Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

TRY a sf

Pim blowin’ it

The Tribune



84F

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



LOW

71F

SUNNY AND
wi WINDY

Volume: 106 No.142



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

=-USA TODAY



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

EX-PLP general in
missing A. prone

investigation into
disappearance

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER PLP general is
assisting police with their inves-
tigations into the disappearance
of a German resident of Cat
Island, who has been missing
since last Wednesday.

Ezra Russell, the campaign
general for PLP deputy leader
Philip “Brave” Davis who later
made headlines when he lam-
basted the Cat Island MP and
threatened to run against him in
the next general election, was
taken into police custody on
Saturday, according to Tribune
sources.

Although police were reluc-



tant to confirm whether the Cat
Island resident was being held
in connection with the disap-
pearance of Johannes Max-
imillian Harsch, 46, Assistant
Commissioner Glenn Miller
confirmed that one of the three
men in custody has the surname
Russell and two are in their

EZRA RUSSELL



and a Bahamian man in for
questioning over the weekend
and were granted an extension
of time to detain them for fur-
ther questioning yesterday.
Mr Miller said a third man
was later taken into custody as

40’s.
Police took an American
part-time resident of Cat Island

SEE page 16

Officer in charge of Central Police
Station reassigned following escape

THE officer in charge of the Central Police Station downtown
has been reassigned following the escape of two men being held
there two weeks ago on charges of rape, armed robbery and kid-
napping.

Last week two police officers, Corporal Jay Sergeant, 44, of
Sandilands Village Road, and Constable Harold Sands, 41, of
Windward Road, were arraigned respectively on charges of neg-
ligently permitting the escape and permitting the escape of Renar-
do Bastian, the surviving escapee.

Both pleaded not guilty to their charges.

Now Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna has con-
firmed that Superintendent Elsworth Moss, formerly officer in
charge of the Central Police station, has been relocated to police

SEE page 16



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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff









PEOPLE QUEUE at the offices of a business with a flourishing loan scheme afeina up to $5, 000 yes-



terday — despite concerns that it may be a scam.

Leslie Miller gives emotional
testimony in murder retrial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE jury in the retrial of two
brothers accused of murdering
Mario Miller heard emotional
testimony yesterday from the vic-
tim’s father.

Businessman and former
Member of Parliament Leslie
Miller was one of three prosecu-
tion witnesses to take the stand
yesterday, as the trial into his
son’s death opened in Supreme
Court.

SEE page 16

Christie ‘would reverse §$65m container port deal’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



PLP Leader Perry Christie has warned would-be investors in
the government’s $65 million Arawak Cay container port that
when he is returned to the office of Prime Minister he will

reverse the deal.

Describing himself as the person who intends “to win the next
general election,” Mr Christie said his position on the matter has

not changed.

SEE page 11



¢ SEE PAGE THREE

ET
ETT,
LT TTL

AT THE time of going to
press late last night Lady
Edith Turnquest, wife of
former governor-general Sir
Orville Turnquest,
remained in critical condi-
tion in a London hospital
after suffering a severe
stroke while on vacation.

Lady Turnquest was tak-
en off life support yesterday
morning, and her family —
husband, son, two daugh-
ters and two grandsons —
remained at her bedside.

As rumours spread
around the Bahamas yes-
terday of her death, FNM
chairman Carl Bethel
denied the reports.

SEE page 11









NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

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Words of wisdom
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philosopher

SEE PAGE THREE



Victimisation
claims after
15 fired from
union posts

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A NUMBER of Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union shop stewards
who ran against President Nicole
Martin, or supported those who
opposed her in recent elections,
are claiming victimisation after
15 of them were fired from their
union posts yesterday.

The hotel workers were all
Atlantis employees, and several
who spoke with The Tribune
claim the union’s executive has
no right to stop them acting on
behalf of the BHCAWU with-
out reference to the union mem-
bership at the hotel first.

However Darren Woods, gen-
eral secretary of the union, said
the BHCAWU was completely
justified in the move, as for one
of several reasons, all of those
who have been removed from
the unpaid posts were no longer
eligible to represent the union.
He claimed consultation with the
membership did form part of the
decision to remove the officers.

Each one of the 15 former
union officers — who allegedly
make up 30 per cent of the total
body of BHCAWU shop stew-

SEE page 16





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LR CGO a

Police chief
agrees (0 meet
victim’s family

NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

AFTER weeks of getting
“nowhere” in their attempts to
meet with senior police over
the death of Keisha Thurston,
her relatives have been given
some hope.

Sources familiar with the
matter said the family had
repeatedly tried in vain to con-
tact officers working on the
case, including Superintendent
Leon Bethel, head of the Crim-
inal Detective Unit (CDU).

However, when this was put
to him on Monday, Superin-
tendent Bethel told The Tri-
bune he would personally con-
tact the family and set up a
meeting “immediately.”

Keisha was found hanged in
her family’s home on February
28. The police investigation is
still open, although officers
originally said it was an “appar-
ent suicide.”

“The initial report was a sui-
cide. We have not received any-
thing to say it is not a suicide.
The young lady was reported
to have been found hung. Not
withstanding suspicions about
suicide, we still have to carry
on a full investigation,” said
Superintendent Bethel.

“Generally we are still inves-
tigating the matter and on com-
pletion we will come to some
conclusion in the matter. We
may have suspicions but we
have to investigate properly.

“We think that we owe a
duty to the members of the
public to investigate all matters
properly before we come to a
conclusion,” he said.

Close friends of Keisha are

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PHONE: 322-2157

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KEISHA THURSTON



convinced her death came
about as a result of foul play,
some criticising the police for
having a “one track mind” from
the start. A close friend told
The Tribune the police did not
“take it serious at the crucial
time” and now most leads have
gone cold. “At the end of the
day we are fighting a losing bat-
tle, but you still want to expose
them; the things they should
have done but didn’t,” said a
source close to the family.

It is understood that just
before Keisha’s death, neigh-
bours heard a commotion
involving more than one per-
son inside the house where her
body was found.

“The things the family were
telling them to act on they did-
n’t. Even when people came to
them with information, they
didn’t act on it. You see why
people take vengeance in their
own hands. You got to be fight-
ing the police for justice,” said
the source. Superintendent
Bethel said he had seen nothing
to suggest the police did not
follow through on any leads.

He would not comment on
specifics, including claims that
police failed to turn up to a pre-
viously agreed meeting with
one of Keisha’s friends, who
had offered to try and get infor-
mation from a person of inter-
est by using a wire. “I am not
going to discuss any specifics
of the investigation. Persons
may have their suspicions but
we still have to protect persons
who we come in contact with
as a result of our investigation,
so we can present a credible
case to the Coroner’s Court,”
said Superintendent Bethel.



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after mob stabbing

BY ALESHA CADET

Authorities were called to
the rear of Evans Condomini-
ums, West Bay Street, after
residents of the area say they
saw a man floating in the
water.

Sgt Chrislyn Skippings said
they received information of
a body in the water around
6.15am yesterday.

Officers responded and dis-
covered the lifeless body of a
dark male dressed in a pair of
multi-coloured swim trunks.

Floating

It was reported that the man
was floating face down in
waters behind the condomini-
ums.

According to police: “Once



GRIM DISCOVERY: A body of a man was found in the mater in i Western area.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

i

retrieved from the water, the
body was brought to the shore-
line. He appeared to be in his
early to mid-forties.”

“From our preliminary
viewing of the body we sus-
pect possible drowning.”

The officer added: “From
the site the body will be trans-
ported to the laboratory where

ed. The autopsy results will
dictate the stage of our inves-
tigation.”

At present police are unable
to say what the circumstances
were surrounding this incident.
However, they are investigat-
ing and have appealed to
members of the public who
have any information regard-
ing this incident or any other

matters to contact them at
CDU 502-991, 919, or Crime
Stoppers at 328-TIPS.

In other crime news, two
juveniles, ages 19 and 14 are
being held after a mob stab-
bing, leaving one man dead.

According to Sgt Skippings,
a man identified as Olondieu
Saint Pré, 53, of Charles Vin-
cent Street, was attacked by a

group of men, resulting in him
being stabbed in the left side of
his chest.

The victim was taken to the
hospital in a private vehicle.

He later died of his injuries.
Police are questioning the two
males in connection with this
matter.

Investigations into the mat-
ter continue.

an autopsy would be request-







British Airways
is bracing for
flights disruption

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



BRITISH Airways is braced for disrup-
tion to flights for hundreds of thousands of
passengers next week as cabin crew plan a
series of strikes starting on Tuesday.

The airline, which operates five direct
flights between Nassau and London
Heathrow each week, suffered £45 million
in losses when the BA cabin crew union
Unite staged seven days of strikes in March.

And BA’s losses were then compound-
ed when all UK airports were closed for six
days after a volcanic explosion in Iceland.

Industrial action in March did not affect
flights between Nassau and London
Heathrow and BA hopes long-haul flights
and several short-haul flights from





Heathrow will not be disrupted by the
strikes.

Flights are expected to operate as normal
from London Gatwick Airport as well as
London City Airport.

“We are confident that many crew will
again ignore Unite’s pointless strike call
and support the efforts of the rest of the air-
line to keep our customers flying,” said air-
line spokeswoman Marcia Erskine.

Airline managers have condemned the
coming strikes as “unjustified” after the
union representing around 13,500 BA cab-
in crew staff rejected the airline’s proposal
and 81 per cent of members voted to strike.

Unite is protesting BA’s cost-cutting
plans including a wage freeze and reduction
of in-flight staff and rejected BA’s offer
last week as it did not include the restora-
tion of travel perks that management had

A BRITISH
AIRWAYS plane
passes tailfins of
other aircraft
belonging to the
airline at Heathrow
Airport in London,
yesterday in this
AP photo.

revoked for employees who participated
in the March walkouts.

They now plan to strike in stages for 20
days, with the first four day walkout to
begin May 18, followed by a strike from
May 24 to 28, and subsequent strikes from
May 30 to June 3, and June 5 to 9.

Mts Erskine said: “This decision has no
semblance of justification. Unite’s officials
continue to operate in their own world,
showing callous disregard for our customers
and their own members in all parts of our
airline. “We have made a very fair offer,
which meets the concerns the union raised
during 14 months of negotiations and also
ensures our crew remain the best rewarded
in the UK airline industry. That offer
remains available.”

Meanwhile, BA managers are working
on contingency plans with other airlines.

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Police, family of murder
victim appeal for help

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net





FREEPORT - The widow of Vincent Pedi-
can made an emotional, tearful plea to her
husband’s killers to turn themselves into the
police and bring some closure to her family.

It has been more than two years since Pedi-
can’s murder in November 2007. The case
has gone cold and police have no solid leads
in the matter.

The police, with the Pedican family, are asking persons with
information that could assist with the investigation to come forward.

Mr Pedican, a security officer at the Eight Mile Rock High
School for some 12 years, reported to work for the midnight shift
and was reported missing around 7am on November 22, 2007,
following an apparent break-in at the school. His body was dis-
covered on November 23, through a service road off East Sunrise
Highway. The church van that was driven by Mr Pedican was also
found on a service road in Hawksbill. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey,
press liaison officer, said initially police had received several leads
and had questioned some persons, but no arrests were made.

“We are certain there are some persons out there who know
something and we are appealing to those persons who might have
seen something to call the police at 352-9774/5 or 911,” she said.

At Police Headquarters, Mrs Claudia Pedican, accompanied
by her daughter Diane Coakley, made an impassioned appeal to the
public for assistance in bringing closure to the case.

Devastated

Mrs Pedican told reporters that the incident has devastated her
family. She described her husband as a loving and caring partner,
and a loving father to their two daughters.

“T am here to make a continuous plea to the public, to anyone
who might know of the person who might have caused my hus-
band’s demise. A real heinous crime was committed against my
family when they took my husband away from me. I don’t know
why, but I know whoever that person is, he or she cannot be con-
tent in their skin. I really have not stopped weeping for my hus-
band; he meant the world to me and my children. He was a loving
father to his children and a loving husband to me,”

“Please, please come forward and say something, if you know
anything.”

“Someone take those children’s father and you’re keeping qui-
et. It is not right, it is not godly. I don’t want to hate you forever;
I want to forgive you personally whoever you are so I can have
some peace and rest. I thank you and I wait patiently for your call
to the police,” said Mrs Pedican.

Mts Pedican recalled the last moments she saw her husband alive
before he left for work around midnight on that fateful day. She
said her husband was looking forward to retirement.

“T got a call I will never forget from the police...when the
news hit me my whole world fell apart; they take my husband
and throw him in the bushes like an animal. I cannot get over
that. So whoever you are, please...come forward and say some-
thing. I need closure in this. I want to know, his children want to
know; they have lost a very supportive father, a good father.”

“He was an honest, trustworthy employee and friend to every-
one. I thought we would grow old together. He was looking forward
to his retirement and I told him I would join him a few years later,
and someone destroyed my dream, someone destroyed my fami-
ly,” she said. ASP Mackey stressed that the police can only fight
crime through partnership with the community. “There is no way
the police can fight crime alone. We have to do this together, we
need the community to partner with us in order for us to reduce
crime, and to make Grand Bahama and by extension the Bahamas,
a safe place,” she said.









VINCENT PEDICAN

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 3



Off-duty officers claim [7

loan scheme is ‘scam’

Scores flock to business
offering up to $5,000

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

SCORES of government
workers and other Bahami-
ans continued to flock to the
offices of a flourishing loan
scheme offering up to $5,000
yesterday — despite concerns
that it may be a scam.

The business has now
imposed a $25 fee for its
application form, which is
printed in colour, and has
ceased accepting black-and-
white or photocopied ver-
sions.

It has been claimed that
a reputable local bank is
being used to issue the loans
by cheque or direct deposit,
however when The Tribune
spoke to a senior person at
the bank, she said: “We are
not involved at all. We are
no way involved.”

Although the standard
application form does not

PoT aaa

have a space for bank
account information, sever-
al applicants claim to have
been told that if they pro-
vided their bank details,
money would be deposited
directly into their accounts.

Sources say the landlord
of the office complex where
the business currently oper-
ates — its second location in
less than a week — planned
to cancel the lease and
change the locks last night.

The loan company only
moved into the building on
Monday, after suddenly
vacating its previous Palm-
dale office.

Employees yesterday said

the office may have to move
again because “people carry
on too bad.”

Hundreds have visited the
office over the past two
days, obstructing the
entrances of neighbouring
businesses and causing con-
gestion in adjoining parking
lots.

Sources say police officers
were among the first to
apply, followed by a num-
ber of Public Service nurses.

At least three off-duty
officers accused the opera-
tion of being a “scam” yes-
terday — after applying for
loans only to later demand a
refund of their $500 deposit.

ia

THE BAHAMAS’ VERY Dens lea PHILOSOPHER







One officer applied on
April 1, but said he has yet
to get his loan, despite being
told no one would be turned
down and that the waiting
period was two weeks.

The men suspect they
only got refunds because
they are police officers, as
many others have asked for
their money back only to be
told to come back in a week.

The officers called the
Central Detective Unit
(CDU) to report their sus-
picions, and Assistant
Superintendent Michael
Moxey of the Commercial
Crimes Unit said he person-
ally went to the location to
investigate.

Mr Moxey said he and his
team went to the office but
did not enter because they
did not see much activity.

He said the investigation
will continue and asked any-
one with relevant informa-
tion to call CDU.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

So why did Sir Stafford leave?

WHY DID Sir Stafford Sands leave the
Bahamas?

This is a question still debated today. The
question is often answered with an air of
great authority by those who haven’t a clue
what they are talking about. Anyone who
lived during the sixties, but were not a part of
the PLP brotherhood, would be a fool to ask
such a question. They all knew what it meant
to be ostracised, victimised, denied jobs
reserved only for followers of the “Chief”,
and verbally abused. Many of them, both
black and white, packed their bags and left.

Even Krissy Love, host of the radio talk
show “Issues of the Day”, whose topic was
the dispute over Sir Stafford’s image being
put on and then taken off the $10 bill, admit-
ted that her family was one of those who
also left the Bahamas during that period. In
the sixties, she said, her parents could not
deal with the way black people were being
treated by the new black regime. Yet, Sir
Stafford Sands, a white man, 1s called a trai-
tor because he also left, only to return in
death. Krissy wanted to know if her family
would be tarred with the same “traitor”
brush. The caller to her show fumbled, but
did not answer.

Another caller, following the same trend
of thought, felt that if a person were a part of
a defeated government, then left the country
because they were displeased with the loss,
that person would be the traitor. At times
when we listen to some of the callers to these
radio talk shows, we often wonder what God
was thinking when he was so stingy in his
distribution of common sense.

It has been said that when Sir Stafford
left for Europe he swore he would never
return to the Bahamas. That is not true.

On the floor of the House when the
Speaker read Sir Stafford’s resignation to
members, Sir Lynden denounced him, charg-
ing that he was “obliged to run” from the
Bahamas because he was a “total embar-
rassment to his party.” That also was not
true. On another occasion, Arthur Hanna,
recently retired governor-general, declared
that Sir Stafford left because “he wanted
nothing to do with a country run by blacks.”
Again not true. It was a claim made against a
man, who unlike his social peers, did not
attend the then exclusive all white Queen’s
College as a student. He was educated with
black students at Government High School
— the same school later attended by Lynden
Pindling. Sir Stafford had made it clear that
he had every intention of returning home
every year. “I will always be available to
work for the party during the time when I am
in Nassau each year,” he said.

Around the 1967 election Sir Stafford was
not a well man. A chain smoker, he suffered
from a serious bronchial condition. In April
of that year he spent six weeks in Miami for
treatment of his problem. That was three
months before he announced his resignation

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from the House. But soon after the PLP
became the government in January of that
year, a reign of terror had been started
against Sir Stafford.

In May his wife had had enough. She
made a statement in The Tribune that their
home, “Waterloo”, was not for sale. She said
she was “sick and tired” of the harassing
calls she was receiving. She wanted her tor-
mentors to know that she and her husband
were not selling their home, but intended
“to stay and reside in it.”

Up until the day of his resignation from
the House, Sir Stafford, who had given up his
law practice mainly for health reasons, had
every intention of spending his winters in
the Bahamas. And so, he didn’t leave because
he was a traitor, he was driven from his coun-
try by a hate-filled, racist government and its
supporters. He no longer felt safe in a coun-
try for which he had worked so hard, but
which his tormentors unjustly accused him of
“raping.”

On the floor of the House another
uncouth member of the PLP accused Sir
Stafford “and his gang of gangsters and hood-
lums” of causing Bahamians to suffer. “He
should be brought back here, put into a bar-
rel of tar and rolled into a pit of fire for what
he has done to the people of this country,”
said the PLP member from the floor of the
House. This was one of this country’s new
legislators speaking.

No wonder there was a lot of unease in the
country.

No wonder Sir Stafford and so many oth-
ers— both black and white — packed their
bags and left.

Just before their election victory, Sir Lyn-
den had told the foreign press that if the PLP
won the 1967 election his government would
retain Sir Stafford as Minister of Tourism.

Their bitter anger over the years probably
stemmed from the fact that they had lost
their prize — a prize that they had planned to
use and abuse.

Five years after his resignation Sir Stafford
died of cancer in the London Clinic in Eng-
land.

There are Bahamians who maintain that
he never came back to the Bahamas. He cer-
tainly came back to a Bahamas that he had
no intention of ever leaving. He came back in
a casket and is buried in the family plot in St
Matthews cemetery.

There were callers to the Krissy Love
show who wanted to know if Sir Stafford
had any family left in the Bahamas. The
answer is yes. This is his daughter’s home,
and the home of one of her two sons, Sir
Stafford’s grandson. They both live and work
here. For them this is home, as it was home
for their father and grandfather. And the
vitriol that is now being spewed by the igno-
rant against the man they feel gave so much
of himself to his country, brings them great
pain.







PLP hatred for
Bahamian whites
still in existence

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Every Bahamian who has
any sense knows that the PLP
hates whites. Never mind the
pretentious naming of Ryan
Pinder as a candidate who
eventually won in Elizabeth, it
cannot dispel the cold hard
facts that they hate whites. This
was exposed in every general
election before today.

Honest PLP and other right
thinking Bahamians cannot,
with a straight face, say that the
replacing of a well deserved
Bahamian could amount to
national security; neither could
they say that any human rights
would be violated.

But what could be said is that
the objection must be designed
to rally their supporters and to
further drive a wedge between
white and blacks. Sensible
Bahamians must be disgusted
with the transgressions of the
past. Our children do not know
of the era of which we speak,
but when are we going to put it
aside and move on to more

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



important pressing matters?

Schools that were the major-
ity white and only privileged
blacks are today predominate-
ly black. Our children are
friends with all colours and
have relationships and even
marry all races.

So why is the PLP waking up
this dead subject. Is it because
they still think that the politics
of the past when the PLP want-
ed us to hate our white brothers
and sisters will help them this
time around?

This primitive kind of think-
ing has already done irrepara-
ble damage to us.

The comment of Fred
Mitchell is proof that the PLP is
not for all Bahamians. They are
definitely on a course to divide
us as a people. Today we need
to create programmes that

would bring us closer together
as a people. This backward
mentality is simply destructive.

How come no other PLP MP
criticise Mr Mitchell, are they
also in agreement with his posi-
tion?

When are they going to be
men and say wrong is wrong
and two wrongs do not make a
right?

Finally, I would not be too
surprised if some temperamen-
tal retaliation follows this, but is
this kind of thinking associated
with crime?

Is this level of pent up hate
good for the country and the
individuals who harbour these
kinds of thoughts. We are
doomed when our elected offi-
cials encourage us to hate each
other.

We definitely cannot afford
to have anyone represent us
who openly and unapologeti-
cally hates.

IVOINE INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May, 2010.

Western civilisation cries for
liberation from a new tyranny

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This week we pay tribute to
the Allied Forces who were
instrumental in liberating
Europe from Nazi oppression.
It was a sacrificial effort in
which many citizens and sol-
diers alike gave up their lives
so that the rest of us could live
ours in freedom.

We might have expected that
such ultimate selflessness might
have conferred upon our soci-
eties the wisdom to truly value
life and liberty.

Unfortunately, in the years
following World War IT, much
of Europe and America turned
its back on its hard-won free-
dom and voluntarily succumbed
to a new dictatorship of rela-
tivism that is no less evil than
the fascism that preceded it.

This new tyranny recognises
nothing as being definitive and
whose ultimate goal consists
solely of satiating one's own
ego and desires.

We have seen the contem-
porary results — nihilistic yet
impeccably democratic legisla-
tion that repudiates life itself!

I am thinking here of exist-
ing, enacted and pending arti-
cles of legislation that legalise
various drugs, prostitution, con-
traception, homosexuality,
same-sex marriage, abortion,
euthanasia, and genetic manip-
ulation.

On the 65th anniversary of
VE-Day, it is Western civilisa-
tion that cries for liberation
from the tyranny of modernity
being imposed by socialist gov-
ernments as they seek new and

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ingenious ways of undermining
morality and embracing
nihilism.

Is this the path western civil-
isation wishes to traverse?

Is it not time for us all to re-
examine the assumptions that

we permit to serve as the foun-
dation of our own individual
lives?

PAUL KOKOSKI
Canada,
May 6, 2010.

Archives: Sir Arthur Foulkes

the ninth Governor General



EDITOR, The Tribune.

Sir Burton Hall
The Hague,
The Netherlands

Good morning Sir Burton,

Patrice M. Williams

Nassau.



I forward the following information which you may wish,
in the interest of ensuring accuracy in the public dis-
course, to share with your readers.

Thank you for your e-mail dated 22 April, 2010. Please
be advised that Sir John Paul was the first Governor-Gen-
eral of an independent Bahamas. His instruments of
appointment indicated that his tenure should last from 10
July - 31 July 1973. Sir Milo Butler was the second Gov-
ernor General so Sir Arthur Foulkes would be the ninth.

Acting Director of Archives,

(Ms Williams’ response is a reply to a request to the
Archives by Sir Burton Hall as to whether Sir Arthur
Foulkes is the eighth or ninth governor general in an
Independent Bahamas. His request to Archives was pub-
lished in The Tribune on Friday, May 7, 2010.

(Sir Burton, was chief justice of the Bahamas for almost
eight years before his appointment to the Hague as Per-
manent Judge of the International Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia. — Ed).

























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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ed
Westminster system of ‘winner takes all’ voting

By LARRY SMITH

IN the 1962 election, despite
polling more votes overall, the
PLP actually lost two seats in
the 33-seat House of Assem-
bly, while the UBP won 20 and
four independents were elect-
ed. This surprising result post-
poned the advent of majority
tule by another five years.

Most of the blame for that
debacle fell on the way con-
stituency boundaries had been
drawn by the UBP — a process
condemned as gerrymander-
ing ever since Governor
Elbridge Gerry of Massachu-
setts passed a redistricting law
in 1812 that grossly favoured
his own party.

But there are those who
argue that the traditional
Westminster system of “win-
ner takes all” voting developed
in Britain during the 19th cen-
tury is a direct cause of the
kind of representative failure
that Bahamians faced in 1962.
And those arguments carry
more weight today following
last week's inconclusive British
election.

For the first time in a gen-
eration, Britain's third party
(the Liberal Democrats) held
the balance of power. Both
Labour and the Conservatives
lost the election, and the
British were suddenly faced
with the spectacle of normally
arrogant politicians scrambling
to negotiate a power sharing
deal. Can you imagine what
would happen here in similar
circumstances? There would
likely be rioting in the streets.

The Liberal Democrat Par-
ty was formed in 1988 when
the venerable Liberal Party
merged with a breakaway fac-
tion of the Labour Party. The
Liberals were once a dominant
force in British politics, alter-
nating in power with the Con-
servative Party from the mid-

1800s until the early 20th cen-
tury when a major political
realignment took place. The
last Liberal prime minister —
David Lloyd George -— left
office in 1922.

From that point on the Lib-
eral vote declined and was
spread more evenly across the
nation, whereas support for the
Conservative and Labour par-
ties was concentrated in areas
that could deliver hundreds of
seats in a general election.
After the Second World War
the Liberal Party was reduced
to a rump and came close to
extinction in the 1950s.

As a result, changing the
voting system to some form of
proportional representation
became a key policy goal. But
in 1974 - the last time there
was a hung parliament in
Britain — the Liberals were
unable to clinch a deal for elec-
toral reform with either of the
main parties, although for a
time they helped prop up a
minority Labour government.

Our parliamentary and vot-
ing system is essentially the
same as the one in Britain. The
candidate in each constituency
who gets the most votes wins
the seat, regardless of the mar-
gin of victory over other can-
didates or percentage of the
overall vote. This can penalize
smaller parties that may have
support that is not concentrat-
ed enough to win many seats.

For example, the Liberal
Democrats emerged from last
Thursday's election with 23 per
cent of the overall vote, but

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just 9 per cent of parliamen-
tary seats. Meanwhile, the
Labour Party won 29 per cent
of the vote, but 40 per cent of
the seats. And the Conserva-
tives, with about 36 per cent
of the vote, took 47 per cent of
the seats. This result meant
that no single party could com-
mand a majority in parliament.

In the early 1990s — after
enduring a decade of Conserv-
ative rule — the Labour Party
began to embrace electoral
reform, promising the Lib
Dems to hold a referendum on
the issue if elected. Although
the scale of Tony Blair's
Labour victory in 1997 made
this unnecessary, a high-pow-
ered commission on voting
reform was set up. It called for
a mixed system, with most MPs
elected by constituencies, and
some by a party list.

This would be similar to the
German model, where a per-
centage of seats is allocated to
each party in proportion to the
number of votes the party
receives in a general election
beyond a legal threshold (usu-
ally 5 per cent). Candidates
who win the most votes in their
districts are elected, but a sec-
ond vote determines how
many representatives will be
sent from each party to the
parliament.

The intellectual rationale
for proportional representa-
tion was provided by the 19th
century British philosopher
John Stuart Mill. He based his
arguments on the possibility of
the mass electorate producing
a tyranny of the majority,
crushing dissent and eliminat-
ing minority representation
altogether.

In our region, countries
with proportional representa-
tion of one kind or another
include the Cayman Islands,
Guyana, the Dominican
Republic, the Netherlands
Antilles and Haiti. Like the
Bahamas, most Caricom coun-
tries have retained the “win-
ner takes all” system inherited
from the British.

Has this had a negative
impact on our little democra-
cy? Well, the Bahamian elec-
torate is relatively homoge-
nous — if you exclude the 15
per cent whitish minority — and
both main parties claim to be
non-racial. Still, there are only
four white MPs in our 41-seat
parliament, so perhaps there
is an argument for proportion-
al representation on ethnic
grounds.

There are no small party
representatives in our parlia-
ment, despite the fact that the
Bahamas Democratic Move-

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



BALLOT PAPERS are counted in
the British general election. (AP)

ment has been slogging away
since 1998. The Coalition for
Democratic Reform lasted five
years without winning a seat
before disbanding ignomin-
iously before the 2007 election.

Before that, the National
Democratic Party (a break-
away faction of the PLP) was
wiped out at the polls in 1967.
And more recently, the new
National Development Party
failed to make any impact in
the Elizabeth bye-election,
despite fielding an attractive
candidate and talking a lot of
sense.

