Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 106 No.127

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The Tribune



ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1





ES INSIGHT SECTION

Another stabbed | a
after car chase

By RUPERT MISSICK

A WOMAN was struck by a
car and killed, and another was
stabbed, after a massive fight
broke out at a gay club.

Female patrons at the Garage
nightclub on Gladstone Road
began fighting inside the estab-
lishment during the early hours
of yesterday morning.

According to police reports,
the battle then spilled out into
the parking lot at about 4am with
a group of enraged women throw-
ing bottles and rocks and pum-
meling each other with their fists.

Soon after, a woman got into a
2008 Toyota Corolla and struck
another female, knocking her
down in the road approximately
100ft from the entrance to the
club.

Witnesses claim the Corolla
then sped off down Gladstone
Road and was pursued by anoth-

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE
TO TECHNICAL ISSUES,
THERE IS NO USA TODAY
IN TODAY'S TRIBUNE









USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

Students’ work
Seat

aS a aa

Woman ced I
jay CHU valle



rN



ABOVE: the Garage nightclub
on Gladstone Road.

RIGHT: The body of the woman
is removed by police.

er vehicle carrying a group of
women.

It is said the Corolla was
chased across the island and even-
tually cornered on Joe Farring-
ton Road where the driver was
stabbed by a person from the pur-
suing car.

The Corolla remained on Joe
Farrington Road while the other
car sped off. It was finally stopped
by police on Yamacraw Road,
and the occupants arrested.

When police arrived at the
nightclub parking lot they dis-
covered the lifeless body of the

SEE page 19

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By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net





RISING star in the Progressive Lib-
eral Party, Melissa Sears, has resigned
her post as vice chairman of the PLP.

Bradley Roberts, PLP chairman, said
he received a resignation letter from Ms
Sears on April 20. The letter did not
indicate the reason for her resignation,
and Mr Roberts said he has yet to speak
with her to gain further insight into her
reason for resigning.

Ms Sears made an impression on the
PLP leadership in 2008 when she deliv-
ered a speech at the party’s convention.
She was voted into office during the
October 2009 PLP Convention.

“Melissa is an outstanding young
woman who has a career in politics. She |.

SEE page 19














Family faced with $150,000 legal debts
after fighting for $100,000 property

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a ten-year battle to
sell four Cowpen Road lots one
family is trying to understand
how they managed to amass
legal debts of more than
$150,000 fighting for property
valued at little more than
$100,000.

Ten years ago, the executors
of the Lockhart estate engaged
the law firm of Arthur D Han-
na & Co (ADH) to handle the
sale of land, owned by the
estate, in the South-Western
Estates Subdivision.

The cash-strapped family
intended to sell the entire five
acres of inherited land, but they
first needed subdivision
approval. The sale of the four
lots, which represented a small

portion of the five acres, was
intended to raise money to pay
for the installation of utilities
and thereby facilitate approval
for the remaining acreage.
Ten years later, several mat-
ters surrounding the con-
veyances are still unresolved.
This prompted one of the estate
beneficiaries, Mavis Coes, to
file an official complaint on
October 20, 2009 against ADH
with the Bar Council. Attached
to the complaint was “the paper
work”, which Mrs Coes said
“explained what happened.”
This followed a previous
threat to make a complaint and
possibly initiate other action,
stated in a July 2008 commu-
nication from attorneys repre-
senting the estate. On January
21 this year, in another letter

SEE page 13

MES OM Uo mIOIe lnm s tT

Bahamas Pharmacy Council



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

IN the wake of contract
signings with six pharmacies,
the National Insurance Board
(NIB) said it is no longer
negotiating with the Bahamas
Pharmacy Council (BPA).

“We are not waiting on a
counter proposal. We actual-
ly met with them more than
six weeks ago. They agreed
to get back to us and they
hadn’t. We signed contracts
with several pharmacies
under the final terms the NIB
is offering,” said Algernon
Cargill, NIB director, speak-
ing of the National Prescrip-
tion Drug Plan (NPDP).

“We met with the BPA



several weeks ago and didn’t
hear from them. As a result
we moved ahead to sign con-
tracts. Those are the terms we
are offering. We are not nego-
tiating at all, We hope more
will join the plan because we
believe it is a good business
opportunity,” said Mr Cargill.

The last hurdle, according
to the NIB, is the completion
of the drug procurement
process. Mr Cargill said this is
expected to be completed in a
few months to facilitate the
expected August launch date
of the NPDP.

The Bahamas National
Drug Agency is assisting the
NIB with the drug procure-
ment process in order to facil-

SEE page 20





with the purchase

of any regular or

large sub.



Mindaria St Paradise Istand



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MISS SUPER MODEL OF THE
BAHAMAS FLOAT PARADE










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REAL ESTATE GUIDE 20 PAGES

A FLOAT parade took to the streets of Nassau on Saturday for the
contestants of the Miss and Li'l Miss Super Model of the Bahamas
competition. The event got underway at RM Bailey Park before head-
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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Man turns himself
in after seizure
of vehicle parts

POLICE took Delroy — division searched a wooden
Foote, a Jamaican, into cus- green and white house on
tody on Saturday, one day Ida Street North, acting on
after issuing an all points information. They recov-
bulletin for his arrest relat- ered suspected stolen parts
ed to the major seizure of consisting of doors, front
vehicle parts. and rear windshields, head

Press liaison officer lights, air conditioning
Sergeant Chrislyn Skip- units, unused airbags,
pings said officers appealed speedometers, fenders,
to the public to help in rims, bumper covers, and
locating Foote for ques- radiators.
















tioning in relation to the
investigation of allegedly
stolen car parts seized by
police on Friday.

A top police officer said
Foote turned himself in to
the Grove Police station
Saturday night on learning
that the police were looking
for him.

Officers of the mobile

Two arrested
after suspected
Marijuana found

OFFICERS of the
Drug Enforcement Unit
arrested two men aged 23
and 36 after finding a
quantity of suspected
marijuana.

The were detained on

The items were found in
various part of the house,
including being stacked in
the ceiling, and in the yard.

Acting on additional
information, police also
searched a nearby aban-
doned house and found
similar vehicle parts.

Foote is still helping
police with their inquiries.









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yearold man, of Bamboo
Boulevard, being
attacked by a group of
men at Lockhart’s Place,
on Wulff Road. The vic-
tim is in hospital listed in
critical condition.

Man shot in
armed robbery

POLICE are investigat-
ing an armed robbery in
which a 48-year-old man
was shot in the hand and
abdomen.

Sometime around
5.11pm on Friday, police
received information of a
shooting at Sapodilla
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dens.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Caymans fights growing crime

WHILE Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade and his newly energised team of
officers make their presence felt throughout
New Providence, the Cayman Islands has
imported British police to help them get their
rising gang-related crime under control as
quickly as possible.

Dependent, like the Bahamas, on its world
image as a safe tourist and financial destina-
tion, Caymanian business leaders fear that
rising crime could damage that image.
According to a Reuters news report from
Georgetown on Thursday, 14 British officers
arrived on the island late Wednesday at the
request of Cayman Police Commissioner
David Baines.

“The murder rate in the small British ter-
ritory, with a population of 55,000, remains
low compared with Caribbean states like
Jamaica,” said the Reuters report. “But the
390-strong local police force has been
stretched since the start of the year by five
murders, a kidnapping, armed robberies and
shootings. Victims included a 4-year-old boy
killed in crossfire.

“Cayman authorities and local leaders in
tourism, financial services and real estate are
worried the spike in crime could damage the
islands’ reputation for safety and security,
which has underpinned its emergence as a
legal domain for many of the world's hedge
funds.

“Tf we can't crack the problem and bring
down the murder rate and restore a much
better level of law and order, in the long
term, it is going to damage the Cayman
Islands,’" the British-appointed governor,
Duncan Taylor, said this month, according to
the Reuters report.

Fearful of losing its attraction — already
crime is affecting the recruitment of foreign
staff for financial positions — Cayman is
determined to get the problem under con-
trol as quickly as possible. “It has to be dealt
with now and we have to deal with it aggres-
sively,” said a developer.

Cayman’s police commissioner has can-
celled all rest days for his force and put them
on 12-hour shifts. Non-essential services were
suspended to boost police visibility on the
streets. Commissioner Baines said it wasn’t
a matter of bringing in a UK SWAT team,
rather it was about “filling in the skill short-
fall we have because our existing detectives
are stretched.”

Although Cayman knows its problems are
not as severe as its neighbours, it is taking no
chances. Compared to its five murders for
the year, the Bahamas has had 26. National
Security Minister Tommy Turnquest said last
week that the international yardstick for mur-
der is five per 100,000. “Assuming a popula-
tion of 350,000 (as is the Bahamas) that
should equate to around 17 or 18 murders a
year in the Bahamas. At 26 murders to date,
we are way over the threshold,” he said. The
Cayman’s population is 55,000.

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Commissioner Ellison Greenslade has also
moved into emergency mode. Armed with a
new police Act, he has outline his five “strate-
gic” crime fighting priorities for 2010. One of
them is to raise the standard of recruits — the
days of compromising a community’s securi-
ty to give a chance to unqualified, and prob-
ably undeserving persons, are over. He will
also demand greater accountability from his
men, and those police officers who are not
doing police work, will be recalled to active
service. He is determined to make our com-

munities healthier and safer.

After studying the hours that most crimes
are committed — 4pm to 8 am - the hours
that the police are on duty will no longer be
exclusively from 9am to Spm. There will be an

active night shift.

Commissioner Greenslade is determined
to have an around-the-clock police presence
in the community. Many of us are already
aware of that presence. We are also aware
that the public is starting to assume its respon-
sibilities of assisting their law enforcement
officers in flushing out pockets of subter-
ranean criminals, who, confident in the silence
of their frightened neighbours, have gone

about their evil ways undisturbed.

Friday’s uncovering of what police believe
is a long-running, well orchestrated car theft
ring, should turn up much information.
Already police have discovered parts of cars
that have been used in armed robberies.

For many years here at The Tribune we
have battled with the police about withhold-
ing information from the public. There were
always two schools of thought in the Force —
those who believed in keeping information to
a minimum so as not to alarm the public, and
those (in the minority) who wanted to share
as much information with the public as pos-
sible, believing that an informed people could
better protect themselves.

At long last we now have leaders of a
Force who realise that the only way to recruit
the public to their crime fighting team, is to
keep them informed. The National Crime
Prevention Office at police headquarters is
making its presence felt. It is keeping the
public informed, not only of crimes commit-
ted, but crime trends and tips to help them
protect themselves and their property. At

long last the public is starting to feel that the
police have their welfare at heart. And in
turn more members of the public are

responding with good, solid information.

With the police and public working in tan-
dem, the criminal will gradually learn that
with the spotlight on him, his safest bet is to
turn himself in. He has already discovered
that there is no longer any place to hide. The
public has had enough crime, and they want
the criminal in the one location built for him

— HM Prison, Fox Hill.

It is now up to the judiciary to get itself
organised and join the team that is deter-

mined to rid our islands of criminals.



1,550sq.ft.
1,056sq.ft
rose B

You know something,
Mr Roberts, we ARE
an uncaring country

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have thought a great
deal about Mr. Bradley
Robert’s comments pertain-
ing to the Potcake airlift of
88 unwanted dogs to the
United States recently by
the Grand Bahama Humane
Society. The first thing I
wish to say is kudos to
Grand Bahama Humane
Society for finding a solu-
tion so that the 88 healthy
Bahamians did not have to
be killed because of their
uncaring countrymen.

Now: Mr. Roberts...It
makes us look like an uncar-
ing country does it? Well
you know something? You
hit the nail right on the
head! We are an uncaring
country; in general we do
not care a fig for the animals
in this land.

I can assure you, Mr.
Roberts, that the tourist
does not have to read about
88 dogs being given a chance
by the few who do care, to
think that we are an uncar-
ing nation. No, sir, all they
need to do is walk down Bay
Street or take an island tour
to see the deplorable state
of our animals...some stand-
ing on the side of the street
starving and mange ridden.

The condition of some of
our Surrey horses has been
known to bring tourists to
tears.

Why, Mr. Roberts?

Because we do not care.
And please, Mr. Roberts, do
not make this political.

The truth of the matter is
that nobody has cared or

STITUTE say ITS OTS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is admittedly a long
time since I was trained and
worked as a journalist.
However, this practice of
outing suspects in a police
investigation and discussing
every detail is quite disturb-
ing to me and I wish that the
press would learn to exer-
cise some forbearance. In
fact, I would suggest that it is

still unlawful in The
Bahamas.
I speak now to the story

about the travails of my con-
stituent Sandra McDonald
who according to the press is
to be charged with an
offence in connection with
the death of her 3-year-old
child. I make no comment
on it save that one wonders
if this is not a matter best
addressed by social services

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LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



done anything for years,
regardless of which party
rules. This is an apolitical
issue: this is a moral issue.
Politicians like all too
well, and far to often, to
grab at things that have been
wrong for decades under
both administrations and
then they try and use it as a
platform to get votes. Did
anybody care before Grand
Bahama did something
inventive and successful?
Let’s leave the animals out
of the politics. Let’s just do
what is right. If we were a
nation of responsible animal
owners we would not have
to airlift our dogs to another
country to get the loving and
kind homes they deserve.
And to have to sit and listen
to such sentiments such as:
“Was it within the law of the
land to export these dogs”
and “were permits issued.”
Please spare me, as if all
of a sudden they are some
precious national commodi-
ty, when in actual fact they
were abandoned, or left at
the Grand Bahama Humane
Society with no regard to
their ultimate end. I suppose
it would be okay to kill these
“national treasures” that
you are so concerned about,
but, Oh Gosh don’t let’s

under the carpet, I don’t
endorse doing things that
way.

I am bitterly disappoint-
ed in Mr. Bradley Robert’s
comments. Bitterly disap-
pointed by the sentiments
he expressed...but, Oh so
very proud of the Grand
Bahama Humane Society
who found a suitable solu-
tion to all those poor dogs
that needed homes.

We here in Nassau home
well over 2000 animals a
year, we have more people
on this island to draw on as
good homes.

But still not enough
homes able to take in all the
abandoned and abused ani-
mals that come through our
doors. The bottom line is, if
people cared for their ani-
mals properly we should not
have to home that many.
There is a new law waiting
to be passed. The Animal
Control and Protection
Act... it has been waiting a
very long time to be passed,
hopefully, as it was men-
tioned in the Speech from
the Throne it will be passed
this session.

But all the laws in the
world won’t make enough
difference if we do not ona
whole change our attitude
towards animals, and com-
ments, such as those uttered
by Mr. Roberts, do not
make our work any easier.

KIM ARANHA,

export them. People might
learn the truth! I suppose
some people think that it is
better to sweep the dirt

rather than by the criminal

law.

My concern here is the
sensationalism of the story
written by The Tribune on
23rd April which carried an
interview with Ms. McDon-
ald under the headline: I
DID NOT KILL MY
BABY. No doubt the press
will say: the public has a
right to know and that she

President of the Bahamas
Humane Society,
Nassau,

April 24, 2010



damage it causes to people
who are not public figures.

Increasingly, the main-
stream papers, the papers of
record (Tribune, Guardian
and Journal) have been
engaged in this kind of com-
petition, which I think is
irresponsible.

When you enter a police
lock-up you are told that
you can remain silent but if

being of full age should not
have spoken to them. That
may be so but the more
important question is,
should the press have done
it? Could The Tribune not
be accused of taking advan-
tage of a guileless woman
speaking to them in the
midst of grief, and they rush-
ing to print in the ever ener-
getic effort to beat to the
punch (the pun is intended)
my cousin over at the name-
less down market rag to
print every bit of gossip and
sensation to make money,
in some cases at the expense
of the truth and in most cas-
es without due regard to the

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you say anything it can and
will be used against you in a
court of law. No such pre-
scription is offered by the
journalist, but that does not
mean that the journalist or
the editor should not exer-
cise some responsibility to
know when it is right to pub-
lish something and right not
to do so. In other words,
they ought to know better
and should not have pub-
lished that story, particular-
ly knowing that the woman
was released pending
inquiries.

Let us pray for all the
people who suffer in this
matter: the mother, the
father and our Fox Hill com-
munity. Let us hope that
there is a lesson for greater
good in the tragic loss of a
three year old.

FRED MITCHELL,MP
Fox Hill,
April 25, 2010

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Mother of three-year-old is
released from police custody

THE mother of three-
year-old Sandria
Demeritte, Sandra
McDonald, was released
late on Friday, the same
day she was placed in
police custody for a second
time.

Criminal charges against
Sandria’s parents could be
filed as, according to
police, new information

came to light during the
investigation.

Police are working with
the Department of Social
Services, and are waiting
on the findings of their
investigation to determine
if charges are going to be
brought.

Police say they want to
question Sandria’s father
Larry Demeritte, 50, of

Abner Street.

A neighbour found San-
dria’s body in a car parked
outside the house where
her father lived.

An autopsy revealed she
had suffocated. Parents
say their daughter’s death
was accidental.

Ms McDonald has two
other children, and Mr
McDonald is a father of 14.

Andre Rollins yet to make






PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOPE
By Jamaal Rolle





ZL SHOULD Comecain
ABT GETING

Too Many
COMPLAINTS!

decision on political future

FORMER NDP leader Andre Rollins has not yet made a deci-
sion on his political future.

When contacted by The Tribune over the weekend Mr Rollins
said he was still weighing his options.

“T don’t want to say anything on that just yet. I have made no
decision on that issue,” he said.

FNM leader Hubert Ingraham and former PLP first lady Dame
Marguerite Pindling have held high-level talks with Dr Rollins.

Both have invited him to join their parties.

Dr Rollins, who operates The Bahamas Brace Place, was one of
three "fringe" party candidates to offer for election in the Elizabeth
by-election, along with the Bahamas Democratic Movement's
Cassius Stewart and the Workers’ Party's Rodney Moncur. Mr
Stewart and Mr Moncur received 77 and 16 votes each.

The NDP has been in existence since October 2008 and therefore
the Elizabeth by-election was the first time it put forward a can-
didate for election.

Mr Rollins has denied that he was offered the chance to run in
a particular constituency by either party, as had been reported in
a downmarket tabloid newspaper.

"IT am still a member of the NDP. I am doing a lot of soul
searching. My ultimate objective is to see this country really take



LLINS



off and maximise its potential,” he said.

Demonstration against one-way system planned

BUSINESS owners unhappy
with the change in the direction
of the flow of traffic on Baillou
Hill Road and Market Street
are planning a demonstration
on Wednesday at 7am in
Coconut Grove.

After forming the Coconut
Grove Business League to rep-
resent their concerns, meme-
bers elected Arnold Heastie as
president, and Leana Ingraham
as secretary.

Businesses on Baillou Hill
Road last week called for the
road change to be reversed as

the traffic diversion has already
forced one business to close and
several others to let staff go.

Several other business own-
ers say they have had fewer cus-
tomers over the last four weeks
as drivers no longer pass their
businesses on their way home
from work, and circular traffic
discourages them from diverting
their route south on Market
Street.

The business owners main-
tain they were not consulted
about the change in traffic flow
prior to its implementation

despite the severe impact it has
had on their livelihoods, that
of their staff and the communi-
ty.

The Ministry of Works made
the traffic change to improve
traffic management and flow,
and to improve road safety and
while business owners admit
that it has been a success in that
respect, there has been a drop in
business after road works com-
menced and prior to the traffic
diversion, he asked proprietors
to wait for road improvements
to be completed.







STRUCKUM

Three arrests after handgun fount

TWO women and a man have been arrested by police
accused of having an unlicensed firearm.

Acting on a tip-off, officers of the Carmichael Division
went to Hamster Road, off Faith Avenue, at about 6.30pm
on Saturday to search a silver coloured 2007 Honda
Accord. They recovered a handgun with an unloaded mag-
azine.

Two woman, aged 21 and 23, and a 28-year-old man of
Sapodilla Boulevard were taken into custody.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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LOCAL NEWS

Lights turned off for Earth Day

THE Keep Grand Bahama
Committee observed Earth
Day with a ten-minute lights
off exercise on Thursday morn-
ing. Businesses and residents
on Grand Bahama were invited
to join in a show of solidarity
whilst conserving energy at the
same time.

Along with observing lights
off, all of the island’s primary
schools were invited to submit
Earth Day pledges on behalf
of their various schools. Local
radio stations cooperated with
Keep Grand Bahama Commit-
tee (KGBC) by airing the
school pledges throughout the
day.

“We were extremely pleased
with the schools’ responses to
our invitation. The pledges
received were heartfelt and
meaningful to the institutions
and represented their commit-
ment to protecting our envi-
ronment,” stated KGBC chair-
man, Nakira Wilchcombe.

She also thanked the broad-
casting stations who willingly
offered to assist with the com-
plimentary live reads.

The KGBC committee also
lent a helping hand to the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
who presented Earth Day and
National Coastal Awareness
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Walter Parker Primary Schools
assembled in the BME gym.

In the days leading up to
Earth Day, KGBC made sev-
eral school visits, including a
visit on Monday to Grand
Bahama Academy of Seventh-
Day Adventists as they sought
to spread their Earth Day mes-
sage. Addressing the students
was KGBC Committee Mem-
ber, Rico Cargill.

“Think of the animals, flow-
ers and trees that make up the
environment — they are alla
part of our eco-system. What
role do you play in protecting
the trees and animals that God
has blessed us with?” Mr
Cargill asked the group.

He further challenged the
youngsters to become
guardians of their environment.
“Here on Grand Bahama we
have a clean environment, one
that’s intact with proper plan-
ning, fresh water and clean air.
Everything we do to our envi-
ronment will come back to
haunt us or future generations
and I think we owe it to them
to keep it clean and pristine for
their future,” Mr Cargill
advised.

Monday also saw the launch
of the new ‘KGBC Talk-in
Trash’ radio hour on Love ’97.
According to Ms Wilchcombe,
“listeners are invited to tune
in every weekday, during the
3pm school drive-time, for tips
on going green, how to reduce,
recycle and reuse, protection
of the environment and much
more.”

Other KGBC initiatives in
celebration of Earth Day
included a no Styrofoam cups
day on April 19, along with car-
pooling and a drive-less lunch
planned for April 29.

Additionally, KGBC seeks
to continue its preservation
efforts with the relaunch of its
aluminum cans recycling pro-
gramme and the initiation of a
‘Keep Grand Bahama Clean
Junior Club’ amongst the
island’s primary schools.

“After reviewing the various
Earth Day pledges received
from our youngsters, we’re
pleased by their eagerness to
become ambassadors for the
protection of our surroundings
and communities,” Ms Wilch-
combe said.

Following are the 2010 Earth
Day Pledges submitted by
some of the Grand Bahama
primary schools:

Freeport Primary School

“Freeport Primary School
pledges to work together and

make every day Earth Day by
recycling, and conserving ener-

St Vincent de Paul

“St Vincent de Paul pledges
to reuse, recycle and dispose
properly so our environment
can be free of debris.”

The Beacon School

“We pledge to keep our
environment clean in sunshine,
wind or rain.” — Mrs Rahming’s
Reception Group

“We pledge from this day on
to be cool and keep our planet
clean.” — Mrs Rolle’s Group

“The Beacon School is keep-
ing Grand Bahama clean and
pristine.” —- Mrs Adam’s Group

“Semple and the Beacon stu-
dents say keep our world clean
to save lives.” — Mrs Semple’s
Group

“Sweeting’s Beacon students
pledge to keep the environ-
ment clean minute by minute.”
— Mrs Sweeting’s Group

Lucayan International
School

“Acting responsibly green to

preserve our. precious
resources.”
Grand Bahama Academy of

Seventh-Day Adventist (Grade
5)

“Grand Bahama Academy
pledges to keep our earth clean
for future generations.”

Mary, Star of the Sea
Catholic School

“We will wisely use
resources, increasing energy
conservation and green-living.”

Freeport Gospel Chapel
School

“Freeport Gospel Chapel
School is committed to con-
serving energy and preserving
our natural resources.”

Sweeting’s Cay All-Age
School

“Sweeting’s Cay All-Age
School pledges to preserve and
protect the environment for
future generations.”

Holmes Rock Primary
School

“Holmes Rock Primary
pledges to:

1) Place trash in the garbage
bins at all times.

2) Conserve power by turn-
ing off lights when rooms are
unoccupied.

3) Conserve water by lath-
ering our hands first and only
turning on the water while
washing.

4) Reduce paper wastage by
using all pages in our note-
books and using both sides of
loose sheets.”

Tabernacle Academy Pri-
mary

1) “We pledge our allegiance
to the earth, we morally
promise to do everything in our
power and might to enhance,
conserve and protect our envi-
ronment and the earth.”

2) “We at Tabernacle Bap-
tist Christian Academy pledge
our loyalty to preserving, con-
serving and protecting our
earth from this day forward.
One Body, one earth.”

McClean’s Town Primary
School

1) Surrounded by the ever-
green: We pledge to keep
McClean’s Town clean.

2) I, McClean’s Town Pri-
mary, pledge to be a cleaner,
greener Me.

Hugh W Campbell Primary
School

“Enjoy Nature’s Beautiful
space — Leave No Trace.”

Free Town Primary School

“Free Town Primary pledges
to preserve and protect our
beautiful Bahama land.”

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Well known Grand

Bahama resident dies

: waiting for the insurance company to wind
: down, a former employee claimed yesterday.

Tributes paid to Florence Edden

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Florence ‘Ma Flo’ Edden,
the matriarch of the Smith’s Point settle-
ment, has died at the age of 95.

Mrs Edden was the oldest resident of
that small community and was two months
away from her 96th birthday.

She is known for her significant contri-
bution to tourism, particularly the devel-
opment of community tourism at Smith’s
Point, where she welcomed thousands of
visitors to her White Wave Club, and even
welcomed them into her home.

Smith’s Point has experienced remark-
able success in community tourism and is
avery popular spot for visitors and locals,
still today.

In a statement released today, the Min-
istry of Tourism paid tribute to Mrs Edden
and extended condolences to her family
and the Smith’s Point community.

Legendary

“The tourism sector today observes and
mourns the passing of one of Grand
Bahama Island’s legendary citizens, Flo-
rence ‘Ma Flo’ Edden of the community of
Smith’s Point.

“Having contributed significantly to the
development of the Grand Bahama
tourism brand by warmly welcoming thou-
sands of visitors into her community and
entertaining them by sharing stories about
our cultural traditions.

Mrs Edden was a favourite of numerous
visiting travel writers, and repeat visitors
over the decades.

“She will be remembered for laying the
ground work in Smith’s Point for what is
internationally recognised as heritage, cul-
tural and community tourism. We extend
sincere condolences to her surviving rela-
tives and the members of the Smith’s Point
Community. May her soul rest in peace,”

the statement read.

Mrs Edden was synonymous with
Smith’s Point. She ran a successful club,
the White Wave Club, and a bakery. She
raised 10 children after her husband died
in 1968.

Her son, musician Audley Edden,
describes his mother as a teacher, a caring
person who loved people, and a commu-
nity leader.

Answer

“When I was 15 years old my father died
and so I basically learned everything from
Ma Flo, he recalls. She had an answer for
every situation you could be in.”

“She taught us the Bible, how to scull
the boat, catch crawfish, how to live right
and how to care for people and take care
of our own family.

“She took care of people from all over
the world and there were times when we
would say ‘Mama you can’t just pick up
people and put them in your house,’ but
she was a caring person who enjoyed help-
ing people because she was in the service
business,” said Mr Edden.

“She was very concerned about the peo-
ple coming and being entertained and she
was a very good Billiard player — she
showed the ladies how to play and beat the
guys,” he recalled.

Mrs Edden retired 10 years ago, leaving
the club and bakery to the children.

Mrs Edden also made significant con-
tributions to the community by donating
property for construction of the St Jude’s
Anglican Church and the Church Hall in
Smith's Point.

Mr Edden said his mother was a promi-
nent member of the community.

“Smith’s Point is a family community
and there wasn’t anyone older than ‘Ma
Flo’ here in Smith’s Point. Almost any-
thing that happened in Smith’s Point went
through Ma Flo, she was the anchor of
the community,” he said.

NDP criticises Ingraham, Christie over BEC

THE National Develop-
ment Party has criticised
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and PLP leader
Perry Christie for prevent-
ing the former Public Util-
ities Commission, now the
Utilities Regulation and
Competition Agency
(URCA,) from properly
regulating BEC.

The party claims this lack
of oversight is allowing the
corporation to impose a
five per cent rate hike on
their consumers.

“At a time when thou-
sands of Bahamians are
unemployed and even
more under-employed, and
when thousands have had





their electric supply dis-
connected, the National
Development Party finds it
unacceptable that Bahamas
Electricity Corporation
(BEC) would seek to
impose a rate hike. The
Bahamas is perhaps the
only country in the world
whose utility regulator, by
law, is only allowed to reg-
ulate its telecommunica-
tions sector,” the party
said.

Firearm and marijuana
found in house search

POLICE recovered a firearm
and a quanity of marijuana
while searching a house on Sat-
urday night.

Officers of the Southern
Division made the discovery
while executing a search war-
rant at a home on Moore Ave,
off Palm Beach Street.

A 14-year-old boy and a man
aged 35 are helping police with
their inquiries.

share




your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

N

HUBERT INGRAHAM

The party believes that
if BEC is sufficiently trans-
parent, the Bahamian peo-
ple will realise that for far
too long they have been
paying the bill for com-
mercial and preferred cus-
tomers who are given ben-
efits that ordinary Bahami-
ans do not enjoy.

“Political interference



PERRY CHRISTIE

has been a perpetual thorn
in the side of the efficient
operation and management
of public utilities in The
Bahamas for decades. As
a result they are all over-
staffed and inefficient, a
product of the Pindling era,
perpetuated and sustained
by the two protégés,” the
NDP said.

Claim that cars and homes lost while

employees await CLICO wind down

MANY of the 144 employees who lost their
jobs after the closure of CLICO Bahamas in
January 2009 have lost cars and homes while

The company needs approximately $3 mil-

lion to settle their obligations to the staff but that
: may be long in coming as to date the company’s
: liquidation has been slow and complex.

One former CLICO employee told The Tri-

bune he was still owed more than $28,000 from
: the company.

While he has been unable to find work since

; the insurer closed its doors, the Grand Bahama
? native, who wanted to remain anonymous, was
: able to secure a loan from family members to
: Start a business.

However, this was not enough to save him

from financial ruin. He has had to take his chil-
: dren out of private school in Freeport and place
:; them in public school in Nassau.

He was also forced to move into a small apart-

ment in New Providence while his house in
: Grand Bahama is up for sale.

“T’m $22,000 in arrears for my house and to be

: honest I blame this situation on how the liqui-
dation is being handled. They should have given

the employees their severance and then work
out the pensions later but the agents did not
stick together,” he said.

The former employee said many of his former
colleagues feel as if there is no big rush to have
the matter resolved.

He said: “They told the judge they need $3
million to pay the staff, The liquidators are tak-
ing so long.

“The unfortunate reality about this situation
is that when the insurance companies debts are
paid, former CLICO employees are further
down the list than they would like to be.”

Craig Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez accoun-
tant and partner, in an April 15, 2010, report to
the US Bankruptcy Court in the southern district
of Florida, warned that the liquidation of CLI-
CO (Bahamas) and its CLICO Enterprises affil-
iate would be "complex", due partly to poor
record keeping at the latter.

CLICO (Bahamas) liquidators have criti-
cised the poor bookkeeping at entities that
received more than $80 million of the insolvent
insurer's funds, hitting out at the lack of coop-
eration from its Trinidadian parent and warning
that "substantial funds" passed through the com-
pany without benefiting it or its policyholders.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

0
USCC



URSA TICK UCM ICON

ANDROSIANS are being
encouraged to pursue agricul-
ture as the catalyst for diversi-
fying the economy, thereby
keeping “a significant portion
of the tourism dollar at home”.

“The millions we use to
import items are a good indica-
tion of what can be earned anda
good estimation of the impact
agriculture can have on the
economy,” said Edison M Key,
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BSIC)
executive chairman.

Mr Key was a featured speak-
er at the first Andros Business
Outlookheld at Stafford Creek’s
Love at First Sight Lodge.

Organised by The Counsel-
lors Limited, the forum featured
leading Andros business people
interacting with political lead-
ers and service providers.

They included Tourism and
Aviation Minister Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux, Nation-
al Insurance Board director
Algernon Cargill, National
Museums executive director Dr
Keith Tinker, Bahamas Ferries
CEO Khaalis Rolle, conserva-
tionist Pericles Maillis, and
Tourism’s sustainable develop-
ment office manager Peter Dou-
glas.

Also present were North
Andros and the Berry Islands
Member of Parliament Vincent
Peet, Andros chambers of com-
merce presidents Edmund Rah-
ming and McKallan Stubbs, and

REAL ESTATE

Bahamas representative for the
Inter-American Institute for Co-
operation in Agriculture (IICA)
Dr Marikus Alverez.

Mr Key spoke on BAIC’s
role in facilitating and support-
ing entrepreneurs for the sus-
tainable development of
Andros.

BAIC is mandated to stimu-
late, facilitate and encourage
agricultural development and to
expand and create opportuni-
ties for Bahamians to partici-
pate in the country’s economy,
he said.

Although the Bahamas has a
resident population of just over
350,000 persons, often over-
looked are the 5 million tourists,
he noted.

“We incur an annual food bill
of some $500 million to support
our residents and tourists,” Mr
Key observed. “The challenge
of feeding 5 million 350,000 peo-
ple gives the government the
opportunity to use agriculture
as a catalyst for growth and
development and reduce our
food bill substantially.”

As a result, BAIC has
embarked on a number of pro-
grams targeting the removal of
constraints that prevent North
Andros farmers from taking
advantage of those opportuni-
ties.

While North Andros farmers
have been producing quality
products, they were having
problems marketing them.

Over the past three years,

BAIC has brought top New
Providence buyers to Andros to
meet with farmers and conduct
fruitful trading.

BAIC has also been address-
ing some of the constraints on
the production side of the indus-
try.
And, it has provided for the
services of an experienced tech-
nical manager, qualified in ani-
mal and plant production, and
who has the ability to acquire
new technology and transfer it
to the farmers, said Mr Key.

With greenhouse technology
which is not common in the
Bahamas, farmers can grow pro-
duce of the quality that is
required for some upscale mar-
kets.

“To remove this constraint
BAIC is in the final phase of
bringing in two greenhouses of
different designs and providing
an expert to teach farmers for
one season how to grow various
crops in greenhouses,” said Mr
Key.

Through the transfer tech-
nology BAIC is showing farmers
how to improve production and
quality from tree crops through
various irrigation systems.

“BAIC is in the final phase
of bringing in three irrigation
systems and installing them on
farms so we can demonstrate to
farmers what can happen with
orchards that are irrigated,” he
said.

As mutton is a $6 million
industry in the Bahamas, he



HARDER THAN IT LOOKS






|

Business Outlook, admires production.

said, animal husbandry can be
“a very lucrative business in
Andros.”

“BAIC is in the process of
assisting some of the BARC
farmers in renovating their pas-
tures with the planting of the
most nutritious tropical forages
available thus increasing feed
availability and quality,” said

Mr Key.

BAIC is providing the
improved genetic potential of
the Boer goat to farmers in
order to maximize production.

“T am of the view that
through BAIC we can signifi-
cantly impact unemployment
and increase the standard of liv-
ing in Andros and the



Gladstone Thurston/BIS

ONIONS ARE IN SEASON in North Andros. BAIC executive chairman Edison M Key, in town for the Andros

Bahamas,” he said.
“Therefore BAIC will con-
tinue to seek to eliminate the
production and marketing con-
straints as they relate to agricul-
ture so that current and prospec-
tive farmers can further take
advantage of the opportunities
available in feeding 5 million
350, 000 people,” said Mr Key.

Machinery & Energy Limited

Your Authorized Caterpillar Dealer!

Would like to announce that their
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By MIKE LIGHTBOURN When comparing against similar
properties, it’s not just the final price
that counts. Appraisers may also factor
in any “incentives” offered (when
Known), such as renovations to be com-
pleted before the home goes on the
market. Their appraisal will show the
value of the property before and after
the renovations.

Perhaps the most important factor
that lenders review in an appraisal is
the closing dates of the “comparables”
(other homes by which yours is mea-
sured).

However, be warned that when mar-
kets change, today’s sale price may be
completely irrelevant tomorrow.

If you’re planning to sell, express
your concerns about the appraisal process to
your Bahamas Real Estate Association apprais-
er, who will offer explanations and suggestions
for improving your report’s results.



April 3", 2010.

AS A real estate appraiser for
more than 40 years, I’m questioned
from time to time about my valua-
tions.

When this happens, the owner
invariably feels his home or prop-
erty is worth more.

Owners often attach an inflated
value on their home. And why
shouldn’t they? After all, this is their
haven; the place of many happy
gatherings and memories.

But in the world of real estate,
the value of a home is based on a
myriad of factors - not one of them
tied to emotion.

Let's look carefully at the process.

The location, number of bedrooms and bath-
rooms, square footage and overall condition of
the home will all come into play, along with any
defects.

Defects may include outdated plumbing, a
worn kitchen or environmental issues, such as
noise.

As we discussed recently, neighbouring homes
in disrepair can drag your property’s value down

NASSAU
Tel: (242) 323-5701
Fax: (242) 323-5700

Website: www.me-ltd.com



Comments or questions? E-mail me at
ask@ColdwellBankerBahamas.com.

E is for Excellence.

Tip of the Week - It’s important to keep your

by as much as 20 percent. The present econom-
ic conditions come into play, the number of

properties on the market, etc.

own home in good repair. It’s not cheap to main-
tain a house, but the value can decline greatly if

you allow it to get run down.

The appraiser will compare your home to

those that have recently sold in your neigh-

bourhood.

Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell

Banker Lightbourn Realty.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



New hi-tech Blood Mobile
to collect donations from
around the Bahamas

THE two local blood banks
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital and Doctors Hospital
have received a new hi-tech
Blood Mobile destined to trav-
el around the Bahamas and
family islands to collect dona-
tions and ultimately save lives.

All of the blood collected
from donations will be shared
equally between the two local
hospital blood banks.

The “Rotary Clubs of the
Bahamas Blood Mobile” came
to fruition by a joint fund-rais-
ing effort by the Rotary Clubs
of The Bahamas, District 7020,
Rotary Clubs of Florida, Dis-
trict 6980, Rotary Clubs of
Georgia, District 6900 and the
Rotary International Founda-
tion which was funded by a
matching grant from Rotary
International and was one of
only 16 such competitive
grants provided worldwide this
year.

The project enables Rotary
to present a fully-equipped
vehicle for the two hospitals
to work together for the ben-
efit of both blood banks and




the country. Rotary will also
serve as a catalyst to provide a
new dynamic for getting blood
donations.

The unique custom-vehicle
built by specifications from
OBS Inc. in Ohio, the Rotary
Clubs of the Bahamas Blood
Mobile was driven through
Georgia and Florida to pay a
visit to the Rotary Clubs that
participated in the funding.

The first of its kind in the
Bahamas and District 7020,
the Rotary Clubs of the
Bahamas Blood Mobile is des-
tined to save lives, one drop
at a time through the efforts of
Rotary and the local hospital
blood banks.

Designed to host blood dri-
ves in Nassau and through the
family islands by ferry service,
the Blood Mobile will reach
more of the Bahamian’ popu-
lation to collect blood and pro-
vide education about healthy
living.

Currently there is a national
blood shortage in the Bahami-
an community. According to
the World Health Organiza-

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LOCAL NEWS

HOSPITAL STAFF in front of the new Blood Bank.



tion (WHO) standard, the
country should collect blood
from five per cent of the pop-
ulation. The required needs
for the Bahamas would be
16,000 pints each year. Unfor-
tunately, the local blood banks
only collect 5,000 pints each
year.

The results of the national
shortage equates to prolonged
hospital stays, delayed surg-
eries, people being treated
without the required units of
blood, cancer patients unable
to receive necessary replace-
ments, and ultimately persons
dying from inadequate sup-
plies.

Also, there are no reserves
in the event of a disaster or
mass casualty.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 15



TLLLTG

Write On - a joint feature between the Ministry of



O24

Education and The Tribune - this week features
the work of Alyssa Iferenta, Harrison Newell,
Cajiah P Bethel and Chloe Campbell

Old Fort
Bay Beach

By ALYSSA IFERENTA



At Spm some Sundays my broth-
ers, parents and I drive say 15 min-
utes in a black Toyota Camry to
the uplifting and clean Old Fort
Bay Beach.

With its cool daiquiri making
restaurants upstairs, the beach’s
white sand and transparent water
makes it the best beach ever. When
you first step foot on this refreshing
beach, breeze from the ocean flows
into your eyes and tiny grains of
sand run through your little toes.

When you finally look up, the
sun sets on the horizon line blend-
ing yellow, red, blue and orange
together.

The soothing tide is so low you
could walk out to the edge of the
earth on it. While running down
the hill, you start to cover yourself
in sand.

The next thing you hear is the
“Wosshhh! Wosshhh! ” of water
pulling you in. Splash! Finally I can
taste the salty water. Swimming out
of control towards the little caves,
the sound changes to crab legs run-
ning in and out of holes quickly.
As it begins to get dark you run up
to the top of the sandy slope where
a warm and fuzzy towel waits for
you. The Old Fort Bay Beach is
the best beach on the island.

It refreshes you in almost all the
ways you can think of.



Why shouldn't

we cut
down trees?

By HARRISON NEWELL





You should never cut down
trees. Trees provide us with
thousands of things like medi-
cines, fruits, shelter, shade
and, most importantly, oxy-
gen. Trees are homes to many
different animals like squir-
rels, red-eye tree frogs,
snakes, sloth, birds, jaguars,
anteaters, termites and Kuala
bears.

The oak tree, for example,
can grow up to about 100 feet
tall. There are certain trees
that can grow only in certain
environments. If people cut
down these trees, we will nev-
er see how tall it grows. This
is why we should not cut
down trees.





Immunisation coverage
for MMR ‘jumps’ by
almost eight per cent

IMMUNISATION coverage for
measles, mumps and rubella
improved to 98 per cent in the
Bahamas in 2009, Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis said.

The figure represents a 7.5 per
cent increase over the years 2004-
2006 when the statistics dropped to
a little under 90 per cent and is
three per cent above the recom-
mended Pan American Health
Organisation (PAHO)/World
Health Organisation (WHO) stan-
dards for vaccination coverage.

Dr Minnis said overall coverage
for routine vaccinations had
remained greater than 90 per cent
from the years 2001-2003 before
the drop-off in the aforementioned
three-year period.

His disclosure came as health
officials continue preparations for
the observance of Vaccination
Week in The Americas, which will
take place from April 26 to May I.
The Bahamas will join 43 other
countries worldwide in observing
the week.

Vaccination Week in the Amer-
icas (VWA) is an unparalleled
effort led by countries of Latin
America and the Caribbean to
strengthen the Expanded Pro-
gramme on Immunisation (EPI)
in the Region by reaching popula-
tions with otherwise limited access
to regular health services, and at
heightened risk of contracting vac-
cine-preventable diseases.

More than 288 million individu-
als “across the age spectrum” have
been vaccinated as a result of the
initiative since its inception in
2003.

Dr Minnis said efforts to elimi-
nate measles, mumps and rubella
from the Bahamian landscape

“The last recorded case of polio was
more than 30 years ago, while the
last reported cases of diphtheria
and tetanus neonatorum, were
reported more than 10 years ago.”



began in 1997 and again in 2003.
He said “significant achievements”
have been made in the control of
vaccine-preventable diseases in the
country.

“The last recorded case of polio
was more than 30 years ago, while
the last reported cases of diphthe-
ria and tetanus neonatorum, were
reported more than 10 years ago,”
Dr Minnis added.

Dr Minnis said the country has
registered a “steady decline” in
other vaccine-preventable diseases
as a result of ongoing public health
measures.

He said the Expanded Pro-
gramme on Immunisation, which
was implemented in the region and
The Bahamas in the late 1970s,
continues to produce positive
results for the country.

The Health Minister said the
Government of The Bahamas has
supported and continues to sup-
port the vaccination programme
through the provision of free vac-
cinations for targeted, vulnerable
populations.

“Additionally, there is also a
requirement of a completed vacci-
nation record for entrance into

Dr Hubert Minnis

pre-school, primary school and
The College of The Bahamas,”
The Minister of Health added.

He said while childhood vacci-
nation has been a “great public
health achievement” and while the
development and widespread use
of vaccines has led to the reduction
or eradication, of once-common
childhood diseases, the viruses and
bacteria that cause vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases and death still
exist, and “can be passed on to
people who are not protected by
vaccines.”

“Regarded as a ‘best buy’ public
health intervention, vaccination
has been responsible for almost
one-quarter of the reduction in
mortality rates in children under
five years of age from 1990-2002
and is now believed to have even
more far-reaching impact insofar
as the economy, educational out-
comes and more years of produc-
tive life,” Dr Minnis said.

“In recent decades, The Ameri-
cas — including Latin America and
the Caribbean — with support from
the Pan American Health Organi-
sation (PAHO), have made extra-
ordinary progress in providing




VITAMALT




IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

By CHLOE CAMPBELL

—<

I am just like you@= |
in

— |



I am a refugee you see,

people in the world have a place to sleep but not me.

I travel hard, I travel long,
but no country accepts us refugees.

My mind is open to whatever I shall do,
to make them realise that I am just like you.
I travel over land and sea, to see where I can just be me.

Nowhere to go

By CAJIAH P BETHEL



No where to turn

A world with nothing No where to go
A world with only you Nothing to learn
A world without a purpose to Who am I?

you You might ask

No where to hide

A refugee is my task.





cA

ia 1
ae ,





Sx

MINISTER OF HEALTH Dr Hubert Minnis

children with protection against
basic, vaccine-preventable dis-
eases,” the Health Minister added.

Dr Minnis said influenza vacci-
nation will be a major focus during
Vaccination Week of the Americ-
as 2010 globally as more than 26
million persons will be targeted
for vaccination.

He said during the week, the
national administration of the



AHINI Vaccine will continue as
part of a week-long vaccination
outreach that has been scheduled
for the R M Bailey Park, begin-
ning Monday, April 26.

“All individuals, families and
communities are encouraged to
avail themselves of recommended
adult vaccinations at this time,
including the AHINI Influenza
Vaccine,” Dr Minnis added.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





e First
= iy





APRIL 21, 22, 23, 2010
Wyndham Nassau Resort Crystal Palace
Rain Forest Theatre

SHOWTIMES

11:30 a.m. (Matinee) & 7: 30 p.m (Evening)
Matinee Show includes Transportation &

BOX OFFICE

Beverage Depot - Mall at Marathon
Burns House - John F. Kennedy Drive
Bahamas Wines & Spirit - Shirley Street











TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











THE TRIBUNE PAGE

0

MONDAY, APRIL 26,





SOOTrTS

OTs

BASKETBALL
NPBA CHAMPIONSHIP



GAME one of the New Providence Basketball
Association’s best-of-five championship series
will get underway tonight at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

The series will be played between last year’s
runners-up Commonwealth Bank Giants against
former champions Real Deal Shockers.

The Giant, coached by Perry Thompson, will
rely on a well-rounded squad that is headed by
Michael ‘Ferly’ Bain, Mark Hanna and Jeremy
Hutchinson.

The Shockers, coached by James Price, will
counter with his squad that includes Carvin Cum-
mings, Corey Williams and Amon Baker.

Game two of the series will be played on
Wednesday with game three and four on Friday
and Saturday respectively.

TRACK
PRIMARY SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS

THE New Providence Primary Schools Inter-
School Track and Field Championships will take
place from Wednesday-Friday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Stadium.

Retired Olympian Pauline Davis-Thompson
will be on hand to give the keynote address at the
opening ceremonies on Wednesday at 9 a.m. The
competition will continue throughout the day.

The action will pick up on Thursday and Friday
at 9.m.

VOLLEYBALL
JUNIOR DEVELOPMENT

The New Providence Volleyball Association
has extended an invitation to all junior and senior
high school male and female athletes to partici-
pate in their development program. The pro-
gram is geared towards the development and
enhancement of volleyball skills at the junior
level and is free to all interested persons.

The development program commenced on
Wednesday, April 14th and will be held every
Wednesday and Friday from 6 - 8:30 p.m. and
Sundays from 4 - 7 p.m. over at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.



Jodge Journ

Starts at:



16
ca



TWO OF RONALD ‘SMOKEY’
MARTIN’S top students, purple

belt Shady and black belt Terrible

T, perform a Stick Kata at the
Mall at Marathon on Saturday.

Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Bahamians excel







overseas





ROStv ie PHONE: 322-1722 FAX: 326 - 7482

ta,



2010



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

URDLER

Nejmi Burn-

side, high

jumper Trevor
Barry and the men’s 4x400
metre relay team headed the
list of Bahamian performances
over the weekend at two pres-
tigious track and field Relay
meets.

Competing at the Penn
Relays in Pennsylvania as a
lone representative for St.
Andrew’s High School, Burn-
side turned in the fastest time in
the high school boys’ 400 hur-
dles in 53.37 as he easily won
the second of three heats.

The time ended up as the
fastest of all from the field of 23
athletes that also included three
other Bahamians.

Two of them competed
against Burnside with Jerome
Stuart of Queen’s College fin-
ishing eighth in 59.19 and
Keiron Forbes of Anatol
Rodgers ninth in 69.22. Kieran
Forbes, also from Anatol
Rodgers, was ninth in heat one
in 64.13.

Stuart ended up 19th overall
and the Forbes occupied the
final two spots in 22nd and
23rd.

The men’s 4 x 400 relay
team, still waiting on the out-
come of the positive drug test-
ing of American LaShawn Mer-
ritt to determine if they will

receive any medals from his
winning performances at the
last World Championships and
the Olympic Games, had to set-
tle for second behind the Unit-
ed States in the USA vs the
World Men’s 4x400 relay.

The American team of David
Neville, Jamaal Torrance, Ber-
shawn Jackson and Angelo
Taylor won in 3:00.60. The
Bahamian team of Nathaniel
McKinney (45.8 slit), Andrea
Williams (45.4), Ramon Miller
(45.88) and Chris ‘Fireman’
Brown (45.44) was second in
3:02.55.

Another US team came in
third in 3:02.64, followed by
Jamaica in 3:03.40 with the
Dominican Republic taking
fifth in 3:04.30.

The Bahamas was to have
also entered a team in the USA
vs the World Women’s 4 x 400
relay, but they didn’t get to the
starting line.

The Americans, anchored by
Allyson Felix, took the victory
in 3:26.12, while the Jamaicans
with Shericka Williams on
anchor, was second in 3:27.72.

In the USA vs the World
Women’s 4 x 100 relay, the
Bahamian team of Tavannia
Thompson, Chandra Sturrup,
Jernise Saunders and Shaketa
Henfield, didn’t finish. There
was no indication as to exactly
what happened.

The American team,
anchored by Carmelita Jeter,
took the victory in 42.74, while
the Jamaican team, anchored
by Shelly-Ann Fraser, had to
settle for second in 41.94.












TREVOR
BARRY, of

the Bahamas,
looks to clear
the bar during
the men’s spe-
cial high jump
at the Drake
Relays athletics
meet,
Saturday, April
24, 2010, in

| Des Moines,

lowa.

A couple of teams, benefiting
from an initiative by the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations, also com-
peted on Saturday’s final day
of competition.

In the High School Boys’ 4x
400 relay, St. Augustine’s Col-
lege team of Stephen Hepburn,
James Carey, Darryl Higgs and
Earl Rahming ran 3:23.96 for
10th out of a field of 12 in their
heat. Another heat saw Moores
Island team of Peron Davis,
Laron Hield, Anton Davis and
Elroy McBridge from Abaco,
take fourth place in their heat
in 3:24.16. Anatol Rodgers’
team of Ulysses Hinsey, Clen-
ero Neymour, Rashad Gray
and Hakeem Brown were 11th
in 3:33.40.

Meanwhile over at the Drake
Relays at the Drake University
in Des Moines Iowa, at least
three Bahamians were in action
led by Trevor Barry.

In the men’s high jump, Bar-
ry cleared 2.21 metres or 7-feet,
3-inches for a second place fin-
ish. The event was won by Kei-
th Moffat, representing Nike,
with 2.21m or 7-3.

Michael Mathieu, competing
for Adidas, was third in the
men’s 400 in 46.16. The win-
ning time was 45.08n by Greg
Nixon of ASICS. Trinidad &
Tobago’s Renny Quow was sec-
ond in 45.69.

And Tia Rolle, a sophomore
from Lincoln University, was
eighth in the women’s 100 in
12.18. The race was won by
Tiffany Townsend, a junior
from Baylor, in 11.60.



(AP Photo
/Charlie
Neibergall)



Mm BARCELONA OPEN BANCSABEDELL ATP WORLD TOUR 500 TOURNAMENT

Knowles and Hewitt fall just short

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net



MARK Knowles finally played in his first final

for the year.

But he and his substitute partner Lleyton

US Open crown in 2000
with Max Mirnyi.

Also on the website,
Zimonjic was quoted as
saying:

“It’s been a great week
here. I’'ld like to congratu-

Hewitt from Australia fell short at the Barcelona
Open BancSabedell ATP World Tour 500 Tour-
nament on Sunday.

The unseeded duo, playing together for the
first time, lost to the top ranked team of Daniel
Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from Ser-
bia in set scores of 4-6, 6-3, 10-6.

Knowles, 38, was unavailable for comments,
but he was quoted on the ATP World Tour as
saying:

“Congrats to Nenad and Daniel. I thought we
had a good chance today, but they’ve been on a
great run in the past few weeks and they came
through.

“T want to thank Lleyton for playing with me
this week. He’s a legend of the game and he
almost took us to the title this week.”

Hewitt, who owns a home at Old Fort Bay
where he reside, was playing in his first doubles
final since Scottsdale in 2003 and he was looking
forward to winning his first title since winning the



late Lleyton and Mark
too. They’ve had a great
week and it was a really
| tough march today, but
somehow we got
through.”

It was the second con-
secutive victry for Zimon-
jic and Nestor as they won
the Monte-Carlo over Mahesh Bhupthi and Max
Mirnyi.

Knowles, who reached the historic 700 win
plateau in the quarter-final, was hoping to win his
third Barcelona title, having won the previous two
with Nestor in 2004 and 2006 just before they
ended their 11-year partnership in 2007.

The last two years Knowles teamed up with
Bhupathi, whom he relinquished his connection

SEE page seventeen



MARK KNOWLES

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 18, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS









RECUPERATING: Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams.





The Tank’ getting ready to
return to the ring after crash

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FIVE months since he was
sidelined from a near fatal car
accident, heavyweight Sherman
‘the Tank’ Williams is now
recuperating and getting ready
to get back into the ring.

Williams, 37, will be heading
to Munich, Germany on Friday
where he will join the training
camp of World Boxing Coun-
cil’s champion Vitali Klitschko
from the Ukraine for two
weeks before he spends anoth-
er two weeks in Austria.

“They have agreed to help
me get back in shape and also
see their sports medical doctor
for the five herniated discs and
the L 3, 4 and 5 in the lower
back and 7 and 8 up top. I also

had some head and face injuries
when I hit the top of the roof.”

The Grand Bahamian, who
was travelling along with his
wife, Michelle, on Sunday,
December 6 on their way from
Church in Vero Beach, Flori-
da, was hit at a stop light by
another driver who was texting
on his phone and didn’t stop.

“He caught on the rear left
driver side and I just started
working out in the gym about
two weeks ago,” Williams said.
“T was doing physio-therapy
from January.

“T’ve already completed four
months of therapy and I’m pro-
gressing very well.”

During his recuperation,
Williams had to turn down two
fights that had been lined up
by his management team on
January 18 and March 20, the

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT atts

latter in Key West, Florida, the
same venue where he was
forced to withdraw after he suf-
fered a hand injury last year.

“Since September, I had two
contracts that I wasn’t able to
fulfill because of the accident,”
he said. “My last fight was in
October in Germany and that
broke my losing streak that I
had for about 3-4 years.

“TI felt the decision was
upside down. It could have
gone either way. I guess if we
had fought in the Bahamas, the
scorecard would have been the
same, but for me. But I got over
that and I was in the gym train-
ing until I got involved in the
accident.”

In that fight on October 10,
2009, Williams lost a 10th round
decision to Manuel Charr at the
Stadthalle, Rostock in Meck-
lenburg-Vorpommern, Ger-
many.

That was his last fight, but
Williams said he’s looking for-
ward to fighting again on June

been my most difficult months.
In January, I could barely walk.
I could barely move,” he
recalled. “But I started therapy
in January and I was progress-
ing.

“But the biggest problem for
me since February was the sta-
tic nerve that resulted from the
herniated disc. The right side
of my leg would have some
excruciating pain in my ham-
string, calf and knee. My right
foot would actually go dead
because I didn’t have any bal-
ance.”

Williams said he was advised
to have back surgery, but he
ruled it out because he just did-
n’t want to get back in the ring
for a short period of time. He
opted to go to Doctor Zim-
merman Sports Therapy in
Vero Beach where he’s been
getting treatment on his back
every Thursday for the last six
weeks.

“T think it’s a blessing and
it’s been working for me where



NOTICE
CORRIDOR 12
EAST STREET

ROAD WORKS
Phase 1

I was able to get back into the
ring two weeks ago,” he said.

3.
Cc Cc “January and February have

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES
S.A would like to inform the motoring public that road
works will be carried out on a section of East Street
effective Thursday April 29, 2010 for approximately six
weeks.



The works include the road widening of the existing two
lane carriageway to four lanes. Milling of the existing
pavement, installation of drainage facilities, utilities,
asphalt pavement, street lighting, sidewalks, traffic signs
and road markings will be constructed in this phase.

Family Island
Regatta wraps up

THE 57th National Family Island Regatta wrapped up on
Saturday night after four days of competitive competition in
Elizabeth Harbour, Georgetown, Exuma.

Among the overall winners were Rupeert’s Legend from
Long Island in the A Class. The Lonesome Dove captured
the B Class, while the C Class champion was Bareley Legal.

There was also a junior segment that was staged on Sat-
urday with the Termite emerging as the winner.

A number of dignitaries were on hand for the regatta,
including newly appointed Governor General Arthur
Foulkes and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles
Maynard. Committee chairman Danny Strachn said they
were quite impressed with what they saw, not only from the
60-plus boats that participated, but from the large crowd of
spectators on hand.

¢ Complete results of the regatta are expected to be pub-
lished in another edition of The Tribune this week.

Lens of

Access will be granted to the business places, pedestrians Cone Spacing: 10 ye
& residents. Proper signage will be erected delineating Lane
the work zone. Please be advised that the following
accesses onto East Street will be permanently closed and
motorist/pedestrians are required to seek an alternative

to their destination:

Soeed Dorrier

e ASHLEY ROAD

© WENTWORTH STREET

Lene Cleed Borrier

Your patience throughout this project is greatly
appreciated and we apologize for the inconvenience
caused.

For further information please contact :



Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
Office:(242)322-8341/322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.ar

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

is an outstanding orator and
has her hands around the issues
facing people. She believes in
people and has committed her-
self to helping the least among
us. Her decision does not mean
her political life is over or her
relationship with the PLP,”
said Obie Wilchcombe, West
End Member of Parliament.
Ms Sears endorsed Mr Wilch-
combe for deputy leader of the
party when he contested the
seat last year.

“She was the bright star of
the (2008) convention and
demonstrated then her tremen-
dous oratory skills and her pas-
sion for people and her
courage and determination as a

FROM page one

woman hit by the car. She was
wearing blue shorts, a white T-
shirt and a green button-down
shirt.

Officers do not know as yet if
she was involved in the fight, and
up to press time they were reluc-
tant to classify her death as a mur-
der. The woman had a deep gash
on her forehead and a compound
leg fracture. Police do not know if
the head injury was caused during
the fight or after she was struck by
the car. The woman who was
stabbed was taken to hospital and
allowed home after treatment.
Her injuries are not known.

Yesterday, the parking lot was
still spotted with blood and lit-
tered with bottles, stones, cloth-
ing, handbags, high heel shoes
and costume jewellery. Huge
stones were left in the road in
front of the club as well.

While police were still inter-
viewing a number of people up
to press time, they admit to being
baffled as to why things at the
club got so out of control. Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings, police press
officer, said officers are investi-
gating to see if the parking lot
death and the stabbing are linked.

She added: “We have located a
blue 2008 Toyota Corolla which is
believed to be the vehicle
involved in this incident. At pre-
sent, police are questioning a
number of persons.

“Police responded and discov-
ered the lifeless body of a female
clad in blue short pants, white T-
shirt and a green shirt. At pre-
sent it is uncertain as to what may
have happened, however, we are
investigating.”

Melissa Sears

fighter, which is required in
front line politics,” said Mr
Wilchcombe.

Ms Sears had been touted as
a potential candidate for the
PLP in Marco City, Grand
Bahama. This seat was for-
merly contested by Pleasant
Bridgewater, against the
FNM’s Zhivargo Laing.

Ms Sears grew up in Marco
City, but Mr Wilchcombe said
she would be a qualified can-
didate for a number of Grand
Bahama constituencies.

He said she had never writ-
ten to the party to express

interest in being a candidate,
or applied formally. However,
the party had been trying to
encourage her.

“We have over the years
sought to convince her to be a
candidate. There comes a time
when a party must recruit and
look for the best and the
brightest and she has proven
that she is prepared to serve
and not to be served. So she is
one of those persons who we
certainly would love to see car-
ry the banner and be a stan-
dard bearer,” said Mr Wilch-
combe. “I believe this might
be considered by some a bump
in the road or a step backward,
but I don’t see it that way.”

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Congratulates the
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Wissing: Ronald Qunoombe [outsede hitler), Chauncey Googer (middie blocker! outside hitter}, Endiench Rahming

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 19

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Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

Memorial/Funeral Service For

Jane Fitzroy
Butler Bethel, 92

\ Memorial Service
| for Jane Fitzroy Butler
Bethel O.B.E., 92

| of #44 Nassau Street will be held

| on Wednesday, April 28th, 7pm at

“=| St Mary The Virgin Parish, Virginia

} Street. Rev Angela Palacious will
officiate.

Funeral service for the late
Jane Fitzroy Butler Bethel, 92

of #44 Nassau Street will be held on Friday, April 30th, 10:30am
at St Matthew’s Anglican Parish, East Shirley Street. The
Rev’d Fr. Dwight M. Bowe will officiate. Interment will be
made in Ebenezer Methodist Church, East Shirley Street.

She is survived by her daughters, Rubie Marie Nottage, Dr
Pamela Etuk, Dr Paulette Bethel, Marion Bethel and Paulette
Rahming; her sons, Dr Marcus Bethel, Michael Bethel and
Owen Bethel; her sister, Halson Butler; her adopted sister,
Hattie Sweeting; eighteen (18) grandchildren, eight (8) great
grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Wednesday from 11am to
6pm and on Thursday from 10am to 6pm.

**There will be no viewing at the church.



PAGE 20, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

NIB no longer negotiating with
Bahamas Pharmacy Council

FROM page one

itate the “transfer of knowl-
edge” to the NIB. Mr Cargill
said over the next year, the NIB
would be able to manage the
process.

Some industry sources said
they thought the end of year was
the more likely time for all out-
standing matters to be sealed.

More than 90 per cent of pri-
vate pharmacy owners are rep-
resented by the BPA. Members
met on Thursday night to dis-
cuss a counter-proposal being
prepared for submission to the
NIB. It was at Thursday’s meet-
ing some members learned a
few of their colleagues already
signed contracts with the NIB.

According to a report pre-
pared by consultants on behalf
of the BPA, discussion points
include subsidies for the instal-
lation of IT infrastructure, and
IT maintenance responsibilities.
The BPA is also negotiating an
average mark-up of 77 per cent,
according to association corre-
spondence.

Thursday’s meeting followed
a March meeting between the
two negotiating parties, during
which the NIB asked the BPA
to form a sub committee to




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bring back recommendations,
said Dr Marvin Smith, BPA
president.

“We anticipated these sort of
statements would come out but
we understand that this govern-
ment is interested in the success
of the programme at that pri-
vate pharmacies are the key
stakeholders. So we are sure the
government, as has been proven
in the past, will look toward hav-
ing a collaborative effort,” said
Dr Smith.

Lowe’s Pharmacy and the
People’s Pharmacy are the only
BPA members signed on so far.
Lowe’s has more than five New
Providence facilities and asso-
ciated facilities in the Family
Islands, but only signed con-
tracts for two (Town Centre
Mall and Soldier Road loca-
tions). The People’s Pharmacy
signed up their Prince Charles,
Carmichael Road, and Soldier
Road locations, according to a
NIB release.

The other pharmacies are
Betande Drugs on West Bay
Street and the Walk-In Clinic’s
Centreville location.

The NIB has been making

THE TRIBUNE

daily calls and emails to some
pharmacy owners “making them
feel they are going to be left
out”, according to an industry
source, who also said NIB is an
insurance company and doing
what they do best.

The BPA reiterated last
week, it was not its intention or
role to endorse or reject the gov-
ernment’s proposal, but to “pro-
vide a forum for reasonable dia-
logue and the presentation of
evidence and discussion on the
matter.”

Towards that end, they have
led discussions with the NIB to
empower members with suffi-
cient information to make an
informed business decision on
the NIB deal. BPA members
were recently informed by exec-
utive members not to panic. Dr
Smith said this has been his mes-
sage from the beginning.

“We understand that in our
society sometimes people tend
to get rushed. All we are saying
to our members is things are
progressing, don’t feel like for
whatever reason people need to
push you into doing A or B,”
said Dr Smith.



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Cable to
‘untie' TV

emi Matos



* BISX-listed firm going 100%
digital, impacting 60% of
customers, to comply with
regulator

* Keeping returns to Cable as
chair

* URCA decides enough
competition in retail/international
leased lines

* BTC to eliminate international
call charges for cell customers

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas has started
an 18-month initiative to
upgrade all customers to a 100
per cent digital platform in a
move to comply with regulato-
ry requirements that it “untie”
its broadband Internet and pay-
TV products for all existing and
new clients, in a bid to elimi-
nate competition/Significant
Market Power (SMP) concerns.

In its final ruling on the SMP
obligations to be imposed on
Cable Bahamas and the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC), the newly-
constituted telecoms sector reg-
ulator, the Utilities Regulation
& Competition Authority
(URCA), said it had consid-
ered several variations of the
likely remedy “to address Cable
Bahamas’ current practice of
tying pay-TV and broadband
Internet services”.

These variations had
involved unbundling the prod-
ucts for all Cable Bahamas’ cus-
tomers; untying for all cus-
tomers who requested it; and
unbundling for new consumers
only. Cable Bahamas had
“made high level proposals”
itself for complying with the
regulator’s requirements,
including using filters to ‘untie’
all new broadband Internet
subscribers for its Coralwave
service only, and “digitization
of the network that will allow
for untied services for all broad-
band customers only”.

In its final ruling on the issue,
URCA said: “URCA believes
that competition will be best
promoted, and thereby fur-
thering consumers’ interests
and welfare, by ensuring the
united services are available to
all customers. Accordingly,
URCA has decided to impose
an obligation on Cable

SEE page 2B



MONDAY, APRIL 26,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia.net

Hotels '1/2 way to full
recovery’ by year-end

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamian hotel indus-
try should be “at least 50 per
cent of the way” to returning
to pre-2008 Wall Street crash
numbers by year-end if it main-
tains current performance
trends, the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s (BHA) president
telling Tribune Business the
organisation had made several
proposals to mitigate the
impact of any rise in electricity
tariffs.

Commenting on the Nas-
sau/Paradise Island hotel sec-
tor’s performance for March
and the 2010 first quarter, dur-
ing which room revenues
increased by 16 per cent and
6.7 per cent respectively,
Robert Sands said that while
the trend was positive, the
industry was “not prepared to
hand our hats yet” on the
notion that consistent improve-
ment would be seen through-
out the remainder of 2010.

“T think they were fairly close
to our forecast position for
March,” Mr Sands said of the
data released last week by the
Ministry of Tourism and BHA.

“The results achieved were
by and large our forecast posi-
tion.”

He acknowledged, though,
that there was “no question”
that the joint Ministry/industry
Companion Fly Free promotion
had made a key “impact” on
the Bahamian tourism indus-
try, in terms of attracting visi-
tors and enabling hotels to
achieve the numbers they had
during the 2010 first quarter.

However, this initiative cou-

* Industry hopes ‘stand-by generation rate’ and
‘deposit interest’ proposals to mitigate BEC rate
rise impact ‘don't fall on deaf ears'

* Largest Bahamian industry ‘not ready to hang
hats’ yet on continued improvement through

2010

* Business acquisition costs rise, as room
revenues still more than 30% down on 2008

levels

ROBERT SANDS



pled with other marketing/TV
promotions by individual
Bahamas-based hotels meant
that “acquisition costs” to bring
tourists to this nation had
increased year-over-year for
many Bahamian properties.
The BHA president said that
while first quarter trends were
expected to continue, the sector
— the largest private sector
employer in the Bahamas —
remained “cautiously opti-

mistic”. “We need a sustained
period of growth,” Mr Sands
told Tribune Business. “The
foundations are taking hold, but
it is still too early to say it will
continue through the rest of the
year. I think it will, but we’re
not prepared to hang our hats
on that particular point yet.

“We want to see continued
improvement, positive trends
year-over-year. We want to see
improvement that gets us back
to 2008 levels, not so much
2009. I think that by the end of
this fiscal year, when we see the
type of results we will have
achieved, I think we will have
made at least 50 per cent of the
inroads to getting back to that
level. We’ll be half-way there
by the end of the year if we
continue on this particular
trend.”

Mr Sands, who is also Baha

SEE page 4B

Climate change to cost Bahamas
$200m-$620m in next 15 years

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Climate change impacts will
cost the Bahamas between
$200 million-$620 million in
the 15 years to 2025, an Inter-
American Bank Develop-
ment (IDB) report has esti-
mated, due to the fact that
some 80 per cent of this
nation’s landmass is within
five to six feet of sea level.

This is one factor why the
IDB’s 2010-2014 country
strategy for the Bahamas is
focusing on infrastructure
development, coupled with
increasing this nation’s capac-
ity to adapt and adjust to
future events such as climate
change.

“Eighty per cent of the
country’s landmass lies within
five to six feet of mean sea
level,” the IDB report, a copy
of which has been seen by Tri-
bune Business, said. “Esti-
mates of the potential impacts
of climate change on the
Bahamas range from $0.2 bil-
lion to $0.62 billion by 2025.”

And the IDB added: “The

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bank will complement its
focus on infrastructure with a
programme of technical sup-
port geared towards enhance-
ment of the country’s adap-
tive capacity and resilience to
the effects of climate change.”

To aid this goal, the IDB’s
2010-2014 country strategy for
the Bahamas is focusing on

SEE page 5B

* IDB aiming to ensure
40% private sector
participation in road
maintenance by 2014

* Also wants to double
private airport managers
to four from current two
* Public transport
‘disorganised' and service
‘below level expected' in
modern economy

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FamGuard outlook ‘negative’
on fears over mortgage woes

* But fellow BISX-listed firm and life/health insurer,
Colina, suffers no such downgrade despite similar A. M.
Best concerns

*FamGuard chief says 8% mortgage defaults below
banking industry average

* Blames CLICO, economy and rating agency pressure for
problems

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



Family Guardian’s level of mortgage delinquencies is
below the Bahamian banking industry’s average at 8 per
cent, its president told Tribune Business, after the BISX-list-
ed entity suffered an outlook downgrade to ‘negative’ over
the issue.

This was despite A. M. Best, the leading international
insurance credit rating agency, reaffirming a ‘positive’ out-
look on Family Guardian’s leading Bahamian life and health
insurance rival, Colina Holdings (Bahamas) and its Colina
Insurance Company subsidiary, even though it expressed the
same mortgage delinquency concerns in relation to Colina’s
loan portfolio. A. M. Best gave no reason for the different
outlooks assigned to the two Bahamian life and health
insurance giants, both of which are publicly listed. It reaf-
firmed both as having an ‘A-‘ and ‘a-‘ financial strength
and issuer credit rating, but the outlook discrepancy is like-
ly to be viewed — in the short-term at least — as something of
a feather in Colina’s cap, and a factor it can exploit via
marketing initiatives. In its assessment of Family Guardian,
A. M. Best said the ‘negative’ outlook “reflects Family
Guardian’s high concentration of mortgage loans relative to
total equity of the company, and the continued delinquen-
cies attributed to the current weak economic environment.

“A. M. Best is concerned that Family Guardian’s geo-
graphic concentration of business risk, and the competitive
and mature life insurance marketplace in the Bahamas,
coupled with a deteriorating mortgage loan portfolio and
inherent risks associated with the group division led by
BahamaHealth, could lead to potential challenges to income
and capital going forward”.

Patricia Hermanns, president of Family Guardian and
its parent, BISX-listed FamGuard Corporation, told Tribune
Business that the rating agency’s actions and comments
reflected more on the prevailing economic environment in

SEE page 7B









NIB contribution rates

slump to 3-5% in Andros

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net





COMPLIANCE with National Insurance Board (NIB) is as
low as 3-5 per cent in some Andros settlements, the social
security system’s director has revealed.

Algernon Cargill said the compliance rate in Andros, by
both employers and the self-employed, was more than unsat-

SEE page 6B

No credit checks. Accepted everywhere. Apply today,

Head Office: (242) 397-3000 | www.BankBohomos.com





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

FROM page 1B

Bahamas to implement unty-
ing for all customers, with the
technical details of complying
with this obligation to be deter-
mined by Cable Bahamas.”
Hence the BISX-listed com-
pany’s announcement late last
week of its digital platform roll-
out, which Tribune Business
understands will first begin in
Fox Hill. Cable Bahamas’ press
release alluded to this initia-
tive’s connection with URCA’s
‘untying’ requirement, stating



Cable

that it “satisfies” the regulator’s
requirements, although no
details were provided.

The initiative will impact
some 60 per cent of Cable
Bahamas’ existing cable TV
subscriber base, since some 40
per cent already have digital
set-top boxes and receive their
signals digitally, rather than via
the analogue method. It is tan-

LEGAL NOTICE







NOTICE

International Business Companies Act.

COIXEM LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), COIXEM LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
2009,

R. Clive. Moore (Liquidator)
Octogone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nassau, Bahamas








OFFICE LOCATED

SUMMERWINOS PLAZA

TONIQUE WILLIAMS HIGHWAY
NASSAL



tamount to a full reconfigura-
tion of Cable Bahamas’ net-
work. Cable Bahamas now has
two months to submit details
of its ‘untying’ plan to URCA,
including the investment cost,
business plan and consumer
terms and conditions. The
investment could well add sev-
eral million dollars to the
BISX-listed company’s cost
base, and the ‘untied’ broad-
band Internet offer is to be
made available to both existing
and new consumers.

Anthony Butler, Cable
Bahamas’ president and chief
executive, was guarded when
speaking to Tribune Business
on the issue last Friday. He
said: “We’ve come a long way
from the original position that
URCA had back in September.

“There are a couple of items
that we will be working on with
URCA in the near future. We'll
engage in those efforts in the
same manner that we have
done in the last six months, and
hope to come to a positive con-
clusion.” He added: “They
[URCA] threw everything into
the pot — the put everything in —
last September, and we have
now go to the point where it’s
[the new SMP regulatory
regime] fairly applicable to
Cable Bahamas as a player in
the sector. “We fully support
the new Communications Act.
The opportunities will be good
for the consumer, and it should
be good for operators in the
sector.”

Meanwhile, with the 30.2 per
cent buyout of Columbus Com-
munications’ former control-
ling stake in Cable Bahamas

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now completed, there is a new
face in the chairman’s seat to
replace Brendan Paddick, who
remains a director of the latter.

Cable Bahamas is ‘Keeping’
the post with a return to its
past, with Philip Keeping, the
company’s founder, ex-chair-
man and former Columbus
Communications head return-
ing to the role he relinquished
some six years ago when he
sold the latter entity to Mr Pad-
dick. It effectively marks Mr
Keeping’s Bahamas comeback,
and effectively completes the
‘full circle’ in terms of his Cable
Bahamas involvement.

URCA, for its part, has
reversed its position on includ-
ing retail and wholesale lines
that are leased at the interna-
tional level (lines that are
leased from providers such as
Cable Bahamas and BTC by
other operators/customers) for
international connectivity,
deciding not to include them in
its SMP designations.

It made this decision largely
based on the presence of
Columbus Communications,
which does not have a control-
ling interest in Cable Bahamas
any more, and its 90 per cent-
owned ARCOS I network.
Cable Bahamas’ broadband
services use only 10 per cent of
ARCOS’s capacity, while BTC
uses only 1.37 megabytes per
second of bandwidth.

Cable Bahamas also uses
only 45 per cent of Caribbean
Crossings’ Bahamas Internet
Cable System (BICS) for
broadband Internet and data
traffic, with a small portion
leased to Systems Resource



-/ for more information
or email yellowpages@btcbahamas.com
GRAND BAHAMA - 352-2336/8
FAMILY ISLANDS CALL - 242-300-1997

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Group (SRG), while BTC only
uses 12 per cent of the capacity
on its Bahamas II cable.

“The existence of Columbus
Communications, a third party
provider of wholesale leased
lines who does not compete in
the retail market for leased
lines in the Bahamas, means it
should be possible for com-
petitors to BTC and Cable
Bahamas to acquire capacity
on reasonable terms, resulting
in a reduction of the potential
barriers to entry to the retail
market,” URCA said.

“A new entrant should be
able to choose from Cable
Bahamas, BTC or Columbus
Communications to secure

THE TRIBUNE

would then have the option to
resell on a retail basis....
“URCA believes that com-
petition identified in wholesale
international leased lines may
result in competition emerging
in retail international leased
lines.” As for BTC, URCA has
mandated that it eliminate
charges imposed on its cellular
customers for incoming inter-
national calls by June 30, 2010,
informing all clients of the
change. The 100 per cent state-
owned incumbent must also
“comply with a national price
averaging obligation”, charging
the same price for the same ser-
vice/product regardless of
where the customer is located

leased line access, which it in the Bahamas.





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2000







COMMON LAW SIDE
No.374







BETWEEN





BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff





AND
ATLANTIS MARBLE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

First Defendant








AND
BERKLEY EVANS






Second Defendant




AND
MIKE P. ROUSSOS





Third Defendant







SUMMONS

LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before Deputy
Registrar, Tabitha Cumberbatch, of the Supreme
Court, Supreme Court Building, Bank Lane, Nassau,
The Bahamas on Thursday the 29% day of April,
A.D., 2010 at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon for the
hearing of an application on the part of the Plaintiff
for an Order for leave to enter Judgment in Default
of Appearance against the Third Defendant pursuant
to Order 73 of the Rules of the Supreme Court for
the amount claimed in the Statement of Claim with
interest, as therein claimed and costs.

TAKE NOTICE that a party intending to oppose this
application or to apply for a stay of execution should
send to the opposition party or its Attorneys to reach
them not less than three (3) days before the date
above mentioned a copy of any Affidavit intended to
be used.

Dated this 20" day of January, A.D., 2010
REGISTRAR

This Summons was taken out by Messers. Gibson,
Rigby & Co., Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaintiff.

Temple Christian High Sehoot

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2010 - 2011
School Year.

Journalism / Literature (Gr. 10-12)
Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-12)
Math (Gr. 7-12)

Physics (Gr. 10-12)

Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)

Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)
Chemistry

Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
Health Science (Gr. 7-9)

General Science (Gr. 7-9)
Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
Music (Gr. 7-12) -

Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr. 7-12)
Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)

Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)

Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)






Applicants must:



A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of
Temple Christian School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or University in
the area of specialization.

. Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

. Have at least two years teaching experience
in the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.

. Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE
levels.

. Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full

curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph and
three references to:
Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is May 3rd, 2010



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 3B



a =~ =~
Bamboo Shack 'could become KFC of Bahamas'

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

The Bahamian market pro-
vides fertile ground for fran-
chises of major international
brands to succeed, according to
organisers of a franchising
workshop for Bahamian entre-
preneurs.

With the growth of the
Bahamian consumer market
and inflow of over four million
annual visitors to the country,
brand consciousness is expand-
ing, said workshop organiser,
Andy Thompson, who is also
the founder and president of
the US-based National Associ-
ation of Black Hotel Owners,
Operators and Developers
(NABHOOD).

Mi Bahamas seen as ripe for franchise success

He said the franchising indus-
try held great potential to cre-
ate jobs, not just for franchisees
but also for the “litany of other
business that are there to sup-
port their concept,” such as
legal consultants, technical per-
sonnel and other service
providers. More than 80
Bahamians participated in this
weekend’s workshop, both as
attendees and guest presenters.
It was a precursor to the antic-
ipated end of summer event,
Bahamas Franchise Summit,
which is also being organised
by Mr Thompson.

“The workshop was well and
enthusiastically attended. There
is an interest in business oppor-

tunities particularly, in the
down market, where the spirit
of entrepreneurship seems to
be very high in the Bahamas,”
said Mr Thompson.

The workshop specifically
targeted Bahamians to intro-
duce them to more franchising
opportunities in light of the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) development,
although it was a part of a wider
conference for the Travel Pro-
fessionals of Color (TPOC).

Bahamian entrepreneur
Tyrone Nabbie, a presenter at
the workshop, is already a ben-
eficiary of the expansion work
at the Sir Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

His Bahamian flavour fran-
chise, Kafe Kalik, recently
opened a new branch in the
departure lounge. This is one
of three other locations in the
US and the Bahamas. Mr Nab-
bie is the owner of several US
franchises, including the Nas-
sau-based Outback Steakhouse,
Bennigan's, Sbarro, Miami
Subs, Nathan's and several oth-
ers. “As a franchise owner it is
critical to set a base for building
your own brand. The systems
and standards are in place, the
models and work ethics (are in
place), to build your own brand.
Having access to these systems
allowed me to build my own
brand; it gave me the operation

The Annual General Meeting

of
Bahamasair Employees
Provident Fund

will be held on

Tuesday, May 20th, 2010
at

The Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied
Worker’s Union Building
Worker’s House
at 7:30 pm

Important matters, including the External Audit Report
for 2009 will be discussed.

All resolutions for proposed amendments to The
Declaration of Trust should be submitted to the Fund
Administrator, in writing on or before 7th May, 2010.

Only resolutions received on or before this date will be
presented at the AGM.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the

following position:

Bodyguard

The incumbent serves as Executive Bodyauard of the Chief of Mission.
Protects the Chief of Mission portal-to-portal fram the threat of terrorism or

other acts of violence.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

U.S. High School diploma or Bahamian equivalency. Fool
Bahamas Police Force College or Royal Bahamas Detense Force
Training or U.S. Military or US. law cnforcenvent experience Is

required.

Ten (10) years of experience in Police, Defense Force law
enforcement or specialized security 1s required

Must be familiar with the city of Nassau, Freeport and the Cut
Islands in The Bahamas. Must also have knowledge of historical
and current events that could aftect the security of the protectec.

Must have the ability to be trained in the use of various firearms

and be eligible to obtain appropriate legal permits to authorize the
carriage of a firearm in the performance of their duties. Must alsa
have refined social skills and commensurate etiquette knowledge

to interact with high-level dignitaries

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The suceessful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S, citizens whe are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application formes are available online at:

hittn.nassau.usembassy cow

All applications are to be submitted via e-mail to the Human Resources

Omce:

Email: poiticrraneystate cov or fermanderrat state. gov

Deadline: May 4, 2010.

Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of the Embassy,



job _ opportunites html



Franchise start-up costs as low as $6k

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIANS are being encouraged to leverage franchise
opportunities to grow a small business, some which can involve as
little as $6,000 in initial start-up costs.

Jerry Crawford, president of Jani-King, one of the 10 largest US
franchises, said his business offers several levels of start-up, with
$6,000 being the lower level to franchise his commercial cleaning
business. "We have small, medium and large franchise opportu-
nities,” said Mr Crawford. "When our owner started the company,
he decided he wanted anyone to have an opportunity to have the
franchise as long as they wanted to work hard."

President and chief executive of the National Association of
Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers (NABHOOD),
Andy Ingraham, said the franchise identity brings a tried and
proven system that is designed to succeed.

He said that was the reason for hosting the Bahamas Franchise
Workshop this past Association (IFA), the Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce, the US Embassy, the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company, the Entrepreneur Venture Fund Ltd and HVS.

A press release for the workshop said franchising has become the
dominant method for the creation of wealth. Mr Ingraham and US
Ambassador to the Bahamas, Nicole Avant, agreed that Bahami-
ans have an exciting opportunity to create and own a small business
through franchising, and said many US firm are eager to partner
with Bahamians. "It is very important to the Embassy to stay
focused on this and remain committed, but most importantly to
make sure that American businesses know that they are support-
ed when they are here and that we will do are best to make sure
that the Bahamian business folk and American business folk con-
nect at the best level and highest level possible," said Ms Avant.

Mr Ingraham added that there were several successful fran-
chises operating in the Bahamas, and several currently being
developed. He said franchise owners understand that the Bahami-
an economy has for a long time outpaced many Caribbean coun-
tries. "Franchising has become the dominant method for the cre-
ation of wealth through small business ownership. Once known for
restaurants, today franchising is used by over 85 industries includ-
ing a wide range of consumer and business to business services (in)
retail, hospitality, health, recreation and many more,” said the
release.






template to succeed,” said Mr
Nabbie. The Bahamas has sev-
eral examples of successful
franchise operators, said Mr
Thompson, who named Eileen
Pinder and Gershan Major as
examples, among others.
“When you look at the success
of Bamboo Shack locally, based
on their expansion across the
island that is good opportunity
for a franchise concept. They
have some good systems down
and they could become the
KFC of the Bahamas,” said Mr
Thompson.

Gershan Major, the Cham-
ber of Commerce vice-presi-
dent, is the chief executive and
master license holder for the
Mailbox Etc franchise for the
Caribbean region. He advised
participants that a franchise is

M

r

“not a turn-key business in a
box” and requires a lot of sweat
equity and real equity.

“Two things happen when
you look at joint ventures. They
are designed to bring the
strength of all parties together.
In the case of Bahamians, it is a
great opportunity to find addi-
tional capital and expertise to
seal the deal in any competi-
tive bidding situation,” said Mr
Thompson. “I think for most
Bahamians one of the issues
that face them is the inability
to network with potential joint
venture partners. While this
was a success sand a great start,
our goal is to encourage them
to attend more meetings inter-
nationally and to explore more
ideas beyond the Bahamians,”
he said.

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

FROM page 1B

Mar’s senior vice-president of
governmental and external
affairs, emphasized that there
was still “a lot of uncertainty
out there”. The Bahamian hotel
industry, he said, still had to
navigate the relatively slow
summer months, and had “the
nuances of hurricanes to over-
come”.

Then there was the state of
the US economy, the key mar-
ket for the Bahamian
tourism/hotel industry, gener-
ating 85 per cent of its customer
base. “There’s a lot of uncer-
tainty out there that impacts
our ability to move forward,”
Mr Sands said. “The volcano
in Iceland had an impact on our
ability to continue growth lev-
els, but such is life. That’s the
nuance of our industry.”

Demand for Bahamian
hotels and tourism is largely a
derived demand, especially dur-

Hotels

ing a recession, being highly
dependent on consumer confi-
dence in employment and
income levels in their home
countries. This factor is largely
out of this nation’s control,
highlighting one of its key eco-
nomic weaknesses, given that
tourism is forecast to account
for 61 per cent of Bahamian
gross domestic product (GDP).

“There are many factors we
can’t control,” Mr Sands said.
“The one good thing we are
hoping for is that there contin-
ues to be a sustained improve-
ment in the generation markets
for our business. One US
employment increases, we will
return to a level of normalcy.
We will not get back to busi-
ness levels as they were two to
three years ago. It will still

remain challenging. Hotels are
spending more to attract new
business. Acquisition costs for
business are much more costly
than last year.”

The demand for travel need-
ed to return, Mr Sands said,
along with group bookings,
which had not returned to pre-
recession levels yet. Both fac-
tors were key to a Bahamian
hotel/tourism economic recov-
ery, Mr Sands said, adding:
“Group bookings are key to
hotels having a book of busi-
ness which they can grow on.”

Meanwhile, faced with an
increase in the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s (BEC)
basic tariff rate by July 1, 2010,
which is estimated at an aver-
age 5 per cent, Mr Sands said
the BHA and wider hotel
industry had proposed a series
of measures they hoped would
be implemented to ease any
impact on the sector.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW

NOTARIES PUBLIC

Carol D. Misiewicz & Simone A.
Morgan-Gomez are pleased to announce the
formation of their partnership for the practice of

law effective 1* April 2010. The firm will continue
to practice under the name of MISIEWICZ & CO.

We also advise that Simon E. Darville is an

Associate in the firm.

Chambers, Suite No.7

Grosvenor Close and Shirley Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel. 242-328-0396 Fax.242-328-1388
Email: misiewicz.chambers@gmail.com

www.misiewiczlaw.com

aa
f irre)
. Vee ey

Lge ae |

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

wishes to announce that applications are now being
invited from all qualified members who wish to be
considered for recommendation as candidates for
the seats to become available on either the Board of
Directors or the Supervisory Committee at the 33rd
Annual General Meeting to be held on Saturday May

22, 2010.

All members interested in serving in either capacity
should collect an application form from any office of
the Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited offices in Nassau, Freeport,
Abaco or Mangrove Cay Andros.

The qualification for each post is available upon

request.

Completed applications, along with the other
information requested should be returned to any of
the offices on or before the close of business on
Friday April 30, 2010.

All Resolutions must also be submitted by Friday

April 30, 2010.

Any application, not fully completed or without the
requested supporting information, or received after
the aforementioned date will not be eligible for

consideration.

“TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

SERVING THE WHOLE BAHAMAS”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



“Any increase in costs to our
sector we believe is not war-
ranted at this point in time. We
will be making some recom-
mendations as to how to
address these costs,” the BHA
president said, adding that they
hoped the proposals did “not
fall on deaf ears”.

The BHA is proposing that
the import duty rates on ener-
gy-efficient equipment and
products be lowered or elimi-
nated, “especially” if hotel
properties are using energy-effi-
cient practices.

The organisation is also rec-
ommending “stand-by genera-
tion rates”, which would allow
Bahamian hotels to switch to
this power production method
“if we get beyond certain levels
of peak demand”. Peak
demand, the BHA said, could
be looked at more frequently
during the year.

Mr Sands said another rec-
ommendation was “increasing
the amount of interest on the
[BEC] deposit that is paid back
to the company over a period of
time”. He added: “These sav-
ings should help to mitigate
against any rate increase going
forward. We believe we have

some recommendations that
will help us mitigate against any
level of increase. We hope
these ideas do not full on deaf
ears.”

As for hotel industry employ-
ment, and recovering the sev-
eral thousand jobs lost in late
2008 and 2009, Mr Sands said
this would be “directly related
to business demand”. While the
sector had not been adding any
jobs in substantial numbers, nor
had it been shedding any
beyond normal attrition rates.

Returning to pre-September
2008 business levels is a key
benchmark for the Bahamian
hotel industry, since while the
2010 figures year-to-date have
been ahead of 2009, they are
up against very weak compara-
tives. For March, the
BHA/Ministry of Tourism data
showed that the 14 major New
Providence hotels achieved an
average 77.6 per cent occupan-
cy rate, compared to 69.7 per
cent in 2009, a rise of 7.9 per-
centage points.

This resulted in a 9.3 per cent
increase in room nights sold
and, combined with the $16
increase in average daily room
rates (ADRs) from $269.14 to

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE
SNOWDEN late

OF FRANCIS JULIAN
of Unit 3?

in Silver Point

Condominium in the City at Freeport on the Island
of (crand Hahama, The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned

on or before 31° May, 2000

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned abowe, the assets of the late
FRANCIS JULIAN SNOWDEN will be distributed among |
the persons entitled thereto having regard only to the clacms
of which the Executors of the Estate shall then have had

Notios.

GRAHAM, THOMPSOM s& CO).
Ahcrreys for the Execuioes
Avbine Atiornecy AM. Bebo
The First Conemercial Contre
58 Floor, Suid 9
FO. Bow Fei
Froqporl, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE

$285.64, generated a 16 per cent
room revenue rise. While nine
of the 14 reporting New Provi-
dence properties reported a
room revenue rise, the Ministry
of Tourism/BHA pointed out:
“While the overall results
showed improvement over
2009, they are still below com-
parative figures for March 2008
when occupancy stood at 81.2
per cent and ADR was $315.41.
In March 2008, room nights
sold and room revenue was still
8.3 per cent and 19.6 per cent
above March 2010 levels.”

For March, some 36 per cent
of the 14 hotels surveyed gen-
erated increased room revenues
through rising room nights sold
and ADRs, “all of them show-
ing double-digit room revenue
increases ranging from 11.1 per
cent to 45.7 per cent”.

A further 36 per cent of
resorts saw an increase in room
nights sold with lower ADRs,
all but one achieving an
increase in room revenues.
Finally, some 21 per cent of the
14 properties surveyed saw
both room nights sold and
ADRs decline, along with room
revenues. As for the 2010 first
quarter, hotel occupancy aver-
ages rose to 67.2 per cent com-
pared to 64 per cent in 2009.
The ADR for the three months
to March 31, 2010, was $260.60
compared to $254.94 the year
before, with hotel room rev-
enue up 6.7 per cent. Some 10
out of the 14 hotels surveyed
reported room revenue increas-
es, with hotel room nights sold
up by 4.3 per cent.

Breaking the numbers down,
the BHA/Ministry of Tourism
reported that 36 per cent of the
14 properties surveyed had
increased room nights sold with
lower ADRs, growing their
room revenues in all cases bar
one. Some 29 per cent
increased both room nights sold
and rates, thereby boosting rev-
enues. A further 21 per cent
saw a reduction in room nights
sold with higher ADRs. Two
of these three properties over-
came the room night loss to
generate higher revenues, but
two hotels saw a decrease in all
performance measurements.

The 2008 first quarter com-
paratives, though, show the
Bahamian hotel industry has
some way to go to conclude its
recovery. Back then, average
occupancies stood at 73.7 per
cent, and ADRs at $282.04.
Room nights sold and room
revenue were 13.9 per cent and
31.4 per cent above their 2010
comparatives.

CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

A leading Bahamian group of companies is seeking to
hire a Deputy General Manager to assist with managing
and developing a large retail business. The duties will
include but are not limited to:

® Managing the daily operations of a multi-facet retail

business

Provide leadership and supervision of staff to ensure
excellent customer service

and daily reconciliation

>
® Direct the audit staff in monitoring inventory controls
>

Assist with the development of the business by
identifying new retailing opportunities

The qualified applicant will have:

® Working knowledge of management principles,
accounting principles, proficient in the use of
computers and previous experience at a senior
management level
Must be available to work flexible hours to monitor

the business operations as needed.

Uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Candidate must be a mature individual and a team
player who is self-motivated, organized, able to work
under pressure, meet deadlines with consistent and
high degree of accuracy

Education and Experience:

® Bachelor’s degree from an accredited College or

University

® Seven (7) years experience in a retail business at a
senior management level

Benefits and salary commensurate with qualifications

and experience.

Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter
and resume to the following e-mail address by 7th May,

2010: applybahamas@yahoo.com





THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

the transportation sector as
one of four key areas to
enhance this nation’s infra-
structure. All of road, air and
sea seem likely to merit some
attention.

“The sector diagnostic has
identified significant gaps in
the quality and level of cov-
erage of road and air trans-
port in the Bahamas,” the
IDB paper said.

“In New Providence, the
road network is inadequate
to cope with existing
demands, leading to serious
traffic congestion and result-
ing in significant increases in
travel time.

“The public transport sys-
tem is disorganized and the
quality of service below the
level expected in a modern,
well-functioning system.

“In addition, weaknesses
have been identified in the
policy formulation, planning
and management capabilities
in key sector agencies and
departments.”

Besides the $135 million
New Providence Road
Improvement Project that the
IDB is financing, with the
aiming of improving road
infrastructure on the
Bahamas’ main island, the
bank is also focusing on
enhancing this nation’s trans-
port planning capability and
road safety.

It also aims to “support
viable schemes to increase
private participation in the
provision of road mainte-
nance and organised opera-
tion of public transport ser-
vices.”

Among the IDB’s goals is
to by 2014 have 40 per cent of
the Bahamas’ road network
upgraded and maintained by
the private sector, as opposed
to the zero participation by
this sector currently.

Other objectives are to
have the Bahamas’ Transport
Development Plan 2006-2015
some 90 per cent implement-

qyiule of »
(Ginn
= vighuim

Mau lth, 2010 Tues-Thurs. 6-8:00pm
May 15th, 2010 Saturdays 9-1:00pm

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 5B
Climate change to cost Bahamas
$200m-$620m in next 15 years

ed by 2014, compared to the
current 30 per cent imple-
mentation level. The IDB also
wants the number of road
accidents in the Bahamas to
be reduced from a recorded
10,320 in 2008 to 8,772 by
2014, with a plan out in place
“for conducting annual and
periodic road maintenance
functions”.

Critical

Not forgetting air transport,
the IDB states the somewhat
obvious in saying this “is crit-
ical to the health of the
tourism industry, represent-
ing the prime mode of trans-
port for stopover tourists. It
also plays a pivotal role in

ensuring accessibility for the
population of the Family
Islands to goods and services
offered only in New Provi-
dence”.

Here, the IDB is aiming to
increase private sector partic-
ipation “in the modernization
of airports infrastructure”,
with the number of private
airport managers doubling
from two (YVRAS in Nassau
and Hutchison Whampoa in
Freeport) to four by 2014.

The bank also wants to cre-
ate an independent Civil Avi-
ation Authority and Airports
Authority, “responsible for
regulation and operations
respectively”, by 2014.

In this way, airport regula-
tion and operations will be
fully separated

a ene eee a)
Used Furniture & Appliances

Excellent Condition Imported

Fate ee

Tel: 436-5709

WANTED

NURSE OR NURSES AIDE

To care for elderly male.
References required. Must
be reliable and have own
transportation.

Tel: 326-3029

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Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.

A onivate Wealth Management Company and medium-sized Family office

}

Has an opening for an

ASSOCIATE

Applicanis must:

es Be aquaified atiorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders will also be considered.
« Have approximately 3-5 years expenence in financial servioas in any of the areas of trust
barking or invesiments

« Have fe abilty to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents relating to spenal
oroects and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the
same

¢ Ge a seasoned professional who is cagable of leading a project, coordinating its vanous
parts and managing fe am associated with the same.

e Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

e Be comoriabie in revewing financeal stalaments, and have a basic understanding of
investment and financial transactons

® Have the abilty to wor under pressure and without constant supervision.

® Have uncompromising personal and business efics.

Successfu! candidate will work directly with the President of Tradelnvest in the
management of complex private fiduciary arrangements. Responsibilities include regular

contact with overseas affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals, as
well as legal counsel and advisors.

Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and Confidential to:

The Presicent
Tradalnwest Asset Management Ltd.
LYFORD WANOR (WEST BUILDING), LYFORD GAY
NASSAU, ALP. THE BAHAMAS
Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 12-2040

Applications must be ressived by 2" May, 2000,

® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice
in the provision of financial services, seeks to identify suitable
candidates for the position of:

COLLECTIONS OFFICER (FREEPORT)

Core Responsibilities:

¢ Manage delinquent portfolios by contacting clients, initiating,
and responding to correspondence, initiating field calls,
collecting and processing payments, interviewing clients, and
conducting research and investigation
Conduct credit risk assessments by inspecting collateral (e.g.
real estate and automobiles), appraising asset value, assessing
client financial position, and calculating reservation value of
assessment
Initiate legal action by preparing and issuing demand letters,
meeting and corresponding with attorneys, preparing summons’
for court appearance, appearing in court as the bank’s
representative, engaging in judgment proceedings, and
coordinating foreclosure proceedings
Compile data and prepare reports to show status, value, and
degree of delinquency

Job Requirements:

Working knowledge of the Collections process; Knowledge of
appraisals and other legal documents

Associates Degree in relevant area, Banking Certificate,
ABIFS, or three to five years collections experience

Strong analytical skills

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Must be a team player and possess the ability to work in a
demanding environment

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications and a suite of other benefits including a group
medical plan.

Interested persons should apply no later than April 28, 2010 to:

Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



=
Cohen & Klein Consulting



(www ,cohenandklein,com|

Presents

The Most Practical & Comprehensive
Debt Collection Training in Bahamas








OCK 70 Debt Collection Stratepies; June 15-18
for New and Expenenced Collectors and Compliance Officers]






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for Manapers aad Supervisors)









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MPU ew UAC i elo

slump to 3-5% in Andros

FROM page 1B

isfactory.

"I wish I could be optimistic
for the compliance picture
here in Andros. But I can't,"
he said. "To say that the com-
pliance rate here is not good
is an understatement."

According to Mr Cargill, in
Nicholl's Town, Andros, the
compliance rate is only 3 per
cent, while in Fresh Creek it is
near 5 per cent.

Speaking to Androsians at
the first-ever Andros Busi-
ness Outlook, Mr Cargill
reminded them that National
Insurance contributions were

The National Insurance
Board last year began to
crack down on companies and
self-employed business per-
sons who have been in arrears
for years, even prosecuting
some business owners for
non-payment.

Mr Cargill said this
increased enforcement led to
the collection of $160 million
in contributions last year, $5
million more than the previ-
ous year.

However, he said places
such as Andros remain a chal-
lenge on the collection front.”
Obviously, not all employers
and self-employed persons

paid within one month after it
becomes due, it is late. Now
that may sound harsh, but
consider this; NIB is liable to
workers whether contribu-
tions are paid on time or late.

"And for every day a con-
tribution is withheld from
NIB, the National Insurance
Fund can be compromised.”

He added that like in
Andros today, the National
Insurance Fund could soon
see its expenditures equalling
its income, which will have
"far-reaching effects on our
fund".

However, Mr Cargill



sought to reassure Bahami-
ans that the$1.6 billion fund is
not in danger of running out.

"Let me hasten to reassure
you, and say unequivocally,
that NIB is not going broke,”
he said. "It simply means that
we have to reform and posi-
tion NIB in a positive posi-
tion for the long term."

And while NIB's current
reserves stand at $1.6 billion,
and its 2008 surplus stood at
$54 million, contribution rate
increases are slated to come
into effect "to ensure long-
term viability”.

are making the effort to








not optional but an obligation
— and mandated - under the
law.

For our brochure, traiming costs and other details visi:
mrw cohenandideincom (1R e-maa) us at: collet gate net

remain current with their con-
tributions," said Mr Cargill.
"Tf a contribution is not

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANTERNIQUCA
DAVIS of Farrington Road, P.O. Box N-4052
intend to change my name to ANTERNIQUCA
MARSHALL. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

Training Location: Netie's Place « Cesuaninas
Nasal, alana

rm lovin’ it

Employment
Opportunity

Restaurant Managers Needed
for leading Fast Food Franchise

Telepbornes (242) 327-015 04, Fao: (42) A27-R152

Ke*| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life .
Requirements:

¢ Must be a High School Graduate

¢ Must have Management experience

¢ Restaurant Management experience is
preferred.

¢ Must have strong leadership skills

¢ Must be customer service driven

¢ Must be results-oriented & articulate
¢ Must have excellent inter-personal skills
¢ Must have excellent oral & written
Communications skills

¢ Professionalism required

Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and
holidays.

[VACANT POSITION]

Coordinator Pharmacy PUBLIC NOTICE

The Public is advised, effective March 25th,
2010 the following Officers and Directors were
elected by the membership to serve on the
Board of Directors of the Bahamas Real Estate
Association.

Qualifications

¢ Experience in a hospital setting is a must.
* 7-10 years as a Pharmacist with a minimum
of 5 years in a management position.
* Intermediate to Advance computer skills is a must

OFFICERS McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Patricia Birch, President

* Excellent written and oral communication skills

Education. ————_ Sara Callender, Vice President Please submit Resume to:
Se «i Virginia Damianos, Treasurer Human Resources Department
* Bachelors Degree in Pharmacy or Science 5
discipline and license Competence Certificate. James Newbold, Secretary McDonald’s Head Office
* PharmD is a major plus. on Market St. North
DIRECTORS ELECTED TO SERVE UNTIL MARCH 2012
Sally Hutcheson Michael Lightbourn P.O.Box 58-5925
Position Summar ; ° 395.
7 _— y Wendy Johnson, Rachel Pinder Telephone: 325-4444
Visionary, pioneering and implementing of new projects Carla Sweetin g Franon Wilson Nassau, The Bahamas

Revenue generation, purchase management

Sai He a BEER HRHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEEH HH
naan: DIRECORS SERVING UNTIL MARCH 2011
Zachary Bonczek Carlyle Campbell

Cara Christie George Damianos



Monitoring of continuing education for the team
Monthly reports/data analysis

Monitoring formulary/formulary changes.
Assisting on-line whenever possible

Are you...
Motivated, outgoing and professional?

SO ARE WE |

Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits

June Fife has been appointed as Registrar.

Date: April 26th, 2010

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department President: Patricia Birch
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas

or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com .
Join our rapidly growing group of companies and
FG CAPITAL MARKETS enjoy an exciting and rewarding career in sales.
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

C2.tt+ Tt. t3 mh FT A OT

ROYAL FIDELITY

Moumey at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 23 APRIL 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,561.59 | CHG -8.89 | %CHG -0.57 | YTD -3.79 | YTD % -0.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWWwW_BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit_y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $

Outside Sales

Previous Close Today's Close Change

7.00 AML Foods Limited
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund
5.23 Bank of Bahamas

0.44 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste

2.14 Fidelity Bank

9.62 Cable Bahamas

2.69 Colina Holdings

5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1)
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs
1.32 Doctor's Hospital

5.94 Famguard

1.02
10.63
5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17
12.07
2.84
6.08
2.88
2.54
6.07

1.02 0.00
10.63 0.00
5.24 0.00

0.283
0.992
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.627
-0.003

0.44 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.17 0.00
12.07 0.00
2.84 0.00
5.90 -0.18
3.00 0.12
2.54 0.00
6.07 0.00

Representative

8.75 Finco 9.08 9.08 0.00
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60 10.60 0.00
3.75 Focol (S) 5.08 5.08 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00
FBB22 100.00 0.00

0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

The ideal candidate must:

« Bea ligt malvalad eel stirter wih an oelhueiadhe, Inencly did culgeng parsitalty,
15 October F017 «Be vwilling io be bainad ina vanely of pmdud kniwedge area

19 October 2022

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Interest

Prime + 1.75%

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T% 30 May 2013 7 Possess, Peeler onganizationsl and ane management oh I
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015 4 1’
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) = wien y
52wk-Low Symbol Bid & Ask & Last Price Daily Val. EPS $ Divs P/E i ' Be abe ip wor Nepencealy Pepresenl Me Ilenests OF management And tie
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00 0.000 .
RND Holdings o.35 O40 oss 0.001 0.000 Conipaty prolestoraly and eoéilly, and hand cusloaners efocivly.
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) . a é
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 E MT r E c r rc
Pe case ae oS a a0 ae » Possess computer sill, io include working knowledge of MS: Oifice Sule (Excel,
BISX Listed Mutual Funds +
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months % NAV 3MTH NAV 6MTH Word, PowerPoini, and iniemet Exp ee Bic. |
1.3702 _CFAL Bond Fund 1.4602 1.50 6.57 1.438700 1.407626
2.8266 CFAL MS! Preferred Fund 2.9116 0.85 0.52 2.886947 2.830013 - a acl : Hn
1.4548 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5268 1.31 4.94 1.507147 1.491956 5 Be pune BV have al oe bansporahen

2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

9.1005

3.2025 2.75 -3.54
13.4986 0.98 5.44
107.5706 3.45 6.99
105.7706 3.99 13.50
1.1034 1.25 5.25
1.0764 0.79 4.37
1.1041 1.23 5.34
9.5795 5.33 5.33

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Postion is oTiimassign baad - your success Gecerals einitely on your sales afiotts - lhe
pay i= fhe lim!

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Intl Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000 10.5417 -2.13 10.96

Construction brace experience prelerred

4.8105 7.6928 -0.31
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month divider
Bid $ - Buying price of Gol
Ask $ - Selling price of Gol
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin gful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

47.51

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
price in last 52 weeks
g price in last 52 weeks
- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Shange - Change in closing price fram day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

divided by closing price

Please emrall jour resume ln out idecales hota com











THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1B

the Bahamas than they did on the
company, plus the international pres-
sures on A. M. Best and its ilk.

“There is really no impact for Fam-
ily Guardian in its operations,” Ms
Hermanns told this newspaper. “Fam-
ily Guardian is a very stable company.
Essentially, the revision of the rating
from ‘stable’ to ‘negative’ really hinges
on the economic condition of the coun-
try. The rate of defaults on our mort-
gages is below the threshold the Cen-
tral Bank has reported for the banks as
a whole. The deterioration we are
experiencing is below what the Central
Bank is reporting as the position with-
in the banking community. Our rate is
below 8 per cent.”

The total percentage of defaulted
mortgages issues by Bahamian com-
mercial banks (those in arrears and
non-performing) was a combined 9.8
per cent at end-February 2010,
although the situation was showing
signs of stabilization. Ms Hermanns
suggested A. M. Best’s stance was also
influenced by “changes taking place
in the local market with one life and
health insurer”, a reference to CLI-
CO (Bahamas) collapse into insolven-
cy in early 2009. This, she added, had

Chairman’s Report — Q4, 2009

FamGuard outlook

combined with the international pres-
sure currently faced by A. M. Best and
all credit rating agencies as a result of
criticism over their failure to spot
advanced warnings of the sub-prime
mortgage crisis, and subsequent finan-
cial and economic collapse.

As a result, Family Guardian’s pres-
ident suggested A. M. Best and others
were being “very conservative” and
“more aggressive” in their rating opin-
ions and actions, hence the outlook
action taken with regard to the BISX-
listed life and health insurer.

As to Family Guardian’s ratio of
mortgage loans to total equity, Ms
Hermanns said it was little different
to what A. M. Best had seen in previ-
ous rating periods. “The situation has
not changed negatively since previous
ratings,” she told Tribune Business.

“There has been some slight
increase in defaults, but nothing sub-
stantial, and the rate of deterioration is
below that of the Central Bank of the
Bahamas for the wider financial com-
munity.”

As for FamGuard’s 2009 year-end
and fourth quarter financials, which

are due to be published this week, Ms
Hermanns said: “There was no deteri-
oration beyond the third quarter. What
was released in the third quarter
results has not deteriorated since
then.”

Replying to the “risks” identified
by A. M. Best in relation to its
BahamaHealth division, Ms Hermanns
said health claims were far more
volatile than life insurance as they
were ongoing, rather than a one-time
claim at death.

“Our health claims increased in the
last year, and that was driven by eco-
nomic conditions that impacted the
claims,” she added. Family Guardian
was now in the processing of reviewing
all its health insurance contracts, and
whether premiums matched risk based
on the recent claims history.

A. M. Best balanced its comments
by praising Family Guardian’s
“favourable risk-adjusted capitalisa-
tion”, operational profitability and
marketing presence. It was especially
impressed with the fact that share-
holders’ equity had grown over the
last five years despite dividend pay-
ments. Yet none of this explains A.
M. Best’s different treatment of Coli-
na’s outlook. It was just as harsh, if
nor harsher, on Colina and the “risks

associated with the company’s mort-
gage loan portfolio and its delinquen-
cies, which increased further in 2009
despite Colina implementing aggres-
sive measures to address the rising
delinquencies and provide for potential
losses in that portfolio.

“The mature nature of the Bahami-
an life/health market, and the recent
erosion in the Bahamian economy, pri-
marily resulting from a decline in the
tourism sector, also is a concern to A.
M. Best, as it could impede not only
Colina’s potential for growth, but its
ability to stabilize its troubled mort-
gage loan portfolio.”

Lynden Nairn, Colina’s vice-presi-
dent of life/health, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “With respect to mortgage loan
deterioration, I would make the obser-
vation that this is no different from
what the wider financial sector has
experienced over the past 18 months.

“T would point out further that our
provisioning has been very aggressive,
and the expectation is that in the ensu-
ing months there will be an improve-
ment in the mortgage portfolio as the
economy improves.”

One possible difference for A. M.
Best’s different treatment of the two
listed life and health insurers is that it
believes Colina, due to its larger bal-

ance sheet and more than 50 per cent
share of the Bahamian life and health
insurance market, is better able to
absorb any mortgage delinquency
‘shocks’. A. M. Best said its Colina
Insurance Company analysis was influ-
enced by its “improved operations in
the health line of business”, plus its
leading ‘more than 50 per cent’ market
share, “favourable risk-adjusted capi-
talisation and conservative reserving
practices”.

The rating agency also referred to
Colina Insurance Company expand-
ing into other Caribbean and Latin
American markets, something Mr
Nairn declined to comment upon. A.
M. Best added that the company
would need to focus on growing its
business organically via expanding its
market share in the Bahamas, as
opposed to relying on its acquisition
spree over the past decade. “Manage-
ment’s expectation is that Colina will
continue to differentiate itself from
others in the industry,” Mr Nairn told
Tribune Business. “I think we’re going
to be able to achieve the kind of organ-
ic growth that is necessary to sustain a
growing business. It’s going to be intro-
ducing new products, leveraging tech-
nology, and understanding the mar-
ket we’re in.”



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Sales

Cost of sales

Quarter Ended
January 31, 2010

$

Quarter Ended
January 31, 2009

24,073 26,457
(16,929)

(18,687)



Gross profit

Selling, general and administrative expenses
Other operating income

7,144 7,710
(6,196) (5,984)

185 116



Net operating profit

Interest expense
Dividends on preference shares

1,133 1,902

(5) (80)

(119) (136)



Net profit on continuing operations

Property revaluation write-back

Net loss on discontinued operations

1,009 1,686

56



Net profit



Profit per share

I am pleased to report to you the results for our Company’s fourth quarter 2009, which ended
January 31, 2010, as well as our unaudited results for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010.

2009 has been a good year for AML Foods Limited. As we re-branded our corporate identity to
better reflect our Company today, we continued to record sound growth and profits in the midst of
economically challenging times. We also achieved substantial improvements in our balance sheet -
the most significant of which is the strengthening of our liquidity. As a result, we currently stand in a
net cash position of $2.2m after being in the red for many years.

It is as a result of this improvement in liquidity that I am extremely pleased to announce that AML
Foods Limited will pay a dividend of 4c per share, based on 2009 results, our first dividend since late
2001. Our resumption to dividends has been a long time coming and I would like to thank our
shareholders who have been very patient with us during that time.

While we recorded sound growth and achieved tremendous milestones, we continue to face
challenging conditions. Our profits for the fourth quarter recorded a drop over the prior year as
economic conditions and increased competition continue to impact operations in all of our markets.
The decrease in our sales is primarily the result of decreases in average transactions as our customer
counts remain strong and largely unchanged. This indicates that customers are generally spending less
while increasingly shopping around for weekly specials and discounts. As this is something we expect
to define the market in which we operate for the foreseeable future — if not permanently — we have
focused on initiatives to further enhance our competitiveness and diversify revenue streams. While
we saw a continuation of Q4 sales trends into February, our sales are beginning to rebound as the
measures and initiatives we put in place to address increased competitiveness take effect.

In an effort to further reduce costs and pass savings on to our customers, we have continued our
focus on reducing our shrink in real terms after battling unacceptable levels for years. I am very
pleased to report that one of those most important achievements of 2009 results is our achievement
of an overall decrease of 6% in our shrink expense. This major focus on shrink awareness and
reduction throughout our entire Company is finally realizing real progress and positive results. We
remain commutted to this critical aspect of our business and have targeted a 10% overall reduction in
shrink for 2010.

In addition to our focus on reducing shrink and controlling costs where possible, we are also focused
on opportunities for new revenue streams. To this end, we have recently launched
www.costright.com, allowing our Cost Right Nassau shoppers to purchase its full range of products
on-line. We are also undergoing the final beta testing on our Domino’s on-line ordering website and
we expect to announce at least one additional Domino’s location soon. We have completed the
design phase and are now in the bidding stage for “Solomon’s Fresh Food Market” — our new
location in the Western New Providence Town Centre Development. We are very excited about our
new store and the opportunities it will provide both for us and the shoppers in Western New
Providence.

We expect 2010 to be something of a mixed bag with a challenging first half of the year and a much
better second half. We remain confident that the many new sales initiatives we have recently
implemented will help minimize the impact of the changes we are seeing to the marketplace that we
operate in. It will be our continued focus on the synergies we have achieved in our buying and
logistics, cost control and the strategic focus on our brands that will deliver savings, quality and real
value to our customers and enable us to not only continue facing these challenges but also build on
our progress enabling continued growth and development for AML Foods.

We thank you for your continued support.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar
April 12, 2010

“git

UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE QUARTER ENDED JANUARY 31, 2010



CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

January 31, January 31,
2010 2009

Assets 30,703 30,607

Liabilities (14,519) (18,319)



Equity 16,184 12,288







CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (CONTINUED)
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Year Ended
January 31, 2010

Year Ended
January 31, 2009

Sales $ 93,212 91,180
Cost of sales (65,123) (64,461)

Gross profit 28,089 26,719
Selling, general and administrative expenses (24,339) (24,035)
Other operating income 637 383
Net operating profit 4,387 3,067





Pre-opening costs (24)

Interest expense (283)
Dividends on preference shares (620)



Net profit on continuing operations 2,140
Property revaluation write-back 56

Net profit/(loss) on discontinued operations (192)



Net profit 2,004



Profit per share $0.127



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Year Ended
January 31, 2010

Year Ended
January 31, 2009

Net profit for period 3,896 2,004



Net cash provided by operating activities 5,625 6,575



Net cash used in investing activities (920) (4,077)



Net cash (used in)/provided by financing activities (2,288) 99



Increase in cash 2,417





EXPLANATORY NOTES
TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Year Ended January 31, 2010

ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies and methods of computation as
the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the 2008 Annual Report.

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of AML Foods Limited,
formerly Abaco Markets Limited, (“the Company”) and its significant wholly owned
subsidiaries: Solomon’s Supercentre (Nassau) Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited,
Solomon’s Club (Freeport) Limited, Thompson Wholesale Limited, Caribbean Franchise
Holdings Limited and Solomon’s Fresh Market Limited.

DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operations in Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly,
the assets and liabilities of Cost Right Abaco were treated as discontinued and a
restructuring reserve was set up at January 31, 2009. Remaining balance of this reserve
was written back at October 31, 2009.

The Company has signed a three year lease for the building used by the former store.
The lease includes an option to purchase the building at the end of the lease for $2.8m.

The equipment of the former business was sold for $350,000, resulting in a gain on
disposal of $79,000.

Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from
Ms.Brendalee Gibson, at AML Foods Corporate Offices at Town Centre Mall, Blue Hill
Road, Nassau, The Bahamas, tel. 1 242 677 7200.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 8B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

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week again engaged Amer-
ican Airlines in an attempt
to further increase the fre-
quency of airlift to the Fam-
ily Islands.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said this new round of
talks was simply a continu-
ing effort to drive larger
tourist numbers to islands
outside of Nassau/Paradise
Island.

Speaking at the first annu-
al Andros Business Outlook,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said coordinating increased
airlift and infrastructure
development was key to
increasing the success
prospects for resorts and
other tourism industry part-
ners on the Family Islands.

He said statistics have
shown that while there has
been a steady increase of
visitor arrivals to
Nassau/Paradise Island in
the past 30 years, for 30
years the Out Islands have
remained flat.

The primary factor behind
the “flatline” of tourism
growth in the Out Islands
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said, was the extremely high
cost of travel to those loca-
tions.

“Low cost of air travel has
to be the norm," he said.
"Our proximity advantage
has been erased because the
cost was the same to other
destinations in the region."







Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

The Government is tar-
geting increased airlift to
several major Family Islands
over the next several years.
And they successfully nego-
tiated new and increased air-
lift to Nassau and Grand
Bahama last year, the results
of which are already being
seen.

While Mr Vanderpool-
Wallacer said he could not
reveal which islands he was

negotiating with American
Airlines to service, it is like-
ly that one element of his
trip was the return of Amer-
ican Eagle to Governors
Harbour Airport in
Eleuthera.

The airline announced last
month that it would discon-
tinue flights to Governor's
Harbour while changes to
the airport's navigational
aids were being made. Many
Eleuthera resorts immedi-
ately felt the fallout from the
discontinuation of the
flights.

While there are those
infrastructural problem to
contend with, the Ministry
is also attempting to increase
the amount of airlift to the
Family Islands from Nassau
through Bahamian-owned
private carriers, who are
adept at flying throughout
the Bahamas and often do
not require as many high-
tech navigational aids.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the companion airfare
promotion garnered almost
25,000 bookings in the first
quarter of 2010 alone.
Therefore, the Government
and private sector partners
involved in the promotion
have extended it and added
a component to introduce
similar results for Out Island
bookings.

He added that the Min-
istry of Tourism is gaining
ground on creating Island-






























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MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



IN THE past, Bahamians
were denied the right to gamble
in their own country as the state
sought to act as the “moral com-
pass” for the nation. As long as
the people agreed with this
thinking; things were fine. How-
ever, times have changed and the
people are becoming weary of
the state dictating what they can
and cannot do with their time
and tithes.

According to the well-known
author and psychologist, J. Mar-
tin Kohe, “the greatest power
that a person possesses is the
power to choose.”

This is what is central to the
ongoing debate; not the morality
of gambling, but whether
Bahamians should have the right
to choose to gamble.

It is quite clear that many are
choosing to gamble even though
the state has deemed it illegal.
How do we know this? Just look
at every other street corner, tuck
shop, bar, restaurant, DVD
retailer and even clothing store.
Back in the days, the saying used
to be that in the Bahamas, on
every Street corner there was a
church, and next to that church,
a bar room.

society

Today, it is safe to say that we
can add to that truism, that
where there is a church, there is
a bar, and in that bar there is a
numbers house. The fact that
numbers houses and gambling
has permeated many different
facets of society proves that
Bahamians are exercising their
right to choose to gamble.

With twenty-three fully func-
tioning numbers houses it is hard
to bury ones head in the sand
and believe that these institu-
tions do not exist.

We can pretend that the
majority of us don’t know what it
means to “box” a number. But
everybody from your grammy,
to your nephew, to the pastor in
your church knows exactly what
that means. Every birthday,
every anniversary, every death,
every scripture reading and every
dream influences this booming
industry.

The Christian Council has
been the main stumbling block
for any government that seeks
to legalize this industry.

As our “moral” watchdog, this
group has taken over the busi-
ness of deciding what we as a
people can watch in our theatres,



INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Bahamians have right
to live their own lives



what we can do with our recre-
ational time, and now what we
can do with our money.

But as one wise Bahamian
indicated on a
BahamasIssues.com thread on
the topic, this is a slippery slope
and can lead to a multiplicity of
other oppressive and ridiculous
laws.

CHAN: “Some people spend
all their salary on the weekend
when one good ‘sale’ come
round on clothes or
shoes. So outlaw
sales, ’cus peo-

ple ga
spend <
up all >>




—-

their rent
money. Some
people get paid
on Friday, head to da
bar, and by Saturday
night dey broke. So outlaw
alcohol.

“Some people hopelessly
addicted ta online shopping, so
outlaw dat too.

“After all, we don't want them
to spend up all their money on
foolishness. Some women make
$200 per week, and spend $100 a
week on nails and hair, so outlaw
all da salons.

“Some men spend all dey
salary on dey sweetheart and her
chirren, and leave da wife and
her chirren ta fend for dey self.
So outlaw sweetheartin’. For
Gawd's sake, if ya earn ya own
money, ain no government gat
da rite ta tell ya what ta do wit ya
earnins.”

We must not get carried away
with this debate, because we all
know how Bahamians go.

The argument will then be,
“well if Bahamians have a right
to gamble, then why can’t we
have the right to hire strippers,
or smoke weed, or carry guns,
or rape our wives?”

But let’s think about what a
state is here to do.

The state has a responsibility
to protect its citizens. It does not
have the right to dictate the
morality of those citizens; or at
least that is what Bahamians in
this 21st century are trying to
communicate.

When something like gambling
is hidden, and kept under the
radar, it does more harm than
good.



Businesses spring
up in the shadiest of
areas, and ulti-
mately attract the
basest element.
When the indus-
try is illegal, citi-
zens are not pro-
tected from the

plethora
of abuses that
could follow. As
another blogger, Adi-
dasboi987 said on
BahamaslIssues.com:
“When you criminalize some-
thing, you don't rid yourself of
the demand for it. What you cre-
ate is an underground, or black
market — the only persons
standing to get rich off it is those
numbers houses — so how long
are we going to allow those num-
bers men to make millions of
dollars? They are in no rush to
see it “legalized” trust me — nor
is the church — but for other rea-
sons. Pastors are fully aware that
their members make donations
from their winnings — as a means
to “purge” their “wrong” act —
keep it illegal — keep the stigma
— keep the guilt. Good strategy, I
suppose.

Police

According to one numbers
operator, bribes to the police are
factored in to the weekly expens-
es to avoid a major shakedown.
This in itself is as illegal as the
industry. But if numbers were
legalized and regulated, the cas-
es of police extorting monies in
these instances would be fewer
and far between.

Let
us think about

= where the proceeds

from this industry could be
used if this industry were legal-
ized, regulated and taxed. We
already know that proprietors
have funded political campaigns
and even donated to NEMA.
They have helped numerous local
businesses and the communities
in which they operate. Many
Bahamians, when turned away
by local banks have turned to
numbers houses that have acted
as loaning agents, helping men
and women to pay their bills,
school fees, repair their homes,
buy cars, etcetera. In the grand
scheme of things, these are only
the footnotes.

But what would it be about if
it were made legal? It would pro-
vide substantial tax revenue and
even more employment oppor-
tunities. The government would
be able to keep tabs on the indus-
try, to ensure that payouts are
made on a timely basis and that
they know who and how many
proprietors are involved in the
industry; because as we all know,
even the regulation of an industry
costs the state a lot of money.

What improvements could be
made to the Bahamas from the
proceeds of this industry?















New and better schools? More
scholarships for worthy students?
Better roads and infrastructure?
Teachers might actually get rais-
es on a timely basis. Nurses might
get their insurance without
threatening to strike. ’m sure
any government, especially dur-
ing these difficult financial times,
would agree that an extra $20
million in the Treasury would be
well received.

Possibilities

In short, the possibilities are
endless as to what the govern-
ment could do with the proceeds.
The people are only asking that
they take this fact into consider-
ation.

It is about time that the
Bahamian government acknowl-
edges that Bahamians have the
right to live their own lives.
Whether that involves watching a
controversial film, gambling in a
casino, buying a lottery ticket, or
going to an establishment where
someone dances for money. It
boils down to having the right to
choose, and the people hope, and
expect, that the government will
finally listen to what they are say-
ing.



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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



PEOPLE LOOK AT a U.S. helicopter at the Corail refugee camp, on the outskirts of
Port-au-Prince, Wednesday, April 21, 2010. Corail is a new site prepared by IOM, International
Organization for Migration, and US army engineers together with humanitarian partners and
Suitable for up to 6,000 residents.

Ramon Espinosa/AP












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The organized relocation camp
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tant tents on groomed, graded
mountain soil. The settlement
three miles (four kilometers)
down the road — named after
the U.S. president in hopes of get-
ting attention from foreigners —
has leaky plastic tarps and wood-
en sticks pitched on a muddy
slope, according to Associated
Press.

Corail has a stocked U.N.
World Food Program warehouse
for its 3,000-and-counting resi-
dents; the more than 8,500 at
Camp Obama are desperate for
food and water. Corail's entrance
is guarded by U.N. peacekeepers
and Haitian police. Camp Oba-
ma's residents put up a Haitian
flag to mark their empty security
tent.

The camps, neighbors in the
foothills of a treeless mountain,
are a diptych of the uneven
response to Haiti's Jan. 12 earth-
quake. More than $12.7 billion
has been pledged by foreign gov-
ernments, agencies and organi-
zations, including $2.8 billion for
humanitarian response and
another $9.9 billion promised at
the March 31 U.N. donors con-
ference.

In one camp, which dignitaries
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"We've heard the foreigners
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But we're still living the same way
as before, and we're still dying
the same way as before," said
Duverny Nelmeus, a 52-year-old
welder-turned Camp Obama res-
ident-coordinator.

Haiti's needs are still enor-
mous, but more than 100 days
after the quake, the plan for deal-

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ing with them is unclear. Even
the death toll is confusing: Gov-
ernment estimates hovered
around 230,000 until the U.N.
donors conference when, without
explanation, the total jumped to
300,000.

There are officially 1.3 million
people displaced by the magni-
tude-7 earthquake. Hundreds of
thousands have massed in settle-
ment camps that, like Camp Oba-
ma, sprouted with little or no
planning. These Haitians live in
makeshift tarp homes and
shanties, govern their affairs with
self-formed security committees
and make do with whatever aid
arrives.

It was said early on that nearly
all the displaced needed to be
moved ahead of the arriving rainy
season to carefully planned camps
like Corail. But it took months
to procure land. By March, aid
officials decided instead that peo-
ple should start going home, say-
ing thousands of houses are still
habitable or can be repaired.

It was even better, they said,
for most to stay where they were:
Agencies deemed just 37,000 peo-
ple in nine camps at high risk for
flash floods, said Shaun Scales of
the International Organization
for Migration.

But many people are not moy-
ing, nor do they want to stay
where they are.

Persistent aftershocks and
rumors of more to come — Pres-
ident Rene Preval warned of an
impending earthquake at a news
conference this month — are
keeping people from going back.
Private landowners and schools
are threatening to evict squatters.
Those who remain are suffering.

What they want is a better
option. And for a few lucky peo-
ple, right now, that's Corail. The
product of a coordinated effort
by aid agencies, the United
Nations, the U.S. military, the
Haitian government and other
entities, it has sprung up seem-
ingly overnight on a cactus patch
where the Cite Soleil slum meets
the suburb of Croix-des-Bou-
quets.

There was little here but a few
concrete homes, disorganized
camps and brush until a few
weeks ago, when Preval
announced that the government
would seize — with compensa-
tion for the owners — 18,500
acres (7,490 hectares) of the arid
land.

Authorities began moving peo-
ple in immediately, even before
services were in place. Croix-des-
Bouquets officials say they were
unprepared for the onslaught.
Aid groups Oxfam, World Vision
and CARE criticized the rush as
violating human dignity.

Now ecstatic arrivals are
streaming in aboard air-condi-
tioned buses, clutching laminated
ID cards with maps of the settle-
ment, wearing green bracelets
bearing their names. Nearly all
come from the most famous camp
in post-quake Port-au-Prince: the
Petionville Club golf course,
home to 45,000 quake survivors,
elements of the U.S. Army 82nd
Airborne and a gaggle of Holly-
wood volunteers led by Sean
Penn.

Aid workers lead the smiling
tenants to their Chinese-made
cylindrical tents, pointing out the
floodlights, the police tent and
where the 342 toilets and 24
showers are being built.

The plan is to stage about 6,000

Good camp, bad camp:
The shortfalls of Haiti aid

people here along the 50-acre (20-
hectare) "Sector 4" as the rainy
season gets under way, even while
UN. trucks, U.S. Navy engineers
and aid groups continue con-
struction. Then they will start
building sturdier shelters of wood,
plastic and metal in adjacent Sec-
tors 2 and 3.

There's no word yet on what
will be built in Sector 1, but locals
are expecting some major devel-
opment. Concrete homes and
stores are also being built around
the new camp.

Manushka Lindor, 23, is
among the lucky. She sat in the
shady tent with her 3-year-old
son, Peterson St. Louis Jr., who
squealed "Vroom! Vroom!" as
the big construction trucks went
by. Just a few hours after arrival,
she was already planning to stay.

"T don't have anywhere else to
live. If they come here and build
a house I can rent, I'd be very
satisfied," she said.

Her husband, Peterson St.
Louis Sr., pushed a green wheel-
barrow full of welcome bounty: a
week of ready-to-eat meals for
the whole family and hygiene kits
with soap, toothpaste, toilet paper
and sanitary napkins.

They had been living in the
golf-course camp, dealing with
crime, mud and danger. One day,
Lindor said, a water truck slid
backward into a tent and killed
two people.

Their new home offers quiet,
assistance and a chance for a fresh
start. St. Louis, a 27-year-old bar-
ber, is setting up shop in the back
of the tent with an office chair
and a car battery to charge his
electric clippers.

Outside it is a different story.
Roads are cracked, and rubble
lines the route. Twisted webs of
steel rebar lie in heaps, collected
by residents sick of waiting for
help and now setting out to
rebuild on their own. Police cars
pull over by the side of the road
to buy pirated gasoline amid fuel
shortages.

In Camp Obama, the help has
been spotty and often ineffective.
Almost everyone has at least one
plastic tarp, the “emergency shel-
ter material," in aid-worker par-
lance, that was a focus of relief
efforts in the months after the
quake. But those are leaking and
falling apart.

Nobody remembers what aid
group came when — the parade
of foreigners becomes a blur.
Someone left a rubber bladder to
hold drinking water, another a
black tank for the same. Both are
broken and empty.

"We'd thank God for a glass
of water," Nelmeus said.

Cuban doctors have come and
provided anti-malarial and other
medicines, as did some Ameri-
cans. But while Corail's hospital
tent is fully staffed, Camp Oba-
ma's is usually empty. Nelmeus'
two children are sick with fever
and awaiting treatment.

They cannot go to Corail,
where organizers rejected a
request by the Croix-des-Bou-
quets mayor to take in 10,000
homeless squatting on land in his
town.

Corail's organizers worry about
the discrepancy.

Camp leaders told U.S. South-
ern Command chief Gen. Dou-
glas Fraser on Wednesday that
they have ruled out fences but
are debating stepped-up patrols
or other measures to keep aid-
seeking neighbors out.

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THE TRIBUNE




















































i. Investments in Securities

The fair values below represent the chosing bid price established on the last trading day of the
CuETENL reporting period by che exchange on whieh the securities are principally traded
Interest Armortined Fair
Lite Ha rate Euler Maturity Ca Volur
CHE CHF CHF
500,000 Colgaic-Falaive Co ae: (eo S00
SO Mew York Lite Pusding - EMT L126 = IBID 158,430
S0000 HSBC Farince Crop - RMT ETS 12

OLBM)
500,500)
Se60 SET Gari
5000 Caneel Beare Copia Cen GECC 1.79 Kio

M.Ob. 2
106.19
S000 © Koesditanetal Poer Wisderaaf baa ey 304

1ST 3230
500, 2 S720
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S000) Swedih Covered Road Corporation - EMT 113%
Â¥O04 95 412
B00 545 ae 5G
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PRL

SO0000 « Elecinciie de France ITER
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40700 5a
—————————

Included in the amortivad coal of investments in securities on the stanemenct of financial posiben
I aDoTEed Inferest receivable ameunling CHP 39027 (ae: CHP 48611),

General Banking Reserve

The Bank mokes appropriation from retained earings to o gemeral banking reserve for
unforeseeable risks ond future lneses, “The general banking reserve cam only be distributed
following approval by the shareholders in o general preeting

Copital Management
The Bank's objectives when managing capital are

Ta comply with the capital nequinements set by the Central Bank of The Bahamas (the
Central Bank's

To saheguard the Bank's ability to continws as 2 going concer a thal it can continues io
provide reborn Gor its sharehenliers and benefits for other stakeholder: end

To iainldin a sirong capital base to suppent the development of its business

Cupital adequacy and the use of regulatory capital ane monitored by the Bank's monogemesd,
enaploying lechniques desigaed io ensure compliance with guidelines culablished by the Central
Bank. The required information is filed with the Ceniral Bank on a quarterly basis.

The Central Bamk requires cach entity with a public bank ond trust licence woo (a) have
regulatory capital of at least ES (HOM) ad () maintain a ratio of intal regulatory capital te
Tsk phhed ssacls ator above a minimum of 8

The table below sarmariees the Composition af repulasory capital amd) chives the capilal
adequacy ratio of the Bonk os of the statement of finencial position die. The Bank has
complied with all of the externally imposed capital requirements to which ic is subject

7K UME

CHF CHF

Tier 1 captial
Share capital | 3 (4K1,000)
OK Ca)
£700 540

13,091,000)
LEC) 000)

W221

Oeneral reserve
Hel ar Eenpes
Total Tier | capital 40,70540

63740

ALE
Less adjustments to base capital 63,740

Total eligible base cxpltal 43,6760) 158070

Hisk-weighted assets 1h eT 208 1 71
Capital adequacy rath ar 62%

Fair Valoc Estimation of Financial [nstromenis

Financial imiraments olilized by the Bank melode recorded mseis and liabilities shown im the
statement of financlal posiien, a well a¢ items disclosed in this financial statement that
poncipally involve off-balesc: sheet isk. The majority of the Bank"s financial instruments
ence those disclomed in Nome 8. are either ehort-term in nalure or have interest rates that
aulomatically Teset to market on o Peritatec bua. Acoording!y, their catimaled Gar values ure
nol wignificantly different from their carrying values for each major casegory of the Banks
recomded assets. and liabilities. The Gar value of he mvesiments im securities thot ore beld-io
Taibonity O60 3) December 21M? if CAF 5.078400 (0: CHF 5,998,700). Prectous metals
Inchaded in the statement of financial position are aloo measurcd at fair valuc. The fair value of
precious metals represents the chosing bid price established on the last trading day of the
Caren reporting period by the exchange on which the precious metals are principally traded

4 Kom-leh“s wat
ALL your

LEGAL
NOTICES,

call
The Tribune’s
rte
DTD orsaasitoelt

502-2394

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 5C

UK scientist: Aliens

may pose risks

LONDON

BRITISH astrophysicist
Stephen Hawking says aliens
are out there, but it could be
too dangerous for humans to He
interact with extraterrestrial
life, according to Associated
Press.

Hawking claims in a new
documentary that intelligent
alien lifeforms almost cer-
tainly exist, but warns that
communicating with them
could be "too risky.”

The 68-year-old scientist

says a visit by extraterrestri- | month.

als to Earth would be like
Christopher Columbus arriv-
ing in the Americas, "which
didn't turn out very well for
the Native Americans.”
speculates
extraterrestrial life will be
similar to microbes, or small
animals —
advanced lifeforms may be
"nomads, looking to conquer
and colonize."

The Discovery Channel
said Sunday it will broadcast
"Stephen Hawking's Uni-
verse" in Britain next

most

but adds

STEPHEN HAWKING (AP)



Torpedo blast likely sank
warship: SKorea minister

SEOUL, South Korea



AN EXPLOSION caused by a torpedo like-
ly tore apart and sank a South Korean war-
ship near the North Korean border, Seoul's
defense minister said Sunday, while declining to
assign blame for the blast as suspicion increas-
ingly falls on Pyongyang, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Defense Minister Kim Tae-young said an
underwater explosion appeared to have ripped
apart the vessel, and a torpedo blast seemed the
most likely cause.

Investigators who examined salvaged wreck-
age separately announced Sunday that a close-
range, external explosion likely sank it.

"Basically, I think the bubble jet effect caused
by a heavy torpedo is the most likely" cause,
Kim told reporters.

The bubble jet effect refers to the rapidly
expanding bubble an underwater blast creates
and the subsequent destructive column of water
unleashed.

Kim, however, did not speculate on who may
have fired the weapon and said an investigation
was ongoing and it's still too early to deter-
mine the cause.

Soon after the disaster, Kim told lawmak-
ers that a North Korean torpedo was one of the
likely scenarios, but the government has been
careful not to blame the North outright, and
Pyongyang has denied its involvement.

As investigations have pointed to an external
explosion as the cause of the sinking, however,
suspicion of the North has grown, given the

a srl

country's history of provocation and attacks
on the South.

The Cheonan was on a routine patrol on
March 26 when the unexplained explosion split
it in two in one of South Korea's worst naval
disasters. Forty bodies have been recovered so
far, but six crew members are still unaccounted
for and are presumed dead.

The site of the sinking is near where the rival
Koreas fought three times since 1999, most
recently a November clash that left one North
Korean soldier dead and three others wounded.
The two Koreas are still technically at war
because their 1950-53 Korean War ended in a
truce, not a peace treaty.

Also Sunday, investigators said a prelimi-
nary investigation of the front part of the 1,200-
ton ship — retrieved the day before — pointed
to an external explosion.

Chief investigator Yoon Duk-yong told
reporters that an inspection of the hull pointed
to an underwater explosion. He appeared to
support the bubble jet effect theory, saying,
"It is highly likely that a non-contact explo-
sion was the case rather than a contact explo-
sion.”

But he, too, said it was too early to determine
what caused the explosion.

Earlier Sunday, Prime Minister Chung Un-
chan said South Korea will take "stern" action
against whoever was behind the explosion as
the country started a five-day funeral for the 46
dead and missing sailors. Makeshift alters were
set up in Seoul and other major cities to allow
citizens to pay their respect.

GN 1034

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
APPLICATION FOR RENEWAL

OF BUSINESS LICENCES

The Ministry of Finance advises the general public that in accordance
with the Business Licence Act 1980, all business licences expire on
the 31 December and must be renewed on or before January 1st,
but not later than April, 30th. All Applications must be accompanied
by relevant governmental regulatory requirements to be renewed.

First time applicants may visit our office located on Frederick
Street, Frederick House for more information.

Applications for businesses with turnovers of $1,000,000.00 and
turnovers exceeding $1,000,000.00 should be certified by a certified
Public Accountant, registered under the Public Accountants Act.

You are further advised that it is an offence to carry on a business
without a valid Business Licence. On failure to comply with the law,
Section 15 of the Business Licence Act prescribes on summary
conviction, a fine of $10,000.00 or imprisonment for two years as

follows.

*In any year without lawful excuse carries on a business in
respect of which there is no licence in force.

* Fails to apply for a Business Licence.

* Fails without reasonable excuse to furnish any particulars or
information within the time specified by the Secretary for

revenue.

* Makes a false statement in a material particular in any
application for a business licence, or in any other
information furnished under the Act.

* Obstructs the Secretary of Revenue in the exercise of his
functions under this section of the Act.

Additionally, you are advised that officers from the Ministry of
Finance will commence regular inspections of businesses to
ensure full compliance with the Law.

For additional information regarding this matter, kindly
contact our office, Frederick House, Frederick Street, at
telephone (242)325-1171 or the Administrator’s
office in any Family Island.

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ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1





ES INSIGHT SECTION

Another stabbed | a
after car chase

By RUPERT MISSICK

A WOMAN was struck by a
car and killed, and another was
stabbed, after a massive fight
broke out at a gay club.

Female patrons at the Garage
nightclub on Gladstone Road
began fighting inside the estab-
lishment during the early hours
of yesterday morning.

According to police reports,
the battle then spilled out into
the parking lot at about 4am with
a group of enraged women throw-
ing bottles and rocks and pum-
meling each other with their fists.

Soon after, a woman got into a
2008 Toyota Corolla and struck
another female, knocking her
down in the road approximately
100ft from the entrance to the
club.

Witnesses claim the Corolla
then sped off down Gladstone
Road and was pursued by anoth-

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE
TO TECHNICAL ISSUES,
THERE IS NO USA TODAY
IN TODAY'S TRIBUNE









USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

Students’ work
Seat

aS a aa

Woman ced I
jay CHU valle



rN



ABOVE: the Garage nightclub
on Gladstone Road.

RIGHT: The body of the woman
is removed by police.

er vehicle carrying a group of
women.

It is said the Corolla was
chased across the island and even-
tually cornered on Joe Farring-
ton Road where the driver was
stabbed by a person from the pur-
suing car.

The Corolla remained on Joe
Farrington Road while the other
car sped off. It was finally stopped
by police on Yamacraw Road,
and the occupants arrested.

When police arrived at the
nightclub parking lot they dis-
covered the lifeless body of the

SEE page 19

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By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net





RISING star in the Progressive Lib-
eral Party, Melissa Sears, has resigned
her post as vice chairman of the PLP.

Bradley Roberts, PLP chairman, said
he received a resignation letter from Ms
Sears on April 20. The letter did not
indicate the reason for her resignation,
and Mr Roberts said he has yet to speak
with her to gain further insight into her
reason for resigning.

Ms Sears made an impression on the
PLP leadership in 2008 when she deliv-
ered a speech at the party’s convention.
She was voted into office during the
October 2009 PLP Convention.

“Melissa is an outstanding young
woman who has a career in politics. She |.

SEE page 19














Family faced with $150,000 legal debts
after fighting for $100,000 property

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a ten-year battle to
sell four Cowpen Road lots one
family is trying to understand
how they managed to amass
legal debts of more than
$150,000 fighting for property
valued at little more than
$100,000.

Ten years ago, the executors
of the Lockhart estate engaged
the law firm of Arthur D Han-
na & Co (ADH) to handle the
sale of land, owned by the
estate, in the South-Western
Estates Subdivision.

The cash-strapped family
intended to sell the entire five
acres of inherited land, but they
first needed subdivision
approval. The sale of the four
lots, which represented a small

portion of the five acres, was
intended to raise money to pay
for the installation of utilities
and thereby facilitate approval
for the remaining acreage.
Ten years later, several mat-
ters surrounding the con-
veyances are still unresolved.
This prompted one of the estate
beneficiaries, Mavis Coes, to
file an official complaint on
October 20, 2009 against ADH
with the Bar Council. Attached
to the complaint was “the paper
work”, which Mrs Coes said
“explained what happened.”
This followed a previous
threat to make a complaint and
possibly initiate other action,
stated in a July 2008 commu-
nication from attorneys repre-
senting the estate. On January
21 this year, in another letter

SEE page 13

MES OM Uo mIOIe lnm s tT

Bahamas Pharmacy Council



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

IN the wake of contract
signings with six pharmacies,
the National Insurance Board
(NIB) said it is no longer
negotiating with the Bahamas
Pharmacy Council (BPA).

“We are not waiting on a
counter proposal. We actual-
ly met with them more than
six weeks ago. They agreed
to get back to us and they
hadn’t. We signed contracts
with several pharmacies
under the final terms the NIB
is offering,” said Algernon
Cargill, NIB director, speak-
ing of the National Prescrip-
tion Drug Plan (NPDP).

“We met with the BPA



several weeks ago and didn’t
hear from them. As a result
we moved ahead to sign con-
tracts. Those are the terms we
are offering. We are not nego-
tiating at all, We hope more
will join the plan because we
believe it is a good business
opportunity,” said Mr Cargill.

The last hurdle, according
to the NIB, is the completion
of the drug procurement
process. Mr Cargill said this is
expected to be completed in a
few months to facilitate the
expected August launch date
of the NPDP.

The Bahamas National
Drug Agency is assisting the
NIB with the drug procure-
ment process in order to facil-

SEE page 20





with the purchase

of any regular or

large sub.



Mindaria St Paradise Istand



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MISS SUPER MODEL OF THE
BAHAMAS FLOAT PARADE










Local NEWS.........:0ecceese-



BUSINESS SECTION
BUSINESS.....cceeeececeeeeeceeeeeeeeeee P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
INSIGHT SECTION



CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES





REAL ESTATE GUIDE 20 PAGES

A FLOAT parade took to the streets of Nassau on Saturday for the
contestants of the Miss and Li'l Miss Super Model of the Bahamas
competition. The event got underway at RM Bailey Park before head-
ing out into the afternoon sunshine.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Man turns himself
in after seizure
of vehicle parts

POLICE took Delroy — division searched a wooden
Foote, a Jamaican, into cus- green and white house on
tody on Saturday, one day Ida Street North, acting on
after issuing an all points information. They recov-
bulletin for his arrest relat- ered suspected stolen parts
ed to the major seizure of consisting of doors, front
vehicle parts. and rear windshields, head

Press liaison officer lights, air conditioning
Sergeant Chrislyn Skip- units, unused airbags,
pings said officers appealed speedometers, fenders,
to the public to help in rims, bumper covers, and
locating Foote for ques- radiators.
















tioning in relation to the
investigation of allegedly
stolen car parts seized by
police on Friday.

A top police officer said
Foote turned himself in to
the Grove Police station
Saturday night on learning
that the police were looking
for him.

Officers of the mobile

Two arrested
after suspected
Marijuana found

OFFICERS of the
Drug Enforcement Unit
arrested two men aged 23
and 36 after finding a
quantity of suspected
marijuana.

The were detained on

The items were found in
various part of the house,
including being stacked in
the ceiling, and in the yard.

Acting on additional
information, police also
searched a nearby aban-
doned house and found
similar vehicle parts.

Foote is still helping
police with their inquiries.









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yearold man, of Bamboo
Boulevard, being
attacked by a group of
men at Lockhart’s Place,
on Wulff Road. The vic-
tim is in hospital listed in
critical condition.

Man shot in
armed robbery

POLICE are investigat-
ing an armed robbery in
which a 48-year-old man
was shot in the hand and
abdomen.

Sometime around
5.11pm on Friday, police
received information of a
shooting at Sapodilla
Boulevard, Pinewood Gar-
dens.

According to reports, a
48-year old man of
Coconut Grove and a 37-
year-old man from Talbot
Avenue were walking on
Buttonwood Street,
Pinewood Gardens, when
they were approached by
two men who demanded
cash. As they made off
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pair, leaving the 48-year-
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Caymans fights growing crime

WHILE Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade and his newly energised team of
officers make their presence felt throughout
New Providence, the Cayman Islands has
imported British police to help them get their
rising gang-related crime under control as
quickly as possible.

Dependent, like the Bahamas, on its world
image as a safe tourist and financial destina-
tion, Caymanian business leaders fear that
rising crime could damage that image.
According to a Reuters news report from
Georgetown on Thursday, 14 British officers
arrived on the island late Wednesday at the
request of Cayman Police Commissioner
David Baines.

“The murder rate in the small British ter-
ritory, with a population of 55,000, remains
low compared with Caribbean states like
Jamaica,” said the Reuters report. “But the
390-strong local police force has been
stretched since the start of the year by five
murders, a kidnapping, armed robberies and
shootings. Victims included a 4-year-old boy
killed in crossfire.

“Cayman authorities and local leaders in
tourism, financial services and real estate are
worried the spike in crime could damage the
islands’ reputation for safety and security,
which has underpinned its emergence as a
legal domain for many of the world's hedge
funds.

“Tf we can't crack the problem and bring
down the murder rate and restore a much
better level of law and order, in the long
term, it is going to damage the Cayman
Islands,’" the British-appointed governor,
Duncan Taylor, said this month, according to
the Reuters report.

Fearful of losing its attraction — already
crime is affecting the recruitment of foreign
staff for financial positions — Cayman is
determined to get the problem under con-
trol as quickly as possible. “It has to be dealt
with now and we have to deal with it aggres-
sively,” said a developer.

Cayman’s police commissioner has can-
celled all rest days for his force and put them
on 12-hour shifts. Non-essential services were
suspended to boost police visibility on the
streets. Commissioner Baines said it wasn’t
a matter of bringing in a UK SWAT team,
rather it was about “filling in the skill short-
fall we have because our existing detectives
are stretched.”

Although Cayman knows its problems are
not as severe as its neighbours, it is taking no
chances. Compared to its five murders for
the year, the Bahamas has had 26. National
Security Minister Tommy Turnquest said last
week that the international yardstick for mur-
der is five per 100,000. “Assuming a popula-
tion of 350,000 (as is the Bahamas) that
should equate to around 17 or 18 murders a
year in the Bahamas. At 26 murders to date,
we are way over the threshold,” he said. The
Cayman’s population is 55,000.

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Commissioner Ellison Greenslade has also
moved into emergency mode. Armed with a
new police Act, he has outline his five “strate-
gic” crime fighting priorities for 2010. One of
them is to raise the standard of recruits — the
days of compromising a community’s securi-
ty to give a chance to unqualified, and prob-
ably undeserving persons, are over. He will
also demand greater accountability from his
men, and those police officers who are not
doing police work, will be recalled to active
service. He is determined to make our com-

munities healthier and safer.

After studying the hours that most crimes
are committed — 4pm to 8 am - the hours
that the police are on duty will no longer be
exclusively from 9am to Spm. There will be an

active night shift.

Commissioner Greenslade is determined
to have an around-the-clock police presence
in the community. Many of us are already
aware of that presence. We are also aware
that the public is starting to assume its respon-
sibilities of assisting their law enforcement
officers in flushing out pockets of subter-
ranean criminals, who, confident in the silence
of their frightened neighbours, have gone

about their evil ways undisturbed.

Friday’s uncovering of what police believe
is a long-running, well orchestrated car theft
ring, should turn up much information.
Already police have discovered parts of cars
that have been used in armed robberies.

For many years here at The Tribune we
have battled with the police about withhold-
ing information from the public. There were
always two schools of thought in the Force —
those who believed in keeping information to
a minimum so as not to alarm the public, and
those (in the minority) who wanted to share
as much information with the public as pos-
sible, believing that an informed people could
better protect themselves.

At long last we now have leaders of a
Force who realise that the only way to recruit
the public to their crime fighting team, is to
keep them informed. The National Crime
Prevention Office at police headquarters is
making its presence felt. It is keeping the
public informed, not only of crimes commit-
ted, but crime trends and tips to help them
protect themselves and their property. At

long last the public is starting to feel that the
police have their welfare at heart. And in
turn more members of the public are

responding with good, solid information.

With the police and public working in tan-
dem, the criminal will gradually learn that
with the spotlight on him, his safest bet is to
turn himself in. He has already discovered
that there is no longer any place to hide. The
public has had enough crime, and they want
the criminal in the one location built for him

— HM Prison, Fox Hill.

It is now up to the judiciary to get itself
organised and join the team that is deter-

mined to rid our islands of criminals.



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You know something,
Mr Roberts, we ARE
an uncaring country

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have thought a great
deal about Mr. Bradley
Robert’s comments pertain-
ing to the Potcake airlift of
88 unwanted dogs to the
United States recently by
the Grand Bahama Humane
Society. The first thing I
wish to say is kudos to
Grand Bahama Humane
Society for finding a solu-
tion so that the 88 healthy
Bahamians did not have to
be killed because of their
uncaring countrymen.

Now: Mr. Roberts...It
makes us look like an uncar-
ing country does it? Well
you know something? You
hit the nail right on the
head! We are an uncaring
country; in general we do
not care a fig for the animals
in this land.

I can assure you, Mr.
Roberts, that the tourist
does not have to read about
88 dogs being given a chance
by the few who do care, to
think that we are an uncar-
ing nation. No, sir, all they
need to do is walk down Bay
Street or take an island tour
to see the deplorable state
of our animals...some stand-
ing on the side of the street
starving and mange ridden.

The condition of some of
our Surrey horses has been
known to bring tourists to
tears.

Why, Mr. Roberts?

Because we do not care.
And please, Mr. Roberts, do
not make this political.

The truth of the matter is
that nobody has cared or

STITUTE say ITS OTS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is admittedly a long
time since I was trained and
worked as a journalist.
However, this practice of
outing suspects in a police
investigation and discussing
every detail is quite disturb-
ing to me and I wish that the
press would learn to exer-
cise some forbearance. In
fact, I would suggest that it is

still unlawful in The
Bahamas.
I speak now to the story

about the travails of my con-
stituent Sandra McDonald
who according to the press is
to be charged with an
offence in connection with
the death of her 3-year-old
child. I make no comment
on it save that one wonders
if this is not a matter best
addressed by social services

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LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



done anything for years,
regardless of which party
rules. This is an apolitical
issue: this is a moral issue.
Politicians like all too
well, and far to often, to
grab at things that have been
wrong for decades under
both administrations and
then they try and use it as a
platform to get votes. Did
anybody care before Grand
Bahama did something
inventive and successful?
Let’s leave the animals out
of the politics. Let’s just do
what is right. If we were a
nation of responsible animal
owners we would not have
to airlift our dogs to another
country to get the loving and
kind homes they deserve.
And to have to sit and listen
to such sentiments such as:
“Was it within the law of the
land to export these dogs”
and “were permits issued.”
Please spare me, as if all
of a sudden they are some
precious national commodi-
ty, when in actual fact they
were abandoned, or left at
the Grand Bahama Humane
Society with no regard to
their ultimate end. I suppose
it would be okay to kill these
“national treasures” that
you are so concerned about,
but, Oh Gosh don’t let’s

under the carpet, I don’t
endorse doing things that
way.

I am bitterly disappoint-
ed in Mr. Bradley Robert’s
comments. Bitterly disap-
pointed by the sentiments
he expressed...but, Oh so
very proud of the Grand
Bahama Humane Society
who found a suitable solu-
tion to all those poor dogs
that needed homes.

We here in Nassau home
well over 2000 animals a
year, we have more people
on this island to draw on as
good homes.

But still not enough
homes able to take in all the
abandoned and abused ani-
mals that come through our
doors. The bottom line is, if
people cared for their ani-
mals properly we should not
have to home that many.
There is a new law waiting
to be passed. The Animal
Control and Protection
Act... it has been waiting a
very long time to be passed,
hopefully, as it was men-
tioned in the Speech from
the Throne it will be passed
this session.

But all the laws in the
world won’t make enough
difference if we do not ona
whole change our attitude
towards animals, and com-
ments, such as those uttered
by Mr. Roberts, do not
make our work any easier.

KIM ARANHA,

export them. People might
learn the truth! I suppose
some people think that it is
better to sweep the dirt

rather than by the criminal

law.

My concern here is the
sensationalism of the story
written by The Tribune on
23rd April which carried an
interview with Ms. McDon-
ald under the headline: I
DID NOT KILL MY
BABY. No doubt the press
will say: the public has a
right to know and that she

President of the Bahamas
Humane Society,
Nassau,

April 24, 2010



damage it causes to people
who are not public figures.

Increasingly, the main-
stream papers, the papers of
record (Tribune, Guardian
and Journal) have been
engaged in this kind of com-
petition, which I think is
irresponsible.

When you enter a police
lock-up you are told that
you can remain silent but if

being of full age should not
have spoken to them. That
may be so but the more
important question is,
should the press have done
it? Could The Tribune not
be accused of taking advan-
tage of a guileless woman
speaking to them in the
midst of grief, and they rush-
ing to print in the ever ener-
getic effort to beat to the
punch (the pun is intended)
my cousin over at the name-
less down market rag to
print every bit of gossip and
sensation to make money,
in some cases at the expense
of the truth and in most cas-
es without due regard to the

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you say anything it can and
will be used against you in a
court of law. No such pre-
scription is offered by the
journalist, but that does not
mean that the journalist or
the editor should not exer-
cise some responsibility to
know when it is right to pub-
lish something and right not
to do so. In other words,
they ought to know better
and should not have pub-
lished that story, particular-
ly knowing that the woman
was released pending
inquiries.

Let us pray for all the
people who suffer in this
matter: the mother, the
father and our Fox Hill com-
munity. Let us hope that
there is a lesson for greater
good in the tragic loss of a
three year old.

FRED MITCHELL,MP
Fox Hill,
April 25, 2010

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Mother of three-year-old is
released from police custody

THE mother of three-
year-old Sandria
Demeritte, Sandra
McDonald, was released
late on Friday, the same
day she was placed in
police custody for a second
time.

Criminal charges against
Sandria’s parents could be
filed as, according to
police, new information

came to light during the
investigation.

Police are working with
the Department of Social
Services, and are waiting
on the findings of their
investigation to determine
if charges are going to be
brought.

Police say they want to
question Sandria’s father
Larry Demeritte, 50, of

Abner Street.

A neighbour found San-
dria’s body in a car parked
outside the house where
her father lived.

An autopsy revealed she
had suffocated. Parents
say their daughter’s death
was accidental.

Ms McDonald has two
other children, and Mr
McDonald is a father of 14.

Andre Rollins yet to make






PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOPE
By Jamaal Rolle





ZL SHOULD Comecain
ABT GETING

Too Many
COMPLAINTS!

decision on political future

FORMER NDP leader Andre Rollins has not yet made a deci-
sion on his political future.

When contacted by The Tribune over the weekend Mr Rollins
said he was still weighing his options.

“T don’t want to say anything on that just yet. I have made no
decision on that issue,” he said.

FNM leader Hubert Ingraham and former PLP first lady Dame
Marguerite Pindling have held high-level talks with Dr Rollins.

Both have invited him to join their parties.

Dr Rollins, who operates The Bahamas Brace Place, was one of
three "fringe" party candidates to offer for election in the Elizabeth
by-election, along with the Bahamas Democratic Movement's
Cassius Stewart and the Workers’ Party's Rodney Moncur. Mr
Stewart and Mr Moncur received 77 and 16 votes each.

The NDP has been in existence since October 2008 and therefore
the Elizabeth by-election was the first time it put forward a can-
didate for election.

Mr Rollins has denied that he was offered the chance to run in
a particular constituency by either party, as had been reported in
a downmarket tabloid newspaper.

"IT am still a member of the NDP. I am doing a lot of soul
searching. My ultimate objective is to see this country really take



LLINS



off and maximise its potential,” he said.

Demonstration against one-way system planned

BUSINESS owners unhappy
with the change in the direction
of the flow of traffic on Baillou
Hill Road and Market Street
are planning a demonstration
on Wednesday at 7am in
Coconut Grove.

After forming the Coconut
Grove Business League to rep-
resent their concerns, meme-
bers elected Arnold Heastie as
president, and Leana Ingraham
as secretary.

Businesses on Baillou Hill
Road last week called for the
road change to be reversed as

the traffic diversion has already
forced one business to close and
several others to let staff go.

Several other business own-
ers say they have had fewer cus-
tomers over the last four weeks
as drivers no longer pass their
businesses on their way home
from work, and circular traffic
discourages them from diverting
their route south on Market
Street.

The business owners main-
tain they were not consulted
about the change in traffic flow
prior to its implementation

despite the severe impact it has
had on their livelihoods, that
of their staff and the communi-
ty.

The Ministry of Works made
the traffic change to improve
traffic management and flow,
and to improve road safety and
while business owners admit
that it has been a success in that
respect, there has been a drop in
business after road works com-
menced and prior to the traffic
diversion, he asked proprietors
to wait for road improvements
to be completed.







STRUCKUM

Three arrests after handgun fount

TWO women and a man have been arrested by police
accused of having an unlicensed firearm.

Acting on a tip-off, officers of the Carmichael Division
went to Hamster Road, off Faith Avenue, at about 6.30pm
on Saturday to search a silver coloured 2007 Honda
Accord. They recovered a handgun with an unloaded mag-
azine.

Two woman, aged 21 and 23, and a 28-year-old man of
Sapodilla Boulevard were taken into custody.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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LOCAL NEWS

Lights turned off for Earth Day

THE Keep Grand Bahama
Committee observed Earth
Day with a ten-minute lights
off exercise on Thursday morn-
ing. Businesses and residents
on Grand Bahama were invited
to join in a show of solidarity
whilst conserving energy at the
same time.

Along with observing lights
off, all of the island’s primary
schools were invited to submit
Earth Day pledges on behalf
of their various schools. Local
radio stations cooperated with
Keep Grand Bahama Commit-
tee (KGBC) by airing the
school pledges throughout the
day.

“We were extremely pleased
with the schools’ responses to
our invitation. The pledges
received were heartfelt and
meaningful to the institutions
and represented their commit-
ment to protecting our envi-
ronment,” stated KGBC chair-
man, Nakira Wilchcombe.

She also thanked the broad-
casting stations who willingly
offered to assist with the com-
plimentary live reads.

The KGBC committee also
lent a helping hand to the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
who presented Earth Day and
National Coastal Awareness
Month messages to scores of
students gathered on Thursday





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Walter Parker Primary Schools
assembled in the BME gym.

In the days leading up to
Earth Day, KGBC made sev-
eral school visits, including a
visit on Monday to Grand
Bahama Academy of Seventh-
Day Adventists as they sought
to spread their Earth Day mes-
sage. Addressing the students
was KGBC Committee Mem-
ber, Rico Cargill.

“Think of the animals, flow-
ers and trees that make up the
environment — they are alla
part of our eco-system. What
role do you play in protecting
the trees and animals that God
has blessed us with?” Mr
Cargill asked the group.

He further challenged the
youngsters to become
guardians of their environment.
“Here on Grand Bahama we
have a clean environment, one
that’s intact with proper plan-
ning, fresh water and clean air.
Everything we do to our envi-
ronment will come back to
haunt us or future generations
and I think we owe it to them
to keep it clean and pristine for
their future,” Mr Cargill
advised.

Monday also saw the launch
of the new ‘KGBC Talk-in
Trash’ radio hour on Love ’97.
According to Ms Wilchcombe,
“listeners are invited to tune
in every weekday, during the
3pm school drive-time, for tips
on going green, how to reduce,
recycle and reuse, protection
of the environment and much
more.”

Other KGBC initiatives in
celebration of Earth Day
included a no Styrofoam cups
day on April 19, along with car-
pooling and a drive-less lunch
planned for April 29.

Additionally, KGBC seeks
to continue its preservation
efforts with the relaunch of its
aluminum cans recycling pro-
gramme and the initiation of a
‘Keep Grand Bahama Clean
Junior Club’ amongst the
island’s primary schools.

“After reviewing the various
Earth Day pledges received
from our youngsters, we’re
pleased by their eagerness to
become ambassadors for the
protection of our surroundings
and communities,” Ms Wilch-
combe said.

Following are the 2010 Earth
Day Pledges submitted by
some of the Grand Bahama
primary schools:

Freeport Primary School

“Freeport Primary School
pledges to work together and

make every day Earth Day by
recycling, and conserving ener-

St Vincent de Paul

“St Vincent de Paul pledges
to reuse, recycle and dispose
properly so our environment
can be free of debris.”

The Beacon School

“We pledge to keep our
environment clean in sunshine,
wind or rain.” — Mrs Rahming’s
Reception Group

“We pledge from this day on
to be cool and keep our planet
clean.” — Mrs Rolle’s Group

“The Beacon School is keep-
ing Grand Bahama clean and
pristine.” —- Mrs Adam’s Group

“Semple and the Beacon stu-
dents say keep our world clean
to save lives.” — Mrs Semple’s
Group

“Sweeting’s Beacon students
pledge to keep the environ-
ment clean minute by minute.”
— Mrs Sweeting’s Group

Lucayan International
School

“Acting responsibly green to

preserve our. precious
resources.”
Grand Bahama Academy of

Seventh-Day Adventist (Grade
5)

“Grand Bahama Academy
pledges to keep our earth clean
for future generations.”

Mary, Star of the Sea
Catholic School

“We will wisely use
resources, increasing energy
conservation and green-living.”

Freeport Gospel Chapel
School

“Freeport Gospel Chapel
School is committed to con-
serving energy and preserving
our natural resources.”

Sweeting’s Cay All-Age
School

“Sweeting’s Cay All-Age
School pledges to preserve and
protect the environment for
future generations.”

Holmes Rock Primary
School

“Holmes Rock Primary
pledges to:

1) Place trash in the garbage
bins at all times.

2) Conserve power by turn-
ing off lights when rooms are
unoccupied.

3) Conserve water by lath-
ering our hands first and only
turning on the water while
washing.

4) Reduce paper wastage by
using all pages in our note-
books and using both sides of
loose sheets.”

Tabernacle Academy Pri-
mary

1) “We pledge our allegiance
to the earth, we morally
promise to do everything in our
power and might to enhance,
conserve and protect our envi-
ronment and the earth.”

2) “We at Tabernacle Bap-
tist Christian Academy pledge
our loyalty to preserving, con-
serving and protecting our
earth from this day forward.
One Body, one earth.”

McClean’s Town Primary
School

1) Surrounded by the ever-
green: We pledge to keep
McClean’s Town clean.

2) I, McClean’s Town Pri-
mary, pledge to be a cleaner,
greener Me.

Hugh W Campbell Primary
School

“Enjoy Nature’s Beautiful
space — Leave No Trace.”

Free Town Primary School

“Free Town Primary pledges
to preserve and protect our
beautiful Bahama land.”

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Well known Grand

Bahama resident dies

: waiting for the insurance company to wind
: down, a former employee claimed yesterday.

Tributes paid to Florence Edden

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Florence ‘Ma Flo’ Edden,
the matriarch of the Smith’s Point settle-
ment, has died at the age of 95.

Mrs Edden was the oldest resident of
that small community and was two months
away from her 96th birthday.

She is known for her significant contri-
bution to tourism, particularly the devel-
opment of community tourism at Smith’s
Point, where she welcomed thousands of
visitors to her White Wave Club, and even
welcomed them into her home.

Smith’s Point has experienced remark-
able success in community tourism and is
avery popular spot for visitors and locals,
still today.

In a statement released today, the Min-
istry of Tourism paid tribute to Mrs Edden
and extended condolences to her family
and the Smith’s Point community.

Legendary

“The tourism sector today observes and
mourns the passing of one of Grand
Bahama Island’s legendary citizens, Flo-
rence ‘Ma Flo’ Edden of the community of
Smith’s Point.

“Having contributed significantly to the
development of the Grand Bahama
tourism brand by warmly welcoming thou-
sands of visitors into her community and
entertaining them by sharing stories about
our cultural traditions.

Mrs Edden was a favourite of numerous
visiting travel writers, and repeat visitors
over the decades.

“She will be remembered for laying the
ground work in Smith’s Point for what is
internationally recognised as heritage, cul-
tural and community tourism. We extend
sincere condolences to her surviving rela-
tives and the members of the Smith’s Point
Community. May her soul rest in peace,”

the statement read.

Mrs Edden was synonymous with
Smith’s Point. She ran a successful club,
the White Wave Club, and a bakery. She
raised 10 children after her husband died
in 1968.

Her son, musician Audley Edden,
describes his mother as a teacher, a caring
person who loved people, and a commu-
nity leader.

Answer

“When I was 15 years old my father died
and so I basically learned everything from
Ma Flo, he recalls. She had an answer for
every situation you could be in.”

“She taught us the Bible, how to scull
the boat, catch crawfish, how to live right
and how to care for people and take care
of our own family.

“She took care of people from all over
the world and there were times when we
would say ‘Mama you can’t just pick up
people and put them in your house,’ but
she was a caring person who enjoyed help-
ing people because she was in the service
business,” said Mr Edden.

“She was very concerned about the peo-
ple coming and being entertained and she
was a very good Billiard player — she
showed the ladies how to play and beat the
guys,” he recalled.

Mrs Edden retired 10 years ago, leaving
the club and bakery to the children.

Mrs Edden also made significant con-
tributions to the community by donating
property for construction of the St Jude’s
Anglican Church and the Church Hall in
Smith's Point.

Mr Edden said his mother was a promi-
nent member of the community.

“Smith’s Point is a family community
and there wasn’t anyone older than ‘Ma
Flo’ here in Smith’s Point. Almost any-
thing that happened in Smith’s Point went
through Ma Flo, she was the anchor of
the community,” he said.

NDP criticises Ingraham, Christie over BEC

THE National Develop-
ment Party has criticised
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and PLP leader
Perry Christie for prevent-
ing the former Public Util-
ities Commission, now the
Utilities Regulation and
Competition Agency
(URCA,) from properly
regulating BEC.

The party claims this lack
of oversight is allowing the
corporation to impose a
five per cent rate hike on
their consumers.

“At a time when thou-
sands of Bahamians are
unemployed and even
more under-employed, and
when thousands have had





their electric supply dis-
connected, the National
Development Party finds it
unacceptable that Bahamas
Electricity Corporation
(BEC) would seek to
impose a rate hike. The
Bahamas is perhaps the
only country in the world
whose utility regulator, by
law, is only allowed to reg-
ulate its telecommunica-
tions sector,” the party
said.

Firearm and marijuana
found in house search

POLICE recovered a firearm
and a quanity of marijuana
while searching a house on Sat-
urday night.

Officers of the Southern
Division made the discovery
while executing a search war-
rant at a home on Moore Ave,
off Palm Beach Street.

A 14-year-old boy and a man
aged 35 are helping police with
their inquiries.

share




your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

N

HUBERT INGRAHAM

The party believes that
if BEC is sufficiently trans-
parent, the Bahamian peo-
ple will realise that for far
too long they have been
paying the bill for com-
mercial and preferred cus-
tomers who are given ben-
efits that ordinary Bahami-
ans do not enjoy.

“Political interference



PERRY CHRISTIE

has been a perpetual thorn
in the side of the efficient
operation and management
of public utilities in The
Bahamas for decades. As
a result they are all over-
staffed and inefficient, a
product of the Pindling era,
perpetuated and sustained
by the two protégés,” the
NDP said.

Claim that cars and homes lost while

employees await CLICO wind down

MANY of the 144 employees who lost their
jobs after the closure of CLICO Bahamas in
January 2009 have lost cars and homes while

The company needs approximately $3 mil-

lion to settle their obligations to the staff but that
: may be long in coming as to date the company’s
: liquidation has been slow and complex.

One former CLICO employee told The Tri-

bune he was still owed more than $28,000 from
: the company.

While he has been unable to find work since

; the insurer closed its doors, the Grand Bahama
? native, who wanted to remain anonymous, was
: able to secure a loan from family members to
: Start a business.

However, this was not enough to save him

from financial ruin. He has had to take his chil-
: dren out of private school in Freeport and place
:; them in public school in Nassau.

He was also forced to move into a small apart-

ment in New Providence while his house in
: Grand Bahama is up for sale.

“T’m $22,000 in arrears for my house and to be

: honest I blame this situation on how the liqui-
dation is being handled. They should have given

the employees their severance and then work
out the pensions later but the agents did not
stick together,” he said.

The former employee said many of his former
colleagues feel as if there is no big rush to have
the matter resolved.

He said: “They told the judge they need $3
million to pay the staff, The liquidators are tak-
ing so long.

“The unfortunate reality about this situation
is that when the insurance companies debts are
paid, former CLICO employees are further
down the list than they would like to be.”

Craig Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez accoun-
tant and partner, in an April 15, 2010, report to
the US Bankruptcy Court in the southern district
of Florida, warned that the liquidation of CLI-
CO (Bahamas) and its CLICO Enterprises affil-
iate would be "complex", due partly to poor
record keeping at the latter.

CLICO (Bahamas) liquidators have criti-
cised the poor bookkeeping at entities that
received more than $80 million of the insolvent
insurer's funds, hitting out at the lack of coop-
eration from its Trinidadian parent and warning
that "substantial funds" passed through the com-
pany without benefiting it or its policyholders.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

0
USCC



URSA TICK UCM ICON

ANDROSIANS are being
encouraged to pursue agricul-
ture as the catalyst for diversi-
fying the economy, thereby
keeping “a significant portion
of the tourism dollar at home”.

“The millions we use to
import items are a good indica-
tion of what can be earned anda
good estimation of the impact
agriculture can have on the
economy,” said Edison M Key,
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BSIC)
executive chairman.

Mr Key was a featured speak-
er at the first Andros Business
Outlookheld at Stafford Creek’s
Love at First Sight Lodge.

Organised by The Counsel-
lors Limited, the forum featured
leading Andros business people
interacting with political lead-
ers and service providers.

They included Tourism and
Aviation Minister Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux, Nation-
al Insurance Board director
Algernon Cargill, National
Museums executive director Dr
Keith Tinker, Bahamas Ferries
CEO Khaalis Rolle, conserva-
tionist Pericles Maillis, and
Tourism’s sustainable develop-
ment office manager Peter Dou-
glas.

Also present were North
Andros and the Berry Islands
Member of Parliament Vincent
Peet, Andros chambers of com-
merce presidents Edmund Rah-
ming and McKallan Stubbs, and

REAL ESTATE

Bahamas representative for the
Inter-American Institute for Co-
operation in Agriculture (IICA)
Dr Marikus Alverez.

Mr Key spoke on BAIC’s
role in facilitating and support-
ing entrepreneurs for the sus-
tainable development of
Andros.

BAIC is mandated to stimu-
late, facilitate and encourage
agricultural development and to
expand and create opportuni-
ties for Bahamians to partici-
pate in the country’s economy,
he said.

Although the Bahamas has a
resident population of just over
350,000 persons, often over-
looked are the 5 million tourists,
he noted.

“We incur an annual food bill
of some $500 million to support
our residents and tourists,” Mr
Key observed. “The challenge
of feeding 5 million 350,000 peo-
ple gives the government the
opportunity to use agriculture
as a catalyst for growth and
development and reduce our
food bill substantially.”

As a result, BAIC has
embarked on a number of pro-
grams targeting the removal of
constraints that prevent North
Andros farmers from taking
advantage of those opportuni-
ties.

While North Andros farmers
have been producing quality
products, they were having
problems marketing them.

Over the past three years,

BAIC has brought top New
Providence buyers to Andros to
meet with farmers and conduct
fruitful trading.

BAIC has also been address-
ing some of the constraints on
the production side of the indus-
try.
And, it has provided for the
services of an experienced tech-
nical manager, qualified in ani-
mal and plant production, and
who has the ability to acquire
new technology and transfer it
to the farmers, said Mr Key.

With greenhouse technology
which is not common in the
Bahamas, farmers can grow pro-
duce of the quality that is
required for some upscale mar-
kets.

“To remove this constraint
BAIC is in the final phase of
bringing in two greenhouses of
different designs and providing
an expert to teach farmers for
one season how to grow various
crops in greenhouses,” said Mr
Key.

Through the transfer tech-
nology BAIC is showing farmers
how to improve production and
quality from tree crops through
various irrigation systems.

“BAIC is in the final phase
of bringing in three irrigation
systems and installing them on
farms so we can demonstrate to
farmers what can happen with
orchards that are irrigated,” he
said.

As mutton is a $6 million
industry in the Bahamas, he



HARDER THAN IT LOOKS






|

Business Outlook, admires production.

said, animal husbandry can be
“a very lucrative business in
Andros.”

“BAIC is in the process of
assisting some of the BARC
farmers in renovating their pas-
tures with the planting of the
most nutritious tropical forages
available thus increasing feed
availability and quality,” said

Mr Key.

BAIC is providing the
improved genetic potential of
the Boer goat to farmers in
order to maximize production.

“T am of the view that
through BAIC we can signifi-
cantly impact unemployment
and increase the standard of liv-
ing in Andros and the



Gladstone Thurston/BIS

ONIONS ARE IN SEASON in North Andros. BAIC executive chairman Edison M Key, in town for the Andros

Bahamas,” he said.
“Therefore BAIC will con-
tinue to seek to eliminate the
production and marketing con-
straints as they relate to agricul-
ture so that current and prospec-
tive farmers can further take
advantage of the opportunities
available in feeding 5 million
350, 000 people,” said Mr Key.

Machinery & Energy Limited

Your Authorized Caterpillar Dealer!

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By MIKE LIGHTBOURN When comparing against similar
properties, it’s not just the final price
that counts. Appraisers may also factor
in any “incentives” offered (when
Known), such as renovations to be com-
pleted before the home goes on the
market. Their appraisal will show the
value of the property before and after
the renovations.

Perhaps the most important factor
that lenders review in an appraisal is
the closing dates of the “comparables”
(other homes by which yours is mea-
sured).

However, be warned that when mar-
kets change, today’s sale price may be
completely irrelevant tomorrow.

If you’re planning to sell, express
your concerns about the appraisal process to
your Bahamas Real Estate Association apprais-
er, who will offer explanations and suggestions
for improving your report’s results.



April 3", 2010.

AS A real estate appraiser for
more than 40 years, I’m questioned
from time to time about my valua-
tions.

When this happens, the owner
invariably feels his home or prop-
erty is worth more.

Owners often attach an inflated
value on their home. And why
shouldn’t they? After all, this is their
haven; the place of many happy
gatherings and memories.

But in the world of real estate,
the value of a home is based on a
myriad of factors - not one of them
tied to emotion.

Let's look carefully at the process.

The location, number of bedrooms and bath-
rooms, square footage and overall condition of
the home will all come into play, along with any
defects.

Defects may include outdated plumbing, a
worn kitchen or environmental issues, such as
noise.

As we discussed recently, neighbouring homes
in disrepair can drag your property’s value down

NASSAU
Tel: (242) 323-5701
Fax: (242) 323-5700

Website: www.me-ltd.com



Comments or questions? E-mail me at
ask@ColdwellBankerBahamas.com.

E is for Excellence.

Tip of the Week - It’s important to keep your

by as much as 20 percent. The present econom-
ic conditions come into play, the number of

properties on the market, etc.

own home in good repair. It’s not cheap to main-
tain a house, but the value can decline greatly if

you allow it to get run down.

The appraiser will compare your home to

those that have recently sold in your neigh-

bourhood.

Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell

Banker Lightbourn Realty.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



New hi-tech Blood Mobile
to collect donations from
around the Bahamas

THE two local blood banks
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital and Doctors Hospital
have received a new hi-tech
Blood Mobile destined to trav-
el around the Bahamas and
family islands to collect dona-
tions and ultimately save lives.

All of the blood collected
from donations will be shared
equally between the two local
hospital blood banks.

The “Rotary Clubs of the
Bahamas Blood Mobile” came
to fruition by a joint fund-rais-
ing effort by the Rotary Clubs
of The Bahamas, District 7020,
Rotary Clubs of Florida, Dis-
trict 6980, Rotary Clubs of
Georgia, District 6900 and the
Rotary International Founda-
tion which was funded by a
matching grant from Rotary
International and was one of
only 16 such competitive
grants provided worldwide this
year.

The project enables Rotary
to present a fully-equipped
vehicle for the two hospitals
to work together for the ben-
efit of both blood banks and




the country. Rotary will also
serve as a catalyst to provide a
new dynamic for getting blood
donations.

The unique custom-vehicle
built by specifications from
OBS Inc. in Ohio, the Rotary
Clubs of the Bahamas Blood
Mobile was driven through
Georgia and Florida to pay a
visit to the Rotary Clubs that
participated in the funding.

The first of its kind in the
Bahamas and District 7020,
the Rotary Clubs of the
Bahamas Blood Mobile is des-
tined to save lives, one drop
at a time through the efforts of
Rotary and the local hospital
blood banks.

Designed to host blood dri-
ves in Nassau and through the
family islands by ferry service,
the Blood Mobile will reach
more of the Bahamian’ popu-
lation to collect blood and pro-
vide education about healthy
living.

Currently there is a national
blood shortage in the Bahami-
an community. According to
the World Health Organiza-

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LOCAL NEWS

HOSPITAL STAFF in front of the new Blood Bank.



tion (WHO) standard, the
country should collect blood
from five per cent of the pop-
ulation. The required needs
for the Bahamas would be
16,000 pints each year. Unfor-
tunately, the local blood banks
only collect 5,000 pints each
year.

The results of the national
shortage equates to prolonged
hospital stays, delayed surg-
eries, people being treated
without the required units of
blood, cancer patients unable
to receive necessary replace-
ments, and ultimately persons
dying from inadequate sup-
plies.

Also, there are no reserves
in the event of a disaster or
mass casualty.



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Friday, Apr 30, 2010

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 15



TLLLTG

Write On - a joint feature between the Ministry of



O24

Education and The Tribune - this week features
the work of Alyssa Iferenta, Harrison Newell,
Cajiah P Bethel and Chloe Campbell

Old Fort
Bay Beach

By ALYSSA IFERENTA



At Spm some Sundays my broth-
ers, parents and I drive say 15 min-
utes in a black Toyota Camry to
the uplifting and clean Old Fort
Bay Beach.

With its cool daiquiri making
restaurants upstairs, the beach’s
white sand and transparent water
makes it the best beach ever. When
you first step foot on this refreshing
beach, breeze from the ocean flows
into your eyes and tiny grains of
sand run through your little toes.

When you finally look up, the
sun sets on the horizon line blend-
ing yellow, red, blue and orange
together.

The soothing tide is so low you
could walk out to the edge of the
earth on it. While running down
the hill, you start to cover yourself
in sand.

The next thing you hear is the
“Wosshhh! Wosshhh! ” of water
pulling you in. Splash! Finally I can
taste the salty water. Swimming out
of control towards the little caves,
the sound changes to crab legs run-
ning in and out of holes quickly.
As it begins to get dark you run up
to the top of the sandy slope where
a warm and fuzzy towel waits for
you. The Old Fort Bay Beach is
the best beach on the island.

It refreshes you in almost all the
ways you can think of.



Why shouldn't

we cut
down trees?

By HARRISON NEWELL





You should never cut down
trees. Trees provide us with
thousands of things like medi-
cines, fruits, shelter, shade
and, most importantly, oxy-
gen. Trees are homes to many
different animals like squir-
rels, red-eye tree frogs,
snakes, sloth, birds, jaguars,
anteaters, termites and Kuala
bears.

The oak tree, for example,
can grow up to about 100 feet
tall. There are certain trees
that can grow only in certain
environments. If people cut
down these trees, we will nev-
er see how tall it grows. This
is why we should not cut
down trees.





Immunisation coverage
for MMR ‘jumps’ by
almost eight per cent

IMMUNISATION coverage for
measles, mumps and rubella
improved to 98 per cent in the
Bahamas in 2009, Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis said.

The figure represents a 7.5 per
cent increase over the years 2004-
2006 when the statistics dropped to
a little under 90 per cent and is
three per cent above the recom-
mended Pan American Health
Organisation (PAHO)/World
Health Organisation (WHO) stan-
dards for vaccination coverage.

Dr Minnis said overall coverage
for routine vaccinations had
remained greater than 90 per cent
from the years 2001-2003 before
the drop-off in the aforementioned
three-year period.

His disclosure came as health
officials continue preparations for
the observance of Vaccination
Week in The Americas, which will
take place from April 26 to May I.
The Bahamas will join 43 other
countries worldwide in observing
the week.

Vaccination Week in the Amer-
icas (VWA) is an unparalleled
effort led by countries of Latin
America and the Caribbean to
strengthen the Expanded Pro-
gramme on Immunisation (EPI)
in the Region by reaching popula-
tions with otherwise limited access
to regular health services, and at
heightened risk of contracting vac-
cine-preventable diseases.

More than 288 million individu-
als “across the age spectrum” have
been vaccinated as a result of the
initiative since its inception in
2003.

Dr Minnis said efforts to elimi-
nate measles, mumps and rubella
from the Bahamian landscape

“The last recorded case of polio was
more than 30 years ago, while the
last reported cases of diphtheria
and tetanus neonatorum, were
reported more than 10 years ago.”



began in 1997 and again in 2003.
He said “significant achievements”
have been made in the control of
vaccine-preventable diseases in the
country.

“The last recorded case of polio
was more than 30 years ago, while
the last reported cases of diphthe-
ria and tetanus neonatorum, were
reported more than 10 years ago,”
Dr Minnis added.

Dr Minnis said the country has
registered a “steady decline” in
other vaccine-preventable diseases
as a result of ongoing public health
measures.

He said the Expanded Pro-
gramme on Immunisation, which
was implemented in the region and
The Bahamas in the late 1970s,
continues to produce positive
results for the country.

The Health Minister said the
Government of The Bahamas has
supported and continues to sup-
port the vaccination programme
through the provision of free vac-
cinations for targeted, vulnerable
populations.

“Additionally, there is also a
requirement of a completed vacci-
nation record for entrance into

Dr Hubert Minnis

pre-school, primary school and
The College of The Bahamas,”
The Minister of Health added.

He said while childhood vacci-
nation has been a “great public
health achievement” and while the
development and widespread use
of vaccines has led to the reduction
or eradication, of once-common
childhood diseases, the viruses and
bacteria that cause vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases and death still
exist, and “can be passed on to
people who are not protected by
vaccines.”

“Regarded as a ‘best buy’ public
health intervention, vaccination
has been responsible for almost
one-quarter of the reduction in
mortality rates in children under
five years of age from 1990-2002
and is now believed to have even
more far-reaching impact insofar
as the economy, educational out-
comes and more years of produc-
tive life,” Dr Minnis said.

“In recent decades, The Ameri-
cas — including Latin America and
the Caribbean — with support from
the Pan American Health Organi-
sation (PAHO), have made extra-
ordinary progress in providing




VITAMALT




IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

By CHLOE CAMPBELL

—<

I am just like you@= |
in

— |



I am a refugee you see,

people in the world have a place to sleep but not me.

I travel hard, I travel long,
but no country accepts us refugees.

My mind is open to whatever I shall do,
to make them realise that I am just like you.
I travel over land and sea, to see where I can just be me.

Nowhere to go

By CAJIAH P BETHEL



No where to turn

A world with nothing No where to go
A world with only you Nothing to learn
A world without a purpose to Who am I?

you You might ask

No where to hide

A refugee is my task.





cA

ia 1
ae ,





Sx

MINISTER OF HEALTH Dr Hubert Minnis

children with protection against
basic, vaccine-preventable dis-
eases,” the Health Minister added.

Dr Minnis said influenza vacci-
nation will be a major focus during
Vaccination Week of the Americ-
as 2010 globally as more than 26
million persons will be targeted
for vaccination.

He said during the week, the
national administration of the



AHINI Vaccine will continue as
part of a week-long vaccination
outreach that has been scheduled
for the R M Bailey Park, begin-
ning Monday, April 26.

“All individuals, families and
communities are encouraged to
avail themselves of recommended
adult vaccinations at this time,
including the AHINI Influenza
Vaccine,” Dr Minnis added.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





e First
= iy





APRIL 21, 22, 23, 2010
Wyndham Nassau Resort Crystal Palace
Rain Forest Theatre

SHOWTIMES

11:30 a.m. (Matinee) & 7: 30 p.m (Evening)
Matinee Show includes Transportation &

BOX OFFICE

Beverage Depot - Mall at Marathon
Burns House - John F. Kennedy Drive
Bahamas Wines & Spirit - Shirley Street











TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM








THE TRIBUNE PAGE

0

MONDAY, APRIL 26,





SOOTrTS

OTs

BASKETBALL
NPBA CHAMPIONSHIP



GAME one of the New Providence Basketball
Association’s best-of-five championship series
will get underway tonight at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

The series will be played between last year’s
runners-up Commonwealth Bank Giants against
former champions Real Deal Shockers.

The Giant, coached by Perry Thompson, will
rely on a well-rounded squad that is headed by
Michael ‘Ferly’ Bain, Mark Hanna and Jeremy
Hutchinson.

The Shockers, coached by James Price, will
counter with his squad that includes Carvin Cum-
mings, Corey Williams and Amon Baker.

Game two of the series will be played on
Wednesday with game three and four on Friday
and Saturday respectively.

TRACK
PRIMARY SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS

THE New Providence Primary Schools Inter-
School Track and Field Championships will take
place from Wednesday-Friday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Stadium.

Retired Olympian Pauline Davis-Thompson
will be on hand to give the keynote address at the
opening ceremonies on Wednesday at 9 a.m. The
competition will continue throughout the day.

The action will pick up on Thursday and Friday
at 9.m.

VOLLEYBALL
JUNIOR DEVELOPMENT

The New Providence Volleyball Association
has extended an invitation to all junior and senior
high school male and female athletes to partici-
pate in their development program. The pro-
gram is geared towards the development and
enhancement of volleyball skills at the junior
level and is free to all interested persons.

The development program commenced on
Wednesday, April 14th and will be held every
Wednesday and Friday from 6 - 8:30 p.m. and
Sundays from 4 - 7 p.m. over at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.



Jodge Journ

Starts at:



16
ca



TWO OF RONALD ‘SMOKEY’
MARTIN’S top students, purple

belt Shady and black belt Terrible

T, perform a Stick Kata at the
Mall at Marathon on Saturday.

Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Bahamians excel







overseas





ROStv ie PHONE: 322-1722 FAX: 326 - 7482

ta,



2010



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

URDLER

Nejmi Burn-

side, high

jumper Trevor
Barry and the men’s 4x400
metre relay team headed the
list of Bahamian performances
over the weekend at two pres-
tigious track and field Relay
meets.

Competing at the Penn
Relays in Pennsylvania as a
lone representative for St.
Andrew’s High School, Burn-
side turned in the fastest time in
the high school boys’ 400 hur-
dles in 53.37 as he easily won
the second of three heats.

The time ended up as the
fastest of all from the field of 23
athletes that also included three
other Bahamians.

Two of them competed
against Burnside with Jerome
Stuart of Queen’s College fin-
ishing eighth in 59.19 and
Keiron Forbes of Anatol
Rodgers ninth in 69.22. Kieran
Forbes, also from Anatol
Rodgers, was ninth in heat one
in 64.13.

Stuart ended up 19th overall
and the Forbes occupied the
final two spots in 22nd and
23rd.

The men’s 4 x 400 relay
team, still waiting on the out-
come of the positive drug test-
ing of American LaShawn Mer-
ritt to determine if they will

receive any medals from his
winning performances at the
last World Championships and
the Olympic Games, had to set-
tle for second behind the Unit-
ed States in the USA vs the
World Men’s 4x400 relay.

The American team of David
Neville, Jamaal Torrance, Ber-
shawn Jackson and Angelo
Taylor won in 3:00.60. The
Bahamian team of Nathaniel
McKinney (45.8 slit), Andrea
Williams (45.4), Ramon Miller
(45.88) and Chris ‘Fireman’
Brown (45.44) was second in
3:02.55.

Another US team came in
third in 3:02.64, followed by
Jamaica in 3:03.40 with the
Dominican Republic taking
fifth in 3:04.30.

The Bahamas was to have
also entered a team in the USA
vs the World Women’s 4 x 400
relay, but they didn’t get to the
starting line.

The Americans, anchored by
Allyson Felix, took the victory
in 3:26.12, while the Jamaicans
with Shericka Williams on
anchor, was second in 3:27.72.

In the USA vs the World
Women’s 4 x 100 relay, the
Bahamian team of Tavannia
Thompson, Chandra Sturrup,
Jernise Saunders and Shaketa
Henfield, didn’t finish. There
was no indication as to exactly
what happened.

The American team,
anchored by Carmelita Jeter,
took the victory in 42.74, while
the Jamaican team, anchored
by Shelly-Ann Fraser, had to
settle for second in 41.94.












TREVOR
BARRY, of

the Bahamas,
looks to clear
the bar during
the men’s spe-
cial high jump
at the Drake
Relays athletics
meet,
Saturday, April
24, 2010, in

| Des Moines,

lowa.

A couple of teams, benefiting
from an initiative by the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations, also com-
peted on Saturday’s final day
of competition.

In the High School Boys’ 4x
400 relay, St. Augustine’s Col-
lege team of Stephen Hepburn,
James Carey, Darryl Higgs and
Earl Rahming ran 3:23.96 for
10th out of a field of 12 in their
heat. Another heat saw Moores
Island team of Peron Davis,
Laron Hield, Anton Davis and
Elroy McBridge from Abaco,
take fourth place in their heat
in 3:24.16. Anatol Rodgers’
team of Ulysses Hinsey, Clen-
ero Neymour, Rashad Gray
and Hakeem Brown were 11th
in 3:33.40.

Meanwhile over at the Drake
Relays at the Drake University
in Des Moines Iowa, at least
three Bahamians were in action
led by Trevor Barry.

In the men’s high jump, Bar-
ry cleared 2.21 metres or 7-feet,
3-inches for a second place fin-
ish. The event was won by Kei-
th Moffat, representing Nike,
with 2.21m or 7-3.

Michael Mathieu, competing
for Adidas, was third in the
men’s 400 in 46.16. The win-
ning time was 45.08n by Greg
Nixon of ASICS. Trinidad &
Tobago’s Renny Quow was sec-
ond in 45.69.

And Tia Rolle, a sophomore
from Lincoln University, was
eighth in the women’s 100 in
12.18. The race was won by
Tiffany Townsend, a junior
from Baylor, in 11.60.



(AP Photo
/Charlie
Neibergall)



Mm BARCELONA OPEN BANCSABEDELL ATP WORLD TOUR 500 TOURNAMENT

Knowles and Hewitt fall just short

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net



MARK Knowles finally played in his first final

for the year.

But he and his substitute partner Lleyton

US Open crown in 2000
with Max Mirnyi.

Also on the website,
Zimonjic was quoted as
saying:

“It’s been a great week
here. I’'ld like to congratu-

Hewitt from Australia fell short at the Barcelona
Open BancSabedell ATP World Tour 500 Tour-
nament on Sunday.

The unseeded duo, playing together for the
first time, lost to the top ranked team of Daniel
Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from Ser-
bia in set scores of 4-6, 6-3, 10-6.

Knowles, 38, was unavailable for comments,
but he was quoted on the ATP World Tour as
saying:

“Congrats to Nenad and Daniel. I thought we
had a good chance today, but they’ve been on a
great run in the past few weeks and they came
through.

“T want to thank Lleyton for playing with me
this week. He’s a legend of the game and he
almost took us to the title this week.”

Hewitt, who owns a home at Old Fort Bay
where he reside, was playing in his first doubles
final since Scottsdale in 2003 and he was looking
forward to winning his first title since winning the



late Lleyton and Mark
too. They’ve had a great
week and it was a really
| tough march today, but
somehow we got
through.”

It was the second con-
secutive victry for Zimon-
jic and Nestor as they won
the Monte-Carlo over Mahesh Bhupthi and Max
Mirnyi.

Knowles, who reached the historic 700 win
plateau in the quarter-final, was hoping to win his
third Barcelona title, having won the previous two
with Nestor in 2004 and 2006 just before they
ended their 11-year partnership in 2007.

The last two years Knowles teamed up with
Bhupathi, whom he relinquished his connection

SEE page seventeen



MARK KNOWLES

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 18, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS









RECUPERATING: Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams.





The Tank’ getting ready to
return to the ring after crash

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FIVE months since he was
sidelined from a near fatal car
accident, heavyweight Sherman
‘the Tank’ Williams is now
recuperating and getting ready
to get back into the ring.

Williams, 37, will be heading
to Munich, Germany on Friday
where he will join the training
camp of World Boxing Coun-
cil’s champion Vitali Klitschko
from the Ukraine for two
weeks before he spends anoth-
er two weeks in Austria.

“They have agreed to help
me get back in shape and also
see their sports medical doctor
for the five herniated discs and
the L 3, 4 and 5 in the lower
back and 7 and 8 up top. I also

had some head and face injuries
when I hit the top of the roof.”

The Grand Bahamian, who
was travelling along with his
wife, Michelle, on Sunday,
December 6 on their way from
Church in Vero Beach, Flori-
da, was hit at a stop light by
another driver who was texting
on his phone and didn’t stop.

“He caught on the rear left
driver side and I just started
working out in the gym about
two weeks ago,” Williams said.
“T was doing physio-therapy
from January.

“T’ve already completed four
months of therapy and I’m pro-
gressing very well.”

During his recuperation,
Williams had to turn down two
fights that had been lined up
by his management team on
January 18 and March 20, the

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT atts

latter in Key West, Florida, the
same venue where he was
forced to withdraw after he suf-
fered a hand injury last year.

“Since September, I had two
contracts that I wasn’t able to
fulfill because of the accident,”
he said. “My last fight was in
October in Germany and that
broke my losing streak that I
had for about 3-4 years.

“TI felt the decision was
upside down. It could have
gone either way. I guess if we
had fought in the Bahamas, the
scorecard would have been the
same, but for me. But I got over
that and I was in the gym train-
ing until I got involved in the
accident.”

In that fight on October 10,
2009, Williams lost a 10th round
decision to Manuel Charr at the
Stadthalle, Rostock in Meck-
lenburg-Vorpommern, Ger-
many.

That was his last fight, but
Williams said he’s looking for-
ward to fighting again on June

been my most difficult months.
In January, I could barely walk.
I could barely move,” he
recalled. “But I started therapy
in January and I was progress-
ing.

“But the biggest problem for
me since February was the sta-
tic nerve that resulted from the
herniated disc. The right side
of my leg would have some
excruciating pain in my ham-
string, calf and knee. My right
foot would actually go dead
because I didn’t have any bal-
ance.”

Williams said he was advised
to have back surgery, but he
ruled it out because he just did-
n’t want to get back in the ring
for a short period of time. He
opted to go to Doctor Zim-
merman Sports Therapy in
Vero Beach where he’s been
getting treatment on his back
every Thursday for the last six
weeks.

“T think it’s a blessing and
it’s been working for me where



NOTICE
CORRIDOR 12
EAST STREET

ROAD WORKS
Phase 1

I was able to get back into the
ring two weeks ago,” he said.

3.
Cc Cc “January and February have

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES
S.A would like to inform the motoring public that road
works will be carried out on a section of East Street
effective Thursday April 29, 2010 for approximately six
weeks.



The works include the road widening of the existing two
lane carriageway to four lanes. Milling of the existing
pavement, installation of drainage facilities, utilities,
asphalt pavement, street lighting, sidewalks, traffic signs
and road markings will be constructed in this phase.

Family Island
Regatta wraps up

THE 57th National Family Island Regatta wrapped up on
Saturday night after four days of competitive competition in
Elizabeth Harbour, Georgetown, Exuma.

Among the overall winners were Rupeert’s Legend from
Long Island in the A Class. The Lonesome Dove captured
the B Class, while the C Class champion was Bareley Legal.

There was also a junior segment that was staged on Sat-
urday with the Termite emerging as the winner.

A number of dignitaries were on hand for the regatta,
including newly appointed Governor General Arthur
Foulkes and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles
Maynard. Committee chairman Danny Strachn said they
were quite impressed with what they saw, not only from the
60-plus boats that participated, but from the large crowd of
spectators on hand.

¢ Complete results of the regatta are expected to be pub-
lished in another edition of The Tribune this week.

Lens of

Access will be granted to the business places, pedestrians Cone Spacing: 10 ye
& residents. Proper signage will be erected delineating Lane
the work zone. Please be advised that the following
accesses onto East Street will be permanently closed and
motorist/pedestrians are required to seek an alternative

to their destination:

Soeed Dorrier

e ASHLEY ROAD

© WENTWORTH STREET

Lene Cleed Borrier

Your patience throughout this project is greatly
appreciated and we apologize for the inconvenience
caused.

For further information please contact :



Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
Office:(242)322-8341/322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.ar

The Project Execution Unit
Ministry of Works & Transport
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs

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LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

is an outstanding orator and
has her hands around the issues
facing people. She believes in
people and has committed her-
self to helping the least among
us. Her decision does not mean
her political life is over or her
relationship with the PLP,”
said Obie Wilchcombe, West
End Member of Parliament.
Ms Sears endorsed Mr Wilch-
combe for deputy leader of the
party when he contested the
seat last year.

“She was the bright star of
the (2008) convention and
demonstrated then her tremen-
dous oratory skills and her pas-
sion for people and her
courage and determination as a

FROM page one

woman hit by the car. She was
wearing blue shorts, a white T-
shirt and a green button-down
shirt.

Officers do not know as yet if
she was involved in the fight, and
up to press time they were reluc-
tant to classify her death as a mur-
der. The woman had a deep gash
on her forehead and a compound
leg fracture. Police do not know if
the head injury was caused during
the fight or after she was struck by
the car. The woman who was
stabbed was taken to hospital and
allowed home after treatment.
Her injuries are not known.

Yesterday, the parking lot was
still spotted with blood and lit-
tered with bottles, stones, cloth-
ing, handbags, high heel shoes
and costume jewellery. Huge
stones were left in the road in
front of the club as well.

While police were still inter-
viewing a number of people up
to press time, they admit to being
baffled as to why things at the
club got so out of control. Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings, police press
officer, said officers are investi-
gating to see if the parking lot
death and the stabbing are linked.

She added: “We have located a
blue 2008 Toyota Corolla which is
believed to be the vehicle
involved in this incident. At pre-
sent, police are questioning a
number of persons.

“Police responded and discov-
ered the lifeless body of a female
clad in blue short pants, white T-
shirt and a green shirt. At pre-
sent it is uncertain as to what may
have happened, however, we are
investigating.”

Melissa Sears

fighter, which is required in
front line politics,” said Mr
Wilchcombe.

Ms Sears had been touted as
a potential candidate for the
PLP in Marco City, Grand
Bahama. This seat was for-
merly contested by Pleasant
Bridgewater, against the
FNM’s Zhivargo Laing.

Ms Sears grew up in Marco
City, but Mr Wilchcombe said
she would be a qualified can-
didate for a number of Grand
Bahama constituencies.

He said she had never writ-
ten to the party to express

interest in being a candidate,
or applied formally. However,
the party had been trying to
encourage her.

“We have over the years
sought to convince her to be a
candidate. There comes a time
when a party must recruit and
look for the best and the
brightest and she has proven
that she is prepared to serve
and not to be served. So she is
one of those persons who we
certainly would love to see car-
ry the banner and be a stan-
dard bearer,” said Mr Wilch-
combe. “I believe this might
be considered by some a bump
in the road or a step backward,
but I don’t see it that way.”

OAKES FIELD

(ACROSS FROM THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS)

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Congratulates the
Scotiabank Defenders Volleyball Club

on their 2009/2010 accomplishments!



L- Rt Stasding: Shenwaine Achuss icocapbais, dues hitter), Mlorigomery Ferguecs (riddia blecoer), in Pare (outeade
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fiberoi right side hitler), DeVinoe Smith jooechrsetier| and Bary Naim (Asst Coach! setter). L -A Kneeling: Maurice
Smith (ier! ublity Payer] and Hecior Role (middie Blocke],

Wissing: Ronald Qunoombe [outsede hitler), Chauncey Googer (middie blocker! outside hitter}, Endiench Rahming

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 19

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Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

Memorial/Funeral Service For

Jane Fitzroy
Butler Bethel, 92

\ Memorial Service
| for Jane Fitzroy Butler
Bethel O.B.E., 92

| of #44 Nassau Street will be held

| on Wednesday, April 28th, 7pm at

“=| St Mary The Virgin Parish, Virginia

} Street. Rev Angela Palacious will
officiate.

Funeral service for the late
Jane Fitzroy Butler Bethel, 92

of #44 Nassau Street will be held on Friday, April 30th, 10:30am
at St Matthew’s Anglican Parish, East Shirley Street. The
Rev’d Fr. Dwight M. Bowe will officiate. Interment will be
made in Ebenezer Methodist Church, East Shirley Street.

She is survived by her daughters, Rubie Marie Nottage, Dr
Pamela Etuk, Dr Paulette Bethel, Marion Bethel and Paulette
Rahming; her sons, Dr Marcus Bethel, Michael Bethel and
Owen Bethel; her sister, Halson Butler; her adopted sister,
Hattie Sweeting; eighteen (18) grandchildren, eight (8) great
grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Wednesday from 11am to
6pm and on Thursday from 10am to 6pm.

**There will be no viewing at the church.



PAGE 20, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

NIB no longer negotiating with
Bahamas Pharmacy Council

FROM page one

itate the “transfer of knowl-
edge” to the NIB. Mr Cargill
said over the next year, the NIB
would be able to manage the
process.

Some industry sources said
they thought the end of year was
the more likely time for all out-
standing matters to be sealed.

More than 90 per cent of pri-
vate pharmacy owners are rep-
resented by the BPA. Members
met on Thursday night to dis-
cuss a counter-proposal being
prepared for submission to the
NIB. It was at Thursday’s meet-
ing some members learned a
few of their colleagues already
signed contracts with the NIB.

According to a report pre-
pared by consultants on behalf
of the BPA, discussion points
include subsidies for the instal-
lation of IT infrastructure, and
IT maintenance responsibilities.
The BPA is also negotiating an
average mark-up of 77 per cent,
according to association corre-
spondence.

Thursday’s meeting followed
a March meeting between the
two negotiating parties, during
which the NIB asked the BPA
to form a sub committee to




Did you know thal you can pay your “Balat

bring back recommendations,
said Dr Marvin Smith, BPA
president.

“We anticipated these sort of
statements would come out but
we understand that this govern-
ment is interested in the success
of the programme at that pri-
vate pharmacies are the key
stakeholders. So we are sure the
government, as has been proven
in the past, will look toward hav-
ing a collaborative effort,” said
Dr Smith.

Lowe’s Pharmacy and the
People’s Pharmacy are the only
BPA members signed on so far.
Lowe’s has more than five New
Providence facilities and asso-
ciated facilities in the Family
Islands, but only signed con-
tracts for two (Town Centre
Mall and Soldier Road loca-
tions). The People’s Pharmacy
signed up their Prince Charles,
Carmichael Road, and Soldier
Road locations, according to a
NIB release.

The other pharmacies are
Betande Drugs on West Bay
Street and the Walk-In Clinic’s
Centreville location.

The NIB has been making

THE TRIBUNE

daily calls and emails to some
pharmacy owners “making them
feel they are going to be left
out”, according to an industry
source, who also said NIB is an
insurance company and doing
what they do best.

The BPA reiterated last
week, it was not its intention or
role to endorse or reject the gov-
ernment’s proposal, but to “pro-
vide a forum for reasonable dia-
logue and the presentation of
evidence and discussion on the
matter.”

Towards that end, they have
led discussions with the NIB to
empower members with suffi-
cient information to make an
informed business decision on
the NIB deal. BPA members
were recently informed by exec-
utive members not to panic. Dr
Smith said this has been his mes-
sage from the beginning.

“We understand that in our
society sometimes people tend
to get rushed. All we are saying
to our members is things are
progressing, don’t feel like for
whatever reason people need to
push you into doing A or B,”
said Dr Smith.



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Cable to
‘untie' TV

emi Matos



* BISX-listed firm going 100%
digital, impacting 60% of
customers, to comply with
regulator

* Keeping returns to Cable as
chair

* URCA decides enough
competition in retail/international
leased lines

* BTC to eliminate international
call charges for cell customers

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas has started
an 18-month initiative to
upgrade all customers to a 100
per cent digital platform in a
move to comply with regulato-
ry requirements that it “untie”
its broadband Internet and pay-
TV products for all existing and
new clients, in a bid to elimi-
nate competition/Significant
Market Power (SMP) concerns.

In its final ruling on the SMP
obligations to be imposed on
Cable Bahamas and the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC), the newly-
constituted telecoms sector reg-
ulator, the Utilities Regulation
& Competition Authority
(URCA), said it had consid-
ered several variations of the
likely remedy “to address Cable
Bahamas’ current practice of
tying pay-TV and broadband
Internet services”.

These variations had
involved unbundling the prod-
ucts for all Cable Bahamas’ cus-
tomers; untying for all cus-
tomers who requested it; and
unbundling for new consumers
only. Cable Bahamas had
“made high level proposals”
itself for complying with the
regulator’s requirements,
including using filters to ‘untie’
all new broadband Internet
subscribers for its Coralwave
service only, and “digitization
of the network that will allow
for untied services for all broad-
band customers only”.

In its final ruling on the issue,
URCA said: “URCA believes
that competition will be best
promoted, and thereby fur-
thering consumers’ interests
and welfare, by ensuring the
united services are available to
all customers. Accordingly,
URCA has decided to impose
an obligation on Cable

SEE page 2B



MONDAY, APRIL 26,



2010

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia.net

Hotels '1/2 way to full
recovery’ by year-end

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamian hotel indus-
try should be “at least 50 per
cent of the way” to returning
to pre-2008 Wall Street crash
numbers by year-end if it main-
tains current performance
trends, the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s (BHA) president
telling Tribune Business the
organisation had made several
proposals to mitigate the
impact of any rise in electricity
tariffs.

Commenting on the Nas-
sau/Paradise Island hotel sec-
tor’s performance for March
and the 2010 first quarter, dur-
ing which room revenues
increased by 16 per cent and
6.7 per cent respectively,
Robert Sands said that while
the trend was positive, the
industry was “not prepared to
hand our hats yet” on the
notion that consistent improve-
ment would be seen through-
out the remainder of 2010.

“T think they were fairly close
to our forecast position for
March,” Mr Sands said of the
data released last week by the
Ministry of Tourism and BHA.

“The results achieved were
by and large our forecast posi-
tion.”

He acknowledged, though,
that there was “no question”
that the joint Ministry/industry
Companion Fly Free promotion
had made a key “impact” on
the Bahamian tourism indus-
try, in terms of attracting visi-
tors and enabling hotels to
achieve the numbers they had
during the 2010 first quarter.

However, this initiative cou-

* Industry hopes ‘stand-by generation rate’ and
‘deposit interest’ proposals to mitigate BEC rate
rise impact ‘don't fall on deaf ears'

* Largest Bahamian industry ‘not ready to hang
hats’ yet on continued improvement through

2010

* Business acquisition costs rise, as room
revenues still more than 30% down on 2008

levels

ROBERT SANDS



pled with other marketing/TV
promotions by individual
Bahamas-based hotels meant
that “acquisition costs” to bring
tourists to this nation had
increased year-over-year for
many Bahamian properties.
The BHA president said that
while first quarter trends were
expected to continue, the sector
— the largest private sector
employer in the Bahamas —
remained “cautiously opti-

mistic”. “We need a sustained
period of growth,” Mr Sands
told Tribune Business. “The
foundations are taking hold, but
it is still too early to say it will
continue through the rest of the
year. I think it will, but we’re
not prepared to hang our hats
on that particular point yet.

“We want to see continued
improvement, positive trends
year-over-year. We want to see
improvement that gets us back
to 2008 levels, not so much
2009. I think that by the end of
this fiscal year, when we see the
type of results we will have
achieved, I think we will have
made at least 50 per cent of the
inroads to getting back to that
level. We’ll be half-way there
by the end of the year if we
continue on this particular
trend.”

Mr Sands, who is also Baha

SEE page 4B

Climate change to cost Bahamas
$200m-$620m in next 15 years

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Climate change impacts will
cost the Bahamas between
$200 million-$620 million in
the 15 years to 2025, an Inter-
American Bank Develop-
ment (IDB) report has esti-
mated, due to the fact that
some 80 per cent of this
nation’s landmass is within
five to six feet of sea level.

This is one factor why the
IDB’s 2010-2014 country
strategy for the Bahamas is
focusing on infrastructure
development, coupled with
increasing this nation’s capac-
ity to adapt and adjust to
future events such as climate
change.

“Eighty per cent of the
country’s landmass lies within
five to six feet of mean sea
level,” the IDB report, a copy
of which has been seen by Tri-
bune Business, said. “Esti-
mates of the potential impacts
of climate change on the
Bahamas range from $0.2 bil-
lion to $0.62 billion by 2025.”

And the IDB added: “The

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bank will complement its
focus on infrastructure with a
programme of technical sup-
port geared towards enhance-
ment of the country’s adap-
tive capacity and resilience to
the effects of climate change.”

To aid this goal, the IDB’s
2010-2014 country strategy for
the Bahamas is focusing on

SEE page 5B

* IDB aiming to ensure
40% private sector
participation in road
maintenance by 2014

* Also wants to double
private airport managers
to four from current two
* Public transport
‘disorganised' and service
‘below level expected' in
modern economy

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FamGuard outlook ‘negative’
on fears over mortgage woes

* But fellow BISX-listed firm and life/health insurer,
Colina, suffers no such downgrade despite similar A. M.
Best concerns

*FamGuard chief says 8% mortgage defaults below
banking industry average

* Blames CLICO, economy and rating agency pressure for
problems

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



Family Guardian’s level of mortgage delinquencies is
below the Bahamian banking industry’s average at 8 per
cent, its president told Tribune Business, after the BISX-list-
ed entity suffered an outlook downgrade to ‘negative’ over
the issue.

This was despite A. M. Best, the leading international
insurance credit rating agency, reaffirming a ‘positive’ out-
look on Family Guardian’s leading Bahamian life and health
insurance rival, Colina Holdings (Bahamas) and its Colina
Insurance Company subsidiary, even though it expressed the
same mortgage delinquency concerns in relation to Colina’s
loan portfolio. A. M. Best gave no reason for the different
outlooks assigned to the two Bahamian life and health
insurance giants, both of which are publicly listed. It reaf-
firmed both as having an ‘A-‘ and ‘a-‘ financial strength
and issuer credit rating, but the outlook discrepancy is like-
ly to be viewed — in the short-term at least — as something of
a feather in Colina’s cap, and a factor it can exploit via
marketing initiatives. In its assessment of Family Guardian,
A. M. Best said the ‘negative’ outlook “reflects Family
Guardian’s high concentration of mortgage loans relative to
total equity of the company, and the continued delinquen-
cies attributed to the current weak economic environment.

“A. M. Best is concerned that Family Guardian’s geo-
graphic concentration of business risk, and the competitive
and mature life insurance marketplace in the Bahamas,
coupled with a deteriorating mortgage loan portfolio and
inherent risks associated with the group division led by
BahamaHealth, could lead to potential challenges to income
and capital going forward”.

Patricia Hermanns, president of Family Guardian and
its parent, BISX-listed FamGuard Corporation, told Tribune
Business that the rating agency’s actions and comments
reflected more on the prevailing economic environment in

SEE page 7B









NIB contribution rates

slump to 3-5% in Andros

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net





COMPLIANCE with National Insurance Board (NIB) is as
low as 3-5 per cent in some Andros settlements, the social
security system’s director has revealed.

Algernon Cargill said the compliance rate in Andros, by
both employers and the self-employed, was more than unsat-

SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

FROM page 1B

Bahamas to implement unty-
ing for all customers, with the
technical details of complying
with this obligation to be deter-
mined by Cable Bahamas.”
Hence the BISX-listed com-
pany’s announcement late last
week of its digital platform roll-
out, which Tribune Business
understands will first begin in
Fox Hill. Cable Bahamas’ press
release alluded to this initia-
tive’s connection with URCA’s
‘untying’ requirement, stating



Cable

that it “satisfies” the regulator’s
requirements, although no
details were provided.

The initiative will impact
some 60 per cent of Cable
Bahamas’ existing cable TV
subscriber base, since some 40
per cent already have digital
set-top boxes and receive their
signals digitally, rather than via
the analogue method. It is tan-

LEGAL NOTICE







NOTICE

International Business Companies Act.

COIXEM LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act. (No. 45 of
2000), COIXEM LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution is 26th June,
2009,

R. Clive. Moore (Liquidator)
Octogone Fund Management Limited
P.O. Box SP-63157
No. 3 Offices at Old Fort Bay
Western Road
Nassau, Bahamas








OFFICE LOCATED

SUMMERWINOS PLAZA

TONIQUE WILLIAMS HIGHWAY
NASSAL



tamount to a full reconfigura-
tion of Cable Bahamas’ net-
work. Cable Bahamas now has
two months to submit details
of its ‘untying’ plan to URCA,
including the investment cost,
business plan and consumer
terms and conditions. The
investment could well add sev-
eral million dollars to the
BISX-listed company’s cost
base, and the ‘untied’ broad-
band Internet offer is to be
made available to both existing
and new consumers.

Anthony Butler, Cable
Bahamas’ president and chief
executive, was guarded when
speaking to Tribune Business
on the issue last Friday. He
said: “We’ve come a long way
from the original position that
URCA had back in September.

“There are a couple of items
that we will be working on with
URCA in the near future. We'll
engage in those efforts in the
same manner that we have
done in the last six months, and
hope to come to a positive con-
clusion.” He added: “They
[URCA] threw everything into
the pot — the put everything in —
last September, and we have
now go to the point where it’s
[the new SMP regulatory
regime] fairly applicable to
Cable Bahamas as a player in
the sector. “We fully support
the new Communications Act.
The opportunities will be good
for the consumer, and it should
be good for operators in the
sector.”

Meanwhile, with the 30.2 per
cent buyout of Columbus Com-
munications’ former control-
ling stake in Cable Bahamas

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now completed, there is a new
face in the chairman’s seat to
replace Brendan Paddick, who
remains a director of the latter.

Cable Bahamas is ‘Keeping’
the post with a return to its
past, with Philip Keeping, the
company’s founder, ex-chair-
man and former Columbus
Communications head return-
ing to the role he relinquished
some six years ago when he
sold the latter entity to Mr Pad-
dick. It effectively marks Mr
Keeping’s Bahamas comeback,
and effectively completes the
‘full circle’ in terms of his Cable
Bahamas involvement.

URCA, for its part, has
reversed its position on includ-
ing retail and wholesale lines
that are leased at the interna-
tional level (lines that are
leased from providers such as
Cable Bahamas and BTC by
other operators/customers) for
international connectivity,
deciding not to include them in
its SMP designations.

It made this decision largely
based on the presence of
Columbus Communications,
which does not have a control-
ling interest in Cable Bahamas
any more, and its 90 per cent-
owned ARCOS I network.
Cable Bahamas’ broadband
services use only 10 per cent of
ARCOS’s capacity, while BTC
uses only 1.37 megabytes per
second of bandwidth.

Cable Bahamas also uses
only 45 per cent of Caribbean
Crossings’ Bahamas Internet
Cable System (BICS) for
broadband Internet and data
traffic, with a small portion
leased to Systems Resource



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Group (SRG), while BTC only
uses 12 per cent of the capacity
on its Bahamas II cable.

“The existence of Columbus
Communications, a third party
provider of wholesale leased
lines who does not compete in
the retail market for leased
lines in the Bahamas, means it
should be possible for com-
petitors to BTC and Cable
Bahamas to acquire capacity
on reasonable terms, resulting
in a reduction of the potential
barriers to entry to the retail
market,” URCA said.

“A new entrant should be
able to choose from Cable
Bahamas, BTC or Columbus
Communications to secure

THE TRIBUNE

would then have the option to
resell on a retail basis....
“URCA believes that com-
petition identified in wholesale
international leased lines may
result in competition emerging
in retail international leased
lines.” As for BTC, URCA has
mandated that it eliminate
charges imposed on its cellular
customers for incoming inter-
national calls by June 30, 2010,
informing all clients of the
change. The 100 per cent state-
owned incumbent must also
“comply with a national price
averaging obligation”, charging
the same price for the same ser-
vice/product regardless of
where the customer is located

leased line access, which it in the Bahamas.





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2000







COMMON LAW SIDE
No.374







BETWEEN





BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff





AND
ATLANTIS MARBLE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

First Defendant








AND
BERKLEY EVANS






Second Defendant




AND
MIKE P. ROUSSOS





Third Defendant







SUMMONS

LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before Deputy
Registrar, Tabitha Cumberbatch, of the Supreme
Court, Supreme Court Building, Bank Lane, Nassau,
The Bahamas on Thursday the 29% day of April,
A.D., 2010 at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon for the
hearing of an application on the part of the Plaintiff
for an Order for leave to enter Judgment in Default
of Appearance against the Third Defendant pursuant
to Order 73 of the Rules of the Supreme Court for
the amount claimed in the Statement of Claim with
interest, as therein claimed and costs.

TAKE NOTICE that a party intending to oppose this
application or to apply for a stay of execution should
send to the opposition party or its Attorneys to reach
them not less than three (3) days before the date
above mentioned a copy of any Affidavit intended to
be used.

Dated this 20" day of January, A.D., 2010
REGISTRAR

This Summons was taken out by Messers. Gibson,
Rigby & Co., Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaintiff.

Temple Christian High Sehoot

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2010 - 2011
School Year.

Journalism / Literature (Gr. 10-12)
Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-12)
Math (Gr. 7-12)

Physics (Gr. 10-12)

Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)

Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)
Chemistry

Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
Health Science (Gr. 7-9)

General Science (Gr. 7-9)
Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
Music (Gr. 7-12) -

Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr. 7-12)
Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)

Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)

Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)






Applicants must:



A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of
Temple Christian School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or University in
the area of specialization.

. Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

. Have at least two years teaching experience
in the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.

. Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE
levels.

. Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full

curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph and
three references to:
Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is May 3rd, 2010
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 3B



a =~ =~
Bamboo Shack 'could become KFC of Bahamas'

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

The Bahamian market pro-
vides fertile ground for fran-
chises of major international
brands to succeed, according to
organisers of a franchising
workshop for Bahamian entre-
preneurs.

With the growth of the
Bahamian consumer market
and inflow of over four million
annual visitors to the country,
brand consciousness is expand-
ing, said workshop organiser,
Andy Thompson, who is also
the founder and president of
the US-based National Associ-
ation of Black Hotel Owners,
Operators and Developers
(NABHOOD).

Mi Bahamas seen as ripe for franchise success

He said the franchising indus-
try held great potential to cre-
ate jobs, not just for franchisees
but also for the “litany of other
business that are there to sup-
port their concept,” such as
legal consultants, technical per-
sonnel and other service
providers. More than 80
Bahamians participated in this
weekend’s workshop, both as
attendees and guest presenters.
It was a precursor to the antic-
ipated end of summer event,
Bahamas Franchise Summit,
which is also being organised
by Mr Thompson.

“The workshop was well and
enthusiastically attended. There
is an interest in business oppor-

tunities particularly, in the
down market, where the spirit
of entrepreneurship seems to
be very high in the Bahamas,”
said Mr Thompson.

The workshop specifically
targeted Bahamians to intro-
duce them to more franchising
opportunities in light of the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) development,
although it was a part of a wider
conference for the Travel Pro-
fessionals of Color (TPOC).

Bahamian entrepreneur
Tyrone Nabbie, a presenter at
the workshop, is already a ben-
eficiary of the expansion work
at the Sir Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

His Bahamian flavour fran-
chise, Kafe Kalik, recently
opened a new branch in the
departure lounge. This is one
of three other locations in the
US and the Bahamas. Mr Nab-
bie is the owner of several US
franchises, including the Nas-
sau-based Outback Steakhouse,
Bennigan's, Sbarro, Miami
Subs, Nathan's and several oth-
ers. “As a franchise owner it is
critical to set a base for building
your own brand. The systems
and standards are in place, the
models and work ethics (are in
place), to build your own brand.
Having access to these systems
allowed me to build my own
brand; it gave me the operation

The Annual General Meeting

of
Bahamasair Employees
Provident Fund

will be held on

Tuesday, May 20th, 2010
at

The Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied
Worker’s Union Building
Worker’s House
at 7:30 pm

Important matters, including the External Audit Report
for 2009 will be discussed.

All resolutions for proposed amendments to The
Declaration of Trust should be submitted to the Fund
Administrator, in writing on or before 7th May, 2010.

Only resolutions received on or before this date will be
presented at the AGM.

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the

following position:

Bodyguard

The incumbent serves as Executive Bodyauard of the Chief of Mission.
Protects the Chief of Mission portal-to-portal fram the threat of terrorism or

other acts of violence.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

U.S. High School diploma or Bahamian equivalency. Fool
Bahamas Police Force College or Royal Bahamas Detense Force
Training or U.S. Military or US. law cnforcenvent experience Is

required.

Ten (10) years of experience in Police, Defense Force law
enforcement or specialized security 1s required

Must be familiar with the city of Nassau, Freeport and the Cut
Islands in The Bahamas. Must also have knowledge of historical
and current events that could aftect the security of the protectec.

Must have the ability to be trained in the use of various firearms

and be eligible to obtain appropriate legal permits to authorize the
carriage of a firearm in the performance of their duties. Must alsa
have refined social skills and commensurate etiquette knowledge

to interact with high-level dignitaries

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The suceessful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S, citizens whe are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application formes are available online at:

hittn.nassau.usembassy cow

All applications are to be submitted via e-mail to the Human Resources

Omce:

Email: poiticrraneystate cov or fermanderrat state. gov

Deadline: May 4, 2010.

Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of the Embassy,



job _ opportunites html



Franchise start-up costs as low as $6k

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIANS are being encouraged to leverage franchise
opportunities to grow a small business, some which can involve as
little as $6,000 in initial start-up costs.

Jerry Crawford, president of Jani-King, one of the 10 largest US
franchises, said his business offers several levels of start-up, with
$6,000 being the lower level to franchise his commercial cleaning
business. "We have small, medium and large franchise opportu-
nities,” said Mr Crawford. "When our owner started the company,
he decided he wanted anyone to have an opportunity to have the
franchise as long as they wanted to work hard."

President and chief executive of the National Association of
Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers (NABHOOD),
Andy Ingraham, said the franchise identity brings a tried and
proven system that is designed to succeed.

He said that was the reason for hosting the Bahamas Franchise
Workshop this past Association (IFA), the Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce, the US Embassy, the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company, the Entrepreneur Venture Fund Ltd and HVS.

A press release for the workshop said franchising has become the
dominant method for the creation of wealth. Mr Ingraham and US
Ambassador to the Bahamas, Nicole Avant, agreed that Bahami-
ans have an exciting opportunity to create and own a small business
through franchising, and said many US firm are eager to partner
with Bahamians. "It is very important to the Embassy to stay
focused on this and remain committed, but most importantly to
make sure that American businesses know that they are support-
ed when they are here and that we will do are best to make sure
that the Bahamian business folk and American business folk con-
nect at the best level and highest level possible," said Ms Avant.

Mr Ingraham added that there were several successful fran-
chises operating in the Bahamas, and several currently being
developed. He said franchise owners understand that the Bahami-
an economy has for a long time outpaced many Caribbean coun-
tries. "Franchising has become the dominant method for the cre-
ation of wealth through small business ownership. Once known for
restaurants, today franchising is used by over 85 industries includ-
ing a wide range of consumer and business to business services (in)
retail, hospitality, health, recreation and many more,” said the
release.






template to succeed,” said Mr
Nabbie. The Bahamas has sev-
eral examples of successful
franchise operators, said Mr
Thompson, who named Eileen
Pinder and Gershan Major as
examples, among others.
“When you look at the success
of Bamboo Shack locally, based
on their expansion across the
island that is good opportunity
for a franchise concept. They
have some good systems down
and they could become the
KFC of the Bahamas,” said Mr
Thompson.

Gershan Major, the Cham-
ber of Commerce vice-presi-
dent, is the chief executive and
master license holder for the
Mailbox Etc franchise for the
Caribbean region. He advised
participants that a franchise is

M

r

“not a turn-key business in a
box” and requires a lot of sweat
equity and real equity.

“Two things happen when
you look at joint ventures. They
are designed to bring the
strength of all parties together.
In the case of Bahamians, it is a
great opportunity to find addi-
tional capital and expertise to
seal the deal in any competi-
tive bidding situation,” said Mr
Thompson. “I think for most
Bahamians one of the issues
that face them is the inability
to network with potential joint
venture partners. While this
was a success sand a great start,
our goal is to encourage them
to attend more meetings inter-
nationally and to explore more
ideas beyond the Bahamians,”
he said.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

FROM page 1B

Mar’s senior vice-president of
governmental and external
affairs, emphasized that there
was still “a lot of uncertainty
out there”. The Bahamian hotel
industry, he said, still had to
navigate the relatively slow
summer months, and had “the
nuances of hurricanes to over-
come”.

Then there was the state of
the US economy, the key mar-
ket for the Bahamian
tourism/hotel industry, gener-
ating 85 per cent of its customer
base. “There’s a lot of uncer-
tainty out there that impacts
our ability to move forward,”
Mr Sands said. “The volcano
in Iceland had an impact on our
ability to continue growth lev-
els, but such is life. That’s the
nuance of our industry.”

Demand for Bahamian
hotels and tourism is largely a
derived demand, especially dur-

Hotels

ing a recession, being highly
dependent on consumer confi-
dence in employment and
income levels in their home
countries. This factor is largely
out of this nation’s control,
highlighting one of its key eco-
nomic weaknesses, given that
tourism is forecast to account
for 61 per cent of Bahamian
gross domestic product (GDP).

“There are many factors we
can’t control,” Mr Sands said.
“The one good thing we are
hoping for is that there contin-
ues to be a sustained improve-
ment in the generation markets
for our business. One US
employment increases, we will
return to a level of normalcy.
We will not get back to busi-
ness levels as they were two to
three years ago. It will still

remain challenging. Hotels are
spending more to attract new
business. Acquisition costs for
business are much more costly
than last year.”

The demand for travel need-
ed to return, Mr Sands said,
along with group bookings,
which had not returned to pre-
recession levels yet. Both fac-
tors were key to a Bahamian
hotel/tourism economic recov-
ery, Mr Sands said, adding:
“Group bookings are key to
hotels having a book of busi-
ness which they can grow on.”

Meanwhile, faced with an
increase in the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s (BEC)
basic tariff rate by July 1, 2010,
which is estimated at an aver-
age 5 per cent, Mr Sands said
the BHA and wider hotel
industry had proposed a series
of measures they hoped would
be implemented to ease any
impact on the sector.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW

NOTARIES PUBLIC

Carol D. Misiewicz & Simone A.
Morgan-Gomez are pleased to announce the
formation of their partnership for the practice of

law effective 1* April 2010. The firm will continue
to practice under the name of MISIEWICZ & CO.

We also advise that Simon E. Darville is an

Associate in the firm.

Chambers, Suite No.7

Grosvenor Close and Shirley Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel. 242-328-0396 Fax.242-328-1388
Email: misiewicz.chambers@gmail.com

www.misiewiczlaw.com

aa
f irre)
. Vee ey

Lge ae |

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

wishes to announce that applications are now being
invited from all qualified members who wish to be
considered for recommendation as candidates for
the seats to become available on either the Board of
Directors or the Supervisory Committee at the 33rd
Annual General Meeting to be held on Saturday May

22, 2010.

All members interested in serving in either capacity
should collect an application form from any office of
the Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited offices in Nassau, Freeport,
Abaco or Mangrove Cay Andros.

The qualification for each post is available upon

request.

Completed applications, along with the other
information requested should be returned to any of
the offices on or before the close of business on
Friday April 30, 2010.

All Resolutions must also be submitted by Friday

April 30, 2010.

Any application, not fully completed or without the
requested supporting information, or received after
the aforementioned date will not be eligible for

consideration.

“TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

SERVING THE WHOLE BAHAMAS”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



“Any increase in costs to our
sector we believe is not war-
ranted at this point in time. We
will be making some recom-
mendations as to how to
address these costs,” the BHA
president said, adding that they
hoped the proposals did “not
fall on deaf ears”.

The BHA is proposing that
the import duty rates on ener-
gy-efficient equipment and
products be lowered or elimi-
nated, “especially” if hotel
properties are using energy-effi-
cient practices.

The organisation is also rec-
ommending “stand-by genera-
tion rates”, which would allow
Bahamian hotels to switch to
this power production method
“if we get beyond certain levels
of peak demand”. Peak
demand, the BHA said, could
be looked at more frequently
during the year.

Mr Sands said another rec-
ommendation was “increasing
the amount of interest on the
[BEC] deposit that is paid back
to the company over a period of
time”. He added: “These sav-
ings should help to mitigate
against any rate increase going
forward. We believe we have

some recommendations that
will help us mitigate against any
level of increase. We hope
these ideas do not full on deaf
ears.”

As for hotel industry employ-
ment, and recovering the sev-
eral thousand jobs lost in late
2008 and 2009, Mr Sands said
this would be “directly related
to business demand”. While the
sector had not been adding any
jobs in substantial numbers, nor
had it been shedding any
beyond normal attrition rates.

Returning to pre-September
2008 business levels is a key
benchmark for the Bahamian
hotel industry, since while the
2010 figures year-to-date have
been ahead of 2009, they are
up against very weak compara-
tives. For March, the
BHA/Ministry of Tourism data
showed that the 14 major New
Providence hotels achieved an
average 77.6 per cent occupan-
cy rate, compared to 69.7 per
cent in 2009, a rise of 7.9 per-
centage points.

This resulted in a 9.3 per cent
increase in room nights sold
and, combined with the $16
increase in average daily room
rates (ADRs) from $269.14 to

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE
SNOWDEN late

OF FRANCIS JULIAN
of Unit 3?

in Silver Point

Condominium in the City at Freeport on the Island
of (crand Hahama, The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned

on or before 31° May, 2000

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned abowe, the assets of the late
FRANCIS JULIAN SNOWDEN will be distributed among |
the persons entitled thereto having regard only to the clacms
of which the Executors of the Estate shall then have had

Notios.

GRAHAM, THOMPSOM s& CO).
Ahcrreys for the Execuioes
Avbine Atiornecy AM. Bebo
The First Conemercial Contre
58 Floor, Suid 9
FO. Bow Fei
Froqporl, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE

$285.64, generated a 16 per cent
room revenue rise. While nine
of the 14 reporting New Provi-
dence properties reported a
room revenue rise, the Ministry
of Tourism/BHA pointed out:
“While the overall results
showed improvement over
2009, they are still below com-
parative figures for March 2008
when occupancy stood at 81.2
per cent and ADR was $315.41.
In March 2008, room nights
sold and room revenue was still
8.3 per cent and 19.6 per cent
above March 2010 levels.”

For March, some 36 per cent
of the 14 hotels surveyed gen-
erated increased room revenues
through rising room nights sold
and ADRs, “all of them show-
ing double-digit room revenue
increases ranging from 11.1 per
cent to 45.7 per cent”.

A further 36 per cent of
resorts saw an increase in room
nights sold with lower ADRs,
all but one achieving an
increase in room revenues.
Finally, some 21 per cent of the
14 properties surveyed saw
both room nights sold and
ADRs decline, along with room
revenues. As for the 2010 first
quarter, hotel occupancy aver-
ages rose to 67.2 per cent com-
pared to 64 per cent in 2009.
The ADR for the three months
to March 31, 2010, was $260.60
compared to $254.94 the year
before, with hotel room rev-
enue up 6.7 per cent. Some 10
out of the 14 hotels surveyed
reported room revenue increas-
es, with hotel room nights sold
up by 4.3 per cent.

Breaking the numbers down,
the BHA/Ministry of Tourism
reported that 36 per cent of the
14 properties surveyed had
increased room nights sold with
lower ADRs, growing their
room revenues in all cases bar
one. Some 29 per cent
increased both room nights sold
and rates, thereby boosting rev-
enues. A further 21 per cent
saw a reduction in room nights
sold with higher ADRs. Two
of these three properties over-
came the room night loss to
generate higher revenues, but
two hotels saw a decrease in all
performance measurements.

The 2008 first quarter com-
paratives, though, show the
Bahamian hotel industry has
some way to go to conclude its
recovery. Back then, average
occupancies stood at 73.7 per
cent, and ADRs at $282.04.
Room nights sold and room
revenue were 13.9 per cent and
31.4 per cent above their 2010
comparatives.

CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

A leading Bahamian group of companies is seeking to
hire a Deputy General Manager to assist with managing
and developing a large retail business. The duties will
include but are not limited to:

® Managing the daily operations of a multi-facet retail

business

Provide leadership and supervision of staff to ensure
excellent customer service

and daily reconciliation

>
® Direct the audit staff in monitoring inventory controls
>

Assist with the development of the business by
identifying new retailing opportunities

The qualified applicant will have:

® Working knowledge of management principles,
accounting principles, proficient in the use of
computers and previous experience at a senior
management level
Must be available to work flexible hours to monitor

the business operations as needed.

Uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Candidate must be a mature individual and a team
player who is self-motivated, organized, able to work
under pressure, meet deadlines with consistent and
high degree of accuracy

Education and Experience:

® Bachelor’s degree from an accredited College or

University

® Seven (7) years experience in a retail business at a
senior management level

Benefits and salary commensurate with qualifications

and experience.

Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter
and resume to the following e-mail address by 7th May,

2010: applybahamas@yahoo.com


THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

the transportation sector as
one of four key areas to
enhance this nation’s infra-
structure. All of road, air and
sea seem likely to merit some
attention.

“The sector diagnostic has
identified significant gaps in
the quality and level of cov-
erage of road and air trans-
port in the Bahamas,” the
IDB paper said.

“In New Providence, the
road network is inadequate
to cope with existing
demands, leading to serious
traffic congestion and result-
ing in significant increases in
travel time.

“The public transport sys-
tem is disorganized and the
quality of service below the
level expected in a modern,
well-functioning system.

“In addition, weaknesses
have been identified in the
policy formulation, planning
and management capabilities
in key sector agencies and
departments.”

Besides the $135 million
New Providence Road
Improvement Project that the
IDB is financing, with the
aiming of improving road
infrastructure on the
Bahamas’ main island, the
bank is also focusing on
enhancing this nation’s trans-
port planning capability and
road safety.

It also aims to “support
viable schemes to increase
private participation in the
provision of road mainte-
nance and organised opera-
tion of public transport ser-
vices.”

Among the IDB’s goals is
to by 2014 have 40 per cent of
the Bahamas’ road network
upgraded and maintained by
the private sector, as opposed
to the zero participation by
this sector currently.

Other objectives are to
have the Bahamas’ Transport
Development Plan 2006-2015
some 90 per cent implement-

qyiule of »
(Ginn
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Mau lth, 2010 Tues-Thurs. 6-8:00pm
May 15th, 2010 Saturdays 9-1:00pm

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 5B
Climate change to cost Bahamas
$200m-$620m in next 15 years

ed by 2014, compared to the
current 30 per cent imple-
mentation level. The IDB also
wants the number of road
accidents in the Bahamas to
be reduced from a recorded
10,320 in 2008 to 8,772 by
2014, with a plan out in place
“for conducting annual and
periodic road maintenance
functions”.

Critical

Not forgetting air transport,
the IDB states the somewhat
obvious in saying this “is crit-
ical to the health of the
tourism industry, represent-
ing the prime mode of trans-
port for stopover tourists. It
also plays a pivotal role in

ensuring accessibility for the
population of the Family
Islands to goods and services
offered only in New Provi-
dence”.

Here, the IDB is aiming to
increase private sector partic-
ipation “in the modernization
of airports infrastructure”,
with the number of private
airport managers doubling
from two (YVRAS in Nassau
and Hutchison Whampoa in
Freeport) to four by 2014.

The bank also wants to cre-
ate an independent Civil Avi-
ation Authority and Airports
Authority, “responsible for
regulation and operations
respectively”, by 2014.

In this way, airport regula-
tion and operations will be
fully separated

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Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.

A onivate Wealth Management Company and medium-sized Family office

}

Has an opening for an

ASSOCIATE

Applicanis must:

es Be aquaified atiorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders will also be considered.
« Have approximately 3-5 years expenence in financial servioas in any of the areas of trust
barking or invesiments

« Have fe abilty to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents relating to spenal
oroects and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the
same

¢ Ge a seasoned professional who is cagable of leading a project, coordinating its vanous
parts and managing fe am associated with the same.

e Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

e Be comoriabie in revewing financeal stalaments, and have a basic understanding of
investment and financial transactons

® Have the abilty to wor under pressure and without constant supervision.

® Have uncompromising personal and business efics.

Successfu! candidate will work directly with the President of Tradelnvest in the
management of complex private fiduciary arrangements. Responsibilities include regular

contact with overseas affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals, as
well as legal counsel and advisors.

Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and Confidential to:

The Presicent
Tradalnwest Asset Management Ltd.
LYFORD WANOR (WEST BUILDING), LYFORD GAY
NASSAU, ALP. THE BAHAMAS
Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 12-2040

Applications must be ressived by 2" May, 2000,

® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice
in the provision of financial services, seeks to identify suitable
candidates for the position of:

COLLECTIONS OFFICER (FREEPORT)

Core Responsibilities:

¢ Manage delinquent portfolios by contacting clients, initiating,
and responding to correspondence, initiating field calls,
collecting and processing payments, interviewing clients, and
conducting research and investigation
Conduct credit risk assessments by inspecting collateral (e.g.
real estate and automobiles), appraising asset value, assessing
client financial position, and calculating reservation value of
assessment
Initiate legal action by preparing and issuing demand letters,
meeting and corresponding with attorneys, preparing summons’
for court appearance, appearing in court as the bank’s
representative, engaging in judgment proceedings, and
coordinating foreclosure proceedings
Compile data and prepare reports to show status, value, and
degree of delinquency

Job Requirements:

Working knowledge of the Collections process; Knowledge of
appraisals and other legal documents

Associates Degree in relevant area, Banking Certificate,
ABIFS, or three to five years collections experience

Strong analytical skills

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Must be a team player and possess the ability to work in a
demanding environment

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications and a suite of other benefits including a group
medical plan.

Interested persons should apply no later than April 28, 2010 to:

Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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slump to 3-5% in Andros

FROM page 1B

isfactory.

"I wish I could be optimistic
for the compliance picture
here in Andros. But I can't,"
he said. "To say that the com-
pliance rate here is not good
is an understatement."

According to Mr Cargill, in
Nicholl's Town, Andros, the
compliance rate is only 3 per
cent, while in Fresh Creek it is
near 5 per cent.

Speaking to Androsians at
the first-ever Andros Busi-
ness Outlook, Mr Cargill
reminded them that National
Insurance contributions were

The National Insurance
Board last year began to
crack down on companies and
self-employed business per-
sons who have been in arrears
for years, even prosecuting
some business owners for
non-payment.

Mr Cargill said this
increased enforcement led to
the collection of $160 million
in contributions last year, $5
million more than the previ-
ous year.

However, he said places
such as Andros remain a chal-
lenge on the collection front.”
Obviously, not all employers
and self-employed persons

paid within one month after it
becomes due, it is late. Now
that may sound harsh, but
consider this; NIB is liable to
workers whether contribu-
tions are paid on time or late.

"And for every day a con-
tribution is withheld from
NIB, the National Insurance
Fund can be compromised.”

He added that like in
Andros today, the National
Insurance Fund could soon
see its expenditures equalling
its income, which will have
"far-reaching effects on our
fund".

However, Mr Cargill



sought to reassure Bahami-
ans that the$1.6 billion fund is
not in danger of running out.

"Let me hasten to reassure
you, and say unequivocally,
that NIB is not going broke,”
he said. "It simply means that
we have to reform and posi-
tion NIB in a positive posi-
tion for the long term."

And while NIB's current
reserves stand at $1.6 billion,
and its 2008 surplus stood at
$54 million, contribution rate
increases are slated to come
into effect "to ensure long-
term viability”.

are making the effort to








not optional but an obligation
— and mandated - under the
law.

For our brochure, traiming costs and other details visi:
mrw cohenandideincom (1R e-maa) us at: collet gate net

remain current with their con-
tributions," said Mr Cargill.
"Tf a contribution is not

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANTERNIQUCA
DAVIS of Farrington Road, P.O. Box N-4052
intend to change my name to ANTERNIQUCA
MARSHALL. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

Training Location: Netie's Place « Cesuaninas
Nasal, alana

rm lovin’ it

Employment
Opportunity

Restaurant Managers Needed
for leading Fast Food Franchise

Telepbornes (242) 327-015 04, Fao: (42) A27-R152

Ke*| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life .
Requirements:

¢ Must be a High School Graduate

¢ Must have Management experience

¢ Restaurant Management experience is
preferred.

¢ Must have strong leadership skills

¢ Must be customer service driven

¢ Must be results-oriented & articulate
¢ Must have excellent inter-personal skills
¢ Must have excellent oral & written
Communications skills

¢ Professionalism required

Must be able to work flexible hours,
including late nights, weekends and
holidays.

[VACANT POSITION]

Coordinator Pharmacy PUBLIC NOTICE

The Public is advised, effective March 25th,
2010 the following Officers and Directors were
elected by the membership to serve on the
Board of Directors of the Bahamas Real Estate
Association.

Qualifications

¢ Experience in a hospital setting is a must.
* 7-10 years as a Pharmacist with a minimum
of 5 years in a management position.
* Intermediate to Advance computer skills is a must

OFFICERS McDonald’s offers excellent benefits!

Patricia Birch, President

* Excellent written and oral communication skills

Education. ————_ Sara Callender, Vice President Please submit Resume to:
Se «i Virginia Damianos, Treasurer Human Resources Department
* Bachelors Degree in Pharmacy or Science 5
discipline and license Competence Certificate. James Newbold, Secretary McDonald’s Head Office
* PharmD is a major plus. on Market St. North
DIRECTORS ELECTED TO SERVE UNTIL MARCH 2012
Sally Hutcheson Michael Lightbourn P.O.Box 58-5925
Position Summar ; ° 395.
7 _— y Wendy Johnson, Rachel Pinder Telephone: 325-4444
Visionary, pioneering and implementing of new projects Carla Sweetin g Franon Wilson Nassau, The Bahamas

Revenue generation, purchase management

Sai He a BEER HRHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEEH HH
naan: DIRECORS SERVING UNTIL MARCH 2011
Zachary Bonczek Carlyle Campbell

Cara Christie George Damianos



Monitoring of continuing education for the team
Monthly reports/data analysis

Monitoring formulary/formulary changes.
Assisting on-line whenever possible

Are you...
Motivated, outgoing and professional?

SO ARE WE |

Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits

June Fife has been appointed as Registrar.

Date: April 26th, 2010

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department President: Patricia Birch
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas

or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com .
Join our rapidly growing group of companies and
FG CAPITAL MARKETS enjoy an exciting and rewarding career in sales.
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

C2.tt+ Tt. t3 mh FT A OT

ROYAL FIDELITY

Moumey at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 23 APRIL 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,561.59 | CHG -8.89 | %CHG -0.57 | YTD -3.79 | YTD % -0.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWWwW_BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit_y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $

Outside Sales

Previous Close Today's Close Change

7.00 AML Foods Limited
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund
5.23 Bank of Bahamas

0.44 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste

2.14 Fidelity Bank

9.62 Cable Bahamas

2.69 Colina Holdings

5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1)
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs
1.32 Doctor's Hospital

5.94 Famguard

1.02
10.63
5.24
0.44
3.15
2.17
12.07
2.84
6.08
2.88
2.54
6.07

1.02 0.00
10.63 0.00
5.24 0.00

0.283
0.992
0.598
-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.627
-0.003

0.44 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.17 0.00
12.07 0.00
2.84 0.00
5.90 -0.18
3.00 0.12
2.54 0.00
6.07 0.00

Representative

8.75 Finco 9.08 9.08 0.00
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60 10.60 0.00
3.75 Focol (S) 5.08 5.08 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00
FBB22 100.00 0.00

0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156

The ideal candidate must:

« Bea ligt malvalad eel stirter wih an oelhueiadhe, Inencly did culgeng parsitalty,
15 October F017 «Be vwilling io be bainad ina vanely of pmdud kniwedge area

19 October 2022

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Interest

Prime + 1.75%

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T% 30 May 2013 7 Possess, Peeler onganizationsl and ane management oh I
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015 4 1’
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) = wien y
52wk-Low Symbol Bid & Ask & Last Price Daily Val. EPS $ Divs P/E i ' Be abe ip wor Nepencealy Pepresenl Me Ilenests OF management And tie
Bahamas Supermarkets 10.06 11.06 14.00 0.000 .
RND Holdings o.35 O40 oss 0.001 0.000 Conipaty prolestoraly and eoéilly, and hand cusloaners efocivly.
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) . a é
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 E MT r E c r rc
Pe case ae oS a a0 ae » Possess computer sill, io include working knowledge of MS: Oifice Sule (Excel,
BISX Listed Mutual Funds +
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months % NAV 3MTH NAV 6MTH Word, PowerPoini, and iniemet Exp ee Bic. |
1.3702 _CFAL Bond Fund 1.4602 1.50 6.57 1.438700 1.407626
2.8266 CFAL MS! Preferred Fund 2.9116 0.85 0.52 2.886947 2.830013 - a acl : Hn
1.4548 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5268 1.31 4.94 1.507147 1.491956 5 Be pune BV have al oe bansporahen

2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

9.1005

3.2025 2.75 -3.54
13.4986 0.98 5.44
107.5706 3.45 6.99
105.7706 3.99 13.50
1.1034 1.25 5.25
1.0764 0.79 4.37
1.1041 1.23 5.34
9.5795 5.33 5.33

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680

Postion is oTiimassign baad - your success Gecerals einitely on your sales afiotts - lhe
pay i= fhe lim!

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Intl Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000 10.5417 -2.13 10.96

Construction brace experience prelerred

4.8105 7.6928 -0.31
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month divider
Bid $ - Buying price of Gol
Ask $ - Selling price of Gol
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin gful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

47.51

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
price in last 52 weeks
g price in last 52 weeks
- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Shange - Change in closing price fram day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

divided by closing price

Please emrall jour resume ln out idecales hota com








THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1B

the Bahamas than they did on the
company, plus the international pres-
sures on A. M. Best and its ilk.

“There is really no impact for Fam-
ily Guardian in its operations,” Ms
Hermanns told this newspaper. “Fam-
ily Guardian is a very stable company.
Essentially, the revision of the rating
from ‘stable’ to ‘negative’ really hinges
on the economic condition of the coun-
try. The rate of defaults on our mort-
gages is below the threshold the Cen-
tral Bank has reported for the banks as
a whole. The deterioration we are
experiencing is below what the Central
Bank is reporting as the position with-
in the banking community. Our rate is
below 8 per cent.”

The total percentage of defaulted
mortgages issues by Bahamian com-
mercial banks (those in arrears and
non-performing) was a combined 9.8
per cent at end-February 2010,
although the situation was showing
signs of stabilization. Ms Hermanns
suggested A. M. Best’s stance was also
influenced by “changes taking place
in the local market with one life and
health insurer”, a reference to CLI-
CO (Bahamas) collapse into insolven-
cy in early 2009. This, she added, had

Chairman’s Report — Q4, 2009

FamGuard outlook

combined with the international pres-
sure currently faced by A. M. Best and
all credit rating agencies as a result of
criticism over their failure to spot
advanced warnings of the sub-prime
mortgage crisis, and subsequent finan-
cial and economic collapse.

As a result, Family Guardian’s pres-
ident suggested A. M. Best and others
were being “very conservative” and
“more aggressive” in their rating opin-
ions and actions, hence the outlook
action taken with regard to the BISX-
listed life and health insurer.

As to Family Guardian’s ratio of
mortgage loans to total equity, Ms
Hermanns said it was little different
to what A. M. Best had seen in previ-
ous rating periods. “The situation has
not changed negatively since previous
ratings,” she told Tribune Business.

“There has been some slight
increase in defaults, but nothing sub-
stantial, and the rate of deterioration is
below that of the Central Bank of the
Bahamas for the wider financial com-
munity.”

As for FamGuard’s 2009 year-end
and fourth quarter financials, which

are due to be published this week, Ms
Hermanns said: “There was no deteri-
oration beyond the third quarter. What
was released in the third quarter
results has not deteriorated since
then.”

Replying to the “risks” identified
by A. M. Best in relation to its
BahamaHealth division, Ms Hermanns
said health claims were far more
volatile than life insurance as they
were ongoing, rather than a one-time
claim at death.

“Our health claims increased in the
last year, and that was driven by eco-
nomic conditions that impacted the
claims,” she added. Family Guardian
was now in the processing of reviewing
all its health insurance contracts, and
whether premiums matched risk based
on the recent claims history.

A. M. Best balanced its comments
by praising Family Guardian’s
“favourable risk-adjusted capitalisa-
tion”, operational profitability and
marketing presence. It was especially
impressed with the fact that share-
holders’ equity had grown over the
last five years despite dividend pay-
ments. Yet none of this explains A.
M. Best’s different treatment of Coli-
na’s outlook. It was just as harsh, if
nor harsher, on Colina and the “risks

associated with the company’s mort-
gage loan portfolio and its delinquen-
cies, which increased further in 2009
despite Colina implementing aggres-
sive measures to address the rising
delinquencies and provide for potential
losses in that portfolio.

“The mature nature of the Bahami-
an life/health market, and the recent
erosion in the Bahamian economy, pri-
marily resulting from a decline in the
tourism sector, also is a concern to A.
M. Best, as it could impede not only
Colina’s potential for growth, but its
ability to stabilize its troubled mort-
gage loan portfolio.”

Lynden Nairn, Colina’s vice-presi-
dent of life/health, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “With respect to mortgage loan
deterioration, I would make the obser-
vation that this is no different from
what the wider financial sector has
experienced over the past 18 months.

“T would point out further that our
provisioning has been very aggressive,
and the expectation is that in the ensu-
ing months there will be an improve-
ment in the mortgage portfolio as the
economy improves.”

One possible difference for A. M.
Best’s different treatment of the two
listed life and health insurers is that it
believes Colina, due to its larger bal-

ance sheet and more than 50 per cent
share of the Bahamian life and health
insurance market, is better able to
absorb any mortgage delinquency
‘shocks’. A. M. Best said its Colina
Insurance Company analysis was influ-
enced by its “improved operations in
the health line of business”, plus its
leading ‘more than 50 per cent’ market
share, “favourable risk-adjusted capi-
talisation and conservative reserving
practices”.

The rating agency also referred to
Colina Insurance Company expand-
ing into other Caribbean and Latin
American markets, something Mr
Nairn declined to comment upon. A.
M. Best added that the company
would need to focus on growing its
business organically via expanding its
market share in the Bahamas, as
opposed to relying on its acquisition
spree over the past decade. “Manage-
ment’s expectation is that Colina will
continue to differentiate itself from
others in the industry,” Mr Nairn told
Tribune Business. “I think we’re going
to be able to achieve the kind of organ-
ic growth that is necessary to sustain a
growing business. It’s going to be intro-
ducing new products, leveraging tech-
nology, and understanding the mar-
ket we’re in.”



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Sales

Cost of sales

Quarter Ended
January 31, 2010

$

Quarter Ended
January 31, 2009

24,073 26,457
(16,929)

(18,687)



Gross profit

Selling, general and administrative expenses
Other operating income

7,144 7,710
(6,196) (5,984)

185 116



Net operating profit

Interest expense
Dividends on preference shares

1,133 1,902

(5) (80)

(119) (136)



Net profit on continuing operations

Property revaluation write-back

Net loss on discontinued operations

1,009 1,686

56



Net profit



Profit per share

I am pleased to report to you the results for our Company’s fourth quarter 2009, which ended
January 31, 2010, as well as our unaudited results for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010.

2009 has been a good year for AML Foods Limited. As we re-branded our corporate identity to
better reflect our Company today, we continued to record sound growth and profits in the midst of
economically challenging times. We also achieved substantial improvements in our balance sheet -
the most significant of which is the strengthening of our liquidity. As a result, we currently stand in a
net cash position of $2.2m after being in the red for many years.

It is as a result of this improvement in liquidity that I am extremely pleased to announce that AML
Foods Limited will pay a dividend of 4c per share, based on 2009 results, our first dividend since late
2001. Our resumption to dividends has been a long time coming and I would like to thank our
shareholders who have been very patient with us during that time.

While we recorded sound growth and achieved tremendous milestones, we continue to face
challenging conditions. Our profits for the fourth quarter recorded a drop over the prior year as
economic conditions and increased competition continue to impact operations in all of our markets.
The decrease in our sales is primarily the result of decreases in average transactions as our customer
counts remain strong and largely unchanged. This indicates that customers are generally spending less
while increasingly shopping around for weekly specials and discounts. As this is something we expect
to define the market in which we operate for the foreseeable future — if not permanently — we have
focused on initiatives to further enhance our competitiveness and diversify revenue streams. While
we saw a continuation of Q4 sales trends into February, our sales are beginning to rebound as the
measures and initiatives we put in place to address increased competitiveness take effect.

In an effort to further reduce costs and pass savings on to our customers, we have continued our
focus on reducing our shrink in real terms after battling unacceptable levels for years. I am very
pleased to report that one of those most important achievements of 2009 results is our achievement
of an overall decrease of 6% in our shrink expense. This major focus on shrink awareness and
reduction throughout our entire Company is finally realizing real progress and positive results. We
remain commutted to this critical aspect of our business and have targeted a 10% overall reduction in
shrink for 2010.

In addition to our focus on reducing shrink and controlling costs where possible, we are also focused
on opportunities for new revenue streams. To this end, we have recently launched
www.costright.com, allowing our Cost Right Nassau shoppers to purchase its full range of products
on-line. We are also undergoing the final beta testing on our Domino’s on-line ordering website and
we expect to announce at least one additional Domino’s location soon. We have completed the
design phase and are now in the bidding stage for “Solomon’s Fresh Food Market” — our new
location in the Western New Providence Town Centre Development. We are very excited about our
new store and the opportunities it will provide both for us and the shoppers in Western New
Providence.

We expect 2010 to be something of a mixed bag with a challenging first half of the year and a much
better second half. We remain confident that the many new sales initiatives we have recently
implemented will help minimize the impact of the changes we are seeing to the marketplace that we
operate in. It will be our continued focus on the synergies we have achieved in our buying and
logistics, cost control and the strategic focus on our brands that will deliver savings, quality and real
value to our customers and enable us to not only continue facing these challenges but also build on
our progress enabling continued growth and development for AML Foods.

We thank you for your continued support.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar
April 12, 2010

“git

UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE QUARTER ENDED JANUARY 31, 2010



CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

January 31, January 31,
2010 2009

Assets 30,703 30,607

Liabilities (14,519) (18,319)



Equity 16,184 12,288







CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (CONTINUED)
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Year Ended
January 31, 2010

Year Ended
January 31, 2009

Sales $ 93,212 91,180
Cost of sales (65,123) (64,461)

Gross profit 28,089 26,719
Selling, general and administrative expenses (24,339) (24,035)
Other operating income 637 383
Net operating profit 4,387 3,067





Pre-opening costs (24)

Interest expense (283)
Dividends on preference shares (620)



Net profit on continuing operations 2,140
Property revaluation write-back 56

Net profit/(loss) on discontinued operations (192)



Net profit 2,004



Profit per share $0.127



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Year Ended
January 31, 2010

Year Ended
January 31, 2009

Net profit for period 3,896 2,004



Net cash provided by operating activities 5,625 6,575



Net cash used in investing activities (920) (4,077)



Net cash (used in)/provided by financing activities (2,288) 99



Increase in cash 2,417





EXPLANATORY NOTES
TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Year Ended January 31, 2010

ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies and methods of computation as
the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the 2008 Annual Report.

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of AML Foods Limited,
formerly Abaco Markets Limited, (“the Company”) and its significant wholly owned
subsidiaries: Solomon’s Supercentre (Nassau) Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited,
Solomon’s Club (Freeport) Limited, Thompson Wholesale Limited, Caribbean Franchise
Holdings Limited and Solomon’s Fresh Market Limited.

DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operations in Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly,
the assets and liabilities of Cost Right Abaco were treated as discontinued and a
restructuring reserve was set up at January 31, 2009. Remaining balance of this reserve
was written back at October 31, 2009.

The Company has signed a three year lease for the building used by the former store.
The lease includes an option to purchase the building at the end of the lease for $2.8m.

The equipment of the former business was sold for $350,000, resulting in a gain on
disposal of $79,000.

Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from
Ms.Brendalee Gibson, at AML Foods Corporate Offices at Town Centre Mall, Blue Hill
Road, Nassau, The Bahamas, tel. 1 242 677 7200.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 8B, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

BD VV Minister targets

BUTLER’S BARGAIN MART American On Out
Island airlift

Friday: 8:00am - 8:00pm
By CHESTER ROBARDS

Saturday: 8:00am - 9:00pm « Sunday: 8:00am - 2:00pm
FREE DELIVERY TO THE MAIL BOAT! Blsiness Reporter Promotion generates

Ph: 323-5422 Or 322-3616 ° 2 OOO 1 ookin S
Baillou Hill Rd. Corner Off Wellington St. | Tourism and Aviation txt >, Qib 5



Family Island Orders Welcomed
















































Bumble Bee Tuna
(Water & Oil) 6 oz.

Niagara Water
24/16.91 oz.

Febreze Air Effects
Asst. 9.7 oz.

week again engaged Amer-
ican Airlines in an attempt
to further increase the fre-
quency of airlift to the Fam-
ily Islands.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said this new round of
talks was simply a continu-
ing effort to drive larger
tourist numbers to islands
outside of Nassau/Paradise
Island.

Speaking at the first annu-
al Andros Business Outlook,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said coordinating increased
airlift and infrastructure
development was key to
increasing the success
prospects for resorts and
other tourism industry part-
ners on the Family Islands.

He said statistics have
shown that while there has
been a steady increase of
visitor arrivals to
Nassau/Paradise Island in
the past 30 years, for 30
years the Out Islands have
remained flat.

The primary factor behind
the “flatline” of tourism
growth in the Out Islands
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said, was the extremely high
cost of travel to those loca-
tions.

“Low cost of air travel has
to be the norm," he said.
"Our proximity advantage
has been erased because the
cost was the same to other
destinations in the region."







Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

The Government is tar-
geting increased airlift to
several major Family Islands
over the next several years.
And they successfully nego-
tiated new and increased air-
lift to Nassau and Grand
Bahama last year, the results
of which are already being
seen.

While Mr Vanderpool-
Wallacer said he could not
reveal which islands he was

negotiating with American
Airlines to service, it is like-
ly that one element of his
trip was the return of Amer-
ican Eagle to Governors
Harbour Airport in
Eleuthera.

The airline announced last
month that it would discon-
tinue flights to Governor's
Harbour while changes to
the airport's navigational
aids were being made. Many
Eleuthera resorts immedi-
ately felt the fallout from the
discontinuation of the
flights.

While there are those
infrastructural problem to
contend with, the Ministry
is also attempting to increase
the amount of airlift to the
Family Islands from Nassau
through Bahamian-owned
private carriers, who are
adept at flying throughout
the Bahamas and often do
not require as many high-
tech navigational aids.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the companion airfare
promotion garnered almost
25,000 bookings in the first
quarter of 2010 alone.
Therefore, the Government
and private sector partners
involved in the promotion
have extended it and added
a component to introduce
similar results for Out Island
bookings.

He added that the Min-
istry of Tourism is gaining
ground on creating Island-






























a a, P4 [ j 4 specific packages, market-

Vnour or ! : ing and overall identities in
RUMBLE BEE : a — order to properly sell and
Fan Light Tun s, i : brand islands outside of

well-known Nassau/Paradise
Island.

"We are moving away
from promoting The
Bahamas and moving to
promoting the individual

iy ices i. BT islands," he said. "Nas-
clean eer pase 18 oz. $1 .99 n - & 580 whey ai) sau/Paradise Islands and the
= O02 . q ae Bahamas have become syn-

Hill Asst. Cookies re — rs onymous... We have now

created individual logos for

1509m .99¢ Alberto Parboiled/ each clave

———— CVERYONE C0 pau
Shurfine Fork & Long Grain Rice 5ib SEVEN DAYS TO CENSUS DAY Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
. 2/$ 4 99 er i - order to increase
poon Act ' otel and resort occupancies
s 2 $i 2 9 in the Family Islands and
drive their rates down, airlift
has to be increased.
"Rates are where they are
because if Iam getting infre-
quent visitors, I will have to

charge higher rates to get
Whole Chicken Danish more money," he said.

$1.69 | Spree

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MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



IN THE past, Bahamians
were denied the right to gamble
in their own country as the state
sought to act as the “moral com-
pass” for the nation. As long as
the people agreed with this
thinking; things were fine. How-
ever, times have changed and the
people are becoming weary of
the state dictating what they can
and cannot do with their time
and tithes.

According to the well-known
author and psychologist, J. Mar-
tin Kohe, “the greatest power
that a person possesses is the
power to choose.”

This is what is central to the
ongoing debate; not the morality
of gambling, but whether
Bahamians should have the right
to choose to gamble.

It is quite clear that many are
choosing to gamble even though
the state has deemed it illegal.
How do we know this? Just look
at every other street corner, tuck
shop, bar, restaurant, DVD
retailer and even clothing store.
Back in the days, the saying used
to be that in the Bahamas, on
every Street corner there was a
church, and next to that church,
a bar room.

society

Today, it is safe to say that we
can add to that truism, that
where there is a church, there is
a bar, and in that bar there is a
numbers house. The fact that
numbers houses and gambling
has permeated many different
facets of society proves that
Bahamians are exercising their
right to choose to gamble.

With twenty-three fully func-
tioning numbers houses it is hard
to bury ones head in the sand
and believe that these institu-
tions do not exist.

We can pretend that the
majority of us don’t know what it
means to “box” a number. But
everybody from your grammy,
to your nephew, to the pastor in
your church knows exactly what
that means. Every birthday,
every anniversary, every death,
every scripture reading and every
dream influences this booming
industry.

The Christian Council has
been the main stumbling block
for any government that seeks
to legalize this industry.

As our “moral” watchdog, this
group has taken over the busi-
ness of deciding what we as a
people can watch in our theatres,



INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Bahamians have right
to live their own lives



what we can do with our recre-
ational time, and now what we
can do with our money.

But as one wise Bahamian
indicated on a
BahamasIssues.com thread on
the topic, this is a slippery slope
and can lead to a multiplicity of
other oppressive and ridiculous
laws.

CHAN: “Some people spend
all their salary on the weekend
when one good ‘sale’ come
round on clothes or
shoes. So outlaw
sales, ’cus peo-

ple ga
spend <
up all >>




—-

their rent
money. Some
people get paid
on Friday, head to da
bar, and by Saturday
night dey broke. So outlaw
alcohol.

“Some people hopelessly
addicted ta online shopping, so
outlaw dat too.

“After all, we don't want them
to spend up all their money on
foolishness. Some women make
$200 per week, and spend $100 a
week on nails and hair, so outlaw
all da salons.

“Some men spend all dey
salary on dey sweetheart and her
chirren, and leave da wife and
her chirren ta fend for dey self.
So outlaw sweetheartin’. For
Gawd's sake, if ya earn ya own
money, ain no government gat
da rite ta tell ya what ta do wit ya
earnins.”

We must not get carried away
with this debate, because we all
know how Bahamians go.

The argument will then be,
“well if Bahamians have a right
to gamble, then why can’t we
have the right to hire strippers,
or smoke weed, or carry guns,
or rape our wives?”

But let’s think about what a
state is here to do.

The state has a responsibility
to protect its citizens. It does not
have the right to dictate the
morality of those citizens; or at
least that is what Bahamians in
this 21st century are trying to
communicate.

When something like gambling
is hidden, and kept under the
radar, it does more harm than
good.



Businesses spring
up in the shadiest of
areas, and ulti-
mately attract the
basest element.
When the indus-
try is illegal, citi-
zens are not pro-
tected from the

plethora
of abuses that
could follow. As
another blogger, Adi-
dasboi987 said on
BahamaslIssues.com:
“When you criminalize some-
thing, you don't rid yourself of
the demand for it. What you cre-
ate is an underground, or black
market — the only persons
standing to get rich off it is those
numbers houses — so how long
are we going to allow those num-
bers men to make millions of
dollars? They are in no rush to
see it “legalized” trust me — nor
is the church — but for other rea-
sons. Pastors are fully aware that
their members make donations
from their winnings — as a means
to “purge” their “wrong” act —
keep it illegal — keep the stigma
— keep the guilt. Good strategy, I
suppose.

Police

According to one numbers
operator, bribes to the police are
factored in to the weekly expens-
es to avoid a major shakedown.
This in itself is as illegal as the
industry. But if numbers were
legalized and regulated, the cas-
es of police extorting monies in
these instances would be fewer
and far between.

Let
us think about

= where the proceeds

from this industry could be
used if this industry were legal-
ized, regulated and taxed. We
already know that proprietors
have funded political campaigns
and even donated to NEMA.
They have helped numerous local
businesses and the communities
in which they operate. Many
Bahamians, when turned away
by local banks have turned to
numbers houses that have acted
as loaning agents, helping men
and women to pay their bills,
school fees, repair their homes,
buy cars, etcetera. In the grand
scheme of things, these are only
the footnotes.

But what would it be about if
it were made legal? It would pro-
vide substantial tax revenue and
even more employment oppor-
tunities. The government would
be able to keep tabs on the indus-
try, to ensure that payouts are
made on a timely basis and that
they know who and how many
proprietors are involved in the
industry; because as we all know,
even the regulation of an industry
costs the state a lot of money.

What improvements could be
made to the Bahamas from the
proceeds of this industry?















New and better schools? More
scholarships for worthy students?
Better roads and infrastructure?
Teachers might actually get rais-
es on a timely basis. Nurses might
get their insurance without
threatening to strike. ’m sure
any government, especially dur-
ing these difficult financial times,
would agree that an extra $20
million in the Treasury would be
well received.

Possibilities

In short, the possibilities are
endless as to what the govern-
ment could do with the proceeds.
The people are only asking that
they take this fact into consider-
ation.

It is about time that the
Bahamian government acknowl-
edges that Bahamians have the
right to live their own lives.
Whether that involves watching a
controversial film, gambling in a
casino, buying a lottery ticket, or
going to an establishment where
someone dances for money. It
boils down to having the right to
choose, and the people hope, and
expect, that the government will
finally listen to what they are say-
ing.



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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



PEOPLE LOOK AT a U.S. helicopter at the Corail refugee camp, on the outskirts of
Port-au-Prince, Wednesday, April 21, 2010. Corail is a new site prepared by IOM, International
Organization for Migration, and US army engineers together with humanitarian partners and
Suitable for up to 6,000 residents.

Ramon Espinosa/AP












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at Corail-Cesselesse has thou-
sands of spacious, hurricane-resis-
tant tents on groomed, graded
mountain soil. The settlement
three miles (four kilometers)
down the road — named after
the U.S. president in hopes of get-
ting attention from foreigners —
has leaky plastic tarps and wood-
en sticks pitched on a muddy
slope, according to Associated
Press.

Corail has a stocked U.N.
World Food Program warehouse
for its 3,000-and-counting resi-
dents; the more than 8,500 at
Camp Obama are desperate for
food and water. Corail's entrance
is guarded by U.N. peacekeepers
and Haitian police. Camp Oba-
ma's residents put up a Haitian
flag to mark their empty security
tent.

The camps, neighbors in the
foothills of a treeless mountain,
are a diptych of the uneven
response to Haiti's Jan. 12 earth-
quake. More than $12.7 billion
has been pledged by foreign gov-
ernments, agencies and organi-
zations, including $2.8 billion for
humanitarian response and
another $9.9 billion promised at
the March 31 U.N. donors con-
ference.

In one camp, which dignitaries
and military commanders visit by

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"We've heard the foreigners
have given a lot of aid money.
But we're still living the same way
as before, and we're still dying
the same way as before," said
Duverny Nelmeus, a 52-year-old
welder-turned Camp Obama res-
ident-coordinator.

Haiti's needs are still enor-
mous, but more than 100 days
after the quake, the plan for deal-

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ing with them is unclear. Even
the death toll is confusing: Gov-
ernment estimates hovered
around 230,000 until the U.N.
donors conference when, without
explanation, the total jumped to
300,000.

There are officially 1.3 million
people displaced by the magni-
tude-7 earthquake. Hundreds of
thousands have massed in settle-
ment camps that, like Camp Oba-
ma, sprouted with little or no
planning. These Haitians live in
makeshift tarp homes and
shanties, govern their affairs with
self-formed security committees
and make do with whatever aid
arrives.

It was said early on that nearly
all the displaced needed to be
moved ahead of the arriving rainy
season to carefully planned camps
like Corail. But it took months
to procure land. By March, aid
officials decided instead that peo-
ple should start going home, say-
ing thousands of houses are still
habitable or can be repaired.

It was even better, they said,
for most to stay where they were:
Agencies deemed just 37,000 peo-
ple in nine camps at high risk for
flash floods, said Shaun Scales of
the International Organization
for Migration.

But many people are not moy-
ing, nor do they want to stay
where they are.

Persistent aftershocks and
rumors of more to come — Pres-
ident Rene Preval warned of an
impending earthquake at a news
conference this month — are
keeping people from going back.
Private landowners and schools
are threatening to evict squatters.
Those who remain are suffering.

What they want is a better
option. And for a few lucky peo-
ple, right now, that's Corail. The
product of a coordinated effort
by aid agencies, the United
Nations, the U.S. military, the
Haitian government and other
entities, it has sprung up seem-
ingly overnight on a cactus patch
where the Cite Soleil slum meets
the suburb of Croix-des-Bou-
quets.

There was little here but a few
concrete homes, disorganized
camps and brush until a few
weeks ago, when Preval
announced that the government
would seize — with compensa-
tion for the owners — 18,500
acres (7,490 hectares) of the arid
land.

Authorities began moving peo-
ple in immediately, even before
services were in place. Croix-des-
Bouquets officials say they were
unprepared for the onslaught.
Aid groups Oxfam, World Vision
and CARE criticized the rush as
violating human dignity.

Now ecstatic arrivals are
streaming in aboard air-condi-
tioned buses, clutching laminated
ID cards with maps of the settle-
ment, wearing green bracelets
bearing their names. Nearly all
come from the most famous camp
in post-quake Port-au-Prince: the
Petionville Club golf course,
home to 45,000 quake survivors,
elements of the U.S. Army 82nd
Airborne and a gaggle of Holly-
wood volunteers led by Sean
Penn.

Aid workers lead the smiling
tenants to their Chinese-made
cylindrical tents, pointing out the
floodlights, the police tent and
where the 342 toilets and 24
showers are being built.

The plan is to stage about 6,000

Good camp, bad camp:
The shortfalls of Haiti aid

people here along the 50-acre (20-
hectare) "Sector 4" as the rainy
season gets under way, even while
UN. trucks, U.S. Navy engineers
and aid groups continue con-
struction. Then they will start
building sturdier shelters of wood,
plastic and metal in adjacent Sec-
tors 2 and 3.

There's no word yet on what
will be built in Sector 1, but locals
are expecting some major devel-
opment. Concrete homes and
stores are also being built around
the new camp.

Manushka Lindor, 23, is
among the lucky. She sat in the
shady tent with her 3-year-old
son, Peterson St. Louis Jr., who
squealed "Vroom! Vroom!" as
the big construction trucks went
by. Just a few hours after arrival,
she was already planning to stay.

"T don't have anywhere else to
live. If they come here and build
a house I can rent, I'd be very
satisfied," she said.

Her husband, Peterson St.
Louis Sr., pushed a green wheel-
barrow full of welcome bounty: a
week of ready-to-eat meals for
the whole family and hygiene kits
with soap, toothpaste, toilet paper
and sanitary napkins.

They had been living in the
golf-course camp, dealing with
crime, mud and danger. One day,
Lindor said, a water truck slid
backward into a tent and killed
two people.

Their new home offers quiet,
assistance and a chance for a fresh
start. St. Louis, a 27-year-old bar-
ber, is setting up shop in the back
of the tent with an office chair
and a car battery to charge his
electric clippers.

Outside it is a different story.
Roads are cracked, and rubble
lines the route. Twisted webs of
steel rebar lie in heaps, collected
by residents sick of waiting for
help and now setting out to
rebuild on their own. Police cars
pull over by the side of the road
to buy pirated gasoline amid fuel
shortages.

In Camp Obama, the help has
been spotty and often ineffective.
Almost everyone has at least one
plastic tarp, the “emergency shel-
ter material," in aid-worker par-
lance, that was a focus of relief
efforts in the months after the
quake. But those are leaking and
falling apart.

Nobody remembers what aid
group came when — the parade
of foreigners becomes a blur.
Someone left a rubber bladder to
hold drinking water, another a
black tank for the same. Both are
broken and empty.

"We'd thank God for a glass
of water," Nelmeus said.

Cuban doctors have come and
provided anti-malarial and other
medicines, as did some Ameri-
cans. But while Corail's hospital
tent is fully staffed, Camp Oba-
ma's is usually empty. Nelmeus'
two children are sick with fever
and awaiting treatment.

They cannot go to Corail,
where organizers rejected a
request by the Croix-des-Bou-
quets mayor to take in 10,000
homeless squatting on land in his
town.

Corail's organizers worry about
the discrepancy.

Camp leaders told U.S. South-
ern Command chief Gen. Dou-
glas Fraser on Wednesday that
they have ruled out fences but
are debating stepped-up patrols
or other measures to keep aid-
seeking neighbors out.

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THE TRIBUNE




















































i. Investments in Securities

The fair values below represent the chosing bid price established on the last trading day of the
CuETENL reporting period by che exchange on whieh the securities are principally traded
Interest Armortined Fair
Lite Ha rate Euler Maturity Ca Volur
CHE CHF CHF
500,000 Colgaic-Falaive Co ae: (eo S00
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Included in the amortivad coal of investments in securities on the stanemenct of financial posiben
I aDoTEed Inferest receivable ameunling CHP 39027 (ae: CHP 48611),

General Banking Reserve

The Bank mokes appropriation from retained earings to o gemeral banking reserve for
unforeseeable risks ond future lneses, “The general banking reserve cam only be distributed
following approval by the shareholders in o general preeting

Copital Management
The Bank's objectives when managing capital are

Ta comply with the capital nequinements set by the Central Bank of The Bahamas (the
Central Bank's

To saheguard the Bank's ability to continws as 2 going concer a thal it can continues io
provide reborn Gor its sharehenliers and benefits for other stakeholder: end

To iainldin a sirong capital base to suppent the development of its business

Cupital adequacy and the use of regulatory capital ane monitored by the Bank's monogemesd,
enaploying lechniques desigaed io ensure compliance with guidelines culablished by the Central
Bank. The required information is filed with the Ceniral Bank on a quarterly basis.

The Central Bamk requires cach entity with a public bank ond trust licence woo (a) have
regulatory capital of at least ES (HOM) ad () maintain a ratio of intal regulatory capital te
Tsk phhed ssacls ator above a minimum of 8

The table below sarmariees the Composition af repulasory capital amd) chives the capilal
adequacy ratio of the Bonk os of the statement of finencial position die. The Bank has
complied with all of the externally imposed capital requirements to which ic is subject

7K UME

CHF CHF

Tier 1 captial
Share capital | 3 (4K1,000)
OK Ca)
£700 540

13,091,000)
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Hel ar Eenpes
Total Tier | capital 40,70540

63740

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Less adjustments to base capital 63,740

Total eligible base cxpltal 43,6760) 158070

Hisk-weighted assets 1h eT 208 1 71
Capital adequacy rath ar 62%

Fair Valoc Estimation of Financial [nstromenis

Financial imiraments olilized by the Bank melode recorded mseis and liabilities shown im the
statement of financlal posiien, a well a¢ items disclosed in this financial statement that
poncipally involve off-balesc: sheet isk. The majority of the Bank"s financial instruments
ence those disclomed in Nome 8. are either ehort-term in nalure or have interest rates that
aulomatically Teset to market on o Peritatec bua. Acoording!y, their catimaled Gar values ure
nol wignificantly different from their carrying values for each major casegory of the Banks
recomded assets. and liabilities. The Gar value of he mvesiments im securities thot ore beld-io
Taibonity O60 3) December 21M? if CAF 5.078400 (0: CHF 5,998,700). Prectous metals
Inchaded in the statement of financial position are aloo measurcd at fair valuc. The fair value of
precious metals represents the chosing bid price established on the last trading day of the
Caren reporting period by the exchange on which the precious metals are principally traded

4 Kom-leh“s wat
ALL your

LEGAL
NOTICES,

call
The Tribune’s
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DTD orsaasitoelt

502-2394

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2010, PAGE 5C

UK scientist: Aliens

may pose risks

LONDON

BRITISH astrophysicist
Stephen Hawking says aliens
are out there, but it could be
too dangerous for humans to He
interact with extraterrestrial
life, according to Associated
Press.

Hawking claims in a new
documentary that intelligent
alien lifeforms almost cer-
tainly exist, but warns that
communicating with them
could be "too risky.”

The 68-year-old scientist

says a visit by extraterrestri- | month.

als to Earth would be like
Christopher Columbus arriv-
ing in the Americas, "which
didn't turn out very well for
the Native Americans.”
speculates
extraterrestrial life will be
similar to microbes, or small
animals —
advanced lifeforms may be
"nomads, looking to conquer
and colonize."

The Discovery Channel
said Sunday it will broadcast
"Stephen Hawking's Uni-
verse" in Britain next

most

but adds

STEPHEN HAWKING (AP)



Torpedo blast likely sank
warship: SKorea minister

SEOUL, South Korea



AN EXPLOSION caused by a torpedo like-
ly tore apart and sank a South Korean war-
ship near the North Korean border, Seoul's
defense minister said Sunday, while declining to
assign blame for the blast as suspicion increas-
ingly falls on Pyongyang, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Defense Minister Kim Tae-young said an
underwater explosion appeared to have ripped
apart the vessel, and a torpedo blast seemed the
most likely cause.

Investigators who examined salvaged wreck-
age separately announced Sunday that a close-
range, external explosion likely sank it.

"Basically, I think the bubble jet effect caused
by a heavy torpedo is the most likely" cause,
Kim told reporters.

The bubble jet effect refers to the rapidly
expanding bubble an underwater blast creates
and the subsequent destructive column of water
unleashed.

Kim, however, did not speculate on who may
have fired the weapon and said an investigation
was ongoing and it's still too early to deter-
mine the cause.

Soon after the disaster, Kim told lawmak-
ers that a North Korean torpedo was one of the
likely scenarios, but the government has been
careful not to blame the North outright, and
Pyongyang has denied its involvement.

As investigations have pointed to an external
explosion as the cause of the sinking, however,
suspicion of the North has grown, given the

a srl

country's history of provocation and attacks
on the South.

The Cheonan was on a routine patrol on
March 26 when the unexplained explosion split
it in two in one of South Korea's worst naval
disasters. Forty bodies have been recovered so
far, but six crew members are still unaccounted
for and are presumed dead.

The site of the sinking is near where the rival
Koreas fought three times since 1999, most
recently a November clash that left one North
Korean soldier dead and three others wounded.
The two Koreas are still technically at war
because their 1950-53 Korean War ended in a
truce, not a peace treaty.

Also Sunday, investigators said a prelimi-
nary investigation of the front part of the 1,200-
ton ship — retrieved the day before — pointed
to an external explosion.

Chief investigator Yoon Duk-yong told
reporters that an inspection of the hull pointed
to an underwater explosion. He appeared to
support the bubble jet effect theory, saying,
"It is highly likely that a non-contact explo-
sion was the case rather than a contact explo-
sion.”

But he, too, said it was too early to determine
what caused the explosion.

Earlier Sunday, Prime Minister Chung Un-
chan said South Korea will take "stern" action
against whoever was behind the explosion as
the country started a five-day funeral for the 46
dead and missing sailors. Makeshift alters were
set up in Seoul and other major cities to allow
citizens to pay their respect.

GN 1034

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
APPLICATION FOR RENEWAL

OF BUSINESS LICENCES

The Ministry of Finance advises the general public that in accordance
with the Business Licence Act 1980, all business licences expire on
the 31 December and must be renewed on or before January 1st,
but not later than April, 30th. All Applications must be accompanied
by relevant governmental regulatory requirements to be renewed.

First time applicants may visit our office located on Frederick
Street, Frederick House for more information.

Applications for businesses with turnovers of $1,000,000.00 and
turnovers exceeding $1,000,000.00 should be certified by a certified
Public Accountant, registered under the Public Accountants Act.

You are further advised that it is an offence to carry on a business
without a valid Business Licence. On failure to comply with the law,
Section 15 of the Business Licence Act prescribes on summary
conviction, a fine of $10,000.00 or imprisonment for two years as

follows.

*In any year without lawful excuse carries on a business in
respect of which there is no licence in force.

* Fails to apply for a Business Licence.

* Fails without reasonable excuse to furnish any particulars or
information within the time specified by the Secretary for

revenue.

* Makes a false statement in a material particular in any
application for a business licence, or in any other
information furnished under the Act.

* Obstructs the Secretary of Revenue in the exercise of his
functions under this section of the Act.

Additionally, you are advised that officers from the Ministry of
Finance will commence regular inspections of businesses to
ensure full compliance with the Law.

For additional information regarding this matter, kindly
contact our office, Frederick House, Frederick Street, at
telephone (242)325-1171 or the Administrator’s
office in any Family Island.

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