Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

Pim blowin’ it

HIGH 87F
LOW 78F

SUN AND
“yy FSTORM

Volume: 106 No.146

FEATURES

SEN Me LOu sy es | Me

Haitians to he evicted



Landowner moves
to reclaim Marsh
Harbour property

T= om A



Pn

BEING EVICTED: Pigeon ar Poco

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



HUNDREDS of Haitian families living in
Marsh Harbour’s Pigeon Pea settlement will
be evicted from their homes as the landown-
er moves to reclaim his property.

Anger over the illegal settlement of around
1,500 residents bordering The Mud, where
an estimated 2,000 more migrants live on gov-
ernment land, has reached boiling point in
Abaco, locals say.

And landowner Ricky Albury started to
serve eviction notices to residents last night
after securing the deeds to generational prop-
erty left to the heirs of Nathan Key.

A previous attempt to evict the hundreds of
residents living on his land without permission
fell flat ten years ago when the matter was not
pursued, but Mr Albury is now confident the
residents will have to vacate his property with-
in six months or be taken to court.

He served eviction notices to residents last
night with the help of a police officer and
Marsh Harbour and Spring City Township
chairman Roscoe Thompson III, and will con-
tinue to serve notices as the community cele-
brates Haitian Flag Day today.

It is anticipated the move will drive evicted
Pigeon Pea residents into The Mud, and Mr

SEE page 11

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SUSA TODAY.
BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com







made @ | CARS FOR SALE,



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Chureh
lreakaway
linked to gay
controversy

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





A LEADER in the
Presbyterian kirks of
The Bahamas has
announced the official
abandonment their
“mother church”, the
Church of Scotland, to
align with an evangelli-
cal church in the US.

The move has been
connected to the world-
wide tensions in the
church over the issue of
the ordination of gay
ministers.

Reverend Scott Kirk-























s land of the (Freeport)
a Lucaya Presbyterian
: S Church yesterday con-
â„¢ "ee = firmed that he and elder
a \ = Captain Dugie McNab
rs ' i £ will represent the con-
J P cn P| ah * es &
‘fae * -_ | La = SEE page 11
, 4 . A ¥ \ I 1 iz
CHARGED: Kooban Bar, 26 CHARGED: Merritt Forbes, 26 Mavnar d-Gib son
By NATARIO McKENZIE when he became the victim of a drive-by shooting. Forbes, y
Tribune Staff Reporter alias “Mole”, of Pinewood Gardens, and Barr, of Sir Lynden * oe
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net Pindling Estates, were arraigned before Chief Magistrate confirms decision
Roger Gomez, in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday. They :
TWO men were arraigned in court yesterday charged were not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. not to run again
with the murder of a teenage boy who was gunned down in The two are also accused of conspiring to murder young
broad daylight. Miller. They were not required to enter a plea. By ALISON LOWE
Police have charged Merritt Forbes, 26, and Kooban Last week, Seriozha McKenzie, 31, of Miller's Heights, Tribune Staff Reporter
Barr, also 26, with the murder of Berkley Theophilus Miller. was arraigned in connection with Miller’s murder. alowe@tribunemedia.net

Miller, 17, of Stapeldon Gardens, was walking on Regent
Street, in Miller's Heights, at about 6pm on Friday, May 7, SEE page 11 IN the wake
of Allyson

Maynard-Gib-

Oil spillage concern mounts =":











again in
By ALISON LOWE aa Pinewood in
Tribune Staff Reporter il oe enae’t Pus the next gen-
alowe@tribunemedia.net ae — eral election,
laisnicaipgl ual Allyson
- attire operate | = PLP leader saynard-Gibson
IN what could be the realisation of a worst-case a 7 mee Perry Christie
scenario for The Bahamas, several scientists are say- | &, tha oak Minp 1T says his party
ing that oil from the Gulf spill has now entered the Pi ge pe is having difficulty “balancing
“loop current” that could bring it flowing into Bahami- = mn the old with the new” as it
an waters. fin monet moves to pin down its slate of
Marine researchers from the University of South | Lug8 «+ a for the election bat-
Florida’s College of Marine Science say a computer | ~*~ €.
ia re oh model based on weather, ocean current and oil spill ma ; ee ~ amie a
3 -TOP ad | G PIZZA data from the US Navy and National Oceanic Admin- | a. ag 7 ie ed -
= : _ istration shows the oil has now entered the current. | Joss cus = te Oe yee Sey
rr ¥, v — —_ — am that she has declined a nomi-

INA





SEE page twelve MAP shows forecasted location for oil for SEE page 11
Monday amid growing fears for the Bahamas.

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SSAU AND BAHAMAISUCANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Miller's injuries ‘could have been
Caused hy more than one weapon

MORE than one weapon
could have been used in the
attack on murder victim
Mario Miller, a forensic
pathologist testified yester-
day. Dr Govinda Raju was
back on the witness stand as
the retrial into the June 2002,
murder continued in the
Supreme Court.

Mario Miller, 28, was
found dead with multiple
stab and chop wounds on
various parts of his body in
bushes near the Super Value
food store in Winton on Sat-
urday, June 22, 2008.

Brothers Ricardo Miller,
alias “Tamar Lee”, and Ryan
Miller, alias “Manny”, are
charged with Mario's mur-
der. Both men are on bail.

Dr Raju told the court
that the 18 injuries sustained
by murder victim Mario
Miller could have been
caused by more than one
weapon.

He said a sharp object,
possibly a knife, could have
been used to cause Mario’s
injuries.

The doctor also noted that
there were no injuries to
Mario’s lower extremities
and that there were defen-
sive injuries on Miller’s right
palm, outer right forearm
and the back of his left hand.

During cross-examination
by attorney Dorsey McPhee,
who is representing Ricardo
Miller, Dr Raju said the
injuries could have been
caused by one knife but
added that it was unlikely.

Daryl Bartlett, a pilot and
friend of the victim, said that
on Saturday, June 22, 2002,
he received a box for Mario.
He did not know who it
came from, and did not
know the person who deliv-
ered it between 7 and 8am.

He said that he spoke to
Mario over the phone twice
that morning and saw him
around 10am, at which time
he gave Mario the box.

The witness said the pair
then arranged to meet later




FAMILY GUARDIAN

in the day. He said he called
Mario later that afternoon,
but was unable to reach him.

Under cross-examination
by attorney Richard Bootle,
who represents Ryan Miller,
Bartlett admitted that he had
been arrested and ques-
tioned about Mario’s death,
but said he was not charged
with anything.

Barry Pinder, a self
employed heavy duty truck
and tractor operator, also
took the witness stand.

He told the court that he
was doing work in the
Yamacraw Beach Estates
area on morning of June 22,
2002, and at around 7.30am,
dropped off some employ-
ees to a site and gave them
instructions.

Mr Pinder said he then
went to the beach to relax
and train his dog.

He said that around 10 or
llam, he saw a green and
gold jeep drive past him and
15 minutes later, what
appeared to be a white Sen-
tra heading in the same
direction. He said the driver
tooted the car’s horn.

The witness said that
about an half hour later, he
saw the Sentra come back
but not the jeep.

He said that he took a dri-
ve up the beach and saw the
jeep in the middle of a cause-
way with its left door open.

Mr Pinder said he
assumed lovers were in the
car and did not want to dis-
turb them, so he went back
the way he came.

The trial resumes today
before Senior Justice Jon
Isaacs.

The first trial ended four
weeks after it began in Janu-
ary, 2006, when the court
learned that a juror sitting
on the case was closely con-
nected to a relative of the
accused. The second trial was
declared a mistrial on Octo-
ber 7, 2008, when the jury
failed to reach a unanimous
verdict.

$10 million worth of
marijuana plants seized

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net





FREEPORT- The discovery of sever-
al marijuana fields in East Grand
Bahama on Sunday resulted in the
seizure of 10,000 plants with an estimat-
ed street value of $10 million.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey, police press
liaison officer, reported that three men
were taken into custody and are assisting
police with their investigations.

According to reports, at around
6.45am, a team of officers from the Drug
Enforcement Unit (DEU) were search-
ing a bushy area off Perimeter Parkway
when they came upon three men in a
red Daewoo. The men sped off when
they saw the officers, ASP Mackey said.

A chase followed and police were able
to bring the car to a stop. They arrested
the occupants — a 30-year-old man and

two 31-year-old men.

Searching the car, the officers found
two large buckets filled with marijuana,
some marijuana seeds mixed with soil
and two bottles of drinking water.

Detectives searched the immediate
area and found several fields containing

10,000 plants in total.

“The plants, which range in height
from one foot to six feet, have a total
street value of some $10 million,” ASP

Mackey said.





Bahama on Sunday.

DEU officers are seen cutting and removing marijuana plants discovered in East Grand



Government approves redevelopment of Centreville House

By ALESHA CADET

GOVERNMENT has offi-
cially given its approval for the
redevelopment of Centreville
House as the National Museum
of the Bahamas.

Making the announcement
yesterday at the Antiquities,
Monuments and Museums Cor-
poration (AMMC) office, Min-

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announcing that we are pro-
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year-old Collins Mansion.”
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GOVERNMENT has officially given its approval for the ssleebonehto of
Centreville House as the National Museum of the Bahamas.

tions, cultural activities and edu-
cational exhibits. It is our goal
to transform Centreville House
into one of the premier educa-
tional and touristic attractions
in the nation.”

The decision, together with
the selection and restoration of
Villa Doyle as the National Art
Gallery, shows the strong com-
mitment of the government to
the promotion of cultural edu-
cation and awareness, Mr May-
nard said.

He said the transformation of
Centreville House on Shirley
Street into a national museum
is something the AMMC, and
indeed the entire cultural com-
munity, has been anticipating for
some time.

However, he said that the
restoration will have to proceed
in small steps “because it is not
an inexpensive or an easy task.”

To date, the priority has been
to stabilise the building’s struc-
ture, remove non-original parti-
tions and infrastructure, and
landscape the grounds.

The next stage of the devel-
opment will be the full restora-
tion of the 35,000 square foot
mansion itself.

“It is essential to make the
building waterproof, a $405,411

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contract will be signed today
with Osprey Developers to
repair the gutters, parapets,
dormers and roof tiles. The
entire roof will be pressure
cleaned and a thermoflex water-
proof coating applied,” Mr May-
nard said.

“Despite financial constraints,
funds have been assigned to
kick-start the redevelopment
process, because it is vital to
secure the building and prevent
further deterioration. But this is
only the initial phase.”

Thomas Whitehead, vice-pres-
ident of Osprey Developers, said
the restoration of the museum
is a 12 to 16-week project.

The next phase will be the
restoration of the remainder of
the structure to include all the
floors from the basement to the
attic; external plaster and tex-
tured stucco to the main
entrance; external terrace walls
and dormers. This phase is esti-
mated to cost $1.6 million.

The final phase will be the
interior restoration and outtfit-
ting of the National Museum of
the Bahamas.

Mr Maynard said that the
AMMC is working with a num-
ber of entities, including the His-
toric Bahamas Foundation to
raise the necessary funds to com-
plete this “costly, yet very worth-
while project.”

“TI would invite the general
public to help us in this national
enterprise,” he said.

Once the home of Ralph
Collins, a prominent citizen and
parliamentarian who died in
1946, the current building was
erected in 1931, but a residence
known as Centreville existed on
the site as early as 1871.

The estate once extended
from Shirley Street in the north
to almost Wulff Road in the
south and east to what is now
Palmdale.

, —
Re a a

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



PLP seeks commission of inquiry

into container port safety measures

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP wants a commis-
sion of inquiry to look into safe-
ty measures at the Freeport
Container Port as the party is
not satisfied the government
ordered independent inquiry is
sufficiently objective.

FCP staff are said by the PLP
to have been the subject of
manipulation in the inquiry
launched by an independent
occupational health and safety
expert five weeks after a tor-
nado struck the port and three
workers were killed on March
29.

Dozens of maintenance
workers were also injured in
the storm, leading FCP staff to
question the safety regulations
put in place by facility owner
Hutchison Whampoa.

An initial investigation under
the Department of Labour
raised questions of negligence
by staff at the Meteorological
Office in Nassau for not giving
sufficient warning, and the PLP
blamed the FNM for closing
the Meteorological Office in
Grand Bahama prior to the
storm.

An independent investiga-
tion to establish all of the facts
surrounding the incident led by
occupational health and safety
expert Jacques Obadia was
secured by the International
Labour Organisation (ILO)
and launched on May 6.

But the PLP has now called
into question the integrity of
the investigation.

A statement released by PLP
chairman Bradley Roberts yes-
terday said the party has been
“reliably informed” that
employees of the FCP who par-
ticipated in this investigation
are required to undergo a
“debriefing” before being inter-
viewed by the ILO investiga-
tor.

MINISTER of Labour Dion
Foulkes has hit back at PLP chair-
man Bradley Roberts, calling his
comments about the investigation
into the Container Port accident,
“reckless and irresponsible”.

Mr Foulkes said the Department
of Labour has received no com-
plaints from any of the employees
at the Container Port to substanti-
ate the “baseless allegations” made by the PLP.

He said: “If the PLP has any information to
substantiate their allegations they should present
such information to the Department of Labour
so that the appropriate authorities can review
these complaints.”

Mr Foulkes said the Ministry of Labour has
full confidence in the investigation which was
conducted by the International Labour Organ-



Dion
Foulkes

isation’s recommended health and safety expert,
Jacques Obadia, who completed his inquiry on
Saturday. He added: “The PLP government in
2006 also sought the ILO’s assistance when a
male employee of the Grand Bahama Shipyard
died as a result of an industrial accident. The
PLP government engaged Mr Sparks, a health
and safety expert, to conduct the investigation
pursuant to the ILO’s recommendation.

“The same confidence the PLP reposed in
the ILO, is the same confidence the FNM gov-
ernment has in this specialised agency of the
United Nations. The PLP’s claims are an attack
on the integrity of Mr Obadia.”

Mr Foulkes said Mr Robert’s comments were
also a demonstration of the “hypocrisy, deficit of
credibility and lack of seriousness of purpose” of
the PLP.

















TORNADO AFTERMATH: The container port tragedy.

He said this raises serious
concerns about the objectivity
and independence of the inves-
tigation.

Mr Roberts and the Oppo-
sition party are therefore calling
for a commission of inquiry to
be held, and for the govern-
ment to reveal findings of the
initial investigation conducted
by the Ministry of Labour as
the results may show why an
independent investigation was
required.

“As the investigation

involves a critical and forensic
analysis of the health and safe-
ty policies of the FCP by a third
party, the process must be
transparent and independent,”
Mr Roberts added.

“Shortly after the tornado
struck the prime minister visit-
ed the affected site and
declared it safe based on con-
jecture at best; he also absolved
management of any safety vio-
lations or wrongdoing.

“The actions of the prime
minister severely compromised

College dispute: Union
renews forensic audit call

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGING financial mis-
management at the College of
the Bahamas, the Union of Ter-
tiary Educators of the Bahamas
has renewed its call for a foren-
sic audit to be conducted.

Audited financial statements
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly last week for the year end-
ing June 30, 2008, revealed over
$5 million was owed to the
institution in unpaid tuition fees
for that year, and that as of
February 2010, the college was
in breach of agreements gov-
erning the loans used to con-
struct its new library.

In a press statement yester-
day, UTEB said: “The union
was caught off guard by these
surprising reports, particularly
the news relating to the new
library, and it supports the
union’s concerns that the cost
and overruns associated with
the library’s construction need
to be scrutinised.

“More troubling to the
union, and probably to many
in the general public, is that
from 2007-2008, COB has not
collected $6.2 million in back
tuition and the union wonders
where that figure would stand if
the years 2008-2010 were
added. UTEB would like an
explanation of how the college
was able to balance its 2007-
2008 budgets in light of the $6.2
million deficit.”

The union also pointed out
that a faculty strike took place
at Bishop University in Canada
during the tenure of current
COB president Janyne Hod-
der. UTEB said the strike was
organised by the Association
of Professors of Bishop’s Uni-
versity (APBU) in connection
with allegations of financial
mismanagement of faculty and

staff pension funds. The college
has thus far rejected the union’s
calls for an audit, saying that
to conduct one would be an
admission of wrongdoing,
which the college denies.

The union has countered that
a “clear understanding of the
financial state of the institu-
tion” would increase confidence
with stakeholders and attract
new investors.

Evasive

The UTEB statement said:
“The college’s repeated insis-
tence that there is no cause for
a forensic audit seems dismis-
sive and evasive and are noth-
ing more than diversionary tac-
tics that are “full of sound and
fury, signifying nothing” — par-
ticularly when we consider the
financial failings of such inter-
national and local companies
as Enron, Banco Ambrosiano,
and CLICO, each of which had
extensive records of apparent
financial normalcy and stellar
financial audits, only to have
that appearance and those
audits discredited when their
failings uncovered years of
financial mismanagement and
wrongdoing.”

The union said it will not
abandon its campaign for
“transparency and account-
ability” — even after an indus-
trial agreement is finalised
between faculty and adminis-
tration.












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Negotiations for such an
agreement have been halted
pending the appointment of
external arbitrators.

It has been mutually agreed
that the arbitrators should try to
conclude a final deal within sev-
en working days should the par-
ties be unable to agree by May
14.

Tomorrow, the parties will
meet with Director of Labour
Harcourt Brown to decide who
will oversee the arbitration
process.

If discussions are successful,
and the teams are able to
resume negotiations on Thurs-
day, the faculty union could
have a new industrial agree-
ment by the end of this month -
nearly two years after their old
agreement expired.

the integrity of any investiga-
tion short of a commission of
inquiry; therefore, the PLP is
again calling for a commission
of inquiry in the public inter-
est.

“In light of the ill-advised
comments made by the prime
minister after consulting with
FCP management team, cou-
pled with conflicting reports
from the rank and file employ-
ees at the FCP, it is the consid-
ered view of the PLP that a
commission of inquiry remains
the most appropriate course of
action in identifying the root
causes of the loss of life and
property damage in the wake
of the tragedy.”

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master









































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M.,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Attempt to remove Jamaica’s PM

JAMAICA has been in political tur-
moil for the past few weeks with one
of Prime Minister Bruce Golding’s sup-
porters — wanted in the US to face
charges of drugs and weapons traffick-
ing— the central figure in his downfall.

Over the weekend a photograph in
The Gleaner of Jamaica showed the
prime minister mopping his worried
brow, while his harried wife sought the
prayers of her church and told how the
cries for his resignation was hurting their
family. Her husband is accused of mis-
leading parliament in an attempt to
shield a supporter in his constituency
from extradition to the United States.
The position taken by the Jamaican gov-
ernment in this affair has also strained
relations with the US.

While church leaders prayed for the
Golding family, the outspoken pastor
did not spare harsh words to condemn
the prime minister’s handling of the
affair and demand that he tell the whole
truth. Prime Minister Golding is accused
of misleading — some say lying to par-
liament. During the pastor’s sermon the
choir was instructed to raise protest
placards demanding justice and trans-
parency.

Since the 1970s when political parties
in Jamaica armed their supporters to
intimidate their rivals, the perception
has been that Jamaica’s gang leaders
have a loose affiliation with both of
Jamaica’s leading parties. Too close for
comfort many say, and now the Christo-
pher “Dudus” Coke case is flushing the
speculation to the surface.

Coke, a community leader and sup-
porter in the prime minister’s Kingston
constituency, is wanted in the United
States to face drug and gun running
charges.

The “Dudus” case has been blocked
by the argument in the Attorney Gen-
eral’s office that the US obtained its
information by illegal wiretaps. In the
meantime a US law firm was hired to
lobby the United States government
over Jamaica’s refusal to extradite
“Dudus.” It hoped to have the case
against “Dudus” dropped.

When it was claimed in the Jamaican
parliament that the government had
hired the law firm, Mr Golding “dis-
missed the assertion out of hand.” His
reaction was that he had no knowledge

of the affair. Said a Gleaner editorial
writer: “He lied by omission.”

Last week — two months later — he
was forced to backtrack. He admitted
that not only did he know about the
hiring of the firm, but he had sanctioned
it. However, not as prime minister but as
leader of his political party. It became a
battle of semantics with the prime min-
ister declaring in parliament that he had
to answer to nobody for what he did as
party leader. He said that Manatt,
Phelps & Phillips were acting for the
Jamaica Labour Party, not for the Gov-
ernment of Jamaica. Because the law
firm could not “produce one single doc-
ument” to represent authorisation of
the Jamaica government, then presum-
ably he had not lied by saying he knew
nothing about his government hiring
the firm. However, although his party
supported him, his detractors did not
want to permit him even that wiggle
room.

As the Gleaner leader writer pointed
out “in many democracies, deliberately
misleading the country is cause for a
prime minister to resign. Mr Golding
and the Jamaican people must decide
whether the PM’s lies now render him a
fatally flawed leader.”

Although it was reported yesterday
that the prime minister will not resign,
the “Dudus” Coke case will not so eas-
ily be swept under the carpet — it has
been raging since last August when the
US government filed a request for his
presence before its own courts. “Dudus”
is accused of overseeing the distribu-
tion of cocaine in the New York area,
and, according to the Associated Press
of smuggling weapons back to Jamaica
as the reputed leader of the notorious
“Shower Posse” gang — a gang that he
inherited from his equally notorious late
father. The US Justice Department
named him to a list of the world’s most
dangerous drug kingpins.

Reported AP: Coke has lived openly
in his barricaded Tivoli Gardens neigh-
bourhood as Golding has led opposi-
tion to the extradition request, claim-
ing the indictment in the Southern Dis-
trict of New York is based on illegal
wiretaps. The question now is: Who
will go? Will it be “Dudus” Coke to the
US or the Jamaican prime minister to
parliament’s back bench?

Budget needed
to aid violent
crime victims
and relatives

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE untimely deaths of
important breadwinners have
left untold thousands of
Bahamians in inextricable
financial bewilderment.

And, arguably even more
debilitating, are the many
thousands of victims who
have been injured beyond
repair (blinded, paralysed or
otherwise permanently dis-
abled) and forever totally
dependent on the charity of
others (friends, relatives, and,
the church).

As usual, the vast majority
of victims of serious, violent
and deadly crime are the poor
who are already at a major
socio-economic disadvantage.
These people cannot afford
any form of insurance to aug-
ment or replace their income,
therefore, a loss of a provider
(because of death or incapac-
itation) represents a disaster
of epic proportions.

The media’s count of 29
killings in just more than 4
months is frightening and

ACRES

ETC

EDITOR, The Tribune.



You have considerably cov-
ered the story of Brenton
Smith, even to the May 13,
2010. The relatives of Bren-
ton, are rigorously, in pur-
suance of justice. Perhaps,
there are two more to be tak-
en.

In the Catholic Church, the
mass or prayers, can be said,
for a loved one and as Bren-
ton died suddenly, how bene-
ficially, his soul can be
blessed. Let him go to glory,
he was made for glory, all
were made for glory.

In memory of Brenton, his
death can be so helpful to oth-
ers, as, he innocently took
that short-cut and paid dearly
with his life. Yes, we, are told
by the police, not to take
short-cuts.

On our island, how many of
us, used the short-cut inno-
cently as Brenton. Is it a
short-cut, or are we innocent-
ly trespassing?

These are avenues, I wish
to share and do wish Bren-
ton’s relatives to remained in
good health, as hospitalisation
is not the answer, rather,
thanking God, for love ones.

Thanking you for your daily
and informative newspaper.

PATRICK BETHEL
Nassau,
May 14, 2010.

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



astonishing. The high murder
rate has obvious negative
ramifications that hurt us
locally and internationally.
However, that tally does not
take into account the finan-
cial impact and ripple-effect
that violence has on our indi-
vidual families and commu-
nities.

In spite of our growing
number of derailed/disrupted
lives and families due to crime
and violence, the government
has not seen fit to step up to
its responsibility to assist the
ever- increasing number of
victims of crime. But rather
they ‘throw away’ millions in
revenue on its “safety net”
policies.

In a society wracked by vio-
lence and several killings each
month, some of that money
could also have gone towards

assisting our swelling number
of dependents sent adrift in
stormy economic seas with-
out their breadwinner or “old
age pension.” Many people
left permanently disabled
(and dependent on people
already unable to meet their
basic daily needs) by the cal-
lous acts of violent criminals
could have been assisted.

Criminality and violence do
not appear out of thin air;
they come about as a result
of deficient social and eco-
nomic policies that effectively
secrete a subset of society that
inevitably evolves its own
mores and morals, laws and
governance.

Criminality and violence
represent the failure of a soci-
ety and ignoring the victims
of our failings will only com-
pound the problem.

It is full time we budget to
assist the victims and relatives
of victims of violent crime.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
May, 2010.



EDITOR, The Tribune.

makes them unelectable.

to learn to do.

Nassau,
May 14, 2010



PLP needs to set aside egos
and put national interest first

Perhaps the PLP's greatest shortcoming is their overriding
belief that having the PLP govern the country is in the
national interest, when, of course, what is truly needed is for
those elected to public office to govern in the national inter-
est. This PLP arrogance manifested itself again recently when
Perry Christie (and separately Jerome Fitzgerald) publicly
declared the container port relocation to Arawak Cay will be
reversed “when” the PLP are returned to power. As is their
nature, the PLP resort to threats and intimidation in an effort
to force their will on the nation. So long as they continue in
this vein they shall be insufferable. One can only hope it also

Surely, the more responsible approach would be to desist
from making threats and, should the Bahamian public ever
be persuaded to re-elect the PLP to power, to try and evalu-
ate on an objective basis — having regard to the circum-
stances prevailing at the relevant time — which course of
action might best serve the national interest? Then again,
this would require the PLP to set aside their egos and put the
national interest ahead of their own, something they have yet

A TRUE, TRUE BAHAMIAN





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BER RRR RRR



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

TRIBUNEPOLL

TRANSPARENCY IN POLITICS



Tribune readers back call for
politicians to make public
foreign campaign contributions

TRIBUNE readers overwhelmingly support the idea that
politicians should have to make public all foreign campaign
contributions.

In one of the most one-sided results in the history of the
tribune242.com poll, 279 readers agreed with Fort Char-
lotte MP Alfred Sears’ call for mandatory reporting of for-
eign campaign contributions, while only 31 disagreed.

Commenting on the poll, Erasmus
Folly said the question is a “no brainer”.

“FNM or PLP, people should agree to
this without a second thought,” the read-
er said. “We should know of ALL con-
tributions to any politicians, that should
be public record. Freedom of Informa-
tion Act please!”

Liberal said: “Without a second
thought I cannot help but to agree with
Mr Sears. This is a step towards creating
absolute transparency in the political
playground (pun intended) and estab-
lishing a formula to diagnose political
corruption. We must remember that pol-
itics is the people’s business.”

Levilla added: “T think all campaign
monies should be declared because
as you know there is a big problem in 6G
our sister islands, namely Turks, with We
eed - _ was due ere —. should
of campaign donations and we don't
want that to happen in the Bahamas.” know of ALL

Laurette said: “I think that we the COntribu-
Bahamian public needs to know who tions to any
is backing these politicians,

political parties because in the end, that should
everyone wants pay-back. In today's be public
world it's always something for some- P
thing.” record. Free-

However, A Conservative Liberal dom of
noted that: “Every political election Information

Act please!”
SSS SSS)



bh

ALFRED SEARS.

season the opposition makes the case
that we need to have reform to play to
an emotional subject that many have
a view that we should.” The reader urged Mr Sears to create
legislation supporting his views, rather than merely talking
and “grand-standing”.

Facts agreed, asking Mr Sears why the PLP did not table
relevant legislation while in power. “If I want to help fund
a campaign, why should my name be published? That should
be optional on the part of the donor,” the reader added.

Common Sense noted that campaigning is very costly and
pointed out that most “high worth” individuals prefer to give
funds in anonymity.

“So if they want to go ahead and call names, for what I see
as a selfish political move on the part of Mr Sears, then so be
it — many high net individuals will not contribute, leaving
them to fend for themselves. When contributions are made,
an agreement should be signed between parties, that no
political favours will be had by any contributors, et cetera,
and this should be filed with the legal counsels for the par-
ties, held private and confidential.”

e The current poll at tribune242.com asks the following
question: Kirk Nixon has organised a group of about 50 to
boycott the Census. They say they will refuse to surrender
their personal information before political leaders do as is
mandated by law. Do you plan to participate in the 2010
Census?

Readers are invited to visit the website to take part in the
poll and comment on issue.







Police still to identify man
killed in Sunday night crash

POLICE have not yet
identified the passenger who
was killed Sunday night in
a traffic accident on West-
ern Road between Lyford
Cay and Mount Pleasant.

A 1997 green Honda
Accord, licence plate num-
ber 171332, crashed into a
tree just before 10pm when
the driver reportedly lost
control. The passenger, a 22-
year-old Sapodilla Boule-
vard man, had to be
removed from the vehicle
using the “jaws of life”. He
was taken to the hospital but
died of his injuries that
night.

The driver of the vehicle is
reportedly in stable condi-
tion. Police are investigat-
ing.

SHOOTING

Police are investigating a
shooting that took place at
the Esso Service Station on

Tac)
etsy

VeRO TET

eS HL
Wee

VETERAN real estate
director Hilary Jones was
sworn in as a Justice of the
Peace by Magistrate Gwen-
dolyn Hamilton-Claude at
the Freeport Magistrate
Court this past week on
Grand Bahama. Ms Jones
was born in New Providence
and then relocated to Grand
Bahama in 1969.

In 1981, she purchased
majority shares in McPher-
son and Brown Real Estate
(Freeport) Limited before
the company's name was
changed to Churchill and
Jones Real Estate Limited.

Ms Jones is a former pres-
ident of the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce and
is said to have contributed
much to the island's business
developments, social activi-

_—



Tonique Williams Darling
Highway yesterday. At
around 4am, an employee
of the station was

a ANE Nae) |e



ties and other events.

Educated at Government
High School, Cornell Uni-
versity, and the Art Institute
of Technology in Atlanta,
Georgia, Ms Jones said she
is humbled and honoured by
the Justice of the Peace
appointment.

She said she is grateful to
those who considered her
worthy and looks forward to
carrying out her duties when
and where necessary.

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approached by a man armed
with a handgun and wear-
ing a yellow shirt and black
trousers.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

CRUMPLED: The wreck of the car after Sunday night’s smash near Lyford Cay.

The two men got into a
struggle that resulted in the
employee being shot in the
left arm.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

China and Caribbean issue joint WR Tiitr ye

communique after round of talks

THE People’s Republic of China
and the Caribbean have agreed to
strengthen consultation and coopera-
tion on major issues such as the global
financial and economic crisis, the cli-
mate change, and to uphold the rights
and interests of developing countries.

This is the result of the one-day sum-
mit held in Nassau last week.

Following this latest round of talks
between Caribbean countries and Chi-
na, a joint communiqué was issued that
outlines the areas of interests to both
parties and the way forward in accom-
plishing them.

Li Jinzhang, Vice-Minister of For-
eign Affairs of the People’s Republic of
China, and Brent Symonette, Deputy
Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of
the Bahamas, co-chaired the consul-
tations.

The Caribbean countries represent-
ed at the consultations were Antigua
and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados,
Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica,
Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago.

According to the joint communiqué:

The two sides reviewed with satis-
faction the progress made in the rela-
tionship between China and the
Caribbean countries since the Third
Round of Consultations in 2006 and
agreed to make joint efforts to deepen
their friendship and cooperation.

They also exchanged views on inter-
national and regional issues of mutual
interest.

The two sides spoke positively of the
important role of the Consultations in





BRENT SYMONETTE

promoting their exchanges and coop-
eration in political, economic, agricul-
tural, educational, cultural and other
areas.

Dialogue

They also agreed to strengthen polit-
ical dialogue, enhance mutual under-
standing and trust, and promote coop-
eration to achieve greater progress in
bilateral relations on the basis of sov-
ereign equality and mutual respect and
benefit.

The Caribbean side welcomed the
first ever formulation and issuance of
China’s Policy Paper on Latin Ameri-

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Public Relations & Corporate Programs

Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and
implementation of a strategic public relations and communication program together
with the effective and efficient planning and execution of all corporate events and

activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

¢ Assisting with the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate
Programs plan to support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
¢ Overseeing the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations

programs, plan and budget;

¢ Assisting with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation

and, where necessary, the wider community;

Preparing and distributing the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directing press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press
releases, photographs, fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management

and Media Representatives;

Coordinating the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion

surveys;

Providing assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in
writing speeches, preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluating and assessing customer complaints, queries and disseminating

information to management;

Assisting with the development, implementation and management of external

communication efforts;

Coordinating marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the

external Public Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifying and liaising with service providers to secure speakers, presenters

and entertainment for Corporate events;

Liaising with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e.
awards, invitations, prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as

necessary and maintaining an inventory of the same;

Preparing and distributing all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices)

relative to Corporate activities, as necessary;

Creating and updating all standard operation procedures for all activities, as

necessary;

Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of

bills for all events and activities as necessary;

Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity Gnternal and external), as necessary on all Corporate

activities;

Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company

newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information

relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business

Communication, or equivalent.
* A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level
¢ Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;
¢ Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management

and public groups;

¢ Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing

ca and the Caribbean by the Chinese
government in 2008, and expressed
appreciation for China’s programme
directed toward the economic and
social development of the Caribbean.

The Chinese side agreed to continue
to provide assistance to the best of its
ability to the Caribbean countries hav-
ing diplomatic relations with China to
contribute to their social and econom-
ic development.

The two sides agreed to strengthen
economic and trade cooperation
between China and the Caribbean and
encourage their companies to conduct
business cooperation in various forms
toward this end.

Both sides affirmed their commit-
ment to ensure the success of the Third
China-Caribbean Economic and Trade
Cooperation Forum to be held in
Trinidad and Tobago later this year.

The Caribbean countries attending
the Consultations reiterated their com-
mitment to the One China policy and
support for the peaceful development
of cross-Strait relations and the course
of China’s peaceful reunification.

