key

be it physical, cognitive or
social. This is simply to con-
clude that foot function is the
key to improved mobility. The
majority of persons having this
condition do experience loss-
es in flexibility, strength, skele-
tal muscle mass, decreased
cardiovascular delivery and
inactivity.

If you suffer from any of
these conditions as seen in
the arthritic feet and more so
it in older persons, the aging
feet, seek the help of a pedor-
thist or footwear professional
to provide the correct shoe
and accessories to assist with
the alleviation of such pains
and discomforts.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified & licensed Pedorthist,

tions, a health and wellness

care and proper shoe fit, locat-

"The views expressed are those

: of the author and do not neces-
: sarily represent those of Foot

> Solutions Incorporated or any

: of its subsidiary and/or affiliat-
: ed companies”.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



WOMAN



@x GRE E N SCEN E By Gardener Jack

Wax jambu

he wax jambu
T Seen saman-
gense} is becoming
a very popular back
yard fruit tree here on
Abaco where as little as
ten years ago it was vir-

tually unknown.

I first came across it
through Carrington (Samson)
Lightbourn who brought me
a branch of fruits to identify.
Moxey’s Nursery near Trea-
sure Cay has been the main
provider of young trees to the
Abaco public over the last
decade.

The wax jambu tree is very
handsome with large 10-inch
long leaves and dense foliage
in a fairly compact shape. I
try to keep my tree at about
12 feet that is about right for
convenient picking of fruits.

May and June are the main
months of fruit production
and a mature tree produces
prolifically.

puff white flowers that give
way to a button-like structure
that develops into the bell-
shaped pink or red fruit. The
flowers attract bees by the
hundreds.

The 2-inch long fruits are
produced in panicles of up to
two dozen. The fruit masses
are so dense that some of the
fruits are squeezed out of the
cluster. Those that remain
can be lightly tinged with
pink, solid pink or an attrac-
tive deep red. The colour
does not really reflect the
ripeness of the fruit.

Wax jambu fruits can be
eaten out of hand from the
tree and taste much like
unexceptional apples with a
dash of rose water. They look
far more appetising than they
taste. Within the fruits is a
single seed, sometimes two.

Children tend to enjoy wax
jambu fruits more than
adults. The fruits become
more acceptable if they are
sliced thinly and enjoyed

can be added to salads, used
as an interesting garnish, or
taken with a firm cheese and
crackers.

I prefer to cook the fruits.
When simmered in sugar
water they lose their lovely
colour but develop a lovely
taste that is very close to
lychee. Served this way with a
little cream or ice cream the
fruits make a delicious and
filling dessert.

Wax jambu is also called
Java apple, rose apple, water
apple and wax apple. These
names indicate how apple-
like the raw fruits taste. It
comes to us from the
Malaysian peninsula and is
closely related to the Malay
apple, which is considered
superior eating. It is also
related to guava, allspice and
Surinam cherry.

Wax jambu trees can easily
be propagated from seeds
and grow quickly. Trees can
produce a small harvest in the
third or fourth year and then



Tv mts is an attractive fruit and the trees bear mea during May and June.

compact trees are ideal for
small gardens that cannot
accommodate large fruit trees
such as mango.

Wax jambu does not make
a very interesting jam but
experts suggest adding it to
other fruits in the jam making
process.

Towards the end of May I
passed by my wax jambu tree

impressed by the noise from
within, just like a small but
efficient generator. It was
bees, thousands of them.
Wax jambu attracts bees
more than any other plant I
know at flowering time. They
go crazy among the spiky
flowers and fight for space. I
do not know what the honey
would be like but beekeepers



look into this phenomenon.
Unfortunately, I have some
passion fruit vines that are
flowering and do not seem to
be setting fruit. I think that
is because all the bees are at
the main show in town. Ah
well, let me get some Q-tips
and pollinate them myself.

It all starts with powder-

piecemeal. In this form they

bear heavily thereafter. The

and was immediately

and honey makers might well

* gardenerjack@coralwave.com



Carrie

BRADSHAW

eCharlotte treated
marriage like a soror-
ity she was desperate-
ly hoping to pledge.
¢ So what are we
going to do? Sit
around bars, sipping
Cosmos and sleeping
with strangers when we're eighty?

¢: I've spent $40,000 on shoes and I have no
place to live? I will literally be the old
woman who lived in her shoes!

¢ I'm homeless! I'll be a bag lady! A Fendi
bag lady, but a bag lady!

eThe most important thing in life is your
family. There are days you love them, and
others you don't. But, in the end, they're
the people you always come home to.
Sometimes it's the family you're born into
and sometimes it's the one you make for
yourself.

¢Carrie [buying a pregnancy test] : Which
kind do I get?

Miranda : Here. This one's on sale: half
off.

Carrie : I just spent $395 on a pair of open-
toed Gucci's last week. This is not the
place to be frugal.

¢Carrie : Wait... have you ever been in
love?

Big : Abso*****-lutely!

¢ “Samantha is my friend. She's my family.
My insides. She will be fine because she
has to be fine. That's how important she is
to me.”

e “Tf you can only have one great love,
then New York just may be mine. And I
don't want nobody talkin’ about my
boyfriend.”

¢ “No matter who broke your heart, or
how long it takes to heal, you'll never get
through it without your friends.”

¢Carrie: You're missing it.

Charlotte: What?

Carrie: Everything. You're missing your
wedding. You have a wonderful man who
loves you and will be there to catch you
when you fall. Do you know how special
that is? I would love to find a man who is
strong enough to catch me.

¢ Later that day I got to thinking about
relationships. There are those that open
you up to something new and exotic, those
that are old and familiar, those that bring
up lots of questions, those that bring you
somewhere unexpected, those that bring
you far from where you started, and those
that bring you back. But the most exciting,
challenging and significant relationship of
all is the one you have with yourself. And
if you can find someone to love the you
you love, well, that's just fabulous.



Charlotte

YORK

e * Allow me to get
right to the point,
guys. After careful
consideration, I have
decided that Iam
getting married this
year.

eCharlotte : You're
engaged!

Carrie : I threw up. I saw the ring and I
threw up. That can't be normal.
Samantha : That's my reaction to mar-
riage.

eCharlotte : I've been dating since I was
fifteen! I'm exhausted! Where is he?
Miranda : Who, the White Knight?
Samantha : That only happens in fairy
tales.

¢Charlotte : Miranda has a son!
Samantha : Just what the world needs:
another man.

eCharlotte: [ proposed to myself.

Carrie: What?

Charlotte: Yes. I suggested he have a
tomato salad, then I suggested we get mar-
ried.

Carrie: Wait. What exactly did he say?
Charlotte: All righty.

Carrie: All righty? He said ‘all righty?’
Now I'm thinking the upsetting thing isn't
that you proposed, it's that you proposed
to a guy that says ‘all righty’.

Charlotte: Oh, Carrie, stop.

Carrie: All righty.

¢Charlotte [whispering] : Could you
please not use the F-word in Vera Wang?
eCharlotte : So how are you?

Carrie : I'm good. How are you?
Charlotte : Great.

[pause]

Carrie : I told Aidan about the affair and
he broke up with me.

Charlotte : Trey and I never had sex on
our honeymoon.

Carrie : You win. So. Should we get more
coffee or should we get two guns and kill
ourselves?

eCharlotte : My marriage is a fake Fendi!
¢Charlotte : [just don't understand. How
could you forget someone you slept with?
Carrie : Toto, I don't think we're in single
digits anymore.



HOBBES

e I said no white, no
ivory, no nothing that
says virgin. I have a
child. The jig is up.

e T once was broken
up with by a guy's
doorman. "I'm sorry
Ms. Hobbes,
Jonathan won't be coming down. Ever”.

e It's amazing. In a courtroom, reasonable
doubt can get you off for murder. In an
engagement, it makes you feel like a bad
person.

e Why do we get stuck with old maid and
spinster and men get to be bachelors and
playboys?

eHow did it happen that four such smart
women have nothing to talk about but
boyfriends? It's like seventh grade with
bank accounts.

* (to Carrie's answering machine): Your
good friend Miranda has just taken a piece
of cake out of the garbage and eaten it.
You will probably need this information
when you check me into the Betty Crocker
Clinic

eMiranda: Why didn't you just get an
automatic?

Carrie : I love this car! It goes with my out-
fit.

eMiranda ( on finding out she’s pregnant)
Why didn’t I use a condom?

Carrie: You didn’t use a condom?
Miranda: He only has one ball and I have a
lazy ovary. In what world does that create
a baby? It's like the special Olympics of
conception!



Samantha

JONES

eSamantha : He did
something to me that
was so perverse!
Okay, I'm just going
to say it. He tried to
hold my hand.

Carrie : You mean to
tell me that Smith is a
hand-holder? And to think he once served
us food.

eSamantha : Men cheat for the same rea-
son dogs lick their balls: because they can.
Samantha: [to the girls| I think I have
monogamy. I caught it from you people.
Carrie: Now it's airborne.

eSamantha : Drinking with three blondes!
I guess that's a regular day for you.

Hugh Hefner : A slow one, yes.
eSamantha : Sex with an ex can be
depressing. If it's good, you don't have it
anymore. If it's bad, you just had sex with
an ex.

eSamantha When I'm old and my
(breasts) are in my shoes, I can look at this
picture and say; I was hot.



eMagda: What you did. That is love. You
love.

Miranda: Let's not make a big deal of it to
Steve, it will upset him.

eBunny - "I must tell you right now - I
don't enjoy Mandarin food, and I don't
enjoy a Mandarin child"

¢Stanford [about to enter a women's
dressing area] : Knock knock! Nothing in
here I haven't seen and ruled out in junior
high!

e Aidan Shaw

I love you Carrie, there's no one I could
love more... I wanna live my life with you.
What do you think?

(taken from classic tv quotes.com and
IDBM.COM)



SEX AND THE CITY TRIVIA >>

How well do you know the show ?

E) Trip

7. Carrie writes a sex column for:

1. What is Mr Big's real name? 4. Carrie's father: A) The Enquirer
A) Aidan A) died when she was young B) The NY Post
B) John B) lives in LA C) The NY Times

C) It's never revealed - C) cheated on her mother D) Vogue keeper/nanny is called:
he's too unavailable D) is a recovering alcoholic E) The Star A) Marina
D) Carson E) abandoned her B) Yelena
E) Bruce 8. Aidan's beloved pet dog is C) Sascha
5. Carrie's love interest during the called: D) Katerina
2. Carrie has dated: LA episodes was played by: A) Trevor E) Magda
A) A mental patient who was an ex A) David Duchovny B) Bow wow
B) A recovering sex addict B) Kyle McLaughlin C) Pete 11. Which one of these is not a
C) A bi-sexual twenty-something, C) Vince Vaughn D) Puddin' saucy Samantha line:
a politician who wanted her to pee D) Matthew McConaughey E) Rusty A) Oh my God, she's fashion

on him, a mental patient who was
an ex and a recovering sex addict
D) A bi-sexual twenty-something

E) A politician who wanted her to

6. Who is "the idiot stick figure
with no soul"?

E) Hugh Hefner
9. Which of these is not a classic

Miranda quote:

A) | just faked a sonogram

E) I'm a 34-year-old woman with
braces and I'm on a liquid diet - pain

doesn't begin to cover it

10. Miranda's judgemental house-

road kill

B) Oh please! There's always a

contest with an ex. It's called

“who will die miserable’.

A) Brady

B) Wright

C) Parsons
D) Jerrod

E) MacDougal

13. When Carrie first asked Mr Big
if he had ever been in love, he said:
A) "I've been in lust"
B) 'No way"
C) 'Abso-* **-lutely’
D) "Not a chance"
E) "Kid, let's be real"

14. What is the name of the play in
which Smith Jerrod bared his but-
tocks?

A) Monty Python's Flying Circus

pee on him

3. Charlotte's over-the-top wedding

A) Heidi Klum, when she stepped
over Carrie in the fashion show
B) Bunny, Charlotte's ex-mother-

stylist is called: in-law
A) Clay C) Amalita Amalfi, Carrie's Eurotrash
B) Ivana friend
C) Stanford D) Natasha, Big's ex-wife
D) Anthony E) Steve's cheesy girlfriend Debbie

B) I'm telling you, married people
are the enemy

C) How does it happen that four
such smart women have nothing to
talk about but boyfriends? It's like
seventh grade with bank accounts
D) Puberty is a phase - 15 years of
rejection is a lifestyle

C) Ladies, I'm a lesbian

D) Until he says "I love you", you're

a free agent

12. Samantha's cheating, hotel-
mogul boyfriend was called
Richard:

B) The Blue Room
C) Porno Valley
D) Full Moon

E) The Full Monty

(taken from Ivillageuk.com)
SEE Answers on page 11

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 11B





Screening and cocktail party set for Sex and the City 2









IN THIS film publicity image released by Warner Bros., from left, Kristin Davis, Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall and Cynthia Nixon are shown in a scene from "Sex and the City 2."

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

THIS Thursday night will
be the ultimate girls’ night
out for fans of Sex and City
with a chance to attend a
cocktail party and screen-
ing of the long- awaited
sequel to the 2008 movie
and original series.

The premiere event for

held at Galleria Cinemas
JFK.

“It’s gonna be all about
the shoes,” says event co-
organiser Megan Sweeting
of Sole events, who along
with her business partner
Gidget Dean came up with
the idea for the event.

“There is not a lot to do
in Nassau and we thought
that this would be a great
idea because women love

night where we encourage
them to dress up and have a
girl’s night out, something
that they might not do all
the time.

“We have a number of
corporate sponsors on
board such as John Bull,
CDM , the Dermal Clinic
and guests will get to enjoy
a fabulous cocktail recep-
tion and will receive great
gift bags filled with prod-

said.

For persons who want to
spend a bit more, the VIP
pass will provide access to
an after party and addition-
al gift items.

“I don’t want to give too
much away, but I think per-
sons attending will be sur-
prised- it’s gonna be a fabu-
lous night. We have a lot
planned.”

The Sex and the City 2

place on at 7pm at Galleria
Cinemas on JFK. Tickets
are $30 for general admis-
sion and $50 for VIP. They
are available at Clippen-
dales hair salon and Sole
Events.

The movie takes place
two years after the 2008
movie when the four friends
in need of a vacation travel
to exotic Abu Dhabi for
more fun and fabulous

COCO ROEDERER RETO E REET ETE ERO ESET E ETRE SEEH ERR ESEEH OED OERER OES OERO ERE SEER EHR TETES EHR TETOER EO TESO ERR ESEER ESR ETEEHOETESEER OE TEEHE SEER EER EERE OBER EEE EE

AN SWE RS from pg 10

Question1: John : We learn
his name when he calls her
mobile in the closing scene
of the last ever episode.



Question 2: A bi-sexual
twenty-something, a politi-
cian who wanted her to pee
on him, a mental patient
who was an ex and a recov-
ering sex addict

Question 3; Anthony

Question 4: Carrie's father
abandoned her

Question 5: Carrie's love
interest during the LA
episodes was played by:
Vince Vaughn

Question 6: Natasha, Big's
ex-wife

Question 7: Carrie writes a
sex column for: The Star

Question 8: Aidan's beloved
pet dog is called Pete

Question 9; Puberty is a
phase - 15 years of rejection
is a lifestyle. That line was
actually said by Stanford.

Question 10: Miranda’s
judgemental
housekeeper/nanny is called
Magda

Question 11: Oh my God,
she’s fashion road kill. It was
actually said by Stanford

Question 12: Samantha’s
cheating, hotel-mogul
boyfriend was called
Richard Wright

Question 13: Big said
"Abso-***-lutely"

Question 14: What is the
name of the play in which
Smith Jerrod bared his but-






























































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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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THE TRIBUNE

WHY VVOMEN LOVE

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

Tribune Features Editor



have been drawn fo a certain city and the adventures

Fi. the past ten years, women all over the world

of four women who live there. And unless you live
under a rock, you know that this week the ladies of Sex
and the City are back - this time in the incredible setting
of Abu Dhabi in the long awaited sequel fo the 2008

movie and the hit show.

Sex and the City is more than
just a hit HBO series that ended
before its time, it’s the “ultimate
female fantasy,” my friend Ava
told me when I asked her to
explain why the show still holds so
much appeal even though it’s
been off the air since 2004.

“It’s the fairy tale, finally end-
ing up with your prince charming
and being fabulously dressed in
the process,” she said.

“Tt’s the life we all secretly wish
we could have,” my cousin Cine
tells me. “When you have the
unlimited budget to drink cosmos
with your friends and buy the
$800 Manolos without a care. I

j
ner B

love this show.” She loves it so
much that she has set her cell
phone’s ringtone to the opening
credit music known instantly to
fans around the world.

Jewel Smith describes herself
as the “ultimate Sex and the City
fan” and has even named her dog
Carrie - after the main character
and the one she says she relates to
most. She says its all about the
shoes and the fashions.

“The fashion alone is just amaz-
ing, clothing, the handbags and
oh my goodness the shoes (my
passion) were fabulous!! I cannot
wait to see what’s to come in
S&TC2.”



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yathi

Jewel was introduced to the
show when it was in reruns on
TBS. She was also given the book
(written by Candice Bushnell)
and DVDs of the original series as
gifts.

“Why I think the show still has
so much appeal is because it is
unpredictable. With this show you
never know what’s going to hap-
pen next and it takes you on an
emotional roller-coaster with the
characters. It has stayed fresh and
interesting and you are always left
you wanting more,” she said.

Fashion aside, ask real fans and
they will all tell you the same
thing - the real draw to the show
is the fact that it focuses on four
successful woman who have a
genuine friendship.

“This show shows that it’s pos-
sible for women to have friend-
ship without jealousy, gossip or
spite, where you can be com-
pletely happy for your best friends
because you truly want what’s
best for them,” says Sarah
Thompson another huge fan.

“What appeals to me about this
show are the relationships the
ladies have with each other. I

TUESDAY, MAY 25,

2010

think it is truly an amazing thing
to have friends that you can real-
ly count on and share anything
with. Their personalities are very
different but they all accept each
other regardless, and that is some-
thing special. As individual
women they are very strong and
independent, qualities that I
admire. And of course the rela-
tionships they have built with
their men are priceless,” Jewel
said.

