Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 106 No.134

Pim blowin’ it

87F
75F

ge BREEZY WITH
SUNSHINE



The ty



ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1







VA ts eee

US

Minister warns
over US oil spill

ARE i.

SEE INSIGHT SECTION

Se

i
5

a



Gulf of Mexico drama
monitored in event of
‘worst case scenario’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ENVIRONMENT Minis-
ter Earl Deveaux warned
yesterday that if the massive
oil spill spreading through-
out the US Gulf Coast
reached Bahamian waters it
could have a “calamitous

the Bahamas is remote —
due to current weather con-
ditions — they are monitor-
ing the oil spill's develop-
ments in the event of a
"worst case scenario."

As a result, the National
Oil Spill Contingency Team
will immediately convene a
task force of relevant stake-
holders to devise a strategy —

=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

Write on:

SUC CT CMTE 4
in the spotlight ’

Fs
be

SEE PAGE FIFTEEN K



Police officer is
held in connection
with latest murder



A POLICE officer is in custody today in connection
with the country’s latest murder.

According to police press officer Chrislyn Skip-
pings, 21-year-old George Carey was the victim of a
stabbing incident on Saturday, April 24, in the Wulff
Road area near Lockharts Bar. Carey died from his
wounds last week Tuesday.

Since that time, police have been seeking a 29-year-
old resident of Fire Trail Road.

However, the police have not revealed the identity
of the officer they currently have in custody for ques-
tioning. This officer is expected to be taken to court
sometime early this week.

Mae OU Ga Leet La)
J ~







affect" on our marine
resources.

While local environment
officials say that the possi-
bility of the slick reaching

Wendell ‘Big O’ Ferguson
dies at the age of 54

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

should the growing oil spill
be pushed towards the
Bahamas by wind and ocean

SEE page 19



WENDELL Ferguson, better known as
“Big O” for his tremendous ability to moti-
vate and encourage people to live a healthy
lifestyle, has died.

The 54-year-old former coach and per-
sonal trainer died on Sunday around 5 am

SEE page 19

Mother's Da

Sale?

S ewels Boxes
* Handbags
® Picture Frames
* Artificial Flawers
* Gift Baskets

from Max's

tomo Fi ten ie
with a ma palzeeoe it io

G tht A Lae
Card

WENDELL
FERGUSON

* Gibson Dinnerware

* Studio Silversmiths
Giftwore

* Arc Glass & Crystal

* Bodash Crystal

* Circle Glassware

* Godinger Silver

ay el a







THE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE BAND took to Rawson Square yesterday for a Beat Retreat under the theme ‘A Higher

Call to Service’.

Bishop Simeon Hall tells Christian Me CLES eS S









community: stop demonising gays

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BISHOP Simeon Hall
yesterday called on the
Christian community to
abstain from "demonising"
gays and to instead focus on
extending kindness to those
whose "lifestyles differ from
ours."

The message of Christian-
ity should not be one of
exclusion, but rather spread-
ing God's love, said the
senior pastor of New
Covenant Baptist Church in

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean
â„¢ Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada.

a Statement released yester-
day.

"The Christian message,
as I understand it, does not
allow for the demonising of
any human being. I believe
that all human beings bear
on the deepest level the
image of God and if we
search far and deep enough,
we will find it.

"Those of us practising a
Christian life must come to
see that we did not qualify
for God's love, it is a gift.
Grace freely given must be

SEE page 14

e SEE PAGE 15



PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
criticised the government for its deci-
sion to reinstate the image of Sir
Stafford Sands on the Bahamian $10
note after it had been removed in 2005
by the PLP during its term in office.

Long hailed as the “principal archi- [=
tect” of the modern Bahamian econo-
my, Sir Stafford’s image was first placed
on the $10 banknote on March 7, 2000,
replacing the image of Her Majesty
Queen Elizabeth IL r fi

In a brief statement issued to the FRIED [ol Ohl SLE
press on Friday, the government said that while the previous
PLP government decided to reverse this decision in 2005,
they have now sought to return Sir Stafford to the ban-
knote once again.

SEE page 14











Royal Premier” loans give you MORE.

You can afford the things in life that are important to you with a Royal Premier Loan. Whether it's
PICU M Ce SiN ANA LCM Ca ULM aM me LOM eh EMCO mae (Oe Codel Cele

CTL MLM CMe SSM OTC Zee Me TC eee UMUC MeN Ceol Ze)

MUMMIES Im eMac ey LMSC Lee) Mec CM ULSI A-TILO Re
Del Uecl)Cee eh eM COLUM see MTT Co Oa (eee 1

® The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.







NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER






























PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Man dies in traffic accident

By DENISE MAYCOCK he lost control of the vehicle and crashed
Tribune Freeport Reporter into a tree at the Sunshine Apartments.
I dmaycock@tribunemedia.net The young man was taken by ambulance



to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where he
was pronounced dead at lam by the doc-

FREEPORT - A 33-year-old man was jae

fatally injured in a traffic accident early Sat- Police Wavenot reload we wien iden:

urday morning, police reported. _ _ tity. His death is classified as the fourth traf-

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said the acci- fic fatality for the year on Grand Bahama.
dent occurred shortly after midnight at ASP Mackey said investigations are con-
Sergeant Major Road and Fiddler’s Green. — tinuing into the accident.

According to police reports, the driver of In the meantime, motorists are being
a silver-coloured Honda Accord was travel- advised to drive with extreme caution and to
ling south on Sergeant Major Road when obey the speed limit and traffic laws.

Appetizer Station Two men Seriously hurt

* Assorted Breads & Sweet Rolls * Antipasti Platter ms : is
¢ Tomato & Heart of Palm Salad ¢ Pasta Salad TA STY FF R E S$ ee In separate incidents
Tuscan Chicken Salad * Caesar Salad ® @ hiiaten ceeaieaae
Smoked Salmon Eggs Benedict ; TRY OU R DE L| SAN DWICH ES ous condition due to injuries

Miniature Conch Cakes w/ Rosa Aioli each sustained from separate
Crab & Corn Fritters w/ Pomodoro Sauce incidents that occurred early
yesterday morning.

At around 3 am, a 24-year-
old man was stabbed in the
upper right side of his chest
after getting into an argument
with another man on Moss
Lane, off Bay Street.

An hour later and further
south, police responded to a
shooting at Carmichael Road
and Faith Avenue, which
resulted in a man being taken
to hospital by ambulance. It
was reported that as he got into
his car, the man _ was
approached by two men — one
of whom was armed with a
handgun. The armed man fired
several shots in the direction of
the victim injuring him in his
back and face. Both men are
listed in serious, but stable con-
dition. Police are investigating
both matters.

OF CHICAGO
Mothers Day Brunch

Sunday, May9th 2010
11:30am - 3:30pm





A la Carte Entrée Choices
From $30
Price includes Appetizer Buffet, Dessert Buffets & One (1) Mimosa
Entrée prices plus 15% gratuity
Fruitti di Mare
Roast Loin of Pork wi sautéed Apples & Oranges
Chicken Parmigiana wl Penne Pomodoro
Filet Mignon wl a Chianti reduction
Boneless stuffed Leg of Lamb wi Pine Nuts, Sun-dried Tomatos
& Herbed Breadcrumbs
Oven Roasted Nassau Grouper
Minced Lobster Arrabiatta
























Dessert Buffet ri F
Assorted Fruit Pastries ¢ Apple Strudel ee EL
Bahamian Guava Duff w/ a Rum Sauce ¢ Chocolate Cannoli’s mi si : : Z

DDDEL! DUNKIN' | snp pate deme
fd h of Ider|
SADUNMIM, | cone rons

Bahama on Friday.

The 71-year-old woman was
taken to Rand Memorial Hos-
pital around noon by ambu-
lance after she began experi-
encing difficulty while snorkel-
ing near Deadman’s Reef with
her husband. She was pro-
nounced dead by the attending
doctor at 2pm. The couple,
from Baltimore, Maryland,
were passengers onboard the
Carnival Pride cruise liner.





All Moms Are Special & Deserves The Bat. *

Treat Her To An Extra-ordinary Day,

Ba ‘ha Fare

Nassau’s Leading Trendsetting Spa
SF ATE —————

Hair Services for Men and Women, Massages, Facials, Rin POSUERE ele ram .
Waxing, Eyebrow Threading, Body Sugaring Hair Removal, Manicures, ‘4 EaeeReeeyan Spa,Packare > /
Pedicures, Solar Nails (Safer Alternative to Acrylic), during the month of May to be eligible.
Spa Parties and Much More. ees

SPA PACKAGES Rejuvenate 3hrs op AGES

Experience your well deserved rejuvenation with Baha-Retreat
PADS .onnersrnnvorsscsee 6.5hrs Signature Massage or Facial. Then enjoy a spa pedicure.

¢ Aromatherapy Body Polish Conclude with Shampoo and Style. =
* Nourishing Body Wrap Aromatherapy massage and vitamin c

* 90 minutes signature massage Refresh facial, a spa pedicure and classic manicure.

(includes aromatherapy and hot stone) Deep Cleansing Facial or Swedish Massage, Classic Manicure

¢ Chocolate Extravagance Antioxidant Facial .
¢ Signature Manicure and Pedicure ee aiaco, Treatment and Style. De-Stress $155.......2hrs, 15min.

pigeludes ean he meer) ‘ Getaway Express massage, facial, manicure and
(fro aaa oe ns) a Begin with a luxurious European Cleansing Facial Treatment, pedicure, just what you need to get you on
de-stress with a 50 minute Swedish Massage, and enjoy delectable your toes.

Baha-Retreat Year Package Spa Cuisine. Then indulge in our Spa Pedicure and Manicure,
Special price......$810 and leave us looking your best with Shampoo and Style.

be only package that keeps “giving” throughout the year. Once a month you can come in with your : i
‘ choice of 50 min. Swedish Massage, or Basic European Facial, or a Pedicure and Manicure. Body polish, Swedish massage, and a

classic facial or basic anti-aging facial.
( Takes you off into another world, includes
SERVIGE the body polish, hot stone massage, an anti-
o —_ aging facial, signature pedicure, signature

.
no oe paneqrecee® oe

| & AV oe edad ite Mot manicure and lunch included.
ju Seam G ! pit Cards Accepted Onlin.
Tedit & Debt Gi E

East Bay Street, Just East of Luciano’s « Telephone: (242) 323-6711 - 323-6715
Email Appointments/Inquiries to: info@baharetreat.com _Phailable
Visit our website at: www.baharetreat.com Credit & Debit Cards

. OPEN: Monday 10am - 4pm ¢ Tuesday - Saturday 9am - 6pm Accepted Online
MOTHER'S DAY - May 9th, 9am - 3pm

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Ml UNION OF TERTIARY EDUCATORS OF THE BAHAMAS AND THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

College dispute: Talks have *
stalled again, says union

THE WAR of words
between the Union of Tertiary
Educators of the Bahamas and
the College of the Bahamas
continued yesterday with the
union alleging that negotiations
have stalled once again despite
the May 14 deadline.

In a statement issued to the
media yesterday, the union’s
president Jennifer Isaacs-Dot-
son said that after a week of
negotiations UTEB and COB
have agreed and signed off on
just two sub-clauses, with near-
ly 50 clauses and other items
remaining to be signed.

“During this lockdown,
UTEB sees the College’s latest
stalling actions as part and par-
cel of a series of bad faith
efforts initiated by the College
last week aimed at intimidat-
ing faculty, staff, and students,
while at the same time trying
to frustrate and derail the nego-
tiation process. Despite the
deleterious impact that the Col-
lege’s latest acts may be hav-
ing on the institution’s public
image, the union is not sur-
prised at the College’s actions
and its continued lack of effort
in working towards the signing
of a new industrial agreement
for the faculty. It sees the acts
as a series of last ditch, ‘union
busting’ efforts against a union
that will continue to fight for
its members and to advance the
College community,” she said.

Unsure of the college’s moti-
vation, or “lack thereof”, Ms
Isaacs-Dotson said that the
union is of the opinion that the
college has no intention of and
never has had any intention of
signing a new agreement.

“The union feels that the
Department of Labour must be
under the same impression, as
its conciliator has recommend-
ed to both sides bringing in a
third party mediator to inter-
vene in this stalemate so that
the signing off on the agree-
ment can take place by the pre-
scribed deadline.

“Despite endeavouring to do
its best to work through the
agreement with the College’s
negotiating team, the union
wholeheartedly agrees with the
Department of Labour on its
assessment and sees immediate
mediation as the most proba-
ble solution to a process that
the College shows no interest in
concluding.

“As far as the union is con-
cerned, the first week of nego-
tiations with the College turned
out to be a complete waste of
time and effort, with the Col-
lege presenting the union with a
new, 191-page draft of a pro-
posed agreement, with
renamed clauses, for UTEB to
consider. This presumptuous
act on the part of the College
could have only been a foolish
move to once again slow down
an already delayed process. The
College could have better pre-
pared itself to move forward in
negotiations with the union by
reviewing and preparing to dis-
cuss the proposals that were
already on the table for discus-
sion since February 2009,” she
said. Additionally in this first
week, the union said that COB
sought to intimidate a member
of staff and students of Ms
Isaacs-Dotson. This staff mem-
ber was allegedly called into a
meeting with the Vice-presi-
dent of Academic Affairs and
two College Deans and inter-
rogated as to the specifics sur-
rounding Ms Isaacs-Dotson’s
exams, which were scheduled
to take place during the peri-
od of industrial action.

“At the same time, the
administrators began harassing

uh
RS

Ute
Ha ear by |



Ms Isaacs-Dotson’s students at
home, seeking to interrogate
them about the exam particu-
lars and their attendance in
class. These acts of intimida-
tion and harassment were fol-
lowed by the College’s illegal
pay cuts of faculty members
who were on strike and others
who were assumed to be on
strike.

Distressed

“On Wednesday of last
week, several faculty contact-
ed the union distressed over
disparities in figures that
appeared on their monthly
salary slips and in their bank
accounts — disparities that
showed drastic cuts ranging
from $400 to $700. As a result,
many faculty are seeking legal
counsel and are considering
proceedings against the College
for the illegal manoeuvres that
contravene the Industrial Rela-
tions and Employment Acts.

“Additionally, the union is
prepared to make available to

Financing Available Through
Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood

= 20% OFF White:

Crepe Backed Satin, Lamour

Heavily Embroidered Eyelet, Lace,
Romie Linen, Poplin, Brocade & Silk

* Red and White Cormations for Corsages _.
* White Gloves starting at - -
« New Peorl Neckloce Sets. 222 5. $70
* Giant Mother's Day Cords from
* Potted Orchids ond Roses, ee

* New Candle sets, Mugs, Mother's Day bears

the media, if necessary, docu-
mentation which calls into
question the integrity and truth-
fulness of information released
by the College into the public
domain before and after the
union’s industrial action with
the institution.

“And despite the College’s
recent misleading letter writing
campaign to the faculty body
and the general public aimed
at maligning the union, its lead-
ership, and their efforts to get a
signed industrial agreement in

place by May 14, 2010, the
union is overwhelmed by the
support of faculty members
who are now mobilized and ral-
lying around the union presi-
dent and the negotiating team.
The faculty actions recently
show that they continue to have
full confidence in the union
president’s leadership, and they
have demonstrated this by re-
electing Ms Isaacs-Dotson,
unopposed, to a third term in
office,” the statement read.

COMPUTER STUDIES

CERTIFICATE COURSES
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS

WordProcessing (MS Word)
CLASS BEGINS WEDNESDAY 5th MAY
Credit Cards Accepted

INSTITUTE OF BUSINESS AND COMMERCE - 324-4625



1-pc 5 Drawer Chest



Queen 8 Pc’Set....
King 8 Pc Set .



% OFF ENTIRE

STOCK OF WHITE FABRIC









per aa ir pe Bt

2/$] HATS FROM $3¢

— $10”



Home Ves









/) DeskJet OfficeJet | LaserJet

PRINTERS

ui AUTHORISED DEALER

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE = 242.329.3049 «



Where it’s at!

AY MIC RCONE TB





UNION president Jennie ae feisem

GIFT SHOP

Celebrate Mother's Day with New Arrivals
@ Fab Finds Gift Shop!

Two convenient locations to serve you:
Lyford Cay Shopping Centre
(242) 362 6123

Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
(242) 394 4284

fabfinds@coralwave.com

Look for us on Facebook!



as THIS ——
i phe SAD PANS hs “y

Pe a

% ao

| i Pc Tha

Piet nn
a Cl

Ui a

Galleria re

Vike i lall-at- lara ie
POX OFFICE PENS AT ee AM DAILY

Seater eye TT
[wostwane cwemsmmecr —wew!| 1-18 [x30 | wa | aos | a5 | sas |

sere a Fv | [|
PTHEBADEUFRLAM TT | 100 | 05 | ok | 00 | 20 | a |

rwewsers ete faa | ma | cs [ass ||
‘oomeararoean + _[va0 ys Twa Tom Lan Do
fucks | to aan | ma | mn [oan |v |
fomewom (soar ma | cn [ass | ss |
war oo oerwamnToo 1 | 120} sas [eas | am [02s | sew |
feusnormenonsao + [105 ]3o1| ma | os [a0 ||
[ow ro ream oun Racor [140 a [ wa | aa [an | sas
fowmorAWNPrND a | 120] 34s | aa | ain | a | so |

er ee

LISE TOWRA E-GERO TO RESERVE TICKETS Al 230-8 OF AW Gal L BAM CIMER AS CON
fmcnrwnconnsroeet_wew] 1:16 [310 [wa [6s [40 | ans]
femccurran vfs [aan [wa [60s [e20 | ro]
feetonens [va [as [Wa [oan [28 | ros]
emmarrecrncin ——¥ [11s [a0 [WA [ons [0 | voxs
fwursoracrwweneor vr [v1 [aan [wa [coo [4 | ro]

eenorreermaeao [ts [328 (WA [ins [#20 | vos
ee es ee

UUme your e-card to reamearos biokets af 280-3849 or viel us at
wew.bohamaslooaloom



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914













































































SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M.,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Sir Stafford returned to the $10 note

WE CONGRATULATE the Ingraham
government — unlike the mean-spirited PLP
— for giving credit where credit is due and
returning the image of Sir Stafford Sands
to its rightful place on the $10 Bahamian
bill.

In making the announcement the FNM
acknowledged Sir Stafford, a former finance
minister, as “‘a principal architect of the mod-
ern Bahamian economy.” It was this sin-
gular achievement — from which this country
is still reaping benefits today — that earned
Sir Stafford his rightful place on the Bahami-
an currency on March 7, 2000.

In 1992, after 25 years of PLP rule under
the late Sir Lynden Pindling, the FNM par-
ty, under Hubert Ingraham, came to power.

The following year the Ingraham gov-
ernment decided to honour Bahamians who
had made significant contributions to the
nation by removing the non-controversial
image of the Queen from our currency and
replacing it with those of “deserving Bahami-
ans.”

The late Sir Milo Butler, the first Bahami-
an governor-general was the first to be hon-
oured. In 1993 his image was put on the $20
bill. No one objected.

The late Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield, one
of the founders of the FNM, followed in
1995 on the $5 bill. Still no objection. Sir
Roland Symonette, first Bahamian Premier
of the Bahamas, went on the $50 bill in 2000,
followed by Sir Lynden, the Bahamas’ first
prime minister, on the $1 bill in 2001. None
of these men was perfect. They all had their
warts, but it was only Sir Stafford who made
headlines when the PLP labelled him a hat-
ed racist, whose image should not be on the
currency.

And so, in 2005 when the PLP, under Per-
ry Christie, was back in government Sir
Stafford was removed and the Queen
returned to the $10 bill. On Friday, the FNM
announced that now that the 2005 $10 series
of bank notes had expired, Sir Stafford
would be returned to the place that he had
earned.

It was Sir Lynden who had said on the
floor of the House that no one could deny
that it was Sir Stafford’s “great foresight,
great energy and indomitable spirit that had
laid the foundation for a prosperous tourist
industry and an economic empire.”

And yet today, there are those among
Sir Lynden’s own party who would deny Sir
Stafford that place. In The Tribune today,
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell warns that should
the PLP again win the government, Sir
Stafford would be denied that place. The
PLP would again remove his image from
the currency.

“There may be members in this House,

MULTI-DISCOUNT
BRIDAL CENTER
15% Off Storewide \_

/ $ale Starts
This Monday May 3rd - Saturday May 8th

who might not agree with what Sir Stafford
did or why he did it,” said Sir Lynden in
1972 on the death of Sir Stafford at the age
of 58, “but one can still say that for many
years a great Bahamian stood in this cham-
ber and gave service to his country in the
manner he thought best. His name is one
that all of us will remember and one that
will long ring in this country.”

Oh, no, not if some of today’s PLP can
help it.

They say he was a racist, a rabid racist at
that. No matter which side you come down
on there is always a caveat with Sir Stafford,
ayes, but...

It depends upon who you talk with and
whether that person knew Sir Stafford in
his private life, or only his public life. The
person who knew both sides of the man
would deny that he was racist, or had any
prejudices. However, speak with someone
who knew him only in his public life, and the
answer would be that he was a born racist.

Now let’s take the case of Sir Milo Butler.
He made no bones about being a racist. We
can personally attest to that when as a young
reporter we sat long hours in the House of
Assembly listening to him bellowing at the
top of his powerful voice, fist stabbing the
air, about how the blood of the much hated
white Englishman would soon flow down
Bay Street. If Sir Stafford were a racist, he
never proclaimed it. Sir Milo, on the other
hand, never missed an opportunity.

The PLP seem to think that racists come
in one colour. Sir Stafford, a white man, was
the colour of the racist. Sir Milo, a black
man, apparently didn’t qualify. No one
objects to Sir Milo being on the currency,
because it is acknowledged that he too made
his mark on the history of the Bahamas.

And then there was Sir Lynden. True he
brought us majority rule, but somewhere in
his long history he lost his way and the drug
trafficking during his administration
destroyed this country’s good name and
wrecked its value system. “It was a legacy of
destruction,” commented a black Bahamian,
“from which we shall suffer for generations
to come.”

According to Sir Lynden, Sir Stafford
had “laid the foundation for a prosperous
tourist industry and an economic empire.”
But Sir Lynden, who brought majority rule,
left this country with a tarnished image.

Yet Sir Stafford, according to a PLP MP,
will be removed from the currency should
the PLP be returned to power. Nothing has
been mentioned about Sir Milo, or Sir Lyn-
den.

Does any of this make any sense?

We are certainly living in times that try
men’s souls.

Check Out Our Bridal Gift Registry With Great
Gift Items Like Pots, Crystal, China, Pyrex,
Corningware, Gibson, Cuisinart, Hamilton

Beach & So Much More .

Montrose Avenue opposite
Multi Discount Furniture

Larry Smith
can’t have it
both ways

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you to Mr. Larry
Smith for his review of my
recent presentation for The
Nassau Institute, at The
Bahamas National Trust,
Retreat. He provides an
opportunity for me to share
a bit more information with
the Bahamian environmental
audience.

At first Mr Smith fully
understands how market sys-
tems work to avoid “tragedy
of the commons” scenarios
(collapse of the sponge fishery
in The Bahamas) and to
improve environmental qual-
ity. As Mr Smith explains in
his excellent description of
rights-based management sys-
tems, allocating exclusive
“catch shares” to fishers to be
bought and sold works well
for fishers and fish popula-
tions. To elaborate, in the five
years after catch share imple-
mentation in the US, per boat
revenues increased an aver-
age of 80 per cent. Today,
catch shares have been imple-
mented in more than 300 fish-
eries around the world from
New Zealand to Namibia, in
fisheries large and small. I
have even heard that Cuba is
exploring the option of catch
share systems.

So why does Mr Smith then
do an about-face and seem to
argue that this type of system
would not be feasible in the
Bahamas? Is your govern-
ment so big that you can’t see
beyond an old school regula-
tory approach? It is time to
move fisheries management
(and energy, forestry, waste,

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



etc) in the Bahamas into the
21st century.

There is a market for green
products with environmental
entrepreneurs ready to invest
in them. But with government
trying to clumsily perform
these tasks at the taxpayers
expense “enviropreneurs” get
crowded out.

Elinor Ostrom won the
2009 Nobel Prize in econom-
ics for her work recognising
the role that local entrepre-
neurs play in eliminating the
tragedy of the commons.
Whether it is fisheries, forests,
oil fields, or irrigation systems
she provides plenty of exam-
ples.

Mr Smith argues that
“externalities” are a justifica-
tion for government. To
entrepreneurs there are not
environmental problems
caused by externalities, but
environmental opportunities
enhanced by strong property
rights and markets. Indeed,
entrepreneurs thrive in the
space where there are impacts
not accounted for in market
transactions. The more they
can replace externalities with
entrepreneurship, the more
we will see conflict replaced
with cooperation and envi-
ronmental rhetoric (yes that
includes “claims about over-
population threatening
humanity) replaced with real
environmental improvement.

Speaking of ideology, the
first Earth Day (22 April
1970) was organised by
Democrat congressman Gay-
lord Nelson. It was set upon
the 100th birthday of
Vladimir Lenin, who led the
Communist Revolution in
1917. I bring this up as it
serves as a yearly reminder
that the world’s biggest envi-
ronmental catastrophes took
place in the USSR and many
environmental problems can
be seen in North Korea today.

I too want workable solu-
tions for real problems and
that is why the Property and
Environment Research Cen-
tre (PERC) works with
groups such as the Nature
Conservancy, Environmental
Defence Fund, and even the
World Bank and that is also
why we take no government
money and why we don’t look
to government to solve envi-
ronmental problems.

With that said, I hope Mr
Smith authors more books
such as “The Bahamas: Por-
trait of an Archipelago.” It
serves as a beautiful intro-
duction to the treasure of nat-
ural resources found in the
Bahamas.

LAURA

E HUGGINS

Research Fellow at the
Hoover Institution at Stan-
ford University and Director
of Outreach at the Property
and Environment Research
Centre in Bozeman, Mon-
tanawww.perc.org

Montana,

April, 2010

The annual meeting of Brigadoon residents

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The residents of Brigadoon
had their annual meeting in
January, 2010. In attendance
was the representative for
Montagu. We expressed to
her the concerns we had in
our little community, name-
ly, (1) our roads are
deplorable and need resur-
facing; (2) we have to pay for
electricity for our street lights,
plus we had to erect the poles
and place the fixtures on
them. However, government
supplies street lights all over
the Bahamas free.

We are told because we
have a gate at the entrance —

which is open all day Monday
through Friday — the area is
considered private; so we are
being penalized for trying to
protect our area and our
homes.

The MP promised she
would look into the road sit-
uation with a view to possi-
bly getting a special price for
repaving; and she said that
the lights should be paid for
by B.E.C. because there is a
tax added to all B.E.C. bills
that cover street lights and
assured us that she would get
back in touch within a week.
Understanding that she might
be busy we have waited until
now (three months later),



with absolutly no response.

She told us what we want-
ed to hear and went on her
way. Well time rushes on, as
for me and my house, NO
VOTE.

BILLY SANDS
Brigadoon,
Nassau,

April 30, 2010.

a Be Bose S
ae Lae
FAO eH}

re Pe
322-2157



NEW ARRIVALS

A

Exciting New Models-Look Like New!

We now offer ZERO DOWN
on late models up to 2003!

6 i(°_<——-

Hale r pal

We also offer 20% DOWN,
3 YEAR LOAN FOR 2005 models!

AS ALWAYS 1 Month Limited
Warranty, License,Inspection

and Insurance Included.
Restrictions apply.

Phone 356-7924/5/6 a
P.O. Box N-1552 ae.

$5,500 cash
Ae le *

Seem VILLAGE ROAD NEAR
SHIRLEY STREET
Tel: 394-0323 /5
OR 394-1377





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 5









PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOPE
| By Jamaal Rolle

Bahamas seeking to
woo Chinese visitors

Bahamian civil servants in
Shanghai to promote tourism

“TW ys
s a
al | "1





r
]

i
By ALISON LOWE

rth ed ' ‘
Tribune Staff Reporter fe | 3 & [£ “i Da >
N ‘ tv £ I = ij
alowe@tribunemedia.net | Wer Sag At va |

SHANGHAI, China - A ‘ae «4 |
group of Bahamian civil ser- | i
vants have swapped Nassau oO oll
for Shanghai in a bid to boost
tourist visits to the Bahamas
from the Asian region.

Five Ministry of Tourism

officials and one from the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
have been sent to the Chinese
city for six months to promote ;
their country to the estimated
70 million visitors who organ- | PRESCOTT YOUNG AND GABRIELLE ARCHER from the Ministry of
isers project will attend the | Tourism pose for photos next to the pavillion.
Shanghai World Expo 2010,
where The Bahamas is repre-
sented in a walk-through
pavilion within the Caribbean
Community themed area.

Prescott Young, leader of
the Ministry of Tourism and
Foreign Affairs team who
arrived in China in April, said
he is “looking forward to
putting The Bahamas on the
map in China.”

For now, The Bahamas
remains an enigma to many
in the Asian country of over
one billion, but with China set
to become one of the world’s
largest outbound tourism
markets by 2020 as private
incomes increase in line with
its booming economic growth,
tourism officials recognise the
need to change this.

“We're planning on getting
a globe in here so we can
show where we are,” said Mr
Young, who noted that aside
from the Chinese people who

SEE page six


































ere







jamaalinaa Me, oom




Coe lig ht your vote, mater or grandmather with
a custom charcoal portrait hand-drawn by
reknowned Bahamian artist Jarnaal Rolle
Choose a special Mother's Day gift that the
entire family can be invealyed in creating for her

UR a ee = 2 See
ae ee ee da

i call 677-9698 or 454-1979 for more information

Po re beg he TT eal)

WE SEND EM PRG KIN’!

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

“WE WILL MATCH OR BEAT ANY PRICE IN TOWN”

S HH H! Don’t Tell Anyone,
Our

Of Pre-Owned

Honda Accords, Civics
and Nissans have arrived.




————————

” Colors:
lero ATT |) tA y MONTHLY ‘Fuschia ‘Brown *Red ‘Yellow ‘Black ‘Silver

for Government Workers @iidalt ‘White °Gold "Orange Temules "Green
a ER eee eM Re Ree tL

SER em ECU Oey eRe Te |
ERA) MORO eos Cia ET S fl Ky

TEL: (242) 341-0449 + (242) 341-2249 «+ FAX: (242) 361-1136 Rosetta St. - Ph: 325-3336

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM















‘ Sale

es cb oy? w

up to 350/, OFF

Thursday April 29th through Saturday May 8th

Tel. 323-2900
Monday - Saturday 10:30am - 5:30pm
Bay Street (two doors east of Victoria Ave)

yyOu

CLASSIQUE

PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian civil servants in
Shanghai to promote tourism

FROM page five

will gain exposure to The
Bahamas from visiting the
pavilion, many visitors from
other nearby Asian countries
are expected to pass through
too.

“This is a great opportunity
to showcase the Bahamas.
What is interesting is that
we’ve met a lot of people who
think the Bahamas is a part
of Africa so you have to
explain it, to say it’s right off
the coast of the United
States,” said fellow Ministry
of Tourism colleague
Gabrielle Archer.

At the Bahamas’ colourful
pavilion on Saturday morn-
ing, Mr Young and Ms
Archer were taken aback to
find themselves the centre of
attention among the first Chi-
nese visitors to the expo,
which officially opened on
Friday, April 30.