The two sides agreed to hold the
Fifth Round of Consultations between
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the
People’s Republic of China and the
Ministries of Foreign Affairs of the
Caribbean countries having diplomat-
ic relations with China in China in

FNM and PLP
llelegations
visit China

MEMBERS of both the
FNM and the PLP are visit-
ing China as part of a study
tour for young officials.

Funded by the Chinese
government, and including
visits to not only Beijing,
but also Wuhan and Xia-
men over a 13-day period,
the study tour will include
consultations with party
and government officials.

The delegations from the
Bahamas will also take part
in briefings on China’s eco-
nomic and social relations
and on the country’s politi-
cal system and government
administration.



Historic

Historic and culture parts
of the programme will
include visits to the Great
Wall of China, the Forbid-
den City, a party school, a
rural community and the
Dongfend Automobile fac-
tory. The FNM delegation
is headed by Michael
Foulkes, the party’s secre-
tary general, and includes
Michael Turnquest, deputy
chairman, Caron Shepherd,
president of the Women’s
Association, and Hank Fer-
guson. They departed the
Bahamas on Saturday to
travel to Beijing at the invi-
tation of the government of
The People’s Republic of
China.

A similar delegation of
young officials from the
PLP will also travel as part
of the Bahamian contin-
gent.







May 18th, 1995
15 years has gone



THE TRIBUNE



Primary School
SST Ua (eT



ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD Jared Fitzgerald NCEE Une mae UA
School Student of the Year’ as Dr Ricardo Deveaux, president
and CEO of the Bahamas Primary Student of the la ale
dation (far right), Education Minister Desmond Bannister and
his parents, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and Zarina Fitzgerald,
look on.

XAVIER’s Lower School student Jared Fitzgerald, 11,
has been elected Primary School Student of the Year for his
outstanding performance in academics, sports, and com-
munity work.

The son of PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald was selected
from 106 competing primary school students from across
the country for the award offered by the Primary School
Student of the Year Foundation.

Minister of Education Desmond Bannister, in present-
ing the honour, said those participating in the 14th annu-
al competition were the brightest and the best.

Mr Fitzgerald and his wife Zarina said: “We are very
proud of (Jared) and all of the nominees who were select-
ed to represent their various schools.
“They were described by the Minister of Education as
the ‘best and the brightest’. It is sufficient reason to give us
hope that all is not lost and we all have the responsibility
to ensure that we protect and preserve the Bahamas for
them.”

During the awards ceremony on Saturday at Golden
Gates Assemblies World Outreach Ministries Interna-
tional, Jared also received a $7,500 cheque for his achieve-
ments.

The Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year
Awards Programme is a national awards recognition
programme for sixth graders.

The programme was introduced by Dr Ricardo
Deveaux, Charter president of the Nassau, Bahamas
Pan-Hellenic Council.

Industrious

The 441-page souvenir booklet of the event stated:
“The Board of Directors of the Bahamas Primary
School Student of the Year Foundation and the Nassau,
Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council in conjunction with the
distinguished panel of judges are pleased to announce
that an amicable, well-mannered, industrious and
dependable student has been selected as the 2010
Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year.”

Denise Cooper-Louis, principal of Xavier’s Lower
School said of Jared: “This charismatic and dedicated
young leader has an excellent rapport with his peers and
teachers. He can also be described as one of the most
mannerly among the student population. He was recent-
ly awarded the ‘most respectful student’ at the school.”

Jared has participated in numerous national swim-
ming meets and in recent times received the high point
runner-up trophy for the years 2007 and 2009 in his age
category at the Royal Bank of Canada National Swim-
ming Championships.

He is a member of the winning relay team from the
Sea Bees Swim Club which holds the Bahamas Open
Record (LCM) and the Bahamas Record (LCM) in the
200 meters freestyle relay in the age nine and 10 catego-
ry.

He is a member of the Ambassadors Track Club,
Young Writers Association, Ocean Club Tennis and
Golf Clubs and the Ars Nova Music Club.

Jared has also participated in outreach programmes at
the Ranfurly Home for Children, Senior Citizens Cen-
tre, Nazareth Children’s Home, Kids-Up Programme at
the Presbyterian Kirk and the Stephen Dillet Primary
School.

He is also involved in St Matthew’s Anglican Church’s
youth group and serves as an acolyte at church.

Jared, who has maintained an accumulative grade
point average of 3.75, noted that he has three dreams -
to become a medical doctor graduating from Harvard
Medical School; to find a cure for breast cancer, and to
represent the Bahamas at the Olympic Games.



Former Senator

Austin H. Grant ML,
J.P. S.C. M.B.E.
January 27th, 1930

Your love is still so stro
To us it’s just like yesterday
In our hearts you will always stay



¢ Experience in managing special events and activities

¢ Excellent time management and organizational skills

¢ Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

¢ Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications
* Good analytical skills

¢ Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Daddy take your rest,
We know you did your best.

Thank You Jesus
Thank You Jesus
Thank You Jesus

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Royal Bank of Canada’s



ROTARY CLUB OF WEST NASSAU SPRING RAFFLE



SPRING
RAFFLE:
(Standing from
left) PAST
president of the
West Nassau
Rotary Club
William Wong;
fundraising
chairman and
past president
Bryan Knowles,
raffle chairman.
(Seated from
left) Rotarian
Rupert Roberts
and Rotary
Club of West
Nassau presi-
dent 2009/10
Caldwell Pratt.







Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALUCHI VENTURES LTD.

— ——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BALUCHI VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIKENHEAD

COMPANY LTD.

— *)—

/
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIKENHEAD COMPANY LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Thirtieth (30th)
Annual General Meeting of THE PUBLIC
WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION
LIMITED, will be held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, Bay Street, on Friday, May 21,
2010, commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following
purposes:

* To receive the report of The Board of
Directors.
* To receive the Audited Report for 2009

« To elect members of The Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee and Credit Committee

* To discuss and approve the budget for 2011

All eligible members, wishing to run for a
position on the Board of Directors, Supervisory
Committee or Credit Committee, are asked to
submit their names to the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4 p.m.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!





THE Rotary Club of
West Nassau has
announced its Spring
Raffle for June 16.

The first prize is
$10,000 worth of gro-
ceries from Super Val-
ue. Second prize is two
Motorola trunking
radios with one-year air-
time. Third prize is one
$20 BTC phone card per
week for 52 weeks. The
fourth prize is a $200
Esso gas gift certificate.
Fifth prize is round-trip
ticket for one to Cat
Island. Sixth prize is a
$100 Galleria Cinemas
gift certificate and the
seventh prize is a round-
trip ticket for one to
Harbour Island.

Net profit from this
raffle will benefit Pro-
ject SURE, the Chil-
dren’s Emergency Hos-
tel, Bilney Lane Home,
Persis Rodgers Home,
BTVI and Rotary com-
munity projects. The
Rotary Club of West
Nassau is a member of
Rotary International, a
non-profit service
organisation with over
1.2 million members.
The West Club meets
each Thursday at
12.30pm at Graycliff
Restaurant.



JEFFERY KING, 24, whose last
known address was Augusta
Street is wanted for questioning
about the Yellow Elder Gardens
triple shooting on 15th May.
Police say he is considered
armed and dangerous. He is 5ft
Ains, of slim build, and weighs
140lbs.





































airport upgrade deal
hailed as ‘unique’

THE DEAL has been
described as the largest financ-
ing of a public infrastructure
asset by non-public entities in
the history of the Bahamas, and
the Royal Bank of Canada sur-
passed all other local banks in
its contribution to the $265 mil-
lion upgrade for the US Depar-
tures Terminal at the Lynden
Pindling International Aiport.

While construction on the
terminal has just begun, the
deal that made the project pos-
sible began months ago.

“We started discussions in
mid-2008, and it took nine
months to pull it all together,”
said Brian Knowles, senior
account manager at RBC.

“These deals are very com-
plex, but so important for the
local economy and to enhance
our tourism industry.”

A total of 16 investors and
lenders along with the Nassau
Airport Development (NAD)
Company’s main shareholder,
the government of the
Bahamas, provided the capital
to begin work on stage one of
the airport expansion project.

RBC is the largest partici-
pant of the local banks and
played an instrumental role in
the financing. The deal was
unique in that it was the largest
financing of a public infra-
structure asset in the Bahamas
and the first in country to seek
non-public financing. Structur-
ing the financing, especially in a
troubled economy, required
out-of-the box thinking, organ-
isers said.

“The process was very col-



BRIAN KNOWLES, senior
account manager of Commer-
cial Financial Services at RBC.

laborative,” said Stewart
Steeves, vice-president of Air-
port Development and former
vice-president of finance and
CFO at NAD, who spearhead-
ed the negotiations.

“Because of the complexities
of this particular deal, the par-
ticipants needed to pull togeth-
er to make it happen.

“It was the mutual process
of trying to find solutions to
meet our unique financing
needs that contributed to its
success. RBC was one of the
first to commit to the deal and
was a leader throughout the
process.”

Project Finance Magazine
recently awarded NAD the
Latin America Project Bond
Deal of the Year for 2009.

Nathaniel Beneby Jr, presi-
dent and country head for RBC
in the Bahamas, said: “This deal
is just the latest example of our
innovation and support as we
focus on serving our clients and
enhancing the future of the

Bahamas.” In addition to the
airport financing, RBC also co-
led a transaction in 2009 to pro-
vide $200 million in financing
for the government, which was
later refinanced by a $300 mil-
lion bond issue.

“RBC has been the govern-
ment’s primary bank for the
past 65 years. It’s our most
important relationship,” said
Simon Wilson of the Ministry
of Finance. “With the most
recent deal with Nassau Air-
port Development, Royal Bank
came in first and served as the
lead on the project. The whole
team demonstrated tremendous
partnership in providing sound
advice and counsel. They con-
sistently demonstrated that they
believe in the government and
believe in this project.”

This latest transaction is the
third financing of the airport.
RBC has been involved in each
of these deals. The next phase
of this latest financing includes
taking out the revolving credit
facility and finding bond
investors to fund stage two of
the airport project, and even-
tually converting all of the debt
to long-term bonds.

“In every transaction, we
work in close partnership with
all the parties involved to
ensure the deals are structured
appropriately,” said George
Roache, head of Commercial
Banking for RBC. With this
project and others, we are inter-
ested in ensuring the sustain-
ability of the Bahamas for years
to come.”

BNT throws support behind proposed Forestry Act

THE Bahamas National Trust (BNT) has offi-
cially declared its support for the Forestry Bill
2010 that was debated in the House of Assembly
last month.

The Bill for an Act to provide for the conser-
vation and control of forests is an important
piece of legislation that has been under devel-
opment since mid 1980s, the Trust said.

“Tt is notable at this time in our nation’s devel-
opment that the Ministry of the Environment is
working to develop an integrative approach to
development in the Bahamas,” the BNT said.

However, the Trust said that in order for this
approach to be successful the necessary legisla-
tion needs to be in place “to guide government,
developers and conservation advocates through
the complex discussions and choices faced on
environmental matters.”

“Forests are the lungs of the earth and an
important part of ‘the library of life on earth’
and must be protected. Careful management of
this important resource can also provide impor-
tant income from the sustainable use of forestry
resources — both consumptive and non-con-
sumptive,” the BNT said.

Additionally, the Trust said, agro-forestry is
becoming an important tool to ensure long-term
survival and sustainability in farming systems.

The new Forestry Act is designed to do the fol-
lowing:

- Assist in the formulation and implementation
of land use plans.

- Provide a framework for the implementa-
tion for sustainable forestry initiatives at a com-
munity level. - Enhance the awareness of stake-
holders of the benefits of forests and forestry,
ensuring their effective participation in the con-
servation of their natural resources.

- Identify forest reserves, protected forests and
conservation forests which will provide a frame-
work for identifying forest areas with special
attributes that make them particularly valuable
for biodiversity and/or local sustainable use.

- Support the ecosystem services approach to
evaluating the goods and services that trees and
forests provide to society.

The BNT said in its view, the Forestry Act
2010 will strengthen and complement overall
national conservation efforts.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERLEY HILL

INVESTMENTS LTD.

— +——

Fi
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EVERLEY HILLINVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BRAXTONHOUSE

HOLDINGS LTD.

— + ——

é
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BRAXTONHOUSE HOLDINGS

LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BASHKIR VENTURES LTD.

—

i
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BASHKIR VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COLLEY PLAINES LTD.

— +——

Fi
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COLLEY PLAINES LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

TCU ORR C Church breakaway linked to gay controversy

FROM page one

Thompson said it will force the government to address the migrant
community’s illegal living situation established more than 30 years
ago. “Where they go is really not up to the landowner, but gov-
ernment is going to have to step in and they are going to have to
make a decision,” the local government chairman said.

The indiscriminate building and establishment of businesses
and churches without adherence to planning laws or building
codes in the settlements has enraged Abaconians over the years.

A resident who did not want to be named said: “Abaco is getting
very tired of waiting for government to act on these Haitian com-
munities.

“T don’t think people are really against the Haitians, but there is
no controlling of building, they don’t follow the rules and regula-
tions. Bahamians have to apply for building permits and have
regular plumbing, and these people come in and do whatever
they want and I think that is really irritating.”

The Abaco resident said some Bahamians have been so frus-
trated by the flouting of building regulations in Pigeon Pea and The
Mud they have torn down new buildings as soon as they are con-
structed.

“That’s how angry people are,” the resident said.

“Because central government is not doing anything.”

Mr Thompson said local government supported the landowners
decision to reclaim Pigeon Pea.

“With all the illegal buildings and construction going on here, it’s
difficult to tell Bahamians they can’t build when right in your
backyard you have foreigners building without any permits,” he
said. And the lack of building codes also puts the health and safe-
ty of Haitian residents at risk as insufficient drainage causes flood-
ing, and dangerous electricity supplies have sparked a series of fires
spreading quickly between the densely packed wooden homes
claiming lives and property.

Regular raids are conducted by the Department of Immigration,
based across the road from The Mud, however the value of these
raids has been called into question by the Haitian community as
Immigration and Defence Force officers have been accused of
using intimidation tactics and violence against residents, separat-
ing families, and not helping the situation as many Haitians who do
not have the right to live and work in the Bahamas manage to
escape apprehension.

Mr Thompson said he will ensure the correct procedure is fol-
lowed as eviction notices are served and residents are dealt with
humanely.

Charged with murdering teenage boy
FROM page one

Keith Seymour, attorney for Barr, told the court his client suf-
fered several injuries while in police custody.

Mr Seymour noted that the right side of Barr’s face was swollen
and he also had injuries to his stomach. He asked that his client
receive medical attention.

Attorney Willie Moss, who represents Forbes, also alleged his
client had been beaten by police. He told the court Forbes had been
beaten over a three-day period and had been denied his right to see
his attorney. Mr Moss also asked that his client be taken to a doc-
tor to receive medical attention, and told the court he intends to
object to any statement attributed to his client because Forbes had
been beaten.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that both men receive medical
attention and remanded them to Her Majesty’s Prison.

Their case was adjourned to tomorrow and transferred to Court
5, Bank Lane.

FROM page one

gregations of St Andrews,
Lucaya, and the Kirk of the
Pines (Marsh Harbour) at the
General Assembly of the
Church of Scotland in Scotland
this week where they will “bid
the Church of Scotland
farewell” after 200 years.

Rev Kirkland said the move
has been under discussion for
“over 15 years”, adding that
“with happy agreement from
the Church of Scotland, the
time is now ripe to leave the
mother church”.

A vote was held in Nassau
on the question of whether the
Bahamian Presbyterian kirks
would leave the Church of
Scotland last year, only several
months after Rev John
MacLeod resigned from his
post at St Andrew’s in Nassau
following the decision by the
church in Scotland to confirm
the ordination of Scott Rennie,
its first openly gay minister.

Yesterday one senior church
member in Nassau, speaking
anonymously, said the two
events were not linked, howev-

er, with the US Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, with
whom the Bahamas churches
now seek to align themselves
being strongly against such
ordinations. It appears likely
that this has played a role in
the decision.
Division

The Church of Scotland has
been riven with division over
the question of homosexuality
in the Church for some time,
with tensions growing since the
ordination of Rev Rennie last
year.

More than 50 Scottish
churches have already backed
the evangelical position, like
that now apparently being tak-
en by the Nassau and Lucaya
Kirks, that they will not accept
the ordination of gay ministers.

Church officers had been
gagged from speaking on the
gay question as the Church of
Scotland has appointed a spe-
cial commission to investigate
issues related to gay ordination
which is due to report in 2011.

Speaking of his decision to

quit the Church of Scotland,
and consequently, The
Bahamas, last year, Rev
Macleod said: “It wasn’t just
the Scott Rennie thing, it was
the general tenor of the Gen-
eral Assembly that I don’t think
is the way a church should do
business. I think it is a shame
that the Church of Scotland has
tried to stifle the debate.

“T have had misgivings over
the Church of Scotland for a
number of years. I believe
there is a general drift away
from Biblical orthodoxy.”

The Reverend quit last June
but remained in Nassau on six
months notice. He has now
been assigned to the Allander
Evangelical Church in Glasgow,
Scotland.

Yesterday Rev Kirkland said
the Presbyterian Church of The
Bahamas in Nassau, St
Andrews, has the “joy of
inducting a fine new young
minister, Rev Bryn MacPhail”
on June 6 to replace Rev
Macleod, “the same day that
the congregations will formally
mark their entry into the Evan-
gelical Presbyterian Church.”



While The Tribune was
unable to confirm this with
Church elders in Nassau yes-
terday, who were remaining
tightlipped on details related to
the move, The Herald newspa-
per in Scotland reported over
the weekend that the vote by
the congregation of St Andrews
in favour of leaving the Church
of Scotland went 32 to 16 while
in Lucaya it was an even
greater 40 to 3 in favour.

One church member told
The Tribune yesterday that
there was “some controversy”
over the vote last year, as some
members were under the
impression that it would not be
a final decision on whether the
split should go ahead, but
rather a polling of views that
would subsequently be deter-
mined at a later date.

According to Rev Kirkland,
the plan now is for the affilia-
tion of the Presbyterian Kirks
in The Bahamas to be an
“interim step” which will “help
prepare the congregations for
ultimately becoming the Pres-
byterian Church of the
Bahamas.”

ms decision not to run again

FROM page one

nation from Mr Christie for the upcoming
election, telling The Tribune she would like
to give some younger candidates an oppor-
tunity to move up the political ladder.

Meanwhile, in a separate interview with
this newspaper, Mr Christie said the party
which he hopes to lead into the next elec-
tion has been inundated with interest from
potential candidates hoping to receive nom-
inations to run under the party’s banner.

With an anti-incumbent movement grow-
ing throughout the world, PLP leader Per-
ry Christie said that his party is faced with
the same challenge as scores of people have
been lining up to represent the PLP in seats
that already have sitting Members of Par-
lament.

However, while having six or seven can-
didates vying for any given constituency, Mr
Christie said that the party is having diffi-
culty balancing “the old with the new”.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson is the second mem-
ber of the “old guard” of PLPs who it is
suggested will not offer again for the party
in the next election. PLP MP for Fort Char-



lotte Alfred
Sears is
reportedly in
consultation
with his con-
stituents as to
whether or
not to offer
for re-elec-
tion for the
area.

Nonethe-
less, Mr
Christie told
The Tribune
he is pleased to see the enthusiasm from
younger members of the party.

“There has been a significant increase
in young professionals wishing to enter
public life on our side. It is really refreshing
and bodes well for the future. Our only
concern is there is not an equal amount of
interest from women seeking to enter pol-
itics.”

Mrs Gibson, as one of the most promi-
nent female members of the party - and
the second in a year to reveal her decision
to step down from frontline politics, along

=
oe
=
a
Perry Christie

with former deputy prime minister Cyn-
thia “Mother” Pratt - says she will now
focus on her role as a “mentor” to others
outside of politics.

“Over the past five years, in other areas
of my life, I have been an advocate for
mentorship and I serve as a mentor. I
tremendously enjoy this and find it very
fulfilling,” she said.

She said her determination to allow a
younger generation to play a bigger role in
the party is in keeping with her father’s
philosophy “that it is important to step
aside to allow room for younger people
and to help them prepare and excel at lead-
ership.”

“T would like to help the PLP find the
right mix of experience and youthful, able
enthusiasm that will propel it to victory in
the next General Elections,” said the for-
mer cabinet minister.

Mrs Maynard Gibson was appointed sen-
ator for the PLP after running unsuccess-
fully for the PLP in 2007. She was defeated
by the FNM’s Byron Woodside, in a result
that was ultimately challenged but con-
firmed in favour of Mr Woodside in an
election court challenge.



“eo vo
ea

THE NATIONAL ART GALLERY OF THE BAHAMAS

PRESENTS

THE FIFTH NATIONAL EXHIBITION (NE5)

CALL FOR ENTRIES

MATIONAL ART GALLERY
OF THE BARAMAS

The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas invites professional artists working in The Bahamas and Bahamian artists
abroad to enter their work in our Fifth National Exhibition (NE5) scheduled to open in August 2010, The theme for this
exhibition is "The Carbon Footprint: Bahamian Artists’ 21st Century Response to the Environment." We encourage all
professional artists to submit their work for this juried show which represents the best of contemporary Bahamian Art.

Over the last few years, we have witnessed many events
which have had a global impact whether they were the fiscal
events that emerged during the height of the credit crunch
or the natural disaster events that occurred this year in Haiti,
Peru and here at home. These events are ALL related one
Way or another to various forms of global climate change.

In response to this, the NAGE is announcing that its fifth
national open submission exhibition, the NES, will be a
themed exhibition exploring ideas and narratives on issues
relating ta the 21st Century global question on carbon
footprint and climate change,

A carbon footprint is a measure of the impact our activities
have on the environment and, in particular, on climate
change. (It relates to the amount of greenhouse gages
we individually produce in our day-to-day lives through
burning fossil fuels for electricity transportation, etc.

It ls Gur intention at the NAGE to explore this area frarn an
artists perspective seeing how they use their own unique
artistic tools and vision to produce works that look at areas
such as urbanization, mability (cars, planes, beats, ete),
domesticity, personal space(s), landscape, industrialization,
natural earth elements, fabricated non-natural ements, etc.
that relate to carbon footprint and climate change.

This is mot an easy challenge but at the MAGE. we feel that
with difficult and complex tinves, it is important that artists
are given the opportunity to respond,

If you are interested in participating, you may request the
Official Rules and Entry Form by contacting the Gallery at
Tel: 242-328-5800/1 or email at info@nagb.org.bs.

CATEGORIES

A. Painging / B. Works on Paper Oravd ng) Collage, Original Prins, Watercolors,
Pastel, ate. { C. (Photography / 0. Sculpture, Assemblage, Installation
E, Ceramics | F, Mied & Alpemative Wthedia inchading Widen iG, Quilts

ELIGIBILITY

This exhibition is open to all peodessional artists msiding in The Bahamas
and all professional Bahamian arte practicing abroad. Professional i¢
defined as an adult individual working primarily a5 an artist preferably with
a history of exhibiting works,

ALD Gl AG

The sehecthon of works will be completed bya panel of judges chosen by
the Gallary. Judging will tae place in July 2010.

COLLECTION OF WORKS

Works mat selected for the exhibtion must be collected from the
Nasional Art Gallery af The Bahamas by July 3G, 2070. After this dase, the
Nasional Art Gallery ateohees itell of eer responsibility for the work ard
reserves The right To auction uncollected work bo Cover Sborage ooss

Works accepted for the exhibition must be collected within TWD [2)
weeks of the closing date. After this date, the Gallery reserves the right to
auction off the works to cover the eqpenses of extended storage.

INSURANCE

Pease dupply ihe National Art Gallery af The Bahamas with a copy of
CURT Insurance policies if ary) on all armvork submitted, The MAGE
reserves the fight ta reject a work if it feels i cannes cower the estimaned
value of the wark provided

SALE OF WORKS AND PURCHASE AWARDS

*The National Art Galery undertakes to acest in the sale of thoee works
whech artists indicate are for sale. Price lists will be offered at the exhibition
opening and vill be avedable during the exhibition run

* To assist in defraying the cost of the Fifth National Exhibition,
the National Gallery will retain a commission of 25%, which will be
deducted fram the stated sales price. This mans that the sale price should
include artist rewenue plus commission.

"The MAGE may choose to acquire works far the National Collection
Ery thi praeness,

*IFa non-residend is interested in purchasing work on display, the Gallary
valll inform the aetist of the potential sabe The artist must Indicate whether
to process the sale and agree to cower the cost of shipping the work
internationally, @ the purchaser refuses.

DELIVERY OF WORKS

Artes are bo agubrrit works for selection, along wilh asigned otlicia eniry
form to the MAGE, West Hill Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Works will not be
ateepted without Ertry Form and current Cv.

THE CLOSING DATE FOR ENTRIES I5 WEDNESDAY, JUNE
50, 2010 AT 12 WON.

MANDATORY REQUIREMENT FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:
Aurtisns are REQUIRED to attend the screening of af least one of ther filers
featured in this adwertisement, For Intemational and Farily sland partici
pants ony, films will bo availabe for dow nboading from the web via a link
that will be emailed to you. Request link by emailing Jackson Petit at
jpetit@nagborg os. For further information, please contact the Gallery at
282-928-5800 of email Holly Paratti at hparottitmagb.org.bs.

MANDATORY REQUIRED FILMS
FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:

in order for Artista te be eligible te submit
artwork to the MES, they MUST attend the
screening of at least one of the films
featured below,

"Rementber Sono-Mivwaâ„¢ -Tuc, May 18, 4pm
"Home" = Thu. May 20, 4pm

ee

Pace
ee ee a
a

ee ec os i

HOME

Pe IL ets ey ene



"Home" = Thu. May 20, Spm

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



BIMINI ALL-AGE SCHOOL

FESTIVAL

ADJUDICATIONS

STUDENTS of the Bimini All-Age School

gave it their all during the E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival adjudications in Alice

Town last week.





BIMINI ALL-AGE
SCHOOL students
dance and sing a
gospel medley during
the E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival
adjudications in Alice
Town on May 10.

Sav lined arial eit Sochedy







BIMINI All-Age School students merge singers and musicians into an ensemble
gospel group during the E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival adjudications in Alice

Town, Bimini on May 10, 2010.

Eric Rose/BIS Photos


























STUDENTS
of the Bimini
All-Age
School play
the brass and
percussion
instruments
during the E
Clement
Bethel
National Arts
Festival adju-
dications in
Alice Town,
Bimini on
May 10.









Concern mounts about oil spillage impact on Bahamas

FROM page one

Meanwhile, the Florida Sun-Sen-
tinel newspaper is reporting that
Mitch Roffer, an oceanographer who
runs Roffer’s Ocean Fishing Fore-
casting Service, has analysed new
images, taken Saturday by NASA’s
Jet Propulsion Laboratory and found
they too “clearly show that the oil is
being pulled into the Loop current”.

The loop current is a warm ocean
current that moves clockwise

through the Caribbean basin to the
Gulf of Mexico and then the Florida
straits.

Beaches

Movement of the oil with the cur-
rent could send the spill around
Florida and into the Atlantic Ocean,
possibly leading to oil covered
beaches and the death of marine life
in those areas.

This could also put Cay Sal Bank,

the Bimini chain, the western side
of Andros and West End, Grand
Bahama at risk, Commander Patrick
McNeil, head of the National Oil
Spill Contingency Team, has stated.

Previously experts, admitting that
unpredictable weather patterns
made it impossible to say conclu-
sively whether the threat of the oil
entering the current was a likely pos-
sibility, had stated that they felt all
evidence so far pointed to the oil
slick staying away from the current
which could bring it into the Florida

Keys, The Bahamas and the east
coast of the US. Officials have been
meeting in The Bahamas to form a
plan of action in the event weather
conditions push the giant spill into
these islands.

The spill, which was a result of an
April 20 explosion and fire on the
drilling rig Deepwater Horizon,
which killed 11 workers.

US President Barack Obama has
described it as a “potentially
unprecedented” environmental dis-
aster.

The official estimate of the
amount of oil flowing from the leak-
ing wellis 5,000 barrels (or 210,000
gallons) a day.

The figure is a National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration
estimate based on aerial imagery
early in the crisis as well as scrutiny
of video from the sea bottom.

However, some scientists have
drawn this figure into question, esti-
mating that the oil leak may be much
greater - possibly as big as 26,000
barrels a day.





-*






TAltmusn DAY
“MAUFISHeO10





BUTLER € SANDS GROUNDS, JFK

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Tae SITs
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| @PLAL ENSIS-
Me




ot ates

=








THE TRIBUNE
D ru





ine

TUESDAY,

MAY

ites



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Rating agency:
Budget to decide
debt downgrade

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A WALL
Street credit
rating agency
yesterday gave
its starkest
warning yet
that the
upcoming
2010-2011
Budget will
determine
whether it downgrades the
Bahamas’ sovereign credit
rating, with a former finance
minister telling Tribune Busi-
ness that the Government

SEE page 5B

SMITH



* Moody's issues starkest
warning yet to Bahamas
government, as former
minister says Wall Street
and IMF want to see if
we have ‘mettle’ to return
to fiscal prudence

* Aroues that 2010-2011
Budget demands
‘national sacrifice’
from public sector

* Suggests that cuts best
coming ‘across the board’,
as Budget key to sending
right international message

$857m project: ousted
partner blasts ‘irrational’
Tribunal verdict

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE $857 million South
Ocean development’s former
managing partner has asked
a New York court to set aside
the arbitration ruling that
removed him, alleging that it
was “irrational and in excess
of its powers” to find him per-
sonally liable for damages,
and did not account for “crim-
inal investigations” into the
project’s financing partners.

Responding to a petition by
hedge fund Plainfield Asset

SEE page 2B

* Claims ruling ‘in excess of
its powers’ by finding him
personally liable for $1.262m
damages payment, when
not party to key contracts

* Argues that arbitration verdict
would have been different if
panel knew of ‘criminal
investigations’ into South
Ocean financing partner

* Also alleges ruling should
be ‘null and void’ because
of supposed ‘bias’ on
behalf of arbitrators

BID for imminent
City legislation

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

DRAFT legislation for the
Business Improvement Dis-
trict (BID) that will be
responsible for taking control
of downtown Nassau’s rede-
velopment and management
has been completed, and is
expected to go to Cabinet for
review in just weeks, the
Downtown Nassau Partner-
ship's (DNP) managing direc-
tor told Tribune Business yes-
terday.

Vaughn Roberts said he
also hopes to get the legisla-
tion to Parliament in time to
have the Government allo-
cate funds in the 2010-2011

Damianos |

$4.5m Charlotte St
pedestrianisation
could be funded by
10% business levy

Budget to begin pilot
improvement projects, name-
ly the pedestrianisation of
Charlotte Street.

According to Mr Roberts,
the $4.5 million road project
will also be funded by a 10
per cent contribution from
private stakeholders on Char-
lotte Street.

He said the majority of
people in the area would like

SEE page 4B

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By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Common-

wealth Brew-

ery/Burns

House 25 per

cent initial pub-
lic offering (IPO) will be val-
ued at between $60-$65 mil-
lion, Tribune Business was
told, as the companies
pledged the sale would hap-
pen this year following yes-
terday’s completion of the
buyout of Sir Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson’s family investment
vehicle.

LeRoy Archer, Burns
House’s managing director,
confirmed to this newspaper
last night that the combined
companies had been valued
at $240 million, meaning a 25
per cent IPO to Bahamian
institutional and retail
investors would be worth $60-
$65 million - making it
arguably the largest equity
IPO in Bahamian capital mar-
kets history.



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FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

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(242) 367-3135

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S60-65m IPO
for Heineken

* Combined Commonwealth Brewery/Burns
House pledge public offering to happen this
year; managing director says ideally, November

* Entities valued at collective $240m, making it
largest IPO in Bahamian capital markets history

* Together, firms did $150m in sales on
volumes of 200,000 hectolitres in 2008

* Buyout of Finlayson entities closes yesterday,
as Tribune Business revealed last week

Mr Archer declined to
detail the “record breaking
profits” that the release con-
firming the buyout, which Tri-
bune Business revealed in
February this year, referred
to. This, he added, would be
detailed in documents pub-
lished later this year in rela-
tion to the IPO.

However, Mr Archer did

reveal that in 2008, “Com-
monwealth Brewery and
Burns House had sales com-
bined of $150 million on vol-
umes of 200,000 hectolitres”.

He added that the buyout,
which currently leaves
Heineken in 100 per cent con-
trol of Commonwealth Brew-
ery/Burns House, gave the
combined entity “a great

Lyford Cay billionaire in
S12.4m Lehman claim row

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMAS-based
investment fund managed by
a billionaire Lyford Cay resi-
dent’s firm is appealing a deci-
sion to reject its $12.4 million
claim against bankrupt invest-
ment bank Lehman Brothers,
arguing that it is owed both a
cash deposit and short selling
gains.

Moore Macro Fund, which
is registered and domiciled in
the Bahamas, and its invest-
ment manager, Moore Capital

Fund manager Louis Bacon’s firm appeals
rejection of demand against bankrupt investment
bank by their Bahamian-registered fund

Management, are appealing
the decision by trustee James
Giddens to reject their claim
against the bank’s whose Sep-
tember 2008 collapse trig-
gered the full-blown credit
crunch that almost tanked the
world’s financial system and
with it, the global and
Bahamian economies.
Moore Capital Manage-
ment was set up, and is

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Money at Work

owned, by billionaire hedge
fund trader Louis Bacon, who
has a multi-million dollar
home at Lyford Cay.
Appealing the decision by
Lehman Brothers’ bankrupt-
cy trustee, the attorneys for
Moore Macro Fund and
Moore Capital Management
argued in documents obtained

SEE page 6B

opportunity to see what we
can do out of the box”, includ-
ing expanding export markets
for its homegrown Kalik beer.

Confirming that an “inter-
nal corporate restructuring”
would now take place follow-
ing the exit of the Finlaysons
and their Associated Bahami-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
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$857m project: ousted partner
blasts ‘irrational’ Tribunal verdict

FROM page 1B

Management, and its Seaside
Heights investment vehicle,
which seeks to enforce the

International Arbitration Tri-
bunal’s ruling, Roger Stein
and his RHS Ventures com-
pany outlined a number of
alleged grounds that would
give the New York State

Supreme Court reason to
“vacate” a judgment that
comprehensively found
against him.