“T have heard the naysayers
say, ‘Oh, they are just a bunch of
women that sleep around’, but on
the contrary I feel the show is
more than that, it’s deeper than
that. Charlotte for one kept
searching until she found the per-
fect man for her, but little did she
know it would turn out to be
someone she never envisioned for
herself but what she needed and
they are a beautiful couple. He
treats her as though she is the
only woman in the world that
matters; like a queen and that is
what we women hope for.”

“It’s not mushy,” said Cammie
Smith. “These women are real,
despite the fact that they are tal-




ented and successful, they make
mistakes, they give their hearts
to the wrong people and make
bad choices. Carrie went on a
roller coaster with Mr Big she got
very hurt along the way and
broke Aidan’s heart, but true love
won out. Who doesn’t want to see
that. You were cheering for her in
that final scene in the series when
Big goes to her in Paris and says,
‘It took a while to get here, but
you're the one.’ It’s a modern day
Cinderella story.”

There is a little of Carrie, Char-
lotte, Miranda and Samantha in
all of us. And some of us are
lucky enough to have friends like
these four women - friends who
are the real deal. The ones who
you can call in the middle of the
day or night to help you, no ques-
tions asked, or be there to dry
your tears and to celebrate your
joys.

And this week, women all over
will slip on their high heels, grab
their friends and go see this movie
because, to quote Carrie Brad-
shaw, “If you can find someone to
love the you, you love, well that’s
just fabulous.”

{ t
Lh
mage “~~
Bro . s
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FILES


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ARCHBISHOP Patrick Pin-
der, leader of the Roman
Catholic community in the
Bahamas, does not think the
law should be changed to sup-
port legalised gambling

is the tendency of human
nature to go to excess and to
extremes. Thus what may be
harmless in the beginning can,
without proper restraints
become quite harmful later on.

The wisdom of the law as it
now stands seems to under-
stand this reality.

“The law as it now stands,”
said the Archbishop, “appears

The Archbishop pointed out
that although the Church’s
longstanding tradition that
games of chance are not in
themselves morally evil, “there



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LOCAL NEWS

Archbishop says no to legalised gambling

intended to exercise an abun-
dance of necessary caution for
the good of individuals and the
community as a whole.

“Permitting the harmless use
of games of chance while pro-
tecting against their harmful
excess is indeed the value which
the current law appears to pro-
tect and promote.”

It was on these grounds that
the Archbishop felt that the law
should be upheld and gambling
not be legalised.

Following is the text of the
Archbishop’s statement:

“The Bahamian communi-
ty is currently engaged in much
discussion surrounding the pos-
sibility of the legalisation of
gambling. Surely this matter
calls for much serious thought
and research as part of an in-
depth, national conversation.
Such conversation is a neces-
sary aspect of the formation of
public policy in a strong democ-
racy. I wish here to offer an ini-

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Master Techaici

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tial contribu-
tion to that
conversation.

“The ques-
tion of legali-
sation of gam-

a bling is a chal-
C lenging one
Archbishop for one

Patrick Pinder Bahamian
community as

a whole. It is
particularly challenging for our
Roman Catholic community.
At the risk of being quoted out
of context, I must indicate at
the outset the Church’s long-
standing tradition that games
of chance are not in themselves
morally evil. This finds official
expression in the Catechism of
the Catholic Church in these
words: ‘Games of chance or
wagers are not in themselves
contrary to justice.’ (CCC2413).
It is on this basis that there is a
well known practice of utilising
various games of chance, in par-



ticular raffles, as a staple fea-
ture of parish fund raising.
“However, the same section of
the Catechism goes on to say:
‘(Games of chance) become
morally unacceptable when
they deprive someone of what
is necessary to provide for his
needs or those of others. The
passion for gambling risks
becoming an enslavement.’
(CCC 2431).

“Our Catholic tradition
recognised that while gambling
is not inherently evil there is
the tendency of human nature
to go to excess and to extremes.
Thus what may be harmless in
the beginning can, without
proper restraints become quite
harmful later on. The wisdom
of the law as it now stands
seems to understand this reali-
ty. The law as it now stands
appears intended to exercise an
abundance of necessary caution
for the good of individuals and
the community as a whole.”





Investigation into toddler drowning

AN investigation has begun after a toddler drowned off a
beach near the Coral Harbour Defence Force base on Sun-
day. According to police reports, the two-year-old girl was at
a family function at the beach when it is believed she went
into the water. Police and emergency medical personnel were
dispatched to the scene at around 6.10pm where they found
her lifeless body floating in the water.





ST ET HUTA

PT eh

CLOSING submissions will
be presented today in the trial
of two brothers accused of the
June 2002 murder of Mario
Miller.

On Friday, the brothers
Ricardo Miller, alias "Tamar
Lee", and Ryan Miller, alias
"Manny", who are charged with
Mario's murder, both opted to
make unsworn statements from
the prisoner’s dock, meaning
that they were not subject to
cross-examination by the pros-
ecution. Mario Miller, the son
of businessman and former MP
Leslie Miller, was found dead
with multiple stab and chop
wounds on various parts of his
body in bushes near the Super
Value food store in Winton on
Saturday, June 22, 2002.

Ricardo Miller during his
unsworn statement claimed that
he and Mario, who
he claimed had been his busi-
ness partner and friend, had
been ambushed in a drug deal
but stated he was not responsi-
ble for the 28-year-old's death.

Ricardo Milller is being rep-
resented by attorney Dorsey
McPhee. His brother Ryan
Miller, in a brief unsworn state-
ment from the prisoner's dock,
claimed he to was not involved
in Mario's murder and also
denied being involved in a drug
deal.



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THE TRIBUNE

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Two Haitian-Bahamian
men are dead following a shooting in the
South Bahamia area early Sunday morning.

Silvano Yasmin, also known as “Ameri-
can Boy” and Kendrick Dolphy, ages
unknown, were discovered with multiple
gunshot body wounds inside a SUV parked
at a gated apartment complex on Pinta
Avenue. The driver was pronounced dead
at the scene. The passenger in the front
seat was taken by ambulance to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he died around
8.25am. Police are conducting investiga-
tions into the double homicide, which
brings Grand Bahamas’ homicides to five
for the year.

According to Asst Supt Loretta Mackey,
police received a report around 6am of
gunshots being fired near The Hamptons
Apartments.

When police arrived at the scene, they
discovered a dark-blue Ford Expedition

Teenage girl abducted

A TEENAGE girl was
abducted in Nassau Village
when a thug forced her into his
car at gunpoint. The incident
occurred shortly before 8pm on
Saturday when the 15-year-old
was walking along Alexandria
Boulevard. A dark-coloured
Nissan Sentra pulled up along-
side her. The driver reportedly
produced a handgun and
threatened the girl with it, forc-
ing her to get into his vehicle.

She was eventually released
and taken to hospital.

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 3

Police probe double murder







MURDER SCENE: Gathering evidence.

SUV parked at the entrance gate of the
apartment complex with the engine run-
ning. Ms Mackey said a black male was sit-
ting motionless in the driver’s seat with
multiple gunshot wounds to his body. A
second black male was lying on the ground
near the rear passenger door, which was
open. Portions of Pinta Avenue were cor-
doned off by police when The Tribune
arrived at the scene sometime after 9.30am.

Several officers were still processing the
scene. The body of one victim had not been
removed yet from the vehicle. It had been

riddled with gunshots. Gunshots had also
damaged several apartments and a vehi-
cle. Numerous bullet markers were seen
on the ground where a number of bullet
casings were discovered around the vehicle.

ASP Mackey said police believe that at
least two gunmen were involved in the
shooting. She reported that Yasmin and
Dolphy were residents of The Hamptons
Apartments, which is a secure gated com-
plex in South Bahamia. According to
reports, the two men were seen earlier
attending a reggae concert, which had end-
ed sometime around 6am.

“The exact ages of the men are not
known at this time, but they appear to be in
their late thirties, early forties.

“We don’t know what the motive is for
this homicide, but police are continuing
their investigations,” said ASP Mackey.

“Police are following some leads into
this latest incident, but we are appealing to
persons who were in the area when this
incident occurred to call the police at 350-
3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911 to assist us in our
investigations.”

Maderia St. ONLY
MAY 16 - 29



Stabbing incidents

A MAN and two women are
in hospital after they received
knife wounds in two separate
stabbing incidents over the hol-
iday weekend. The man was
stabbed in his head when he
was robbed of cash at around
11 pm on Saturday at Spike-
nard Road, off Cowpen Road.
after being approached by a
white Toyota Avalon.

The second — stabbing
occurred around 3.20am on
Sunday on Parker Street, off
Meadow Street after two
women got into a dispute.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Ex-PLP leadership contender
Paul Moss joining the NDP

A FORMER PLP leadership
contender has announced he is
joined forces with the National
Development Party (NDP).

Attorney Paul Moss said his
decision is a “last ditch attempt”
to save the country, and he
implored all Bahamians to
change their political direction
at the next General Election
before it is too late.

He said: “I am humbled to
be in the NDP, for it truly has
the characteristics of a true
democracy where talent is
respected and appreciated. It is
not a party of petty jealousies
or insecurities. I am pleased to
be in a party that is truly interest
in the well being of people and
one that is prepared to win the
right way not win at any costs.”

Mr Moss said he met with the
NDP, along with several other
individuals, for several weeks
and was satisfied with the inten-
tions shared.

Under the PLP, Mr Moss had
been adamant that a change of
leadership was instrumental to
the progression of the party and
its success in the next General
Election. He challenged Leader
Perry Christie unsuccessfully at
last year’s convention under his
campaign “The New Bahamas:
We Can Do Better”, and in
March officially resigned.

Rather than continue his
political journey alone in the
face of the “tremendous bur-
den in the country”, Mr Moss
said it “made sense” to join the
NDP as they held the same
vision.





PAUL MOSS

He said: “I met with a group
of people who see the NDP as a
vehicle to be used to put the
Bahamas on the right footing
and to wrestle away the author-
ity from those that currently
have it, and give it back to the
Bahamian people.

“We have to invest in our
people, trust our people, put the
ownership of this economy in
the hands of the people. This
isn’t a party that’s only inter-
ested in winning so their sup-
porters can get contracts from
the governement. We’re inter-
ested in reformation, putting
Bahamians back to work, ensur-
ing the next generation is a bet-
ter generation.”

Renward Wells, chairman of
the NDP, said: "Paul brings
tremendous talent and an arse-
nal of tools that we in the NDP
are please to have in our party's
tent. We know that he is a fight-
er for the people and like us in
the NDP, wants to see the coun-
try rescued from the malaise it is
in as a result of failed govern-
ments particularly since the lat-
ter half of the 1980s. We antici-
pate that Paul will play an inte-

gral role in the party in the
months to come as we move
from strength to strength.”

The party is soliciting Parlia-
mentary candidates for the next
General Election and is expect-
ed to be very proactive in the
upcoming months promoting
party awareness.

Mr Moss said the party would
be appealing to FNMs, PLPs,
and “in-betweens who feel this
country can do much better”,
and he identified persons such
as Tennison Wells, Pierre
Dupuch, Algernon Allen, and
Omar Smith as favorable can-
didates. He continued: “People
that really see the country could
be better but because of the
political culture, there is no
movement for direction, per-
sons who feel they have assets
and treasures - to really come
together so we can save this
country. I really believe that if
this country does not change at
the next opportunity - it will be
the end of this country.”

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean diplo-
mat)

I: is not often that a book
comes along that should
be in the Library of every
school and on the list of civics
reading material. “Living my
Dreams”, the recently pub-
lished biography of West Indi-
an Cricket commentator,
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a book.

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be overcome.

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young people throughout the
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native West Indies. I say
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Reds was born in Guyana’s
interior in an area called
Pomeroon, he belongs to the
West Indian region as a whole,
having spent most of his adult
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cally serving the area in one
capacity or another.

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around by boat and went to
Church barefooted. When he
moved to Guyana’s capital
Georgetown at the age of six,
he had never heard a radio or
knew that a world existed
beyond the Pomeroon river and





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LOCAL NEWS

Overcoming the Odds:
Reds Perreira’s Biography





SIR RONALD SANDERS

feeding the pigs on his father’s
farm. In his boyhood in
Georgetown, he learned of dis-
tant places via the radio but he
could have had no idea that he
would tour the world as the
eyes and ears of the West Indi-
an people in the majestic game
of cricket, particularly as for
the first twenty years of his life
he was afflicted by a terrible
stammer.

Nonetheless, he dreamt of
it. Reds recalls lying in bed at
night doing “imaginary com-
mentaries of cricket coming
from Australia, and from Eng-
land at Lords” and doing so
without a stammer. This stam-
mering affected his perfor-
mance at school. As he tells it:
“T had a major problem trying
to get through my schooling at
a time when the world was not
sympathetic to handicaps.
Invariably, I would be afraid if
the teacher were to ask me a
question during any given
class.” Even though Reds
moved through school to fifth
standard passing his exams
every year and finishing in the
top ten, his recurring problem
was his “inability to be able to
speak fluently and confident-
ly.”

Reds did not finish sec-
ondary school. He went to
work at the age of sixteen and
immediately showed both his
gift for organizing sports events
and his love for them. All his
wages were spent on arranging
competition between cricket

and football teams he helped
to set up. The rest of his time
was spent haunting Guyana’s
cricket grounds watching the
performances of local players
and exulting in the clashes with
visiting touring teams such as
Australia in 1955 when he saw
the young Guyanese batsman,
Rohan Kanhai, smash a mag-
nificent century.

What Reds lacked in fluent
speech was more than balanced
by his abundance of determi-
nation. In 1962, he went to live
in England. His anchor there
as it was for many other young
West Indians was the West
Indian Student Centre. Pre-
dictably, Reds became the Cen-
tre’s sports coordinator and,
this young man of limited edu-
cation, made good friends with
able West Indian students who,
like him, were later to distin-
guish themselves in their fields.

Two of them Lester Bird of
Antigua and Barbuda and JMG
“Tom” Adams of Barbados
became Prime Ministers of
their countries. Gerry Watt
(now Sir Gerald) and David
Simmons (now Sir David) were
later to become Attorneys-
General of Antigua and Bar-
buda and Barbados respective-
ly.

Recalling Reds’ capacity for
sports organization and his
deep commitment to the devel-
opment of sports, Lester Bird
(the Deputy Prime Minister of
Antigua and Barbuda) was
instrumental in Reds’ appoint-
ment as Head of the OECS
Sports Desk in 1984 despite the
fact that Reds was not from any
of the OECS countries and
there was some opposition to
his appointment on those
parochial grounds. After twen-
ty-six years of sterling and
unselfish service to almost
every sport in the OECS, few

now remember that Reds was
born in Guyana. In a note in
the book, Bird says of Reds’
work at the OECS: “You set a
great example which will be dif-
ficult to emulate.”

David Simmons, who for
four years captained the West
Indian Students Centre Cricket
team of which Reds was open-
ing batsman, also helped to
secure Reds a work permit in
Barbados in the early days of
his long stint as a Cricket com-
mentator alongside the Doyen
of West Indian Cricket Com-
mentators, Barbados’ Tony
Cozier. But, first Reds had to
overcome his stammer. And,
he recounts in this book how
he did so. Discipline, determi-
nation and dedication were the
things that did it. He wanted
desperately to be a Cricket
Commentator and to do it, he
had to put stammering behind
him. A remarkable career fol-
lowed in which he encountered
at first hand and reported on
the great successes and miser-
able failures of many West Indi-
an sports people, particularly
its cricketers. And, then, yet
another obstacle intruded upon
his life. A stroke on New Year’s
Day 1996 as he was about to
cover the West Indies cricket
tour of Australia paralyzed his
left hand side.

Again, it was only determi-
nation, discipline and dedica-
tion that pulled Reds back from
the bed-ridden existence of a
stroke victim to the full life he
lives today. It has been a
remarkable life in which huge
obstacles were overcome;
obstacles that would have
stopped a lesser man, but in
Reds Perreira’s case drove him
to further heights of achieve-
ment. The book, which tells
many behind the scenes stories
particularly about West Indian
Cricket and cricketers, is ulti-
mately a moving tale that
should inspire every young per-
son to set their goals, work hard
to achieve them and live their
dreams.

Responses and previous
commentaries:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website af wew.cob.edubs

THE SEARCH FOR A PRESIDENT

The College Council of The College of The Bahamas (COB) is pleased to

| annonce

a scarch for a new President and invites nominations and expres-

jsions of interest in this outstanding opportunity for leadership at a truly
unique institution, After nearly thirty-five years of serving The Bahamas,
first as a two-year institution, then as a four-year degree-granting College,

|COB expects to become The University of The Bahamas.

As it moves to

solidify its university status, COB will continue to deliver excellent under-
jeraduate teaching while developing new undergraduate and graduate pro-
| grams, increasing research and innovation activities, and focusing its work in
areas crucial to national development.

| Since its founding in 1974, The College of The Bahamas has grown in repu-
tation and currently enrolls over 5000 students in undergraduate and gradu-
ate education. The institution grants primarily bachelor’s degrees, and will
launch its first master’s degree later this year. Currently, COB offers joint
)master’s degrees in conjunction with other accredited universities and col
leges within the United States and enjoys extensive links with higher educa-
tion institutions in the Caribbean, North America and Great Britain.

NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS

VA prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
jities for the new president, a full enumeration of qualifications for the posi-
tion, and instructions for submitting applications or nominations may be

‘tound under

“Current Searches”

at wwwacademic-search.com. Those

On

sidering becoming candidates are urged to visit this Web site before submit-
j ting application materials. A complete application shall include a thoughtful
letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and a list of at least five professional ref-
erences (with email addresses and telephone numbers) and must be received
by June 9th, 2010, Nominations, inquiries and applications are treated confi-
[dentially and should be submitted electronically (MS Word or PDF) to:

| COBPresident@academic-search.com

| Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained

from The College's

5 website, |

(haw cob ed

ine ava Kirkhope and Bill Franklin of Academic Search, Inc. are assisting with

| Maya Ranchod Kirkhope

| Senior Consultant
| Academic Search, Inc.
| Washington, DAC., USA

| ma akirkhope@academic-search.com

| (703) Hi) 9195

this search. Nominations and expressions of interest will be treated in confi-
dence and may be directed to:

Dr. Bill Franklin

Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Ine.
Washington, D.C., USA

hjf@academic-search.com

(830) 249-1444

The College of The Bahamas is committed to providing equal educational
}and employment opportunity.


THE TRIBUNE



intensifyi

DAVID McFADDEN,
Associated Press Writer
KINGSTON, Jamaica

Jamaica's security forces
clashed with masked gunmen
allied with an alleged drug king-
pin for a second consecutive
day on Monday as an intensify-
ing multi-front battle against
gangs spread to volatile slums
outside the capital, according
to Associated Press.

Police and soldiers came
under heavy fire in barricaded
battle zones in the West
Kingston stronghold of Christo-
pher "Dudus” Coke, who is try-
ing to avoid extradition to the
USS. on drug and arms traffick-
ing charges. Military helicopters
with mounted guns buzzed
above the impoverished area,
between plumes of black
smoke. West Kingston, which
includes the Trenchtown slum
where reggae superstar Bob
Marley was raised, is the epi-
center of the violence. But on
Monday, security agents were
also under attack in troubled
areas outside that patchwork
of gritty slums.

Gunmen shot at police while
trying to erect barricades in a
poor section of St. Catherine
parish, which is just outside the
two parishes where the gov-
ernment on Sunday imple-
mented a monthlong state of
emergency. A police station in
an outlying area of Kingston
parish also was showered with
bullets by a roving band of gun-
men with high-powered rifles.

Security Minister Dwight
Nelson said "police are on top
of the situation,” but gunfire
was reported in several poor
communities and brazen gun-
men shot up Kingston's central
police station.

Killed

The Jamaica Constabulary
Force said two officers have
been killed and six injured dur-
ing firefights with criminal
gangs whose arsenals rival
police firepower.

"The loss of these two offi-
cers and the injury to the six,
while difficult to deal with, will
only serve as a rallying call for
the police to remain strong,
committed and firm as we con-
tinue to encounter brazen crim-
inals," said Police Commis-
sioner Owen Ellington.

Ellington said "scores of
criminals" from gangs across
the Caribbean island had joined
the fighting in the Kingston
area, where the fear of gun vio-
lence has driven many to live
behind gated walls with key-
pad entry systems and 24-hour
security.In a sun-splashed island
known more for reggae music
and all-inclusive resorts, the
violence erupted Sunday after-
noon after nearly a week of ris-
ing tensions over the possible
extradition of Coke to the Unit-
ed States, where he faces a pos-
sible sentence of life in prison.

Coke is described as one of
the world's most dangerous
drug lords by the USS. Justice
Department.

Coke leads one of the gangs
that control politicized slums
known as "garrisons." Political
parties created the gangs in the
1970s to rustle up votes. The
gangs have since turned to drug
trafficking, but each remains
closely tied to a political party.
Coke's gang is tied to the gov-
erning Labor Party.

Prime Minister Bruce Gold-
ing had stalled Coke's extradi-
tion request for nine months
with claims the U.S. indictment
relied on illegal wiretap evi-
dence. After Golding reversed
himself last Monday amid
growing public discontent,
Coke's supporters began bar-
ricading streets and preparing
for battle.

On Friday, the U.S. State
Department warned in a travel
alert that access roads to the
airport could be blocked by civ-
il unrest, but Jamaica's Civil
Aviation Authority said Mon-
day that flights were arriving
and departing on schedule at
Kingston's Norman Manley
International Airport.

The USS. State Department
said Monday it was "the
responsibility of the Jamaican
government to locate and arrest
Mr. Coke." A U.S. Embassy
spokeswoman denied wide-
spread rumors that USS. offi-
cials were meeting with Coke's
lawyers. Coke's lead attorney,
Don Foote, refused to disclose
to The Associated Press
whether Coke was hunkered
down in his stronghold in the
barricaded Tivoli Gardens slum





TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 7

CARIBBEAN NEWS

Jamaica: Gun battles are



(AP Photos/The Jamaica Gleaner, Norman Grindley

LEFT: In this photo taken Wednesday, May 19, 2010 a Jamaica
Defense Force armoured vehicle make its way into a barricaded
street in Hannah Town, West Kingston. Jamaica. RIGHT: A demon-
strator displays a cardboard with a message in support of Christopher
“Dudus” Coke during a march on May 20 in Kingston. Jamaican
Police have an arrest warrant for Christopher “Dudus” Coke, who
allegedly leads one of Jamaica’s drug gangs and is sought by U.S.
authorities on drug and arms trafficking charges but residents of West
Kingston neighborhoods have set up barricades to prevent the police
for entering the slums to execute the order.

or was somewhere else in the
Caribbean country. In a nation-
al address Sunday night, Gold-
ing said the state of emergency
order for Kingston and St.

Andrew parish gives authori-
ties the power to restrict move-
ment. Security forces will also
be able to conduct searches and
detain people without warrants.

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
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a a ru nk a
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ALLEGED drug gang leader

Christopher “Dudus” Coke.



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TUESDAY, MAY 25,

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

n contrasting perfor-
mances, Jermaine
“Choo Choo” Mackey
and Jerome ‘The
Bahamian Bronze
Bomber’ Ellis pulled off victo-
ries to gear themselves up for a
possible clash for the Bahamian
super middleweight title.
Highlighting First Class Pro-
motions’ “In Your Face, Ready
to Rumble” professional boxing
card Saturday night at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
Mackey needed just one and-a-
half rounds to dispose of Amer-
ican Alex ‘Undertaker’ Lubo.
The fight was so lopsided
with Mackey, one minute and
40 seconds into the second
round, using his towering height
to simply out-class the veteran
Colombian fighting out of

Miramar, Florida.

The scheduled eight-round
main event fight was simply
over as soon as it got started.
“He came out strong, but I just
decided to take it to his body
and not try to make it a slug
fest,” said Mackey, who really
didn’t give Lubo a chance to
mount any serious attack.

Mackey, making his return
to the local scene since May 30,
2009, when he won a third
round TKO over Emiliano
Cayetano in defense of his
WBC Caribbean Boxing Fed-
eration (CABOFE) title, said
he was out to prove to the
Bahamian public that he’s still
the champion.

The Bahamian super mid-
dleweight champion was refer-
ring to the critics who indicated
that he took two ill-advised
fights, one on September 25
against Adonis Stevenson in
Montreal, Canada, and the oth-



rts

2010

er against Kirt ‘The Technician’
Sinnette December 12 in
Trinidad & Tobago, only to
lose by TKO in the Sth and
11th rounds respectively.

“Tt was nerve racking fighting
a guy with over 30 fights, so
basically because he had the
experience on his side, I just
decided to keep my guard up
and not get over excited,” said
Mackey, who noted that he just
went to the body and then the
head to easily win the fight.

Improving his record to 19-5
with his sixth TKO, Mackey
was simply too much for Lubo
to handle. He knocked him
down twice, the last with an on-
slaught that dropped both fight-
ers to the canvas.

Mackey, 30, was able to get
back up, but when Lubo tried,
he knelt on one knee, signalling
that he had suffered enough.

As he reflected on his per-
formance, Mackey turned to
the trash-talking from Ellis,
who is waiting in the wings for a
showdown for the Bahamian
middleweight title at the end

CT CME PAN ALOU RESULT



ALEX ‘Undertaker’ Lubo (left above and kneeling top right) connects with a punch to the face of Jermaine “Choo

Bodybuilder honoured

of the year.

“T’m going to go down to the
middleweight and he’s going to
come up to the middleweight,
so it should be a good fight,”
Mackey projected.

To his opponent, Mackey
had this warning: “I’m looking
forward to that title. Hey
Jerome Ellis, bring it on. I’m
going to trip your breaker.”

Ellis, who hasn’t fought at
home since he defeated Wilson
Theophile on February 25,
2005, for the Bahamas light
middleweight title, had to go
four rounds before he forced
Jamaican Testie ‘Neck Breaker’
Davis into submission at the

Choo” Mackey on Saturday night...

2:05 mark.

“It was all right. I got a little
injury in training, but I’m used
to it. The fight must go on.
Even though I couldn’t use my
right hand like I wanted to, I
knew I had enough talent and
enough power to take him out
with my left hand,” Ellis said.

The 31-year-old who went to
Florida where he fought his last
17 fights (posting a 6-9-2 win-
loss-draw record) over the past
six years, said he wasn’t con-
cerned about Davis, despite

that he put up a challenge at
the beginning.

Davis, a virtually unknown
competitor, kept Ellis on the
ropes for the first three rounds
as he threw a series of combi-
nations. But he didn’t have the
power to put Ellis away at any
time.

“Everybody’s going to get
hit, but at the end of the day,
mine was a little harder than
his,” said Ellis, referring to the
series of left body shots that he
connected to Davis, forcing him

SEE more pictures on page 14

to call it quits.

With his record now
improved to 13-11-2 and a fight
pending on June 13 against
Ossie Duran at the Hyatt
Regency in Philadelphia, Ellis
said he’s eager for the much
anticipated match-up against
Mackey. “Baby work, baby
work,” was how Ellis described
the showdown. “All I need to
do is get my right hand as sharp
as it used to be and he will drop
within four. Seeing is believing.
That’s what it’s all about.”



ws



PROFESSIONAL bodybuilder Joel Stubbs congratulates his long-
time teammate Raymond Tucker (right) at the Bahamas Bodybuilding
and Fitness Federation’s Novice Bodybuilding and Fitness Champi-
onships Saturday night at the National Centre for the Performing
Arts. Tucker (right) was honoured by the federation for his out-
standing performance over the years.

(Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

‘Big Daddy’ Butler cuts ‘Mountain’ down

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



ONE look at American James ‘Moun-
tain’ Pratt when he stepped into the ring on
Saturday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium and you would wonder if he wasn’t
getting ready to play basketball instead of
box.

Although he came from Charlotte, North
Carolina, for the latter, Pratt’s trip to the
Bahamas was short lived as Jerry ‘Big Dad-
dy’ Butler wasted little time in cutting him
down like timber.

In what turned out to be his second
longest appearance in the ring, Pratt didn’t
have any defense for the on-slaught that
Butler threw at him in the third round.

One minute and 32 seconds and it was all
over as Pratt came crashing to the canvas in
the heavyweight bout of the First Class
Promotions’ undercard of the “In Your
Face, Ready To Rumble” professional box-
ing show.

“At first I was a little disappointed
because (Friday) the fighter didn’t come.

Then this morning (Saturday), they called
me and told me the fighter was here,” But-
ler said.

“When I saw him this evening (Satur-
day), I said ‘man, I have some work cut
out for me.’ So I decided to put him to the
test: Either he feel me, or I feel him.”

For the first two rounds, neither fighter
seemed to have the initiative to go after
the other as they played it safe. But in the
third, Butler finally got inside and he went
to work on Pratt’s body.

Having shed some 15 pounds with about
30 to go, the 280 pound 29-year-old Butler
said he’s hoping that the Bahamas Boxing
Commission will give him a chance to take
on Sherman ‘The Tank’ Williams for the
Bahamas heavyweight title.

“That might be the biggest fight the
Bahamas has ever seen since Ray Minus
and Quincy Pratt and (Jermaine Mackey)
Choo Choo and Marvin (Smith),” Butler
said. “They want to see the big boys.”

And 5-foot-9 Butler warned the 5711, 37-
year-old Williams that if he’s not careful, he
could end up just like the 38-year-old Pratt,
who dropped to 2-8.

Also on the undercard, in what turned
out to be another lopsided match, Elkeno
‘Punisher’ Saunders stopped American
Robert Marsh 1:15 in the first round.

“It was very exciting,” said Saunders,
who moved up from the middleweight to
the heavyweight class. “I was very
impressed with myself in this fight.”

Saunders, fighting for the first time at
home since he won the WBA FedeCaribe
middleweight title over Floyd Trumpet on
August 10, 2007, was all over Marsh.

In fact Saunders, whose last fight was
on April 25, 2008, when he lost to Renan St
Juste in Quebec, Canada, pounded Marsh
to the canvas twice.

On the last on-slaught, Marsh fell flat
on his back. After he was given the stand-
ing eight count with one knee still on the
canvas, he got up arguing with referee Gre-
gory Storr to no avail.

“T didn’t experience what I wanted to
experience in this fight,” Saunders said. “I
was looking to get pushed around and try to
get my body beat up a bit.

SEE page 14

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 13



Arnett wins
title in 400mH

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FORMER St Augustine’s
College standout Nathan
Arnett began his tenure at Iowa
Central on a high note, while
Tasman Evans ended his on a
disappointing one over the
weekend.

At the National Junior Col-
lege Athletic Association,
Arnett won the title in the
men’s 400 metre hurdles in
51.47 seconds.

Arnett, who has rebounded
well from an injury that ham-
pered his process prior to this
year, came into the final with
the fastest qualifying time of
51.92.

“He had a fantastic race. It
was windier than it could have
been. Had it not been so windy,
I really believe that Nathan
would have ran under 50 sec-
onds,” said Denny Myers, the
head coach for the Tritons at
Iowa Central.

“It’s really taken him until
now to get back to where he
was, but he’s definitely there
and he’s ready to run fast. I
expect he will come home and
run at the championships there
and see what happens from
there.”

His team-mate Tasman
Evans of Government High
School finished eighth in the
preliminaries in 53.36. Howev-



KOBE BRYANT (AP)

Tasman Evans pulls quad, not able
to compete in final of his event

er, he didn’t contest the final
after pulling his quad leading
off the Tritons’ 4 x 100 relay
team, bringing the curtain down
on his career at lowa Central.

“That was quite disappoint-
ing because he was going to
have a great meet,” coach
Myers pointed out. “Tasman
worked really hard this year to
get to the level that he was. I
felt really bad for him.”

Arnett also competed in the
110 hurdles where he was
fourth in 14.20 with Dennis
Bain of Rend Lake sixth in
14.59. Evans also qualified for
the final because of the injury.

In the preliminary rounds,
Arnett posted the fourth fastest
time of 14.55 with Evans sixth
in 14.61 and Bain eighth in
14.64.

Bain is a freshman from Jack
Hayward High School in Grand
Bahama and a team-mate of
JPVente Deveaux, a freshman
from the Church of God High
School, who didn’t get to com-
pete.

In the 4 x 400 relay, Arnett
helped Iowa Central to third
place finish as he ran on the
third leg. The Tritons ran
3:12.09.





NATHAN ARNETT (centre) and TASMAN EVANS (far right) in action...

Two females represented
their respective in their spe-
cialties.

Shelleyeka Rolle of Barton
County was sixth in the 800
final in 2:17.31. The winning
time was 2:08.50. Rolle had the
sixth fastest qualifying time of
2:15.75.

Rolle also competed on Bar-
ton County’s 4 x 4 relay team
that ended up third.

And Keithra Richards, com-
peting for Allen County Com-
munity College, was 11th in the
long jump with her leap of 5.45
metres or 17-feet, 10 3/4-inches.
The winning leap was 20-5.

Richards also contested the
triple jump, but she failed to
post a mark in the field of 12
that saw the winning leap
recorded at 13.06 m or 42-10
4.

Bahamian athletes
shine in Brazil

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

TREVOR Barry is certainly
making the best of his exposure
on the international circuit.

After placing second in the
men’s high jump at the Fort-
aleza Grand Prix last week with
a leap of 2.22 metres or 7-feet, 3
1/3-inches, Barry improved to
2.25m or 7-41/2 to win at the
Brazilian Grand Prix on Sun-
day.

In that meet, Barry was able
to turn the tables on American
Jamie Nieto, who won in Fort-
aleza with 2.25m or 7-41/2, but
had to settle for second in
Brazil with 2.23m or 7-4.

Another victory in Brazil
came from Christine Amertil
in the women’s 400 metres in
a time of 51.67 seconds, just
ahead of Guyana’s Aliann
Pompey, who ran 51.76. Brazil-
ian Jailma Sales de Lima was
third in 52.70.

It was the second straight vic-
tory for Amertil, although the
first came in the shorter dis-
tance when she took the 200 at
Fortaleza in 23.48 with Brialian
Ana Claudia Lemos Silva com-
ing behind in 23.49.

Also from Brazil, former
IAAF World champion Der-
rick Atkins, working his way
back to his original form after a
series of injuries, had to settle
for sixth place in the men’s 100
in 10.21.

The race was won by Amer-
ican Mike Rodgers in 10.06, fol-
lowed by Great Britain’s Dwain
Chambers, who is making his
comeback after a drug suspen-
sion, in 10.11. Jamaican Lerone

Clarke was third in the same
time.

Atkins ended up eighth over-
all in the standings after the two
races were combined.

Like Barry and Amertil,
Atkins also competed at Fort-
aleza where he was fifth in the
century in 10.57. The winning
time was 10.46 by American
Leroy Dixon with Trinidad &
Tobago’s Emmanuel Callander
second in 10.47 and Frenchman
Martial Mbandjock third in
10.55.

Also in Fortaleza was Grand
Bahamian quarter-miler
Michael Mathieu, who finished
fourth in the men’s one-lapper
in 46.10. Brazil’s Eduardo de
Oliveira Vasconcelos won the
race in 45.62.

Meanwhile at the Shanghai
Meeting in China on Sunday,
sprinter Chandra Sturrup and
quarter-miler Andrea Williams
from Grand Bahama compet-
ed.

Sturrup, 38, showed that she
can still compete with the
youngsters as the veteran
pulled through with a third
place in the straight away race
in 11.38.

American Carmelita Jeter
took the tape in 11.09 with
Jamaican World champion
Shelly-Ann Fraser a little dis-
tant behind in 11.29.

And in the men’s 400,
Williams ended up ninth in
48.03.

The race was won by Amer-
ican Jeremy Wariner in a sea-
son’s best of 45.41, pulling
through his compatriot David
Neville in 45.70. Great Britain’s
Michael Bingham took third in
45.84.

Lakers look to dismantle Suns’ zone in Game 4

By BOB BAUM
AP Sports Writer



PHOENIX (AP) — Losing one game
in Phoenix was tolerable for the Los
Angeles Lakers. Two losses and things
start to get uncomfortable for the reign-
ing NBA champions.

It’s safe to say that coach Phil Jackson

was giving his team a refresher course on
how to beat a zone defense when the
Lakers worked out at US Airways Cen-
ter on Monday after Phoenix employed
the strategy to great success in its 118-
109 victory on Sunday night. The Suns
can square the series at 2-2 with anoth-
er home win in Game 4 tonight.
Jackson said he had never seen a team

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the zone, he answered sarcastically.
"Nah," he said. "We're doomed."
The Suns used the zone much of the

Features:

second quarter and the entire second
half.

Phoenix coach Alvin Gentry said that
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Los Angeles averaged 126 points and
shot 58 per cent in the series’ first two
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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

Hitmen blow away Dorsey Park Boyz



By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



CONTRASTING finishes in this
weekend’s New Providence Softball
Association action at the Blue Hills
Sporting Complex saw one team con-
tinue their offensive dominance while
another came out on top in another
close game.

In Saturday night’s opening game, the
Dorin United Hitmen blew away last
year’s powerhouse, the Dorsey Park
Boyz, 16-1, while the New Breed took
down John’s Buccaneers 4-1.

Kieron Munroe dominated both on
the mound and at the plate and was the
catalyst for his team’s lopsided win. He
pitched a complete game and in four
Innings, gave up just a single hit, one
earned run and struck out seven bat-
ters. At the plate, he went 1-3 with three
runs scored and one RBI.

The Hitmen began the offensive
onslaught in the first inning as they
mounted four runs to take an early
advantage.



SOFTBALL

Munroe, William Delancey, Richard
Bain and Alcott Forbes each crossed
the plate.

Munroe struck out two of three bat-
ters in the first as he held the Dorsey
Park Boyz scoreless for the first of three
innings.

The Hitmen followed with another
four-run inning, this time with Vincent
Seymour Jr and Darren Stevens joining
Munroe and Delancey in the runs col-
umn.

With an 8-0 lead in hand, Munroe
struck out the side to keep his shutout
intact through two innings.

Bain and Munroe added a pair of runs
for the Hitmen in the third as they took
a 10-0 lead.

The Hitmen had their most produc-
tive offensive output in the fourth inning
with six runs. The inning was highlight-
ed by home runs from Everette Neely
and Seymour.

The Dorsey Park Boyz lone run came

late in the fourth inning when Rudy Fox
crossed home plate.

Offensively for the Hitmen, Richard
Bain led the way with a perfect night at
the plate, 3-3 with three runs scored and
three RBI.

Delancey was 2-2 with the three runs
scored and one RBI, Forbes was 1-2
with two runs, Stevens was 1-2 with one
run scored, and Seymour was 1-2 with
two runs scored and two RBI.

For the Dorsey Park Boyz, Fox was 1-
1 with one run scored and one RBI.
Daniel Storr was tagged with the loss.

In the feature contest, the New Breed
held the Buccaneers to a single late
game run in the final inning and walked
away with their second consecutive 4-1
win in a defensive struggle.

The New Breed took a 1-0 lead in the
top half of the first inning when a sac fly
by Greg Gardiner plated Ken Wood.

Daniel Gonzalez pitched a complete

game in seven innings and routinely
overpowered the Buccaneers lineup as
he allowed just five hits and recorded 17
strikeouts.

He struck out the side in both the first
and second innings and both teams
remained scoreless until Gardiner scored
in the fourth to give the New Breed a 2-
0 lead.

The New Breed added a run each in
the fifth and sixth innings for a 4-0 lead.

Marcellas Hall scored the lone run
for the Buccaneers in the bottom of the
seventh inning for the game’s final mar-
gin.

Offensively for the New Breed, Wood
was 1-3 with one run scored, Gardiner
was 2-3 with one run scored and one
RBI and Garfield Bethel was 2-4.

For the Buccaneers, Cordero Pinder
was 2-2 and Hall was 1-3 with one run
scored. Charles Caroll was tagged with
the loss.







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FROM page 1B

“Unfortunately, I was able
to move around and didn’t
allow him to hit me. From the
first punch, I realised that I was
in control of the fight. From we
touched gloves, I could see the
fear in his eyes. I was ready.”

And in the other fight on the
card, Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woods
kept moving around and he
out-boxed Richard ‘The Ham-
mer’ Pitt for four rounds in an
all-Bahamian light welterweight
opener.

“T trained hard for this fight,
but coach told me not to knock
him out,” Woods said. “So I
just tried to stay away from him
and every chance I got to go
inside and box.”

There was also scheduled to
be a female boxing match
between Saunders’ wife,
Altonique ‘Lady Punisher’
Saunders and American Mia
‘Just Do It? Henderson.

But according to promoter
Michelle Minus, Henderson
wasn’t able to secure her pass-
port in time to make the trip.

She assured the fans that
when First Class puts on its
next show, they hope to have
Saunders in the ring.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS
INBRIEF

TENNIS

KNOWLES/FISH AT

ROLAND GARROS

BAHAMIAN touring
pro and his American part-
ner Mardy Fish are seeded
at No. 13 at the Roland
Garros 2010 Men’s Doubles
Championships in France
this week.

The duo have gotten a
bye in the first round. They
are not due to start playing
until Wednesday or Thurs-
day. If they are successful,
they could eventually play
the No. 2 seeded team of
Daniel Nestor and Nenad
Zimonjic in the quarter-final
and the No.5 seeds of
Mahesh Bhupathi and Max
Mirnyi in the semifinal.

Both Nestor and Bhu-
pathi are former partners of
Knowles.

The top seeds in the tour-
nament are American iden-
tical twin brothers Bob and
Mike Bryan.



SOFTBALL

NPSA ACTION

THE New Providence
Softball Association played
a double header on Satur-
day night at the Banker’s
Field at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex as the
John’s Buccaneers blanked
the Y-II Shipping New
Breed 3-0 and the Dorin
United Hitmen routed the
Dorsey Park Boyz 16-1.

Action is scheduled to
continue tonight with anoth-
er double header on tap.

In the women’s 7pm
opener, the Proper Care
Pool Lady Sharks are set to
face the Bommer G Opera-
tors and in the men’s fea-
ture contest, it will be New
Breed against the Dorsey
Park Boyz.

VOLLEYBALL

BAISS PLAYOFFS

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools are slated
to play their sudden death
junior girls and boys play-
offs 4pm today at St
Augustine’s College.

The winners from the
respective match-ups will
advance to the one-game
championship that is sched-
uled to take place 4pm
Wednesday at SAC.

Volleyball is the final
event on the sporting calen-
dar for the BAISS.

SOFTBALL

GSSSA PLAYOFFS

THE Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association is slated to play
its softball playoffs starting
4pm today at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.

The playoffs were post-
poned last week because of
the rain.

It is the final event on the
GSSSA sporting calendar
for the year.

VOLLEYBALL

BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council is scheduled to hold
a meeting 10am Saturday at
the Tom ‘The Bird’ Grant
Park for all churches inter-
ested in participating in the
2010 volleyball classic.

All interested teams are
urged to have two repre-
sentatives present as the
rules for the classic will be
discussed. The divisions will
include men, women and
17-and-under. There is a
registration fee per team in
each division.

BASKETBALL

RODGERS CAMP

“BUILDING Healthy
Bodies With Positive
minds” is what the 23rd
annual Jeff Rodgers Bas-
ketball Camp intends to do
this year.

This camp will expose
young people to talented
skilled instructors, inspiring
guest speakers, qualified
college coaches and NBA
players who will interact,
inform and perform for the
campers.

The camp has assisted
with promoting positive
character traits, instilling
good sportsmanship skills
and building teamwork
while developing the sound
fundamentals of basketball
in each camper.

The camp kicks off on
Monday, July 5, and is set
to run Friday, July 30, from
9am to 1pm at the HD Col-
burn Gymnatorium at
Bahamas Academy, Wulff
Road.

The camp is designed for
players between the ages of
5-19. Interested persons can
call 393-3381 for further
details.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 15

French Ambassador visits Balamas and

decorates former Honorary French Consul

















El al! : 4
MARC-OLIVIER GENDRY, French Ambassador to the Bahamas with residence in Kingston, Jamaica, recently
visited Nassau and took the opportunity to call on the Brent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister
of Foreign Affairs, John Delaney, Attorney General and Alvin Smith, Speaker of the House of Assembly, as
well as his counterparts from the American, Brazilian and Haitian embassies.

Irene Graham, formerly Iréne von Honingen Huene, Honorary Consul for France in the Bahamas from
1988 to 2003, was honoured by the French Republic for her dedication and work in this function. She
received the insignia of Officier de Ordre National du Mérite from Ambassador Gendry at a reception offered
by Alec Head at Lyford Cay. Ambassador Gendry thanked her for 15 years of loyal and dedicated service to
France and French citizens residing in The Bahamas. Dominique Lefevre, the new Honorary French Consul to
the Bahamas and Peter Graham, spouse of Irene Graham were among guests at the reception.

Pictured (left to right) are: Dominique Lefevre, Ghislaine Head, Ambassador Marc-Olivier Gendry, Irene
Graham, Alec Head, Peter Graham.

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





unancial SHENG Hating

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

palondar contest

speci contest latais listed of our Wwelisite Visit www.fami yguardian.com for

Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for special hints and contest details!

the company’s 2011 calendar will be “A Celebration of Nature”. Photographs may be of any Tita aaa RRR ERROR RRR RTE RTI mR aR |

subject (animate or inanimate), scene or histrocial structure that features a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas. entry 10 f) rll

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 30, 2010. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk
and will not be returned.

Return this form with photos and CD to:

Calendar Contest

Family Guardian Corporate Centre
Village Road & East Bay Street, P.O. Box SS-6232
Nassau, Bahamas




~—__A+ Exepilont

3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village Road and
East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00a.m and 5:00p.m weekdays only. Envelopes should
be marked “Calendar Contest”.

4 Allentries must be accompanied by a signed and completed official entry form, available
at any Family Guardian office, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.
familyguardian.com).








































5 Only colour images willbe considered. Images must be provided as digital files on CD. Digital
images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure















the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality Se
_ JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be Telephone: B H G -
with colour prints (8x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints i LOBSTER TAILS
itted without CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name, EMail:
ject and photo location must be written on the reverse of the print. P.O. Box: MANY of the top restau-
ntries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality Reise i. at = Paradise
hotograph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the s open oe tee ee
; Restaurant Week all this week
ilyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Address: : : :
Mctnedecision of the iud il be final with signature dishes and
I eee uon te Wages will be minal. Island: seafood specialties on a fixed-



ued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs
dits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per

of 5 photos.

Il publication and reproduction rights attached

1 and the company reserves the right to

price menu for one week.

It's all part of the lead-up to
the Great Bahamian Seafood
& Wine Festival set for May 28
and 29.

Fifteen of the top restaurants
in Nassau and Paradise Island
will flex their culinary muscles
during the Great Bahamian
Seafood and Wine Festival with
a range of unique menus.

"The restaurants are going
all out, creating menus that

Number of Photos Entered (a maximum of 5):

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as
a winner in the 2011 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the
property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all
rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos
entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have
not been previously published.



Signature Date



— .



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Tr: }
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TRAVEL





ae
siz Ao AGENTS ‘& ye
a jwW.|sjohnson.com

Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 § d Ne 3 6286
Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420

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offer mouth-watering dishes
made from local seafood --
conch, grouper, crawfish, tuna,
mahi-mahi and stone crab,"
said De Anne Gibson, Ministry
of Tourism, which is partner-
ing with the Downtown Nassau
Partnership and the Ministry of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources for the event.

"In these challenging times,
what makes it even more
appealing is that the best of
Bahamian seafood in the finest
of Bahamian restaurants is
being offered on a greatly dis-
counted pre-fixe menu. What
we truly hope is that our visitors
will take home wonderful mem-
ories of The Bahamas that will
whet their appetite for a return
visit."

According to Downtown
Nassau Partnership managing
director Vaughn Roberts, the
response from restaurants has
been "overwhelming."

"For the first of its kind, I
think we've put together an
impressive list of participating
eateries for restaurant week
and they in turn have assem-
bled an equally impressive
assortment of exotic dishes,"
Roberts said. "Their response
has been overwhelming.”

Some of the best-known
restaurants from August Moon
in Lyford Cay to The Bahami-
an Club at Atlantis, from Gray-
cliff in the heart of historic Nas-
sau to Drifters at Arawak Cay
and nearly a dozen more, chefs
are planning to showcase their
kitchen wizardry with morsels
of the sea.

Conch

Additionally on Saturday,
May 29, thousands are expected
to flock to a full-day of festival
activities including chef demon-
strations, conch cracking con-
test, conch fritter competition,
dozens of seafood stalls, live
musical performances and a
blessing of the fleet. The official
day-long festival that will
include a children's section is
set for Junkanoo Beach East,
just west of the British Colo-
nial Hilton on West Bay Street.
Tickets are $3 and available at
the gate. Bank of The Bahamas
is providing festival dollars for
a cashless, secure environment.

Festival sponsors include
Bank of The Bahamas, Bristol
Cellars, British Colonial Hilton,
Burns House, Caribbean Bot-
tling Co. (Coca-Cola), Diane
Phillips & Associates, Geneva
Brass, Graycliff, John Bull Ltd,
Paradise Fisheries, Phil's Food
Service, Smith & Benjamin and
The Sign Man.

Details about the festival and
restaurant week can be made
available by contacting the
DNP at 326-0992 or e-mail
vroberts@downtownnassau.org
or check out www.downtown-
nassau.org/seafoodfestival html









A SERVING of delicious crab
claws served with peppers, diced
tomato, dill and lemon. Crab
cracker in the background for
breaking in to the hard shells.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY,

ine

MAY 25,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net







KEITH DAVIES

BISX to use UK
recognition as
‘launching pad

)

* UK tax authority designation
to act as marketing tool in
garnering new business for
exchange, granting listed
securities certain
tax exemptions

* Move shows potential
benefits to Bahamas from
TIEA signing, as BISX seeks
other international
designations

* Move seen as ‘validation’ of
exchange’s work, as it moves
to close on two new listings

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) is aiming to use
‘recognition’ from Great
Britain’s tax authority as a
“launch pad” to both attract
new UK business/fund listings
and a similar status with oth-
er countries, the development
proving there are beneficial
spin-offs from signing Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs).

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness that becoming a desig-
nated ‘recognised stock
exchange’ with the UK’s HM
Revenue and Customs
(HMRC) was “a validation of
the work we’re doing”.

He explained that this sta-
tus would enable certain secu-
rities and investment struc-
tures to obtain various tax-
related exemptions from the
UK by virtue of listing on
BISX as a ‘recognised stock
exchange’, a feature that
could prove very attractive in
gaining new business for the
Bahamian exchange.

Pledging that BISX
planned to “go out and mar-
ket it, and let people know
that we have this designa-
tion”, Mr Davies told Tribune
Business: “It’s excellent news
when you get this type of
recognition. It’s a validation
of things that you’re doing. It
indicates you’re on the right
track and of international

SEE page 4B



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Kerzner plans $100m
worth of PI upgrades

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



erzner International

will this year begin a

$100 million project to

renovate its existing

Paradise Island proper-
ties, which include Atlantis and the
One & Only Ocean Club, a move that
is set to create some 400 jobs.

It is unclear whether those posts are
permanent or temporary, although
sources familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business they could be per-
manent, full-time jobs. Regardless, the
move is likely to be seen as a shot of
much-needed confidence for the
Bahamian economy, providing imme-
diate work for the construction indus-
try.

Approvals for the renovations have
been obtained from the Government,
it is understood, with one source telling
Tribune Business: “Kerzner is going to
do $100 million worth of stuff on Par-
adise Island, with some of the work
to start this year.”

Neither George Markantonis,
Kerzner International (Bahamas)
managing director, nor company
spokesman Ed Fields, have returned
Tribune Business calls seeking com-
ment on the issue over the past week,
this newspaper having learned of the
project 10 days ago.

Project could create up to 400 jobs,
sources tell Tribune Business

It is also unclear whether the Par-
adise Island upgrades include the pro-
posed Hurricane Hole project, which
was shelved by Kerzner International
when the recession took hold in 2008-
2009. That project included redevel-
oping the former Hurricane Hole
Shopping Plaza and Marina into a sec-
ond Marina Village-style development,
plus timeshare offering. Such a pro-
ject would certainly create something
close top 400 full-time jobs.

Tribune Business previously report-
ed that Stephen Wrinkle, the Bahami-
an Contractors Association’s (BCA)
president, said he "understood" that
Kerzner International was in the
process of applying for permits so it
could both renovate its existing Par-
adise Island properties and revive its
Hurricane Hole project.

"They're trying to get their approval
process complete so they can get
scheduled work, to my understanding,
on the Hurricane Hole project and
some renovation work. They were
talking about a January start,” Mr
Wrinkle said. "There will be a big
boom, which will make a pleasant
change."

Meanwhile, over at Cable Beach,
the $2.6 billion Baha Mar project is
still awaiting approval from both the
Bahamian and Chinese governments,
Tribune Business has been informed.

It is understood that there are
numerous conditions precedent that
still have to be fulfilled, many of them
similar to Baha Mar’s previous agree-
ments with Harrah’s Entertainment.

The key issue, Tribune Business has
been told, is for Baha Mar to success-
fully resolve the issue over Scotia-
bank’s $170 million syndicated loan
that financed the developer’s acquisi-
tion of the existing Cable Beach prop-
erties.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar's senior
vice-president for governmental and
external affairs, last week confirmed
that talks between the two parties were
continuing, although he provided no
details.

As revealed by this newspaper pre-
viously, Baha Mar needs to success-
fully resolve the situation over the Sco-
tiabank loan, as it is said to be secured
on the existing Sheraton Cable Beach,

SEE page 7B

Police protie
‘more than’ 100
suspected henefit
fraud cases

* NIB amendments
to be tabled in House
in next 60-90 days

* Some $24.24m paid out
to 16,700 unemployed
Bahamians since
programme started,
although monthly
claimants taper
off to just 400

* Benefits paid out $1m
below projections, while
contribution income
ahead of target
year-to-date at $53m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

POLICE are currently
investigating “more than” 100
cases of suspected unemploy-
ment benefit fraud, the
National Insurance Board’s
(NIB) director has told Tri-
bune Business, with some 22



SEE page 6B



and ‘mainstay

Fix revenues

9

of economy

THE Customs Department

Automated plans to slash Customs clearance time

By NEIL HARTNELL

. . :
Tribune Business Editor Department testing new system It

hopes to go live with ‘within a month’

* Ex-finance minister
expresses concern revenue
forecasts too optimistic,
with recession-hit 2009-
2010 predictions
above previous year

* Says Bahamas has greater
medium and long-term
problem than 2010-2011
Budget - ‘fixing an economy
not performing to potential’

* Government likely to use
mixture of revenue
enhancements/spending
freezes to get public
finances back in line,
with suggestions politicians
to lead by example

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance minis-
ter has expressed concern that
the Government’s revenue
forecasts have been too opti-
mistic and failed to account for
the recession, while warning
that the Bahamas needed to
tackle “fundamental structur-

SEE page 8B

is aiming to slash the time tak-
en to clear/process imports
even further once it initiates an
automated process which,
“within a month”, will allow
brokers and frequent importers
access to its computer system
to input goods and duty
amounts.

Responding to assertions by
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president that small
businesses, in particular,
endured an “ordeal” that lasted
one-and-half days in getting
necessary equipment and goods
cleared through Customs,
Comptroller Glenn Gomez

* Comptroller describes Chamber chief’s
Customs complaints as ‘not true’

denied this was true.

“That’s not true,” he told Tri-
bune Business of Khaalis
Rolle’s comments. “That may
have been true a year ago, but
not so now; that’s definitely not
the case now.”

Pointing out that problems
experienced before a broker or
company got to the Customs
Department were not its
responsibility, Mr Gomez said
the process of getting through
its procedures took “‘a matter of

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

hours” if everything was in
order.

While it may take brokers
with multiple entries a day or so
to get everything cleared in
Customs, Mr Gomez said: “The
time taken may be in prepar-
ing the documents to come to
Customs, but once they come
to Customs it’s not a long
process - it’s a couple of hours.”

The Comptroller also

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

OU eA eT



advancer and the other secu-
rities remaining unchanged.
EQUITY MARKET
A total of 50,698 shares

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

trading in the Bahamian stock
market. Investors traded in
11 out of the 24 listed securi-
ties, with three decliners, one

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changed hands, representing
an increase of 6,465 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
44,233 shares.

Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Company
(PRE) was the volume leader,
trading 31,238 shares to see
its stock close the week
unchanged at $10.

First Caribbean Interna-
tional Bank (BAH) (CIB) was
last week's big decliner, trad-
ing 1,300 shares to end the
week with its share price
down $0.75 at $9.85.

AML Foods (AML) was
the sole advancer for the
week, trading 5,000 shares to
end the week with its stock
up $0.01 at $1.05.

BOND MARKET

One FBB Series D Due
May 30, 2015, traded in the
bond market at a total value
of $1,000.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Cable Bahamas (CAB)
released its unaudited finan-
cial results for the quarter
ending March 31, 2010. Net
income and comprehensive
income fell from $7.5 million
in the 2009 first quarter to
$4.7 million, down by $2.8
million or 37.3 per cent.

Total revenues of $22 mil-
lion were up slightly by
$987,000 or 4.7 per cent from
$21.1 million in the 2009 first
quarter, while operating
expenses of $11.9 million
increased by $2 million or 21.2
per cent. Management attrib-
uted this to increased regula-
tory costs associated with the
liberalisation of the telecom-
munications industry, as well
as increased hiring by the
company in anticipation of
new growth opportunities.

It was also noted that both
interest expense, as well as
dividends paid on preferred
shares, totalling $1.8 million,
increased significantly by $1.2
million quarter-over-quarter,
with management indicating
that the higher costs were a
direct result of financing
arrangements relating to the



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e

The Bahamian Stock Market
FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.05 $0.01 5,000 -10.26%
BBL $0.33 -$0.07 2,000 -47 62%
BOB $5.20 -$0.04 1,500 -11.86%
BPF $10.63 $- 0 -1.02%
BSL $9.42 $- 0 -6.36%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $12.07 $- 830 20.94%
CBL $6.99 $- 0 -0.14%
CHL $2.84 $- 0 441%
CIB $9.85 -$0.75 1,300 -1.40%
CWCB $2.42 -$0.22 0 -15.09%
DHS $2.54 $ 6,000 -0.39%
FAM $6.07 $- 150 -6.47%
FBB $2.17 $- 0 -8.44%
FCC $0.27 $- 0 0.00%
FCL $5.08 iS 2,000 6.50%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $9.00 $- 680 -3.02%
ICD $5.59 $- 0 0.00%
JSJ $9.95 $- 0 0.00%
PRE $10.00 $- 31,238 0.00%





International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

Columbus Communications
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compared to $0.38 in the 2009
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1,087.69 -4.23
2,229.04 -5.02
9,784.54 -6.48

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THE TRIBUNE

OO BUSINESS
Public procurement

reform ‘long overdue’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contrac-
tors Association’s (BCA)
president has praised pro-
posed reforms to the Gov-
ernment’s public procurement
process as bringing “‘a sense of
parity and legitimacy” to pub-
lic construction contract ten-
ders, but urged that they must
be complemented by licens-
ing and certification for the
industry.

Stephen Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business that the pro-
posed reforms to public pro-
curement in the Bahamas,
which have been detailed by
this newspaper over the past
week, were “long overdue”,
and he expressed hope that it
would alleviate problems
experienced by local govern-
ment administrations in the
Family Islands when it came
to evaluating planning/con-
struction submissions.

“Tt’s wonderful,” Mr Wrin-
kle said of the reform plans.
“Tt will certainly instill a sense
of parity and legitimacy to the
tender process for our indus-
try.

“T think in recent times we
have seen a little more trans-
parency in the tender process,
but there’s definitely room for
improvement, and as we
move forward and the scope
of work is enlarged, it’s
important we have this trans-

* Contractors chief says proposals will aid Family Island local
governments in evaluating planning/construction submissions

* But warns that changes can only work in harmony with legislation to govern industry

* Praises FNM for clearing up perceived unfairness/corruption

that has persisted in public construction contracts

parency element to it.”

The reforms, as detailed by
Tribune Business previously,
under the guise of regulations
are designed to comply with
the Bahamas’ obligations
under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) and
the World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO), and introduce
"international best practices"
into the Bahamas.

While the award of many
contracts would still be decen-
tralised, with Procurement
Units and Tenders Commit-
tees much in evidence, the
consultants have recom-
mended the creation of a Pub-
lic Procurement Department,
headed by a Chief Procure-
ment Officer, which would
engage in centralised pro-
curement for goods and ser-
vices used across government
departments.

The recommendations also
involve the creation of a Pub-
lic Procurement Board, which
will be formed from members
appointed by the private sec-
tor and Ministry of Finance,
to oversee all government
procurement.

And, unlike the current

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |,

FLORENTINA

GABRIELLA MARIA HANNA-JOSHI of Stapledon Gardens,
PO. BOX 55-5217, Nassau. Bahamas intend to change

my name to FLORENTINA GABRIELLA MARIA HANNA.
If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Cheet
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
ater than thirty (30) days aller the date of publication ol

This notice



GOVERNM
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

structure, an Independent
Procurement Review Tri-
bunal will be created to
"determine all appeals, mat-
ters and disputes" relating to
government contracts that
come under its jurisdiction.
This will provide a formal
avenue of appeal to disgrun-
tled bidders that currently
does not exist.

Mr Wrinkle told Tribune
Business that the Public Pro-
curement Department could
provide a cadre of “experts
that can better analyse the
tenders”, and provide sound
advice to local government
administrations in the Family
Islands.

“As it stands now, we have
a significant problem in the
Family Islands,” the BCA
president said. “Many times,
local governments are review-
ing these proposals, and in
some instances they don’t
have the knowledge to evalu-
ate them properly from a con-
struction standpoint.

“Tf this [reform] process
moves forward, it will help
alleviate these problems and
give local councils access to
expert opinion and expert
advice, which they seem to
have difficulty in getting. If
they have a Public Procure-
ment Department, it will give
them a good avenue to expert
advice.”

When asked how much
perceived unfairness/corrup-
tion there had been when it
came to construction con-
tracts issued by the public sec-
tor, Mr Wrinkle told Tribune
Business: “I would say that in
the past there’s been a lot of
it, but in recent times the
work I’ve observed being car-

Procurement for Cleaning Supplies for the Year 2010

1.0 The Ministry of Education (hereafter called the “Purchaser”’) now
invites sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement Cleaning
Supplies for the School Year 2010.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from
the Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education,
Headquarters, The Teacher’s Credit Union Building, East Street,
from Monday 3%May, 2010, and obtain further information, at the
second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a
sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed
with the subject bided on (“Cleaning Supplies” ).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first
address, on or before Friday, 21st May, 2010 by 5:00 p.m (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since It may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of
those Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend,
at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th May, 2010 at the first address

below.

(1) The Chairman Tender’
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-2700

6.0 The Ministry reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tender.



ried out has been a lot better
controlled and administered.

“This [FNM] administra-
tion has demonstrated a will-
ingness to provide trans-
parency measures to the point
where the quality of work is
improving. I’ve seen it in the
court buildings in Nassau
Street, the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.”

In addition, Mr Wrinkle
said the tender/bid documents
for the ground floor recon-
struction of the former Ans-
bacher building on down-
town’s Bank Lane, aiming to
turn it into the Supreme
Court building, had been pre-
sented in a “comprehensive
package” that was well-
researched.

The Government, the BCA
president added, was moving
to get ‘value for money’ and
ensure “investment up front is
paying dividends at the back
end. They don’t want to issue
contracts to people who are
not qualified”.

However, Mr Wrinkle said
the proposed public procure-
ment reforms could only work
if his favourite tool, the Con-
tractors Bill, was passed into
law to certify, licence and reg-
ulate the industry.

“All these other things are
spokes to the wheel, but the
actual hub must be licensing
for contractors, and it is only
by passing measures to
licence, regulate and control
the industry, and therefore
the standards, that we will see
best practices applied in the
field,” the BCA president
said, adding that the Bahamas
had been tinkering “around
the edges” of this issue for too
long.

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 3B

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NOTICE

In The Estate WILLIAM LEO RUMNEY,
late of Water Street in the Town of Elizabethtown in
the Country of Essex in the States of New York, one
of the States of the United States of America.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the Undersigned on or before the 6th day of
July, 2010, after which date the Executirix will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only to

the claims of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date hereinbe-
fore metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executrix
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010
SINE
BISX to use UK recognition as ‘launching pad’

FROM page 1B

standard. It’s also important
for the jurisdiction; let’s make
that clear.”

The BISX chief executive
explained that obtaining the
HMRC designation had “tak-
en us a while”, the exchange
having approached the UK
government’s chief customs
and tax authority over the
issue in early to mid-2009.
One of the initial issues, espe-
cially given that the designa-
tion conferred certain tax
benefits on listed entities, was
the absence of a TIEA
between the UK and the
Bahamas.

“One of the stumbling
blocks was that the Bahamas
did not have a TIEA with the
UK, as it does now,” Mr
Davies explained. “When we
initially approached them, it
was made very clear to us that
any recognition would hinge

wre
PUBLIGNOTICE (Gy

~ RELOCATION OF THE SAN SALVADOR &
NORTH ELEUTHERA LOCAL OFFICES ~

For the information of residents in the affected communities, the
National Insurance Board wishes to advise that effective June 1,
2010, its San Salvador Local Office in San Salvador, and North

Eleuthera Local Office in Lower Bogue,

Eleuthera, will be

relocated. The San Salvador office will move from ils current
location in the Carter Williams Building, Queens Highway, to “The
Plaza,” which ts situated near the San Salvador Community Clinic,
also on Queens Highway in Cockburn Town. The North Eleuthera
office will move from its current location in the Glen Albury

Building in Lower Bogue, to “Builders Square,”

Lower Bogue.

Queens Highway,

Minit deca x Marine esol boo

ts

7

at itt



PHD

WAY

on whether the Bahamas ini-
tialled a TIEA with the UK.
Upon the Bahamas signing
with the UK, we were able to
submit our updated applica-
tion and met all the require-
ments the HMRC had to be a
recognised stock exchange.”

Detailing the background
that led to BISX’s initial
approach, the BISX chief
executive added: “We were
approached by an entity that
was seeking to list a number
of securities with us interna-
tionally, and they queried us
on whether they have certain
recognitions.

“We had already looked at
it from another angle, but had
a direct approach from a
client interested in using the
exchange and decided to pur-
sue it further.”

Under the HMRC designa-
tion, securities listed and trad-
ed on BISX meet certain
requirements of the UK’s
Income Tax Act 2007, with
the exchange also regarded
as a recognised stock
exchange for Inheritance Tax
purposes.

“Part of the designation

means that for securities
claiming certain exemptions
and standards in the UK, by
the fact they have their secu-
rities in the Bahamas listed
on our exchange, they will
receive certain designations
and exemptions afforded
them by HMRC for certain
types of investments,” Mr
Davies said. “We qualify to
meet certain exemptions
under their tax code asa
result of entities being listed
on a recognised exchange.”
In turn, this would allow
investment structures and
securities to “set up shop
here, comfortably list here
and comply with home coun-
try” tax laws. In short, a per-
fect tool for BISX to attract
additional business from the

“We’re able to attract busi-
ness that has been precluded
or prevented from using the
exchange, because we did not
qualify for the specific exemp-
tions,” Mr Davies said. “All
the securities listed on our
exchange meet their qualifi-
cations for being listed on a
recognised stock exchange.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Please be informed that

MS. KASHAN DURHAM

is no longer employed with
Advantage Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd.
and is therfore not authorized to do business
in any way on behalf of the company.



THE TRIBUNE

“That is an added feature
we did not have, that we’re
able to offer to structures and
investment vehicles in the
Bahamas. It behooves us to
go out and market it, and let
people know we have the des-
ignation in the Bahamas.”

BISX is hoping the
Bahamian investment funds
industry, plus its internation-
al contacts and service
providers, will assist it in these
efforts.

“We hope this will be a
launch pad for other interna-
tional recognitions, and we
are pursuing others as we
speak,” Mr Davies said.

“There are benefits that
accrue to structures for inher-
itance tax purposes and other
exemptions specific to the UK
tax code. We’re going to go
out there and try and make
this worth our while.”

He praised the work done
by BISX executive Holland
Grant in obtaining the
HMRC designation.

HMRC required BISX “to
have rules and regulations
that are of a standard that
meets international norms of
transparency” when it came
to listings and their gover-
nance. Those regulations also
needed to be “clear and con-
cise”, modern and allow BISX
to proactively regulate the
market and its participants.

“They must have found our
rules met the minimum stan-
dards they had for proper reg-
ulation of a jurisdiction,” Mr
Davies told Tribune Business.
“Tt allows them to look quite
deeply into what you do, and
ask deep questions about how
you operate. We were able to
provide them with concise dis-
closure covering all aspects of
the market and all aspects of
operations, and what we do
day-to-day.”

Meanwhile, Mr Davies said
BISX hoped to announce
another new listing this week,
which is believed to be the
Government’s recent $300
million US dollar-denominat-
ed bond issue. He did not
confirm this, but added that
the exchange was also work-
ing “to close an extra one”.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
IMPORTANT NOTICE

NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY

ALL PERSONS WHO HAVE COMPLETED HIGH SCHOOL IN THE BAHAMAS

AND WHO HAVE OBTAINED

FIVE (£2) BGOCSE AT GRADES A, BL OR C

(inclusive of Wathenmaties anid

ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE A NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY TO ATTEND THE

COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.

ALL AWARDS WILL COVER TUITION AND LAB FEES AND WILL ONLY BE
PAYABLE TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

TO QUALIFY, PERSONS MUST:

- SUBMIT A COMPLETED APPLICATION FORM (ON OR BEFORE MAY 28, 2010)

- MUST BE BAHAMIAN CITIZEN

- HAWE BGCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND MATHEMATICS AT GRADES
4, 6,08 G INCLUDED IN THE FIVE SUBJECTS REQUIRED

- HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

INTO AN APPROVED COLLEGE LEVEL PROGRAMME

- PURSUE 4

1 ITH

- MAINTAIN A 3.0 GPA PER SEMESTER AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TERTIARY DEPARTMENT
TEACHERS & SALARIED WORKERS COOPERATIVE CREDIT UNION BUILDING

EAST STREET SOUTH & EAST-WEST ADGA AW

P.0. BOX S-F91a'14
ASSAD, BAHAMAS

Tel: 302-2700

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MAY 28, 2010

Application forms can also be downloaded
from www. bahamaseducation.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

explained that not everyone
who came to Customs had to
go through its Valuation
Department, which largely
dealt with high-end, luxury
goods that attracted the major
tariffs, such as cars.

And he took issue with Mr
Rolle’s complaints about long
queues to pay the duty due,
telling Tribune Business that
there were always three
cashiers on duty and “no need
for long lines. There’s no need
for people to be hanging
around here”. There were also
three to four windows where
entries were submitted, with
one allocated for dealing with
queries.

“In fact, we’re looking with-
in a month or so, once we get
the electronic processing, at cut-
ting that [waiting time] even
more,” Mr Gomez told this
newspaper.

“What that would mean is
that persons who frequent cus-
toms, brokers and frequent
importers, are given a password
to access our system and key
in the information” on their
imports and the duty payable.

Once that is picked up by
Customs personnel and veri-
fied, Mr Gomez said the busi-
nesses and brokers involved
would be able to come in, pay
and then pick-up the relevant
shipments.

“We’re looking to that to
give us tremendous turn-
around,” the Comptroller
added. “We’ve been working
on it for a couple of months,
and just about worked out all
the bugs. In a week or so, we’ll
be doing live testing with a cou-
ple of brokers and large
importers, and once complete,
we’ll go public with it.

“Tm not content with what
we’re doing now. The thing is
to modernise and move
processes forward. This is not
the 80s and 90s. This is 2010.”

With the new automated sys-
tem, Mr Gomez said brokers
and large importers would just
have to leave their offices to
pay the required duty, before
going to collect the shipment,
thus cutting time spent in deal-
ing with Customs.