The Chinese — many of
whom are unused to seeing
people of other ethnic origins
— rushed to greet and have
photos of themselves taken
with the pair.

Inside the pavilion itself,
Mr Young and Ms Archer
will take turns with their oth-
er colleagues to be on hand
to promote and explain the
Bahamas to the visitors who
will pass through the area
between the hours of 10am
and 10pm, assisted by the pri-
vate mandarin Chinese lan-
guage tutoring they are to
receive throughout their stay,
and a local Chinese transla-
tor.

The theme of the massive
Expo, which covers 5.28
square kilometres along the
Huangpu river in Shanghai,
is “Better City, Better Life.”
The six-month event, in which
over 200 countries are partic-
ipating, has been touted as
one that will allow partici-
pants and those attending to
explore the concept of urban
life now and in the future, and
promote “harmony and
cooperation between nations







of the world. Commentators
note that another major
aspect of the estimated $45
billion event, which comes
just two years after China
staged the 2008 Olympics in
Beijing, is for China to again
promote itself on the world
stage, and for those countries
involved to grow their ties
with the global giant.

Beach

Meanwhile, at The
Bahamas pavilion, the main
message is simply “It’s Bet-
ter in the Bahamas.”

A perimeter wall displays
a photographic image of a
pristine Bahamian beach,
while inside, visitors can find
out more about Nassau’s
Downtown Revitalisation
Project, investing in The
Bahamas, local straw craft
and music — which will be
highlighted by performances
and displays from a Bahamian
straw weaver and Gregory
Douglas, a Bahamian musi-





cian who lives in Beijing — and
the Atlantis and Baha Mar
hotel properties.

On the floor is a map of the
Bahamas, showing the vari-
ous islands that can be visited
in addition to Nassau/Paradise
Island — this “differentiation”
strategy being key to the Min-
istry of Tourism’s recent pro-
motional campaigns.

Atlantis and Baha Mar take
a prominent position in the
Bahamian expo in light of the
role they played in bringing
it into being — each donating
$25,000 to the cause of having
it set up and manned for six
months, and offering seven-
day trips to The Bahamas as
prizes to be made available
through the pavilion at the
expo. Further funds were pro-
vided by the Bahamian and
Chinese Governments
towards the Bahamas partici-
pation in the expo. The
Bahamas is just one of more
than 200 other countries that
accepted invitations to have
a presence at the event.

Throughout its six-month
duration, different days have
been chosen to highlight the
culture of the various regions
of the world, and on July 17th
it is the Bahamas and the
Caribbean community that
will take centre stage.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has accepted an
invitation to attend the expo
at this time.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit oar website af www. coded is

THE SEARCH FOR A PRESIDENT

The College Council of The College of The Bahamas (COB) is pleased to
announce a search for a new President and invites nominations and expres-
psions of interest in this outstanding opportunity for leadership at a truly
unique institution, After nearly thirty-five years of serving The Bahamas,
first as a two-year institution, then as a four-year degree-granting College,
COB expects to become The University of The Bahamas. As it moves to
solidify its university status, COB will continue to deliver excellent under-
eraduate teaching while developing new undergraduate and graduate pro-
grams, increasing research and innovation activities, and focusing its work in
areas crucial to national development.

Since its founding in 1974, The College of The Bahamas has grown in repu-
lation and currently enrolls over 5000) students in undergraduate and gradu-
ate education. The institution grants primarily bachelor’s degrees, and will
launch its first master's degree later this year. Currently, COB offers joint
master’s degrees in conjunction with other accredited universities and col
leges within the United States and enjoys extensive links with higher edwea-
tion institutions in the Caribbean, North America and Great Britain.

NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS
A prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
ities for the new president, a full enumeration of qualifications for the posi-
tion, and instructions for submitting applications or nominations may be
found under “Current Searches” at www.academic-search.com. Those con-
sidering becoming candidates are urged to visit this Web site before submit-
ting application materials. A complete application shall include a thoughtful
letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and a list of at least five professional ref-
erences (with email addresses and telephone numbers) and must be received
by June 9th, 2010, Nominations, inquiries and applications are treated confi-
dentially and should be submitted electronically (MS Word or PDF) to:
COBPresident@academic-search.com
Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained
from The College’s website,
Maya Kirkhope and Bill Fr ankiin of Academic Search, Inc. are assisting with
this search. Nominations and expressions of interest will be treated in confi-
}dence and may be directed to:

20%-S0% OFF

Sale On Selected Items

Maya Ranchod Kirkhope

Senior Consultant

| Academic Search, Inc.

Washington, DwC., USA
mava.kirkhope@academic-search.oom
(703) S80 9195

Dr. Bill Franklin

Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Ine.
Washington, D.C., USA
hjf@academic-search.com
(S30) 249-1444

Mt. Royal Avenue (1 Door South of Quality Fabric)

Tel: 328-0837 + 328-4793

. email:bijouxclassique@ yahoo.com The College of The Bahamas is committed to providing equal educational

and employment opportunity,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 7
LOCAL NEWS



Oft with a a bang!

World Expo
2010 opens with
spectacular
ceremony

=
-

SHANGHAI, China — The
Shanghai World Expo 2010 got
off with a bang on Frida
evening when Chinese Presi-
dent Hu Jintao officially
declared it open during a spec-
tacular ceremony involving
thousands of Chinese perform-
ers and a handful of interna-
tional stars, including Italian
opera singer Andrea Boccelli
and Chinese actor Jackie Chan.

The event was held inside the
Expo Culture Centre, a flying-
saucer shaped structure located
in the heart of the 5.28 square
kilometer Expo site, and was
attended by a variety of world
leaders, among them President
Nicolas Sarkozy of France and
his wife Carla Bruni.

The Shanghai Expo 2010 is
ostensibly a non-commercial
expo in which participating
countries display their take on a
theme — “Better city, better
life” — through national pavil-
ions highlighting urban living
in their cities. Other “themed
areas“ within the expo site
explore issues relating to pre-
sent urban life around the
world and potential options for
enhanced future city living.

Jean Pierre-Lafon, President
of the International Exhibitions
Bureau which partly coordi-
nates the expo, said in his open-
ing speech at the ceremony that
with the majority of the world’s

SEE page nine





freeforall

sign-up at IndiGO before May 31st





= : iw rt -
>

1
al = :
eal | eens
<=) 58): sre er ae





ae ck oe

THE MEXICAN pavilion's "forest of kites’, said to embody Mexico's idea of urban life in the future and desire © ACROBATIC performers dangle from the ceiling of the Expo Culture
for more green space in cities. Centre during the finale of the indoor segment of the opening ceremony.















. ae
Make Mother’s Day
aMINIEvent . 4 Weve gotit

COMPUTERS LIMITED
4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.»

Sales: 242.396.1100 © Service: 242.396.1115

WAWLOUStomcompubers.bs:
solutions(@customcomputers.bs

(Jp Mini 2102



LO Mele (itele)emicted
FREE modem!
FREE |/ocal number!

FREE calls to
onephone clients on
the family islands!

Plans as low as

I g95 AU

Calling plans for

ee AE Ue elec
Canada, UK, Caribbean
even for your cell phone!

Available at

INdiGO

nn
6771111 Nassau 6881111 Freeport 6991111 Abaco

PALMDALE & HARBOUR BAY

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE







» PEL UNITE

a ~~ UNTEg
A The Sloe Villane Re & > NATIONS sea

“Shoes For All Walks Of Life”

Azaleta Ishmael-Newry



ROT,
ARY CLUBS oF THE Banaya











ENVIRONMENT Minister Earl Deveaux addresses the Model United
Nations Sessions held at the Police Conference Centre on April 26.

Students take part
in Model United
Nations Sessions

=> -

RSS Deere neers

- x =~ cs

Gucci.com bahamas saffrey square bay street and bank lane nassau 242.325.0561, crystal court at atlantis paradise island 242.363.5823

STUDENTS representing
13 high schools throughout
The Bahamas participated
in the 13th Model United
Nations Sessions (MUNS)
held on April 26.

MUNS is a simulation of
the United Nations within
an academic platform. The
objective of the sessions is
to educate and train the par-
ticipants in matters relating
to civics, issues of globaliza-
tion, communication and
diplomacy.

Four students from each
school are assigned a coun-
try and participate in a sim-
ulated session of an inter-
governmental organization.
The 47 students who par-
ticipated were asked to
take on the role of diplo-
mats of the representative
countries of the United
Nations.

Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux presented
remarks on behalf of the
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette before the
sessions began.

Role

The topics selected were
“significant” to the role of
the United Nations in the
21st century in the areas of
technological advancement
and free trade respectively,
as “industrialized countries
play an increasingly impor-
tant role in the transference
of technological expertise to
smaller, less developed
states,” Mr Deveaux said.

“The principles of free
trade will continue to elimi-
nate borders and stimulate
the implementation of poli-
cies which promote national
development and economic
sustainability,” he added.

The minister congratulat-
ed the students and their
advisers for their efforts
and long hours of research
and preparation and
also thanked the
Rotary Clubs of The
Bahamas for partnering

with the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs to host the event.

The students participated
in debates during two ses-
sions. The topic for the
morning session was “Is the
United Nations meeting the
needs of all its Member
States in order to benefit
from the exponential expan-
sion of technological
advances already evident in
the beginning of the 21st
Century?”

Benefits

The topic for the after-
noon session was "In a
rapidly globalizing world,
does ‘Free Trade’ contribute
to development for all coun-
tries? Are the benefits of
globalization evenly distrib-
uted?”

The judges included Jose
Luis Ponce Caraballo,
ambassador of the Republic
of Cuba to The Bahamas;
Dr Carlton Watson, from
The College of The
Bahamas (COB); Dr
Llewellyn Curling, COB;
Caldwell Pratt, deputy direc-
tor of the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport; Ray-
mond Winder, managing
partner Deloitte & Touch
and Philip Simon, executive
director of The Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce.

The winners will receive
an all expense paid trip to
attend the United Nations
General Assembly (UNGA)
65th Session during this Fall
where they will hear Deputy
Prime Minister Brent
Symonette address the
Assembly.

Second place winners
received laptops and all win-
ners received trophies. All
participants received certifi-
cates and prizes.

The winners are: Queen’s
College High School repre-
senting Japan; 2nd place: St.
Andrew’s High School rep-
resenting Singapore and 3rd
place: New Age Academy,
from Turks and Caicos
Islands representing Chile.

The Bahamas Immigration
Department customer service
improvement strategy

THE Bahamas Immigration Department recently iden-
tified five areas of focus and initiative to improve customer

satisfaction and efficiency.

Critical to the Department’s customer service improve-
ment strategy are the following areas, according to a gov-

ernment statement:

Training and retraining; to review and improve proce-

dures and processes; to improve public relations and dis-
semination of information; to create a customer service
desk at headquarters and to introduce and implement an
electronic identification system.

According to the government statement, the Department
is pleased with its efforts to date, particularly the recent
launch of its website, completion of its information
brochures, and the Minister’s ability to approve Permanent
Residency for foreign spouses married to Bahamian citizens,
once their spousal permits have expired. As a consequence
the waiting period for permanent residency for this catego-
ry of permits has been significantly reduced.

“The Department continues to review its procedures
and processes aimed at improving the length of time permits
are processed. The department remains committed to the
overall improvement of its services,” said the statement.




Sy

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 9



FROM page seven

population living in cities today, he hopes the
city-themed expo will “contribute to a social
awakening” that will lead to cities becoming
“safer, more harmonious” places.

When the indoors portion of the ceremony
was over, invited guests were told to head outside
for a firework show of a lifetime - at least 20
minutes of fireworks launched into the night sky
over the Huangpu river, from boats and buildings,

World Expo 2010 opens with spectacular ceremony

intermixed with choreographed fountains of
water and light beams pulsating in time with a
grand orchestral musical accompaniment.

The following morning the expo site officially
opened to the general public and tens of thou-
sands of primarily Chinese visitors, young and
old, flocked to see the international pavilions,
themed areas, performances, restaurants serv-
ing global dishes and more that are scattered



9
a”

yp



throughout the expo site. By midday there was a
three-and-a-half hour waiting time in the hot sun
for a chance to get inside the most popular attrac-
tions, which included the United States, Canadi-
an and Russian pavilions.

Inside, visitors got to see for the first time how
the various countries had explored the theme
“Better city, better life.”

Many countries have spent millions of dollars

on their offerings, and hi-tech lighting and video
and audio technology was put to use to stimulate
visitors’ senses — although in some cases those
attending were somewhat perplexed as to the
intended message.

The Bahamas is participating in the expo too,
with a mini-pavilion inside the Caribbean Com-
munity Pavilion that hosts 14 Caribbean countries
in all, each of which is hoping to raise aware-
ness of their country’s culture, products and
attraction as a tourism destination through par-
ticipation in the expo.

Top of the Line
Performance Vehicles
only at Tyreflex Star Motors.

MERCEDES-BENZ E-Class, C-Class, CLC-Class & ML-Class

a
a

ISUZU D-MAX Trucks

rau

Memories one bead at a time...

Tyreflex Star Motors is the Exclusive Authorized Dealer
for Mercedes-Benz, Subaru and Isuzu vehicles.

New & Used Cars & Trucks * Sales, Parts & Service
Call us at 325.4961 or visit our showroom on Wulff Rd today!

The Brass & Leather Shops Ltd.
Charlotte Street Of Bay - Tel.: 322-3806
The Mall at Marathon - Tel; 394-3676

Abaco Shopping Centre - Marsh Harbour - Tel.: 367-3645

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS

Call us today for your new Top of the Line Vehicle at 325.4961
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas ¢ Fax: 323.4667







my
- WIN OVER

Ai ee
Be

ii G, :
Sethe

plus Complete Your Look With Accents for as low as 35 per week'!




NASSAU ® Town Centre Mall
Tel: (242) 397-PLUS ose
Mon-Sat Jam-9pm

Fax: (242) 325-6368 mh



|

j =,

New & Ad xciting Selections Just For Mom!

GRAND BAHAMA © Madeira Croft
Tel: (242) 352-PLUS prsa?
Mon-Fri Sam-6pm * Sat Jam-4pnm
Fax: (242) 352-9823

F

4 piece Living Room Suite

r







, hi 2s starting as low as $2 S eas week*

Balun Chamber of (aummerce
OUTSTANDING. FUSES ESS
LIF THE PRA ac DP STH



FURNITURE

Nassau * Grand Bahama « Abaco Coming Soon

.
itureplus :
L aah ]



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

gf ANDREW,

SCHOOL

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat)

(TB wor school

School Nurse
St. Andrew’s School, The International School of
The Bahamas, requires a School Nurse for the
2010-2011 school year.

“.... He that filches from me my
good name
Robs me of that which not
enriches him,
And makes me poor indeed”:
Shakespeare, Othello

Several Caribbean countries
could be stigmatized globally if
they support a proposition to top-
ple the global ban on commercial
whaling and legitimize the heinous
slaughter of these intelligent mam-
mals.

This proposition is being
advanced by the Chair and Vice
Chair of the 88-nation Interna-
tional Whaling Commission
(IWC), a body whose governing
Convention provides for the prop-
er conservation of whale stocks
and the complete protection of
certain species as well as desig-
nating specified areas as whale
sanctuaries.

Most of what constitutes the
proposition was developed by 12
governments in a small working
group, and it is being touted by
the Chair and Vice Chair as a basis
for additional negotiations
between now and an IWC meet-
ing to be held in Morocco in June.

No member government of the
IWC has endorsed the proposi-

. Mom & Me...

e

eee
>
ie
» e e
e@ 9 e
: e°
e
e
eo owls
Cc@ j NINA 9.9! /
“haga ae oN J
SVE et :

All applications must include a written letter
of application, full details of degrees, nursing
qualifications and experience as
well as the names of two relevant referees.

All applications must be received at the school by
3:00pm, Friday, May, 14“ 2010 and should be
addressed to: Mrs Sharon E Wilson, the Principal.

Applications without the complete information
required or those received after that date will not be
considered.











SATURDAY, May 8TH

It’s a tea party like none other! Join us as we
celebrate and pamper Mom’s just in time for
Mother’s Day. Participate in fun filled in-store
activities as you make those gift selections that
are sure to please Mom.

Massage Therapists

Make-up Consultations
Perfume Profiling

Gift Giving Ideas

Live Entertainment

Candy Bar

Starbucks Tea Discovery

Mom & Me Photos
Mom&MeLook-A-LikeCompetition
Spin To Win Beauty Wheel
Best/Creative Hat Competition



IK OK OK OK OK OK OK OK 2K 2K 2K OK

Fabulous Prizes and Gift Giveaways
Join” Bull pe
Mall at Marathon
(242) 393 4406





Saturday, May 8th - Marathon Mall:

Event, 12 Noon - 6:00 p.m.





Save the Caribbean’s standing:
Sink the yen for whales

= =
Sa i eS == i — —

WORLD VIEW -

tion to date but some governments
have forcefully stated their objec-
tion to it - among them: Mexico,
Australia, New Zealand and
Britain. It is expected that India,
South Africa and Brazil will also
oppose the proposition.

Caribbean countries that are
members of the IWC — the six
independent members of the
Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS) and
Suriname — could be very instru-
mental in either quashing it or val-
idating it.

If the proposition is endorsed,
it would: overturn the global ban
on commercial whaling and allow
hunting in the Southern Ocean
Whale Sanctuary around Antarc-
tica; approve the killing of whales
for commercial purposes by Japan
around Antarctica and in the
North Pacific; and allow continu-
ing whaling by Iceland and Nor-
way in violation of long-agreed
scientific procedures and the glob-
al whaling ban.

The Caribbean nations have
absolutely nothing politically, or
in orthodox material terms, to gain
by helping to support the propo-
sition; they have much more to
lose.

Apart from Bequia, one of the
tiny islands of St Vincent and the
Grenadines (about which, more
later), Caribbean people do not
eat whale meat, but many of the
islands have a vibrant whale-
watching industry from which they
derive revenue and jobs. More
importantly, the Caribbean sells
itself to the global tourism mar-
ket as environmentally friendly
and protective of natural wildlife —
an assault on this latter reputation
by tourism groups, who are
increasingly demanding higher
environmental standards, could
damage the region’s already frag-
ile tourism industry.

It has to be recalled that it is
only inside the Caribbean that a
differentiation is made between
the countries that reside in it; to
the North American and Euro-
pean tourists, the Caribbean is one
place. The perception of the area
overall can affect countries indi-
vidually.

It is claimed that Japan pays
the IWC membership fees for sev-
eral of the Caribbean countries,
and also finances the participation
of their delegations who have
become the most vocal support-
ers of Japan’s drive for commercial
whaling.

In April 2002, the then
Accountant General of Grenada
wrote in a letter (later made pub-
lic): “Contributions from the gov-
ernment of Japan to the govern-
ment of Grenada were not
received for the International
Whaling Commission and as such
was not reflected in the said
accounts for the years 1998 and
1999. However, our internal audit
revealed that contributions were
received for all other years prior to
and following 1998 and 1999.
Moreover the Japanese have con-
firmed that it made contributions
to the government of Grenada for
the specified periods.”

Japan has taken advantage of
the economic vulnerability of these
small and needy countries to cap-
ture their votes. In return for sup-
port at the IWC, Japan has pro-
vided fish refrigeration facilities
in all the independent OECS
countries which, while opened
with great fanfare and flourish as a
boon to local fishermen, are now
mostly disused or used for other
purposes. In some countries, they
have become known as the local
“ice house.”

But, when the economics of
the relationship with Japan is ana-
lyzed, these Caribbean countries
come out worse. Japan has a mas-
sive annual balance of trade sur-
plus with each of them — they are

Odessa









SIR RONALD SANDERS

ready markets for Japan’s motor-
vehicles, television sets, radios,
computers, printers, cameras, agri-
cultural equipment and a host of
other goods. In turn, Japan’s pur-
chases from these countries, where
such purchases exist, are negligi-
ble.

To say that the latest proposi-
tion from the IWC Chairs to over-
turn the ban on commercial whal-
ing has caused outrage around the
world would be to put the matter
mildly.

Governments, non-govern-
mental organizations, environ-
mental groups and ordinary peo-
ple have written letters, signed
petitions, organized demonstra-
tions, created blogs on the Internet
and generally agitated against
what they rightly regard as an
activity that is not only unneces-
sary, but is cruel and barbaric.

The human population of the
world does not depend on whale
meat to live; in fact, including a
small number of aboriginal peo-
ples - and an elite group in Japan
— whale meat is eaten by only a
tiny fraction of the global popula-
tion.

The three remaining countries
in the world that flout the spirit
of the IWC rules and decisions in
respect of commercial whaling are
Iceland, Japan and Norway.

In the Caribbean, apart from
Bequia, any ancient hunting of
whales has long since been aban-
doned, and there is certainly no
tradition of eating whale meat in
the region. The primitive process
of hunting whales off Bequia is
cruel verging on the barbaric and
does nothing to promote the
island’s reputation as a premier
residential tourism destination. It
has to be assumed that this activi-
ty will soon be regulated by the
Minister who has power to do so
under the law.

The Caribbean governments
involved in this matter should join
progressive governments around
the world by formally declaring
their opposition to the proposi-
tion long before the IWC meet-
ing in June, and, if they do attend,
by vigorously opposing it then.

Better still, given the difficult
financial circumstances con-
fronting each of them, Caribbean
countries can validly stay away
from this meeting which would be
costly to attend in distant Moroc-
co, and which has no benefit for
them. In that way, they could save
their own standing with the vast
majority of public opinion while
sinking the yen for whales.

Othello’s exclamation above
began:

“Good name in man and
woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their
souls”.

In this matter of the slaughter
of the world’s whales, the people
of the OECS countries and Suri-
name would not want the jewel
of their souls tarnished with “thir-
ty pieces” of yen. But it could hap-
pen to their detriment unless Gov-
ernments remove their countries
from the fray.

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

Ge arden

where life is still simple and people still care
Murphyville, first corner left off Sears Road, first
house right, yellow and white.

Telephone 322-8493

Give Her A Mother's Day Memory
She Vill “Creasure Forever! !!!

China Tea Set C1900 20% off.
Hand Painted with Roses Porcelain AntiqueTea Set 20% off.
Vintage 1930's Hooked Wool Rug 33% off.

nee

Kashmiri Silk Persian Rug 2.6ft x 4ft Tree of Life Design
40% off. —

Other larger Rugs 50% off.
Vintage Croquet Sets Adults, one Child's Set All 50% off.
Tea Towels 33% off.

Vintage Feed Sacks, 33% off, good for quilting.
Assorted Vintage and Antique Aprons pretty colours.
20-33% off.

Primitive Style Prairie Bonnets good for Plays and Skits
33% off.

Hand Crocheted Tops and Shirts, beautiful, 50% off.
Silk Floral Arrangements 33% off.

The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
Girls' Lovely organza Dresses sizes 2 to 16,
we also have boleros to blend with the sleeveless dresses.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010



THE TRIBUNE

hee

LOCAL NEWS

Pedestrian crossings
installed in Market
Street and Baillou

areas



Hill Road

—————— =,









ae,





(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson).
WORKS AND TRANSPORT MINISTER Neko Grant (left) inspects the
recently installed pedestrian crossing at Bahama Avenue and discusses
further road improvement plans for the area with Sidney Cleare, senior

superintendent of the Road Sign Department.

IN response to requests by business own-
ers and residents for more pedestrian cross-
ings on the Baillou Hill Road and Market
Street corridors, the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport has started installing
several crosswalks in this area.

“We committed to swift action on a num-
ber of the concerns raised at the Communi-
ty Meeting held to provide information for



ey a



Poo



the road improvement projects, Tuesday,
April 27,” said Works Minister Neko Grant.

Crosswalks were identified based on crit-
ical locations particularly in high traffic areas
near schools, businesses and government
departments.

The crossings are also designed to assist
with traffic management.

“The pedestrian crossings are intended to

move pedestrians in the Market Street and
Baillou Hill Road corridors in a safe and
orderly manner based on the volume of traf-
fic,” Mr Grant added.

The first phase of pedestrian crossings
include the intersections before Coconut
Grove Avenue, Palm Tree Avenue and
Bahama Avenue.

A crossing also will be installed between

(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson)

PICTURED is Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant chatting with Sidney Cleare, senior superintendent of the Road Sign Depart-
ment, as Andrew Darling uses a thermo plastic applicator to install a pedestrian crossing at the intersection before Bahama Avenue.

Bimini and Andros Avenues. Other areas
identified for crossings are the intersections
before Coconut Grove and Baillou Hill
Road, Baillou Hill Road and Bahama
Avenue and Baillou Hill and Tucker Roads.

The Ministry of Works also plans to erect
speed limits and school zone signs in these
areas,

OATES a
SREAL



LRN

TO ee cn ae Omen a

LIFE HAS
ITS MOMENTS...



I: you hear the whispers below
the rumble, you know that the
recent financial and housing melt-
down in the US has actually created
some great opportunities for smart investors in the Bahamas.

The price on some homes, especially second homes and
vacant property in the Family Islands, has adjusted to more
realistic levels — in some cases, far more realistic levels.
This environment is favourable for long-term gains.

It may not be for everyone, but if you’re in the right
financial position, you may want to invest in a second (hol-
iday) home or well situated vacant property. However,
there is a right way and a wrong way to invest — it’s the wrong
way that led so many to suffer in the recent housing crisis in
the US. In our office, some persons have spoken of forming
investment clubs to take advantage of new opportunities.

Don’t think about investing in a second home until you’ve
saved up for your nest egg and have held or reduced your
expenses to keep it growing. Your money doesn’t work for
you unless it’s your money.

Similarly, don’t begin your investment adventure until
you’ve polished up your credit standing. The best opportu-
nities go to those with upfront cash and excellent credit.
Maximise your borrowed capital by making sure you get the
lowest interest rates and best terms. Shop around!

It then follows that you should not over-borrow. Real
estate markets are continually cycling up and down. Learn
the lessons of the recent debacle, and don’t over-leverage
yourself to the point you can’t survive a down period in
the cycle. If you’re smart about it, you won’t get rich quick,
but you will get rich right!

Over the years, I’ve seen second home and vacant prop-
erty prices double, even triple, in value, especially in Abaco,
Harbour Island and Exuma. Some investors have made a
mint. Others over extended themselves and were sorry they
rushed into the investment without thinking it through.

Questions or comments? Email me at ask@Coldwell-
BankerBahamas.com.

Hapes Mother's Da Y

.. MAKE THEM
UNFORGETTABLE

Tip of the Week: If you are investing, pick a home or
vacant property in a good location, either on or near the
beach, or elevated with sea views. It should be close to
amenities with wide appeal. See if there is a rental history if
you are interested in a home. Do not assume that the rental
income will pay your mortgage! Factor in insurance costs,
maintenance, etc.







i

PANDORA"

UNFORGETTABLE MOMENTS

Sandel, Emerald Bay Resort

Invites application for the position of:

Cooks
Food Server
Bartender
Bar Backs
Steward
Washmen
Pool/Beach Attendant
Room Attendant
Houseman
Guest Service Agent
Airport Greeter
Social Host (Entertainment Coordinator)
Spa Therapist
Photographer
Videographer

284 Bay Street (242) 302-2800

Harbour Bay ® Marina Village, Paradise Island
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Fax or email resume with proof of qualifications
and experience to:

U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,507 * © » All rights reserved * PANDORA-JEWELRY.COM

Email: sebhr@grp.sandals.com
Fax: 1-242-336-6980



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Bishop Simeon Hall tells Christian
community: stop demonising gays

FROM page one

grace freely and uncondi-
tionally extended.”

He continued: "The sex-
ual preference which a per-
son might engage in does
not negate their common
humanity nor their innate
capacity to see the light of
God's love which can lead
to redemptive healing and
wholeness.

"The Christian Church is
the last bastion of hope,
healing and restoration and
we ought to extend these to
all persons who hurt — even
those outside the (pre-

scribed) scope of normalcy."

"The intensity to which
we condemn all sins must
not be greater than the affir-
mation we maintain of the
human person. I believe we
can protect the sanctity of
the traditional Christian
family values without
demonising those whose
lifestyle differs from ours,"
said Mr Hall, who did not
specify what provoked his
statement.

In the past, religious lead-
ers have publicly spoken out
about their fight against "the
gay agenda" arguing that
such a fight is geared

towards "saving the family"
and upholding traditional
views of marriage.

This fight reached a boil-
ing point in the summer of
2004 when gay and lesbian
cruise ship passengers com-
ing ashore from their family
themed cruise were met
with chants of "gay ways are
not God's ways!"

According to the Canadi-
an Press, a pastor named
William Hanchell took to a
makeshift stage during the
protest, telling onlookers,
"We will never accept your
lifestyle."

"We don't care how much

BEST PRICES in Treasure Cove!

SHE

ae ULE TOT

I a Homes Won't Last Long!

WRIA GRIT | ake ewe

Cle

Craig Pinder

UT Me eT Cre eee ma

ho

TS DPLy

AE

REMIX

PARADISE REALTY

DATH © HOME
ither's Day aalg



money they bring. The
Bahamas is off-limits,"
added another pastor
Vaughan Miller, the Cana-
dian Press said.

Recently, Grace Commu-
nity Church leader Pastor
Lyall Bethel gave his opin-
ion on the issue arguing that
Bahamians "are not fooled
by suggestions that homo-
sexuality is normal and will
fight vigorously to defend
this country from further
infiltration."

He also said that gays
have "intentionally tried to
provoke island nations
throughout the Bahamas
and the Caribbean by
announcing these gay cruis-
es to their islands, and then

yelling ‘homophobe’, ‘hate-
filled’ and ‘intolerant’ when
those said nations object."

Pastor Bethel —- whose
comments came in response
to an Insight article explor-
ing the roots of homopho-
bia in Bahamian society —
added that as a religious
leader it was his calling to
help "the homosexual and
all other sinners find a right
relationship with God."

In early March, the
Bahamas Coalition of Evan-
gelical Pastors expressed
concern that a reported vis-
it of a gay cruise ship to the
Bahamas could potentially
threaten the "morality and
decency" of the country's
"Judeo-Christian" heritage.

In Loving Memory of



Kristoff Kenny Cooper

January 8,

198? |

Mea v 3, 2009

Kris, it broke our hearts to lose you, but

you did not go a

olone, fora part ¢

Of us

went with you, the day God called
you home.

Continue to rest in peace from your
parents, Phil & Agnes Cooper, your
sisters Phillipa,Cindy Tonya, &

Sharanda,

your brothers Antione,

Craig,é Caleb, niece,& nephews a
host of other relatives and friends.

We would always miss, cherish and
lOve YOU.



BISHOP SIMEON HALL



MP criticises govt
over Sir Stafford
Sands on $10 note

FROM page one

However, Mr Mitchell said
that it was irresponsible of the
government to continue with
this plan as it would be one
that would be reversed at the
quickest opportunity by any
future PLP government.

“T think it’s an inappropri-
ate tempting of fate in the
face of the earlier dispute, and
my position is the same; he
should not be on the $10 bill,
and that it should be removed
if there is an opportunity for
the PLP to do so at some
future point,” Mr Mitchell
said.