But ex-PLP chairman Ray-
nard Rigby sees no need for
proportional representation:
"The voters’ voices are not
suppressed. I don't accept that
argument. The fact that third
parties can't get a majority has
all to do with message, believ-
ability and connecting with the
voters. I always start from the
premise that the voter does not
make a mistake. So there can
be no unfair elections.”

FNM Chairman Carl Bethel
says proportional representa-
tion has never been on the
radar here. "There is no
appetite to change the ‘first
past the post’ system because
the two parties in the House
would lose their monopoly (on
power) if a party with (a mini-
mum) popular vote was able
to win seats. We don't have
the equivalent of a Liberal
Democrat Party with substan-
tial seats to open the possibili-
ties for gridlock which now
confronts the UK.

"Let me also add that, from
what I observed in Guyana, a
PR system would greatly
strengthen the hand of the
prime minister, since individual
MPs, do not actually represent
any constituency. What hap-
pens is that a list of MPs is
issued and from that list the
actual MPs are selected
according to the party's pro-
portional entitlement after the
election. The PM would be
able to exclude his internal
competitors or opponents.”

According to Sir Arthur
Foulkes, writing in 2006, polit-
ical parties in the Bahamas are
easy to form but difficult to
build. The PLP succeeded in
the 1950s because of "a con-

fluence of events that made
the Bahamas ripe for the
establishment and growth of a
political party with popular
appeal across the nation. The
PLP leadership was deter-
mined to remove the intransi-
gent Old Guard from power."

As for the FNM, he said the
circumstances at the time were
unique and unlikely to occur
again. "After the 1967 and
1968 general elections, the
political division in the House
of Assembly was clearly along
racial lines and there was a
good chance the UBP would
have been wiped out altogeth-
er. In any event, the time had
come to end racial politics.

"A few enlightened and
perceptive members of the
UBP, led by Geoffrey John-
stone, understood this. So
when in 1970 a bloc of parlia-
mentary members of the PLP —
the Dissident Eight — voted no
confidence in their leader and
were suspended from the par-
ty, Sir Geoffrey proposed the
dissolution of the UBP and
turning over the responsibility
for opposition to the Eight.

"So in 1971 a new political
party — the FNM - was formed
and assumed the role of oppo-
sition, not third party. After a
disastrous splintering in 1977,
the FNM was reunified in time
for the 1982 election and has
remained in parliament until
now."

In the 2007 general election,
splinter candidates (the BDM
and several independents)
received only about 3 per cent
of the vote. In fact, the elec-
toral high point for candidates
not drawn from the two major
parties was the general elec-
tion of 2002, when they collec-
tively won 7.5 per cent of the
vote. But that was largely due
to the fact that the PLP
refrained from fielding candi-
dates against several indepen-
dents (all former FNM incum-
bents).

In the late 1980s, Hubert
Ingraham and his supporters
toyed with the idea of setting
up a "third force" after he was
expelled from the PLP for
opposing corruption. The con-
sensus was that building a new
party was too difficult from a
logistical and financial point
of view, so Ingraham went on
to join the FNM. He was
anointed by a dying Sir Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield, and elected
leader in 1990.

Under Ingraham, the FNM
defeated the PLP in 1992, with
55 per cent of the overall vote.
Five years later they achieved
an overwhelming victory, tak-
ing 85 per cent of the parlia-
mentary seats on the strength
of 58 per cent of the overall
vote (34 to six). In 2002 this
result was practically reversed,
with the PLP taking 73 per
cent of the seats on the basis of
52 per cent of the vote (29 to
seven).

Before 1992 the PLP com-
fortably won elections in 1987,

a
CREDIT SUISSE

1982, 1977, 1972, 1968 and
1967. In fact, there were legit-
imate fears during their quar-
ter-century monopoly on pow-
er that democracy would all
but disappear in the Bahamas.
In fact, the ruling party has
won all of the seats in parlia-
ment in more than a dozen
general elections in Common-
wealth Caribbean countries.

Would proportional repre-
sentation help avoid such dis-
tortions here? Could a third
party ever establish itself in
our parliament without pro-
portional representation?

Dr John Rodgers, a local
eye surgeon and public affairs
commentator, believes the
time is ripe for a third party
movement: "A new party
could win outright, or at least
enough seats to force a coali-
tion in the next election, if it
has the right mix of candidates,
a solid mandate and $5-10 mil-
lion in campaign funding."

Younger voters, he says, are
tired of the same old rhetoric,
personalities and policies. "The
economy is in terrible shape
and crime is out of control -
the two things people are most
concerned about. The elec-
torate has witnessed the
changes in the US and now the
UK. There will be a change
here in 2012 if the right third
party emerges."

Well, that's a big "if". And
$10 million is a lot to invest in
an unknown entity. Mean-
while, back in Britain the fat
lady hasn't sung yet (as this is
written on Monday), but it
appears that interest is refo-
cusing on a potential deal
between the Lib Dems and
Labour, with Gordon Brown
resigning.

That would only be because
the Tories won't budge on pro-
portional representation. The
Liberal Democrats have been
down this road before with
Labour, yet the promised elec-
toral reform never materi-
alised. The big difference this
time is that they have Labour
by the short and hairies.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

¢ Yesterday Gordon Brown
tendered his resignation to the
Queen after three years in
power. David Cameron, Con-
servative leader having sealed
a deal with Nick Clegg of the
Liberal Democrats, became
the UK’s prime minister,
returning the Conservatives to
power after 13 years on the
backbench. Mr Clegg will be
deputy prime minister with
four members of his party cab-
inet ministers.

Mr Brown also resigned as
Labour leader to be replaced
by deputy Harriet Harman
until a successor is elected. Mr
Brown will remain as a back-
bench MP in Parliament.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 7

Police walkabout

aims to calm any
fears of residents

By GENA GIBBS



FOLLOWING the police shooting
of a man who escaped from Central
Police Station last week, officers of the
Northeast Division Police and the
Urban Renewal Committee conducted
a walkabout in the Kemp Road area
with the aim of calming any fears mem-
bers of the community may have.

“The walkabout was scheduled for
an earlier date, but with the recent inci-
dent, as it relates to the escapees, it was
put off. We came out with Pastor Dale
Moss of the Shirley Street Church of
God of Prophecy and employees of the
other government entities,” said Craig
Stubbs, Assistant Supt of the North-
eastern Division.

The walkabout included meeting res-
idents from St James Road, Abraham
Street, the Five Pound Lot, White’s
Addition, and Cooper’s Terrace, that
were impacted by the police shooting
that occurred on Tuesday, May 4.

Ricardo “Ricky” Knowles Jr, 22, was
shot by police in White’s Addition, off
Kemp Road, after escaping from the
Central Police Station. He was being
held and waiting to appear before Jus-
tice Jon Isaacs on armed robbery, kid-
napping, and rape charges.

Renardo Bastian, the other escapee,
who was also awaiting trial on the same
charges, was captured in the Kemp
Road area.

He has since been acquitted of the
robbery, kidnapping and rape charges
against him, but has other matters pend-

40th anniversary

ing before the court.

“The feedback from the residents is
that they understand what took place,
they understand the job of the police
officers, they understand we had to do
what we had to do,” Asst Supt Stubbs
said.

“A lot of them were afraid because
of the amount of officers that converged
on the area on Tuesday afternoon. With
the assurance that we have talked to
them, a lot of them are accepting the
fact that what had to be done was
done.”

Aside from that incident there has
been no increase in crime in the Kemp
Rod area, he said.

“Since January, there has been no
increase. The majority of what you
might be faced with is basically the
small domestic loud music, and one or
two stealing incidents but nothing
major,” said Asst Supt Stubbs.

Residents in the community called
the police to inform them of the
escapees’ whereabouts.

“Tuesday was a result of the police
interaction with the community,” said
Asst Supt Stubbs.

“The community (residents) were the
persons calling in and giving the police
information as it relates to the escapees.
So, there is an ongoing partnership with
the community on a large scale. With-
out the community, we, at Northeast-
ern, cannot function.”

Kemp Road residents have also told
police they want to see more patrols in
the area.





NORTHEASTERN DIVISION POLICE and
Kemp Road Urban Renewal Committee mem-
bers make their presence known in the com-
munity only days after police were involved in
a fatal shooting that resulted in the death of an
escapee.

“Honestly, they want to see increased
patrols. They need to see more police
vehicles driving around at night,
through the community and maybe
stopping,” Asst Supt Stubbs said.

Young men between the ages of 17
and 27 fit the profile of most of the
criminal behaviour in the area. Police
have identified unemployment and idle-
ness as the source of youth reckless-
ness, he said.

“A lot of them want construction
jobs. Weeding the yard is an income
and they will say they want to do it, but
there is no sign of it. For the younger
generation, Urban Renewal offers com-
puter classes and other after school
activities and we try to steer them in
that direction and get them involved.”

“T would say about 95 per cent of
the people we spoke to this morning
are in support of the police depart-
ment,” Asst Supt Stubbs said.

he HMBS Flamingo






By MATT MAURA

THE sinking of the HMBS
Flamingo 30 years ago has
become the most significant
event to have taken place in
the life of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force and
perhaps the national con-
science, Under-Secretary in
the Ministry of National
Security Peter Deveaux-
Isaacs said on Monday at
Coral Harbour Base.

Addressing parents and
family members of the
marines killed in action on
the occasion of the 30th
anniversary of the sinking,
he said that their losses will
never be forgotten.

“It was this instance of
national shock that helped
Bahamians to grasp fully the



of the sinking of t



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Hilton Hotel, Bay Street, on Friday, May 21,
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Supervisory Committee and Credit Committee

* To discuss and approve the budget for 2011

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Committee or Credit Committee, are asked to
submit their names to the Credit Union’s Offices



concept of national identity
when our sovereignty was
challenged back of May 10,
1980,” Mr Deveaux-Isaacs
said.

“Thirty years ago we lost
four, young marines and one
of our 103ft Marlin class ves-
sels to hostile and deliberate
attacks from our southerly
neighbour, Cuba. The shock
(of those attacks) was unbe-
lievable (and) Bahamians
from all walks of life gar-
nered together in protest.

“That incident, though
tragic, served to do what no
Bahamian event has been
able to do since Indepen-
dence in 1973, it united
Bahamians, concretising the
meaning of independence
and sovereignty in our minds
and clarifying for all what it
meant to be united in love
and service,” Mr Deveaux-

Isaacs added.

While attempting to arrest
two Cuban fishing vessels
near the Ragged Island
Chain on May 10, 1980, Able
Seaman Fenrick Sturrup, 21;
Marine Seaman Austin
Rudolph Smith, 21; Marine
Seaman David Allison Tuck-
er, 21, and Marine Seaman
Edward Arnold Williams, 23,
were killed when Cuban
MIG jets fired upon and
sank the HMBS Flamingo.

Mr Deveaux-Isaacs said
the four marines made the
ultimate sacrifice for their
country.

“Thirty years have since
passed since the lives of
those four, young marines
were lost and others were
also lost in the line of duty
due to the nature of work
carried out by members of

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the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force,” Mr Deveaux-Isaacs
said.

He applauded the work of
the men and women of the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force — past and present. He
also paid special tribute to
the families of the men and
women who serve in the
country’s armed force.

sinking of the HMBS Flamingo
presented a plaque to May-
nard Miller for his outstanding
efforts in assisting all the sur-
vivors and helping them get
to Ragged Island following the
disaster. Pictured (I-r) are For-
mer Able Seaman Cladwell
Farrington, Retired FCP Rev-
erend Dencil Clarke and
Retired CP Maynard “Dusty”
Miller.

in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4p.m.











ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

The Centre for Continuing Education
& Extension Services (CEES

Presents a special town meeting on the
Becker CPA Review Programme

GUEST SPEAKER:
Mr. Steven Chou,

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Becker Professional Education, Chi rag, Lines.

DATE:
Wednesday, May 12th at 5:30pm.

VENUE:

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Students who prepare for the CPA Exams using the Becker Review pass at double

the rate of non-Becker candidates.

CPA Lecturers will be present at the town meeting to answer your questions.

For more information call: 328-1936, 328-0093 or
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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

He said: “My position on
the $10 bill is known. My
position on the port is
known, and time doesn’t
change that.

“What political organisa-
tions do is review its own
thinking on a matter with
respect to the issue. And
there is nothing to date that
has convinced me that there
should be a change in that
thinking.”

Describing the Hubert
Ingraham-led government’s
decision to relocate the con-
tainer port to Arawak Cay
as an “abominable mistake”,
Mr Christie said the move
would work against the beau-
tification of the downtown
area.

“T find it very difficult to
understand how the govern-
ment of the Bahamas can
proceed with this matter. I
do not believe, no matter
how they try to hide the exis-
tence of that port, I do not
feel it is right to put an indus-
trial centre next to the Fish
Fry and destroy what would
otherwise be a scenic drive
along West Bay Street.”

Mr Christie added that the
project seems to be littered
with “major” flaws consider-
ing its enormity and the
expense that would have to
be undertaken to do it.

With the next General
Election expected any time
within the next 18 to 24

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 11

Christie ‘would reverse container port deal’



PERRY CHRISTIE



months, sources within the
FNM have stated that Mr
Christie’s position on the
matter would mean very lit-
tle, even if he were to hold
the seat of Prime Minister.

“Tas a citizen of this coun-
try am not threatened by
anything that Perry Christie
says he will do because con-
sidering his history, he will
do nothing,” the source
laughed.

Brandishing such remarks
as being “typical of the PLP”
he went on to add how the
PLP had also threatened to
reverse the deal on Atlantis
which was first refused under
the PLP but later signed after
the FNM came to power in
1992.

“The PLP would be open-
ing themselves to a litany of

lawsuits. So that is a politi-
cal argument at best. Once
this agreement is signed that
is it. These stakeholders can
sue them for attempting to
stop it.

“But Mr Christie should
know better. He is trying to
make this deal fail before it
gets off the ground. He is try-
ing to instil fear in the hearts
of the stated investors and
those yet in the pool. That is
unfit for a former Prime Min-
ister to be doing, particularly
in this current climate,” he
said.

In thanking all those par-
ties involved in making the
signing a success, Prime Min-
ister Ingraham told the press
on Monday that it took
“great effort” on the private
sector’s part because they
were faced with reducing
income which they are now
making, and having threats
by an Opposition Party that
it would discontinue the
operation at Arawak Cay.

“And so they had to be
bold and take my word and
my action for it that a deal
done with the government of
the Bahamas is a deal done,
irrespective of any noise to
the contrary in the market-
place.

“The government there-
fore, looks forward to a har-
monious relationship
between the private sector
and ourselves. We expect
that the port will be managed
by the private sector and not
by the government,” he said.

FROM page one

Mr Bethel's phone was "ringing off the hook"
yesterday as he was inundated with calls from
persons seeking to verify the report.

"IT am being told that there is no truth to the
rumour that Lady Turnquest died," Mr Bethel
said when contacted by The Tribune yesterday
morning. He said this information came from a
close friend of the Turnquest family.

He added: "I have no reason to doubt that
(information)."

When contacted for an update later in the
afternoon, Mr Bethel said he could not authen-
ticate the rumours. "There's no confirmation
one way or the other,” he said.

At last report, Lady Turnquest remained in
critical condition in hospital in England, accord-
ing to an e-mail from her son, National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest who flew to Lon-
don earlier this week to be at her side.

A friend of the Turnquest family, who spoke to
The Tribune yesterday afternoon, also denied
the claims of Lady Turnquest’s death. This came
as multiple websites posted unconfirmed reports
that Lady Turnquest had died in hospital while in
England.

Lady Turnquest suffered a serious stroke Sat-
urday morning while on holiday in London with
her husband and eldest grandson.



Trt:



Lady Turnquest remains
in critical condition

Her immediate family, including Mount Mori-
ah MP and National Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest, arrived in London on Sunday to be
with their mother, who has since undergone neu-
rosurgery.

On Monday night, Mr Turnquest said by e-
mail that his mother "remains in critical condi-
tion, with no change since yesterday (Sunday)."

Lady Turnquest had suffered bleeding to the
left side of her brain because of the stroke and
was left paralysed on one side of her body. On
Sunday she remained in a critical care unit for
"monitoring and further care," according to the
family's statement.

Her surgery went "rather better than expect-
ed,” according to the doctor who treated her,
said the earlier statement.

With Lady Turnquest are Sir Orville, her three
children, Mrs Caryl Lashley, Mrs Michele Fields
and Tommy Turnquest, and two of her grand-
sons.

Sir Orville served almost seven years as Gov-
ernor-general with Lady Turnquest by his side
from 1995 until late 2001.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Mario Miller, 28,
was found dead with
multiple stab and chop
wounds about his body
in bushes near the
Super Value food store
in Winton.

Brothers Ricardo
Miller alias ‘Tamar
Lee’ and Ryan Miller
alias ‘Manny’ are
charged with Mario’s



Lesiie Miller

head, face, neck and
hands. He said that
brown slippers were also
found at the scene.

He further testified
that on June 24, 2002,
he visited the Rand Lab-
oratory at the Princess
Margaret Hospital and
was present when Leslie
Miller identified his son.

murder. LESLIE MILLER ‘S¢etgeant Colebrook

Mr Miller sobbed on — outside of court
yesterday.

the witness stand yes-
terday when ques-
tioned by lead prosecutor Cheryl
Grant-Bethell about learning of
his son’s death.

He said he last saw his son on
June 21, 2002, and that Mario
owned a green and gold Infiniti
SUV. He recalled that his son
had complained of a foot injury.
A tearful Mr Miller told the court
that when he arrived at the scene
where his son’s body had been
discovered, the ambulance had
already taken him to the hospital.
Mr Miller said at the hospital, he
saw his son lying on a stretcher
with “a lot of stab wounds.”

Detective Sergeant James
Colebrook, a crime scene inves-
tigator, was the first witness to
take the stand yesterday.

He told the court that while
on duty at the Criminal Records
Office on June 22, 2002, he and
DC 1824 Anderson, acting on
information, travelled to the
Super Value food store in Win-
ton.

Sergeant Colebrook said that
he took photographs of Mario’s
lifeless body. He said Mario, who
was dressed in long blue jeans
and a multicoloured shirt, had
multiple stab wounds about his

also told the court that
Dr Govinda Raju point-
ed out injuries on Mari-
o’s body. Sergeant Cole-
brook said he photographed the
injuries and also told the court
that albums were compiled from
the photographs he had taken.

Former detective Corporal
Darren Ellis, who in June 2002
was attached to the Elizabeth
Estates Police Station, also took
the witness stand yesterday.

He told the court that while
on duty around 4pm on June 22,
acting on information he pro-
ceeded to Yamacraw Hill Road
where he saw a 1997 QX4 Infini-
ti SUV registered to Mario
Miller. The former crime scene
investigator told the court he saw
blood inside as well as outside
the vehicle.

Mrs Grant-Bethell, during her
opening address yesterday, told
the jury that the prosecution will
rely on strong forensic and cir-
cumstantial evidence.

She also said the prosecution
intends to call some 30 witnesses.

Senior Justice Jon Isaacs pre-
sides over the case. Attorney
Dorsey McPhee represents
Ricardo Miller, and attorney
Richard Bootle represents Ryan
Miller.

Victimisation claims
FROM page one

ards at the resort — was notified of the executive council’s decision to
remove them through letters circulated at Atlantis yesterday.

The step comes two weeks after Ms Martin, Mr Woods and the rest
of the “A-Team” were elected to the leadership of the union.

Mr Woods said: “We had gotten some complaints from people in
the areas they represented indicating they no longer wanted them to
represent them, and one or two of the people (who were fired) had
transferred from one area to the next in the hotel, which means
they would have to be appointed or elected for the new area.

“Some indicated they could not work with us (the new executive
team headed by Nicole Martin) and some of the same would have
penned letters to the Director of Labour to have the union de-reg-
istered. But the main reason (they are being removed) is because
some of the members said they didn’t want them there anymore. If
we were victimising them we’d have gotten rid of them the first
time (they ran against Martin).”

But two of the Shop Stewards who spoke with The Tribune said
that despite their support for persons other than Ms Martin in the
recent and previous union elections, they were more than willing to
work with her as President and had not indicated otherwise.

They claimed that far from it being done at the behest of the
membership, their removal has disappointed and confused many
of those who they had represented at the hotel and will cause division
in the union.

“The members are very upset because at the end of the day its one
union and so if you ran against Nicole Martin or voted against her as
long as you do your duties as shop steward and work with adminis-
tration it shouldn’t be a problem. It’s about the members and every
member has the right to run,” said one of the affected shop stewards.

One former shop steward complained the letter gave no official rea-
son for their removal, only stating that they were “no longer autho-
rise to work or act on behalf of the union.”

“People want to know if she (Nicole Martin) can really do that,”
said one of the hotel workers, adding that she feels the membership’s
interests can only be hurt by the removal of the representatives.

“T don’t get paid as a shop steward, I was only doing it because I
love what I do and I like to see people treated fairly and respectful-
ly. At the end of the day you’re only going to hurt the industry if you
put shop stewards in there who don’t know what they’re doing,” she
said, noting that many of the stewards had served in their union
posts for many years.

Mr Woods said the exercise of removing the shop stewards was
about ensuring that they too are held accountable to the membership
as the executive members are when they have to go up for re-election
every three years, rather than “‘serving infinitum” or continuing to do
so even if the membership no longer wants them to or they fail to “act
in their best interests.”

FROM page one — EYX-PLP general

investigations continue.

The German businessman
was reported missing last
Wednesday prompting a wide-
scale search of the 48-mile long
island and surrounding waters,
which in seven days has pro-
duced no sign of the foreigner.

Inspector Tony Taylor at
New Bight police station said
the missing German’s home,
truck, private airplane and
yacht were found undisturbed.

He said: “We have nothing
concrete, no positive results at
the moment.

“We have been door-to-
door, had several aerial search-
es, but at this moment we have
not come up with anything to
find Mr Harsch.

“Information surfaced and
we took two persons into cus-
tody who we were questioning.

“If there is a break in the
case and we get something sub-

stantive from them we will
charge them.”

He said Mr Harsch was a fre-
quent visitor to Fernandez Bay
over the last year and was con-
sidering buying property on the
island.

The unmarried man was
staying in Cat Island alone and
was last seen at Hawk’s Nest
restaurant on Sunday, May 2,
before he was reported missing
three days later.

A team of five officers from
the Criminal Detective Unit
were sent to New Bight last
week to assist investigations.

Inspector Taylor said Mr
Harsch’s friends and family
have been informed of his dis-
appearance through the Ger-
man consuls in Nassau and
Miami.

Calls to the German consul
were not returned yesterday.

Central Police Station

FROM page one

headquarters and Superintendent Wayne Miller has replaced him

at Central.

Supt Miller formerly headed the Strategic Policy and Planning

branch at police headquarters.

Second in charge of the station, Asst Supt Cleophus Cooper, will
remain in his position at Central, while Chief Inspector Robert Sim-
mons, formerly of Nassau Street, will also join the downtown
police team.

Speaking of the transferral of Supt Moss, ACP Hanna said that
such reassignments are not necessarily to be considered punish-
ments, but can be done for many reasons.

ACP Hanna said: “The whole scheme of things is to get it right
and nothing is fixed in stone. If a person can be sent to a particu-
lar remit today in a matter of weeks that person can be removed.”

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ROYAL FIDELITY

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THE TRIBUNE

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isin

WEDNESDAY,

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ee



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SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net





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‘Well short of expectations’ To, marina sees
60% April rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BISX-listed bank
yesterday
acknowledged its
2009 results fell
“well short of our expecta-
tions”, a more than five-fold
increase in loan loss provisions
due to the contracting economy
holding net income flat, with
its chief executive forecasting
no growth for 18-24 months.
Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) head, told Tri-
bune Business that the “very
substantially increased loan loss
provisions”, which increased by
569 per cent to $1.316 million
from $231,261 the previous
year, was the “key” to why the
banks’ net income only
increased by 3.3 per cent over
2008 comparatives to $1.357
million.
“The loan book has been
deteriorating, consistent with
what has been going on in the

economy,” Mr (ij
Sunderji said. ,
“While our top
line grew and
expenses were |
controlled, our
bottom line did
not really
improve because
of the substantial
mcrease in provi-
sions.”

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
non-performing loans, as a per-
centage of its total $200 million
portfolio, grew to 9.09 per cent
or $18.635 million - in line with
the commercial banking indus-
try average - compared to 3.32
per cent or $6.734 million at
year-end 2008.

The non-performing loans,
the bank’s financial statements
said, consisted of $13.8 million
worth of mortgage loans (some
$5.4 million in 2008) and $4.8
million in consumer loans
(some $1.3 million of these
were non-performing in 2008).

SUNDERJI

AC device aiming for
20% power bill drop

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN company
yesterday said it was aiming to
reduce household and business
electricity bills by up to 20 per
cent through reducing air-con-
ditioning costs, especially dur-
ing the upcoming summer
months.

Larry Black, technical con-
sultant for Powersave Interna-
tional, said the Aircosaver,
which can be attached to any
air-conditioning unit, except
chill-water systems, can signifi-
cantly reduce the high costs
associated with long-running
condensing units.

According to Mr Black, the
small electronic Aircosaver
unit, which is retro-fitted to
existing air conditioning units,
and was tested by NASA, uses
German technology to detect
when a unit’s evaporator coils
have reached the desired tem-
perature to cool a room. It then
switches the condensing unit
off, leaving the blower running
to continue distributing cold air.

Mr Black said the unit had
been shown to reduce air con-
ditioner operating costs by
more than 25 per cent.

“Tf you are happy with your
electricity bill then you don’t
need it,” said Mr Black. “And
while the best energy saving
device is the on/off switch,

when you are using your air
conditioning the Aircosaver is
saving you money.”

Powersave International is
the exclusive Bahamian dis-
tributor of the Aircosaver mod-
ule, and offers energy audits of
homes and businesses to gauge
how its energy-saving devices
could benefit them.

The company, along with the
Aircosaver, also distributes
ThermaMax, which lowers
compressor head pressure,
shortens compressor run time,
decreases friction in the com-
pressor and increases the life
of air conditioning units. It also
supplies a capacitor-based Pow-
ersave device that can increase
the efficiency of motors in a
home or business up to 99 per
cent.

Mr Black said that by using
many of his own products, he
has seen significant savings at
his own residence. And feed-
back from clients has revealed
some 30 per cent in savings for
some with he Aircosaver.

He added that Powersave
International sought to make
the device affordable to both
businesses and private homes,
and sells it lower than the
MSRP (Manufacturers Sug-
gested Retail Price).

Mr Black said the company
also offers payment plans to
residential customers and
approved commercial cus-
tomers.

‘They’re ranking up there
with BEC these days’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Power
Company’s outage woes stem
from the decision to “hive off”
the utility from Port Authority
control, the ex-head of the
island’s Chamber of Commerce
said yesterday, with “the profit
motive” superior to providing a
reliable power supply.

Christopher Lowe, com-
menting on the electricity out-
ages that plagued Freeport and
Grand Bahama throughout
much of last week, bringing
commerce to a standstill, told
Tribune Business: “This all
stems from the fact that it
[Grand Bahama Power] used
to the responsibility of the Port
Authority/

“T suppose this is par for the
course when the profit motive
becomes the primary concern,
and a reasonable, decent elec-
tricity supply is secondary to
that.

“It was never designed to




TARGET!

* Ex-Chamber head says
Grand Bahama Power
woes have their roots
in decision to ‘hive off
utility from Port Authority

* Argues that ‘profit motive’
superior to delivering
reliable electricity supply,
and points out Hawksbill
Creek Agreement focused
on different goal of
creating a new city

make a profit. It was designed
to run itself, pay for itself and
be there. It was the Port
Authority’s responsibility. This
stems from 15 years ago when
Edward hived it off and sold it
off. It was an asset of the Port,
but has been hived off for per-
sonal profit. Yet the Hawksbill

SEE page 2B



* BISX-listed bank says more than five-fold increase in

loan loss provisions to $1.357m hit 2009 ambitions
* Fidelity puts growth plans on hold for 18-24 months; ‘for

all of 2010 and most of 2011’, pushing them back two years
* Hopes ‘may have seen the bottom’ of loan book deterioration

Mr Sunderji conceded that
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) had
been forced by the contracting
Bahamian economy to post-
pone its planned growth strate-
gy, which it had hoped to initi-
ate in 2009 and 2010 following
heavy infrastructure invest-
ments in previous years, for at
least two years.

Acknowledging that the
focus over its next two finan-
cial years would be managing
its existing credit portfolio and
controlling expenses, Mr Sun-
derji told Tribune Business:
“Until the economy shows signs
of improvement, our focus is
going to remain on asset quali-
ty and recovering the money
we’ve lent out.

“T think the loan book dete-
rioration has stabilised now,
and we expect that it will
improve over time, the next 12-
18 months. Until such time as
that happens, we have no plans
for growing and expanding the
business.

“The economic environment
simply does not support growth
strategies. We have an econo-
my that has contracted quite
substantially. We have had a
very bid increase in unemploy-
ment, with many Bahamians in
trouble paying off their loans.
This is not the time to be think-
ing of growing.”