Arguing that the court
should declare the Tribunal’s



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ruling “null and void”, among
the grounds cited by Mr Stein,
RHS Ventures and RHS
Holdings (Bahamas) were
that two of the three-member
arbitration panel had failed
to disclose potential “conflicts
of interest and material rela-
tionships” linking them to
Plainfield.

“The Partial Final Award
clearly manifests disregard for
the law, and is therefore irra-
tional and in excess of the
power of the arbitrators, inso-
far as it imposes personal lia-
bility on Roger Stein under
contracts to which he was not
a party,” he and RHS Ven-
tures alleged, “and there is
new evidence of criminal
investigations of predatory
lending practices by [Plain-
field], material to the claims
determined by the arbitrators
but unknown to them at the
time, and which ‘might have
drastically altered the out-
come of the arbitration’.”

Mr Stein has thus made
good on his pledge to attempt
to vacate the Tribunal’s rul-
ing, ensuring the battle for
control of the $857 million
South Ocean project in south-
western New Providence
rages on. The New York
court will now have to deter-
mine whether there is any
merit to his claims, or whether
the ruling should be enforced
and _— Plainfield/Seaside
Heights replace him as gen-
eral partner, confirming RHS
Ventures is out in the cold.

Seeking to back up his
“irrationality” claims, Mr
Stein said the Tribunal had
ruled that he, individually,
and RHS Ventures pay $1.262
million to New South Ocean
Ventures, the firm oversee-
ing the development, even
though he was not named
personally as a party in the
Limited Partnership Agree-
ment (LPA) and Develop-
ment Agreement between

RHS/Plainfield.

Urging that the Tribunal’s
ruling in relation to Mr Stein
personally should be set aside,
the appeal alleged: “The arbi-
trators based their award on
the conclusion that the gen-
eral partner under the LPA
(RHS Ventures) had
breached the LPA and had
breached its fiduciary duties
as general partner.

“The general partner under
the LPA was not in contrac-
tual privity with, and had no
fiduciary duties to, South
Ocean Ventures, which was
not a party to the LPA.

“Stein was not a party to
either agreement; was not in
contractual privity with any
of the counterclaims; and nev-
er agreed to be personally
responsible for the debts or
liability of the general part-
ner under the LPA.”

A cornerstone of Mr Stein’s
case against Plainfield had
been allegations of predato-
ry lending, with the Con-
necticut-based hedge fund
supposed to have initiated
debt financing so onerous he
would be unable to repay it,
allowing it to take over the
South Ocean project.

The Tribunal emphatically
shot down Mr Stein’s claims
in this regard, but he is now
alleging that Plainfield faces
investigation by the New
York District Attorney’s
Office and Connecticut Attor-
ney General “for perpetrat-
ing the same pattern of preda-
tory tactics” in other cases,
“including ‘high pressure’
audits without reasonable
notice’ and ‘hardball’ litiga-
tion”.

Plainfield has consistently
denied any allegations of such
wrongdoing, and has previ-
ously claimed that these
investigations - and media
articles carrying details of the
probes - have been initiated
by Mr Stein and RHS Ven-

THE TRIBUNE

tures.

The latter, though, argued
that the Tribunal was
unaware of the investigations
into Plainfield when it ruled,
and RHS Ventures chose not
to inform the panel despite
knowing they existed. Mr
Stein is now alleging that had
the Tribunal known, it would
have come to a different con-
clusion.

He also alleged that Plain-
field had attempted to use the
Tribunal ruling to persuade
the New York attorney to
drop its investigation, but this
had been declined.

Mr Stein produced an April
12, 2010, letter from Matthew
J. Budzik, Connecticut’s assis-
tant attorney general, asking
himself and RHS Ventures to
hand over “all documents
within your possession or con-
trol concerning any business
dealings that you...... may
have had with Plainfield Asset
Management” in relation to
the South Ocean project.

In its hard-hitting April rul-
ing, the Tribunal ordered
RHS Ventures and Mr Stein
to repay more than $2.9 mil-
lion to the New South Ocean
project.

The Tribunal ordered Mr
Stein and RHS Ventures to
reimburse the project with
some $1.262 million, which
had allegedly been used to
fund his personal expenses,
including "$761,000 for villa
and yacht rentals and expens-
es", and $251,000 for private
plane travel".

And RHS Ventures and Mr
Stein were ordered to pay a
further $558,186 for "over-
payments of development
fees and acquisition fees",
with another $1.1 million
required to cover a sum
"improperly credited” to
RHS Ventures’ equity
account. The Tribunal ruled
that Mr Stein and RHS
should "earn" their equity.

S60-65m IPO
eineken

for

FROM page 1B

an Distillers and Brewers
(ABDAB) vehicle, Com-
monwealth Brewery/Burns
House pledged that although
they had been given 18
months by the Government

to do so, the IPO would take
place before year-end 2010.

That is likely to have
Bahamian brokerage and
investment banking houses,
all of whom are keen to win
the lucrative placement agent
role and the fees to go with it,
salivating. They are likely to
start breaking bank deposits
now, so as to ensure they and
institutional clients have the
surplus assets ready to invest.

The release on the buyout’s
completion also, somewhat
surprisingly, said the Bahami-
an government was prepared
to become a shareholder in
the combined entity, as it had
“indicated” it would purchase
any shares not subscribed for
by the Bahamian public dur-
ing the IPO - effectively
meaning it is acting as a guar-
antor/underwriter for its suc-
cess.

“T haven’t spoken to any-
one ready to place it, but if I
were to guess and if you ask
me what my wish list is, I
would say by November this
year,” Mr Archer said of a
date for the IPO.

Asked about its value, he
told Tribune Business: “If you
take the total value of the
companies to be $240 million,
25 per cent of which is...... It’s
about $60-$65 million.”

Tribune Business revealed
last week that the IPO would
likely be valued in the $60
million range, and correctly
reported that the deal would
be signed imminently - as
happened yesterday.
Heineken acquired the 47 per
cent stake ABDAB held in
Commonwealth Brewery (it
already owned the remaining
53 per cent) and the 78.8 per
cent it had in Burns House.

Both sides were tightlipped
on the purchase price paid by
Heineken, and what consid-
eration ABDAB had
received, although it had pre-
viously been suggested it was
a $100 million or nine-figure
sum. Some of the proceeds
are likely to be used by the

Finlaysons to pay down bank
debt associated with their pur-
chase and financing of the
Solomon’s Mines luxury
goods chain, much of which
is owed to Citibank.

The Finlaysons are also
thought likely to use their
cash pile to pursue other
investment opportunities.

Meanwhile, going forward,
Mr Archer said: “The chal-
lenge basically is it’s one com-
pany, One mission, one vision.
We don’t plan at this time to
have any lay-offs, although I
can’t make any promises.

“T believe that as managing
director you should have one
step in the future, and look
at new opportunities to grow
revenues and cut costs. It’s a
great opportunity to see what
we can do out of the box.

“Tcan only say that it’s [the
buyout] not an end; it’s a new
beginning, and we’re going to
look at all avenues to see how
we can best manage the
opportunities to achieve effi-
ciencies. We already export
Kalik to the US, and we are
looking to see if there are any
other opportunities.”

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald’s
law office, Chancery Law
Associates, advised ABDAB.

Heineken already has
Board and management con-
trol at Burns House, which
became the largest liquor dis-
tributor and wholesaler in the
Bahamas via the 2000 pur-
chase of Butler & Sands. The
Board and management
arrangement, concluded in
2004, provided the Finlayson
family with the financing
needed to complete the
Solomon's Mines purchase.

Apart from the Finlaysons,
ABDAB's third largest share-
holder is understood to be
PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts. Its second largest
shareholder is Sir David Gib-
bons, owner of the Colonial
Group, which owns the
Bahamas-based Atlantic
Medical and Security & Gen-
eral insurance companies.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 3B



Property manager
exploits growth in
gated communities

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A GROWING number of
gated communities has
spawned the creation of a new
property management com-
pany, which yesterday said it
hopes to take advantage of
their proliferation.

Partner in Bahamas Execu-
tive Property Management
Company (Bahamas EPMC),
Erna Dudley-Hanna, said the
property management busi-
ness in the Bahamas was rela-
tively smallm with only three
or four firms in Nassau.

According to her, however,
the number of properties in
need of management services
is increasing.

The company, which is run
by Mrs Dudley-Hanna and
her husband, Harry Hanna,
provides property manage-
ment services, financial man-
agement, administrative man-
agement and maintenance
management.

Mrs Dudley-Hanna worked
for a management company
internationally before starting
Bahamas EPMC, and with a
background in accounting,
runs the financial manage-
ment side while her husband
focuses on the property man-

agement.

She said there could be
many potential contracts com-
ing to Bahamas EPMC,
becauase as developers com-
plete properties, they employ
property management com-
panies to take over the day-
to-day management.

“After it’s 50 per cent com-
plete, developers like to hand
over the reigns,” said Mrs
Dudley-Hanna.

She said large capital costs
had not been incurred in start-
ing the business, and since its
inception it had taken on two
clients and was awaiting
responses from three more
bids.

“The challenge is usually
waiting to get a business

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



license, because they want to
see a lease agreement signed
and sealed,” she said. “So it’s
hard when you have a nega-
tive cash flow while you are
trying to pay a lease, before
you even have clients.”

Mrs Dudley-Hanna said the
company hasn’t received any
new properties as yet, recent-
ly taking on properties that
have decided to change man-
agement companies.

While Bahamas EPMC
employs three people, it will
sub-contract a number of
smaller companies for services
such as maintenance, securi-
ty and landscape.

“A lot of times the devel-
opers struggle doing it them-
selves,” she said

Legal Notice

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALBERTPARK

INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
— H—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALBERTPARK INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EDBEEL
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— H—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EDBEEL INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULLBOAT SAIL INC.

is ‘—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FULLBOAT SAIL INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
CARTHUSIAN

HOLDINGS INC.
— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CARTHUSIAN HOLDINGS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EXMOOR HOLDINGS LTD.

— H—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of EXMOOR HOLDINGS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DILLS PAISER

HOLDINGS LTD.
— 4—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DILLS PAISER HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Tel: 502 2356 fgg

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Legal Notice

NOTICE
ASPERA OVERSEAS LTD.

— %—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of ASPERA OVERSEAS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ARAAPPALOOSA

INVESTMENTS LTD.
— 4—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ARAAPPALOOSA INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOSPORT
VENTURES LTD.

—— / >_—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GOSPORT VENTURES LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



To advertise in The
ge el Sa

FROM page 1B

directing projects that will
point interest back to the
downtown area.

The pedestrianisation of
Charlotte Street has been
talked about for almost 20
years, but could finally come
to fruition next year, while
there are thoughts of doing
similar works to several other
side streets connecting Bay
and Shirley Streets.

to see improvements to the
physical environment in the
downtown Bay Street loca-
tion, but the machinery to
implement the changes has
to be in place before that can
happen.

The DNP is public-private
partnership that is working
toward creating the BID, and

Pe Ce)
TTAB OE



Legal Notice

NOTICE
DILLONPRO LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ASYMMETRIC LTD.

— i —

#

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of DILLONPRO LTD. has been completed;

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ASYMMETRIC LTD. has been com-
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com- pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

pany has therefore been struck off the Register. Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIGEASI VALLEY INC.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ATHENA VENTURES LTD.

— *+,— — -,—

Fi i
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIGEASI VALLEY INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution ofp ATHENA VENTURES LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)








ROYAL DFIDELITY

Money at Work




COL] NTA L.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 17 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,615.16 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD 49.78 | YTD % 3.18
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 0.250 0.040



52wk-Hi Previous Close Today's Close

1.04

Change
0.00








































4.2 3.85%




. 9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050 0.200 212.6 1.88%
6.94 §.23 Bank of Bahamas 5.24 5.24 0.00 0.598 0.260 8.8 4.96%)
0.58 0.36 Benchmark 0.40 0.36 -0.04 1,000 -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%)
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168 0.090 18.8 2.86%)
2.15 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.17 2.17 0.00 0.055 0.040 39.5 1.84%
12.55 9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07 12.07 0.00 1.406 0.290 8.6 2.40%
2.84 2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84 2.84 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.4 1.41%
17.00 5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.99 6.99 0.00 0.460 0.230 15.2 3.29%
13.65 2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.64 2.67 0.03 0.111 0.052 24.1 1.95%
2.55 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00 0.627 0.110 4.1 4.33%
6.99 5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00 -0.003 0.240 N/M 3.95%
10.99 8.75 Finco 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.168 0.520 53.6 5.78%
10.60 9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60 10.60 0.00 0.678 0.350 15.6 3.30%
5.53 3.75 Focol (S) 5.08 5.08 0.00 0.366 0.170 13.9 3.35%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.30 0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035 0.000 7.7 0.00%
5.59 5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.407 0.240 13.7 4.29%)
10.50 9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.5 6.43%)
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 0.000 64.1 0.00%!

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
































1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7% 19 October 2017

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00

EPS $
-2.945

Div $
0.000




















































N/M




6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

41.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%
10.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months % NAV 3MTH NAV 6MTH NAV Date




















1.3758 CFAL Bond Fund 1.4674 1.446000 1.419947 30-Apr-10

2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9020 0.52 -0.11 2.886947 2.830013 30-Apr-10

1.5302 1.4590 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5302 1.53 4.88 1.514105 1.498375 7-May-10

3.2025 2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0368 2.57 -4.99 31-Mar-10

13.5654 12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.5654 1.48 5.47 31-Mar-10

107.5706 100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund 107.5706 3.45 6.99 103.987340 103.095570 31-Mar-10

105.7765 93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund 105.7706 3.99 13.50 101.725415 99.417680 31-Mar-10

1.1034 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.1034 1.25 5.25 31-Mar-10

1.0801 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0764 0.79 4.37 31-Mar-10

1.1041 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1041 1.23 5.34 31-Mar-10

19.5795 9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int! Investment Fund 9.4839 1.52 7.41 31-Mar-10
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

11.2361 10.0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund 10.6709 -0.93 12.33 31-Mar-10
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

17.9664 4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'| Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 3.23 58.37 31-Mar-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525








“We are presenting a com-
prehensive programme,” said
Mr Roberts.

According Mr Roberts,
Cabinet ministers have not
yet seen any of the draft leg-
islation, which was penned
by lawyers pro bono.

He added, though, that it
was important the legislation
be passed through Cabinet
for approval before it
becomes entangled and stag-
nated in the campaigns for
the 2012 election.

Operations manager at
The Coin of the Realm,
Cathy Moultrie, told Tribune
Business recently that a Char-
lotte Street committee was

BID for imminent City legislation

formed to prepare and lob-
by for the pedestriansation
process.

She said turning the street
into a thoroughfare that
would accept only foot traffic
could encourage visitors and
locals to venture off Bay
Street and patronise shops
and restaurants.

“Tt would be a great thing,”
said Mrs Moultrie.

“There is usually a lot of
congestion on the road. Mak-
ing it a pedestrian zone would
encourage tourists to come
up the road and encourage
shopping. There are a lot of
wonderful shops and restau-
rant on Charlotte Street.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

FARREM INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above named
company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-4447, Nassau, The Bahamas
on or before the 18th day of June, A.D. 2010.

Ché Toussaint Erad Campbell Chase
Liquidator

P.O. Box N-4447, Nassau, The Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AUSTASIA HOLDINGS LTD.

a

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of AUSTASIA HOLDINGS LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BRIXHALL GREEN

HOLDINGS LTD.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BRIXHALL GREEN HOLDINGS LTD.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BRIZAY INVESTMENTS

PTE. LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BRIZAY INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

would have to call on the pub-
lic sector to make a similar
“national sacrifice” to the pri-
vate sector.

James Smith, who ran the
Ministry of Finance during
the 2002-2007 Christie admin-
istration, said the nature of
the Bahamian government’s
Budget, with some 60 per cent
of all spending going on civil
service wages, gratuities and
pensions, required the admin-
istration to “put everything
on the block” to achieve the
desired effect from austerity
measures.

He added that the signifi-
cance of the 2010-2011 Bud-
get lay largely in the message
it sent both locally and inter-
nationally, as the likes of
Standard & Poor’s (S&P) and
Moody’s, plus the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF),
would use it to assess whether
the Bahamas had “the met-
tle” to get its public finances
back on track through apply-
ing tough fiscal medicine.

Such statements were rein-
forced graphically yesterday
by Moody’s latest assessment
of the Bahamas’ creditwor-
thiness. The opinion, obtained
by Tribune Business, said:
“The world economic crisis
has had a negative impact on
[Bahamian] economic growth,
especially on the tourism sec-
tor. 2010 is likely to be the
third year in a row with nega-
tive growth.

“Debt has been rising, and

we will monitor the upcom-
ing Budget to determine if a
rating action is warranted.”

Moody’s thus could not
have been clearer about the
implications for the Bahamas,
and the public finances, if the
Government fails to adopt the
measures it is seeking. A
downgrade would raise the
Bahamas’ borrowing costs on
the international markets, as
investors would demand a
higher interest rate of return
for the perceived increase in
risk, the consequences of
which would be to further
increase debt servicing costs
and drag more funds away
from the likes of health, edu-
cation and social services.

“T think this Budget would
have its significance in the
message not just sent locally,
but internationally,” Mr
Smith told Tribune Business
yesterday. “The Bahamas, in
the last couple of years, has
gone somewhere it has never
been before, with the increase
in the deficit and the debt.

“This is unusual for the
Bahamas, and the interna-
tional rating agencies under-
stand this. They are now look-
ing to see if we have the met-
tle to make the adjustments
necessary to get back on the
path to fiscal prudence.”

Acknowledging that “this
might very well be one of the
most important” Budgets
delivered in the Bahamas for
the past two decades, Mr
Smith said it came against the
backdrop of one of the worst,
and deepest, global recessions
in living memory.

Rating agency: Bu dget to
decide debt downgrade

Previous recessions had
been short-lived, with the US
economy recovering rapidly,
and the Bahamas had been
able to adjust easily to any
government spending over-
shooting, aided by inflows
from tourism and foreign
direct investment.

“This one is deep, and we
still don’t know how long it’s
going to last, because the goal
posts are changing on us,” Mr
Smith said. “Apart from send-
ing a signal that we’ve got to
cut back, this Budget has got
to make some judgments as
to how long we can continue
or get out of it. We don’t want
to overshoot, because if we
need to start borrowing for
essential services, we’ve got
to have some headroom.

“This is fundamental eco-
nomics: making a choice
between wants and scarce
resources.”

The Central Bank had
pegged the Bahamas’ nation-
al debt at over $3.9 billion, or
just under $4 billion, at year-
end 2009, a debt-to-GDP
ratio of 53.6 per cent - com-
pared to the 40 per cent nor-
mally regarded as the thresh-
old it was dangerous to go
past.

And, for the first eight to
nine months of the current fis-
cal year, the Government’s
deficit had grown by $36.3
million or 20.1 per cent year-
over-year to $216.6 million.
Total spending was up $57.2
million or 5.7 per cent at
$1.067 billion, led by a 33.7
per cent increase in capital
works spending to $98.8 mil-

lion.

Given the nature of the
Government’s budget, Mr
Smith said that if any spend-
ing cuts were necessary, “you
might have to put everything
on the block. Any adjust-
ments will have the effect of
limiting resources in other
areas”.

Given that the “big chal-
lenge” was that 60 per cent
of government spending went
on salaries, pensions and gra-
tuities, Mr Smith said the best
idea might be to assess how
much to cut spending by, then
impose a 10 per cent reduc-
tion across all departments
and ministries bar debt ser-
vicing.

“Nothing can be regarded
as sacred,” he warned, sug-
gesting that the 2010-2011
Budget would likely involve
wage and pay freezes, pro-
motion, increment and pen-
sion freezes, and early retire-
ment for those at this age.

“It’s kind of a call for a
national sacrifice that other
parts of the economy have
been making for the past two
years,” Mr Smith said. “If you
don’t do it now, it will have to
happen some time.

The fact that some 70 per
cent of the Budget’s costs
were fixed “doesn’t give you
much wiggle room”, Mr
Smith added. Other areas that
could be earmarked for cuts,
he suggested, were the sus-
pension of certain projects,
while non-revenue generat-
ing sectors - like health, edu-
cation and social services -
could also be targeted.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, NICOLA

JULIANA PACIOTTA of NASSAU, BAHAMAS
intend to change my name to CHRISTIANA NICOLA
BURROWS. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NATASHA ANGELA
PARKER of NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend to change the
name of my daughter from AHMAIR THERESA SAUNDERS
to AHMAIR THERESA PARKER. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days
after the date of publication of this notice.





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NAFCOD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by The Registrar General on the 3rd day of February,
AD., 2010.

Dated 14th day of May, A.D., 2010.
Gabriele Schneider

Liquidator of
NAFCOD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED





Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PALLAS INTERNATIONAL LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 13, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 25th day of June, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquida-
tor of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

MAY 14, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

NASBARE & COMPANY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45
of 2000), of NASBARE & COMPANY LIMITED has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of the completion of the dissolution
was April 6th, 2010.

|: |

aoeen EA
Foberice Kong V _

Liqpidater

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

Metaconsult Limited
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, Metaconsult Limited is in dissolution as of May
13, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

GORO LTD

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, GORO LTD is in dissolution as of May 11, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 5B

NOTICE
MAVERICK INVESTMENT HOLDING INC.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MAVERICK INVESTMENT HOLDING INC. is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 10" March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Diodata
Holdings Ltd. of Wickhams Cay, Tortola, British Virgin
Islands.

Dated this 18" day of March A. D. 2010



Diodata Holdings Ltd.
Liquidator































NOTICE
AQUILA ASIA LIMITED

N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) AQUILA ASIA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 13" May 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Peter Leppard
of c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393.

Dated this 18" day of May A. D. 2010



Peter Leppard
Liquidator

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

ESOBRAL HOLDINGS S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(1) of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45
of 2000, the dissolution of ESOBRAL HOLDINGS S.A.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of the completion of the dissolution
was April 26th, 2010.

- r = =
—— at = - aa
magnets [EL SERIE eA RAL
Liguedaior

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SONBUILT INVEST LTD

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
SONBUILT INVEST LTD is in dissolution as of May 10,
2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SOUTHGATE INC

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, SOUTHGATE INC. is in dissolution as of May
4, 2010.

Sarah Petre-Mears situated at Shaw’s Estate, Newcastle,
St. James Parish, Nevis, West Indies is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


























NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC JERRY of KEMP ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11â„¢ DAY of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

In The Estate Anne C. Doyle
late of 3640 North Ocean Drive in the
City of Singer Island in the Country of
Palm Beach in the State of Florida one
of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send before the 24th day of June,
2010, after which date the Administrators will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only
to the claims of which they shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date herein-
before metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FILLWORTH LEES
INVESTMENTS LTD.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FILLWORTH LEES INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLOUDY RESOURCES LTD.

— -——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLOUDY RESOURCES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAIRWAY OCEAN
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— + ——_

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FAIRWAY OCEAN INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE TRIBUNE

Lyford Cay
billionaire in $12.4m
Lehman claim row

FROM page 1B

by Tribune Business that the
former was “owed cash, plus
any costs and expenses
incurred, in connection with
securities activities undertak-
en in the fixed income securi-
ties prime brokerage account
that the fund maintained with
Lehman Brothers”.

Arguing that Lehman
Brothers had failed to settle
the Moore Macro Fund’s
short-selling of mortgage
backed securities, which
occurred on September 9,
2008, and return the cash bal-
ances held in the account
before bankruptcy, Moore
Capital Management said it
had notified the trustee that
the trades had terminated via
a letter some 15 days later.

“In the case of each of the
three trades, the termination
price of the mortgage-backed
securities was lower than the
original trade price,” Moore
Capital Management alleged.
“The fund [Moore Macro
Fund] therefore had an unre-
alised gain on its short sales of
securities of $5.784 million,
which Lehman Brothers owes
to the fund.”

Adding that the Bahamian
investment fund was also
owed interest on the unre-
alised gain, Moore Capital
Management further alleged:
“Lehman Brothers also owes
the fund cash in the amount
of $6.662 million. At the time
that Lehman Brothers liqui-
dation commenced, the fund
held the cash deposit in the
account for purposes of enter-

ing into transaction in fixed-
income securities.

“In addition, Lehman
Brothers owes the fund
accrued interest on the cash
deposit under the terms of the
agreement” between the two
sides.

The Lehman trustee had
denied the Bahamian invest-
ment fund’s claim on the
grounds that the funds sought
were allegedly not “customer
property” as defined by the
Securities Investor Protection
Act.

However, Moore Macro
Fund’s attorneys argued that
both the unrealised trading
gain and cash deposit should
have been - or were - “cus-
todied”, meaning that
Lehman Brothers held them
on trust in a fiduciary capaci-

ty for the benefit of clients.

Although Moore Macro
Fund’s short sales were effect-
ed through the Lehman
Brothers account, they never
settled, and “should be treat-
ed as having been completed
and closed out as of the trade
date.

“Had Lehman Brothers
settled the fund’s short sales
of the mortgage-backed secu-
rities, the fund would have
had short sale proceeds in the
account of approximately
$586 million. Lehman Broth-
ers default resulted in its
inability to settle the short
sale transactions, and forced
the termination of the trades
at prices lower than the orig-
inal sales prices, resulting in
the unrealised gain of $5.784
million.”

NOTICE is hereby given that JIFEMA RAPHAEL of #23
PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18â„¢ DAY OF MAY, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CAYUSE VENTURES S.A.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CAYUSE VENTURES S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EAGLE TRADING

INVESTMENTS INC.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EAGLE TRADING INVESTMENTS
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHAPARRAL

ENTERPRISES LTD.

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CHAPARRAL ENTERPRISES LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

URGENT

Notice for Claudette Pinder
Daughter of Willord Pinder (deceased)
Is hereby ask to contact
Edmund Russell
At Kevin M. Russell & Co.
373-9740/41 or
Anastacia Pinder: 352-2186 h
or 350-3515w

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEDO ASSETS LTD.

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLEDO ASSETS LID. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELKIN BRIDGE

INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ELKIN BRIDGE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAYANDA VISTANA INC.

— +——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of BAYANDA VISTANA INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 7B



Profitable firms
increasingly put
on the market

PROFITABLE Bahamian
businesses are increasingly
being placed on the market
for sale in the midst of trou-
bling economic times, accord-
ing to a business broker, as
entrepreneurs find their busi-
ness flat and unlikely to
increase in value in the short
to medium-term.

A release by Bahamas-
based business brokering
firm, Res Socius, revealed
that the recession has pro-
duced a “tremendous” oppor-
tunity for acquiring business-
es to expand and take advan-
tage of “economies of scale”.

According to founding
partner of Res Socius, Simon
Cooper, a sustained econom-
ic turnaround is not likely
until 2011, but there are
opportunities for business sec-
tors to consolidate, allowing
freed-up capital to be used
more productively.

“There is a risk of contin-
ued US dollar weakness,
expected for some time,
which is likely to hinder the
growth of the real US econo-
my,” he said.

“The ‘borrow and spend’
economy is ‘numbing the
pain’ for the time being, but

the bills will have to be paid at
some point. I believe a sus-
tainable US recovery is years
away, which has obvious ram-
ifications for the Bahamian
economy. There appears to
be a need for consolidation
of many business sectors right
now...”

Mr Cooper believes com-
panies should constantly
review their operations, and
diversify and improve effi-
ciencies, especially during
downturns.

“Res Socius helps business
owners reach the right deci-
sion for their particular cir-

cumstances,” he said. “That
may mean advising the client
to restructure in preparation
of a sale, wait, sell or simply
do nothing. However, if the
decision is to put the business
on the market, we assist with
everything from business val-
uation to closing.”

The firm was founded in
2009 and is authorized by the
Bahamas Investment Author-
ity to practice as business bro-
kers and consultants.

Mr Cooper has specialiaed
in the acquisition, mergers,
troubleshooting and divesti-
ture of businesses.

Leading law firm with offices located in
Nassau and Freeport is seeking to fill the
position.

Accounts Administrator

The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum qualifications:

An Associate’s Degree in Accounting or
Business Administration

Two to three years experience in a financial
environment

Computer Literate - proficiency in excel a plus
Excellent oral and written communication
skills

General responsibilities will include but not
limited to:

Accounts Payable & Receivable

Client Billing

Liasing with clients and outside agencies
Bank Reconciliations

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CASTELO INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
ANDERSON ASSOCIATES LIMITED

Personal Attributes
Ability to prioritize tasks
Ability to work with minimal supervision
Team Player
Punctual with excellent attendance

In Voluntary liquidation

WE OFFER
An attractive and competitive package of
benefits including a Pension Plan

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), ANDERSON
ASSOCIATES LIMITED, has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate
of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on
the 30th day of March, 2010.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, CASTELO INTERNATIONAL
LTD., has been dissolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 24th day of March,
2010.

Interested persons should apply in writing to:
The Human Resources Officer

P.O. Box N-4196
Nassau, Bahamas

To advertise, just call 502-2371

Mrs. Shiew Ling Katherine TSUI HUANG
1501 Ruttonjee House, Ruttonjee Centre
11 Duddell Street
Central, Hong Kong
Liquidator

Nautilus Corporate Services Limited,
of Nautilus House, La Cour des Casernes,
St. Helier, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE1 3NH
Liquidator





DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

This Months Topic: MENTAL HEALTH

LECTURE DATE:
Thursday, May 20th, 2010
@ 6PM
DOCTORS HOSPITAL, CONFERENCE ROOM

DOWDESWELL STREET
SEATING IS LIMITED, RSVP 302-4603

Please join US as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

‘a es
SPEAKER:
Dr. Rashida Brown-Clarke
Psychiatrist

LECTURE SERIES

Purpose:
To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished
physicians,

Get your Free Blood
Pressure Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between
“Weeting the needs of advertisers Spm & 6pm.
and readers motivates me to do
a good job. The Tribune is

iy newspaper.”

RSVP:
To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-003

ESTHER GARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune
My Voice. Wy Hewzpaper?

/DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Heater For Life







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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 9B



The Tribune

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

ibune Health is uncovering the
[eet of sex for both men and
women. Last week we spoke to
Dr Joseph | Evans, urologist at the
Bahamas Urology Center who pro-
vided insightful information about
the advantages of responsible and
safe intercourse.

Some of the advantages Dr Evans
listed are also benefiting to women
as well. The common denominators,
for instance include the fact that sex
helps to relieve stress, helps one to
sleep better, promotes a healthy self
esteem and is conducive to overall
mental health.

This week we spoke to our health
columnist Maggie Bain, a relation-
ship and sex therapist who said there
are female health advantages which
can be derived from sex as well. She
also said that women who are near-
ing menopause should engage in





consistent sexual activities with their
partners since it has positive effects
on the pubic and vaginal areas.

Decreases Vaginal Atrophy

This condition- which occurs
when the lining of the walls of the
vagina get thinner or become
inflamed due to insufficient female
hormones is usually faced by women
who are nearing menopause or who
have surpassed the menopausal
stage.

The condition causes intercourse
to be a less pleasurable and more
painful experience which in turn
causes sexual desire and interest to
diminish slowly.

To prevent that from happening,
Mrs Bain suggest mature women,
have sex more frequently with their
partners.

“Intercourse helps to increase
blood supply in the pelvic region.
The blood flow due to arousal helps
to keep the tissues and the entire
pelvic organs healthy,” she told Tri-



Benefits 0fsSex -

SEX FOR WOMEN

bune Health.

Sex Strengthens Pelvic Floor Muscles

During intercourse the muscles in
the pelvic region are constantly con-
tracting and relaxing. This continu-
ous contracting and relaxing helps
to strengthen the pelvic floor mus-
cles, Mrs Bain said.

Additionally pelvic floor strength
makes sex a more pleasurable expe-
rience according to Webmd.com.
“For women, doing a few pelvic floor
muscle exercises known as Kegels
during sex offers a couple of benefits.
They will enjoy more pleasure, and it
will also strengthen the area help-
ing to minimise the risk of inconti-
nence later in life,” the website
explained.

Sex Reduces Pain
For expectant mothers, frequent
sex can be a plus since it may relieve
pain during contractions. Wedmd
explains: “As the hormone oxytocin
surges, endorphins increase, and pain

declines. So if your headache, arthri- |
tis pain, or PMS symptoms seem to }
improve after sex, you can thank :

those higher oxytocin levels,” the : ; ng
:; take what I say and interpret it in a

website said.

In a study published by the Bul-
letin of Experimental Biology and :
Medicine and posted by Webmd, 48 :
volunteers who inhaled oxytocin ;
vapour and then had their fingers ;
pricked found that their threshold for :
pain was lowered by more than half. :

: asked with regard to euthanasia.

Improves Intimacy

Because women are emotional :
beings this benefit might be more }

significant.

“Sex improves intimacy between
partners. It helps couples to bond :
and build trust. During love making :

a woman needs to be touched, kissed
and hugged. Those things are really
important,” Mrs Bain explained.
She also said that hormones
released during intercourse create

ness and contentment.



By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIAN women now have
an alternative public health care out-
let from which to receive preventa-
tive care for the leading gynecologi-
cal cancer in the Bahamas.

The new Colposcopy Unit at the
South Beach Health Centre was offi-
cially launched last week and is
equipped to detect and treat early
stages of cervical cancer, considered
one of the most preventable forms of
cancer.

Colposcopy involves a thorough
examination of the cervix and tis-
sues of the vagina and vulva using a
special microscope called a colpo-
scope, which is able to detect pre-
malignant lesions which are treat-
able before they progress into cervi-
cal cancer.

If pre-malignant lesions are iden-
tified, the clinic has the facilities to
treat patients using cryosurgery or
loop electrosurgical excision proce-
dure (LEEFP).

A colposcopy is a more detailed
screening test that is recommended
based on the results of a routine
screening test called a PAP smear,
which all women over the age of 18
are encouraged to receive from their
health care provider during their
yearly physical examination.

