Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Tribune



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TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

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Car death ir
parents charged

Pair accused of
manslaughter
by negligence

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE parents of a three-
year-old girl who was
found dead inside a
parked car in Fox Hill last
month appeared in court
yesterday in connection
with her death.

Police have charged
Larry Demeritte, 50, and
Sandra McDonald, 44,
both of Abner Street, with
manslaughter by negli-
gence.

The two were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane _ yester-
day afternoon.

It is alleged that on Sat-
urday, April 17, while at
Abner Street, Fox Hill,
the two negligently caused
the death of their daugh-
ter Sandria Demeritte.

The three-year-old was
found in a kneeling posi-
tion inside a parked green
2001 Nubira Daewoo, just

100 metres away from her
father's home on Abner
Street, Fox Hill, on April
17.

According to reports,
Sandria had been missing
for several hours before
her body was found.

She had reportedly wan-
dered from her mother's
house.

An autopsy has revealed
the child had suffocated
in the car.

Her parents were not
required to enter a plea to
the manslaughter charge.

Demeritte was repre-
sented by attorney V
Alfred Gray and McDon-
ald was represented by
attorney Davard Francis.

The prosecution did not
object to the accused
being granted bail.

They were each granted
bail in the sum of $6,000
with two sureties.

The case was adjourned
to May 14 and transferred
to Court 10, Nassau
Street.

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SEE PAGE THIRTEEN |



Pastor among six people
charged over alleged
immigration forgery ring



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



SEE page 12



SIX people, including a local pastor, appeared in court
yesterday in an alleged immigration forgery ring.

Bahamian residents, Absalom Rolle, 43, of Ridgeland
Park, Pastor David McCartney, 52, of Fox Hill Road, and
Sade Palmer, 22, of Union Village, were arraigned before
Magistrate Guillimena Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street
yesterday along with Lucner Michel, 39, of Foxdale Subdi-
vision, Jean Tony St Louis, 38, of Fox Hill, and Pierre Moi-















Sandra McDonald and Larry Demeritte pictured yesterday.

Three charged in connection with PUSQUng AEC

jewellery store armed robbery

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO men and a woman
appeared in court yesterday in
connection with an armed rob-
bery at a jewellery store last
Wednesday.

Police have charged Marvin
Campbell, 37, of Sumner Street,
and Ryan Smith, of Water
Street, with three counts of
armed robbery.

It is alleged that the two men,
while armed with a handgun on

SEE page 15

Land and sea search for missing man

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A RESIDENT of Cat Island has mysteriously disappeared,
sparking an intensive police investigation and land and sea search.
Johannes Maximillian Harsch, 46, a German businessman who
lived alone in Fernandez Bay, was last seen on Sunday, May 2, hav-

SEE page 15

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children’s homes

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State for
Social Services Loretta But-
ler Turner has revealed there
has been a surge in demand
for government subsidies
from care homes, in particu-
lar children’s homes, which
have seen private donations
drop significantly over the
last year.

And after a “really diffi-
cult year” attempting to keep
pace with the demand for
funds from cash-strapped

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Hotel bosses
hopeful of
settlement

with union

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BOSSES at the Wyndham
are hopeful the hotel can set-
tle a dispute with the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union over
the property's planned six-
week closure without indus-
trial action.

Robert “Sandy” Sands,
vice-president of external
affairs at Baha Mar, said hotel
and union officials are still
holding talks to come to some
accord after news broke over
disagreement over the
planned August 23 to Octo-
ber 7 closure.

Mr Sands also disputed
arguments that the temporary

SEE page 12

Govt signs deal to
tlevelop Arawak Cay

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WIDER distribution of the
profits from the freight shipping
industry, reduced cost of living
for Bahamians and the facilita-
tion of the redevelopment and
revitalisation of downtown Nas-
sau were highlighted as the
major benefits of a signing
between the government and
private investors to develop
Arawak Cay into New Provi-
dence’s freight hub yesterday.

After 18 months of negotia-
tions with a group of 19 pro-
posed private stakeholders, the
government announced that it
had signed a memorandum of
understanding with the Arawak
Cay Port Development Com-
pany to forge a private-public
sector partnership that will see
the relocation of shipping oper-
ations from downtown Bay
Street to Arawak Cay.

The announcement was
made at a press conference held

SEE page 12

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



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TWENTY-YEAR-OLD Braneka Bassett was crowned Miss Bahamas World 2010 on Sunda
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who beat her competitors to walk away with the diamond studded crown. The new queen



NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



A FORMER applicant to a flourishing loan
scheme has demanded her money back after
becoming concerned that it could be a scam.

The business is said to have already received
hundreds of applications for its personal loan
service. Applicants are guaranteed $5,000 if they
come up with a cash down payment of $500.

“I found out about it from someone at work.
Plenty people put their money down from April
1. No one got anything yet,” claimed the woman.

“They are preying on poor people. They know
persons are in need so the idea of getting money
right away is a sweet thing,” she said.

The Tribune yesterday tried unsuccessfully to
establish whether the business is legally regis-
tered. The telephone number on the application
form is a cell number that immediately goes to an
answering machine which is filled to capacity.
There is no address printed on the form.

The applicant said she went to the office where
she made the down-payment last week to collect
her $5,000 loan, but was informed the office was
moving and could not disburse funds at that time.

When she demanded that her deposit be
refunded, the employees said if she waited
around for a few hours she could get her money
back.

“After new persons who wanted to apply came
in to put their money down, she was able to get
her money back. She waited for three hours,”



Loan applicant demands
refund over possible scam

said a source familiar with the situation.

As the applicant was able to get her money
back, she decided not to call the police, but she is
now warning the public to be careful.

The former office space of the business is now
vacant. Sources claim it moved on Saturday toa
larger location.

Curiosity

When, out of curiosity, the applicant tried to
enter the business’ new office, she said she was
refused entry.

“A lot of people were inside. The security
guard said they don’t have any more application
forms and they aren’t seeing anyone until Sep-
tember.

“Some people were to get their money today.
They don’t even know the people moved,” she
added.

The application form states that the company
is “not a bank”. It requires applicants to disclose
personal information such as their address, tele-
phone contacts, and employer’s name, as well
as the names of their dependents and the church
they attend.

Rumors surfaced that the company was being
backed by the well-known FML Group of Com-
panies, however FML denied any connection.

According to one source at FML, “hundreds”
have called to inquire about the loan, many
becoming enraged when told that the scheme
was in “no way, shape, or form” connected to
FML.

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THE TRIBUNE

Man plans census boycott until 7,

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

MPs disclose financial assets

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



A LOCAL man plans to boycott this
year's census until all members of parlia-
ment publicly disclose their financial assets
and liabilities.

Kirk Nixon, who manufactures canvas
and awnings, said he is disgusted by the
lack of accountability displayed by politi-
cians, many of whom have failed to declare
the state of their assets despite being
required to do so by law.

Mtr Nixon said he has convinced about 50
friends and family members to shut out
census workers as a form of informal
protest. "We're going to boycott it unless
every MP gives full public disclosure which
they should have done long ago by law,"
said Mr Nixon, 54.

He said the public has a right to know
which businesses their representatives have
a stake in, adding that full disclosure will
ensure politicians do not profit from the
public purse.

"T will not do it and I’m telling every-
body I know not to do it either until we
get full disclosure from each MP as to what
they own, how much money they bring in,
their total value and what projects they are
privately involved in. We know there are a
number of politicians involved in mega pro-

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AIT

with murder

AE eH
Wa

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter





jects in this town which they are not sup-
posed to compete with the general public
for,” he said.

The last full list of public disclosures by
MPs was published on November 3, 2004.

In early February, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham confessed that he was among the
group of politicians who had not complied
with the law stipulating yearly public dis-
closures. "... The Public Disclosures Act is
not being adhered to by members of par-
liament,” Mr Ingraham said.

Documents

The prime minister said he was in the
process of preparing the necessary docu-
ments and explained that his last public dis-
closure was in 2007 when he ran for the
North Abaco constituency in the last gen-
eral election.

He later made a public apology for his
delinquency.

Mr Nixon said it is a contradiction for
government agencies to ask private citizens
to reveal their financial information —
although the government vows to keep the
data confidential — when the country’s leg-
islature has failed to do so.

"Common sense dictates that they have
to pave the way and show everybody that
they are willing to expose their wealth like
they want us to do. Yet they tell us to be

good citizens and give out our personal
information," said Mr Nixon, who believes
the real aim of a census is to aid government
in formulating its strategy for determining
constituency boundaries in the lead up to
national elections.

Under the Public Disclosure Act, before
the first day of March every year, all sena-
tors and members of the House of Assem-
bly must declare their assets, income and
liabilities, as well as those of their spouses
and children. According to the Act, this
information should be published in a nation-
al gazette. A Public Disclosure Commis-
sion, chaired by Oswald Isaacs, is charged
with ensuring compliance with the Act.

Messages left for Mr Isaacs and the com-
mission's secretary Garnett Knowles were
not returned up to press time yesterday.

Director of the Department of Statistics
Kelsie Dorsett said she had not yet received
reports of boycotts or resistance to the cen-
sus. "I haven't heard any of those reports,"
said Ms Dorsett, who added that the public
has so far been "very accommodating."

She recently stressed the importance of
complying with the census, saying it will
provide government and the private sector
with information vital to planning the future
location of schools, senior citizen homes
and other important facilities.

The census, the first since 2000, began
on May 4 and is expected to continue for
about six weeks.

ys
LIGHTBOURNE, 21,



dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Three men
were charged with murder
and armed robbery in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Freeport residents
Kennedy Bain, 21; Alfred
Carvel Rolle, 21; and Duane
Lightbourne, 21, appeared
in Court One before Magis-
trate Debbie Ferguson.

It is alleged that on
November 14, 2009, the
accused men intentionally
and caused the death of







Steffon “Tommy” Mitchell
at Albacore Drive, Freeport.
It is also alleged that on the
same date and in the place,
the men committed armed
robbery.

Attorney Simeon Brown
represented Lightbourne
and Carlson Shurland repre-
sented Rolle and Bain.

The men were not
required to enter plea to the
charges.

The matter was adjourned
to November 10 and 11 for
preliminary inquiry and the
men were remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.



Cycling robbers shoot man

CARVEL ROLLE, 21

BRAZEN gunmen on bicy-
cles opened fire outside the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre yesterday and shot a man
in the leg as they robbed him.

Police said two men armed
with handguns cycled up to a
group of three men outside the
Thompson Boulevard sports
centre at around 2.45pm and
demanded cash.

They stole the men’s money
and one of the robbers shot a
man in his left leg.

The injured man was rushed
to hospital by ambulance where
he is in stable condition.

Police are appealing for pub-
lic assistance in locating the
gunmen, who were both wear-
ing white T-shirts and black
trousers.

In other crime news, the man
shot dead in Regent Street off
West Avenue on Friday, was
identified by police yesterday

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Berkley Theophilus Miller, 17.

Police also said one of the
men killed in a traffic accident
in Eleuthera on Friday is David
Hanna, 23, of Hatchet Bay, not
David Hamilton, as previously
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Playing musical chairs with history

LAST TUESDAY Krissy Love turned
her “Issues of the Day” radio talk show into
a “$10 bill Tuesday” to discover whether
members of the public wanted the image of
Sir Stafford Sands — “a principal architect of
the modern Bahamian economy” — to
remain on or be removed from the Bahamas’
$10 bill.

In 1993, a year after the Ingraham gov-
ernment came to power, it was decided that
on certain Bahamian currency notes the
Queen’s image would be replaced by
“deserving Bahamians.” Those chosen were
first governor general Sir Milo Butler, Sir
Cecil Wallace Whitfield, Sir Roland Symon-
ette, Sir Lynden Pindling and Sir Stafford
Sands. The life of each man marks a mile-
stone in our history. However, there was
vicious objection from PLP quarters when
Sir Stafford’s image appeared on the $10
bill on March 7, 2000.

Here was a finance minister who had had
the foresight to peg our currency to the US
dollar, providing the financial stability from
which this country still reaps benefits. And it
was he, who transformed these islands from
a winter resort, into the year-round success-
ful resort that we know today. Yet, the PLP
felt he did not qualify for recognition. And so
when they won the government in 2002, Sir
Stafford’s image was removed from the cur-
rency. Recently the FNM returned it to the
$10 bill. PLP MP Fred Mitchell then
announced that if the PLP ever regained
power, Sir Stafford would be again ousted.
As Krissy Love described it: “Playing musi-
cal chairs with history!”

Most of the callers to the programme felt
that Sir Stafford had earned his place on
the $10 bill, and should never have been
taken off. “He was a one man band who did
more for this country than any other man,”
said one caller, whose sentiments were
echoed by most of the callers to the show.

However, there were three or four who
felt he should never have been on the bill in
the first place because he was a “traitor.”
And why a traitor? Well, when the UBP
lost the election, Sir Stafford did not want to
live under a black government. He fled the
country, they claimed. When one hears the
name of Hitler, asked another caller to the
radio show, what do you think of? Why the
death of six million Jews was his own reply.
And when people think of Sir Stafford
Sands, he pressed, what to do Bahamians
think of? “Racist,” he insisted.

And yet there were those callers who
knew Sir Stafford personally, and denied he
was a racist. They told of his unlimited gen-
erosity to black Bahamians. “We were very
poor,” one woman explained as she
described Sir Stafford’s kindness and con-
cern for her family.

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Bahamian entertainers were better off
under Sir Stafford than they are now. Local
troubadour Nat Saunders agreed.

Krissy Love, wanted to know why the
name Stafford Sands created such heated
debate? Was one of the callers to the show
suggesting, she asked, that everyone who
left the country after the PLP came to pow-
er was a traitor? She pointed out that not
only did white Bahamians leave, but many
black families also packed their bags and
relocated. She admitted that her family was
among them. In the 1960s, she said, her par-
ents could not deal with the way black peo-
ple were being treated by the new black
regime. One caller said that Sir Stafford
vowed that he would never return to the
Bahamas. This is not true. It was the opinion
of another caller that lack of knowledge of
the truth and politicians pushing the race
card for votes had led to much of today’s
ignorance — and even bitterness.

In 1967 — seven months after the PLP
came to power — Sir Stafford Sands
resigned his seat in the House of Assembly
as the UBP representative for the City. In his
letter of resignation, he said, he was “not
prepared to be a paid professional politi-
cian.” Up until then no member of the leg-
islature received a salary. They felt it their
duty to freely devote time to the adminis-
tration of their beloved country. The PLP
introduced salaries for politicians.

When Sir Stafford’s resignation letter was
read to the House by the Speaker, there was
bedlam. PLP members were annoyed that he
had resigned. They probably wanted him to
remain in their midst so that he could be
the butt of their weekly ridicule. He was to
deny them their vicious pleasure.

The scene in the House that day was one
of hysteria. PLP members made all kinds of
outlandish accusations, not caring whether
they were true or false. Most of them were
false. Sir Lynden, then prime minister, went
so far as to claim that Sir Stafford was “oblig-
ed to run” from the Bahamas because he
was a “total embarrassment” to his party.

And yet it was this same diminutive man
who could with a straight face stand in the
same House on the occasion of Sir Stafford’s
death five years later and say: “For many
years a great Bahamian stood in this cham-
ber and gave service to his country in the
manner he thought best. His name is one
that all of us will remember and one that
will long ring in this country.”

In this column tomorrow we shall
describe the atmosphere that drove Sir
Stafford from his beloved homeland. The
bitterness of that era could still be heard in
the voices of the few ill-informed callers
who contributed to the Krissy Love “$10
Bill Tuesday” debate last week.







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/ Problem solver, self starter and highly
committed individual

/ Must reside in New Providence

/ Willing to travel throughout the Islands

lf you answer yes to the above, we urge you to
send your résumé in strict confidence to:

P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas

by May 17th, 2010

We need to
find a dam
solution

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In a letter issued last year I
urged the Government to con-
sider the urgency in addressing
matters concerning, the securi-
ty of The Bahamas especially
in the area of our borders.
There are no solid indications
that the current economic con-
dition of this region and the
world will get better any time
soon. Right now I believe that
our greatest threat to main-
taining an even moderate sta-
bility during this crisis is the
current deterioration of gover-
nance in Haitt.

The January earthquake in
Haiti has added a severe blow
to what once was an already
depressed state.

Though the world has
responded to the current, basic
needs of Haiti, we cannot
expect or depend on a sus-
tained effort by any group or
nation to keep Haiti from
falling back to a place which it
once was or worse.

The current deteriorating
economic situation in Greece
and the bailout response from
its allies is a prime example of
how recovery efforts by nations
will have to be shifted continu-
ally to meet the demands of a
progressively unstable world.

This recession has made it
such that no nation can now
solely deal with any one of
these unforeseen events that
now seem to occur on a daily
basis.

Our Problem

The time has come for us to
find more creative solutions to
this Immigration problem as it’s
now clear that the ones that we
are currently undertaking do
not work. We cannot afford
during this time to guess and
hope that this issue will go
away. The risk alone of a severe
humanitarian crisis is sufficient
to induce a swift and proactive
approach to the matter from
within Haiti itself.

It’s a known fact that the
immediate and repetitive repa-
triation of migrants from Haiti
is a counter-productive exer-
cise yet we continue to do it.
This recurrent programme was
not funded by the disposable
income of the Bahamian public
even during good economical
times.

Every dollar back then was
important and today —even
more. We cannot afford to con-
tinue to waste money in this
manner. We must find a solu-
tion that will not only stop this
haemorrhaging of our funds but
also transform it into an invest-
ment.

The source of this problem
lies within Haiti itself, its gov-
ernance and its people. It’s
clear that the matter of stabili-





















LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



ty in Haiti is one that cannot
be solved overnight. Last year,
before anyone could have
dreamt an earthquake was
pending, we were given a good
forecast by the Haitian Ambas-
sador himself that we should
expect even more migrants in
the near future. Now the future
is here and it has brought along
the unexpected. What should
we do?

The Dam Solution

What I propose to solve this
problem is an aggressive sys-
tem of control. Like a Dam, we
need a solution that will regu-
late this flood of migrants and
create positive energy from
what is now, no doubt, a
destructive force.

I propose that we create a
regulated and isolated labour
force of Haitian migrants and
nationals who can apply within
Haiti to work on a contract
within the Bahamas. I believe
that the employment of all
Haitian migrants should fall
solely under the portfolio of the
Bahamian Government or a
proper, select organisation who
would qualify to handle the
task.

Therefore, if given that the
Government of the Bahamas
has sole rights to employ these
migrants I propose that we dis-
continue the issuing and renew-
al of work permits for Haitian
nationals living in the Bahamas.
Through isolated, predeter-
mined work assignments for
migrants I believe that we can
also stem out the existing trend
of corruption in the Depart-
ment of Immigration and other
Government entities.

We should embrace this as a
plan for national development
through the creation of new
industries, mass farming and
the improvement of infrastruc-
ture throughout our family
islands. This plan would be sim-
ilar to the work Contract pro-
gramme introduced by the
United States in the late 1940s -
50s which many Bahamians had
applied for. This programme as
many know aided tremendous-
ly in the development of South
Florida.

We can also invite other
Caribbean nations to adopt this
same work programme to aid in
the effort. In the event of a
mass exodus from Haiti we
would then have the ability to
share labour with our neigh-
bouring countries.

A set quota of workers can
be rotated within a specified
period, returning home to allow
for a new group to enter the
programme. If in the event the
quota is exceeded do to an
arrival of illegal migrants we
can then prematurely substitute
those currently here.

What prevents us from
implementing a programme
such as this? The mere fact that
we can give those from Haiti
(who are willing and able) the
opportunity to work, feed their
families and fund their own
flights back to their homeland is
enough an incentive to try it.

Ican go further into how this
plan can work but I must
address another part of this
issue.

Mass Repatriation
and Naturalisation

For any serious effort to
work in this matter it is impor-
tant to conduct massive repa-
triation exercise like none oth-
er previously undertaken. An
aggressively planned repatria-
tion will allow us to begin this
programme with a clean slate.

The issue of naturalisation
for those who qualify should
also be addressed. I believe that
a contributor to our crime prob-
lem are those who were born
to immigrants who have yet to
feel that they are a part of our
society. I believe that it's com-
pletely wrong to leave an indi-
vidual in limbo as to his status
in life if he or she was born into
your society, especially one
whose only connection to his
heritage is that of his parents.
Naturalisation for these per-
sons should be made much eas-
ier and more transparent.

Citizenship, identity and the
benefits of freedom are essen-
tial to positive growth and
development of every human
being. Those who deserve it
should have it. Without this I
believe that loose cultures are
developed and hate towards
those that have these rights are
created.

It would be better for us to
embrace and integrate these
people, many of whom I
believe have a true desire to do
good and contribute to the
development of our country.

Conclusion

It is not in the best interest of
our nation to wait for more
unforeseen events to take place
in order for us to jolt into
action. A proactive approach,
going to where the problem lies
first and applying solutions
beforehand are some of the
greatest keys to maintaining a
healthy and secure society.

The quality of life for every
Bahamian should be first on
the Government’s agenda. We
have been plagued with this
problem of Immigration for far
too long and I feel that there
is no greater time than now to
find a Dam Solution.

DELROY MEADOWS
Nassau,
May 4, 2010.

PRS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Police set to examine
stations’ security after
escape of inmates. — The
Tribune, May 5, 2010.

Security would probably
be improved by simply
removing some of the sta-
tions’ distractions — such as
cell phones, radios, TV’s,
and, of course, any grade D-
dummies.

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
May 5, 2010.







Sandals Emerald Bay Resort

Invites applications for the following position:-

PROJECT WAREHOUSE
COORDINATOR

Applicant must be able to run the entire
storeroom operation including unloading

Containers

Maintain Inventory levels produce monthly

reports

Coordinate all relevant shipping documents
with Customs and coordinate customs

inspections.

Applicant must be computer literate in Excel

Word and email.

Operating a fork lift Skytrac and Crane a must
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Working hours Monday-Friday 7am-6pm
Saturday 7am-3pm.

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cmajor@g¢grp.sandals.com

Or fax to
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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





JENNISAN ENRIQUEZ of Forest Heights Academy, Marsh Harbour,
made her mark in the Texaco Road Safety Speech Competition. She
placed third and won a $3,000 scholarship prize.





THE TOP THREE WINNERS of the 9th Annual Texaco Speech Com-

petition smile happily after a well-fought battle to take top honours in
the event, a youth development programme of Chevron Bahamas and
a segment of Chevron’s “Energy for Learning” worldwide initiative.

Family Island students dominate

= TEXACO S

HREE - stu-

dents from

Family Island

schools walked
away with the top prizes at
the 9th Annual Texaco
Speech Competition to pro-
mote road safety.

The three winners - one
boy and two girls - beat out
29 competitors from nine
islands at the event held at
the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts on May 1
under the theme "Shifting
Gears with Texaco for a
Safer Bahamas".

Governor-General Sir
Arthur Foulkes and Lady
Joan Foulkes were the
patrons of the competition’s
finals.

Thirteen-year-old Valtio
Cooper, an 11th grader at
North Andros High School,
walked away with the first
prize, with Michelle Greene
of San Salvador Central
High in second place, fol-
lowed by Jennisan Enriquez
of Forest Heights Academy,
Marsh Harbour, in third.

The Family Island trio
took home trophies and
scholarship prizes of
$10,000, $6,000 and $3,000,
respectively.

Gifts

The three, along with oth-
er participants, received a
number of gifts and oppor-
tunities, including meetings
with the country’s leaders,
Sir Arthur and Prime Min-

r

yy

Tt

nan it \ at \ Ye
[ie z

]

/ Mi i} f



PEEC



ister Hubert Ingraham.
Among the presenters of

the special awards was Hec-

tor Infante, Chevron’s pub-

Notice is hereby given that the Thirtieth (80th)

Annual General

Meeting of THE PUBLIC

WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION
LIMITED, will be held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, Bay Street, on Friday, May 21,
2010, commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

purposes:

* To receive the report of The Board of

Directors.

* To receive the Audited Report for 2009

* To elect members of The Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee and Credit Committee

+ To discuss and approve the budget for 2011

All eligible members, wishing to run for a
position on the Board of Directors, Supervisory
Committee or Credit Committee, are asked to
submit their names to the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4 p.m.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



lic and government affairs
manager - a member of the
Chevron party who travelled
to Nassau in support of the
Chevron Bahamas event.

Valtio, son of single par-
ent, Tina Cooper, thanked
God, his mother, his school
principal and teachers, and
the district administrator for
their sustained support,
which contributed to his
winning.

He lauded Chevron
Bahamas for having
“stepped up to the plate”
and ensured that the com-
petition was successful.




iy

Tox ae 0 Dthy

E
Lear

Brin
Spee oad Safoty
Wile OM PBtitian



DISPLAYING a gift for showmanship, Valtio Cooper of North Andros
High emerged as overall winner of the Texaco Road Safety Speech

Competition.











RYAN BAIN, district sales manager of Chevron Bahamas, explained the company’s educational mission,
which it furthers though its sponsorship of the annual speech competition.

“Road safety is a crucial
topic in our day and age
because many Bahamians
don’t think of it as a threat
to their lives, but during this
speech competition and dur-
ing the preparation of this
speech I learnt that shifting
gears is serious, serious busi-
ness that requires a para-
digm shift.

“Therefore, road safety
must begin in our minds and
manifest itself in our
actions,” he said.

Complimenting the other
two winners, San Salvador’s
Michelle Greene, who came

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MICHELLE GREENE of
San Salvador High
School took second
place in the May 1, Tex-

aco Road Safety Speech Competi-
tion and was awarded a scholarship
prize of $6,000 for her efforts.



Road Safety Competition were delighted by the
musical renditions of the “Texaco Quartet”, whose
members included Tanisha Braithwaite of Preston
Albury High School, Eleuthera; Quitel Charlton of
St Francis de Sales High School, Abaco; Giavono
Bowe of Old Bight High School, Cat Island, and
Winnae Hunt of Sunland Baptist Academy, Grand
Bahama, who is also the junior minister of
Tourism. The impromptu group was formed just
two days before the finals.



second, was very upbeat
about the value of the com-
petition.

Positive

“The Texaco Road Safety
Speech Competition is one
of the most positive experi-
ences of my young life. I
must say the competition
has given me a new boost of
confidence in my speaking
skills and has definitely
raised my self-confidence to
a new level. I would recom-
mend this experience to all
my peers,” she said.

The 2010 competitors rep-
resented ten secondary
schools in New Providence,
high schools on Abaco,
Andros (North and South),
Cat Island, Eleuthera,
Grand Bahama, Long Island
and Salvador, as well as
Junior Achievement,
Bahamas Association of
Compliance officers, Gen-
tlemen’s Club, Rotary Club
of Abaco and the Junior
Tourism Minister Pro-
gramme.

Ryan Bain, district sales
manager of Chevron
Bahamas, explained the
selection process, which con-
tributed to the strength of
the field of competitors:

“Each year since then

(2001), the competition has
invited the best young
speakers in the Bahamas to
participate. All of them
come to us as winners of
various debates and speech
competitions. They are the
top speakers in their high
schools and youth organisa-
tions.

“The competition helps
students to sharpen their
research, thinking and
speaking skills.

“We push the educational
mission even further with
the award of scholarship
prizes to aid in funding the
college studies of the top
three winners. We further
promote leadership skills by
appointing the first place
winner as ‘Texaco Youth
Spokesperson’ for a year,”
he said.

‘I must say the
competition has giv-
en me a new boost
of confidence in my
speaking skills and
has definitely raised
my self-confidence
to a new level.’



Michelle Greene





SIR ARTHUR FOULKES, Governor-General of the Bahamas, greets
Hector Infante, Chevron’s public and government affairs manager.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Cruise ‘passenger spending
increases almost 39 per cent’

Industry executives
reveal rise over the

last three years
By BETTY VEDRINE

THERE has been an
almost 39 per cent increase in
cruise passenger spending
over the last three years,
according to industry execu-
tives.

Speaking to the media at a
meeting between government
officials and members of the
Florida Caribbean Cruise
Association (FCCA) on Fri-
day, Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Senator Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said that
this “notable” increase is due
to the dialogue between the
government and industry
stakeholders.

FCCA represents a num-
ber of cruise lines that serve
the Bahamas and is one of the
many organisations with
which the Ministry of Tourism
has formed a partnership to
ensure visitor satisfaction.

“The best news for us is
that there has been an
increase in the level of cruise
passenger satisfaction in num-
ber and spending from the lat-
est survey, SO we want to con-
tinue that upward trend,” said
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace.

“In order to ensure that we
are able to do that, we sit and
talk about ways that we are
moving along that path
together.”

Meeting

He added that the meeting
is part of a regular series of
ongoing gatherings where
stakeholders seek ways to
improve the quality of expe-
rience that cruise passengers
have when coming into the
Bahamas.

“We try to cover every pos-
sible scenario such as what
happens when vessels come
in, scheduling of vessels to
facilitate the movement of
passengers in and around the
port.”

Topics discussed at the
meeting included the dredg-
ing of the harbour, water tour
dispatch, crime, cancellation
of vessels, Customs clearance
for private islands and hull
maintenance while in port,
among others.

President of FCCA
Michelle Paige said that “hap-
py” passengers spend money,
and the amount of money
that the passengers and crew
are spending has gone up con-
siderably.

“If you estimate that the
passenger spending went up
almost 39 per cent over the
last three years; spending by
the crew went up from $20 to
$78, which is 290 per cent.

“Those changes do not
come about because nothing
happened. Those changes
come about because the prod-
uct has improved and because
of the communication,” said
Ms Paige.

Minister of Environment
Dr Earl Deveaux was also
present and said he was very
satisfied that the police have
taken the initiative to ensure a













(BIS photo/Kristaan Ingraham).
MEMBERS of the Florida Caribbean Cruise Association visit the
Queen’s Staircase to see safety measures installed by the police to
ensure cruise passenger's safety.









"(BIS photo/ Kristaan Ingraham)

MINISTER of Environment Dr Earl Deveaux (right) speaks with
reporters as Minister of Tourism and Aviation Senator Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace looks on. Both ministers were attending a meeting
between government officials and members of the Florida Caribbean
Cruise Association at the Port Department, Friday, May 7.

higher level of safety of visi-
tors to the Bahamas.

Pleased

“IT am very pleased with
what the police and the port
controller are doing to ensure
the safety and security of our
visitors. The police have
installed CCTV all over
downtown Nassau,” Dr
Deveaux said.

“Additional resources have
also been mobilised with
respect to the port itself.

“We have a well-trained
and highly motivated team of
Defence Force officers and
port officers that work along
with the police. While we do
have incidents, safety as a rule
is not a concern for us,” he
said.

Other initiatives that have
been instituted to ensure the
safety of sites frequently vis-
ited by cruise ship passengers
include the increase in police
presence and proper lighting.

NOTICE

The Annual General Meeting of the
Board of Directors of the Bahamas
Planning Association will be held

on Thursday, June 10, 2010 at 6:00
p.m. at the Association’s Centre on
#37 East Avenue, Centreville. Only
financial members will be allowed
to vote. Do you want to become a
member? Attend the AGM.





“The best news for us
is that there has been
an increase in the lev-
el of cruise passenger
satisfaction in number
and spending from
the latest survey, so
we want to continue
that upward trend.”



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

FCCA PRESIDENT Michelle
Paige addresses reporters dur-
ing the meeting between the
Florida Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation and government offi-
cials at the Port Department,
Friday, May 7.







FCCA MEMBERS and media take a tour of Fort Charlotte to see
new safety measures implemented by the police to ensure cruise
passenger safety.

(BIS photo/Kristaan Ingraham)



ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department’s Triage, Registration and Patient Waiting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic,

Effective Tuesday May || th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed,

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services,

For more information please call 502-7885 for A&E Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic.






Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused,

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

The Centre for Continuing Education

& Extension Services (CEES)

Presents a special town meeting on the

Becker CPA Review Programme

GUEST SPEAKER:
Mr. Steven Chou,

Director of International Business Operations,

Becker Professional Education, Chicago, Illinois.

DATE:
Wednesday, May 12th at 5:30pm.

VENUE:

Michael H. Eldon Boardroom, The College of The Bahamas,

Thompson Boulevard

Students who prepare for the CPA Exams using the Becker Review pass at double

the rate of non-Becker candidates.

CPA Lecturers will be present at the town meeting to answer your questions.

For more information call: 328-1936, 328-0093 or



email: lbastian@cob.edu.bs

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

at the Cabinet Office, in the
Churchill Building in downtown
Nassau.

The deal struck facilitates the
construction of port infrastruc-
ture on Arawak Cay and in the
harbour to allow for the other
two thirds of the country’s
freight that does not presently
arrive into that area already to
do so, as well as the construc-
tion of an inland warehouse
depot at Gladstone Road from
which containers not scheduled
for immediate distribution to
businesses will be kept, with
their movement then taking
place in the evening rather than
day time hours to reduce con-
gestion.

Flanked by Cabinet ministers
and company directors, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and
Jimmy Mosko, chairman of the
Arawak Cay Port Development
Company, confirmed that the
government will take a 40 per
cent stake in the new port, as
will the 19 private sector stake-
holders who came together
under the Arawak Cay Port
Development Company, and
eventually the public will be
able to collectively buy up a 20
per cent share in the port. The
government and the private sec-
tor shareholders will put up a
total of $20 million each
towards setting up the opera-
tion.