When asked by Tribune

SEE page 3B

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE LARGEST marina in
the Bahamas saw a 60 per cent
year-on-year increase for the
month of April in pleasure
yacht arrivals, and expects to
continue this improving trend
during the 2010 second quar-
ter.

Bob Kramm, general man-
ager at the Abaco Beadh
Resort, said June’s boat slip
occupancies were expected to
be significantly up over last
year. He added, though, that
occupancy forecasts have been
difficult as booking windows
continue to be short, a trend
that came about with the down-
turn in the economy last year.

Mr Kramm told Tribune

IPOs to ‘really wake up’ the capital market

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE potential Arawak Cay
port and Commonwealth Brew-
ery/Burns House initial public
offerings (IPOs) will “really
wake up” Bahamian capital
markets that have been dor-
mant for too long, Tribune
Business was told yesterday, a
leading analyst predicting the
port’s $10-$15 million prefer-
ence share issue would likely
be oversubscribed.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said:
“T think the two issues will real-
ly wake up the market and
bring back all that interest that
has been latent for so long. It

* Arawak Cay port and Burns House/Brewery deals
to ‘liven up’ equities sector, with former’s $10-$15m
preference issue likely to be oversubscribed

* Analyst: ‘We’ve lagged behind the
global markets for too long’

* Burns House/Brewery offering could be largest in
Bahamas’ history, worth $50-60m, sources suggest

livens things up a bit.”
Agreeing with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham’s asser-
tion that granting the public a
20 per cent stake in the Arawak
Cay port would “expand own-
ership opportunities for
Bahamians”, in addition to
broadening and deepening the

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

capital markets, Mr Kerr said
the two potential IPOs both
had “attractive” attributes.
“To a large extent they’re
both monopolies - they oper-
ate as monopolies,” he told Tri-
bune Business. The Arawak

SEE page 2B



* Abaco Beach Resort
restarts real estate sales
effort as ‘enthused about
outlook’ for 2010

* Expects improved trend
for pleasure yacht arrivals
to continue through
2010 second quarter

* But tourism ‘not out
of the woods yet’

Business that April was fore-
cast to be a slow month based
on preliminary figures. How-
ever, as the month progressed,
last minute reservations came
in to boost the resort and mari-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

Sure your kid will get a scholarship!
Now what's Plan B?

We can get you there. Royal Fidelity.

ROYAL SFIDELITY

Money at Work



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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS
IPOs to ‘really wake up’

FROM page 1B

Cay port, which will serve as the
principal entry port for all goods
shipped into New Providence by
sea, has no direct competitor on
this island, while a merged Com-
monwealth Brewery/Burns House
group would also dominate its sec-
tor. The latter’s main competition
would lie on the distribution side in
the form of Bristol Cellars.

While the Arawak Cay port IPO
is unlikely to take place until later
in the year - possibly in the fall - at
earliest, given the Prime Minister’s
comments that investors would
first want to see its facilities oper-
ational, the preference share issue
- part of the $20-$25 million in out-
side investor financing being
sought - may well take place earli-
er.

This issue, which is effectively
fixed income debt, will be targeted
at so-called ‘sophisticated’
investors, institutional and high-
net worths, and Mr Kerr said this
was likely to be oversubscribed
depending on the details of the
estimated $10-$15 million issue.

“T think the fixed income one is
huge,” he explained. “Institutional
people will pick it up. I think it will
be more than fully subscribed. The
fixed income portion on that gives
you a consistent income.

“People may not yet have confi-
dence restored to the extent they
will want to wait for the equity
stuff to kick-in for the Port and
Heineken.”

Apart from Kerzner Interna-
tional and Consolidated Water’s
Bahamian Depository Receipt
(CDR) derivative offerings, there
have been no IPOs in the Bahami-
an capital markets since 2001,
Freeport Concrete’s being the last.

Mr Kerr suggested the lack of
new IPOs - and investment oppor-
tunities - had resulted from a lack
of confidence in the Bahamian
equities market on the part of both
potential issuers and investors.

“On the equities side, people
have lost confidence and, more
fundamental, is a lack of under-
standing of what the markets can
do and the whole idea of equity
ownership,” Mr Kerr told Tribune
Business. “We have lagged behind
the global markets for too long, to
the extent that there were huge
run-ups in the US and global mar-
kets and we had not IPOs here
because people were scared.

“You need that education to
help people understand what’s
going on, and it’s now the right

time to be investing in equities - a
lot of valuations are very attrac-
tive.”

While the absence of IPOs had
not stifled Bahamian capital mar-
ket development, Mr Kerr said
they were “certainly a critical fac-
tor” in stimulating investor interest
and creating trading activity.

He also expressed surprise that
more Bahamian companies with
‘succession’ issues, which had been
held in family ownership for
decades, had not come to market.

The finer details of the Arawak
Cay port and the Commonwealth
Brewery/Burns House IPOs have
yet to be worked out. Market
sources yesterday suggested that
the latter deal could have to total
worth of $50-$60 million once
Heineken completed the buyout
of the stake held by Associated
Bahamian Distillers and Brewers
(ABDAB), the Finlayson family
holding vehicle, a deal first exclu-
sively revealed by Tribune Busi-
ness.

Market sources yesterday sug-
gested that Heineken would offer
50 per cent of whatever it acquired
from ABDAB in the IPO, mean-
ing that if it was a $100 million pur-
chase price - as has been widely
touted - the IPO could be valued in
the $50 million range.

If correct, that would make the
Commonwealth Brewery/Burns
House IPO the largest in Bahami-
an history, one source telling Tri-
bune Business yesterday: “There
wouldn’t have been an offering of
that size in this market, so it will be
interesting to see how an offer of
that size will be placed.”

Tribune Business understands
that preliminary discussions have
already taken place between Burns
House, headed by its managing
director, LeRoy Archer, and
Bahamian brokerage/investment
houses keen to earn the role of
placement/advisory agent when-
ever the IPO takes place.

Among those said to be keen to
win the business are the usual sus-
pects - RoyalFidelity Capital Mar-
kets, CFAL, Providence Advisors,
Atlantic Medical and First-
Caribbean.

It is understood that certain con-
ditions have to be fulfilled before
Heineken and ABDAB close their
deal, but that is thought to be a
formality and should happen immi-
nently. Government approval
seems set, and while the compa-
nies have 18 months to ready for
the IPO, it seems a certainty this
will take place.

Received a

best buy rating’ for

Whirlpoa



NASSAU, The Bahamas
— A law firm is reaping the
benefits of establishing its
office in Nassau’s fastest
growing population area,
Carmichael Road.

At a time when many
companies and homeowners
are trying to determine
where to relocate to make
their best of their invest-
ment, the increasing num-
ber of plazas and subdivi-
sions being built around
Carmichael Road is evi-
dence that the community is
on its way to rebounding
from the recent recession.

Many companies and banks have
opened extra locations to accommo-
date residents in the area, eliminating
the commute to downtown Nassau.
Among these businesses is the Melisa
Hall & Company law firm. Now in its
fifth year in operation, the firm, which
specialises in several areas of practice,
including mortgages and corporate law,
has already been receiving inquiries
from passers-by since opening on the
junction of Faith Avenue and
Carmichael Road.

“In the past few years, there has





MELISA HALL

Law company reaps
Carmichael benefits

been a proliferation of busi-
nesses in the Carmichael
area,” said founder Melisa
Hall, who lives nearby.

“Just the other day on our
morning walk, my husband
and I met a man who was
taking a survey of vehicles
that passed, and in about an
hour there were almost 700.
That doesn’t include the esti-
mated 20 people per jitney
or others carpooling. From
that alone, we see there is
tremendous potential and
need for more businesses
like ours to be in the heart of
expanding communities like
this, especially when downtown is such
a far distance for them to drive.”

While there aren’t any shortages of
Justices of the Peace in the area, per-
sons have commended Mrs Hall for
bringing all of the firm’s offerings to
the area. In fact, she says plans are
already underway for several commu-
nity activities before summer.

“We are looking forward to getting
to know our neighbors on Carmichael
Road,” said Mrs Hall. “I think all in all,
we are going to fit right in with the
mix of Carmichael Road’s diversity.”





Top marina sees
60% April rise

FROM page 1B

na over 2009 levels.

Driving some business for the Abaco
Beach Resort, and Abaco itself, has
been the return of three fishing tour-
naments, some of which were cancelled
last year as a result of the economy.
Only two tournaments were held for
the whole of last year.

Mr Kramm said the outlook for 2010
has even moved the resort to restart
real estate sales and marketing pro-
grammes to push their luxury condo
sales.

“We had suspended activity for a
while,” he said. “But we are again
enthused about the outlook.”

The resort continues to create entic-
ing packages to keep their guests busy
and interested. Last year, it hosted full-
moon parties for their guests and cre-
ated a wide range of activities for fam-
ilies in order to drive business.

A spate of boat thefts last year also
threatened to shrink business for the
marina. However, Mr Kramm said that
in 2010 police have cracked down on
such thefts and arrested some signifi-
cant figures suspected of lifting boats.

While Mr Kramm said the tourism
industry in Abaco was not “out of the
woods yet”, and has no idea of how the
second half of 2010 will progress, he is
optimistic that it is on the rise.

“We haven’t been able to gauge yet
how things might affect us,” he said.

‘They’re ranking up there with BEC these days’

FROM page 1B

Creek Agreement was not about profit
but developing a city.”

Grand Bahama Power Company was
spun-off from the Grand Bahama Port
Authority in the mid-1990s by the late
Edward St George and Sir Jack Hay-
ward. They ultimately sold a 55 per cent
controlling interest in the firm to South-
ern Electric (later Mirant), with the
remaining 45 per cent equity split
between Mr St George and Bahamian
investors to the tune of 25/20 via BISX-
listed ICD Utilities.

Mirant eventually sold its controlling
interest - and all its Caribbean electricity
operations - to Japanese giant Marubeni.
The latter struck a partnership with Taga,
the Dubai-based power generator, that
has left both with the current, controlling
joint venture interest in Grand Bahama
Power Company.

In addition, Lady Henrietta St George
sold the 25 per cent ownership interest
held by her late husband via his ICD
Utilities stake to Canadian power pro-

ducer, Emera, for $41 million back in
2008.

Thus three leading electricity produc-
ers, with global operations, are in charge
at Grand Bahama Power Company at a
time when it was forced to place its cus-
tomers on a ‘rolling’ load shedding sched-
ule - interrupting power supply to con-
sumers and businesses for hours at a time
last week. The company blamed its prob-
lems on the breakdown of several gen-
eration units, and the difficulty in access-
ing spares/maintenance parts due to its
previous supplier going out of business.

Mr Lowe, meanwhile, told Tribune
Business that the ownership changes had
effectively converted Grand Bahama
Power Company into “nothing more than
an ordinary licensee [of the Port Author-
ity], and a pretty pathetic one at that.

“This is what happens when you take
an essential service and convert it into an
ordinary licensee of the Port Authority
with a profit motive as its primary con-
cern. They’re ranking up there with BEC
these days.”

Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

He joked that while Emera, one of the
owners of Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, had been engaged by the Govern-
ment to assess how best to implement
recommendations to revive the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC), “it
appears that BEC may be advising
Emera” given the performance in
Freeport last week.

While all private sector entities had a
right and need to generate profits, Mr
Lowe said that in Grand Bahama Power
Company’s case this should “not come at
the expense of maintenance, reliability
and ability to perform the service”.

As to the impact of last week’s power
outages, which cost businesses in
Freeport and wider Grand Bahama sig-
nificant sums of money, the former
Chamber president added: “Obviously,
we’re going to be spending a lot of mon-
ey on diesel fuel to do their [the power
company’s] job for them. But the major-
ity of people do not have generation
capacity to keep the lights on, so it’s dev-
astating for them.”

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, the Nurses Association of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas (NACB),
an independent. nonpolitical, non-governmental organization of nurses was founded in
1947 primarily to represent the interests of nurses practicing in The Bahamas, nationally,
regionally and internationally:

AND WHEREAS, The Nurses Association encourages the professional and educational
advancement of nurses and promotes the highest possible standard of quality nursing
care, irrespective of nationality, race, colour or social origin;

AND WHEREAS, professional nurses are committed and dedicated to providing quality
nursing care with sensitivity to sick, infirmed and handicapped persons:

AND WHEREAS, professional nurses demonstrate excellence in health promotion, patient
care, teaching research, administration and education in the field of Nursing:

AND WHEREAS, The Nurses Association of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas is

existence;

an organization whose vision is to promote nursing excellence and to influence national
policies through local regional and international networks in order to provide best practices
and advice in policy matters relating to and impacting the profession,

AND WHEREAS, The Nurses Association is celebrating the 63rd Anniversary of its

AND WHEREAS, in countries worldwide, the month of May, 2010 is set aside as time to
give focus to the critical roles performed by nurses and in recognition of the Indefatigable
contribution that nurses make to humanity through the healing process,

AND WHEREAS, International Nurses Day will be celebrated on Wednesday 12th May,
2010 under the theme: “Delivery Quality, Serving Communities: Nurses Leading

Chronic Care”, and will be marked by events, activities and ceremonies worldwide in

ead Washer Classic too Dry

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recognition of the invaluable contribution that nurses make to the improvement of health;

AND WHEREAS, the Nurses Association of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
organized a number of activities in commemoration of the NATIONAL NURSES MONTH,
including a church service, Mall Exhibition, an Appreciation Day, Community Health Fair
and a Symposium which are all intended to inform, sensitize and give focus to the role and
function of nurses within the healthcare system:

CHEN Wo Boy cosh
i !

The pawer le gel mete doas,

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of May, 2010 as “NATIONAL NURSES

MONTH”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, | have
hereunto set my Hand and Seal
this 6th day of May, 2010

Master Technici.

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ee era tre sre aty

erred be ie ac ea ie ROL ere a rete tele)
ae eee eM ce eee Mc a Mente rpc ier) ee eay |

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 3B



2 2S SSeS EUSINESS ne ee ea
Bahamian fund audit sign-off eyed again

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

HAVING Bahamian
accountants sign-off on the
audits of Bahamas-domiciled
investment funds would signif-
icantly facilitate Securities
Commission investigations,
helping to prevent problems in
the sector, a senior Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA) executive said
yesterday.

Lambert Longley, BICA’s
the second vice-president, who
is also a partner at KPMG, said
that while most accountants in
public practice in the Bahamas
are agitating for the Securities
Commission to mandate that
investment funds registered
here, but administered/man-
aged outside this nation, be
audited here, the regulator is
still mulling the issue.

Mr Longley said BICA has
broached the subject of

Bahamian accounting firms
signing-off on investment fund
audits regularly. However, like
the Securities Commission they
have not taken a definitive
stance on the issue.

“Most accountants in public
practice believe it would be
more appropriate for foreign
investment firms licensed in the
Bahamas to be audited from
within the Bahamas,” he said.

“It is important for regula-
tors to have direct access to
auditors, which they can cer-
tainly do in the Bahamas, and
would have more difficulty
doing it if they [auditors] were
outside of the Bahamas.

“We can’t be sure that it
would eliminate any malfea-
sance in the industry, but it
would significantly facilitate the
securities industry’s investiga-
tions that may arise.”

The issue resurfaced in rela-
tion to the Cdn$440 million
Olympus Univest investment
fund structure’s collapse, as its

‘Well short of expectations’

FROM page 1B

Business how long such a con-
servative strategy would remain
in place, Mr Sunderji replied:
“For all of 201o and most of
2011. We need to see the econ-
omy come back before we
embark on resuming our
growth strategy.”

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
financial statements indicated
both the conservative nature of
its lending portfolio and the fact
that many assets are secured on
underlying real estate, mean-
ing it should be able to recover
loans that remain in arrears.

Out of $159 million in mort-
gage loans, the bank said some
$129 million were supported by
liens over family residential
properties, while another $26
million was secured on unde-
veloped land. A further $4 mil-
lion was covered by mortgages
on commercial properties.

As for its $45 million con-
sumer loan portfolio, some $7
million was cash secured; $11
million funded by salary deduc-
tions; and $5 million was relat-
ed to overdrafts.

Mr Sunderji also told Tri-
bune Business that Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) “had no new

product plans” for 2010, believ-
ing it already had a “substan-
tial” portfolio with built-in sav-
ings that covered all client
needs.

While the bank would take a
“sensible and low-risk approach
going forward”, Mr Sunderji
added that there were some ini-
tial signs that the Bahamian
commercial banking industry
“may have seen the bottom” in
terms of loan portfolio/asset
quality deterioration.

“T think we may have seen
the worst and hopefully things
will get better as we go forward,
but I doubt that the first quarter
is going to show any material
change,” the chief executive
added.

He told this newspaper that
the BISX-listed commercial
bank had been “working hard
on cost containment, simply
holding head count and being
more efficient, with a lot of con-
solidation in the back office,
combining jobs and roles and
trying to improve efficiency”.

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
grew its loan and mortgage
book by less than $2 million in
2009, funding this with a $6.3
million expansion of its deposit
base

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHANE WILLIAMS OF #148
CLIVE AVENUE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12TH day of MAY,
2010 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, The Bahamas.

Legal Notice

Bahamian auditor was not per-
mitted to audit other funds in
the underlying group - the
fund’s manager instead getting
a Canadian accounting firm to
perform the task.

As revealed by Tribune Busi-
ness on Monday, Paul Gomez,
an accountant and partner in
Grant Thornton (Bahamas),
told investigators probing the
collapse of Canadian-based
Norshield Financial Group, and
its Bahamian-domiciled Olym-
pus Univest investment fund,
that he had to rely on valua-
tions provided by others for the
Channel Funds - a key
Bahamas-based investment
counterparty.

According to Mr Gomez's
testimony to Norshield/Olym-
pus Univest receiver Raymond
Massi, which was revealed for
the first time as part of an
Ontario Securities Commission
ruling on the collapse, he was
provided with a December 30,
2001, letter vouching for the



value of debentures held in one
of the Channel Funds by Mosa-
ic Composite. The latter is the
key Olympus Univest counter-
party through which much of
the funds’ investments flowed.

"In his examination before
the receiver, Gomez stated that
he relied upon Mount Real's
valuation of the Channel
Funds’ debenture investments
while performing the audit of
Mosaic Composite," the
Ontario Securities Commission
said in its ruling.

"However, he [Mr Gomez]
also stated that he did not
believe Mount Real to be an
arm's length party. He stated
that he thought there was a
connection between Mount
Real and the Norshield invest-
ment structure, and that he did
not have confidence in Mount
Real's valuations.

"Gomez & Gomez [Grant
Thornton (Bahamas)] also
received a management repre-
sentation letter dated January

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMILIEN DELVA of CHARLES
VINCENT STREET, P.O. BOX CR-56766, NASSAU
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5" day of
MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
















P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

UPPERCLASS HOLDINGS LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED













Noticeishereby given thatin accordance with section 137 (8)ofthe
International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution of
UPPERCLASS HOLDINGS LTD. has been completed, a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been









struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 8th of April





IS

2, 2002, from [Stephen] Han-
cock, as a director of Mosaic
Composite, which assured them
that the valuations of invest-
ments in debentures were prop-
erly presented."

The Commission's ruling said
Mr Gomez told the receiver
that he believed Dale Smith,
one of those it had charged as a
result of Norshield's collapse,
was the "driving force behind
the audit". "Gomez & Gomez
asked if Grant Thornton could
perform an audit of the Chan-
nel Funds for 2002. He [Mr
Gomez] stated that Smith chose
Brooks, Di Santo to perform
the audit instead," the Com-
mission's ruling said.

The Channel Funds played
a key role in the Olympus Uni-
vest investment structure's col-
lapse, the Canadian receiver
finding that the their net asset
values (NAVs) "were overstat-
ed by at least $200 million for
2002 and $300 million for 2003,
an overstatement of approxi-

mately 88 per cent in 2003".

BICA’s president, Reece
Chipman, said yesterday that
one dynamic behind any deci-
sion to mandate local auditing
of investment funds is the num-
ber of funds domiciled in the
Bahamas.

“But the issue is still there,
and BICA is still discussing
with its members whether or
not we ought to approach the
issue again,” Mr Chipman said.

“As it stands now, the Invest-
ment Funds Act does not state
that Bahamian accountants
must sign-off on investment
funds and it has been an area of
discussion in the Institute. We
are still in discussions.”

Mr Longley said collapsed
Bahamas-domiciled funds not
only have a negative impact for
the investor, but can often cast
a dark shadow over the juris-
diction hosting the fund. “The
regulators want to minimise
fallout from any collapses that
might occur,” he said.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOCELYN CADEAU of
SPICKENARD ROAD, OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
1274 DAY of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CLEMENTINE HOLDINGS LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Noticeishereby given thatin accordance with section 137 (8) ofthe
International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution of
CLEMENTINE HOLDINGS LTD. has been completed, a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 8th of April

2010.

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Morey at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 11 MAY 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,590.19 | CHG 3.63 | %CHG 0.23 | YTD 24.81 | YTD % 1.58

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

NOTICE

JOOP INVESTMENTS LID.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

52wk-Low
1.00
9.67
5.23
0.44
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.69
5.00
2.21
1.32
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
9.95
10.00

Security
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

1.04
10.63
5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17
12.07
2.84
6.40
2.60
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dis-
solution of JOOP INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 26th of
February 2010.

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Last Sale

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.07
0.09
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.04
10.63
5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17
12.07
2.84
6.47
2.69
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00
Change Daily Vol.

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00

0.00

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

52wk-Low Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND Holdings

Bid
10.06
2.00

Legal Notice 0.35

Ask &
11.06
6.25
0.40
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

Last Price.
14.00
4.00
0.55

Daily Val.

COLGAN TAL

EPS $

ases)

0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

Div $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877

0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.460
0.111
0.627

-0.003

0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

Interest

0.000
0.001

EPS $ DivS
-2.945

0.000
0.480
0.000

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E

N/M
256.6

NOTICE
BOLTZMANN INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of May 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3758
2.8266
1.5127
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

10.0000

4.8105

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Last 12 Months %

NAV
1.4674
2.9020
1.5289
3.0368

13.5654
107.5706
105.7706

1.1034
1.0764
1.1041
9.4839

10.6709

7.9664

YTD%

0.52
1.44
2.57
1.48
3.45
3.99
1.25
0.79
1.23
1.52

-0.93

3.23

6.66
-0.11
475
-4.99
5.47
6.99
13.50
5.25
4.37
5.34
7A1

12.33

58.37

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.507147

103.987340
101.725415

4.540
0.002

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

‘S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.491956

NAV Date
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10

103.095570
99.417680

-Mar-10

-Mar-10

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM














Naturally 7 Meet the chefs of
abighitin Paradise Plates
Grand See page five ll.
Bahama

See page six

i _"
i mi

The Tribune SECTION B












WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

a

He
has brought that same cleverness back, turn-
ing a simple observation into a captivating body
of work titled “Stir”.
The showcase opened at the Ladder Gallery
last week and consists of 14 pieces, 10 drawings,
and 4 photographs.
In this body of work, Schmid makes a psycho-
logical observation between physical tiredness and
mental restlessness or distraction.
For instance, ever notice a person who is phys-
ically tired, but the moment he or she goes to
take a rest they are unable to find comfort
because of a wondering mind?
This simple, but clever observation is
at the center of Stir and all of the related
drawings and photographs follow this
e concept.
“This body of work are simple draw-
ings, and depicts figures fighting in their
chairs,” said the artist. “Stir shows a
severe contrast between physical rest
and mental distraction. It was a sim-
ple observation that was very inter-
esting to me. The showcase is a visu-
al communication of physical rest
and psychological distraction” he
told Tribune Arts.
He has always been fascinated with
the human figure, which is the reason
why it is the central subject matter of
this showcase.
“T like having the body in my work.
The body gives off emotions and atti-
tudes that makes the work come alive,”
he said.

Smudged charcoal, pastel, and acrylic
mediums help to create the tension in
each of the images.

“In the drawing the body is riddled
with tension and I tried to communi-
cate that tension as much as possi-
ble,” he said.

Viewing the drawings the concept

is more vivid, making it much easier to
understand the perspective the artist
has formed.
The drawing pictures human figures
fidgeting in their seats and his use of
three dimensional techniques conveys
the movement of the figure effectively.
The portraits by Schmid takes on this
same concept. They are basically portraits
of the artist trying to sit comfortably for
long periods. The effort becomes unsuc-
cessful and soon the images become blur-
ry due to his movement.
“The images are simple yet very
effective and they work well for me,”
the artist told Tribune Arts.
Mr Schmid said that he hopes viewers
can appreciate the observation he has
made. “This work has a beautiful awk-
wardness to it and I hope viewers can
relate to what is being communicated in
this body of work”.
Though he has done a little of every-
i thing concerning art his chosen medium is
| sketch work since it is “preliminary and
ie. ; more liberating when it comes to utensil”.
ic a, ! Heino Schmid received an Associates
iy oe Degree in Art from the College of the
i a4 By Bahamas in 1991, a Bachelor in Fine Arts for
H on \ | photography in 2003 from the Savannah Col-

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

T has been almost a
year and half since
Heino Schmid,
sketch artist,
released new char-
coal sketch draw-
ings. It was in 2008 ~
when he intrigued the
audience at Popop Stu- ~
dios Center of the Visual
Arts with his subtle,
thought provoking sketch
work titled “We're All As Mad As
Each Other”a showcase where simple®
human experiences and tribulations
were his main inspiration.

Charcoal,

pastel and
} acrylic on

paper.



lege of Art and Design and a Masters in Fine
a Art in 2006 from the Utrecht Graduate School
FR of Visual Art and Design in the Netherlands.

Charcoal, pastel,
oil stick and
acrylic on paper.

Charcoal, pastel,

oil stick and
acrylic on paper.

Inside the studio
for the exhibition
aS ae





THE TRIBUNE

eS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 5B



Paradise

PLATES





The Tribune
















THE VEGGIE nugget displayed is one of Chef Julie's exquisite creations for the Hands For Hunger-
Paradise Plates event.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff













By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



HEF Lorenzo Martinez at Lucianos of Chica-

go, located East Bay Street, and Julie Andree

Knowles chef and co -owner of Le Petit
Gourmet located in the Shirley Street Plaza, said
diners at the Hands For Hunger - Paradise Plates
event “better come hungry” for the delightful entrees
they plan to serve at the Charity event.

A Milanese dish, with a
piquant taste, osso buco, is
Chef Lorenzo’s contribution.
The dish is made from veal
(cattle) shank, and will be
served with light rigatoni pas-
ta.

Veals shanks are found at
the lower part of the legs of
calves and the marrow of the
meat has a rich smooth melt-
ing texture said Chef Loren-
ZO.

Sliced, carrots, celery,
whole plum tomatoes, and a
dash of lush white wine add
an even more toothsome
taste to the thick tomato
sauce that is heavily glazed
over the meat.

The vegetarian nugget and
the chicken arigato made by
Chef Julie is just as diverse
in flavour as the veal shank.

This scrumptious veggie
nugget is filled with zucchini,
carrots and bell peppers.
With a light crisp in every bite
it’s so easy to forget you’re
eating a vegan inspired dish.

Asian herbs and spices are

at heart of chicken arigato.
An Epicurean delight,
minced chicken breast is
bonded together with red bell
pepper and makes the per-
fect combination.

And delectables don’t stop
just there. After diners dig
into their osso buco, veggie
nuggets, and chicken arigato,
they will have a chance to
sink their teeth into an assort-
ment of cheesecakes also by
Le Petit Gourmet. Diners will
have the choice of guava,
chocolate truffle, and pecan
caramel cheesecake.

Both chefs participated in
the event last year and their
hearts soften when discussing
how the Hands For Hunger
organisation reaches those
individuals without food.

Chef Julie noted that after
a long day of work she is
excited to know that there is
a place to donate excess food
items.

“Before Hands For Hunger
I was so disappointed that we
had to throw away all of the

food at the end of the day.
And now it makes me happy
to know that there is a place
we can take the food,” said
Chef Julie.

“People take for granted
the abundance they have.
There are people out there
who don’t have food to eat
or can’t cook proper meals
for themselves and it is very
good what the organisation
is doing,” she said.

Chef Lorenzo also said “I
would encourage other chefs
to get involved with the
event. It has grown since last
year and it is for a very wor-
thy cause”.

Paradise Plates will take
place this Saturday, in the
Atlantis Crown Ballroom.

The creatively presented
event showcases a lavish
array of gourmet food pre-
pared by chefs from Nassau’s
premier restaurants, fine
wine and spirits and live
entertainment with all pro-
ceeds benefiting Hands For
Hunger the non-profit,
humanitarian organisation
committed to the elimination
of hunger and the reduction
of food waste in The
Bahamas.

Each day, Hands For
Hunger picks-up fresh, high
quality food that would oth-
erwise go to waste and deliv-
ers it to community centers,
shelters, churches and soup
kitchens throughout New
Providence.



Need a healthy meal idea? Just open the cupboard

(ARA) - Putting healthy,
nutritious meals on the table
for your family every day often
feels daunting, but it can be as
easy as opening your pantry.
Even on busy nights, when
you may be tempted to hit the
drive-through, cooking at
home with simple ingredients
from your pantry is a more
nutritious, cost-effective and
quicker solution when dinner-
time rolls around.

