Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 106 No.130



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Dati attacks prope

into Hany s death

RUG Uea

Father claims the police
have ‘badgered’ mother

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

A GRIEVING father
called police “incompetent”
over the way they investigat-
ed the death of his infant son.

Gary Swaby, father of
almost four-month-old
Joeshua Swaby, said police
have “badgered” Joeshua’s
mother, Charlotte McPhee,
and the incident has created a
wedge between them.

“You could say right now
we are officially separated,”
said Mr Swaby.

The investigation into the

infant’s death is still “open
and ongoing,” said Supt Leon
Bethel in charge of the Crim-
inal Detective Unit (CDU).
He said he could not respond
to any specifics of the investi-
gation, and most of all to Mr
Swaby’s claims.

“Initially when this
occurred the police told us to
put our trust in them. The
very trust we invested in them
they used that against us. I
think that is one of the biggest
factors here that they can turn
around and break that trust
that we invested in them,”

SEE page eight

Two women targeted by
criminals warn motorists

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



TWO women targeted by criminals — some of them as young
as 12 — are warning unsuspecting motorists not to let their
guard down at busy intersections.

One of them is a mother-of-three who claims a young boy
snatched a gold chain off her neck as she sat in her car near a
stoplight at a busy intersection on Collins Avenue and Wulff

SEE page two



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SEE PAGE 14

Hotel union

members go
to the polls



By NOELLE NICOLLS
and AVA TURNQUEST





THE ‘A’ Team representing
Nicole Martin in the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union election was “confident
but not celebratory” at press time,
as they waited for the final results,
late last night.

Hubert Saunders, candidate for
treasurer on the ‘A’ Team, said
they were waiting on the last votes
to be counted. That was not
expected for another two hours,
which would be about midnight.

SEE page two







Felipé Major/Tribune staff



MEMBERS of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union place their votes yesterday in elections for the union’s next president.

er wem ITIL
guilty of murder
and attempted

armed robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Herman
Natari Francis and Ray-
mond Darling were found
guilty by a unanimous vote
of 12-0 for the murder and
attempted armed robbery
of Tyna “Penny” Pinder by
Supreme Court jury on
Tuesday.

A jury of seven men and
five women delivered the
guilty verdicts shortly after
6pm following some six
hours of deliberations.

Before the delivering the

SEE page nine





Freeport Concrete hoping for
land sale after $636,000 net loss

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Cash-strapped Freeport
Concrete is pinning its hopes
on the sale of land valued at
$4.95 million to rescue it from
its current financial predica-
ment, having suffered a
$636,000 net loss in its 2010

second quarter that leaves it
with negative net worth of
$855,000.

The publicly-listed compa-
ny, whose majority share-
holder is former Grand
Bahama Port Authority chair-
man Hannes Babak, said the

SEE page eight

Claims of mistreatment
of patients at Sandilands

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



TRAUMATISED by a court-ruled stay, an ex-patient at the
nation’s only publicly-funded rehabilitation centre is demanding
that greater scrutiny be placed on attendants at the institution.

The young man claims he became aware of the mistreatment of

SEE page two

* SEE STORY ABOVE

- Business owners set
— fo march in protest
at one-way system

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BUSINESS owners are
? expected to march in protest
: of Nassau’s new one-way traf-
: fic system this morning in
: what they say is an effort to
? save hundreds of jobs and
: protect their livelihoods.
: More than 100 businesses
: impacted by the March 30
: change making Baillou HII
: Road one-way north-bound
: and Market Street one-way
: south-bound fear they will be
: forced to close their doors
: and about 400 jobs will be lost
: if the system remains.

They have formed the
: Coconut Grove Business

SEE page nine





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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

patients at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre (SRC)
after a court ordered he undergo a two-week evaluation:

there.

He described to The Tribune an environment where
patients were subject to inhumane conditions at the :
mercy of dispassionate attendants and often times the :

victims of neglect, and verbal and physical abuse.

He said: “They have on their sheets, on the pillows, :
‘we care and love our patients’, but some of the people :
working there do not share that view. Some patients :
there who are handicapped and incapable of even :
cleaning themselves, and there are attendants there :
that simply don’t do their job. Ifa patient messes him- :
self up they would just leave him and wait until the next :
attendant comes on shift for them to deal with it. :
Sometimes what happens is other patients would help

bathe off patients that can’t help themselves.”

Attendants at SRC, he claims, were poorly super- :
vised. Of the night staff, he said: “It’s like a party at :
night. Some don’t even stay on their job, they just :
check in and then leave.” He claimed that there were :
occasions when some, who did show up, were “either :

drunk or drinking, or even high.

“They are supposed to be taking care of people who }
are trying to recover from alcohol and drug abuse but :
they are the ones who need rehabilitation. They are :
coming to work wasted or with their personal problems

and they take it out on the patients.”

The ex-patient recalled a disparaging exchange :
between two attendants while in the presence of :
patients. The attendant reportedly criticised the valid- :
ity of the patients staying at the institution and said he }
felt they were wasting the government’s money, “suck- ;

ing up a/c, taking up beds and eating all the food.”

Said the former patient: “This attendant had only :
been there for four months, and this was his attitude ;
towards patients. He might not have been serious but } National Centre for Performin 9, Arts on Shirley
that’s not right. They need to do an intense investiga- :
tion into the attendants that they are hiring to care :
for the patients. Not all of them mistreat the patients, police having to intervene in an altercation
but there are some that really should not be there-not :
at a place that is supposed to be rehabilitating people.” :

SRC Hospital Administrator Catherine Weech :
admitted the possibility of patient mistreatment cannot :

be denied, however she said there were several forms }

of recourse that patients and ex-patients can pursue.

“Patients can speak with the attending nurse or the
physician responsible for their care. They can also :

refer the matter to administration” she said.

“Oftentimes patients know of information that we position in less than a year.

don’t have, and I would be concerned that we go back :
and address these claims with a view towards improv- ;

ing the service we provide to our clients.”

Upon their release, patients at the institution under-
go a discharge process which allows them the oppor- :
tunity to confide with their immediate care provider :

their rehabilitation experience.

Ms Weech added: “After completing care persons :
can also write us — positive or negative — to let us }
know. Once we get that information we can carry out :
an investigation with a view to either make correc- :
tions to improve our service, or for those that have :
made a positive impact, they can be made aware of :

their influence.”

LOCAL NEWS

ee eS COCA ES eT
Claims of mistreatment Teacher of the Year 2010-2012 named

ANDREA Simms- Adderley
has been named the ninth Nation-
al Teacher of the Year 2010-2012.
The Garvin Tynes teacher won
over 11 district finalists competing
for the title.

A nine-year teaching veteran,
Mrs Simms- Adderley was
declared the winner at a gala affair
which was held at the Rain Forest
Theatre of the Wyndham Cable
Beach Resort last Saturday.

Mrs Simms-Adderley, who won
four out of the eight categories
assessed for the outstanding
teacher award, was lauded for her
contributions to education, includ-
ing devising academic and behav-
ioural intervention plans for stu-
dents with disabilities; staging
numerous workshops for teach-
ers from public and independent
schools, and working on the
Department of Education’s cur-
riculum team for primary school
Language Arts.

She has also conducted con-

Photo by Edgar Arnette/MOE

(L-R) MINISTER OF EDUCATION Desmond Bannister; Andrea Simms-Adder-
ley, National Teacher of the Year 2010-2012 and Olga Richards, District

Superintendent for the Southwestern District.



an educational and professional
conference during her two-year
reign.

The other four runners-up also
received cash awards and trophies
as well as educational grants.

Other teachers receiving
awards were: Afrika Karamo-
Miller, a modern language teacher
at the Sister Mary Patricia Rus-
sell Junior School, who was the
first place runner-up; Latoya Bur-
rows, a language arts teacher at
S C McPherson Junior, 2nd run-
ner-up; Lynn Gibson, a Spanish
teacher at L W Young Junior
High School, 3rd runner-up, and
Triver Culmer, a French teacher
at the C C Sweeting Senior High
School placed fourth in the com-
petition which featured 11 district
finalists.

Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister addressed the
audience at the gala event, stating:
“The presence of these 11 district
finalists and school winners of the

claves for teachers, teacher-aides
and parents in a variety of sub-
ject areas including reading inter-
ventions, improving writing
instruction, behaviour modifica-
tion and positive parenting dur-
ing her career.

Mrs Simms-Adderley has also
taught at St John’s College,
Albury Sayle and Glinton’s Pri-
mary (Long Island).

In accepting the award, she
encouraged her fellow teachers to
continue to do their best for the

children of our nation.

Mrs Simms-Adderley received
a large ‘Crystal Lamp of Learn-
ing’, $7,000 in cash prizes provid-
ed by the Ministry of Education
and the Higgs and Johnson law
firm, as well as a grant to attend

Teacher of the Year here this
evening can be summarised in one
statement: Excellent teachers pro-
duce excellent students. If this is
the reality, then we must seek only
excellence to reap excellence in
our educational system.”

FROM page one

Hundreds of workers gathered between
Worker's House, on Harrold Road, and the

Street while ballots were being counted. The
atmosphere was rowdy and festive, with the

between supporters at the Shirley Street polling
station.

Just two candidates went head-to-head for
the presidency of around 6,000 hotel workers.
Both candidates, Nicole Martin of the ‘A’ Team
and Lionel Morley of the Workers Coalition,
were confident they had won enough support-
ers to secure the coveted top spot of the coun-
try’s largest union in the third election for this

At press time, supporters of the Workers
Coalition said Ms Martin won the Bahamas
Communication and Public Officers Union
(BCPOU) division; Mr Morley was up by nine
in Grand Bahama, and Ms Martin won
Eleuthera by two. Workers Coalition support-
ers said the final result could still swing any
way.

Mr Saunders said the ‘A’ Team “swept”
Eleuthera, and won San Salvador and Andros.
He said Ms Martin was up by about 158 votes in
the Workers House division and 100 votes in
the Atlantis division, which is the largest.

These results were preliminary and not able

Hotel union

to be verified by officials.

The polls opened in New Providence at 8am
and closed at 6pm at the BHCAWU Head-
quarters, Worker's House, on Harrold Road,
BCPOU Hall in Farrington Road and the
National Centre for Performing Arts on Shirley
Street. Polling stations were also open on Grand
Bahama and the various Family Islands.

Ms Martin said: “Members have definitely
been through a lot and we appreciate everyone
that made the time to come out here and vote.
The previous elections weren’t overturned due
to anything voters did. The executive commit-
tee didn’t do what they were supposed to do —
leadership couldn’t get their act together.”

The first two election attempts, both won by
Ms Martin, were ultimately nullified by a Court
of Appeal ruling and members voting at the
polls expressed their frustration at having to
vote for a third time.

Clever Adderley, an Ocean Club employee,
said: “T think it’s bad we have to go to the polls
again. She (Ms Martin) did it once, she did it
twice, it’s a clear sign that the people know
who they want. It’s not fair, this whole process
has wasted a lot of people’s time — to have to
come here and do this again. I understand there
are judicial technicalities, but the people’s vote
should have some count — majority rules.”

Another union worker said: “I’m sick and
tired of coming back here, the union business
needs to go on and the people need represen-
tation. Utility workers have the power to shut
down the entire island, we shouldn’t be under-
estimated or taken advantage of. That’s why ’'m
here again, it’s inconvenient, but this is too
important.”

Twice denied candidate Lionel Morley was
“optimistically cautious” at the polling station
yesterday. He said that his team’s analysis of
voter patterns gave him confidence that this
election would prove successful for him.

Mr Morley said: “This election will see the
union’s return back to the members. For too
long special interest has had a hand in union
matters.”

He continued: “Only 57 per cent of members
have shown up for past elections, so perhaps
members have lost confidence in the union or
feel as though the union is not carrying its
weight. But spirits are high and the healing
process will begin immediately.”

The past two years have been extremely dif-
ficult for the union, as infighting and financial
disputes escalated to calls for legal action over
the validity of authorization for a disbursement
of almost $700,000.

Union members at the polls yesterday were
unanimous that regardless of the candidate, it is
critical that the election process is immaculate
so that the organisation can progress forward
and gain stability.

FROM page one

Road. The other said she was
lucky to avoid being caught
in asuspected ambush on Vil-
lage Road early Monday
morning.

Police at the Wulff Road
police station yesterday con-

veh
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Me tik)
PHONE: 822-2157













Two women targeted warn motorists

firmed the first woman’s
report, adding that a juvenile
has since been arrested and
charged before the courts on
the complaint.

"That matter was in fact
reported here and we made
an arrest and sent the person,
a juvenile, off to court,” said
Superintendent Ashton
Greenslade, officer-in-charge
of the Wulff Road Police Sta-
tion.

However the mother, who
did not want to be named, still
wants the public to be aware
of the potential danger of
being targeted in an area

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where most people let their
guard down. An email depict-
ing her ordeal is making the
rounds through cyberspace
and now the mother has spo-
ken to The Tribune in the
hope of preventing similar
incidents.

She said that she rolled to a
stop near a traffic light on the
busy Collins Avenue and
Wulff Road junction around
Spm last week Monday, in
front of a fruit stand and a
liquor store. There, she said,
she noticed a group of boys
who “appeared to be as
young as 12 years old” all

wearing white t-shirts.

"I took no note of this
because upon my travels peo-
ple from time to time would
beg for money. This occasion
was different for me," she said
in her email.

At some point, one of the
boys broke away from the
group and approached her
before sticking his hand
through her open window,
"ripping" her necklace off
and running away.

"He didn't say anything —
I didn't have a chance to react
and he was gone,” she added.

Bystanders urged her to go
to the police.

She said she drove to the

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nearby police station and
thanked officers at the Wulff
Road police station for their
quick response which led to
the arrest of a juvenile.

Now she is urging motorists
to keep their guard up for
possible similar attacks.

"It was very scary — even
though it's a child — to have
something like that happen
it's not nice. I want people to
be careful when on the
streets. When you see the
emails about people being
attacked, take it serious".

Since taking over the Wulff
Road police station in Janu-
ary Superintendent Ashton
Greenslade said there have
been about four similar
reports of adolescent boys
committing petty theft.

He wouldn't call the inci-
dents a "big problem" but
added that the northeastern
division has initiatives in place
to try and stamp out such
activity.

"I was here for four months
and we have had about four
(similar incidents). One is too
many but I wouldn't consider
that alarming,” said Mr
Greenslade, adding that there
have been instances of per-
sons being targeted on foot
and cars by "misguided
youths" stealing cell phones
and other personal property.

In response, police from his
station have been on the look-
out for truant or loitering
youth.

"We are up and about

looking for them, stopping
and searching them when we
come across them and some-
times taking them to their
parents,” he said.

The second woman, a 22-
year-old, was returning to her
Village Road home at around
12.30am Monday with four
tourists who were her guests
when they almost ran into a
suspected ambush.

The party of five had gone
to dinner, then on to Ham-
merheads Bar. On the way
home, they started to make
the turn at the light on the
corner of East Bay Street and
Village Road north.

Two gray coloured cars
with heavily tinted windows
had both lanes blocked. At
first, it appeared that it was
an accident, but at a second
glance, there was no sign of
damage.

Although two cars were
involved, only one person was
visible — a tall, thin man who
stood outside the open dri-
ver's door of one of the cars.
The whole scene struck the
driver as odd.

She quickly swerved onto
the other side of the road and
kept going.

The police control room
confirmed today there was no
report of an accident in the
area during this period.

The driver, who is con-
vinced she almost became a
victim of a criminal plot, has
urged the public to be care-
ful.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

INSERTS - LITTLE SWITZERLAND

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Bimini Bay developers
fire three contractors

Move after allegations of
construction misconduct

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



DEVELOPERS of the Bimini Bay
Resort have restated their commitment to
environmental protection by firing three
contractors following allegations of con-
struction misconduct.

The operators of heavy equipment were
photographed dumping fill in wetlands with-
out silt curtains, berm barriers or other sil-
tation mitigation mechanisms west of North
Sound last month.

A concerned biologist in Bimini caught
the destructive activity on camera and sent
pictures to The Tribune and Minister for
the Environment Earl Deveaux along with
a list of concerns about possible miscon-
duct by some agents of Rav Bahamas (Ltd),
a subsidiary of the Capo Group which owns
Bimini Bay.

A Bimini Bay representative said the
contractors in question were suspended as
soon as their employers discovered they
had violated good practice standards at the
development.

“They were filling in wetlands without
silt curtains and berm barriers,” the repre-
sentative said.

“And the three equipment operators who
breached contract and did not follow our
rigorous training programme were imme-
diately put on probation and then termi-
nated for not following our strict environ-
mental guidelines.

“We are doing everything we can to
ensure all building and operating does not
affect the environment.”

Developers also claim the Environmental
Management Plan and Environmental
Impact Assessment required for construc-
tion were submitted to the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technology (BEST)
Commission in April last year.

However, the government body respon-
sible for protecting, conserving and man-
aging the country’s environmental resources
never acknowledged receipt of the reports,
according to the developers.

When interviewed by The Tribune earli-









IT WAS claimed the dump truck in this picture was depositing fill at the water's edge with-

out a protective barrier in place.

er this month, BEST director Philip Weech
said the EIA and EMP to monitor con-
struction of the 700 acre site in north Bimi-
ni had not been received, but Rav Bahamas
maintains the documents were sent by reg-
istered mail and received in May last year.

Acopy of the mail receipt was sent to The
Tribune yesterday, however the documents
themselves have yet to be made public.

The Bimini Bay Resort representative
said the company followed up with a num-
ber of letters and phone calls but got no
response from the BEST Commission and
have pressed on with construction in the
meantime.

“We have not got any sort of phone call
to say they have received it, and no update
when we have called to follow up, so what
are we supposed to do to get an answer?

“Of course we press on, we still work
along with the Bahamas government and
Earl Deveaux, who also received the EIA
and EMP,” the Bimini Bay representative
said.

Government was advised in a Black and
Veatch International (BVI) study of the

site nearly two years ago to require devel-
opers to submit both an EIA and EMP.

The lack of a public E[A and EMP was
emphasised by Alfredo Quarto, executive
director of the international non-govern-
mental organisation for the protection of
mangroves, The Mangrove Action Project
(MAP), in February.

Mr Quarto and other conservationists
are concerned acres of mangroves have
been ripped out of wetlands in Bimini
destroying a sensitive ecosystem in the
absence of the studies.

He called on the Environment Minister to
investigate the matter and address the delay
in establishing boundaries for a Marine Pro-
tected Area (MPA) in North Bimini expect-
ed to be drawn up last year after nearly a
decade of planning.

The Tribune made inquiries about gov-
ernment’s receipt of an EIA and EMP and
publication of the documents yesterday,
however calls to the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment and the BEST Commission were
not returned before The Tribune went to
press.

1,600 field officers to
seek data for 2010 census

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



IN JUST under a week, the
Department of Statistics will roll
out its 2010 census with some
1,600 field officers knocking on
doors throughout the country
asking questions that will pro-
vide valuable data about our
society.

Director of Statistics Kelsie
Dorsett said the census is crucial
to future city planning, adding
that the data collected helps
government decide if more
schools or elderly care centres
are needed in certain areas. It
also supplies business owners
with critical demographic infor-

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mation for their target cus-
tomers, she said.

The information will be
received by "well-trained" enu-
merators - persons who issue
and receive forms during a cen-
sus - who will be required to
take an oath of confidentiality
before the process begins.

"We would like for people to
be patient with us because we
are getting information that is
critical to planners in the pri-
vate and public sector, for
school children writing papers,
for business owners," said the
director, who added that the
department has spent about a
year preparing for the census.

"If you are a businessman,
for instance in insurance, if you
know the population is in a cer-
tain age group then you design
your policies accordingly in
terms of payment plans. If you
know the population is getting
older then you know what med-
ical benefits to emphasise. In
terms of other business, for
instance if you are interested in
opening a maternity store, you
won't do that in a retirement

community.

"So you want to know as a
businessman, how is the popu-
lation dispersed both in terms of
where they live, in terms of their
sex, in terms of their age. Like-
wise, for the government they
need to know what are they
dealing with in terms of the size
and age of the labour force. This
would also determine if more
schools need to be built in cer-
tain areas".

Ms Dorsett said the process
should take an average of 20
minutes for a four-person
household. Each household will
be asked to answer basic ques-
tions ranging from education
levels, employment and income.

"People should expect a well-
trained enumerator who will ask
them questions about their
household like how many peo-
ple live there, what type of
amenities do they have, do they
have a car, electricity.

"We will also ask about the
individual's education, sex, race,
citizenship, fertility, the use of
the internet - whether they use
it at work or at home. It's social

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demographic information that
is really critical for (city) plan-
ning,” she said.

While census workers are
hopeful they will be able to
question every household
throughout the country, Ms
Dorsett admitted some areas
are hard to access through the
department's door-to-door pol-
icy. Gated communities have
been particularly hard for
Department of Labour employ-
ees to access, she said.

Ms Dorsett appealed for gat-
ed community residents to
make themselves available for
the census, or contact an enu-
merator.

The census begins May 4 and
is expected to run until the end
of June, at a cost of $3 million.

The last census was conduct-
ed in 2000.











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Bahamas marks ‘Black
Tuesday’ anniversary

By ALESHA CADET



YESTERDAY marked the 45th anniversary of “Black
Tuesday” in the Bahamas.

Tuesday, April 27, 1965 was the day that the late Sir
Lynden Pindling, the then leader of the opposition, threw
the Speaker's mace from the east window of the House of
Assembly in protest of the gerrymandering of boundaries
by the then governing United Bahamian Party.

Charging that “this mace is supposed to belong to the
people of this country as a symbol,” Mr Pindling hurled
the 165-year old sceptre, which represents the authority
of the Speaker of the House, through the open window.

The late Sir Milo Butler Sr followed the move by grab-
bing the two hour glasses on the Speaker’s desk and
throwing them out the window as well.

A statement released by the Progressive Liberal Party
yesterday stated: “The demonstration appeared to be
spontaneous at the time but it was not. Throwing the
mace out of the window was a carefully orchestrated plan
by the PLP'’s leaders at the time to demonstrate their
position on the right to a fair and equal distribution of
boundaries.”

“The late Sir Milo Butler Sr threw the Speaker's hour
glass out of window as a protest against the limitation of
speaking time in the House.”

The election of January 10, 1967 was fought on the
boundaries set in 1965.

The PLP’s protest came against the backdrop of their
loss in 1962 to the United Bahamian Party (UBP) which
came about because the number of seats in the Out
Islands exceeded the number of seats in New Providence,
where the majority of the population lived.

This meant the PLP won the popular vote in 1962 but
lost the general election because they lost the seat count.

Each year, the PLP remembers the day and pays tribute
to the “national heroes and heroines” who joined the par-
ty in the public square following the protest, such as the
late Ena Hepburn and the now Mrs Effie Walkes. Former
Governor General Arthur Hanna and his replacement Sir
Arthur Foulkes were also among the group.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Rocky start for new global board

WASHINGTON — The Group of 20
nations, designated as the new board of
directors for the global economy, is off to a
rocky start.

Financial ministers and central bank gov-
ernors from the 20 countries met in Wash-
ington over the past three days to advance a
reform agenda designed to fix serious prob-
lems that the 2008 financial crisis exposed.

But in the end, instead of resolving dif-
ferences, the discussions exposed a number
of divisions not only over old issues but new
problems such as rising government debt
burdens.

The worry is that the debt crisis current-
ly hitting Greece could be only the first of a
series of government debt crises.

The level of government debt has risen
to heights not seen since just after World
War II.

Of course, the finance officials sought to
paper over differences, issuing a series of
bland communiqués pledging greater efforts
at cooperation.

They insisted that they would intensify
efforts to resolve disagreements on finan-
cial rules before a meeting of G-20 leaders in
Canada June 25-27.

But that will require considerable effort
given stark differences in such areas as set-
ting new capital standards for banks and
imposing new bank taxes to pay for the cost
of bailouts.

It is highly unlikely that all of those dis-
putes will be resolved in time for President
Barack Obama and the other G-20 leaders to
agree on a completed package at their Cana-
da summit.

For one thing, many governments are
facing the same challenges as the Obama
administration in trying to overcome deter-
mined opposition from big banks to tight-
ening the current rules under which they
are making a lot of money.

Those activities, which have been blamed
for bringing on the crisis, include trading in
complex financial products such as deriva-
tives and operating with inadequate amounts
of capital to cushion against losses.

While an IMF staff paper endorsed
imposing new taxes on banks, an idea that
has support in the administration and in
Europe, other G-20 countries — Canada,
Australia and Japan — are opposed. They
argue that their banks didn't suffer massive
failures and therefore shouldn't have to bear
the burden of new taxes.

IMF Managing Director Dominick
Strauss-Kahn tried to put the best face on the
disagreements in the financial area, saying it
wasn't important for countries to adopt the

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same approach as long as whatever rules
changes they adopted were compatible with
other countries.

The concern is that in an era of financial
globalization — where millions of dollars
can flow around the world at the click of a
computer key — countries need to pursue
similar approaches to regulation.

If they don't, it could spark a race to the
bottom where financial firms go searching
for nations with weaker rules that allow
them to pursue riskier activities and rake in
greater profits.

"T think the charges lodged against Gold-
man Sachs in the United States have helped
countries see the need for reforms, but they
are still far apart on the best approach," said
Sung Won Sohn, a business professor at the
Martin Smith School of Business at Califor-
nia State University.

Even in areas where the G-20 was able to
agree on a more coordinated approach, there
is concern that the efforts will fall short of
what is needed to keep the global economy
on an even keel.

G-20 officials endorsed providing emer-
gency loans through the IMF to debt-rid-
den Greece.

But the size of the overall package being
discussed — about $40 billion from Euro-
pean countries and $13.4 billion from the
IMF — was viewed by many analysts as
falling well short of what will eventually be
required not only for Greece but other
nations sinking under rising debt burdens.

"What the financial crisis and Great
Recession did was pile on a lot of debt and it
will take some time for nations to work
through their budget problems,” said Mark
Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Econo-
my.com.

All of the disagreements among the G-20
nations may have some people pining for
the old days when the board of directors for
the global economy was much smaller.

For three decades, the global economic
agenda was set by the G-7, composed of the
United States, Japan, Germany, France,
Britain, Italy and Canada, the seven biggest
economies in the mid-1970s when this group
was formed.

But with China now the third largest
economy in the world and economic pow-
erhouses Brazil, India and South Korea also
key members of the G-20, the old G-7 days
are certainly gone forever.

No matter how messy, the world needs to
get accustomed to a bigger board room.

(This article was written by Martin
Crutsinger, AP Economics writer).



—

THE TRIBUNE

Controversy ovet
construction of
low cost homes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A lot has been said in
recent weeks about the poor
construction of low cost hous-
es in certain areas of New
Providence. The Bahamas
Government is spending mil-
lions of dollars to repair the
houses for the poor people
who purchased them.

Some years ago when
Neville Wisdom was appoint-
ed to take over the Ministry
of Housing he apparently
became aware of rumours of
corruption in the Ministry, in
particular as it relates to the
construction of low cost hous-
es.
Mr Wisdom referred the
matter to the Police and
requested a thorough and
intensive investigation.

At that time many of the
householders were reporting
defects in the houses due to
poor construction. Roofs were
leaking, walls cracking, doors
could not be closed and water
coming up from the floors
were just a few of the com-
plaints reported in the media.

Some time later the gov-
ernment changed and a new
Minister of Housing was
appointed. I heard that Min-
ister in response to a question
from a talk-show host state

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



that the Police investigation
into the alleged corruption in
the Ministry of Housing was
dormant as no persons had
come forward to give any
information. I subsequently
wrote the press on what
should have been done by the
Police with that investigation;
(a) Visit all defective houses,
photograph the defects and
record statements from the
householders. The Police
would have a file for each of
the defective houses. Conduct
investigations to identify the
building inspectors, who
passed the houses for occu-
pancy and the contractors,
who built the houses. Detain
and interrogate the building
inspectors and contractors to
determine why the houses
were passed for occupancy.
Over a period of twenty-
four hours interrogation infor-
mation would have been
received disclosing whether
there was corruption, gross
neglect and poor performance
on the part of some of the
building inspectors and shod-

dy work done by the contrac-
tors.

If the investigation sug-
gested corruption the Police
could have prosecuted to dis-
cover the truth.

In the event that the inves-
tigation proved gross negli-
gence on the part of the build-
ing inspectors there ought to
have been disciplinary action.
As far as the contractors were
concerned the government
should have insisted that they
repair the damage they had
done at no cost to the gov-
ernment or the householders.

These contractors should
not have been recipients of
any other government con-
tracts.

I have been reliably
informed that the investiga-
tion was assigned to a senior
police officer.

It has also been suggested
that he did absolutely noth-
ing. The reason being given
was that his politics got in the
way.

The media has disclosed
that government has spent $3
million to date on the repairs
to those defective houses.

PAUL THOMPSON Sr
Nassau,
April 21, 2010.

Who is being satisfied by
discrimination of women?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

While reading a poignant
article written by Insight
reporter Noelle Nicolls, I was
drawn into the depth of her
persuasive passion and
inspired to unleash my
thoughts on this delicate and
hotly-debated subject.

It is an ominous indictment
on this country when an invid-
ious rabble of obstinate men,
they who subsist on borrowed
ideas and boast of self-
appointed titles — are the
exclusive proponents spewing
a pig-pen of beguiled half-
truths to our somewhat
gullible communities (on the
matter of Spousal Rape being
adjudged a terrible crime)
who then give support to
these brutish and backward
“deities of folly” demanding
ownership of a woman’s
indomitable soul.

It is with a precipitous
debasement of progress (of
wholesome values and
morals) that these narrow-
minded “saviours of them-
selves” brazenly plunder the
open trove of advancement

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ¥YWETTE MICHELLE
MILLER of Marathon Estates, PO. Box EE-16898,
intend ta change my name to VETTE MICHELLE
NIXON. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau,

Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of

publication of this notice.

that the FNM government so
kindly restored. Sadly, the
king does not wish to protect
this vital treasure of triumph.
But with a brilliant display of
honour, we salute our
Bahamian women who are
the quintessential beacons of
strength in the Western
Hemisphere and ensure our
survival and growth.

I regret not wanting to
write very long on this sub-
ject (because I might lose my
temper) but be assured, many
of these detractors to this
“enlightened movement” that
enshrines a woman’s precious
spirit are simply jealous of the
unbridled female successes in
the Bahamas and are terribly
frightened, even threatened
by further incursions into

their fragmented dreams of
power. This is an epic demon-
stration of their excessive
ignorance and mental illitera-
cy.

Lastly, and I say this with
solemnity while forecasting
the darkening season of our
times, we are setting a dan-
gerous precedent for the well-
being of our daughters that is
bound to have debilitating
effects on this nation, now
being grievously misled by a
distorted sense of “Christian-
ity.” Kudos to Ms Nicolls for
her courage and keen dispen-
sation of journalistic duty.
Thank you.

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
April 15, 2010.

Utterly disappointed in ladies of FNM

EDITOR, The Tribune.

they say so.

support for the brother!

DISAPPOINTED
Nassau,
April, 2010.



I wish to express utter disappointment in the ladies of the
FNM party for their expecting women to be recognised or
honoured simply because they are women. What these ladies
should be doing is gathering support for Bills that will ensure
a better way of life for Bahamian women.

I do not remember seeing any of these ladies standing
shoulder to shoulder on Bay Street for the Marital Rape Bill,
neither were they knocking on doors to solicit signatures to
present to the Prime Minister in support of this Bill. Yet they
want the Prime Minister to just hand out honours because

Yes, I agree Janet Bostwick has achieved much, but Sir
Arthur Foulkes has done more on behalf of the Bahamian
people and is more deserving at this time. So ladies, show





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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Man turns himself in
after armed robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama police are question-

ing a 33-year-old man who }
turned himself in following an :
armed robbery incident at a :

downtown store on Monday.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey :
said police received informa- :
tion that an armed robbery had
occurred at the Athlete’s Foot :

Store sometime after Spm.

According to reports, a man
armed with a handgun entered;
the store at about 5.15pm and ;

demanded cash.

After robbing the store of
money, the gunman fled on :

foot.

The gunman was wearing :
tan pants and shirt. He was :
described as a tall, heavy-built :
individual of dark complex- :

ion.

after 8pm a man turned him-
self in at the Central Police Sta-
tion. He was taken into pice
custody for questioning in rela-
tion to the armed robbery.

Investigations are continu-
ing into the matter.

Investigations into
child's death contig

INVESTIGATIONS con- :
tinue into the death of a :
three-year-old who was found :
inside a parked car in Fox :

Hill nearly two weeks ago,
police said yesterday.

Three-year-old Sandria :
Demeritte was found in a :
kneeling position inside a :
parked green 2001 Nubira :
Daewoo, just 100 metres :
away from her father’s home :
on Abner Street, Fox Hillon :

April 17.

According to reports, she
had been missing for several :
hours before her body was :

found.

She had reportedly wan-
dered from her mother’s :
house also located on Abner :

Street.

An autopsy has revealed :
that the child had suffocated. :
Police say they are work- :
ing with the Department of ;
Social Services on this case :
and are awaiting the findings :

of social workers.

ASP Mackey said sometime

Tad 4 }
aT mrs JOHNSON rT tee re an All-Star game in the nineties. ie







‘Magic’ Johnson to speak
at Business Development
Seminar in the Bahamas

LEGENDARY basket-
ball player Earvin “Magic”
Johnson Jr is scheduled to
visit the Bahamas to head-
line the 6th Annual Business
Development Seminar next
week.

Presented by the Bahamas
Chamber of the Commerce
and the United States
Embassy, the event is this
year being held under the
theme "Business Unusual:
Creativity and Innovation".

The seminar starts on
Wednesday, May 5 at
8.30am at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel, and kicks





music mogul Steve Stoute
and economist Mike Bryant
of the Federal Reserve.
Other featured speakers
and presenters include Min-
ister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing, Minister of
Tourism and Aviation Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace
and Jackson Burnside III.
Topics include the creative
economy, doing business in
the Bahamas, marketing
your business in tough eco-
nomic climates, government
incentives for business devel-
opment, business opportu-
nities in culture and tourism,

off with speakers such as

and more.

- Association goes ‘back to
basics’ for the community

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



A COMMUNITY association in
eastern New Providence is going “back
to basics” with the aim of positively
impacting the area through non-politi-
cal partnership and outreach initiatives.

As part of their community-building
mission, the Eastern Community Asso-
ciation often collaborates with govern-
ment and other non-governmental
organisations to facilitate social, cul-
tural, and environmental development.
It’s stated boundaries encompass all
communities east of Fox Hill, including
that historic neighbourhood.

The organisation was formed in 2003,
as the Yamacraw Community Devel-
opment Association but the name was
changed last year to better reflect the
area of concern and distance the group
from identification with any particular
constituency.

ECA president Karl Spencer said:
“Tt was in August 2003 when a group of
concerned citizens gathered at the

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Anglican Church of Epiphany to give
consideration to the formation of a
community association. The idea was
well received and a steering commit-
tee was appointed.”

Headed by Mr Spencer, a former
Family Island commissioner and admin-
istrator for 32 years, the committee
named the association, appointed exec-
utives and proposed constitution by-
laws.

Crime

Mr Spencer explained: “It’s essen-
tially going back to the basics, we are
our brother’s keepers and together we
can accomplish so much. Particularly
from the aspect of crime prevention
and crime watch.

“The community is best able to iden-
tify their own needs, concerns, so the
association started off with basically a
crime watch and over the years its
grown into an unofficial local govern-
ment system.

“As it evolved we saw the need to
prepare this community for the even-
tuality of local government. So when
and if local government comes into
being, people would know how it
works.”

The association now boasts a mem-
bership of well over 100, and in addition
to their annual festival, hosts a num-
ber of initiatives such as band concerts,
health walks, movies in the park and
Christmas tree lighting and community
carol services.

Mr Spencer said: “We meet every
month and people come with their con-
cerns, which are then quoted to the
appropriate agency or government
office for attention. We are keeping the
MPs’ “feet to the fire” so to speak. “In
a sense we have taken it upon ourselves
to function as an unofficial Local Gov-
ernment entity.”

ECA will hold its annual community
“Fun Fantastic Festival” next Saturday,
May 1, at the green space west of Super
Value on Prince Charles and Jasmine
Drive. Families are encouraged to come

Crepir Suisse

out for a day of food, music, activities
and shows for all ages.

The event will start at noon, and pro-
ceeds will go towards funding the asso-
ciation’s marching and concert band,
the Eastern Community Pacesetters
Youth Band.

Focus

Mr Spencer added: “Whatever we
do our focus is on our youth band. If
you keep the young people involved,
you keep them out of crime. All our
festivals are geared towards raising
money for the band — which we refer to
as an amalgamated band with the police
band, who provide the music instruction
and discipline.”

Festival entertainment will include
local artists Nathan Stone, Gino D,
Elon Moxey, Chippie & the Boys and
Count Bernadino. Also performing will
be the Royal Bahamas Police Force
Band and Thelma Gibson Primary
School Junkanoo Rush Out.

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
Graduate Trainee Program

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas has operated an Apprenticeship Training
Program in The Bahamas since the early 1990's. Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
is now pleased to announce the continuation of its Graduate Trainee Program,
with the second intake of trainees intended for July 5, 2010. Full details and an
application form can be obtained from:

The Graduate Trainee Program Administrator
Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch

The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4'" Floor
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax No.: 242-356-8148

Application forms should be returned NO LATER THAN MAY 31, 2010
AIM

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas is committed to identifying and
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offering one (1) year Graduate Trainee Contracts to College of The
Bahamas graduates or graduates returning to The Bahamas from
accredited colleges or universities abroad.