Mr Ingraham said he antici-
pates the private sector will lead
the way in operating the port,
and ultimately it is the govern-
ment’s intention that the 40 per
cent stake it presently owns also
will be made available to the
public.

“Historically and even today
the substantial income derived
from the shipping industry in
New Providence has been

owned and controlled by a
select few families — the Symon-
ettes, the Bethells, the Kellys,
the Farringtons, the Roberts
and more recently the Moskos,
the Wells, and the Light-
bournes.

“Today we are taking action
so that income from shipping is
distributed more equitably and
evenly among the population
of The Bahamas. Sixty per cent
of the profits derived from this
enterprise will go directly to
other Bahamians other than the
historic shipping families,” said
the Prime Minister.

Mr Ingraham emphasised on
several occasions that the deal
was one intended to benefit the
public at large through a “broad
ownership structure”, rather
than any small group of indi-
viduals or FNM party support-
ers, as the Opposition PLP have
claimed in their criticisms of the
plan to relocate shipping to
Arawak Cay rather than their
preferred southwest New Prov-
idence location.

The PLP came out strongly
against the Arawak Cay move
from the early stages of its con-
sideration by the present gov-
ernment, suggesting any
investors would put in money
“at their own risk” given that
the PLP claims it will move the
port to its preferred southwest
location if elected in 2012. The
south western New Providence
site, although ranked top in a
study conducted by indepen-
dent consultants by the previ-
ous government, was deemed
by the current government to
be a cost prohibitive choice for
a new port site, both for
investors and the general public
who would see the cost of goods
rise.

In fact the independent con-

LOCAL NEWS

Govt signs deal to develop Arawak Cay

sultants’ study found that
Arawak Cay ranked ahead of
the Christie administration’s
preferred southwestern port site
when it came to minimising
environmental impact, a fact the
the PLP government did not
make public. The main factor
behind Arawak’s downgrade
was that the location —
although it was environmental-
ly superior — did not fit into
the Christie government’s mas-
ter planning vision for the
island.

Yesterday Mr Mosko
declined to respond to the com-
ments from the PLP about the
port on behalf of the investors,
stating that he is “not a politi-
cian.”

Mr Ingraham belittled the
claim that the PLP would derail
the project, saying “the signing
of this agreement and the com-
mencement of the project
speaks for itself more than any
word that can be uttered by
anyone.”

The Prime Minister added he
was pleased to “have a hand” in
yesterday’s signing, the realisa-
tion of a “40 year delayed
promise” that freight would be
moved off the Bay Street water-
front.

The entire port project is set
to be completed by October
2011, and Mr Mosko estimated
that all freight will be relocated
from Bay Street by December
of this year.

The first “marine” phase of
the construction work, which
officially got underway yester-
day, will be conducted by US-
based company American
Bridge, a subcontractor on the
recent harbour-dredging and
Arawak Cay extension project,
at a cost of around $33 million,
while the later phases of con-





JIMMY MOSKO, chairman of the Arawak Cay Port Development



Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at the site at Arawak Cay.

struction will involve local con-
tractors and may create around
150 construction jobs, it was
claimed.

The government will lease
47.7 acres of the roughly 150
acres available at Arawak Cay
to the port company in which
it holds a stake and 15 acres in
the Gladstone Road area for
the inland depot.

For this, the government will
collect $2 million in rent annu-
ally, or $40 per container, for
the lease of the land, whichever
turns out to be greater, said Mr
Ingraham.

“We seek in this exercise
firstly to lower the cost of goods
and the cost of living to the
Bahamian people by reducing
the cost of imported goods. We
seek to expand the ownership

by Bahamians of an import
profitable sector of the Bahami-
an economy. By doing this we’ll
open up significant real prop-
erty along Bay Street for rede-
velopment and growth down-
town and we will also reduce
congestion along the main thor-
oughfare in our city and permit
the restoration of our city to its
earlier days of charm,” he
added.

The exercise will also ulti-
mately see customs operations
downtown consolidated — from
six current locations including
the Prince George cruise dock,
to two — allowing for the “rede-
ployment” of some officers to
other areas.

Meanwhile, part of the work
to be done at the Arawak Cay
site to prepare for the reloca-

Company, holds a rope yesterday with

tion of the freight operations
will require the removal and
relocation of the Water and
Sewage storage tank that exists
at the site. The cost of this will
be borne by the joint public-pri-
vate company rather than the
WSC and will result in less
evaporation of water from the
tank, and therefore savings for
the cash-strapped corporation,
said Mr Ingraham.

“So this is a godsend for them
also,” he added.

The Prime Minister said that
the Memorandum of Under-
standing and the as yet unre-
leased traffic study pertaining
to the impact of the port in this
regard will be made available
to the public after they are
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly tomorrow.

Pastor among six people charged

FROM page one

closure violates a recently
signed agreement — between
the union and the Bahamas
Hotel Employers Associa-
tion — which required the
union to slash pension con-
tributions by half in 2010 for
the promise that BHEA will
not lay off any hotel work-
ers this year.

According to Mr Sands,
none of the property's 1,200
employees will be laid off

during the six-week closure.
Instead, that time will be
allotted for employees to
take their vacations, many
of whom will be entitled to
four or five week holidays
with pay, he said.

This, he said, is better
than the alternative of hav-
ing employees garnering one
day’s pay while on short-
ened work weeks during
slow periods.

“We've stated our posi-
tion in terms of the need to
close and in terms of the
agreement to the pension
fund. We believe that we are
compliant — the pension
fund says ‘not to reduce the
number of employees in the
bargaining unit for the
entire year of 2010’.”

He said hotel executives
met with the union officials
last week to inform them of
the planned closure. He said
this meeting came after a
decision made in January to

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protect the financial viabili-

ty of the hotel, which closed

for six weeks around the
same time last year during :
a traditionally low occupan- :

? se, of Dean’s Lane.
He added that talks :

cy period.

between the hotel and the
union were stalled because

tions.
Messages left for union

head Nicole Martin were :
not returned up to press |
time. However BHCAWU :

Secretary general Darren :

the ; nent residency certificate and also pleaded not guilty to a separate
inion’ discontent wih ihe 2. Ue alleging that he was found in possession of four Bahamian
planned closure earlier this : permanent residency certificates.

week and hinted at a possi- fences:

Woods expressed

ble strike.

But Mr Sands is confident $500 from Suzette Pennerman.

the matter can be resolved

amicably, although he added ; pleaded not guilty to abetting in the possession of a forged docu-

Wyndham's : ment.

planned closure is set in :

that the
stone.

history of resolving disputes

(but) it requires the oppor-
tunity for the parties to get :
together and discuss the way :

forward. It is our hope that : erre I t 3
: Immigration permanent residency stamps and not guilty to a

: charge of conspiring to possess forged documents.

we will work our way
through this,” he said.

Close to 1,200 people are }

: is expected in court today along with Michel and St Louis when
See ee may ? immigration officials will inform the court whether they have

Casino, about 40 per cent of legal status in the country.

part of granted $5,000 bail with one surety and Palmer was granted $8,000

: bail with one surety. The case was adjourned to September 22.

Hotel and Crystal Palace

them are a
BHCAWU.

FROM page one

They are all charged with possessing forged documents between

December 1, 2009, and May 7, 2010. They all pleaded not guilty yes-
; terday to the charge.
of BHCAWU's April elec- :

Rolle and Palmer pleaded not guilty to conspiring to commit

forgery between December 1, 2009, and May 7, 2010. They also
: pleaded not guilty to a charge of forgery. It is alleged that between

the same time the two forged nine Bahamian permanent residen-
cy certificates, a Bahamian naturalization certificate, and five
Bahamian immigration permanent residency stamps.

Rolle also pleaded not guilty to possession of a forged perma-

He also pleaded not guilty to the charge of fraud by false pre-

Court dockets state that on Thursday, March 25, he obtained

McCartney, the pastor at Full Life Pentecostal Ministries,

It is alleged that between Tuesday, December 1, and Friday,

: May 7, McCartney did facilitate Jean Tony St Louis in possessing
"I think that we have a : certain forged documents, namely a Bahamian permanent resi-

: dency certificate bearing the name of Jean Tony St Louis.

Michel also pleaded not guilty to possession of forged docu-
ments, namely two Bahamian permanent residency certificates, and

a permanent residency stamp.

Pierre Moise pleaded not guilty to possession of three Bahamas

Moise, who is represented by attorney Romona Farquharson,

Rolle was granted $15,000 bail with two sureties. McCartney was

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

homes caring for the country’s
most vulnerable in a harsh eco-
nomic climate, the department
of social services and those finan-
cially challenged institutions it
seeks to support will be placed
under even greater strain in the
next budget cycle, suggested the
Minister of State.

“A lot of the homes are hav-
ing financial challenges. These
are very difficult times,” said Mrs
Butler Turner, who suggested
that cut backs to her depart-
ment’s budget expected in the
coming budget cycle in the face
of ongoing government revenue
shortfalls will only exacerbate
the challenges faced by the gov-
ernment in meeting the higher-
than-usual demand.

Meanwhile, in addition to the
financial hardships of homes hit
by the economic downturn
which her ministry has sought
to address in recent times, Mrs
Butler-Turner noted the unique
case of the Grand Bahama Chil-
dren’s Home, which cares for
children aged up to 12 who have
been removed from their fami-
lies for reasons of abandonment,
abuse or neglect.

The home, once the “‘pet pro-
ject” of Lady Henrietta St
George, widow of the late
Edward St George, former part-
owner and Chairman of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
used to receive over $500,000
from the GBPA towards its
operating costs, however the
legal wrangling over the owner-
ship of the GBPA which raged
unresolved for years took its toll
on the home, said Mrs Butler
Turner, who said the govern-
ment had to step in to fill the
funding void when this annual

Children's homes

donation dried up.

“We've had to take over a
huge undertaking there that is
no longer being supported the
way it was by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority,” said
the minister.

“We have barely been able to
meet all of the demands, we’ve
met them, but with many con-
straints,” she added.

She said that while the Board
of Directors at the home have
in the past done an excellent job
of fundraising within the com-
munity for the children’s home,
Grand Bahama “‘s not in a posi-
tion to support fundraisers like
that anymore because it is chal-
lenged tremendously.”

The Tribune understands that
the Ranfurly Home for children
in New Providence is also expe-
riencing major financial hard-
ships at present, although when
contacted late last week staff
members said the situation was
“no more (difficult) than usual.”

Mrs Butler-Turner said that
Social Services officials have a
meeting scheduled with the
Board of Directors at the Ran-
furly home in the near future in
relation to funding challenges.

As demand for grants and
other additional subsidies rose
over the last year in particular,
Mrs Butler Turner said that her
ministry has sought to find extra
money to offer them and was
able to give a “one time shot”
of funding to “some homes that
were really crying out for help”
during the budget review exer-
cise earlier this year, but were
not able to benefit.

Social Services sought to assist
numerous church-run homes “so

Land and sea search for missing man

FROM page one

ing a meal at the Hawk’s Nest restaurant at around 10.30pm.

Police found his home secure, his truck untouched, his yacht tied
up to the dock, and his aircraft sitting on the New Bight airport run-
way undisturbed while there has been no trace of Mr Harsch.

A team of five Criminal Detective Unit officers flew from New
Providence to New Bight on Tuesday, May 4, to assist the search
along with a superintendent of police from Exuma and Cat Island.

They have searched the 48-mile long island and ordered a wider
search of the surrounding waters but have yet to find any sign of Mr
Harsch, said Assistant Commissioner of Police Glenn Miller.

Officers questioned two men in connection with the disappear-
ance yesterday, however no charges had been brought before The

Tribune went to press.

“We have not yet established whether there has been a crime or

not,” said Mr Miller.

“His vehicle — his truck — was found in good condition with no
damage, his house was secured, his aircraft at the airport is in
good condition, and his yacht is also in good condition.

“We have found no signs of struggle in his house or his air-

craft.

“The officers have done an area search of land and sea and not

come up with anything so far.”

Police are appealing to the public to assist investigations.

Anyone who knows anything that may help locate Mr Harsch
should call police urgently on 911, 919, 502-9991, or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

fee ate ee

facebook
ie ee

that they don’t have to delve into
their church finances,” she not-

cycle coming to a close, money is
tighter than ever before for the
ministry, and things are only set
to get more challenging even as
the demand from homes persists.

“One of the things we’re
awaiting now is that we’re going

FROM page one

: : jewellery.
Pega pa aa. a eo Smith has also been charged with raping a \
woman.

imperative that we all cut back in
our budgets so this is going to
be very difficult for us,” said Mrs
Butler-Turner, who said Social
Services “absolutely could not”
provide for an increase in its
grants to care homes in the com-
ing financial period.

the charges of armed robbery.

‘Three charged in connection with
es with the present budget : jewellery store armed robbery

May 5, robbed Michael Anthony Jewellers, ; I
Mackey Street, of $123,123 in jewellery. It is
further alleged they robbed William Malone of
$500, and robbed a woman of nearly $20,000 in

The men were not required to enter a plea to













Sandra Smith, Marvin Campbell and Ryan Smith

Campbell, along with 41-year-old Sandra
Smith, of Fowler Street, were arraigned on one
count of possession of an unlicensed firearm
and three counts of possession of ammunition.

It is alleged that the two were found in pos-
session of a Makarov 9mm pistol, 27 rounds of

9mm bullets, 32 .45 mm bullets and five rounds
of 9mm bullets.

Campbell pleaded guilty to the charges while
Smith pleaded not guilty. The accused are
expected back in court this afternoon at 2pm.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

Calendar contest

speci Contest details listed on our website

Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for
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e original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be
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CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name,
oto location must be written on the reverse of the print.
be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality
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Return this form with photos and CD to:
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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010 THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

BRITAIN'S PRIME MINISTER GORDON BROWN speaking to the media outside his official London
residence, No.10 Downing Street, Monday, May, 10 2010. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown
announced Monday he will resign by September — a dramatic move that improves his Labour Party's
chances of staying in power in a possible coalition government with the third-place Liberal Democrats.
Brown said Labour, which came a distant second to the Conservatives in Thursday's national election,
would begin a leadership contest to replace him while he focused on talks aimed at breaking Britain's
election deadlock.

Simon Dawson/AP





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UK’s Prime Minister
Gordon Brown to resign

LONDON

BRITISH Prime Minister
Gordon Brown made a dra-
matic bid to keep his belea-
guered Labour Party in power
after it was punished in elec-
tions last week, announcing
Monday he will resign by Sep-
tember at the latest even if the
Liberal Democrats — being
wooed by the Conservatives —
decide to join his party in gov-
ernment, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The political theater, played
out in front of the iconic black
door of No. 10 Downing Street,
comes as David Cameron's
Conservatives — which won
the most seats in Parliament
but fell short of a majority —
struggled in their attempts to

RODEO BURGER

win over the third-place Liber-
al Democrats.

Brown's party has been will-
ing to entertain supporting the
Liberal Democrats’ demand for
an overhaul of the voting sys-
tem toward proportional rep-
resentation, which would great-
ly increase that party's future
seat tallies. But evening
brought a further twist with a
counteroffer from the Conser-
vatives — of a referendum on a
less dramatic type of electoral
reform.

While uncertainty prevails,
to the displeasure of the mar-
kets, one thing appears certain:
The career of Brown — the
Treasury chief who waited a
decade in the wings for his
chance to become prime minis-
ter — is winding to an end.

Brown, looking statesman-
like but resigned to political
reality, accepted blame for
Labour's loss of 91 seats in last
week's election and its failure to
win a parliamentary majority.

No other party won outright
either, resulting in the first
“hung Parliament" since 1974
and triggering a frantic scram-
ble between Brown's Labour
and the main opposition Con-
servatives to broker a coalition
— or at least an informal part-
nership — with the Liberal
Democrats.

"As leader of my party, I
must accept that that is a judg-
ment on me," Brown said,
offering to step down before
the party conference in Sep-
tember.

Brown said Liberal Democ-
rat leader Nick Clegg had asked
to begin formal coalition talks
with the Labour Party and said
he believed their parties might
form a center-left alliance.
Clegg had previously suggested
Brown's departure would like-
ly be a condition of any deal
with Labour.

The Liberal Democrats have
seemed genuinely open to a
deal with the Conservatives —
who are less ideologically com-
patible with them than they are
with Labour — largely out of a
sense that Cameron won a
moral mandate and supporting
him was expected by the nation
at a time of economic turmoil.

But Brown's statement
appeared to give Clegg's party
a viable alternative, and real
temptation: join a possibly
short-lived alliance, remove the
unpopular Brown, and pass
electoral reform that could
transform their fortunes and
even banish the Conservatives
to the political wilderness.

The day's drama disappoint-
ed those hoping for a swift res-

5 PC CHICEEN TENDERS

olution and deepened the post-
election limbo that many feared
could further undermine con-
fidence in Europe's financial
markets.

The pound fell nearly 1.5
cents against the dollar after
Brown's statement on his
future, trading at $1.4866 late
Monday.

Belying morning optimism
and buoyant statements by par-
ty spokesmen, the Liberal
Democrats announced by after-
noon that they hadn't yet
reached an agreement with the
Conservatives on education
funding, fair taxation and elec-
toral reform. Then came
Brown's offer.

Clegg said the Liberal
Democrats and Conservatives
had "some very constructive
talks ... and made a great deal
of progress. But we haven't yet
reached a comprehensive part-
nership agreement."

The Conservatives said their
final offer on electoral reform
was for a referendum on the
“alternative vote" electoral sys-
tem, under which voters rank
candidates by preference and
second-choice votes are allo-
cated if no candidate wins 50
percent of the first preference
votes. The result could give
Clegg's party more seats — but
it would not constitute the rev-
olution that proportional rep-
resentation would.

Under proportional repre-
sentation — widely used in con-
tinental Europe — the Liberal
Democrats, with almost a quar-
ter of the vote, would have that
proportion of parliament seats.
Under Britain's current system
they won only 57 out of 650, or
just 9 percent of the seats.

Cameron's center-right Con-
servatives won 306 seats and
Labour 258. Smaller parties
took the rest.

William Hague, a senior
Conservative lawmaker and
Cameron's de facto deputy, said
that given that breakdown it
appeared unlikely that the Con-
servatives could form a minor-
ity government on their own —
a scenario that is allowed but
would not survive a no-confi-
dence vote.

He also said voters would not
want to see a second un-elected
leader. Brown was handed the
reins from former Prime Min-
ister Tony Blair.

Hague said the Conserva-
tives had offered the Liberal
Democrats a full coalition, with
Cabinet positions for members
of Clegg's team and a pledge
not to hold a new national elec-
tion for at least two and a half
years.




eine




\




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THE TRIBUNE

&



TUESDAY,



MAY

ter,



2010

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

‘18 months’ to merge the
Brewery and Burns House

By ALLISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Gov-
ernment has
given brewing
giant Heineken
18 months to
“consolidate”
Commonwealth
Brewery and
Burns House
into one compa-
ny prior to a 25
per cent initial
public offering (IPO), Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

Confirming what has been
widely reported, namely that
Heineken has to offer shares in
the combined group to Bahami-
an retail and institutional
investors in return for govern-
ment approval for purchasing
the stake held by a holding
vehicle for Sir Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson and his family, Mr
Ingraham said that such an
arrangement would broaden
Bahamian ownership of key
economic assets.

“Government has agreed
Kalik and Commonwealth have
to make shares 25 per cent
available to the public of the
Bahamas as we seek to broaden
ownership,” the Prime Minis-
ter said of the deal exclusively
revealed by Tribune Business
earlier this year.

“Commonwealth will first of
all have to consolidate the two
companies into one, and I think
they have up to 18 months to

INGRAHAM



* PM confirms 25% IPO to
follow from Heineken buyout

* But ‘integration’ comment may
raise competition concerns

do so, so they will choose the
timing.”

While that statement may
dampen hopes in the Bahamian
investor and brokerage com-
munity that an IPO - possibly
worth up to $25 million - was
imminent, Mr Ingraham’s state-
ment also raises some further
questions in relation to
Heineken’s $100 million pur-
chase of the stakes held in
Commonwealth Brewery and
Burns House by the Associated
Bahamian Distillers and Brew-
ers (ABDAB), the Finlayson
family vehicle.

ABDAB currently owns 47
per cent of Commonwealth
Brewery, giving Heineken the
majority 53 per cent equity
stake. However, the position is
reversed at Burns House,
where ABDAB holds a 78.8
per cent stake.

While the deal seems good
for Bahamian investors, given
that Commonwealth Brewery
- the most valuable asset - is
included, and they will have
equity ownership in a vertically
integrated brewer, distributor
and retailer (liquor being a
commodity for which there is
inelastic demand), questions
will be raised on competition
grounds.

SEE page 2B

Water Corp still owing

$4.6m to key supplier



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE cash-strapped Water &
Sewerage Corporation still
owed its main water supplier
some $4.6 million as at the 2010
first quarter end, it was
revealed last night, with the
Government pledging that
monthly payments through
June would both meet current
invoices and reduce “delin-
quent receivables”.

BISX-listed Consolidated
Water, unveiling its first quarter
results, said in its 10-Q filing
with the Securities & Exchange
Commission (SEC): “As of

March 31, 2010, Consolidated
Water-Bahamas was due
approximately $4.6 million
from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation.

“We have been informed
previously by representatives
of the Bahamas government
that the delay in paying our
accounts receivables is due to
operating issues within the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, that the delay does not
reflect any type of dispute with
us with respect to the amounts
owed, and that the amounts will
ultimately be paid in full.

SEE page 3B

Regulator criticises BTC
over ‘double dipping’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) was
yesterday criticised by the sec-
tor regulator for “double dip-
ping” on revenues by charging
its cellular customers for receiv-
ing international calls, which it
said could have been invested
in overcoming “technical chal-
lenges” at the Government-
owned incumbent.

Responding to comments by

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president of sales and market-
ing, that the company would
give up $2-$3 million in rev-
enue per annum by eliminating
these charges, the Utilities Reg-
ulation & Competition Author-
ity (URCA) said the case for
its action was proven because it
would bring the Bahamas into
line with the rest of the
Caribbean and the world.
“BTC has profited for many

SEE page 3B

Sotheby's



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

aha Mar yesterday

said the six-week

closure of the

Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace
casino accounted for a “sig-
nificant portion” of the 50 per
cent reduction in its 2009 net
losses, compared to the year
before.

Explaining the economic
rationale for the six-week clo-
sure, which Baha Mar will
again effect this year during
the slowest period of the
tourism season, Robert Sands,
the developer’s senior vice-
president of external and gov-
ernmental affairs, told Tribune
Business: “We cut the loss in
half [in 2009] from the year
before.”

When asked about how
much the summer closure con-
tributed to this saving, Mr
Sands added: “It was a signif-
icant portion, or else we would
not be doing it this year. It
reduces the costs and expens-
es at traditionally the slowest
time of the year, and we’re
able to put staff on vacation
at the same time.

“We believe that we
reduced the loss from the year
before significantly, and that
allowed us to start the year at
our current staff levels.”

Mr Sands, who is also the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
(BHA) president, said hotel
operating costs throughout the
Bahamas had benefited from



Closure cut Baha Mar losses ‘in half’

* Resort executive says Wyndham/Crystal Palace
closure accounted for ‘significant portion’
of 50% reduction in 2009 losses

* Closure savings ‘close’ to target, and although
‘not all goals’ met, developer believes additional
savings to come in 2010 in areas such as energy

the reduction in contributions
to the hotel pension funds,
which fell by 50 per cent -
from 6 per cent of employee
salaries to 3 per cent - from
the first pay week of 2010
onwards. The employer pays
100 per cent of the contribu-
tion.

“We’re closing for the slow-
est period of the year, and
organising that people be tak-
ing their vacation during this
period.” Mr Sands said many
staff, those who had been
employed for between 10-15
years, were due to take
between four to five weeks’
vacation per year - account-
ing for almost the entire six-
week closure period.

The 2010 Wyndham/Crys-
tal Palace closure will take
place between August 23-
October 5, and Mr Sands
added: “September is the
slowest month of the year and,
God forbid, hurricane season.
We'll direct the existing busi-
ness to the Sheraton, so we
will basically be volume con-
trolling the business during
this period.”

Some 1100-1200 staff will
be affected, and Mr Sands said
“less than 40 per cent” of

these were members of the
hotel union bargaining unit,
since those impacted included
management, casino and non-
unionised personnel.

The Baha Mar executive
told Tribune Business that the
resort owner “did not accom-
plish all of the goals we want-
ed to achieve” during last
year’s closure, although “a sig-
nificant portion” were
achieved “and helped to
reduces losses during that
period”.

Adding that Baha Mar “got
very close” to its planned sav-
ings target in 2009, Mr Sands
said: “We would have pre-
ferred to see additional sav-
ings, and the way we managed
this process this year will help
us to achieve that, especially in
the area of energy.”

Letters were sent out to
Wyndham/Crystal Palace
employees in early January
regarding the potential 2010
closure, and Mr Sands said
areas such as the laundry and
energy plant would remain
open throughout, along with
the golf course.

In an exclusive interview

SEE page 2B





Defaults slow, but banks cannot be ‘overly optimistic’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN banks cannot
afford to be “overly optimistic”
over the 2010 first quarter slow-
down in credit quality deterio-
ration, with loans in arrears
increasing by just $6.5 million
during that period, the Clearing
Banks Association’s chairman
warning yesterday that “cau-
tious strategies” were needed
for at least the next 12-18
months.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness after Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ data showed that
loans in arrears increased by
just 0.3 per cent to 18.1 per
cent, or $1.097 billion, in the
three months to March 31,

Lenders set to be cautious for another ‘12-18 months’, despite positive
sign from just $6.5 million rise in bad loans to $1.1bn during 2010 Q1

2010, Paul
McWeeney
said that

while this
was a “posi-
tive sign” any
sustained
recovery in

credit quality

was still

some way McWEENEY
off.

“It could be a reflection that
things are slowing - that’s one
of the signs. The rate of growth
[in loan arrears] is slowing,
which is good news” Mr
McWeeney told this newspa-

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per.
But it was “too early to tell”
whether this was the start of a
sustained recovery in credit
quality throughout the Bahami-
an commercial banking system,
he added, acknowledging that
the sector was “a long way”
from seeing any robust recov-
ery in its key loan indicators.
“We can’t be overly opti-
mistic,” Mr McWeeney warned.
“We have to be cautious and
ensure our strategies reflect
caution over the next 12-18
months. It’s going to be some

SEE page 2B





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Equal $20m
equity input
for new port

By ALLISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government and 19
private shipping companies will
each contribute $20 million in
equity cash to the new Arawak
Cay port, the Prime Minister
confirmed yesterday, implying
that the initial public offering
(IPO) of a 20 per cent stake
will be valued at $10 million.

With a return on investment
pegged at 10 per cent, Mr
Ingraham and Jimmy Mosko,
chairman of Arawak Cay Port
Development, confirmed that
the Government and 19 private
investors will each take a 40 per
cent stake in the port initially,
at a cost of $20 million each.

Given that the Bahamian
public will have an initial 20 per
cent stake, that implies the IPO
will be worth a total $10 mil-
lion. Collectively, the amount
of equity capital invested in the
Arawak Cay port will be $50
million - some $1 million each
coming from the 19 sharehold-
ers - with the balance of the
$60-$65 million project’s financ-
ing coming from a $10-$15 mil-
lion preference share issue.

The date for the IPO of a 20
per cent stake, in what Mr
Ingraham deemed a “very prof-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.





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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



> =~
Money supply growth gave us borrowed time

DR Jonathan Rodgers must
be commended for his careful-
ly reasoned article on the
Bahamian economy and the
causes of the US recession (see
Tribune Business, May 5, 2010,
page 2B). While it adds to the
public dialogue, much of his
thesis can be properly chal-
lenged. Let’s look at the US
recession.

The authority cited by Dr
Rodgers on key issues is Joseph
Stiglitz, a professor at Columbia
University, a former World
Bank chief economist and a
Nobel Laureate, who considers
himself to be an outstanding
critic of “free market funda-
mentalists”. Consistent with this
description, Dr. Rodgers con-
cludes:

* Tt was the financial institu-
tions that created the mess and
the US government that bailed
them out.

In all countries with a paper
currency, the government con-
trols the quantity of currency
in circulation and, indirectly,
the amount of credit outstand-
ing. This function ranks, along
with the maintenance of the
rule of law, as the most impor-
tant of all government respon-
sibilities. It determines whether
a country will experience:

* Inflation, possibly with a
speculative bubble

* Low inflation (stable
prices) and growth or

* Deflation with falling pro-
duction and employment.

In the case of any country,
the objectives of the Central
Bank can pit it against the polit-
ical interests of the president
and legislature when it, for

BAHA, from 1B

with Tribune Business earlier
this year, Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha
Mar's chairman and chief exec-
utive, said the company’s two
existing Cable Beach resorts
were still open only because his
family had used their own mon-
ey to cover “significant multi-
million dollar losses”, particu-
larly over the last two years.
He added that, together, the
combined cost of acquiring the
now-Sheraton Nassau and
Wyndham Resort & Crystal
Palace Casino plus associated
land (estimated at near $200
million); the $150 million
investment in upgrading those
properties; Baha Mar develop-
ment costs; and covering the
existing resorts' losses (proba-
bly at least $40-$50 million)
since the 2005 acquisition, had
made the Izmirlian family the
largest private investors in the

Bahamas-based economist Ralph Massey responds to
Dr Jonathan Rodgers by pinpointing what he sees as the

real cause of the financial sector/economic meltdown

instance, properly limits the
growth in outstanding credit.

I contend that, while financial
executives and institutions both
contributed to and greatly prof-
ited from the housing bubble,
the chief causal factor was a
government that failed in its
responsibilities.

Incestuous Relations

Dr Rodgers states that “there
is an incestuous relationship
between the Fed and the banks
because supposedly it is respon-
sible for the oversight of the
same banks who actually own
it”. One may call this a ‘con-
spiracy theory’ or a conflict of
interest. Neither describes a
unique complex reality.

The Fed was created in 1913
as a solution to the recurring
banking panics created by a
paper currency and a fractional
reserve banking system, which
consisted of many private banks
operating in 48 different legal
jurisdictions.

“The Fed conducts the
nation's monetary policy by
influencing the volume of cred-
it and money in circulation. [It]
regulates private banking,
works to contain systemic risk,
and provides certain financial
services to the US government,
the public and financial insti-
tutions.” (Wikipedia)

Bahamas. Tribune Business
estimates that investment to be
around at least $500 million.

"Those hotels have lost mon-
ey for the past four years," Mr
Izmirlian said of the Sheraton
and Wyndham. “In the past two
years, they've lost significant
amounts of money because of
high operating costs in the
Bahamas and the recession in
the US. The only reason they're
still open is because my family
has covered those losses - sig-
nificant losses.”

Mr Izmirlian declined to give
figures for those losses, or how
great a subsidy his family had
been forced to inject, but
added: "All I can tell you is that
the amount of money invested
in buying the land, renovating
the hotels and covering the loss-
es makes us by far the largest
private investor in the history of
the Bahamas. Those are big
losses."

The Governor, the governors
of the 12 district banks and the
Board of Governors are
appointed by the president sub-
ject to Senate confirmation.
Yes, the Fed’s shareholders are
private banks who get central
banking services, regulations,
reporting requirements and a
small dividend each year.

Nevertheless, the Fed is
responsible to the President
with Congressional oversight.
Yes, its work is highly technical
and not very glamorous; it is
staffed by those experienced in
banking and finance; and it
operates within a political envi-
ronment. It is easy to see
“incestuous relations” in such a
complex institutional arrange-
ment,and this can distort objec-
tivity.

M3 & Boom-and-Bust

There are three different
measures of the quantity of
money in circulation:

* “MI is the sum of the actu-
al currency (which can be legal-
ly tendered in the exchange for
goods and services) that is held
outside banks, travelers
cheques, checking accounts.

* ‘M2’ is the sum of M1 plus
savings deposits, money mar-
ket accounts, small denomina-
tion time deposits and retire-
ment accounts.

* ‘M3’ is M2 plus the large
time deposits, Eurodollar
deposits, dollars held at foreign
offices of US banks and insti-
tutional money market funds.

The role of money in the
Great Depression was not
defined until the mid-1950s by
Milton Friedman at the Uni-
versity of Chicago. His quanti-
ty theory of money and its sub-
sequent refinement remain a
key element in the Fed’s mon-
etary and credit management.
An annual growth of 2 per cent
up to 4 per cent in M3 was
deemed acceptable.

However, in November 2005
Alan Greenspan, then-gover-
nor of the Fed, and Ben
Bernanke, governor of the New
York Fed, stopped publishing
the M3 money supply data. The
reason given at the time was
that “the costs of collecting the
underlying data and publishing
M3 outweigh its benefits”. This
was a surprise since M3 gives
a much better indication of the
evolution of credit creation in
the economy than M1 or
M2...and, for instance, the
European Central Bank con-
siders M3 to be the most impor-
tant monetary aggregate.

At the time the decision was
made, M3 started growing at 8
per cent per year, and it explod-
ed upward to just short of 18



per cent per year in 2008 (as
reported in Shadow Govern-
ment Statistics) before plum-
meting to a minus 4 per cent in
2010.

Why did the Fed stop

publishing the M3 data?

Alan Greenspan and Ben
Bernanke followed a clear
expansionist monetary policy,
especially after 2000. Real
short-term interest rates (that is
nominal rates adjusted for
changes in consumer prices)
started low, below 1 per cent,
and turned negative between
late 2002 and late 2005. It real-
ly paid to borrow and
spend...an apparent real no-
brainer.

