Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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The Tribune



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Volume: 106 No.128

aU a)

PLP chief ‘offended
by Christie remarks



SSA

Decision to resign
‘made alter meeting’

PLP CHIEF Melissa
Sears quit her job as vice
chairman because she was
“offended” by verbal
remarks made by party
leader Perry Christie, The
Tribune learned last night.

As speculation mounts
surrounding her departure,
it is being reported that she
decided to resign following a
meeting in Grand Bahama.

According to sources very
close to the matter, Mr
Christie was in Grand
Bahama to rally the party’s
machinery sometime earli-
er this month. At this meet-
ing, it was claimed, he made
the point that he had “no
time” for Ms Sears — who
was in earshot of the
remark.

Although the comment
was admittedly “harsh”, one
PLP source explained that
the party leader was send-
ing the message that he was
aware of Ms Sears’ alleged
allegiance to other would-
be leaders within the organ-
isation.

“She was a known anti-
Christie during the PLP con-
vention and even before
that. So he had to let her

%

know that he was aware of
that fact. In this (political)
climate you have to do what
you have to do,” the source
added.

When contacted for com-
ment on the matter, PLP
chairman Bradley Roberts
said he doubted that Mr
Christie would make such a
remark, and directed The
Tribune to speak to the par-
ty leader directly.

However, repeated
attempts to reach Mr
Christie proved unsuccess-
ful, and messages left were
not returned up to press
time last night.

While Ms Sears’ alleged
allegiance to one faction or
the other is not known offi-
cially, it has been reported
that she was a staunch sup-
porter of PLP deputy leader
challenger Obie Wilch-
combe who came to her
defence in yesterday’s Tri-
bune.

In that article, Mr Wilch-
combe said Ms Sears was an
“outstanding young woman”
who still has a career in pol-
itics.

SEE page 15

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USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

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SEE PAGE THREE






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TOURISTS CROSS the rain-soaked streets in Down-
town Nassau yesterday. Heavy rain caused disruption in
south Florida and the northern Bahamas.

e SEE STORY RIGHT AND PHOTOS ON PAGE TWO

Hotel union set
for third election

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A THIRD and hoped final election will select the
next president of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union today with just two candi-
dates going head-to-head for the top post.

Twice victorious Nicole Martin of the A Team,

SEE page 12

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Gay nightclut in
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properly licensed





By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



THE gay nightclub that was
the scene of a massive fight and a
woman’s death is properly
licensed to operate, according to
property owner Kendal Mor-
timer.

Orial Farrington, 20, of Nel-
son Street, was found dead in

SEE page 15





TINE

Bahamians stranded

as thunderstorms

ground many flights

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



SEVERE thunderstorms left Bahami-
an airline passengers stranded yester-
day with flights being grounded at Ft
Lauderdale and a number of local flights
delayed or cancelled.

Heavy rain, high winds and potential
tornadoes threatened south Florida and
the northern Bahamas yesterday with a
severe thunderstorm warning issued by
the Bahamas Department of Meteorol-
ogy for Grand Bahama at around 1lam

SEE page 15







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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

Negotiations
between COB,
union could
pass deadline

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DISPARITIES between the
number of clauses left to be
negotiated within the new
industrial agreement for facul-
ty at College of the Bahamas
(COB) could push negotiations
past its estimated three-week
deadline.

Last week, COB estimated
that there were some 32 claus-
es left outstanding in the
industrial agreement, however
the faculty's union told The
Tribune that the number of
clauses left, by their count, is
actually 51.

The negotiation process
lets both teams present their
clauses to be discussed and
agreed upon for inclusion in a
new agreement.

The union said it has sub-
mitted several clauses since
February of last year but
these have yet to be addressed
by the college.

The negotiating teams
agreed on a three-week dead-
line in which to sign off on the
remaining clauses, and have
consented to a "lock-down",
meeting Monday through Fri-
day and half-day on Saturday.
After faculty members took
strike action on the first day
of exams at the tertiary insti-
tution — seeking a timely reso-
lution for industrial agree-
ment negotiations — it was
agreed that if they are still
unable to finalize an agree-
ment by May 14, external
negotiators will be brought in
for a total of seven days to
expedite the process.

During the faculty's four-
day strike, which began last
week Monday, both COB and
UTEB expressed difficulties
with clauses dealing with
appointments, promotions,
duties and responsibilities,
performance assessments and
salaries.

On their first day back to
the negotiating table, the
teams signed off on two out-
standing sub-clauses relating
to sick leave and retirement.



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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE









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THIS DARK CLOUD coms over Fast Si Street, Nassau as severe weather moves in.









INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

calendar contest

sec Contest details listed on our website

Fark Guedens Antes! Calender Photo Contest ic open to all phodepraphers, The tithe ber
the company’s 200) calendar will be “A Celobrniion of Netare™. Photigmphs may be ot any
subject (animate or inanimata), scane or hisirocial structure that faatures a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas.

DEADUIAE FOR ENTRIES IS JME 30, 2000 AS eeies are cubetitied af the canes rie
and will neq be returned

Al anireas ana to ba delivered po Famely Guardian's Corporate Lantre, Willige Road and
East Bay S0rot, Nassau, beewnen Siam and SO. mweakdays only. Envalopes should
bo marked “Calendar Contest”.

Al setries must be accompanied by a eigqned and completed offical entry lorm, available
at any Farly Guardian office, as published in thee niaspacars onan the webeatie (ewe,
famiyguardan.coml.

Only echour images vil be congiiared, Ina ged mat be provided aa digital liagen C0, figital
images must be of high quality 2700 2 F100 peels or larger). Digital images showing signe
of photo manipelation, rescligion anhancemerd or comprassion wall be raacted, To eran
the best colour reproducton, digéal images should be supplied in MAW. TIFF of high quality
JPEG and in dea angina colour format the camera wees [LAB er AGE), All entries must be
eupplied wth colour prints |B« 10) which wall be used in the jedging process. (Note: prints
submitted without CO's will net be eligible aed vice versal. The phatagmpher's name,
phete subject and phote location must be atittes on the reverse af the print,

Judging of aririag wil ba head om Gaaity, inners, comeasitinn, ealaur, originalny
and gealite of photograph. Particular arans and subjects of interest are datalked an the
website (ewre.lamilyguardiancoml. The phoiographs selected will 2epear in Family
Gueedian's 2017 calendar. The decision of the judges wall be feral.

A ogi certificate valued at S00 wil be presented fee each of ihe photograpes
selacted, Pieiayraphic cradie wil be given in The talaniae The tumber of aittiag par
photographer is limited to a maimum of 5 phone,

The winning photographs, along with all peblicaton and reproduction rights attachad
tharete, become the property of Family Guardian and the company rosarms the nightio
use suchin the future. Photos wall mot be retumed,

Employees of Family Guardian, tg affiliated companies of family amber are nor aligibia,
Frowioushy publishad photos are not eligible,

FAMILY GUARDIAN Gate

mony O b AL ri
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Visit www. familygu ardian.com for
special hints and contest details!

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{ Reture this berm with photos aed CO tn

' Calendar Geant

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| Vilage Road & Eset Bay Street, P0. Box 55-6292
1 Nassae, Bahamas

Nama:
Telephone: 7 H f

EMail:

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dB
Ss us
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Pl rar LY

PHOTOS:
Felipe Major
/Tribune staff

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters

P13,14
Peromie

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION
Business Pilp2soedeor oneal

CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



Lady Patricia

Isaacs, wife of

former FNM
leader, dies

LADY Patricia Isaacs, the
wife of former FNM leader
Kendal Isaacs, died on Sun-
day night.

Announcing her passing
yesterday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham offered his
sympathies to her family,
describing Lady Isaacs as a
well-known and well-loved
Bahamian whose personal
style and professional train-
ing and experience were
greatly admired.

“She possessed a bubbly
personality that afforded her
to great enjoyment of the arts,
both performing and visual.
She was very family oriented,
enjoyed tennis (in which her
husband excelled), music and
dancing and other social activ-
ities,” Mr Ingraham said.

Lady Isaacs and her hus-
band worshipped at Holy
Trinity Anglican Church,
although before marriage, as a
member of the Fountain fam-
ily, she attended the Central
Gospel Chapel.

A qualified nurse, Lady

Governor-General
visits recovering
Sir Durward Knowles

GOVERNOR-General Sir Arthur
Foulkes visited Sir Durward Knowles
yesterday at his home in Winton Mead-
ows, where he is recovering after a traf-

fic accident.

Sir Durward, 92, was injured in the
crash, and was released on Friday after
spending some time in the intensive
care unit at Doctor’s Hospital.

The Olympic gold medalist suffered
cuts and bruises when he was involved
in a three-car collision on the Eastern

Road on April 12.

Isaacs became the matron of
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, where she served for
many years before becoming
Training Officer for the
Bahamas Public Service.

There, she negotiated with
universities and other train-
ing centres abroad to facili-
tate the development of
future senior public officers,
many of whom rose to the
position of permanent secre-
tary.

The prime minister said:
“With exceptional good
humour, she did all she could
to advance the cause of
Bahamians in general and of
women in particular.

“She supported her hus-
band in his leadership of the
FNM and carried the burden
of organising and implement-
ing events on his behalf. A
loyal, gracious and beautiful
lady, Lady Isaacs endeared
herself to all.

“When I became prime
minister in 1992, I sought
advice and suggestions from



LADY Patricia Isaacs pictured with Kendal Isaacs in me



Lady Isaacs. Without hesita-
tion she provided sage, sober
and honest advice then and
continued to do so.

“As a final gift to the
Bahamas, Patricia Lady Isaacs
served as a Deputy to the
Governor-General from July,
1997 until April, 2002 when





she elected to resign her
appointment.

“The Bahamas has lost a
noble daughter. However, her
rich example of devotion to
family, church, and state will
never be erased. She was a
Lady deserving of the high-
est praise.”












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TWO women in court on weapons possession charge * Crepe Thread 2 for $1.00

TWO women were arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on a weapons possession charge.

Zonovia Bain, 21, of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates; and Krystal Fernander, 20, of Pinewood
Gardens, were arraigned before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Carolita Bethell in Court 8, Bank
Lane yesterday charged with possession of an

unlicensed firearm.

It is alleged that on Saturday, April 24, the two
women were found in possession of a .380 Hi
Point pistol. Both women pleaded not guilty to

the charge.

They were each granted bail in them sum of

$7,500.

the charges.

hearing.

BPA STORY CORRECTION

IN AN article in yesterday’s
Tribune headlined “NIB no
longer negotiating with
Bahamas Pharmacy Council”
the Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association was incorrectly
referred to as the Bahamas
Pharmacy Council.

The Bahamas Pharmacy
Council is the government
agency, established through the
Pharmacy Act 2009, that regu-
lates the industry. All pharma-
ceutical professionals and busi-
nesses must be registered with
and licensed by the council.

The Bahamas Pharmaceuti-
cal Association is the profes-
sional body providing repre-
sentation for more than 90 per
cent of registered private phar-
macies. Pharmaceutical enti-
ties are not required to join the
BPA, but are encouraged to
do so.

Contrary to what was sug-
gested in the article, it is the
association (BPA), and not the
council (BPC), which is cur-
rently seeking to negotiate with
the National Insurance Board
(NIB) the terms of a contract
for private pharmacies under
the National Prescription Drug
Plan (NPDP).

The NIB has said it is no
longer negotiating, and the
contracts recently signed with
six pharmacies is the final con-
tract.

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e A 22-year-old Peter Street woman was
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on
several ammunitions charges.

It is alleged that on Thursday, April 22, Latoya
Carty was found in possession of four .38 bullets;
twenty .40 bullets; twenty .9mm bullets and twen-
ty-nine .25 bullets.

Carty, who was arraigned before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Carolita Bethell, pleaded not guilty to

She was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison
and is expected back in court on May 3 for a bail

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Parties tar other as Wall Street’s pal

WASHINGTON — Republicans and
Democrats are furiously casting each other as
Wall Street's handmaiden, playing to elec-
tion-year anger surging on Main Street. But
neither party has clean hands when it comes
to the financial industry.

Both parties have accepted huge amounts
of campaign cash from companies such as
Goldman Sachs, the investment bank facing
fraud charges from the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission. Both parties wel-
comed big business’ chief executives to the
White House when in power. Both share the
blame for deregulating the industry in the
1990s and bailing out Wall Street when the
financial sector was on the brink of collapse.

Not that either side will acknowledge tt.

Instead, Republicans and Democrats are
using President Barack Obama's push for
tighter controls on the industry to try to gain
the political advantage with voters ahead of
November's congressional elections, when
the balance of power in Washington is at
stake. "We need to enact a set of updated,
commonsense rules to ensure accountability
on Wall Street and to protect consumers in
our financial system," President Obama said
Thursday in New York, tapping into public
outrage over excesses that led to the eco-
nomic meltdown.

With polls showing more voters favouring
tighter controls on Wall Street, everyone
wants to be seen as siding with the little guy.

"Far from protecting consumers from Wall
Street excess, this bill would provide endless
protection for the biggest banks on Wall
Street,” said Senate Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky.

Looking to energize their voters and boost
fundraising, the national parties are trading
charges. "For years, Republicans stood by
while Wall Street ran wild," says a Democra-
tic National Committee television spot.
"Risky bets. Lax regulation. When the econ-
omy collapsed, Republicans looked the other
way. ... Now Republicans are working with
Wall Street lobbyists to block reform" that
would "protect consumers and prevent a
future bailout."

Countering, the Republican National Com-
mittee rolled out a video claiming the legis-
lation rewards Wall Street with a "perma-
nent bailout fund. ... Propping up Wall Street
is what Obama does, and Obama does it
well.”

The Centre for Responsive Politics found
that both sides raked in cash from the indus-
try they're vilifying.

In the current election cycle, the DNC col-
lected $6.2 million from the financial services,
real estate and insurance sectors and $3.7
million from other business interests. The
RNC has raised $2.5 million from the indus-
try and $2.7 million from other business inter-
ests. During the 2008 presidential campaign,
President Obama raised $40 million from the
industry and $37 million from other business
interests while Republican John McCain col-









WANTED

An International Pharmaceutical Company, well

lected $29 million and $16 million. Deregu-
lation is faulted for the financial industry's
crisis — and both parties played a role. The
Depression-era Glass-Steagall Act separat-
ed commercial from investment banking, but
in 1999 most of its restrictions were repealed
by a Republican Congress and Democratic
President Bill Clinton. In the fall of 2008,
President George W. Bush and the Democ-
ratic Congress backed a massive bailout of the
financial industry amid signs of impending
economic collapse. President Obama signed
off on the second infusion of cash shortly
after taking office. Such coziness with Wall
Street and politicians’ lack of candor about it
are likely factors in low job approval ratings
for Congress and an overall cynicism about
politics. However, the US public is conflicted.
More than half — 58 per cent — say that
"the government has gone too far in regu-
lating business and interfering with the free
enterprise system," and roughly half oppose
government exerting more control over the
economy. But, perhaps because their own
pocketbooks are at stake, people make an
exception for regulating the financial industry:
Sixty-one per cent say it's a good idea for the
government to more strictly limit the way
major financial companies do business.

A recent Gallup poll showed that voters’
ire was directed toward Wall Street on the
issue of giving Washington new powers over
the industry. In the survey, 50 per cent
favoured more regulation of Wall Street
banks while 36 per cent opposed. When the
question was asked more broadly — regulat-
ing large banks and major financial institu-
tions — 46 per cent favoured and 43 per cent
opposed.

All that — combined with the fact that
about two-thirds of likely voters own stock,
many of whom invest in tax-deferred retire-
ment accounts, underscores why the White
House as well as Republicans and Democrats
are competing to be the most populist. It also
helps explain why Democrats and Republi-
cans are trying to agree on a bipartisan bill
even as they publicly castigate each other.

"On one side are consumers and investors,
families and businesses and the vast majority
of Americans who want us to make sure the
financial crisis they just lived through can
never happen again,” said Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid of Nevada. "Democrats
are on their side, and we're ready to act."

House Republican leader John Boehner of
Ohio offered a different take.

"The president says that he wants to clean
up Wall Street, but when you look at this bill,
what he actually does is protect them from
ever having a financial problem," he said.
"This is a bad bill and Republicans are going
to stand with the American people, who are
standing on their tiptoes yelling, 'Stop.'"

American voters will have the last word —
in November.

(This article was written by Liz Sidoti, AP
National Political Writer).



established in the Caribbean, requires a








SALES MANAGER

for The Bahamas

Preference will be given to applicants who

meet the following requirements:

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Outgoing personality with good
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We offer:
Basic Salary
Travel Expenses
Health Plan
Pension Plan
Excellent Incentive Plan
Telephone Allowance

Why safety
managers are
needed for
building sites

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

During the construction of
the Atlantis Royal Tower I
had the opportunity to
observe the company’s safety
manager at work and was
able to learn a lot from him
about safety policy on large
construction sites. I was told
that he was a retired Admiral
of the United States Navy.

Observation of his policy
began on arrival at work.

If you did not have your
hard hat or hard tip boots, just
go home for the day.

If caught working on the
upper floors without wearing
the safety harness and having
it attached to the safety line.

Automatic suspension from
work.

Personnel, who appear to
have been drinking were
invited to the Medical Clinic
on site to take the breathalis-
er test. If found to be above
the limit — suspension for the
rest of the day.

There were random drug
tests and persons found to be
abusing drugs were suspended
for an indefinite period and
told to return with a certifi-
cate from an authorised clinic
indicating that you are drug

letters@triounemedia.net



free. Many Bahamians were
exposed to his policies and
learned safety in the work
place from him.

His policies and the
enforcement thereof resulted
in an accident free comple-
tion of the Royal Tower.

Government Ministries and
Corporations, construction
firms and industrial plants
should have on staff safety
managers, who will write and
enforce safety policies, which
could avoid serious accidents,
destructive fires and exten-
sive damage to property.

Such safety managers could
be persons on the staff or con-
sultants, who visit at regular
intervals to ensure that safety
measures are being enforced.

Persons employed at these
locations should be familiar
with fire and accident pre-
vention policies and must be
able to use available fire
extinguishing equipment.

The Straw Market fire is a
good example of our failure
to enforce safety policy. There

was supposed to be fire extin-
guishers on each floor of the
building.

I am told that there was
none. I am told that the same
applied to the adjacent Min-
istry of Tourism Building.
Safety Consultants or Safety
Officers would have been vis-
iting those buildings and not-
ed the absence of fire extin-
guishing equipment.

Finally, my inquiries have
revealed, that the mattress
warehouse, that was recently
destroyed by fire had no
sprinklers installed.

A building with such large
quantities of flammable mate-
rial should have installed
sprinklers.

I would suggest that the
Ministry of Works when con-
sidering plans for the con-
struction of warehouse must
insist on the installation of
sprinklers.

Insurance companies ought
to insist on sprinklers and
adequate fire fighting equip-
ment at all such buildings.

PAUL THOMPSON Sr
Nassau,
April 21, 2010.

‘Prime’ Andros farm land: Some
questions and a burning desire

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing this letter in
response to an article pub-
lished in The Tribune on
April 14, 2010.

BAIC, Lands, Agricul-
ture, handicrafts, and works
representatives visited a
three mile swath being cut
through south Andros.

Said to be leading into a
“new world for south
Andros in food production”
having “reached the island’s
thousands of acres of prime
farm land” the featured pho-
tos show a backdrop of trac-
tors in a field of exposed
limestone as the visitors con-
verse in the foreground.

The challenges cited in the
article mention a 70-foot hill
on the edge of the pine land,
the need for more work and
machinery and the request
of additional funding.

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The article mentions the
government's “food security
thrust.”

A thrust can be defined
as “to force on an unwilling
or improper recipient” or
“an attack or assault.”

The connotations of brevi-
ty, aggression and unsus-
tainable action are also
implied.

While I do not seek to
belittle the government’s
efforts to encourage devel-
opment in our family
islands, or hinder the earn-
ing potential of the folks on
that island I have a few sim-
ple questions and one burn-
ing desire.

Where is this prime farm
land or what types of crops
grow best on this exposed
limestone?

In this visiting contingent,
who represented the Min-
istry of The Environment?

Have they done the
appropriate geological sur-
veys to determine distance
to groundwater resources
and linkages within the Blue
holes before denuding this
area?

How many farmers are
immediately ready to move
onto this newly raped land?
I have more questions but
perhaps we can get a start
to some answers on these.

My one desire, however,

is that Government and the
people begin to move
toward a sustainable future.

I am tired of seeing areas
of tall grass choking aban-
doned fruit trees in family
islands where some farming
initiative has gone under.

It sickens me to see feral
goats, donkeys and sheep
run over in the street or
leaving nothing but thorny
bushes as they forage the
surrounding coppice and
consume all the edible
plants.

Most of all Iam annoyed
at Bahamians, men and
women, crying poor mouth
because they want a yard
covered in driveways and
Bermuda grass and prefer
to drive to the food store for
the fruits that their parents
and grandparents grew in
their backyards.

The hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars invested in
cutting down habitat could
have distributed fruit trees
to the homes in South
Andros.

What food is more secure
than the fruit tree growing
within the walls of your own
property?

ANCILLENO O DAVIS
Nassau,
April 20, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE



CABLE Bahamas has start-
ed with its 18-month pro-
gramme to upgrade all cus-
tomers in New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco and
Eleuthera to a 100 per cent
digital platform.

Just like the recent digital
transition in the United
States, all customers will
require a digital converter to
receive digital services.

Currently 40 per cent of
Cable Bahamas’ customers
have a digital set-top box and
receive their signal digitally,
the company said.

“Unlike the digital transi-
tion in the United States,
there will not be a specific
date when all signals will be
100 per cent digital”, said
David Burrows, the cable
company’s director of market-
ing.

Transition

“Our transition will take
place one neighbourhood at a
time, taking the utmost care
to ensure that homes that cur-
rently do not have digital set-
top boxes have them and that
their service is at the highest
level.

“After each customer in a
neighbourhood has the
required equipment then that
neighbourhood will be transi-
tioned to a 100 per cent digital
plant,” he said.

The digital transition will
begin in New Providence with
the first neighbourhoods
being targetted in the south-
eastern part of the island.

According to Mr Burrows,
“this network upgrade will
allow the increased availabili-

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

lied | Union chief John Pinder denies

reports of political challenge

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Public Service
Union John Pinder has
denied reports that he is
gauging support in the Fox
Hill area before vying for a
nomination on the Free
National Movement ticket
in the next general election.

Local news commentary
website, bahamasuncen-
sored.com, reported that Mr
Pinder is mounting a chal-
lenge against FNM Senator
Jacinta Higgs — who lost her
bid to take the constituency
from PLP incumbent Fred
Mitchell in 2007 — and was
rumoured to have been spot-
ted in bars and restaurants
in the area recently, pre-
sumably testing the waters.

Yesterday Mr Pinder, who
grew up in Fox Hill and now
lives near the community,
denied he had any plans to
challenge Mrs Higgs for the
FNM ticket. Still, the union
leader did not rule out the
possibility that he will seek
political office in the future.

"Jacinta Higgs and I are
cousins, Jacinta has that
nomination and I have no
problem supporting her as a







66, don't know why people
keep trying to say things like
that. If I want the Fox Hill nomi-
nation for any side, or as an inde-
pendent, I have enough family,
friends, and church associates — I
grew up in Fox Hill — to give me
the support I need.”

John Pinder



Fox Hillian,"
he told The
Tribune yes-
terday when
asked about
the report.

He added:
"I don't
know why
people keep
trying to say
things like that. If I want the
Fox Hill nomination for any
side, or as an independent, I
have enough family, friends,
and church associates — I
grew up in Fox Hill - to give
me the support I need."

He claimed that leading
up to February's hotly con-
tested by-election in the Eliz-
abeth constituency, branch

JACINTA
HIGGS



ty of high definition (HD) and
standard definition channels,
new services like video on
demand (VOD) and pave the
way for additional services yet
to be developed for the digital
platform”.

“This is great news for cus-
tomers and also satisfies the
telecommunications Commu-
nications Regulator (URCA)
recent requirements imposed
on Cable Bahamas,” he said.

THE Bahamas Electricity Corporation and
the Ministry of the Environment will launch a
series of town hall meetings on Friday to discuss
BEC’s plan to raise tariffs.

Faced with a crippling financial situation, the
state-owned power company is planning to

officers from both major par-
ties asked him to consider
entering the race for their
side.

Neutral

The BPSU boss, who also
oversees the National Con-
gress of Trade Unions, said
he chose not to enter the
fray because of his responsi-
bility to remain politically
neutral as a trade union offi-
cial.

"T told them that because
of my role in the union I
don't want to align myself
with any party at this time.
When it comes down to
dealing with the union I
don't cross the line. Iam a

increase its core rate. The first New Providence
meeting is scheduled for Friday, April 30 at 7pm,
at SC McPherson Junior High School.
Environment Minister Earl Deveaux and
Minister of State for the Environment, Phen-
ton Neymour, are expected to attend.

trade unionist and I am paid
by the union to give them
the best representation pos-
sible," he said.

Mr Pinder added: "I
believe both parties know
that I am not a fella who you
can tell the sky is red when I
know it's blue. You ain’ ga
muzzle me, so if you don't
want me to speak the truth
and help people, don't offer
me no nomination. If you
looking for someone to work
hard, I'm your man."

Right now, the union boss
said, he is focused on crafting
a new industrial agreement
for the public service, which
the BPSU plans to present
to government for review in
the coming weeks.

POEM AAMT MC aU



ern aba] SVU) 4





mi SUPREME COURT: Raymond Darling

Murder accused: I was not involved
in attempted armed robbery, shooting

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT — Murder accused Raymond
Darling told the Supreme Court yesterday
that he was not involved in the attempted
armed robbery and shooting which led to the
death of Tyna Pinder almost five years ago.

Tyna “Penny” Pinder, a 34-year-old office
clerk/secretary, was shot to death in her office
at the Cool Breeze Apartments on Novem-
ber 25, 2005 during an attempted robbery.

Darling and Herman Natari Francis are
accused of planning the robbery and killing
Ms Pinder.

Dennis Louis, 22, faced the same charges,
but was found dead at West End on February
28.

Darling is on remand, while Francis is out on
bail.

The defence opened its case yesterday morn-
ing. Darling, who is represented by K Brian
Hanna, gave an unsworn statement. Francis,
who is represented by Mario Grey, gave sworn
statement under oath from the witness stand.

Darling told the court he had known Dennis
Louis for about eight to 10 years, but that he
did not know Francis. He claimed that on
November 25, Louis and Francis came to his
Garden Villas home and asked for a ride in his
car.

Waist

Darling claimed Francis had an object in
his waist. He said he dropped them off near
Tabernacle Baptist Academy on Settler’s Way,
then went to his grandmother’s house on
Rhode’s Lane near Dr Roop’s Clinic.

Darling claimed he later received a call from
Dennis about a shooting. “Dennis told me
that Francis shot someone,” he said.

According to Darling’s unsworn testimony,
he contacted police about the shooting and
was told by officer Johnson to call him back.

“When I tried to call back he was not at the
office,” he claimed, adding that he later
learned that a lady got shot while watching
the news.

“T never planned to rob or kill anyone. I
only gave them a ride. I never sold drugs and
Inever stepped foot at the Cool Breeze Apart-
ments,” he told jurors.

“T voluntarily went to the police station to
help police in solving the matter. I took them
to where Dennis kept all his guns. I never
thought I would be arrested for this,” he said.

Herman Francis, who was 12 or 13 years
old at the time, said that he knew Dennis Louis
for some five years. They both went to Jack
Hayward High School and had played bas-
ketball on occasion.

He did not know Raymond Darling for very

long, probably about three months, he said.
They all sold drugs for money, he said.

Francis said he lived at the Cool Breeze
Apartments for a short period time. During the
three months he lived there, he claimed that he
never knew the victim.

He said that on November 25, he and Den-
nis Louis caught a ride with Darling in his car
—ared Toyota Camry.

Francis claimed that Darling drove to some
shabby looking apartments. The accused said
he thought they had gone there to sell drugs,
adding that he did not know anything about a
robbery.

He said Darling and Louis open the car
trunk and retrieved something that looked
like a gun wrapped in a sheet. He said he
stayed the in the vehicle, smoking a “joint.”

Francis said he then heard a loud sound and
ran off, later learning from a newspaper that he
was being sought by police.

He claims that the statement he gave to
police was not accurate and that some things
were left out.

Planning

Prosecutor Jillian Williams told jurors in
her closing remarks that Darling and Francis
acted together in planning the robbery. She
said police statements given by the accused
men show that both knew about the robbery.

She noted that Darling knew about a gun
and had said in his unsworn statement that he
saw Francis with a gun.

“He is guilty of murder because he must
know that a gun might have been discharged
and someone would be killed,” she told jurors.

Ms Williams also pointed out that Darling
led police to a shotgun which was discovered
by officers near Dr Roop’s Clinic on Rhodes
Lane, where his grandmother lived.

She said that Francis was not a truthful wit-
ness and that he too was, in fact, part of the
plan to rob the victim.

Ms Williams noted that in his statement to
police, Francis said Darling and Louis told
him that they were going on a “play” involving
a woman.

“A play in street terms meaning robbery,”
she said.

In his closing address to the jury, Mr Grey
said the police did not carry out proper inves-
tigations, failing to link any of the accused to
the crime at Cool Breeze Apartments.

He said there were no fingerprints, and no
forensic evidence from the shotgun or clothing.

Mr Grey also said that the two prosecution
witnesses who told police they got a good look
at the shooter’s face never participated in an
ID parade.

Justice Hartman Longley will deliver his
summation on Tuesday, after which the jury is
expected to deliberate.

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MRS Jane Fitzroy Bethel,
MBE, founder with her late
husband of Bethel Brothers
Morticians, who died on
Thursday, was recognised by
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty as “an outstanding moth-
er, businessperson, and com-
munity leader.” The party
said on Monday that it
mourned her passing.

“We salute this matriarch
of the Bethel family who
along with her husband,
Marcus H. Bethel Sr.,
founded Bethel Brothers
Morticians, one of the oldest
Funeral Homes in the
Bahamas,” said a statement
from the party.

Husband

Her husband, who prede-
ceased her in 1967, was a
former Member of the
House of Assembly for the
Western District of New
Providence. He was defeat-
ed in the 1956 election by his
brother-in-law, the late Sir
Milo Butler, Sr, the first
Bahamian Governor Gener-
al. Sir Milo was Mrs Bethel’s
brother.

Following the untimely
death of her husband, Mrs
Bethel raised and educated
all of their children who are
well known and have made
significant contributors to
the Bahamas. Mrs Bethel
was awarded the M.B.E by
Her Majesty the Queen for
her outstanding dedication
to community development.

Mrs. Bethel’s children
included, former Senator
and Minister of Health and
the Environment Dr. Mar-
cus Bethel Jr., who served in
the PLP Government
between 2002 and 2007,
retired Justice Rubie Not-
tage, and Ambassador Dr.
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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

The Republic of Zambia and the
Bahamas explore commonalities

BY BETTY VEDRINE

THE Bahamas and Zam-
bia have many things in
common, including a simi-
lar demographic profile, a
focus on major industries
such as tourism and agricul-
ture, and a vulnerability to
natural disasters such as hur-
ricanes.

Governor General Sir
Arthur Foulkes made this
statement during his first
official ceremony at Gov-
ernment House last Thurs-
day.

The Governor General
was addressing Dr Nevers
Sekwila Mumba, High Com-
missioner of the Republic of
Zambia to the Bahamas as
he presented his Letters of
Commission.

Similarities

“It is important to elabo-
rate that the similarities
between our two countries
extend further,” said Sir
Arthur.

“Despite the geographical
distance that separates us,





























Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHALLOW
WATERS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YANGCHEN VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WHITE CASHMERE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TOP PREMIER
INDUSTRIES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE TRIBUNE



we have both been blessed
with spectacular and extra-

THE NATIONAL
ISLAND REGATTA



ordinary natural beauty,
which, in your case, includes
one of the seven natural
wonders of the world — the
Victoria Falls along the
Zambezi River.”

The Bahamas also shares
other concerns with Zambia
including the social chal-
lenge of having a mostly
youthful population, con-
centrated urbanisation, pub-
lic health ravages, in partic-
ular HIV/AIDS and the par-
allel security risks of illegal
migration, the Governor
General said.

The Zambian High Com-
missioner congratulated Sir
Arthur on his new appoint-
ment and said he was
delighted to be visiting the
Bahamas.

Dr Mumba is a non-resi-
dent High Commissioner
and resides in Canada.

“Zambia and the



:



3

(BIS photo/Patrick Hanna)

i

GEORGE TOWN, EXUMA - Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes and Joan Lady Foulkes touched
down in George Town, Exuma for the National Family Island Regatta on Thursday, April 22.



Bahamas enjoy a close and
historical relationship on
many fronts,” said Dr Mum-
ba. “Bahamians and the
Zambian people share com-
mon values and aspirations,
creating the democratic val-
ues and respect of human
rights.”

The Letters of Commis-
sion were passed on to the
Governor General as the
Deputy Prime Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette looked on.

A reception followed in
the ballroom at Mount
Fitzwilliam.







THE 57TH
National
Family Island
Regatta
wrapped up
on Saturday
night after
four days of
competitive
competition
in Elizabeth
Harbour,
Georgetown,
Exuma.
Pictured is
Beerly Legal.







Legal Notice

NOTICE

CARLTON VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STRATO
ENCOUNTERS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SENTECO SANS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ROH HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIDEL VILLAS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GALLERIA
PALACE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Thousands

Show up for



day.

route.



fun wall

THOUSANDS showed up or the
Atlantic Medical Fun Walk on Satur-

The event began at 6am at Montagu
Beach with a warm-up session, and the
walk began promptly at 6.30am.

Participants followed one of two
routes, an “A” route for competitive
walkers and for those who opted to par-
ticipate at a less strenuous level, the “B”

The A route went west on Shirley
Street, to Church, north on to Church
Street to the new Paradise Island bridge,
east off the bridge to the Paradise Island
Golf Course and then back to Montagu
Beach via the old bridge, east on East
Bay St. to Montagu Beach.

Cultural evening puts spotlight on





Kathy Ingraham/Capital City Marketing



talented youth and various nations

THE cultures of the
Bahamas, Jamaica, Peru,
India and the Republic of
Congo were showcased at the
Rotary Club of Southeast
Nassau’s Sixth International
Cultural Evening.

Over 40 high school stu-
dents participated in the
event, performing songs,
dances and reading poetry.

Students from nine schools,
including R M Bailey, Doris
Johnson, Government High,
Aquinas College, St Andrew’s,
CI Gibson, L W Young, D W
Davis and C H Reeves repre-
sented six countries.

“What a great way to pro-
mote world peace and under-
standing,” said Anna DeGre-
gory, president of the Club.

The event was held at Gov-
ernment House in March.

Haitian Ambassador Louis
Joseph, Rotary District 7020’s
assistant district governor Felix
Stubbs, Rotarians, parents,
teachers and others enjoyed the
show the students put on.

Indian

Those attending the cultural
evening were treated to a clas-
sical Indian dance to a modern
Bollywood beat representing
India’s culture, the fast rhythm
of the Congo dancers and
drummers, a down-home rake
and scrape song, a father and
daughter performance on
piano, poetry in Creole and
many more talented perfor-
manices.

The international service
committee of the Rotary Club
of Southeast Nassau worked
with the various guidance coun-
selors and music teachers from
the schools to put the evening
together.

“We were really proud and
pleased by the performances
given today,” said John
Haughton, director of interna-
tional service.

“As you can see, the
Bahamas is full of talent and it
warms my heart to see the pos-
itive side of our youth and that
we are able to offer a venue for
them to show us what they have
got.”

This kind of programme,
Rotary Club of Southeast Nas-
sau said, falls perfectly in place
with Rotary’s four avenues of
service, one of which is inter-
national service.

This service encompasses





MEMBERS of the international service committee of the Rotary Club of
Southeast Nassau are recognised by director of international service
John Haughton (on stage). From left to right are: Rodney Eve, Afton Mox-
ey, Erica Rolle, Cleo Davis, Johann Bain and Charles Stuart.

Missing are Gordan Rodland and Ivan Carroll.

efforts to expand Rotary’s
humanitarian reach around the
world and to promote world
understanding and peace as
well as focusing on the youth
of the nation.

There are 12 Rotary Clubs
of the Bahamas with nine in
District 7020, which include the
islands of New Providence,




THE ROTARY CLUB of Southeast Nassau’s (ROSEN) International Culture Evening was held at Government

Eleuthera, Cat Island and Aba-
co. Rotary is an international
organisation of business and
professional leaders united
worldwide, who provide
humanitarian service, encour-
age high ethical standards in all
vocations and strive to help
build goodwill and peace in the
world.




Photo by Azaleta Ishmael-Newry

House. Nine local high schools showcased their talents and the culture of six countries. Shown in the pho-
to are (seated from left to right): Louis Joseph, Ambassador for Haiti; Felix Stubs, Rotary 7020 assistant dis-
trict governor; Anna DeGregory, president of the RCSEN; John Haughton, director of international service,
RCSEN; Charles Sealy II, incoming assistant district governor and past president of the RCSEN, and Val Mau-
ra, MC and director of public relations for the RCSEN. Standing are the performers; missing are three mem-

bers.



MS ABRAHAM of St Andrew’s
School illustrates her Indian
classical dance routine at the
Rotary Club of Southeast Nas-
sau’s International Cultural
Evening.

Photos:

By Azaleta Ishmael-Newry

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
Miwa emer te Merely
on Mondays

Crepir Suisstâ„¢

THOUSANDS at the a
start of the fun walk. 3






Photo: Wendall Cleare ’

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATIEND

‘Che 6th CB8tAnnual Convention

INTERNATIONAL UNITED PENTECOSTAL
FELLOWSHIP INC.

which convenes at Golden Gates World Quireach Miniseries Interna
lhinal on Carmachacl Road an Tiesday, Agel 27 bo Friday, April Ub,
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The Theme:

UNITED IN PROCLAMATION AND PRAISE.

Dynante speakers will inchede:

Bishop Fos Davis
Tuesday, April 27, 20010

Bishop John AM. Humes.
Thursday, April 28, 20010

Bishop Hulan Hanne
Wednesday, April 28, 2010

fm i

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Bishop Robert A McPhee
Friday, Apnl 30, 2010

Vuesday: Goldin Gast Word Quah Wali Siftemione Nigie
Wednesday: Chock of Ged of Prophecy Migit

Tharsday: Cure of Gad Taels oad Caltros tetas iene
Friday: Nighway Check af God Batons foc. Wight

COME AND BE BLESSED!!!



Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
Graduate Trainee Program

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas has operated an Apprenticeship Training
Program in The Bahamas since the early 1990's. Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
is now pleased to announce the continuation of its Graduate Trainee Program,
with the second intake of trainees intended for July 5, 2010. Full details and an
application form can be obtained from:

The Graduate Trainee Program Administrator
Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch
The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4'" Floor

Shirley & Charlotte Streets

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax No.: 242-356-8148

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A) AIM

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas is committed to identifying and
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The candidate must have graduated with a minimum grade point average of

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The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of a person employed

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 11



I don’t want our nation turned
into Sodom and Gomorrah

Pastor Lyall Bethel responds to Larry Smith article
YOUR SAY

By PASTOR LYALL
BETHEL

SEVERAL weeks ago
when a Tribune staff reporter
took on the Bahamian Church
community and scolded and
lectured us on our position on
homosexuality, I answered her
because she mischaracterized
us.
More recently Mr. Larry
Smith has entered the debate
in his usual mocking, sneering
tones, with gross mischarac-
terizations of me. Not able to
rely on the strength of his own
weak arguments, Mr. Smith
has resorted to name-calling
like the school yard children
do.

He wants to call me “aya-
tollah” because I, represent-
ing the vast majority of
Bahamians, don’t want to see
our nation turned into Sodom
and Gomorrah.

Mr. Smith’s comments were
reckless and irresponsible and
seem designed to demonize
me and cast me in the worst
possible light. This is the same
kind of bomb-throwing and
scare tactics that the lunatic
fringe on the left and the right
in the United States use to
demonize their opponents
rather than try to deal fairly
with their arguments. And
whereas the reporter and I
have argued over facts and
statements from our perspec-
tives on the rightness or
wrongness of homosexual
behaviour, Mr. Smith sought
to attack my character and
integrity.

This is now the second time
he has tried to lampoon me by
saying that I believe that there
is clandestine attempt or "con-
spiracy" to promote homo-
sexuality. Think for a minute
Mr. Smith, (and please try and
follow the simple logic here,
although it has eluded you all
these years), it can't be clan-
destine if it was publicly
announced, nor a conspiracy
when it is a widely known!

Why do Christians fight the
Agenda?

According to Mr. Smith,
“one is hard-pressed to dis-
cern what drives people like
Lyall Bethel ... to become so
obsessed with an imaginary
plot to take over the world
that he and others like to refer
to as ‘the gay militant agen-
da’.” Let me see if [can make
it plain for him. How am I an
Ayatollah because I see where
the homosexual agenda is
going and raise a cry of alarm?
One need only watch what is
going on in the U.S. and
around the world to under-
stand what compliance or

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refusal to take seriously the
homosexual agenda will bring
about.

Laws are broken to accom-
modate the agenda; San Fran-
cisco’s Major Gavin Newsome,
while elected to uphold the
law, instead illegally issued
marriage licenses to same-sex
couples. When responsible
law and order was restored
those certificates were over-
turned.

Elementary schools in Cali-
fornia that should be dealing
with the three “Rs” are being
made to instruct children with
graphic pictures that homo-
sexuality is normal! And as if
that were not enough in sev-
eral states these elementary
age children are being indoc-
trinated with children’s books
like “Heather has Two
Moms.”

At the direction of activist
judges and politicians, law
makers in Massachusetts leg-
islated same sex “marriage”
without going to the people.
Indeed some six states at last
count have used the legisla-
ture (avoiding the will of the
people who always vote against
it) to force the issue. In Cana-
da, they have effectively muz-
zled opposing voices by mak-
ing it illegal to speak out
against homosexuality or you
face a jail-term of two years. In
Sweden Pastor Ake Green
was sent to jail for suggesting
homosexuality is a sin from
which a person could find
wholeness in Christ. Thank
God his conviction was over-
turned.

I trust that the above sum-
mary has helped, but in short,
it is because they see the
silencing of the critics of
homosexuality, the threat of
jail terms for speaking their
consciences, their children
being indoctrinated with their
own tax dollars and the illogic
of political correctness gone
wild!

Much support for homosex-
uality is not based on logic and
reason but on blind ideology
that can be dangerous to the
rest of society. For instance,
in Scotland homosexual cam-
paigners want removed the
prohibition against blood
donated by men who have sex
with men taken away, even
though to do so would result in
a “five-fold increase in the risk
of HIV-infected blood enter-
ing the blood supply,” accord-
ing to the National Blood Ser-

SECURITY

vice. The prohibition was
based on high risk behaviour
alone!

Despite a 117 per cent
increase in syphilis infections
in men who have sex with
men, between 2002 and 2006,
the homosexual campaigners
still maintain there should be
no exclusion of their blood.
This is the kind of blind ideol-
ogy that Mr. Smith and oth-
ers seem to espouse: Damn all
just to affirm homosexuality.

As a pastor Iam in the busi-
ness of saving lives. I am there
to help families in their grief,
to be with them when they
receive the news that a loved
one has cancer or has died.
And while I am there to hold
the hand of the grief-stricken
widow, or receiving calls in the
middle of the night from a sui-
cidal teen or parent, Mr. Smith
sits around dreaming about
what damage he can do with
his poisonous pen. Indeed,
while he sits in his ivory tower
dispensing what he believes
passes for wisdom, we pastors,
whom he despises, are nurs-
ing back to health the disease
ridden bodies of the young
men and women whose bodies
have been feasted on, abused
and discarded by the power-
ful and the protected.

Our way is not to force
belief on anybody, but rather
to appeal to their conscience.
We have the right to appeal
for enforcement of the laws of
the land to stop immoral activ-
ity like gambling and strip
clubs, and that is what we do.
It is the Church that has come
to the aid of families that have
been made destitute by the
compulsive gambler who bet
on and lost the family home.
Perhaps Mr. Smith does not
Know of the many stories of
foreign women who are lured
here to model and dance, but
once they arrive are forced to
work as prostitutes and strip-
pers (Tribune, Thursday April
Sth, 2007 - “Panamanian
women claim they were forced
to have sex for money by Nas-
sau Club owners”). Or perhaps
he simply does not care.

In fact, the Jamaican media
has reported on similar stories
of Jamaican women being
lured to The Bahamas through
deceptive ads running in
Jamaica, and once they arrive
here, they are forced into pros-
titution and work in strip
clubs. Are we evil for trying
to shut down this illegal,



=





PASTOR LYALL BETHEL



immoral, exploitative practice
in The Bahamas? Imagine
that, while women are being
held against their will in this
country and forced into pros-
titution and stripping for a liv-
ing, pastors that try to shut
such places down are consid-
ered ayatollahs by Mr. Smith?
Who doesn't know that any
society that seeks to dominate
and exploit women is a
doomed society?

Why can't I demand along
with like-minded citizens that
politicians seeking office in
The Bahamas be made to
declare their views on various
issues that are important to
the Bahamian public, instead
of the carnival-like atmos-
phere that presently exists.
(Excellent candidates are put
forward by the various parties
but we are quickly helped to
understand that it has nothing
to do with them but rather the
party leader!)

If US Presidential candi-
dates had to declare their
views on issues like same-sex
marriage and abortion, why
shouldn’t our politicians?

For the record, every one of
the presidential candidates in
the last US election was made
to state his views on some of
the same topics, same-sex mar-
riage, abortion, etc. Why
should Bahamian citizens like
myself not have the right to
know what our would be elect-
ed representatives believe and
stand for, when we were blind-
sided back in 1996 during the
first announced "gay cruise”
by the reality that the govern-
ment had changed the laws
concerning sodomy back in
1991.

Despite Mr. Smith’s claims,
the Christian community is a
friend to the homosexual, cer-
tainly a better friend than he

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could ever be for all his “lofty”
idealism! Many homosexuals
are living lives of painful des-
peration filled with abuse, vio-
lence, jealousy, betrayal,
shame, drugs and alcohol
addiction and disease. Many
are corrupted, abused and
shattered souls who the church
has to come alongside to
redeem and restore, and some-
times house, feed and pay
their medical bills!

Typically, Mr. Smith embell-
ished my comments suggest-
ing that I believed that ALL
homosexuals “live filthy,
unhealthy, dangerous, and vio-
lent lives” and are child moles-
ters. I never said nor implied
that ALL homosexuals are
paedophiles or that all were
involved in sordid lives. I
merely put forth stats from sci-
entific sources and homosexu-
al commentators concerning
SOME homosexuals NOT
ALL (even going so far as to
give the percentages), and they
were given to help give a more
realistic view of the many
high-risk behaviours associat-
ed with homosexuality.

He tried to downplay my
comments about paedophilia
and the group NAMBLA
(North American Man Boy
Love Association) whose
chant is “Sex before eight
before it’s too late” by saying
that “almost all gay groups are
opposed to [them]”. But until
these demands stated at the

infamous rally are retracted,
and they are not allowed to
march in any homosexual
parade, then I can honestly
cite some homosexuals as
being interested in paedophil-
ia. And what were those
demands?

Point (2) - “Demands for
the legalisation of all forms of
sexual expression, including
paedophilia, and (3) Demands
to change the age of consent to
allow sex with minors.” Mr.
Smith cannot pull the wool
over our eyes with this.

It was helpful that Mr.
Smith posted my picture
because the person he
described was so unrecogniz-
able to me and everybody else
that I had to keep referring to
it to remember that he was
supposedly talking about me. I
am surprised that in his quest
to demonize me he did not
succumb to the obvious temp-
tation to draw some demonic
horns and fangs on my photo
to better establish his point.

While Mr. Smith has
accused me of bearing false
witness, I will leave it up to
God to decide who is bearing
false witness and judge accord-
ingly. The fact is that we can
do nothing against the truth;
truth (including the truth
about homosexuality) always
marches on, undeterred by
those who fight against it.
That is my consolation in this
debate.

#10 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 « Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 « Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 ¢ Evening: 324-4687

FUNERAL SERVICE

Full Military Funeral Service for
Principal Officer Samuel Alexander Duvalier, 45

of Danielle Street, Lynden Pindling
Estates and formerly of Congo Town,
South Andros who died on Thursday,
April 15th, 2010 will be held on
Thursday, April 29th, at 10:00am at the
Church of God Auditorium, Joe
Farrington Road. Officiating will be
Pastor Wesley L. Thompson assisted
by Pastor Leonard Clarke, Chaplain
HMP and other Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Rev. Samuel’s life has touched so many
and has left an indelible mark in the lives of all who loved him and
cherished him.

Unforgettable memories will forever linger in the heart of his loving
Wife: Betsy Duvalier; Mother: Sylvia Duvalier; Parents-in-law:
Deacon Dennis & Anna Rena Henfield; (4) Brothers: Michael,
Jeffery, Arnold & Rodger Duvalier; (6) Sisters: Doraline Johnson,
Janeth Forbes, Zelrona Outten, Louise, Andrea & Nadine Duvalier;
(11) Nephews: Renaldo, Perneko, Robert, Roger Jr., Jeffery Jr.,
Sharrow, Jefton, Dominique, Justin, Rodrick & Krisoff; (13) Nieces:
Shanressa, Deah, Cindy, Nachae’, Ashley, Shanrese, Hillary, Lisa,
Deneka, Stacy, Derecka, Diamond & Garnell; (6) Uncles: Rev.
James Pratt, Rev. Cedric Duvalier, Bruce of West Palm Beach
Florida, Edwin Burrows & David Duncombe; (5) Aunts: Althea
Moss of Freeport, Rev. Mildred Burrows, Rev. Shirley Gibson, Rev
Martha Duvalier & Mary Pratt; (3) Sisters-in-law: Lorraine, Sherice
& Patrice Duvalier; (3) Brothers-in-law: Joseph Johnson, Victor
Forbes & Dereck Outten; Cousins including: Rev. Roy Burrows,
Rev. Garth Fynes, Rev. Alfreda McPhee, Minister Cinderetta Johnson,
Minister Barbara Smith, Evangelist Karen Collie, Almina Ferguson,
Wilfred McKenzie, Pandora St. Fleur, Remilda, Almanda, Frisco,
Robert & Chester McKenzie, Samuel & Harold Lynes, Betty Sawyer,
Laverne Kelly-Grant, John Jr. & Edison Kelly, Deborah Brown,
Jennifer, Cedric Jr., Huey, Terrance, & Andrea Duvalier, Dellareese
Rahming, Lillith Burrows, Cheryl King, Monique “Madlyn”
McIntosh, Paulette Darville, Roshell Murphy, Marva Davis, Derick,
Joshua & Maxwell Burrows, Patrice Gibson-Price, Garnet Jr., Elton,
Raymond, Ramon, Harvey, Howell & Kayla Gibson, Verlene,
Carlton, Wellington, Sara, Altamase, Johnny, Linda & Neil Duvalier,
Paulene Johnson, Jethro Sr., & Ezekiel Pratt, Sonia Rolle, Calvin
Burrows, Joann, Tony, Randy, Angela, Arametta, Hubell, Albertha,
Drucilla, Kenneth & Terrance Duncombe, Joycelyn, Carolyn, Donny,
Ruth, Milestine, Murriel, Dave, Inez, Prudence, Norraine & Fenrick
Nottage, Eugene & Michelle Burrows, Elise, Maggie, Elsada
Burrows, Stephanie & Shelia Forbes, Hubert, Terry, Darvin &
Dwayne Duncombe, Stephanie Duncombe-Clarke, Marilyn
Duncombe-Cartwright & Desiree Duncombe-Saunders; A host of
other relatives and friends including: Rev. Leta David & family,
Pastor Wesley & Marsha Thompson, Pastors, Office and the entire
membership of Mt. Pleasant Green Baptist Church family, Samuel
Brown, Chief Officer Vernice Forbes, Chief Officer Sarah Gardiner,
Corporal Judy Whymms, Sargent Claudia Fraser, Corporal Sheineka
Basden, Principal Officer Charles Curtis, Sargent Gregory Daxon,
Sargent Zendall Colebrooke & family, Hon. Tommy Turnquest,
Superintendent Elliston Rahming, Deputy Superintendent Charles
Rolle and the entire Staff of Her Majesty’s Prison, Rev. Mary
Johnson, Rev. T.G. Morrison, Deborah Johnson, Wandalee Henfield,
Ursula Reckley, Mr. Herbert Brown, Ms. Catherine Weech and the
entire staff of Sandilands Rehabilitation Hospital, management &
staff of Migrafill Security, Sara Robinson, Ethel Forbes, Mable
Forbes & family, Brad Fraser, Fellowship Church of God In Christ
Church family, Officers & members of Vision of Hope Church of
God in Christ, Rev. Carrington & Mrs. Pinder and the entire church
family of St. Mark’s Native Baptist Church, management & staff
of Doctor’s Hospital, management and. staff of Private Medical
Ward PMH, the management & staff of Vincent Peet Law Chambers
and the entire Congo Town and South Andros communities.

Viewing will be held at Clarke’s Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway on Wednesday, April 28th from 10:00am
to 6:00pm and on Thursday from 9:00am until service time.



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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Hotel union set
for third election

FROM page one

whose landslide win in May was
ruled null and void by a
Supreme Court judge and sub-
sequent September win was
ruled out by the Court of
Appeal, is up against Lionel
Morley, The Workers Coalition
candidate.

Incumbent president Roy
Colebrooke has dropped out of
the race along with the leaders
of three other parties previous-
ly vying for the spot.

Mr Morley, of Grand
Bahama, said he is confident it
will be a case of third time
lucky for himself in a press con-
ference at the House of Labour
on Wulff Road yesterday.

The union’s current second
vice-president attributed Ms
Martin’s previous successes to a
low voter turnout and intimi-
dation tactics executed by her
supporters.

He called on the Commis-
sioner of Police to send his best
officers to manage the elections
tomorrow to assure voters they
will not be intimidated at the
polls.

Just 56 per cent of around
6,000 members of the country’s

largest union have voted in the
previous five elections, Mr
Morley said, as he called on
members not be discouraged
from choosing policy over per-
sonality.

High on his agenda is the
reversal of changes to the pen-
sion fund made in December
without consulting union mem-
bers, building two healthcare
clinics for members in Grand
Bahama and New Providence,
and ensuring all union officers
are trained for their positions.

“My campaign is about issues
and ideas,” Mr Morley said.

“This union is simply too big
to not have primary healthcare
for membership.

“This is not about personali-
ties, it’s about leadership, trans-
parency and accountability.”

The union has been rocked
by serious infighting and dis-
putes over funds for more than
two years which culminated in
calls for legal action over the
disbursement of almost
$700,000 allegedly authorised
by certain union executives in
August against the wishes of
others.

Mr Colebrooke said he
hopes the election will bring
stability back to the organisa-

tion. He said that building the
memberships’ confidence in its
representation should be an
important focus for whichever
team is elected.

Single mother-of-three Ms
Martin boasted a landslide vic-
tory in the May 28 election last
year, but the vote was then
declared null and void by
Supreme Court Justice Jon
Isaacs.

Supreme Court Justice
Neville Adderley then ordered
a new election process to be
held in September resulting in
another victory for Ms Mar-
tin.

However, the decisions made
by both Supreme Court judges
were then overturned in the
Court of Appeal and a third
election was set for today.

Unless something goes fun-
damentally wrong today, the
vote should be the union’s final
election.i

The polls will open at the
BHCAWU Headquarters,
Worker's House, in Harrold
Road, Bahamas Communica-
tion and Public Officers Union
(BCPOU) Hall in Farrington
Road and the National Centre
for Performing Arts on Shirley
Street from 8am to 6pm today.

PULSE UTA ie EES MTU Ca DES

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

Silsby declined comment from her jail cell.



A HAITIAN judge said Monday he has
dismissed kidnapping and criminal association
charges against 10 American missionaries
detained for trying to take a busload of chil-
dren out of the country after the Jan. 12
earthquake, according to Associated Press.

Judge Bernard Saint-Vil said Laura Sils-
by, the last of the 10 missionaries jailed in
Haiti, still faced a lesser charge for allegedly
organizing the effort to transport the 33 chil-
dren to an orphanage they were setting up in
the Dominican Republic.

Silsby faces up to three years in prison if
convicted on the remaining charge, the "orga-
nization of irregular trips," from a 1980
statute restricting travel out of Haiti signed by
then-dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier.



Shiller Roi, a lawyer for Silsby, declined com-
ment, saying he hadn't yet received the
judge's written decision.

The judge told The Associated Press that
the charge of organizing the trip was also
pending against Jean Sainvil, a Haitian-born
pastor from Atlanta who also helped organize
the venture. Sainvil did not immediately
respond to message left on his voicemail.

The judge, who spoke to AP in a brief
phone interview, did not explain the reasons
for his decisions.

It was the latest development in a case that
emerged amid the chaos following the dev-
astating earthquake, which the government
said killed an estimated 230,000 people and
left hundreds of thousands of people home-
less.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS

Gay nightclub in
mass brawl ‘is

properly licensed

FROM page one

the road about 100ft from the
entrance to the Garage nightclub.

She was allegedly knocked down
by a woman in a blue 2008 Toyota
Carolla. Police later located the vehi-
cle they believe was involved in the
incident on Yamacraw Road.

The incident happened in the
wake of a parking lot brawl at about
4am Sunday between a group of
enraged women throwing bottles
and rocks and pummeling each oth-
er with their fists.

Police are still investigating the
situation, but it is believed the row
broke out over a young girl at the
club.

The Gladstone Road nightclub is
located on Crown land, which is
leased by Mr Mortimer. The prop-
erty is primarily used for Kendal’s
Auto Parts, which is housed in a
building with four separate garage
units.

An extension building, connected
to the auto shop, is rented to the
operators of the Garage nightclub.
The operators could not be contact-
ed for comment.

Tribune sources within the
Department of Land and Surveys
said Crown land should not be sub-
leased unless there is written per-
mission to do so. He said the appli-
cation form for Crown land must

state the purpose for use, and any
deviations must be approved.

He said the Gladstone Road prop-
erty in question “was leased for the
expressed purpose of a car garage.”

Mr Mortimer said he did not want
to comment on questions related to
the terms of his Crown land lease
arrangement.

He said Kendal’s Auto Shop is at
least 15 years old.

Two years ago he started renting
the extension building to the cur-
rent nightclub owners.

Although it is a known gay haunt,
Mr Mortimer said he could not com-
ment on that as he has never visited
the club.

He said the club’s owners applied
for the various approvals and have a
licence to operate on Saturdays.

Mr Mortimer said the purpose of
the ‘For Rent’ sign on the perimeter
fence is to advertise the garage units,
which he sometimes rents to
mechanics for short-term use.

He said he was not concerned
about the incident, as the Gladstone
Road area is known for flare-ups.
He said he was not considering clos-
ing the club as it provides an
income.

After the fight, the parking lot was
spotted with blood and littered with
bottles, stones, clothing, handbags,
high heel shoes and costume jew-
ellery. Large stones were left in the







road.

Bahamians stranded
as thunderstorms
sround many flights

FROM page one

yesterday.

It was later extended to
include Bimini, North Andros,
North Eleuthera and the sur-
rounding waters as meteorol-
ogists kept a close eye on
storms moving towards the
capital.

Bahamasair general manag-
er Henry Woods said flights
in Fort Lauderdale were
grounded for two hours yes-
terday morning delaying the
10am flight to Nassau until
noon.

A passenger booked on
Bahamasair’s 11.40am was
subsequently delayed by more
than three hours as she board-
ed the aircraft at around lpm
and then waited on the busy
runway for another hour
before departing for Nassau
and arriving at 3.30pm.

The working mother said:
“They kept us updated and
told us what to expect, but we
didn’t get any compensation.

“The weather did look real-
ly bad outside though, so ?m
glad they chose safety first, but
I couldn’t get to work yester-
day, so I was still inconve-
nienced.”

SkyBahamas cancelled two
flights between Nassau and
Freeport, and Nassau to Cat
Island yesterday, and delayed
four flights out of George
Town, Exuma, Marsh Har-
bour, Abaco, and Nassau and

PLP chief

Freeport.

Pilots flying out of George
Town yesterday turned back
when they encountered bad
weather on the way to Nassau
and landed safely back in Exu-
ma.

SkyBahamas chief opera-
tions officer Kenneth Romer
said: “We are not going to
compromise when it comes to
safety.

“And although it was an act
of God and we weren’t obliged
to compensate our passengers
we took good care of them,
we gave them meals, rebooked
them on flights, and demon-
strated good customer ser-
vice.”

Cat Island Air was also
forced to cancel the afternoon
flight to Nassau yesterday as
thunderstorms moved south-
west across the Bahamas and
were expected to continue
across the central Bahamas
this morning.

Ian McKenzie, Operational
forecaster at the Meteorologi-
cal Office, said airlines were
kept updated with regular
weather warnings and made
their own decisions on
whether or not to operate
flights.

“We can’t take anything for
granted because every second
counts,” Mr McKenzie said.

“Grand Bahama was over-
cast, cloudy with light to mod-
erate rain, heavy at times, with
thunderstorm activity, and, of

l i
offended

hy Christie remarks

FROM page one

“She is an outstanding orator and has her hands around
the issues facing people. She believes in people and has
committed herself to helping the least amongst us. Her
decision does not mean her political life is over or her rela-
tionship with the PLP,” said the West End and Bimini MP.

However, a former leadership candidate during the PLP’s
51st National Convention in 2008, Paul Moss, said the PLP
has to address the fact that the party is losing good and
qualified persons “left, right, and centre.”

Having resigned from the PLP himself, Mr Moss asked the
public to question why “good partisan people” are inca-
pable of having a voice and even staying with the party.

“The party’s inability to have introspection to prepare
itself moving forward to being the alternative to the gov-
ernment, they have not done that. They are trying to win at
all costs. And I don’t think that is going to work, even

against a third party,” he said.

course, there is a possibility of
tornadoes even if it’s an i1so-
lated short-lived tornado.

“The chances would have
been greater in areas of con-
vection or severe thunder-
storm activity.

“While the thunderstorm
warning is issued, that’s always
a risk.”

The thunderstorms are to
be expected as the weather
warms up in a transitional
stage from winter to summer.

Grand Bahama bears the
brunt of severe thunderstorms
as it is the closest island to the
United States, however the
storms tend to dissipate as
they move across. the
Bahamas, Mr McKenzie said.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 13B








The Tribune

Cancer in dogs

CANCER or malignant tumors usually
refers to an abnormal growth of cells that
interferes with normal body function. All
body cells have a life span. When they die,
cells are replaced through a process called
mitosis in which a single cell splits into two
cells identical to the parent cell.

For reasons unknown to us, normal cells
sometimes mutate during mitosis, producing
fast growing abnormal cells that act like par-
asites, invading and replacing healthy tis-
sue.

Under ideal circumstances, the body’s
immune system recognises these cells as for-
eign and eliminates them before they cause
problems. Sometimes, the body can’t fight
off this attack by these cells resulting in
growth of abnormal cells, called tumors or
neoplasms. Those that remain localised and
relatively harmless are termed benign, while
potentially deadly spreading tumors are
called malignant.

Malignant tumors or cancer can be con-
fined to one area, but often they spread or
metastasise throughout the body. The most
dangerous cancer is already spreading at the

B O Gi

ealth







early stages, when the point of origination is
still very small or even nearly undectable. A
malignant tumor becomes deadly when it
interferes with normal body processes.

Cancer is considered a disease of older
dogs and the incidence of tumors in dogs
increase with age.

Approximately 20 per cent of all pet dogs
will develop cancer. The prevalence of can-
cer is difficult to determine. The exact cause
of cancer remains a mystery, but we do know
that cancer causing agents, referred to as
CARCINOGENS, may increase the risk of
developing certain kinds of diseases.E.¢.
exposure to sunlight increases the risk of
skin cancer. The relation of sexual hormones
and some cancers have been documented.

E.g. mammary cancer in female dogs and
prostrate and testicular cancer in males.

CLINICAL SIGNS OF CANCER

1. Abnormal swelling that persist or
continues to grow.

2. Sores that do not heal

3. Weight loss

4. Loss of appetite

5. Bleeding or discharge from any
body opening

6. Offensive odor

7. Difficulty eating and swallowing
8. Hesitation to exercise or loss of stamina
9. Persistent lameness or stiffness
10. Difficulty in breathing, urinating
or defecating

Dogs can suffer from more kinds of cancer
that any other domestic animal. Skin cancer
is the most common canine cancer. The most
common skin tumors are sebaceous adeno-
mas and then mast cell tumors.

Mammary gland cancer is considered the
second leading cancer in dogs. This type of
cancer is seen in middle age, intact (non-
spayed) females. Usually, a painless lump
or enlargement appears in the breast closest
to the rear legs. Lymph gland cancer are
devastating because they commonly spread
throughout the body. Oral tumors are also
very common. Bone cancer or (Osteosarco-



ma) which are almost always malignant that
spread to the lungs is also common.

The cancer treatment of choice in veteri-
nary medicine is surgical removed of the
tumor, which is particularly effective when
the cancer is localised and has not spread.
For instance, bone cancer is usually treated
by amputation of the affected limb.

Unfortunately, surgical cure is rare
because it is difficult to remove every can-
cerous cell. Leaving behind a single cell
allows the cancer to recur and / or spread.
Some cancers that encroach upon vital
organs, nerves, or muscle can be difficult to
surgically remove without damaging normal
tissue.

In those instances radiation may be used.
However, in the Bahamas there is no vet-
erinary hospital equipped to perform this
expensive treatment. Chemotherapy is the
third cancer treatment commonly used with
dogs and it is most useful in treating cancer
that has spread throughout the body. A wide
variety of CYTOTOXIC (cell poisoning)
drugs are available and may be used singly or
in combination with pills or intravenous
injections. The specific drugs (s) used will
depend on the type of cancer.

Many of the same human medications are
effective against cancer in dogs.

A LAUGHIER
BURDENS AWAY

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



OTHING is probably

more refreshing than,

a belly hurting, eye
watering, “can’t catch ya sef”

laugh.

We’re not talking about just a lit-
tle chuckle by the way but the kind
of laugh more contagious than a
cough, sniffle, or sneeze. Its the kind
of laugh where you can feel the mus-
cles in your abdomen contracting,
as though you did a quick ab crunch-
ing exercise.

Along with giving you those few
moments of emotional liberation and
pleasure, laughter is actually the best
remedy for any emotional sapping
situation, relieving stress and adding
joy and zest to your life.

And what makes it the best kind
of medicine is the fact that it is fun,
free, (emphasis on the free) and
easy.

Psychologist Francis Farmer rec-
ommends laughter, when stress is
on the rise, and it is hard to wrap
your head around the challenges that
life seems to bring, since there is def-
initely a link between laughter and
mental health.

This in particular is so apparent
that a gelotological (study of laugh-
ing and laughter) observation is not
even needed.

Perhaps you can carry out your
own experiment, proving that point.
You can probably think back to time
when you were poignant or stressed,
and that coworker/friend/family
member made you laugh. Didn’t you
feel so much better afterwards?

Dr Farmer provided a simple
explanation as to how that stagnant
negative energy transferred into an
exhilarating feeling.

“Laughter produces chemicals in

the brain that affect mood. These
chemicals are in fact what makes us
feel good when we are laughing.

“ One of the most well known
secretions released during laughter is
endorphins, which are the same hor-
mones secreted during the peak of
intercourse. Usually dubbed as the
body’s natural feel good chemicals,
they help create a good feeling with-
in the body.

“It is a very powerful antidote
when it comes to stress, pain, and
conflict.”

And according to
www.helpguide.org, a non profit
resource where certified doctors and
psychologists discuss mental and
emotional health issues, laughter is
even good for your physical health.

The website explained that laugh-
ter relaxes the whole body in that it
relieves physical tension and stress
leaving the muscles relaxed up to 45
minutes afterwards.

“Laughter boots the immune sys-
tem. It decreases stress hormones
and increases immune cells and
infection fighting antibodies, thus
improving your resistance to disease.
Laughter also improves the function
of blood vessels and increases blood
flow which can help protect you
against cardio related problems,”
the website said.

Aware of the healthy benefits of
laughter, there are some doctors who
recommend patients to laughter
therapy to their patients whether
physically ill, or emotionally ill.

This laughter therapy can come
in the form of anything Dr Farmer
explained.

“Laughter is obviously good for
the well being. It brightens up your
mood and you have a different out-
look. One way to get a good laugh is
by watching a funny movie. It is
much better to watch a movie that is
healthy and uplifting than one that is
depeessiney ” Dr Farmer told Tribune

Health.

To get they
same results, she i
also. recom-#j
mends spending#*
time with peo- 8
ple who are’ / i
high-spirited ji
and always hayet |
a positive outloo
on life.

“Be around people wh6
are bright and happy. Try
to avoid situations where
people are often complaining.
This is a negative situation
because you will begin to feel
exactly like the person who
is complaining,” she
said.

The social benefits of
a giggle also has a posi-
tive impression on life.
Mutual humor within a
relationship builds positive
bonds between partners. ~

Here are just few of the of
the benefits physical, mental, and
social benefits of laughter.

PHYSICAL HEALTH BENEFITS:
¢ Boosts immunity
¢ Lowers stress hormones
¢ Decreases pain
¢ Relaxes your muscles
¢ Prevents heart disease

MENTAL HEALTH BENEFITS:
¢ Eases anxiety and fear
Relieves stress
¢ Improves mood
¢ Enhances resilience

SOCIAL BENEFITS:
« Strengthens relationships
¢ Attracts others to us
¢ Enhances teamwork
¢ Helps defuse conflict
¢ Promotes group bonding

Benefits taken from www.helpquide.org

What will people think?

TAKE a moment, and think back
to the difficult times in your life. Do
you think it was the impossibility of
the situation, dealing with specific
individuals, or the overwhelming
emotions that it unearthed?

Perhaps it is hard to put your fin-
ger on it, and it was in fact all the
above and more? If we set aside all
these considerations, then perhaps
one thing that we could all agree on
is that many of us agonise over ‘what
will people think?”

For some of us worrying about
other people stops us from dealing
with anything. Do you think this
happens everywhere or does it just
become more obvious in small soci-
eties?

Even if we disagree with this
observation most of us do take into
consideration how it would affect
the people closest to us. The prob-



lem can produce ripple effects
depending on how large it is or how
it is dealt with. These are all
admirable qualities and certainly a
sign of maturity and thoughtfulness.
But can we carry it too far and use it
as an excuse not to be honest in our
relating with others? Can we pass it
off by consistently saying ‘But I did-
n't want to hurt you’ or ‘we can't do
that because they would think badly
of us'?

When we make these statements,

or overly consider others, what are
we really worried about? Is it really
their thoughts and feelings, or is it
our image? In most circumstances, is
it as ‘black and white' as that or does
it generally fall into the vast shades
of gray? The reality is that we do
not live alone on an island and our
lives are intertwined.
Undoubtedly, our own identity
and how we view ourselves plays a
vital role in our decisions. To be able
to live in peace with ourselves, and
sleep well at night, we need to feel
comfortable. Our uniqueness char-
acterises us and yet if we were hard
pressed we would probably define
it in the areas of competency, being
a good person and being worthy of
love. Often, when we play out pos-
sible scenarios, it is this mixed bag of
thoughts and emotions that swirl
around in our head. Sometimes, it is

just a matter of time for us to clear
our minds and sort through the rub-
ble. Bit by bit, we are able to dis-
card some feelings and get down to
the primary cause. Time has a way of
putting perspective on things, hence
the saying ‘timing is everything’ or
‘time will tell’.

When we get to the stage of real-
ly knowing ourselves we are then
able to prepare ourselves in advance.
Considering what you would gain
from the situation, the unpre-
dictability of the response, and the
attack on your identity may help to
keep your composure. If we are then
thrown a curve ball, with complete
contradictory statement of how we
see ourselves, we are hopefully not
completely thrown off balance.

Being ‘older and wiser' still does
not make us immune from making
mistakes. None of us are perfect,
and sometimes we are just caught
off guard. Even if we are sent in all
directions during the conversation
it is important to try and follow
through in a productive direction.



















This may not happen all at once, and
you may require a ‘time out’, but if
you care about the relationship it is
important to return until you both
find a solution.

Believing in ourselves for the type
of person we want to be is crucial.
The more positive ‘self-talk’ that we
tell ourselves, the more confident
we will become. We need to move
away from destructive self-thinking
when we start to believe others neg-
ative thoughts of us. Totally denying
or exaggerating our qualities pre-
vents us from learning and growing
throughout our lives. Coming to
terms that we are all complex human
beings, living in a complex world,
hopefully brings some leniency and
comfort.



e Listen to ~ Love on the Rock ' with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9 For appointments .
call 364 7230 , email relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com.

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PAGE 14B, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Easing the pains of the body

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

attling those bodily aches

and pains that come from

athletic exertion, or the
dreadful aging process? Have
you visited the chiropractor
many times, but still need
relief?

At The Eden Centre, Dr Liu
Zelin (Dr Leo) and his team per-
form age-long treatments for fast
and easy weight loss, and pain relief
with acupuncture and massage tech-
niques to ease a frozen shoulder,
encourage longer erections, and
decrease headache and sinus pain.

He says his methods are uncon-
ventional, but effective. They
include treatments such as electro
magnetic massage therapy, which
uses the elements of water and elec-
tricity to treat persons with pain
from sore muscles

Another procedure is Dr Leo’s
“sword technique” used to obstruct
gas for people who have abdominal
pain. The sword is sharp, and gives
off energy as it is moved about the
stomach, and scatters gas.

“Women with huge breasts even
have it done to break up fatty tis-
sues, since there aren’t many exer-
cises you can do to reduce the bust
line,” says Rachel, Dr Leo’s assis-
tant. She says that clients can lose
up to two breast sizes with this tech-
nique, combined with acupuncture,
and following a strict diet for weight
loss.

Dr Leo advises his clients to fol-
low a strict diet consisting of meat
and water, and he reports that they
can lose up to 20 inches, some
patients even more, depending on
their size.

There are over 361 pressure
points about the body, which are
used to determine where to admin-
ister the “painless” needles during
the acupuncture procedure.

If the chent comes in for weight



loss treatment, he would recom-
mend acupuncture therapy, as the
needles are injected on the surface
of the skin to cure that part of your
body that is aching.

Acupuncture is used to treat
menopause symptoms in women,
and sterility in men. It is also a rec-
ommended treatment for relaxation,
and blood circulation.

Blood circulation levels are also
defined and encouraged through Dr
Leo’s electro-magnetic massage
therapy. During a session, Dr Leo
has the client strip down to their
undergarments, and lie on the mas-
sage bed, where he hooks them up
to the eletro- magnetic machine, and
uses two wet towels under his and
the client’s feet.

Electricity passes through the doc-
tor and the client. It’s a tingling
feeling that charges up two 10 kilo-
watts, but the client only gets six
kilos that transfer to from his hands
to the area that he is treating.

The six kilowatts of energy is just
the amount of energy you would get
from a radio, and completely safe.
All the while, Dr Leo is massaging
the areas of pain in the client’s body
to feel for poor circulation in certain
areas.

He pulls the joints of the body,
and if the client doesn’t feel it, or if
they don’t react, usually they have
poor circulation in that area.

“Tf you have poor circulation you
are sick,” says Dr Leo. “If your cir-
culation and balance is good, you
will never be sick with arthritis, and
stiff neck.”

On one particular client, the doc-
tor pulls the hand in one way, and
his fingers contort in a certain way.
According to Dr Leo, this means
two of the client’s toes aren’t work-
ing well. He’s not a healthy eater, so
circulation is a problem for him.

Electro magnetic massage ther-
apy can help clients to have less
pain as they age Dr Leo said.
Depending on the client, and his
or her ailment, they will need a
varied treatment regiment of two
or more sessions.











(Cy NEWS FROM JAPAN

Hong Kong, Hong Kong!!!

AWESOME! I was really
happy to able to go and see
another Asian country before
I left.

After the 5 hour plane ride
from Osaka, I arrived in Hong
Kong airport. The airport
shuttle bus was going to take
an hour to get there so I decid-
ed to take the public bus.

It’s funny, put me in the
kitchen with a piece of meat
and tell me cook it; I wouldn’t
have any idea what to do. But,
put me in a foreign city where
no one speaks English and I
would jump on the public bus
just to get lost for fun! I am
weird I know.

Nevertheless, I asked the
bus driver to point out where
my stop was. He didn’t speak
any English but it’s amazing
how effective pointing and
grunting can be. And I got to
the right stop with no prob-
lems whatsoever.

I met my really good friend
Cheep (who is Chinese Sin-
gaporean) from university and
we took the town by storm.



The first night I met her rela-
tives and we enjoyed a really
nice meal; endless treats of
rice and noodles based dishes
simply delicious. I even ate
jellyfish tentacles (quite yum-
my).
After the meal they all start-
ed shouting in Chinese and
taking out their credit cards. I
am like what is going on? It
sounded quite violent. Appar-
ently, they were arguing on
who was going to treat every-
one for dinner. Cheep won. If
you know her you would
understand why; apparently
she shouted the loudest.

I’m like this is total culture
shock. No where in The
Caribbean would we be argu-
ing over who would treat
everyone to dinner? We

would probably be searching
for our wallets the first few
seconds and after realising
that we weren’t going to be
treated then start dividing up
the check: “Ok you had two
drinks... I had the fries....”, I
am telling you Asians totally
rock!

The people in Hong Kong
probably thought I was crazy
though, because I kept bowing
and speaking in Japanese to
everyone. They were proba-
bly thinking that this girl is in
Hong Kong and probably
doesn’t realise that all Asians
were not Japanese. I had to
explain once or twice that I
lived there and I that I wasn’t
completely silly.

DAY TWO

We went exploring Hong
Kong, visiting temples and the
city. The temples were full of
people. I don’t know why, if it
was a special day or some-
thing but it was like a Christ-
ian church on Easter Sunday.
There was a lot of incense

smoke in the air I had to step
outside where it was just all
around me. For some reason
they had food with them (The
Chinese visiting the temple)
like they were going to have a
picnic lunch afterwards and
they stuck their incense in
fruit (i.e oranges). Why? I
don’t know. I wasn’t able to
find anyone to ask.

The city itself is quite cool
kind of reminded me of New
York. The neon lights at night
were amazing!!!! I would love
to see the city’s electricity bill.

DAY THREE
We went to an island and
saw a really big Budda. It was
really worth the trip. Of
course my camera’s battery
died when we made it up top
to the mountain.

THE RETURN
I left Hong Kong and the
plane made a stop in Taiwan
for an hour before heading
back to Osaka. We had a
choice if we wanted to

deplane or not but after hear-
ing about all the stuff that
you could get arrested for in
Taiwan that included capital
punishment, I said I will just
stay on plane. I asked the
stewardess if it was ok if we
could use the bathroom while
we were waiting and she said
ok and I went. So half way in
the air on the way to Osaka I
decided to get my bag in the
overhead compartment to
correct my papers.

I wasn’t able to see my bag
so I figured that I was too
short to reach it. So L asked a
taller gentleman to reach it
for me. He didn’t see it either
so then a Japanese girl then
proceeds to tell me that the
stewardess has my bag. I
went up to the stewardess
and asked her for my bag.
Her face drops and she tells
me “I am sorry but your bag
is in Taiwan.”

Tam like WHAT?! Why is
my bag in Taiwan?? She then
calls the captain and he pro-
ceeds to tell me that no one
claimed the bag so they gave
it to the Taiwan authorities
to destroy it. I then took the
deepest breath of my life and
told him that my PASS-
PORT was in that bag. I was

like “Why would you destroy
the bag? It was clear that
someone was still in that seat
my shoes, my books, my
sweater were all there. If that
is the case they should have
destroyed EVERYTHING
that was in that seat not just
my one bag!” P.S This all
happened in the five minutes
when I went to use the bath-
room. He then replied by
saying that they would phone
the Taiwan authorities and
try to reclaim the bag if not
they will do their best to
assist me.

So here I am thousand of
miles in the air flying back to
a country that is not my own
with no passport. I returned
to my seat and started sorting
through my stuff and low and
behold there was my pass-
port. I still had it with me in
my secure documents case
because I was going to fill out
the immigration form. I
informed the captain and he
and I were both happy I did-
n’t have to spend the rest of
my day in Japan locked up in
immigration.

Oh yeah they did find my
bag. I got a long letter of
apology with the bag shipped
to me 3 days later.

@keeee ee
Commonly seen foot deformities

THIS week, we examine defor-
mities of the bone structure of the
foot, placing emphasis on some of
the contributing factors. Although
many foot deformities can be hered-
ity, in most instances they are the
result of improper or poorly fitted
footwear.

Footwear can actually shape the
foot to the extent where bones of
the foot can shift direction to fit the
shape of the shoe. In most cases,
bone realignment requires surgery
to correct or minimise the result-
ing damage. Among those com-
monly acquired deformities are:
flatfeet, claw feet, hammer toes and
bunions.

Flatfoot - also known as 'pes
planus’ is a normal flatfoot and seen
as ‘congenital’ and is believed to be
inherited. Normal flatfeet are func-
tionally healthy and usually cause
no discomfort, however they can
sometimes cause shoe fitting prob-
lems because as the foot sits in the
shoe it occupies more space in the
mid-foot area of the shoe. This fit-
ting presents more direct pressure
on the shank area. However, the
concern lies with that small per-
centage of persons having acquired



flatfoot, also known as ‘pes valgus’.
An ‘acquired flatfoot'’ presents as
a severe breakdown of the arch.
The foot becomes misshapen, with
an extremely depressed arch, and
a rolling in and down of the inner
ankle. The result, severe pronation
(outward rotation) of the heel, and
a pronounced out swing of the fore-
foot.

While ‘acquired flatfeet’ can be
given relief by the use of orthotics,
the cause of a breakdown of the
arch can be attributed to improper
footwear, that is, footwear having
inadequate support over an exten-
sive period of years. Acquired flat-
feet are among the hardest-to-fit
feet. Ordinary shoes on these feet
quickly go out of shape, and hence
special orthopedic footwear, plus
highly skilled and experienced fit-
ting ability is required for such feet.

Bunion - or ‘Hallux Valgus’ sug-
gest that the big toe or great toe
bends in an outward direction
towards the second toe. This defor-
mity can be accompanied by severe
inflammation to the side of the big
toe. Swelling and pain or soreness
can also be felt in the area. These
distressing symptoms are caused by
a constant abrasion of the shoe
against the bursa sac at the side of
the big toe. There again, the correc-
tion of a bunion can be done thor-
ough the services of a podiatrist.

These feet are extremely sensi-
tive to shoe pressure and usually
require extreme care in the type of
shoe worn and the fit. Some stretch-
ing of the shoe in the area may offer
some relief but proper shoe with
the right width and fit will serve
well.

Claw foot - is described as a foot
whose toes are bent backward in a
claw-like shape; such a foot is very
common with a very high arched
foot also known as ‘pes cavus'.
These feet frequently develop thick
and sore calluses under the ball of
the feet due to constant heavy pres-
sure along with arch strains. How-
ever, because such a foot also car-

ries a high instep in addition to the
high arch, this foot usually requires
short-wide shoes with extra dept in
the toe box. Persons with claw feet
will note that a laced or high-rise
slip-on do not give a comfortable
fit. There again, proper footwear
and proper fit is necessary.
Footwear with the right arch sup-
port or orthotic to fill-in the space
that contributes to the strain in the
arch area can provide relief and put
the foot in balance. But arch strains
of any kind should be examined by
a medical practitioner to determine
both the cause and treatment.

Hammer toes - are claw-like toes
looking very much like the head of
a hammer. This condition usually
affects the second toe and at times
the third toe. It is believed that an
acquired hammer toe can be the
result of constant wearing of shoes
with pointed toes, or shoes that are
too short or narrow. It is also
believed that causes can also be
genetic or hereditary. Hammer toes
can be successfully corrected by
simple surgical treatment. However,
a foot with hammer toes should be
fitted in the right size and type of
shoe, with a deep toe box. Proper fit

is a must to avoid painful condi-
tions associated with hammer toes.
Conclusion

Finally, I wish to reiterate that
many ‘acquired foot deformities’
and discomforts are the result of
poorly fitted footwear. Unless there
are reasonable match between shoe
shape and foot shape, then fit,
regardless of proper size is largely
nullified. In essence, while the last is
of vital importance, fit, shape,
design or style, weight, materials
and construction of the shoe are
equally important to properly fit-
ted footwear.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certi-
fied & licensed Pedorthist, is the pro-
prietor of Foot Solutions, a health and
wellness franchise that focuses on
foot care and proper shoe fit, located
in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau.
Please direct any questions or com-
ments to nassau@footsolutions.com
or 327-

FEET, www.footsolutions.com/Nassau
"The views expressed are those of the
author and does not necessarily rep-
resent those of Foot Solutions Incor-
porated or any of its subsidiary
and/or affiliated companies”.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 15B



CLE
Flowers all year long

ONE of the benefits of our mild
sub-tropical winters is that certain
plants that enjoy summer heat also
produce flowers throughout the win-
ter months, making them year-round
ornamentals. We all enjoy waiting
for various flowering plants to pro-
duce but the presence of the same
shrubs and trees in flower every
month of the year gives a solid foun-
dation for a beautiful garden.

Hibiscus is the most obvious of the
shrubs with year-round flowering
characteristics. There may be a few
weeks here and there when the plant
takes a pause otherwise it flowers
regularly. Old varieties of hibiscus
are more reliable performers than
modern ones.

Bougainvillea also gives a summer
display in winter, with the blue/ pur-
ple and red varieties being the most
reliable. Sometimes an individual
plant may take a few weeks to lose
one set of bracts and bud anew but if
you have several varieties of
bougainvillea the colour will be there
all the time.

One of my very favourite small
shrubs is thryallis (Galphimia glauca)
that produces panicles of small five-
petalled flowers in masses. Thryal-
lis is just about the most reliable of
year-round flowerers and only grows
to about three of four feet, making it
so it does not need regular pruning.
Rows of thryallis on either side of a
pathway leading to your front door
will be a cheerful welcome to visi-
tors any day of the year.

One of the most attractive of small
shrubs is peregrina (Jatropha inte-
gerrima) or Star of Bethlehem. In
its early years it tends to be a round-
ed bush but older plants form a trunk
and become true shrubs.

The foliage is attractive and the
red five-petalled flowers are pro-



duced in vivid clusters.

There are red and white varieties
of plumbago (P. capensis) but the
favourite colour in The Bahamas is
blue. Plumbago has dense foliage
and the flower clusters are abundant,
making it a wonderful specimen
plant. It is propagated by root divi-
sion and is also employed at times
as a wayward and informal hedge.

Cape honeysuckle (Tecomaria
capensis) comes to us from South
Africa, as does plumbago, and is one
of the showiest of all tropical plants.
The flowers are produced in upright
panicles that can be bright red or
brick orange. The foliage is also very
attractive, the compound leaves
much resembling those of raspberry.

Cape honeysuckle makes a very
colourful hedge. Sometimes it forms
a hedge without its owner’s permis-
sion, producing ground runners that
put down roots and send up suck-
ers. These ground runners can be
easily trained to head off in the direc-
tion you want them to and in the end
you get a hedge without any digging.
Any free-standing cape honeysuckle
should be pruned to cut away the
ground runners.

Cordia or Geiger tree (Cordia
sebestina) normally grows close to
the sea but can be grown inland.
There are white and red versions
but the red is the most seen. Cordia
is a true tree but tends to stay at 20
feet tall or less. Its leaves are extra-
ordinarily rough — somewhat like
sandpaper — and large but the flow-
ers clusters are impressive. Individ-
ual trumpet-shaped flowers mass
together to form a ball of flowers,
very like hydrangea from a distance.
The white fruits are produced from
these flowers and new trees can be
grown from them very readily.

Pride of Barbados (Caesalpinia



CAPE honeysuckle can be a free-standing specimen or

be trained into a hedge.

PRIDE of Barbados flowers are beautiful and can reward a close scrutiny.

pulcherrima) is often misnamed
dwarf poinciana. True, it is related to
poinciana and shares some of its fea-
tures but only distantly so. The
leaves are compound and feathery
while the branches and stems hold
rather wicked thorns. In the
Caribbean the Pride of Barbados is
often used on the edge of agricul-



tural properties to keep livestock in
and undesirables out.The flowers
are produced in extravagant pani-
cles that are held upright and are
most attractive. The red flowers are
picoteed in yellow and the stamens
are long and yellow. There is a yel-
low flowering version that is partic-
ularly bright and cheerful. The Pride



of Barbados flowers give way to
seedpods and the seeds can be used
to propagate new shrubs.

Were you to have a few of these
shrubs and trees in your garden you
would never be short of colour.

* gardenerjack@coralwave.com





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Nr SANDS, AGE: 22

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THE TRIBUNE







By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



T took several hours on a Sunday to

shoot seventeen contestants for the

Miss Bahamas 2010 pageant at a
tropical background at The Retreat
Gardens, by The Bahamas National
Trust, an oasis of rare exotic palms

and native coppice.

Transformed into 1950’s pin-up girls, the
women, with sun-kissed faces, and lively swim-
suits in tectonic colors, lent their beauty to
the tropical back drop of antique candy-cane
colored cars donated by the Bahamas Antique
Auto Association.w

This year on May 9, 17 “Timeless Beauties”
will compete for the right to wear the Dia-
monds International Miss Bahamas crown,
and the opportunity to represent the Bahamas
at both the Miss Universe and Miss World
pageants on May 9.

Countdown to the pageant has been nothing
but a whirlwind of activity, including numerous
public appearances and events; the Miss
Bahamas Sportswoman Competition, and the
Top Model of the Bahamas competition.

On April 9, during a charity gala reception
at the British Colonial Hilton, the women
vying for the Miss Bahamas 2010 title were
unveiled to the public in grand style.

Miss Universe Stefania Fernandez was spe-
cially flown down to the capital for the event,
lending her celebrity status to help the con-
testants raise money for a charity that is dear
to her heart, Haiti earthquake disaster relief.

The evening began with fanfare when Miss
Universe and Miss Bahamas Joanna Brown
were escorted into the ballroom by officers
of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, who
also provided music for the evening.

Pageant fans, sponsors, family members and
well wishers were among those attending the
event in which contestants offered up auction
gifts of their own choosing.

Among the gifts were several beautiful
paintings, authentic Bahamian jewelry and
handbags, a hand-made doll, home decor, and
human hair. When it was all said and done,
some $2700 was raised through bids. Once
collected, that money will be donated to the



LATHYRA TINKER, AGE: 19





tottuedty: Bahumos Wholeanke Agencies, East West Hay, * fot: 242-994-1759 * fax: 242-094-1859 * ermal: bwahahimaseccraivinn.com * Freeport: 1 Milton Si, = Sel: 42531-2207 * fax: 24231-2215 * emai: bwalpoeccsalvacom

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010



MAXINE LOUIS, AGE: 27

























































ANASTAGIA PIERRE, AGE: 21





Bahamians will have a
chance to vote online for
one of the semi-finalists

Bahamas Red Cross for its ongoing efforts in
Haiti.

Additionally, the contestants donated $3247
to the Zonta Club of Nassau’s Empty Pots
project for the homeless during the launch
reception, which was raised during a Beauty
with a Purpose challenge, taped for MBO’s
Backstage Pass ZNS TV Show.

Over the last three months, the contestants
have been immersed in rigorous training and
grooming lessons in Bahamian history and
culture; public speaking, dealing with the
media; discovering one’s purpose; interview
techniques and etiquette.

Michelle Malcolm, president of MBO told
Tribune Woman that this year things will be
slightly different. This year, the winner of the
pageant will compete in both the Miss Uni-
verse and Miss World pageants. The two run-
ners up will also receive titles, Miss Intercon-
tinental Bahamas and Miss Supranational
Bahamas.

A title will be awarded to the contestant
who receives top marks in runway skills during
a special preliminary competition. She will
go on to represent The Bahamas at next year’s
Top Model of the World competition.

MBO’s directors say that with the help of
their partners and the high caliber of ladies
entered in the competition, the forthcoming
Miss Bahamas pageant should be the most
competitive to date.

On May 2, the Miss Bahamas Organisation
will have its preliminary swimsuit competi-
tion, followed up by a talent and evening gown
competition on May 7.

Once again, Bahamians will get the chance
to have their voices heard by selecting one of
the semifinalists via online voting. Pageant
enthusiasts are asked to visit www.missba-
hamas.net to learn more about the “Timeless
Beauties.” The contestant with the highest
number of votes will automatically advance
to the Semifinal round of competition at the
finale at Atlantis Resort’s Imperial Ballroom
on May 9.








a
SHARIE DELVA, AGE: 23



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The Tribune



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“oc WITH SHOWER

Volume: 106 No.128

aU a)

PLP chief ‘offended
by Christie remarks



SSA

Decision to resign
‘made alter meeting’

PLP CHIEF Melissa
Sears quit her job as vice
chairman because she was
“offended” by verbal
remarks made by party
leader Perry Christie, The
Tribune learned last night.

As speculation mounts
surrounding her departure,
it is being reported that she
decided to resign following a
meeting in Grand Bahama.

According to sources very
close to the matter, Mr
Christie was in Grand
Bahama to rally the party’s
machinery sometime earli-
er this month. At this meet-
ing, it was claimed, he made
the point that he had “no
time” for Ms Sears — who
was in earshot of the
remark.

Although the comment
was admittedly “harsh”, one
PLP source explained that
the party leader was send-
ing the message that he was
aware of Ms Sears’ alleged
allegiance to other would-
be leaders within the organ-
isation.

“She was a known anti-
Christie during the PLP con-
vention and even before
that. So he had to let her

%

know that he was aware of
that fact. In this (political)
climate you have to do what
you have to do,” the source
added.

When contacted for com-
ment on the matter, PLP
chairman Bradley Roberts
said he doubted that Mr
Christie would make such a
remark, and directed The
Tribune to speak to the par-
ty leader directly.

However, repeated
attempts to reach Mr
Christie proved unsuccess-
ful, and messages left were
not returned up to press
time last night.

While Ms Sears’ alleged
allegiance to one faction or
the other is not known offi-
cially, it has been reported
that she was a staunch sup-
porter of PLP deputy leader
challenger Obie Wilch-
combe who came to her
defence in yesterday’s Tri-
bune.

In that article, Mr Wilch-
combe said Ms Sears was an
“outstanding young woman”
who still has a career in pol-
itics.

SEE page 15

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USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

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SEE PAGE THREE






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TOURISTS CROSS the rain-soaked streets in Down-
town Nassau yesterday. Heavy rain caused disruption in
south Florida and the northern Bahamas.

e SEE STORY RIGHT AND PHOTOS ON PAGE TWO

Hotel union set
for third election

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



A THIRD and hoped final election will select the
next president of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union today with just two candi-
dates going head-to-head for the top post.

Twice victorious Nicole Martin of the A Team,

SEE page 12

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Ay

Gay nightclut in
mass brawl ‘is

properly licensed





By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



THE gay nightclub that was
the scene of a massive fight and a
woman’s death is properly
licensed to operate, according to
property owner Kendal Mor-
timer.

Orial Farrington, 20, of Nel-
son Street, was found dead in

SEE page 15





TINE

Bahamians stranded

as thunderstorms

ground many flights

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



SEVERE thunderstorms left Bahami-
an airline passengers stranded yester-
day with flights being grounded at Ft
Lauderdale and a number of local flights
delayed or cancelled.

Heavy rain, high winds and potential
tornadoes threatened south Florida and
the northern Bahamas yesterday with a
severe thunderstorm warning issued by
the Bahamas Department of Meteorol-
ogy for Grand Bahama at around 1lam

SEE page 15







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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

Negotiations
between COB,
union could
pass deadline

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DISPARITIES between the
number of clauses left to be
negotiated within the new
industrial agreement for facul-
ty at College of the Bahamas
(COB) could push negotiations
past its estimated three-week
deadline.

Last week, COB estimated
that there were some 32 claus-
es left outstanding in the
industrial agreement, however
the faculty's union told The
Tribune that the number of
clauses left, by their count, is
actually 51.

The negotiation process
lets both teams present their
clauses to be discussed and
agreed upon for inclusion in a
new agreement.

The union said it has sub-
mitted several clauses since
February of last year but
these have yet to be addressed
by the college.

The negotiating teams
agreed on a three-week dead-
line in which to sign off on the
remaining clauses, and have
consented to a "lock-down",
meeting Monday through Fri-
day and half-day on Saturday.
After faculty members took
strike action on the first day
of exams at the tertiary insti-
tution — seeking a timely reso-
lution for industrial agree-
ment negotiations — it was
agreed that if they are still
unable to finalize an agree-
ment by May 14, external
negotiators will be brought in
for a total of seven days to
expedite the process.

During the faculty's four-
day strike, which began last
week Monday, both COB and
UTEB expressed difficulties
with clauses dealing with
appointments, promotions,
duties and responsibilities,
performance assessments and
salaries.

On their first day back to
the negotiating table, the
teams signed off on two out-
standing sub-clauses relating
to sick leave and retirement.



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CAR PURCHASE
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE









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THIS DARK CLOUD coms over Fast Si Street, Nassau as severe weather moves in.









INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

calendar contest

sec Contest details listed on our website

Fark Guedens Antes! Calender Photo Contest ic open to all phodepraphers, The tithe ber
the company’s 200) calendar will be “A Celobrniion of Netare™. Photigmphs may be ot any
subject (animate or inanimata), scane or hisirocial structure that faatures a striking example
of nature as found in The Bahamas.

DEADUIAE FOR ENTRIES IS JME 30, 2000 AS eeies are cubetitied af the canes rie
and will neq be returned

Al anireas ana to ba delivered po Famely Guardian's Corporate Lantre, Willige Road and
East Bay S0rot, Nassau, beewnen Siam and SO. mweakdays only. Envalopes should
bo marked “Calendar Contest”.

Al setries must be accompanied by a eigqned and completed offical entry lorm, available
at any Farly Guardian office, as published in thee niaspacars onan the webeatie (ewe,
famiyguardan.coml.

Only echour images vil be congiiared, Ina ged mat be provided aa digital liagen C0, figital
images must be of high quality 2700 2 F100 peels or larger). Digital images showing signe
of photo manipelation, rescligion anhancemerd or comprassion wall be raacted, To eran
the best colour reproducton, digéal images should be supplied in MAW. TIFF of high quality
JPEG and in dea angina colour format the camera wees [LAB er AGE), All entries must be
eupplied wth colour prints |B« 10) which wall be used in the jedging process. (Note: prints
submitted without CO's will net be eligible aed vice versal. The phatagmpher's name,
phete subject and phote location must be atittes on the reverse af the print,

Judging of aririag wil ba head om Gaaity, inners, comeasitinn, ealaur, originalny
and gealite of photograph. Particular arans and subjects of interest are datalked an the
website (ewre.lamilyguardiancoml. The phoiographs selected will 2epear in Family
Gueedian's 2017 calendar. The decision of the judges wall be feral.

A ogi certificate valued at S00 wil be presented fee each of ihe photograpes
selacted, Pieiayraphic cradie wil be given in The talaniae The tumber of aittiag par
photographer is limited to a maimum of 5 phone,

The winning photographs, along with all peblicaton and reproduction rights attachad
tharete, become the property of Family Guardian and the company rosarms the nightio
use suchin the future. Photos wall mot be retumed,

Employees of Family Guardian, tg affiliated companies of family amber are nor aligibia,
Frowioushy publishad photos are not eligible,

FAMILY GUARDIAN Gate

mony O b AL ri
1
: Ga pen ig to ee ee in eye “a Whoa | ooo catia tit rhe phic
i Steed igh conde mere token in The Dobos by be ered aod ae
|) Ot heen preaiauy pa bie

Dl | __cal

Visit www. familygu ardian.com for
special hints and contest details!

anir'y orm
-Geadliie une 30, 2010

{ Reture this berm with photos aed CO tn

' Calendar Geant

‘Family Guerdies Corporate Centre

| Vilage Road & Eset Bay Street, P0. Box 55-6292
1 Nassae, Bahamas

Nama:
Telephone: 7 H f

EMail:

Pl, Bax:

Sareat:

Address:

' lefand:
: Number of Photos Enterod (a maimen of 5|:

ap aie ihe fen one Te rewe af ery eomered photograph is sale 1 es
Ruay,




Ka
ore | ager op Fae by Gaal a

‘ Signatera Data













dB
Ss us
eA
Pl rar LY

PHOTOS:
Felipe Major
/Tribune staff

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters

P13,14
Peromie

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION
Business Pilp2soedeor oneal

CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



Lady Patricia

Isaacs, wife of

former FNM
leader, dies

LADY Patricia Isaacs, the
wife of former FNM leader
Kendal Isaacs, died on Sun-
day night.

Announcing her passing
yesterday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham offered his
sympathies to her family,
describing Lady Isaacs as a
well-known and well-loved
Bahamian whose personal
style and professional train-
ing and experience were
greatly admired.

“She possessed a bubbly
personality that afforded her
to great enjoyment of the arts,
both performing and visual.
She was very family oriented,
enjoyed tennis (in which her
husband excelled), music and
dancing and other social activ-
ities,” Mr Ingraham said.

Lady Isaacs and her hus-
band worshipped at Holy
Trinity Anglican Church,
although before marriage, as a
member of the Fountain fam-
ily, she attended the Central
Gospel Chapel.

A qualified nurse, Lady

Governor-General
visits recovering
Sir Durward Knowles

GOVERNOR-General Sir Arthur
Foulkes visited Sir Durward Knowles
yesterday at his home in Winton Mead-
ows, where he is recovering after a traf-

fic accident.

Sir Durward, 92, was injured in the
crash, and was released on Friday after
spending some time in the intensive
care unit at Doctor’s Hospital.

The Olympic gold medalist suffered
cuts and bruises when he was involved
in a three-car collision on the Eastern

Road on April 12.

Isaacs became the matron of
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, where she served for
many years before becoming
Training Officer for the
Bahamas Public Service.

There, she negotiated with
universities and other train-
ing centres abroad to facili-
tate the development of
future senior public officers,
many of whom rose to the
position of permanent secre-
tary.

The prime minister said:
“With exceptional good
humour, she did all she could
to advance the cause of
Bahamians in general and of
women in particular.

“She supported her hus-
band in his leadership of the
FNM and carried the burden
of organising and implement-
ing events on his behalf. A
loyal, gracious and beautiful
lady, Lady Isaacs endeared
herself to all.

“When I became prime
minister in 1992, I sought
advice and suggestions from



LADY Patricia Isaacs pictured with Kendal Isaacs in me



Lady Isaacs. Without hesita-
tion she provided sage, sober
and honest advice then and
continued to do so.

“As a final gift to the
Bahamas, Patricia Lady Isaacs
served as a Deputy to the
Governor-General from July,
1997 until April, 2002 when





she elected to resign her
appointment.

“The Bahamas has lost a
noble daughter. However, her
rich example of devotion to
family, church, and state will
never be erased. She was a
Lady deserving of the high-
est praise.”












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TWO women were arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on a weapons possession charge.

Zonovia Bain, 21, of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates; and Krystal Fernander, 20, of Pinewood
Gardens, were arraigned before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Carolita Bethell in Court 8, Bank
Lane yesterday charged with possession of an

unlicensed firearm.

It is alleged that on Saturday, April 24, the two
women were found in possession of a .380 Hi
Point pistol. Both women pleaded not guilty to

the charge.

They were each granted bail in them sum of

$7,500.

the charges.

hearing.

BPA STORY CORRECTION

IN AN article in yesterday’s
Tribune headlined “NIB no
longer negotiating with
Bahamas Pharmacy Council”
the Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association was incorrectly
referred to as the Bahamas
Pharmacy Council.

The Bahamas Pharmacy
Council is the government
agency, established through the
Pharmacy Act 2009, that regu-
lates the industry. All pharma-
ceutical professionals and busi-
nesses must be registered with
and licensed by the council.

The Bahamas Pharmaceuti-
cal Association is the profes-
sional body providing repre-
sentation for more than 90 per
cent of registered private phar-
macies. Pharmaceutical enti-
ties are not required to join the
BPA, but are encouraged to
do so.

Contrary to what was sug-
gested in the article, it is the
association (BPA), and not the
council (BPC), which is cur-
rently seeking to negotiate with
the National Insurance Board
(NIB) the terms of a contract
for private pharmacies under
the National Prescription Drug
Plan (NPDP).

The NIB has said it is no
longer negotiating, and the
contracts recently signed with
six pharmacies is the final con-
tract.

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e A 22-year-old Peter Street woman was
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several ammunitions charges.

It is alleged that on Thursday, April 22, Latoya
Carty was found in possession of four .38 bullets;
twenty .40 bullets; twenty .9mm bullets and twen-
ty-nine .25 bullets.

Carty, who was arraigned before Deputy Chief
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Parties tar other as Wall Street’s pal

WASHINGTON — Republicans and
Democrats are furiously casting each other as
Wall Street's handmaiden, playing to elec-
tion-year anger surging on Main Street. But
neither party has clean hands when it comes
to the financial industry.

Both parties have accepted huge amounts
of campaign cash from companies such as
Goldman Sachs, the investment bank facing
fraud charges from the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission. Both parties wel-
comed big business’ chief executives to the
White House when in power. Both share the
blame for deregulating the industry in the
1990s and bailing out Wall Street when the
financial sector was on the brink of collapse.

Not that either side will acknowledge tt.

Instead, Republicans and Democrats are
using President Barack Obama's push for
tighter controls on the industry to try to gain
the political advantage with voters ahead of
November's congressional elections, when
the balance of power in Washington is at
stake. "We need to enact a set of updated,
commonsense rules to ensure accountability
on Wall Street and to protect consumers in
our financial system," President Obama said
Thursday in New York, tapping into public
outrage over excesses that led to the eco-
nomic meltdown.

With polls showing more voters favouring
tighter controls on Wall Street, everyone
wants to be seen as siding with the little guy.

"Far from protecting consumers from Wall
Street excess, this bill would provide endless
protection for the biggest banks on Wall
Street,” said Senate Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky.

Looking to energize their voters and boost
fundraising, the national parties are trading
charges. "For years, Republicans stood by
while Wall Street ran wild," says a Democra-
tic National Committee television spot.
"Risky bets. Lax regulation. When the econ-
omy collapsed, Republicans looked the other
way. ... Now Republicans are working with
Wall Street lobbyists to block reform" that
would "protect consumers and prevent a
future bailout."

Countering, the Republican National Com-
mittee rolled out a video claiming the legis-
lation rewards Wall Street with a "perma-
nent bailout fund. ... Propping up Wall Street
is what Obama does, and Obama does it
well.”

The Centre for Responsive Politics found
that both sides raked in cash from the indus-
try they're vilifying.

In the current election cycle, the DNC col-
lected $6.2 million from the financial services,
real estate and insurance sectors and $3.7
million from other business interests. The
RNC has raised $2.5 million from the indus-
try and $2.7 million from other business inter-
ests. During the 2008 presidential campaign,
President Obama raised $40 million from the
industry and $37 million from other business
interests while Republican John McCain col-









WANTED

An International Pharmaceutical Company, well

lected $29 million and $16 million. Deregu-
lation is faulted for the financial industry's
crisis — and both parties played a role. The
Depression-era Glass-Steagall Act separat-
ed commercial from investment banking, but
in 1999 most of its restrictions were repealed
by a Republican Congress and Democratic
President Bill Clinton. In the fall of 2008,
President George W. Bush and the Democ-
ratic Congress backed a massive bailout of the
financial industry amid signs of impending
economic collapse. President Obama signed
off on the second infusion of cash shortly
after taking office. Such coziness with Wall
Street and politicians’ lack of candor about it
are likely factors in low job approval ratings
for Congress and an overall cynicism about
politics. However, the US public is conflicted.
More than half — 58 per cent — say that
"the government has gone too far in regu-
lating business and interfering with the free
enterprise system," and roughly half oppose
government exerting more control over the
economy. But, perhaps because their own
pocketbooks are at stake, people make an
exception for regulating the financial industry:
Sixty-one per cent say it's a good idea for the
government to more strictly limit the way
major financial companies do business.

A recent Gallup poll showed that voters’
ire was directed toward Wall Street on the
issue of giving Washington new powers over
the industry. In the survey, 50 per cent
favoured more regulation of Wall Street
banks while 36 per cent opposed. When the
question was asked more broadly — regulat-
ing large banks and major financial institu-
tions — 46 per cent favoured and 43 per cent
opposed.

All that — combined with the fact that
about two-thirds of likely voters own stock,
many of whom invest in tax-deferred retire-
ment accounts, underscores why the White
House as well as Republicans and Democrats
are competing to be the most populist. It also
helps explain why Democrats and Republi-
cans are trying to agree on a bipartisan bill
even as they publicly castigate each other.

"On one side are consumers and investors,
families and businesses and the vast majority
of Americans who want us to make sure the
financial crisis they just lived through can
never happen again,” said Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid of Nevada. "Democrats
are on their side, and we're ready to act."

House Republican leader John Boehner of
Ohio offered a different take.

"The president says that he wants to clean
up Wall Street, but when you look at this bill,
what he actually does is protect them from
ever having a financial problem," he said.
"This is a bad bill and Republicans are going
to stand with the American people, who are
standing on their tiptoes yelling, 'Stop.'"

American voters will have the last word —
in November.

(This article was written by Liz Sidoti, AP
National Political Writer).



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Why safety
managers are
needed for
building sites

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

During the construction of
the Atlantis Royal Tower I
had the opportunity to
observe the company’s safety
manager at work and was
able to learn a lot from him
about safety policy on large
construction sites. I was told
that he was a retired Admiral
of the United States Navy.

Observation of his policy
began on arrival at work.

If you did not have your
hard hat or hard tip boots, just
go home for the day.

If caught working on the
upper floors without wearing
the safety harness and having
it attached to the safety line.

Automatic suspension from
work.

Personnel, who appear to
have been drinking were
invited to the Medical Clinic
on site to take the breathalis-
er test. If found to be above
the limit — suspension for the
rest of the day.

There were random drug
tests and persons found to be
abusing drugs were suspended
for an indefinite period and
told to return with a certifi-
cate from an authorised clinic
indicating that you are drug

letters@triounemedia.net



free. Many Bahamians were
exposed to his policies and
learned safety in the work
place from him.

His policies and the
enforcement thereof resulted
in an accident free comple-
tion of the Royal Tower.

Government Ministries and
Corporations, construction
firms and industrial plants
should have on staff safety
managers, who will write and
enforce safety policies, which
could avoid serious accidents,
destructive fires and exten-
sive damage to property.

Such safety managers could
be persons on the staff or con-
sultants, who visit at regular
intervals to ensure that safety
measures are being enforced.

Persons employed at these
locations should be familiar
with fire and accident pre-
vention policies and must be
able to use available fire
extinguishing equipment.

The Straw Market fire is a
good example of our failure
to enforce safety policy. There

was supposed to be fire extin-
guishers on each floor of the
building.

I am told that there was
none. I am told that the same
applied to the adjacent Min-
istry of Tourism Building.
Safety Consultants or Safety
Officers would have been vis-
iting those buildings and not-
ed the absence of fire extin-
guishing equipment.

Finally, my inquiries have
revealed, that the mattress
warehouse, that was recently
destroyed by fire had no
sprinklers installed.

A building with such large
quantities of flammable mate-
rial should have installed
sprinklers.

I would suggest that the
Ministry of Works when con-
sidering plans for the con-
struction of warehouse must
insist on the installation of
sprinklers.

Insurance companies ought
to insist on sprinklers and
adequate fire fighting equip-
ment at all such buildings.

PAUL THOMPSON Sr
Nassau,
April 21, 2010.

‘Prime’ Andros farm land: Some
questions and a burning desire

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing this letter in
response to an article pub-
lished in The Tribune on
April 14, 2010.

BAIC, Lands, Agricul-
ture, handicrafts, and works
representatives visited a
three mile swath being cut
through south Andros.

Said to be leading into a
“new world for south
Andros in food production”
having “reached the island’s
thousands of acres of prime
farm land” the featured pho-
tos show a backdrop of trac-
tors in a field of exposed
limestone as the visitors con-
verse in the foreground.

The challenges cited in the
article mention a 70-foot hill
on the edge of the pine land,
the need for more work and
machinery and the request
of additional funding.

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The article mentions the
government's “food security
thrust.”

A thrust can be defined
as “to force on an unwilling
or improper recipient” or
“an attack or assault.”

The connotations of brevi-
ty, aggression and unsus-
tainable action are also
implied.

While I do not seek to
belittle the government’s
efforts to encourage devel-
opment in our family
islands, or hinder the earn-
ing potential of the folks on
that island I have a few sim-
ple questions and one burn-
ing desire.

Where is this prime farm
land or what types of crops
grow best on this exposed
limestone?

In this visiting contingent,
who represented the Min-
istry of The Environment?

Have they done the
appropriate geological sur-
veys to determine distance
to groundwater resources
and linkages within the Blue
holes before denuding this
area?

How many farmers are
immediately ready to move
onto this newly raped land?
I have more questions but
perhaps we can get a start
to some answers on these.

My one desire, however,

is that Government and the
people begin to move
toward a sustainable future.

I am tired of seeing areas
of tall grass choking aban-
doned fruit trees in family
islands where some farming
initiative has gone under.

It sickens me to see feral
goats, donkeys and sheep
run over in the street or
leaving nothing but thorny
bushes as they forage the
surrounding coppice and
consume all the edible
plants.

Most of all Iam annoyed
at Bahamians, men and
women, crying poor mouth
because they want a yard
covered in driveways and
Bermuda grass and prefer
to drive to the food store for
the fruits that their parents
and grandparents grew in
their backyards.

The hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars invested in
cutting down habitat could
have distributed fruit trees
to the homes in South
Andros.

What food is more secure
than the fruit tree growing
within the walls of your own
property?

ANCILLENO O DAVIS
Nassau,
April 20, 2010.

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CABLE Bahamas has start-
ed with its 18-month pro-
gramme to upgrade all cus-
tomers in New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco and
Eleuthera to a 100 per cent
digital platform.

Just like the recent digital
transition in the United
States, all customers will
require a digital converter to
receive digital services.

Currently 40 per cent of
Cable Bahamas’ customers
have a digital set-top box and
receive their signal digitally,
the company said.

“Unlike the digital transi-
tion in the United States,
there will not be a specific
date when all signals will be
100 per cent digital”, said
David Burrows, the cable
company’s director of market-
ing.

Transition

“Our transition will take
place one neighbourhood at a
time, taking the utmost care
to ensure that homes that cur-
rently do not have digital set-
top boxes have them and that
their service is at the highest
level.

“After each customer in a
neighbourhood has the
required equipment then that
neighbourhood will be transi-
tioned to a 100 per cent digital
plant,” he said.

The digital transition will
begin in New Providence with
the first neighbourhoods
being targetted in the south-
eastern part of the island.

According to Mr Burrows,
“this network upgrade will
allow the increased availabili-

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

lied | Union chief John Pinder denies

reports of political challenge

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Public Service
Union John Pinder has
denied reports that he is
gauging support in the Fox
Hill area before vying for a
nomination on the Free
National Movement ticket
in the next general election.

Local news commentary
website, bahamasuncen-
sored.com, reported that Mr
Pinder is mounting a chal-
lenge against FNM Senator
Jacinta Higgs — who lost her
bid to take the constituency
from PLP incumbent Fred
Mitchell in 2007 — and was
rumoured to have been spot-
ted in bars and restaurants
in the area recently, pre-
sumably testing the waters.

Yesterday Mr Pinder, who
grew up in Fox Hill and now
lives near the community,
denied he had any plans to
challenge Mrs Higgs for the
FNM ticket. Still, the union
leader did not rule out the
possibility that he will seek
political office in the future.

"Jacinta Higgs and I are
cousins, Jacinta has that
nomination and I have no
problem supporting her as a







66, don't know why people
keep trying to say things like
that. If I want the Fox Hill nomi-
nation for any side, or as an inde-
pendent, I have enough family,
friends, and church associates — I
grew up in Fox Hill — to give me
the support I need.”

John Pinder



Fox Hillian,"
he told The
Tribune yes-
terday when
asked about
the report.

He added:
"I don't
know why
people keep
trying to say
things like that. If I want the
Fox Hill nomination for any
side, or as an independent, I
have enough family, friends,
and church associates — I
grew up in Fox Hill - to give
me the support I need."

He claimed that leading
up to February's hotly con-
tested by-election in the Eliz-
abeth constituency, branch

JACINTA
HIGGS



ty of high definition (HD) and
standard definition channels,
new services like video on
demand (VOD) and pave the
way for additional services yet
to be developed for the digital
platform”.

“This is great news for cus-
tomers and also satisfies the
telecommunications Commu-
nications Regulator (URCA)
recent requirements imposed
on Cable Bahamas,” he said.

THE Bahamas Electricity Corporation and
the Ministry of the Environment will launch a
series of town hall meetings on Friday to discuss
BEC’s plan to raise tariffs.

Faced with a crippling financial situation, the
state-owned power company is planning to

officers from both major par-
ties asked him to consider
entering the race for their
side.

Neutral

The BPSU boss, who also
oversees the National Con-
gress of Trade Unions, said
he chose not to enter the
fray because of his responsi-
bility to remain politically
neutral as a trade union offi-
cial.

"T told them that because
of my role in the union I
don't want to align myself
with any party at this time.
When it comes down to
dealing with the union I
don't cross the line. Iam a

increase its core rate. The first New Providence
meeting is scheduled for Friday, April 30 at 7pm,
at SC McPherson Junior High School.
Environment Minister Earl Deveaux and
Minister of State for the Environment, Phen-
ton Neymour, are expected to attend.

trade unionist and I am paid
by the union to give them
the best representation pos-
sible," he said.

Mr Pinder added: "I
believe both parties know
that I am not a fella who you
can tell the sky is red when I
know it's blue. You ain’ ga
muzzle me, so if you don't
want me to speak the truth
and help people, don't offer
me no nomination. If you
looking for someone to work
hard, I'm your man."

Right now, the union boss
said, he is focused on crafting
a new industrial agreement
for the public service, which
the BPSU plans to present
to government for review in
the coming weeks.

POEM AAMT MC aU



ern aba] SVU) 4





mi SUPREME COURT: Raymond Darling

Murder accused: I was not involved
in attempted armed robbery, shooting

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT — Murder accused Raymond
Darling told the Supreme Court yesterday
that he was not involved in the attempted
armed robbery and shooting which led to the
death of Tyna Pinder almost five years ago.

Tyna “Penny” Pinder, a 34-year-old office
clerk/secretary, was shot to death in her office
at the Cool Breeze Apartments on Novem-
ber 25, 2005 during an attempted robbery.

Darling and Herman Natari Francis are
accused of planning the robbery and killing
Ms Pinder.

Dennis Louis, 22, faced the same charges,
but was found dead at West End on February
28.

Darling is on remand, while Francis is out on
bail.

The defence opened its case yesterday morn-
ing. Darling, who is represented by K Brian
Hanna, gave an unsworn statement. Francis,
who is represented by Mario Grey, gave sworn
statement under oath from the witness stand.

Darling told the court he had known Dennis
Louis for about eight to 10 years, but that he
did not know Francis. He claimed that on
November 25, Louis and Francis came to his
Garden Villas home and asked for a ride in his
car.

Waist

Darling claimed Francis had an object in
his waist. He said he dropped them off near
Tabernacle Baptist Academy on Settler’s Way,
then went to his grandmother’s house on
Rhode’s Lane near Dr Roop’s Clinic.

Darling claimed he later received a call from
Dennis about a shooting. “Dennis told me
that Francis shot someone,” he said.

According to Darling’s unsworn testimony,
he contacted police about the shooting and
was told by officer Johnson to call him back.

“When I tried to call back he was not at the
office,” he claimed, adding that he later
learned that a lady got shot while watching
the news.

“T never planned to rob or kill anyone. I
only gave them a ride. I never sold drugs and
Inever stepped foot at the Cool Breeze Apart-
ments,” he told jurors.

“T voluntarily went to the police station to
help police in solving the matter. I took them
to where Dennis kept all his guns. I never
thought I would be arrested for this,” he said.

Herman Francis, who was 12 or 13 years
old at the time, said that he knew Dennis Louis
for some five years. They both went to Jack
Hayward High School and had played bas-
ketball on occasion.

He did not know Raymond Darling for very

long, probably about three months, he said.
They all sold drugs for money, he said.

Francis said he lived at the Cool Breeze
Apartments for a short period time. During the
three months he lived there, he claimed that he
never knew the victim.

He said that on November 25, he and Den-
nis Louis caught a ride with Darling in his car
—ared Toyota Camry.

Francis claimed that Darling drove to some
shabby looking apartments. The accused said
he thought they had gone there to sell drugs,
adding that he did not know anything about a
robbery.

He said Darling and Louis open the car
trunk and retrieved something that looked
like a gun wrapped in a sheet. He said he
stayed the in the vehicle, smoking a “joint.”

Francis said he then heard a loud sound and
ran off, later learning from a newspaper that he
was being sought by police.

He claims that the statement he gave to
police was not accurate and that some things
were left out.

Planning

Prosecutor Jillian Williams told jurors in
her closing remarks that Darling and Francis
acted together in planning the robbery. She
said police statements given by the accused
men show that both knew about the robbery.

She noted that Darling knew about a gun
and had said in his unsworn statement that he
saw Francis with a gun.

“He is guilty of murder because he must
know that a gun might have been discharged
and someone would be killed,” she told jurors.

Ms Williams also pointed out that Darling
led police to a shotgun which was discovered
by officers near Dr Roop’s Clinic on Rhodes
Lane, where his grandmother lived.

She said that Francis was not a truthful wit-
ness and that he too was, in fact, part of the
plan to rob the victim.

Ms Williams noted that in his statement to
police, Francis said Darling and Louis told
him that they were going on a “play” involving
a woman.

“A play in street terms meaning robbery,”
she said.

In his closing address to the jury, Mr Grey
said the police did not carry out proper inves-
tigations, failing to link any of the accused to
the crime at Cool Breeze Apartments.

He said there were no fingerprints, and no
forensic evidence from the shotgun or clothing.

Mr Grey also said that the two prosecution
witnesses who told police they got a good look
at the shooter’s face never participated in an
ID parade.

Justice Hartman Longley will deliver his
summation on Tuesday, after which the jury is
expected to deliberate.

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MRS Jane Fitzroy Bethel,
MBE, founder with her late
husband of Bethel Brothers
Morticians, who died on
Thursday, was recognised by
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty as “an outstanding moth-
er, businessperson, and com-
munity leader.” The party
said on Monday that it
mourned her passing.

“We salute this matriarch
of the Bethel family who
along with her husband,
Marcus H. Bethel Sr.,
founded Bethel Brothers
Morticians, one of the oldest
Funeral Homes in the
Bahamas,” said a statement
from the party.

Husband

Her husband, who prede-
ceased her in 1967, was a
former Member of the
House of Assembly for the
Western District of New
Providence. He was defeat-
ed in the 1956 election by his
brother-in-law, the late Sir
Milo Butler, Sr, the first
Bahamian Governor Gener-
al. Sir Milo was Mrs Bethel’s
brother.

Following the untimely
death of her husband, Mrs
Bethel raised and educated
all of their children who are
well known and have made
significant contributors to
the Bahamas. Mrs Bethel
was awarded the M.B.E by
Her Majesty the Queen for
her outstanding dedication
to community development.

Mrs. Bethel’s children
included, former Senator
and Minister of Health and
the Environment Dr. Mar-
cus Bethel Jr., who served in
the PLP Government
between 2002 and 2007,
retired Justice Rubie Not-
tage, and Ambassador Dr.
Paulette Bethel.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

The Republic of Zambia and the
Bahamas explore commonalities

BY BETTY VEDRINE

THE Bahamas and Zam-
bia have many things in
common, including a simi-
lar demographic profile, a
focus on major industries
such as tourism and agricul-
ture, and a vulnerability to
natural disasters such as hur-
ricanes.

Governor General Sir
Arthur Foulkes made this
statement during his first
official ceremony at Gov-
ernment House last Thurs-
day.

The Governor General
was addressing Dr Nevers
Sekwila Mumba, High Com-
missioner of the Republic of
Zambia to the Bahamas as
he presented his Letters of
Commission.

Similarities

“It is important to elabo-
rate that the similarities
between our two countries
extend further,” said Sir
Arthur.

“Despite the geographical
distance that separates us,





























Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHALLOW
WATERS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YANGCHEN VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WHITE CASHMERE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TOP PREMIER
INDUSTRIES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE TRIBUNE



we have both been blessed
with spectacular and extra-

THE NATIONAL
ISLAND REGATTA



ordinary natural beauty,
which, in your case, includes
one of the seven natural
wonders of the world — the
Victoria Falls along the
Zambezi River.”

The Bahamas also shares
other concerns with Zambia
including the social chal-
lenge of having a mostly
youthful population, con-
centrated urbanisation, pub-
lic health ravages, in partic-
ular HIV/AIDS and the par-
allel security risks of illegal
migration, the Governor
General said.

The Zambian High Com-
missioner congratulated Sir
Arthur on his new appoint-
ment and said he was
delighted to be visiting the
Bahamas.

Dr Mumba is a non-resi-
dent High Commissioner
and resides in Canada.

“Zambia and the



:



3

(BIS photo/Patrick Hanna)

i

GEORGE TOWN, EXUMA - Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes and Joan Lady Foulkes touched
down in George Town, Exuma for the National Family Island Regatta on Thursday, April 22.



Bahamas enjoy a close and
historical relationship on
many fronts,” said Dr Mum-
ba. “Bahamians and the
Zambian people share com-
mon values and aspirations,
creating the democratic val-
ues and respect of human
rights.”

The Letters of Commis-
sion were passed on to the
Governor General as the
Deputy Prime Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette looked on.

A reception followed in
the ballroom at Mount
Fitzwilliam.







THE 57TH
National
Family Island
Regatta
wrapped up
on Saturday
night after
four days of
competitive
competition
in Elizabeth
Harbour,
Georgetown,
Exuma.
Pictured is
Beerly Legal.







Legal Notice

NOTICE

CARLTON VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STRATO
ENCOUNTERS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SENTECO SANS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ROH HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIDEL VILLAS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GALLERIA
PALACE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of April 2010. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Thousands

Show up for



day.

route.



fun wall

THOUSANDS showed up or the
Atlantic Medical Fun Walk on Satur-

The event began at 6am at Montagu
Beach with a warm-up session, and the
walk began promptly at 6.30am.

Participants followed one of two
routes, an “A” route for competitive
walkers and for those who opted to par-
ticipate at a less strenuous level, the “B”

The A route went west on Shirley
Street, to Church, north on to Church
Street to the new Paradise Island bridge,
east off the bridge to the Paradise Island
Golf Course and then back to Montagu
Beach via the old bridge, east on East
Bay St. to Montagu Beach.

Cultural evening puts spotlight on





Kathy Ingraham/Capital City Marketing



talented youth and various nations

THE cultures of the
Bahamas, Jamaica, Peru,
India and the Republic of
Congo were showcased at the
Rotary Club of Southeast
Nassau’s Sixth International
Cultural Evening.

Over 40 high school stu-
dents participated in the
event, performing songs,
dances and reading poetry.

Students from nine schools,
including R M Bailey, Doris
Johnson, Government High,
Aquinas College, St Andrew’s,
CI Gibson, L W Young, D W
Davis and C H Reeves repre-
sented six countries.

“What a great way to pro-
mote world peace and under-
standing,” said Anna DeGre-
gory, president of the Club.

The event was held at Gov-
ernment House in March.

Haitian Ambassador Louis
Joseph, Rotary District 7020’s
assistant district governor Felix
Stubbs, Rotarians, parents,
teachers and others enjoyed the
show the students put on.

Indian

Those attending the cultural
evening were treated to a clas-
sical Indian dance to a modern
Bollywood beat representing
India’s culture, the fast rhythm
of the Congo dancers and
drummers, a down-home rake
and scrape song, a father and
daughter performance on
piano, poetry in Creole and
many more talented perfor-
manices.

The international service
committee of the Rotary Club
of Southeast Nassau worked
with the various guidance coun-
selors and music teachers from
the schools to put the evening
together.

“We were really proud and
pleased by the performances
given today,” said John
Haughton, director of interna-
tional service.

“As you can see, the
Bahamas is full of talent and it
warms my heart to see the pos-
itive side of our youth and that
we are able to offer a venue for
them to show us what they have
got.”

This kind of programme,
Rotary Club of Southeast Nas-
sau said, falls perfectly in place
with Rotary’s four avenues of
service, one of which is inter-
national service.

This service encompasses





MEMBERS of the international service committee of the Rotary Club of
Southeast Nassau are recognised by director of international service
John Haughton (on stage). From left to right are: Rodney Eve, Afton Mox-
ey, Erica Rolle, Cleo Davis, Johann Bain and Charles Stuart.

Missing are Gordan Rodland and Ivan Carroll.

efforts to expand Rotary’s
humanitarian reach around the
world and to promote world
understanding and peace as
well as focusing on the youth
of the nation.

There are 12 Rotary Clubs
of the Bahamas with nine in
District 7020, which include the
islands of New Providence,




THE ROTARY CLUB of Southeast Nassau’s (ROSEN) International Culture Evening was held at Government

Eleuthera, Cat Island and Aba-
co. Rotary is an international
organisation of business and
professional leaders united
worldwide, who provide
humanitarian service, encour-
age high ethical standards in all
vocations and strive to help
build goodwill and peace in the
world.




Photo by Azaleta Ishmael-Newry

House. Nine local high schools showcased their talents and the culture of six countries. Shown in the pho-
to are (seated from left to right): Louis Joseph, Ambassador for Haiti; Felix Stubs, Rotary 7020 assistant dis-
trict governor; Anna DeGregory, president of the RCSEN; John Haughton, director of international service,
RCSEN; Charles Sealy II, incoming assistant district governor and past president of the RCSEN, and Val Mau-
ra, MC and director of public relations for the RCSEN. Standing are the performers; missing are three mem-

bers.



MS ABRAHAM of St Andrew’s
School illustrates her Indian
classical dance routine at the
Rotary Club of Southeast Nas-
sau’s International Cultural
Evening.

Photos:

By Azaleta Ishmael-Newry

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
Miwa emer te Merely
on Mondays

Crepir Suisstâ„¢

THOUSANDS at the a
start of the fun walk. 3






Photo: Wendall Cleare ’

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATIEND

‘Che 6th CB8tAnnual Convention

INTERNATIONAL UNITED PENTECOSTAL
FELLOWSHIP INC.

which convenes at Golden Gates World Quireach Miniseries Interna
lhinal on Carmachacl Road an Tiesday, Agel 27 bo Friday, April Ub,
AVL0 at 7250 mightly.

The Theme:

UNITED IN PROCLAMATION AND PRAISE.

Dynante speakers will inchede:

Bishop Fos Davis
Tuesday, April 27, 20010

Bishop John AM. Humes.
Thursday, April 28, 20010

Bishop Hulan Hanne
Wednesday, April 28, 2010

fm i

-.
ae

Bishop Robert A McPhee
Friday, Apnl 30, 2010

Vuesday: Goldin Gast Word Quah Wali Siftemione Nigie
Wednesday: Chock of Ged of Prophecy Migit

Tharsday: Cure of Gad Taels oad Caltros tetas iene
Friday: Nighway Check af God Batons foc. Wight

COME AND BE BLESSED!!!



Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
Graduate Trainee Program

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas has operated an Apprenticeship Training
Program in The Bahamas since the early 1990's. Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
is now pleased to announce the continuation of its Graduate Trainee Program,
with the second intake of trainees intended for July 5, 2010. Full details and an
application form can be obtained from:

The Graduate Trainee Program Administrator
Credit Suisse AG, Nassau Branch
The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4'" Floor

Shirley & Charlotte Streets

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax No.: 242-356-8148

Application forms should be returned NO LATER THAN MAY 31, 2010

A) AIM

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas is committed to identifying and
developing the best young talent in The Bahamas. The Group is
offering one (1) year Graduate Trainee Contracts to College of The
Bahamas graduates or graduates returning to The Bahamas from
accredited colleges or universities abroad.

The program will accommodate three (3) graduates. Successful
applicants will be awarded a one year contract of employment during
which time the graduates will rotate between or within different business
units or departments of Credit Suisse Group entities. Permanent
employment opportunities will be evaluated at the end of this period.

B) CONDITIONS

The candidate is required to have a Bachelors Degree in one of the following or

suitably similar disciplines:

Banking and Finance

Engineering
Mathematics
Finance
Economics

Economics & Finance

Management
Accounting

Computer Information Systems

The candidate must have graduated with a minimum grade point average of

3.5 and have graduated within the past 12 months.

The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of a person employed

at the Bank.
BENEFITS

Competitive Salary; Health and Life Insurance



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 11



I don’t want our nation turned
into Sodom and Gomorrah

Pastor Lyall Bethel responds to Larry Smith article
YOUR SAY

By PASTOR LYALL
BETHEL

SEVERAL weeks ago
when a Tribune staff reporter
took on the Bahamian Church
community and scolded and
lectured us on our position on
homosexuality, I answered her
because she mischaracterized
us.
More recently Mr. Larry
Smith has entered the debate
in his usual mocking, sneering
tones, with gross mischarac-
terizations of me. Not able to
rely on the strength of his own
weak arguments, Mr. Smith
has resorted to name-calling
like the school yard children
do.

He wants to call me “aya-
tollah” because I, represent-
ing the vast majority of
Bahamians, don’t want to see
our nation turned into Sodom
and Gomorrah.

Mr. Smith’s comments were
reckless and irresponsible and
seem designed to demonize
me and cast me in the worst
possible light. This is the same
kind of bomb-throwing and
scare tactics that the lunatic
fringe on the left and the right
in the United States use to
demonize their opponents
rather than try to deal fairly
with their arguments. And
whereas the reporter and I
have argued over facts and
statements from our perspec-
tives on the rightness or
wrongness of homosexual
behaviour, Mr. Smith sought
to attack my character and
integrity.

This is now the second time
he has tried to lampoon me by
saying that I believe that there
is clandestine attempt or "con-
spiracy" to promote homo-
sexuality. Think for a minute
Mr. Smith, (and please try and
follow the simple logic here,
although it has eluded you all
these years), it can't be clan-
destine if it was publicly
announced, nor a conspiracy
when it is a widely known!

Why do Christians fight the
Agenda?

According to Mr. Smith,
“one is hard-pressed to dis-
cern what drives people like
Lyall Bethel ... to become so
obsessed with an imaginary
plot to take over the world
that he and others like to refer
to as ‘the gay militant agen-
da’.” Let me see if [can make
it plain for him. How am I an
Ayatollah because I see where
the homosexual agenda is
going and raise a cry of alarm?
One need only watch what is
going on in the U.S. and
around the world to under-
stand what compliance or

7a COLONIAL GROUP
lds] INTERNATIONAL



refusal to take seriously the
homosexual agenda will bring
about.

Laws are broken to accom-
modate the agenda; San Fran-
cisco’s Major Gavin Newsome,
while elected to uphold the
law, instead illegally issued
marriage licenses to same-sex
couples. When responsible
law and order was restored
those certificates were over-
turned.

Elementary schools in Cali-
fornia that should be dealing
with the three “Rs” are being
made to instruct children with
graphic pictures that homo-
sexuality is normal! And as if
that were not enough in sev-
eral states these elementary
age children are being indoc-
trinated with children’s books
like “Heather has Two
Moms.”

At the direction of activist
judges and politicians, law
makers in Massachusetts leg-
islated same sex “marriage”
without going to the people.
Indeed some six states at last
count have used the legisla-
ture (avoiding the will of the
people who always vote against
it) to force the issue. In Cana-
da, they have effectively muz-
zled opposing voices by mak-
ing it illegal to speak out
against homosexuality or you
face a jail-term of two years. In
Sweden Pastor Ake Green
was sent to jail for suggesting
homosexuality is a sin from
which a person could find
wholeness in Christ. Thank
God his conviction was over-
turned.

I trust that the above sum-
mary has helped, but in short,
it is because they see the
silencing of the critics of
homosexuality, the threat of
jail terms for speaking their
consciences, their children
being indoctrinated with their
own tax dollars and the illogic
of political correctness gone
wild!

Much support for homosex-
uality is not based on logic and
reason but on blind ideology
that can be dangerous to the
rest of society. For instance,
in Scotland homosexual cam-
paigners want removed the
prohibition against blood
donated by men who have sex
with men taken away, even
though to do so would result in
a “five-fold increase in the risk
of HIV-infected blood enter-
ing the blood supply,” accord-
ing to the National Blood Ser-

SECURITY

vice. The prohibition was
based on high risk behaviour
alone!

Despite a 117 per cent
increase in syphilis infections
in men who have sex with
men, between 2002 and 2006,
the homosexual campaigners
still maintain there should be
no exclusion of their blood.
This is the kind of blind ideol-
ogy that Mr. Smith and oth-
ers seem to espouse: Damn all
just to affirm homosexuality.

As a pastor Iam in the busi-
ness of saving lives. I am there
to help families in their grief,
to be with them when they
receive the news that a loved
one has cancer or has died.
And while I am there to hold
the hand of the grief-stricken
widow, or receiving calls in the
middle of the night from a sui-
cidal teen or parent, Mr. Smith
sits around dreaming about
what damage he can do with
his poisonous pen. Indeed,
while he sits in his ivory tower
dispensing what he believes
passes for wisdom, we pastors,
whom he despises, are nurs-
ing back to health the disease
ridden bodies of the young
men and women whose bodies
have been feasted on, abused
and discarded by the power-
ful and the protected.

Our way is not to force
belief on anybody, but rather
to appeal to their conscience.
We have the right to appeal
for enforcement of the laws of
the land to stop immoral activ-
ity like gambling and strip
clubs, and that is what we do.
It is the Church that has come
to the aid of families that have
been made destitute by the
compulsive gambler who bet
on and lost the family home.
Perhaps Mr. Smith does not
Know of the many stories of
foreign women who are lured
here to model and dance, but
once they arrive are forced to
work as prostitutes and strip-
pers (Tribune, Thursday April
Sth, 2007 - “Panamanian
women claim they were forced
to have sex for money by Nas-
sau Club owners”). Or perhaps
he simply does not care.

In fact, the Jamaican media
has reported on similar stories
of Jamaican women being
lured to The Bahamas through
deceptive ads running in
Jamaica, and once they arrive
here, they are forced into pros-
titution and work in strip
clubs. Are we evil for trying
to shut down this illegal,



=





PASTOR LYALL BETHEL



immoral, exploitative practice
in The Bahamas? Imagine
that, while women are being
held against their will in this
country and forced into pros-
titution and stripping for a liv-
ing, pastors that try to shut
such places down are consid-
ered ayatollahs by Mr. Smith?
Who doesn't know that any
society that seeks to dominate
and exploit women is a
doomed society?

Why can't I demand along
with like-minded citizens that
politicians seeking office in
The Bahamas be made to
declare their views on various
issues that are important to
the Bahamian public, instead
of the carnival-like atmos-
phere that presently exists.
(Excellent candidates are put
forward by the various parties
but we are quickly helped to
understand that it has nothing
to do with them but rather the
party leader!)

If US Presidential candi-
dates had to declare their
views on issues like same-sex
marriage and abortion, why
shouldn’t our politicians?

For the record, every one of
the presidential candidates in
the last US election was made
to state his views on some of
the same topics, same-sex mar-
riage, abortion, etc. Why
should Bahamian citizens like
myself not have the right to
know what our would be elect-
ed representatives believe and
stand for, when we were blind-
sided back in 1996 during the
first announced "gay cruise”
by the reality that the govern-
ment had changed the laws
concerning sodomy back in
1991.

Despite Mr. Smith’s claims,
the Christian community is a
friend to the homosexual, cer-
tainly a better friend than he

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could ever be for all his “lofty”
idealism! Many homosexuals
are living lives of painful des-
peration filled with abuse, vio-
lence, jealousy, betrayal,
shame, drugs and alcohol
addiction and disease. Many
are corrupted, abused and
shattered souls who the church
has to come alongside to
redeem and restore, and some-
times house, feed and pay
their medical bills!

Typically, Mr. Smith embell-
ished my comments suggest-
ing that I believed that ALL
homosexuals “live filthy,
unhealthy, dangerous, and vio-
lent lives” and are child moles-
ters. I never said nor implied
that ALL homosexuals are
paedophiles or that all were
involved in sordid lives. I
merely put forth stats from sci-
entific sources and homosexu-
al commentators concerning
SOME homosexuals NOT
ALL (even going so far as to
give the percentages), and they
were given to help give a more
realistic view of the many
high-risk behaviours associat-
ed with homosexuality.

He tried to downplay my
comments about paedophilia
and the group NAMBLA
(North American Man Boy
Love Association) whose
chant is “Sex before eight
before it’s too late” by saying
that “almost all gay groups are
opposed to [them]”. But until
these demands stated at the

infamous rally are retracted,
and they are not allowed to
march in any homosexual
parade, then I can honestly
cite some homosexuals as
being interested in paedophil-
ia. And what were those
demands?

Point (2) - “Demands for
the legalisation of all forms of
sexual expression, including
paedophilia, and (3) Demands
to change the age of consent to
allow sex with minors.” Mr.
Smith cannot pull the wool
over our eyes with this.

It was helpful that Mr.
Smith posted my picture
because the person he
described was so unrecogniz-
able to me and everybody else
that I had to keep referring to
it to remember that he was
supposedly talking about me. I
am surprised that in his quest
to demonize me he did not
succumb to the obvious temp-
tation to draw some demonic
horns and fangs on my photo
to better establish his point.

While Mr. Smith has
accused me of bearing false
witness, I will leave it up to
God to decide who is bearing
false witness and judge accord-
ingly. The fact is that we can
do nothing against the truth;
truth (including the truth
about homosexuality) always
marches on, undeterred by
those who fight against it.
That is my consolation in this
debate.

#10 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 « Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 « Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 ¢ Evening: 324-4687

FUNERAL SERVICE

Full Military Funeral Service for
Principal Officer Samuel Alexander Duvalier, 45

of Danielle Street, Lynden Pindling
Estates and formerly of Congo Town,
South Andros who died on Thursday,
April 15th, 2010 will be held on
Thursday, April 29th, at 10:00am at the
Church of God Auditorium, Joe
Farrington Road. Officiating will be
Pastor Wesley L. Thompson assisted
by Pastor Leonard Clarke, Chaplain
HMP and other Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Rev. Samuel’s life has touched so many
and has left an indelible mark in the lives of all who loved him and
cherished him.

Unforgettable memories will forever linger in the heart of his loving
Wife: Betsy Duvalier; Mother: Sylvia Duvalier; Parents-in-law:
Deacon Dennis & Anna Rena Henfield; (4) Brothers: Michael,
Jeffery, Arnold & Rodger Duvalier; (6) Sisters: Doraline Johnson,
Janeth Forbes, Zelrona Outten, Louise, Andrea & Nadine Duvalier;
(11) Nephews: Renaldo, Perneko, Robert, Roger Jr., Jeffery Jr.,
Sharrow, Jefton, Dominique, Justin, Rodrick & Krisoff; (13) Nieces:
Shanressa, Deah, Cindy, Nachae’, Ashley, Shanrese, Hillary, Lisa,
Deneka, Stacy, Derecka, Diamond & Garnell; (6) Uncles: Rev.
James Pratt, Rev. Cedric Duvalier, Bruce of West Palm Beach
Florida, Edwin Burrows & David Duncombe; (5) Aunts: Althea
Moss of Freeport, Rev. Mildred Burrows, Rev. Shirley Gibson, Rev
Martha Duvalier & Mary Pratt; (3) Sisters-in-law: Lorraine, Sherice
& Patrice Duvalier; (3) Brothers-in-law: Joseph Johnson, Victor
Forbes & Dereck Outten; Cousins including: Rev. Roy Burrows,
Rev. Garth Fynes, Rev. Alfreda McPhee, Minister Cinderetta Johnson,
Minister Barbara Smith, Evangelist Karen Collie, Almina Ferguson,
Wilfred McKenzie, Pandora St. Fleur, Remilda, Almanda, Frisco,
Robert & Chester McKenzie, Samuel & Harold Lynes, Betty Sawyer,
Laverne Kelly-Grant, John Jr. & Edison Kelly, Deborah Brown,
Jennifer, Cedric Jr., Huey, Terrance, & Andrea Duvalier, Dellareese
Rahming, Lillith Burrows, Cheryl King, Monique “Madlyn”
McIntosh, Paulette Darville, Roshell Murphy, Marva Davis, Derick,
Joshua & Maxwell Burrows, Patrice Gibson-Price, Garnet Jr., Elton,
Raymond, Ramon, Harvey, Howell & Kayla Gibson, Verlene,
Carlton, Wellington, Sara, Altamase, Johnny, Linda & Neil Duvalier,
Paulene Johnson, Jethro Sr., & Ezekiel Pratt, Sonia Rolle, Calvin
Burrows, Joann, Tony, Randy, Angela, Arametta, Hubell, Albertha,
Drucilla, Kenneth & Terrance Duncombe, Joycelyn, Carolyn, Donny,
Ruth, Milestine, Murriel, Dave, Inez, Prudence, Norraine & Fenrick
Nottage, Eugene & Michelle Burrows, Elise, Maggie, Elsada
Burrows, Stephanie & Shelia Forbes, Hubert, Terry, Darvin &
Dwayne Duncombe, Stephanie Duncombe-Clarke, Marilyn
Duncombe-Cartwright & Desiree Duncombe-Saunders; A host of
other relatives and friends including: Rev. Leta David & family,
Pastor Wesley & Marsha Thompson, Pastors, Office and the entire
membership of Mt. Pleasant Green Baptist Church family, Samuel
Brown, Chief Officer Vernice Forbes, Chief Officer Sarah Gardiner,
Corporal Judy Whymms, Sargent Claudia Fraser, Corporal Sheineka
Basden, Principal Officer Charles Curtis, Sargent Gregory Daxon,
Sargent Zendall Colebrooke & family, Hon. Tommy Turnquest,
Superintendent Elliston Rahming, Deputy Superintendent Charles
Rolle and the entire Staff of Her Majesty’s Prison, Rev. Mary
Johnson, Rev. T.G. Morrison, Deborah Johnson, Wandalee Henfield,
Ursula Reckley, Mr. Herbert Brown, Ms. Catherine Weech and the
entire staff of Sandilands Rehabilitation Hospital, management &
staff of Migrafill Security, Sara Robinson, Ethel Forbes, Mable
Forbes & family, Brad Fraser, Fellowship Church of God In Christ
Church family, Officers & members of Vision of Hope Church of
God in Christ, Rev. Carrington & Mrs. Pinder and the entire church
family of St. Mark’s Native Baptist Church, management & staff
of Doctor’s Hospital, management and. staff of Private Medical
Ward PMH, the management & staff of Vincent Peet Law Chambers
and the entire Congo Town and South Andros communities.

Viewing will be held at Clarke’s Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway on Wednesday, April 28th from 10:00am
to 6:00pm and on Thursday from 9:00am until service time.



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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Hotel union set
for third election

FROM page one

whose landslide win in May was
ruled null and void by a
Supreme Court judge and sub-
sequent September win was
ruled out by the Court of
Appeal, is up against Lionel
Morley, The Workers Coalition
candidate.

Incumbent president Roy
Colebrooke has dropped out of
the race along with the leaders
of three other parties previous-
ly vying for the spot.

Mr Morley, of Grand
Bahama, said he is confident it
will be a case of third time
lucky for himself in a press con-
ference at the House of Labour
on Wulff Road yesterday.

The union’s current second
vice-president attributed Ms
Martin’s previous successes to a
low voter turnout and intimi-
dation tactics executed by her
supporters.

He called on the Commis-
sioner of Police to send his best
officers to manage the elections
tomorrow to assure voters they
will not be intimidated at the
polls.

Just 56 per cent of around
6,000 members of the country’s

largest union have voted in the
previous five elections, Mr
Morley said, as he called on
members not be discouraged
from choosing policy over per-
sonality.

High on his agenda is the
reversal of changes to the pen-
sion fund made in December
without consulting union mem-
bers, building two healthcare
clinics for members in Grand
Bahama and New Providence,
and ensuring all union officers
are trained for their positions.

“My campaign is about issues
and ideas,” Mr Morley said.

“This union is simply too big
to not have primary healthcare
for membership.

“This is not about personali-
ties, it’s about leadership, trans-
parency and accountability.”

The union has been rocked
by serious infighting and dis-
putes over funds for more than
two years which culminated in
calls for legal action over the
disbursement of almost
$700,000 allegedly authorised
by certain union executives in
August against the wishes of
others.

Mr Colebrooke said he
hopes the election will bring
stability back to the organisa-

tion. He said that building the
memberships’ confidence in its
representation should be an
important focus for whichever
team is elected.

Single mother-of-three Ms
Martin boasted a landslide vic-
tory in the May 28 election last
year, but the vote was then
declared null and void by
Supreme Court Justice Jon
Isaacs.

Supreme Court Justice
Neville Adderley then ordered
a new election process to be
held in September resulting in
another victory for Ms Mar-
tin.

However, the decisions made
by both Supreme Court judges
were then overturned in the
Court of Appeal and a third
election was set for today.

Unless something goes fun-
damentally wrong today, the
vote should be the union’s final
election.i

The polls will open at the
BHCAWU Headquarters,
Worker's House, in Harrold
Road, Bahamas Communica-
tion and Public Officers Union
(BCPOU) Hall in Farrington
Road and the National Centre
for Performing Arts on Shirley
Street from 8am to 6pm today.

PULSE UTA ie EES MTU Ca DES

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

Silsby declined comment from her jail cell.



A HAITIAN judge said Monday he has
dismissed kidnapping and criminal association
charges against 10 American missionaries
detained for trying to take a busload of chil-
dren out of the country after the Jan. 12
earthquake, according to Associated Press.

Judge Bernard Saint-Vil said Laura Sils-
by, the last of the 10 missionaries jailed in
Haiti, still faced a lesser charge for allegedly
organizing the effort to transport the 33 chil-
dren to an orphanage they were setting up in
the Dominican Republic.

Silsby faces up to three years in prison if
convicted on the remaining charge, the "orga-
nization of irregular trips," from a 1980
statute restricting travel out of Haiti signed by
then-dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier.



Shiller Roi, a lawyer for Silsby, declined com-
ment, saying he hadn't yet received the
judge's written decision.

The judge told The Associated Press that
the charge of organizing the trip was also
pending against Jean Sainvil, a Haitian-born
pastor from Atlanta who also helped organize
the venture. Sainvil did not immediately
respond to message left on his voicemail.

The judge, who spoke to AP in a brief
phone interview, did not explain the reasons
for his decisions.

It was the latest development in a case that
emerged amid the chaos following the dev-
astating earthquake, which the government
said killed an estimated 230,000 people and
left hundreds of thousands of people home-
less.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS

Gay nightclub in
mass brawl ‘is

properly licensed

FROM page one

the road about 100ft from the
entrance to the Garage nightclub.

She was allegedly knocked down
by a woman in a blue 2008 Toyota
Carolla. Police later located the vehi-
cle they believe was involved in the
incident on Yamacraw Road.

The incident happened in the
wake of a parking lot brawl at about
4am Sunday between a group of
enraged women throwing bottles
and rocks and pummeling each oth-
er with their fists.

Police are still investigating the
situation, but it is believed the row
broke out over a young girl at the
club.

The Gladstone Road nightclub is
located on Crown land, which is
leased by Mr Mortimer. The prop-
erty is primarily used for Kendal’s
Auto Parts, which is housed in a
building with four separate garage
units.

An extension building, connected
to the auto shop, is rented to the
operators of the Garage nightclub.
The operators could not be contact-
ed for comment.

Tribune sources within the
Department of Land and Surveys
said Crown land should not be sub-
leased unless there is written per-
mission to do so. He said the appli-
cation form for Crown land must

state the purpose for use, and any
deviations must be approved.

He said the Gladstone Road prop-
erty in question “was leased for the
expressed purpose of a car garage.”

Mr Mortimer said he did not want
to comment on questions related to
the terms of his Crown land lease
arrangement.

He said Kendal’s Auto Shop is at
least 15 years old.

Two years ago he started renting
the extension building to the cur-
rent nightclub owners.

Although it is a known gay haunt,
Mr Mortimer said he could not com-
ment on that as he has never visited
the club.

He said the club’s owners applied
for the various approvals and have a
licence to operate on Saturdays.

Mr Mortimer said the purpose of
the ‘For Rent’ sign on the perimeter
fence is to advertise the garage units,
which he sometimes rents to
mechanics for short-term use.

He said he was not concerned
about the incident, as the Gladstone
Road area is known for flare-ups.
He said he was not considering clos-
ing the club as it provides an
income.

After the fight, the parking lot was
spotted with blood and littered with
bottles, stones, clothing, handbags,
high heel shoes and costume jew-
ellery. Large stones were left in the







road.

Bahamians stranded
as thunderstorms
sround many flights

FROM page one

yesterday.

It was later extended to
include Bimini, North Andros,
North Eleuthera and the sur-
rounding waters as meteorol-
ogists kept a close eye on
storms moving towards the
capital.

Bahamasair general manag-
er Henry Woods said flights
in Fort Lauderdale were
grounded for two hours yes-
terday morning delaying the
10am flight to Nassau until
noon.

A passenger booked on
Bahamasair’s 11.40am was
subsequently delayed by more
than three hours as she board-
ed the aircraft at around lpm
and then waited on the busy
runway for another hour
before departing for Nassau
and arriving at 3.30pm.

The working mother said:
“They kept us updated and
told us what to expect, but we
didn’t get any compensation.

“The weather did look real-
ly bad outside though, so ?m
glad they chose safety first, but
I couldn’t get to work yester-
day, so I was still inconve-
nienced.”

SkyBahamas cancelled two
flights between Nassau and
Freeport, and Nassau to Cat
Island yesterday, and delayed
four flights out of George
Town, Exuma, Marsh Har-
bour, Abaco, and Nassau and

PLP chief

Freeport.

Pilots flying out of George
Town yesterday turned back
when they encountered bad
weather on the way to Nassau
and landed safely back in Exu-
ma.

SkyBahamas chief opera-
tions officer Kenneth Romer
said: “We are not going to
compromise when it comes to
safety.

“And although it was an act
of God and we weren’t obliged
to compensate our passengers
we took good care of them,
we gave them meals, rebooked
them on flights, and demon-
strated good customer ser-
vice.”

Cat Island Air was also
forced to cancel the afternoon
flight to Nassau yesterday as
thunderstorms moved south-
west across the Bahamas and
were expected to continue
across the central Bahamas
this morning.

Ian McKenzie, Operational
forecaster at the Meteorologi-
cal Office, said airlines were
kept updated with regular
weather warnings and made
their own decisions on
whether or not to operate
flights.

“We can’t take anything for
granted because every second
counts,” Mr McKenzie said.

“Grand Bahama was over-
cast, cloudy with light to mod-
erate rain, heavy at times, with
thunderstorm activity, and, of

l i
offended

hy Christie remarks

FROM page one

“She is an outstanding orator and has her hands around
the issues facing people. She believes in people and has
committed herself to helping the least amongst us. Her
decision does not mean her political life is over or her rela-
tionship with the PLP,” said the West End and Bimini MP.

However, a former leadership candidate during the PLP’s
51st National Convention in 2008, Paul Moss, said the PLP
has to address the fact that the party is losing good and
qualified persons “left, right, and centre.”

Having resigned from the PLP himself, Mr Moss asked the
public to question why “good partisan people” are inca-
pable of having a voice and even staying with the party.

“The party’s inability to have introspection to prepare
itself moving forward to being the alternative to the gov-
ernment, they have not done that. They are trying to win at
all costs. And I don’t think that is going to work, even

against a third party,” he said.

course, there is a possibility of
tornadoes even if it’s an i1so-
lated short-lived tornado.

“The chances would have
been greater in areas of con-
vection or severe thunder-
storm activity.

“While the thunderstorm
warning is issued, that’s always
a risk.”

The thunderstorms are to
be expected as the weather
warms up in a transitional
stage from winter to summer.

Grand Bahama bears the
brunt of severe thunderstorms
as it is the closest island to the
United States, however the
storms tend to dissipate as
they move across. the
Bahamas, Mr McKenzie said.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 13B








The Tribune

Cancer in dogs

CANCER or malignant tumors usually
refers to an abnormal growth of cells that
interferes with normal body function. All
body cells have a life span. When they die,
cells are replaced through a process called
mitosis in which a single cell splits into two
cells identical to the parent cell.

For reasons unknown to us, normal cells
sometimes mutate during mitosis, producing
fast growing abnormal cells that act like par-
asites, invading and replacing healthy tis-
sue.

Under ideal circumstances, the body’s
immune system recognises these cells as for-
eign and eliminates them before they cause
problems. Sometimes, the body can’t fight
off this attack by these cells resulting in
growth of abnormal cells, called tumors or
neoplasms. Those that remain localised and
relatively harmless are termed benign, while
potentially deadly spreading tumors are
called malignant.

Malignant tumors or cancer can be con-
fined to one area, but often they spread or
metastasise throughout the body. The most
dangerous cancer is already spreading at the

B O Gi

ealth







early stages, when the point of origination is
still very small or even nearly undectable. A
malignant tumor becomes deadly when it
interferes with normal body processes.

Cancer is considered a disease of older
dogs and the incidence of tumors in dogs
increase with age.

Approximately 20 per cent of all pet dogs
will develop cancer. The prevalence of can-
cer is difficult to determine. The exact cause
of cancer remains a mystery, but we do know
that cancer causing agents, referred to as
CARCINOGENS, may increase the risk of
developing certain kinds of diseases.E.¢.
exposure to sunlight increases the risk of
skin cancer. The relation of sexual hormones
and some cancers have been documented.

E.g. mammary cancer in female dogs and
prostrate and testicular cancer in males.

CLINICAL SIGNS OF CANCER

1. Abnormal swelling that persist or
continues to grow.

2. Sores that do not heal

3. Weight loss

4. Loss of appetite

5. Bleeding or discharge from any
body opening

6. Offensive odor

7. Difficulty eating and swallowing
8. Hesitation to exercise or loss of stamina
9. Persistent lameness or stiffness
10. Difficulty in breathing, urinating
or defecating

Dogs can suffer from more kinds of cancer
that any other domestic animal. Skin cancer
is the most common canine cancer. The most
common skin tumors are sebaceous adeno-
mas and then mast cell tumors.

Mammary gland cancer is considered the
second leading cancer in dogs. This type of
cancer is seen in middle age, intact (non-
spayed) females. Usually, a painless lump
or enlargement appears in the breast closest
to the rear legs. Lymph gland cancer are
devastating because they commonly spread
throughout the body. Oral tumors are also
very common. Bone cancer or (Osteosarco-



ma) which are almost always malignant that
spread to the lungs is also common.

The cancer treatment of choice in veteri-
nary medicine is surgical removed of the
tumor, which is particularly effective when
the cancer is localised and has not spread.
For instance, bone cancer is usually treated
by amputation of the affected limb.

Unfortunately, surgical cure is rare
because it is difficult to remove every can-
cerous cell. Leaving behind a single cell
allows the cancer to recur and / or spread.
Some cancers that encroach upon vital
organs, nerves, or muscle can be difficult to
surgically remove without damaging normal
tissue.

In those instances radiation may be used.
However, in the Bahamas there is no vet-
erinary hospital equipped to perform this
expensive treatment. Chemotherapy is the
third cancer treatment commonly used with
dogs and it is most useful in treating cancer
that has spread throughout the body. A wide
variety of CYTOTOXIC (cell poisoning)
drugs are available and may be used singly or
in combination with pills or intravenous
injections. The specific drugs (s) used will
depend on the type of cancer.

Many of the same human medications are
effective against cancer in dogs.

A LAUGHIER
BURDENS AWAY

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



OTHING is probably

more refreshing than,

a belly hurting, eye
watering, “can’t catch ya sef”

laugh.

We’re not talking about just a lit-
tle chuckle by the way but the kind
of laugh more contagious than a
cough, sniffle, or sneeze. Its the kind
of laugh where you can feel the mus-
cles in your abdomen contracting,
as though you did a quick ab crunch-
ing exercise.

Along with giving you those few
moments of emotional liberation and
pleasure, laughter is actually the best
remedy for any emotional sapping
situation, relieving stress and adding
joy and zest to your life.

And what makes it the best kind
of medicine is the fact that it is fun,
free, (emphasis on the free) and
easy.

Psychologist Francis Farmer rec-
ommends laughter, when stress is
on the rise, and it is hard to wrap
your head around the challenges that
life seems to bring, since there is def-
initely a link between laughter and
mental health.

This in particular is so apparent
that a gelotological (study of laugh-
ing and laughter) observation is not
even needed.

Perhaps you can carry out your
own experiment, proving that point.
You can probably think back to time
when you were poignant or stressed,
and that coworker/friend/family
member made you laugh. Didn’t you
feel so much better afterwards?

Dr Farmer provided a simple
explanation as to how that stagnant
negative energy transferred into an
exhilarating feeling.

“Laughter produces chemicals in

the brain that affect mood. These
chemicals are in fact what makes us
feel good when we are laughing.

“ One of the most well known
secretions released during laughter is
endorphins, which are the same hor-
mones secreted during the peak of
intercourse. Usually dubbed as the
body’s natural feel good chemicals,
they help create a good feeling with-
in the body.

“It is a very powerful antidote
when it comes to stress, pain, and
conflict.”

And according to
www.helpguide.org, a non profit
resource where certified doctors and
psychologists discuss mental and
emotional health issues, laughter is
even good for your physical health.

The website explained that laugh-
ter relaxes the whole body in that it
relieves physical tension and stress
leaving the muscles relaxed up to 45
minutes afterwards.

“Laughter boots the immune sys-
tem. It decreases stress hormones
and increases immune cells and
infection fighting antibodies, thus
improving your resistance to disease.
Laughter also improves the function
of blood vessels and increases blood
flow which can help protect you
against cardio related problems,”
the website said.

Aware of the healthy benefits of
laughter, there are some doctors who
recommend patients to laughter
therapy to their patients whether
physically ill, or emotionally ill.

This laughter therapy can come
in the form of anything Dr Farmer
explained.

“Laughter is obviously good for
the well being. It brightens up your
mood and you have a different out-
look. One way to get a good laugh is
by watching a funny movie. It is
much better to watch a movie that is
healthy and uplifting than one that is
depeessiney ” Dr Farmer told Tribune

Health.

To get they
same results, she i
also. recom-#j
mends spending#*
time with peo- 8
ple who are’ / i
high-spirited ji
and always hayet |
a positive outloo
on life.

“Be around people wh6
are bright and happy. Try
to avoid situations where
people are often complaining.
This is a negative situation
because you will begin to feel
exactly like the person who
is complaining,” she
said.

The social benefits of
a giggle also has a posi-
tive impression on life.
Mutual humor within a
relationship builds positive
bonds between partners. ~

Here are just few of the of
the benefits physical, mental, and
social benefits of laughter.

PHYSICAL HEALTH BENEFITS:
¢ Boosts immunity
¢ Lowers stress hormones
¢ Decreases pain
¢ Relaxes your muscles
¢ Prevents heart disease

MENTAL HEALTH BENEFITS:
¢ Eases anxiety and fear
Relieves stress
¢ Improves mood
¢ Enhances resilience

SOCIAL BENEFITS:
« Strengthens relationships
¢ Attracts others to us
¢ Enhances teamwork
¢ Helps defuse conflict
¢ Promotes group bonding

Benefits taken from www.helpquide.org

What will people think?

TAKE a moment, and think back
to the difficult times in your life. Do
you think it was the impossibility of
the situation, dealing with specific
individuals, or the overwhelming
emotions that it unearthed?

Perhaps it is hard to put your fin-
ger on it, and it was in fact all the
above and more? If we set aside all
these considerations, then perhaps
one thing that we could all agree on
is that many of us agonise over ‘what
will people think?”

For some of us worrying about
other people stops us from dealing
with anything. Do you think this
happens everywhere or does it just
become more obvious in small soci-
eties?

Even if we disagree with this
observation most of us do take into
consideration how it would affect
the people closest to us. The prob-



lem can produce ripple effects
depending on how large it is or how
it is dealt with. These are all
admirable qualities and certainly a
sign of maturity and thoughtfulness.
But can we carry it too far and use it
as an excuse not to be honest in our
relating with others? Can we pass it
off by consistently saying ‘But I did-
n't want to hurt you’ or ‘we can't do
that because they would think badly
of us'?

When we make these statements,

or overly consider others, what are
we really worried about? Is it really
their thoughts and feelings, or is it
our image? In most circumstances, is
it as ‘black and white' as that or does
it generally fall into the vast shades
of gray? The reality is that we do
not live alone on an island and our
lives are intertwined.
Undoubtedly, our own identity
and how we view ourselves plays a
vital role in our decisions. To be able
to live in peace with ourselves, and
sleep well at night, we need to feel
comfortable. Our uniqueness char-
acterises us and yet if we were hard
pressed we would probably define
it in the areas of competency, being
a good person and being worthy of
love. Often, when we play out pos-
sible scenarios, it is this mixed bag of
thoughts and emotions that swirl
around in our head. Sometimes, it is

just a matter of time for us to clear
our minds and sort through the rub-
ble. Bit by bit, we are able to dis-
card some feelings and get down to
the primary cause. Time has a way of
putting perspective on things, hence
the saying ‘timing is everything’ or
‘time will tell’.

When we get to the stage of real-
ly knowing ourselves we are then
able to prepare ourselves in advance.
Considering what you would gain
from the situation, the unpre-
dictability of the response, and the
attack on your identity may help to
keep your composure. If we are then
thrown a curve ball, with complete
contradictory statement of how we
see ourselves, we are hopefully not
completely thrown off balance.

Being ‘older and wiser' still does
not make us immune from making
mistakes. None of us are perfect,
and sometimes we are just caught
off guard. Even if we are sent in all
directions during the conversation
it is important to try and follow
through in a productive direction.



















This may not happen all at once, and
you may require a ‘time out’, but if
you care about the relationship it is
important to return until you both
find a solution.

Believing in ourselves for the type
of person we want to be is crucial.
The more positive ‘self-talk’ that we
tell ourselves, the more confident
we will become. We need to move
away from destructive self-thinking
when we start to believe others neg-
ative thoughts of us. Totally denying
or exaggerating our qualities pre-
vents us from learning and growing
throughout our lives. Coming to
terms that we are all complex human
beings, living in a complex world,
hopefully brings some leniency and
comfort.



e Listen to ~ Love on the Rock ' with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9 For appointments .
call 364 7230 , email relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com.

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PAGE 14B, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Easing the pains of the body

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

attling those bodily aches

and pains that come from

athletic exertion, or the
dreadful aging process? Have
you visited the chiropractor
many times, but still need
relief?

At The Eden Centre, Dr Liu
Zelin (Dr Leo) and his team per-
form age-long treatments for fast
and easy weight loss, and pain relief
with acupuncture and massage tech-
niques to ease a frozen shoulder,
encourage longer erections, and
decrease headache and sinus pain.

He says his methods are uncon-
ventional, but effective. They
include treatments such as electro
magnetic massage therapy, which
uses the elements of water and elec-
tricity to treat persons with pain
from sore muscles

Another procedure is Dr Leo’s
“sword technique” used to obstruct
gas for people who have abdominal
pain. The sword is sharp, and gives
off energy as it is moved about the
stomach, and scatters gas.

“Women with huge breasts even
have it done to break up fatty tis-
sues, since there aren’t many exer-
cises you can do to reduce the bust
line,” says Rachel, Dr Leo’s assis-
tant. She says that clients can lose
up to two breast sizes with this tech-
nique, combined with acupuncture,
and following a strict diet for weight
loss.

Dr Leo advises his clients to fol-
low a strict diet consisting of meat
and water, and he reports that they
can lose up to 20 inches, some
patients even more, depending on
their size.

There are over 361 pressure
points about the body, which are
used to determine where to admin-
ister the “painless” needles during
the acupuncture procedure.

If the chent comes in for weight



loss treatment, he would recom-
mend acupuncture therapy, as the
needles are injected on the surface
of the skin to cure that part of your
body that is aching.

Acupuncture is used to treat
menopause symptoms in women,
and sterility in men. It is also a rec-
ommended treatment for relaxation,
and blood circulation.

Blood circulation levels are also
defined and encouraged through Dr
Leo’s electro-magnetic massage
therapy. During a session, Dr Leo
has the client strip down to their
undergarments, and lie on the mas-
sage bed, where he hooks them up
to the eletro- magnetic machine, and
uses two wet towels under his and
the client’s feet.

Electricity passes through the doc-
tor and the client. It’s a tingling
feeling that charges up two 10 kilo-
watts, but the client only gets six
kilos that transfer to from his hands
to the area that he is treating.

The six kilowatts of energy is just
the amount of energy you would get
from a radio, and completely safe.
All the while, Dr Leo is massaging
the areas of pain in the client’s body
to feel for poor circulation in certain
areas.

He pulls the joints of the body,
and if the client doesn’t feel it, or if
they don’t react, usually they have
poor circulation in that area.

“Tf you have poor circulation you
are sick,” says Dr Leo. “If your cir-
culation and balance is good, you
will never be sick with arthritis, and
stiff neck.”

On one particular client, the doc-
tor pulls the hand in one way, and
his fingers contort in a certain way.
According to Dr Leo, this means
two of the client’s toes aren’t work-
ing well. He’s not a healthy eater, so
circulation is a problem for him.

Electro magnetic massage ther-
apy can help clients to have less
pain as they age Dr Leo said.
Depending on the client, and his
or her ailment, they will need a
varied treatment regiment of two
or more sessions.











(Cy NEWS FROM JAPAN

Hong Kong, Hong Kong!!!

AWESOME! I was really
happy to able to go and see
another Asian country before
I left.

After the 5 hour plane ride
from Osaka, I arrived in Hong
Kong airport. The airport
shuttle bus was going to take
an hour to get there so I decid-
ed to take the public bus.

It’s funny, put me in the
kitchen with a piece of meat
and tell me cook it; I wouldn’t
have any idea what to do. But,
put me in a foreign city where
no one speaks English and I
would jump on the public bus
just to get lost for fun! I am
weird I know.

Nevertheless, I asked the
bus driver to point out where
my stop was. He didn’t speak
any English but it’s amazing
how effective pointing and
grunting can be. And I got to
the right stop with no prob-
lems whatsoever.

I met my really good friend
Cheep (who is Chinese Sin-
gaporean) from university and
we took the town by storm.



The first night I met her rela-
tives and we enjoyed a really
nice meal; endless treats of
rice and noodles based dishes
simply delicious. I even ate
jellyfish tentacles (quite yum-
my).
After the meal they all start-
ed shouting in Chinese and
taking out their credit cards. I
am like what is going on? It
sounded quite violent. Appar-
ently, they were arguing on
who was going to treat every-
one for dinner. Cheep won. If
you know her you would
understand why; apparently
she shouted the loudest.

I’m like this is total culture
shock. No where in The
Caribbean would we be argu-
ing over who would treat
everyone to dinner? We

would probably be searching
for our wallets the first few
seconds and after realising
that we weren’t going to be
treated then start dividing up
the check: “Ok you had two
drinks... I had the fries....”, I
am telling you Asians totally
rock!

The people in Hong Kong
probably thought I was crazy
though, because I kept bowing
and speaking in Japanese to
everyone. They were proba-
bly thinking that this girl is in
Hong Kong and probably
doesn’t realise that all Asians
were not Japanese. I had to
explain once or twice that I
lived there and I that I wasn’t
completely silly.

DAY TWO

We went exploring Hong
Kong, visiting temples and the
city. The temples were full of
people. I don’t know why, if it
was a special day or some-
thing but it was like a Christ-
ian church on Easter Sunday.
There was a lot of incense

smoke in the air I had to step
outside where it was just all
around me. For some reason
they had food with them (The
Chinese visiting the temple)
like they were going to have a
picnic lunch afterwards and
they stuck their incense in
fruit (i.e oranges). Why? I
don’t know. I wasn’t able to
find anyone to ask.

The city itself is quite cool
kind of reminded me of New
York. The neon lights at night
were amazing!!!! I would love
to see the city’s electricity bill.

DAY THREE
We went to an island and
saw a really big Budda. It was
really worth the trip. Of
course my camera’s battery
died when we made it up top
to the mountain.

THE RETURN
I left Hong Kong and the
plane made a stop in Taiwan
for an hour before heading
back to Osaka. We had a
choice if we wanted to

deplane or not but after hear-
ing about all the stuff that
you could get arrested for in
Taiwan that included capital
punishment, I said I will just
stay on plane. I asked the
stewardess if it was ok if we
could use the bathroom while
we were waiting and she said
ok and I went. So half way in
the air on the way to Osaka I
decided to get my bag in the
overhead compartment to
correct my papers.

I wasn’t able to see my bag
so I figured that I was too
short to reach it. So L asked a
taller gentleman to reach it
for me. He didn’t see it either
so then a Japanese girl then
proceeds to tell me that the
stewardess has my bag. I
went up to the stewardess
and asked her for my bag.
Her face drops and she tells
me “I am sorry but your bag
is in Taiwan.”

Tam like WHAT?! Why is
my bag in Taiwan?? She then
calls the captain and he pro-
ceeds to tell me that no one
claimed the bag so they gave
it to the Taiwan authorities
to destroy it. I then took the
deepest breath of my life and
told him that my PASS-
PORT was in that bag. I was

like “Why would you destroy
the bag? It was clear that
someone was still in that seat
my shoes, my books, my
sweater were all there. If that
is the case they should have
destroyed EVERYTHING
that was in that seat not just
my one bag!” P.S This all
happened in the five minutes
when I went to use the bath-
room. He then replied by
saying that they would phone
the Taiwan authorities and
try to reclaim the bag if not
they will do their best to
assist me.

So here I am thousand of
miles in the air flying back to
a country that is not my own
with no passport. I returned
to my seat and started sorting
through my stuff and low and
behold there was my pass-
port. I still had it with me in
my secure documents case
because I was going to fill out
the immigration form. I
informed the captain and he
and I were both happy I did-
n’t have to spend the rest of
my day in Japan locked up in
immigration.

Oh yeah they did find my
bag. I got a long letter of
apology with the bag shipped
to me 3 days later.

@keeee ee
Commonly seen foot deformities

THIS week, we examine defor-
mities of the bone structure of the
foot, placing emphasis on some of
the contributing factors. Although
many foot deformities can be hered-
ity, in most instances they are the
result of improper or poorly fitted
footwear.

Footwear can actually shape the
foot to the extent where bones of
the foot can shift direction to fit the
shape of the shoe. In most cases,
bone realignment requires surgery
to correct or minimise the result-
ing damage. Among those com-
monly acquired deformities are:
flatfeet, claw feet, hammer toes and
bunions.

Flatfoot - also known as 'pes
planus’ is a normal flatfoot and seen
as ‘congenital’ and is believed to be
inherited. Normal flatfeet are func-
tionally healthy and usually cause
no discomfort, however they can
sometimes cause shoe fitting prob-
lems because as the foot sits in the
shoe it occupies more space in the
mid-foot area of the shoe. This fit-
ting presents more direct pressure
on the shank area. However, the
concern lies with that small per-
centage of persons having acquired



flatfoot, also known as ‘pes valgus’.
An ‘acquired flatfoot'’ presents as
a severe breakdown of the arch.
The foot becomes misshapen, with
an extremely depressed arch, and
a rolling in and down of the inner
ankle. The result, severe pronation
(outward rotation) of the heel, and
a pronounced out swing of the fore-
foot.

While ‘acquired flatfeet’ can be
given relief by the use of orthotics,
the cause of a breakdown of the
arch can be attributed to improper
footwear, that is, footwear having
inadequate support over an exten-
sive period of years. Acquired flat-
feet are among the hardest-to-fit
feet. Ordinary shoes on these feet
quickly go out of shape, and hence
special orthopedic footwear, plus
highly skilled and experienced fit-
ting ability is required for such feet.

Bunion - or ‘Hallux Valgus’ sug-
gest that the big toe or great toe
bends in an outward direction
towards the second toe. This defor-
mity can be accompanied by severe
inflammation to the side of the big
toe. Swelling and pain or soreness
can also be felt in the area. These
distressing symptoms are caused by
a constant abrasion of the shoe
against the bursa sac at the side of
the big toe. There again, the correc-
tion of a bunion can be done thor-
ough the services of a podiatrist.

These feet are extremely sensi-
tive to shoe pressure and usually
require extreme care in the type of
shoe worn and the fit. Some stretch-
ing of the shoe in the area may offer
some relief but proper shoe with
the right width and fit will serve
well.

Claw foot - is described as a foot
whose toes are bent backward in a
claw-like shape; such a foot is very
common with a very high arched
foot also known as ‘pes cavus'.
These feet frequently develop thick
and sore calluses under the ball of
the feet due to constant heavy pres-
sure along with arch strains. How-
ever, because such a foot also car-

ries a high instep in addition to the
high arch, this foot usually requires
short-wide shoes with extra dept in
the toe box. Persons with claw feet
will note that a laced or high-rise
slip-on do not give a comfortable
fit. There again, proper footwear
and proper fit is necessary.
Footwear with the right arch sup-
port or orthotic to fill-in the space
that contributes to the strain in the
arch area can provide relief and put
the foot in balance. But arch strains
of any kind should be examined by
a medical practitioner to determine
both the cause and treatment.

Hammer toes - are claw-like toes
looking very much like the head of
a hammer. This condition usually
affects the second toe and at times
the third toe. It is believed that an
acquired hammer toe can be the
result of constant wearing of shoes
with pointed toes, or shoes that are
too short or narrow. It is also
believed that causes can also be
genetic or hereditary. Hammer toes
can be successfully corrected by
simple surgical treatment. However,
a foot with hammer toes should be
fitted in the right size and type of
shoe, with a deep toe box. Proper fit

is a must to avoid painful condi-
tions associated with hammer toes.
Conclusion

Finally, I wish to reiterate that
many ‘acquired foot deformities’
and discomforts are the result of
poorly fitted footwear. Unless there
are reasonable match between shoe
shape and foot shape, then fit,
regardless of proper size is largely
nullified. In essence, while the last is
of vital importance, fit, shape,
design or style, weight, materials
and construction of the shoe are
equally important to properly fit-
ted footwear.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certi-
fied & licensed Pedorthist, is the pro-
prietor of Foot Solutions, a health and
wellness franchise that focuses on
foot care and proper shoe fit, located
in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau.
Please direct any questions or com-
ments to nassau@footsolutions.com
or 327-

FEET, www.footsolutions.com/Nassau
"The views expressed are those of the
author and does not necessarily rep-
resent those of Foot Solutions Incor-
porated or any of its subsidiary
and/or affiliated companies”.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010, PAGE 15B



CLE
Flowers all year long

ONE of the benefits of our mild
sub-tropical winters is that certain
plants that enjoy summer heat also
produce flowers throughout the win-
ter months, making them year-round
ornamentals. We all enjoy waiting
for various flowering plants to pro-
duce but the presence of the same
shrubs and trees in flower every
month of the year gives a solid foun-
dation for a beautiful garden.

Hibiscus is the most obvious of the
shrubs with year-round flowering
characteristics. There may be a few
weeks here and there when the plant
takes a pause otherwise it flowers
regularly. Old varieties of hibiscus
are more reliable performers than
modern ones.

Bougainvillea also gives a summer
display in winter, with the blue/ pur-
ple and red varieties being the most
reliable. Sometimes an individual
plant may take a few weeks to lose
one set of bracts and bud anew but if
you have several varieties of
bougainvillea the colour will be there
all the time.

One of my very favourite small
shrubs is thryallis (Galphimia glauca)
that produces panicles of small five-
petalled flowers in masses. Thryal-
lis is just about the most reliable of
year-round flowerers and only grows
to about three of four feet, making it
so it does not need regular pruning.
Rows of thryallis on either side of a
pathway leading to your front door
will be a cheerful welcome to visi-
tors any day of the year.

One of the most attractive of small
shrubs is peregrina (Jatropha inte-
gerrima) or Star of Bethlehem. In
its early years it tends to be a round-
ed bush but older plants form a trunk
and become true shrubs.

The foliage is attractive and the
red five-petalled flowers are pro-



duced in vivid clusters.

There are red and white varieties
of plumbago (P. capensis) but the
favourite colour in The Bahamas is
blue. Plumbago has dense foliage
and the flower clusters are abundant,
making it a wonderful specimen
plant. It is propagated by root divi-
sion and is also employed at times
as a wayward and informal hedge.

Cape honeysuckle (Tecomaria
capensis) comes to us from South
Africa, as does plumbago, and is one
of the showiest of all tropical plants.
The flowers are produced in upright
panicles that can be bright red or
brick orange. The foliage is also very
attractive, the compound leaves
much resembling those of raspberry.

Cape honeysuckle makes a very
colourful hedge. Sometimes it forms
a hedge without its owner’s permis-
sion, producing ground runners that
put down roots and send up suck-
ers. These ground runners can be
easily trained to head off in the direc-
tion you want them to and in the end
you get a hedge without any digging.
Any free-standing cape honeysuckle
should be pruned to cut away the
ground runners.

Cordia or Geiger tree (Cordia
sebestina) normally grows close to
the sea but can be grown inland.
There are white and red versions
but the red is the most seen. Cordia
is a true tree but tends to stay at 20
feet tall or less. Its leaves are extra-
ordinarily rough — somewhat like
sandpaper — and large but the flow-
ers clusters are impressive. Individ-
ual trumpet-shaped flowers mass
together to form a ball of flowers,
very like hydrangea from a distance.
The white fruits are produced from
these flowers and new trees can be
grown from them very readily.

Pride of Barbados (Caesalpinia



CAPE honeysuckle can be a free-standing specimen or

be trained into a hedge.

PRIDE of Barbados flowers are beautiful and can reward a close scrutiny.

pulcherrima) is often misnamed
dwarf poinciana. True, it is related to
poinciana and shares some of its fea-
tures but only distantly so. The
leaves are compound and feathery
while the branches and stems hold
rather wicked thorns. In the
Caribbean the Pride of Barbados is
often used on the edge of agricul-



tural properties to keep livestock in
and undesirables out.The flowers
are produced in extravagant pani-
cles that are held upright and are
most attractive. The red flowers are
picoteed in yellow and the stamens
are long and yellow. There is a yel-
low flowering version that is partic-
ularly bright and cheerful. The Pride



of Barbados flowers give way to
seedpods and the seeds can be used
to propagate new shrubs.

Were you to have a few of these
shrubs and trees in your garden you
would never be short of colour.

* gardenerjack@coralwave.com





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Nr SANDS, AGE: 22

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THE TRIBUNE







By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



T took several hours on a Sunday to

shoot seventeen contestants for the

Miss Bahamas 2010 pageant at a
tropical background at The Retreat
Gardens, by The Bahamas National
Trust, an oasis of rare exotic palms

and native coppice.

Transformed into 1950’s pin-up girls, the
women, with sun-kissed faces, and lively swim-
suits in tectonic colors, lent their beauty to
the tropical back drop of antique candy-cane
colored cars donated by the Bahamas Antique
Auto Association.w

This year on May 9, 17 “Timeless Beauties”
will compete for the right to wear the Dia-
monds International Miss Bahamas crown,
and the opportunity to represent the Bahamas
at both the Miss Universe and Miss World
pageants on May 9.

Countdown to the pageant has been nothing
but a whirlwind of activity, including numerous
public appearances and events; the Miss
Bahamas Sportswoman Competition, and the
Top Model of the Bahamas competition.

On April 9, during a charity gala reception
at the British Colonial Hilton, the women
vying for the Miss Bahamas 2010 title were
unveiled to the public in grand style.

Miss Universe Stefania Fernandez was spe-
cially flown down to the capital for the event,
lending her celebrity status to help the con-
testants raise money for a charity that is dear
to her heart, Haiti earthquake disaster relief.

The evening began with fanfare when Miss
Universe and Miss Bahamas Joanna Brown
were escorted into the ballroom by officers
of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, who
also provided music for the evening.

Pageant fans, sponsors, family members and
well wishers were among those attending the
event in which contestants offered up auction
gifts of their own choosing.

Among the gifts were several beautiful
paintings, authentic Bahamian jewelry and
handbags, a hand-made doll, home decor, and
human hair. When it was all said and done,
some $2700 was raised through bids. Once
collected, that money will be donated to the



LATHYRA TINKER, AGE: 19





tottuedty: Bahumos Wholeanke Agencies, East West Hay, * fot: 242-994-1759 * fax: 242-094-1859 * ermal: bwahahimaseccraivinn.com * Freeport: 1 Milton Si, = Sel: 42531-2207 * fax: 24231-2215 * emai: bwalpoeccsalvacom

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2010



MAXINE LOUIS, AGE: 27

























































ANASTAGIA PIERRE, AGE: 21





Bahamians will have a
chance to vote online for
one of the semi-finalists

Bahamas Red Cross for its ongoing efforts in
Haiti.

Additionally, the contestants donated $3247
to the Zonta Club of Nassau’s Empty Pots
project for the homeless during the launch
reception, which was raised during a Beauty
with a Purpose challenge, taped for MBO’s
Backstage Pass ZNS TV Show.

Over the last three months, the contestants
have been immersed in rigorous training and
grooming lessons in Bahamian history and
culture; public speaking, dealing with the
media; discovering one’s purpose; interview
techniques and etiquette.

Michelle Malcolm, president of MBO told
Tribune Woman that this year things will be
slightly different. This year, the winner of the
pageant will compete in both the Miss Uni-
verse and Miss World pageants. The two run-
ners up will also receive titles, Miss Intercon-
tinental Bahamas and Miss Supranational
Bahamas.

A title will be awarded to the contestant
who receives top marks in runway skills during
a special preliminary competition. She will
go on to represent The Bahamas at next year’s
Top Model of the World competition.

MBO’s directors say that with the help of
their partners and the high caliber of ladies
entered in the competition, the forthcoming
Miss Bahamas pageant should be the most
competitive to date.

On May 2, the Miss Bahamas Organisation
will have its preliminary swimsuit competi-
tion, followed up by a talent and evening gown
competition on May 7.

Once again, Bahamians will get the chance
to have their voices heard by selecting one of
the semifinalists via online voting. Pageant
enthusiasts are asked to visit www.missba-
hamas.net to learn more about the “Timeless
Beauties.” The contestant with the highest
number of votes will automatically advance
to the Semifinal round of competition at the
finale at Atlantis Resort’s Imperial Ballroom
on May 9.








a
SHARIE DELVA, AGE: 23



Cire

Freshina [Breeze Exugece





Carhean Baby

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