Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
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Volume: 106 No.131



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



PLP operatives are allegedly
continuing a vicious smear cam-
paign against one of their own
colleagues, The Tribune has
uncovered.

Having recently resigned from
her post as vice-chairman in the
Progressive Liberal Party, Melis-
sa Sears has become the focus of
repeated attacks by PLPs on the
Internet and in the political
sphere.

In their messages, some party
supporters have sought to sully
the former vice-chairman’s rep-

utation and have gone as far as to cast a cloud
of suspicion over her friendship with a sitting

FNM Cabinet Minister.

Yesterday, a source close to Ms Sears actu-
ally distanced himself from the party’s official
messaging on the issue, claiming he did not
want his planned statement on the matter to
be associated with what “the rest of the par-

ty” was seeking to do.

Ms Sears, he said, will make any statement

Pim blowin’ it

82F
71F



. Lhe Tribune



ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



PARTLY CLOUDY

PLPS Did
(0 Sm
eXx-chiet

Repeated attacks on Melissa
Sears following resignation

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

USA TODAY.

4,920

CaP ae
SAMMI



Available at
The Paint Depot

Mt. Royal Ave. Tel:326-1875

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Amid speculation that thousands of Chinese
labourers are expected in the Bahamas for the
newly-sealed Baha Mar investment deal, Jian



INVESTORS in the Baha Mar project on
Cable Beach have submitted applications for
almost 5,000 foreign workers, an official at the

Tan, chief of the commercial section at the Chi-

governments.

MELISSA SEARS





Ms Sears’
informed that a current PLP Member of Par-

she feels is necessary if and when
the time comes.

In the meantime, however, the
vice-chairwoman’s resignation is
continuing to be used as a political
football among two of the most
prominent warring camps within
the party.

The attacks against Ms Sears
has left some within the organi-
sation to question the amount of
damage this issue will ultimately
inflict upon the party.

It has also left others calling
for a shift in the messaging of the
PLP and a “much needed
change” in the way “sensitive
matters are handled.”

As it relates to the attacks on
name The Tribune was reliably

liament was the actual genesis of those

reports.

In fact, we were made aware yesterday
that an operative within the party was suc-
cessful in transmitting a lurid text message to
the Cabinet Minister’s cellular phone seeking

SEE page 15

STUTTERING

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AN INVESTIGA-
TION has been launched
into the claims of patient
neglect and mistreatment
at Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre.

The allegations, which
were made by a former
Sandilands Rehabilitation



to our attention an inves-

Centre (SRC) patient and
published in The Tribune
yesterday, have not been
confirmed by the institu-
tion, but management
instead expressed a will-
ingness to investigate
these claims.

Hospital Administrator
Catherine Weech said:
“As a result of the infor-
mation he is now bringing

tigation will now be con-
ducted.”

The former patient
described his stay at the
SRC as a horrifying real-
ization about the treat-
ment of patients at the
institution. He claimed
that some attending staff

Chinese Embassy told The Tribune exclusively
yesterday.

nese Embassy in Nassau, said investors have sub-
mitted their plans to the Bahamian and Chinese

SEE page 19





Felipé Major/Tribune staff



SEE page 14







te oe

a

CHICKEN

SANDWICH





BPA wants NIB to reopen
drug plan negotiations

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Pharma-
ceutical Association is
appealing to the National
Insurance Board to consider
reopening National Pre-
scription Drug Plan negoti-
ations after NIB director
Algernon Cargill abruptly
ended all talks by way of a
public announcement on
Sunday.

Mr Cargill told the press
he had not heard from the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association (BPA) for six
weeks, but the organisation
that represents about 90 per
cent of the country’s private
pharmaceutical companies,
in a statement released yes-
terday, claimed any delays in
their negotiations were
brought on by the National
Insurance Board (NIB).

SEE page 14



Two charged in
connection with
gay club fight

TWO women appeared in
court yesterday in connection
with a fight that broke out at a
gay night club.

Janiqua Russell, 20, and
Lacey Knowles, 19, were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane, yesterday.

It is alleged that on Sun-
day, April 25, Russell and
Knowles while being con-
cerned together caused griev-
ous harm to Angela New-
church.

According to police Ms
Newchurch was reportedly
stabbed after a fight broke
out among female patrons at
The Garage nightclub, on
Gladstone Road. Ms New-
church was treated in hospital
and discharged.

Russell, of Pinewood Gar-
dens, and Knowles, of Wind-
sor Estates, pleaded not guilty

SEE page 19

LACEY KNOWLES and Janiqua
Russell appeared in court
yesterday.

Opposition questions aspects of
environmental protection legislation

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



WHILE praising aspects of the Conservation and Control of
Forests Bill as a key piece of legislation in protecting the envi-
ronment, Opposition members yesterday questioned if aspects
of the Bill violated the constitution and criticised government for
not consulting with affected communities and landowners before

bringing the Bill to Parliament.

The legislation would create areas of forest reserves, protected
forests and conservation forests throughout the entire Bahamas on
portions of private, commonage and Crown land. Under the Bill,

SEE page 15



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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MORE THAN 40 MOTORISTS DEMONSTRATE THEIR FRUSTRATION ON BAILLOU HILL ROAD



anger by &
one-way

system

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MORE than 40 motorists
were involved in a demonstra-
tion against the new one-way
system on Baillou Hill Road
and Market Street yesterday.

Dissatisfied business owners
and residents drove two laps
around the one-way loop,
demonstrating their frustration



















with the new system during ear-
ly morning traffic from 7am
until around 8.30am, ending at
the Super Value foodstore on
Baillou Hill Road.

Organised by the newly
formed Coconut Grove Busi-
ness League, the action fol-
lowed a town meeting held to
discuss the new road system on
Tuesday night.

Athama Bowe, member of







MOTERCADE on Baillou Hill Road.
PHOTO: Felipé Major/Tribune staff





the league and attendant at the
town meeting, said: “It’s impor-
tant for the government to
appreciate that the citizens
expect them to not only hear
but listen, and to respect what

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their submissions are — not to
just instinctively respond as if its
business as usual.

into a major highway ... It’s a
fundamental nightmare.”

Minister of Transport and
Works Neko Grant said he felt
the majority of the concerns
about the road changes were
due to the disruption caused by
ongoing construction — and in
some cases, resistance to
change.

He said it is important for
Bahamians to consider that the
government is not merely
paving roads but reconstruct-
ing them, and that the improve-
ments will also enhance utili-

Nightmare

“Last night you got the
approach that ‘We hear you but
we’re still going do what we’re
gonna do.’ Culturally and
socially Market Street was
nothing but a side corner, and
now they’ve put in speeding
lanes. You walk out of your
front shop door and straight



ties and telecommunications
services.

Mr Grant said the one way
system is based on years of
planning and research into how
traffic congestion in New Prov-
idence can be alleviated.

He said there were numer-
ous suggestions made at the
meeting that the government
plans to act on, such as adding
more signs indicating school
zones and pedestrian crossings;
making lane markings more
clear and raising the height of
roadside utility wires.















T-SHIRTS were made up for the
store owners in the area.

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major
/Tribune staff

Unite) [e718
eas eles
STH TE



OWNER OF ESSO Baillou Hill Road Mr Heastie| ie speaks out to the press yes-
terday morning.



PHONE: 322-2157

POLICE

| OFFICERS
stop the
motorcade
yesterday
morning to
ensure

| certain
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Preliminary
results name
Nicole Martin as
union president

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

OFFICIAL results of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering
and Allied Workers Union
elections have yet to be
released by the Depart-
ment of Labour.

Preliminary results
polling stations in New
Providence named ‘A
Team’ candidate Nicole
Martin as the new presi-
dent of the largest union in
the Bahamas.

Third

If the result stands, it will
be the third time she has
secured this position in
under a year, after a Court
of Appeal ruling voided
two previous wins.

Her opponent, Worker’s
Coalition candidate Lionel
Morley, congratulated Ms
Martin on her success.

He said: “We do not
intend to challenge it; the
people have decided who
they want and we hope
that she is prepared for the
task at hand.”

Bail granted to
man accused of
committing perjury

A MAN accused of com-
mitting perjury in a murder
trial has been granted bail.

Charles Russell was
charged with perjury last
Friday and pleaded not
guilty to the charge. He
was back before Deputy
Chief Magistrate Carolita
Bethell in Court 8, Bank
Lane for a bail hearing yes-
terday.

Russell, 29, of Pinewood
Gardens, is accused of
committing perjury on
Thursday, April 22.

It is alleged that while a
witness under oath in the
Supreme Court, Russell
gave evidence that he
knew was false, intending
to mislead the jury.

Adjourned

He was granted $7,500
bail with no objection from
the prosecution. The case
was adjourned to July 1.

Russell was a prosecu-
tion witness in the murder
trial of Cohen Light-
bourne, which came to an
abrupt end last Friday
when Justice Vera Watkins
discharged the jury, citing
“unforeseen circum-
stances.”

The decision came after
it was revealed to the judge
that some members of the
jury may have witnessed
the arrest of Russell out-
side the courtroom after
lead prosecutor Franklyn
Williams filed a complaint
with the police, claiming
the witness had perverted
the course of justice.

The judge decided it was
probable that the jury had
seen what happened and
had been compromised.

A retrial will be ordered.

Lightbourne is charged
with the July 25, 2007
shooting death of Carl
Russell, 33, who was killed
at a home in the Pride
Estates subdivision.

General practice clinic
cancelled, says PMH

THE Princess Margaret
Hospital wishes to advise
the public that the general
practice afternoon clinic
scheduled for tomorrow
has been cancelled due to
family medicine examina-
tions.

All persons with
appointments are asked to
contact the clinic for new
appointment dates at tele-
phone number 322-2861,
extension 2161/2201.

PMH apologises for any
inconveniences.



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY: BILL FOR AN ACT 10 PROVIDE FOR CONSERVATION AND CONTROL OF FORESTS

The House debates
legislation ‘to revive
lumber industry’

Proposal to protect forested areas throughout Bahamas

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



MEMBERS of the House
of Assembly yesterday debat-
ed legislation Government
says will provide the founda-
tion to revitalise the lumber
industry while preserving and
protecting forested areas
throughout the Bahamas.

The Bill for an Act to Pro-
vide for the Conservation and
Control of Forests will create
forest reserves, protected
forests and conservation
forests on designated acres of
land — including Crown, pri-
vate and commonage —
throughout the country.

An estimated 3,416,398
acres of land throughout the
Bahamas are part of the des-
ignations of forest categories.

For example in New Provi-
dence — which consists of
52,000 acres — some 1,952
acres of land has been desig-
nated as forest reserves and
7,728 acres for conservation
forests.

Grand Bahama, with
339,200 acres of land, will have
106,427 acres of forest
reserves and 161,372 acres of
conservation forests.

Only two islands, Andros
and Abaco have areas desig-
nated for protected forests —
78,597 and 33,643 acres
respectively.

In addition to conservation
initiatives, the legislation also
aims to facilitate the commer-
cial harvesting of timber, an
industry that has been dor-
mant since 1973 and once pro-
vided more than a thousand
local jobs, said Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux.

He added that the suspen-
sion of commercial harvesting
caused pine tree overcrowd-
ing leading to periodic fires
that destroyed acres of forest
due to a lack of management
of these resources.

Now, he said, "a compre-
hensive, integrated approach
to managing the timber
resources in partnership with
Bahamians is required to nur-
ture this renewable resource.

"This legislation we debate
today is the legal architecture
to provide for the protection

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and wide use of the heritage of
future generations of Bahami-
ans."

Local forests, at one time,
provided the source material
for dyes for fabric, timber for
shipbuilding and flooring,
wood for paper.

They also provide a natural
habitat for crabs, birds, flora
and fauna.

Vital

"These abundant and sus-
tainable timber resources
which are so vital to rainfall,
the water table, fisheries and
the quality of air we breathe
once employed over 1,500
people full-time and support-
ed communities numbering
several thousand," he said.

The legislation provides for
the establishment of a forestry
unit which will include a direc-
tor of forestry and other forest
officers to facilitate the oper-
ations of the unit and exercise
punishment to those found in
violation of the respective
laws.

The director will be respon-
sible for, among other things,
creating a forest management
plan that should be submitted
to the minister of environment
for approval every five years.

Forest reserves will be man-
aged for conservation of nat-
ural forests including provid-

"This legislation
we debate today is
the legal architec-
ture to provide
for the protection
and wide use of
the heritage of
future generations
of Bahamians."

Earl Deveaux

ing for the sustained yield of
timber and other forest prod-
ucts in perpetuity, to provide
for development of forest
resources to include possible
establishment of forestry to
provide for the conservation
of fresh water resources and
the creation of natural ameni-
ties.

An Act of Parliament will
be required to sell or transfer
land deemed as a forest
reserve unless the minister
responsible for forestry grants
a lease for the use of this land
as prescribed in Part V of the
Bill.

Protected forests will have
status "less permanent" than
forest reserves and are likely
to be required for alternative
land use or development, said
Mr Deveaux.

He added that they may be
released "for such purpose on
the assumption that the analy-
sis shows that the alternative
use or development is sound
and yields a better return than
forestry" and is subject to an
Environmental Impact
Assessment.

Conservation forests are
portions of land to be man-
aged in an effort to conserve
biological diversity, specific
flora and fauna, and areas of
scientific interest, scenic beau-
ty and natural resources, said
Mr Deveaux.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Developer is

clearly swimming
against tide of

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Deficit fix painful, inaction’s worse

WASHINGTON — The costs of solving
the federal deficit problem are more than
many people want to pay — higher taxes on
a wide swath of Americans and cuts in bene-
fit programmes that reach into millions of
homes.

But the results of inaction on the steadily
growing debt threat are even more costly:
fundamental damage to the U.S. economy
and a lower standard of living for future gen-
erations.

The warnings from deficit hawks are much
more urgent since the nation's fiscal health
went from bad several years ago to drastically
worse with the financial crisis and recession of
2008 and 2009. Last year, the government
borrowed $1.4 trillion, nearly 40 cents of
every dollar it spent. "The path forward con-
tains many difficult trade-offs and choices,
but postponing those choices and failing to
put the nation's finances on a sustainable
long-run trajectory would ultimately do great
damage to our economy," Federal Reserve
Board Chairman Ben Bernanke told Presi-
dent Barack Obama's 18-member deficit
commission at its first meeting Tuesday.

As Bernanke testified, the stock market
began a precipitous dive after Standard &
Poor's downgraded the debt of Greece to
junk bond status. The Mediterranean country
is mired in a debt crisis that has shaken its
economy and markets.

The United States is a long way from
where Greece is. But U.S. deficits — like last
year's $1.4 trillion — that continue well in
excess of 4 per cent of the nation's total eco-
nomic production are unsustainable, most
major economists say. Such deficits would
push interest rates higher, crowd out private
investment and ultimately erode living stan-
dards. “Substantial deficits projected far into
the future could cause the market to rapidly
lose confidence in the government's credit-
worthiness, producing a spike in interest rates
and fundamentally disrupting economic activ-
ity more broadly," White House budget chief
Peter Orszag said.

With interest payments on the debt grow-
ing without respite, future generations would
have to pay for the lack of corrective action.
That means higher taxes and fewer govern-
ment services — and a potentially weaker
economy.

"We know for a fact, it's irrefutable, that
we're giving the next generation an inferior
standard of living,” said Rep. Paul Ryan, R-
Wis. "We've never done that before in this
country. You know, the legacy of this country
has always been you take on the challenges
before you to make sure that your kids and
grandkids have a better life."

Tuesday's mantra, mostly among Democ-
rats, was that all options should be on the
table, which signalled that politically toxic
tax increases will be under consideration.

"I'm not going to say what's in. I'm not
going to say what's out," said President Oba-
ma, who has promised repeatedly not to raise
taxes on American families with incomes less
than $250,000. "I want this commission to
be free to do its work."

It's a task, though, that won't be easy:
Produce a deficit no bigger than $550 billion
by 2015, an amount equal to about 3 per cent
of the total U.S. economy. That would
require deficit savings in the range of $250 bil-
lion or more in 2015 alone.

Deficits have worsened largely because
of a drop in tax revenues and increasing costs
for safety-net programmes like unemploy-
ment insurance due to the recession. Spi-
raling costs of federal health care pro-
grammes also have been a major contributor.

The problem is too large to be handled
with easy Washington chestnuts like cutting
foreign aid and ending waste, fraud and
abuse, undoing the Wall Street bailout or
rescinding what remains of Obama's $862
billion economic stimulus bill.

"Spending cuts will have to affect pro-
grammes we all care about and benefit from
and revenue increases will have to come from
a wide swath of Americans," Urban Insti-
tute President Robert Reischauer said. "In
other words, raising taxes on the rich or cor-
porations, closing tax loopholes, eliminating
wasteful or low-priority programmes and
prohibiting earmarks simply won't be
enough.”

But summoning the political courage to
propose, say, tax increases for a majority of
Americans or making people work another
year to qualify for Social Security benefits is
far easier said than done.

President Obama is but the latest example.
His February budget was a cautious docu-
ment that punted the tough decisions to his
new bipartisan commission. And the panel's
instructions are to deliver its recommenda-
tions after November's mid-term elections.

"There are few issues on which there is
more vigorous bipartisan agreement than fis-
cal responsibility," said President Obama,
flanked by former Clinton White House
Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles and former
Sen. Alan Simpson, R-Wyo., the two men
he asked to head the panel. "But in practice,
this responsibility for the future is often over-
whelmed by the politics of the moment."

(This article was written by Andrew Taylor,
Associated Press Writer).



Pirst Maptist Church

| a Seca)
- . ° a hd
Christ le Seen More
Clearly When We Remain In
The Background.”

SUNDAY SEAVICES F ag
72am, §:00am, 11:15am me

public approval

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Last night (April 14) the
community of Coral Har-
bour attended a Town
Meeting called by members
of the Town Planning Board
and a developer named
Tony Joudi.

Mr Michael Major from
Town Planning introduced
Mr Joudi who addressed the
community for the second
time in a public meeting
about his intentions for “his”
ongoing development of
Coral Harbour. He
announced that he believed
it was Divine Guidance that
brought him to Coral Har-
bour from his native country
of Lebanon and he had a
verbal approval of Town
Planning for his plans. As in
his first appearance before
the residents of Coral Har-
bour, Mr Joudi offered that
his appearance was a mere
“courtesy” to hear what the
feelings were toward his
intentions of destroying the
two northern walls of the
over fifty-year landmark
roundabout at the entrance
of the community. There
were over a hundred people
from all walks of life who
attended last night’s meet-
ing, spilling out into the
parking lot of the commu-
nity church next to the
Humminway Plaza. Emo-
tions again ran high when
our Member of Parliament,
Mr Kendall Wright
expressed disappointment
that he had not been invited
by either Town Planning or
the developer to this public
meeting. Mr Wright reiter-
ated that in the first meeting
the residents of the area had
already expressed their will
to have the landmark pro-
tected. The Tribune in past
weeks has also taken inter-
est and articled the resis-
tance to the destruction. As
emotions and rhetoric
became more intense Mr
Major announced over the
public address system “this
is why we usually don’t
invite politicians”! The
attendees were outraged
that our Representative was
spoken to in this manner.

The Board and develop-
er were asked if there had
been any “market feasibility
study, environmental impact
study or traffic flow impact

Ll i il

BOBCAT'S

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



studies conducted in this
consideration? Mr Major
responded in the negative
to all.

This resident then asked
Mr Joudi “if he recollected
his announcement at the
first Town Meeting where
he declared “that if he did
not have 100 per cent sup-
port for his plans he would
pack his bags and leave”!
“Why then, after hearing
first hand that a majority of
residents have voiced and
petitioned an objection to
Town Planning, that he
totally disregards residents
wishes and continues with
his plans regardless”?

A vote was asked of the
attendees last night and 95
per cent of their hands were
raised in objection to both
his planned destruction of
the walls and his intent to
build a seven screen cinema,
gas station, and 62,000 sq ft
complex on the northeast
corner of the roundabout.

Mr Joudi then announced
publicly that “the walls will
stay!” He received a loud
applause and thanks from
the public.

A member of the audi-
ence then introduced him-
self as a resident of Coral
Harbour whose profession
was a hydrologist for the
Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration.

He expressed sincere con-
cerns that a gas station
would violate the well being
of the well fields that cover a
vast expanse of the area
under development. He also
addressed the shared con-
cerns that the development
is also threatening the
drainage of the whole area
and further studies should
be implemented by the
authorities responsible.

Another member took the
microphone expressing that
he had applied for a gas sta-
tion approval some time ago
but was refused on two
grounds: “That a station
would threaten the well
being of the well fields and
secondly that the Govern-
ment moratorium on gas
station approvals was in

place.” The gentleman then
asked Mr Major “if indeed
that moratorium was still in
place why was a new station
being considered for this
developer?” Mr Major con-
firmed the Government
moratorium was still in
effect. An audience mem-
ber asked: If the residents
would be able to see a ren-
dering of the proposed
development and would be
given voice to the approval
process? Both the Board
and developer acknowl-
edged this could be brought
forth.

Mr Joudi told of his inten-
tions of stringent building
codes for the area to protect
the well fields and then
added, to everyone’s disbe-
lief, that his considerations
for removing the walls
would indeed be still in play!
His previous public declara-
tion and word yet again
appeared to be worthless?

The small community of
Coral Harbour, comprising
of just regular hard working
people, is sending a clear
message to their fellow
Bahamians, that before
developers come marching
into your neighbourhood,
the community should be
consulted and involved in
any plans for their growth.
There need not be “behind
closed doors” consideration
and approvals to any
destruction of their sur-
roundings and environmen-
tal impact without the prior
approval of the neighbour-
hood concerned.

This developer is clearly
swimming against the tide
of public approval. With last
night’s vote, if anything hap-
pens to our surroundings,
without our prior consent,
we will know full well some-
thing in the system has a
foul odour and total disre-
gard of a community’s wish-
es. Mr Joudi might well
learn that a better plan
would be to sway a commu-
nity’s support, listen to their
needs, and then reap suffi-
cient reward with the resi-
dents now patronising his
investments.

CAPT P HARDING

A Bahamian,

Coral Harbour resident,
Nassau,

April 15, 2010.

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THETRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 5

COB accused of faculty ‘witch-hunt’

LESS than a week after commencing, talks
between the College of the Bahamas and the
unions representing faculty are once again
strained — with the union accusing the adminis-
tration of underhanded tactics.

In a statement issued yesterday, the Union of
Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas (UTEB) said
that while its negotiators are taking part in the
talks in good faith, the union is “seriously trou-
bled by the acts of harassment, intimidation, and
victimisation perpetrated by college officials
against members of the college community,
including students in the process of taking exam-
inations.”

The union said that many of its members —
some of whom took part in last week’s strike
and some of whom did not — have reported pay
cuts of between $400 and $700 in their salary
cheques this month. The statement said faculty
were told in an April 16 letter that their would
only be paid if they had informed their deans or
VPs that they were carrying out their “normal
duties and continue to do so”.

It was also indicated that faculty who do not
communicate with the administration will be
assumed to be on strike until the union informs
the college in writing that it has ended the strike,
the statement claimed.

The union said it calls into question “the legal-
ity of the college’s action to target innocent fac-
ulty members when it is aware that their request
to faculty and these latest actions are not only a
clear violation and in direct contravention of the
laws of this country, particularly the Employ-
ment Act of 2001 and Section 45 of the Industri-
al Relations Act, but they also go against current
practices in place for faculty at the college.”

The union said it is also concerned and trou-

bled by reports from students that they are being
harassed and intimidated by college administra-
tors purportedly carrying out “investigations”
into exam irregularities — including exams admin-
istered by the union’s president, Jennifer Isaacs-
Dotson.

In addition, UTEB claimed, a staff member
from the School of Education was called into a
meeting with three senior administrators and
“interrogated” about matters relating to Ms
Isaacs-Dotson’s examinations.

“Once again, the union is disturbed by the
administrators’ actions, particularly when, in the
process of their ‘investigations’, they neglected to
make contact with Dr Beulah Farquharson, the
chair of the School of Education, to make their
concerns about Ms Isaacs-Dotson’s exams
known,” the statement said.

“In light of the college’s public statements
throughout its dispute with the union that that
there were no problems or irregularities with the
invigilation of exams, the union now questions
these ‘investigations’ and sees the administra-
tion’s recent targeting of staff and students con-
nected to the union president as a witch-hunt.
The union asks the college to cease its acts of per-
secution.”

UTEB said it sees these “peripheral discrimi-
natory acts” following the strike as a distraction
intended to frustrate and delay the negotiations
for a new faculty contract, while deflecting atten-
tion from the union’s repeated calls for a foren-
sic audit of the college’s finances.

“Therefore,” the statement said, “UTEB asks
the public to join us in its call, in the name of
transparency, for a forensic audit of the college
and for the college to put an end to this body of
divisive acts.”

Reha daca Nassau trip





BAHAMIAN individuals and
companies banded together to help
make special memories for a fam-
ily coping with a life-threatening
illness. Facing terminal cancer,
Gaylene Smith’s greatest wish was
to spend time with her family in
the Bahamas, where she had spent
her honeymoon two decades ear-
lier with husband Randy. Through
a huge cooperative effort, her wish
came true. The Minnesota family





Derek Smith/BI$





vacationed in Nassau for four
nights in April.

The Sheraton Nassau Beach
Resort provided them with a com-
plimentary stay at the resort. The
complimentary package included
limo service from and back to the
airport, all meals and a dinner
cruise. Meanwhile, Atlantis Resort
also hosted the family to a day of
water activities, and the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation presented
Mrs Smith with authentically
Bahamian gifts as souvenirs of her
days in the sun with her family.

Hyacinth Pratt, permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation, presented the gifts
to the family.

STRUCKUM



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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
Alowe@tribunemedia. net

BEIJING, China — Requests
for visas for travel to the
Bahamas by Chinese people
have been increasing over the
last two years, with this year see-
ing a visit by 600 tourists in one
group alone, according to the
Bahamas’ Ambassador to Chi-
na.

In an interview at the
Bahamas’ Beijing Embassy, first
resident Bahamian Ambassador
to China Elma Campbell noted
that while that trip by the 600-
member group was unusual,
based on evidence so far, she
anticipates a continued “gradual
increase” in the number of appli-
cations for visas for recreational
visits to the Bahamas.

The recently opened consular
section at the Embassy in Bei-
jing has resulted in the waiting
time for Bahamian visas for peo-
ple in the Asian region to
decrease to less than a week.

Previously, all visa applica-
tions from those in the Asian
region for the Bahamas had to be

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—_—
IN THIS PHOTO taken Tuesday, April 27, 2010, fireworks explode over the site of World Expo during a
rehearsal for the opening ceremony in Shanghai, China. The Bahamas Embassy has, in conjunction
with the Ministry of Tourism, taken part in expos and trade shows in China. (AP)

made via the United Kingdom’s
diplomatic mission in Beijing,
and forwarded to the Bahamas
for processing, before being sent
back to China.

This long and involved
process led to complaints from
tourist and business executives,
and promises of less red tape
from the Bahamian government.

“T’m very proud and happy
to say that the consular section is
very efficient,” said Ambassador
Campbell.

Sheila Carey, Deputy Chief
of Mission at the Embassy, said
that during the second half of
2008, about 80 visas were
processed, in 2009 this jumped
to between four and five hun-
dred, and for the first four
months of 2010 that figure has
increased to almost 800.

Ambassador Campbell not-
ed the 600-strong group of
tourists, which included Chinese
people of Taiwanese, Shanghai
and Mongolian origin — who
added a trip to Atlantis to their
itinerary in March 2010 after
attending a conference in the US
—was not the norm.

Visa requests from individual
tourists, she said, are in general
“the minority” of all the applica-
tions the Embassy receives at
present.

More commonly visa requests
come from Chinese government
departments sending officials to
the Bahamas, such as those who
visited last year as part of two
high-level delegations.

One delegation was led by
Hui Luangyu, Vice Premier of
the State Council of the People's
Republic of China, in February
2009, and Chairman Wu Bang-
guo, Chairman of the Standing
Committee of the National Peo-
ple's Congress, led a second one
in September 2009.

Along with those applications
came many more from the gov-
ernment on behalf of Chinese
labourers and technicians who
were sent to the Bahamas to help
with the construction of the
national stadium presently being
built by the Chinese as a gift to
the Bahamas.

Visas were also applied for
and granted to officials travel-
ling to engage in discussions with

respect to the financing and con-
struction contracts that have now
been signed between two Chi-
nese entities — the China State
Export-Import Bank and the
China State Construction Com-
pany — and the Baha Mar
Resorts Ltd to build the Cable
Beach resort.

These visits, as the Bahamas
and Chinese governments have
noted, exemplify the “growing”
relationship between the
Bahamas and China over the last
few years in particular.

According to Ambassador
Campbell, no visa applications
have yet been made for con-
struction workers for the Baha
Mar project.

Consular services have been
the primary focus of the
Embassy’s attentions since it
opened in July 2008, but it has
also made sure it plays its part
to promote the Bahamas as a
tourist destination.

The Embassy also forwards
enquiries related to business and
investment interests to the rele-
vant authorities in the Bahamas.

On the tourism front, the
Embassy has, in conjunction with
the Ministry of Tourism, taken
part in expos and trade shows in
China, promoting the Bahamas
as a vacation destination.

The Embassy staff, which
includes four Bahamians and two
local Chinese employees, has
also participated in seminars
organised by Continental Air-
lines in which diplomatic officers
were able to engage with those
business persons who are at the
forefront of selling vacations to
the local population in China.

“In those we can talk to Chi-

nese travel agents about travel-
ling to the Bahamas and the ease
of going to the Bahamas, so
we’ve been doing that kind of
thing as well to make sure the
Bahamas’ name gets out there,”
said Deputy Chief of Mission Ms
Carey.

Tt was thanks to a 2005 Mem-
orandum of Understanding
signed between the Chinese gov-
ernment and the Bahamas that
the Bahamas was granted the
globally much-sought after sta-
tus of “approved destination” for
Chinese tourists, with Bahami-
an vacations then made available
for sale by Chinese travel agents.

Bahamian government offi-
cials touted the opening of the
Embassy in China as a step
towards the Bahamas being able
to tap into the growing Chinese
outbound tourism market, which
the World Tourism Organisation
has projected will grow to
become the third largest global-
ly by 2020, as more Chinese peo-
ple achieve middle class status
and have disposable income for
recreation.

Ms Carey said the opening of
the Embassy in Beijing certainly
helped to better position the
Bahamas to reap the benefits of
that 2005 Memorandum of
Understanding. However, anec-
dotal evidence meanwhile sug-
gests that the Bahamas remains
an unlikely destination for Chi-
nese visitors. In interviews with
The Tribune, a number of Chi-
nese people said that while they
are sure the Bahamas is beauti-
ful, they think it may be too far
away and too expensive for their
holiday choice compared with
other, nearer Asian destinations.

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THE TRIBUNE






By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BEIJING, China - The Tri-
bune is represented in China
among a group of 100 journalists
from 47 countries who have
been invited by the Chinese gov-
ernment to view first-hand what
the growing world power is tout-
ing as a “grand exposition for
the whole of mankind” - the
Shanghai World Expo 2010.