Since consumer prices
remained low and stable and
productivity was increasing,
Greenspan and Bernanke min-
imised the importance of the
unsustainable rise in housing
(asset) prices. That is... until it
was too late. Then they elimi-
nated the officially published
M3 warning sign.

Johan Van Overtveldt, the
economic historian, concluded:
“The Fed’s responsibility for
the housing bubble is consid-
erable. This conclusion has
important implications, among
others, for what is structurally
probably the worst derailment

in the American economy: the
extreme increase in relative
consumption expenditures and
its mirror image of disappearing
personal savings as the basis of
the huge external deficit of the
United States.” (Bernanke’s
Test, p. 97)

One should note that Con-
gress passed a number of laws
between 1964 and 1999 that
granted the Fed powers to
affect lending practices, both at
the consumer and financial
banking levels. Alan Greenspan
never used them.

When looking for the gov-
ernment’s hand in the housing
bubble one must also look at
its well-intentioned effort in the
housing market. It started in
the 1930s with the US govern-
ment trying to provide funds
(or liquidity) to this market.
With the civil rights movement,
the objective became the end
of discrimination in lending.
With time, lending standards
degenerated to ‘Sub-prime’, the
riskiest of all loans, ‘Ninja
Loans’ - No Income...No
Job...No Assets.”

It is easier for the public and
politicians to focus on the
predatory lenders to ill-
informed home buyers, or the
Wall Street financiers who inge-
niously packaged these loans,
sold them around the world and
made a fortune. They ‘earned’
their commissions, the mort-
gage holders suffer the possi-
ble loss of their newly-acquired
homes, and the politicians pro-
pose remedies, pontificate
about Goldman Sachs and wait
for their just returns at the
polls.

‘18 months’ to merge the brewery and Burns House

FROM page 1B

Dionisio D’Aguilar, the for-
mer Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president, said ear-
lier this year that the Heineken
buy-out of the Finlaysons and
ABDAB created an opportu-
nity to break-up the monop-
oly/duopoly environment in the
liquor industry - something the
Government might not be tak-
ing.

ve D' Aguilar said that dur-
ing his two-year stint as Cham-
ber president, which ended in
2009, he was contacted by
numerous Bahamian indepen-
dent liquor store owners com-
plaining that they were unable
to compete against the Burns
House-owned stores.

"I used to get complaints
from small, independent liquor
retailers that because Burns
House controlled such a big
share of the market, they were
at an inherent disadvantage,
and Burns House was essen-
tially a monopoly on the retail
side," Mr D' Aguilar recalled.

"IT remember a number of
liquor store owners calling the
Chamber and complaining
about what was a monopoly
environment. Because they
[Burns House] had so much
market share, it was very, very
difficult for smaller liquor stores
to compete.

"Firstly, they couldn't get
product, and secondly the prod-
uct they did was priced at a lev-
el that was not as good as the
prices given to the Burns House
stores."



Equal $20m equity
input for new port



FROM page 1B

itable enterprise”, was not disclosed,
although he said the Government ulti-
mately intended for its 40 per cent stake
to eventually be sold off to the public,
making Bahamian investors the majori-
ty shareholders in the port.

Yesterday’s signing of the Memoran-
dum of Understanding - exclusively
revealed by Tribune Business last week
- for the Arawak Cay port project, will
see the relocation of freight shipping
from downtown Nassau to Arawak Cay
and an inland warehouse depot on Glad-
stone Road.

Under the port deal, the Government
will lease land to Arawak Port Devel-
opment for around $2 million annually
or $40 per container unit, “whichever
is the greater of the two”, once the oper-
ation gets underway, the Prime Minister
said.

Land leased will include 15 acres in

the Gladstone Road area just south of
Bahamas Food Services, where 200,000
square feet of warehouses to house con-
tainers not destined for immediate dis-
tribution will be kept. Just under 50
acres of the 150 acres will be available at
Arawak Cay for the port itself.

Construction on the port officially
began yesterday following a formal
groundbreaking ceremony, with US-
based American Bridge winning a
roughly $33 million contract to do the
first “marine” phase of construction,
ahead of the future phases which will
be primarily done by Bahamian con-
tractors.

Mr Mosko said the company feels it
got a “good price” on this initial con-
struction phase. “We took advantage of
American Bridge already being here,”
he said, referring to the work the com-
pany had been doing as a sub-contractor
on the Nassau Harbour dredging pro-
ject.

Mr Mosko said it was intended that
the construction of the inland depot will

get underway “shortly”, with pre-engi-
neered and specially-designed buildings
not yet having been ordered. In total,
150 construction jobs are projected to be
created throughout the course of the
port’s development.

The Prime Minister said the key aims
of the deal were to broaden Bahamian
ownership in one of the most profitable
sectors of the economy, reduce the cost
of living through reducing the cost of
imported goods, as well as minimising
congestion and freeing up property
downtown for Bay Street’s redevelop-
ment.

Meanwhile, he also revealed that the
Government intends to enter into an
arrangement with Bahamas Fast Fer-
ries for that inter-island transportation
company to set up a new ferry terminal
on the south eastern portion of Arawak
Cay, next to the port, creating new small
business opportunities in that area. Oth-
er Family Island transportation opera-
tions are also expected to relocate to
this terminal, he added.







Pm lovin’ it

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

To eliminate monopoly/com-
petition concerns after com-
pleting the Butler & Sands
acquisition in 2000, Burns
House franchised out many of
the retail stores to independent,
Bahamian entrepreneurs who
would source most of their
products from its wholesale
operation.

However, the move did not
work, and many of the inde-
pendent stores were subse-
quently taken back under
Burns House ownership. Tri-
bune Business also received
calls from the Burns House
store franchisees, complaining
that the company's wholly-
owned stores were obtaining
better prices and discounts than
they were, leaving them unable
to compete.

Such concerns are likely to
arise again, given that the
merged Burns House/Com-

monwealth Brewery owns a sig-
nificant number of liquor retail
outlets.

Heineken already has Board
and management control at
Burns House, which became
the largest liquor distributor
and wholesaler in the Bahamas
via the 2000 purchase of Butler
& Sands. The Board and man-
agement arrangement, con-
cluded in 2004, provided the
Finlayson family with the
financing needed to complete
the Solomon's Mines purchase.

Apart from the Finlaysons,
ABDAB's third largest share-
holder is understood to be PLP
chairman Bradley Roberts. Its
second largest shareholder is
Sir David Gibbons, owner of
the Colonial Group, which
owns the Bahamas-based
Atlantic Medical and Security
& General insurance compa-
nies.

Defaults slow, but banks
cannot be ‘overly optimistic’

FROM page 1B

time before we see a sustained
recover in the wider economy.
It’s still very early in the game,
and banks are going to be cau-
tious like most businesses.”

For the 2010 first quarter, the
Central Bank’s statistics
showed that while loan delin-
quencies between 31-90 days
past due actually contracted by
$2.1 million or 0.4 per cent to
$511.6 million, accounting for
8.5 per cent of all outstanding
loans, non-performing loans -
credit which is 90 days’ past due
and upon which banks have
stopped accruing interest -
increased by $8.6 million to
$585 million. That represented
growth of 0.2 per cent, with
non-performing loans account-
ing for 9.7 per cent of all out-
standing loans in the Bahamas.

“The marginal increase in
total arrears reflected growth
in mortgage delinquencies,
which outstripped contractions
in the consumer and commer-
cial segments,” the Central
Bank said.

“The mortgage component
advanced by $33 million (6.2
per cent) to $564.5 million,
occasioned by a $15.5 million
(5.3 per cent) gain in the short-

term segment to $305.8 million
and a $17.5 million (7.3 per
cent) expansion in related non-
performing loans to $258.6 mil-
lion.

“Consumer arrears fell by
$25.9 million (8 per cent) to
$297.2 million, reflecting
improvements in short-term
arrears of $16.6 million (11.1
per cent) to $132.7 million and
non-performing loans of $9.3
million (5.4 per cent) to $164.5
million.

“Commercial arrears were
slightly reduced by $0.6 million
(0.3 per cent) to $235 million,
due primarily to a reduction in
the 31-90 day category by $1
million (1.3 per cent) to $73.1
million.”

Mr McWeeney said the
Bahamian commercial banking
industry and its asset quality
situation was simply “a symp-
tom” of this nation’s current
economic condition, caused by
unemployment and the fact that
the tourism industry had yet to
rebound to pre-recession lev-
els.

He warned that banks were
being “very, very selective right
now” when it came to new
lending opportunities, due to
the focus on managing existing
portfolios.





Fears ‘small firms will be screwed’ Water Corp still owing





$4.6m to key supplier
By CHESTER ROBARDS FROM page 1B

“We have been informed by

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness



THE OWNER of a downtown Bay
Street restaurant, who depends on ship-
ping company and Customs employees
for the bulk of his business, yesterday
said he was sure many small businesses
will not survive long when those compa-
nies move to Arawak Cay.

Simon Smith, owner of Native Breeze,
said small businesses in downtown Nas-
sau, especially those east of East Street,
which rely on business from people who
work in the area, will find it difficult to
keep their doors open when the large
shipping companies move to Arawak
Cay.

With the Arawak Cay port deal being
signed yesterday, businesses are bracing
for economic changes that could come

in the next several months.

Mr Smith said that while there was still
some time before the shipping compa-
nies move, as ground has not yet been
broken on the port or its Gladstone Road
container facility, businesses have to
brace for the changes that will come with

the move.
Offices

“The offices will not be moving right
away and some of them will still be down
here,” he said. “But it means small busi-
nesses will get screwed.”

Though Mr Smith feels the move will
be potentially devastating to businesses,
as “doing business downtown is expen-
sive”, he is cautiously optimistic that the
changes that will come to Bay Street will
bring more business to the area in the
long run. The complete revitalisation of

Downtown could take as long as 30 - 40
years by some calculations.

Some downtown business operators
share a different sentiment over the sign-
ing of the Arawak Cay port deal

General manager of the Perfume Shop,
Tim Lighbourne, touted the move, saying
it was 20 years too late.

“Thank the Lord,” he said. “It won’t be

the end all, but it is a hell of a relief.”
According to Mr Lightbourne, a huge
relief to the downtown area, with the
shipping companies moved to Arawak
Cay, will be the reduction in the amount
of heavy tractor trailer trucks spewing
black smoke and creating noise on Bay
Street.
“It should have happened many years
ago, but it’s happening now and the best
advantage is to reposition Nassau as the
leading destination in the Caribbean,”
said Mr Lightbourne.





these representatives that
monthly payments to Consoli-
dated Water-Bahamas will
continue through June 2010 in
sufficient amounts to meet cur-
rent invoices and reduce the
amount of the delinquent
receivables. Based upon these
communications, we believe
that the accounts receivable
from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation are fully col-
lectible and therefore have not
provided any allowance for
possible non-payment of these
receivables as of March 31,
2010.”

The sums owed by the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion account for 47 per cent of

Consolidated Water’s $9.8 mil-
lion accounts receivables.

The outstanding amount
indicates that the 100 per cent
government-owned entity is
still having trouble paying its
bills despite receiving an addi-
tional $6.8 million subsidy for
fiscal 2009-2010 in the Mid-
Term Budget.

Allocated

Some 85 per cent of the $19
million initially allocated had
been used to pay the Corpo-
ration's private sector reverse
osmosis suppliers, with $10.8
million or 56.8 per cent going
to Consolidated Water as the
owner of the Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant.

Regulator criticises BTC over ‘double dipping’

FROM page 1B

years from this unusual prac-
tice of charging its mobile cus-
tomers for incoming interna-
tional calls, whilst also getting
revenue from their interna-
tional telecommunications part-
ners, therefore ‘double dipping’
in revenue,” URCA said.

Replying to Mr Johnson’s
statements, published in Tri-
bune Business, which said BTC
had been forced to levy those
charges because it was unable
to distinguish between incom-
ing international calls to cellular
and landline customers, URCA
added: “Those profits could
have been invested in over-
coming these technical charges
much earlier.

“Tt is URCA’s duty to ensure
that the interest of consumers is
protected. As Mr Johnson stat-
ed that ‘BTC had little choice
but to fall into line with the rest
of the world’ - this confirms that
there was a need by URCA to
review and mandate BTC elim-
inate these charges to the cus-
tomers. Once BTC has com-
plied, it will bring BTC and the
Bahamas in line with other
countries in the region.”

URCA also disputed Mr
Johnson’s and BTC’s view,
revealed exclusively in Tribune
Business, that it had been
tougher on the company than
Cable Bahamas when it came
to imposing remedies for their
Significant Market Power
(SMP) on the duo.

BTC was concerned that
Cable Bahamas had allegedly
been given 18 months to ‘untie’
its broadband Internet offering
from its pay TV services,
whereas it had been forced to
de-couple its own Internet
offering from its fixed-line tele-
phone service back in 2009.

“URCA does not agree with
the view that somehow URCA
has been tougher on BTC by

making BTC untie its DSL
broadband offering from its
fixed-line telephone services
some time ago,” the regulator
said in a statement sent to Tri-
bune Business.

“The simple fact is that
before September 1, 2009,
URCA did not regulate the pay
Tv services. In addition, URCA
did not have the appropriate
regulatory tools to force Cable
Bahamas to untie its broadband
Internet from pay Tv services,
as it does now under the Com-
munications Act.”

URCA said it had not given
Cable Bahamas an 18-month
timeline to untie its bundled
Internet and pay TV offering,
adding that it was the company
who had made this statement.
The regulator is now awaiting
Cable Bahamas’ proposals to
achieve the desired result.

As for BTC’s suggestion that
URCA create a ‘more dynam-
ic marketplace’ by using price
ceilings, setting the maximum
and lowest prices it could
charge for a specific service, the
regulator said: “The approach
suggested by Mr Johnson is
valid in a market where the
SMP operator produces reli-
able and verifiable costing
information.

“The information required
for Mr Johnson’s proposals
does not currently exist within
BTC, although BTC is imple-
menting regulatory financial
accounting systems that could
help in the future. Until that
time, URCA concluded that a
rules-based retail price regula-
tion approach is more reason-
able.”

And tackling BTC’s unhap-
piness with the fact that SMP
operators, meaning itself and
Cable Bahamas, need to obtain
its prior permission before ini-
tiating special promotions,
URCA said ‘single day’ pro-
motions did not need its

approval - only five days’ notice
being required.

“Mr Johnson argues that by
lowering prices, the consumer
benefits. URCA does not dis-
agree,” the regulator said.
“However, whilst a promotion
may appear to be of a benefit to
the consumer, it also has the
potential to harm the consumer
as it can lessen competition in
relevant markets, leaving con-
sumers with little or no choice
of provider in the long run. This
is the rationale for the regula-
tion of promotions.”

URCA also disagreed with
Cable Bahamas’ argument that
BTC’s cellular exclusivity did
not prevent other operators
from launching Wimax services.
Refuting the impression that it
was choosing not to issue
licences for these services,
URCA agreed that licences can
be awarded for Wimax spec-
trum.

“Indeed, URCA has issued
such licences and is entertaining
more requests for radio spec-
trum typically used for Wimax
technology,” the regulator said.
“However, new and existing
licensees using Wimax spec-
trum or technology must still
comply with the restrictions in
their licences prohibiting them
from providing services in
breach of BTC’s exclusivity of

providing cellular mobile ser-
vices.”

And Cable Bahamas’ argu-
ments that mobile resale or Vir-
tual Mobile Network Opera-
tors could enter the Bahamian
market also ran into the Gov-
ernment’s policy of BTC exclu-
sivity on cellular services,
URCA said, something that
was designed to maximise pri-
vatisation value.

URCA said it had also
brought forward its planned
consultation on number porta-
bility, in response to Cable
Bahamas’ concerns, and added:
“Whilst on one hand Cable
Bahamas argues for accelera-
tion of regulatory matters that
may bring it commercial bene-
fit, on the other hand Cable
Bahamas argues that URCA’s
plans are ambitious, and has
expressed concerns about the
impact on Cable Bahamas of
the workload associated with
URCA’s consultations.”

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays









FAMGUARD

The Board of Directors
of

FamGuard Corporation Limited

is pleased to advise that
the first quarterly dividend
for 2010
of 6 cents per share

has been declared to be paid on
May 25, 2010

to Shareholders of record as at
May 17, 2010

FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED

The parent holding company of

Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Limited
FG General Insurance Agency Limited
FG Capital Markets Limited
FG Financial Limited









NOTICE
MODA GIOVANE LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MODA GIOVANE LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 10th May, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 11th day of May, A. D. 2010



CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, 2000
NOTICE is hereby given that, SPARK GLOBAL
FUND LIMITED has been dissolved and that the
name has been struck from the Register of Com-
panies with effect from the 3rd day of May, 2010.

International Protector Group Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EDLINE OSCAR of COOPER’S
TERRACE OFF KEMP ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 3'¢ day of MAY, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC JERRY of KEMP ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 117" DAY of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

In The Estate Anne C. Doyle
late of 3640 North Ocean Drive in the
City of Singer Island in the Country of
Palm Beach in the State of Florida one
of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send before the 24th day of June,
2010, after which date the Administrators will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only
to the claims of which they shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date herein-
before metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/1852
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY SIDE

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Four hundred and Seventy-six and Sixty-one
hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister Rock Road north
of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE of the Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon

Rolle
NOTICE

The Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle of the Smith Hill
Settlement of the Island of Andros one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate comprising Four hundred and Seventy-
six and Sixty-one hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister
Rock Road north of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas bounded Northwardly
by land now or formerly the property of James Brisbane and
running Four Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy-three and
Seventy-eight Hundredths (4,973.78) feet on the Eastwardly by
the Sea and running thereon Four thousand Eight hundred and
Fifty-seven and Eighty-seven Hundredths (4,857.87) feet on the
Southwardly by 130 feet wide Road Reservation and running
thereon Three thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety-seven and
Forty-four Hundredths (3,997.44) feet on the Westwardly by
land now or formerly the property of Joseph Johnson and running
thereon One thousand Four Hundred and Forty-eight and Seventy
Hundredths (1,448.70) feet and by land now or formerly the
property of A. Speirs and running thereon Three thousand Three
Hundred and Three Hundredths (3,300.03) feet which said piece
parcel or plot of land describe above has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimension as are shown on the diagram or plan
recorded at the Department of Land of Surveys under the Land
Surveyors Act 1975 as Plan Number 537 AN of the said diagram
or plan which is coloured pink and prepared by Hubert Williams
in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
on the Island of New Providence.

The Petitioners Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle, claim to be the
owner in of the fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and have applied to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas under S.
3 of the Quieting Titles, Act in the above to have her title to the
said land investigated and declared.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street, N.P., and
at the Chambers of Michelle Y. Roberts & Co., Christie Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or any adverse claims not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of Twenty-one (21) days after the final
publication of these presents file in the said Registry of the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of their claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed in the said Registry of the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the above Michelle Y. Roberts &
Co. statement of such claim. Failure of any such to file and serve
a statement of such claim by the above time will operate as a bar
to such claim.
Dated the 25th day of November A. D., 2009

MICHELLE Y. ROBERTS & CO.
Attorney for the Petitioners



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 7B





The Tribune



©





ith



Benefits of

CX

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



aving sex can be more
than just a fun roll in the
hay. Medical practition-
ers say there are great health
benefits that can be derived

from having intercourse.

This is part one of Tribune
Health’s quest to find out the affects
of sex on males and females. This
week we are focusing on how
responsible intercourse benefits men.

CARDIOVASCULAR BENEFITS
While older men may be worried
that engaging in sex might be a detri-
ment to their heart, studies have
contrasted that misconception. Tri-
bune Health spoke to Dr Joseph



sy |

(CY LOVING RELATION 2

Evans, urologist at the Bahamas
Urology Center who said intercourse
improves cardiovascular health.

“Research has shown that men
who engage in sexual activities live
longer. Dr Evans explained that men
who are sexual have less cardiovas-
cular problems.

“For sexual function to come
about a man must have a strong
heart and good cardiovascular
integrity,” he said.

“Penile erection in male requires
good blood flow. A compromise in
blood flow or cardiovascular func-
tion often manifests itself as erectile
dysfunction,” he said.

In a study published by the Journal
of Epidemology and Community
Health posted by www.webmd.com
researchers found that having sex
twice or more a week reduced the
risk of a fatal heart attack by half

SHIPS

for the men, compared with those
who had sex less than once a month.

Though there are number of car-
diovascular advantages of sex, Dr
Evans said that there are sexual
practices that individuals must be
cautious of using.

For instance, a man with a com-
promised cardiac function, for safe-
ty might want the woman to act in
the dominant role. “In this instance
he would not have to be active,” Dr
Evans said.

PROMOTES PSYCHOLOGICAL
WELL BEING

Sex affects a person’s overall men-
tal well being and when things are
right sexually a person is able to
function much better Dr Evans said.

“Often times a person who has
sexual dysfunction becomes anxious
and depressed. They want to be well
and have a proper functioning body.

“A person’s sexuality is often an
indicator of a person’s psychologi-
cal state thus a person’s sense of well
being is sometimes based upon that
person’s ability to function sexual-
ly,” he explained.

BURN CALORIES
During sex the entire body is fully
engaged in the activity. And if a cou-
ple is innovative enough it is stimu-
lation for the mind and entire body.

Exfoliation

“Thirty minutes of sex burns 85 : |
calories or more. It may not sound :

like much, but it adds up: 42 half- :
hour sessions will burn 3,570 calo- :
ries, more than enough to lose a :
pound. Doubling up, you could drop :
that pound in 21 hour-long sessions,” :

webmd explained.

RELIEVES STRESS

One of the biggest benefits of hav-
ing sex is that it has the ability to :
relieve stress. The hormones that are :
released during intercourse act as }

anti-depressants.

Another study done by Scotland
that was published in the journal :

Biological Psychology and posted by
www.webmd.com showed that sex
lowers blood pressure and reduces
stress.

“They studied 24 women and 22

men who kept records of their sexu- !

al activity. Then the researchers sub-
jected them to stressful situations --

such as speaking in public and doing :



: HOW can J improve my dull skin?
: Will exfoliation help the health of my
i skin? The fast answer is yes!

Skin exfoliation assists in the
? removal of dead skin cells to

* Improve skin smoothness and tone.
* Speed cell renewal

« Allow for increased penetration of
active conditioners from subsequent
products.

: As our skin cells renew, old surface
: cells harden and loose moisture, cre-
i ating a dull, lackluster appearance that
i can cause clogging and congestion.
: And as we age, damaged, contaminat-
i: ed cells don't always fall from skin.

i Through professional and home
: exfoliation dulling cells are effectively
? removed, and newer cells are revealed
i for a fresher, healthier appearance.

verbal arithmetic -- and noted their :

blood pressure response to stress. :
Those who had intercourse had bet- :
ter responses to stress than those ;

who engaged in other sexual behav-

iors or abstained,” the website said. :

There is no magic number as to

the amount of time necessary to :

experience those benefits, the fre-
quency is up to the individual.



Men and Sex: The Single Man

AS A woman, it is fascinating to
listen in on a male group discussion.
By sitting back and not contribut-
ing, we may find the subject turning
to ‘typical female views on men.’

Gender stereotypes may accu-
rately illustrate and please some. But
is it fair to generalise all men as over-
ly aggressive, unexpressive, insensi-
tive, and thinking only with their
genitals?

What about those men who do not
fit the description? Do they just keep
quiet, or just say what is expected
of them because they do not want
to be labeled? Does the idea of being
the 'odd man out’ and protecting the
image help to maintain surface
friendships?

If that is the case then where do
men go if they have real problems?

For many men, finding and suc-
cumbing to instant gratification of
their sexual needs is all they are
looking for.

Perhaps it is at a certain stage in
their lives or due to unhappiness
within their relationship, that many
cannot conceive the idea of being
completely monogamous, and there-
fore live an open lifestyle. But if we
look passed momentary pleasure,
and ask men 'Do you know what
you want?', we may be surprised by



their answer. Many describe them-
selves as ‘basically monogamous’,
but this is only once they have com-
mitted themselves to another. These
are the men who are interested in
improving their quality of life,
because they know that good sex is
dependent on a satisfying relation-
ship.

Our culture is surrounded with
teachings of 'Female Empower-
ment’, and women have certainly
stepped up and faced their chal-
lenges. Is it possible that men are
trailing behind in their personal
development, and are not taking the
time to look ahead to their future? Is
it this discrepancy in expectation that
is contributing to the growing dis-
satisfaction with relationships?

Knowing this, we should then not
be surprised when men reveal anxi-
ety about sexual performance. Not
only do they feel the usual sexual

pressures, but find themselves
thrown off balance with new ones.
They may encounter a female who is
confident in what she wants and may
be the one to initiate and direct the
sexual encounter. Just when they
think they understand the ‘new
woman’, they meet one who wants
him to instigate everything. He dis-
covers there are advantages with
both and wonders if it is possible to
have it all.

For those of us who have already
guessed the answer, the solution
seems quite obvious. Yes, we cer-
tainly need to keep in mind the gen-
der differences; but ultimately we
need to throw away the text books
and really study the uniqueness of
the individual in front of us. By real-
ly taking the time to understand,
share and open up to your partner;
you will find out what makes them
tick. Instead of worrying about per-
formance and ‘scoring’ you, will dis-
cover a higher degree of pleasure
and fulfillment.

Many men are wakening up to the
realisation that getting to know a
new love interest can actually pro-
duce a more rewarding sex life. Hon-
esty, laying all the cards on the table
from the very beginning is the first
step to satisfaction. By doing this,

you can actually be with someone
who makes you feel like a better per-
son; this is one element of compati-
bility.

Just like everything in our life,
sometimes things do not always run

smoothly and sexual problems are :

to be expected at times. For a few,
this actually puts them off dating and
may lead to avoiding sex altogether.

Many men have discovered that sex }
therapy is not only extremely valu- :

able, but also a place to open up
about their problems.

Sex hormones are fundamental in :

making us who we are, but they can
also mislead us in choosing the mate

: WHAT IS AN EXFOLIANT?

An exfoliant is any agent that
: removes dead skin cells and triggers
: new cells to push towards the skin's sur-
: face. Exfoliants can be physical, chemi-
i cal, or both, and usage is dependent
: upon the individual skin care needs.

: PHYSICAL EXFOLIANTS

Physical exfoliants use friction to
: remove dead skin cells, either through
: the use of a tool (such as a brush or
i sponge or a gentle abrasive (such as
: Corn Cob Meal, Rice Bran or Oat-
: meal).

; CHEMICAL EXFOLIANTS

i Chemical exfoliants dissolve the
: intercellular “glue” that attaches to
: the surface. Hydroxyl acids, Salicylic
: Acid, Retinol, and enzymes (proteins
; that break the chemical bonds of older
: cells and “digest” them) are a few
: examples of chemical exfoliant.

i Hydroxy acids are the most com-
i mon form of home chemical exfolia-
: tion because they are extremely effec-
: tive and, when used properly, very safe.
i Glycolic Acid was the first Hydroxy
: Acid to be used in a cosmetic applica-
: tion and it is still widely-used despite a
: high incidence of skin irritation. Lactic
: and Salicylic Acids, which are as effec-
i tive as Glycolic Acid, are now the
: choice of leading skin care profession-
: als because they deliver the same lev-
: el of results with considerably less irri-
: tation and have exhibited anti-inflam-
i matory properties.

: WHAT ABOUT OVER-EXFOLIATION?

i Aggressive exfoliation treatments
: such as dermabrasion and chemical
: peels have led to over-exfoliation of
i skin. Research at The International
: Dermal Institute indicates a series of
: exfoliation treatments can be much
: more effective than one very aggres-
i sive “lunchtime” procedure. In fact,
i any skin treatment- including exfolia-
: tion- that causes skin to become red
: and irritated is triggering the inflam-
: matory response, which in turn accel-
i erates premature aging.

i The Dermalogica BioActivity score
: system takes the guesswork out of
i selecting the best exfoliant for your
i skin. Determined by a professional cal-
culation of active agents and formu-
lation parameters, the higher the
BioActivity Score the stronger the
i exfoliant.

: WHAT TO EXPECT DURING
: AN EXFOLIATION TREATMENT
i Exfoliation treatments will consist
: of a professional double cleanse to
: remove all traces of make-up, mois-
: turizers, sunscreens and debris. Your
i Face Mapping skin analysis will deter-
: mine use of chemical or physical exfo-
: liant (or even a combination of both),
: and possibly electric brushes to facili-
i tate action of exfoliants.
: After your skin is exfoliated, your skin
: therapist will apply hydrating, brighten-
: ing, or purifying treatments. If performed
i during the day, sunscreen must be
applied to shield and protect skin.
Dermalogica MicroZone Flash
: Exfoliation treatments can help resur-
i face and brighten skin in less than 20
: minutes. They're the ideal mainte-
i nance service between Dermalogica
: Skin Treatments or your prescribed
i exfoliation treatment.

more suitable for us. Combine that :

with a new generation of sexually

aggressive women, and the whole :

thing becomes even more compli-
cated. Knowing which direction we

want our life to take, and the type of :

person we want to share it with, will
lead us to the happiness we all
deserve.

¢ Listen to ~ Love on the Rock ' with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9 For appointments .
call 364 7230 , email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.

: EXFOLIATION AND SPF

: When professional exfoliation is per-
i formed, it is important to apply sun
i protection (daylight defense) to protect
the skin, as the sensitivity of the skin
: has been increased by the exfoliation.
: Continue to wear daylight defense
i everyday to shield skin from UV light
: damage.

i ¢ This information was taken from derma-
: logica.com. Tamika Pinder is a Dermalogi-
: ca Skin Care Therapist at The Dermal Clin-
: ic in Sandyport. Please call 327-6788 for

: more information or visit www.dermal-

: clinic.com.

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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



@l GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack

a

Oo
ie
= © od

ail





RIC RAC flowers take a long time to bloom but are worth the wait, even though they are produced at night and for only one evening.

Ric rac orchid cactus

rowing plants in hang-

ing pots is very reward-

ing because the plants
can be viewed at or above eye
level and be more readily
appreciated.

The downside is watering. Plants
in hanging pots need to be watered
regularly and individually. One very
interesting plant for pots is an
orchid cactus called Ric Rac that
takes all the toil out of hanging bas-
Kets.

Ric Rac cannot be mistaken for
anything else. Its leaves grow to
about 3 feet long and look like tub-
by alternating fishbones. The sur-
face of the leaves is smooth and
looks almost artificial; the whole
thing looks as though it came from
another planet.

Actually, Ric Rac orchid cactus
(Selenicereus anthonyanus) comes
to us from southern Mexico.
Although the region in which it was
discovered had been thoroughly
combed by plant scientists, Ric Rac
was only found in 1946. Its original
name was therefore Cryptocereus,
as in ‘hidden’.

Ric Rac is related to both orchids
and cacti and in the wild is epi-
phytic, taking moisture into its roots
from the air. Ric Rac is very easily
grown by taking 6-inch cuttings
from leaf ends, allowing them to
dry for a week or so, and then plant-
ing them into a container.

The initial soil should have some
compost or peat moss added to
assist with moisture retention but
once the plant is established it

should be allowed to dry out con-
siderably before watering. It is, after
all, related to cactus.

Ric Rac is also related to orchids
and can flower, though rarely and
only on really mature plants. The
flowers are 4-6 inches in diameter
and are spiky and can be white,
pink or red. The flowers are usual-
ly produced in late spring and come
out at night, so keep a careful eye
on the plant once buds form. The
flowers last for one night only and
thereafter produce seeds. The first
flowers were grown by Dr Howard
E Anthony in 1950, so you can see
that the plant is very new to us.

In the wild the Ric Rac attaches
itself to trees and grows as an epi-
phyte that does not harm the tree,
only uses it as an anchor. Ric Rac
can grow throughout a tree’s bower
quite extensively and if you have a
suitable fairly open-canopied tree
in your yard that may be the best
place to put it. In the wild it would
grow from seeds that fell into
branch crotches.

A few years ago a leaf of Ric Rac
escaped from the pot I had put it in
and started to climb a cement wall. It
attached itself very efficiently and
grew absolutely vertical.

Young Ric Rac leaves are smooth
and easily handled. Once the plant
matures it develops thorns at the
apices of the leaflets and these can
draw blood.

Ric Rac should be re-potted every
two or three years to allow for its
expanding root ball. It can take a
fair degree of sunshine but does best
in bright light without direct sun.
You will have noticed that Ric Rac







RIC RAC makes an unusual hanging basket and is very easy to look after because it is related to cactus.

was discovered in 1946 and the first
flowering was observed in 1950. That
gives us an indication of how long we
must wait for the flowers to be pro-
duced.

Some people call ric rac ‘zig zag
orchid cactus’ and liken the leaf

shape to a cartoon bolt of lightning.
This led to another name, St Antho-
ny’s cactus. St. Anthony is the saint
one turns to when weather is bad
and threatening but I feel sure the
attributory scientific name ‘antho-
nyanus’ refers to Dr Anthony who



first observed Ric Rac flowering.
‘Ric rac’ actually refers to a style of
hem-stitching commonly called Ric
rack.

© gardenerjack@coralwave.com



Elimination problems in cats

EVERY week I often hear the
primary complaint by cat lovers
“why does my cat urinate in every
other place other than the litter
box?”. A cat’s failure to urinate in
the litter box may have several caus-
es.( By the way it is recommended
that you provide a litter box for
every cat in your household.)