The Ministry of Health stated that
less than ten per cent of women in
the Bahamas receive annual pap
smear tests.

Dr Darron Halliday, the focal
point physician for the Colposcopy
clinic, said the Bahamas has roughly
20-30 new cervical cancer cases each
year, according to international sta-
tistics.

He estimated: “About half of the
women die within a year of their
diagnosis, because they didn’t get a
pap smear and are only diagnosed
when in the advanced stages - usu-
ally symptoms would not present
themselves until Stage 3.”





th

a

The microscope was donated by
the Spanish government to all
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) member states that partici-
pated in a training program for gyne-
cologists and obstetricians, jointly
organised along with the CARI-
COM Secretariat.

CARICOM stated that the
Caribbean region has the highest
incidence of cervical cancer in the
Americas. The program was part of
a series of interventions designed to
“help reduce the incidence and
prevalence of cervical cancer in the



A

DR DARRON Halliday (seated at machine) and Dr Raleigh Butler (standing) put a patient through the steps on how the col-
poscope machine works during a demonstration at the South Beach Health Centre Health officials say the addition of the
machine and a Colposcopy Clinic at the Health Centre will help to improve outcomes for cervical cancer in women as a
result of more regular and early screenings.

Caribbean by building capacity
through training in the early detec-
tion and treatment of cervical can-
cer.”

Dr Halliday was one of 30 practi-
tioners who participated in the
“Train-the-Trainers’ program which
certified him as a trainer in col-
poscopy.

Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis said: “The establishment of a
colposcopy unit with a strong fol-
low-up and education unit will do
much to improve the long wait for
appointments at the Princess Mar-



%,

th.

\

atrick Hanna/BIS photo



garet Hospital, and relieve the bur-

individuals and their families in the
Bahamas.

rics on an ongoing basis.”

The Ministry of Health reports

that 1,000 women are referred annu- : . : .
: euthanasia of a terminally ill or

ally for abnormal pap smear tests in

the public health care system. Of
this amount, 300 women require col- :
: for your pet.

poscopy screenings.







Euthanasia

ALL OF us who love and care

: for our pets understand that we will
: outlive our pets and ultimately have
: to say good bye. But knowing that
: doesn’t make the reality any easier.
: Quality care can prolong the lives of
: our pets only for so long. As pet
: lovers we all feel the bond that ties
: us to our animal family members.

This human-animal bond can be,

: and often is, as strong as any inter-
: human bond. One of the problems
:; with getting so close to these rela-
: tively short lived creatures is that
: we will likely have to say good bye
: one day.

It is incumbent upon caring own-

ers to make the wisest, most com-
: passionate and certainly the most

difficult decision for our pets. The

! time will come when a longer life
: isn’t necessarily a better life. When
: the joy of living is gone, when pain
: replaces pleasure, and when your
: dog is ready to leap forward into
: the next adventures beyond your
: side, you can grant her the greatest
: gift of all, a merciful death.

I realise the topic of pet euthana-
sia is a sensitive one, and frankly it is
difficult to write about because
someone somewhere is going to

negative way. But after some
thought and reflection, I realise that
if a veterinarian can’t openly talk
about euthanasia and possibly help
someone struggling with this issue
then who can?

Some of the common questions

1) How is it done?

2) Does it hurt the animal?
3) How are the animal’s
remains handled?

Some advice to all animal lovers

: that I would offer at this time so
: that they can get through this diffi-
: cult period. I tell them that the one
: thing that most pet owners have in
: ~ | common is that we will likely outlive
good feelings that promote happi- our pets. 1am not a gambling man,
: but the odds are good that we will
: probably, at some time, face a deci-
: sion about euthanasia for our

South Beach Health Centre unveils Colposcopy Unit

: have been a veterinarian since 1983
: and throughout my career; I have
: had to euthanise many dogs, cats
|: and horses. I must confess that this

: is one of my most difficult tasks to
: do as a veterinarian.

beloved animal friend.
As a veterinarian, I approach the
task of euthanasia very seriously. I

For this reason, I believe that the

: method we use to ecuthanise should
: be truly humane, brief and painless.
: If that was not the case, I doubt I
: would not be able to sleep properly
: at night.

The most common method of

: euthanasia is the intravenous injec-
: tion of a barbiturate that rapidly
: renders the pet unconscious. With-
: in a few seconds this same medica-
: tion arrests the heart. This method
: assures us and the grieving pet own-
: er alike, that the animal feels no
: pain or anxiety and simply “falls
: asleep.” After a pet is put to rest,
: arrangements must be made for his
: or her remains. She can be cremat-
ed or buried at home, or whatsoev-
: er the owner wishes.

Over the last 20 years, I have

! worked with and supported many

i part of the healing process of the
: grief that is felt with the loss of a
; pet which to some can be equal to
: that felt with the loss of a family
: member.

families through the pain of their
pet’s euthanasia. Hugs, tears, hand
shakes, and other gestures are all

Euthanasia is a very personal

: decision. I truly feel that the pet

den of cervical cancer treatment to owner should make the decision on
: his or her own terms. The right time,

: the right place and the right reasons

This unit will allow for the edu- ; for putting your pet to sleep vary
cation and training of nursing and :

medical students, and residents rotat- : The pet owner needs to know that

ing through gynecology and obstet- : they need to do what feels right for

: them and their pet.

tremendously for each pet lover.

Euthanasia is a caring and loving
act. One must understand that

injured animal may be the most car-
ing and loving thing you will ever do

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Or

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Men and

S WOMEN, is it really possible for

A: to be able to relate to all aspects

of male sexuality? Even if we

thought of ourselves as very imaginative, and

believed that we could visualise being in their
shoes, would we be accurate?

Just as they are unable to truly ‘know us’,
the same has to be acknowledged. Our
unique DNA framework not only places us in
our gender groups, but also defines our indi-
vidual characteristics.

If we take time to stop and reflect, we see
a society of performance driven people. As
parents, we often feel the need to be com-
petitive with fellow parents. Giving our child
the ‘very best' surely reflects that we are the
best parents. Pushing and striving for the
highest grades, top in the class, best degrees
in the top universities, and so it goes on. Of
course, Maximising our true potential, and
not wasting our talents, is not only common
sense but realistic in our competitive world.

But what happens when we try our very
best, give it our all, and it still does not get us
where we want? Do we find ourselves being
a disappointment to those closest to us, and a
failure to ourselves?

Each gender has its own performance dri-
ven traits, but perhaps one of the most inter-
esting topics is how it affects male sexuality.
Myths surrounding sexual performance per-
meate in every society. Some cultures are
more rigid and unyielding, whilst others are



(Coy GREEN SCENE

Heirloom
fish pepper

ALTHOUGH hot peppers originated in
the foothills of the Andes they have spread
all over the tropical and sub-tropical world
and have developed into an amazing array
of shape, colour, size and heat strength.

For instance, Thailand has a great num-
ber of distinctive hot peppers and Hungar-
ian paprika is deservedly known worldwide.

Of this myriad of peppers there is one
that stands out for two very good reasons:
the foliage is variegated and the ripening
fruits are striped.

Fish pepper was taken to the US east-
ern seaboard in the mid-1800s from West
Africa and has been used by black fishing
communities around the Chesapeake Bay
to season fish, crabs and shellfish since the
beginning of the twentieth century. Its use
has spread to Philadelphia and Maryland
and other areas in the northeast United
States.

Fish pepper is a Capsicum annuum and
its most distinctive feature is its green and
white foliage. This makes the two-foot tall
plant a candidate for the ornamental garden
instead of the pepper patch.

Being an heirloom variety there are great
deviations in the variegation. Some plants
have leaves that are almost completely
green with a few variegated patches while
others bear leaves that are predominantly
white. The perfect fish pepper plant is even-
ly variegated.

The peppers are also very ornamental.
When young they are cream in colour and
then develop green striping. As the fruit
turns orange the striping becomes brown.
When the fish pepper is fully mature it is
bright red with no striping.

It is said that the name fish pepper came
about from the appearance of the striped
unripe fruits and their resemblance to the
markings of a fish. The use as a seasoning
for fish would be a natural step.

Fish pepper is in the middle of the heat
range, being about as pungent as Serrano. I
doubt if it would be a favourite in The
Bahamas because the ripe fruits are crunchy
and very difficult to mash with the tines of
a fork, the way bird peppers are dealt with
at boil fish time. The shoulders of fish pep-
pers are larger than Serrano and tends to
curve banana-wise and end in a point.

Fish pepper is the only party-coloured
pepper I know of. Many peppers change
colour and briefly show two colours at one
time but fish pepper is constant in its varied
colouration at different stages.

I came across fish pepper recently when
Steve and Janine Roessler, of Bahama Palm
Shores, Abaco, and Minnesota, asked me to
baby sit their plant for the summer. By the
time fall comes and I return the plant to
them I will have my own plants grown from
seed.

In the northeastern United States the
fish pepper would be grown as an annual
but here in The Bahamas the plant should
last for several years. It seems to me that we
did not have a true spring this year. Right
until the end of April there were unsea-
sonable cold winds. When the sun came
out and the breezes warmed up it was sud-
denly time to put on the air conditioning.
We went from winter to summer in a few
days early in May.

During the first week of May the first
bridal bouquet flower appeared and that
made me very happy. Bridal bouquet is a
frangipani (Plumeria pudica) that keeps its
attractive leaves year-round and flowers
from May to December. The masses of
beautiful white flowers with yellow centres
make a decided contrast to the typical
red/yellow/orange/pink of most tropical
flowers.

¢ gardenerjack@coralwave.com

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more liberal in their thinking.

High on the list is the focus on the quality
and frequency of erections. The concept that
men are always willing, ready and able, some-
times places unreasonable pressure. The nat-
ural thought process then moves towards that
sex is only intercourse, and requires a full
erection for penetration. We understand then
why men feel so responsible for successful
and satisfying lovemaking. Even if he allows
his partner to instigate, and lead the sexual
activity, he still considers himself 'in charge’.

Living with the knowledge that your erec-
tions pre-determine your potency, will hope-
fully affect your outlook towards your health.
Because the workings of the penis have so
much to do with circuitry, men need to follow
similar health guidelines for their heart. A
low fat diet is necessary to prevent clogging of
the arteries, and in turn increases blood flow
to the genital region. We know that exercise
and preventing weight gain, can improve
libido and performance by increasing testos-

terone. Testosterone, thyroid and glucose
levels play an important role and can be eas-
ily treated. Healthy living, minus chronic use
of cocaine, marijuana, alcohol, steroids, and
tobacco reduce risk factors and a negative
effect on male potency. Is it the paying atten-
tion to your health that prolongs your sex
life or vice versa?

Today, it is not only women who are inter-
ested in age rejuvenation and life extension,
but also men. More and more people are
becoming well informed about all aspects of
their sexual and reproductive systems. Once
again, education shows us that by early detec-
tion of even the smallest change can prevent
us from developing larger problems.

With the media's help, the public's appre-
ciation that their prescription medications
may adversely affect their sex life, places an
even greater pressure on the physician. Anti-
hypertensive, antidepressants, antipsychot-
ic, antiandrogen medications are the most
popularly prescribed groups to affect erec-
tions. Throw in chemotherapy and radiation
for the treatment of cancer and a chronic
problem develops.

Neurological problems such as Multiple
Sclerosis, Parkinson's, spinal cord injuries,
and long-term diabetes can disrupt the nor-
mal sequence of events necessary for an erec-
tion to occur. How to tackle these difficult
problems, maintain a personal sense of man-
hood, as well as maintaining a relationship





Sex: Male Sexual Health

become an interesting dilemma. Some prob-
lems are helped by various medical, phar-
maceutical, or mechanical interventions, and
by sex therapy. More often than not it is a
combination of treatments that is the most
effective.

It is extremely important to remember that
one of the most common erectile problems is
performance anxiety. When a man feels pres-
sured to achieve or maintain an erection, he
will commonly become more anxious when in
a sexually demanding situation. Stress increas-
es the body's production of catecholamine
such as serotonin, epinephrine, and norepi-
nephrine, which act as erection inhibitors. A
cycle begins and everything goes down hill
from there.

Healthy life practices need to be started
at a young age, however, you are never too
old to slow down the natural changes in our
bodies. If your sexual performance is impor-
tant to you, and your partner, then take time
to research ways to maximize your poten-
tial. It is important to remember that the way
we choose to live our lives influences those
around us and in particular our children.

¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock’ with Maggie
Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on Island FM102.9.
For appointments call 364-7230, email relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.

By Gardener Jack :







CREAM coloured fish peppers turn to green and cream, then orange and brown, then bright red.



a

THE fish pepper not only has variegated leaves, it has variegated fruits.





Sensitive
Skin

> How can I calm my sensitive
> skin?

: Simply put, sensitive, skin
> hurts.

: Sensitive, red, irritated skin
: is a frustrating disruption to
> everyday life. You're not
: alone: up to 90 per cent of the
* population perceives their
: own skin as sensitive. But, do
: you really have sensitive skin?
: Or is your skin sensitised,
* meaning the itching, redness
: and sensitivity is a result of
> environmental assaults? Take
: a look at the differences
> between these two conditions
: that share a similar result.



? Sensitive skin...

- © Those who have very

: fair skin and are usually of
> Northern European ancestry
: have a genetic predisposi-

: tion towards sensitive skin.
: This could be caused by the
* lower amount of pigmenta-
: tion and thinner epidermal
: layer, allowing for easier

: access of potentially-irritat-
* ing ingredients.

: © People with sensitive

> skin have more histamine

: readily produced in the

: body. The result is a more

: hypersensitive skin, waiting
: to react at any opportunity.

: Versus Sensitized Skin...

: = @ Sensitised skin isn't

> caused by a genetic predis-
: position. It can affect any-
* one, any age, of any race

: that is exposed to environ-
> mental assaults.

: And what they have in com-
: mon.

: ¢ Symptoms and triggers

: are the same for these con-
: ditions, as both experience

: itching, burning, dryness,

: flushing and stinging.

: Sensitive and sensitised

: skins form a weakened lipid
: barrier that's unable to

: shield against assaults that

> increase moisture loss and

: skin dehydration. Dehydrat-
: ed skin cells function poorly
: and skin's immunity weak-

> ens, creating a higher risk

: for skin diseases (rosacea,

: eczema, psoriasis) and infec-
: tion from irritants that con-
: tribute to skin sensitisation.

> © This information was taken

: from dermalogica.com. "Sarah
: Beek " is a Dermalogica Skin

> Care Therapist at The Dermal

: Clinic in Sandyport. Please call
: 327-6788 for more information
5 or visit www.dermal-clinic.com.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays











THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 11B





News from Japan

Calligraphy

In my quest to improve
my Japanese I decided to
learn how to write their
alphabet. However, anyone
who has seen my handwrit-
ing knows that I should
probably concentrate more
on forming my English
alphabet then trying to learn
the Japanese alphabet.

So I basically had two
strikes against me one being
left handed (it makes hard-
er to hold the brush cor-
rectly) and two not being
able to write well in general.
My calligraphy teacher how-
ever was awesome, a very
patient man who enjoys
teaching foreigners. In
Japanese writing you are
not just “drawing lines” like
I used to think, but creat-
ing stroke orders with your
brush. I often use to trace
over what he had done pre-
viously in order to create
the right stroke. However,
even with tracing, my results
didn’t always come out just
right.

This experience helped
me to be much more com-
passionate with my students
who were learning how to
write the English alphabet. I
think it’s important to put
yourself in their shoes to get
a better understanding of
how to teach them.

Cherry Blossoms! Sakura!

Japan is famous for its
cherry blossom season. This
means that winter is over
and spring has come. The
trees are beautiful with
white and pink leaves. The



season only lasts for one to
two weeks so the people
come out in masses in the
parks to enjoy the sunshine
and take advantage of the
beautiful scenery. It is like a
beach in the Bahamas dur-
ing the summer holidays.
The only that is missing is
someone’s car blasting loud
music in the background. I
thought that Bahamians,
Canadians, the Spanish and
the French drank a lot but
that was before I met the
Japanese. All on their pic-
nic tables were empty beer
cans (arranged neatly of
course even the drunks are
neat here).

I really like that about
Japanese people no matter
how festive the atmosphere
is and how drunk they get,
there are never any fights.
Everyone is happy and hav-
ing a good time. I wish all
cultures were like that.

Kimono/Yukata

You know those beauti-
ful traditional Japanese
dresses (Kimono/Yukata)
that you see on television
and in Memoirs of a
Geisha? I had the opportu-
nity to wear one at a party
in Tokushima.

While they are beautiful
to look at and Japanese
women are really elegant

wearing them the actually
process of getting it on, isa
REAL pain in the butt. It’s
like yow’re putting on your
wedding dress, the stages of
sucking in and putting on...
you understand why they
only wear those on special
occasions.

Garbage in Bikes

Once in awhile, after
returning from leaving your
bike in one place for a time
it is possible to meet ran-
dom garbage in your bas-
ket. It was most likely left
behind by some kids too
lazy to take home their
garbage. It doesn’t happen
often but enough times to
get on your nerves.

As I was leaving a store
one day already annoyed at
something, I caught this
teenager dropping her ciga-
rette and juice can in MY
bike basket. I walked right
up to her turned on my
junglist voice (it came out
of no where). And said
“Sweet gurl you bes take
dat ting out ma basket if ya
know what good fur ya.”

Don’t really know where
that came from as I normal-
ly don’t talk like that. I
guess as a Bahamian we all
have a bit of junglist in us.

Her reaction? Even
though I spoke in English
she understood my point.
She was totally scared gave
me a REALLY DEEP bow.
All of her friends laughed
at her. I am sure that she
will think next time she
throws her stuff in someone
else’s bike.





TT is famous ma its cherry blossom ein















il

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM























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TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010



Man Made



By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

IS work has been seen in fashion
Hi shows both locally and abroad. He has
assisted with special effects makeup in
the 2006 American movie Pirates of the
Caribbean Dead Mans Chest and the
Bahamian film Balls Alley.

He has done makeup for a number of music videos
and American celebrities like rapper Eve. And that is
just a small portion of the professional work D'Angelo
Bethel has in his portfolio.

Makeup artist at the MAC store in the Cosmetic
Boutique located on Bay Street, Mr Bethel has creat-
ed a fabulous reputation for himself. His exquisite tal-
ent, knowledge of beauty, and out of this world per-
sonality has him on the “most wanted list” for proms,
weddings, and other special occasions.

Ten years ago, one might have met Mr Bethel in a
salon with a curling iron in one hand and a bottle of
hair spray in the next. But after attending fashion and
beauty schools in the United Kingdom, he found his
niche and inspiration in make up art.

He initially wanted to further his education in hair
care, but after being surrounded with hair and make-
up he got inspired to pick up a brush, and a eye shad-
ow palette making the face his blank canvas.

"I started off modeling, then I began doing a little bit
of everything surrounding fashion. I got into photog-
raphy, makeup, and hair,” I fell in love with every
type of makeup,” he told Tribune Woman.

While passion is the main ingredient to excel in this
field, he agrees that one must be artistically inclined.

"I do believe that a person must be talented artisti-
cally because this field involves art," Mr Bethel said.



a

GO

fp . \ Pa
ae Be
me i va i

Addl
ies

EAUTY.

Because of the type of work Mr Bethel does, he
often finds himself hopping off planes at airports all
over the United States, Canada and Europe.

"Tam always traveling. I have been almost all over
the United States and I have also been to a few places
in Europe. I get to meet a lot of people when they
come in and out of the store. I just recently met a lady
who lives in Atlanta. She hired me to do makeup for a
special occasion they were having,” he said.

He says being a male in a female dominated indus-
try in the Bahamas has not always been easy, but the
strength he has gained throughout the years has kept
him standing tall.

He approached the tongue lashing from others who
are not as open as he is about this career choice posi-
tively.

"T try to remain strong through it all. I don't allow the
things that people say about me or my career get to me.
I love what I do and I will continue to do it well," he
said.

The beauty industry locally and internationally can
expect to see more work from this young make up
artist at fashion shows, in movies and ad campaigns.

During our interview Mr Bethel, gave Tribune
Woman a few of the do's and don'ts of makeup appli-
cation.

A don't that he sees is becoming very popular, is the
trend where women are wearing very thick eyelashes.
He said this not suited for a everyday look. "This is
more for a high fashion look, or a photo shoot or a
fashion show, it is just not cute," he said.

For flawless skin, he emphasised skin care, because
if the skin is not taken care of then it is impossible to
have a ravishing finish he said.

And now that summer is here wearing less is best. "I
would advised women to wear less foundation and
light powder. It would also be best of they purchase
makeup with SPF (Sun Protection Factor).”







D' ANGELO Bethel has honed this everyday activity into a
professional career, excelling greatly in this female domi-
nated industry.









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THE TRIBUNE

ND

UESDAY, MAY 18,

PAGE 9

OF





t

2010









SPECIAL ATHLETES from New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco compete during the 2009 Nationals...

Special Olympic Nationals:
Bocce, field events to start

total of 200 special
athletes have reg-
istered to take part

in the Special Olympic
Nationals later this month,
according to Basil Christie,
national chairman of Special
Olympics Bahamas.

And they will be trying to
impress the selection com-
mittee for next year’s World
Games in Athens, Greece,
says Roosevelt Thompson,
the sports director.

“Every year in May ath-
letes from the islands of Aba-
co and Grand Bahama head
to the capital to compete for

Athletes look to be selected
for World Games in Greece



the coveted gold medals.

“Grand Bahama has regis-
tered 58 athletes and Abaco
45. A total of 200 athletes
have registered this year.
These athletes have been
training all year and will be
competing in bocce and track
and field, said a press state-
ment.

However, due to the clos-
ing of the Betty Kenny-Kelly

Aquatic Centre, the swim-
ming competition has been
postponed until September.
The preliminaries for boc-
ce and field events are slated
for noon to 6pm on Friday,
May 21, at the College of the
Bahamas playing grounds.
And the track events are set
for 9am-4pm on Saturday,
May 22, at the Thomas A
Robinson stadium.

“The opening ceremony
and lighting of the torch
begins at 9am. Finals in boc-
ce and track and field take
place all day,” said the state-
ment. “The public is invited
to have the experience of a
lifetime by sharing in the
competition and winning spir-
it of our Special Olympics
athletes. Admission is free
and volunteers are welcome.”

In February, a number of
athletes successfully repre-
sented the Bahamas at the
Special Olympics Latin
American Games in Puerto
Rico.

Andre Rodgers championships
expected to be ‘biggest to date’

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ORGANISERS of the 8th
Annual Andre Rodgers
National Baseball Champi-
onship anticipate that it will
be the largest to date.

The Bahamas Baseball
Federation (BBF) is sched-
uled to host the event June 3-
6in Grand Bahama, which is
expected to feature a record
37 teams and more than 650
athletes representing six
islands across the Bahamas.

Under the theme “All
Roads Lead to Grand
Bahama,” games will be host-
ed at the Grand Bahama
Baseball Park and the YMCA
Baseball Park.

The National Baseball
Championships will feature
players in six age brackets:
Coach Pitch (7-8), Bantam
Minor (9-10), Bantam Senior
(11-12), Junior (13-15), Senior
High School (16-18) and Col-
legiate Divisions (25-and-
under).

Participating leagues
include the Abaco Baseball
League (ABL), Bimini Base-
ball League (BBL), Grand
Bahama Amateur Baseball
League (GBABL), Grand
Bahama Little League
(GBLL), Eleuthera Baseball
Association (EBA), Freedom
Farm Baseball League
(FFBL), Inagua Baseball
Association (IBA), Junior
Baseball League of Nassau
(JBLN), Legacy Baseball
League (LBL) and the Span-
ish Wells Baseball Associa-
tion (SWBA).

The opening ceremony is
set for 7:30pm June 4 at the
Grand Bahama Baseball
Park, followed by the
evening’s feature game,
Grand Bahama Little League
against Bimini in the Senior
High School Division.

Craig Kemp, president of
the BBF, said the federation
is adequately prepared and
looks forward to the notion
of hosting the largest edition
of the tournament in federa-



BASEBALL

tion history.

“This is the biggest tourna-
ment we have had to date
thus far and all indications
suggest that it will be an excit-
ing and ultimately successful
one,” he said. “Planning for
an event of this magnitude is
quite a task and we actually
begin preparations from Jan-
uary to ensure the event is
hosted the right way. There
is much for us to take into
account but those are things
we need to do if we expect to
continue hosting the event in
a successful manner as we
have in past years.”

Kemp said the move from
New Providence to Grand
Bahama should pay dividends
to all and aid in the develop-
ment of the sport throughout
the country.

Editions

“To date all of the previ-
ous editions have been hosted
in New Providence and we
thought it would be a nice
change of pace to switch the
venue to Grand Bahama,” he
said.

“Tt should do well for the
economy of Grand Bahama
and the New Providence kids
are excited about travelling
to compete, and for many of
them this will be their first
time doing that so we expect
the competition level to be as
exciting as it has been in the
past.”

The BBF is also set to
recognise baseball legends
from past generations with its
highest honour — the Lifetime
Achievement Award — which
will be presented at the open-
ing ceremony.

The 2010 honourees
include Fred “Papa” Smith of
New Providence, Franklyn
“Cox” Rolle of Grand
Bahama and George Weech
and Glen Rolle, both of Bimi-
ni.

The executive body will

also honour “deserving
Bahamians” who have played
an integral role in the devel-
opment of baseball in the
Bahamas.

Past recipients include Greg
Burrows in 2007, Bernard
Aranha in 2008 and Reno

Introducing The All NEW EP

Brown in 2009.

Major sponsors for the
event include Insurance Man-
agement, UBS Bahamas Ltd,
Gatorade, BTC, ZNS
TV/Radio, Cable 12 TV,
D’Albenas Agency Ltd and
Phil’s Food Services.

$=.

Drive one.








Goss wins
9th stage of

Giro d'Italia...
See page 10




‘0’ Ferguson's
‘pertormance
for the ages’

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ith several NCAA
conference track
and field champi-

onships completed over the
weekend, the Bahamas’ pres-
ence emerged across the US
with a series of impressive
performances, including one
sprinter who accomplished a
rare feat.

Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson led
the way for the Bahamian
contingent with a perfor-
mance for the ages at the SEC
Championships in Knoxville,
Tennessee.

The Auburn University
junior captured a trio of first
place performances in the 100
and 200m and led her team
in the 400m relay.

The three first place finish-
es enabled her to win the
Commissioner’s Trophy, giv-
en to the highest female point
scorer in the meet.

In the century, she turned
in a season’s best time of
11.19s, the fifth fastest time
in the NCAA this season.

She returned to complete
the sprint double by winning
the 200m in a time of 23.09s,
just barely missing out on her
season’s best. She became the
woman in school history to
complete the sprint double,
joining Jamaican Kerron
Stewart.

Grand Bahamian native
Nivea Smith also had a pair of
noteworthy performances in
the sprint double. She finished
third in the 200m in 23.41s
and was fifth in the 100 in
11.57 seconds. The duo joined
teammates Shaquela Williams
and Joanna Atkins to take the
400m relay in 43.38s.

The Auburn men’s and
women’s track and field teams
both finished in fourth place.

The women finished with
97 points while trailing only
LSU, the SEC champions
took the event with 132
points.



In the Big
12 champi-
onships, a
pair of
Bahamian
quartermilers
squared off
in the men’s
event.

Demetrius
Pinder of
Texas A &
M University
finished in second place with a
time of 46.02s, while Latoy
Williams was fifth in 47.02s.

Pinder’s teammate Tabarie
Henry took the event in
45.89s.

Williams returned with
teammates Bryce Brown,
Zach Plinario, and Jamele
Mason to reach the medal
podium with a third place fin-
ish in the 1600m relay.

Also in the Big 12, Marcus
Thompson of Baylor Univer-
sity continues his return from
injury but failed to advance
past the preliminaries in both
short sprints. He finished 16th
in the 200m and 19th in the
100m in 21.80s and 11.03s
respectively.

At the PAC 10 Champi-
onships, sprinter Karlton
Rolle of UCLA was fifth in
the final of the 200m in a time
of 21.68s, while Natalya Bene-
by of California finished 11th
in the 400mH and failed to
advance to the final.

In the field, Lamar Delaney
represented the University of
Houston at the Conference
USA Championships.

Delaney was impressive in
both jump events as he fin-
ished second in the long jump
with a leap of 7.46m and third
in the triple jump with a leap
of 15.36m.

In the Southland Confer-
ence Championships, Juan
Lewis finished fifth in the
400m for the University of
Texas at Arlington in a time
of 47.59s, while in the Great
West Championships, Jame-
son Strachan was also fifth in
the same event in 49.67s.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

D’backs
acquire
right-handed
reliever from
Indians

PHOENIX (AP) — The
Arizona Diamondbacks have
acquired right-handed reliev-
er Saul Rivera from the
Cleveland Indians in
exchange for cash considera-
tions.

Rivera was 2-0 with four
saves and a 0.53 ERA during
15 relief appearances for
Triple-A Columbus. He was
signed by the Indians to a
minor league contract on Dec.

21.
Played

Rivera has played part of
13 seasons professionally,
including four seasons with
the Washington Nationals
from 2006-09.

The Diamondbacks on
Monday also released right-
hander Bob Howry. The 36-
year-old Howry went 1-0 with
a 10.67 ERA in 14 relief
appearances for Arizona this
season. Arizona has by far the
worst bullpen statistically in
the major leagues.

AUSTRALIA’S captain Alex Blackwell (second left) jumps to join her teammates to celebrate their win over New Zealand in the Twenty20

Cricket World Cup women final match in Bridgetown, Barbados, on Sunday. Australia won by 3 runs...



IRVING, Texas (AP) —
Dallas Cowboys quarter-
back Tony Romo is throw-
ing passes instead of
putting.

Romo was on the field
with the Cowboys as orga-
nized team activities began
Monday.

The quarterback had a
tee time Monday morning
for a chance to earn a spot
in the Byron Nelson Cham-
pionship, the PGA Tour
event this week just down
the road from the team’s





TONY ROMO (AP)

Romo passing instead of putting

Valley Ranch practice facil-
ity. But the tee time con-
flicted with the voluntary
workout.

Romo is getting his first
chance to throw passes to
receiver Dez Bryant, the
team’s first-round draft pick
last month.

Returning receivers
Patrick Crayton and Sam
Hurd both were given per-
mission to seek a trade after
Bryant was drafted. Hurd
was on the field Monday,
Crayton wasn’t.





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(AP Photo)

Gilles Simon pulls
out of French Open

PARIS (AP) — Gilles Simon of France has withdrawn from
the French Open because he is not in shape after returning from

a knee injury.

He will be replaced in the main draw by Igor Kunitsyn of
Russia. The clay-court major starts Sunday.

Simon started training only last week, and the French tennis
federation said Monday he "feels inadequately prepared to
play in an event as demanding as Roland Garros."

The Frenchman is ranked No. 32.

Uchiyama retains
his WBA super
featherweight title

a



r



JAPANESE champion Takashi Uchiyama (right) sends a right to
Venezuelan challenger Angel Granados in their WBA super feather-
weight title match in Saitama, near Tokyo, on Monday. Uchiyama
stopped Granados in the sixth round to retain his title.

(AP Photo)

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Injury concerns
remain as the US
team opens camp

By RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer

PRINCETON, N.J. (AP)
— Before wrapping them-
selves in the red, white and
blue, the US soccer team sur-
rounded themselves with
orange and black.

Players began training for
the World Cup on Monday at
Princeton University’s
Roberts Stadium, a $13.4 mil-
lion soccer facility opened two
years ago by the alma mater
of US coach Bob Bradley,
who also coached the Tigers
from 1984-95.

Even on the first day of
workouts, there were injuries
that caused goalkeeper Tim
Howard (quadriceps strain),
defender Jay DeMerit
(abdominal strain), forward
Eddie Johnson (hamstring
strain) and defender Chad
Marshall (slight hamstring
strain) to be in the trainer’s
room instead of the lush,
green grass.

Defender Carlos Bocane-
gra (abdominal strain) did
ball work on his own. Landon
Donovan, Edson Buddle and
Jose Torres were off getting
physicals, and four players
based in Europe had yet to
arrive.

And there were still ques-
tions about one player who
won’t be coming, forward
Charlie Davies, who thought
he had recovered sufficiently
from a near-fatal car crash last
October to merit an invita-
tion only to learn last Tuesday
he had been omitted from the
30-man preliminary roster.

Bradley said he made the
decision based on input from
US trainers and the staff of
Davies’ French club, Sochaux.
Bradley even viewed a video
of Davies in a recent training
session in France.

Singh out of
top 50 for 1st
time since

1992

LONDON (AP) — The
world golf ranking does not
have Vijay Singh among the
top 50 for the first time in
nearly 18 years.

Singh slipped to No. 51 in
the world ranking published
Monday after he failed to
qualify for the final 36 holes at
the Texas Open. It was his
fifth consecutive tournament
without earning ranking
points.

The last time Singh was
ranked out of the top 50 was
August 16, 1992. He won the
German Open the next week
and has been in the top 50
every week since. Singh is the
only other player besides
Tiger Woods to be No. 1 in
the world during the last
decade, reaching the top for
the first time in 2004.

The timing could not have
been worse. Singh has one
week to get back into the top
50 or he will have to qualify
for the US Open.

Goss wins 9th stage of Giro d'Italia

CAVA DE TIRRENI,
Italy (AP) — Matthew Goss
of Australia won the ninth
stage of the Giro d'Italia in
a sprint finish Monday while
Alexandre Vinokourov of
Kazakhstan kept the overall
lead.

Goss, who rides for the
HTC-Columbia team, cov-
ered the mostly flat 116-mile
leg from Frosinone to Cava
De' Tirreni in 4 hours, 8 min-
utes, 17 seconds. This was the
first victory of the season for
Goss, who usually sets up
sprints for teammates Mark
Cavendish and Andre
Greipel.

"It was nice to get a win,"
Goss said. "It was a very hard
finish, slightly uphill."