In total, over 13,000 reporters
are expected to cover the event
throughout its six-month dura-
tion, but The Tribune was one
of a select few invited to travel
courtesy of the Chinese govern-
ment via its Embassy in Nassau
to attend the grand opening on
May 1, along with numerous
world leaders and thousands of
other invited guests.

Unlike trade expositions or
“expos, which are specifically
organised to promote commer-
cial interests, world expos are
largely non-commercial.

Regarded as the “Olympic
games of the economy, science
and technology”, countries have
come together to participate in
these international expos over
the last 150 years to promote an
exchange of their ideas, cultures
and their achievements in these
various fields.

While world expos have a
long established history, Shang-
hai Expo 2010 is the first to take
place in a developing country - a
fact China does not want any-
one to miss - and is promised to
break previous expo size and
attendance records.

While its profile outside of the
country may not yet be signifi-
cant, the Shanghai Expo is a
huge deal in China - more mon-

ole. Vi eS

Tribune in China for
Shanghai World Expo



ey was reportedly spent on it
than on the Beijing Olympics -
and it is being seen as an oppor-
tunity both for greater linkages
between countries globally and
for China to enhance its status in
the eyes of its people and the
world.

China won the bidding for the
2010 expo in 2002, and has
undertaken massive infrastruc-
tural developments, including
new metro lines, railways and
more, to facilitate the event.

Under the finely-developed
theme, “Better City, Better
Life”, the expo is touted by Chi-
na as “a grand meeting to dis-
cuss city life in the new century.”

Despite the financial chal-
lenges of the global economic
recession, many of the countries
taking part have spent tens of
millions of dollars constructing
elaborate and permanent “pavil-
ions” - previews of which indi-
cate they will be mind boggling
in their size, design and concep-
tual detail.

Through these physical struc-
tures, along with daily “gala
shows, ethnic displays, interac-
tive moments, gourmet events
and culture parades”, the expo
will create the opportunity for
participating countries to show-
case their take on the overall
theme, gaining massive exposure

at ul Pay ?
VISITORS WALK outside China Pavilion at the World Expo si
Near the centre of Shanghai's World Expo grounds stands the crimson, crown-shaped China Pavilion. (AP)

in the process.

The Bahamas will be repre-
sented on a small scale along
with 192 other countries and 50
international organisations at the
expo, participating under the
joint CARICOM pavilion with
other Caribbean nations.

Alongside country-specific
pavilions, visitors can explore
five other themed pavilions - the
Urbanian Pavilion, the Pavilion
of City Being, the Pavilion of
Urban Planet, the Pavilion of
Urban Civilisation and the Pavil-
ion of Fortune.

Each, through elaborately
designed structures and displays,
explores sub-themes such as life
within cities, the impact of urban
life on the earth and prospects
for future city living.

The pavilions have been con-
structed within a 5.28 square
kilometre area running on both
sides of the Huangpu river in
Shanghai.

An Urban Best Practices
Area will allow for participants
to exemplify best practices in
cities in four aspects: Liveable
cities, sustainable urbanisation,
protection and utilisation of his-
toric heritage and technological
innovation in the built environ-
ment. See The Tribune over the
next week and a half for more on
the Shanghai Expo.

> ae
Y VONPLE Y CIty

Thursday April 29th through Saturday May 8th

Tel. 323-2900
Monday - Saturday 10:30am - 5:30pm
Bay Street (two doors east of Victoria Ave)



ite on the trial day in Shanghai, China on Friday.



THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 7

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Workable solutions needed for

BY LARRY SMITH

G G I GET upset every

Earth Day," says

Laura Huggins, a

political scientist at

the Hoover Institution in Cali-

fornia who describes herself as

a free market environmentalist.

"I get upset because of all those

catastrophic claims that have

been made about the environ-
ment for the past 40 years."

What "outrageous" claims is
she referring to? The link
between industrial pollutants
and cancer made by Rachel
Carson; the suggestions by Paul
Ehrlich that population growth
poses major problems for
humanity; and the idea that we
are plundering the planet at a
pace which will outstrip its
capacity to support life, to
name a few.

Huggins was speaking at a
public meeting last week
organised by the Nassau Insti-
tute, which advocates libertar-
ian free market policies for the
Bahamas. She is a director of
the Property and Environment
Research Centre in Montana,
and the author of books and
articles that promote market
principles to help solve envi-
ronmental dilemmas.

"Are resources really
finite?" she asked. "That
depends on how you look at it,
because our ultimate resource
is the mind. Every generation
has underestimated the poten-
tial for finding new recipes and
ideas. The sky is not falling,
and the end of the world is no
closer today than it was in
1970."

But that too depends on
how you look at it. Before the
first Earth Day in the United
States — April 22 1970 — small
groups of people around the
country were battling massive
environmental degradation.
Things were bad and, in some
cases, they were spectacularly
bad, and getting worse.

In the US especially, the
decades following World War
II were a period of unprece-
dented economic development,
accompanied by big environ-
mental changes. Lakes were
being poisoned, rivers were
catching fire, the Grand
Canyon was about to be
dammed and flooded, and a big
chunk of the Everglades was
being paved over for a jetport.



‘What we want are workable solutions to
the very real challenges that we face, whether
they involve private or public sector

approaches.’



Earth Day mobilised these
disparate groups of citizens into
a widespread popular move-
ment that was able to persuade
politicians to take action. The
US Congress passed aggressive
legislation to curb air and water
pollution, and to change the
way government and business
treated the environment.

Those reforms grew out of
the first Earth Day, and in the
years since then trillions of dol-
lars have been spent different-
ly than they would have if this
new regulatory framework did
not exist. And environmental
impact assessments became the
standard tool around the world
to evaluate the impacts of
development.

But Huggins is a free mar-
ket environmentalist, so she
does not accept these outcomes
uncritically: "At what cost are
things improving as a result of
regulation?" she asked, before
concluding that "red tape won't
fix green problems."

Incentives

So what's the alternative?
Well, Huggins says incentives
and property rights are the
answer. And she gave a few
examples. In the US, a group
called Defenders of Wildlife
has been compensating ranch-
ers for livestock losses due to
wolves and grizzly bears. The
goal is to share the economic
responsibility for preserving
these endangered animals.

Some green groups — like
The Nature Conservancy —
have been actively buying up
private land in order to pre-
serve special wilderness areas.
And some commercial fisheries
have benefited from rights-
based management, which
gives exclusive catch shares to
fishermen that can be bought

and sold. There are more than
a hundred such programmes
around the world, but Huggins
cited the case of the Alaska
halibut fishery, which had been
reduced to a 48-hour season by
the mid-1990s. At that point,
the authorities allocated catch
shares to individual fishermen,
based on scientific estimates of
the sustainable fish catch. And
the results were striking.

The halibut season eventu-
ally stretched to nine months,
meaning that fish hit the mar-
ket in smaller numbers, but
over a sustained period. This
meant that the per-pound price
of halibut increased and con-
sumers enjoyed better access
to year-round fresh fish.
According to some proponents,
rights-based management can
halt and reverse fishery col-
lapse.

But implementing such a
system in the Bahamas would
not be not easy, as you can
imagine. How would rights be
allocated? Could shares be
consolidated, sold or traded?
And how would fish popula-
tions, and catches, be moni-
tored? It is unclear whether
this approach would ever be
feasible here, where enforce-
ment of any rule is almost
impossible. That is not to say
the current approach is neces-
sarily better. Our conch, lob-
ster and reef fisheries are under
heavy commercial pressure, yet
we continue to underwrite the
fisheries sector with subsidies
(boats, engines and equipment
are duty-free), by paying the
costs of fisheries management,
and through depletion of capi-
tal (read over-exploitation of
fish stocks). This means that
while the benefits of fishing
accrue to a few, the costs of
over-exploitation are shared by

SEE page nine

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 9



green pro

FROM page eight

all of us — a concept known as
perverse incentive.

According to Huggins,
resources that are un-owned
are subject to the tragedy of
the commons — which means
we scrabble over the spoils
until they are all gone. A good
example of this was the north-
ern Caribbean sponge fishery,
which — at its peak before the
Second World War — removed
47 million pounds of live
sponge annually and employed
thousands of people and hun-
dreds of ships in the Bahamas
alone. But over-exploitation
and disease wiped out the
sponge beds in 1939, leaving
the fishermen destitute. And
only a tiny remnant of this once
thriving industry exists today.
Could we have escaped this
consequence if settlements had
joined together to protect their
exclusive fishing zones and set
harvesting rules?

One of Huggins’ main argu-
ments is that our treatment of
the environment improves as
we get wealthier — in other
words, respect for the environ-
mental increases as gross
domestic product goes up.
Well, it is comforting to know
that all we have to do is make
enough money, repeal every
regulation, and get rid of all
public resources for everything
to be right with the world.

But regulations that tax pol-
lution are aimed at making the
hidden costs (known as exter-
nalities) part of the decision-
making. Laws can force pol-
luters to take notice of these
external social costs by pre-
scribing limits to what can be
discharged or emitted. The
optimal level of pollution, for
example, then becomes the lev-
el at which the extra costs of
cleaning up equal the cost of
environmental damage caused
by that pollution.

Regulations that offer incen-
tives for alternative technolo-
gies — like electric vehicles or
solar panels or mass transit —
are aimed at offsetting some of
the external costs associated
with the entrenched and highly
polluting transportation and

ems — not ideology

power generating industries.
Currently, these costs are
avoided by the polluters.

It is a fact that if you build
too close to the sea and destroy
the dune, you will eventually
lose the beach, which is what
attracted you to the area in the
first place. But there are any
number of examples of
wealthy, well-informed indi-
viduals and companies that
have done exactly that
throughout the Bahamas and
the rest of the world. Just look
at the former Crystal Palace
Hotel on Cable Beach.

Regulations

Would clear government
regulations setting out build-
ing requirements along our
coastline fix this problem? I
believe so. Will we be able to
benefit from electric car and
renewable power technologies
unless tax policies are adjust-
ed? Clearly not within a rea-
sonable time frame. Can we
prevent the destruction of wet-
lands by making them private-
ly owned? Look at SandyPort
and the south coast of New
Providence, where developers
are filling them in as we speak.
Can we trade air pollution
rights? For some reason, that's
a big no-no for free marketers.

The phase out of lead in
gasoline and paint that began
in 1973 in the US is one of the
most successful environmental
health initiatives of the last cen-
tury. Yet, despite the fact that
the known harmful effects of
lead to health were increasing-
ly well known, industry contin-
ued to fight mandatory emis-
sions controls for years.
Through government regula-
tion, the percentage of US chil-
dren with elevated blood-lead
levels dropped from almost 90
per cent to less than 5 per cent.

This brings me to the nag-
ging concern I kept coming
back to while listening to Hug-
gins speak last week. As a
political scientist, everything
she said was based strictly on
her strongly-held ideological
views. And if something does-
n't fit in with that ideology,
then it must be discarded. This

=

is the same approach taken by
Marxists at the opposite
extreme.

I can't buy that anymore.
What we want are workable
solutions to the very real chal-
lenges that we face, whether
they involve private or public
sector approaches. In the case
of environmental impact
assessments, the lesson is not
that development must be halt-
ed, but that the consequences
must be studied to weigh the
pros against the cons, and to
incorporate appropriate safe-
guards. Yes, that has a cost, but
so does construction of poorly
planned developments. The
cost of the EIA is borne by the
developer, but the cost of envi-
ronmental disaster is shared by
all of us. It is easy to make fun
of environmental scenarios by
saying the sky is always falling,
but what about the never-end-
ing assertions of free market
thinkers that financial cata-
strophe is just around the cor-
ner due to Keynesian over-
spending by governments.

We seem to be able to put
off that disaster, which never-
theless still might come to pass.
And the same is true for the
consequences of rising popu-
lations, over-exploitation of
resources, and industrial pol-
lution.

Like Huggins, I get upset
every Earth Day. Especially
when I consider how we have
wasted most of the past 30
years after the dismantling of
America's nascent renewable
energy programme in 1980.
The ultimate symbol of those
lost years was the well-publi-
cised removal by President
Ronald Reagan of solar water
heaters installed by President
Jimmy Carter on the roof of
the White House. Solar panels
— producing power and hot
water — did not return to the
White House until the early
2000s, when they were installed
by the National Park Service.
And now we are all scrambling
to find ways to implement non-
polluting renewable technolo-
gies to save the planet.

What do you think? Send com-

ments to larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

a Mey

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas prominent

in 2010 Apex Awards

THE Bahamas took promi-
nent places in the 2010 Apex
Awards, with Ministry of
Tourism general manager Anita
Johnson-Patty walking away
with her very own Apex.

Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace also accepted an Apex on
behalf of Bermuda Premier Dr
Ewart Brown.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
he and Dr Brown are close col-
leagues and friends. They both
support each other in events and
issues in Bermuda and the
Bahamas, he said.

“Tf anybody is wondering
about Bermuda and _ the
Bahamas, we both compete and
cooperate,” he said.

The same is true for the
Bahamas’ relationship with
many other Caribbean nations.
Minister Vanderpool-Wallace
said the Bahamas shares a great
deal of information with other
countries, cooperating in vari-
ous projects.

“Tf there was such a thing as
the United States of the
Caribbean, we would do some
special things in the world, and if
you just want to see a little piece
of it, I ask you to think about
having a country called the Unit-
ed States of the Caribbean com-
pete in the Olympic Games -
game over,” he said.

The Apex Awards are pre-
sented annually by Black Meet-
ings and Tourism Magazine for
distinguished service.

The awards, which were part
of the Travel Professionals of
Colour conference, recognise
outstanding contributions that
have positively impacted travel
and tourism.

Anita Johnson-Patty, who
represents offshore communi-
cations in the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation’s office
in Plantation, Florida, was a
proud recipient of the Apex.

“Working in the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism for 24
years, it is so easy to come to
work,” she said as she received
the honour at the Sheraton Nas-
sau Beach Resort.

“T have a passion for it, and I
just love selling it. So when I
received this honour I was just
taken aback and shocked.”

The awards were presided
over by Solomon and Gloria
Herbert, publisher and associ-
ate publisher of Black Meetings
and Tourism Magazine.



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THE TRIBUNE

Saving the Bahamas’ reefs by early

viewing of new movie ‘Oceans’

THE Ministry of Tourism,
The Nature Conservancy and
Disneynature kicked off the
race to save coral reefs with
the premiere of Disney’s new
film “Oceans” on Earth Day
last week in the US and Cana-
da.

US and Canadian movie-
goers now have the opportu-
nity to help save the Bahamas’
marine habitats while viewing
the majestic Caribbean seas in
Disneynature’s newest motion
picture, filmed partly on-loca-
tion in the Bahamas.

Disneynature will make a
contribution to the Nature
Conservancy to save coral
reefs and help establish new
marine protected areas in the
Bahamas in honour of each
movie-goer who saw the film
during opening week, April
22-28.

The Ministry of Tourism
built anticipation and excite-
ment for the movie debut via
its social media network,
reaching many consumers and
fans of the Bahamas.

Tweets containing marine
conservation facts will contin-
ued to stream from the @Visit-
TheBahamas handle through-
out the first week of the
movie’s premiere.

The Bahamas’ Facebook
page hosts a link to the
movie’s trailer along with
information on the Bahamas’
marine protection efforts.

Oceans is the second film to
come from Walt Disney Stu-
dios Motion Pictures’ newest
label, Disneynature.

Disneynature’s first film,
Earth, made its record-break-
ing debut last year, grossing

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 11

SU
FOR SALE

2006 IZUZU



more than $100 million world-
wide and creating a devout fol-
lowing and loyal fan base.

This year’s Oceans follows
directors Jacques Perrin and
Jacques Cluzaud as they dive
deep into the world’s seas and
chronicle the mysteries that lie
beneath.

The 700 Islands of the
Bahamas contain miles of vital
coral reefs, which are the foun-
dation of a healthy ocean envi-
ronment, providing protection,
nurseries and feeding ground
for hundreds of marine
species, including sea turtles,
dolphins and a wide range of
fish. Scientists estimate that
the coral reefs of the
Caribbean could be gone with-
in 50 years without a network
of well-managed marine pro-
tected areas.

“The Bahamas has long
been at the forefront of marine
preservation and environmen-



—

tal safeguarding,” said Vernice
Walkine, director general of
the Ministry of Tourism.

“We feel privileged and for-
tunate to have such remark-
able organisations recognise
the importance of the
Caribbean marine habitat and
contribute to the future con-
servation of the waters that
sustain us all.”

More than half a decade
ago, the Bahamas began tak-
ing steps to protect some of
the most pristine and produc-
tive waters in the Caribbean
— including extending legal
protection to all species of sea
turtles found within the coun-
try’s waters.

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Trust established Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park in 1958,
making it the first marine fish-
ery reserve established in the
Caribbean and the first land
and sea park in the world.



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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

LOCAL NEAR

THE TRIBUNE



Island-wide clean-up *
launched in Bimini

BIMINI Bay Resort employees put
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For The Quarter Ended Janaury 41, 2010 1B. S000)
January 31, 2010 January 31, 200%
The Directors of FOCOL Holdings Limited ASSETS fi [26,873 $ 118,985
[FOCOL) ore pleased to present results
: Lictalities oF ie 35,608
for the second quarter ended Janvary lotal shorelvalders' equity Os 84. 1h
41, 2010. Net inceme available to a a
Talal liatlities & shorehalders =qualy i 76899 = § 119,985

shareholders for the ox
months ended January 31. 2010 wos
7.514.918 compared to $5,991 705 beast

common

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)

year. Qur eamings per share increqsed (B SOCK)

i ris t } Sik rmanihe @nded fi manihs ended
rom 17 cents to 22 cents. Janaury 31,2000 Janaury 31, 2009
Over the past year FOCOL has invested Sale & revenues $ 0 62204 5 ae
in new technealogy that has significantly Coat of sales (a7 aoa) (136, 004
| fe 5 3 in! a
Improved Our Sea ® ficiency Income fran aperations 24401 a7 OFA
campany wide, Qur strategic

i in ; seacrtait

nearer in marine fuel nana nai Marketing, administrative and genercl [1 2,858) (13,403)
and improvements ta aur retail network Deprectation 1,403} j 1,120)

a Finance cost | 226] [ 373
are podtioning the company for long Other Income expense) 7 él
term success. We have alo been able oO p__

: ii Mist Inecorne B74 Fada
fo increose our dividends and make Gradenerce shore chvicarcls (1.421) 1341]

significant reduction In long tern debts,

This strategy should allow us to continue Net income avalable to common

Shareholders f Pole } 5.2
to toke advantage of expansion TO
epportunitias that may become Batic: earings per share f 072 5 0.17
cvallabile
Gur Directors. management and staff Dividends per shore 5 0.10 $ 0.09

remain committed to seeking every

avenue to contrisute to the growth of

FOCOIL.

Copies of a full set of The ungudited tinancal statement can be obtained tar stephen Adderley

boadderteyétocal.com), at the Freeport Cal Company lecoted on Queers Highway, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday tram 8:30 AAA TS 5900 Ph.

i Rh _e -

i

Sir Albert... Miller, KCMG
Chairman and President



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

BPA wants NIB to reopen

drug plan negotiations

FROM page one

Meanwhile the BPA main-
tains it has worked tirelessly
to serve as a forum for dis-
cussion about the new drug
plan to provide prescription
drugs to patients of chronic
non-communicable diseases
from August, without endors-
ing nor rejecting the govern-
ment plan.

They had invited NIB offi-
cials to meet with BPA mem-
bers at two well-attended
association meetings in Jan-
uary and March, and at their
second meeting the NIB
asked the BPA to form a sub-
committee to examine and
respond to the National Pre-
scription Drug Plan (NPDP)
contract proposals detailing
four levels of retrmbursement
mark-up percentages at four
different price ranges.

But the BPA said the sub-
committee was delayed in
their work as NIB took three
weeks to send them restruc-
tured contract terms and
mark-up ranges, and another
two weeks to release critical

data about tender-pricing
related products.

The BPA further claims
they were held back by NIB’s
failure to address the key
issue of mark-ups in the
March meeting despite the
BPA’s request, without which
the BPA were unable to pro-
duce definitive recommenda-
tions in regards to payment.

When all documents were
received the BPA completed
their counter-proposal, dis-
tributed it to their members
on Thursday and intended to
hand it to NIB on Monday,
the association said.

“Even after such delay the
BPA completed our proposed
recommendations in two
weeks, a remarkable feat
when one considers that a full
time NIB team has taken
more than a year just to draft
the document initially circu-

lated and one that was obvi-
ously flawed,” the BPA stat-
ed.

“How does one know it was
flawed? Because NIB itself
has changed it significantly on
three occasions.”

As the sub-committee
poured over the details of the
contract, NIB signed the non-
negotiated agreement with
two Lowe’s Pharmacy outlets
and three People’s Pharmacy
stores in New Providence,
before calling off talks with
the BHA in a public state-
ment on Sunday.

“We are not waiting on a
counter-proposal, we signed
contracts with several phar-
macies under the final terms
the NIB is offering,” Mr
Cargill said.

However, the BPA is keen
for the NIB director to recon-
sider his position and take

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into account the counter-pro-
posal their members have
worked so hard on.

The association maintains
it has been consistently open
to negotiation and expressed
their members willingness to
work with the government
plan in a fiscal report on the
implementation of national
prescription plans conducted
in 2008.

“Tt is clear the intent of the
BPA was always to partner
with the government to
ensure a viable, sustainable
plan come to fruition, and
that it would benefit all
aspects of the public and pri-
vate sector,” the BPA states.

“Pharmacists are a key part
of the healthcare system, and
while there are fiscal and busi-
ness concerns, the BPA
assures the public that our
members view the access to

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THE TRIBUNE



healthcare as a fundamental
right of every Bahamian.”

However, the association
added: “The plan will do
more harm than good if it
closes down every small phar-
macy in the country, espe-
cially when you consider there
are only small independent,
private pharmacies and no
chain stores in the Family
Islands.

“It is hoped the review
process will be expedited and
both NIB and the BPA will
continue to work to produce a
programme for the Bahamian
public that will indeed be a
benefit to those it serves.

“This is not about pharma-
cists trying to make exorbi-
tant profits, but rather, a ques-
tion of survival for an essen-
tial component of the health-
care delivery system.”





ALGERNON CARGILL



Sandilands mistreatment claims investigated
FROM page one

were dismissive of the basic human needs of patients at the insti-
tution, specifically the handicapped, and often reneged on
their care duties.

Ms Weech confirmed that all claims made by the former
patient have been itemized and will be thoroughly explored.

The exercise will include meetings with the appropriate staff
to ensure that proper procedures are being followed.

Reiterating that management cannot implement solutions
unless they are made aware of deficiencies, Ms Weech encour-
aged patients of the institution to report their concerns or dif-
ficulties to administration directly so that they can be addressed
as they occur.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

areas designated as conserva-
tion forests cannot be sold,
granted or transferred unless so
ordered by the minister respon-
sible for forestry subject to a
resolution of Parliament.

Fox Hill member of Parlia-
ment Fred Mitchell, the Oppo-
sition's lead spokesman on the
Bill, questioned this clause say-
ing that at face value it appears
to offend Article 27 of the con-
stitution which says that if pri-
vate land is going to be com-
pulsorily acquired prompt and
adequate compensation must
be given.

"The government has decid-
ed that not only lands which it
owns, but also privately owned
lands are to be part of conser-
vation forests. Once it becomes
a part of a conservation forest it
effectively takes the land out of
the ownership or to be more
correct out of the use of the
land for the normal purposes
that are associated with owner-
ship. This is troubling and there
has to be a full explanation for
this," said Mr Mitchell. "Does
this bill describe with certainty
and with particularity the para-
meters and boundaries of this
land so that people will know
whose land is affected and
whose land is not? Has there
been public consultation on this
matter?"

Elizabeth MP Ryan Pinder
said that much of the land des-
ignated for forest reserve or
conservation forests in North
Eleuthera is presently being
occupied by local farmers. He
also questioned the impact of
the legislation on those who are

Opposition questions
aspects of legislation

in possession of commonage
land.

"It is unfair to enact this leg-
islation and tell those who have
been involved in farming for
generations that they can no
longer farm, that they have to
stop planting and cannot har-
vest without going through the
bureaucratic process of obtain-
ing a license or lease to do so.
The practical implications of
this can be devastating to a
farming operation, especially if
it interrupts a harvest," he told
the House of Assembly yester-
day.

Englerston MP Glenys Han-
na-Martin also weighed in on
the debate, saying that it was
worrisome that the Bill "appears
out of the blue with little true
discussion with our people and
in particular with affected com-
munities nor private nor collec-
tive owners of affected land.”

Last night, Environment Min-
ister Earl Deveaux explained
that the legislation was not
attempting to wrestle private
land away from owners but sim-
ply to set up a system to regulate
environmentally sensitive areas.

"We put this process in place
to ensure that the conservation
land, which is really our wet-
lands, whether it be private land
or public land is subject to some
process otherwise what you
have occurring right now in
South Beach, along the southern
coast of New Providence, and
that has been taking place for
the last 50 years where the wet-
lands are filled in and

eMC a ae



encroached upon,” he said.

"The idea is to ensure that we
have a defined process in law
that helps us guide how we pro-
mote intervention in these
lands.”

In the face of criticism from
the Opposition that government
did not allow for consultation
before the Bill was brought to
Parliament, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said, "We can
put law after law on the web we
can advertise in the newspaper
few people come forward before
some action is taken on it.
Hopefully this (debate) will
cause some other people to put
forward some ideas."

Added Mr Deveaux: "This
particular Bill has probably been
in more hands and has been
consulted on and changed and
edited by more Bahamians than
probably any other legislation
that I've had anything to do
with."

The prime minister said Gov-
ernment would give the Oppo-
sition ten days to put forward
any recommendations it has in
relation to the Bill, while the
legislation is in committee.

Government intends to pass
the legislation in the third week
of May.

e SEE PAGE THREE

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THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 15



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OTHER ANNIVERSARY EVENTS

FROM page one

to disguise the message as a legitimate one from
the former vice-chairwoman.

This message, it was said, would then have
been posted online to embarrass Ms Sears and
the Minister; destroying any possibility for the
fledgling politician to ever return at any level of
influence in the PLP.

It is understood that this message, has been for-
warded to the relevant authorities to ascertain its
origin for further investigations.

These attacks, along with others, have left
some right-thinking PLPs disgusted with the way

PLPs ‘bid to smear ex-chief

show host said that having known Ms Sears for a
few years as a native Grand Bahamian himself, he
was disappointed in the way the party was han-
dling this “great young talent.”

“This is just another example of the PLP dis-
playing their ability to misuse and mishandle
excellent young talent in the Bahamas.

“Melissa Sears has shown she is grounded in
family, church, and community, and she is cer-
tainly a woman that serves as an example to any
young woman as to how to go about serving your

Grand Home-Coming, Gala Banquet,
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the party has handled the resignation of Ms Sears. Country as a good citizen. It’s unfortunate in my al r May = October ?01 )
Instead of seeking to coax the party supporter _ Opinion that she has been put through the polit- r if ’

into re-thinking her decision, it was said that ial wringer of the PLP,” he said.

some within the organisation immediately went sacl camer nee seen: ‘

on the offensive and tried to “ruin her political- | people Have been pul Mirough this unfortunate \ ti ] 1 "

ly.” P process and many others have refused toeven Come & Ce lebrate wit 5
Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Erin engage these political parties as it is an “absolute ys r

Ferguson, the political commentator and TV _ waste of time. +> f S34 East Street, below the hill

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one 4 920 workers set for Baha Mar

The plan includes having
a peak of 4,920 workers
operating on the construc-
tion project for a period of
12 months. The construction
company plans to create a
housing village within the
construction site to house
the workers.

The peak period for con-
struction is between month
24 and month 36 of the pro-
ject, and at that time there
also will be in more than
2,500 Bahamian construc-
tion workers.

Total employment at the
peak of the project will be
close to 7,500 both foreign
and Bahamian workers.

The project is waiting the
approval of both govern-
ments.

No visa applications have
been filed at the Bahamian
Embassy in Beijing as yet,
according to Elma Camp-
bell, the Bahamian Ambas-
sador to China.

Mr Tan said workers with
specialised skills are expect-
ed from countries other than
China, and permits will
apply to workers needed at
different stages over the
course of the resort’s con-
struction. The project is
scheduled for completion in
late 2013.

But according to Chinese
government officials there
is no need for concern over
the large immigrant work
force, as the Chinese work-



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ers in the Bahamas are high-
ly regulated by the Bahamas
government and the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China.

“This project is very
large. It is one of the largest
loan projects all over the
world, especially at this cold
time under the crisis condi-
tions. The China State Con-
struction Engineering Cor-
poration has already pro-
vided their plans to the
competent authorities. They
are just waiting for their
plans to be approved. As
they get the approvals as
well as the approvals from
the Bahamian government
they will start,” said Mr
Tan.

Late last month, Baha
Mar secured $2.5 billion in
financing from the Export-
Import Bank of China and a
contract with new minority
partner, China State Con-
struction Engineering Cor-
poration, also serving as the
project’s general contractor.

The intake of Chinese
workers on the Baha Mar
investment project is con-
siderably higher than the
pool of workers being con-
tracted for the National Sta-
dium development project,
based on the scale of the
investment and the devel-
opment time period.

Less than 300 permits
were requested for workers
on the stadium project,









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including managers, techni-
cians and common workers,
said Mr Tan. Forty per cent
of the workers have already
returned to China, includ-
ing the 45 who worked on
the piling foundations, and
some inspectors. The peak
volume of workers — 170 — is
currently being employed
on the project.

Mr Tan said the Bahami-
an entity engaging the Chi-
nese company had to sub-
mit a letter of invitation on
behalf of each worker to the
Chinese government and
apply for a work permit
from the Bahamas govern-
ment.

The Chinese entity also

had to apply for travel visas
at the Bahamas embassy in
China. During this process,
police records from Chinese
authorities were produced
for each worker to prove
they had no criminal record.

“They work hard on the
stadium construction site.
Their work permit is can-
celled when they leave.
They only get a one-time
entry visa into the Bahamas,
so they can’t come back to
the Bahamas again unless
they get a new work permit
and visa. I think we do not
need to worry about this
because they are totally
under the control of two
governments who obey very

Two charged in connection
With gay club fight

FROM page one

to the charges.

The prosecution did not object to the two women being
granted bail. They were each granted bail in the sum of $8,000

with one surety.

Russell was ordered to report to the East Street South
Police Station every Saturday before 6pm. Knowles was ordered
to report to the Elizabeth Estates Police Station every Saturday
before 6pm. The case was adjourned to May 4 and transferred

to Court 5, Bank Lane.

According to police, 20-year-old Orial Farrington, of Nelson
Street, died at the nightclub parking lot after being struck by a
2008 Toyota Corolla. Investigations into her death are contin-

uing.

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS

strict procedures for immi-
grants,” said Mr Tan.

The same process is
expected to apply for work-
ers on the Baha Mar pro-
ject, and the Abaco agricul-
tural investment project, if
it materializes.