The program will accommodate three (3) graduates. Successful
applicants will be awarded a one year contract of employment during
which time the graduates will rotate between or within different business
units or departments of Credit Suisse Group entities. Permanent
employment opportunities will be evaluated at the end of this period.

B) CONDITIONS

The candidate is required to have a Bachelors Degree in one of the following or
suitably similar disciplines:

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Economics
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Management
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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Noelle Sawyer wins top
2010 scholarship award

NOELLE Sawyer of St
John’s College made it “two
straight” for the Green
Giants by winning the top





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(Tony - Freddy), 58

of Soldier Road and formerly of
Ramsey and The Fey Bxama will
he held on Thursday April 29,
S010 at 11-00 AM, at Choruch of
Gol of Prophecy, Englerston,
Ottciating wall be Bishop Rudolph
Bowe assisted by Other Ministers
of Religion. Interment in The
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spiknard Roads.





















He is survived by his son, Anthony
Fredrick Bowe (Lil’ Freddie): 4
Brothers, Chester, Bert raat, James,
Dwight & Bradley; 7 Sisters, Ann,
Denna, Janet, Jasmine, Maron, Donna & Keenan; 3 uneles,
Nigel Bowe, Kenneth Bowe, Altred Brown: 3 aunts, Gloria
Brown, Fluorine Devens, Lillian Ward, Joun Bowe, Visnu Bowe-
Mackay, Stephanie Bowe, Catherine Saunders: 2 sister-in-law,
Tanya aid Freda; 2 brothers-in-law, Steve Morrison, TheiRick
Knight: 10 nieces, Monique, Denise, Robin, Cha-lee, Anishka,
Shenique, Shade, Diva, Joba, Dwightania: 10 nephews, Jason,
Robert Jr, Franco, Adam, Abraham, Roberto, Sheldon, Sharada,
Leshawna, Jaimie, Dwight Jr, Bertram I, Amthony; 18
grandniens & grandnephews; many other relative and friends
including, Allan Brice, Phillis Rose, Columbus Stafford and
family, Lawrence Kelle and family, Ward family, Wellington
Bullard and family, Bishop Rudolph Bowe and fimily, Community
The Ferry, Community George Town, Exuma, Joyous Pickstock,
Geleta Rolle, Chules, George, and Victor Deveoux, Sandra ,
Shirley Linoel, and Jimmy Clarke, Ramsey Exuma, the Homes
family, Shirley Papageorge, Helen “ahran of Washington, Georgia,
U.S.A., the Nixon family of Exurna and Nassau, Una Curtis and
farnily, the family af the late Lionard “Bowtie” Bowe, the family
of the late Lillian Bowe, the family of the late Charles Bowe
Ward, the farnily of the lave Alvira Bowe, the farnily of the Late
Charles Bowe of Riviera Florida, the family of the late Kathkeen
Bowe-Nixon, the family of the late Ismael Bowe, the family of
Staftord Bowe, the fumily ot the late Sylvia Bowe-Newbold of
Riviera Beach, Florida, the family of the late Ethel Bowe, the
family of the late Eloise Bowe-Ritchie, Enid Cox of Miami,
Florida, Elaine Ready of Miami, Cynthia Dean of Miami, Florida,
the family of the late Cecil Rose and family, Mr. & Mrs. Philip
Taylor of Miami, Florida, Bethamae Marshall and family, Mr. &
Mrs, Themdore Gilbert Jack and family and others too numerous




Io mention,

The boty will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary Robinson
Road and Fifth Street on Wednesday April 28, 2009 from 2:00
PM, until 6:00 P.M. and at the church on Thursday trom 10:0








AML until service time.

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At the ceremony held at
Government House recently,
52 of the best and brightest
amongst 2010 graduating
female seniors, representing
all but three Family Islands,
participated in a weekend of
opportunities and fun.

However, only one of them
would be named 2010 vale-
dictorian.

Award

Ms Sawyer, head girl at St
John’s College, took home
the award and received a
$5,000 scholarship towards
tuition at a university of her
choice, donated by the Cable-
Care foundation.

At the presentation, the
foundation representative Dr
Keith Wisdom said he was so
impressed with the pro-
gramme and Ms Sawyer that
she was granted an extra
$500. The daughter of Eve-
lyn and Clyde Sawyer, Noelle
is no stranger to placing first;
she received the Bahamas

Association of Independent
Schools’ student Leader
Award and placed first in the
OAS Mathematics 2007 com-
petition.

The future mathematics
and history teacher believes
that if you “change your
thoughts you would change
your world”.

Receiving the most out-
standing Family Island Stu-
dent award along with a
$2,000 scholarship was Joy
Cierra Archer of St Francis
De Sales High School, Aba-
co.
Joy also received an addi-
tional $500 for the best essay
written on the 2010 Honours
Day theme “Exemplifying
Scholastic Potential”.

Speaker at the award cere-
mony was writer, film pro-
ducer and director Maria
Govan.

She challenged the students
not to be persuaded by what
others expect of them, but
instead to pursue their
dreams and their passion.

Using her own life story as
an example, Ms Govan told
the high achievers that while
she did not graduate from
college, and encountered per-
sonal challenges early in her
life, she did not give up on
her passion for film making
and now sees it as an oppor-
tunity to give back to the
place she calls home, the
Bahamas.

Students

Other students receiving
awards were Keri Lynn Pin-
der of Queen’s College, who
was given the Community
Service and Leadership
Award; Shannae Stubbs of
Central Eleuthera High
School, who was named the
most Industrious Honouree,
and Dawn Ferguson of South
Andros High School, who
was given the Most Popular
Honouree Award.

Sharry Nixon of Nassau
Christian Academy and Tan-
isha Braithwaite of Preston



NTO) SAN Ad

Albury High School,
Eleuthera, received hon-
ourable mention for their sub-
missions in the essay competi-
tion.

Other honours day weekend
activities included corporate
worship with Rev Carla Cul-
mer and the members of Wes-
ley Methodist Church Blue
Hill Road; a tour of the Clifton
Heritage National Park and
the College of the Bahamas;
courtesy calls on the Minister
of Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard and the
COB president Jayne Hodder.







bl es

SGT GARLAND ROLLE is pictured speaking to student and teach-
ers during an assembly at C | Gibson.







Ministry of Public Works
and the RBPF ‘committed to
increasing safety for children’

THE Ministry of Public
Works and Transport and
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force said they are com-
mitted to further increas-
ing safety for children dur-
ing school travel times.

Sergeant Garland Rolle
of the Traffic Division and

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Re ee ee

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Charlene Collie-Harris,
project civil engineer, vis-
ited C I Gibson Senior
High School on Monday to
address school road safety
and inform students,
teachers and administra-
tion of upcoming road
works in Marathon/Robin-
son Roads and East
Street/Solider Road corri-
dors.

Their presentations also
promoted pedestrian skills
and traffic awareness.

School Nurse

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St. Andrew’s School, The International School of
The Bahamas,requires a School Nurse for the

2010-2011 school year.

All applications must include a written letter
of application, full details of degrees, nursing
qualifications and experience as
well as the names of two relevant referees.

All applications must be received at the school by
3:00pm, Friday, May, 14 2010 and should be
addressed to: Mrs Sharon E Wilson, the Principal.

Applications without the complete information
required or those received after that date will not be

considered.





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROMpage one Freeport Concrete

company’s negative net worth
would be shortlived, as the
reappraised value of 126.75
acres of land it owns in
Freeport would increase bal-
ance sheet shareholder equity
by $3.429 million by the time
its third quarter results are
published.




Butler's Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

However, in a candid let-
ter to Freeport Concrete’s
Bahamian shareholders, Ray-
mond Simpson, the compa-
ny’s chief executive, said the
revaluation of this land’s
worth to $4.95 million “does
not help the company from a

Memorial
Announcement







13, 2010.













This is to announce, with great
sorrow, the passing of

Jean Ann Hoerkens,
nee Cox, 67

of Montagu Heights, Nassau, died on April

She is survived by her husband: Karl; her
daughters: Nicky and Tina and their husbands:
Jorge and Ward; her grand children: Connor,
Davis and Avery; her brother: Ronald Cox
and family of Wigan, England; nieces and
nephews and many friends.

A Memorial Service will be held on April
30th 2010 at 6:00 p.m. at Christ Church
Cathedral in Nassau.

In Lieu of flowers, please feel free to
contribute to a charity of your choice.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium,
Ernest and York Streets.




a Eastern Community Association

mw pcobaharmacorg

cash perspective.”

Freeport Concrete’s main
problem over the past two
years has been its inability to
generate enough “cash on
hand” to purchase the
required inventory level at its
Home Centre subsidiary.
Consequently, the Home
Centre has been unable to
generate enough sales to
break the vicious cycle and
return Freeport Concrete to
profitability.

“The company continues to
lose money as we have no
cash to purchase sufficient
inventory at the Home Cen-
tre,” Mr Simpson wrote.

“Only one of our suppliers
of building materials is sup-
porting us by sending us trail-
ers of lumber, sheetrock and
plywood. This is keeping us

Dad attacks probe

FROM page one

said Mr Swaby.

Joeshua was pronounced
dead on arrival at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
on April 9. He was collected
from the daycare centre by
his parents, who told police
he was in an “unresponsive
state” and taken directly to
the hospital.

“They had hyped us up
first, promising to bring
about closure to this matter
and to bring about justice,
but they have failed in doing
this. They told us they would
provide counselling and
therapy and that hasn’t hap-
pened. They told us they
would direct social services
to help us. I had to bury my
child myself out of my own
pocket and I am unem-
ployed,” said Mr Swaby,
who is the father of seven
other children.

On the point of police fail-
ing to provide counselling to
the family, Mr Bethel said if
the father could specifically
identify which police officer
promised the assistance, he
could respond.

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in business, but is not enough
inventory to enable us to be
profitable with existing costs,
despite us reducing our
expenses approximately 36
per cent in this six-month
period compared to the same
six months last year.

“However, we will be now
trying to sell this land for a
price that will enable us to
pay off the bank debt of $2
million and have sufficient
cash to buy the inventory we
need for the Home Centre.
This will then result in our
being able to increase our dai-
ly sales to a sufficient level
that will generate profits now
that we have reduced our
expenses substantially.”

But until a sale of the land
was achieved, Mr Simpson
said Freeport Concrete need-
ed to find the cash to remain
in business. Its bank, First-
Caribbean International Bank



JOESHUA SWABY died on April 9



The police are in commu-
nication with the pathologist
working on the case. Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings, police
press liaison officer, con-
firmed the autopsy has been
completed.

Joeshua’s parents previ-
ously raised questions about
the conduct of the daycare
centre. Mr Swaby said
Joeshua was buried on Sat-
urday, and it was “chilling
and cold” to think the day-
care did not attend or send
condolences.

“They did not even
acknowledge the fact that a
child who attended their
nursery had died,” he said.

The owner of the daycare
centre said: “All I can say is
the evidence is there. I don’t
have anything to say. I am
trying to get over it. The evi-
dence has cleared me. When
I gave my statement on ZNS

(Bahamas), was “not willing
to advance any additional
funds and is putting on pres-
sure for the sale of some of
the company’s assets to be
completed so they can be paid
off.”

With Freeport Concrete’s
survival still in question, Mr
Simpson warned sharehold-
ers that the company might
make a cash call on them via a
rights issue to inject addition-
al equity capital into the busi-
ness. An Extraordinary Gen-
eral Meeting (EGM) would
also be needed to ratify any
sale of the 126.75 acres.

Mr Simpson said a potential
buyer of some of Freeport
Concrete’s assets had yet to
follow through on their
promises, despite having
flown to Freeport four weeks
ago to “assure me that the
definitive agreement would
be finalised and sent to us in

‘short order’”.

Various parties, though,
had expressed interest in the
126.75-acre site on North
Shore, just east of Grand
Bahama International Air-
port, for quarry operations.

As a result, Freeport Con-
crete decided to have the land
reappraised and determine
whether it was undervalued.
Appraisals are done on “the
highest and best use of the
land,” and Mr Simpson said
the previous valuation was
based on the 126.75 acre site’s
use for residential or com-
mercial purposes, rather than
as a quarry that processes
limestone into aggregate and
sand.

The conveyancing docu-
ments related to the proper-
ty also prevent Freeport
Concrete from using it for
purposes other than as a
quarry.

into baby’s death

that was my condolences. I
am sorry to be so blunt, but
this is a very sensitive situa-
tion.”

Mr Swaby said police
questioned Joeshua’s moth-
er about having over-the-
counter drugs in the baby’s
diaper bag.

One week before
Joeshua’s death, he was tak-
en to the Accident and
Emergency section at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
with a fever.

Mr Swaby said the doctors
revealed to them that a
“mild fever is something that
happens when the child is
teething.” Ms McPhee said
Joeshua “was biting on his
hands, so (she) would
assume he was ready for that
stage.”

Mr Swaby said diagnostic
tests indicated Joeshua had a
clean bill of health.

The nurses discharged the
baby and informed the
mother that if anything per-
sisted or unusual happened
she could bring him back.

Ms McPhee said the next
day she informed the day-
care to give Joeshua a dose
of the popular pain and
fever drug, Calpol.

She said the fever broke
and no further problems
arose.

She said there was no fur-
ther need for medication,
although as a precaution she
packed several over the
counter drugs in Joeshua’s
bag, such as gripe water and
Ovol drops for gas, and
nasal drops.

“T feel as though because
they have nothing else to go
on they are now targeting
the mother instead of the
nursery because of their lev-
el of incompetence,” said Mr
Swaby.

“At this point the police
are badgering the mother
which is pathetic because
they know carrying those
medication is a normal
action for any parent, espe-
cially when the child is at
the period of teething,” he
said.

PUBLIC NOTICE

CHANGE OF NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, BRANEKA

CONSTANCE CAMILLE JONES of PO. Box N-
3038, Nassau, Bahamas, have legally changed my name
by deed poll to BRANEKA CONSTANCE BASSETT.
The Deed Poll has been duly recorded at the Registrar

General’s Office.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Pair are found
euilty of murder
and attempted
armed robbery

FROM page one

verdicts, the jury returned around 4.50pm for
further re-direction from Justice Hartman Lon-
gley on murder as it relates to the law, as well as

the joint enterprise of murder.

Ms Pinder, 33, was shot to death in her office at
the Cool Breeze Apartments on November 25,
2005. She died of cardiac arrest as a result of a

shotgun injury to the neck.

The prosecution alleged that Francis and Dar-
ling planned the robbery and took steps to carry
it out by using a shotgun. A third man, Dennis
Louis, 22, who was also initially charged with
the men, was found dead on February 28 at West

End.

The prosecution has indicated in Court that it
intends to seek the death penalty.

Attorneys Brian Hanna and Mario Grey have
requested probationary and psychiatric reports

for Darling and Francis.

Justice Longley has set a hearing date for July

30

The family of Ms Pinder was very pleased with
the verdicts and sang hymns as they left the cour-

thouse.

Joy Rolle, the mother of Tyna Pinder was
overcome with emotion after leaving the court-
room and was quickly embraced by her niece,

Desi Wallace.

Shena Rolle, the aunt of the deceased, thanked
the prosecution and jurors, and the police.

FROM page one

League in reaction to the traffic
plans and are gathering support
for a protest which members
have vowed to pursue to the
end.

Spokesman for the league,
Ethric Bowe, said: “We are not
going to lose this.

“We will pursue this, and it’s
going to keep escalating until
they understand how serious
this is to us, because they seem
to be taking it so lightly and
they are dealing with people’s
lives. We are not doing this for
fun.

“We have seen the destruc-
tion of businesses before when
they made the road one way in
Bay Street, Shirley Street, and
the Tonique Williams Darling
Highway.

“We can see it coming and
we are saying don’t do that to
us too.”

Proprietors have reported 20
to 40 per cent losses since the
road change without having any







Herman Natari Francis and Raymond Darling

“We prayed all night because we know there is
a God above. We knew we would get a 12-0 ver-

dict and we give all thanks and honour to the

One above because He channeled everything

through those (jurors) sitting in the courts. The

prosecution did an excellent job and we extend a
very special thanks to them.”

Ms Rolle said she supports capital punishment.

“If you take a life, your life should be taken
also,” she said.

Attorneys Hanna and Grey intend to file appli-
cation for appeal.

“There are a few issues that arose during the

trial and when the jury returned from their delib-
erations and we will definitely be addressing
those issues,” said Mr Hanna.

Mr Grey agrees that there were a few legal

of the jury.

Business owner's

opportunity to anticipate it as
neither an economic nor social
impact study was done prior to
its implementation.

But they say customers no
longer stop in as they don’t pass
their establishments at conve-
nient times and businesses
established over generations
are now worse off than ever
before.

Their frustrations have been
compounded by road works in
Baillou Hill Road leaving only
one lane of the new dual car-
riageway open, and yet there
were no contractors working at
the site yesterday morning.

Works Minister Neko Grant
invited the business owners to a
town meeting at the First Bap-
tist Church in Market Street
last night, following a previous
meeting between the two par-
ties last week.

Calls to the Minister went
unanswered yesterday as phone
lines at the Ministry of Works

POSITION AVAILABLE

issues that must be addressed beyond the realm

appeared to be down for the
second day this week.

Meanwhile support for the
protest has been swelling as
business league members took
to the streets distributing fly-
ers, gathering a petition of sig-
natures and speaking out in the
media.

“We are calling on the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to mit-
igate and compensate for the
losses caused by their negli-
gence and poor planning,” Mr
Bowe said.

“We will demonstrate that
we are not afraid of them and
make them clearly aware that
they are employed by us and
serve us.

“We are hoping something
will happen to bring wisdom
and sanity to this whole process.

“Everybody can win, but we
have got to work together.”

Protesters planned to march
along Market Street and Bail-
lou Hill Road during the morn-
ing rush hour, ending with a
rally outside Super Value in
Baillou Hill Road.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE - FREEPORT

HAF Financial & Insurance (Bahamas) Lid is searching fora Customer Service Redresentative. The deal
candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent interpersonal and communication skils, The
ability to work with limited supervision in a senice-diven progressive culture is a must,

Responsibilities:

Parlor adninstralive and clerical duties with efficiency a5 assigned by Manager
Gree! and receive walk i and telephone cheets ina professional manner
Handle Intemal and esiamal client quenes

Parlor duties 33 a cashier, receiving prerriuin paymenls ete,

Receive anplications for credit lilt, General Insurance and Morlgages and liaise wilh Financial brstibutions,
Key in Applicalions and emsure accurate application processing

Liaise with Underwriting dapariment an application Raues and saprovals
General reperiing and adenmetralion al all inaurance precducls

Core Competencies:

® Ability to work with limited supervision and leam new shalls quickly
Excelent oral and written communication skils
Abilly to execu dulies wilh agauracy and praficienty
Demonstrate a keen aya for details
Ablity to work under pressure and follow company guidelines
Slrang interpersanal skills and abiliy to maintain a harmonious retaionstig wilh co-workers
Abiily to mainiain conlident ellily
Reliable, dapendable and fexibla team-playar
Working knowledge of MS WORD, MS EXCEL and Business Math

Customer lacused

Required Qualifications:

« Associates Degree in Business Administration or related field (Bachelor Degrea 2 Plus]

«2 VESTS BPE Te nce in an Insurance oF banking operaion or similar position

Excelen! Gonipuler Sail and proficiency it Enc required
Insurance or Banding designations a plus

Benefits:

Salary COMMENSUTELE WIN CUTTen Salary Sceles, Skils and espanence. Altace benetit package Maucing Lif, Haalth and

Pansion,

Submit Resume to the Human Resources Department
P.O. Box §-4815, Nassau Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to

dparker@my hatsalutions.com

Deadline Friday April 30, 2010

Bi" BAF FINANCIAL































































HSBC €)

HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA

BALANCE SHEET

at 31 December 2009

Ye 2009 2008
? Assets

liquid assets 439,021 659,750
10,136,129
26,552,649
14,087,654
1,559,576
13,467

17,529,284

| 21205078
12.343,988
= 4.562,050'
a ARO
24,370,905

Amounts due from customers

Loans secured by mortgages

Securities and precious metals held for trading purposes
Financial fixed assets

Participations P103,415 139,741
Fixed assets TN 082 79,274
Goodwill as 2679
Accrued income and prepaid expenses 2 OSV 674 436,016
Other assets 21275,557 2,473,530
Total assets 73,314,355 73,669,749
Total amounts due from Group companies and qualified participants 7580,036 13,452,499
Total subordinated loans 03:50 210,445



Liabilities
Amounts due arising from money-market papers ee 9545
Amounts due to banks 46-796, 609
Other amounts due to customers 50. 199.768
Accrued expenses and deferred income ee ABQ 442
Other fabilities laa
Value adjustments and provisions ; E15 §3,251
Ri ee ETN 5S? 163,440
69,985,648
Share capital 480
General legal reserve —— - = , 1,607;066 1,170,161
Profit brought forward 1314002 1,132,976
Profit for the year “2 873;367 672,484

4,302,015 3,584,1

FBL3GS 73,669,749
3.599477: 2,665,580
782,291
1,965,483
1,147,601

16,924
19,403,060
47,003,393

501,585
2,843,995



Total amounts due to Group companies and qualified participants
Total subordinated debt





62,832,419
2,160,337
2,748,889

Fiduciary transactions : 45,492,356 20,695,563

STATEMENT OF INCOME

for the year ended 31 December 2009

% a 2009 2008
@ interest income

Interest and dividend income 2,001,123

674,954
(1,869,562)
806,515

oo p62 451

Income from commissions, products and services
Commission income from credit-granting business
Commission income from securities and investment activities
Commission income from other services rendered

760,090
DBT
(121.872)
B27

729,883
22,396
{141,276}
§20,100



Other ordinary results

Income from sale of financial fixed assets 43,322
Income from participations He 1,500
Other ordinary income : i 3,022
Other ordinary expenses (39,319}
Total other ordinary results



(579,603)
(268,554)
7)
835,543
(32,018)
(2,557)
(48,612)
752,356
53,737

Personnel expenses a TEE {626,060)
Oth . ce : . . (266,769)

= 808.849.
(27.094)
ee HEAT
= (8.618)

Gross profit

Depreciation of fixed assets
Amortisation of goodwill

Value adjustments, provisions and losses
Profit before extraordinary items and taxes 260,667.
Extraordinary income 292,750
Extraordinary expenses = B09) (18,046)
Taxes oe 19,744) {115,563}
Profitforthe year eeereeees __STS.387, 672.484







REPORT OF THE STATUTORY AUDITOR ON THE FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS TO THE GENERAL SHAREHOLDERS’ MEETING

of HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA, Geneva

As statutory auditor, we have audited the accompanying Opinion
financial statements of HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA,
which comprise the balance sheet, income statement

and notes for the year ended 31 December 2009.

In our opinion, the financial statements for the year
ended 31 December 2008 comply with Swiss law and
the company’s articles of incorporation.

Board of Directors’ resnensibliny

Resort on other jegal requirements
The Board of Directors is responsible for the
preparation of the financial statements in
accordance with the requirements of Swiss law

and the company’s articles of incorporation. This
responsibility includes designing, implementing and
maintaining an internal control system relevant to
the preparation of financial statements that are free
from material misstatement, whether due to fraud

or error. The Board of Directors is further responsible
for selecting and applying appropriate accounting
policies and making accounting estimates that are
reasonable in the circumstances.

We confirm that we meet the legal requirements on
licensing according to the Auditor Oversight Act (AOA)
and independence (article 728 CO and article 11 AOA)
and that there are no circumstances incompatible with
our independence.

In accordance with article 728a paragraph 1 item

3 CO and Swiss Auditing Standard 890, we confirm
that an internal control system exists, which has been
designed for the preparation of financial statements
according to the instructions of the Board of Directors.

We further confirm that the proposed appropriation
of available earnings complies with Swiss law and
the company’s articles of incorporation.

We recommend that the financial statements
submitted to you be approved.

KPMG Ltd

Auditor's responsiblity

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on

these financial staternents based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with Swiss
law and Swiss Auditing Standards (SAS). Those
standards require that we plan and perform the audit
to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial
statements are free from material misstatement.

Raphael Prebandier
Licensed Audit Expert

Philippe Cordonier
Licensed Audit Expert
Auditor in Charge

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain Geneva, 9 March 2010
audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures

in the financial statements. The procedures selected
depend on the auditor's judgement, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement

of the financial! statements, whether due to fraud

or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers the internal contro! system relevant to the
entity’s preparation of the financial statements in order
to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the
circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing
an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal
control system. An audit also includes evaluating

the appropriateness of the accounting policies used
and the reasonableness of accounting estimates

made, as well as evaluating the overall presentation

of the financial statements. We believe that the

audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and
appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

The summarized financial information set out above is derived from the Annual Report of
HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA for the year ended 31 December 2009. The full Report
can be obtained from: HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA, Suite 306, Centre of Commerce,
One Bay Street, P.O. Box N-4917, Nassau, Bahamas.



THE TRIBUNE

Spor

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28,



Bahamians
walk, run

for fun and
‘healthier
hearts’

EVERY year, the
Bahamas Heart Associa-
tion partners with Corpo-
rate Bahamas to “get the
word out there” to
encourage Bahamians to
take the necessary steps
to have healthier hearts.

Recently, Bahamians
and tourists from all
walks of life gathered
together at Goodman’s
Bay, Cable Beach, to
walk a distance of six
miles in the 11th Annual
Subway Fun Walk.

About 600 participants
lined up for the event.
The Celebrity Category
was won by Candia
Dames of Cable 12 News
and the Medical Associa-
tion of the Bahamas won
the much coveted Corpo-
rate Entity award.

Said Serena Miller,
owner of Subway in Nas-
sau: “We are indeed very
pleased to partner with
great corporate entities
like Colina and the Med-
ical Association of the
Bahamas. It just goes to
show that Bahamians are
indeed keen about
healthy lifestyles and to
maintaining a good quali-
ty of life.”

Colina employees
turned out in good num-
bers to compete during
the popular annual event
along with the some 80
persons representing the
Medical Association of
the Bahamas.

A cheque presentation
was made to the Bahamas
Heart Association on
behalf of Subway and its
partners. Linda Lafluer
pledged to make good use
of the funds in response
to the many medical and
heart conditions of chil-
dren in the Bahamas.

© See PAGE 15

SSS
~~ ——

Drive one.

PAGE 14

ts

2010



PAGE 15 ¢ International sports news

Giants torch Shockers in opener

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Commonwealth

Bank Giants - 92

Real Deal Shockers - 84
Giants lead series 1-0

ichael Bain was

fouled just

before he fin-

ished a reverse
lay-up sandwiched between a
trio of defenders, walked over
to the group Shockers sup-
porters in the stands and
screamed “Now find some-
one to stop me.”

The Shockers’ players,
coaches and fans had no
answer, and now the Giants
sit one game closer to reclaim-
ing the New Providence Bas-

ketball Association champi-
onship.

Bain torched the Shockers
for a game high 38 points to
lead the Giants to a 94-82 win
Monday night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium in the
opening game of the champi-
onship series.

Mark Hanna and Jeremy
Hutchinson completed a
potent night for the Giants
big three as they dominated
the boards and each finished
with double doubles.

Hanna finished with 20
points and a game high 15
rebounds, while Hutchinson
overcame early foul trouble
to finish with 14 points, 12
rebounds and three steals.

The trio led the Giants to a
rugged come-from-behind vic-
tory in a game where they

trailed by 10 at the half and by
six heading into the final
quarter.

The Shockers starters each
reached double figures led by
Sidney Hillary who finished
with 18 points.

Sharp shooting wingman
Corey Williams added 16,
Calvin Cummings added 14
points and seven assists, while
Kevin Coakley and Emeka
Watson each chipped in with
10.

Both teams traded baskets
early in the first quarter when
the Shockers grabbed a firm
hold of the lead on a floater
from Hillary, to take an 11-9
lead.

The score sparked a 6-0 run
for the Shockers which last-
ed until Bain answered with a
three-point play.



29th Primary Schools Track and
Field Championships all set







WR

|

Se







Â¥

&

MORE THAN 17 schools across the Bahamas, including 10 from Grand Bahama, have registered
to participate in the 29th version of the Primary Schools Track and Field Championships. The event
is scheduled for May 19-21 at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium and will be geared
towards athletes in the 7-and-under, 9-and-under, 11-and-under, and 13-and-under divisions.
Frank Rahming, chairman of the organising committee, revealed plans for the hosting of the event.
Shown (I-r) are Rahming, Ralph McKinney, Keno Demeritte and Sharon Harris...

Photo by Felipe Major/Tribune staff







The Shockers lead reached
double figures for the first
time on a layup from Barry
Carter for a 22-12 lead and
grew to as much as 14 when
Hillary successfully convert-
ed a three point play for a 26-
12 lead.

The Giants mounted a late
rally but trailed 28-21 at the
end of the first.

The lead fluctuated in the
second half, as it grew to as
much as 18 and shrank to six
with each team making time-
ly runs.

Williams three from the
wing gave the Shockers a 44-
28 advantage and they
reached their biggest lead of
the game on the following
possession when Coakley
made two from the line for a
46-28 with just under two
minutes left to play in the
half.

The Giants ended the half
on a 8-0 run to trim the deficit
to 10 and trailed 46-36 at the
half.

Bain came out with a scor-
ers mentality to open the third
and sparked an 11-5 run
which brought the Giants
within five, when his three
point play made the score 51-
47

Following the play, Shock-
ers head coach James Price
was charged with a technical
foul which ignited his team
on a 9-0 run of their own to
reclaim their margin by dou-
ble figures.

Hillary made a three point-
er from the top of the key,
Williams and Coakley added
a pair of layups and Hillary
capped the run at the line to
give the Shockers a 60-47
lead.

Real Deal would maintain

SEE NEXT page



SWIMMING

KNOWLES’ NEW BIRTH

OLYMPIC swimmer Jeremy Knowles
and his wife, Heather, are celebrating
the birth of their first child, Mason
Daniel. The seven-pound, 19-inch boy
was born at 11:12pm on Sunday, April 25
in Charlotte, North Carolina.

This is the fourth grandchild for coach-
es Andy and Nancy. Everyone is doing
fine and very happy. Tribune Sports
extends congratulations to the Knowles

family.

2010

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locks and mirrors, alloy wheels, automatic headlights, radio, CD
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SUV, without exception, all this plus 3 years/36000 mile warranty, 3
years roadside assistance, 3 years rust protection, Licence and
inspection to birthday, full tank of gas, floor mats first five services.

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TRACK

GRANT INVITATIONAL

400m- 52.36.

Men Invitational - Adrian Griffith

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FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THE 3rd Fritz Grant Track and Field
Meet is scheduled for Saturday, May & at
the Thomas A Robinson Stadium. As
usual, the Ambassadors Athletic is to
host this event and is inviting the fol-
lowing athletes to be a part of the meet:

Female Invitational - Courtney Pat-
terson (US Virgin Islands) 100m - 11.22
and Melocia Fearon-Clarke (Jamaica)

(Bahamas) 100m- 10.28; Sekou Clarke

(Jamaica) 400m- 45.85 and the Panthers

Track and Field Club (Turks and Caicos

Islands). “We expect that these athletes
will provide the necessary competition
here on home soil to allow seven ath-
letes to join them in the invitational
events,” said Bernard Newbold, the meet
director. The meet is open to all clubs
and Primary/High schools. Athletes will
have the opportunity to run qualifying
times for all summer meets but that does

not mean they are on the teams right

away.

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com
WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



FREEDOM FARM

HNMR AR



RESULTS of the Freedom
Farm Baseball League action
over the weekend:

TEE BALL

Mangoes def. Coco Plum
19-15; Guineps def. Dillies 10-
8; Sea Grapes def. Jujus 18-7;
Dillies def. Guineps 15-6.

COACH PITCH

Sand Flies def. Green Tur-
tles 17-5; Mosquitoes def.
Bees 8-3; Boas def. Red Ants
18-3; Wasps def. Green Tur-
tles 14-3; Wasps def. Boas 17-
5.

9-10

Octopus def. Red Snappers
19-2; Octopus def. Red Snap-
pers 15-4; Barracudas def.
Turbots 8-6; Barracudas def.
Turbots 11-7; Wahoos def.
Eels 6-4; Wahoos def. Dol-
phins 9-5; Octopus def. Tur-
bots 6-1.

11-12:

Divers def. White Crowns
11-1; Divers def. White
Crowns 8-5.

13-15:

Raccoons def. Falcons 7-0;
Sharks def. Stingrays 7-0; Sil-
verjacks def. Potcakes 13-1;
Silverjacks def. Falcons 7-6;
Potcakes def. Stingrays 14-2;
Owlz def. Sharks 10-0.

16- 20:

Arawaks def. Lucayans 11-
1; Caribs def. Tainos 8-7.

¢ Playoffs in 16-20 division
are scheduled to kick off 2pm
May 2 with Arawaks taking
on the Lucayans and the
Caribs playing the Tainos at
4:30 pm

Magic rest
up, cool down
after first-round

Sweep...
See page 15



Coaches
to attend
Nike b-ball
clinic

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

A NUMBER of local
coaches will be heading to the
Nike Championship Basket-
ball Clinic to broaden their
knowledge of the game.

The clinic is set for this
weekend at the Orleans Are-
na in Las Vegas, Nevada,
April 30-May 2 and is expect-
ed to feature some US coach-
es as lecturers.

New Providence Women’s
Basketball Association cham-
pions Bommer G Lady
Angels’ coaching staff, inclu-
sive of Kayla Campbell,
Anthony Swaby and Share
Cash, as well as runners-up
Four Season’s Lady Cheetahs’
coach Mario Bowleg, are all
scheduled to participate.

They are expected to be
joined by St George’s senior
boys coach Darrel Sears, who
this past weekend held a Bas-
ketball Showcase for local
players in Grand Bahama.

Swaby, who is leaving today
for his third appearance at the
clinic, said it’s very important
for the coaches to attend as
it will increase their knowl-
edge of the sport.

“T think if coaches want to
get their players to play at the
next level, the first thing they
have to do is improve them-
selves,” Swaby said.

“Some people who want to
be coaches, don’t want to do
anything where they have to
pay for it. Of this was a free
trip, the plane would have
been full. But like anything
in life, if you want to improve
yourself, you have to attend
seminars and clinics.”

While in Las Vegas, Swa-
by said he, Bowleg and Sears
will be contacting Nike with
the view of hosting a similar
clinic here in the Bahamas,
either in New Providence or
Grand Bahama.

Basketball Hall of Famer
Bob Knight will head the
cadre of lecturers as he speaks
on the topic of “Knight
School: Teaching Coaches
What to Coach.”

Other coaches expected to
address the various sessions
are legendary Roy Williams,
another Basketball Hall of
Famer from North Carolina,
Tom Izzo of Michigan State,
Bob Huggins of West Vir-
ginia, Mark Few from Gon-
zaga, Lon Kruger from
UNLV, Matt Painter from
Purdue, Steve Alford from
New Mexico, Gail
Goestenkors from Texas,
Craig Robinson from Oregon
State, John Spezia, the NJC-
CA president and Ed Janka,
the director of the Nike
Championship Basketball
Clinics.

As a part of the clinic, the
coaches will also get the
opportunity to view both the
National Junior College
Coaches’ Association All-Star
games.

Swaby said there are usu-
ally around 3,000 coaches
from around the world
attending the clinic. “You get
to meet a whole lot of coach-
es,” Swaby said. “It’s just a
good opportunity to boost
yourself. It’s just an excep-
tional clinic to attend.”

Bowleg and Sears are said
to already be in Las Vegas
and while Swaby will join
them today, Campbell and
Cash are scheduled to leave
town on Thursday.

“We hope that as a result of
going to this clinic, we will be
able to improve ourselves,”
Swaby said. “We also hope to
use this as an opportunity to
get some more pointers on
how to run our annual sum-
mer camp.

“Hopefully, we will be able
to make some contacts with
some of the coaches who will
try to get to come here to par-
ticipate in the camp, which we
intend to run for a month
instead of just the one week.”

The coaches are expected
back home on Monday.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 15

SPORTS

EPMA CReUT IKE
Crawlord wins

6th man award



ATLANTA (AP) —
Atlanta Hawks guard
Jamal Crawford has been
named the NBA Sixth
Man of the Year.

Crawford won the
award going away with 580
of a possible 610 points.



JAMAL CRAWFORD dribbles
past Spurs guard George Hill
(AP Photo)

Jason Terry of the Dallas
Mavericks finished second
with 220 points and
Anderson Varejao of the
Cleveland Cavaliers (126
points) finished third.

Crawford averaged 18
points a game in 31.1 min-
utes off the bench in his
first season with Atlanta.
He shot 44.9 percent from
the field to help the
Hawks win 53 games and
earn the third seed in the
Eastern Conference play-
offs.

The Hawks are the
fourth NBA team in nine
years for the 30-year-old
Crawford.







Bayern
Munich
beats Lyon
3-0 to reach
the final

By JEROME PUGMIRE
AP Sports Writer

LYON, France (AP) —
Bayern Munich advanced to
the European Champions
League final for the first time
in nine years, routing Lyon 3-
0 Tuesday night on three
goals by Ivica Olic.

Bayern won the home-and-
home total goals series on 4-0
aggregate and will seek its
fifth European title when it
plays defending champion
Barcelona or Inter Milan in
the final on May 22 at
Madrid.

Barcelona will try to over-
turn a 3-1 deficit when it hosts
Inter on Wednesday night.

Tlic scored in the 26th, 67th
and 78th minutes, giving him
five goals in his last four
European games.

Lyon captain Cris was
ejected in the 59th minute
when he received a yellow
card for fouling Olic, then was
given a second yellow for sar-
castically applauding referee
Massimo Busacca of Switzer-
land.

Giants win gm 1

FROM page 14

a 66-60 lead headed into the
fourth quarter. The Giants
would again open the quar-
ter on a timely run, this time a
19-5 run which vaulted them
into the lead.

Bain tied the game with a
pair at the line, 71-71 with
seven minutes left to play and
Hanna gave the Giants their
first lead since early in the
opening quarter when he also
converted at the line.

Bain capped the run for the
Giants with an acrobatic finish
to give his team a 79-71 lead.

The Shockers pulled within
three after a three pointer by
Cummings, 79-76 but would
pull no closer in the waning
moment of the fourth.

Jamaliel Rose regained the
two possession advantage for
the Giants with a tough three
point play and the Giants
were able to close out the win
and complete the comeback
with clutch free throw shoot-
ing in the final two minutes.

¢ Game two of the series is
set for 8pm tonight at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Federer upset by Gulbis at Rome Masters

By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — Roger
Federer lost his opening
match of the clay-court sea-
son, beaten by 40th-ranked
Ernests Gulbis of Latvia 2-6,
6-1, 7-5 on Tuesday.

In the 16-time Grand Slam
champion's first singles match
in nearly a month, Federer
had an easy first set but his
form then dropped drastically.
The top-ranked Swiss strug-
gled with his consistency
under a light rain as the match
wore on. Gulbis held on at
the finish, winning on his sev-
enth match point.

"My game was definitely
not up to speed," Federer
said. "My serve was not work-
ing at all.”

Federer took off several
weeks after losing to Tomas
Berdych in the fourth round
in Key Biscayne, Fla., on
March 30.

Federer played a rare dou-
bles match Monday, teaming
with Yves Allegro in a victo-
ry.

Federer reached the semi-
final here last year and went
on to win his first Grand Slam
title on clay at the French
Open a few weeks later. This
year's tournament at Roland
Garros begins on May 23.

Winners of the
11th Annual
Subway Fun

Run/Walk

BELOW are the winners
of the 11th Annual Subway
Fun Walk/Run:

OVERALL WOMEN

RUNNERS —

Ist - Jessica Murray

2nd - Rayvonne Bethel

3rd - Artesia Davis

OVERALL MEN

RUNNERS

1st - Danny McClenahan

2nd - Oneil Williams

3rd - Jason Williams

OVERALL WOMEN

WALKERS

1st - Kimley Saunders

2nd - Joan Pinder

3rd - Sandra Smith

OVERALL MEN

WALKERS

Ist - Ryan Bethel

2nd - Richard Adderley

3rd - Don Williams
RUNNERS

U-15 Girls Runner

1st — Charisma Taylor

2nd — Rashae Cartwright

3rd — Lyric Brennen
U-15 Boys Runner

Ist — Reagan Cartwrigh

2nd — Tre Taylor

3rd — Davarian Storr
U-17 Girls Runner

1st — Paulette Strachan.
U-17 Boys Runner

1st — Perez Williams

2nd — Kyle Missick
U-20 Girls Runner

Ist — Chanae King

2nd — Krystal Francis
U-20 Boys Runner

1st — Lester Taylor

2nd — Justin Lockhart

OPEN WOMEN

RUNNER

1st — Jessica Murray

2nd — Artesia Davis

3rd — Elizabeth Shaddock



—




—

Thompéil ee Oakes Field

ee

;
o



OPEN MEN
RUNNER

1st - Danny McClenahan
2nd — Oneil Williams
3rd — Jason Williams
MASTER WOMEN
RUNNER

Ist — Rayvonne Bethel
2nd — Heather Kirleis
3rd — Carla Armbrister
MASTER MEN
RUNNER

1st — Thor Kirleis

2nd — Ricardo Rolle
3rd — Ashland Murray Sr
WALKERS

U-15 Girls Walker

1st — Sherell Fernander
U-15 Boys Walker

1st — Dante Cooper

2nd — Carter Pinder

3rd — Matthew Chea
U-17 Girls Walker

1st — Taylor Lightbourne
U-17 Boys Walker

1st — Revello Williams
2nd — Marc Ferere
OPEN WOMEN
WALKER

1st — Tamica Strachan
2nd — Jentell Forbes
3rd — Shakavia Moxey
OPEN MEN
WALKER

1st — Don Williams

2nd — Oscar Rolle

3rd — Dwight Strachan
MASTER MEN
WALKER

1st — Ryan Bethel

2nd — Richard Adderley
3rd — Fredrick Wallace
MASTER MEN
WALKER

Ist — Kimley Saunders
2nd — Joan Pinder

3rd — Sandra Smith

- TEEN CHALLENGE
-BYAyH"ASMFAS ~

. Celebrating 22 years of Ministry i in the Bahamas



ERNESTS GULBIS returns to
Roger Federer at Rome Masters
Tuesday...

(AP Photo)

He will play two more tour-
naments — in Estoril and
Madrid — before heading to
Paris.

"I hope I can come back

from this. That's usually what
I do after a loss like this,"
Federer said. "Sometimes it
takes a loss to wake up and
shake you up for your
approach the next week.
When you always win, some-
times you forget how hard it
is. That's why today I don't
get too worried about this
loss."

Playing inside the tourna-
ment's new 10,500-seat stadi-
um, Gulbis appeared nervous
at the start and Federer won
the opening set easily.

He didn't face a break
point until the fourth game of
the second set, when he
missed a forehand wide to

end a long rally and hand
Gulbis a 3-1 lead. Gulbis then
broke again to go up 5-1 when
Federer made a series of
errors — including a rare
overhead miss.

Federer committed 15
unforced errors to Gulbis'
eight in the second set alone,
and his form in the final set
was even worse, missing one
routine baseline shot after
another.

In all, Federer committed
38 unforced errors to Gulbis'
39, and trailed 20-33 in win-
ners. Federer also struggled
with his serve, landing only
half of his first attempts to
Gulbis’ 71 per cent.



By A GONZALEZ
AP Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP)
— First a sweep. Now
some rest.

Dusting aside Charlotte
has given the Orlando
Magic some significant
down time before their
second-round _ series.
They'll still have plenty to
fix when they return to
practice Thursday, start-
ing with getting Dwight
Howard out of his foul-
trouble funk.

They at least know one
thing is certain.

"We're going to be well
rested," Howard said,
laughing. "Well, I'm going
to be well rested.”

Orlando will face the
winner of the Atlanta-Mil-
waukee series no earlier
than Sunday. That series
is tied two games apiece,
and if it goes seven games,
the Magic won't begin the
second round until next
Tuesday — eight days
between games.

A much bigger concern
is their All-Star center
finding his playoff poise.

About the only imprint
Howard made in the first
round was on his seat
cushion, relegated to the
bench in constant foul
trouble. He fouled out in
the last two games, played
only 105 minutes and
committed 22 fouls in four
games.

Howard's hacking
became so prevalent
against the Bobcats that
teammates even teased
him with a new nickname.
No longer Superman, they
simply referred to him as
"Foul on You."

The Magic might not
find that so funny if the



Magic rest up, cool down
after first-round sweep

TN i (sad
JAMEER NELSON (left) reacts after hitting a 3-point shot as
teammate Rashard Lewis (9) runs past during the second half
of the Magic's 99-90 win over the Charlotte Bobcats in Game
4 of a first round NBA playoff basketball game in Charlotte,
N.C., Monday, April 26, 2010.

trend continues.

"It's something I've
never been through,"
Howard said. "I never
have been in a situation
where I've had to sit out
or things may not go my
way. I think all this hap-
pens for a reason. So am
mad when it happens. But
I go back home and I sit
down and think about it,
maybe (backup center)
Marcin (Gortat) and those
other guys need a chance
to step up and see what
playoff basketball is like."

That was perhaps the
only positive twist with
Howard's foul trouble.

The Magic flexed their
playoff muscles with the





(AP Photo)

NBA's two-time defensive
player of the year side-
lined. Jameer Nelson —
who missed the first three
rounds last season recov-
ering from right shoulder
surgery, only to play poor-
ly in his return in the NBA
finals — showed he can be
a force when healthy, and
their bench was deep and
dependable when it count-
ed most.

Even Vince Carter end-
ed his 0-for-15 skid from
3-point range in the finale,
beginning to break out of
his slump that made him
almost a complete non-
factor in the first three
games. Carter had 21
points in the clincher.



during the month of April

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



New resort
celebrates

history with |

art unveiling

GREAT Exuma’s newest
resort Sandals Emerald Bay
is celebrated part of the
island’s unique history last
week with the grand unveil-
ing of an oil painting depict-
ing the legend of Pompey,
leader of the 19th Century
slave rebellion in the
Bahamas.

The magnificent piece,
spanning four feet in length
and capturing Pompey’s
unique story, was especially
commissioned by Sandals’
CEO Adam Stewart and
will be displayed in the
resort’s piano bar for guests
and team members to
savour.

Rewarded

In 1830, Pompey, a 32-
year-old slave, led a group
of slaves who rebelled
against an unauthorised
transfer to Cat Island from
Exuma. They hid in bushes
for several weeks before
stealing a boat and sailing
to Nassau to petition the
Governor. Their efforts
were rewarded when the
authorities in Nassau ruled
that the slaves be allowed
to stay in Exuma with their
families.

Commenting on the
unveiling, Sandals Emerald
Bay general manager John



Lady Muriel sails
to victory in the
Sandals Resorts Cup

WITH the aim of giving back

Keating said, “The most
amazing aspect of this tale
is not only that it did actu-
ally happen but it happened
right here in Great Exuma.
Hollywood would be hard
pressed to create such a
spellbinding story.”
Spirit

“At Sandals, we feel it
vitally important that our
guests and team members
feel the spirit of this desti-
nation and take a little
piece of it home with
them.”

“This artwork will ensure
that our guests will go home
safe in the knowledge that
there is much more to
Great Exuma than beauti-
ful beaches and crystal clear
waters. It’s an island blessed
with special people with a
unique story to tell.”

The artwork took more
than three months to com-
plete. Highly-acclaimed
Bahamian artist Jolyon
Smith, who himself
researched the story, said
he was inspired by the spir-
it of liberation and triumph
that goes with it.

President of the Pompey
Association, Floyd Arm-
brister said, “As chairman
of the Steventon Common-
age Committee, we note the

SKIPPER of the
Lady Muriel, Marcus
Mitchell, and John
Keating, general
manager of*Sandals
sane ecL@Msy-\')

Te) oy Seng




HIGHLY-ACCLAIMED
Bahamian artist Jolyon Smith
working on the artwork which
took more than three months
to complete.

recognition of Pompey by
the Sandals group. Seeing
the image of Pompey
reminds me of the freedom
fighting spirit of Pompey.

“The people of Exuma
and Steventon would do
well to reconnect with the
Pompey spirit as they seek
to empower themselves and
build a better economic
future. ”

In addition to the oil
painting, Sandals also
revealed a plaque telling
the fascinating tale glori-
ously cast in bronze and
mounted in the main lob-
by.





to the Exuma community, Sandals
Emerald Bay last weekend spon-
sored the largest event held on the
island.

The National Family Island
Regatta celebrated its 57th year
of sloop sailing in Elizabeth Har-
bor, Exuma, and the resort











She washed with dove.





ae eee

became a sponsor of the Sandals
Resorts Cup 3rd Series Race that
took place Saturday past.

The Class A category consisted
of four scheduled races including
the Prime Minister’s Cup.

Twelve boats from all over the
Bahamas battled it out in the race
for the coveted bragging rights and

She washed with soap.

dramatization af

prizes.

The victorious boat was the
Lady Muriel from Staniel Cay,
Exuma.

John Keating, general manager
of Sandals Emerald Bay, was on
hand to congratulate Captain Mar-
cus Mitchell and his crew. Beam-
ing with excitement, Mr Keating







said “regatta is not only about sail-
ing, but competition, excellence,
dedication, commitment and
excitement; these are some of the
principles that Sandals is guided
by and we believe that we too will
make a positive impact in the Exu-
ma community.”

Commodore of the National

te BE eae




WINNING boat and crew -
Lady Muriel





Family Island Regatta Danny
Strachan, who expressed his grat-
itude on behalf of the National
Family Island Regatta Committee
to Sandals Resorts, said: “We are
grateful that Sandals decided to
partner with us to help to make
this year another successful
event.”

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By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



ahamas Waste is moving
with “full force” on its
biodiesel production facil-
ity after starting construc-
tion on the $750,000 facility last Thurs-
day, its managing director telling Tri-
bune Business yesterday that the com-
pany might start production by end-
June 2010 “if everything goes well”.

With the biodiesel facility set to ben-
efit “50-plus” of Bahamas Waste’s
vehicles, the company currently being
restricted to using the product inter-
nally only, Francisco de Cardenas said
the BISX-listed firm had also just
exported its first two loads of recycled
cardboard to China.

Aiming to export another two loads
yesterday, the Bahamas Waste man-
aging director told Tribune Business
that the company aimed to export 500
tonnes of recycled cardboard per
month, generating another valuable
foreign currency earnings stream for
the Bahamian economy from an all-

‘Major progress’ in Baha
Mat’s Scotia loan talks

WEDNESDAY,

APRIL 28,

2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL 9FIDELITY

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RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

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(242) 367-3135

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Full force’ on $750k biodiesel investment



* Bahamas Waste starts construction on facility designed to recycle 500,000
gallons of waste cooking oil per year, and create at least ‘half a dozen’ jobs

* BISX-listed firm already exporting recycled cardboard to China, and
aiming to do 500 tonnes per month; 240-250 loads per year

too-rare export.

“We started construction last Thurs-
day,” Mr de Cardenas said of the
biodiesel production facility. “We’re
now going full force. We have our
manufacturer’s licence; we have all
our permits in order. We’re almost in
May, and I think that if we’re building
and everything goes well, we’ll be able
to start doing something by the end
of June. If not, July, knock on wood.

“We have some equipment up north
in Wisconsin that is already built and
tested. Now, we can concentrate on
developing our raw material. Once we
get some traction in operations, we

will be able to start collection.”

Mr de Cardenas said Bahamas
Waste’s internal feasibility studies esti-
mated that this nation generated at
least 500,000 gallons per year in waste
cooking oil, chiefly from establish-
ments such as hotels and restaurants,
plus households. That number, he
added, could easily be higher because
it may not include the waste oil from
cruise ships calling in the Bahamas.

“1d say $750,000,” said Mr de Car-
denas, when asked about the level of
Bahamas Waste’s investment in the
new facility. “Obviously there will be
some shifting around and stuff, but we

will need at least two-three people in
waste oil collection, processing and
fuel generation. We’ll probably cre-
ate a number of positions, probably
up to half a dozen.”

The Bahamas Waste managing
director said the biodiesel production
facility would consist of a small gener-
ator to run the processing equipment;
a raw material tank; a methanol tank;
a diesel tank; and a “tank for blending
the finished product with regular
diesel”.

Some blending would be necessary,
Mr de Cardenas said, because not all
Bahamas Waste’s vehicle fleet would

be able to take 100 per cent biodiesel
fuel. “The majority of our vehicles will
benefit. Some 50-plus vehicles will ben-
efit from it,” he added.

Mr de Cardenas said the ultimate
benefit to the company from using
biodiesel would depend on the market
price of diesel fuel, and how much
cheaper Bahamas Waste could pro-
duce its own fuel. He added, though,
that it would prevent the company
from passing on extra fuel costs, in the
form of surcharges, to its largely com-
mercial customers.

SEE page 4B

Insurer’s S8m investment in

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA Mar and Scotiabank
were last night said to be
“close” to a resolution over the
latter’s $170 million syndicat-
ed loan that financed the devel-
oper’s acquisition of the exist-
ing Cable Beach properties,
sources close to the situation
telling Tribune Business that
“tremendous progress” had
been made.

This newspaper was told that
Baha Mar and the bank, which
is involving executives from its
Toronto head office in the talks,
had been meeting since the

developer signed the $2.5 bil-
lion loan with China Export-
Import Bank to facilitate the
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment.

“They’ve been meeting, and
tremendous progress has been
made,” a source with knowl-
edge of the situation told Tri-
bune Business. “They may
almost be at the point where
they’re close to a resolution.”

Robert Sands, Baha Mar's
senior vice-president for gov-
ernmental and external affairs,
declined to comment when con-
tacted by Tribune Business

SEE page 2B

Colina’s $3.7m RND refinance

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COLINA Holdings
(Bahamas) has refinanced the
existing bank debt of its newly-
acquired subsidiary, publicly-
listed RND Holdings, with a
$3.7 million mortgage, the
BISX-listed life and health
insurer’s audited financial
statements for fiscal 2009
reveal.

A copy of those statements,
obtained yesterday by Tribune
Business, also revealed that
Colina Holdings had actually
acquired a majority interest in
RND Holdings as far back as
June 9, 2009, although the
extent of its equity holdings was
only revealed to the latter’s

SEE page 5B

* Majority control at fellow
public company gave
Colina $43,926 profits,
and $815,191 in
revenue, in 2009

* Insurer took majority
stake in early June,
some six months before
RND notified investors
of material change

* Colina Holdings saw
‘bargain purchase’
gain of $2.054m on
deal, gaining $3.793m
in net assets for
$1.74m outlay

Cable warning over
‘severe undermining’

of telecoms industry



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has
warned that the telecommuni-
cations industry will be “severe-
ly undermined” if the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) is not forced to open up
mobile voice and data services
to other operators and resellers,
arguing that this would harm
competition and be “anti-inno-
vation and anti-consumer”.

In an April 8, 2010, letter to
the Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority
(URCA), Cable Bahamas’ in-
house legal counsel, Judith

SEE page 4B



* BISx-listed firm says
nothing to stop mobile
voice and data services
being opened up to virtual
operators and resellers

* Warns that failure to do so
would be anti-competitive,
and ‘anti-innovation
and anti-consumer’

* Cable raises concern on
number portability and
facilities sharing, with BTC
‘dominating market for
years to come’ on
directory services



Ansbacher post affiliate purchase

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



COLINA Holdings
(Bahamas), the BISX-listed life
and health insurer, and its whol-
ly-owned subsidiary acquired
for $8 million a collective 19
per cent stake in the holding
vehicle that acquired Ansbach-
er (Bahamas) last summer, a
merger deal that lost $3 million
in the five months to end-
December 2009.

The life and health insurer’s
2009 financial statements, a
copy of which was obtained by
Tribune Business yesterday,
revealed that the BISX-listed

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

* Colina Holdings and subsidiary take 19%
stake in offshore bank’s holding vehicle

* Ansbacher parent suffers $3m loss in
five months to December 31, 2009

entity and its Colina Insurance
Company subsidiary lost
$569,899 on their investment
between July and December
31, 2009.

As a result, the value of their
investment in SBL Ltd, the
holding company for the
merged Sentinel Bank & Trust
and Ansbacher (Bahamas), was
downgraded at year-end from

$8 million to $7.43 million.
Referring to the investment
in SBL Ltd (thought to stand
for Sentinel Bank Ltd), the Col-
ina Holdings (Bahamas) finan-
cial statements said: “In July
2009, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) and Colina Insur-
ance Ltd purchased 7 per cent

SEE page 5B

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a



PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010
ee
‘Supply side’ medicine ignored by good Doctor

I THANK Dr Jonathan
Rodgers for his thoughtful
reply to my response to his
original article. I will keep my
comments here short, and
inevitably won’t address all of
the issues he raises.

Although he claims his orig-
inal article was about reducing
the cost of living and not about
the more general merits of mar-
kets, those two issues cannot
be disentangled. One of the
points I wish I had made more
clearly is that one, though not
the only, cause of the high cost
of living in the Bahamas is var-
ious forms of government inter-
vention in markets. Despite his
protests to the contrary, both
in the original article and this
reply, Dr Rodgers goes out of
his way to argue that the reces-
sion demonstrates the failures
of the free market. I took that
claim as consistent with several
of his other proposals.

In fact, nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth. The cur-
rent recession, as I have argued

In response to Dr Jonathan Rodgers’ latest ‘cost of living’
missive, Professor Steven Horwitz, writing on behalf of The
Nassau Institute, argues that less regulation and taxation -
and not more - is the way forward for the Bahamas

in The House that Uncle Sam
Built, (http://bit.ly/8jem1K), is
the product of government
interference with the market in
the form of US Federal
Reserve policy, government-
sponsored entities such as Fan-
nie Mae and Freddie Mac, and
other elements of US housing
policy. This was not a failure of
free markets, but a failure of
policy, and the 4:1 ratio
between new regulatory laws
and new deregulatory ones in
the last 30 years is evidence of
that, as numerous other Nobel
Prize winners have pointed out.
If we don’t learn that lesson
from the events of the last
decade, we will likely repeat its

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DIGESTIVE HEALTH

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Centre, Grosvenor Close

Medical assistant needed
for busy Ambulatory Endos-
copy Centre. Some office
reception duties included.

Fax resume to:
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NOTICE

mistakes, as some of Dr
Rodgers’ proposals do.

Let me address two specific
issues he raises. First, he is con-
fused by my opposition to
antitrust policy because he sees
the intent of antitrust as pro-
moting competition. Dr
Rodgers’ position misses two
key points: First, just because a
government policy has a cer-
tain intent does not mean that it
will turn out as intended.

In the case of antitrust in the
US, over 75 per cent of antitrust
complaints are brought not by
the government but by other
firms complaining about the
behaviour of their competition.
In other words, antitrust is used
to limit competition, not
encourage it. It is a way for
firms to enhance their market
power by legally prohibiting
other firms from engaging in
certain behaviours.

The second point is that, as it
turns out, this was exactly the
intent of the laws when they
were passed, at least in the US.
The laws were pushed for and
supported by large incumbent

firms who saw their prohibi-
tions on certain forms of behav-
iour as a way to prevent rival
upstarts from gaining ground
on them. I would suggest that
readers consult the left-wing
historian Gabriel Kolko’s book,
The Triumph of Conservatism,
for the full story. Antitrust pro-
tects competitors, not compe-
tition, and would raise, not low-
er, the cost of living. The real
solution is to deregulate entry
and allow new firms to use cre-
ative, competitive tactics to
challenge incumbents.

Dr. Rodgers’ point about the
velocity of money is still not
completely correct. The for-
mula in question is that money
supply x velocity = price level x
real output/income/transac-
tions, depending on which ver-
sion you use. At the very least,
the right side of the equation
is nominal not real GDP, so
increases in the money supply
or velocity can add either to
real output or to inflation,
depending on the circum-
stances. But more to the point:
it is not clear to me how

encouraging more Bahamians
to shop in the Bahamas would
increase the supply of money.
That can only happen if the
Central Bank acts.

The question is whether
more domestic purchases would
raise real output. It might, or
it might not, but it will not be as
a result of an addition to the
money supply. Even if it causes
the existing supply to ‘turn
over’ more times, Dr Rodgers
has to show why this would add
to real GDP and not just drive
up prices.

I would argue that real eco-
nomic growth comes from the
‘supply side’ in the form of
more new businesses and new
innovation, which will come
with deregulation and lower
taxes. Simply spending existing
dollars more times, in and of
itself, does not necessarily lead
to growth.

Notice, too, that if the costs
of some goods are reduced
through a better tax system,
that means fewer dollars spent
on them and more that can be
spent on other goods. This will

THE TRIBUNE

lead to growth, not because of
factors involving the velocity of
money (which will not change),
but because consumers will
have more of their own wealth
to spend on more things. I am
all in favour of revamping the
import duties system if it will
lower overall taxation on
Bahamians, but the growth it
produces will not be the result
of additions to the money sup-
ply. It will be due to a reduction
in the overall tax burden that
allows markets to function
more freely and fully.

Dr. Rodgers’ hope for “free
but adequately regulated mar-
kets” is a chimera. Regulations
are impediments to that free-
dom, and almost always get
manipulated by the largest
firms being regulated, as we’ve
seen in the US. If the goal is to
release the entrepreneurial spir-
it of the Bahamian people, then
reducing the size of the regu-
latory state and taxation to the
bare minimum is the way to go.

NB: Dr Steven Horwitz is a
Professor of Economics at St.
Lawrence University in New
York. The Nassau Institute is
an independent, a-political,
non-profit institute that pro-
motes economic growth in a
free market economy with lim-
ited government, in a society
that embraces the rule of law
and the right to private proper-
ty. Website: www.nassauinsti-
tute.org



LOAN, from 1B

about the status of the Scotia-
bank talks last night.

Still, other sources told this
newspaper yesterday that the
two parties seemed to be feel-
ing “more positive” about
reaching a successful conclu-
sion amenable to both in the
wake of Baha Mar’s successful
conclusion of talks with its Chi-
nese partners, who also include
China State Construction.

As revealed by this newspa-
per previously, Baha Mar needs
to successfully resolve the situ-
ation over the Scotiabank loan,
as it is said to be secured on the
existing Sheraton Cable Beach,
Wyndham Nassau and Crystal
Palace Casino and associated
real estate parcels at Cable
Beach.

The potential complication
is that real estate also includes

INVITATION TO TENDER

Tender for the provision of
Water and Sewerage General Insurance

The Water and Sewerage Corporation invites tenders from any bidder who is
authorized to do business in the Bahamas; and who satisfied all eligibility and
qualification requirements of the CORPORATION and is registered with and licensed
by register of insurance to issue insurances for the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Receptionist’s desk at the
Corporation’s Headquarters at #87 Thompson Boulevard.

Sealed bids are to be delivered on or before May 14 at 4:00 p.m. and addressed as

follows:

Deputy General Manager/Engineering & Planning

Water Sewerage Corporation
87 Thompson Boulevard
Nassau Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to reject or accept any or all proposals.

Submission should be marked as follows:-

Tender: General Insurance Proposal
Type of Coverage Required

All general risk insurance

Commercial Property Insurance (Building content)
Computers, IT infrastructure, Mobile, Equipments
Motor insurance, Commercial & Private, Motor Vehicle
Accident Insurance, Money & Fidelity
Liability Insurance, Marine Cargo

Signed : Management, Water and Sewerage Corporation



parcels upon which China Ex-
Im Bank will take security for
its $2.5 billion loan.

The Chinese bank will need
those assets delivered ‘free of
encumberances’, to quote legal
parlance, which is why Baha
Mar and Scotiabank need to
resolve their loan situation.

Scotiabank has already
extended the due date twice -
from December 31, 2009, to
end-January 2010, and then to
March 31, 2010 - to give the
developer time to seal the deal
with Beijing. That was con-
cluded on March 30, 2010, and
possibly explains Baha Mar's
haste to last night seal the deal
with the Chinese.

In the aftermath of that
agreement’s signing, Tribune
Business sources indicated that
Baha Mar set to "re-engage"
Scotiabank over that loan, hav-
ing prioritised sealing the agree-
ment with China before turning
its attention to this.

Baha Mar's strategy appears
to have been to conclude suc-
cessful negotiations with the
Chinese before turning its
attention to Scotiabank. This
credit facility enabled the devel-
oper to acquire the existing
Wyndham and Sheraton Nas-
sau Beach resorts from Philip

BOUT eee
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Ruffin and the Government.

Tribune Business previously
reported how Baha Mar and its
principals, the Lyford Cay-
based Izmirlian family, had
offered to make Scotiabank
"whole" and repay the entire
loan, having previously offered
to pay down $85 million or 50
per cent during proposals that
were swapped between the two
sides.

"Baha Mar appreciates Sco-

tiabank's support during these
economic times, and is satisfied
Scotiabank supports the devel-
opment of Cable Beach," was
all Mr Sands was prepared to
say on the situation in a previ-
ous interview.

Meanwhile, Tribune Busi-
ness also understands that Baha
Mar and the Chinese have sub-
mitted their investment project
proposals to the Bahamian gov-
ernment.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 3B





Mall denies 200 Bahamas closer
on airline deal

jobs in danger

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TOWN Centre Mall is
not being directly affected by
the re-routing of Blue Hill
Road and Market Street, its
general manager denying
claims that 200 jobs were at risk
because of it and the associated
roadworks.

Frank McGwire, responding
to claims that hundreds of peo-
ple employed at stores through-
out the Mall could lose their
jobs due to declining sales, said
there was no evidence this is
true. And, internally, he has not
heard of drastically declining
sales figures.

In contrast, he said a Mall
business that opened recently
had shown sales increases
month-on-month of 30 per cent.

However, sources told Tri-
bune Business that it was an
individual close to the Mall’s
owners who quoted the 200 fig-
ure.

Engineer Ethric Bowe told
Tribune Business yesterday that
almost half the 400 potentially
affected jobs in the area of the
re-routed roads could come
from the Towne Centre Mall,
which he argued had been hit
hard since the road directions
were changed to one-way.



yet had an effect on consumer
traffic.

He added, though, that the
roadworks have not been going
on for a long enough period to
indicate that the Mall was being
affected.

“With the time period the
construction has been going on,
it is still a bit too early to tell (if
the mall is being negatively
impacted),” said Mr McGwire.
“The access to Town Centre
Mall is not impeded.”

He said Mall stores have
been forced to face the same
economic conditions affecting
most businesses across the
country, a direct result of the
global economic downturn.

Mr McGwire said, though,
that the Mall had seen some
turnaround as a result of an
uptick in the tourism industry in

quarter one of this year.

“As people go back to work
at hotels and do construction
work, those people continue to
shop with us,” he said.

He expressed sympathy for
the businesses being affected
by the roadworks and said he
would make an offer to move
them into the Mall if their busi-
nesses were to close.

“T want to talk to other ten-
ants down there and see how I
can assist them,” said Mr McG-
wire.

Mr Bowe said the business
owners that form the League
will stage a demonstration
today protesting the road
changes and asking for reforms.

Only yesterday evening they
met with government officials
to discuss what can be done to
ease the impact of the changes.

MOH:

NOTICE is hereby given that DOUGLAS JOY GEORGES of
1850 N.E. 158 Street, N. Miami Beach, 33162, P.O. Box CR-
54660, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 28" day of April, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS is close to
forming a mutually beneficial
partnership with American Air-
lines to provide airlift to many
Family Islands, the Minister of
Tourism and Aviation revealed
to Tribune Business yesterday.

Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
said the meeting last weekend
with one of the world's largest
airlines spurred new interest in
airlift to some islands in the
Bahamas, outside of American
Airlines’ already flown routes,
"in a way that we have never to
this point”.

"We have attracted the
attention of American Air-
lines... with them focusing on
the individual destinations (of
the islands of the Bahamas),"
he said.

The minister said American
Airlines was not aware of the

number of Bahamian destina-
tions in need of service, and
had taken an interest in part-
nering with the Bahamas gov-
ernment/Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation.

Mr VAnderpool-Wallace
said airlift via the third largest
carrier in the US will prove to
be a "symbiotic" relationship,
as American Airlines seeks to
become profitable. The airline
reported fourth quarter 2009
losses of $344 million.

"At the end of the day,
American lost money in their
fourth quarter, but there are a
lot of ways for us to allow them
to be competitive (in the
Bahamas)," he said. "We have
to make certain we pave the
way for profitable air service."

The minister added that in
spite of the many airlines able
to service the Bahamas, “they
are at the top of the list".

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
that while American Airlines’

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PO Box N 123

Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

costs are often higher, the Gov-
ernment will work with them
to reduce costs to the Family
Islands.

He also hinted at a major
development that will allow this
country to service air travellers
in a much better fashion, but
could not get into specifics.

"It will provide visitors with
an experience that makes it eas-
ier for them to transit back and
forth," Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said.

"Air travel is seen by the cus-
tomer as a necessary evil; part
of their experience," he said.
"So it should be painless, easy
and as inexpensive a possible.”

American Airlines
announced last month that it
would discontinue flights to
Governor's Harbour while
changes to the airport's navi-
gational aids were being made.
Many Eleuthera resorts imme-
diately felt the fallout from the
discontinuation of the flights.



Telephone 242 393 2007
Fax 242 393 1772
Internet www.kprng.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To: The Shareholder

WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LEQNARD RAYMONVIL
of Market St., P.'O.Box N7060,Nassau Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 21% day of April, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED
(‘the Bank”), which comprise the statement of financial position as at December 31, 2009, and the statements
of comprehensive income, changes in equity and cash flows for the year then ended, and a summary of
significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

But Mr McGwire said the
road changes, which end at
Robinson Road, one of the
mall’s perimeter roads, had not
Management's responsibility for the financial statements

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing,
implementing and maintaining interna! control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial
statements that are free from material misstatements, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying
appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

INSIGHT

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behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Auditors’ responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted
our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply
with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
financial statements are free fram material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the
financial statements. The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including the assessment of the risks
of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk
assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the Bank’s preparation and fair presentation of the
financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for
the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Bank's internal control. An audit also
includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting
estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements

5) TumbleFresh”

option

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our
audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED as of December 31, 2009, and its financial performance and
cash flows for the year then ended, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Hue

Nassau, Bahamas
February 26, 2010

WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED

Statement of Financial Position

December 31, 2009, with corresponding figures for 2008
(Expressed in United States dollars)

See eee
Assets
Cash and cash equivalents (notes 5 and 18) 82,823,014
388,912,448
171,059,599
2,657,839
43,988
8,101
123,136,396

50,206,288
500,616,791
55,150,214
2,318,042
39,260
4,893
101,239,775
272,954 402,614
5,427,461 5,566,924
1,950,000 -

Loans and advances to customers (notes 6 and 18)
Reverse repurchase agreements (note 7)

Accrued interest receivable (note 18)

Other accounts receivable

Prepaid expenses

Investments (notes 8 and 17)

Foreclosed assets (note 9)

Property and equipment (note 10)

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Other assets (note 11)

Total assets $ 776,291,800 715,544,801

Liabilities and Shareholder's Equity

Liabilities:

Customers' deposits (notes 12 and 18) $ 699,856,478
9,217,337

5,496,879

643,723,535
7,050,772
5,134,234

Accrued interest payable (note 18)
Accounts payable and other liabilities

Total liabilities 714,570,694 655,908,541
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Shareholder's equity:

Share capital (note 13) 38,000,000

23,721,106
61,721,106

38,000,000

21,636,260
59,636,260

Retained earnings

_ = Commitments and contingencies (note 14)
save 257% when you pay cash ————
F Total liabilities and shareholder's equity = $ 776,291,800 715,544,801

The statement of financial position should be read along with the accompanying
notes, which are an integrals part of the financial statements.

Whirlpool
These financial statements were approved on behalf of the Board of Directors on

Tha peuar ta at eiere dua: February 26, 2010 by the following:

@o

Interested parties may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Financial Statements
from the licensee at:

Master Technici

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS
Y Westrust Bank (International) Ltd

Office # 1, Building # 10
Caves Village
West Bay Street
P.O.BOX N-1419
Nassau, Bahamas

NENT frau

rm ere eae tre sy Aes ees MOM (Ile cae AM ecttaPescel reed
Ph: 393-5310 Fox: 393-8094 © www.mastertechbohamas.com

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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010
a > =<:
Cable warning over ‘severe undermining’ of telecoms industry

FROM page 1B

Smith, said the BISX-listed
company disagreed with the
sector regulator’s position that
it would be “contrary” to gov-
ernment policy to require BTC
to open its mobile voice and
data services to access by other
users.

While Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has publicly stated
that competition in the provi-
sion of cellular services would
only enter the Bahamian mar-
ket two years post-privatisation
(rival operators will be allowed
to bid for licences one year
after BTC is privatised, with
the extra year granted for them
to construct their networks),
Cable Bahamas said the Gov-
ernment’s policy limits referred
only to the award of new GSM
licences.

This, the BISX-listed com-
pany argued, did not prevent
URCA “moving forward with
the development of a plan and
process for the award of spec-
trum licences for the provision
of WiMax services (fixed and
mobile)”.

WiMax is a fixed wireless
network, and Cable Bahamas
argued that the Government’s
communications sector policy
allowed URCA to “impose
wholesale obligations on BTC”
that would allow other opera-
tors (such as itself) to provide

competition through Mobile
Virtual Networks or resell
space on BTC’s network to oth-
ers. Mobile Virtual Networks
would allow other operators to
provide mobile voice and data
services using BTC’s existing
infrastructure.

Any introduction of compe-
tition in the mobile (cellular)
sector is likely to be fiercely
resisted by BTC, and possibly
the Government, given that
some three-quarters of the 100
per cent state-owned incum-
bent’s revenues are derived
from this service. Essentially,
BTC’s cellular monopoly is
what is keeping the company
afloat, and any introduction of
competition at this stage could
have a disastrous effect on its
privatisation value - currently
thought to lie at around $130
million.

Still, Cable Bahamas also
proposed that URCA could
choose to intervene in the
mobile voice and data market
after competition was intro-
duced, if it found that “BTC
has abused a position of domi-
nance if [it] declines to negoti-
ate reasonable Mobile Virtual
Network Operator agreements
with its competitors in good
faith”.

“In the absence of reason-
able resale obligations applica-
ble to BTC’s mobile offerings,
the overarching objectives of
the Communications Act would

POSITION
AVAILABLE

be severely undermined, since
in that circumstance, only BTC
would be in a position to pro-
vide customers with the full
suite of fixed and mobile ser-
vices on a ‘one-stop shop’ basis
or as part of an integrated pack-
age,” Ms Smith wrote on Cable
Bahamas’ behalf.

“This would be both anti-
competitive, but also anti-inno-
vation and anti-consumer. At
a minimum, if reasonable
Mobile Virtual Network Oper-
ator or reseller provisions are
not imposed by URCA or vol-
untarily offered by BTC,
URCA should explicitly adopt
a [Significant Market Power]
measure preventing BTC from
offering any mobile voice or
data services, including fixed-
to-mobile services, as part of a
package or bundle involving
any of its other services, pend-
ing full liberalisation of the
mobile market.”

Confirming that Cable
Bahamas was seeking to com-
pete with BTC in the provision
of fixed-line and cellular voice
services once the market was
liberalised, Ms Smith said the
BISX-listed company was con-
cerned about whether inter-
connection agreements with the
incumbent covered co-locations
and facilities sharing.

Interconnection is required
to allow traffic originating on
one carrier’s network to flow
seamlessly to the intended
recipient, who is the customer
of another telecom operator,
and Cable Bahamas said this
was an essential requirement
for it and others to “compete
fairly and effectively” with
BTC.

“URCA’s final decision on
BTC’s Significant Market Pow-
er obligations should clarify
that the Reference Access
Interconnection Offer (RAIO)
must include reasonable co-

location and facility sharing
arrangements, even if the
details are left to further nego-
tiation,” Ms Smith urged on
Cable Bahamas’ behalf.

“Otherwise, BTC will be
under no obligation to ensure
that it maintains reasonable
space in its facilities for this pur-
pose, and the future prospects
for imposing workable obliga-
tions involving access to BTC’s
space for co-location or other
forms of facility sharing will be
greatly diminished.”

Cable Bahamas _ also
expressed concern that BTC
would “continue to dominate
the marketplace for years to
come in the absence of regula-
tory intervention” over direc-
tory inquiries and related par-
ties.

Warning that a “substantial
information gap and asymme-
try” in this area would work to
BTC’s advantage, Ms Smith
said it was unclear whether the
provision of directory informa-
tion on customers of rival oper-
ators fell within the SMP guide-
lines and interconnection offer.

“It also remains unclear to
what extent Cable Bahamas
and other competitive opera-
tors will be able to ensure that
their customers are not disad-
vantaged in this respect (for
example, by requiring BTC to
make its directory information
available to third parties so that
they can produce their own on-
line directories or printed
guides),” Cable Bahamas
argued.

Number portability - the abil-
ity of customers to keep the
same number when they
switched operator or moved
house - was also raised as an
issue by Cable Bahamas, which
demanded that URCA indicate
when a consultation on this
issue - and implementation of
an interim arrangement - would

take place.

Arguing that BTC’s entry
into new business lines should
hinge on it implementing a
“workable approach” to num-
ber portability, Cable Bahamas
criticised URCA’s “apparent
lack of urgency” on the issue.

“Number portability has
proven to be a critical compo-
nent in virtually every country
for the development of effec-
tive and sustainable competi-
tion in the fixed-voice market,”
Ms Smith said.

THE TRIBUNE

“Efficient and effective
implementation of number
portability between fixed-voice
operators should be dealt with
as a matter or urgency, and an
interim solution should be iden-
tified and imposed as soon as
possible to help speed up cus-
tomers’ ability to switch
between fixed-voice providers.

“Tn addition, rules relating
to win-back and other com-
mercial practices will need to
be developed and enforced
against BTC.”



FROM page 1B

it’s a no brainer.”

fees on the cardboard.



‘Full force’ on
$750k biodiesel
investment

Noting the volatility of fuel prices, Mr de Cardenas said:
“Tf we can get a product, a waste product, and re-use it to
produce renewable energy, and we do it at a reasonable cost,

As for its cardboard recycling initiative, Mr de Cardenas
said: “We’re already exported our first two loads to China.
We’re trying to get two more loads out today.

“We’re probably looking at 240-250 loads a year, and mul-
tiplying that 500 tonnes by 12 gives you 6,000 tonnes per
year. There’s 25 tonnes per container.

“We hired a recycling co-ordinator last week. We’re con-
centrating on cardboard, but certainly there’s a need for
plastic and other items that are difficult to handle.

“Our target goal right now is to try and take out 500
tonnes a month. That’s not much, and we suspect there’s a
lot more out there. We’re actually going to customers and
asking them to separate they’re cardboard. It’s a bit of a cost
avoidance for them, as they no longer have to pay tipping





Office clerk needed for upscale
company. We are searching for
a highly motivated individual
with strong organizational skills,
along with excellent verbal and
written communication skills.
Must be proficient in MS Office

(Outlook, Word, Excel, Access
and PowerPoint), and be able
to meet demanding timelines.
The individual must have the
ability to work independently
and handle other duties as
required.

Please contact
Ms. Smith at 327-5595
or email:
psmith@nassauroyalholiday.com

’m lovin’ it

Employment
Opportunity



NOTICE is hereby given that GAYMORE SHERWOOD of
WINDSOR PLACE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21* day of April, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL GULF PIPELINE LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O.
Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 21st
day of May, A.D., 2010. In default thereof they will
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 27" day of April, A.D., 2010

B. J. Conjelko
Liquidator
Al Wosail Building
West Bay Area
Doha, Qatar

Restaurant Managers Needed
for leading Fast Food Franchise

Requirements:

¢ Must be a High School Graduate

* Must have Management experience

e Restaurant Management experience is
preferred.

¢ Must have strong leadership skills

¢ Must be customer service driven

¢ Must be results-oriented & articulate
¢ Must have excellent inter-personal skills
¢ Must have excellent oral & written
Communications skills

* Professionalism required

Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and
holidays.

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Please submit Resume to:
Human Resources Department
McDonald’s Head Office
on Market St. North
P.O.Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444

Nassau, The Bahamas
BER RR RR RRP eee

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CRYSTAL
CHARMAINE LOWE domiciled
and late of Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against or
interest in the above Estate should send
same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before 12th May, 2010
after which date the Executors will proceed
to distribute the assets of the Estate having
regard only to the claims, demands or
interests of which they shall then have had
notice AND all persons indebted to the
above Estate are asked to settle such debts
on or before 12th May, 2010.

V.M. LIGHTBOURNE & CO.
Attorneys for the Executors
P.O. Box AB-20365

Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Abaco, The Bahamas

(31st March, 14th & 28th April, 2010)

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL GULF PIPELINE LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL GULF PIPELINE LIMITED is in
dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 26th day of April, 2010 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is B. J. Conjelko of
Al Wosail Building, West Bay Area, Doha, Qatar.

Dated the 27th day of April, 2010.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of WINIFRED EMILY
CHRISTOFILLS late and domiciled of the West-
ern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Ba-
hamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
requested to send their names, addresses and par-
ticulars of the same certified in writing to the un-
dersigned on or before the 21st day of May A.D.
2010 and if required, to prove such debts or claims
or in default be excluded from any distribution;
after the above date the assets will be distributed
having regard only to the proved debts or claims
of which the Executors shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons in-
debted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the 21st day of May A.D.
2010.

Dated the 27th day of April, A.D. 2010

ROBERTS, ISAACS & WARD
Attorney for the Executor
Chambers
Bay Street & Victoria Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas



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THE TRIBUNE



Colina’s $3.7m
RND refinance

FROM page 1B

minority shareholders in late
January 2010.

The $3.7 million mortgage to
refinance RND, which both
Colina Holdings and the for-
mer’s chairman, Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald had indicat-
ed would happen, is for a 15-
year period and carries a 9 per
cent per annum interest rate.

That rate, according to Coli-
na Holdings’ financial state-
ments, is some 1.5 percentage
points, or 150 basis points, high-
er than the 7.5 per cent per
annum interest rate charged on
RND Holdings’ existing $2.904
million loan from First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas).

Meanwhile, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) financial statements
revealed that RND Holdings
generated $43,926 in net
income for the BISX-listed life
and health insurer in 2009 dur-
ing the almost-six months fol-
lowing the acquisition of its
majority stake. Some $815,191
in revenue also flowed to Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas) benefit.

“From the date of acquisi-
tion, RND has contributed
$815,191 of revenue and
$43,926 to the net profit before
non-controlling interests of
[Colina Holdings Bahamas],”
the insurer’s financial state-
ments said.

While Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) and its fully-owned
subsidiary, Colina Insurance
Company, had built up a 24.8
per cent stake in RND Hold-
ings as at 2008 year-end, via the
purchase of 2,197, 779 shares, it
took another six months for
them to acquire a majority.

“During 2009, through addi-
tional purchases of shares on
the open market as of June 9,
2009, the company [Colina
Holdings (Bahamas)] had
acquired a total of 4,482,314
shares at a cost of $0.40 per
share, representing a 50.6 per
cent shareholding,” the finan-
cial statements said.

“The company has acquired
RND to expand its investment
property holdings to support its
life insurance liabilities over the
long-term.”

Informed capital markets
observers may question why
RND Holdings minority share-
holders, and the Bahamian

investing public at large, were
only informed by the company
of a change in its majority own-
ership in January 2010 - some
six months after the change, a
material event, had occurred.

There is little doubt, though,
that Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) acquired majority
control at RND Holdings for a
relative bargain price, since its
accounts record a $2.054 mil-
lion “gain on bargain purchase”
among its investment income
gains during 2009.

This “bargain” occurred
because it acquired its 50.6 per
cent share of RND’s $7.498 mil-
lion net assets, worth $3.794
million, for $1.74 million. The
latter figure is the sum spent
on building Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) majority interest in
RND’s ordinary shares.

The balance sheet details
provided for RND Holdings at
the June 9, 2009, acquisition
date show why the company
needed a ‘saviour’ in the form
of Colina Holdings (Bahamas).

RND had just $1,459 in cash
at the balance sheet date, indi-
cating that just about all the
rental cash flow from its invest-
ment properties - the RND
Plazas in Nassau and Freeport -
was being sucked up to
repay/service bank debt and
other liabilities.

Some 97.9 per cent of RND’s
assets, $11.559 million out of
$11.804 million, were tied up in
the value of its illiquid real
estate holdings.

This was matched against lia-
bilities that were more current,
including a $3.064 million bank
loan; $197,191 in bank over-
drafts; and $877,716 in accounts
payables and other liabilities.

Subsequent to Colina Hold-
ings (Bahamas) financial year-
end, it acquired a further 2.8
million RND Holdings shares
in a series of transactions in
January and March 2010, taking
its controlling stake to 79.8 per
cent.

And further increasing its
real estate investments, part of
its strategy to match long-term
insurance liabilities with long-
term assets, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) has also passed a
Board of Directors resolution
to “authorise an investment of
$3.9 million in a [unrelated] real
estate development in the west-
ern district of New Provi-
dence”.

Insurer’s S8m
investment in
Ansbacher post
affiliate purchase

FROM page 1B

and 12 per cent of SBL Ltd ata
cost of $3 million and $5 million
respectively.

“In considering the classifi-
cation of its 19 per cent equity
holding in SBL Ltd, [Colina
Holdings] has classified its
investment in SBL as an invest-
ment in associate as two of the
10 Board members of SBL Ltd
are also directors of Colina
Holdings (Bahamas).

“SBL Ltd, in May 2009,
acquired the issued and out-
standing shares of Ansbacher
(Bahamas) and merged Ans-
bacher subsequently with Sen-
tinel Bank & Trust in July 2009,
with the surviving entity retain-
ing the name Ansbacher
(Bahamas).”

Ansbacher (Bahamas),
according to its website, is part
of the A. F. Holdings (formerly
the Colina Financial Group)
group of companies, as is Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas). A. F.
Holdings, whose principals are
attorney Emanuel Alexiou and
financial executive Anthony
Ferguson, also holds a majority
58.1 per cent stake in Colina
Holdings (Bahamas).

Mr Ferguson did not return
Tribune Business’s message
seeking comment before press
deadline, so the precise ratio-
nale for Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) investment in Ans-
bacher (Bahamas) could not be
ascertained.

However, observers contact-
ed by Tribune Business yester-
day suggested that the timing
of the 19 per cent equity stake’s
acquisition, coming so soon
after the Ansbacher deal’s con-
clusion, indicated the insurance
companies were boosting their
offshore bank’s affiliate’s equi-
ty levels and enhancing capi-
talisation (recapitalising) post-
purchase.

This, they added, could sug-
gest that Colina Holdings

(Bahamas) and its subsidiary
were effectively underwriting,
or financing, the purchase of
Ansbacher (Bahamas) by their
common majority shareholder,
A. F. Holdings, and its SBL Ltd
associate.

The Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) accounts showed
that SBL (Ansbacher
Bahamas) had some $207.652
million in assets, and $179.603
million in liabilities, at the
December 31, 2009, balance
sheet date, giving it net assets of
$28.049 million.

Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
had a $5.329 million share of
SBL Ltd’s net assets, plus
$1.423 million in goodwill and
$677,296 in “intangible assets”,
giving its investment a $7.43
million ‘fair value’.

SBL Ltd, the accounts
revealed, earned $4.883 million
in total revenues in the five
months to December 31, 2009,
and generated a $2.999 million
net loss. These figures are like-
ly to apply to Ansbacher
(Bahamas) as SBL Ltd’s key
asset, and probably reflect one-
off costs associated with the
acquisition and merger, includ-
ing the redundancy packages
associated with staff downsiz-
ing.

Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
enjoyed a successful 2009, with
net income increasing by 64.5
per cent to $13.373 million,
compared to $8.129 million the
previous year.

Net income available to com-
mon shareholders, once pref-
erence share dividends of
$997,328 were taken out, rose
by 60.7 per cent to $12.376 mil-
lion compared to $7.699 mil-
lion the year before.

Accounting for $1.638 mil-
lion in other comprehensive
expenses during the year, Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas) earned
comprehensive income of
$11.736 million, an 11.3 per cent
rise on the $10.543 million
recorded in 2008.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 5B

C REDIT S UISSE a» CREDIT SUISSE AG, NASSAU BRANCH

The Bahamas Financial Centre Telephone +1 242 356 8100
Ath Floor Telefax +1 242 426 6689
Shitley & Charlotte Streets
P.O, Box N-4998
Nassau, Bahamas

www.credit-suisse.com

Consolidated balance sheets





























Reference
= on 2 to notes oe ee _end of
2009 2008

Assets (CHF million)
Cash and due from banks 52,535 90,521
interest-bearing deposits with banks 2,200 3,892
Central bank funds sold, securities purchased under —
resale agreements and securities borrowing transactions 12 208,378 = =—269,013
a oe arate rat mince E ear Oia rd eta ede NEe Ni see S ae 196,308 “years
Securities received as collateral, at fair value a _ a —_ 37,371 29,755
a ea ie ne a ea SE eae at an neo a Pe ore sidiog es chars
Trading assets, at fair value oo —_ 13 931,307
a RES era ise ener one Cinen renee y aie i 2843 chneaoaneae’
investment securities - - —_ - ; 14 9,180 ~
Brae os eG ene eg ee me oe eeG nan a eee.
Other investments ol eB 8,587
ere rr ee a ie in etre eee Hee ey oo ace eee
Netioans SSOS”*~ oe 8 ere RD Re agp et a ge a a
oe es — Noo caw peinns Soman es de aeee so eaeu cae ewanymctagade bonne ad reten den eons a eemeansoeeeeeteameLieas Gs : a Paes aes
Premises and equipment ~ eee a — ~ OW "5,901 67g
ggg —————————— ee ee
Other intangible assets. =Ssts—=—“CS~s‘“‘—*S*~*~S~S~™S Fe BCOTBSSC«

of which reported at fair value
Brokerage receivables











of which encumbered




Assets of discontinued operations held-for-sale 4 0

1,010,482



neptune A SEATON RN PALA TRITTTA CDEC ASS ALOR tt EA re EPA OSTA EA

Reference
to notes end of

Liabilities and equity (CHF million)
Due to banks



























of which reported at fair value 4,914 3,576
5st cx capdasions aniiseuniandged macaaceenaronansn Gee ener ges ecu eee ee dee Oe ee
a Ce ne a Central bank funds purchased, ‘securities sold under
repurchase agreements and securities lending transactions 12 191,587 243,970
Gea ee ee a eesceys rang pace ee eae
Obligation | to return sacurities received as collateral, at vat fair value een 37,371 29,755
Trading labilities, at fair value ~ 13 134,875 ‘153,718
Short-term borrowings ~ ~ ~ 6,058 10,182
Shee ee ae ee
Long-term debt > —— 22 186,676 148,560
pee ee ea ee ree ene eae rer roma acrvena nr 75808 oye ie
Brokerage payables OO ~ 7 " — 69, 132 93,426
Other liabilities = aa 20 70,254 63,089





of which reported at fair value

Liabilities of discontinued operations heid- for-sale



Total liabilities ~— ~ 964,731 1,105,520





Cormimon shares / Ele certificates

Total shareholder's equity 31,228 26,868



Nancontrolling interests 14,523 19,281

Total equity 45,751 46,149





Total liabilities and equity = 1,010,482 1,151,669





end of 2009 2008



Additional share information
Par value (CHF)

issued shares (milion)

Shares outstanding (million) 44.0 44.0





Interested parties may obtain a copy of the audited accounts from Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, 4° Floor, Shirley and Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-+928.

KPMG AG
Audit Financial Services
P.O. Box

Badenerstrasse 172
CH-8004 Zunch CH-8026 Zunch

Telephone +41 44 249 31 31
Fax +41 44 249 23 15
Internet www.kpmg.ch

Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm to the General Mecting of

Credit Suisse Group AG, Zurich

We have audited Credit Suisse Group AG and subsidiaries’ (the “Group”) internal control over financial reporting as
of December 31, 2009, based on criteria established in /nternal Control-—integrated Framework issued by the
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The Group's board of directors and
management are responsible for maintaining effective internal contro! over financial reporting and the Group's
management is responsible for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting,
included in the accompanying Management Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility
is to express an opinion on the Group's internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board
(United States), Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in alf material respects. Our audit included
obtaining an understanding of interna! contro! over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness
exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal contra! based on the assessed risk.
Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We
believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding
the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance
with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal contro! over financial reporting includes those
policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly
reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company: (2) provide reasonable assurance that
transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance
with authorizations of management and directors of the company: and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding
prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have
a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.
Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become
inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may
deteriorate.

In our opinion, the Group maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of
December 31, 2009. based on criteria established in /nternal Control--Integrated Framework issued by the
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States) and Swiss Auditing Standards, the consolidated balance sheets of the Group as of December 31, 2009 and
2008, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in equity, comprehensive income. and cash
flows, and notes thereto, for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2009, and our report dated
March 25, 2010 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

lee

Mare Ufer
Licensed Audit Expert

KPMG AG

David L. EL Neh ke

Licensed Audit Expert

Zurich, Switzerland
March 25, 2610



THE TRIBUNE

iS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 7B



The Tribune







Amish Friendship Bread - part 2

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

Tribune Features Editor



fast food and immediate gratification, the idea of

| n a world bombarded with instant text messages,

waiting ten days to prepare two loaves of Amish
Friendship Bread seems strange.

Why devote ten days of
your life to preparing the bat-
ter when any number of bak-
eries have offerings to ease
your sweet tooth right now.

However I was intrigued
when my online editor gave
me a starter kit and suggested
it would make a great Taste
story. So we decided to do
our own “ Tribune newsroom
friendship bread experiment”
with less than perfect results.

ing smell due to the yeast but
the mix is totally good) The
other reporter forgot her bag
after a few days and so she
removed her self from the
experiment.

Perhaps the thought of not
having another Taste story
propelled me to continue
alone and I am quite proud of
myself for remembering to
mush my bag and follow the
instructions. It did help that I






Our business reporter, a
news reporter and my self all
took a starter kit and decided
we would do different
flavourings to compare.
Somewhere in the ten days
however, my coworkers for-
got the friendship. One bag
was thrown away because a
mother decided it had to be
bad- ( the bag has a ferment-

THE FRIENDSHIP starter bag on the date it was given to me.

HI



put the instruction sheet on
the fridge so at some point
throughout the day I was
reminded to check my batter.

Amish Friendship Bread
takes your mind back to a
simpler period of life when
all you had was time. Time
without the distraction of
modern conveniences (you
aren’t allowed to refrigerate it

or use a mixer or anything
metal to mix it) and when
having a cup of coffee and
dessert with neighbors was
the social event of the week.
The concept of Friendship
Bread is simple and sweet- a
friend gives you a starter bag
they received from a friend,
for the first five days you just
“mush” the bag, on day six
add flour, sugar, and milk to
the bag, days 7-9 just mush
the mixture and then on the
tenth day you are ready to
bake. The recipe is simple to
follow just like preparing any
cake. Each starter bag pro-
vides four more starter bags
and enough batter for two
loaves of bread.

The recipe allows you to
flavour the bread with the
pudding flavor of your choice.
I chose chocolate pudding
with cinnamon and sugar
sprinkled on top for added
taste. My friendship bread
turned out a consistency
between a cake and a brown-
ie with a mild taste of choco-
late. I would have preferred a
sweeter taste and would
probably add a bit more sug-
ar anda more milk to make
it a little more moist.

My co-worker who gave
us the starter bag flavoured
her friendship bread with
lemon flavoured pudding and
lemon zest. It brought out
the yeasty flavoring of the
bread giving it a sour dough
taste which was pretty good
as well.

Ihave given my three bags
to my mom, my aunt and a
cousin studying to be a chef
and can’t wait to sample their
results next week. I think I
will try butterscotch for my
next batch. And so the friend-
ship continues.











(ARA) - Want to do some-
thing good for your heart?
Find new ways to increase
your intake of potassium. This
nutrient may help reduce the
risk of high blood pressure
and promote heart health.
The U.S. Food and Drug
Administration reports that
diets containing foods that are
a good source of potassium
and that are low in sodium
may help reduce the risk of
high blood pressure and
stroke.

Did you know potatoes are
a good source of potassium
and contain no sodium? In
fact, one medium potato (5.3
ounces) with the skin on con-
tains 620 mg of potassium.
That's 18 per cent of your dai-
ly requirement and more than
a banana. Need more reasons
to love potatoes? Read on.

1. Did you grow up listening to
your mother tell you to eat your
vegetables? Well, potatoes are

vegetables, so eat away.

2. This one's simple: one medi-
um-sized potato (5.3 oz.) has
110 calories and is

fat- and cholesterol- free.

3. Potatoes (with the skin) are
a good source of potassium.
Research shows that potassi-
um may help lower blood pres-
sure, contributing to a heart-
healthy diet.

4. Hit by a cold? What you eat
can help fight it off. A medium-
sized spud has nearly half the
recommended daily value of
vitamin C and is also a good
source of vitamin B6.

5. Potatoes are also a source of
dietary fiber, a complex carbo-
hydrate, which is known to
increase satiety and help with
weight loss.

6. Russets, reds, fingerlings,
blues, purples, yellows and
whites - with six common fresh
potato varieties, there's always
a new color or texture to exper-
iment with.

7. No time to boil or bake?



That's a good thing. The quick-
est methods for cooking pota-
toes, microwaving and steam-
ing, are also the healthiest
because they allow the potato
to retain the most nutritional
value.

8. Potato casserole, potato sal-
ad, mashed potatoes, baked
potatoes, roasted potatoes -
what do these dishes have in
common? They can all be
made in less than 20 minutes
and without turning on the
oven or boiling water.

9. Potatoes with skin rank



highest for potassium content
among the top 20 most fre-
quently consumed raw vegeta-
bles and the top 20 most fre-
quently consumed raw fruits.
That means they have more
potassium than a banana, more
than broccoli, more than an
orange, more than spinach ...
you get the idea.

10. For a potato dish that's
packed with potassium, try
Quick and Healthy Microwave
Mashed Potatoes or visit
www.potatogoodness.com for
more ideas.

QUICK AND HEALTHY
MICROWAVE
MASHED POTATOES

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Cost per serving: $.37
Makes four servings

INGREDIENTS:

11/4 pounds Russet potatoes
(Red, white or yellow-fleshed
potatoes can be substituted)
1/2 cup each: nonfat plain
yogurt and fat-free milk

11/2 tablespoons healthy but-
ter spread

1/4 teaspoon sea salt (or 1/2



teaspoon garlic or seasoned
salt)
Freshly ground pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

Place whole potatoes (do not
poke) into microwave-sate
dish. Cover dish. (If covering
dish with plastic wrap, poke
small hole in plastic.)
Microwave on high for 10 to 12
minutes depending on strength
of microwave. Use oven mitts
to remove dish from
microwave; carefully remove
cover and mash well. Stir in
yogurt, milk, butter spread and
seasonings. Cook for a minute





or two more to heat if neces-
sary.

Nutritional analysis per serving
with skins:

Calories: 170, Fat: 3.5 grams,
Saturated Fat: 1 gram, Trans
Fat: 0 grams, Cholesterol: 0
milligrams, Sodium: 220 mil-
ligrams, Potassium: 644 mil-
ligrams, Carbohydrates: 29
grams, Fiber: 2 grams, Sugar:
4 grams, Protein: 5 grams, Vit-
amin A: 10 per cent, Vitamin C:
50 per cent, Calcium: 10 per
cent, Iron: 6 per cent

Courtesy of ARAcontent

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

SUES

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune





Kappa Alpha Psi hosts ‘Impromptu’

ON FRIDAY April 30th Kappa
Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc in partner-
ship with the British Colonial Hilton
Nassau will be host “Impromptu” in
the ocean front gardens of the his-
toric British Colonial Hilton, Down-
town Nassau.

This is the 5th annual Evening of
Jazz, Wine, Art and Soul hosted by
the fraternity and will begin with
cocktails at 7pm and the show will
begin at 7.45pm.

The target audience will be young
professionals, trendsetters, city slick-
ers, tastemakers and music enthusi-
asts of all varieties.

The fraternity selected some of the
most talented musicians and visual
artists in the Bahamas to come
together in this most spectacular
night of artistic fusion.

Impromptu has become a marquee
event of the social calendar and with
Nassau Harbor as this year’s back-
drop the night is expected to be noth-
ing shy of pure magic.

This year headline performer will
be the legendary American Jazz Sax-
ophonist Jon Saxx and the Endless
Possibilities Band.

Jon Saxx is an amazing talent who
has played with countless musical
greats including Mary J. Blige, Mor-
ris Day and the Time, Anthony
Hamilton and Keith Sweat . He was
most recently featured at the annual
“Jazz in the Gardens” event in Mia-
mi, the “Jamaica Jazz and Blues Fes-
tival” in Montego Bay and is the offi-
cial saxophonist for the NBA’s Mia-
mi Heat.

A number of “break out” musi-

cians from the local scene will also
perform to inject a different shade
of soul to the night.

Proceeds from the evening will go
to Guide Right - the fraternity’s
national mentoring program for ado-
lescent boys at risk. Over the years
Kappa Alpha Psi has provided edu-
cational, developmental, financial and
moral support to these young men
and has positively shaped many lives.

Kappa Alpha Psi is an internation-
al organisation of professional men
who firmly believe in achievement in
every field of human endeavor. The
organisation has served the commu-
nity for nearly a century and is par-
ticularly proud of their record in the
Bahamas where the orgnisation assist
countless communities and charities
annually.



& â„¢



6 BIVI PRESENTS

rans



By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



the platform stylists at the

Bahamas Technical &
Vocational Institute (BTV)
hair show, “Transformation
2010: Recreating Beauty
Through Elegance” took a
simple daytime hairstyle
and transformed it into a
high fashion up-do to com-

pliment evening wear.

Attendees were blown away by
the showcase. But there was one
in particular that had the audi-
ence glaring in amazement.

It was big, and colorfully deco-
rated, featuring an “under the sea”
theme. “Accessories featuring sea
creatures like the starfish, and
seashells decorated this bold and
beautiful hairstyle. A miniature
fish tank stood tall in the center of
the hair. The show which took
place at Superclub Breezes a few
weeks ago gave the students at
the institute an opportunity to
showcase their cosmetology skills.

And they showed off their tal-
ent live on stage in front of guests.

“The students performed live
on stage using a model that night.
The only thing they did was pre-
relax and pre-color the hair before
the show but they did everything
on spot,” Andrea Taylor cosme-
tology coordinator at BTVI told
Tribune Entertainment.

N just 20 short minutes,



formation 2010



CLEOMIE WOODS, Mistress of Ceremonies; Hair Model; First Place Student Hairstylist Winner in Daytime Comb-Out and Evening
Comb-Out categories, Jan Knowles, Regional Manager of Public Relations and Communications, RBC; Andrea Beneby -Taylor, BTVI
Hair Show Event Chairperson.



To make sure the women in the
audience were on point with their
hair trends, the students provided
a crash course on what styles to
wear during the day and the
evening.

“The ladies demonstrated how
to change a day time look into a
evening look. They also showed
the audience the looks that are
perfect for day and the looks that
are perfect for night,” she said.

The hair show allowed students
who desire to break into the beau-
ty industry the experience of
working live which Ms Taylor said
was beneficial.

“There are companies that are
looking for platform artists who
can demonstrate how products
should be used. But it is rather
hard finding stylist who are inter-
ested in performing live. They can
also become salon reps or product
reps. We wanted to expose the
ladies to these avenues,” Ms Tay-
lor said.

Along with the thirteen ladies at
BTVI, two high school students
participated in the show. And
because of their dazzling creations
they were awarded a scholarship
for two years to attend the insti-
tute.

Additionally, the first, second,
and third place winners of the hair
show were also awarded a educa-
tional scholarship from ASHTAE
salons located in North Carolina.

Ms Taylor added “The ladies
have done an excellent job at the
hair show and they deserve special
commendation. The show built up
their self esteem because some of
them complained of how nervous
they were before going on stage
but when they got out there they
did well,” she said.

“We want to expose Bahami-
ans to what BTVI has to offer.
We offer courses in barbering,
massage therapy, facial technolo-
gy, and nail technology,” she said.



UNDER the Sea theme by C.V. Bethel student.







—



-



OTT idat= Janome) CAMO mea

7



© CHAMBER PRESENTATION:

‘SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE’
On Thursday, April 29,
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce's Institute pre-
sents a workshop called
‘Superior Customer Ser-
vice’ that teaches you the
skills for superior customer
service, how to build a cus-
tomer-oriented environ-
ment and how to handle
conflict successfully. Cost:
$190/chamber members;
$240/non-members. Tele-
phone: 322-2145. Email:
rabrams@thebaham-
aschamber.com.

© RAS ISHI: ‘DIARIES

UNLOCKED’ OFFICIAL OPENING
The National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas invites you
to the official opening of
the exhibition Ras Ishi:
‘Diaries Unlocked,’ Thurs-
day, April 29, 6.30pm at
the gallery. RSVP, Tele-
phone: 328-5800 by Mon-
day, April 26.

* LYFORD CAY
MEMBERS FOUNDATION

FISHING TOURNAMENT

On April 30 through May
1, Lyford Cay Members
Foundation host a fishing
tournament that acts as a
qualifier for the Interna-
tional Game Fish Associa-
tion's World Champi-
onship. Telephone: 362-
4910.

* BAHAMAS HUMANE
SOCIETY'S FUN DAY

AND JUMBLE SALE

Saturday, May 1, The
Bahamas Humane Society
holds this year's flea mar-
ket/jumble sale in conjunc-
tion with its annual Family
Fun Day featuring a dog
show, bouncing castle and
the newly instituted Best
Kept Potcake Award.
12pm-5pm at Botanical
Gardens. Telephone: 323-
3157. Email: bhuma-
neevents@gmail.com.

* 3RD ANNUAL FRITZ GRANT

TRACK AND FIELD INVITATIONAL
The 3rd annual Fritz Grant
Track and Field invitation-
al will be held at the
Thomas A. Robinson Sta-
dium on Saturday, May 8.
Categories are open to all
ages under 7,9, 11, 13, 15,
17 and open. Entry fee:
$5/per athlete and $8/per
relay team. Deadline, Apr
27. Bamboo Town pre-
sents its 2nd annual spring
festival, noon-until at Zion
Boulevard Park. Come on
out and enjoy lots of enter-
tainment, lots of food, local
arts and crafts, free face
painting and bouncing cas-
tle for kids. Opening cere-
mony at 4pm. Telephone:
326-0915.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 9B

ARTS



Paradise

PP Wns Meet the chefs of Paradise Plates

By JEFFARAH GIBSON OD MPA CEN Cte TIAN F
Tribune Features Writer his mango coconut charlotte cake. ff

TTENDEES at the Hands For Hunger - Par-

adise Plates fundraiser event to be held

at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom on May
23 will experience the rich flavour of a curry
conch chowder made by Freddie Van Breugal,
chef owner of Van Breugals Restaurant, and the
delightful taste of a mango coconut charlotte
cake made by Ronny Deryckere, pastry chef at
the Patisserie Tea Room.

Both chefs have “put their foot” in each of the recipes,
that will have diners saying “mmmmmm” as they “lick
their platters clean”.

The curry conch chowder made with a little twist, and
pleasantly prepared is a combination of savoury flavors.
Chef Freddie calls it a culturally mixed dish, giving that it
is native and there are a few Italian spices in the creamy,
conchy mixture. “There is a gist to the conch chowder. It
is an ethnic mix of flavors,” Chef Freddie told Tribune
Taste.

This is no regular conch chowder, added to the mixture
is coconut milk, conch of course, diced potatoes, basil, and
other delicious herbs.

Chef Freddie is not the only one to utilise coconut in his
recipe, Chef Ronny did the same in his presentation of the
mango coconut charlotte cake which he made so cre-
atively.

Enticing to the eyes and taste buds, the sliced cake
covered in coconut shreds sits in the midst of two swirls of
whip cream topped with sliced kiwi, mango, and straw-
berries. And to accent the flaky taste of the coconut
cream cake, a miniature nutty bar sits at the bottom of the
creamy swirls.

Tasting this creation is an experience is to die for.

Both Chefs have participated in the Hands For Hunger
ever since it’s inception last year. They discussed their will-
ingness to contribute to cause as such.

“T participated in the event last year. And I am happy
to be part of it again this year. There are people out
there who are hungry and is important that others aware
of this,” Chef Ronny said.

Chef Freddie added: "I will always be part of the Hands
For Hunger it raises a lot of money and it makes differ-
ence,” he said.

Hands For Hunger is a non - profit humanitarian organ-
isation committed to the elimination of hunger and the
reduction of waste in the Bahamas.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED |
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





WEDNESDAY,





APRIL 28,



re ye ae
(ia



es at J

- By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



IVE Tanya Evans a HB

number 2 graphite

pencil, a blank sheet
of paper, and in one hour or
more, depending on the
image, she can create a very
convincing three dimensional

portrait.

Characterised by precise strokes
and deft lines, pencil art is one of
the crafty outlets for talented Tanya
to unleash her artistic leanings.

She was 11 when she realised that
making images come to life on a
paper medium was her calling.

“T was in primary school when I
realised my gift. My 5th grade home-
room teacher said to me “Tanya you
have a gift you know’. I was not like
the other kids in my class who were
just drawing apples and oranges,”
she said jokingly.

Though her talent is more clear
than a crystal ball, Tanya is one of
those individuals who find them-
selves contrasting their dreams, and
heading down a different career
path.

And though she has not honed
this at home hobby into a profes-
sion just yet, she has been head over
heels, or even a little “trip” for arts
and craft.

While she has dipped her hands in
a little bit of everything surrounding
arts and crafts, her main subject mat-
ter is drawing realistic pencil por-
traits.

“T have been trying just about any
and everything but I do not only
draw portraits. However this is my
favourite type of artwork because I
can make images more vibrant and
realistic on paper,” she told Tribune
Arts.

While she lies comfortably in her
queen size bed, she cranks up her
favorite tunes and her hand express-

01

Plates

4| See page nine

es the fantasies of her mind.

To be good at anything time must
be invested. And to get to the level
she is today with her artwork she
has spent hours of practice, dedicat-
ing a separate corner of her life to
doing just that.

She’s no novice, since she contin-
ues to enhance her skills, drawing a
variety of portraits even though she
doesn’t have an open platform to
showcase her work.

“T did these portraits a few years
ago. Since that I have gotten so
much better. I have been perfecting
my skills in every way that I can,”
she said.

The portraits shown are just a few
of the pieces she has done. Her latest
work was done in 2008, when she
participated in the Ministry of
Tourism’s annual Authentically
Bahamian Craft Show which was
held at Wyndham Nassau Resort
and Crystal Palace Casino. That year
she took home the award for Best
Authentic Art piece. And when she
participated in the Craft Show in
2007 she was awarded for Best Craft.

“In 2008 when I participated in
the Craft Show I made a sea grape
leave design. What I did was painted
glossy sea grape leaves onto a can-
vas. They were painted in a variety
of colors and I ran a paint hardener
over the back of the leaves. It was so
exotic and different and it was prob-
ably one of my best works yet,” she
said.

Additionally, she participated in
the Central Bank art show in 2007
where she had a few paintings on
display.

Life has brought many changes
for Tanya . Ever since the birth of
her son last year, time has not
allowed her to get back into her art
and craft work. And while this is her
reality at present, she said the art
community in the Bahamas can
expect more from her in the years to
come.

Persons interested in any her work
may contact 503-2373.

BIVI presents
“Transformation






see page eight



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Dati attacks prope

into Hany s death

RUG Uea

Father claims the police
have ‘badgered’ mother

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

A GRIEVING father
called police “incompetent”
over the way they investigat-
ed the death of his infant son.

Gary Swaby, father of
almost four-month-old
Joeshua Swaby, said police
have “badgered” Joeshua’s
mother, Charlotte McPhee,
and the incident has created a
wedge between them.

“You could say right now
we are officially separated,”
said Mr Swaby.

The investigation into the

infant’s death is still “open
and ongoing,” said Supt Leon
Bethel in charge of the Crim-
inal Detective Unit (CDU).
He said he could not respond
to any specifics of the investi-
gation, and most of all to Mr
Swaby’s claims.

“Initially when this
occurred the police told us to
put our trust in them. The
very trust we invested in them
they used that against us. I
think that is one of the biggest
factors here that they can turn
around and break that trust
that we invested in them,”

SEE page eight

Two women targeted by
criminals warn motorists

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



TWO women targeted by criminals — some of them as young
as 12 — are warning unsuspecting motorists not to let their
guard down at busy intersections.

One of them is a mother-of-three who claims a young boy
snatched a gold chain off her neck as she sat in her car near a
stoplight at a busy intersection on Collins Avenue and Wulff

SEE page two



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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL al 2010

es
a

EEG
| (uae al

A
USES



1 i

USA TODAY







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

eee Oey
Shockers
Ty Titel
SEE PAGE 14

Hotel union

members go
to the polls



By NOELLE NICOLLS
and AVA TURNQUEST





THE ‘A’ Team representing
Nicole Martin in the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union election was “confident
but not celebratory” at press time,
as they waited for the final results,
late last night.

Hubert Saunders, candidate for
treasurer on the ‘A’ Team, said
they were waiting on the last votes
to be counted. That was not
expected for another two hours,
which would be about midnight.

SEE page two







Felipé Major/Tribune staff



MEMBERS of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union place their votes yesterday in elections for the union’s next president.

er wem ITIL
guilty of murder
and attempted

armed robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Herman
Natari Francis and Ray-
mond Darling were found
guilty by a unanimous vote
of 12-0 for the murder and
attempted armed robbery
of Tyna “Penny” Pinder by
Supreme Court jury on
Tuesday.

A jury of seven men and
five women delivered the
guilty verdicts shortly after
6pm following some six
hours of deliberations.

Before the delivering the

SEE page nine





Freeport Concrete hoping for
land sale after $636,000 net loss

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Cash-strapped Freeport
Concrete is pinning its hopes
on the sale of land valued at
$4.95 million to rescue it from
its current financial predica-
ment, having suffered a
$636,000 net loss in its 2010

second quarter that leaves it
with negative net worth of
$855,000.

The publicly-listed compa-
ny, whose majority share-
holder is former Grand
Bahama Port Authority chair-
man Hannes Babak, said the

SEE page eight

Claims of mistreatment
of patients at Sandilands

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



TRAUMATISED by a court-ruled stay, an ex-patient at the
nation’s only publicly-funded rehabilitation centre is demanding
that greater scrutiny be placed on attendants at the institution.

The young man claims he became aware of the mistreatment of

SEE page two

* SEE STORY ABOVE

- Business owners set
— fo march in protest
at one-way system

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BUSINESS owners are
? expected to march in protest
: of Nassau’s new one-way traf-
: fic system this morning in
: what they say is an effort to
? save hundreds of jobs and
: protect their livelihoods.
: More than 100 businesses
: impacted by the March 30
: change making Baillou HII
: Road one-way north-bound
: and Market Street one-way
: south-bound fear they will be
: forced to close their doors
: and about 400 jobs will be lost
: if the system remains.

They have formed the
: Coconut Grove Business

SEE page nine





Cards Accopted!
Debit Cards









NASSAU AND BAHAM,

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

patients at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre (SRC)
after a court ordered he undergo a two-week evaluation:

there.

He described to The Tribune an environment where
patients were subject to inhumane conditions at the :
mercy of dispassionate attendants and often times the :

victims of neglect, and verbal and physical abuse.

He said: “They have on their sheets, on the pillows, :
‘we care and love our patients’, but some of the people :
working there do not share that view. Some patients :
there who are handicapped and incapable of even :
cleaning themselves, and there are attendants there :
that simply don’t do their job. Ifa patient messes him- :
self up they would just leave him and wait until the next :
attendant comes on shift for them to deal with it. :
Sometimes what happens is other patients would help

bathe off patients that can’t help themselves.”

Attendants at SRC, he claims, were poorly super- :
vised. Of the night staff, he said: “It’s like a party at :
night. Some don’t even stay on their job, they just :
check in and then leave.” He claimed that there were :
occasions when some, who did show up, were “either :

drunk or drinking, or even high.

“They are supposed to be taking care of people who }
are trying to recover from alcohol and drug abuse but :
they are the ones who need rehabilitation. They are :
coming to work wasted or with their personal problems

and they take it out on the patients.”

The ex-patient recalled a disparaging exchange :
between two attendants while in the presence of :
patients. The attendant reportedly criticised the valid- :
ity of the patients staying at the institution and said he }
felt they were wasting the government’s money, “suck- ;

ing up a/c, taking up beds and eating all the food.”

Said the former patient: “This attendant had only :
been there for four months, and this was his attitude ;
towards patients. He might not have been serious but } National Centre for Performin 9, Arts on Shirley
that’s not right. They need to do an intense investiga- :
tion into the attendants that they are hiring to care :
for the patients. Not all of them mistreat the patients, police having to intervene in an altercation
but there are some that really should not be there-not :
at a place that is supposed to be rehabilitating people.” :

SRC Hospital Administrator Catherine Weech :
admitted the possibility of patient mistreatment cannot :

be denied, however she said there were several forms }

of recourse that patients and ex-patients can pursue.

“Patients can speak with the attending nurse or the
physician responsible for their care. They can also :

refer the matter to administration” she said.

“Oftentimes patients know of information that we position in less than a year.

don’t have, and I would be concerned that we go back :
and address these claims with a view towards improv- ;

ing the service we provide to our clients.”

Upon their release, patients at the institution under-
go a discharge process which allows them the oppor- :
tunity to confide with their immediate care provider :

their rehabilitation experience.

Ms Weech added: “After completing care persons :
can also write us — positive or negative — to let us }
know. Once we get that information we can carry out :
an investigation with a view to either make correc- :
tions to improve our service, or for those that have :
made a positive impact, they can be made aware of :

their influence.”

LOCAL NEWS

ee eS COCA ES eT
Claims of mistreatment Teacher of the Year 2010-2012 named

ANDREA Simms- Adderley
has been named the ninth Nation-
al Teacher of the Year 2010-2012.
The Garvin Tynes teacher won
over 11 district finalists competing
for the title.

A nine-year teaching veteran,
Mrs Simms- Adderley was
declared the winner at a gala affair
which was held at the Rain Forest
Theatre of the Wyndham Cable
Beach Resort last Saturday.

Mrs Simms-Adderley, who won
four out of the eight categories
assessed for the outstanding
teacher award, was lauded for her
contributions to education, includ-
ing devising academic and behav-
ioural intervention plans for stu-
dents with disabilities; staging
numerous workshops for teach-
ers from public and independent
schools, and working on the
Department of Education’s cur-
riculum team for primary school
Language Arts.

She has also conducted con-

Photo by Edgar Arnette/MOE

(L-R) MINISTER OF EDUCATION Desmond Bannister; Andrea Simms-Adder-
ley, National Teacher of the Year 2010-2012 and Olga Richards, District

Superintendent for the Southwestern District.



an educational and professional
conference during her two-year
reign.

The other four runners-up also
received cash awards and trophies
as well as educational grants.

Other teachers receiving
awards were: Afrika Karamo-
Miller, a modern language teacher
at the Sister Mary Patricia Rus-
sell Junior School, who was the
first place runner-up; Latoya Bur-
rows, a language arts teacher at
S C McPherson Junior, 2nd run-
ner-up; Lynn Gibson, a Spanish
teacher at L W Young Junior
High School, 3rd runner-up, and
Triver Culmer, a French teacher
at the C C Sweeting Senior High
School placed fourth in the com-
petition which featured 11 district
finalists.

Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister addressed the
audience at the gala event, stating:
“The presence of these 11 district
finalists and school winners of the

claves for teachers, teacher-aides
and parents in a variety of sub-
ject areas including reading inter-
ventions, improving writing
instruction, behaviour modifica-
tion and positive parenting dur-
ing her career.

Mrs Simms-Adderley has also
taught at St John’s College,
Albury Sayle and Glinton’s Pri-
mary (Long Island).

In accepting the award, she
encouraged her fellow teachers to
continue to do their best for the

children of our nation.

Mrs Simms-Adderley received
a large ‘Crystal Lamp of Learn-
ing’, $7,000 in cash prizes provid-
ed by the Ministry of Education
and the Higgs and Johnson law
firm, as well as a grant to attend

Teacher of the Year here this
evening can be summarised in one
statement: Excellent teachers pro-
duce excellent students. If this is
the reality, then we must seek only
excellence to reap excellence in
our educational system.”

FROM page one

Hundreds of workers gathered between
Worker's House, on Harrold Road, and the

Street while ballots were being counted. The
atmosphere was rowdy and festive, with the

between supporters at the Shirley Street polling
station.

Just two candidates went head-to-head for
the presidency of around 6,000 hotel workers.
Both candidates, Nicole Martin of the ‘A’ Team
and Lionel Morley of the Workers Coalition,
were confident they had won enough support-
ers to secure the coveted top spot of the coun-
try’s largest union in the third election for this

At press time, supporters of the Workers
Coalition said Ms Martin won the Bahamas
Communication and Public Officers Union
(BCPOU) division; Mr Morley was up by nine
in Grand Bahama, and Ms Martin won
Eleuthera by two. Workers Coalition support-
ers said the final result could still swing any
way.

Mr Saunders said the ‘A’ Team “swept”
Eleuthera, and won San Salvador and Andros.
He said Ms Martin was up by about 158 votes in
the Workers House division and 100 votes in
the Atlantis division, which is the largest.

These results were preliminary and not able

Hotel union

to be verified by officials.

The polls opened in New Providence at 8am
and closed at 6pm at the BHCAWU Head-
quarters, Worker's House, on Harrold Road,
BCPOU Hall in Farrington Road and the
National Centre for Performing Arts on Shirley
Street. Polling stations were also open on Grand
Bahama and the various Family Islands.

Ms Martin said: “Members have definitely
been through a lot and we appreciate everyone
that made the time to come out here and vote.
The previous elections weren’t overturned due
to anything voters did. The executive commit-
tee didn’t do what they were supposed to do —
leadership couldn’t get their act together.”

The first two election attempts, both won by
Ms Martin, were ultimately nullified by a Court
of Appeal ruling and members voting at the
polls expressed their frustration at having to
vote for a third time.

Clever Adderley, an Ocean Club employee,
said: “T think it’s bad we have to go to the polls
again. She (Ms Martin) did it once, she did it
twice, it’s a clear sign that the people know
who they want. It’s not fair, this whole process
has wasted a lot of people’s time — to have to
come here and do this again. I understand there
are judicial technicalities, but the people’s vote
should have some count — majority rules.”

Another union worker said: “I’m sick and
tired of coming back here, the union business
needs to go on and the people need represen-
tation. Utility workers have the power to shut
down the entire island, we shouldn’t be under-
estimated or taken advantage of. That’s why ’'m
here again, it’s inconvenient, but this is too
important.”

Twice denied candidate Lionel Morley was
“optimistically cautious” at the polling station
yesterday. He said that his team’s analysis of
voter patterns gave him confidence that this
election would prove successful for him.

Mr Morley said: “This election will see the
union’s return back to the members. For too
long special interest has had a hand in union
matters.”

He continued: “Only 57 per cent of members
have shown up for past elections, so perhaps
members have lost confidence in the union or
feel as though the union is not carrying its
weight. But spirits are high and the healing
process will begin immediately.”

The past two years have been extremely dif-
ficult for the union, as infighting and financial
disputes escalated to calls for legal action over
the validity of authorization for a disbursement
of almost $700,000.

Union members at the polls yesterday were
unanimous that regardless of the candidate, it is
critical that the election process is immaculate
so that the organisation can progress forward
and gain stability.

FROM page one

Road. The other said she was
lucky to avoid being caught
in asuspected ambush on Vil-
lage Road early Monday
morning.

Police at the Wulff Road
police station yesterday con-

veh
ey

Me tik)
PHONE: 822-2157













Two women targeted warn motorists

firmed the first woman’s
report, adding that a juvenile
has since been arrested and
charged before the courts on
the complaint.

"That matter was in fact
reported here and we made
an arrest and sent the person,
a juvenile, off to court,” said
Superintendent Ashton
Greenslade, officer-in-charge
of the Wulff Road Police Sta-
tion.

However the mother, who
did not want to be named, still
wants the public to be aware
of the potential danger of
being targeted in an area

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where most people let their
guard down. An email depict-
ing her ordeal is making the
rounds through cyberspace
and now the mother has spo-
ken to The Tribune in the
hope of preventing similar
incidents.

She said that she rolled to a
stop near a traffic light on the
busy Collins Avenue and
Wulff Road junction around
Spm last week Monday, in
front of a fruit stand and a
liquor store. There, she said,
she noticed a group of boys
who “appeared to be as
young as 12 years old” all

wearing white t-shirts.

"I took no note of this
because upon my travels peo-
ple from time to time would
beg for money. This occasion
was different for me," she said
in her email.

At some point, one of the
boys broke away from the
group and approached her
before sticking his hand
through her open window,
"ripping" her necklace off
and running away.

"He didn't say anything —
I didn't have a chance to react
and he was gone,” she added.

Bystanders urged her to go
to the police.

She said she drove to the

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nearby police station and
thanked officers at the Wulff
Road police station for their
quick response which led to
the arrest of a juvenile.

Now she is urging motorists
to keep their guard up for
possible similar attacks.

"It was very scary — even
though it's a child — to have
something like that happen
it's not nice. I want people to
be careful when on the
streets. When you see the
emails about people being
attacked, take it serious".

Since taking over the Wulff
Road police station in Janu-
ary Superintendent Ashton
Greenslade said there have
been about four similar
reports of adolescent boys
committing petty theft.

He wouldn't call the inci-
dents a "big problem" but
added that the northeastern
division has initiatives in place
to try and stamp out such
activity.

"I was here for four months
and we have had about four
(similar incidents). One is too
many but I wouldn't consider
that alarming,” said Mr
Greenslade, adding that there
have been instances of per-
sons being targeted on foot
and cars by "misguided
youths" stealing cell phones
and other personal property.

In response, police from his
station have been on the look-
out for truant or loitering
youth.

"We are up and about

looking for them, stopping
and searching them when we
come across them and some-
times taking them to their
parents,” he said.

The second woman, a 22-
year-old, was returning to her
Village Road home at around
12.30am Monday with four
tourists who were her guests
when they almost ran into a
suspected ambush.

The party of five had gone
to dinner, then on to Ham-
merheads Bar. On the way
home, they started to make
the turn at the light on the
corner of East Bay Street and
Village Road north.

Two gray coloured cars
with heavily tinted windows
had both lanes blocked. At
first, it appeared that it was
an accident, but at a second
glance, there was no sign of
damage.

Although two cars were
involved, only one person was
visible — a tall, thin man who
stood outside the open dri-
ver's door of one of the cars.
The whole scene struck the
driver as odd.

She quickly swerved onto
the other side of the road and
kept going.

The police control room
confirmed today there was no
report of an accident in the
area during this period.

The driver, who is con-
vinced she almost became a
victim of a criminal plot, has
urged the public to be care-
ful.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

INSERTS - LITTLE SWITZERLAND

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Bimini Bay developers
fire three contractors

Move after allegations of
construction misconduct

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



DEVELOPERS of the Bimini Bay
Resort have restated their commitment to
environmental protection by firing three
contractors following allegations of con-
struction misconduct.

The operators of heavy equipment were
photographed dumping fill in wetlands with-
out silt curtains, berm barriers or other sil-
tation mitigation mechanisms west of North
Sound last month.

A concerned biologist in Bimini caught
the destructive activity on camera and sent
pictures to The Tribune and Minister for
the Environment Earl Deveaux along with
a list of concerns about possible miscon-
duct by some agents of Rav Bahamas (Ltd),
a subsidiary of the Capo Group which owns
Bimini Bay.

A Bimini Bay representative said the
contractors in question were suspended as
soon as their employers discovered they
had violated good practice standards at the
development.

“They were filling in wetlands without
silt curtains and berm barriers,” the repre-
sentative said.

“And the three equipment operators who
breached contract and did not follow our
rigorous training programme were imme-
diately put on probation and then termi-
nated for not following our strict environ-
mental guidelines.

“We are doing everything we can to
ensure all building and operating does not
affect the environment.”

Developers also claim the Environmental
Management Plan and Environmental
Impact Assessment required for construc-
tion were submitted to the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technology (BEST)
Commission in April last year.

However, the government body respon-
sible for protecting, conserving and man-
aging the country’s environmental resources
never acknowledged receipt of the reports,
according to the developers.

When interviewed by The Tribune earli-









IT WAS claimed the dump truck in this picture was depositing fill at the water's edge with-

out a protective barrier in place.

er this month, BEST director Philip Weech
said the EIA and EMP to monitor con-
struction of the 700 acre site in north Bimi-
ni had not been received, but Rav Bahamas
maintains the documents were sent by reg-
istered mail and received in May last year.

Acopy of the mail receipt was sent to The
Tribune yesterday, however the documents
themselves have yet to be made public.

The Bimini Bay Resort representative
said the company followed up with a num-
ber of letters and phone calls but got no
response from the BEST Commission and
have pressed on with construction in the
meantime.

“We have not got any sort of phone call
to say they have received it, and no update
when we have called to follow up, so what
are we supposed to do to get an answer?

“Of course we press on, we still work
along with the Bahamas government and
Earl Deveaux, who also received the EIA
and EMP,” the Bimini Bay representative
said.

Government was advised in a Black and
Veatch International (BVI) study of the

site nearly two years ago to require devel-
opers to submit both an EIA and EMP.

The lack of a public E[A and EMP was
emphasised by Alfredo Quarto, executive
director of the international non-govern-
mental organisation for the protection of
mangroves, The Mangrove Action Project
(MAP), in February.

Mr Quarto and other conservationists
are concerned acres of mangroves have
been ripped out of wetlands in Bimini
destroying a sensitive ecosystem in the
absence of the studies.

He called on the Environment Minister to
investigate the matter and address the delay
in establishing boundaries for a Marine Pro-
tected Area (MPA) in North Bimini expect-
ed to be drawn up last year after nearly a
decade of planning.

The Tribune made inquiries about gov-
ernment’s receipt of an EIA and EMP and
publication of the documents yesterday,
however calls to the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment and the BEST Commission were
not returned before The Tribune went to
press.

1,600 field officers to
seek data for 2010 census

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



IN JUST under a week, the
Department of Statistics will roll
out its 2010 census with some
1,600 field officers knocking on
doors throughout the country
asking questions that will pro-
vide valuable data about our
society.

Director of Statistics Kelsie
Dorsett said the census is crucial
to future city planning, adding
that the data collected helps
government decide if more
schools or elderly care centres
are needed in certain areas. It
also supplies business owners
with critical demographic infor-

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mation for their target cus-
tomers, she said.

The information will be
received by "well-trained" enu-
merators - persons who issue
and receive forms during a cen-
sus - who will be required to
take an oath of confidentiality
before the process begins.

"We would like for people to
be patient with us because we
are getting information that is
critical to planners in the pri-
vate and public sector, for
school children writing papers,
for business owners," said the
director, who added that the
department has spent about a
year preparing for the census.

"If you are a businessman,
for instance in insurance, if you
know the population is in a cer-
tain age group then you design
your policies accordingly in
terms of payment plans. If you
know the population is getting
older then you know what med-
ical benefits to emphasise. In
terms of other business, for
instance if you are interested in
opening a maternity store, you
won't do that in a retirement

community.

"So you want to know as a
businessman, how is the popu-
lation dispersed both in terms of
where they live, in terms of their
sex, in terms of their age. Like-
wise, for the government they
need to know what are they
dealing with in terms of the size
and age of the labour force. This
would also determine if more
schools need to be built in cer-
tain areas".

Ms Dorsett said the process
should take an average of 20
minutes for a four-person
household. Each household will
be asked to answer basic ques-
tions ranging from education
levels, employment and income.

"People should expect a well-
trained enumerator who will ask
them questions about their
household like how many peo-
ple live there, what type of
amenities do they have, do they
have a car, electricity.

"We will also ask about the
individual's education, sex, race,
citizenship, fertility, the use of
the internet - whether they use
it at work or at home. It's social

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demographic information that
is really critical for (city) plan-
ning,” she said.

While census workers are
hopeful they will be able to
question every household
throughout the country, Ms
Dorsett admitted some areas
are hard to access through the
department's door-to-door pol-
icy. Gated communities have
been particularly hard for
Department of Labour employ-
ees to access, she said.

Ms Dorsett appealed for gat-
ed community residents to
make themselves available for
the census, or contact an enu-
merator.

The census begins May 4 and
is expected to run until the end
of June, at a cost of $3 million.

The last census was conduct-
ed in 2000.











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Bahamas marks ‘Black
Tuesday’ anniversary

By ALESHA CADET



YESTERDAY marked the 45th anniversary of “Black
Tuesday” in the Bahamas.

Tuesday, April 27, 1965 was the day that the late Sir
Lynden Pindling, the then leader of the opposition, threw
the Speaker's mace from the east window of the House of
Assembly in protest of the gerrymandering of boundaries
by the then governing United Bahamian Party.

Charging that “this mace is supposed to belong to the
people of this country as a symbol,” Mr Pindling hurled
the 165-year old sceptre, which represents the authority
of the Speaker of the House, through the open window.

The late Sir Milo Butler Sr followed the move by grab-
bing the two hour glasses on the Speaker’s desk and
throwing them out the window as well.

A statement released by the Progressive Liberal Party
yesterday stated: “The demonstration appeared to be
spontaneous at the time but it was not. Throwing the
mace out of the window was a carefully orchestrated plan
by the PLP'’s leaders at the time to demonstrate their
position on the right to a fair and equal distribution of
boundaries.”

“The late Sir Milo Butler Sr threw the Speaker's hour
glass out of window as a protest against the limitation of
speaking time in the House.”

The election of January 10, 1967 was fought on the
boundaries set in 1965.

The PLP’s protest came against the backdrop of their
loss in 1962 to the United Bahamian Party (UBP) which
came about because the number of seats in the Out
Islands exceeded the number of seats in New Providence,
where the majority of the population lived.

This meant the PLP won the popular vote in 1962 but
lost the general election because they lost the seat count.

Each year, the PLP remembers the day and pays tribute
to the “national heroes and heroines” who joined the par-
ty in the public square following the protest, such as the
late Ena Hepburn and the now Mrs Effie Walkes. Former
Governor General Arthur Hanna and his replacement Sir
Arthur Foulkes were also among the group.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Rocky start for new global board

WASHINGTON — The Group of 20
nations, designated as the new board of
directors for the global economy, is off to a
rocky start.

Financial ministers and central bank gov-
ernors from the 20 countries met in Wash-
ington over the past three days to advance a
reform agenda designed to fix serious prob-
lems that the 2008 financial crisis exposed.

But in the end, instead of resolving dif-
ferences, the discussions exposed a number
of divisions not only over old issues but new
problems such as rising government debt
burdens.

The worry is that the debt crisis current-
ly hitting Greece could be only the first of a
series of government debt crises.

The level of government debt has risen
to heights not seen since just after World
War II.

Of course, the finance officials sought to
paper over differences, issuing a series of
bland communiqués pledging greater efforts
at cooperation.

They insisted that they would intensify
efforts to resolve disagreements on finan-
cial rules before a meeting of G-20 leaders in
Canada June 25-27.

But that will require considerable effort
given stark differences in such areas as set-
ting new capital standards for banks and
imposing new bank taxes to pay for the cost
of bailouts.

It is highly unlikely that all of those dis-
putes will be resolved in time for President
Barack Obama and the other G-20 leaders to
agree on a completed package at their Cana-
da summit.

For one thing, many governments are
facing the same challenges as the Obama
administration in trying to overcome deter-
mined opposition from big banks to tight-
ening the current rules under which they
are making a lot of money.

Those activities, which have been blamed
for bringing on the crisis, include trading in
complex financial products such as deriva-
tives and operating with inadequate amounts
of capital to cushion against losses.

While an IMF staff paper endorsed
imposing new taxes on banks, an idea that
has support in the administration and in
Europe, other G-20 countries — Canada,
Australia and Japan — are opposed. They
argue that their banks didn't suffer massive
failures and therefore shouldn't have to bear
the burden of new taxes.

IMF Managing Director Dominick
Strauss-Kahn tried to put the best face on the
disagreements in the financial area, saying it
wasn't important for countries to adopt the

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same approach as long as whatever rules
changes they adopted were compatible with
other countries.

The concern is that in an era of financial
globalization — where millions of dollars
can flow around the world at the click of a
computer key — countries need to pursue
similar approaches to regulation.

If they don't, it could spark a race to the
bottom where financial firms go searching
for nations with weaker rules that allow
them to pursue riskier activities and rake in
greater profits.

"T think the charges lodged against Gold-
man Sachs in the United States have helped
countries see the need for reforms, but they
are still far apart on the best approach," said
Sung Won Sohn, a business professor at the
Martin Smith School of Business at Califor-
nia State University.

Even in areas where the G-20 was able to
agree on a more coordinated approach, there
is concern that the efforts will fall short of
what is needed to keep the global economy
on an even keel.

G-20 officials endorsed providing emer-
gency loans through the IMF to debt-rid-
den Greece.

But the size of the overall package being
discussed — about $40 billion from Euro-
pean countries and $13.4 billion from the
IMF — was viewed by many analysts as
falling well short of what will eventually be
required not only for Greece but other
nations sinking under rising debt burdens.

"What the financial crisis and Great
Recession did was pile on a lot of debt and it
will take some time for nations to work
through their budget problems,” said Mark
Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Econo-
my.com.

All of the disagreements among the G-20
nations may have some people pining for
the old days when the board of directors for
the global economy was much smaller.

For three decades, the global economic
agenda was set by the G-7, composed of the
United States, Japan, Germany, France,
Britain, Italy and Canada, the seven biggest
economies in the mid-1970s when this group
was formed.

But with China now the third largest
economy in the world and economic pow-
erhouses Brazil, India and South Korea also
key members of the G-20, the old G-7 days
are certainly gone forever.

No matter how messy, the world needs to
get accustomed to a bigger board room.

(This article was written by Martin
Crutsinger, AP Economics writer).



—

THE TRIBUNE

Controversy ovet
construction of
low cost homes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A lot has been said in
recent weeks about the poor
construction of low cost hous-
es in certain areas of New
Providence. The Bahamas
Government is spending mil-
lions of dollars to repair the
houses for the poor people
who purchased them.

Some years ago when
Neville Wisdom was appoint-
ed to take over the Ministry
of Housing he apparently
became aware of rumours of
corruption in the Ministry, in
particular as it relates to the
construction of low cost hous-
es.
Mr Wisdom referred the
matter to the Police and
requested a thorough and
intensive investigation.

At that time many of the
householders were reporting
defects in the houses due to
poor construction. Roofs were
leaking, walls cracking, doors
could not be closed and water
coming up from the floors
were just a few of the com-
plaints reported in the media.

Some time later the gov-
ernment changed and a new
Minister of Housing was
appointed. I heard that Min-
ister in response to a question
from a talk-show host state

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



that the Police investigation
into the alleged corruption in
the Ministry of Housing was
dormant as no persons had
come forward to give any
information. I subsequently
wrote the press on what
should have been done by the
Police with that investigation;
(a) Visit all defective houses,
photograph the defects and
record statements from the
householders. The Police
would have a file for each of
the defective houses. Conduct
investigations to identify the
building inspectors, who
passed the houses for occu-
pancy and the contractors,
who built the houses. Detain
and interrogate the building
inspectors and contractors to
determine why the houses
were passed for occupancy.
Over a period of twenty-
four hours interrogation infor-
mation would have been
received disclosing whether
there was corruption, gross
neglect and poor performance
on the part of some of the
building inspectors and shod-

dy work done by the contrac-
tors.

If the investigation sug-
gested corruption the Police
could have prosecuted to dis-
cover the truth.

In the event that the inves-
tigation proved gross negli-
gence on the part of the build-
ing inspectors there ought to
have been disciplinary action.
As far as the contractors were
concerned the government
should have insisted that they
repair the damage they had
done at no cost to the gov-
ernment or the householders.

These contractors should
not have been recipients of
any other government con-
tracts.

I have been reliably
informed that the investiga-
tion was assigned to a senior
police officer.

It has also been suggested
that he did absolutely noth-
ing. The reason being given
was that his politics got in the
way.

The media has disclosed
that government has spent $3
million to date on the repairs
to those defective houses.

PAUL THOMPSON Sr
Nassau,
April 21, 2010.

Who is being satisfied by
discrimination of women?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

While reading a poignant
article written by Insight
reporter Noelle Nicolls, I was
drawn into the depth of her
persuasive passion and
inspired to unleash my
thoughts on this delicate and
hotly-debated subject.

It is an ominous indictment
on this country when an invid-
ious rabble of obstinate men,
they who subsist on borrowed
ideas and boast of self-
appointed titles — are the
exclusive proponents spewing
a pig-pen of beguiled half-
truths to our somewhat
gullible communities (on the
matter of Spousal Rape being
adjudged a terrible crime)
who then give support to
these brutish and backward
“deities of folly” demanding
ownership of a woman’s
indomitable soul.

It is with a precipitous
debasement of progress (of
wholesome values and
morals) that these narrow-
minded “saviours of them-
selves” brazenly plunder the
open trove of advancement

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ¥YWETTE MICHELLE
MILLER of Marathon Estates, PO. Box EE-16898,
intend ta change my name to VETTE MICHELLE
NIXON. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau,

Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of

publication of this notice.

that the FNM government so
kindly restored. Sadly, the
king does not wish to protect
this vital treasure of triumph.
But with a brilliant display of
honour, we salute our
Bahamian women who are
the quintessential beacons of
strength in the Western
Hemisphere and ensure our
survival and growth.

I regret not wanting to
write very long on this sub-
ject (because I might lose my
temper) but be assured, many
of these detractors to this
“enlightened movement” that
enshrines a woman’s precious
spirit are simply jealous of the
unbridled female successes in
the Bahamas and are terribly
frightened, even threatened
by further incursions into

their fragmented dreams of
power. This is an epic demon-
stration of their excessive
ignorance and mental illitera-
cy.

Lastly, and I say this with
solemnity while forecasting
the darkening season of our
times, we are setting a dan-
gerous precedent for the well-
being of our daughters that is
bound to have debilitating
effects on this nation, now
being grievously misled by a
distorted sense of “Christian-
ity.” Kudos to Ms Nicolls for
her courage and keen dispen-
sation of journalistic duty.
Thank you.

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
April 15, 2010.

Utterly disappointed in ladies of FNM

EDITOR, The Tribune.

they say so.

support for the brother!

DISAPPOINTED
Nassau,
April, 2010.



I wish to express utter disappointment in the ladies of the
FNM party for their expecting women to be recognised or
honoured simply because they are women. What these ladies
should be doing is gathering support for Bills that will ensure
a better way of life for Bahamian women.

I do not remember seeing any of these ladies standing
shoulder to shoulder on Bay Street for the Marital Rape Bill,
neither were they knocking on doors to solicit signatures to
present to the Prime Minister in support of this Bill. Yet they
want the Prime Minister to just hand out honours because

Yes, I agree Janet Bostwick has achieved much, but Sir
Arthur Foulkes has done more on behalf of the Bahamian
people and is more deserving at this time. So ladies, show





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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Man turns himself in
after armed robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama police are question-

ing a 33-year-old man who }
turned himself in following an :
armed robbery incident at a :

downtown store on Monday.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey :
said police received informa- :
tion that an armed robbery had
occurred at the Athlete’s Foot :

Store sometime after Spm.

According to reports, a man
armed with a handgun entered;
the store at about 5.15pm and ;

demanded cash.

After robbing the store of
money, the gunman fled on :

foot.

The gunman was wearing :
tan pants and shirt. He was :
described as a tall, heavy-built :
individual of dark complex- :

ion.

after 8pm a man turned him-
self in at the Central Police Sta-
tion. He was taken into pice
custody for questioning in rela-
tion to the armed robbery.

Investigations are continu-
ing into the matter.

Investigations into
child's death contig

INVESTIGATIONS con- :
tinue into the death of a :
three-year-old who was found :
inside a parked car in Fox :

Hill nearly two weeks ago,
police said yesterday.

Three-year-old Sandria :
Demeritte was found in a :
kneeling position inside a :
parked green 2001 Nubira :
Daewoo, just 100 metres :
away from her father’s home :
on Abner Street, Fox Hillon :

April 17.

According to reports, she
had been missing for several :
hours before her body was :

found.

She had reportedly wan-
dered from her mother’s :
house also located on Abner :

Street.

An autopsy has revealed :
that the child had suffocated. :
Police say they are work- :
ing with the Department of ;
Social Services on this case :
and are awaiting the findings :

of social workers.

ASP Mackey said sometime

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‘Magic’ Johnson to speak
at Business Development
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LEGENDARY basket-
ball player Earvin “Magic”
Johnson Jr is scheduled to
visit the Bahamas to head-
line the 6th Annual Business
Development Seminar next
week.

Presented by the Bahamas
Chamber of the Commerce
and the United States
Embassy, the event is this
year being held under the
theme "Business Unusual:
Creativity and Innovation".

The seminar starts on
Wednesday, May 5 at
8.30am at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel, and kicks





music mogul Steve Stoute
and economist Mike Bryant
of the Federal Reserve.
Other featured speakers
and presenters include Min-
ister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing, Minister of
Tourism and Aviation Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace
and Jackson Burnside III.
Topics include the creative
economy, doing business in
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your business in tough eco-
nomic climates, government
incentives for business devel-
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off with speakers such as

and more.

- Association goes ‘back to
basics’ for the community

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



A COMMUNITY association in
eastern New Providence is going “back
to basics” with the aim of positively
impacting the area through non-politi-
cal partnership and outreach initiatives.

As part of their community-building
mission, the Eastern Community Asso-
ciation often collaborates with govern-
ment and other non-governmental
organisations to facilitate social, cul-
tural, and environmental development.
It’s stated boundaries encompass all
communities east of Fox Hill, including
that historic neighbourhood.

The organisation was formed in 2003,
as the Yamacraw Community Devel-
opment Association but the name was
changed last year to better reflect the
area of concern and distance the group
from identification with any particular
constituency.

ECA president Karl Spencer said:
“Tt was in August 2003 when a group of
concerned citizens gathered at the

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Anglican Church of Epiphany to give
consideration to the formation of a
community association. The idea was
well received and a steering commit-
tee was appointed.”

Headed by Mr Spencer, a former
Family Island commissioner and admin-
istrator for 32 years, the committee
named the association, appointed exec-
utives and proposed constitution by-
laws.

Crime

Mr Spencer explained: “It’s essen-
tially going back to the basics, we are
our brother’s keepers and together we
can accomplish so much. Particularly
from the aspect of crime prevention
and crime watch.

“The community is best able to iden-
tify their own needs, concerns, so the
association started off with basically a
crime watch and over the years its
grown into an unofficial local govern-
ment system.

“As it evolved we saw the need to
prepare this community for the even-
tuality of local government. So when
and if local government comes into
being, people would know how it
works.”

The association now boasts a mem-
bership of well over 100, and in addition
to their annual festival, hosts a num-
ber of initiatives such as band concerts,
health walks, movies in the park and
Christmas tree lighting and community
carol services.

Mr Spencer said: “We meet every
month and people come with their con-
cerns, which are then quoted to the
appropriate agency or government
office for attention. We are keeping the
MPs’ “feet to the fire” so to speak. “In
a sense we have taken it upon ourselves
to function as an unofficial Local Gov-
ernment entity.”

ECA will hold its annual community
“Fun Fantastic Festival” next Saturday,
May 1, at the green space west of Super
Value on Prince Charles and Jasmine
Drive. Families are encouraged to come

Crepir Suisse

out for a day of food, music, activities
and shows for all ages.

The event will start at noon, and pro-
ceeds will go towards funding the asso-
ciation’s marching and concert band,
the Eastern Community Pacesetters
Youth Band.

Focus

Mr Spencer added: “Whatever we
do our focus is on our youth band. If
you keep the young people involved,
you keep them out of crime. All our
festivals are geared towards raising
money for the band — which we refer to
as an amalgamated band with the police
band, who provide the music instruction
and discipline.”

Festival entertainment will include
local artists Nathan Stone, Gino D,
Elon Moxey, Chippie & the Boys and
Count Bernadino. Also performing will
be the Royal Bahamas Police Force
Band and Thelma Gibson Primary
School Junkanoo Rush Out.

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
Graduate Trainee Program

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas has operated an Apprenticeship Training
Program in The Bahamas since the early 1990's. Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
is now pleased to announce the continuation of its Graduate Trainee Program,
with the second intake of trainees intended for July 5, 2010. Full details and an
application form can be obtained from:

The Graduate Trainee Program Administrator
Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch

The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4'" Floor
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax No.: 242-356-8148

Application forms should be returned NO LATER THAN MAY 31, 2010
AIM

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas is committed to identifying and
developing the best young talent in The Bahamas. The Group is

offering one (1) year Graduate Trainee Contracts to College of The
Bahamas graduates or graduates returning to The Bahamas from
accredited colleges or universities abroad.

The program will accommodate three (3) graduates. Successful
applicants will be awarded a one year contract of employment during
which time the graduates will rotate between or within different business
units or departments of Credit Suisse Group entities. Permanent
employment opportunities will be evaluated at the end of this period.

B) CONDITIONS

The candidate is required to have a Bachelors Degree in one of the following or
suitably similar disciplines:

Banking and Finance
Engineering
Mathematics
Finance

Economics
Economics & Finance

Management
Accounting

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Noelle Sawyer wins top
2010 scholarship award

NOELLE Sawyer of St
John’s College made it “two
straight” for the Green
Giants by winning the top





scholarship award at the
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorori-
ty’s 2010 Honours Day pro-
gramme.

Rurtiss Memorial Mortuary
Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma Tel: 248-7000 Robinson Aid & Sth Street
Tek: 325-6621/922-4968 » 24 Hour Paging Service 222-9761

Anthony Frederick Bowe
(Tony - Freddy), 58

of Soldier Road and formerly of
Ramsey and The Fey Bxama will
he held on Thursday April 29,
S010 at 11-00 AM, at Choruch of
Gol of Prophecy, Englerston,
Ottciating wall be Bishop Rudolph
Bowe assisted by Other Ministers
of Religion. Interment in The
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spiknard Roads.





















He is survived by his son, Anthony
Fredrick Bowe (Lil’ Freddie): 4
Brothers, Chester, Bert raat, James,
Dwight & Bradley; 7 Sisters, Ann,
Denna, Janet, Jasmine, Maron, Donna & Keenan; 3 uneles,
Nigel Bowe, Kenneth Bowe, Altred Brown: 3 aunts, Gloria
Brown, Fluorine Devens, Lillian Ward, Joun Bowe, Visnu Bowe-
Mackay, Stephanie Bowe, Catherine Saunders: 2 sister-in-law,
Tanya aid Freda; 2 brothers-in-law, Steve Morrison, TheiRick
Knight: 10 nieces, Monique, Denise, Robin, Cha-lee, Anishka,
Shenique, Shade, Diva, Joba, Dwightania: 10 nephews, Jason,
Robert Jr, Franco, Adam, Abraham, Roberto, Sheldon, Sharada,
Leshawna, Jaimie, Dwight Jr, Bertram I, Amthony; 18
grandniens & grandnephews; many other relative and friends
including, Allan Brice, Phillis Rose, Columbus Stafford and
family, Lawrence Kelle and family, Ward family, Wellington
Bullard and family, Bishop Rudolph Bowe and fimily, Community
The Ferry, Community George Town, Exuma, Joyous Pickstock,
Geleta Rolle, Chules, George, and Victor Deveoux, Sandra ,
Shirley Linoel, and Jimmy Clarke, Ramsey Exuma, the Homes
family, Shirley Papageorge, Helen “ahran of Washington, Georgia,
U.S.A., the Nixon family of Exurna and Nassau, Una Curtis and
farnily, the family af the late Lionard “Bowtie” Bowe, the family
of the late Lillian Bowe, the family of the late Charles Bowe
Ward, the farnily of the lave Alvira Bowe, the farnily of the Late
Charles Bowe of Riviera Florida, the family of the late Kathkeen
Bowe-Nixon, the family of the late Ismael Bowe, the family of
Staftord Bowe, the fumily ot the late Sylvia Bowe-Newbold of
Riviera Beach, Florida, the family of the late Ethel Bowe, the
family of the late Eloise Bowe-Ritchie, Enid Cox of Miami,
Florida, Elaine Ready of Miami, Cynthia Dean of Miami, Florida,
the family of the late Cecil Rose and family, Mr. & Mrs. Philip
Taylor of Miami, Florida, Bethamae Marshall and family, Mr. &
Mrs, Themdore Gilbert Jack and family and others too numerous




Io mention,

The boty will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary Robinson
Road and Fifth Street on Wednesday April 28, 2009 from 2:00
PM, until 6:00 P.M. and at the church on Thursday trom 10:0








AML until service time.

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At the ceremony held at
Government House recently,
52 of the best and brightest
amongst 2010 graduating
female seniors, representing
all but three Family Islands,
participated in a weekend of
opportunities and fun.

However, only one of them
would be named 2010 vale-
dictorian.

Award

Ms Sawyer, head girl at St
John’s College, took home
the award and received a
$5,000 scholarship towards
tuition at a university of her
choice, donated by the Cable-
Care foundation.

At the presentation, the
foundation representative Dr
Keith Wisdom said he was so
impressed with the pro-
gramme and Ms Sawyer that
she was granted an extra
$500. The daughter of Eve-
lyn and Clyde Sawyer, Noelle
is no stranger to placing first;
she received the Bahamas

Association of Independent
Schools’ student Leader
Award and placed first in the
OAS Mathematics 2007 com-
petition.

The future mathematics
and history teacher believes
that if you “change your
thoughts you would change
your world”.

Receiving the most out-
standing Family Island Stu-
dent award along with a
$2,000 scholarship was Joy
Cierra Archer of St Francis
De Sales High School, Aba-
co.
Joy also received an addi-
tional $500 for the best essay
written on the 2010 Honours
Day theme “Exemplifying
Scholastic Potential”.

Speaker at the award cere-
mony was writer, film pro-
ducer and director Maria
Govan.

She challenged the students
not to be persuaded by what
others expect of them, but
instead to pursue their
dreams and their passion.

Using her own life story as
an example, Ms Govan told
the high achievers that while
she did not graduate from
college, and encountered per-
sonal challenges early in her
life, she did not give up on
her passion for film making
and now sees it as an oppor-
tunity to give back to the
place she calls home, the
Bahamas.

Students

Other students receiving
awards were Keri Lynn Pin-
der of Queen’s College, who
was given the Community
Service and Leadership
Award; Shannae Stubbs of
Central Eleuthera High
School, who was named the
most Industrious Honouree,
and Dawn Ferguson of South
Andros High School, who
was given the Most Popular
Honouree Award.

Sharry Nixon of Nassau
Christian Academy and Tan-
isha Braithwaite of Preston



NTO) SAN Ad

Albury High School,
Eleuthera, received hon-
ourable mention for their sub-
missions in the essay competi-
tion.

Other honours day weekend
activities included corporate
worship with Rev Carla Cul-
mer and the members of Wes-
ley Methodist Church Blue
Hill Road; a tour of the Clifton
Heritage National Park and
the College of the Bahamas;
courtesy calls on the Minister
of Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard and the
COB president Jayne Hodder.







bl es

SGT GARLAND ROLLE is pictured speaking to student and teach-
ers during an assembly at C | Gibson.







Ministry of Public Works
and the RBPF ‘committed to
increasing safety for children’

THE Ministry of Public
Works and Transport and
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force said they are com-
mitted to further increas-
ing safety for children dur-
ing school travel times.

Sergeant Garland Rolle
of the Traffic Division and

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Charlene Collie-Harris,
project civil engineer, vis-
ited C I Gibson Senior
High School on Monday to
address school road safety
and inform students,
teachers and administra-
tion of upcoming road
works in Marathon/Robin-
son Roads and East
Street/Solider Road corri-
dors.

Their presentations also
promoted pedestrian skills
and traffic awareness.

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St. Andrew’s School, The International School of
The Bahamas,requires a School Nurse for the

2010-2011 school year.

All applications must include a written letter
of application, full details of degrees, nursing
qualifications and experience as
well as the names of two relevant referees.

All applications must be received at the school by
3:00pm, Friday, May, 14 2010 and should be
addressed to: Mrs Sharon E Wilson, the Principal.

Applications without the complete information
required or those received after that date will not be

considered.


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROMpage one Freeport Concrete

company’s negative net worth
would be shortlived, as the
reappraised value of 126.75
acres of land it owns in
Freeport would increase bal-
ance sheet shareholder equity
by $3.429 million by the time
its third quarter results are
published.




Butler's Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

However, in a candid let-
ter to Freeport Concrete’s
Bahamian shareholders, Ray-
mond Simpson, the compa-
ny’s chief executive, said the
revaluation of this land’s
worth to $4.95 million “does
not help the company from a

Memorial
Announcement







13, 2010.













This is to announce, with great
sorrow, the passing of

Jean Ann Hoerkens,
nee Cox, 67

of Montagu Heights, Nassau, died on April

She is survived by her husband: Karl; her
daughters: Nicky and Tina and their husbands:
Jorge and Ward; her grand children: Connor,
Davis and Avery; her brother: Ronald Cox
and family of Wigan, England; nieces and
nephews and many friends.

A Memorial Service will be held on April
30th 2010 at 6:00 p.m. at Christ Church
Cathedral in Nassau.

In Lieu of flowers, please feel free to
contribute to a charity of your choice.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium,
Ernest and York Streets.




a Eastern Community Association

mw pcobaharmacorg

cash perspective.”

Freeport Concrete’s main
problem over the past two
years has been its inability to
generate enough “cash on
hand” to purchase the
required inventory level at its
Home Centre subsidiary.
Consequently, the Home
Centre has been unable to
generate enough sales to
break the vicious cycle and
return Freeport Concrete to
profitability.

“The company continues to
lose money as we have no
cash to purchase sufficient
inventory at the Home Cen-
tre,” Mr Simpson wrote.

“Only one of our suppliers
of building materials is sup-
porting us by sending us trail-
ers of lumber, sheetrock and
plywood. This is keeping us

Dad attacks probe

FROM page one

said Mr Swaby.

Joeshua was pronounced
dead on arrival at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
on April 9. He was collected
from the daycare centre by
his parents, who told police
he was in an “unresponsive
state” and taken directly to
the hospital.

“They had hyped us up
first, promising to bring
about closure to this matter
and to bring about justice,
but they have failed in doing
this. They told us they would
provide counselling and
therapy and that hasn’t hap-
pened. They told us they
would direct social services
to help us. I had to bury my
child myself out of my own
pocket and I am unem-
ployed,” said Mr Swaby,
who is the father of seven
other children.

On the point of police fail-
ing to provide counselling to
the family, Mr Bethel said if
the father could specifically
identify which police officer
promised the assistance, he
could respond.

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in business, but is not enough
inventory to enable us to be
profitable with existing costs,
despite us reducing our
expenses approximately 36
per cent in this six-month
period compared to the same
six months last year.

“However, we will be now
trying to sell this land for a
price that will enable us to
pay off the bank debt of $2
million and have sufficient
cash to buy the inventory we
need for the Home Centre.
This will then result in our
being able to increase our dai-
ly sales to a sufficient level
that will generate profits now
that we have reduced our
expenses substantially.”

But until a sale of the land
was achieved, Mr Simpson
said Freeport Concrete need-
ed to find the cash to remain
in business. Its bank, First-
Caribbean International Bank



JOESHUA SWABY died on April 9



The police are in commu-
nication with the pathologist
working on the case. Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings, police
press liaison officer, con-
firmed the autopsy has been
completed.

Joeshua’s parents previ-
ously raised questions about
the conduct of the daycare
centre. Mr Swaby said
Joeshua was buried on Sat-
urday, and it was “chilling
and cold” to think the day-
care did not attend or send
condolences.

“They did not even
acknowledge the fact that a
child who attended their
nursery had died,” he said.

The owner of the daycare
centre said: “All I can say is
the evidence is there. I don’t
have anything to say. I am
trying to get over it. The evi-
dence has cleared me. When
I gave my statement on ZNS

(Bahamas), was “not willing
to advance any additional
funds and is putting on pres-
sure for the sale of some of
the company’s assets to be
completed so they can be paid
off.”

With Freeport Concrete’s
survival still in question, Mr
Simpson warned sharehold-
ers that the company might
make a cash call on them via a
rights issue to inject addition-
al equity capital into the busi-
ness. An Extraordinary Gen-
eral Meeting (EGM) would
also be needed to ratify any
sale of the 126.75 acres.

Mr Simpson said a potential
buyer of some of Freeport
Concrete’s assets had yet to
follow through on their
promises, despite having
flown to Freeport four weeks
ago to “assure me that the
definitive agreement would
be finalised and sent to us in

‘short order’”.

Various parties, though,
had expressed interest in the
126.75-acre site on North
Shore, just east of Grand
Bahama International Air-
port, for quarry operations.

As a result, Freeport Con-
crete decided to have the land
reappraised and determine
whether it was undervalued.
Appraisals are done on “the
highest and best use of the
land,” and Mr Simpson said
the previous valuation was
based on the 126.75 acre site’s
use for residential or com-
mercial purposes, rather than
as a quarry that processes
limestone into aggregate and
sand.

The conveyancing docu-
ments related to the proper-
ty also prevent Freeport
Concrete from using it for
purposes other than as a
quarry.

into baby’s death

that was my condolences. I
am sorry to be so blunt, but
this is a very sensitive situa-
tion.”

Mr Swaby said police
questioned Joeshua’s moth-
er about having over-the-
counter drugs in the baby’s
diaper bag.

One week before
Joeshua’s death, he was tak-
en to the Accident and
Emergency section at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
with a fever.

Mr Swaby said the doctors
revealed to them that a
“mild fever is something that
happens when the child is
teething.” Ms McPhee said
Joeshua “was biting on his
hands, so (she) would
assume he was ready for that
stage.”

Mr Swaby said diagnostic
tests indicated Joeshua had a
clean bill of health.

The nurses discharged the
baby and informed the
mother that if anything per-
sisted or unusual happened
she could bring him back.

Ms McPhee said the next
day she informed the day-
care to give Joeshua a dose
of the popular pain and
fever drug, Calpol.

She said the fever broke
and no further problems
arose.

She said there was no fur-
ther need for medication,
although as a precaution she
packed several over the
counter drugs in Joeshua’s
bag, such as gripe water and
Ovol drops for gas, and
nasal drops.

“T feel as though because
they have nothing else to go
on they are now targeting
the mother instead of the
nursery because of their lev-
el of incompetence,” said Mr
Swaby.

“At this point the police
are badgering the mother
which is pathetic because
they know carrying those
medication is a normal
action for any parent, espe-
cially when the child is at
the period of teething,” he
said.

PUBLIC NOTICE

CHANGE OF NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, BRANEKA

CONSTANCE CAMILLE JONES of PO. Box N-
3038, Nassau, Bahamas, have legally changed my name
by deed poll to BRANEKA CONSTANCE BASSETT.
The Deed Poll has been duly recorded at the Registrar

General’s Office.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Pair are found
euilty of murder
and attempted
armed robbery

FROM page one

verdicts, the jury returned around 4.50pm for
further re-direction from Justice Hartman Lon-
gley on murder as it relates to the law, as well as

the joint enterprise of murder.

Ms Pinder, 33, was shot to death in her office at
the Cool Breeze Apartments on November 25,
2005. She died of cardiac arrest as a result of a

shotgun injury to the neck.

The prosecution alleged that Francis and Dar-
ling planned the robbery and took steps to carry
it out by using a shotgun. A third man, Dennis
Louis, 22, who was also initially charged with
the men, was found dead on February 28 at West

End.

The prosecution has indicated in Court that it
intends to seek the death penalty.

Attorneys Brian Hanna and Mario Grey have
requested probationary and psychiatric reports

for Darling and Francis.

Justice Longley has set a hearing date for July

30

The family of Ms Pinder was very pleased with
the verdicts and sang hymns as they left the cour-

thouse.

Joy Rolle, the mother of Tyna Pinder was
overcome with emotion after leaving the court-
room and was quickly embraced by her niece,

Desi Wallace.

Shena Rolle, the aunt of the deceased, thanked
the prosecution and jurors, and the police.

FROM page one

League in reaction to the traffic
plans and are gathering support
for a protest which members
have vowed to pursue to the
end.

Spokesman for the league,
Ethric Bowe, said: “We are not
going to lose this.

“We will pursue this, and it’s
going to keep escalating until
they understand how serious
this is to us, because they seem
to be taking it so lightly and
they are dealing with people’s
lives. We are not doing this for
fun.

“We have seen the destruc-
tion of businesses before when
they made the road one way in
Bay Street, Shirley Street, and
the Tonique Williams Darling
Highway.

“We can see it coming and
we are saying don’t do that to
us too.”

Proprietors have reported 20
to 40 per cent losses since the
road change without having any







Herman Natari Francis and Raymond Darling

“We prayed all night because we know there is
a God above. We knew we would get a 12-0 ver-

dict and we give all thanks and honour to the

One above because He channeled everything

through those (jurors) sitting in the courts. The

prosecution did an excellent job and we extend a
very special thanks to them.”

Ms Rolle said she supports capital punishment.

“If you take a life, your life should be taken
also,” she said.

Attorneys Hanna and Grey intend to file appli-
cation for appeal.

“There are a few issues that arose during the

trial and when the jury returned from their delib-
erations and we will definitely be addressing
those issues,” said Mr Hanna.

Mr Grey agrees that there were a few legal

of the jury.

Business owner's

opportunity to anticipate it as
neither an economic nor social
impact study was done prior to
its implementation.

But they say customers no
longer stop in as they don’t pass
their establishments at conve-
nient times and businesses
established over generations
are now worse off than ever
before.

Their frustrations have been
compounded by road works in
Baillou Hill Road leaving only
one lane of the new dual car-
riageway open, and yet there
were no contractors working at
the site yesterday morning.

Works Minister Neko Grant
invited the business owners to a
town meeting at the First Bap-
tist Church in Market Street
last night, following a previous
meeting between the two par-
ties last week.

Calls to the Minister went
unanswered yesterday as phone
lines at the Ministry of Works

POSITION AVAILABLE

issues that must be addressed beyond the realm

appeared to be down for the
second day this week.

Meanwhile support for the
protest has been swelling as
business league members took
to the streets distributing fly-
ers, gathering a petition of sig-
natures and speaking out in the
media.

“We are calling on the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to mit-
igate and compensate for the
losses caused by their negli-
gence and poor planning,” Mr
Bowe said.

“We will demonstrate that
we are not afraid of them and
make them clearly aware that
they are employed by us and
serve us.

“We are hoping something
will happen to bring wisdom
and sanity to this whole process.

“Everybody can win, but we
have got to work together.”

Protesters planned to march
along Market Street and Bail-
lou Hill Road during the morn-
ing rush hour, ending with a
rally outside Super Value in
Baillou Hill Road.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE - FREEPORT

HAF Financial & Insurance (Bahamas) Lid is searching fora Customer Service Redresentative. The deal
candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent interpersonal and communication skils, The
ability to work with limited supervision in a senice-diven progressive culture is a must,

Responsibilities:

Parlor adninstralive and clerical duties with efficiency a5 assigned by Manager
Gree! and receive walk i and telephone cheets ina professional manner
Handle Intemal and esiamal client quenes

Parlor duties 33 a cashier, receiving prerriuin paymenls ete,

Receive anplications for credit lilt, General Insurance and Morlgages and liaise wilh Financial brstibutions,
Key in Applicalions and emsure accurate application processing

Liaise with Underwriting dapariment an application Raues and saprovals
General reperiing and adenmetralion al all inaurance precducls

Core Competencies:

® Ability to work with limited supervision and leam new shalls quickly
Excelent oral and written communication skils
Abilly to execu dulies wilh agauracy and praficienty
Demonstrate a keen aya for details
Ablity to work under pressure and follow company guidelines
Slrang interpersanal skills and abiliy to maintain a harmonious retaionstig wilh co-workers
Abiily to mainiain conlident ellily
Reliable, dapendable and fexibla team-playar
Working knowledge of MS WORD, MS EXCEL and Business Math

Customer lacused

Required Qualifications:

« Associates Degree in Business Administration or related field (Bachelor Degrea 2 Plus]

«2 VESTS BPE Te nce in an Insurance oF banking operaion or similar position

Excelen! Gonipuler Sail and proficiency it Enc required
Insurance or Banding designations a plus

Benefits:

Salary COMMENSUTELE WIN CUTTen Salary Sceles, Skils and espanence. Altace benetit package Maucing Lif, Haalth and

Pansion,

Submit Resume to the Human Resources Department
P.O. Box §-4815, Nassau Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to

dparker@my hatsalutions.com

Deadline Friday April 30, 2010

Bi" BAF FINANCIAL































































HSBC €)

HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA

BALANCE SHEET

at 31 December 2009

Ye 2009 2008
? Assets

liquid assets 439,021 659,750
10,136,129
26,552,649
14,087,654
1,559,576
13,467

17,529,284

| 21205078
12.343,988
= 4.562,050'
a ARO
24,370,905

Amounts due from customers

Loans secured by mortgages

Securities and precious metals held for trading purposes
Financial fixed assets

Participations P103,415 139,741
Fixed assets TN 082 79,274
Goodwill as 2679
Accrued income and prepaid expenses 2 OSV 674 436,016
Other assets 21275,557 2,473,530
Total assets 73,314,355 73,669,749
Total amounts due from Group companies and qualified participants 7580,036 13,452,499
Total subordinated loans 03:50 210,445



Liabilities
Amounts due arising from money-market papers ee 9545
Amounts due to banks 46-796, 609
Other amounts due to customers 50. 199.768
Accrued expenses and deferred income ee ABQ 442
Other fabilities laa
Value adjustments and provisions ; E15 §3,251
Ri ee ETN 5S? 163,440
69,985,648
Share capital 480
General legal reserve —— - = , 1,607;066 1,170,161
Profit brought forward 1314002 1,132,976
Profit for the year “2 873;367 672,484

4,302,015 3,584,1

FBL3GS 73,669,749
3.599477: 2,665,580
782,291
1,965,483
1,147,601

16,924
19,403,060
47,003,393

501,585
2,843,995



Total amounts due to Group companies and qualified participants
Total subordinated debt





62,832,419
2,160,337
2,748,889

Fiduciary transactions : 45,492,356 20,695,563

STATEMENT OF INCOME

for the year ended 31 December 2009

% a 2009 2008
@ interest income

Interest and dividend income 2,001,123

674,954
(1,869,562)
806,515

oo p62 451

Income from commissions, products and services
Commission income from credit-granting business
Commission income from securities and investment activities
Commission income from other services rendered

760,090
DBT
(121.872)
B27

729,883
22,396
{141,276}
§20,100



Other ordinary results

Income from sale of financial fixed assets 43,322
Income from participations He 1,500
Other ordinary income : i 3,022
Other ordinary expenses (39,319}
Total other ordinary results



(579,603)
(268,554)
7)
835,543
(32,018)
(2,557)
(48,612)
752,356
53,737

Personnel expenses a TEE {626,060)
Oth . ce : . . (266,769)

= 808.849.
(27.094)
ee HEAT
= (8.618)

Gross profit

Depreciation of fixed assets
Amortisation of goodwill

Value adjustments, provisions and losses
Profit before extraordinary items and taxes 260,667.
Extraordinary income 292,750
Extraordinary expenses = B09) (18,046)
Taxes oe 19,744) {115,563}
Profitforthe year eeereeees __STS.387, 672.484







REPORT OF THE STATUTORY AUDITOR ON THE FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS TO THE GENERAL SHAREHOLDERS’ MEETING

of HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA, Geneva

As statutory auditor, we have audited the accompanying Opinion
financial statements of HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA,
which comprise the balance sheet, income statement

and notes for the year ended 31 December 2009.

In our opinion, the financial statements for the year
ended 31 December 2008 comply with Swiss law and
the company’s articles of incorporation.

Board of Directors’ resnensibliny

Resort on other jegal requirements
The Board of Directors is responsible for the
preparation of the financial statements in
accordance with the requirements of Swiss law

and the company’s articles of incorporation. This
responsibility includes designing, implementing and
maintaining an internal control system relevant to
the preparation of financial statements that are free
from material misstatement, whether due to fraud

or error. The Board of Directors is further responsible
for selecting and applying appropriate accounting
policies and making accounting estimates that are
reasonable in the circumstances.

We confirm that we meet the legal requirements on
licensing according to the Auditor Oversight Act (AOA)
and independence (article 728 CO and article 11 AOA)
and that there are no circumstances incompatible with
our independence.

In accordance with article 728a paragraph 1 item

3 CO and Swiss Auditing Standard 890, we confirm
that an internal control system exists, which has been
designed for the preparation of financial statements
according to the instructions of the Board of Directors.

We further confirm that the proposed appropriation
of available earnings complies with Swiss law and
the company’s articles of incorporation.

We recommend that the financial statements
submitted to you be approved.

KPMG Ltd

Auditor's responsiblity

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on

these financial staternents based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with Swiss
law and Swiss Auditing Standards (SAS). Those
standards require that we plan and perform the audit
to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial
statements are free from material misstatement.

Raphael Prebandier
Licensed Audit Expert

Philippe Cordonier
Licensed Audit Expert
Auditor in Charge

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain Geneva, 9 March 2010
audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures

in the financial statements. The procedures selected
depend on the auditor's judgement, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement

of the financial! statements, whether due to fraud

or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers the internal contro! system relevant to the
entity’s preparation of the financial statements in order
to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the
circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing
an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal
control system. An audit also includes evaluating

the appropriateness of the accounting policies used
and the reasonableness of accounting estimates

made, as well as evaluating the overall presentation

of the financial statements. We believe that the

audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and
appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

The summarized financial information set out above is derived from the Annual Report of
HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA for the year ended 31 December 2009. The full Report
can be obtained from: HSBC Private Bank (Suisse) SA, Suite 306, Centre of Commerce,
One Bay Street, P.O. Box N-4917, Nassau, Bahamas.
THE TRIBUNE

Spor

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28,



Bahamians
walk, run

for fun and
‘healthier
hearts’

EVERY year, the
Bahamas Heart Associa-
tion partners with Corpo-
rate Bahamas to “get the
word out there” to
encourage Bahamians to
take the necessary steps
to have healthier hearts.

Recently, Bahamians
and tourists from all
walks of life gathered
together at Goodman’s
Bay, Cable Beach, to
walk a distance of six
miles in the 11th Annual
Subway Fun Walk.

About 600 participants
lined up for the event.
The Celebrity Category
was won by Candia
Dames of Cable 12 News
and the Medical Associa-
tion of the Bahamas won
the much coveted Corpo-
rate Entity award.

Said Serena Miller,
owner of Subway in Nas-
sau: “We are indeed very
pleased to partner with
great corporate entities
like Colina and the Med-
ical Association of the
Bahamas. It just goes to
show that Bahamians are
indeed keen about
healthy lifestyles and to
maintaining a good quali-
ty of life.”

Colina employees
turned out in good num-
bers to compete during
the popular annual event
along with the some 80
persons representing the
Medical Association of
the Bahamas.

A cheque presentation
was made to the Bahamas
Heart Association on
behalf of Subway and its
partners. Linda Lafluer
pledged to make good use
of the funds in response
to the many medical and
heart conditions of chil-
dren in the Bahamas.

© See PAGE 15

SSS
~~ ——

Drive one.

PAGE 14

ts

2010



PAGE 15 ¢ International sports news

Giants torch Shockers in opener

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Commonwealth

Bank Giants - 92

Real Deal Shockers - 84
Giants lead series 1-0

ichael Bain was

fouled just

before he fin-

ished a reverse
lay-up sandwiched between a
trio of defenders, walked over
to the group Shockers sup-
porters in the stands and
screamed “Now find some-
one to stop me.”

The Shockers’ players,
coaches and fans had no
answer, and now the Giants
sit one game closer to reclaim-
ing the New Providence Bas-

ketball Association champi-
onship.

Bain torched the Shockers
for a game high 38 points to
lead the Giants to a 94-82 win
Monday night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium in the
opening game of the champi-
onship series.

Mark Hanna and Jeremy
Hutchinson completed a
potent night for the Giants
big three as they dominated
the boards and each finished
with double doubles.

Hanna finished with 20
points and a game high 15
rebounds, while Hutchinson
overcame early foul trouble
to finish with 14 points, 12
rebounds and three steals.

The trio led the Giants to a
rugged come-from-behind vic-
tory in a game where they

trailed by 10 at the half and by
six heading into the final
quarter.

The Shockers starters each
reached double figures led by
Sidney Hillary who finished
with 18 points.

Sharp shooting wingman
Corey Williams added 16,
Calvin Cummings added 14
points and seven assists, while
Kevin Coakley and Emeka
Watson each chipped in with
10.

Both teams traded baskets
early in the first quarter when
the Shockers grabbed a firm
hold of the lead on a floater
from Hillary, to take an 11-9
lead.

The score sparked a 6-0 run
for the Shockers which last-
ed until Bain answered with a
three-point play.



29th Primary Schools Track and
Field Championships all set







WR

|

Se







Â¥

&

MORE THAN 17 schools across the Bahamas, including 10 from Grand Bahama, have registered
to participate in the 29th version of the Primary Schools Track and Field Championships. The event
is scheduled for May 19-21 at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium and will be geared
towards athletes in the 7-and-under, 9-and-under, 11-and-under, and 13-and-under divisions.
Frank Rahming, chairman of the organising committee, revealed plans for the hosting of the event.
Shown (I-r) are Rahming, Ralph McKinney, Keno Demeritte and Sharon Harris...

Photo by Felipe Major/Tribune staff







The Shockers lead reached
double figures for the first
time on a layup from Barry
Carter for a 22-12 lead and
grew to as much as 14 when
Hillary successfully convert-
ed a three point play for a 26-
12 lead.

The Giants mounted a late
rally but trailed 28-21 at the
end of the first.

The lead fluctuated in the
second half, as it grew to as
much as 18 and shrank to six
with each team making time-
ly runs.

Williams three from the
wing gave the Shockers a 44-
28 advantage and they
reached their biggest lead of
the game on the following
possession when Coakley
made two from the line for a
46-28 with just under two
minutes left to play in the
half.

The Giants ended the half
on a 8-0 run to trim the deficit
to 10 and trailed 46-36 at the
half.

Bain came out with a scor-
ers mentality to open the third
and sparked an 11-5 run
which brought the Giants
within five, when his three
point play made the score 51-
47

Following the play, Shock-
ers head coach James Price
was charged with a technical
foul which ignited his team
on a 9-0 run of their own to
reclaim their margin by dou-
ble figures.

Hillary made a three point-
er from the top of the key,
Williams and Coakley added
a pair of layups and Hillary
capped the run at the line to
give the Shockers a 60-47
lead.

Real Deal would maintain

SEE NEXT page



SWIMMING

KNOWLES’ NEW BIRTH

OLYMPIC swimmer Jeremy Knowles
and his wife, Heather, are celebrating
the birth of their first child, Mason
Daniel. The seven-pound, 19-inch boy
was born at 11:12pm on Sunday, April 25
in Charlotte, North Carolina.

This is the fourth grandchild for coach-
es Andy and Nancy. Everyone is doing
fine and very happy. Tribune Sports
extends congratulations to the Knowles

family.

2010

FORD EXPLORER KLT

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configuration, power seat with power back rest, power windows,
locks and mirrors, alloy wheels, automatic headlights, radio, CD
player, with out question, the best value in The Bahamas on a large
SUV, without exception, all this plus 3 years/36000 mile warranty, 3
years roadside assistance, 3 years rust protection, Licence and
inspection to birthday, full tank of gas, floor mats first five services.

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TRACK

GRANT INVITATIONAL

400m- 52.36.

Men Invitational - Adrian Griffith

VIUXTa ae LOR La LLL LA

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THE 3rd Fritz Grant Track and Field
Meet is scheduled for Saturday, May & at
the Thomas A Robinson Stadium. As
usual, the Ambassadors Athletic is to
host this event and is inviting the fol-
lowing athletes to be a part of the meet:

Female Invitational - Courtney Pat-
terson (US Virgin Islands) 100m - 11.22
and Melocia Fearon-Clarke (Jamaica)

(Bahamas) 100m- 10.28; Sekou Clarke

(Jamaica) 400m- 45.85 and the Panthers

Track and Field Club (Turks and Caicos

Islands). “We expect that these athletes
will provide the necessary competition
here on home soil to allow seven ath-
letes to join them in the invitational
events,” said Bernard Newbold, the meet
director. The meet is open to all clubs
and Primary/High schools. Athletes will
have the opportunity to run qualifying
times for all summer meets but that does

not mean they are on the teams right

away.

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com
WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



FREEDOM FARM

HNMR AR



RESULTS of the Freedom
Farm Baseball League action
over the weekend:

TEE BALL

Mangoes def. Coco Plum
19-15; Guineps def. Dillies 10-
8; Sea Grapes def. Jujus 18-7;
Dillies def. Guineps 15-6.

COACH PITCH

Sand Flies def. Green Tur-
tles 17-5; Mosquitoes def.
Bees 8-3; Boas def. Red Ants
18-3; Wasps def. Green Tur-
tles 14-3; Wasps def. Boas 17-
5.

9-10

Octopus def. Red Snappers
19-2; Octopus def. Red Snap-
pers 15-4; Barracudas def.
Turbots 8-6; Barracudas def.
Turbots 11-7; Wahoos def.
Eels 6-4; Wahoos def. Dol-
phins 9-5; Octopus def. Tur-
bots 6-1.

11-12:

Divers def. White Crowns
11-1; Divers def. White
Crowns 8-5.

13-15:

Raccoons def. Falcons 7-0;
Sharks def. Stingrays 7-0; Sil-
verjacks def. Potcakes 13-1;
Silverjacks def. Falcons 7-6;
Potcakes def. Stingrays 14-2;
Owlz def. Sharks 10-0.

16- 20:

Arawaks def. Lucayans 11-
1; Caribs def. Tainos 8-7.

¢ Playoffs in 16-20 division
are scheduled to kick off 2pm
May 2 with Arawaks taking
on the Lucayans and the
Caribs playing the Tainos at
4:30 pm

Magic rest
up, cool down
after first-round

Sweep...
See page 15



Coaches
to attend
Nike b-ball
clinic

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

A NUMBER of local
coaches will be heading to the
Nike Championship Basket-
ball Clinic to broaden their
knowledge of the game.

The clinic is set for this
weekend at the Orleans Are-
na in Las Vegas, Nevada,
April 30-May 2 and is expect-
ed to feature some US coach-
es as lecturers.

New Providence Women’s
Basketball Association cham-
pions Bommer G Lady
Angels’ coaching staff, inclu-
sive of Kayla Campbell,
Anthony Swaby and Share
Cash, as well as runners-up
Four Season’s Lady Cheetahs’
coach Mario Bowleg, are all
scheduled to participate.

They are expected to be
joined by St George’s senior
boys coach Darrel Sears, who
this past weekend held a Bas-
ketball Showcase for local
players in Grand Bahama.

Swaby, who is leaving today
for his third appearance at the
clinic, said it’s very important
for the coaches to attend as
it will increase their knowl-
edge of the sport.

“T think if coaches want to
get their players to play at the
next level, the first thing they
have to do is improve them-
selves,” Swaby said.

“Some people who want to
be coaches, don’t want to do
anything where they have to
pay for it. Of this was a free
trip, the plane would have
been full. But like anything
in life, if you want to improve
yourself, you have to attend
seminars and clinics.”

While in Las Vegas, Swa-
by said he, Bowleg and Sears
will be contacting Nike with
the view of hosting a similar
clinic here in the Bahamas,
either in New Providence or
Grand Bahama.

Basketball Hall of Famer
Bob Knight will head the
cadre of lecturers as he speaks
on the topic of “Knight
School: Teaching Coaches
What to Coach.”

Other coaches expected to
address the various sessions
are legendary Roy Williams,
another Basketball Hall of
Famer from North Carolina,
Tom Izzo of Michigan State,
Bob Huggins of West Vir-
ginia, Mark Few from Gon-
zaga, Lon Kruger from
UNLV, Matt Painter from
Purdue, Steve Alford from
New Mexico, Gail
Goestenkors from Texas,
Craig Robinson from Oregon
State, John Spezia, the NJC-
CA president and Ed Janka,
the director of the Nike
Championship Basketball
Clinics.

As a part of the clinic, the
coaches will also get the
opportunity to view both the
National Junior College
Coaches’ Association All-Star
games.

Swaby said there are usu-
ally around 3,000 coaches
from around the world
attending the clinic. “You get
to meet a whole lot of coach-
es,” Swaby said. “It’s just a
good opportunity to boost
yourself. It’s just an excep-
tional clinic to attend.”

Bowleg and Sears are said
to already be in Las Vegas
and while Swaby will join
them today, Campbell and
Cash are scheduled to leave
town on Thursday.

“We hope that as a result of
going to this clinic, we will be
able to improve ourselves,”
Swaby said. “We also hope to
use this as an opportunity to
get some more pointers on
how to run our annual sum-
mer camp.

“Hopefully, we will be able
to make some contacts with
some of the coaches who will
try to get to come here to par-
ticipate in the camp, which we
intend to run for a month
instead of just the one week.”

The coaches are expected
back home on Monday.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 15

SPORTS

EPMA CReUT IKE
Crawlord wins

6th man award



ATLANTA (AP) —
Atlanta Hawks guard
Jamal Crawford has been
named the NBA Sixth
Man of the Year.

Crawford won the
award going away with 580
of a possible 610 points.



JAMAL CRAWFORD dribbles
past Spurs guard George Hill
(AP Photo)

Jason Terry of the Dallas
Mavericks finished second
with 220 points and
Anderson Varejao of the
Cleveland Cavaliers (126
points) finished third.

Crawford averaged 18
points a game in 31.1 min-
utes off the bench in his
first season with Atlanta.
He shot 44.9 percent from
the field to help the
Hawks win 53 games and
earn the third seed in the
Eastern Conference play-
offs.

The Hawks are the
fourth NBA team in nine
years for the 30-year-old
Crawford.







Bayern
Munich
beats Lyon
3-0 to reach
the final

By JEROME PUGMIRE
AP Sports Writer

LYON, France (AP) —
Bayern Munich advanced to
the European Champions
League final for the first time
in nine years, routing Lyon 3-
0 Tuesday night on three
goals by Ivica Olic.

Bayern won the home-and-
home total goals series on 4-0
aggregate and will seek its
fifth European title when it
plays defending champion
Barcelona or Inter Milan in
the final on May 22 at
Madrid.

Barcelona will try to over-
turn a 3-1 deficit when it hosts
Inter on Wednesday night.

Tlic scored in the 26th, 67th
and 78th minutes, giving him
five goals in his last four
European games.

Lyon captain Cris was
ejected in the 59th minute
when he received a yellow
card for fouling Olic, then was
given a second yellow for sar-
castically applauding referee
Massimo Busacca of Switzer-
land.

Giants win gm 1

FROM page 14

a 66-60 lead headed into the
fourth quarter. The Giants
would again open the quar-
ter on a timely run, this time a
19-5 run which vaulted them
into the lead.

Bain tied the game with a
pair at the line, 71-71 with
seven minutes left to play and
Hanna gave the Giants their
first lead since early in the
opening quarter when he also
converted at the line.

Bain capped the run for the
Giants with an acrobatic finish
to give his team a 79-71 lead.

The Shockers pulled within
three after a three pointer by
Cummings, 79-76 but would
pull no closer in the waning
moment of the fourth.

Jamaliel Rose regained the
two possession advantage for
the Giants with a tough three
point play and the Giants
were able to close out the win
and complete the comeback
with clutch free throw shoot-
ing in the final two minutes.

¢ Game two of the series is
set for 8pm tonight at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Federer upset by Gulbis at Rome Masters

By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — Roger
Federer lost his opening
match of the clay-court sea-
son, beaten by 40th-ranked
Ernests Gulbis of Latvia 2-6,
6-1, 7-5 on Tuesday.

In the 16-time Grand Slam
champion's first singles match
in nearly a month, Federer
had an easy first set but his
form then dropped drastically.
The top-ranked Swiss strug-
gled with his consistency
under a light rain as the match
wore on. Gulbis held on at
the finish, winning on his sev-
enth match point.

"My game was definitely
not up to speed," Federer
said. "My serve was not work-
ing at all.”

Federer took off several
weeks after losing to Tomas
Berdych in the fourth round
in Key Biscayne, Fla., on
March 30.

Federer played a rare dou-
bles match Monday, teaming
with Yves Allegro in a victo-
ry.

Federer reached the semi-
final here last year and went
on to win his first Grand Slam
title on clay at the French
Open a few weeks later. This
year's tournament at Roland
Garros begins on May 23.

Winners of the
11th Annual
Subway Fun

Run/Walk

BELOW are the winners
of the 11th Annual Subway
Fun Walk/Run:

OVERALL WOMEN

RUNNERS —

Ist - Jessica Murray

2nd - Rayvonne Bethel

3rd - Artesia Davis

OVERALL MEN

RUNNERS

1st - Danny McClenahan

2nd - Oneil Williams

3rd - Jason Williams

OVERALL WOMEN

WALKERS

1st - Kimley Saunders

2nd - Joan Pinder

3rd - Sandra Smith

OVERALL MEN

WALKERS

Ist - Ryan Bethel

2nd - Richard Adderley

3rd - Don Williams
RUNNERS

U-15 Girls Runner

1st — Charisma Taylor

2nd — Rashae Cartwright

3rd — Lyric Brennen
U-15 Boys Runner

Ist — Reagan Cartwrigh

2nd — Tre Taylor

3rd — Davarian Storr
U-17 Girls Runner

1st — Paulette Strachan.
U-17 Boys Runner

1st — Perez Williams

2nd — Kyle Missick
U-20 Girls Runner

Ist — Chanae King

2nd — Krystal Francis
U-20 Boys Runner

1st — Lester Taylor

2nd — Justin Lockhart

OPEN WOMEN

RUNNER

1st — Jessica Murray

2nd — Artesia Davis

3rd — Elizabeth Shaddock



—




—

Thompéil ee Oakes Field

ee

;
o



OPEN MEN
RUNNER

1st - Danny McClenahan
2nd — Oneil Williams
3rd — Jason Williams
MASTER WOMEN
RUNNER

Ist — Rayvonne Bethel
2nd — Heather Kirleis
3rd — Carla Armbrister
MASTER MEN
RUNNER

1st — Thor Kirleis

2nd — Ricardo Rolle
3rd — Ashland Murray Sr
WALKERS

U-15 Girls Walker

1st — Sherell Fernander
U-15 Boys Walker

1st — Dante Cooper

2nd — Carter Pinder

3rd — Matthew Chea
U-17 Girls Walker

1st — Taylor Lightbourne
U-17 Boys Walker

1st — Revello Williams
2nd — Marc Ferere
OPEN WOMEN
WALKER

1st — Tamica Strachan
2nd — Jentell Forbes
3rd — Shakavia Moxey
OPEN MEN
WALKER

1st — Don Williams

2nd — Oscar Rolle

3rd — Dwight Strachan
MASTER MEN
WALKER

1st — Ryan Bethel

2nd — Richard Adderley
3rd — Fredrick Wallace
MASTER MEN
WALKER

Ist — Kimley Saunders
2nd — Joan Pinder

3rd — Sandra Smith

- TEEN CHALLENGE
-BYAyH"ASMFAS ~

. Celebrating 22 years of Ministry i in the Bahamas



ERNESTS GULBIS returns to
Roger Federer at Rome Masters
Tuesday...

(AP Photo)

He will play two more tour-
naments — in Estoril and
Madrid — before heading to
Paris.

"I hope I can come back

from this. That's usually what
I do after a loss like this,"
Federer said. "Sometimes it
takes a loss to wake up and
shake you up for your
approach the next week.
When you always win, some-
times you forget how hard it
is. That's why today I don't
get too worried about this
loss."

Playing inside the tourna-
ment's new 10,500-seat stadi-
um, Gulbis appeared nervous
at the start and Federer won
the opening set easily.

He didn't face a break
point until the fourth game of
the second set, when he
missed a forehand wide to

end a long rally and hand
Gulbis a 3-1 lead. Gulbis then
broke again to go up 5-1 when
Federer made a series of
errors — including a rare
overhead miss.

Federer committed 15
unforced errors to Gulbis'
eight in the second set alone,
and his form in the final set
was even worse, missing one
routine baseline shot after
another.

In all, Federer committed
38 unforced errors to Gulbis'
39, and trailed 20-33 in win-
ners. Federer also struggled
with his serve, landing only
half of his first attempts to
Gulbis’ 71 per cent.



By A GONZALEZ
AP Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP)
— First a sweep. Now
some rest.

Dusting aside Charlotte
has given the Orlando
Magic some significant
down time before their
second-round _ series.
They'll still have plenty to
fix when they return to
practice Thursday, start-
ing with getting Dwight
Howard out of his foul-
trouble funk.

They at least know one
thing is certain.

"We're going to be well
rested," Howard said,
laughing. "Well, I'm going
to be well rested.”

Orlando will face the
winner of the Atlanta-Mil-
waukee series no earlier
than Sunday. That series
is tied two games apiece,
and if it goes seven games,
the Magic won't begin the
second round until next
Tuesday — eight days
between games.

A much bigger concern
is their All-Star center
finding his playoff poise.

About the only imprint
Howard made in the first
round was on his seat
cushion, relegated to the
bench in constant foul
trouble. He fouled out in
the last two games, played
only 105 minutes and
committed 22 fouls in four
games.

Howard's hacking
became so prevalent
against the Bobcats that
teammates even teased
him with a new nickname.
No longer Superman, they
simply referred to him as
"Foul on You."

The Magic might not
find that so funny if the



Magic rest up, cool down
after first-round sweep

TN i (sad
JAMEER NELSON (left) reacts after hitting a 3-point shot as
teammate Rashard Lewis (9) runs past during the second half
of the Magic's 99-90 win over the Charlotte Bobcats in Game
4 of a first round NBA playoff basketball game in Charlotte,
N.C., Monday, April 26, 2010.

trend continues.

"It's something I've
never been through,"
Howard said. "I never
have been in a situation
where I've had to sit out
or things may not go my
way. I think all this hap-
pens for a reason. So am
mad when it happens. But
I go back home and I sit
down and think about it,
maybe (backup center)
Marcin (Gortat) and those
other guys need a chance
to step up and see what
playoff basketball is like."

That was perhaps the
only positive twist with
Howard's foul trouble.

The Magic flexed their
playoff muscles with the





(AP Photo)

NBA's two-time defensive
player of the year side-
lined. Jameer Nelson —
who missed the first three
rounds last season recov-
ering from right shoulder
surgery, only to play poor-
ly in his return in the NBA
finals — showed he can be
a force when healthy, and
their bench was deep and
dependable when it count-
ed most.

Even Vince Carter end-
ed his 0-for-15 skid from
3-point range in the finale,
beginning to break out of
his slump that made him
almost a complete non-
factor in the first three
games. Carter had 21
points in the clincher.



during the month of April

t. (242) 326-6377 « f. (242) 326-6:

e.sanpin@hotmail.com

| “Building Lives of Value and Purpose”










#289 Wulff Road
P.O. Box N-4904
t. (242) 394-444) f. (242) 393-8


PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



New resort
celebrates

history with |

art unveiling

GREAT Exuma’s newest
resort Sandals Emerald Bay
is celebrated part of the
island’s unique history last
week with the grand unveil-
ing of an oil painting depict-
ing the legend of Pompey,
leader of the 19th Century
slave rebellion in the
Bahamas.

The magnificent piece,
spanning four feet in length
and capturing Pompey’s
unique story, was especially
commissioned by Sandals’
CEO Adam Stewart and
will be displayed in the
resort’s piano bar for guests
and team members to
savour.

Rewarded

In 1830, Pompey, a 32-
year-old slave, led a group
of slaves who rebelled
against an unauthorised
transfer to Cat Island from
Exuma. They hid in bushes
for several weeks before
stealing a boat and sailing
to Nassau to petition the
Governor. Their efforts
were rewarded when the
authorities in Nassau ruled
that the slaves be allowed
to stay in Exuma with their
families.

Commenting on the
unveiling, Sandals Emerald
Bay general manager John



Lady Muriel sails
to victory in the
Sandals Resorts Cup

WITH the aim of giving back

Keating said, “The most
amazing aspect of this tale
is not only that it did actu-
ally happen but it happened
right here in Great Exuma.
Hollywood would be hard
pressed to create such a
spellbinding story.”
Spirit

“At Sandals, we feel it
vitally important that our
guests and team members
feel the spirit of this desti-
nation and take a little
piece of it home with
them.”

“This artwork will ensure
that our guests will go home
safe in the knowledge that
there is much more to
Great Exuma than beauti-
ful beaches and crystal clear
waters. It’s an island blessed
with special people with a
unique story to tell.”

The artwork took more
than three months to com-
plete. Highly-acclaimed
Bahamian artist Jolyon
Smith, who himself
researched the story, said
he was inspired by the spir-
it of liberation and triumph
that goes with it.

President of the Pompey
Association, Floyd Arm-
brister said, “As chairman
of the Steventon Common-
age Committee, we note the

SKIPPER of the
Lady Muriel, Marcus
Mitchell, and John
Keating, general
manager of*Sandals
sane ecL@Msy-\')

Te) oy Seng




HIGHLY-ACCLAIMED
Bahamian artist Jolyon Smith
working on the artwork which
took more than three months
to complete.

recognition of Pompey by
the Sandals group. Seeing
the image of Pompey
reminds me of the freedom
fighting spirit of Pompey.

“The people of Exuma
and Steventon would do
well to reconnect with the
Pompey spirit as they seek
to empower themselves and
build a better economic
future. ”

In addition to the oil
painting, Sandals also
revealed a plaque telling
the fascinating tale glori-
ously cast in bronze and
mounted in the main lob-
by.





to the Exuma community, Sandals
Emerald Bay last weekend spon-
sored the largest event held on the
island.

The National Family Island
Regatta celebrated its 57th year
of sloop sailing in Elizabeth Har-
bor, Exuma, and the resort











She washed with dove.





ae eee

became a sponsor of the Sandals
Resorts Cup 3rd Series Race that
took place Saturday past.

The Class A category consisted
of four scheduled races including
the Prime Minister’s Cup.

Twelve boats from all over the
Bahamas battled it out in the race
for the coveted bragging rights and

She washed with soap.

dramatization af

prizes.

The victorious boat was the
Lady Muriel from Staniel Cay,
Exuma.

John Keating, general manager
of Sandals Emerald Bay, was on
hand to congratulate Captain Mar-
cus Mitchell and his crew. Beam-
ing with excitement, Mr Keating







said “regatta is not only about sail-
ing, but competition, excellence,
dedication, commitment and
excitement; these are some of the
principles that Sandals is guided
by and we believe that we too will
make a positive impact in the Exu-
ma community.”

Commodore of the National

te BE eae




WINNING boat and crew -
Lady Muriel





Family Island Regatta Danny
Strachan, who expressed his grat-
itude on behalf of the National
Family Island Regatta Committee
to Sandals Resorts, said: “We are
grateful that Sandals decided to
partner with us to help to make
this year another successful
event.”

Soap leaves scum.

Dove doesn't.

Switch to Dove® bar with
1/4 moistunzing cream for
softer, smoother skin



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a

find Dove at your
favourite food store



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



ahamas Waste is moving
with “full force” on its
biodiesel production facil-
ity after starting construc-
tion on the $750,000 facility last Thurs-
day, its managing director telling Tri-
bune Business yesterday that the com-
pany might start production by end-
June 2010 “if everything goes well”.

With the biodiesel facility set to ben-
efit “50-plus” of Bahamas Waste’s
vehicles, the company currently being
restricted to using the product inter-
nally only, Francisco de Cardenas said
the BISX-listed firm had also just
exported its first two loads of recycled
cardboard to China.

Aiming to export another two loads
yesterday, the Bahamas Waste man-
aging director told Tribune Business
that the company aimed to export 500
tonnes of recycled cardboard per
month, generating another valuable
foreign currency earnings stream for
the Bahamian economy from an all-

‘Major progress’ in Baha
Mat’s Scotia loan talks

WEDNESDAY,

APRIL 28,

2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL 9FIDELITY

Ue eal
RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Full force’ on $750k biodiesel investment



* Bahamas Waste starts construction on facility designed to recycle 500,000
gallons of waste cooking oil per year, and create at least ‘half a dozen’ jobs

* BISX-listed firm already exporting recycled cardboard to China, and
aiming to do 500 tonnes per month; 240-250 loads per year

too-rare export.

“We started construction last Thurs-
day,” Mr de Cardenas said of the
biodiesel production facility. “We’re
now going full force. We have our
manufacturer’s licence; we have all
our permits in order. We’re almost in
May, and I think that if we’re building
and everything goes well, we’ll be able
to start doing something by the end
of June. If not, July, knock on wood.

“We have some equipment up north
in Wisconsin that is already built and
tested. Now, we can concentrate on
developing our raw material. Once we
get some traction in operations, we

will be able to start collection.”

Mr de Cardenas said Bahamas
Waste’s internal feasibility studies esti-
mated that this nation generated at
least 500,000 gallons per year in waste
cooking oil, chiefly from establish-
ments such as hotels and restaurants,
plus households. That number, he
added, could easily be higher because
it may not include the waste oil from
cruise ships calling in the Bahamas.

“1d say $750,000,” said Mr de Car-
denas, when asked about the level of
Bahamas Waste’s investment in the
new facility. “Obviously there will be
some shifting around and stuff, but we

will need at least two-three people in
waste oil collection, processing and
fuel generation. We’ll probably cre-
ate a number of positions, probably
up to half a dozen.”

The Bahamas Waste managing
director said the biodiesel production
facility would consist of a small gener-
ator to run the processing equipment;
a raw material tank; a methanol tank;
a diesel tank; and a “tank for blending
the finished product with regular
diesel”.

Some blending would be necessary,
Mr de Cardenas said, because not all
Bahamas Waste’s vehicle fleet would

be able to take 100 per cent biodiesel
fuel. “The majority of our vehicles will
benefit. Some 50-plus vehicles will ben-
efit from it,” he added.

Mr de Cardenas said the ultimate
benefit to the company from using
biodiesel would depend on the market
price of diesel fuel, and how much
cheaper Bahamas Waste could pro-
duce its own fuel. He added, though,
that it would prevent the company
from passing on extra fuel costs, in the
form of surcharges, to its largely com-
mercial customers.

SEE page 4B

Insurer’s S8m investment in

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA Mar and Scotiabank
were last night said to be
“close” to a resolution over the
latter’s $170 million syndicat-
ed loan that financed the devel-
oper’s acquisition of the exist-
ing Cable Beach properties,
sources close to the situation
telling Tribune Business that
“tremendous progress” had
been made.

This newspaper was told that
Baha Mar and the bank, which
is involving executives from its
Toronto head office in the talks,
had been meeting since the

developer signed the $2.5 bil-
lion loan with China Export-
Import Bank to facilitate the
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment.

“They’ve been meeting, and
tremendous progress has been
made,” a source with knowl-
edge of the situation told Tri-
bune Business. “They may
almost be at the point where
they’re close to a resolution.”

Robert Sands, Baha Mar's
senior vice-president for gov-
ernmental and external affairs,
declined to comment when con-
tacted by Tribune Business

SEE page 2B

Colina’s $3.7m RND refinance

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COLINA Holdings
(Bahamas) has refinanced the
existing bank debt of its newly-
acquired subsidiary, publicly-
listed RND Holdings, with a
$3.7 million mortgage, the
BISX-listed life and health
insurer’s audited financial
statements for fiscal 2009
reveal.

A copy of those statements,
obtained yesterday by Tribune
Business, also revealed that
Colina Holdings had actually
acquired a majority interest in
RND Holdings as far back as
June 9, 2009, although the
extent of its equity holdings was
only revealed to the latter’s

SEE page 5B

* Majority control at fellow
public company gave
Colina $43,926 profits,
and $815,191 in
revenue, in 2009

* Insurer took majority
stake in early June,
some six months before
RND notified investors
of material change

* Colina Holdings saw
‘bargain purchase’
gain of $2.054m on
deal, gaining $3.793m
in net assets for
$1.74m outlay

Cable warning over
‘severe undermining’

of telecoms industry



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has
warned that the telecommuni-
cations industry will be “severe-
ly undermined” if the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) is not forced to open up
mobile voice and data services
to other operators and resellers,
arguing that this would harm
competition and be “anti-inno-
vation and anti-consumer”.

In an April 8, 2010, letter to
the Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority
(URCA), Cable Bahamas’ in-
house legal counsel, Judith

SEE page 4B



* BISx-listed firm says
nothing to stop mobile
voice and data services
being opened up to virtual
operators and resellers

* Warns that failure to do so
would be anti-competitive,
and ‘anti-innovation
and anti-consumer’

* Cable raises concern on
number portability and
facilities sharing, with BTC
‘dominating market for
years to come’ on
directory services



Ansbacher post affiliate purchase

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



COLINA Holdings
(Bahamas), the BISX-listed life
and health insurer, and its whol-
ly-owned subsidiary acquired
for $8 million a collective 19
per cent stake in the holding
vehicle that acquired Ansbach-
er (Bahamas) last summer, a
merger deal that lost $3 million
in the five months to end-
December 2009.

The life and health insurer’s
2009 financial statements, a
copy of which was obtained by
Tribune Business yesterday,
revealed that the BISX-listed

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

* Colina Holdings and subsidiary take 19%
stake in offshore bank’s holding vehicle

* Ansbacher parent suffers $3m loss in
five months to December 31, 2009

entity and its Colina Insurance
Company subsidiary lost
$569,899 on their investment
between July and December
31, 2009.

As a result, the value of their
investment in SBL Ltd, the
holding company for the
merged Sentinel Bank & Trust
and Ansbacher (Bahamas), was
downgraded at year-end from

$8 million to $7.43 million.
Referring to the investment
in SBL Ltd (thought to stand
for Sentinel Bank Ltd), the Col-
ina Holdings (Bahamas) finan-
cial statements said: “In July
2009, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) and Colina Insur-
ance Ltd purchased 7 per cent

SEE page 5B

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BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
St. Michael:

246.435.1955



a
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010
ee
‘Supply side’ medicine ignored by good Doctor

I THANK Dr Jonathan
Rodgers for his thoughtful
reply to my response to his
original article. I will keep my
comments here short, and
inevitably won’t address all of
the issues he raises.

Although he claims his orig-
inal article was about reducing
the cost of living and not about
the more general merits of mar-
kets, those two issues cannot
be disentangled. One of the
points I wish I had made more
clearly is that one, though not
the only, cause of the high cost
of living in the Bahamas is var-
ious forms of government inter-
vention in markets. Despite his
protests to the contrary, both
in the original article and this
reply, Dr Rodgers goes out of
his way to argue that the reces-
sion demonstrates the failures
of the free market. I took that
claim as consistent with several
of his other proposals.

In fact, nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth. The cur-
rent recession, as I have argued

In response to Dr Jonathan Rodgers’ latest ‘cost of living’
missive, Professor Steven Horwitz, writing on behalf of The
Nassau Institute, argues that less regulation and taxation -
and not more - is the way forward for the Bahamas

in The House that Uncle Sam
Built, (http://bit.ly/8jem1K), is
the product of government
interference with the market in
the form of US Federal
Reserve policy, government-
sponsored entities such as Fan-
nie Mae and Freddie Mac, and
other elements of US housing
policy. This was not a failure of
free markets, but a failure of
policy, and the 4:1 ratio
between new regulatory laws
and new deregulatory ones in
the last 30 years is evidence of
that, as numerous other Nobel
Prize winners have pointed out.
If we don’t learn that lesson
from the events of the last
decade, we will likely repeat its

THE CENTRE FOR
DIGESTIVE HEALTH

Grosvenor Medical
Centre, Grosvenor Close

Medical assistant needed
for busy Ambulatory Endos-
copy Centre. Some office
reception duties included.

Fax resume to:
242-328-5552 or e-mail
haroldjr@batelnet.bs



NOTICE

mistakes, as some of Dr
Rodgers’ proposals do.

Let me address two specific
issues he raises. First, he is con-
fused by my opposition to
antitrust policy because he sees
the intent of antitrust as pro-
moting competition. Dr
Rodgers’ position misses two
key points: First, just because a
government policy has a cer-
tain intent does not mean that it
will turn out as intended.

In the case of antitrust in the
US, over 75 per cent of antitrust
complaints are brought not by
the government but by other
firms complaining about the
behaviour of their competition.
In other words, antitrust is used
to limit competition, not
encourage it. It is a way for
firms to enhance their market
power by legally prohibiting
other firms from engaging in
certain behaviours.

The second point is that, as it
turns out, this was exactly the
intent of the laws when they
were passed, at least in the US.
The laws were pushed for and
supported by large incumbent

firms who saw their prohibi-
tions on certain forms of behav-
iour as a way to prevent rival
upstarts from gaining ground
on them. I would suggest that
readers consult the left-wing
historian Gabriel Kolko’s book,
The Triumph of Conservatism,
for the full story. Antitrust pro-
tects competitors, not compe-
tition, and would raise, not low-
er, the cost of living. The real
solution is to deregulate entry
and allow new firms to use cre-
ative, competitive tactics to
challenge incumbents.

Dr. Rodgers’ point about the
velocity of money is still not
completely correct. The for-
mula in question is that money
supply x velocity = price level x
real output/income/transac-
tions, depending on which ver-
sion you use. At the very least,
the right side of the equation
is nominal not real GDP, so
increases in the money supply
or velocity can add either to
real output or to inflation,
depending on the circum-
stances. But more to the point:
it is not clear to me how

encouraging more Bahamians
to shop in the Bahamas would
increase the supply of money.
That can only happen if the
Central Bank acts.

The question is whether
more domestic purchases would
raise real output. It might, or
it might not, but it will not be as
a result of an addition to the
money supply. Even if it causes
the existing supply to ‘turn
over’ more times, Dr Rodgers
has to show why this would add
to real GDP and not just drive
up prices.

I would argue that real eco-
nomic growth comes from the
‘supply side’ in the form of
more new businesses and new
innovation, which will come
with deregulation and lower
taxes. Simply spending existing
dollars more times, in and of
itself, does not necessarily lead
to growth.

Notice, too, that if the costs
of some goods are reduced
through a better tax system,
that means fewer dollars spent
on them and more that can be
spent on other goods. This will

THE TRIBUNE

lead to growth, not because of
factors involving the velocity of
money (which will not change),
but because consumers will
have more of their own wealth
to spend on more things. I am
all in favour of revamping the
import duties system if it will
lower overall taxation on
Bahamians, but the growth it
produces will not be the result
of additions to the money sup-
ply. It will be due to a reduction
in the overall tax burden that
allows markets to function
more freely and fully.

Dr. Rodgers’ hope for “free
but adequately regulated mar-
kets” is a chimera. Regulations
are impediments to that free-
dom, and almost always get
manipulated by the largest
firms being regulated, as we’ve
seen in the US. If the goal is to
release the entrepreneurial spir-
it of the Bahamian people, then
reducing the size of the regu-
latory state and taxation to the
bare minimum is the way to go.

NB: Dr Steven Horwitz is a
Professor of Economics at St.
Lawrence University in New
York. The Nassau Institute is
an independent, a-political,
non-profit institute that pro-
motes economic growth in a
free market economy with lim-
ited government, in a society
that embraces the rule of law
and the right to private proper-
ty. Website: www.nassauinsti-
tute.org



LOAN, from 1B

about the status of the Scotia-
bank talks last night.

Still, other sources told this
newspaper yesterday that the
two parties seemed to be feel-
ing “more positive” about
reaching a successful conclu-
sion amenable to both in the
wake of Baha Mar’s successful
conclusion of talks with its Chi-
nese partners, who also include
China State Construction.

As revealed by this newspa-
per previously, Baha Mar needs
to successfully resolve the situ-
ation over the Scotiabank loan,
as it is said to be secured on the
existing Sheraton Cable Beach,
Wyndham Nassau and Crystal
Palace Casino and associated
real estate parcels at Cable
Beach.

The potential complication
is that real estate also includes

INVITATION TO TENDER

Tender for the provision of
Water and Sewerage General Insurance

The Water and Sewerage Corporation invites tenders from any bidder who is
authorized to do business in the Bahamas; and who satisfied all eligibility and
qualification requirements of the CORPORATION and is registered with and licensed
by register of insurance to issue insurances for the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Receptionist’s desk at the
Corporation’s Headquarters at #87 Thompson Boulevard.

Sealed bids are to be delivered on or before May 14 at 4:00 p.m. and addressed as

follows:

Deputy General Manager/Engineering & Planning

Water Sewerage Corporation
87 Thompson Boulevard
Nassau Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to reject or accept any or all proposals.

Submission should be marked as follows:-

Tender: General Insurance Proposal
Type of Coverage Required

All general risk insurance

Commercial Property Insurance (Building content)
Computers, IT infrastructure, Mobile, Equipments
Motor insurance, Commercial & Private, Motor Vehicle
Accident Insurance, Money & Fidelity
Liability Insurance, Marine Cargo

Signed : Management, Water and Sewerage Corporation



parcels upon which China Ex-
Im Bank will take security for
its $2.5 billion loan.

The Chinese bank will need
those assets delivered ‘free of
encumberances’, to quote legal
parlance, which is why Baha
Mar and Scotiabank need to
resolve their loan situation.

Scotiabank has already
extended the due date twice -
from December 31, 2009, to
end-January 2010, and then to
March 31, 2010 - to give the
developer time to seal the deal
with Beijing. That was con-
cluded on March 30, 2010, and
possibly explains Baha Mar's
haste to last night seal the deal
with the Chinese.

In the aftermath of that
agreement’s signing, Tribune
Business sources indicated that
Baha Mar set to "re-engage"
Scotiabank over that loan, hav-
ing prioritised sealing the agree-
ment with China before turning
its attention to this.

Baha Mar's strategy appears
to have been to conclude suc-
cessful negotiations with the
Chinese before turning its
attention to Scotiabank. This
credit facility enabled the devel-
oper to acquire the existing
Wyndham and Sheraton Nas-
sau Beach resorts from Philip

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Ruffin and the Government.

Tribune Business previously
reported how Baha Mar and its
principals, the Lyford Cay-
based Izmirlian family, had
offered to make Scotiabank
"whole" and repay the entire
loan, having previously offered
to pay down $85 million or 50
per cent during proposals that
were swapped between the two
sides.

"Baha Mar appreciates Sco-

tiabank's support during these
economic times, and is satisfied
Scotiabank supports the devel-
opment of Cable Beach," was
all Mr Sands was prepared to
say on the situation in a previ-
ous interview.

Meanwhile, Tribune Busi-
ness also understands that Baha
Mar and the Chinese have sub-
mitted their investment project
proposals to the Bahamian gov-
ernment.

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* Circle the soups on your store receipt dated
from April 19, 2010.
¢ Bring your receipt to The d’Albenas Agency
Ltd., Madeira St., Palmdale and receive your
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VEGETARIAN

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The d’Albenas Agency reserves the right to limit quantities.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 3B





Mall denies 200 Bahamas closer
on airline deal

jobs in danger

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TOWN Centre Mall is
not being directly affected by
the re-routing of Blue Hill
Road and Market Street, its
general manager denying
claims that 200 jobs were at risk
because of it and the associated
roadworks.

Frank McGwire, responding
to claims that hundreds of peo-
ple employed at stores through-
out the Mall could lose their
jobs due to declining sales, said
there was no evidence this is
true. And, internally, he has not
heard of drastically declining
sales figures.

In contrast, he said a Mall
business that opened recently
had shown sales increases
month-on-month of 30 per cent.

However, sources told Tri-
bune Business that it was an
individual close to the Mall’s
owners who quoted the 200 fig-
ure.

Engineer Ethric Bowe told
Tribune Business yesterday that
almost half the 400 potentially
affected jobs in the area of the
re-routed roads could come
from the Towne Centre Mall,
which he argued had been hit
hard since the road directions
were changed to one-way.



yet had an effect on consumer
traffic.

He added, though, that the
roadworks have not been going
on for a long enough period to
indicate that the Mall was being
affected.

“With the time period the
construction has been going on,
it is still a bit too early to tell (if
the mall is being negatively
impacted),” said Mr McGwire.
“The access to Town Centre
Mall is not impeded.”

He said Mall stores have
been forced to face the same
economic conditions affecting
most businesses across the
country, a direct result of the
global economic downturn.

Mr McGwire said, though,
that the Mall had seen some
turnaround as a result of an
uptick in the tourism industry in

quarter one of this year.

“As people go back to work
at hotels and do construction
work, those people continue to
shop with us,” he said.

He expressed sympathy for
the businesses being affected
by the roadworks and said he
would make an offer to move
them into the Mall if their busi-
nesses were to close.

“T want to talk to other ten-
ants down there and see how I
can assist them,” said Mr McG-
wire.

Mr Bowe said the business
owners that form the League
will stage a demonstration
today protesting the road
changes and asking for reforms.

Only yesterday evening they
met with government officials
to discuss what can be done to
ease the impact of the changes.

MOH:

NOTICE is hereby given that DOUGLAS JOY GEORGES of
1850 N.E. 158 Street, N. Miami Beach, 33162, P.O. Box CR-
54660, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 28" day of April, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS is close to
forming a mutually beneficial
partnership with American Air-
lines to provide airlift to many
Family Islands, the Minister of
Tourism and Aviation revealed
to Tribune Business yesterday.

Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
said the meeting last weekend
with one of the world's largest
airlines spurred new interest in
airlift to some islands in the
Bahamas, outside of American
Airlines’ already flown routes,
"in a way that we have never to
this point”.

"We have attracted the
attention of American Air-
lines... with them focusing on
the individual destinations (of
the islands of the Bahamas),"
he said.

The minister said American
Airlines was not aware of the

number of Bahamian destina-
tions in need of service, and
had taken an interest in part-
nering with the Bahamas gov-
ernment/Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation.

Mr VAnderpool-Wallace
said airlift via the third largest
carrier in the US will prove to
be a "symbiotic" relationship,
as American Airlines seeks to
become profitable. The airline
reported fourth quarter 2009
losses of $344 million.

"At the end of the day,
American lost money in their
fourth quarter, but there are a
lot of ways for us to allow them
to be competitive (in the
Bahamas)," he said. "We have
to make certain we pave the
way for profitable air service."

The minister added that in
spite of the many airlines able
to service the Bahamas, “they
are at the top of the list".

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
that while American Airlines’

KPMG

PO Box N 123

Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

costs are often higher, the Gov-
ernment will work with them
to reduce costs to the Family
Islands.

He also hinted at a major
development that will allow this
country to service air travellers
in a much better fashion, but
could not get into specifics.

"It will provide visitors with
an experience that makes it eas-
ier for them to transit back and
forth," Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said.

"Air travel is seen by the cus-
tomer as a necessary evil; part
of their experience," he said.
"So it should be painless, easy
and as inexpensive a possible.”

American Airlines
announced last month that it
would discontinue flights to
Governor's Harbour while
changes to the airport's navi-
gational aids were being made.
Many Eleuthera resorts imme-
diately felt the fallout from the
discontinuation of the flights.



Telephone 242 393 2007
Fax 242 393 1772
Internet www.kprng.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To: The Shareholder

WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LEQNARD RAYMONVIL
of Market St., P.'O.Box N7060,Nassau Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 21% day of April, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED
(‘the Bank”), which comprise the statement of financial position as at December 31, 2009, and the statements
of comprehensive income, changes in equity and cash flows for the year then ended, and a summary of
significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

But Mr McGwire said the
road changes, which end at
Robinson Road, one of the
mall’s perimeter roads, had not
Management's responsibility for the financial statements

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing,
implementing and maintaining interna! control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial
statements that are free from material misstatements, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying
appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Auditors’ responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted
our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply
with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
financial statements are free fram material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the
financial statements. The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including the assessment of the risks
of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk
assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the Bank’s preparation and fair presentation of the
financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for
the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Bank's internal control. An audit also
includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting
estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements

5) TumbleFresh”

option

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our
audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED as of December 31, 2009, and its financial performance and
cash flows for the year then ended, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Hue

Nassau, Bahamas
February 26, 2010

WESTRUST BANK (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED

Statement of Financial Position

December 31, 2009, with corresponding figures for 2008
(Expressed in United States dollars)

See eee
Assets
Cash and cash equivalents (notes 5 and 18) 82,823,014
388,912,448
171,059,599
2,657,839
43,988
8,101
123,136,396

50,206,288
500,616,791
55,150,214
2,318,042
39,260
4,893
101,239,775
272,954 402,614
5,427,461 5,566,924
1,950,000 -

Loans and advances to customers (notes 6 and 18)
Reverse repurchase agreements (note 7)

Accrued interest receivable (note 18)

Other accounts receivable

Prepaid expenses

Investments (notes 8 and 17)

Foreclosed assets (note 9)

Property and equipment (note 10)

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Other assets (note 11)

Total assets $ 776,291,800 715,544,801

Liabilities and Shareholder's Equity

Liabilities:

Customers' deposits (notes 12 and 18) $ 699,856,478
9,217,337

5,496,879

643,723,535
7,050,772
5,134,234

Accrued interest payable (note 18)
Accounts payable and other liabilities

Total liabilities 714,570,694 655,908,541
Whirlpool Duet
Gas Dryer
WGD9?750WW

$1,700

Whirlpool Duet”
Washer
WFEW9250WW

$1,850

Shareholder's equity:

Share capital (note 13) 38,000,000

23,721,106
61,721,106

38,000,000

21,636,260
59,636,260

Retained earnings

_ = Commitments and contingencies (note 14)
save 257% when you pay cash ————
F Total liabilities and shareholder's equity = $ 776,291,800 715,544,801

The statement of financial position should be read along with the accompanying
notes, which are an integrals part of the financial statements.

Whirlpool
These financial statements were approved on behalf of the Board of Directors on

Tha peuar ta at eiere dua: February 26, 2010 by the following:

@o

Interested parties may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Financial Statements
from the licensee at:

Master Technici

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS
Y Westrust Bank (International) Ltd

Office # 1, Building # 10
Caves Village
West Bay Street
P.O.BOX N-1419
Nassau, Bahamas

NENT frau

rm ere eae tre sy Aes ees MOM (Ile cae AM ecttaPescel reed
Ph: 393-5310 Fox: 393-8094 © www.mastertechbohamas.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010
a > =<:
Cable warning over ‘severe undermining’ of telecoms industry

FROM page 1B

Smith, said the BISX-listed
company disagreed with the
sector regulator’s position that
it would be “contrary” to gov-
ernment policy to require BTC
to open its mobile voice and
data services to access by other
users.

While Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has publicly stated
that competition in the provi-
sion of cellular services would
only enter the Bahamian mar-
ket two years post-privatisation
(rival operators will be allowed
to bid for licences one year
after BTC is privatised, with
the extra year granted for them
to construct their networks),
Cable Bahamas said the Gov-
ernment’s policy limits referred
only to the award of new GSM
licences.

This, the BISX-listed com-
pany argued, did not prevent
URCA “moving forward with
the development of a plan and
process for the award of spec-
trum licences for the provision
of WiMax services (fixed and
mobile)”.

WiMax is a fixed wireless
network, and Cable Bahamas
argued that the Government’s
communications sector policy
allowed URCA to “impose
wholesale obligations on BTC”
that would allow other opera-
tors (such as itself) to provide

competition through Mobile
Virtual Networks or resell
space on BTC’s network to oth-
ers. Mobile Virtual Networks
would allow other operators to
provide mobile voice and data
services using BTC’s existing
infrastructure.

Any introduction of compe-
tition in the mobile (cellular)
sector is likely to be fiercely
resisted by BTC, and possibly
the Government, given that
some three-quarters of the 100
per cent state-owned incum-
bent’s revenues are derived
from this service. Essentially,
BTC’s cellular monopoly is
what is keeping the company
afloat, and any introduction of
competition at this stage could
have a disastrous effect on its
privatisation value - currently
thought to lie at around $130
million.

Still, Cable Bahamas also
proposed that URCA could
choose to intervene in the
mobile voice and data market
after competition was intro-
duced, if it found that “BTC
has abused a position of domi-
nance if [it] declines to negoti-
ate reasonable Mobile Virtual
Network Operator agreements
with its competitors in good
faith”.

“In the absence of reason-
able resale obligations applica-
ble to BTC’s mobile offerings,
the overarching objectives of
the Communications Act would

POSITION
AVAILABLE

be severely undermined, since
in that circumstance, only BTC
would be in a position to pro-
vide customers with the full
suite of fixed and mobile ser-
vices on a ‘one-stop shop’ basis
or as part of an integrated pack-
age,” Ms Smith wrote on Cable
Bahamas’ behalf.

“This would be both anti-
competitive, but also anti-inno-
vation and anti-consumer. At
a minimum, if reasonable
Mobile Virtual Network Oper-
ator or reseller provisions are
not imposed by URCA or vol-
untarily offered by BTC,
URCA should explicitly adopt
a [Significant Market Power]
measure preventing BTC from
offering any mobile voice or
data services, including fixed-
to-mobile services, as part of a
package or bundle involving
any of its other services, pend-
ing full liberalisation of the
mobile market.”

Confirming that Cable
Bahamas was seeking to com-
pete with BTC in the provision
of fixed-line and cellular voice
services once the market was
liberalised, Ms Smith said the
BISX-listed company was con-
cerned about whether inter-
connection agreements with the
incumbent covered co-locations
and facilities sharing.

Interconnection is required
to allow traffic originating on
one carrier’s network to flow
seamlessly to the intended
recipient, who is the customer
of another telecom operator,
and Cable Bahamas said this
was an essential requirement
for it and others to “compete
fairly and effectively” with
BTC.

“URCA’s final decision on
BTC’s Significant Market Pow-
er obligations should clarify
that the Reference Access
Interconnection Offer (RAIO)
must include reasonable co-

location and facility sharing
arrangements, even if the
details are left to further nego-
tiation,” Ms Smith urged on
Cable Bahamas’ behalf.

“Otherwise, BTC will be
under no obligation to ensure
that it maintains reasonable
space in its facilities for this pur-
pose, and the future prospects
for imposing workable obliga-
tions involving access to BTC’s
space for co-location or other
forms of facility sharing will be
greatly diminished.”

Cable Bahamas _ also
expressed concern that BTC
would “continue to dominate
the marketplace for years to
come in the absence of regula-
tory intervention” over direc-
tory inquiries and related par-
ties.

Warning that a “substantial
information gap and asymme-
try” in this area would work to
BTC’s advantage, Ms Smith
said it was unclear whether the
provision of directory informa-
tion on customers of rival oper-
ators fell within the SMP guide-
lines and interconnection offer.

“It also remains unclear to
what extent Cable Bahamas
and other competitive opera-
tors will be able to ensure that
their customers are not disad-
vantaged in this respect (for
example, by requiring BTC to
make its directory information
available to third parties so that
they can produce their own on-
line directories or printed
guides),” Cable Bahamas
argued.

Number portability - the abil-
ity of customers to keep the
same number when they
switched operator or moved
house - was also raised as an
issue by Cable Bahamas, which
demanded that URCA indicate
when a consultation on this
issue - and implementation of
an interim arrangement - would

take place.

Arguing that BTC’s entry
into new business lines should
hinge on it implementing a
“workable approach” to num-
ber portability, Cable Bahamas
criticised URCA’s “apparent
lack of urgency” on the issue.

“Number portability has
proven to be a critical compo-
nent in virtually every country
for the development of effec-
tive and sustainable competi-
tion in the fixed-voice market,”
Ms Smith said.

THE TRIBUNE

“Efficient and effective
implementation of number
portability between fixed-voice
operators should be dealt with
as a matter or urgency, and an
interim solution should be iden-
tified and imposed as soon as
possible to help speed up cus-
tomers’ ability to switch
between fixed-voice providers.

“Tn addition, rules relating
to win-back and other com-
mercial practices will need to
be developed and enforced
against BTC.”



FROM page 1B

it’s a no brainer.”

fees on the cardboard.



‘Full force’ on
$750k biodiesel
investment

Noting the volatility of fuel prices, Mr de Cardenas said:
“Tf we can get a product, a waste product, and re-use it to
produce renewable energy, and we do it at a reasonable cost,

As for its cardboard recycling initiative, Mr de Cardenas
said: “We’re already exported our first two loads to China.
We’re trying to get two more loads out today.

“We’re probably looking at 240-250 loads a year, and mul-
tiplying that 500 tonnes by 12 gives you 6,000 tonnes per
year. There’s 25 tonnes per container.

“We hired a recycling co-ordinator last week. We’re con-
centrating on cardboard, but certainly there’s a need for
plastic and other items that are difficult to handle.

“Our target goal right now is to try and take out 500
tonnes a month. That’s not much, and we suspect there’s a
lot more out there. We’re actually going to customers and
asking them to separate they’re cardboard. It’s a bit of a cost
avoidance for them, as they no longer have to pay tipping





Office clerk needed for upscale
company. We are searching for
a highly motivated individual
with strong organizational skills,
along with excellent verbal and
written communication skills.
Must be proficient in MS Office

(Outlook, Word, Excel, Access
and PowerPoint), and be able
to meet demanding timelines.
The individual must have the
ability to work independently
and handle other duties as
required.

Please contact
Ms. Smith at 327-5595
or email:
psmith@nassauroyalholiday.com

’m lovin’ it

Employment
Opportunity



NOTICE is hereby given that GAYMORE SHERWOOD of
WINDSOR PLACE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21* day of April, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL GULF PIPELINE LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O.
Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 21st
day of May, A.D., 2010. In default thereof they will
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 27" day of April, A.D., 2010

B. J. Conjelko
Liquidator
Al Wosail Building
West Bay Area
Doha, Qatar

Restaurant Managers Needed
for leading Fast Food Franchise

Requirements:

¢ Must be a High School Graduate

* Must have Management experience

e Restaurant Management experience is
preferred.

¢ Must have strong leadership skills

¢ Must be customer service driven

¢ Must be results-oriented & articulate
¢ Must have excellent inter-personal skills
¢ Must have excellent oral & written
Communications skills

* Professionalism required

Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and
holidays.

McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Please submit Resume to:
Human Resources Department
McDonald’s Head Office
on Market St. North
P.O.Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444

Nassau, The Bahamas
BER RR RR RRP eee

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CRYSTAL
CHARMAINE LOWE domiciled
and late of Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against or
interest in the above Estate should send
same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before 12th May, 2010
after which date the Executors will proceed
to distribute the assets of the Estate having
regard only to the claims, demands or
interests of which they shall then have had
notice AND all persons indebted to the
above Estate are asked to settle such debts
on or before 12th May, 2010.

V.M. LIGHTBOURNE & CO.
Attorneys for the Executors
P.O. Box AB-20365

Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Abaco, The Bahamas

(31st March, 14th & 28th April, 2010)

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL GULF PIPELINE LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL GULF PIPELINE LIMITED is in
dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 26th day of April, 2010 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is B. J. Conjelko of
Al Wosail Building, West Bay Area, Doha, Qatar.

Dated the 27th day of April, 2010.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of WINIFRED EMILY
CHRISTOFILLS late and domiciled of the West-
ern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Ba-
hamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
requested to send their names, addresses and par-
ticulars of the same certified in writing to the un-
dersigned on or before the 21st day of May A.D.
2010 and if required, to prove such debts or claims
or in default be excluded from any distribution;
after the above date the assets will be distributed
having regard only to the proved debts or claims
of which the Executors shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons in-
debted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the 21st day of May A.D.
2010.

Dated the 27th day of April, A.D. 2010

ROBERTS, ISAACS & WARD
Attorney for the Executor
Chambers
Bay Street & Victoria Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas



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THE TRIBUNE



Colina’s $3.7m
RND refinance

FROM page 1B

minority shareholders in late
January 2010.

The $3.7 million mortgage to
refinance RND, which both
Colina Holdings and the for-
mer’s chairman, Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald had indicat-
ed would happen, is for a 15-
year period and carries a 9 per
cent per annum interest rate.

That rate, according to Coli-
na Holdings’ financial state-
ments, is some 1.5 percentage
points, or 150 basis points, high-
er than the 7.5 per cent per
annum interest rate charged on
RND Holdings’ existing $2.904
million loan from First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas).

Meanwhile, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) financial statements
revealed that RND Holdings
generated $43,926 in net
income for the BISX-listed life
and health insurer in 2009 dur-
ing the almost-six months fol-
lowing the acquisition of its
majority stake. Some $815,191
in revenue also flowed to Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas) benefit.

“From the date of acquisi-
tion, RND has contributed
$815,191 of revenue and
$43,926 to the net profit before
non-controlling interests of
[Colina Holdings Bahamas],”
the insurer’s financial state-
ments said.

While Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) and its fully-owned
subsidiary, Colina Insurance
Company, had built up a 24.8
per cent stake in RND Hold-
ings as at 2008 year-end, via the
purchase of 2,197, 779 shares, it
took another six months for
them to acquire a majority.

“During 2009, through addi-
tional purchases of shares on
the open market as of June 9,
2009, the company [Colina
Holdings (Bahamas)] had
acquired a total of 4,482,314
shares at a cost of $0.40 per
share, representing a 50.6 per
cent shareholding,” the finan-
cial statements said.

“The company has acquired
RND to expand its investment
property holdings to support its
life insurance liabilities over the
long-term.”

Informed capital markets
observers may question why
RND Holdings minority share-
holders, and the Bahamian

investing public at large, were
only informed by the company
of a change in its majority own-
ership in January 2010 - some
six months after the change, a
material event, had occurred.

There is little doubt, though,
that Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) acquired majority
control at RND Holdings for a
relative bargain price, since its
accounts record a $2.054 mil-
lion “gain on bargain purchase”
among its investment income
gains during 2009.

This “bargain” occurred
because it acquired its 50.6 per
cent share of RND’s $7.498 mil-
lion net assets, worth $3.794
million, for $1.74 million. The
latter figure is the sum spent
on building Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) majority interest in
RND’s ordinary shares.

The balance sheet details
provided for RND Holdings at
the June 9, 2009, acquisition
date show why the company
needed a ‘saviour’ in the form
of Colina Holdings (Bahamas).

RND had just $1,459 in cash
at the balance sheet date, indi-
cating that just about all the
rental cash flow from its invest-
ment properties - the RND
Plazas in Nassau and Freeport -
was being sucked up to
repay/service bank debt and
other liabilities.

Some 97.9 per cent of RND’s
assets, $11.559 million out of
$11.804 million, were tied up in
the value of its illiquid real
estate holdings.

This was matched against lia-
bilities that were more current,
including a $3.064 million bank
loan; $197,191 in bank over-
drafts; and $877,716 in accounts
payables and other liabilities.

Subsequent to Colina Hold-
ings (Bahamas) financial year-
end, it acquired a further 2.8
million RND Holdings shares
in a series of transactions in
January and March 2010, taking
its controlling stake to 79.8 per
cent.

And further increasing its
real estate investments, part of
its strategy to match long-term
insurance liabilities with long-
term assets, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) has also passed a
Board of Directors resolution
to “authorise an investment of
$3.9 million in a [unrelated] real
estate development in the west-
ern district of New Provi-
dence”.

Insurer’s S8m
investment in
Ansbacher post
affiliate purchase

FROM page 1B

and 12 per cent of SBL Ltd ata
cost of $3 million and $5 million
respectively.

“In considering the classifi-
cation of its 19 per cent equity
holding in SBL Ltd, [Colina
Holdings] has classified its
investment in SBL as an invest-
ment in associate as two of the
10 Board members of SBL Ltd
are also directors of Colina
Holdings (Bahamas).

“SBL Ltd, in May 2009,
acquired the issued and out-
standing shares of Ansbacher
(Bahamas) and merged Ans-
bacher subsequently with Sen-
tinel Bank & Trust in July 2009,
with the surviving entity retain-
ing the name Ansbacher
(Bahamas).”

Ansbacher (Bahamas),
according to its website, is part
of the A. F. Holdings (formerly
the Colina Financial Group)
group of companies, as is Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas). A. F.
Holdings, whose principals are
attorney Emanuel Alexiou and
financial executive Anthony
Ferguson, also holds a majority
58.1 per cent stake in Colina
Holdings (Bahamas).

Mr Ferguson did not return
Tribune Business’s message
seeking comment before press
deadline, so the precise ratio-
nale for Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) investment in Ans-
bacher (Bahamas) could not be
ascertained.

However, observers contact-
ed by Tribune Business yester-
day suggested that the timing
of the 19 per cent equity stake’s
acquisition, coming so soon
after the Ansbacher deal’s con-
clusion, indicated the insurance
companies were boosting their
offshore bank’s affiliate’s equi-
ty levels and enhancing capi-
talisation (recapitalising) post-
purchase.

This, they added, could sug-
gest that Colina Holdings

(Bahamas) and its subsidiary
were effectively underwriting,
or financing, the purchase of
Ansbacher (Bahamas) by their
common majority shareholder,
A. F. Holdings, and its SBL Ltd
associate.

The Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) accounts showed
that SBL (Ansbacher
Bahamas) had some $207.652
million in assets, and $179.603
million in liabilities, at the
December 31, 2009, balance
sheet date, giving it net assets of
$28.049 million.

Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
had a $5.329 million share of
SBL Ltd’s net assets, plus
$1.423 million in goodwill and
$677,296 in “intangible assets”,
giving its investment a $7.43
million ‘fair value’.

SBL Ltd, the accounts
revealed, earned $4.883 million
in total revenues in the five
months to December 31, 2009,
and generated a $2.999 million
net loss. These figures are like-
ly to apply to Ansbacher
(Bahamas) as SBL Ltd’s key
asset, and probably reflect one-
off costs associated with the
acquisition and merger, includ-
ing the redundancy packages
associated with staff downsiz-
ing.

Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
enjoyed a successful 2009, with
net income increasing by 64.5
per cent to $13.373 million,
compared to $8.129 million the
previous year.

Net income available to com-
mon shareholders, once pref-
erence share dividends of
$997,328 were taken out, rose
by 60.7 per cent to $12.376 mil-
lion compared to $7.699 mil-
lion the year before.

Accounting for $1.638 mil-
lion in other comprehensive
expenses during the year, Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas) earned
comprehensive income of
$11.736 million, an 11.3 per cent
rise on the $10.543 million
recorded in 2008.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 5B

C REDIT S UISSE a» CREDIT SUISSE AG, NASSAU BRANCH

The Bahamas Financial Centre Telephone +1 242 356 8100
Ath Floor Telefax +1 242 426 6689
Shitley & Charlotte Streets
P.O, Box N-4998
Nassau, Bahamas

www.credit-suisse.com

Consolidated balance sheets





























Reference
= on 2 to notes oe ee _end of
2009 2008

Assets (CHF million)
Cash and due from banks 52,535 90,521
interest-bearing deposits with banks 2,200 3,892
Central bank funds sold, securities purchased under —
resale agreements and securities borrowing transactions 12 208,378 = =—269,013
a oe arate rat mince E ear Oia rd eta ede NEe Ni see S ae 196,308 “years
Securities received as collateral, at fair value a _ a —_ 37,371 29,755
a ea ie ne a ea SE eae at an neo a Pe ore sidiog es chars
Trading assets, at fair value oo —_ 13 931,307
a RES era ise ener one Cinen renee y aie i 2843 chneaoaneae’
investment securities - - —_ - ; 14 9,180 ~
Brae os eG ene eg ee me oe eeG nan a eee.
Other investments ol eB 8,587
ere rr ee a ie in etre eee Hee ey oo ace eee
Netioans SSOS”*~ oe 8 ere RD Re agp et a ge a a
oe es — Noo caw peinns Soman es de aeee so eaeu cae ewanymctagade bonne ad reten den eons a eemeansoeeeeeteameLieas Gs : a Paes aes
Premises and equipment ~ eee a — ~ OW "5,901 67g
ggg —————————— ee ee
Other intangible assets. =Ssts—=—“CS~s‘“‘—*S*~*~S~S~™S Fe BCOTBSSC«

of which reported at fair value
Brokerage receivables











of which encumbered




Assets of discontinued operations held-for-sale 4 0

1,010,482



neptune A SEATON RN PALA TRITTTA CDEC ASS ALOR tt EA re EPA OSTA EA

Reference
to notes end of

Liabilities and equity (CHF million)
Due to banks



























of which reported at fair value 4,914 3,576
5st cx capdasions aniiseuniandged macaaceenaronansn Gee ener ges ecu eee ee dee Oe ee
a Ce ne a Central bank funds purchased, ‘securities sold under
repurchase agreements and securities lending transactions 12 191,587 243,970
Gea ee ee a eesceys rang pace ee eae
Obligation | to return sacurities received as collateral, at vat fair value een 37,371 29,755
Trading labilities, at fair value ~ 13 134,875 ‘153,718
Short-term borrowings ~ ~ ~ 6,058 10,182
Shee ee ae ee
Long-term debt > —— 22 186,676 148,560
pee ee ea ee ree ene eae rer roma acrvena nr 75808 oye ie
Brokerage payables OO ~ 7 " — 69, 132 93,426
Other liabilities = aa 20 70,254 63,089





of which reported at fair value

Liabilities of discontinued operations heid- for-sale



Total liabilities ~— ~ 964,731 1,105,520





Cormimon shares / Ele certificates

Total shareholder's equity 31,228 26,868



Nancontrolling interests 14,523 19,281

Total equity 45,751 46,149





Total liabilities and equity = 1,010,482 1,151,669





end of 2009 2008



Additional share information
Par value (CHF)

issued shares (milion)

Shares outstanding (million) 44.0 44.0





Interested parties may obtain a copy of the audited accounts from Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, 4° Floor, Shirley and Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-+928.

KPMG AG
Audit Financial Services
P.O. Box

Badenerstrasse 172
CH-8004 Zunch CH-8026 Zunch

Telephone +41 44 249 31 31
Fax +41 44 249 23 15
Internet www.kpmg.ch

Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm to the General Mecting of

Credit Suisse Group AG, Zurich

We have audited Credit Suisse Group AG and subsidiaries’ (the “Group”) internal control over financial reporting as
of December 31, 2009, based on criteria established in /nternal Control-—integrated Framework issued by the
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The Group's board of directors and
management are responsible for maintaining effective internal contro! over financial reporting and the Group's
management is responsible for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting,
included in the accompanying Management Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility
is to express an opinion on the Group's internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board
(United States), Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in alf material respects. Our audit included
obtaining an understanding of interna! contro! over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness
exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal contra! based on the assessed risk.
Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We
believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding
the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance
with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal contro! over financial reporting includes those
policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly
reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company: (2) provide reasonable assurance that
transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance
with authorizations of management and directors of the company: and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding
prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have
a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.
Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become
inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may
deteriorate.

In our opinion, the Group maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of
December 31, 2009. based on criteria established in /nternal Control--Integrated Framework issued by the
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States) and Swiss Auditing Standards, the consolidated balance sheets of the Group as of December 31, 2009 and
2008, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in equity, comprehensive income. and cash
flows, and notes thereto, for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2009, and our report dated
March 25, 2010 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

lee

Mare Ufer
Licensed Audit Expert

KPMG AG

David L. EL Neh ke

Licensed Audit Expert

Zurich, Switzerland
March 25, 2610
THE TRIBUNE

iS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 7B



The Tribune







Amish Friendship Bread - part 2

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

Tribune Features Editor



fast food and immediate gratification, the idea of

| n a world bombarded with instant text messages,

waiting ten days to prepare two loaves of Amish
Friendship Bread seems strange.

Why devote ten days of
your life to preparing the bat-
ter when any number of bak-
eries have offerings to ease
your sweet tooth right now.

However I was intrigued
when my online editor gave
me a starter kit and suggested
it would make a great Taste
story. So we decided to do
our own “ Tribune newsroom
friendship bread experiment”
with less than perfect results.

ing smell due to the yeast but
the mix is totally good) The
other reporter forgot her bag
after a few days and so she
removed her self from the
experiment.

Perhaps the thought of not
having another Taste story
propelled me to continue
alone and I am quite proud of
myself for remembering to
mush my bag and follow the
instructions. It did help that I






Our business reporter, a
news reporter and my self all
took a starter kit and decided
we would do different
flavourings to compare.
Somewhere in the ten days
however, my coworkers for-
got the friendship. One bag
was thrown away because a
mother decided it had to be
bad- ( the bag has a ferment-

THE FRIENDSHIP starter bag on the date it was given to me.

HI



put the instruction sheet on
the fridge so at some point
throughout the day I was
reminded to check my batter.

Amish Friendship Bread
takes your mind back to a
simpler period of life when
all you had was time. Time
without the distraction of
modern conveniences (you
aren’t allowed to refrigerate it

or use a mixer or anything
metal to mix it) and when
having a cup of coffee and
dessert with neighbors was
the social event of the week.
The concept of Friendship
Bread is simple and sweet- a
friend gives you a starter bag
they received from a friend,
for the first five days you just
“mush” the bag, on day six
add flour, sugar, and milk to
the bag, days 7-9 just mush
the mixture and then on the
tenth day you are ready to
bake. The recipe is simple to
follow just like preparing any
cake. Each starter bag pro-
vides four more starter bags
and enough batter for two
loaves of bread.

The recipe allows you to
flavour the bread with the
pudding flavor of your choice.
I chose chocolate pudding
with cinnamon and sugar
sprinkled on top for added
taste. My friendship bread
turned out a consistency
between a cake and a brown-
ie with a mild taste of choco-
late. I would have preferred a
sweeter taste and would
probably add a bit more sug-
ar anda more milk to make
it a little more moist.

My co-worker who gave
us the starter bag flavoured
her friendship bread with
lemon flavoured pudding and
lemon zest. It brought out
the yeasty flavoring of the
bread giving it a sour dough
taste which was pretty good
as well.

Ihave given my three bags
to my mom, my aunt and a
cousin studying to be a chef
and can’t wait to sample their
results next week. I think I
will try butterscotch for my
next batch. And so the friend-
ship continues.











(ARA) - Want to do some-
thing good for your heart?
Find new ways to increase
your intake of potassium. This
nutrient may help reduce the
risk of high blood pressure
and promote heart health.
The U.S. Food and Drug
Administration reports that
diets containing foods that are
a good source of potassium
and that are low in sodium
may help reduce the risk of
high blood pressure and
stroke.

Did you know potatoes are
a good source of potassium
and contain no sodium? In
fact, one medium potato (5.3
ounces) with the skin on con-
tains 620 mg of potassium.
That's 18 per cent of your dai-
ly requirement and more than
a banana. Need more reasons
to love potatoes? Read on.

1. Did you grow up listening to
your mother tell you to eat your
vegetables? Well, potatoes are

vegetables, so eat away.

2. This one's simple: one medi-
um-sized potato (5.3 oz.) has
110 calories and is

fat- and cholesterol- free.

3. Potatoes (with the skin) are
a good source of potassium.
Research shows that potassi-
um may help lower blood pres-
sure, contributing to a heart-
healthy diet.

4. Hit by a cold? What you eat
can help fight it off. A medium-
sized spud has nearly half the
recommended daily value of
vitamin C and is also a good
source of vitamin B6.

5. Potatoes are also a source of
dietary fiber, a complex carbo-
hydrate, which is known to
increase satiety and help with
weight loss.

6. Russets, reds, fingerlings,
blues, purples, yellows and
whites - with six common fresh
potato varieties, there's always
a new color or texture to exper-
iment with.

7. No time to boil or bake?



That's a good thing. The quick-
est methods for cooking pota-
toes, microwaving and steam-
ing, are also the healthiest
because they allow the potato
to retain the most nutritional
value.

8. Potato casserole, potato sal-
ad, mashed potatoes, baked
potatoes, roasted potatoes -
what do these dishes have in
common? They can all be
made in less than 20 minutes
and without turning on the
oven or boiling water.

9. Potatoes with skin rank



highest for potassium content
among the top 20 most fre-
quently consumed raw vegeta-
bles and the top 20 most fre-
quently consumed raw fruits.
That means they have more
potassium than a banana, more
than broccoli, more than an
orange, more than spinach ...
you get the idea.

10. For a potato dish that's
packed with potassium, try
Quick and Healthy Microwave
Mashed Potatoes or visit
www.potatogoodness.com for
more ideas.

QUICK AND HEALTHY
MICROWAVE
MASHED POTATOES

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Cost per serving: $.37
Makes four servings

INGREDIENTS:

11/4 pounds Russet potatoes
(Red, white or yellow-fleshed
potatoes can be substituted)
1/2 cup each: nonfat plain
yogurt and fat-free milk

11/2 tablespoons healthy but-
ter spread

1/4 teaspoon sea salt (or 1/2



teaspoon garlic or seasoned
salt)
Freshly ground pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

Place whole potatoes (do not
poke) into microwave-sate
dish. Cover dish. (If covering
dish with plastic wrap, poke
small hole in plastic.)
Microwave on high for 10 to 12
minutes depending on strength
of microwave. Use oven mitts
to remove dish from
microwave; carefully remove
cover and mash well. Stir in
yogurt, milk, butter spread and
seasonings. Cook for a minute





or two more to heat if neces-
sary.

Nutritional analysis per serving
with skins:

Calories: 170, Fat: 3.5 grams,
Saturated Fat: 1 gram, Trans
Fat: 0 grams, Cholesterol: 0
milligrams, Sodium: 220 mil-
ligrams, Potassium: 644 mil-
ligrams, Carbohydrates: 29
grams, Fiber: 2 grams, Sugar:
4 grams, Protein: 5 grams, Vit-
amin A: 10 per cent, Vitamin C:
50 per cent, Calcium: 10 per
cent, Iron: 6 per cent

Courtesy of ARAcontent

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PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010

SUES

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune





Kappa Alpha Psi hosts ‘Impromptu’

ON FRIDAY April 30th Kappa
Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc in partner-
ship with the British Colonial Hilton
Nassau will be host “Impromptu” in
the ocean front gardens of the his-
toric British Colonial Hilton, Down-
town Nassau.

This is the 5th annual Evening of
Jazz, Wine, Art and Soul hosted by
the fraternity and will begin with
cocktails at 7pm and the show will
begin at 7.45pm.

The target audience will be young
professionals, trendsetters, city slick-
ers, tastemakers and music enthusi-
asts of all varieties.

The fraternity selected some of the
most talented musicians and visual
artists in the Bahamas to come
together in this most spectacular
night of artistic fusion.

Impromptu has become a marquee
event of the social calendar and with
Nassau Harbor as this year’s back-
drop the night is expected to be noth-
ing shy of pure magic.

This year headline performer will
be the legendary American Jazz Sax-
ophonist Jon Saxx and the Endless
Possibilities Band.

Jon Saxx is an amazing talent who
has played with countless musical
greats including Mary J. Blige, Mor-
ris Day and the Time, Anthony
Hamilton and Keith Sweat . He was
most recently featured at the annual
“Jazz in the Gardens” event in Mia-
mi, the “Jamaica Jazz and Blues Fes-
tival” in Montego Bay and is the offi-
cial saxophonist for the NBA’s Mia-
mi Heat.

A number of “break out” musi-

cians from the local scene will also
perform to inject a different shade
of soul to the night.

Proceeds from the evening will go
to Guide Right - the fraternity’s
national mentoring program for ado-
lescent boys at risk. Over the years
Kappa Alpha Psi has provided edu-
cational, developmental, financial and
moral support to these young men
and has positively shaped many lives.

Kappa Alpha Psi is an internation-
al organisation of professional men
who firmly believe in achievement in
every field of human endeavor. The
organisation has served the commu-
nity for nearly a century and is par-
ticularly proud of their record in the
Bahamas where the orgnisation assist
countless communities and charities
annually.



& â„¢



6 BIVI PRESENTS

rans



By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



the platform stylists at the

Bahamas Technical &
Vocational Institute (BTV)
hair show, “Transformation
2010: Recreating Beauty
Through Elegance” took a
simple daytime hairstyle
and transformed it into a
high fashion up-do to com-

pliment evening wear.

Attendees were blown away by
the showcase. But there was one
in particular that had the audi-
ence glaring in amazement.

It was big, and colorfully deco-
rated, featuring an “under the sea”
theme. “Accessories featuring sea
creatures like the starfish, and
seashells decorated this bold and
beautiful hairstyle. A miniature
fish tank stood tall in the center of
the hair. The show which took
place at Superclub Breezes a few
weeks ago gave the students at
the institute an opportunity to
showcase their cosmetology skills.

And they showed off their tal-
ent live on stage in front of guests.

“The students performed live
on stage using a model that night.
The only thing they did was pre-
relax and pre-color the hair before
the show but they did everything
on spot,” Andrea Taylor cosme-
tology coordinator at BTVI told
Tribune Entertainment.

N just 20 short minutes,



formation 2010



CLEOMIE WOODS, Mistress of Ceremonies; Hair Model; First Place Student Hairstylist Winner in Daytime Comb-Out and Evening
Comb-Out categories, Jan Knowles, Regional Manager of Public Relations and Communications, RBC; Andrea Beneby -Taylor, BTVI
Hair Show Event Chairperson.



To make sure the women in the
audience were on point with their
hair trends, the students provided
a crash course on what styles to
wear during the day and the
evening.

“The ladies demonstrated how
to change a day time look into a
evening look. They also showed
the audience the looks that are
perfect for day and the looks that
are perfect for night,” she said.

The hair show allowed students
who desire to break into the beau-
ty industry the experience of
working live which Ms Taylor said
was beneficial.

“There are companies that are
looking for platform artists who
can demonstrate how products
should be used. But it is rather
hard finding stylist who are inter-
ested in performing live. They can
also become salon reps or product
reps. We wanted to expose the
ladies to these avenues,” Ms Tay-
lor said.

Along with the thirteen ladies at
BTVI, two high school students
participated in the show. And
because of their dazzling creations
they were awarded a scholarship
for two years to attend the insti-
tute.

Additionally, the first, second,
and third place winners of the hair
show were also awarded a educa-
tional scholarship from ASHTAE
salons located in North Carolina.

Ms Taylor added “The ladies
have done an excellent job at the
hair show and they deserve special
commendation. The show built up
their self esteem because some of
them complained of how nervous
they were before going on stage
but when they got out there they
did well,” she said.

“We want to expose Bahami-
ans to what BTVI has to offer.
We offer courses in barbering,
massage therapy, facial technolo-
gy, and nail technology,” she said.



UNDER the Sea theme by C.V. Bethel student.







—



-



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7



© CHAMBER PRESENTATION:

‘SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE’
On Thursday, April 29,
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce's Institute pre-
sents a workshop called
‘Superior Customer Ser-
vice’ that teaches you the
skills for superior customer
service, how to build a cus-
tomer-oriented environ-
ment and how to handle
conflict successfully. Cost:
$190/chamber members;
$240/non-members. Tele-
phone: 322-2145. Email:
rabrams@thebaham-
aschamber.com.

© RAS ISHI: ‘DIARIES

UNLOCKED’ OFFICIAL OPENING
The National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas invites you
to the official opening of
the exhibition Ras Ishi:
‘Diaries Unlocked,’ Thurs-
day, April 29, 6.30pm at
the gallery. RSVP, Tele-
phone: 328-5800 by Mon-
day, April 26.

* LYFORD CAY
MEMBERS FOUNDATION

FISHING TOURNAMENT

On April 30 through May
1, Lyford Cay Members
Foundation host a fishing
tournament that acts as a
qualifier for the Interna-
tional Game Fish Associa-
tion's World Champi-
onship. Telephone: 362-
4910.

* BAHAMAS HUMANE
SOCIETY'S FUN DAY

AND JUMBLE SALE

Saturday, May 1, The
Bahamas Humane Society
holds this year's flea mar-
ket/jumble sale in conjunc-
tion with its annual Family
Fun Day featuring a dog
show, bouncing castle and
the newly instituted Best
Kept Potcake Award.
12pm-5pm at Botanical
Gardens. Telephone: 323-
3157. Email: bhuma-
neevents@gmail.com.

* 3RD ANNUAL FRITZ GRANT

TRACK AND FIELD INVITATIONAL
The 3rd annual Fritz Grant
Track and Field invitation-
al will be held at the
Thomas A. Robinson Sta-
dium on Saturday, May 8.
Categories are open to all
ages under 7,9, 11, 13, 15,
17 and open. Entry fee:
$5/per athlete and $8/per
relay team. Deadline, Apr
27. Bamboo Town pre-
sents its 2nd annual spring
festival, noon-until at Zion
Boulevard Park. Come on
out and enjoy lots of enter-
tainment, lots of food, local
arts and crafts, free face
painting and bouncing cas-
tle for kids. Opening cere-
mony at 4pm. Telephone:
326-0915.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 2010, PAGE 9B

ARTS



Paradise

PP Wns Meet the chefs of Paradise Plates

By JEFFARAH GIBSON OD MPA CEN Cte TIAN F
Tribune Features Writer his mango coconut charlotte cake. ff

TTENDEES at the Hands For Hunger - Par-

adise Plates fundraiser event to be held

at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom on May
23 will experience the rich flavour of a curry
conch chowder made by Freddie Van Breugal,
chef owner of Van Breugals Restaurant, and the
delightful taste of a mango coconut charlotte
cake made by Ronny Deryckere, pastry chef at
the Patisserie Tea Room.

Both chefs have “put their foot” in each of the recipes,
that will have diners saying “mmmmmm” as they “lick
their platters clean”.

The curry conch chowder made with a little twist, and
pleasantly prepared is a combination of savoury flavors.
Chef Freddie calls it a culturally mixed dish, giving that it
is native and there are a few Italian spices in the creamy,
conchy mixture. “There is a gist to the conch chowder. It
is an ethnic mix of flavors,” Chef Freddie told Tribune
Taste.

This is no regular conch chowder, added to the mixture
is coconut milk, conch of course, diced potatoes, basil, and
other delicious herbs.

Chef Freddie is not the only one to utilise coconut in his
recipe, Chef Ronny did the same in his presentation of the
mango coconut charlotte cake which he made so cre-
atively.

Enticing to the eyes and taste buds, the sliced cake
covered in coconut shreds sits in the midst of two swirls of
whip cream topped with sliced kiwi, mango, and straw-
berries. And to accent the flaky taste of the coconut
cream cake, a miniature nutty bar sits at the bottom of the
creamy swirls.

Tasting this creation is an experience is to die for.

Both Chefs have participated in the Hands For Hunger
ever since it’s inception last year. They discussed their will-
ingness to contribute to cause as such.

“T participated in the event last year. And I am happy
to be part of it again this year. There are people out
there who are hungry and is important that others aware
of this,” Chef Ronny said.

Chef Freddie added: "I will always be part of the Hands
For Hunger it raises a lot of money and it makes differ-
ence,” he said.

Hands For Hunger is a non - profit humanitarian organ-
isation committed to the elimination of hunger and the
reduction of waste in the Bahamas.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
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*)|INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


WEDNESDAY,





APRIL 28,



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es at J

- By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



IVE Tanya Evans a HB

number 2 graphite

pencil, a blank sheet
of paper, and in one hour or
more, depending on the
image, she can create a very
convincing three dimensional

portrait.

Characterised by precise strokes
and deft lines, pencil art is one of
the crafty outlets for talented Tanya
to unleash her artistic leanings.

She was 11 when she realised that
making images come to life on a
paper medium was her calling.

“T was in primary school when I
realised my gift. My 5th grade home-
room teacher said to me “Tanya you
have a gift you know’. I was not like
the other kids in my class who were
just drawing apples and oranges,”
she said jokingly.

Though her talent is more clear
than a crystal ball, Tanya is one of
those individuals who find them-
selves contrasting their dreams, and
heading down a different career
path.

And though she has not honed
this at home hobby into a profes-
sion just yet, she has been head over
heels, or even a little “trip” for arts
and craft.

While she has dipped her hands in
a little bit of everything surrounding
arts and crafts, her main subject mat-
ter is drawing realistic pencil por-
traits.

“T have been trying just about any
and everything but I do not only
draw portraits. However this is my
favourite type of artwork because I
can make images more vibrant and
realistic on paper,” she told Tribune
Arts.

While she lies comfortably in her
queen size bed, she cranks up her
favorite tunes and her hand express-

01

Plates

4| See page nine

es the fantasies of her mind.

To be good at anything time must
be invested. And to get to the level
she is today with her artwork she
has spent hours of practice, dedicat-
ing a separate corner of her life to
doing just that.

She’s no novice, since she contin-
ues to enhance her skills, drawing a
variety of portraits even though she
doesn’t have an open platform to
showcase her work.

“T did these portraits a few years
ago. Since that I have gotten so
much better. I have been perfecting
my skills in every way that I can,”
she said.

The portraits shown are just a few
of the pieces she has done. Her latest
work was done in 2008, when she
participated in the Ministry of
Tourism’s annual Authentically
Bahamian Craft Show which was
held at Wyndham Nassau Resort
and Crystal Palace Casino. That year
she took home the award for Best
Authentic Art piece. And when she
participated in the Craft Show in
2007 she was awarded for Best Craft.

“In 2008 when I participated in
the Craft Show I made a sea grape
leave design. What I did was painted
glossy sea grape leaves onto a can-
vas. They were painted in a variety
of colors and I ran a paint hardener
over the back of the leaves. It was so
exotic and different and it was prob-
ably one of my best works yet,” she
said.

Additionally, she participated in
the Central Bank art show in 2007
where she had a few paintings on
display.

Life has brought many changes
for Tanya . Ever since the birth of
her son last year, time has not
allowed her to get back into her art
and craft work. And while this is her
reality at present, she said the art
community in the Bahamas can
expect more from her in the years to
come.

Persons interested in any her work
may contact 503-2373.

BIVI presents
“Transformation






see page eight



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