Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

The Tribune Ex

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

USA TODAY
BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

Pim blowin’ it

HIGH 87F
LOW 74F

es, SUNNY AND
w BREELY

Volume: 106 No.133



McDonald's downtown

CS EMC mel dy

24 hours

CE Ee eer rte





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Children
and domestic
violence

China — a land

BURY |
Hea

DS e

my
Ta
Rea

-
J
yf
i
ae
Vi

fascination
SEE PAGE FIVE





SEES)

i

Gay club battle: 7

police with their investi-
gations into the murder
of George Carey.

Mr Carey, 21, of
Bamboo Street, in the
Pinewood Gardens sub-
division, was admitted

Women
charged in
hit-and-run
tragedy

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO women, charged
with murder in the hit-and-
run death of a young woman
outside a gay night club,
were arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Unelta St Louis, 21, and
Angela Newchurch, 27, both
of Fox Hill Road were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in
court One, Bank Lane yes-
terday, charged with the
murder of Orial Farrington.
According to reports, Far-
rington, 20, of Nelson Street
was struck down by the dri-
ver of a 2008 Toyota Corolla
outside the Garage night-
club on Gladstone Road
early Sunday morning. The
incident occurred after a
massive fight, which started
inside the club, spilled into
the parking lot.

St Louis and Newchurch
were not required to enter a
plea to the murder charge.
The two women are repre-
sented by attorneys Jan
Cargill, Tai Pinder and Mary
Bain. Mr Cargill told the

SEE page 12

FML tlenies
involvement in
‘loan’ scheme

THE FML Group of
Companies has denied any
involvement in a local
“loan” scheme that claims
to guarantee applicants
$5,000 if they are able to
come up with a cash down
payment of $500.

Over the past two weeks,
a local “business” has
reportedly sprung up in the
Palmdale area under the
pretext that it was being
backed by the well-known
FML Group of Companies
and its proprietor Craig
Flowers.

However, executives at
FML have denied any con-
nection with this business.

When visiting the estab-
lishment where these alleged
loan agreements were being

SEE page 12







TT Mic PAM AOU RSIECUE
Felipé Major/Tribune staff

CHARGED: Angela Newchurch, 27

CHARGED: Unelta St Louis, 21.





AN updated series of $10 banknotes will
be issued by the Central Bank bearing the
image of Sir Stafford Sands, former Minis-
ter of Finance and a principal architect of
the modern Bahamian economy, it was
announced late yesterday.

“Sir Stafford's image was first placed
on the banknote on March 7, 2000, when
the series 2000 banknotes were released
into circulation, replacing the image of Her
Majesty Queen Elizabeth IT,” said the gov-



SIR STAFFORD SANDS



Banknotes to bear image of Sir Stafford Sands

ernment release. However, in 2005 the
PLP government under Perry Christie had
Sir Stafford’s image removed and replaced
by the image of the Queen.

Shortly after coming to office in 2007
the Ingraham Government decided that
when the 2005 series of banknotes bear-
ing the image of the Queen expired the
new series of $10 banknotes would again

SEE page twelve





Civil Aviation pledges action



over pilots’ flying hours

By ALESHA CADET



_ Officer who killed Brenton Smith
stayed on duty following death
By MEGAN REYNOLDS =F

: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net





CIVIL Aviation has said it will ensure that every possible :
action will be taken against airlines if they force their pilots :
to fly more than the allowed number of hours.

This comes as a group of pilots at Lynden Pindling Inter- :
national Airport (LPIA) expressed concerns about their :
jobs, their safety and the safety of the public. :

The pilots claim they are overworked and overtired, and :

SEE page twelve

yesterday.

THE police officer who shot and
: killed teenager Brenton Smith
remained armed and on the force
while his conduct came under scrutiny
: ina coroner’s inquest, it was revealed

SEE page twelve

BRENTON SMITH



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER





wr a SS UL RY)

~ Man helping
police with
George Carey

murder probe







A MAN is helping

to hospital last Saturday
suffering multiple stab
wounds. He died on
Tuesday.

It is believed Mr
Carey was at Lockhart’s
Place, on Wulff Road,
when he was attacked
by a group of men.

Yesterday police said
that a 29-year-old man
who lives at Fire Trail
Road is being ques-
tioned.

Police are also inves-
tigating a stabbing inci-
dent at Solider Road
and Abundant Life
Road which left a young
man in hospital yester-
day morning.

Press Liaison Officer
Sergeant Chrislyn Skip-
pings said police were
informed of the incident
around 11.30am yester-
day. Responding offi-
cers were told that a
man got into an alterca-
tion with two other men
which led to the victim
being stabbed in his
abdomen.

He is in serious con-
dition in hospital. Police
investigations continue.

Meanwhile, police
arrested two men after a
search of a house in the
Joan's Heights area
revealed a quantity of
suspected marijuana.

Sgt Skippings said
officers from the Drug
Enforcement Unit exe-
cuted the search warrant
around 10.04pm on
Thursday at New Hope

SEE page 12











Police look
into apparent
drowning

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Grand Bahama
are investigating the appar-
ent drowning of an American
visitor who was snorkeling at
Deadman’s Reef yesterday.

According to reports, the
victim — a 71-year-old woman
from Baltimore, Maryland —
arrived in Grand Bahama
onboard the Carnival Pride
cruise ship.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said she was among a group
of visitors who went on a
snorkeling trip at Deadman’s
Reef.

While snorkeling, the
woman experienced some
complications and was assist-
ed to a boat, said Ms Mackey.

SEE page 12



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise

Awards Two Paul

THE Rotary Club of Nas-
sau Sunrise bestowed a Paul
Harris Fellow Award on two
women who have made a dif-
ference for thousands of
Bahamians.

Jacqueline Knowles, coor-
dinator of PACE (Providing
Access to Continued Educa-
tion) and Nancy McDonald
of Read Bahamas have
worked tirelessly and pas-
sionately in educating and
improving the lives of others
and making them better
equipped.

Last month at a recognition
dinner, members of the
Rotary Club of Nassau Sun-
rise, the Rotary Bahamas,
assistant district governor
Felix Stubbs, past Rotary
International director Barry

Rassin and others paid trib-
ute to Mrs Knowles and Mrs
McDonald.

Jacqueline Knowles is the
coordinator of the PACE pro-
gramme for mentoring teen
mothers.

“She understands the strug-
gle of these young women
from her experience as a sur-
rogate mother to her siblings
and was once a teenage mom
herself, ” said a spokesman.

“She is a woman with a big
heart and has spent most of
her adult life helping the less
fortunate in our society. Her
dedication to education
earned her the Teacher of the
Year Award (1994-95) at the
C C Sweeting Senior High
School and she is also
involved with the Bahamas





PAUL Harris Fellow Recipient Nancy McDonald receiving her award
from Past Int'l Director Barry Rassin (left) and P.P. William T.

Teacher Mentoring Pro-
gramme. Married and a proud
mother of four children and
two grandchildren, she is a

member of the Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Church.

“Nancy McDonald’s con-
tribution to literacy has been

remarkable during her eight
years in the Bahamas. Upon
learning about the lack of
libraries in many schools,
especially in the Family
Islands, she wanted to make a
difference. As a result, she
founded Read Bahamas in
2007 and began donating
books to those schools in
need. Her concern for the
future of the Bahamian chil-
dren and their ability to have
books available have taken
her throughout the islands of
the Bahamas.

“Through the assistance of
numerous partners, Mrs
McDonald has delivered
almost 15,000 books to over
85 schools throughout the
archipelago. She is driven by
her passion for reading and

Harris Fellows

her love of books as well as
the positive impact this pro-
gramme has had on the
Bahamian children.”

The Paul Harris Fellow
Award is named after the
founder of Rotary Interna-
tional and has many recogni-
tion levels.

Donors of US$1,000.00 or
more to the Rotary Founda-
tion's Annual Programmes
Fund, PolioPlus or the
Humanitarian Grants Pro-
gramme, or people who have
that amount contributed in
their name, can be recognised
as Paul Harris Fellows.

The Rotary Club of Nassau
Sunrise made a $2,000 dona-
tion to the Rotary Founda-
tion for Mrs Knowles’ and
Mrs McDonald’s awards.











KENISKA Bain, Sandals administrative assistant, is pictured with
Ruth Strachan (left), acting administrator of the ‘Nazareth Centre.

Sandals Foundation donates
Supplies to Nazareth Centre

THE Nazareth Centre, a children’s home located in Mille- *
nium Gardens, received much needed supplies during a visit by :
a team from Sandals last week. Sandals Royal Bahamian’s :
public relations manager Stacy Mackey and administrative ;
assistant Keniska Bain presented acting administrator of the
centre Ruth Strachan with an assortment of books, school sup-
plies, toys and clothing from the Sandals Foundation.

The Sandals Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Sandals
Resorts International, was officially launched in 2009 and is the
culmination of three decades of work in communities where
Sandals operates across the Caribbean, the company said.

Opened since 2002, Nazareth Centre is home to 45 children
who range from infant to twelve years of age. Ms Strachan
thanked Sandals for its contribution and said that the kind

gesture was much appreciated.



urtz Ritchie/Photo



TURTLE Ie LC
in Supermodel of the
HVT UT HULU



THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY



Sat Ist May 12noon - 6pm

Botanical Gardens

Bingo, Hoopla, Games, Agility Show, Door Prizes
Bring your dog to the dog show.



8 | Lightbourn
| Trading Co Ltd






TITLE winners of the
Supermodel of the Bahamas
competition held this week are
being hailed as shining exam-
ples of fresh faces from the
island of Grand Bahama.

Peandra Knowles and
Sinardo Deleveaux, both from
Grand Bahama, came out as
title winners in the female and
male category, as 21 finalists
from throughout the country
took to the runway in a com-
petition that has been under-
way for several months.

Similar to America’s Next
Top Model, many of the con-
testants had never modelled
before, but were selected and
trained for the competition.

The young men, women
and girls ranging in ages from
six to 24 years showed their
model best at the British
Colonial Hilton and tried to
impress the international
judges, Kendell Monroe (for-
mer manager of the late
Michael Jackson) and Audrey
Adams (former Wilhelminia
model and executive producer
of Talk ! with Audrey, and
publisher of The Adams
Report ) visiting from the US.

The event was hosted by
Damien Humes of the Street
Team and Charmaine Bur-
rows, top model of OilinSha
Model Management.

The contestants were greet-
ed with cheers and applause as
they first walked the runway
in swimsuits and later in haute
couture outfits designed by
Bahamian designer, Cedric
Bernard. Entertainment for
the show was provided by
Julien, who performed his hit
song “Believe”, and visiting
Bahamian recording artist
based in Los Angeles Brettina
singing two of her smooth jazz
singles.

In the junior category,
Gabriella Hall of New Provi-
dence won the Little Super-
model of the Bahamas title.
Kourtni Pinder of Grand
Bahama is the junior runner-

up.

2010 Supermodel of the
Bahamas, Peandra Knowles,
a 18-year-old biochemistry
student at College of the
Bahamas who plans to
become a cardiologist, said
this about her win: “When I
began to walk down the run-
way after I won, I gave God
thanks for allowing my
dreams to come true. From
the beginning I had such won-
derful supporters back home
that gave me encouraging
words to keep me strong for
the competition. I want to
thank them and my wonderful
parents, Prescott Knowles and
Annarine Johnson, who never
doubted that I could win. The
possibilities are endless for my
future and my eyes are open

DESIGNER
Cedric
Bernard
(centre)
stands with
the final
contestants of
Supermodel
of the
Bahamas on
the staircase
in the British
Colonial
Hilton. Mr
Bernard
received the
2010 Super-
model of the
Bahamas
Designer
Award.

wide to the road ahead.”

2010 Supermodel of the
Bahamas Sinardo Deleveaux
is a 20-year-old who is into
yoga, pilates and flying
trapeze, who since entering
the competition, has modelled
in a couple shows in Freeport.
Sinardo had this to say about
his win: “This is an amazing
opportunity for me, and Iam
prepared to work as hard as
possible to take this further.
I’m so excited about New
York, and [’m prepared for
the exciting things it has to
show and teach me. I want to
thank everyone who support-
ed me, in particular my East
Restaurant and Italian Spe-
cialty families where I work.”

Supermodel of the
Bahamas female runner up is
Kenresa Pickering of Nassau,
and the male runner up is
Miguel Wright of Nassau.
Swimsuit winners are Miguel
Wright and Kieasha Adder-
ley of Nassau.

Best Spokespersons are
Wayne Mackey of Nassau and
Priska Pascal of Abaco.

Most Popular went to
Miguel Wright, Kourtni Pin-
der of Freeport, and the
Future Star award went to
Reashawn Davis of Nassau.

Most Votes went to Garrett
Bowleg of Grand Bahama.

Most Photogenic went to
Sinardo Deleveaux,
ReaShawn Davis and Kourtni
Pinder.

Awards of Appreciation
went to fashion designer
Cedric Bernard; Robbin
Whachell of TheBa-
hamasWeekly.com; Damien
Humes and Devron Pinder of
Street Team Media; Angela
Hilton, and Illya Tinker.

The 2010 Supermodel of
the Bahamas Designer award
went to Cedric Bernard.

The title winners of Super-
model of the Bahamas
received $3,000 in cash and
prizes and have already been
scheduled to walk the runway
in New York in Stomp the
Runway New York Fashion
Week from September 11-18.

On this trip they will be
escorted to ‘go sees’ with
renowned designer and TV
personality Nole Marin, and
will attend theatre shows,
model parties and have photo
shoots with top photographers
in NYC. In March 2011 they
will walk in Miami Fashion
Week.

OilinSha Coakley, founder
of the competition and owner
of Supermodel of the
Bahamas, said, “2010 has
brought about new experi-
ences and this year's event has
given me more reason to con-
tinue with the development of
fashion and entertainment in
the Bahamas.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 3







WHY YOU
VEX?



I'm vex because they

turned the light at
Parkgate and Village Roads
back on. I know they going
around Nassau fixing the
broken traffic lights but
maybe they should keep

that one off.

"There is too little dis-
tance between that light and
the roundabout so traffic is

WORK CONTINUES APACE ON NATIONAL STADIUM



THE 15,000-
SEAT
Thomas A.
Robinson
stadium cur-
rently under
construction
at the Queen
Elizabeth
Sports Cen-
tre was a
$30-million
gift from the
People's
Republic of
China.



COLLEGE OF BAHAMAS: Strike aftermath

COB professor: My pay

always backed up to a
standstill during the morn-
ing rush. I wish the powers
that be will realise that traf-
fic flow is much smoother
when that light is not on."

- Mad Motorist.

"IT vex because too much
of my neighbours burning
fires through Romer Street
in Fox Hill and it is not
good for my health."

- Vex in Romer Street.

"'T'm vex with people
who continue to annoy me
at work by sending me silly
emails with silly links that
lead to nowhere and just
waste my time.

"Maybe if more people
worried about being pro-
ductive at work instead of
getting giggles behind the
computer this country

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A COLLEGE professor who did not
strike with the Union of Tertiary Edu-
cators of the Bahamas (UTEB) said his
salary was cut and he intends to press
criminal charges if not compensated
immediately.

College of the Bahamas (COB) asso-
ciate professor and political science lec-
turer Felix Bethel continued to work
throughout the union’s four-day strike
and said he informed the college of this
in prompt response to a memo sent out
on the first day of the strike April 16.

Teachers were informed by COB
administration that they would not be
paid for labour withheld unless they
informed their deans or vice-president’s
they were carrying out their normal
duties and would continue to do so

throughout the industrial action, which
Mr Bethel claims he did. The COB lec-
turer of 33 years said while he agrees
with the premise of UTEB’s strike to
push for an end to prolonged negotia-
tions over their industrial agreement,
the father of nine and grandfather of
seven did not wish to support the strike
action and could not afford to sacrifice
his earnings.

Despite his precaution the 60-year-
old COB professor said he suffered the
same pay cut as those who did strike
and UTEB maintains many more staff,
including others who did not strike, also
had their pay cut by $400 to $700 this
month.

“The College of the Bahamas has
stolen from me,” Mr Bethel claimed yes-
terday.

“They have cut my pay illegally and I
consider it a theft.

“T carried out all of my duties

throughout the industrial action, I did
everything I was supposed to do, and I
am disappointed in the College of the
Bahamas because this is gross incom-
petence.

Apology

“T want an apology directly from the
president of the College, and in the
absence of an apology I will take the
matter to court because it is wrong to
deprive me of property of this kind.”

Mr Bethel said he would report the
matter to the police if not paid forth-
with. Meanwhile UTEB president Jen-
nifer Isaacs-Dotson is seeking legal
advice over all pay cuts reported by
union members as COB did not docu-
ment the apparently indiscriminate cuts
on salary slips this month.

Industrial action commenced on the
first day of student exams, Monday April



would run more smoothly."

- Hard worker
Dowdeswell Street.

"T vex that the govern-

ment taking so long

legalise the number busi-

ness. I don't play numb

now myself because I am
weary of being caught in a
‘web shop’ when the police

swoop in for a raid.

"However, I see nothing
morally reprehensible about

putting a dollar or two o
lotto especially if I kn
that this money will go

good use - creating better

education opportunities

our youth and other social
programmes - instead of just
in the hands of a wealthy

number man.

"Come on Mr Prime
Minister, don't be afraid of
the noise from the market.

At the very least, put it o

referendum for the people
to decide instead of relying
on advice from a few 'men

of the cloth’ who have
answer to God on th

own, just like the rest of us.”

- Monique T.

"Tis vex ‘cause we the
poor struggling people has
to pay BEC and BEC wants
to increase the electricity
fee, and I dead vex to reads
that "BEC ‘loses’ 25 per cent
of all power it produces"

The Tribune Business s

tion ‘cause people tiefing 18
per cent of electricity and

eight per cent lost from
system.
"How come we have

pay more and BEC ain't jail
no one yet for tiefing plus
somebody gots to be help-
ing them to tief. They
mussey crazy for us to pay
more an’ they don't charge
an' jail them electricity tiefs.
BEC needs to have a plan
to round them tiefs up first."

- Get Real.

"I deeply disturbed that
Baillou Hill Road/Market
Street road works is for the
benefit for motorists to get
to work on time without
congestion versus the eco-
nomic well-being and liveli-
hood of hundreds of mer-
chants and residents who

live there.
"If you want to get
work on time, just get

earlier. The residents should
not have to suffer for others

who choose to live/build

the other side of the island
when they can renovate and
rebuild the inner city with
tax concessions from the

on

NOELLE NICOLLS

Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

. A two man-team from the
non-profit organisation, ‘Flying
for Kosovo’, landed in Nassau
on Wednesday night to lobby
the Bahamian government to
recognise their homeland’s
independence.

Kosovo natives James
Berisha and Neil Spahiu, a free-
lance journalist, are on the tail
end of their self-appointed
diplomatic tour of the Ameri-
can continents.

“What we have been trying
to do is raise awareness that we
exist; we are human beings, we
want to be accepted as part of
the same planet. We would like
the people and the government
of the Bahamas to recognise
our independence,” said Mr
Berisha.

Kosovo is a self-declared
independent state recognised
by 66 out of 192 United Nations
(UN) Member States, includ-
ing the United States, Canada,
and 22 out of 27 European
Union states. It has a popula-
tion of about 2.2 million.

It declared itself independent
of Serbia on February 17, 2008.
Serbia was a territory in
Yugoslavia prior to its disinte-
gration. Serbia does not recog-
nise the secession of Kosovo.
Russia is one of the largest sup-
porters of Serbia.

At this time, the Bahamas
does not recognise Kosovo as
an independent state, although
representatives of several coun-
tries in that region have lob-
bied the government directly
and through various diplomat-
ic offices, said Brent Symon-
ette, Minister of Foreign
Affairs.

“The government of the
Bahamas has been approached
by numerous countries in the
region regarding the sover-
eignty or independence of
Kosovo and matters in the area.

ers

na
ow
to

for

na

to
eir

in
ec-

its

to

to Oath of Secrecy Ceremony.

We have considered and con-
tinue to consider the situation
on the ground on both sides
and maintain a status of await-
ing the outcome of negotiations
between Kosovo and its neigh-
bouring countries before com-
mitting support to either of the
two countries,” said Mr Symon-
ette. He was yet to meet with
the non-profit representatives,
although they said it was their
intention to walk into the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs and
seek an audience with the Min-
ister. “The issue is very sensi-
tive. There has been quite a lot
of international lobbying by
both sides and hence our posi-
tion at the moment,” said Mr
Symonette. The Bahamas is not
the only Caribbean country
withholding its support. The
Dominican Republic is so far
the only Caribbean country
recognising Kosovo’s indepen-
dence. “CARICOM is working
on it. More and more pressure
is being created. There is some-
thing moving right now. I am
sure in this year more things
will happen,” said Mr Berisha.

He said the most receptive
countries on the trip so far were
Paraguay, Grenada, St Vincent
and the Grenadines, St Lucia,
and St Kitts and Nevis.

Mr Berisha is the founder of
Flyer for Kosovo. He took a
leave of absence from his job
as an airline pilot to fly a four-
seat Cessna 174 airplane with
Mr Spahiu, fellow Kosovo
native, across the Americas.

Over the past year, they vis-
ited every country in South
America, Central America and
North America, except the
three countries still on the List:
Cuba, the United States and
Canada. Some experts say the
Kosovo-Serbia dispute is as rid-
dled with politics, history and
tension as the Israeli-Palestin-
ian conflict. A complex web of
geo-politics, global-politics and
internal politics has worked
against the Kosovo indepen-

Census 2010: Oath of Secrecy
Ceremony set for Monday

AFTER months of preparation for Census 2010, the Depart-
ment of Statistics is launching its census work on Monday with the

up Approximately 1,100 persons will gather at the Kendal Isaacs

on be held in strictest confidence.

divulged to anybody or entity.

government,” - Concerned laration.

reader.

"I am happy to see that
the press is finally putting
the picture of 'white collar’

alleged criminals and giv

their names on the front
page just as they do for the
alleged petty purse snatcher

thief.”
- Equal Justice.

Michael Barnett.

ing





Gym to solemnly commit themselves to the work and to swear that
all information received during the course of their field work will

The ongoing work of the Department depends on its integrity
and the public trust that the information given by them is not

The Department said it takes this seriously hence this public dec-
The Oath of Secrecy will be administered by Chief Justice

This will be preceded by a brief charge regarding honesty and
integrity by the president of the Christian Council Pastor Patrick
Paul, and will be followed by a prayer by the head of the Baptist
Community, Rev William Thompson. Prior to this part of the cer-
emony, a presentation on safety tips will be made by Assistant
Commissioner of Police Glen Miller, and the keynote presentation
will be made by the Minister of State for Finance, Zhivargo Laing.

The census officers will be knocking on doors throughout the
country asking questions that will provide valuable data about
our society. The census begins on Tuesday and is expected to run
until the end of June, at a cost of $3 million.

The last census was conducted in 2000.

Kosovo NGO to lobby Bahamian govt

dence movement.

“By being a dark spot on the
planet you are basically nonex-
istent. I don’t want to be that
nonexistent person. We are
missing a lot of stuff like cul-
tural and educational
exchange,” said Mr Berisha.

“Tt stops a lot of tourists com-
ing here from Kosovo. People
would love to see the Bahamas.
The Bahamas is a famous place.
If there is not that relationship
between the countries you are
stopping a lot of people from
coming here,” he said.

Mr Symonette said there are
outstanding issues for the gov-
ernment to resolve. He said
the Bahamian government is
knowledgeable on the matter
and “it is an issue we are still
investigating”.

ele
Suse
PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157







ALL MAJOR
CREDIT CORDS
ACCEPTED!
BORRY
HO DEST






Low To THAIN YOUN ORAGON-IO a | 190 | sap | wim | cio | m0 | soe |
oun OF AwOMPY Kg a | 430 | sae | aan | oan | an | soe |

Sree aT ie eee

AHL TL REBERVE [RR PSST SHCMEA CH WY COL LE ae te CH

ncaTwaae On cuwsTaceY WEW| 1:18 | 3:30 | WA | 6:18 | o-30 | 1055 |



PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



was cut illegally

16, with around 45 union members
demonstrating outside the front gates
of the Oakes Field campus in Thompson
Boulevard and the support of two of the
country’s largest unions: the National
Congress of Trade Unions of the
Bahamas and the Bahamas Public Ser-
vice Union headed by John Pinder.

The teachers returned to their posts
on Thursday, April 22, when UTEB and
the college agreed to bring in external
negotiators to expedite talks over seven
days if they do not finalise the industri-
al agreement by May 14.

Both COB and UTEB expressed dif-
ficulties with clauses dealing with
appointments, promotions, duties and
responsibilities, performance assess-
ments and salaries. COB estimated
around 60 per cent of faculty carried
out their normal invigilation duties dur-
ing the strike and examinations were
said to continue without disruption.

Galleria Cinemas

“Wie: ia Bact = Pe Dacia bien
1X OF FTCE OPENS AT betel AM DAILY

__ EFFECTIVE APRIL 30TH, 2010
[wcrTuane oeuN sTacer ew) 118 | 330 | wa | aos | nas | 103 |
famstwnrta ww] 100 wn [em | rm | wa | 08)
0 rr Ee ee
Tae wagers | tt
[DEATHATAPUNERAL 0 t_| 4:30 | as |
jwockags | 100 | 0 |
ewreworr sre La Fn To fs [os

| +00 | 22s | &
| 108 |






















535 | wm | ts | ons | sas |

jens | gon | was | soso
[30 | wa | eos | m0 | ses |



T9"08f

GR. Sweeting's



Madeira Shopping Plaza * 32840703 « hlarathon Mal # 395-6113 * RNID Plaza, Freeport * 391-3274



Fwemexorsun + [v9s-[20 [wa [as | 0 vo
pmevoweas | tt 5 [WA | ato | a3 | i: |

Loearh atthe runenAL 0 T | vin8 | 3:40 | WA | Gets | o:06 | toes

fwreorcarwmns [100 [340 [WA [eon | o25] uso
ausnornernneze + [108 [wae [WA [ood | 00 [reat
Fi

Ui eur aed lo Peed eke et 380-3640 oF vigil ud al
www, bela ecu conn

3 DAYS
ONLY!

Thursday,
Friday &
Saturday

APRIL

29, 30



Up To



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

UK’s candidates agree: Race is wide open

LONDON — Divided over the country's
ballooning debt, the economy and the con-
tentious issue of immigration, the three front
runners in Britain's general election can still
agree on one thing: This race is anyone's to
win.

Conservative challenger David Cameron,
fresh off what observers said was his best
live televised debate performance to date,
told BBC radio that next week's national
election was "still far from won."

Nick Clegg, riding higher in the polls than
most political observers had ever expected,
said the campaign was "wide open.”

Even Britain's ever-optimistic former
Prime Minister Tony Blair, who hit the cam-
paign trail Friday in support of his successor,
Gordon Brown, could only say that their
governing Labour Party "has every chance of
succeeding."

An ICM/Populus poll, published Friday
by The Guardian, showed the gap between
each party within the margin of error. Sta-
tistically, the three-way contest involving
Cameron, Clegg and Brown has become a
dead heat.

Those figures are disappointing for
Cameron, whose Tories at one point enjoyed
a double-digit lead over Labour, which has
run the country since Blair was elected in
1997.

But Labour managed to whittle away
Cameron's advantage as the election drew
closer, and both parties have been caught
off-guard by Clegg, whose affable and
straightforward style in the nation's first
US.-style TV debate on April 15 led to a
surge in support for his opposition Liberal
Democrats.

Andrew Gamble, the head of the depart-
ment of politics at Cambridge University,
said Cameron “should be winning this elec-
tion by a mile.”

"The fact that they're not is deeply trou-
bling for the Conservatives,” he said. "Clegg
is spoiling the party for them."

Political observers said Cameron did well
in Thursday's debate, watched by some 8
million people, although Clegg also held his
own. Brown placed a distant third in a per-
formance that politics expert John Curtice
described as overly defensive, the observers
said. But none of the candidates provided
detailed economic recovery plans in a nation
that faces major economic troubles and one





Quality





Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
and TRUCKS

TRADE-INS ON NEW
CAR SALES ACCEPTED

Check Out These Great Values

of the largest deficits in Europe — both of
which will require harsh cuts in public spend-
ing after the election.

Labour had more bad luck Friday, when
a car crashed into a bus shelter as the prime
minister and several members of his Cabinet
launched a new poster campaign nearby.
No one was hurt in the incident, but evening
TV newscasts captured Brown deputy Peter
Mandelson's speech briefly interrupted by a
loud screech followed by the sound of a
crash.

Pressed by a journalist, Mandelson denied
that the incident was a metaphor for
Labour's election campaign.

Labour got even worse news when The
Guardian newspaper announced its support
for the Liberal Democrats and The Times of
London backed the Tories.

The right-leaning Times’ endorsement
of the Conservatives was no surprise, but
Labour's loss of the left-leaning Guardian
was more damaging.

Curtice, the politics expert, said The
Guardian endorsement was "simply an indi-
cation of how badly Labour is doing.”

Still, with the election on May 6, Brown's
opponents aren't taking anything for grant-
ed. Addressing a crowd in northern Eng-
land, Clegg said he was "certainly not going
to rest one millisecond, one minute until
this campaign ends — right up to the
moment when people decide how to vote."

"There are lots of people who haven't
decided how they are going to vote," he
said. "I think many people now see this cam-
paign is wide open. It's one of the most excit-
ing campaigns in a generation and that we
can do something different.”

In his interview Friday, Cameron said his
party would “have to fight for every vote
and every seat."

Brown, too, has pledged to take his fight
down to the wire. "The time for debates is
finished, the time for decision has begun," he
told supporters. "We will continue to fight
for the future of this country until the very
last second of this election campaign.”

Gamble suggested that those very last
seconds could still be crucial.

"In this last week a lot of voters will be
making up their minds," he said.

(This article was written by Raphael G.
Slatter, Associated Press Writer).







candidate with p





Nassau Retailer seeks

Retail Manager

We ore a successful retail chain currently looking for a
woven retail management expenence
to join our team. Responsibilities will include the
management of daily store operations, management
ofall staff, ond various store-related administration as
well as opportunities to contribute towards marketing
and staff development programs.



Lunch vendors at
sovernment-owned.
schools in GB
cry out for help

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There is a major concern
among lunch vendors at
government-owned schools
in Grand Bahama primary,
junior high and high schools
that tuck shops being oper-
ated by the schools are reap-
ing financial benefits while
vendors have been ignored
and thrown into a financial
dilemma. The tuck shops
have been allowed to oper-
ate with the consent of the
Ministry of Education under
supposed restrictions which
are being violated. This has
resulted in lunch vendors
suffering great financial
hardship over the past years
while tuck shops compete
bringing financial benefits
to the schools.

Lunch vendors do not
have an association and
their cries to date have only
been answered with promis-
es which have not been kept.
Please, Hon T Desmond
Bannister we request that
you be informed and
address the following issues
at Freeport schools.

1) Why is it that tuck
shops are being allowed to
sell candies, hot patties, ice
cream, pizzas and doughnuts
among other food items dur-
ing the breaks and lunch
time?

letters@tribunemedia.net



2) Why is it that while
tuck shops are allowed to
sell items sold by vendors,
the sale of drinks are not
allowed by vendors? In
addition oftentimes tuck
shops copy vendors’ items
and compete with their
sales. It claimed that some
principals are actively
involved in the purchasing
of many of the restricted
items.

3) Why is it that teachers
who are being paid to teach
our students also being
allowed to compete with
vendors by selling food
items at lunch time?

4) Why is it that schools
are allowed to operate as
many as two tuck shops?

5) Is there any ruling as to
the number of dress-up days
allowed in any given school
term? Each dress-up day
costs $2.00 per student.

6) Should principals be
allowed to dictate to ven-
dors the prices at which
lunch must be sold?

7) Should principals not
have a mandate to commu-
nicate to vendors all events
being held by the schools

involving food which could
affect the vendors? Also all
changes to lunch periods
should be available on a
school’s official weekly
schedule to which vendors
should have access. Princi-
pals need to understand that
lunch vendors are humans
with bills to be paid and
most vendors are aware of
the financial potential in
their area. Sad to say that
the very persons who have
caused vendors to be placed
on their school properties
are also the main contribu-
tors to the destitute, heart-
wrenching position that we
are now experiencing. How
can any adult with bills to
be paid survive in these
already tough economic
times when lunch is pre-
pared for fifty students and
because of the adverse situ-
ation in the schools your
total income some days is as
low as $20.00?