Chinese investors visited
Abaco at least twice over
the past year, prospecting
for a planned investment in
vegetable, fruit and live-
stock production, and a pos-
sible processing plant.

Abaconians have raised
questions about the project,

in part, expressing concern
over a feared influx of Chi-
nese workers. Bahamas gov-
ernment officials and Chi-
nese government officials
have called the criticism pre-
mature, because no official
plans have been submitted
for review.

Mr Tan said Bahamians
should also not worry
because Chinese workers
find it difficult to live in the
Bahamas, based on the lan-
guage barrier, the culinary
differences, and the high
cost of living.





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APRIL 29, 2010

7 me

THURSDAY,

[° Bank of The Bahamas

WInTERNATIONAL



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government

has got it “total-

ly wrong” on

Blue Hill Road,

a former Cham-
ber of Commerce president
blasted yesterday, adding that
it had “devastated and
destroyed” a number of busi-
nesses at the peak of their vul-
nerability, one of his outlets
having suffered a 14 per cent
month-over-month sales
decline since the traffic
changes took effect.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, Super-
wash’s president, told Tribune
Business that the Govern-
ment, in implementing the
changes as part of the New
Providence Road Improve-
ment Project, had forgotten
that Blue Hill Road was a
“significant Over-the-Hill
depository” of Bahamian-
owned businesses that relied
heavily on commuter traffic
for the majority of their cus-
tomers.

With Blue Hill Road con-
verted into a one-way system

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

‘Totally wrong’ on
Blue Hill re-routing

* Ex-Chamber chief blasts government for ‘devastating and destroying’
a key Over-the-Hill business area, and urges it to change course

* Says sales at own outlet in impacted area down 14%

month-over-month between March and April 2010
* Argues that Blue Hill Road has lost its commuter
business and turned into early evening ‘wasteland’

going north only, the imme-
diate past Chamber president
said the area’s businesses
were attracting little com-
muter business because few
had time to stop in the morn-
ings on their way to work.

Most did their shopping in
the evening and, having to
travel back home south on
Market Street, were reluctant
to travel to Blue Hill Road - a
round-trip that Mr D’ Aguilar
said was effectively six blocks
long.

“T think the Government
has gotten it totally wrong on
this one,” Mr D’Aguilar told
Tribune Business, “and peo-
ple are legitimately justified
in complaining about the

Food retailing
consolidation in

‘six to nine months’



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LEADING Bahamian food
retailers yesterday said a con-
solidation/shake-up in the sec-
tor was imminent, possibly as
little as “six to nine months”
away, as the increased num-
ber of new market entrants
and stores chases a market
that has shrunk in the reces-
sion.

SEE page 7B

* AML Foods and Robin Hood
bosses agree that ‘something
has to give’, especially in GB

* Too many chains and stores
chasing to little money and
customers, although too
early to determine if
mergers or shake-out

will be order of day

* Food group head still
‘troubled’ by level
of Florida spending

Bahamas bank suffers
$15,000 net loss for Q1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUTTERFIELD Bank
(Bahamas) suffered a small
$15,000 net loss during the
2010 first quarter, after it was
squeezed by falling revenues
and a $100,000 increase in
expenses year-over-year.

The Bermuda-headquar-
tered bank, in releasing its
results for the three months
to March 31, 2010, revealed

that its Bahamian private
banking subsidiary suffered a
3.2 per cent revenue decline
year-over-year, with the top-
line falling to $1.855 million
from $1.916 million the year
before.

Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) also had to con-
tend with a $105,000 increase
in total expenses, which grew
by 5.9 per cent from $1.765

SEE page 4B

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change in traffic because it
has devastated businesses
there.

“Where I think they went
wrong is that while it makes
sense to flow the majority of
traffic north on Blue Hill and
south on Market Street, Blue
Hill Road is a significant
Over-the-Hill depository of
local businesses.

“Most people do their
shopping on the way home,
not on their way to work.
They’re in a rush. As a result,
Blue Hill Road is a wasteland
at 5-6pm at night. Nothing is
going on. And, to add insult
to injury, you’ve got all the
construction work going on.
It’s just a congestion night-

550)$4.57

a) |

pig $4.47



mare.”

Mr D’Aguilar said his
Superwash outlet at the cor-
ner of Blue Hill and Robinson
Roads had been less affected
by the changes than other
companies, since it was easier
for customers to reach him.

However, he said that
month-over-month, sales at
that Superwash outlet for the
first 20 days in April 2010
were off by 14 per cent
against their March 2010 com-
paratives.

He pinpointed early April
as the date when the road-
works and re-routing began,
adding that year-over-year,
sales for the first 20 days in
April 2010 were down by 12

per cent.

“There’s not any significant
businesses on Market Street;
all the large Over-the-Hill
businesses were on Blue Hill
Road. It was a major business
thoroughfare, a major com-
mercial avenue,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Because Blue Hill Road
was situated three blocks
away from Market Street,
commuters travelling south
on the latter would be faced
with a six-block round-trip to
do shopping on Blue Hill
Road. This, coupled with traf-
fic congestion, would likely

SEE page 10B



Online at
BankBahamasOnline.com

Saunders Beach
work ‘complete’
hy next month

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ROADWORKS at Saun-
ders Beach, part of the $2 mil-
lion phase one New Provi-
dence Road Improvement
Project, could be completed
by next month, according to
Ministry of Works engineers.
The project has reportedly
created almost 160 Bahami-
an jobs.

Charlene Collie-Harris,
speaking at the Bahamas
Society of Engineers monthly
meeting, said the project at
Saunders Beach had been set
back by problems with the
importation of materials and
unforeseen problems with
underground utilities.

According to Mrs Harris,
the road corridors are being
constructed so that they are
all completed near the same
time, in order for Bahamians
to see the benefits of traffic
improvements almost imme-
diately.

She said the project had
been eight to 10 years behind
in construction due to the ini-
tial contractor hired going
bankrupt.

However, Mrs Harris said

SEE page 5B

Contractors in ‘better position’ after Q1 closing

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ALTHOUGH many
Bahamian contractors are
“still scratching for work”, the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president yes-
terday said the sector was
“beginning to see movement”
in the lower end of the sec-
ond home market, while Baha
Mar was “weeks away” on its
Commercial Village contracts.

Stephen Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business that home/lot
packages valued at around
$500,000 seemed to be prov-
ing especially popular with
foreign real estate purchasers,

Mother’s Day Gift Cards.

* Many ‘still scratching for work’, but pick up signs
there, especially in Family Island second home market
* Home/lot packages in $500k range especially
popular with foreign buyers, as government said to be
mulling changes to lower/middle income home market
* BCA chief says Baha Mar ‘very much a go’ and
‘weeks away’ on Commercial Village contract
* But recovery on commercial construction

likely ‘8-12 months away’

since they allowed buyers to
meet Bahamian residency
qualifications without prov-
ing prohibitively expensive.
Mr Wrinkle said he expect-
ed the second home con-

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Head Office: (242) 397-3000 | www.BankBahamas.com

struction market to recover
first, given that it was popu-
lated by relatively wealthy
individuals who still possessed

SEE page 6B









Job Notice

SCHOOL PRINCIPAL



A well established private School that espouses Christian principles is in
search of a Principal to lead the institution which provides day care and,
pre, primary and high school departments. Committed to providing a
quality education which upholds a standard of scholastic excellence and
fosters vital Christian living in preparation for responsible citizenship for
students of all backgrounds, the institution offers a curriculum that fulfils
the requirements of the Government's compulsory education statutes.
Located in a residential community in New Providence the school’s current
population of roughly 500 students is expected to grow.

The Principal will be a strong, innovative leader with a high degree of
administrative and supervisory skills and a capacity to identify and
remediate instructional practices, where necessary. Committed to the
promotion of Christian ethics and morals, she/he will be able to build
strong relationships both within the internal and external communities,
develop, implement and maintain a safe and healthy school environment
and represent, promote and articulate the school’s vision to all
stakeholders and the community at large. Responsible for driving and
leading the implementation of the school's vision and values, the principal
will cultivate and maintain a positive, achievement focused school culture
among teachers, students, staff and parents. In the selection of faculty
and staff and the organization and budgeting of resources (human,
material and financial), the principal will be guided by creativity, efficiency
and effectiveness. As the instructional leader, the principal will ensure the
maintenance of a curriculum that is relevant and serviceable.

The successful candidate will be required to take up the post for the
beginning of the academic year 2010 -2011.

Qualifications include a Masters Degree or higher and Professional
Certification and experience in an Educational Leadership capacity.
Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Mail resume to:

Eileen Fielder
P.O.Box N3220,
Nassau, Bahamas
or email:
efielder@thecounsellorsitd.com





(

(iani0\

of th

Correct logo is key
to a business ‘go-go’

MUCH has been said
about a company’s need for
a distinct identity to survive
in an overcrowded market
place. A logo, generically, is a
pictorial recognition of a com-
pany's name, values or ser-
vices. It is a fundamental or
root of the brand. Like a tree,
a brand can grow if the logo is
strong and well-nourished,
and has strength that is
reflected in the creativity of
the design.

David Aaker, in his book
Building Strong Brands, lays
strong emphasis on the fact
that “familiarity of a brand
elicits clients to indulge”.
Nonetheless, one of the most
important decisions a busi-
ness owner can make is
choosing the design of a logo.
I am convinced that such
questions have more than
likely popped into your head.
How would a logo benefit my
company? In other words,
would a logo amplify,
enhance or highlight my over-
all purpose? Does it make
sense for me to have a logo?
If you run a small accounting
company from your home,
investing in a logo might not
make sense. So what's the
best way to decide on invest-
ing in a logo?

When you are in a business
with similar products or ser-
vices, that unique factor is
what every business should
strive for. For example, travel
agencies often use globes in
their logos, so aim to use
something else. Customers
need to know you are better
and the logo should reiterate
just that. Without a logo, it
would be difficult for every-
one to identify you among the
multitude of. say, computer
companies in the market.

Experts suggest people
tend to remember images
more than text. As the old
adage states: “A picture is
worth a thousand words”, and
if you know how the human
mind works, memory can trig-







The Art
of Graphix

BUS Cnm Mer RIeT





ger with the slightest hint of
seeing the same logo again.

Imagine if McDonald's did-
n't have the ‘golden arches’
or Nike's ubiquitous 'swoosh'
never existed? Would their
brands be as strong today if
that image wasn't imprinted
on the minds of most con-
sumers?

Sometimes a logo design
can represent the history and
popular culture of that time.
You might have seen logos
that are more than a century
old, or a historical icon that
represents history and contri-
butions to the economy.

Whether they see your
logo on television, in the
pages of a magazine or a
newspaper, you want your
logo to scream: ‘Look at me!’
You want an audacious logo
that explodes and captivates
your customer, so try not to
make it overly complex,
because it will not lend itself
to multiple uses and can
potentially fail to deliver your
message clearly.

Chiefly, logos need to func-
tion smartly in many differ-
ent mediums - from the Inter-
net to print advertising sce-
narios, envelopes and memo
pads, etc. To encourage
repeat business as well as
referrals, don’t forget to put it
on all your online materials.
Yet, it is an easy journey from
one R to another, Recogni-
tion to Revenue.

Keep in mind that the logo
can be shrunk to fit certain
items, such as a business card,
or blown up larger, like a bill-
board, so it should convert
well. A tag could also be
included in your company’s
logo, which is simply a list of
services or products your

THE TRIBUNE

company provides.

Getting started

Before you begin sketch-
ing, first articulate the mes-
sage you want your logo to
convey. Try writing a one-sen-
tence image and mission
statement to help focus your
efforts. Stay true to this state-
ment while creating.

The most important things
to determine before design-
ing your logo are:Who You
Are; Your business's mission,
vision and purpose; What
You Do; the products and
services that you deliver; and
Who You Can Best Help?
(your target audience).
Remember, your logo has to
connect with your clients, so
ensure you're designing for
them and not for yourself,
which might result in a logo
that does not serve its pur-
pose. Here are some addi-
tional tactics and considera-
tions that will help you cre-
ate an appropriate company
logo:

Make it clean

and functional

Your logo should work as
well on a business card as on
the side of a truck. It should
be scalable, easy to repro-
duce, memorable and distinc-
tive. Icons are better than
photographs, which may be
indecipherable if enlarged or
reduced significantly. And be
sure to create a logo that can
be reproduced in black and
white, so that it can be faxed,
photocopied or used in a
black-and-white ad as effec-
tively as in colour.

Your business name will
affect your logo design For
example, with a company
called ‘Lightning Bolt Print-
ing’, the logo might feature
some creative implementation
of...... you guessed it, a light-
ning bolt. It even could be

SEE page 14B

AWARD ax

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 3B



Mystery shop
start-up to combat
bad service

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

CUSTOMER service has
a nameless and faceless ally,
with a new Bahamian-
owned and operated Mys-
tery Shopping agency hop-
ing to change the stigma of
“bad service” allegedly
plaguing this country’s
many restaurants, retail
stores and government
agencies.

Principal of Mystery
Shopper, Dorian Roach, has
partnered with Ryan
Knowles to help raise the
standard of service at stores,
shops and firms across the
country.

According to Mr Roach,
mystery shopping secks to
help business owners main-
tain standards in their stores
by ensuring employees are
following the protocols laid
out for them by their
employer.

“This is a customer ser-
vice programme where we
provide a mystery shopper,”
said Mr Roach.

“They basically go into a
business and rate the service
they get.”

He added that mystery
shoppers not only record
notes on what they find
when they enter a business,
but also use hidden cameras
to document the interaction
between customer and staff
for training purposes.

“We make sure certain
standards are adhered to,
just to make sure they are
being followed and done to
that standard,” Mr Roach

said.

“Tt’s more of a training
tool than a punitive tool. If
you tell a staff member they
didn’t do something, they
don’t get the picture until

they see themselves doing it.

The video shows a lot more
than what the paper report
can.”

Mr Roach said he and his
partner have been in the
retail business for a number
of years and understand the
need for mystery shoppers
in stores across the
Bahamas.

He said he had used mys-
tery shopping in his own
stores, and found that many

times employees did not fol-
low through on service stan-

dards when managers were
not on the floor.
Therefore, he and his
partner decided to put a
dent in the “bad” customer

service railed about regular-

ly in the Bahamas.

“Staff will do all the right
things until you are not
around,” said Mr Roach.

Major quality assurance
services such as this exist

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States, such as AAA, which
rates a plethora of compa-
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Mr Roach said it can be a

“You always hear how bad
the service is in the
Bahamas, so there is defi-

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considered for recommendation as candidates for
the seats to become available on either the Board of
Directors or the Supervisory Committee at the 33rd
Annual General Meeting to be held on Saturday May
22, 2010.

All members interested in serving in either capacity
should collect an application form from any office of
the Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited offices in Nassau, Freeport,
Abaco or Mangrove Cay Andros.

The qualification for each post is available upon
request.

Completed applications, along with the other
information requested should be returned to any of
the offices on or before the close of business on
Friday April 30, 2010.

All Resolutions must also be submitted by Friday
April 30, 2010.

Any application, not fully completed or without the
requested supporting information, or received after
the aforementioned date will not be eligible for
consideration.

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Bahamas bank
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FROM page 1B

million to $1.87 million year-
over-year.

The end result was that
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas)
incurred a small $15,000 net
loss for the 2010 first quarter,
as opposed to a $55,000 net
profit in the same period dur-

ing 2009.

Its Bermuda parent said of
its Bahamian subsidiary:
“Total revenue before gains
and losses was in line with last
year at $1.9 million. Total
non-interest expenses were
up $0.1 million to $1.9 million
due to the accelerated vest-
ing of options. As a result,
there was a minimal net loss

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THE TRIBUNE

at the end of the 2010 first
quarter.”

Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) also suffered a
$0.6 million increase in non-
performing residential mort-
gages during the 2010 first
quarter, its parent’s results
disclosed.

Net interest income derived
from its clients, though,
remained relatively flat at
$556,000, compared to
$561,000 generated in the
2009 first quarter. And But-
terfield Bank (Bahamas)
actually saw a small rise in its
non-interest income year-
over-year, as this grew from
$1.258 million in 2009 to
$1.287 million.

The Bahamian subsidiary
also saw its total assets fall by
11 per cent during the three
months to March 31, 2010, as
they dropped from $166.455
million to $148.116 million
year-over-year.

And its total deposits fell
by a similar 11.2 per cent in
the three months following
the 2009 year-end, dropping
from $133.189 million to
$118.364 million. Deposits
payable on demand rose from
$67.429 million to $72.53 mil-
lion, while deposits payable
on a fixed date fell to $45.834
million from $65.76 million.

Meanwhile, Butterfield
Bank (Bahamas) saw its total
credit exposure drop from
$81.687 million to $75.483 mil-
lion over the same period.

The bank had unveiled a
$119,000 loss for 2009, an
$885,000 goodwill write-down
having sent it into the red,
with its parent unveiling a
$550 million equity capital
raising to rescue the Bermu-
da-headquartered institution
after the group suffered a
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 5B



Farming output flat for 30 years

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ agricultur-
al output has remained flat
for the past 30 years, with the
lack of new, younger Bahami-
ans rising up the ranks in the
Ministry of Agriculture also
threatening the industry’s
longevity. of the industry said
yesterday.

Greg Rahming, a senior
chemist at the Department of
Agriculture, said yesterday
that there had been no suc-
cession planning within the
Ministry of Agriculture to
ensure that a younger gener-
ation carries on the mission




FROM page 1B

the corridors currently being
constructed will be designed
to last 20 to 25 years.

Motorists could finally see
the use of the new Saunders
Beach roundabout beginning
as early as next week.

The Ministry of Works is
also planning the widening
and improvement of Prince
Charles Drive and Robinson
Road, in order to reduce
instances of bumper-to-
bumper traffic during morn-
ing and evening rush hours.

Mrs Harris said Robinson
Road will become a three-
lane road, with a centre lane
being added for turning, and
Prince Charles is to become a
four-lane highway.

These changes alone, she
said, will not immediately rec-
tify the traffic situation but
will be done in tandem with
the unification and improve-
ment of the public trans-
portation system, a school bus
system and a comprehensive
and improved driver instruc-
tion and education plan.

Business people have railed

Saunders Beach work
‘complete’ by next month

to provide sustainable food
security for the Bahamas.

Speaking at the first annu-
al agricultural symposium at
the Gladstone Road Agricul-
tural Research and Demon-
stration Complex, Mr Rah-
ming outlined several obsta-
cles to the industry’s success,
especially as it pertains to
trade.

According to Mr Rahming,
one of the most immediate
setbacks to the agricultural
industry is the lack of mterest
in the sector by generations
of newly-graduated high
school and college students.

He suggested that the Gov-
ernment reintroduce its schol-
arship programme to train



against some of the Govern-
ment’s road work projects,
namely the rerouting of the
Market Street and Blue Hill
Road Corridors.

Businesses on those streets
say they have noticed a 30 to
60 per cent decrease in busi-
ness since the road directions
were changed, and some have
talked about closing their
doors because of it.

Yesterday, many of the
owners of those businesses
staged a protest, lobbying the
Government to return the
roads to their original traffic
flows.

However, Mrs Harris point-
ed out that the changes were
necessary for the long-term
viability of traffic flows in the
area and the Bahamas, which
continue to increase year-on-
year.

She said the Ministry of
Works conducted an impact
assessment on the businesses
in the area, which found that
the road improvements and
changes would increase com-
merce in the area. However,
those owners tell a different
story.

individuals in the agriculture
sector, and have them work
in the industry for a specified
length of time.

Mr Rahming added that
the agricultural sector, to its
detriment, was lacking lead-
ership on the private sector
front and insisted interna-
tional help could change that.

Chinese investors are inter-
ested in Abaco, and are
expected to bring new tech-
nology and strategies to assist
in farming. However, it has
been said that they are also
interested in exports to their
own country.

The Bahamas has talked
about feeding itself for years,
and with a food bill of more
than $500 million, including
imported and locally-pro-
duced food stuffs, export
seems a long way off.

According to Mr Rahming,
this country’s agricultural










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industry standards are not
where they should be in order
to engage in trade under
agreements such as the World
Trade Organisation (WTO).

“Without regulation and
standards, people will not
have confidence in Bahamian
products,” he said.

He added that one of the
most striking, unregulated
sectors is poultry production,
which is not subject to inspec-
tion and has “no law govern-
ing it”.

While there are crops that
can be grown and be prof-
itable in the Bahamas, the
number of registered farmers
has decreased over time,
according to senior market-
ing officer for the Ministry of
Agriculture, Leslie Minns.

According to his figures,
this country’s agricultural out-
puts have remained flat for
almost 30 years.



Why,
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and HATS
GIRLS DRESSES



GN 1043

Ministry of Public Works And Transport
Construction of New Campus
The Eugune Dupuch Law School- Thompson
Boulevard
Pre-Qualification of Contractors

NOTICE

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
through the Ministry of Works and Transport is inviting
qualified General Contractors to participate in a Pre-
Qualification for the Tender for Construction of The
Campus of The Eugene Dupuch Law School, to be built on
a site located on Thompson Boulevard, New Providence.

The structure will be approximately 30,500 Sq. Ft.
comprising of a series of detached structures connected
by roof, around a common courtyard, with associated
external works and services.

The General Contractors will be required to provide a
detailed indication of their competence, both technically
and financially, to carry out the intended scope of work
within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification
documents as of Wednesday 21st, April 2010, between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. - 5-00 p.m. from:

The office of the:

Director of Public Works

Ministry of Public Works and Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830
Fax: (242) 302-9770

The completed pre-qualification document should be
deposited in the Tender box at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd
Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, West Bay Street,
P.O. Box N-3017, Nassau, The Bahamas no later than 10:
00 a.m. on Tuesday 4th May 2010.

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
has the right to reject any or all pre-qualification
contractors.

Signed:

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



To advertise, call 502-2371



Eastern Com aawohie Association

1 www. ee banaia org

i part

Come join the communities of the EAST
Let’s get to know one another again in family fun, friendship and fellowship at the

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May 1, 2010

12 noon
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Green Space West
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and Jasmine Dr



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PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



=
Contractors in ‘better position’ after Q1 closing

FROM page 1B

enough surplus assets to
invest in home projects. That
would be followed by the
local Bahamian housing mar-
ket, he suggested, with recov-
ery in the commercial con-
struction market “another
eight to 12 months away” due
to the existing oversupply of
empty office space.

“T think we’re beginning to
see some movement in the
industry as a whole,” Mr

Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I would say there’s pos-
itive movement in the second
home market, particularly
with regard to the Family
Islands - Abaco, Eleuthera
and Exuma.

“T’ve been there because
we’ve got projects on all three
islands. There’s movement
there, and indications that the
US market is beginning to
loosen up. People who build
second homes in the Family



POSITION
AVAILABLE

A resort type property seek to employee the following:

Front Office Manager

Responsibilities:

* Manage entire scope of the Front Office Department

* Attend to guest enquiries

* Monitor performance against budget projections
* Ensure proper training and procedures in place to

provide

* Attend to crisis or emergency situations
* Able to understand and interpret budgets and financial

statements

* Able to display a high degree of professionalism
and integrity as befitting as a member of executive

management

Requirements:

* Arelevant degree in hospitality or business
* Minimum five years hotel experience, preferably in

Room Division

decision making



* Demonstrate supervisory skills; good judgment in

* Computer literate with knowledge of a variety of
computer software applications

+ Superior written and oral skills

* Excellent organizational and time management skills
with the ability to set priorities for self and other

All submissions will be kept confidential.
Interested persons should apply in writing to HR Manager:
DA 83556, c/o The Tribune,

PO Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas





NOTICE

Islands are, for the most part,
well-off anyway.”

Mr Wrinkle said home/lot
packages in the $300,000-
$500,000 range were proving
especially popular, adding:
“That’s a niche market that
seems to employ a good,
steady interest. We’re finding
housing and lot packages stay-
ing at that $500,000 mark
offer people the ability to
meet their residency require-
ments without breaking the
bank.

“That seems to be a more
robust market. Going over
the $600,000 mark gets into
difficulties, as there is a dif-
ferent type of client.”

The BCA president
described the local Bahami-
an housing market as “still
sluggish”, due to the persis-
tent high unemployment lev-
els and reluctance of com-
mercial banks to extend cred-
it to all borrowers apart from

those deemed ‘good risks’.

Still, Mr Wrinkle suggest-
ed that there may soon be fur-
ther opportunities for
Bahamian contractors as a
result of the Government’s
desire to exit the house build-
ing market altogether and
leave it to the private sector.

But if it was to fully exploit
such an opportunity, Mr
Wrinkle said the Bahamian
construction industry needed
the licensing, certification and
standards that would be ush-
ered in by the Contractors Bill
- a piece of legislation that the
Government promised to pass
during this parliamentary ses-
sion in the Speech from the
Throne.

“Government is trying to
get out of the home building
business and just provide ser-
vice lots, so we may see
changes in the way the hous-
ing market for the lower and
middle classes is being

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for busy Ambulatory Endos-
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Fax resume to:
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haroldjr@batelnet.bs

INVITATION TO TENDER

Tender for the provision of
Water and Sewerage General Insurance

The Water and Sewerage Corporation invites tenders from any bidder who is
authorized to do business in the Bahamas; and who satisfied all eligibility and
qualification requirements of the CORPORATION and is registered with and licensed
by register of insurance to issue insurances for the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Receptionist’s desk at the
Corporation’s Headquarters at #87 Thompson Boulevard.

Sealed bids are to be delivered on or before May 14 at 4:00 p.m. and addressed as

follows:

Deputy General Manager/Engineering & Planning

Water Sewerage Corporation
87 Thompson Boulevard
Nassau Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to reject or accept any or all proposals.

Submission should be marked as follows:-

Tender: General Insurance Proposal
Type of Coverage Required

All general risk insurance
Commercial Property Insurance (Building content)
Computers, IT infrastructure, Mobile, Equipments

Motor insurance, Commercial & Private, Motor Vehicle

Accident Insurance, Money & Fidelity
Liability Insurance, Marine Cargo

Signed : Management, Water and Sewerage Corporation





approached,” the BCA presi-
dent said.

“One of the things being
talked of is that they’re going
to try and encourage more
private home building on ser-
vice lots the Government pro-
vides, as opposed to the Gov-
ernment building and selling
them.

“That will help the housing
programmes that the Gov-
ernment is planning to launch
in short order. It will expand
the pot of contractors able to
build those homes.”

Asked by Tribune Business
about the level of business
that Bahamian contractors
were currently enjoying, Mr
Wrinkle told this newspaper:
“The majority of contractors
probably have something
going on, but the majority of
contractors do not have
enough going on to sustain
them.

“Tt’s still a “pick-pick’ econ-
omy where they’re still
scratching for work. It takes a
while to spool back, but I
would say we’re in a better
position at the end of the first
quarter than we were at the
end of last year.”

Apart from the potential
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



velopment finally moving
ahead, Mr Wrinkle said there
were relatively few prospects
for additional commercial
development work besides
existing projects.

“The rest of the commer-
cial market is very flat,” he
added. “There’s an excess of
prime office space available,
and there’s still an excess
amount of multi-family space
available.

“We'll have to wait another
eight to 12 months to see
commercial work resurface,
because there’s a lag there
that has to catch up. The sec-
ond home market is the first
one we will see re-emerge,
followed by the housing sec-
tor and the commercial mar-
ket.”

Expressing optimism over
the prospects for Bahamian
contractors at Cable Beach,
Mr Wrinkle told Tribune
Business that the BCA had
met with Baha Mar execu-
tives on Tuesday, and the pro-
ject was “very much a go”.

“They’re trying to do the
‘is’ and cross the ‘ts’, and as
soon as everything is finished
the horses can bolt out of the
gate,” he added. “There is a
lot of work available for
Bahamian contractors, and
we’re looking forward to that.

“All indications are that
we’re weeks away now with
the Commercial Village work,
which is the first phase, and
all the work will go to
Bahamian contractors.”

The jobs and confidence
stimulus from the Baha Mar
project could in themselves
be enough to stimulate the
housing market, Mr Wrinkle
said, as it would “give the
banks a measure of confi-
dence about job security”.

The BCA president said
the impending reforms at the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
“will help our industry, as it
will expand the construction
trade programmes and
involve the private sector with
BTVI initiatives, which will
provide a better education.
We’re looking forward to
that, as it should be very pos-
itive for us”.



Applicants must:

Has an opening for an

ASSOCIATE

Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in any of the areas of trust,
banking or investments.

| Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.
A private Wealth Management Company and medium-sized Family office

¢ Bea qualified attorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders will also be considered. :

Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents relating to special

projects and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the

same.

e Bea seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project, coordinating its various

parts and managing the team associated with the same.



















e¢ Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

¢ Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic understanding of
investment and financial transactions.

Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant supervision.
e Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Successful candidate will work directly with the President of Tradelnvest in the

management of complex private fiduciary arrangements. Responsibilities include regular
contact with overseas affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals, as

well as legal counsel and advisors.



















Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and Confidential to:

The President
Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.

LYFORD MANOR (WEST BUILDING), LYFORD CAY

NASSAU, N.P., THE BAHAMAS

Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 702-2040

Applications must be received by 3° May, 2040.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 7B



5
Food retailing consolidation

in ‘six to nine months’

FROM page 1B

When asked by Tribune
Business whether the over-
supply of food stores in the
Bahamian market was likely
to lead to a consolidation,
Sandy Schaefer, president of
Robin Hood, replied:
“Absolutely. There’s no ques-
tion.

“Tt’s coming already in the
next six to nine months, and
we intend to be among the
winners. There’s some reali-
ties that cannot be overcome.
To some extent, there is more
competitive pressure out
there, and that’s forcing
everyone to follow suit, reduc-
ing prices or operational
costs.”

New entrants to the
Bahamian food/grocery retail-
ing market in recent months
have included Mr Schaefer’s
Robin Hood and Gladstone
Road-based Phil’s Food Ser-
vices (formerly Premium
Foods).

Now competing against
more established food retail

chains, such as City Markets,
Super Value and AML
Foods, neighbourhood chains
such as Budget Meats and
multiple ‘Mom and Pop’
stores, their entrance and the
expansion of other businesses
has led many observers to
view this market as ripe for
consolidation, as too many
stores chase too few cus-
tomers in a market that has
been battered by the reces-
sion.

It is unclear whether con-
solidation will occur through
mergers and acquisitions, with
one food store chain acquiring
a rival or rivals, or through
some stores - or even an
entire chain - being forced out
of business.

Gavin Watchorn, presi-
dent/chief executive of AML
Foods, the Solomon’s Super-
Centre and Cost Right owner,
agreed with Mr Schaefer that
the Bahamian food retailing
market was heading for con-
solidation, although he said
this was more likely to occur
in Freeport than Nassau.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |,
Garden
Exuma, Nassau,

VINCENT ROLLE of
Thompson,

GARY

Hills #2, Mt
Bahamas intend

to change my name to GARY VINCENT LORD

ROLLE. [Tf there are an
of name by Deed

objections to this change
oll, you ma

write such

objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PHILIP NEWTON ANDREWS
of 22 PORT NEW PROVIDENCE, P.O.BOX N-44,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29" day of
APRIL, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PALTAL HOLDING
INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

¢ Jackilin Brice

¢ Scott Smith

¢ Sheldon Smith



¢ Krystal Lord

¢ Debbie Ferguson
c/o Paul A. Wells

e Irene Tucker

“T think the market is head-
ing for that,” Mr Watchorn
told Tribune Business. “I
don’t think you could suggest
there would be a fall-out or
shake-up, but there is defi-
nitely an oversupply of retail-
ers on the food side and new
stores opening up all the time.

“T would see that more in
Freeport than Nassau. I see
something coming there. Giv-
en that Freeport is in a per-
petually worse state than Nas-
sau, something is going to
have to give.”

Arguably the most vulner-
able could be City Markets
and its Bahamas Supermar-
kets parent, which picked the
worst possible time - a reces-
sion and increased competi-
tion - to endure financial woes
that saw them lose almost a
net $20 million over a three-
year period following the buy-
out of their former majority
owner, US retail chain Winn-
Dixie.

Mr Watchorn acknowl-
edged that the increased com-
petition had impacted AML
Foods’ margins, telling Tri-
bune Business: “Our margins
have taken a little dip. It’s just
the nature of the market right
now. We have to be competi-
tive, and that drives margins
down a little bit, yes.

“Competition is not that
bad of a thing. It forces you to
examine what you’re doing
and what you can do better.
There is a little bit of an
unlevel playing field out
there.” He did not elaborate
on that comment.

Mr Schaefer, meanwhile,
said it was impossible for
retailers to continue selling
products below cost indefi-
nitely and rely on volumes.
At some point, the need to
achieve margins and earn a
profit would come into play.

Mr Watchorn, though, said
he remained “troubled” by
the huge quantities of food
and other goods imported by
Bahamians via shopping trips
to Florida, pointing out that
this was money and jobs lost
to the economy when it need-
ed them most - in the midst of
a recession.

“It goes back to Bahami-
ans supporting their own busi-
nesses, and the amount of
product readily available in
the Bahamas that continues
to be imported is still trou-
bling. It’s short-sighted gains
for long-term impediments.”

The AML Foods president
said “hundreds of thousands
of dollars per week in the
food retail business alone”
was being brought back from
south Florida.

“The reaction when you
talk about this is that busi-
nesses are being greedy and
want more business, but you
need to look at job creation
and government revenues,”
he added.

Spending money in the
Bahamas, Mr Watchorn said,
would keep it in the econo-
my, where it would be recy-
cled. “When you bring it to
the States and leave it there, it
stays there,” he added.



Payments not made by May 10th, 2010.
Items will be sold to cover outstanding Account!

stor-it-all
Soldier Road

(by Lowe’s Wholesale),
Telephone: 393-0964

stor-if-all

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

freeportCONCRETE

company limited




























































































Providing the foundations for The Bahamas

Dear Shareholder,
As it has been over a month since our last update to you on March 8, 2010, we felt it was important that you are
aware of the company’s position at the present time.

With regard to the potential buyer of some of the assets of the company that | had mentioned in my last report, this
individual flew to Freeport almost 4 weeks ago and assured me that the definitive agreement would be finalized and
sent to us in ‘short order’ but so far we have not received.

In addition, in the past few weeks, there has been interest from various parties to purchase our 126.75 acres of land,
which sits on the North Shore just east of the Freeport Intl. Airport for quarry operations. Due to this and the fact that
the land sits right next to a quarry operation today, it has led us to revisit the value of this land and to determine if in
fact the land is undervalued in our books.

As most of you are aware, appraisals need to be done on the highest and best use of the land. Definitions by the
American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers state: “The use that, at the time of appraisal, is the most profitable use”.
It may be also defined as: The available use and programme of future utilization that produces the highest present
land value”

As a result of this, we looked over the last appraisal that was done in 2005 and we determined that this appraisal was
based on the land being used more for residential or commercial use. However, on reviewing earlier documentation,
it was clearly evident that the best and highest use of this land is for quarry operations which processes limestone
rock into aggregate and sand. In fact in the actual conveyance of this property to Freeport Concrete Company Limited
it states “Not to use any portion of the said hereditaments for any purpose other than for the operation of a plant for
the excavation, manufacture and sale of rock and construction aggregate”

Therefore, we contacted a very reputable engineering and appraisal firm here in Freeport and had them review our
findings. This has resulted in us receiving an appraisal from W. Carver Grant & Co. valuing the land at $4,950,000.
We have sent a copy of this appraisal to our auditors for their review and will also be posting a copy of the appraisal
on our website www.fccbahamas.com for you, our shareholders, to review.

The company continues to lose money as we have no cash to purchase sufficient inventory at the Home Centre. Only
one of our suppliers of building materials is supporting us by sending us trailers of lumber, sheetrock and plywood,
this is keeping us in business, but is not enough inventory to enable us to be profitable with existing costs, despite us
reducing our expenses approximately 36% in this 6 months period compared to the same 6 months last year.
Attached are our 2"° quarter financials showing a 2"° quarter loss of $636k and shareholders equity as at February
28, 2010 a negative $855k.

Our board of directors have determined that this latest appraisal of the land has a significant and material effect on
our balance sheet. We have therefore decided to restate this asset in our books as we feel that the appraised value
is fair based on the value of the land for limestone rock mining over a 15 year period.

The restating of the value of this asset will be done this month and will mean an increase in shareholders equity by
$3,429,000, which you will see in our 34 quarter as at May 31, 2010 financials.

Unfortunately, this does not help the company from a cash perspective.

However, we will be now trying to sell this land for a price that will enable us to pay off the bank debt of $2 million and
have sufficient cash to buy the inventory we need for the Home Centre. This will then result in our being able to
increase our daily sales to a sufficient level that will generate profits now that we have reduced our expenses
substantially.

Meanwhile, whilst we go through this process of trying to sell this land, we need to remain in operation. Regrettably
our bank is not willing to advance us any additional funds and is putting pressure for the sale of some of the
company’s assets mentioned earlier to be completed in order that they can be paid off.

Time is of the essence and the board is also considering the possibility of doing a shareholders rights offering to
facilitate a critical cash injection into the company. We will inform all shareholders of any decision in this regard.

We thank you for your continued support and will continue to keep you informed as we work through this process.
Yours sincerely,

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer
April 26, 2010

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
(in B$ '000's)
As at
8/31/09
(unaudited)

As at
2/28/10
(unaudited)
ssets
Current assets:
Cash
ccounts receivable, net
Inventories
Inventories of spare parts and supplies
Deposits and prepaid expenses

Total current assets
Property,plant and equipment

Total assets

Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity

Current liabilities:

Bank overdraft

ccounts payable and accrued expenses
Warranty Provision

Current portion of long term debt

Total current liabilities
Long term liability

Shareholders equity:
Share Capital
Contributed surplus
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Current earnings
Total equity

Total liabilities and
shareholders’ equity

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Consolidated Statement of Operations

(in B$ '000's)

6 months

2/28/09
(unaudited)

6 months.
2/28/10
(unaudited)

3 months
2/28/09
(unaudited)

3 months
2/28/10
(unaudited)

Sales 737 2,639 2,346 6,064
Cost of Sales (603) (1,871) (1,773) (4,441)
Gross Profit 134 768 573 1,623
Payroll (321) (704) (693) (1,203)
Rent (107) (107) (213) (210)
Utilities (67) (86) (127) (181)
Other operating costs (123) (210) (245) (399)

(608) (1,107) (1,278) (1,993)
Net income (loss) from operations (474) (339) (705) (370)

Depreciation and amortization (122) (142) (242) (290)
Interest expense (40) (40) (85) (82)

Net income/(loss) (636) (621) (1,032) (742)

To advertise in The Tribune -
UC a MAWES ae RR
UE ate aera a TE



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





CARICOM ‘not doing much’ on EPA details

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



ONE year after regional Carifo-
rum governments signed on to the
Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the European Union
(EU), there is still “not much being
done” at a regional level to hasten
implementation of the trade agree-
ment, the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s trade expert said yes-
terday.

Hank Ferguson said the non-
CARICOM Dominican Republic
has taken quick advantage of last

year’s signing, and has already begun
exporting a mass amount of sugar
to some EU member states.
According to Mr Ferguson, the
Dominican Republic has been
extremely proactive in moving for-
ward with EPA implementation, but
ironically had been one of the hold-
ups in bringing the agreement into
force for the region. It is a part of
Cariforum, a non-legal body, but not
a part of CARICOM -a legal entity.
And while some three years still
remain for this country to complete
legislation essential to implement-
ing the EPA, according to minister
of state for finance, Zhivargo Laing,

it would seem that the Bahamas
could also have jump-started its
trade with the EU like the Domini-
can Republic has done.

“Until implementation, we won’t
realize the benefits,” said Mr Fer-
guson.

Measures

Most measures still waiting to be
enacted have already been passed
by CARIFORUM countries when
they joined other global trade agree-
ments such as the World Trade
Organization (WTO).

The Bahamas is in the queue to

accede to the WTO, which according
Mr Ferguson, will be a more strin-
gent implementation process.

He added, however, that the EPA
implementation process could assist
this nation with the smooth adop-
tion of other upcoming trade agree-
ments, including the CARIBCAN
agreement with Canada.

The EPA cannot, though, fully
come into force until the Joint Coun-
cil of Cariforum and EU heads meet,
and the conundrum with the
Dominican Republic has not allowed
that to happen.

The Dominican Republic is lob-
bying for Cariform, of which they

are a signatory, to be a legal entity
for EPA accession. For now, Cari-
com is the legal authority.

Caribbean countries are eager to
receive the benefits of the EPA, one
of which is a development assistance
arrangement that promises up to 165
million Euros.

Mr Ferguson said those benefits
will not be realized until there is an
EPA implementation unit, which is
not recognized by the Dominican
Republic.

“The real question now is: How
do you reconcile the DR’s (Domini-
can Republic) position with that of
Caricom bodies,” he said.

‘Totally wrong’ on Blue Hill re-routing

FROM page 1B

deter commuters from mak-
ing the trip, costing Blue Hill
Road businesses dearly.

Such a trip was something
Bahamians “inherently are
not prepared to do”, Mr
D’ Aguilar added, saying that
most would “take the path of
least resistance”.



Urging the Government to
make Market Street flow
north and Blue Hill Road
flow south if it stuck to its
one-way plans, the former
Chamber president suggest-
ed that it had implemented
its current scheme based on
the likely traffic improve-
ments alone, without consid-
ering the wider impact on
businesses.

“In the process, they’ve
devastated and destroyed a
number of businesses at a crit-
ical time. They’re very weak
as a result of the recession,”
Mr D’ Aguilar added.

He questioned whether the
perceived improvement in
traffic flow was, from the
Government’s perspective,
worth more than the poten-
tial harm inflicted on busi-

nesses in the Blue Hill Road
area, coupled with employ-
ment at these companies.

Already, the Super Value
store on Blue Hill Road is
alleging that it has lost
$100,000 in revenues as a
result of the traffic change,
while Heastie’s Gas Station
has suffered a customer
decline just after making a $1
million investment.

President of the Carmichael
Business League, Ethric
Bowe, previously said: "The
road changes are destructive
to jobs. More than 400 jobs
are on the line. The decision
will close a number of busi-
nesses. Many will have to
downsize.

"Tt's one thing to go out of
business, but it's entirely dif-
ferent to be put out of busi-
ness, and it's even worse to
be put out of business by your
own government.”

School uniform store pro-
prietor Janet Fowler with-
drew a $250,000 loan last year
to relocate her business to



Blue Hill Road before she
knew of the traffic diversion
she fears will never take off.

"I'm dead before I've
lived," she said.

"And I feel as if my gov-
ernment is trying to bury me.

"This change has put me in
a critical situation and I'm
asking for government to
reverse the traffic."

Super Value operations
manager Kendrick Moss said
business at the Blue Hill
Road store had dropped by
up to 40 per cent during their
once busy evening hours, and
more than 32 employees
could be affected.

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COLONIAL

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 28 APRIL 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,556.44 | CHG -5.09 | %CHG -0.33 | YTD -8.94 | YTD % -0.57

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.00

Securit_y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

3.87
5.23:
0.44
S15
2.14
9.62
2.69
5.00
21
1.32

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

5.94
8.75
9.50
aioe
1.00
0.27
5.00
3.95.
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

EPS $
0.250

Previous Close Today's Close Div $
1.02 1.02
10.63 10.63
5.24 5.24
0.44 0.44
3.15 3.15
2.17 2.17
12.07 12.07
2.84 2.84

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.10
-0.03
0.00

0.050
0.598
OFT
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)
Interest

3.30
2.94
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08

5.80
21
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.27
3.38.
9.35:
10.00

1.00
0.27
5.59.
9.35
10.00

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
%%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund

1.3702
2.8266
1.4467
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
83.1986
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

Principal Protected TIGRS, S

10.0000 R Fi ity Bah Int'l Inves'
Principal Protected TIGRS,

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

ighted price for daily volume
weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

total shares traded today

hare paid in the last 12 months

price divided by the last 12 month eamings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
ies 1

Bids
10.06

Ask &
11.06
200 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
O45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4602 1.50 6.57
2.9116 0.85 0.52
1.5274 1.34 4.98
-3.54
5.44
6.99
13.50
5.25
4.37
5.34
5.33

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

DivS
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price P/E

14.00

Daily Val.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.507147

NAV 6MTH
1.407626
2.830013
1.491956

B.2025
13.4986
107.5706
105.7706
1.1034
1.0764
1.1041
9.5795.

ote
0.98
3.45
3.99
1.25
0.79
1.23
5.33

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

10.5417 -2.13 10.96
7.6928 -0.31
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of C
Last Price - Last traded over-the-c
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of th.
EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

47.51

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting
career opportunity?

AVAILABLE POSITION:

The Senior Manager -
Watch listed Accounts

e Manage a portfolio of high risk business accounts
and supervise/monitor the banks potential loss
exposure accounts

NOTICE is hereby given that
PODOLEO STREET, P.O. BOX SB-7060, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29" day of April, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

FRANCOIS MACKEY of

Teacher Vacancies for September 2010

Kingsway Academy invites applicants from qualified and
experienced candidates for teaching positions at the:

High School level

* Technical Drawing and Woodwork (Grades 7 to 9)

* Music (Grades 8 to 12)

* Information Technology (Grades 7 to 12 and
Advanced Placement level)

* Physics (Grades 10 to 12 and Advanced Placement
level)

The successful candidates should have the following:
* An academic degree in the area of specialization

* A teaching certificate

* Excellent communication skills

* A love for children and learning

* High standards of morality

* Be a born-again Christian

Acomplete application package consists of:
(a) completed and signed Kingsway Academy application form
- available at the school’s Administration building or on the website

www.kingswayacademy.com (See Document Downloads)

(b) detailed resume with cover letter

(c) recent photograph

(d) three (3) reference letters, one (1) being from your church’s
minister

(e) legible e-mail address and working telephone contacts

Note: All documents should be submitted
at the same time.

Please forward to:

Kingsway Academy Employment Application

Kingsway Academy

Box N-4378

Bernard Road

Nassau, The Bahamas
e-mail:jbethell@kingswayacademy.com

Deadline: To ensure consideration, complete

application materials must be received by
Friday, May 14", 2010

TIES

A”
—

& =,

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010
Correct logo is key to a business ‘go-go’

FROM page 1B

manipulated to suggest speed
and assurance. Be relevant

be, clip art can be copied too
easily. Not only will original
art make a more impressive
statement about your compa-
ny, but it will set your busi-

and creative. ness apart from others.

Don't use clip art
However tempting it may

Avoid trendy looks
One option is to make



































«°| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

[VACANT POSITION]

| Coordinator Pharmacy

Qualifications

Experience in a hospital setting is a must.

7 - 10 years as a Pharmacist with a minimum

of 5 years in a management position.
Intermediate to Advance computer skills is a must
Excellent written and oral communication skills
Excellent customer service skills

Education

* Bachelors Degree in Pharmacy or Science
discipline and license Competence Certificate.
* PharmD is a major plus.

Position Summary

Visionary, pioneering and implementing of new projects
Revenue generation, purchase management

gradual logo changes and
choose a logo that will stay
current for 10 to 20 years or
longer. Quaker Oats modi-
fied the Quaker Man on its
package over a 10-year period
to avoid undermining cus-
tomer confidence. That’s the
mark of a good design.

Watch Your Colours

Be careful as you explore
color options. Your five-
colour logo may be gorgeous,
but when producing it on sta-
tionery the price won't be so
attractive, nor will it work in
mediums that only allow one
or two colours. Try not to
exceed three colours unless
you decide it is absolutely
necessary.

Hire a Designer

A professional design firm
may charge anywhere from
$4,000 to $15,000 for a logo
design. Shop around, as there
are a lot of [freelance] design-
ers with rates ranging from
$15 to $150 per hour, based
on their experience. Don't
hire someone just because of
their bargain price. Remem-
ber that a good logo should
last at least 10 years, so if you
look at the amortisation of
that cost over a 10-year peri-
od, it doesn't seem so bad.

Moreover, graphic design-
ers know whether or not a
logo design will transfer easi-
ly into print or on to a sign.
You might come up with a
beautiful design that can't be

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DELAWARE OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on April 28, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 10th day of June, 2010 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

APRIL 29, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

transferred or would cost too
much money to be printed.
Your logo is the foundation
of all your promotional mate-
rials, so this is one area where
spending a little more now
can really pay off later.
Ensure that you receive
your logo graphic from your
designer in its original created
format, especially now that it
belongs to you. Having a
library of logo files will enable
you to send vendors the type
of files needed to other
designers, printers or other
services in the future.

Protecting Your Logo

Once you've produced a
logo, ensure it is trademarked
to protect it from use by oth-
er companies.

Creating a logo sounds
easy, doesn't it? It can be. Just
remember to keep your cus-
tomers and the nature of your
business in mind when you
put it all together. In time,
you'll have succeeded in
building equity in your trade-
mark, and it will become a
positive and recognisable
symbol of your product or
service.

I hope these tips were use-
ful and have convinced you
of the necessity of owning a
logo. So, until we meet again,
play a little, have fun and stay
on top of your game

Readers Feedback:
From: Ron Lightbourn

THE TRIBUNE

(rlight@coralwave.com)
To: Deidre M. Bastian

Thanks for your well writ-
ten article, The Point that
Gives You Power. I was hop-
ing for instructions on using it.
Have you already published
this?

Hi Ron: Thank you for tak-
ing the time to read The Art
of Graphix column, which is
published every Thursday in
the Business section of The
Tribune.

Yes, it was published
already. That was the pub-
lished edition you read. I have
found two sites that would
assist you with adding sounds
to a power point presentation.
(Copy or type either link into
your browser window) and
follow.

a

http://office.microsoft.com/e
n -
s/powerpoint/HA10095060103
3.aspx,

(b) |

http:/Awww.microsoft.com/e
ducation/Multimedi-
aSlideShow.aspx

Let me know if this was
helpful.
Have a good day.

NB: the author can be con-
tacted at deedee2111@hot-
mail.com

ET Ta ae) ar

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DONNETTA
ELIZABETH BROWN of SP-64071, Carmichael
Rd.,Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to DONNETTA ELIZABETH TURNQUEST.
If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you ue write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL GASPARD
of LYON ROAD OFF SHIRLEY STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22"¢ day of April, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TO SHAREHOLDERS OF

Staff morale/team building
Monitoring of continuing education for the team LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
Monthly reports/data analysis

Monitoring formulary/formulary changes. International Business Companies Act

(N°45 of 2000)
ISD INTERNATIONAL S.A.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Assisting on-line whenever possible

Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of ISD INTERNATIONAL S.A. has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com

The date of completion of the dissolution was the 17th day of
March, 2010.

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Fads kh ih
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.

Liquidator

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2010 - 2011
School Year.



Journalism / Literature (Gr. 10-12)
Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-12)
Math (Gr. 7-12)

Physics (Gr. 10-12)

Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)

Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)
Chemistry

Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
Health Science (Gr. 7-9)

General Science (Gr. 7-9)
Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)

Music (Gr. 7-12) -

Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr. 7-12)
Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)

Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)

Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)



Are you...
Motivated, outgoing and professional?

SO ARE WE !

Join our rapidly growing group of companies and
enjoy an exciting and rewarding career in sales.

Doctors Hospital Health System
regarding

Outside Sales DIVIDEND DECLARATION

Representative

Whereas there are sufficient funds to provide a cash dividend

Applicants must: to the shareholders of Doctors Hospital Health System, and

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of
Temple Christian School.

Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or University in ; ; ; ees ,
he area of epscieieaiion, ° an » Bea highly motivated self starter with an enthusiastic, friendly and outgoing personality.
. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma. » Be willing to be trained in a variety of product knowledge areas.
. Have at least two years teaching experience _ .
in the relevant subject area with excellent + Possess excellent organizational and time management skills

communication skills. . » Be able to work independently: represent the interests of management and the
. Applicants must have the ability to prepare ; a .
students for all examinations to the BUC/BGCSE company professionally and efficiently: and handle customers effectively.
» Possess computer skills, to include working knowledge of MS Office Suite (Excel,

levels.
. Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra .

Word, PowerPoint, and Internet Explorer etc.
+ Be punctual and have reliable transportation.

The ideal candidate must:
Whereas the Directors have determined that after the

payment of such dividends the Company will be able to meet
all of its continuing obligations and provide adequate funds

for reinvestment in the business,

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors has
curricular programmes.

og , declared a dividend of $0.02 per share to be paid to
Application must be picked up at the High School

Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph and
three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton

The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is May 3rd, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

shareholders of record on May 7, 2010. The payment

Position is commission based - your Success depends entirely on your sales efforts - the
date shall be May 14, 2010.

sky is the limit!
Construction trade experience preferred.

Please email your resume to outsidesales1@hotmail.com

Fae DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life











THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 15B





Royal Caribbean returns
to profit as revenue rises

By ASHLEY M HEHER
AP Retail Writer

CHICAGO (AP) — Royal
Caribbean Cruises Ltd.
returned to a first-quarter
profit as more travelers vaca-
tioned on its ships and spent
more money when they did,
the cruise line owner said
Wednesday.

The company that owns
Royal Caribbean and Celebri-
ty cruise lines earned $87.5
million, or 40 cents per share,
during the three-month peri-
od that ended on March 31.
That figure includes a 39-cent
gain from a legal settlement.
Excluding that benefit, Royal
Caribbean earned a penny
per share — far better than
last year’s loss of $36.2 mil-
lion, or 17 cents per share.

The Miami company’s rev-
enue climbed 12 per cent to
$1.49 billion, up from $1.33
billion for the same period
last year and trumped Wall
Street forecasts.

Royal Caribbean said it’s
getting higher prices for cruise
tickets than last year, a signif-
icant measure of demand
because cruise lines generally
set prices to keep their ships
as full as possible.

“While the economy is still
affecting our results, we are
pleased to be reporting bet-
ter than expected revenues
and costs, and we continue to
see a gradual and steady
improvement in the booking



environment,” Richard D
Fain, chairman and CEO, said
in a statement.

Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Reuters expected
Royal Caribbean to lose five
cents per share, excluding
one-time items, on revenue
of $1.48 billion.

Also Wednesday, Royal
Caribbean said reservations
showed “a gradual and steady
improvement” as the eco-
nomic recovery began to gain
traction and travelers spent
more time — and money —
vacationing.

It raised its full-year profit
forecast, saying it expected to
earn between $2.15 and $2.25
per share for fiscal 2010. And
it narrowed its forecast for net
yield — a ratio of revenue to
occupancy during the period,
saying it now expects the
measure to climb four per
cent to five per cent for the
year.

The company said it expect-
ed that travel disruptions
caused by Iceland’s volcano
will cut into profit by less than
five cents per share. That will
likely be recorded in the sec-
ond quarter.

Royal Caribbean shares fell
$1.38, or 3.8 per cent, to
$34.92 Wednesday morning.





—ooee—e

THE WORLD’S LARGEST and newest cruise ship >
Oasis of the Seas docked at Port Everglades in Ft.

Lauderdale, Florida.

(AP Photo)



























































































































































































































ail





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
5-Day FORECAST Say Ng
i; :
z, se 0|1|/2|3|4|5|6|7|8|¢
es Co id X “ Low MODERATE | HIGH V. HIGH EXT.
~ Se
= é. ORLANDO ~ Sunny to partly Mainly clear Partly sunny and Mostly sunny and Partly sunny; breezy, Sunshine mixing with The higher the AccuWeather UV Index number, the
. c High: 83° F/28°C; a cloudy breezy warm, humid some clouds greater the need for eye and skin protection.
© Low:61°F/16°C High: 85° High: 87° High: 88° High: 86°
\ > ? High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 72° Low: 74° Low: 73° Low: 73° as PO
Stearn j ¢ + , ET Ta cr Ea VT) Pat Ld VT emit td .
High: 81° F/27° C : ae < 80° F 85°-75° F 105°-76° F 98°-77° F 93°-76° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.({t.
: 2 ae The excl AccuWeather RealF cr erat dex that combines the effects of t it d, humidit hine intensity, cloudi tati
foe ee F206 = — oe aa re body everything that effects how warrn er cold a person feske. Tempersaurse reflect the high and the low tor the day. Today = 8:01am. 25 2:10am. -06
ea ‘ 8:30pm. 3.2 2:08 p.m. _-0.7
) Friday 8:48 a.m. 2.5 2:58 a.m. -0.4
? \ 9:16 p.m. 3.1 2:53 p.m. -0.6
¢ . \ = i, Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 9:35am. 2.4 3:45am. -0.3
7 v t ABACO A Temperature 10:02pm. 2.9 3:39p.m. -0.3
a eerie & High ~- 86" F/80"C Sunday 10:23am. 2.2 4:33am. 0.0
7 : 68° °C sw 7 Low ... 70° F/21° C : a . : : *
5 a 14 knots Cc ee <= ince 82° F/28° C 10:49 p.m. 2.7 4:25 p.m._ 0.0
4 - Normal low 70° F/21° C Mond: : 5
a “a. WEST PALM BEACH = Last years h eee ee ee
Ig! A on ee ~ 4-8 knots Last year's low . 72° F/22°C - — - . = =
Low: 69° F/21°C eo. Precipitation Tuesday 12:05p.m. 2.1 6:12am. 0.3
A FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT e ete p ie YOStEFdAY ceeceescesesesceseeeeseeeeee, 0.00" 0 6:07 p.m. __0.4
High: 81° F/27°C High: 80° F/27°C BAL TO CatG .n-ssnsscsesee oo Wednesdayl2:29a.m. 2.5 7:03am. 0.4
caan 71° F/22°C @ ae 67°F/A19°C Normal year to date .........cccceseseeseeeereeeeeees 7.42 1:02 p.m. 2.4 7:05 p.m. 0.6
= a AccuWeather.com
Vv MIAMI ELEUTHERA Forecasts and graphics provided by Sun anp Moon
ie _ High: 82° F/28°C 5 he REO e AccuWeather, Inc. ©2010
pie knits " = 70° fee NASSAU — High: 85° F/29° C Sunrise...... 6:36 a.m. Moonrise ....9:11 p.m.
Low: 70° F/21°C _ 1-730 °
ao ; High: 82° F/28° C Low: 73° F/23°G Sunset....... 7:39 p.m. Moonset ..... 7:08 a.m.
> A ON me c Last New First Full
KEY WEST p at i Pa
High: 81° F/27°C , am << a Cre i a
Low: 73° F/23°C a ~ Py A Low: 70° F/21°C xs
a WV Cia zs May 6 May 13 May 20 May 27
8-16 knots t I
Vv = SAN SALVADOR
GREAT EXUMA High: 87° F/31°C
8-16 knots High: 88° F/31°C f Low: 72° F/22°C
Ags Low: 74° F/23° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's o ANDROS" ‘ highs and tonights's lows. P=] Hote oe oe *s ay = ie ‘
Ow: 7 at >
. x” a
INSURANCE MANAGMENT TRACKING Map LONG ISLAND _
eee 8-16 knots
Z i 55 SS SEEN SOS EES ‘ Low: 74° F/23°
ie a Cape Hatteras SSE SSS SS (GS OES Ls Sd GS Sa NOG MAYAGUANA
+355 Atlanta 5 ‘Charlotte ° Highs: 69°F/21°C SSSLILLLL Shown is today's = >> ae ore
| Highs: 78°F /26° °C Highs: 74°F/23°C weather. Temperatures = ‘ms
ile SE ene Bermuda pa CROOKEDISLAND/ACKLINS =
| Sao * Highs: 78°F/26°C Highs 7A. aie focay, sb Olle and High: 91° F/33° C
pensscalat CH az i tonight's lows. RAGGEDISLAND /ow:75°F/24°C
}) Highs: 78°F/26°C pase d a
2 ° . il
~30 ~ Daytona Beach GREAT MARUS .
<> © Highs: 79°F/26°C A igh: eG e
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Cozumel Highs: 93°F /34°C San Juan Friday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 74°F
Highs: 88°F/31°C rae lamar ° ° ANDROS Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
A g ° es e Highs: 90°F /32°C BSS Friday: ESE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
are = e Santa ~ » Antigua = ot CAT ISLAND Today: ENE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
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uss mt = Kingston Domingo “Highs: 88°F/31°C Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
Highs: 88°F/31°C Highs: 89°F/32°C Highs: 86°F/30°C rae CROOKED ISLAND Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 7 Miles 79° F
oF, gns: Friday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 79° F
as ELEUTHERA Today: ENE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 7a Fr
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ua® - Highs: 90°F/32°C o = Friday: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
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QALFI33°C ¢ ‘Trinida Friday: E at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 77°F
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Se ee es ee eo Wgns: { CZ Friday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
Se as Ce a See SU . an REG SES NASSAU Today: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
S oa Rw oN J ofS Shs Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
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Warm Cold Stationary Showers Rain | T-storms Flurries Snow Ice RAGGED ISLAND Today: NE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
Vv - a a SANs NS ¢ o de eo 2 sss S . Sa SR rvielels Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 76° F

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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



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Full Text
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AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES




TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

{\

HIGH
LOW

ms SUNNY TD

Volume: 106 No.131



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



PLP operatives are allegedly
continuing a vicious smear cam-
paign against one of their own
colleagues, The Tribune has
uncovered.

Having recently resigned from
her post as vice-chairman in the
Progressive Liberal Party, Melis-
sa Sears has become the focus of
repeated attacks by PLPs on the
Internet and in the political
sphere.

In their messages, some party
supporters have sought to sully
the former vice-chairman’s rep-

utation and have gone as far as to cast a cloud
of suspicion over her friendship with a sitting

FNM Cabinet Minister.

Yesterday, a source close to Ms Sears actu-
ally distanced himself from the party’s official
messaging on the issue, claiming he did not
want his planned statement on the matter to
be associated with what “the rest of the par-

ty” was seeking to do.

Ms Sears, he said, will make any statement

Pim blowin’ it

82F
71F



. Lhe Tribune



ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



PARTLY CLOUDY

PLPS Did
(0 Sm
eXx-chiet

Repeated attacks on Melissa
Sears following resignation

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

USA TODAY.

4,920

CaP ae
SAMMI



Available at
The Paint Depot

Mt. Royal Ave. Tel:326-1875

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Amid speculation that thousands of Chinese
labourers are expected in the Bahamas for the
newly-sealed Baha Mar investment deal, Jian



INVESTORS in the Baha Mar project on
Cable Beach have submitted applications for
almost 5,000 foreign workers, an official at the

Tan, chief of the commercial section at the Chi-

governments.

MELISSA SEARS





Ms Sears’
informed that a current PLP Member of Par-

she feels is necessary if and when
the time comes.

In the meantime, however, the
vice-chairwoman’s resignation is
continuing to be used as a political
football among two of the most
prominent warring camps within
the party.

The attacks against Ms Sears
has left some within the organi-
sation to question the amount of
damage this issue will ultimately
inflict upon the party.

It has also left others calling
for a shift in the messaging of the
PLP and a “much needed
change” in the way “sensitive
matters are handled.”

As it relates to the attacks on
name The Tribune was reliably

liament was the actual genesis of those

reports.

In fact, we were made aware yesterday
that an operative within the party was suc-
cessful in transmitting a lurid text message to
the Cabinet Minister’s cellular phone seeking

SEE page 15

STUTTERING

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AN INVESTIGA-
TION has been launched
into the claims of patient
neglect and mistreatment
at Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre.

The allegations, which
were made by a former
Sandilands Rehabilitation



to our attention an inves-

Centre (SRC) patient and
published in The Tribune
yesterday, have not been
confirmed by the institu-
tion, but management
instead expressed a will-
ingness to investigate
these claims.

Hospital Administrator
Catherine Weech said:
“As a result of the infor-
mation he is now bringing

tigation will now be con-
ducted.”

The former patient
described his stay at the
SRC as a horrifying real-
ization about the treat-
ment of patients at the
institution. He claimed
that some attending staff

Chinese Embassy told The Tribune exclusively
yesterday.

nese Embassy in Nassau, said investors have sub-
mitted their plans to the Bahamian and Chinese

SEE page 19





Felipé Major/Tribune staff



SEE page 14







te oe

a

CHICKEN

SANDWICH





BPA wants NIB to reopen
drug plan negotiations

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Pharma-
ceutical Association is
appealing to the National
Insurance Board to consider
reopening National Pre-
scription Drug Plan negoti-
ations after NIB director
Algernon Cargill abruptly
ended all talks by way of a
public announcement on
Sunday.

Mr Cargill told the press
he had not heard from the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association (BPA) for six
weeks, but the organisation
that represents about 90 per
cent of the country’s private
pharmaceutical companies,
in a statement released yes-
terday, claimed any delays in
their negotiations were
brought on by the National
Insurance Board (NIB).

SEE page 14



Two charged in
connection with
gay club fight

TWO women appeared in
court yesterday in connection
with a fight that broke out at a
gay night club.

Janiqua Russell, 20, and
Lacey Knowles, 19, were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane, yesterday.

It is alleged that on Sun-
day, April 25, Russell and
Knowles while being con-
cerned together caused griev-
ous harm to Angela New-
church.

According to police Ms
Newchurch was reportedly
stabbed after a fight broke
out among female patrons at
The Garage nightclub, on
Gladstone Road. Ms New-
church was treated in hospital
and discharged.

Russell, of Pinewood Gar-
dens, and Knowles, of Wind-
sor Estates, pleaded not guilty

SEE page 19

LACEY KNOWLES and Janiqua
Russell appeared in court
yesterday.

Opposition questions aspects of
environmental protection legislation

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



WHILE praising aspects of the Conservation and Control of
Forests Bill as a key piece of legislation in protecting the envi-
ronment, Opposition members yesterday questioned if aspects
of the Bill violated the constitution and criticised government for
not consulting with affected communities and landowners before

bringing the Bill to Parliament.

The legislation would create areas of forest reserves, protected
forests and conservation forests throughout the entire Bahamas on
portions of private, commonage and Crown land. Under the Bill,

SEE page 15



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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MORE THAN 40 MOTORISTS DEMONSTRATE THEIR FRUSTRATION ON BAILLOU HILL ROAD



anger by &
one-way

system

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MORE than 40 motorists
were involved in a demonstra-
tion against the new one-way
system on Baillou Hill Road
and Market Street yesterday.

Dissatisfied business owners
and residents drove two laps
around the one-way loop,
demonstrating their frustration



















with the new system during ear-
ly morning traffic from 7am
until around 8.30am, ending at
the Super Value foodstore on
Baillou Hill Road.

Organised by the newly
formed Coconut Grove Busi-
ness League, the action fol-
lowed a town meeting held to
discuss the new road system on
Tuesday night.

Athama Bowe, member of







MOTERCADE on Baillou Hill Road.
PHOTO: Felipé Major/Tribune staff





the league and attendant at the
town meeting, said: “It’s impor-
tant for the government to
appreciate that the citizens
expect them to not only hear
but listen, and to respect what

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EDUCATIONAL
LOAN

CAR
PURCHASE

their submissions are — not to
just instinctively respond as if its
business as usual.

into a major highway ... It’s a
fundamental nightmare.”

Minister of Transport and
Works Neko Grant said he felt
the majority of the concerns
about the road changes were
due to the disruption caused by
ongoing construction — and in
some cases, resistance to
change.

He said it is important for
Bahamians to consider that the
government is not merely
paving roads but reconstruct-
ing them, and that the improve-
ments will also enhance utili-

Nightmare

“Last night you got the
approach that ‘We hear you but
we’re still going do what we’re
gonna do.’ Culturally and
socially Market Street was
nothing but a side corner, and
now they’ve put in speeding
lanes. You walk out of your
front shop door and straight



ties and telecommunications
services.

Mr Grant said the one way
system is based on years of
planning and research into how
traffic congestion in New Prov-
idence can be alleviated.

He said there were numer-
ous suggestions made at the
meeting that the government
plans to act on, such as adding
more signs indicating school
zones and pedestrian crossings;
making lane markings more
clear and raising the height of
roadside utility wires.















T-SHIRTS were made up for the
store owners in the area.

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major
/Tribune staff

Unite) [e718
eas eles
STH TE



OWNER OF ESSO Baillou Hill Road Mr Heastie| ie speaks out to the press yes-
terday morning.



PHONE: 322-2157

POLICE

| OFFICERS
stop the
motorcade
yesterday
morning to
ensure

| certain
measures
are in
place.

TASTY. FRESH.

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DUNKIN
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Preliminary
results name
Nicole Martin as
union president

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

OFFICIAL results of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering
and Allied Workers Union
elections have yet to be
released by the Depart-
ment of Labour.

Preliminary results
polling stations in New
Providence named ‘A
Team’ candidate Nicole
Martin as the new presi-
dent of the largest union in
the Bahamas.

Third

If the result stands, it will
be the third time she has
secured this position in
under a year, after a Court
of Appeal ruling voided
two previous wins.

Her opponent, Worker’s
Coalition candidate Lionel
Morley, congratulated Ms
Martin on her success.

He said: “We do not
intend to challenge it; the
people have decided who
they want and we hope
that she is prepared for the
task at hand.”

Bail granted to
man accused of
committing perjury

A MAN accused of com-
mitting perjury in a murder
trial has been granted bail.

Charles Russell was
charged with perjury last
Friday and pleaded not
guilty to the charge. He
was back before Deputy
Chief Magistrate Carolita
Bethell in Court 8, Bank
Lane for a bail hearing yes-
terday.

Russell, 29, of Pinewood
Gardens, is accused of
committing perjury on
Thursday, April 22.

It is alleged that while a
witness under oath in the
Supreme Court, Russell
gave evidence that he
knew was false, intending
to mislead the jury.

Adjourned

He was granted $7,500
bail with no objection from
the prosecution. The case
was adjourned to July 1.

Russell was a prosecu-
tion witness in the murder
trial of Cohen Light-
bourne, which came to an
abrupt end last Friday
when Justice Vera Watkins
discharged the jury, citing
“unforeseen circum-
stances.”

The decision came after
it was revealed to the judge
that some members of the
jury may have witnessed
the arrest of Russell out-
side the courtroom after
lead prosecutor Franklyn
Williams filed a complaint
with the police, claiming
the witness had perverted
the course of justice.

The judge decided it was
probable that the jury had
seen what happened and
had been compromised.

A retrial will be ordered.

Lightbourne is charged
with the July 25, 2007
shooting death of Carl
Russell, 33, who was killed
at a home in the Pride
Estates subdivision.

General practice clinic
cancelled, says PMH

THE Princess Margaret
Hospital wishes to advise
the public that the general
practice afternoon clinic
scheduled for tomorrow
has been cancelled due to
family medicine examina-
tions.

All persons with
appointments are asked to
contact the clinic for new
appointment dates at tele-
phone number 322-2861,
extension 2161/2201.

PMH apologises for any
inconveniences.



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY: BILL FOR AN ACT 10 PROVIDE FOR CONSERVATION AND CONTROL OF FORESTS

The House debates
legislation ‘to revive
lumber industry’

Proposal to protect forested areas throughout Bahamas

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



MEMBERS of the House
of Assembly yesterday debat-
ed legislation Government
says will provide the founda-
tion to revitalise the lumber
industry while preserving and
protecting forested areas
throughout the Bahamas.

The Bill for an Act to Pro-
vide for the Conservation and
Control of Forests will create
forest reserves, protected
forests and conservation
forests on designated acres of
land — including Crown, pri-
vate and commonage —
throughout the country.

An estimated 3,416,398
acres of land throughout the
Bahamas are part of the des-
ignations of forest categories.

For example in New Provi-
dence — which consists of
52,000 acres — some 1,952
acres of land has been desig-
nated as forest reserves and
7,728 acres for conservation
forests.

Grand Bahama, with
339,200 acres of land, will have
106,427 acres of forest
reserves and 161,372 acres of
conservation forests.

Only two islands, Andros
and Abaco have areas desig-
nated for protected forests —
78,597 and 33,643 acres
respectively.

In addition to conservation
initiatives, the legislation also
aims to facilitate the commer-
cial harvesting of timber, an
industry that has been dor-
mant since 1973 and once pro-
vided more than a thousand
local jobs, said Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux.

He added that the suspen-
sion of commercial harvesting
caused pine tree overcrowd-
ing leading to periodic fires
that destroyed acres of forest
due to a lack of management
of these resources.

Now, he said, "a compre-
hensive, integrated approach
to managing the timber
resources in partnership with
Bahamians is required to nur-
ture this renewable resource.

"This legislation we debate
today is the legal architecture
to provide for the protection

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and wide use of the heritage of
future generations of Bahami-
ans."

Local forests, at one time,
provided the source material
for dyes for fabric, timber for
shipbuilding and flooring,
wood for paper.

They also provide a natural
habitat for crabs, birds, flora
and fauna.

Vital

"These abundant and sus-
tainable timber resources
which are so vital to rainfall,
the water table, fisheries and
the quality of air we breathe
once employed over 1,500
people full-time and support-
ed communities numbering
several thousand," he said.

The legislation provides for
the establishment of a forestry
unit which will include a direc-
tor of forestry and other forest
officers to facilitate the oper-
ations of the unit and exercise
punishment to those found in
violation of the respective
laws.

The director will be respon-
sible for, among other things,
creating a forest management
plan that should be submitted
to the minister of environment
for approval every five years.

Forest reserves will be man-
aged for conservation of nat-
ural forests including provid-

"This legislation
we debate today is
the legal architec-
ture to provide
for the protection
and wide use of
the heritage of
future generations
of Bahamians."

Earl Deveaux

ing for the sustained yield of
timber and other forest prod-
ucts in perpetuity, to provide
for development of forest
resources to include possible
establishment of forestry to
provide for the conservation
of fresh water resources and
the creation of natural ameni-
ties.

An Act of Parliament will
be required to sell or transfer
land deemed as a forest
reserve unless the minister
responsible for forestry grants
a lease for the use of this land
as prescribed in Part V of the
Bill.

Protected forests will have
status "less permanent" than
forest reserves and are likely
to be required for alternative
land use or development, said
Mr Deveaux.

He added that they may be
released "for such purpose on
the assumption that the analy-
sis shows that the alternative
use or development is sound
and yields a better return than
forestry" and is subject to an
Environmental Impact
Assessment.

Conservation forests are
portions of land to be man-
aged in an effort to conserve
biological diversity, specific
flora and fauna, and areas of
scientific interest, scenic beau-
ty and natural resources, said
Mr Deveaux.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

Developer is

clearly swimming
against tide of

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Deficit fix painful, inaction’s worse

WASHINGTON — The costs of solving
the federal deficit problem are more than
many people want to pay — higher taxes on
a wide swath of Americans and cuts in bene-
fit programmes that reach into millions of
homes.

But the results of inaction on the steadily
growing debt threat are even more costly:
fundamental damage to the U.S. economy
and a lower standard of living for future gen-
erations.

The warnings from deficit hawks are much
more urgent since the nation's fiscal health
went from bad several years ago to drastically
worse with the financial crisis and recession of
2008 and 2009. Last year, the government
borrowed $1.4 trillion, nearly 40 cents of
every dollar it spent. "The path forward con-
tains many difficult trade-offs and choices,
but postponing those choices and failing to
put the nation's finances on a sustainable
long-run trajectory would ultimately do great
damage to our economy," Federal Reserve
Board Chairman Ben Bernanke told Presi-
dent Barack Obama's 18-member deficit
commission at its first meeting Tuesday.

As Bernanke testified, the stock market
began a precipitous dive after Standard &
Poor's downgraded the debt of Greece to
junk bond status. The Mediterranean country
is mired in a debt crisis that has shaken its
economy and markets.

The United States is a long way from
where Greece is. But U.S. deficits — like last
year's $1.4 trillion — that continue well in
excess of 4 per cent of the nation's total eco-
nomic production are unsustainable, most
major economists say. Such deficits would
push interest rates higher, crowd out private
investment and ultimately erode living stan-
dards. “Substantial deficits projected far into
the future could cause the market to rapidly
lose confidence in the government's credit-
worthiness, producing a spike in interest rates
and fundamentally disrupting economic activ-
ity more broadly," White House budget chief
Peter Orszag said.

With interest payments on the debt grow-
ing without respite, future generations would
have to pay for the lack of corrective action.
That means higher taxes and fewer govern-
ment services — and a potentially weaker
economy.

"We know for a fact, it's irrefutable, that
we're giving the next generation an inferior
standard of living,” said Rep. Paul Ryan, R-
Wis. "We've never done that before in this
country. You know, the legacy of this country
has always been you take on the challenges
before you to make sure that your kids and
grandkids have a better life."

Tuesday's mantra, mostly among Democ-
rats, was that all options should be on the
table, which signalled that politically toxic
tax increases will be under consideration.

"I'm not going to say what's in. I'm not
going to say what's out," said President Oba-
ma, who has promised repeatedly not to raise
taxes on American families with incomes less
than $250,000. "I want this commission to
be free to do its work."

It's a task, though, that won't be easy:
Produce a deficit no bigger than $550 billion
by 2015, an amount equal to about 3 per cent
of the total U.S. economy. That would
require deficit savings in the range of $250 bil-
lion or more in 2015 alone.

Deficits have worsened largely because
of a drop in tax revenues and increasing costs
for safety-net programmes like unemploy-
ment insurance due to the recession. Spi-
raling costs of federal health care pro-
grammes also have been a major contributor.

The problem is too large to be handled
with easy Washington chestnuts like cutting
foreign aid and ending waste, fraud and
abuse, undoing the Wall Street bailout or
rescinding what remains of Obama's $862
billion economic stimulus bill.

"Spending cuts will have to affect pro-
grammes we all care about and benefit from
and revenue increases will have to come from
a wide swath of Americans," Urban Insti-
tute President Robert Reischauer said. "In
other words, raising taxes on the rich or cor-
porations, closing tax loopholes, eliminating
wasteful or low-priority programmes and
prohibiting earmarks simply won't be
enough.”

But summoning the political courage to
propose, say, tax increases for a majority of
Americans or making people work another
year to qualify for Social Security benefits is
far easier said than done.

President Obama is but the latest example.
His February budget was a cautious docu-
ment that punted the tough decisions to his
new bipartisan commission. And the panel's
instructions are to deliver its recommenda-
tions after November's mid-term elections.

"There are few issues on which there is
more vigorous bipartisan agreement than fis-
cal responsibility," said President Obama,
flanked by former Clinton White House
Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles and former
Sen. Alan Simpson, R-Wyo., the two men
he asked to head the panel. "But in practice,
this responsibility for the future is often over-
whelmed by the politics of the moment."

(This article was written by Andrew Taylor,
Associated Press Writer).



Pirst Maptist Church

| a Seca)
- . ° a hd
Christ le Seen More
Clearly When We Remain In
The Background.”

SUNDAY SEAVICES F ag
72am, §:00am, 11:15am me

public approval

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Last night (April 14) the
community of Coral Har-
bour attended a Town
Meeting called by members
of the Town Planning Board
and a developer named
Tony Joudi.

Mr Michael Major from
Town Planning introduced
Mr Joudi who addressed the
community for the second
time in a public meeting
about his intentions for “his”
ongoing development of
Coral Harbour. He
announced that he believed
it was Divine Guidance that
brought him to Coral Har-
bour from his native country
of Lebanon and he had a
verbal approval of Town
Planning for his plans. As in
his first appearance before
the residents of Coral Har-
bour, Mr Joudi offered that
his appearance was a mere
“courtesy” to hear what the
feelings were toward his
intentions of destroying the
two northern walls of the
over fifty-year landmark
roundabout at the entrance
of the community. There
were over a hundred people
from all walks of life who
attended last night’s meet-
ing, spilling out into the
parking lot of the commu-
nity church next to the
Humminway Plaza. Emo-
tions again ran high when
our Member of Parliament,
Mr Kendall Wright
expressed disappointment
that he had not been invited
by either Town Planning or
the developer to this public
meeting. Mr Wright reiter-
ated that in the first meeting
the residents of the area had
already expressed their will
to have the landmark pro-
tected. The Tribune in past
weeks has also taken inter-
est and articled the resis-
tance to the destruction. As
emotions and rhetoric
became more intense Mr
Major announced over the
public address system “this
is why we usually don’t
invite politicians”! The
attendees were outraged
that our Representative was
spoken to in this manner.

The Board and develop-
er were asked if there had
been any “market feasibility
study, environmental impact
study or traffic flow impact

Ll i il

BOBCAT'S

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



studies conducted in this
consideration? Mr Major
responded in the negative
to all.

This resident then asked
Mr Joudi “if he recollected
his announcement at the
first Town Meeting where
he declared “that if he did
not have 100 per cent sup-
port for his plans he would
pack his bags and leave”!
“Why then, after hearing
first hand that a majority of
residents have voiced and
petitioned an objection to
Town Planning, that he
totally disregards residents
wishes and continues with
his plans regardless”?

A vote was asked of the
attendees last night and 95
per cent of their hands were
raised in objection to both
his planned destruction of
the walls and his intent to
build a seven screen cinema,
gas station, and 62,000 sq ft
complex on the northeast
corner of the roundabout.

Mr Joudi then announced
publicly that “the walls will
stay!” He received a loud
applause and thanks from
the public.

A member of the audi-
ence then introduced him-
self as a resident of Coral
Harbour whose profession
was a hydrologist for the
Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration.

He expressed sincere con-
cerns that a gas station
would violate the well being
of the well fields that cover a
vast expanse of the area
under development. He also
addressed the shared con-
cerns that the development
is also threatening the
drainage of the whole area
and further studies should
be implemented by the
authorities responsible.

Another member took the
microphone expressing that
he had applied for a gas sta-
tion approval some time ago
but was refused on two
grounds: “That a station
would threaten the well
being of the well fields and
secondly that the Govern-
ment moratorium on gas
station approvals was in

place.” The gentleman then
asked Mr Major “if indeed
that moratorium was still in
place why was a new station
being considered for this
developer?” Mr Major con-
firmed the Government
moratorium was still in
effect. An audience mem-
ber asked: If the residents
would be able to see a ren-
dering of the proposed
development and would be
given voice to the approval
process? Both the Board
and developer acknowl-
edged this could be brought
forth.

Mr Joudi told of his inten-
tions of stringent building
codes for the area to protect
the well fields and then
added, to everyone’s disbe-
lief, that his considerations
for removing the walls
would indeed be still in play!
His previous public declara-
tion and word yet again
appeared to be worthless?

The small community of
Coral Harbour, comprising
of just regular hard working
people, is sending a clear
message to their fellow
Bahamians, that before
developers come marching
into your neighbourhood,
the community should be
consulted and involved in
any plans for their growth.
There need not be “behind
closed doors” consideration
and approvals to any
destruction of their sur-
roundings and environmen-
tal impact without the prior
approval of the neighbour-
hood concerned.

This developer is clearly
swimming against the tide
of public approval. With last
night’s vote, if anything hap-
pens to our surroundings,
without our prior consent,
we will know full well some-
thing in the system has a
foul odour and total disre-
gard of a community’s wish-
es. Mr Joudi might well
learn that a better plan
would be to sway a commu-
nity’s support, listen to their
needs, and then reap suffi-
cient reward with the resi-
dents now patronising his
investments.

CAPT P HARDING

A Bahamian,

Coral Harbour resident,
Nassau,

April 15, 2010.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 5

COB accused of faculty ‘witch-hunt’

LESS than a week after commencing, talks
between the College of the Bahamas and the
unions representing faculty are once again
strained — with the union accusing the adminis-
tration of underhanded tactics.

In a statement issued yesterday, the Union of
Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas (UTEB) said
that while its negotiators are taking part in the
talks in good faith, the union is “seriously trou-
bled by the acts of harassment, intimidation, and
victimisation perpetrated by college officials
against members of the college community,
including students in the process of taking exam-
inations.”

The union said that many of its members —
some of whom took part in last week’s strike
and some of whom did not — have reported pay
cuts of between $400 and $700 in their salary
cheques this month. The statement said faculty
were told in an April 16 letter that their would
only be paid if they had informed their deans or
VPs that they were carrying out their “normal
duties and continue to do so”.

It was also indicated that faculty who do not
communicate with the administration will be
assumed to be on strike until the union informs
the college in writing that it has ended the strike,
the statement claimed.

The union said it calls into question “the legal-
ity of the college’s action to target innocent fac-
ulty members when it is aware that their request
to faculty and these latest actions are not only a
clear violation and in direct contravention of the
laws of this country, particularly the Employ-
ment Act of 2001 and Section 45 of the Industri-
al Relations Act, but they also go against current
practices in place for faculty at the college.”

The union said it is also concerned and trou-

bled by reports from students that they are being
harassed and intimidated by college administra-
tors purportedly carrying out “investigations”
into exam irregularities — including exams admin-
istered by the union’s president, Jennifer Isaacs-
Dotson.

In addition, UTEB claimed, a staff member
from the School of Education was called into a
meeting with three senior administrators and
“interrogated” about matters relating to Ms
Isaacs-Dotson’s examinations.

“Once again, the union is disturbed by the
administrators’ actions, particularly when, in the
process of their ‘investigations’, they neglected to
make contact with Dr Beulah Farquharson, the
chair of the School of Education, to make their
concerns about Ms Isaacs-Dotson’s exams
known,” the statement said.

“In light of the college’s public statements
throughout its dispute with the union that that
there were no problems or irregularities with the
invigilation of exams, the union now questions
these ‘investigations’ and sees the administra-
tion’s recent targeting of staff and students con-
nected to the union president as a witch-hunt.
The union asks the college to cease its acts of per-
secution.”

UTEB said it sees these “peripheral discrimi-
natory acts” following the strike as a distraction
intended to frustrate and delay the negotiations
for a new faculty contract, while deflecting atten-
tion from the union’s repeated calls for a foren-
sic audit of the college’s finances.

“Therefore,” the statement said, “UTEB asks
the public to join us in its call, in the name of
transparency, for a forensic audit of the college
and for the college to put an end to this body of
divisive acts.”

Reha daca Nassau trip





BAHAMIAN individuals and
companies banded together to help
make special memories for a fam-
ily coping with a life-threatening
illness. Facing terminal cancer,
Gaylene Smith’s greatest wish was
to spend time with her family in
the Bahamas, where she had spent
her honeymoon two decades ear-
lier with husband Randy. Through
a huge cooperative effort, her wish
came true. The Minnesota family





Derek Smith/BI$





vacationed in Nassau for four
nights in April.

The Sheraton Nassau Beach
Resort provided them with a com-
plimentary stay at the resort. The
complimentary package included
limo service from and back to the
airport, all meals and a dinner
cruise. Meanwhile, Atlantis Resort
also hosted the family to a day of
water activities, and the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation presented
Mrs Smith with authentically
Bahamian gifts as souvenirs of her
days in the sun with her family.

Hyacinth Pratt, permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation, presented the gifts
to the family.

STRUCKUM



rt /
LAWNS, PLANTS &
SAY

es ee



PICTURED (left-right) SONJA Albury of the Ministry of Tourism;
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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
Alowe@tribunemedia. net

BEIJING, China — Requests
for visas for travel to the
Bahamas by Chinese people
have been increasing over the
last two years, with this year see-
ing a visit by 600 tourists in one
group alone, according to the
Bahamas’ Ambassador to Chi-
na.

In an interview at the
Bahamas’ Beijing Embassy, first
resident Bahamian Ambassador
to China Elma Campbell noted
that while that trip by the 600-
member group was unusual,
based on evidence so far, she
anticipates a continued “gradual
increase” in the number of appli-
cations for visas for recreational
visits to the Bahamas.

The recently opened consular
section at the Embassy in Bei-
jing has resulted in the waiting
time for Bahamian visas for peo-
ple in the Asian region to
decrease to less than a week.

Previously, all visa applica-
tions from those in the Asian
region for the Bahamas had to be

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—_—
IN THIS PHOTO taken Tuesday, April 27, 2010, fireworks explode over the site of World Expo during a
rehearsal for the opening ceremony in Shanghai, China. The Bahamas Embassy has, in conjunction
with the Ministry of Tourism, taken part in expos and trade shows in China. (AP)

made via the United Kingdom’s
diplomatic mission in Beijing,
and forwarded to the Bahamas
for processing, before being sent
back to China.

This long and involved
process led to complaints from
tourist and business executives,
and promises of less red tape
from the Bahamian government.

“T’m very proud and happy
to say that the consular section is
very efficient,” said Ambassador
Campbell.

Sheila Carey, Deputy Chief
of Mission at the Embassy, said
that during the second half of
2008, about 80 visas were
processed, in 2009 this jumped
to between four and five hun-
dred, and for the first four
months of 2010 that figure has
increased to almost 800.

Ambassador Campbell not-
ed the 600-strong group of
tourists, which included Chinese
people of Taiwanese, Shanghai
and Mongolian origin — who
added a trip to Atlantis to their
itinerary in March 2010 after
attending a conference in the US
—was not the norm.

Visa requests from individual
tourists, she said, are in general
“the minority” of all the applica-
tions the Embassy receives at
present.

More commonly visa requests
come from Chinese government
departments sending officials to
the Bahamas, such as those who
visited last year as part of two
high-level delegations.

One delegation was led by
Hui Luangyu, Vice Premier of
the State Council of the People's
Republic of China, in February
2009, and Chairman Wu Bang-
guo, Chairman of the Standing
Committee of the National Peo-
ple's Congress, led a second one
in September 2009.

Along with those applications
came many more from the gov-
ernment on behalf of Chinese
labourers and technicians who
were sent to the Bahamas to help
with the construction of the
national stadium presently being
built by the Chinese as a gift to
the Bahamas.

Visas were also applied for
and granted to officials travel-
ling to engage in discussions with

respect to the financing and con-
struction contracts that have now
been signed between two Chi-
nese entities — the China State
Export-Import Bank and the
China State Construction Com-
pany — and the Baha Mar
Resorts Ltd to build the Cable
Beach resort.

These visits, as the Bahamas
and Chinese governments have
noted, exemplify the “growing”
relationship between the
Bahamas and China over the last
few years in particular.

According to Ambassador
Campbell, no visa applications
have yet been made for con-
struction workers for the Baha
Mar project.

Consular services have been
the primary focus of the
Embassy’s attentions since it
opened in July 2008, but it has
also made sure it plays its part
to promote the Bahamas as a
tourist destination.

The Embassy also forwards
enquiries related to business and
investment interests to the rele-
vant authorities in the Bahamas.

On the tourism front, the
Embassy has, in conjunction with
the Ministry of Tourism, taken
part in expos and trade shows in
China, promoting the Bahamas
as a vacation destination.

The Embassy staff, which
includes four Bahamians and two
local Chinese employees, has
also participated in seminars
organised by Continental Air-
lines in which diplomatic officers
were able to engage with those
business persons who are at the
forefront of selling vacations to
the local population in China.

“In those we can talk to Chi-

nese travel agents about travel-
ling to the Bahamas and the ease
of going to the Bahamas, so
we’ve been doing that kind of
thing as well to make sure the
Bahamas’ name gets out there,”
said Deputy Chief of Mission Ms
Carey.

Tt was thanks to a 2005 Mem-
orandum of Understanding
signed between the Chinese gov-
ernment and the Bahamas that
the Bahamas was granted the
globally much-sought after sta-
tus of “approved destination” for
Chinese tourists, with Bahami-
an vacations then made available
for sale by Chinese travel agents.

Bahamian government offi-
cials touted the opening of the
Embassy in China as a step
towards the Bahamas being able
to tap into the growing Chinese
outbound tourism market, which
the World Tourism Organisation
has projected will grow to
become the third largest global-
ly by 2020, as more Chinese peo-
ple achieve middle class status
and have disposable income for
recreation.

Ms Carey said the opening of
the Embassy in Beijing certainly
helped to better position the
Bahamas to reap the benefits of
that 2005 Memorandum of
Understanding. However, anec-
dotal evidence meanwhile sug-
gests that the Bahamas remains
an unlikely destination for Chi-
nese visitors. In interviews with
The Tribune, a number of Chi-
nese people said that while they
are sure the Bahamas is beauti-
ful, they think it may be too far
away and too expensive for their
holiday choice compared with
other, nearer Asian destinations.

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THE TRIBUNE






By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BEIJING, China - The Tri-
bune is represented in China
among a group of 100 journalists
from 47 countries who have
been invited by the Chinese gov-
ernment to view first-hand what
the growing world power is tout-
ing as a “grand exposition for
the whole of mankind” - the
Shanghai World Expo 2010.

In total, over 13,000 reporters
are expected to cover the event
throughout its six-month dura-
tion, but The Tribune was one
of a select few invited to travel
courtesy of the Chinese govern-
ment via its Embassy in Nassau
to attend the grand opening on
May 1, along with numerous
world leaders and thousands of
other invited guests.

Unlike trade expositions or
“expos, which are specifically
organised to promote commer-
cial interests, world expos are
largely non-commercial.

Regarded as the “Olympic
games of the economy, science
and technology”, countries have
come together to participate in
these international expos over
the last 150 years to promote an
exchange of their ideas, cultures
and their achievements in these
various fields.

While world expos have a
long established history, Shang-
hai Expo 2010 is the first to take
place in a developing country - a
fact China does not want any-
one to miss - and is promised to
break previous expo size and
attendance records.

While its profile outside of the
country may not yet be signifi-
cant, the Shanghai Expo is a
huge deal in China - more mon-

ole. Vi eS

Tribune in China for
Shanghai World Expo



ey was reportedly spent on it
than on the Beijing Olympics -
and it is being seen as an oppor-
tunity both for greater linkages
between countries globally and
for China to enhance its status in
the eyes of its people and the
world.

China won the bidding for the
2010 expo in 2002, and has
undertaken massive infrastruc-
tural developments, including
new metro lines, railways and
more, to facilitate the event.

Under the finely-developed
theme, “Better City, Better
Life”, the expo is touted by Chi-
na as “a grand meeting to dis-
cuss city life in the new century.”

Despite the financial chal-
lenges of the global economic
recession, many of the countries
taking part have spent tens of
millions of dollars constructing
elaborate and permanent “pavil-
ions” - previews of which indi-
cate they will be mind boggling
in their size, design and concep-
tual detail.

Through these physical struc-
tures, along with daily “gala
shows, ethnic displays, interac-
tive moments, gourmet events
and culture parades”, the expo
will create the opportunity for
participating countries to show-
case their take on the overall
theme, gaining massive exposure

at ul Pay ?
VISITORS WALK outside China Pavilion at the World Expo si
Near the centre of Shanghai's World Expo grounds stands the crimson, crown-shaped China Pavilion. (AP)

in the process.

The Bahamas will be repre-
sented on a small scale along
with 192 other countries and 50
international organisations at the
expo, participating under the
joint CARICOM pavilion with
other Caribbean nations.

Alongside country-specific
pavilions, visitors can explore
five other themed pavilions - the
Urbanian Pavilion, the Pavilion
of City Being, the Pavilion of
Urban Planet, the Pavilion of
Urban Civilisation and the Pavil-
ion of Fortune.

Each, through elaborately
designed structures and displays,
explores sub-themes such as life
within cities, the impact of urban
life on the earth and prospects
for future city living.

The pavilions have been con-
structed within a 5.28 square
kilometre area running on both
sides of the Huangpu river in
Shanghai.

An Urban Best Practices
Area will allow for participants
to exemplify best practices in
cities in four aspects: Liveable
cities, sustainable urbanisation,
protection and utilisation of his-
toric heritage and technological
innovation in the built environ-
ment. See The Tribune over the
next week and a half for more on
the Shanghai Expo.

> ae
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Thursday April 29th through Saturday May 8th

Tel. 323-2900
Monday - Saturday 10:30am - 5:30pm
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> The Cancer Society of The Bahamas
PRESENTS ITS

eli
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Under the Patronage of the Governor
General of The Bahamas
His Excellency Sir Arthur D. Foulkes
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Workable solutions needed for

BY LARRY SMITH

G G I GET upset every

Earth Day," says

Laura Huggins, a

political scientist at

the Hoover Institution in Cali-

fornia who describes herself as

a free market environmentalist.

"I get upset because of all those

catastrophic claims that have

been made about the environ-
ment for the past 40 years."

What "outrageous" claims is
she referring to? The link
between industrial pollutants
and cancer made by Rachel
Carson; the suggestions by Paul
Ehrlich that population growth
poses major problems for
humanity; and the idea that we
are plundering the planet at a
pace which will outstrip its
capacity to support life, to
name a few.

Huggins was speaking at a
public meeting last week
organised by the Nassau Insti-
tute, which advocates libertar-
ian free market policies for the
Bahamas. She is a director of
the Property and Environment
Research Centre in Montana,
and the author of books and
articles that promote market
principles to help solve envi-
ronmental dilemmas.

"Are resources really
finite?" she asked. "That
depends on how you look at it,
because our ultimate resource
is the mind. Every generation
has underestimated the poten-
tial for finding new recipes and
ideas. The sky is not falling,
and the end of the world is no
closer today than it was in
1970."

But that too depends on
how you look at it. Before the
first Earth Day in the United
States — April 22 1970 — small
groups of people around the
country were battling massive
environmental degradation.
Things were bad and, in some
cases, they were spectacularly
bad, and getting worse.

In the US especially, the
decades following World War
II were a period of unprece-
dented economic development,
accompanied by big environ-
mental changes. Lakes were
being poisoned, rivers were
catching fire, the Grand
Canyon was about to be
dammed and flooded, and a big
chunk of the Everglades was
being paved over for a jetport.



‘What we want are workable solutions to
the very real challenges that we face, whether
they involve private or public sector

approaches.’



Earth Day mobilised these
disparate groups of citizens into
a widespread popular move-
ment that was able to persuade
politicians to take action. The
US Congress passed aggressive
legislation to curb air and water
pollution, and to change the
way government and business
treated the environment.

Those reforms grew out of
the first Earth Day, and in the
years since then trillions of dol-
lars have been spent different-
ly than they would have if this
new regulatory framework did
not exist. And environmental
impact assessments became the
standard tool around the world
to evaluate the impacts of
development.

But Huggins is a free mar-
ket environmentalist, so she
does not accept these outcomes
uncritically: "At what cost are
things improving as a result of
regulation?" she asked, before
concluding that "red tape won't
fix green problems."

Incentives

So what's the alternative?
Well, Huggins says incentives
and property rights are the
answer. And she gave a few
examples. In the US, a group
called Defenders of Wildlife
has been compensating ranch-
ers for livestock losses due to
wolves and grizzly bears. The
goal is to share the economic
responsibility for preserving
these endangered animals.

Some green groups — like
The Nature Conservancy —
have been actively buying up
private land in order to pre-
serve special wilderness areas.
And some commercial fisheries
have benefited from rights-
based management, which
gives exclusive catch shares to
fishermen that can be bought

and sold. There are more than
a hundred such programmes
around the world, but Huggins
cited the case of the Alaska
halibut fishery, which had been
reduced to a 48-hour season by
the mid-1990s. At that point,
the authorities allocated catch
shares to individual fishermen,
based on scientific estimates of
the sustainable fish catch. And
the results were striking.

The halibut season eventu-
ally stretched to nine months,
meaning that fish hit the mar-
ket in smaller numbers, but
over a sustained period. This
meant that the per-pound price
of halibut increased and con-
sumers enjoyed better access
to year-round fresh fish.
According to some proponents,
rights-based management can
halt and reverse fishery col-
lapse.

But implementing such a
system in the Bahamas would
not be not easy, as you can
imagine. How would rights be
allocated? Could shares be
consolidated, sold or traded?
And how would fish popula-
tions, and catches, be moni-
tored? It is unclear whether
this approach would ever be
feasible here, where enforce-
ment of any rule is almost
impossible. That is not to say
the current approach is neces-
sarily better. Our conch, lob-
ster and reef fisheries are under
heavy commercial pressure, yet
we continue to underwrite the
fisheries sector with subsidies
(boats, engines and equipment
are duty-free), by paying the
costs of fisheries management,
and through depletion of capi-
tal (read over-exploitation of
fish stocks). This means that
while the benefits of fishing
accrue to a few, the costs of
over-exploitation are shared by

SEE page nine

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 9



green pro

FROM page eight

all of us — a concept known as
perverse incentive.

According to Huggins,
resources that are un-owned
are subject to the tragedy of
the commons — which means
we scrabble over the spoils
until they are all gone. A good
example of this was the north-
ern Caribbean sponge fishery,
which — at its peak before the
Second World War — removed
47 million pounds of live
sponge annually and employed
thousands of people and hun-
dreds of ships in the Bahamas
alone. But over-exploitation
and disease wiped out the
sponge beds in 1939, leaving
the fishermen destitute. And
only a tiny remnant of this once
thriving industry exists today.
Could we have escaped this
consequence if settlements had
joined together to protect their
exclusive fishing zones and set
harvesting rules?

One of Huggins’ main argu-
ments is that our treatment of
the environment improves as
we get wealthier — in other
words, respect for the environ-
mental increases as gross
domestic product goes up.
Well, it is comforting to know
that all we have to do is make
enough money, repeal every
regulation, and get rid of all
public resources for everything
to be right with the world.

But regulations that tax pol-
lution are aimed at making the
hidden costs (known as exter-
nalities) part of the decision-
making. Laws can force pol-
luters to take notice of these
external social costs by pre-
scribing limits to what can be
discharged or emitted. The
optimal level of pollution, for
example, then becomes the lev-
el at which the extra costs of
cleaning up equal the cost of
environmental damage caused
by that pollution.

Regulations that offer incen-
tives for alternative technolo-
gies — like electric vehicles or
solar panels or mass transit —
are aimed at offsetting some of
the external costs associated
with the entrenched and highly
polluting transportation and

ems — not ideology

power generating industries.
Currently, these costs are
avoided by the polluters.

It is a fact that if you build
too close to the sea and destroy
the dune, you will eventually
lose the beach, which is what
attracted you to the area in the
first place. But there are any
number of examples of
wealthy, well-informed indi-
viduals and companies that
have done exactly that
throughout the Bahamas and
the rest of the world. Just look
at the former Crystal Palace
Hotel on Cable Beach.

Regulations

Would clear government
regulations setting out build-
ing requirements along our
coastline fix this problem? I
believe so. Will we be able to
benefit from electric car and
renewable power technologies
unless tax policies are adjust-
ed? Clearly not within a rea-
sonable time frame. Can we
prevent the destruction of wet-
lands by making them private-
ly owned? Look at SandyPort
and the south coast of New
Providence, where developers
are filling them in as we speak.
Can we trade air pollution
rights? For some reason, that's
a big no-no for free marketers.

The phase out of lead in
gasoline and paint that began
in 1973 in the US is one of the
most successful environmental
health initiatives of the last cen-
tury. Yet, despite the fact that
the known harmful effects of
lead to health were increasing-
ly well known, industry contin-
ued to fight mandatory emis-
sions controls for years.
Through government regula-
tion, the percentage of US chil-
dren with elevated blood-lead
levels dropped from almost 90
per cent to less than 5 per cent.

This brings me to the nag-
ging concern I kept coming
back to while listening to Hug-
gins speak last week. As a
political scientist, everything
she said was based strictly on
her strongly-held ideological
views. And if something does-
n't fit in with that ideology,
then it must be discarded. This

=

is the same approach taken by
Marxists at the opposite
extreme.

I can't buy that anymore.
What we want are workable
solutions to the very real chal-
lenges that we face, whether
they involve private or public
sector approaches. In the case
of environmental impact
assessments, the lesson is not
that development must be halt-
ed, but that the consequences
must be studied to weigh the
pros against the cons, and to
incorporate appropriate safe-
guards. Yes, that has a cost, but
so does construction of poorly
planned developments. The
cost of the EIA is borne by the
developer, but the cost of envi-
ronmental disaster is shared by
all of us. It is easy to make fun
of environmental scenarios by
saying the sky is always falling,
but what about the never-end-
ing assertions of free market
thinkers that financial cata-
strophe is just around the cor-
ner due to Keynesian over-
spending by governments.

We seem to be able to put
off that disaster, which never-
theless still might come to pass.
And the same is true for the
consequences of rising popu-
lations, over-exploitation of
resources, and industrial pol-
lution.

Like Huggins, I get upset
every Earth Day. Especially
when I consider how we have
wasted most of the past 30
years after the dismantling of
America's nascent renewable
energy programme in 1980.
The ultimate symbol of those
lost years was the well-publi-
cised removal by President
Ronald Reagan of solar water
heaters installed by President
Jimmy Carter on the roof of
the White House. Solar panels
— producing power and hot
water — did not return to the
White House until the early
2000s, when they were installed
by the National Park Service.
And now we are all scrambling
to find ways to implement non-
polluting renewable technolo-
gies to save the planet.

What do you think? Send com-

ments to larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

a Mey

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas prominent

in 2010 Apex Awards

THE Bahamas took promi-
nent places in the 2010 Apex
Awards, with Ministry of
Tourism general manager Anita
Johnson-Patty walking away
with her very own Apex.

Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace also accepted an Apex on
behalf of Bermuda Premier Dr
Ewart Brown.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
he and Dr Brown are close col-
leagues and friends. They both
support each other in events and
issues in Bermuda and the
Bahamas, he said.

“Tf anybody is wondering
about Bermuda and _ the
Bahamas, we both compete and
cooperate,” he said.

The same is true for the
Bahamas’ relationship with
many other Caribbean nations.
Minister Vanderpool-Wallace
said the Bahamas shares a great
deal of information with other
countries, cooperating in vari-
ous projects.

“Tf there was such a thing as
the United States of the
Caribbean, we would do some
special things in the world, and if
you just want to see a little piece
of it, I ask you to think about
having a country called the Unit-
ed States of the Caribbean com-
pete in the Olympic Games -
game over,” he said.

The Apex Awards are pre-
sented annually by Black Meet-
ings and Tourism Magazine for
distinguished service.

The awards, which were part
of the Travel Professionals of
Colour conference, recognise
outstanding contributions that
have positively impacted travel
and tourism.

Anita Johnson-Patty, who
represents offshore communi-
cations in the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation’s office
in Plantation, Florida, was a
proud recipient of the Apex.

“Working in the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism for 24
years, it is so easy to come to
work,” she said as she received
the honour at the Sheraton Nas-
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“T have a passion for it, and I
just love selling it. So when I
received this honour I was just
taken aback and shocked.”

The awards were presided
over by Solomon and Gloria
Herbert, publisher and associ-
ate publisher of Black Meetings
and Tourism Magazine.



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THE TRIBUNE

Saving the Bahamas’ reefs by early

viewing of new movie ‘Oceans’

THE Ministry of Tourism,
The Nature Conservancy and
Disneynature kicked off the
race to save coral reefs with
the premiere of Disney’s new
film “Oceans” on Earth Day
last week in the US and Cana-
da.

US and Canadian movie-
goers now have the opportu-
nity to help save the Bahamas’
marine habitats while viewing
the majestic Caribbean seas in
Disneynature’s newest motion
picture, filmed partly on-loca-
tion in the Bahamas.

Disneynature will make a
contribution to the Nature
Conservancy to save coral
reefs and help establish new
marine protected areas in the
Bahamas in honour of each
movie-goer who saw the film
during opening week, April
22-28.

The Ministry of Tourism
built anticipation and excite-
ment for the movie debut via
its social media network,
reaching many consumers and
fans of the Bahamas.

Tweets containing marine
conservation facts will contin-
ued to stream from the @Visit-
TheBahamas handle through-
out the first week of the
movie’s premiere.

The Bahamas’ Facebook
page hosts a link to the
movie’s trailer along with
information on the Bahamas’
marine protection efforts.

Oceans is the second film to
come from Walt Disney Stu-
dios Motion Pictures’ newest
label, Disneynature.

Disneynature’s first film,
Earth, made its record-break-
ing debut last year, grossing

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 11

SU
FOR SALE

2006 IZUZU



more than $100 million world-
wide and creating a devout fol-
lowing and loyal fan base.

This year’s Oceans follows
directors Jacques Perrin and
Jacques Cluzaud as they dive
deep into the world’s seas and
chronicle the mysteries that lie
beneath.

The 700 Islands of the
Bahamas contain miles of vital
coral reefs, which are the foun-
dation of a healthy ocean envi-
ronment, providing protection,
nurseries and feeding ground
for hundreds of marine
species, including sea turtles,
dolphins and a wide range of
fish. Scientists estimate that
the coral reefs of the
Caribbean could be gone with-
in 50 years without a network
of well-managed marine pro-
tected areas.

“The Bahamas has long
been at the forefront of marine
preservation and environmen-



—

tal safeguarding,” said Vernice
Walkine, director general of
the Ministry of Tourism.

“We feel privileged and for-
tunate to have such remark-
able organisations recognise
the importance of the
Caribbean marine habitat and
contribute to the future con-
servation of the waters that
sustain us all.”

More than half a decade
ago, the Bahamas began tak-
ing steps to protect some of
the most pristine and produc-
tive waters in the Caribbean
— including extending legal
protection to all species of sea
turtles found within the coun-
try’s waters.

The Bahamas National
Trust established Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park in 1958,
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

LOCAL NEAR

THE TRIBUNE



Island-wide clean-up *
launched in Bimini

BIMINI Bay Resort employees put
together a day of environmental education
to launch an island-wide clean-up pro-
gramme.

With the help of 150 local students, they

collected more than 6,000 littered bottles
and 14 car batteries.

The clean-up efforts will continue
throughout the year with an after school
programme and summer camp.











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CHAIRMAN'S REPORT
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITED)
For The Quarter Ended Janaury 41, 2010 1B. S000)
January 31, 2010 January 31, 200%
The Directors of FOCOL Holdings Limited ASSETS fi [26,873 $ 118,985
[FOCOL) ore pleased to present results
: Lictalities oF ie 35,608
for the second quarter ended Janvary lotal shorelvalders' equity Os 84. 1h
41, 2010. Net inceme available to a a
Talal liatlities & shorehalders =qualy i 76899 = § 119,985

shareholders for the ox
months ended January 31. 2010 wos
7.514.918 compared to $5,991 705 beast

common

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)

year. Qur eamings per share increqsed (B SOCK)

i ris t } Sik rmanihe @nded fi manihs ended
rom 17 cents to 22 cents. Janaury 31,2000 Janaury 31, 2009
Over the past year FOCOL has invested Sale & revenues $ 0 62204 5 ae
in new technealogy that has significantly Coat of sales (a7 aoa) (136, 004
| fe 5 3 in! a
Improved Our Sea ® ficiency Income fran aperations 24401 a7 OFA
campany wide, Qur strategic

i in ; seacrtait

nearer in marine fuel nana nai Marketing, administrative and genercl [1 2,858) (13,403)
and improvements ta aur retail network Deprectation 1,403} j 1,120)

a Finance cost | 226] [ 373
are podtioning the company for long Other Income expense) 7 él
term success. We have alo been able oO p__

: ii Mist Inecorne B74 Fada
fo increose our dividends and make Gradenerce shore chvicarcls (1.421) 1341]

significant reduction In long tern debts,

This strategy should allow us to continue Net income avalable to common

Shareholders f Pole } 5.2
to toke advantage of expansion TO
epportunitias that may become Batic: earings per share f 072 5 0.17
cvallabile
Gur Directors. management and staff Dividends per shore 5 0.10 $ 0.09

remain committed to seeking every

avenue to contrisute to the growth of

FOCOIL.

Copies of a full set of The ungudited tinancal statement can be obtained tar stephen Adderley

boadderteyétocal.com), at the Freeport Cal Company lecoted on Queers Highway, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday tram 8:30 AAA TS 5900 Ph.

i Rh _e -

i

Sir Albert... Miller, KCMG
Chairman and President



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

BPA wants NIB to reopen

drug plan negotiations

FROM page one

Meanwhile the BPA main-
tains it has worked tirelessly
to serve as a forum for dis-
cussion about the new drug
plan to provide prescription
drugs to patients of chronic
non-communicable diseases
from August, without endors-
ing nor rejecting the govern-
ment plan.

They had invited NIB offi-
cials to meet with BPA mem-
bers at two well-attended
association meetings in Jan-
uary and March, and at their
second meeting the NIB
asked the BPA to form a sub-
committee to examine and
respond to the National Pre-
scription Drug Plan (NPDP)
contract proposals detailing
four levels of retrmbursement
mark-up percentages at four
different price ranges.

But the BPA said the sub-
committee was delayed in
their work as NIB took three
weeks to send them restruc-
tured contract terms and
mark-up ranges, and another
two weeks to release critical

data about tender-pricing
related products.

The BPA further claims
they were held back by NIB’s
failure to address the key
issue of mark-ups in the
March meeting despite the
BPA’s request, without which
the BPA were unable to pro-
duce definitive recommenda-
tions in regards to payment.

When all documents were
received the BPA completed
their counter-proposal, dis-
tributed it to their members
on Thursday and intended to
hand it to NIB on Monday,
the association said.

“Even after such delay the
BPA completed our proposed
recommendations in two
weeks, a remarkable feat
when one considers that a full
time NIB team has taken
more than a year just to draft
the document initially circu-

lated and one that was obvi-
ously flawed,” the BPA stat-
ed.

“How does one know it was
flawed? Because NIB itself
has changed it significantly on
three occasions.”

As the sub-committee
poured over the details of the
contract, NIB signed the non-
negotiated agreement with
two Lowe’s Pharmacy outlets
and three People’s Pharmacy
stores in New Providence,
before calling off talks with
the BHA in a public state-
ment on Sunday.

“We are not waiting on a
counter-proposal, we signed
contracts with several phar-
macies under the final terms
the NIB is offering,” Mr
Cargill said.

However, the BPA is keen
for the NIB director to recon-
sider his position and take

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into account the counter-pro-
posal their members have
worked so hard on.

The association maintains
it has been consistently open
to negotiation and expressed
their members willingness to
work with the government
plan in a fiscal report on the
implementation of national
prescription plans conducted
in 2008.

“Tt is clear the intent of the
BPA was always to partner
with the government to
ensure a viable, sustainable
plan come to fruition, and
that it would benefit all
aspects of the public and pri-
vate sector,” the BPA states.

“Pharmacists are a key part
of the healthcare system, and
while there are fiscal and busi-
ness concerns, the BPA
assures the public that our
members view the access to

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THE TRIBUNE



healthcare as a fundamental
right of every Bahamian.”

However, the association
added: “The plan will do
more harm than good if it
closes down every small phar-
macy in the country, espe-
cially when you consider there
are only small independent,
private pharmacies and no
chain stores in the Family
Islands.

“It is hoped the review
process will be expedited and
both NIB and the BPA will
continue to work to produce a
programme for the Bahamian
public that will indeed be a
benefit to those it serves.

“This is not about pharma-
cists trying to make exorbi-
tant profits, but rather, a ques-
tion of survival for an essen-
tial component of the health-
care delivery system.”





ALGERNON CARGILL



Sandilands mistreatment claims investigated
FROM page one

were dismissive of the basic human needs of patients at the insti-
tution, specifically the handicapped, and often reneged on
their care duties.

Ms Weech confirmed that all claims made by the former
patient have been itemized and will be thoroughly explored.

The exercise will include meetings with the appropriate staff
to ensure that proper procedures are being followed.

Reiterating that management cannot implement solutions
unless they are made aware of deficiencies, Ms Weech encour-
aged patients of the institution to report their concerns or dif-
ficulties to administration directly so that they can be addressed
as they occur.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

areas designated as conserva-
tion forests cannot be sold,
granted or transferred unless so
ordered by the minister respon-
sible for forestry subject to a
resolution of Parliament.

Fox Hill member of Parlia-
ment Fred Mitchell, the Oppo-
sition's lead spokesman on the
Bill, questioned this clause say-
ing that at face value it appears
to offend Article 27 of the con-
stitution which says that if pri-
vate land is going to be com-
pulsorily acquired prompt and
adequate compensation must
be given.

"The government has decid-
ed that not only lands which it
owns, but also privately owned
lands are to be part of conser-
vation forests. Once it becomes
a part of a conservation forest it
effectively takes the land out of
the ownership or to be more
correct out of the use of the
land for the normal purposes
that are associated with owner-
ship. This is troubling and there
has to be a full explanation for
this," said Mr Mitchell. "Does
this bill describe with certainty
and with particularity the para-
meters and boundaries of this
land so that people will know
whose land is affected and
whose land is not? Has there
been public consultation on this
matter?"

Elizabeth MP Ryan Pinder
said that much of the land des-
ignated for forest reserve or
conservation forests in North
Eleuthera is presently being
occupied by local farmers. He
also questioned the impact of
the legislation on those who are

Opposition questions
aspects of legislation

in possession of commonage
land.

"It is unfair to enact this leg-
islation and tell those who have
been involved in farming for
generations that they can no
longer farm, that they have to
stop planting and cannot har-
vest without going through the
bureaucratic process of obtain-
ing a license or lease to do so.
The practical implications of
this can be devastating to a
farming operation, especially if
it interrupts a harvest," he told
the House of Assembly yester-
day.

Englerston MP Glenys Han-
na-Martin also weighed in on
the debate, saying that it was
worrisome that the Bill "appears
out of the blue with little true
discussion with our people and
in particular with affected com-
munities nor private nor collec-
tive owners of affected land.”

Last night, Environment Min-
ister Earl Deveaux explained
that the legislation was not
attempting to wrestle private
land away from owners but sim-
ply to set up a system to regulate
environmentally sensitive areas.

"We put this process in place
to ensure that the conservation
land, which is really our wet-
lands, whether it be private land
or public land is subject to some
process otherwise what you
have occurring right now in
South Beach, along the southern
coast of New Providence, and
that has been taking place for
the last 50 years where the wet-
lands are filled in and

eMC a ae



encroached upon,” he said.

"The idea is to ensure that we
have a defined process in law
that helps us guide how we pro-
mote intervention in these
lands.”

In the face of criticism from
the Opposition that government
did not allow for consultation
before the Bill was brought to
Parliament, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said, "We can
put law after law on the web we
can advertise in the newspaper
few people come forward before
some action is taken on it.
Hopefully this (debate) will
cause some other people to put
forward some ideas."

Added Mr Deveaux: "This
particular Bill has probably been
in more hands and has been
consulted on and changed and
edited by more Bahamians than
probably any other legislation
that I've had anything to do
with."

The prime minister said Gov-
ernment would give the Oppo-
sition ten days to put forward
any recommendations it has in
relation to the Bill, while the
legislation is in committee.

Government intends to pass
the legislation in the third week
of May.

e SEE PAGE THREE

East Street Gospel Chapel ~

0" ANNIVERSARY

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 15



Fun Run Walk

6:00am Saturday. May 1st, 2010

PRIZES:
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* Free T-Shirt with

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Phone: 322-3874

OTHER ANNIVERSARY EVENTS

FROM page one

to disguise the message as a legitimate one from
the former vice-chairwoman.

This message, it was said, would then have
been posted online to embarrass Ms Sears and
the Minister; destroying any possibility for the
fledgling politician to ever return at any level of
influence in the PLP.

It is understood that this message, has been for-
warded to the relevant authorities to ascertain its
origin for further investigations.

These attacks, along with others, have left
some right-thinking PLPs disgusted with the way

PLPs ‘bid to smear ex-chief

show host said that having known Ms Sears for a
few years as a native Grand Bahamian himself, he
was disappointed in the way the party was han-
dling this “great young talent.”

“This is just another example of the PLP dis-
playing their ability to misuse and mishandle
excellent young talent in the Bahamas.

“Melissa Sears has shown she is grounded in
family, church, and community, and she is cer-
tainly a woman that serves as an example to any
young woman as to how to go about serving your

Grand Home-Coming, Gala Banquet,
Spiritual Renewal, Inspirational Musical,

Socials, Bowling & Sports

the party has handled the resignation of Ms Sears. Country as a good citizen. It’s unfortunate in my al r May = October ?01 )
Instead of seeking to coax the party supporter _ Opinion that she has been put through the polit- r if ’

into re-thinking her decision, it was said that ial wringer of the PLP,” he said.

some within the organisation immediately went sacl camer nee seen: ‘

on the offensive and tried to “ruin her political- | people Have been pul Mirough this unfortunate \ ti ] 1 "

ly.” P process and many others have refused toeven Come & Ce lebrate wit 5
Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Erin engage these political parties as it is an “absolute ys r

Ferguson, the political commentator and TV _ waste of time. +> f S34 East Street, below the hill

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one 4 920 workers set for Baha Mar

The plan includes having
a peak of 4,920 workers
operating on the construc-
tion project for a period of
12 months. The construction
company plans to create a
housing village within the
construction site to house
the workers.

The peak period for con-
struction is between month
24 and month 36 of the pro-
ject, and at that time there
also will be in more than
2,500 Bahamian construc-
tion workers.

Total employment at the
peak of the project will be
close to 7,500 both foreign
and Bahamian workers.

The project is waiting the
approval of both govern-
ments.

No visa applications have
been filed at the Bahamian
Embassy in Beijing as yet,
according to Elma Camp-
bell, the Bahamian Ambas-
sador to China.

Mr Tan said workers with
specialised skills are expect-
ed from countries other than
China, and permits will
apply to workers needed at
different stages over the
course of the resort’s con-
struction. The project is
scheduled for completion in
late 2013.

But according to Chinese
government officials there
is no need for concern over
the large immigrant work
force, as the Chinese work-



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ers in the Bahamas are high-
ly regulated by the Bahamas
government and the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China.

“This project is very
large. It is one of the largest
loan projects all over the
world, especially at this cold
time under the crisis condi-
tions. The China State Con-
struction Engineering Cor-
poration has already pro-
vided their plans to the
competent authorities. They
are just waiting for their
plans to be approved. As
they get the approvals as
well as the approvals from
the Bahamian government
they will start,” said Mr
Tan.

Late last month, Baha
Mar secured $2.5 billion in
financing from the Export-
Import Bank of China and a
contract with new minority
partner, China State Con-
struction Engineering Cor-
poration, also serving as the
project’s general contractor.

The intake of Chinese
workers on the Baha Mar
investment project is con-
siderably higher than the
pool of workers being con-
tracted for the National Sta-
dium development project,
based on the scale of the
investment and the devel-
opment time period.

Less than 300 permits
were requested for workers
on the stadium project,









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including managers, techni-
cians and common workers,
said Mr Tan. Forty per cent
of the workers have already
returned to China, includ-
ing the 45 who worked on
the piling foundations, and
some inspectors. The peak
volume of workers — 170 — is
currently being employed
on the project.

Mr Tan said the Bahami-
an entity engaging the Chi-
nese company had to sub-
mit a letter of invitation on
behalf of each worker to the
Chinese government and
apply for a work permit
from the Bahamas govern-
ment.

The Chinese entity also

had to apply for travel visas
at the Bahamas embassy in
China. During this process,
police records from Chinese
authorities were produced
for each worker to prove
they had no criminal record.

“They work hard on the
stadium construction site.
Their work permit is can-
celled when they leave.
They only get a one-time
entry visa into the Bahamas,
so they can’t come back to
the Bahamas again unless
they get a new work permit
and visa. I think we do not
need to worry about this
because they are totally
under the control of two
governments who obey very

Two charged in connection
With gay club fight

FROM page one

to the charges.

The prosecution did not object to the two women being
granted bail. They were each granted bail in the sum of $8,000

with one surety.

Russell was ordered to report to the East Street South
Police Station every Saturday before 6pm. Knowles was ordered
to report to the Elizabeth Estates Police Station every Saturday
before 6pm. The case was adjourned to May 4 and transferred

to Court 5, Bank Lane.

According to police, 20-year-old Orial Farrington, of Nelson
Street, died at the nightclub parking lot after being struck by a
2008 Toyota Corolla. Investigations into her death are contin-

uing.

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS

strict procedures for immi-
grants,” said Mr Tan.

The same process is
expected to apply for work-
ers on the Baha Mar pro-
ject, and the Abaco agricul-
tural investment project, if
it materializes.

Chinese investors visited
Abaco at least twice over
the past year, prospecting
for a planned investment in
vegetable, fruit and live-
stock production, and a pos-
sible processing plant.

Abaconians have raised
questions about the project,

in part, expressing concern
over a feared influx of Chi-
nese workers. Bahamas gov-
ernment officials and Chi-
nese government officials
have called the criticism pre-
mature, because no official
plans have been submitted
for review.

Mr Tan said Bahamians
should also not worry
because Chinese workers
find it difficult to live in the
Bahamas, based on the lan-
guage barrier, the culinary
differences, and the high
cost of living.





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APRIL 29, 2010

7 me

THURSDAY,

[° Bank of The Bahamas

WInTERNATIONAL



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government

has got it “total-

ly wrong” on

Blue Hill Road,

a former Cham-
ber of Commerce president
blasted yesterday, adding that
it had “devastated and
destroyed” a number of busi-
nesses at the peak of their vul-
nerability, one of his outlets
having suffered a 14 per cent
month-over-month sales
decline since the traffic
changes took effect.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, Super-
wash’s president, told Tribune
Business that the Govern-
ment, in implementing the
changes as part of the New
Providence Road Improve-
ment Project, had forgotten
that Blue Hill Road was a
“significant Over-the-Hill
depository” of Bahamian-
owned businesses that relied
heavily on commuter traffic
for the majority of their cus-
tomers.

With Blue Hill Road con-
verted into a one-way system

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

‘Totally wrong’ on
Blue Hill re-routing

* Ex-Chamber chief blasts government for ‘devastating and destroying’
a key Over-the-Hill business area, and urges it to change course

* Says sales at own outlet in impacted area down 14%

month-over-month between March and April 2010
* Argues that Blue Hill Road has lost its commuter
business and turned into early evening ‘wasteland’

going north only, the imme-
diate past Chamber president
said the area’s businesses
were attracting little com-
muter business because few
had time to stop in the morn-
ings on their way to work.

Most did their shopping in
the evening and, having to
travel back home south on
Market Street, were reluctant
to travel to Blue Hill Road - a
round-trip that Mr D’ Aguilar
said was effectively six blocks
long.

“T think the Government
has gotten it totally wrong on
this one,” Mr D’Aguilar told
Tribune Business, “and peo-
ple are legitimately justified
in complaining about the

Food retailing
consolidation in

‘six to nine months’



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LEADING Bahamian food
retailers yesterday said a con-
solidation/shake-up in the sec-
tor was imminent, possibly as
little as “six to nine months”
away, as the increased num-
ber of new market entrants
and stores chases a market
that has shrunk in the reces-
sion.

SEE page 7B

* AML Foods and Robin Hood
bosses agree that ‘something
has to give’, especially in GB

* Too many chains and stores
chasing to little money and
customers, although too
early to determine if
mergers or shake-out

will be order of day

* Food group head still
‘troubled’ by level
of Florida spending

Bahamas bank suffers
$15,000 net loss for Q1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUTTERFIELD Bank
(Bahamas) suffered a small
$15,000 net loss during the
2010 first quarter, after it was
squeezed by falling revenues
and a $100,000 increase in
expenses year-over-year.

The Bermuda-headquar-
tered bank, in releasing its
results for the three months
to March 31, 2010, revealed

that its Bahamian private
banking subsidiary suffered a
3.2 per cent revenue decline
year-over-year, with the top-
line falling to $1.855 million
from $1.916 million the year
before.

Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) also had to con-
tend with a $105,000 increase
in total expenses, which grew
by 5.9 per cent from $1.765

SEE page 4B

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change in traffic because it
has devastated businesses
there.

“Where I think they went
wrong is that while it makes
sense to flow the majority of
traffic north on Blue Hill and
south on Market Street, Blue
Hill Road is a significant
Over-the-Hill depository of
local businesses.

“Most people do their
shopping on the way home,
not on their way to work.
They’re in a rush. As a result,
Blue Hill Road is a wasteland
at 5-6pm at night. Nothing is
going on. And, to add insult
to injury, you’ve got all the
construction work going on.
It’s just a congestion night-

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mare.”

Mr D’Aguilar said his
Superwash outlet at the cor-
ner of Blue Hill and Robinson
Roads had been less affected
by the changes than other
companies, since it was easier
for customers to reach him.

However, he said that
month-over-month, sales at
that Superwash outlet for the
first 20 days in April 2010
were off by 14 per cent
against their March 2010 com-
paratives.

He pinpointed early April
as the date when the road-
works and re-routing began,
adding that year-over-year,
sales for the first 20 days in
April 2010 were down by 12

per cent.

“There’s not any significant
businesses on Market Street;
all the large Over-the-Hill
businesses were on Blue Hill
Road. It was a major business
thoroughfare, a major com-
mercial avenue,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Because Blue Hill Road
was situated three blocks
away from Market Street,
commuters travelling south
on the latter would be faced
with a six-block round-trip to
do shopping on Blue Hill
Road. This, coupled with traf-
fic congestion, would likely

SEE page 10B



Online at
BankBahamasOnline.com

Saunders Beach
work ‘complete’
hy next month

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ROADWORKS at Saun-
ders Beach, part of the $2 mil-
lion phase one New Provi-
dence Road Improvement
Project, could be completed
by next month, according to
Ministry of Works engineers.
The project has reportedly
created almost 160 Bahami-
an jobs.

Charlene Collie-Harris,
speaking at the Bahamas
Society of Engineers monthly
meeting, said the project at
Saunders Beach had been set
back by problems with the
importation of materials and
unforeseen problems with
underground utilities.

According to Mrs Harris,
the road corridors are being
constructed so that they are
all completed near the same
time, in order for Bahamians
to see the benefits of traffic
improvements almost imme-
diately.

She said the project had
been eight to 10 years behind
in construction due to the ini-
tial contractor hired going
bankrupt.

However, Mrs Harris said

SEE page 5B

Contractors in ‘better position’ after Q1 closing

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ALTHOUGH many
Bahamian contractors are
“still scratching for work”, the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president yes-
terday said the sector was
“beginning to see movement”
in the lower end of the sec-
ond home market, while Baha
Mar was “weeks away” on its
Commercial Village contracts.

Stephen Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business that home/lot
packages valued at around
$500,000 seemed to be prov-
ing especially popular with
foreign real estate purchasers,

Mother’s Day Gift Cards.

* Many ‘still scratching for work’, but pick up signs
there, especially in Family Island second home market
* Home/lot packages in $500k range especially
popular with foreign buyers, as government said to be
mulling changes to lower/middle income home market
* BCA chief says Baha Mar ‘very much a go’ and
‘weeks away’ on Commercial Village contract
* But recovery on commercial construction

likely ‘8-12 months away’

since they allowed buyers to
meet Bahamian residency
qualifications without prov-
ing prohibitively expensive.
Mr Wrinkle said he expect-
ed the second home con-

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struction market to recover
first, given that it was popu-
lated by relatively wealthy
individuals who still possessed

SEE page 6B






Job Notice

SCHOOL PRINCIPAL



A well established private School that espouses Christian principles is in
search of a Principal to lead the institution which provides day care and,
pre, primary and high school departments. Committed to providing a
quality education which upholds a standard of scholastic excellence and
fosters vital Christian living in preparation for responsible citizenship for
students of all backgrounds, the institution offers a curriculum that fulfils
the requirements of the Government's compulsory education statutes.
Located in a residential community in New Providence the school’s current
population of roughly 500 students is expected to grow.

The Principal will be a strong, innovative leader with a high degree of
administrative and supervisory skills and a capacity to identify and
remediate instructional practices, where necessary. Committed to the
promotion of Christian ethics and morals, she/he will be able to build
strong relationships both within the internal and external communities,
develop, implement and maintain a safe and healthy school environment
and represent, promote and articulate the school’s vision to all
stakeholders and the community at large. Responsible for driving and
leading the implementation of the school's vision and values, the principal
will cultivate and maintain a positive, achievement focused school culture
among teachers, students, staff and parents. In the selection of faculty
and staff and the organization and budgeting of resources (human,
material and financial), the principal will be guided by creativity, efficiency
and effectiveness. As the instructional leader, the principal will ensure the
maintenance of a curriculum that is relevant and serviceable.

The successful candidate will be required to take up the post for the
beginning of the academic year 2010 -2011.

Qualifications include a Masters Degree or higher and Professional
Certification and experience in an Educational Leadership capacity.
Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Mail resume to:

Eileen Fielder
P.O.Box N3220,
Nassau, Bahamas
or email:
efielder@thecounsellorsitd.com





(

(iani0\

of th

Correct logo is key
to a business ‘go-go’

MUCH has been said
about a company’s need for
a distinct identity to survive
in an overcrowded market
place. A logo, generically, is a
pictorial recognition of a com-
pany's name, values or ser-
vices. It is a fundamental or
root of the brand. Like a tree,
a brand can grow if the logo is
strong and well-nourished,
and has strength that is
reflected in the creativity of
the design.

David Aaker, in his book
Building Strong Brands, lays
strong emphasis on the fact
that “familiarity of a brand
elicits clients to indulge”.
Nonetheless, one of the most
important decisions a busi-
ness owner can make is
choosing the design of a logo.
I am convinced that such
questions have more than
likely popped into your head.
How would a logo benefit my
company? In other words,
would a logo amplify,
enhance or highlight my over-
all purpose? Does it make
sense for me to have a logo?
If you run a small accounting
company from your home,
investing in a logo might not
make sense. So what's the
best way to decide on invest-
ing in a logo?

When you are in a business
with similar products or ser-
vices, that unique factor is
what every business should
strive for. For example, travel
agencies often use globes in
their logos, so aim to use
something else. Customers
need to know you are better
and the logo should reiterate
just that. Without a logo, it
would be difficult for every-
one to identify you among the
multitude of. say, computer
companies in the market.

Experts suggest people
tend to remember images
more than text. As the old
adage states: “A picture is
worth a thousand words”, and
if you know how the human
mind works, memory can trig-







The Art
of Graphix

BUS Cnm Mer RIeT





ger with the slightest hint of
seeing the same logo again.

Imagine if McDonald's did-
n't have the ‘golden arches’
or Nike's ubiquitous 'swoosh'
never existed? Would their
brands be as strong today if
that image wasn't imprinted
on the minds of most con-
sumers?

Sometimes a logo design
can represent the history and
popular culture of that time.
You might have seen logos
that are more than a century
old, or a historical icon that
represents history and contri-
butions to the economy.

Whether they see your
logo on television, in the
pages of a magazine or a
newspaper, you want your
logo to scream: ‘Look at me!’
You want an audacious logo
that explodes and captivates
your customer, so try not to
make it overly complex,
because it will not lend itself
to multiple uses and can
potentially fail to deliver your
message clearly.

Chiefly, logos need to func-
tion smartly in many differ-
ent mediums - from the Inter-
net to print advertising sce-
narios, envelopes and memo
pads, etc. To encourage
repeat business as well as
referrals, don’t forget to put it
on all your online materials.
Yet, it is an easy journey from
one R to another, Recogni-
tion to Revenue.

Keep in mind that the logo
can be shrunk to fit certain
items, such as a business card,
or blown up larger, like a bill-
board, so it should convert
well. A tag could also be
included in your company’s
logo, which is simply a list of
services or products your

THE TRIBUNE

company provides.

Getting started

Before you begin sketch-
ing, first articulate the mes-
sage you want your logo to
convey. Try writing a one-sen-
tence image and mission
statement to help focus your
efforts. Stay true to this state-
ment while creating.

The most important things
to determine before design-
ing your logo are:Who You
Are; Your business's mission,
vision and purpose; What
You Do; the products and
services that you deliver; and
Who You Can Best Help?
(your target audience).
Remember, your logo has to
connect with your clients, so
ensure you're designing for
them and not for yourself,
which might result in a logo
that does not serve its pur-
pose. Here are some addi-
tional tactics and considera-
tions that will help you cre-
ate an appropriate company
logo:

Make it clean

and functional

Your logo should work as
well on a business card as on
the side of a truck. It should
be scalable, easy to repro-
duce, memorable and distinc-
tive. Icons are better than
photographs, which may be
indecipherable if enlarged or
reduced significantly. And be
sure to create a logo that can
be reproduced in black and
white, so that it can be faxed,
photocopied or used in a
black-and-white ad as effec-
tively as in colour.

Your business name will
affect your logo design For
example, with a company
called ‘Lightning Bolt Print-
ing’, the logo might feature
some creative implementation
of...... you guessed it, a light-
ning bolt. It even could be

SEE page 14B

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 3B



Mystery shop
start-up to combat
bad service

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

CUSTOMER service has
a nameless and faceless ally,
with a new Bahamian-
owned and operated Mys-
tery Shopping agency hop-
ing to change the stigma of
“bad service” allegedly
plaguing this country’s
many restaurants, retail
stores and government
agencies.

Principal of Mystery
Shopper, Dorian Roach, has
partnered with Ryan
Knowles to help raise the
standard of service at stores,
shops and firms across the
country.

According to Mr Roach,
mystery shopping secks to
help business owners main-
tain standards in their stores
by ensuring employees are
following the protocols laid
out for them by their
employer.

“This is a customer ser-
vice programme where we
provide a mystery shopper,”
said Mr Roach.

“They basically go into a
business and rate the service
they get.”

He added that mystery
shoppers not only record
notes on what they find
when they enter a business,
but also use hidden cameras
to document the interaction
between customer and staff
for training purposes.

“We make sure certain
standards are adhered to,
just to make sure they are
being followed and done to
that standard,” Mr Roach

said.

“Tt’s more of a training
tool than a punitive tool. If
you tell a staff member they
didn’t do something, they
don’t get the picture until

they see themselves doing it.

The video shows a lot more
than what the paper report
can.”

Mr Roach said he and his
partner have been in the
retail business for a number
of years and understand the
need for mystery shoppers
in stores across the
Bahamas.

He said he had used mys-
tery shopping in his own
stores, and found that many

times employees did not fol-
low through on service stan-

dards when managers were
not on the floor.
Therefore, he and his
partner decided to put a
dent in the “bad” customer

service railed about regular-

ly in the Bahamas.

“Staff will do all the right
things until you are not
around,” said Mr Roach.

Major quality assurance
services such as this exist

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States, such as AAA, which
rates a plethora of compa-
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Mr Roach said it can be a

“You always hear how bad
the service is in the
Bahamas, so there is defi-

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THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

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considered for recommendation as candidates for
the seats to become available on either the Board of
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All members interested in serving in either capacity
should collect an application form from any office of
the Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited offices in Nassau, Freeport,
Abaco or Mangrove Cay Andros.

The qualification for each post is available upon
request.

Completed applications, along with the other
information requested should be returned to any of
the offices on or before the close of business on
Friday April 30, 2010.

All Resolutions must also be submitted by Friday
April 30, 2010.

Any application, not fully completed or without the
requested supporting information, or received after
the aforementioned date will not be eligible for
consideration.

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

Bahamas bank
suffers $15,000
net loss for Ql

FROM page 1B

million to $1.87 million year-
over-year.

The end result was that
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas)
incurred a small $15,000 net
loss for the 2010 first quarter,
as opposed to a $55,000 net
profit in the same period dur-

ing 2009.

Its Bermuda parent said of
its Bahamian subsidiary:
“Total revenue before gains
and losses was in line with last
year at $1.9 million. Total
non-interest expenses were
up $0.1 million to $1.9 million
due to the accelerated vest-
ing of options. As a result,
there was a minimal net loss

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THE TRIBUNE

at the end of the 2010 first
quarter.”

Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) also suffered a
$0.6 million increase in non-
performing residential mort-
gages during the 2010 first
quarter, its parent’s results
disclosed.

Net interest income derived
from its clients, though,
remained relatively flat at
$556,000, compared to
$561,000 generated in the
2009 first quarter. And But-
terfield Bank (Bahamas)
actually saw a small rise in its
non-interest income year-
over-year, as this grew from
$1.258 million in 2009 to
$1.287 million.

The Bahamian subsidiary
also saw its total assets fall by
11 per cent during the three
months to March 31, 2010, as
they dropped from $166.455
million to $148.116 million
year-over-year.

And its total deposits fell
by a similar 11.2 per cent in
the three months following
the 2009 year-end, dropping
from $133.189 million to
$118.364 million. Deposits
payable on demand rose from
$67.429 million to $72.53 mil-
lion, while deposits payable
on a fixed date fell to $45.834
million from $65.76 million.

Meanwhile, Butterfield
Bank (Bahamas) saw its total
credit exposure drop from
$81.687 million to $75.483 mil-
lion over the same period.

The bank had unveiled a
$119,000 loss for 2009, an
$885,000 goodwill write-down
having sent it into the red,
with its parent unveiling a
$550 million equity capital
raising to rescue the Bermu-
da-headquartered institution
after the group suffered a
$214 million net loss for the
last fiscal year.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 5B



Farming output flat for 30 years

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ agricultur-
al output has remained flat
for the past 30 years, with the
lack of new, younger Bahami-
ans rising up the ranks in the
Ministry of Agriculture also
threatening the industry’s
longevity. of the industry said
yesterday.

Greg Rahming, a senior
chemist at the Department of
Agriculture, said yesterday
that there had been no suc-
cession planning within the
Ministry of Agriculture to
ensure that a younger gener-
ation carries on the mission




FROM page 1B

the corridors currently being
constructed will be designed
to last 20 to 25 years.

Motorists could finally see
the use of the new Saunders
Beach roundabout beginning
as early as next week.

The Ministry of Works is
also planning the widening
and improvement of Prince
Charles Drive and Robinson
Road, in order to reduce
instances of bumper-to-
bumper traffic during morn-
ing and evening rush hours.

Mrs Harris said Robinson
Road will become a three-
lane road, with a centre lane
being added for turning, and
Prince Charles is to become a
four-lane highway.

These changes alone, she
said, will not immediately rec-
tify the traffic situation but
will be done in tandem with
the unification and improve-
ment of the public trans-
portation system, a school bus
system and a comprehensive
and improved driver instruc-
tion and education plan.

Business people have railed

Saunders Beach work
‘complete’ by next month

to provide sustainable food
security for the Bahamas.

Speaking at the first annu-
al agricultural symposium at
the Gladstone Road Agricul-
tural Research and Demon-
stration Complex, Mr Rah-
ming outlined several obsta-
cles to the industry’s success,
especially as it pertains to
trade.

According to Mr Rahming,
one of the most immediate
setbacks to the agricultural
industry is the lack of mterest
in the sector by generations
of newly-graduated high
school and college students.

He suggested that the Gov-
ernment reintroduce its schol-
arship programme to train



against some of the Govern-
ment’s road work projects,
namely the rerouting of the
Market Street and Blue Hill
Road Corridors.

Businesses on those streets
say they have noticed a 30 to
60 per cent decrease in busi-
ness since the road directions
were changed, and some have
talked about closing their
doors because of it.

Yesterday, many of the
owners of those businesses
staged a protest, lobbying the
Government to return the
roads to their original traffic
flows.

However, Mrs Harris point-
ed out that the changes were
necessary for the long-term
viability of traffic flows in the
area and the Bahamas, which
continue to increase year-on-
year.

She said the Ministry of
Works conducted an impact
assessment on the businesses
in the area, which found that
the road improvements and
changes would increase com-
merce in the area. However,
those owners tell a different
story.

individuals in the agriculture
sector, and have them work
in the industry for a specified
length of time.

Mr Rahming added that
the agricultural sector, to its
detriment, was lacking lead-
ership on the private sector
front and insisted interna-
tional help could change that.

Chinese investors are inter-
ested in Abaco, and are
expected to bring new tech-
nology and strategies to assist
in farming. However, it has
been said that they are also
interested in exports to their
own country.

The Bahamas has talked
about feeding itself for years,
and with a food bill of more
than $500 million, including
imported and locally-pro-
duced food stuffs, export
seems a long way off.

According to Mr Rahming,
this country’s agricultural










un







FAMGUARD

The Board of Directors

of

FamGuard Corporation Limited
advises shareholders and the
public that the company’s Audited
Consolidated Financial Statements for

the year ended December 31, 2009 are
available on the company’s website:

www.famguardbahamas.com

FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED
The parent holding company of

Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Limited
FG General Insurance Agency Limited
FG Capital Markets Limited

FG Financial Limited









ae AIL: ‘Sizes Available

Location:-Soldier Road,West
p2 Doors From Southland Church of God
Telphone:-361-3620

industry standards are not
where they should be in order
to engage in trade under
agreements such as the World
Trade Organisation (WTO).

“Without regulation and
standards, people will not
have confidence in Bahamian
products,” he said.

He added that one of the
most striking, unregulated
sectors is poultry production,
which is not subject to inspec-
tion and has “no law govern-
ing it”.

While there are crops that
can be grown and be prof-
itable in the Bahamas, the
number of registered farmers
has decreased over time,
according to senior market-
ing officer for the Ministry of
Agriculture, Leslie Minns.

According to his figures,
this country’s agricultural out-
puts have remained flat for
almost 30 years.



Why,
LADIES SUITS
and HATS
GIRLS DRESSES



GN 1043

Ministry of Public Works And Transport
Construction of New Campus
The Eugune Dupuch Law School- Thompson
Boulevard
Pre-Qualification of Contractors

NOTICE

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
through the Ministry of Works and Transport is inviting
qualified General Contractors to participate in a Pre-
Qualification for the Tender for Construction of The
Campus of The Eugene Dupuch Law School, to be built on
a site located on Thompson Boulevard, New Providence.

The structure will be approximately 30,500 Sq. Ft.
comprising of a series of detached structures connected
by roof, around a common courtyard, with associated
external works and services.

The General Contractors will be required to provide a
detailed indication of their competence, both technically
and financially, to carry out the intended scope of work
within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification
documents as of Wednesday 21st, April 2010, between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. - 5-00 p.m. from:

The office of the:

Director of Public Works

Ministry of Public Works and Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830
Fax: (242) 302-9770

The completed pre-qualification document should be
deposited in the Tender box at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd
Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, West Bay Street,
P.O. Box N-3017, Nassau, The Bahamas no later than 10:
00 a.m. on Tuesday 4th May 2010.

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
has the right to reject any or all pre-qualification
contractors.

Signed:

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



To advertise, call 502-2371



Eastern Com aawohie Association

1 www. ee banaia org

i part

Come join the communities of the EAST
Let’s get to know one another again in family fun, friendship and fellowship at the

Fun Fantastic

May 1, 2010

12 noon
to
midnight

Green Space West
OR Ty aC
Oh iM ea ti Ceorem ey vale:
and Jasmine Dr



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



=
Contractors in ‘better position’ after Q1 closing

FROM page 1B

enough surplus assets to
invest in home projects. That
would be followed by the
local Bahamian housing mar-
ket, he suggested, with recov-
ery in the commercial con-
struction market “another
eight to 12 months away” due
to the existing oversupply of
empty office space.

“T think we’re beginning to
see some movement in the
industry as a whole,” Mr

Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I would say there’s pos-
itive movement in the second
home market, particularly
with regard to the Family
Islands - Abaco, Eleuthera
and Exuma.

“T’ve been there because
we’ve got projects on all three
islands. There’s movement
there, and indications that the
US market is beginning to
loosen up. People who build
second homes in the Family



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Responsibilities:

* Manage entire scope of the Front Office Department

* Attend to guest enquiries

* Monitor performance against budget projections
* Ensure proper training and procedures in place to

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* Attend to crisis or emergency situations
* Able to understand and interpret budgets and financial

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All submissions will be kept confidential.
Interested persons should apply in writing to HR Manager:
DA 83556, c/o The Tribune,

PO Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas





NOTICE

Islands are, for the most part,
well-off anyway.”

Mr Wrinkle said home/lot
packages in the $300,000-
$500,000 range were proving
especially popular, adding:
“That’s a niche market that
seems to employ a good,
steady interest. We’re finding
housing and lot packages stay-
ing at that $500,000 mark
offer people the ability to
meet their residency require-
ments without breaking the
bank.

“That seems to be a more
robust market. Going over
the $600,000 mark gets into
difficulties, as there is a dif-
ferent type of client.”

The BCA president
described the local Bahami-
an housing market as “still
sluggish”, due to the persis-
tent high unemployment lev-
els and reluctance of com-
mercial banks to extend cred-
it to all borrowers apart from

those deemed ‘good risks’.

Still, Mr Wrinkle suggest-
ed that there may soon be fur-
ther opportunities for
Bahamian contractors as a
result of the Government’s
desire to exit the house build-
ing market altogether and
leave it to the private sector.

But if it was to fully exploit
such an opportunity, Mr
Wrinkle said the Bahamian
construction industry needed
the licensing, certification and
standards that would be ush-
ered in by the Contractors Bill
- a piece of legislation that the
Government promised to pass
during this parliamentary ses-
sion in the Speech from the
Throne.

“Government is trying to
get out of the home building
business and just provide ser-
vice lots, so we may see
changes in the way the hous-
ing market for the lower and
middle classes is being

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Medical assistant needed
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Fax resume to:
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haroldjr@batelnet.bs

INVITATION TO TENDER

Tender for the provision of
Water and Sewerage General Insurance

The Water and Sewerage Corporation invites tenders from any bidder who is
authorized to do business in the Bahamas; and who satisfied all eligibility and
qualification requirements of the CORPORATION and is registered with and licensed
by register of insurance to issue insurances for the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Receptionist’s desk at the
Corporation’s Headquarters at #87 Thompson Boulevard.

Sealed bids are to be delivered on or before May 14 at 4:00 p.m. and addressed as

follows:

Deputy General Manager/Engineering & Planning

Water Sewerage Corporation
87 Thompson Boulevard
Nassau Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to reject or accept any or all proposals.

Submission should be marked as follows:-

Tender: General Insurance Proposal
Type of Coverage Required

All general risk insurance
Commercial Property Insurance (Building content)
Computers, IT infrastructure, Mobile, Equipments

Motor insurance, Commercial & Private, Motor Vehicle

Accident Insurance, Money & Fidelity
Liability Insurance, Marine Cargo

Signed : Management, Water and Sewerage Corporation





approached,” the BCA presi-
dent said.

“One of the things being
talked of is that they’re going
to try and encourage more
private home building on ser-
vice lots the Government pro-
vides, as opposed to the Gov-
ernment building and selling
them.

“That will help the housing
programmes that the Gov-
ernment is planning to launch
in short order. It will expand
the pot of contractors able to
build those homes.”

Asked by Tribune Business
about the level of business
that Bahamian contractors
were currently enjoying, Mr
Wrinkle told this newspaper:
“The majority of contractors
probably have something
going on, but the majority of
contractors do not have
enough going on to sustain
them.

“Tt’s still a “pick-pick’ econ-
omy where they’re still
scratching for work. It takes a
while to spool back, but I
would say we’re in a better
position at the end of the first
quarter than we were at the
end of last year.”

Apart from the potential
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



velopment finally moving
ahead, Mr Wrinkle said there
were relatively few prospects
for additional commercial
development work besides
existing projects.

“The rest of the commer-
cial market is very flat,” he
added. “There’s an excess of
prime office space available,
and there’s still an excess
amount of multi-family space
available.

“We'll have to wait another
eight to 12 months to see
commercial work resurface,
because there’s a lag there
that has to catch up. The sec-
ond home market is the first
one we will see re-emerge,
followed by the housing sec-
tor and the commercial mar-
ket.”

Expressing optimism over
the prospects for Bahamian
contractors at Cable Beach,
Mr Wrinkle told Tribune
Business that the BCA had
met with Baha Mar execu-
tives on Tuesday, and the pro-
ject was “very much a go”.

“They’re trying to do the
‘is’ and cross the ‘ts’, and as
soon as everything is finished
the horses can bolt out of the
gate,” he added. “There is a
lot of work available for
Bahamian contractors, and
we’re looking forward to that.

“All indications are that
we’re weeks away now with
the Commercial Village work,
which is the first phase, and
all the work will go to
Bahamian contractors.”

The jobs and confidence
stimulus from the Baha Mar
project could in themselves
be enough to stimulate the
housing market, Mr Wrinkle
said, as it would “give the
banks a measure of confi-
dence about job security”.

The BCA president said
the impending reforms at the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
“will help our industry, as it
will expand the construction
trade programmes and
involve the private sector with
BTVI initiatives, which will
provide a better education.
We’re looking forward to
that, as it should be very pos-
itive for us”.



Applicants must:

Has an opening for an

ASSOCIATE

Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in any of the areas of trust,
banking or investments.

| Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.
A private Wealth Management Company and medium-sized Family office

¢ Bea qualified attorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders will also be considered. :

Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents relating to special

projects and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the

same.

e Bea seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project, coordinating its various

parts and managing the team associated with the same.



















e¢ Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

¢ Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic understanding of
investment and financial transactions.

Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant supervision.
e Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Successful candidate will work directly with the President of Tradelnvest in the

management of complex private fiduciary arrangements. Responsibilities include regular
contact with overseas affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals, as

well as legal counsel and advisors.



















Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and Confidential to:

The President
Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.

LYFORD MANOR (WEST BUILDING), LYFORD CAY

NASSAU, N.P., THE BAHAMAS

Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 702-2040

Applications must be received by 3° May, 2040.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 7B



5
Food retailing consolidation

in ‘six to nine months’

FROM page 1B

When asked by Tribune
Business whether the over-
supply of food stores in the
Bahamian market was likely
to lead to a consolidation,
Sandy Schaefer, president of
Robin Hood, replied:
“Absolutely. There’s no ques-
tion.

“Tt’s coming already in the
next six to nine months, and
we intend to be among the
winners. There’s some reali-
ties that cannot be overcome.
To some extent, there is more
competitive pressure out
there, and that’s forcing
everyone to follow suit, reduc-
ing prices or operational
costs.”

New entrants to the
Bahamian food/grocery retail-
ing market in recent months
have included Mr Schaefer’s
Robin Hood and Gladstone
Road-based Phil’s Food Ser-
vices (formerly Premium
Foods).

Now competing against
more established food retail

chains, such as City Markets,
Super Value and AML
Foods, neighbourhood chains
such as Budget Meats and
multiple ‘Mom and Pop’
stores, their entrance and the
expansion of other businesses
has led many observers to
view this market as ripe for
consolidation, as too many
stores chase too few cus-
tomers in a market that has
been battered by the reces-
sion.

It is unclear whether con-
solidation will occur through
mergers and acquisitions, with
one food store chain acquiring
a rival or rivals, or through
some stores - or even an
entire chain - being forced out
of business.

Gavin Watchorn, presi-
dent/chief executive of AML
Foods, the Solomon’s Super-
Centre and Cost Right owner,
agreed with Mr Schaefer that
the Bahamian food retailing
market was heading for con-
solidation, although he said
this was more likely to occur
in Freeport than Nassau.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |,
Garden
Exuma, Nassau,

VINCENT ROLLE of
Thompson,

GARY

Hills #2, Mt
Bahamas intend

to change my name to GARY VINCENT LORD

ROLLE. [Tf there are an
of name by Deed

objections to this change
oll, you ma

write such

objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PHILIP NEWTON ANDREWS
of 22 PORT NEW PROVIDENCE, P.O.BOX N-44,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29" day of
APRIL, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PALTAL HOLDING
INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

¢ Jackilin Brice

¢ Scott Smith

¢ Sheldon Smith



¢ Krystal Lord

¢ Debbie Ferguson
c/o Paul A. Wells

e Irene Tucker

“T think the market is head-
ing for that,” Mr Watchorn
told Tribune Business. “I
don’t think you could suggest
there would be a fall-out or
shake-up, but there is defi-
nitely an oversupply of retail-
ers on the food side and new
stores opening up all the time.

“T would see that more in
Freeport than Nassau. I see
something coming there. Giv-
en that Freeport is in a per-
petually worse state than Nas-
sau, something is going to
have to give.”

Arguably the most vulner-
able could be City Markets
and its Bahamas Supermar-
kets parent, which picked the
worst possible time - a reces-
sion and increased competi-
tion - to endure financial woes
that saw them lose almost a
net $20 million over a three-
year period following the buy-
out of their former majority
owner, US retail chain Winn-
Dixie.

Mr Watchorn acknowl-
edged that the increased com-
petition had impacted AML
Foods’ margins, telling Tri-
bune Business: “Our margins
have taken a little dip. It’s just
the nature of the market right
now. We have to be competi-
tive, and that drives margins
down a little bit, yes.

“Competition is not that
bad of a thing. It forces you to
examine what you’re doing
and what you can do better.
There is a little bit of an
unlevel playing field out
there.” He did not elaborate
on that comment.

Mr Schaefer, meanwhile,
said it was impossible for
retailers to continue selling
products below cost indefi-
nitely and rely on volumes.
At some point, the need to
achieve margins and earn a
profit would come into play.

Mr Watchorn, though, said
he remained “troubled” by
the huge quantities of food
and other goods imported by
Bahamians via shopping trips
to Florida, pointing out that
this was money and jobs lost
to the economy when it need-
ed them most - in the midst of
a recession.

“It goes back to Bahami-
ans supporting their own busi-
nesses, and the amount of
product readily available in
the Bahamas that continues
to be imported is still trou-
bling. It’s short-sighted gains
for long-term impediments.”

The AML Foods president
said “hundreds of thousands
of dollars per week in the
food retail business alone”
was being brought back from
south Florida.

“The reaction when you
talk about this is that busi-
nesses are being greedy and
want more business, but you
need to look at job creation
and government revenues,”
he added.

Spending money in the
Bahamas, Mr Watchorn said,
would keep it in the econo-
my, where it would be recy-
cled. “When you bring it to
the States and leave it there, it
stays there,” he added.



Payments not made by May 10th, 2010.
Items will be sold to cover outstanding Account!

stor-it-all
Soldier Road

(by Lowe’s Wholesale),
Telephone: 393-0964

stor-if-all

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

freeportCONCRETE

company limited




























































































Providing the foundations for The Bahamas

Dear Shareholder,
As it has been over a month since our last update to you on March 8, 2010, we felt it was important that you are
aware of the company’s position at the present time.

With regard to the potential buyer of some of the assets of the company that | had mentioned in my last report, this
individual flew to Freeport almost 4 weeks ago and assured me that the definitive agreement would be finalized and
sent to us in ‘short order’ but so far we have not received.

In addition, in the past few weeks, there has been interest from various parties to purchase our 126.75 acres of land,
which sits on the North Shore just east of the Freeport Intl. Airport for quarry operations. Due to this and the fact that
the land sits right next to a quarry operation today, it has led us to revisit the value of this land and to determine if in
fact the land is undervalued in our books.

As most of you are aware, appraisals need to be done on the highest and best use of the land. Definitions by the
American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers state: “The use that, at the time of appraisal, is the most profitable use”.
It may be also defined as: The available use and programme of future utilization that produces the highest present
land value”

As a result of this, we looked over the last appraisal that was done in 2005 and we determined that this appraisal was
based on the land being used more for residential or commercial use. However, on reviewing earlier documentation,
it was clearly evident that the best and highest use of this land is for quarry operations which processes limestone
rock into aggregate and sand. In fact in the actual conveyance of this property to Freeport Concrete Company Limited
it states “Not to use any portion of the said hereditaments for any purpose other than for the operation of a plant for
the excavation, manufacture and sale of rock and construction aggregate”

Therefore, we contacted a very reputable engineering and appraisal firm here in Freeport and had them review our
findings. This has resulted in us receiving an appraisal from W. Carver Grant & Co. valuing the land at $4,950,000.
We have sent a copy of this appraisal to our auditors for their review and will also be posting a copy of the appraisal
on our website www.fccbahamas.com for you, our shareholders, to review.

The company continues to lose money as we have no cash to purchase sufficient inventory at the Home Centre. Only
one of our suppliers of building materials is supporting us by sending us trailers of lumber, sheetrock and plywood,
this is keeping us in business, but is not enough inventory to enable us to be profitable with existing costs, despite us
reducing our expenses approximately 36% in this 6 months period compared to the same 6 months last year.
Attached are our 2"° quarter financials showing a 2"° quarter loss of $636k and shareholders equity as at February
28, 2010 a negative $855k.

Our board of directors have determined that this latest appraisal of the land has a significant and material effect on
our balance sheet. We have therefore decided to restate this asset in our books as we feel that the appraised value
is fair based on the value of the land for limestone rock mining over a 15 year period.

The restating of the value of this asset will be done this month and will mean an increase in shareholders equity by
$3,429,000, which you will see in our 34 quarter as at May 31, 2010 financials.

Unfortunately, this does not help the company from a cash perspective.

However, we will be now trying to sell this land for a price that will enable us to pay off the bank debt of $2 million and
have sufficient cash to buy the inventory we need for the Home Centre. This will then result in our being able to
increase our daily sales to a sufficient level that will generate profits now that we have reduced our expenses
substantially.

Meanwhile, whilst we go through this process of trying to sell this land, we need to remain in operation. Regrettably
our bank is not willing to advance us any additional funds and is putting pressure for the sale of some of the
company’s assets mentioned earlier to be completed in order that they can be paid off.

Time is of the essence and the board is also considering the possibility of doing a shareholders rights offering to
facilitate a critical cash injection into the company. We will inform all shareholders of any decision in this regard.

We thank you for your continued support and will continue to keep you informed as we work through this process.
Yours sincerely,

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer
April 26, 2010

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
(in B$ '000's)
As at
8/31/09
(unaudited)

As at
2/28/10
(unaudited)
ssets
Current assets:
Cash
ccounts receivable, net
Inventories
Inventories of spare parts and supplies
Deposits and prepaid expenses

Total current assets
Property,plant and equipment

Total assets

Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity

Current liabilities:

Bank overdraft

ccounts payable and accrued expenses
Warranty Provision

Current portion of long term debt

Total current liabilities
Long term liability

Shareholders equity:
Share Capital
Contributed surplus
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Current earnings
Total equity

Total liabilities and
shareholders’ equity

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Consolidated Statement of Operations

(in B$ '000's)

6 months

2/28/09
(unaudited)

6 months.
2/28/10
(unaudited)

3 months
2/28/09
(unaudited)

3 months
2/28/10
(unaudited)

Sales 737 2,639 2,346 6,064
Cost of Sales (603) (1,871) (1,773) (4,441)
Gross Profit 134 768 573 1,623
Payroll (321) (704) (693) (1,203)
Rent (107) (107) (213) (210)
Utilities (67) (86) (127) (181)
Other operating costs (123) (210) (245) (399)

(608) (1,107) (1,278) (1,993)
Net income (loss) from operations (474) (339) (705) (370)

Depreciation and amortization (122) (142) (242) (290)
Interest expense (40) (40) (85) (82)

Net income/(loss) (636) (621) (1,032) (742)

To advertise in The Tribune -
UC a MAWES ae RR
UE ate aera a TE
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





CARICOM ‘not doing much’ on EPA details

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



ONE year after regional Carifo-
rum governments signed on to the
Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the European Union
(EU), there is still “not much being
done” at a regional level to hasten
implementation of the trade agree-
ment, the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s trade expert said yes-
terday.

Hank Ferguson said the non-
CARICOM Dominican Republic
has taken quick advantage of last

year’s signing, and has already begun
exporting a mass amount of sugar
to some EU member states.
According to Mr Ferguson, the
Dominican Republic has been
extremely proactive in moving for-
ward with EPA implementation, but
ironically had been one of the hold-
ups in bringing the agreement into
force for the region. It is a part of
Cariforum, a non-legal body, but not
a part of CARICOM -a legal entity.
And while some three years still
remain for this country to complete
legislation essential to implement-
ing the EPA, according to minister
of state for finance, Zhivargo Laing,

it would seem that the Bahamas
could also have jump-started its
trade with the EU like the Domini-
can Republic has done.

“Until implementation, we won’t
realize the benefits,” said Mr Fer-
guson.

Measures

Most measures still waiting to be
enacted have already been passed
by CARIFORUM countries when
they joined other global trade agree-
ments such as the World Trade
Organization (WTO).

The Bahamas is in the queue to

accede to the WTO, which according
Mr Ferguson, will be a more strin-
gent implementation process.

He added, however, that the EPA
implementation process could assist
this nation with the smooth adop-
tion of other upcoming trade agree-
ments, including the CARIBCAN
agreement with Canada.

The EPA cannot, though, fully
come into force until the Joint Coun-
cil of Cariforum and EU heads meet,
and the conundrum with the
Dominican Republic has not allowed
that to happen.

The Dominican Republic is lob-
bying for Cariform, of which they

are a signatory, to be a legal entity
for EPA accession. For now, Cari-
com is the legal authority.

Caribbean countries are eager to
receive the benefits of the EPA, one
of which is a development assistance
arrangement that promises up to 165
million Euros.

Mr Ferguson said those benefits
will not be realized until there is an
EPA implementation unit, which is
not recognized by the Dominican
Republic.

“The real question now is: How
do you reconcile the DR’s (Domini-
can Republic) position with that of
Caricom bodies,” he said.

‘Totally wrong’ on Blue Hill re-routing

FROM page 1B

deter commuters from mak-
ing the trip, costing Blue Hill
Road businesses dearly.

Such a trip was something
Bahamians “inherently are
not prepared to do”, Mr
D’ Aguilar added, saying that
most would “take the path of
least resistance”.



Urging the Government to
make Market Street flow
north and Blue Hill Road
flow south if it stuck to its
one-way plans, the former
Chamber president suggest-
ed that it had implemented
its current scheme based on
the likely traffic improve-
ments alone, without consid-
ering the wider impact on
businesses.

“In the process, they’ve
devastated and destroyed a
number of businesses at a crit-
ical time. They’re very weak
as a result of the recession,”
Mr D’ Aguilar added.

He questioned whether the
perceived improvement in
traffic flow was, from the
Government’s perspective,
worth more than the poten-
tial harm inflicted on busi-

nesses in the Blue Hill Road
area, coupled with employ-
ment at these companies.

Already, the Super Value
store on Blue Hill Road is
alleging that it has lost
$100,000 in revenues as a
result of the traffic change,
while Heastie’s Gas Station
has suffered a customer
decline just after making a $1
million investment.

President of the Carmichael
Business League, Ethric
Bowe, previously said: "The
road changes are destructive
to jobs. More than 400 jobs
are on the line. The decision
will close a number of busi-
nesses. Many will have to
downsize.

"Tt's one thing to go out of
business, but it's entirely dif-
ferent to be put out of busi-
ness, and it's even worse to
be put out of business by your
own government.”

School uniform store pro-
prietor Janet Fowler with-
drew a $250,000 loan last year
to relocate her business to



Blue Hill Road before she
knew of the traffic diversion
she fears will never take off.

"I'm dead before I've
lived," she said.

"And I feel as if my gov-
ernment is trying to bury me.

"This change has put me in
a critical situation and I'm
asking for government to
reverse the traffic."

Super Value operations
manager Kendrick Moss said
business at the Blue Hill
Road store had dropped by
up to 40 per cent during their
once busy evening hours, and
more than 32 employees
could be affected.

GO RONE: Yleysn Selected Appliances

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

JONES & CO

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

322-2188/9

3 FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COLONIAL

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 28 APRIL 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,556.44 | CHG -5.09 | %CHG -0.33 | YTD -8.94 | YTD % -0.57

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.00

Securit_y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

3.87
5.23:
0.44
S15
2.14
9.62
2.69
5.00
21
1.32

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

5.94
8.75
9.50
aioe
1.00
0.27
5.00
3.95.
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

EPS $
0.250

Previous Close Today's Close Div $
1.02 1.02
10.63 10.63
5.24 5.24
0.44 0.44
3.15 3.15
2.17 2.17
12.07 12.07
2.84 2.84

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.10
-0.03
0.00

0.050
0.598
OFT
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)
Interest

3.30
2.94
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08

5.80
21
2.54
6.07
9.08
10.60
5.08

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.27
3.38.
9.35:
10.00

1.00
0.27
5.59.
9.35
10.00

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
%%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund

1.3702
2.8266
1.4467
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
83.1986
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

Principal Protected TIGRS, S

10.0000 R Fi ity Bah Int'l Inves'
Principal Protected TIGRS,

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

ighted price for daily volume
weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

total shares traded today

hare paid in the last 12 months

price divided by the last 12 month eamings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
ies 1

Bids
10.06

Ask &
11.06
200 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
30.13 31.59 29.00
O45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months %
1.4602 1.50 6.57
2.9116 0.85 0.52
1.5274 1.34 4.98
-3.54
5.44
6.99
13.50
5.25
4.37
5.34
5.33

EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

DivS
0.000
0.480
0.000

Last Price P/E

14.00

Daily Val.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NAV 3MTH
1.438700
2.886947
1.507147

NAV 6MTH
1.407626
2.830013
1.491956

B.2025
13.4986
107.5706
105.7706
1.1034
1.0764
1.1041
9.5795.

ote
0.98
3.45
3.99
1.25
0.79
1.23
5.33

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

10.5417 -2.13 10.96
7.6928 -0.31
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of C
Last Price - Last traded over-the-c
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of th.
EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

47.51

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting
career opportunity?

AVAILABLE POSITION:

The Senior Manager -
Watch listed Accounts

e Manage a portfolio of high risk business accounts
and supervise/monitor the banks potential loss
exposure accounts

NOTICE is hereby given that
PODOLEO STREET, P.O. BOX SB-7060, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29" day of April, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

FRANCOIS MACKEY of

Teacher Vacancies for September 2010

Kingsway Academy invites applicants from qualified and
experienced candidates for teaching positions at the:

High School level

* Technical Drawing and Woodwork (Grades 7 to 9)

* Music (Grades 8 to 12)

* Information Technology (Grades 7 to 12 and
Advanced Placement level)

* Physics (Grades 10 to 12 and Advanced Placement
level)

The successful candidates should have the following:
* An academic degree in the area of specialization

* A teaching certificate

* Excellent communication skills

* A love for children and learning

* High standards of morality

* Be a born-again Christian

Acomplete application package consists of:
(a) completed and signed Kingsway Academy application form
- available at the school’s Administration building or on the website

www.kingswayacademy.com (See Document Downloads)

(b) detailed resume with cover letter

(c) recent photograph

(d) three (3) reference letters, one (1) being from your church’s
minister

(e) legible e-mail address and working telephone contacts

Note: All documents should be submitted
at the same time.

Please forward to:

Kingsway Academy Employment Application

Kingsway Academy

Box N-4378

Bernard Road

Nassau, The Bahamas
e-mail:jbethell@kingswayacademy.com

Deadline: To ensure consideration, complete

application materials must be received by
Friday, May 14", 2010

TIES

A”
—

& =,

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010
Correct logo is key to a business ‘go-go’

FROM page 1B

manipulated to suggest speed
and assurance. Be relevant

be, clip art can be copied too
easily. Not only will original
art make a more impressive
statement about your compa-
ny, but it will set your busi-

and creative. ness apart from others.

Don't use clip art
However tempting it may

Avoid trendy looks
One option is to make



































«°| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

[VACANT POSITION]

| Coordinator Pharmacy

Qualifications

Experience in a hospital setting is a must.

7 - 10 years as a Pharmacist with a minimum

of 5 years in a management position.
Intermediate to Advance computer skills is a must
Excellent written and oral communication skills
Excellent customer service skills

Education

* Bachelors Degree in Pharmacy or Science
discipline and license Competence Certificate.
* PharmD is a major plus.

Position Summary

Visionary, pioneering and implementing of new projects
Revenue generation, purchase management

gradual logo changes and
choose a logo that will stay
current for 10 to 20 years or
longer. Quaker Oats modi-
fied the Quaker Man on its
package over a 10-year period
to avoid undermining cus-
tomer confidence. That’s the
mark of a good design.

Watch Your Colours

Be careful as you explore
color options. Your five-
colour logo may be gorgeous,
but when producing it on sta-
tionery the price won't be so
attractive, nor will it work in
mediums that only allow one
or two colours. Try not to
exceed three colours unless
you decide it is absolutely
necessary.

Hire a Designer

A professional design firm
may charge anywhere from
$4,000 to $15,000 for a logo
design. Shop around, as there
are a lot of [freelance] design-
ers with rates ranging from
$15 to $150 per hour, based
on their experience. Don't
hire someone just because of
their bargain price. Remem-
ber that a good logo should
last at least 10 years, so if you
look at the amortisation of
that cost over a 10-year peri-
od, it doesn't seem so bad.

Moreover, graphic design-
ers know whether or not a
logo design will transfer easi-
ly into print or on to a sign.
You might come up with a
beautiful design that can't be

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DELAWARE OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on April 28, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 10th day of June, 2010 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

APRIL 29, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

transferred or would cost too
much money to be printed.
Your logo is the foundation
of all your promotional mate-
rials, so this is one area where
spending a little more now
can really pay off later.
Ensure that you receive
your logo graphic from your
designer in its original created
format, especially now that it
belongs to you. Having a
library of logo files will enable
you to send vendors the type
of files needed to other
designers, printers or other
services in the future.

Protecting Your Logo

Once you've produced a
logo, ensure it is trademarked
to protect it from use by oth-
er companies.

Creating a logo sounds
easy, doesn't it? It can be. Just
remember to keep your cus-
tomers and the nature of your
business in mind when you
put it all together. In time,
you'll have succeeded in
building equity in your trade-
mark, and it will become a
positive and recognisable
symbol of your product or
service.

I hope these tips were use-
ful and have convinced you
of the necessity of owning a
logo. So, until we meet again,
play a little, have fun and stay
on top of your game

Readers Feedback:
From: Ron Lightbourn

THE TRIBUNE

(rlight@coralwave.com)
To: Deidre M. Bastian

Thanks for your well writ-
ten article, The Point that
Gives You Power. I was hop-
ing for instructions on using it.
Have you already published
this?

Hi Ron: Thank you for tak-
ing the time to read The Art
of Graphix column, which is
published every Thursday in
the Business section of The
Tribune.

Yes, it was published
already. That was the pub-
lished edition you read. I have
found two sites that would
assist you with adding sounds
to a power point presentation.
(Copy or type either link into
your browser window) and
follow.

a

http://office.microsoft.com/e
n -
s/powerpoint/HA10095060103
3.aspx,

(b) |

http:/Awww.microsoft.com/e
ducation/Multimedi-
aSlideShow.aspx

Let me know if this was
helpful.
Have a good day.

NB: the author can be con-
tacted at deedee2111@hot-
mail.com

ET Ta ae) ar

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DONNETTA
ELIZABETH BROWN of SP-64071, Carmichael
Rd.,Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to DONNETTA ELIZABETH TURNQUEST.
If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you ue write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL GASPARD
of LYON ROAD OFF SHIRLEY STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22"¢ day of April, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TO SHAREHOLDERS OF

Staff morale/team building
Monitoring of continuing education for the team LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
Monthly reports/data analysis

Monitoring formulary/formulary changes. International Business Companies Act

(N°45 of 2000)
ISD INTERNATIONAL S.A.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Assisting on-line whenever possible

Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of ISD INTERNATIONAL S.A. has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com

The date of completion of the dissolution was the 17th day of
March, 2010.

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Fads kh ih
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.

Liquidator

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2010 - 2011
School Year.



Journalism / Literature (Gr. 10-12)
Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-12)
Math (Gr. 7-12)

Physics (Gr. 10-12)

Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)

Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)
Chemistry

Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
Health Science (Gr. 7-9)

General Science (Gr. 7-9)
Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)

Music (Gr. 7-12) -

Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr. 7-12)
Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)

Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)

Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)



Are you...
Motivated, outgoing and professional?

SO ARE WE !

Join our rapidly growing group of companies and
enjoy an exciting and rewarding career in sales.

Doctors Hospital Health System
regarding

Outside Sales DIVIDEND DECLARATION

Representative

Whereas there are sufficient funds to provide a cash dividend

Applicants must: to the shareholders of Doctors Hospital Health System, and

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of
Temple Christian School.

Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or University in ; ; ; ees ,
he area of epscieieaiion, ° an » Bea highly motivated self starter with an enthusiastic, friendly and outgoing personality.
. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma. » Be willing to be trained in a variety of product knowledge areas.
. Have at least two years teaching experience _ .
in the relevant subject area with excellent + Possess excellent organizational and time management skills

communication skills. . » Be able to work independently: represent the interests of management and the
. Applicants must have the ability to prepare ; a .
students for all examinations to the BUC/BGCSE company professionally and efficiently: and handle customers effectively.
» Possess computer skills, to include working knowledge of MS Office Suite (Excel,

levels.
. Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra .

Word, PowerPoint, and Internet Explorer etc.
+ Be punctual and have reliable transportation.

The ideal candidate must:
Whereas the Directors have determined that after the

payment of such dividends the Company will be able to meet
all of its continuing obligations and provide adequate funds

for reinvestment in the business,

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors has
curricular programmes.

og , declared a dividend of $0.02 per share to be paid to
Application must be picked up at the High School

Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph and
three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton

The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is May 3rd, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

shareholders of record on May 7, 2010. The payment

Position is commission based - your Success depends entirely on your sales efforts - the
date shall be May 14, 2010.

sky is the limit!
Construction trade experience preferred.

Please email your resume to outsidesales1@hotmail.com

Fae DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life








THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 2010, PAGE 15B





Royal Caribbean returns
to profit as revenue rises

By ASHLEY M HEHER
AP Retail Writer

CHICAGO (AP) — Royal
Caribbean Cruises Ltd.
returned to a first-quarter
profit as more travelers vaca-
tioned on its ships and spent
more money when they did,
the cruise line owner said
Wednesday.

The company that owns
Royal Caribbean and Celebri-
ty cruise lines earned $87.5
million, or 40 cents per share,
during the three-month peri-
od that ended on March 31.
That figure includes a 39-cent
gain from a legal settlement.
Excluding that benefit, Royal
Caribbean earned a penny
per share — far better than
last year’s loss of $36.2 mil-
lion, or 17 cents per share.

The Miami company’s rev-
enue climbed 12 per cent to
$1.49 billion, up from $1.33
billion for the same period
last year and trumped Wall
Street forecasts.

Royal Caribbean said it’s
getting higher prices for cruise
tickets than last year, a signif-
icant measure of demand
because cruise lines generally
set prices to keep their ships
as full as possible.

“While the economy is still
affecting our results, we are
pleased to be reporting bet-
ter than expected revenues
and costs, and we continue to
see a gradual and steady
improvement in the booking



environment,” Richard D
Fain, chairman and CEO, said
in a statement.

Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Reuters expected
Royal Caribbean to lose five
cents per share, excluding
one-time items, on revenue
of $1.48 billion.

Also Wednesday, Royal
Caribbean said reservations
showed “a gradual and steady
improvement” as the eco-
nomic recovery began to gain
traction and travelers spent
more time — and money —
vacationing.

It raised its full-year profit
forecast, saying it expected to
earn between $2.15 and $2.25
per share for fiscal 2010. And
it narrowed its forecast for net
yield — a ratio of revenue to
occupancy during the period,
saying it now expects the
measure to climb four per
cent to five per cent for the
year.

The company said it expect-
ed that travel disruptions
caused by Iceland’s volcano
will cut into profit by less than
five cents per share. That will
likely be recorded in the sec-
ond quarter.

Royal Caribbean shares fell
$1.38, or 3.8 per cent, to
$34.92 Wednesday morning.





—ooee—e

THE WORLD’S LARGEST and newest cruise ship >
Oasis of the Seas docked at Port Everglades in Ft.

Lauderdale, Florida.

(AP Photo)



























































































































































































































ail





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
5-Day FORECAST Say Ng
i; :
z, se 0|1|/2|3|4|5|6|7|8|¢
es Co id X “ Low MODERATE | HIGH V. HIGH EXT.
~ Se
= é. ORLANDO ~ Sunny to partly Mainly clear Partly sunny and Mostly sunny and Partly sunny; breezy, Sunshine mixing with The higher the AccuWeather UV Index number, the
. c High: 83° F/28°C; a cloudy breezy warm, humid some clouds greater the need for eye and skin protection.
© Low:61°F/16°C High: 85° High: 87° High: 88° High: 86°
\ > ? High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 72° Low: 74° Low: 73° Low: 73° as PO
Stearn j ¢ + , ET Ta cr Ea VT) Pat Ld VT emit td .
High: 81° F/27° C : ae < 80° F 85°-75° F 105°-76° F 98°-77° F 93°-76° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.({t.
: 2 ae The excl AccuWeather RealF cr erat dex that combines the effects of t it d, humidit hine intensity, cloudi tati
foe ee F206 = — oe aa re body everything that effects how warrn er cold a person feske. Tempersaurse reflect the high and the low tor the day. Today = 8:01am. 25 2:10am. -06
ea ‘ 8:30pm. 3.2 2:08 p.m. _-0.7
) Friday 8:48 a.m. 2.5 2:58 a.m. -0.4
? \ 9:16 p.m. 3.1 2:53 p.m. -0.6
¢ . \ = i, Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 9:35am. 2.4 3:45am. -0.3
7 v t ABACO A Temperature 10:02pm. 2.9 3:39p.m. -0.3
a eerie & High ~- 86" F/80"C Sunday 10:23am. 2.2 4:33am. 0.0
7 : 68° °C sw 7 Low ... 70° F/21° C : a . : : *
5 a 14 knots Cc ee <= ince 82° F/28° C 10:49 p.m. 2.7 4:25 p.m._ 0.0
4 - Normal low 70° F/21° C Mond: : 5
a “a. WEST PALM BEACH = Last years h eee ee ee
Ig! A on ee ~ 4-8 knots Last year's low . 72° F/22°C - — - . = =
Low: 69° F/21°C eo. Precipitation Tuesday 12:05p.m. 2.1 6:12am. 0.3
A FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT e ete p ie YOStEFdAY ceeceescesesesceseeeeseeeeee, 0.00" 0 6:07 p.m. __0.4
High: 81° F/27°C High: 80° F/27°C BAL TO CatG .n-ssnsscsesee oo Wednesdayl2:29a.m. 2.5 7:03am. 0.4
caan 71° F/22°C @ ae 67°F/A19°C Normal year to date .........cccceseseeseeeereeeeeees 7.42 1:02 p.m. 2.4 7:05 p.m. 0.6
= a AccuWeather.com
Vv MIAMI ELEUTHERA Forecasts and graphics provided by Sun anp Moon
ie _ High: 82° F/28°C 5 he REO e AccuWeather, Inc. ©2010
pie knits " = 70° fee NASSAU — High: 85° F/29° C Sunrise...... 6:36 a.m. Moonrise ....9:11 p.m.
Low: 70° F/21°C _ 1-730 °
ao ; High: 82° F/28° C Low: 73° F/23°G Sunset....... 7:39 p.m. Moonset ..... 7:08 a.m.
> A ON me c Last New First Full
KEY WEST p at i Pa
High: 81° F/27°C , am << a Cre i a
Low: 73° F/23°C a ~ Py A Low: 70° F/21°C xs
a WV Cia zs May 6 May 13 May 20 May 27
8-16 knots t I
Vv = SAN SALVADOR
GREAT EXUMA High: 87° F/31°C
8-16 knots High: 88° F/31°C f Low: 72° F/22°C
Ags Low: 74° F/23° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's o ANDROS" ‘ highs and tonights's lows. P=] Hote oe oe *s ay = ie ‘
Ow: 7 at >
. x” a
INSURANCE MANAGMENT TRACKING Map LONG ISLAND _
eee 8-16 knots
Z i 55 SS SEEN SOS EES ‘ Low: 74° F/23°
ie a Cape Hatteras SSE SSS SS (GS OES Ls Sd GS Sa NOG MAYAGUANA
+355 Atlanta 5 ‘Charlotte ° Highs: 69°F/21°C SSSLILLLL Shown is today's = >> ae ore
| Highs: 78°F /26° °C Highs: 74°F/23°C weather. Temperatures = ‘ms
ile SE ene Bermuda pa CROOKEDISLAND/ACKLINS =
| Sao * Highs: 78°F/26°C Highs 7A. aie focay, sb Olle and High: 91° F/33° C
pensscalat CH az i tonight's lows. RAGGEDISLAND /ow:75°F/24°C
}) Highs: 78°F/26°C pase d a
2 ° . il
~30 ~ Daytona Beach GREAT MARUS .
<> © Highs: 79°F/26°C A igh: eG e
Low: 76° F/24° C A
Tampa e Freeport > se
Highs: 81°F/27°C~ Highs: 80°F/27°C =< a > J <1 >
Miami e ; —_
A ~ @ Nassau
= ° ° an @oNs 10-20 knots 10-20 knots
20, L_ Highs: 82°F/28°C . Highs: 82°F/28°C
SSS J os eT (ie
< SS S@@Havana . e :
S32 S Highs: 82 R/31°C UG Se
Ses S ESS =< Santiago de Cuba _; ‘
aS Se Se Highs: 86°F/30°C- oS _ WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
20 Koo si 3 Poftt®au-Prince ABACO Oday: NE at 4-8 Knots 3-5 Feet 10 Miles 74° F
Cozumel Highs: 93°F /34°C San Juan Friday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 74°F
Highs: 88°F/31°C rae lamar ° ° ANDROS Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
A g ° es e Highs: 90°F /32°C BSS Friday: ESE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
are = e Santa ~ » Antigua = ot CAT ISLAND Today: ENE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
e Belize ; g Nees
uss mt = Kingston Domingo “Highs: 88°F/31°C Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
Highs: 88°F/31°C Highs: 89°F/32°C Highs: 86°F/30°C rae CROOKED ISLAND Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 7 Miles 79° F
oF, gns: Friday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 79° F
as ELEUTHERA Today: ENE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 7a Fr
Na Barbados Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 75° F
x Aruba Curacao a 0 Highs: 86°F/30°C FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
ua® - Highs: 90°F/32°C o = Friday: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
ep eae — Trinidad GREAT EXUMA Today: NE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles tf7F
QALFI33°C ¢ ‘Trinida Friday: E at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 77°F
yRBBr fF =f _ Tobago GREAT INAGUA Today: NE at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 6 Miles 80° F
aq ~ 2.Rrw ee SE e ° ° Friday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 7 Miles 80° F
=10°> Limon ° . 8 ~ ees Highs: 88°F/31 °C ~ e-Panama City > a aracas a eS Friday: E at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 79° F
seeestt Se pe Meee Highs: 88°F/31°C MAYAGUANA Today: NE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 70 Miles 78° F
Se ee es ee eo Wgns: { CZ Friday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 78° F
Se as Ce a See SU . an REG SES NASSAU Today: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
S oa Rw oN J ofS Shs Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
SS SPPVVVBHS SS SSSBOS EES 75 Xs s8 70 = SRRR RRR VLR eee se LEr sas s fd SS SEES = 3] Shoe SOREL SES SS Friday: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 30° F
Warm Cold Stationary Showers Rain | T-storms Flurries Snow Ice RAGGED ISLAND Today: NE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 76° F
Vv - a a SANs NS ¢ o de eo 2 sss S . Sa SR rvielels Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 76° F

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