1. A dirty litter box may cause a
cat to avoid the box. Individual cats
have different levels of tolerance to
an unclean litter box. One cat may
use a litter box that is only cleaned
once or twice a week, when another
cat may avoid a box that has been
used just once.

2. A negative experience associ-
ated with the litter box could also
deter its use. Do not scold or startle
acat in the vicinity of the litter box.

Inappropriate urination can also
be a form of traumatised memory.
Urine marking outside of the litter
box in an erect, crouching or startling
position occurs in a sexually inact
or neutered male or female cats.

Urine marking in the standing
position is called spraying. It is per-
formed by males and females.

Cats that have been neutered at
the appropriate age and who have
never roamed outdoors or ever seen



another cat may begin to urinate
outside the litter box. A sexually
intact male or female in heat that
has begun to urinate inappropriate
should be neutered without delay.
The hormone influences related to
reproduction may motivate urine
marking. Once these hormones are
no larger in circulation following
neutering, the behaviour is likely to
stop.

Neutering alone however may not
be enough to return behaviour to
normal if marking is long-term.
(Normally more than several weeks)
Also neutering does not guarantee a
cat will never urinate inappropri-
ately.

ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
Urine contains odours that iden-

tify the individual and mark a cat’s

territory. The location of food, water



and safe places to rest are linked to
acat’s sense of security. If these are
disturbed, it may reaffirm its terri-
torial claim and relieve anxiety by
urine marking.

Litter training is further compli-
cated in households with more that
one cat. An easily offended cat may
avoid a box that has been used by
housemate. Territorial conflict
between cats in multi-cat homes may
cause problems including the litter



box. As mentioned earlier, provide a
litter box for every cat in your house-
hold.

Choose a variety of locations in
quiet corners in your home.

PHYSICAL INFLUENCES

A medical problem can be associ-
ated with inappropriate urination.
The common problems are cystitis
(urinary bladder infection), kidney
diseases and diabetes. If you suspect



any of these problems see and con-
sult your veterinarian. Virtually any
illness may be caused by inappro-
priate urination.

Inappropriate defecation may
stem from a dirty litter box, med-
ical problems, stress, anxiety and
even fear. Most cats prefer a quiet,
out of the way place for urination
and defecation. Too much noise or
activity nearby can discourage a cat
from using the litter box and drive it
to another location of its own choos-
ing. Moving the litter box to a new
location can also upset certain cats. If
the litter box must be moved, do it
gradually.

ELIMINATION IN HOUSE PLANT POTS

Cats have a natural instinct to void
and dig in soil or sand. The litter
box is a human invention and an
artificial substitute. It is surprising
that more cats do not eliminate in
potted plants. To discourage your
cat from eliminating in your house-
hold plant, one must devise ways to
prevent access to them e.g. cover the
soil with wire mesh or aluminum
foil.

There is a myriad of reasons why a
cat will eliminate other than in the
litter box.

It is recommended that you keep
the litter box especially clean and
make sure that you provide enough
of them for the number of cats you
have in the house.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 9B





Lady Builder:

EBBY Deal is a female perfectionist who has

excelled in the traditionally male dominated

field of construction. Her company Contempo-
rary Builders builds “green homes” which are a

more environmentally friend
option for her clients.

She says Bahamians have
become more concerned with
energy consumption and their
impact on the environment as
it relates to the future.

“Before I see a client, they
have already done the research
and pretty much know what
they want and what they think
they need for their home to
reduce their monthly energy
costs as well as their long range
maintenance costs,” said Mrs
Deal.

“T add my input of things
that I know may be of greater
value for them now and in the
long term and during our
meetings show them projects
where these things have
already been done.”

She explained that utilising

ly and cost efficient

having a small reverse osmosis
machine under the sink to
eliminate buying bottled water,
are small changes which can
make a huge impact on con-
serving energy.

One of her biggest payoffs
was in 2007, when the finan-
cial controller of a company
that had hired her to doa
warehouse and office exten-
sion and subsequent mainte-
nance works, approached and
asked if the company would
be interested in doing a green
subdivision in South Ocean
called South Ocean Palms

Recently, she completed a
project in Charlottesville with
alternate energy, solar panels
on the roof, an inverter in the
laundry room and battery stor-



mean big savings for the client,
based on my own electricity
bills, the solar power system
would pay for itself easily in
two years.”

Mrs Deal explained that her
interest in construction was fos-
tered by her father whom she
jokes “ must have wanted a
boy” because she would fol-
low him around and assist him
with projects around the house.
She attended Sheriden College
where she studied design and
learnt drafting. She has been
in the construction business for
the past 25 years.

She and her husband even-
tually decided to start their
own company and she said that
it is a good mix as she enjoys
the detail side of the business
and he enjoys the structural
side. In 1994, he branched out
to a company that specialisies
in ready mixed concrete. Their
youngest daughter has fol-
lowed in the footsteps as she
began working for the compa-
ny in 2007 and also owns her

struction team is made up of
masons, electricians, plumbers,
and pastemen all of whom
have a long history of working
with Contemporary Builders.
When asked about how the
crew feels about her being a
female, she says that no one
treats her like a female “but
just another part of the team.”

“T have gotten older, and it is
a bit more difficult to do, but I
am more than willing to pitch
in and help, I like being able to
do the same tasks I ask the
crew to do,” she said. “In fact,
I did a lot of the tiling and
painting herself on the con-
struction site.”

Mrs Deal noted that she has
a critical eye when it comes to
her projects which “can drive a
normal person crazy,” because
she wants everything done as
perfect and fairly as possible.
She said that unfortunately
there are many contractors
who create a bad reputation
for others by being unethical
and greedy by overcharging for
items, underbuilding and then
adding on blind costs to the
consumer. She pointed out that
honesty is always the best pol-
icy.”

“Greed gets you no where.
It doesn’t take long for the
word to get out so I like being
honest and fair, totally upfront
with my clients and word of
mouth will take over from
there.”

As a woman, Mrs Deal feels
that she has an advantage, and
a very good sense of how a
house should be laid out and
should function, particularly
when it comes to bathrooms,
closets and kitchens; areas that
females utilise most.

“No one should limit them-
selves in a profession due to
whether they are male or
female,” says Ms Deal. “Any
woman out there who has the
knack, the stamina and educa-
tion should venture into a

Debbie Deal









A new home in
Charlottesville
with solar panel
energy plates
on the roof.







simple measures like tinted age room on the exterior. own business- Closets Etc. career of choice, not circum-
< * © ‘ ‘ 2
glass, trees to offer shade, and “This innovation will be Mrs Deal said that her con- _ stance.
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM














By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

HE night ended in tears of
ye as twenty year old
Braneka Bassett was
crowned Miss Bahamas
World 2010 Sunday night in

the Atlantis Imperial Ballroom.

Seventeen fierce beauties vied for
the coveted title of Miss Bahamas
World, but it was Braneka Basset
with her platform of "Empowering
Our Youth" who beat out her com-
petitors to walk away the diamond
studded crown.

In an exclusive interview with Tri-
bune Woman yesterday morning, the
new queen described being crowned
as “ amazing”.

“Never in a million years did I
believe I would have been the next
Miss Bahamas.” Now that I am Miss
Bahamas there is a lot more I can
do for my country,” she said.

The first thing on her plate is
working on her platform and prepar-
ing for the Miss Universe pageant
which she is to confident she will
bring home to the Bahamas.

"My platform is the first thing I
want to start working on. I went to a
school and I heard the kids talking
about big dreams they had but they
didn't know how to reach their
dreams. So I want to empower them
to take the steps that will get them
closer to their dreams," she said.

The new queen who is a Grand
Bahama native attended Mary Star
of the Seas Primary School, Sea Saw
Christian Academy before attend-
ing high schools in California and
Georgia. The beauty queen who has
modeled since age 16 has had sever-
al jobs in California at the Next Mod-
el Agency and the Osbrink Talented
Agency. She also participated in the
Janice Dickenson Modeling Agency
which used to air on the Oxygen
cable channel and would like to one
day host camps for aspiring models.

“Being a beauty queen is not just
only about the glamour, but it is a lot



Braneka Bassett is the new
Miss Bahamas World 2010






THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11,





of hard work. You have to eat right,
exercise and have beauty with a pur-
pose,” she added.

“T will also prepare myself for the
Miss Universe pageant and bring the
crown to my country where I think
it’s suppose to be,” she said.

She wants the Bahamas to know
that she will prove herself suited for
such a title.

"T will stick by my word, and stick
by my promises so people can see
that I am truly representing this
country,” she said.

The work is just beginning for the
newly crowned queen, who seeks the
support from all Bahamians in her
future endeavors. She will go on to
represent the Bahamas in the Miss
Universe Pageant later this year.

As Braneka Bassett took her first
walk as beauty queen, the small
crowd of supporters burst in cheers.

The contestants were judged on
their poise and elegance, articula-
tion creativity, popularity, fitness,
photogenic and congeniality.

Sunday night proved to be fulfill-
ing experience for the young women.
And as the tape rolled back to their
past encounters it was evident that
ladies had built a strong cama-
raderie.

In a colorful performance, the con-
testant gyrated and swayed, chanting
to upbeat rhythms of African music.

Then under the sound of local
Bahamian artist Sammi Starr's voice,
who sang "Pick Me’, the ladies took
to the stage, modeling glistening,
beautifully tailored evening gowns.

The semi finalist were cut down to
five finalist. The five beauties were
asked what advice they would give to
the nation during this tough eco-
nomic time. And while each girl gave
it their best, it was Ms Bassett who
eloquently expressed herself with
two simple words- love and hope.

Along with the crown she also
walked away with the award for Best
Body.

She is embracing her new respon-
sibilities with open arms and she
vows to best the queen to represent
the Bahamas.









4

Braneka Bassett makes her way down the
catwalk as the newly crowned beauty queen.

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.






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and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
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THE TRIBUNE




or
i

he

TUESDAY, MAY 11,

PAGE 14 ¢ International sports news

PAGE 13



2010

ts







Woods says
neck injury
not related

to crash...
See page 14

Knowles and Fish unite, Win in first round

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



fter being forced to take

a break from their injury-

prone partnership, Mark

Knowles and Mardy Fish
are back together again.

The Bahamian-American combo
reunited yesterday at the Mutua
Madrilena Madrid Open in Madrid,
Spain, with an easy first round victory.

Their 6-3, 6-1 triumph over the
Spaniard wild card team of Daniel
Gimeno-Traver and Ivan Navarro
proved that the unseeded team is slow-
ly getting back on track.

Their real test, however, will come
in the second round when they take on

SPORTS

le

VOLLEYBALL
BAISS JUNIOR
COMPETITION



THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools opened its
junior girls volleyball com-
petition at St Augustine’s
College yesterday.

Defending champions St
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machine took advantage of
their home turf to easily win
their two games. The Big
Red Machine rolled past the
St Andrew’s Hurricanes 17-7
and 17-9 and they got by the
St John’s Giants 17-2 and 17-
2.

The Aquinas College Aces
also won their double header.
They beat the Nassau Chris-
tian Academy Crusaders in
three games and they
knocked off the Kingsway
Academy Saints 17-13, 11-17
and 18-18.

In the two other games
played, Nassau Christian
Academy handed St. John’s a
double dose of defeat with a
17-6 and 17-16 decision and
St Andrew’s rebounded from
their loss to give Kingsway
Academy a second loss, 17-
14 and 17-16. The junior girls
are scheduled to be back in

the No.8 seeded team of Mariusz Frys-
tenberg and Marcin Matkowski of
Poland. If they are successful, Knowles
and Fish could probably end up play-
ing the No.2 seeded team of American
identical twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

The top seeds in the tournament are
Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad
Zimonjic of Serbia. This is the first
year that Knowles and Fish are playing
together. But it’s certainly not the start
that either of them anticipated when
they hooked up.

In their season opener in a prelude
to the Australian Open in January,
Knowles went down with an injury in
Sydney, Australia, in the first round
as they eventually lost to the Aus-
tralian team of Carsten Ball and



MADRID OPEN





TENNIS ACE MARK KNOWLES



ALEX SMITH signed a one-year contract with the Cleveland Browns on May 4...

Stephen Huss.

The injury kept Knowles out of
action until he and fish played in Mem-
phis, Tennessee, in February as they
advanced to the semifinal, only to lose
to the American team of John Isner
and Sam Querrey.

They came back and played again at
the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 in
Miami, Florida, where they got ousted
in the first round by the Russian team
of Igor Andreev and Mikhail Youzh-
ny. But it was in Houston, Texas, in
April that fish went down with an
injury in the quarter-final against the
team of Mischa Zverev of Germany
and Horacio Zeballos of Argentina.

That forced Knowles to go with two
different partners in the next three
tournaments. He started in Monte Car-

Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

lo with Brazilian Brunoa Soares and
ended the streak in Rome, Italy, last
week where they failed to get out of
round 16.

In between the pair of tournaments
with Soares, Knowles teamed up with
Aussie Lleyton Hewitt where they
went all the way to the final, only to
lose to Nestor and Zimonjic in three
sets.

In the first round of that tourna-
ment, Knowles and Hewitt knocked
off Soares and Marcelo Melo in two
sets. Fish was originally scheduled to
make his return at Roland Garros at
the end of the month. But he has
decided to use the Madrid Open as a
tune-up to test his physical ability
before the second Grand Slam Tour-
nament for the year.

Alex Smith signs
one-year contract
with the Browns

By RENALDO DORSETT

draft.

His rookie season was one
of the most productive of his
career when he started 10

A NATIVE Bahamian grid-
iron star recently exited the free
agent pool and signed to the
fourth team in his five-year
career.

Alex Smith signed a one-year
contract with the Cleveland
Browns on May 4. However,
terms of the deal were undis-
closed.

Smith is expected to solidify
a tight end receiving corps
which struggled heavily last
year as the Browns had one of
the league’s weakest passing
attacks in the league.

The Browns’ leading receiv-
ing tight end of 2009-10, Robert
Royal, totaled just 11 catches
for 134 yards and one touch-
down in 11 starts.

Royal grabbed the starting
spot after Steve Heiden was
placed on injured reserve due
to an ankle injury.

The Browns released Heiden
on March 12, the day they
signed former New England
Patriots’ Ben Watson to a four-
year deal.

Smith was drafted by the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the
third round of the 2005 NFL

games and totaled 41 receptions
for 367 yards and two touch-
downs.

Smith followed with several
productive seasons, in 2006 with
35 catches for 250 yards and
three touchdowns, 2007 with 32
catches for 385 yards and three
touchdowns, and 2008 with 21
catches for 250 yards with three
touchdowns.

Acquired

He was acquired by the
Patriots from the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers on April 30, 2009,
in exchange for a fifth-round
selection in the 2010 NFL draft.

Smith never appeared on the
field for the Patriots and was
released during final cuts on
September 5, 2009.

He was signed just days later
by the Philadelphia Eagles on
September 8 and went on to
start five games with the NFC
East powerhouse. Smith fin-
ished with three receptions for
25 yards.

For his career, he has totaled
132 receptions for 1277 yards
and 11 touchdowns.

action on Wednesday.

Starting at 4pm today, 10
teams are expected to begin
competition in the junior
boys division.

TRACK
DIOCESAN
MEET

THE annual Archdiocesan
Catholic Primary Schools
Track and Field meet is slat-
ed for Friday at Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.

Preliminary events will be
staged starting 10am Thurs-
day. Six Catholic primary
schools in New Providence
are expected to take part.

The meet is set to com-
mence 9am Friday and is
expected to be officially
opened by Mike Sands, pres-
ident of the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions.

Anthony Robinson, a
member of the Catholic
Board of Education, is to
present the awards to last
year’s champions, St Cecili-
a’s, in the primary division
and St Thomas More in the
junior division.







Record number of teams in primary track champs

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



A RECORD total of 57 teams have
confirmed their participation in the 29th
Primary Schools Track and Field Cham-
pionships at Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

Formally sponsored by Ovaltine
through Lightbourne Trading and Milo
through Thompson Trading, for the sec-
ond consecutive year, next week’s cham-
pionships will be organised by the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Culture with-
out a major sponsor.

But Minister of Sports Charles May-
nard said they are still looking forward
to a very impressive meet from Wednes-
day, May 19 to Friday, May 21.

“In the past years, the ministry
received assistance from various corpo-
rate citizens,” said Maynard of the meet
that got started in 1981 to enable athletes
from throughout the country to com-
pete in a major national meet.

“This year, we are unable to attract
any sponsors, but we are appealing to

the general public
to come forth and
assist in the
meet.”

Prior to the
start of the meet,
Bahamians
throughout New
Providence can
get up at 7am and
watch the Torch
Run that will
begin at four dif-
ferent locations
and end up in
front of the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Those spots are the R M Bailey Park
in the east, SC McPherson Junior High
School in the south, Goodsman Bay in
the west and Arawak Cay in the north.

“We encourage Family Islands to
organise similar events and use it as a
fundraiser,” Maynard said.

Then starting 3pm Tuesday, organis-
ers are set to stage the cheerleading and
banner competition at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

Last year, Spanish Wells took the

RAHMING



cheerleading title to Eleuthera, but com-
mittee chairman Cedricka Rolle said
they are looking for one of the teams
from New Providence to keep the title
here this year.

In the past, the most schools partici-
pating in the meet was 45, but Frank
‘Pancho’ Rahming said they have seen
the numbers swell well beyond those
figures this year.

“Already we have some 19 primary
schools registered to participate,” said
Rahming, adding that while the min-
istry has subsidized their hotel accom-
modations, they didn’t anticipate having
that many this year.

Lisa Mortimer, president of the New
Providence Primary Schools Sports
Association, said they have lived up to
their commitment with more than 20
schools participating this year.

“[’m appealing to the other four
schools to please come out,” said Mor-
timer, who noted that it will be the first
time that this amount of schools will
compete in the meet.

“These kids, these little darlings, are
the future athletes of the Bahamas and

that is what the New Providence Prima-
ry Schools Association is all about.”

As the meet draws closer, Val Kemp
has indicated that they intend to put on
a “short and sweet” official opening cer-
emony on Wednesday, May 19.

During the ceremonies, when Minister
Maynard will deliver the keynote
address, the winners of the cheerleading
competition will put on a repeat perfor-
mance as part of the activities.

“This is the biggest meet ever held in
the Bahamas and just the performances
of the little kids will want to make you
stay until the very end,” she said.

“With the amount of entries that we
have, I’m sure that we will still be com-
peting until 3 pm, so you can still come
down and watch the kids. There’s no
other meet like this.”

This year, the organising committee is
printing a souvenir booklet and while
it’s almost completed, Keno Demeritte is
asking those companies and schools still
wishing to get an advertisement in to
contact him at Temple Christian Prima-
ry School or Brent Stubbs at The Tri-
bune.

Olympic gold medallists lift gymnasts’ aspirations

ON the eve of Mother’s Day (Sun-
day, May 10), Olympic gold medal-
lists Pauline Davis-Thompson and
Eldece Clarke-Lewis gave precious
advice to gymnasts aspiring to blaze
a trail in track and field.

The Motivation and Nutritional
Seminar was hosted by Bahamas Gym-
nastics Parent Booster Club in con-
junction with Bahamas Star Gymnas-
tics in the conference room of
Bahamas Financial Services Board.

Special guests included Claudia
Kretschmer, GymAmerica, Saline
Michigan who attended via webcam
technology and Miles Yallop, Ministry
of Sports liaison officer with responsi-

bility for gym-
nastics.
Motivation
By simply re-
telling their sto-
ry of the grunt
work en route to
the glory of win-
ning their
medals, Davis-
Thompson and
Clarke-Lewis
lifted the hopes
and aspirations
of the gymnasts.
The duo, who both share a common
thread of humble beginnings, empha-

DAVIS-THOMPSON



sized goal setting, making the right
choice of positive friends and influ-
ences, discipline, dedication, determi-
nation, perseverance and prayer as
ingredients to achieving their ultimate
goals.

The gymnasts all listened attentive-
ly as they assimilated the advice from
the pair of Bahamian heroes who reit-
erated that achievement begins with
mental focus and hard work.

Davis-Thompson underscored that
the skills honed for athletics pay divi-
dends later as lifestyle skills for success.
She cited that research has proven that
the majority of Fortune 500 top exec-
utives were former athletes.

Nutrition

They said that athletes must be dis-
ciplined in the choice of foods, not
only to improve their performance and
heal quickly after injuries, but to devel-
op healthy habits which will curb the
negative trends in the onset of lifestyle
diseases plaguing our nation.

Honesty Pays

The young gymnasts were warned
against cheating and the use of per-
formance-enhancing substances.

The message to stay clean, work
hard and achieve results honestly res-
onated with the families after Davis-
Thompson shared her personal expe-
rience.

Clarke-Lewis pointed out that hon-
esty is rewarded as her former team-
mate, after 28 years and five Olympic
games, now holds four distinctions —
ist Bahamian Olympic track gold
medal, first individual Olympic track
medal, first double Olympic gold
champion and 1st female Olympian to
medal for the Bahamas.

The gymnasts will have a chance to
put all of the advice to good use start-
ing this summer with the opening of a
new 5,000 square feet training facility
and the launch of the Ist Annual
Bahamas Summer Camp which will
be conducted by 10 US-based clini-
cians.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Talks to begin again for Pacquiao-Mayweather



TONY PARKER walks down court

after the Spurs were called for a

foul against the Suns Sunday...
(AP Photo)

Parker, Spurs
temper trade
speculation

By PAUL J WEBER
Associated Press Writer

SAN ANTONIO (AP) —
Gregg Popovich joked last sum-
mer that he should be fired if
the revamped Spurs didn’t win
a fifth title this season.

He’ll be back. Who else will
be is the question.

Popovich said Monday that
this season was the most diffi-
cult of his 14 years in San Anto-
nio. He cited the struggles the
Spurs had adjusting to a roster
overhaul they hoped would
restore their championship
form.

The Spurs wound up being
the No. 7 seed and were swept
by Phoenix in the Western
Conference semifinals.

Popovich expects a less busy
summer this time. Tony Parker
and general manager R.C.
Buford also sounded like the
star point guard isn’t going any-
where despite his contract
expiring next season.

Al Ahly, Mazembe
reach group stage
of the African
Champs League

JOHANNESBURG (AP)
— Al Ahly of Egypt overcame
a 2-0 deficit in the first leg to
reach the group stage of the
African Champions League.

The six-time winners beat
Libya’s Al Ittihad 3-0 in Cairo
on Sunday, going through after
a late goal from teenager She-
hab Ahmed.

Defending champion TP
Mazembe of Congo beat Mali’s
Djoliba 4-0 on aggregate after a
3-0 home win.

Egypt’s Ismaily and Alger-
ian clubs JS Kabylie and
Entente Setif also qualified in
weekend matches. Tunisia’s
Esperance progressed with a 4-
1 win over Sudan’s Al Merreikh
over two legs.

Six of the eight qualifiers for
the group stage are former
African champions.

Last year’s finalist, Heartland
of Nigeria, and Zimbabwe’s
Dynamos also qualified.

If you are looking for the

By DAVE SKRETTA
AP Sports Writer

most high-profile fighters was discussed at
length earlier this year, but negotiations



NEW YORK (AP) — Negotiations for a
megafight involving Manny Pacquiao and
Floyd Mayweather Jr are expected to begin

again this week.

The matchup involving boxing’s two

fell apart when the sides could not agree on
drug testing protocol. Both took other
fights, with Pacquiao beating Josh Clottey
and Mayweather defeating Shane Mosley.

Pacquiao’s trainer, Freddie Roach, tells
The Associated Press that discussions could

begin as early as Tuesday, once the results
of the Philippine elections are in. Pacquiao
is running for Congress for the second time.

Roach was in New York on Monday with
another of his fighters, Amir Khan, who
defends his junior welterweight title against
Paulie Malignaggi on Saturday night at

Madison Square Garden.



Serena wins in three
hours, 26 minutes

MADRID (AP) — Sere-
na Williams won the longest
match of her career, playing 3
hours, 26 minutes in defeat-
ing Vera Dushevina of Rus-
sia 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5), 7-6 (5) to
reach the third round of the
Madrid Masters.

The top-seeded American
looked set to close the match
when she broke serve to go 5-
2 up, but squandered the lead
and then trailed 4-0 in the
decisive tiebreaker. She
saved a match point before
going on to win.

“T definitely feel really
proud because I definitely
wasn’t playing my best ten-
nis and I was far off playing
well,” she said. “Also, at that
point I wasn’t going to lose.
After three hours, I’d better
win.”

Williams left the court for
treatment when ahead 3-2 in
the third set. She returned
with a strapped right thigh
and does not yet know the
extent of the injury.

Williams wasted three set





SERENA WILLIAMS returns the ball during her match against Vera
Dushevina of Russia at Madrid Open yesterday...

(AP Photo)

points in the first and then
faced a match point on her
serve when trailing 6-5 in the
second, but held on despite a
slew of unforced errors.

In another second-round
match, Francesca Schiavone
beat Sybille Bammer 6-2, 6-1.

In the first round, Peng
Shuai advanced when 10th-
seeded Victoria Azarenka
retired while trailing 3-0. Oth-
er seeded winners were No. 8
Samantha Stosur, No. 14
Flavia Pennetta and No. 16
Nadia Petrova.

In the men’s first round,
12th-seeded Gael Monfils of
France beat compatriot
Stephane Robert 6-2, 7-5.
Qualifier Oleksandr Dolgo-
polov Jr of Ukraine downed
Andrea Seppi of Italy 6-3, 6-
4 and will meet Rafael Nadal
in the second round.

Austria’s Jurgen Melzer
topped South African quali-
fier Kevin Anderson 6-2, 2-6,
6-4 to set up a meeting with
David Nalbandian or Tomas
Berdych.





Woods says neck injury not related to crash

By DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer

NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa.
(AP) — Tiger Woods says
there is “zero connection”
between the neck pain that
forced him to withdraw from
The Players Championship and
his November 27 car accident.

Woods said during a news
conference Monday that his
neck started bothering him two
weeks before the Masters, his
first competition in five months.
He brushed it off as “no big
deal” until it kept getting worse.

“T’m at a point now where I
just can’t go anymore,” he said.

Woods said he’s been taking
anti-inflammatory drugs, but
they have not helped. He plans
to have an MRI when he
returns to Orlando, Florida.

He said his schedule is “up
in the air” and could be shaped
based on what he sees in the
MRI.

Woods insisted he can deal
with the pain, which he feels in
the right side of his neck, but

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TIGER WOODS reacts after putting
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round of Players Championship
Sunday in Ponte Vedra Beach.
(AP Photo)

Veering off course

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cannot deal with the spasms
that affect his ability to turn his
head. “For me not to play all 18
holes, that was as angry and as
frustrated as I’ve been in a long
time,” Woods said of with-
drawing from The Players
Championship on Sunday. “It is
sore.”

In November, Woods was
briefly hospitalized after he
crashed his Cadillac Escalade
into a fire hydrant and a tree
outside his home, resulting in
a sore neck and a cut lip.

Woods spent some of his
time at The Players Champi-
onship denying speculation that
he is about to leave Hank
Haney, his swing coach since
2004.

He said at Aronimink Golf
Club that he was working on
his swing. “I talked to Hank
about some of the stuff. We’re
still working on it,” he said.
“We have a lot of work to do. I
can’t make the movements that
I made before because of the
neck. I need to get healthy to
play the proper way.”

Pakistan stays
in contention
with South
Africa win

CASTRIES, St Lucia (AP)
— Defending champion Pak-
istan stayed in contention for
a semifinal spot in the World
Twenty20 with an 11-run vic-
tory over South Africa in their
Super Eight match on Mon-
day.

The result at Beausejour
Stadium also meant England
progresses to the final four
while South Africa exits the
tournament.

Umar Akmal’s blistering 51
off 33 balls led Pakistan to a
total of 148-7 from their 20
overs. Akmal cracked two
fours and four sixes to lift
Pakistan from early trouble at
18-3.

Fast bowler Charl
Langeveldt claimed 4-19 off
his four overs.

South Africa stalled early in
their run chase and could only
manage 137-7. A B de Villiers
topscored with 53 off 41 balls
but he fell at a crucial stage to
off-spinner Saeed Ajmal, who
grabbed 4-26.

South Africa’s pursuit was
undermined by the early loss
of both openers.

Herschelle Gibbs smacked
Abdul Razzaq straight to mid-
wicket with the score on 12,
then captain Graeme Smith
mis-hit left-arm spinner
Abdur Rehman to mid-on to
make it 23-2.

De Villiers and Kallis
added 33 for the third wicket
but the required run rate kept
climbing.

Kallis spent 21 balls compil-
ing 22 before he was Ajmal’s
first scalp, thanks to a brilliant
catch at long-on from Umar
Akmal.

De Villiers smacked
Rehman’s final over for 20
runs to revive South African
hopes but Ajmal claimed his
wicket in the next over to tilt
the balance.

Johan Botha blasted 19 off
eight balls in a late flourish
that threatened to produce a
miracle for the Proteas. How-
ever, with 17 needed off the
final over, Ajmal removed
Botha and ensured that only
ones and twos were on offer
to the batsmen.

Earlier, Pakistan recovered
from a difficult start after win-
ning the toss choosing to bat.

Salman Butt miscued a pull
off Dale Steyn, Khalid Latif
lofted Jacques Kallis to mid-
on and Mohammad Hafeez
was LBW to Langeveldt.

But Umar Akmal anchored
the Pakistan recovery with
two half century partnerships,
adding 51 from 36 balls with
his older brother Kamran and
then a further 61 off 33 balls
with skipper Shahid Afridi.

Kamran Akmal hit three
fours and two sixes in his 37
off 33 balls.

Afridi, who supplied 30 off
18 deliveries, blasted four
fours and a six.

Bankers Softball
League results

RESULTS of games played
in the Bankers Softball League
at the Banker’s Field, Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, over
the weekend, are as follows:

BAF Financial 8, CMC 4

Winning pitcher:

Corey Burrows

Losing pitcher: Adrian Smith

Top Performers (BAF) -
Mike Butler went 1-for-3 and
scored two runs with a RBI,
Richard Bastian went 3-for-4,
with a double and four RBI,
Marvin Wood went 1-for-2,
scored a run, had one double
and a RBI, Joey Demeritte
went 2-for-4, scored two runs
and Alicia Culmer went 2-for-3.

Top Performers (CMC) -
Jayson Lockhart went 1-for-3,
scored a run with a triple and a
RBI and Mike Gomez went 2-
for-3.

Citi Trust 14, Bank of

Bahamas 13

Winning pitcher:

Teddy Sweeting

Losing pitcher:

Jackie Conyers

Top Performers (Citi) -
Kervin Culmer went 2-for-2,
scored a run, had a home run
and five RBI, Erin Adderley
went 2-for-4, scored three runs
and had a double, McNeil
Albury went 2-for-3, scored a
run with a RBI, Phillipa Willie
went 2-for-3, scored a run with
a RBI and Bernie Major went
2-for-4 with a run scored.

Top Performers (Bank of
Bahamas) - Ray Newbold went
4-for-5, scored three runs with a
home run and four RBI,
Bernard Young went 3-for-4,
scored two runs had a double, a
home run and two RBI and
Jackie Conyers went 2-for-4,
scored two runs with a triple.



First Caribbean 10,

RBC Lions 8

Winning Pitcher: Robert Cox

Losing pitcher:

Julian Seymour

Top Performers (First
Caribbean) - Patrick Lockhart
went 2-for-3, scored two runs
with a double, and a RBI,
Jayson Clarke went 2-for-3 with
two runs scored, a double and
one RBI, Mark Gomez went
1-for-3, scored a run with two
RBI and Robert Cox went 1-
for-3, scored a run and had a
RBI.

Top Performers (RBC
Lions) - Avery Rolle went 1-
for-3, scored two runs with a
double and two RBI, Kris
Turnquest went 2-for-4 with a
run scored and Julian Seymour
went 1-for-3, scored a run and
had a RBI.

Fidelity 15, Colina 14

Winning pitcher:

Rory Newbold

Losing pitcher: Tim Sawyer

Top Performers (Fidelity) -
Godfrey Burnside went 3-for-4,
scored three runs with two dou-
bles and two RBI, David Gar-
diner went 2-for-3, scored two
runs with two doubles and
three RBI, Chavez Thompson
went 2-for-3, scored three runs
with a RBI and Greg Jones
went 2-for-2 with two run
scored.

Top Performers (Colina) -
Burton Saunders went 3-for-4,
scored three runs with two
RBI, Levan Cox went 3-for-4,
scored two runs with a double
and a RBI, Peter Isaacs went 2-
for-4, scored a run, had a home
run and four RBI and Clint
Paul went 1-for-3, scored two
runs with a home run and three
RBI.

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www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

eS
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AND REAL ESTATE “

PPE te So i



Car death ir
parents charged

Pair accused of
manslaughter
by negligence

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE parents of a three-
year-old girl who was
found dead inside a
parked car in Fox Hill last
month appeared in court
yesterday in connection
with her death.

Police have charged
Larry Demeritte, 50, and
Sandra McDonald, 44,
both of Abner Street, with
manslaughter by negli-
gence.

The two were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane _ yester-
day afternoon.

It is alleged that on Sat-
urday, April 17, while at
Abner Street, Fox Hill,
the two negligently caused
the death of their daugh-
ter Sandria Demeritte.

The three-year-old was
found in a kneeling posi-
tion inside a parked green
2001 Nubira Daewoo, just

100 metres away from her
father's home on Abner
Street, Fox Hill, on April
17.