Mr Minister, would you
come to Freeport and
address this situation imme-
diately.

CONCERNED
FREEPORT
LUNCH
VENDORS
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
April 26, 2010.

Response to ‘Gambling
Should Be Our Choice’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It would be greatly appre-
ciated if you would be kind
enough to publish my
response to your Staff
Reporter, Mr Paul G Turn-
quest’s article, “Gambling
Should Be Our Choice,” in
today’s edition of your
paper. Thank you.

Reading his “rambling
reasons” for the legalisation
of gambling in the Bahamas
brought to mind a saying
that arose out of and during
the early days of the abor-
tion battle in the USA,
namely: “When all fails, use
the choice card.” (Pun
intended!) Then, as now
with legalised gambling, the
issue has nothing to do with
choice per se, but with the
right to choose what is
wrong. With regards to

abortion, the true issue was:
Is it right to terminate the
life of a person at the begin-
ning of his/her life, not
whether it was right to
choose to have sex or ter-
minate a pregnancy.

Now, with legalised gam-
bling — which all credible
studies have shown oppress-
es the poor, destroys fami-
lies, morally corrupts a soci-
ety, etc. — the issue is not an
individual’s choice per se,
but an individual’s right to
choose an activity or action
that has been scientifically
and pragmatically shown to
be detrimental to others,
and in the final analysis,
“has no redeeming social
good” whatsoever.

As to the writer’s com-
ment re: the Government’s
responsibility to protect its
citizens, he is right on. In the
case of legalised gambling,
it is the government’s first
and foremost responsibility
to protect its citizens from
the proven and certain
adverse effects of legalised
gambling — and that, regard-
less of the “apparent” eco-
nomic benefits it may seem
to bring about.

Even a casual perusal of
the literature on the issue
will show that the “cleaning
up process” of the “cost of
doing business” to bring this
about is always more costly
than the so-called benefits.
The one is immediate grati-
fication of felt needs; the

other is the long term “real
penalty” for such transient
gratification.

A government that backs
and promotes legalised gam-
bling teaches it people to
support good and worthy
causes for the wrong reasons
— not out of patriotic con-
cern, citizen responsibility,
pride and decency, but out
of selfishness, greed and per-
sonal gain.

Government sponsored
gambling tempt the poor,
the youth and the needy to
squander their money, not
to save it or invest it wisely.
It teaches a wrong, non-pro-
ductive way of life when it
should be teaching a right
and productive way of life.
In our case, it could actually
help to ruin the lives of the
very “little darlings” the pro-
ceeds from legalise gambling
are supposed to help!

Thus, it is my considered
opinion that for a govern-
ment of a professedly Chris-
tian inclined nation to
legalise, actively promote
and officially encourage its
citizens to indulge in this
form of debasing behaviour
would be one of the most
serious acts of the derelic-
tion of its duty that it could
ever commit.

Again, thank you for pub-
lishing this response.

ALLAN R LEE
Nassau,
April 26, 2010.












The candidate should demonstrate the following:

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

01 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘97 VOLKSWAGON BEETLE
‘98 HYUNDAI COUPE

01 MAZDA MPV WAGON
‘99 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
‘03 DAIHATSU TERIOS

03 HYUNDAI H1 VAN

‘00 HYUNDAI ACCENT

| QUALITY#2 @
7 LIMITED a

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

OPEN: Mon to Fri 8:30am - 5:30pm ¢ Sat 8:30am - 12:30pm

* Self-motivation and self-leadership

WU

NOTICE is hereby given that FRITO ESTIME of Ridgeland
Park/Robinson Rd., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

* Strong leadership and management skills

* Motivational skills

(cullivale jeam contribulion and to rain! develop slam ier -
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 24" day of APRIL, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHERENFANT ULRICK of ST.
JAMES ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

* Excellent Interpersonal Skills
jatecive oral and written communication)

“Professional appearance and attitude



* Computer Literacy
(Including Microsoft XP MS Word, Excel, Email)

* Willingness to work shifts and long hours

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport phot, two references, resume, cover letter.




Applications can be sent via email, fax or post.
Ce ee me ote

(espe eee ere lair eae

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 1*' day of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ere ee
P.O. Box 55-19021















THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

BAHAMAS’ FIRST RESIDENT AMBASSADOR TO CHINA MARVELS AT THE RISING POWER’S NATIONAL PRIDE, WORK ETHIC AND GRANDEUR

China,
a land



of endless
fascination

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BEIJING, China - Almost
two years into her time serving
as the Bahamas’ first resident
Ambassador to China, Elma
Campbell said she is still finding
reasons to be surprised by this
“fascinating” country.

China’s national pride, deter-
mination and work ethic - not
to mention the grandeur of its
many national events to cele-
brate its history, culture and
achievements - often leave her
“lost for words”, Ambassador
Campbell told The Tribune.

And her experience has
impressed upon her the view
that the Bahamas could learn a
lot from the rising world power.

“There’s almost nothing they
won’t accomplish,” she said.

After serving as Minister of
State for Immigration under the
FNM administration in 2007,
Ms Campbell was appointed
Ambassador to China in early
2008, and officially took up the
post on July 14 of that year.

In an interview at her Bei-
jing office, she reflected on her
time in China. She was joined
by career diplomat Sheila
Career, who serves as Deputy

Chief of Mission for the
Embassy, and Misty Bain, the
Embassy’s Attaché.

“T think my vocabulary has
shrunk and I think that about
sums it up. China is fascinat-
ing. I tell people you really have
to see it to understand, but I
find myself always using the
words ‘awesome’, ‘royal’,
‘grand’, ‘majestic’. Almost two
years later I find I walk the
streets, very often the same
streets, and everyday I see
something different. I consid-
ered myself well-travelled when
Icame here, but arriving I don’t
think I was prepared for the
experience. Each country is cul-
turally different, but I think the
further east you go the greater
the difference is,” said Ms
Campbell.

The Ambassador has trav-
elled all over China - mostly at
the bidding of the Chinese gov-
ernment, who are very keen for
resident diplomats to partake
of the “China that they wish for
you to see”, Mrs Carey said.

Ambassador Campbell also
finds herself and her staff fre-
quently attending extended cer-
emonial events.

Seeing “the juxtaposition of
old and new” in Chinese archi-
tecture - the country’s civilisa-

ll BAHAMIAN STUDENT IN CHINA

‘T can use cultural insight and
knowledge to help the Bahamas’

ew oe

-



Eric Feberberg, Pool/AP Photo

FIREWORKS light up during the opening ceremony for the Shanghai 2010 World Exhibition, Friday

April 30, 2010.



(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

PERFORMERS wearing Shanghai World Expo mascot “haibao” cos-
tumes are seen on stage during the opening ceremony.

tion encompasses thousands of
years - has been a highlight of
these tours and events.

But the life of a diplomat in
China “is not a social scene”,
she is quick to emphasise.

Busy

Ms Carey, who has served in
Washington, DC, New York,
Miami and Canada, notes that
the foreign ministry in China
has a “much closer relation-
ship” with diplomats than the
same department would in oth-
er countries, and for this rea-
son, the staff's work schedule
can be very busy. “Whereas in

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



BEIJING, China- A
former Kingsway Acade-
my student says he is
preparing to return to the
Bahamas to “revitalise and
revamp” the country using
the knowledge and cultur-
al insight he has gained
during his time studying at
a university in the Chinese
capital city.

Studying international economics and busi-
ness in Beijing on a full scholarship from the
Chinese government, Matthew Arnett, 23, told
The Tribune that his voyage of discovery in Chi-
na started “accidentally”, but he now considers
the country his second home.

According to Bahamian Ambassador to China
Elma Campbell, there are currently 10 Bahami-
ans studying at universities in Beijing, Shanghai,
Nanjing and Guangzhou on scholarships from
the Chinese government.

Several scholarships a year have been award-
ed to Bahamians by the Chinese government
since diplomatic relations were established
between the two countries in 1997.

“T don’t think my parents took me seriously at
first,” said Matthew speaking of his family’s reac-
tion when he told them he was considering mov-
ing to China to pursue further education.

Scholarship

“It all sort of happened by accident. I was
going to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (in Nas-
sau) to drop off a form for an OAS (Organisation
of American States) scholarship, but when I got
there I saw the notice on the door saying ‘Chinese
scholarships, apply now’. That day was the last
day to apply, so I ran and got all my statements
together and applied,” he said.

“Everybody was sort of like, ‘are you really
going to do this?’ But we’d grown up in sort of
America’s backyard with American fundamen-
tals, education, viewpoints and I wanted a greater
challenge and to prepare myself for future.”

Matthew said he had initially been intrigued by
China after visiting for two weeks when he rep-
resented the Chinese Friendship Association and
the Bahamas at a conference in Beijing in 2005.

He said when he eventually moved to Beijing
in September 2006 to take up the scholarship he
won, he was struck by how different China was to
the “jaded” image of the country which is pre-
sented in the foreign media.

And in the time he has lived there, Matthew
said he has been most impressed by the scale of
the country’s progression.

“It’s been amazing, I’ve seen so much devel-
opment and changes over just a few short years,”
he said.

Meanwhile, Matthew has also developed.

The scholarship required a year of intensive
Mandarin language training, as all classes and



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY: Matthew Arnett, 23.

course work would be held in the Chinese lan-
guage.

And having survived the “sink or swim” lan-
guage course, he has become one of a small num-
ber of Bahamians fluent in Mandarin, which is
recognised as one of the world’s toughest lan-
guages to master. It is also increasingly in demand
in the business sector as China’s economic influ-
ence expands globally.

The 23-year-old said his good family back-
ground and study ethic he developed back home
stood him in good stead to make the most of the
opportunity the scholarship presented.

During his time in Beijing, Matthew said he has
benefitted not only from his formal education, but
from observing the Chinese way of life and val-
ues. Based on his observations, the student said
he feels China is not exerting itself on the world
stage as much as it could, in part because of a Chi-
nese cultural ethic of “humility” and an accepted
teaching that “the highest eminence is to be
gained step-by-step.”

“One of the most famous leaders in China,
Deng Xiaoping (the former Chinese Commu-
nist Party leader who led China towards a market
economy), taught that China should keep it’s
head down and always assume a role of humility.
Those policies and those values the Chinese hold
in very high regard,” said Matthew.

“It’s also a matter of playing their cards right.
It’s like a poker game, you never show people
what you’re holding,” he added.

Matthew considers himself a “pioneer for
Bahamians, Caribbean people and young black
people” in China, and after completing his Mas-
ters Degree which he wants to undertake in Bei-
jing, he would like to return to the Bahamas to set
up a business which will allow him to profit from
the business acumen and cultural insight he has
gained, before ultimately trying his hand at pol-
itics.

“T want to start a tourism and travel company,
first focusing on China, then Asia as a whole,
encouraging planned groups, weddings, and cor-
porate travel to Bahamas,” he said.

the US, the State Department
doesn’t really ‘check for you’
like that, the foreign ministry
in China likes to have diplo-
mats at events,“ said Ms Carey.

“And everything is an occa-
sion,” added Ms Campbell, not-
ing that she and her staff can
often find themselves out dur-
ing the week until 9pm.

Ms Carey described the
recent Women‘s Day celebra-
tions, organised by the Nation-
al Women‘s Federation of Chi-
na, as a good example of the
style in which China chooses to
recognise occasions.

“There were two days of
events starting on a Sunday

Badash C

Giftware

1G) ace me

ee reel
em Rete ste)

Tel: re RL Ew (007 Meinl
Fax: (242) 393-4096



Arc Glass & Crystal
Circle Glassware
Godinger Silver
Gibson Dinnerware
Studio Silversmiths

PAWL koe

morning - Sunday is not a spe-
cial day in China because it is
not a Christian country - and
President Hu Jintao spoke and
the entire National People‘s
Congress attended,” she said.

Ambassador Campbell told
The Tribune her experience in
China has taught her that
“there is almost nothing China
will not accomplish” if it choos-
es to and has impressed upon
her China’s national pride and
ability to unify behind a com-
mon goal.

“We can certainly learn some
things from them. If the Chi-
nese wake up today and deter-
mine that that couch is brown
(points at furniture in her
office), and they determine that
the world needs to know that
that couch is brown, they might
well have three days of events
to invite diplomats and they
might invite us at different
times and they might have as
many as a dozen speakers over
the three days, and each one is
on message, and by the time we
leave we will appreciate why
the Chinese say that that sofa is
brown,” she laughed.

In fact, not even natural phe-
nomena can deter China, the
Ambassador explained.

Rather than cancel, delay, or

rystal

Ft Abe)



Jewelry Boxes
Handbags
Picture Frames
Artificial Flowers
Gift Baskets

from Max’s

April 30th-May 8th, 2010

have the spectacular October
1, 2009, ceremony for the recent
60th Anniversary of the found-
ing of the People’s Republic of
China threatened by bad
weather, the government sim-
ply “dispersed” the clouds.
“There were a few scattered
showers in the morning but by
10am it was burning hot. They
had determined that it would
not rain on the parade.”
“They do everything in grand
style and they have immense
national pride,” said the
Ambassador. Ms Campbell,
who is likely to remain in China
for another year, said that she
feels the Embassy she heads
has served its purpose in bring-
ing the Bahamas and China
closer. “We’re satisfied that we
have contributed to the growth
of the relationship between
China and the Bahamas, and
that’s what we’re here for - to
enhance that relationship, to
strengthen it,” she said.

eee ee Byles
aa aa
SAM aH!

ete
322-2197
















r oe Nas
re holes




ome Now open 7am

*Except on net ifems



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MINISTER OF STATE SPEAKS AT PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM DOMESTIC VIOLENCE WORKSHOP

Hundreds of children
exposed to domestic
violence each year

BY BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

THE hundreds of children
who are exposed to domestic
violence in the Bahamas each
year are at an increased risk for
complicated emotional and
behavioural difficulties, said
Minister of State in the Min-
istry of Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner.

Speaking at the Protecting
Children from Domestic Vio-
lence workshop on Thursday,
Mrs Butler-Turner said a recent
analysis of reports to one of the
major police stations in New
Providence revealed that 660
cases of domestic violence were
received that year.

“Statistics from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force also dis-
closed that 29 per cent of the
murders committed in all of the
Bahamas in 1998 took place at
a private place of residence,”
she said.

“In 2000, police statistics
revealed that 45 per cent of
homicides reported that year
occurred as a result of domestic
related incidents,” Mrs Butler-
Turner said.

Domestic disputes often
occur in the presence of chil-
dren, she explained.

“Until recently, it was
believed that most children
escaped unharmed from wit-
nessing violence directed at a
parent.”

However, she said research




Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo





“In 2000, police
statistics revealed
that 45 per cent of
homicides reported
that year occurred
as a result of
domestic related
incidents.”

ee |
Loretta Butler-Turner

indicates that domestic violence
impacts children in many com-
plicated and long lasting ways
and experts are becoming more
aware of the “pervasiveness,
intensity and destructiveness of
intimate partner violence in its
impact”.

The Minister of State said
children of battered parents
have been found to be at
increased risk for a broad range
of emotional and behavioural
difficulties, including depres-
sion, substance abuse, develop-
mental delays, educational
attention problems, suicidal
tendencies and involvement in
violence.

Cycle

“Some studies have pointed
to a cycle of violence in which
boys who grow up in violent
households are 10 times or
more likely to be violent that
those who are not,” she said.

too hard

> for God

NO ADDICTION
IS TOO STRONG











wn

BEHOLD, | AM THE LORD. THE GOD OF ALL FLESH:
S THERE ANYTHING TOO HARD FOR NE? Jeremiah 32:27





f

â„¢

Come! Join us this sunday as we come together
and explore & meet the God who transforms

i a
ad

SUNDAY SERVICES

* Early Worship Service .......

saseavacn: EM) Th

* Sunday School for all ages

* Worship SOP vie som:

omen #1300 am

| Turner talking to stakehold-














. —_
(Photo: Letisha Henderson)

MINISTER of State in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner talking to stakeholders and professionals who
deal with child protection issues at the Protecting Children from Domestic Violence workshop on Thursday.

“Similarly, women in rela-
tionships with men who had
grown up with violent fathers
are four times more likely to
suffer abuse in an intimate rela-
tionship than are other
women.”

These findings highlight the
inter-generational nature of vio-
lent cycles, Mrs Butler-Turner
said. “They show how male
children, in particular, often
imitate powerful role models
with whom they identify, espe-
cially when certain circum-
stances — for example, feeling










+ a

MINISTER of State in the Min-
istry of Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler- |



ers and professionals who
deal with child protection
issues at the Protecting Chil-
dren from Domestic Violence
workshop on Thursday.






inadequate or out of control —
arise at some later point in their
lives and act out in violence.”

She also noted that family
experiences involving violence
are an important influence in
increasing the risk of violence in
subsequent relationships.

“Tt is critical, therefore, that
our family units provide the
safe environment necessary to
protect children.”

But Mrs Butler-Turner said
the reality is that children are
not always safe within the fam-
ily, many children are physical-

ly, emotionally and sexually
abused by family members.

Studies on the effects of child
abuse reveal that abused chil-
dren experience developmen-
tal problems, she said.

“This disruption, she said,
“with normal developmental
processes creates a rippling
effect on later abilities.

“Physical and sexual abuse
often involve many other forms
of unhealthy, inappropriate and
harmful experiences and
untimely influence the child’s
overall psychological growth

Govt has shown ‘commitment

and development.” “In partic-
ular, abused children do not
have the ability to interact
appropriately with others, nor
do they establish a satisfactory
sexual relationship.”

Mrs Butler-Turner com-
mended private and public
agencies, including the Depart-
ment of Social Services, the
Children and Family Services
Division and the National Par-
enting Programme for efforts
in ensuring that all children
have the benefit of a physically
safe family environment.

UPC TIE UR CU LTT oe

BY BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

THE Bahamas government
has demonstrated its commit-
ment to the prevention and
eradication of violence and
abuse against children
through the ratification of the
United Nations Convention
on the Rights of the Child in
1991, Social Development
Minister of State Loretta But-
ler-Turner told stakeholders
this week.

During the Protecting Chil-
dren from Domestic Violence
workshop on Thursday, Mrs
Butler-Turner said, “the 54

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010
11:30 am Speaker

Pastor Dexter Duvalier

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
© Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

(Sunday Schoaok 10am
Preaching
Radio Bidle Hour:
sunday Gpm- NS 2

Ved. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
liam A F:30em EVANGELISTIG

Pastor. Mile

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Paséor: H. flilis * Phone: 393-0564 = Box Weds? }

* Spanish SSvite eee | am
* FADS Youth Churches 7-12]
First & Third Suriday
* POWER CREW Church|Ages 10411 yrs.)
Second & Fourth Sunday 130 am.
* Evening Serace 6:30 pm

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

a.

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira
Shopping Center

WEDNESDAY

at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective dible Teaching

* Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs,
* Misskoresthess (Gairls Chit) 416 yrs

* Spanish Bible Study

FRIDAY
at 7:30 p.m.

* Youth Ministry Meeting
iGracies 7-12]

Pastor Knowles can be heard each

RADIO MINISTRY on Suncoys of 8:20 oum. - 25 4 - TEMPLE TIME
mae ia morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE 4 BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

ee CUM Ceeea menial
Ree sR meee Em Oa ob
SFM me aoa Lae

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs



articled Convention is the first
universal legally binding code
of child rights in history and
covers the right to be free
from abuse and the right to
protection from any kind of
exploitation.”

She added that the Child
Protection Act was enacted
in 2009.

Responsibility

“This piece of legislation
covers among other things:
parental responsibility; the
concept of significant harm to
children; expanded definition
of cruelty to a child and
supervision orders, emer-
gency protection orders, care
orders and exclusion orders,”
Mrs Butler-Turner said.

“The Act imposes a duty
on persons who have respon-
sibility to care for children to
use their best efforts to pro-
tect them from abuse and
neglect and mandates the
reporting of all forms of
abuse,” she added.

The Child Protection Act
allows a police officer, social
service officer or any other
authorised person who has





grounds to believe that a child
is suffering or is likely to suf-
fer from any abusive situa-
tion, to intervene to ensure
the safety of that child, Mrs
Butler-Turner said.

She also told stakeholders
and professionals dealing with
child protection issues that
understanding the abuser as
a parent, safety planning for
victims and children, the role
of the courts and the school in
intervention in these circum-
stances can help them navi-
gate the complexities and
risks of these cases and assist
in confronting the underlying
problematic social and cul-
tural concepts that enable
domestic violence to continue.

During the workshop,
which was one of the last
activities planned for Child
Protection Month, Mrs But-
ler-Turner also challenged
them to take child protection
seriously.

“Our children have a right
to be protected from domestic
violence. You must do all that
you can to protect our chil-
dren. The lives of our chil-
dren are precious; let us take
the time to care for them,”
she said.

Grant's Town Wesley Methodist Church

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.giwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 2ND, 2010

7:00 a.m. Rev Carla Culmer/Bro. Franklyn Bethel
11:00 a.m.Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Nathalie Thompson (HC)

7:00 p.m.Bro. Franklyn Bethel/Members-At-Large

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace and eta Wesleyan Church
& Society of The Free Methodiat Church of
Horth &merica

VED BLE Ge ES ALONG AGE AA EE REG ES LE aun ay

at ae,

(ler

Worship Time: Elan. d& 6p.n.

Prayer Time: Mh fanwm, te MibaS am,

Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights aff Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O), Thaw Sh-"4 |
Telephone number: 324-258
Telefaa nimber: bps 2487

COME To WORSHIP LEAVE To SERVE



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

SkyBahamas Airlines
IFS IAL

OEE
CTE

SKYBAHAMAS Airlines made good on its
promise to donate $10,000 to the 57th National Fam-
ily Island Regatta in Exuma last week.

Signing up as the official carrier/sponsor for this
year’s regatta held in George Town was something
the company felt obligated to do, said CEO and
president Captain Randy Butler.

“Exuma is considered the birth place for SkyBa-
hamas, having given the airline its start some four
years ago,” said Captain Butler.

The CEO said that safely transporting well over
1,000 passengers into Exuma during the regatta was
not only a good business
move for the company, but
he felt that the extra airlift





“Exuma is con-

sidered the birth also gave the local Exuma
poe for SkyBa- economy a stimulus that was
amas, havin so badly needed.

iven the airline “We wanted Exuma to
its start some four know that they have been

years ago.” very supportive of us, and
our company will continue to
Capt. Randy pe supportive of them,” said
Butler Captain Butler.
SkyBahamas’ chairman of
the Board of Directors Peter
Turnquest, who also serves as the head of the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commerce, underscored the
company’s commitment of supporting the communi-
ties the airline services. According to Mr Turnquest,
“SkyBahamas is gaining the reputation of being a
model corporate citizen.”

Awards

The $10,000 donated by the airline to the regatta
committee assisted in defraying the cost of the event
and provided awards to participating sloops.

“This level of community support is something
sadly lacking with many progressive companies in
recent times,” said Mr Turnquest.

“In order for our communities to grow we must all
make the sacrificial effort to support activities consis-
tent with our cultural and national endeavors.”

SkyBahamas’ chief operating officers Kenneth
Romer reaffirmed Mr Turnquest’s conviction by
adding that SkyBahamas has committed to sponsor-
ing many cultural initiatives in the months ahead.

Some of these include the Mangrove Cay Home-
Coming and Regatta scheduled for early May, the
Cat Island Rake and Scrape Festival set for June and
the North Abaco Power Boat Race in July.

Additionally, SkyBahamas is the official airline for
the Miss Bahamas Beauty Pageant and related
events.

According to Mr Romer, “SkyBahamas’ commit-
ment to things Bahamian is clear evidence that the
airline is moving in the right direction of becoming
the premier airline for the Bahamas and the region”.

SkyBahamas presently has permits to operate
scheduled flights into Freeport; Marsh Harbour,
Abaco; George Town, Exuma; New Bight and
Arthur’s Town, Cat Island; Bimini, Andros,
Eleuthera, Providencieles Turks and Caicos, Haiti
and Jamaica.







Are you...
wwitotivated, outgoing and professional?

50 ARE WE!

Join our rapidly growing group of companies and
enjoy an exciting and rewarding career in sales,

Outside Sales
Representative

The ideal cardidate must:

» Bea high motivated sell sarier wiht an emhusiasic, iendy and qulgoing personality.

«Be wiling ko be trained ina venedy of product noawlinds areas.

« Possees aecellent onjanizational and ime management sil.

» Be able io word independenty: sepresem the interests of management and the
company professionally and effidertty; and handle customers efiectivel)

» Possess compuler shils, to include working knowledge of MS Ofice Suite (Ence,
Word, PowerPoint, and [nemel Explorer ett)

« Be punctual and have relsbia ranspoalinn,

Posiion ig commissinn based - your sunness depends entirely oni your sales efforts - the
sky is he limit!
Construction trade experience praferad.

Pledge email your resume lo oubsdecales | jahotmail.com







C H Reeves students advised to
take responsibility for their safety



By Bahamas
Information Services

AS road works begin on
the Marathon/Robinson
Road and East Street corri-
dors, students of C H
Reeves were encouraged to
exercise proper use of the
roadways.

Charlene Collie-Harris,
project civil engineer in the
Ministry of Public Works
and Transport, along with
Sergeant Garlon Rolle of
the Traffic Division of the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force, addressed the stu-
dents during an assembly
this week.

Sidewalks

Mrs Harris told the stu-
dents that when the road
improvements have been
completed there will be
proper sidewalks, pedestrian





(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson)

STUDENTS of C H Reeves listen as a representative of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport and them
about road improvement works Robinson Road and Marathon.



crossings and bus stops.

She urged them to use the
sidewalks, crossings and bus
stops properly.

“The bus stops will be
clearly identified. Stand on
the bus stops and not any-
where. Help the bus drivers
to pull on the side of the
road,” she said.

Set Rolle told the students
that the police and Ministry
of Works are very con-
cerned about their safety.

He said there are “too
many” traffic accidents and
“too many” people are
dying on the streets.

“We can do a better job
as a community,” he said.

“You have a personal
responsibility for your own
safety.”

He encouraged the chil- ie
dren to exercise caution par-
ticularly when crossing the
streets and exiting a bus.

“Make sure the way is
clear at all times,” he said.



CH Reeves about road safety.

Jamaica increases police presence after killings

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — Jamaica's security minister has
assigned dozens more police officers to crime-ridden areas
after gunmen killed a 5-year-old girl and a priest in separate
attacks, according to Associated Press.

Police say the girl was killed in Glendevon, a poor commu-
nity near the resort city of Montego Bay, as her father drove her
to school Thursday. The girl's father and a 9-year-old sister were
seriously injured. Security Minister Dwight Nelson said Friday
that 40 police officers will be assigned to Glendevon, where five
men were killed on Sunday. He also expects to increase police
presence in Spanish Town, where authorities say the Rev.
Michael Dixon was killed at his home Thursday. Jamaica has
one of the world's highest murder rates.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TERRAN
AKEEM WELLS of PO.Box N-4283 Nassau
Bahamas intend to change my name to TERRAN
AKEEM NEWRY. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PRO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Paoney 20 Wioek





= i

(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson)

SERGEANT Garlon Rolle of the Traffic Division of the Royal Bahamas Police Force speaks to students of

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GORDON

of Nassau, The
Bahamas, intend to change my name to G.O X. If
there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO. Box N-742, Nassau, The
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.



FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

clade lca NT AT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 29 APRIL 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,556.59 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -8.79 | YTD % -0.56
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.02
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
5.23 Bank of Bahamas 5.24
0.44 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste
2.14 Fidelity Bank
9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07
2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84
5.00 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.80
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.91
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54
5.94 Famguard 6.07
8.75 Finco 9.08
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60
3.75 Focol (S) 5.08
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59
9.95 J. S. Johnson

10.00 Premier Real Estate

0.44
3.15
2.17

9.95
10.00
52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

52wkaLow Symbol Bid S

Bahamas Supermarkets. 10.06

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00

RND Holdings 0.35

6.25
0.40

Previous Close Today's Close

10.63

12.07

10.60

10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

100.00
100.00
100.00 - 7%
100.00 .

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Ask &
11.06

EPS $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.460
0.111
0.627

-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366

Change Div$
7.05 0.03
0.00

0.00

Daily Vol.
21

5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.84 0.00
5.80 0.00
2.90 -0.01
2.54 0.00
6.07 0.00
9.08 0.00
0.00
0.00
1.00 0.00
0.27 0.00
5.59 0.00
9.95 0.00
0.00

5.08
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156 64.1
ases)
Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
EPS$
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div & P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price. Daily Val.

4.00
0.55.

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

ABDAB 30.13

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55

31.59

4.540
0.002

0.000

0.55 0.000

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV YTD%
1.4602 1.50
2.9116 0.85
1.5274 1.34
3.2025 2.75

13.4986 0.98

107.5706 3.45

105.7706 3.99
1.1034 1.25
1.0764 0.79
1.1041 1.23
9.5795 5.33

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

1.3702
2.8266
1.4467
2.9343
12.6816

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000 10.5417 -2.13

4.8105 7.6928 -0.31

NAV 3MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.507147

NAV 6MTH
1.407626
2.830013
1.491956

Last 12 Months %
6.57
0.52
4.98
-3.54
5.44
6.99
13.50
bce)
4.37
5.34
5.33

31-Mar-10
23-Apr-10
31-Jan-00
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
31-Dec-09

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

10.96 31-Mar-10

47.51 31-Dec-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily valume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Shange - Ghange in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Weekly Vol. -



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Golina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Goli

Last Price - Last traded over

Trading volume of tt

ie
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stack Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 9

r



SATURDAY, MAY 1,

t

2010





Primary school track and field invitational
produces outstanding individual performances

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHILE they didn’t crown
an overall champion, the
New Providence Primary
School Track and Field Invi-
tational produced some out-
standing individual perfor-
mances.

The championships con-
cluded yesterday at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium of three
days of intense competition.

While the preliminaries

took place over the first two
days, only final events were
contested on the final day,
including the 100, 200, 400
and 800 metres on the track.

There were limited events
staged on the field.

For the first time, associa-
tion president Lisa Mortimer
said they invited some of the
small private schools to par-
ticipate and that sort of
enhanced the competition.

From track events con-
tested, there were some mul-
tiple winners, who also dou-
bled up winning one or two

other events.

Juliette Pierre of Gerald
Cash, won the girls A 100
metres in 13.22 seconds after
she upset Our Lady’s Tyla
Davis, who had the fastest
qualifying time of 13.00.
Davis got second in 13.57
with Jasmine Farrington of
Freedom Academy taking
third in 13.84.

“It was great,” said Pierre,
the 11-year-old sixth grader,
who eariler won the 400 in
1:06.76 ahead of Claridge’s
Kiera Bramwell (1:08.22). “I
knew I was going to win.”

Nitcheu Casseus of Cen-
terville won the A boys 100
in 11.78, followed by Okel
Nesbitt of Carlton Francis in
12.24 and Oti Willburgh of
Camrichael third in 12.85.

“T felt it. It was exciting,”
said Casseus, an 11-year-old
sixth grader who also won
the long jump. “I really
believed that I could win.”

The B Girls 100 came right
down to the wire with Ade-
laide’s Dirtonise Sensuren
pulling off the victory in
13.66, just ahead of Uriah
McPhee’s Elrindera Bethel

in 13.67. Proleine Pierre of
Claridge was third in 13.83.

Eleazor Goodman of Thel-
ma Gibson took the B Boys
100 in 13.33. Coming in sec-
ond was Bradley Duncombe
of Yellow Elder in 13.57,
while Terjoel Dawkins got
third in 13.66.

In the C Girls 100, Anish-
ka Lotmore of Claridge took
the tape in 14.58, well ahead
of her team-mate Tyra
McKenzie in 14.84. Jonay
Hanna of Thelma Gibson
was third in 14.91.