Having been the cause of
some public outcry in the
past, Mr Mitchell said that he
does not believe that this rein-
statement of Sir Stafford’s
image would become a “cen-
tral issue” of debate, as the
current government has many
other more pressing problems
on its hands.

“My view is that the cen-
tral issue is the inability of the
present government to run
the affairs of this country
properly. The economy is in
the tank. There is unemploy-
ment. There are tremendous
social problems. They have
inadequate healthcare. Edu-
cation is in trouble. Those are
much more serious issues than

Â¥
that,” he said.

Catch football’s best plays with ‘taal
4. olan hele].

al Pass;
Geer A

7\G BIE

EyeoLom 1h eco ob PIU o 1M oC-o yo S.-o RS ee)

Aen

SALE STARTS
MONDAY MAY 3* . SATURDAY MAY st

Style Master Full, Queen, King Bedspreads - set
Victora Classic 15PC Bath In A Bag Sets ~hb.9 |
Madison Reflection 2PC Bath Rug Sets ~~ $21.99...
Premium 55PO 5/5 Blemder (W Glass Jar - $59.99 4
Toastmaster 2-Slice Toaster #TMTTW - 376. ee r
Premium Steam/Dry Iron #7147-$15.99
Wamsutta 450 Full Sheet Sets - $23.99
Madison Bath Sheet Towels - $11.99
Black & Decker Iron #4405 - $23.99
Luxury Queen Sheet Sets - $39.99
Vases 20% Off

Wall Pictures 20% off

12 x 46 Door Mirrors - $9.99

Madison Bath Towels - $9.99

Kitchen Curtain Sets - $15.99

Color Tones Bed Skirts $10.99

Lynns 20PC Dinnerware Sets - $59.99
Zodlac 3PC 5/5 Cookware Sets - $59.99
Black & Decker Food Processors $89.99
AMirro Get A Grip PC Cookware Set - 58
Libbey Iced Tea & Lemonade 7PC Glass

CNC LSM HO) g ime) |
UCR OC COR TU es He

Offer good while supplies last.

WIN ONE OF 5 FLAT SCREEN TV’s

with the purchase of any 2 (3pk) boxes of Act II Popcorn.

OC ea OC Cam OR UCTS OC CTacl (am T Lt
during promotion to Asa H Pritchard Ltd on Robinson Road, and fill out an entry form.

Judges’ decision is final. Prizes not redeemable for cash. Prizes must be collected within 30 days of promotion’s end.
Staff of Asa H Pritchard Ltd and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

7

Libbey Heart & Hearth 18PC Glassware Set - $36
Gibson Basic Living N11 16PC Dinnerware Set- 521.990

Located: Harbour Bay Tent ete
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Promotion runs Friday April 9 through Thursday June 3, 2010.
Entry deadline Wednesday June 2, 2010.

Winners will be contacted by telephone.

Winners must agree to have their photo taken for a winners’ ad.







THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 15

LOCAL NEWS





Write On - a joint feature between the Ministry of
Education and The Tribune - this week features the
work of Luke Carey, Sofia Ocon and Lauren Knowles

If I were a teacher for a day

By LUKE CAREY
Year 4P



IF I were a teacher for a day, I
would try to be a good teacher. A
good teacher should make sure that
everyone respects each other. It is
also very important to make learn-
ing as fun as possible. I would make
sure everyone understands me when
Texplain things.

As a teacher, I would make sure
students care about the building and

As a refugee

By LAUREN KNOWLES
St Andrews
Grade 5 C

not draw on it. I would tell the chil-
dren to take pride in their uniforms.
I would also encourage my students
to take pride in their work. I would
read a story about adventures,
because reading helps you learn
new things.

IT would also have arts and crafts
with my students. I would show
them how to make a diorama of
plans with the theme, “Going green
in the Bahamas”. It would be great
to be a teacher for a day!

How I would heal the World

By SOFIA OCON
Year 4P



I would heal the world by buying things that I can
recycle and buying things that are not harmful to the
planet. I would heal the world by picking up garbage
that Isee on the ground. I would heal the world by
helping the environment and cleaning beaches and
places that are dirty. I would make a garden to
make more oxygen and encourage more life. That’s
how I would heal the world.









have to work for all my needs no matter the
cuts or gashes that may bleed a simple story,
Tran away from the world that rejected me back in the day.



All alone with no one there...
A tefugee’s life I have come to fear

but now that a refugee is a part of me.

Shameful to my family tree,

Where to go?
Who will accept me?
A poor girl with nothing left,

A refugee, a refugee lonely with nothing.

Yes, that’s me...

a)

PB
it



a VITAMALT®

IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

i

ce

rR
A
NY

DEFENCE FORCE
BAND BEAT RETREAT

THE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE BAND staged a Beat
Retreat in Rawson Square yesterday as part of the organisation’s

30th anniversary.








































The



VITAMALT

_ Presents
First Bahamian Ciréus

«ts



APRIL 21, 22, 23, 2010

Wyndham Nassau Resort Crystal Palace
Rain Forest Theatre

SHOWTIMES
11:30 a.m. (Matinee) & 7: 30 p.m (Evening)
Matinee Show includes Transportation & One Vitamalt

BOX OFFICE
Beverage Depot - Mall at Marathon
Burns House - John F. Kennedy Drive
Bahamas Wines & Spirit - Shirley Street





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

Minister
warns over
US oil spill

FROM page one

currents.

"With respect to the
Bahamas, the spill is cur-
rently headed towards the
Gulf (of Mexico) and we are
not at risk right now because
of the direction of the wind
and weather. But if it
spreads into the Gulf Stream
and comes around the Key
West (Florida) area, the
Bahamas and the Great
Bahama Bank - it would
have a calamitous and detri-
mental impact on our
Marine environment," Mr
Deveaux told The Tribune
yesterday.

The Gulf Stream is a
warm-water current that
flows from the Gulf of Mex-
ico to the North Atlantic
Ocean.

The Associated Press
reported that if the oil enters
this stream, it would flow
around the southern tip of
Florida and up the Eastern
Seaboard of the US, possi-
bly putting the western
Bahamas at risk.

“It will be on the East
Coast of Florida in almost
no time,” Hans Graber,
executive director of the
University of Miami’s Cen-
tre for Southeastern Tropi-
cal Advanced Remote Sens-
ing, told The Associated
Press. “I don’t think we can
prevent that. It’s more of a
question of when rather
than if.”

However, Philip Weech,
part of the contingency
team, said current wind pat-
terns were driving the mas-
sive slick towards Louisiana
in the southern United
States - putting the
Bahamas out of harms way
for now.

"The weather conditions
at the moment are spreading
the spill northward towards
the coast of Louisiana," said
Mr Weech, director of envi-
ronmental agency Bahamas
National Trust.

Both he and Mr Deveaux
maintained that there is a
possibility that a change in
wind patterns could move
the spill in the Bahamas'
direction.

"Tf it shifts then we would
have to make an immediate
and coordinated appeal to
international companies to
mobilise all their resources
to minimise the effect of the
flow.

This would really require
the mobilisation of interna-
tional resources because of
the size of the oil spill," said
Mr Deveaux.

The spill — caused by an
exploding BP oil rig in the
Gulf of Mexico on April 22
—is estimated to have spread
to 3,500 square miles, rough-
ly the size of Puerto Rico,
with an estimated tens of
thousands of gallons leak-
ing every day. More than 1.5
million gallons of oil have
leaked since then.

It is expected to hit fragile
wetlands, marshlands,
wildlife and is a threat to
fishing and spawning spots
in the Gulf.

Added to this is the fear
that the slick will lead to oil
covered beaches in coastal
cities stretching from
Louisiana to Florida.

Yesterday US President
Barack Obama flew to
Louisiana to get a first hand
look at the calamity as the
US government banned all
commercial and recreation-
al fishing in parts of the Gulf
of Mexico due to health
risks from the massive crude
oil spill, according to US
media outlets.

American officials have
plans to drill a well to plug
the gushing oil however this
could take up to three
months, The New York
Times reported.

Observers say the disas-
ter is on track to be the
worst spill in US history top-
ping the Exxon Valdez dis-
aster of 1989 when 10.8 mil-
lion gallons of crude oil was
spilled in Alaskan waters
killing hundreds of thou-
sands of seabirds and marine
life.



MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS



OT a GBS

© THE OIL SPILL ESTIMATED 10 BE
3,500 SQUARE MILES, ROUGHLY
THE SIZE OF PUERTO RICO.

© 210,000 GALLONS, OR 5,000
BARRELS ARE ESTIMATED TO BE
LEAKING DAILY INTO THE GULF OF
MEXICO.

© A10-DAY FISHING BAN HAS
BEEN IMPOSED IN AREAS AFFECTED
BY THE SPILL.

© WORST OIL SPILL IN AMERICAN
HISTORY SINCE EXXON VALDEZ DIS-
ASTER OF 1989.

© US OFFICIALS SAY THAT THE
COASTS OF TEXAS, LOUISIANA, MIS-









SISSIPPI, ALABAMA AND FLORIDA MEMBERS OF the U.S. Army National Guard B Company 711 put Hesco containers along
ARE UNDER THREAT. the beaches of Dauphin Island, Ala., Sunday, May 2, 2010. The containers are designed to



changes the sheen to a more solid state which can be recycled. (AP)



RBC Royal Bank
of Canada



Create your future with our experience.



www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean
® Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ™ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

absorb oil through a fibrous material which reacts with a non-harmful material that

ee

Wendell ‘Big 0° Ferguson

FROM page one

after a short battle with sarcoma can-
cer.

Ferguson is survived by his daugh-
ter, Gabrielle; his siblings, Stencil
“Stoney”, Willie, Dario, Levhon and
Brendalee; two aunts, Doreen Camp-
bell and Nora McClain and Henry Fer-
guson and a special friend, Tony
Godet.

In December, 2009, Ferguson was
diagnosed with sarcoma cancer, a dis-
ease in which cancer cells are found in
the soft tissue of parts of the body.

Ferguson, who last worked at Body
Zone Fitness Centre in the Sea Grapes
Shopping Centre, was undergoing
chemotherapy with the view of having
his right leg amputated.

However, his family and friends say
he took a turn for the worse last week
and on Saturday was admitted to the
ICU. He never recovered.

* SEE SPORTS PAGE 16 FOR FULL STORY



sh Transactior=







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 23

LOCAL NEWS








THE HUMANE
SOCIETY’S
annual dog
show held at
the Botanical
Gardens on
Saturday.

EAGLE ELECTRICAL
& LIGHTING

ae. EAGLE
FOR.

Everyday low prices on quality products!

Electri cal
Supplies

Eagle Ductless
Air Conditioners

Bahama Breeze
Ceiling Fans
]

LASKO
Stand Fans

Central Air
Conditioners

Decorative
Lighting

New Stock of Central Air
Conditioning Systems

Eagle Microwaves AIR HANDLERS

(Blk, Wht & Stainless Stoo) 3TON $649.99 —
$62.50" 4TON $829.99 ©
Eagle Ductless 5 TON $849.99 Cool Star

= Air Conditioners
$399.00"

em

* Base price

Get these items Hd
Eagle’s =p)

CONDENSERS
| 3TON $1,139.99

Eagle Generators
(Gas & Diesel)

$284.00

4TON $1,439.99
5 TON $1,499.99

EAGLE We ship to the Family Island!

Tel: (242) 341-4000 + Tonique Williams Daring Highway’ Harold Fd.

Fax: (242) 341-5080 # Website: wwweadebahamnas.com
BEST QUALITY, BEST PRICE, GUARANTEED 1

HUMANE SOCIETY

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major/Tribune staff















Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
and TRUCKS

TRADE-INS ON NEW
CAR SALES ACCEPTED

Check Out These Great Values

06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘01 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
97 VOLKSWAGON BEETLE
98 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘01 MAZDA MPV WAGON
°99 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
03 DAIHATSU TERIOS

03 HYUNDAI H1 VAN

‘00 HYUNDAI ACCENT

auto (SEQ,
(ay QUAI j | Y sales eS)
ee LIMITED ="

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS

a SHIRLEY STREET ° 322- as ei 3079
Visit our showroom ai aru ality Auto "se les (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, a 2916

OPEN: Mon to Fi 8: 0am - 5:30pm e Sat 8:30am - 12:30pm

























Neaside Buffet Mather Day POLO
Menu

Salad Station
Potate, Spicy Crab, Sweet Pickle Beets, Coleslaw,
Pasta w/ smoke Ham
Fresh Fruits, Mixed Green and Caesar Salad Station
Peel and Eat Shrimps

From the Deli
Assorted international cheese, Fresh Grilled Assorted
Garden Vegetable and Deli Meats.

Soup
Grand Ma's Peas soup and dough
Nassau Conch Chowder

Carving Station
Herb Jerk Prime of Beef w/ natural jus

niree
Grilled skirt steaks w/a pineapple balsamic glazed
A Crispy lernon pepper Grouper w/ Creole sauce
Herb Roasted Chicken with Honey Mustard
Broiled Snapper w/ sweet basil roasted tomatoes
Baked Andros stuffed crab
Two cheese baked macaroni
Black eye peas and rice
Sweet fried Plantain
Island boils w/ salt beef
sautéed Garden Vegetable

Dessert
An array of delectable sweet/ include hot pudding
Tarts, cakes and mousses.

Price: $29.00 + 15% gratuities

WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT ~

& (CRYSTAL PALACE CASINGS

Seaside



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 24, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



PTTL Bios

PRXyYe PVC)
ANNUAL FAIR

THE YAMACRAW ASSOCIATION annual fair was held on
Saturday atthe grounds near Super Value in Prince
Charles Drive. People came out to enjoy a variety of
attractions. As these photos show there was plenty to
interest bike enthusiasts.

a

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Thin Ss Tuff. **
ce |
. We Understana!



Clothing
Shoes
Underwear

Prince Charles
o28-bd ts

East South Beach Bahama Avenue
g22-5528 329-4153



/atroducing wines from:
Santa Margherita,
&t. Francis, Marassec,

Washington Aéis and

Music by:
The G-Notes

Jazz Etcetera

Caribah

Featuring art by:
Antonius Roberts
Malcolm Roe

Kevin Cooper

uy,
>

Sg
jazz
May 15, 2010

The Poop Deck Sandyport

3- 7pm
Admission $30

Tamara Russell

Bid in silent auction
fo support your
favorite charity

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



cee

ie

a

















8,000 BTU-Remote
$420.00

#AEQO8
10,000 BTU-Remote
$477.00

#AEQ10
12,000 BTU-Remote
$510.00

#AEQI2A
18,000 BTU-Remote
$765.00

#AKM18D

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
322-2188/9

JONES & CO

You'll wonder how you ever got along without it.

ns.net

©2010 CreativeRelatio:







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 25
LOCAL NEWS

YAMACRAW ASSOCIATION

ANNUAL FAIR
































_ oe : 5 a '

Butler’s Funeral Homes ¢ .
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts. =
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

DEATH NOTICE FOR MAAR BLE & GCRANITE SPECIALISTS












MARTIN [
LUTHER KING,

_* ~*$60-$100/s0,."
Cowles Cat aisad ied at Cpe

the Potter’s Cay Dock on
Friday April 23rd, 2010.

rN ount

Memorial Announcement
or

MARTIN LUTHER
KING, 36 c

will be held on Wednesday, 05th May, 2010 at 11:30
a.m. at Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church, Montrose
Avenue. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Garnet King and
Rev. Raymond Neilly. Cremation will follow.

=. De

left to celebrate his life and cherish his memories are
his adopted mother: Isadora King Bethell; step father:
Franklyn Adderley; three sisters: Scieska Knowles, ke



He is pre-deceased by his mother: Valdeeta Adderley, Q




Shakera Dyer and Winsanette Major; two brothers-in- oS
law: Henry Knowles and Randy Dyer; three nieces:
Azaria Knowles, Codeshia Collie and Talaya Dyer;
two nephews: Zakari Knowles and Omari Dyer;
adopted family: Dion and Christine Bethell, Renee
and Carl Scavella, Rhonda and Marvin Arthur, I

=
ae Cem elery

Monultents

}



Astranique Bethell, Winston and Pat Major, Carland] |
Casey Scavella, Toni, Brandon and Camryn Bethell
and Addison Bethell; seven uncles; two aunts; numerous

F

Travertines Contract a

_Tiles

cousins and other relatives and friends including: Kermit
“Vads” Forbes, DeAnne Moncur, Nora Johnson, Nora
Ethelee, Willamae, Bertha, Pearl, the King, Seymour Marbles Construction

and Strachan families, Lydia Bethell, Hughton Brown,

Alvern King, Cookie Adderley, Vernice Prudent, Percy Glass Cleaning

and Melrose Taylor and family of Deadman’s Cay, Mosaics

Long Island, and the class of 1990 of N.G.M. Major #91 Wulff Road
High School in Deadman’s Cay, Long Island, the entire









community of Knowles Cat Island and the crew of the P.O.Box N-4111
Bimini Mack; and other relatives too numerous to Nassau. Bahamas
mention. oe
[2 [-| OTO S . Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Tel: 242-326-6526
Feliné Maior Homes & Crematorium, Ernest and York Streetson | | Fax: 242-322-5607 eae
Tritune oi — May 04th, 2010 from 11:00 a. m. until 4:00 : Email: info@wecarestonework.com ;
There will be no viewing at the church. 4 website:www.wecarestonework.com
i = a a —_ Sa oa ee fo i Jel



ISVS iy Histatussin DM

COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT

AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING DRUG STORES.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 27

LOCAL NEWS



i





Re ee ee se ee
a eee =
ce eo ee a
ae ce
« Attach receipt to a completed entry form and
ee Ce ee ee
ra Pa 7 LF. 7.
/ od The difilbenas Agency in Palmdale,
ee Coe ae eee
t NA (oh aT)

‘\
7







THE NATIONAL STADIUM is tak- Se ee ee ee



ing shape as construction con-
tinues at at the Queen Elizabeth Pee RS aS xin oT ee Il
Sports Centre. The centre was a Lf ee te ie a Ea es Lf

$30-million gift from the People's
Republic of China.

pay less for insuring your home!



Have you heard the good news?
You CAN save money!

Ask NIBA for a home insurance quote! Home insurance with
NIBA costs less AND you receive cover with a claims service
that lives up to its promise! For added convenience, you
can choose to pay by interest free installments. :

It’s time to pay less for insuring your
home!

Tel. 677-6422 or visit
www.nibaquote.com

HATO BAY SHOPPINGPL cea he Glee ‘CABLE COTTAGE, GABLE BEACH

NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue

P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com









OOM! Nexs

BOLD, NEW

SUVA AE OS CSR es

CHICKEN

on " 7] ‘i T i
Seu
“. ’ JS





PHILLY ITALIAN -_ ITALIAN :
CEE land ao & PEPPERS eed 0 he





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



Benchmark
‘easily expects’
12-15 per

cent property
investment
return

* Carmichael project 60%
leased, and expected to
generate $500,000 per
annum cash flow
when fully leased

* Firm aims to use extra
cash to ‘very aggressively’
seek out private equity
style investment
possibilities

* Ends 2009 fiscal year
with $1.1m balance
sheet net worth

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BENCHMARK (Bahamas)
"easily expects" to generate a
12-15 per cent return per
annum on its $2.5 million
investment in its Carmichael
Road commercial centre over
the next five years, as it plans to
"very aggressively" seek out
private equity-type investment
opportunities among Bahamian
companies.

Julian Brown, the company's
president and chief executive,
told Tribune Business that the
property, which lies at the cor-
ner of Carmichael and Fire
Trail Roads, was set to generate
$500,000 in cash flow for the
BISX-listed company once full
leased, which it expected to
accomplish by end-2010.

"We are well on our way in
terms of the Carmichael Road
property,” he said. "That prop-
erty should be fully completed
by the end of May, and we've
already started to finalise leas-
es. We're getting a lot of
inquiries on Carmichael Road.

"We're very upbeat about
what we're going to recover as
a return on our investment
down there. We expect to make
12-15 per cent, taking that an
investment and averaging it
over the next five years. I think
that's a rate of return we easily
expect to get from that invest-
ment."

Mr Brown added: "It's worth
about $500,000 per year in cash
flow to us, and once we extin-
guish the debt down there, the
returns will look very good. The
loan facility is for 10 years, and
we will look at aggressively pay-
ing that down, once we get it
fully leased and see where the
cash flow drivers are. We're
basically about 60 per cent
leased and the project is not
finished.”

A Bank of the Bahamas
International branch will act as
the anchor tenant for Bench-
mark (Bahamas) at Carmichael
Road, and Mr Brown told Tri-
bune Business: "We have two
other tenants that are there,
and working towards complet-
ing lease agreements. They're
pretty substantial, and well-
known in the community.”

The 15,000 square foot com-
plex, apart from the bank
branch, will feature eight rental
spaces - four on the ground
floor, with a similar number on
top.

SEE page 4B

Oo
in y
> LIC

MONDAY,

SECTION B « business @tribunemedia.net




MAY 3,

2010






ROYAL FIDELITY

Pale
CT a

City Markets $6.6m loss
beats ‘09 in nine months

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ity Markets’ $6.558
million net loss for
the first nine
months of its cur-
rent financial year exceeds what
the company lost for its entire
fiscal 2009, management
accounts have revealed, with
top-line sales off 18.5 per cent
for the year to March 31, 2010.

The accounts for the compa-
ny’s holding entity, publicly
traded Bahamas Supermarkets,
which were released on Friday
as part of its settlement with
the Securities Commission over
charges related to late filing of
its financials, reveal a spectac-
ular destruction of shareholder
value to the tune of $28.805 mil-
lion since 2007.

Since Winn-Dixie sold its
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets to the
BSL Holdings buyout group,
the company has seen retained
earnings worth $12.874 million
as at June 27, 2007, converted
into an $15.931 million accu-
mulated deficit as at March 31,
2010.

That deficit has resulted from
persistent heavy losses in
Bahamas Supermarkets’ 2008,
2009 and current financial year,



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

which collectively total around
$26 million, plus the $2.749 mil-
lion dividend payment that was,
with hindsight, an ill-advised
decision to make.

Neither Derek Winford,
Bahamas Supermarkets’ chief
executive, nor Basil Sands, the
company’s chairman, could be
contacted for comment. How-
ever, the accounts by them-
selves paint a grim picture, and
tell a story in their own right.

For City Markets’ net losses
for the year to March 31, 2010,
have increased by 35.4 per cent
year-over-year to $6.578 mil-
lion, as opposed to a $4.844 mil-
lion net loss for the same period
last year.

That translates into a $1.43

issued when the company was started in
1994, the Cable Bahamas prefs, and every



expire around the same date.

founded in 1994.

preference shares.



CABLE Bahamas plans to 'roll over’
$10 million worth of preference shares
due to mature next month by issuing new
ones to Bahamian investors, while keeping
its options "open" on the $5 million in
Caribbean Crossings securities set to

Barry Williams, the BISX-listed com-
pany's Vice-president of finance, confirmed
Cable Bahamas was set to continue its
tradition of ‘rolling over’ its $10 million
preference share issue every five years,
something it has done ever since being

"T think it's pretty safe for me to say to
you that we intend to reissue them,” Mr
Williams told Tribune Business of Cable's

"You may recall that those shares were

five years we've successfully rolled them."

The Cable Bahamas executive said one
reason why the company was able to per-
form this maneuver every five years was
investor demand, as the 7-8 per cent
coupon rate (rate of return) they could
earn on preference shares in the Bahami-
an market was much greater than that for
bank deposits, government paper and oth-
er relatively 'safe' fixed-income securi-

ties.

"One of the reasons why we've been
successful in doing that is because of the
limited amount of opportunities out there
for really good yields on paper in this mar-
ket," Mr Williams told Tribune Business.

"I think it was really called for, and
demanded of us, that we do it, so it's very



loss per share, compared to a
$1.06 per share loss in fiscal
2009, with the $6.578 million
loss for the first nine months
exceeding Bahamas Supermar-
kets’ $6.069 million loss for the
previous full year.

Much of City Markets’
immediate financial woes are
related to the sharp decline in
its top-line net sales, which fell
by 18.5 per cent in the nine
months to March 31, 2010. The
drop, from $93.059 million a
year ago to $76.022 million this
year, leaves the company strug-
gling to break the $100 million
sales threshold for 2010, and
also indicates that it may still
be losing market share in a food
retailing industry that has

Cable to ‘roll over’ $10m in preference debt

likely that we're going to continue with the

same strategy we've had for previous years

and roll it."

He recalled that demand "from share-
holders that wanted the paper to be main-
tained" had been "quite overwhelming" at
times, adding: "We had a need for the
financing, and we went ahead at rolled it.
It was mostly to the same shareholders
who wanted to keep it.

"The rates are pretty competitive. Inter-
est rates are still quite low on the banking
side of things, so as a result deposit rates
are quite low. So the opportunities to earn
a good return on your money are in the
preference market.

"You're not going to get 7-8 per cent on
a bank deposit, and on Government Reg-
istered Stock you get Prime plus a small
percentage; you will not get 7-8 per cent.
It's a good place for investors to place
money in this environment."

SEE page 7B

* Grocery chain struggling to generate $100m in
top line for 2010, with sales off 18.5% to March
* More than $28m reversal in shareholder value to
$15.931m accumulated deficit at nine-month end
* Cash flow bering eaten up to keep firm operating
* Net losses up 35% for first three quarters

become increasingly competi-
tive via new entrants such as
Robin Hood and Phil’s Food
Services.

The only crumbs of comfort
for City Markets were that the
sales decline seems to have
slowed. For the quarter to
March 31, they were only down
15.4 per cent at $22.627 million,
as opposed to $26.756 million in
the year before period.

This was an improvement
upon the 2010 first half, when
sales were off 19.5 per cent —
standing at $53.395 million
compared to $66.303 million
the year before. While some of
the sales decline is doubtless
due to the recession, the fig-
ures also indicate that City
Markets is struggling to win
back customers who may have
deserted it during its 2008-2009
travails.

The only other piece of good





‘Definitive’ BTC
position ‘soon enough’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government will
"make a definitive statement
soon enough" on the status of
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company's (BTC) pri-
vatisation, a minister denying
Standard & Poor's (S&P) claim
that the process had been
"postponed yet again".

Unaware of how S&P was
able to make such a comment,
given that it did not come from
the Government, Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, told Tribune Business:
"The BTC process continues,
and when we're able to do so,
we will make a definitive state-
ment on the matter, which I
expect to be soon enough.



"T he
process 1s
ongoing.
Work con-
tinues with
respect to
evaluating
potential
buyers. It
has been
happening
all along."

Sources
with knowledge of the BTC pri-
vatisation process told Tribune
Business that they understood
that the Government and its
privatisation committee were
gearing up to receive some
"kind of final offer" from the
preferred bidder within the

SEE page 3B

LAING

Credit bureau is ‘key
area’ for regulator

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Central Bank of the Bahamas governor has confirmed
the regulator is targeting 2010 for major “progress” on imple-
menting a Bahamian credit bureau, arguing that this will reduce
borrowing costs and enhance access to credit for businesses/con-

sumers with good track records.

Wendy Craigg, writing in the Central Bank’s 2009 annual report,
said: “Key areas for 2010 will include progress towards the even-
tual implementation of a credit bureau for the Bahamas.

“The recent global financial crisis underscores the need for
financial institutions to properly manage their credit risk, and to
have the means to assess the creditworthiness of their customers.
It is anticipated that the introduction of a privately-owned credit
bureau in the Bahamas should benefit the local economy through
reduced borrowing costs and increased access to loans by individ-
uals and businesses that have good credit scores.”

Tribune Business previously revealed that the Central Bank
was seeking to implement a credit bureau for the Bahamas, with
assistance from the World Bank and Caribbean Regional Training

Centre (CARTAC). Its develop-
ment has long been viewed as a

SEE page 3B

$400k acquisition gives near 2,000 customer base for Bahamas Waste

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Waste has
increased its commercial
garbage collection client base
to "close to 2,000 customers",
and strengthened its grip on
that market through the
$400,000 acquisition of a com-
petitor's division in that field.

Francisco de Cardenas, the
BISX-listed garbage/waste ser-
vices provider's managing
director, told Tribune Business
that the acquisition of
Wastenot's rear load commer-
cial trash collection business
would generate "almost 300
customers" and "about a dozen
new routes through the week".

* Purchase of Wastenot division strengthens BISX-listed firm's market position
* Firm matching 2009 performance for year-to-date
* Hopeful on opportunities from residential garbage privatisation

"It was just a natural thing
to happen. I believe we've
always had the bulk of that
[commercial garbage collection]
business, and obviously it
strengthens our position," Mr
de Cardenas told this newspa-
per. "We're going to study this
very carefully. We believe we
can incorporate it into our exist-
ing routes. We made a com-
mitment to Wastenot customers
to keep the rates she [principal
Ginny McKinney], and take a
look at it after a year or so."

When asked how the rates
compared to those charged by
Bahamas Waste, Mr de Carde-
nas said: "Some are lower. It
varies. She had some different
business philosophies concern-
ing deposits and billings, and
we're going to keep those in
line with what she's imple-
mented.

"We're going to try and
make it as smooth a transition
as possible. It's our aim to keep
every single one of them
[Wastenot customers], keep

them happy and provide unbe-
lievable service so that they will
stick with us."

The $400,000 all-cash deal,
which took effect on Saturday,
May 1, with all payments com-
pleted by August 31, 2010, will
see Bahamas Waste take over
two vehicles from Wastenot -
further boosting its 50-strong
vehicle fleet.

No employees will switch as
a result of the commercial
garbage market consolidation,
although the BISX-listed com-

pany takes over some bins,

rums and other equipment
associated with rear load pack-
er collections.

Bahamas Waste's main
remaining competitors are the
likes of Impac and United San-
itation, the deal allowing Ms
McKinny and Wastenot to con-
tinue operating under their
existing name and concentrate
on other business areas. These
include renewable energy and
recycling initiatives, such as
‘Cans for Kids’.

Bahamas Waste and
Wastenot also remain joint ven-
ture partners in Green Systems,
the western New Providence-

SEE page 4B

news for the 11-store chain and
its shareholders was that the
company continues to find cost-
cutting scope, as operating and
administrative expenses for the
first nine months in 2010
dropped by 11.1 per cent, from
$25.25 million the year before
to $22.44 million this time
around.

However, companies can
only cut so much, whatever
field of business they are in,
and it seems doubtful whether
City Markets has scope for
much more. Unless the compa-
ny is able to regain market
share and increase sales quick-
ly, doubts over its future via-
bility — and the prospect of job
losses and store closures — will
continue to grow.

Bahamian wholesale indus-
try sources have confirmed to

SEE page 4B

Fiscal deficit
to hit 5.2% of
GDP this year

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s fiscal
deficit for its 2009-2010 finan-
cial year is likely to hit 5.2 per
cent of gross domestic product
(GDP), a Wall Street credit rat-
ing agency has warned, with the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
forecasting that the national
debt — already more than $3.9
billion or 53.6 per cent of GDP
— will breach the $4 billion
mark this year.

Both Standard & Poor’s
(S&P) and the Central Bank
continue to send warning sig-
nals about the immediate need
to set the Bahamian public
finances back on a sustainable
path, the former projecting in
its Bahamas country report that
the 2009-2010 fiscal deficit was
set to come in 1.3 percentage
points higher than the original
3.9 per cent forecast “given con-
tinued pressures on revenue”.