Filippo Pozzato of Italy was
second and Tyler Farrar of
the United States was third.
Farrar, who won the second
stage, took over the points
jersey usually reserved for the
race's top sprinter.

Vinokourov maintained a
72-second lead over Cadel
Evans of Australia in the
overall standings.

Four riders took part in a
breakaway for most of the





MATTHEW GOSS is kissed by the race hostesses as he stands on the
podium after winning the ninth stage of the cycling race...
(AP Photo)

stage, opening a lead of 4
minutes at one point.

The last two remaining rid-
ers — Michael Barry of
Canada and Mikhail Ignatiev
of Russia — were caught by

the main pack with 3 miles to

go.

Tuesday's 10th stage in
southern Italy is a rolling 143-
mile route from Avellino to
Bitonto.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Full Text
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HIGH 87F
LOW 78F

SUN AND
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Volume: 106 No.146

FEATURES

SEN Me LOu sy es | Me

Haitians to he evicted



Landowner moves
to reclaim Marsh
Harbour property

T= om A



Pn

BEING EVICTED: Pigeon ar Poco

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



HUNDREDS of Haitian families living in
Marsh Harbour’s Pigeon Pea settlement will
be evicted from their homes as the landown-
er moves to reclaim his property.

Anger over the illegal settlement of around
1,500 residents bordering The Mud, where
an estimated 2,000 more migrants live on gov-
ernment land, has reached boiling point in
Abaco, locals say.

And landowner Ricky Albury started to
serve eviction notices to residents last night
after securing the deeds to generational prop-
erty left to the heirs of Nathan Key.

A previous attempt to evict the hundreds of
residents living on his land without permission
fell flat ten years ago when the matter was not
pursued, but Mr Albury is now confident the
residents will have to vacate his property with-
in six months or be taken to court.

He served eviction notices to residents last
night with the help of a police officer and
Marsh Harbour and Spring City Township
chairman Roscoe Thompson III, and will con-
tinue to serve notices as the community cele-
brates Haitian Flag Day today.

It is anticipated the move will drive evicted
Pigeon Pea residents into The Mud, and Mr

SEE page 11

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SUSA TODAY.
BAHAMAS EDITION

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Chureh
lreakaway
linked to gay
controversy

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





A LEADER in the
Presbyterian kirks of
The Bahamas has
announced the official
abandonment their
“mother church”, the
Church of Scotland, to
align with an evangelli-
cal church in the US.

The move has been
connected to the world-
wide tensions in the
church over the issue of
the ordination of gay
ministers.

Reverend Scott Kirk-























s land of the (Freeport)
a Lucaya Presbyterian
: S Church yesterday con-
â„¢ "ee = firmed that he and elder
a \ = Captain Dugie McNab
rs ' i £ will represent the con-
J P cn P| ah * es &
‘fae * -_ | La = SEE page 11
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CHARGED: Kooban Bar, 26 CHARGED: Merritt Forbes, 26 Mavnar d-Gib son
By NATARIO McKENZIE when he became the victim of a drive-by shooting. Forbes, y
Tribune Staff Reporter alias “Mole”, of Pinewood Gardens, and Barr, of Sir Lynden * oe
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net Pindling Estates, were arraigned before Chief Magistrate confirms decision
Roger Gomez, in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday. They :
TWO men were arraigned in court yesterday charged were not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. not to run again
with the murder of a teenage boy who was gunned down in The two are also accused of conspiring to murder young
broad daylight. Miller. They were not required to enter a plea. By ALISON LOWE
Police have charged Merritt Forbes, 26, and Kooban Last week, Seriozha McKenzie, 31, of Miller's Heights, Tribune Staff Reporter
Barr, also 26, with the murder of Berkley Theophilus Miller. was arraigned in connection with Miller’s murder. alowe@tribunemedia.net

Miller, 17, of Stapeldon Gardens, was walking on Regent
Street, in Miller's Heights, at about 6pm on Friday, May 7, SEE page 11 IN the wake
of Allyson

Maynard-Gib-

Oil spillage concern mounts =":











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By ALISON LOWE aa Pinewood in
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- attire operate | = PLP leader saynard-Gibson
IN what could be the realisation of a worst-case a 7 mee Perry Christie
scenario for The Bahamas, several scientists are say- | &, tha oak Minp 1T says his party
ing that oil from the Gulf spill has now entered the Pi ge pe is having difficulty “balancing
“loop current” that could bring it flowing into Bahami- = mn the old with the new” as it
an waters. fin monet moves to pin down its slate of
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SEE page twelve MAP shows forecasted location for oil for SEE page 11
Monday amid growing fears for the Bahamas.

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with a Fast Track Loan.

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SSAU AND BAHAMAISUCANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Miller's injuries ‘could have been
Caused hy more than one weapon

MORE than one weapon
could have been used in the
attack on murder victim
Mario Miller, a forensic
pathologist testified yester-
day. Dr Govinda Raju was
back on the witness stand as
the retrial into the June 2002,
murder continued in the
Supreme Court.

Mario Miller, 28, was
found dead with multiple
stab and chop wounds on
various parts of his body in
bushes near the Super Value
food store in Winton on Sat-
urday, June 22, 2008.

Brothers Ricardo Miller,
alias “Tamar Lee”, and Ryan
Miller, alias “Manny”, are
charged with Mario's mur-
der. Both men are on bail.

Dr Raju told the court
that the 18 injuries sustained
by murder victim Mario
Miller could have been
caused by more than one
weapon.

He said a sharp object,
possibly a knife, could have
been used to cause Mario’s
injuries.

The doctor also noted that
there were no injuries to
Mario’s lower extremities
and that there were defen-
sive injuries on Miller’s right
palm, outer right forearm
and the back of his left hand.

During cross-examination
by attorney Dorsey McPhee,
who is representing Ricardo
Miller, Dr Raju said the
injuries could have been
caused by one knife but
added that it was unlikely.

Daryl Bartlett, a pilot and
friend of the victim, said that
on Saturday, June 22, 2002,
he received a box for Mario.
He did not know who it
came from, and did not
know the person who deliv-
ered it between 7 and 8am.

He said that he spoke to
Mario over the phone twice
that morning and saw him
around 10am, at which time
he gave Mario the box.

The witness said the pair
then arranged to meet later




FAMILY GUARDIAN

in the day. He said he called
Mario later that afternoon,
but was unable to reach him.

Under cross-examination
by attorney Richard Bootle,
who represents Ryan Miller,
Bartlett admitted that he had
been arrested and ques-
tioned about Mario’s death,
but said he was not charged
with anything.

Barry Pinder, a self
employed heavy duty truck
and tractor operator, also
took the witness stand.

He told the court that he
was doing work in the
Yamacraw Beach Estates
area on morning of June 22,
2002, and at around 7.30am,
dropped off some employ-
ees to a site and gave them
instructions.

Mr Pinder said he then
went to the beach to relax
and train his dog.

He said that around 10 or
llam, he saw a green and
gold jeep drive past him and
15 minutes later, what
appeared to be a white Sen-
tra heading in the same
direction. He said the driver
tooted the car’s horn.

The witness said that
about an half hour later, he
saw the Sentra come back
but not the jeep.

He said that he took a dri-
ve up the beach and saw the
jeep in the middle of a cause-
way with its left door open.

Mr Pinder said he
assumed lovers were in the
car and did not want to dis-
turb them, so he went back
the way he came.

The trial resumes today
before Senior Justice Jon
Isaacs.

The first trial ended four
weeks after it began in Janu-
ary, 2006, when the court
learned that a juror sitting
on the case was closely con-
nected to a relative of the
accused. The second trial was
declared a mistrial on Octo-
ber 7, 2008, when the jury
failed to reach a unanimous
verdict.

$10 million worth of
marijuana plants seized

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net





FREEPORT- The discovery of sever-
al marijuana fields in East Grand
Bahama on Sunday resulted in the
seizure of 10,000 plants with an estimat-
ed street value of $10 million.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey, police press
liaison officer, reported that three men
were taken into custody and are assisting
police with their investigations.

According to reports, at around
6.45am, a team of officers from the Drug
Enforcement Unit (DEU) were search-
ing a bushy area off Perimeter Parkway
when they came upon three men in a
red Daewoo. The men sped off when
they saw the officers, ASP Mackey said.

A chase followed and police were able
to bring the car to a stop. They arrested
the occupants — a 30-year-old man and

two 31-year-old men.

Searching the car, the officers found
two large buckets filled with marijuana,
some marijuana seeds mixed with soil
and two bottles of drinking water.

Detectives searched the immediate
area and found several fields containing

10,000 plants in total.

“The plants, which range in height
from one foot to six feet, have a total
street value of some $10 million,” ASP

Mackey said.





Bahama on Sunday.

DEU officers are seen cutting and removing marijuana plants discovered in East Grand



Government approves redevelopment of Centreville House

By ALESHA CADET

GOVERNMENT has offi-
cially given its approval for the
redevelopment of Centreville
House as the National Museum
of the Bahamas.

Making the announcement
yesterday at the Antiquities,
Monuments and Museums Cor-
poration (AMMC) office, Min-

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GOVERNMENT has officially given its approval for the ssleebonehto of
Centreville House as the National Museum of the Bahamas.

tions, cultural activities and edu-
cational exhibits. It is our goal
to transform Centreville House
into one of the premier educa-
tional and touristic attractions
in the nation.”

The decision, together with
the selection and restoration of
Villa Doyle as the National Art
Gallery, shows the strong com-
mitment of the government to
the promotion of cultural edu-
cation and awareness, Mr May-
nard said.

He said the transformation of
Centreville House on Shirley
Street into a national museum
is something the AMMC, and
indeed the entire cultural com-
munity, has been anticipating for
some time.

However, he said that the
restoration will have to proceed
in small steps “because it is not
an inexpensive or an easy task.”

To date, the priority has been
to stabilise the building’s struc-
ture, remove non-original parti-
tions and infrastructure, and
landscape the grounds.

The next stage of the devel-
opment will be the full restora-
tion of the 35,000 square foot
mansion itself.

“It is essential to make the
building waterproof, a $405,411

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contract will be signed today
with Osprey Developers to
repair the gutters, parapets,
dormers and roof tiles. The
entire roof will be pressure
cleaned and a thermoflex water-
proof coating applied,” Mr May-
nard said.

“Despite financial constraints,
funds have been assigned to
kick-start the redevelopment
process, because it is vital to
secure the building and prevent
further deterioration. But this is
only the initial phase.”

Thomas Whitehead, vice-pres-
ident of Osprey Developers, said
the restoration of the museum
is a 12 to 16-week project.

The next phase will be the
restoration of the remainder of
the structure to include all the
floors from the basement to the
attic; external plaster and tex-
tured stucco to the main
entrance; external terrace walls
and dormers. This phase is esti-
mated to cost $1.6 million.

The final phase will be the
interior restoration and outtfit-
ting of the National Museum of
the Bahamas.

Mr Maynard said that the
AMMC is working with a num-
ber of entities, including the His-
toric Bahamas Foundation to
raise the necessary funds to com-
plete this “costly, yet very worth-
while project.”

“TI would invite the general
public to help us in this national
enterprise,” he said.

Once the home of Ralph
Collins, a prominent citizen and
parliamentarian who died in
1946, the current building was
erected in 1931, but a residence
known as Centreville existed on
the site as early as 1871.

The estate once extended
from Shirley Street in the north
to almost Wulff Road in the
south and east to what is now
Palmdale.

, —
Re a a

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



PLP seeks commission of inquiry

into container port safety measures

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP wants a commis-
sion of inquiry to look into safe-
ty measures at the Freeport
Container Port as the party is
not satisfied the government
ordered independent inquiry is
sufficiently objective.

FCP staff are said by the PLP
to have been the subject of
manipulation in the inquiry
launched by an independent
occupational health and safety
expert five weeks after a tor-
nado struck the port and three
workers were killed on March
29.

Dozens of maintenance
workers were also injured in
the storm, leading FCP staff to
question the safety regulations
put in place by facility owner
Hutchison Whampoa.

An initial investigation under
the Department of Labour
raised questions of negligence
by staff at the Meteorological
Office in Nassau for not giving
sufficient warning, and the PLP
blamed the FNM for closing
the Meteorological Office in
Grand Bahama prior to the
storm.

An independent investiga-
tion to establish all of the facts
surrounding the incident led by
occupational health and safety
expert Jacques Obadia was
secured by the International
Labour Organisation (ILO)
and launched on May 6.

But the PLP has now called
into question the integrity of
the investigation.

A statement released by PLP
chairman Bradley Roberts yes-
terday said the party has been
“reliably informed” that
employees of the FCP who par-
ticipated in this investigation
are required to undergo a
“debriefing” before being inter-
viewed by the ILO investiga-
tor.

MINISTER of Labour Dion
Foulkes has hit back at PLP chair-
man Bradley Roberts, calling his
comments about the investigation
into the Container Port accident,
“reckless and irresponsible”.

Mr Foulkes said the Department
of Labour has received no com-
plaints from any of the employees
at the Container Port to substanti-
ate the “baseless allegations” made by the PLP.

He said: “If the PLP has any information to
substantiate their allegations they should present
such information to the Department of Labour
so that the appropriate authorities can review
these complaints.”

Mr Foulkes said the Ministry of Labour has
full confidence in the investigation which was
conducted by the International Labour Organ-



Dion
Foulkes

isation’s recommended health and safety expert,
Jacques Obadia, who completed his inquiry on
Saturday. He added: “The PLP government in
2006 also sought the ILO’s assistance when a
male employee of the Grand Bahama Shipyard
died as a result of an industrial accident. The
PLP government engaged Mr Sparks, a health
and safety expert, to conduct the investigation
pursuant to the ILO’s recommendation.

“The same confidence the PLP reposed in
the ILO, is the same confidence the FNM gov-
ernment has in this specialised agency of the
United Nations. The PLP’s claims are an attack
on the integrity of Mr Obadia.”

Mr Foulkes said Mr Robert’s comments were
also a demonstration of the “hypocrisy, deficit of
credibility and lack of seriousness of purpose” of
the PLP.

















TORNADO AFTERMATH: The container port tragedy.

He said this raises serious
concerns about the objectivity
and independence of the inves-
tigation.

Mr Roberts and the Oppo-
sition party are therefore calling
for a commission of inquiry to
be held, and for the govern-
ment to reveal findings of the
initial investigation conducted
by the Ministry of Labour as
the results may show why an
independent investigation was
required.

“As the investigation

involves a critical and forensic
analysis of the health and safe-
ty policies of the FCP by a third
party, the process must be
transparent and independent,”
Mr Roberts added.

“Shortly after the tornado
struck the prime minister visit-
ed the affected site and
declared it safe based on con-
jecture at best; he also absolved
management of any safety vio-
lations or wrongdoing.

“The actions of the prime
minister severely compromised

College dispute: Union
renews forensic audit call

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGING financial mis-
management at the College of
the Bahamas, the Union of Ter-
tiary Educators of the Bahamas
has renewed its call for a foren-
sic audit to be conducted.

Audited financial statements
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly last week for the year end-
ing June 30, 2008, revealed over
$5 million was owed to the
institution in unpaid tuition fees
for that year, and that as of
February 2010, the college was
in breach of agreements gov-
erning the loans used to con-
struct its new library.

In a press statement yester-
day, UTEB said: “The union
was caught off guard by these
surprising reports, particularly
the news relating to the new
library, and it supports the
union’s concerns that the cost
and overruns associated with
the library’s construction need
to be scrutinised.

“More troubling to the
union, and probably to many
in the general public, is that
from 2007-2008, COB has not
collected $6.2 million in back
tuition and the union wonders
where that figure would stand if
the years 2008-2010 were
added. UTEB would like an
explanation of how the college
was able to balance its 2007-
2008 budgets in light of the $6.2
million deficit.”

The union also pointed out
that a faculty strike took place
at Bishop University in Canada
during the tenure of current
COB president Janyne Hod-
der. UTEB said the strike was
organised by the Association
of Professors of Bishop’s Uni-
versity (APBU) in connection
with allegations of financial
mismanagement of faculty and

staff pension funds. The college
has thus far rejected the union’s
calls for an audit, saying that
to conduct one would be an
admission of wrongdoing,
which the college denies.

The union has countered that
a “clear understanding of the
financial state of the institu-
tion” would increase confidence
with stakeholders and attract
new investors.

Evasive

The UTEB statement said:
“The college’s repeated insis-
tence that there is no cause for
a forensic audit seems dismis-
sive and evasive and are noth-
ing more than diversionary tac-
tics that are “full of sound and
fury, signifying nothing” — par-
ticularly when we consider the
financial failings of such inter-
national and local companies
as Enron, Banco Ambrosiano,
and CLICO, each of which had
extensive records of apparent
financial normalcy and stellar
financial audits, only to have
that appearance and those
audits discredited when their
failings uncovered years of
financial mismanagement and
wrongdoing.”

The union said it will not
abandon its campaign for
“transparency and account-
ability” — even after an indus-
trial agreement is finalised
between faculty and adminis-
tration.












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Negotiations for such an
agreement have been halted
pending the appointment of
external arbitrators.

It has been mutually agreed
that the arbitrators should try to
conclude a final deal within sev-
en working days should the par-
ties be unable to agree by May
14.

Tomorrow, the parties will
meet with Director of Labour
Harcourt Brown to decide who
will oversee the arbitration
process.

If discussions are successful,
and the teams are able to
resume negotiations on Thurs-
day, the faculty union could
have a new industrial agree-
ment by the end of this month -
nearly two years after their old
agreement expired.

the integrity of any investiga-
tion short of a commission of
inquiry; therefore, the PLP is
again calling for a commission
of inquiry in the public inter-
est.

“In light of the ill-advised
comments made by the prime
minister after consulting with
FCP management team, cou-
pled with conflicting reports
from the rank and file employ-
ees at the FCP, it is the consid-
ered view of the PLP that a
commission of inquiry remains
the most appropriate course of
action in identifying the root
causes of the loss of life and
property damage in the wake
of the tragedy.”

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master









































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M.,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Attempt to remove Jamaica’s PM

JAMAICA has been in political tur-
moil for the past few weeks with one
of Prime Minister Bruce Golding’s sup-
porters — wanted in the US to face
charges of drugs and weapons traffick-
ing— the central figure in his downfall.

Over the weekend a photograph in
The Gleaner of Jamaica showed the
prime minister mopping his worried
brow, while his harried wife sought the
prayers of her church and told how the
cries for his resignation was hurting their
family. Her husband is accused of mis-
leading parliament in an attempt to
shield a supporter in his constituency
from extradition to the United States.
The position taken by the Jamaican gov-
ernment in this affair has also strained
relations with the US.

While church leaders prayed for the
Golding family, the outspoken pastor
did not spare harsh words to condemn
the prime minister’s handling of the
affair and demand that he tell the whole
truth. Prime Minister Golding is accused
of misleading — some say lying to par-
liament. During the pastor’s sermon the
choir was instructed to raise protest
placards demanding justice and trans-
parency.

Since the 1970s when political parties
in Jamaica armed their supporters to
intimidate their rivals, the perception
has been that Jamaica’s gang leaders
have a loose affiliation with both of
Jamaica’s leading parties. Too close for
comfort many say, and now the Christo-
pher “Dudus” Coke case is flushing the
speculation to the surface.

Coke, a community leader and sup-
porter in the prime minister’s Kingston
constituency, is wanted in the United
States to face drug and gun running
charges.

The “Dudus” case has been blocked
by the argument in the Attorney Gen-
eral’s office that the US obtained its
information by illegal wiretaps. In the
meantime a US law firm was hired to
lobby the United States government
over Jamaica’s refusal to extradite
“Dudus.” It hoped to have the case
against “Dudus” dropped.

When it was claimed in the Jamaican
parliament that the government had
hired the law firm, Mr Golding “dis-
missed the assertion out of hand.” His
reaction was that he had no knowledge

of the affair. Said a Gleaner editorial
writer: “He lied by omission.”

Last week — two months later — he
was forced to backtrack. He admitted
that not only did he know about the
hiring of the firm, but he had sanctioned
it. However, not as prime minister but as
leader of his political party. It became a
battle of semantics with the prime min-
ister declaring in parliament that he had
to answer to nobody for what he did as
party leader. He said that Manatt,
Phelps & Phillips were acting for the
Jamaica Labour Party, not for the Gov-
ernment of Jamaica. Because the law
firm could not “produce one single doc-
ument” to represent authorisation of
the Jamaica government, then presum-
ably he had not lied by saying he knew
nothing about his government hiring
the firm. However, although his party
supported him, his detractors did not
want to permit him even that wiggle
room.

As the Gleaner leader writer pointed
out “in many democracies, deliberately
misleading the country is cause for a
prime minister to resign. Mr Golding
and the Jamaican people must decide
whether the PM’s lies now render him a
fatally flawed leader.”

Although it was reported yesterday
that the prime minister will not resign,
the “Dudus” Coke case will not so eas-
ily be swept under the carpet — it has
been raging since last August when the
US government filed a request for his
presence before its own courts. “Dudus”
is accused of overseeing the distribu-
tion of cocaine in the New York area,
and, according to the Associated Press
of smuggling weapons back to Jamaica
as the reputed leader of the notorious
“Shower Posse” gang — a gang that he
inherited from his equally notorious late
father. The US Justice Department
named him to a list of the world’s most
dangerous drug kingpins.

Reported AP: Coke has lived openly
in his barricaded Tivoli Gardens neigh-
bourhood as Golding has led opposi-
tion to the extradition request, claim-
ing the indictment in the Southern Dis-
trict of New York is based on illegal
wiretaps. The question now is: Who
will go? Will it be “Dudus” Coke to the
US or the Jamaican prime minister to
parliament’s back bench?

Budget needed
to aid violent
crime victims
and relatives

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE untimely deaths of
important breadwinners have
left untold thousands of
Bahamians in inextricable
financial bewilderment.

And, arguably even more
debilitating, are the many
thousands of victims who
have been injured beyond
repair (blinded, paralysed or
otherwise permanently dis-
abled) and forever totally
dependent on the charity of
others (friends, relatives, and,
the church).

As usual, the vast majority
of victims of serious, violent
and deadly crime are the poor
who are already at a major
socio-economic disadvantage.
These people cannot afford
any form of insurance to aug-
ment or replace their income,
therefore, a loss of a provider
(because of death or incapac-
itation) represents a disaster
of epic proportions.

The media’s count of 29
killings in just more than 4
months is frightening and

ACRES

ETC

EDITOR, The Tribune.



You have considerably cov-
ered the story of Brenton
Smith, even to the May 13,
2010. The relatives of Bren-
ton, are rigorously, in pur-
suance of justice. Perhaps,
there are two more to be tak-
en.

In the Catholic Church, the
mass or prayers, can be said,
for a loved one and as Bren-
ton died suddenly, how bene-
ficially, his soul can be
blessed. Let him go to glory,
he was made for glory, all
were made for glory.

In memory of Brenton, his
death can be so helpful to oth-
ers, as, he innocently took
that short-cut and paid dearly
with his life. Yes, we, are told
by the police, not to take
short-cuts.

On our island, how many of
us, used the short-cut inno-
cently as Brenton. Is it a
short-cut, or are we innocent-
ly trespassing?

These are avenues, I wish
to share and do wish Bren-
ton’s relatives to remained in
good health, as hospitalisation
is not the answer, rather,
thanking God, for love ones.

Thanking you for your daily
and informative newspaper.

PATRICK BETHEL
Nassau,
May 14, 2010.

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



astonishing. The high murder
rate has obvious negative
ramifications that hurt us
locally and internationally.
However, that tally does not
take into account the finan-
cial impact and ripple-effect
that violence has on our indi-
vidual families and commu-
nities.

In spite of our growing
number of derailed/disrupted
lives and families due to crime
and violence, the government
has not seen fit to step up to
its responsibility to assist the
ever- increasing number of
victims of crime. But rather
they ‘throw away’ millions in
revenue on its “safety net”
policies.

In a society wracked by vio-
lence and several killings each
month, some of that money
could also have gone towards

assisting our swelling number
of dependents sent adrift in
stormy economic seas with-
out their breadwinner or “old
age pension.” Many people
left permanently disabled
(and dependent on people
already unable to meet their
basic daily needs) by the cal-
lous acts of violent criminals
could have been assisted.

Criminality and violence do
not appear out of thin air;
they come about as a result
of deficient social and eco-
nomic policies that effectively
secrete a subset of society that
inevitably evolves its own
mores and morals, laws and
governance.

Criminality and violence
represent the failure of a soci-
ety and ignoring the victims
of our failings will only com-
pound the problem.

It is full time we budget to
assist the victims and relatives
of victims of violent crime.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
May, 2010.



EDITOR, The Tribune.

makes them unelectable.

to learn to do.

Nassau,
May 14, 2010



PLP needs to set aside egos
and put national interest first

Perhaps the PLP's greatest shortcoming is their overriding
belief that having the PLP govern the country is in the
national interest, when, of course, what is truly needed is for
those elected to public office to govern in the national inter-
est. This PLP arrogance manifested itself again recently when
Perry Christie (and separately Jerome Fitzgerald) publicly
declared the container port relocation to Arawak Cay will be
reversed “when” the PLP are returned to power. As is their
nature, the PLP resort to threats and intimidation in an effort
to force their will on the nation. So long as they continue in
this vein they shall be insufferable. One can only hope it also

Surely, the more responsible approach would be to desist
from making threats and, should the Bahamian public ever
be persuaded to re-elect the PLP to power, to try and evalu-
ate on an objective basis — having regard to the circum-
stances prevailing at the relevant time — which course of
action might best serve the national interest? Then again,
this would require the PLP to set aside their egos and put the
national interest ahead of their own, something they have yet

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

TRIBUNEPOLL

TRANSPARENCY IN POLITICS



Tribune readers back call for
politicians to make public
foreign campaign contributions

TRIBUNE readers overwhelmingly support the idea that
politicians should have to make public all foreign campaign
contributions.

In one of the most one-sided results in the history of the
tribune242.com poll, 279 readers agreed with Fort Char-
lotte MP Alfred Sears’ call for mandatory reporting of for-
eign campaign contributions, while only 31 disagreed.

Commenting on the poll, Erasmus
Folly said the question is a “no brainer”.

“FNM or PLP, people should agree to
this without a second thought,” the read-
er said. “We should know of ALL con-
tributions to any politicians, that should
be public record. Freedom of Informa-
tion Act please!”

Liberal said: “Without a second
thought I cannot help but to agree with
Mr Sears. This is a step towards creating
absolute transparency in the political
playground (pun intended) and estab-
lishing a formula to diagnose political
corruption. We must remember that pol-
itics is the people’s business.”

Levilla added: “T think all campaign
monies should be declared because
as you know there is a big problem in 6G
our sister islands, namely Turks, with We
eed - _ was due ere —. should
of campaign donations and we don't
want that to happen in the Bahamas.” know of ALL

Laurette said: “I think that we the COntribu-
Bahamian public needs to know who tions to any
is backing these politicians,

political parties because in the end, that should
everyone wants pay-back. In today's be public
world it's always something for some- P
thing.” record. Free-

However, A Conservative Liberal dom of
noted that: “Every political election Information

Act please!”
SSS SSS)



bh

ALFRED SEARS.

season the opposition makes the case
that we need to have reform to play to
an emotional subject that many have
a view that we should.” The reader urged Mr Sears to create
legislation supporting his views, rather than merely talking
and “grand-standing”.

Facts agreed, asking Mr Sears why the PLP did not table
relevant legislation while in power. “If I want to help fund
a campaign, why should my name be published? That should
be optional on the part of the donor,” the reader added.

Common Sense noted that campaigning is very costly and
pointed out that most “high worth” individuals prefer to give
funds in anonymity.

“So if they want to go ahead and call names, for what I see
as a selfish political move on the part of Mr Sears, then so be
it — many high net individuals will not contribute, leaving
them to fend for themselves. When contributions are made,
an agreement should be signed between parties, that no
political favours will be had by any contributors, et cetera,
and this should be filed with the legal counsels for the par-
ties, held private and confidential.”

e The current poll at tribune242.com asks the following
question: Kirk Nixon has organised a group of about 50 to
boycott the Census. They say they will refuse to surrender
their personal information before political leaders do as is
mandated by law. Do you plan to participate in the 2010
Census?

Readers are invited to visit the website to take part in the
poll and comment on issue.







Police still to identify man
killed in Sunday night crash

POLICE have not yet
identified the passenger who
was killed Sunday night in
a traffic accident on West-
ern Road between Lyford
Cay and Mount Pleasant.

A 1997 green Honda
Accord, licence plate num-
ber 171332, crashed into a
tree just before 10pm when
the driver reportedly lost
control. The passenger, a 22-
year-old Sapodilla Boule-
vard man, had to be
removed from the vehicle
using the “jaws of life”. He
was taken to the hospital but
died of his injuries that
night.

The driver of the vehicle is
reportedly in stable condi-
tion. Police are investigat-
ing.

SHOOTING

Police are investigating a
shooting that took place at
the Esso Service Station on

Tac)
etsy

VeRO TET

eS HL
Wee

VETERAN real estate
director Hilary Jones was
sworn in as a Justice of the
Peace by Magistrate Gwen-
dolyn Hamilton-Claude at
the Freeport Magistrate
Court this past week on
Grand Bahama. Ms Jones
was born in New Providence
and then relocated to Grand
Bahama in 1969.

In 1981, she purchased
majority shares in McPher-
son and Brown Real Estate
(Freeport) Limited before
the company's name was
changed to Churchill and
Jones Real Estate Limited.

Ms Jones is a former pres-
ident of the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce and
is said to have contributed
much to the island's business
developments, social activi-

_—



Tonique Williams Darling
Highway yesterday. At
around 4am, an employee
of the station was

a ANE Nae) |e



ties and other events.

Educated at Government
High School, Cornell Uni-
versity, and the Art Institute
of Technology in Atlanta,
Georgia, Ms Jones said she
is humbled and honoured by
the Justice of the Peace
appointment.

She said she is grateful to
those who considered her
worthy and looks forward to
carrying out her duties when
and where necessary.

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with a handgun and wear-
ing a yellow shirt and black
trousers.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

CRUMPLED: The wreck of the car after Sunday night’s smash near Lyford Cay.

The two men got into a
struggle that resulted in the
employee being shot in the
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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

China and Caribbean issue joint WR Tiitr ye

communique after round of talks

THE People’s Republic of China
and the Caribbean have agreed to
strengthen consultation and coopera-
tion on major issues such as the global
financial and economic crisis, the cli-
mate change, and to uphold the rights
and interests of developing countries.

This is the result of the one-day sum-
mit held in Nassau last week.

Following this latest round of talks
between Caribbean countries and Chi-
na, a joint communiqué was issued that
outlines the areas of interests to both
parties and the way forward in accom-
plishing them.

Li Jinzhang, Vice-Minister of For-
eign Affairs of the People’s Republic of
China, and Brent Symonette, Deputy
Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of
the Bahamas, co-chaired the consul-
tations.

The Caribbean countries represent-
ed at the consultations were Antigua
and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados,
Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica,
Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago.

According to the joint communiqué:

The two sides reviewed with satis-
faction the progress made in the rela-
tionship between China and the
Caribbean countries since the Third
Round of Consultations in 2006 and
agreed to make joint efforts to deepen
their friendship and cooperation.

They also exchanged views on inter-
national and regional issues of mutual
interest.

The two sides spoke positively of the
important role of the Consultations in





BRENT SYMONETTE

promoting their exchanges and coop-
eration in political, economic, agricul-
tural, educational, cultural and other
areas.

Dialogue

They also agreed to strengthen polit-
ical dialogue, enhance mutual under-
standing and trust, and promote coop-
eration to achieve greater progress in
bilateral relations on the basis of sov-
ereign equality and mutual respect and
benefit.

The Caribbean side welcomed the
first ever formulation and issuance of
China’s Policy Paper on Latin Ameri-

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necessary;

Ensuring timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of

bills for all events and activities as necessary;

Working closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that
there is global publicity Gnternal and external), as necessary on all Corporate

activities;

Ensuring that the websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company

newsletter and Internal PA system are used for the communication of information

relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public
Relations/Journalism/Marketing/Business Administration/Business

Communication, or equivalent.
* A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisor/Management level
¢ Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform
to prescribed style and format;
¢ Ability to effectively present information to Senior and Executive Management

and public groups;

¢ Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing

ca and the Caribbean by the Chinese
government in 2008, and expressed
appreciation for China’s programme
directed toward the economic and
social development of the Caribbean.

The Chinese side agreed to continue
to provide assistance to the best of its
ability to the Caribbean countries hav-
ing diplomatic relations with China to
contribute to their social and econom-
ic development.

The two sides agreed to strengthen
economic and trade cooperation
between China and the Caribbean and
encourage their companies to conduct
business cooperation in various forms
toward this end.

Both sides affirmed their commit-
ment to ensure the success of the Third
China-Caribbean Economic and Trade
Cooperation Forum to be held in
Trinidad and Tobago later this year.

The Caribbean countries attending
the Consultations reiterated their com-
mitment to the One China policy and
support for the peaceful development
of cross-Strait relations and the course
of China’s peaceful reunification.

The two sides agreed to hold the
Fifth Round of Consultations between
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the
People’s Republic of China and the
Ministries of Foreign Affairs of the
Caribbean countries having diplomat-
ic relations with China in China in

FNM and PLP
llelegations
visit China

MEMBERS of both the
FNM and the PLP are visit-
ing China as part of a study
tour for young officials.

Funded by the Chinese
government, and including
visits to not only Beijing,
but also Wuhan and Xia-
men over a 13-day period,
the study tour will include
consultations with party
and government officials.

The delegations from the
Bahamas will also take part
in briefings on China’s eco-
nomic and social relations
and on the country’s politi-
cal system and government
administration.



Historic

Historic and culture parts
of the programme will
include visits to the Great
Wall of China, the Forbid-
den City, a party school, a
rural community and the
Dongfend Automobile fac-
tory. The FNM delegation
is headed by Michael
Foulkes, the party’s secre-
tary general, and includes
Michael Turnquest, deputy
chairman, Caron Shepherd,
president of the Women’s
Association, and Hank Fer-
guson. They departed the
Bahamas on Saturday to
travel to Beijing at the invi-
tation of the government of
The People’s Republic of
China.