“It was fine,” said Lot-

more, the nine-year-old, who
also took the 200 in 31.60
over McKenzie’s 31.88. “I
just went out and ran good.”
The meet served as a pre-
lude to the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture’s
29th Primary Schools Track
and Field Championships
that will take place from May
19-21 at the TAR Stadium.
At the meet, teams from
the various Family Islands
will be coming to town to
compete against both the
public and private schools in
siumilar age groups.



NPBA men's

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



WHILE the New Providence
Women’s Basketball Association
champions have been decided, the
New Providence Basketball Associa-
tion men’s championship could be
completed this weekend.

The winner from the NPBA’s best-
of-five series between the Common-
wealth Bank Giants and the Real
Deal Shockers will join the NPWBA
champions Bommer G Lady
Swingers in representing New Prov-
idence in the Bahamas Basketball
Federation’s National Round Robin
Tournament.

The tournament is scheduled from
May 14-15 at the Grace Gymnasium
in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and will
feature teams from Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Long Island and
New Providence.

This year’s tournament is being
held in honour of David ‘Stretch’
Morley, the immediate past presi-
dent of the BBF, who served for the
past 10 years.

Federation secretary general and
tournament director Sean Bastian
said they are expecting some keen
competition from the five men and
three women teams lined up to com-
pete.

“Last year, we had it in Bimini and
the year before that, it was in
Inagua,” Bastian said. “We’re look-
ing to take the nationals to the vari-
ous Family Islands because we feel it
is time for us to give them the show-
case that they deserve.”

Federation president Lawrence
Hepburn said the idea of taking the
tournament to the Family Islands is
to give the residents to see the high
level of competition and also to help
generate revenue as is done with the
regattas.

“When persons rent a room for
five nights, that’s a big revenue earn-
er from the hotel and the food ven-
dors in the Family Islands,” Hepburn
said.

Teams from Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Long Island and
New Providence will contest the
men’s division, while the women will
comprise of Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama and New Providence.

“We are hoping that the Abaco
basketball fans and the whole com-
munity of Abaco will come out and
embrace this high level of competi-
tion,” Bastian said.

“We’re looking at the best of the
best from the Family Islands come
out. This is an opportunity for the
community of Abaco to come out
and see the best that the Bahamas
has to offer in basketball in the men
and women.”

Bastian said like they did last year,
the federation might extend the
women’s division to a round robin
because they have interest from at
least one or two more teams from
New Providence traveling to com-
pete with the Lady Angels.

“We are trying to see if we can
give them some more playing time
because women basketball don’t
have as much competition as the
men,” Bastian said.

“So we are trying to expose them
to the game as much as we can. That is
why we opened it up last year with the
other teams that traveled to Bimini.”

e
5@ .

rT}

Ra a

—
Cc

‘oopok [TEN [ak]

fat]
fa

Ped RELIANCE 5@ = RCLIAN'
fied RELIANCE 5

: GUYANA T20 CRICKET WORLD CUP

championship set
for this weekend



Andres Leighton/AP Photos

WEST Indies’
batsman
Ramnaresh
Sarwan, center,
plays a shot off
Ireland's Trent
Johnston, right,
as wicket keep-
er Niall O'Brien
looks on during
their Twenty20
Cricket World
Cup match in
Georgetown,
Guyana, Friday,
April 30, 2010.
The West Indies
finished their
innings in 138
for nine.





=

WEST Indies’ bowler Ravi Rampaul celebrates after taking the wicket of Ire-
land's Alex Cusack, unseen.

iit

WEST In










dies’ opener Shivnarine Chanderpaul plays a shot off Ireland's
Boyd Rankin, unseen, as wicket keeper Niall O'Brien looks on.

IRELAND'S bowler Alex Cusack celebrates after catching and bowling
West Indies’ captain Dwayne Bravo for 18 runs during their Twenty20

Cricket World Cup match in Georgetown, Guyana, Friday, April 30, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



SPORTS

INBRIEF

German great
Mueller picks Brazil
to win World Cup

SOCCER
FRANKFURT
Associated Press



FORMER Germany great
Gerd Mueller says Brazil is
the favorite to win the World
Cup, and his own country
doesn't have a good team.

Mueller, one of the heroes
of Germany's 1974 World
Cup triumph at home, says
Germany coach Joachim

Loew is being stubborn for :
still not picking Schalke strik- :
er Kevin Kuranyi for the :

World Cup.

Mueller says "as long ashe :
(Loew) is stubborn, we won't :
have the best (Germany) :
team. He (Kuranyi) is the :
man scoring goals right now. :

... We don't have a good ! : : ; : : ; ; ; ; ; ;
: RAFAEL Nadal of Spain returns the ball to Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland during their match at the Rome Masters tennis tournament, in Rome, Friday, April 30,

team."

Loew has said he will con- :
sider Kuranyi's return after :
kicking the striker off the :
team for disciplinary reasons :

in October 2008.

Asked to name a World
Cup favorite, the 64-year-old
Mueller says "Brazil."

Bryant ready to
focus on future
with Cowboys

FOOTBALL
IRVING, Texas
Associated Press

Sooo seeseeseseesesresaeeeeesereesees

a

2010. Nadal beat Wawrinca 6-4, 6-1.

Natal beats Wawrinka to reach semis in Rome

TENNIS
ROME
Associated Press

RAFAEL Nadal overcame
a slow start to beat Stanislas
Wawrinka 6-4, 6-1 in the quar-
terfinals of the Rome Masters
on Friday.

Aiming for his fifth title at
the Foro Italico in five years,
Nadal had trouble finding his

+ range off Wawrinka's power-
: ful serve, but managed to

asked by Miami Dolphins gen- :

eral manager Jeff Ireland ina :

pre-draft interview if his moth- > points in his first four service

er was ever a prostitute.

DALLAS Cowboys rookie : break the 26th-ranked Swiss
receiver Dez Bryant says he's > to close out the first set, then
done talking about being : ‘Tuised from there.

Wawrinka, the 2008 run-
ner-up, dropped only two

* games.

After his first workout with !

repeatedly said he didn't want :
to talk about his interview :

with Ireland and the contro-
versy that has followed.

"IT don't want to talk about
it. [just want to talk about the
Cowboys and what I'm doing.
I put that in the past," Bryant
said. "I'm just going to move
on, I really don't even want
to speak on it anymore. I feel
fine, things are great. I'm just
looking ahead now."

Bryant's on-field debut with
the Cowboys came days after
Ireland apologized publicly,
the NFL players union raised
concerns about discrimination
and degradation, and Dol-
phins owner Stephen Ross
said he would look into the
matter personally.

Meanwhile, Ross gave Ire-
land a vote of confidence Fri-
day and said he considers "the
matter closed."

In a four-paragraph state-
ment, the Dolphins owner
said he spoke with several
people, both directly and indi-
rectly involved with the situa-
tion, and concluded the team
will need to make some
changes to its interview prac-
tices.

He stopped short, howev-
er, of saying he considered
any punishment for Ireland.

"Jeff Ireland is a man of
great capability and integrity
and he is well deserving of my
continued confidence,” Ross
said.

Ross did not specify exact-
ly how the interview process-
es going forward would
change.

"We are going to take a
hard look at our interview
practices and we will make
improvements that will allow

us to get the important infor- °
mation we need about players +

Nowitzki ‘to Keep my options open this summer

major investment, but with- +

in whom we are making a

out being insensitive," Ross :

BASKETBALL

said.
Another twist came Friday

asked Bryant if his mother :
was a prostitute as a follow- :

to oth ided +
cnet -yie econ bras ara : Mavericks jersey would be

by the 21-year-old receiver.
The SI.com report cited an

alleged exchange in which :
Bryant was asked what his :
father did for a living when :
the receiver was growing up, :
and he responded that his dad :

was a pimp. When Bryant was :

then asked what his mother : Dallas reached the NBA finals

did and answered that she :

worked for his dad, Ireland :

asked if she was a prostitute.

"The first set was level for a

the Cowboys during a rookie * long time," Nadal said. "He
minicamp Friday, Bryant : WS holding serve much easi-

er than me. All the games on
my serve were harder than
his. But at 5-4 I started to play
really well with some good
drop shots."

Nadal then began
approaching the net in the
second set.

"Iam going to the net
more," the Spaniard said.
"You can go to the net more
when you're dominating the
points."

Nadal improved his record
on clay this season to 8-0, hav-
ing won the Monte Carlo
Masters two weeks ago.

"T played well, but I was
definitely playing better in
Monte Carlo," Nadal said.

His only loss at this French
Open warmup came against
fellow Spaniard Juan Carlos
Ferrero in the opening round



Henin

overcomes
Jankovic at

Porsche GP

TENNIS
STUTTGART, Germany
Associated Press

JUSTINE Henin of Belgium
stayed on course for her first
title since coming out of retire-
ment by beating Jelena
Jankovic — yet again — for a
place in the Porsche Grand
Prix semifinals.

Henin rallied to win Friday's
match 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3 and
bring her record against the
Serb to 10-0.

"Tstill don't know how I did
it," Henin said after the match.
"It was really intense."

Henin will play Shahar Peer
of Israel, who stopped Dinara
Safina's comeback from injury
by beating the second-seeded
Russian 6-3, 6-2.

Henin returned to the cir-
cuit in January, ending an 18-
month retirement, and was
runner-up in Brisbane and at
the Australian Open.

: DALLAS

when SI.com, citing unnamed :

sources, reported that Ireland : Associated Press

DIRK Nowitzki has always
said wearing anything but a

strange, and that winning a
title anywhere but Dallas
wouldn't be the same.

Now, he's not so sure.

Still reeling from a first-
round playoff ousting — his
third in the four years since

— Nowitzki said Friday he
needs some down time before
deciding whether to return to

Jankovic thought the Bel-
gian was just as strong as
when she retired as the reign-
ing No. 1.

"She is playing the same, she
is still one of the best on clay.
You have to hold your ground,
as soon as you lose concentra-
tion she takes advantage, she
has so much experience," said
Jankovic.

Also a former No. 1,
Jankovic won the Stuttgart
tournament in 2008 and was
seeded fourth this time.

"We both played a good
match and maybe I was a little
unlucky at the crucial times,"
the Serb said. "I had a break
point at 5-5 in the second and I
was hoping to pounce on her
serve but she hit one of her
best serves of the match with
her second serve."

Henin had 44 unforced
errors but also produced 43
winners, while Jankovic only

the Mavericks next season or
to opt out of his contract and
become a free agent.

"Thave to keep my options
open at this point, see what's
going on; got to get over this
disappointment for a while,"
he said. "I'll probably drown
my sorrows for a bit, then start
thinking about stuff like that
in a week or two. As of now, I
just want to keep my options
open and see what happens."

Nowitzki is due $21.5 mil-
lion in 2010-11. If he leaves,
it wouldn't be for more mon-
ey, but for a better chance of
winning a championship.

had 18 winners to go with 23

two years ago, when he was
bothered by a foot blister.

Nadal's semifinal opponent
will be either Ernests Gulbis or
Feliciano Lopez, who were
playing the night match.

Earlier, Fernando Verdas-
co extended his impressive
form on clay with a grueling
7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-4 win over
Novak Djokovic.

Verdasco has reached the
final of his last two events —
losing to Nadal in Monte Car-
lo and winning last week's
Barcelona Open. In the semi-
finals, Verdasco will face
David Ferrer, who cruised past
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4, 6-1.

Roger Federer and Swiss
Davis Cup teammate Yves
Allegro were eliminated from
the doubles tournament by
American pair John Isner and

Sam Querrey 6-4, 6-4.

Federer lost his opener in
singles to Gulbis on Tuesday.

Between Verdasco and
Djokovic the first set alone
lasted nearly 1? hours and the
sixth-seeded Verdasco closed
out the match with an ace
down the middle after 3 hours,
18 minutes of long baseline
rallies under a glaring sun.

"When you face someone
who always makes you play
one more shot on every point
it's not easy to play a quick
match," Djokovic said. "So I
knew it was going to be a long
match today.

"The match could have
gone either way. It was decid-
ed by one or two points."

Verdasco also _ beat
Djokovic in the Monte Carlo
semifinals, although with a rel-







Daniel Maurer/AP Pho

RUSSIA'S Dinara Safina returns a ball during her quarterfinal match against Israel's Shahar Peer



atively straightforward 6-2, 6-2
score.

The turning point this time
didn't come until Verdasco
won a marathon game on his
sixth break point to take a 2-1
lead in the third set, running
down a drop shot from
Djokovic and forcing the
exhausted Serb to hit into the
net.

Djokovic committed 46
unforced errors to Verdasco's
40.

"My backhand wasn't at the
level I wanted it to be at today,
and I struggled a little with my
serve, but I'm happy more or
less with the way I played,"
Djokovic said. "If there was
one different thing I could've
done I would have liked to
play better on the important
points."



at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix in Stuttgart, Germany, Friday, April 30, 2010.

unforced errors.

"She played very consis-
tently in the first set and I was
under a lot of pressure," Henin
said. "I kept fighting and Iam
really happy to get through."

Peer, Henin's semifinal
opponent, is celebrating her
23rd birthday Saturday.

Safina, another former No.
1, was playing her first tourna-
ment since retiring from the
Australian Open in January

Dallas has won at least 50
games for 10 straight season,
yet still hasn't won a title.
Only three other franchises
have pulled off the 50-for-10
feat and each won at least
three titles during that span,
adding to the frustration for
Dallas players, management
and fans.

Nowitzki said he believes
owner Mark Cuban and pres-
ident Donnie Nelson would
continue to surround him with
the pieces needed to compete.
In fact, he spent the last few
weeks repeatedly saying this
version was "the deepest team

with a lower-back injury.

"Dinara is a good player but
she hasn't played for a while,"
Peer said. "I was playing solid
and I was aggressive."

Peer made only three
unforced errors in the second
set as she twice broke Safina's
serve. Safina finished with 27
unforced errors, and Peer has
now won the last four of her
seven matches against the
Russian.

Earlier, seventh-seeded
Samantha Stosur also
advanced to the last four with a
6-3, 6-3 victory over Li Na of
China to extend her winning
streak on clay to 10.

Stosur, who will next face
either Lucie Safarova of the
Czech Republic or Anna
Lapushchenkova of Russia,
committed only seven
unforced errors and never
faced a break point.



I've been on in my career"
and that it was "built for the
playoffs."

But how would he react if
good buddy Steve Nash sug-
gested they team up again in
Phoenix? Or if LeBron James,
or Dwyane Wade, asks him to
come along wherever they go?

"As of right now, it's all
speculation,” said Nowitzki,
whom the Mavs hope to use
as their own recruiter this
summer in the NBA's free
agency bonanza. "I've always
said I want to finish my career
here in Dallas and it would-
n't feel the same putting on a
different uniform. So, that
really always was my plan. So
we'll just have to wait and
see."



ee



THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 11
LOCAL NEWS

nwCatering





CHEF Tim

e , J Tibbitts and his
/ wife Rebecca
rl + Tibbitts, founders
2 r = | of 99/1 Food
i = ] Services
. Management.

IN GRAND BAHAMA



FREEPORT —



ahamian entrepreneurs are doing their part
in helping boost Grand Bahama’s econo-
my by launching a new catering service to
assist homemakers, entertainers, wedding
parties and event planners with all their culinary needs.
The new company, 99/1 Food Services Management,
was launched last year by Tim Tibbitts and his wife
Rebecca who have over 30 combined years experience
in the food and hospitality.
The couple moved back to Grand Bahama after living
in Canada for many years.
After successfully launching EAST restaurant in Port
Lucaya, the Tibbitts opened their own catering business
and have been busy ever since.

Busy

“We've been extremely lucky that Tim’s culinary rep-
utation and our quality in service has kept us very busy,”
said Mrs Tibbitts.
“We offer a service where we can prepare the food
for working families, cater private dinner parties or pre-
pare for a wedding for 150 at the Grand Bahama Yacht
Club or any other venue.”
Mr Tibbitts, a former top ranking Canadian musician,
returned his focus on his passion for cooking a few years
ago and decided to make the move home like many oth-
er Bahamians. j es
“T missed the lifestyle, the close friends, and to be eee r a] 3 ai
honest, the fishing,” he said. i t Tibbitts pictured
“Very few things get me as excited as working with ; sii a pecenh
great ingredients that are as fresh as our local seafood, OTC
especially when we catch it ourselves. I love to experi- MORON
ment with global flavours to bring new experiences to rn yes
the people who we serve.” ;






































































INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS BROKERS & AGENTS
pe ey tr ee ee a WEDNESDAY eC Sey
ey , oo, ons a, a
, ¥ — » — » ry , o|1|2/3\4|5 6|7|s|9|10}11+
Sat —i ii tye r eat uw =| wonerame ee | He | er
- Sune aad bore Chad atl Gries Soaiete Gea wth Partly deary, beeary Sah ed peat Suns Tae foghar te Aoceeeer UM idee corse te
— % fare cicuck. aad bu Geen bh wiry eter Gen need doc oe od eke podem
_ High: ae ee iti Mighu: Sr" Hiigih: Ba"
eh r High: Be Lowe: 74" Lore: 7a" Low: 73° Low: 73" Lowe: 76" ee
eee a el ee Te
Zipm 225 pm fo
Surcog leed Le 4a Bo
bi lt ceed iiMipe 27 dose oo
4 Sus ae fer Aide Ce 2 pe peer Mead Suan Z CHa oe
i | “y High: #7" Fate A Teme eceinrt “ign 26 fap 63
a he * 7 Figh _. : - 7 ~ SP Ar af 7
= + Lowe Ter Fa" an Tear. Tay 12pm 21 ize Ba
i Ene knots —— as ‘ formal kre —— a Weteenbp 25am 25 Tam ba
a = rs: higa ar = 1G
E-1 knots: prt fseelat fi se . _ hPa ae zt MEL pum _ Ie
Precipiben There 1522 a 22° T33 am Gs
J Ac cl Spun, perertay nae 134 pm ri | Bae pn GT
i —_ Feo Ue chad 7 cr onary 2 2,
1 - Wormal year to date : : : Tia pea pm 7 fod pan He
| AccuWeather.con ——|-—_—-—
Forenar and graphics prnesded by tm la
HASSAN 000 Wwe gS"FaE"c a, ee end Semen Beam Meceries TESS pre
mene Leee TE" Fac Samet . 70 pan a. et on
Lasse 7? FZ" : bens Hew First Full
- petite
KEY WEST % p CAT 1SLAe 4
High 24" RSC : Foye High: BS" F235" c el
Loe TE Fee" G i, : A ‘ Lore: Ta" Pear ie =
L_ > * c _ May i Mey 15 May 0 Mery £7
“ 4-16 kets a + > if \,
â„¢ VÂ¥ 3 xuMA ae
": GREAT E ere
7 E16 bots High: 32° A=" G J Lora! 8
—_ Lee Jer aa" G
Shor ks ae vom De ees forays __ ‘ ™ pa
pies and benights = res. i gfe iy es, . ”
- : "¥ ir ’ i i "
Wawa ‘ a
ee eae ee
ee — a Hah: OF" Fea” ~ 8-16 knets
agg fd oi 4 Law Fer —
gee ae ate a a ee ie Cape Hatheras ae -& [ola
SOP a aah a at a Charlotte * Highs: T4"FesC Shown is today's - tee rae
et & = = & *
‘ HH 2) 84°F S280C better Ta rere res ;
22D laupdeg ot See issaae Bermuda Pee aes —
‘Sa og het SR . Highs: 82" Feec Highs: 77" Fase are ays feghs an ee
fe fe em ee ee ee + " . 1 fl Ror
4 Pensacola: * 4 * Savannah ee RAGSES ee pot
' ‘High’ "83 1c Highs: &2"F2a*c Lower 7S" Free a
30 « Daytona Beach = .
Highs: B4"F/29"C A. Lowe TER A
Tampa . Preepert (H) 7 cE P
Highs: 88 °RS25C.-, ed << ry <<
Miami * aaa ¥ ad ¥
; *Fg 8-18 Geots 8-716 krvata
25 HANS: BESFSONG "Highs: BS"FYS0"C “
Havana *
Hh Santiago de C a
7 . ul
~ WIS: WATS TEREITY WATT TOMes
20 - Hueaes Fey = aca Tada tE =F 16 Kress 1-2 Fee 11 Raber TF
oa Highs: o4°Fa4°C zee) ee ate ANDRS Tei ee aie whee ee:
1 = | . 2 a. at reas Ea Fen Pa
Highe: 89° Rek2*c - te eHighs: S0°Ra25C Susie EEE af 4-4 Knots Sod. Feet 1 Biles: Tz F
# Belize = mite 2 Antigua Car ISL 460 Tey ab 8-16 Krests ond Fem 4 Bes Tr F
Highs: Sa Bras ae Dominga ) Abgihs: BFC Baxi at 14 Knots oot Fer 1 Ales ie
ghs: Sar H : . a CRED BLAM Teta, ToS Ents: fa Fem 7
igha: SERS 2oC Highs: &5"Fr2aoC : eae :
15 a a E ood. Fees
tee ee a oe Barbadas E cai
ee ee ee Aruba Cunacan Highs: BS"F a0" me s ay ——
+ ee +Mariag ua Highs: B8°Frai°C E ri ioe LE faa Th
. is : . . Highs? oP Trinidad Sarma ESE af 6-12 Ket 1-3 Fa 11 ides iF
Re BO ee et Teer Teer Ea G15 Races oot Fame '
& & oe : = = Scio wi 1S Enotes ed Pe 1] Bie oF
2 1 : mL eres + a= : â„¢ % Canal Highe: era r Ea B16 Geote 1-3 Fame
a / Lt T- Pa & i a
eR . . Heine 255 . ‘e = Panama Clary Highs: Ba" FS1 5S MLLGOEMA ae See va a am ar
en = 81°F 25C CT 7 Eo WSO &n 7-f Fee 7 ile: I” F-
heb eb te ERE EE EEE * he be ® ABSSau Toy ESE ab 8-15 Krents 1-I Feet 40 Fn Ta F
Se RR RR RR ERE EER ESE a = ee ES i ELE wt 7-14 5 1-2 Fee 11 Ble 7 FE
SRRSNAS BUA RASS BGS 75 SS7OSS PSS 6S 1. SP 50 | SANEALWOBR Tray Ear Te Gere zie Yess 31
Waar Cad Swiss See ait Ladonrs: Pharr ore ie ALBR SLEMD Tos, ee 16 fas 1-2 Fee 1 Ae. rr F
oe a S03 OF _ cee eae fa LR Ree nos 6h = et tee Fes ta Sado: EEE of 7-14 Kreis 1-2 Feet 1 Aes TF





[JF] | INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

iiteibice t ia i Gees 1 tee

Tek (242) S02-G000 | Tek (2437) 250-3500 wenn rag we sa we

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Gay club battle
Two accused
of murder

FROM page one

court that Newchurch had stitches in her arm and shoulder
which she had been scheduled to have removed on Friday.
Mr Cargill asked that Newchurch be taken to hospital. Jani-
qua Russell, 20, and Lacey Knowles, 19, have been charged
with causing grievous harm to Newchurch who was stabbed
after the fight erupted inside the Garage nightclub early Sun-
day morning. Russell and Knowles who were arraigned on
Wednesday are on $8,000 bail.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Newchurch
be taken to hospital. Both women were also ordered to be
remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. Their case has been
adjourned to May 7.

Man helping police with
George Carey murder probe

FROM page one

Drive in Joan’s Heights.

"Officers searched and recovered a quantity of suspected
marijuana. Two males, ages 19 and 22 years old of Knowles Dri-
ve, were taken into custody," she said.

That same day, police recovered a pistol and ammunition
found in a bushy area near the Government High School in Yel-
low Elder Gardens. Investigations continue.

Banknotes to bear image
of Sir Stafford Sands

FROM page one

bear the image of Sir Stafford Sands.

“Now, given the expiration of the 2005 banknotes,” said
the government release, “the image of Bahamian Sir Stafford
once again returns to the notes.”

Government said it was “pleased to continue this effort
of honouring Bahamians who make significant contribu-
tions to The Bahamas by placing their images on our local
currency, an exercise that began in December 1993 when, for
the first time, the portrait of a Bahamian, Sir Milo Butler was
placed on the $20 banknote.

“Thereafter, the portraits of Sir Cecil was placed on the
1995 $5 banknote; Sir Roland on the $50 banknote in 2000
and Sir Lynden on the $1 banknote in 2001.”

Police look into apparent drowning
FROM page one

She was taken to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where she
died around 2pm.

Ms Mackey said the victim’s identity is being withheld pend-
ing notification of next of kin. She said an autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the cause death.

Officer who killed Brenton Smith

stayed on duty following death

FROM page one

Royal Bahamas Police
Force (RBPF) Assistant
Superintendent Hulan Han-
na confirmed Detective Cor-
poral Kelsie Munroe was
not removed from duty and
his firearm was not confis-
cated after he shot the 18-
year-old while responding
to an armed robbery at City
Market, in Village Road.

An inquest into the death
opened in November, suf-
fered a number of setbacks
before the seven-member
jury returned a unanimous
verdict yesterday absolving
DC Munroe of possible neg-
ligence or use of excessive
force when he shot the
teenager.

Mr Smith, 18, was found
unarmed. Evidence showed



Detective Corporal
Kelsie Munroe

he had not robbed the
supermarket, as DC Munroe
told the court he had sus-
pected, and continues to sus-
pect.

Coroner William Camp-
bell presented the jury with
four possible verdicts,

including manslaughter by
way of excessive force,
manslaughter by gross neg-
ligence and an open verdict.

But the panel found DC
Munroe acted in self-
defence with reasonable use
of lethal force as he was in
fear for his life when he
encountered Mr Smith.

DC Munroe said they had
come face to face at a break
in the wall which serves as a
public access path between
the supermarket and Bar-
ber Street, off Kemp Road,
when Mr Smith “came at
him.”

The Fox Hill division offi-
cer with 11 years experience
who has held a firearms
licence since 2002 had heard
the robbers described as two
men, one wearing a white
T-shirt, when he parked the



car behind the supermarket,
emerged with his gun drawn,
and encountered Mr Smith,
wearing a white T-shirt, and
he fired a shot from the
RBPF 9mm pistol within
seconds.

Mr Smith’s family main-
tain the College of the
Bahamas student, who was
walking with his friend
Leshad Thompson, 18, when
he was shot at around 8pm
on July 9, was not involved
in the armed robbery.

No evidence was found to

suggest that he or his friend,
a key witness in the inquest,
were involved in the rob-
bery.
Brenton Smith’s father
Hector Smith said he
intends to pursue legal
action to “obtain justice” for
his son.

Civil Aviation pledges action
over pilots’ flying hours

FROM page one

consequently the travelling public is
being put at risk.

A pilot, who wished to remain
anonymous, told The Tribune: “There
are bylaws by the Civil Aviation
Department that allow a flight crew to
work a 12-hour duty day, with up to
eight hours flight time or ten flights in
most cases.

“Most evening flights are done by a
very tired flight crew. Working 12-hour
days in some cases and flying 10 or
more flights in a single day is not an
easy task, much less with people’s lives
at stake. Pilots are coming to work and
flying aircraft with serious issues, most
deeming them non-airworthy and
should be grounded in fact.

“So most pilots who are paid by the
day have no choice and most times
take these extreme risks in hopes of
returning alive, all to receive an already
minimal pay cheque.”

Patrick Rolle, Director of Civil Avi-
ation told The Tribune: “The law is
very specific, if the companies are forc-
ing the pilots to fly and the pilots are
not entering the correct time or prob-
lems they are having with the airplane,

then they themselves are violating the
law.”

Mr Rolle added: “We want to assure
the pilots that if they came into Civil
Aviation and report those companies,
Civil Aviation will ensure every possi-
ble action is taken against those com-
panies.

Risk

“We cannot allow pilots or compa-
nies to put the flying public at risk.”

Another pilot at LPIA said: “Most
pilots are being paid by the day. They
receive a pay cheque every two weeks
and have a full time roster like any
other full time scheduled worker in the
Bahamas. There is no other industry in
this country where this blatant non-
sense is tolerated, much less even sanc-
tioned.

“The pilots fly these aircraft because
if they don’t fly that day they won’t
get paid. This in itself is added stress
and fatigue to an already critical job in
itself.”

In response to pilot salaries Mr Rolle
said: “There is nothing Civil Aviation
can do about that, it should be taken up
with the companies they work for. Civ-

il Aviation does not deal with pilot
salaries.”

Another pilot stated: “An addition-
al challenge at the airport is the secu-
rity risks that pilots fly under on a dai-
ly basis. While pilots go through the
security screening check point, bag-
gage handlers are allowed through an
easy access door close to the ramp with
carts loaded with unscreened bags and
are merely patted down.

“When a flight crew arrives at their
aircraft, they are unaware as to the
contents onboard, but are still the pri-
mary target and most susceptible to
arrest by the police, customs or
whichever authority when something
illegal or prohibited is found onboard
the aircraft.

“Over the years pilots have grown
tired of seeing their co-workers treated
unfairly and fired in an attempt to sus-
tain and maintain mere livelihood.”

Mr Rolle replied: “The pilots need
to look at the regulation. It talks about
your maximum duty times that a pilot
can fly. They should use the regula-
tion to their benefit.

“The law specifically talks about rest
periods. All these provisions in the law
are to protect the pilots. There needs to
be a clear understanding.”

FIL denies involvement in ‘loan’ scheme



TEEN

i

a - 2S

Se
SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED ELITEMOTORS LTD. sate

eT eye
aera!
ae CLE eee | cere eet



FROM page one

CHALLENGE =
BAHAMAS

a 12 year's of Ministery i in the Baa
wp during the month of ‘ori Tat,





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

made, The Tribune was told yesterday that about 500 appli-
cants had already been seen for that day. It is said the oper-
ation closed early at 3.30pm after allegedly running out of
application forms.

Some people, however, did not take the news of the clo-
sure of the office well, and demanded to be seen to be eli-
gible for the loan. According to a loan application, which The
Tribune was able to secure, the applicant is required to
give the establishment (whose name is being withheld at this
time) a two-week processing period where the application
would reportedly go before a “board” where it would either
be “approved, denied” or left undecided.

The telephone number on the application rang immedi-
ately to an answering machine that had already been filled
to its capacity.

This reportedly had caused a number of persons to flood
FML locations demanding answers on the alleged loan.

According to one source at the FML Group of Compa-
nies, “hundreds” of persons had called and visited their
locations inquiring about the loan.

The majority of these people were said to have become
enraged when they discovered that the businesses were in
“no way, shape, or form” connected.

PEL Te tC



THE officers from the Eastern Police Station in conjunction with
the Eastern Community Association are promising a day of fun and
music for the entire family at their “Fun Fantastic Festival and Mini
Tattoo” today.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette, Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs, Director of Social
Services Mellany Zonicle and Assistant Police Commissioner
Hulan Hanna are all scheduled to attend the festival.

The event, held on the grounds of the Super Value food store in
Winton Estates, begins at noon.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 5B





The Tribune

B

O Di



ea









A

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

re

vita

min really

necessary?



HERE are hundreds of different dietary supplements
on the market today that claim they will boost your
overall vitality and give you all the vitamins that

your body requires.

Some general practitioners and
pharmacists claim that it’s necessary to
take a vitamin pill each day to make
up for the nutritional deficiencies of
the modern-day diet which often
includes processed and fast foods.

But others say that simply taking a
pill a day can’t replace getting all of
your nutritional needs through eating
a balanced diet made up from items of
all of the food groups.

“Vitamins should only be taken if
it’s recommended by the doctor,”
Myra Albury Deputy, chief dietitian at
Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH),
told Tribune Health.

“These include cases where the per-
son has a health condition, which
includes diseases that affect your iron
count, like a kidney ailment which
makes taking a vitamin necessary to
make up for deficiencies.”

Only in cases such as these does Ms
Albury recommend taking multivita-
min supplements.

“Pm not knocking down vitamins,”
said Ms Albury. “I just think that con-
suming high protein foods and drinks
can’t match getting your protein from
natural sources. I recommend eating
well-balanced diets covering all the
food groups such as starch, vegeta-
bles, meats and other food sources,”
she said.

“Eat a variety of nutritious foods
from all the food groups. You may be
eating plenty of food, but your body
may not be getting the nutrients it
needs to be healthy.”

Nutrient-rich foods have vitamins,
minerals and fibre, and also have less
calories.