"Keeping your pantry
stocked with basic, non-per-
ishable items is an economic
and easy way for families to
put nutritious meals on the
table every night," says Dave
Lieberman, chef and cook-
book author of "The 10 Things
You Need To Eat: And More
Than 100 Easy and Delicious
Ways to Prepare Them."

"My advice is to keep a run-
ning grocery list with you at
all times, and when these
pantry staple items are on sale,
you can purchase them in bulk

- ultimately helping you stretch
your grocery dollar.”

All pantries should include
the basics: pastas, corn starch,
oil and flour, allowing you to
put together family meals in a
matter of minutes, but Lieber-
man says there are more
essential, must-have items that
no cupboard should be with-
out. Here are some of his tips
and tricks on stocking the per-
fect pantry.

TIP 1: STOCK UP ON
CANNED TOMATOES.

e Unlike fresh tomatoes,
canned tomatoes contain more
nutrients and lycopene
because they are pre-cooked,
which enhances their nutri-
tional content. Tomatoes have
a unique flavor combination
of sweet, savory and acidic all
at the same time, making them
a staple ingredient to cuisines
around the world. Studies have
shown that tomatoes may help
reduce heart disease risk and

protect against certain types
of cancers. Lieberman recom-
mends keeping cans of Del
Monte Stewed Tomatoes on
hand because they have a lot
of the same vegetables he nor-
mally adds to his dishes, such
as onions, celery and green
peppers - the perfect base for
any one-pot feast.

TIP 2: LENTILS KEEP
YOUR FAMILY FEELING
FULL, LONGER.

¢ Lentils are one of the high-
est-fiber foods in the world.
They are also rich in protein,
contain no cholesterol, and vir-
tually no fat. The best, yet
often overlooked solution for
adding fiber to your diet
comes in the form these disk-
shaped earthy legumes. The
fiber in lentils will keep your
family feeling satisfied, help-
ing to prevent late-night snack-
ing on less nutritious foods.
Not sure exactly how to use
lentils? A delicious family-

friendly recipe Lieberman sug-
gests is his chicken and lentil
quesadillas; simply substitute
lentils for traditional refried
beans and serve.

TIP 3: NUTS ARE THE
PERFECT PANTRY
STAPLE SNACK FOOD.

e Walnuts, almonds and
peanuts are great items to have
on hand at a moment's notice,
especially when guests drop by
unexpectedly. Nuts are loaded
with heart-healthy fats and
omega-3s. Studies have shown
that four servings a week may
lower your risk for heart dis-
ease. Lieberman relies on nuts
for textural contrast, especially
in salads, like his green mango
salad. When you finely grind
nuts, you get a rich creaminess
you can actually use as a sub-
stitution for dry flour in many
baking recipes.

TIP 4: DON'T THROW
OUT LEFTOVERS.

e Shelf-stable stocks and
broths are inexpensive and
add a lot of flavor to all kinds
of dishes, from soups to
sauces. They are also a great
way to add robust flavor to
bland or dried-out leftovers.
In addition to using stocks
and broths to add excitement
to food, some other great
items that you probably
already have in your cup-
board are:

— Black pepper. Most recipes
call for a dash of salt and
pepper. For bigger flavor,
grind your own pepper from
peppercorns rather than
using pre-ground pepper.

— Salt. Keep different types
of salt on hand to add
unique flavors to your meals,
like fine sea salt and kosher
salt. Avoid using iodized
table salt to flavour meals,
because it's very easy to
over-salt your dishes with it.
— Olive oil. In addition to its

health benefits, such as low-
ering the risk of heart dis-
ease, olive oil is considered
one of the "healthy fats”
you should eat. It is the per-
fect last-minute flavour for
salads and soups. Extra vir-
gin olive oil has the most
flavour and is the least
processed olive oil, meaning
it's more pure; therefore,
more heart healthy.

— Parmesan cheese. You'll
find this ingredient in most
recipes because it's delicious
and lower in fat than other
types of cheese. The best
part? You don't need to add
that much to your dish to
experience the rich flavour it
adds.

For more tips and recipe
ideas from Lieberman about
how to cook healthy and
nutritious meals from your
pantry, visit www.del-
monte.com/solutions.

Courtesy of ARAcontent

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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

See

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune

Pil



=
c int
ee $1 — — — — —-

—_

_





|





Alia Coley releases “Unfadable’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

LIA COLEY, a Bahami-

A artist who has been

on the music scene for

the last 10 years, has just released

her new album ‘Unfadable’ a

sequel to her 2007 urban sounding
CD, ‘Feel My Heart.”

The name for the CD sprung
from a song written by American
singing artist consultant Bright
Riley, who wrote the lyrics for a
song named *“Unbreakable.’

Produced in Los Angeles,
‘Unfadable’ is a project with 13
tracks all with the exception of
three are produced by Sammi



Starr.

R&B fans got to witness first-
hand Alia’s vocal ability in a sen-
sational concert event last Friday.
‘Unfadable’ comes a long way for
the Bahamian songstress. She’s
been in hibernation for a while,
working on reinventing her total
package as a local artist. Alia pre-
dicted that audience members
would note the quality of her
“international” sound in Friday’s
production, and they did.

Ten musical bands, and ten
dancers made the concert colour-
ful. The show went the whole nine
yards, showcasing the best that
entertainment has to offer in the
Bahamas.

The show included flashing

lights, and sound effects. On the
night of the concert, guests were
enthralled with dance performers,
and a group of male dancers who
perform local artists Puzzle.

Today, Ms Coley is a fierce pro-
moter of Bahamian music. She
told Tribune Entertainment that
she would like to see other artists
rise to the occasion, and emerge
as forces to be reckoned with on
the international scene.

“Just because we’re from the
Bahamas doesn’t mean that we
don’t need to be on the same stage
as those other guys,” said Ms
Coley.

The number of persons backing
this new project is extensive,
including a foreign agency, Clear

Channel who has donated to the
production of her CD. The media
agency decided to come onboard
August of last year.

Liking her sound to R&B greats
like Alicia Keys and more, Alia is
crossing into the Hip-Hop and
R&B genres. She has taken on a
new sound reminiscent of soulful
greats like Mary J Blige and Lau-
ryn Hill.

In her analysis, the songs on her
CD are about love, life, and rela-
tionships- themes that she says
everyone can relate to.

“Pm excited about just being
happy to be in love and the expe-
rience of life,” said Alia, and “this
is a very important theme that I
am encouraged to pursue.”

MOVIEREVIEW

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MICKEY Rourke in Iron Man 2.

Iron Man 2

By JASON DONALD

STARRING: ROBERT DOWNEY JR, GWYNETH PALTROW,
MICKEY ROURKE, SAM ROCKWELL, DON CHEADLE





IT SEEMS like only five minutes since Iron Man almost

single-handedly put Robert Downey Jr back on the A-list.

His effortlessly charismatic turn as billionaire Tony Stark :
hogged the spotlight from the rest of 2008’s blockbusters and :

the gears were quickly in motion for a sequel.

Iron Man 2 picks up almost immediately where its prede- }
cessor left off: Stark, having revealed his alter ego is the epony- :
mous hero - a hi-tech suit wearing warrior - claims without irony :

that he has “successfully privatised world peace”.

But politicians are on his case, claiming the suit isa weapon
and, therefore, should be turned over to the authorities before :
it falls into the wrong hands. Stark refuses and, at a hearing, :
shows a funny montage of failed Iron Man suit attempts from :
overseas and says no one else is near recreating the technolo- :

8y-

intends to use it against Tony Stark.

This is all enjoyable nonsense and, by filling the major roles
with strong actors, Iron Man 2 makes sure it keeps the ingre- : titled performance that takes an
dients that made the original work so well. Downey Jr is in his : 3a ; f f
element here and he has real chemistry with Gwyneth Pal- : UNCOM promising view ol many oO
trow who plays his assistant Pepper Pots. Sam Rockwell, asa :
kind of sleazy Tony Stark-lite, looks like he’s having aballasa :
corporate villain. Likewise Don Cheadle, replacing Terrence : ; ‘
Howard as Lt Colonel James Rhodes, who comically seems to : National Centre for the Performing
pre-empt any audience confusion on his entrance by saying: “It’s :
| ; ; ; : Tickets are $15.

Mickey Rourke, whose star is also on the rise again follow- :
ing his acclaimed performance in The Wrestler, is particularly :
impressive. Despite being surprisingly low-key as the villain, he :
: solo art show entitled Colour Palette

If there are any gripes, perhaps the attempt to introduce at 7 pm on Tuesday evening at the
members of the secret S.H.E.LL.D agency adds one plot strand :
: Gallery Frederick Street. The show

But, for the most part, Iron Man 2 delivers - great set pieces, runs until the end of the month.

me, I’m here, deal with it.”

has real presence and enjoys some great exchanges with Rock-
well.

too many and feels shoe-horned in.

acast on their game and some solid, summer entertainment.

He’s wrong however: mysterious Russian scientist Ivan :
Vanko (Rourke) has successfully created his own suit and :

“Tm excited
about just
being happy
to be in love
and the

experience
of life.”

- ALIA COLEY

Naturally 7 gives Grand Bahamians

an exhilarating performance

NATURALLY 7 treated Grand

: Bahamians to an exhilarating jaw drop-
: ping concert on Saturday. From begin-
i ning to end, there was never a dull
: moment as Naturally 7 went from song to
: amazing song during their two hours plus
i performance; boldly taking the human
: voice where no one thought it could go.
: Indeed, Naturally 7 Live was a family
: event.
: received more than their money's worth.

Attendees all agreed they

Naturally 7's multi-talented band

: members Roger Thomas (musical direc-
: tor, arranger, 1st Baritone, Rap), Warren
: Thomas (percussion, guitar, clarinet, 3rd
: tenor) Rod Eldridge (1st tenor, scratch-
: ing, trumpet), Jamal Reed (4th Tenor,
: electric guitar), Dwight Stewart (2nd
: baritone), Garfield Buckley (2nd Tenor,
: Harmonica) and “Hops” Hutton (Bass)
: took their audience on a mesmerizing
: musical journey. They were taken from
: funk to gospel, Motown to Abbey Road
-) : and back with snippets of Hip Hop along
| : the way.

In addition to their hit singles "Wall

|: of Sound' and "In The Air Tonight",
: Naturally 7 performed tunes made pop-
: ular by The Beatles, Simon and Gar-
i funkel, Michael Jackson and more to an
: audience that relished every moment.
: At the end of the show, Naturally 7
i responded to relentless audience pleas

Raw Form presents an evening
of music, art and poetry in a self

the issues facing society.
The event will be held at the
Arts on Friday evening at 7pm.

¢ Marco Mullings will present a

Central Bank of the Bahamas Art

for an encore performance with two
additional songs.

The evening began with a performance
by the Bishop Michael Eldon School
Senior Steel Pan Band and an a cappella
renditions of the Star Spangled Banner
and March on Bahamialand by the tal-
ented Starlighters trio.

The humorous antics of MC, David
Wallace, assured that there was never a
dull moment before the show or during
intermission. At intermission, David
challenged audience members to come
on stage and attempt to do Vocal-Play,
which is the copyrighted term that Nat-
urally 7 created to define the way they
perform their music using solely their
voices without any instruments. Three
brave young persons came on stage dur-
ing intermission and entertained the
crowd. The big intermission surprise
was when Grand Bahama Performing
Arts Society founder, Dalia Feldman
was coaxed to go on stage; she performed
a portion of the Broadway show tune,
“Popular” to thunderous applause.

Naturally 7 expressed their gratitude
for the warm hospitality they received,
from their red carpet arrival to the
Junkanoo Rush Out they participated
in at the end of their Sunday May 2nd
workshop at Bishop Michael Eldon
Auditorium. Naturally 7 members

¢ South Touch Productions
is proud to present for the first
time in the Bahamas “Casual Cal
Dupree and his vast, high quali-
ty family entertaining Bumping
Big Show Circus. The six day
event begins with a premier show
on Wednesday May 12 at the
Kendal GL Issacs gymnasium.
The reminder of the shows from
Thursday May 13-Sunday May 16
will have maintee and evening
performance at 10am and 8pm.

¢ The Hands For Hunger -
Paradise Plates event will

remarked; “It didn't feel like work, it felt
like we came to party with our family
and friends. We had a "Grand Bahama"
good time.”

Following the concert The Grand
Bahama Performing Arts Society hosted
a gala VIP reception at Agave Latin
Fusion Restaurant and Bar in Port
Lucaya where persons had the chance
to mingle with the group.

Dalia Feldman, founder of The Grand
Bahama Performing Arts Society, gave
special thanks to the major sponsors of
this event; The Harnisch Family Philan-
thropies, Thayer's Natural Remedies,
Pelican Bay at Lucaya, American Air-
lines, Argus Advisors, The Bahamas
Weekly, Mackey Media Itd, GBI
Tourism TV, Maecal Electronics, Bishop
Michael Eldon School, La Femme
Events, and H Forbes Charters.

The Grand Bahama Performing Arts
Society was created to bring profession-
al artists and performers from around
the world to audiences in Grand
Bahama. Drawing from Bahamian and
international talent, a number of perfor-
mances are planned throughout the year.
Proceeds are used for the advancement
of Grand Bahama students of the per-
forming arts. The Grand Bahama Per-
forming Society can be reached at gbper-

form@gmail.com.



take place at the Atlantis Resort
this Saturday starting in the
Crown Ballroom from 7pm -
11pm nighty. There will a lavish
array of food and drinks. Diners
will also have the opportunity to
participate in silent auction,
and raffle. There will also be
live entertainment.

* Heino Schmid presents
his new showcase Stir which
opened last week at Popop Stu-
dios Centre for the Visual Arts
in Chippingham. For more
information call 322-7834.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 7B



ENTERTAINMENT





Raw
Form

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor



IN THEIR first ever multi- media presentation
the artistic group Raw Form will present a thought
provoking, no holds barred presentation touching
on a variety of societal issues in a self entited per-
formance.

The group which consists of 6 core artists will
present an evening featuring poetry, music dance,
jewellery displays and visual arts at the National
Centre for the Performing Arts this Friday evening.

Speaking with Tribune Arts on Monday two of
the group’ members- Zee Thompson and Xan-Xi
Bethel explained that the purpose of the evening is
to provide upliftment and send a postive message to
the community.

“Tts not for the feble minded though” Xan Xi
explained. “ We are going to be pushing the enve-
lope, but we will be talking about the truth. The
event will touch on a variety of topics including
love, peace slavery and race.

Zee explained that the idea for Raw Form came as
a result of the need for colloboration by local artists.

“T used to be a singer and I wanted to hold an
event and could not get the support, so I decide to
network with several other artists and we created
the group. We want to be able to empower other
artists. We call it Raw Form- because that’s just
how we bring it.”

The show took three months to put together and
the response has thus far been extremely
favourable.

They are being assisted by blackfood.org- a local
activist group and by Seedlings Place, a vegetarian
and vegan support group which will also be pro-
viding the food for the evening.Burns House will
provide the drinks.

“We want to hold an event that will not only
feed people physically, but mentally as well,” said
Zee.

The price for the event is $15. Part proceeds will
go towards hosting children’s seminars and work-
shops to encourage creativity and mental growth.






































































Sai . , The group is inviting other artists to join them. “
= : We can grow the movement if people who are seri-
ASL MUL ASL ia p Raw Form. ous about growth come out and join us,” said Zee.
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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 14
WY «@ Magic finish
P 7
off sweep
WEDNESDAY, MAY 12,

of Hawks...
See page 15



2010

2015 Pan Am

appointment

for BOA boss
Miller

BAHAMAS
Olympic Asso-
ciation (BOA)
president
Wellington
Miller has been
appointed to
help co-ordi-
nate the organ-
isation of the
2015 Pan
American
Games in the
Americas region.

Miller now serves as a mem-
ber of the Co-ordinating Com-
mission for the Pan Am Games,
the largest sporting event in the
region with athletes from all
nations in the Americas — some
42 countries in all.

The games are held every
four years in the year before
the summer Olympic Games.
The next Pan American Games
in is set to be hosted in Toron-
to, Canada.

Mario Vasquez Raila, presi-
dent of the Pan American
Sports Organisation and the
Association of National
Olympic Committees (ANOC),
on March 7 made the appoint-
ment in Merida, Mexico.

Member

Vasquez Rajfia is also a mem-
ber of the executive board of
the International Olympic
Committee (IOC).

Said Miller: “The acceptance
of this appointment is a
supreme moment in my sport-
ing career and I was gratified
to have been personally invited
to do so by President Rafia.”

Miller was one of six Nation-
al Olympic Committee presi-
dents appointed from this hemi-
sphere.

“We are happy that some-
one from the Bahamas has the
opportunity to serve and make
this nation’s presence felt. We
in the Bahamas are now pre-
pared to export our talent
throughout the region and the
hemisphere.

“While there, I will do my
best to ensure that more
Bahamians are given opportu-
nities to serve on the various
regional and hemispheric com-
mittees.”

The Pan Am Games will cost
2.5 billion dollars and it is an
important seat at the table for

Drive one.

MILLER











By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



fter what most mixed mar-

tial arts critics deemed as a

disappointing performance,

one of the sport’s pop cul-
ture icons finds himself out of work after
being released from the top MMA pro-
motional brand.

Kevin “Kimbo Slice” Ferguson lost
his latest fight against Matt Mitrione on
the undercard of UFC 113 in Montreal,
Canada.

Slice fell to a professional record of 4-
2, however the nature of both lackluster
losses are the lasting impressions on his
résumé thus far.

Just days after the bout, Ultimate
Fighting Championships president Dana
White announced that Slice had been
dropped from the brand as one of its
fighters and would no longer be fea-
tured at its events.

Slice began his professional career in
2007 with a first round submission win
over Bo Cantrell in just 19 seconds. His
next fight was a first-round knockout
over MMA legend Tank Abbott, this
time in 43 seconds.

He got a third-round knockout of
James Thompson and suffered his first
professional defeat months later in a
surprising first-round knockout loss to
Seth Petruzelli, a loss that many thought
initiated the end of Elite XC.

Ferguson became an Internet sensa-
tion when his series of street fights
became popular. He made a name for
himself by knocking out average street
fighters and rose to fame when the fights
were placed on YouTube.com. He con-
verted a career as a common street fight-
er into one of the most sought fighters in
MMA history.

Prior to Slice’s UFC involvement,
White never shied away from his opinion
on the street fighter and did not consid-
er him to be a legitimate MMA fighter.

He appeared on “The Ultimate Fight-
er” and briefly boosted ratings for UFC
show, but failed to resonate as a viable
fighter.

With a 4-2 professional MMA record,
he has headlined two of the four most-
watched MMA matches in North Amer-
ican history, including a win over James
Thompson in May, 2008, on the now
defunct Elite XC brand on CBS, and
his loss against Roy Nelson during The
Ultimate Fighter.

AP Photos





KIMBO SLICE (right) takes a knee to the head from Matt Mitrione in their heavyweight fight at
UFC113 on May 8, 2010, in Montreal. Mitrione won with a second round TKO...

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the Bahamas.

“T hope that my performance
will encourage the regional and
hemispheric organisations to
look more to the Bahamas for

2010

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other persons, realizing that we
in the Bahamas have talents in
all areas of regional and inter-
national sport, competitive ath-
letes, coaches and sports man-

eel

agers and organisers,” Miller
said.

The Co-ordinating Commis-
sion will act as the liaison
between the Pan Am 2015

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

Organising Committee and the
Pan American Sports Organi-
sation.

In 2008, Miller joined Sir
Arlington Butler as only the
second Bahamian to receive the
Mario Vasquez Rafia Sports
Merit Award.



SPORTS
le

SWIMMING

SWIFT swim club will
attend the 40th anniversary
of the US Masters National
Swimming Championships
at Georgia Tech Universi-
ty May 19 -23.

The team attending this
year’s US Nationals consists
of Percy Knowles, Andy
Knowles and Nancy
Knowles as swimmers and
team manager Yvonne
Knowles.

BASEBALL

BBF PRAISES

PLAYERS

WITH the Bahamas
Baseball Federation’s
National Baseball Champi-
onships fast approaching,
the federation extends con-
gratulations to the follow-
ing players who are making
an impact on their respec-
tive teams in the US as they
compete this weekend:

¢ Marvin McQueen -
Grand Bahama - Highland
Christian Academy - Dis-
trict 14 - 1A - plays May 14
at Regional Finals against
Miami Britto. (Highland
Christian has the top SS
prospect currently in the
nation)

e Andre Turnquest,
Travis Strachan and Perez
Knowles - Grand Bahama -
Rabun Gab - NCISSA - 3A
- plays in the state’s quar-
terfinals today against Wes-
leyan Christian Academy in
High Point, North Caroli-
na.

¢ Brandon Murray, Kyle
Hall, Geren Albury, Byron
Ferguson - New Providence
- Trinity Christian Acade-
my - District 12 - 1A - play
May 14 in Regional Finals.

Note: Ramon Grant is
also on the Trinity Christian
Academy team.

If Highland and Trinity
win, they would most likely
play in the first round of the
Florida State Championship
-1A.

TRACK

SCRATCH

MEETING

THE New Providence
Primary Schools Track and
Field Championship com-
mittee is scheduled to hold a
scratch meeting 3pm Mon-
day at Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium for
all primary schools compet-
ing in the meet scheduled
for May 19-21 at the stadi-
um.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, ,MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 15



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Mayweather
proves to bea
pay-per-view
draw

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Floyd
Mayweather Jr proved to be a
box office draw in his fight with
Shane Mosley, with 1.4 million
buys for television revenue of
$78.3 million.

HBO released figures Tues-
day that showed the fight made
the top 10 of pay-per-view
bouts ever. The most pay-per-
view buys for a fight was 2.4
million for Mayweather’s 2007
bout with Oscar De La Hoya.

Mayweather’s manager,
Leonard Ellerbe, said the buys
helped Mayweather pocket $40
million for the fight. He had
been guaranteed $22.5 million
plus a percentage of the sales.

Mosley was also expected to
make more than his guarantee
of $7 million.

Mayweather remained
unbeaten with a lopsided 12-
round decision in the bout.

Magic finish
off sweep of
Hawks 98-84

By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — The
Orlando Magic dribbled the
final seconds off the clock,
shook hands with another
defeated foe, then turned to
more important matters.

Time to get ready for anoth-
er series. The celebration can
wait.

“There’s more work to be
done,” Jameer Nelson said.
“We still have things to accom-
plish.”

Ever since they lost in last
year’s NBA finals, the Magic
have been determined to get
back — and, this time, win it
all.

They are halfway there after
a thoroughly dominating per-
formance against the team that
finished just behind them in the
Eastern Conference standings.

Orlando finished off the
third-seeded Atlanta Hawks
with a 98-84 victory on Mon-
day night, winning the second-
round series by an average of
25.3 points for the most lop-
sided four-game sweep in
league history.

“Guys are just focused,” said
Vince Carter, who led the Mag-
ic with 22 points. “It’s unbe-
lievable to see.”

Orlando heads to the Eastern
Conference finals for the sec-
ond year in a row.

The Magic will face either
Boston or a rematch with
Cleveland, the team they upset
for last year’s conference title
before losing to the Los Ange-
les Lakers in the NBA finals.

The Cavaliers and the Celtics
were tied 2-2 heading into
Game 5 last night, which means
Orlando will get another
extended break before its next
series.

That’s the same formula that
worked so well after a sweep
of Charlotte in the opening
round, when the Magic got
eight days to rest up for the
Hawks — then wiped them out.

















CARLOS BOOZER reacts after missing a shot against the
Lakers in second half of Game 4 in Salt Lake City Monday...
(AP Photo)

Lakers sweep
Jazz in semis

By DOUG ALDEN
AP Sports Writer

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Los Angeles Lakers
have a little more time to rest before their third straight
trip to the Western Conference finals.

The Lakers advanced again by completing a four-
game sweep of Utah with a 111-96 win on Monday night
in Utah, eliminating the Jazz and any threat of playing a
Game 5 back in Los Angeles.

Instead, the Lakers have almost a week to prepare for
the conference finals against the Suns, who wrapped
up their own sweep on Sunday night at San Antonio.

"T look forward to a couple days of rest, but I really
look forward to starting it up against a very good
Phoenix team," said Pau Gasol, who had 33 points and
14 rebounds for the Lakers on Monday.

Kobe Bryant added 32 points for the Lakers, who
will host Game 1 against the Suns on Monday.











Federer
cruises
into 3rd

round

MADRID (AP) — Defending
champion Roger Federer shrugged
off his recent dip in form to cruise
into the third round of the Madrid
Masters, defeating Benjamin Beck-
er 6-2, 7-6 (4) on Tuesday.

The top-seeded Federer broke
serve right away and broke again to
close out the first set. He then took
control of the second set tiebreak-
er.

Federer is seeking to improve
his game in Madrid. He lost his first
clay-court match of the year at the
Rome Masters before exiting the
Estoril Open in the semifinals.

In the women’s tournament,
ninth-seeded Agnieszka Radwans-
ka lost in the second round to Pat-
ty Schnyder 3-6, 6-4, 6-4 and Mari-
on Bartoli was upset by Anabel



Medina Garrigues 6-2, 6-0.

Ronaldinho among

big stars

ignored

for World Cup

By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Football Writer

LONDON (AP) — Ronaldin-
ho was left out of Brazil's initial
World Cup squad, Francesco Tot-
ti and Luca Toni were missing
from Italy's squad and Jamie Car-
ragher came out of retirement for
England as coaches issued their
provisional lists on Tuesday.

The coaches of the 32 teams
headed for next month's cham-
pionship in South Africa faced a
FIFA deadline Tuesday to
announce provisional 30-man
squads.

The lists included some walking

wounded who hope to be fit for [

the tournament, some unexpected
inclusions and some big names
who missed out.

Ronaldinho, Adriano and Ney-
mar were omitted from Brazil
coach Dunga's initial 23-man list.
They could be among the seven
more players to be announced
later by Dunga, but would only be
on standby in case of injuries. The
coach has stuck to most of the
players who helped Brazil win last
year's Confederations Cup and





RONALDINHO reacts after 1-0 loss
in quarterfinal World Cup match
against France at the World Cup
stadium in Frankfurt, Germany...
(AP Photo)

finish top of South American qualifying.

"These players are winners,"

Dunga said. "There is no doubt that

they are prepared to help Brazil reach its goal. They are ready to

give their best for the country.

"Ronaldinho's quality and capacity as a player is indisputable.
But my decision has to be made based on reason. I have to make
a decision based on what happens on the field."

Karim Benzema was a surprise omission from France's provi-
sional squad and coach Raymond Domenech said it was because
of his form on the field rather than allegations of his involvement
in an under-age sex scandal with an escort.

"To me this is not a concern,"

said Domenech, who also left out

veteran midfielder Patrick Vieira but selected off-form striker
Thierry Henry. "I'm only thinking about football and about what
the players want to give on the pitch."

Ruud van Nistelrooy was left out of the Netherlands squad
despite having recovered from a long-term knee injury. Netherlands
coach Bert van Marwijk said the 34-year-old former Manchester
United and Real Madrid striker was not at a high enough level to

play at the World Cup.

There was speculation that Totti might also come out of inter-
national retirement to help Italy defend the World Cup. When
Marcello Lippi's squad was announced Tuesday, there was no
sign of his name, nor that of Toni, despite seven strikers being

picked.

TOP? HVS.

DabDE,

| Eee
Dain) oi SUFFERN

a z
i a a

D-Watle's wife
briefly held
in divorce
proceedings

CHICAGO
(AP) — The
wife of Miami
Heat star
Dwyane
Wade surren-
dered to
authorities in
Chicago on
Monday and
was released
an hour later
after posting a
$10,000 bond.

Siohvaughn
Wade’s brief
stay in custody
came a day
after a Cook
County judge
angrily
ordered her
brought in
when she
failed to appear for a hearing in
the couple’s contentious
divorce.

Last week, Wade filed a law-
suit alleging her husband’s rela-
tionship with actress Gabrielle
Union has caused distress for
her and their two sons.











UNION

Roethlisberger:
Can’t cut him,
can’t stand him

By ALAN ROBINSON
AP Sports Writer

PITTSBURGH (AP) — It’s
fans like Becky Rickard who
Ben Roethlisberger has lost.

The 33-year-old Rickard is a
Pittsburgher and a fan of every
team in town. She should love
the Steelers and their six Super
Bow! titles, including two under
the direction of Roethlisberger.
Right?

“T had a Ben jersey and gave
it away,” Rickard said. “We’re
a proud city and we don’t like
anything to make us look bad.
Ben has tainted what our image
is.”

Rickard might as well be
speaking for many of the
300,000-plus citizens in this
clannish town.

Roethlisberger has worn out
his welcome in Pittsburgh.

The good will generated by
those NFL titles, capped by his
memorable last-minute touch-
down pass to Santonio Holmes
in the Super Bowl 15 months
ago, is all gone. It’s been lost
in Roethlisberger’s night of
tearing through a Georgia uni-
versity town wearing a devil T-
shirt, ending with an underage
university student accusing him
of sexual assault in a nightclub
bathroom.

The case won’t be prosecut-
ed, but the quarterback’s latest
episode of bad behaviour has
destroyed his reputation in
Pittsburgh and beyond, and
shamed his team and its highly
regarded owners.