According to reports,
Sandria had been missing
for several hours before
her body was found.

She had reportedly wan-
dered from her mother's
house.

An autopsy has revealed
the child had suffocated
in the car.

Her parents were not
required to enter a plea to
the manslaughter charge.

Demeritte was repre-
sented by attorney V
Alfred Gray and McDon-
ald was represented by
attorney Davard Francis.

The prosecution did not
object to the accused
being granted bail.

They were each granted
bail in the sum of $6,000
with two sureties.

The case was adjourned
to May 14 and transferred
to Court 10, Nassau
Street.

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SEE PAGE THIRTEEN |



Pastor among six people
charged over alleged
immigration forgery ring



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



SEE page 12



SIX people, including a local pastor, appeared in court
yesterday in an alleged immigration forgery ring.

Bahamian residents, Absalom Rolle, 43, of Ridgeland
Park, Pastor David McCartney, 52, of Fox Hill Road, and
Sade Palmer, 22, of Union Village, were arraigned before
Magistrate Guillimena Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street
yesterday along with Lucner Michel, 39, of Foxdale Subdi-
vision, Jean Tony St Louis, 38, of Fox Hill, and Pierre Moi-















Sandra McDonald and Larry Demeritte pictured yesterday.

Three charged in connection with PUSQUng AEC

jewellery store armed robbery

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO men and a woman
appeared in court yesterday in
connection with an armed rob-
bery at a jewellery store last
Wednesday.

Police have charged Marvin
Campbell, 37, of Sumner Street,
and Ryan Smith, of Water
Street, with three counts of
armed robbery.

It is alleged that the two men,
while armed with a handgun on

SEE page 15

Land and sea search for missing man

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A RESIDENT of Cat Island has mysteriously disappeared,
sparking an intensive police investigation and land and sea search.
Johannes Maximillian Harsch, 46, a German businessman who
lived alone in Fernandez Bay, was last seen on Sunday, May 2, hav-

SEE page 15

Fast Track your plans...
with a Fast Track Loan.

Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



donations for

children’s homes

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State for
Social Services Loretta But-
ler Turner has revealed there
has been a surge in demand
for government subsidies
from care homes, in particu-
lar children’s homes, which
have seen private donations
drop significantly over the
last year.

And after a “really diffi-
cult year” attempting to keep
pace with the demand for
funds from cash-strapped

SEE page 15







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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

Hotel bosses
hopeful of
settlement

with union

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BOSSES at the Wyndham
are hopeful the hotel can set-
tle a dispute with the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union over
the property's planned six-
week closure without indus-
trial action.

Robert “Sandy” Sands,
vice-president of external
affairs at Baha Mar, said hotel
and union officials are still
holding talks to come to some
accord after news broke over
disagreement over the
planned August 23 to Octo-
ber 7 closure.

Mr Sands also disputed
arguments that the temporary

SEE page 12

Govt signs deal to
tlevelop Arawak Cay

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WIDER distribution of the
profits from the freight shipping
industry, reduced cost of living
for Bahamians and the facilita-
tion of the redevelopment and
revitalisation of downtown Nas-
sau were highlighted as the
major benefits of a signing
between the government and
private investors to develop
Arawak Cay into New Provi-
dence’s freight hub yesterday.

After 18 months of negotia-
tions with a group of 19 pro-
posed private stakeholders, the
government announced that it
had signed a memorandum of
understanding with the Arawak
Cay Port Development Com-
pany to forge a private-public
sector partnership that will see
the relocation of shipping oper-
ations from downtown Bay
Street to Arawak Cay.

The announcement was
made at a press conference held

SEE page 12

a, ame!

EDUCATIOALAL LG


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



i =



oa

described being crowned as “ amazing”.







44m |

TWENTY-YEAR-OLD Braneka Bassett was crowned Miss Bahamas World 2010 on Sunda
night in the Atlantis Imperial Ballroom. Seventeen beauties vied for the title of Miss

Bahamas World, but it was Braneka Bassett with her platform of "Empowering Our Youth"
who beat her competitors to walk away with the diamond studded crown. The new queen



NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



A FORMER applicant to a flourishing loan
scheme has demanded her money back after
becoming concerned that it could be a scam.

The business is said to have already received
hundreds of applications for its personal loan
service. Applicants are guaranteed $5,000 if they
come up with a cash down payment of $500.

“I found out about it from someone at work.
Plenty people put their money down from April
1. No one got anything yet,” claimed the woman.

“They are preying on poor people. They know
persons are in need so the idea of getting money
right away is a sweet thing,” she said.

The Tribune yesterday tried unsuccessfully to
establish whether the business is legally regis-
tered. The telephone number on the application
form is a cell number that immediately goes to an
answering machine which is filled to capacity.
There is no address printed on the form.

The applicant said she went to the office where
she made the down-payment last week to collect
her $5,000 loan, but was informed the office was
moving and could not disburse funds at that time.

When she demanded that her deposit be
refunded, the employees said if she waited
around for a few hours she could get her money
back.

“After new persons who wanted to apply came
in to put their money down, she was able to get
her money back. She waited for three hours,”



Loan applicant demands
refund over possible scam

said a source familiar with the situation.

As the applicant was able to get her money
back, she decided not to call the police, but she is
now warning the public to be careful.

The former office space of the business is now
vacant. Sources claim it moved on Saturday toa
larger location.

Curiosity

When, out of curiosity, the applicant tried to
enter the business’ new office, she said she was
refused entry.

“A lot of people were inside. The security
guard said they don’t have any more application
forms and they aren’t seeing anyone until Sep-
tember.

“Some people were to get their money today.
They don’t even know the people moved,” she
added.

The application form states that the company
is “not a bank”. It requires applicants to disclose
personal information such as their address, tele-
phone contacts, and employer’s name, as well
as the names of their dependents and the church
they attend.

Rumors surfaced that the company was being
backed by the well-known FML Group of Com-
panies, however FML denied any connection.

According to one source at FML, “hundreds”
have called to inquire about the loan, many
becoming enraged when told that the scheme
was in “no way, shape, or form” connected to
FML.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

Man plans census boycott until 7,

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

MPs disclose financial assets

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



A LOCAL man plans to boycott this
year's census until all members of parlia-
ment publicly disclose their financial assets
and liabilities.

Kirk Nixon, who manufactures canvas
and awnings, said he is disgusted by the
lack of accountability displayed by politi-
cians, many of whom have failed to declare
the state of their assets despite being
required to do so by law.

Mtr Nixon said he has convinced about 50
friends and family members to shut out
census workers as a form of informal
protest. "We're going to boycott it unless
every MP gives full public disclosure which
they should have done long ago by law,"
said Mr Nixon, 54.

He said the public has a right to know
which businesses their representatives have
a stake in, adding that full disclosure will
ensure politicians do not profit from the
public purse.

"T will not do it and I’m telling every-
body I know not to do it either until we
get full disclosure from each MP as to what
they own, how much money they bring in,
their total value and what projects they are
privately involved in. We know there are a
number of politicians involved in mega pro-

eta)
AIT

with murder

AE eH
Wa

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter





jects in this town which they are not sup-
posed to compete with the general public
for,” he said.

The last full list of public disclosures by
MPs was published on November 3, 2004.

In early February, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham confessed that he was among the
group of politicians who had not complied
with the law stipulating yearly public dis-
closures. "... The Public Disclosures Act is
not being adhered to by members of par-
liament,” Mr Ingraham said.

Documents

The prime minister said he was in the
process of preparing the necessary docu-
ments and explained that his last public dis-
closure was in 2007 when he ran for the
North Abaco constituency in the last gen-
eral election.

He later made a public apology for his
delinquency.

Mr Nixon said it is a contradiction for
government agencies to ask private citizens
to reveal their financial information —
although the government vows to keep the
data confidential — when the country’s leg-
islature has failed to do so.

"Common sense dictates that they have
to pave the way and show everybody that
they are willing to expose their wealth like
they want us to do. Yet they tell us to be

good citizens and give out our personal
information," said Mr Nixon, who believes
the real aim of a census is to aid government
in formulating its strategy for determining
constituency boundaries in the lead up to
national elections.

Under the Public Disclosure Act, before
the first day of March every year, all sena-
tors and members of the House of Assem-
bly must declare their assets, income and
liabilities, as well as those of their spouses
and children. According to the Act, this
information should be published in a nation-
al gazette. A Public Disclosure Commis-
sion, chaired by Oswald Isaacs, is charged
with ensuring compliance with the Act.

Messages left for Mr Isaacs and the com-
mission's secretary Garnett Knowles were
not returned up to press time yesterday.

Director of the Department of Statistics
Kelsie Dorsett said she had not yet received
reports of boycotts or resistance to the cen-
sus. "I haven't heard any of those reports,"
said Ms Dorsett, who added that the public
has so far been "very accommodating."

She recently stressed the importance of
complying with the census, saying it will
provide government and the private sector
with information vital to planning the future
location of schools, senior citizen homes
and other important facilities.

The census, the first since 2000, began
on May 4 and is expected to continue for
about six weeks.

ys
LIGHTBOURNE, 21,



dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Three men
were charged with murder
and armed robbery in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Freeport residents
Kennedy Bain, 21; Alfred
Carvel Rolle, 21; and Duane
Lightbourne, 21, appeared
in Court One before Magis-
trate Debbie Ferguson.

It is alleged that on
November 14, 2009, the
accused men intentionally
and caused the death of







Steffon “Tommy” Mitchell
at Albacore Drive, Freeport.
It is also alleged that on the
same date and in the place,
the men committed armed
robbery.

Attorney Simeon Brown
represented Lightbourne
and Carlson Shurland repre-
sented Rolle and Bain.

The men were not
required to enter plea to the
charges.

The matter was adjourned
to November 10 and 11 for
preliminary inquiry and the
men were remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.



Cycling robbers shoot man

CARVEL ROLLE, 21

BRAZEN gunmen on bicy-
cles opened fire outside the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre yesterday and shot a man
in the leg as they robbed him.

Police said two men armed
with handguns cycled up to a
group of three men outside the
Thompson Boulevard sports
centre at around 2.45pm and
demanded cash.

They stole the men’s money
and one of the robbers shot a
man in his left leg.

The injured man was rushed
to hospital by ambulance where
he is in stable condition.

Police are appealing for pub-
lic assistance in locating the
gunmen, who were both wear-
ing white T-shirts and black
trousers.

In other crime news, the man
shot dead in Regent Street off
West Avenue on Friday, was
identified by police yesterday

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as Stapledon Gardens teenager
Berkley Theophilus Miller, 17.

Police also said one of the
men killed in a traffic accident
in Eleuthera on Friday is David
Hanna, 23, of Hatchet Bay, not
David Hamilton, as previously
stated.

Anyone with information
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mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Playing musical chairs with history

LAST TUESDAY Krissy Love turned
her “Issues of the Day” radio talk show into
a “$10 bill Tuesday” to discover whether
members of the public wanted the image of
Sir Stafford Sands — “a principal architect of
the modern Bahamian economy” — to
remain on or be removed from the Bahamas’
$10 bill.

In 1993, a year after the Ingraham gov-
ernment came to power, it was decided that
on certain Bahamian currency notes the
Queen’s image would be replaced by
“deserving Bahamians.” Those chosen were
first governor general Sir Milo Butler, Sir
Cecil Wallace Whitfield, Sir Roland Symon-
ette, Sir Lynden Pindling and Sir Stafford
Sands. The life of each man marks a mile-
stone in our history. However, there was
vicious objection from PLP quarters when
Sir Stafford’s image appeared on the $10
bill on March 7, 2000.

Here was a finance minister who had had
the foresight to peg our currency to the US
dollar, providing the financial stability from
which this country still reaps benefits. And it
was he, who transformed these islands from
a winter resort, into the year-round success-
ful resort that we know today. Yet, the PLP
felt he did not qualify for recognition. And so
when they won the government in 2002, Sir
Stafford’s image was removed from the cur-
rency. Recently the FNM returned it to the
$10 bill. PLP MP Fred Mitchell then
announced that if the PLP ever regained
power, Sir Stafford would be again ousted.
As Krissy Love described it: “Playing musi-
cal chairs with history!”

Most of the callers to the programme felt
that Sir Stafford had earned his place on
the $10 bill, and should never have been
taken off. “He was a one man band who did
more for this country than any other man,”
said one caller, whose sentiments were
echoed by most of the callers to the show.

However, there were three or four who
felt he should never have been on the bill in
the first place because he was a “traitor.”
And why a traitor? Well, when the UBP
lost the election, Sir Stafford did not want to
live under a black government. He fled the
country, they claimed. When one hears the
name of Hitler, asked another caller to the
radio show, what do you think of? Why the
death of six million Jews was his own reply.
And when people think of Sir Stafford
Sands, he pressed, what to do Bahamians
think of? “Racist,” he insisted.

And yet there were those callers who
knew Sir Stafford personally, and denied he
was a racist. They told of his unlimited gen-
erosity to black Bahamians. “We were very
poor,” one woman explained as she
described Sir Stafford’s kindness and con-
cern for her family.

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Bahamian entertainers were better off
under Sir Stafford than they are now. Local
troubadour Nat Saunders agreed.

Krissy Love, wanted to know why the
name Stafford Sands created such heated
debate? Was one of the callers to the show
suggesting, she asked, that everyone who
left the country after the PLP came to pow-
er was a traitor? She pointed out that not
only did white Bahamians leave, but many
black families also packed their bags and
relocated. She admitted that her family was
among them. In the 1960s, she said, her par-
ents could not deal with the way black peo-
ple were being treated by the new black
regime. One caller said that Sir Stafford
vowed that he would never return to the
Bahamas. This is not true. It was the opinion
of another caller that lack of knowledge of
the truth and politicians pushing the race
card for votes had led to much of today’s
ignorance — and even bitterness.

In 1967 — seven months after the PLP
came to power — Sir Stafford Sands
resigned his seat in the House of Assembly
as the UBP representative for the City. In his
letter of resignation, he said, he was “not
prepared to be a paid professional politi-
cian.” Up until then no member of the leg-
islature received a salary. They felt it their
duty to freely devote time to the adminis-
tration of their beloved country. The PLP
introduced salaries for politicians.

When Sir Stafford’s resignation letter was
read to the House by the Speaker, there was
bedlam. PLP members were annoyed that he
had resigned. They probably wanted him to
remain in their midst so that he could be
the butt of their weekly ridicule. He was to
deny them their vicious pleasure.

The scene in the House that day was one
of hysteria. PLP members made all kinds of
outlandish accusations, not caring whether
they were true or false. Most of them were
false. Sir Lynden, then prime minister, went
so far as to claim that Sir Stafford was “oblig-
ed to run” from the Bahamas because he
was a “total embarrassment” to his party.

And yet it was this same diminutive man
who could with a straight face stand in the
same House on the occasion of Sir Stafford’s
death five years later and say: “For many
years a great Bahamian stood in this cham-
ber and gave service to his country in the
manner he thought best. His name is one
that all of us will remember and one that
will long ring in this country.”

In this column tomorrow we shall
describe the atmosphere that drove Sir
Stafford from his beloved homeland. The
bitterness of that era could still be heard in
the voices of the few ill-informed callers
who contributed to the Krissy Love “$10
Bill Tuesday” debate last week.







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We need to
find a dam
solution

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In a letter issued last year I
urged the Government to con-
sider the urgency in addressing
matters concerning, the securi-
ty of The Bahamas especially
in the area of our borders.
There are no solid indications
that the current economic con-
dition of this region and the
world will get better any time
soon. Right now I believe that
our greatest threat to main-
taining an even moderate sta-
bility during this crisis is the
current deterioration of gover-
nance in Haitt.

The January earthquake in
Haiti has added a severe blow
to what once was an already
depressed state.

Though the world has
responded to the current, basic
needs of Haiti, we cannot
expect or depend on a sus-
tained effort by any group or
nation to keep Haiti from
falling back to a place which it
once was or worse.

The current deteriorating
economic situation in Greece
and the bailout response from
its allies is a prime example of
how recovery efforts by nations
will have to be shifted continu-
ally to meet the demands of a
progressively unstable world.

This recession has made it
such that no nation can now
solely deal with any one of
these unforeseen events that
now seem to occur on a daily
basis.

Our Problem

The time has come for us to
find more creative solutions to
this Immigration problem as it’s
now clear that the ones that we
are currently undertaking do
not work. We cannot afford
during this time to guess and
hope that this issue will go
away. The risk alone of a severe
humanitarian crisis is sufficient
to induce a swift and proactive
approach to the matter from
within Haiti itself.

It’s a known fact that the
immediate and repetitive repa-
triation of migrants from Haiti
is a counter-productive exer-
cise yet we continue to do it.
This recurrent programme was
not funded by the disposable
income of the Bahamian public
even during good economical
times.

Every dollar back then was
important and today —even
more. We cannot afford to con-
tinue to waste money in this
manner. We must find a solu-
tion that will not only stop this
haemorrhaging of our funds but
also transform it into an invest-
ment.

The source of this problem
lies within Haiti itself, its gov-
ernance and its people. It’s
clear that the matter of stabili-





















LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



ty in Haiti is one that cannot
be solved overnight. Last year,
before anyone could have
dreamt an earthquake was
pending, we were given a good
forecast by the Haitian Ambas-
sador himself that we should
expect even more migrants in
the near future. Now the future
is here and it has brought along
the unexpected. What should
we do?

The Dam Solution

What I propose to solve this
problem is an aggressive sys-
tem of control. Like a Dam, we
need a solution that will regu-
late this flood of migrants and
create positive energy from
what is now, no doubt, a
destructive force.

I propose that we create a
regulated and isolated labour
force of Haitian migrants and
nationals who can apply within
Haiti to work on a contract
within the Bahamas. I believe
that the employment of all
Haitian migrants should fall
solely under the portfolio of the
Bahamian Government or a
proper, select organisation who
would qualify to handle the
task.

Therefore, if given that the
Government of the Bahamas
has sole rights to employ these
migrants I propose that we dis-
continue the issuing and renew-
al of work permits for Haitian
nationals living in the Bahamas.
Through isolated, predeter-
mined work assignments for
migrants I believe that we can
also stem out the existing trend
of corruption in the Depart-
ment of Immigration and other
Government entities.

We should embrace this as a
plan for national development
through the creation of new
industries, mass farming and
the improvement of infrastruc-
ture throughout our family
islands. This plan would be sim-
ilar to the work Contract pro-
gramme introduced by the
United States in the late 1940s -
50s which many Bahamians had
applied for. This programme as
many know aided tremendous-
ly in the development of South
Florida.

We can also invite other
Caribbean nations to adopt this
same work programme to aid in
the effort. In the event of a
mass exodus from Haiti we
would then have the ability to
share labour with our neigh-
bouring countries.

A set quota of workers can
be rotated within a specified
period, returning home to allow
for a new group to enter the
programme. If in the event the
quota is exceeded do to an
arrival of illegal migrants we
can then prematurely substitute
those currently here.

What prevents us from
implementing a programme
such as this? The mere fact that
we can give those from Haiti
(who are willing and able) the
opportunity to work, feed their
families and fund their own
flights back to their homeland is
enough an incentive to try it.

Ican go further into how this
plan can work but I must
address another part of this
issue.

Mass Repatriation
and Naturalisation

For any serious effort to
work in this matter it is impor-
tant to conduct massive repa-
triation exercise like none oth-
er previously undertaken. An
aggressively planned repatria-
tion will allow us to begin this
programme with a clean slate.

The issue of naturalisation
for those who qualify should
also be addressed. I believe that
a contributor to our crime prob-
lem are those who were born
to immigrants who have yet to
feel that they are a part of our
society. I believe that it's com-
pletely wrong to leave an indi-
vidual in limbo as to his status
in life if he or she was born into
your society, especially one
whose only connection to his
heritage is that of his parents.
Naturalisation for these per-
sons should be made much eas-
ier and more transparent.

Citizenship, identity and the
benefits of freedom are essen-
tial to positive growth and
development of every human
being. Those who deserve it
should have it. Without this I
believe that loose cultures are
developed and hate towards
those that have these rights are
created.

It would be better for us to
embrace and integrate these
people, many of whom I
believe have a true desire to do
good and contribute to the
development of our country.

Conclusion

It is not in the best interest of
our nation to wait for more
unforeseen events to take place
in order for us to jolt into
action. A proactive approach,
going to where the problem lies
first and applying solutions
beforehand are some of the
greatest keys to maintaining a
healthy and secure society.

The quality of life for every
Bahamian should be first on
the Government’s agenda. We
have been plagued with this
problem of Immigration for far
too long and I feel that there
is no greater time than now to
find a Dam Solution.

DELROY MEADOWS
Nassau,
May 4, 2010.

PRS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Police set to examine
stations’ security after
escape of inmates. — The
Tribune, May 5, 2010.

Security would probably
be improved by simply
removing some of the sta-
tions’ distractions — such as
cell phones, radios, TV’s,
and, of course, any grade D-
dummies.

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
May 5, 2010.







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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





JENNISAN ENRIQUEZ of Forest Heights Academy, Marsh Harbour,
made her mark in the Texaco Road Safety Speech Competition. She
placed third and won a $3,000 scholarship prize.





THE TOP THREE WINNERS of the 9th Annual Texaco Speech Com-

petition smile happily after a well-fought battle to take top honours in
the event, a youth development programme of Chevron Bahamas and
a segment of Chevron’s “Energy for Learning” worldwide initiative.

Family Island students dominate

= TEXACO S

HREE - stu-

dents from

Family Island

schools walked
away with the top prizes at
the 9th Annual Texaco
Speech Competition to pro-
mote road safety.

The three winners - one
boy and two girls - beat out
29 competitors from nine
islands at the event held at
the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts on May 1
under the theme "Shifting
Gears with Texaco for a
Safer Bahamas".

Governor-General Sir
Arthur Foulkes and Lady
Joan Foulkes were the
patrons of the competition’s
finals.

Thirteen-year-old Valtio
Cooper, an 11th grader at
North Andros High School,
walked away with the first
prize, with Michelle Greene
of San Salvador Central
High in second place, fol-
lowed by Jennisan Enriquez
of Forest Heights Academy,
Marsh Harbour, in third.

The Family Island trio
took home trophies and
scholarship prizes of
$10,000, $6,000 and $3,000,
respectively.

Gifts

The three, along with oth-
er participants, received a
number of gifts and oppor-
tunities, including meetings
with the country’s leaders,
Sir Arthur and Prime Min-

r

yy

Tt

nan it \ at \ Ye
[ie z

]

/ Mi i} f



PEEC



ister Hubert Ingraham.
Among the presenters of

the special awards was Hec-

tor Infante, Chevron’s pub-

Notice is hereby given that the Thirtieth (80th)

Annual General

Meeting of THE PUBLIC

WORKERS’ CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION
LIMITED, will be held at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, Bay Street, on Friday, May 21,
2010, commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

purposes:

* To receive the report of The Board of

Directors.

* To receive the Audited Report for 2009

* To elect members of The Board of Directors,
Supervisory Committee and Credit Committee

+ To discuss and approve the budget for 2011

All eligible members, wishing to run for a
position on the Board of Directors, Supervisory
Committee or Credit Committee, are asked to
submit their names to the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Monday,
May 17th, 2010, by 4 p.m.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



lic and government affairs
manager - a member of the
Chevron party who travelled
to Nassau in support of the
Chevron Bahamas event.

Valtio, son of single par-
ent, Tina Cooper, thanked
God, his mother, his school
principal and teachers, and
the district administrator for
their sustained support,
which contributed to his
winning.

He lauded Chevron
Bahamas for having
“stepped up to the plate”
and ensured that the com-
petition was successful.




iy

Tox ae 0 Dthy

E
Lear

Brin
Spee oad Safoty
Wile OM PBtitian



DISPLAYING a gift for showmanship, Valtio Cooper of North Andros
High emerged as overall winner of the Texaco Road Safety Speech

Competition.











RYAN BAIN, district sales manager of Chevron Bahamas, explained the company’s educational mission,
which it furthers though its sponsorship of the annual speech competition.

“Road safety is a crucial
topic in our day and age
because many Bahamians
don’t think of it as a threat
to their lives, but during this
speech competition and dur-
ing the preparation of this
speech I learnt that shifting
gears is serious, serious busi-
ness that requires a para-
digm shift.

“Therefore, road safety
must begin in our minds and
manifest itself in our
actions,” he said.

Complimenting the other
two winners, San Salvador’s
Michelle Greene, who came

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MICHELLE GREENE of
San Salvador High
School took second
place in the May 1, Tex-

aco Road Safety Speech Competi-
tion and was awarded a scholarship
prize of $6,000 for her efforts.



Road Safety Competition were delighted by the
musical renditions of the “Texaco Quartet”, whose
members included Tanisha Braithwaite of Preston
Albury High School, Eleuthera; Quitel Charlton of
St Francis de Sales High School, Abaco; Giavono
Bowe of Old Bight High School, Cat Island, and
Winnae Hunt of Sunland Baptist Academy, Grand
Bahama, who is also the junior minister of
Tourism. The impromptu group was formed just
two days before the finals.



second, was very upbeat
about the value of the com-
petition.

Positive

“The Texaco Road Safety
Speech Competition is one
of the most positive experi-
ences of my young life. I
must say the competition
has given me a new boost of
confidence in my speaking
skills and has definitely
raised my self-confidence to
a new level. I would recom-
mend this experience to all
my peers,” she said.

The 2010 competitors rep-
resented ten secondary
schools in New Providence,
high schools on Abaco,
Andros (North and South),
Cat Island, Eleuthera,
Grand Bahama, Long Island
and Salvador, as well as
Junior Achievement,
Bahamas Association of
Compliance officers, Gen-
tlemen’s Club, Rotary Club
of Abaco and the Junior
Tourism Minister Pro-
gramme.

Ryan Bain, district sales
manager of Chevron
Bahamas, explained the
selection process, which con-
tributed to the strength of
the field of competitors:

“Each year since then

(2001), the competition has
invited the best young
speakers in the Bahamas to
participate. All of them
come to us as winners of
various debates and speech
competitions. They are the
top speakers in their high
schools and youth organisa-
tions.

“The competition helps
students to sharpen their
research, thinking and
speaking skills.

“We push the educational
mission even further with
the award of scholarship
prizes to aid in funding the
college studies of the top
three winners. We further
promote leadership skills by
appointing the first place
winner as ‘Texaco Youth
Spokesperson’ for a year,”
he said.

‘I must say the
competition has giv-
en me a new boost
of confidence in my
speaking skills and
has definitely raised
my self-confidence
to a new level.’



Michelle Greene





SIR ARTHUR FOULKES, Governor-General of the Bahamas, greets
Hector Infante, Chevron’s public and government affairs manager.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Cruise ‘passenger spending
increases almost 39 per cent’

Industry executives
reveal rise over the

last three years
By BETTY VEDRINE

THERE has been an
almost 39 per cent increase in
cruise passenger spending
over the last three years,
according to industry execu-
tives.

Speaking to the media at a
meeting between government
officials and members of the
Florida Caribbean Cruise
Association (FCCA) on Fri-
day, Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Senator Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said that
this “notable” increase is due
to the dialogue between the
government and industry
stakeholders.

FCCA represents a num-
ber of cruise lines that serve
the Bahamas and is one of the
many organisations with
which the Ministry of Tourism
has formed a partnership to
ensure visitor satisfaction.

“The best news for us is
that there has been an
increase in the level of cruise
passenger satisfaction in num-
ber and spending from the lat-
est survey, SO we want to con-
tinue that upward trend,” said
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace.

“In order to ensure that we
are able to do that, we sit and
talk about ways that we are
moving along that path
together.”

Meeting

He added that the meeting
is part of a regular series of
ongoing gatherings where
stakeholders seek ways to
improve the quality of expe-
rience that cruise passengers
have when coming into the
Bahamas.

“We try to cover every pos-
sible scenario such as what
happens when vessels come
in, scheduling of vessels to
facilitate the movement of
passengers in and around the
port.”

Topics discussed at the
meeting included the dredg-
ing of the harbour, water tour
dispatch, crime, cancellation
of vessels, Customs clearance
for private islands and hull
maintenance while in port,
among others.

President of FCCA
Michelle Paige said that “hap-
py” passengers spend money,
and the amount of money
that the passengers and crew
are spending has gone up con-
siderably.

“If you estimate that the
passenger spending went up
almost 39 per cent over the
last three years; spending by
the crew went up from $20 to
$78, which is 290 per cent.

“Those changes do not
come about because nothing
happened. Those changes
come about because the prod-
uct has improved and because
of the communication,” said
Ms Paige.

Minister of Environment
Dr Earl Deveaux was also
present and said he was very
satisfied that the police have
taken the initiative to ensure a













(BIS photo/Kristaan Ingraham).
MEMBERS of the Florida Caribbean Cruise Association visit the
Queen’s Staircase to see safety measures installed by the police to
ensure cruise passenger's safety.









"(BIS photo/ Kristaan Ingraham)

MINISTER of Environment Dr Earl Deveaux (right) speaks with
reporters as Minister of Tourism and Aviation Senator Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace looks on. Both ministers were attending a meeting
between government officials and members of the Florida Caribbean
Cruise Association at the Port Department, Friday, May 7.

higher level of safety of visi-
tors to the Bahamas.

Pleased

“IT am very pleased with
what the police and the port
controller are doing to ensure
the safety and security of our
visitors. The police have
installed CCTV all over
downtown Nassau,” Dr
Deveaux said.

“Additional resources have
also been mobilised with
respect to the port itself.

“We have a well-trained
and highly motivated team of
Defence Force officers and
port officers that work along
with the police. While we do
have incidents, safety as a rule
is not a concern for us,” he
said.

Other initiatives that have
been instituted to ensure the
safety of sites frequently vis-
ited by cruise ship passengers
include the increase in police
presence and proper lighting.

NOTICE

The Annual General Meeting of the
Board of Directors of the Bahamas
Planning Association will be held

on Thursday, June 10, 2010 at 6:00
p.m. at the Association’s Centre on
#37 East Avenue, Centreville. Only
financial members will be allowed
to vote. Do you want to become a
member? Attend the AGM.





“The best news for us
is that there has been
an increase in the lev-
el of cruise passenger
satisfaction in number
and spending from
the latest survey, so
we want to continue
that upward trend.”



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

FCCA PRESIDENT Michelle
Paige addresses reporters dur-
ing the meeting between the
Florida Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation and government offi-
cials at the Port Department,
Friday, May 7.







FCCA MEMBERS and media take a tour of Fort Charlotte to see
new safety measures implemented by the police to ensure cruise
passenger safety.

(BIS photo/Kristaan Ingraham)



ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE

In an effort to improve our patient services, the Princess Margaret Hospital
will undergo renovations to the Accident & Emergency
Department’s Triage, Registration and Patient Waiting
Areas, along with the Registration and Reception areas for
the Orthopedic Clinic,

Effective Tuesday May || th, 2010, Patients seeking Emergency and
Orthopedic Services must use the Pharmacy entrance and will be directed
as needed,

Patients are also reminded to use your Community Poly-Clinics for Non-
Emergency Services,

For more information please call 502-7885 for A&E Triage or
356-9465 for the Orthopedic Clinic.






Management apologizes for any inconvenience caused,

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

The Centre for Continuing Education

& Extension Services (CEES)

Presents a special town meeting on the

Becker CPA Review Programme

GUEST SPEAKER:
Mr. Steven Chou,

Director of International Business Operations,

Becker Professional Education, Chicago, Illinois.

DATE:
Wednesday, May 12th at 5:30pm.

VENUE:

Michael H. Eldon Boardroom, The College of The Bahamas,

Thompson Boulevard

Students who prepare for the CPA Exams using the Becker Review pass at double

the rate of non-Becker candidates.

CPA Lecturers will be present at the town meeting to answer your questions.

For more information call: 328-1936, 328-0093 or



email: lbastian@cob.edu.bs

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

at the Cabinet Office, in the
Churchill Building in downtown
Nassau.

The deal struck facilitates the
construction of port infrastruc-
ture on Arawak Cay and in the
harbour to allow for the other
two thirds of the country’s
freight that does not presently
arrive into that area already to
do so, as well as the construc-
tion of an inland warehouse
depot at Gladstone Road from
which containers not scheduled
for immediate distribution to
businesses will be kept, with
their movement then taking
place in the evening rather than
day time hours to reduce con-
gestion.

Flanked by Cabinet ministers
and company directors, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and
Jimmy Mosko, chairman of the
Arawak Cay Port Development
Company, confirmed that the
government will take a 40 per
cent stake in the new port, as
will the 19 private sector stake-
holders who came together
under the Arawak Cay Port
Development Company, and
eventually the public will be
able to collectively buy up a 20
per cent share in the port. The
government and the private sec-
tor shareholders will put up a
total of $20 million each
towards setting up the opera-
tion.

Mr Ingraham said he antici-
pates the private sector will lead
the way in operating the port,
and ultimately it is the govern-
ment’s intention that the 40 per
cent stake it presently owns also
will be made available to the
public.

“Historically and even today
the substantial income derived
from the shipping industry in
New Providence has been

owned and controlled by a
select few families — the Symon-
ettes, the Bethells, the Kellys,
the Farringtons, the Roberts
and more recently the Moskos,
the Wells, and the Light-
bournes.

“Today we are taking action
so that income from shipping is
distributed more equitably and
evenly among the population
of The Bahamas. Sixty per cent
of the profits derived from this
enterprise will go directly to
other Bahamians other than the
historic shipping families,” said
the Prime Minister.

Mr Ingraham emphasised on
several occasions that the deal
was one intended to benefit the
public at large through a “broad
ownership structure”, rather
than any small group of indi-
viduals or FNM party support-
ers, as the Opposition PLP have
claimed in their criticisms of the
plan to relocate shipping to
Arawak Cay rather than their
preferred southwest New Prov-
idence location.

The PLP came out strongly
against the Arawak Cay move
from the early stages of its con-
sideration by the present gov-
ernment, suggesting any
investors would put in money
“at their own risk” given that
the PLP claims it will move the
port to its preferred southwest
location if elected in 2012. The
south western New Providence
site, although ranked top in a
study conducted by indepen-
dent consultants by the previ-
ous government, was deemed
by the current government to
be a cost prohibitive choice for
a new port site, both for
investors and the general public
who would see the cost of goods
rise.

In fact the independent con-

LOCAL NEWS

Govt signs deal to develop Arawak Cay

sultants’ study found that
Arawak Cay ranked ahead of
the Christie administration’s
preferred southwestern port site
when it came to minimising
environmental impact, a fact the
the PLP government did not
make public. The main factor
behind Arawak’s downgrade
was that the location —
although it was environmental-
ly superior — did not fit into
the Christie government’s mas-
ter planning vision for the
island.

Yesterday Mr Mosko
declined to respond to the com-
ments from the PLP about the
port on behalf of the investors,
stating that he is “not a politi-
cian.”

Mr Ingraham belittled the
claim that the PLP would derail
the project, saying “the signing
of this agreement and the com-
mencement of the project
speaks for itself more than any
word that can be uttered by
anyone.”

The Prime Minister added he
was pleased to “have a hand” in
yesterday’s signing, the realisa-
tion of a “40 year delayed
promise” that freight would be
moved off the Bay Street water-
front.

The entire port project is set
to be completed by October
2011, and Mr Mosko estimated
that all freight will be relocated
from Bay Street by December
of this year.

The first “marine” phase of
the construction work, which
officially got underway yester-
day, will be conducted by US-
based company American
Bridge, a subcontractor on the
recent harbour-dredging and
Arawak Cay extension project,
at a cost of around $33 million,
while the later phases of con-





JIMMY MOSKO, chairman of the Arawak Cay Port Development



Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at the site at Arawak Cay.

struction will involve local con-
tractors and may create around
150 construction jobs, it was
claimed.

The government will lease
47.7 acres of the roughly 150
acres available at Arawak Cay
to the port company in which
it holds a stake and 15 acres in
the Gladstone Road area for
the inland depot.

For this, the government will
collect $2 million in rent annu-
ally, or $40 per container, for
the lease of the land, whichever
turns out to be greater, said Mr
Ingraham.

“We seek in this exercise
firstly to lower the cost of goods
and the cost of living to the
Bahamian people by reducing
the cost of imported goods. We
seek to expand the ownership

by Bahamians of an import
profitable sector of the Bahami-
an economy. By doing this we’ll
open up significant real prop-
erty along Bay Street for rede-
velopment and growth down-
town and we will also reduce
congestion along the main thor-
oughfare in our city and permit
the restoration of our city to its
earlier days of charm,” he
added.

The exercise will also ulti-
mately see customs operations
downtown consolidated — from
six current locations including
the Prince George cruise dock,
to two — allowing for the “rede-
ployment” of some officers to
other areas.

Meanwhile, part of the work
to be done at the Arawak Cay
site to prepare for the reloca-

Company, holds a rope yesterday with

tion of the freight operations
will require the removal and
relocation of the Water and
Sewage storage tank that exists
at the site. The cost of this will
be borne by the joint public-pri-
vate company rather than the
WSC and will result in less
evaporation of water from the
tank, and therefore savings for
the cash-strapped corporation,
said Mr Ingraham.

“So this is a godsend for them
also,” he added.

The Prime Minister said that
the Memorandum of Under-
standing and the as yet unre-
leased traffic study pertaining
to the impact of the port in this
regard will be made available
to the public after they are
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly tomorrow.

Pastor among six people charged

FROM page one

closure violates a recently
signed agreement — between
the union and the Bahamas
Hotel Employers Associa-
tion — which required the
union to slash pension con-
tributions by half in 2010 for
the promise that BHEA will
not lay off any hotel work-
ers this year.

According to Mr Sands,
none of the property's 1,200
employees will be laid off

during the six-week closure.
Instead, that time will be
allotted for employees to
take their vacations, many
of whom will be entitled to
four or five week holidays
with pay, he said.

This, he said, is better
than the alternative of hav-
ing employees garnering one
day’s pay while on short-
ened work weeks during
slow periods.

“We've stated our posi-
tion in terms of the need to
close and in terms of the
agreement to the pension
fund. We believe that we are
compliant — the pension
fund says ‘not to reduce the
number of employees in the
bargaining unit for the
entire year of 2010’.”

He said hotel executives
met with the union officials
last week to inform them of
the planned closure. He said
this meeting came after a
decision made in January to

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protect the financial viabili-

ty of the hotel, which closed

for six weeks around the
same time last year during :
a traditionally low occupan- :

? se, of Dean’s Lane.
He added that talks :

cy period.

between the hotel and the
union were stalled because

tions.
Messages left for union

head Nicole Martin were :
not returned up to press |
time. However BHCAWU :

Secretary general Darren :

the ; nent residency certificate and also pleaded not guilty to a separate
inion’ discontent wih ihe 2. Ue alleging that he was found in possession of four Bahamian
planned closure earlier this : permanent residency certificates.

week and hinted at a possi- fences:

Woods expressed

ble strike.

But Mr Sands is confident $500 from Suzette Pennerman.

the matter can be resolved

amicably, although he added ; pleaded not guilty to abetting in the possession of a forged docu-

Wyndham's : ment.

planned closure is set in :

that the
stone.

history of resolving disputes

(but) it requires the oppor-
tunity for the parties to get :
together and discuss the way :

forward. It is our hope that : erre I t 3
: Immigration permanent residency stamps and not guilty to a

: charge of conspiring to possess forged documents.

we will work our way
through this,” he said.

Close to 1,200 people are }

: is expected in court today along with Michel and St Louis when
See ee may ? immigration officials will inform the court whether they have

Casino, about 40 per cent of legal status in the country.

part of granted $5,000 bail with one surety and Palmer was granted $8,000

: bail with one surety. The case was adjourned to September 22.

Hotel and Crystal Palace

them are a
BHCAWU.

FROM page one

They are all charged with possessing forged documents between

December 1, 2009, and May 7, 2010. They all pleaded not guilty yes-
; terday to the charge.
of BHCAWU's April elec- :

Rolle and Palmer pleaded not guilty to conspiring to commit

forgery between December 1, 2009, and May 7, 2010. They also
: pleaded not guilty to a charge of forgery. It is alleged that between

the same time the two forged nine Bahamian permanent residen-
cy certificates, a Bahamian naturalization certificate, and five
Bahamian immigration permanent residency stamps.

Rolle also pleaded not guilty to possession of a forged perma-

He also pleaded not guilty to the charge of fraud by false pre-

Court dockets state that on Thursday, March 25, he obtained

McCartney, the pastor at Full Life Pentecostal Ministries,

It is alleged that between Tuesday, December 1, and Friday,

: May 7, McCartney did facilitate Jean Tony St Louis in possessing
"I think that we have a : certain forged documents, namely a Bahamian permanent resi-

: dency certificate bearing the name of Jean Tony St Louis.

Michel also pleaded not guilty to possession of forged docu-
ments, namely two Bahamian permanent residency certificates, and

a permanent residency stamp.

Pierre Moise pleaded not guilty to possession of three Bahamas

Moise, who is represented by attorney Romona Farquharson,

Rolle was granted $15,000 bail with two sureties. McCartney was

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ee say
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ela et
FISH OIL |

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rae

Pets aah

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Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. - 393-4854




THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

homes caring for the country’s
most vulnerable in a harsh eco-
nomic climate, the department
of social services and those finan-
cially challenged institutions it
seeks to support will be placed
under even greater strain in the
next budget cycle, suggested the
Minister of State.

“A lot of the homes are hav-
ing financial challenges. These
are very difficult times,” said Mrs
Butler Turner, who suggested
that cut backs to her depart-
ment’s budget expected in the
coming budget cycle in the face
of ongoing government revenue
shortfalls will only exacerbate
the challenges faced by the gov-
ernment in meeting the higher-
than-usual demand.

Meanwhile, in addition to the
financial hardships of homes hit
by the economic downturn
which her ministry has sought
to address in recent times, Mrs
Butler-Turner noted the unique
case of the Grand Bahama Chil-
dren’s Home, which cares for
children aged up to 12 who have
been removed from their fami-
lies for reasons of abandonment,
abuse or neglect.

The home, once the “‘pet pro-
ject” of Lady Henrietta St
George, widow of the late
Edward St George, former part-
owner and Chairman of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
used to receive over $500,000
from the GBPA towards its
operating costs, however the
legal wrangling over the owner-
ship of the GBPA which raged
unresolved for years took its toll
on the home, said Mrs Butler
Turner, who said the govern-
ment had to step in to fill the
funding void when this annual

Children's homes

donation dried up.

“We've had to take over a
huge undertaking there that is
no longer being supported the
way it was by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority,” said
the minister.

“We have barely been able to
meet all of the demands, we’ve
met them, but with many con-
straints,” she added.

She said that while the Board
of Directors at the home have
in the past done an excellent job
of fundraising within the com-
munity for the children’s home,
Grand Bahama “‘s not in a posi-
tion to support fundraisers like
that anymore because it is chal-
lenged tremendously.”

The Tribune understands that
the Ranfurly Home for children
in New Providence is also expe-
riencing major financial hard-
ships at present, although when
contacted late last week staff
members said the situation was
“no more (difficult) than usual.”

Mrs Butler-Turner said that
Social Services officials have a
meeting scheduled with the
Board of Directors at the Ran-
furly home in the near future in
relation to funding challenges.

As demand for grants and
other additional subsidies rose
over the last year in particular,
Mrs Butler Turner said that her
ministry has sought to find extra
money to offer them and was
able to give a “one time shot”
of funding to “some homes that
were really crying out for help”
during the budget review exer-
cise earlier this year, but were
not able to benefit.

Social Services sought to assist
numerous church-run homes “so

Land and sea search for missing man

FROM page one

ing a meal at the Hawk’s Nest restaurant at around 10.30pm.

Police found his home secure, his truck untouched, his yacht tied
up to the dock, and his aircraft sitting on the New Bight airport run-
way undisturbed while there has been no trace of Mr Harsch.

A team of five Criminal Detective Unit officers flew from New
Providence to New Bight on Tuesday, May 4, to assist the search
along with a superintendent of police from Exuma and Cat Island.

They have searched the 48-mile long island and ordered a wider
search of the surrounding waters but have yet to find any sign of Mr
Harsch, said Assistant Commissioner of Police Glenn Miller.

Officers questioned two men in connection with the disappear-
ance yesterday, however no charges had been brought before The

Tribune went to press.

“We have not yet established whether there has been a crime or

not,” said Mr Miller.

“His vehicle — his truck — was found in good condition with no
damage, his house was secured, his aircraft at the airport is in
good condition, and his yacht is also in good condition.

“We have found no signs of struggle in his house or his air-

craft.

“The officers have done an area search of land and sea and not

come up with anything so far.”

Police are appealing to the public to assist investigations.

Anyone who knows anything that may help locate Mr Harsch
should call police urgently on 911, 919, 502-9991, or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

fee ate ee

facebook
ie ee

that they don’t have to delve into
their church finances,” she not-

cycle coming to a close, money is
tighter than ever before for the
ministry, and things are only set
to get more challenging even as
the demand from homes persists.

“One of the things we’re
awaiting now is that we’re going

FROM page one

: : jewellery.
Pega pa aa. a eo Smith has also been charged with raping a \
woman.

imperative that we all cut back in
our budgets so this is going to
be very difficult for us,” said Mrs
Butler-Turner, who said Social
Services “absolutely could not”
provide for an increase in its
grants to care homes in the com-
ing financial period.

the charges of armed robbery.

‘Three charged in connection with
es with the present budget : jewellery store armed robbery

May 5, robbed Michael Anthony Jewellers, ; I
Mackey Street, of $123,123 in jewellery. It is
further alleged they robbed William Malone of
$500, and robbed a woman of nearly $20,000 in

The men were not required to enter a plea to













Sandra Smith, Marvin Campbell and Ryan Smith

Campbell, along with 41-year-old Sandra
Smith, of Fowler Street, were arraigned on one
count of possession of an unlicensed firearm
and three counts of possession of ammunition.

It is alleged that the two were found in pos-
session of a Makarov 9mm pistol, 27 rounds of

9mm bullets, 32 .45 mm bullets and five rounds
of 9mm bullets.

Campbell pleaded guilty to the charges while
Smith pleaded not guilty. The accused are
expected back in court this afternoon at 2pm.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

Calendar contest

speci Contest details listed on our website

Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for
the company’s 2011 calendar will be “A Celebration of Nature”. Photographs may be of any
subject (animate or inanimate), scene or histrocial structure that features a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas.

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 30, 2010. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk
and will not be returned.




































3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and
East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00a.m and 5:00p.m weekdays only. Envelopes should
be marked “Calendar Contest”.

4 Allentries must be accompanied by a signed and completed official entry form, available
at any Family Guardian office, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.



‘colourimages will be considered. Images must be provided as digital files on CD. Digital
must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure
ir reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality
e original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be
)lour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints
CD's will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer's name,
oto location must be written on the reverse of the print.
be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality
P lar areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the
The photographs selected will appear in Family
e judges will be final.
ented for each of the photographs
the calendar. The number of entries per

tion rights attached
‘reserves the right to



Haansial StENGth Rating

WAY COM
leading june 30, 2010

Return this form with photos and CD to:
Calendar Contest

Family Guardian Corporate Centre

Village Road & East Bay Street, P.O. Box SS-6232
Nassau, Bahamas

Name:



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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010 THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

BRITAIN'S PRIME MINISTER GORDON BROWN speaking to the media outside his official London
residence, No.10 Downing Street, Monday, May, 10 2010. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown
announced Monday he will resign by September — a dramatic move that improves his Labour Party's
chances of staying in power in a possible coalition government with the third-place Liberal Democrats.
Brown said Labour, which came a distant second to the Conservatives in Thursday's national election,
would begin a leadership contest to replace him while he focused on talks aimed at breaking Britain's
election deadlock.

Simon Dawson/AP





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UK’s Prime Minister
Gordon Brown to resign

LONDON

BRITISH Prime Minister
Gordon Brown made a dra-
matic bid to keep his belea-
guered Labour Party in power
after it was punished in elec-
tions last week, announcing
Monday he will resign by Sep-
tember at the latest even if the
Liberal Democrats — being
wooed by the Conservatives —
decide to join his party in gov-
ernment, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The political theater, played
out in front of the iconic black
door of No. 10 Downing Street,
comes as David Cameron's
Conservatives — which won
the most seats in Parliament
but fell short of a majority —
struggled in their attempts to

RODEO BURGER

win over the third-place Liber-
al Democrats.

Brown's party has been will-
ing to entertain supporting the
Liberal Democrats’ demand for
an overhaul of the voting sys-
tem toward proportional rep-
resentation, which would great-
ly increase that party's future
seat tallies. But evening
brought a further twist with a
counteroffer from the Conser-
vatives — of a referendum on a
less dramatic type of electoral
reform.

While uncertainty prevails,
to the displeasure of the mar-
kets, one thing appears certain:
The career of Brown — the
Treasury chief who waited a
decade in the wings for his
chance to become prime minis-
ter — is winding to an end.

Brown, looking statesman-
like but resigned to political
reality, accepted blame for
Labour's loss of 91 seats in last
week's election and its failure to
win a parliamentary majority.

No other party won outright
either, resulting in the first
“hung Parliament" since 1974
and triggering a frantic scram-
ble between Brown's Labour
and the main opposition Con-
servatives to broker a coalition
— or at least an informal part-
nership — with the Liberal
Democrats.

"As leader of my party, I
must accept that that is a judg-
ment on me," Brown said,
offering to step down before
the party conference in Sep-
tember.

Brown said Liberal Democ-
rat leader Nick Clegg had asked
to begin formal coalition talks
with the Labour Party and said
he believed their parties might
form a center-left alliance.
Clegg had previously suggested
Brown's departure would like-
ly be a condition of any deal
with Labour.

The Liberal Democrats have
seemed genuinely open to a
deal with the Conservatives —
who are less ideologically com-
patible with them than they are
with Labour — largely out of a
sense that Cameron won a
moral mandate and supporting
him was expected by the nation
at a time of economic turmoil.

But Brown's statement
appeared to give Clegg's party
a viable alternative, and real
temptation: join a possibly
short-lived alliance, remove the
unpopular Brown, and pass
electoral reform that could
transform their fortunes and
even banish the Conservatives
to the political wilderness.

The day's drama disappoint-
ed those hoping for a swift res-

5 PC CHICEEN TENDERS

olution and deepened the post-
election limbo that many feared
could further undermine con-
fidence in Europe's financial
markets.

The pound fell nearly 1.5
cents against the dollar after
Brown's statement on his
future, trading at $1.4866 late
Monday.

Belying morning optimism
and buoyant statements by par-
ty spokesmen, the Liberal
Democrats announced by after-
noon that they hadn't yet
reached an agreement with the
Conservatives on education
funding, fair taxation and elec-
toral reform. Then came
Brown's offer.

Clegg said the Liberal
Democrats and Conservatives
had "some very constructive
talks ... and made a great deal
of progress. But we haven't yet
reached a comprehensive part-
nership agreement."

The Conservatives said their
final offer on electoral reform
was for a referendum on the
“alternative vote" electoral sys-
tem, under which voters rank
candidates by preference and
second-choice votes are allo-
cated if no candidate wins 50
percent of the first preference
votes. The result could give
Clegg's party more seats — but
it would not constitute the rev-
olution that proportional rep-
resentation would.

Under proportional repre-
sentation — widely used in con-
tinental Europe — the Liberal
Democrats, with almost a quar-
ter of the vote, would have that
proportion of parliament seats.
Under Britain's current system
they won only 57 out of 650, or
just 9 percent of the seats.

Cameron's center-right Con-
servatives won 306 seats and
Labour 258. Smaller parties
took the rest.

William Hague, a senior
Conservative lawmaker and
Cameron's de facto deputy, said
that given that breakdown it
appeared unlikely that the Con-
servatives could form a minor-
ity government on their own —
a scenario that is allowed but
would not survive a no-confi-
dence vote.

He also said voters would not
want to see a second un-elected
leader. Brown was handed the
reins from former Prime Min-
ister Tony Blair.

Hague said the Conserva-
tives had offered the Liberal
Democrats a full coalition, with
Cabinet positions for members
of Clegg's team and a pledge
not to hold a new national elec-
tion for at least two and a half
years.




eine




\




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THE TRIBUNE

&



TUESDAY,



MAY

ter,



2010

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

‘18 months’ to merge the
Brewery and Burns House

By ALLISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Gov-
ernment has
given brewing
giant Heineken
18 months to
“consolidate”
Commonwealth
Brewery and
Burns House
into one compa-
ny prior to a 25
per cent initial
public offering (IPO), Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

Confirming what has been
widely reported, namely that
Heineken has to offer shares in
the combined group to Bahami-
an retail and institutional
investors in return for govern-
ment approval for purchasing
the stake held by a holding
vehicle for Sir Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson and his family, Mr
Ingraham said that such an
arrangement would broaden
Bahamian ownership of key
economic assets.

“Government has agreed
Kalik and Commonwealth have
to make shares 25 per cent
available to the public of the
Bahamas as we seek to broaden
ownership,” the Prime Minis-
ter said of the deal exclusively
revealed by Tribune Business
earlier this year.

“Commonwealth will first of
all have to consolidate the two
companies into one, and I think
they have up to 18 months to

INGRAHAM



* PM confirms 25% IPO to
follow from Heineken buyout

* But ‘integration’ comment may
raise competition concerns

do so, so they will choose the
timing.”

While that statement may
dampen hopes in the Bahamian
investor and brokerage com-
munity that an IPO - possibly
worth up to $25 million - was
imminent, Mr Ingraham’s state-
ment also raises some further
questions in relation to
Heineken’s $100 million pur-
chase of the stakes held in
Commonwealth Brewery and
Burns House by the Associated
Bahamian Distillers and Brew-
ers (ABDAB), the Finlayson
family vehicle.

ABDAB currently owns 47
per cent of Commonwealth
Brewery, giving Heineken the
majority 53 per cent equity
stake. However, the position is
reversed at Burns House,
where ABDAB holds a 78.8
per cent stake.

While the deal seems good
for Bahamian investors, given
that Commonwealth Brewery
- the most valuable asset - is
included, and they will have
equity ownership in a vertically
integrated brewer, distributor
and retailer (liquor being a
commodity for which there is
inelastic demand), questions
will be raised on competition
grounds.

SEE page 2B

Water Corp still owing

$4.6m to key supplier



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE cash-strapped Water &
Sewerage Corporation still
owed its main water supplier
some $4.6 million as at the 2010
first quarter end, it was
revealed last night, with the
Government pledging that
monthly payments through
June would both meet current
invoices and reduce “delin-
quent receivables”.

BISX-listed Consolidated
Water, unveiling its first quarter
results, said in its 10-Q filing
with the Securities & Exchange
Commission (SEC): “As of

March 31, 2010, Consolidated
Water-Bahamas was due
approximately $4.6 million
from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation.

“We have been informed
previously by representatives
of the Bahamas government
that the delay in paying our
accounts receivables is due to
operating issues within the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, that the delay does not
reflect any type of dispute with
us with respect to the amounts
owed, and that the amounts will
ultimately be paid in full.

SEE page 3B

Regulator criticises BTC
over ‘double dipping’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) was
yesterday criticised by the sec-
tor regulator for “double dip-
ping” on revenues by charging
its cellular customers for receiv-
ing international calls, which it
said could have been invested
in overcoming “technical chal-
lenges” at the Government-
owned incumbent.

Responding to comments by

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president of sales and market-
ing, that the company would
give up $2-$3 million in rev-
enue per annum by eliminating
these charges, the Utilities Reg-
ulation & Competition Author-
ity (URCA) said the case for
its action was proven because it
would bring the Bahamas into
line with the rest of the
Caribbean and the world.
“BTC has profited for many

SEE page 3B

Sotheby's



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

aha Mar yesterday

said the six-week

closure of the

Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace
casino accounted for a “sig-
nificant portion” of the 50 per
cent reduction in its 2009 net
losses, compared to the year
before.

Explaining the economic
rationale for the six-week clo-
sure, which Baha Mar will
again effect this year during
the slowest period of the
tourism season, Robert Sands,
the developer’s senior vice-
president of external and gov-
ernmental affairs, told Tribune
Business: “We cut the loss in
half [in 2009] from the year
before.”

When asked about how
much the summer closure con-
tributed to this saving, Mr
Sands added: “It was a signif-
icant portion, or else we would
not be doing it this year. It
reduces the costs and expens-
es at traditionally the slowest
time of the year, and we’re
able to put staff on vacation
at the same time.

“We believe that we
reduced the loss from the year
before significantly, and that
allowed us to start the year at
our current staff levels.”

Mr Sands, who is also the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
(BHA) president, said hotel
operating costs throughout the
Bahamas had benefited from



Closure cut Baha Mar losses ‘in half’

* Resort executive says Wyndham/Crystal Palace
closure accounted for ‘significant portion’
of 50% reduction in 2009 losses

* Closure savings ‘close’ to target, and although
‘not all goals’ met, developer believes additional
savings to come in 2010 in areas such as energy

the reduction in contributions
to the hotel pension funds,
which fell by 50 per cent -
from 6 per cent of employee
salaries to 3 per cent - from
the first pay week of 2010
onwards. The employer pays
100 per cent of the contribu-
tion.

“We’re closing for the slow-
est period of the year, and
organising that people be tak-
ing their vacation during this
period.” Mr Sands said many
staff, those who had been
employed for between 10-15
years, were due to take
between four to five weeks’
vacation per year - account-
ing for almost the entire six-
week closure period.

The 2010 Wyndham/Crys-
tal Palace closure will take
place between August 23-
October 5, and Mr Sands
added: “September is the
slowest month of the year and,
God forbid, hurricane season.
We'll direct the existing busi-
ness to the Sheraton, so we
will basically be volume con-
trolling the business during
this period.”

Some 1100-1200 staff will
be affected, and Mr Sands said
“less than 40 per cent” of

these were members of the
hotel union bargaining unit,
since those impacted included
management, casino and non-
unionised personnel.

The Baha Mar executive
told Tribune Business that the
resort owner “did not accom-
plish all of the goals we want-
ed to achieve” during last
year’s closure, although “a sig-
nificant portion” were
achieved “and helped to
reduces losses during that
period”.

Adding that Baha Mar “got
very close” to its planned sav-
ings target in 2009, Mr Sands
said: “We would have pre-
ferred to see additional sav-
ings, and the way we managed
this process this year will help
us to achieve that, especially in
the area of energy.”

Letters were sent out to
Wyndham/Crystal Palace
employees in early January
regarding the potential 2010
closure, and Mr Sands said
areas such as the laundry and
energy plant would remain
open throughout, along with
the golf course.

In an exclusive interview

SEE page 2B





Defaults slow, but banks cannot be ‘overly optimistic’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN banks cannot
afford to be “overly optimistic”
over the 2010 first quarter slow-
down in credit quality deterio-
ration, with loans in arrears
increasing by just $6.5 million
during that period, the Clearing
Banks Association’s chairman
warning yesterday that “cau-
tious strategies” were needed
for at least the next 12-18
months.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness after Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ data showed that
loans in arrears increased by
just 0.3 per cent to 18.1 per
cent, or $1.097 billion, in the
three months to March 31,

Lenders set to be cautious for another ‘12-18 months’, despite positive
sign from just $6.5 million rise in bad loans to $1.1bn during 2010 Q1

2010, Paul
McWeeney
said that

while this
was a “posi-
tive sign” any
sustained
recovery in

credit quality

was still

some way McWEENEY
off.

“It could be a reflection that
things are slowing - that’s one
of the signs. The rate of growth
[in loan arrears] is slowing,
which is good news” Mr
McWeeney told this newspa-

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per.
But it was “too early to tell”
whether this was the start of a
sustained recovery in credit
quality throughout the Bahami-
an commercial banking system,
he added, acknowledging that
the sector was “a long way”
from seeing any robust recov-
ery in its key loan indicators.
“We can’t be overly opti-
mistic,” Mr McWeeney warned.
“We have to be cautious and
ensure our strategies reflect
caution over the next 12-18
months. It’s going to be some

SEE page 2B





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Equal $20m
equity input
for new port

By ALLISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government and 19
private shipping companies will
each contribute $20 million in
equity cash to the new Arawak
Cay port, the Prime Minister
confirmed yesterday, implying
that the initial public offering
(IPO) of a 20 per cent stake
will be valued at $10 million.

With a return on investment
pegged at 10 per cent, Mr
Ingraham and Jimmy Mosko,
chairman of Arawak Cay Port
Development, confirmed that
the Government and 19 private
investors will each take a 40 per
cent stake in the port initially,
at a cost of $20 million each.

Given that the Bahamian
public will have an initial 20 per
cent stake, that implies the IPO
will be worth a total $10 mil-
lion. Collectively, the amount
of equity capital invested in the
Arawak Cay port will be $50
million - some $1 million each
coming from the 19 sharehold-
ers - with the balance of the
$60-$65 million project’s financ-
ing coming from a $10-$15 mil-
lion preference share issue.

The date for the IPO of a 20
per cent stake, in what Mr
Ingraham deemed a “very prof-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.





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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



> =~
Money supply growth gave us borrowed time

DR Jonathan Rodgers must
be commended for his careful-
ly reasoned article on the
Bahamian economy and the
causes of the US recession (see
Tribune Business, May 5, 2010,
page 2B). While it adds to the
public dialogue, much of his
thesis can be properly chal-
lenged. Let’s look at the US
recession.

The authority cited by Dr
Rodgers on key issues is Joseph
Stiglitz, a professor at Columbia
University, a former World
Bank chief economist and a
Nobel Laureate, who considers
himself to be an outstanding
critic of “free market funda-
mentalists”. Consistent with this
description, Dr. Rodgers con-
cludes:

* Tt was the financial institu-
tions that created the mess and
the US government that bailed
them out.

In all countries with a paper
currency, the government con-
trols the quantity of currency
in circulation and, indirectly,
the amount of credit outstand-
ing. This function ranks, along
with the maintenance of the
rule of law, as the most impor-
tant of all government respon-
sibilities. It determines whether
a country will experience:

* Inflation, possibly with a
speculative bubble

* Low inflation (stable
prices) and growth or

* Deflation with falling pro-
duction and employment.

In the case of any country,
the objectives of the Central
Bank can pit it against the polit-
ical interests of the president
and legislature when it, for

BAHA, from 1B

with Tribune Business earlier
this year, Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha
Mar's chairman and chief exec-
utive, said the company’s two
existing Cable Beach resorts
were still open only because his
family had used their own mon-
ey to cover “significant multi-
million dollar losses”, particu-
larly over the last two years.
He added that, together, the
combined cost of acquiring the
now-Sheraton Nassau and
Wyndham Resort & Crystal
Palace Casino plus associated
land (estimated at near $200
million); the $150 million
investment in upgrading those
properties; Baha Mar develop-
ment costs; and covering the
existing resorts' losses (proba-
bly at least $40-$50 million)
since the 2005 acquisition, had
made the Izmirlian family the
largest private investors in the

Bahamas-based economist Ralph Massey responds to
Dr Jonathan Rodgers by pinpointing what he sees as the

real cause of the financial sector/economic meltdown

instance, properly limits the
growth in outstanding credit.

I contend that, while financial
executives and institutions both
contributed to and greatly prof-
ited from the housing bubble,
the chief causal factor was a
government that failed in its
responsibilities.

Incestuous Relations

Dr Rodgers states that “there
is an incestuous relationship
between the Fed and the banks
because supposedly it is respon-
sible for the oversight of the
same banks who actually own
it”. One may call this a ‘con-
spiracy theory’ or a conflict of
interest. Neither describes a
unique complex reality.

The Fed was created in 1913
as a solution to the recurring
banking panics created by a
paper currency and a fractional
reserve banking system, which
consisted of many private banks
operating in 48 different legal
jurisdictions.

“The Fed conducts the
nation's monetary policy by
influencing the volume of cred-
it and money in circulation. [It]
regulates private banking,
works to contain systemic risk,
and provides certain financial
services to the US government,
the public and financial insti-
tutions.” (Wikipedia)

Bahamas. Tribune Business
estimates that investment to be
around at least $500 million.

"Those hotels have lost mon-
ey for the past four years," Mr
Izmirlian said of the Sheraton
and Wyndham. “In the past two
years, they've lost significant
amounts of money because of
high operating costs in the
Bahamas and the recession in
the US. The only reason they're
still open is because my family
has covered those losses - sig-
nificant losses.”

Mr Izmirlian declined to give
figures for those losses, or how
great a subsidy his family had
been forced to inject, but
added: "All I can tell you is that
the amount of money invested
in buying the land, renovating
the hotels and covering the loss-
es makes us by far the largest
private investor in the history of
the Bahamas. Those are big
losses."

The Governor, the governors
of the 12 district banks and the
Board of Governors are
appointed by the president sub-
ject to Senate confirmation.
Yes, the Fed’s shareholders are
private banks who get central
banking services, regulations,
reporting requirements and a
small dividend each year.

Nevertheless, the Fed is
responsible to the President
with Congressional oversight.
Yes, its work is highly technical
and not very glamorous; it is
staffed by those experienced in
banking and finance; and it
operates within a political envi-
ronment. It is easy to see
“incestuous relations” in such a
complex institutional arrange-
ment,and this can distort objec-
tivity.

M3 & Boom-and-Bust

There are three different
measures of the quantity of
money in circulation:

* “MI is the sum of the actu-
al currency (which can be legal-
ly tendered in the exchange for
goods and services) that is held
outside banks, travelers
cheques, checking accounts.

* ‘M2’ is the sum of M1 plus
savings deposits, money mar-
ket accounts, small denomina-
tion time deposits and retire-
ment accounts.

* ‘M3’ is M2 plus the large
time deposits, Eurodollar
deposits, dollars held at foreign
offices of US banks and insti-
tutional money market funds.

The role of money in the
Great Depression was not
defined until the mid-1950s by
Milton Friedman at the Uni-
versity of Chicago. His quanti-
ty theory of money and its sub-
sequent refinement remain a
key element in the Fed’s mon-
etary and credit management.
An annual growth of 2 per cent
up to 4 per cent in M3 was
deemed acceptable.

However, in November 2005
Alan Greenspan, then-gover-
nor of the Fed, and Ben
Bernanke, governor of the New
York Fed, stopped publishing
the M3 money supply data. The
reason given at the time was
that “the costs of collecting the
underlying data and publishing
M3 outweigh its benefits”. This
was a surprise since M3 gives
a much better indication of the
evolution of credit creation in
the economy than M1 or
M2...and, for instance, the
European Central Bank con-
siders M3 to be the most impor-
tant monetary aggregate.