The PMH dietitian said people must
eat balanced meals, prepared in the
right way, and ensure that they get
physical exercise.

“To get your requirements of
protein, have lean cutlets of
meat. You can have
tuna, salmon, fish,

chicken, turkey - skinless, less red,
more white meat,” Ms Albury said.

“Tf you have chicken, ensure that is
baked well and broiled.”

Have three to five servings of fruits
and vegetables, and 25 to 30 grammes
of fibre daily.

The best vegetables are fresh, the
next best are frozen and the worst are
canned. The minerals go down the
drain with the water, she said.

And Ms Albury recommends not
to overcook vegetables; they should be
slightly raw when consumed.

Some people, for instance, cook
broccoli until it loses its colour. The
richer in colour the food is, the greater
the nutritional benefits.

“You destroy the natural vitamins
inside (when you overcook). When
you steam your vegetables down, only
have them on the stove for five to ten
minutes, but the purpose is not to
cook them,” Ms Albury said.

“Some vegetables take a long time
to cook. But don’t cook them with a
lot of water, and you can also
microwave them.”

When it comes to a good source of
protein, Ms Albury recommends eat-
ing fish.

“If the person is healthy and eating
a well-balanced diet they don’t need to
be on vitamins at a healthy age,”
she said.

The dietitian also added that too
many vitamin supplements can lead
to vitamin poisoning - high storage
levels of vitamins which can lead to
toxic symptoms.

But there are those who disagree
with this stance on vitamin supple-
ments, and are of the opinion that it is
almost impossible to get all of your
necessary nutrients from food items
sold in supermarkets today.

Dr Humblestone, a physician for
stress related disorders, for example,
said that “the premise that you can
eat fresh fruits and vegetables and
you'll be okay is too simple.”

“There’s a lot more to health,” he
told Tribune Health.

He explained that a significant
amount of nutrients that a body
requires cannot be found in foods that
are made from white flour and sugar.

“White flour and white sugar don’t
have the micro-nutrients, the minerals
and the vitamins which are so impor-
tant,” he said.

“Tn animal experiments, it has been
clearly shown that if you give animals
less calories that they are normally
calculated to require for the given
body weight of the animal, they die if
you give them less calories, but you
add extra vitamins and minerals and
some of those animals live up to 50
per cent longer. The ones who live on
the regular balanced diet do not live as
long,” he said.

Times have changed, and so have
people’s nutritional needs, Dr Hum-
blestone said.

“We are under stress more than




people in old times with regard to
food. The island food as it used to be
was from the sea. We don’t get natur-
al foods (anymore), as everything is
processed and packaged, even down
to vegetables.

“We’ve got so much canned foods
now where the minerals go down the
drain with the water,” said Dr Hum-
blestone.

Dr Humblestone said that eating
fresh produce, fruit and vegetables, is
required to live healthy, but warned
that you can still lose high levels of
zine and vitamin D through drinking
alcohol and even by taking on psy-
chological stress, which internalised,
depletes the body of vitamins B and C.

“Tf you have a high sugar diet you
can lose more zinc in your urine, it’s
just one of the things that happens,”
said Dr Humblestone. If you lose too
much zinc, your sense of taste will
diminish and you will need a lot of
flavours in order to satisfy you,” he
said.

“So much of the diet nowadays is
unhealthy, so you’ve got to ensure
that the mineral and vitamin function
is boosted.”

In Dr Humblestone’s opinion, there
is sufficient support for taking micro-
nutrient supplements (vitamins).

“Vitamins do play a very important
part in health and longevity. If you
can’t get it in your diet, then you sup-
plement,” he said.














FDA 101: Dietary
Supplements

(public information from the
United States Food and Drug
Administration)

THE Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) sug-
gests that you consult with a
health care professional
before using any dietary sup-
plement. Many supplements
contain ingredients that have
strong biological effects, and
such products may not be
safe in all people.

If you have certain health
conditions and take these
products, you may be
putting yourself at risk. Your
health care professional can
discuss with you whether it is
safe for you to take a par-
ticular product and whether
the product is appropriate
for your needs. Here is some
general advice:

e Dietary supplements are
not intended to treat, diag-
nose, cure, or alleviate the
effects of diseases. They can-
not completely prevent dis-
eases, as some vaccines can.
However, some supplements
are useful in reducing the
risk of certain diseases and
are authorised to make label
claims about these uses. For
example, folic acid supple-
ments may make a claim
about reducing the risk of
birth defects of the brain and
spinal cord.

e Using supplements
improperly can be harmful.
Taking a combination of
supplements, using these
products together with med-
icine, or substituting them
in place of prescribed medi-
cines could lead to harmful,
even life-threatening, results.

e Some supplements can
have unwanted effects
before, during, or after
surgery. For example, bleed-
ing is a potential side effect
risk of garlic, ginkgo biloba,
ginseng, and Vitamin E. In
addition, kava and valerian
act as sedatives and can
increase the effects of anes-
thetics and other medica-
tions used during surgery.
Before surgery, you should
inform your health care pro-
fessional about all the sup-
plements you use.

Are Supplements Safe?

Many dietary supple-
ments have clean safety his-
tories. For example, mil-
lions of Americans respon-
sibly consume multi-vita-
mins and experience no ill
effects.

Some dietary supple-
ments have been shown to
be beneficial for certain
health conditions. For
example, the use of folic
acid supplements by
women of child-bearing age
who may become pregnant
reduces the risk of some
birth defects.

Another example is the
crystalline form of vitamin
B12, which is beneficial in
people over age 50 who
often have a reduced abili-
ty to absorb naturally
occurring vitamin B12. But
further study is needed for
some other dietary supple-
ments.

Some supplements have
had to be recalled because
of proven or potential
harmful effects. Reasons
for these recalls include:

e microbiological, pesti-
cide, and heavy metal con-
tamination

e absence of a dietary
ingredient claimed to be in
the product

e the presence of more
or less than the amount of
the dietary ingredient
claimed on the label

In addition, unscrupulous
manufacturers have tried to
sell bogus products that
should not be on the mar-
Ket at all.

Before taking a dietary
supplement, make sure that
the supplement is safe for
you and appropriate for the
intended purpose.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



a
(© ATE

What really attracts us?

BEING a fly on the wall at a
lunch or girl’s night out will
undoubtedly open your eyes to
the world of ‘what turns women
on’.

Topics may include a beautiful
face, eyes, body shape, voice, smell,
the way they move and being ‘too
hot’ to resist.

This may not surprise you, but if
you hang around long enough you
may note the conversation moving
towards the magnetic effect of per-
sonality.

Qualities such as self-confidence,
sense of humor, plus an air of mys-
tery often supersede looks.

It is a known fact that lack of sex-
ual attraction is a deal breaker when
it comes to romance. A friend may
come to mind who is terrific in every
way but you just do not see them
‘that way’, and the very thought of
getting intimate with them is beyond
your comprehension.

If it is not merely looks then what
is it that really determines sexual
attraction? We may hear ourselves
saying ‘Oh, he’s just not my type’ or
‘I keep on going for the same type
and they are never interested in me’.



Where does this image of ‘our type’
come from and is it possible to
change it if we find it does not work
for us?

By the time we are adolescents,
our ‘love map’ has been embossed
into our subconscious. The paths on
the map are marked with indelible
ink and all lead back to past experi-
ences.

Impressions of looks and person-
alities of those persons who were
kind and loving to us, and also those
who were not, are stamped well
below our conscious thinking.

This explains why we often choose
similar types of people. The likeli-
hood of meeting the perfect ‘love
map’ person is slim; however, if
someone has some of those quali-
ties then an attraction starts to form.

You may well be agreeing, but
also may be reminded of falling
heavily for someone who was the
complete opposite to your type.

So is it possible to venture out of
the safety net of your predictable
type?

It is well documented that just
being in close proximity to someone
on a regular basis promotes a con-
nection. Sitting close to someone in
a classroom or adjoining offices will
develop familiarity. Also, the tanta-
lising effect of frequent deep eye
contact is known to accelerate the
feelings of falling in love. This
explains the nature of work place
romances and the difficulty of break-
ing the tie because of the frequent
contact.

We understand these concepts and
recognise the significance of our
past.

But it does not really explain the
mind-blowing effect of picking one
person out of a crowd of equally
attractive individuals.

You may be surprised to discover
that biologists have identified evo-
lutionary reasons why we choose
certain people and not others. Indi-

cators for this are signs of masculin-
ity such as height, greater shoulder
to hip ratio, deep voice, a manly
walk and an air of sexiness.

Someone who is seen to be pow-
erful, attractive to other females will
add to their attractiveness and desir-
ability.

Knowingly or unknowingly we are
on the look out for a compatible
mate to reproduce with. Our evolu-
tionary past drives us towards
healthy and high quality genes in
order that our children will survive
and in turn reproduce. This provokes
healthy debate about how much evo-
lutionary influence impacts our pre-
sent day lives, versus conscious
choices.

Gene selection starts as early as
the first contact with the person’s
natural scent, or pheromones.

We know now that women’s sense
of smell is much more acute than
men’s, and particularly during the
slim window of ovulation. The sig-
nificance of choosing someone with
dissimilar pheromones plays an even
greater role when we look at our
unique Chromosome 6 gene and the
Major Histocompatability Complex
(MHC).

Scientific research shows us when
we choose a mate whose MHC is
dissimilar to ours then we have a
greater sexual attraction.

Interestingly, Chromosome 6 is
also responsible for immune func-
tioning and by having a dissimilar
mate our children will have a bet-
ter immune response. It is thought
that this is nature’s way of reducing
abnormalities due to inbreeding.

Many sexual desire problems can
be retraced to the initial attraction
and the development of the rela-
tionship.

The importance of having an over-
whelming sexual attraction from the
beginning is significant as this plays
a role in future sexual desire, fideli-
ty and the longevity of the relation-
ship. Evidence shows us that having
a mate who is MHC similar to you
will usually mean less frequency of
sex and willingness to please. It is a
shame that we can not genetically
test every potential mate. However,
keep in mind the best litmus test
that we do have is to listen carefully
to our body’s response and our own
intuition.

¢ Margaret Bain is an individual and
couples relationship therapist. She is a
registered nurse and a certified clinical
sex therapist. For appointments call
364-7230 or e-mail her at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also
available for speaking engagements.

@x GRE E N SC E N E By Gardener Jack



The year begins

WELCOME to 2010, the
last year of the first decade
of the third

millennium.

I know that the US media
have already been touting the
end of the first decade but
they are plain wrong.

There was no year 0. We
went from BCE 1 to CE 1, so
the first decade CE ended
with the completion of year
CE 10, just as this decade will
end at midnight on Decem-
ber 31, 2010.

Now I have that off my
chest, let’s turn to garden mat-
ters.

The record warm temper-
atures in the first three weeks
of December led, I believe,
to tomatoes ripening even
earlier than normal.

I rarely get a tomato glut
in December but it happened
in 2009. The earliest produc-
ers were Cuban tomatoes.
They stayed rather small but
were delicious. The rest of the
early crop included Big Boy,
Early Girl and Roma.

My second crop in another
lot started to ripen before
Christmas and will take me
through February.

The third crop will be heir-
loom tomatoes. I plan to sow
Cuban tomatoes again in

May, June and July in the
hope they can produce dur-
ing the summer months.

My pepper plants are doing
well but are rather small in
size. Before Christmas I
dressed them with liquid fer-
tilizer from a compost cock-
tail, so I hope they pick up.

I am on my second set of
string beans, Swiss chard and
mesclun. Strawberries were
late and we have only had one
or two so far. Growing in the
same patch as the strawber-
ries is fennel, a vegetable cum
herb that is as handsome as
it is tasty. Carrots will, of
course, take a few more
months before maturity.

It has been a good rose sea-
son. I prune my roses severe-
ly in late

April and late October
every year and we had a grat-
ifying show over the Christ-
mas period.

My wife is in charge of the
flowers this year, with one
exception. I love nasturtiums
and have them in several pots
including, to good effect, in a
strawberry planter.

Valerie’s choices for the
front garden planters that face
north were New Guinea
impatiens, double-flowering
impatiens, gingers, marigolds,

zinnias and an ongoing selec-
tion of bulbs.

The bromeliad planter
looks a little wan. You can
buy flowering

bromeliads from a nursery
all year round but once estab-
lished in the garden they
respond to nature and flower
only in the warmer months of
the year.

A bed of bromeliads with-
out any flower stalks is inter-
esting but hardly spectacular.

We are coming to the end
of the carambola fruiting sea-
son. When the last fruits have
been picked there will be no
more until August.

There are still some late
local avocados to be had but
they also are coming to an
end. Papaya produces all year
long and ensures we are nev-
er completely without some
sort of fruit.

Bridal bouquet is on its last
flowers for the season and we
will have to wait until early
summer for the next set.

In the meantime, unlike
other frangipanis bridal bou-
quet keep its rather attractive
leaves.

Bridal bouquet is the only
plumeria I have in the year. I
love

flowering frangipani but I
hate the dormant season
when the shrubs or trees are
starkly bare.

A few years ago I was given
sprigs of xanadu, a man-made





PMO gaelic) MOV LAUI | MNO) ANU Pacey

form of philodendron. I grew
some in hanging pots and to
this day they are giving good
service and collect plenty of
comments. Xanadu needs lit-
tle care and is very tough.
Cuttings grow very readily
just by laying them on the
ground.

The old standby for a per-

manent hanging basket is the
spider plant that produces
dozens of baby plants hanging
down around the pot.

Less permanent, but defi-
nitely prettier, is a hanging
pot of portulaca.

The flowers come in single
and double forms and a myr-
iad of colours. The succulent

stems grow up to two feet
long, starting downwards and
then curling up to reveal the
watered silk-like flowers to
good effect.

¢ For questions and comments
contact gardenerjack@coral-
wave.com



Are men at risk?

By IAN A BETHELL
BENNETT

IN THE 1980s/1990s
Caribbean scholar Errol
Miller offered that men were
at risk.

In 2010 is this still true? If
so, what are they at risk of?
This is the nebulous part?
Where are men at risk?
Apparently they aren’t at risk
in the patriarchal system that
posits them as masters of
industry.

Nor are they at risk in the
running of the world econo-
my.

But young, working-class,
black men are more at risk
than others. They are not the
captains of industry. Nor do
they run the world system.

They are often the first to
be laid off when the econo-
my goes south. They are the
first to be picked up by the
police for loitering if they are
walking along the street.
These men are certainly at
risk in a world where the
economy has come to a
screeching halt.

But men are not alone
when it comes to being at risk
for HIV.

In the Caribbean we still
think that men alone push the
HIV statistics out of the
stratosphere.

In reality, however, young
women are now the group
most affected by the HIV
pandemic.

Most women do not believe
that they are at greater risk
of contracting HIV than many
men.

In the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, in general, there

exists this deluded idea that
women cannot easily contract
HIV.

This delusion holds strong
in spite of numerous studies,
statistics and ‘numbers’ that
argue against it. But, again,
we go back to outdated ideas
about gender and a significant
problem with the dissemina-
tion of information.

Our old ideas about gender
and gendered behaviour dic-
tate that HIV is a gay infec-
tion.

Women feel that they can
be out of the loop when it
comes to up-to-date HIV
awareness.

Ironically, even profession-
al women are under informed
about their risks of contract-
ing HIV and the gender
dynamics that work within
their personal relationships.

They often see no need to
make a partner, whom they
may share with other women,
use a condom.

They do not acknowledge
when they catch blows. Nor
do they publicly acknowledge
when they are forced into an
act against their wishes.

They refuse to admit that
domestic violence increases
their risk of contracting HIV.
These are all problems when
it comes to spreading HIV.
While I can appreciate the
need for light-hearted discus-
sion at this point in the
world’s economic meltdown,
there is also a need for a
sobering examination of our
beliefs.

Over Christmas I was
astounded at the number of
conversations that seemed to
not only imply but state that

women were continuing to
engage in sexual relations
with men without demanding
they use protection.

Some of these encounters
were not necessarily happy.
The conclusion is obvious,
Bahamians really think that
we are above risk. Those con-
versations also showed the
need to include some statis-
tics in this piece.

In a recent UNFEM (et al.)
study ‘The Multiple Faces of
the Intersections between
HIV and Violence Against
Women’, the risks are clearly
highlighted:

“Tt is important to highlight
that the feminisation process
of AIDS has not evolved at
the same pace worldwide, as it
has been estimated that in
Sub-Saharan Africa approxi-
mately 61 per cent of adults
who lived with HIV in 2007
were women, while in the
Caribbean this percentage
was 43 per cent (page 12).”

Sadly, we always say, ‘well,
at least we are not as bad as
Sub-Saharan Africa’.

That maybe true, but it also
means that we are dismissing
the gravity of our cultural sit-
uation.

The numbers speak for
themselves. And, as the study
further underscores, there is a
considerable problem with
underreporting in our region.
This indicates that a large per-
centage of cases will not be
reported to the authorities.
Translation, in reality the
numbers are higher.

Nonetheless, the numbers
are sufficient to show that
there is need for alarm. Fur-
ther, as we move deeper into

recession’s darkening grasp
more people, particularly
men, lose their jobs. The sit-
uation will worsen. As male
unemployment increases it
exacerbates other, already
existent, problems. Male frus-
tration will only worsen. The
title of the article should hint
at the direction we will now
take.

Arguably, men are at risk.
Their risk is in part due to a
general increase in violence.
Violence is a fundamental
problem in our society, what-
ever guise it takes. It is only
now that the Bahamas is
beginning to take a serious
position against violence as it
threatens to undo the very
social mechanisms that make
our society work in ‘semi-har-
mony’. The UNIFEM study
sets the scene on what’s at
stake:

In this feminisation process
of the epidemic, young
women have been particular-
ly affected. It is estimated that
women account for 60 per
cent of people living with
HIV between the ages of 15
and 24 (UNICEF 2005, page
1).
Sexual violence, while not
discussed in our society, is a
growing problem. Moreover,
as men lose jobs, they cannot
maintain the role that society
has engendered them with.
They are hardworking
providers for their family.
Society sees men in relation
to how much they earn, their
professional success and their
ability to perform the mascu-
line role ascribed to them by
the group.

This masculine behaviour
determines how successful
one is with women, and is
based on professional and
financial success.

Once men lose their ability

to perform the established
masculine role, they lose self-
respect.

The way they relate to oth-
ers then also changes. Men’s
loss of self-esteem often plays
itself out through increasing
anger and violent behaviour.
As a result, some men strike
out more at those they per-
ceive as being less able to
retaliate. This fact is borne
out by any number of studies
that show how gender-based
violence increases during peri-
ods of extreme stress and
hardship, as in a recession.

To be sure, as the econom-
ic crisis deepens, more peo-
ple will find themselves unem-
ployed.

More of these people will
be men who are then unable
to meet their families’
demands. As their self-
esteem falls anger, crime and
violence rise.

This is a logical chain of
events that no one seems to
be discussing. Furthermore,
the more a man is emasculat-
ed in most areas of his life,
the harder he will fight to
retain dominance in arenas
where he still holds it.

As women look to their
men for money to buy the
essential things (or things that
appear important), Coach
bags, Land brief cases, David
Yurman jewellery, the newest
mobile phone on the market,
they find themselves in a
more vulnerable position.
These women also feel less
empowered to demand that
men use protection during
intercourse.

They also feel that they
cannot leave when a relation-
ship turns violent. Both men
and women find themselves
at risk in this scenario. Men
are at risk because they feel
angry and act out their anger,

and women because they get
blows.

Rape within marriage
becomes more of a problem
within this kind of situation.

In the end can we say that
men are at risk? Men are at
risk, in part, because they are
sidelined by a hostile world
of high unemployment that
breads anger and discontent.

Some men will then act vio-
lently, which results in them
being further marginalised by
a society that in turn reacts
to their violent behaviour by
locking them away. The more
men act out their rage, the
more they marginalise them-
selves. The more they mani-
fest violent behaviour the
more women are affected by
their behaviour. Gendered
relations mean that there is
always a co-relationship.

If men are at risk then, ulti-
mately, women are also at
risk.

As men react against their
social marginalisation women
are usually the victims of their
violent behaviour.

Furthermore, women
expose themselves to uncal-
culated, ‘unnecessary’ risk
each time they decide to go
for a joy ride with a man they
want to buy them a ting or
two! Unfortunately, marriage
is not necessarily a sanctuary
removed from the polemics
of this scenario.

¢ lan A Bethell Bennett is an
Associate Professor in the
Department of English at the Uni-
versity of Puerto Rico. He spe-
cialises in cultural studies,
Caribbean literature and litera-
ture of the British Common-
wealth. His research interests
include youth, masculinity, HIV
and gender-based violence and
trade.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 7B



Bahamian beauty queen could
claim ‘sexiest woman alive’ title |

ISS Bahamas

World Joanna

Brown has been
named as a finalist in a
major international com-
petition and Bahamians
are being called on to
boost her chances of win-
ning.
Fresh off a stellar performance in
the Miss World pageant, 18-year-
old Joanna has been listed among
the 10 finalists in the ‘Sexiest
Woman Alive’, a competition by
the world’s leading pageant por-
tal, Global Beauties.

This is the first time that a
Bahamian beauty has appeared in
the list since the inception of that
competition.

And Bahamians can help their
fellow countrywoman win by vot-
ing for Joanna online.

Each year, the Global Beauties
team reviews all of the contestants
who competed in the five “Grand
Slam” pageants — namely Miss Uni-
verse, Miss World, Miss Tourism
Queen International, Miss Earth,
and Miss International.

In 2009, about 440 women com-
peted in these pageants and from
all those beauties, only 20 were
considered to take part in Global
Beauties’ contest, ‘The Sexiest
Woman Alive’.

These 20 finalists were then
reduced to 10, with Joanna making
the cut, it was announced on Sun-

WOMAN

day.

“This is such an incredible hon-
our and we are extremely proud”,
said Miss Bahamas Organisation
(MBO) president Michelle Mal-
colm.

“It shows that even though she
did not make the cut at Miss
World, she is still a world class
beauty worthy of recognition.”

Although she did not become a
semi-finalist in that pageant, Joan-
na made her presence felt by plac-
ing fourth in the ‘Beauty with a
Purpose’ competition, and by
becoming a finalist in the ‘Talent’
competition, and a semi-finalist in
the ‘Sportswoman’ competition.

“We came away from the Miss
World pageant on a high, and now
this. Joanna has set the bar very
high for the queens who follow
her,” Ms Malcolm said. Joanna, a
recent high school graduate from
Grand Bahama, is among impres-
sive company on the Global Beau-
ties list.

Others to be named are the
reigning Miss Universe Stefania
Fernandez, the reigning Miss
World Kaiane Aldorino, and sev-
eral finalists from the Grand Slam
pageants.

Bahamians are being urged to
increase Joanna’s chances of fur-
ther advancing in the Global Beau-
ties’ “Sexiest Woman Alive’ com-
petition by voting for her online at
the following link: www.global-
beauties.com/sexiest/2009.

The total number of votes will
count as one judge.











Li a 7


12-5 brats

Shoes i6 today's weather Temper

higes. and fond pitts 's home

Havana *
Highs: 66° F2o°c

Highs: 81" Fyarne ».

BGS set

tee ie



ures ans Socks, 5

« Panama City
=" ‘Highs: Ss1°Ras c |

Vey aed cod seth
eae: ed cae

: 15-25 kant
a WEST PALM BEACH

High Br FAG G
= a

Cape Hatteras.



-
a7 i ‘Sharlotte * Highs: 400 Ff
Highas 37 FSC :
| Atlanta * : *
Hi sen FZ â„¢ = Charleston se
a _ * Highs: 46°REeC
Penescola, * Savannah ss Mee
Highs: 46h7C | Highs: 46°F * = eS
: â„¢ ~ a, The
“a0 Daytona Beach! at
me * Highs: 50°F /OPE *
Tampa . Freeport: ~~**~
Higha: 52° FA 1.5, oem, SOHe'c
NM Lainad
25 High: BrRire a ee

Pa

Dominge
Highs: 84° R/29°C

Aruba Cured

San Juan
«Hate: ae° rae

7

High: &" Fre" ic
Pee

a 2

al

24,

didid

a4 4 &

=

= aa ee

| a ae ee &

fh ey eh

ee ee ee ee ee ee

a

aHRrE eR RRR REED ©

kee bet eH eH
eee a

» Antigua
eae SS" Fac

Barbados
Highs: 26°F

* Trinidad
_ Tokeago







“Highs: 86° r1 oc

By

a aa a High 1 a3 &
55 4f a! d Lowe FALE
vnesen GREAT INAGUA
eee ee & “
Se ee Ae he ler HI" TFG ih
ih ty ey lh ty ty .
act c oe =o 4 <>
_ ae ee ro i, - a,
ah eh “a y
~~ 16-28 kets 12-25 kate
ce ae
eee METER TEMPS



































| High Hii) ove i
- apes ae 1 > yaaa Paflacd Wek Pac on Le . J Toot 1 ara * es
= of a vs
Sie ane bor Pics Legs 7 po. pede Thercky 351 am 1
A ee z EE TH pe is
ity] ‘, i ct RE Friiey 1-5 am 11
i a Rental fag dz

25-35 inarts

20-35 knots

Shonen i today" &
Bide Tenperehure:
* are today s highs and
inmighits hoes

Soe
at
Low: 55°

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

UU se ny





many baidy of lr

a: ice en eee
High: 4"
Low: 52"









an: Ger Hi “gh: Ta

Ligwy: So

Tipes FOR Massa




Aci low





7
TL yitiary oa

c
aa eli p
1 te dome wane
Morel ca ip dite .



AccuWeather.com
ELEUTHERA Pe aed Sie fed be
(Miph- fer Ftc Accu Meanther, Inc. (2D TE



Sige TS aS ic
PP itecsr rise

*. A wr
<1 >
“
5-30 knot
BAY AUG LANA,

Higt: TT" Fras"
Low: 58° Fe" &





= .
RAGGED SLAM = Lrrserrns"c















oe

aa

ELEUIHERA
FREEPGAT
GHERT EXUA

ar ard eel op bed ee lags agl d o bae
"

GSEET Ge

LOWE LAND

EEEEEEE,
F
1







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

remember the smart choice is
Insurance Wlanagpement.
Slain people you cau tous.

INSURANCE

CRABLAMLAS) LIMIT HE. INS TRANCE BDORERS & AEM IS

(EL) sues

renee a Tek (RE) SAPD | Tek (EEE) KDE | Dek (42) 34-2



THE TRIBUNE

nN
, Me MM TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010



A Bahamian
woman ona
special mission



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



LISA Gardiner is not your
typical Bahamian woman.
\ While others are striving to
\ make it in the corporate
world, getting married and
buying a house, 39-year-old
Lisa has chosen to follow a
very different path - that of
Christian missionary work in

a foreign country.

Lisa told Tribune Woman that it was
during a nighttime church service that
she felt God was “tugging” on her heart
“to reach tribal people.”

She was sitting among a small congre-
gation at Blue Hill Gospel Chapel watch-
ing a video on the efforts of a small
organisation called New Tribes Missions
which recruits Christians who want to
do missionary work in foreign countries.

Lisa said she went home that night
with a lot on her mind. She was a young
professional who had been working as a
lab technician for most of her adult life.
She wasn’t yet married, and understood
that leaving the Bahamas to do mission-
ary work abroad would cancel out all of
the plans she had made so far for her
life.

Weighing all the pros and cons, Lisa
finally decided that getting involved in
local ministry at her church was the bet-
ter alternative.

“T thought about the cost, what it takes
to be a missionary and started to doubt
for a couple of days,” she said.

“So I thought that if I just got involved
in ministry, that that would take the
place of going on the mission field.”

And that’s the path she followed for
eight years, involving herself in the
Awana programme and other youth pro-
grammes at her church.

“But I soon felt a void that was so
heavy, like something was missing,” she
said, “When it got so strong and heavy I
had to put it before the Lord.”

“Then the devil brought negative
things to my mind like, ‘missionaries are
nuns, and you’re going to have to be sin-
gle for the rest of your life, you'll have to
leave a secure job, family and friends,
and the Bahamas, your homeland,” she
said.

At this point in her life, Lisa even con-
sidered making a career change to feel
more fulfilled.

“Before I left my career, I prayed
about it and just when I did that, the
Lord brought back (the video) fresh in
my mind.”

“But God said, “you know Lisa, what’s
better, doing this career change that
you're not sure of, or going to do what
I’m telling you to do right now, which
was leaving Nassau to reach tribal peo-
ple?’

“When I said yes, the void was filled
and there weren’t any more questions
or doubts,” she said. “I sent away for
new information, and they sent me a
new application and the ball got rolling
for entering training at New Tribes Mis-
sion.”

Still, there were other setbacks that
required a “step of faith”, she said.

Still, Lisa was optimistic about her
newly chosen path in life. And few
months later she was packing her bags to
make her big move across the globe, to
Thailand.

“When I went, I only had a certain
amount of money in my hand. I was like,
‘Lord, this is going to take me for only a
few months, but it’s up to you to provide
for me in the next months’.”

That was 16 years ago.

Lisa
Gardiner



Since then Lisa said she has had a very
rewarding experience working as a mis-
sionary in Thailand.

Living in Thailand, she said, has given
her a greater appreciation for home, and
a cross-cultural experience that she has
shared with people at home.

She is now one of only a handful of
Bahamian missionaries working abroad.

For the past year Lisa has been back in
the Bahamas, on temporary leave.

But tomorrow the soft-spoken mis-
sionary is returning to Chiang Kham in
the Thai region of Phayao to continue
with her work.

Perhaps the biggest obstacle she’s had
to overcome was the language barrier.

As a missionary, she’s had to share
the gospel of Jesus Christ with the Thai
people, teach them the Bible, and help
them found churches.

Learning the Thai language required
her to study rigorously.

Thai has four regional dialects, Central
Thai, Northeastern Thai (Isan or Lao),
Northern Thai (Kam Muang or Lanna),
and Southern Thai (Paktai).

Every dialect has its own peculiari-
ties.

Lisa is now about 85 to 90 per cent
fluent in Thai, but “there’s a lot more I
need to learn,” she said.

Thai is a tonal language, with five dif-
ferent tones. Each sentence in Thai ends
with a ‘ka’ or ‘kap’ depending on the
speaker’s gender.

For instance, to say ‘hi’ or ‘bye’, the
women say “Sawadika,” and the men
say “Sawadikap.”

“As I studied and talked to the Thai
people, they would say, ‘oh, you speak
Thai really well.’”

Lisa said this was very encouraging
for her because she was toiling day and
night to learn the native tongue.

Cooking Thai food also took a while
to learn, but Lisa said she has grown to
love it.

“It’s spicy, so good, and it’s very cheap.
When I tried the different types of food
I was like ‘oh, I can try this, I can try
that’.”

Steamed wasp larvae, python snake
worms, and deep fried caterpillars have
all been a part of her diet while living in
Thailand.

“The python snake has the texture of
conch, and doesn't have much flavour
so you must add seasonings to make it
tasty. After it is killed, the poison is
removed, and I wasn't afraid because I
wanted to try it,” she said.

She describes the steamed wasp larvae
as having “a nutty flavour that I won’t
eat again.”

As for the deep fried caterpillars, Lisa
said they are something you have to
acquire a taste for.

“When you bite into it, you can taste a
pocket of air and a little mush that I
don’t like,” she said.

Lisa is more familiar with eating the
more popular native dish of Pa Thai,
which is fried noodles, and you can have
it with chicken, shrimp or pork, scram-
bled eggs, green onions, and sauce.

During the week, she will have a Thai
meal for lunch, and have something
Western for dinner.

“T want the best of both worlds, you
know,” she said.

Buying food hasn’t put a huge dent
in her budget. She said a Thai dollar can
easily feed her, and other essentials that
she needs are affordable as well.

“T may not have all of the normal
things that I would have as a woman
over here,” she said, “but I’m living with
what I have and I’m adapting to what is
there and making it my home.”

While she’s had to give up some luxu-
ries in life and adapt to a whole new cul-
ture, Lisa said her move to Thailand is “a
lifetime commitment”.

It is one that she doesn’t regret.

Discover the goodness
of Ovaitine.