And the twist is that while
Pittsburgh can’t stand him the
Steelers can’t cut him. At least
not soon, given the $50 million
the team has spent on Roeth-
lisberger’s salary and signing
bonuses since 2008.



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Full Text
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wi WINDY

Volume: 106 No.142



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

=-USA TODAY



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

EX-PLP general in
missing A. prone

investigation into
disappearance

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER PLP general is
assisting police with their inves-
tigations into the disappearance
of a German resident of Cat
Island, who has been missing
since last Wednesday.

Ezra Russell, the campaign
general for PLP deputy leader
Philip “Brave” Davis who later
made headlines when he lam-
basted the Cat Island MP and
threatened to run against him in
the next general election, was
taken into police custody on
Saturday, according to Tribune
sources.

Although police were reluc-



tant to confirm whether the Cat
Island resident was being held
in connection with the disap-
pearance of Johannes Max-
imillian Harsch, 46, Assistant
Commissioner Glenn Miller
confirmed that one of the three
men in custody has the surname
Russell and two are in their

EZRA RUSSELL



and a Bahamian man in for
questioning over the weekend
and were granted an extension
of time to detain them for fur-
ther questioning yesterday.
Mr Miller said a third man
was later taken into custody as

40’s.
Police took an American
part-time resident of Cat Island

SEE page 16

Officer in charge of Central Police
Station reassigned following escape

THE officer in charge of the Central Police Station downtown
has been reassigned following the escape of two men being held
there two weeks ago on charges of rape, armed robbery and kid-
napping.

Last week two police officers, Corporal Jay Sergeant, 44, of
Sandilands Village Road, and Constable Harold Sands, 41, of
Windward Road, were arraigned respectively on charges of neg-
ligently permitting the escape and permitting the escape of Renar-
do Bastian, the surviving escapee.

Both pleaded not guilty to their charges.

Now Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna has con-
firmed that Superintendent Elsworth Moss, formerly officer in
charge of the Central Police station, has been relocated to police

SEE page 16



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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff









PEOPLE QUEUE at the offices of a business with a flourishing loan scheme afeina up to $5, 000 yes-



terday — despite concerns that it may be a scam.

Leslie Miller gives emotional
testimony in murder retrial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE jury in the retrial of two
brothers accused of murdering
Mario Miller heard emotional
testimony yesterday from the vic-
tim’s father.

Businessman and former
Member of Parliament Leslie
Miller was one of three prosecu-
tion witnesses to take the stand
yesterday, as the trial into his
son’s death opened in Supreme
Court.

SEE page 16

Christie ‘would reverse §$65m container port deal’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



PLP Leader Perry Christie has warned would-be investors in
the government’s $65 million Arawak Cay container port that
when he is returned to the office of Prime Minister he will

reverse the deal.

Describing himself as the person who intends “to win the next
general election,” Mr Christie said his position on the matter has

not changed.

SEE page 11



¢ SEE PAGE THREE

ET
ETT,
LT TTL

AT THE time of going to
press late last night Lady
Edith Turnquest, wife of
former governor-general Sir
Orville Turnquest,
remained in critical condi-
tion in a London hospital
after suffering a severe
stroke while on vacation.

Lady Turnquest was tak-
en off life support yesterday
morning, and her family —
husband, son, two daugh-
ters and two grandsons —
remained at her bedside.

As rumours spread
around the Bahamas yes-
terday of her death, FNM
chairman Carl Bethel
denied the reports.

SEE page 11









NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

PE ay. bY

Words of wisdom
from the Bahamas’
oe MO sie ekae |
philosopher

SEE PAGE THREE



Victimisation
claims after
15 fired from
union posts

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A NUMBER of Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union shop stewards
who ran against President Nicole
Martin, or supported those who
opposed her in recent elections,
are claiming victimisation after
15 of them were fired from their
union posts yesterday.

The hotel workers were all
Atlantis employees, and several
who spoke with The Tribune
claim the union’s executive has
no right to stop them acting on
behalf of the BHCAWU with-
out reference to the union mem-
bership at the hotel first.

However Darren Woods, gen-
eral secretary of the union, said
the BHCAWU was completely
justified in the move, as for one
of several reasons, all of those
who have been removed from
the unpaid posts were no longer
eligible to represent the union.
He claimed consultation with the
membership did form part of the
decision to remove the officers.

Each one of the 15 former
union officers — who allegedly
make up 30 per cent of the total
body of BHCAWU shop stew-

SEE page 16


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LR CGO a

Police chief
agrees (0 meet
victim’s family

NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

AFTER weeks of getting
“nowhere” in their attempts to
meet with senior police over
the death of Keisha Thurston,
her relatives have been given
some hope.

Sources familiar with the
matter said the family had
repeatedly tried in vain to con-
tact officers working on the
case, including Superintendent
Leon Bethel, head of the Crim-
inal Detective Unit (CDU).

However, when this was put
to him on Monday, Superin-
tendent Bethel told The Tri-
bune he would personally con-
tact the family and set up a
meeting “immediately.”

Keisha was found hanged in
her family’s home on February
28. The police investigation is
still open, although officers
originally said it was an “appar-
ent suicide.”

“The initial report was a sui-
cide. We have not received any-
thing to say it is not a suicide.
The young lady was reported
to have been found hung. Not
withstanding suspicions about
suicide, we still have to carry
on a full investigation,” said
Superintendent Bethel.

“Generally we are still inves-
tigating the matter and on com-
pletion we will come to some
conclusion in the matter. We
may have suspicions but we
have to investigate properly.

“We think that we owe a
duty to the members of the
public to investigate all matters
properly before we come to a
conclusion,” he said.

Close friends of Keisha are

ae
US

Ghat)
PHONE: 322-2157

se









shel Oe

'
—_ aa nS

oe

KEISHA THURSTON



convinced her death came
about as a result of foul play,
some criticising the police for
having a “one track mind” from
the start. A close friend told
The Tribune the police did not
“take it serious at the crucial
time” and now most leads have
gone cold. “At the end of the
day we are fighting a losing bat-
tle, but you still want to expose
them; the things they should
have done but didn’t,” said a
source close to the family.

It is understood that just
before Keisha’s death, neigh-
bours heard a commotion
involving more than one per-
son inside the house where her
body was found.

“The things the family were
telling them to act on they did-
n’t. Even when people came to
them with information, they
didn’t act on it. You see why
people take vengeance in their
own hands. You got to be fight-
ing the police for justice,” said
the source. Superintendent
Bethel said he had seen nothing
to suggest the police did not
follow through on any leads.

He would not comment on
specifics, including claims that
police failed to turn up to a pre-
viously agreed meeting with
one of Keisha’s friends, who
had offered to try and get infor-
mation from a person of inter-
est by using a wire. “I am not
going to discuss any specifics
of the investigation. Persons
may have their suspicions but
we still have to protect persons
who we come in contact with
as a result of our investigation,
so we can present a credible
case to the Coroner’s Court,”
said Superintendent Bethel.



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after mob stabbing

BY ALESHA CADET

Authorities were called to
the rear of Evans Condomini-
ums, West Bay Street, after
residents of the area say they
saw a man floating in the
water.

Sgt Chrislyn Skippings said
they received information of
a body in the water around
6.15am yesterday.

Officers responded and dis-
covered the lifeless body of a
dark male dressed in a pair of
multi-coloured swim trunks.

Floating

It was reported that the man
was floating face down in
waters behind the condomini-
ums.

According to police: “Once



GRIM DISCOVERY: A body of a man was found in the mater in i Western area.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

i

retrieved from the water, the
body was brought to the shore-
line. He appeared to be in his
early to mid-forties.”

“From our preliminary
viewing of the body we sus-
pect possible drowning.”

The officer added: “From
the site the body will be trans-
ported to the laboratory where

ed. The autopsy results will
dictate the stage of our inves-
tigation.”

At present police are unable
to say what the circumstances
were surrounding this incident.
However, they are investigat-
ing and have appealed to
members of the public who
have any information regard-
ing this incident or any other

matters to contact them at
CDU 502-991, 919, or Crime
Stoppers at 328-TIPS.

In other crime news, two
juveniles, ages 19 and 14 are
being held after a mob stab-
bing, leaving one man dead.

According to Sgt Skippings,
a man identified as Olondieu
Saint Pré, 53, of Charles Vin-
cent Street, was attacked by a

group of men, resulting in him
being stabbed in the left side of
his chest.

The victim was taken to the
hospital in a private vehicle.

He later died of his injuries.
Police are questioning the two
males in connection with this
matter.

Investigations into the mat-
ter continue.

an autopsy would be request-







British Airways
is bracing for
flights disruption

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



BRITISH Airways is braced for disrup-
tion to flights for hundreds of thousands of
passengers next week as cabin crew plan a
series of strikes starting on Tuesday.

The airline, which operates five direct
flights between Nassau and London
Heathrow each week, suffered £45 million
in losses when the BA cabin crew union
Unite staged seven days of strikes in March.

And BA’s losses were then compound-
ed when all UK airports were closed for six
days after a volcanic explosion in Iceland.

Industrial action in March did not affect
flights between Nassau and London
Heathrow and BA hopes long-haul flights
and several short-haul flights from





Heathrow will not be disrupted by the
strikes.

Flights are expected to operate as normal
from London Gatwick Airport as well as
London City Airport.

“We are confident that many crew will
again ignore Unite’s pointless strike call
and support the efforts of the rest of the air-
line to keep our customers flying,” said air-
line spokeswoman Marcia Erskine.

Airline managers have condemned the
coming strikes as “unjustified” after the
union representing around 13,500 BA cab-
in crew staff rejected the airline’s proposal
and 81 per cent of members voted to strike.

Unite is protesting BA’s cost-cutting
plans including a wage freeze and reduction
of in-flight staff and rejected BA’s offer
last week as it did not include the restora-
tion of travel perks that management had

A BRITISH
AIRWAYS plane
passes tailfins of
other aircraft
belonging to the
airline at Heathrow
Airport in London,
yesterday in this
AP photo.

revoked for employees who participated
in the March walkouts.

They now plan to strike in stages for 20
days, with the first four day walkout to
begin May 18, followed by a strike from
May 24 to 28, and subsequent strikes from
May 30 to June 3, and June 5 to 9.

Mts Erskine said: “This decision has no
semblance of justification. Unite’s officials
continue to operate in their own world,
showing callous disregard for our customers
and their own members in all parts of our
airline. “We have made a very fair offer,
which meets the concerns the union raised
during 14 months of negotiations and also
ensures our crew remain the best rewarded
in the UK airline industry. That offer
remains available.”

Meanwhile, BA managers are working
on contingency plans with other airlines.

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Police, family of murder
victim appeal for help

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net





FREEPORT - The widow of Vincent Pedi-
can made an emotional, tearful plea to her
husband’s killers to turn themselves into the
police and bring some closure to her family.

It has been more than two years since Pedi-
can’s murder in November 2007. The case
has gone cold and police have no solid leads
in the matter.

The police, with the Pedican family, are asking persons with
information that could assist with the investigation to come forward.

Mr Pedican, a security officer at the Eight Mile Rock High
School for some 12 years, reported to work for the midnight shift
and was reported missing around 7am on November 22, 2007,
following an apparent break-in at the school. His body was dis-
covered on November 23, through a service road off East Sunrise
Highway. The church van that was driven by Mr Pedican was also
found on a service road in Hawksbill. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey,
press liaison officer, said initially police had received several leads
and had questioned some persons, but no arrests were made.

“We are certain there are some persons out there who know
something and we are appealing to those persons who might have
seen something to call the police at 352-9774/5 or 911,” she said.

At Police Headquarters, Mrs Claudia Pedican, accompanied
by her daughter Diane Coakley, made an impassioned appeal to the
public for assistance in bringing closure to the case.

Devastated

Mrs Pedican told reporters that the incident has devastated her
family. She described her husband as a loving and caring partner,
and a loving father to their two daughters.

“T am here to make a continuous plea to the public, to anyone
who might know of the person who might have caused my hus-
band’s demise. A real heinous crime was committed against my
family when they took my husband away from me. I don’t know
why, but I know whoever that person is, he or she cannot be con-
tent in their skin. I really have not stopped weeping for my hus-
band; he meant the world to me and my children. He was a loving
father to his children and a loving husband to me,”

“Please, please come forward and say something, if you know
anything.”

“Someone take those children’s father and you’re keeping qui-
et. It is not right, it is not godly. I don’t want to hate you forever;
I want to forgive you personally whoever you are so I can have
some peace and rest. I thank you and I wait patiently for your call
to the police,” said Mrs Pedican.

Mts Pedican recalled the last moments she saw her husband alive
before he left for work around midnight on that fateful day. She
said her husband was looking forward to retirement.

“T got a call I will never forget from the police...when the
news hit me my whole world fell apart; they take my husband
and throw him in the bushes like an animal. I cannot get over
that. So whoever you are, please...come forward and say some-
thing. I need closure in this. I want to know, his children want to
know; they have lost a very supportive father, a good father.”

“He was an honest, trustworthy employee and friend to every-
one. I thought we would grow old together. He was looking forward
to his retirement and I told him I would join him a few years later,
and someone destroyed my dream, someone destroyed my fami-
ly,” she said. ASP Mackey stressed that the police can only fight
crime through partnership with the community. “There is no way
the police can fight crime alone. We have to do this together, we
need the community to partner with us in order for us to reduce
crime, and to make Grand Bahama and by extension the Bahamas,
a safe place,” she said.









VINCENT PEDICAN

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 3



Off-duty officers claim [7

loan scheme is ‘scam’

Scores flock to business
offering up to $5,000

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

SCORES of government
workers and other Bahami-
ans continued to flock to the
offices of a flourishing loan
scheme offering up to $5,000
yesterday — despite concerns
that it may be a scam.

The business has now
imposed a $25 fee for its
application form, which is
printed in colour, and has
ceased accepting black-and-
white or photocopied ver-
sions.

It has been claimed that
a reputable local bank is
being used to issue the loans
by cheque or direct deposit,
however when The Tribune
spoke to a senior person at
the bank, she said: “We are
not involved at all. We are
no way involved.”

Although the standard
application form does not

PoT aaa

have a space for bank
account information, sever-
al applicants claim to have
been told that if they pro-
vided their bank details,
money would be deposited
directly into their accounts.

Sources say the landlord
of the office complex where
the business currently oper-
ates — its second location in
less than a week — planned
to cancel the lease and
change the locks last night.

The loan company only
moved into the building on
Monday, after suddenly
vacating its previous Palm-
dale office.

Employees yesterday said

the office may have to move
again because “people carry
on too bad.”

Hundreds have visited the
office over the past two
days, obstructing the
entrances of neighbouring
businesses and causing con-
gestion in adjoining parking
lots.

Sources say police officers
were among the first to
apply, followed by a num-
ber of Public Service nurses.

At least three off-duty
officers accused the opera-
tion of being a “scam” yes-
terday — after applying for
loans only to later demand a
refund of their $500 deposit.

ia

THE BAHAMAS’ VERY Dens lea PHILOSOPHER







One officer applied on
April 1, but said he has yet
to get his loan, despite being
told no one would be turned
down and that the waiting
period was two weeks.

The men suspect they
only got refunds because
they are police officers, as
many others have asked for
their money back only to be
told to come back in a week.

The officers called the
Central Detective Unit
(CDU) to report their sus-
picions, and Assistant
Superintendent Michael
Moxey of the Commercial
Crimes Unit said he person-
ally went to the location to
investigate.

Mr Moxey said he and his
team went to the office but
did not enter because they
did not see much activity.

He said the investigation
will continue and asked any-
one with relevant informa-
tion to call CDU.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

So why did Sir Stafford leave?

WHY DID Sir Stafford Sands leave the
Bahamas?

This is a question still debated today. The
question is often answered with an air of
great authority by those who haven’t a clue
what they are talking about. Anyone who
lived during the sixties, but were not a part of
the PLP brotherhood, would be a fool to ask
such a question. They all knew what it meant
to be ostracised, victimised, denied jobs
reserved only for followers of the “Chief”,
and verbally abused. Many of them, both
black and white, packed their bags and left.

Even Krissy Love, host of the radio talk
show “Issues of the Day”, whose topic was
the dispute over Sir Stafford’s image being
put on and then taken off the $10 bill, admit-
ted that her family was one of those who
also left the Bahamas during that period. In
the sixties, she said, her parents could not
deal with the way black people were being
treated by the new black regime. Yet, Sir
Stafford Sands, a white man, 1s called a trai-
tor because he also left, only to return in
death. Krissy wanted to know if her family
would be tarred with the same “traitor”
brush. The caller to her show fumbled, but
did not answer.

Another caller, following the same trend
of thought, felt that if a person were a part of
a defeated government, then left the country
because they were displeased with the loss,
that person would be the traitor. At times
when we listen to some of the callers to these
radio talk shows, we often wonder what God
was thinking when he was so stingy in his
distribution of common sense.

It has been said that when Sir Stafford
left for Europe he swore he would never
return to the Bahamas. That is not true.

On the floor of the House when the
Speaker read Sir Stafford’s resignation to
members, Sir Lynden denounced him, charg-
ing that he was “obliged to run” from the
Bahamas because he was a “total embar-
rassment to his party.” That also was not
true. On another occasion, Arthur Hanna,
recently retired governor-general, declared
that Sir Stafford left because “he wanted
nothing to do with a country run by blacks.”
Again not true. It was a claim made against a
man, who unlike his social peers, did not
attend the then exclusive all white Queen’s
College as a student. He was educated with
black students at Government High School
— the same school later attended by Lynden
Pindling. Sir Stafford had made it clear that
he had every intention of returning home
every year. “I will always be available to
work for the party during the time when I am
in Nassau each year,” he said.

Around the 1967 election Sir Stafford was
not a well man. A chain smoker, he suffered
from a serious bronchial condition. In April
of that year he spent six weeks in Miami for
treatment of his problem. That was three
months before he announced his resignation

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from the House. But soon after the PLP
became the government in January of that
year, a reign of terror had been started
against Sir Stafford.

In May his wife had had enough. She
made a statement in The Tribune that their
home, “Waterloo”, was not for sale. She said
she was “sick and tired” of the harassing
calls she was receiving. She wanted her tor-
mentors to know that she and her husband
were not selling their home, but intended
“to stay and reside in it.”

Up until the day of his resignation from
the House, Sir Stafford, who had given up his
law practice mainly for health reasons, had
every intention of spending his winters in
the Bahamas. And so, he didn’t leave because
he was a traitor, he was driven from his coun-
try by a hate-filled, racist government and its
supporters. He no longer felt safe in a coun-
try for which he had worked so hard, but
which his tormentors unjustly accused him of
“raping.”

On the floor of the House another
uncouth member of the PLP accused Sir
Stafford “and his gang of gangsters and hood-
lums” of causing Bahamians to suffer. “He
should be brought back here, put into a bar-
rel of tar and rolled into a pit of fire for what
he has done to the people of this country,”
said the PLP member from the floor of the
House. This was one of this country’s new
legislators speaking.

No wonder there was a lot of unease in the
country.

No wonder Sir Stafford and so many oth-
ers— both black and white — packed their
bags and left.

Just before their election victory, Sir Lyn-
den had told the foreign press that if the PLP
won the 1967 election his government would
retain Sir Stafford as Minister of Tourism.

Their bitter anger over the years probably
stemmed from the fact that they had lost
their prize — a prize that they had planned to
use and abuse.

Five years after his resignation Sir Stafford
died of cancer in the London Clinic in Eng-
land.

There are Bahamians who maintain that
he never came back to the Bahamas. He cer-
tainly came back to a Bahamas that he had
no intention of ever leaving. He came back in
a casket and is buried in the family plot in St
Matthews cemetery.

There were callers to the Krissy Love
show who wanted to know if Sir Stafford
had any family left in the Bahamas. The
answer is yes. This is his daughter’s home,
and the home of one of her two sons, Sir
Stafford’s grandson. They both live and work
here. For them this is home, as it was home
for their father and grandfather. And the
vitriol that is now being spewed by the igno-
rant against the man they feel gave so much
of himself to his country, brings them great
pain.







PLP hatred for
Bahamian whites
still in existence

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Every Bahamian who has
any sense knows that the PLP
hates whites. Never mind the
pretentious naming of Ryan
Pinder as a candidate who
eventually won in Elizabeth, it
cannot dispel the cold hard
facts that they hate whites. This
was exposed in every general
election before today.

Honest PLP and other right
thinking Bahamians cannot,
with a straight face, say that the
replacing of a well deserved
Bahamian could amount to
national security; neither could
they say that any human rights
would be violated.

But what could be said is that
the objection must be designed
to rally their supporters and to
further drive a wedge between
white and blacks. Sensible
Bahamians must be disgusted
with the transgressions of the
past. Our children do not know
of the era of which we speak,
but when are we going to put it
aside and move on to more

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



important pressing matters?

Schools that were the major-
ity white and only privileged
blacks are today predominate-
ly black. Our children are
friends with all colours and
have relationships and even
marry all races.

So why is the PLP waking up
this dead subject. Is it because
they still think that the politics
of the past when the PLP want-
ed us to hate our white brothers
and sisters will help them this
time around?

This primitive kind of think-
ing has already done irrepara-
ble damage to us.

The comment of Fred
Mitchell is proof that the PLP is
not for all Bahamians. They are
definitely on a course to divide
us as a people. Today we need
to create programmes that

would bring us closer together
as a people. This backward
mentality is simply destructive.

How come no other PLP MP
criticise Mr Mitchell, are they
also in agreement with his posi-
tion?

When are they going to be
men and say wrong is wrong
and two wrongs do not make a
right?

Finally, I would not be too
surprised if some temperamen-
tal retaliation follows this, but is
this kind of thinking associated
with crime?

Is this level of pent up hate
good for the country and the
individuals who harbour these
kinds of thoughts. We are
doomed when our elected offi-
cials encourage us to hate each
other.

We definitely cannot afford
to have anyone represent us
who openly and unapologeti-
cally hates.

IVOINE INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May, 2010.

Western civilisation cries for
liberation from a new tyranny

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This week we pay tribute to
the Allied Forces who were
instrumental in liberating
Europe from Nazi oppression.
It was a sacrificial effort in
which many citizens and sol-
diers alike gave up their lives
so that the rest of us could live
ours in freedom.

We might have expected that
such ultimate selflessness might
have conferred upon our soci-
eties the wisdom to truly value
life and liberty.

Unfortunately, in the years
following World War IT, much
of Europe and America turned
its back on its hard-won free-
dom and voluntarily succumbed
to a new dictatorship of rela-
tivism that is no less evil than
the fascism that preceded it.

This new tyranny recognises
nothing as being definitive and
whose ultimate goal consists
solely of satiating one's own
ego and desires.

We have seen the contem-
porary results — nihilistic yet
impeccably democratic legisla-
tion that repudiates life itself!

I am thinking here of exist-
ing, enacted and pending arti-
cles of legislation that legalise
various drugs, prostitution, con-
traception, homosexuality,
same-sex marriage, abortion,
euthanasia, and genetic manip-
ulation.

On the 65th anniversary of
VE-Day, it is Western civilisa-
tion that cries for liberation
from the tyranny of modernity
being imposed by socialist gov-
ernments as they seek new and

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ingenious ways of undermining
morality and embracing
nihilism.

Is this the path western civil-
isation wishes to traverse?

Is it not time for us all to re-
examine the assumptions that

we permit to serve as the foun-
dation of our own individual
lives?

PAUL KOKOSKI
Canada,
May 6, 2010.

Archives: Sir Arthur Foulkes

the ninth Governor General



EDITOR, The Tribune.

Sir Burton Hall
The Hague,
The Netherlands

Good morning Sir Burton,

Patrice M. Williams

Nassau.



I forward the following information which you may wish,
in the interest of ensuring accuracy in the public dis-
course, to share with your readers.

Thank you for your e-mail dated 22 April, 2010. Please
be advised that Sir John Paul was the first Governor-Gen-
eral of an independent Bahamas. His instruments of
appointment indicated that his tenure should last from 10
July - 31 July 1973. Sir Milo Butler was the second Gov-
ernor General so Sir Arthur Foulkes would be the ninth.

Acting Director of Archives,

(Ms Williams’ response is a reply to a request to the
Archives by Sir Burton Hall as to whether Sir Arthur
Foulkes is the eighth or ninth governor general in an
Independent Bahamas. His request to Archives was pub-
lished in The Tribune on Friday, May 7, 2010.

(Sir Burton, was chief justice of the Bahamas for almost
eight years before his appointment to the Hague as Per-
manent Judge of the International Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia. — Ed).

























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by May 17th, 2010
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ed
Westminster system of ‘winner takes all’ voting

By LARRY SMITH

IN the 1962 election, despite
polling more votes overall, the
PLP actually lost two seats in
the 33-seat House of Assem-
bly, while the UBP won 20 and
four independents were elect-
ed. This surprising result post-
poned the advent of majority
tule by another five years.

Most of the blame for that
debacle fell on the way con-
stituency boundaries had been
drawn by the UBP — a process
condemned as gerrymander-
ing ever since Governor
Elbridge Gerry of Massachu-
setts passed a redistricting law
in 1812 that grossly favoured
his own party.

But there are those who
argue that the traditional
Westminster system of “win-
ner takes all” voting developed
in Britain during the 19th cen-
tury is a direct cause of the
kind of representative failure
that Bahamians faced in 1962.
And those arguments carry
more weight today following
last week's inconclusive British
election.

For the first time in a gen-
eration, Britain's third party
(the Liberal Democrats) held
the balance of power. Both
Labour and the Conservatives
lost the election, and the
British were suddenly faced
with the spectacle of normally
arrogant politicians scrambling
to negotiate a power sharing
deal. Can you imagine what
would happen here in similar
circumstances? There would
likely be rioting in the streets.

The Liberal Democrat Par-
ty was formed in 1988 when
the venerable Liberal Party
merged with a breakaway fac-
tion of the Labour Party. The
Liberals were once a dominant
force in British politics, alter-
nating in power with the Con-
servative Party from the mid-

1800s until the early 20th cen-
tury when a major political
realignment took place. The
last Liberal prime minister —
David Lloyd George -— left
office in 1922.

From that point on the Lib-
eral vote declined and was
spread more evenly across the
nation, whereas support for the
Conservative and Labour par-
ties was concentrated in areas
that could deliver hundreds of
seats in a general election.
After the Second World War
the Liberal Party was reduced
to a rump and came close to
extinction in the 1950s.

As a result, changing the
voting system to some form of
proportional representation
became a key policy goal. But
in 1974 - the last time there
was a hung parliament in
Britain — the Liberals were
unable to clinch a deal for elec-
toral reform with either of the
main parties, although for a
time they helped prop up a
minority Labour government.

Our parliamentary and vot-
ing system is essentially the
same as the one in Britain. The
candidate in each constituency
who gets the most votes wins
the seat, regardless of the mar-
gin of victory over other can-
didates or percentage of the
overall vote. This can penalize
smaller parties that may have
support that is not concentrat-
ed enough to win many seats.

For example, the Liberal
Democrats emerged from last
Thursday's election with 23 per
cent of the overall vote, but

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just 9 per cent of parliamen-
tary seats. Meanwhile, the
Labour Party won 29 per cent
of the vote, but 40 per cent of
the seats. And the Conserva-
tives, with about 36 per cent
of the vote, took 47 per cent of
the seats. This result meant
that no single party could com-
mand a majority in parliament.

In the early 1990s — after
enduring a decade of Conserv-
ative rule — the Labour Party
began to embrace electoral
reform, promising the Lib
Dems to hold a referendum on
the issue if elected. Although
the scale of Tony Blair's
Labour victory in 1997 made
this unnecessary, a high-pow-
ered commission on voting
reform was set up. It called for
a mixed system, with most MPs
elected by constituencies, and
some by a party list.

This would be similar to the
German model, where a per-
centage of seats is allocated to
each party in proportion to the
number of votes the party
receives in a general election
beyond a legal threshold (usu-
ally 5 per cent). Candidates
who win the most votes in their
districts are elected, but a sec-
ond vote determines how
many representatives will be
sent from each party to the
parliament.

The intellectual rationale
for proportional representa-
tion was provided by the 19th
century British philosopher
John Stuart Mill. He based his
arguments on the possibility of
the mass electorate producing
a tyranny of the majority,
crushing dissent and eliminat-
ing minority representation
altogether.

In our region, countries
with proportional representa-
tion of one kind or another
include the Cayman Islands,
Guyana, the Dominican
Republic, the Netherlands
Antilles and Haiti. Like the
Bahamas, most Caricom coun-
tries have retained the “win-
ner takes all” system inherited
from the British.

Has this had a negative
impact on our little democra-
cy? Well, the Bahamian elec-
torate is relatively homoge-
nous — if you exclude the 15
per cent whitish minority — and
both main parties claim to be
non-racial. Still, there are only
four white MPs in our 41-seat
parliament, so perhaps there
is an argument for proportion-
al representation on ethnic
grounds.

There are no small party
representatives in our parlia-
ment, despite the fact that the
Bahamas Democratic Move-

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BALLOT PAPERS are counted in
the British general election. (AP)

ment has been slogging away
since 1998. The Coalition for
Democratic Reform lasted five
years without winning a seat
before disbanding ignomin-
iously before the 2007 election.