A similar delegation of
young officials from the
PLP will also travel as part
of the Bahamian contin-
gent.







May 18th, 1995
15 years has gone



THE TRIBUNE



Primary School
SST Ua (eT



ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD Jared Fitzgerald NCEE Une mae UA
School Student of the Year’ as Dr Ricardo Deveaux, president
and CEO of the Bahamas Primary Student of the la ale
dation (far right), Education Minister Desmond Bannister and
his parents, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and Zarina Fitzgerald,
look on.

XAVIER’s Lower School student Jared Fitzgerald, 11,
has been elected Primary School Student of the Year for his
outstanding performance in academics, sports, and com-
munity work.

The son of PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald was selected
from 106 competing primary school students from across
the country for the award offered by the Primary School
Student of the Year Foundation.

Minister of Education Desmond Bannister, in present-
ing the honour, said those participating in the 14th annu-
al competition were the brightest and the best.

Mr Fitzgerald and his wife Zarina said: “We are very
proud of (Jared) and all of the nominees who were select-
ed to represent their various schools.
“They were described by the Minister of Education as
the ‘best and the brightest’. It is sufficient reason to give us
hope that all is not lost and we all have the responsibility
to ensure that we protect and preserve the Bahamas for
them.”

During the awards ceremony on Saturday at Golden
Gates Assemblies World Outreach Ministries Interna-
tional, Jared also received a $7,500 cheque for his achieve-
ments.

The Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year
Awards Programme is a national awards recognition
programme for sixth graders.

The programme was introduced by Dr Ricardo
Deveaux, Charter president of the Nassau, Bahamas
Pan-Hellenic Council.

Industrious

The 441-page souvenir booklet of the event stated:
“The Board of Directors of the Bahamas Primary
School Student of the Year Foundation and the Nassau,
Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council in conjunction with the
distinguished panel of judges are pleased to announce
that an amicable, well-mannered, industrious and
dependable student has been selected as the 2010
Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year.”

Denise Cooper-Louis, principal of Xavier’s Lower
School said of Jared: “This charismatic and dedicated
young leader has an excellent rapport with his peers and
teachers. He can also be described as one of the most
mannerly among the student population. He was recent-
ly awarded the ‘most respectful student’ at the school.”

Jared has participated in numerous national swim-
ming meets and in recent times received the high point
runner-up trophy for the years 2007 and 2009 in his age
category at the Royal Bank of Canada National Swim-
ming Championships.

He is a member of the winning relay team from the
Sea Bees Swim Club which holds the Bahamas Open
Record (LCM) and the Bahamas Record (LCM) in the
200 meters freestyle relay in the age nine and 10 catego-
ry.

He is a member of the Ambassadors Track Club,
Young Writers Association, Ocean Club Tennis and
Golf Clubs and the Ars Nova Music Club.

Jared has also participated in outreach programmes at
the Ranfurly Home for Children, Senior Citizens Cen-
tre, Nazareth Children’s Home, Kids-Up Programme at
the Presbyterian Kirk and the Stephen Dillet Primary
School.

He is also involved in St Matthew’s Anglican Church’s
youth group and serves as an acolyte at church.

Jared, who has maintained an accumulative grade
point average of 3.75, noted that he has three dreams -
to become a medical doctor graduating from Harvard
Medical School; to find a cure for breast cancer, and to
represent the Bahamas at the Olympic Games.



Former Senator

Austin H. Grant ML,
J.P. S.C. M.B.E.
January 27th, 1930

Your love is still so stro
To us it’s just like yesterday
In our hearts you will always stay



¢ Experience in managing special events and activities

¢ Excellent time management and organizational skills

¢ Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

¢ Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications
* Good analytical skills

¢ Good judgment and sound reasoning ability.

Daddy take your rest,
We know you did your best.

Thank You Jesus
Thank You Jesus
Thank You Jesus

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form
to: The Assistant Manager - Human Resources Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Friday, May 28, 2010.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Royal Bank of Canada’s



ROTARY CLUB OF WEST NASSAU SPRING RAFFLE



SPRING
RAFFLE:
(Standing from
left) PAST
president of the
West Nassau
Rotary Club
William Wong;
fundraising
chairman and
past president
Bryan Knowles,
raffle chairman.
(Seated from
left) Rotarian
Rupert Roberts
and Rotary
Club of West
Nassau presi-
dent 2009/10
Caldwell Pratt.







Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALUCHI VENTURES LTD.

— ——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BALUCHI VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIKENHEAD

COMPANY LTD.

— *)—

/
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIKENHEAD COMPANY LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Thirtieth (30th)
Annual General Meeting of THE PUBLIC
WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION
LIMITED, will be held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, Bay Street, on Friday, May 21,
2010, commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following
purposes:

* To receive the report of The Board of
Directors.
* To receive the Audited Report for 2009

« To elect members of The Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee and Credit Committee

* To discuss and approve the budget for 2011

All eligible members, wishing to run for a
position on the Board of Directors, Supervisory
Committee or Credit Committee, are asked to
submit their names to the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4 p.m.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!





THE Rotary Club of
West Nassau has
announced its Spring
Raffle for June 16.

The first prize is
$10,000 worth of gro-
ceries from Super Val-
ue. Second prize is two
Motorola trunking
radios with one-year air-
time. Third prize is one
$20 BTC phone card per
week for 52 weeks. The
fourth prize is a $200
Esso gas gift certificate.
Fifth prize is round-trip
ticket for one to Cat
Island. Sixth prize is a
$100 Galleria Cinemas
gift certificate and the
seventh prize is a round-
trip ticket for one to
Harbour Island.

Net profit from this
raffle will benefit Pro-
ject SURE, the Chil-
dren’s Emergency Hos-
tel, Bilney Lane Home,
Persis Rodgers Home,
BTVI and Rotary com-
munity projects. The
Rotary Club of West
Nassau is a member of
Rotary International, a
non-profit service
organisation with over
1.2 million members.
The West Club meets
each Thursday at
12.30pm at Graycliff
Restaurant.



JEFFERY KING, 24, whose last
known address was Augusta
Street is wanted for questioning
about the Yellow Elder Gardens
triple shooting on 15th May.
Police say he is considered
armed and dangerous. He is 5ft
Ains, of slim build, and weighs
140lbs.





































airport upgrade deal
hailed as ‘unique’

THE DEAL has been
described as the largest financ-
ing of a public infrastructure
asset by non-public entities in
the history of the Bahamas, and
the Royal Bank of Canada sur-
passed all other local banks in
its contribution to the $265 mil-
lion upgrade for the US Depar-
tures Terminal at the Lynden
Pindling International Aiport.

While construction on the
terminal has just begun, the
deal that made the project pos-
sible began months ago.

“We started discussions in
mid-2008, and it took nine
months to pull it all together,”
said Brian Knowles, senior
account manager at RBC.

“These deals are very com-
plex, but so important for the
local economy and to enhance
our tourism industry.”

A total of 16 investors and
lenders along with the Nassau
Airport Development (NAD)
Company’s main shareholder,
the government of the
Bahamas, provided the capital
to begin work on stage one of
the airport expansion project.

RBC is the largest partici-
pant of the local banks and
played an instrumental role in
the financing. The deal was
unique in that it was the largest
financing of a public infra-
structure asset in the Bahamas
and the first in country to seek
non-public financing. Structur-
ing the financing, especially in a
troubled economy, required
out-of-the box thinking, organ-
isers said.

“The process was very col-



BRIAN KNOWLES, senior
account manager of Commer-
cial Financial Services at RBC.

laborative,” said Stewart
Steeves, vice-president of Air-
port Development and former
vice-president of finance and
CFO at NAD, who spearhead-
ed the negotiations.

“Because of the complexities
of this particular deal, the par-
ticipants needed to pull togeth-
er to make it happen.

“It was the mutual process
of trying to find solutions to
meet our unique financing
needs that contributed to its
success. RBC was one of the
first to commit to the deal and
was a leader throughout the
process.”

Project Finance Magazine
recently awarded NAD the
Latin America Project Bond
Deal of the Year for 2009.

Nathaniel Beneby Jr, presi-
dent and country head for RBC
in the Bahamas, said: “This deal
is just the latest example of our
innovation and support as we
focus on serving our clients and
enhancing the future of the

Bahamas.” In addition to the
airport financing, RBC also co-
led a transaction in 2009 to pro-
vide $200 million in financing
for the government, which was
later refinanced by a $300 mil-
lion bond issue.

“RBC has been the govern-
ment’s primary bank for the
past 65 years. It’s our most
important relationship,” said
Simon Wilson of the Ministry
of Finance. “With the most
recent deal with Nassau Air-
port Development, Royal Bank
came in first and served as the
lead on the project. The whole
team demonstrated tremendous
partnership in providing sound
advice and counsel. They con-
sistently demonstrated that they
believe in the government and
believe in this project.”

This latest transaction is the
third financing of the airport.
RBC has been involved in each
of these deals. The next phase
of this latest financing includes
taking out the revolving credit
facility and finding bond
investors to fund stage two of
the airport project, and even-
tually converting all of the debt
to long-term bonds.

“In every transaction, we
work in close partnership with
all the parties involved to
ensure the deals are structured
appropriately,” said George
Roache, head of Commercial
Banking for RBC. With this
project and others, we are inter-
ested in ensuring the sustain-
ability of the Bahamas for years
to come.”

BNT throws support behind proposed Forestry Act

THE Bahamas National Trust (BNT) has offi-
cially declared its support for the Forestry Bill
2010 that was debated in the House of Assembly
last month.

The Bill for an Act to provide for the conser-
vation and control of forests is an important
piece of legislation that has been under devel-
opment since mid 1980s, the Trust said.

“Tt is notable at this time in our nation’s devel-
opment that the Ministry of the Environment is
working to develop an integrative approach to
development in the Bahamas,” the BNT said.

However, the Trust said that in order for this
approach to be successful the necessary legisla-
tion needs to be in place “to guide government,
developers and conservation advocates through
the complex discussions and choices faced on
environmental matters.”

“Forests are the lungs of the earth and an
important part of ‘the library of life on earth’
and must be protected. Careful management of
this important resource can also provide impor-
tant income from the sustainable use of forestry
resources — both consumptive and non-con-
sumptive,” the BNT said.

Additionally, the Trust said, agro-forestry is
becoming an important tool to ensure long-term
survival and sustainability in farming systems.

The new Forestry Act is designed to do the fol-
lowing:

- Assist in the formulation and implementation
of land use plans.

- Provide a framework for the implementa-
tion for sustainable forestry initiatives at a com-
munity level. - Enhance the awareness of stake-
holders of the benefits of forests and forestry,
ensuring their effective participation in the con-
servation of their natural resources.

- Identify forest reserves, protected forests and
conservation forests which will provide a frame-
work for identifying forest areas with special
attributes that make them particularly valuable
for biodiversity and/or local sustainable use.

- Support the ecosystem services approach to
evaluating the goods and services that trees and
forests provide to society.

The BNT said in its view, the Forestry Act
2010 will strengthen and complement overall
national conservation efforts.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERLEY HILL

INVESTMENTS LTD.

— +——

Fi
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EVERLEY HILLINVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BRAXTONHOUSE

HOLDINGS LTD.

— + ——

é
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BRAXTONHOUSE HOLDINGS

LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BASHKIR VENTURES LTD.

—

i
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BASHKIR VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COLLEY PLAINES LTD.

— +——

Fi
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COLLEY PLAINES LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

TCU ORR C Church breakaway linked to gay controversy

FROM page one

Thompson said it will force the government to address the migrant
community’s illegal living situation established more than 30 years
ago. “Where they go is really not up to the landowner, but gov-
ernment is going to have to step in and they are going to have to
make a decision,” the local government chairman said.

The indiscriminate building and establishment of businesses
and churches without adherence to planning laws or building
codes in the settlements has enraged Abaconians over the years.

A resident who did not want to be named said: “Abaco is getting
very tired of waiting for government to act on these Haitian com-
munities.

“T don’t think people are really against the Haitians, but there is
no controlling of building, they don’t follow the rules and regula-
tions. Bahamians have to apply for building permits and have
regular plumbing, and these people come in and do whatever
they want and I think that is really irritating.”

The Abaco resident said some Bahamians have been so frus-
trated by the flouting of building regulations in Pigeon Pea and The
Mud they have torn down new buildings as soon as they are con-
structed.

“That’s how angry people are,” the resident said.

“Because central government is not doing anything.”

Mr Thompson said local government supported the landowners
decision to reclaim Pigeon Pea.

“With all the illegal buildings and construction going on here, it’s
difficult to tell Bahamians they can’t build when right in your
backyard you have foreigners building without any permits,” he
said. And the lack of building codes also puts the health and safe-
ty of Haitian residents at risk as insufficient drainage causes flood-
ing, and dangerous electricity supplies have sparked a series of fires
spreading quickly between the densely packed wooden homes
claiming lives and property.

Regular raids are conducted by the Department of Immigration,
based across the road from The Mud, however the value of these
raids has been called into question by the Haitian community as
Immigration and Defence Force officers have been accused of
using intimidation tactics and violence against residents, separat-
ing families, and not helping the situation as many Haitians who do
not have the right to live and work in the Bahamas manage to
escape apprehension.

Mr Thompson said he will ensure the correct procedure is fol-
lowed as eviction notices are served and residents are dealt with
humanely.

Charged with murdering teenage boy
FROM page one

Keith Seymour, attorney for Barr, told the court his client suf-
fered several injuries while in police custody.

Mr Seymour noted that the right side of Barr’s face was swollen
and he also had injuries to his stomach. He asked that his client
receive medical attention.

Attorney Willie Moss, who represents Forbes, also alleged his
client had been beaten by police. He told the court Forbes had been
beaten over a three-day period and had been denied his right to see
his attorney. Mr Moss also asked that his client be taken to a doc-
tor to receive medical attention, and told the court he intends to
object to any statement attributed to his client because Forbes had
been beaten.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that both men receive medical
attention and remanded them to Her Majesty’s Prison.

Their case was adjourned to tomorrow and transferred to Court
5, Bank Lane.

FROM page one

gregations of St Andrews,
Lucaya, and the Kirk of the
Pines (Marsh Harbour) at the
General Assembly of the
Church of Scotland in Scotland
this week where they will “bid
the Church of Scotland
farewell” after 200 years.

Rev Kirkland said the move
has been under discussion for
“over 15 years”, adding that
“with happy agreement from
the Church of Scotland, the
time is now ripe to leave the
mother church”.

A vote was held in Nassau
on the question of whether the
Bahamian Presbyterian kirks
would leave the Church of
Scotland last year, only several
months after Rev John
MacLeod resigned from his
post at St Andrew’s in Nassau
following the decision by the
church in Scotland to confirm
the ordination of Scott Rennie,
its first openly gay minister.

Yesterday one senior church
member in Nassau, speaking
anonymously, said the two
events were not linked, howev-

er, with the US Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, with
whom the Bahamas churches
now seek to align themselves
being strongly against such
ordinations. It appears likely
that this has played a role in
the decision.
Division

The Church of Scotland has
been riven with division over
the question of homosexuality
in the Church for some time,
with tensions growing since the
ordination of Rev Rennie last
year.

More than 50 Scottish
churches have already backed
the evangelical position, like
that now apparently being tak-
en by the Nassau and Lucaya
Kirks, that they will not accept
the ordination of gay ministers.

Church officers had been
gagged from speaking on the
gay question as the Church of
Scotland has appointed a spe-
cial commission to investigate
issues related to gay ordination
which is due to report in 2011.

Speaking of his decision to

quit the Church of Scotland,
and consequently, The
Bahamas, last year, Rev
Macleod said: “It wasn’t just
the Scott Rennie thing, it was
the general tenor of the Gen-
eral Assembly that I don’t think
is the way a church should do
business. I think it is a shame
that the Church of Scotland has
tried to stifle the debate.

“T have had misgivings over
the Church of Scotland for a
number of years. I believe
there is a general drift away
from Biblical orthodoxy.”

The Reverend quit last June
but remained in Nassau on six
months notice. He has now
been assigned to the Allander
Evangelical Church in Glasgow,
Scotland.

Yesterday Rev Kirkland said
the Presbyterian Church of The
Bahamas in Nassau, St
Andrews, has the “joy of
inducting a fine new young
minister, Rev Bryn MacPhail”
on June 6 to replace Rev
Macleod, “the same day that
the congregations will formally
mark their entry into the Evan-
gelical Presbyterian Church.”



While The Tribune was
unable to confirm this with
Church elders in Nassau yes-
terday, who were remaining
tightlipped on details related to
the move, The Herald newspa-
per in Scotland reported over
the weekend that the vote by
the congregation of St Andrews
in favour of leaving the Church
of Scotland went 32 to 16 while
in Lucaya it was an even
greater 40 to 3 in favour.

One church member told
The Tribune yesterday that
there was “some controversy”
over the vote last year, as some
members were under the
impression that it would not be
a final decision on whether the
split should go ahead, but
rather a polling of views that
would subsequently be deter-
mined at a later date.

According to Rev Kirkland,
the plan now is for the affilia-
tion of the Presbyterian Kirks
in The Bahamas to be an
“interim step” which will “help
prepare the congregations for
ultimately becoming the Pres-
byterian Church of the
Bahamas.”

ms decision not to run again

FROM page one

nation from Mr Christie for the upcoming
election, telling The Tribune she would like
to give some younger candidates an oppor-
tunity to move up the political ladder.

Meanwhile, in a separate interview with
this newspaper, Mr Christie said the party
which he hopes to lead into the next elec-
tion has been inundated with interest from
potential candidates hoping to receive nom-
inations to run under the party’s banner.

With an anti-incumbent movement grow-
ing throughout the world, PLP leader Per-
ry Christie said that his party is faced with
the same challenge as scores of people have
been lining up to represent the PLP in seats
that already have sitting Members of Par-
lament.

However, while having six or seven can-
didates vying for any given constituency, Mr
Christie said that the party is having diffi-
culty balancing “the old with the new”.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson is the second mem-
ber of the “old guard” of PLPs who it is
suggested will not offer again for the party
in the next election. PLP MP for Fort Char-



lotte Alfred
Sears is
reportedly in
consultation
with his con-
stituents as to
whether or
not to offer
for re-elec-
tion for the
area.

Nonethe-
less, Mr
Christie told
The Tribune
he is pleased to see the enthusiasm from
younger members of the party.

“There has been a significant increase
in young professionals wishing to enter
public life on our side. It is really refreshing
and bodes well for the future. Our only
concern is there is not an equal amount of
interest from women seeking to enter pol-
itics.”

Mrs Gibson, as one of the most promi-
nent female members of the party - and
the second in a year to reveal her decision
to step down from frontline politics, along

=
oe
=
a
Perry Christie

with former deputy prime minister Cyn-
thia “Mother” Pratt - says she will now
focus on her role as a “mentor” to others
outside of politics.

“Over the past five years, in other areas
of my life, I have been an advocate for
mentorship and I serve as a mentor. I
tremendously enjoy this and find it very
fulfilling,” she said.

She said her determination to allow a
younger generation to play a bigger role in
the party is in keeping with her father’s
philosophy “that it is important to step
aside to allow room for younger people
and to help them prepare and excel at lead-
ership.”

“T would like to help the PLP find the
right mix of experience and youthful, able
enthusiasm that will propel it to victory in
the next General Elections,” said the for-
mer cabinet minister.

Mrs Maynard Gibson was appointed sen-
ator for the PLP after running unsuccess-
fully for the PLP in 2007. She was defeated
by the FNM’s Byron Woodside, in a result
that was ultimately challenged but con-
firmed in favour of Mr Woodside in an
election court challenge.



“eo vo
ea

THE NATIONAL ART GALLERY OF THE BAHAMAS

PRESENTS

THE FIFTH NATIONAL EXHIBITION (NE5)

CALL FOR ENTRIES

MATIONAL ART GALLERY
OF THE BARAMAS

The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas invites professional artists working in The Bahamas and Bahamian artists
abroad to enter their work in our Fifth National Exhibition (NE5) scheduled to open in August 2010, The theme for this
exhibition is "The Carbon Footprint: Bahamian Artists’ 21st Century Response to the Environment." We encourage all
professional artists to submit their work for this juried show which represents the best of contemporary Bahamian Art.

Over the last few years, we have witnessed many events
which have had a global impact whether they were the fiscal
events that emerged during the height of the credit crunch
or the natural disaster events that occurred this year in Haiti,
Peru and here at home. These events are ALL related one
Way or another to various forms of global climate change.

In response to this, the NAGE is announcing that its fifth
national open submission exhibition, the NES, will be a
themed exhibition exploring ideas and narratives on issues
relating ta the 21st Century global question on carbon
footprint and climate change,

A carbon footprint is a measure of the impact our activities
have on the environment and, in particular, on climate
change. (It relates to the amount of greenhouse gages
we individually produce in our day-to-day lives through
burning fossil fuels for electricity transportation, etc.

It ls Gur intention at the NAGE to explore this area frarn an
artists perspective seeing how they use their own unique
artistic tools and vision to produce works that look at areas
such as urbanization, mability (cars, planes, beats, ete),
domesticity, personal space(s), landscape, industrialization,
natural earth elements, fabricated non-natural ements, etc.
that relate to carbon footprint and climate change.

This is mot an easy challenge but at the MAGE. we feel that
with difficult and complex tinves, it is important that artists
are given the opportunity to respond,

If you are interested in participating, you may request the
Official Rules and Entry Form by contacting the Gallery at
Tel: 242-328-5800/1 or email at info@nagb.org.bs.

CATEGORIES

A. Painging / B. Works on Paper Oravd ng) Collage, Original Prins, Watercolors,
Pastel, ate. { C. (Photography / 0. Sculpture, Assemblage, Installation
E, Ceramics | F, Mied & Alpemative Wthedia inchading Widen iG, Quilts

ELIGIBILITY

This exhibition is open to all peodessional artists msiding in The Bahamas
and all professional Bahamian arte practicing abroad. Professional i¢
defined as an adult individual working primarily a5 an artist preferably with
a history of exhibiting works,

ALD Gl AG

The sehecthon of works will be completed bya panel of judges chosen by
the Gallary. Judging will tae place in July 2010.

COLLECTION OF WORKS

Works mat selected for the exhibtion must be collected from the
Nasional Art Gallery af The Bahamas by July 3G, 2070. After this dase, the
Nasional Art Gallery ateohees itell of eer responsibility for the work ard
reserves The right To auction uncollected work bo Cover Sborage ooss

Works accepted for the exhibition must be collected within TWD [2)
weeks of the closing date. After this date, the Gallery reserves the right to
auction off the works to cover the eqpenses of extended storage.

INSURANCE

Pease dupply ihe National Art Gallery af The Bahamas with a copy of
CURT Insurance policies if ary) on all armvork submitted, The MAGE
reserves the fight ta reject a work if it feels i cannes cower the estimaned
value of the wark provided

SALE OF WORKS AND PURCHASE AWARDS

*The National Art Galery undertakes to acest in the sale of thoee works
whech artists indicate are for sale. Price lists will be offered at the exhibition
opening and vill be avedable during the exhibition run

* To assist in defraying the cost of the Fifth National Exhibition,
the National Gallery will retain a commission of 25%, which will be
deducted fram the stated sales price. This mans that the sale price should
include artist rewenue plus commission.

"The MAGE may choose to acquire works far the National Collection
Ery thi praeness,

*IFa non-residend is interested in purchasing work on display, the Gallary
valll inform the aetist of the potential sabe The artist must Indicate whether
to process the sale and agree to cower the cost of shipping the work
internationally, @ the purchaser refuses.

DELIVERY OF WORKS

Artes are bo agubrrit works for selection, along wilh asigned otlicia eniry
form to the MAGE, West Hill Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Works will not be
ateepted without Ertry Form and current Cv.

THE CLOSING DATE FOR ENTRIES I5 WEDNESDAY, JUNE
50, 2010 AT 12 WON.

MANDATORY REQUIREMENT FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:
Aurtisns are REQUIRED to attend the screening of af least one of ther filers
featured in this adwertisement, For Intemational and Farily sland partici
pants ony, films will bo availabe for dow nboading from the web via a link
that will be emailed to you. Request link by emailing Jackson Petit at
jpetit@nagborg os. For further information, please contact the Gallery at
282-928-5800 of email Holly Paratti at hparottitmagb.org.bs.

MANDATORY REQUIRED FILMS
FOR SUBMITTING ARTISTS:

in order for Artista te be eligible te submit
artwork to the MES, they MUST attend the
screening of at least one of the films
featured below,

"Rementber Sono-Mivwaâ„¢ -Tuc, May 18, 4pm
"Home" = Thu. May 20, 4pm

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"Home" = Thu. May 20, Spm

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



BIMINI ALL-AGE SCHOOL

FESTIVAL

ADJUDICATIONS

STUDENTS of the Bimini All-Age School

gave it their all during the E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival adjudications in Alice

Town last week.





BIMINI ALL-AGE
SCHOOL students
dance and sing a
gospel medley during
the E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival
adjudications in Alice
Town on May 10.

Sav lined arial eit Sochedy







BIMINI All-Age School students merge singers and musicians into an ensemble
gospel group during the E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival adjudications in Alice

Town, Bimini on May 10, 2010.

Eric Rose/BIS Photos


























STUDENTS
of the Bimini
All-Age
School play
the brass and
percussion
instruments
during the E
Clement
Bethel
National Arts
Festival adju-
dications in
Alice Town,
Bimini on
May 10.









Concern mounts about oil spillage impact on Bahamas

FROM page one

Meanwhile, the Florida Sun-Sen-
tinel newspaper is reporting that
Mitch Roffer, an oceanographer who
runs Roffer’s Ocean Fishing Fore-
casting Service, has analysed new
images, taken Saturday by NASA’s
Jet Propulsion Laboratory and found
they too “clearly show that the oil is
being pulled into the Loop current”.

The loop current is a warm ocean
current that moves clockwise

through the Caribbean basin to the
Gulf of Mexico and then the Florida
straits.

Beaches

Movement of the oil with the cur-
rent could send the spill around
Florida and into the Atlantic Ocean,
possibly leading to oil covered
beaches and the death of marine life
in those areas.

This could also put Cay Sal Bank,

the Bimini chain, the western side
of Andros and West End, Grand
Bahama at risk, Commander Patrick
McNeil, head of the National Oil
Spill Contingency Team, has stated.

Previously experts, admitting that
unpredictable weather patterns
made it impossible to say conclu-
sively whether the threat of the oil
entering the current was a likely pos-
sibility, had stated that they felt all
evidence so far pointed to the oil
slick staying away from the current
which could bring it into the Florida

Keys, The Bahamas and the east
coast of the US. Officials have been
meeting in The Bahamas to form a
plan of action in the event weather
conditions push the giant spill into
these islands.

The spill, which was a result of an
April 20 explosion and fire on the
drilling rig Deepwater Horizon,
which killed 11 workers.

US President Barack Obama has
described it as a “potentially
unprecedented” environmental dis-
aster.

The official estimate of the
amount of oil flowing from the leak-
ing wellis 5,000 barrels (or 210,000
gallons) a day.

The figure is a National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration
estimate based on aerial imagery
early in the crisis as well as scrutiny
of video from the sea bottom.

However, some scientists have
drawn this figure into question, esti-
mating that the oil leak may be much
greater - possibly as big as 26,000
barrels a day.





-*






TAltmusn DAY
“MAUFISHeO10





BUTLER € SANDS GROUNDS, JFK

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Tae SITs
MUNGHEOUT NERS

| @PLAL ENSIS-
Me




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THE TRIBUNE
D ru





ine

TUESDAY,

MAY

ites



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Rating agency:
Budget to decide
debt downgrade

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A WALL
Street credit
rating agency
yesterday gave
its starkest
warning yet
that the
upcoming
2010-2011
Budget will
determine
whether it downgrades the
Bahamas’ sovereign credit
rating, with a former finance
minister telling Tribune Busi-
ness that the Government

SEE page 5B

SMITH



* Moody's issues starkest
warning yet to Bahamas
government, as former
minister says Wall Street
and IMF want to see if
we have ‘mettle’ to return
to fiscal prudence

* Aroues that 2010-2011
Budget demands
‘national sacrifice’
from public sector

* Suggests that cuts best
coming ‘across the board’,
as Budget key to sending
right international message

$857m project: ousted
partner blasts ‘irrational’
Tribunal verdict

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE $857 million South
Ocean development’s former
managing partner has asked
a New York court to set aside
the arbitration ruling that
removed him, alleging that it
was “irrational and in excess
of its powers” to find him per-
sonally liable for damages,
and did not account for “crim-
inal investigations” into the
project’s financing partners.

Responding to a petition by
hedge fund Plainfield Asset

SEE page 2B

* Claims ruling ‘in excess of
its powers’ by finding him
personally liable for $1.262m
damages payment, when
not party to key contracts

* Argues that arbitration verdict
would have been different if
panel knew of ‘criminal
investigations’ into South
Ocean financing partner

* Also alleges ruling should
be ‘null and void’ because
of supposed ‘bias’ on
behalf of arbitrators

BID for imminent
City legislation

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

DRAFT legislation for the
Business Improvement Dis-
trict (BID) that will be
responsible for taking control
of downtown Nassau’s rede-
velopment and management
has been completed, and is
expected to go to Cabinet for
review in just weeks, the
Downtown Nassau Partner-
ship's (DNP) managing direc-
tor told Tribune Business yes-
terday.

Vaughn Roberts said he
also hopes to get the legisla-
tion to Parliament in time to
have the Government allo-
cate funds in the 2010-2011

Damianos |

$4.5m Charlotte St
pedestrianisation
could be funded by
10% business levy

Budget to begin pilot
improvement projects, name-
ly the pedestrianisation of
Charlotte Street.

According to Mr Roberts,
the $4.5 million road project
will also be funded by a 10
per cent contribution from
private stakeholders on Char-
lotte Street.

He said the majority of
people in the area would like

SEE page 4B

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By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Common-

wealth Brew-

ery/Burns

House 25 per

cent initial pub-
lic offering (IPO) will be val-
ued at between $60-$65 mil-
lion, Tribune Business was
told, as the companies
pledged the sale would hap-
pen this year following yes-
terday’s completion of the
buyout of Sir Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson’s family investment
vehicle.

LeRoy Archer, Burns
House’s managing director,
confirmed to this newspaper
last night that the combined
companies had been valued
at $240 million, meaning a 25
per cent IPO to Bahamian
institutional and retail
investors would be worth $60-
$65 million - making it
arguably the largest equity
IPO in Bahamian capital mar-
kets history.



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FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

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(242) 367-3135

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S60-65m IPO
for Heineken

* Combined Commonwealth Brewery/Burns
House pledge public offering to happen this
year; managing director says ideally, November

* Entities valued at collective $240m, making it
largest IPO in Bahamian capital markets history

* Together, firms did $150m in sales on
volumes of 200,000 hectolitres in 2008

* Buyout of Finlayson entities closes yesterday,
as Tribune Business revealed last week

Mr Archer declined to
detail the “record breaking
profits” that the release con-
firming the buyout, which Tri-
bune Business revealed in
February this year, referred
to. This, he added, would be
detailed in documents pub-
lished later this year in rela-
tion to the IPO.

However, Mr Archer did

reveal that in 2008, “Com-
monwealth Brewery and
Burns House had sales com-
bined of $150 million on vol-
umes of 200,000 hectolitres”.

He added that the buyout,
which currently leaves
Heineken in 100 per cent con-
trol of Commonwealth Brew-
ery/Burns House, gave the
combined entity “a great

Lyford Cay billionaire in
S12.4m Lehman claim row

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMAS-based
investment fund managed by
a billionaire Lyford Cay resi-
dent’s firm is appealing a deci-
sion to reject its $12.4 million
claim against bankrupt invest-
ment bank Lehman Brothers,
arguing that it is owed both a
cash deposit and short selling
gains.

Moore Macro Fund, which
is registered and domiciled in
the Bahamas, and its invest-
ment manager, Moore Capital

Fund manager Louis Bacon’s firm appeals
rejection of demand against bankrupt investment
bank by their Bahamian-registered fund

Management, are appealing
the decision by trustee James
Giddens to reject their claim
against the bank’s whose Sep-
tember 2008 collapse trig-
gered the full-blown credit
crunch that almost tanked the
world’s financial system and
with it, the global and
Bahamian economies.
Moore Capital Manage-
ment was set up, and is

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

owned, by billionaire hedge
fund trader Louis Bacon, who
has a multi-million dollar
home at Lyford Cay.
Appealing the decision by
Lehman Brothers’ bankrupt-
cy trustee, the attorneys for
Moore Macro Fund and
Moore Capital Management
argued in documents obtained

SEE page 6B

opportunity to see what we
can do out of the box”, includ-
ing expanding export markets
for its homegrown Kalik beer.

Confirming that an “inter-
nal corporate restructuring”
would now take place follow-
ing the exit of the Finlaysons
and their Associated Bahami-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





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Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
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$857m project: ousted partner
blasts ‘irrational’ Tribunal verdict

FROM page 1B

Management, and its Seaside
Heights investment vehicle,
which seeks to enforce the

International Arbitration Tri-
bunal’s ruling, Roger Stein
and his RHS Ventures com-
pany outlined a number of
alleged grounds that would
give the New York State

Supreme Court reason to
“vacate” a judgment that
comprehensively found
against him.

Arguing that the court
should declare the Tribunal’s



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ruling “null and void”, among
the grounds cited by Mr Stein,
RHS Ventures and RHS
Holdings (Bahamas) were
that two of the three-member
arbitration panel had failed
to disclose potential “conflicts
of interest and material rela-
tionships” linking them to
Plainfield.

“The Partial Final Award
clearly manifests disregard for
the law, and is therefore irra-
tional and in excess of the
power of the arbitrators, inso-
far as it imposes personal lia-
bility on Roger Stein under
contracts to which he was not
a party,” he and RHS Ven-
tures alleged, “and there is
new evidence of criminal
investigations of predatory
lending practices by [Plain-
field], material to the claims
determined by the arbitrators
but unknown to them at the
time, and which ‘might have
drastically altered the out-
come of the arbitration’.”

Mr Stein has thus made
good on his pledge to attempt
to vacate the Tribunal’s rul-
ing, ensuring the battle for
control of the $857 million
South Ocean project in south-
western New Providence
rages on. The New York
court will now have to deter-
mine whether there is any
merit to his claims, or whether
the ruling should be enforced
and _— Plainfield/Seaside
Heights replace him as gen-
eral partner, confirming RHS
Ventures is out in the cold.

Seeking to back up his
“irrationality” claims, Mr
Stein said the Tribunal had
ruled that he, individually,
and RHS Ventures pay $1.262
million to New South Ocean
Ventures, the firm oversee-
ing the development, even
though he was not named
personally as a party in the
Limited Partnership Agree-
ment (LPA) and Develop-
ment Agreement between

RHS/Plainfield.

Urging that the Tribunal’s
ruling in relation to Mr Stein
personally should be set aside,
the appeal alleged: “The arbi-
trators based their award on
the conclusion that the gen-
eral partner under the LPA
(RHS Ventures) had
breached the LPA and had
breached its fiduciary duties
as general partner.

“The general partner under
the LPA was not in contrac-
tual privity with, and had no
fiduciary duties to, South
Ocean Ventures, which was
not a party to the LPA.

“Stein was not a party to
either agreement; was not in
contractual privity with any
of the counterclaims; and nev-
er agreed to be personally
responsible for the debts or
liability of the general part-
ner under the LPA.”

A cornerstone of Mr Stein’s
case against Plainfield had
been allegations of predato-
ry lending, with the Con-
necticut-based hedge fund
supposed to have initiated
debt financing so onerous he
would be unable to repay it,
allowing it to take over the
South Ocean project.

The Tribunal emphatically
shot down Mr Stein’s claims
in this regard, but he is now
alleging that Plainfield faces
investigation by the New
York District Attorney’s
Office and Connecticut Attor-
ney General “for perpetrat-
ing the same pattern of preda-
tory tactics” in other cases,
“including ‘high pressure’
audits without reasonable
notice’ and ‘hardball’ litiga-
tion”.

Plainfield has consistently
denied any allegations of such
wrongdoing, and has previ-
ously claimed that these
investigations - and media
articles carrying details of the
probes - have been initiated
by Mr Stein and RHS Ven-

THE TRIBUNE

tures.

The latter, though, argued
that the Tribunal was
unaware of the investigations
into Plainfield when it ruled,
and RHS Ventures chose not
to inform the panel despite
knowing they existed. Mr
Stein is now alleging that had
the Tribunal known, it would
have come to a different con-
clusion.

He also alleged that Plain-
field had attempted to use the
Tribunal ruling to persuade
the New York attorney to
drop its investigation, but this
had been declined.

Mr Stein produced an April
12, 2010, letter from Matthew
J. Budzik, Connecticut’s assis-
tant attorney general, asking
himself and RHS Ventures to
hand over “all documents
within your possession or con-
trol concerning any business
dealings that you...... may
have had with Plainfield Asset
Management” in relation to
the South Ocean project.

In its hard-hitting April rul-
ing, the Tribunal ordered
RHS Ventures and Mr Stein
to repay more than $2.9 mil-
lion to the New South Ocean
project.

The Tribunal ordered Mr
Stein and RHS Ventures to
reimburse the project with
some $1.262 million, which
had allegedly been used to
fund his personal expenses,
including "$761,000 for villa
and yacht rentals and expens-
es", and $251,000 for private
plane travel".

And RHS Ventures and Mr
Stein were ordered to pay a
further $558,186 for "over-
payments of development
fees and acquisition fees",
with another $1.1 million
required to cover a sum
"improperly credited” to
RHS Ventures’ equity
account. The Tribunal ruled
that Mr Stein and RHS
should "earn" their equity.

S60-65m IPO
eineken

for

FROM page 1B

an Distillers and Brewers
(ABDAB) vehicle, Com-
monwealth Brewery/Burns
House pledged that although
they had been given 18
months by the Government

to do so, the IPO would take
place before year-end 2010.

That is likely to have
Bahamian brokerage and
investment banking houses,
all of whom are keen to win
the lucrative placement agent
role and the fees to go with it,
salivating. They are likely to
start breaking bank deposits
now, so as to ensure they and
institutional clients have the
surplus assets ready to invest.

The release on the buyout’s
completion also, somewhat
surprisingly, said the Bahami-
an government was prepared
to become a shareholder in
the combined entity, as it had
“indicated” it would purchase
any shares not subscribed for
by the Bahamian public dur-
ing the IPO - effectively
meaning it is acting as a guar-
antor/underwriter for its suc-
cess.

“T haven’t spoken to any-
one ready to place it, but if I
were to guess and if you ask
me what my wish list is, I
would say by November this
year,” Mr Archer said of a
date for the IPO.

Asked about its value, he
told Tribune Business: “If you
take the total value of the
companies to be $240 million,
25 per cent of which is...... It’s
about $60-$65 million.”

Tribune Business revealed
last week that the IPO would
likely be valued in the $60
million range, and correctly
reported that the deal would
be signed imminently - as
happened yesterday.
Heineken acquired the 47 per
cent stake ABDAB held in
Commonwealth Brewery (it
already owned the remaining
53 per cent) and the 78.8 per
cent it had in Burns House.

Both sides were tightlipped
on the purchase price paid by
Heineken, and what consid-
eration ABDAB had
received, although it had pre-
viously been suggested it was
a $100 million or nine-figure
sum. Some of the proceeds
are likely to be used by the

Finlaysons to pay down bank
debt associated with their pur-
chase and financing of the
Solomon’s Mines luxury
goods chain, much of which
is owed to Citibank.

The Finlaysons are also
thought likely to use their
cash pile to pursue other
investment opportunities.

Meanwhile, going forward,
Mr Archer said: “The chal-
lenge basically is it’s one com-
pany, One mission, one vision.
We don’t plan at this time to
have any lay-offs, although I
can’t make any promises.

“T believe that as managing
director you should have one
step in the future, and look
at new opportunities to grow
revenues and cut costs. It’s a
great opportunity to see what
we can do out of the box.

“Tcan only say that it’s [the
buyout] not an end; it’s a new
beginning, and we’re going to
look at all avenues to see how
we can best manage the
opportunities to achieve effi-
ciencies. We already export
Kalik to the US, and we are
looking to see if there are any
other opportunities.”

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald’s
law office, Chancery Law
Associates, advised ABDAB.

Heineken already has
Board and management con-
trol at Burns House, which
became the largest liquor dis-
tributor and wholesaler in the
Bahamas via the 2000 pur-
chase of Butler & Sands. The
Board and management
arrangement, concluded in
2004, provided the Finlayson
family with the financing
needed to complete the
Solomon's Mines purchase.

Apart from the Finlaysons,
ABDAB's third largest share-
holder is understood to be
PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts. Its second largest
shareholder is Sir David Gib-
bons, owner of the Colonial
Group, which owns the
Bahamas-based Atlantic
Medical and Security & Gen-
eral insurance companies.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 3B



Property manager
exploits growth in
gated communities

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A GROWING number of
gated communities has
spawned the creation of a new
property management com-
pany, which yesterday said it
hopes to take advantage of
their proliferation.

Partner in Bahamas Execu-
tive Property Management
Company (Bahamas EPMC),
Erna Dudley-Hanna, said the
property management busi-
ness in the Bahamas was rela-
tively smallm with only three
or four firms in Nassau.

According to her, however,
the number of properties in
need of management services
is increasing.

The company, which is run
by Mrs Dudley-Hanna and
her husband, Harry Hanna,
provides property manage-
ment services, financial man-
agement, administrative man-
agement and maintenance
management.

Mrs Dudley-Hanna worked
for a management company
internationally before starting
Bahamas EPMC, and with a
background in accounting,
runs the financial manage-
ment side while her husband
focuses on the property man-

agement.

She said there could be
many potential contracts com-
ing to Bahamas EPMC,
becauase as developers com-
plete properties, they employ
property management com-
panies to take over the day-
to-day management.

“After it’s 50 per cent com-
plete, developers like to hand
over the reigns,” said Mrs
Dudley-Hanna.

She said large capital costs
had not been incurred in start-
ing the business, and since its
inception it had taken on two
clients and was awaiting
responses from three more
bids.

“The challenge is usually
waiting to get a business

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



license, because they want to
see a lease agreement signed
and sealed,” she said. “So it’s
hard when you have a nega-
tive cash flow while you are
trying to pay a lease, before
you even have clients.”

Mrs Dudley-Hanna said the
company hasn’t received any
new properties as yet, recent-
ly taking on properties that
have decided to change man-
agement companies.

While Bahamas EPMC
employs three people, it will
sub-contract a number of
smaller companies for services
such as maintenance, securi-
ty and landscape.

“A lot of times the devel-
opers struggle doing it them-
selves,” she said

Legal Notice

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALBERTPARK

INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
— H—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALBERTPARK INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EDBEEL
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— H—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EDBEEL INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULLBOAT SAIL INC.

is ‘—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FULLBOAT SAIL INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
CARTHUSIAN

HOLDINGS INC.
— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CARTHUSIAN HOLDINGS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EXMOOR HOLDINGS LTD.

— H—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of EXMOOR HOLDINGS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DILLS PAISER

HOLDINGS LTD.
— 4—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DILLS PAISER HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Tel: 502 2356 fgg

for ad rates



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ASPERA OVERSEAS LTD.

— %—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of ASPERA OVERSEAS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ARAAPPALOOSA

INVESTMENTS LTD.
— 4—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ARAAPPALOOSA INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOSPORT
VENTURES LTD.

—— / >_—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GOSPORT VENTURES LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



To advertise in The
ge el Sa

FROM page 1B

directing projects that will
point interest back to the
downtown area.

The pedestrianisation of
Charlotte Street has been
talked about for almost 20
years, but could finally come
to fruition next year, while
there are thoughts of doing
similar works to several other
side streets connecting Bay
and Shirley Streets.

to see improvements to the
physical environment in the
downtown Bay Street loca-
tion, but the machinery to
implement the changes has
to be in place before that can
happen.

The DNP is public-private
partnership that is working
toward creating the BID, and

Pe Ce)
TTAB OE



Legal Notice

NOTICE
DILLONPRO LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ASYMMETRIC LTD.

— i —

#

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of DILLONPRO LTD. has been completed;

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ASYMMETRIC LTD. has been com-
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com- pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

pany has therefore been struck off the Register. Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIGEASI VALLEY INC.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ATHENA VENTURES LTD.

— *+,— — -,—

Fi i
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIGEASI VALLEY INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution ofp ATHENA VENTURES LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)








ROYAL DFIDELITY

Money at Work




COL] NTA L.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 17 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,615.16 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD 49.78 | YTD % 3.18
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 0.250 0.040



52wk-Hi Previous Close Today's Close

1.04

Change
0.00








































4.2 3.85%




. 9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050 0.200 212.6 1.88%
6.94 §.23 Bank of Bahamas 5.24 5.24 0.00 0.598 0.260 8.8 4.96%)
0.58 0.36 Benchmark 0.40 0.36 -0.04 1,000 -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%)
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168 0.090 18.8 2.86%)
2.15 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.17 2.17 0.00 0.055 0.040 39.5 1.84%
12.55 9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07 12.07 0.00 1.406 0.290 8.6 2.40%
2.84 2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84 2.84 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.4 1.41%
17.00 5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.99 6.99 0.00 0.460 0.230 15.2 3.29%
13.65 2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.64 2.67 0.03 0.111 0.052 24.1 1.95%
2.55 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00 0.627 0.110 4.1 4.33%
6.99 5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00 -0.003 0.240 N/M 3.95%
10.99 8.75 Finco 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.168 0.520 53.6 5.78%
10.60 9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60 10.60 0.00 0.678 0.350 15.6 3.30%
5.53 3.75 Focol (S) 5.08 5.08 0.00 0.366 0.170 13.9 3.35%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.30 0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035 0.000 7.7 0.00%
5.59 5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.407 0.240 13.7 4.29%)
10.50 9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.5 6.43%)
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 0.000 64.1 0.00%!

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
































1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7% 19 October 2017

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00

EPS $
-2.945

Div $
0.000




















































N/M




6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

41.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%
10.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months % NAV 3MTH NAV 6MTH NAV Date




















1.3758 CFAL Bond Fund 1.4674 1.446000 1.419947 30-Apr-10

2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9020 0.52 -0.11 2.886947 2.830013 30-Apr-10

1.5302 1.4590 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5302 1.53 4.88 1.514105 1.498375 7-May-10

3.2025 2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0368 2.57 -4.99 31-Mar-10

13.5654 12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.5654 1.48 5.47 31-Mar-10

107.5706 100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund 107.5706 3.45 6.99 103.987340 103.095570 31-Mar-10

105.7765 93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund 105.7706 3.99 13.50 101.725415 99.417680 31-Mar-10

1.1034 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.1034 1.25 5.25 31-Mar-10

1.0801 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0764 0.79 4.37 31-Mar-10

1.1041 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1041 1.23 5.34 31-Mar-10

19.5795 9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int! Investment Fund 9.4839 1.52 7.41 31-Mar-10
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

11.2361 10.0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund 10.6709 -0.93 12.33 31-Mar-10
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

17.9664 4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'| Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 3.23 58.37 31-Mar-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525








“We are presenting a com-
prehensive programme,” said
Mr Roberts.

According Mr Roberts,
Cabinet ministers have not
yet seen any of the draft leg-
islation, which was penned
by lawyers pro bono.

He added, though, that it
was important the legislation
be passed through Cabinet
for approval before it
becomes entangled and stag-
nated in the campaigns for
the 2012 election.

Operations manager at
The Coin of the Realm,
Cathy Moultrie, told Tribune
Business recently that a Char-
lotte Street committee was

BID for imminent City legislation

formed to prepare and lob-
by for the pedestriansation
process.

She said turning the street
into a thoroughfare that
would accept only foot traffic
could encourage visitors and
locals to venture off Bay
Street and patronise shops
and restaurants.

“Tt would be a great thing,”
said Mrs Moultrie.

“There is usually a lot of
congestion on the road. Mak-
ing it a pedestrian zone would
encourage tourists to come
up the road and encourage
shopping. There are a lot of
wonderful shops and restau-
rant on Charlotte Street.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

FARREM INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above named
company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-4447, Nassau, The Bahamas
on or before the 18th day of June, A.D. 2010.

Ché Toussaint Erad Campbell Chase
Liquidator

P.O. Box N-4447, Nassau, The Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AUSTASIA HOLDINGS LTD.

a

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of AUSTASIA HOLDINGS LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BRIXHALL GREEN

HOLDINGS LTD.

—

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BRIXHALL GREEN HOLDINGS LTD.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BRIZAY INVESTMENTS

PTE. LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BRIZAY INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

would have to call on the pub-
lic sector to make a similar
“national sacrifice” to the pri-
vate sector.

James Smith, who ran the
Ministry of Finance during
the 2002-2007 Christie admin-
istration, said the nature of
the Bahamian government’s
Budget, with some 60 per cent
of all spending going on civil
service wages, gratuities and
pensions, required the admin-
istration to “put everything
on the block” to achieve the
desired effect from austerity
measures.

He added that the signifi-
cance of the 2010-2011 Bud-
get lay largely in the message
it sent both locally and inter-
nationally, as the likes of
Standard & Poor’s (S&P) and
Moody’s, plus the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF),
would use it to assess whether
the Bahamas had “the met-
tle” to get its public finances
back on track through apply-
ing tough fiscal medicine.

Such statements were rein-
forced graphically yesterday
by Moody’s latest assessment
of the Bahamas’ creditwor-
thiness. The opinion, obtained
by Tribune Business, said:
“The world economic crisis
has had a negative impact on
[Bahamian] economic growth,
especially on the tourism sec-
tor. 2010 is likely to be the
third year in a row with nega-
tive growth.

“Debt has been rising, and

we will monitor the upcom-
ing Budget to determine if a
rating action is warranted.”

Moody’s thus could not
have been clearer about the
implications for the Bahamas,
and the public finances, if the
Government fails to adopt the
measures it is seeking. A
downgrade would raise the
Bahamas’ borrowing costs on
the international markets, as
investors would demand a
higher interest rate of return
for the perceived increase in
risk, the consequences of
which would be to further
increase debt servicing costs
and drag more funds away
from the likes of health, edu-
cation and social services.

“T think this Budget would
have its significance in the
message not just sent locally,
but internationally,” Mr
Smith told Tribune Business
yesterday. “The Bahamas, in
the last couple of years, has
gone somewhere it has never
been before, with the increase
in the deficit and the debt.

“This is unusual for the
Bahamas, and the interna-
tional rating agencies under-
stand this. They are now look-
ing to see if we have the met-
tle to make the adjustments
necessary to get back on the
path to fiscal prudence.”

Acknowledging that “this
might very well be one of the
most important” Budgets
delivered in the Bahamas for
the past two decades, Mr
Smith said it came against the
backdrop of one of the worst,
and deepest, global recessions
in living memory.

Rating agency: Bu dget to
decide debt downgrade

Previous recessions had
been short-lived, with the US
economy recovering rapidly,
and the Bahamas had been
able to adjust easily to any
government spending over-
shooting, aided by inflows
from tourism and foreign
direct investment.

“This one is deep, and we
still don’t know how long it’s
going to last, because the goal
posts are changing on us,” Mr
Smith said. “Apart from send-
ing a signal that we’ve got to
cut back, this Budget has got
to make some judgments as
to how long we can continue
or get out of it. We don’t want
to overshoot, because if we
need to start borrowing for
essential services, we’ve got
to have some headroom.

“This is fundamental eco-
nomics: making a choice
between wants and scarce
resources.”

The Central Bank had
pegged the Bahamas’ nation-
al debt at over $3.9 billion, or
just under $4 billion, at year-
end 2009, a debt-to-GDP
ratio of 53.6 per cent - com-
pared to the 40 per cent nor-
mally regarded as the thresh-
old it was dangerous to go
past.

And, for the first eight to
nine months of the current fis-
cal year, the Government’s
deficit had grown by $36.3
million or 20.1 per cent year-
over-year to $216.6 million.
Total spending was up $57.2
million or 5.7 per cent at
$1.067 billion, led by a 33.7
per cent increase in capital
works spending to $98.8 mil-

lion.

Given the nature of the
Government’s budget, Mr
Smith said that if any spend-
ing cuts were necessary, “you
might have to put everything
on the block. Any adjust-
ments will have the effect of
limiting resources in other
areas”.

Given that the “big chal-
lenge” was that 60 per cent
of government spending went
on salaries, pensions and gra-
tuities, Mr Smith said the best
idea might be to assess how
much to cut spending by, then
impose a 10 per cent reduc-
tion across all departments
and ministries bar debt ser-
vicing.

“Nothing can be regarded
as sacred,” he warned, sug-
gesting that the 2010-2011
Budget would likely involve
wage and pay freezes, pro-
motion, increment and pen-
sion freezes, and early retire-
ment for those at this age.

“It’s kind of a call for a
national sacrifice that other
parts of the economy have
been making for the past two
years,” Mr Smith said. “If you
don’t do it now, it will have to
happen some time.

The fact that some 70 per
cent of the Budget’s costs
were fixed “doesn’t give you
much wiggle room”, Mr
Smith added. Other areas that
could be earmarked for cuts,
he suggested, were the sus-
pension of certain projects,
while non-revenue generat-
ing sectors - like health, edu-
cation and social services -
could also be targeted.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, NICOLA

JULIANA PACIOTTA of NASSAU, BAHAMAS
intend to change my name to CHRISTIANA NICOLA
BURROWS. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NATASHA ANGELA
PARKER of NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend to change the
name of my daughter from AHMAIR THERESA SAUNDERS
to AHMAIR THERESA PARKER. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days
after the date of publication of this notice.





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NAFCOD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by The Registrar General on the 3rd day of February,
AD., 2010.

Dated 14th day of May, A.D., 2010.
Gabriele Schneider

Liquidator of
NAFCOD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED





Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PALLAS INTERNATIONAL LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 13, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 25th day of June, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquida-
tor of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

MAY 14, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

NASBARE & COMPANY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45
of 2000), of NASBARE & COMPANY LIMITED has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of the completion of the dissolution
was April 6th, 2010.

|: |

aoeen EA
Foberice Kong V _

Liqpidater

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

Metaconsult Limited
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, Metaconsult Limited is in dissolution as of May
13, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

GORO LTD

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, GORO LTD is in dissolution as of May 11, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 5B

NOTICE
MAVERICK INVESTMENT HOLDING INC.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MAVERICK INVESTMENT HOLDING INC. is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 10" March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Diodata
Holdings Ltd. of Wickhams Cay, Tortola, British Virgin
Islands.

Dated this 18" day of March A. D. 2010



Diodata Holdings Ltd.
Liquidator































NOTICE
AQUILA ASIA LIMITED

N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) AQUILA ASIA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 13" May 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Peter Leppard
of c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393.

Dated this 18" day of May A. D. 2010



Peter Leppard
Liquidator

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

ESOBRAL HOLDINGS S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(1) of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45
of 2000, the dissolution of ESOBRAL HOLDINGS S.A.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of the completion of the dissolution
was April 26th, 2010.

- r = =
—— at = - aa
magnets [EL SERIE eA RAL
Liguedaior

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SONBUILT INVEST LTD

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
SONBUILT INVEST LTD is in dissolution as of May 10,
2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SOUTHGATE INC

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, SOUTHGATE INC. is in dissolution as of May
4, 2010.

Sarah Petre-Mears situated at Shaw’s Estate, Newcastle,
St. James Parish, Nevis, West Indies is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


























NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC JERRY of KEMP ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11â„¢ DAY of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

In The Estate Anne C. Doyle
late of 3640 North Ocean Drive in the
City of Singer Island in the Country of
Palm Beach in the State of Florida one
of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send before the 24th day of June,
2010, after which date the Administrators will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only
to the claims of which they shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date herein-
before metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FILLWORTH LEES
INVESTMENTS LTD.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FILLWORTH LEES INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLOUDY RESOURCES LTD.

— -——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLOUDY RESOURCES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAIRWAY OCEAN
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— + ——_

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FAIRWAY OCEAN INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE TRIBUNE

Lyford Cay
billionaire in $12.4m
Lehman claim row

FROM page 1B

by Tribune Business that the
former was “owed cash, plus
any costs and expenses
incurred, in connection with
securities activities undertak-
en in the fixed income securi-
ties prime brokerage account
that the fund maintained with
Lehman Brothers”.

Arguing that Lehman
Brothers had failed to settle
the Moore Macro Fund’s
short-selling of mortgage
backed securities, which
occurred on September 9,
2008, and return the cash bal-
ances held in the account
before bankruptcy, Moore
Capital Management said it
had notified the trustee that
the trades had terminated via
a letter some 15 days later.

“In the case of each of the
three trades, the termination
price of the mortgage-backed
securities was lower than the
original trade price,” Moore
Capital Management alleged.
“The fund [Moore Macro
Fund] therefore had an unre-
alised gain on its short sales of
securities of $5.784 million,
which Lehman Brothers owes
to the fund.”

Adding that the Bahamian
investment fund was also
owed interest on the unre-
alised gain, Moore Capital
Management further alleged:
“Lehman Brothers also owes
the fund cash in the amount
of $6.662 million. At the time
that Lehman Brothers liqui-
dation commenced, the fund
held the cash deposit in the
account for purposes of enter-

ing into transaction in fixed-
income securities.

“In addition, Lehman
Brothers owes the fund
accrued interest on the cash
deposit under the terms of the
agreement” between the two
sides.

The Lehman trustee had
denied the Bahamian invest-
ment fund’s claim on the
grounds that the funds sought
were allegedly not “customer
property” as defined by the
Securities Investor Protection
Act.

However, Moore Macro
Fund’s attorneys argued that
both the unrealised trading
gain and cash deposit should
have been - or were - “cus-
todied”, meaning that
Lehman Brothers held them
on trust in a fiduciary capaci-

ty for the benefit of clients.

Although Moore Macro
Fund’s short sales were effect-
ed through the Lehman
Brothers account, they never
settled, and “should be treat-
ed as having been completed
and closed out as of the trade
date.

“Had Lehman Brothers
settled the fund’s short sales
of the mortgage-backed secu-
rities, the fund would have
had short sale proceeds in the
account of approximately
$586 million. Lehman Broth-
ers default resulted in its
inability to settle the short
sale transactions, and forced
the termination of the trades
at prices lower than the orig-
inal sales prices, resulting in
the unrealised gain of $5.784
million.”

NOTICE is hereby given that JIFEMA RAPHAEL of #23
PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18â„¢ DAY OF MAY, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CAYUSE VENTURES S.A.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CAYUSE VENTURES S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EAGLE TRADING

INVESTMENTS INC.

——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EAGLE TRADING INVESTMENTS
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHAPARRAL

ENTERPRISES LTD.

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CHAPARRAL ENTERPRISES LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

URGENT

Notice for Claudette Pinder
Daughter of Willord Pinder (deceased)
Is hereby ask to contact
Edmund Russell
At Kevin M. Russell & Co.
373-9740/41 or
Anastacia Pinder: 352-2186 h
or 350-3515w

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEDO ASSETS LTD.

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CLEDO ASSETS LID. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELKIN BRIDGE

INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ELKIN BRIDGE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAYANDA VISTANA INC.

— +——

#
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of BAYANDA VISTANA INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 7B



Profitable firms
increasingly put
on the market

PROFITABLE Bahamian
businesses are increasingly
being placed on the market
for sale in the midst of trou-
bling economic times, accord-
ing to a business broker, as
entrepreneurs find their busi-
ness flat and unlikely to
increase in value in the short
to medium-term.

A release by Bahamas-
based business brokering
firm, Res Socius, revealed
that the recession has pro-
duced a “tremendous” oppor-
tunity for acquiring business-
es to expand and take advan-
tage of “economies of scale”.

According to founding
partner of Res Socius, Simon
Cooper, a sustained econom-
ic turnaround is not likely
until 2011, but there are
opportunities for business sec-
tors to consolidate, allowing
freed-up capital to be used
more productively.

“There is a risk of contin-
ued US dollar weakness,
expected for some time,
which is likely to hinder the
growth of the real US econo-
my,” he said.

“The ‘borrow and spend’
economy is ‘numbing the
pain’ for the time being, but

the bills will have to be paid at
some point. I believe a sus-
tainable US recovery is years
away, which has obvious ram-
ifications for the Bahamian
economy. There appears to
be a need for consolidation
of many business sectors right
now...”

Mr Cooper believes com-
panies should constantly
review their operations, and
diversify and improve effi-
ciencies, especially during
downturns.

“Res Socius helps business
owners reach the right deci-
sion for their particular cir-

cumstances,” he said. “That
may mean advising the client
to restructure in preparation
of a sale, wait, sell or simply
do nothing. However, if the
decision is to put the business
on the market, we assist with
everything from business val-
uation to closing.”

The firm was founded in
2009 and is authorized by the
Bahamas Investment Author-
ity to practice as business bro-
kers and consultants.

Mr Cooper has specialiaed
in the acquisition, mergers,
troubleshooting and divesti-
ture of businesses.

Leading law firm with offices located in
Nassau and Freeport is seeking to fill the
position.

Accounts Administrator

The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum qualifications:

An Associate’s Degree in Accounting or
Business Administration

Two to three years experience in a financial
environment

Computer Literate - proficiency in excel a plus
Excellent oral and written communication
skills

General responsibilities will include but not
limited to:

Accounts Payable & Receivable

Client Billing

Liasing with clients and outside agencies
Bank Reconciliations

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CASTELO INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
ANDERSON ASSOCIATES LIMITED

Personal Attributes
Ability to prioritize tasks
Ability to work with minimal supervision
Team Player
Punctual with excellent attendance

In Voluntary liquidation

WE OFFER
An attractive and competitive package of
benefits including a Pension Plan

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), ANDERSON
ASSOCIATES LIMITED, has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate
of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on
the 30th day of March, 2010.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, CASTELO INTERNATIONAL
LTD., has been dissolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 24th day of March,
2010.

Interested persons should apply in writing to:
The Human Resources Officer

P.O. Box N-4196
Nassau, Bahamas

To advertise, just call 502-2371

Mrs. Shiew Ling Katherine TSUI HUANG
1501 Ruttonjee House, Ruttonjee Centre
11 Duddell Street
Central, Hong Kong
Liquidator

Nautilus Corporate Services Limited,
of Nautilus House, La Cour des Casernes,
St. Helier, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE1 3NH
Liquidator





DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

This Months Topic: MENTAL HEALTH

LECTURE DATE:
Thursday, May 20th, 2010
@ 6PM
DOCTORS HOSPITAL, CONFERENCE ROOM

DOWDESWELL STREET
SEATING IS LIMITED, RSVP 302-4603

Please join US as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

‘a es
SPEAKER:
Dr. Rashida Brown-Clarke
Psychiatrist

LECTURE SERIES

Purpose:
To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished
physicians,

Get your Free Blood
Pressure Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between
“Weeting the needs of advertisers Spm & 6pm.
and readers motivates me to do
a good job. The Tribune is

iy newspaper.”

RSVP:
To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-003

ESTHER GARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune
My Voice. Wy Hewzpaper?

/DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Heater For Life







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 9B



The Tribune

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

ibune Health is uncovering the
[eet of sex for both men and
women. Last week we spoke to
Dr Joseph | Evans, urologist at the
Bahamas Urology Center who pro-
vided insightful information about
the advantages of responsible and
safe intercourse.

Some of the advantages Dr Evans
listed are also benefiting to women
as well. The common denominators,
for instance include the fact that sex
helps to relieve stress, helps one to
sleep better, promotes a healthy self
esteem and is conducive to overall
mental health.

This week we spoke to our health
columnist Maggie Bain, a relation-
ship and sex therapist who said there
are female health advantages which
can be derived from sex as well. She
also said that women who are near-
ing menopause should engage in





consistent sexual activities with their
partners since it has positive effects
on the pubic and vaginal areas.

Decreases Vaginal Atrophy

This condition- which occurs
when the lining of the walls of the
vagina get thinner or become
inflamed due to insufficient female
hormones is usually faced by women
who are nearing menopause or who
have surpassed the menopausal
stage.

The condition causes intercourse
to be a less pleasurable and more
painful experience which in turn
causes sexual desire and interest to
diminish slowly.

To prevent that from happening,
Mrs Bain suggest mature women,
have sex more frequently with their
partners.

“Intercourse helps to increase
blood supply in the pelvic region.
The blood flow due to arousal helps
to keep the tissues and the entire
pelvic organs healthy,” she told Tri-



Benefits 0fsSex -

SEX FOR WOMEN

bune Health.

Sex Strengthens Pelvic Floor Muscles

During intercourse the muscles in
the pelvic region are constantly con-
tracting and relaxing. This continu-
ous contracting and relaxing helps
to strengthen the pelvic floor mus-
cles, Mrs Bain said.

Additionally pelvic floor strength
makes sex a more pleasurable expe-
rience according to Webmd.com.
“For women, doing a few pelvic floor
muscle exercises known as Kegels
during sex offers a couple of benefits.
They will enjoy more pleasure, and it
will also strengthen the area help-
ing to minimise the risk of inconti-
nence later in life,” the website
explained.

Sex Reduces Pain
For expectant mothers, frequent
sex can be a plus since it may relieve
pain during contractions. Wedmd
explains: “As the hormone oxytocin
surges, endorphins increase, and pain

declines. So if your headache, arthri- |
tis pain, or PMS symptoms seem to }
improve after sex, you can thank :

those higher oxytocin levels,” the : ; ng
:; take what I say and interpret it in a

website said.

In a study published by the Bul-
letin of Experimental Biology and :
Medicine and posted by Webmd, 48 :
volunteers who inhaled oxytocin ;
vapour and then had their fingers ;
pricked found that their threshold for :
pain was lowered by more than half. :

: asked with regard to euthanasia.

Improves Intimacy

Because women are emotional :
beings this benefit might be more }

significant.

“Sex improves intimacy between
partners. It helps couples to bond :
and build trust. During love making :

a woman needs to be touched, kissed
and hugged. Those things are really
important,” Mrs Bain explained.
She also said that hormones
released during intercourse create

ness and contentment.



By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIAN women now have
an alternative public health care out-
let from which to receive preventa-
tive care for the leading gynecologi-
cal cancer in the Bahamas.

The new Colposcopy Unit at the
South Beach Health Centre was offi-
cially launched last week and is
equipped to detect and treat early
stages of cervical cancer, considered
one of the most preventable forms of
cancer.

Colposcopy involves a thorough
examination of the cervix and tis-
sues of the vagina and vulva using a
special microscope called a colpo-
scope, which is able to detect pre-
malignant lesions which are treat-
able before they progress into cervi-
cal cancer.

If pre-malignant lesions are iden-
tified, the clinic has the facilities to
treat patients using cryosurgery or
loop electrosurgical excision proce-
dure (LEEFP).

A colposcopy is a more detailed
screening test that is recommended
based on the results of a routine
screening test called a PAP smear,
which all women over the age of 18
are encouraged to receive from their
health care provider during their
yearly physical examination.

The Ministry of Health stated that
less than ten per cent of women in
the Bahamas receive annual pap
smear tests.

Dr Darron Halliday, the focal
point physician for the Colposcopy
clinic, said the Bahamas has roughly
20-30 new cervical cancer cases each
year, according to international sta-
tistics.

He estimated: “About half of the
women die within a year of their
diagnosis, because they didn’t get a
pap smear and are only diagnosed
when in the advanced stages - usu-
ally symptoms would not present
themselves until Stage 3.”





th

a

The microscope was donated by
the Spanish government to all
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) member states that partici-
pated in a training program for gyne-
cologists and obstetricians, jointly
organised along with the CARI-
COM Secretariat.