Ovaltine's unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759





Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

The Tribune Ex

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

USA TODAY
BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

Pim blowin’ it

HIGH 87F
LOW 74F

es, SUNNY AND
w BREELY

Volume: 106 No.133



McDonald's downtown

CS EMC mel dy

24 hours

CE Ee eer rte





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Children
and domestic
violence

China — a land

BURY |
Hea

DS e

my
Ta
Rea

-
J
yf
i
ae
Vi

fascination
SEE PAGE FIVE





SEES)

i

Gay club battle: 7

police with their investi-
gations into the murder
of George Carey.

Mr Carey, 21, of
Bamboo Street, in the
Pinewood Gardens sub-
division, was admitted

Women
charged in
hit-and-run
tragedy

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO women, charged
with murder in the hit-and-
run death of a young woman
outside a gay night club,
were arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Unelta St Louis, 21, and
Angela Newchurch, 27, both
of Fox Hill Road were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in
court One, Bank Lane yes-
terday, charged with the
murder of Orial Farrington.
According to reports, Far-
rington, 20, of Nelson Street
was struck down by the dri-
ver of a 2008 Toyota Corolla
outside the Garage night-
club on Gladstone Road
early Sunday morning. The
incident occurred after a
massive fight, which started
inside the club, spilled into
the parking lot.

St Louis and Newchurch
were not required to enter a
plea to the murder charge.
The two women are repre-
sented by attorneys Jan
Cargill, Tai Pinder and Mary
Bain. Mr Cargill told the

SEE page 12

FML tlenies
involvement in
‘loan’ scheme

THE FML Group of
Companies has denied any
involvement in a local
“loan” scheme that claims
to guarantee applicants
$5,000 if they are able to
come up with a cash down
payment of $500.

Over the past two weeks,
a local “business” has
reportedly sprung up in the
Palmdale area under the
pretext that it was being
backed by the well-known
FML Group of Companies
and its proprietor Craig
Flowers.

However, executives at
FML have denied any con-
nection with this business.

When visiting the estab-
lishment where these alleged
loan agreements were being

SEE page 12







TT Mic PAM AOU RSIECUE
Felipé Major/Tribune staff

CHARGED: Angela Newchurch, 27

CHARGED: Unelta St Louis, 21.





AN updated series of $10 banknotes will
be issued by the Central Bank bearing the
image of Sir Stafford Sands, former Minis-
ter of Finance and a principal architect of
the modern Bahamian economy, it was
announced late yesterday.

“Sir Stafford's image was first placed
on the banknote on March 7, 2000, when
the series 2000 banknotes were released
into circulation, replacing the image of Her
Majesty Queen Elizabeth IT,” said the gov-



SIR STAFFORD SANDS



Banknotes to bear image of Sir Stafford Sands

ernment release. However, in 2005 the
PLP government under Perry Christie had
Sir Stafford’s image removed and replaced
by the image of the Queen.

Shortly after coming to office in 2007
the Ingraham Government decided that
when the 2005 series of banknotes bear-
ing the image of the Queen expired the
new series of $10 banknotes would again

SEE page twelve





Civil Aviation pledges action



over pilots’ flying hours

By ALESHA CADET



_ Officer who killed Brenton Smith
stayed on duty following death
By MEGAN REYNOLDS =F

: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net





CIVIL Aviation has said it will ensure that every possible :
action will be taken against airlines if they force their pilots :
to fly more than the allowed number of hours.

This comes as a group of pilots at Lynden Pindling Inter- :
national Airport (LPIA) expressed concerns about their :
jobs, their safety and the safety of the public. :

The pilots claim they are overworked and overtired, and :

SEE page twelve

yesterday.

THE police officer who shot and
: killed teenager Brenton Smith
remained armed and on the force
while his conduct came under scrutiny
: ina coroner’s inquest, it was revealed

SEE page twelve

BRENTON SMITH



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER





wr a SS UL RY)

~ Man helping
police with
George Carey

murder probe







A MAN is helping

to hospital last Saturday
suffering multiple stab
wounds. He died on
Tuesday.

It is believed Mr
Carey was at Lockhart’s
Place, on Wulff Road,
when he was attacked
by a group of men.

Yesterday police said
that a 29-year-old man
who lives at Fire Trail
Road is being ques-
tioned.

Police are also inves-
tigating a stabbing inci-
dent at Solider Road
and Abundant Life
Road which left a young
man in hospital yester-
day morning.

Press Liaison Officer
Sergeant Chrislyn Skip-
pings said police were
informed of the incident
around 11.30am yester-
day. Responding offi-
cers were told that a
man got into an alterca-
tion with two other men
which led to the victim
being stabbed in his
abdomen.

He is in serious con-
dition in hospital. Police
investigations continue.

Meanwhile, police
arrested two men after a
search of a house in the
Joan's Heights area
revealed a quantity of
suspected marijuana.

Sgt Skippings said
officers from the Drug
Enforcement Unit exe-
cuted the search warrant
around 10.04pm on
Thursday at New Hope

SEE page 12











Police look
into apparent
drowning

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Grand Bahama
are investigating the appar-
ent drowning of an American
visitor who was snorkeling at
Deadman’s Reef yesterday.

According to reports, the
victim — a 71-year-old woman
from Baltimore, Maryland —
arrived in Grand Bahama
onboard the Carnival Pride
cruise ship.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said she was among a group
of visitors who went on a
snorkeling trip at Deadman’s
Reef.

While snorkeling, the
woman experienced some
complications and was assist-
ed to a boat, said Ms Mackey.

SEE page 12
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise

Awards Two Paul

THE Rotary Club of Nas-
sau Sunrise bestowed a Paul
Harris Fellow Award on two
women who have made a dif-
ference for thousands of
Bahamians.

Jacqueline Knowles, coor-
dinator of PACE (Providing
Access to Continued Educa-
tion) and Nancy McDonald
of Read Bahamas have
worked tirelessly and pas-
sionately in educating and
improving the lives of others
and making them better
equipped.

Last month at a recognition
dinner, members of the
Rotary Club of Nassau Sun-
rise, the Rotary Bahamas,
assistant district governor
Felix Stubbs, past Rotary
International director Barry

Rassin and others paid trib-
ute to Mrs Knowles and Mrs
McDonald.

Jacqueline Knowles is the
coordinator of the PACE pro-
gramme for mentoring teen
mothers.

“She understands the strug-
gle of these young women
from her experience as a sur-
rogate mother to her siblings
and was once a teenage mom
herself, ” said a spokesman.

“She is a woman with a big
heart and has spent most of
her adult life helping the less
fortunate in our society. Her
dedication to education
earned her the Teacher of the
Year Award (1994-95) at the
C C Sweeting Senior High
School and she is also
involved with the Bahamas





PAUL Harris Fellow Recipient Nancy McDonald receiving her award
from Past Int'l Director Barry Rassin (left) and P.P. William T.

Teacher Mentoring Pro-
gramme. Married and a proud
mother of four children and
two grandchildren, she is a

member of the Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Church.

“Nancy McDonald’s con-
tribution to literacy has been

remarkable during her eight
years in the Bahamas. Upon
learning about the lack of
libraries in many schools,
especially in the Family
Islands, she wanted to make a
difference. As a result, she
founded Read Bahamas in
2007 and began donating
books to those schools in
need. Her concern for the
future of the Bahamian chil-
dren and their ability to have
books available have taken
her throughout the islands of
the Bahamas.

“Through the assistance of
numerous partners, Mrs
McDonald has delivered
almost 15,000 books to over
85 schools throughout the
archipelago. She is driven by
her passion for reading and

Harris Fellows

her love of books as well as
the positive impact this pro-
gramme has had on the
Bahamian children.”

The Paul Harris Fellow
Award is named after the
founder of Rotary Interna-
tional and has many recogni-
tion levels.

Donors of US$1,000.00 or
more to the Rotary Founda-
tion's Annual Programmes
Fund, PolioPlus or the
Humanitarian Grants Pro-
gramme, or people who have
that amount contributed in
their name, can be recognised
as Paul Harris Fellows.

The Rotary Club of Nassau
Sunrise made a $2,000 dona-
tion to the Rotary Founda-
tion for Mrs Knowles’ and
Mrs McDonald’s awards.











KENISKA Bain, Sandals administrative assistant, is pictured with
Ruth Strachan (left), acting administrator of the ‘Nazareth Centre.

Sandals Foundation donates
Supplies to Nazareth Centre

THE Nazareth Centre, a children’s home located in Mille- *
nium Gardens, received much needed supplies during a visit by :
a team from Sandals last week. Sandals Royal Bahamian’s :
public relations manager Stacy Mackey and administrative ;
assistant Keniska Bain presented acting administrator of the
centre Ruth Strachan with an assortment of books, school sup-
plies, toys and clothing from the Sandals Foundation.

The Sandals Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Sandals
Resorts International, was officially launched in 2009 and is the
culmination of three decades of work in communities where
Sandals operates across the Caribbean, the company said.

Opened since 2002, Nazareth Centre is home to 45 children
who range from infant to twelve years of age. Ms Strachan
thanked Sandals for its contribution and said that the kind

gesture was much appreciated.



urtz Ritchie/Photo



TURTLE Ie LC
in Supermodel of the
HVT UT HULU



THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY



Sat Ist May 12noon - 6pm

Botanical Gardens

Bingo, Hoopla, Games, Agility Show, Door Prizes
Bring your dog to the dog show.



8 | Lightbourn
| Trading Co Ltd






TITLE winners of the
Supermodel of the Bahamas
competition held this week are
being hailed as shining exam-
ples of fresh faces from the
island of Grand Bahama.

Peandra Knowles and
Sinardo Deleveaux, both from
Grand Bahama, came out as
title winners in the female and
male category, as 21 finalists
from throughout the country
took to the runway in a com-
petition that has been under-
way for several months.

Similar to America’s Next
Top Model, many of the con-
testants had never modelled
before, but were selected and
trained for the competition.

The young men, women
and girls ranging in ages from
six to 24 years showed their
model best at the British
Colonial Hilton and tried to
impress the international
judges, Kendell Monroe (for-
mer manager of the late
Michael Jackson) and Audrey
Adams (former Wilhelminia
model and executive producer
of Talk ! with Audrey, and
publisher of The Adams
Report ) visiting from the US.

The event was hosted by
Damien Humes of the Street
Team and Charmaine Bur-
rows, top model of OilinSha
Model Management.

The contestants were greet-
ed with cheers and applause as
they first walked the runway
in swimsuits and later in haute
couture outfits designed by
Bahamian designer, Cedric
Bernard. Entertainment for
the show was provided by
Julien, who performed his hit
song “Believe”, and visiting
Bahamian recording artist
based in Los Angeles Brettina
singing two of her smooth jazz
singles.

In the junior category,
Gabriella Hall of New Provi-
dence won the Little Super-
model of the Bahamas title.
Kourtni Pinder of Grand
Bahama is the junior runner-

up.

2010 Supermodel of the
Bahamas, Peandra Knowles,
a 18-year-old biochemistry
student at College of the
Bahamas who plans to
become a cardiologist, said
this about her win: “When I
began to walk down the run-
way after I won, I gave God
thanks for allowing my
dreams to come true. From
the beginning I had such won-
derful supporters back home
that gave me encouraging
words to keep me strong for
the competition. I want to
thank them and my wonderful
parents, Prescott Knowles and
Annarine Johnson, who never
doubted that I could win. The
possibilities are endless for my
future and my eyes are open

DESIGNER
Cedric
Bernard
(centre)
stands with
the final
contestants of
Supermodel
of the
Bahamas on
the staircase
in the British
Colonial
Hilton. Mr
Bernard
received the
2010 Super-
model of the
Bahamas
Designer
Award.

wide to the road ahead.”

2010 Supermodel of the
Bahamas Sinardo Deleveaux
is a 20-year-old who is into
yoga, pilates and flying
trapeze, who since entering
the competition, has modelled
in a couple shows in Freeport.
Sinardo had this to say about
his win: “This is an amazing
opportunity for me, and Iam
prepared to work as hard as
possible to take this further.
I’m so excited about New
York, and [’m prepared for
the exciting things it has to
show and teach me. I want to
thank everyone who support-
ed me, in particular my East
Restaurant and Italian Spe-
cialty families where I work.”

Supermodel of the
Bahamas female runner up is
Kenresa Pickering of Nassau,
and the male runner up is
Miguel Wright of Nassau.
Swimsuit winners are Miguel
Wright and Kieasha Adder-
ley of Nassau.

Best Spokespersons are
Wayne Mackey of Nassau and
Priska Pascal of Abaco.

Most Popular went to
Miguel Wright, Kourtni Pin-
der of Freeport, and the
Future Star award went to
Reashawn Davis of Nassau.

Most Votes went to Garrett
Bowleg of Grand Bahama.

Most Photogenic went to
Sinardo Deleveaux,
ReaShawn Davis and Kourtni
Pinder.

Awards of Appreciation
went to fashion designer
Cedric Bernard; Robbin
Whachell of TheBa-
hamasWeekly.com; Damien
Humes and Devron Pinder of
Street Team Media; Angela
Hilton, and Illya Tinker.

The 2010 Supermodel of
the Bahamas Designer award
went to Cedric Bernard.

The title winners of Super-
model of the Bahamas
received $3,000 in cash and
prizes and have already been
scheduled to walk the runway
in New York in Stomp the
Runway New York Fashion
Week from September 11-18.

On this trip they will be
escorted to ‘go sees’ with
renowned designer and TV
personality Nole Marin, and
will attend theatre shows,
model parties and have photo
shoots with top photographers
in NYC. In March 2011 they
will walk in Miami Fashion
Week.

OilinSha Coakley, founder
of the competition and owner
of Supermodel of the
Bahamas, said, “2010 has
brought about new experi-
ences and this year's event has
given me more reason to con-
tinue with the development of
fashion and entertainment in
the Bahamas.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 3







WHY YOU
VEX?



I'm vex because they

turned the light at
Parkgate and Village Roads
back on. I know they going
around Nassau fixing the
broken traffic lights but
maybe they should keep

that one off.

"There is too little dis-
tance between that light and
the roundabout so traffic is

WORK CONTINUES APACE ON NATIONAL STADIUM



THE 15,000-
SEAT
Thomas A.
Robinson
stadium cur-
rently under
construction
at the Queen
Elizabeth
Sports Cen-
tre was a
$30-million
gift from the
People's
Republic of
China.



COLLEGE OF BAHAMAS: Strike aftermath

COB professor: My pay

always backed up to a
standstill during the morn-
ing rush. I wish the powers
that be will realise that traf-
fic flow is much smoother
when that light is not on."

- Mad Motorist.

"IT vex because too much
of my neighbours burning
fires through Romer Street
in Fox Hill and it is not
good for my health."

- Vex in Romer Street.

"'T'm vex with people
who continue to annoy me
at work by sending me silly
emails with silly links that
lead to nowhere and just
waste my time.

"Maybe if more people
worried about being pro-
ductive at work instead of
getting giggles behind the
computer this country

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A COLLEGE professor who did not
strike with the Union of Tertiary Edu-
cators of the Bahamas (UTEB) said his
salary was cut and he intends to press
criminal charges if not compensated
immediately.

College of the Bahamas (COB) asso-
ciate professor and political science lec-
turer Felix Bethel continued to work
throughout the union’s four-day strike
and said he informed the college of this
in prompt response to a memo sent out
on the first day of the strike April 16.

Teachers were informed by COB
administration that they would not be
paid for labour withheld unless they
informed their deans or vice-president’s
they were carrying out their normal
duties and would continue to do so

throughout the industrial action, which
Mr Bethel claims he did. The COB lec-
turer of 33 years said while he agrees
with the premise of UTEB’s strike to
push for an end to prolonged negotia-
tions over their industrial agreement,
the father of nine and grandfather of
seven did not wish to support the strike
action and could not afford to sacrifice
his earnings.

Despite his precaution the 60-year-
old COB professor said he suffered the
same pay cut as those who did strike
and UTEB maintains many more staff,
including others who did not strike, also
had their pay cut by $400 to $700 this
month.

“The College of the Bahamas has
stolen from me,” Mr Bethel claimed yes-
terday.

“They have cut my pay illegally and I
consider it a theft.

“T carried out all of my duties

throughout the industrial action, I did
everything I was supposed to do, and I
am disappointed in the College of the
Bahamas because this is gross incom-
petence.

Apology

“T want an apology directly from the
president of the College, and in the
absence of an apology I will take the
matter to court because it is wrong to
deprive me of property of this kind.”

Mr Bethel said he would report the
matter to the police if not paid forth-
with. Meanwhile UTEB president Jen-
nifer Isaacs-Dotson is seeking legal
advice over all pay cuts reported by
union members as COB did not docu-
ment the apparently indiscriminate cuts
on salary slips this month.

Industrial action commenced on the
first day of student exams, Monday April



would run more smoothly."

- Hard worker
Dowdeswell Street.

"T vex that the govern-

ment taking so long

legalise the number busi-

ness. I don't play numb

now myself because I am
weary of being caught in a
‘web shop’ when the police

swoop in for a raid.

"However, I see nothing
morally reprehensible about

putting a dollar or two o
lotto especially if I kn
that this money will go

good use - creating better

education opportunities

our youth and other social
programmes - instead of just
in the hands of a wealthy

number man.

"Come on Mr Prime
Minister, don't be afraid of
the noise from the market.

At the very least, put it o

referendum for the people
to decide instead of relying
on advice from a few 'men

of the cloth’ who have
answer to God on th

own, just like the rest of us.”

- Monique T.

"Tis vex ‘cause we the
poor struggling people has
to pay BEC and BEC wants
to increase the electricity
fee, and I dead vex to reads
that "BEC ‘loses’ 25 per cent
of all power it produces"

The Tribune Business s

tion ‘cause people tiefing 18
per cent of electricity and

eight per cent lost from
system.
"How come we have

pay more and BEC ain't jail
no one yet for tiefing plus
somebody gots to be help-
ing them to tief. They
mussey crazy for us to pay
more an’ they don't charge
an' jail them electricity tiefs.
BEC needs to have a plan
to round them tiefs up first."

- Get Real.

"I deeply disturbed that
Baillou Hill Road/Market
Street road works is for the
benefit for motorists to get
to work on time without
congestion versus the eco-
nomic well-being and liveli-
hood of hundreds of mer-
chants and residents who

live there.
"If you want to get
work on time, just get

earlier. The residents should
not have to suffer for others

who choose to live/build

the other side of the island
when they can renovate and
rebuild the inner city with
tax concessions from the

on

NOELLE NICOLLS

Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

. A two man-team from the
non-profit organisation, ‘Flying
for Kosovo’, landed in Nassau
on Wednesday night to lobby
the Bahamian government to
recognise their homeland’s
independence.

Kosovo natives James
Berisha and Neil Spahiu, a free-
lance journalist, are on the tail
end of their self-appointed
diplomatic tour of the Ameri-
can continents.

“What we have been trying
to do is raise awareness that we
exist; we are human beings, we
want to be accepted as part of
the same planet. We would like
the people and the government
of the Bahamas to recognise
our independence,” said Mr
Berisha.

Kosovo is a self-declared
independent state recognised
by 66 out of 192 United Nations
(UN) Member States, includ-
ing the United States, Canada,
and 22 out of 27 European
Union states. It has a popula-
tion of about 2.2 million.

It declared itself independent
of Serbia on February 17, 2008.
Serbia was a territory in
Yugoslavia prior to its disinte-
gration. Serbia does not recog-
nise the secession of Kosovo.
Russia is one of the largest sup-
porters of Serbia.

At this time, the Bahamas
does not recognise Kosovo as
an independent state, although
representatives of several coun-
tries in that region have lob-
bied the government directly
and through various diplomat-
ic offices, said Brent Symon-
ette, Minister of Foreign
Affairs.

“The government of the
Bahamas has been approached
by numerous countries in the
region regarding the sover-
eignty or independence of
Kosovo and matters in the area.

ers

na
ow
to

for

na

to
eir

in
ec-

its

to

to Oath of Secrecy Ceremony.

We have considered and con-
tinue to consider the situation
on the ground on both sides
and maintain a status of await-
ing the outcome of negotiations
between Kosovo and its neigh-
bouring countries before com-
mitting support to either of the
two countries,” said Mr Symon-
ette. He was yet to meet with
the non-profit representatives,
although they said it was their
intention to walk into the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs and
seek an audience with the Min-
ister. “The issue is very sensi-
tive. There has been quite a lot
of international lobbying by
both sides and hence our posi-
tion at the moment,” said Mr
Symonette. The Bahamas is not
the only Caribbean country
withholding its support. The
Dominican Republic is so far
the only Caribbean country
recognising Kosovo’s indepen-
dence. “CARICOM is working
on it. More and more pressure
is being created. There is some-
thing moving right now. I am
sure in this year more things
will happen,” said Mr Berisha.

He said the most receptive
countries on the trip so far were
Paraguay, Grenada, St Vincent
and the Grenadines, St Lucia,
and St Kitts and Nevis.

Mr Berisha is the founder of
Flyer for Kosovo. He took a
leave of absence from his job
as an airline pilot to fly a four-
seat Cessna 174 airplane with
Mr Spahiu, fellow Kosovo
native, across the Americas.

Over the past year, they vis-
ited every country in South
America, Central America and
North America, except the
three countries still on the List:
Cuba, the United States and
Canada. Some experts say the
Kosovo-Serbia dispute is as rid-
dled with politics, history and
tension as the Israeli-Palestin-
ian conflict. A complex web of
geo-politics, global-politics and
internal politics has worked
against the Kosovo indepen-

Census 2010: Oath of Secrecy
Ceremony set for Monday

AFTER months of preparation for Census 2010, the Depart-
ment of Statistics is launching its census work on Monday with the

up Approximately 1,100 persons will gather at the Kendal Isaacs

on be held in strictest confidence.

divulged to anybody or entity.

government,” - Concerned laration.

reader.

"I am happy to see that
the press is finally putting
the picture of 'white collar’

alleged criminals and giv

their names on the front
page just as they do for the
alleged petty purse snatcher

thief.”
- Equal Justice.

Michael Barnett.

ing





Gym to solemnly commit themselves to the work and to swear that
all information received during the course of their field work will

The ongoing work of the Department depends on its integrity
and the public trust that the information given by them is not

The Department said it takes this seriously hence this public dec-
The Oath of Secrecy will be administered by Chief Justice

This will be preceded by a brief charge regarding honesty and
integrity by the president of the Christian Council Pastor Patrick
Paul, and will be followed by a prayer by the head of the Baptist
Community, Rev William Thompson. Prior to this part of the cer-
emony, a presentation on safety tips will be made by Assistant
Commissioner of Police Glen Miller, and the keynote presentation
will be made by the Minister of State for Finance, Zhivargo Laing.

The census officers will be knocking on doors throughout the
country asking questions that will provide valuable data about
our society. The census begins on Tuesday and is expected to run
until the end of June, at a cost of $3 million.

The last census was conducted in 2000.

Kosovo NGO to lobby Bahamian govt

dence movement.

“By being a dark spot on the
planet you are basically nonex-
istent. I don’t want to be that
nonexistent person. We are
missing a lot of stuff like cul-
tural and educational
exchange,” said Mr Berisha.

“Tt stops a lot of tourists com-
ing here from Kosovo. People
would love to see the Bahamas.
The Bahamas is a famous place.
If there is not that relationship
between the countries you are
stopping a lot of people from
coming here,” he said.

Mr Symonette said there are
outstanding issues for the gov-
ernment to resolve. He said
the Bahamian government is
knowledgeable on the matter
and “it is an issue we are still
investigating”.

ele
Suse
PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157







ALL MAJOR
CREDIT CORDS
ACCEPTED!
BORRY
HO DEST






Low To THAIN YOUN ORAGON-IO a | 190 | sap | wim | cio | m0 | soe |
oun OF AwOMPY Kg a | 430 | sae | aan | oan | an | soe |

Sree aT ie eee

AHL TL REBERVE [RR PSST SHCMEA CH WY COL LE ae te CH

ncaTwaae On cuwsTaceY WEW| 1:18 | 3:30 | WA | 6:18 | o-30 | 1055 |



PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



was cut illegally

16, with around 45 union members
demonstrating outside the front gates
of the Oakes Field campus in Thompson
Boulevard and the support of two of the
country’s largest unions: the National
Congress of Trade Unions of the
Bahamas and the Bahamas Public Ser-
vice Union headed by John Pinder.

The teachers returned to their posts
on Thursday, April 22, when UTEB and
the college agreed to bring in external
negotiators to expedite talks over seven
days if they do not finalise the industri-
al agreement by May 14.

Both COB and UTEB expressed dif-
ficulties with clauses dealing with
appointments, promotions, duties and
responsibilities, performance assess-
ments and salaries. COB estimated
around 60 per cent of faculty carried
out their normal invigilation duties dur-
ing the strike and examinations were
said to continue without disruption.

Galleria Cinemas

“Wie: ia Bact = Pe Dacia bien
1X OF FTCE OPENS AT betel AM DAILY

__ EFFECTIVE APRIL 30TH, 2010
[wcrTuane oeuN sTacer ew) 118 | 330 | wa | aos | nas | 103 |
famstwnrta ww] 100 wn [em | rm | wa | 08)
0 rr Ee ee
Tae wagers | tt
[DEATHATAPUNERAL 0 t_| 4:30 | as |
jwockags | 100 | 0 |
ewreworr sre La Fn To fs [os

| +00 | 22s | &
| 108 |






















535 | wm | ts | ons | sas |

jens | gon | was | soso
[30 | wa | eos | m0 | ses |



T9"08f

GR. Sweeting's



Madeira Shopping Plaza * 32840703 « hlarathon Mal # 395-6113 * RNID Plaza, Freeport * 391-3274



Fwemexorsun + [v9s-[20 [wa [as | 0 vo
pmevoweas | tt 5 [WA | ato | a3 | i: |

Loearh atthe runenAL 0 T | vin8 | 3:40 | WA | Gets | o:06 | toes

fwreorcarwmns [100 [340 [WA [eon | o25] uso
ausnornernneze + [108 [wae [WA [ood | 00 [reat
Fi

Ui eur aed lo Peed eke et 380-3640 oF vigil ud al
www, bela ecu conn

3 DAYS
ONLY!

Thursday,
Friday &
Saturday

APRIL

29, 30



Up To



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

UK’s candidates agree: Race is wide open

LONDON — Divided over the country's
ballooning debt, the economy and the con-
tentious issue of immigration, the three front
runners in Britain's general election can still
agree on one thing: This race is anyone's to
win.

Conservative challenger David Cameron,
fresh off what observers said was his best
live televised debate performance to date,
told BBC radio that next week's national
election was "still far from won."

Nick Clegg, riding higher in the polls than
most political observers had ever expected,
said the campaign was "wide open.”

Even Britain's ever-optimistic former
Prime Minister Tony Blair, who hit the cam-
paign trail Friday in support of his successor,
Gordon Brown, could only say that their
governing Labour Party "has every chance of
succeeding."

An ICM/Populus poll, published Friday
by The Guardian, showed the gap between
each party within the margin of error. Sta-
tistically, the three-way contest involving
Cameron, Clegg and Brown has become a
dead heat.

Those figures are disappointing for
Cameron, whose Tories at one point enjoyed
a double-digit lead over Labour, which has
run the country since Blair was elected in
1997.

But Labour managed to whittle away
Cameron's advantage as the election drew
closer, and both parties have been caught
off-guard by Clegg, whose affable and
straightforward style in the nation's first
US.-style TV debate on April 15 led to a
surge in support for his opposition Liberal
Democrats.

Andrew Gamble, the head of the depart-
ment of politics at Cambridge University,
said Cameron “should be winning this elec-
tion by a mile.”

"The fact that they're not is deeply trou-
bling for the Conservatives,” he said. "Clegg
is spoiling the party for them."

Political observers said Cameron did well
in Thursday's debate, watched by some 8
million people, although Clegg also held his
own. Brown placed a distant third in a per-
formance that politics expert John Curtice
described as overly defensive, the observers
said. But none of the candidates provided
detailed economic recovery plans in a nation
that faces major economic troubles and one





Quality





Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
and TRUCKS

TRADE-INS ON NEW
CAR SALES ACCEPTED

Check Out These Great Values

of the largest deficits in Europe — both of
which will require harsh cuts in public spend-
ing after the election.

Labour had more bad luck Friday, when
a car crashed into a bus shelter as the prime
minister and several members of his Cabinet
launched a new poster campaign nearby.
No one was hurt in the incident, but evening
TV newscasts captured Brown deputy Peter
Mandelson's speech briefly interrupted by a
loud screech followed by the sound of a
crash.

Pressed by a journalist, Mandelson denied
that the incident was a metaphor for
Labour's election campaign.

Labour got even worse news when The
Guardian newspaper announced its support
for the Liberal Democrats and The Times of
London backed the Tories.

The right-leaning Times’ endorsement
of the Conservatives was no surprise, but
Labour's loss of the left-leaning Guardian
was more damaging.

Curtice, the politics expert, said The
Guardian endorsement was "simply an indi-
cation of how badly Labour is doing.”

Still, with the election on May 6, Brown's
opponents aren't taking anything for grant-
ed. Addressing a crowd in northern Eng-
land, Clegg said he was "certainly not going
to rest one millisecond, one minute until
this campaign ends — right up to the
moment when people decide how to vote."

"There are lots of people who haven't
decided how they are going to vote," he
said. "I think many people now see this cam-
paign is wide open. It's one of the most excit-
ing campaigns in a generation and that we
can do something different.”

In his interview Friday, Cameron said his
party would “have to fight for every vote
and every seat."

Brown, too, has pledged to take his fight
down to the wire. "The time for debates is
finished, the time for decision has begun," he
told supporters. "We will continue to fight
for the future of this country until the very
last second of this election campaign.”

Gamble suggested that those very last
seconds could still be crucial.

"In this last week a lot of voters will be
making up their minds," he said.

(This article was written by Raphael G.
Slatter, Associated Press Writer).







candidate with p





Nassau Retailer seeks

Retail Manager

We ore a successful retail chain currently looking for a
woven retail management expenence
to join our team. Responsibilities will include the
management of daily store operations, management
ofall staff, ond various store-related administration as
well as opportunities to contribute towards marketing
and staff development programs.



Lunch vendors at
sovernment-owned.
schools in GB
cry out for help

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There is a major concern
among lunch vendors at
government-owned schools
in Grand Bahama primary,
junior high and high schools
that tuck shops being oper-
ated by the schools are reap-
ing financial benefits while
vendors have been ignored
and thrown into a financial
dilemma. The tuck shops
have been allowed to oper-
ate with the consent of the
Ministry of Education under
supposed restrictions which
are being violated. This has
resulted in lunch vendors
suffering great financial
hardship over the past years
while tuck shops compete
bringing financial benefits
to the schools.

Lunch vendors do not
have an association and
their cries to date have only
been answered with promis-
es which have not been kept.
Please, Hon T Desmond
Bannister we request that
you be informed and
address the following issues
at Freeport schools.

1) Why is it that tuck
shops are being allowed to
sell candies, hot patties, ice
cream, pizzas and doughnuts
among other food items dur-
ing the breaks and lunch
time?

letters@tribunemedia.net



2) Why is it that while
tuck shops are allowed to
sell items sold by vendors,
the sale of drinks are not
allowed by vendors? In
addition oftentimes tuck
shops copy vendors’ items
and compete with their
sales. It claimed that some
principals are actively
involved in the purchasing
of many of the restricted
items.

3) Why is it that teachers
who are being paid to teach
our students also being
allowed to compete with
vendors by selling food
items at lunch time?

4) Why is it that schools
are allowed to operate as
many as two tuck shops?

5) Is there any ruling as to
the number of dress-up days
allowed in any given school
term? Each dress-up day
costs $2.00 per student.

6) Should principals be
allowed to dictate to ven-
dors the prices at which
lunch must be sold?

7) Should principals not
have a mandate to commu-
nicate to vendors all events
being held by the schools

involving food which could
affect the vendors? Also all
changes to lunch periods
should be available on a
school’s official weekly
schedule to which vendors
should have access. Princi-
pals need to understand that
lunch vendors are humans
with bills to be paid and
most vendors are aware of
the financial potential in
their area. Sad to say that
the very persons who have
caused vendors to be placed
on their school properties
are also the main contribu-
tors to the destitute, heart-
wrenching position that we
are now experiencing. How
can any adult with bills to
be paid survive in these
already tough economic
times when lunch is pre-
pared for fifty students and
because of the adverse situ-
ation in the schools your
total income some days is as
low as $20.00?