Before that, the National
Democratic Party (a break-
away faction of the PLP) was
wiped out at the polls in 1967.
And more recently, the new
National Development Party
failed to make any impact in
the Elizabeth bye-election,
despite fielding an attractive
candidate and talking a lot of
sense.

But ex-PLP chairman Ray-
nard Rigby sees no need for
proportional representation:
"The voters’ voices are not
suppressed. I don't accept that
argument. The fact that third
parties can't get a majority has
all to do with message, believ-
ability and connecting with the
voters. I always start from the
premise that the voter does not
make a mistake. So there can
be no unfair elections.”

FNM Chairman Carl Bethel
says proportional representa-
tion has never been on the
radar here. "There is no
appetite to change the ‘first
past the post’ system because
the two parties in the House
would lose their monopoly (on
power) if a party with (a mini-
mum) popular vote was able
to win seats. We don't have
the equivalent of a Liberal
Democrat Party with substan-
tial seats to open the possibili-
ties for gridlock which now
confronts the UK.

"Let me also add that, from
what I observed in Guyana, a
PR system would greatly
strengthen the hand of the
prime minister, since individual
MPs, do not actually represent
any constituency. What hap-
pens is that a list of MPs is
issued and from that list the
actual MPs are selected
according to the party's pro-
portional entitlement after the
election. The PM would be
able to exclude his internal
competitors or opponents.”

According to Sir Arthur
Foulkes, writing in 2006, polit-
ical parties in the Bahamas are
easy to form but difficult to
build. The PLP succeeded in
the 1950s because of "a con-

fluence of events that made
the Bahamas ripe for the
establishment and growth of a
political party with popular
appeal across the nation. The
PLP leadership was deter-
mined to remove the intransi-
gent Old Guard from power."

As for the FNM, he said the
circumstances at the time were
unique and unlikely to occur
again. "After the 1967 and
1968 general elections, the
political division in the House
of Assembly was clearly along
racial lines and there was a
good chance the UBP would
have been wiped out altogeth-
er. In any event, the time had
come to end racial politics.

"A few enlightened and
perceptive members of the
UBP, led by Geoffrey John-
stone, understood this. So
when in 1970 a bloc of parlia-
mentary members of the PLP —
the Dissident Eight — voted no
confidence in their leader and
were suspended from the par-
ty, Sir Geoffrey proposed the
dissolution of the UBP and
turning over the responsibility
for opposition to the Eight.

"So in 1971 a new political
party — the FNM - was formed
and assumed the role of oppo-
sition, not third party. After a
disastrous splintering in 1977,
the FNM was reunified in time
for the 1982 election and has
remained in parliament until
now."

In the 2007 general election,
splinter candidates (the BDM
and several independents)
received only about 3 per cent
of the vote. In fact, the elec-
toral high point for candidates
not drawn from the two major
parties was the general elec-
tion of 2002, when they collec-
tively won 7.5 per cent of the
vote. But that was largely due
to the fact that the PLP
refrained from fielding candi-
dates against several indepen-
dents (all former FNM incum-
bents).

In the late 1980s, Hubert
Ingraham and his supporters
toyed with the idea of setting
up a "third force" after he was
expelled from the PLP for
opposing corruption. The con-
sensus was that building a new
party was too difficult from a
logistical and financial point
of view, so Ingraham went on
to join the FNM. He was
anointed by a dying Sir Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield, and elected
leader in 1990.

Under Ingraham, the FNM
defeated the PLP in 1992, with
55 per cent of the overall vote.
Five years later they achieved
an overwhelming victory, tak-
ing 85 per cent of the parlia-
mentary seats on the strength
of 58 per cent of the overall
vote (34 to six). In 2002 this
result was practically reversed,
with the PLP taking 73 per
cent of the seats on the basis of
52 per cent of the vote (29 to
seven).

Before 1992 the PLP com-
fortably won elections in 1987,

a
CREDIT SUISSE

1982, 1977, 1972, 1968 and
1967. In fact, there were legit-
imate fears during their quar-
ter-century monopoly on pow-
er that democracy would all
but disappear in the Bahamas.
In fact, the ruling party has
won all of the seats in parlia-
ment in more than a dozen
general elections in Common-
wealth Caribbean countries.

Would proportional repre-
sentation help avoid such dis-
tortions here? Could a third
party ever establish itself in
our parliament without pro-
portional representation?

Dr John Rodgers, a local
eye surgeon and public affairs
commentator, believes the
time is ripe for a third party
movement: "A new party
could win outright, or at least
enough seats to force a coali-
tion in the next election, if it
has the right mix of candidates,
a solid mandate and $5-10 mil-
lion in campaign funding."

Younger voters, he says, are
tired of the same old rhetoric,
personalities and policies. "The
economy is in terrible shape
and crime is out of control -
the two things people are most
concerned about. The elec-
torate has witnessed the
changes in the US and now the
UK. There will be a change
here in 2012 if the right third
party emerges."

Well, that's a big "if". And
$10 million is a lot to invest in
an unknown entity. Mean-
while, back in Britain the fat
lady hasn't sung yet (as this is
written on Monday), but it
appears that interest is refo-
cusing on a potential deal
between the Lib Dems and
Labour, with Gordon Brown
resigning.

That would only be because
the Tories won't budge on pro-
portional representation. The
Liberal Democrats have been
down this road before with
Labour, yet the promised elec-
toral reform never materi-
alised. The big difference this
time is that they have Labour
by the short and hairies.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

¢ Yesterday Gordon Brown
tendered his resignation to the
Queen after three years in
power. David Cameron, Con-
servative leader having sealed
a deal with Nick Clegg of the
Liberal Democrats, became
the UK’s prime minister,
returning the Conservatives to
power after 13 years on the
backbench. Mr Clegg will be
deputy prime minister with
four members of his party cab-
inet ministers.

Mr Brown also resigned as
Labour leader to be replaced
by deputy Harriet Harman
until a successor is elected. Mr
Brown will remain as a back-
bench MP in Parliament.

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Or by mail foc P.O. Box M4807
Nassau, Bahernas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS MAY 21, 2010


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 7

Police walkabout

aims to calm any
fears of residents

By GENA GIBBS



FOLLOWING the police shooting
of a man who escaped from Central
Police Station last week, officers of the
Northeast Division Police and the
Urban Renewal Committee conducted
a walkabout in the Kemp Road area
with the aim of calming any fears mem-
bers of the community may have.

“The walkabout was scheduled for
an earlier date, but with the recent inci-
dent, as it relates to the escapees, it was
put off. We came out with Pastor Dale
Moss of the Shirley Street Church of
God of Prophecy and employees of the
other government entities,” said Craig
Stubbs, Assistant Supt of the North-
eastern Division.

The walkabout included meeting res-
idents from St James Road, Abraham
Street, the Five Pound Lot, White’s
Addition, and Cooper’s Terrace, that
were impacted by the police shooting
that occurred on Tuesday, May 4.

Ricardo “Ricky” Knowles Jr, 22, was
shot by police in White’s Addition, off
Kemp Road, after escaping from the
Central Police Station. He was being
held and waiting to appear before Jus-
tice Jon Isaacs on armed robbery, kid-
napping, and rape charges.

Renardo Bastian, the other escapee,
who was also awaiting trial on the same
charges, was captured in the Kemp
Road area.

He has since been acquitted of the
robbery, kidnapping and rape charges
against him, but has other matters pend-

40th anniversary

ing before the court.

“The feedback from the residents is
that they understand what took place,
they understand the job of the police
officers, they understand we had to do
what we had to do,” Asst Supt Stubbs
said.

“A lot of them were afraid because
of the amount of officers that converged
on the area on Tuesday afternoon. With
the assurance that we have talked to
them, a lot of them are accepting the
fact that what had to be done was
done.”

Aside from that incident there has
been no increase in crime in the Kemp
Rod area, he said.

“Since January, there has been no
increase. The majority of what you
might be faced with is basically the
small domestic loud music, and one or
two stealing incidents but nothing
major,” said Asst Supt Stubbs.

Residents in the community called
the police to inform them of the
escapees’ whereabouts.

“Tuesday was a result of the police
interaction with the community,” said
Asst Supt Stubbs.

“The community (residents) were the
persons calling in and giving the police
information as it relates to the escapees.
So, there is an ongoing partnership with
the community on a large scale. With-
out the community, we, at Northeast-
ern, cannot function.”

Kemp Road residents have also told
police they want to see more patrols in
the area.





NORTHEASTERN DIVISION POLICE and
Kemp Road Urban Renewal Committee mem-
bers make their presence known in the com-
munity only days after police were involved in
a fatal shooting that resulted in the death of an
escapee.

“Honestly, they want to see increased
patrols. They need to see more police
vehicles driving around at night,
through the community and maybe
stopping,” Asst Supt Stubbs said.

Young men between the ages of 17
and 27 fit the profile of most of the
criminal behaviour in the area. Police
have identified unemployment and idle-
ness as the source of youth reckless-
ness, he said.

“A lot of them want construction
jobs. Weeding the yard is an income
and they will say they want to do it, but
there is no sign of it. For the younger
generation, Urban Renewal offers com-
puter classes and other after school
activities and we try to steer them in
that direction and get them involved.”

“T would say about 95 per cent of
the people we spoke to this morning
are in support of the police depart-
ment,” Asst Supt Stubbs said.

he HMBS Flamingo






By MATT MAURA

THE sinking of the HMBS
Flamingo 30 years ago has
become the most significant
event to have taken place in
the life of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force and
perhaps the national con-
science, Under-Secretary in
the Ministry of National
Security Peter Deveaux-
Isaacs said on Monday at
Coral Harbour Base.

Addressing parents and
family members of the
marines killed in action on
the occasion of the 30th
anniversary of the sinking,
he said that their losses will
never be forgotten.

“It was this instance of
national shock that helped
Bahamians to grasp fully the



of the sinking of t



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concept of national identity
when our sovereignty was
challenged back of May 10,
1980,” Mr Deveaux-Isaacs
said.

“Thirty years ago we lost
four, young marines and one
of our 103ft Marlin class ves-
sels to hostile and deliberate
attacks from our southerly
neighbour, Cuba. The shock
(of those attacks) was unbe-
lievable (and) Bahamians
from all walks of life gar-
nered together in protest.

“That incident, though
tragic, served to do what no
Bahamian event has been
able to do since Indepen-
dence in 1973, it united
Bahamians, concretising the
meaning of independence
and sovereignty in our minds
and clarifying for all what it
meant to be united in love
and service,” Mr Deveaux-

Isaacs added.

While attempting to arrest
two Cuban fishing vessels
near the Ragged Island
Chain on May 10, 1980, Able
Seaman Fenrick Sturrup, 21;
Marine Seaman Austin
Rudolph Smith, 21; Marine
Seaman David Allison Tuck-
er, 21, and Marine Seaman
Edward Arnold Williams, 23,
were killed when Cuban
MIG jets fired upon and
sank the HMBS Flamingo.

Mr Deveaux-Isaacs said
the four marines made the
ultimate sacrifice for their
country.

“Thirty years have since
passed since the lives of
those four, young marines
were lost and others were
also lost in the line of duty
due to the nature of work
carried out by members of

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the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force,” Mr Deveaux-Isaacs
said.

He applauded the work of
the men and women of the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force — past and present. He
also paid special tribute to
the families of the men and
women who serve in the
country’s armed force.

sinking of the HMBS Flamingo
presented a plaque to May-
nard Miller for his outstanding
efforts in assisting all the sur-
vivors and helping them get
to Ragged Island following the
disaster. Pictured (I-r) are For-
mer Able Seaman Cladwell
Farrington, Retired FCP Rev-
erend Dencil Clarke and
Retired CP Maynard “Dusty”
Miller.

in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4p.m.











ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

He said: “My position on
the $10 bill is known. My
position on the port is
known, and time doesn’t
change that.

“What political organisa-
tions do is review its own
thinking on a matter with
respect to the issue. And
there is nothing to date that
has convinced me that there
should be a change in that
thinking.”

Describing the Hubert
Ingraham-led government’s
decision to relocate the con-
tainer port to Arawak Cay
as an “abominable mistake”,
Mr Christie said the move
would work against the beau-
tification of the downtown
area.

“T find it very difficult to
understand how the govern-
ment of the Bahamas can
proceed with this matter. I
do not believe, no matter
how they try to hide the exis-
tence of that port, I do not
feel it is right to put an indus-
trial centre next to the Fish
Fry and destroy what would
otherwise be a scenic drive
along West Bay Street.”

Mr Christie added that the
project seems to be littered
with “major” flaws consider-
ing its enormity and the
expense that would have to
be undertaken to do it.

With the next General
Election expected any time
within the next 18 to 24

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 11

Christie ‘would reverse container port deal’



PERRY CHRISTIE



months, sources within the
FNM have stated that Mr
Christie’s position on the
matter would mean very lit-
tle, even if he were to hold
the seat of Prime Minister.

“Tas a citizen of this coun-
try am not threatened by
anything that Perry Christie
says he will do because con-
sidering his history, he will
do nothing,” the source
laughed.

Brandishing such remarks
as being “typical of the PLP”
he went on to add how the
PLP had also threatened to
reverse the deal on Atlantis
which was first refused under
the PLP but later signed after
the FNM came to power in
1992.

“The PLP would be open-
ing themselves to a litany of

lawsuits. So that is a politi-
cal argument at best. Once
this agreement is signed that
is it. These stakeholders can
sue them for attempting to
stop it.

“But Mr Christie should
know better. He is trying to
make this deal fail before it
gets off the ground. He is try-
ing to instil fear in the hearts
of the stated investors and
those yet in the pool. That is
unfit for a former Prime Min-
ister to be doing, particularly
in this current climate,” he
said.

In thanking all those par-
ties involved in making the
signing a success, Prime Min-
ister Ingraham told the press
on Monday that it took
“great effort” on the private
sector’s part because they
were faced with reducing
income which they are now
making, and having threats
by an Opposition Party that
it would discontinue the
operation at Arawak Cay.

“And so they had to be
bold and take my word and
my action for it that a deal
done with the government of
the Bahamas is a deal done,
irrespective of any noise to
the contrary in the market-
place.

“The government there-
fore, looks forward to a har-
monious relationship
between the private sector
and ourselves. We expect
that the port will be managed
by the private sector and not
by the government,” he said.

FROM page one

Mr Bethel's phone was "ringing off the hook"
yesterday as he was inundated with calls from
persons seeking to verify the report.

"IT am being told that there is no truth to the
rumour that Lady Turnquest died," Mr Bethel
said when contacted by The Tribune yesterday
morning. He said this information came from a
close friend of the Turnquest family.

He added: "I have no reason to doubt that
(information)."

When contacted for an update later in the
afternoon, Mr Bethel said he could not authen-
ticate the rumours. "There's no confirmation
one way or the other,” he said.

At last report, Lady Turnquest remained in
critical condition in hospital in England, accord-
ing to an e-mail from her son, National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest who flew to Lon-
don earlier this week to be at her side.

A friend of the Turnquest family, who spoke to
The Tribune yesterday afternoon, also denied
the claims of Lady Turnquest’s death. This came
as multiple websites posted unconfirmed reports
that Lady Turnquest had died in hospital while in
England.

Lady Turnquest suffered a serious stroke Sat-
urday morning while on holiday in London with
her husband and eldest grandson.



Trt:



Lady Turnquest remains
in critical condition

Her immediate family, including Mount Mori-
ah MP and National Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest, arrived in London on Sunday to be
with their mother, who has since undergone neu-
rosurgery.

On Monday night, Mr Turnquest said by e-
mail that his mother "remains in critical condi-
tion, with no change since yesterday (Sunday)."

Lady Turnquest had suffered bleeding to the
left side of her brain because of the stroke and
was left paralysed on one side of her body. On
Sunday she remained in a critical care unit for
"monitoring and further care," according to the
family's statement.

Her surgery went "rather better than expect-
ed,” according to the doctor who treated her,
said the earlier statement.

With Lady Turnquest are Sir Orville, her three
children, Mrs Caryl Lashley, Mrs Michele Fields
and Tommy Turnquest, and two of her grand-
sons.

Sir Orville served almost seven years as Gov-
ernor-general with Lady Turnquest by his side
from 1995 until late 2001.

a

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Mario Miller, 28,
was found dead with
multiple stab and chop
wounds about his body
in bushes near the
Super Value food store
in Winton.

Brothers Ricardo
Miller alias ‘Tamar
Lee’ and Ryan Miller
alias ‘Manny’ are
charged with Mario’s



Lesiie Miller

head, face, neck and
hands. He said that
brown slippers were also
found at the scene.

He further testified
that on June 24, 2002,
he visited the Rand Lab-
oratory at the Princess
Margaret Hospital and
was present when Leslie
Miller identified his son.

murder. LESLIE MILLER ‘S¢etgeant Colebrook

Mr Miller sobbed on — outside of court
yesterday.

the witness stand yes-
terday when ques-
tioned by lead prosecutor Cheryl
Grant-Bethell about learning of
his son’s death.

He said he last saw his son on
June 21, 2002, and that Mario
owned a green and gold Infiniti
SUV. He recalled that his son
had complained of a foot injury.
A tearful Mr Miller told the court
that when he arrived at the scene
where his son’s body had been
discovered, the ambulance had
already taken him to the hospital.
Mr Miller said at the hospital, he
saw his son lying on a stretcher
with “a lot of stab wounds.”

Detective Sergeant James
Colebrook, a crime scene inves-
tigator, was the first witness to
take the stand yesterday.

He told the court that while
on duty at the Criminal Records
Office on June 22, 2002, he and
DC 1824 Anderson, acting on
information, travelled to the
Super Value food store in Win-
ton.

Sergeant Colebrook said that
he took photographs of Mario’s
lifeless body. He said Mario, who
was dressed in long blue jeans
and a multicoloured shirt, had
multiple stab wounds about his

also told the court that
Dr Govinda Raju point-
ed out injuries on Mari-
o’s body. Sergeant Cole-
brook said he photographed the
injuries and also told the court
that albums were compiled from
the photographs he had taken.

Former detective Corporal
Darren Ellis, who in June 2002
was attached to the Elizabeth
Estates Police Station, also took
the witness stand yesterday.

He told the court that while
on duty around 4pm on June 22,
acting on information he pro-
ceeded to Yamacraw Hill Road
where he saw a 1997 QX4 Infini-
ti SUV registered to Mario
Miller. The former crime scene
investigator told the court he saw
blood inside as well as outside
the vehicle.

Mrs Grant-Bethell, during her
opening address yesterday, told
the jury that the prosecution will
rely on strong forensic and cir-
cumstantial evidence.

She also said the prosecution
intends to call some 30 witnesses.

Senior Justice Jon Isaacs pre-
sides over the case. Attorney
Dorsey McPhee represents
Ricardo Miller, and attorney
Richard Bootle represents Ryan
Miller.

Victimisation claims
FROM page one

ards at the resort — was notified of the executive council’s decision to
remove them through letters circulated at Atlantis yesterday.

The step comes two weeks after Ms Martin, Mr Woods and the rest
of the “A-Team” were elected to the leadership of the union.

Mr Woods said: “We had gotten some complaints from people in
the areas they represented indicating they no longer wanted them to
represent them, and one or two of the people (who were fired) had
transferred from one area to the next in the hotel, which means
they would have to be appointed or elected for the new area.

“Some indicated they could not work with us (the new executive
team headed by Nicole Martin) and some of the same would have
penned letters to the Director of Labour to have the union de-reg-
istered. But the main reason (they are being removed) is because
some of the members said they didn’t want them there anymore. If
we were victimising them we’d have gotten rid of them the first
time (they ran against Martin).”

But two of the Shop Stewards who spoke with The Tribune said
that despite their support for persons other than Ms Martin in the
recent and previous union elections, they were more than willing to
work with her as President and had not indicated otherwise.

They claimed that far from it being done at the behest of the
membership, their removal has disappointed and confused many
of those who they had represented at the hotel and will cause division
in the union.

“The members are very upset because at the end of the day its one
union and so if you ran against Nicole Martin or voted against her as
long as you do your duties as shop steward and work with adminis-
tration it shouldn’t be a problem. It’s about the members and every
member has the right to run,” said one of the affected shop stewards.

One former shop steward complained the letter gave no official rea-
son for their removal, only stating that they were “no longer autho-
rise to work or act on behalf of the union.”

“People want to know if she (Nicole Martin) can really do that,”
said one of the hotel workers, adding that she feels the membership’s
interests can only be hurt by the removal of the representatives.

“T don’t get paid as a shop steward, I was only doing it because I
love what I do and I like to see people treated fairly and respectful-
ly. At the end of the day you’re only going to hurt the industry if you
put shop stewards in there who don’t know what they’re doing,” she
said, noting that many of the stewards had served in their union
posts for many years.

Mr Woods said the exercise of removing the shop stewards was
about ensuring that they too are held accountable to the membership
as the executive members are when they have to go up for re-election
every three years, rather than “‘serving infinitum” or continuing to do
so even if the membership no longer wants them to or they fail to “act
in their best interests.”

FROM page one — EYX-PLP general

investigations continue.

The German businessman
was reported missing last
Wednesday prompting a wide-
scale search of the 48-mile long
island and surrounding waters,
which in seven days has pro-
duced no sign of the foreigner.

Inspector Tony Taylor at
New Bight police station said
the missing German’s home,
truck, private airplane and
yacht were found undisturbed.

He said: “We have nothing
concrete, no positive results at
the moment.

“We have been door-to-
door, had several aerial search-
es, but at this moment we have
not come up with anything to
find Mr Harsch.

“Information surfaced and
we took two persons into cus-
tody who we were questioning.

“If there is a break in the
case and we get something sub-

stantive from them we will
charge them.”

He said Mr Harsch was a fre-
quent visitor to Fernandez Bay
over the last year and was con-
sidering buying property on the
island.

The unmarried man was
staying in Cat Island alone and
was last seen at Hawk’s Nest
restaurant on Sunday, May 2,
before he was reported missing
three days later.

A team of five officers from
the Criminal Detective Unit
were sent to New Bight last
week to assist investigations.

Inspector Taylor said Mr
Harsch’s friends and family
have been informed of his dis-
appearance through the Ger-
man consuls in Nassau and
Miami.

Calls to the German consul
were not returned yesterday.

Central Police Station

FROM page one

headquarters and Superintendent Wayne Miller has replaced him

at Central.

Supt Miller formerly headed the Strategic Policy and Planning

branch at police headquarters.

Second in charge of the station, Asst Supt Cleophus Cooper, will
remain in his position at Central, while Chief Inspector Robert Sim-
mons, formerly of Nassau Street, will also join the downtown
police team.

Speaking of the transferral of Supt Moss, ACP Hanna said that
such reassignments are not necessarily to be considered punish-
ments, but can be done for many reasons.

ACP Hanna said: “The whole scheme of things is to get it right
and nothing is fixed in stone. If a person can be sent to a particu-
lar remit today in a matter of weeks that person can be removed.”

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eed

THE TRIBUNE

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company



isin

WEDNESDAY,

MAY

ee



2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net





NASSAU

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

‘Well short of expectations’ To, marina sees
60% April rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BISX-listed bank
yesterday
acknowledged its
2009 results fell
“well short of our expecta-
tions”, a more than five-fold
increase in loan loss provisions
due to the contracting economy
holding net income flat, with
its chief executive forecasting
no growth for 18-24 months.
Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) head, told Tri-
bune Business that the “very
substantially increased loan loss
provisions”, which increased by
569 per cent to $1.316 million
from $231,261 the previous
year, was the “key” to why the
banks’ net income only
increased by 3.3 per cent over
2008 comparatives to $1.357
million.
“The loan book has been
deteriorating, consistent with
what has been going on in the

economy,” Mr (ij
Sunderji said. ,
“While our top
line grew and
expenses were |
controlled, our
bottom line did
not really
improve because
of the substantial
mcrease in provi-
sions.”

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
non-performing loans, as a per-
centage of its total $200 million
portfolio, grew to 9.09 per cent
or $18.635 million - in line with
the commercial banking indus-
try average - compared to 3.32
per cent or $6.734 million at
year-end 2008.

The non-performing loans,
the bank’s financial statements
said, consisted of $13.8 million
worth of mortgage loans (some
$5.4 million in 2008) and $4.8
million in consumer loans
(some $1.3 million of these
were non-performing in 2008).

SUNDERJI

AC device aiming for
20% power bill drop

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN company
yesterday said it was aiming to
reduce household and business
electricity bills by up to 20 per
cent through reducing air-con-
ditioning costs, especially dur-
ing the upcoming summer
months.

Larry Black, technical con-
sultant for Powersave Interna-
tional, said the Aircosaver,
which can be attached to any
air-conditioning unit, except
chill-water systems, can signifi-
cantly reduce the high costs
associated with long-running
condensing units.

According to Mr Black, the
small electronic Aircosaver
unit, which is retro-fitted to
existing air conditioning units,
and was tested by NASA, uses
German technology to detect
when a unit’s evaporator coils
have reached the desired tem-
perature to cool a room. It then
switches the condensing unit
off, leaving the blower running
to continue distributing cold air.

Mr Black said the unit had
been shown to reduce air con-
ditioner operating costs by
more than 25 per cent.

“Tf you are happy with your
electricity bill then you don’t
need it,” said Mr Black. “And
while the best energy saving
device is the on/off switch,

when you are using your air
conditioning the Aircosaver is
saving you money.”

Powersave International is
the exclusive Bahamian dis-
tributor of the Aircosaver mod-
ule, and offers energy audits of
homes and businesses to gauge
how its energy-saving devices
could benefit them.

The company, along with the
Aircosaver, also distributes
ThermaMax, which lowers
compressor head pressure,
shortens compressor run time,
decreases friction in the com-
pressor and increases the life
of air conditioning units. It also
supplies a capacitor-based Pow-
ersave device that can increase
the efficiency of motors in a
home or business up to 99 per
cent.

Mr Black said that by using
many of his own products, he
has seen significant savings at
his own residence. And feed-
back from clients has revealed
some 30 per cent in savings for
some with he Aircosaver.

He added that Powersave
International sought to make
the device affordable to both
businesses and private homes,
and sells it lower than the
MSRP (Manufacturers Sug-
gested Retail Price).

Mr Black said the company
also offers payment plans to
residential customers and
approved commercial cus-
tomers.

‘They’re ranking up there
with BEC these days’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Power
Company’s outage woes stem
from the decision to “hive off”
the utility from Port Authority
control, the ex-head of the
island’s Chamber of Commerce
said yesterday, with “the profit
motive” superior to providing a
reliable power supply.

Christopher Lowe, com-
menting on the electricity out-
ages that plagued Freeport and
Grand Bahama throughout
much of last week, bringing
commerce to a standstill, told
Tribune Business: “This all
stems from the fact that it
[Grand Bahama Power] used
to the responsibility of the Port
Authority/

“T suppose this is par for the
course when the profit motive
becomes the primary concern,
and a reasonable, decent elec-
tricity supply is secondary to
that.

“It was never designed to




TARGET!

* Ex-Chamber head says
Grand Bahama Power
woes have their roots
in decision to ‘hive off
utility from Port Authority

* Argues that ‘profit motive’
superior to delivering
reliable electricity supply,
and points out Hawksbill
Creek Agreement focused
on different goal of
creating a new city

make a profit. It was designed
to run itself, pay for itself and
be there. It was the Port
Authority’s responsibility. This
stems from 15 years ago when
Edward hived it off and sold it
off. It was an asset of the Port,
but has been hived off for per-
sonal profit. Yet the Hawksbill

SEE page 2B



* BISX-listed bank says more than five-fold increase in

loan loss provisions to $1.357m hit 2009 ambitions
* Fidelity puts growth plans on hold for 18-24 months; ‘for

all of 2010 and most of 2011’, pushing them back two years
* Hopes ‘may have seen the bottom’ of loan book deterioration

Mr Sunderji conceded that
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) had
been forced by the contracting
Bahamian economy to post-
pone its planned growth strate-
gy, which it had hoped to initi-
ate in 2009 and 2010 following
heavy infrastructure invest-
ments in previous years, for at
least two years.

Acknowledging that the
focus over its next two finan-
cial years would be managing
its existing credit portfolio and
controlling expenses, Mr Sun-
derji told Tribune Business:
“Until the economy shows signs
of improvement, our focus is
going to remain on asset quali-
ty and recovering the money
we’ve lent out.

“T think the loan book dete-
rioration has stabilised now,
and we expect that it will
improve over time, the next 12-
18 months. Until such time as
that happens, we have no plans
for growing and expanding the
business.

“The economic environment
simply does not support growth
strategies. We have an econo-
my that has contracted quite
substantially. We have had a
very bid increase in unemploy-
ment, with many Bahamians in
trouble paying off their loans.
This is not the time to be think-
ing of growing.”

When asked by Tribune

SEE page 3B

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE LARGEST marina in
the Bahamas saw a 60 per cent
year-on-year increase for the
month of April in pleasure
yacht arrivals, and expects to
continue this improving trend
during the 2010 second quar-
ter.

Bob Kramm, general man-
ager at the Abaco Beadh
Resort, said June’s boat slip
occupancies were expected to
be significantly up over last
year. He added, though, that
occupancy forecasts have been
difficult as booking windows
continue to be short, a trend
that came about with the down-
turn in the economy last year.

Mr Kramm told Tribune

IPOs to ‘really wake up’ the capital market

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE potential Arawak Cay
port and Commonwealth Brew-
ery/Burns House initial public
offerings (IPOs) will “really
wake up” Bahamian capital
markets that have been dor-
mant for too long, Tribune
Business was told yesterday, a
leading analyst predicting the
port’s $10-$15 million prefer-
ence share issue would likely
be oversubscribed.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said:
“T think the two issues will real-
ly wake up the market and
bring back all that interest that
has been latent for so long. It

* Arawak Cay port and Burns House/Brewery deals
to ‘liven up’ equities sector, with former’s $10-$15m
preference issue likely to be oversubscribed

* Analyst: ‘We’ve lagged behind the
global markets for too long’

* Burns House/Brewery offering could be largest in
Bahamas’ history, worth $50-60m, sources suggest

livens things up a bit.”
Agreeing with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham’s asser-
tion that granting the public a
20 per cent stake in the Arawak
Cay port would “expand own-
ership opportunities for
Bahamians”, in addition to
broadening and deepening the

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

capital markets, Mr Kerr said
the two potential IPOs both
had “attractive” attributes.
“To a large extent they’re
both monopolies - they oper-
ate as monopolies,” he told Tri-
bune Business. The Arawak

SEE page 2B



* Abaco Beach Resort
restarts real estate sales
effort as ‘enthused about
outlook’ for 2010

* Expects improved trend
for pleasure yacht arrivals
to continue through
2010 second quarter

* But tourism ‘not out
of the woods yet’

Business that April was fore-
cast to be a slow month based
on preliminary figures. How-
ever, as the month progressed,
last minute reservations came
in to boost the resort and mari-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

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BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010





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‘School ol Suppl es,

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BARBADOS
St. Michael:

246.435.1955





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS
IPOs to ‘really wake up’

FROM page 1B

Cay port, which will serve as the
principal entry port for all goods
shipped into New Providence by
sea, has no direct competitor on
this island, while a merged Com-
monwealth Brewery/Burns House
group would also dominate its sec-
tor. The latter’s main competition
would lie on the distribution side in
the form of Bristol Cellars.

While the Arawak Cay port IPO
is unlikely to take place until later
in the year - possibly in the fall - at
earliest, given the Prime Minister’s
comments that investors would
first want to see its facilities oper-
ational, the preference share issue
- part of the $20-$25 million in out-
side investor financing being
sought - may well take place earli-
er.

This issue, which is effectively
fixed income debt, will be targeted
at so-called ‘sophisticated’
investors, institutional and high-
net worths, and Mr Kerr said this
was likely to be oversubscribed
depending on the details of the
estimated $10-$15 million issue.

“T think the fixed income one is
huge,” he explained. “Institutional
people will pick it up. I think it will
be more than fully subscribed. The
fixed income portion on that gives
you a consistent income.

“People may not yet have confi-
dence restored to the extent they
will want to wait for the equity
stuff to kick-in for the Port and
Heineken.”

Apart from Kerzner Interna-
tional and Consolidated Water’s
Bahamian Depository Receipt
(CDR) derivative offerings, there
have been no IPOs in the Bahami-
an capital markets since 2001,
Freeport Concrete’s being the last.

Mr Kerr suggested the lack of
new IPOs - and investment oppor-
tunities - had resulted from a lack
of confidence in the Bahamian
equities market on the part of both
potential issuers and investors.

“On the equities side, people
have lost confidence and, more
fundamental, is a lack of under-
standing of what the markets can
do and the whole idea of equity
ownership,” Mr Kerr told Tribune
Business. “We have lagged behind
the global markets for too long, to
the extent that there were huge
run-ups in the US and global mar-
kets and we had not IPOs here
because people were scared.

“You need that education to
help people understand what’s
going on, and it’s now the right

time to be investing in equities - a
lot of valuations are very attrac-
tive.”

While the absence of IPOs had
not stifled Bahamian capital mar-
ket development, Mr Kerr said
they were “certainly a critical fac-
tor” in stimulating investor interest
and creating trading activity.

He also expressed surprise that
more Bahamian companies with
‘succession’ issues, which had been
held in family ownership for
decades, had not come to market.

The finer details of the Arawak
Cay port and the Commonwealth
Brewery/Burns House IPOs have
yet to be worked out. Market
sources yesterday suggested that
the latter deal could have to total
worth of $50-$60 million once
Heineken completed the buyout
of the stake held by Associated
Bahamian Distillers and Brewers
(ABDAB), the Finlayson family
holding vehicle, a deal first exclu-
sively revealed by Tribune Busi-
ness.

Market sources yesterday sug-
gested that Heineken would offer
50 per cent of whatever it acquired
from ABDAB in the IPO, mean-
ing that if it was a $100 million pur-
chase price - as has been widely
touted - the IPO could be valued in
the $50 million range.

If correct, that would make the
Commonwealth Brewery/Burns
House IPO the largest in Bahami-
an history, one source telling Tri-
bune Business yesterday: “There
wouldn’t have been an offering of
that size in this market, so it will be
interesting to see how an offer of
that size will be placed.”

Tribune Business understands
that preliminary discussions have
already taken place between Burns
House, headed by its managing
director, LeRoy Archer, and
Bahamian brokerage/investment
houses keen to earn the role of
placement/advisory agent when-
ever the IPO takes place.

Among those said to be keen to
win the business are the usual sus-
pects - RoyalFidelity Capital Mar-
kets, CFAL, Providence Advisors,
Atlantic Medical and First-
Caribbean.

It is understood that certain con-
ditions have to be fulfilled before
Heineken and ABDAB close their
deal, but that is thought to be a
formality and should happen immi-
nently. Government approval
seems set, and while the compa-
nies have 18 months to ready for
the IPO, it seems a certainty this
will take place.

Received a

best buy rating’ for

Whirlpoa



NASSAU, The Bahamas
— A law firm is reaping the
benefits of establishing its
office in Nassau’s fastest
growing population area,
Carmichael Road.

At a time when many
companies and homeowners
are trying to determine
where to relocate to make
their best of their invest-
ment, the increasing num-
ber of plazas and subdivi-
sions being built around
Carmichael Road is evi-
dence that the community is
on its way to rebounding
from the recent recession.

Many companies and banks have
opened extra locations to accommo-
date residents in the area, eliminating
the commute to downtown Nassau.
Among these businesses is the Melisa
Hall & Company law firm. Now in its
fifth year in operation, the firm, which
specialises in several areas of practice,
including mortgages and corporate law,
has already been receiving inquiries
from passers-by since opening on the
junction of Faith Avenue and
Carmichael Road.

“In the past few years, there has





MELISA HALL

Law company reaps
Carmichael benefits

been a proliferation of busi-
nesses in the Carmichael
area,” said founder Melisa
Hall, who lives nearby.

“Just the other day on our
morning walk, my husband
and I met a man who was
taking a survey of vehicles
that passed, and in about an
hour there were almost 700.
That doesn’t include the esti-
mated 20 people per jitney
or others carpooling. From
that alone, we see there is
tremendous potential and
need for more businesses
like ours to be in the heart of
expanding communities like
this, especially when downtown is such
a far distance for them to drive.”

While there aren’t any shortages of
Justices of the Peace in the area, per-
sons have commended Mrs Hall for
bringing all of the firm’s offerings to
the area. In fact, she says plans are
already underway for several commu-
nity activities before summer.

“We are looking forward to getting
to know our neighbors on Carmichael
Road,” said Mrs Hall. “I think all in all,
we are going to fit right in with the
mix of Carmichael Road’s diversity.”





Top marina sees
60% April rise

FROM page 1B

na over 2009 levels.

Driving some business for the Abaco
Beach Resort, and Abaco itself, has
been the return of three fishing tour-
naments, some of which were cancelled
last year as a result of the economy.
Only two tournaments were held for
the whole of last year.

Mr Kramm said the outlook for 2010
has even moved the resort to restart
real estate sales and marketing pro-
grammes to push their luxury condo
sales.

“We had suspended activity for a
while,” he said. “But we are again
enthused about the outlook.”

The resort continues to create entic-
ing packages to keep their guests busy
and interested. Last year, it hosted full-
moon parties for their guests and cre-
ated a wide range of activities for fam-
ilies in order to drive business.

A spate of boat thefts last year also
threatened to shrink business for the
marina. However, Mr Kramm said that
in 2010 police have cracked down on
such thefts and arrested some signifi-
cant figures suspected of lifting boats.

While Mr Kramm said the tourism
industry in Abaco was not “out of the
woods yet”, and has no idea of how the
second half of 2010 will progress, he is
optimistic that it is on the rise.

“We haven’t been able to gauge yet
how things might affect us,” he said.

‘They’re ranking up there with BEC these days’

FROM page 1B

Creek Agreement was not about profit
but developing a city.”

Grand Bahama Power Company was
spun-off from the Grand Bahama Port
Authority in the mid-1990s by the late
Edward St George and Sir Jack Hay-
ward. They ultimately sold a 55 per cent
controlling interest in the firm to South-
ern Electric (later Mirant), with the
remaining 45 per cent equity split
between Mr St George and Bahamian
investors to the tune of 25/20 via BISX-
listed ICD Utilities.

Mirant eventually sold its controlling
interest - and all its Caribbean electricity
operations - to Japanese giant Marubeni.
The latter struck a partnership with Taga,
the Dubai-based power generator, that
has left both with the current, controlling
joint venture interest in Grand Bahama
Power Company.

In addition, Lady Henrietta St George
sold the 25 per cent ownership interest
held by her late husband via his ICD
Utilities stake to Canadian power pro-

ducer, Emera, for $41 million back in
2008.

Thus three leading electricity produc-
ers, with global operations, are in charge
at Grand Bahama Power Company at a
time when it was forced to place its cus-
tomers on a ‘rolling’ load shedding sched-
ule - interrupting power supply to con-
sumers and businesses for hours at a time
last week. The company blamed its prob-
lems on the breakdown of several gen-
eration units, and the difficulty in access-
ing spares/maintenance parts due to its
previous supplier going out of business.

Mr Lowe, meanwhile, told Tribune
Business that the ownership changes had
effectively converted Grand Bahama
Power Company into “nothing more than
an ordinary licensee [of the Port Author-
ity], and a pretty pathetic one at that.

“This is what happens when you take
an essential service and convert it into an
ordinary licensee of the Port Authority
with a profit motive as its primary con-
cern. They’re ranking up there with BEC
these days.”

Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

He joked that while Emera, one of the
owners of Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, had been engaged by the Govern-
ment to assess how best to implement
recommendations to revive the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC), “it
appears that BEC may be advising
Emera” given the performance in
Freeport last week.

While all private sector entities had a
right and need to generate profits, Mr
Lowe said that in Grand Bahama Power
Company’s case this should “not come at
the expense of maintenance, reliability
and ability to perform the service”.

As to the impact of last week’s power
outages, which cost businesses in
Freeport and wider Grand Bahama sig-
nificant sums of money, the former
Chamber president added: “Obviously,
we’re going to be spending a lot of mon-
ey on diesel fuel to do their [the power
company’s] job for them. But the major-
ity of people do not have generation
capacity to keep the lights on, so it’s dev-
astating for them.”

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, the Nurses Association of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas (NACB),
an independent. nonpolitical, non-governmental organization of nurses was founded in
1947 primarily to represent the interests of nurses practicing in The Bahamas, nationally,
regionally and internationally:

AND WHEREAS, The Nurses Association encourages the professional and educational
advancement of nurses and promotes the highest possible standard of quality nursing
care, irrespective of nationality, race, colour or social origin;

AND WHEREAS, professional nurses are committed and dedicated to providing quality
nursing care with sensitivity to sick, infirmed and handicapped persons:

AND WHEREAS, professional nurses demonstrate excellence in health promotion, patient
care, teaching research, administration and education in the field of Nursing:

AND WHEREAS, The Nurses Association of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas is

existence;

an organization whose vision is to promote nursing excellence and to influence national
policies through local regional and international networks in order to provide best practices
and advice in policy matters relating to and impacting the profession,

AND WHEREAS, The Nurses Association is celebrating the 63rd Anniversary of its

AND WHEREAS, in countries worldwide, the month of May, 2010 is set aside as time to
give focus to the critical roles performed by nurses and in recognition of the Indefatigable
contribution that nurses make to humanity through the healing process,

AND WHEREAS, International Nurses Day will be celebrated on Wednesday 12th May,
2010 under the theme: “Delivery Quality, Serving Communities: Nurses Leading

Chronic Care”, and will be marked by events, activities and ceremonies worldwide in

ead Washer Classic too Dry

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recognition of the invaluable contribution that nurses make to the improvement of health;

AND WHEREAS, the Nurses Association of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
organized a number of activities in commemoration of the NATIONAL NURSES MONTH,
including a church service, Mall Exhibition, an Appreciation Day, Community Health Fair
and a Symposium which are all intended to inform, sensitize and give focus to the role and
function of nurses within the healthcare system:

CHEN Wo Boy cosh
i !

The pawer le gel mete doas,

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of May, 2010 as “NATIONAL NURSES

MONTH”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, | have
hereunto set my Hand and Seal
this 6th day of May, 2010

Master Technici.

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ee era tre sre aty

erred be ie ac ea ie ROL ere a rete tele)
ae eee eM ce eee Mc a Mente rpc ier) ee eay |

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HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 3B



2 2S SSeS EUSINESS ne ee ea
Bahamian fund audit sign-off eyed again

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

HAVING Bahamian
accountants sign-off on the
audits of Bahamas-domiciled
investment funds would signif-
icantly facilitate Securities
Commission investigations,
helping to prevent problems in
the sector, a senior Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA) executive said
yesterday.

Lambert Longley, BICA’s
the second vice-president, who
is also a partner at KPMG, said
that while most accountants in
public practice in the Bahamas
are agitating for the Securities
Commission to mandate that
investment funds registered
here, but administered/man-
aged outside this nation, be
audited here, the regulator is
still mulling the issue.

Mr Longley said BICA has
broached the subject of

Bahamian accounting firms
signing-off on investment fund
audits regularly. However, like
the Securities Commission they
have not taken a definitive
stance on the issue.

“Most accountants in public
practice believe it would be
more appropriate for foreign
investment firms licensed in the
Bahamas to be audited from
within the Bahamas,” he said.

“It is important for regula-
tors to have direct access to
auditors, which they can cer-
tainly do in the Bahamas, and
would have more difficulty
doing it if they [auditors] were
outside of the Bahamas.

“We can’t be sure that it
would eliminate any malfea-
sance in the industry, but it
would significantly facilitate the
securities industry’s investiga-
tions that may arise.”

The issue resurfaced in rela-
tion to the Cdn$440 million
Olympus Univest investment
fund structure’s collapse, as its

‘Well short of expectations’

FROM page 1B

Business how long such a con-
servative strategy would remain
in place, Mr Sunderji replied:
“For all of 201o and most of
2011. We need to see the econ-
omy come back before we
embark on resuming our
growth strategy.”

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
financial statements indicated
both the conservative nature of
its lending portfolio and the fact
that many assets are secured on
underlying real estate, mean-
ing it should be able to recover
loans that remain in arrears.

Out of $159 million in mort-
gage loans, the bank said some
$129 million were supported by
liens over family residential
properties, while another $26
million was secured on unde-
veloped land. A further $4 mil-
lion was covered by mortgages
on commercial properties.

As for its $45 million con-
sumer loan portfolio, some $7
million was cash secured; $11
million funded by salary deduc-
tions; and $5 million was relat-
ed to overdrafts.

Mr Sunderji also told Tri-
bune Business that Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) “had no new

product plans” for 2010, believ-
ing it already had a “substan-
tial” portfolio with built-in sav-
ings that covered all client
needs.

While the bank would take a
“sensible and low-risk approach
going forward”, Mr Sunderji
added that there were some ini-
tial signs that the Bahamian
commercial banking industry
“may have seen the bottom” in
terms of loan portfolio/asset
quality deterioration.

“T think we may have seen
the worst and hopefully things
will get better as we go forward,
but I doubt that the first quarter
is going to show any material
change,” the chief executive
added.

He told this newspaper that
the BISX-listed commercial
bank had been “working hard
on cost containment, simply
holding head count and being
more efficient, with a lot of con-
solidation in the back office,
combining jobs and roles and
trying to improve efficiency”.

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
grew its loan and mortgage
book by less than $2 million in
2009, funding this with a $6.3
million expansion of its deposit
base

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHANE WILLIAMS OF #148
CLIVE AVENUE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12TH day of MAY,
2010 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, The Bahamas.

Legal Notice

Bahamian auditor was not per-
mitted to audit other funds in
the underlying group - the
fund’s manager instead getting
a Canadian accounting firm to
perform the task.

As revealed by Tribune Busi-
ness on Monday, Paul Gomez,
an accountant and partner in
Grant Thornton (Bahamas),
told investigators probing the
collapse of Canadian-based
Norshield Financial Group, and
its Bahamian-domiciled Olym-
pus Univest investment fund,
that he had to rely on valua-
tions provided by others for the
Channel Funds - a key
Bahamas-based investment
counterparty.

According to Mr Gomez's
testimony to Norshield/Olym-
pus Univest receiver Raymond
Massi, which was revealed for
the first time as part of an
Ontario Securities Commission
ruling on the collapse, he was
provided with a December 30,
2001, letter vouching for the



value of debentures held in one
of the Channel Funds by Mosa-
ic Composite. The latter is the
key Olympus Univest counter-
party through which much of
the funds’ investments flowed.

"In his examination before
the receiver, Gomez stated that
he relied upon Mount Real's
valuation of the Channel
Funds’ debenture investments
while performing the audit of
Mosaic Composite," the
Ontario Securities Commission
said in its ruling.

"However, he [Mr Gomez]
also stated that he did not
believe Mount Real to be an
arm's length party. He stated
that he thought there was a
connection between Mount
Real and the Norshield invest-
ment structure, and that he did
not have confidence in Mount
Real's valuations.

"Gomez & Gomez [Grant
Thornton (Bahamas)] also
received a management repre-
sentation letter dated January

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMILIEN DELVA of CHARLES
VINCENT STREET, P.O. BOX CR-56766, NASSAU
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5" day of
MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
















P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

UPPERCLASS HOLDINGS LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED













Noticeishereby given thatin accordance with section 137 (8)ofthe
International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution of
UPPERCLASS HOLDINGS LTD. has been completed, a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been









struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 8th of April





IS

2, 2002, from [Stephen] Han-
cock, as a director of Mosaic
Composite, which assured them
that the valuations of invest-
ments in debentures were prop-
erly presented."

The Commission's ruling said
Mr Gomez told the receiver
that he believed Dale Smith,
one of those it had charged as a
result of Norshield's collapse,
was the "driving force behind
the audit". "Gomez & Gomez
asked if Grant Thornton could
perform an audit of the Chan-
nel Funds for 2002. He [Mr
Gomez] stated that Smith chose
Brooks, Di Santo to perform
the audit instead," the Com-
mission's ruling said.

The Channel Funds played
a key role in the Olympus Uni-
vest investment structure's col-
lapse, the Canadian receiver
finding that the their net asset
values (NAVs) "were overstat-
ed by at least $200 million for
2002 and $300 million for 2003,
an overstatement of approxi-

mately 88 per cent in 2003".

BICA’s president, Reece
Chipman, said yesterday that
one dynamic behind any deci-
sion to mandate local auditing
of investment funds is the num-
ber of funds domiciled in the
Bahamas.

“But the issue is still there,
and BICA is still discussing
with its members whether or
not we ought to approach the
issue again,” Mr Chipman said.

“As it stands now, the Invest-
ment Funds Act does not state
that Bahamian accountants
must sign-off on investment
funds and it has been an area of
discussion in the Institute. We
are still in discussions.”

Mr Longley said collapsed
Bahamas-domiciled funds not
only have a negative impact for
the investor, but can often cast
a dark shadow over the juris-
diction hosting the fund. “The
regulators want to minimise
fallout from any collapses that
might occur,” he said.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOCELYN CADEAU of
SPICKENARD ROAD, OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
1274 DAY of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CLEMENTINE HOLDINGS LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Noticeishereby given thatin accordance with section 137 (8) ofthe
International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution of
CLEMENTINE HOLDINGS LTD. has been completed, a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 8th of April

2010.

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Morey at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 11 MAY 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,590.19 | CHG 3.63 | %CHG 0.23 | YTD 24.81 | YTD % 1.58

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

NOTICE

JOOP INVESTMENTS LID.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

52wk-Low
1.00
9.67
5.23
0.44
3.15
2.14
9.62
2.69
5.00
2.21
1.32
5.94
8.75
9.50
3.75
1.00
0.27
5.00
9.95
10.00

Security
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

1.04
10.63
5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17
12.07
2.84
6.40
2.60
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dis-
solution of JOOP INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 26th of
February 2010.

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Last Sale

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.07
0.09
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.04
10.63
5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17
12.07
2.84
6.47
2.69
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08
1.00
0.27
5.59
9.95
10.00
Change Daily Vol.

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00

0.00

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

52wk-Low Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND Holdings

Bid
10.06
2.00

Legal Notice 0.35

Ask &
11.06
6.25
0.40
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

Last Price.
14.00
4.00
0.55

Daily Val.

COLGAN TAL

EPS $

ases)

0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

Div $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877

0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.460
0.111
0.627

-0.003

0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

Interest

0.000
0.001

EPS $ DivS
-2.945

0.000
0.480
0.000

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E

N/M
256.6

NOTICE
BOLTZMANN INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of May 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3758
2.8266
1.5127
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

10.0000

4.8105

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Last 12 Months %

NAV
1.4674
2.9020
1.5289
3.0368

13.5654
107.5706
105.7706

1.1034
1.0764
1.1041
9.4839

10.6709

7.9664

YTD%

0.52
1.44
2.57
1.48
3.45
3.99
1.25
0.79
1.23
1.52

-0.93

3.23

6.66
-0.11
475
-4.99
5.47
6.99
13.50
5.25
4.37
5.34
7A1

12.33

58.37

NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.507147

103.987340
101.725415

4.540
0.002

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

‘S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.491956

NAV Date
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
30-Apr-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10

103.095570
99.417680

-Mar-10

-Mar-10

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











Naturally 7 Meet the chefs of
abighitin Paradise Plates
Grand See page five ll.
Bahama

See page six

i _"
i mi

The Tribune SECTION B












WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

a

He
has brought that same cleverness back, turn-
ing a simple observation into a captivating body
of work titled “Stir”.
The showcase opened at the Ladder Gallery
last week and consists of 14 pieces, 10 drawings,
and 4 photographs.
In this body of work, Schmid makes a psycho-
logical observation between physical tiredness and
mental restlessness or distraction.
For instance, ever notice a person who is phys-
ically tired, but the moment he or she goes to
take a rest they are unable to find comfort
because of a wondering mind?
This simple, but clever observation is
at the center of Stir and all of the related
drawings and photographs follow this
e concept.
“This body of work are simple draw-
ings, and depicts figures fighting in their
chairs,” said the artist. “Stir shows a
severe contrast between physical rest
and mental distraction. It was a sim-
ple observation that was very inter-
esting to me. The showcase is a visu-
al communication of physical rest
and psychological distraction” he
told Tribune Arts.
He has always been fascinated with
the human figure, which is the reason
why it is the central subject matter of
this showcase.
“T like having the body in my work.
The body gives off emotions and atti-
tudes that makes the work come alive,”
he said.

Smudged charcoal, pastel, and acrylic
mediums help to create the tension in
each of the images.

“In the drawing the body is riddled
with tension and I tried to communi-
cate that tension as much as possi-
ble,” he said.

Viewing the drawings the concept

is more vivid, making it much easier to
understand the perspective the artist
has formed.
The drawing pictures human figures
fidgeting in their seats and his use of
three dimensional techniques conveys
the movement of the figure effectively.
The portraits by Schmid takes on this
same concept. They are basically portraits
of the artist trying to sit comfortably for
long periods. The effort becomes unsuc-
cessful and soon the images become blur-
ry due to his movement.
“The images are simple yet very
effective and they work well for me,”
the artist told Tribune Arts.
Mr Schmid said that he hopes viewers
can appreciate the observation he has
made. “This work has a beautiful awk-
wardness to it and I hope viewers can
relate to what is being communicated in
this body of work”.
Though he has done a little of every-
i thing concerning art his chosen medium is
| sketch work since it is “preliminary and
ie. ; more liberating when it comes to utensil”.
ic a, ! Heino Schmid received an Associates
iy oe Degree in Art from the College of the
i a4 By Bahamas in 1991, a Bachelor in Fine Arts for
H on \ | photography in 2003 from the Savannah Col-

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

T has been almost a
year and half since
Heino Schmid,
sketch artist,
released new char-
coal sketch draw-
ings. It was in 2008 ~
when he intrigued the
audience at Popop Stu- ~
dios Center of the Visual
Arts with his subtle,
thought provoking sketch
work titled “We're All As Mad As
Each Other”a showcase where simple®
human experiences and tribulations
were his main inspiration.

Charcoal,

pastel and
} acrylic on

paper.



lege of Art and Design and a Masters in Fine
a Art in 2006 from the Utrecht Graduate School
FR of Visual Art and Design in the Netherlands.

Charcoal, pastel,
oil stick and
acrylic on paper.

Charcoal, pastel,

oil stick and
acrylic on paper.

Inside the studio
for the exhibition
aS ae


THE TRIBUNE

eS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 5B



Paradise

PLATES





The Tribune
















THE VEGGIE nugget displayed is one of Chef Julie's exquisite creations for the Hands For Hunger-
Paradise Plates event.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff













By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



HEF Lorenzo Martinez at Lucianos of Chica-

go, located East Bay Street, and Julie Andree

Knowles chef and co -owner of Le Petit
Gourmet located in the Shirley Street Plaza, said
diners at the Hands For Hunger - Paradise Plates
event “better come hungry” for the delightful entrees
they plan to serve at the Charity event.

A Milanese dish, with a
piquant taste, osso buco, is
Chef Lorenzo’s contribution.
The dish is made from veal
(cattle) shank, and will be
served with light rigatoni pas-
ta.

Veals shanks are found at
the lower part of the legs of
calves and the marrow of the
meat has a rich smooth melt-
ing texture said Chef Loren-
ZO.

Sliced, carrots, celery,
whole plum tomatoes, and a
dash of lush white wine add
an even more toothsome
taste to the thick tomato
sauce that is heavily glazed
over the meat.

The vegetarian nugget and
the chicken arigato made by
Chef Julie is just as diverse
in flavour as the veal shank.

This scrumptious veggie
nugget is filled with zucchini,
carrots and bell peppers.
With a light crisp in every bite
it’s so easy to forget you’re
eating a vegan inspired dish.

Asian herbs and spices are

at heart of chicken arigato.
An Epicurean delight,
minced chicken breast is
bonded together with red bell
pepper and makes the per-
fect combination.

And delectables don’t stop
just there. After diners dig
into their osso buco, veggie
nuggets, and chicken arigato,
they will have a chance to
sink their teeth into an assort-
ment of cheesecakes also by
Le Petit Gourmet. Diners will
have the choice of guava,
chocolate truffle, and pecan
caramel cheesecake.

Both chefs participated in
the event last year and their
hearts soften when discussing
how the Hands For Hunger
organisation reaches those
individuals without food.

Chef Julie noted that after
a long day of work she is
excited to know that there is
a place to donate excess food
items.

“Before Hands For Hunger
I was so disappointed that we
had to throw away all of the

food at the end of the day.
And now it makes me happy
to know that there is a place
we can take the food,” said
Chef Julie.

“People take for granted
the abundance they have.
There are people out there
who don’t have food to eat
or can’t cook proper meals
for themselves and it is very
good what the organisation
is doing,” she said.

Chef Lorenzo also said “I
would encourage other chefs
to get involved with the
event. It has grown since last
year and it is for a very wor-
thy cause”.

Paradise Plates will take
place this Saturday, in the
Atlantis Crown Ballroom.

The creatively presented
event showcases a lavish
array of gourmet food pre-
pared by chefs from Nassau’s
premier restaurants, fine
wine and spirits and live
entertainment with all pro-
ceeds benefiting Hands For
Hunger the non-profit,
humanitarian organisation
committed to the elimination
of hunger and the reduction
of food waste in The
Bahamas.

Each day, Hands For
Hunger picks-up fresh, high
quality food that would oth-
erwise go to waste and deliv-
ers it to community centers,
shelters, churches and soup
kitchens throughout New
Providence.



Need a healthy meal idea? Just open the cupboard

(ARA) - Putting healthy,
nutritious meals on the table
for your family every day often
feels daunting, but it can be as
easy as opening your pantry.
Even on busy nights, when
you may be tempted to hit the
drive-through, cooking at
home with simple ingredients
from your pantry is a more
nutritious, cost-effective and
quicker solution when dinner-
time rolls around.

"Keeping your pantry
stocked with basic, non-per-
ishable items is an economic
and easy way for families to
put nutritious meals on the
table every night," says Dave
Lieberman, chef and cook-
book author of "The 10 Things
You Need To Eat: And More
Than 100 Easy and Delicious
Ways to Prepare Them."