“We project a slow decline
in the deficit to about 3 per cent
of GDP by 2012 as economic
conditions strengthen,” S&P
said, indicating that the Gov-
ernment will be unable to
reverse the recent rapid
increase in the national debt in
the short-term at least.

The Wall Street credit rating
agency paints a less than rosy
picture for the Government’s
finances, forecasting that the
2010-2011 fiscal year will pro-
duce a 4.9 per cent fiscal deficit,
followed by deficits of 3.4 per
cent and 3 per cent in 2011-2012
and 2012-2013.

The persistent deficits and

SEE page 7B









The information cot ‘is from a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held
| responsible for errors and/or omission |

fromthe dailyreport, ‘











- .



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



@ ROVAL FIDELITY MARKET WRA

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT WAS a fair week of trad-
ing in the Bahamian stock mar-
ket. Investors traded in three
out of the 24 listed securities
with one decliner, one advancer
and the other security remain-
ing unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 123,093 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 74,131 shares com-
pared to the previous week's
trading volume of 197,224
shares.

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) was the volume leader
for a third consecutive week,



trading 99,800 shares to see its
share price close the week
down by $0.06 at $5.84.

¢ AML Foods (AML) was
the only advancer for the week,
trading 23,221 shares to see its
stock end the week up $0.03 at
$1.05.

BOND MARKET

There was no activity last
week in the Bahamian bond
market.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:
¢ Focol!l Holdings (FCL)

released unaudited results for
the six months ended January
31, 2010, reporting net income

available to common share-
holders of $7.5million, an
increase of $1.5 million or 25
per cent over the same period
in the prior year.

While both sales revenue and
cost of sales were down in the
period, FCL reported higher
income from operations of
$23.4 million, which increased
by $1.3 million or 6 per cent.

Sales and revenues of $121
million declined by $37 million
or 23 per cent during the peri-
od, while cost of sales saw a
higher decline of $38.3 million
or 28 per cent to total $97.8 mil-
lion.

Management cited invest-
ment in marine fuel trans-
portation and improvements to









The Bahamian Stock Market
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.05 $0.03 23,221 -10.26%
its retail network as key factors | BBL $0.44 $- 0 -30.16%
for long-term success, and indi- | BOB $5.24 $- 0 -11.19%
cated that investments in new | BPF $10.63 ce 0 -1.02%
technology resulted in improve- | BSL $9.42 $- 0 -6.36%
ments in operational efficien- | BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
cy during the past year. CAB $12.07 $- 0 20.94%
FCL’s total operating costs | CBL $5.84 -$0.06 99,800 -16.57%
of $14.5 million declined by | CHL $2.84 $- 72 4.41%
$300,000 or 2 per cent from | CIB $10.60 $- 0 6.11%
$14.8 million reported in the | CWCB $2.83 -$0.17 0 -0.70%
previous period. DHS $2.54 $- 0 -0.39%
FCL’s earnings per share of | FAM $6.07 $- 0 -6.47%
$0.22 increased by $0.05 from | FBB $2.17 $- 0 -8.44%
the $0.17 reported in the prior | FCC $0.27 ce 0 0.00%
period. Total assets and liabili- | FCL $5.08 $- 0 6.50%
ties of the company at January | FCLB $1.00 oe 0 0.00%
31, 2010, stood at $127 million | FIN $9.08 $- 0 -2.16%
and $28 million respectively, | ICD $5.59 $- 0 0.00%
compared to $120 million and | JsJ $9.95 $- 0 0.00%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

SEE page 6B

Business Insurance

“Ask for business Insurance trom a
company that measures up to the job"

Security & General is a local company with international credentials - offering the benefits of business experience at home

and overseas, as a member of Colonial Group International. Group companies have helped customers with over $300 million

of hurricane-related claims since 2000. Group savings and administrative efficiencies benefit customers too - with the best

products at the best possible price, from a company where people come first.

CALL 326-7100 for an agent
or visit www.cgigroup.bm

SECURITY
& GENERAL

SECURITY & GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.

Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box N-3540 Nassau Tel. 326-7100

www.cgigroup.bm >

Security & General Insurance is

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life rated A (Excellent) by AM Best

Being on time has Its benerits.

It's easy... receive a 15% discount just by
showing this coupon at the FedEx locations
listed below. Same service, better prices.

Visit us at:

EE Mackey Plaza
Thompson Blvd.

Nassau
Tel: (242) 322-5656/57

seventeen Shopping Center
Phase 2

Woodstock and Bank Lane
Freeport

Ic] VULVA teas LOYAL LOK
Norfolk House

Aste (stg Hees vinstsil

Nassau

Tel: (242) 322-5656/57

cusy@neil

ae oe

Express

ee

ly

Applies to cash sales only. Shipments must be
dropped off at this World Service Center location
FedEx standard terms and conditions apply. This
FedEx discount offer cannot be combined with
any other FedEx discounts available.

im LOM UNE RPAUL

(ides sae)
FedEx Tracking No.

®
(els)





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 3B



=
Expo presence aims to boost China investment

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



THE GOVERNMENT is hoping
to leverage the World Expo in Shang-
hai, China, to increase invesment inter-
est in the Bahamas by adding a stand-
alone, investment centred area to the
Bahamas’ booth that will be manned
by members of the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB), it was
revealed.

The Bahamas Booth, designed to

showcase the Islands of the Bahamas
along with their heritage and culture, is
also showcasing to the world - through
some 70 million people expected to
visit - investment opportunities for this
country.

Liaison for the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, Eugene Newry, said during a
press conference organised by the Min-
istry of Tourism that investment
opportunities will be highlighted by
the BFSB during the six-month run of
the World Expo.

The Expo, which carries the theme

‘Better City, Better life', includes a
Caribbean Pavilion, of which the
Bahamas is a part and is expected to
receive 15 per cent of expected visitors
or 10 million people. Or “at a more
modest rate", 3.5 million visitors or
19,000 visitors per day.

The Ministry of Tourism, as is the
region, is hoping to capture the atten-
tion the more than 100 million out-
bound travelers coming from China
by 2020.

The Caribbean’s Pavilion and the
Bahamas’ elaborate booth were sub-

sidized by a $600,000 grant by the Chi-
nese government. The Bahamas gov-
ernment contributed $100,000 to the
construction of this country’s booth.

The Bahamas Booth is in the shape
of a sailing sloop and is repelete with
Bahamian-made handicraft, Junkanoo
sculptures and specially designed
kiosks highlighting Atlantis and Baha
Mar. Those resorts each contributed
$25,000 to the development of the
country’s booth.

“The exhibit in the open gallery at
the back of the booth interprets the

Expo theme of ‘Better City, Better
Life’ with a depiction of the ambitious,
futuristic project of the revitalization of
the City of Nassau,” a MInistry of For-
eign Affairs and Tourism release said.
“Video Presentations on continu-
ous rotation will showcase the newly
dredged harbour, which accomodates
Genesis class cruise ships and the new
Oasis of the Seas; the remodelling of
Bay Street, including the new Straw
Market; and the relocated container
port (demonstating the Bahamas’
ever-growing trade capacity).”



BTC, from 1B

next two weeks, following
which further due diligence
would take place. The offer's
terms were likely to be accept-
able to the Government, one
source said.

Mr Laing, though, declined
to comment when questioned
on this by Tribune Business.
He had previously told this
newspaper that while three
months behind, the Govern-
ment would have a good sense
of where the process was going
by end-June, indicating that

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham may have something to say
on the matter in his Budget
statement, given that the BTC
sale proceeds have been ear-
marked for paying down
debt/closing the fiscal deficit.
S&P's analysis on the
Bahamas' sovereign credit rat-
ing, released last week, said:
"The Government hoped to
receive $200-$300 million in
proceeds from the sale of a 51
per cent stake in BTC in the
first half of 2010 to alleviate
financing needs. "However, the
Government has once again
postponed the privatisation fol-

lowing seeming disappointment
with the bids and prices offered
at the end of 2009. Plans have
existed to sell BTC since the
first Ingraham government, and
when it took office again in
2007, it cancelled the sale of
BTC to Bluewater Communi-
cations, which the previous
administration had arranged."

The "postponed" statement
is at odds with the Govern-
ment-appointed privatisation
committee's recent assertion
that 'due diligence’ on the
prospective bidders was con-
tinuing.

Those invited through to the

due diligence round included J.
P. Morgan/Vodafone; Atlantic
Tele-Network/CFAL; Trilogy
International Partners; and Dig-
icel. Tribune Business last week
heard whispers that both Digi-
cel and J. P. Morgan/Vodafone
were no longer interested,
which would be a surprise in
the latter's case, given that it
was a frontrunner and others
have said it is still at the table.

Speculation of a $130 million
purchase price for 51 per cent
of BTC has not been con-
firmed, nor has a valuation of
$250-$260 million for the whole

company.

ae
ae
N

D

Nassau Airport

Development Company

UINTT |

NAD Concierge

The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking



CREDIT, from 1B

logical extension to the Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH),
which was implemented by the
Bahamian commercial banks
earlier this year.

There can be little doubting
the Central Bank’s concerns
with regard to insulating the
Bahamian commercial banking
industry from the effects of the
credit crunch/global recession.

“To ensure that banks main-
tained sufficient levels of capital
to act as a buffer against the
systemic risk associated with
the significant credit concen-
tration in the Bahamas, the
[Central] Bank, in November
2009, set higher minimum risk-
weighted target and trigger
ratios, of 17 per cent and 14 per
cent respectively, for all com-
mercial banks,” the Central
Bank’s annual report said.

“With average risk weighted
capital adequacy ratios across
the domestic banking sector of
approximately 24 per cent at
end-2009,k and well above the
minimum capital standards of 8
per cent, the revision did not

CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch
Private Banking

present an immediate challenge
for the major banks.”

The Bahamas Interbank Set-
tlement System (BISS), the
complement to the ACH,
which makes real time pay-
ments of high value, critical
transactions between Bahamian
clearing banks, saw a 17.1 per
cent increase in volume to
53,277 such dealings during
2009. There was also a 6.8 per
cent gain in the value of these
transactions to $10.8 billion.

“Partly reflecting the
increased usage of ATM and
debit card facilities, the volume
of retail cheques cleared among
banks fell by 6.3 per cent to 3.5
million, with the value lower
by 15.5 per cent at $7.3 billion,”
the Central Bank’s annual
report said.

It also found that the amount
of currency liabilities it held, as
wells as the quantity of curren-
cy in circulation, both contract-
ed by 1.2 per cent to $319.8 mil-
lion and $319.2 million respec-
tively during 2009.

“On average, currency in cir-
culation fell, month-on-month,
by 3.3 per cent to $279.4 mil-
lion — equivalent to an estimat-

ed 3.7 per cent of GDP, up
from 2.8 per cent in 2008,” the
Central Bank said.

Meanwhile, its key perfor-
mance indicator for the
Bahamas’ critical foreign
exchange reserves, the ratio of
external reserves to base mon-
ey, “remained within and even
exceeded the [Central] Bank’s
established band of 90-100 per
cent between March and
December 2009.” They were
aided in this goal by the Gov-
ernment’s domestic foreign cur-
rency borrowings, coupled with
its $300 million bond issue and
$178.8 million in International
Monetary Fund (IMF) special
drawing rights.

The Government’s stock of
outstanding bonds rose by 9.6
per cent in 2009 to $2.269 bil-
lion, the Central Bank added,
as two new issues worth a col-
lective $257.2 million were
launched, while one $60 mil-
lion issue was redeemed. As for
Treasury Bills, these increased
by $13.8 million to $244.3 mil-
lion outstanding in 2009.

When it came to dormant
Bahamas-based bank accounts,
upon which no customer activ-

is presently considering applications for
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER — CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICAN DESK

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business
Development Officer covering Central and South American Markets:

Requirements:

Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in

Banking & Finance)

At least seven (7) years banking experience including relationship
management, trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities

markets

Marketing experience throughout Central and South America
Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$150 Mio and a well developed network within

the market regions

Strong communication skills in Spanish/English is a requirement to facilitate
marketing and relationship management with clients and prospects and a
third language would be beneficial
Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout Central and South America and utilize
a network of existing contacts and associates
Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Duties will include:

* Acquisition and development of new offshore Central and South American

based clients

- Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the
set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures

- Advising clients on products, services and investment opportunities

« Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from Central

and South America

Personal Qualities:

* Acommitment to service excellence
* Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
* Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills
+ Ability to work independently

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the
minimum requirements need not apply.

Telephone calls will not be accepted.
Applications should be submitted to:

Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: MAY 10, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



ity has taken place for seven
years, the Central Bank said 48
institutions reported accounts
worth a collective $5.1 million

to it in this regard.

“The bank processed approx-
imately $1.2 million in claims,
compared to $0.3 million in
2008,” the Central Bank’s
annual report said. “As at end-
2009, the outstanding stock of
dormant account balances
administered by the [Central]
Bank totalled the equivalent of
$41.4 million, net of claims set-
tled since 1989, when the first
transfers were received.”

PN Cosetteaar- rete!
vailable

EBRD. Asin

Positions

Fax: 322-2243

Tiel
henfield@lincolnbethel.com



candidates for the position of Concierge. The ideal individual must
be able to provide superior customer service to passengers at LPIA.

REPORTS TO - Manager, Customer Experience

Key responsibilities include but are not limited to: Daily facility

required

inspections, responding to customer service and tenant calls,
facilitating solutions to complaints and situations as they arise,
supervising the Arawak Lounge, responding to the needs and
requests of tenants and business partners and monitoring the
performance of airport contractors i.e. janitorial. Shift work will be

QUALIFICATIONS

* Associate degree in a related field required

+ 3-5 years experience in a customer service role required
* Effective communicator and problem solver

+ Ability to multi-task, prioritize and make sound on-the-spot

decisions

* Team Player

For more details, please visit the PEOPLE section of
our website at www.nas.bs

Ifyou are qualified and interested, please submit your
resume by May 14, 2010 to:

Manager, People

Nassau Airport Development Company
P.O. Box AP 59229

Nassau, Bahamas

or e-mail people@nas.bs







OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com



eA ee

Grand Bahama Power Company has a position available for a Financial
Controller, This is a management position that reports to the Vice President of
Finance with the following responsibilities.

Responsibilities:

* Planning, directing and coordinating all accounting functions.

* Managing the accumulation of all financial data necessary for the
production of monthly financial statements and other financial reports.

* Coordinating activities of external auditors.

* Providing upper management with information vital to the decision-
making process,

+ Assessing current accounting operations, offering recommendations for
improvement and implementing new processes.

* [Fivaluation of the effectiveness of accounting software and supporting
database, as needed.

* Developing and monitoring business performance metrics.

* Oversight and training of accounting staff.

Requirements:

* Must be a Certified Public Accountant (CPA, CA, ACCA).

«At least seven years of relevant experience and a Bachelor's Degree in
Accounting or Finance.

* Must possess good communication, technology, analytical and
management skills,

* Knowledge of all aspects of international accounting standards.

Applications with supporting documents including a clean Police Certificate and
proof of Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:

ETTORE SO eT EWE ote On
OIA RW EURO Pe AOU eben OILED OD

P.O, BOX F-40888
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS

May 10,2010

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Kaping Grand Bahana Fate Bright











PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
INSIGHT

Ob to d :

ama to do

‘everything
possible’
on oil spill

VENICE, La.



FACED with an environmental
catastrophe, President Barack
Obama rushed to the Gulf Coast
on Sunday to inspect forces
arrayed against a spreading oil
gusher threatening fragile coastal
wetlands. Cabinet members said
the situation was grave, but insist-
ed the administration was doing
everything it could, according to
Associated Press.

Under threat of tornadoes, the
president shunned helicopter trav-
el and drove from New Orleans
to tour a close-to-the-water staging
area where the government and
well-owner BP are trying to keep
the 30-mile long oil slick from
causing even more damage. As of
now, it appeared little could be
done in the short term to stem the
oil flow.,

Impact

At his first stop, Obama ques-
tioned Adm. Thad Allen, the
Coast Guard commandant, about
the potential impact on shipping
lanes in the Gulf.

The leaking oil well is not only
an ecological disaster but a poten-
tial political hazard, as well,
depending on how the public
judges the Obama administration's
response. Then-President George
W. Bush stumbled in dealing with
Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf in
2005, leaving the impression of a

president distant from the
immense suffering. His presidency
never recovered.

Homeland Security Secretary
Janet Napolitano said any com-
parison between the ruptured BP
oil well and Katrina was "a total
mischaracterization" and that the
government has taken an "all
hands on deck" approach.

Administration officials have
been at pains to explain that Oba-
ma's late March decision to
expand offshore oil exploration
could be altered as a result of the
spill and that stricter safety rules
would doubtless be written into
leases.

In reality, oil companies and the
government lack the technology
to prevent the damage from a well
gushing masses of oil, killing
wildlife and tainting a delicate
ecosystem. The oil washing ashore
could ruin the coastal fishing
industry.

While the government has
mobilized masses of equipment to
scoop up, burn and block the oil
from moving ashore, the tools to
contain the ecological and eco-
nomic damage washing devastat-
ingly toward the coast were akin
to big game hunting with a pellet
gun.

Allen said the volume crude oil
spewing from the damaged well-
head a mile deep in the Gulf of
Mexico could climb to 100,000
barrels a day, with 60 days to 90
days needed for BP to drill relief
wells to stem the flow. He spoke



—————







OUT OF WORK fishermen hired by BP PLC and crew boat workers lay oil booms in preparation for the looming oil spill from
the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig at Elephant Pass, ina tributary of the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana

on Sunday.

to the obvious urgency of stop-
ping the flow of crude.

"The difference between 1,000
and 5,000 barrels a day (original
estimates), when you look at the
potential discharge of 100,000,
leads me to believe that there are
a lot of inaccuracies associated
with trying to estimate flow froma
broken pipe at 5,000 feet," Allen
said. "That's the reason it's so
very, very important we focus on
stopping this leak right away."

If BP's unmanned submarines
are unable to activate a failed
shut-off valve on the sea floor —
attempts have been futile for days
now — it could take 6 days to 8
days for the oil company to try to
smother the spewing wellhead
with a 74-ton metal and concrete
box.

That was the estimate Sunday
from Lamar McKay, chairman and



eampound, Shirley Street.

og

fay seal

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
MATERIALS MANAGEMENT DIRECTORATE

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
MEDICAL & SURGICAL AND RELATED ITEMS FOR THE NATIONAL
INSURANCE BOARD- NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG PLAN (NPDP)

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Medical and Surgical
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and
The Ministry of Health, The Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

The Tender CD, which includes Instruction to the Tenderers along with other
Relevant information, can be collected 9:00 a.m. — 3:00 pam., Monday through
Friday at the Materials Management Directorate, Princess Margaret Hospital’s

president of BP America, who
appeared on ABC's "This Week."
The oil slick now threatens not
only the Louisiana coast but also
the beaches of neighboring Mis-
sissippi and further east along the
Florida Panhandle.

Briefed

White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs told reporters with
the president that Obama was
briefed on the spill for 50 minutes
during the flight from Washing-
ton by homeland security and
counterterrorism adviser John
Brennan and energy adviser Car-
ol Browner. Chief of staff Rahm
Emanuel rounded out the presi-
dential party.

Gibbs said Brennan and Brown-
er went "through a series of sce-

narios," while Obama wanted to
know "what was the latest on our
first, our biggest priority, which is
capping the well."

Like Napolitano, Gibbs said the
president was visiting "to make
sure that we are continuing to do
all that is humanly possible."

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar
tried to assure Americans that BP,
rather than taxpayers, would pay
for what will likely become the
nation's worst oil disaster.

"We will not spare any effort
on the part of the United States of
America to make sure that all of
their resources are brought effec-
tively to address the problem."

The bill's going to be an extra-
ordinary hit on BP's bottom line.
The sea shore and the animals and
fishermen who depend on them
will pay, perhaps, an even heavier
cost.



an

NEW YORK CITY Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, at podium, accompanied by Mayor Michael
Bloomberg, right, Speaker Christine Quinn, 2nd right, and Governor David Paterson, left, hold a news
conference Sunday morning, May 2, 2010 in Times Square near where a car carrying three propane
tanks, fireworks and two filled 5-gallon gasoline containers was found Saturday night. Heavily armed
police and emergency vehicles shut down the city's busiest streets, teeming with taxis and theatergo-
ers on one of the first summer-like days of the year. (AP)

NYPD: No evidence of a
Taliban link to SUV bomb

Atender CD must be submitted along with printed copies (duplicated) ina sealed
envelope or package identified as

“TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
MEDICAL & SURGICAL AND RELATED ITEMS FOR
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD- NATIONAL
PRESCRIPTION DRUG PLAN (NPDP)~
and addressed to:

NEW YORK

THERE was no evidence of a
Taliban link to a failed bomb
found in a smoking SUV parked
in Times Square, and police
were on their way to Pennsyl-
vania to talk to a man who said
he may have recorded a bomb-
ing suspect in a nearby alley, the
police commissioner said Sun-
day, according to Associated
Press.

The video apparently shows a
white man in his 40s taking off
his shirt in the alley and putting
it in a bag, Commissioner Ray
Kelly said.

Police found the SUV parked
on one of the prime blocks for
Broadway shows such as "The
Lion King" after being alerted
by two street vendors on Satur-
day night. Thousands of tourists
were cleared from the streets
for 10 hours, and the bomb was
dismantled. No one was injured.

The SUV contained three
propane tanks, fireworks, two
filled 5-gallon gasoline contain-
ers and two clocks with batter-
ies, electrical wire and other
components, police said. Timers
were connected to a 16-ounce

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Fifth Terrace Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau Bahamas,

All tenders must be received at the above address on or
hefore Spm May 21°" 2010.
A copy of a valid business license and National Insurance
Certificate must accompany all proposals.





The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).





can filled with fireworks that
were apparently intended to set
the gas cans afire, then ignite
the three barbecue-grill-sized
propane tanks.

Kelly said it was "the intent of
whoever did this to cause may-
hem, create casualties."

Mayor Michael Bloomberg
called the explosive device
"amateurish" but potentially
deadly, noting: "We are very
lucky.”

"We avoided what could have
been a very deadly event,"
Bloomberg said. "It certainly
could have exploded and had a
pretty big fire and a decent
amount of explosive impact."

Police also found eight bags of
an unknown substance in a gun
locker that was in the smoking
SUV, Kelly said. The substance
"looks and feels" like fertilizer,
he said, but tests were pending.

A group that monitors mili-
tant websites had said the Pak-
istani Taliban claimed respon-
sibility.

A T-shirt vendor and a hand-
bag vendor alerted police at
about 6:30 p.m. Saturday, the
height of dinner hour before
theatergoers head to Saturday

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

night shows.

Duane Jackson, a 58-year-old
handbag vendor from
Buchanan, N.Y., said he noticed
the car and wondered who had
left it there.

"That was my first thought:
Who sat this car here?" Jack-
son said Sunday.

Jackson said he looked in the
car and saw keys in the ignition
with 19 or 20 keys on a ring. He
said he alerted a passing mount-
ed police officer.

They were looking in the car
"when the smoke started com-
ing out and then we heard the
little pop pop pop like fire-
crackers going out and that's
when everybody scattered and
ran back," he said.

"Now that I saw the propane
tanks and the gasoline, what if
that would have ignited?" Jack-
son said. "I'm less than 8 feet
away from the car. We dodged a
bullet here."

Connecticut license plates on
the vehicle did not match up,
and police had interviewed the
Connecticut car owner, who told
them he had sent the plates to a
nearby junkyard, Bloomberg
said.



MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010





INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Access all areas?





LEGALISED GAMBLING AND ENTRY TO LOCAL CASINOS

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

SEGREGATION is a
provocative word and should
not be used lightly, especial-
ly in societies where institu-
tionalised discrimination was
a feature of recent history.

The concept is most often
associated with oppression,
cruelty and racial prejudice,
but is by no means confined
to these characteristics; seg-
regation can take place with-
out malicious intent and is
not always implemented
according to race.

That a well intentioned
double standard is no less
harmful to the human spirit
than a malicious one — thanks
to its fundamental unfairness
—is a proposition all Bahami-
ans should keep in mind
when contemplating the fact
that their country’s laws pro-
hibit citizens from gambling
but protect the right of for-
eigners to wager their earn-
ings.

As activist Lincoln Bain
said last week:

“There should not be a law
that allows some people to
gamble, but not all. There
would not be a law to allow
tourists to smoke marijuana
and prohibit Bahamians, or
for tourists to run the red
lights and not Bahamians.
The whole law is ludicrous
and reminiscent of the 1950s
and 1960s segregation era.”

What then, are we to
make of the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s recommenda-
tion that if the government
is going to legalise some
forms of gambling for locals,
casinos should be exempt
from this plan?

It is not, as some have sug-
gested, a sinister plot hatched
by foreign hotel bosses to dis-
criminate against Bahamians;
both Sarkis Izmirlian of Baha
Mar and George Markanto-
nis, CEO of Atlantis, have
said they are open to
Bahamian casino clientele.

A distinction must also be
made between the BHA’s
position and the hypocritical
posture of some religious
leaders, who oppose any
change in the law in an effort
to maintain the prominent
position of “morality” in
national affairs and thereby
preserve their own signifi-
cance.

BHA members say that,
like the politicians who have
propped up the blanket gam-
bling ban over the years,
their intention is to protect
Bahamians from themselves.
Calling for careful consider-
ation before any change to
the law is made, former
Prime Minister Perry Christie
explained that “all govern-
ments up to now have sort of
elected to avoid the calami-
tous social consequences and
people who talk about having
freedom, they say ‘Well









you're interfering with our
freedom’. But governments
knew from the experience of
some other countries that it
has a dire impact upon pop-
ulations and people who are
tempted to go for the big
prize and spending even their
children's lunch money."

According to former
finance minister James
Smith, keeping locals out of
casinos is a smart move for
other reasons as well.

Casino taxes have long
been a reliable source of for-
eign currency, and Mr Smith
is worried that locals gam-
bling will have the double
effect of allowing the casinos
to pay the government at
least partially in local cur-
rency, while at the same time
draining our foreign reserves
as hotel owners convert
Bahamian dollars before
sending their earnings out of
the country.

As Mr Christie suggested,
the gambling question is
essentially a philosophical
one: whether our personal
freedoms are worth preserv-
ing even if their expression
could lead to disastrous con-
sequences; whether the gov-
ernment has the right to pro-
tect you from yourself.

But regardless of the
answer, there is a subtle but
enormously important dis-
tinction between the blanket
ban and the prospect of
Bahamians being allowed to
gamble everywhere but in
foreign-owned casinos.

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Until now, the ban has
been construed as a moral
imperative which, whether
misguided or not, is intended
to protect Bahamians from
the supposedly corrosive
effects of gambling on the
conscience, character and
wallet.

If the ban is lifted but casi-
nos remain off limits, the new
message will not be moral
but social — with a new dan-
ger and a new victim. Sud-
denly, it will not be Bahami-
ans who must be protected
from themselves, but foreign
tourists who must be pro-
tected from “the natives.”

In this sense, what the
BHA suggests would indeed
be a return to a policy remi-
niscent of the 1950s, when all
but the “right” locals were
banned from casinos for
exactly this reason.

That the BHA does not
intend it to be so is not the
point; it will be characterised
in this way by many Bahami-
ans to whom equality
remains a sensitive issue, and
the fact that it would be our
own government and not for-
eign hotel owners enforcing
this state of
affairs
will

likely make matters worse.

Anyone who fails to
recognise the potential for
such a law to spark vocal,
energetic and public opposi-
tion is not sufficiently
acquainted with our procliv-
ity for protest and righteous
indignation.

And the protesters would
at the very least have on their
side that such a law is a clear
violation of the constitution,
which strictly prohibits dis-
crimination, defining it as any
situation in which one group
is “accorded privileges or
advantages which are not
accorded to persons of anoth-
er such description.”

In this, our founding doc-
ument reflects those of many
other countries, which might
explain why if a casino ban
were to take effect,

t h oe














Bahamas would become only
the third country in the
world, after Vietnam and
South Korea, where gam-
bling is legal but locals are
kept out of establishments
reserved for tourists.

Samoa and Guyana, which
have fledgling casino indus-
tries, are wrestling with the
same issues and many peo-
ple in both countries have
responded with outrage to
suggestions of foreigner-only
casinos, which many see as a
question of race as well as
nationality. One commenta-
tor said the Samoa govern-
ment “had better go over
their notes again before there
is a major problem.”

Our politicians would do
well to consider themselves
the intended target of this
warning, particularly as casi-
nos here are already fre-
quented by Bahamians
adept at imitating the
accent and mannerisms
of Americans. And while
they are by no means all
white, the vast majority are.
It is likely this practice will

become

even more common, as the
legalisation of other forms of
gambling will strengthen the
already widespread feeling
that playing a few hands is
not a “real” breach of the
law.

The net effect in the minds
of most Bahamians will be
that a situation has arisen in
which their own government
enforces the right of foreign-
ers and local elites to indulge
in a privilege that the average
Bahamian cannot — segrega-
tion based on race, and class.

At the same time, there is
no question that the conse-
quences of granting Bahami-
ans full access to casinos after
so many years are unpre-
dictable. And while the idea
that lifting the ban will lead
to the black-jack tables being
overwhelmed by hordes of
undesirables is little more
than bigotry and paranoia, it
is fair to point out that the
number of disagreeable inci-
dents that place on casino
floors is likely to increase.

But this does not have to
be a question for the govern-
ment. Following the incident
at Atlantis’ Marina Village
in which two security guards
were shot, the resort demon-
strated it is more than capa-
ble of regulating what hap-
pens on its own private prop-
erty.

Many hotels already
restrict the use of facilities
and amenities to hotel guests
or those who take part in
organised visits, and there is
no reason why this could or
should not be extended to
cover the casinos. This would
mean Bahamians who stay in
a hotel would be allowed to
gamble in its casino just like
any other guest.

Hoteliers might not con-
sider this an ideal solution,
as it places the responsibility
for enforcement — and a cer-
tain level of resentment and
hostility that will inevitably
come with it — squarely on
their shoulders. Still, they
would do well to remember
that their own prosperity
depends largely on the social
climate in which they operate
and that supporting a law
which reinforces such inflam-
matory distinctions as “rich
and poor”, “black and white”
or “local and foreigner” will
not benefit them in the long
run.

What do you think?
pnunez@tribunemedia.net





Features include:

Air conditioning

14-09 1.8-litre 4-cylinder angine
Automatic transmission

Power windows, locks and mirrors

EXECUTIVE | c=:
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Auto Mall, Shirley Street qopp. St Matthew's (church)
Mon to Fin Sam. - 5:30pm
Sat Bam - |2noom

tel: 397-1700

E-mail: exscmatoniaibatelmet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed

GP) TOYOTA moving forward

Driver front airbag & front passenger airbag
4-wheel antilock brake sytem [ABS)
Remote keyless entry

Anti-theft system with engine immabililzer
AM/FM CD MP3 ployer

Backed by o 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty.



Avadlabla in Grand Gaharea al Geelty Asie Bales Feeepart) = Queens Hig S629 022 © Abaes Motor Mall, Dee Maetary Bie, 267-290







Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 106 No.134

Pim blowin’ it

87F
75F

ge BREEZY WITH
SUNSHINE



The ty



ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1







VA ts eee

US

Minister warns
over US oil spill

ARE i.