Mr Minister, would you
come to Freeport and
address this situation imme-
diately.

CONCERNED
FREEPORT
LUNCH
VENDORS
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
April 26, 2010.

Response to ‘Gambling
Should Be Our Choice’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It would be greatly appre-
ciated if you would be kind
enough to publish my
response to your Staff
Reporter, Mr Paul G Turn-
quest’s article, “Gambling
Should Be Our Choice,” in
today’s edition of your
paper. Thank you.

Reading his “rambling
reasons” for the legalisation
of gambling in the Bahamas
brought to mind a saying
that arose out of and during
the early days of the abor-
tion battle in the USA,
namely: “When all fails, use
the choice card.” (Pun
intended!) Then, as now
with legalised gambling, the
issue has nothing to do with
choice per se, but with the
right to choose what is
wrong. With regards to

abortion, the true issue was:
Is it right to terminate the
life of a person at the begin-
ning of his/her life, not
whether it was right to
choose to have sex or ter-
minate a pregnancy.

Now, with legalised gam-
bling — which all credible
studies have shown oppress-
es the poor, destroys fami-
lies, morally corrupts a soci-
ety, etc. — the issue is not an
individual’s choice per se,
but an individual’s right to
choose an activity or action
that has been scientifically
and pragmatically shown to
be detrimental to others,
and in the final analysis,
“has no redeeming social
good” whatsoever.

As to the writer’s com-
ment re: the Government’s
responsibility to protect its
citizens, he is right on. In the
case of legalised gambling,
it is the government’s first
and foremost responsibility
to protect its citizens from
the proven and certain
adverse effects of legalised
gambling — and that, regard-
less of the “apparent” eco-
nomic benefits it may seem
to bring about.

Even a casual perusal of
the literature on the issue
will show that the “cleaning
up process” of the “cost of
doing business” to bring this
about is always more costly
than the so-called benefits.
The one is immediate grati-
fication of felt needs; the

other is the long term “real
penalty” for such transient
gratification.

A government that backs
and promotes legalised gam-
bling teaches it people to
support good and worthy
causes for the wrong reasons
— not out of patriotic con-
cern, citizen responsibility,
pride and decency, but out
of selfishness, greed and per-
sonal gain.

Government sponsored
gambling tempt the poor,
the youth and the needy to
squander their money, not
to save it or invest it wisely.
It teaches a wrong, non-pro-
ductive way of life when it
should be teaching a right
and productive way of life.
In our case, it could actually
help to ruin the lives of the
very “little darlings” the pro-
ceeds from legalise gambling
are supposed to help!

Thus, it is my considered
opinion that for a govern-
ment of a professedly Chris-
tian inclined nation to
legalise, actively promote
and officially encourage its
citizens to indulge in this
form of debasing behaviour
would be one of the most
serious acts of the derelic-
tion of its duty that it could
ever commit.

Again, thank you for pub-
lishing this response.

ALLAN R LEE
Nassau,
April 26, 2010.












The candidate should demonstrate the following:

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

01 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘97 VOLKSWAGON BEETLE
‘98 HYUNDAI COUPE

01 MAZDA MPV WAGON
‘99 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
‘03 DAIHATSU TERIOS

03 HYUNDAI H1 VAN

‘00 HYUNDAI ACCENT

| QUALITY#2 @
7 LIMITED a

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

OPEN: Mon to Fri 8:30am - 5:30pm ¢ Sat 8:30am - 12:30pm

* Self-motivation and self-leadership

WU

NOTICE is hereby given that FRITO ESTIME of Ridgeland
Park/Robinson Rd., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

* Strong leadership and management skills

* Motivational skills

(cullivale jeam contribulion and to rain! develop slam ier -
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 24" day of APRIL, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHERENFANT ULRICK of ST.
JAMES ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

* Excellent Interpersonal Skills
jatecive oral and written communication)

“Professional appearance and attitude



* Computer Literacy
(Including Microsoft XP MS Word, Excel, Email)

* Willingness to work shifts and long hours

Applications are to include: Recent police record,
passport phot, two references, resume, cover letter.




Applications can be sent via email, fax or post.
Ce ee me ote

(espe eee ere lair eae

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 1*' day of MAY, 2010 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ere ee
P.O. Box 55-19021












THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

BAHAMAS’ FIRST RESIDENT AMBASSADOR TO CHINA MARVELS AT THE RISING POWER’S NATIONAL PRIDE, WORK ETHIC AND GRANDEUR

China,
a land



of endless
fascination

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BEIJING, China - Almost
two years into her time serving
as the Bahamas’ first resident
Ambassador to China, Elma
Campbell said she is still finding
reasons to be surprised by this
“fascinating” country.

China’s national pride, deter-
mination and work ethic - not
to mention the grandeur of its
many national events to cele-
brate its history, culture and
achievements - often leave her
“lost for words”, Ambassador
Campbell told The Tribune.

And her experience has
impressed upon her the view
that the Bahamas could learn a
lot from the rising world power.

“There’s almost nothing they
won’t accomplish,” she said.

After serving as Minister of
State for Immigration under the
FNM administration in 2007,
Ms Campbell was appointed
Ambassador to China in early
2008, and officially took up the
post on July 14 of that year.

In an interview at her Bei-
jing office, she reflected on her
time in China. She was joined
by career diplomat Sheila
Career, who serves as Deputy

Chief of Mission for the
Embassy, and Misty Bain, the
Embassy’s Attaché.

“T think my vocabulary has
shrunk and I think that about
sums it up. China is fascinat-
ing. I tell people you really have
to see it to understand, but I
find myself always using the
words ‘awesome’, ‘royal’,
‘grand’, ‘majestic’. Almost two
years later I find I walk the
streets, very often the same
streets, and everyday I see
something different. I consid-
ered myself well-travelled when
Icame here, but arriving I don’t
think I was prepared for the
experience. Each country is cul-
turally different, but I think the
further east you go the greater
the difference is,” said Ms
Campbell.

The Ambassador has trav-
elled all over China - mostly at
the bidding of the Chinese gov-
ernment, who are very keen for
resident diplomats to partake
of the “China that they wish for
you to see”, Mrs Carey said.

Ambassador Campbell also
finds herself and her staff fre-
quently attending extended cer-
emonial events.

Seeing “the juxtaposition of
old and new” in Chinese archi-
tecture - the country’s civilisa-

ll BAHAMIAN STUDENT IN CHINA

‘T can use cultural insight and
knowledge to help the Bahamas’

ew oe

-



Eric Feberberg, Pool/AP Photo

FIREWORKS light up during the opening ceremony for the Shanghai 2010 World Exhibition, Friday

April 30, 2010.



(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

PERFORMERS wearing Shanghai World Expo mascot “haibao” cos-
tumes are seen on stage during the opening ceremony.

tion encompasses thousands of
years - has been a highlight of
these tours and events.

But the life of a diplomat in
China “is not a social scene”,
she is quick to emphasise.

Busy

Ms Carey, who has served in
Washington, DC, New York,
Miami and Canada, notes that
the foreign ministry in China
has a “much closer relation-
ship” with diplomats than the
same department would in oth-
er countries, and for this rea-
son, the staff's work schedule
can be very busy. “Whereas in

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



BEIJING, China- A
former Kingsway Acade-
my student says he is
preparing to return to the
Bahamas to “revitalise and
revamp” the country using
the knowledge and cultur-
al insight he has gained
during his time studying at
a university in the Chinese
capital city.

Studying international economics and busi-
ness in Beijing on a full scholarship from the
Chinese government, Matthew Arnett, 23, told
The Tribune that his voyage of discovery in Chi-
na started “accidentally”, but he now considers
the country his second home.

According to Bahamian Ambassador to China
Elma Campbell, there are currently 10 Bahami-
ans studying at universities in Beijing, Shanghai,
Nanjing and Guangzhou on scholarships from
the Chinese government.

Several scholarships a year have been award-
ed to Bahamians by the Chinese government
since diplomatic relations were established
between the two countries in 1997.

“T don’t think my parents took me seriously at
first,” said Matthew speaking of his family’s reac-
tion when he told them he was considering mov-
ing to China to pursue further education.

Scholarship

“It all sort of happened by accident. I was
going to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (in Nas-
sau) to drop off a form for an OAS (Organisation
of American States) scholarship, but when I got
there I saw the notice on the door saying ‘Chinese
scholarships, apply now’. That day was the last
day to apply, so I ran and got all my statements
together and applied,” he said.

“Everybody was sort of like, ‘are you really
going to do this?’ But we’d grown up in sort of
America’s backyard with American fundamen-
tals, education, viewpoints and I wanted a greater
challenge and to prepare myself for future.”

Matthew said he had initially been intrigued by
China after visiting for two weeks when he rep-
resented the Chinese Friendship Association and
the Bahamas at a conference in Beijing in 2005.

He said when he eventually moved to Beijing
in September 2006 to take up the scholarship he
won, he was struck by how different China was to
the “jaded” image of the country which is pre-
sented in the foreign media.

And in the time he has lived there, Matthew
said he has been most impressed by the scale of
the country’s progression.

“It’s been amazing, I’ve seen so much devel-
opment and changes over just a few short years,”
he said.

Meanwhile, Matthew has also developed.

The scholarship required a year of intensive
Mandarin language training, as all classes and



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY: Matthew Arnett, 23.

course work would be held in the Chinese lan-
guage.

And having survived the “sink or swim” lan-
guage course, he has become one of a small num-
ber of Bahamians fluent in Mandarin, which is
recognised as one of the world’s toughest lan-
guages to master. It is also increasingly in demand
in the business sector as China’s economic influ-
ence expands globally.

The 23-year-old said his good family back-
ground and study ethic he developed back home
stood him in good stead to make the most of the
opportunity the scholarship presented.

During his time in Beijing, Matthew said he has
benefitted not only from his formal education, but
from observing the Chinese way of life and val-
ues. Based on his observations, the student said
he feels China is not exerting itself on the world
stage as much as it could, in part because of a Chi-
nese cultural ethic of “humility” and an accepted
teaching that “the highest eminence is to be
gained step-by-step.”

“One of the most famous leaders in China,
Deng Xiaoping (the former Chinese Commu-
nist Party leader who led China towards a market
economy), taught that China should keep it’s
head down and always assume a role of humility.
Those policies and those values the Chinese hold
in very high regard,” said Matthew.

“It’s also a matter of playing their cards right.
It’s like a poker game, you never show people
what you’re holding,” he added.

Matthew considers himself a “pioneer for
Bahamians, Caribbean people and young black
people” in China, and after completing his Mas-
ters Degree which he wants to undertake in Bei-
jing, he would like to return to the Bahamas to set
up a business which will allow him to profit from
the business acumen and cultural insight he has
gained, before ultimately trying his hand at pol-
itics.

“T want to start a tourism and travel company,
first focusing on China, then Asia as a whole,
encouraging planned groups, weddings, and cor-
porate travel to Bahamas,” he said.

the US, the State Department
doesn’t really ‘check for you’
like that, the foreign ministry
in China likes to have diplo-
mats at events,“ said Ms Carey.

“And everything is an occa-
sion,” added Ms Campbell, not-
ing that she and her staff can
often find themselves out dur-
ing the week until 9pm.

Ms Carey described the
recent Women‘s Day celebra-
tions, organised by the Nation-
al Women‘s Federation of Chi-
na, as a good example of the
style in which China chooses to
recognise occasions.

“There were two days of
events starting on a Sunday

Badash C

Giftware

1G) ace me

ee reel
em Rete ste)

Tel: re RL Ew (007 Meinl
Fax: (242) 393-4096



Arc Glass & Crystal
Circle Glassware
Godinger Silver
Gibson Dinnerware
Studio Silversmiths

PAWL koe

morning - Sunday is not a spe-
cial day in China because it is
not a Christian country - and
President Hu Jintao spoke and
the entire National People‘s
Congress attended,” she said.

Ambassador Campbell told
The Tribune her experience in
China has taught her that
“there is almost nothing China
will not accomplish” if it choos-
es to and has impressed upon
her China’s national pride and
ability to unify behind a com-
mon goal.

“We can certainly learn some
things from them. If the Chi-
nese wake up today and deter-
mine that that couch is brown
(points at furniture in her
office), and they determine that
the world needs to know that
that couch is brown, they might
well have three days of events
to invite diplomats and they
might invite us at different
times and they might have as
many as a dozen speakers over
the three days, and each one is
on message, and by the time we
leave we will appreciate why
the Chinese say that that sofa is
brown,” she laughed.

In fact, not even natural phe-
nomena can deter China, the
Ambassador explained.

Rather than cancel, delay, or

rystal

Ft Abe)



Jewelry Boxes
Handbags
Picture Frames
Artificial Flowers
Gift Baskets

from Max’s

April 30th-May 8th, 2010

have the spectacular October
1, 2009, ceremony for the recent
60th Anniversary of the found-
ing of the People’s Republic of
China threatened by bad
weather, the government sim-
ply “dispersed” the clouds.
“There were a few scattered
showers in the morning but by
10am it was burning hot. They
had determined that it would
not rain on the parade.”
“They do everything in grand
style and they have immense
national pride,” said the
Ambassador. Ms Campbell,
who is likely to remain in China
for another year, said that she
feels the Embassy she heads
has served its purpose in bring-
ing the Bahamas and China
closer. “We’re satisfied that we
have contributed to the growth
of the relationship between
China and the Bahamas, and
that’s what we’re here for - to
enhance that relationship, to
strengthen it,” she said.

eee ee Byles
aa aa
SAM aH!

ete
322-2197
















r oe Nas
re holes




ome Now open 7am

*Except on net ifems
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MINISTER OF STATE SPEAKS AT PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM DOMESTIC VIOLENCE WORKSHOP

Hundreds of children
exposed to domestic
violence each year

BY BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

THE hundreds of children
who are exposed to domestic
violence in the Bahamas each
year are at an increased risk for
complicated emotional and
behavioural difficulties, said
Minister of State in the Min-
istry of Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner.

Speaking at the Protecting
Children from Domestic Vio-
lence workshop on Thursday,
Mrs Butler-Turner said a recent
analysis of reports to one of the
major police stations in New
Providence revealed that 660
cases of domestic violence were
received that year.

“Statistics from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force also dis-
closed that 29 per cent of the
murders committed in all of the
Bahamas in 1998 took place at
a private place of residence,”
she said.

“In 2000, police statistics
revealed that 45 per cent of
homicides reported that year
occurred as a result of domestic
related incidents,” Mrs Butler-
Turner said.

Domestic disputes often
occur in the presence of chil-
dren, she explained.

“Until recently, it was
believed that most children
escaped unharmed from wit-
nessing violence directed at a
parent.”

However, she said research




Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo





“In 2000, police
statistics revealed
that 45 per cent of
homicides reported
that year occurred
as a result of
domestic related
incidents.”

ee |
Loretta Butler-Turner

indicates that domestic violence
impacts children in many com-
plicated and long lasting ways
and experts are becoming more
aware of the “pervasiveness,
intensity and destructiveness of
intimate partner violence in its
impact”.

The Minister of State said
children of battered parents
have been found to be at
increased risk for a broad range
of emotional and behavioural
difficulties, including depres-
sion, substance abuse, develop-
mental delays, educational
attention problems, suicidal
tendencies and involvement in
violence.

Cycle

“Some studies have pointed
to a cycle of violence in which
boys who grow up in violent
households are 10 times or
more likely to be violent that
those who are not,” she said.

too hard

> for God

NO ADDICTION
IS TOO STRONG











wn

BEHOLD, | AM THE LORD. THE GOD OF ALL FLESH:
S THERE ANYTHING TOO HARD FOR NE? Jeremiah 32:27





f

â„¢

Come! Join us this sunday as we come together
and explore & meet the God who transforms

i a
ad

SUNDAY SERVICES

* Early Worship Service .......

saseavacn: EM) Th

* Sunday School for all ages

* Worship SOP vie som:

omen #1300 am

| Turner talking to stakehold-














. —_
(Photo: Letisha Henderson)

MINISTER of State in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner talking to stakeholders and professionals who
deal with child protection issues at the Protecting Children from Domestic Violence workshop on Thursday.

“Similarly, women in rela-
tionships with men who had
grown up with violent fathers
are four times more likely to
suffer abuse in an intimate rela-
tionship than are other
women.”

These findings highlight the
inter-generational nature of vio-
lent cycles, Mrs Butler-Turner
said. “They show how male
children, in particular, often
imitate powerful role models
with whom they identify, espe-
cially when certain circum-
stances — for example, feeling










+ a

MINISTER of State in the Min-
istry of Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler- |



ers and professionals who
deal with child protection
issues at the Protecting Chil-
dren from Domestic Violence
workshop on Thursday.






inadequate or out of control —
arise at some later point in their
lives and act out in violence.”

She also noted that family
experiences involving violence
are an important influence in
increasing the risk of violence in
subsequent relationships.

“Tt is critical, therefore, that
our family units provide the
safe environment necessary to
protect children.”

But Mrs Butler-Turner said
the reality is that children are
not always safe within the fam-
ily, many children are physical-

ly, emotionally and sexually
abused by family members.

Studies on the effects of child
abuse reveal that abused chil-
dren experience developmen-
tal problems, she said.

“This disruption, she said,
“with normal developmental
processes creates a rippling
effect on later abilities.

“Physical and sexual abuse
often involve many other forms
of unhealthy, inappropriate and
harmful experiences and
untimely influence the child’s
overall psychological growth

Govt has shown ‘commitment

and development.” “In partic-
ular, abused children do not
have the ability to interact
appropriately with others, nor
do they establish a satisfactory
sexual relationship.”

Mrs Butler-Turner com-
mended private and public
agencies, including the Depart-
ment of Social Services, the
Children and Family Services
Division and the National Par-
enting Programme for efforts
in ensuring that all children
have the benefit of a physically
safe family environment.

UPC TIE UR CU LTT oe

BY BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

THE Bahamas government
has demonstrated its commit-
ment to the prevention and
eradication of violence and
abuse against children
through the ratification of the
United Nations Convention
on the Rights of the Child in
1991, Social Development
Minister of State Loretta But-
ler-Turner told stakeholders
this week.

During the Protecting Chil-
dren from Domestic Violence
workshop on Thursday, Mrs
Butler-Turner said, “the 54

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010
11:30 am Speaker

Pastor Dexter Duvalier

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
© Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

(Sunday Schoaok 10am
Preaching
Radio Bidle Hour:
sunday Gpm- NS 2

Ved. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
liam A F:30em EVANGELISTIG

Pastor. Mile

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Paséor: H. flilis * Phone: 393-0564 = Box Weds? }

* Spanish SSvite eee | am
* FADS Youth Churches 7-12]
First & Third Suriday
* POWER CREW Church|Ages 10411 yrs.)
Second & Fourth Sunday 130 am.
* Evening Serace 6:30 pm

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

a.

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira
Shopping Center

WEDNESDAY

at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective dible Teaching

* Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs,
* Misskoresthess (Gairls Chit) 416 yrs

* Spanish Bible Study

FRIDAY
at 7:30 p.m.

* Youth Ministry Meeting
iGracies 7-12]

Pastor Knowles can be heard each

RADIO MINISTRY on Suncoys of 8:20 oum. - 25 4 - TEMPLE TIME
mae ia morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE 4 BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

ee CUM Ceeea menial
Ree sR meee Em Oa ob
SFM me aoa Lae

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs



articled Convention is the first
universal legally binding code
of child rights in history and
covers the right to be free
from abuse and the right to
protection from any kind of
exploitation.”

She added that the Child
Protection Act was enacted
in 2009.

Responsibility

“This piece of legislation
covers among other things:
parental responsibility; the
concept of significant harm to
children; expanded definition
of cruelty to a child and
supervision orders, emer-
gency protection orders, care
orders and exclusion orders,”
Mrs Butler-Turner said.

“The Act imposes a duty
on persons who have respon-
sibility to care for children to
use their best efforts to pro-
tect them from abuse and
neglect and mandates the
reporting of all forms of
abuse,” she added.

The Child Protection Act
allows a police officer, social
service officer or any other
authorised person who has





grounds to believe that a child
is suffering or is likely to suf-
fer from any abusive situa-
tion, to intervene to ensure
the safety of that child, Mrs
Butler-Turner said.

She also told stakeholders
and professionals dealing with
child protection issues that
understanding the abuser as
a parent, safety planning for
victims and children, the role
of the courts and the school in
intervention in these circum-
stances can help them navi-
gate the complexities and
risks of these cases and assist
in confronting the underlying
problematic social and cul-
tural concepts that enable
domestic violence to continue.

During the workshop,
which was one of the last
activities planned for Child
Protection Month, Mrs But-
ler-Turner also challenged
them to take child protection
seriously.

“Our children have a right
to be protected from domestic
violence. You must do all that
you can to protect our chil-
dren. The lives of our chil-
dren are precious; let us take
the time to care for them,”
she said.

Grant's Town Wesley Methodist Church

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.giwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 2ND, 2010

7:00 a.m. Rev Carla Culmer/Bro. Franklyn Bethel
11:00 a.m.Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Nathalie Thompson (HC)

7:00 p.m.Bro. Franklyn Bethel/Members-At-Large

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace and eta Wesleyan Church
& Society of The Free Methodiat Church of
Horth &merica

VED BLE Ge ES ALONG AGE AA EE REG ES LE aun ay

at ae,

(ler

Worship Time: Elan. d& 6p.n.

Prayer Time: Mh fanwm, te MibaS am,

Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights aff Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O), Thaw Sh-"4 |
Telephone number: 324-258
Telefaa nimber: bps 2487

COME To WORSHIP LEAVE To SERVE



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

SkyBahamas Airlines
IFS IAL

OEE
CTE

SKYBAHAMAS Airlines made good on its
promise to donate $10,000 to the 57th National Fam-
ily Island Regatta in Exuma last week.

Signing up as the official carrier/sponsor for this
year’s regatta held in George Town was something
the company felt obligated to do, said CEO and
president Captain Randy Butler.

“Exuma is considered the birth place for SkyBa-
hamas, having given the airline its start some four
years ago,” said Captain Butler.

The CEO said that safely transporting well over
1,000 passengers into Exuma during the regatta was
not only a good business
move for the company, but
he felt that the extra airlift





“Exuma is con-

sidered the birth also gave the local Exuma
poe for SkyBa- economy a stimulus that was
amas, havin so badly needed.

iven the airline “We wanted Exuma to
its start some four know that they have been

years ago.” very supportive of us, and
our company will continue to
Capt. Randy pe supportive of them,” said
Butler Captain Butler.
SkyBahamas’ chairman of
the Board of Directors Peter
Turnquest, who also serves as the head of the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commerce, underscored the
company’s commitment of supporting the communi-
ties the airline services. According to Mr Turnquest,
“SkyBahamas is gaining the reputation of being a
model corporate citizen.”

Awards

The $10,000 donated by the airline to the regatta
committee assisted in defraying the cost of the event
and provided awards to participating sloops.

“This level of community support is something
sadly lacking with many progressive companies in
recent times,” said Mr Turnquest.

“In order for our communities to grow we must all
make the sacrificial effort to support activities consis-
tent with our cultural and national endeavors.”

SkyBahamas’ chief operating officers Kenneth
Romer reaffirmed Mr Turnquest’s conviction by
adding that SkyBahamas has committed to sponsor-
ing many cultural initiatives in the months ahead.

Some of these include the Mangrove Cay Home-
Coming and Regatta scheduled for early May, the
Cat Island Rake and Scrape Festival set for June and
the North Abaco Power Boat Race in July.

Additionally, SkyBahamas is the official airline for
the Miss Bahamas Beauty Pageant and related
events.

According to Mr Romer, “SkyBahamas’ commit-
ment to things Bahamian is clear evidence that the
airline is moving in the right direction of becoming
the premier airline for the Bahamas and the region”.

SkyBahamas presently has permits to operate
scheduled flights into Freeport; Marsh Harbour,
Abaco; George Town, Exuma; New Bight and
Arthur’s Town, Cat Island; Bimini, Andros,
Eleuthera, Providencieles Turks and Caicos, Haiti
and Jamaica.







Are you...
wwitotivated, outgoing and professional?

50 ARE WE!

Join our rapidly growing group of companies and
enjoy an exciting and rewarding career in sales,

Outside Sales
Representative

The ideal cardidate must:

» Bea high motivated sell sarier wiht an emhusiasic, iendy and qulgoing personality.

«Be wiling ko be trained ina venedy of product noawlinds areas.

« Possees aecellent onjanizational and ime management sil.

» Be able io word independenty: sepresem the interests of management and the
company professionally and effidertty; and handle customers efiectivel)

» Possess compuler shils, to include working knowledge of MS Ofice Suite (Ence,
Word, PowerPoint, and [nemel Explorer ett)

« Be punctual and have relsbia ranspoalinn,

Posiion ig commissinn based - your sunness depends entirely oni your sales efforts - the
sky is he limit!
Construction trade experience praferad.

Pledge email your resume lo oubsdecales | jahotmail.com







C H Reeves students advised to
take responsibility for their safety



By Bahamas
Information Services

AS road works begin on
the Marathon/Robinson
Road and East Street corri-
dors, students of C H
Reeves were encouraged to
exercise proper use of the
roadways.

Charlene Collie-Harris,
project civil engineer in the
Ministry of Public Works
and Transport, along with
Sergeant Garlon Rolle of
the Traffic Division of the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force, addressed the stu-
dents during an assembly
this week.

Sidewalks

Mrs Harris told the stu-
dents that when the road
improvements have been
completed there will be
proper sidewalks, pedestrian





(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson)

STUDENTS of C H Reeves listen as a representative of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport and them
about road improvement works Robinson Road and Marathon.



crossings and bus stops.

She urged them to use the
sidewalks, crossings and bus
stops properly.

“The bus stops will be
clearly identified. Stand on
the bus stops and not any-
where. Help the bus drivers
to pull on the side of the
road,” she said.

Set Rolle told the students
that the police and Ministry
of Works are very con-
cerned about their safety.

He said there are “too
many” traffic accidents and
“too many” people are
dying on the streets.

“We can do a better job
as a community,” he said.

“You have a personal
responsibility for your own
safety.”

He encouraged the chil- ie
dren to exercise caution par-
ticularly when crossing the
streets and exiting a bus.

“Make sure the way is
clear at all times,” he said.



CH Reeves about road safety.

Jamaica increases police presence after killings

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — Jamaica's security minister has
assigned dozens more police officers to crime-ridden areas
after gunmen killed a 5-year-old girl and a priest in separate
attacks, according to Associated Press.

Police say the girl was killed in Glendevon, a poor commu-
nity near the resort city of Montego Bay, as her father drove her
to school Thursday. The girl's father and a 9-year-old sister were
seriously injured. Security Minister Dwight Nelson said Friday
that 40 police officers will be assigned to Glendevon, where five
men were killed on Sunday. He also expects to increase police
presence in Spanish Town, where authorities say the Rev.
Michael Dixon was killed at his home Thursday. Jamaica has
one of the world's highest murder rates.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TERRAN
AKEEM WELLS of PO.Box N-4283 Nassau
Bahamas intend to change my name to TERRAN
AKEEM NEWRY. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PRO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Paoney 20 Wioek





= i

(BIS photo/Letisha Henderson)

SERGEANT Garlon Rolle of the Traffic Division of the Royal Bahamas Police Force speaks to students of

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GORDON

of Nassau, The
Bahamas, intend to change my name to G.O X. If
there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO. Box N-742, Nassau, The
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.



FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

clade lca NT AT.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 29 APRIL 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,556.59 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -8.79 | YTD % -0.56
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.02
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63
5.23 Bank of Bahamas 5.24
0.44 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste
2.14 Fidelity Bank
9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07
2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84
5.00 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.80
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.91
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54
5.94 Famguard 6.07
8.75 Finco 9.08
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60
3.75 Focol (S) 5.08
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59
9.95 J. S. Johnson

10.00 Premier Real Estate

0.44
3.15
2.17

9.95
10.00
52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

52wkaLow Symbol Bid S

Bahamas Supermarkets. 10.06

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00

RND Holdings 0.35

6.25
0.40

Previous Close Today's Close

10.63

12.07

10.60

10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

100.00
100.00
100.00 - 7%
100.00 .

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Ask &
11.06

EPS $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.460
0.111
0.627

-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366

Change Div$
7.05 0.03
0.00

0.00

Daily Vol.
21

5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.84 0.00
5.80 0.00
2.90 -0.01
2.54 0.00
6.07 0.00
9.08 0.00
0.00
0.00
1.00 0.00
0.27 0.00
5.59 0.00
9.95 0.00
0.00

5.08
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156 64.1
ases)
Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
EPS$
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div & P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price. Daily Val.

4.00
0.55.

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

ABDAB 30.13

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55

31.59

4.540
0.002

0.000

0.55 0.000

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV YTD%
1.4602 1.50
2.9116 0.85
1.5274 1.34
3.2025 2.75

13.4986 0.98

107.5706 3.45

105.7706 3.99
1.1034 1.25
1.0764 0.79
1.1041 1.23
9.5795 5.33

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

1.3702
2.8266
1.4467
2.9343
12.6816

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000 10.5417 -2.13

4.8105 7.6928 -0.31

NAV 3MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.507147

NAV 6MTH
1.407626
2.830013
1.491956

Last 12 Months %
6.57
0.52
4.98
-3.54
5.44
6.99
13.50
bce)
4.37
5.34
5.33

31-Mar-10
23-Apr-10
31-Jan-00
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
-Mar-10
31-Dec-09

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

10.96 31-Mar-10

47.51 31-Dec-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily valume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Shange - Ghange in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Weekly Vol. -



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Golina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Goli

Last Price - Last traded over

Trading volume of tt

ie
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stack Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 9

r



SATURDAY, MAY 1,

t

2010





Primary school track and field invitational
produces outstanding individual performances

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHILE they didn’t crown
an overall champion, the
New Providence Primary
School Track and Field Invi-
tational produced some out-
standing individual perfor-
mances.

The championships con-
cluded yesterday at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium of three
days of intense competition.

While the preliminaries

took place over the first two
days, only final events were
contested on the final day,
including the 100, 200, 400
and 800 metres on the track.

There were limited events
staged on the field.

For the first time, associa-
tion president Lisa Mortimer
said they invited some of the
small private schools to par-
ticipate and that sort of
enhanced the competition.

From track events con-
tested, there were some mul-
tiple winners, who also dou-
bled up winning one or two

other events.

Juliette Pierre of Gerald
Cash, won the girls A 100
metres in 13.22 seconds after
she upset Our Lady’s Tyla
Davis, who had the fastest
qualifying time of 13.00.
Davis got second in 13.57
with Jasmine Farrington of
Freedom Academy taking
third in 13.84.

“It was great,” said Pierre,
the 11-year-old sixth grader,
who eariler won the 400 in
1:06.76 ahead of Claridge’s
Kiera Bramwell (1:08.22). “I
knew I was going to win.”

Nitcheu Casseus of Cen-
terville won the A boys 100
in 11.78, followed by Okel
Nesbitt of Carlton Francis in
12.24 and Oti Willburgh of
Camrichael third in 12.85.

“T felt it. It was exciting,”
said Casseus, an 11-year-old
sixth grader who also won
the long jump. “I really
believed that I could win.”

The B Girls 100 came right
down to the wire with Ade-
laide’s Dirtonise Sensuren
pulling off the victory in
13.66, just ahead of Uriah
McPhee’s Elrindera Bethel

in 13.67. Proleine Pierre of
Claridge was third in 13.83.

Eleazor Goodman of Thel-
ma Gibson took the B Boys
100 in 13.33. Coming in sec-
ond was Bradley Duncombe
of Yellow Elder in 13.57,
while Terjoel Dawkins got
third in 13.66.

In the C Girls 100, Anish-
ka Lotmore of Claridge took
the tape in 14.58, well ahead
of her team-mate Tyra
McKenzie in 14.84. Jonay
Hanna of Thelma Gibson
was third in 14.91.