"My advice is to keep a run-
ning grocery list with you at
all times, and when these
pantry staple items are on sale,
you can purchase them in bulk

- ultimately helping you stretch
your grocery dollar.”

All pantries should include
the basics: pastas, corn starch,
oil and flour, allowing you to
put together family meals in a
matter of minutes, but Lieber-
man says there are more
essential, must-have items that
no cupboard should be with-
out. Here are some of his tips
and tricks on stocking the per-
fect pantry.

TIP 1: STOCK UP ON
CANNED TOMATOES.

e Unlike fresh tomatoes,
canned tomatoes contain more
nutrients and lycopene
because they are pre-cooked,
which enhances their nutri-
tional content. Tomatoes have
a unique flavor combination
of sweet, savory and acidic all
at the same time, making them
a staple ingredient to cuisines
around the world. Studies have
shown that tomatoes may help
reduce heart disease risk and

protect against certain types
of cancers. Lieberman recom-
mends keeping cans of Del
Monte Stewed Tomatoes on
hand because they have a lot
of the same vegetables he nor-
mally adds to his dishes, such
as onions, celery and green
peppers - the perfect base for
any one-pot feast.

TIP 2: LENTILS KEEP
YOUR FAMILY FEELING
FULL, LONGER.

¢ Lentils are one of the high-
est-fiber foods in the world.
They are also rich in protein,
contain no cholesterol, and vir-
tually no fat. The best, yet
often overlooked solution for
adding fiber to your diet
comes in the form these disk-
shaped earthy legumes. The
fiber in lentils will keep your
family feeling satisfied, help-
ing to prevent late-night snack-
ing on less nutritious foods.
Not sure exactly how to use
lentils? A delicious family-

friendly recipe Lieberman sug-
gests is his chicken and lentil
quesadillas; simply substitute
lentils for traditional refried
beans and serve.

TIP 3: NUTS ARE THE
PERFECT PANTRY
STAPLE SNACK FOOD.

e Walnuts, almonds and
peanuts are great items to have
on hand at a moment's notice,
especially when guests drop by
unexpectedly. Nuts are loaded
with heart-healthy fats and
omega-3s. Studies have shown
that four servings a week may
lower your risk for heart dis-
ease. Lieberman relies on nuts
for textural contrast, especially
in salads, like his green mango
salad. When you finely grind
nuts, you get a rich creaminess
you can actually use as a sub-
stitution for dry flour in many
baking recipes.

TIP 4: DON'T THROW
OUT LEFTOVERS.

e Shelf-stable stocks and
broths are inexpensive and
add a lot of flavor to all kinds
of dishes, from soups to
sauces. They are also a great
way to add robust flavor to
bland or dried-out leftovers.
In addition to using stocks
and broths to add excitement
to food, some other great
items that you probably
already have in your cup-
board are:

— Black pepper. Most recipes
call for a dash of salt and
pepper. For bigger flavor,
grind your own pepper from
peppercorns rather than
using pre-ground pepper.

— Salt. Keep different types
of salt on hand to add
unique flavors to your meals,
like fine sea salt and kosher
salt. Avoid using iodized
table salt to flavour meals,
because it's very easy to
over-salt your dishes with it.
— Olive oil. In addition to its

health benefits, such as low-
ering the risk of heart dis-
ease, olive oil is considered
one of the "healthy fats”
you should eat. It is the per-
fect last-minute flavour for
salads and soups. Extra vir-
gin olive oil has the most
flavour and is the least
processed olive oil, meaning
it's more pure; therefore,
more heart healthy.

— Parmesan cheese. You'll
find this ingredient in most
recipes because it's delicious
and lower in fat than other
types of cheese. The best
part? You don't need to add
that much to your dish to
experience the rich flavour it
adds.

For more tips and recipe
ideas from Lieberman about
how to cook healthy and
nutritious meals from your
pantry, visit www.del-
monte.com/solutions.

Courtesy of ARAcontent

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

See

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune

Pil



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|





Alia Coley releases “Unfadable’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

LIA COLEY, a Bahami-

A artist who has been

on the music scene for

the last 10 years, has just released

her new album ‘Unfadable’ a

sequel to her 2007 urban sounding
CD, ‘Feel My Heart.”

The name for the CD sprung
from a song written by American
singing artist consultant Bright
Riley, who wrote the lyrics for a
song named *“Unbreakable.’

Produced in Los Angeles,
‘Unfadable’ is a project with 13
tracks all with the exception of
three are produced by Sammi



Starr.

R&B fans got to witness first-
hand Alia’s vocal ability in a sen-
sational concert event last Friday.
‘Unfadable’ comes a long way for
the Bahamian songstress. She’s
been in hibernation for a while,
working on reinventing her total
package as a local artist. Alia pre-
dicted that audience members
would note the quality of her
“international” sound in Friday’s
production, and they did.

Ten musical bands, and ten
dancers made the concert colour-
ful. The show went the whole nine
yards, showcasing the best that
entertainment has to offer in the
Bahamas.

The show included flashing

lights, and sound effects. On the
night of the concert, guests were
enthralled with dance performers,
and a group of male dancers who
perform local artists Puzzle.

Today, Ms Coley is a fierce pro-
moter of Bahamian music. She
told Tribune Entertainment that
she would like to see other artists
rise to the occasion, and emerge
as forces to be reckoned with on
the international scene.

“Just because we’re from the
Bahamas doesn’t mean that we
don’t need to be on the same stage
as those other guys,” said Ms
Coley.

The number of persons backing
this new project is extensive,
including a foreign agency, Clear

Channel who has donated to the
production of her CD. The media
agency decided to come onboard
August of last year.

Liking her sound to R&B greats
like Alicia Keys and more, Alia is
crossing into the Hip-Hop and
R&B genres. She has taken on a
new sound reminiscent of soulful
greats like Mary J Blige and Lau-
ryn Hill.

In her analysis, the songs on her
CD are about love, life, and rela-
tionships- themes that she says
everyone can relate to.

“Pm excited about just being
happy to be in love and the expe-
rience of life,” said Alia, and “this
is a very important theme that I
am encouraged to pursue.”

MOVIEREVIEW

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MICKEY Rourke in Iron Man 2.

Iron Man 2

By JASON DONALD

STARRING: ROBERT DOWNEY JR, GWYNETH PALTROW,
MICKEY ROURKE, SAM ROCKWELL, DON CHEADLE





IT SEEMS like only five minutes since Iron Man almost

single-handedly put Robert Downey Jr back on the A-list.

His effortlessly charismatic turn as billionaire Tony Stark :
hogged the spotlight from the rest of 2008’s blockbusters and :

the gears were quickly in motion for a sequel.

Iron Man 2 picks up almost immediately where its prede- }
cessor left off: Stark, having revealed his alter ego is the epony- :
mous hero - a hi-tech suit wearing warrior - claims without irony :

that he has “successfully privatised world peace”.

But politicians are on his case, claiming the suit isa weapon
and, therefore, should be turned over to the authorities before :
it falls into the wrong hands. Stark refuses and, at a hearing, :
shows a funny montage of failed Iron Man suit attempts from :
overseas and says no one else is near recreating the technolo- :

8y-

intends to use it against Tony Stark.

This is all enjoyable nonsense and, by filling the major roles
with strong actors, Iron Man 2 makes sure it keeps the ingre- : titled performance that takes an
dients that made the original work so well. Downey Jr is in his : 3a ; f f
element here and he has real chemistry with Gwyneth Pal- : UNCOM promising view ol many oO
trow who plays his assistant Pepper Pots. Sam Rockwell, asa :
kind of sleazy Tony Stark-lite, looks like he’s having aballasa :
corporate villain. Likewise Don Cheadle, replacing Terrence : ; ‘
Howard as Lt Colonel James Rhodes, who comically seems to : National Centre for the Performing
pre-empt any audience confusion on his entrance by saying: “It’s :
| ; ; ; : Tickets are $15.

Mickey Rourke, whose star is also on the rise again follow- :
ing his acclaimed performance in The Wrestler, is particularly :
impressive. Despite being surprisingly low-key as the villain, he :
: solo art show entitled Colour Palette

If there are any gripes, perhaps the attempt to introduce at 7 pm on Tuesday evening at the
members of the secret S.H.E.LL.D agency adds one plot strand :
: Gallery Frederick Street. The show

But, for the most part, Iron Man 2 delivers - great set pieces, runs until the end of the month.

me, I’m here, deal with it.”

has real presence and enjoys some great exchanges with Rock-
well.

too many and feels shoe-horned in.

acast on their game and some solid, summer entertainment.

He’s wrong however: mysterious Russian scientist Ivan :
Vanko (Rourke) has successfully created his own suit and :

“Tm excited
about just
being happy
to be in love
and the

experience
of life.”

- ALIA COLEY

Naturally 7 gives Grand Bahamians

an exhilarating performance

NATURALLY 7 treated Grand

: Bahamians to an exhilarating jaw drop-
: ping concert on Saturday. From begin-
i ning to end, there was never a dull
: moment as Naturally 7 went from song to
: amazing song during their two hours plus
i performance; boldly taking the human
: voice where no one thought it could go.
: Indeed, Naturally 7 Live was a family
: event.
: received more than their money's worth.

Attendees all agreed they

Naturally 7's multi-talented band

: members Roger Thomas (musical direc-
: tor, arranger, 1st Baritone, Rap), Warren
: Thomas (percussion, guitar, clarinet, 3rd
: tenor) Rod Eldridge (1st tenor, scratch-
: ing, trumpet), Jamal Reed (4th Tenor,
: electric guitar), Dwight Stewart (2nd
: baritone), Garfield Buckley (2nd Tenor,
: Harmonica) and “Hops” Hutton (Bass)
: took their audience on a mesmerizing
: musical journey. They were taken from
: funk to gospel, Motown to Abbey Road
-) : and back with snippets of Hip Hop along
| : the way.

In addition to their hit singles "Wall

|: of Sound' and "In The Air Tonight",
: Naturally 7 performed tunes made pop-
: ular by The Beatles, Simon and Gar-
i funkel, Michael Jackson and more to an
: audience that relished every moment.
: At the end of the show, Naturally 7
i responded to relentless audience pleas

Raw Form presents an evening
of music, art and poetry in a self

the issues facing society.
The event will be held at the
Arts on Friday evening at 7pm.

¢ Marco Mullings will present a

Central Bank of the Bahamas Art

for an encore performance with two
additional songs.

The evening began with a performance
by the Bishop Michael Eldon School
Senior Steel Pan Band and an a cappella
renditions of the Star Spangled Banner
and March on Bahamialand by the tal-
ented Starlighters trio.

The humorous antics of MC, David
Wallace, assured that there was never a
dull moment before the show or during
intermission. At intermission, David
challenged audience members to come
on stage and attempt to do Vocal-Play,
which is the copyrighted term that Nat-
urally 7 created to define the way they
perform their music using solely their
voices without any instruments. Three
brave young persons came on stage dur-
ing intermission and entertained the
crowd. The big intermission surprise
was when Grand Bahama Performing
Arts Society founder, Dalia Feldman
was coaxed to go on stage; she performed
a portion of the Broadway show tune,
“Popular” to thunderous applause.

Naturally 7 expressed their gratitude
for the warm hospitality they received,
from their red carpet arrival to the
Junkanoo Rush Out they participated
in at the end of their Sunday May 2nd
workshop at Bishop Michael Eldon
Auditorium. Naturally 7 members

¢ South Touch Productions
is proud to present for the first
time in the Bahamas “Casual Cal
Dupree and his vast, high quali-
ty family entertaining Bumping
Big Show Circus. The six day
event begins with a premier show
on Wednesday May 12 at the
Kendal GL Issacs gymnasium.
The reminder of the shows from
Thursday May 13-Sunday May 16
will have maintee and evening
performance at 10am and 8pm.

¢ The Hands For Hunger -
Paradise Plates event will

remarked; “It didn't feel like work, it felt
like we came to party with our family
and friends. We had a "Grand Bahama"
good time.”

Following the concert The Grand
Bahama Performing Arts Society hosted
a gala VIP reception at Agave Latin
Fusion Restaurant and Bar in Port
Lucaya where persons had the chance
to mingle with the group.

Dalia Feldman, founder of The Grand
Bahama Performing Arts Society, gave
special thanks to the major sponsors of
this event; The Harnisch Family Philan-
thropies, Thayer's Natural Remedies,
Pelican Bay at Lucaya, American Air-
lines, Argus Advisors, The Bahamas
Weekly, Mackey Media Itd, GBI
Tourism TV, Maecal Electronics, Bishop
Michael Eldon School, La Femme
Events, and H Forbes Charters.

The Grand Bahama Performing Arts
Society was created to bring profession-
al artists and performers from around
the world to audiences in Grand
Bahama. Drawing from Bahamian and
international talent, a number of perfor-
mances are planned throughout the year.
Proceeds are used for the advancement
of Grand Bahama students of the per-
forming arts. The Grand Bahama Per-
forming Society can be reached at gbper-

form@gmail.com.



take place at the Atlantis Resort
this Saturday starting in the
Crown Ballroom from 7pm -
11pm nighty. There will a lavish
array of food and drinks. Diners
will also have the opportunity to
participate in silent auction,
and raffle. There will also be
live entertainment.

* Heino Schmid presents
his new showcase Stir which
opened last week at Popop Stu-
dios Centre for the Visual Arts
in Chippingham. For more
information call 322-7834.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 7B



ENTERTAINMENT





Raw
Form

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor



IN THEIR first ever multi- media presentation
the artistic group Raw Form will present a thought
provoking, no holds barred presentation touching
on a variety of societal issues in a self entited per-
formance.

The group which consists of 6 core artists will
present an evening featuring poetry, music dance,
jewellery displays and visual arts at the National
Centre for the Performing Arts this Friday evening.

Speaking with Tribune Arts on Monday two of
the group’ members- Zee Thompson and Xan-Xi
Bethel explained that the purpose of the evening is
to provide upliftment and send a postive message to
the community.

“Tts not for the feble minded though” Xan Xi
explained. “ We are going to be pushing the enve-
lope, but we will be talking about the truth. The
event will touch on a variety of topics including
love, peace slavery and race.

Zee explained that the idea for Raw Form came as
a result of the need for colloboration by local artists.

“T used to be a singer and I wanted to hold an
event and could not get the support, so I decide to
network with several other artists and we created
the group. We want to be able to empower other
artists. We call it Raw Form- because that’s just
how we bring it.”

The show took three months to put together and
the response has thus far been extremely
favourable.

They are being assisted by blackfood.org- a local
activist group and by Seedlings Place, a vegetarian
and vegan support group which will also be pro-
viding the food for the evening.Burns House will
provide the drinks.

“We want to hold an event that will not only
feed people physically, but mentally as well,” said
Zee.

The price for the event is $15. Part proceeds will
go towards hosting children’s seminars and work-
shops to encourage creativity and mental growth.






































































Sai . , The group is inviting other artists to join them. “
= : We can grow the movement if people who are seri-
ASL MUL ASL ia p Raw Form. ous about growth come out and join us,” said Zee.
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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 14
WY «@ Magic finish
P 7
off sweep
WEDNESDAY, MAY 12,

of Hawks...
See page 15



2010

2015 Pan Am

appointment

for BOA boss
Miller

BAHAMAS
Olympic Asso-
ciation (BOA)
president
Wellington
Miller has been
appointed to
help co-ordi-
nate the organ-
isation of the
2015 Pan
American
Games in the
Americas region.

Miller now serves as a mem-
ber of the Co-ordinating Com-
mission for the Pan Am Games,
the largest sporting event in the
region with athletes from all
nations in the Americas — some
42 countries in all.

The games are held every
four years in the year before
the summer Olympic Games.
The next Pan American Games
in is set to be hosted in Toron-
to, Canada.

Mario Vasquez Raila, presi-
dent of the Pan American
Sports Organisation and the
Association of National
Olympic Committees (ANOC),
on March 7 made the appoint-
ment in Merida, Mexico.

Member

Vasquez Rajfia is also a mem-
ber of the executive board of
the International Olympic
Committee (IOC).

Said Miller: “The acceptance
of this appointment is a
supreme moment in my sport-
ing career and I was gratified
to have been personally invited
to do so by President Rafia.”

Miller was one of six Nation-
al Olympic Committee presi-
dents appointed from this hemi-
sphere.

“We are happy that some-
one from the Bahamas has the
opportunity to serve and make
this nation’s presence felt. We
in the Bahamas are now pre-
pared to export our talent
throughout the region and the
hemisphere.

“While there, I will do my
best to ensure that more
Bahamians are given opportu-
nities to serve on the various
regional and hemispheric com-
mittees.”

The Pan Am Games will cost
2.5 billion dollars and it is an
important seat at the table for

Drive one.

MILLER











By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



fter what most mixed mar-

tial arts critics deemed as a

disappointing performance,

one of the sport’s pop cul-
ture icons finds himself out of work after
being released from the top MMA pro-
motional brand.

Kevin “Kimbo Slice” Ferguson lost
his latest fight against Matt Mitrione on
the undercard of UFC 113 in Montreal,
Canada.

Slice fell to a professional record of 4-
2, however the nature of both lackluster
losses are the lasting impressions on his
résumé thus far.

Just days after the bout, Ultimate
Fighting Championships president Dana
White announced that Slice had been
dropped from the brand as one of its
fighters and would no longer be fea-
tured at its events.

Slice began his professional career in
2007 with a first round submission win
over Bo Cantrell in just 19 seconds. His
next fight was a first-round knockout
over MMA legend Tank Abbott, this
time in 43 seconds.

He got a third-round knockout of
James Thompson and suffered his first
professional defeat months later in a
surprising first-round knockout loss to
Seth Petruzelli, a loss that many thought
initiated the end of Elite XC.

Ferguson became an Internet sensa-
tion when his series of street fights
became popular. He made a name for
himself by knocking out average street
fighters and rose to fame when the fights
were placed on YouTube.com. He con-
verted a career as a common street fight-
er into one of the most sought fighters in
MMA history.

Prior to Slice’s UFC involvement,
White never shied away from his opinion
on the street fighter and did not consid-
er him to be a legitimate MMA fighter.

He appeared on “The Ultimate Fight-
er” and briefly boosted ratings for UFC
show, but failed to resonate as a viable
fighter.

With a 4-2 professional MMA record,
he has headlined two of the four most-
watched MMA matches in North Amer-
ican history, including a win over James
Thompson in May, 2008, on the now
defunct Elite XC brand on CBS, and
his loss against Roy Nelson during The
Ultimate Fighter.

AP Photos





KIMBO SLICE (right) takes a knee to the head from Matt Mitrione in their heavyweight fight at
UFC113 on May 8, 2010, in Montreal. Mitrione won with a second round TKO...

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the Bahamas.

“T hope that my performance
will encourage the regional and
hemispheric organisations to
look more to the Bahamas for

2010

FORD EXPLORER XLT

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other persons, realizing that we
in the Bahamas have talents in
all areas of regional and inter-
national sport, competitive ath-
letes, coaches and sports man-

eel

agers and organisers,” Miller
said.

The Co-ordinating Commis-
sion will act as the liaison
between the Pan Am 2015

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

Organising Committee and the
Pan American Sports Organi-
sation.

In 2008, Miller joined Sir
Arlington Butler as only the
second Bahamian to receive the
Mario Vasquez Rafia Sports
Merit Award.



SPORTS
le

SWIMMING

SWIFT swim club will
attend the 40th anniversary
of the US Masters National
Swimming Championships
at Georgia Tech Universi-
ty May 19 -23.

The team attending this
year’s US Nationals consists
of Percy Knowles, Andy
Knowles and Nancy
Knowles as swimmers and
team manager Yvonne
Knowles.

BASEBALL

BBF PRAISES

PLAYERS

WITH the Bahamas
Baseball Federation’s
National Baseball Champi-
onships fast approaching,
the federation extends con-
gratulations to the follow-
ing players who are making
an impact on their respec-
tive teams in the US as they
compete this weekend:

¢ Marvin McQueen -
Grand Bahama - Highland
Christian Academy - Dis-
trict 14 - 1A - plays May 14
at Regional Finals against
Miami Britto. (Highland
Christian has the top SS
prospect currently in the
nation)

e Andre Turnquest,
Travis Strachan and Perez
Knowles - Grand Bahama -
Rabun Gab - NCISSA - 3A
- plays in the state’s quar-
terfinals today against Wes-
leyan Christian Academy in
High Point, North Caroli-
na.

¢ Brandon Murray, Kyle
Hall, Geren Albury, Byron
Ferguson - New Providence
- Trinity Christian Acade-
my - District 12 - 1A - play
May 14 in Regional Finals.

Note: Ramon Grant is
also on the Trinity Christian
Academy team.

If Highland and Trinity
win, they would most likely
play in the first round of the
Florida State Championship
-1A.

TRACK

SCRATCH

MEETING

THE New Providence
Primary Schools Track and
Field Championship com-
mittee is scheduled to hold a
scratch meeting 3pm Mon-
day at Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium for
all primary schools compet-
ing in the meet scheduled
for May 19-21 at the stadi-
um.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, ,MAY 12, 2010, PAGE 15



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Mayweather
proves to bea
pay-per-view
draw

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Floyd
Mayweather Jr proved to be a
box office draw in his fight with
Shane Mosley, with 1.4 million
buys for television revenue of
$78.3 million.

HBO released figures Tues-
day that showed the fight made
the top 10 of pay-per-view
bouts ever. The most pay-per-
view buys for a fight was 2.4
million for Mayweather’s 2007
bout with Oscar De La Hoya.

Mayweather’s manager,
Leonard Ellerbe, said the buys
helped Mayweather pocket $40
million for the fight. He had
been guaranteed $22.5 million
plus a percentage of the sales.

Mosley was also expected to
make more than his guarantee
of $7 million.

Mayweather remained
unbeaten with a lopsided 12-
round decision in the bout.

Magic finish
off sweep of
Hawks 98-84

By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — The
Orlando Magic dribbled the
final seconds off the clock,
shook hands with another
defeated foe, then turned to
more important matters.

Time to get ready for anoth-
er series. The celebration can
wait.

“There’s more work to be
done,” Jameer Nelson said.
“We still have things to accom-
plish.”

Ever since they lost in last
year’s NBA finals, the Magic
have been determined to get
back — and, this time, win it
all.

They are halfway there after
a thoroughly dominating per-
formance against the team that
finished just behind them in the
Eastern Conference standings.

Orlando finished off the
third-seeded Atlanta Hawks
with a 98-84 victory on Mon-
day night, winning the second-
round series by an average of
25.3 points for the most lop-
sided four-game sweep in
league history.

“Guys are just focused,” said
Vince Carter, who led the Mag-
ic with 22 points. “It’s unbe-
lievable to see.”

Orlando heads to the Eastern
Conference finals for the sec-
ond year in a row.

The Magic will face either
Boston or a rematch with
Cleveland, the team they upset
for last year’s conference title
before losing to the Los Ange-
les Lakers in the NBA finals.

The Cavaliers and the Celtics
were tied 2-2 heading into
Game 5 last night, which means
Orlando will get another
extended break before its next
series.

That’s the same formula that
worked so well after a sweep
of Charlotte in the opening
round, when the Magic got
eight days to rest up for the
Hawks — then wiped them out.

















CARLOS BOOZER reacts after missing a shot against the
Lakers in second half of Game 4 in Salt Lake City Monday...
(AP Photo)

Lakers sweep
Jazz in semis

By DOUG ALDEN
AP Sports Writer

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Los Angeles Lakers
have a little more time to rest before their third straight
trip to the Western Conference finals.

The Lakers advanced again by completing a four-
game sweep of Utah with a 111-96 win on Monday night
in Utah, eliminating the Jazz and any threat of playing a
Game 5 back in Los Angeles.

Instead, the Lakers have almost a week to prepare for
the conference finals against the Suns, who wrapped
up their own sweep on Sunday night at San Antonio.

"T look forward to a couple days of rest, but I really
look forward to starting it up against a very good
Phoenix team," said Pau Gasol, who had 33 points and
14 rebounds for the Lakers on Monday.

Kobe Bryant added 32 points for the Lakers, who
will host Game 1 against the Suns on Monday.











Federer
cruises
into 3rd

round

MADRID (AP) — Defending
champion Roger Federer shrugged
off his recent dip in form to cruise
into the third round of the Madrid
Masters, defeating Benjamin Beck-
er 6-2, 7-6 (4) on Tuesday.

The top-seeded Federer broke
serve right away and broke again to
close out the first set. He then took
control of the second set tiebreak-
er.

Federer is seeking to improve
his game in Madrid. He lost his first
clay-court match of the year at the
Rome Masters before exiting the
Estoril Open in the semifinals.

In the women’s tournament,
ninth-seeded Agnieszka Radwans-
ka lost in the second round to Pat-
ty Schnyder 3-6, 6-4, 6-4 and Mari-
on Bartoli was upset by Anabel



Medina Garrigues 6-2, 6-0.

Ronaldinho among

big stars

ignored

for World Cup

By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Football Writer

LONDON (AP) — Ronaldin-
ho was left out of Brazil's initial
World Cup squad, Francesco Tot-
ti and Luca Toni were missing
from Italy's squad and Jamie Car-
ragher came out of retirement for
England as coaches issued their
provisional lists on Tuesday.

The coaches of the 32 teams
headed for next month's cham-
pionship in South Africa faced a
FIFA deadline Tuesday to
announce provisional 30-man
squads.

The lists included some walking

wounded who hope to be fit for [

the tournament, some unexpected
inclusions and some big names
who missed out.

Ronaldinho, Adriano and Ney-
mar were omitted from Brazil
coach Dunga's initial 23-man list.
They could be among the seven
more players to be announced
later by Dunga, but would only be
on standby in case of injuries. The
coach has stuck to most of the
players who helped Brazil win last
year's Confederations Cup and





RONALDINHO reacts after 1-0 loss
in quarterfinal World Cup match
against France at the World Cup
stadium in Frankfurt, Germany...
(AP Photo)

finish top of South American qualifying.

"These players are winners,"

Dunga said. "There is no doubt that

they are prepared to help Brazil reach its goal. They are ready to

give their best for the country.

"Ronaldinho's quality and capacity as a player is indisputable.
But my decision has to be made based on reason. I have to make
a decision based on what happens on the field."

Karim Benzema was a surprise omission from France's provi-
sional squad and coach Raymond Domenech said it was because
of his form on the field rather than allegations of his involvement
in an under-age sex scandal with an escort.

"To me this is not a concern,"

said Domenech, who also left out

veteran midfielder Patrick Vieira but selected off-form striker
Thierry Henry. "I'm only thinking about football and about what
the players want to give on the pitch."

Ruud van Nistelrooy was left out of the Netherlands squad
despite having recovered from a long-term knee injury. Netherlands
coach Bert van Marwijk said the 34-year-old former Manchester
United and Real Madrid striker was not at a high enough level to

play at the World Cup.

There was speculation that Totti might also come out of inter-
national retirement to help Italy defend the World Cup. When
Marcello Lippi's squad was announced Tuesday, there was no
sign of his name, nor that of Toni, despite seven strikers being

picked.

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D-Watle's wife
briefly held
in divorce
proceedings

CHICAGO
(AP) — The
wife of Miami
Heat star
Dwyane
Wade surren-
dered to
authorities in
Chicago on
Monday and
was released
an hour later
after posting a
$10,000 bond.

Siohvaughn
Wade’s brief
stay in custody
came a day
after a Cook
County judge
angrily
ordered her
brought in
when she
failed to appear for a hearing in
the couple’s contentious
divorce.

Last week, Wade filed a law-
suit alleging her husband’s rela-
tionship with actress Gabrielle
Union has caused distress for
her and their two sons.











UNION

Roethlisberger:
Can’t cut him,
can’t stand him

By ALAN ROBINSON
AP Sports Writer

PITTSBURGH (AP) — It’s
fans like Becky Rickard who
Ben Roethlisberger has lost.

The 33-year-old Rickard is a
Pittsburgher and a fan of every
team in town. She should love
the Steelers and their six Super
Bow! titles, including two under
the direction of Roethlisberger.
Right?

“T had a Ben jersey and gave
it away,” Rickard said. “We’re
a proud city and we don’t like
anything to make us look bad.
Ben has tainted what our image
is.”

Rickard might as well be
speaking for many of the
300,000-plus citizens in this
clannish town.

Roethlisberger has worn out
his welcome in Pittsburgh.

The good will generated by
those NFL titles, capped by his
memorable last-minute touch-
down pass to Santonio Holmes
in the Super Bowl 15 months
ago, is all gone. It’s been lost
in Roethlisberger’s night of
tearing through a Georgia uni-
versity town wearing a devil T-
shirt, ending with an underage
university student accusing him
of sexual assault in a nightclub
bathroom.

The case won’t be prosecut-
ed, but the quarterback’s latest
episode of bad behaviour has
destroyed his reputation in
Pittsburgh and beyond, and
shamed his team and its highly
regarded owners.

And the twist is that while
Pittsburgh can’t stand him the
Steelers can’t cut him. At least
not soon, given the $50 million
the team has spent on Roeth-
lisberger’s salary and signing
bonuses since 2008.



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