SEE INSIGHT SECTION

Se

i
5

a



Gulf of Mexico drama
monitored in event of
‘worst case scenario’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ENVIRONMENT Minis-
ter Earl Deveaux warned
yesterday that if the massive
oil spill spreading through-
out the US Gulf Coast
reached Bahamian waters it
could have a “calamitous

the Bahamas is remote —
due to current weather con-
ditions — they are monitor-
ing the oil spill's develop-
ments in the event of a
"worst case scenario."

As a result, the National
Oil Spill Contingency Team
will immediately convene a
task force of relevant stake-
holders to devise a strategy —

=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

Write on:

SUC CT CMTE 4
in the spotlight ’

Fs
be

SEE PAGE FIFTEEN K



Police officer is
held in connection
with latest murder



A POLICE officer is in custody today in connection
with the country’s latest murder.

According to police press officer Chrislyn Skip-
pings, 21-year-old George Carey was the victim of a
stabbing incident on Saturday, April 24, in the Wulff
Road area near Lockharts Bar. Carey died from his
wounds last week Tuesday.

Since that time, police have been seeking a 29-year-
old resident of Fire Trail Road.

However, the police have not revealed the identity
of the officer they currently have in custody for ques-
tioning. This officer is expected to be taken to court
sometime early this week.

Mae OU Ga Leet La)
J ~







affect" on our marine
resources.

While local environment
officials say that the possi-
bility of the slick reaching

Wendell ‘Big O’ Ferguson
dies at the age of 54

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

should the growing oil spill
be pushed towards the
Bahamas by wind and ocean

SEE page 19



WENDELL Ferguson, better known as
“Big O” for his tremendous ability to moti-
vate and encourage people to live a healthy
lifestyle, has died.

The 54-year-old former coach and per-
sonal trainer died on Sunday around 5 am

SEE page 19

Mother's Da

Sale?

S ewels Boxes
* Handbags
® Picture Frames
* Artificial Flawers
* Gift Baskets

from Max's

tomo Fi ten ie
with a ma palzeeoe it io

G tht A Lae
Card

WENDELL
FERGUSON

* Gibson Dinnerware

* Studio Silversmiths
Giftwore

* Arc Glass & Crystal

* Bodash Crystal

* Circle Glassware

* Godinger Silver

ay el a







THE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE BAND took to Rawson Square yesterday for a Beat Retreat under the theme ‘A Higher

Call to Service’.

Bishop Simeon Hall tells Christian Me CLES eS S









community: stop demonising gays

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BISHOP Simeon Hall
yesterday called on the
Christian community to
abstain from "demonising"
gays and to instead focus on
extending kindness to those
whose "lifestyles differ from
ours."

The message of Christian-
ity should not be one of
exclusion, but rather spread-
ing God's love, said the
senior pastor of New
Covenant Baptist Church in

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean
â„¢ Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada.

a Statement released yester-
day.

"The Christian message,
as I understand it, does not
allow for the demonising of
any human being. I believe
that all human beings bear
on the deepest level the
image of God and if we
search far and deep enough,
we will find it.

"Those of us practising a
Christian life must come to
see that we did not qualify
for God's love, it is a gift.
Grace freely given must be

SEE page 14

e SEE PAGE 15



PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
criticised the government for its deci-
sion to reinstate the image of Sir
Stafford Sands on the Bahamian $10
note after it had been removed in 2005
by the PLP during its term in office.

Long hailed as the “principal archi- [=
tect” of the modern Bahamian econo-
my, Sir Stafford’s image was first placed
on the $10 banknote on March 7, 2000,
replacing the image of Her Majesty
Queen Elizabeth IL r fi

In a brief statement issued to the FRIED [ol Ohl SLE
press on Friday, the government said that while the previous
PLP government decided to reverse this decision in 2005,
they have now sought to return Sir Stafford to the ban-
knote once again.

SEE page 14











Royal Premier” loans give you MORE.

You can afford the things in life that are important to you with a Royal Premier Loan. Whether it's
PICU M Ce SiN ANA LCM Ca ULM aM me LOM eh EMCO mae (Oe Codel Cele

CTL MLM CMe SSM OTC Zee Me TC eee UMUC MeN Ceol Ze)

MUMMIES Im eMac ey LMSC Lee) Mec CM ULSI A-TILO Re
Del Uecl)Cee eh eM COLUM see MTT Co Oa (eee 1

® The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.







NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



























PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Man dies in traffic accident

By DENISE MAYCOCK he lost control of the vehicle and crashed
Tribune Freeport Reporter into a tree at the Sunshine Apartments.
I dmaycock@tribunemedia.net The young man was taken by ambulance



to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where he
was pronounced dead at lam by the doc-

FREEPORT - A 33-year-old man was jae

fatally injured in a traffic accident early Sat- Police Wavenot reload we wien iden:

urday morning, police reported. _ _ tity. His death is classified as the fourth traf-

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said the acci- fic fatality for the year on Grand Bahama.
dent occurred shortly after midnight at ASP Mackey said investigations are con-
Sergeant Major Road and Fiddler’s Green. — tinuing into the accident.

According to police reports, the driver of In the meantime, motorists are being
a silver-coloured Honda Accord was travel- advised to drive with extreme caution and to
ling south on Sergeant Major Road when obey the speed limit and traffic laws.

Appetizer Station Two men Seriously hurt

* Assorted Breads & Sweet Rolls * Antipasti Platter ms : is
¢ Tomato & Heart of Palm Salad ¢ Pasta Salad TA STY FF R E S$ ee In separate incidents
Tuscan Chicken Salad * Caesar Salad ® @ hiiaten ceeaieaae
Smoked Salmon Eggs Benedict ; TRY OU R DE L| SAN DWICH ES ous condition due to injuries

Miniature Conch Cakes w/ Rosa Aioli each sustained from separate
Crab & Corn Fritters w/ Pomodoro Sauce incidents that occurred early
yesterday morning.

At around 3 am, a 24-year-
old man was stabbed in the
upper right side of his chest
after getting into an argument
with another man on Moss
Lane, off Bay Street.

An hour later and further
south, police responded to a
shooting at Carmichael Road
and Faith Avenue, which
resulted in a man being taken
to hospital by ambulance. It
was reported that as he got into
his car, the man _ was
approached by two men — one
of whom was armed with a
handgun. The armed man fired
several shots in the direction of
the victim injuring him in his
back and face. Both men are
listed in serious, but stable con-
dition. Police are investigating
both matters.

OF CHICAGO
Mothers Day Brunch

Sunday, May9th 2010
11:30am - 3:30pm





A la Carte Entrée Choices
From $30
Price includes Appetizer Buffet, Dessert Buffets & One (1) Mimosa
Entrée prices plus 15% gratuity
Fruitti di Mare
Roast Loin of Pork wi sautéed Apples & Oranges
Chicken Parmigiana wl Penne Pomodoro
Filet Mignon wl a Chianti reduction
Boneless stuffed Leg of Lamb wi Pine Nuts, Sun-dried Tomatos
& Herbed Breadcrumbs
Oven Roasted Nassau Grouper
Minced Lobster Arrabiatta
























Dessert Buffet ri F
Assorted Fruit Pastries ¢ Apple Strudel ee EL
Bahamian Guava Duff w/ a Rum Sauce ¢ Chocolate Cannoli’s mi si : : Z

DDDEL! DUNKIN' | snp pate deme
fd h of Ider|
SADUNMIM, | cone rons

Bahama on Friday.

The 71-year-old woman was
taken to Rand Memorial Hos-
pital around noon by ambu-
lance after she began experi-
encing difficulty while snorkel-
ing near Deadman’s Reef with
her husband. She was pro-
nounced dead by the attending
doctor at 2pm. The couple,
from Baltimore, Maryland,
were passengers onboard the
Carnival Pride cruise liner.





All Moms Are Special & Deserves The Bat. *

Treat Her To An Extra-ordinary Day,

Ba ‘ha Fare

Nassau’s Leading Trendsetting Spa
SF ATE —————

Hair Services for Men and Women, Massages, Facials, Rin POSUERE ele ram .
Waxing, Eyebrow Threading, Body Sugaring Hair Removal, Manicures, ‘4 EaeeReeeyan Spa,Packare > /
Pedicures, Solar Nails (Safer Alternative to Acrylic), during the month of May to be eligible.
Spa Parties and Much More. ees

SPA PACKAGES Rejuvenate 3hrs op AGES

Experience your well deserved rejuvenation with Baha-Retreat
PADS .onnersrnnvorsscsee 6.5hrs Signature Massage or Facial. Then enjoy a spa pedicure.

¢ Aromatherapy Body Polish Conclude with Shampoo and Style. =
* Nourishing Body Wrap Aromatherapy massage and vitamin c

* 90 minutes signature massage Refresh facial, a spa pedicure and classic manicure.

(includes aromatherapy and hot stone) Deep Cleansing Facial or Swedish Massage, Classic Manicure

¢ Chocolate Extravagance Antioxidant Facial .
¢ Signature Manicure and Pedicure ee aiaco, Treatment and Style. De-Stress $155.......2hrs, 15min.

pigeludes ean he meer) ‘ Getaway Express massage, facial, manicure and
(fro aaa oe ns) a Begin with a luxurious European Cleansing Facial Treatment, pedicure, just what you need to get you on
de-stress with a 50 minute Swedish Massage, and enjoy delectable your toes.

Baha-Retreat Year Package Spa Cuisine. Then indulge in our Spa Pedicure and Manicure,
Special price......$810 and leave us looking your best with Shampoo and Style.

be only package that keeps “giving” throughout the year. Once a month you can come in with your : i
‘ choice of 50 min. Swedish Massage, or Basic European Facial, or a Pedicure and Manicure. Body polish, Swedish massage, and a

classic facial or basic anti-aging facial.
( Takes you off into another world, includes
SERVIGE the body polish, hot stone massage, an anti-
o —_ aging facial, signature pedicure, signature

.
no oe paneqrecee® oe

| & AV oe edad ite Mot manicure and lunch included.
ju Seam G ! pit Cards Accepted Onlin.
Tedit & Debt Gi E

East Bay Street, Just East of Luciano’s « Telephone: (242) 323-6711 - 323-6715
Email Appointments/Inquiries to: info@baharetreat.com _Phailable
Visit our website at: www.baharetreat.com Credit & Debit Cards

. OPEN: Monday 10am - 4pm ¢ Tuesday - Saturday 9am - 6pm Accepted Online
MOTHER'S DAY - May 9th, 9am - 3pm

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Ml UNION OF TERTIARY EDUCATORS OF THE BAHAMAS AND THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

College dispute: Talks have *
stalled again, says union

THE WAR of words
between the Union of Tertiary
Educators of the Bahamas and
the College of the Bahamas
continued yesterday with the
union alleging that negotiations
have stalled once again despite
the May 14 deadline.

In a statement issued to the
media yesterday, the union’s
president Jennifer Isaacs-Dot-
son said that after a week of
negotiations UTEB and COB
have agreed and signed off on
just two sub-clauses, with near-
ly 50 clauses and other items
remaining to be signed.

“During this lockdown,
UTEB sees the College’s latest
stalling actions as part and par-
cel of a series of bad faith
efforts initiated by the College
last week aimed at intimidat-
ing faculty, staff, and students,
while at the same time trying
to frustrate and derail the nego-
tiation process. Despite the
deleterious impact that the Col-
lege’s latest acts may be hav-
ing on the institution’s public
image, the union is not sur-
prised at the College’s actions
and its continued lack of effort
in working towards the signing
of a new industrial agreement
for the faculty. It sees the acts
as a series of last ditch, ‘union
busting’ efforts against a union
that will continue to fight for
its members and to advance the
College community,” she said.

Unsure of the college’s moti-
vation, or “lack thereof”, Ms
Isaacs-Dotson said that the
union is of the opinion that the
college has no intention of and
never has had any intention of
signing a new agreement.

“The union feels that the
Department of Labour must be
under the same impression, as
its conciliator has recommend-
ed to both sides bringing in a
third party mediator to inter-
vene in this stalemate so that
the signing off on the agree-
ment can take place by the pre-
scribed deadline.

“Despite endeavouring to do
its best to work through the
agreement with the College’s
negotiating team, the union
wholeheartedly agrees with the
Department of Labour on its
assessment and sees immediate
mediation as the most proba-
ble solution to a process that
the College shows no interest in
concluding.

“As far as the union is con-
cerned, the first week of nego-
tiations with the College turned
out to be a complete waste of
time and effort, with the Col-
lege presenting the union with a
new, 191-page draft of a pro-
posed agreement, with
renamed clauses, for UTEB to
consider. This presumptuous
act on the part of the College
could have only been a foolish
move to once again slow down
an already delayed process. The
College could have better pre-
pared itself to move forward in
negotiations with the union by
reviewing and preparing to dis-
cuss the proposals that were
already on the table for discus-
sion since February 2009,” she
said. Additionally in this first
week, the union said that COB
sought to intimidate a member
of staff and students of Ms
Isaacs-Dotson. This staff mem-
ber was allegedly called into a
meeting with the Vice-presi-
dent of Academic Affairs and
two College Deans and inter-
rogated as to the specifics sur-
rounding Ms Isaacs-Dotson’s
exams, which were scheduled
to take place during the peri-
od of industrial action.

“At the same time, the
administrators began harassing

uh
RS

Ute
Ha ear by |



Ms Isaacs-Dotson’s students at
home, seeking to interrogate
them about the exam particu-
lars and their attendance in
class. These acts of intimida-
tion and harassment were fol-
lowed by the College’s illegal
pay cuts of faculty members
who were on strike and others
who were assumed to be on
strike.

Distressed

“On Wednesday of last
week, several faculty contact-
ed the union distressed over
disparities in figures that
appeared on their monthly
salary slips and in their bank
accounts — disparities that
showed drastic cuts ranging
from $400 to $700. As a result,
many faculty are seeking legal
counsel and are considering
proceedings against the College
for the illegal manoeuvres that
contravene the Industrial Rela-
tions and Employment Acts.

“Additionally, the union is
prepared to make available to

Financing Available Through
Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood

= 20% OFF White:

Crepe Backed Satin, Lamour

Heavily Embroidered Eyelet, Lace,
Romie Linen, Poplin, Brocade & Silk

* Red and White Cormations for Corsages _.
* White Gloves starting at - -
« New Peorl Neckloce Sets. 222 5. $70
* Giant Mother's Day Cords from
* Potted Orchids ond Roses, ee

* New Candle sets, Mugs, Mother's Day bears

the media, if necessary, docu-
mentation which calls into
question the integrity and truth-
fulness of information released
by the College into the public
domain before and after the
union’s industrial action with
the institution.

“And despite the College’s
recent misleading letter writing
campaign to the faculty body
and the general public aimed
at maligning the union, its lead-
ership, and their efforts to get a
signed industrial agreement in

place by May 14, 2010, the
union is overwhelmed by the
support of faculty members
who are now mobilized and ral-
lying around the union presi-
dent and the negotiating team.
The faculty actions recently
show that they continue to have
full confidence in the union
president’s leadership, and they
have demonstrated this by re-
electing Ms Isaacs-Dotson,
unopposed, to a third term in
office,” the statement read.

COMPUTER STUDIES

CERTIFICATE COURSES
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS

WordProcessing (MS Word)
CLASS BEGINS WEDNESDAY 5th MAY
Credit Cards Accepted

INSTITUTE OF BUSINESS AND COMMERCE - 324-4625



1-pc 5 Drawer Chest



Queen 8 Pc’Set....
King 8 Pc Set .



% OFF ENTIRE

STOCK OF WHITE FABRIC









per aa ir pe Bt

2/$] HATS FROM $3¢

— $10”



Home Ves









/) DeskJet OfficeJet | LaserJet

PRINTERS

ui AUTHORISED DEALER

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE = 242.329.3049 «



Where it’s at!

AY MIC RCONE TB





UNION president Jennie ae feisem

GIFT SHOP

Celebrate Mother's Day with New Arrivals
@ Fab Finds Gift Shop!

Two convenient locations to serve you:
Lyford Cay Shopping Centre
(242) 362 6123

Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
(242) 394 4284

fabfinds@coralwave.com

Look for us on Facebook!



as THIS ——
i phe SAD PANS hs “y

Pe a

% ao

| i Pc Tha

Piet nn
a Cl

Ui a

Galleria re

Vike i lall-at- lara ie
POX OFFICE PENS AT ee AM DAILY

Seater eye TT
[wostwane cwemsmmecr —wew!| 1-18 [x30 | wa | aos | a5 | sas |

sere a Fv | [|
PTHEBADEUFRLAM TT | 100 | 05 | ok | 00 | 20 | a |

rwewsers ete faa | ma | cs [ass ||
‘oomeararoean + _[va0 ys Twa Tom Lan Do
fucks | to aan | ma | mn [oan |v |
fomewom (soar ma | cn [ass | ss |
war oo oerwamnToo 1 | 120} sas [eas | am [02s | sew |
feusnormenonsao + [105 ]3o1| ma | os [a0 ||
[ow ro ream oun Racor [140 a [ wa | aa [an | sas
fowmorAWNPrND a | 120] 34s | aa | ain | a | so |

er ee

LISE TOWRA E-GERO TO RESERVE TICKETS Al 230-8 OF AW Gal L BAM CIMER AS CON
fmcnrwnconnsroeet_wew] 1:16 [310 [wa [6s [40 | ans]
femccurran vfs [aan [wa [60s [e20 | ro]
feetonens [va [as [Wa [oan [28 | ros]
emmarrecrncin ——¥ [11s [a0 [WA [ons [0 | voxs
fwursoracrwweneor vr [v1 [aan [wa [coo [4 | ro]

eenorreermaeao [ts [328 (WA [ins [#20 | vos
ee es ee

UUme your e-card to reamearos biokets af 280-3849 or viel us at
wew.bohamaslooaloom



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914













































































SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M.,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Sir Stafford returned to the $10 note

WE CONGRATULATE the Ingraham
government — unlike the mean-spirited PLP
— for giving credit where credit is due and
returning the image of Sir Stafford Sands
to its rightful place on the $10 Bahamian
bill.

In making the announcement the FNM
acknowledged Sir Stafford, a former finance
minister, as “‘a principal architect of the mod-
ern Bahamian economy.” It was this sin-
gular achievement — from which this country
is still reaping benefits today — that earned
Sir Stafford his rightful place on the Bahami-
an currency on March 7, 2000.

In 1992, after 25 years of PLP rule under
the late Sir Lynden Pindling, the FNM par-
ty, under Hubert Ingraham, came to power.

The following year the Ingraham gov-
ernment decided to honour Bahamians who
had made significant contributions to the
nation by removing the non-controversial
image of the Queen from our currency and
replacing it with those of “deserving Bahami-
ans.”

The late Sir Milo Butler, the first Bahami-
an governor-general was the first to be hon-
oured. In 1993 his image was put on the $20
bill. No one objected.

The late Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield, one
of the founders of the FNM, followed in
1995 on the $5 bill. Still no objection. Sir
Roland Symonette, first Bahamian Premier
of the Bahamas, went on the $50 bill in 2000,
followed by Sir Lynden, the Bahamas’ first
prime minister, on the $1 bill in 2001. None
of these men was perfect. They all had their
warts, but it was only Sir Stafford who made
headlines when the PLP labelled him a hat-
ed racist, whose image should not be on the
currency.

And so, in 2005 when the PLP, under Per-
ry Christie, was back in government Sir
Stafford was removed and the Queen
returned to the $10 bill. On Friday, the FNM
announced that now that the 2005 $10 series
of bank notes had expired, Sir Stafford
would be returned to the place that he had
earned.

It was Sir Lynden who had said on the
floor of the House that no one could deny
that it was Sir Stafford’s “great foresight,
great energy and indomitable spirit that had
laid the foundation for a prosperous tourist
industry and an economic empire.”

And yet today, there are those among
Sir Lynden’s own party who would deny Sir
Stafford that place. In The Tribune today,
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell warns that should
the PLP again win the government, Sir
Stafford would be denied that place. The
PLP would again remove his image from
the currency.

“There may be members in this House,

MULTI-DISCOUNT
BRIDAL CENTER
15% Off Storewide \_

/ $ale Starts
This Monday May 3rd - Saturday May 8th

who might not agree with what Sir Stafford
did or why he did it,” said Sir Lynden in
1972 on the death of Sir Stafford at the age
of 58, “but one can still say that for many
years a great Bahamian stood in this cham-
ber and gave service to his country in the
manner he thought best. His name is one
that all of us will remember and one that
will long ring in this country.”

Oh, no, not if some of today’s PLP can
help it.

They say he was a racist, a rabid racist at
that. No matter which side you come down
on there is always a caveat with Sir Stafford,
ayes, but...

It depends upon who you talk with and
whether that person knew Sir Stafford in
his private life, or only his public life. The
person who knew both sides of the man
would deny that he was racist, or had any
prejudices. However, speak with someone
who knew him only in his public life, and the
answer would be that he was a born racist.

Now let’s take the case of Sir Milo Butler.
He made no bones about being a racist. We
can personally attest to that when as a young
reporter we sat long hours in the House of
Assembly listening to him bellowing at the
top of his powerful voice, fist stabbing the
air, about how the blood of the much hated
white Englishman would soon flow down
Bay Street. If Sir Stafford were a racist, he
never proclaimed it. Sir Milo, on the other
hand, never missed an opportunity.

The PLP seem to think that racists come
in one colour. Sir Stafford, a white man, was
the colour of the racist. Sir Milo, a black
man, apparently didn’t qualify. No one
objects to Sir Milo being on the currency,
because it is acknowledged that he too made
his mark on the history of the Bahamas.

And then there was Sir Lynden. True he
brought us majority rule, but somewhere in
his long history he lost his way and the drug
trafficking during his administration
destroyed this country’s good name and
wrecked its value system. “It was a legacy of
destruction,” commented a black Bahamian,
“from which we shall suffer for generations
to come.”

According to Sir Lynden, Sir Stafford
had “laid the foundation for a prosperous
tourist industry and an economic empire.”
But Sir Lynden, who brought majority rule,
left this country with a tarnished image.

Yet Sir Stafford, according to a PLP MP,
will be removed from the currency should
the PLP be returned to power. Nothing has
been mentioned about Sir Milo, or Sir Lyn-
den.

Does any of this make any sense?

We are certainly living in times that try
men’s souls.

Check Out Our Bridal Gift Registry With Great
Gift Items Like Pots, Crystal, China, Pyrex,
Corningware, Gibson, Cuisinart, Hamilton

Beach & So Much More .

Montrose Avenue opposite
Multi Discount Furniture

Larry Smith
can’t have it
both ways

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you to Mr. Larry
Smith for his review of my
recent presentation for The
Nassau Institute, at The
Bahamas National Trust,
Retreat. He provides an
opportunity for me to share
a bit more information with
the Bahamian environmental
audience.

At first Mr Smith fully
understands how market sys-
tems work to avoid “tragedy
of the commons” scenarios
(collapse of the sponge fishery
in The Bahamas) and to
improve environmental qual-
ity. As Mr Smith explains in
his excellent description of
rights-based management sys-
tems, allocating exclusive
“catch shares” to fishers to be
bought and sold works well
for fishers and fish popula-
tions. To elaborate, in the five
years after catch share imple-
mentation in the US, per boat
revenues increased an aver-
age of 80 per cent. Today,
catch shares have been imple-
mented in more than 300 fish-
eries around the world from
New Zealand to Namibia, in
fisheries large and small. I
have even heard that Cuba is
exploring the option of catch
share systems.

So why does Mr Smith then
do an about-face and seem to
argue that this type of system
would not be feasible in the
Bahamas? Is your govern-
ment so big that you can’t see
beyond an old school regula-
tory approach? It is time to
move fisheries management
(and energy, forestry, waste,

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



etc) in the Bahamas into the
21st century.

There is a market for green
products with environmental
entrepreneurs ready to invest
in them. But with government
trying to clumsily perform
these tasks at the taxpayers
expense “enviropreneurs” get
crowded out.

Elinor Ostrom won the
2009 Nobel Prize in econom-
ics for her work recognising
the role that local entrepre-
neurs play in eliminating the
tragedy of the commons.
Whether it is fisheries, forests,
oil fields, or irrigation systems
she provides plenty of exam-
ples.

Mr Smith argues that
“externalities” are a justifica-
tion for government. To
entrepreneurs there are not
environmental problems
caused by externalities, but
environmental opportunities
enhanced by strong property
rights and markets. Indeed,
entrepreneurs thrive in the
space where there are impacts
not accounted for in market
transactions. The more they
can replace externalities with
entrepreneurship, the more
we will see conflict replaced
with cooperation and envi-
ronmental rhetoric (yes that
includes “claims about over-
population threatening
humanity) replaced with real
environmental improvement.

Speaking of ideology, the
first Earth Day (22 April
1970) was organised by
Democrat congressman Gay-
lord Nelson. It was set upon
the 100th birthday of
Vladimir Lenin, who led the
Communist Revolution in
1917. I bring this up as it
serves as a yearly reminder
that the world’s biggest envi-
ronmental catastrophes took
place in the USSR and many
environmental problems can
be seen in North Korea today.

I too want workable solu-
tions for real problems and
that is why the Property and
Environment Research Cen-
tre (PERC) works with
groups such as the Nature
Conservancy, Environmental
Defence Fund, and even the
World Bank and that is also
why we take no government
money and why we don’t look
to government to solve envi-
ronmental problems.

With that said, I hope Mr
Smith authors more books
such as “The Bahamas: Por-
trait of an Archipelago.” It
serves as a beautiful intro-
duction to the treasure of nat-
ural resources found in the
Bahamas.

LAURA

E HUGGINS

Research Fellow at the
Hoover Institution at Stan-
ford University and Director
of Outreach at the Property
and Environment Research
Centre in Bozeman, Mon-
tanawww.perc.org

Montana,

April, 2010

The annual meeting of Brigadoon residents

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The residents of Brigadoon
had their annual meeting in
January, 2010. In attendance
was the representative for
Montagu. We expressed to
her the concerns we had in
our little community, name-
ly, (1) our roads are
deplorable and need resur-
facing; (2) we have to pay for
electricity for our street lights,
plus we had to erect the poles
and place the fixtures on
them. However, government
supplies street lights all over
the Bahamas free.

We are told because we
have a gate at the entrance —

which is open all day Monday
through Friday — the area is
considered private; so we are
being penalized for trying to
protect our area and our
homes.

The MP promised she
would look into the road sit-
uation with a view to possi-
bly getting a special price for
repaving; and she said that
the lights should be paid for
by B.E.C. because there is a
tax added to all B.E.C. bills
that cover street lights and
assured us that she would get
back in touch within a week.
Understanding that she might
be busy we have waited until
now (three months later),



with absolutly no response.

She told us what we want-
ed to hear and went on her
way. Well time rushes on, as
for me and my house, NO
VOTE.

BILLY SANDS
Brigadoon,
Nassau,

April 30, 2010.

a Be Bose S
ae Lae
FAO eH}

re Pe
322-2157



NEW ARRIVALS

A

Exciting New Models-Look Like New!

We now offer ZERO DOWN
on late models up to 2003!

6 i(°_<——-

Hale r pal

We also offer 20% DOWN,
3 YEAR LOAN FOR 2005 models!

AS ALWAYS 1 Month Limited
Warranty, License,Inspection

and Insurance Included.
Restrictions apply.

Phone 356-7924/5/6 a
P.O. Box N-1552 ae.

$5,500 cash
Ae le *

Seem VILLAGE ROAD NEAR
SHIRLEY STREET
Tel: 394-0323 /5
OR 394-1377


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 5









PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOPE
| By Jamaal Rolle

Bahamas seeking to
woo Chinese visitors

Bahamian civil servants in
Shanghai to promote tourism

“TW ys
s a
al | "1





r
]

i
By ALISON LOWE

rth ed ' ‘
Tribune Staff Reporter fe | 3 & [£ “i Da >
N ‘ tv £ I = ij
alowe@tribunemedia.net | Wer Sag At va |

SHANGHAI, China - A ‘ae «4 |
group of Bahamian civil ser- | i
vants have swapped Nassau oO oll
for Shanghai in a bid to boost
tourist visits to the Bahamas
from the Asian region.

Five Ministry of Tourism

officials and one from the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
have been sent to the Chinese
city for six months to promote ;
their country to the estimated
70 million visitors who organ- | PRESCOTT YOUNG AND GABRIELLE ARCHER from the Ministry of
isers project will attend the | Tourism pose for photos next to the pavillion.
Shanghai World Expo 2010,
where The Bahamas is repre-
sented in a walk-through
pavilion within the Caribbean
Community themed area.

Prescott Young, leader of
the Ministry of Tourism and
Foreign Affairs team who
arrived in China in April, said
he is “looking forward to
putting The Bahamas on the
map in China.”

For now, The Bahamas
remains an enigma to many
in the Asian country of over
one billion, but with China set
to become one of the world’s
largest outbound tourism
markets by 2020 as private
incomes increase in line with
its booming economic growth,
tourism officials recognise the
need to change this.

“We're planning on getting
a globe in here so we can
show where we are,” said Mr
Young, who noted that aside
from the Chinese people who

SEE page six


































ere







jamaalinaa Me, oom




Coe lig ht your vote, mater or grandmather with
a custom charcoal portrait hand-drawn by
reknowned Bahamian artist Jarnaal Rolle
Choose a special Mother's Day gift that the
entire family can be invealyed in creating for her

UR a ee = 2 See
ae ee ee da

i call 677-9698 or 454-1979 for more information

Po re beg he TT eal)

WE SEND EM PRG KIN’!

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

“WE WILL MATCH OR BEAT ANY PRICE IN TOWN”

S HH H! Don’t Tell Anyone,
Our

Of Pre-Owned

Honda Accords, Civics
and Nissans have arrived.




————————

” Colors:
lero ATT |) tA y MONTHLY ‘Fuschia ‘Brown *Red ‘Yellow ‘Black ‘Silver

for Government Workers @iidalt ‘White °Gold "Orange Temules "Green
a ER eee eM Re Ree tL

SER em ECU Oey eRe Te |
ERA) MORO eos Cia ET S fl Ky

TEL: (242) 341-0449 + (242) 341-2249 «+ FAX: (242) 361-1136 Rosetta St. - Ph: 325-3336

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM












‘ Sale

es cb oy? w

up to 350/, OFF

Thursday April 29th through Saturday May 8th

Tel. 323-2900
Monday - Saturday 10:30am - 5:30pm
Bay Street (two doors east of Victoria Ave)

yyOu

CLASSIQUE

PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian civil servants in
Shanghai to promote tourism

FROM page five

will gain exposure to The
Bahamas from visiting the
pavilion, many visitors from
other nearby Asian countries
are expected to pass through
too.

“This is a great opportunity
to showcase the Bahamas.
What is interesting is that
we’ve met a lot of people who
think the Bahamas is a part
of Africa so you have to
explain it, to say it’s right off
the coast of the United
States,” said fellow Ministry
of Tourism colleague
Gabrielle Archer.

At the Bahamas’ colourful
pavilion on Saturday morn-
ing, Mr Young and Ms
Archer were taken aback to
find themselves the centre of
attention among the first Chi-
nese visitors to the expo,
which officially opened on
Friday, April 30.