And while paying the
required duty, Mr Gomez said
the importer could dispatch
personnel to the dock to pick

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 5B

Automated plans to slash Customs clearance time

up the goods at the same time.
Customs officers there would
be able to tell via computer
once the required duty was
paid.

In his comments to Tribune
Business last week, Mr Rolle
told this newspaper that the
process of clearing imported
goods and equipment (for use
in a business) could be "an
ordeal in and of itself", espe-
cially for small businesses, as
clearance could take up to one-
and-a-half days.

"That's a cost, a direct cost,
and I'd like that to be min-
imised and the processes of
Customs to be more transpar-
ent, predictable and efficient,"
he added.

Currently, Mr Rolle said
many small Bahamian compa-
nies were unable to afford to

hire customs brokers to handle
their imports. They had to first
fill out the relevant forms, take
them to a broker to determine
the applicable duty rates, and
then go to the Valuation
Department at Customs.

Once Valuation had accept-
ed the forms and duty rates,
businesses then had to go to
another section of Customs
which then accepted/rejected
whatever Valuation had done.
Finally, businesses had to stand
in “a long line" to pay their
bills, then return to another sec-
tion to claim their products.

"It's burdensome, anda
nightmare for small business-
es," Mr Rolle said. "Big busi-
nesses can manage because
they can afford brokers, but for
small businesses it becomes a
real burden.

NOTICE

In The Estate Anne C. Doyle
late of 3640 North Ocean Drive in the
City of Singer Island in the Country of
Palm Beach in the State of Florida one
of the States of the United States of

America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send before the 24th day of June,
2010, after which date the Administrators will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only
to the claims of which they shall then have had

notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date herein-
before metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators

Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas



ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE









SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department’s Triage, Registration and Patient Walting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic.

Effective Tuesday May !/th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed.

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services.

For more information please call 502-7885 for A&E Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic,

al i



THE INSURANCE COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Analyst

The newly formed Insurance Commission (a statutory corporation) is seeking analysts

to assist with the on-site and off-site examination of insurance companies and
intermediaries.

Responsibilities

* Reports to the Chief Analyst/Superintendent

* Responsible for the supervision of other analysts /directly responsible for
the examination of licensees to ensure that licensees are compliant with
prudential requirements through on-site and off-site examinations

¢ Prepare/vet the preparation of examination reports

* Prepare/vet/approve on-site/off-site financial analysis, letters and other
correspondence as necessary

* Ensure that licensees databases are maintained

¢ Supervision of other analysts/directly responsible for the assessment of new

applications for licensees

* Contributes to the refining of supervisory methodology, policy development

and the formulation of new/revised legislation and the related guidelines
* Provide advice and information to licensees and the wider public regarding
complaints and questions about licensees’ performance

Qualifications/Skills

* Professional Accountant / MBA in accounting /Certification in Insurance/
experience in the insurance industry

¢ Financial analysis skills

¢ Excellent leadership, communications, teamwork and organization skills

* Proficient in Microsoft office products to intermediate level

* Ability to work independently and multi-task

* Excellent written and oral communications skills

* Knowledge of insurance industry an asset

Compensation
A competitive compensation package commensurate with relevant experience and

qualifications.

Deadline
31 May 2010

Application including comprehensive resume to be submitted by e-mail addresses to:
info@icb.gov.bs



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and
implementation of a strategic public relations and communication program together
with the effective and efficient planning and execution of all corporate events and
activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

Assisting with the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate
Programs plan to support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Overseeing the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations
programs, plan and budget;

Assisting with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation
and, where necessary, the wider community;

Preparing and distributing the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directing press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press
releases, photographs, fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management
and Media Representatives;

Coordinating the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion
surveys;

Providing assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in
writing speeches, preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluating and assessing customer complaints, queries and disseminating
information to management;

Assisting with the development, implementation and management of external
communication efforts;

Coordinating marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the
external Public Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifying and liaising with service providers to secure speakers, presenters
and entertainment for Corporate events;

Liaising with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e.
awards, invitations, prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as
necessary and maintaining an inventory of the same;

Preparing and distributing all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices)
relative to Corporate activities, as necessary;

Creating and updating all standard operation procedures for all activities, as
necessary;

Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of
bills for all events and activities as necessary;

Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate
activities;

Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company
newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information
relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business
Communication, or equivalent.

A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;

Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management
and public groups;

Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities

Excellent time management and organizational skills

Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications
Good analytical skills

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Police probe ‘more than’ 100
suspected benefit fraud cases

FROM page 1B

amendments to the NIB Act
and accompanying regulations
expected to be tabled in the

House of Assembly within the
next 60-90 days.

Confirming that NIB exec-
utives had met recently with
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force on the issue, Algernon

IN THE ESTATE OF LAGLORIA
MILLER nee RUSSELL a.k.a.
LAGLORIA ELOUISE RUSSELL
a.k.a. GLORIA ELOUISE RUSSELL
late of Water Street, Big Pond in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is herby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 9th day of June, A.D. 2010,

after which date the Executrix will proceed
to distribute the estate having regard only
to the claims of which she shall have had

notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make
full settlement on or before the date
hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 24th day of May, A.D. 2010

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas



“Mieceting the needs of advertisers

and readers motivates me to da

a good job. The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PROOUCTION MANAGER

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune
My Voice. My Hewspaper!

Cargill said: “They are cur-
rently investigating more than
100 cases of unemployment
benefit fraud.

“Once we detect fraud we
pass things over to the police.
Fraud is detected when con-
tributions come in for benefit
claimants, so we know they
must be working.”

Still, Mr Cargill said the
unemployment benefit initia-
tive had, in NIB’s view, ful-
filled its aim of providing
much-needed income support
to Bahamians struggling to
make ends meet after being
laid-off, or unable to find
work, as a consequence of the
recession.

Since the Government
started the initiative last year,
Mr Cargill said some 16,168
Bahamians had received
unemployment benefit, with
NIB paying out a collective
$24.24 million to date. That
has been funded by the $20
million transfer from NIB’s
medical branch that was
effected last year, and going
forward will be financed by
the collective 1 per cent
increase in contribution rates
- split evenly between
employer and employee - that
will take effect imminently.

Mr Cargill, though, con-
firmed that the number of
new registrants for the unem-

TECHNOLOGY

COMPANY LIMITED

New Office Hours

Monday - Friday

9am -

6pm

Saturdays
10am - 4pm



ployment benefit had
“tapered off significantly” -
possibly reflecting the
reduced pace of lay-offs. The
average number of monthly
claimants in 2010 had
declined to 400 per month,
compared to 1,500 a month
in 2009.

“People are graduating, and
very few new people are
being added on,” Mr Cargill
said. “The new qualifying
rules will apply to newly-qual-
ified unemployed persons.”

Reflecting on the unem-
ployment benefit initiative as
a whole, the NIB director
said: “It has gone better than
expected in terms of manage-
ment of the programme.
We’ve been able to provide
assistance for 16,000.

“We estimated that total
expenditure would be $20 mil-
lion last year, and it was
approximately $20.7 million
last year, so in terms of expen-
diture we were pretty close to
expectations.”

Besides dealing with short-
term issues, NIB has also
been looking towards the
Fund’s long-term sustainabil-
ity, and in line with recom-
mendations from its eighth
actuarial review and 2005
Social Security Reform Com-
mission report, is moving to
implement 22 amendments to
achieve that effect.

Confirming that discussions
had been held on the issue
with the Chamber of Com-
merce, employer groups and
the trade unions, Mr Cargill
told Tribune Business: “We
are in the present stages of
drafting the amendments to
the NIB Act, and expect that
in 60-90 days that the minister
will table those in the House

of Assembly.”
Mr Cargill said two critical
amendments were the

changes in the insurable wage
ceiling and the number of
weekly contributions required

to be eligible for retirement
benefit.

On the former, NIB will
raise the insurable wage ceil-
ing from $400 per week to
$500 per week in January
2011, followed by a further
rise from $500 to $600 in July
2012. Thereafter, the insur-
able wage ceiling will be
increased every two years in
July, using a formula calcu-
lated by the change in the
Bahamas Retail Price Index
over that time plus 2 per cent.

On the retirement benefit
side, NIB is moving to
increase the number of con-
tributions required from 150
weeks or three years to 500
weeks or 10 years.

“These changes also mean
higher benefits and more rel-
evant benefits,” Mr Cargill
said. “We want to make sure
benefits are relevant.”

For 2010 to-date, the NIB
director said benefits paid out
were $1 million below fore-
cast, largely due to the intro-
duction of the Med-4 form
last year, requiring employ-
ers to confirm that workers
were genuinely off work sick
or injured. That resulted in a
$3 million reduction in such
claims in 2009, a trend that
has continued into 2010.

On the contributions side,
NIB was ahead of forecast for
year-to-date with some $53
million received, having beat-
en its predictions for last year
also.

Mr Cargill added that NIB
was committed to imple-
menting the changes to guar-
antee its long-term relevancy
today.

“We want to continue to
reduce the operating expense
base and, even more impor-
tantly, we want to improve
customer service. The higher
the level of customer service
is, the more pleased the
Bahamian public will be with
NIB,” Mr Cargill said.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Procurement for School Furniture for the Year 2010

1.0 The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’) now
invites sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School
Furniture for the School Year 2010.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from
the Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education,
Headquarters, The Teacher’s Credit Union Building, from Monday
3%May, 2010, and obtain further information, at the second
address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a
sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed

with the subject bided on (“School Furniture” ).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first
address, on or before Friday, 21st May, 2010 by 5:00 p.m (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since It may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of
those Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend,
at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th May, 2010 at the first address

below.

(1) The Chairman Tender’
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-2700

6.0 The Ministry reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tender.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 7B



Kerzner plans $100m
worth of PI upgrades

FROM page 1B

Wyndham Nassau and Crystal
Palace Casino and associated
real estate parcels at Cable
Beach.

Potential

The potential complication
is that real estate also includes
parcels upon which China Ex-
Im Bank will take security for
its $2.5 billion loan.

The Chinese bank will need

those assets delivered ‘free of
encumberances’', to quote
legal parlance, which is why
Baha Mar and Scotiabank
need to resolve their loan sit-
uation.

Scotiabank has already
extended the due date twice -
from December 31, 2009, to
end-January 2010, and then
to March 31, 2010 - to give
the developer time to seal the
deal with Beijing. That was
concluded on March 30, 2010,
and possibly explains Baha
Mar's haste to seal the deal

with the China Export-Import
Bank and China State Con-
struction by that date.

Tribune Business also pre-
viously reported how Baha
Mar and its principals, the

Lyford Cay-based Izmirlian
family, had offered to make
Scotiabank "whole" and
repay the entire loan, having
previously offered to pay
down $85 million or 50 per
cent during proposals that
were swapped between the
two sides.

Reported

UU TT 0/7 UT
















an
ane

NAD

Nassau Airport

Devslopment Company

Manager, Commercial Properties

The Nassau Aiport Development Company [MAD is seeking
candd aie for the powtion of Manager Comnencal Peapertes. The
position ig eeaponsitie for the eanagarent and development of
commarcdal operations [ratal, food and beverage, services and
space leases) al fhe Lynden Pinding Iniematonal farport

Key Penile induce Butane peat lide lee Managerial af all
tenant leases, devclooing the danaitment’s annual business plan
and budget, participate in land usaidevelopment plan for te airport,
anahzing key performance measures for concessionaines and work
wih congoraics to develop shekegee iy masini revenues

SiG.

BEA, Aviation

SUPERVISOR

Aircraft Service International Inc., a leading global
aviation service company has an opportunity for a
Supervisor responsible for supervising and coordinat-
ing operational functions of the fuel facility at our
Nassau, Bahamas location. Duties will include staff
supervision, ensuring effective operation of air car-
rier fueling functions and operation of the fuel facili-
ties and administrative functions.

This is a hands-on position requiring attention to de-
tail and safety while also requiring a great deal of
physical demand. The successful candidate will
have a minimum of 2 years related experience or
equivalent combination of education and experi-
ence. Must have the ability to communicate well
both verbally and written, excellent problem solving
skills, computer literate and possess a valid driver's
license as well as any required Airport identification.

To apply, please email resume to asignassau@ya-
hoo.com.

Please no phone calls or agencies

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/1852
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY SIDE

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Four hundred and Seventy-six and Sixty-one
hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister Rock Road north
of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE of the Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon

Rolle
NOTICE

The Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle of the Smith Hill
Settlement of the Island of Andros one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate comprising Four hundred and Seventy-
six and Sixty-one hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister
Rock Road north of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas bounded Northwardly
by land now or formerly the property of James Brisbane and
running Four Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy-three and
Seventy-eight Hundredths (4,973.78) feet on the Eastwardly by
the Sea and running thereon Four thousand Eight hundred and
Fifty-seven and Eighty-seven Hundredths (4,857.87) feet on the
Southwardly by 130 feet wide Road Reservation and running
thereon Three thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety-seven and
Forty-four Hundredths (3,997.44) feet on the Westwardly by
land now or formerly the property of Joseph Johnson and running
thereon One thousand Four Hundred and Forty-eight and Seventy
Hundredths (1,448.70) feet and by land now or formerly the
property of A. Speirs and running thereon Three thousand Three
Hundred and Three Hundredths (3,300.03) feet which said piece
parcel or plot of land describe above has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimension as are shown on the diagram or plan
recorded at the Department of Land of Surveys under the Land
Surveyors Act 1975 as Plan Number 537 AN of the said diagram
or plan which is coloured pink and prepared by Hubert Williams
in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the Cityof Nassau
on the Island of New Providence.

The Petitioners Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle, claim to be the
owner in of the fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and have applied to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas under S.
3 of the Quieting Titles, Act in the above to have her title to the
said land investigated and declared.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street, N.P., and
at the Chambers of Michelle Y. Roberts & Co., Christie Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or any adverse claims not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of Twenty-one (21) days after the final
publication of these presents file in the said Registry of the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of their claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed in the said Registry of the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the above Michelle Y. Roberts &
Co. statement of such claim. Failure of any such to file and serve
a statement of such claim by the above time will operate as a bar
to such claim.
Dated the 25th day of November A. D., 2009

MICHELLE Y. ROBERTS & CO.
Attorney for the Petitioners



GUALIFICATIONS

«Posi secondary education in business, commerce, commercial
a6 oF equivalent

* Five Wears MNSSEMeA Oe Super ory epee noe if a girrilay
aoe LGN

* Experience in tha analysis. of slatishoal and fnarcml dita

* Ability to handle mulbple lasks and interact professionally with staf,
takehoders and chants

* Retel industry and / or commercal lew experience would be an

Meer =

For more details, please visit the PEOPLE section of
NOTICE is hereby given that JIFEMA RAPHAEL of #23 our website al wind i,
PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18" DAY OF MAY, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

RMR BRC
just call 902-2371 today!

Fyou are quaidied and iniwesiod, ploose cabin your
sume by Mary 26, 20410 io

Manager, People

Nassau Alport Developement Company
Fo. Box AF 6228

Nassau. Bahamas

of @fhail peophginad.ba

Julius Bar

abides

Julius Bae Groug, the laading dedicated Waalh Manapar ia siabing cardielatan Tex
the position of ;

KINGSWAY ACADEMY

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER FOR EXTERNAL ASSET MANAGERS -
FRENCH & SPANISH SPEAKING DESH

Core Ries pores (bilities:

ELEMENTARY
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS

Markel EAMs and Boers leit:

Negotiate and conclude coopecaion apmeenents

Gat-un of coopacaion (Oeerations, Conplianca, Logedics, Docenentation |
Susser EAMG in fer da By Paths, eh aed Pee Leg
Exstableh, verty, conbol rebocensios naports

Polow-up on Eas, agent, inirocucars, naport bo hererchy

Endabdeshy per tinagsaiy ie Gurkpatira) preci ered HAL prgepetcters

Cooperate Gosely with hierchy and Ak! desks

(Cooperaie and sapped local management and PH wails

hold
Entrance Examinations for all elementary
grade levels:- K4 to Grade 6 from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon on Saturday, May 29, 2010. Parents

Kingsway Academy Elementary will

Privat Clarita

Agung (eierohip marcperend by prea chants onlrselyoed thy raaperinn
Tarkers:

- Assume Advan for seca prvi cans

- Market private chenis suilabla thesa markets

are asked to collect application forms from

the Elementary Desk in the Administration Sih
Excebent openi@abional Headership and compunecrdon stills
Exleraia caper oe in bani fig ares
Minirtun 5 paar eeperience in cherd paiadirtiy peereagerren| (EA's aed peri

before the testing date. Application forms may —

Sobd knowsindge and mxpenonoa in iniiment acvisory

building between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. daily,

also be accessed from the school’s website

www.kingswayacademy.com (see Document
Downloads).

Feraign Languages
Fiusel (eriten are Geel) in Fisich, Eaghea 4h Sperigh, Geran aa aaeel

Wheeesied Candeeke: shoukd ore) 8 cope of ese eecuree bey di lunes 2072, 0 She tention it

BY HAND: By BAIL:

Parvceal 4 Confidenty Pessoal & Covideria
doar-Hace F nile; Aiuto! Versace
dalvs Baer Bank 4 rest Banaraa| Lid P.O. Boe Hela
Lingac Lender Montague Foreshore Fim, geri.
Egel Bay GesHe

Key, Hahareg

For further information, kindly contact the school at

telephone numbers:- 324 - 5049 or 324 - 2158

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Maries an hark

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 21 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,568.20 | CHG -0.34 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD 2.82 | YTD % 0.18
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.05 1.05 0.00 0.250
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050,
5.20 Bank of Bahamas 5.24 5.20 -0.04 0.598
0.33: Benchmark o.33 O.33 0.00 O.8FF
a. 1S Bahamas Waste 1S 3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.1F 2.1F 0.00 0.055,
9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07 12.07 0.00 1.408
2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84 2.84 0.00 0.249
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.99 6.99 0.00 0.460
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.44 2.42 -0.02 0.111

0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
o.13e

Previous Close Today's Close Change

1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00
8.75 Finca 9.00 9.00 0.00
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 9.85 9.85 0.00
3.75 Focol (S$) 5.08 5.08 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 O27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00 -2.945 0.000
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000

S2wk-Hi Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

S2wk-Low

CFAL Securities Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD%
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4674 1.99
2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9020 0.52
1.4611 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5315 1.62
2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.0368 2.57
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.5654 1.48
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, s1

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.515417

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.499936

Last 12 Months %
1.3758
30-Apr-10
14-May-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
31-Mar-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
10-Apr-10
31-Mar-10

107.5706 3.45
105.7706 3.99
1.1080 4 .eF

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.4176380

1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

41.0615: -0.61
1.1050 Aaa
9.43839 1.52

10.0000, 10.6709 -0.SS 31-Mar-10

4.8105 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 31-Mar-10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Ask $ - Selling
Last Price - La:

Weekly Vol. - Trad
EPS $ - A compan

ahted price for daily volume
ighted prise for daily volume

Change - Cha fi day to day
Daily Vol. -N d today

hare paid in the last 12 months

jed by the last 12 month earnin: as
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

FROM page 1B

al” problems that were pre-
venting its economy perform-
ing to potential.

James Smith, who was min-
ister of state for finance in the
2002-2007 Christie administra-
tion, questioned whether offi-
cials were following revenue
trends from previous years, giv-
en that according to Central
Bank of the Bahamas data, the
Government’s 2009-20210 Bud-
get projected it would earn $14
billion from revenue and grants.

That projection was calculat-
ed at a time when the Bahami-
an economy was already in
deep recession, and during a

2008-2009 financial year in
when revenue was already com-
ing in below target - it finished
the year at $1.324 billion, some
$245 million short of forecast.

Yet 2009-2010 revenues were
projected to be almost $76 mil-
lion higher than the previous
year, according to the Central
Bank, and Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business: “TI think it has
been kind of a feature of the
Budget over the last several
years that the revenue projec-
tions have always been the
problem.......

“T think that whoever is pro-
viding the revenue forecasts is
over-optimistic, which might be
a bit charitable, or not following
revenue trends over the previ-

ous year.”

Mr Smith said it was prob-
lematic to continue projecting
revenue growth in an economy
where the tax base had shrunk
as a result of the recession, as
there was “no buoyancy” in
revenues due to the lack of eco-
nomic activity and trade.

Even increased or new taxes
would have minimal to no pos-
itive impact on the Govern-
ment’s revenues for the same
reason - a reduced tax base and
economic activity.

Pointing out that all Bahami-
ans knew the economy had
been mired in recession for
some 18 months, contracting by
between 4-5 per cent in 2009,
Mr Smith said of the revenue








> NCE re

The National Insurance Board



of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas





Reminder to Employers

The National Insurance Board wishes to remind all Employers when completing



the monthly Contribution Statements (C10 Forms), to please ensure that the following




information is provided for each employee:

First and last name;



National Insurance number;



Number of weeks worked dunng the month;



The insurable earnings (salary) for the month up to the ceiling, and whether

the salary/ wages are paid weekly (WV) or monthly (M).




The above information will ensure the accurate and timely posting of employees’



contribution records to their accounts. Your cooperation in this regatd will be

appreciated. If you need further assistance, please feel free to contact the

Inspectorate or Contabutions Departments, located in the Board’s Clittord Darling

Complex, Ballou Hill Road, or at telephone number 502-1500,



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Procurement for General Supplies for the Year 2010

1.0 The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser”) now
invites sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement Cleaning
Supplies for the School Year 2010.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from
the Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education,
Headquarters, The Teacher’s Credit Union Building, East Street
from Monday 3May, 2010, and obtain further information, at the
second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a
sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed
with the subject bided on (“General Supplies” ).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first
address, on or before Friday, 21st May, 2010 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since It may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of
those Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend,
at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th May, 2010 at the first address

below.

(1) The Chairman Tender’

forecasts: “The danger of that is
that if the revenue projections
are off too much, you can real-
ly dig a hole for yourself
because revenue projections are
what you base expenditure on

“Government might want to
revisit that, take a closer look at
that, so they no not overshoot,
which could have the impact of
widening the deficit. All the ele-
ments that generate revenue
are down, and consequently
even if you put taxes up you
may get diminishing returns as
a result of a lower tax base.”

In fairness to the Govern-
ment, revenue forecasting is not
a precise science, and adminis-
trations throughout the world
have had difficulty in predicting
the depth and breadth of this
current recession - not to men-
tion its impact on the public
finances.

Tomorrow’s 2011-2012 Bud-
get is likely to see the Ingra-
ham administration undertake

a combination of revenue
enhancing/expenditure freez-
ing measures in a bid to set the
Bahamas’ key fiscal ratios,
namely the debt-to-GDP and
deficit ratios, back on a more
sustainable path.

The Government will likely
be seeking to avoid any public
sector lay-offs via a combina-
tion of freezes on pay, promo-
tions and increments, amid
speculation that the Prime Min-
ister and members of his Cabi-
net, plus MPs, will lead by
example in taking salary cuts
themselves - driving home the
reality of the situation to the
Bahamian people, and showing
the Government’s serious
intent.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith sug-
gested that besides being con-
cerned about the 2010-2011
Budget, the Bahamas also
needed to raise its head to the
medium and long-term, and
address the structural problems

THE TRIBUNE

that were holding the economy
- and, by extension, government
revenues - back.

“What we are faced with is
more of a medium and long-
term problem, because while
we’re looking at the Budget
and what’s going to happen in
the near-term, there’s some
fundamental structural issues
we have to address,” he
explained.

“There’s been no real growth
in air arrivals in the last decade,
and that’s the mainstay of the
economy. That has to be fixed,
and that could be a question of
service or the cost of a vaca-
tion, which brings into utilities
and airlift costs.

“So while we’re dealing with
this [Budget], you’re really
dealing with larger and more
structural problems - an econ-
omy that’s not performing to
its potential. We’re all in this
together. We’ve got our work
cut out for us.”





NOTICE

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT ALL
BAF FINANCIAL NASSAU
OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED ON
WEDNESDAY MAY 26 , 2010 FROM
9:00 A.M. — 1:00 P.M.

FOR THE COMPANY’S ANNUAL
AWARDS CEREMONY

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED.

BA= BAF FINANCIAL





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at wew.cob.edu.bs

FACULTY OF PURE & APPLIED SCIENCES

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS CAMPBELL

Maritime Summer Camp - 2010

28th June -

16th July, 2010

Sth & 9th Graders

Interested in:

Marine Transportation
Marine Stiance
Marine Engineering

Contact your guidance
counsellor for information
of collect an application
packet tram the Office of

SHIPPING

the Dean, Faculty Pure &
Applied Sciences,

Room 4-80 at the

College of The Bahamas -
Telephone: 302-1400 or
302-4 D065

Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Application deadline:

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section Friday, 4th June, 2010

Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-2700

Camp Fee: $90.00

Space is limited

6.0 The Ministry reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tender.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 9B



The Tribune









E

: Pe
ee

AN ENVIRONMENTALLY
FRESH EXPERIENCE

‘My Ocean’ soaps will add a healthy and unique experience to a bubble bath

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



ANYA Klonaris Azevedo

and her husband Eduardo

Azevedo brought their
artistic capabilities, love, and
respect for the ocean together
to form a company that spe-
cialises in crafting beautiful
handmade glycerin soap bars
that are healthy for the skin and
add a unique experience to a

bubble bath.

So instead of lathering with Amer-
ican made soap bars, giving these glyc-
erin environmentally friendly bars
made by My Ocean a try will leave
the skin looking and feeling great.

The exclusion of animal by prod-
ucts, sticking only to vegetable base
combinations is what leaves the skin
healthy, soft, and ravishing.

Tribune Health spoke to Tanya
Klonaris, owner of My Ocean, who
explained why it is better to use soaps

that are made mainly with vegetable
byproducts.

“The main differences between ani-
mal byproduct soaps and vegetable
soaps are that vegetable oil soaps are
chemically superior and can be of
higher quality than soaps made with
animal fats. Vegetable oils are much
more readily absorbed by the skin
while animal oils have been found to
clog pores and aggravate certain skin
conditions, such as Eczema,” Mrs
Klonaris said.

Their use of all natural coconut oils,
safia oils, glycerin and natural fra-
grances is what makes soap made by
My Ocean better to use on the skin
than some of the store bought brands.

However, the presence of glycerin
along with other chemicals is what
locks moisture into the skin. It also
aids in relieving symptoms of skin con-
ditions including eczema and psoriasis.

Glycerin is a colourless neutral
sweet tasting thick liquid that helps
to attract moisture to the skin. Most
commercial soaps remove this chemi-
cal for profiting purposes.

“There are many benefits to using

glycerin soaps. Commercial soaps (the
ones you get in the foodstore) remove
the glycerin which is a natural by-
product of the soap making process
for use in more profit producing
lotions and creams etc. Our soaps have
extra glycerin added to them. This
helps to make it clear, and also makes
it a lot more moisturising,” Mrs
Klonaris said.

Mrs Klonaris said some of the ben-
efits of glycerin are:

¢ Moisturising Aid- Glycerin soap
helps to attract moisture to the skin by
absorbing the moisture in the air,
causing your skin it to stay softer.

¢ Sensitive Skin - People with sensitive
skin find that glycerin is gentle on
their complexion.

¢ Dissolves Easily - This soap quickly
dissolves in water, making it easy to
wash off. It doesn't leave behind a
film like heavier soaps do.

Men and Sex: Why do men pay for sex?

"WHY do men pay for sex?’ is such
an interesting question and one that
usually provokes an impassioned
debate. Today, even amongst
researchers, psychologists and partici-
pants of the sex trade, there are still
varying theories; despite it being an
age-old practice.

We only have to look around the
world, and view different cultures to
see that the acceptance of buying and
selling sex varies considerably.

In countries where prostitution,
pimping and ownership of a brothel
are illegal, participants can find them-
selves facing prosecution. A few exam-
ples of such countries are: China, South
Africa, and Saudi Arabia. Interesting-
ly, in Sweden, it is not against the law
to sell sex, but it is illegal to buy. The
rational being that it is not the women
who are the driving force behind the
trade, but the demand from men.

Other cultures legalise prostitution
but add some restrictions. They require
the women to register and have regu-
lar health examinations, but prohibit
pimping and brothel ownership.

Then, there are countries that
legalise but regulate all sex services.
Registration, health examinations, and
age limits are usually included with a
ban on forced prostitution. These
countries include Germany, The



ay
Netherlands, New Zealand, and
Turkey.

Despite legal discrepancies, all seem
to agree that there is not a specific
type of man who pays for sex. All con-
cur that there is no particular profes-
sion or socioeconomic group that
would accurately describe a typical
‘john’. However, there seems to be a
general theme of 'risk taking’, and for
the man who is secure in his invinci-
bility, this is often demonstrated by
the refusal to use condoms.

“Why pay for sex when you can get
it for free?” is often the argument put
forth by those trying to understand
the motivation. Two of the most hot-
ly contested arguments are intimacy
issues versus dominance over women.
Critics describe it as an immoral,
aggressive patriarchal behaviour that
exploits women as a commodity.
Described by many as ‘the ultimate
antifeminism act’ to make a woman

powerless, and force her to complete
submission. Others suggest that we
pay for other pleasurable activities
and that this is just harmless role-play
for a fee.

Research, however, confirms that
for many prostitutes it is not harm-
less’, and psychological and physical
abuse accompanies their work. Very
few choose the profession, but are
drawn in due to poverty, fear, and
addictions. Knowing this, it would
seem not only compassionate, but also
humanitarian to provide help to these
women.

In sex therapy, we know that the
role of the sex worker often soothes
many common psychological prob-
lems. Being paid for emotional com-
fort, empathy and sexual fulfillment on
demand, makes her services very
appealing. Men, who have relation-
ship problems, have a desire to exper-
iment, or perhaps feel continuously
rejected might find it easier in such a
setting. Romance and love may also
be missing and for some men this tem-
porarily fills an emptiness. This can
be seen by the fact that many return to
the same woman time and time again.

“But is it not the same as cheat-
ing?” is another question put forward,
particularly by women. Certainly,
secrecy and deception often accom-

¢ Skin Disorders - Those who suffer
from such skin disorders, such as

symptoms by washing with glycerin
All-Ages Cleanser because it's
gentle on the skin.

My Ocean has taken a different :
approach to soap making, ensuring :
that each bar is infused with products :

that unlock the richness of natural : ae :
: arthritis are the following:

resources in the Bahamas.

With their creamy coconut base :

combinations like the original Bahami- +” .
an soap scroll, Bay Rum Coconut, Jas- ¢ Pal and swelling around the
mine Coconut, Rice Flower Shea and : crc
Bahama Cherry, that literally looks ; C@US¢ pain with every step.
and smells like their name suggests,the =

product will leave a sensational fin- : ‘ ee
: mation of the joints that can

ish.

Art is definitely part of this process. !

The soaps are made in cute decorative : : :
: on the degree of inflammation

shapes, colors and sizes.

“We have been cultivating a com- + :
pany whose mission has been to use ! results in slow, steady destruc-
our creativity in the service of original :
and high quality products that are :

infused with the particular smells, =

colours, textures, shapes, and spirit of : as hard various sized bumps

> on toes, heels or toe joints that

The Bahamas,” she said.

“T think that people deserve to !
make themselves feel good, and our +
soaps are designed for that purpose. :

They smell divine, they look beautiful + :
and most importantly they are really : C4” be addressed with a rock-
good for the skin. They make a great :

gift for yourself or someone else,” she * the pressure off the big toe.

: The right combination of

said.

My Ocean is a Bahamian grown :!
bath, body and home manufacturing :
company with retail outlets in down- ¢ the pressure off the nodules,
town Nassau and at the Lynden O ;
Pindling International Airport. They ¢
have expanded to produce soap bars, ° :
body ie ere a ae range of can- ¢ cardiovascular problems. Ask

dles, ceramics, textiles and home décor ° ee
: about footwear specifically

: designed for the arthritic feet.

(SY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS 2

> toanimproved quality of life,
pany such behaviour, and depending :
on the state of the relationship, it can :
have far reaching consequences. Feel- :
ings of anger, betrayal, lack of trust are !
similar to discovering any type of infi- :
delity. However, there are some cou- }
ples that reach a mutual understanding +
in order to preserve the relationship. :
They may have decided that this is :
the best way for both of their needs to !

accessories.

be met, and it works for them.

Buying sex can become very addic- :
tive, particularly for those who have a :
compulsive nature. Loss of income, :
productivity at work, neglecting per- ¢
sonal health and relationships are +
often the first signs of loss of control. ?
By that time, professional help is :
strongly suggested to refocus, and also :
because denial stands in the way of !

healing.

If we open our minds, push our atti- :
tudes to the side for a moment; we :

can then carry all this insight into our ? * :
own relationships. Finding out your ¢ is the proprietor of Foot Solu-
partners true needs, and in turn being : franchise that focuses on foot
able to express them, will help to nur- ?

ed the ni et ae make it : ed in the Sandyport Plaza, Nas-
OMe ANSE ie ea WAlene er Te NOM Sail, Please uirect any ques
est, trust grows and a deeper intimacy : tigne gr comments to nas-
: sau@footsolutions.com or 327-
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¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock’ with Mag- : oe

develops.

gie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM102.9. For appointments call
364-7230, email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.



: Common foot
: pain and arthritis

ARTHRITIS, which has

: been clinically described as,
: ‘conditions that result in loss
: or destruction of the cartilage
: lining the ends of the bones
: that make up a joint’, affects
: an astonishing number of peo-

ple.
In fact it is assumed that

? about 50 per cent of persons
: aged 65 or older suffer from it,
: along with a significant por-
: tion of younger people. If you
: have arthritis, read on to find
: out more about a few of the
: common foot pains associated
: with it, and how footwear can
: not only help you feel better
: but also allow for better
: mobility.

In brief, arthritis has been

: divided into two main cate-
: gories, mechanical and inflam-
: matory. In mechanical arthri-
ee ; : tis, the main abnormality is
eczema and psoriasis, can help relieve : disease of cartilage which is
: most often age-related wear-
: ing of
> (osteoarthritis). Inflammato-
: ry arthritis is inflammation of

the cartilage

the synovial lining of the joint

(rheumatoid arthritis).
Among some of the most

common foot pains related to

Big Toe Joint Pain: Appears as

base of the big toe and can

Rheumatoid Arthritis: Inflam-

affect any joints in the foot.
Stiffness may occur depending

of the joint. This condition
tion of joint cartilage.

Rheumatoid Nodules: Appear

cause discomforts when pres-
sure is put on them.

Solutions: Big toe joint pains

er-sole shoe to take some of

padding, inserts and arthritic
approved shoes can help take

making them less sensitive.
There are specially designed
socks and stockings to address

your healthcare professional

In sum, arthritis of the feet
can limit mobility which is key

be it physical, cognitive or
social. This is simply to con-
clude that foot function is the
key to improved mobility. The
majority of persons having this
condition do experience loss-
es in flexibility, strength, skele-
tal muscle mass, decreased
cardiovascular delivery and
inactivity.

If you suffer from any of
these conditions as seen in
the arthritic feet and more so
it in older persons, the aging
feet, seek the help of a pedor-
thist or footwear professional
to provide the correct shoe
and accessories to assist with
the alleviation of such pains
and discomforts.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified & licensed Pedorthist,

tions, a health and wellness

care and proper shoe fit, locat-

"The views expressed are those

: of the author and do not neces-
: sarily represent those of Foot

> Solutions Incorporated or any

: of its subsidiary and/or affiliat-
: ed companies”.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



WOMAN



@x GRE E N SCEN E By Gardener Jack

Wax jambu

he wax jambu
T Seen saman-
gense} is becoming
a very popular back
yard fruit tree here on
Abaco where as little as
ten years ago it was vir-

tually unknown.

I first came across it
through Carrington (Samson)
Lightbourn who brought me
a branch of fruits to identify.
Moxey’s Nursery near Trea-
sure Cay has been the main
provider of young trees to the
Abaco public over the last
decade.

The wax jambu tree is very
handsome with large 10-inch
long leaves and dense foliage
in a fairly compact shape. I
try to keep my tree at about
12 feet that is about right for
convenient picking of fruits.

May and June are the main
months of fruit production
and a mature tree produces
prolifically.

puff white flowers that give
way to a button-like structure
that develops into the bell-
shaped pink or red fruit. The
flowers attract bees by the
hundreds.

The 2-inch long fruits are
produced in panicles of up to
two dozen. The fruit masses
are so dense that some of the
fruits are squeezed out of the
cluster. Those that remain
can be lightly tinged with
pink, solid pink or an attrac-
tive deep red. The colour
does not really reflect the
ripeness of the fruit.

Wax jambu fruits can be
eaten out of hand from the
tree and taste much like
unexceptional apples with a
dash of rose water. They look
far more appetising than they
taste. Within the fruits is a
single seed, sometimes two.

Children tend to enjoy wax
jambu fruits more than
adults. The fruits become
more acceptable if they are
sliced thinly and enjoyed

can be added to salads, used
as an interesting garnish, or
taken with a firm cheese and
crackers.

I prefer to cook the fruits.
When simmered in sugar
water they lose their lovely
colour but develop a lovely
taste that is very close to
lychee. Served this way with a
little cream or ice cream the
fruits make a delicious and
filling dessert.

Wax jambu is also called
Java apple, rose apple, water
apple and wax apple. These
names indicate how apple-
like the raw fruits taste. It
comes to us from the
Malaysian peninsula and is
closely related to the Malay
apple, which is considered
superior eating. It is also
related to guava, allspice and
Surinam cherry.

Wax jambu trees can easily
be propagated from seeds
and grow quickly. Trees can
produce a small harvest in the
third or fourth year and then



Tv mts is an attractive fruit and the trees bear mea during May and June.

compact trees are ideal for
small gardens that cannot
accommodate large fruit trees
such as mango.

Wax jambu does not make
a very interesting jam but
experts suggest adding it to
other fruits in the jam making
process.

Towards the end of May I
passed by my wax jambu tree

impressed by the noise from
within, just like a small but
efficient generator. It was
bees, thousands of them.
Wax jambu attracts bees
more than any other plant I
know at flowering time. They
go crazy among the spiky
flowers and fight for space. I
do not know what the honey
would be like but beekeepers



look into this phenomenon.
Unfortunately, I have some
passion fruit vines that are
flowering and do not seem to
be setting fruit. I think that
is because all the bees are at
the main show in town. Ah
well, let me get some Q-tips
and pollinate them myself.

It all starts with powder-

piecemeal. In this form they

bear heavily thereafter. The

and was immediately

and honey makers might well

* gardenerjack@coralwave.com



Carrie

BRADSHAW

eCharlotte treated
marriage like a soror-
ity she was desperate-
ly hoping to pledge.
¢ So what are we
going to do? Sit
around bars, sipping
Cosmos and sleeping
with strangers when we're eighty?

¢: I've spent $40,000 on shoes and I have no
place to live? I will literally be the old
woman who lived in her shoes!

¢ I'm homeless! I'll be a bag lady! A Fendi
bag lady, but a bag lady!

eThe most important thing in life is your
family. There are days you love them, and
others you don't. But, in the end, they're
the people you always come home to.
Sometimes it's the family you're born into
and sometimes it's the one you make for
yourself.

¢Carrie [buying a pregnancy test] : Which
kind do I get?

Miranda : Here. This one's on sale: half
off.

Carrie : I just spent $395 on a pair of open-
toed Gucci's last week. This is not the
place to be frugal.

¢Carrie : Wait... have you ever been in
love?

Big : Abso*****-lutely!

¢ “Samantha is my friend. She's my family.
My insides. She will be fine because she
has to be fine. That's how important she is
to me.”

e “Tf you can only have one great love,
then New York just may be mine. And I
don't want nobody talkin’ about my
boyfriend.”

¢ “No matter who broke your heart, or
how long it takes to heal, you'll never get
through it without your friends.”

¢Carrie: You're missing it.

Charlotte: What?

Carrie: Everything. You're missing your
wedding. You have a wonderful man who
loves you and will be there to catch you
when you fall. Do you know how special
that is? I would love to find a man who is
strong enough to catch me.

¢ Later that day I got to thinking about
relationships. There are those that open
you up to something new and exotic, those
that are old and familiar, those that bring
up lots of questions, those that bring you
somewhere unexpected, those that bring
you far from where you started, and those
that bring you back. But the most exciting,
challenging and significant relationship of
all is the one you have with yourself. And
if you can find someone to love the you
you love, well, that's just fabulous.



Charlotte

YORK

e * Allow me to get
right to the point,
guys. After careful
consideration, I have
decided that Iam
getting married this
year.

eCharlotte : You're
engaged!

Carrie : I threw up. I saw the ring and I
threw up. That can't be normal.
Samantha : That's my reaction to mar-
riage.

eCharlotte : I've been dating since I was
fifteen! I'm exhausted! Where is he?
Miranda : Who, the White Knight?
Samantha : That only happens in fairy
tales.

¢Charlotte : Miranda has a son!
Samantha : Just what the world needs:
another man.

eCharlotte: [ proposed to myself.

Carrie: What?

Charlotte: Yes. I suggested he have a
tomato salad, then I suggested we get mar-
ried.

Carrie: Wait. What exactly did he say?
Charlotte: All righty.

Carrie: All righty? He said ‘all righty?’
Now I'm thinking the upsetting thing isn't
that you proposed, it's that you proposed
to a guy that says ‘all righty’.

Charlotte: Oh, Carrie, stop.

Carrie: All righty.

¢Charlotte [whispering] : Could you
please not use the F-word in Vera Wang?
eCharlotte : So how are you?

Carrie : I'm good. How are you?
Charlotte : Great.

[pause]

Carrie : I told Aidan about the affair and
he broke up with me.

Charlotte : Trey and I never had sex on
our honeymoon.

Carrie : You win. So. Should we get more
coffee or should we get two guns and kill
ourselves?

eCharlotte : My marriage is a fake Fendi!
¢Charlotte : [just don't understand. How
could you forget someone you slept with?
Carrie : Toto, I don't think we're in single
digits anymore.



HOBBES

e I said no white, no
ivory, no nothing that
says virgin. I have a
child. The jig is up.

e T once was broken
up with by a guy's
doorman. "I'm sorry
Ms. Hobbes,
Jonathan won't be coming down. Ever”.

e It's amazing. In a courtroom, reasonable
doubt can get you off for murder. In an
engagement, it makes you feel like a bad
person.

e Why do we get stuck with old maid and
spinster and men get to be bachelors and
playboys?

eHow did it happen that four such smart
women have nothing to talk about but
boyfriends? It's like seventh grade with
bank accounts.

* (to Carrie's answering machine): Your
good friend Miranda has just taken a piece
of cake out of the garbage and eaten it.
You will probably need this information
when you check me into the Betty Crocker
Clinic

eMiranda: Why didn't you just get an
automatic?

Carrie : I love this car! It goes with my out-
fit.

eMiranda ( on finding out she’s pregnant)
Why didn’t I use a condom?

Carrie: You didn’t use a condom?
Miranda: He only has one ball and I have a
lazy ovary. In what world does that create
a baby? It's like the special Olympics of
conception!



Samantha

JONES

eSamantha : He did
something to me that
was so perverse!
Okay, I'm just going
to say it. He tried to
hold my hand.

Carrie : You mean to
tell me that Smith is a
hand-holder? And to think he once served
us food.

eSamantha : Men cheat for the same rea-
son dogs lick their balls: because they can.
Samantha: [to the girls| I think I have
monogamy. I caught it from you people.
Carrie: Now it's airborne.

eSamantha : Drinking with three blondes!
I guess that's a regular day for you.

Hugh Hefner : A slow one, yes.
eSamantha : Sex with an ex can be
depressing. If it's good, you don't have it
anymore. If it's bad, you just had sex with
an ex.

eSamantha When I'm old and my
(breasts) are in my shoes, I can look at this
picture and say; I was hot.



eMagda: What you did. That is love. You
love.

Miranda: Let's not make a big deal of it to
Steve, it will upset him.

eBunny - "I must tell you right now - I
don't enjoy Mandarin food, and I don't
enjoy a Mandarin child"

¢Stanford [about to enter a women's
dressing area] : Knock knock! Nothing in
here I haven't seen and ruled out in junior
high!

e Aidan Shaw

I love you Carrie, there's no one I could
love more... I wanna live my life with you.
What do you think?

(taken from classic tv quotes.com and
IDBM.COM)



SEX AND THE CITY TRIVIA >>

How well do you know the show ?

E) Trip

7. Carrie writes a sex column for:

1. What is Mr Big's real name? 4. Carrie's father: A) The Enquirer
A) Aidan A) died when she was young B) The NY Post
B) John B) lives in LA C) The NY Times

C) It's never revealed - C) cheated on her mother D) Vogue keeper/nanny is called:
he's too unavailable D) is a recovering alcoholic E) The Star A) Marina
D) Carson E) abandoned her B) Yelena
E) Bruce 8. Aidan's beloved pet dog is C) Sascha
5. Carrie's love interest during the called: D) Katerina
2. Carrie has dated: LA episodes was played by: A) Trevor E) Magda
A) A mental patient who was an ex A) David Duchovny B) Bow wow
B) A recovering sex addict B) Kyle McLaughlin C) Pete 11. Which one of these is not a
C) A bi-sexual twenty-something, C) Vince Vaughn D) Puddin' saucy Samantha line:
a politician who wanted her to pee D) Matthew McConaughey E) Rusty A) Oh my God, she's fashion

on him, a mental patient who was
an ex and a recovering sex addict
D) A bi-sexual twenty-something

E) A politician who wanted her to

6. Who is "the idiot stick figure
with no soul"?

E) Hugh Hefner
9. Which of these is not a classic

Miranda quote:

A) | just faked a sonogram

E) I'm a 34-year-old woman with
braces and I'm on a liquid diet - pain

doesn't begin to cover it

10. Miranda's judgemental house-

road kill

B) Oh please! There's always a

contest with an ex. It's called

“who will die miserable’.

A) Brady

B) Wright

C) Parsons
D) Jerrod

E) MacDougal

13. When Carrie first asked Mr Big
if he had ever been in love, he said:
A) "I've been in lust"
B) 'No way"
C) 'Abso-* **-lutely’
D) "Not a chance"
E) "Kid, let's be real"

14. What is the name of the play in
which Smith Jerrod bared his but-
tocks?

A) Monty Python's Flying Circus

pee on him

3. Charlotte's over-the-top wedding

A) Heidi Klum, when she stepped
over Carrie in the fashion show
B) Bunny, Charlotte's ex-mother-

stylist is called: in-law
A) Clay C) Amalita Amalfi, Carrie's Eurotrash
B) Ivana friend
C) Stanford D) Natasha, Big's ex-wife
D) Anthony E) Steve's cheesy girlfriend Debbie

B) I'm telling you, married people
are the enemy

C) How does it happen that four
such smart women have nothing to
talk about but boyfriends? It's like
seventh grade with bank accounts
D) Puberty is a phase - 15 years of
rejection is a lifestyle

C) Ladies, I'm a lesbian

D) Until he says "I love you", you're

a free agent

12. Samantha's cheating, hotel-
mogul boyfriend was called
Richard:

B) The Blue Room
C) Porno Valley
D) Full Moon

E) The Full Monty

(taken from Ivillageuk.com)
SEE Answers on page 11

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010, PAGE 11B





Screening and cocktail party set for Sex and the City 2









IN THIS film publicity image released by Warner Bros., from left, Kristin Davis, Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall and Cynthia Nixon are shown in a scene from "Sex and the City 2."

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

THIS Thursday night will
be the ultimate girls’ night
out for fans of Sex and City
with a chance to attend a
cocktail party and screen-
ing of the long- awaited
sequel to the 2008 movie
and original series.

The premiere event for

held at Galleria Cinemas
JFK.

“It’s gonna be all about
the shoes,” says event co-
organiser Megan Sweeting
of Sole events, who along
with her business partner
Gidget Dean came up with
the idea for the event.

“There is not a lot to do
in Nassau and we thought
that this would be a great
idea because women love

night where we encourage
them to dress up and have a
girl’s night out, something
that they might not do all
the time.

“We have a number of
corporate sponsors on
board such as John Bull,
CDM , the Dermal Clinic
and guests will get to enjoy
a fabulous cocktail recep-
tion and will receive great
gift bags filled with prod-

said.

For persons who want to
spend a bit more, the VIP
pass will provide access to
an after party and addition-
al gift items.

“I don’t want to give too
much away, but I think per-
sons attending will be sur-
prised- it’s gonna be a fabu-
lous night. We have a lot
planned.”

The Sex and the City 2

place on at 7pm at Galleria
Cinemas on JFK. Tickets
are $30 for general admis-
sion and $50 for VIP. They
are available at Clippen-
dales hair salon and Sole
Events.

The movie takes place
two years after the 2008
movie when the four friends
in need of a vacation travel
to exotic Abu Dhabi for
more fun and fabulous

COCO ROEDERER RETO E REET ETE ERO ESET E ETRE SEEH ERR ESEEH OED OERER OES OERO ERE SEER EHR TETES EHR TETOER EO TESO ERR ESEER ESR ETEEHOETESEER OE TEEHE SEER EER EERE OBER EEE EE

AN SWE RS from pg 10

Question1: John : We learn
his name when he calls her
mobile in the closing scene
of the last ever episode.



Question 2: A bi-sexual
twenty-something, a politi-
cian who wanted her to pee
on him, a mental patient
who was an ex and a recov-
ering sex addict

Question 3; Anthony

Question 4: Carrie's father
abandoned her

Question 5: Carrie's love
interest during the LA
episodes was played by:
Vince Vaughn

Question 6: Natasha, Big's
ex-wife

Question 7: Carrie writes a
sex column for: The Star

Question 8: Aidan's beloved
pet dog is called Pete

Question 9; Puberty is a
phase - 15 years of rejection
is a lifestyle. That line was
actually said by Stanford.

Question 10: Miranda’s
judgemental
housekeeper/nanny is called
Magda

Question 11: Oh my God,
she’s fashion road kill. It was
actually said by Stanford

Question 12: Samantha’s
cheating, hotel-mogul
boyfriend was called
Richard Wright

Question 13: Big said
"Abso-***-lutely"

Question 14: What is the
name of the play in which
Smith Jerrod bared his but-






























































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THE TRIBUNE

WHY VVOMEN LOVE

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

Tribune Features Editor



have been drawn fo a certain city and the adventures

Fi. the past ten years, women all over the world

of four women who live there. And unless you live
under a rock, you know that this week the ladies of Sex
and the City are back - this time in the incredible setting
of Abu Dhabi in the long awaited sequel fo the 2008

movie and the hit show.

Sex and the City is more than
just a hit HBO series that ended
before its time, it’s the “ultimate
female fantasy,” my friend Ava
told me when I asked her to
explain why the show still holds so
much appeal even though it’s
been off the air since 2004.

“It’s the fairy tale, finally end-
ing up with your prince charming
and being fabulously dressed in
the process,” she said.

“Tt’s the life we all secretly wish
we could have,” my cousin Cine
tells me. “When you have the
unlimited budget to drink cosmos
with your friends and buy the
$800 Manolos without a care. I

j
ner B

love this show.” She loves it so
much that she has set her cell
phone’s ringtone to the opening
credit music known instantly to
fans around the world.

Jewel Smith describes herself
as the “ultimate Sex and the City
fan” and has even named her dog
Carrie - after the main character
and the one she says she relates to
most. She says its all about the
shoes and the fashions.

“The fashion alone is just amaz-
ing, clothing, the handbags and
oh my goodness the shoes (my
passion) were fabulous!! I cannot
wait to see what’s to come in
S&TC2.”



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Jewel was introduced to the
show when it was in reruns on
TBS. She was also given the book
(written by Candice Bushnell)
and DVDs of the original series as
gifts.

“Why I think the show still has
so much appeal is because it is
unpredictable. With this show you
never know what’s going to hap-
pen next and it takes you on an
emotional roller-coaster with the
characters. It has stayed fresh and
interesting and you are always left
you wanting more,” she said.

Fashion aside, ask real fans and
they will all tell you the same
thing - the real draw to the show
is the fact that it focuses on four
successful woman who have a
genuine friendship.

“This show shows that it’s pos-
sible for women to have friend-
ship without jealousy, gossip or
spite, where you can be com-
pletely happy for your best friends
because you truly want what’s
best for them,” says Sarah
Thompson another huge fan.

“What appeals to me about this
show are the relationships the
ladies have with each other. I

TUESDAY, MAY 25,

2010

think it is truly an amazing thing
to have friends that you can real-
ly count on and share anything
with. Their personalities are very
different but they all accept each
other regardless, and that is some-
thing special. As individual
women they are very strong and
independent, qualities that I
admire. And of course the rela-
tionships they have built with
their men are priceless,” Jewel
said.

“T have heard the naysayers
say, ‘Oh, they are just a bunch of
women that sleep around’, but on
the contrary I feel the show is
more than that, it’s deeper than
that. Charlotte for one kept
searching until she found the per-
fect man for her, but little did she
know it would turn out to be
someone she never envisioned for
herself but what she needed and
they are a beautiful couple. He
treats her as though she is the
only woman in the world that
matters; like a queen and that is
what we women hope for.”

“It’s not mushy,” said Cammie
Smith. “These women are real,
despite the fact that they are tal-




ented and successful, they make
mistakes, they give their hearts
to the wrong people and make
bad choices. Carrie went on a
roller coaster with Mr Big she got
very hurt along the way and
broke Aidan’s heart, but true love
won out. Who doesn’t want to see
that. You were cheering for her in
that final scene in the series when
Big goes to her in Paris and says,
‘It took a while to get here, but
you're the one.’ It’s a modern day
Cinderella story.”

There is a little of Carrie, Char-
lotte, Miranda and Samantha in
all of us. And some of us are
lucky enough to have friends like
these four women - friends who
are the real deal. The ones who
you can call in the middle of the
day or night to help you, no ques-
tions asked, or be there to dry
your tears and to celebrate your
joys.

And this week, women all over
will slip on their high heels, grab
their friends and go see this movie
because, to quote Carrie Brad-
shaw, “If you can find someone to
love the you, you love, well that’s
just fabulous.”

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mage “~~
Bro . s
Ni

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