At the time the decision was
made, M3 started growing at 8
per cent per year, and it explod-
ed upward to just short of 18



per cent per year in 2008 (as
reported in Shadow Govern-
ment Statistics) before plum-
meting to a minus 4 per cent in
2010.

Why did the Fed stop

publishing the M3 data?

Alan Greenspan and Ben
Bernanke followed a clear
expansionist monetary policy,
especially after 2000. Real
short-term interest rates (that is
nominal rates adjusted for
changes in consumer prices)
started low, below 1 per cent,
and turned negative between
late 2002 and late 2005. It real-
ly paid to borrow and
spend...an apparent real no-
brainer.

Since consumer prices
remained low and stable and
productivity was increasing,
Greenspan and Bernanke min-
imised the importance of the
unsustainable rise in housing
(asset) prices. That is... until it
was too late. Then they elimi-
nated the officially published
M3 warning sign.

Johan Van Overtveldt, the
economic historian, concluded:
“The Fed’s responsibility for
the housing bubble is consid-
erable. This conclusion has
important implications, among
others, for what is structurally
probably the worst derailment

in the American economy: the
extreme increase in relative
consumption expenditures and
its mirror image of disappearing
personal savings as the basis of
the huge external deficit of the
United States.” (Bernanke’s
Test, p. 97)

One should note that Con-
gress passed a number of laws
between 1964 and 1999 that
granted the Fed powers to
affect lending practices, both at
the consumer and financial
banking levels. Alan Greenspan
never used them.

When looking for the gov-
ernment’s hand in the housing
bubble one must also look at
its well-intentioned effort in the
housing market. It started in
the 1930s with the US govern-
ment trying to provide funds
(or liquidity) to this market.
With the civil rights movement,
the objective became the end
of discrimination in lending.
With time, lending standards
degenerated to ‘Sub-prime’, the
riskiest of all loans, ‘Ninja
Loans’ - No Income...No
Job...No Assets.”

It is easier for the public and
politicians to focus on the
predatory lenders to ill-
informed home buyers, or the
Wall Street financiers who inge-
niously packaged these loans,
sold them around the world and
made a fortune. They ‘earned’
their commissions, the mort-
gage holders suffer the possi-
ble loss of their newly-acquired
homes, and the politicians pro-
pose remedies, pontificate
about Goldman Sachs and wait
for their just returns at the
polls.

‘18 months’ to merge the brewery and Burns House

FROM page 1B

Dionisio D’Aguilar, the for-
mer Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president, said ear-
lier this year that the Heineken
buy-out of the Finlaysons and
ABDAB created an opportu-
nity to break-up the monop-
oly/duopoly environment in the
liquor industry - something the
Government might not be tak-
ing.

ve D' Aguilar said that dur-
ing his two-year stint as Cham-
ber president, which ended in
2009, he was contacted by
numerous Bahamian indepen-
dent liquor store owners com-
plaining that they were unable
to compete against the Burns
House-owned stores.

"I used to get complaints
from small, independent liquor
retailers that because Burns
House controlled such a big
share of the market, they were
at an inherent disadvantage,
and Burns House was essen-
tially a monopoly on the retail
side," Mr D' Aguilar recalled.

"IT remember a number of
liquor store owners calling the
Chamber and complaining
about what was a monopoly
environment. Because they
[Burns House] had so much
market share, it was very, very
difficult for smaller liquor stores
to compete.

"Firstly, they couldn't get
product, and secondly the prod-
uct they did was priced at a lev-
el that was not as good as the
prices given to the Burns House
stores."



Equal $20m equity
input for new port



FROM page 1B

itable enterprise”, was not disclosed,
although he said the Government ulti-
mately intended for its 40 per cent stake
to eventually be sold off to the public,
making Bahamian investors the majori-
ty shareholders in the port.

Yesterday’s signing of the Memoran-
dum of Understanding - exclusively
revealed by Tribune Business last week
- for the Arawak Cay port project, will
see the relocation of freight shipping
from downtown Nassau to Arawak Cay
and an inland warehouse depot on Glad-
stone Road.

Under the port deal, the Government
will lease land to Arawak Port Devel-
opment for around $2 million annually
or $40 per container unit, “whichever
is the greater of the two”, once the oper-
ation gets underway, the Prime Minister
said.

Land leased will include 15 acres in

the Gladstone Road area just south of
Bahamas Food Services, where 200,000
square feet of warehouses to house con-
tainers not destined for immediate dis-
tribution will be kept. Just under 50
acres of the 150 acres will be available at
Arawak Cay for the port itself.

Construction on the port officially
began yesterday following a formal
groundbreaking ceremony, with US-
based American Bridge winning a
roughly $33 million contract to do the
first “marine” phase of construction,
ahead of the future phases which will
be primarily done by Bahamian con-
tractors.

Mr Mosko said the company feels it
got a “good price” on this initial con-
struction phase. “We took advantage of
American Bridge already being here,”
he said, referring to the work the com-
pany had been doing as a sub-contractor
on the Nassau Harbour dredging pro-
ject.

Mr Mosko said it was intended that
the construction of the inland depot will

get underway “shortly”, with pre-engi-
neered and specially-designed buildings
not yet having been ordered. In total,
150 construction jobs are projected to be
created throughout the course of the
port’s development.

The Prime Minister said the key aims
of the deal were to broaden Bahamian
ownership in one of the most profitable
sectors of the economy, reduce the cost
of living through reducing the cost of
imported goods, as well as minimising
congestion and freeing up property
downtown for Bay Street’s redevelop-
ment.

Meanwhile, he also revealed that the
Government intends to enter into an
arrangement with Bahamas Fast Fer-
ries for that inter-island transportation
company to set up a new ferry terminal
on the south eastern portion of Arawak
Cay, next to the port, creating new small
business opportunities in that area. Oth-
er Family Island transportation opera-
tions are also expected to relocate to
this terminal, he added.







Pm lovin’ it

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To eliminate monopoly/com-
petition concerns after com-
pleting the Butler & Sands
acquisition in 2000, Burns
House franchised out many of
the retail stores to independent,
Bahamian entrepreneurs who
would source most of their
products from its wholesale
operation.

However, the move did not
work, and many of the inde-
pendent stores were subse-
quently taken back under
Burns House ownership. Tri-
bune Business also received
calls from the Burns House
store franchisees, complaining
that the company's wholly-
owned stores were obtaining
better prices and discounts than
they were, leaving them unable
to compete.

Such concerns are likely to
arise again, given that the
merged Burns House/Com-

monwealth Brewery owns a sig-
nificant number of liquor retail
outlets.

Heineken already has Board
and management control at
Burns House, which became
the largest liquor distributor
and wholesaler in the Bahamas
via the 2000 purchase of Butler
& Sands. The Board and man-
agement arrangement, con-
cluded in 2004, provided the
Finlayson family with the
financing needed to complete
the Solomon's Mines purchase.

Apart from the Finlaysons,
ABDAB's third largest share-
holder is understood to be PLP
chairman Bradley Roberts. Its
second largest shareholder is
Sir David Gibbons, owner of
the Colonial Group, which
owns the Bahamas-based
Atlantic Medical and Security
& General insurance compa-
nies.

Defaults slow, but banks
cannot be ‘overly optimistic’

FROM page 1B

time before we see a sustained
recover in the wider economy.
It’s still very early in the game,
and banks are going to be cau-
tious like most businesses.”

For the 2010 first quarter, the
Central Bank’s statistics
showed that while loan delin-
quencies between 31-90 days
past due actually contracted by
$2.1 million or 0.4 per cent to
$511.6 million, accounting for
8.5 per cent of all outstanding
loans, non-performing loans -
credit which is 90 days’ past due
and upon which banks have
stopped accruing interest -
increased by $8.6 million to
$585 million. That represented
growth of 0.2 per cent, with
non-performing loans account-
ing for 9.7 per cent of all out-
standing loans in the Bahamas.

“The marginal increase in
total arrears reflected growth
in mortgage delinquencies,
which outstripped contractions
in the consumer and commer-
cial segments,” the Central
Bank said.

“The mortgage component
advanced by $33 million (6.2
per cent) to $564.5 million,
occasioned by a $15.5 million
(5.3 per cent) gain in the short-

term segment to $305.8 million
and a $17.5 million (7.3 per
cent) expansion in related non-
performing loans to $258.6 mil-
lion.

“Consumer arrears fell by
$25.9 million (8 per cent) to
$297.2 million, reflecting
improvements in short-term
arrears of $16.6 million (11.1
per cent) to $132.7 million and
non-performing loans of $9.3
million (5.4 per cent) to $164.5
million.

“Commercial arrears were
slightly reduced by $0.6 million
(0.3 per cent) to $235 million,
due primarily to a reduction in
the 31-90 day category by $1
million (1.3 per cent) to $73.1
million.”

Mr McWeeney said the
Bahamian commercial banking
industry and its asset quality
situation was simply “a symp-
tom” of this nation’s current
economic condition, caused by
unemployment and the fact that
the tourism industry had yet to
rebound to pre-recession lev-
els.

He warned that banks were
being “very, very selective right
now” when it came to new
lending opportunities, due to
the focus on managing existing
portfolios.


Fears ‘small firms will be screwed’ Water Corp still owing





$4.6m to key supplier
By CHESTER ROBARDS FROM page 1B

“We have been informed by

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness



THE OWNER of a downtown Bay
Street restaurant, who depends on ship-
ping company and Customs employees
for the bulk of his business, yesterday
said he was sure many small businesses
will not survive long when those compa-
nies move to Arawak Cay.

Simon Smith, owner of Native Breeze,
said small businesses in downtown Nas-
sau, especially those east of East Street,
which rely on business from people who
work in the area, will find it difficult to
keep their doors open when the large
shipping companies move to Arawak
Cay.

With the Arawak Cay port deal being
signed yesterday, businesses are bracing
for economic changes that could come

in the next several months.

Mr Smith said that while there was still
some time before the shipping compa-
nies move, as ground has not yet been
broken on the port or its Gladstone Road
container facility, businesses have to
brace for the changes that will come with

the move.
Offices

“The offices will not be moving right
away and some of them will still be down
here,” he said. “But it means small busi-
nesses will get screwed.”

Though Mr Smith feels the move will
be potentially devastating to businesses,
as “doing business downtown is expen-
sive”, he is cautiously optimistic that the
changes that will come to Bay Street will
bring more business to the area in the
long run. The complete revitalisation of

Downtown could take as long as 30 - 40
years by some calculations.

Some downtown business operators
share a different sentiment over the sign-
ing of the Arawak Cay port deal

General manager of the Perfume Shop,
Tim Lighbourne, touted the move, saying
it was 20 years too late.

“Thank the Lord,” he said. “It won’t be

the end all, but it is a hell of a relief.”
According to Mr Lightbourne, a huge
relief to the downtown area, with the
shipping companies moved to Arawak
Cay, will be the reduction in the amount
of heavy tractor trailer trucks spewing
black smoke and creating noise on Bay
Street.
“It should have happened many years
ago, but it’s happening now and the best
advantage is to reposition Nassau as the
leading destination in the Caribbean,”
said Mr Lightbourne.





these representatives that
monthly payments to Consoli-
dated Water-Bahamas will
continue through June 2010 in
sufficient amounts to meet cur-
rent invoices and reduce the
amount of the delinquent
receivables. Based upon these
communications, we believe
that the accounts receivable
from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation are fully col-
lectible and therefore have not
provided any allowance for
possible non-payment of these
receivables as of March 31,
2010.”

The sums owed by the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion account for 47 per cent of

Consolidated Water’s $9.8 mil-
lion accounts receivables.

The outstanding amount
indicates that the 100 per cent
government-owned entity is
still having trouble paying its
bills despite receiving an addi-
tional $6.8 million subsidy for
fiscal 2009-2010 in the Mid-
Term Budget.

Allocated

Some 85 per cent of the $19
million initially allocated had
been used to pay the Corpo-
ration's private sector reverse
osmosis suppliers, with $10.8
million or 56.8 per cent going
to Consolidated Water as the
owner of the Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant.

Regulator criticises BTC over ‘double dipping’

FROM page 1B

years from this unusual prac-
tice of charging its mobile cus-
tomers for incoming interna-
tional calls, whilst also getting
revenue from their interna-
tional telecommunications part-
ners, therefore ‘double dipping’
in revenue,” URCA said.

Replying to Mr Johnson’s
statements, published in Tri-
bune Business, which said BTC
had been forced to levy those
charges because it was unable
to distinguish between incom-
ing international calls to cellular
and landline customers, URCA
added: “Those profits could
have been invested in over-
coming these technical charges
much earlier.

“Tt is URCA’s duty to ensure
that the interest of consumers is
protected. As Mr Johnson stat-
ed that ‘BTC had little choice
but to fall into line with the rest
of the world’ - this confirms that
there was a need by URCA to
review and mandate BTC elim-
inate these charges to the cus-
tomers. Once BTC has com-
plied, it will bring BTC and the
Bahamas in line with other
countries in the region.”

URCA also disputed Mr
Johnson’s and BTC’s view,
revealed exclusively in Tribune
Business, that it had been
tougher on the company than
Cable Bahamas when it came
to imposing remedies for their
Significant Market Power
(SMP) on the duo.

BTC was concerned that
Cable Bahamas had allegedly
been given 18 months to ‘untie’
its broadband Internet offering
from its pay TV services,
whereas it had been forced to
de-couple its own Internet
offering from its fixed-line tele-
phone service back in 2009.

“URCA does not agree with
the view that somehow URCA
has been tougher on BTC by

making BTC untie its DSL
broadband offering from its
fixed-line telephone services
some time ago,” the regulator
said in a statement sent to Tri-
bune Business.

“The simple fact is that
before September 1, 2009,
URCA did not regulate the pay
Tv services. In addition, URCA
did not have the appropriate
regulatory tools to force Cable
Bahamas to untie its broadband
Internet from pay Tv services,
as it does now under the Com-
munications Act.”

URCA said it had not given
Cable Bahamas an 18-month
timeline to untie its bundled
Internet and pay TV offering,
adding that it was the company
who had made this statement.
The regulator is now awaiting
Cable Bahamas’ proposals to
achieve the desired result.

As for BTC’s suggestion that
URCA create a ‘more dynam-
ic marketplace’ by using price
ceilings, setting the maximum
and lowest prices it could
charge for a specific service, the
regulator said: “The approach
suggested by Mr Johnson is
valid in a market where the
SMP operator produces reli-
able and verifiable costing
information.

“The information required
for Mr Johnson’s proposals
does not currently exist within
BTC, although BTC is imple-
menting regulatory financial
accounting systems that could
help in the future. Until that
time, URCA concluded that a
rules-based retail price regula-
tion approach is more reason-
able.”

And tackling BTC’s unhap-
piness with the fact that SMP
operators, meaning itself and
Cable Bahamas, need to obtain
its prior permission before ini-
tiating special promotions,
URCA said ‘single day’ pro-
motions did not need its

approval - only five days’ notice
being required.

“Mr Johnson argues that by
lowering prices, the consumer
benefits. URCA does not dis-
agree,” the regulator said.
“However, whilst a promotion
may appear to be of a benefit to
the consumer, it also has the
potential to harm the consumer
as it can lessen competition in
relevant markets, leaving con-
sumers with little or no choice
of provider in the long run. This
is the rationale for the regula-
tion of promotions.”

URCA also disagreed with
Cable Bahamas’ argument that
BTC’s cellular exclusivity did
not prevent other operators
from launching Wimax services.
Refuting the impression that it
was choosing not to issue
licences for these services,
URCA agreed that licences can
be awarded for Wimax spec-
trum.

“Indeed, URCA has issued
such licences and is entertaining
more requests for radio spec-
trum typically used for Wimax
technology,” the regulator said.
“However, new and existing
licensees using Wimax spec-
trum or technology must still
comply with the restrictions in
their licences prohibiting them
from providing services in
breach of BTC’s exclusivity of

providing cellular mobile ser-
vices.”

And Cable Bahamas’ argu-
ments that mobile resale or Vir-
tual Mobile Network Opera-
tors could enter the Bahamian
market also ran into the Gov-
ernment’s policy of BTC exclu-
sivity on cellular services,
URCA said, something that
was designed to maximise pri-
vatisation value.

URCA said it had also
brought forward its planned
consultation on number porta-
bility, in response to Cable
Bahamas’ concerns, and added:
“Whilst on one hand Cable
Bahamas argues for accelera-
tion of regulatory matters that
may bring it commercial bene-
fit, on the other hand Cable
Bahamas argues that URCA’s
plans are ambitious, and has
expressed concerns about the
impact on Cable Bahamas of
the workload associated with
URCA’s consultations.”

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays









FAMGUARD

The Board of Directors
of

FamGuard Corporation Limited

is pleased to advise that
the first quarterly dividend
for 2010
of 6 cents per share

has been declared to be paid on
May 25, 2010

to Shareholders of record as at
May 17, 2010

FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED

The parent holding company of

Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Limited
FG General Insurance Agency Limited
FG Capital Markets Limited
FG Financial Limited









NOTICE
MODA GIOVANE LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MODA GIOVANE LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 10th May, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 11th day of May, A. D. 2010



CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, 2000
NOTICE is hereby given that, SPARK GLOBAL
FUND LIMITED has been dissolved and that the
name has been struck from the Register of Com-
panies with effect from the 3rd day of May, 2010.

International Protector Group Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EDLINE OSCAR of COOPER’S
TERRACE OFF KEMP ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 3'¢ day of MAY, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC JERRY of KEMP ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 117" DAY of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

In The Estate Anne C. Doyle
late of 3640 North Ocean Drive in the
City of Singer Island in the Country of
Palm Beach in the State of Florida one
of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send before the 24th day of June,
2010, after which date the Administrators will pro-
ceed to distribute the assets having reguard only
to the claims of which they shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all per-
sons indebted to the said Estate are requested to
make full settlement on or before the date herein-
before metioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/1852
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY SIDE

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Four hundred and Seventy-six and Sixty-one
hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister Rock Road north
of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE of the Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon

Rolle
NOTICE

The Petition of Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle of the Smith Hill
Settlement of the Island of Andros one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate comprising Four hundred and Seventy-
six and Sixty-one hundredths (476.61) acres situate off Blister
Rock Road north of Smith Hill Settlement of the Island of Andros
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas bounded Northwardly
by land now or formerly the property of James Brisbane and
running Four Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy-three and
Seventy-eight Hundredths (4,973.78) feet on the Eastwardly by
the Sea and running thereon Four thousand Eight hundred and
Fifty-seven and Eighty-seven Hundredths (4,857.87) feet on the
Southwardly by 130 feet wide Road Reservation and running
thereon Three thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety-seven and
Forty-four Hundredths (3,997.44) feet on the Westwardly by
land now or formerly the property of Joseph Johnson and running
thereon One thousand Four Hundred and Forty-eight and Seventy
Hundredths (1,448.70) feet and by land now or formerly the
property of A. Speirs and running thereon Three thousand Three
Hundred and Three Hundredths (3,300.03) feet which said piece
parcel or plot of land describe above has such position boundaries
shape marks and dimension as are shown on the diagram or plan
recorded at the Department of Land of Surveys under the Land
Surveyors Act 1975 as Plan Number 537 AN of the said diagram
or plan which is coloured pink and prepared by Hubert Williams
in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
on the Island of New Providence.

The Petitioners Willis Rolle and Simeon Rolle, claim to be the
owner in of the fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and have applied to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas under S.
3 of the Quieting Titles, Act in the above to have her title to the
said land investigated and declared.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street, N.P., and
at the Chambers of Michelle Y. Roberts & Co., Christie Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or any adverse claims not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of Twenty-one (21) days after the final
publication of these presents file in the said Registry of the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of their claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed in the said Registry of the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the above Michelle Y. Roberts &
Co. statement of such claim. Failure of any such to file and serve
a statement of such claim by the above time will operate as a bar
to such claim.
Dated the 25th day of November A. D., 2009

MICHELLE Y. ROBERTS & CO.
Attorney for the Petitioners



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 7B





The Tribune



©





ith



Benefits of

CX

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



aving sex can be more
than just a fun roll in the
hay. Medical practition-
ers say there are great health
benefits that can be derived

from having intercourse.

This is part one of Tribune
Health’s quest to find out the affects
of sex on males and females. This
week we are focusing on how
responsible intercourse benefits men.

CARDIOVASCULAR BENEFITS
While older men may be worried
that engaging in sex might be a detri-
ment to their heart, studies have
contrasted that misconception. Tri-
bune Health spoke to Dr Joseph



sy |

(CY LOVING RELATION 2

Evans, urologist at the Bahamas
Urology Center who said intercourse
improves cardiovascular health.

“Research has shown that men
who engage in sexual activities live
longer. Dr Evans explained that men
who are sexual have less cardiovas-
cular problems.

“For sexual function to come
about a man must have a strong
heart and good cardiovascular
integrity,” he said.

“Penile erection in male requires
good blood flow. A compromise in
blood flow or cardiovascular func-
tion often manifests itself as erectile
dysfunction,” he said.

In a study published by the Journal
of Epidemology and Community
Health posted by www.webmd.com
researchers found that having sex
twice or more a week reduced the
risk of a fatal heart attack by half

SHIPS

for the men, compared with those
who had sex less than once a month.

Though there are number of car-
diovascular advantages of sex, Dr
Evans said that there are sexual
practices that individuals must be
cautious of using.

For instance, a man with a com-
promised cardiac function, for safe-
ty might want the woman to act in
the dominant role. “In this instance
he would not have to be active,” Dr
Evans said.

PROMOTES PSYCHOLOGICAL
WELL BEING

Sex affects a person’s overall men-
tal well being and when things are
right sexually a person is able to
function much better Dr Evans said.

“Often times a person who has
sexual dysfunction becomes anxious
and depressed. They want to be well
and have a proper functioning body.

“A person’s sexuality is often an
indicator of a person’s psychologi-
cal state thus a person’s sense of well
being is sometimes based upon that
person’s ability to function sexual-
ly,” he explained.

BURN CALORIES
During sex the entire body is fully
engaged in the activity. And if a cou-
ple is innovative enough it is stimu-
lation for the mind and entire body.

Exfoliation

“Thirty minutes of sex burns 85 : |
calories or more. It may not sound :

like much, but it adds up: 42 half- :
hour sessions will burn 3,570 calo- :
ries, more than enough to lose a :
pound. Doubling up, you could drop :
that pound in 21 hour-long sessions,” :

webmd explained.

RELIEVES STRESS

One of the biggest benefits of hav-
ing sex is that it has the ability to :
relieve stress. The hormones that are :
released during intercourse act as }

anti-depressants.

Another study done by Scotland
that was published in the journal :

Biological Psychology and posted by
www.webmd.com showed that sex
lowers blood pressure and reduces
stress.

“They studied 24 women and 22

men who kept records of their sexu- !

al activity. Then the researchers sub-
jected them to stressful situations --

such as speaking in public and doing :



: HOW can J improve my dull skin?
: Will exfoliation help the health of my
i skin? The fast answer is yes!

Skin exfoliation assists in the
? removal of dead skin cells to

* Improve skin smoothness and tone.
* Speed cell renewal

« Allow for increased penetration of
active conditioners from subsequent
products.

: As our skin cells renew, old surface
: cells harden and loose moisture, cre-
i ating a dull, lackluster appearance that
i can cause clogging and congestion.
: And as we age, damaged, contaminat-
i: ed cells don't always fall from skin.

i Through professional and home
: exfoliation dulling cells are effectively
? removed, and newer cells are revealed
i for a fresher, healthier appearance.

verbal arithmetic -- and noted their :

blood pressure response to stress. :
Those who had intercourse had bet- :
ter responses to stress than those ;

who engaged in other sexual behav-

iors or abstained,” the website said. :

There is no magic number as to

the amount of time necessary to :

experience those benefits, the fre-
quency is up to the individual.



Men and Sex: The Single Man

AS A woman, it is fascinating to
listen in on a male group discussion.
By sitting back and not contribut-
ing, we may find the subject turning
to ‘typical female views on men.’

Gender stereotypes may accu-
rately illustrate and please some. But
is it fair to generalise all men as over-
ly aggressive, unexpressive, insensi-
tive, and thinking only with their
genitals?

What about those men who do not
fit the description? Do they just keep
quiet, or just say what is expected
of them because they do not want
to be labeled? Does the idea of being
the 'odd man out’ and protecting the
image help to maintain surface
friendships?

If that is the case then where do
men go if they have real problems?

For many men, finding and suc-
cumbing to instant gratification of
their sexual needs is all they are
looking for.

Perhaps it is at a certain stage in
their lives or due to unhappiness
within their relationship, that many
cannot conceive the idea of being
completely monogamous, and there-
fore live an open lifestyle. But if we
look passed momentary pleasure,
and ask men 'Do you know what
you want?', we may be surprised by



their answer. Many describe them-
selves as ‘basically monogamous’,
but this is only once they have com-
mitted themselves to another. These
are the men who are interested in
improving their quality of life,
because they know that good sex is
dependent on a satisfying relation-
ship.

Our culture is surrounded with
teachings of 'Female Empower-
ment’, and women have certainly
stepped up and faced their chal-
lenges. Is it possible that men are
trailing behind in their personal
development, and are not taking the
time to look ahead to their future? Is
it this discrepancy in expectation that
is contributing to the growing dis-
satisfaction with relationships?

Knowing this, we should then not
be surprised when men reveal anxi-
ety about sexual performance. Not
only do they feel the usual sexual

pressures, but find themselves
thrown off balance with new ones.
They may encounter a female who is
confident in what she wants and may
be the one to initiate and direct the
sexual encounter. Just when they
think they understand the ‘new
woman’, they meet one who wants
him to instigate everything. He dis-
covers there are advantages with
both and wonders if it is possible to
have it all.

For those of us who have already
guessed the answer, the solution
seems quite obvious. Yes, we cer-
tainly need to keep in mind the gen-
der differences; but ultimately we
need to throw away the text books
and really study the uniqueness of
the individual in front of us. By real-
ly taking the time to understand,
share and open up to your partner;
you will find out what makes them
tick. Instead of worrying about per-
formance and ‘scoring’ you, will dis-
cover a higher degree of pleasure
and fulfillment.

Many men are wakening up to the
realisation that getting to know a
new love interest can actually pro-
duce a more rewarding sex life. Hon-
esty, laying all the cards on the table
from the very beginning is the first
step to satisfaction. By doing this,

you can actually be with someone
who makes you feel like a better per-
son; this is one element of compati-
bility.

Just like everything in our life,
sometimes things do not always run

smoothly and sexual problems are :

to be expected at times. For a few,
this actually puts them off dating and
may lead to avoiding sex altogether.

Many men have discovered that sex }
therapy is not only extremely valu- :

able, but also a place to open up
about their problems.

Sex hormones are fundamental in :

making us who we are, but they can
also mislead us in choosing the mate

: WHAT IS AN EXFOLIANT?

An exfoliant is any agent that
: removes dead skin cells and triggers
: new cells to push towards the skin's sur-
: face. Exfoliants can be physical, chemi-
i cal, or both, and usage is dependent
: upon the individual skin care needs.

: PHYSICAL EXFOLIANTS

Physical exfoliants use friction to
: remove dead skin cells, either through
: the use of a tool (such as a brush or
i sponge or a gentle abrasive (such as
: Corn Cob Meal, Rice Bran or Oat-
: meal).

; CHEMICAL EXFOLIANTS

i Chemical exfoliants dissolve the
: intercellular “glue” that attaches to
: the surface. Hydroxyl acids, Salicylic
: Acid, Retinol, and enzymes (proteins
; that break the chemical bonds of older
: cells and “digest” them) are a few
: examples of chemical exfoliant.

i Hydroxy acids are the most com-
i mon form of home chemical exfolia-
: tion because they are extremely effec-
: tive and, when used properly, very safe.
i Glycolic Acid was the first Hydroxy
: Acid to be used in a cosmetic applica-
: tion and it is still widely-used despite a
: high incidence of skin irritation. Lactic
: and Salicylic Acids, which are as effec-
i tive as Glycolic Acid, are now the
: choice of leading skin care profession-
: als because they deliver the same lev-
: el of results with considerably less irri-
: tation and have exhibited anti-inflam-
i matory properties.

: WHAT ABOUT OVER-EXFOLIATION?

i Aggressive exfoliation treatments
: such as dermabrasion and chemical
: peels have led to over-exfoliation of
i skin. Research at The International
: Dermal Institute indicates a series of
: exfoliation treatments can be much
: more effective than one very aggres-
i sive “lunchtime” procedure. In fact,
i any skin treatment- including exfolia-
: tion- that causes skin to become red
: and irritated is triggering the inflam-
: matory response, which in turn accel-
i erates premature aging.

i The Dermalogica BioActivity score
: system takes the guesswork out of
i selecting the best exfoliant for your
i skin. Determined by a professional cal-
culation of active agents and formu-
lation parameters, the higher the
BioActivity Score the stronger the
i exfoliant.

: WHAT TO EXPECT DURING
: AN EXFOLIATION TREATMENT
i Exfoliation treatments will consist
: of a professional double cleanse to
: remove all traces of make-up, mois-
: turizers, sunscreens and debris. Your
i Face Mapping skin analysis will deter-
: mine use of chemical or physical exfo-
: liant (or even a combination of both),
: and possibly electric brushes to facili-
i tate action of exfoliants.
: After your skin is exfoliated, your skin
: therapist will apply hydrating, brighten-
: ing, or purifying treatments. If performed
i during the day, sunscreen must be
applied to shield and protect skin.
Dermalogica MicroZone Flash
: Exfoliation treatments can help resur-
i face and brighten skin in less than 20
: minutes. They're the ideal mainte-
i nance service between Dermalogica
: Skin Treatments or your prescribed
i exfoliation treatment.

more suitable for us. Combine that :

with a new generation of sexually

aggressive women, and the whole :

thing becomes even more compli-
cated. Knowing which direction we

want our life to take, and the type of :

person we want to share it with, will
lead us to the happiness we all
deserve.

¢ Listen to ~ Love on the Rock ' with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9 For appointments .
call 364 7230 , email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.

: EXFOLIATION AND SPF

: When professional exfoliation is per-
i formed, it is important to apply sun
i protection (daylight defense) to protect
the skin, as the sensitivity of the skin
: has been increased by the exfoliation.
: Continue to wear daylight defense
i everyday to shield skin from UV light
: damage.

i ¢ This information was taken from derma-
: logica.com. Tamika Pinder is a Dermalogi-
: ca Skin Care Therapist at The Dermal Clin-
: ic in Sandyport. Please call 327-6788 for

: more information or visit www.dermal-

: clinic.com.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



@l GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack

a

Oo
ie
= © od

ail





RIC RAC flowers take a long time to bloom but are worth the wait, even though they are produced at night and for only one evening.

Ric rac orchid cactus

rowing plants in hang-

ing pots is very reward-

ing because the plants
can be viewed at or above eye
level and be more readily
appreciated.

The downside is watering. Plants
in hanging pots need to be watered
regularly and individually. One very
interesting plant for pots is an
orchid cactus called Ric Rac that
takes all the toil out of hanging bas-
Kets.

Ric Rac cannot be mistaken for
anything else. Its leaves grow to
about 3 feet long and look like tub-
by alternating fishbones. The sur-
face of the leaves is smooth and
looks almost artificial; the whole
thing looks as though it came from
another planet.

Actually, Ric Rac orchid cactus
(Selenicereus anthonyanus) comes
to us from southern Mexico.
Although the region in which it was
discovered had been thoroughly
combed by plant scientists, Ric Rac
was only found in 1946. Its original
name was therefore Cryptocereus,
as in ‘hidden’.

Ric Rac is related to both orchids
and cacti and in the wild is epi-
phytic, taking moisture into its roots
from the air. Ric Rac is very easily
grown by taking 6-inch cuttings
from leaf ends, allowing them to
dry for a week or so, and then plant-
ing them into a container.

The initial soil should have some
compost or peat moss added to
assist with moisture retention but
once the plant is established it

should be allowed to dry out con-
siderably before watering. It is, after
all, related to cactus.

Ric Rac is also related to orchids
and can flower, though rarely and
only on really mature plants. The
flowers are 4-6 inches in diameter
and are spiky and can be white,
pink or red. The flowers are usual-
ly produced in late spring and come
out at night, so keep a careful eye
on the plant once buds form. The
flowers last for one night only and
thereafter produce seeds. The first
flowers were grown by Dr Howard
E Anthony in 1950, so you can see
that the plant is very new to us.

In the wild the Ric Rac attaches
itself to trees and grows as an epi-
phyte that does not harm the tree,
only uses it as an anchor. Ric Rac
can grow throughout a tree’s bower
quite extensively and if you have a
suitable fairly open-canopied tree
in your yard that may be the best
place to put it. In the wild it would
grow from seeds that fell into
branch crotches.

A few years ago a leaf of Ric Rac
escaped from the pot I had put it in
and started to climb a cement wall. It
attached itself very efficiently and
grew absolutely vertical.

Young Ric Rac leaves are smooth
and easily handled. Once the plant
matures it develops thorns at the
apices of the leaflets and these can
draw blood.

Ric Rac should be re-potted every
two or three years to allow for its
expanding root ball. It can take a
fair degree of sunshine but does best
in bright light without direct sun.
You will have noticed that Ric Rac







RIC RAC makes an unusual hanging basket and is very easy to look after because it is related to cactus.

was discovered in 1946 and the first
flowering was observed in 1950. That
gives us an indication of how long we
must wait for the flowers to be pro-
duced.