The Chinese — many of
whom are unused to seeing
people of other ethnic origins
— rushed to greet and have
photos of themselves taken
with the pair.

Inside the pavilion itself,
Mr Young and Ms Archer
will take turns with their oth-
er colleagues to be on hand
to promote and explain the
Bahamas to the visitors who
will pass through the area
between the hours of 10am
and 10pm, assisted by the pri-
vate mandarin Chinese lan-
guage tutoring they are to
receive throughout their stay,
and a local Chinese transla-
tor.

The theme of the massive
Expo, which covers 5.28
square kilometres along the
Huangpu river in Shanghai,
is “Better City, Better Life.”
The six-month event, in which
over 200 countries are partic-
ipating, has been touted as
one that will allow partici-
pants and those attending to
explore the concept of urban
life now and in the future, and
promote “harmony and
cooperation between nations







of the world. Commentators
note that another major
aspect of the estimated $45
billion event, which comes
just two years after China
staged the 2008 Olympics in
Beijing, is for China to again
promote itself on the world
stage, and for those countries
involved to grow their ties
with the global giant.

Beach

Meanwhile, at The
Bahamas pavilion, the main
message is simply “It’s Bet-
ter in the Bahamas.”

A perimeter wall displays
a photographic image of a
pristine Bahamian beach,
while inside, visitors can find
out more about Nassau’s
Downtown Revitalisation
Project, investing in The
Bahamas, local straw craft
and music — which will be
highlighted by performances
and displays from a Bahamian
straw weaver and Gregory
Douglas, a Bahamian musi-





cian who lives in Beijing — and
the Atlantis and Baha Mar
hotel properties.

On the floor is a map of the
Bahamas, showing the vari-
ous islands that can be visited
in addition to Nassau/Paradise
Island — this “differentiation”
strategy being key to the Min-
istry of Tourism’s recent pro-
motional campaigns.

Atlantis and Baha Mar take
a prominent position in the
Bahamian expo in light of the
role they played in bringing
it into being — each donating
$25,000 to the cause of having
it set up and manned for six
months, and offering seven-
day trips to The Bahamas as
prizes to be made available
through the pavilion at the
expo. Further funds were pro-
vided by the Bahamian and
Chinese Governments
towards the Bahamas partici-
pation in the expo. The
Bahamas is just one of more
than 200 other countries that
accepted invitations to have
a presence at the event.

Throughout its six-month
duration, different days have
been chosen to highlight the
culture of the various regions
of the world, and on July 17th
it is the Bahamas and the
Caribbean community that
will take centre stage.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has accepted an
invitation to attend the expo
at this time.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit oar website af www. coded is

THE SEARCH FOR A PRESIDENT

The College Council of The College of The Bahamas (COB) is pleased to
announce a search for a new President and invites nominations and expres-
psions of interest in this outstanding opportunity for leadership at a truly
unique institution, After nearly thirty-five years of serving The Bahamas,
first as a two-year institution, then as a four-year degree-granting College,
COB expects to become The University of The Bahamas. As it moves to
solidify its university status, COB will continue to deliver excellent under-
eraduate teaching while developing new undergraduate and graduate pro-
grams, increasing research and innovation activities, and focusing its work in
areas crucial to national development.

Since its founding in 1974, The College of The Bahamas has grown in repu-
lation and currently enrolls over 5000) students in undergraduate and gradu-
ate education. The institution grants primarily bachelor’s degrees, and will
launch its first master's degree later this year. Currently, COB offers joint
master’s degrees in conjunction with other accredited universities and col
leges within the United States and enjoys extensive links with higher edwea-
tion institutions in the Caribbean, North America and Great Britain.

NOMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS
A prospectus for this search with information about the institution, the prior-
ities for the new president, a full enumeration of qualifications for the posi-
tion, and instructions for submitting applications or nominations may be
found under “Current Searches” at www.academic-search.com. Those con-
sidering becoming candidates are urged to visit this Web site before submit-
ting application materials. A complete application shall include a thoughtful
letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and a list of at least five professional ref-
erences (with email addresses and telephone numbers) and must be received
by June 9th, 2010, Nominations, inquiries and applications are treated confi-
dentially and should be submitted electronically (MS Word or PDF) to:
COBPresident@academic-search.com
Additional information on The College of The Bahamas may be obtained
from The College’s website,
Maya Kirkhope and Bill Fr ankiin of Academic Search, Inc. are assisting with
this search. Nominations and expressions of interest will be treated in confi-
}dence and may be directed to:

20%-S0% OFF

Sale On Selected Items

Maya Ranchod Kirkhope

Senior Consultant

| Academic Search, Inc.

Washington, DwC., USA
mava.kirkhope@academic-search.oom
(703) S80 9195

Dr. Bill Franklin

Senior Consultant
Academic Search, Ine.
Washington, D.C., USA
hjf@academic-search.com
(S30) 249-1444

Mt. Royal Avenue (1 Door South of Quality Fabric)

Tel: 328-0837 + 328-4793

. email:bijouxclassique@ yahoo.com The College of The Bahamas is committed to providing equal educational

and employment opportunity,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 7
LOCAL NEWS



Oft with a a bang!

World Expo
2010 opens with
spectacular
ceremony

=
-

SHANGHAI, China — The
Shanghai World Expo 2010 got
off with a bang on Frida
evening when Chinese Presi-
dent Hu Jintao officially
declared it open during a spec-
tacular ceremony involving
thousands of Chinese perform-
ers and a handful of interna-
tional stars, including Italian
opera singer Andrea Boccelli
and Chinese actor Jackie Chan.

The event was held inside the
Expo Culture Centre, a flying-
saucer shaped structure located
in the heart of the 5.28 square
kilometer Expo site, and was
attended by a variety of world
leaders, among them President
Nicolas Sarkozy of France and
his wife Carla Bruni.

The Shanghai Expo 2010 is
ostensibly a non-commercial
expo in which participating
countries display their take on a
theme — “Better city, better
life” — through national pavil-
ions highlighting urban living
in their cities. Other “themed
areas“ within the expo site
explore issues relating to pre-
sent urban life around the
world and potential options for
enhanced future city living.

Jean Pierre-Lafon, President
of the International Exhibitions
Bureau which partly coordi-
nates the expo, said in his open-
ing speech at the ceremony that
with the majority of the world’s

SEE page nine





freeforall

sign-up at IndiGO before May 31st





= : iw rt -
>

1
al = :
eal | eens
<=) 58): sre er ae





ae ck oe

THE MEXICAN pavilion's "forest of kites’, said to embody Mexico's idea of urban life in the future and desire © ACROBATIC performers dangle from the ceiling of the Expo Culture
for more green space in cities. Centre during the finale of the indoor segment of the opening ceremony.















. ae
Make Mother’s Day
aMINIEvent . 4 Weve gotit

COMPUTERS LIMITED
4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.»

Sales: 242.396.1100 © Service: 242.396.1115

WAWLOUStomcompubers.bs:
solutions(@customcomputers.bs

(Jp Mini 2102



LO Mele (itele)emicted
FREE modem!
FREE |/ocal number!

FREE calls to
onephone clients on
the family islands!

Plans as low as

I g95 AU

Calling plans for

ee AE Ue elec
Canada, UK, Caribbean
even for your cell phone!

Available at

INdiGO

nn
6771111 Nassau 6881111 Freeport 6991111 Abaco

PALMDALE & HARBOUR BAY

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE







» PEL UNITE

a ~~ UNTEg
A The Sloe Villane Re & > NATIONS sea

“Shoes For All Walks Of Life”

Azaleta Ishmael-Newry



ROT,
ARY CLUBS oF THE Banaya











ENVIRONMENT Minister Earl Deveaux addresses the Model United
Nations Sessions held at the Police Conference Centre on April 26.

Students take part
in Model United
Nations Sessions

=> -

RSS Deere neers

- x =~ cs

Gucci.com bahamas saffrey square bay street and bank lane nassau 242.325.0561, crystal court at atlantis paradise island 242.363.5823

STUDENTS representing
13 high schools throughout
The Bahamas participated
in the 13th Model United
Nations Sessions (MUNS)
held on April 26.

MUNS is a simulation of
the United Nations within
an academic platform. The
objective of the sessions is
to educate and train the par-
ticipants in matters relating
to civics, issues of globaliza-
tion, communication and
diplomacy.

Four students from each
school are assigned a coun-
try and participate in a sim-
ulated session of an inter-
governmental organization.
The 47 students who par-
ticipated were asked to
take on the role of diplo-
mats of the representative
countries of the United
Nations.

Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux presented
remarks on behalf of the
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette before the
sessions began.

Role

The topics selected were
“significant” to the role of
the United Nations in the
21st century in the areas of
technological advancement
and free trade respectively,
as “industrialized countries
play an increasingly impor-
tant role in the transference
of technological expertise to
smaller, less developed
states,” Mr Deveaux said.

“The principles of free
trade will continue to elimi-
nate borders and stimulate
the implementation of poli-
cies which promote national
development and economic
sustainability,” he added.

The minister congratulat-
ed the students and their
advisers for their efforts
and long hours of research
and preparation and
also thanked the
Rotary Clubs of The
Bahamas for partnering

with the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs to host the event.

The students participated
in debates during two ses-
sions. The topic for the
morning session was “Is the
United Nations meeting the
needs of all its Member
States in order to benefit
from the exponential expan-
sion of technological
advances already evident in
the beginning of the 21st
Century?”

Benefits

The topic for the after-
noon session was "In a
rapidly globalizing world,
does ‘Free Trade’ contribute
to development for all coun-
tries? Are the benefits of
globalization evenly distrib-
uted?”

The judges included Jose
Luis Ponce Caraballo,
ambassador of the Republic
of Cuba to The Bahamas;
Dr Carlton Watson, from
The College of The
Bahamas (COB); Dr
Llewellyn Curling, COB;
Caldwell Pratt, deputy direc-
tor of the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport; Ray-
mond Winder, managing
partner Deloitte & Touch
and Philip Simon, executive
director of The Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce.

The winners will receive
an all expense paid trip to
attend the United Nations
General Assembly (UNGA)
65th Session during this Fall
where they will hear Deputy
Prime Minister Brent
Symonette address the
Assembly.

Second place winners
received laptops and all win-
ners received trophies. All
participants received certifi-
cates and prizes.

The winners are: Queen’s
College High School repre-
senting Japan; 2nd place: St.
Andrew’s High School rep-
resenting Singapore and 3rd
place: New Age Academy,
from Turks and Caicos
Islands representing Chile.

The Bahamas Immigration
Department customer service
improvement strategy

THE Bahamas Immigration Department recently iden-
tified five areas of focus and initiative to improve customer

satisfaction and efficiency.

Critical to the Department’s customer service improve-
ment strategy are the following areas, according to a gov-

ernment statement:

Training and retraining; to review and improve proce-

dures and processes; to improve public relations and dis-
semination of information; to create a customer service
desk at headquarters and to introduce and implement an
electronic identification system.

According to the government statement, the Department
is pleased with its efforts to date, particularly the recent
launch of its website, completion of its information
brochures, and the Minister’s ability to approve Permanent
Residency for foreign spouses married to Bahamian citizens,
once their spousal permits have expired. As a consequence
the waiting period for permanent residency for this catego-
ry of permits has been significantly reduced.

“The Department continues to review its procedures
and processes aimed at improving the length of time permits
are processed. The department remains committed to the
overall improvement of its services,” said the statement.




Sy

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 9



FROM page seven

population living in cities today, he hopes the
city-themed expo will “contribute to a social
awakening” that will lead to cities becoming
“safer, more harmonious” places.

When the indoors portion of the ceremony
was over, invited guests were told to head outside
for a firework show of a lifetime - at least 20
minutes of fireworks launched into the night sky
over the Huangpu river, from boats and buildings,

World Expo 2010 opens with spectacular ceremony

intermixed with choreographed fountains of
water and light beams pulsating in time with a
grand orchestral musical accompaniment.

The following morning the expo site officially
opened to the general public and tens of thou-
sands of primarily Chinese visitors, young and
old, flocked to see the international pavilions,
themed areas, performances, restaurants serv-
ing global dishes and more that are scattered



9
a”

yp



throughout the expo site. By midday there was a
three-and-a-half hour waiting time in the hot sun
for a chance to get inside the most popular attrac-
tions, which included the United States, Canadi-
an and Russian pavilions.

Inside, visitors got to see for the first time how
the various countries had explored the theme
“Better city, better life.”

Many countries have spent millions of dollars

on their offerings, and hi-tech lighting and video
and audio technology was put to use to stimulate
visitors’ senses — although in some cases those
attending were somewhat perplexed as to the
intended message.

The Bahamas is participating in the expo too,
with a mini-pavilion inside the Caribbean Com-
munity Pavilion that hosts 14 Caribbean countries
in all, each of which is hoping to raise aware-
ness of their country’s culture, products and
attraction as a tourism destination through par-
ticipation in the expo.

Top of the Line
Performance Vehicles
only at Tyreflex Star Motors.

MERCEDES-BENZ E-Class, C-Class, CLC-Class & ML-Class

a
a

ISUZU D-MAX Trucks

rau

Memories one bead at a time...

Tyreflex Star Motors is the Exclusive Authorized Dealer
for Mercedes-Benz, Subaru and Isuzu vehicles.

New & Used Cars & Trucks * Sales, Parts & Service
Call us at 325.4961 or visit our showroom on Wulff Rd today!

The Brass & Leather Shops Ltd.
Charlotte Street Of Bay - Tel.: 322-3806
The Mall at Marathon - Tel; 394-3676

Abaco Shopping Centre - Marsh Harbour - Tel.: 367-3645

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS

Call us today for your new Top of the Line Vehicle at 325.4961
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas ¢ Fax: 323.4667







my
- WIN OVER

Ai ee
Be

ii G, :
Sethe

plus Complete Your Look With Accents for as low as 35 per week'!




NASSAU ® Town Centre Mall
Tel: (242) 397-PLUS ose
Mon-Sat Jam-9pm

Fax: (242) 325-6368 mh



|

j =,

New & Ad xciting Selections Just For Mom!

GRAND BAHAMA © Madeira Croft
Tel: (242) 352-PLUS prsa?
Mon-Fri Sam-6pm * Sat Jam-4pnm
Fax: (242) 352-9823

F

4 piece Living Room Suite

r







, hi 2s starting as low as $2 S eas week*

Balun Chamber of (aummerce
OUTSTANDING. FUSES ESS
LIF THE PRA ac DP STH



FURNITURE

Nassau * Grand Bahama « Abaco Coming Soon

.
itureplus :
L aah ]



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

gf ANDREW,

SCHOOL

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat)

(TB wor school

School Nurse
St. Andrew’s School, The International School of
The Bahamas, requires a School Nurse for the
2010-2011 school year.

“.... He that filches from me my
good name
Robs me of that which not
enriches him,
And makes me poor indeed”:
Shakespeare, Othello

Several Caribbean countries
could be stigmatized globally if
they support a proposition to top-
ple the global ban on commercial
whaling and legitimize the heinous
slaughter of these intelligent mam-
mals.

This proposition is being
advanced by the Chair and Vice
Chair of the 88-nation Interna-
tional Whaling Commission
(IWC), a body whose governing
Convention provides for the prop-
er conservation of whale stocks
and the complete protection of
certain species as well as desig-
nating specified areas as whale
sanctuaries.

Most of what constitutes the
proposition was developed by 12
governments in a small working
group, and it is being touted by
the Chair and Vice Chair as a basis
for additional negotiations
between now and an IWC meet-
ing to be held in Morocco in June.

No member government of the
IWC has endorsed the proposi-

. Mom & Me...

e

eee
>
ie
» e e
e@ 9 e
: e°
e
e
eo owls
Cc@ j NINA 9.9! /
“haga ae oN J
SVE et :

All applications must include a written letter
of application, full details of degrees, nursing
qualifications and experience as
well as the names of two relevant referees.

All applications must be received at the school by
3:00pm, Friday, May, 14“ 2010 and should be
addressed to: Mrs Sharon E Wilson, the Principal.

Applications without the complete information
required or those received after that date will not be
considered.











SATURDAY, May 8TH

It’s a tea party like none other! Join us as we
celebrate and pamper Mom’s just in time for
Mother’s Day. Participate in fun filled in-store
activities as you make those gift selections that
are sure to please Mom.

Massage Therapists

Make-up Consultations
Perfume Profiling

Gift Giving Ideas

Live Entertainment

Candy Bar

Starbucks Tea Discovery

Mom & Me Photos
Mom&MeLook-A-LikeCompetition
Spin To Win Beauty Wheel
Best/Creative Hat Competition



IK OK OK OK OK OK OK OK 2K 2K 2K OK

Fabulous Prizes and Gift Giveaways
Join” Bull pe
Mall at Marathon
(242) 393 4406





Saturday, May 8th - Marathon Mall:

Event, 12 Noon - 6:00 p.m.





Save the Caribbean’s standing:
Sink the yen for whales

= =
Sa i eS == i — —

WORLD VIEW -

tion to date but some governments
have forcefully stated their objec-
tion to it - among them: Mexico,
Australia, New Zealand and
Britain. It is expected that India,
South Africa and Brazil will also
oppose the proposition.

Caribbean countries that are
members of the IWC — the six
independent members of the
Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS) and
Suriname — could be very instru-
mental in either quashing it or val-
idating it.

If the proposition is endorsed,
it would: overturn the global ban
on commercial whaling and allow
hunting in the Southern Ocean
Whale Sanctuary around Antarc-
tica; approve the killing of whales
for commercial purposes by Japan
around Antarctica and in the
North Pacific; and allow continu-
ing whaling by Iceland and Nor-
way in violation of long-agreed
scientific procedures and the glob-
al whaling ban.

The Caribbean nations have
absolutely nothing politically, or
in orthodox material terms, to gain
by helping to support the propo-
sition; they have much more to
lose.

Apart from Bequia, one of the
tiny islands of St Vincent and the
Grenadines (about which, more
later), Caribbean people do not
eat whale meat, but many of the
islands have a vibrant whale-
watching industry from which they
derive revenue and jobs. More
importantly, the Caribbean sells
itself to the global tourism mar-
ket as environmentally friendly
and protective of natural wildlife —
an assault on this latter reputation
by tourism groups, who are
increasingly demanding higher
environmental standards, could
damage the region’s already frag-
ile tourism industry.

It has to be recalled that it is
only inside the Caribbean that a
differentiation is made between
the countries that reside in it; to
the North American and Euro-
pean tourists, the Caribbean is one
place. The perception of the area
overall can affect countries indi-
vidually.

It is claimed that Japan pays
the IWC membership fees for sev-
eral of the Caribbean countries,
and also finances the participation
of their delegations who have
become the most vocal support-
ers of Japan’s drive for commercial
whaling.

In April 2002, the then
Accountant General of Grenada
wrote in a letter (later made pub-
lic): “Contributions from the gov-
ernment of Japan to the govern-
ment of Grenada were not
received for the International
Whaling Commission and as such
was not reflected in the said
accounts for the years 1998 and
1999. However, our internal audit
revealed that contributions were
received for all other years prior to
and following 1998 and 1999.
Moreover the Japanese have con-
firmed that it made contributions
to the government of Grenada for
the specified periods.”

Japan has taken advantage of
the economic vulnerability of these
small and needy countries to cap-
ture their votes. In return for sup-
port at the IWC, Japan has pro-
vided fish refrigeration facilities
in all the independent OECS
countries which, while opened
with great fanfare and flourish as a
boon to local fishermen, are now
mostly disused or used for other
purposes. In some countries, they
have become known as the local
“ice house.”

But, when the economics of
the relationship with Japan is ana-
lyzed, these Caribbean countries
come out worse. Japan has a mas-
sive annual balance of trade sur-
plus with each of them — they are

Odessa









SIR RONALD SANDERS

ready markets for Japan’s motor-
vehicles, television sets, radios,
computers, printers, cameras, agri-
cultural equipment and a host of
other goods. In turn, Japan’s pur-
chases from these countries, where
such purchases exist, are negligi-
ble.

To say that the latest proposi-
tion from the IWC Chairs to over-
turn the ban on commercial whal-
ing has caused outrage around the
world would be to put the matter
mildly.

Governments, non-govern-
mental organizations, environ-
mental groups and ordinary peo-
ple have written letters, signed
petitions, organized demonstra-
tions, created blogs on the Internet
and generally agitated against
what they rightly regard as an
activity that is not only unneces-
sary, but is cruel and barbaric.

The human population of the
world does not depend on whale
meat to live; in fact, including a
small number of aboriginal peo-
ples - and an elite group in Japan
— whale meat is eaten by only a
tiny fraction of the global popula-
tion.

The three remaining countries
in the world that flout the spirit
of the IWC rules and decisions in
respect of commercial whaling are
Iceland, Japan and Norway.

In the Caribbean, apart from
Bequia, any ancient hunting of
whales has long since been aban-
doned, and there is certainly no
tradition of eating whale meat in
the region. The primitive process
of hunting whales off Bequia is
cruel verging on the barbaric and
does nothing to promote the
island’s reputation as a premier
residential tourism destination. It
has to be assumed that this activi-
ty will soon be regulated by the
Minister who has power to do so
under the law.

The Caribbean governments
involved in this matter should join
progressive governments around
the world by formally declaring
their opposition to the proposi-
tion long before the IWC meet-
ing in June, and, if they do attend,
by vigorously opposing it then.

Better still, given the difficult
financial circumstances con-
fronting each of them, Caribbean
countries can validly stay away
from this meeting which would be
costly to attend in distant Moroc-
co, and which has no benefit for
them. In that way, they could save
their own standing with the vast
majority of public opinion while
sinking the yen for whales.

Othello’s exclamation above
began:

“Good name in man and
woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their
souls”.

In this matter of the slaughter
of the world’s whales, the people
of the OECS countries and Suri-
name would not want the jewel
of their souls tarnished with “thir-
ty pieces” of yen. But it could hap-
pen to their detriment unless Gov-
ernments remove their countries
from the fray.

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

Ge arden

where life is still simple and people still care
Murphyville, first corner left off Sears Road, first
house right, yellow and white.

Telephone 322-8493

Give Her A Mother's Day Memory
She Vill “Creasure Forever! !!!

China Tea Set C1900 20% off.
Hand Painted with Roses Porcelain AntiqueTea Set 20% off.
Vintage 1930's Hooked Wool Rug 33% off.

nee

Kashmiri Silk Persian Rug 2.6ft x 4ft Tree of Life Design
40% off. —

Other larger Rugs 50% off.
Vintage Croquet Sets Adults, one Child's Set All 50% off.
Tea Towels 33% off.

Vintage Feed Sacks, 33% off, good for quilting.
Assorted Vintage and Antique Aprons pretty colours.
20-33% off.

Primitive Style Prairie Bonnets good for Plays and Skits
33% off.

Hand Crocheted Tops and Shirts, beautiful, 50% off.
Silk Floral Arrangements 33% off.

The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
Girls' Lovely organza Dresses sizes 2 to 16,
we also have boleros to blend with the sleeveless dresses.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010



THE TRIBUNE

hee

LOCAL NEWS

Pedestrian crossings
installed in Market
Street and Baillou

areas



Hill Road

—————— =,









ae,





(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson).
WORKS AND TRANSPORT MINISTER Neko Grant (left) inspects the
recently installed pedestrian crossing at Bahama Avenue and discusses
further road improvement plans for the area with Sidney Cleare, senior

superintendent of the Road Sign Department.

IN response to requests by business own-
ers and residents for more pedestrian cross-
ings on the Baillou Hill Road and Market
Street corridors, the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport has started installing
several crosswalks in this area.

“We committed to swift action on a num-
ber of the concerns raised at the Communi-
ty Meeting held to provide information for



ey a



Poo



the road improvement projects, Tuesday,
April 27,” said Works Minister Neko Grant.

Crosswalks were identified based on crit-
ical locations particularly in high traffic areas
near schools, businesses and government
departments.

The crossings are also designed to assist
with traffic management.

“The pedestrian crossings are intended to

move pedestrians in the Market Street and
Baillou Hill Road corridors in a safe and
orderly manner based on the volume of traf-
fic,” Mr Grant added.

The first phase of pedestrian crossings
include the intersections before Coconut
Grove Avenue, Palm Tree Avenue and
Bahama Avenue.

A crossing also will be installed between

(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson)

PICTURED is Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant chatting with Sidney Cleare, senior superintendent of the Road Sign Depart-
ment, as Andrew Darling uses a thermo plastic applicator to install a pedestrian crossing at the intersection before Bahama Avenue.

Bimini and Andros Avenues. Other areas
identified for crossings are the intersections
before Coconut Grove and Baillou Hill
Road, Baillou Hill Road and Bahama
Avenue and Baillou Hill and Tucker Roads.

The Ministry of Works also plans to erect
speed limits and school zone signs in these
areas,

OATES a
SREAL



LRN

TO ee cn ae Omen a

LIFE HAS
ITS MOMENTS...



I: you hear the whispers below
the rumble, you know that the
recent financial and housing melt-
down in the US has actually created
some great opportunities for smart investors in the Bahamas.

The price on some homes, especially second homes and
vacant property in the Family Islands, has adjusted to more
realistic levels — in some cases, far more realistic levels.
This environment is favourable for long-term gains.

It may not be for everyone, but if you’re in the right
financial position, you may want to invest in a second (hol-
iday) home or well situated vacant property. However,
there is a right way and a wrong way to invest — it’s the wrong
way that led so many to suffer in the recent housing crisis in
the US. In our office, some persons have spoken of forming
investment clubs to take advantage of new opportunities.

Don’t think about investing in a second home until you’ve
saved up for your nest egg and have held or reduced your
expenses to keep it growing. Your money doesn’t work for
you unless it’s your money.

Similarly, don’t begin your investment adventure until
you’ve polished up your credit standing. The best opportu-
nities go to those with upfront cash and excellent credit.
Maximise your borrowed capital by making sure you get the
lowest interest rates and best terms. Shop around!

It then follows that you should not over-borrow. Real
estate markets are continually cycling up and down. Learn
the lessons of the recent debacle, and don’t over-leverage
yourself to the point you can’t survive a down period in
the cycle. If you’re smart about it, you won’t get rich quick,
but you will get rich right!

Over the years, I’ve seen second home and vacant prop-
erty prices double, even triple, in value, especially in Abaco,
Harbour Island and Exuma. Some investors have made a
mint. Others over extended themselves and were sorry they
rushed into the investment without thinking it through.

Questions or comments? Email me at ask@Coldwell-
BankerBahamas.com.

Hapes Mother's Da Y

.. MAKE THEM
UNFORGETTABLE

Tip of the Week: If you are investing, pick a home or
vacant property in a good location, either on or near the
beach, or elevated with sea views. It should be close to
amenities with wide appeal. See if there is a rental history if
you are interested in a home. Do not assume that the rental
income will pay your mortgage! Factor in insurance costs,
maintenance, etc.







i

PANDORA"

UNFORGETTABLE MOMENTS

Sandel, Emerald Bay Resort

Invites application for the position of:

Cooks
Food Server
Bartender
Bar Backs
Steward
Washmen
Pool/Beach Attendant
Room Attendant
Houseman
Guest Service Agent
Airport Greeter
Social Host (Entertainment Coordinator)
Spa Therapist
Photographer
Videographer

284 Bay Street (242) 302-2800

Harbour Bay ® Marina Village, Paradise Island
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Fax or email resume with proof of qualifications
and experience to:

U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,507 * © » All rights reserved * PANDORA-JEWELRY.COM

Email: sebhr@grp.sandals.com
Fax: 1-242-336-6980



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Bishop Simeon Hall tells Christian
community: stop demonising gays

FROM page one

grace freely and uncondi-
tionally extended.”

He continued: "The sex-
ual preference which a per-
son might engage in does
not negate their common
humanity nor their innate
capacity to see the light of
God's love which can lead
to redemptive healing and
wholeness.

"The Christian Church is
the last bastion of hope,
healing and restoration and
we ought to extend these to
all persons who hurt — even
those outside the (pre-

scribed) scope of normalcy."

"The intensity to which
we condemn all sins must
not be greater than the affir-
mation we maintain of the
human person. I believe we
can protect the sanctity of
the traditional Christian
family values without
demonising those whose
lifestyle differs from ours,"
said Mr Hall, who did not
specify what provoked his
statement.

In the past, religious lead-
ers have publicly spoken out
about their fight against "the
gay agenda" arguing that
such a fight is geared

towards "saving the family"
and upholding traditional
views of marriage.

This fight reached a boil-
ing point in the summer of
2004 when gay and lesbian
cruise ship passengers com-
ing ashore from their family
themed cruise were met
with chants of "gay ways are
not God's ways!"

According to the Canadi-
an Press, a pastor named
William Hanchell took to a
makeshift stage during the
protest, telling onlookers,
"We will never accept your
lifestyle."

"We don't care how much

BEST PRICES in Treasure Cove!

SHE

ae ULE TOT

I a Homes Won't Last Long!

WRIA GRIT | ake ewe

Cle

Craig Pinder

UT Me eT Cre eee ma

ho

TS DPLy

AE

REMIX

PARADISE REALTY

DATH © HOME
ither's Day aalg



money they bring. The
Bahamas is off-limits,"
added another pastor
Vaughan Miller, the Cana-
dian Press said.

Recently, Grace Commu-
nity Church leader Pastor
Lyall Bethel gave his opin-
ion on the issue arguing that
Bahamians "are not fooled
by suggestions that homo-
sexuality is normal and will
fight vigorously to defend
this country from further
infiltration."

He also said that gays
have "intentionally tried to
provoke island nations
throughout the Bahamas
and the Caribbean by
announcing these gay cruis-
es to their islands, and then

yelling ‘homophobe’, ‘hate-
filled’ and ‘intolerant’ when
those said nations object."

Pastor Bethel —- whose
comments came in response
to an Insight article explor-
ing the roots of homopho-
bia in Bahamian society —
added that as a religious
leader it was his calling to
help "the homosexual and
all other sinners find a right
relationship with God."

In early March, the
Bahamas Coalition of Evan-
gelical Pastors expressed
concern that a reported vis-
it of a gay cruise ship to the
Bahamas could potentially
threaten the "morality and
decency" of the country's
"Judeo-Christian" heritage.

In Loving Memory of



Kristoff Kenny Cooper

January 8,

198? |

Mea v 3, 2009

Kris, it broke our hearts to lose you, but

you did not go a

olone, fora part ¢

Of us

went with you, the day God called
you home.

Continue to rest in peace from your
parents, Phil & Agnes Cooper, your
sisters Phillipa,Cindy Tonya, &

Sharanda,

your brothers Antione,

Craig,é Caleb, niece,& nephews a
host of other relatives and friends.

We would always miss, cherish and
lOve YOU.



BISHOP SIMEON HALL



MP criticises govt
over Sir Stafford
Sands on $10 note

FROM page one

However, Mr Mitchell said
that it was irresponsible of the
government to continue with
this plan as it would be one
that would be reversed at the
quickest opportunity by any
future PLP government.

“T think it’s an inappropri-
ate tempting of fate in the
face of the earlier dispute, and
my position is the same; he
should not be on the $10 bill,
and that it should be removed
if there is an opportunity for
the PLP to do so at some
future point,” Mr Mitchell
said.

Having been the cause of
some public outcry in the
past, Mr Mitchell said that he
does not believe that this rein-
statement of Sir Stafford’s
image would become a “cen-
tral issue” of debate, as the
current government has many
other more pressing problems
on its hands.

“My view is that the cen-
tral issue is the inability of the
present government to run
the affairs of this country
properly. The economy is in
the tank. There is unemploy-
ment. There are tremendous
social problems. They have
inadequate healthcare. Edu-
cation is in trouble. Those are
much more serious issues than

Â¥
that,” he said.

Catch football’s best plays with ‘taal
4. olan hele].

al Pass;
Geer A

7\G BIE

EyeoLom 1h eco ob PIU o 1M oC-o yo S.-o RS ee)

Aen

SALE STARTS
MONDAY MAY 3* . SATURDAY MAY st

Style Master Full, Queen, King Bedspreads - set
Victora Classic 15PC Bath In A Bag Sets ~hb.9 |
Madison Reflection 2PC Bath Rug Sets ~~ $21.99...
Premium 55PO 5/5 Blemder (W Glass Jar - $59.99 4
Toastmaster 2-Slice Toaster #TMTTW - 376. ee r
Premium Steam/Dry Iron #7147-$15.99
Wamsutta 450 Full Sheet Sets - $23.99
Madison Bath Sheet Towels - $11.99
Black & Decker Iron #4405 - $23.99
Luxury Queen Sheet Sets - $39.99
Vases 20% Off

Wall Pictures 20% off

12 x 46 Door Mirrors - $9.99

Madison Bath Towels - $9.99

Kitchen Curtain Sets - $15.99

Color Tones Bed Skirts $10.99

Lynns 20PC Dinnerware Sets - $59.99
Zodlac 3PC 5/5 Cookware Sets - $59.99
Black & Decker Food Processors $89.99
AMirro Get A Grip PC Cookware Set - 58
Libbey Iced Tea & Lemonade 7PC Glass

CNC LSM HO) g ime) |
UCR OC COR TU es He

Offer good while supplies last.

WIN ONE OF 5 FLAT SCREEN TV’s

with the purchase of any 2 (3pk) boxes of Act II Popcorn.

OC ea OC Cam OR UCTS OC CTacl (am T Lt
during promotion to Asa H Pritchard Ltd on Robinson Road, and fill out an entry form.

Judges’ decision is final. Prizes not redeemable for cash. Prizes must be collected within 30 days of promotion’s end.
Staff of Asa H Pritchard Ltd and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

7

Libbey Heart & Hearth 18PC Glassware Set - $36
Gibson Basic Living N11 16PC Dinnerware Set- 521.990

Located: Harbour Bay Tent ete
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Promotion runs Friday April 9 through Thursday June 3, 2010.
Entry deadline Wednesday June 2, 2010.

Winners will be contacted by telephone.

Winners must agree to have their photo taken for a winners’ ad.




THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 15

LOCAL NEWS





Write On - a joint feature between the Ministry of
Education and The Tribune - this week features the
work of Luke Carey, Sofia Ocon and Lauren Knowles

If I were a teacher for a day

By LUKE CAREY
Year 4P



IF I were a teacher for a day, I
would try to be a good teacher. A
good teacher should make sure that
everyone respects each other. It is
also very important to make learn-
ing as fun as possible. I would make
sure everyone understands me when
Texplain things.

As a teacher, I would make sure
students care about the building and

As a refugee

By LAUREN KNOWLES
St Andrews
Grade 5 C

not draw on it. I would tell the chil-
dren to take pride in their uniforms.
I would also encourage my students
to take pride in their work. I would
read a story about adventures,
because reading helps you learn
new things.

IT would also have arts and crafts
with my students. I would show
them how to make a diorama of
plans with the theme, “Going green
in the Bahamas”. It would be great
to be a teacher for a day!

How I would heal the World

By SOFIA OCON
Year 4P



I would heal the world by buying things that I can
recycle and buying things that are not harmful to the
planet. I would heal the world by picking up garbage
that Isee on the ground. I would heal the world by
helping the environment and cleaning beaches and
places that are dirty. I would make a garden to
make more oxygen and encourage more life. That’s
how I would heal the world.









have to work for all my needs no matter the
cuts or gashes that may bleed a simple story,
Tran away from the world that rejected me back in the day.



All alone with no one there...
A tefugee’s life I have come to fear

but now that a refugee is a part of me.

Shameful to my family tree,

Where to go?
Who will accept me?
A poor girl with nothing left,

A refugee, a refugee lonely with nothing.

Yes, that’s me...

a)

PB
it



a VITAMALT®

IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

i

ce

rR
A
NY

DEFENCE FORCE
BAND BEAT RETREAT

THE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE BAND staged a Beat
Retreat in Rawson Square yesterday as part of the organisation’s

30th anniversary.








































The



VITAMALT

_ Presents
First Bahamian Ciréus

«ts



APRIL 21, 22, 23, 2010

Wyndham Nassau Resort Crystal Palace
Rain Forest Theatre

SHOWTIMES
11:30 a.m. (Matinee) & 7: 30 p.m (Evening)
Matinee Show includes Transportation & One Vitamalt

BOX OFFICE
Beverage Depot - Mall at Marathon
Burns House - John F. Kennedy Drive
Bahamas Wines & Spirit - Shirley Street





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

Minister
warns over
US oil spill

FROM page one

currents.

"With respect to the
Bahamas, the spill is cur-
rently headed towards the
Gulf (of Mexico) and we are
not at risk right now because
of the direction of the wind
and weather. But if it
spreads into the Gulf Stream
and comes around the Key
West (Florida) area, the
Bahamas and the Great
Bahama Bank - it would
have a calamitous and detri-
mental impact on our
Marine environment," Mr
Deveaux told The Tribune
yesterday.

The Gulf Stream is a
warm-water current that
flows from the Gulf of Mex-
ico to the North Atlantic
Ocean.

The Associated Press
reported that if the oil enters
this stream, it would flow
around the southern tip of
Florida and up the Eastern
Seaboard of the US, possi-
bly putting the western
Bahamas at risk.

“It will be on the East
Coast of Florida in almost
no time,” Hans Graber,
executive director of the
University of Miami’s Cen-
tre for Southeastern Tropi-
cal Advanced Remote Sens-
ing, told The Associated
Press. “I don’t think we can
prevent that. It’s more of a
question of when rather
than if.”

However, Philip Weech,
part of the contingency
team, said current wind pat-
terns were driving the mas-
sive slick towards Louisiana
in the southern United
States - putting the
Bahamas out of harms way
for now.

"The weather conditions
at the moment are spreading
the spill northward towards
the coast of Louisiana," said
Mr Weech, director of envi-
ronmental agency Bahamas
National Trust.

Both he and Mr Deveaux
maintained that there is a
possibility that a change in
wind patterns could move
the spill in the Bahamas'
direction.

"Tf it shifts then we would
have to make an immediate
and coordinated appeal to
international companies to
mobilise all their resources
to minimise the effect of the
flow.

This would really require
the mobilisation of interna-
tional resources because of
the size of the oil spill," said
Mr Deveaux.

The spill — caused by an
exploding BP oil rig in the
Gulf of Mexico on April 22
—is estimated to have spread
to 3,500 square miles, rough-
ly the size of Puerto Rico,
with an estimated tens of
thousands of gallons leak-
ing every day. More than 1.5
million gallons of oil have
leaked since then.

It is expected to hit fragile
wetlands, marshlands,
wildlife and is a threat to
fishing and spawning spots
in the Gulf.

Added to this is the fear
that the slick will lead to oil
covered beaches in coastal
cities stretching from
Louisiana to Florida.

Yesterday US President
Barack Obama flew to
Louisiana to get a first hand
look at the calamity as the
US government banned all
commercial and recreation-
al fishing in parts of the Gulf
of Mexico due to health
risks from the massive crude
oil spill, according to US
media outlets.

American officials have
plans to drill a well to plug
the gushing oil however this
could take up to three
months, The New York
Times reported.

Observers say the disas-
ter is on track to be the
worst spill in US history top-
ping the Exxon Valdez dis-
aster of 1989 when 10.8 mil-
lion gallons of crude oil was
spilled in Alaskan waters
killing hundreds of thou-
sands of seabirds and marine
life.



MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS



OT a GBS

© THE OIL SPILL ESTIMATED 10 BE
3,500 SQUARE MILES, ROUGHLY
THE SIZE OF PUERTO RICO.

© 210,000 GALLONS, OR 5,000
BARRELS ARE ESTIMATED TO BE
LEAKING DAILY INTO THE GULF OF
MEXICO.

© A10-DAY FISHING BAN HAS
BEEN IMPOSED IN AREAS AFFECTED
BY THE SPILL.

© WORST OIL SPILL IN AMERICAN
HISTORY SINCE EXXON VALDEZ DIS-
ASTER OF 1989.

© US OFFICIALS SAY THAT THE
COASTS OF TEXAS, LOUISIANA, MIS-









SISSIPPI, ALABAMA AND FLORIDA MEMBERS OF the U.S. Army National Guard B Company 711 put Hesco containers along
ARE UNDER THREAT. the beaches of Dauphin Island, Ala., Sunday, May 2, 2010. The containers are designed to



changes the sheen to a more solid state which can be recycled. (AP)



RBC Royal Bank
of Canada



Create your future with our experience.



www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean
® Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ™ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

absorb oil through a fibrous material which reacts with a non-harmful material that

ee

Wendell ‘Big 0° Ferguson

FROM page one

after a short battle with sarcoma can-
cer.

Ferguson is survived by his daugh-
ter, Gabrielle; his siblings, Stencil
“Stoney”, Willie, Dario, Levhon and
Brendalee; two aunts, Doreen Camp-
bell and Nora McClain and Henry Fer-
guson and a special friend, Tony
Godet.

In December, 2009, Ferguson was
diagnosed with sarcoma cancer, a dis-
ease in which cancer cells are found in
the soft tissue of parts of the body.

Ferguson, who last worked at Body
Zone Fitness Centre in the Sea Grapes
Shopping Centre, was undergoing
chemotherapy with the view of having
his right leg amputated.

However, his family and friends say
he took a turn for the worse last week
and on Saturday was admitted to the
ICU. He never recovered.

* SEE SPORTS PAGE 16 FOR FULL STORY



sh Transactior=







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 23

LOCAL NEWS








THE HUMANE
SOCIETY’S
annual dog
show held at
the Botanical
Gardens on
Saturday.

EAGLE ELECTRICAL
& LIGHTING

ae. EAGLE
FOR.

Everyday low prices on quality products!

Electri cal
Supplies

Eagle Ductless
Air Conditioners

Bahama Breeze
Ceiling Fans
]

LASKO
Stand Fans

Central Air
Conditioners

Decorative
Lighting

New Stock of Central Air
Conditioning Systems

Eagle Microwaves AIR HANDLERS

(Blk, Wht & Stainless Stoo) 3TON $649.99 —
$62.50" 4TON $829.99 ©
Eagle Ductless 5 TON $849.99 Cool Star

= Air Conditioners
$399.00"

em

* Base price

Get these items Hd
Eagle’s =p)

CONDENSERS
| 3TON $1,139.99

Eagle Generators
(Gas & Diesel)

$284.00

4TON $1,439.99
5 TON $1,499.99

EAGLE We ship to the Family Island!

Tel: (242) 341-4000 + Tonique Williams Daring Highway’ Harold Fd.

Fax: (242) 341-5080 # Website: wwweadebahamnas.com
BEST QUALITY, BEST PRICE, GUARANTEED 1

HUMANE SOCIETY

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major/Tribune staff















Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
and TRUCKS

TRADE-INS ON NEW
CAR SALES ACCEPTED

Check Out These Great Values

06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘01 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
97 VOLKSWAGON BEETLE
98 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘01 MAZDA MPV WAGON
°99 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
03 DAIHATSU TERIOS

03 HYUNDAI H1 VAN

‘00 HYUNDAI ACCENT

auto (SEQ,
(ay QUAI j | Y sales eS)
ee LIMITED ="

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS

a SHIRLEY STREET ° 322- as ei 3079
Visit our showroom ai aru ality Auto "se les (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, a 2916

OPEN: Mon to Fi 8: 0am - 5:30pm e Sat 8:30am - 12:30pm

























Neaside Buffet Mather Day POLO
Menu

Salad Station
Potate, Spicy Crab, Sweet Pickle Beets, Coleslaw,
Pasta w/ smoke Ham
Fresh Fruits, Mixed Green and Caesar Salad Station
Peel and Eat Shrimps

From the Deli
Assorted international cheese, Fresh Grilled Assorted
Garden Vegetable and Deli Meats.

Soup
Grand Ma's Peas soup and dough
Nassau Conch Chowder

Carving Station
Herb Jerk Prime of Beef w/ natural jus

niree
Grilled skirt steaks w/a pineapple balsamic glazed
A Crispy lernon pepper Grouper w/ Creole sauce
Herb Roasted Chicken with Honey Mustard
Broiled Snapper w/ sweet basil roasted tomatoes
Baked Andros stuffed crab
Two cheese baked macaroni
Black eye peas and rice
Sweet fried Plantain
Island boils w/ salt beef
sautéed Garden Vegetable

Dessert
An array of delectable sweet/ include hot pudding
Tarts, cakes and mousses.

Price: $29.00 + 15% gratuities

WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT ~

& (CRYSTAL PALACE CASINGS

Seaside



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 24, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



PTTL Bios

PRXyYe PVC)
ANNUAL FAIR

THE YAMACRAW ASSOCIATION annual fair was held on
Saturday atthe grounds near Super Value in Prince
Charles Drive. People came out to enjoy a variety of
attractions. As these photos show there was plenty to
interest bike enthusiasts.

a

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Thin Ss Tuff. **
ce |
. We Understana!



Clothing
Shoes
Underwear

Prince Charles
o28-bd ts

East South Beach Bahama Avenue
g22-5528 329-4153



/atroducing wines from:
Santa Margherita,
&t. Francis, Marassec,

Washington Aéis and

Music by:
The G-Notes

Jazz Etcetera

Caribah

Featuring art by:
Antonius Roberts
Malcolm Roe

Kevin Cooper

uy,
>

Sg
jazz
May 15, 2010

The Poop Deck Sandyport

3- 7pm
Admission $30

Tamara Russell

Bid in silent auction
fo support your
favorite charity

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



cee

ie

a

















8,000 BTU-Remote
$420.00

#AEQO8
10,000 BTU-Remote
$477.00

#AEQ10
12,000 BTU-Remote
$510.00

#AEQI2A
18,000 BTU-Remote
$765.00

#AKM18D

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
322-2188/9

JONES & CO

You'll wonder how you ever got along without it.

ns.net

©2010 CreativeRelatio:




THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 25
LOCAL NEWS

YAMACRAW ASSOCIATION

ANNUAL FAIR
































_ oe : 5 a '

Butler’s Funeral Homes ¢ .
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts. =
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

DEATH NOTICE FOR MAAR BLE & GCRANITE SPECIALISTS












MARTIN [
LUTHER KING,

_* ~*$60-$100/s0,."
Cowles Cat aisad ied at Cpe

the Potter’s Cay Dock on
Friday April 23rd, 2010.

rN ount

Memorial Announcement
or

MARTIN LUTHER
KING, 36 c

will be held on Wednesday, 05th May, 2010 at 11:30
a.m. at Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church, Montrose
Avenue. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Garnet King and
Rev. Raymond Neilly. Cremation will follow.

=. De

left to celebrate his life and cherish his memories are
his adopted mother: Isadora King Bethell; step father:
Franklyn Adderley; three sisters: Scieska Knowles, ke



He is pre-deceased by his mother: Valdeeta Adderley, Q




Shakera Dyer and Winsanette Major; two brothers-in- oS
law: Henry Knowles and Randy Dyer; three nieces:
Azaria Knowles, Codeshia Collie and Talaya Dyer;
two nephews: Zakari Knowles and Omari Dyer;
adopted family: Dion and Christine Bethell, Renee
and Carl Scavella, Rhonda and Marvin Arthur, I

=
ae Cem elery

Monultents

}



Astranique Bethell, Winston and Pat Major, Carland] |
Casey Scavella, Toni, Brandon and Camryn Bethell
and Addison Bethell; seven uncles; two aunts; numerous

F

Travertines Contract a

_Tiles

cousins and other relatives and friends including: Kermit
“Vads” Forbes, DeAnne Moncur, Nora Johnson, Nora
Ethelee, Willamae, Bertha, Pearl, the King, Seymour Marbles Construction

and Strachan families, Lydia Bethell, Hughton Brown,

Alvern King, Cookie Adderley, Vernice Prudent, Percy Glass Cleaning

and Melrose Taylor and family of Deadman’s Cay, Mosaics

Long Island, and the class of 1990 of N.G.M. Major #91 Wulff Road
High School in Deadman’s Cay, Long Island, the entire









community of Knowles Cat Island and the crew of the P.O.Box N-4111
Bimini Mack; and other relatives too numerous to Nassau. Bahamas
mention. oe
[2 [-| OTO S . Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Tel: 242-326-6526
Feliné Maior Homes & Crematorium, Ernest and York Streetson | | Fax: 242-322-5607 eae
Tritune oi — May 04th, 2010 from 11:00 a. m. until 4:00 : Email: info@wecarestonework.com ;
There will be no viewing at the church. 4 website:www.wecarestonework.com
i = a a —_ Sa oa ee fo i Jel



ISVS iy Histatussin DM

COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT

AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING DRUG STORES.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 27

LOCAL NEWS



i





Re ee ee se ee
a eee =
ce eo ee a
ae ce
« Attach receipt to a completed entry form and
ee Ce ee ee
ra Pa 7 LF. 7.
/ od The difilbenas Agency in Palmdale,
ee Coe ae eee
t NA (oh aT)

‘\
7







THE NATIONAL STADIUM is tak- Se ee ee ee



ing shape as construction con-
tinues at at the Queen Elizabeth Pee RS aS xin oT ee Il
Sports Centre. The centre was a Lf ee te ie a Ea es Lf

$30-million gift from the People's
Republic of China.

pay less for insuring your home!



Have you heard the good news?
You CAN save money!

Ask NIBA for a home insurance quote! Home insurance with
NIBA costs less AND you receive cover with a claims service
that lives up to its promise! For added convenience, you
can choose to pay by interest free installments. :

It’s time to pay less for insuring your
home!

Tel. 677-6422 or visit
www.nibaquote.com

HATO BAY SHOPPINGPL cea he Glee ‘CABLE COTTAGE, GABLE BEACH

NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue

P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com









OOM! Nexs

BOLD, NEW

SUVA AE OS CSR es

CHICKEN

on " 7] ‘i T i
Seu
“. ’ JS





PHILLY ITALIAN -_ ITALIAN :
CEE land ao & PEPPERS eed 0 he





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



Benchmark
‘easily expects’
12-15 per

cent property
investment
return

* Carmichael project 60%
leased, and expected to
generate $500,000 per
annum cash flow
when fully leased

* Firm aims to use extra
cash to ‘very aggressively’
seek out private equity
style investment
possibilities

* Ends 2009 fiscal year
with $1.1m balance
sheet net worth

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BENCHMARK (Bahamas)
"easily expects" to generate a
12-15 per cent return per
annum on its $2.5 million
investment in its Carmichael
Road commercial centre over
the next five years, as it plans to
"very aggressively" seek out
private equity-type investment
opportunities among Bahamian
companies.

Julian Brown, the company's
president and chief executive,
told Tribune Business that the
property, which lies at the cor-
ner of Carmichael and Fire
Trail Roads, was set to generate
$500,000 in cash flow for the
BISX-listed company once full
leased, which it expected to
accomplish by end-2010.

"We are well on our way in
terms of the Carmichael Road
property,” he said. "That prop-
erty should be fully completed
by the end of May, and we've
already started to finalise leas-
es. We're getting a lot of
inquiries on Carmichael Road.

"We're very upbeat about
what we're going to recover as
a return on our investment
down there. We expect to make
12-15 per cent, taking that an
investment and averaging it
over the next five years. I think
that's a rate of return we easily
expect to get from that invest-
ment."

Mr Brown added: "It's worth
about $500,000 per year in cash
flow to us, and once we extin-
guish the debt down there, the
returns will look very good. The
loan facility is for 10 years, and
we will look at aggressively pay-
ing that down, once we get it
fully leased and see where the
cash flow drivers are. We're
basically about 60 per cent
leased and the project is not
finished.”

A Bank of the Bahamas
International branch will act as
the anchor tenant for Bench-
mark (Bahamas) at Carmichael
Road, and Mr Brown told Tri-
bune Business: "We have two
other tenants that are there,
and working towards complet-
ing lease agreements. They're
pretty substantial, and well-
known in the community.”

The 15,000 square foot com-
plex, apart from the bank
branch, will feature eight rental
spaces - four on the ground
floor, with a similar number on
top.

SEE page 4B

Oo
in y
> LIC

MONDAY,

SECTION B « business @tribunemedia.net




MAY 3,

2010






ROYAL FIDELITY

Pale
CT a

City Markets $6.6m loss
beats ‘09 in nine months

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ity Markets’ $6.558
million net loss for
the first nine
months of its cur-
rent financial year exceeds what
the company lost for its entire
fiscal 2009, management
accounts have revealed, with
top-line sales off 18.5 per cent
for the year to March 31, 2010.

The accounts for the compa-
ny’s holding entity, publicly
traded Bahamas Supermarkets,
which were released on Friday
as part of its settlement with
the Securities Commission over
charges related to late filing of
its financials, reveal a spectac-
ular destruction of shareholder
value to the tune of $28.805 mil-
lion since 2007.

Since Winn-Dixie sold its
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets to the
BSL Holdings buyout group,
the company has seen retained
earnings worth $12.874 million
as at June 27, 2007, converted
into an $15.931 million accu-
mulated deficit as at March 31,
2010.

That deficit has resulted from
persistent heavy losses in
Bahamas Supermarkets’ 2008,
2009 and current financial year,



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

which collectively total around
$26 million, plus the $2.749 mil-
lion dividend payment that was,
with hindsight, an ill-advised
decision to make.

Neither Derek Winford,
Bahamas Supermarkets’ chief
executive, nor Basil Sands, the
company’s chairman, could be
contacted for comment. How-
ever, the accounts by them-
selves paint a grim picture, and
tell a story in their own right.

For City Markets’ net losses
for the year to March 31, 2010,
have increased by 35.4 per cent
year-over-year to $6.578 mil-
lion, as opposed to a $4.844 mil-
lion net loss for the same period
last year.

That translates into a $1.43

issued when the company was started in
1994, the Cable Bahamas prefs, and every



expire around the same date.

founded in 1994.

preference shares.



CABLE Bahamas plans to 'roll over’
$10 million worth of preference shares
due to mature next month by issuing new
ones to Bahamian investors, while keeping
its options "open" on the $5 million in
Caribbean Crossings securities set to

Barry Williams, the BISX-listed com-
pany's Vice-president of finance, confirmed
Cable Bahamas was set to continue its
tradition of ‘rolling over’ its $10 million
preference share issue every five years,
something it has done ever since being

"T think it's pretty safe for me to say to
you that we intend to reissue them,” Mr
Williams told Tribune Business of Cable's

"You may recall that those shares were

five years we've successfully rolled them."

The Cable Bahamas executive said one
reason why the company was able to per-
form this maneuver every five years was
investor demand, as the 7-8 per cent
coupon rate (rate of return) they could
earn on preference shares in the Bahami-
an market was much greater than that for
bank deposits, government paper and oth-
er relatively 'safe' fixed-income securi-

ties.

"One of the reasons why we've been
successful in doing that is because of the
limited amount of opportunities out there
for really good yields on paper in this mar-
ket," Mr Williams told Tribune Business.

"I think it was really called for, and
demanded of us, that we do it, so it's very



loss per share, compared to a
$1.06 per share loss in fiscal
2009, with the $6.578 million
loss for the first nine months
exceeding Bahamas Supermar-
kets’ $6.069 million loss for the
previous full year.

Much of City Markets’
immediate financial woes are
related to the sharp decline in
its top-line net sales, which fell
by 18.5 per cent in the nine
months to March 31, 2010. The
drop, from $93.059 million a
year ago to $76.022 million this
year, leaves the company strug-
gling to break the $100 million
sales threshold for 2010, and
also indicates that it may still
be losing market share in a food
retailing industry that has

Cable to ‘roll over’ $10m in preference debt

likely that we're going to continue with the

same strategy we've had for previous years

and roll it."

He recalled that demand "from share-
holders that wanted the paper to be main-
tained" had been "quite overwhelming" at
times, adding: "We had a need for the
financing, and we went ahead at rolled it.
It was mostly to the same shareholders
who wanted to keep it.

"The rates are pretty competitive. Inter-
est rates are still quite low on the banking
side of things, so as a result deposit rates
are quite low. So the opportunities to earn
a good return on your money are in the
preference market.

"You're not going to get 7-8 per cent on
a bank deposit, and on Government Reg-
istered Stock you get Prime plus a small
percentage; you will not get 7-8 per cent.
It's a good place for investors to place
money in this environment."

SEE page 7B

* Grocery chain struggling to generate $100m in
top line for 2010, with sales off 18.5% to March
* More than $28m reversal in shareholder value to
$15.931m accumulated deficit at nine-month end
* Cash flow bering eaten up to keep firm operating
* Net losses up 35% for first three quarters

become increasingly competi-
tive via new entrants such as
Robin Hood and Phil’s Food
Services.

The only crumbs of comfort
for City Markets were that the
sales decline seems to have
slowed. For the quarter to
March 31, they were only down
15.4 per cent at $22.627 million,
as opposed to $26.756 million in
the year before period.

This was an improvement
upon the 2010 first half, when
sales were off 19.5 per cent —
standing at $53.395 million
compared to $66.303 million
the year before. While some of
the sales decline is doubtless
due to the recession, the fig-
ures also indicate that City
Markets is struggling to win
back customers who may have
deserted it during its 2008-2009
travails.

The only other piece of good





‘Definitive’ BTC
position ‘soon enough’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government will
"make a definitive statement
soon enough" on the status of
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company's (BTC) pri-
vatisation, a minister denying
Standard & Poor's (S&P) claim
that the process had been
"postponed yet again".

Unaware of how S&P was
able to make such a comment,
given that it did not come from
the Government, Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, told Tribune Business:
"The BTC process continues,
and when we're able to do so,
we will make a definitive state-
ment on the matter, which I
expect to be soon enough.



"T he
process 1s
ongoing.
Work con-
tinues with
respect to
evaluating
potential
buyers. It
has been
happening
all along."

Sources
with knowledge of the BTC pri-
vatisation process told Tribune
Business that they understood
that the Government and its
privatisation committee were
gearing up to receive some
"kind of final offer" from the
preferred bidder within the

SEE page 3B

LAING

Credit bureau is ‘key
area’ for regulator

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Central Bank of the Bahamas governor has confirmed
the regulator is targeting 2010 for major “progress” on imple-
menting a Bahamian credit bureau, arguing that this will reduce
borrowing costs and enhance access to credit for businesses/con-

sumers with good track records.

Wendy Craigg, writing in the Central Bank’s 2009 annual report,
said: “Key areas for 2010 will include progress towards the even-
tual implementation of a credit bureau for the Bahamas.

“The recent global financial crisis underscores the need for
financial institutions to properly manage their credit risk, and to
have the means to assess the creditworthiness of their customers.
It is anticipated that the introduction of a privately-owned credit
bureau in the Bahamas should benefit the local economy through
reduced borrowing costs and increased access to loans by individ-
uals and businesses that have good credit scores.”

Tribune Business previously revealed that the Central Bank
was seeking to implement a credit bureau for the Bahamas, with
assistance from the World Bank and Caribbean Regional Training

Centre (CARTAC). Its develop-
ment has long been viewed as a

SEE page 3B

$400k acquisition gives near 2,000 customer base for Bahamas Waste

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Waste has
increased its commercial
garbage collection client base
to "close to 2,000 customers",
and strengthened its grip on
that market through the
$400,000 acquisition of a com-
petitor's division in that field.

Francisco de Cardenas, the
BISX-listed garbage/waste ser-
vices provider's managing
director, told Tribune Business
that the acquisition of
Wastenot's rear load commer-
cial trash collection business
would generate "almost 300
customers" and "about a dozen
new routes through the week".

* Purchase of Wastenot division strengthens BISX-listed firm's market position
* Firm matching 2009 performance for year-to-date
* Hopeful on opportunities from residential garbage privatisation

"It was just a natural thing
to happen. I believe we've
always had the bulk of that
[commercial garbage collection]
business, and obviously it
strengthens our position," Mr
de Cardenas told this newspa-
per. "We're going to study this
very carefully. We believe we
can incorporate it into our exist-
ing routes. We made a com-
mitment to Wastenot customers
to keep the rates she [principal
Ginny McKinney], and take a
look at it after a year or so."

When asked how the rates
compared to those charged by
Bahamas Waste, Mr de Carde-
nas said: "Some are lower. It
varies. She had some different
business philosophies concern-
ing deposits and billings, and
we're going to keep those in
line with what she's imple-
mented.

"We're going to try and
make it as smooth a transition
as possible. It's our aim to keep
every single one of them
[Wastenot customers], keep

them happy and provide unbe-
lievable service so that they will
stick with us."

The $400,000 all-cash deal,
which took effect on Saturday,
May 1, with all payments com-
pleted by August 31, 2010, will
see Bahamas Waste take over
two vehicles from Wastenot -
further boosting its 50-strong
vehicle fleet.

No employees will switch as
a result of the commercial
garbage market consolidation,
although the BISX-listed com-

pany takes over some bins,

rums and other equipment
associated with rear load pack-
er collections.

Bahamas Waste's main
remaining competitors are the
likes of Impac and United San-
itation, the deal allowing Ms
McKinny and Wastenot to con-
tinue operating under their
existing name and concentrate
on other business areas. These
include renewable energy and
recycling initiatives, such as
‘Cans for Kids’.

Bahamas Waste and
Wastenot also remain joint ven-
ture partners in Green Systems,
the western New Providence-

SEE page 4B

news for the 11-store chain and
its shareholders was that the
company continues to find cost-
cutting scope, as operating and
administrative expenses for the
first nine months in 2010
dropped by 11.1 per cent, from
$25.25 million the year before
to $22.44 million this time
around.

However, companies can
only cut so much, whatever
field of business they are in,
and it seems doubtful whether
City Markets has scope for
much more. Unless the compa-
ny is able to regain market
share and increase sales quick-
ly, doubts over its future via-
bility — and the prospect of job
losses and store closures — will
continue to grow.

Bahamian wholesale indus-
try sources have confirmed to

SEE page 4B

Fiscal deficit
to hit 5.2% of
GDP this year

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s fiscal
deficit for its 2009-2010 finan-
cial year is likely to hit 5.2 per
cent of gross domestic product
(GDP), a Wall Street credit rat-
ing agency has warned, with the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
forecasting that the national
debt — already more than $3.9
billion or 53.6 per cent of GDP
— will breach the $4 billion
mark this year.

Both Standard & Poor’s
(S&P) and the Central Bank
continue to send warning sig-
nals about the immediate need
to set the Bahamian public
finances back on a sustainable
path, the former projecting in
its Bahamas country report that
the 2009-2010 fiscal deficit was
set to come in 1.3 percentage
points higher than the original
3.9 per cent forecast “given con-
tinued pressures on revenue”.