CARICOM stated that the
Caribbean region has the highest
incidence of cervical cancer in the
Americas. The program was part of
a series of interventions designed to
“help reduce the incidence and
prevalence of cervical cancer in the



A

DR DARRON Halliday (seated at machine) and Dr Raleigh Butler (standing) put a patient through the steps on how the col-
poscope machine works during a demonstration at the South Beach Health Centre Health officials say the addition of the
machine and a Colposcopy Clinic at the Health Centre will help to improve outcomes for cervical cancer in women as a
result of more regular and early screenings.

Caribbean by building capacity
through training in the early detec-
tion and treatment of cervical can-
cer.”

Dr Halliday was one of 30 practi-
tioners who participated in the
“Train-the-Trainers’ program which
certified him as a trainer in col-
poscopy.

Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis said: “The establishment of a
colposcopy unit with a strong fol-
low-up and education unit will do
much to improve the long wait for
appointments at the Princess Mar-



%,

th.

\

atrick Hanna/BIS photo



garet Hospital, and relieve the bur-

individuals and their families in the
Bahamas.

rics on an ongoing basis.”

The Ministry of Health reports

that 1,000 women are referred annu- : . : .
: euthanasia of a terminally ill or

ally for abnormal pap smear tests in

the public health care system. Of
this amount, 300 women require col- :
: for your pet.

poscopy screenings.







Euthanasia

ALL OF us who love and care

: for our pets understand that we will
: outlive our pets and ultimately have
: to say good bye. But knowing that
: doesn’t make the reality any easier.
: Quality care can prolong the lives of
: our pets only for so long. As pet
: lovers we all feel the bond that ties
: us to our animal family members.

This human-animal bond can be,

: and often is, as strong as any inter-
: human bond. One of the problems
:; with getting so close to these rela-
: tively short lived creatures is that
: we will likely have to say good bye
: one day.

It is incumbent upon caring own-

ers to make the wisest, most com-
: passionate and certainly the most

difficult decision for our pets. The

! time will come when a longer life
: isn’t necessarily a better life. When
: the joy of living is gone, when pain
: replaces pleasure, and when your
: dog is ready to leap forward into
: the next adventures beyond your
: side, you can grant her the greatest
: gift of all, a merciful death.

I realise the topic of pet euthana-
sia is a sensitive one, and frankly it is
difficult to write about because
someone somewhere is going to

negative way. But after some
thought and reflection, I realise that
if a veterinarian can’t openly talk
about euthanasia and possibly help
someone struggling with this issue
then who can?

Some of the common questions

1) How is it done?

2) Does it hurt the animal?
3) How are the animal’s
remains handled?

Some advice to all animal lovers

: that I would offer at this time so
: that they can get through this diffi-
: cult period. I tell them that the one
: thing that most pet owners have in
: ~ | common is that we will likely outlive
good feelings that promote happi- our pets. 1am not a gambling man,
: but the odds are good that we will
: probably, at some time, face a deci-
: sion about euthanasia for our

South Beach Health Centre unveils Colposcopy Unit

: have been a veterinarian since 1983
: and throughout my career; I have
: had to euthanise many dogs, cats
|: and horses. I must confess that this

: is one of my most difficult tasks to
: do as a veterinarian.

beloved animal friend.
As a veterinarian, I approach the
task of euthanasia very seriously. I

For this reason, I believe that the

: method we use to ecuthanise should
: be truly humane, brief and painless.
: If that was not the case, I doubt I
: would not be able to sleep properly
: at night.

The most common method of

: euthanasia is the intravenous injec-
: tion of a barbiturate that rapidly
: renders the pet unconscious. With-
: in a few seconds this same medica-
: tion arrests the heart. This method
: assures us and the grieving pet own-
: er alike, that the animal feels no
: pain or anxiety and simply “falls
: asleep.” After a pet is put to rest,
: arrangements must be made for his
: or her remains. She can be cremat-
ed or buried at home, or whatsoev-
: er the owner wishes.

Over the last 20 years, I have

! worked with and supported many

i part of the healing process of the
: grief that is felt with the loss of a
; pet which to some can be equal to
: that felt with the loss of a family
: member.

families through the pain of their
pet’s euthanasia. Hugs, tears, hand
shakes, and other gestures are all

Euthanasia is a very personal

: decision. I truly feel that the pet

den of cervical cancer treatment to owner should make the decision on
: his or her own terms. The right time,

: the right place and the right reasons

This unit will allow for the edu- ; for putting your pet to sleep vary
cation and training of nursing and :

medical students, and residents rotat- : The pet owner needs to know that

ing through gynecology and obstet- : they need to do what feels right for

: them and their pet.

tremendously for each pet lover.

Euthanasia is a caring and loving
act. One must understand that

injured animal may be the most car-
ing and loving thing you will ever do

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Or

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Men and

S WOMEN, is it really possible for

A: to be able to relate to all aspects

of male sexuality? Even if we

thought of ourselves as very imaginative, and

believed that we could visualise being in their
shoes, would we be accurate?

Just as they are unable to truly ‘know us’,
the same has to be acknowledged. Our
unique DNA framework not only places us in
our gender groups, but also defines our indi-
vidual characteristics.

If we take time to stop and reflect, we see
a society of performance driven people. As
parents, we often feel the need to be com-
petitive with fellow parents. Giving our child
the ‘very best' surely reflects that we are the
best parents. Pushing and striving for the
highest grades, top in the class, best degrees
in the top universities, and so it goes on. Of
course, Maximising our true potential, and
not wasting our talents, is not only common
sense but realistic in our competitive world.

But what happens when we try our very
best, give it our all, and it still does not get us
where we want? Do we find ourselves being
a disappointment to those closest to us, and a
failure to ourselves?

Each gender has its own performance dri-
ven traits, but perhaps one of the most inter-
esting topics is how it affects male sexuality.
Myths surrounding sexual performance per-
meate in every society. Some cultures are
more rigid and unyielding, whilst others are



(Coy GREEN SCENE

Heirloom
fish pepper

ALTHOUGH hot peppers originated in
the foothills of the Andes they have spread
all over the tropical and sub-tropical world
and have developed into an amazing array
of shape, colour, size and heat strength.

For instance, Thailand has a great num-
ber of distinctive hot peppers and Hungar-
ian paprika is deservedly known worldwide.

Of this myriad of peppers there is one
that stands out for two very good reasons:
the foliage is variegated and the ripening
fruits are striped.

Fish pepper was taken to the US east-
ern seaboard in the mid-1800s from West
Africa and has been used by black fishing
communities around the Chesapeake Bay
to season fish, crabs and shellfish since the
beginning of the twentieth century. Its use
has spread to Philadelphia and Maryland
and other areas in the northeast United
States.

Fish pepper is a Capsicum annuum and
its most distinctive feature is its green and
white foliage. This makes the two-foot tall
plant a candidate for the ornamental garden
instead of the pepper patch.

Being an heirloom variety there are great
deviations in the variegation. Some plants
have leaves that are almost completely
green with a few variegated patches while
others bear leaves that are predominantly
white. The perfect fish pepper plant is even-
ly variegated.

The peppers are also very ornamental.
When young they are cream in colour and
then develop green striping. As the fruit
turns orange the striping becomes brown.
When the fish pepper is fully mature it is
bright red with no striping.

It is said that the name fish pepper came
about from the appearance of the striped
unripe fruits and their resemblance to the
markings of a fish. The use as a seasoning
for fish would be a natural step.

Fish pepper is in the middle of the heat
range, being about as pungent as Serrano. I
doubt if it would be a favourite in The
Bahamas because the ripe fruits are crunchy
and very difficult to mash with the tines of
a fork, the way bird peppers are dealt with
at boil fish time. The shoulders of fish pep-
pers are larger than Serrano and tends to
curve banana-wise and end in a point.

Fish pepper is the only party-coloured
pepper I know of. Many peppers change
colour and briefly show two colours at one
time but fish pepper is constant in its varied
colouration at different stages.

I came across fish pepper recently when
Steve and Janine Roessler, of Bahama Palm
Shores, Abaco, and Minnesota, asked me to
baby sit their plant for the summer. By the
time fall comes and I return the plant to
them I will have my own plants grown from
seed.

In the northeastern United States the
fish pepper would be grown as an annual
but here in The Bahamas the plant should
last for several years. It seems to me that we
did not have a true spring this year. Right
until the end of April there were unsea-
sonable cold winds. When the sun came
out and the breezes warmed up it was sud-
denly time to put on the air conditioning.
We went from winter to summer in a few
days early in May.

During the first week of May the first
bridal bouquet flower appeared and that
made me very happy. Bridal bouquet is a
frangipani (Plumeria pudica) that keeps its
attractive leaves year-round and flowers
from May to December. The masses of
beautiful white flowers with yellow centres
make a decided contrast to the typical
red/yellow/orange/pink of most tropical
flowers.

¢ gardenerjack@coralwave.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



more liberal in their thinking.

High on the list is the focus on the quality
and frequency of erections. The concept that
men are always willing, ready and able, some-
times places unreasonable pressure. The nat-
ural thought process then moves towards that
sex is only intercourse, and requires a full
erection for penetration. We understand then
why men feel so responsible for successful
and satisfying lovemaking. Even if he allows
his partner to instigate, and lead the sexual
activity, he still considers himself 'in charge’.

Living with the knowledge that your erec-
tions pre-determine your potency, will hope-
fully affect your outlook towards your health.
Because the workings of the penis have so
much to do with circuitry, men need to follow
similar health guidelines for their heart. A
low fat diet is necessary to prevent clogging of
the arteries, and in turn increases blood flow
to the genital region. We know that exercise
and preventing weight gain, can improve
libido and performance by increasing testos-

terone. Testosterone, thyroid and glucose
levels play an important role and can be eas-
ily treated. Healthy living, minus chronic use
of cocaine, marijuana, alcohol, steroids, and
tobacco reduce risk factors and a negative
effect on male potency. Is it the paying atten-
tion to your health that prolongs your sex
life or vice versa?

Today, it is not only women who are inter-
ested in age rejuvenation and life extension,
but also men. More and more people are
becoming well informed about all aspects of
their sexual and reproductive systems. Once
again, education shows us that by early detec-
tion of even the smallest change can prevent
us from developing larger problems.

With the media's help, the public's appre-
ciation that their prescription medications
may adversely affect their sex life, places an
even greater pressure on the physician. Anti-
hypertensive, antidepressants, antipsychot-
ic, antiandrogen medications are the most
popularly prescribed groups to affect erec-
tions. Throw in chemotherapy and radiation
for the treatment of cancer and a chronic
problem develops.

Neurological problems such as Multiple
Sclerosis, Parkinson's, spinal cord injuries,
and long-term diabetes can disrupt the nor-
mal sequence of events necessary for an erec-
tion to occur. How to tackle these difficult
problems, maintain a personal sense of man-
hood, as well as maintaining a relationship





Sex: Male Sexual Health

become an interesting dilemma. Some prob-
lems are helped by various medical, phar-
maceutical, or mechanical interventions, and
by sex therapy. More often than not it is a
combination of treatments that is the most
effective.

It is extremely important to remember that
one of the most common erectile problems is
performance anxiety. When a man feels pres-
sured to achieve or maintain an erection, he
will commonly become more anxious when in
a sexually demanding situation. Stress increas-
es the body's production of catecholamine
such as serotonin, epinephrine, and norepi-
nephrine, which act as erection inhibitors. A
cycle begins and everything goes down hill
from there.

Healthy life practices need to be started
at a young age, however, you are never too
old to slow down the natural changes in our
bodies. If your sexual performance is impor-
tant to you, and your partner, then take time
to research ways to maximize your poten-
tial. It is important to remember that the way
we choose to live our lives influences those
around us and in particular our children.

¢ Listen to ‘Love on the Rock’ with Maggie
Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on Island FM102.9.
For appointments call 364-7230, email relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.

By Gardener Jack :







CREAM coloured fish peppers turn to green and cream, then orange and brown, then bright red.



a

THE fish pepper not only has variegated leaves, it has variegated fruits.





Sensitive
Skin

> How can I calm my sensitive
> skin?

: Simply put, sensitive, skin
> hurts.

: Sensitive, red, irritated skin
: is a frustrating disruption to
> everyday life. You're not
: alone: up to 90 per cent of the
* population perceives their
: own skin as sensitive. But, do
: you really have sensitive skin?
: Or is your skin sensitised,
* meaning the itching, redness
: and sensitivity is a result of
> environmental assaults? Take
: a look at the differences
> between these two conditions
: that share a similar result.



? Sensitive skin...

- © Those who have very

: fair skin and are usually of
> Northern European ancestry
: have a genetic predisposi-

: tion towards sensitive skin.
: This could be caused by the
* lower amount of pigmenta-
: tion and thinner epidermal
: layer, allowing for easier

: access of potentially-irritat-
* ing ingredients.

: © People with sensitive

> skin have more histamine

: readily produced in the

: body. The result is a more

: hypersensitive skin, waiting
: to react at any opportunity.

: Versus Sensitized Skin...

: = @ Sensitised skin isn't

> caused by a genetic predis-
: position. It can affect any-
* one, any age, of any race

: that is exposed to environ-
> mental assaults.

: And what they have in com-
: mon.

: ¢ Symptoms and triggers

: are the same for these con-
: ditions, as both experience

: itching, burning, dryness,

: flushing and stinging.

: Sensitive and sensitised

: skins form a weakened lipid
: barrier that's unable to

: shield against assaults that

> increase moisture loss and

: skin dehydration. Dehydrat-
: ed skin cells function poorly
: and skin's immunity weak-

> ens, creating a higher risk

: for skin diseases (rosacea,

: eczema, psoriasis) and infec-
: tion from irritants that con-
: tribute to skin sensitisation.

> © This information was taken

: from dermalogica.com. "Sarah
: Beek " is a Dermalogica Skin

> Care Therapist at The Dermal

: Clinic in Sandyport. Please call
: 327-6788 for more information
5 or visit www.dermal-clinic.com.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays








THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

MAY 18, 2010, PAGE 11B





News from Japan

Calligraphy

In my quest to improve
my Japanese I decided to
learn how to write their
alphabet. However, anyone
who has seen my handwrit-
ing knows that I should
probably concentrate more
on forming my English
alphabet then trying to learn
the Japanese alphabet.

So I basically had two
strikes against me one being
left handed (it makes hard-
er to hold the brush cor-
rectly) and two not being
able to write well in general.
My calligraphy teacher how-
ever was awesome, a very
patient man who enjoys
teaching foreigners. In
Japanese writing you are
not just “drawing lines” like
I used to think, but creat-
ing stroke orders with your
brush. I often use to trace
over what he had done pre-
viously in order to create
the right stroke. However,
even with tracing, my results
didn’t always come out just
right.

This experience helped
me to be much more com-
passionate with my students
who were learning how to
write the English alphabet. I
think it’s important to put
yourself in their shoes to get
a better understanding of
how to teach them.

Cherry Blossoms! Sakura!

Japan is famous for its
cherry blossom season. This
means that winter is over
and spring has come. The
trees are beautiful with
white and pink leaves. The



season only lasts for one to
two weeks so the people
come out in masses in the
parks to enjoy the sunshine
and take advantage of the
beautiful scenery. It is like a
beach in the Bahamas dur-
ing the summer holidays.
The only that is missing is
someone’s car blasting loud
music in the background. I
thought that Bahamians,
Canadians, the Spanish and
the French drank a lot but
that was before I met the
Japanese. All on their pic-
nic tables were empty beer
cans (arranged neatly of
course even the drunks are
neat here).

I really like that about
Japanese people no matter
how festive the atmosphere
is and how drunk they get,
there are never any fights.
Everyone is happy and hav-
ing a good time. I wish all
cultures were like that.

Kimono/Yukata

You know those beauti-
ful traditional Japanese
dresses (Kimono/Yukata)
that you see on television
and in Memoirs of a
Geisha? I had the opportu-
nity to wear one at a party
in Tokushima.

While they are beautiful
to look at and Japanese
women are really elegant

wearing them the actually
process of getting it on, isa
REAL pain in the butt. It’s
like yow’re putting on your
wedding dress, the stages of
sucking in and putting on...
you understand why they
only wear those on special
occasions.

Garbage in Bikes

Once in awhile, after
returning from leaving your
bike in one place for a time
it is possible to meet ran-
dom garbage in your bas-
ket. It was most likely left
behind by some kids too
lazy to take home their
garbage. It doesn’t happen
often but enough times to
get on your nerves.

As I was leaving a store
one day already annoyed at
something, I caught this
teenager dropping her ciga-
rette and juice can in MY
bike basket. I walked right
up to her turned on my
junglist voice (it came out
of no where). And said
“Sweet gurl you bes take
dat ting out ma basket if ya
know what good fur ya.”

Don’t really know where
that came from as I normal-
ly don’t talk like that. I
guess as a Bahamian we all
have a bit of junglist in us.

Her reaction? Even
though I spoke in English
she understood my point.
She was totally scared gave
me a REALLY DEEP bow.
All of her friends laughed
at her. I am sure that she
will think next time she
throws her stuff in someone
else’s bike.





TT is famous ma its cherry blossom ein















il

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TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010



Man Made



By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

IS work has been seen in fashion
Hi shows both locally and abroad. He has
assisted with special effects makeup in
the 2006 American movie Pirates of the
Caribbean Dead Mans Chest and the
Bahamian film Balls Alley.

He has done makeup for a number of music videos
and American celebrities like rapper Eve. And that is
just a small portion of the professional work D'Angelo
Bethel has in his portfolio.

Makeup artist at the MAC store in the Cosmetic
Boutique located on Bay Street, Mr Bethel has creat-
ed a fabulous reputation for himself. His exquisite tal-
ent, knowledge of beauty, and out of this world per-
sonality has him on the “most wanted list” for proms,
weddings, and other special occasions.

Ten years ago, one might have met Mr Bethel in a
salon with a curling iron in one hand and a bottle of
hair spray in the next. But after attending fashion and
beauty schools in the United Kingdom, he found his
niche and inspiration in make up art.

He initially wanted to further his education in hair
care, but after being surrounded with hair and make-
up he got inspired to pick up a brush, and a eye shad-
ow palette making the face his blank canvas.

"I started off modeling, then I began doing a little bit
of everything surrounding fashion. I got into photog-
raphy, makeup, and hair,” I fell in love with every
type of makeup,” he told Tribune Woman.

While passion is the main ingredient to excel in this
field, he agrees that one must be artistically inclined.

"I do believe that a person must be talented artisti-
cally because this field involves art," Mr Bethel said.



a

GO

fp . \ Pa
ae Be
me i va i

Addl
ies

EAUTY.

Because of the type of work Mr Bethel does, he
often finds himself hopping off planes at airports all
over the United States, Canada and Europe.

"Tam always traveling. I have been almost all over
the United States and I have also been to a few places
in Europe. I get to meet a lot of people when they
come in and out of the store. I just recently met a lady
who lives in Atlanta. She hired me to do makeup for a
special occasion they were having,” he said.

He says being a male in a female dominated indus-
try in the Bahamas has not always been easy, but the
strength he has gained throughout the years has kept
him standing tall.

He approached the tongue lashing from others who
are not as open as he is about this career choice posi-
tively.

"T try to remain strong through it all. I don't allow the
things that people say about me or my career get to me.
I love what I do and I will continue to do it well," he
said.

The beauty industry locally and internationally can
expect to see more work from this young make up
artist at fashion shows, in movies and ad campaigns.

During our interview Mr Bethel, gave Tribune
Woman a few of the do's and don'ts of makeup appli-
cation.

A don't that he sees is becoming very popular, is the
trend where women are wearing very thick eyelashes.
He said this not suited for a everyday look. "This is
more for a high fashion look, or a photo shoot or a
fashion show, it is just not cute," he said.

For flawless skin, he emphasised skin care, because
if the skin is not taken care of then it is impossible to
have a ravishing finish he said.

And now that summer is here wearing less is best. "I
would advised women to wear less foundation and
light powder. It would also be best of they purchase
makeup with SPF (Sun Protection Factor).”







D' ANGELO Bethel has honed this everyday activity into a
professional career, excelling greatly in this female domi-
nated industry.









Discover the goodness
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THE TRIBUNE

ND

UESDAY, MAY 18,

PAGE 9

OF





t

2010









SPECIAL ATHLETES from New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco compete during the 2009 Nationals...

Special Olympic Nationals:
Bocce, field events to start

total of 200 special
athletes have reg-
istered to take part

in the Special Olympic
Nationals later this month,
according to Basil Christie,
national chairman of Special
Olympics Bahamas.

And they will be trying to
impress the selection com-
mittee for next year’s World
Games in Athens, Greece,
says Roosevelt Thompson,
the sports director.

“Every year in May ath-
letes from the islands of Aba-
co and Grand Bahama head
to the capital to compete for

Athletes look to be selected
for World Games in Greece



the coveted gold medals.

“Grand Bahama has regis-
tered 58 athletes and Abaco
45. A total of 200 athletes
have registered this year.
These athletes have been
training all year and will be
competing in bocce and track
and field, said a press state-
ment.

However, due to the clos-
ing of the Betty Kenny-Kelly

Aquatic Centre, the swim-
ming competition has been
postponed until September.
The preliminaries for boc-
ce and field events are slated
for noon to 6pm on Friday,
May 21, at the College of the
Bahamas playing grounds.
And the track events are set
for 9am-4pm on Saturday,
May 22, at the Thomas A
Robinson stadium.

“The opening ceremony
and lighting of the torch
begins at 9am. Finals in boc-
ce and track and field take
place all day,” said the state-
ment. “The public is invited
to have the experience of a
lifetime by sharing in the
competition and winning spir-
it of our Special Olympics
athletes. Admission is free
and volunteers are welcome.”

In February, a number of
athletes successfully repre-
sented the Bahamas at the
Special Olympics Latin
American Games in Puerto
Rico.

Andre Rodgers championships
expected to be ‘biggest to date’

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ORGANISERS of the 8th
Annual Andre Rodgers
National Baseball Champi-
onship anticipate that it will
be the largest to date.

The Bahamas Baseball
Federation (BBF) is sched-
uled to host the event June 3-
6in Grand Bahama, which is
expected to feature a record
37 teams and more than 650
athletes representing six
islands across the Bahamas.

Under the theme “All
Roads Lead to Grand
Bahama,” games will be host-
ed at the Grand Bahama
Baseball Park and the YMCA
Baseball Park.

The National Baseball
Championships will feature
players in six age brackets:
Coach Pitch (7-8), Bantam
Minor (9-10), Bantam Senior
(11-12), Junior (13-15), Senior
High School (16-18) and Col-
legiate Divisions (25-and-
under).

Participating leagues
include the Abaco Baseball
League (ABL), Bimini Base-
ball League (BBL), Grand
Bahama Amateur Baseball
League (GBABL), Grand
Bahama Little League
(GBLL), Eleuthera Baseball
Association (EBA), Freedom
Farm Baseball League
(FFBL), Inagua Baseball
Association (IBA), Junior
Baseball League of Nassau
(JBLN), Legacy Baseball
League (LBL) and the Span-
ish Wells Baseball Associa-
tion (SWBA).

The opening ceremony is
set for 7:30pm June 4 at the
Grand Bahama Baseball
Park, followed by the
evening’s feature game,
Grand Bahama Little League
against Bimini in the Senior
High School Division.

Craig Kemp, president of
the BBF, said the federation
is adequately prepared and
looks forward to the notion
of hosting the largest edition
of the tournament in federa-



BASEBALL

tion history.

“This is the biggest tourna-
ment we have had to date
thus far and all indications
suggest that it will be an excit-
ing and ultimately successful
one,” he said. “Planning for
an event of this magnitude is
quite a task and we actually
begin preparations from Jan-
uary to ensure the event is
hosted the right way. There
is much for us to take into
account but those are things
we need to do if we expect to
continue hosting the event in
a successful manner as we
have in past years.”

Kemp said the move from
New Providence to Grand
Bahama should pay dividends
to all and aid in the develop-
ment of the sport throughout
the country.

Editions

“To date all of the previ-
ous editions have been hosted
in New Providence and we
thought it would be a nice
change of pace to switch the
venue to Grand Bahama,” he
said.

“Tt should do well for the
economy of Grand Bahama
and the New Providence kids
are excited about travelling
to compete, and for many of
them this will be their first
time doing that so we expect
the competition level to be as
exciting as it has been in the
past.”

The BBF is also set to
recognise baseball legends
from past generations with its
highest honour — the Lifetime
Achievement Award — which
will be presented at the open-
ing ceremony.

The 2010 honourees
include Fred “Papa” Smith of
New Providence, Franklyn
“Cox” Rolle of Grand
Bahama and George Weech
and Glen Rolle, both of Bimi-
ni.

The executive body will

also honour “deserving
Bahamians” who have played
an integral role in the devel-
opment of baseball in the
Bahamas.

Past recipients include Greg
Burrows in 2007, Bernard
Aranha in 2008 and Reno

Introducing The All NEW EP

Brown in 2009.

Major sponsors for the
event include Insurance Man-
agement, UBS Bahamas Ltd,
Gatorade, BTC, ZNS
TV/Radio, Cable 12 TV,
D’Albenas Agency Ltd and
Phil’s Food Services.

$=.

Drive one.








Goss wins
9th stage of

Giro d'Italia...
See page 10




‘0’ Ferguson's
‘pertormance
for the ages’

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ith several NCAA
conference track
and field champi-

onships completed over the
weekend, the Bahamas’ pres-
ence emerged across the US
with a series of impressive
performances, including one
sprinter who accomplished a
rare feat.

Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson led
the way for the Bahamian
contingent with a perfor-
mance for the ages at the SEC
Championships in Knoxville,
Tennessee.

The Auburn University
junior captured a trio of first
place performances in the 100
and 200m and led her team
in the 400m relay.

The three first place finish-
es enabled her to win the
Commissioner’s Trophy, giv-
en to the highest female point
scorer in the meet.

In the century, she turned
in a season’s best time of
11.19s, the fifth fastest time
in the NCAA this season.

She returned to complete
the sprint double by winning
the 200m in a time of 23.09s,
just barely missing out on her
season’s best. She became the
woman in school history to
complete the sprint double,
joining Jamaican Kerron
Stewart.

Grand Bahamian native
Nivea Smith also had a pair of
noteworthy performances in
the sprint double. She finished
third in the 200m in 23.41s
and was fifth in the 100 in
11.57 seconds. The duo joined
teammates Shaquela Williams
and Joanna Atkins to take the
400m relay in 43.38s.

The Auburn men’s and
women’s track and field teams
both finished in fourth place.

The women finished with
97 points while trailing only
LSU, the SEC champions
took the event with 132
points.



In the Big
12 champi-
onships, a
pair of
Bahamian
quartermilers
squared off
in the men’s
event.

Demetrius
Pinder of
Texas A &
M University
finished in second place with a
time of 46.02s, while Latoy
Williams was fifth in 47.02s.

Pinder’s teammate Tabarie
Henry took the event in
45.89s.

Williams returned with
teammates Bryce Brown,
Zach Plinario, and Jamele
Mason to reach the medal
podium with a third place fin-
ish in the 1600m relay.

Also in the Big 12, Marcus
Thompson of Baylor Univer-
sity continues his return from
injury but failed to advance
past the preliminaries in both
short sprints. He finished 16th
in the 200m and 19th in the
100m in 21.80s and 11.03s
respectively.

At the PAC 10 Champi-
onships, sprinter Karlton
Rolle of UCLA was fifth in
the final of the 200m in a time
of 21.68s, while Natalya Bene-
by of California finished 11th
in the 400mH and failed to
advance to the final.

In the field, Lamar Delaney
represented the University of
Houston at the Conference
USA Championships.

Delaney was impressive in
both jump events as he fin-
ished second in the long jump
with a leap of 7.46m and third
in the triple jump with a leap
of 15.36m.

In the Southland Confer-
ence Championships, Juan
Lewis finished fifth in the
400m for the University of
Texas at Arlington in a time
of 47.59s, while in the Great
West Championships, Jame-
son Strachan was also fifth in
the same event in 49.67s.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

D’backs
acquire
right-handed
reliever from
Indians

PHOENIX (AP) — The
Arizona Diamondbacks have
acquired right-handed reliev-
er Saul Rivera from the
Cleveland Indians in
exchange for cash considera-
tions.

Rivera was 2-0 with four
saves and a 0.53 ERA during
15 relief appearances for
Triple-A Columbus. He was
signed by the Indians to a
minor league contract on Dec.

21.
Played

Rivera has played part of
13 seasons professionally,
including four seasons with
the Washington Nationals
from 2006-09.

The Diamondbacks on
Monday also released right-
hander Bob Howry. The 36-
year-old Howry went 1-0 with
a 10.67 ERA in 14 relief
appearances for Arizona this
season. Arizona has by far the
worst bullpen statistically in
the major leagues.

AUSTRALIA’S captain Alex Blackwell (second left) jumps to join her teammates to celebrate their win over New Zealand in the Twenty20

Cricket World Cup women final match in Bridgetown, Barbados, on Sunday. Australia won by 3 runs...



IRVING, Texas (AP) —
Dallas Cowboys quarter-
back Tony Romo is throw-
ing passes instead of
putting.

Romo was on the field
with the Cowboys as orga-
nized team activities began
Monday.

The quarterback had a
tee time Monday morning
for a chance to earn a spot
in the Byron Nelson Cham-
pionship, the PGA Tour
event this week just down
the road from the team’s





TONY ROMO (AP)

Romo passing instead of putting

Valley Ranch practice facil-
ity. But the tee time con-
flicted with the voluntary
workout.

Romo is getting his first
chance to throw passes to
receiver Dez Bryant, the
team’s first-round draft pick
last month.

Returning receivers
Patrick Crayton and Sam
Hurd both were given per-
mission to seek a trade after
Bryant was drafted. Hurd
was on the field Monday,
Crayton wasn’t.





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(AP Photo)

Gilles Simon pulls
out of French Open

PARIS (AP) — Gilles Simon of France has withdrawn from
the French Open because he is not in shape after returning from

a knee injury.

He will be replaced in the main draw by Igor Kunitsyn of
Russia. The clay-court major starts Sunday.

Simon started training only last week, and the French tennis
federation said Monday he "feels inadequately prepared to
play in an event as demanding as Roland Garros."

The Frenchman is ranked No. 32.

Uchiyama retains
his WBA super
featherweight title

a



r



JAPANESE champion Takashi Uchiyama (right) sends a right to
Venezuelan challenger Angel Granados in their WBA super feather-
weight title match in Saitama, near Tokyo, on Monday. Uchiyama
stopped Granados in the sixth round to retain his title.

(AP Photo)

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Injury concerns
remain as the US
team opens camp

By RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer

PRINCETON, N.J. (AP)
— Before wrapping them-
selves in the red, white and
blue, the US soccer team sur-
rounded themselves with
orange and black.

Players began training for
the World Cup on Monday at
Princeton University’s
Roberts Stadium, a $13.4 mil-
lion soccer facility opened two
years ago by the alma mater
of US coach Bob Bradley,
who also coached the Tigers
from 1984-95.

Even on the first day of
workouts, there were injuries
that caused goalkeeper Tim
Howard (quadriceps strain),
defender Jay DeMerit
(abdominal strain), forward
Eddie Johnson (hamstring
strain) and defender Chad
Marshall (slight hamstring
strain) to be in the trainer’s
room instead of the lush,
green grass.

Defender Carlos Bocane-
gra (abdominal strain) did
ball work on his own. Landon
Donovan, Edson Buddle and
Jose Torres were off getting
physicals, and four players
based in Europe had yet to
arrive.

And there were still ques-
tions about one player who
won’t be coming, forward
Charlie Davies, who thought
he had recovered sufficiently
from a near-fatal car crash last
October to merit an invita-
tion only to learn last Tuesday
he had been omitted from the
30-man preliminary roster.

Bradley said he made the
decision based on input from
US trainers and the staff of
Davies’ French club, Sochaux.
Bradley even viewed a video
of Davies in a recent training
session in France.

Singh out of
top 50 for 1st
time since

1992

LONDON (AP) — The
world golf ranking does not
have Vijay Singh among the
top 50 for the first time in
nearly 18 years.

Singh slipped to No. 51 in
the world ranking published
Monday after he failed to
qualify for the final 36 holes at
the Texas Open. It was his
fifth consecutive tournament
without earning ranking
points.

The last time Singh was
ranked out of the top 50 was
August 16, 1992. He won the
German Open the next week
and has been in the top 50
every week since. Singh is the
only other player besides
Tiger Woods to be No. 1 in
the world during the last
decade, reaching the top for
the first time in 2004.

The timing could not have
been worse. Singh has one
week to get back into the top
50 or he will have to qualify
for the US Open.

Goss wins 9th stage of Giro d'Italia

CAVA DE TIRRENI,
Italy (AP) — Matthew Goss
of Australia won the ninth
stage of the Giro d'Italia in
a sprint finish Monday while
Alexandre Vinokourov of
Kazakhstan kept the overall
lead.

Goss, who rides for the
HTC-Columbia team, cov-
ered the mostly flat 116-mile
leg from Frosinone to Cava
De' Tirreni in 4 hours, 8 min-
utes, 17 seconds. This was the
first victory of the season for
Goss, who usually sets up
sprints for teammates Mark
Cavendish and Andre
Greipel.

"It was nice to get a win,"
Goss said. "It was a very hard
finish, slightly uphill."

Filippo Pozzato of Italy was
second and Tyler Farrar of
the United States was third.
Farrar, who won the second
stage, took over the points
jersey usually reserved for the
race's top sprinter.

Vinokourov maintained a
72-second lead over Cadel
Evans of Australia in the
overall standings.

Four riders took part in a
breakaway for most of the





MATTHEW GOSS is kissed by the race hostesses as he stands on the
podium after winning the ninth stage of the cycling race...
(AP Photo)

stage, opening a lead of 4
minutes at one point.

The last two remaining rid-
ers — Michael Barry of
Canada and Mikhail Ignatiev
of Russia — were caught by

the main pack with 3 miles to

go.

Tuesday's 10th stage in
southern Italy is a rolling 143-
mile route from Avellino to
Bitonto.

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