Some people call ric rac ‘zig zag
orchid cactus’ and liken the leaf

shape to a cartoon bolt of lightning.
This led to another name, St Antho-
ny’s cactus. St. Anthony is the saint
one turns to when weather is bad
and threatening but I feel sure the
attributory scientific name ‘antho-
nyanus’ refers to Dr Anthony who



first observed Ric Rac flowering.
‘Ric rac’ actually refers to a style of
hem-stitching commonly called Ric
rack.

© gardenerjack@coralwave.com



Elimination problems in cats

EVERY week I often hear the
primary complaint by cat lovers
“why does my cat urinate in every
other place other than the litter
box?”. A cat’s failure to urinate in
the litter box may have several caus-
es.( By the way it is recommended
that you provide a litter box for
every cat in your household.)

1. A dirty litter box may cause a
cat to avoid the box. Individual cats
have different levels of tolerance to
an unclean litter box. One cat may
use a litter box that is only cleaned
once or twice a week, when another
cat may avoid a box that has been
used just once.

2. A negative experience associ-
ated with the litter box could also
deter its use. Do not scold or startle
acat in the vicinity of the litter box.

Inappropriate urination can also
be a form of traumatised memory.
Urine marking outside of the litter
box in an erect, crouching or startling
position occurs in a sexually inact
or neutered male or female cats.

Urine marking in the standing
position is called spraying. It is per-
formed by males and females.

Cats that have been neutered at
the appropriate age and who have
never roamed outdoors or ever seen



another cat may begin to urinate
outside the litter box. A sexually
intact male or female in heat that
has begun to urinate inappropriate
should be neutered without delay.
The hormone influences related to
reproduction may motivate urine
marking. Once these hormones are
no larger in circulation following
neutering, the behaviour is likely to
stop.

Neutering alone however may not
be enough to return behaviour to
normal if marking is long-term.
(Normally more than several weeks)
Also neutering does not guarantee a
cat will never urinate inappropri-
ately.

ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
Urine contains odours that iden-

tify the individual and mark a cat’s

territory. The location of food, water



and safe places to rest are linked to
acat’s sense of security. If these are
disturbed, it may reaffirm its terri-
torial claim and relieve anxiety by
urine marking.

Litter training is further compli-
cated in households with more that
one cat. An easily offended cat may
avoid a box that has been used by
housemate. Territorial conflict
between cats in multi-cat homes may
cause problems including the litter



box. As mentioned earlier, provide a
litter box for every cat in your house-
hold.

Choose a variety of locations in
quiet corners in your home.

PHYSICAL INFLUENCES

A medical problem can be associ-
ated with inappropriate urination.
The common problems are cystitis
(urinary bladder infection), kidney
diseases and diabetes. If you suspect



any of these problems see and con-
sult your veterinarian. Virtually any
illness may be caused by inappro-
priate urination.

Inappropriate defecation may
stem from a dirty litter box, med-
ical problems, stress, anxiety and
even fear. Most cats prefer a quiet,
out of the way place for urination
and defecation. Too much noise or
activity nearby can discourage a cat
from using the litter box and drive it
to another location of its own choos-
ing. Moving the litter box to a new
location can also upset certain cats. If
the litter box must be moved, do it
gradually.

ELIMINATION IN HOUSE PLANT POTS

Cats have a natural instinct to void
and dig in soil or sand. The litter
box is a human invention and an
artificial substitute. It is surprising
that more cats do not eliminate in
potted plants. To discourage your
cat from eliminating in your house-
hold plant, one must devise ways to
prevent access to them e.g. cover the
soil with wire mesh or aluminum
foil.

There is a myriad of reasons why a
cat will eliminate other than in the
litter box.

It is recommended that you keep
the litter box especially clean and
make sure that you provide enough
of them for the number of cats you
have in the house.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010, PAGE 9B





Lady Builder:

EBBY Deal is a female perfectionist who has

excelled in the traditionally male dominated

field of construction. Her company Contempo-
rary Builders builds “green homes” which are a

more environmentally friend
option for her clients.

She says Bahamians have
become more concerned with
energy consumption and their
impact on the environment as
it relates to the future.

“Before I see a client, they
have already done the research
and pretty much know what
they want and what they think
they need for their home to
reduce their monthly energy
costs as well as their long range
maintenance costs,” said Mrs
Deal.

“T add my input of things
that I know may be of greater
value for them now and in the
long term and during our
meetings show them projects
where these things have
already been done.”

She explained that utilising

ly and cost efficient

having a small reverse osmosis
machine under the sink to
eliminate buying bottled water,
are small changes which can
make a huge impact on con-
serving energy.

One of her biggest payoffs
was in 2007, when the finan-
cial controller of a company
that had hired her to doa
warehouse and office exten-
sion and subsequent mainte-
nance works, approached and
asked if the company would
be interested in doing a green
subdivision in South Ocean
called South Ocean Palms

Recently, she completed a
project in Charlottesville with
alternate energy, solar panels
on the roof, an inverter in the
laundry room and battery stor-



mean big savings for the client,
based on my own electricity
bills, the solar power system
would pay for itself easily in
two years.”

Mrs Deal explained that her
interest in construction was fos-
tered by her father whom she
jokes “ must have wanted a
boy” because she would fol-
low him around and assist him
with projects around the house.
She attended Sheriden College
where she studied design and
learnt drafting. She has been
in the construction business for
the past 25 years.

She and her husband even-
tually decided to start their
own company and she said that
it is a good mix as she enjoys
the detail side of the business
and he enjoys the structural
side. In 1994, he branched out
to a company that specialisies
in ready mixed concrete. Their
youngest daughter has fol-
lowed in the footsteps as she
began working for the compa-
ny in 2007 and also owns her

struction team is made up of
masons, electricians, plumbers,
and pastemen all of whom
have a long history of working
with Contemporary Builders.
When asked about how the
crew feels about her being a
female, she says that no one
treats her like a female “but
just another part of the team.”

“T have gotten older, and it is
a bit more difficult to do, but I
am more than willing to pitch
in and help, I like being able to
do the same tasks I ask the
crew to do,” she said. “In fact,
I did a lot of the tiling and
painting herself on the con-
struction site.”

Mrs Deal noted that she has
a critical eye when it comes to
her projects which “can drive a
normal person crazy,” because
she wants everything done as
perfect and fairly as possible.
She said that unfortunately
there are many contractors
who create a bad reputation
for others by being unethical
and greedy by overcharging for
items, underbuilding and then
adding on blind costs to the
consumer. She pointed out that
honesty is always the best pol-
icy.”

“Greed gets you no where.
It doesn’t take long for the
word to get out so I like being
honest and fair, totally upfront
with my clients and word of
mouth will take over from
there.”

As a woman, Mrs Deal feels
that she has an advantage, and
a very good sense of how a
house should be laid out and
should function, particularly
when it comes to bathrooms,
closets and kitchens; areas that
females utilise most.

“No one should limit them-
selves in a profession due to
whether they are male or
female,” says Ms Deal. “Any
woman out there who has the
knack, the stamina and educa-
tion should venture into a

Debbie Deal









A new home in
Charlottesville
with solar panel
energy plates
on the roof.







simple measures like tinted age room on the exterior. own business- Closets Etc. career of choice, not circum-
< * © ‘ ‘ 2
glass, trees to offer shade, and “This innovation will be Mrs Deal said that her con- _ stance.
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

HE night ended in tears of
ye as twenty year old
Braneka Bassett was
crowned Miss Bahamas
World 2010 Sunday night in

the Atlantis Imperial Ballroom.

Seventeen fierce beauties vied for
the coveted title of Miss Bahamas
World, but it was Braneka Basset
with her platform of "Empowering
Our Youth" who beat out her com-
petitors to walk away the diamond
studded crown.

In an exclusive interview with Tri-
bune Woman yesterday morning, the
new queen described being crowned
as “ amazing”.

“Never in a million years did I
believe I would have been the next
Miss Bahamas.” Now that I am Miss
Bahamas there is a lot more I can
do for my country,” she said.

The first thing on her plate is
working on her platform and prepar-
ing for the Miss Universe pageant
which she is to confident she will
bring home to the Bahamas.

"My platform is the first thing I
want to start working on. I went to a
school and I heard the kids talking
about big dreams they had but they
didn't know how to reach their
dreams. So I want to empower them
to take the steps that will get them
closer to their dreams," she said.

The new queen who is a Grand
Bahama native attended Mary Star
of the Seas Primary School, Sea Saw
Christian Academy before attend-
ing high schools in California and
Georgia. The beauty queen who has
modeled since age 16 has had sever-
al jobs in California at the Next Mod-
el Agency and the Osbrink Talented
Agency. She also participated in the
Janice Dickenson Modeling Agency
which used to air on the Oxygen
cable channel and would like to one
day host camps for aspiring models.

“Being a beauty queen is not just
only about the glamour, but it is a lot



Braneka Bassett is the new
Miss Bahamas World 2010






THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 11,





of hard work. You have to eat right,
exercise and have beauty with a pur-
pose,” she added.

“T will also prepare myself for the
Miss Universe pageant and bring the
crown to my country where I think
it’s suppose to be,” she said.

She wants the Bahamas to know
that she will prove herself suited for
such a title.

"T will stick by my word, and stick
by my promises so people can see
that I am truly representing this
country,” she said.

The work is just beginning for the
newly crowned queen, who seeks the
support from all Bahamians in her
future endeavors. She will go on to
represent the Bahamas in the Miss
Universe Pageant later this year.

As Braneka Bassett took her first
walk as beauty queen, the small
crowd of supporters burst in cheers.

The contestants were judged on
their poise and elegance, articula-
tion creativity, popularity, fitness,
photogenic and congeniality.

Sunday night proved to be fulfill-
ing experience for the young women.
And as the tape rolled back to their
past encounters it was evident that
ladies had built a strong cama-
raderie.

In a colorful performance, the con-
testant gyrated and swayed, chanting
to upbeat rhythms of African music.

Then under the sound of local
Bahamian artist Sammi Starr's voice,
who sang "Pick Me’, the ladies took
to the stage, modeling glistening,
beautifully tailored evening gowns.

The semi finalist were cut down to
five finalist. The five beauties were
asked what advice they would give to
the nation during this tough eco-
nomic time. And while each girl gave
it their best, it was Ms Bassett who
eloquently expressed herself with
two simple words- love and hope.

Along with the crown she also
walked away with the award for Best
Body.

She is embracing her new respon-
sibilities with open arms and she
vows to best the queen to represent
the Bahamas.









4

Braneka Bassett makes her way down the
catwalk as the newly crowned beauty queen.

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.






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THE TRIBUNE




or
i

he

TUESDAY, MAY 11,

PAGE 14 ¢ International sports news

PAGE 13



2010

ts







Woods says
neck injury
not related

to crash...
See page 14

Knowles and Fish unite, Win in first round

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



fter being forced to take

a break from their injury-

prone partnership, Mark

Knowles and Mardy Fish
are back together again.

The Bahamian-American combo
reunited yesterday at the Mutua
Madrilena Madrid Open in Madrid,
Spain, with an easy first round victory.

Their 6-3, 6-1 triumph over the
Spaniard wild card team of Daniel
Gimeno-Traver and Ivan Navarro
proved that the unseeded team is slow-
ly getting back on track.

Their real test, however, will come
in the second round when they take on

SPORTS

le

VOLLEYBALL
BAISS JUNIOR
COMPETITION



THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools opened its
junior girls volleyball com-
petition at St Augustine’s
College yesterday.

Defending champions St
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machine took advantage of
their home turf to easily win
their two games. The Big
Red Machine rolled past the
St Andrew’s Hurricanes 17-7
and 17-9 and they got by the
St John’s Giants 17-2 and 17-
2.

The Aquinas College Aces
also won their double header.
They beat the Nassau Chris-
tian Academy Crusaders in
three games and they
knocked off the Kingsway
Academy Saints 17-13, 11-17
and 18-18.

In the two other games
played, Nassau Christian
Academy handed St. John’s a
double dose of defeat with a
17-6 and 17-16 decision and
St Andrew’s rebounded from
their loss to give Kingsway
Academy a second loss, 17-
14 and 17-16. The junior girls
are scheduled to be back in

the No.8 seeded team of Mariusz Frys-
tenberg and Marcin Matkowski of
Poland. If they are successful, Knowles
and Fish could probably end up play-
ing the No.2 seeded team of American
identical twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

The top seeds in the tournament are
Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad
Zimonjic of Serbia. This is the first
year that Knowles and Fish are playing
together. But it’s certainly not the start
that either of them anticipated when
they hooked up.

In their season opener in a prelude
to the Australian Open in January,
Knowles went down with an injury in
Sydney, Australia, in the first round
as they eventually lost to the Aus-
tralian team of Carsten Ball and



MADRID OPEN





TENNIS ACE MARK KNOWLES



ALEX SMITH signed a one-year contract with the Cleveland Browns on May 4...

Stephen Huss.

The injury kept Knowles out of
action until he and fish played in Mem-
phis, Tennessee, in February as they
advanced to the semifinal, only to lose
to the American team of John Isner
and Sam Querrey.

They came back and played again at
the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 in
Miami, Florida, where they got ousted
in the first round by the Russian team
of Igor Andreev and Mikhail Youzh-
ny. But it was in Houston, Texas, in
April that fish went down with an
injury in the quarter-final against the
team of Mischa Zverev of Germany
and Horacio Zeballos of Argentina.

That forced Knowles to go with two
different partners in the next three
tournaments. He started in Monte Car-

Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

lo with Brazilian Brunoa Soares and
ended the streak in Rome, Italy, last
week where they failed to get out of
round 16.

In between the pair of tournaments
with Soares, Knowles teamed up with
Aussie Lleyton Hewitt where they
went all the way to the final, only to
lose to Nestor and Zimonjic in three
sets.

In the first round of that tourna-
ment, Knowles and Hewitt knocked
off Soares and Marcelo Melo in two
sets. Fish was originally scheduled to
make his return at Roland Garros at
the end of the month. But he has
decided to use the Madrid Open as a
tune-up to test his physical ability
before the second Grand Slam Tour-
nament for the year.

Alex Smith signs
one-year contract
with the Browns

By RENALDO DORSETT

draft.

His rookie season was one
of the most productive of his
career when he started 10

A NATIVE Bahamian grid-
iron star recently exited the free
agent pool and signed to the
fourth team in his five-year
career.

Alex Smith signed a one-year
contract with the Cleveland
Browns on May 4. However,
terms of the deal were undis-
closed.

Smith is expected to solidify
a tight end receiving corps
which struggled heavily last
year as the Browns had one of
the league’s weakest passing
attacks in the league.

The Browns’ leading receiv-
ing tight end of 2009-10, Robert
Royal, totaled just 11 catches
for 134 yards and one touch-
down in 11 starts.

Royal grabbed the starting
spot after Steve Heiden was
placed on injured reserve due
to an ankle injury.

The Browns released Heiden
on March 12, the day they
signed former New England
Patriots’ Ben Watson to a four-
year deal.

Smith was drafted by the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the
third round of the 2005 NFL

games and totaled 41 receptions
for 367 yards and two touch-
downs.

Smith followed with several
productive seasons, in 2006 with
35 catches for 250 yards and
three touchdowns, 2007 with 32
catches for 385 yards and three
touchdowns, and 2008 with 21
catches for 250 yards with three
touchdowns.

Acquired

He was acquired by the
Patriots from the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers on April 30, 2009,
in exchange for a fifth-round
selection in the 2010 NFL draft.

Smith never appeared on the
field for the Patriots and was
released during final cuts on
September 5, 2009.

He was signed just days later
by the Philadelphia Eagles on
September 8 and went on to
start five games with the NFC
East powerhouse. Smith fin-
ished with three receptions for
25 yards.

For his career, he has totaled
132 receptions for 1277 yards
and 11 touchdowns.

action on Wednesday.

Starting at 4pm today, 10
teams are expected to begin
competition in the junior
boys division.

TRACK
DIOCESAN
MEET

THE annual Archdiocesan
Catholic Primary Schools
Track and Field meet is slat-
ed for Friday at Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.

Preliminary events will be
staged starting 10am Thurs-
day. Six Catholic primary
schools in New Providence
are expected to take part.

The meet is set to com-
mence 9am Friday and is
expected to be officially
opened by Mike Sands, pres-
ident of the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions.

Anthony Robinson, a
member of the Catholic
Board of Education, is to
present the awards to last
year’s champions, St Cecili-
a’s, in the primary division
and St Thomas More in the
junior division.







Record number of teams in primary track champs

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



A RECORD total of 57 teams have
confirmed their participation in the 29th
Primary Schools Track and Field Cham-
pionships at Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

Formally sponsored by Ovaltine
through Lightbourne Trading and Milo
through Thompson Trading, for the sec-
ond consecutive year, next week’s cham-
pionships will be organised by the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Culture with-
out a major sponsor.

But Minister of Sports Charles May-
nard said they are still looking forward
to a very impressive meet from Wednes-
day, May 19 to Friday, May 21.

“In the past years, the ministry
received assistance from various corpo-
rate citizens,” said Maynard of the meet
that got started in 1981 to enable athletes
from throughout the country to com-
pete in a major national meet.

“This year, we are unable to attract
any sponsors, but we are appealing to

the general public
to come forth and
assist in the
meet.”

Prior to the
start of the meet,
Bahamians
throughout New
Providence can
get up at 7am and
watch the Torch
Run that will
begin at four dif-
ferent locations
and end up in
front of the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Those spots are the R M Bailey Park
in the east, SC McPherson Junior High
School in the south, Goodsman Bay in
the west and Arawak Cay in the north.

“We encourage Family Islands to
organise similar events and use it as a
fundraiser,” Maynard said.

Then starting 3pm Tuesday, organis-
ers are set to stage the cheerleading and
banner competition at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

Last year, Spanish Wells took the

RAHMING



cheerleading title to Eleuthera, but com-
mittee chairman Cedricka Rolle said
they are looking for one of the teams
from New Providence to keep the title
here this year.

In the past, the most schools partici-
pating in the meet was 45, but Frank
‘Pancho’ Rahming said they have seen
the numbers swell well beyond those
figures this year.

“Already we have some 19 primary
schools registered to participate,” said
Rahming, adding that while the min-
istry has subsidized their hotel accom-
modations, they didn’t anticipate having
that many this year.

Lisa Mortimer, president of the New
Providence Primary Schools Sports
Association, said they have lived up to
their commitment with more than 20
schools participating this year.

“[’m appealing to the other four
schools to please come out,” said Mor-
timer, who noted that it will be the first
time that this amount of schools will
compete in the meet.

“These kids, these little darlings, are
the future athletes of the Bahamas and

that is what the New Providence Prima-
ry Schools Association is all about.”

As the meet draws closer, Val Kemp
has indicated that they intend to put on
a “short and sweet” official opening cer-
emony on Wednesday, May 19.

During the ceremonies, when Minister
Maynard will deliver the keynote
address, the winners of the cheerleading
competition will put on a repeat perfor-
mance as part of the activities.

“This is the biggest meet ever held in
the Bahamas and just the performances
of the little kids will want to make you
stay until the very end,” she said.

“With the amount of entries that we
have, I’m sure that we will still be com-
peting until 3 pm, so you can still come
down and watch the kids. There’s no
other meet like this.”

This year, the organising committee is
printing a souvenir booklet and while
it’s almost completed, Keno Demeritte is
asking those companies and schools still
wishing to get an advertisement in to
contact him at Temple Christian Prima-
ry School or Brent Stubbs at The Tri-
bune.

Olympic gold medallists lift gymnasts’ aspirations

ON the eve of Mother’s Day (Sun-
day, May 10), Olympic gold medal-
lists Pauline Davis-Thompson and
Eldece Clarke-Lewis gave precious
advice to gymnasts aspiring to blaze
a trail in track and field.

The Motivation and Nutritional
Seminar was hosted by Bahamas Gym-
nastics Parent Booster Club in con-
junction with Bahamas Star Gymnas-
tics in the conference room of
Bahamas Financial Services Board.

Special guests included Claudia
Kretschmer, GymAmerica, Saline
Michigan who attended via webcam
technology and Miles Yallop, Ministry
of Sports liaison officer with responsi-

bility for gym-
nastics.
Motivation
By simply re-
telling their sto-
ry of the grunt
work en route to
the glory of win-
ning their
medals, Davis-
Thompson and
Clarke-Lewis
lifted the hopes
and aspirations
of the gymnasts.
The duo, who both share a common
thread of humble beginnings, empha-

DAVIS-THOMPSON



sized goal setting, making the right
choice of positive friends and influ-
ences, discipline, dedication, determi-
nation, perseverance and prayer as
ingredients to achieving their ultimate
goals.

The gymnasts all listened attentive-
ly as they assimilated the advice from
the pair of Bahamian heroes who reit-
erated that achievement begins with
mental focus and hard work.

Davis-Thompson underscored that
the skills honed for athletics pay divi-
dends later as lifestyle skills for success.
She cited that research has proven that
the majority of Fortune 500 top exec-
utives were former athletes.

Nutrition

They said that athletes must be dis-
ciplined in the choice of foods, not
only to improve their performance and
heal quickly after injuries, but to devel-
op healthy habits which will curb the
negative trends in the onset of lifestyle
diseases plaguing our nation.

Honesty Pays

The young gymnasts were warned
against cheating and the use of per-
formance-enhancing substances.

The message to stay clean, work
hard and achieve results honestly res-
onated with the families after Davis-
Thompson shared her personal expe-
rience.

Clarke-Lewis pointed out that hon-
esty is rewarded as her former team-
mate, after 28 years and five Olympic
games, now holds four distinctions —
ist Bahamian Olympic track gold
medal, first individual Olympic track
medal, first double Olympic gold
champion and 1st female Olympian to
medal for the Bahamas.

The gymnasts will have a chance to
put all of the advice to good use start-
ing this summer with the opening of a
new 5,000 square feet training facility
and the launch of the Ist Annual
Bahamas Summer Camp which will
be conducted by 10 US-based clini-
cians.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Talks to begin again for Pacquiao-Mayweather



TONY PARKER walks down court

after the Spurs were called for a

foul against the Suns Sunday...
(AP Photo)

Parker, Spurs
temper trade
speculation

By PAUL J WEBER
Associated Press Writer

SAN ANTONIO (AP) —
Gregg Popovich joked last sum-
mer that he should be fired if
the revamped Spurs didn’t win
a fifth title this season.

He’ll be back. Who else will
be is the question.

Popovich said Monday that
this season was the most diffi-
cult of his 14 years in San Anto-
nio. He cited the struggles the
Spurs had adjusting to a roster
overhaul they hoped would
restore their championship
form.

The Spurs wound up being
the No. 7 seed and were swept
by Phoenix in the Western
Conference semifinals.

Popovich expects a less busy
summer this time. Tony Parker
and general manager R.C.
Buford also sounded like the
star point guard isn’t going any-
where despite his contract
expiring next season.

Al Ahly, Mazembe
reach group stage
of the African
Champs League

JOHANNESBURG (AP)
— Al Ahly of Egypt overcame
a 2-0 deficit in the first leg to
reach the group stage of the
African Champions League.

The six-time winners beat
Libya’s Al Ittihad 3-0 in Cairo
on Sunday, going through after
a late goal from teenager She-
hab Ahmed.

Defending champion TP
Mazembe of Congo beat Mali’s
Djoliba 4-0 on aggregate after a
3-0 home win.

Egypt’s Ismaily and Alger-
ian clubs JS Kabylie and
Entente Setif also qualified in
weekend matches. Tunisia’s
Esperance progressed with a 4-
1 win over Sudan’s Al Merreikh
over two legs.

Six of the eight qualifiers for
the group stage are former
African champions.

Last year’s finalist, Heartland
of Nigeria, and Zimbabwe’s
Dynamos also qualified.

If you are looking for the

By DAVE SKRETTA
AP Sports Writer

most high-profile fighters was discussed at
length earlier this year, but negotiations



NEW YORK (AP) — Negotiations for a
megafight involving Manny Pacquiao and
Floyd Mayweather Jr are expected to begin

again this week.

The matchup involving boxing’s two

fell apart when the sides could not agree on
drug testing protocol. Both took other
fights, with Pacquiao beating Josh Clottey
and Mayweather defeating Shane Mosley.

Pacquiao’s trainer, Freddie Roach, tells
The Associated Press that discussions could

begin as early as Tuesday, once the results
of the Philippine elections are in. Pacquiao
is running for Congress for the second time.

Roach was in New York on Monday with
another of his fighters, Amir Khan, who
defends his junior welterweight title against
Paulie Malignaggi on Saturday night at

Madison Square Garden.



Serena wins in three
hours, 26 minutes

MADRID (AP) — Sere-
na Williams won the longest
match of her career, playing 3
hours, 26 minutes in defeat-
ing Vera Dushevina of Rus-
sia 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5), 7-6 (5) to
reach the third round of the
Madrid Masters.

The top-seeded American
looked set to close the match
when she broke serve to go 5-
2 up, but squandered the lead
and then trailed 4-0 in the
decisive tiebreaker. She
saved a match point before
going on to win.

“T definitely feel really
proud because I definitely
wasn’t playing my best ten-
nis and I was far off playing
well,” she said. “Also, at that
point I wasn’t going to lose.
After three hours, I’d better
win.”

Williams left the court for
treatment when ahead 3-2 in
the third set. She returned
with a strapped right thigh
and does not yet know the
extent of the injury.

Williams wasted three set





SERENA WILLIAMS returns the ball during her match against Vera
Dushevina of Russia at Madrid Open yesterday...

(AP Photo)

points in the first and then
faced a match point on her
serve when trailing 6-5 in the
second, but held on despite a
slew of unforced errors.

In another second-round
match, Francesca Schiavone
beat Sybille Bammer 6-2, 6-1.

In the first round, Peng
Shuai advanced when 10th-
seeded Victoria Azarenka
retired while trailing 3-0. Oth-
er seeded winners were No. 8
Samantha Stosur, No. 14
Flavia Pennetta and No. 16
Nadia Petrova.

In the men’s first round,
12th-seeded Gael Monfils of
France beat compatriot
Stephane Robert 6-2, 7-5.
Qualifier Oleksandr Dolgo-
polov Jr of Ukraine downed
Andrea Seppi of Italy 6-3, 6-
4 and will meet Rafael Nadal
in the second round.

Austria’s Jurgen Melzer
topped South African quali-
fier Kevin Anderson 6-2, 2-6,
6-4 to set up a meeting with
David Nalbandian or Tomas
Berdych.





Woods says neck injury not related to crash

By DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer

NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa.
(AP) — Tiger Woods says
there is “zero connection”
between the neck pain that
forced him to withdraw from
The Players Championship and
his November 27 car accident.

Woods said during a news
conference Monday that his
neck started bothering him two
weeks before the Masters, his
first competition in five months.
He brushed it off as “no big
deal” until it kept getting worse.

“T’m at a point now where I
just can’t go anymore,” he said.

Woods said he’s been taking
anti-inflammatory drugs, but
they have not helped. He plans
to have an MRI when he
returns to Orlando, Florida.

He said his schedule is “up
in the air” and could be shaped
based on what he sees in the
MRI.

Woods insisted he can deal
with the pain, which he feels in
the right side of his neck, but

=



TIGER WOODS reacts after putting
on the third green during the final
round of Players Championship
Sunday in Ponte Vedra Beach.
(AP Photo)

Veering off course

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cannot deal with the spasms
that affect his ability to turn his
head. “For me not to play all 18
holes, that was as angry and as
frustrated as I’ve been in a long
time,” Woods said of with-
drawing from The Players
Championship on Sunday. “It is
sore.”

In November, Woods was
briefly hospitalized after he
crashed his Cadillac Escalade
into a fire hydrant and a tree
outside his home, resulting in
a sore neck and a cut lip.

Woods spent some of his
time at The Players Champi-
onship denying speculation that
he is about to leave Hank
Haney, his swing coach since
2004.

He said at Aronimink Golf
Club that he was working on
his swing. “I talked to Hank
about some of the stuff. We’re
still working on it,” he said.
“We have a lot of work to do. I
can’t make the movements that
I made before because of the
neck. I need to get healthy to
play the proper way.”

Pakistan stays
in contention
with South
Africa win

CASTRIES, St Lucia (AP)
— Defending champion Pak-
istan stayed in contention for
a semifinal spot in the World
Twenty20 with an 11-run vic-
tory over South Africa in their
Super Eight match on Mon-
day.

The result at Beausejour
Stadium also meant England
progresses to the final four
while South Africa exits the
tournament.

Umar Akmal’s blistering 51
off 33 balls led Pakistan to a
total of 148-7 from their 20
overs. Akmal cracked two
fours and four sixes to lift
Pakistan from early trouble at
18-3.

Fast bowler Charl
Langeveldt claimed 4-19 off
his four overs.

South Africa stalled early in
their run chase and could only
manage 137-7. A B de Villiers
topscored with 53 off 41 balls
but he fell at a crucial stage to
off-spinner Saeed Ajmal, who
grabbed 4-26.

South Africa’s pursuit was
undermined by the early loss
of both openers.

Herschelle Gibbs smacked
Abdul Razzaq straight to mid-
wicket with the score on 12,
then captain Graeme Smith
mis-hit left-arm spinner
Abdur Rehman to mid-on to
make it 23-2.

De Villiers and Kallis
added 33 for the third wicket
but the required run rate kept
climbing.

Kallis spent 21 balls compil-
ing 22 before he was Ajmal’s
first scalp, thanks to a brilliant
catch at long-on from Umar
Akmal.

De Villiers smacked
Rehman’s final over for 20
runs to revive South African
hopes but Ajmal claimed his
wicket in the next over to tilt
the balance.

Johan Botha blasted 19 off
eight balls in a late flourish
that threatened to produce a
miracle for the Proteas. How-
ever, with 17 needed off the
final over, Ajmal removed
Botha and ensured that only
ones and twos were on offer
to the batsmen.

Earlier, Pakistan recovered
from a difficult start after win-
ning the toss choosing to bat.

Salman Butt miscued a pull
off Dale Steyn, Khalid Latif
lofted Jacques Kallis to mid-
on and Mohammad Hafeez
was LBW to Langeveldt.

But Umar Akmal anchored
the Pakistan recovery with
two half century partnerships,
adding 51 from 36 balls with
his older brother Kamran and
then a further 61 off 33 balls
with skipper Shahid Afridi.

Kamran Akmal hit three
fours and two sixes in his 37
off 33 balls.

Afridi, who supplied 30 off
18 deliveries, blasted four
fours and a six.

Bankers Softball
League results

RESULTS of games played
in the Bankers Softball League
at the Banker’s Field, Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, over
the weekend, are as follows:

BAF Financial 8, CMC 4

Winning pitcher:

Corey Burrows

Losing pitcher: Adrian Smith

Top Performers (BAF) -
Mike Butler went 1-for-3 and
scored two runs with a RBI,
Richard Bastian went 3-for-4,
with a double and four RBI,
Marvin Wood went 1-for-2,
scored a run, had one double
and a RBI, Joey Demeritte
went 2-for-4, scored two runs
and Alicia Culmer went 2-for-3.

Top Performers (CMC) -
Jayson Lockhart went 1-for-3,
scored a run with a triple and a
RBI and Mike Gomez went 2-
for-3.

Citi Trust 14, Bank of

Bahamas 13

Winning pitcher:

Teddy Sweeting

Losing pitcher:

Jackie Conyers

Top Performers (Citi) -
Kervin Culmer went 2-for-2,
scored a run, had a home run
and five RBI, Erin Adderley
went 2-for-4, scored three runs
and had a double, McNeil
Albury went 2-for-3, scored a
run with a RBI, Phillipa Willie
went 2-for-3, scored a run with
a RBI and Bernie Major went
2-for-4 with a run scored.

Top Performers (Bank of
Bahamas) - Ray Newbold went
4-for-5, scored three runs with a
home run and four RBI,
Bernard Young went 3-for-4,
scored two runs had a double, a
home run and two RBI and
Jackie Conyers went 2-for-4,
scored two runs with a triple.



First Caribbean 10,

RBC Lions 8

Winning Pitcher: Robert Cox

Losing pitcher:

Julian Seymour

Top Performers (First
Caribbean) - Patrick Lockhart
went 2-for-3, scored two runs
with a double, and a RBI,
Jayson Clarke went 2-for-3 with
two runs scored, a double and
one RBI, Mark Gomez went
1-for-3, scored a run with two
RBI and Robert Cox went 1-
for-3, scored a run and had a
RBI.

Top Performers (RBC
Lions) - Avery Rolle went 1-
for-3, scored two runs with a
double and two RBI, Kris
Turnquest went 2-for-4 with a
run scored and Julian Seymour
went 1-for-3, scored a run and
had a RBI.

Fidelity 15, Colina 14

Winning pitcher:

Rory Newbold

Losing pitcher: Tim Sawyer

Top Performers (Fidelity) -
Godfrey Burnside went 3-for-4,
scored three runs with two dou-
bles and two RBI, David Gar-
diner went 2-for-3, scored two
runs with two doubles and
three RBI, Chavez Thompson
went 2-for-3, scored three runs
with a RBI and Greg Jones
went 2-for-2 with two run
scored.

Top Performers (Colina) -
Burton Saunders went 3-for-4,
scored three runs with two
RBI, Levan Cox went 3-for-4,
scored two runs with a double
and a RBI, Peter Isaacs went 2-
for-4, scored a run, had a home
run and four RBI and Clint
Paul went 1-for-3, scored two
runs with a home run and three
RBI.

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