“It was fine,” said Lot-

more, the nine-year-old, who
also took the 200 in 31.60
over McKenzie’s 31.88. “I
just went out and ran good.”
The meet served as a pre-
lude to the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture’s
29th Primary Schools Track
and Field Championships
that will take place from May
19-21 at the TAR Stadium.
At the meet, teams from
the various Family Islands
will be coming to town to
compete against both the
public and private schools in
siumilar age groups.



NPBA men's

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



WHILE the New Providence
Women’s Basketball Association
champions have been decided, the
New Providence Basketball Associa-
tion men’s championship could be
completed this weekend.

The winner from the NPBA’s best-
of-five series between the Common-
wealth Bank Giants and the Real
Deal Shockers will join the NPWBA
champions Bommer G Lady
Swingers in representing New Prov-
idence in the Bahamas Basketball
Federation’s National Round Robin
Tournament.

The tournament is scheduled from
May 14-15 at the Grace Gymnasium
in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and will
feature teams from Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Long Island and
New Providence.

This year’s tournament is being
held in honour of David ‘Stretch’
Morley, the immediate past presi-
dent of the BBF, who served for the
past 10 years.

Federation secretary general and
tournament director Sean Bastian
said they are expecting some keen
competition from the five men and
three women teams lined up to com-
pete.

“Last year, we had it in Bimini and
the year before that, it was in
Inagua,” Bastian said. “We’re look-
ing to take the nationals to the vari-
ous Family Islands because we feel it
is time for us to give them the show-
case that they deserve.”

Federation president Lawrence
Hepburn said the idea of taking the
tournament to the Family Islands is
to give the residents to see the high
level of competition and also to help
generate revenue as is done with the
regattas.

“When persons rent a room for
five nights, that’s a big revenue earn-
er from the hotel and the food ven-
dors in the Family Islands,” Hepburn
said.

Teams from Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Long Island and
New Providence will contest the
men’s division, while the women will
comprise of Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama and New Providence.

“We are hoping that the Abaco
basketball fans and the whole com-
munity of Abaco will come out and
embrace this high level of competi-
tion,” Bastian said.

“We’re looking at the best of the
best from the Family Islands come
out. This is an opportunity for the
community of Abaco to come out
and see the best that the Bahamas
has to offer in basketball in the men
and women.”

Bastian said like they did last year,
the federation might extend the
women’s division to a round robin
because they have interest from at
least one or two more teams from
New Providence traveling to com-
pete with the Lady Angels.

“We are trying to see if we can
give them some more playing time
because women basketball don’t
have as much competition as the
men,” Bastian said.

“So we are trying to expose them
to the game as much as we can. That is
why we opened it up last year with the
other teams that traveled to Bimini.”

e
5@ .

rT}

Ra a

—
Cc

‘oopok [TEN [ak]

fat]
fa

Ped RELIANCE 5@ = RCLIAN'
fied RELIANCE 5

: GUYANA T20 CRICKET WORLD CUP

championship set
for this weekend



Andres Leighton/AP Photos

WEST Indies’
batsman
Ramnaresh
Sarwan, center,
plays a shot off
Ireland's Trent
Johnston, right,
as wicket keep-
er Niall O'Brien
looks on during
their Twenty20
Cricket World
Cup match in
Georgetown,
Guyana, Friday,
April 30, 2010.
The West Indies
finished their
innings in 138
for nine.





=

WEST Indies’ bowler Ravi Rampaul celebrates after taking the wicket of Ire-
land's Alex Cusack, unseen.

iit

WEST In










dies’ opener Shivnarine Chanderpaul plays a shot off Ireland's
Boyd Rankin, unseen, as wicket keeper Niall O'Brien looks on.

IRELAND'S bowler Alex Cusack celebrates after catching and bowling
West Indies’ captain Dwayne Bravo for 18 runs during their Twenty20

Cricket World Cup match in Georgetown, Guyana, Friday, April 30, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



SPORTS

INBRIEF

German great
Mueller picks Brazil
to win World Cup

SOCCER
FRANKFURT
Associated Press



FORMER Germany great
Gerd Mueller says Brazil is
the favorite to win the World
Cup, and his own country
doesn't have a good team.

Mueller, one of the heroes
of Germany's 1974 World
Cup triumph at home, says
Germany coach Joachim

Loew is being stubborn for :
still not picking Schalke strik- :
er Kevin Kuranyi for the :

World Cup.

Mueller says "as long ashe :
(Loew) is stubborn, we won't :
have the best (Germany) :
team. He (Kuranyi) is the :
man scoring goals right now. :

... We don't have a good ! : : ; : : ; ; ; ; ; ;
: RAFAEL Nadal of Spain returns the ball to Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland during their match at the Rome Masters tennis tournament, in Rome, Friday, April 30,

team."

Loew has said he will con- :
sider Kuranyi's return after :
kicking the striker off the :
team for disciplinary reasons :

in October 2008.

Asked to name a World
Cup favorite, the 64-year-old
Mueller says "Brazil."

Bryant ready to
focus on future
with Cowboys

FOOTBALL
IRVING, Texas
Associated Press

Sooo seeseeseseesesresaeeeeesereesees

a

2010. Nadal beat Wawrinca 6-4, 6-1.

Natal beats Wawrinka to reach semis in Rome

TENNIS
ROME
Associated Press

RAFAEL Nadal overcame
a slow start to beat Stanislas
Wawrinka 6-4, 6-1 in the quar-
terfinals of the Rome Masters
on Friday.

Aiming for his fifth title at
the Foro Italico in five years,
Nadal had trouble finding his

+ range off Wawrinka's power-
: ful serve, but managed to

asked by Miami Dolphins gen- :

eral manager Jeff Ireland ina :

pre-draft interview if his moth- > points in his first four service

er was ever a prostitute.

DALLAS Cowboys rookie : break the 26th-ranked Swiss
receiver Dez Bryant says he's > to close out the first set, then
done talking about being : ‘Tuised from there.

Wawrinka, the 2008 run-
ner-up, dropped only two

* games.

After his first workout with !

repeatedly said he didn't want :
to talk about his interview :

with Ireland and the contro-
versy that has followed.

"IT don't want to talk about
it. [just want to talk about the
Cowboys and what I'm doing.
I put that in the past," Bryant
said. "I'm just going to move
on, I really don't even want
to speak on it anymore. I feel
fine, things are great. I'm just
looking ahead now."

Bryant's on-field debut with
the Cowboys came days after
Ireland apologized publicly,
the NFL players union raised
concerns about discrimination
and degradation, and Dol-
phins owner Stephen Ross
said he would look into the
matter personally.

Meanwhile, Ross gave Ire-
land a vote of confidence Fri-
day and said he considers "the
matter closed."

In a four-paragraph state-
ment, the Dolphins owner
said he spoke with several
people, both directly and indi-
rectly involved with the situa-
tion, and concluded the team
will need to make some
changes to its interview prac-
tices.

He stopped short, howev-
er, of saying he considered
any punishment for Ireland.

"Jeff Ireland is a man of
great capability and integrity
and he is well deserving of my
continued confidence,” Ross
said.

Ross did not specify exact-
ly how the interview process-
es going forward would
change.

"We are going to take a
hard look at our interview
practices and we will make
improvements that will allow

us to get the important infor- °
mation we need about players +

Nowitzki ‘to Keep my options open this summer

major investment, but with- +

in whom we are making a

out being insensitive," Ross :

BASKETBALL

said.
Another twist came Friday

asked Bryant if his mother :
was a prostitute as a follow- :

to oth ided +
cnet -yie econ bras ara : Mavericks jersey would be

by the 21-year-old receiver.
The SI.com report cited an

alleged exchange in which :
Bryant was asked what his :
father did for a living when :
the receiver was growing up, :
and he responded that his dad :

was a pimp. When Bryant was :

then asked what his mother : Dallas reached the NBA finals

did and answered that she :

worked for his dad, Ireland :

asked if she was a prostitute.

"The first set was level for a

the Cowboys during a rookie * long time," Nadal said. "He
minicamp Friday, Bryant : WS holding serve much easi-

er than me. All the games on
my serve were harder than
his. But at 5-4 I started to play
really well with some good
drop shots."

Nadal then began
approaching the net in the
second set.

"Iam going to the net
more," the Spaniard said.
"You can go to the net more
when you're dominating the
points."

Nadal improved his record
on clay this season to 8-0, hav-
ing won the Monte Carlo
Masters two weeks ago.

"T played well, but I was
definitely playing better in
Monte Carlo," Nadal said.

His only loss at this French
Open warmup came against
fellow Spaniard Juan Carlos
Ferrero in the opening round



Henin

overcomes
Jankovic at

Porsche GP

TENNIS
STUTTGART, Germany
Associated Press

JUSTINE Henin of Belgium
stayed on course for her first
title since coming out of retire-
ment by beating Jelena
Jankovic — yet again — for a
place in the Porsche Grand
Prix semifinals.

Henin rallied to win Friday's
match 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3 and
bring her record against the
Serb to 10-0.

"Tstill don't know how I did
it," Henin said after the match.
"It was really intense."

Henin will play Shahar Peer
of Israel, who stopped Dinara
Safina's comeback from injury
by beating the second-seeded
Russian 6-3, 6-2.

Henin returned to the cir-
cuit in January, ending an 18-
month retirement, and was
runner-up in Brisbane and at
the Australian Open.

: DALLAS

when SI.com, citing unnamed :

sources, reported that Ireland : Associated Press

DIRK Nowitzki has always
said wearing anything but a

strange, and that winning a
title anywhere but Dallas
wouldn't be the same.

Now, he's not so sure.

Still reeling from a first-
round playoff ousting — his
third in the four years since

— Nowitzki said Friday he
needs some down time before
deciding whether to return to

Jankovic thought the Bel-
gian was just as strong as
when she retired as the reign-
ing No. 1.

"She is playing the same, she
is still one of the best on clay.
You have to hold your ground,
as soon as you lose concentra-
tion she takes advantage, she
has so much experience," said
Jankovic.

Also a former No. 1,
Jankovic won the Stuttgart
tournament in 2008 and was
seeded fourth this time.

"We both played a good
match and maybe I was a little
unlucky at the crucial times,"
the Serb said. "I had a break
point at 5-5 in the second and I
was hoping to pounce on her
serve but she hit one of her
best serves of the match with
her second serve."

Henin had 44 unforced
errors but also produced 43
winners, while Jankovic only

the Mavericks next season or
to opt out of his contract and
become a free agent.

"Thave to keep my options
open at this point, see what's
going on; got to get over this
disappointment for a while,"
he said. "I'll probably drown
my sorrows for a bit, then start
thinking about stuff like that
in a week or two. As of now, I
just want to keep my options
open and see what happens."

Nowitzki is due $21.5 mil-
lion in 2010-11. If he leaves,
it wouldn't be for more mon-
ey, but for a better chance of
winning a championship.

had 18 winners to go with 23

two years ago, when he was
bothered by a foot blister.

Nadal's semifinal opponent
will be either Ernests Gulbis or
Feliciano Lopez, who were
playing the night match.

Earlier, Fernando Verdas-
co extended his impressive
form on clay with a grueling
7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-4 win over
Novak Djokovic.

Verdasco has reached the
final of his last two events —
losing to Nadal in Monte Car-
lo and winning last week's
Barcelona Open. In the semi-
finals, Verdasco will face
David Ferrer, who cruised past
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4, 6-1.

Roger Federer and Swiss
Davis Cup teammate Yves
Allegro were eliminated from
the doubles tournament by
American pair John Isner and

Sam Querrey 6-4, 6-4.

Federer lost his opener in
singles to Gulbis on Tuesday.

Between Verdasco and
Djokovic the first set alone
lasted nearly 1? hours and the
sixth-seeded Verdasco closed
out the match with an ace
down the middle after 3 hours,
18 minutes of long baseline
rallies under a glaring sun.

"When you face someone
who always makes you play
one more shot on every point
it's not easy to play a quick
match," Djokovic said. "So I
knew it was going to be a long
match today.

"The match could have
gone either way. It was decid-
ed by one or two points."

Verdasco also _ beat
Djokovic in the Monte Carlo
semifinals, although with a rel-







Daniel Maurer/AP Pho

RUSSIA'S Dinara Safina returns a ball during her quarterfinal match against Israel's Shahar Peer



atively straightforward 6-2, 6-2
score.

The turning point this time
didn't come until Verdasco
won a marathon game on his
sixth break point to take a 2-1
lead in the third set, running
down a drop shot from
Djokovic and forcing the
exhausted Serb to hit into the
net.

Djokovic committed 46
unforced errors to Verdasco's
40.

"My backhand wasn't at the
level I wanted it to be at today,
and I struggled a little with my
serve, but I'm happy more or
less with the way I played,"
Djokovic said. "If there was
one different thing I could've
done I would have liked to
play better on the important
points."



at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix in Stuttgart, Germany, Friday, April 30, 2010.

unforced errors.

"She played very consis-
tently in the first set and I was
under a lot of pressure," Henin
said. "I kept fighting and Iam
really happy to get through."

Peer, Henin's semifinal
opponent, is celebrating her
23rd birthday Saturday.

Safina, another former No.
1, was playing her first tourna-
ment since retiring from the
Australian Open in January

Dallas has won at least 50
games for 10 straight season,
yet still hasn't won a title.
Only three other franchises
have pulled off the 50-for-10
feat and each won at least
three titles during that span,
adding to the frustration for
Dallas players, management
and fans.

Nowitzki said he believes
owner Mark Cuban and pres-
ident Donnie Nelson would
continue to surround him with
the pieces needed to compete.
In fact, he spent the last few
weeks repeatedly saying this
version was "the deepest team

with a lower-back injury.

"Dinara is a good player but
she hasn't played for a while,"
Peer said. "I was playing solid
and I was aggressive."

Peer made only three
unforced errors in the second
set as she twice broke Safina's
serve. Safina finished with 27
unforced errors, and Peer has
now won the last four of her
seven matches against the
Russian.

Earlier, seventh-seeded
Samantha Stosur also
advanced to the last four with a
6-3, 6-3 victory over Li Na of
China to extend her winning
streak on clay to 10.

Stosur, who will next face
either Lucie Safarova of the
Czech Republic or Anna
Lapushchenkova of Russia,
committed only seven
unforced errors and never
faced a break point.



I've been on in my career"
and that it was "built for the
playoffs."

But how would he react if
good buddy Steve Nash sug-
gested they team up again in
Phoenix? Or if LeBron James,
or Dwyane Wade, asks him to
come along wherever they go?

"As of right now, it's all
speculation,” said Nowitzki,
whom the Mavs hope to use
as their own recruiter this
summer in the NBA's free
agency bonanza. "I've always
said I want to finish my career
here in Dallas and it would-
n't feel the same putting on a
different uniform. So, that
really always was my plan. So
we'll just have to wait and
see."



ee
THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010, PAGE 11
LOCAL NEWS

nwCatering





CHEF Tim

e , J Tibbitts and his
/ wife Rebecca
rl + Tibbitts, founders
2 r = | of 99/1 Food
i = ] Services
. Management.

IN GRAND BAHAMA



FREEPORT —



ahamian entrepreneurs are doing their part
in helping boost Grand Bahama’s econo-
my by launching a new catering service to
assist homemakers, entertainers, wedding
parties and event planners with all their culinary needs.
The new company, 99/1 Food Services Management,
was launched last year by Tim Tibbitts and his wife
Rebecca who have over 30 combined years experience
in the food and hospitality.
The couple moved back to Grand Bahama after living
in Canada for many years.
After successfully launching EAST restaurant in Port
Lucaya, the Tibbitts opened their own catering business
and have been busy ever since.

Busy

“We've been extremely lucky that Tim’s culinary rep-
utation and our quality in service has kept us very busy,”
said Mrs Tibbitts.
“We offer a service where we can prepare the food
for working families, cater private dinner parties or pre-
pare for a wedding for 150 at the Grand Bahama Yacht
Club or any other venue.”
Mr Tibbitts, a former top ranking Canadian musician,
returned his focus on his passion for cooking a few years
ago and decided to make the move home like many oth-
er Bahamians. j es
“T missed the lifestyle, the close friends, and to be eee r a] 3 ai
honest, the fishing,” he said. i t Tibbitts pictured
“Very few things get me as excited as working with ; sii a pecenh
great ingredients that are as fresh as our local seafood, OTC
especially when we catch it ourselves. I love to experi- MORON
ment with global flavours to bring new experiences to rn yes
the people who we serve.” ;






































































INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS BROKERS & AGENTS
pe ey tr ee ee a WEDNESDAY eC Sey
ey , oo, ons a, a
, ¥ — » — » ry , o|1|2/3\4|5 6|7|s|9|10}11+
Sat —i ii tye r eat uw =| wonerame ee | He | er
- Sune aad bore Chad atl Gries Soaiete Gea wth Partly deary, beeary Sah ed peat Suns Tae foghar te Aoceeeer UM idee corse te
— % fare cicuck. aad bu Geen bh wiry eter Gen need doc oe od eke podem
_ High: ae ee iti Mighu: Sr" Hiigih: Ba"
eh r High: Be Lowe: 74" Lore: 7a" Low: 73° Low: 73" Lowe: 76" ee
eee a el ee Te
Zipm 225 pm fo
Surcog leed Le 4a Bo
bi lt ceed iiMipe 27 dose oo
4 Sus ae fer Aide Ce 2 pe peer Mead Suan Z CHa oe
i | “y High: #7" Fate A Teme eceinrt “ign 26 fap 63
a he * 7 Figh _. : - 7 ~ SP Ar af 7
= + Lowe Ter Fa" an Tear. Tay 12pm 21 ize Ba
i Ene knots —— as ‘ formal kre —— a Weteenbp 25am 25 Tam ba
a = rs: higa ar = 1G
E-1 knots: prt fseelat fi se . _ hPa ae zt MEL pum _ Ie
Precipiben There 1522 a 22° T33 am Gs
J Ac cl Spun, perertay nae 134 pm ri | Bae pn GT
i —_ Feo Ue chad 7 cr onary 2 2,
1 - Wormal year to date : : : Tia pea pm 7 fod pan He
| AccuWeather.con ——|-—_—-—
Forenar and graphics prnesded by tm la
HASSAN 000 Wwe gS"FaE"c a, ee end Semen Beam Meceries TESS pre
mene Leee TE" Fac Samet . 70 pan a. et on
Lasse 7? FZ" : bens Hew First Full
- petite
KEY WEST % p CAT 1SLAe 4
High 24" RSC : Foye High: BS" F235" c el
Loe TE Fee" G i, : A ‘ Lore: Ta" Pear ie =
L_ > * c _ May i Mey 15 May 0 Mery £7
“ 4-16 kets a + > if \,
â„¢ VÂ¥ 3 xuMA ae
": GREAT E ere
7 E16 bots High: 32° A=" G J Lora! 8
—_ Lee Jer aa" G
Shor ks ae vom De ees forays __ ‘ ™ pa
pies and benights = res. i gfe iy es, . ”
- : "¥ ir ’ i i "
Wawa ‘ a
ee eae ee
ee — a Hah: OF" Fea” ~ 8-16 knets
agg fd oi 4 Law Fer —
gee ae ate a a ee ie Cape Hatheras ae -& [ola
SOP a aah a at a Charlotte * Highs: T4"FesC Shown is today's - tee rae
et & = = & *
‘ HH 2) 84°F S280C better Ta rere res ;
22D laupdeg ot See issaae Bermuda Pee aes —
‘Sa og het SR . Highs: 82" Feec Highs: 77" Fase are ays feghs an ee
fe fe em ee ee ee + " . 1 fl Ror
4 Pensacola: * 4 * Savannah ee RAGSES ee pot
' ‘High’ "83 1c Highs: &2"F2a*c Lower 7S" Free a
30 « Daytona Beach = .
Highs: B4"F/29"C A. Lowe TER A
Tampa . Preepert (H) 7 cE P
Highs: 88 °RS25C.-, ed << ry <<
Miami * aaa ¥ ad ¥
; *Fg 8-18 Geots 8-716 krvata
25 HANS: BESFSONG "Highs: BS"FYS0"C “
Havana *
Hh Santiago de C a
7 . ul
~ WIS: WATS TEREITY WATT TOMes
20 - Hueaes Fey = aca Tada tE =F 16 Kress 1-2 Fee 11 Raber TF
oa Highs: o4°Fa4°C zee) ee ate ANDRS Tei ee aie whee ee:
1 = | . 2 a. at reas Ea Fen Pa
Highe: 89° Rek2*c - te eHighs: S0°Ra25C Susie EEE af 4-4 Knots Sod. Feet 1 Biles: Tz F
# Belize = mite 2 Antigua Car ISL 460 Tey ab 8-16 Krests ond Fem 4 Bes Tr F
Highs: Sa Bras ae Dominga ) Abgihs: BFC Baxi at 14 Knots oot Fer 1 Ales ie
ghs: Sar H : . a CRED BLAM Teta, ToS Ents: fa Fem 7
igha: SERS 2oC Highs: &5"Fr2aoC : eae :
15 a a E ood. Fees
tee ee a oe Barbadas E cai
ee ee ee Aruba Cunacan Highs: BS"F a0" me s ay ——
+ ee +Mariag ua Highs: B8°Frai°C E ri ioe LE faa Th
. is : . . Highs? oP Trinidad Sarma ESE af 6-12 Ket 1-3 Fa 11 ides iF
Re BO ee et Teer Teer Ea G15 Races oot Fame '
& & oe : = = Scio wi 1S Enotes ed Pe 1] Bie oF
2 1 : mL eres + a= : â„¢ % Canal Highe: era r Ea B16 Geote 1-3 Fame
a / Lt T- Pa & i a
eR . . Heine 255 . ‘e = Panama Clary Highs: Ba" FS1 5S MLLGOEMA ae See va a am ar
en = 81°F 25C CT 7 Eo WSO &n 7-f Fee 7 ile: I” F-
heb eb te ERE EE EEE * he be ® ABSSau Toy ESE ab 8-15 Krents 1-I Feet 40 Fn Ta F
Se RR RR RR ERE EER ESE a = ee ES i ELE wt 7-14 5 1-2 Fee 11 Ble 7 FE
SRRSNAS BUA RASS BGS 75 SS7OSS PSS 6S 1. SP 50 | SANEALWOBR Tray Ear Te Gere zie Yess 31
Waar Cad Swiss See ait Ladonrs: Pharr ore ie ALBR SLEMD Tos, ee 16 fas 1-2 Fee 1 Ae. rr F
oe a S03 OF _ cee eae fa LR Ree nos 6h = et tee Fes ta Sado: EEE of 7-14 Kreis 1-2 Feet 1 Aes TF





[JF] | INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

iiteibice t ia i Gees 1 tee

Tek (242) S02-G000 | Tek (2437) 250-3500 wenn rag we sa we

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Gay club battle
Two accused
of murder

FROM page one

court that Newchurch had stitches in her arm and shoulder
which she had been scheduled to have removed on Friday.
Mr Cargill asked that Newchurch be taken to hospital. Jani-
qua Russell, 20, and Lacey Knowles, 19, have been charged
with causing grievous harm to Newchurch who was stabbed
after the fight erupted inside the Garage nightclub early Sun-
day morning. Russell and Knowles who were arraigned on
Wednesday are on $8,000 bail.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Newchurch
be taken to hospital. Both women were also ordered to be
remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. Their case has been
adjourned to May 7.

Man helping police with
George Carey murder probe

FROM page one

Drive in Joan’s Heights.

"Officers searched and recovered a quantity of suspected
marijuana. Two males, ages 19 and 22 years old of Knowles Dri-
ve, were taken into custody," she said.

That same day, police recovered a pistol and ammunition
found in a bushy area near the Government High School in Yel-
low Elder Gardens. Investigations continue.

Banknotes to bear image
of Sir Stafford Sands

FROM page one

bear the image of Sir Stafford Sands.

“Now, given the expiration of the 2005 banknotes,” said
the government release, “the image of Bahamian Sir Stafford
once again returns to the notes.”

Government said it was “pleased to continue this effort
of honouring Bahamians who make significant contribu-
tions to The Bahamas by placing their images on our local
currency, an exercise that began in December 1993 when, for
the first time, the portrait of a Bahamian, Sir Milo Butler was
placed on the $20 banknote.

“Thereafter, the portraits of Sir Cecil was placed on the
1995 $5 banknote; Sir Roland on the $50 banknote in 2000
and Sir Lynden on the $1 banknote in 2001.”

Police look into apparent drowning
FROM page one

She was taken to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where she
died around 2pm.

Ms Mackey said the victim’s identity is being withheld pend-
ing notification of next of kin. She said an autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the cause death.

Officer who killed Brenton Smith

stayed on duty following death

FROM page one

Royal Bahamas Police
Force (RBPF) Assistant
Superintendent Hulan Han-
na confirmed Detective Cor-
poral Kelsie Munroe was
not removed from duty and
his firearm was not confis-
cated after he shot the 18-
year-old while responding
to an armed robbery at City
Market, in Village Road.

An inquest into the death
opened in November, suf-
fered a number of setbacks
before the seven-member
jury returned a unanimous
verdict yesterday absolving
DC Munroe of possible neg-
ligence or use of excessive
force when he shot the
teenager.

Mr Smith, 18, was found
unarmed. Evidence showed



Detective Corporal
Kelsie Munroe

he had not robbed the
supermarket, as DC Munroe
told the court he had sus-
pected, and continues to sus-
pect.

Coroner William Camp-
bell presented the jury with
four possible verdicts,

including manslaughter by
way of excessive force,
manslaughter by gross neg-
ligence and an open verdict.

But the panel found DC
Munroe acted in self-
defence with reasonable use
of lethal force as he was in
fear for his life when he
encountered Mr Smith.

DC Munroe said they had
come face to face at a break
in the wall which serves as a
public access path between
the supermarket and Bar-
ber Street, off Kemp Road,
when Mr Smith “came at
him.”

The Fox Hill division offi-
cer with 11 years experience
who has held a firearms
licence since 2002 had heard
the robbers described as two
men, one wearing a white
T-shirt, when he parked the



car behind the supermarket,
emerged with his gun drawn,
and encountered Mr Smith,
wearing a white T-shirt, and
he fired a shot from the
RBPF 9mm pistol within
seconds.

Mr Smith’s family main-
tain the College of the
Bahamas student, who was
walking with his friend
Leshad Thompson, 18, when
he was shot at around 8pm
on July 9, was not involved
in the armed robbery.

No evidence was found to

suggest that he or his friend,
a key witness in the inquest,
were involved in the rob-
bery.
Brenton Smith’s father
Hector Smith said he
intends to pursue legal
action to “obtain justice” for
his son.

Civil Aviation pledges action
over pilots’ flying hours

FROM page one

consequently the travelling public is
being put at risk.

A pilot, who wished to remain
anonymous, told The Tribune: “There
are bylaws by the Civil Aviation
Department that allow a flight crew to
work a 12-hour duty day, with up to
eight hours flight time or ten flights in
most cases.

“Most evening flights are done by a
very tired flight crew. Working 12-hour
days in some cases and flying 10 or
more flights in a single day is not an
easy task, much less with people’s lives
at stake. Pilots are coming to work and
flying aircraft with serious issues, most
deeming them non-airworthy and
should be grounded in fact.

“So most pilots who are paid by the
day have no choice and most times
take these extreme risks in hopes of
returning alive, all to receive an already
minimal pay cheque.”

Patrick Rolle, Director of Civil Avi-
ation told The Tribune: “The law is
very specific, if the companies are forc-
ing the pilots to fly and the pilots are
not entering the correct time or prob-
lems they are having with the airplane,

then they themselves are violating the
law.”

Mr Rolle added: “We want to assure
the pilots that if they came into Civil
Aviation and report those companies,
Civil Aviation will ensure every possi-
ble action is taken against those com-
panies.

Risk

“We cannot allow pilots or compa-
nies to put the flying public at risk.”

Another pilot at LPIA said: “Most
pilots are being paid by the day. They
receive a pay cheque every two weeks
and have a full time roster like any
other full time scheduled worker in the
Bahamas. There is no other industry in
this country where this blatant non-
sense is tolerated, much less even sanc-
tioned.

“The pilots fly these aircraft because
if they don’t fly that day they won’t
get paid. This in itself is added stress
and fatigue to an already critical job in
itself.”

In response to pilot salaries Mr Rolle
said: “There is nothing Civil Aviation
can do about that, it should be taken up
with the companies they work for. Civ-

il Aviation does not deal with pilot
salaries.”

Another pilot stated: “An addition-
al challenge at the airport is the secu-
rity risks that pilots fly under on a dai-
ly basis. While pilots go through the
security screening check point, bag-
gage handlers are allowed through an
easy access door close to the ramp with
carts loaded with unscreened bags and
are merely patted down.

“When a flight crew arrives at their
aircraft, they are unaware as to the
contents onboard, but are still the pri-
mary target and most susceptible to
arrest by the police, customs or
whichever authority when something
illegal or prohibited is found onboard
the aircraft.

“Over the years pilots have grown
tired of seeing their co-workers treated
unfairly and fired in an attempt to sus-
tain and maintain mere livelihood.”

Mr Rolle replied: “The pilots need
to look at the regulation. It talks about
your maximum duty times that a pilot
can fly. They should use the regula-
tion to their benefit.

“The law specifically talks about rest
periods. All these provisions in the law
are to protect the pilots. There needs to
be a clear understanding.”

FIL denies involvement in ‘loan’ scheme



TEEN

i

a - 2S

Se
SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED ELITEMOTORS LTD. sate

eT eye
aera!
ae CLE eee | cere eet



FROM page one

CHALLENGE =
BAHAMAS

a 12 year's of Ministery i in the Baa
wp during the month of ‘ori Tat,





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

made, The Tribune was told yesterday that about 500 appli-
cants had already been seen for that day. It is said the oper-
ation closed early at 3.30pm after allegedly running out of
application forms.

Some people, however, did not take the news of the clo-
sure of the office well, and demanded to be seen to be eli-
gible for the loan. According to a loan application, which The
Tribune was able to secure, the applicant is required to
give the establishment (whose name is being withheld at this
time) a two-week processing period where the application
would reportedly go before a “board” where it would either
be “approved, denied” or left undecided.

The telephone number on the application rang immedi-
ately to an answering machine that had already been filled
to its capacity.

This reportedly had caused a number of persons to flood
FML locations demanding answers on the alleged loan.

According to one source at the FML Group of Compa-
nies, “hundreds” of persons had called and visited their
locations inquiring about the loan.

The majority of these people were said to have become
enraged when they discovered that the businesses were in
“no way, shape, or form” connected.

PEL Te tC



THE officers from the Eastern Police Station in conjunction with
the Eastern Community Association are promising a day of fun and
music for the entire family at their “Fun Fantastic Festival and Mini
Tattoo” today.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette, Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs, Director of Social
Services Mellany Zonicle and Assistant Police Commissioner
Hulan Hanna are all scheduled to attend the festival.

The event, held on the grounds of the Super Value food store in
Winton Estates, begins at noon.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.










THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 5B





The Tribune

B

O Di



ea









A

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

re

vita

min really

necessary?



HERE are hundreds of different dietary supplements
on the market today that claim they will boost your
overall vitality and give you all the vitamins that

your body requires.

Some general practitioners and
pharmacists claim that it’s necessary to
take a vitamin pill each day to make
up for the nutritional deficiencies of
the modern-day diet which often
includes processed and fast foods.

But others say that simply taking a
pill a day can’t replace getting all of
your nutritional needs through eating
a balanced diet made up from items of
all of the food groups.

“Vitamins should only be taken if
it’s recommended by the doctor,”
Myra Albury Deputy, chief dietitian at
Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH),
told Tribune Health.

“These include cases where the per-
son has a health condition, which
includes diseases that affect your iron
count, like a kidney ailment which
makes taking a vitamin necessary to
make up for deficiencies.”

Only in cases such as these does Ms
Albury recommend taking multivita-
min supplements.

“Pm not knocking down vitamins,”
said Ms Albury. “I just think that con-
suming high protein foods and drinks
can’t match getting your protein from
natural sources. I recommend eating
well-balanced diets covering all the
food groups such as starch, vegeta-
bles, meats and other food sources,”
she said.

“Eat a variety of nutritious foods
from all the food groups. You may be
eating plenty of food, but your body
may not be getting the nutrients it
needs to be healthy.”

Nutrient-rich foods have vitamins,
minerals and fibre, and also have less
calories.