“We project a slow decline
in the deficit to about 3 per cent
of GDP by 2012 as economic
conditions strengthen,” S&P
said, indicating that the Gov-
ernment will be unable to
reverse the recent rapid
increase in the national debt in
the short-term at least.

The Wall Street credit rating
agency paints a less than rosy
picture for the Government’s
finances, forecasting that the
2010-2011 fiscal year will pro-
duce a 4.9 per cent fiscal deficit,
followed by deficits of 3.4 per
cent and 3 per cent in 2011-2012
and 2012-2013.

The persistent deficits and

SEE page 7B









The information cot ‘is from a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held
| responsible for errors and/or omission |

fromthe dailyreport, ‘











- .
PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



@ ROVAL FIDELITY MARKET WRA

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT WAS a fair week of trad-
ing in the Bahamian stock mar-
ket. Investors traded in three
out of the 24 listed securities
with one decliner, one advancer
and the other security remain-
ing unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 123,093 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 74,131 shares com-
pared to the previous week's
trading volume of 197,224
shares.

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) was the volume leader
for a third consecutive week,



trading 99,800 shares to see its
share price close the week
down by $0.06 at $5.84.

¢ AML Foods (AML) was
the only advancer for the week,
trading 23,221 shares to see its
stock end the week up $0.03 at
$1.05.

BOND MARKET

There was no activity last
week in the Bahamian bond
market.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:
¢ Focol!l Holdings (FCL)

released unaudited results for
the six months ended January
31, 2010, reporting net income

available to common share-
holders of $7.5million, an
increase of $1.5 million or 25
per cent over the same period
in the prior year.

While both sales revenue and
cost of sales were down in the
period, FCL reported higher
income from operations of
$23.4 million, which increased
by $1.3 million or 6 per cent.

Sales and revenues of $121
million declined by $37 million
or 23 per cent during the peri-
od, while cost of sales saw a
higher decline of $38.3 million
or 28 per cent to total $97.8 mil-
lion.

Management cited invest-
ment in marine fuel trans-
portation and improvements to









The Bahamian Stock Market
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.05 $0.03 23,221 -10.26%
its retail network as key factors | BBL $0.44 $- 0 -30.16%
for long-term success, and indi- | BOB $5.24 $- 0 -11.19%
cated that investments in new | BPF $10.63 ce 0 -1.02%
technology resulted in improve- | BSL $9.42 $- 0 -6.36%
ments in operational efficien- | BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
cy during the past year. CAB $12.07 $- 0 20.94%
FCL’s total operating costs | CBL $5.84 -$0.06 99,800 -16.57%
of $14.5 million declined by | CHL $2.84 $- 72 4.41%
$300,000 or 2 per cent from | CIB $10.60 $- 0 6.11%
$14.8 million reported in the | CWCB $2.83 -$0.17 0 -0.70%
previous period. DHS $2.54 $- 0 -0.39%
FCL’s earnings per share of | FAM $6.07 $- 0 -6.47%
$0.22 increased by $0.05 from | FBB $2.17 $- 0 -8.44%
the $0.17 reported in the prior | FCC $0.27 ce 0 0.00%
period. Total assets and liabili- | FCL $5.08 $- 0 6.50%
ties of the company at January | FCLB $1.00 oe 0 0.00%
31, 2010, stood at $127 million | FIN $9.08 $- 0 -2.16%
and $28 million respectively, | ICD $5.59 $- 0 0.00%
compared to $120 million and | JsJ $9.95 $- 0 0.00%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

SEE page 6B

Business Insurance

“Ask for business Insurance trom a
company that measures up to the job"

Security & General is a local company with international credentials - offering the benefits of business experience at home

and overseas, as a member of Colonial Group International. Group companies have helped customers with over $300 million

of hurricane-related claims since 2000. Group savings and administrative efficiencies benefit customers too - with the best

products at the best possible price, from a company where people come first.

CALL 326-7100 for an agent
or visit www.cgigroup.bm

SECURITY
& GENERAL

SECURITY & GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.

Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box N-3540 Nassau Tel. 326-7100

www.cgigroup.bm >

Security & General Insurance is

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life rated A (Excellent) by AM Best

Being on time has Its benerits.

It's easy... receive a 15% discount just by
showing this coupon at the FedEx locations
listed below. Same service, better prices.

Visit us at:

EE Mackey Plaza
Thompson Blvd.

Nassau
Tel: (242) 322-5656/57

seventeen Shopping Center
Phase 2

Woodstock and Bank Lane
Freeport

Ic] VULVA teas LOYAL LOK
Norfolk House

Aste (stg Hees vinstsil

Nassau

Tel: (242) 322-5656/57

cusy@neil

ae oe

Express

ee

ly

Applies to cash sales only. Shipments must be
dropped off at this World Service Center location
FedEx standard terms and conditions apply. This
FedEx discount offer cannot be combined with
any other FedEx discounts available.

im LOM UNE RPAUL

(ides sae)
FedEx Tracking No.

®
(els)





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010, PAGE 3B



=
Expo presence aims to boost China investment

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



THE GOVERNMENT is hoping
to leverage the World Expo in Shang-
hai, China, to increase invesment inter-
est in the Bahamas by adding a stand-
alone, investment centred area to the
Bahamas’ booth that will be manned
by members of the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB), it was
revealed.

The Bahamas Booth, designed to

showcase the Islands of the Bahamas
along with their heritage and culture, is
also showcasing to the world - through
some 70 million people expected to
visit - investment opportunities for this
country.

Liaison for the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, Eugene Newry, said during a
press conference organised by the Min-
istry of Tourism that investment
opportunities will be highlighted by
the BFSB during the six-month run of
the World Expo.

The Expo, which carries the theme

‘Better City, Better life', includes a
Caribbean Pavilion, of which the
Bahamas is a part and is expected to
receive 15 per cent of expected visitors
or 10 million people. Or “at a more
modest rate", 3.5 million visitors or
19,000 visitors per day.

The Ministry of Tourism, as is the
region, is hoping to capture the atten-
tion the more than 100 million out-
bound travelers coming from China
by 2020.

The Caribbean’s Pavilion and the
Bahamas’ elaborate booth were sub-

sidized by a $600,000 grant by the Chi-
nese government. The Bahamas gov-
ernment contributed $100,000 to the
construction of this country’s booth.

The Bahamas Booth is in the shape
of a sailing sloop and is repelete with
Bahamian-made handicraft, Junkanoo
sculptures and specially designed
kiosks highlighting Atlantis and Baha
Mar. Those resorts each contributed
$25,000 to the development of the
country’s booth.

“The exhibit in the open gallery at
the back of the booth interprets the

Expo theme of ‘Better City, Better
Life’ with a depiction of the ambitious,
futuristic project of the revitalization of
the City of Nassau,” a MInistry of For-
eign Affairs and Tourism release said.
“Video Presentations on continu-
ous rotation will showcase the newly
dredged harbour, which accomodates
Genesis class cruise ships and the new
Oasis of the Seas; the remodelling of
Bay Street, including the new Straw
Market; and the relocated container
port (demonstating the Bahamas’
ever-growing trade capacity).”



BTC, from 1B

next two weeks, following
which further due diligence
would take place. The offer's
terms were likely to be accept-
able to the Government, one
source said.

Mr Laing, though, declined
to comment when questioned
on this by Tribune Business.
He had previously told this
newspaper that while three
months behind, the Govern-
ment would have a good sense
of where the process was going
by end-June, indicating that

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham may have something to say
on the matter in his Budget
statement, given that the BTC
sale proceeds have been ear-
marked for paying down
debt/closing the fiscal deficit.
S&P's analysis on the
Bahamas' sovereign credit rat-
ing, released last week, said:
"The Government hoped to
receive $200-$300 million in
proceeds from the sale of a 51
per cent stake in BTC in the
first half of 2010 to alleviate
financing needs. "However, the
Government has once again
postponed the privatisation fol-

lowing seeming disappointment
with the bids and prices offered
at the end of 2009. Plans have
existed to sell BTC since the
first Ingraham government, and
when it took office again in
2007, it cancelled the sale of
BTC to Bluewater Communi-
cations, which the previous
administration had arranged."

The "postponed" statement
is at odds with the Govern-
ment-appointed privatisation
committee's recent assertion
that 'due diligence’ on the
prospective bidders was con-
tinuing.

Those invited through to the

due diligence round included J.
P. Morgan/Vodafone; Atlantic
Tele-Network/CFAL; Trilogy
International Partners; and Dig-
icel. Tribune Business last week
heard whispers that both Digi-
cel and J. P. Morgan/Vodafone
were no longer interested,
which would be a surprise in
the latter's case, given that it
was a frontrunner and others
have said it is still at the table.

Speculation of a $130 million
purchase price for 51 per cent
of BTC has not been con-
firmed, nor has a valuation of
$250-$260 million for the whole

company.

ae
ae
N

D

Nassau Airport

Development Company

UINTT |

NAD Concierge

The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking



CREDIT, from 1B

logical extension to the Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH),
which was implemented by the
Bahamian commercial banks
earlier this year.

There can be little doubting
the Central Bank’s concerns
with regard to insulating the
Bahamian commercial banking
industry from the effects of the
credit crunch/global recession.

“To ensure that banks main-
tained sufficient levels of capital
to act as a buffer against the
systemic risk associated with
the significant credit concen-
tration in the Bahamas, the
[Central] Bank, in November
2009, set higher minimum risk-
weighted target and trigger
ratios, of 17 per cent and 14 per
cent respectively, for all com-
mercial banks,” the Central
Bank’s annual report said.

“With average risk weighted
capital adequacy ratios across
the domestic banking sector of
approximately 24 per cent at
end-2009,k and well above the
minimum capital standards of 8
per cent, the revision did not

CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch
Private Banking

present an immediate challenge
for the major banks.”

The Bahamas Interbank Set-
tlement System (BISS), the
complement to the ACH,
which makes real time pay-
ments of high value, critical
transactions between Bahamian
clearing banks, saw a 17.1 per
cent increase in volume to
53,277 such dealings during
2009. There was also a 6.8 per
cent gain in the value of these
transactions to $10.8 billion.

“Partly reflecting the
increased usage of ATM and
debit card facilities, the volume
of retail cheques cleared among
banks fell by 6.3 per cent to 3.5
million, with the value lower
by 15.5 per cent at $7.3 billion,”
the Central Bank’s annual
report said.

It also found that the amount
of currency liabilities it held, as
wells as the quantity of curren-
cy in circulation, both contract-
ed by 1.2 per cent to $319.8 mil-
lion and $319.2 million respec-
tively during 2009.

“On average, currency in cir-
culation fell, month-on-month,
by 3.3 per cent to $279.4 mil-
lion — equivalent to an estimat-

ed 3.7 per cent of GDP, up
from 2.8 per cent in 2008,” the
Central Bank said.

Meanwhile, its key perfor-
mance indicator for the
Bahamas’ critical foreign
exchange reserves, the ratio of
external reserves to base mon-
ey, “remained within and even
exceeded the [Central] Bank’s
established band of 90-100 per
cent between March and
December 2009.” They were
aided in this goal by the Gov-
ernment’s domestic foreign cur-
rency borrowings, coupled with
its $300 million bond issue and
$178.8 million in International
Monetary Fund (IMF) special
drawing rights.

The Government’s stock of
outstanding bonds rose by 9.6
per cent in 2009 to $2.269 bil-
lion, the Central Bank added,
as two new issues worth a col-
lective $257.2 million were
launched, while one $60 mil-
lion issue was redeemed. As for
Treasury Bills, these increased
by $13.8 million to $244.3 mil-
lion outstanding in 2009.

When it came to dormant
Bahamas-based bank accounts,
upon which no customer activ-

is presently considering applications for
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER — CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICAN DESK

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business
Development Officer covering Central and South American Markets:

Requirements:

Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in

Banking & Finance)

At least seven (7) years banking experience including relationship
management, trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities

markets

Marketing experience throughout Central and South America
Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$150 Mio and a well developed network within

the market regions

Strong communication skills in Spanish/English is a requirement to facilitate
marketing and relationship management with clients and prospects and a
third language would be beneficial
Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout Central and South America and utilize
a network of existing contacts and associates
Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Duties will include:

* Acquisition and development of new offshore Central and South American

based clients

- Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the
set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures

- Advising clients on products, services and investment opportunities

« Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from Central

and South America

Personal Qualities:

* Acommitment to service excellence
* Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
* Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills
+ Ability to work independently

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the
minimum requirements need not apply.

Telephone calls will not be accepted.
Applications should be submitted to:

Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: MAY 10, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



ity has taken place for seven
years, the Central Bank said 48
institutions reported accounts
worth a collective $5.1 million

to it in this regard.

“The bank processed approx-
imately $1.2 million in claims,
compared to $0.3 million in
2008,” the Central Bank’s
annual report said. “As at end-
2009, the outstanding stock of
dormant account balances
administered by the [Central]
Bank totalled the equivalent of
$41.4 million, net of claims set-
tled since 1989, when the first
transfers were received.”

PN Cosetteaar- rete!
vailable

EBRD. Asin

Positions

Fax: 322-2243

Tiel
henfield@lincolnbethel.com



candidates for the position of Concierge. The ideal individual must
be able to provide superior customer service to passengers at LPIA.

REPORTS TO - Manager, Customer Experience

Key responsibilities include but are not limited to: Daily facility

required

inspections, responding to customer service and tenant calls,
facilitating solutions to complaints and situations as they arise,
supervising the Arawak Lounge, responding to the needs and
requests of tenants and business partners and monitoring the
performance of airport contractors i.e. janitorial. Shift work will be

QUALIFICATIONS

* Associate degree in a related field required

+ 3-5 years experience in a customer service role required
* Effective communicator and problem solver

+ Ability to multi-task, prioritize and make sound on-the-spot

decisions

* Team Player

For more details, please visit the PEOPLE section of
our website at www.nas.bs

Ifyou are qualified and interested, please submit your
resume by May 14, 2010 to:

Manager, People

Nassau Airport Development Company
P.O. Box AP 59229

Nassau, Bahamas

or e-mail people@nas.bs







OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com



eA ee

Grand Bahama Power Company has a position available for a Financial
Controller, This is a management position that reports to the Vice President of
Finance with the following responsibilities.

Responsibilities:

* Planning, directing and coordinating all accounting functions.

* Managing the accumulation of all financial data necessary for the
production of monthly financial statements and other financial reports.

* Coordinating activities of external auditors.

* Providing upper management with information vital to the decision-
making process,

+ Assessing current accounting operations, offering recommendations for
improvement and implementing new processes.

* [Fivaluation of the effectiveness of accounting software and supporting
database, as needed.

* Developing and monitoring business performance metrics.

* Oversight and training of accounting staff.

Requirements:

* Must be a Certified Public Accountant (CPA, CA, ACCA).

«At least seven years of relevant experience and a Bachelor's Degree in
Accounting or Finance.

* Must possess good communication, technology, analytical and
management skills,

* Knowledge of all aspects of international accounting standards.

Applications with supporting documents including a clean Police Certificate and
proof of Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:

ETTORE SO eT EWE ote On
OIA RW EURO Pe AOU eben OILED OD

P.O, BOX F-40888
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS

May 10,2010

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Kaping Grand Bahana Fate Bright








PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE
INSIGHT

Ob to d :

ama to do

‘everything
possible’
on oil spill

VENICE, La.



FACED with an environmental
catastrophe, President Barack
Obama rushed to the Gulf Coast
on Sunday to inspect forces
arrayed against a spreading oil
gusher threatening fragile coastal
wetlands. Cabinet members said
the situation was grave, but insist-
ed the administration was doing
everything it could, according to
Associated Press.

Under threat of tornadoes, the
president shunned helicopter trav-
el and drove from New Orleans
to tour a close-to-the-water staging
area where the government and
well-owner BP are trying to keep
the 30-mile long oil slick from
causing even more damage. As of
now, it appeared little could be
done in the short term to stem the
oil flow.,

Impact

At his first stop, Obama ques-
tioned Adm. Thad Allen, the
Coast Guard commandant, about
the potential impact on shipping
lanes in the Gulf.

The leaking oil well is not only
an ecological disaster but a poten-
tial political hazard, as well,
depending on how the public
judges the Obama administration's
response. Then-President George
W. Bush stumbled in dealing with
Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf in
2005, leaving the impression of a

president distant from the
immense suffering. His presidency
never recovered.

Homeland Security Secretary
Janet Napolitano said any com-
parison between the ruptured BP
oil well and Katrina was "a total
mischaracterization" and that the
government has taken an "all
hands on deck" approach.

Administration officials have
been at pains to explain that Oba-
ma's late March decision to
expand offshore oil exploration
could be altered as a result of the
spill and that stricter safety rules
would doubtless be written into
leases.

In reality, oil companies and the
government lack the technology
to prevent the damage from a well
gushing masses of oil, killing
wildlife and tainting a delicate
ecosystem. The oil washing ashore
could ruin the coastal fishing
industry.

While the government has
mobilized masses of equipment to
scoop up, burn and block the oil
from moving ashore, the tools to
contain the ecological and eco-
nomic damage washing devastat-
ingly toward the coast were akin
to big game hunting with a pellet
gun.

Allen said the volume crude oil
spewing from the damaged well-
head a mile deep in the Gulf of
Mexico could climb to 100,000
barrels a day, with 60 days to 90
days needed for BP to drill relief
wells to stem the flow. He spoke



—————







OUT OF WORK fishermen hired by BP PLC and crew boat workers lay oil booms in preparation for the looming oil spill from
the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig at Elephant Pass, ina tributary of the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana

on Sunday.

to the obvious urgency of stop-
ping the flow of crude.

"The difference between 1,000
and 5,000 barrels a day (original
estimates), when you look at the
potential discharge of 100,000,
leads me to believe that there are
a lot of inaccuracies associated
with trying to estimate flow froma
broken pipe at 5,000 feet," Allen
said. "That's the reason it's so
very, very important we focus on
stopping this leak right away."

If BP's unmanned submarines
are unable to activate a failed
shut-off valve on the sea floor —
attempts have been futile for days
now — it could take 6 days to 8
days for the oil company to try to
smother the spewing wellhead
with a 74-ton metal and concrete
box.

That was the estimate Sunday
from Lamar McKay, chairman and



eampound, Shirley Street.

og

fay seal

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
MATERIALS MANAGEMENT DIRECTORATE

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
MEDICAL & SURGICAL AND RELATED ITEMS FOR THE NATIONAL
INSURANCE BOARD- NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG PLAN (NPDP)

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Medical and Surgical
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and
The Ministry of Health, The Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

The Tender CD, which includes Instruction to the Tenderers along with other
Relevant information, can be collected 9:00 a.m. — 3:00 pam., Monday through
Friday at the Materials Management Directorate, Princess Margaret Hospital’s

president of BP America, who
appeared on ABC's "This Week."
The oil slick now threatens not
only the Louisiana coast but also
the beaches of neighboring Mis-
sissippi and further east along the
Florida Panhandle.

Briefed

White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs told reporters with
the president that Obama was
briefed on the spill for 50 minutes
during the flight from Washing-
ton by homeland security and
counterterrorism adviser John
Brennan and energy adviser Car-
ol Browner. Chief of staff Rahm
Emanuel rounded out the presi-
dential party.

Gibbs said Brennan and Brown-
er went "through a series of sce-

narios," while Obama wanted to
know "what was the latest on our
first, our biggest priority, which is
capping the well."

Like Napolitano, Gibbs said the
president was visiting "to make
sure that we are continuing to do
all that is humanly possible."

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar
tried to assure Americans that BP,
rather than taxpayers, would pay
for what will likely become the
nation's worst oil disaster.

"We will not spare any effort
on the part of the United States of
America to make sure that all of
their resources are brought effec-
tively to address the problem."

The bill's going to be an extra-
ordinary hit on BP's bottom line.
The sea shore and the animals and
fishermen who depend on them
will pay, perhaps, an even heavier
cost.



an

NEW YORK CITY Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, at podium, accompanied by Mayor Michael
Bloomberg, right, Speaker Christine Quinn, 2nd right, and Governor David Paterson, left, hold a news
conference Sunday morning, May 2, 2010 in Times Square near where a car carrying three propane
tanks, fireworks and two filled 5-gallon gasoline containers was found Saturday night. Heavily armed
police and emergency vehicles shut down the city's busiest streets, teeming with taxis and theatergo-
ers on one of the first summer-like days of the year. (AP)

NYPD: No evidence of a
Taliban link to SUV bomb

Atender CD must be submitted along with printed copies (duplicated) ina sealed
envelope or package identified as

“TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
MEDICAL & SURGICAL AND RELATED ITEMS FOR
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD- NATIONAL
PRESCRIPTION DRUG PLAN (NPDP)~
and addressed to:

NEW YORK

THERE was no evidence of a
Taliban link to a failed bomb
found in a smoking SUV parked
in Times Square, and police
were on their way to Pennsyl-
vania to talk to a man who said
he may have recorded a bomb-
ing suspect in a nearby alley, the
police commissioner said Sun-
day, according to Associated
Press.

The video apparently shows a
white man in his 40s taking off
his shirt in the alley and putting
it in a bag, Commissioner Ray
Kelly said.

Police found the SUV parked
on one of the prime blocks for
Broadway shows such as "The
Lion King" after being alerted
by two street vendors on Satur-
day night. Thousands of tourists
were cleared from the streets
for 10 hours, and the bomb was
dismantled. No one was injured.

The SUV contained three
propane tanks, fireworks, two
filled 5-gallon gasoline contain-
ers and two clocks with batter-
ies, electrical wire and other
components, police said. Timers
were connected to a 16-ounce

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Fifth Terrace Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau Bahamas,

All tenders must be received at the above address on or
hefore Spm May 21°" 2010.
A copy of a valid business license and National Insurance
Certificate must accompany all proposals.





The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).





can filled with fireworks that
were apparently intended to set
the gas cans afire, then ignite
the three barbecue-grill-sized
propane tanks.

Kelly said it was "the intent of
whoever did this to cause may-
hem, create casualties."

Mayor Michael Bloomberg
called the explosive device
"amateurish" but potentially
deadly, noting: "We are very
lucky.”

"We avoided what could have
been a very deadly event,"
Bloomberg said. "It certainly
could have exploded and had a
pretty big fire and a decent
amount of explosive impact."

Police also found eight bags of
an unknown substance in a gun
locker that was in the smoking
SUV, Kelly said. The substance
"looks and feels" like fertilizer,
he said, but tests were pending.

A group that monitors mili-
tant websites had said the Pak-
istani Taliban claimed respon-
sibility.

A T-shirt vendor and a hand-
bag vendor alerted police at
about 6:30 p.m. Saturday, the
height of dinner hour before
theatergoers head to Saturday

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

night shows.

Duane Jackson, a 58-year-old
handbag vendor from
Buchanan, N.Y., said he noticed
the car and wondered who had
left it there.

"That was my first thought:
Who sat this car here?" Jack-
son said Sunday.

Jackson said he looked in the
car and saw keys in the ignition
with 19 or 20 keys on a ring. He
said he alerted a passing mount-
ed police officer.

They were looking in the car
"when the smoke started com-
ing out and then we heard the
little pop pop pop like fire-
crackers going out and that's
when everybody scattered and
ran back," he said.

"Now that I saw the propane
tanks and the gasoline, what if
that would have ignited?" Jack-
son said. "I'm less than 8 feet
away from the car. We dodged a
bullet here."

Connecticut license plates on
the vehicle did not match up,
and police had interviewed the
Connecticut car owner, who told
them he had sent the plates to a
nearby junkyard, Bloomberg
said.
MONDAY, MAY 3, 2010





INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Access all areas?





LEGALISED GAMBLING AND ENTRY TO LOCAL CASINOS

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

SEGREGATION is a
provocative word and should
not be used lightly, especial-
ly in societies where institu-
tionalised discrimination was
a feature of recent history.

The concept is most often
associated with oppression,
cruelty and racial prejudice,
but is by no means confined
to these characteristics; seg-
regation can take place with-
out malicious intent and is
not always implemented
according to race.

That a well intentioned
double standard is no less
harmful to the human spirit
than a malicious one — thanks
to its fundamental unfairness
—is a proposition all Bahami-
ans should keep in mind
when contemplating the fact
that their country’s laws pro-
hibit citizens from gambling
but protect the right of for-
eigners to wager their earn-
ings.

As activist Lincoln Bain
said last week:

“There should not be a law
that allows some people to
gamble, but not all. There
would not be a law to allow
tourists to smoke marijuana
and prohibit Bahamians, or
for tourists to run the red
lights and not Bahamians.
The whole law is ludicrous
and reminiscent of the 1950s
and 1960s segregation era.”

What then, are we to
make of the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s recommenda-
tion that if the government
is going to legalise some
forms of gambling for locals,
casinos should be exempt
from this plan?

It is not, as some have sug-
gested, a sinister plot hatched
by foreign hotel bosses to dis-
criminate against Bahamians;
both Sarkis Izmirlian of Baha
Mar and George Markanto-
nis, CEO of Atlantis, have
said they are open to
Bahamian casino clientele.

A distinction must also be
made between the BHA’s
position and the hypocritical
posture of some religious
leaders, who oppose any
change in the law in an effort
to maintain the prominent
position of “morality” in
national affairs and thereby
preserve their own signifi-
cance.

BHA members say that,
like the politicians who have
propped up the blanket gam-
bling ban over the years,
their intention is to protect
Bahamians from themselves.
Calling for careful consider-
ation before any change to
the law is made, former
Prime Minister Perry Christie
explained that “all govern-
ments up to now have sort of
elected to avoid the calami-
tous social consequences and
people who talk about having
freedom, they say ‘Well









you're interfering with our
freedom’. But governments
knew from the experience of
some other countries that it
has a dire impact upon pop-
ulations and people who are
tempted to go for the big
prize and spending even their
children's lunch money."

According to former
finance minister James
Smith, keeping locals out of
casinos is a smart move for
other reasons as well.

Casino taxes have long
been a reliable source of for-
eign currency, and Mr Smith
is worried that locals gam-
bling will have the double
effect of allowing the casinos
to pay the government at
least partially in local cur-
rency, while at the same time
draining our foreign reserves
as hotel owners convert
Bahamian dollars before
sending their earnings out of
the country.

As Mr Christie suggested,
the gambling question is
essentially a philosophical
one: whether our personal
freedoms are worth preserv-
ing even if their expression
could lead to disastrous con-
sequences; whether the gov-
ernment has the right to pro-
tect you from yourself.

But regardless of the
answer, there is a subtle but
enormously important dis-
tinction between the blanket
ban and the prospect of
Bahamians being allowed to
gamble everywhere but in
foreign-owned casinos.

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Until now, the ban has
been construed as a moral
imperative which, whether
misguided or not, is intended
to protect Bahamians from
the supposedly corrosive
effects of gambling on the
conscience, character and
wallet.

If the ban is lifted but casi-
nos remain off limits, the new
message will not be moral
but social — with a new dan-
ger and a new victim. Sud-
denly, it will not be Bahami-
ans who must be protected
from themselves, but foreign
tourists who must be pro-
tected from “the natives.”

In this sense, what the
BHA suggests would indeed
be a return to a policy remi-
niscent of the 1950s, when all
but the “right” locals were
banned from casinos for
exactly this reason.

That the BHA does not
intend it to be so is not the
point; it will be characterised
in this way by many Bahami-
ans to whom equality
remains a sensitive issue, and
the fact that it would be our
own government and not for-
eign hotel owners enforcing
this state of
affairs
will

likely make matters worse.

Anyone who fails to
recognise the potential for
such a law to spark vocal,
energetic and public opposi-
tion is not sufficiently
acquainted with our procliv-
ity for protest and righteous
indignation.

And the protesters would
at the very least have on their
side that such a law is a clear
violation of the constitution,
which strictly prohibits dis-
crimination, defining it as any
situation in which one group
is “accorded privileges or
advantages which are not
accorded to persons of anoth-
er such description.”

In this, our founding doc-
ument reflects those of many
other countries, which might
explain why if a casino ban
were to take effect,

t h oe














Bahamas would become only
the third country in the
world, after Vietnam and
South Korea, where gam-
bling is legal but locals are
kept out of establishments
reserved for tourists.

Samoa and Guyana, which
have fledgling casino indus-
tries, are wrestling with the
same issues and many peo-
ple in both countries have
responded with outrage to
suggestions of foreigner-only
casinos, which many see as a
question of race as well as
nationality. One commenta-
tor said the Samoa govern-
ment “had better go over
their notes again before there
is a major problem.”

Our politicians would do
well to consider themselves
the intended target of this
warning, particularly as casi-
nos here are already fre-
quented by Bahamians
adept at imitating the
accent and mannerisms
of Americans. And while
they are by no means all
white, the vast majority are.
It is likely this practice will

become

even more common, as the
legalisation of other forms of
gambling will strengthen the
already widespread feeling
that playing a few hands is
not a “real” breach of the
law.

The net effect in the minds
of most Bahamians will be
that a situation has arisen in
which their own government
enforces the right of foreign-
ers and local elites to indulge
in a privilege that the average
Bahamian cannot — segrega-
tion based on race, and class.

At the same time, there is
no question that the conse-
quences of granting Bahami-
ans full access to casinos after
so many years are unpre-
dictable. And while the idea
that lifting the ban will lead
to the black-jack tables being
overwhelmed by hordes of
undesirables is little more
than bigotry and paranoia, it
is fair to point out that the
number of disagreeable inci-
dents that place on casino
floors is likely to increase.

But this does not have to
be a question for the govern-
ment. Following the incident
at Atlantis’ Marina Village
in which two security guards
were shot, the resort demon-
strated it is more than capa-
ble of regulating what hap-
pens on its own private prop-
erty.

Many hotels already
restrict the use of facilities
and amenities to hotel guests
or those who take part in
organised visits, and there is
no reason why this could or
should not be extended to
cover the casinos. This would
mean Bahamians who stay in
a hotel would be allowed to
gamble in its casino just like
any other guest.

Hoteliers might not con-
sider this an ideal solution,
as it places the responsibility
for enforcement — and a cer-
tain level of resentment and
hostility that will inevitably
come with it — squarely on
their shoulders. Still, they
would do well to remember
that their own prosperity
depends largely on the social
climate in which they operate
and that supporting a law
which reinforces such inflam-
matory distinctions as “rich
and poor”, “black and white”
or “local and foreigner” will
not benefit them in the long
run.

What do you think?
pnunez@tribunemedia.net





Features include:

Air conditioning

14-09 1.8-litre 4-cylinder angine
Automatic transmission

Power windows, locks and mirrors

EXECUTIVE | c=:
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Auto Mall, Shirley Street qopp. St Matthew's (church)
Mon to Fin Sam. - 5:30pm
Sat Bam - |2noom

tel: 397-1700

E-mail: exscmatoniaibatelmet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed

GP) TOYOTA moving forward

Driver front airbag & front passenger airbag
4-wheel antilock brake sytem [ABS)
Remote keyless entry

Anti-theft system with engine immabililzer
AM/FM CD MP3 ployer

Backed by o 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty.



Avadlabla in Grand Gaharea al Geelty Asie Bales Feeepart) = Queens Hig S629 022 © Abaes Motor Mall, Dee Maetary Bie, 267-290







xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EG13RK525_G5KLSK INGEST_TIME 2011-07-26T21:00:00Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01562
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES