Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

USA TODAY

Pim blowin’ it

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“ex AND T-STORM

Volume: 106 No.148





Many cases said
to involve incest

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



THERE has been a sub-
stantial increase in the num-
ber of girls — some as young
as 10 years old —- being
admitted to a government-
funded teenage pregnancy
programme, it was revealed
yesterday.

Officials of the Providing
Access to Continued Edu-
cation (PACE) Foundation
said many of the cases
involve incest, and more
young girls have entered the
programme so far in 2010

than any previous year on
record.

Sonia Brown, the presi-
dent of PACE, said it is dif-
ficult to identify a root cause,
because each case is differ-
ent.

She said: "It’s difficult to
pinpoint what the direct
cause of the increase is, how-
ever, for cases involving chil-
dren under the age of 10, it is
definitely an issue of an old-
er person preying ona child.
Someone that young cannot
possibly give any kind of

SEE page 15

MPs seek to make animal
owners more responsible

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



PARLIAMENT last night passed a new law relating to animal
ownership and control, expressing its desire to reduce the stray and
roaming animal population, enhance the safety and rights of the
public against out of control animals and minimise animal cruelty.

The Animal Control and Protection Bill 2010
brings with it a range of new responsibilities, fines
and penalties for the owners of dogs and various

other animals.

As soon as the Bill is brought into force, all
dog owners will be required to pay a fee to license
their dog or dogs on an annual basis or face a

$250 fine.

Whether or not they receive a license to keep

LARRY
CARTWRIGHT

their dog will depend on their being deemed “suit-
able” to keep a dog, and being over 18 years of

age, Minister for Agriculture and Marine

Resources Larry Cartwright said.

The comprehensive 45-page Bill includes some regulations

SEE page 15





PPRoy Time oFF wir





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Call for two
weather officers
to be disciplined

THE public service com-
mission investigating the
aftermath of the killer torna-
do that struck Grand
Bahama is recommending
that two officers at the
Meteorological Office in
Nassau be disciplined.

The Tribune understands
a recommendation of dis-
missal was made for one
officer and a recommenda-
tion of disciplinary action
for another.



aid oil spill exercise

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



THE Bahamas is mobilising a
team of regional and internation-
al experts to assist in the oil spill
disaster preparedness exercise
currently under way.

Acknowledging the weakness-
es in local capacity, Minister of
Environment Earl Deveaux said
the government contacted the
International Maritime Organi-
sation (IMO), the Caribbean





Charles Riedel/AP Photo

OIL FROM the Deepwater
Horizon oil rig explosion







f oo BURGH

) us

Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875









Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff
FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL Sir Orville Turnquest (far right), attends the memorial for his wife, Lady Edith Turnquest, yesterday at Christ
Church Cathedral. Also shown are Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest (far left) and his wife, Shawn (centre). Inset: Lady Turn-
quest, who died on May 12 aged 80 after suffering a serious stroke while in London.

Team of experts to

Police probe theft
of safe thought to
contain $30,000

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning a
number of persons in connec-
tion with the theft of a large
safe from the South Andros
Road Traffic office which is
estimated to contain about
$30,000.

While the burglars were
able to make good their
escape with the safe, it is
understood the police are in



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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

Improving community relations

seen as key to reducing crime

THE greatest challenge facing police in their
efforts to reduce crime is improving relations
with the community, Commissioner Ellison

Greenslade said.

Appearing on a radio talk show this week,
Commissioner Greenslade stressed there was
much work to be done to change the attitudes
of both Bahamians and police officers, in order
to create healthy communication.

THE TRIBUNE

He admitted the task was not an easy one,
but through “respect and trust”, the commis-
sioner said the police hope to foster a rela-

tionship that will ultimately help reduce crime.

The murder rate for the year now stands at
33, up from 25 at the same point last year,
however callers expressed confidence in Mr
Greenslade’s ability and commended him for
establishing a vision for the force.

NEW NETWORKING PARTNERSHIP WITH US PREACHER PASTOR PAULA WHITE




TBAT
Wee

By ALESHA CADET





THE Ministry of Tourism
yesterday revealed its latest
efforts to tap into the lucrative
religious tourism market by

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PHONE: 322-2157

Fine Teen

Bernard iid « Magker St» Thompeon Bled

Fresh bid to
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announcing a new network-
ing partnership with promi-
nent American preacher Pas-
tor Paula White.

At a press conference at the
British Colonial Hilton, Pas-
tor White, who is also a tele-
vision evangelist and motiva-
tional speaker, said she is
looking forward to bringing
TV shows, retreats and other
religious events to the
Bahamas.

Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine
especially thanked Bishop
Neil Ellis of Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Baptist Church
for his role in helping bring
Pastor White to the Bahamas.

“Neil Ellis saw the oppor-
tunity to help in Pastor Paula
White joining us here today,”
she said. Bishop Ellis said:
“These are some difficult
times. My relationship with
Paula White goes back some-
time, I believe she can be a
blessing to the Bahamas. J am
so delighted that she accepted
our invitation to come to the
Bahamas.”












BISHOP Neil Ellis looks
on as Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine
(right) presents Pastor
Paula White with a hand-
made Bahamian bag at
the British Colonial
Hilton.

Tim Clarke
/Tribune staff




Ms White, who serves as
senior pastor of the Without
Walls International Church
in Tampa, Florida, said “being
in the Bahamas has been an
amazing experience.”

“T thoroughly enjoyed
myself and the people are
amazing.

“Tam grateful for Bishop
Neil Ellis who represents the
Bahamas with such greatness.

“Tt has been a wonderful
opportunity and a privilege.
I want to see people’s lives
bettered and empowered,”
she said.

Ms Walkine later presented
Pastor White with a thank-
you gift representing the peo-
ple of the Bahamas.



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THE TRIBUNE

Church
breakaway
‘not linked
to gay issue’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REVEREND Scott
Kirkland has rejected
claims that the ordination
of gay ministers in the
Church of Scotland drove
Presbyterian kirks in the
Bahamas to break away.

The minister of Lucaya
Presbyterian Church in
Freeport announced at the
General Assembly of the
Church of Scotland in
Scotland this week that
Presbyterian congregations
in the Bahamas had voted
in favour of leaving the
“mother church” after 200
years to align with the
Evangelical Presbyterian
Church (EPC) in the Unit-
ed States.

A total of 39 church
members voted in favour
of joining the EPC and
three against after Rev
John Macleod resigned
from St Andrew’s Presby-
terian Kirk in Nassau and
admitted it was partially
over the Church of Scot-
land’s ordination of its first
openly gay minister, Scott
Rennie.

Ordinations

The American EPC is
strongly against such ordi-
nations and since the ordi-
nation of Rev Rennie last
year, more than 50 Scottish
churches have backed the
evangelical position, show-
ing they will not accept the
ordination of gay ministers.

However, Rev Kirkland
has shot down any link
between Rev Rennie’s
appointment and the
Bahamian choice to align
with the EPC.

“To suggest my congre-
gation is leaving the
Church of Scotland
because of the General
Assembly’s decision to
uphold the call of an open-
ly gay minister is simply
not true,” he said.

“It has been a long-held
ambition of the Kirk’s con-
eregations in the Bahamas
to form our own denomi-
nation, following the exam-
ple of many other churches
around the world which
began their life under the
wing of the Church of
Scotland.”

Although the ambition
to form a Presbyterian
Church of the Bahamas
(PCB) has been under dis-
cussion for 15 years, the
Bahamian following lacks
the capacity to run its own
denomination and there-
fore hopes to affiliate with
the US Presbyterians as an
interim step, Rev Kirkland
said. “Furthermore it has a
Presbytery in Florida, very
close to the Bahamas,
where the two congrega-
tions can have the experi-
ence of being part of a
working Presbytery and
benefit from the capacity
and supervision it offers,”
he added.

Oa aS

Homicide
count now
up to 33

THE homicide count now
stands at 33 after a 41-year-
old man died of his injuries
in a fight yesterday.

Dwane Christopher John-
son, who lived off Pitt Road,
got into an argument with
another man, resulting in
him being severely beaten.

Mr Johnson was taken to
the hospital by ambulance
where he died seven hours
later.

A 36-year-old man is
helping police with their
inquiries.



THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Government expects
BP to be responsible



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux said the government is
assuming it will not have to sue
BP, operators of the exploded
Deep Horizon oil rig leaking
huge amounts of oil into the
Gulf of Mexico, which could
possibly affect the Bahamas.

He said the government is
keen to recover any money it
may be forced to spend on



Gerald Herbert/AP Photo

clean-up operations, but noted
that BP has indicated it will
“foot the bill” created by the
spill. Mr Deveaux said it is
believed BP has a global fund
that will come to bear if con-
tainment efforts have to extend
to the Bahamas.

If this is the case, it will be
the Minister of Foreign Affairs
who handles the initial round
of negotiations, he said.

Only if it became necessary
for the matter to go before the
courts would the Attorney
General’s Office be directly
involved, said Minister
Deveaux. He admitted that if,
in the end, the government
does have to sue BP, it would
most likely be some time before

LOUISIANA GOV. Bobby Jindal, centre, and Plaquemines Parish
President Billy Nungesser, right, tour the oil impacted marsh of
Pass a Loutre, La. on Wednesday, May 19, 2010. Oil from the
Deepwater Horizon oil spill is infiltrating the coast of Louisiana.

the Bahamas receives any
funds. The National Oil Spill
Contingency Team is fully
mobilised to respond to the
spill, although officials are hop-
ing the situation is contained
before the oil slick has a chance
to extend beyond the Gulf.
However, Mr Deveaux said
he is not “particularly
impressed” with the “frag-
mented” response of the US
government to the crisis. He
said he hopes the Bahamas’
efforts will be “infinitely” more
organised and effective.

It is feared that ocean cur-
rents could carry the spilled oil
into Bahamian waters and dev-
astate wildlife habitats in the
north-western islands.

With the hurricane season
approaching, bringing with it
the potential for strong winds
and increased tidal flows, the
situation could be “very diffi-
cult if not impossible” to man-
age, Mr Deveaux warned.

He added that speculation
about an impending disaster
has fueled a “growing sense of
helplessness and hysteria”.

Political clashes amid claims government
‘fired’ mother of child suffocated in car

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
was accused of seeking to score
political points when he hit out
at the government for allegedly
“firing” the mother of the
three-year-old girl who suffo-
cated in a car in his constituen-
cy.

Yate McDonald, 44, along
with the girl’s father, Larry
Demeritte, were charged on
May 10 with manslaughter by
negligence in connection with
the death of their child, San-
dria Demeritte, who died after
becoming trapped in a vehicle
near her father’s home in mid-
April.

According to reports, San-
dria had been missing for sev-
eral hours before her body was
found.

Mr Mitchell yesterday
described the alleged firing of
Ms McDonald from her gov-
ernment job as “terrible”.

“Having lost her daughter
now she’s on the dole,” he told
parliament.

His comments drew the ire
of Minister of State for Social
Development with responsibil-
ity for social services, Loretta
Butler-Turner, who claimed he
was “misleading” parliament

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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— _ ae 7



Fred Mitchell Butler-Turner

about the matter and merely
making his claims to gain
“political mileage.”

Mr Mitchell was speaking
during the debate on the Ani-
mal Control and Protection Bill
2010, using Ms McDonald’s sit-
uation to highlight his call for
the government to “also seek
to treat people properly” as
well as animals.

“T support the legislation but
I must say this also: The gov-
ernment must take care of peo-
ple properly if the people are to
take care of the dogs,” said Mr
Mitchell. Mrs Butler Turner
claimed Mr Mitchell’s state-

ment about Ms McDonald was
“inaccurate” since Ms McDon-
ald was only ever a temporary
government worker.

“The person was not in the
employ of the Department of
Social Services. She was a tem-
porary worker in the employ
of the Elizabeth Estates Chil-
dren Home. (Ms McDonald) is
not employed by the Bahamas
government and not a member
of social services. It was a tem-
porary programme. She was
never permanent and pension-
able and therefore she was not
fired by the Department of
Social Services,” said Mrs But-
ler Turner. Mr Mitchell object-
ed to Mrs Butler Turnet’s alle-
gation that he was only trying
to score political points by rais-
ing the matter, and said the
point he was making was that
by “firing” Ms McDonald and
putting her in a position to
require assistance from the gov-
ernment, the department was
“making a problem for itself.”

“You are putting a person on
the dole who has to go right
back to social services,” he said.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Time to get control of the ‘garrisons’

UP TO late last night Jamaica’s Tivoli
Gardens’ residents manned the barricades to
protect its “Don” — Christopher “Dudus”
Coke, listed by the US Justice Department
as one of the world’s most dangerous drug
kingpins—from arrest, and deportation to
the US.

At last after more than half a year of
delaying negotiations with the United States
for the extradition of “Dudus” Coke, Prime
Minister Bruce Golding, who was near to
resignation over the weekend, in a radio
broadcast on Monday apologised to his peo-
ple, and announced that his government had
agreed to let the US’s extradition request
go to the attorney general. The warrant for
Dudus’ arrest was signed. “Dudus” controls
the Tivoli garrison, which supports the prime
minister and at election time “delivers” the
votes.

With all four main roads into Tivoli
blocked, the Jamaican police, although
armed with an arrest warrant, cannot execute
the warrant. Unless “Dudus” comes out
peacefully, many fear that the matter cannot
be resolved without bloodshed.

It is reported that his supporters have
located oxygen tanks, ready to be ignited, at
strategic entrances into Tivoli.

“He took care of us,” say his supporters,
“now we are willing to die for him!”

Meanwhile, in parliament the Opposi-
tion walked out on Tuesday when it was
made clear that Prime Minister Golding,
after his national address over the airwaves
on Monday had no intention of discussing
the matter in parliament. The Opposition,
offended at this “disrespect”, left the cham-
ber.

And there the matter rests — a stale-
mate. Tense, and dangerous. Meanwhile,
the US State Department expressed its plea-
sure with the Jamaican government’s deci-
sion “to instruct the attorney general to pro-
ceed with the extradition process.”

If Jamaica can get over this difficult face-
off, in years to come history might mark it as
an important milestone in Jamaica’s attempt
to break the hold that the island’s criminal
element has over many of its politicians.

Many of Jamaica’s problems — particu-
larly crime — stem from the power of the
“garrisons”. The politicians took care of the
garrisons which assured them of political
support. Many a gun battle was fought if
anyone tried to oppose their “man.” Of
course, the politician protected his “sup-



DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION

porters” by making certain that lucrative
government contracts came their way. In
turn the supporters —often governed by
ruthless “dons”— protected the politician
and his party, guaranteeing, even at the point
of a gun, that no one opposed him. At elec-
tion time persons were even timid to put up
an opposition candidate against the gar-
rison’s man in power. However, when drugs
entered the picture, the chiefs in the garrison
often had more money than the government.
There was no stopping them. It was an
underground reign of terror, which if not
stamped out, Jamaica — a beautiful country
— faced, and still faces, a bleak future.

Today, the government has been forced
to stand up to a powerful “Don” and his
own “constituents”. For the sake of
Jamaica’s future, it is important that the
Jamaican government wins this round. Not
only wins it, but uses it as a launch pad to
move against all of the internal fiefdoms
that protect so many criminals.

Jamaica’s troubles started in the 1970s
when its political parties armed their sup-
porters to intimidate their rivals.

It was around the same time in the
Bahamas that PLP “goons” tried to control
our elections. The 1972 and 1977 elections
were elections of violence with the church
and Opposition leaders calling for peace and
respect for free speech.

At one point, from a political platform,
Paul Adderley, who later became attorney
general in the Pindling cabinet, but earlier
led his own party after leaving the PLP, had
the microphone snatched from his hands as
he addressed a political gathering from a
public platform.

In one of the campaigns, the “goons” so
controlled public places that the Opposi-
tion had to campaign from door-to-door. It
was no longer safe to hold a public meeting.
In the 1972 elections shots were fired, and
people were injured.

However, although many Bahamians
were victimised during the 25 years of the
Pindling administration, the Bahamas never
allowed the situation to develop as it did in
Jamaica.

The crisis might be dangerous in
Kingston, it might even get deadly, but this
is now an important turning point for the
Jamaican government. It is that govern-
ment’s opportunity to shake off its depen-
dence on “dons” and “garrisons” and get
full control of the country.



The slaying of
Ramos Williams
and justice delayed

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Honourable Leaders of
Government and citizens of
The Bahamas:

This is a short note to let
you know, that the present
situation is critical and the law
that was created to service
man, has now become the
death of man. It is imperative,
that a quick look at its func-
tions be noted and its duties
examined.

This letter is in reference
to the death of slain officer
Ramos Williams.

The death of officer
Wiliams, after a period of
three years is yet to be
resolved, because arguments
within the law have not yet
been brought to trial. If this
delay of justice is evidence of
our legal system and its func-
tions, then time within the
confounds of change must be
questioned. Are we a people
of justice or injustice? Or are

letters@triounemedia.net



we flunkies within a system,
where democracy is only a
joke? Are we allowing the
world of doubt to lead the jus-
tice within our hearts, or are
we dedicated to the truth
through the life and death of
Christ? Or do we have the
right to crucify him out of
convenience.

Blind! Is the argument
within the law, because they
denied the truth and subject
themselves to a lie. There is
no higher judgment than the
Almighty and within this
hour, his attention is upon us.

We are complete within our
love, let us be complete with-
in our justice and truth. Let
the blood of an innocent man
be appeased.

To die in service for one’s
country, is an honourable
thing, because the man in
question is honourable, even
in death. Deserving of his
respect within the country
that he loved, died for and the
justice that he bled for.

The inner circle of the
Williams family “grieved”,
not for the sibling that we lost
but instead for the justice, that
for so long, has been obstruct-
ed. Within this justice, I too
may feel from the assassins’
bullet or will we murder jus-
tice once again?

It is with great anticipation
I write this letter, in the hope
that justice will prevail, with
God as our refuge and
strength.

Thank you for your atten-
tion and concern.

THE WILLIAMS
FAMILY,
Nassau,

May 18, 2010.

Bahamians need to be more vigilant
about the granting of citizenship

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please explain to the Min-
ister of Immigration, Mr
Symonette, that contrary to
his assertions in a 23rd March,
2010 interview with ZNS, that
persons born in the Bahamas
are not automatically entitled
to citizenship as a result of
their birth. The Constitution
provides that persons born in
the Bahamas of non Bahami-
an parentage have a right to
apply only. There is no auto-
matic granting of citizenship
and, to my mind, there
shouldn’t be. If the Minister in
charge of the Immigration
Department who considers
and submits applications for
Bahamian citizenship to cab-
inet does not know this, it’s
no surprise that citizenship in
this country is being granted
lightly!

On a recent trip to the US,
one of the US Immigration
agents at the LPIA com-
mented to me and my com-
panions that Bahamians enjoy
privileges with respect to
entry into the United States
that are not enjoyed by most
countries where he had been
stationed, in particular, oth-
er countries in the Caribbean
and Latin America. This left a
great impression on me and
reminded me of the long lines
and laborious process I have
experienced while seeking to
enter the US from other
countries in the world. The
Bahamian passport and The
Bahamas are still regarded

first Baptist Church

“TEAMWORK DIVIDES THE
EFFORT AND MULTIPLIES

THE EFFECT.
SUNDAY SERVICES

favourably. Given the very
liberal policies now being
adopted, we do not know how
long this will be the case.
Bahamians need to be
more vigilant about how and
to whom our government
grants citizenship. It directly
determines who we represent
ourselves to be to the world at
large. In spite of our prob-
lems, we continue to be con-
sidered as a friendly, peace
loving people who are not on
the restricted entry list many
others find themselves on. We

simply cannot allow that to
be changed by an indiscrimi-
nate granting of citizenship
and issuing of Bahamian pass-
ports. Once changed, it will
not be possible to restore our
image in the world and we too
may find ourselves on the
“unwanted” list.

SUPPORTER OF
GENERATION
X BAHAMIAN
MOTHER
Nassau,

April, 2010.

POETS OE ET a Ta

gain from this false advertising?

EDITOR, The Tribune.



The “best” hotel in the world was the header and
announcement of the News Reader...reporting on the results
of the Travel Web site... EXPEDIA Customer Survey of
the World’s Hotels, 2010.

The News Reader announced that the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort was the best hotel in the world — from the
Expedia Survey. A total mistruth. The Sheraton Nassau
Beach was No.1810 of the listing with 91.70 points.

There were three other Bahamas resorts with far better
ratings than The Sheraton: Pelican Bay, Freeport No.171
with 99.30 points, The Cove, Atlantis No. 879 with 96 points,
The one and only Ocean Club No. 965 with 95.60 points.

What does the Sheraton management gain from this false
advertising? A bad reputation, as simple as that, and as of
late all the PR on Baha Mar I suggest is all part of the
same...for some reason desperately trying to convince some-
one.

On Baha Mar - the announcement that the highest exec-
utive on the development side of Baha Mar recently resigned
at this stage of Baha Mar is peculiar and significant to say the
least when ground breaking is, so we are told about to hap-
pen. Did anything change from when Harrah’s/Caesar’s
World walked?



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Nassau,
May 16, 2010.







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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Eaith Turnquest, a real Lady

VIEW FROM AFAR

5S S A

PUSHIN’ DA ENVELO
By Jamaal Rolle







OIL SPTLL FEARS INCREASE

J O HN |





Be Turnquest did not need her beloved
Tiny to receive the Knighthood to be Lady

Turnquest. She was a lady in every sense of the
word. She was gracious, polite, hospitable but most
of all she was an outstanding wife, mother, grand-
mother and an example to all who knew her or even
knew of her.

My wife and I had the privilege of knowing Sir
Orville and Lady Turnquest for almost twenty years
and during that time our families almost became
one. This good fortune has allowed us to observe this
very loving and close family first hand. And at its
centre was Lady Edith Turnquest.

Lunch

Every Sunday the family gets together for lunch,
all three generations, and we have had the good
fortune to be included when we have been in Nassau.
Over the Christmas holidays we have also been able
| to observe and enjoy their wonderful gatherings,
where not only family but friends came and went
throughout the day.

The interest she showed not only in their children
but also in their grandchildren and their grandchil-
dren’s friends is an example from which we all can
learn. We are all poorer for the passing of Lady
Turnquest but we can celebrate her life and use her
example to improve our own.

Whether she was a Minister’s wife, a Lady in the
Governor General’s residence or a private citizen she
was the same good friend, wife, mother and grand-
mother. We will all miss her.

May she rest in peace.

Police criticised for response to car break-in







LADY TURNQUEST

A PARKED vehicle in
front of A Wong & Son’s
Convenience Store on West
Bay Street was broken into
in broad daylight yesterday.

According to a manager
at the store, the burglar
smashed the front passen-
ger window of the car and
made off with a woman’s
handbag.

After reporting the mat-

ter to the police’s Tourism
Branch, situated just yards
from the scene of the crime,
the store’s staff said it
seemed as if the officers “did
not want” to investigate.

In fact, the manager said,
he was only able to report
the burglary after visiting
the police station himself, as
all the listed numbers he had
tried were either busy or not

working at the time. “We
normally feel safe up this
way throughout the week —
only on the weekend do you
have to worry about any-
thing happening.

“Back in the day when the
police graduated all those
officers, you would see them
up and down the road
patrolling.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

NEWS
Greek fraternity teams ‘stomping’ towards Nassau | 7

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

GREEK fraternity teams
from all across the United
States are “stomping” their way
to Nassau this weekend to com-
pete in the ‘Steppin’ On Da
Shores’ event presented by KO
Productions.

This Saturday, teams from
New Jersey, Washington DC,
Connecticut, Chicago, Indi-

anapolis and Atlanta will par-
ticipate in the big “throw-
down” that begins with a pre-
show battle of the high schools.

Teams from Nassau’s C H
Reeves, presenting the public
schools, and St John’s College,
representing the private
schools, will compete against
each other. After that, compet-
ing Greek teams will take to
the stage at Arawak Cay, incor-
porating elements from differ-

ent dance genres in their rou-
tines. The Steppin’ On Da
Shores event has gained many
fans over the years, and last
year’s cancellation was a disap-
pointment to all, said Kenny
Pratt of KO Productions.

However, organisers promise
that this weekend’s event will
more than make up for the can-
celled show last year.

“This year is going to be big-
ger and better than the last

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website af were cob eduis

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE GRAPHIC DESIGN & LAYOUT

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of The
College of The Bahamas Alumni Magazine. Through a high quality graphic format,
the alumni magazine provides key information about The Col llege, its graduates, stu
dents, researchers, fnends and supporters and has become a pivotal publics itign bor
The College in the last two-and-a-half years.

The look, feel and general format for the magazine is consistent from issue to issue
with variations to suit the level and detail of the content of cach issue,

Proposals: Vendors should deliver ane (1) original and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one ori ginal signature to the tollowing
address:

Attn: Ms, Gabriella Fraser

Assaciate Vice President, Exterial Affairs

The College of The Bahamas

AO Bow W402

Oakes Field Campus

Nassau, The Bahwinas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 5:00 p.m. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request For Proposal (RFP) document,
requested attachments, and amy amendments if issued, The proposal must contain
the signature of a duly authonzed officer or agent of the company submitting the

proposal. Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST. Friday June 23, 2010, will not be
considered and will be returned unopened.

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept of reject any or all respons-

vs to this RFP.

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of External
Affairs at (242) 302-4304, Technical questions may be directed to Ms. Maelynn
Seyoour-Maypor, Office of Communication at (242) 32-4455.

§ Scotia Private Client Group’

VACANCY

Investment Advisor, Offshore Brokerage

Scotia Private Client Group (SP Bahamas

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of an

Investment Advisor, Offshore Brokerage
Position Summary:

The position is responsible for ensuring profitable portfolio growth and
revenue generation both in Offshore Brokerage and the Scotia Private Client
Group (SPCG) overall. This will be achieved through aggressive marketing
and business development efforts, and helping our clients achieve peace of
mind by providing trusted advice and personalize solutions to meet their
financial goals.

The position is also responsible for developing quality referrals from
potential clients identified as being able to benefit from other products and
services offered through SPCG.

Key accountabilities for this role:

Initiate and develop investment relationships with clients identifying and
servicing their financial needs.

Ensure the growth in the number, size and profitability of Offshore
Brokerage relationships as well as the profitability of SPCG.
Contribute to managing the growth and profitability of the Offshore
Brokerage Portfolio.

Responsible for being fully conversant with all procedures and requirements
of Know Your Client (K YC) and Anti-Money Laundering & Anti-Terrorist
Financing (AML/ATF) policies.

Effectively utilize and develop subordinate staff to fill the needs of the
Offshore Brokerage Unit.

QUALIFICATIONS:
External education andlor licensing requirements/recommendations:

¢ Post Secondary Education
* Canadian Securities Course (current with CEC requirements satisfied)
¢ Fluency in French is required

Preferred Professional designations:

* Certified Financial Planner
* Chartered Accountant
* Chartered Financial Analyst

Qualified candidates only should submit applications no
later than May 31, 2010 to:

Centre Director, Scotia Private Client Group, Bahamas,
Scotia House, 404 East Bay Street.
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
or e-mail ross.painter@scotiabank.com

THE TRIBUNE



Steppin’ On Da Shores. We are
flying over nearly 100 persons
for the event. This year we are
also teaming up with the Min-
istry of Tourism,” Mr Pratt said.

Following Saturday’s show,
the KO team is organising a
‘wet fete’ boat cruise to Colo-
nial Beach on Sunday which
will feature a mini competition
between Greek and non-Greek





teams. “Every 20 minutes there
will be a boat leaving Prince
George Wharf heading to Colo-



nial Beach,” Mr Pratt said.

Competing in the show will
be sorority teams including
Zeta Phi Beta’s Zeta Elite out
of New Jersey; Alpha Kappa
Alpha squad and Sigma Gam-
ma Rho squad out of Chicago;
Delta Sigma Theta squad and
X- Alpha Kappa Alpha squad
from Howard University in
Washington, DC. The fraterni-
ty teams include Phi Beta Sig-
ma’s No Mercy; Kappa Alpha
Psi from Howard University;
Alpha Phi Alpa’s A -Team and
the Omega Psi Phi team from
Connecticut.











CHICKEN catching and clothes hanging have
moved beyond being forgotten pieces of the
Bahamian cultural past to now become center-
pieces of the signature event for Harbour Island
- the Briland Backyard Festival.

The festival takes place on Harbour Island
this Friday and Saturday.

Organisers aim to make it the most authentic
Bahamian festival today, with several activities for
participants, said June Cartwright, acting manager
of the Harbour Island Tourist Office.

“When you come onto Harbour Island, the
whole area is going to be set up like a backyard,”
she said. “We’re talking about fishing lines, fish-
ing nets and hanging clothes. When you are walk-
ing over Bay Street and you look up, you are
going to actually have clothes hanging over you.”

The list of activities and competitions for the
festival include clothes hanging, goat pepper eat-
ing, onion peeling, coconut barking and chicken
catching. Harbour Island’s wild chickens are
being rounded up and will be kept caged during
the festival. On the last night of the festival, how-
ever, they will be released and persons will com-
pete to catch the most chickens.

Martin Lee Grant, a public relations officer
for the festival, explained that Harbour Island has
a special relationship with wild roosters.

“We have a lot of roosters running around the
island,” he said. “We call them our pets. The
tourists love them. They appreciate them great-
ly. We want to highlight the uniqueness of Har-
bour Island when it comes to vacationing here -
the warmth the friendliness, the great hospitality



Derek Smith/BIS Photo

MARTIN LEE GRANT and June Cartwright
demonstrate the clothes hanging competitions
that will be part of the Briland Backyard Festival
this weekend.

that the persons here share with whomever comes
here from all walks of life, regardless of colour,
creed or religion. We just appreciate everyone
who comes to Harbour Island and we like to
share with them our rich history, our beautiful
nightlife culture and our beautiful pink sand
beach.”

Stage performers scheduled to appear at the
Briland Backyard Festival include KB, T’rez
Hepburn, April Cartwright-Miller and Harbour
Island’s own Afro Band. Ms Cartwright said her
office has worked closely with transportation
providers to ensure that travel to and from Har-
bour Island during the weekend of the festival is
fast and convenient. Bahamas Ferries has sched-
uled 8am voyages from Nassau from Thursday to
Sunday, returning each day at 3.40pm. Mean-
while, Bahamasair has at least two daily flights to
North Eleuthera, which is just 10 minutes away
from Harbour Island, she said.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit ovr website af www.cat. eda is
THE SEARCH FOR A PRESIDENT

The College Council of The College of The Bahamas (COB) is pleased to
announce a search for a new President and invites nominations and expres-
sions Of interest in this outstanding opportunity for leadership at a truly
unique institution. After nearly thirty-five years of serving The Bahamas,
first as a two-Vear institution, then as a four-year degree-granting College,
COB expects to become The University of The Bahamas. As it moves to
solidify its university status, COB will continue to deliver excellent under-
eraduate teaching while developing new undergraduate and graduate pro-
grams, increasing research and innovation activities, and focusing its work in
areas crucial to national development.

Since its founding in 1974, The College of The Bahamas has grown in repu-
lation and currently enrolls over 5000) students in undergraduate and gradu-
ate education. The institution grants primarily bachelor’s degrees, and will
launch its first master’s degree later this year. Currently, COB offers joint
master’s degrees in conjunction with other accredited universities and col
leges within the United States and enjoys extensive links with higher edwea-
tion institutions in the Canbbean, North America and Great Britain.

NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS
A prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
ities for the new president, a full enumeration of qualifications for the posi-
tion, and instructions for submitting applications or nominations may be
found under “Current Searches” at www.academic-search.com. Those con-
sidering becoming candidates are urged to visit this Web site before submit-
ting application materials. A complete application shall include a thoughtful
letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and a list of at least five professional ref-
erences (with email addresses and telephone numbers) and must be received
by June 9th, 2010, Nominations, inquirics and applications are treated confi-
dentially and should be submitted electronically (MS Word or PDF) to:
COBPresident@academic-search.com
Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained
from The College’s website, fAwww.cob ed
Maya Kirkhope and Bill Franklin of Academic Search, Inc. are assisting with
this search. Nominations and expressions of interest will be treated in confi-
dence and may be directed to:

Dr. Bill Franklin

Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Ine.
Washington, D.C., USA
hjf@academic-searchcom
(S30) 249-1444

Maya Ranchod Kirkhope
Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Inc.
Washington, DwC., USA

mava.kirkhope@academic-search.com

(703) S00 9195

The College of The Bahamas ts committed to providing equal educational
and ¢ -mploy ment opportunity.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Building and house numbering



THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 7



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit oar website af www. cod. edie

exercise is progressing well

By KATHRYN
CAMPBELL

APPROXIMATELY
5,000 buildings in New Prov-
idence have so far received
numbers in the governmen-
t’s house numbering exer-
cise.

The project is a part of the
six-month National Jobs
Programme designed to cre-
ate jobs throughout the
Bahamas.

The Ministry of Public
Works and Transport said
the “historic” exercise of
correctly numbering the
houses, when completed,
will make it easier to locate
businesses and houses
throughout the island of
New Providence.

Delmar Bowe, project
supervisor with responsibil-
ity for house numbering and
street naming, said he is
pleased with the progress to
date.

“We started on April 12
and we are doing quite well
with our installation. By the
time the programme ends
we will be quite far ahead
with installation of all num-
bers,” he said.

Mr Bowe explained that
during the first month of
training the teams collected
survey data from the areas
selected by the government
in phase one of the pilot
project.



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TWO WORKERS assigned to the government’s six- month
National Jobs Programme install numbers to a home in St

Michael’s Road, Monday, May 17.

System

“We have a system that
we use for house number-
ing. We number from north
to south or from east to
west. The houses on the left
side of the street have odd
numbers and the houses on
the right side have even
numbers. We number every
lot whether there is a build-
ing on the lot or not,” he
said.

Phase one of the number-
ing exercise includes the
southeastern portion of New
Providence that is bounded
by Robinson Road/Prince
Charles Drive in the north,
East Street in the west, Fox
Hill Road in the east and
the sea in the south.

The teams are presently
completing the buildings in
St Michael’s Road and will
continue in Nassau Village.

“Residents and business
owners are to make their
properties available to us,”
said Mr Bowe. “ If we can-
not access the property we
would put the number in an
envelope and the resi-
dent/owner has to install the
number.

“We try to install an aver-
age of 60 to 100 numbers
per day.

“We will do our best to
get all the buildings in phase
one done as we are winding
down the sixth-month pro-
gramme,” he added. The
program is scheduled to end
in June.

Accident sparks traffic anger



Thousands of motorists were stuck in traf-
fic for up to an hour-and-a-half yesterday
after an afternoon accident shut down one

lane of Shirley Street.

The three-car pile-up involving two small
vehicles and an Atlantis tour bus took place
around 2 p.m. in Shirley Street just before the
intersection on Church Street.

Several angry drivers called The Tribune to

complain about how long it took for police to
reach the scene.
One said: “I was in traffic for 50 minutes

before I reached the scene of the accident

and there was not a policeman in sight.
“T would think that with a main artery like
Shirley Street the police would try to deal

with such a crippling obstruction in a more

timely manner.”



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010
LOCAL NEWS

Should we be limited to a

That's what our “winner
takes all” electoral system
boils down to, critics say.

In fact, Forbes Burnham,
the late but not missed presi-
dent of Guyana, argued that
state resources should be
used to maintain power at all
costs — any incumbent losing
an election would be "negli-
gent” in this view.

My last column looked at
the recent inconclusive

THE TRIBUNE



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Academics say that a consensus exists
throughout the Caribbean that the power of
the prime minister is too great and needs to
be limited, while the legislature needs to be
more independent and better able to restrain

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British general election in the
context of Bahamian third
parties and electoral reform.
It generated a response from
Dr Dexter Johnson, who has
spent years trying to break
the mould of our "Westmin-
ster export model constitu-
tion."

Dr Johnson is both a sur-
geon and a lawyer. For the
past 10 years he has been
teaching constitutional law at
the College of the Bahamas,
and recently produced three
books on the legal, political
and constitutional issues that,
he says, Bahamians are failing
to face up to.

Electoral reform is high
on his list of concerns.

He believes that the cur-
rent first-past-the-post voting
system inherited from the
British is the crudest method
of all, and prone to producing
unrepresentative results.

"You can conceivably win
every seat in the assembly
and still not have even 50 per
cent of the votes cast. As a
result you have effectively
disregarded the views of over
half of the electorate. Smaller
parties can be almost perma-
nently shut out from the
assembly, and you end up
with a system that chooses
the lesser of two evils."

This is compounded, he
says, by a constitution that
gives power and perks to the
two main parties, but noth-
ing at all to minor parties.
This pressures the electorate
into voting for either A or B,
when neither are their true
preference. It also allows the
two main parties to resist
change, since inevitably one

the executive.

or other will form the gov-
ernment.

"The matter is made even
more undesirable when A
and B are run by former part-
ners of a single law firm, and
their differences are negligi-
ble. The essence of democra-
cy is choice, and this is
thwarted by a first-past-the-
post system. Under-repre-
sentation prevents the voic-
ing of minority opinions.”

Cynicism

In countries where the first-
past-the-post system persists,
he says, voter participation
declines over time and cyni-
cism rises. In fact, other than
Britain, Canada, the United
States, India, Taiwan and sev-
eral former British colonies
in African and the Caribbean,
most countries today have
electoral systems that incor-
porate some form of propor-
tional representation.

Johnson also believes that
that our “winner takes all”
system could have dangerous
consequences. "We have two
main tribes, the PLP and the
FNM The antipathy
between these two tribes
increases daily, and it is my
concern that they will soon
be as hostile to each other as
the PNP and JLP are in
Jamaica, coached by the same
type of constitution.

"Inevitably, the desire to
access government's tremen-
dous power has converted
political parties into frenzied
masses of emotion-exuding

ih

APOSTLE CLEON

&

FIRST LADY MUNROE

as the 'y celebrate their

supporters who no longer
care for anything but to win
at all costs."

Trevor Munroe, professor
of government and politics at
the University of the West
Indies, voiced similar views
about Jamaica in the 1990s,
arguing that electoral reform
requires a clear understand-
ing of the common threat
presented by such unmediat-
ed tribalism:

"Tt is increasingly difficult
to envisage a way forward
which does not involve broad
social compromise, includ-
ing...power sharing arrange-
ments. Has the time not
come, not only for some mea-
sure of proportional repre-
sentation in our legislatures,
but also in the executive?"

Opponents of electoral
reform insist that the first-
past-the-post system has suc-
cessfully eliminated sectari-
an, fringe, and fruitcake par-
ties in those countries where
it operates. “Winner takes
all” voting favours broad par-
ties, which have to resolve the
interests of diverse con-
stituencies. As one commen-
tator put it, "this is the citi-
zen's best guarantee against
tails wagging dogs."

Unfortunately (for one
who holds that a measure of
electoral reform would be a
good thing for our political
system), objective conditions
in the Bahamas do not offer
much hope for reform.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 9



é

FROM page eight

Probably the best chance
for a third party break-
through recently came dur-
ing the 2002 general election,
when the Coalition for
Democratic Reform and oth-
er small parties took over
3,000 votes, while indepen-
dent candidates won more
than 6,000. Together, these
candidates polled about 7.5
per cent of the overall vote,
but third parties won no seats
and a few independents were
elected only because they
were unopposed by one of
the main parties.

Shortly before the 2002
election, the Ingraham
administration held our first-
ever referendum on constitu-
tional change. But all the pro-
posals were voted down,
despite the fact that they had
been approved by both major
parties in parliament. One of
those proposals was for an
independent electoral and
boundaries commission. Go
figure.

A broad-based constitu-
tional commission was
appointed by the Christie
administration soon after it
came to office in 2002 (co-
chaired by Paul Adderley and
Harvey Tynes). This group
produced a booklet on possi-
ble reforms, held a series of
meetings, issued a prelimi-
nary report in March 2006 —-
and then faded into oblivion.

Although no change to the
way MPs are elected was pro-
posed, there were calls for the
appointment of non-party
senators from various com-
munity groups, a reduction in
the prime minister's powers
of appointment, and the
strengthening of parliamen-
tary oversight committees.
The commission also called
for an independent electoral
and boundaries commission,
as well as limits on campaign
spending and donations to
ensure transparency and
accountability.

Campaign financing is a
matter of great sensitivity in
the Bahamas and there are
currently no rules that apply.

winner takes all’ system

But clearly, when politicians
receive secret donations to
get elected, the question of
returning the favour must be
uppermost in their minds on
taking office. More to the
point, how can a third party
with no seats ever expect to
generate enough financing to
get off the ground?

And financing is key to an
election. According to FNM
Chairman Carl Bethel, can-
didates in 2007 received
about $30,000 each from the
party for their constituency
campaigns. That's about $1.2
million — on top of advertis-
ing, printing and travel, so it is
clear that elections can cost
each party several million
dollars. (Former PLP chair-
man Raynard Rigby did not
respond to this inquiry).

Donations

"The money comes from
small and large donors,"
Bethel said. "Both parties
have a non-discriminatory
policy when it comes to dona-
tions. I cannot speak for the
PLP but I know that the
FNM does not accept dona-
tions from persons of unsa-
vory or suspect backgrounds.
We have refused to accept
money in the past.”

Academics say that a con-
sensus exists throughout the
Caribbean that the power of
the prime minister is too
great and needs to be limited,
while the legislature needs to
be more independent and
better able to restrain the
executive.

The lack of accountability
of public officials is also a
major concern in the
Bahamas and across the
region.

In his book Winner Takes
All — The Westminster Expe-
rience in the Caribbean,
Trinidad and Tobago political
scientist Selwyn Ryan listed
several key recommendations
for improving governance in
the region.

They included adoption of
a voting system similar to the
German model, which mixes
proportional representation
with the first-past-the-post

system; term limits for the
prime minister and fixed gen-
eral election dates; greater
powers and more resources
for local government; and the
creation of an ombudsman's
office to investigate and cor-
rect administrative abuses.

Dexter Johnson is a for-
mer FNM supporter and can-
didate who has spent the last
several years trying to build a
third party (in various incar-
nations). In his book Crisis
in Paradise, he says we should
convene a non-partisan con-
stituent assembly to draft a
republican constitution that
would be adopted following a
referendum.

"We must not continue to
revere the present constitu-
tion as if it were our creation
from scratch and perfectly
suited to our needs. It is nei-
ther, and the sooner we
change it the better it will be
for our progress towards a
more democratic society."

Johnson is now deputy
chairman of the National
Development Party, whose
leader (Dr Andre Rollins)
failed to gain any traction in
the recent Elizabeth bye-elec-
tion. The NDP is in the
process of revising its plat-
form for the 2012 election,
and is expected to support
comprehensive electoral
reform including term limits,
recall of non-functional par-
liamentarians, and campaign
finance laws.

It is often said that the
first-past-the-post system
inevitably produces a stag-
nant two-party system, with
narrow-minded governments
that crush dissent. Why
should we limit ourselves to
such a system?

According to the German
sociologist Max Weber, "suc-
cessful politics is always the
art of the possible, but this
does not mean you should
not reach out towards the
impossible which lies
beyond."

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribune-
media.net

Or visit www. bahamapun-
dit.com

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

FROM page one

Community (CARICOM), and
other international partners to
formally request assistance.

“The Bahamas is not pre-
pared for the level of calamity.
We are mobilising to address
it,” said Minister Deveaux.

If the oil currently leaking
from the BP Deep Horizon
platform enters the exclusive
economic zone of the Bahamas,
which sits about 120 miles south
of Key West, Florida, it could
be “disastrous” for the
Bahamas, and the many peo-
ple who depend on fishing for
their livelihood, said Minister
Deveaux.

The government is prepared
to cede some judgments to the







EARL DEVEAUX

team of experts, while main-
taining its sovereignty. These
decisions would include the
type of chemical disspersants
to used in the event they are
needed.

Chemical disspersants have
proven to be controversial,

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

We Paoite fs Cordially Sevited Te ena
THE MOSTHLY LUNCHEON FRESENTATION
Hoeted by The Bohanmas Seriety of Engieeer=












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Team of experts to aid oil spill exercise

because the manner and the
quantity in which they are being
used in the gulf are unprece-
dented. Standards vary across
the world as to what chemicals
are most safe and most effec-
tive.

“We don’t have the resources
and means to make an inde-
pendent determination,” said
Minister Deveaux, who admit-
ted the long-term environmen-
tal impact of the chemicals is
unknown.

Philip Weech, director of the
Bahamas Environment Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission, said the use of chemi-
cals, while potentially harmful,
was necessary for the immedi-
ate containment exercise.

He said it was important to
“shorten the resident time of
oil in the environment”, and
the chemicals helped to thin out
the oil, enabling it to be evapo-
rated, and prevent clumping.

Based on the potential use
of chemicals, he anticipated
testing in the marine environ-
ment would persist long after
the immediate aftermath of the
disaster to assess the long term
impact.

No definitive models exists
to determine if or when oil will
enter Bahamian territory, and if

it does, what form the oil will
take. Scientists predict based
on ocean currents, the north-
western Bahamas is at risk,
including some areas being con-
sidered for protected marine
habitat designation.

Three American scientists
were named by the local organ-
ising body, the National Oil
Spill Contingency Team, to
spearhead the planned Friday
exercise of collecting water, tis-
sue and sediment samples on
the Cay Sal Bank.

Marine biologist Kathleen
Sealey, from the University of
Miami, botanist Dr Ethan Freid
and independent biologist and
Bahamian seabird ecologist
Will Mackin will travel to the
Cay Sal Bank to collect sam-
ples.

Tissue samples from the liv-
ers of fish will be of particular
interest to the researchers,
according to Eric Carey, direc-
tor of the Bahamas National
Trust. He said researchers
would also test seabirds who
nest in Cay Sal, because some
of them travel a long distance
to feed in areas immediately
affected by the oil spill.

Initial samples will provide
baseline data for future analy-
sis. Although the government

This is to inform you that Gertrude
Roberts is no longer employed at Baha-
Retreat Spa and is not allowed to
conduct or transact any business on
behalf of its management, staff or its

clients.

is yet to sign off on a laborato-
ry, tests will be conducted in a
lab certified by the US Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
(EPA). They will also be stored
based on strict EPA guidelines.

Minister Deveaux said he
understands the oil is “sticky
and messy”. Some environ-
mentalists have described it as
“thin”. They maintain it is dif-
ficult to predict the state on
arrival in the Bahamas, but sce-
narios include oil arriving on
the surface, as tar balls, or
underwater plums or clouds.

Scientists determined the tar
balls discovered on the Florida
coast by the US Coast Guard
earlier this week were not from
the BP oil spill.

In the event of oil reaching
land in the Bahamas, the gov-
ernment plans to call on volun-
teers to make themselves avail-
able to assist, including indi-
viduals from the scientific com-
munity. Volunteers with boats
are asked to be on stand by to
assist with laying booms, which
are partially submerged floating
devices used to trap surface oil.

“We want to ensure we have
on call and available resources
to mobalise in the event the
worse case scenario arises,” said
Minister Deveaux.

THE TRIBUNE

Call for two
weather officers
to be disciplined
FROM page one

“Nothing has happened as
yet, but it is working
through the system,” said a
Tribune source.

The two officers were
written to by investigators
and utilised their opportuni-
ty to formally respond.

The Grand Bahama tor-
nado caused the death of
three Freeport Container
Port workers. It also left
dozens injured and caused
millions of dollars of dam-
age.

In the aftermath, the PLP
blamed the FNM for closing
the Meteorological Office in
Grand Bahama, while gov-
ernment sources said there is
no doubt “negligence” at the
Met Office in Nassau was at
least partially responsible for
the extent of the catastrophe.

Workers at the Container
Port questioned the safety
regulations put in place by
Hutchison Whampoa, which
owns the facility.

This is to inform you that Kedra
Bell is no longer employed at Baha-
Retreat Spa and is not allowed to
conduct or transact any business on
behalf of its management, staff or its

clients.

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

~ Call for help for
4- Haiti continues

FOUR months after a
massive 7.0 earthquake
devastated much of Haiti,
help continues to pour in
for the impoverished
4 nation and for the hun-

i dreds of thousands left

4 homeless by the disaster.

\ Although relief boxes
“ have now been collected
1 | from Bank of the Bahamas
branches, Kelly's Home
Centre at the Mall at
Marathon and City Market
stores in New Providence,
the Help Us Help Haiti
Relief account at Bank of
the Bahamas remains
open. Donations may be
made to 5510032762.









Se




deck ai F
© Fork of Ths ek
I"

HAITI RELIEF

PAR | — |

rs






Family Eye Care Centre





PICTURED at the final drop-off of donated goods, a campaign created by Bank of the Bahamas, are (I-
r) Salvation Army administrator Lisa Armbrister; BOB sponsorship committee members Laura
Williams, Dania Ferguson and Diane Phillips; marketing manager of Bahamas Supermarkets Nicola
Simmons and Salvation Army divisional secretary Major Oral Morris.





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ATIONAL ART GALLERY OF THE BAHAMAS



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wi The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas invites professional artists working in The Bahamas and Bahamian artists
abroad to enter their work in our Fifth National Exhibition (MES) scheduled to open in August 2010, The theme for this
exhibition is "The Carbon Footprint: Bahamian Artists’ 21st Century Response to the Environment." \Ve encourage all
professional artists to submit their work for this juned show which represents the best of contemporary Bahamian Art.

Over the last few years, we have witnessed many events
which have had a global impact whether they were the fiscal
events that emerged during the height of the credit crunch
or the natural disaster events that occurred this year in Haiti,
Peru and here at home. These events are ALL related one
way OF another ta varlous forms of global climate change.

In response to this, the MAGE is announcing that its fifth
national open submission exhibition, the NES, will be a
themed exhibition exploring ideas and marratives on issues
relating to the ist Century global question on carbon
footprint and climate change,

A carbon footprint is a measure of the impact our activities
have on the environment and, in particular, on climate
change. It relates to the amount of greenhouse gases
we individually produce im qur day-to-day lives through
burning fossil fuels for electricity, transpartation, ete.

It is our intention at the NAGE te explore this area fram an
artist's perspective seeing how they use their own unique
artistic tools and vision to produce works that look at areas
such as urbanization, mability (cars, planes, boats, etc.),
domesticity. personal space(s), landscape, industrialization,
natural earth elements, fabricated non-natural elements, etc.
that relate to carbon footprint and climate change.

This is not an easy challenge but at the NAGE, we feel that
with difficult and complex times, it is important that artists
are given the opportunity to respond.

if you are interested im participating, you may request the
Official Rules amd Entry Foro by contacting the Gallery at
Tel; 242-328-5800 or email at info@nagb.org.bs,

CATEGORIES

APainting s 0. Works on Paper Drawing, Collage, Orginal Prints, Watercolors,
Faitek, etc. § C. Photography / OL Sculptures, Assemblage, Installation
E.Ceranicg / Mined & ARe mative Media including Vides /G. Quilts

ELIGIBILITÂ¥

This exhibition if open to all prodessionad artists residing in The Bahamas
and all professional Baharnian artists practicing abroad, Professional is
Gefined at an adult individual working primarily 24 an artist preferably with
a history of exhibhing works.

JUDGING

The selection of varks will be completed bya panel of judipes chosen by
Ihe Gallery, Judging will take place im July 2070.

COLLECTION OF WORKS

Works mot selected for the exhibetion must be collected from the
Niational Art Gallery af The Bahamas by daly 0, 000, After the cle, he
National Art Gallary absolves itself of any respansiillity for the work and
mosorves the right to auction uncollected work bo cover storage costs.

Works accepted for the exhibation mutt be collected within TWO {2}
weeks of lhe chasing date, AMer this date, the Gallery reserves the right i
auction Off the works to cover the expences of extended storage,

INSURANCE
Pleake supply the National Art Gallery af The Baharia wlth @ copy of
CUPEAE GSuFanoe picks 0 aon] on all artwork submited, The WAGE

reserves the right to reject a work If it feels it canmat comer the estimated
walue of the work provided.

SALE OF WORKS AND PURCHASE AWARDS

The National Art Gallery undertakes to assist in the sale of those wears
which artists indicate are for sale. Price lists wall be offered at the exhibition
opening and will be available during the exhibition nun.

7 To assent in defraying the cost of the Filth National Exhibition
ihe National Gallery will retain a commission of 25%, whach willl be
deducted fram the stated sales price. This means that the sale price should
ndude artist revenue plus commission.

"The NAGE may chooie te acquire works for the National Collection
by this process,

«(Fa mon-reident is interested lin purchasing wark on display, the Gallery
will inform the artist of the potential sake. The actist rust indicate whether
1 process the gale ard agree to cower the coat af shipping the work
ritemationadly, if the purchaser rafuses,

DELIVERY OF WORKS
Artis are to subnet works for selection, along with a agreed official enary

teem fe the MAGE, West Hill Street, Marsan, Bahamas, Werks will net be
accepted without Entry Form and current CV.

THE CLOSING DATE FOR ENTRIES |S WEDNESDAY, JUNE
20, 2019 AT la NOON,

MANDATORY REGUIREMENT FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:
Artiets are REQUIRED to attend the screening of at least .one of the filma
featured in Tht. advertisement, hor international and Farnily Bland partici-
paarts ony, films will be avaliable for chiownloadineg from the wet via a link
that aall be emailed to you. Request link by emailing Jackson Petit at
|petititnagbiongbs. For further infonmation, please contect the Gallery at
242-528-98007 or email Holly Parosti at hparottie@nagborglbs.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

MANDATORY REQUIRED FILMS
FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:

In order for Artists to be eligible to submit
artwork to the NES, they MUST attend the
screening of at least one of the films
featured below.

“flemember Saro-Wiwa" -Tue. May 18, apm
"Home" - Thu. May 20, apm

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NOME

PC De ee

"Home" ~ Thu. May 20, 8pm





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 15

LOCAL NEWS



Catch football’s best plays with Act Il

Girls, 10, pregnant

FROM page one

consent."

The press conference had
been held to officially
announce the partnership
between PACE and the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force.

Superintendent Stephen
Dean, head of the National
Crime Prevention Office
(NCPO), said the relation-
ship with the programme
would realise crime preven-
tion goals such as positive
involvement and engage-
ment with the community.

He said: "We have to be
open and straight. We all see
it. We all know what's going
on and a lot of it is covered
up. And it’s these girls’ lives
that we are sacrificing."

Mr Dean also noted that
often, while society con-
demns teenage mothers, not
much is done to address the
fathers, and the police will
be especially targeting older
men.

He added: "Particularly to
the mothers of these young
girls — don't cover it up.
Report what happened and
go straight through to pros-
ecution.

"Anyone with informa-
tion should come forward.
If it is found out that a per-
son knew about it and with-
held information, it is a
criminal offence and they
will be prosecuted also."

In response to requests

Supper and Bingo fundraiser



The PACE foundation is having a Supper and Bingo
fundraiser on Saturday at noon on the grounds of the

Police Headquarters.

Dinner tickets are $10 and prizes include jewellery,
housewares and appliances. There also will be a bouncing

castle for children.

The fundraiser will lend much need assistance to the
programme, which, over the years, has provided assistance
to more than 3,000 teenage mothers and their babies.



more information about
graduates of the pro-
gramme, PACE published
a documentary, which show-
cased the testimonials of
graduates. The film, called
“Interrupted”, is used as an
educational tool for parents,
teachers and guidance coun-
sellors so that students can
be sensitised to the conse-
quences of teenage preg-
nancy.

Research

Mrs Brown said: "When
we did the research, one
thing that all of the girls
mentioned was that their
parents never told them
what they expected of them.
Parents need to get to know
their children, as simple as
sitting down and having din-
ner together. Get to be com-
fortable with them so they
can tell you what's going on.

“We live in a society
where people don't like to

dren are occurring from
somewhere. We need to
strengthen our parenting
skills. We have to talk to our
children about sex."

Mrs Brown said it was
never too early for parents
to start talking to their chil-
dren about sex and it was
parent's responsibility to
find the right language to
communicate with them.

She said: "People see the
girls pregnant and in the uni-
form and think that they are
just bad girls but there are a
range of issues, they don’t
know what the story is
behind it. There could be so
many things, it could be
incest or just bad decisions
whether with a young boy
or an older man.

"Parents need to be
responsible if you have a
young daughter, you need
to know who her friends are,
who she says she is going out
with and you can't have a
young girl going out with a

Om CO eiy Or talk about sex, but the chil-

MPs seek to make animal

owners more responsible
FROM page one

which previously existed under the Dog License Act of 1942,
which it will now repeal and replace, as well as under the Penal
Code, but also provides for more demands on animal owners and
increases the fines that come along wth failure to comply with
those regulations.

The Bill “promotes responsible animal ownership”, said the
MP for Long Island and Ragged Island, who told Parliament it
came after more than 12 years of “extensive consultation” and in
particular out of a “felt and expressed need for greater control and
regulation of roaming and stray animals in the Bahamas”.

Mr Cartwright added that the creation of the Bill was initially
inspired in the 1990s after a series of dog attacks against tourists and
Bahamians. Recognising that the Bill includes some regulations
which did exist in previous legislation, he stressed that ‘““enforce-
ment” of the legislation’s provisions, new and old, will now be key
to the achievement of its objectives.

Improving the likelyhood of this, a 12 member Animal Protec-
tion and Control Board will be appointed with responsibility for the
welfare and protection of animals, along with similar authorities in
other family islands, said Mr Cartwright.

New animal control units will also be established on those
islands where impounded animals can be held and Animal Wardens
will be employed under the Bill, having the authority to inspect and
investigate potential or actual animal welfare issues.

Roaming or stray animals - either owned but lost or unowned -
can be seized and impounded at the owner’s expense if found
roaming, with the owner given four days notice before they may be
euthanised.

Protection of the public and their property against animal attacks
is covered, providing for people to recoup damages from the own-
ers of animals in these cases and calling for the confinement of all
dogs such that they cannot leave an owner’s property.

The legislation further outlines the need for those who board or
breed animals for sale - whether in their homes or elsewhere - to
meet animal welfare standards and obtain a license to do the
same. Animal identification measures are a key feature of the
legislation, along with the responsibility of owners to take steps to
reduce unwanted breeding by their dogs.

Public safety in the face of potentially dangerous dogs or guard
dogs, reducing the fear and occurrence of dog attacks, is addressed.

Meanwhile, cruelty to animals is defined as any instance where
an animal is or is permitted to be “cruelly kicked, ill treated, tor-
tured or overworked” or “inhumanely killed, sexually assaulted,
neglected, deprived of water food or shelter or caused unnecessary
suffering”.

The Bill provides for a Magistrate to have an animal subject to
such cruelty taken from its owner and for that person to be dis-
qualified from owning an animal.

The PLP supported the Bill but questioned whether it would be
properly enforced and how much this would cost the government.

Elizabeth MP Ryan Pinder said the Bill “should be more pro-
gressive” and include a “framework for the education of the pub-
lic on responsible animal ownership”, focusing more on education
“and less on fines”.

Police investigate theft of safe
FROM page one

possession of its key. According to the initial report, the bur-
glars are said to have entered the compound in which the build-
ing is located between 2am and 8am on Sunday, either through a
window or one of the air-conditioning vents on the northern
side. They then smashed the doors of the post office open with
an object, possibly a crowbar.

The compound also holds the community’s police station, but
sources say no officers were present at the time, having all left
after a function held there earlier that night.

Taking cash, cheques and money orders together thought to
be worth about $30,000, as well as mail, the burglars are report-
ed to have made their escape on foot.

They are said to have dragged the safe across Queen’s High-
way and down to the beach, where it was put on either a truck
or boat. Officers from the Central Detective Unit have flown to
the island to investigate the matter, and are expected to make
an arrest within the very near future.

In other crime related news, officers are also in Abaco prob-
ing the disappearance of $1,800 from the central government
offices. According to well-placed sources within the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, officers were dispatched to Abaco on
May 5 to assist with the investigation.

It is believed the money had been earmarked for local gov-
ernment programmes.

grown man."



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MMA HOG MOLL
when you enter to win the Flat Screen TVs.

Offer good while supplies last.

WIN ONE OF 5 FLAT SCREEN TV’s

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To enter, bring your 2 empty boxes of Act II popcorn plus your local store receipt, dated
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Winners must agree to have their photo taken for a winners’ ad.







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Phe slund’s best
pava 1 on the
move! ‘Che second,
© Marco's Pizza
restaurant located in ‘Tve
Village Road Shopping
Plaza officially opened
itis door to welcome
customers on Wednesday,
"May L2th. This newest
YF oedditien to the 3 growing
y Marco's chain boasts.
; State-of-the-art features like a
Piarce digital display screen to
expodite take-out orders, and a
Hpacious, dining room complete
with old-world charm aml a

seating capacity of fifty.

Marco's 2, will now expand the
company’s delivery range to
residences and businesses as far
as Mackey Street and Marathon
Road while including Sea Breeze,
Dannotage Estates. Johnson
Road, Prince Charles, Yamacrayw
and East Bay Street,

couldn't resist the delicious pizza aroma, She ordered
ihe 37.09 Lunch Special becoming the first take-oul
clasomer and winning herself a free large Specialty

Pizza.

Cwners: Terry Tsavoussis, Franchise Go-Ch

‘2 Vice President: Ancila Henbur,

General Manager, Chris Taavouseis, Future Marcos Franchises; Yolanda Pawar,
Marketing Khlanager Mol shown: Chrstopher Tsavoussis, President & Franchise

Loser

Building on the
brand's reputation for delivering
the best pizza in the industry,
Marco's authentic pizza-making
traditions infuse time-honored
techniques with robust seasonings
and sauces, pene©rous Llopping
portions, and a signature blend of
three, fresh, never frozen cheeses
lo guarantee a favor experence

oul of this world!

With pizzas starting at
under ten dollars, plus a
full menu offering hot,

Baked Subs,

C

Herself a large Specialty Pizza

freshly-made Salads, succulent
Chicken Wings, Savory Cheezy
Bread and delightfully sweet
Cinnasquares, Mareo’s Pizza is
the ideal farnily treat!

As a grand opening special, all
customers purchasing an A-large
Specialty Pizza will receive a free
arder of Chicken Tumblers
while supplies Last at both the
new Village Eoad and
Ponce Charles locations.

veo J

that Bank Of The Bahaenss loves Marco's Pizza
Situated fight maxl door, BOTR was the mew
reshaurand's first delivery and lucky Tarnmy won



7‘,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











THE TRIBUNE

&



THURSDAY,



MAY 20,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net










By NEIL HARTNELL

BOCTORS HOSrITAL

Tribune Business Editor

7

= £ a
ia

The company’s annual report for the
year to January 31, 2010, which has





octors Hospital has hired

architects to produce

drawings for the planned

expansion of its Shirley
Street/Collins Avenue facility, after the
BISX-listed company saw net income
for fiscal 2010 rise year-over-year by
28 per cent to $4.886 million.

been seen by Tribune Business, con-
firmed: “The expansion is currently
planned to include an energy centre,
additional clinical areas and new park-
ing facilities, along with needed space
for support services.”

The BISX-listed healthcare provider
said its estimated capital budget for the
current 2011 fiscal year stood at $4.5






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







PROFIT CENTRE: Doctors eliminated all bank debt, and has appointed architects to design planned growth...

Doctors to expand
after 28% profit rise

million, with funds allocated for the
purchase of a digital mammogram
machine, new x-ray machine, operat-
ing room equipment and data centre
equipment.

Doctors Hospital had planned to
spend $3 million on capital purchases in
its 2010 fiscal year, but deferred some
$1.3 million of this amount.

SEE page 5B







Money Safe.
Money Fast.

dniernia thee! Money m @)

[@ Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

Ophir wt
Bank BahamasOnhina.com

$36k savings in 10
years from better
bus system

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN family of
four could save some $36,340
over 10 years if a strengthened
jitney system encouraged them
to use public transportation
rather than acquire a $22,000
car, College of the Bahamas
(COB) lecturers have estimat-
ed, warning that the current
inadequate infrastructure only
“deepens our growing trade
imbalance and national debt”.

The 1962 Foundation, a
COB faculty group that
includes noted academics Dr
Tan Strachan and Dr Olivia
Saunders, warned that the exist-
ing weak public transportation
system was fuelling an “unsus-
tainable lifestyle”, where traffic
congestion was costing the
Bahamian economy productiv-
ity and working hours.

The rate of increase in regis-
tered private motor vehicles on
New Providence had outpaced
population growth four-fold in
percentage terms between
2002-2006, their report said, and
the need to secure car owner-
ship was having “a dramatic
impact on the cost of living” for
many Bahamian households.

“The 1962 Foundation esti-
mates that the cost of owning
and operating a $22,000 auto-
mobile for a New Providence

Insurer targets ‘niche markets’ ‘Never going to be perfect’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALStar Assurance, the
Bahamian property and casu-
alty insurer, is increasingly tar-
geting niche markets and
groups with specific products,
while also continuing to build-
up its 24-hour claims service
that is being used “more and
more frequently”.

Describing the general insur-
ance carrier’s plans for 2010,
Steve Watson, its managing
director, said it planned to fur-
ther “push” its 24-hour claims
service, as well as target select
markets with “affinity prod-
ucts”.

“We've got a couple of things

* RoyalStar also focusing
on 24-hour claims service,
which has ‘on the spot
value’ and being used
‘more and more frequently’

* Only large losses in 2009
were sinkings of fishing
vessel and motor yacht

that are in the pipeline and are
ongoing,” Mr Watson told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re contin-
uing to push our 24 hour claims
service, which has been well-
received. It’s taken quite a

SEE page 9B

Court throws out Ginn suit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AUS court has thrown out a
lawsuit filed against the devel-
opers of the $4.9 billion Ginn
sur mer project, in which pur-
chasers who spent between
$525,900 and $1.37 million on
acquiring real estate parcels had
alleged fraudulent conspiracy,
on the grounds that the
Bahamas was the correct juris-
diction in which a court should
hear their complaints.

District Judge Marcia
Morales Howard, sitting in the
Middle Florida courts, in her

Finds Bahamas proper
venue to settle purchaser
claims over $526,000-
$1.37m real estate
purchases at $4.9bn
Bahamas project

March 31, 2010, ruling dis-
missed in its entirety the lawsuit
brought by a group of Ginn sur
mer purchasers against the pro-
ject and its developers for
“improper venue”.

SEE page 4B

Crvnd floor fall) furaished 2-hed, 2-hath conde with
Juntanic Harbour views, landicoped gardens, aml
sparkling paal within We pated oomannnify af
‘Eosteind’. Great rental kistary!

$535,000 Gross
Craig Pinder 457-2282

tml: Cri PuraliseBabamscom

call NO cae

PARADISE REALTY



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s public
procurement system is not
“ever going to be perfect”, a
former Chamber of Commerce
president told Tribune Business
yesterday, arguing that the
Bahamas’ relatively small size
and interwoven family/political
relationships made it impossible
to “eliminate the foolishness
that goes on”.

Responding to the proposed
public procurement reforms,
which could save the Govern-
ment up to 30 per cent (close to
$130 million) on its existing
$400 million annual contracts
budget, Dionisio D’Aguilar said

up to 6% interest®

Safeguard your family’s future with a Bank of The Bahamas B$ Investment Certificate.

* Ex-Chamber chief says Bahamas’ small size and
interlocking family/political relationships make
it impossible to ‘ever eliminate foolishness and
corruption’ in government contract awards and bidding
* ‘Wary’ of creating another layer

of bureaucracy with reforms

* Suggests ability of bidder to deliver, not
price, should be key assessment criteria

that while he was wary about
introducing more bureaucracy
into public sector contract
processes, efforts to eliminate
corruption and political influ-
ences had to be made.

“T don’t think it’s ever going
to be perfect,” Mr D’ Aguilar

told Tribune Business of the
Government’s public procure-
ment system. “Given the small-
ness of the country, I don’t
think you’ll ever eliminate the
foolishness that goes, but you

SEE page 7B

Sign up now and get a free prepaid card membership for the first year.

www.BankBahamas.com

*Certain restrictions apply



family is $7,284 a year, or
$72,840 over 10 years,” their
report said. “$7,284 represents
15 per cent of the average
household income in New
Providence.

“The cost to a family of four
of using public transportation
for the year is only $3,650 (7
per cent of the average nation-
al household income) or
$36,500 over 10 years. If a fam-
ily of four chose not to borrow
from a bank to own a $22,000
automobile and took the bus
instead, they would save $3,634
a year or $36,340 over 10
years.”

To help alleviate the prob-
lem, the Foundation suggested
that there be “a more mean-
ingful linkage” between the tax
revenues gained from the trans-
port industry and regulation of
the public transport system.

Key fees and taxes were fuel
taxes, car licensing, inspection
fees, and traffic violation fines,
yet in the 2007 Budget the
Road Traffic Department had
just $6.692 million to spend,
despite collecting $39 million
in fiscal 2008 from inspection
and licensing fees, plus taxi and
bus franchise fees.

The Government was also
urged to encourage the use and
importation of high fuel-effi-

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report



° BOB





DY

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$1.79

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Softner 28.7 oz

$1.99



PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010
Selecting the program
that is right for you

WHEN it comes to selecting
a graphic program, there are so
many choices that it can often
be difficult to determine which
is right for you. While the ten-
dency is to want to go with the
most popular program avail-
able, that's not always the most
appropriate option for every
person's needs.

Choosing the best profes-
sional software can seem daunt-
ing, but with a little planning
you can easily find the right
program by comparing price,
performance and features that
should be considered before
making a final decision.

Graphic Design Software has
vast creative tools for drawing,
logos, page layout, image
design, painting, photo editing,
web graphics and other creative
masterpieces.

In this article, we'll take a
brief look at the relevant graph-
ic software on the market, and
assess how to choose the right
Graphic Design software.

Generally, graphic design is a
process of text and picture com-
bination that tells a story which
cannot be told effectively with
raw text. This is mainly done
on book covers, newspapers,
magazines, logos and for adver-
tisement. Nonetheless, in order
to design graphics, graphic
design software is required.

However, high quality soft-
ware such as Adobe Photoshop
and illustrator, Corel and
Quark Xpress are the top
graphic design products on the
market today. They are mainly
considered because of their
professional page layout, price
and user interface.

The finest graphic design
software is chosen depending
on qualities such as:

* Task- What are you design-
ing?

* Operating system: The
software has to be compatible
with the operating system being
used.

* Affordability: Do you have
enough funds to obtain the pre-
ferred software?

* Memory: Can your
machine support the normal
running of the given graphic
software?

* Features: Are there
required features in the soft-
ware to meet your end needs?

Q
S








The Art
of Graphix

adore O se Rie





Types of Graphic Software

* Corel Graphic design: We
have only one graphic design
in the Corel category, which is
Coral draw. Other top graphic
design software products
include Acrobat, Dimension,
Dream weaver, Frame maker,
Front page and Shock wave.

* Page layout software is used
to combine graphics and text
to produce a document. Usu-
ally these documents are
intended to be printed, but they
can also be slide show presen-
tations or websites.

* Word Processors, as the
name implies, have an emphasis
on working mainly with text.
In recent years, however, word
processors can be used to com-
bine text and graphics for many
documents such as brochures,
booklets, flyers and postcards.

* Publishing Software
includes Adobe PageMaker,
Microsoft Publisher, Macro-
media Freehand, Creative
Printing Software includes Print
Artist, The Print Shop and
Print Master.

* Presentation software is
designed for creating on-screen
presentations, reports, over-
head transparencies, and
slideshows. Also, this type of
software allows you to incor-
porate multimedia into docu-
ments.

* Web Publishing Software:
Another development in recent
years that has the ability to pub-
lish work on the Internet.

* Graphic design and desk-
top publishing software is essen-
tially the same thing. The pri-
mary difference is that the
desktop publishing category
includes some consumer level
programs not typically consid-
ered graphic design software.
Adobe InDesign and QuarkX-
Press are the primary page lay-

THE TRIBUNE

out programs.

Some of the leading graphic
software includes:

Adobe Photoshop

CS4 software:

Photoshop CS4 definitely tips
the scales. This is ‘THE’ photo
editing king in the graphics
world, and used by most serious
graphic designers, photogra-
phers and image manipulators.
It is one of the most advanced
and versatile programs that
dominates the industry. Bun-
dled with different graphic
applications it has always been
a given in my wish list, and
comes with a host of features
that allow for an excellent fin-
ish.

The biggest obstacle to any
designer who wants Photoshop
is the price but, ultimately, it
can create an image from
scratch or edit an existing file.
This is the graphic design soft-
ware that most graphic design-
ers will not do without.

Types of Output: Pho-
tographs, Manipulated objects,
Web Graphics and Texture
editing.

Freehand software: This pro-
gram is manufactured by
Macromedia and allows for the
creation of vector art. It is good
for line art, cartoons, logo cre-
ation and resizing, and still has
smooth edges and lines. Vec-
tor images are made up of lines,
curves and gradients.

Types of Output: Line Art,
Logos, Cartoons, smooth edges
and shapes. Not for pho-
tographs.

Illustration software:
Although not technically con-
sidered a layout software, this
program has the ability to flow
text, check spelling and gram-
mar, and adjust kerning and
line spacing on smaller projects
such as postcards, greeting
cards, brochures, business
cards, letterheads and small
booklets.

Types of Output: Line Art,
Logos, Cartoons - anything
with smooth edges and shapes.

Quark Xpress: This is a lay-
out program for printed media.

SEE page 11B

New NIB Contribution Rate
to take effect June 1, 2010

“Up, NCE 9° For the first time since the National Insurance programme started

in 1974, the rate of contribution payments will be increased for employed

Pasta Select
150z

$1.39

1-2-3 Oil
330Z

$2.50

Super B Evaporated
Milk 41 og .69¢

BUTLER’S BARGAIN MART
Household items
pk ep Microfiber Sheet Set

Queen $14.99. Twin $10.99

Ironing Boards

sais $35.00

Large Bath Towels

Starting from $6.50)
Fleece Throw Blanket
60°80 - 812.99
50°60 - 99.99

Umbrellas
starting from $7.00









persons, Beginning June 1, 2010, the rate will be increased by 1% - one half percent
(50%) to be paid by the employer, and one-half percent (.50) to be paid by the employee.
This means that the current rate of 8.8%, shared 5.4% for employer and 3.4% for
employee, will change to 9.8%, shared 5.9% for employer, and 3.9% for employee.
This translates to a maximum weekly increase of §2 for the employer and $2 for the
employee.

The increase, which was necessitated by the addition of Unemployment Benefit to the
National Insurance benefits package, will only impact Eerployed Persons - Le., persons
who have bosses, The rate of contributions for all other contributors « self-employed
persons; voluntarily insured persons; and Summer students - will not be increased
because contriburions paid by them in these categories will not qualify them to receive
Unemployment Benefit.

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR EmMplovep Persons FROM JUNE 1

ACTUAL INSURABLE (CONTRIBUTIONS PAYABLE AS
— — PERCENTAGE OF INSURABLE WAGES BY

Up to $59,99 eaves | Wages Up tc 2.2% 7.6% PS
and including $59.4
$60 te $400 actual wages from 5% 5h
a bes S400

| abow S400 | 5200



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR PENSIONABLE CIVIL. SERVANTS

(CONTRIBUTIONS PAYABLE AS
PERCENTAGE ‘OF INSURABLE WAGES BY

pte $59.99 actual wages up to
and including $59.9 234, 6% 9.5%
$60 to F110
5 3, i 4, Bh
5.99

above $110 to $40
plus 3.05%

actual wages from
$60 to $110

(a) actual wages up to $110
(b} actual wapes in excess of
$110 but up ta $400

fa) actual wages up to $110 3% 5.9% 9.8%
(b} actual wages in excess of
$110 upto $400

and above
plus 5.25%

plus 2% plus 53,0555. plus 5254

Visit www.oib-bahamas.com for more information or ta download the new
contribution tables.





THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas to repay furthe

$80m in debt next year

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE BAHAMAS is expect-
ed to reduce its debt by anoth-
er $80 million in the next fiscal
year, the minister of state for
finance told Tribune Business
yesterday, while continuing to
seek Technical Assistance
Grants for economic and social
development.

Zhivargo Laing said, though,
that the amount of retired debt
could be higher or lower as it is
decreased every fiscal year.

"We have a line item in the
budget for debt redemption.
Almost every year we have an
estimate for what debt redemp-
tion is, and every year you retire
debt," said Mr Laing. "That's
why we always talk about the
net increase in our debt because
while we are borrowing we are
also paying back debt."

Mr Laing said the Bahamas
can often have a difficult time
borrowing from some interna-
tional lending facilities because
of the size of its gross domestic
product (GDP), yet can often
always access technical assis-
tance grants for projects dealing
with poverty reduction or envi-
ronmental sustainability.

"Techincal assistance grants
are somthing that is readily
available for us," he said.

Mr Laing said many institu-
tions want to give technical
asisitance to help improve a
country's capacity to grow its
infrastructure and social devel-
opment programmes.

He added that the Bahamas
has several technical assistance
grants in the pipeline and will









access many more in the future.

"We have a number of tech-
nical assistance programs with
either the IDB (Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank) or
CDB (Caribbean Development
Bank)," Mr Laing said. "We are
constantly using those assis-
tance programmes, and there is
no question that there will be
more as we go along."

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 3B

r Credit union worker

passes Canada exam

THE membership STI provides
supervisor at the training for both the
: National Workers exams required to
potas on iad ieee Co-operative Cred- complete the CSC.

planned infrastructure projects
across the region.

But as the CDB recently
acquired an historic $1 billion in
extra funding facilities in the
region, the Bahamas has
already benefited, signing an
agreement for $a 10.1 million
loan from the bank on Tues-
day.

it Union, Kim Vic-
toria Simpson, has
completed the Cana-
dian Securities
Course (CSC) after
studying at the Nas-
sau-based Securities
Training Institute
(STD.



KIM SIMPSON

Ms Albury, STIT’s
course administra-
tor, said: “Our com-
prehensive work-
shops greatly assist
in enhancing stu-
dents’ understand-
ing of financial prod-
ucts and services.”



Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, addressing the body of the
Governors of the Caribbean
Development Bank, said the

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Court throws
out Ginn suit

FROM page 1B

“In so concluding, the court
expresses no view as to the
merits of the plaintiffs’ claims,
but simply holds that the [pur-
chasers] ‘must honour their bar-
gains’ and attempt to vindicate
their claims in a Bahamian
court,” Judge Howard ruled.

Noting that the case “stems
from their respective contracts
to purchase undeveloped
parcels of real property in the
Versailles sur mer subdivision
on Grand Bahama Island from
Ginn-LA West End, a Bahami-
an corporation”, the judge not-
ed Ginn’s argument that all
contracts with the purchasers
“contain enforceable forum-
selection clauses designating
the exclusive venue for the
instant litigation to be in the
Bahamas”.

The Ginn sur mer lots in
question had been purchased
in 2006 and 2007, and the judge
said: “Paragraph 22 of each
sales contract contains an iden-
tical forum-selection clause pur-
porting to designate the
Bahamas as the exclusive venue
for any legal action” relating to
the agreements.

The US court found that the
“contracts and underlying
transactions” were internation-
alin nature, with the buyers all
Americans. Ginn was a
Bahamian company, “the con-
tracts were negotiated in the
US, but the closings apparently
took place partially in the US
and partially in the Bahamas”.

“Finally, and perhaps most
importantly, the subject matter
of the contracts each concerns
the sale of real property in the
Bahamas,” Judge Howard said.

The purchasers, though, had
argued that the choice of the
Bahamas as the jurisdiction
governing the contracts was
“unreasonable”, claiming the
deals had been produced
through fraud, and that using
this nation would prevent the
hearing of claims under US law.

Judge Howard found that the
contracts with Ginn were

“freely negotiated”, adding:
“Although the forum selection,
and indeed the entire contracts,
are nearly identical, there is no
indication from plaintiffs that
they were not the product of
free negotiation.

“In contrast to the terms of a
cruise ticket forced upon a con-
sumer with limited bargaining
power, the instant contracts
concerned sophisticated real
estate transactions involving
large sums of money - purchase
prices ranged from $525,900 to
$1.37 million. Indeed, the [$1.37
million] contract contains alter-
ations - seemingly favourable
to the buyer - that eliminate
one provision of the contract
and add others.”

Judge Howard found that the
choice of Bahamas as governing
jurisdiction for the contracts
was clearly stated in the docu-
mentation, even though the
purchasers claimed that a hear-
ing in this nation would ‘preju-
dice’ their case and deprive
them of a fair hearing.

Rejecting this, the judge said
the purchasers had “in a some-
what condescending manner”,
argued that Bahamian courts
“are ill-equipped to adjudicate
claims” that were complex.

She added: “The court finds
that plaintiffs have failed to car-
ry their heavy burden of show-
ing that a Bahamian forum
would deprive them of a full
and fair hearing so as to make
the forum-selection clause
unreasonable.”

Justice Howard also found:
“Additionally, plaintiffs take
issue with the fact that the con-
tracts require litigation in the
Bahamas despite having been
carefully structured to avoid the
necessity of plaintiffs having to
travel to the Bahamas to com-
plete the closing of the trans-
actions at issue.

“Although these factors may
make plaintiffs’ suit prospects
more difficult, and less appeal-
ing, the court cannot conclude
that requiring suit in the
Bahamas for a contract con-
cerning the purchase by plain-

tiffs of property in the Bahamas
evinces a bad-faith motive of
discouraging plaintiffs from
pursuing claims.”

In its ultimately successful
defence to the action, Ginn had
alleged that it was merely “an
attempt to find a scapegoat for
their buyers’ remorse", amid
claims that a lender took a $276
million mortgage on the Grand
Bahama site despite just the
development receiving just 2
per cent of its loan proceeds.

Ginn, in a February 16, 2010,
filing argued that while the
plaintiffs had all purchased lots
at the Ginn sur mer site in
Grand Bahama, they were now
seeking to blame it for all the
problems stemming from the
credit crunch and global reces-
sion.

"Following the unprecedent-
ed decline in the real estate
market and the resulting mort-
gage crisis, plaintiffs now seek
to hold Ginn responsible for
the decline in their property
values by alleging several claims
under the [US] Interstate Land
Sales Full Disclosure Act,"
Ginn alleged.

Much of the plaintiffs’ argu-
ments surrounded the $675 mil-
lion syndicated loan that Ginn
obtained from Credit Suisse,
which was secured on Ginn Sur
mer and four other properties it
was developing. Ginn ulti-
mately defaulted on the repay-
ments due on this loan, lead-
ing the Credit Suisse syndicate
to ultimately foreclose on it,
including the Grand Bahama
real estate it was secured upon,
making them the developer's
joint venture partner moving
forward.

Ginn alleged that their case
was " red herring", and said the
real estate buyers bringing the
action - all of them US citizens
- knew the Credit Suisse credit
facility was due "to be repaid
through lot sales, which ceased
as a result of the real estate
market collapse.

"The Ginn defendants can-
not possibly be at fault for the
real estate market collapse."



ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT






SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused,

PUBLIC NOTICE

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department's Triage, Registration and Patient Waiting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic.

Effective Tuesday May 11th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed,

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services,

For more information please call 502-7885 for A&E Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic.







THE TRIBUNE

THE CARIBBEAN region,
including the Bahamas,
received an $850 million
pledge of support from a group
of lenders who signed a Joint

Action Plan yesterday
designed to support economic
growth.

Five international financial
institutions said they would
collectively help to provide
support to governments and
private sectors through loan
facilities that would encourage
support when finding capital
was difficult for small islands
states in the Caribbean.

The institutions, the
Caribbean Development
Bank, European Investment
Bank, Proparco (the private
sector arm of the Agence Fran-
caise de Development Group),
the International Finance Cor-
poration (Part of the World
Bank) and the Netherlands

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 5B
$850m pledge to support
Caribbean and Bahamas

Development Finance Com-
pany (FMO), have already
pledged to support the recon-
struction efforts in Haiti, with
the agreement of the
Caribbean Joint Action Plan.

Desmond Brunton, vice-
president of operations for the
Caribbean Development
Bank, said the synergy of four
financial institutions working
together will assist countries
in accessing funding for a wide
range of projects, as each one
has its own ideas and agendas.

"Today, five leading inter-
national financial institutions
active in the Caribbean rein-
forced their commitment to
ensuring long-term economic
growth across the region,
resilience to the global finan-
cial crisis and effective deploy-
ment of assistance for recon-
struction efforts in Haiti with
agreement of the Caribbean

Joint Action Plan,” a joint
press release said.

"The Caribbean Joint
Action Plan will enable more
effective use of financial and
technical assistance by encour-
aging a stronger focus on each
participating institution’s expe-
rience and capabilities."

Mr Brunton said the idea of
the joint facilities was to give
each country the best chance
of receiving support from one
or several of the four banks.

"It is expected that this
approach will further support
economic growth in the region
by mobilizing IFI (Interna-
tional Financial Institutions)
investment to act as a catalyst
for private sector engagement,
and facilitating national and
sub-regional support and poli-
cy dialogue amongst both pri-
vate and public stakeholders,”
the joint statement said.

Doctors to expand after 28% profit rise

FROM page 1B

Assessing its 2010 results, the
company said net income rose
to $0.49 per share, compared
to $3.814 million or $0.38 per
share in the prior year, largely
due to a $3.05 million or 7.3 per
cent year-over-year increase in
patient service revenues.

This was achieved against a
backdrop of just 12,875 patient
days, the lowest level since
2007, with adult patient days
down by 2.4 per cent year-over-
year - trends that Doctors Hos-
pital expects to continue
through fiscal 2011.

Still, the growth in patient
service revenues outpaced the
5.9 per cent, or $2.3 million,
increase that Doctors Hospital
suffered in its fiscal 2010
expenses.

“As a percentage of total rev-
enues, expenses decreased
slightly from 90.2 per cent in
fiscal 2009 to 89 per cent in fis-
cal 2010,” the company said in
its annual report. It added that
salaries and benefits were held
below its target level of 39 per

cent of patient service revenues,
falling slightly to 38 per cent
compared to 38.8 per cent dur-
ing the 2009 fiscal year.

Salary and benefit expenses
increased slightly over 2009, ris-
ing by $0.8 million or 5 per cent,
something Doctors Hospital
attributed to “increased”
patient activity.

Elsewhere, days revenue in
accounts receivables dropped
from 60 days in fiscal 2009 to
just 33 days last year, corre-
sponding to a 33.7 decrease in
accounts receivables which
occurred largely in the third
party-payor category.

“Bad debt expense as a per-
centage of patient service rev-
enues rose to 4.8 per cent in the
year ended January 31, 2010,
compared to 3.8 per cent the
previous year,” Doctors Hos-
pital said. “This represented an
increase of $0.6 million or 36.1
per cent. The increase is attrib-
utable to one payor with whom
the hospital is working dili-
gently to recover.

“The percentage of receiv-
ables from insurers represents
85 per cent of total receivables

Sheraton
Nassau
BEACH RESORT

compared to 75 per cent last
year. The percentage due from
self-pay patients dropped to 11
per cent from 15 per cent, and
the percentage due from
National Insurance dropped
from 4 per cent to 10 per cent
last year.”

Aided by the impact of the
reduction in fuel prices on the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) prices, Doctors
Hospital saw electricity costs
fall by 22.2 per cent or $0.4 mil-
lion year-over-year in 2010.

Some $5.1 million of the
company’s $6.2 million worth
of cash employed in financing
activities was used to com-
pletely eliminate Doctors Hos-
pital’s debt with Royal Bank of
Canada.

And the BISX-listed health-
care provider added: “Doctors
Hospital Health Systems con-
tinues to pursue the sale of
Western Medical Plaza and to
secure additional tenants in the
interim. There has been an
increase in interest in purchas-
ing one or both of the two
buildings at the Plaza during
recent months.”

The new 70) room Sheraton Cable Beach Resort, Nassau, The Bahamas is looking

for

Banquet Manager

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Fax:341-7378
Email:kool_tech@live.com



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
IMPORTANT NOTICE

NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY

Effectively monitor the daily operations of the Banquet Department, including pro-
viding support and guidance to fellow banquet personnel to ensure a successful and
clfective operation cading in a positive gucsl experience.

ALL PERSONS WHO HAVE COMPLETED HIGH SCHOOL IN THE BAHAMAS
AND WHO HAVE OBTAINED
FIVE (2) BOCSE AT GRADES A, B, ORC

finclusive of Mathematics anid

ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE A NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY TO ATTEND THE
COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.

Fasential Functions

* Review all written communication, 1.¢., resumes, diulyiweekly, Banquet Event
Onders to determine appropriate slaffing levels, room/stalion assignments, buffer
décor and enhancements as they relate lo banquets and meeting room set-ups.

ALL AWARDS WILL COVER TUITION AND LAB FEES AND WILL ONLY BE

* Responsible for maintaiming a strong client relationship and ensuring that all PAYABLE TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

convention specifications are communicated to and executed by all hotel operating

departments. Maintain constant and timely communication with the Convention

; . . ; : TO QUALIFY, PERSONS MUST:
Servien!Catering Sales Manager as it applics to the clicnt at band.

- SUBMIT A COMPLETED APPLICATION FORM (ON OR BEFORE MAY 26, 2070)
- MUST BE BAHAMIAN CITIZEN
. HAVE BGCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND MATHEMATICS AT GRADES
4, B, OR C INCLUDED IN THE FIVE SUBJECTS REQUIRED
- HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
INTO AN APPROVED COLLEGE LEVEL PROGRAMME
- PURSUE 4 MINIMUM OF 12 CREDITHOURS PER SEMESTER
MAINTAIN 4 3.0 GPA PER SEMESTER AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

* Responsible for the appropriate and timely ect up of all functions and meetings
While maintaining standards of food, beverage and meeting specifications.

Skills & Abilities

Musi be able to speak, read, write and understand the English Language.
Requires good communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must possess basic computer skills and computational abilvty.
Must have a working knorwledme of types of room set-ups and capacities 1
Telation to type of event, ete.
Must have excellent interpersonal and eales-related akills.
Must have caceptional organizational, supervisory killa.
Must be able to prepare and analyze data and figures, and transcriptions prepared
on and generated by computer.
* Most have exceptional food and beverage knowledge and pricing.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
TERTIARY DEPARTMENT

TEACHERS & SALARIED WORKERS COOPERATIVE CREDIT UNION BUILDING
EAST STREET SOUTH & EAST-WEST HUGH W AY
P.O. BOX N-F013/14
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Tel: 302-2700

Chaali hicalicens fe | LA perience

* High School or equivalent education required, Bachelor's Degree preferred,
* Ome to two years of food and beverage service background and prior hospitality
expenicnce required,

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MAY 28, 2010

Qualified applicants are invited to visit our website or email resumes to:
anbrpobat! sheraten com

Application forms can also be downloaded

Note: All information will be held in strictest of confidence 7
from www.bahamaseducation.com

Deadline for all applicants is June 7, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 7B



aS
‘Never going to be perfect’

FROM page 1B

have to take the necessary steps
to ensure transparency and that
the system is not susceptible to
political pay-offs and corrup-
tion that arise from time to
time.”

The two greatest problems,
Mr D’ Aguilar said, were “the
corruption of persons in the
Government having
[family/personal] relationships
with the [bidding] parties, and
the political relationships,
where the politicians influence
who the Government does
business with.

“Both are equally as bad, and
you’ve got to think of a system
that eliminates both.”

Reforms outlines by consul-
tants Peter Trepte and Jorge
Claro at an April 26-28 confer-
ence in Nassau, in the shape of
regulations, are designed to
comply with the Bahamas’
obligations under the Econom-
ic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) and the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), and
introduce "international best
practices” into the Bahamas.

While the award of many
contracts would still be decen-
tralised, with Procurement
Units and Tenders Committees
much in evidence, the consul-
tants have recommended the
creation of a Public Procure-
ment Department, headed by

INSIGHT

TU gl

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a Chief Procurement Officer,
which would engage in cen-
tralised procurement for goods
and services used across gov-
ernment departments.

The recommendations also
involve the creation of a Public
Procurement Board, which will
be formed from members
appointed by the private sec-
tor and Ministry of Finance, to
oversee all government pro-
curement.

And, unlike the current
structure, an Independent Pro-
curement Review Tribunal will
be created to "determine all
appeals, matters and disputes"
relating to government con-
tracts that come under its juris-
diction. This will provide a for-
mal avenue of appeal to dis-
gruntled bidders that currently
does not exist.

Mr D’ Aguilar told Tribune
Business that the Government
needed to be wary about
awarding contracts simply
based on lowest price/cost,
adding that it needed to asses
other criteria, such as the win-
ning bidder’s reliability and
ability to deliver the goods and
services promised.

“As with everything, you
have to balance transparency
and the proper garnishing of
bids with the ability of an enti-
ty like the Government to
move forward on a timely
basis,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.
“You're very wary of putting
in another level of bureaucracy
that slows things down.

“There’s many factors that
go into the awarding of bids
other than cost. If you go for
the best cost, you do not neces-
sarily get the best bid. I have
people that provide services for
me at Superwash that are reli-
able. You develop a relation-
ship with someone in govern-

ment, you deliver for them and,
hopefully, deliver for the peo-
ple, but it is not necessarily the
best price.

“At the end of the day, you
want to work with people who
deliver good results. You’ve got
to measure cost against the abil-
ity of the provider to deliver.
That’s the hard thing, and you
will not get it right all the time.
The Government is dealing
with people who give the best
quote, but are unable to deliv-
er.”

Pointing to the problems
experienced with the Govern-
ment’s housing programme,
where numerous homes had to
be repaired due to alleged poor
workmanship, Mr D’ Aguilar
said: “They probably gave
those contracts to the person
with the best price, but they did
not know how to build hous-
es.”

As reported by Tribune Busi-
ness previously, controversy has
often shrouded many Bahami-
an government procurement
processes, with unsuccessful
firms not knowing why they
were not selected. There have
also been allegations and sus-
picions that the award of cer-
tain contracts has been influ-
enced by nepotism, corruption
and political favouritism, all
things that cost the public -
PLPs and FNMs - plus the
Bahamian taxpayer and con-
sumer, money.

The critical role government
procurement plays in national
development is also reason
enough for reform. Given that
public sector contracts account
for a significant percentage of
per annum gross domestic
product (GDP), they are a sig-
nificant tool in encouraging the
growth and development of
Bahamian firms.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Public Relations & Corporate Programs

Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and
implementation of a strategic public relations and communication program together
with the effective and efficient planning and execution of all corporate events and

activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

Assisting with the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate
Programs plan to support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Overseeing the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations
programs, plan and budget;

Assisting with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation
and, where necessary, the wider community;

Preparing and distributing the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directing press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press
releases, photographs, fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management
and Media Representatives;

Coordinating the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion
surveys;

Providing assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in
writing speeches, preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluating and assessing customer complaints, queries and disseminating
information to management;

Assisting with the development, implementation and management of external
communication efforts;

Coordinating marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the
external Public Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifying and liaising with service providers to secure speakers, presenters
and entertainment for Corporate events;

Liaising with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e.
awards, invitations, prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as
necessary and maintaining an inventory of the same;

Preparing and distributing all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices)
relative to Corporate activities, as necessary;

Creating and updating all standard operation procedures for all activities, as
necessary;

Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of
bills for all events and activities as necessary;

Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate
activities;

Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company
newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information
relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business
Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;
Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management
and public groups;
Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills
Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications
Good analytical skills

¢ Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) RATAFIA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 18, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 30th day of June, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquida-
tor of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

MAY 19, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

To advertise, call 502-2371

PUBLIC NOTICE



46k savings in 10 years
from better bus system

FROM page 1B

ciency vehicles through its tar-
iff/fimport duty policies, and
reduce tariffs on mopeds, which
currently stand at 70 per cent.

It was also recommended
that the Government limit the
number of vehicles per resi-
dence to one, where there were
two or fewer licensed drivers,
and to two cars per residence
where there were three or more
licensed drivers.

Drawing on a July 2008 Bud-
get communication, the Foun-
dation’s report said there were
some 111,184 registered motor
vehicles on New Providence in
2002. By 2006, this number had


a J
—

~ RELOCATION OF THE SAN SALVADOR &
NORTH ELEUTHERA LOCAL OFFICES ~

For the information of residents in the affected communities, the
National Insurance Board wishes to advise that effective June 1,
2010, its San Salvador Local Office in San Salvador, and North
Eleuthera Local Office in Lower Bogue, Eleuthera, will be
relocated. The San Salvador office will move from its current
location in the Carter Williams Building, Queens Highway, to “The
Plaza,” which ts situated near the San Salvador Community Clinic,
also on Queens Highway in Cockburn Town. The North Eleuthera
office will move from its current location in the Glen Albury
Building in Lower Bogue, to “Builders Square,” Queens Highway,

Lower Bogue.

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited
East Street South and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Third (33rd)
Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-
operative Credit Union Limited will be held at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, located on Bay Street,
on Saturday, May 22, 2010 commencing at 8:00 a.m.

for the following purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of Directors

of 2009

To receive the Audited Accounts of 2009.

To elect members of the Board of Directors.

To elect members of the Supervisory Committee
To discuss and approve the Budget for 2010.
To take action on such matters as may come

before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary

NB: VISITORS AND CHILDREN ARE WELCOMED,
HOWEVER, THEY WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
THEIR LUNCH AT A COST OF $22.50 PER

PERSON

risen to 156,480, an increase of
29 per cent.

Department of Statistics data
showed that New Providence’s
population in 2002 was esti-
mated at $218,000, and by 2006
stood at 233,000 - a 7 per cent
increase over four years. The
Foundation used this to show
that, in percentage terms, the
rate of growth in vehicles on
New Providence was outpacing
the population four-fold.

“Traffic congestion con-
tributes significantly to the loss
of working hours on the island,
the wear and tear on motor
vehicles, the consumption of
gasoline, the increase in air pol-
lution and the stress and anxi-
ety level of many citizens,” the

report said.

“We must also consider the
current macroeconomic impact
of our current unsustainable
lifestyle where transport is con-
cerned: over-reliance on pri-
vate vehicles guarantees our
small nation’s continued severe
dependence on fossil fuel from
abroad. Year after year, this
deepens our growing trade
imbalance and national debt.”

A 2005 study by Advanced
Logistics Group for the Gov-
ernment had estimated that
some 1,043 hours were spent in
traffic during the morning peak
hour on New Providence, cost-
ing $1.3 million or $9 per hour
of lost work annually.

The Foundation, though,

ATTRACTIVE
BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITY

Established Downtown
Restaurant
is offered for lease on mid
to long term basis. Excellent
income potential. Only serious
enquires will be entertained.
All basic equipment already in
place and fully functional.

Please Call
557-8721 or 466-2190
to arrange a meeting.

queried this estimate, arguing
that it did not account for lunch
time traffic, the 3pm school
pick-up and 5pm traffic.


















The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TST

For the stories
WA UT
a aT
Insight on
Mondays

Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd

Subsidiary of

BNXIILE

Ga Prinere ioe icy
Vacancy for an:

Investment Advisor

Responsibilities:

The general responsibility of the Investment Advisor is to provide an 1n-
house service to Senior Management, the Investment Committee and

Relationship Managers.

Duties include, but are not limited to the following:

* Work closely with the Investment Committee to develop effective
business models and improve the productivity of existing models

¢ Provide support to various project development and management
initiatives within the group

¢ Management of discretionary private client portfolios

* Research, develop and implement strategies for new products (all

asset classes)

* Guide and assist staff in the training of Bank’s products
¢ Provide advisory services to sophisticated clientele

Required skills and competences:

¢ Main expertise should be in U.S. markets

¢ Sound knowledge of LatAm markets also a plus

¢ A university graduate, in business, finance, economics,
accounting or sales and marketing

¢ At least 7 years experience working in Private Wealth Management

¢ Thorough understanding of financial markets, instruments,

operations

¢ Good oral and written communication skills

¢ Excellence in risk management, finance, marketing and business

acumen skills

¢ Knowledge of French and Spanish a plus

Interested persons should apply in writing to:

The Chief Operations Officer
P.O. Box AP 59241

Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: robert.mullings@pasche.ch

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 9B



Insurer targets ‘niche markets’

FROM page 1B

while to build it up through and
advertising campaign, but it’s
being increasingly called out
and provides a very valuable
service on the spot. It’s being
used more and more frequent-
ly.”

The 24-hour claims service
provides RoyalStar clients with
an instant response, in the event
of a car accident, house fire or
some other incident for which
they are insured.

Elsewhere, Mr Watson told




Tribune Business that the gen-
eral insurer was focused on
developing “affinity products
for targeted groups and target-
ed types of risk”.

While not disclosing the pre-
cise targets, the RoyalStar man-
aging director said: “We’ve
identified niche risks and are
marketing to niche categories.”

RoyalStar’s move comes
after a 2009 in which its profits
rose by 53 per cent or more
than $2.3 million to $6.816 mil-
lion, as the carrier shrugged off
a 12 per cent reduction in its
top-line gross written premium

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DANIELA JOSEPH of WULFF
ROADS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 20â„¢ DAY OF MAY, 2010 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-



7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

KINGSWAY ACADEMY

ELEMENTARY
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS

Kingsway Academy Elementary will

hold

Entrance Examinations for all elementary
grade levels:- K4 to Grade 6 from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon on Saturday, May 29, 2010. Parents

are asked to collect application forms from

the Elementary Desk in the Administration

building between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. daily,

before the testing date. Application forms may

also be accessed from the school’s website

www.kingswayacademy.com (see Document

Downloads).



For further information, kindly contact the school at

telephone numbers:- 324 - 5049 or 324 - 2158

thanks to a 42 per cent fall in
net claims to just $4.386 mil-
lion.

Writing in the company’s
annual report, Mr Watson said:
“The most notable features of
our 2009 results were the 12 per
cent reduction in gross written
premium to $64.573 million,
and two large marine losses
involving the sinking of a fish-
ing vessel and the sinking of a
large motor yacht.

“Other than those two inci-
dents, large loss activity was
well below the long-term aver-
age. The lack of hurricane activ-
ity and the low large loss activ-
ity allowed us to produce a very

good combined operating ratio
of 63.1 per cent, which trans-
lates to an underwriting profit
of $5.716 million. Added to this
is investment income of $1.099
million, producing a total prof-
it of $6.816 million, which is a
21 per cent return on equity.”

Mr Watson described the
investment income as the
“cing on the cake’ as opposed
to the cake itself”, reiterating
his stance that RoyalStar and
all other insurance carriers
needed to concentrate on pro-
ducing an underwriting profit
as the priority.

Although the ‘bottom’ had
reached in terms of the global

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

NOTICE

Audited Consolidated
Financial Statements

The Board of Directors of
Doctors Hospital Health

System Limited advises the

shareholders and the public
that the Company’s Audited

Consolidated Financial

Statements for the year ended
January 31, 2010 are available

on the Company’s website

www.doctorshosp.com

ce DOCTORS HOSPITAL

For the stories behind
TMU EM MEST e
UT ES

THE INSURANCE COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Analyst

The newly formed Insurance Commission (a statutory corporation) 1s seeking analysts
to assist with the on-site and off-site examination of insurance companies and

intermediaries.

Responsibilities

* Reports to the Chief Analyst/Superintendent
* Responsible for the supervision of other analysts /directly responsible for
the examination of licensees to ensure that licensees are compliant with

prudential requirements through on-site and off-site examinations

* Prepare/vet the preparation of examination reports

* Prepare/vet/approve on-site/off-site financial analysis, letters and other
correspondence as necessary

* Ensure that licensees databases are maintained

¢ Supervision of other analysts/directly responsible for the assessment of new
applications for licensees

* Contributes to the refining of supervisory methodology, policy development
and the formulation of new/revised legislation and the related guidelines

* Provide advice and information to licensees and the wider public regarding
complaints and questions about licensees’ performance

Quailifications/Skills

* Professional Accountant / MBA in accounting /Certification in Insurance/
experience in the insurance industry

¢ Financial analysis skills

* Excellent leadership, communications, teamwork and organization skills

* Proficient in Microsoft office products to intermediate level

* Ability to work independently and multi-task

¢ Excellent written and oral communications skills

* Knowledge of insurance industry an asset

Compensation

A competitive compensation package commensurate with relevant experience and

qualifications.

Deadline
31s May 2010

Application including comprehensive resume to be submitted by e-mail addresses to:

info@icb.gov.bs



recession and its impact on the
Bahamas, Mr Watson added:
“Clearly, however, a huge
amount of economic damage
has been done, particularly in
the area of unemployment,
which continues to be a large
problem, especially for the
Bahamas, and this has been one
of the reasons for our reduced
gross written premium.”

This was emphasised by Roy-
alStar’s chairman, Franklyn
Wilson, who told shareholders
that “there is no doubt that
2010 will be a very difficult
year, and whilst there is a sense
of economic stability, growth is
likely to be very modest”.

He added: “The macroeco-
nomic environment in which
Bahamian businesses operated
last year has been extremely
challenging indeed, and as
would be expected, the perfor-
mance of the many different
Bahamian businesses has been
mixed.

“As with most businesses,
RoyalStar suffered from a loss
of business, with gross written
premiums reducing by 12 per
cent, which is more than we had
expected.”

Still, RoyalStar’s equity had
increased to $35.178 million,
while its solvency margin was at
a “very healthy 253 per cent”.

Requirements:

preferred.

holidays.

rm lovin’ if
Employment
Opportunity

Restaurant Managers Needed
for leading Fast Food Franchise

¢ Must be a High School Graduate
¢ Must have Management experience
¢ Restaurant Management experience is

e Must have strong leadership skills

e Must be customer service driven

¢ Must be results-oriented & articulate

¢ Must have excellent inter-personal skills
¢ Must have excellent oral & written
Communications skills

¢ Professionalism required

Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Please submit Resume to:
Human Resources Department
McDonald’s Head Office
on Market St. North
P.O.Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444

Nassau, The Bahamas
BERR RRR Ree ee eee

Public Notice

Gaming Board For
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries and Gaming Act
Chapter 387, notice is hereby given that Treasure Bay
(G.B.I.) Limited a Company incorporated under the laws
of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has in accordance
with the provisions of Section 34(2) of the said Act, made
application to the Secretary of the Gaming Board of The
Bahamas for a licence to manage the casino premises
located at Our Lucaya Beach Resort, Freeport,Grand
Bahama, one of the islands of The Commonwealth of The

Bahamas.

Notice is also given that any person who desires to object
to the grant of the licence shall send to the Secretary of the
Gaming Board for The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New Providence, The Bahamas
or deliver to the Office situated in the Renaissance Building,
West Bay Street on or before noon on Monday, May 31st,
2010, two (2) copies of a brief statement in writing of the
grounds of the objection.

Signed:

Dennis W. Martin

Secretary
Gaming Board

For The Commonwealth

of The Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 11B



Selecting the program for you

FROM page 2B

It can create any layout from a
brochure to an entire book, and
can be used to define page size,
margins, typeface, text flow and
page numbering.

Types of Output: Books,
magazines, brochures, CD cov-
ers, manuals and menus.

Adobe InDesign: This is a
layout program, and again
works well with other Adobe
products. This Adobe graphic
design software suite (Photo-
shop, Illustrator, InDesign, and
Acrobat) is called Adobe Cre-
ative Suite.

Types of Output: Books,
magazines, brochures, CD cov-
ers and manuals.

Paint Shop Pro Photo X3

While Paint Shop can't
match Photoshop, it wins points
in user-friendliness. Paint Shop
has always been an easy pro-
gram to master, and offers the
features for red-eye reduction,
color correction, filters, special
effects and advanced editing
tools.

Adobe After Effects 7.0:
After Effects is the most
advanced and visually impres-
sive effects tool on the market.
Used for television and movie
production, After Effects pro-
vides some of the best 2D and
3D features for both title/text
animation and composition,
made possible through this ver-
satile piece of software.

Corel Draw: I would be
remiss not to give a big nod to
Corel Draw, which is a part of
the CorelDRAW Graphics
Suite. This has a long history
of being one of the most popu-
lar vector drawing applications
around. It also has the ability to
design for print, web or other
media. This software has
proven to be my favourite
graphic software and is defi-
nitely a keeper.

An honorable mention to
Macromedia Flash Profession-
al CS3, which has been one of
the most innovative technolo-

gies on the web and more wide-
ly deployed than ever. Flash is
more than a vector graphics-
based multimedia tool, proving
itself a kicker for generating
animation effects as well.
Microsoft Publisher provides
more control over document
elements than Microsoft Word.
It is considered to have many of
the advanced features of its
competitors, and is part of the
Microsoft Office package.

Macromedia Freehand is a
drawing application that can be
used to handle minor desk top
publishing projects. Advanced
features include live effects,
flash integration and 3d effects.
Macromedia Freehand is a vec-
tor-based drawing program as
well.

To this end technology is
growing, and more quality
graphic software is being man-
ufactured daily, giving designers
the liberty of using not only one
version of software but options
that are available for novices
as well as the most-skilled.

The mentioned programs are
considered industry-standard.
However, they are not the only
choices available.

Always choose programs
with the necessary bells and
whistles that are appropriate
for your skill level. This way
you do not have to waste funds
on getting advanced editing
tools you cannot use. Fortu-
nately, as you advance, you can
upgrade your software to an
intermediate or professional
level. I hope this article has
helped you understand the dif-
ferent types of graphics soft-
ware. Remember: There is no
single best graphic design soft-
ware program, but there are
specific programs better suited
for certain tasks. So until we
meet again, play a little, have
fun and stay on top of your
game!

NB: The author can be con-
tacted at deedee2111@hot-
mail.com

pay less for insuring your car!

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Atntit House, 2nd Terrace & Calling Avenue
PC. Box h-

7764 Nassau Tel. 6f7-422 wenanibaquote.com

To advertise in The Tribune - the No. 1 newspaper
in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!


















































































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i (BAHAMAS) LIMITED LIMITED
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THURSDAY, MAY

PAGE 13 & 14¢ International sports news





a)

No time to
waste: Celtics

See page 14

Imary-schoolers hit the track

Young athletes across
Bahamas take part in
29th National Primary
School Track & Field
Championships










=_

ance

= Photos by ayn Clarke/Tribune ee









MORE than 2,000 primary
school students from a number
of institutions throughout Nas-
sau and the Family Islands yes-
terday geared up for the start of
the 29th annual National Pri-
mary School Track & Field
Championships.

Shown here are some of the
highlights of the three-day
event, the “largest ever” of its
kind, at the Thomas A Robin-
son stadium.

The meet’s overall champi-
on will be crowned when it
wraps up Friday...



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(e) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit ar website af ww. coded is

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE PRINT PRODUCTION

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of
The College of The Bahamas Alumai Magazine. Through a high quality graph-
ic format, the alumni magazine provides key information about The College, its
#raduates, students, researchers, friends and supporters and has become a piv-
otal publication for The College in the last two-and-a-half years,

‘The look, feel and general format for the magazine ts consistent from Issue to
issue with variations to suit the level and detail of the content of each issue.

Proposals: Vendors should deliver one (1) original and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one original signature to the following
address:

Attn: Ms. Gabriella Fraser

Associate Vice President, External Affairs
The College of The Bahamas

PO Box § 4912

Oakes Field Canipus

Nassau, The Bahamas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 50pm. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request for Proposal (RFP) document,
requested attachments, and any amendments if issued. The proposal must con-
tain the signature of a duly authorized officer or agent of the company submit-
ting the proposal. Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST, Friday June 25, 2010,
will not be considered and will be returned unopened.

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
responses to this RFP.

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of
External Affairs, at (242) 302-4304. Technical questions may be directed to Ms.
Machynn Seymour-Major, Office of Communicatio.n at (242) 302-4353,

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

disappoints
Afridi

By RIZWAN ALI
AP Sports Writer

ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pak-
istan ended up going further
than expected at the World
Twenty20, but captain Shahid
Afridi said losing in the semifi-
nals to Australia still stung.

Pakistan went to the
Caribbean defending its Twen-
ty20 title in its first tournament
since seven players, including
Afridi, were sanctioned in
March for a disastrous tour of
Australia.

Four players were banned
from the team for varying peri-
ods while only fines were given
to three — Afridi and the
Akmal brothers, who all made
the World Twenty20 team.

Pakistan lost a group match
to Australia then lost consecu-
tive matches against England
and New Zealand in the Super
Eight stage before beating
South Africa to scrape into the
semifinals on better run-rate.

Afridi, on arriving home
from the Caribbean in the
southern port city of Karachi
on Wednesday, said he was not
expecting the team to make it
that far after the two defeats in
the Super Eights.

“T was not expecting that we
will perform so good against
South Africa and Australia
especially after we dropped too
many catches against England
and lost narrowly (by one run)
to New Zealand,” he said.

“So I think overall I am quite
satisfied with the team”’s per-
formance and importantly we
played as a unit.”

Afridi said losing the thrilling
semi to Australia stung far
more than if they’d lost the final
of the World Twenty20.

Australia came from
nowhere to reach a 192-run tar-
get at St Lucia last Friday.
Michael Hussey hit three sixes
and a four in the last over off
spinner Saeed Ajmal to engi-
neer Australia’s great escape.

“Had I won that match
(against Australia) and lost the
final I would not have been dis-
appointed,” Afridi said .

Pakistan conceded 53 runs
off the last 16 balls.

By JOE KAY
AP Sports Writer

CINCINNATI (AP) —
Adam “Pacman” Jones didn’t
even try to put a positive spin
on his year away from football.

The cornerback who entered
the NFL with such promise in
2005 spent all last season try-
ing to get back into the game,
looking for someone — anyone
—who would give him another
chance. For a while, it looked
like that chance might not
come.

“It was miserable,” he said.



ADAM JONES (AP)

Miserable enough to make
him learn anything?

The 26-year-old Jones said
Wednesday that he has
changed his lifestyle and
reordered his priorities in the
past year, the result of much
soul-searching while he was
outside the NFL. The Cincin-
nati Bengals gave him a two-
year deal that represents what
could be his final chance to
prove it.

During his first interview ses-
sion in town Wednesday, Jones
told reporters that he no longer
hangs around with the same

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 13

Semitinal loss ‘Pacman’ Jones says he'll

show he has changed

people who helped him get into
trouble after he was Ten-
nessee’s first-round pick in
2005. He recognized that a lot
of things had to change.

“Of course, you change as
you grow,” Jones said. “Like I
said, it ain’t overnight. ’'m 26
years old now, so I can’t do the
same things I was doing at 21,
or I’m going to be dead or in
jail.

“T know what my passion is,
and my passion is football. I
know what I’ve got to do to
keep playing football, and that’s
what I’m working on doing.”







Y i

Klitschko to
defend title







VITALI KLITSCHKO trains during a media workout session in Going, Austria. WBC Heavyweight Champion Vitali Klitschko is set to
defend his title against Albert Sosnowski of Poland in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on May 29...



(AP Photo)



ST LOUIS (AP) — Hanley
Ramirez is back in the Florida
Marlins’ lineup, after a pre-
game talk with manager Fredi
Gonzalez to clear the air.

The reigning NL batting
champion was benched Tues-
day after taking shots at his
manager and teammates a day

Ramirez back in Marlins’ lineup

after getting yanked from a
game for not hustling.

Gonzalez and Ramirez chat-
ted for five or 10 minutes in
the manager’s office, with the

door open and Ramirez stand-
ing, several hours before Mar-
lins played the St Louis Cardi-
nals.

Gonzalez had two lineup

cards ready in case the talk did-
n’t go well but Ramirez was
back in the third slot.

Gonzalez said Ramirez
planned to apologize to team-
mates.

A team spokesman said
Ramirez did not plan to talk
to the media.

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England’s
top trio
chasing

Woods in

rankings

By GRAHAM OTWAY
Associated Press Writer

WENTWORTH, England
(AP) — England’s players in
the top eight have their eye
on the No. 1 ranking while
Tiger Woods is sidelined with
a sore neck and bruised repu-
tation.

Lee Westwood, Ian Poulter
and Paul Casey spoke of their
ambitions Wednesday, a day
before the start of the BMW
PGA Championship at Went-
worth.

Phil Mickelson, back at No.
2 after his victory at the Mas-
ters in April, is the biggest
threat to Woods’ 258-week
reign atop the rankings.

Westwood, at No. 3 for the
first time in his 16-year career,
knows a win this weekend will
keep him in the hunt.

“For me, the No. 2 and No.
1 positions are more achiev-
able now than they have been
in the last few years,” West-
wood said. “Tiger’s perfor-
mance, schedule and things
like that are unpredictable at
the moment.

“Phil is obviously a world-
class player and has already
won a major this year, but you
know his performances are
very much up and down. And
the world rankings are all
about consistency.”

Consistency has become the
cornerstone of Westwood’s
game during the past year in
which he landed atop
Europe's first Race to Dubai
money list. In recent weeks on
the US tour, he’s finished sec-
ond at the Masters and led the
Players Championship going
into the final round.

The sixth-ranked Poulter,
who moved into the top 10 for
the first time after winning the
Accenture World Matchplay
at Dove Mountain in Febru-
ary, believes it is not just a
two-man race to claim
Woods’ crown.

CROSS OVER INTO LUXURY
EDGE 2010

Drive one.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Maradona
Vhs wee
man squad

for World
Cup

By STEPHEN WADE
AP Sports Writer



BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina (AP) — Argenti-
na coach Diego Maradona
named his final 23-man
squad for the World Cup on
Wednesday, which includes
Lionel Messi of Barcelona,
Carlos Tevez of Manches-
ter City and most of the
country’s other big stars.

The big surprise was the
inclusion of defender Ariel
Garce, who played his first
international match for
Argentina earlier this
month against Haiti.

The list released on
Wednesday includes
tremendous power up front,
led by Messi, Carlos Tevez
and Gonzalo Higuain.

Argentina faces Canada
on Monday at River Plate’s
stadium in Buenos Aires, in
what is expected to be its
last warm-up before the
World Cup. The 1978 and
‘86 champion opens on June
12 in South Africa against
Nigeria and also faces
Greece and South Korea in
Group B.

Argentine officials con-
firmed for the first time that
the team will depart for
South Africa on May 28.

Maradona, who present-
ed a provisional 30-man
squad last week, selected a
group that includes three
goalkeepers, seven defend-
ers, seven at midfield and
six forwards.

Maradona will have as
many weapons as any coach
in the World Cup.





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No time to waste: Celtics
take 2-0 lead on Magic

By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
The Boston Celtics could have
used a break during parts of the
season with all their injuries.
Now the last thing they want is
time off.

Showing no signs of age, the
revived Celtics took a com-
manding lead in the Eastern
Conference finals with a 95-92
victory over the Orlando Mag-
icin Game 2 on Tuesday night.

Paul Pierce scored 28 points,
and Rajon Rondo had 25 as
Boston bullied and bruised its
way to a 2-0 series lead on the
road against a Magic team that
had won 14 straight until this
series.

Now they'll have to wait until
Saturday for Game 3 in Boston.

"I wish we could take them
to Alcatraz for four days and
be on the island all by our-
selves," Celtics coach Doc
Rivers said about his team.
"That's not going to happen.
Going home, it's great in some
ways. In a lot of ways, but in
other ways, it's tough. Every-
where they go, they're going to
hear how great they are.

"We haven't done anything
— you need four wins; we have
two."

After being hampered by
injuries for much of the season,
often looking slow and worn
down, the Celtics are just two
wins away from their second
NBA finals appearance in three
seasons.

Age doesn't seem to matter
these days for Boston's veter-
ans.

Rasheed Wallace (35), Kevin
Garnett (34), Ray Allen (34)
and Pierce (32) are back to
their winning ways. The Celtics

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GLEN DAVIS (center) drives in for a layup past Magic forward Rashard Lewis (9) and guard J J Redick (7) in
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have won five straight for the
first time since they rolled off
11 in a row before Christmas.

"I think we are becoming the
team that started the season,"
Rivers said. "The team that
started the season was pretty
good."

Maybe even good enough to
take down the defending con-
ference champion Magic.

Dwight Howard had 30
points, and Vince Carter and
J.J. Redick scored 16 apiece for
the Magic, who overcame an
11-point deficit to take a brief

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(AP Photo)

lead in the fourth quarter. But
they couldn't hold it.

Jameer Nelson's desperation
3-point attempt was an airball
at the buzzer, sending fans to
the exits in silence.

"I won't stop believing,”
Howard said. "And I won't let
my teammates stop believing.”

Two years removed from
their 17th NBA championship,
the Celtics, once thought too
old to contend for another title,
have found their footing again.
After ousting LeBron James
and the Cleveland Cavaliers,
the team with the league's best
record, Boston is showing no
signs of stopping.

Bryans win
as US tops
Spain at
World
Team Cup

DUESSELDORF, Germany
(AP) — Bob and Mike Bryan
gave the United States a 2-1
win over Spain on Wednesday
by winning the decisive dou-
bles match at the World Team
Cup.

It was the Americans’ sec-
ond straight group stage victo-
ry, and they will play the Czech
Republic for a spot in Satur-
day's final.

After the teams split the sin-
gles matches Tuesday, the
Bryan twins beat Daniel
Gimeno-Lopez and Marc
Lopez 6-3, 7-5 to end Spain’s
hopes of reaching the final.

Also in the Red Group, the
Czechs beat Australia 2-1 after
Tomas Berdych clinched the
series with a 6-3, 7-6 (4) win
over Carsten Ball.

Berdych had expected to face
Lleyton Hewitt, but the former
No. 1 withdrew because of a
stomach problem. Berdych
struggled against Ball and had
to save eight of the nine break
points he faced before closing
out the match with an ace.

“You are just preparing all
day to play Lleyton Hewitt, you
get some tactics or whatever,
strategy, and then just change it
in the last moment,” Berdych
said. “So, it was a quite tough
one. He was playing well.”

In the Blue Group, France
beat Serbia 2-1 and will play
Argentina for a spot in the
final. The Argentines overcame
Germany by the same score,
despite trailing 1-0 after Tues-
day’s opening singles match.

Eduardo Schwank evened
the series by beating Germany's
Andreas Beck 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-3,
before Juan Monaco and Hora-
cio Zeballos teamed to beat
Christopher Kas and Philipp
Kohlschreiber 6-2, 6-3 in the
doubles.

Jeremy Chardy and Nicolas
Mahut won the decisive dou-
bles match for France by over-
coming Viktor Troicki and
Nenad Zimonjic 7-6 (4), 6-2.

The final round-robin match-
es will be played over two days,
with the winner of each group
advancing to the final.

Defending champ Del Potro
expects to miss US Open

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — Defending champion
Juan Martin del Potro says he expects to miss the US Open
because of recent surgery on his right wrist.

He said Wednesday he might return to the ATP Tour after the
last of the four Grand Slam tournaments. The US Open begins on
August 30. He also will miss the French Open, Wimbledon and
Argentina’s Davis Cup quarterfinal against Russia on July 9-11.

Del Potro has not played since a fourth-round loss at the Aus-
tralian Open. He said he will wear a protective bandage for several

more weeks and need months to regain strength and flexibility.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Thirtieth (30th)

Annual General

Meeting of THE PUBLIC

WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION

LIMITED,

will be held at the British Colonial

Hilton Hotel, Bay Street, on Friday, May 21,
2010, commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

purposes:

* To receive the report of The Board of

Directors.

* To receive the Audited Report for 2009

* To elect members of The Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee and Credit Committee

* To discuss and approve the budget for 2011

All eligible members, wishing to run for a
position on the Board of Directors, Supervisory
Committee or Credit Committee, are asked to
submit their names to the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4p.m.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!





Full Text


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USA TODAY

Pim blowin’ it

84F
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“ex AND T-STORM

Volume: 106 No.148





Many cases said
to involve incest

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



THERE has been a sub-
stantial increase in the num-
ber of girls — some as young
as 10 years old —- being
admitted to a government-
funded teenage pregnancy
programme, it was revealed
yesterday.

Officials of the Providing
Access to Continued Edu-
cation (PACE) Foundation
said many of the cases
involve incest, and more
young girls have entered the
programme so far in 2010

than any previous year on
record.

Sonia Brown, the presi-
dent of PACE, said it is dif-
ficult to identify a root cause,
because each case is differ-
ent.

She said: "It’s difficult to
pinpoint what the direct
cause of the increase is, how-
ever, for cases involving chil-
dren under the age of 10, it is
definitely an issue of an old-
er person preying ona child.
Someone that young cannot
possibly give any kind of

SEE page 15

MPs seek to make animal
owners more responsible

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



PARLIAMENT last night passed a new law relating to animal
ownership and control, expressing its desire to reduce the stray and
roaming animal population, enhance the safety and rights of the
public against out of control animals and minimise animal cruelty.

The Animal Control and Protection Bill 2010
brings with it a range of new responsibilities, fines
and penalties for the owners of dogs and various

other animals.

As soon as the Bill is brought into force, all
dog owners will be required to pay a fee to license
their dog or dogs on an annual basis or face a

$250 fine.

Whether or not they receive a license to keep

LARRY
CARTWRIGHT

their dog will depend on their being deemed “suit-
able” to keep a dog, and being over 18 years of

age, Minister for Agriculture and Marine

Resources Larry Cartwright said.

The comprehensive 45-page Bill includes some regulations

SEE page 15





PPRoy Time oFF wir





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Call for two
weather officers
to be disciplined

THE public service com-
mission investigating the
aftermath of the killer torna-
do that struck Grand
Bahama is recommending
that two officers at the
Meteorological Office in
Nassau be disciplined.

The Tribune understands
a recommendation of dis-
missal was made for one
officer and a recommenda-
tion of disciplinary action
for another.



aid oil spill exercise

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



THE Bahamas is mobilising a
team of regional and internation-
al experts to assist in the oil spill
disaster preparedness exercise
currently under way.

Acknowledging the weakness-
es in local capacity, Minister of
Environment Earl Deveaux said
the government contacted the
International Maritime Organi-
sation (IMO), the Caribbean





Charles Riedel/AP Photo

OIL FROM the Deepwater
Horizon oil rig explosion







f oo BURGH

) us

Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875









Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff
FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL Sir Orville Turnquest (far right), attends the memorial for his wife, Lady Edith Turnquest, yesterday at Christ
Church Cathedral. Also shown are Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest (far left) and his wife, Shawn (centre). Inset: Lady Turn-
quest, who died on May 12 aged 80 after suffering a serious stroke while in London.

Team of experts to

Police probe theft
of safe thought to
contain $30,000

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning a
number of persons in connec-
tion with the theft of a large
safe from the South Andros
Road Traffic office which is
estimated to contain about
$30,000.

While the burglars were
able to make good their
escape with the safe, it is
understood the police are in



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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

Improving community relations

seen as key to reducing crime

THE greatest challenge facing police in their
efforts to reduce crime is improving relations
with the community, Commissioner Ellison

Greenslade said.

Appearing on a radio talk show this week,
Commissioner Greenslade stressed there was
much work to be done to change the attitudes
of both Bahamians and police officers, in order
to create healthy communication.

THE TRIBUNE

He admitted the task was not an easy one,
but through “respect and trust”, the commis-
sioner said the police hope to foster a rela-

tionship that will ultimately help reduce crime.

The murder rate for the year now stands at
33, up from 25 at the same point last year,
however callers expressed confidence in Mr
Greenslade’s ability and commended him for
establishing a vision for the force.

NEW NETWORKING PARTNERSHIP WITH US PREACHER PASTOR PAULA WHITE




TBAT
Wee

By ALESHA CADET





THE Ministry of Tourism
yesterday revealed its latest
efforts to tap into the lucrative
religious tourism market by

[el B
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announcing a new network-
ing partnership with promi-
nent American preacher Pas-
tor Paula White.

At a press conference at the
British Colonial Hilton, Pas-
tor White, who is also a tele-
vision evangelist and motiva-
tional speaker, said she is
looking forward to bringing
TV shows, retreats and other
religious events to the
Bahamas.

Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine
especially thanked Bishop
Neil Ellis of Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Baptist Church
for his role in helping bring
Pastor White to the Bahamas.

“Neil Ellis saw the oppor-
tunity to help in Pastor Paula
White joining us here today,”
she said. Bishop Ellis said:
“These are some difficult
times. My relationship with
Paula White goes back some-
time, I believe she can be a
blessing to the Bahamas. J am
so delighted that she accepted
our invitation to come to the
Bahamas.”












BISHOP Neil Ellis looks
on as Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine
(right) presents Pastor
Paula White with a hand-
made Bahamian bag at
the British Colonial
Hilton.

Tim Clarke
/Tribune staff




Ms White, who serves as
senior pastor of the Without
Walls International Church
in Tampa, Florida, said “being
in the Bahamas has been an
amazing experience.”

“T thoroughly enjoyed
myself and the people are
amazing.

“Tam grateful for Bishop
Neil Ellis who represents the
Bahamas with such greatness.

“Tt has been a wonderful
opportunity and a privilege.
I want to see people’s lives
bettered and empowered,”
she said.

Ms Walkine later presented
Pastor White with a thank-
you gift representing the peo-
ple of the Bahamas.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

Church
breakaway
‘not linked
to gay issue’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REVEREND Scott
Kirkland has rejected
claims that the ordination
of gay ministers in the
Church of Scotland drove
Presbyterian kirks in the
Bahamas to break away.

The minister of Lucaya
Presbyterian Church in
Freeport announced at the
General Assembly of the
Church of Scotland in
Scotland this week that
Presbyterian congregations
in the Bahamas had voted
in favour of leaving the
“mother church” after 200
years to align with the
Evangelical Presbyterian
Church (EPC) in the Unit-
ed States.

A total of 39 church
members voted in favour
of joining the EPC and
three against after Rev
John Macleod resigned
from St Andrew’s Presby-
terian Kirk in Nassau and
admitted it was partially
over the Church of Scot-
land’s ordination of its first
openly gay minister, Scott
Rennie.

Ordinations

The American EPC is
strongly against such ordi-
nations and since the ordi-
nation of Rev Rennie last
year, more than 50 Scottish
churches have backed the
evangelical position, show-
ing they will not accept the
ordination of gay ministers.

However, Rev Kirkland
has shot down any link
between Rev Rennie’s
appointment and the
Bahamian choice to align
with the EPC.

“To suggest my congre-
gation is leaving the
Church of Scotland
because of the General
Assembly’s decision to
uphold the call of an open-
ly gay minister is simply
not true,” he said.

“It has been a long-held
ambition of the Kirk’s con-
eregations in the Bahamas
to form our own denomi-
nation, following the exam-
ple of many other churches
around the world which
began their life under the
wing of the Church of
Scotland.”

Although the ambition
to form a Presbyterian
Church of the Bahamas
(PCB) has been under dis-
cussion for 15 years, the
Bahamian following lacks
the capacity to run its own
denomination and there-
fore hopes to affiliate with
the US Presbyterians as an
interim step, Rev Kirkland
said. “Furthermore it has a
Presbytery in Florida, very
close to the Bahamas,
where the two congrega-
tions can have the experi-
ence of being part of a
working Presbytery and
benefit from the capacity
and supervision it offers,”
he added.

Oa aS

Homicide
count now
up to 33

THE homicide count now
stands at 33 after a 41-year-
old man died of his injuries
in a fight yesterday.

Dwane Christopher John-
son, who lived off Pitt Road,
got into an argument with
another man, resulting in
him being severely beaten.

Mr Johnson was taken to
the hospital by ambulance
where he died seven hours
later.

A 36-year-old man is
helping police with their
inquiries.



THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Government expects
BP to be responsible



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux said the government is
assuming it will not have to sue
BP, operators of the exploded
Deep Horizon oil rig leaking
huge amounts of oil into the
Gulf of Mexico, which could
possibly affect the Bahamas.

He said the government is
keen to recover any money it
may be forced to spend on



Gerald Herbert/AP Photo

clean-up operations, but noted
that BP has indicated it will
“foot the bill” created by the
spill. Mr Deveaux said it is
believed BP has a global fund
that will come to bear if con-
tainment efforts have to extend
to the Bahamas.

If this is the case, it will be
the Minister of Foreign Affairs
who handles the initial round
of negotiations, he said.

Only if it became necessary
for the matter to go before the
courts would the Attorney
General’s Office be directly
involved, said Minister
Deveaux. He admitted that if,
in the end, the government
does have to sue BP, it would
most likely be some time before

LOUISIANA GOV. Bobby Jindal, centre, and Plaquemines Parish
President Billy Nungesser, right, tour the oil impacted marsh of
Pass a Loutre, La. on Wednesday, May 19, 2010. Oil from the
Deepwater Horizon oil spill is infiltrating the coast of Louisiana.

the Bahamas receives any
funds. The National Oil Spill
Contingency Team is fully
mobilised to respond to the
spill, although officials are hop-
ing the situation is contained
before the oil slick has a chance
to extend beyond the Gulf.
However, Mr Deveaux said
he is not “particularly
impressed” with the “frag-
mented” response of the US
government to the crisis. He
said he hopes the Bahamas’
efforts will be “infinitely” more
organised and effective.

It is feared that ocean cur-
rents could carry the spilled oil
into Bahamian waters and dev-
astate wildlife habitats in the
north-western islands.

With the hurricane season
approaching, bringing with it
the potential for strong winds
and increased tidal flows, the
situation could be “very diffi-
cult if not impossible” to man-
age, Mr Deveaux warned.

He added that speculation
about an impending disaster
has fueled a “growing sense of
helplessness and hysteria”.

Political clashes amid claims government
‘fired’ mother of child suffocated in car

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
was accused of seeking to score
political points when he hit out
at the government for allegedly
“firing” the mother of the
three-year-old girl who suffo-
cated in a car in his constituen-
cy.

Yate McDonald, 44, along
with the girl’s father, Larry
Demeritte, were charged on
May 10 with manslaughter by
negligence in connection with
the death of their child, San-
dria Demeritte, who died after
becoming trapped in a vehicle
near her father’s home in mid-
April.

According to reports, San-
dria had been missing for sev-
eral hours before her body was
found.

Mr Mitchell yesterday
described the alleged firing of
Ms McDonald from her gov-
ernment job as “terrible”.

“Having lost her daughter
now she’s on the dole,” he told
parliament.

His comments drew the ire
of Minister of State for Social
Development with responsibil-
ity for social services, Loretta
Butler-Turner, who claimed he
was “misleading” parliament

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about the matter and merely
making his claims to gain
“political mileage.”

Mr Mitchell was speaking
during the debate on the Ani-
mal Control and Protection Bill
2010, using Ms McDonald’s sit-
uation to highlight his call for
the government to “also seek
to treat people properly” as
well as animals.

“T support the legislation but
I must say this also: The gov-
ernment must take care of peo-
ple properly if the people are to
take care of the dogs,” said Mr
Mitchell. Mrs Butler Turner
claimed Mr Mitchell’s state-

ment about Ms McDonald was
“inaccurate” since Ms McDon-
ald was only ever a temporary
government worker.

“The person was not in the
employ of the Department of
Social Services. She was a tem-
porary worker in the employ
of the Elizabeth Estates Chil-
dren Home. (Ms McDonald) is
not employed by the Bahamas
government and not a member
of social services. It was a tem-
porary programme. She was
never permanent and pension-
able and therefore she was not
fired by the Department of
Social Services,” said Mrs But-
ler Turner. Mr Mitchell object-
ed to Mrs Butler Turnet’s alle-
gation that he was only trying
to score political points by rais-
ing the matter, and said the
point he was making was that
by “firing” Ms McDonald and
putting her in a position to
require assistance from the gov-
ernment, the department was
“making a problem for itself.”

“You are putting a person on
the dole who has to go right
back to social services,” he said.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Time to get control of the ‘garrisons’

UP TO late last night Jamaica’s Tivoli
Gardens’ residents manned the barricades to
protect its “Don” — Christopher “Dudus”
Coke, listed by the US Justice Department
as one of the world’s most dangerous drug
kingpins—from arrest, and deportation to
the US.

At last after more than half a year of
delaying negotiations with the United States
for the extradition of “Dudus” Coke, Prime
Minister Bruce Golding, who was near to
resignation over the weekend, in a radio
broadcast on Monday apologised to his peo-
ple, and announced that his government had
agreed to let the US’s extradition request
go to the attorney general. The warrant for
Dudus’ arrest was signed. “Dudus” controls
the Tivoli garrison, which supports the prime
minister and at election time “delivers” the
votes.

With all four main roads into Tivoli
blocked, the Jamaican police, although
armed with an arrest warrant, cannot execute
the warrant. Unless “Dudus” comes out
peacefully, many fear that the matter cannot
be resolved without bloodshed.

It is reported that his supporters have
located oxygen tanks, ready to be ignited, at
strategic entrances into Tivoli.

“He took care of us,” say his supporters,
“now we are willing to die for him!”

Meanwhile, in parliament the Opposi-
tion walked out on Tuesday when it was
made clear that Prime Minister Golding,
after his national address over the airwaves
on Monday had no intention of discussing
the matter in parliament. The Opposition,
offended at this “disrespect”, left the cham-
ber.

And there the matter rests — a stale-
mate. Tense, and dangerous. Meanwhile,
the US State Department expressed its plea-
sure with the Jamaican government’s deci-
sion “to instruct the attorney general to pro-
ceed with the extradition process.”

If Jamaica can get over this difficult face-
off, in years to come history might mark it as
an important milestone in Jamaica’s attempt
to break the hold that the island’s criminal
element has over many of its politicians.

Many of Jamaica’s problems — particu-
larly crime — stem from the power of the
“garrisons”. The politicians took care of the
garrisons which assured them of political
support. Many a gun battle was fought if
anyone tried to oppose their “man.” Of
course, the politician protected his “sup-



DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION

porters” by making certain that lucrative
government contracts came their way. In
turn the supporters —often governed by
ruthless “dons”— protected the politician
and his party, guaranteeing, even at the point
of a gun, that no one opposed him. At elec-
tion time persons were even timid to put up
an opposition candidate against the gar-
rison’s man in power. However, when drugs
entered the picture, the chiefs in the garrison
often had more money than the government.
There was no stopping them. It was an
underground reign of terror, which if not
stamped out, Jamaica — a beautiful country
— faced, and still faces, a bleak future.

Today, the government has been forced
to stand up to a powerful “Don” and his
own “constituents”. For the sake of
Jamaica’s future, it is important that the
Jamaican government wins this round. Not
only wins it, but uses it as a launch pad to
move against all of the internal fiefdoms
that protect so many criminals.

Jamaica’s troubles started in the 1970s
when its political parties armed their sup-
porters to intimidate their rivals.

It was around the same time in the
Bahamas that PLP “goons” tried to control
our elections. The 1972 and 1977 elections
were elections of violence with the church
and Opposition leaders calling for peace and
respect for free speech.

At one point, from a political platform,
Paul Adderley, who later became attorney
general in the Pindling cabinet, but earlier
led his own party after leaving the PLP, had
the microphone snatched from his hands as
he addressed a political gathering from a
public platform.

In one of the campaigns, the “goons” so
controlled public places that the Opposi-
tion had to campaign from door-to-door. It
was no longer safe to hold a public meeting.
In the 1972 elections shots were fired, and
people were injured.

However, although many Bahamians
were victimised during the 25 years of the
Pindling administration, the Bahamas never
allowed the situation to develop as it did in
Jamaica.

The crisis might be dangerous in
Kingston, it might even get deadly, but this
is now an important turning point for the
Jamaican government. It is that govern-
ment’s opportunity to shake off its depen-
dence on “dons” and “garrisons” and get
full control of the country.



The slaying of
Ramos Williams
and justice delayed

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Honourable Leaders of
Government and citizens of
The Bahamas:

This is a short note to let
you know, that the present
situation is critical and the law
that was created to service
man, has now become the
death of man. It is imperative,
that a quick look at its func-
tions be noted and its duties
examined.

This letter is in reference
to the death of slain officer
Ramos Williams.

The death of officer
Wiliams, after a period of
three years is yet to be
resolved, because arguments
within the law have not yet
been brought to trial. If this
delay of justice is evidence of
our legal system and its func-
tions, then time within the
confounds of change must be
questioned. Are we a people
of justice or injustice? Or are

letters@triounemedia.net



we flunkies within a system,
where democracy is only a
joke? Are we allowing the
world of doubt to lead the jus-
tice within our hearts, or are
we dedicated to the truth
through the life and death of
Christ? Or do we have the
right to crucify him out of
convenience.

Blind! Is the argument
within the law, because they
denied the truth and subject
themselves to a lie. There is
no higher judgment than the
Almighty and within this
hour, his attention is upon us.

We are complete within our
love, let us be complete with-
in our justice and truth. Let
the blood of an innocent man
be appeased.

To die in service for one’s
country, is an honourable
thing, because the man in
question is honourable, even
in death. Deserving of his
respect within the country
that he loved, died for and the
justice that he bled for.

The inner circle of the
Williams family “grieved”,
not for the sibling that we lost
but instead for the justice, that
for so long, has been obstruct-
ed. Within this justice, I too
may feel from the assassins’
bullet or will we murder jus-
tice once again?

It is with great anticipation
I write this letter, in the hope
that justice will prevail, with
God as our refuge and
strength.

Thank you for your atten-
tion and concern.

THE WILLIAMS
FAMILY,
Nassau,

May 18, 2010.

Bahamians need to be more vigilant
about the granting of citizenship

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please explain to the Min-
ister of Immigration, Mr
Symonette, that contrary to
his assertions in a 23rd March,
2010 interview with ZNS, that
persons born in the Bahamas
are not automatically entitled
to citizenship as a result of
their birth. The Constitution
provides that persons born in
the Bahamas of non Bahami-
an parentage have a right to
apply only. There is no auto-
matic granting of citizenship
and, to my mind, there
shouldn’t be. If the Minister in
charge of the Immigration
Department who considers
and submits applications for
Bahamian citizenship to cab-
inet does not know this, it’s
no surprise that citizenship in
this country is being granted
lightly!

On a recent trip to the US,
one of the US Immigration
agents at the LPIA com-
mented to me and my com-
panions that Bahamians enjoy
privileges with respect to
entry into the United States
that are not enjoyed by most
countries where he had been
stationed, in particular, oth-
er countries in the Caribbean
and Latin America. This left a
great impression on me and
reminded me of the long lines
and laborious process I have
experienced while seeking to
enter the US from other
countries in the world. The
Bahamian passport and The
Bahamas are still regarded

first Baptist Church

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EFFORT AND MULTIPLIES

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favourably. Given the very
liberal policies now being
adopted, we do not know how
long this will be the case.
Bahamians need to be
more vigilant about how and
to whom our government
grants citizenship. It directly
determines who we represent
ourselves to be to the world at
large. In spite of our prob-
lems, we continue to be con-
sidered as a friendly, peace
loving people who are not on
the restricted entry list many
others find themselves on. We

simply cannot allow that to
be changed by an indiscrimi-
nate granting of citizenship
and issuing of Bahamian pass-
ports. Once changed, it will
not be possible to restore our
image in the world and we too
may find ourselves on the
“unwanted” list.

SUPPORTER OF
GENERATION
X BAHAMIAN
MOTHER
Nassau,

April, 2010.

POETS OE ET a Ta

gain from this false advertising?

EDITOR, The Tribune.



The “best” hotel in the world was the header and
announcement of the News Reader...reporting on the results
of the Travel Web site... EXPEDIA Customer Survey of
the World’s Hotels, 2010.

The News Reader announced that the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort was the best hotel in the world — from the
Expedia Survey. A total mistruth. The Sheraton Nassau
Beach was No.1810 of the listing with 91.70 points.

There were three other Bahamas resorts with far better
ratings than The Sheraton: Pelican Bay, Freeport No.171
with 99.30 points, The Cove, Atlantis No. 879 with 96 points,
The one and only Ocean Club No. 965 with 95.60 points.

What does the Sheraton management gain from this false
advertising? A bad reputation, as simple as that, and as of
late all the PR on Baha Mar I suggest is all part of the
same...for some reason desperately trying to convince some-
one.

On Baha Mar - the announcement that the highest exec-
utive on the development side of Baha Mar recently resigned
at this stage of Baha Mar is peculiar and significant to say the
least when ground breaking is, so we are told about to hap-
pen. Did anything change from when Harrah’s/Caesar’s
World walked?



W. THOMPSON,
Nassau,
May 16, 2010.







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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Eaith Turnquest, a real Lady

VIEW FROM AFAR

5S S A

PUSHIN’ DA ENVELO
By Jamaal Rolle







OIL SPTLL FEARS INCREASE

J O HN |





Be Turnquest did not need her beloved
Tiny to receive the Knighthood to be Lady

Turnquest. She was a lady in every sense of the
word. She was gracious, polite, hospitable but most
of all she was an outstanding wife, mother, grand-
mother and an example to all who knew her or even
knew of her.

My wife and I had the privilege of knowing Sir
Orville and Lady Turnquest for almost twenty years
and during that time our families almost became
one. This good fortune has allowed us to observe this
very loving and close family first hand. And at its
centre was Lady Edith Turnquest.

Lunch

Every Sunday the family gets together for lunch,
all three generations, and we have had the good
fortune to be included when we have been in Nassau.
Over the Christmas holidays we have also been able
| to observe and enjoy their wonderful gatherings,
where not only family but friends came and went
throughout the day.

The interest she showed not only in their children
but also in their grandchildren and their grandchil-
dren’s friends is an example from which we all can
learn. We are all poorer for the passing of Lady
Turnquest but we can celebrate her life and use her
example to improve our own.

Whether she was a Minister’s wife, a Lady in the
Governor General’s residence or a private citizen she
was the same good friend, wife, mother and grand-
mother. We will all miss her.

May she rest in peace.

Police criticised for response to car break-in







LADY TURNQUEST

A PARKED vehicle in
front of A Wong & Son’s
Convenience Store on West
Bay Street was broken into
in broad daylight yesterday.

According to a manager
at the store, the burglar
smashed the front passen-
ger window of the car and
made off with a woman’s
handbag.

After reporting the mat-

ter to the police’s Tourism
Branch, situated just yards
from the scene of the crime,
the store’s staff said it
seemed as if the officers “did
not want” to investigate.

In fact, the manager said,
he was only able to report
the burglary after visiting
the police station himself, as
all the listed numbers he had
tried were either busy or not

working at the time. “We
normally feel safe up this
way throughout the week —
only on the weekend do you
have to worry about any-
thing happening.

“Back in the day when the
police graduated all those
officers, you would see them
up and down the road
patrolling.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

NEWS
Greek fraternity teams ‘stomping’ towards Nassau | 7

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

GREEK fraternity teams
from all across the United
States are “stomping” their way
to Nassau this weekend to com-
pete in the ‘Steppin’ On Da
Shores’ event presented by KO
Productions.

This Saturday, teams from
New Jersey, Washington DC,
Connecticut, Chicago, Indi-

anapolis and Atlanta will par-
ticipate in the big “throw-
down” that begins with a pre-
show battle of the high schools.

Teams from Nassau’s C H
Reeves, presenting the public
schools, and St John’s College,
representing the private
schools, will compete against
each other. After that, compet-
ing Greek teams will take to
the stage at Arawak Cay, incor-
porating elements from differ-

ent dance genres in their rou-
tines. The Steppin’ On Da
Shores event has gained many
fans over the years, and last
year’s cancellation was a disap-
pointment to all, said Kenny
Pratt of KO Productions.

However, organisers promise
that this weekend’s event will
more than make up for the can-
celled show last year.

“This year is going to be big-
ger and better than the last

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website af were cob eduis

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE GRAPHIC DESIGN & LAYOUT

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of The
College of The Bahamas Alumni Magazine. Through a high quality graphic format,
the alumni magazine provides key information about The Col llege, its graduates, stu
dents, researchers, fnends and supporters and has become a pivotal publics itign bor
The College in the last two-and-a-half years.

The look, feel and general format for the magazine is consistent from issue to issue
with variations to suit the level and detail of the content of cach issue,

Proposals: Vendors should deliver ane (1) original and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one ori ginal signature to the tollowing
address:

Attn: Ms, Gabriella Fraser

Assaciate Vice President, Exterial Affairs

The College of The Bahamas

AO Bow W402

Oakes Field Campus

Nassau, The Bahwinas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 5:00 p.m. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request For Proposal (RFP) document,
requested attachments, and amy amendments if issued, The proposal must contain
the signature of a duly authonzed officer or agent of the company submitting the

proposal. Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST. Friday June 23, 2010, will not be
considered and will be returned unopened.

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept of reject any or all respons-

vs to this RFP.

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of External
Affairs at (242) 302-4304, Technical questions may be directed to Ms. Maelynn
Seyoour-Maypor, Office of Communication at (242) 32-4455.

§ Scotia Private Client Group’

VACANCY

Investment Advisor, Offshore Brokerage

Scotia Private Client Group (SP Bahamas

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of an

Investment Advisor, Offshore Brokerage
Position Summary:

The position is responsible for ensuring profitable portfolio growth and
revenue generation both in Offshore Brokerage and the Scotia Private Client
Group (SPCG) overall. This will be achieved through aggressive marketing
and business development efforts, and helping our clients achieve peace of
mind by providing trusted advice and personalize solutions to meet their
financial goals.

The position is also responsible for developing quality referrals from
potential clients identified as being able to benefit from other products and
services offered through SPCG.

Key accountabilities for this role:

Initiate and develop investment relationships with clients identifying and
servicing their financial needs.

Ensure the growth in the number, size and profitability of Offshore
Brokerage relationships as well as the profitability of SPCG.
Contribute to managing the growth and profitability of the Offshore
Brokerage Portfolio.

Responsible for being fully conversant with all procedures and requirements
of Know Your Client (K YC) and Anti-Money Laundering & Anti-Terrorist
Financing (AML/ATF) policies.

Effectively utilize and develop subordinate staff to fill the needs of the
Offshore Brokerage Unit.

QUALIFICATIONS:
External education andlor licensing requirements/recommendations:

¢ Post Secondary Education
* Canadian Securities Course (current with CEC requirements satisfied)
¢ Fluency in French is required

Preferred Professional designations:

* Certified Financial Planner
* Chartered Accountant
* Chartered Financial Analyst

Qualified candidates only should submit applications no
later than May 31, 2010 to:

Centre Director, Scotia Private Client Group, Bahamas,
Scotia House, 404 East Bay Street.
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
or e-mail ross.painter@scotiabank.com

THE TRIBUNE



Steppin’ On Da Shores. We are
flying over nearly 100 persons
for the event. This year we are
also teaming up with the Min-
istry of Tourism,” Mr Pratt said.

Following Saturday’s show,
the KO team is organising a
‘wet fete’ boat cruise to Colo-
nial Beach on Sunday which
will feature a mini competition
between Greek and non-Greek





teams. “Every 20 minutes there
will be a boat leaving Prince
George Wharf heading to Colo-



nial Beach,” Mr Pratt said.

Competing in the show will
be sorority teams including
Zeta Phi Beta’s Zeta Elite out
of New Jersey; Alpha Kappa
Alpha squad and Sigma Gam-
ma Rho squad out of Chicago;
Delta Sigma Theta squad and
X- Alpha Kappa Alpha squad
from Howard University in
Washington, DC. The fraterni-
ty teams include Phi Beta Sig-
ma’s No Mercy; Kappa Alpha
Psi from Howard University;
Alpha Phi Alpa’s A -Team and
the Omega Psi Phi team from
Connecticut.











CHICKEN catching and clothes hanging have
moved beyond being forgotten pieces of the
Bahamian cultural past to now become center-
pieces of the signature event for Harbour Island
- the Briland Backyard Festival.

The festival takes place on Harbour Island
this Friday and Saturday.

Organisers aim to make it the most authentic
Bahamian festival today, with several activities for
participants, said June Cartwright, acting manager
of the Harbour Island Tourist Office.

“When you come onto Harbour Island, the
whole area is going to be set up like a backyard,”
she said. “We’re talking about fishing lines, fish-
ing nets and hanging clothes. When you are walk-
ing over Bay Street and you look up, you are
going to actually have clothes hanging over you.”

The list of activities and competitions for the
festival include clothes hanging, goat pepper eat-
ing, onion peeling, coconut barking and chicken
catching. Harbour Island’s wild chickens are
being rounded up and will be kept caged during
the festival. On the last night of the festival, how-
ever, they will be released and persons will com-
pete to catch the most chickens.

Martin Lee Grant, a public relations officer
for the festival, explained that Harbour Island has
a special relationship with wild roosters.

“We have a lot of roosters running around the
island,” he said. “We call them our pets. The
tourists love them. They appreciate them great-
ly. We want to highlight the uniqueness of Har-
bour Island when it comes to vacationing here -
the warmth the friendliness, the great hospitality



Derek Smith/BIS Photo

MARTIN LEE GRANT and June Cartwright
demonstrate the clothes hanging competitions
that will be part of the Briland Backyard Festival
this weekend.

that the persons here share with whomever comes
here from all walks of life, regardless of colour,
creed or religion. We just appreciate everyone
who comes to Harbour Island and we like to
share with them our rich history, our beautiful
nightlife culture and our beautiful pink sand
beach.”

Stage performers scheduled to appear at the
Briland Backyard Festival include KB, T’rez
Hepburn, April Cartwright-Miller and Harbour
Island’s own Afro Band. Ms Cartwright said her
office has worked closely with transportation
providers to ensure that travel to and from Har-
bour Island during the weekend of the festival is
fast and convenient. Bahamas Ferries has sched-
uled 8am voyages from Nassau from Thursday to
Sunday, returning each day at 3.40pm. Mean-
while, Bahamasair has at least two daily flights to
North Eleuthera, which is just 10 minutes away
from Harbour Island, she said.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit ovr website af www.cat. eda is
THE SEARCH FOR A PRESIDENT

The College Council of The College of The Bahamas (COB) is pleased to
announce a search for a new President and invites nominations and expres-
sions Of interest in this outstanding opportunity for leadership at a truly
unique institution. After nearly thirty-five years of serving The Bahamas,
first as a two-Vear institution, then as a four-year degree-granting College,
COB expects to become The University of The Bahamas. As it moves to
solidify its university status, COB will continue to deliver excellent under-
eraduate teaching while developing new undergraduate and graduate pro-
grams, increasing research and innovation activities, and focusing its work in
areas crucial to national development.

Since its founding in 1974, The College of The Bahamas has grown in repu-
lation and currently enrolls over 5000) students in undergraduate and gradu-
ate education. The institution grants primarily bachelor’s degrees, and will
launch its first master’s degree later this year. Currently, COB offers joint
master’s degrees in conjunction with other accredited universities and col
leges within the United States and enjoys extensive links with higher edwea-
tion institutions in the Canbbean, North America and Great Britain.

NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS
A prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
ities for the new president, a full enumeration of qualifications for the posi-
tion, and instructions for submitting applications or nominations may be
found under “Current Searches” at www.academic-search.com. Those con-
sidering becoming candidates are urged to visit this Web site before submit-
ting application materials. A complete application shall include a thoughtful
letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and a list of at least five professional ref-
erences (with email addresses and telephone numbers) and must be received
by June 9th, 2010, Nominations, inquirics and applications are treated confi-
dentially and should be submitted electronically (MS Word or PDF) to:
COBPresident@academic-search.com
Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained
from The College’s website, fAwww.cob ed
Maya Kirkhope and Bill Franklin of Academic Search, Inc. are assisting with
this search. Nominations and expressions of interest will be treated in confi-
dence and may be directed to:

Dr. Bill Franklin

Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Ine.
Washington, D.C., USA
hjf@academic-searchcom
(S30) 249-1444

Maya Ranchod Kirkhope
Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Inc.
Washington, DwC., USA

mava.kirkhope@academic-search.com

(703) S00 9195

The College of The Bahamas ts committed to providing equal educational
and ¢ -mploy ment opportunity.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Building and house numbering



THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 7



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit oar website af www. cod. edie

exercise is progressing well

By KATHRYN
CAMPBELL

APPROXIMATELY
5,000 buildings in New Prov-
idence have so far received
numbers in the governmen-
t’s house numbering exer-
cise.

The project is a part of the
six-month National Jobs
Programme designed to cre-
ate jobs throughout the
Bahamas.

The Ministry of Public
Works and Transport said
the “historic” exercise of
correctly numbering the
houses, when completed,
will make it easier to locate
businesses and houses
throughout the island of
New Providence.

Delmar Bowe, project
supervisor with responsibil-
ity for house numbering and
street naming, said he is
pleased with the progress to
date.

“We started on April 12
and we are doing quite well
with our installation. By the
time the programme ends
we will be quite far ahead
with installation of all num-
bers,” he said.

Mr Bowe explained that
during the first month of
training the teams collected
survey data from the areas
selected by the government
in phase one of the pilot
project.



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TWO WORKERS assigned to the government’s six- month
National Jobs Programme install numbers to a home in St

Michael’s Road, Monday, May 17.

System

“We have a system that
we use for house number-
ing. We number from north
to south or from east to
west. The houses on the left
side of the street have odd
numbers and the houses on
the right side have even
numbers. We number every
lot whether there is a build-
ing on the lot or not,” he
said.

Phase one of the number-
ing exercise includes the
southeastern portion of New
Providence that is bounded
by Robinson Road/Prince
Charles Drive in the north,
East Street in the west, Fox
Hill Road in the east and
the sea in the south.

The teams are presently
completing the buildings in
St Michael’s Road and will
continue in Nassau Village.

“Residents and business
owners are to make their
properties available to us,”
said Mr Bowe. “ If we can-
not access the property we
would put the number in an
envelope and the resi-
dent/owner has to install the
number.

“We try to install an aver-
age of 60 to 100 numbers
per day.

“We will do our best to
get all the buildings in phase
one done as we are winding
down the sixth-month pro-
gramme,” he added. The
program is scheduled to end
in June.

Accident sparks traffic anger



Thousands of motorists were stuck in traf-
fic for up to an hour-and-a-half yesterday
after an afternoon accident shut down one

lane of Shirley Street.

The three-car pile-up involving two small
vehicles and an Atlantis tour bus took place
around 2 p.m. in Shirley Street just before the
intersection on Church Street.

Several angry drivers called The Tribune to

complain about how long it took for police to
reach the scene.
One said: “I was in traffic for 50 minutes

before I reached the scene of the accident

and there was not a policeman in sight.
“T would think that with a main artery like
Shirley Street the police would try to deal

with such a crippling obstruction in a more

timely manner.”



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010
LOCAL NEWS

Should we be limited to a

That's what our “winner
takes all” electoral system
boils down to, critics say.

In fact, Forbes Burnham,
the late but not missed presi-
dent of Guyana, argued that
state resources should be
used to maintain power at all
costs — any incumbent losing
an election would be "negli-
gent” in this view.

My last column looked at
the recent inconclusive

THE TRIBUNE



DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES



Academics say that a consensus exists
throughout the Caribbean that the power of
the prime minister is too great and needs to
be limited, while the legislature needs to be
more independent and better able to restrain

This Months Topic: MENTAL HEALTH

LECTURE DATE:
Thursday, May 20th, 2010

@ 6PM

DOCTORS HOSPITAL, CONFERENCE ROOM
DOWDESWELL STREET
SEATING IS LIMITED, RSVP 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

SPEAKER: _
Dr Rashida Brown-Clarke
Psychiatrist

LECTURE SERIES

Purpose:
To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished
hweicd

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British general election in the
context of Bahamian third
parties and electoral reform.
It generated a response from
Dr Dexter Johnson, who has
spent years trying to break
the mould of our "Westmin-
ster export model constitu-
tion."

Dr Johnson is both a sur-
geon and a lawyer. For the
past 10 years he has been
teaching constitutional law at
the College of the Bahamas,
and recently produced three
books on the legal, political
and constitutional issues that,
he says, Bahamians are failing
to face up to.

Electoral reform is high
on his list of concerns.

He believes that the cur-
rent first-past-the-post voting
system inherited from the
British is the crudest method
of all, and prone to producing
unrepresentative results.

"You can conceivably win
every seat in the assembly
and still not have even 50 per
cent of the votes cast. As a
result you have effectively
disregarded the views of over
half of the electorate. Smaller
parties can be almost perma-
nently shut out from the
assembly, and you end up
with a system that chooses
the lesser of two evils."

This is compounded, he
says, by a constitution that
gives power and perks to the
two main parties, but noth-
ing at all to minor parties.
This pressures the electorate
into voting for either A or B,
when neither are their true
preference. It also allows the
two main parties to resist
change, since inevitably one

the executive.

or other will form the gov-
ernment.

"The matter is made even
more undesirable when A
and B are run by former part-
ners of a single law firm, and
their differences are negligi-
ble. The essence of democra-
cy is choice, and this is
thwarted by a first-past-the-
post system. Under-repre-
sentation prevents the voic-
ing of minority opinions.”

Cynicism

In countries where the first-
past-the-post system persists,
he says, voter participation
declines over time and cyni-
cism rises. In fact, other than
Britain, Canada, the United
States, India, Taiwan and sev-
eral former British colonies
in African and the Caribbean,
most countries today have
electoral systems that incor-
porate some form of propor-
tional representation.

Johnson also believes that
that our “winner takes all”
system could have dangerous
consequences. "We have two
main tribes, the PLP and the
FNM The antipathy
between these two tribes
increases daily, and it is my
concern that they will soon
be as hostile to each other as
the PNP and JLP are in
Jamaica, coached by the same
type of constitution.

"Inevitably, the desire to
access government's tremen-
dous power has converted
political parties into frenzied
masses of emotion-exuding

ih

APOSTLE CLEON

&

FIRST LADY MUNROE

as the 'y celebrate their

supporters who no longer
care for anything but to win
at all costs."

Trevor Munroe, professor
of government and politics at
the University of the West
Indies, voiced similar views
about Jamaica in the 1990s,
arguing that electoral reform
requires a clear understand-
ing of the common threat
presented by such unmediat-
ed tribalism:

"Tt is increasingly difficult
to envisage a way forward
which does not involve broad
social compromise, includ-
ing...power sharing arrange-
ments. Has the time not
come, not only for some mea-
sure of proportional repre-
sentation in our legislatures,
but also in the executive?"

Opponents of electoral
reform insist that the first-
past-the-post system has suc-
cessfully eliminated sectari-
an, fringe, and fruitcake par-
ties in those countries where
it operates. “Winner takes
all” voting favours broad par-
ties, which have to resolve the
interests of diverse con-
stituencies. As one commen-
tator put it, "this is the citi-
zen's best guarantee against
tails wagging dogs."

Unfortunately (for one
who holds that a measure of
electoral reform would be a
good thing for our political
system), objective conditions
in the Bahamas do not offer
much hope for reform.

SEE page nine

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 9



é

FROM page eight

Probably the best chance
for a third party break-
through recently came dur-
ing the 2002 general election,
when the Coalition for
Democratic Reform and oth-
er small parties took over
3,000 votes, while indepen-
dent candidates won more
than 6,000. Together, these
candidates polled about 7.5
per cent of the overall vote,
but third parties won no seats
and a few independents were
elected only because they
were unopposed by one of
the main parties.

Shortly before the 2002
election, the Ingraham
administration held our first-
ever referendum on constitu-
tional change. But all the pro-
posals were voted down,
despite the fact that they had
been approved by both major
parties in parliament. One of
those proposals was for an
independent electoral and
boundaries commission. Go
figure.

A broad-based constitu-
tional commission was
appointed by the Christie
administration soon after it
came to office in 2002 (co-
chaired by Paul Adderley and
Harvey Tynes). This group
produced a booklet on possi-
ble reforms, held a series of
meetings, issued a prelimi-
nary report in March 2006 —-
and then faded into oblivion.

Although no change to the
way MPs are elected was pro-
posed, there were calls for the
appointment of non-party
senators from various com-
munity groups, a reduction in
the prime minister's powers
of appointment, and the
strengthening of parliamen-
tary oversight committees.
The commission also called
for an independent electoral
and boundaries commission,
as well as limits on campaign
spending and donations to
ensure transparency and
accountability.

Campaign financing is a
matter of great sensitivity in
the Bahamas and there are
currently no rules that apply.

winner takes all’ system

But clearly, when politicians
receive secret donations to
get elected, the question of
returning the favour must be
uppermost in their minds on
taking office. More to the
point, how can a third party
with no seats ever expect to
generate enough financing to
get off the ground?

And financing is key to an
election. According to FNM
Chairman Carl Bethel, can-
didates in 2007 received
about $30,000 each from the
party for their constituency
campaigns. That's about $1.2
million — on top of advertis-
ing, printing and travel, so it is
clear that elections can cost
each party several million
dollars. (Former PLP chair-
man Raynard Rigby did not
respond to this inquiry).

Donations

"The money comes from
small and large donors,"
Bethel said. "Both parties
have a non-discriminatory
policy when it comes to dona-
tions. I cannot speak for the
PLP but I know that the
FNM does not accept dona-
tions from persons of unsa-
vory or suspect backgrounds.
We have refused to accept
money in the past.”

Academics say that a con-
sensus exists throughout the
Caribbean that the power of
the prime minister is too
great and needs to be limited,
while the legislature needs to
be more independent and
better able to restrain the
executive.

The lack of accountability
of public officials is also a
major concern in the
Bahamas and across the
region.

In his book Winner Takes
All — The Westminster Expe-
rience in the Caribbean,
Trinidad and Tobago political
scientist Selwyn Ryan listed
several key recommendations
for improving governance in
the region.

They included adoption of
a voting system similar to the
German model, which mixes
proportional representation
with the first-past-the-post

system; term limits for the
prime minister and fixed gen-
eral election dates; greater
powers and more resources
for local government; and the
creation of an ombudsman's
office to investigate and cor-
rect administrative abuses.

Dexter Johnson is a for-
mer FNM supporter and can-
didate who has spent the last
several years trying to build a
third party (in various incar-
nations). In his book Crisis
in Paradise, he says we should
convene a non-partisan con-
stituent assembly to draft a
republican constitution that
would be adopted following a
referendum.

"We must not continue to
revere the present constitu-
tion as if it were our creation
from scratch and perfectly
suited to our needs. It is nei-
ther, and the sooner we
change it the better it will be
for our progress towards a
more democratic society."

Johnson is now deputy
chairman of the National
Development Party, whose
leader (Dr Andre Rollins)
failed to gain any traction in
the recent Elizabeth bye-elec-
tion. The NDP is in the
process of revising its plat-
form for the 2012 election,
and is expected to support
comprehensive electoral
reform including term limits,
recall of non-functional par-
liamentarians, and campaign
finance laws.

It is often said that the
first-past-the-post system
inevitably produces a stag-
nant two-party system, with
narrow-minded governments
that crush dissent. Why
should we limit ourselves to
such a system?

According to the German
sociologist Max Weber, "suc-
cessful politics is always the
art of the possible, but this
does not mean you should
not reach out towards the
impossible which lies
beyond."

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribune-
media.net

Or visit www. bahamapun-
dit.com

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

i

SHERYL CROW

Saturday, May 29th

a

Titi et eee

Grammy-winner and
singer-sangwriter Sheryl Craw

et

—
JUSTIN BIEBER

et = [AO] ae | ae OT Ta ea)
2:30PM

Veneta) =e) | ee

Deemer tse Tacs ene te] sc
returns to the Atlantis Live stage with
songs fram his smash debut album,
such as ‘Baby’, “One Time’ and
‘One Less Lonely Girl’

:
ew a

he

i

f

a, =
——
Zin N

a
4
a
1 r
7 ’
ay

he.

will perform her classic songs
which are a unique blend
ase lea

|

TAYLOR SWIFT

Saturday, June 19th

=m
Imperial Ballroom

Mats m a bad LeeLee Tana ST
Taylor Swift comes to Paradise Island

= fo give an intimate performance,
ace Leelee TP

FOR TICKET INFORMATION CALL 363-6601

ENP eer



If you want te receive all the latest news about Atlantis concerts and other events
then join the e-newsletter just for residents The Atlantis Scene!
Just subscribe to TheAtlantieScened@kerzner.com!

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

FROM page one

Community (CARICOM), and
other international partners to
formally request assistance.

“The Bahamas is not pre-
pared for the level of calamity.
We are mobilising to address
it,” said Minister Deveaux.

If the oil currently leaking
from the BP Deep Horizon
platform enters the exclusive
economic zone of the Bahamas,
which sits about 120 miles south
of Key West, Florida, it could
be “disastrous” for the
Bahamas, and the many peo-
ple who depend on fishing for
their livelihood, said Minister
Deveaux.

The government is prepared
to cede some judgments to the







EARL DEVEAUX

team of experts, while main-
taining its sovereignty. These
decisions would include the
type of chemical disspersants
to used in the event they are
needed.

Chemical disspersants have
proven to be controversial,

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

We Paoite fs Cordially Sevited Te ena
THE MOSTHLY LUNCHEON FRESENTATION
Hoeted by The Bohanmas Seriety of Engieeer=












Niaw SOL

Lai ni: bie aiL

F rash lly

4 pons eal

by

=

Wednesday, May 26, 2010
Giaegt Fi paabesr

MS. BERTHA COOPER-ROUSSEAU
Rousseau & Cooper

Counc! aod Attonnmeys=ail=Lavw

Topi
“The Chartered Institute of Abritrators
and the Banefits to Engineersâ„¢

PLACE:
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Time: 12:14) p-m. - ea

Registration aul Networking

12:15 - 1:15 Luncheon
Financial Menherss S20)
Stade’ Mironkerira: S500
Publix: s 22,10

If picsible please onlin your attendance by email

CT ee ee ge piker =

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PO), Bow S565, Nace. Rabamas
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LOCAL NEWS

Team of experts to aid oil spill exercise

because the manner and the
quantity in which they are being
used in the gulf are unprece-
dented. Standards vary across
the world as to what chemicals
are most safe and most effec-
tive.

“We don’t have the resources
and means to make an inde-
pendent determination,” said
Minister Deveaux, who admit-
ted the long-term environmen-
tal impact of the chemicals is
unknown.

Philip Weech, director of the
Bahamas Environment Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission, said the use of chemi-
cals, while potentially harmful,
was necessary for the immedi-
ate containment exercise.

He said it was important to
“shorten the resident time of
oil in the environment”, and
the chemicals helped to thin out
the oil, enabling it to be evapo-
rated, and prevent clumping.

Based on the potential use
of chemicals, he anticipated
testing in the marine environ-
ment would persist long after
the immediate aftermath of the
disaster to assess the long term
impact.

No definitive models exists
to determine if or when oil will
enter Bahamian territory, and if

it does, what form the oil will
take. Scientists predict based
on ocean currents, the north-
western Bahamas is at risk,
including some areas being con-
sidered for protected marine
habitat designation.

Three American scientists
were named by the local organ-
ising body, the National Oil
Spill Contingency Team, to
spearhead the planned Friday
exercise of collecting water, tis-
sue and sediment samples on
the Cay Sal Bank.

Marine biologist Kathleen
Sealey, from the University of
Miami, botanist Dr Ethan Freid
and independent biologist and
Bahamian seabird ecologist
Will Mackin will travel to the
Cay Sal Bank to collect sam-
ples.

Tissue samples from the liv-
ers of fish will be of particular
interest to the researchers,
according to Eric Carey, direc-
tor of the Bahamas National
Trust. He said researchers
would also test seabirds who
nest in Cay Sal, because some
of them travel a long distance
to feed in areas immediately
affected by the oil spill.

Initial samples will provide
baseline data for future analy-
sis. Although the government

This is to inform you that Gertrude
Roberts is no longer employed at Baha-
Retreat Spa and is not allowed to
conduct or transact any business on
behalf of its management, staff or its

clients.

is yet to sign off on a laborato-
ry, tests will be conducted in a
lab certified by the US Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
(EPA). They will also be stored
based on strict EPA guidelines.

Minister Deveaux said he
understands the oil is “sticky
and messy”. Some environ-
mentalists have described it as
“thin”. They maintain it is dif-
ficult to predict the state on
arrival in the Bahamas, but sce-
narios include oil arriving on
the surface, as tar balls, or
underwater plums or clouds.

Scientists determined the tar
balls discovered on the Florida
coast by the US Coast Guard
earlier this week were not from
the BP oil spill.

In the event of oil reaching
land in the Bahamas, the gov-
ernment plans to call on volun-
teers to make themselves avail-
able to assist, including indi-
viduals from the scientific com-
munity. Volunteers with boats
are asked to be on stand by to
assist with laying booms, which
are partially submerged floating
devices used to trap surface oil.

“We want to ensure we have
on call and available resources
to mobalise in the event the
worse case scenario arises,” said
Minister Deveaux.

THE TRIBUNE

Call for two
weather officers
to be disciplined
FROM page one

“Nothing has happened as
yet, but it is working
through the system,” said a
Tribune source.

The two officers were
written to by investigators
and utilised their opportuni-
ty to formally respond.

The Grand Bahama tor-
nado caused the death of
three Freeport Container
Port workers. It also left
dozens injured and caused
millions of dollars of dam-
age.

In the aftermath, the PLP
blamed the FNM for closing
the Meteorological Office in
Grand Bahama, while gov-
ernment sources said there is
no doubt “negligence” at the
Met Office in Nassau was at
least partially responsible for
the extent of the catastrophe.

Workers at the Container
Port questioned the safety
regulations put in place by
Hutchison Whampoa, which
owns the facility.

This is to inform you that Kedra
Bell is no longer employed at Baha-
Retreat Spa and is not allowed to
conduct or transact any business on
behalf of its management, staff or its

clients.

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

~ Call for help for
4- Haiti continues

FOUR months after a
massive 7.0 earthquake
devastated much of Haiti,
help continues to pour in
for the impoverished
4 nation and for the hun-

i dreds of thousands left

4 homeless by the disaster.

\ Although relief boxes
“ have now been collected
1 | from Bank of the Bahamas
branches, Kelly's Home
Centre at the Mall at
Marathon and City Market
stores in New Providence,
the Help Us Help Haiti
Relief account at Bank of
the Bahamas remains
open. Donations may be
made to 5510032762.









Se




deck ai F
© Fork of Ths ek
I"

HAITI RELIEF

PAR | — |

rs






Family Eye Care Centre





PICTURED at the final drop-off of donated goods, a campaign created by Bank of the Bahamas, are (I-
r) Salvation Army administrator Lisa Armbrister; BOB sponsorship committee members Laura
Williams, Dania Ferguson and Diane Phillips; marketing manager of Bahamas Supermarkets Nicola
Simmons and Salvation Army divisional secretary Major Oral Morris.





Grab your discount
out of the BAG
On Clothing

Extra 5% off for Privilege Cards
& Corporate Partners

THE N

THE FIFTH NATIONAL EXHIBITION (NE5)

30 - 50% Off selected
Clothing & SHOES

“Ea

ATIONAL ART GALLERY OF THE BAHAMAS



5)

MOTHER'S HAVE EXCEPTIONAL PERCEPTION AND

VISION. THEY ARE INDEED SPECIAL.

Or. Charlene C. Wallace G0
#65 CHI Allee
a Tet 322-3 YE (322-3995)

FOR THE MONTH OF MAY, ALL MOTHERS

aes epee as aaa |
WILL BE ENTITLED TO A DISCOUNT OFF OF THEIR

to one

PRESENTS

CALL FOR ENTRIES

GLASSES ACCORDING TO THEIR AGE

We ey a 4 Pte)
Fire i aG amet
Cie eG eee eet ay
pe meme Pe eee)
ae ee et

eee
NATIONAL ART GALLERY
OF THE BAHAMAS

wi The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas invites professional artists working in The Bahamas and Bahamian artists
abroad to enter their work in our Fifth National Exhibition (MES) scheduled to open in August 2010, The theme for this
exhibition is "The Carbon Footprint: Bahamian Artists’ 21st Century Response to the Environment." \Ve encourage all
professional artists to submit their work for this juned show which represents the best of contemporary Bahamian Art.

Over the last few years, we have witnessed many events
which have had a global impact whether they were the fiscal
events that emerged during the height of the credit crunch
or the natural disaster events that occurred this year in Haiti,
Peru and here at home. These events are ALL related one
way OF another ta varlous forms of global climate change.

In response to this, the MAGE is announcing that its fifth
national open submission exhibition, the NES, will be a
themed exhibition exploring ideas and marratives on issues
relating to the ist Century global question on carbon
footprint and climate change,

A carbon footprint is a measure of the impact our activities
have on the environment and, in particular, on climate
change. It relates to the amount of greenhouse gases
we individually produce im qur day-to-day lives through
burning fossil fuels for electricity, transpartation, ete.

It is our intention at the NAGE te explore this area fram an
artist's perspective seeing how they use their own unique
artistic tools and vision to produce works that look at areas
such as urbanization, mability (cars, planes, boats, etc.),
domesticity. personal space(s), landscape, industrialization,
natural earth elements, fabricated non-natural elements, etc.
that relate to carbon footprint and climate change.

This is not an easy challenge but at the NAGE, we feel that
with difficult and complex times, it is important that artists
are given the opportunity to respond.

if you are interested im participating, you may request the
Official Rules amd Entry Foro by contacting the Gallery at
Tel; 242-328-5800 or email at info@nagb.org.bs,

CATEGORIES

APainting s 0. Works on Paper Drawing, Collage, Orginal Prints, Watercolors,
Faitek, etc. § C. Photography / OL Sculptures, Assemblage, Installation
E.Ceranicg / Mined & ARe mative Media including Vides /G. Quilts

ELIGIBILITÂ¥

This exhibition if open to all prodessionad artists residing in The Bahamas
and all professional Baharnian artists practicing abroad, Professional is
Gefined at an adult individual working primarily 24 an artist preferably with
a history of exhibhing works.

JUDGING

The selection of varks will be completed bya panel of judipes chosen by
Ihe Gallery, Judging will take place im July 2070.

COLLECTION OF WORKS

Works mot selected for the exhibetion must be collected from the
Niational Art Gallery af The Bahamas by daly 0, 000, After the cle, he
National Art Gallary absolves itself of any respansiillity for the work and
mosorves the right to auction uncollected work bo cover storage costs.

Works accepted for the exhibation mutt be collected within TWO {2}
weeks of lhe chasing date, AMer this date, the Gallery reserves the right i
auction Off the works to cover the expences of extended storage,

INSURANCE
Pleake supply the National Art Gallery af The Baharia wlth @ copy of
CUPEAE GSuFanoe picks 0 aon] on all artwork submited, The WAGE

reserves the right to reject a work If it feels it canmat comer the estimated
walue of the work provided.

SALE OF WORKS AND PURCHASE AWARDS

The National Art Gallery undertakes to assist in the sale of those wears
which artists indicate are for sale. Price lists wall be offered at the exhibition
opening and will be available during the exhibition nun.

7 To assent in defraying the cost of the Filth National Exhibition
ihe National Gallery will retain a commission of 25%, whach willl be
deducted fram the stated sales price. This means that the sale price should
ndude artist revenue plus commission.

"The NAGE may chooie te acquire works for the National Collection
by this process,

«(Fa mon-reident is interested lin purchasing wark on display, the Gallery
will inform the artist of the potential sake. The actist rust indicate whether
1 process the gale ard agree to cower the coat af shipping the work
ritemationadly, if the purchaser rafuses,

DELIVERY OF WORKS
Artis are to subnet works for selection, along with a agreed official enary

teem fe the MAGE, West Hill Street, Marsan, Bahamas, Werks will net be
accepted without Entry Form and current CV.

THE CLOSING DATE FOR ENTRIES |S WEDNESDAY, JUNE
20, 2019 AT la NOON,

MANDATORY REGUIREMENT FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:
Artiets are REQUIRED to attend the screening of at least .one of the filma
featured in Tht. advertisement, hor international and Farnily Bland partici-
paarts ony, films will be avaliable for chiownloadineg from the wet via a link
that aall be emailed to you. Request link by emailing Jackson Petit at
|petititnagbiongbs. For further infonmation, please contect the Gallery at
242-528-98007 or email Holly Parosti at hparottie@nagborglbs.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

MANDATORY REQUIRED FILMS
FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:

In order for Artists to be eligible to submit
artwork to the NES, they MUST attend the
screening of at least one of the films
featured below.

“flemember Saro-Wiwa" -Tue. May 18, apm
"Home" - Thu. May 20, apm

‘wr

ee ee i ee ee ee

ee ee ee

NOME

PC De ee

"Home" ~ Thu. May 20, 8pm


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 15

LOCAL NEWS



Catch football’s best plays with Act Il

Girls, 10, pregnant

FROM page one

consent."

The press conference had
been held to officially
announce the partnership
between PACE and the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force.

Superintendent Stephen
Dean, head of the National
Crime Prevention Office
(NCPO), said the relation-
ship with the programme
would realise crime preven-
tion goals such as positive
involvement and engage-
ment with the community.

He said: "We have to be
open and straight. We all see
it. We all know what's going
on and a lot of it is covered
up. And it’s these girls’ lives
that we are sacrificing."

Mr Dean also noted that
often, while society con-
demns teenage mothers, not
much is done to address the
fathers, and the police will
be especially targeting older
men.

He added: "Particularly to
the mothers of these young
girls — don't cover it up.
Report what happened and
go straight through to pros-
ecution.

"Anyone with informa-
tion should come forward.
If it is found out that a per-
son knew about it and with-
held information, it is a
criminal offence and they
will be prosecuted also."

In response to requests

Supper and Bingo fundraiser



The PACE foundation is having a Supper and Bingo
fundraiser on Saturday at noon on the grounds of the

Police Headquarters.

Dinner tickets are $10 and prizes include jewellery,
housewares and appliances. There also will be a bouncing

castle for children.

The fundraiser will lend much need assistance to the
programme, which, over the years, has provided assistance
to more than 3,000 teenage mothers and their babies.



more information about
graduates of the pro-
gramme, PACE published
a documentary, which show-
cased the testimonials of
graduates. The film, called
“Interrupted”, is used as an
educational tool for parents,
teachers and guidance coun-
sellors so that students can
be sensitised to the conse-
quences of teenage preg-
nancy.

Research

Mrs Brown said: "When
we did the research, one
thing that all of the girls
mentioned was that their
parents never told them
what they expected of them.
Parents need to get to know
their children, as simple as
sitting down and having din-
ner together. Get to be com-
fortable with them so they
can tell you what's going on.

“We live in a society
where people don't like to

dren are occurring from
somewhere. We need to
strengthen our parenting
skills. We have to talk to our
children about sex."

Mrs Brown said it was
never too early for parents
to start talking to their chil-
dren about sex and it was
parent's responsibility to
find the right language to
communicate with them.

She said: "People see the
girls pregnant and in the uni-
form and think that they are
just bad girls but there are a
range of issues, they don’t
know what the story is
behind it. There could be so
many things, it could be
incest or just bad decisions
whether with a young boy
or an older man.

"Parents need to be
responsible if you have a
young daughter, you need
to know who her friends are,
who she says she is going out
with and you can't have a
young girl going out with a

Om CO eiy Or talk about sex, but the chil-

MPs seek to make animal

owners more responsible
FROM page one

which previously existed under the Dog License Act of 1942,
which it will now repeal and replace, as well as under the Penal
Code, but also provides for more demands on animal owners and
increases the fines that come along wth failure to comply with
those regulations.

The Bill “promotes responsible animal ownership”, said the
MP for Long Island and Ragged Island, who told Parliament it
came after more than 12 years of “extensive consultation” and in
particular out of a “felt and expressed need for greater control and
regulation of roaming and stray animals in the Bahamas”.

Mr Cartwright added that the creation of the Bill was initially
inspired in the 1990s after a series of dog attacks against tourists and
Bahamians. Recognising that the Bill includes some regulations
which did exist in previous legislation, he stressed that ‘““enforce-
ment” of the legislation’s provisions, new and old, will now be key
to the achievement of its objectives.

Improving the likelyhood of this, a 12 member Animal Protec-
tion and Control Board will be appointed with responsibility for the
welfare and protection of animals, along with similar authorities in
other family islands, said Mr Cartwright.

New animal control units will also be established on those
islands where impounded animals can be held and Animal Wardens
will be employed under the Bill, having the authority to inspect and
investigate potential or actual animal welfare issues.

Roaming or stray animals - either owned but lost or unowned -
can be seized and impounded at the owner’s expense if found
roaming, with the owner given four days notice before they may be
euthanised.

Protection of the public and their property against animal attacks
is covered, providing for people to recoup damages from the own-
ers of animals in these cases and calling for the confinement of all
dogs such that they cannot leave an owner’s property.

The legislation further outlines the need for those who board or
breed animals for sale - whether in their homes or elsewhere - to
meet animal welfare standards and obtain a license to do the
same. Animal identification measures are a key feature of the
legislation, along with the responsibility of owners to take steps to
reduce unwanted breeding by their dogs.

Public safety in the face of potentially dangerous dogs or guard
dogs, reducing the fear and occurrence of dog attacks, is addressed.

Meanwhile, cruelty to animals is defined as any instance where
an animal is or is permitted to be “cruelly kicked, ill treated, tor-
tured or overworked” or “inhumanely killed, sexually assaulted,
neglected, deprived of water food or shelter or caused unnecessary
suffering”.

The Bill provides for a Magistrate to have an animal subject to
such cruelty taken from its owner and for that person to be dis-
qualified from owning an animal.

The PLP supported the Bill but questioned whether it would be
properly enforced and how much this would cost the government.

Elizabeth MP Ryan Pinder said the Bill “should be more pro-
gressive” and include a “framework for the education of the pub-
lic on responsible animal ownership”, focusing more on education
“and less on fines”.

Police investigate theft of safe
FROM page one

possession of its key. According to the initial report, the bur-
glars are said to have entered the compound in which the build-
ing is located between 2am and 8am on Sunday, either through a
window or one of the air-conditioning vents on the northern
side. They then smashed the doors of the post office open with
an object, possibly a crowbar.

The compound also holds the community’s police station, but
sources say no officers were present at the time, having all left
after a function held there earlier that night.

Taking cash, cheques and money orders together thought to
be worth about $30,000, as well as mail, the burglars are report-
ed to have made their escape on foot.

They are said to have dragged the safe across Queen’s High-
way and down to the beach, where it was put on either a truck
or boat. Officers from the Central Detective Unit have flown to
the island to investigate the matter, and are expected to make
an arrest within the very near future.

In other crime related news, officers are also in Abaco prob-
ing the disappearance of $1,800 from the central government
offices. According to well-placed sources within the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, officers were dispatched to Abaco on
May 5 to assist with the investigation.

It is believed the money had been earmarked for local gov-
ernment programmes.

grown man."



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MMA HOG MOLL
when you enter to win the Flat Screen TVs.

Offer good while supplies last.

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writen fio

Tialian Fiaza

i rym

Phe slund’s best
pava 1 on the
move! ‘Che second,
© Marco's Pizza
restaurant located in ‘Tve
Village Road Shopping
Plaza officially opened
itis door to welcome
customers on Wednesday,
"May L2th. This newest
YF oedditien to the 3 growing
y Marco's chain boasts.
; State-of-the-art features like a
Piarce digital display screen to
expodite take-out orders, and a
Hpacious, dining room complete
with old-world charm aml a

seating capacity of fifty.

Marco's 2, will now expand the
company’s delivery range to
residences and businesses as far
as Mackey Street and Marathon
Road while including Sea Breeze,
Dannotage Estates. Johnson
Road, Prince Charles, Yamacrayw
and East Bay Street,

couldn't resist the delicious pizza aroma, She ordered
ihe 37.09 Lunch Special becoming the first take-oul
clasomer and winning herself a free large Specialty

Pizza.

Cwners: Terry Tsavoussis, Franchise Go-Ch

‘2 Vice President: Ancila Henbur,

General Manager, Chris Taavouseis, Future Marcos Franchises; Yolanda Pawar,
Marketing Khlanager Mol shown: Chrstopher Tsavoussis, President & Franchise

Loser

Building on the
brand's reputation for delivering
the best pizza in the industry,
Marco's authentic pizza-making
traditions infuse time-honored
techniques with robust seasonings
and sauces, pene©rous Llopping
portions, and a signature blend of
three, fresh, never frozen cheeses
lo guarantee a favor experence

oul of this world!

With pizzas starting at
under ten dollars, plus a
full menu offering hot,

Baked Subs,

C

Herself a large Specialty Pizza

freshly-made Salads, succulent
Chicken Wings, Savory Cheezy
Bread and delightfully sweet
Cinnasquares, Mareo’s Pizza is
the ideal farnily treat!

As a grand opening special, all
customers purchasing an A-large
Specialty Pizza will receive a free
arder of Chicken Tumblers
while supplies Last at both the
new Village Eoad and
Ponce Charles locations.

veo J

that Bank Of The Bahaenss loves Marco's Pizza
Situated fight maxl door, BOTR was the mew
reshaurand's first delivery and lucky Tarnmy won



7‘,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM








THE TRIBUNE

&



THURSDAY,



MAY 20,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net










By NEIL HARTNELL

BOCTORS HOSrITAL

Tribune Business Editor

7

= £ a
ia

The company’s annual report for the
year to January 31, 2010, which has





octors Hospital has hired

architects to produce

drawings for the planned

expansion of its Shirley
Street/Collins Avenue facility, after the
BISX-listed company saw net income
for fiscal 2010 rise year-over-year by
28 per cent to $4.886 million.

been seen by Tribune Business, con-
firmed: “The expansion is currently
planned to include an energy centre,
additional clinical areas and new park-
ing facilities, along with needed space
for support services.”

The BISX-listed healthcare provider
said its estimated capital budget for the
current 2011 fiscal year stood at $4.5






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff







PROFIT CENTRE: Doctors eliminated all bank debt, and has appointed architects to design planned growth...

Doctors to expand
after 28% profit rise

million, with funds allocated for the
purchase of a digital mammogram
machine, new x-ray machine, operat-
ing room equipment and data centre
equipment.

Doctors Hospital had planned to
spend $3 million on capital purchases in
its 2010 fiscal year, but deferred some
$1.3 million of this amount.

SEE page 5B







Money Safe.
Money Fast.

dniernia thee! Money m @)

[@ Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

Ophir wt
Bank BahamasOnhina.com

$36k savings in 10
years from better
bus system

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN family of
four could save some $36,340
over 10 years if a strengthened
jitney system encouraged them
to use public transportation
rather than acquire a $22,000
car, College of the Bahamas
(COB) lecturers have estimat-
ed, warning that the current
inadequate infrastructure only
“deepens our growing trade
imbalance and national debt”.

The 1962 Foundation, a
COB faculty group that
includes noted academics Dr
Tan Strachan and Dr Olivia
Saunders, warned that the exist-
ing weak public transportation
system was fuelling an “unsus-
tainable lifestyle”, where traffic
congestion was costing the
Bahamian economy productiv-
ity and working hours.

The rate of increase in regis-
tered private motor vehicles on
New Providence had outpaced
population growth four-fold in
percentage terms between
2002-2006, their report said, and
the need to secure car owner-
ship was having “a dramatic
impact on the cost of living” for
many Bahamian households.

“The 1962 Foundation esti-
mates that the cost of owning
and operating a $22,000 auto-
mobile for a New Providence

Insurer targets ‘niche markets’ ‘Never going to be perfect’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROYALStar Assurance, the
Bahamian property and casu-
alty insurer, is increasingly tar-
geting niche markets and
groups with specific products,
while also continuing to build-
up its 24-hour claims service
that is being used “more and
more frequently”.

Describing the general insur-
ance carrier’s plans for 2010,
Steve Watson, its managing
director, said it planned to fur-
ther “push” its 24-hour claims
service, as well as target select
markets with “affinity prod-
ucts”.

“We've got a couple of things

* RoyalStar also focusing
on 24-hour claims service,
which has ‘on the spot
value’ and being used
‘more and more frequently’

* Only large losses in 2009
were sinkings of fishing
vessel and motor yacht

that are in the pipeline and are
ongoing,” Mr Watson told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re contin-
uing to push our 24 hour claims
service, which has been well-
received. It’s taken quite a

SEE page 9B

Court throws out Ginn suit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AUS court has thrown out a
lawsuit filed against the devel-
opers of the $4.9 billion Ginn
sur mer project, in which pur-
chasers who spent between
$525,900 and $1.37 million on
acquiring real estate parcels had
alleged fraudulent conspiracy,
on the grounds that the
Bahamas was the correct juris-
diction in which a court should
hear their complaints.

District Judge Marcia
Morales Howard, sitting in the
Middle Florida courts, in her

Finds Bahamas proper
venue to settle purchaser
claims over $526,000-
$1.37m real estate
purchases at $4.9bn
Bahamas project

March 31, 2010, ruling dis-
missed in its entirety the lawsuit
brought by a group of Ginn sur
mer purchasers against the pro-
ject and its developers for
“improper venue”.

SEE page 4B

Crvnd floor fall) furaished 2-hed, 2-hath conde with
Juntanic Harbour views, landicoped gardens, aml
sparkling paal within We pated oomannnify af
‘Eosteind’. Great rental kistary!

$535,000 Gross
Craig Pinder 457-2282

tml: Cri PuraliseBabamscom

call NO cae

PARADISE REALTY



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s public
procurement system is not
“ever going to be perfect”, a
former Chamber of Commerce
president told Tribune Business
yesterday, arguing that the
Bahamas’ relatively small size
and interwoven family/political
relationships made it impossible
to “eliminate the foolishness
that goes on”.

Responding to the proposed
public procurement reforms,
which could save the Govern-
ment up to 30 per cent (close to
$130 million) on its existing
$400 million annual contracts
budget, Dionisio D’Aguilar said

up to 6% interest®

Safeguard your family’s future with a Bank of The Bahamas B$ Investment Certificate.

* Ex-Chamber chief says Bahamas’ small size and
interlocking family/political relationships make
it impossible to ‘ever eliminate foolishness and
corruption’ in government contract awards and bidding
* ‘Wary’ of creating another layer

of bureaucracy with reforms

* Suggests ability of bidder to deliver, not
price, should be key assessment criteria

that while he was wary about
introducing more bureaucracy
into public sector contract
processes, efforts to eliminate
corruption and political influ-
ences had to be made.

“T don’t think it’s ever going
to be perfect,” Mr D’ Aguilar

told Tribune Business of the
Government’s public procure-
ment system. “Given the small-
ness of the country, I don’t
think you’ll ever eliminate the
foolishness that goes, but you

SEE page 7B

Sign up now and get a free prepaid card membership for the first year.

www.BankBahamas.com

*Certain restrictions apply



family is $7,284 a year, or
$72,840 over 10 years,” their
report said. “$7,284 represents
15 per cent of the average
household income in New
Providence.

“The cost to a family of four
of using public transportation
for the year is only $3,650 (7
per cent of the average nation-
al household income) or
$36,500 over 10 years. If a fam-
ily of four chose not to borrow
from a bank to own a $22,000
automobile and took the bus
instead, they would save $3,634
a year or $36,340 over 10
years.”

To help alleviate the prob-
lem, the Foundation suggested
that there be “a more mean-
ingful linkage” between the tax
revenues gained from the trans-
port industry and regulation of
the public transport system.

Key fees and taxes were fuel
taxes, car licensing, inspection
fees, and traffic violation fines,
yet in the 2007 Budget the
Road Traffic Department had
just $6.692 million to spend,
despite collecting $39 million
in fiscal 2008 from inspection
and licensing fees, plus taxi and
bus franchise fees.

The Government was also
urged to encourage the use and
importation of high fuel-effi-

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report



° BOB


DY

BUTLER’S BARGAIN MART

Rosa Venus Multi
Pack Soap

3/,99¢

May 2010

Par Excellence
Parboiled Rice 5lb

Tamarindo Cream
Crackers 200g

$1.29

Regal Malta 12.0z
19¢

in tomato
Sauce/Brine

$1.79

Ensueno Fabric
Softner 28.7 oz

$1.99



PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010
Selecting the program
that is right for you

WHEN it comes to selecting
a graphic program, there are so
many choices that it can often
be difficult to determine which
is right for you. While the ten-
dency is to want to go with the
most popular program avail-
able, that's not always the most
appropriate option for every
person's needs.

Choosing the best profes-
sional software can seem daunt-
ing, but with a little planning
you can easily find the right
program by comparing price,
performance and features that
should be considered before
making a final decision.

Graphic Design Software has
vast creative tools for drawing,
logos, page layout, image
design, painting, photo editing,
web graphics and other creative
masterpieces.

In this article, we'll take a
brief look at the relevant graph-
ic software on the market, and
assess how to choose the right
Graphic Design software.

Generally, graphic design is a
process of text and picture com-
bination that tells a story which
cannot be told effectively with
raw text. This is mainly done
on book covers, newspapers,
magazines, logos and for adver-
tisement. Nonetheless, in order
to design graphics, graphic
design software is required.

However, high quality soft-
ware such as Adobe Photoshop
and illustrator, Corel and
Quark Xpress are the top
graphic design products on the
market today. They are mainly
considered because of their
professional page layout, price
and user interface.

The finest graphic design
software is chosen depending
on qualities such as:

* Task- What are you design-
ing?

* Operating system: The
software has to be compatible
with the operating system being
used.

* Affordability: Do you have
enough funds to obtain the pre-
ferred software?

* Memory: Can your
machine support the normal
running of the given graphic
software?

* Features: Are there
required features in the soft-
ware to meet your end needs?

Q
S








The Art
of Graphix

adore O se Rie





Types of Graphic Software

* Corel Graphic design: We
have only one graphic design
in the Corel category, which is
Coral draw. Other top graphic
design software products
include Acrobat, Dimension,
Dream weaver, Frame maker,
Front page and Shock wave.

* Page layout software is used
to combine graphics and text
to produce a document. Usu-
ally these documents are
intended to be printed, but they
can also be slide show presen-
tations or websites.

* Word Processors, as the
name implies, have an emphasis
on working mainly with text.
In recent years, however, word
processors can be used to com-
bine text and graphics for many
documents such as brochures,
booklets, flyers and postcards.

* Publishing Software
includes Adobe PageMaker,
Microsoft Publisher, Macro-
media Freehand, Creative
Printing Software includes Print
Artist, The Print Shop and
Print Master.

* Presentation software is
designed for creating on-screen
presentations, reports, over-
head transparencies, and
slideshows. Also, this type of
software allows you to incor-
porate multimedia into docu-
ments.

* Web Publishing Software:
Another development in recent
years that has the ability to pub-
lish work on the Internet.

* Graphic design and desk-
top publishing software is essen-
tially the same thing. The pri-
mary difference is that the
desktop publishing category
includes some consumer level
programs not typically consid-
ered graphic design software.
Adobe InDesign and QuarkX-
Press are the primary page lay-

THE TRIBUNE

out programs.

Some of the leading graphic
software includes:

Adobe Photoshop

CS4 software:

Photoshop CS4 definitely tips
the scales. This is ‘THE’ photo
editing king in the graphics
world, and used by most serious
graphic designers, photogra-
phers and image manipulators.
It is one of the most advanced
and versatile programs that
dominates the industry. Bun-
dled with different graphic
applications it has always been
a given in my wish list, and
comes with a host of features
that allow for an excellent fin-
ish.

The biggest obstacle to any
designer who wants Photoshop
is the price but, ultimately, it
can create an image from
scratch or edit an existing file.
This is the graphic design soft-
ware that most graphic design-
ers will not do without.

Types of Output: Pho-
tographs, Manipulated objects,
Web Graphics and Texture
editing.

Freehand software: This pro-
gram is manufactured by
Macromedia and allows for the
creation of vector art. It is good
for line art, cartoons, logo cre-
ation and resizing, and still has
smooth edges and lines. Vec-
tor images are made up of lines,
curves and gradients.

Types of Output: Line Art,
Logos, Cartoons, smooth edges
and shapes. Not for pho-
tographs.

Illustration software:
Although not technically con-
sidered a layout software, this
program has the ability to flow
text, check spelling and gram-
mar, and adjust kerning and
line spacing on smaller projects
such as postcards, greeting
cards, brochures, business
cards, letterheads and small
booklets.

Types of Output: Line Art,
Logos, Cartoons - anything
with smooth edges and shapes.

Quark Xpress: This is a lay-
out program for printed media.

SEE page 11B

New NIB Contribution Rate
to take effect June 1, 2010

“Up, NCE 9° For the first time since the National Insurance programme started

in 1974, the rate of contribution payments will be increased for employed

Pasta Select
150z

$1.39

1-2-3 Oil
330Z

$2.50

Super B Evaporated
Milk 41 og .69¢

BUTLER’S BARGAIN MART
Household items
pk ep Microfiber Sheet Set

Queen $14.99. Twin $10.99

Ironing Boards

sais $35.00

Large Bath Towels

Starting from $6.50)
Fleece Throw Blanket
60°80 - 812.99
50°60 - 99.99

Umbrellas
starting from $7.00









persons, Beginning June 1, 2010, the rate will be increased by 1% - one half percent
(50%) to be paid by the employer, and one-half percent (.50) to be paid by the employee.
This means that the current rate of 8.8%, shared 5.4% for employer and 3.4% for
employee, will change to 9.8%, shared 5.9% for employer, and 3.9% for employee.
This translates to a maximum weekly increase of §2 for the employer and $2 for the
employee.

The increase, which was necessitated by the addition of Unemployment Benefit to the
National Insurance benefits package, will only impact Eerployed Persons - Le., persons
who have bosses, The rate of contributions for all other contributors « self-employed
persons; voluntarily insured persons; and Summer students - will not be increased
because contriburions paid by them in these categories will not qualify them to receive
Unemployment Benefit.

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR EmMplovep Persons FROM JUNE 1

ACTUAL INSURABLE (CONTRIBUTIONS PAYABLE AS
— — PERCENTAGE OF INSURABLE WAGES BY

Up to $59,99 eaves | Wages Up tc 2.2% 7.6% PS
and including $59.4
$60 te $400 actual wages from 5% 5h
a bes S400

| abow S400 | 5200



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR PENSIONABLE CIVIL. SERVANTS

(CONTRIBUTIONS PAYABLE AS
PERCENTAGE ‘OF INSURABLE WAGES BY

pte $59.99 actual wages up to
and including $59.9 234, 6% 9.5%
$60 to F110
5 3, i 4, Bh
5.99

above $110 to $40
plus 3.05%

actual wages from
$60 to $110

(a) actual wages up to $110
(b} actual wapes in excess of
$110 but up ta $400

fa) actual wages up to $110 3% 5.9% 9.8%
(b} actual wages in excess of
$110 upto $400

and above
plus 5.25%

plus 2% plus 53,0555. plus 5254

Visit www.oib-bahamas.com for more information or ta download the new
contribution tables.


THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas to repay furthe

$80m in debt next year

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE BAHAMAS is expect-
ed to reduce its debt by anoth-
er $80 million in the next fiscal
year, the minister of state for
finance told Tribune Business
yesterday, while continuing to
seek Technical Assistance
Grants for economic and social
development.

Zhivargo Laing said, though,
that the amount of retired debt
could be higher or lower as it is
decreased every fiscal year.

"We have a line item in the
budget for debt redemption.
Almost every year we have an
estimate for what debt redemp-
tion is, and every year you retire
debt," said Mr Laing. "That's
why we always talk about the
net increase in our debt because
while we are borrowing we are
also paying back debt."

Mr Laing said the Bahamas
can often have a difficult time
borrowing from some interna-
tional lending facilities because
of the size of its gross domestic
product (GDP), yet can often
always access technical assis-
tance grants for projects dealing
with poverty reduction or envi-
ronmental sustainability.

"Techincal assistance grants
are somthing that is readily
available for us," he said.

Mr Laing said many institu-
tions want to give technical
asisitance to help improve a
country's capacity to grow its
infrastructure and social devel-
opment programmes.

He added that the Bahamas
has several technical assistance
grants in the pipeline and will









access many more in the future.

"We have a number of tech-
nical assistance programs with
either the IDB (Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank) or
CDB (Caribbean Development
Bank)," Mr Laing said. "We are
constantly using those assis-
tance programmes, and there is
no question that there will be
more as we go along."

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 3B

r Credit union worker

passes Canada exam

THE membership STI provides
supervisor at the training for both the
: National Workers exams required to
potas on iad ieee Co-operative Cred- complete the CSC.

planned infrastructure projects
across the region.

But as the CDB recently
acquired an historic $1 billion in
extra funding facilities in the
region, the Bahamas has
already benefited, signing an
agreement for $a 10.1 million
loan from the bank on Tues-
day.

it Union, Kim Vic-
toria Simpson, has
completed the Cana-
dian Securities
Course (CSC) after
studying at the Nas-
sau-based Securities
Training Institute
(STD.



KIM SIMPSON

Ms Albury, STIT’s
course administra-
tor, said: “Our com-
prehensive work-
shops greatly assist
in enhancing stu-
dents’ understand-
ing of financial prod-
ucts and services.”



Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, addressing the body of the
Governors of the Caribbean
Development Bank, said the

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Court throws
out Ginn suit

FROM page 1B

“In so concluding, the court
expresses no view as to the
merits of the plaintiffs’ claims,
but simply holds that the [pur-
chasers] ‘must honour their bar-
gains’ and attempt to vindicate
their claims in a Bahamian
court,” Judge Howard ruled.

Noting that the case “stems
from their respective contracts
to purchase undeveloped
parcels of real property in the
Versailles sur mer subdivision
on Grand Bahama Island from
Ginn-LA West End, a Bahami-
an corporation”, the judge not-
ed Ginn’s argument that all
contracts with the purchasers
“contain enforceable forum-
selection clauses designating
the exclusive venue for the
instant litigation to be in the
Bahamas”.

The Ginn sur mer lots in
question had been purchased
in 2006 and 2007, and the judge
said: “Paragraph 22 of each
sales contract contains an iden-
tical forum-selection clause pur-
porting to designate the
Bahamas as the exclusive venue
for any legal action” relating to
the agreements.

The US court found that the
“contracts and underlying
transactions” were internation-
alin nature, with the buyers all
Americans. Ginn was a
Bahamian company, “the con-
tracts were negotiated in the
US, but the closings apparently
took place partially in the US
and partially in the Bahamas”.

“Finally, and perhaps most
importantly, the subject matter
of the contracts each concerns
the sale of real property in the
Bahamas,” Judge Howard said.

The purchasers, though, had
argued that the choice of the
Bahamas as the jurisdiction
governing the contracts was
“unreasonable”, claiming the
deals had been produced
through fraud, and that using
this nation would prevent the
hearing of claims under US law.

Judge Howard found that the
contracts with Ginn were

“freely negotiated”, adding:
“Although the forum selection,
and indeed the entire contracts,
are nearly identical, there is no
indication from plaintiffs that
they were not the product of
free negotiation.

“In contrast to the terms of a
cruise ticket forced upon a con-
sumer with limited bargaining
power, the instant contracts
concerned sophisticated real
estate transactions involving
large sums of money - purchase
prices ranged from $525,900 to
$1.37 million. Indeed, the [$1.37
million] contract contains alter-
ations - seemingly favourable
to the buyer - that eliminate
one provision of the contract
and add others.”

Judge Howard found that the
choice of Bahamas as governing
jurisdiction for the contracts
was clearly stated in the docu-
mentation, even though the
purchasers claimed that a hear-
ing in this nation would ‘preju-
dice’ their case and deprive
them of a fair hearing.

Rejecting this, the judge said
the purchasers had “in a some-
what condescending manner”,
argued that Bahamian courts
“are ill-equipped to adjudicate
claims” that were complex.

She added: “The court finds
that plaintiffs have failed to car-
ry their heavy burden of show-
ing that a Bahamian forum
would deprive them of a full
and fair hearing so as to make
the forum-selection clause
unreasonable.”

Justice Howard also found:
“Additionally, plaintiffs take
issue with the fact that the con-
tracts require litigation in the
Bahamas despite having been
carefully structured to avoid the
necessity of plaintiffs having to
travel to the Bahamas to com-
plete the closing of the trans-
actions at issue.

“Although these factors may
make plaintiffs’ suit prospects
more difficult, and less appeal-
ing, the court cannot conclude
that requiring suit in the
Bahamas for a contract con-
cerning the purchase by plain-

tiffs of property in the Bahamas
evinces a bad-faith motive of
discouraging plaintiffs from
pursuing claims.”

In its ultimately successful
defence to the action, Ginn had
alleged that it was merely “an
attempt to find a scapegoat for
their buyers’ remorse", amid
claims that a lender took a $276
million mortgage on the Grand
Bahama site despite just the
development receiving just 2
per cent of its loan proceeds.

Ginn, in a February 16, 2010,
filing argued that while the
plaintiffs had all purchased lots
at the Ginn sur mer site in
Grand Bahama, they were now
seeking to blame it for all the
problems stemming from the
credit crunch and global reces-
sion.

"Following the unprecedent-
ed decline in the real estate
market and the resulting mort-
gage crisis, plaintiffs now seek
to hold Ginn responsible for
the decline in their property
values by alleging several claims
under the [US] Interstate Land
Sales Full Disclosure Act,"
Ginn alleged.

Much of the plaintiffs’ argu-
ments surrounded the $675 mil-
lion syndicated loan that Ginn
obtained from Credit Suisse,
which was secured on Ginn Sur
mer and four other properties it
was developing. Ginn ulti-
mately defaulted on the repay-
ments due on this loan, lead-
ing the Credit Suisse syndicate
to ultimately foreclose on it,
including the Grand Bahama
real estate it was secured upon,
making them the developer's
joint venture partner moving
forward.

Ginn alleged that their case
was " red herring", and said the
real estate buyers bringing the
action - all of them US citizens
- knew the Credit Suisse credit
facility was due "to be repaid
through lot sales, which ceased
as a result of the real estate
market collapse.

"The Ginn defendants can-
not possibly be at fault for the
real estate market collapse."



ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT






SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused,

PUBLIC NOTICE

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department's Triage, Registration and Patient Waiting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic.

Effective Tuesday May 11th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed,

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services,

For more information please call 502-7885 for A&E Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic.




THE TRIBUNE

THE CARIBBEAN region,
including the Bahamas,
received an $850 million
pledge of support from a group
of lenders who signed a Joint

Action Plan yesterday
designed to support economic
growth.

Five international financial
institutions said they would
collectively help to provide
support to governments and
private sectors through loan
facilities that would encourage
support when finding capital
was difficult for small islands
states in the Caribbean.

The institutions, the
Caribbean Development
Bank, European Investment
Bank, Proparco (the private
sector arm of the Agence Fran-
caise de Development Group),
the International Finance Cor-
poration (Part of the World
Bank) and the Netherlands

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 5B
$850m pledge to support
Caribbean and Bahamas

Development Finance Com-
pany (FMO), have already
pledged to support the recon-
struction efforts in Haiti, with
the agreement of the
Caribbean Joint Action Plan.

Desmond Brunton, vice-
president of operations for the
Caribbean Development
Bank, said the synergy of four
financial institutions working
together will assist countries
in accessing funding for a wide
range of projects, as each one
has its own ideas and agendas.

"Today, five leading inter-
national financial institutions
active in the Caribbean rein-
forced their commitment to
ensuring long-term economic
growth across the region,
resilience to the global finan-
cial crisis and effective deploy-
ment of assistance for recon-
struction efforts in Haiti with
agreement of the Caribbean

Joint Action Plan,” a joint
press release said.

"The Caribbean Joint
Action Plan will enable more
effective use of financial and
technical assistance by encour-
aging a stronger focus on each
participating institution’s expe-
rience and capabilities."

Mr Brunton said the idea of
the joint facilities was to give
each country the best chance
of receiving support from one
or several of the four banks.

"It is expected that this
approach will further support
economic growth in the region
by mobilizing IFI (Interna-
tional Financial Institutions)
investment to act as a catalyst
for private sector engagement,
and facilitating national and
sub-regional support and poli-
cy dialogue amongst both pri-
vate and public stakeholders,”
the joint statement said.

Doctors to expand after 28% profit rise

FROM page 1B

Assessing its 2010 results, the
company said net income rose
to $0.49 per share, compared
to $3.814 million or $0.38 per
share in the prior year, largely
due to a $3.05 million or 7.3 per
cent year-over-year increase in
patient service revenues.

This was achieved against a
backdrop of just 12,875 patient
days, the lowest level since
2007, with adult patient days
down by 2.4 per cent year-over-
year - trends that Doctors Hos-
pital expects to continue
through fiscal 2011.

Still, the growth in patient
service revenues outpaced the
5.9 per cent, or $2.3 million,
increase that Doctors Hospital
suffered in its fiscal 2010
expenses.

“As a percentage of total rev-
enues, expenses decreased
slightly from 90.2 per cent in
fiscal 2009 to 89 per cent in fis-
cal 2010,” the company said in
its annual report. It added that
salaries and benefits were held
below its target level of 39 per

cent of patient service revenues,
falling slightly to 38 per cent
compared to 38.8 per cent dur-
ing the 2009 fiscal year.

Salary and benefit expenses
increased slightly over 2009, ris-
ing by $0.8 million or 5 per cent,
something Doctors Hospital
attributed to “increased”
patient activity.

Elsewhere, days revenue in
accounts receivables dropped
from 60 days in fiscal 2009 to
just 33 days last year, corre-
sponding to a 33.7 decrease in
accounts receivables which
occurred largely in the third
party-payor category.

“Bad debt expense as a per-
centage of patient service rev-
enues rose to 4.8 per cent in the
year ended January 31, 2010,
compared to 3.8 per cent the
previous year,” Doctors Hos-
pital said. “This represented an
increase of $0.6 million or 36.1
per cent. The increase is attrib-
utable to one payor with whom
the hospital is working dili-
gently to recover.

“The percentage of receiv-
ables from insurers represents
85 per cent of total receivables

Sheraton
Nassau
BEACH RESORT

compared to 75 per cent last
year. The percentage due from
self-pay patients dropped to 11
per cent from 15 per cent, and
the percentage due from
National Insurance dropped
from 4 per cent to 10 per cent
last year.”

Aided by the impact of the
reduction in fuel prices on the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) prices, Doctors
Hospital saw electricity costs
fall by 22.2 per cent or $0.4 mil-
lion year-over-year in 2010.

Some $5.1 million of the
company’s $6.2 million worth
of cash employed in financing
activities was used to com-
pletely eliminate Doctors Hos-
pital’s debt with Royal Bank of
Canada.

And the BISX-listed health-
care provider added: “Doctors
Hospital Health Systems con-
tinues to pursue the sale of
Western Medical Plaza and to
secure additional tenants in the
interim. There has been an
increase in interest in purchas-
ing one or both of the two
buildings at the Plaza during
recent months.”

The new 70) room Sheraton Cable Beach Resort, Nassau, The Bahamas is looking

for

Banquet Manager

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Fax:341-7378
Email:kool_tech@live.com



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
IMPORTANT NOTICE

NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY

Effectively monitor the daily operations of the Banquet Department, including pro-
viding support and guidance to fellow banquet personnel to ensure a successful and
clfective operation cading in a positive gucsl experience.

ALL PERSONS WHO HAVE COMPLETED HIGH SCHOOL IN THE BAHAMAS
AND WHO HAVE OBTAINED
FIVE (2) BOCSE AT GRADES A, B, ORC

finclusive of Mathematics anid

ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE A NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY TO ATTEND THE
COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.

Fasential Functions

* Review all written communication, 1.¢., resumes, diulyiweekly, Banquet Event
Onders to determine appropriate slaffing levels, room/stalion assignments, buffer
décor and enhancements as they relate lo banquets and meeting room set-ups.

ALL AWARDS WILL COVER TUITION AND LAB FEES AND WILL ONLY BE

* Responsible for maintaiming a strong client relationship and ensuring that all PAYABLE TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

convention specifications are communicated to and executed by all hotel operating

departments. Maintain constant and timely communication with the Convention

; . . ; : TO QUALIFY, PERSONS MUST:
Servien!Catering Sales Manager as it applics to the clicnt at band.

- SUBMIT A COMPLETED APPLICATION FORM (ON OR BEFORE MAY 26, 2070)
- MUST BE BAHAMIAN CITIZEN
. HAVE BGCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND MATHEMATICS AT GRADES
4, B, OR C INCLUDED IN THE FIVE SUBJECTS REQUIRED
- HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED TO THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
INTO AN APPROVED COLLEGE LEVEL PROGRAMME
- PURSUE 4 MINIMUM OF 12 CREDITHOURS PER SEMESTER
MAINTAIN 4 3.0 GPA PER SEMESTER AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

* Responsible for the appropriate and timely ect up of all functions and meetings
While maintaining standards of food, beverage and meeting specifications.

Skills & Abilities

Musi be able to speak, read, write and understand the English Language.
Requires good communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must possess basic computer skills and computational abilvty.
Must have a working knorwledme of types of room set-ups and capacities 1
Telation to type of event, ete.
Must have excellent interpersonal and eales-related akills.
Must have caceptional organizational, supervisory killa.
Must be able to prepare and analyze data and figures, and transcriptions prepared
on and generated by computer.
* Most have exceptional food and beverage knowledge and pricing.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
TERTIARY DEPARTMENT

TEACHERS & SALARIED WORKERS COOPERATIVE CREDIT UNION BUILDING
EAST STREET SOUTH & EAST-WEST HUGH W AY
P.O. BOX N-F013/14
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Tel: 302-2700

Chaali hicalicens fe | LA perience

* High School or equivalent education required, Bachelor's Degree preferred,
* Ome to two years of food and beverage service background and prior hospitality
expenicnce required,

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MAY 28, 2010

Qualified applicants are invited to visit our website or email resumes to:
anbrpobat! sheraten com

Application forms can also be downloaded

Note: All information will be held in strictest of confidence 7
from www.bahamaseducation.com

Deadline for all applicants is June 7, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 7B



aS
‘Never going to be perfect’

FROM page 1B

have to take the necessary steps
to ensure transparency and that
the system is not susceptible to
political pay-offs and corrup-
tion that arise from time to
time.”

The two greatest problems,
Mr D’ Aguilar said, were “the
corruption of persons in the
Government having
[family/personal] relationships
with the [bidding] parties, and
the political relationships,
where the politicians influence
who the Government does
business with.

“Both are equally as bad, and
you’ve got to think of a system
that eliminates both.”

Reforms outlines by consul-
tants Peter Trepte and Jorge
Claro at an April 26-28 confer-
ence in Nassau, in the shape of
regulations, are designed to
comply with the Bahamas’
obligations under the Econom-
ic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) and the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), and
introduce "international best
practices” into the Bahamas.

While the award of many
contracts would still be decen-
tralised, with Procurement
Units and Tenders Committees
much in evidence, the consul-
tants have recommended the
creation of a Public Procure-
ment Department, headed by

INSIGHT

TU gl

TT RT aa:
CS



a Chief Procurement Officer,
which would engage in cen-
tralised procurement for goods
and services used across gov-
ernment departments.

The recommendations also
involve the creation of a Public
Procurement Board, which will
be formed from members
appointed by the private sec-
tor and Ministry of Finance, to
oversee all government pro-
curement.

And, unlike the current
structure, an Independent Pro-
curement Review Tribunal will
be created to "determine all
appeals, matters and disputes"
relating to government con-
tracts that come under its juris-
diction. This will provide a for-
mal avenue of appeal to dis-
gruntled bidders that currently
does not exist.

Mr D’ Aguilar told Tribune
Business that the Government
needed to be wary about
awarding contracts simply
based on lowest price/cost,
adding that it needed to asses
other criteria, such as the win-
ning bidder’s reliability and
ability to deliver the goods and
services promised.

“As with everything, you
have to balance transparency
and the proper garnishing of
bids with the ability of an enti-
ty like the Government to
move forward on a timely
basis,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.
“You're very wary of putting
in another level of bureaucracy
that slows things down.

“There’s many factors that
go into the awarding of bids
other than cost. If you go for
the best cost, you do not neces-
sarily get the best bid. I have
people that provide services for
me at Superwash that are reli-
able. You develop a relation-
ship with someone in govern-

ment, you deliver for them and,
hopefully, deliver for the peo-
ple, but it is not necessarily the
best price.

“At the end of the day, you
want to work with people who
deliver good results. You’ve got
to measure cost against the abil-
ity of the provider to deliver.
That’s the hard thing, and you
will not get it right all the time.
The Government is dealing
with people who give the best
quote, but are unable to deliv-
er.”

Pointing to the problems
experienced with the Govern-
ment’s housing programme,
where numerous homes had to
be repaired due to alleged poor
workmanship, Mr D’ Aguilar
said: “They probably gave
those contracts to the person
with the best price, but they did
not know how to build hous-
es.”

As reported by Tribune Busi-
ness previously, controversy has
often shrouded many Bahami-
an government procurement
processes, with unsuccessful
firms not knowing why they
were not selected. There have
also been allegations and sus-
picions that the award of cer-
tain contracts has been influ-
enced by nepotism, corruption
and political favouritism, all
things that cost the public -
PLPs and FNMs - plus the
Bahamian taxpayer and con-
sumer, money.

The critical role government
procurement plays in national
development is also reason
enough for reform. Given that
public sector contracts account
for a significant percentage of
per annum gross domestic
product (GDP), they are a sig-
nificant tool in encouraging the
growth and development of
Bahamian firms.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Public Relations & Corporate Programs

Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and
implementation of a strategic public relations and communication program together
with the effective and efficient planning and execution of all corporate events and

activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

Assisting with the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate
Programs plan to support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Overseeing the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations
programs, plan and budget;

Assisting with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation
and, where necessary, the wider community;

Preparing and distributing the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directing press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press
releases, photographs, fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management
and Media Representatives;

Coordinating the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion
surveys;

Providing assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in
writing speeches, preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluating and assessing customer complaints, queries and disseminating
information to management;

Assisting with the development, implementation and management of external
communication efforts;

Coordinating marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the
external Public Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifying and liaising with service providers to secure speakers, presenters
and entertainment for Corporate events;

Liaising with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e.
awards, invitations, prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as
necessary and maintaining an inventory of the same;

Preparing and distributing all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices)
relative to Corporate activities, as necessary;

Creating and updating all standard operation procedures for all activities, as
necessary;

Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of
bills for all events and activities as necessary;

Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate
activities;

Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company
newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information
relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business
Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;
Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management
and public groups;
Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills
Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications
Good analytical skills

¢ Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) RATAFIA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 18, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 30th day of June, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquida-
tor of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

MAY 19, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

To advertise, call 502-2371

PUBLIC NOTICE



46k savings in 10 years
from better bus system

FROM page 1B

ciency vehicles through its tar-
iff/fimport duty policies, and
reduce tariffs on mopeds, which
currently stand at 70 per cent.

It was also recommended
that the Government limit the
number of vehicles per resi-
dence to one, where there were
two or fewer licensed drivers,
and to two cars per residence
where there were three or more
licensed drivers.

Drawing on a July 2008 Bud-
get communication, the Foun-
dation’s report said there were
some 111,184 registered motor
vehicles on New Providence in
2002. By 2006, this number had


a J
—

~ RELOCATION OF THE SAN SALVADOR &
NORTH ELEUTHERA LOCAL OFFICES ~

For the information of residents in the affected communities, the
National Insurance Board wishes to advise that effective June 1,
2010, its San Salvador Local Office in San Salvador, and North
Eleuthera Local Office in Lower Bogue, Eleuthera, will be
relocated. The San Salvador office will move from its current
location in the Carter Williams Building, Queens Highway, to “The
Plaza,” which ts situated near the San Salvador Community Clinic,
also on Queens Highway in Cockburn Town. The North Eleuthera
office will move from its current location in the Glen Albury
Building in Lower Bogue, to “Builders Square,” Queens Highway,

Lower Bogue.

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited
East Street South and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Third (33rd)
Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-
operative Credit Union Limited will be held at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, located on Bay Street,
on Saturday, May 22, 2010 commencing at 8:00 a.m.

for the following purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of Directors

of 2009

To receive the Audited Accounts of 2009.

To elect members of the Board of Directors.

To elect members of the Supervisory Committee
To discuss and approve the Budget for 2010.
To take action on such matters as may come

before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary

NB: VISITORS AND CHILDREN ARE WELCOMED,
HOWEVER, THEY WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
THEIR LUNCH AT A COST OF $22.50 PER

PERSON

risen to 156,480, an increase of
29 per cent.

Department of Statistics data
showed that New Providence’s
population in 2002 was esti-
mated at $218,000, and by 2006
stood at 233,000 - a 7 per cent
increase over four years. The
Foundation used this to show
that, in percentage terms, the
rate of growth in vehicles on
New Providence was outpacing
the population four-fold.

“Traffic congestion con-
tributes significantly to the loss
of working hours on the island,
the wear and tear on motor
vehicles, the consumption of
gasoline, the increase in air pol-
lution and the stress and anxi-
ety level of many citizens,” the

report said.

“We must also consider the
current macroeconomic impact
of our current unsustainable
lifestyle where transport is con-
cerned: over-reliance on pri-
vate vehicles guarantees our
small nation’s continued severe
dependence on fossil fuel from
abroad. Year after year, this
deepens our growing trade
imbalance and national debt.”

A 2005 study by Advanced
Logistics Group for the Gov-
ernment had estimated that
some 1,043 hours were spent in
traffic during the morning peak
hour on New Providence, cost-
ing $1.3 million or $9 per hour
of lost work annually.

The Foundation, though,

ATTRACTIVE
BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITY

Established Downtown
Restaurant
is offered for lease on mid
to long term basis. Excellent
income potential. Only serious
enquires will be entertained.
All basic equipment already in
place and fully functional.

Please Call
557-8721 or 466-2190
to arrange a meeting.

queried this estimate, arguing
that it did not account for lunch
time traffic, the 3pm school
pick-up and 5pm traffic.


















The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TST

For the stories
WA UT
a aT
Insight on
Mondays

Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd

Subsidiary of

BNXIILE

Ga Prinere ioe icy
Vacancy for an:

Investment Advisor

Responsibilities:

The general responsibility of the Investment Advisor is to provide an 1n-
house service to Senior Management, the Investment Committee and

Relationship Managers.

Duties include, but are not limited to the following:

* Work closely with the Investment Committee to develop effective
business models and improve the productivity of existing models

¢ Provide support to various project development and management
initiatives within the group

¢ Management of discretionary private client portfolios

* Research, develop and implement strategies for new products (all

asset classes)

* Guide and assist staff in the training of Bank’s products
¢ Provide advisory services to sophisticated clientele

Required skills and competences:

¢ Main expertise should be in U.S. markets

¢ Sound knowledge of LatAm markets also a plus

¢ A university graduate, in business, finance, economics,
accounting or sales and marketing

¢ At least 7 years experience working in Private Wealth Management

¢ Thorough understanding of financial markets, instruments,

operations

¢ Good oral and written communication skills

¢ Excellence in risk management, finance, marketing and business

acumen skills

¢ Knowledge of French and Spanish a plus

Interested persons should apply in writing to:

The Chief Operations Officer
P.O. Box AP 59241

Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: robert.mullings@pasche.ch

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 9B



Insurer targets ‘niche markets’

FROM page 1B

while to build it up through and
advertising campaign, but it’s
being increasingly called out
and provides a very valuable
service on the spot. It’s being
used more and more frequent-
ly.”

The 24-hour claims service
provides RoyalStar clients with
an instant response, in the event
of a car accident, house fire or
some other incident for which
they are insured.

Elsewhere, Mr Watson told




Tribune Business that the gen-
eral insurer was focused on
developing “affinity products
for targeted groups and target-
ed types of risk”.

While not disclosing the pre-
cise targets, the RoyalStar man-
aging director said: “We’ve
identified niche risks and are
marketing to niche categories.”

RoyalStar’s move comes
after a 2009 in which its profits
rose by 53 per cent or more
than $2.3 million to $6.816 mil-
lion, as the carrier shrugged off
a 12 per cent reduction in its
top-line gross written premium

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DANIELA JOSEPH of WULFF
ROADS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 20â„¢ DAY OF MAY, 2010 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-



7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

KINGSWAY ACADEMY

ELEMENTARY
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS

Kingsway Academy Elementary will

hold

Entrance Examinations for all elementary
grade levels:- K4 to Grade 6 from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon on Saturday, May 29, 2010. Parents

are asked to collect application forms from

the Elementary Desk in the Administration

building between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. daily,

before the testing date. Application forms may

also be accessed from the school’s website

www.kingswayacademy.com (see Document

Downloads).



For further information, kindly contact the school at

telephone numbers:- 324 - 5049 or 324 - 2158

thanks to a 42 per cent fall in
net claims to just $4.386 mil-
lion.

Writing in the company’s
annual report, Mr Watson said:
“The most notable features of
our 2009 results were the 12 per
cent reduction in gross written
premium to $64.573 million,
and two large marine losses
involving the sinking of a fish-
ing vessel and the sinking of a
large motor yacht.

“Other than those two inci-
dents, large loss activity was
well below the long-term aver-
age. The lack of hurricane activ-
ity and the low large loss activ-
ity allowed us to produce a very

good combined operating ratio
of 63.1 per cent, which trans-
lates to an underwriting profit
of $5.716 million. Added to this
is investment income of $1.099
million, producing a total prof-
it of $6.816 million, which is a
21 per cent return on equity.”

Mr Watson described the
investment income as the
“cing on the cake’ as opposed
to the cake itself”, reiterating
his stance that RoyalStar and
all other insurance carriers
needed to concentrate on pro-
ducing an underwriting profit
as the priority.

Although the ‘bottom’ had
reached in terms of the global

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

NOTICE

Audited Consolidated
Financial Statements

The Board of Directors of
Doctors Hospital Health

System Limited advises the

shareholders and the public
that the Company’s Audited

Consolidated Financial

Statements for the year ended
January 31, 2010 are available

on the Company’s website

www.doctorshosp.com

ce DOCTORS HOSPITAL

For the stories behind
TMU EM MEST e
UT ES

THE INSURANCE COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Analyst

The newly formed Insurance Commission (a statutory corporation) 1s seeking analysts
to assist with the on-site and off-site examination of insurance companies and

intermediaries.

Responsibilities

* Reports to the Chief Analyst/Superintendent
* Responsible for the supervision of other analysts /directly responsible for
the examination of licensees to ensure that licensees are compliant with

prudential requirements through on-site and off-site examinations

* Prepare/vet the preparation of examination reports

* Prepare/vet/approve on-site/off-site financial analysis, letters and other
correspondence as necessary

* Ensure that licensees databases are maintained

¢ Supervision of other analysts/directly responsible for the assessment of new
applications for licensees

* Contributes to the refining of supervisory methodology, policy development
and the formulation of new/revised legislation and the related guidelines

* Provide advice and information to licensees and the wider public regarding
complaints and questions about licensees’ performance

Quailifications/Skills

* Professional Accountant / MBA in accounting /Certification in Insurance/
experience in the insurance industry

¢ Financial analysis skills

* Excellent leadership, communications, teamwork and organization skills

* Proficient in Microsoft office products to intermediate level

* Ability to work independently and multi-task

¢ Excellent written and oral communications skills

* Knowledge of insurance industry an asset

Compensation

A competitive compensation package commensurate with relevant experience and

qualifications.

Deadline
31s May 2010

Application including comprehensive resume to be submitted by e-mail addresses to:

info@icb.gov.bs



recession and its impact on the
Bahamas, Mr Watson added:
“Clearly, however, a huge
amount of economic damage
has been done, particularly in
the area of unemployment,
which continues to be a large
problem, especially for the
Bahamas, and this has been one
of the reasons for our reduced
gross written premium.”

This was emphasised by Roy-
alStar’s chairman, Franklyn
Wilson, who told shareholders
that “there is no doubt that
2010 will be a very difficult
year, and whilst there is a sense
of economic stability, growth is
likely to be very modest”.

He added: “The macroeco-
nomic environment in which
Bahamian businesses operated
last year has been extremely
challenging indeed, and as
would be expected, the perfor-
mance of the many different
Bahamian businesses has been
mixed.

“As with most businesses,
RoyalStar suffered from a loss
of business, with gross written
premiums reducing by 12 per
cent, which is more than we had
expected.”

Still, RoyalStar’s equity had
increased to $35.178 million,
while its solvency margin was at
a “very healthy 253 per cent”.

Requirements:

preferred.

holidays.

rm lovin’ if
Employment
Opportunity

Restaurant Managers Needed
for leading Fast Food Franchise

¢ Must be a High School Graduate
¢ Must have Management experience
¢ Restaurant Management experience is

e Must have strong leadership skills

e Must be customer service driven

¢ Must be results-oriented & articulate

¢ Must have excellent inter-personal skills
¢ Must have excellent oral & written
Communications skills

¢ Professionalism required

Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Please submit Resume to:
Human Resources Department
McDonald’s Head Office
on Market St. North
P.O.Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444

Nassau, The Bahamas
BERR RRR Ree ee eee

Public Notice

Gaming Board For
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries and Gaming Act
Chapter 387, notice is hereby given that Treasure Bay
(G.B.I.) Limited a Company incorporated under the laws
of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has in accordance
with the provisions of Section 34(2) of the said Act, made
application to the Secretary of the Gaming Board of The
Bahamas for a licence to manage the casino premises
located at Our Lucaya Beach Resort, Freeport,Grand
Bahama, one of the islands of The Commonwealth of The

Bahamas.

Notice is also given that any person who desires to object
to the grant of the licence shall send to the Secretary of the
Gaming Board for The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New Providence, The Bahamas
or deliver to the Office situated in the Renaissance Building,
West Bay Street on or before noon on Monday, May 31st,
2010, two (2) copies of a brief statement in writing of the
grounds of the objection.

Signed:

Dennis W. Martin

Secretary
Gaming Board

For The Commonwealth

of The Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 11B



Selecting the program for you

FROM page 2B

It can create any layout from a
brochure to an entire book, and
can be used to define page size,
margins, typeface, text flow and
page numbering.

Types of Output: Books,
magazines, brochures, CD cov-
ers, manuals and menus.

Adobe InDesign: This is a
layout program, and again
works well with other Adobe
products. This Adobe graphic
design software suite (Photo-
shop, Illustrator, InDesign, and
Acrobat) is called Adobe Cre-
ative Suite.

Types of Output: Books,
magazines, brochures, CD cov-
ers and manuals.

Paint Shop Pro Photo X3

While Paint Shop can't
match Photoshop, it wins points
in user-friendliness. Paint Shop
has always been an easy pro-
gram to master, and offers the
features for red-eye reduction,
color correction, filters, special
effects and advanced editing
tools.

Adobe After Effects 7.0:
After Effects is the most
advanced and visually impres-
sive effects tool on the market.
Used for television and movie
production, After Effects pro-
vides some of the best 2D and
3D features for both title/text
animation and composition,
made possible through this ver-
satile piece of software.

Corel Draw: I would be
remiss not to give a big nod to
Corel Draw, which is a part of
the CorelDRAW Graphics
Suite. This has a long history
of being one of the most popu-
lar vector drawing applications
around. It also has the ability to
design for print, web or other
media. This software has
proven to be my favourite
graphic software and is defi-
nitely a keeper.

An honorable mention to
Macromedia Flash Profession-
al CS3, which has been one of
the most innovative technolo-

gies on the web and more wide-
ly deployed than ever. Flash is
more than a vector graphics-
based multimedia tool, proving
itself a kicker for generating
animation effects as well.
Microsoft Publisher provides
more control over document
elements than Microsoft Word.
It is considered to have many of
the advanced features of its
competitors, and is part of the
Microsoft Office package.

Macromedia Freehand is a
drawing application that can be
used to handle minor desk top
publishing projects. Advanced
features include live effects,
flash integration and 3d effects.
Macromedia Freehand is a vec-
tor-based drawing program as
well.

To this end technology is
growing, and more quality
graphic software is being man-
ufactured daily, giving designers
the liberty of using not only one
version of software but options
that are available for novices
as well as the most-skilled.

The mentioned programs are
considered industry-standard.
However, they are not the only
choices available.

Always choose programs
with the necessary bells and
whistles that are appropriate
for your skill level. This way
you do not have to waste funds
on getting advanced editing
tools you cannot use. Fortu-
nately, as you advance, you can
upgrade your software to an
intermediate or professional
level. I hope this article has
helped you understand the dif-
ferent types of graphics soft-
ware. Remember: There is no
single best graphic design soft-
ware program, but there are
specific programs better suited
for certain tasks. So until we
meet again, play a little, have
fun and stay on top of your
game!

NB: The author can be con-
tacted at deedee2111@hot-
mail.com

pay less for insuring your car!

Have you heard the good news?
You CAN save money!

Ask NIBA for a motor insurance quote! Not only do you pay
less with NIBA, you receive cover that's hard to beat and

a claims service that doesn't keep you waiting!

It's time to pay less for insuring your
car!

Tel.677-6422 or visit
www.nibaquote.com

NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS CO. LTD.
Atntit House, 2nd Terrace & Calling Avenue
PC. Box h-

7764 Nassau Tel. 6f7-422 wenanibaquote.com

To advertise in The Tribune - the No. 1 newspaper
in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!


















































































INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
i (BAHAMAS) LIMITED LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS BROKERS & AGENTS
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

A

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THURSDAY, MAY

PAGE 13 & 14¢ International sports news





a)

No time to
waste: Celtics

See page 14

Imary-schoolers hit the track

Young athletes across
Bahamas take part in
29th National Primary
School Track & Field
Championships










=_

ance

= Photos by ayn Clarke/Tribune ee









MORE than 2,000 primary
school students from a number
of institutions throughout Nas-
sau and the Family Islands yes-
terday geared up for the start of
the 29th annual National Pri-
mary School Track & Field
Championships.

Shown here are some of the
highlights of the three-day
event, the “largest ever” of its
kind, at the Thomas A Robin-
son stadium.

The meet’s overall champi-
on will be crowned when it
wraps up Friday...



THE ALL NEW KIA SPORTAGE

- r =
The Powser fo Sovprise

The 2009 Kia Sportage gets slightly freshened styling. This compact SUV is a
crassover that is perfect for the Bahamas. Maximum towing capacity is 1500 |b
with the 4-cylinder Available safety features include ABS, traction control,
antiskid system, front side airbags, and curtain side airbags. Am EX Luxury
Package adds leather upholstery.

[oH THE SPOT PIAA RE AT
(Ol ial Bel DE HA BB

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
f1BS Wulf Rood Theatiesen eel + Cidksri Field
Ph Beam Hist LA) dE R15

RELIANCE JALAL ITH
1 (2a) ee fe ee i DtprehoonalLoon

ATM A TUGE INGLA AE
BATEER E- AUG ERIS LTT.



















(e) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit ar website af ww. coded is

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ALUMNI MAGAZINE PRINT PRODUCTION

The College of The Bahamas is accepting proposals for the print production of
The College of The Bahamas Alumai Magazine. Through a high quality graph-
ic format, the alumni magazine provides key information about The College, its
#raduates, students, researchers, friends and supporters and has become a piv-
otal publication for The College in the last two-and-a-half years,

‘The look, feel and general format for the magazine ts consistent from Issue to
issue with variations to suit the level and detail of the content of each issue.

Proposals: Vendors should deliver one (1) original and five (5) copies which are
clearly marked as such and must contain one original signature to the following
address:

Attn: Ms. Gabriella Fraser

Associate Vice President, External Affairs
The College of The Bahamas

PO Box § 4912

Oakes Field Canipus

Nassau, The Bahamas

Proposal Submission Deadline: 50pm. EST FRIDAY June 25, 2010

This submission shall include the entire Request for Proposal (RFP) document,
requested attachments, and any amendments if issued. The proposal must con-
tain the signature of a duly authorized officer or agent of the company submit-
ting the proposal. Proposals received after 5:00 p.m. EST, Friday June 25, 2010,
will not be considered and will be returned unopened.

The College of The Bahamas reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
responses to this RFP.

Procedural questions may be directed to Ms. Paulette Longley, Office of
External Affairs, at (242) 302-4304. Technical questions may be directed to Ms.
Machynn Seymour-Major, Office of Communicatio.n at (242) 302-4353,

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THE TRIBUNE

disappoints
Afridi

By RIZWAN ALI
AP Sports Writer

ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pak-
istan ended up going further
than expected at the World
Twenty20, but captain Shahid
Afridi said losing in the semifi-
nals to Australia still stung.

Pakistan went to the
Caribbean defending its Twen-
ty20 title in its first tournament
since seven players, including
Afridi, were sanctioned in
March for a disastrous tour of
Australia.

Four players were banned
from the team for varying peri-
ods while only fines were given
to three — Afridi and the
Akmal brothers, who all made
the World Twenty20 team.

Pakistan lost a group match
to Australia then lost consecu-
tive matches against England
and New Zealand in the Super
Eight stage before beating
South Africa to scrape into the
semifinals on better run-rate.

Afridi, on arriving home
from the Caribbean in the
southern port city of Karachi
on Wednesday, said he was not
expecting the team to make it
that far after the two defeats in
the Super Eights.

“T was not expecting that we
will perform so good against
South Africa and Australia
especially after we dropped too
many catches against England
and lost narrowly (by one run)
to New Zealand,” he said.

“So I think overall I am quite
satisfied with the team”’s per-
formance and importantly we
played as a unit.”

Afridi said losing the thrilling
semi to Australia stung far
more than if they’d lost the final
of the World Twenty20.

Australia came from
nowhere to reach a 192-run tar-
get at St Lucia last Friday.
Michael Hussey hit three sixes
and a four in the last over off
spinner Saeed Ajmal to engi-
neer Australia’s great escape.

“Had I won that match
(against Australia) and lost the
final I would not have been dis-
appointed,” Afridi said .

Pakistan conceded 53 runs
off the last 16 balls.

By JOE KAY
AP Sports Writer

CINCINNATI (AP) —
Adam “Pacman” Jones didn’t
even try to put a positive spin
on his year away from football.

The cornerback who entered
the NFL with such promise in
2005 spent all last season try-
ing to get back into the game,
looking for someone — anyone
—who would give him another
chance. For a while, it looked
like that chance might not
come.

“It was miserable,” he said.



ADAM JONES (AP)

Miserable enough to make
him learn anything?

The 26-year-old Jones said
Wednesday that he has
changed his lifestyle and
reordered his priorities in the
past year, the result of much
soul-searching while he was
outside the NFL. The Cincin-
nati Bengals gave him a two-
year deal that represents what
could be his final chance to
prove it.

During his first interview ses-
sion in town Wednesday, Jones
told reporters that he no longer
hangs around with the same

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010, PAGE 13

Semitinal loss ‘Pacman’ Jones says he'll

show he has changed

people who helped him get into
trouble after he was Ten-
nessee’s first-round pick in
2005. He recognized that a lot
of things had to change.

“Of course, you change as
you grow,” Jones said. “Like I
said, it ain’t overnight. ’'m 26
years old now, so I can’t do the
same things I was doing at 21,
or I’m going to be dead or in
jail.

“T know what my passion is,
and my passion is football. I
know what I’ve got to do to
keep playing football, and that’s
what I’m working on doing.”







Y i

Klitschko to
defend title







VITALI KLITSCHKO trains during a media workout session in Going, Austria. WBC Heavyweight Champion Vitali Klitschko is set to
defend his title against Albert Sosnowski of Poland in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on May 29...



(AP Photo)



ST LOUIS (AP) — Hanley
Ramirez is back in the Florida
Marlins’ lineup, after a pre-
game talk with manager Fredi
Gonzalez to clear the air.

The reigning NL batting
champion was benched Tues-
day after taking shots at his
manager and teammates a day

Ramirez back in Marlins’ lineup

after getting yanked from a
game for not hustling.

Gonzalez and Ramirez chat-
ted for five or 10 minutes in
the manager’s office, with the

door open and Ramirez stand-
ing, several hours before Mar-
lins played the St Louis Cardi-
nals.

Gonzalez had two lineup

cards ready in case the talk did-
n’t go well but Ramirez was
back in the third slot.

Gonzalez said Ramirez
planned to apologize to team-
mates.

A team spokesman said
Ramirez did not plan to talk
to the media.

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England’s
top trio
chasing

Woods in

rankings

By GRAHAM OTWAY
Associated Press Writer

WENTWORTH, England
(AP) — England’s players in
the top eight have their eye
on the No. 1 ranking while
Tiger Woods is sidelined with
a sore neck and bruised repu-
tation.

Lee Westwood, Ian Poulter
and Paul Casey spoke of their
ambitions Wednesday, a day
before the start of the BMW
PGA Championship at Went-
worth.

Phil Mickelson, back at No.
2 after his victory at the Mas-
ters in April, is the biggest
threat to Woods’ 258-week
reign atop the rankings.

Westwood, at No. 3 for the
first time in his 16-year career,
knows a win this weekend will
keep him in the hunt.

“For me, the No. 2 and No.
1 positions are more achiev-
able now than they have been
in the last few years,” West-
wood said. “Tiger’s perfor-
mance, schedule and things
like that are unpredictable at
the moment.

“Phil is obviously a world-
class player and has already
won a major this year, but you
know his performances are
very much up and down. And
the world rankings are all
about consistency.”

Consistency has become the
cornerstone of Westwood’s
game during the past year in
which he landed atop
Europe's first Race to Dubai
money list. In recent weeks on
the US tour, he’s finished sec-
ond at the Masters and led the
Players Championship going
into the final round.

The sixth-ranked Poulter,
who moved into the top 10 for
the first time after winning the
Accenture World Matchplay
at Dove Mountain in Febru-
ary, believes it is not just a
two-man race to claim
Woods’ crown.

CROSS OVER INTO LUXURY
EDGE 2010

Drive one.



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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Maradona
Vhs wee
man squad

for World
Cup

By STEPHEN WADE
AP Sports Writer



BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina (AP) — Argenti-
na coach Diego Maradona
named his final 23-man
squad for the World Cup on
Wednesday, which includes
Lionel Messi of Barcelona,
Carlos Tevez of Manches-
ter City and most of the
country’s other big stars.

The big surprise was the
inclusion of defender Ariel
Garce, who played his first
international match for
Argentina earlier this
month against Haiti.

The list released on
Wednesday includes
tremendous power up front,
led by Messi, Carlos Tevez
and Gonzalo Higuain.

Argentina faces Canada
on Monday at River Plate’s
stadium in Buenos Aires, in
what is expected to be its
last warm-up before the
World Cup. The 1978 and
‘86 champion opens on June
12 in South Africa against
Nigeria and also faces
Greece and South Korea in
Group B.

Argentine officials con-
firmed for the first time that
the team will depart for
South Africa on May 28.

Maradona, who present-
ed a provisional 30-man
squad last week, selected a
group that includes three
goalkeepers, seven defend-
ers, seven at midfield and
six forwards.

Maradona will have as
many weapons as any coach
in the World Cup.





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No time to waste: Celtics
take 2-0 lead on Magic

By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
The Boston Celtics could have
used a break during parts of the
season with all their injuries.
Now the last thing they want is
time off.

Showing no signs of age, the
revived Celtics took a com-
manding lead in the Eastern
Conference finals with a 95-92
victory over the Orlando Mag-
icin Game 2 on Tuesday night.

Paul Pierce scored 28 points,
and Rajon Rondo had 25 as
Boston bullied and bruised its
way to a 2-0 series lead on the
road against a Magic team that
had won 14 straight until this
series.

Now they'll have to wait until
Saturday for Game 3 in Boston.

"I wish we could take them
to Alcatraz for four days and
be on the island all by our-
selves," Celtics coach Doc
Rivers said about his team.
"That's not going to happen.
Going home, it's great in some
ways. In a lot of ways, but in
other ways, it's tough. Every-
where they go, they're going to
hear how great they are.

"We haven't done anything
— you need four wins; we have
two."

After being hampered by
injuries for much of the season,
often looking slow and worn
down, the Celtics are just two
wins away from their second
NBA finals appearance in three
seasons.

Age doesn't seem to matter
these days for Boston's veter-
ans.

Rasheed Wallace (35), Kevin
Garnett (34), Ray Allen (34)
and Pierce (32) are back to
their winning ways. The Celtics

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have won five straight for the
first time since they rolled off
11 in a row before Christmas.

"I think we are becoming the
team that started the season,"
Rivers said. "The team that
started the season was pretty
good."

Maybe even good enough to
take down the defending con-
ference champion Magic.

Dwight Howard had 30
points, and Vince Carter and
J.J. Redick scored 16 apiece for
the Magic, who overcame an
11-point deficit to take a brief

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(AP Photo)

lead in the fourth quarter. But
they couldn't hold it.

Jameer Nelson's desperation
3-point attempt was an airball
at the buzzer, sending fans to
the exits in silence.

"I won't stop believing,”
Howard said. "And I won't let
my teammates stop believing.”

Two years removed from
their 17th NBA championship,
the Celtics, once thought too
old to contend for another title,
have found their footing again.
After ousting LeBron James
and the Cleveland Cavaliers,
the team with the league's best
record, Boston is showing no
signs of stopping.

Bryans win
as US tops
Spain at
World
Team Cup

DUESSELDORF, Germany
(AP) — Bob and Mike Bryan
gave the United States a 2-1
win over Spain on Wednesday
by winning the decisive dou-
bles match at the World Team
Cup.

It was the Americans’ sec-
ond straight group stage victo-
ry, and they will play the Czech
Republic for a spot in Satur-
day's final.

After the teams split the sin-
gles matches Tuesday, the
Bryan twins beat Daniel
Gimeno-Lopez and Marc
Lopez 6-3, 7-5 to end Spain’s
hopes of reaching the final.

Also in the Red Group, the
Czechs beat Australia 2-1 after
Tomas Berdych clinched the
series with a 6-3, 7-6 (4) win
over Carsten Ball.

Berdych had expected to face
Lleyton Hewitt, but the former
No. 1 withdrew because of a
stomach problem. Berdych
struggled against Ball and had
to save eight of the nine break
points he faced before closing
out the match with an ace.

“You are just preparing all
day to play Lleyton Hewitt, you
get some tactics or whatever,
strategy, and then just change it
in the last moment,” Berdych
said. “So, it was a quite tough
one. He was playing well.”

In the Blue Group, France
beat Serbia 2-1 and will play
Argentina for a spot in the
final. The Argentines overcame
Germany by the same score,
despite trailing 1-0 after Tues-
day’s opening singles match.

Eduardo Schwank evened
the series by beating Germany's
Andreas Beck 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-3,
before Juan Monaco and Hora-
cio Zeballos teamed to beat
Christopher Kas and Philipp
Kohlschreiber 6-2, 6-3 in the
doubles.

Jeremy Chardy and Nicolas
Mahut won the decisive dou-
bles match for France by over-
coming Viktor Troicki and
Nenad Zimonjic 7-6 (4), 6-2.

The final round-robin match-
es will be played over two days,
with the winner of each group
advancing to the final.

Defending champ Del Potro
expects to miss US Open

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — Defending champion
Juan Martin del Potro says he expects to miss the US Open
because of recent surgery on his right wrist.

He said Wednesday he might return to the ATP Tour after the
last of the four Grand Slam tournaments. The US Open begins on
August 30. He also will miss the French Open, Wimbledon and
Argentina’s Davis Cup quarterfinal against Russia on July 9-11.

Del Potro has not played since a fourth-round loss at the Aus-
tralian Open. He said he will wear a protective bandage for several

more weeks and need months to regain strength and flexibility.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Thirtieth (30th)

Annual General

Meeting of THE PUBLIC

WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION

LIMITED,

will be held at the British Colonial

Hilton Hotel, Bay Street, on Friday, May 21,
2010, commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

purposes:

* To receive the report of The Board of

Directors.

* To receive the Audited Report for 2009

* To elect members of The Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee and Credit Committee

* To discuss and approve the budget for 2011

All eligible members, wishing to run for a
position on the Board of Directors, Supervisory
Committee or Credit Committee, are asked to
submit their names to the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4p.m.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!