The PMH dietitian said people must
eat balanced meals, prepared in the
right way, and ensure that they get
physical exercise.

“To get your requirements of
protein, have lean cutlets of
meat. You can have
tuna, salmon, fish,

chicken, turkey - skinless, less red,
more white meat,” Ms Albury said.

“Tf you have chicken, ensure that is
baked well and broiled.”

Have three to five servings of fruits
and vegetables, and 25 to 30 grammes
of fibre daily.

The best vegetables are fresh, the
next best are frozen and the worst are
canned. The minerals go down the
drain with the water, she said.

And Ms Albury recommends not
to overcook vegetables; they should be
slightly raw when consumed.

Some people, for instance, cook
broccoli until it loses its colour. The
richer in colour the food is, the greater
the nutritional benefits.

“You destroy the natural vitamins
inside (when you overcook). When
you steam your vegetables down, only
have them on the stove for five to ten
minutes, but the purpose is not to
cook them,” Ms Albury said.

“Some vegetables take a long time
to cook. But don’t cook them with a
lot of water, and you can also
microwave them.”

When it comes to a good source of
protein, Ms Albury recommends eat-
ing fish.

“If the person is healthy and eating
a well-balanced diet they don’t need to
be on vitamins at a healthy age,”
she said.

The dietitian also added that too
many vitamin supplements can lead
to vitamin poisoning - high storage
levels of vitamins which can lead to
toxic symptoms.

But there are those who disagree
with this stance on vitamin supple-
ments, and are of the opinion that it is
almost impossible to get all of your
necessary nutrients from food items
sold in supermarkets today.

Dr Humblestone, a physician for
stress related disorders, for example,
said that “the premise that you can
eat fresh fruits and vegetables and
you'll be okay is too simple.”

“There’s a lot more to health,” he
told Tribune Health.

He explained that a significant
amount of nutrients that a body
requires cannot be found in foods that
are made from white flour and sugar.

“White flour and white sugar don’t
have the micro-nutrients, the minerals
and the vitamins which are so impor-
tant,” he said.

“Tn animal experiments, it has been
clearly shown that if you give animals
less calories that they are normally
calculated to require for the given
body weight of the animal, they die if
you give them less calories, but you
add extra vitamins and minerals and
some of those animals live up to 50
per cent longer. The ones who live on
the regular balanced diet do not live as
long,” he said.

Times have changed, and so have
people’s nutritional needs, Dr Hum-
blestone said.

“We are under stress more than




people in old times with regard to
food. The island food as it used to be
was from the sea. We don’t get natur-
al foods (anymore), as everything is
processed and packaged, even down
to vegetables.

“We’ve got so much canned foods
now where the minerals go down the
drain with the water,” said Dr Hum-
blestone.

Dr Humblestone said that eating
fresh produce, fruit and vegetables, is
required to live healthy, but warned
that you can still lose high levels of
zine and vitamin D through drinking
alcohol and even by taking on psy-
chological stress, which internalised,
depletes the body of vitamins B and C.

“Tf you have a high sugar diet you
can lose more zinc in your urine, it’s
just one of the things that happens,”
said Dr Humblestone. If you lose too
much zinc, your sense of taste will
diminish and you will need a lot of
flavours in order to satisfy you,” he
said.

“So much of the diet nowadays is
unhealthy, so you’ve got to ensure
that the mineral and vitamin function
is boosted.”

In Dr Humblestone’s opinion, there
is sufficient support for taking micro-
nutrient supplements (vitamins).

“Vitamins do play a very important
part in health and longevity. If you
can’t get it in your diet, then you sup-
plement,” he said.














FDA 101: Dietary
Supplements

(public information from the
United States Food and Drug
Administration)

THE Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) sug-
gests that you consult with a
health care professional
before using any dietary sup-
plement. Many supplements
contain ingredients that have
strong biological effects, and
such products may not be
safe in all people.

If you have certain health
conditions and take these
products, you may be
putting yourself at risk. Your
health care professional can
discuss with you whether it is
safe for you to take a par-
ticular product and whether
the product is appropriate
for your needs. Here is some
general advice:

e Dietary supplements are
not intended to treat, diag-
nose, cure, or alleviate the
effects of diseases. They can-
not completely prevent dis-
eases, as some vaccines can.
However, some supplements
are useful in reducing the
risk of certain diseases and
are authorised to make label
claims about these uses. For
example, folic acid supple-
ments may make a claim
about reducing the risk of
birth defects of the brain and
spinal cord.

e Using supplements
improperly can be harmful.
Taking a combination of
supplements, using these
products together with med-
icine, or substituting them
in place of prescribed medi-
cines could lead to harmful,
even life-threatening, results.

e Some supplements can
have unwanted effects
before, during, or after
surgery. For example, bleed-
ing is a potential side effect
risk of garlic, ginkgo biloba,
ginseng, and Vitamin E. In
addition, kava and valerian
act as sedatives and can
increase the effects of anes-
thetics and other medica-
tions used during surgery.
Before surgery, you should
inform your health care pro-
fessional about all the sup-
plements you use.

Are Supplements Safe?

Many dietary supple-
ments have clean safety his-
tories. For example, mil-
lions of Americans respon-
sibly consume multi-vita-
mins and experience no ill
effects.

Some dietary supple-
ments have been shown to
be beneficial for certain
health conditions. For
example, the use of folic
acid supplements by
women of child-bearing age
who may become pregnant
reduces the risk of some
birth defects.

Another example is the
crystalline form of vitamin
B12, which is beneficial in
people over age 50 who
often have a reduced abili-
ty to absorb naturally
occurring vitamin B12. But
further study is needed for
some other dietary supple-
ments.

Some supplements have
had to be recalled because
of proven or potential
harmful effects. Reasons
for these recalls include:

e microbiological, pesti-
cide, and heavy metal con-
tamination

e absence of a dietary
ingredient claimed to be in
the product

e the presence of more
or less than the amount of
the dietary ingredient
claimed on the label

In addition, unscrupulous
manufacturers have tried to
sell bogus products that
should not be on the mar-
Ket at all.

Before taking a dietary
supplement, make sure that
the supplement is safe for
you and appropriate for the
intended purpose.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



a
(© ATE

What really attracts us?

BEING a fly on the wall at a
lunch or girl’s night out will
undoubtedly open your eyes to
the world of ‘what turns women
on’.

Topics may include a beautiful
face, eyes, body shape, voice, smell,
the way they move and being ‘too
hot’ to resist.

This may not surprise you, but if
you hang around long enough you
may note the conversation moving
towards the magnetic effect of per-
sonality.

Qualities such as self-confidence,
sense of humor, plus an air of mys-
tery often supersede looks.

It is a known fact that lack of sex-
ual attraction is a deal breaker when
it comes to romance. A friend may
come to mind who is terrific in every
way but you just do not see them
‘that way’, and the very thought of
getting intimate with them is beyond
your comprehension.

If it is not merely looks then what
is it that really determines sexual
attraction? We may hear ourselves
saying ‘Oh, he’s just not my type’ or
‘I keep on going for the same type
and they are never interested in me’.



Where does this image of ‘our type’
come from and is it possible to
change it if we find it does not work
for us?

By the time we are adolescents,
our ‘love map’ has been embossed
into our subconscious. The paths on
the map are marked with indelible
ink and all lead back to past experi-
ences.

Impressions of looks and person-
alities of those persons who were
kind and loving to us, and also those
who were not, are stamped well
below our conscious thinking.

This explains why we often choose
similar types of people. The likeli-
hood of meeting the perfect ‘love
map’ person is slim; however, if
someone has some of those quali-
ties then an attraction starts to form.

You may well be agreeing, but
also may be reminded of falling
heavily for someone who was the
complete opposite to your type.

So is it possible to venture out of
the safety net of your predictable
type?

It is well documented that just
being in close proximity to someone
on a regular basis promotes a con-
nection. Sitting close to someone in
a classroom or adjoining offices will
develop familiarity. Also, the tanta-
lising effect of frequent deep eye
contact is known to accelerate the
feelings of falling in love. This
explains the nature of work place
romances and the difficulty of break-
ing the tie because of the frequent
contact.

We understand these concepts and
recognise the significance of our
past.

But it does not really explain the
mind-blowing effect of picking one
person out of a crowd of equally
attractive individuals.

You may be surprised to discover
that biologists have identified evo-
lutionary reasons why we choose
certain people and not others. Indi-

cators for this are signs of masculin-
ity such as height, greater shoulder
to hip ratio, deep voice, a manly
walk and an air of sexiness.

Someone who is seen to be pow-
erful, attractive to other females will
add to their attractiveness and desir-
ability.

Knowingly or unknowingly we are
on the look out for a compatible
mate to reproduce with. Our evolu-
tionary past drives us towards
healthy and high quality genes in
order that our children will survive
and in turn reproduce. This provokes
healthy debate about how much evo-
lutionary influence impacts our pre-
sent day lives, versus conscious
choices.

Gene selection starts as early as
the first contact with the person’s
natural scent, or pheromones.

We know now that women’s sense
of smell is much more acute than
men’s, and particularly during the
slim window of ovulation. The sig-
nificance of choosing someone with
dissimilar pheromones plays an even
greater role when we look at our
unique Chromosome 6 gene and the
Major Histocompatability Complex
(MHC).

Scientific research shows us when
we choose a mate whose MHC is
dissimilar to ours then we have a
greater sexual attraction.

Interestingly, Chromosome 6 is
also responsible for immune func-
tioning and by having a dissimilar
mate our children will have a bet-
ter immune response. It is thought
that this is nature’s way of reducing
abnormalities due to inbreeding.

Many sexual desire problems can
be retraced to the initial attraction
and the development of the rela-
tionship.

The importance of having an over-
whelming sexual attraction from the
beginning is significant as this plays
a role in future sexual desire, fideli-
ty and the longevity of the relation-
ship. Evidence shows us that having
a mate who is MHC similar to you
will usually mean less frequency of
sex and willingness to please. It is a
shame that we can not genetically
test every potential mate. However,
keep in mind the best litmus test
that we do have is to listen carefully
to our body’s response and our own
intuition.

¢ Margaret Bain is an individual and
couples relationship therapist. She is a
registered nurse and a certified clinical
sex therapist. For appointments call
364-7230 or e-mail her at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also
available for speaking engagements.

@x GRE E N SC E N E By Gardener Jack



The year begins

WELCOME to 2010, the
last year of the first decade
of the third

millennium.

I know that the US media
have already been touting the
end of the first decade but
they are plain wrong.

There was no year 0. We
went from BCE 1 to CE 1, so
the first decade CE ended
with the completion of year
CE 10, just as this decade will
end at midnight on Decem-
ber 31, 2010.

Now I have that off my
chest, let’s turn to garden mat-
ters.

The record warm temper-
atures in the first three weeks
of December led, I believe,
to tomatoes ripening even
earlier than normal.

I rarely get a tomato glut
in December but it happened
in 2009. The earliest produc-
ers were Cuban tomatoes.
They stayed rather small but
were delicious. The rest of the
early crop included Big Boy,
Early Girl and Roma.

My second crop in another
lot started to ripen before
Christmas and will take me
through February.

The third crop will be heir-
loom tomatoes. I plan to sow
Cuban tomatoes again in

May, June and July in the
hope they can produce dur-
ing the summer months.

My pepper plants are doing
well but are rather small in
size. Before Christmas I
dressed them with liquid fer-
tilizer from a compost cock-
tail, so I hope they pick up.

I am on my second set of
string beans, Swiss chard and
mesclun. Strawberries were
late and we have only had one
or two so far. Growing in the
same patch as the strawber-
ries is fennel, a vegetable cum
herb that is as handsome as
it is tasty. Carrots will, of
course, take a few more
months before maturity.

It has been a good rose sea-
son. I prune my roses severe-
ly in late

April and late October
every year and we had a grat-
ifying show over the Christ-
mas period.

My wife is in charge of the
flowers this year, with one
exception. I love nasturtiums
and have them in several pots
including, to good effect, in a
strawberry planter.

Valerie’s choices for the
front garden planters that face
north were New Guinea
impatiens, double-flowering
impatiens, gingers, marigolds,

zinnias and an ongoing selec-
tion of bulbs.

The bromeliad planter
looks a little wan. You can
buy flowering

bromeliads from a nursery
all year round but once estab-
lished in the garden they
respond to nature and flower
only in the warmer months of
the year.

A bed of bromeliads with-
out any flower stalks is inter-
esting but hardly spectacular.

We are coming to the end
of the carambola fruiting sea-
son. When the last fruits have
been picked there will be no
more until August.

There are still some late
local avocados to be had but
they also are coming to an
end. Papaya produces all year
long and ensures we are nev-
er completely without some
sort of fruit.

Bridal bouquet is on its last
flowers for the season and we
will have to wait until early
summer for the next set.

In the meantime, unlike
other frangipanis bridal bou-
quet keep its rather attractive
leaves.

Bridal bouquet is the only
plumeria I have in the year. I
love

flowering frangipani but I
hate the dormant season
when the shrubs or trees are
starkly bare.

A few years ago I was given
sprigs of xanadu, a man-made





PMO gaelic) MOV LAUI | MNO) ANU Pacey

form of philodendron. I grew
some in hanging pots and to
this day they are giving good
service and collect plenty of
comments. Xanadu needs lit-
tle care and is very tough.
Cuttings grow very readily
just by laying them on the
ground.

The old standby for a per-

manent hanging basket is the
spider plant that produces
dozens of baby plants hanging
down around the pot.

Less permanent, but defi-
nitely prettier, is a hanging
pot of portulaca.

The flowers come in single
and double forms and a myr-
iad of colours. The succulent

stems grow up to two feet
long, starting downwards and
then curling up to reveal the
watered silk-like flowers to
good effect.

¢ For questions and comments
contact gardenerjack@coral-
wave.com



Are men at risk?

By IAN A BETHELL
BENNETT

IN THE 1980s/1990s
Caribbean scholar Errol
Miller offered that men were
at risk.

In 2010 is this still true? If
so, what are they at risk of?
This is the nebulous part?
Where are men at risk?
Apparently they aren’t at risk
in the patriarchal system that
posits them as masters of
industry.

Nor are they at risk in the
running of the world econo-
my.

But young, working-class,
black men are more at risk
than others. They are not the
captains of industry. Nor do
they run the world system.

They are often the first to
be laid off when the econo-
my goes south. They are the
first to be picked up by the
police for loitering if they are
walking along the street.
These men are certainly at
risk in a world where the
economy has come to a
screeching halt.

But men are not alone
when it comes to being at risk
for HIV.

In the Caribbean we still
think that men alone push the
HIV statistics out of the
stratosphere.

In reality, however, young
women are now the group
most affected by the HIV
pandemic.

Most women do not believe
that they are at greater risk
of contracting HIV than many
men.

In the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, in general, there

exists this deluded idea that
women cannot easily contract
HIV.

This delusion holds strong
in spite of numerous studies,
statistics and ‘numbers’ that
argue against it. But, again,
we go back to outdated ideas
about gender and a significant
problem with the dissemina-
tion of information.

Our old ideas about gender
and gendered behaviour dic-
tate that HIV is a gay infec-
tion.

Women feel that they can
be out of the loop when it
comes to up-to-date HIV
awareness.

Ironically, even profession-
al women are under informed
about their risks of contract-
ing HIV and the gender
dynamics that work within
their personal relationships.

They often see no need to
make a partner, whom they
may share with other women,
use a condom.

They do not acknowledge
when they catch blows. Nor
do they publicly acknowledge
when they are forced into an
act against their wishes.

They refuse to admit that
domestic violence increases
their risk of contracting HIV.
These are all problems when
it comes to spreading HIV.
While I can appreciate the
need for light-hearted discus-
sion at this point in the
world’s economic meltdown,
there is also a need for a
sobering examination of our
beliefs.

Over Christmas I was
astounded at the number of
conversations that seemed to
not only imply but state that

women were continuing to
engage in sexual relations
with men without demanding
they use protection.

Some of these encounters
were not necessarily happy.
The conclusion is obvious,
Bahamians really think that
we are above risk. Those con-
versations also showed the
need to include some statis-
tics in this piece.

In a recent UNFEM (et al.)
study ‘The Multiple Faces of
the Intersections between
HIV and Violence Against
Women’, the risks are clearly
highlighted:

“Tt is important to highlight
that the feminisation process
of AIDS has not evolved at
the same pace worldwide, as it
has been estimated that in
Sub-Saharan Africa approxi-
mately 61 per cent of adults
who lived with HIV in 2007
were women, while in the
Caribbean this percentage
was 43 per cent (page 12).”

Sadly, we always say, ‘well,
at least we are not as bad as
Sub-Saharan Africa’.

That maybe true, but it also
means that we are dismissing
the gravity of our cultural sit-
uation.

The numbers speak for
themselves. And, as the study
further underscores, there is a
considerable problem with
underreporting in our region.
This indicates that a large per-
centage of cases will not be
reported to the authorities.
Translation, in reality the
numbers are higher.

Nonetheless, the numbers
are sufficient to show that
there is need for alarm. Fur-
ther, as we move deeper into

recession’s darkening grasp
more people, particularly
men, lose their jobs. The sit-
uation will worsen. As male
unemployment increases it
exacerbates other, already
existent, problems. Male frus-
tration will only worsen. The
title of the article should hint
at the direction we will now
take.

Arguably, men are at risk.
Their risk is in part due to a
general increase in violence.
Violence is a fundamental
problem in our society, what-
ever guise it takes. It is only
now that the Bahamas is
beginning to take a serious
position against violence as it
threatens to undo the very
social mechanisms that make
our society work in ‘semi-har-
mony’. The UNIFEM study
sets the scene on what’s at
stake:

In this feminisation process
of the epidemic, young
women have been particular-
ly affected. It is estimated that
women account for 60 per
cent of people living with
HIV between the ages of 15
and 24 (UNICEF 2005, page
1).
Sexual violence, while not
discussed in our society, is a
growing problem. Moreover,
as men lose jobs, they cannot
maintain the role that society
has engendered them with.
They are hardworking
providers for their family.
Society sees men in relation
to how much they earn, their
professional success and their
ability to perform the mascu-
line role ascribed to them by
the group.

This masculine behaviour
determines how successful
one is with women, and is
based on professional and
financial success.

Once men lose their ability

to perform the established
masculine role, they lose self-
respect.

The way they relate to oth-
ers then also changes. Men’s
loss of self-esteem often plays
itself out through increasing
anger and violent behaviour.
As a result, some men strike
out more at those they per-
ceive as being less able to
retaliate. This fact is borne
out by any number of studies
that show how gender-based
violence increases during peri-
ods of extreme stress and
hardship, as in a recession.

To be sure, as the econom-
ic crisis deepens, more peo-
ple will find themselves unem-
ployed.

More of these people will
be men who are then unable
to meet their families’
demands. As their self-
esteem falls anger, crime and
violence rise.

This is a logical chain of
events that no one seems to
be discussing. Furthermore,
the more a man is emasculat-
ed in most areas of his life,
the harder he will fight to
retain dominance in arenas
where he still holds it.

As women look to their
men for money to buy the
essential things (or things that
appear important), Coach
bags, Land brief cases, David
Yurman jewellery, the newest
mobile phone on the market,
they find themselves in a
more vulnerable position.
These women also feel less
empowered to demand that
men use protection during
intercourse.

They also feel that they
cannot leave when a relation-
ship turns violent. Both men
and women find themselves
at risk in this scenario. Men
are at risk because they feel
angry and act out their anger,

and women because they get
blows.

Rape within marriage
becomes more of a problem
within this kind of situation.

In the end can we say that
men are at risk? Men are at
risk, in part, because they are
sidelined by a hostile world
of high unemployment that
breads anger and discontent.

Some men will then act vio-
lently, which results in them
being further marginalised by
a society that in turn reacts
to their violent behaviour by
locking them away. The more
men act out their rage, the
more they marginalise them-
selves. The more they mani-
fest violent behaviour the
more women are affected by
their behaviour. Gendered
relations mean that there is
always a co-relationship.

If men are at risk then, ulti-
mately, women are also at
risk.

As men react against their
social marginalisation women
are usually the victims of their
violent behaviour.

Furthermore, women
expose themselves to uncal-
culated, ‘unnecessary’ risk
each time they decide to go
for a joy ride with a man they
want to buy them a ting or
two! Unfortunately, marriage
is not necessarily a sanctuary
removed from the polemics
of this scenario.

¢ lan A Bethell Bennett is an
Associate Professor in the
Department of English at the Uni-
versity of Puerto Rico. He spe-
cialises in cultural studies,
Caribbean literature and litera-
ture of the British Common-
wealth. His research interests
include youth, masculinity, HIV
and gender-based violence and
trade.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 7B



Bahamian beauty queen could
claim ‘sexiest woman alive’ title |

ISS Bahamas

World Joanna

Brown has been
named as a finalist in a
major international com-
petition and Bahamians
are being called on to
boost her chances of win-
ning.
Fresh off a stellar performance in
the Miss World pageant, 18-year-
old Joanna has been listed among
the 10 finalists in the ‘Sexiest
Woman Alive’, a competition by
the world’s leading pageant por-
tal, Global Beauties.

This is the first time that a
Bahamian beauty has appeared in
the list since the inception of that
competition.

And Bahamians can help their
fellow countrywoman win by vot-
ing for Joanna online.

Each year, the Global Beauties
team reviews all of the contestants
who competed in the five “Grand
Slam” pageants — namely Miss Uni-
verse, Miss World, Miss Tourism
Queen International, Miss Earth,
and Miss International.

In 2009, about 440 women com-
peted in these pageants and from
all those beauties, only 20 were
considered to take part in Global
Beauties’ contest, ‘The Sexiest
Woman Alive’.

These 20 finalists were then
reduced to 10, with Joanna making
the cut, it was announced on Sun-

WOMAN

day.

“This is such an incredible hon-
our and we are extremely proud”,
said Miss Bahamas Organisation
(MBO) president Michelle Mal-
colm.

“It shows that even though she
did not make the cut at Miss
World, she is still a world class
beauty worthy of recognition.”

Although she did not become a
semi-finalist in that pageant, Joan-
na made her presence felt by plac-
ing fourth in the ‘Beauty with a
Purpose’ competition, and by
becoming a finalist in the ‘Talent’
competition, and a semi-finalist in
the ‘Sportswoman’ competition.

“We came away from the Miss
World pageant on a high, and now
this. Joanna has set the bar very
high for the queens who follow
her,” Ms Malcolm said. Joanna, a
recent high school graduate from
Grand Bahama, is among impres-
sive company on the Global Beau-
ties list.

Others to be named are the
reigning Miss Universe Stefania
Fernandez, the reigning Miss
World Kaiane Aldorino, and sev-
eral finalists from the Grand Slam
pageants.

Bahamians are being urged to
increase Joanna’s chances of fur-
ther advancing in the Global Beau-
ties’ “Sexiest Woman Alive’ com-
petition by voting for her online at
the following link: www.global-
beauties.com/sexiest/2009.

The total number of votes will
count as one judge.











Li a 7


12-5 brats

Shoes i6 today's weather Temper

higes. and fond pitts 's home

Havana *
Highs: 66° F2o°c

Highs: 81" Fyarne ».

BGS set

tee ie



ures ans Socks, 5

« Panama City
=" ‘Highs: Ss1°Ras c |

Vey aed cod seth
eae: ed cae

: 15-25 kant
a WEST PALM BEACH

High Br FAG G
= a

Cape Hatteras.



-
a7 i ‘Sharlotte * Highs: 400 Ff
Highas 37 FSC :
| Atlanta * : *
Hi sen FZ â„¢ = Charleston se
a _ * Highs: 46°REeC
Penescola, * Savannah ss Mee
Highs: 46h7C | Highs: 46°F * = eS
: â„¢ ~ a, The
“a0 Daytona Beach! at
me * Highs: 50°F /OPE *
Tampa . Freeport: ~~**~
Higha: 52° FA 1.5, oem, SOHe'c
NM Lainad
25 High: BrRire a ee

Pa

Dominge
Highs: 84° R/29°C

Aruba Cured

San Juan
«Hate: ae° rae

7

High: &" Fre" ic
Pee

a 2

al

24,

didid

a4 4 &

=

= aa ee

| a ae ee &

fh ey eh

ee ee ee ee ee ee

a

aHRrE eR RRR REED ©

kee bet eH eH
eee a

» Antigua
eae SS" Fac

Barbados
Highs: 26°F

* Trinidad
_ Tokeago







“Highs: 86° r1 oc

By

a aa a High 1 a3 &
55 4f a! d Lowe FALE
vnesen GREAT INAGUA
eee ee & “
Se ee Ae he ler HI" TFG ih
ih ty ey lh ty ty .
act c oe =o 4 <>
_ ae ee ro i, - a,
ah eh “a y
~~ 16-28 kets 12-25 kate
ce ae
eee METER TEMPS



































| High Hii) ove i
- apes ae 1 > yaaa Paflacd Wek Pac on Le . J Toot 1 ara * es
= of a vs
Sie ane bor Pics Legs 7 po. pede Thercky 351 am 1
A ee z EE TH pe is
ity] ‘, i ct RE Friiey 1-5 am 11
i a Rental fag dz

25-35 inarts

20-35 knots

Shonen i today" &
Bide Tenperehure:
* are today s highs and
inmighits hoes

Soe
at
Low: 55°

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

UU se ny





many baidy of lr

a: ice en eee
High: 4"
Low: 52"









an: Ger Hi “gh: Ta

Ligwy: So

Tipes FOR Massa




Aci low





7
TL yitiary oa

c
aa eli p
1 te dome wane
Morel ca ip dite .



AccuWeather.com
ELEUTHERA Pe aed Sie fed be
(Miph- fer Ftc Accu Meanther, Inc. (2D TE



Sige TS aS ic
PP itecsr rise

*. A wr
<1 >
“
5-30 knot
BAY AUG LANA,

Higt: TT" Fras"
Low: 58° Fe" &





= .
RAGGED SLAM = Lrrserrns"c















oe

aa

ELEUIHERA
FREEPGAT
GHERT EXUA

ar ard eel op bed ee lags agl d o bae
"

GSEET Ge

LOWE LAND

EEEEEEE,
F
1







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

remember the smart choice is
Insurance Wlanagpement.
Slain people you cau tous.

INSURANCE

CRABLAMLAS) LIMIT HE. INS TRANCE BDORERS & AEM IS

(EL) sues

renee a Tek (RE) SAPD | Tek (EEE) KDE | Dek (42) 34-2
THE TRIBUNE

nN
, Me MM TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2010



A Bahamian
woman ona
special mission



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



LISA Gardiner is not your
typical Bahamian woman.
\ While others are striving to
\ make it in the corporate
world, getting married and
buying a house, 39-year-old
Lisa has chosen to follow a
very different path - that of
Christian missionary work in

a foreign country.

Lisa told Tribune Woman that it was
during a nighttime church service that
she felt God was “tugging” on her heart
“to reach tribal people.”

She was sitting among a small congre-
gation at Blue Hill Gospel Chapel watch-
ing a video on the efforts of a small
organisation called New Tribes Missions
which recruits Christians who want to
do missionary work in foreign countries.

Lisa said she went home that night
with a lot on her mind. She was a young
professional who had been working as a
lab technician for most of her adult life.
She wasn’t yet married, and understood
that leaving the Bahamas to do mission-
ary work abroad would cancel out all of
the plans she had made so far for her
life.

Weighing all the pros and cons, Lisa
finally decided that getting involved in
local ministry at her church was the bet-
ter alternative.

“T thought about the cost, what it takes
to be a missionary and started to doubt
for a couple of days,” she said.

“So I thought that if I just got involved
in ministry, that that would take the
place of going on the mission field.”

And that’s the path she followed for
eight years, involving herself in the
Awana programme and other youth pro-
grammes at her church.

“But I soon felt a void that was so
heavy, like something was missing,” she
said, “When it got so strong and heavy I
had to put it before the Lord.”

“Then the devil brought negative
things to my mind like, ‘missionaries are
nuns, and you’re going to have to be sin-
gle for the rest of your life, you'll have to
leave a secure job, family and friends,
and the Bahamas, your homeland,” she
said.

At this point in her life, Lisa even con-
sidered making a career change to feel
more fulfilled.

“Before I left my career, I prayed
about it and just when I did that, the
Lord brought back (the video) fresh in
my mind.”

“But God said, “you know Lisa, what’s
better, doing this career change that
you're not sure of, or going to do what
I’m telling you to do right now, which
was leaving Nassau to reach tribal peo-
ple?’

“When I said yes, the void was filled
and there weren’t any more questions
or doubts,” she said. “I sent away for
new information, and they sent me a
new application and the ball got rolling
for entering training at New Tribes Mis-
sion.”

Still, there were other setbacks that
required a “step of faith”, she said.

Still, Lisa was optimistic about her
newly chosen path in life. And few
months later she was packing her bags to
make her big move across the globe, to
Thailand.

“When I went, I only had a certain
amount of money in my hand. I was like,
‘Lord, this is going to take me for only a
few months, but it’s up to you to provide
for me in the next months’.”

That was 16 years ago.

Lisa
Gardiner



Since then Lisa said she has had a very
rewarding experience working as a mis-
sionary in Thailand.

Living in Thailand, she said, has given
her a greater appreciation for home, and
a cross-cultural experience that she has
shared with people at home.

She is now one of only a handful of
Bahamian missionaries working abroad.

For the past year Lisa has been back in
the Bahamas, on temporary leave.

But tomorrow the soft-spoken mis-
sionary is returning to Chiang Kham in
the Thai region of Phayao to continue
with her work.

Perhaps the biggest obstacle she’s had
to overcome was the language barrier.

As a missionary, she’s had to share
the gospel of Jesus Christ with the Thai
people, teach them the Bible, and help
them found churches.

Learning the Thai language required
her to study rigorously.

Thai has four regional dialects, Central
Thai, Northeastern Thai (Isan or Lao),
Northern Thai (Kam Muang or Lanna),
and Southern Thai (Paktai).

Every dialect has its own peculiari-
ties.

Lisa is now about 85 to 90 per cent
fluent in Thai, but “there’s a lot more I
need to learn,” she said.

Thai is a tonal language, with five dif-
ferent tones. Each sentence in Thai ends
with a ‘ka’ or ‘kap’ depending on the
speaker’s gender.

For instance, to say ‘hi’ or ‘bye’, the
women say “Sawadika,” and the men
say “Sawadikap.”

“As I studied and talked to the Thai
people, they would say, ‘oh, you speak
Thai really well.’”

Lisa said this was very encouraging
for her because she was toiling day and
night to learn the native tongue.

Cooking Thai food also took a while
to learn, but Lisa said she has grown to
love it.

“It’s spicy, so good, and it’s very cheap.
When I tried the different types of food
I was like ‘oh, I can try this, I can try
that’.”

Steamed wasp larvae, python snake
worms, and deep fried caterpillars have
all been a part of her diet while living in
Thailand.

“The python snake has the texture of
conch, and doesn't have much flavour
so you must add seasonings to make it
tasty. After it is killed, the poison is
removed, and I wasn't afraid because I
wanted to try it,” she said.

She describes the steamed wasp larvae
as having “a nutty flavour that I won’t
eat again.”

As for the deep fried caterpillars, Lisa
said they are something you have to
acquire a taste for.

“When you bite into it, you can taste a
pocket of air and a little mush that I
don’t like,” she said.

Lisa is more familiar with eating the
more popular native dish of Pa Thai,
which is fried noodles, and you can have
it with chicken, shrimp or pork, scram-
bled eggs, green onions, and sauce.

During the week, she will have a Thai
meal for lunch, and have something
Western for dinner.

“T want the best of both worlds, you
know,” she said.

Buying food hasn’t put a huge dent
in her budget. She said a Thai dollar can
easily feed her, and other essentials that
she needs are affordable as well.

“T may not have all of the normal
things that I would have as a woman
over here,” she said, “but I’m living with
what I have and I’m adapting to what is
there and making it my home.”

While she’s had to give up some luxu-
ries in life and adapt to a whole new cul-
ture, Lisa said her move to Thailand is “a
lifetime commitment”.

It is one that she doesn’t regret.

Discover the goodness
of Ovaitine.

Ovaltine's unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759







xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E9ARP51KS_MRSNXN INGEST_TIME 2011-07-26T20:43:13Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01561
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES