Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

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Volume: 106 No.125



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The Tribune 8



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BAHAMAS EDITION

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FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010



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OTHER OF GIRL WHO SUFFOCATED IN CAR SPEAKS OU

1 did not kal my baby

TRIBUNE EXCLUSIVE
By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE mother of the three-
year-old girl who suffocated
to death in a car, last night
spoke of her anguish at los-
ing her only daughter and also
of being accused of her mur-
der.

After being questioned and
released without charge by
police, 44-year-old Sandra
McDonald, told The Tribune
how a “simple misunder-
standing” led to the tragic
death of Sandria Demeritte.

Sandria, who was described
as a bright toddler with
boundless love of her father
Larry Demeritte, was found
dead in a car after she appar-
ently wandered away from
her mother’s home.

It is believed she became
trapped in the vehicle and suf-
focated.

Last night mum Sandra, of
Abner Street, off Fox Hill
Road, claimed the events that
led up to Sandria’s death
began when 50-year-old Mr
Demeritte walked out of her
house.

Ryan Pinder

Sas
ex stant SECTOR



THE TRIBUNE covered the
tragic events on Monday.



She said: “Me and my
boyfriend just had a misun-
derstanding, he got out of the
bed, put on his slippers, and
went walking out the front
door. He slammed the door
behind him. She went behind
him, and like two minutes lat-
er I heard the door and I
heard her say ‘Daddy’, so I
thought he was right there.”

Familiar with the route to
his house, an estimated 100
metres away, the family
believes Sandria left her

SEE page 15

misses first

chance to vote as MP

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



DESPITE enduring heavy
criticism for having voted in the
United States but never in the
Bahamas, Ryan Pinder has yet
to cast a vote in his homeland —
missing his first chance as the
newly-elected MP for Elizabeth.

Mr Pinder is again taking
flack for his voting record, this

time because he passed up the

opportunity to formally support
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Bill in Parliament
on Wednesday.



EVs

The MP defended his absence yesterday, saying he had a pre-
vious engagement, and pointed out that he expressed his sup-

SEE page 15

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Batter Service
Bahamian-owned »*









By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

YESTERDAY’S celebra-
tion of Earth Day saw the
opening of the Bahamas
National Trust’s 26th nation-
al park, Bonefish Pond,
marking the protection of
around 1,000 acres of wet-
lands on the south side of
New Providence.

Eric Carey, executive
director of the Trust,
expressed his hope to
expand the park across the



BNT celebrates Earth Day
with national park opening

south coast as development
expands from Coral Harbour
to Venice Bay and the South
Seas development directly
bordering the new national
park and dredging a canal at
the mouth of Bonefish Pond.

Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux said the sur-
rounding developments are
minor in comparison to the
good work the Trust is doing
to protect important ecosys-
tems.

“The destruction that has
taken place along this coast
has been long standing,” Dr

SANDRA MCDONALD
with her tragic late daughter
Sandria Demeritte.





Deveaux said.

“But it’s only small com-
pared to the expansive wet-
lands on the southern coast
of New Providence.

“All the way to Coral Har-
bour is an expansive wetland
system.

“We hope to shape all that
development around the
wetland system and the envi-
ronment, that way what you
set aside will do its job, and
the surrounding areas can
only get help with sound

SEE page 16





ag TE
daha
INSIDE TODAY



The Minister of
Health intervenes
in row between
govt agencies

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis has intervened
in a conflict between two gov-
ernment agencies regulating
the health sector which, it is
claimed, was impeding the
operations of some local phar-
macies.

Sources in the industry
accused the Health Profes-
sions Council (HPC), which
formerly regulated pharma-
cies in the country, of failing
to turn over records needed

SEE page 16

Man accused
of sexually
abusing boys
denied bail

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN accused of sexu-
ally abusing four young boys
was denied bail yesterday
when he appeared in court
yesterday.

Kevin Hanna, who was
arraigned on unlawful sex
charges two weeks ago, was
back in Magistrates Court
8, Bank Lane, yesterday.

It is alleged that some-
time between December,
2009, and April 5, 2010,
Hanna abused two six-year-
old boys, a five-year-old boy

SEE page 16





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NASSAU AND) BAHAMA ISLANDS”? TEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS






ran Sit



o ST. BEDE’S

a STUDENTS
LEBRATE

a
DAY

STUDENTS of St Bede’s
Catholic Primary School
yesterday celebrated Earth
Day 2010 by planting a
vegetable garden. They plant-
ed everything from cabbage
and beets, to peas, beans and
sweet pepper in their new gar-
den on the school’s grounds.

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Overlooking Beautiful Nassau Harbour. East Bay Street

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Family Fun Day

Domino Tournament
ey pte
Interactive Displays and Games by the Bahamas National Trust
and BREEF
* Lionfish tasting

Adastra Gardens
Allantis Water Features Department with live animals
Tere =the Beit:
Dolphin Encounters
fol rs een
* Adventure Learning Center
Many more partners

* Alrip to Andros to participate in the 2nd Annual Andros Eca-camp
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* Powerboat Adventure Tours

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find out how much money you would save in a year if you
replaced §8. incandescent bulbs’ {75W) with 8. compact
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~.What slogan is written on the Green Bags produced by
the Bahamas National Trust with the support of the National
Coastal Awareness Committee?

Name an invasive plant AND an invasive animal found th
The Bahamas. |
Name three native plants that grow on the eee of The:

_ List the two most common items removed from Bonefish
Pond during the 2009 International Coastal Clean-up.






-. According to the National Coastal /
what are the five main threats to the coa;
The Bahamas?

eness Committee,
@ l environment of





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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 3



Union and COB set to
resume talks on Monday

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia. net



AFTER four days of strike action by
COB faculty, industrial agreement nego-
tiations between the institution and the
Union of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas are set to resume on Monday.

Both parties consented to a “lock-
down” for three weeks, until May 14, and
will be meeting throughout the week from
10am to 7pm and half day on Saturday.

The teams will have two one-hour
breaks and no negotiations will be held on
Sunday.

If negotiations are still at an impasse by
this new deadline, provisions for a sev-
en-day extension have been accepted, at
which time external arbitrators will be
brought in to facilitate an agreement.

Members of the faculty’s negotiating
team were granted an extension of two
weeks after negotiations are completed
to deliver final grades for their students. It
was confirmed that the grades of students
who are graduating or transferring will
be given priority and will be in by the
May 8 transcript deadline.

The two parties have signed off on 52 of
84 clauses on the new agreement in the
presence of Department of Labour offi-
cials. Of the 32 left, the most contentious
deal with appointments, promotions,
duties and responsibilities, performance
assessments and salaries.

UTEB president Jennifer Isaacs-Dot-
son said: “As always we would like to
remain optimistic; I think three weeks is
more than enough time to reach an agree-
ment and we hope to get one. I think we
even have enough time to proof it and
get it finalised as an industrial agree-
ment.”

During the four-day strike, faculty
members raised a number of issues,
including the state of campus facilities
and their unanswered questions about the






















management of funds. They are asking
for COB to undergo a forensic audit and
make its financial records accessible to
the public.

In a press conference yesterday,
Bahamas Public Service Union (BCPOU)
president John Pinder announced his
union’s confidence in COB’s accounting
system.

He said the college had shown him
audited financial statements up to 2008,
and that he found no irregularities in the
audit or the accounting system.

However, the faculty has maintained
that the validity of the audited statements
is irrelevant to their request, which is
essentially about transparency at an insti-
tution partially funded with public money.

Mts Isaacs-Dotson added: “We never
questioned the credibility of the audited
financial statements. We asked for a
forensic audit; this is completely differ-
ent from audited financial statements.

“A forensic audit would really look at
how every cent and penny that was given
to the institution was spent. I think that
they are deliberately trying to confuse
the two.”



UTEB president Jennifer Isaacs-Dotson

‘Tentative signs’ that national economy is stabilising

Two in custody after drugs
seized in separate operations

TWO men are in custody following two separate
police operations in which illegal drugs were seized by
the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU).

Sometime around 5pm on Wednesday, DEU offi-
cers while on patrol in the area of Dumping Ground
Corner observed the occupant of a gold Hyundai Tus-
con, with the licence plate number 151532, acting sus-
piciously.

They conducted a search of the jeep and recovered a
quantity of suspected cocaine from the vehicle’s glove
compartment.

A 38-year-old man of Deveaux Street was taken in for
questioning in connection with this discovery.

Then yesterday, at around 10.30am, DEU officers
searched a home on Milton Street, off East Street.
They recovered a quantity of suspected marijuana. A 25-
year-old man was subsequently arrested.

The DEU also recovered a quantity of suspected
marijuana when they searched an abandoned building
at Red Land Acres off Soldier Road. No on was taken
into custody in connection with this matter so far.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE
Please be advised that

Ms. Jo-Ann McSweeney

ate ae
i

es . 1
oe



is no longer employed and is not authorized
to conduct any Business on behalf of

ACCORDING to the lat-
est Central Bank of the
Bahamas report on economic
and financial developments
in the country, there are “ten-
tative signs of stabilisation”
in the national economy, as
the global economy entered
the early stages of recovery.

However, the domestic
economy will nonetheless
continue to face “significant
headwinds” throughout the
remainder of the year with
employment prospects “con-
strained”, given that the
upturn in the world’s
economies is expected to be
more drawn out than recov-
eries in the past, the report
said.

Based on key economic
indicators in February, the
report, issued this month,
notes that while tourism per-
formance this year is likely
to be “subdued”, it nonethe-

Two armed
robberies
investigated

POLICE are investigat-
ing two armed robberies
which both occurred on
Wednesday night.

The first one took place
around 6.35pm when a
woman was held up at gun-

less saw a “slightly positive”
upswing in its “key stopover
segment” following the sharp
downturn that prevailed at
the same time a year ago.

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reports that a sur-
vey of some large New Prov-
idence hotels suggested “a
marginal improvement” in
the number of tourists staying
overnight on the island in
January and February as well
as in the amount of money
they spent while here.

Goods

Meanwhile, in a bit of fur-
ther good news for the local
population, the cost of goods
and services which had been
buoyed by a 4.7 per cent
inflation rate in February
2009 fell overall a year later,
with an inflation rate of 1.8
per cent registered at the time

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of the report.

This overall decline was
boosted by drops in inflation
in the housing market, for
furniture and household
operation, food and bever-
ages, recreation and enter-
tainment, medical care and
health and transport and
communication when com-
pared with the same time last
year.

However, the report notes
that other key goods and ser-
vices increased in cost,
including education, clothing
and footwear, electricity and
fuel.

“The fuel surcharge for the
month of February rose by
an average of 11.7 per cent
to 10.75 cents per kilowatt
hour (Kwh) over the previ-
ous month, and by 3.8 per
cent when compared to a
year earlier.

“The average price of
diesel fell by 1.6 per cent in
January to $3.60 per gallon;
while gasoline costs rose by
0.5 per cent to $4.19 per gal-
lon. On a year-on-year basis,
the prices of both products
were higher by 31.4 per cent
and 29.7 per cent, respective-
ly,” said the report.

Despite generally positive
signs in the economy at large,

the report records that the
government’s fiscal position
saw “continued erosion” giv-
n “persistent weakness in
private sector demand”.

The government deficit was
25.8 per cent larger in Feb-
ruary 2010 than at the same
time in the previous year, sev-
en months into the 2009/2010
budget cycle, standing at
$200.3 million.

Projects

Spending $90.3 million for
the 2009/2010 budget year so
far on capital projects, $28.5
million more than it had up
until the same point in the
2008/2009 budget cycle, gov-
ernment had spent almost 40
per cent more in this area
compared to the previous
year as it continued its infra-
structure drive to support
employment, the report said.

All the while the govern-
ment continues to lose out on
tax revenue and on interna-
tional trade and non-trade
stamp tax receipts in com-
parison with 2008/2009 due
in part to continually “slug-
gish consumer demand”
among the population, the
Central Bank said.

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point on Palm Beach
Street.

Press liaison officer
Sergeant Chrislyn Skip-
pings said that according to
reports, the woman was
approached by a man with
dread locks, dressed in a
navy blue shirt and short
jeans, allegedly armed with
a handgun, who demanded
cash.

The culprit robbed the
woman of her handbag and
fled the area on foot in an
unknown direction.

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received by police, a group
of three men were standing
in front of a house in
Jubilee Gardens when they
were approached by two
men wearing dark clothing.

One of these men was
reportedly armed with a
handgun.

The two thugs robbed the
men of cell phones, jew-
ellery and an undetermined
amount of cash, before
fleeing the area on foot.

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uae

Madeira St [242] 325-8233 © Robinson Rd [242] 322-3080









PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





















































LONDON — Nick Clegg proved he wasn't
a one-hit wonder in Britain's second election
debate Thursday, holding his own against
Labour's Prime Minister Gordon Brown and
the Conservatives' David Cameron over thorny
issues such as Afghanistan, the Catholic sex
abuse scandal and the special relationship with
the United States.

An initial poll gave Clegg a slight edge in the
debate, but it appeared to be close to a three-
way tie. Still, Clegg managed to keep some of
his political stardust — respondents said the
Liberal Democrats' 43-year-old leader seemed
the most honest.

Clegg shook up the race last week, emerging
as a clear winner after giving a smooth and
confident performance in Britain's first U.S.-
styled election debate and boosting his party's
profile. Thursday's debate came as dozens of
anti-war protesters and other activists clashed
with police outside the studio hosting the prime-
time duel. Pro-Palestinian groups outside
protested Israeli incursions in Gaza. Others
held placards that read "Troops Home!" There
are some 10,000 British troops still stationed in
Afghanistan. It was the closest Britain has come
to the famous 1960 Nixon-Kennedy debate —
every grimace and blemish were seen in high-
definition television format. The candidates’
performances make the razor-close May 6 elec-
tion even harder to predict.

Polls suggest that no party will win an out-
right majority. That situation could turn the
Liberal Democrats into a kingmaker, bartering
with both Labour and the Conservative for
things they want — namely electoral changes
that could weaken Britain's traditional two-
party system. Brown was on the attack for
most of the debate, ridiculing Clegg and
Cameron — both 16 years his junior — and at
one point comparing them to his children. He
also lashed out at Clegg, accusing him of being
anti-American, and going after Cameron for
being "anti-European.”

"These two guys remind me of my two
young boys squabbling at bathtime, squabbling
about referendums on the EU when what we
need is jobs and growth and recovery,” said
Brown, 59. "I'm afraid David is anti-European,
Nick is anti-American and both are out of touch
with reality."

Clegg, whose Liberal Democrats voted
against the U.S.-led Iraq war and who has ques-
tioned British "subservience" to U.S. interests,
denied he was anti-American, but said Britain
should re-evaluate how it deals with its trans-
Atlantic ally. "It's an immensely important spe-
cial relationship, but it shouldn't be a one-way
street. We shouldn't always do what our Amer-
ican friends tell us to do."

An automated telephone poll taken by Com-
Res after the debate showed that 2,691 viewers
favoured Clegg by a tiny margin. About a third
of viewers believed that Clegg won the debate,
while 30 per cent believed that Brown or
Cameron won. The margin of error for that
sample size is plus or minus 2 percentage points.
Cameron, who gave a lackluster performance in

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EDLINE DECIUS of Mackey
Street, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D. D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

UK’s Clegg shows he’s no 1-hit wonder



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

nN -1" 12) 307-097" =a. 1, SOc “02° ks rrr
Government should

rethink one-way
streets change








Publisher/Editor 1972-






last week's debate, appeared to learn from his
mistakes — he looked directly at the camera
and seemed more confident Thursday. He
almost lost his temper when he accused Brown
of allowing campaign leaflets that suggested a
Conservative government would cut benefits
for the elderly.

"These lies you are getting from Labour are
pure and simple lies. I have seen these lies and
they make me very, very angry."

Both Labour and the Conservatives voted
for Britain to go to war in Iraq, a stance that has
hurt them with anti-war sentiment still strong in
Britain. The Labour Party, which has been in
power for 13 years, lost many seats in the 2005
general election when voters cast protest ballots
against Tony Blair's decision to lead Britain
into Iraq. Afghanistan, the latest nettlesome
mission, in which 280 British troops have died,
is now one of Britain's longest and most costly
conflicts, draining government coffers as the
country tries to recover from its worst recession
since World War II.

Clegg criticized the strategy in Afghanistan
and said troops needed better equipment. The
party would support other operations if they
were in the interests of Britain but, "If you put
soldiers into harm's way, you either do the job
properly or don't do it at all," he said.

An audience member asked whether the
leaders backed Pope Benedict XVI's visit to
Britain in September, and if they supported
the church's stance on the sex abuse scandal,
condoms, homosexuality and stem cell research.
All three men said they supported the visit,
which is due to cost taxpayers some £15 million
($22.5 million). Cameron was most definitive,
however, on other differences with the church,
saying the church has "very serious work to do
to unearth and come to terms with some of the
appalling things that have happened."

Clegg, a former member of the European
Parliament, once backed Britain adopting the
euro and has talked about forging stronger ties
with Europe. He stressed Thursday that Britain
needs cooperation from other European coun-
tries if progress is to be made on terrorism,
immigration, climate change and bank regula-
tion. Cameron has long been a euro-sceptic
and stood apart from both Clegg and Brown on
Thursday when he suggested again there should
be a referendum allowing British people to
decide how they feel about being a part of the
European Union. Clegg is unlikely to become
prime minister because Britain's electoral sys-
tem is not proportional so parties must win the
majority of districts not the popular vote. This
puts smaller and newer parties at a disadvan-
tage. Most core voters still either vote Conser-
vative or Labour. Candidates managed to get
across their campaign mantras throughout the
debates — with the Conservatives warning that
a hung Parliament and a coalition government
could hurt the pound and Britain's credit rating
and Brown insisting that a government shake-
up could jeopardize an economic recovery.

(This article was written by Paisley Dodds,
Associated Press Writer).




Ry

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space in
your valuable column to
express my opinion on the
recent change of the south
ends of Market Street and
Baillou Hill Road to one-
way streets.

I live in the southwestern
district of New Providence
and work in the north and
like a large majority of citi-
zens who also live and work
in those areas for years I
have been using Baillou Hill
Road and Market Streets
interchangeably to get to
work and/or return home.

However, since their
recent official change to
one-way streets, I now find
driving to and fro to work
and home to be very frus-
trating.

What once used to be a
20-minute journey back and
forth on any given day for
me, is now ranging any-
where from 45 minutes to
an hour and a half just to
return home.

I am not saying the idea
to make Market and Bail-
lou Hill Roads one way is
not a good one, but I ques-
tion if the Government
looked at every possible
caSe scenario when deciding
to do this.

In my opinion by making
both streets one-way going
south and north respective-
ly, the north and south-
bound traffic (which com-
prises a large concentration
of vehicular traffic) have
only been given one choice —
a one-way route up and a
one-way route down.

In my opinion, Baillou
Hill Road was a very popu-
lar median for those of us
who had to travel to the
south or southwestern parts
of the island while Market
Street was the perfect route
for vehicular traffic going
either east, south-east or




LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



south-west. However, by
making both medians one-
way, all the north-bound
traffic is now being forced
to use Baillou Hill Road in
the morning and during
peak hours and forced to
only use Market Street
when going south, south-
east or south-west after Spm.
Because of this change I
have noticed that traffic is
now grid-locked on Poin-
ciana Drive, Tucker Road
and Thompson Boulevard
because depending on
where you are headed,
south-westerners now have
to use Thompson Boulevard
to get home, while a large
majority of the traffic going
south-east or in some parts
of the south-west are now
concentrated on Market
Street alone, the conve-
nience of Baillou Hill Road
having been taken away.

I have been working in
the downtown area for more
than 15 years and I have
never see traffic grid-locked
on Poinciana Drive and
Tucker Roads, and at least it
used to move on Thompson
Boulevard! Even the street
that runs in the back of The
Nassau Guardian is now
grid-locked with traffic dur-
ing peak hours — a first in
my opinion. You will also
notice if you drive on Bail-
lou Hill Road after Spm and
during peak hours, that it is
like a ghost town.

Conversely, Market Street
is basically the same in the
mornings. I think this is
much to do with the change
and with everyone being
forced to use one street or
the other, the choice of
either/or having been taken
away by making the streets

one-way.

I know I am not a lone
voice crying out in request-
ing that the Government
reconsiders its plan to make
these streets one-way each.
In my opinion, the change
has made it worse not bet-
ter. Personally, I never
found Baillou Hill Road to
be a problem in 40 plus
years of living in the south.
It was, in fact, one of the
easiest roads to use for any-
one centrally located and
even if there were a traffic
jam on Baillou Hill Road,
there was the added conve-
nience of zig-zagging on to
Market Street and back at
an individual's convenience.

In addition to this new
nightmare in returning
home on weekdays, I really
miss the convenience of
using the side streets off
either road going back and
forth. Could you imagine
having to be in traffic for
over 40 minutes on Market
Street just to come all the
way around on Robinson
Road and on to Baillou Hill
Road to make a stop at The
Meat Man on Baillou Hill
Road. Imagine that!

I keep reading about how
certain government officials
came up with this idea, and
it seemed to be a good one
at the time so give it a
chance to work, however, in
my opinion the idea is not
proving to be a good one,
and I trust that the powers
that be would not let their
prides intervene in making
this change a permanent
one.

Please listen to your citi-
zens.

Widen and improve the
streets, but please allow
them to remain two-way.

CONCERNED
DRIVER
Nassau,

April, 2010.

Looking at traffic reversal
and urban development

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish the follow-
ing in reference to the rever-
sal of traffic and urban devel-
opment.

As a young man trying to
find my way in architecture
in 1980, I spent many days at
the Town Planning Depart-
ment learning the in’s and
out’s of plan processing and
building permit approvals.

In the reception area of the
town planning department,

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was a huge model of the city
of Nassau. That model
showed what the city was
intended to be and what it
was at the time, complete with
scaled model buildings, large
green spaces, etc.

That model also showed a
street plan and many housing
complexes that were to be
built.

I remember some streets
were to be reconfigured to
create a going down road and
a coming out road from
downtown. Balliou Hill Road
was to be the coming out road
heading south, and East
Street was a going too road,
headed north into town. Mar-
ket Street was to remain a
two-way street.

Another plan that always
fascinated me was a very large
map of New Providence that
indicated in an array of
colours the particular devel-
opment Zones for the island,
this also included an area des-
ignated as a Free Trade Zone.

The map also showed the
reconfigured roads and high-
ways, two I specifically
remember were the central
highway that began where the
new Frank Watson highway
is today and ended at
Yamacraw and the southern
perimeter road. What is most
significant and relevant is the
model and master plan, as I
remember were titled the
New Providence Urban
Development Plan 1964.

To date I have heard noth-
ing from the professionals
who knew of these plans, to
offer comments to allay the
public’s fears about these
developments, as the plans
made sense then as it does
today, and every government
has sought to put their own
version into play. However
the concept is the same and
will work if given time.

ADRIAN B La-RODA
Nassau,
April, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 5

Waiting for completion of Baillou Hill

Road works ‘will force business closures’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FAMILY businesses will be forced to
close if they take the advice of Minister of
Works Neko Grant and wait for Baillou Hill
Road works to be completed, proprietors
claim.

The business owners reported losses of
20 to 40 per cent since Baillou Hill Road
was made one-way northbound and Market
Street one-way southbound between Wulff
Road and Robinson Road on March 30.

Calling for the road change to be reversed,
they told the Minister of Works and his
senior staff on Monday how the traffic diver-
sion has already forced one business to close
and several others to let staff go.

However, Mr Grant partially blames the
disruption in business on the construction
work on Baillou Hill Road which currently
leaves only one lane of the dual carriage-
way open to drivers and is expected to con-
tinue for the next nine months.

But president of the Carmichael Business
Forum Ethric Bowe said there is no time
for businesses to wait as around 400 jobs are
on the line and family businesses which have
thrived for generations will now have to close
their doors.

He and several other business owners say
they have had fewer customers over the last
four weeks as drivers no longer pass their
businesses on their way home from work,
and circular traffic discourages them from
diverting their route south on Market Street.

“We can’t wait nine months, we need this
to be dealt with now,” Mr Bowe said.

“For us, this is an emergency, and the min-
ister knows full well that every day we wait
we go further into the hole and it’s harder for
us to recover, so it seems there’s an agenda to
put us Bahamian businesses out of business.”

The business owners maintain they were
not consulted about the change in traffic
flow prior to its implementation despite the
severe impact it has had on their livelihoods,
that of their staff and the community at large.





“T just don’t understand the thinking of
government,” Mr Bowe said.

“Without having jobs, I don’t know how
they can go ahead and look at this and say
lets destroy some jobs.

“They are now fully aware of what they
are doing and if they know, they are respon-
sible, and they will be held responsible.”

The Ministry of Works made the traffic
change to improve traffic management and
flow, and to improve road safety.

Mr Grant claims it has been a success in
that respect.

As businesses also reported a drop in
business after road works commenced and
prior to the traffic diversion, he asked pro-
prietors to wait for road improvements to be
completed.

“Traffic is flowing extremely well
between Wulff and Robinson Roads and
we feel that the same thing will happen on
Baillou Hill Road once the construction
has been completed,” Mr Grant said.

“While I assured the business owners
that I heard their concerns, I also respect-
fully asked them to give the project a
chance.

“Wait until we would have completed



BAILLOW HILL RO
ONE WAT
NORTH BOUND
TO WULFF ROAD

the work between Robinson Road and
Wulff Road, and for the traffic to flow for
those persons who might have been reluc-
tant to stop to their various business hous-
es because of the road construction.”

The minister argued that it is more
important for government to accomplish
what it seeks to do in regards to alleviating
traffic so that the greatest number of people
can benefit.

Nevertheless, businesses in the area are
gathering signatures for a petition to protest
the road changes and are planning a public
demonstration next week.

“We will resist this,” Mr Bowe said.

“Businesses are binding together in a
strong way and everybody has stood up
passionately and directly pointed to the
minister and said this cannot stick, you can-
not do this.”

Former PLP leadership contender Paul
Moss, who intends to run as an indepen-
dent parliamentary candidate for St Cecilia
in the next general election, has pledged
his support for the call to scrap the one-
way system, saying the change is “utter
madness” as it is distressing for businesses
and residents.

Some pharmacies ‘have signed on to drug plan’



| Police to host fun walk

: ON Saturday beginning at 6am, the Police Athletic,
: Sports and Social Club will host a fun walk.

: The walk will start at police headquarters on East Street.
: The route for the fun walk is as follows: North on East
: Street to Bay Street, east on Bay Street to the new bridge,
: over the new bridge to the Paradise Island golf course; from
: the golf course, down the old bridge onto Shirley Street,
: west on Shirley Street to East Street, south on East Street
: and back to police headquarters.

Members of the public are encouraged to bring their
: family and walk with the police.

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By ALESHA CADET

DESPITE ongoing negoti-
ations between the Bahamas
Pharmacy Association and
the National Insurance Board
over the terms of the new
National Prescription Drug
Plan, some pharmacies have
reportedly gone ahead and
signed on to the initiative.

BPA president Marvin
Smith said yesterday he is not
aware of any members signing
on, but according to NIB sev-
eral private pharmacies and
government facilities have
executed contacts to serve as
pharmacy providers when the
plan is launched.

This comes as the BPA
continued to discuss its
counter-proposal — which it
intends to present to NIB
shortly — at a regular monthly
meeting last night.

Once implemented, the
National Prescription Drug
Plan (NPDP) will provide

more than 160 prescription
drugs free of charge to suf-
ferers of 11 chronic diseases.
The first phase will cover NIB
pensioners, invalids, children,
and Bahamians over 65.

For months, NIB has been
reporting success with the reg-
istration of beneficiaries.
Tami Francis, NPDP manag-
er, said 7,000 persons have
already signed on.

She said her team is feel-
ing increasingly confident of a
smooth launch this summer.

“We have procured the
information technology sys-
tem and its installation is in
progress; registration and
related activities are ongoing.
So we will be ready,” said Ms
Francis.

However, the BPA is still
not satisfied with the plan.
Among the points of con-
tention are subsidies for the
installation of IT infrastruc-
ture and IT maintenance
responsibilities.

The pharmacies NIB said
have signed on to the NPDP
are: Lowe’s Pharmacy’s Town
Centre Mall and Soldier Road
locations; Betande Drugs on
West Bay Street; the Walk-
In Clinic’s Centreville loca-
tion and the People’s Phar-
macy’s Prince Charles,
Carmichael Road, and Sol-
dier Road locations.

William Cash, CFO of
Lowe’s Pharmacy, said:
“Lowe’s has been involved in
the plan since its inception
and we’ve been following it
all the way through. We feel
its something that the com-
munity needs and we feel its
going to take care of the niche
that’s out there of folk who
are not currently covered. We
intend to give it support and
work with it and try to per-
fect it as quickly as we can.”

Jonathan Fraser of the Peo-
ple’s Pharmacy said: “I think
its long overdue and our
Bahamian people are going

to really appreciate it once we
can get it up and running. The
People’s Pharmacy is excited;
we’re very enthusiastic about
this plan.”

Philip Kemp of the Walk-In
Clinic confirmed that the
company has signed on to the
NPDP and said he thinks it
will have a huge impact on
business.

“Tt will allow us to improve
our customer base.

“Tt will allow access to cus-
tomers that we may not nor-
mally have access to, and
hopefully the services that we
offer will appeal to them oth-
er than just prescriptions,” he
said.

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CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

Notes to Statement of Financial Position

December 31, 2009

4.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

A previously recognized impairment loss is reversed only if there has been a change in
the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount of an asset, however, not to an
amount higher than the carrying amount that would have been determined (net of any
depreciation), had no impairment loss been recognized for the asset in prior years.

A reversal of an impairment loss is credited to current operations.

Related party transactions

Transactions between related parties are based on terms similar to those offered to non-
related parties. Parties are considered to be related if one party has the ability, directly or
indirectly, to control the other party or exercise significant influence over the other party
in making financial and operating decisions and the parties are subject to common control
or common significant influence. Related parties may be individuals or corporate entities.

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Cash and cash equivalents of $148,835 as at December 31, 2009 are comprised of the
following:
Interest 2009 2008
rate $ $
Cash on hand 300 300
Current accounts:
First Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) Limited (B$)
SG Hambros Bank and Trust (Bahamas)
Limited (US$) - 6,266 7,242
Fixed deposit: ;
SG Hambros Bank and Trust (Bahamas) Limited

27,255 31,017

2.61% 115,014

148,835

115,393
153,952

FIXED ASSETS

Fixed assets as at December 31, 2009 are comprised of the following:
2008 Additions Adjustments 2009

$ $ $ $
Cost:

Furniture and equipment
Leasehold improvements

28,583 10,736 -
10,867 2,041
39,450 12,777

39,319
- 12,908
- $2,227
Accumulated depreciation:
Furniture and equipment
Leasehold improvements

27,420 2,794
10,867 453
38,287 3,247

(3,245) 26,969
- 11,320
(3,245) 38,289

Net carrying value 1,163 9,530 3,245 13,938

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

Notes to Statement of Financial Position

December 31, 2009

7.

RISK MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

The Company’s financial instruments include non-derivative instruments such as cash
and cash equivalents and accounts payable, which arise directly from its operations. The

risks arising from the use of financial instruments are liquidity risk and credit risk.

Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk arises from the possibility that the Company may encounter difficulties in
raising funds to meet commitments from financial instruments or that a market for the

financial instruments may not exist in some circumstances.

The Company seeks to manage its liquidity profile to be able to finance operations and
capital expenditures. As part of the liquidity risk management program, the Company
regularly evaluates the projected and actual cash flow information. One of management’s
initiatives is to negotiate increases in trust fees to cover operating expenses. Trust fees for
the year ended December 31, 2009 increased to $505,000 from $487,000 in 2008.

Credit risk

Credit risk is the risk that a counterparty fails to discharge an obligation to the Company.
The Company’s maximum exposure to credit risk in the event the counterparties fail to
perform their obligations in relation to each recognized financial asset, is the carrying
amount of these assets as indicated in the statement of financial position.

It is the Company’s policy to invest excess cash in low risk fixed deposits in reputable
financial institutions and the Company has invested in a fixed deposit with SG Hambros
Bank and Trust (Bahamas) Limited amounting to $115,014 as at December 31,
2009(2008:$1 15,393).

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The Company’s objectives in managing capital are to maintain a strong capital base so as
to maintain stakeholders’ confidence by providing adequate return and to ensure the

Company’s ability to continue as a going concern, and sustain future development of the
business.

In order to maintain or adjust the capital structure, the Company may adjust the amount of
dividends paid to shareholders, return capital to shareholders or issue new shares.

The Company is not exposed to a high level of risk since there are no existing

borrowings. It is more flexible in terms of managing its operations, as it is not subject to
restrictions that might be imposed if there were loans.

Report of Independent Auditors pages 1 and 2,



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 9



Founder of Charles W Saunders

Baptist School is honoured

STUDENTS of the Charles
W Saunders Baptist School locat-
ed on Jean Street honoured their
founder, Rev Dr Charles W
Saunders, in a ceremony attend-
ed by political and religious lead-
ers, former colleagues, friends
and well-wishers on Monday.

Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister was among
those paying homage to an edu-
cator who is known throughout
his five decades of teaching for
being a crusader for excellence.

Minister Bannister, a former
student of Rev Dr Saunders, told
the students that the best way
they can pay tribute to their
patron is to learn their lessons,
become disciplined and respect-
ful human beings and have God
at the centre of their lives.

“Tf you acquire one or more of
these principles, Dr Saunders
would say that his life and labour
to God and country were not in
vain,” he said.

Mr Bannister also quoted
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham when he described Rev
Saunders as a “prince of the Bap-
tist Church in the Bahamas.”

He noted that the prime min-
ister recognised Rev Saunders at
a 2002 banquet stating that:

“Like his predecessors (late
Rev Dr Harcourt W Brown, the
Rev Talmadge Sands, and the
Rev Reuben E Cooper Sr) in the
church, Rev Dr Saunders has
sought to promote respect for,
and protection of the rights and
the dignity of God's people in
the Bahamas. Throughout his
life, he stood for improving the
lot of those least able to assist
themselves, the young, the elder-
ly, and the disenfranchised. He
took a fearless stance in opposi-
tion to the (inbred) inequalities
and prejudices which blighted
our country during the period of
minority government forming an
important part of our history.”

Among the dignitaries that
attended the event were Earl
Deveaux, Minister of the Envi-
ronment; Sir Arlington Butler;
Rev Dr William Thompson; Pas-
tor Hugh Roach; Dr Baltron
Bethel, and Rev T G Morrison.

Rev Dr Saunders appeared
humbled by the recollections of
his life’s achievements, songs and
other expressions of apprecia-

a -













REV CHARLES W SAUNDERS is pictured recounting the history of the
school named in his honour to leaders who attended the affair.

Attending the ceremony were (I-r) Rev Anthony Carroll, president-
elect of the Bahamas National Baptist Missionary and Educational Con-
vention; Wenley Miller, principal of the C W Saunders Baptist School; Rev-
erend Patrick Smith, secretary of the Bahamas National Baptist Mis-
sionary and Educational Convention; Desmond Bannister, Minister of
Education, and Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Environment.

At back is Dr Baltron Bethel, former Director General of Tourism and
Reverend T G Morrison, Pastor of Zion Baptist Church, Shirley Street.

tion made by staff and students.

In his response, he asked the
audience to allow him to speak
candidly about the origin of the
school.

He recounted that it was born
out of many tears shed at night
and a dispute between the South-
ern Baptists United States and
the Bahamas National Mission-
ary and Educational Conference.

Rev Dr Saunders, who was
head of the organisation at that
time, said he was given a mere six
months to secure a loan to pay
the Southern Baptist Church for
the property on which the school
stood.

The group offered Rev Dr
Saunders a down payment on
the property but he refused and
through his own efforts and even
with opposition from within his
organisation, he obtained a loan
and repaid it a mere six weeks.

The school started out as the
Bahamas Baptist College but was
renamed the Charles W Saun-
ders Baptist School in 1996.

In his message to the students,
Rev Dr Saunders told them that

| Eastern Community Association

it was time to settle down and
start to learn as the future of the
Bahamas is in their hands.

He also told them that if they
attended the school that bears
his name they should know how
to properly dress and carry them-
selves,

Rev Dr Saunders reminded
the teachers that they are to be
serious about teaching students
and to do the best they can, while
they can.

In addition to honouring Rev
Dr Saunders, the school also
recognised past administrators
who were instrumental in the
development of the school.

The school also hoisted its new
flag for the first time which was
deigned by Jacoby Johnson, a
10th grade student.

Rev Dr Saunders has served
as a monitor, teacher and princi-
pal in schools throughout the
country and rose through the
ranks at the Ministry of Educa-
tion to become Deputy Perma-
nent Secretary. He has also con-
tributed to several task forces to
develop educational policies.

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Funeral Service For

Melita Eliza Ferguson, 75



of Blue Hills and formerly of
“S@) Bullet Hill, Crooked Island, will
| be held on Saturday at 2:00 p.m.
) at New Bethany Baptist Church,
Key West Street. Officiating will
be Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper.
Interment will follow in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, J.

F, Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish her memories

forever her loving and devoted
husband of 55 years Benjamin; two sons, Winston and
Lloyd Ferguson; four daughters, Joan Clarke, Yvonne
Cooper, Beverly Ferguson and Rose Morrison; son-in-
law, Oswald Morrison; daughters-in-law, Althea; one
brother, Nehemiah Moss of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania;
three sisters, Naomi Munnings, Elizabeth Adderley, Beulah
McPhee; Fifteen grand children, Raquel Kellman, Jerrett,
Shakera & Ryan Clarke, Ashley Williams, Sasha Ferguson,
Cherita Cooper, Jasmine, Jade & Emerald Ferguson,
Rashad Ferguson, Adam Miller, Chad Woodside, and
Tyler & Tarah-Rose Morrison; Six great grand children,
Kevin Kellman, Jahvaughn Clarke, Devonte & Darren
Clarke, Alia Pitt and Sapphire Clarke; two sisters-in-law,
Barbara and Lorraine Moss; one brother-in-law, Laban
Ferguson; four sisters-in-law, Vera Ferguson, Irene
Ferguson, Estella Cox, and Florence Lewis; numerous
relatives and friends Including, Reverend Franklyn and
Sister Katie Clarke, Reverend Wendell Lewis, Minister
Marion Sturrup, Tristina Ferguson, Edna Ferguson her
dedicated caregivers, Natalie Bruno and Josianne Charles,
New Bethany Baptist Church famlly, Alice Rolle, Reverend
Melvin & Bernadette Grant, Dr. Christine Chin and the
dedicated staff of Private Medical Ward, Nurse Ingraham
& Staff of Gambier Clinic, Dr. Sharma from the Trauma
Unit and the Sisal Road East family; a host of other
relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at
Evergreen Mortuary located on Mackey South, from
10:00a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and again at the church from 1pm
service time.



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE







LOCAL NEWS

STUDENTS at the Mangrove Cay High School
in Andros, perform a choral verse piece
during the E Clement Bethel National Arts
Festival adjudications on April 14, 2010.







Mangrove Cay High School scores
high in National Arts Festival

By ERIC ROSE

MANGROVE CAY,
Andros - Mangrove Cay
High School students per-
forming in the Choral
Verse Speaking of the E
Clement Bethel National
Arts Festival adjudications
scored big last week.

The students scored a 98
out of 100, one of the high-
est received so far this year
in that dramatic class.

School Principal Anna
Clarke Rolle said she was
very proud of the students’
performance in front of
drama adjudicator and
Bahamian cultural icon,
James Catalyn. She was
glad that the hard work
they put into it paid off.

“T always knew that the
students here at the Man-
grove Cay High School
have a lot of potential,” she
said. “Sometimes we do not

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4435, 326-7039
Haesau Street, P.0.Box N-1726

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT



Thursday, 22 April, 2010

Jane Fitzroy Butler Bethel,

aged 92, of 44 Nassau Street, died at her residence
Thursday morning. She is survived by her daugh-
ters, Rubie Marie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr.
Paulette Bethel, Marion Bethel, Paulette Rah-
ming; sons Dr. Marcus Bethel, Michael Bethel,
Owen Bethel; sister, Halson Butler; 18 grandchil-
dren, 8 great grandchildren. Numerous other rela-

tives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.







DRAMA ADJUDICATOR James Catalyn speaks to students at the
Mangrove Cay High School in Andros after they performed a choral
verse on April 14, 2010.

enjoyed her individual part
most of all.

get the opportunity to dis-
play or refine what we have

here.”

Seventh-grader Fremee-
ka King said she was happy
that her school did well and

“T enjoyed being able to
say it loud and doing it
myself,” she said. “I cannot
wait to tell my family how

#10 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 ¢ Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 © Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 ¢ Evening: 324-4687

James Harold Larkin, 27

of Price Street, Nassau Village who
died on Saturday, April 10th, 2010
will be held on Saturday, April 24th,
at 10:00am at Commonwealth
Mission Baptist Church,
Commonwealth Boulevard,
Elizabeth Estates. Officiating will
be Bishop Arnold Josey, assisted by
other Ministers. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soldier Road.

=~ 5

Left to cherish unforgettable and
precious memories are his Mother: Patricia Sands-Armbrister;
(1) Daughter: Jhayda Larkin, (1) Son: Jayden Larkin; (3) Sisters:
Michelle & Patricia “Pattie” Larkin & Arnette Sands;
Grandmother: Patsy Anderson; (5) Aunts: Staff Nurse Jean
Sands, Patrice Tynes, Eldora Sands, Jolean & Dianna Williams-
Edwards; (2) Uncles: Dr. David Sands & Philip Sherman of Miami,
Fla; (4) Nieces: Paige Bastian, Anneja Sands, Terren Fulford &
Megan Rolle; (4) Nephews: Miguel Strachan, Quentin Rolle &
Damien Brown Jr.; Numerous cousins including: Malik Sands,
Chauncey, Corey, Nicole, Cleveland, William, Antoinette Sherman
of Miami, Fla. & Ricardo Smith; Special Friend: Vanessa Seymour;
A host of other relatives and friends including: Cyril & Neville
Mackey of Miami, Fla., Ken Sands & family, Vangy Rolle &
family, Roslyn Speights & family of Miami Fla, Lillian Smith &
family of Miami, Fla, Norma Coleman & family of Miami, Fla,
Paula Knight & family of Miami, Fla, Delena Taylor & family of
Miami, Fla, Sandra Roberts & family, Sydney Smith & family,
Mark Armbrister & family, Monica Stuart & family, Edna & family,
Jestina Linsey & family of Miami Fla, Brenda Strachan & family,
Lucy Woodside & family, Sandria Williams & family, Edwin
Johnson & family, Alfred Johnson & family, Antionette Culmer
& family, Donna Wood & family, Denise Godet & family, Racquel
Piper & family of Miami, Fla, Terran, Val & Glen Fulford,
Sharmaine Woodside & family, Delerese Brown & family, Shelly
Bethel & family, Marcia Turnquest & family, Sharell Musgrove
& family, Fredrick & Samuel Wallace & family, Sherilyn Wallace
& family, Sarah Collie & family, Kim Laguerre & family, Catherine
Rolle & family, Vinshan Andrews & family, Roslyn & Sybil Peters
& family, Oliver Hunt & family, Nicole Kemp, Marion Culmer &
family, Joycelyn Woodside & family, Tricia Hilton, Kendrell
Hepburn, Melinda Whitney & family & Quilamae Clarke;
Numerous Close Friends including: Julian Collie, Erica Collie,
Zchivargo Mackey, Trevis Demeritte, Lavardo Miller, Henry
Burnside, Tamiko Wallace, Torshie Ranger, Pastor Jermaine Watkins
and the officers and members of New Life Ministries, Pastor Ed
Allen & Gail Maycock and the officers and members of Abundant
Life Ministries, Bishop Neil C. Ellis and the officers and members
of Mount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist Church, State Bishop Arnold
Josey and the officers and members of Commonwealth Mission
Baptist Church, South Beach Health Center, Nassau Village Urban
Renewal Center and many, many others too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at Clarke’s Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway on Friday, April 23rd, from 10:00am
to 6:00pm and on Saturday at the church from 9:00am until service
time.



well we did. I will feel hap-
py and proud,” she said.

“I feel good because we
did our performance well
and the judge gave us a
great score,” added Christ-
ian Miller.

Kayvohan Gibson said it
made him feel special and
excited.

“IT will feel awesome
when I tell my parents after
school,” he said. “They will
be so proud of me and how
we did.”

Kayvohan also com-
mended his teacher, Nor-
ma Semple, on the amount
of practising they did for
their performance.

Ms Semple said she was
happy for the students she
trained and knew that they
had it in them to do so well.

“They surprised me
because all of the trouble
and the worry that I had
with them rehearsing,” she
joked. “This is their pay-
ment to me. They had to
pay me this way. I am so
pleased and proud of
them.”

Organising secretary of
the Festival, Keva
Cartwright, commended
Ms Semple and the stu-
dents on how well they did
and the level of discipline
they showed in their per-
formance.

“T think you do have a lot
to be proud of,” Ms
Cartwright said. “It is going
to be very hard for them to
be beaten in that class and I
think that you might have a
national winner in this
group.

“Excellent. From the
minute they walked on, you
could tell they were disci-
plined, and that is impor-
tant. All of it is a part of
the performance, as Mr
Catalyn said.”

Principal Rolle added
that she was pleased the
Festival adjudicators came
to her school to listen to
her students.

She also stressed the
importance cultural expres-
sion has in student educa-
tion.

“It is a part of the whole
system,” Ms Rolle said.
“Without culture, the other
part of it would be off bal-
ance; so I think that the cul-
ture blends in with every-
thing else that they do.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







FRIDAY, APRIL 23,

rT

2010



Bahamas’ Fed Cup ladies team recover after humpy start

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE quest for promotion
to Americas Zone Group I
for the Bahamas’ Fed Cup
ladies national team began
with a few bumps in the
road.

At the Americas Zone
Group I, the Bahamas lost
its first tie, but has recovered
to take back-to-back wins
with one match left to play
to qualify for the group
finals.

At the tournament host-
ed at the National Tennis

Team would advance with
win over Dominican Republic

Club in Guayaquil, Ecuador,
the Bahamas’ team of Kerrie
Cartwright, Simone Pratt
and Gabrielle Moxey fell to
the host country 3-0.

Pratt lost the opening
match to Marianna Correa,
6-1, 6-4 while Cartwright fell
in the second singles match
to Marie Elise Casares in
three sets, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.

Pratt and Cartwright also
lost in doubles to Correa and

a aU
A Lh

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

REPRESENTATIVES
of an increasingly popular
Martial Arts community
paid a courtesy call on the
Ministry of Sports to out-
line their immediate plans
for the growth and devel-
opment of the sport.

Representatives from the
Bahamas Martial Arts Fed-
eration, President Brian
Beckford and Executive
Member Oran Rolle along
with with “the father of
MMA in the Bahamas"
Scott Groff plan to elevate
the profile of local mixed
martial arts.

Rolle, who also serves as
chief instructor at Personal
Protection Concepts, said
one of the federation's
main goals was to unify the
sport.

"We are trying to bring
what we do to light and cul-
tivate its growth here in the
Bahamas. Mixed Martial
Arts is the fast growing
sport worldwide and as a
full contact sport its popu-
larity has surpassed that of
boxing," he said. "For the
recognition and to reach
the status we have to
achieve we have to start
from the ground up, build
slowly and gradually until
we one day have locally
based fighters achieve pro-
fessional status. With the
Federation we want to
bring structure to the sport
and present the country
with a unified body for
Martial Arts."

Groff is credited with
popularising the sport of

MMA in the Bahamas and
training some of the sport's
first local participants as far
back as 1992.

He brings over 20 years
of experience training oth-
ers in the sport and spent
years on professional cir-
cuits in the United States,
Japan and Brazil.

"MMA has the potential
to become a bigger and bet-
ter entity in the Bahamas
and the doors are right now
wide open,” Groff said.
"For something like that to
happen, these guys [Beck-
ford and Rolle] are the
right people to make some-
thing of that nature hap-
pen. They have been on the
training, fighting and pro-
motional end of things so
they have a full grasp of
what is going on and what
it takes to be caretakers of
the sport here in the
Bahamas."

Groff has secured the
backing of one of the lead-
ing training and promo-
tional entities in the state
of Texas, XKO Entertain-
ment, which has become
receptive to the idea of
working closely with
Bahamian fighters.

"XKO Entertainment
has pledged to put their
support behind the
Bahamas Martial Arts Fed-
eration and will send about
15 fighters to compete in
the next major event host-
ed by the federation,” he
said. "They are also pre-
pared to host Bahamian
fighters at ‘The Gym' in
Dallas to aid in their train-
ing toward professional sta-
tus."

Permanent Secretary for

Domenica Gonzalez.

In its second tie, the
Bahamas experienced a
complete turnaround with a
3-0 win over Trinidad and
Tobago. Pratt opened the tie
with a 6-2, 7-6 win over Lee-
Anne Lingo, while
Cartwright followed with a
dominating 6-0,6-0 win over
Olivia Bennett.

Moxey experienced her
first action of the tourna-

ment when she teamed with
Pratt to win doubles 6-1, 4-6,
6-4 over Dayna Grazette and
Breana Stampfli.

Team Bahamas moved on
with a 2-1 win over Costa
Rica in its next tie.

After Pratt lost in the
opening singles match to
Camilla Quesada, 6-7 (4), 7-
5, 6-2, Cartwright rebounded
to defeat Laura Viquez, 6-2,
6-1.

Cartwright and Moxey
returned in doubles to secure
the tie for the Bahamas
when they topped Quesada
and Melissa Golfin, 6-0, 6-3.

The Bahamas has one

remaining tie in the opening
round robin when they will
face the Dominican Repub-
lic.

The Dominican Republic
faced undefeated Ecuador
last night, however results
were unavailable to press
time.

They opened the Round
Robin with a 2-1 loss to Cos-
ta Rica and a 3-0 shutout to
Trinidad and Tobago.

The format of play fea-
tures ten countries divided
into two groups.

The Bahamas is grouped
with Ecuador, Trinidad and
Tobago, Costa Rica and the

Dominican Republic while
group B includes Bermuda,
Guatemala, Mexico, Pana-
ma and Peru.

The top country in each
pool will advance to the pool
playoffs and face the runner
up in the opposing group.

The two winning countries
will be promoted to Ameri-
cas Zone Group I.

The Bahamas currently
holds tie breakers over
Trinidad and Tobago and
Costa Rica.

With a win over the
Dominican Republic they
would advance to the group
playoff round.








SEATED from left to right: Brian Beckford, Scott Groff, Archie Nairn, Kevin Colebrooke and Oran Rolle.

the Ministry of Sports,
Archie Nairn, underscored
the importance of a unified
body and highlighted the
impact martial arts can
have on a generation of
untapped potential.

"As with any sport we
find it important to develop
a direct relationship with
the main umbrella organi-
sation and this group seems
poised to ensure that rela-
tionship fosters," he said.
"When I think of this sport
I think of the discipline it
can bring to the young peo-
ple that have the desire and
passion to achieve. We
must continue to expand
the knowledge of the craft
and develop and acumen
for the sport to grow."

Bahamians making major
impacts on the internation-
al MMA scene include
Yves Edwards, credited
with inventing the "Thug-
Jitsu" fighting style and as a
lightweight fighter in
organisations such as the
UFC, PRIDE, Bodog-
FIGHT, and EliteXC; and
Internet sensation turned
MMA fighter, Kevin "Kim-
bo Slice" Ferguson.



Temple Fellowship knocks off
Church of the Nazarene 39-24

AFTER playing two excit-
ing encounters on Saturday,
Temple Fellowship stepped
it up a notch on Tuesday
night and made sure that
Church of the Nazarene did-
n't ruin their bid to win the
men's division of the Bap-
tist Sports Council's 2010
Kendal Rolle Basketball
Classic.

In the third and decisive
game of the president divi-
sional semifinal, Temple Fel-
lowship knocked off Church
of the Nazarene 39-24 to
secure their berth in Satur-
day's semifinals against pen-
nant winning Christian
Tabernacle.

Temple Fellowship
jumped out to an 18-10 lead
after the first quarter and
they posted a 24-12 lead at
the half and they never

trailed by less than double
digits the rest of the way.

Gabi Laurent led the
attack with 12 points, while
Kevin Burrows had 10,
Jason Cooper nine and
Eddie Miller six.

The difference in the
game, however, was the
defensive efforts of Ian Pin-
der, who didn't play in the
two games on Saturday.

Perry Lubin matched Lau-
rent's efforts with 12 for the
losers. Smith Baptiste fin-
ished with eight.Evins Mil-
ford and Robinson Esetor-
cion both scored their four
other points with two apiece.

The postseason will con-
tinue on Saturday with the
following games on tap:

COURT ONE

10 am Macedonia vs Christian

Tabernacle (15)

11 am St. John's vs Golden
Gates (19)

Noon Macedonia vs Bahamas
Harvest (M)

1 pm Latter-Day vs Temple
Fellowship (15)

2 pm Game three of 19-and-
under, if necessary or Men's
game two

3 pm. Game three of 15-and-
under or men's playoffs.

COURT TWO

10 a.m. Temple Fellowship vs
Latter-Day (15)

11 a.m. Christian Tabernacle
vs Macedonia (19)

Noon Mt. Tabor vs Temple
Fellowship (19)

1 p.m. Christian Tabernacle
vs Temple Fellowship (M)

2 p.m. Macedonia vs Christian
Tabernacle (15)

3 p.m. Game three in any
series, if necessary.

GN1040

MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971

CHAPTER 329

THE PRICE CONTROL |GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)

|AMENCMENT) |

) REGULATIONS, 2002

The public is advised that prices ag shown in the Schedule for DWESEL OIL and
LEAD FREE GASOLINE sckd by Chevron (TEXACO) Bahamas Ltd. wil become effective on
Wonday, April 26, 2070 and Thursday, April 29, 2010 respectively.

PLACE

PARTA
NEW PROVIDENCE

Chevron (TEXACO]
Bahamas Ltd.
PART C

GRAND BAHAMA
(NOT FREEPORT)

ARTICLE

DIESEL OIL
| LEAD FREE

SCHEDULE

MAXIMUW WHOLESALE SELLING

PRICE PER U.S. GALLON

MARIMIUM
SUPPLIERS’
PRICE
$

INCLUDING SEA

i
ait

IN®LUDING

Chevron (TEXACO) | DIESEL GIL

Bahamas Lid.
PART Ci

ABACO, ANDROS

ELEUTHERA

Chevron (TEXACO|
Bahamas Ltd.
PARTE

ALL OTHER
FAMILY SLANDS

Chevron (TEXACO)
| Bahamas Lid.

Permanent Secretary

DIESEL IL
__|LEADFREE |

| LEAD FREE

NOT INCLUDING

af
mal

NOT

DIESEL OIL
| LEAD FREE

Signed
Barbara Burrows



MAXIMUM
DISTRIBUTORS’
PRICE

jg

SE A

INCLUDING

MAXIMUM
RETAIL
SELLING PRICE
PER US.
GALLON

FREIGHT

9.68 3.58
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461

FREIGHT

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4.55

SEA FREIGHT

3.86 405
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477

SEA FREIGHT

388
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS





THE CAR was parked in this area when the girl was found inside.



‘T did not kill
my baby’

FROM page one

mother’s house intending to
go with her father. The fam-
ily suspect that the toddler
let herself into her father’s
car, which was not working
at the time, and became
trapped inside.

It wasn’t until Mr
Demeritte returned alone to
watch the children while Ms
McDonald went to work,
that they realised Sandria
was missing.

While family members,
neighbours and friends in the
community scoured the sur-
rounding area for the tod-
dler, Ms McDonald and Mr
Demeritte went to Fox Hill
Police Station to report San-
dria missing. It was while
they were at the station, that
Sandria’s body was found in
the car by a neighbour.

The neighbour said: “We
looked and looked but we
didn’t think to look in the
car, because she had never
gone into the car alone
before. But one of the guys I
guess decided to check
because they know that she’s
always in that yard with her
father. They [Sandria and her
father] were always togeth-
er and he used to hang
around there a lot.”

Sandra continued: “The
car wasn’t abandoned, it just
isn’t working. The windows
and everything worked but
it’s just that one of the inside
all the knobs were broken —
an adult would have been
able to get out, but not a
child.”

At the station, Sandria’s
aunt Lisa Pugh — who would
later identify the body -
overheard a police dispatch
say they had found a girl. Ms
Pugh said she wasn’t sure
who they had found but
immediately left the station
and went back to the area to
find out.

Ms McDonald reflected:
“Someone called for me at
the station, and when they
gave me the phone they said
they found her. I said where
and they said she was in the
car and I just rest the phone
down.

“Whatever it was they
were saying after that I didn’t
hear, and I started to cry in
the station. Her daddy was
standing at the counter and
he just looked at me but I
don’t think he knew at that
time what I was crying for.”

But it wasn’t until Ms Pugh
returned and confirmed San-
dria’s death, that Ms McDon-
ald said she completely broke
down.

She continued: “She say
they find Sandria in the car,
and I just wanted to go to
her [Sandria] but they would-
mt let me go. I begged and
begged the officers, I just
wanted to go to her. I told
them I needed to go but they
refused.”

Ms McDonald says she
and Mr Demeritte were not
allowed to identify their
daughter’s body. The pair
were held in police custody
until Tuesday evening. As of

Uma ea

yesterday, Ms McDonald
says she had still not seen :

Sandria’s body.

She described the interro-
gation period as a horrible :

and frustrating process,

where investigators repeat- :
edly accused her and her :
boyfriend of murdering their

daughter.

“T would never kill my :
child,” she said. “Why would :
T kill her? I don’t know what :
kind of conclusion could they :

come to.

“T was telling them the :
truth but it couldn’t get :
through to them. Why would :
we walk from here and put :
her in the car, knowing the :
consequences? They tried to :
use all these things on us to :
get us to say that we had :

murdered her.”
She continued:

there.”

One neighbor lamented: :
“This is the Fox Hill com- :
munity, everyone know one :
another and their children — :
her daddy was always in that :
yard, she waited for him. If :
he had gone straight, when :
he looked back maybe he :
would have seen her, but he :
turned off. This was an acci- :

dent man.”

Now that she is out of cus- :
tody, Ms McDonald said that :
she doesn’t yet know how :
she and her family will move :

on from this tragedy.

Ms McDonald said: “He’s :
[Sandria’s father] taken this :
especially hard. She was his :
heart — he has 14 children, :
but she was his heart. He still :
cries, every time he comes :
home here, he always say his :
baby isn’t here to come and :

take off his shoes.

“This is something she :
always did, she just love to :
go behind her daddy. Every- :
thing to her is just her daddy, :
she used to do everything for :
him, put on his socks, put on :
his shoes, put on his belt. If I :
cooked, she wouldn’t be sat- :
isfied unless she took him the :

food.”

She continued: “Every- :
body knows that Sandria, :
that’s my daughter and that I :
love my children. I wouldn’t :
do anything to harm them. :
Anyone who see me and :
know me — and know that I :
carry my children behind me :
wherever I g0 —I tote them. I :
have three children I still :
count Sandria as my child. I :
would never go out there and :
kill my children or put them :

in a car to kill them.”

Ms McDonald has two :
other children, two boys, one :
aged 14, the other two. Due :
to their close ages, Ms :
McDonald said Sandria and :
her younger brother shared a :
strong bond, the two-year- :
old still has not grasped San- :

dria’s absence.

When asked for his sister,
Ms McDonald said his :
response is “she gone with }

daddy.”

“Tt frus- :
trated me but I said to myself :
there’s a God above. They :
will find out the truth one :
way or another. I know :
myself and I know my :
boyfriend, none of us killed :
her and we didn’t put her :

Ryan Pinder misses first
chance to vote as MP

FROM page one

port for the Bill during the
House debate, describing it
as a “fundamental compo-
nent” of achieving the results
he promised to his con-
stituents during his campaign
in terms of training small busi-
ness development.

He went on to declare his
intention to vote “every time”
in the House of Assembly;
however the FNM were quick
to point out that so far, the
new MP’s parliamentary vot-
ing record stands at “O for 1”.

Carl Bethel, the FNM
chairman and MP _ for
Seabreeze, said he and some
of his colleagues had planned
to stand and applaud Mr Pin-
der when it came time for the
House to take a vote on the
Bill.

He said the MP was notice-
ably absent from the lower
chamber, which led to an out-
burst of laughter from the
governing side.

“We were ready to stand
and cheer,” Mr Bethel
exclaimed. “Because finally
he would have voted in the
Bahamas. But alas we were
denied that privilege.

“We can only hope that
before this legislative year is
over, Mr Pinder would have
exercised his constitutional
right,” Mr Bethel quipped.

Addressing the chairman’s
remarks, Mr Pinder said he
intends to vote “every time”
he is required to in the House
of Assembly. However, as for
Wednesday’s session, the
Elizabeth MP said he had a
previous speaking engage-
ment that was set “a long time
before the legislative session
was set out.”

“T support the BTVI Bill,
and I have expressed that in
the House and would vote in
favour it. So I don’t under-
stand what (Mr Bethel)

EW.

means. I wouldn’t understand
why they would jump up and
down on a piece of legisla-
tion. It sounds juvenile to me
and certainly sounds like they
are preoccupied with Ryan
Pinder and not the business
of running this country,” Mr
Pinder shot back.

However, the MP’s former
rival for the Elizabeth con-
stituency said that it appears
Mr Pinder’s priorities are not
in the right place.

Dr Duane Sands said: “I
think it’s a bit disappointing
that after waiting such a long
time for representation, at the
first opportunity that the peo-
ple of Elizabeth would have a

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chance to have their voices
heard on an important vote,
their representative was not
available.”

Looking forward to the rest
of the legislative year, Dr
Sands said he hoped the peo-
ple of Elizabeth’s concerns
would attract more attention
from their MP.

Speaking on the matter
before the vote, Mr Pinder
told the House he supports
the Bill, and hoped it wasn’t
“too little, too late”.

He said: “I support it, Mr
Speaker, because I promised
my constituents, the good
constituents of Elizabeth that
Tam a 21st century politician,







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i

;

focused on training and small
business development.

“This Bill is a fundamental
component to achieving these
goals, short term and long
term.

“This Bill is the crux in
developing the skills labour
necessary to build today’s
Bahamas and to ensure eco-
nomic expansion on a sus-
tained basis from among a
segment of our society who
may never get the opportuni-
ty to travel beyond these bor-
ders for tertiary education. So
on behalf of the good people
of Elizabeth, I lend my sup-
port to this Bill which is long
overdue.”


































































RM FRAME

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

BNT on Earth Day
FROM page one

guiding principles of development, and con-
scious, deliberate decisions.”

Dr Deveaux outlined how he is working on
legislation such as the Building and Subdivi-
sions Act to improve development and plan-
ning, and the Bahamas National Trust (BNT)
expressed appreciation for the $140,000 gov-
ernment grant used to build a road to Bonefish
Pond, clear dumped waste, and construct a
600ft of boardwalk with viewing platform over
the mangroves and shallow waters.

The park will serve as a living classroom for
students, adults, children and families who can
observe the diverse natural wildlife, go snor-
keling, kayaking, bonefishing, and cultivate
an interest in the natural world.

Despite the dredging and construction tak-
ing place at the mouth of Bonefish Pond for
the South Seas development the BNT had
fought for several years, the Trust hopes to
preserve what is left of the southern wetlands
and celebrated the progress marked yester-
day.

BNT President Neil McKinney said: “We
are fortunate in this country to have a gov-
ernment that supports national parks, while
in so many other countries, where there hasn’t
been the foresight to put protection in place,
animals and plants have become extinct.

“In New Providence, where there’s huge
population pressure to use the land, it’s impor-
tant to have the land for an educational facil-
ity, and area where families can get together
for recreation in a wholesome way.”

Charles Maynard, the local MP and Minister
of Youth, Sports and Culture said he had
always hoped the mangrove wetlands would be
a protected national park.

“Tm so pleased that this beautiful site is in









CHILDREN from the Discovery Club check out the
new national park yesterday.

the heart of the Golden Isles constituency,” Mr
Maynard said.

“T believe we have to conserve these beau-
tiful sites for future generations.”

Deputy executive director Lynn Gape
added: “This wetland is going to echo with
lots of excitement, and excited children’s voic-
es, about the importance of the mangroves
and why they are so essential for our fish-
eries.”

Bonefish Pond is off Cowpen Road, west
of Gladstone Road, and is open during day-
light hours.

d by July 5.
FROM page one Man accused arn eset to

Hanna being released on

and a two-year-old boy. Indictment, bypassing a pre- hail. He told the court that
Prosecutor Lennox Cole- liminary inquiry in the Mag- investigators claimed the

by said the prosecution — istrate’s Court.

young boys were “dis-

intends to have the matters He said the Attorney — turbed” by the incidents.
proceed in Supreme Court General’s Office expects to Hanna, 36, of Peardale
by way of Voluntary Bill of have filed all the necessary Road, was denied bail.

FROM page one

for the smooth operation of the new regulating
body, the Bahamas Pharmacy Council (BPC).

The sources also claimed the HPC “demand-
ed payment” for copies of the original docu-
ments being withheld.

According to insiders, the documents are
the “legal property” of the new governing
body, and the HPC had “no reasonable, nor
legal reason” to hold the documents hostage
for months.

Dr Horizal Simmons, chairman of the HPC,
said his only statement on the matter was:
“The Health Professions Council is doing all
they can to facilitate an easy and smooth tran-
sition.”

He declined to respond to any specific ques-
tions regarding the conflict.

Dr Minnis said the matter was brought to his
attention on Wednesday, which was one day
after a letter detailing the problem was sent to
the Ministry by the Bahamas Pharmacy Asso-
ciation (BPA).

He said the matter was resolved one day
later after speaking to the HPC and his Per-
manent Secretary Camille Johnson.

“The HPC is something in our past. We
take the approach that all is well that ends
well,” said Marvin Smith, BPA president.

Mr Smith said several association members
called and e-mailed to alert him of the “hur-
dles” they were experiencing, and the associ-
ation wrote to the ministry to reinforce the
work already being done by the BPC to resolve
the issue.

He conceded that there were growing pains
experienced as a result of the transition.

But Mr Smith said this is the case with all
transitions, particularly “if not all parties are

me al

The Minister of Health

brought on line at the same time in the same
way.”

He said the swift intervention of Minister
Minnis is a testament to the supportive work-
ing relationship between the new council, the
association and the ministry, and he had noth-
ing but “thanks and congratulations” for the
ministry.

The documents allegedly being held by the
HPC were important for the operation of phar-
macy businesses to provide proof of registra-
tion to the BPC.

The failure to provide such proof reported-
ly created a problem for small pharmacy own-
ers, who faced challenges with being properly
licenced and procuring funds from local banks;
delays in stock orders and other challenges,
according to sources.

“Those documents are imperative for a
seamless process for registration and gover-
nance. We followed the prescribed protocols to
get the end point. The minister and the per-
manent secretary have always been very effi-
cient in assisting the council in the transition
period,” said Philip Gray, BPC chairman. He
said the intervention of the minister “certain-
ly aids the process.”

The deadline for registration with the BPC
was February 28, 2010, although the deadline
was extended and there was a grace period.

Mr Gray said no penalties had to be applied
to pharmacies as a result of exceeding the stip-
ulated time frame for registration.

All practising pharmacies, he said, are now
registered with the BPC and official inspections
are under way.

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THE TRIBUNE

usine

FRIDAY,



ACP R U2 25.7

2010

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





rn
flledges




TUR YAT])

PTTL Ch

* But Caledonia clients
said to be further upset
over liquidator’s latest
Supreme Court
application for $540k
in costs

* Deloitte partner
charges $500 per hour
for wind-up, and firm’s
fees in line with ‘other
major accounting firms
in the Bahamas’

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Securities Commis-
sion’s executive director yes-
terday pledged that the regu-
lator was investigating the $25
million collapse of a Bahami-
an broker/dealer, as its liq-
uidator applied for Supreme
Court approval to pay anoth-
er $544,000 in costs incurred
by himself and his agents in
the firm’s winding-up.

Hillary Deveaux told Tri-
bune Business that the capital
markets/investment funds reg-
ulator was prohibited by
Bahamian law from disclosing
any details relating to matters
it was investigating, but
promised that the Securities
Commission was looking into
issues surrounding the col-
lapse of Caledonia Corporate
Management.

“T can assure you that we
are investigating matters
related to Caledonia,” Mr
Deveaux told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We cannot disclose to
the public any information on
any investigations going on in
the Commission; that’s basi-
cally the position.

“We are, in fact, compelled
by law not to make public any
of our investigations dealing
with matters arising out of the
Commission. While they
[Caledonia’s clients] may see
nothing happening, we are
continuing with our investiga-
tions.”

Mr Deveaux said the Com-
mission’s investigations were
confidential until they were
completed. He was respond-
ing after Tribune Business
contacted him to relay com-
plaints voiced to this newspa-
per by Caledonia’s clients,
many of whom were question-
ing what the Bahamian regu-
lator had been doing since
the broker/dealer’s collapse
more than two years ago, and
whether it would take any
action against the key parties
involved.

Meanwhile, Anthony Kiki-
varakis, the Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas) partner
and accountant who is acting
as Caledonia’s “court-super-
vised liquidator,” has filed an
affidavit with the Supreme
Court seeking payment for
the work done by himself, the
firm and his attorneys on the
winding-up between April 1-
December 31 2009.

The costs hearing, and their
taxation, was due to have tak-
en place yesterday, but is
understood to have been post-
poned until Friday, April 30,
2010, after the application
once again drew the ire of
many Caledonia clients and
their legal representatives.
Tribune Business understands
that the Caledonia Clients
Committee is due to meet this
Monday to determine how it
and its attorneys can be heard
by the Supreme Court’s
deputy registrar, Ernie Wal-
lace, with sources telling this
newspaper they are unhappy
about the situation.

Mr Kikivarakis’s April 19,
2010, affidavit supporting his
application for costs gives
Bahamians an insight into the
fees charged by professionals
such as accountants and attor-
neys, whose earnings often
appear out of reach of the
average citizen.

The Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas) bills his hourly rate
as Caledonia’s liquidator at

SEE page 9B

prohe ongoing im:

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

85-90% export

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

An estimated 85-90 per
cent of the engineering work
on major Bahamas-based
development projects goes to
foreign firms, the Bahamas
Society of Engineers’ presi-
dent telling Tribune Business
yesterday that “the wholesale
export” of such services
“absolutely guts our entire
industry”.

Robert Reiss, who is also
principal of Islands by
Design/Reiss, said qualified
Bahamian engineers were still
being denied the opportuni-
ty to fully participate in their

profession through the con-
tinuing tendency of both local
and foreign developers, plus
the Government, to look out-
side this nation on jobs that
Bahamians can do.

“One of the key elements
of my platform, a key tenet, is
the fact that I want the
Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers to support the imple-
mentation of the Professional
Engineers Act and Board
and, beyond just the Act, sup-
porting securing and keeping
Bahamian engineering jobs
for Bahamians,” Mr Reiss
told Tribune Business.

“For too long and too
often, our engineering work

in the Bahama goes to for-
eign firms. It’s fine if there’s a
need for specialist expertise,
but there’s a wholesale export
of our money, our opportu-
nities. The dollars and the
opportunities for Bahamian
engineers, who have gone
abroad to school to get quali-
fied, to participate in our pro-
fession get exported. It
absolutely guts our entire
industry.”

Emphasising that “this sit-
uation of having Bahamians
do Bahamian engineering
work is not insular or inward-
looking”, Mr Reiss said the

SEE page 7B

25% of accounts receivables in ‘bad debt’ rating

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Services, told Tribune Business that the failing
economy last year drove demand for his debt
collection services up. However, he has noticed



Up to 25 per cent of accounts receivables
held by Bahamian companies are bad debt on
their books, the head of a debt collection
agency said yesterday, although a recent
decrease in unemployment was driving that

number down.

arecent decline in the amount of firms seeking

the service.

Rory Higgs,president of Apex Management

New store to grow AMLs
Sales 10-12% per annum







GAVIN WATCHORN

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The new Solomon’s Fresh
Market store will increase
AML Foods’ annual sales by
10-12 per cent when it opens in
Spring 2011, its chief executive
telling Tribune Business yes-
terday that the BISX-listed
food group had narrowed its
fourth quarter sales decline “by
40-50 per cent” in March.

Gavin Watchorn, who is also
AML Foods’ president, said
that while the company was
unlikely to match the $3.9 mil-
lion net profit generated dur-
ing the year to January 31,
2010, it was “pretty confident
we’re going to remain prof-
itable” in the face of the wider
economy’s problems and
increased competition in the
food retailing business.

“We had seen quite a bit of
sluggishness in sales in January
and February,” Mr Watchorn
said, following behind the 9 per
cent reduction experienced in
the last three months of the
previous fiscal year.

“We saw that trend in the
fourth quarter numbers, but in
March we have seen quite a
drop in the sales differential.
The sales decrease over last
year came down quite a bit. It
probably came back by about
40-50 per cent from where we
were off in the fourth quarter.”

Helping to compensate for
the decline in food sales,
induced by increased competi-
tion in a crowded grocery mar-
ketplace, Mr Watchorn said
AML Foods’ clothing and gen-
eral merchandise sales “were
up quite a bit over last year”.
He attributed this to the “ven-
dor lines now in place”, plus
the fact that consumers still
holding down jobs had adjusted
their budgets and spending pat-
terns to the new economic real-
ity.

“Our sales will not be as

SEE page 4B



* BISX-listed food group
slashes fourth quarter sales
decline ‘by 40-50% in
March’

* Expects to regain level
pegging with 2009 sales by
Back-to-School period, then
surpass them in last quarter,
although profits for current
year expected to be weaker
* Takes back pharmacy and
bakery in Solomon’s
SuperCentre

* Aiming to pay dividends
on annual basis, increasing
them each year

FAMILY GUARDIAN



Speaking at the Chamber Institute’s Debt
Collection Seminar, Mr Higgs advised busi-
ness owners and individuals involved in debt

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.









95,000 sq ft
shopping centre



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

outs’ engineers a ‘slam dunk’

Robin Hood hopes to have land
under contract in 30-60 days



tenant.

own shopping centre.”

debt from rental income.”

SEE page 2B



Robin Hood yesterday said it had could have the land for
its planned 95,000 square foot shopping centre in eastern
New Providence “under contract” within 30-60 days, its
president telling Tribune Business that the project should be
a “slam dunk” with the expansive retailer acting as anchor

“We've narrowed it down to two options, and in 60 days,
possibly 30, we could have it under contract,” Sandy Schae-
fer said of Robin Hood’s planned $7-$8 million expansion.

“We're going to build 45,000 square feet of retail space for
Robin Hood, and 25,000 square feet around it which we can
lease to other tenants. There will be 25,000 square feet of
second floor space that we can lease out for a medical cen-
tre, offices and gym, etc. Basically, we will be building our

This will transform Robin Hood from a pure retail outlet,
since its present Summerwinds Plaza location is owned by
former PLP Cabinet Minister and MP, Leslie Miller, into a
property development company, too.

This transition held no fear for Mr Schaefer, though,
who told Tribune Business: “There’s nothing like owning,
particularly when you can lease out space and service the

He added that he had previously been involved in retail
leasing in the US, and while this was a “whole other science”
from retailing itself, a priceless advantage with this devel-
opment was that Robin Hood would perform the “Wal-
Mart role’ and act as the anchor tenant to draw other retail-





Water Corp covers just
64% of operating costs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government-owned
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion is selling water to its
Bahamian client base at ‘below
cost’ because its tariffs have not
been increased since 1999, the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) revealing that it
was only recovering 64 per cent
of its operating costs in 2008.

The IDB’s 2010-2014 country
strategy report for the

SEE page 7B

Financial Strength Rating

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

call our mortgage department today at
396-4040 (Nassau) or 352-3670 (Freeport)

aw the home

* State-owned Corporation
selling water ‘below cost’
due to no tariff increase for
decade, as IDB targets
elimination of $20m-plus
subsidies by 2014

* Bank wants to raise
operating cost recovery to
84%, and increase
customer connections

from 66,000 to 75,000

* Corporation hit by
‘tripling’ of reliance on
more expensive reverse
osmosis water to 58% of
total supply

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

BUSINESS
FOR SALE

Well established marine supply
store with Yamaha dealership,
hurricane shutter manufacturing
and wide range assembly license
in Freeport, Bahamas. Consistent
history of protit and zero debt.
Includes: building, land, equipment
and inventory.

Please contact
Alexander Rademaker.
rademaker_alexander@hotmail.com

LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

NONA HOLDINGS
MANAGEMENT INC.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), — the
Dissolution of NONA HOLDINGS MANAGEMENT INC. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was the 25th Day of March, 2010

fst see

PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Liquidator



Important

Notice
SERVICE INTERRUPTION | g

From tam to 7am



25% of accounts receivables in ‘bad debt’ rating

FROM page 1B

collection on behalf of large
Bahamian and international
firms how to apply best prac-
tices when attempting to
recover past due receivables.

“What we are trying to do
is deal with the fundamentals
of debt collection, because we
realise that the economy right
now has been down and, as a
result ,there are a great num-
ber of businesses suffering
from having bad debt on their
books,” he said. “That
includes some of the key prin-

ciples and best practices of
going about collecting the
debt.”

According to Mr Higgs,
many of the businesses suf-
fering huge arrears are those
that grant credit, such as
financial institutions and
banks that do consumer loans
and credit cards, plus health
care facilities, to name a few.

“They extend the credit and
collecting it then becomes a
challenge,” he said.

He added, however, that
the turnaround in the US
could bode well for debtors,



95,000 sq ft shopping

centre a ‘slam dunk’
FROM page 1B

ers in. “For us, it should be a slam dunk,” Mr Schaefer said. “It
should be a lot easier than someone building on spec. We are the
anchor tenant, so that gives us a whole lot of confidence.”

The Robin Hood president pledged that the per square foot
rental price for the company’s planned shopping centre would be
competitive with all other centres. The strategy, he added, was to
attract strong tenants and, by charging a reasonable rent, lower
their overheads and enable them to lower prices and make profits.

Apart from the eastern New Providence shopping centre, Mr
Schaefer said Robin Hood was also looking to expand its existing
Tonique Wiliams-Darling Highway store by another 90,000 square
feet within “a year-and-a-half”, something likely to cost a further
$5-$6 million in inventory and fixtures.

Robin Hood will not incur costs for the structure, as it is a ten-
ant. Mr Schaefer said he had offered to acquire the property from
Mr Miller, but the latter wanted it as a legacy for his family.

And the retailer was “already looking at and getting offers”
for a third store in New Providence, and had “just had some talks
about” a potential expansion into the Freeport market in the past
week.

“T’m not looking out west,” Mr Schaefer said of his third store.
“T don’t think it’s going to hit critical mass for another five to six
years in terms of population base. We get a lot of shoppers coming
from out west.”

Having invested “a couple of hundred thousand dollars to get
things going”, Mr Schaefer said he was only awaiting government
permits to begin shipping to the containers of product to the Fam-
ily Islands. Robin Hood was targeting the likes of Abaco, Exuma
and Eleuthera for one to two day sales stints, bringing its products
and prices to the Family Islands.

The ultimate goal, Mr Schaefer said, was to partner with local
retailers on the main Family Islands and eventually end up with a
Robin Hood-branded outlet on each one. Any surplus produce left
over from its Family Islands sales would be handed over to a
retailer there, he added, who would sell it at Robin Hood prices.

Meanwhile, back in Nassau, Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood’s sales
were still enjoying “double digit increases” above 2009 compar-
isons, with customer counts also up.

March saw customer numbers in the mid-50,000s, but Mr Schae-
fer said this was expected to increase to the mid-60,000s in May,
with the summer months seeing brisk business in appliance sales as
a result of air conditioning demand.

business

as they see income regener-
ate and the job market
reopen. “Our economies are
tied and, listening to reports,
particularly in the mortgage
market, they are starting to
see a peak,” said Mr Higgs.

“Tt is starting to reach the
height and is turning around a
little bit. Our economy here in
the Bahamas lags behind the
States, so if they are starting
to see a turnaround it means
we still have some time left
before we could see ourselves
out of the woods.”

Growth

He reported a growth in
business near the height of
the economic crisis, but
requests for debt collection
services seem to be taking an
opposite turn.

“T have seen a tremendous
growth in the number of
accounts assigned to me and it
hasn’t eased up - it is a steady
flow of business,” Mr Higgs
said.

“We noticed somewhat of
an improvement compared to
times when you call a person
and they are not employed,
and therefore, have no means

of paying. Now, more and
more people are saying they
have a job and to give them a
couple months and they will
take care of it, so we see that
a good number of persons are
going back into the job mar-
ket and finding employment.”

Mr Higgs said internal debt
collection departments, who
do not consider outsourcing
to a firm such as his, must
know and exercise best prac-
tices when calling debtors.

He said businesses should
focus internally on front end
debt that is between 30 to 90
days in arrears, and possibly
get a debt collector to handle
any that are older.

Organizer of the seminar
for the Chamber Institute,
Russ Abrams, said the
Bahamas Employers Confed-
eration (BECon) and Cham-
ber plan to conduct more
workshops like this in the
future. “We have done HR
(Human Resources) work-
shops, employment legislation
workshops and we have cus-
tomer service workshop next
week,” said Mr Abrams. “I
have been very pleased with
the response from the busi-
ness community.”

IOs ULSD

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), TUBO GALVA HOLDING (BAHAMAS) LTD, is in
dissolution. ALBERTO ESCOBAR is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at calle 116715 piso 17, Bogota, Colombia. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are

required to send their name, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before May 21st, 2010.

ALBERTO ESCOBAR
Liquidator



|
CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

A leading Bahamian group of companies is seeking to
hire a Deputy General Manager to assist with managing
and developing a large retail business. The duties will
include but are not limited to:

April 25th, 2010.

Managing the daily operations of a multi-facet retail

FirstCaribbean would like to advise the public that its
Electronic Banking Services will be unavailable during
the time listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance. The bank apologizes for this service
interruption, and for any inconvenience caused.

During this period the following services will be
unavailable:

e ABM

e Visa transactions via ABM

e FCIB Debit Point of Sale transactions
e Internet Banking

¢ Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance.





FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK



GET THERE. TOGETHER.



www firstcaribbeanbank.com





® Provide leadership and supervision of staff to ensure
excellent customer service

® Direct the audit staff in monitoring inventory controls
and daily reconciliation

® Assist with the development of the business by
identifying new retailing opportunities

The qualified applicant will have:

® Working knowledge of management principles,
accounting principles, proficient in the use of
computers and previous experience at a senior
management level
Must be available to work flexible hours to monitor
the business operations as needed.
Uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Candidate must be a mature individual and a team
player who is self-motivated, organized, able to work
under pressure, meet deadlines with consistent and
high degree of accuracy

Education and Experience:

® Bachelor’s degree from an accredited College or
University

& Seven (7) years experience in a retail business at a
senior management level

Benefits and salary commensurate with qualifications
and experience.

Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter
and resume to the following e-mail address by 7th May,

2010: applybahamas@yahoo.com



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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

strong as last year for the first
half, but by the Back-to-School
period of the third quarter they
will be on level terms, and once
we get to the fourth quarter we
will be in growth mode yet
again,” Mr Watchorn told Tri-
bune Business. “Solomon’s
Fresh Market will increase sales
by 10-12 per cent once that gets
up and running.”

The AML Foods chief exec-

New store to grow AMLs
Sales 10-12% per annum

utive added that the company
had “started to look at new rev-
enue streams that are coming
on board one by one in this
quarter”.

Chief among these were the

TAYLOR
INDUSTRIES LTD.

111 Shirley Street

OO
RS

PUL URL

new Cost Right website, which
was already taking orders “pre-
dominantly from the Family
Islands”. Interest in Nassau was
also starting to pick up, and
while not making a tremendous
contribution to AML Foods’
business just yet, Mr Watchorn
said this would increase once
the company embarked on a
“fairly significant marketing
campaign” of the site in the
next month.

AML Foods had taken back
ownership of the pharmacy and
bakery outlets in its Solomon’s
SuperCentre in Nassau, which
were previously leased to ten-
ants, while “new departments”
had been created in some of its
retail outlets.

“We’ve expanded and taken
on more space in Solomon’s in
Nassau, and now have an appli-
ances and furniture section,”
Mr Watchorn said. “That’s

will be able to move the space
allocation about.

“You can’t stand still in this
business, and when we saw the
sales numbers decline coming
down the road a couple of
months back, we had to do
what we needed to maintain
our share of a stagnant market.

“Our customer counts have
held up quite well, but the aver-
age spend is down a couple of
points here and there.”

Mr Watchorn said the reces-
sion, combined with rising
unemployment and reduced
incomes, meant Bahamian
shoppers were less loyal to a
particular brand or store than
they had been 24 months pre-
viously, and were more inclined
to shop around for the best
prices on food items.

“Our margins have taken a
little drop. It’s just the nature of
the market right now,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We have to be competi-
tive, and that drops margins
down a little, yes.”

Besides its online ordering
website, Mr Watchorn said
AML Foods’ Dominos Pizza
franchise was looking to fur-

on one or two buildings, and
we’re hoping to get an answer
on one or both shortly,” he
added.

“That’s in New Providence,
and we’re in discussions with
another group for 2011.”

The AML Foods chief exec-
utive said he was especially
pleased that the group had
reduced shrinkage by 6 per cent
in its last financial year, having
“thrown everything bar the
kitchen sink” at this problem
for several years.

AML Foods will pay out a
total of $624,000 in dividends

to shareholders on May 7, 2010,
the first dividend they have
received for nine years.

Mr Watchorn revealed that
despite the softness predicted
for the first quarter of the com-
pany’s current financial year,
its Board felt investors needed
to be rewarded for their
patience.

“At this point, we’re going
to look at it on an annual
basis,” Mr Watchorn said of the
dividend issue, “with the inten-
tion of dividend payments
creeping up each time we do
it.”

Thursday, April 22
Friday, April 23
Saturday, April 24

We regret any inconvenience
this will cause to our
customers.

Requests for service work will
still be accepted.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006/FAM/div/588

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Divorce & Matrimonial Side

BETWEEN

JOHNATHAN MONCUR
Petitioner

AND
LEAH ESTHER MONCUR
Respondent

AND
EVAMAE RAHMING
Party-cited

NOTICE OF PROCEEDINGS

TAKE NOTICE that the Petitioner
JOHNATHAN MONCUR has commenced
Divorce Proceedings in the Family Division
of the Supreme Court against LEAH
ESTHER MONCUR. EVAMAE RAHMING
has been named as the ‘st Party-cited.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that in the
event EVAMAE RAHMING desires to defend
the proceedings in the Supreme Court
EVAMAE RAHMING will be required to enter
an Appearance in the Supreme Court by
filing a Memorandum of Appearance in the
Registry of the Supreme Court which is situate
on the Third Floor in the Ansbacher Building,
Bank Lane and East Street North in the City
of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
and by delivering the said Memorandum
of Appearance at the Chambers. of
Clarita V. Lockhart, No. 90 Shirley Street,
Shirley Street & Elizabeth Avenue, on or
before the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2010.

Dated: This 21st day of April, A.D., 2010

CLARITA V. LOCKHART

CHAMBERS

NO. 90

SHIRLEY STREET SHIRLEY STREET & ELIZABETH AVE.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Attorney for the Respondent



going to allow us to expand the
electronics department, as we

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DIABAS PREMIER
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above named Company is _ in
dissolution, which commenced on the 20th day
of April, 2010. The Liquidator is BdS Corporate
Services Limited, George House, George Street,
P.O. Box N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas.



BdS Corporate Services Ltd.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

WHITEPEAK HOLDING S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International

Business Companies Act. 2000,
WHITEPEAK HOLDING S.A. is in
dissolution as of April 19, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc.
situated at 35A Regent Street, PO.
Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

LEADERBELL LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, LEADERBELL
LIMITED is in dissolution as of April 7, 2010.

Dima Yim situated at Street no. 6, Phum

Salakanseng, Svan Dongkom Siep Riem
Cambodia is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting

career opportunity?

AVAILABLE POSITION:

The Senior Manager -
Watch listed Accounts

e Manage a portfolio of high risk business accounts
and supervise/monitor the banks potential loss
exposure accounts

ther grow its presence in New
Providence. “We have offers in

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that we, ALICIA SHARI CLEARE
MELIER and FELIX MELIER of Wellington Road off Stapleton
Gardens, PO. Box N-7126 intent to change my child’s

name from ALEO FELIX MELIER to ALEO FELIX COOPER. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ALICIA SHARI
CLEARE MELIER of Wellington Road off Stapleton
Gardens, P.O. Box N-7126 intent to change my name to
ALICIA SHARICLEARE COOPER. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY EDWARD PURVIS
of #16 SEAHORSE LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of APRIL, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



NOTICE

WRIGLEY DEVELOPMENT INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International
Business Companies Act. 2000,
WRIGLEY DEVELOPMENT INC.
is in dissolution as of April 19, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc.
situated at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box
1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

JOUST LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in
accordance with Section 138(4) of
the International Business Companies
Act. 2000, JOUST LIMITED is in

dissolution as of February 11, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc.
situated at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box
1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:
www-firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

) FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



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CONCENTRATION OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

At December 31, 2009, assets and liabilities of the Bank were concentrated in the following
geographical areas:

2009 Assets
Europe

Liabilities

93,423 45,188
Central and South America - 23,993
The Bahamas 76 21
Other 208 -

93,707 € 69,202

2008 Assets
Europe

Liabilities

60,278 30,699
Central and South America - 20,721
The Bahamas 45 31

€ 60,323 € 51,451

The assets include cash and due from banks, loans and advances to customers, net and other
assets.

MATURITIES OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

The scheduled maturities of the Bank’s fixed-term assets and liabilities from December 31,
2009, to the contractual maturity date are as follows:

2009 Assets
Sight-less than 8 days

Liabilities
35,286 €
8 days-less than 1 month 31,507 30,290
1 month-less than 3 months 10,985 10,902
3 months-less than 6 months 2,387 1,187
6 months-less than 1 year 10,255 6,976
1 year-less than 3 years 2,563 2,563
5 years and over 724 703

93,707 €

16,581

69,202

2008 Assets
Sight-less than 8 days

Liabilities

10,049 1,266
8 days-less than 1 month 28,643 28,568
1 month-less than 3 months 7,482 7,505
3 months-less than 6 months 1,837 1,827
6 months-less than | year 11,598 11,586
1 year-less than 3 years 711 699
5 years and over 3 -

€ 60,323 € 31,451

The assets include cash and due from banks, loans and advances to customers, net and other
assets,

CURRENCY CONCENTRATION

At December 31, 2009, assets and liabilities of the Bank were concentrated in the following
currencies:

2009 . Assets
Euro

Liabilities

89,775 65,230
US dollar 3,512 3,565
Bahamian dollar 17 3

Pound Sterling 403 404

93,707 69,202

2008 Assets
Euro

Liabilities
$9,235 50,363
US dollar 966 966
Bahamian dollar 5 5
Others 117 117

€ 60,323 € 51,451

The assets include cash and due from banks, loans and advances to customers, net and other
assets.

Interested persons wishing to inspect the full set of audited financial statements may do so by

re our office, Andbanc (Bahamas) Limited located at suite 304, 1 Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Deloitte

Deloitte & Touche

Chartered Accountants

and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centrevitle

P.O, Box N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www. deloitte.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Shareholders of
Andbanc (Bahamas) Limited:

We have audited the statement of financial position of Andbanc (Bahamas) Limited (the “Bank”) as
at December 31, 2009. This statement of financial position is the responsibility of the Bank’s
management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this statement of financial position
based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
statement of financial position is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a
test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the statement of financial position.
An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the statement of financial position.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the statement of financial position presents fairly, in all material respects, the
financial position of the Bank as at December 31, 2009 in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards.

Without qualifying our opinion, we draw your attention to Notes 11 and 12 to the statement of
financial position. Note 11 provides details of the credit risk with its related parties and Note 12
provides details on concentration of customer deposits.

We also emphasize that the statement of financial position does not comprise a complete set of
financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. Information on

results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to obtain a complete
understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial position of the Bank.

hela, ¢ truke

March 18, 2010



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1B

Bahamas, a copy of which has
been seen by Tribune Business,
said that while the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s tariff
rates had remained the same,
non-revenue water (water lost
from the system before reach-
ing the end user) had risen to 55
per cent.

In addition, more expensive
reverse osmosis water had
increased to 58 per cent of the
supply sold to Bahamian con-
sumers by the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation, meaning that
while its revenues had fallen or
remained flat, costs had
increased markedly.

Outlining its goals for the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, the IDB report said that
by 2014 it wanted to improve
its operating cost recovery to
84 per cent from the current 64
per cent. The Bank, perhaps
ambitiously, also wants to
reduce to zero the subsidies the
Corporation currently receives
from the Bahamian govern-
ment (taxpayer). These stood
at $24 million in 2008.

The IDB is also targeting a
reduction in non-revenue water
from the present 55 per cent to
45 per cent by 2014, and is seek-
ing to help the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation increase its
customer connections from
66,845 in 2008 to 75,000 in 2014.

Summing up the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s weak-
nesses succinctly, the IDB
report said: “Additionally,
while the Water & Sewerage
Corporation supplies water to
only 30 per cent of the potential
clientele, it is losing market
share to private operators and
consumers (tourist develop-
ments) who source their water
from private wells.

“Due to the limited avail-
ability of safe groundwater,
unregulated use of private wells
may have a significant impact
on the sustainability of the sec-

Water Corn

tor, as well as serious environ-
mental and health conse-
quences.”

And with the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation dependent
on government subsidies
(which reached $30 million in
fiscal 2008-2009, and around
$25.8 million this fiscal year) to
cover its operating losses, the
IDB said the amount of financ-
ing available for capital expen-
diture was seriously reduced.

“This reduction in capital
expenditures (including com-
mercial-loss reduction equip-
ment), particularly in New
Providence, has contributed to
a high and rising level of non-
revenue water (55 per cent in
2008) as well as a deteriorating
physical infrastructure,” the
IDB report said.

“The Corporation’s direct
cost of water production has
increased as its reliance on the
more expensive reverse osmosis
modality tripled since 2000 as a
percentage of total production
(58 per cent in 2008).

“Conversely, Water & Sew-
erage Corporation’s tariffs - last
increased in 1999 - have fallen
below the company’s cost of
service. Therefore, the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas has
prioritised the financial restora-
tion and infrastructure upgrad-
ing of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation as part of a larger
objective of achieving sustain-
able provision and coverage of
water and sanitation services in
the Bahamas.”

The IDB said it was focus-
ing on increasing the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s oper-
ating margins, decreasing non-
revenue water volumes and
“enhancing its corporate gov-
ernance”.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has long said that the
subsidies provided to govern-

Makers Wap

BOLF & OFC

EAH CLUB

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Golf Professional/Developer

Key Responsibilities

* Communicate on a daily basis with the General
Manager and Assistant General Manager to
ensure a coordinated effort at providing year
round quality experiences for members and

guests.

Coordinate development of operating and capital
budgets according to the budget calendar;
monitors monthly and takes effective corrective

action as required.

Analyzes other financial statements and
establishes controls to safeguard funds. Reviews
income and costs relative to goals; takes
corrective action as necessary.

Welcomes new club members; meets and greets
all club members as practical during their visits to

the club.

Enforce all of the club rules and regulations
governing the use of Baker’s Bay facilities.
Establish Operating Criteria for Golf Operations.
Develop an opening critical path for Golf

Operations

Develop standards of service for Golf Operations
and an opening and ongoing training program for

new employees.

Oversee the design, purchase, and installation of
all Golf Operations Department FF&E.
Supervise all Golf Operations staff.
Daily/Weekly job responsibilities developed for
all positions in Golf Operations

Job Descriptions developed for all positions in

Golf Operations.

Weekly scheduling of all Golf Operations

employees.

Handle personnel problems as they arise in Golf

Operations.

Evaluate employee’s introductory and annual

performance reviews.

Interview prospective employees and supervisory

staff.

Attend all relevant operational meetings.
Conduct weekly meetings with line staff and

supervisory staff.

Complete daily, weekly and monthly reports as

required.

Qualifications and Skills

Associate degree in Golf Operations,

Golf Management, Management, Business
Administration or related area of study.

Strong leadership, organizational, computer, and

communication skills.

Strong operational background in retail, golf, food
and beverage, and member services.
Ability to source, design and implement training

programs.

Financial experience especially with creating and

implementing budgets.

Experience with private club and/or start up

operations a plus.

If you would like to be a part of a dynamic,
progressive and growing organization, send your

resume to hr@bakersbayclub.com or to the

attention of the VP Human Resources at fax:

242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”



ment-owned Corporations,
chiefly Bahamasair and the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, are “unsustainable”. With
the Government’s fiscal posi-
tion increasingly squeezed, now
appears as good a time as any
to find the political will to deal
with this issue.

“Subdues domestic activity
intensifies fiscal pressures as
the Government rationalises
expenditure on public enter-
prises and employs counter-
cyclical measures to revitalise
the economy,” the IDB said
succinctly. “A disproportionate
burden from the capital budget
reduces the country’s ability to
maintain efficient transport,
communications and public ser-
vices. Two utility companies,
BEC and Water & Sewerage
Corporation, together with the
deficit financing for Bahama-
sair, the nationally-owned air-
line, absorb some 30 per cent of
the allocations in the capital
budget.”

And the IDB added that “ris-
ing social costs have increased
demand for public services,
while declining stimulus from
private sector credit provides
little public sector relief and
adversely affects operating
trends of private sector estab-
lishments.”

* The IDB’s Bahamas coun-
try representative, Oscar
Spencer, yesterday told Tribune
Business that the bank’s data
on the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s (BEC) non-tech-
nical losses was incorrect.

He said the latest BEC
report submitted by the IDB-
hired German consultants,
Fichtner, showed that non-tech-
nical losses (losses resulting
from theft and meter tamper-
ing) were around 6-7 per cent,
rather than 15.7 per cent. Total
losses stood at 14 per cent and
technical losses at 8 per cent,
the former much reduced from
the IDB report’s 25.7 per cent.

85-90%
export
‘guts’
engineers
FROM page 1B

drive to ensure qualified
Bahamian engineers obtained
work they were qualified to
do would “improve our eco-
nomic engine” by keeping
dollars at home.

Mr Reiss, who has been
heavily involved in water and
wastewater treatment engi-
neering work in the US and
abroad, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Even though I’m
Bahamian, I see the compa-
nies I compete against and
beat in foreign locations very
smoothly get work off the
Government that I even have
difficulty in getting shortlisted
for.

“T would easily guess that
85-90 per cent of the engi-
neering work on major devel-
opment projects is done by
foreign engineers.”

Culprit

Mario’ Bastian, the
Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers’ secretary, added that
the Government was just as
big a culprit as developers
when it came to denying
Bahamian engineers oppor-
tunities on projects they were
perfectly qualified to perform.

Local expertise and knowl-
edge would be harnessed on
many projects by using
Bahamian engineers, Mr
Reiss argued, and the passage
of the Act and set-up of the
Professional Engineers Board,
with its registration require-
ments, is viewed as a tool to
aid this goal.

The Act requires foreign
engineers to obtain a certifi-
cate of temporary registration
from the Professional Engi-
neers Board when working in
this nation, and also joint ven-
ture with Bahamian engineers
when working on major pro-
jects in this nation.

The Board, and the
requirement that Bahamian
engineers (and their foreign
counterparts) be registered in
all the disciplines they per-
form, will enhance consumer
protection by letting Bahami-
ans know exactly what an
engineer is qualified to do,
plus enable the sector to be
self-regulating and put certi-
fication standards in place.

Mr Reiss praised develop-
ments such as Albany, the
National Sports Stadium and
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA) rede-
velopment for allowing
Bahamian engineers to play
a key role on those projects.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 9B



Regulator pledges probe ongoing into $25m failed broker

FROM page 1B

$500. This means that an eight-
hour (daily) stint on the bro-
ker/dealer’s wind-up could earn
Mr Kikivarakis $4,000, a sum
larger than most Bahamians’
average monthly salary, and
likely to make many wonder
whether they are in the right
job.

“My services as Official Lig-
uidator are charged at an
hourly rate of $500, which is
within the range of $500-$650,
the charge out rates applied by
Deloitte for services as liquida-
tor rendered by a partner,” Mr
Kikivarakis said in his affidavit.

“Regarding general admin-
istrative and accounting ser-
vices, the prevailing fee sched-
ule, on an hourly basis, applied
by Deloitte during the material
period (which I verily believe
conform with those of other
major accounting firms in the
Bahamas), is as follows.”

The affidavit lists these fees
as thus:

Partners (other than Mr
Kikivarakis): $400-$600 per
hour

Managers: $225-$250 per
hour

Staff accountants: $50-$165
per hour

Consultants: $50-$150 per
hour

Assistants: $50 per hour

In his affidavit, Mr Kiki-
varakis asked for the Supreme
Court to approve a $158,750
payment to himself; $321,345
to Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas); and $64,362 to his
attorney, Alfred Sears, at Sears
& Co.

The issue of the Caledonia
liquidator’s fees has arisen
before, but Tribune Business
has been told by reliable
sources that the Clients Com-
mittee is “extremely unhappy”
over the issue given the
progress of the winding-up to

date. Among the concerns are,
as previously reported by Tri-
bune Business, the fact that the
liquidator has incurred $1 mil-
lion in fees over the last year,
despite the Caledonia matter
having no presiding judge
supervising it following the
departure of former Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons some 11
months ago.

Another issue that has
angered many Caledonia clients
is that in his last report to the
Supreme Court, Mr Kikivarakis
said he would seek court
approval allowing him to retain
a further 2.5 per cent of total
client assets — roughly some
$1.675 million — to meet the liq-
uidation’s continuing costs.

That is in addition to the pre-
vious 2 per cent, or $1.35 mil-
lion, that clients paid into a
security account to fund the lig-
uidator, with some alleging they
were told this was adequate to
fund the winding-up. Thus the
demand for more money has
not gone down well.

The Chents Committee is
also thought to be concerned
that Mr Kikivarakis is seeking
payment of more than $500,000
when, according to his last
Supreme Court report, there
was just $53,393 left in the
Clients Security Account
financing his work. This would
mean that there are not enough
funds to pay him, especially
since Caledonia was insolvent
and had no money of its own.

The liquidator also retained a
further 8 per cent, roughly $5.36
million, of client assets in
escrow as a reserve to cover the
outcome of his investigation
into “an unexpected shortfall”
in Caledonia’s accounts. Some
clients, sources have told Tri-
bune Business, are questioning
why this sum was necessary giv-
en that there was an estimated
shortfall of just $500,000-$1 mil-
lion.

In a previous report to the
Supreme Court, Mr Kikivarakis
said he and Mr Sears took an 11
per cent and 20.83 per cent fee
cut respectively after becoming
involved in “a long, drawn-out
battle” over his costs with the
late Emerick Knowles, QC, and
Brian Simms, partner and head

52wk-Low

Securit y

of litigation at Lennox Paton.

Both men, representing Cale-
donia clients, had opposed a
previous application for pay-
ment of his costs, and Mr Kiki-
varakis alleged that his time
and money could have been
better spent returning assets to
clients.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Mimsy at Work

The report also detailed how
Caledonia clients, and the com-
mittee representing their inter-
ests, objected to the payment
of some $43,000, shared
between three attorneys, to
cover their appearance costs in
hearings to determine Mr Kiki-
varakis's fees, and those of his

attorneys. The $43,000 came
out of the Caledonia Clients
Security Account, into which
all the Bahamian broker/deal-
er's clients had been required
by the Supreme Court to pay
a sum equivalent to 2 per cent
of their assets to cover the liq-
uidator's costs.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 22 APRIL 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.57 | CHG 4.55 | %CHG 0.29 | YTD 5.10| YTD % 0.33
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S$)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
10.00
S5S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

CFAL Bond Fund

2.8266
1.4548
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund

10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

100
10.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
700.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol

Bahamas Supermarkets

Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Last Price.
14.00
4.00
0.55

Daily Vek.

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV

2.9116
1.5268
3.2025
13.4986
107.5706
105.7706
1.1034
1.0764
1.1041
9.5795

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

10.0000

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund

10.5417

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

4.8105

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Shange - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stack Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

7.6928

5.33

-2.

-0.31

NAV 3MTH

Last 12 Months %

103.987340
101.725415

5.33
13 10.96

47.51

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Golina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS$

Prime + 1.75%

Prime + 1.75%

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVECES

clic rca MH A TT.

Div $

0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)

64.1

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

103.095570
99.417680

31-Dec-09
31-Mar-10

31-Dec-09

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525







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PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

8m Bahamian
owned project
aids recovery

THE TRIBUNE





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Wis a ey ape pepe
| Saas



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"5 Tae EE ay
aa er cat i



AN ARTIST’S rendering of Dunmore Court.

An $8 million Bahamian-
owned and built townhome
community has begun con-
struction in western New
Providence with the first
homes scheduled for occu-
pancy by January 2011, its
proponents arguing that the
development is a further sign
of economic recovery taking
shape.

Sidney Bethell, sales asso-
ciate at Mario Carey Realty,
said the project was signifi-
cant for several reasons.

“Dunmore Court is an
interesting development — 28
townhomes, each of them
2,200 square feet, with four
bedrooms and three-and-a-
half baths, starting at
$499,000, packed with very
high-end appointments, but it
is also important because of
who is behind the develop-
ment,” said Mr Bethell.

“The project is 100 per cent
Bahamian-owned, and every
bit of the work - from foun-
dations to the finish on the
swimming pool - is being car-
ried out by Bahamian con-



tractors and sub-contractors.”

The primary developer is
Thompson Plumbing, which
got its start in Harbour Island
and took the name of the
island’s historic settlement to
the new development, which
has a similar in-town, intimate
and cozy feel.

Gated

Located near the high-end
Albany resort and residential
project, Dunmore Court is a
gated community with homes
gathered around a central
avenue. Each townhouse is
three storeys. Residences are
designed to appeal to local
professionals, retirees or for-
eign owners searching for a
primary or secondary home.

The amenities include 24-
hour security, landscaping, fit-
ness centre, swimming pool
and designated parking. The
project will be built in four
phases.

“For nearly three decades,
we have had the opportunity

to partner with a number of
highly respected companies,
including some of the largest
in the business, helping them
manage Family Island pro-
jects on several occasions,”
said Vhaul Thompson of
Thompson Plumbing.

“Dunmore Court is an
opportunity for us to use
those skills developed over
decades to do a complete
community from start to fin-
ish, producing a product cre-
ated with excellence and
attention to detail.”

The architect is Edward
Missick of Missick Designs.
Other contracts have been
awarded to Nassau residents
Lloyd Saunders, of L&B Con-
struction, and Candice Hanna
of Khanaali Media Group.

The interiors will be
designed by Bahamian com-
pany Roomers Ltd, led by
Leslie Callender and Hazel
Stirling. Mario Carey Realty,
which has an exclusive on the
listing, said it anticipates
working with other real estate
firms.





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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

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Being on time has Its benefits.

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showing this coupon at the FedEx locations
TRC RSE eae Cla gc es

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



THE Bahamas Olympic
Association, under the presi-
dency of Wellington Miller,
is making some positive
strides since the drama that
unfolded as it attempted to
hold its last annual general
meeting and election of offi-
cers.

The association has since
relocated to the comfort of its
new home in the JS Johnson
Building on Village Road. It’s
certainly a lot more spacious
than the previous office space
that it occupied.

Additionally, the associa-
tion has been working fever-
ishly trying to secure funding
from its international organi-
sations for its entire member
sporting federations.

So far, the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation has been the
first to benefit from such a
venture and even though he
served as the immediate past



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ext. 246

4

STUBBS BOA makin

president of the BSF, secre-
tary general Rommel
Knowles has assured all of the
other disciplines that they will
be doing the same for them.

Last when he took office,
replacing long-time outgoing
president Arlington Butler,
Miller said he discovered that
there is a lot of money avail-
able to assist all of the sport-
ing bodies that come under
the International Olympic
Committee.

He says associations and
federation only need to apply
for it.

With the country rebuild-
ing from the global economic
crisis and the need for more
and more funding to sustain
the various national pro-
gramme, it’s going to be
incumbent on the BOA to do
that it can to assist its mem-
bers.

The BSF benefited from a

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antelefiarelielanemwenas CASH SALES ONLY!



Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

two-year grant that is contin-
gent on its rebuilding pro-
gramme as it prepares for the
qualifying tournament for the
Central American and
Caribbean Games.

Basketball is definitely one
of those sports that could
surely use such a grant, con-
sidering the fact that there are
a lot more players at the inter-
national level, who could help
the Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration in its quest to qualify
for the World Championships
and subsequently the Olympic
Games.

I’m sure that with such a
grant in place, the federation
could be in a much better
position to lure more of the
professional players stretched
across Europe and even in the
United States to give the
Bahamas a push to the top.

Over the years, we’ve seen
so many of our talented play-
ers fall by the wayside and
have even retired before they
had a chance to represent the
country at prestigious tour-
nament because of the lack
of funding.

The BSF have certainly got-
ten the ball rolling by receiv-
ing the first grant.

But they will need a lot of
work to get the national pro-
gramme to the level where we
can get back to being a con-
tender and our appearances
doesn’t just signal a free ride
to the visiting country for our
players.

It’s a good opportunity for
the BSF to go back into the
Family Islands and try to
rediscover some of the raw
talent that helped to make the
Bahamas the household name
that it has achieved over the
years in the region.

PENN RELAYS A
GOOD START
I think the initiative by the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations to award

some of its outstanding
schools from the National
high School Track and Field
Championships a trip to the
Penn Relays this weekend is
an excellent one.

Take a team like Moores
Island for example. They
came from Abaco and
stunned the field in winning
the under-20 boys 4 x 100
metre relay. They also had a
second place finisher in the
100 final.

It’s incentives such as these
that help to bring out the best
in our athletes, especially
those in the Family Islands,
who something feel that they
never receive their just
reward simply because they
are not from New Providence
or Grand Bahama.

Consider this, the Moores
Island All-Age School has a
population of about 180 stu-
dents. That’s about the
amount in one graduating
class in the majority of the
high schools in New Provi-
dence.

Yet coach Anthony
Williams was able to groom
five young men who came
here and left an impression
on their peers and the
BAAA, so much so that they
are off to Pennsyvlvia,
Philadelphia this weekend.

The 800-plus residence of
Moores Island should be feel-
ing a real sense of pride for
the achievement of Williams
and the young men, for their
accomplishments.

Williams, an ordained pas-
tor and fisherman, has indi-
cated that they are forced to
train on a grass surface simply
because they don’t have the
proper sporting facility.

And he’s pointed out that
they lack the use of the prop-
er facilities like the starting
blocks and weights, yet his
athletes have been able to
persevere to this point.

It just goes to show what a
little bit of motivation can do.

g positive strides

Hopefully this will be a
trend that the BAAA will
continue to do as they expose
more and more high school
athletes from throughout the
country to the biggest relay
type meet in the United
States with the view of trying
to get some of them exposed
to the college scouts waiting
to distribute athletic scholar-
ships to the deserving student-
athletes.

BASKETBALL SHOW-
CASE

Over the next three days,
high school and players out
of school will have another
golden opportunity to display
their skills in Grand Bahama
as the St. George’s Jaguars
host their 8th annual Basket-
ball Showcase.

Coach Darrell Sears and his
staff at St. George’s should
be commended for not just
trying to push the players
from the Jaguars, but they’ve
opened it up to any player in
the country who feels they
have the potential to secure
a scholarship.

Some players might feel it’s
a costly venture to make the
trip to Grand Bahama and
also find accommodations for
the weekend once they get
there.

But there are a lot of play-
ers who wouldn’t mind spend-
ing the money to travel to the
United States for a clinic, a
camp or a similar type Show-
case and incur the same type
of expenses.

If you’re serious about your
future in the sport and the
opportunity to impress the
visiting coaches for a chance
of obtaining a scholarship,
then you should take advan-
tage of the Showcase.

Hopefully through the
efforts of Sears and his staff,
we will see some more players
make their dream of playing
collegiate basketball a reali-
ty as a result of making the
effort to participate.

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LIVERPOOL'S Dirk Kuyt of the Netherlands, right, vies for the ball against Atletico de Madrid's Alvaro
Dominguez, left, during their UEFA Europa League semifinal first leg at the Vicente Calderon stadium in
Madrid on Thursday, April 22, 2010.

GOA ONG Yhaysn Selected Appliances








JONES & CO

322-2188/9





Cruz Azul wins
CONCACAF
final first leg

SOCCER
MEXICO CITY
Associated Press

CRUZ AZUL defeated fel-
low Mexican club Pachuca 2-1
on Wednesday in the first-leg
of the CONCACAF Champi-
ons League final.

Argentine striker Emanuel
Villa, formerly of Derby Coun-
ty, gave Cruz Azula 1-0 lead in
the 19th minute, and an own-
goal by Carlos Gerardo
Rodriguez made it 2-0 in the
23rd.

Pachuca scored what could
be an important away goal in
the 69th through Argentine
midfielder Damian Alvarez.

The second leg will be on
April 28 at Pachuca. Cruz Azul
lost last year's final to fellow
Mexican club Atlante.

This is the fourth time in five
seasons that it's been an all-
Mexico final. Pachuca has won
two of the past three CON-
CACAF Champions League
titles. The winner advances to
the Club World Cup.

Cruz Azul, considered one
of Mexico's four largest clubs,
is the sentimental favorite.

In addition to losing last
year's final to Atlante, Cruz
Azul has also lost three Mexi-
can league finals in recent sea-
sons. It last won a major title
13 years ago, when it took both
the Mexican league title and
the CONCACAF title.

Cruz Azul's manager this
season is Enrique Meza, who
coached Pachuca to two of the
past three CONCACAF titles.

Meza also coached Pachuca
to the Copa Sudamerica title in
2006.

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010



Cool Vibes!

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

OTHER OF GIRL WHO SUFFOCATED IN CAR SPEAKS OU

1 did not kal my baby

TRIBUNE EXCLUSIVE
By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE mother of the three-
year-old girl who suffocated
to death in a car, last night
spoke of her anguish at los-
ing her only daughter and also
of being accused of her mur-
der.

After being questioned and
released without charge by
police, 44-year-old Sandra
McDonald, told The Tribune
how a “simple misunder-
standing” led to the tragic
death of Sandria Demeritte.

Sandria, who was described
as a bright toddler with
boundless love of her father
Larry Demeritte, was found
dead in a car after she appar-
ently wandered away from
her mother’s home.

It is believed she became
trapped in the vehicle and suf-
focated.

Last night mum Sandra, of
Abner Street, off Fox Hill
Road, claimed the events that
led up to Sandria’s death
began when 50-year-old Mr
Demeritte walked out of her
house.

Ryan Pinder

Sas
ex stant SECTOR



THE TRIBUNE covered the
tragic events on Monday.



She said: “Me and my
boyfriend just had a misun-
derstanding, he got out of the
bed, put on his slippers, and
went walking out the front
door. He slammed the door
behind him. She went behind
him, and like two minutes lat-
er I heard the door and I
heard her say ‘Daddy’, so I
thought he was right there.”

Familiar with the route to
his house, an estimated 100
metres away, the family
believes Sandria left her

SEE page 15

misses first

chance to vote as MP

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



DESPITE enduring heavy
criticism for having voted in the
United States but never in the
Bahamas, Ryan Pinder has yet
to cast a vote in his homeland —
missing his first chance as the
newly-elected MP for Elizabeth.

Mr Pinder is again taking
flack for his voting record, this

time because he passed up the

opportunity to formally support
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Bill in Parliament
on Wednesday.



EVs

The MP defended his absence yesterday, saying he had a pre-
vious engagement, and pointed out that he expressed his sup-

SEE page 15

ae he
tt ee ct

Fe
Pot Eos

a ak ao

eer me eon ay

Batter Service
Bahamian-owned »*









By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

YESTERDAY’S celebra-
tion of Earth Day saw the
opening of the Bahamas
National Trust’s 26th nation-
al park, Bonefish Pond,
marking the protection of
around 1,000 acres of wet-
lands on the south side of
New Providence.

Eric Carey, executive
director of the Trust,
expressed his hope to
expand the park across the



BNT celebrates Earth Day
with national park opening

south coast as development
expands from Coral Harbour
to Venice Bay and the South
Seas development directly
bordering the new national
park and dredging a canal at
the mouth of Bonefish Pond.

Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux said the sur-
rounding developments are
minor in comparison to the
good work the Trust is doing
to protect important ecosys-
tems.

“The destruction that has
taken place along this coast
has been long standing,” Dr

SANDRA MCDONALD
with her tragic late daughter
Sandria Demeritte.





Deveaux said.

“But it’s only small com-
pared to the expansive wet-
lands on the southern coast
of New Providence.

“All the way to Coral Har-
bour is an expansive wetland
system.

“We hope to shape all that
development around the
wetland system and the envi-
ronment, that way what you
set aside will do its job, and
the surrounding areas can
only get help with sound

SEE page 16





ag TE
daha
INSIDE TODAY



The Minister of
Health intervenes
in row between
govt agencies

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis has intervened
in a conflict between two gov-
ernment agencies regulating
the health sector which, it is
claimed, was impeding the
operations of some local phar-
macies.

Sources in the industry
accused the Health Profes-
sions Council (HPC), which
formerly regulated pharma-
cies in the country, of failing
to turn over records needed

SEE page 16

Man accused
of sexually
abusing boys
denied bail

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN accused of sexu-
ally abusing four young boys
was denied bail yesterday
when he appeared in court
yesterday.

Kevin Hanna, who was
arraigned on unlawful sex
charges two weeks ago, was
back in Magistrates Court
8, Bank Lane, yesterday.

It is alleged that some-
time between December,
2009, and April 5, 2010,
Hanna abused two six-year-
old boys, a five-year-old boy

SEE page 16





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NASSAU AND) BAHAMA ISLANDS”? TEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS






ran Sit



o ST. BEDE’S

a STUDENTS
LEBRATE

a
DAY

STUDENTS of St Bede’s
Catholic Primary School
yesterday celebrated Earth
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Family Fun Day

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 3



Union and COB set to
resume talks on Monday

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia. net



AFTER four days of strike action by
COB faculty, industrial agreement nego-
tiations between the institution and the
Union of Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas are set to resume on Monday.

Both parties consented to a “lock-
down” for three weeks, until May 14, and
will be meeting throughout the week from
10am to 7pm and half day on Saturday.

The teams will have two one-hour
breaks and no negotiations will be held on
Sunday.

If negotiations are still at an impasse by
this new deadline, provisions for a sev-
en-day extension have been accepted, at
which time external arbitrators will be
brought in to facilitate an agreement.

Members of the faculty’s negotiating
team were granted an extension of two
weeks after negotiations are completed
to deliver final grades for their students. It
was confirmed that the grades of students
who are graduating or transferring will
be given priority and will be in by the
May 8 transcript deadline.

The two parties have signed off on 52 of
84 clauses on the new agreement in the
presence of Department of Labour offi-
cials. Of the 32 left, the most contentious
deal with appointments, promotions,
duties and responsibilities, performance
assessments and salaries.

UTEB president Jennifer Isaacs-Dot-
son said: “As always we would like to
remain optimistic; I think three weeks is
more than enough time to reach an agree-
ment and we hope to get one. I think we
even have enough time to proof it and
get it finalised as an industrial agree-
ment.”

During the four-day strike, faculty
members raised a number of issues,
including the state of campus facilities
and their unanswered questions about the






















management of funds. They are asking
for COB to undergo a forensic audit and
make its financial records accessible to
the public.

In a press conference yesterday,
Bahamas Public Service Union (BCPOU)
president John Pinder announced his
union’s confidence in COB’s accounting
system.

He said the college had shown him
audited financial statements up to 2008,
and that he found no irregularities in the
audit or the accounting system.

However, the faculty has maintained
that the validity of the audited statements
is irrelevant to their request, which is
essentially about transparency at an insti-
tution partially funded with public money.

Mts Isaacs-Dotson added: “We never
questioned the credibility of the audited
financial statements. We asked for a
forensic audit; this is completely differ-
ent from audited financial statements.

“A forensic audit would really look at
how every cent and penny that was given
to the institution was spent. I think that
they are deliberately trying to confuse
the two.”



UTEB president Jennifer Isaacs-Dotson

‘Tentative signs’ that national economy is stabilising

Two in custody after drugs
seized in separate operations

TWO men are in custody following two separate
police operations in which illegal drugs were seized by
the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU).

Sometime around 5pm on Wednesday, DEU offi-
cers while on patrol in the area of Dumping Ground
Corner observed the occupant of a gold Hyundai Tus-
con, with the licence plate number 151532, acting sus-
piciously.

They conducted a search of the jeep and recovered a
quantity of suspected cocaine from the vehicle’s glove
compartment.

A 38-year-old man of Deveaux Street was taken in for
questioning in connection with this discovery.

Then yesterday, at around 10.30am, DEU officers
searched a home on Milton Street, off East Street.
They recovered a quantity of suspected marijuana. A 25-
year-old man was subsequently arrested.

The DEU also recovered a quantity of suspected
marijuana when they searched an abandoned building
at Red Land Acres off Soldier Road. No on was taken
into custody in connection with this matter so far.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE
Please be advised that

Ms. Jo-Ann McSweeney

ate ae
i

es . 1
oe



is no longer employed and is not authorized
to conduct any Business on behalf of

ACCORDING to the lat-
est Central Bank of the
Bahamas report on economic
and financial developments
in the country, there are “ten-
tative signs of stabilisation”
in the national economy, as
the global economy entered
the early stages of recovery.

However, the domestic
economy will nonetheless
continue to face “significant
headwinds” throughout the
remainder of the year with
employment prospects “con-
strained”, given that the
upturn in the world’s
economies is expected to be
more drawn out than recov-
eries in the past, the report
said.

Based on key economic
indicators in February, the
report, issued this month,
notes that while tourism per-
formance this year is likely
to be “subdued”, it nonethe-

Two armed
robberies
investigated

POLICE are investigat-
ing two armed robberies
which both occurred on
Wednesday night.

The first one took place
around 6.35pm when a
woman was held up at gun-

less saw a “slightly positive”
upswing in its “key stopover
segment” following the sharp
downturn that prevailed at
the same time a year ago.

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reports that a sur-
vey of some large New Prov-
idence hotels suggested “a
marginal improvement” in
the number of tourists staying
overnight on the island in
January and February as well
as in the amount of money
they spent while here.

Goods

Meanwhile, in a bit of fur-
ther good news for the local
population, the cost of goods
and services which had been
buoyed by a 4.7 per cent
inflation rate in February
2009 fell overall a year later,
with an inflation rate of 1.8
per cent registered at the time

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of the report.

This overall decline was
boosted by drops in inflation
in the housing market, for
furniture and household
operation, food and bever-
ages, recreation and enter-
tainment, medical care and
health and transport and
communication when com-
pared with the same time last
year.

However, the report notes
that other key goods and ser-
vices increased in cost,
including education, clothing
and footwear, electricity and
fuel.

“The fuel surcharge for the
month of February rose by
an average of 11.7 per cent
to 10.75 cents per kilowatt
hour (Kwh) over the previ-
ous month, and by 3.8 per
cent when compared to a
year earlier.

“The average price of
diesel fell by 1.6 per cent in
January to $3.60 per gallon;
while gasoline costs rose by
0.5 per cent to $4.19 per gal-
lon. On a year-on-year basis,
the prices of both products
were higher by 31.4 per cent
and 29.7 per cent, respective-
ly,” said the report.

Despite generally positive
signs in the economy at large,

the report records that the
government’s fiscal position
saw “continued erosion” giv-
n “persistent weakness in
private sector demand”.

The government deficit was
25.8 per cent larger in Feb-
ruary 2010 than at the same
time in the previous year, sev-
en months into the 2009/2010
budget cycle, standing at
$200.3 million.

Projects

Spending $90.3 million for
the 2009/2010 budget year so
far on capital projects, $28.5
million more than it had up
until the same point in the
2008/2009 budget cycle, gov-
ernment had spent almost 40
per cent more in this area
compared to the previous
year as it continued its infra-
structure drive to support
employment, the report said.

All the while the govern-
ment continues to lose out on
tax revenue and on interna-
tional trade and non-trade
stamp tax receipts in com-
parison with 2008/2009 due
in part to continually “slug-
gish consumer demand”
among the population, the
Central Bank said.

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Press liaison officer
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pings said that according to
reports, the woman was
approached by a man with
dread locks, dressed in a
navy blue shirt and short
jeans, allegedly armed with
a handgun, who demanded
cash.

The culprit robbed the
woman of her handbag and
fled the area on foot in an
unknown direction.

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uae

Madeira St [242] 325-8233 © Robinson Rd [242] 322-3080






PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





















































LONDON — Nick Clegg proved he wasn't
a one-hit wonder in Britain's second election
debate Thursday, holding his own against
Labour's Prime Minister Gordon Brown and
the Conservatives' David Cameron over thorny
issues such as Afghanistan, the Catholic sex
abuse scandal and the special relationship with
the United States.

An initial poll gave Clegg a slight edge in the
debate, but it appeared to be close to a three-
way tie. Still, Clegg managed to keep some of
his political stardust — respondents said the
Liberal Democrats' 43-year-old leader seemed
the most honest.

Clegg shook up the race last week, emerging
as a clear winner after giving a smooth and
confident performance in Britain's first U.S.-
styled election debate and boosting his party's
profile. Thursday's debate came as dozens of
anti-war protesters and other activists clashed
with police outside the studio hosting the prime-
time duel. Pro-Palestinian groups outside
protested Israeli incursions in Gaza. Others
held placards that read "Troops Home!" There
are some 10,000 British troops still stationed in
Afghanistan. It was the closest Britain has come
to the famous 1960 Nixon-Kennedy debate —
every grimace and blemish were seen in high-
definition television format. The candidates’
performances make the razor-close May 6 elec-
tion even harder to predict.

Polls suggest that no party will win an out-
right majority. That situation could turn the
Liberal Democrats into a kingmaker, bartering
with both Labour and the Conservative for
things they want — namely electoral changes
that could weaken Britain's traditional two-
party system. Brown was on the attack for
most of the debate, ridiculing Clegg and
Cameron — both 16 years his junior — and at
one point comparing them to his children. He
also lashed out at Clegg, accusing him of being
anti-American, and going after Cameron for
being "anti-European.”

"These two guys remind me of my two
young boys squabbling at bathtime, squabbling
about referendums on the EU when what we
need is jobs and growth and recovery,” said
Brown, 59. "I'm afraid David is anti-European,
Nick is anti-American and both are out of touch
with reality."

Clegg, whose Liberal Democrats voted
against the U.S.-led Iraq war and who has ques-
tioned British "subservience" to U.S. interests,
denied he was anti-American, but said Britain
should re-evaluate how it deals with its trans-
Atlantic ally. "It's an immensely important spe-
cial relationship, but it shouldn't be a one-way
street. We shouldn't always do what our Amer-
ican friends tell us to do."

An automated telephone poll taken by Com-
Res after the debate showed that 2,691 viewers
favoured Clegg by a tiny margin. About a third
of viewers believed that Clegg won the debate,
while 30 per cent believed that Brown or
Cameron won. The margin of error for that
sample size is plus or minus 2 percentage points.
Cameron, who gave a lackluster performance in

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EDLINE DECIUS of Mackey
Street, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D. D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

UK’s Clegg shows he’s no 1-hit wonder



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

nN -1" 12) 307-097" =a. 1, SOc “02° ks rrr
Government should

rethink one-way
streets change








Publisher/Editor 1972-






last week's debate, appeared to learn from his
mistakes — he looked directly at the camera
and seemed more confident Thursday. He
almost lost his temper when he accused Brown
of allowing campaign leaflets that suggested a
Conservative government would cut benefits
for the elderly.

"These lies you are getting from Labour are
pure and simple lies. I have seen these lies and
they make me very, very angry."

Both Labour and the Conservatives voted
for Britain to go to war in Iraq, a stance that has
hurt them with anti-war sentiment still strong in
Britain. The Labour Party, which has been in
power for 13 years, lost many seats in the 2005
general election when voters cast protest ballots
against Tony Blair's decision to lead Britain
into Iraq. Afghanistan, the latest nettlesome
mission, in which 280 British troops have died,
is now one of Britain's longest and most costly
conflicts, draining government coffers as the
country tries to recover from its worst recession
since World War II.

Clegg criticized the strategy in Afghanistan
and said troops needed better equipment. The
party would support other operations if they
were in the interests of Britain but, "If you put
soldiers into harm's way, you either do the job
properly or don't do it at all," he said.

An audience member asked whether the
leaders backed Pope Benedict XVI's visit to
Britain in September, and if they supported
the church's stance on the sex abuse scandal,
condoms, homosexuality and stem cell research.
All three men said they supported the visit,
which is due to cost taxpayers some £15 million
($22.5 million). Cameron was most definitive,
however, on other differences with the church,
saying the church has "very serious work to do
to unearth and come to terms with some of the
appalling things that have happened."

Clegg, a former member of the European
Parliament, once backed Britain adopting the
euro and has talked about forging stronger ties
with Europe. He stressed Thursday that Britain
needs cooperation from other European coun-
tries if progress is to be made on terrorism,
immigration, climate change and bank regula-
tion. Cameron has long been a euro-sceptic
and stood apart from both Clegg and Brown on
Thursday when he suggested again there should
be a referendum allowing British people to
decide how they feel about being a part of the
European Union. Clegg is unlikely to become
prime minister because Britain's electoral sys-
tem is not proportional so parties must win the
majority of districts not the popular vote. This
puts smaller and newer parties at a disadvan-
tage. Most core voters still either vote Conser-
vative or Labour. Candidates managed to get
across their campaign mantras throughout the
debates — with the Conservatives warning that
a hung Parliament and a coalition government
could hurt the pound and Britain's credit rating
and Brown insisting that a government shake-
up could jeopardize an economic recovery.

(This article was written by Paisley Dodds,
Associated Press Writer).




Ry

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space in
your valuable column to
express my opinion on the
recent change of the south
ends of Market Street and
Baillou Hill Road to one-
way streets.

I live in the southwestern
district of New Providence
and work in the north and
like a large majority of citi-
zens who also live and work
in those areas for years I
have been using Baillou Hill
Road and Market Streets
interchangeably to get to
work and/or return home.

However, since their
recent official change to
one-way streets, I now find
driving to and fro to work
and home to be very frus-
trating.

What once used to be a
20-minute journey back and
forth on any given day for
me, is now ranging any-
where from 45 minutes to
an hour and a half just to
return home.

I am not saying the idea
to make Market and Bail-
lou Hill Roads one way is
not a good one, but I ques-
tion if the Government
looked at every possible
caSe scenario when deciding
to do this.

In my opinion by making
both streets one-way going
south and north respective-
ly, the north and south-
bound traffic (which com-
prises a large concentration
of vehicular traffic) have
only been given one choice —
a one-way route up and a
one-way route down.

In my opinion, Baillou
Hill Road was a very popu-
lar median for those of us
who had to travel to the
south or southwestern parts
of the island while Market
Street was the perfect route
for vehicular traffic going
either east, south-east or




LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



south-west. However, by
making both medians one-
way, all the north-bound
traffic is now being forced
to use Baillou Hill Road in
the morning and during
peak hours and forced to
only use Market Street
when going south, south-
east or south-west after Spm.
Because of this change I
have noticed that traffic is
now grid-locked on Poin-
ciana Drive, Tucker Road
and Thompson Boulevard
because depending on
where you are headed,
south-westerners now have
to use Thompson Boulevard
to get home, while a large
majority of the traffic going
south-east or in some parts
of the south-west are now
concentrated on Market
Street alone, the conve-
nience of Baillou Hill Road
having been taken away.

I have been working in
the downtown area for more
than 15 years and I have
never see traffic grid-locked
on Poinciana Drive and
Tucker Roads, and at least it
used to move on Thompson
Boulevard! Even the street
that runs in the back of The
Nassau Guardian is now
grid-locked with traffic dur-
ing peak hours — a first in
my opinion. You will also
notice if you drive on Bail-
lou Hill Road after Spm and
during peak hours, that it is
like a ghost town.

Conversely, Market Street
is basically the same in the
mornings. I think this is
much to do with the change
and with everyone being
forced to use one street or
the other, the choice of
either/or having been taken
away by making the streets

one-way.

I know I am not a lone
voice crying out in request-
ing that the Government
reconsiders its plan to make
these streets one-way each.
In my opinion, the change
has made it worse not bet-
ter. Personally, I never
found Baillou Hill Road to
be a problem in 40 plus
years of living in the south.
It was, in fact, one of the
easiest roads to use for any-
one centrally located and
even if there were a traffic
jam on Baillou Hill Road,
there was the added conve-
nience of zig-zagging on to
Market Street and back at
an individual's convenience.

In addition to this new
nightmare in returning
home on weekdays, I really
miss the convenience of
using the side streets off
either road going back and
forth. Could you imagine
having to be in traffic for
over 40 minutes on Market
Street just to come all the
way around on Robinson
Road and on to Baillou Hill
Road to make a stop at The
Meat Man on Baillou Hill
Road. Imagine that!

I keep reading about how
certain government officials
came up with this idea, and
it seemed to be a good one
at the time so give it a
chance to work, however, in
my opinion the idea is not
proving to be a good one,
and I trust that the powers
that be would not let their
prides intervene in making
this change a permanent
one.

Please listen to your citi-
zens.

Widen and improve the
streets, but please allow
them to remain two-way.

CONCERNED
DRIVER
Nassau,

April, 2010.

Looking at traffic reversal
and urban development

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish the follow-
ing in reference to the rever-
sal of traffic and urban devel-
opment.

As a young man trying to
find my way in architecture
in 1980, I spent many days at
the Town Planning Depart-
ment learning the in’s and
out’s of plan processing and
building permit approvals.

In the reception area of the
town planning department,

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was a huge model of the city
of Nassau. That model
showed what the city was
intended to be and what it
was at the time, complete with
scaled model buildings, large
green spaces, etc.

That model also showed a
street plan and many housing
complexes that were to be
built.

I remember some streets
were to be reconfigured to
create a going down road and
a coming out road from
downtown. Balliou Hill Road
was to be the coming out road
heading south, and East
Street was a going too road,
headed north into town. Mar-
ket Street was to remain a
two-way street.

Another plan that always
fascinated me was a very large
map of New Providence that
indicated in an array of
colours the particular devel-
opment Zones for the island,
this also included an area des-
ignated as a Free Trade Zone.

The map also showed the
reconfigured roads and high-
ways, two I specifically
remember were the central
highway that began where the
new Frank Watson highway
is today and ended at
Yamacraw and the southern
perimeter road. What is most
significant and relevant is the
model and master plan, as I
remember were titled the
New Providence Urban
Development Plan 1964.

To date I have heard noth-
ing from the professionals
who knew of these plans, to
offer comments to allay the
public’s fears about these
developments, as the plans
made sense then as it does
today, and every government
has sought to put their own
version into play. However
the concept is the same and
will work if given time.

ADRIAN B La-RODA
Nassau,
April, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 5

Waiting for completion of Baillou Hill

Road works ‘will force business closures’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FAMILY businesses will be forced to
close if they take the advice of Minister of
Works Neko Grant and wait for Baillou Hill
Road works to be completed, proprietors
claim.

The business owners reported losses of
20 to 40 per cent since Baillou Hill Road
was made one-way northbound and Market
Street one-way southbound between Wulff
Road and Robinson Road on March 30.

Calling for the road change to be reversed,
they told the Minister of Works and his
senior staff on Monday how the traffic diver-
sion has already forced one business to close
and several others to let staff go.

However, Mr Grant partially blames the
disruption in business on the construction
work on Baillou Hill Road which currently
leaves only one lane of the dual carriage-
way open to drivers and is expected to con-
tinue for the next nine months.

But president of the Carmichael Business
Forum Ethric Bowe said there is no time
for businesses to wait as around 400 jobs are
on the line and family businesses which have
thrived for generations will now have to close
their doors.

He and several other business owners say
they have had fewer customers over the last
four weeks as drivers no longer pass their
businesses on their way home from work,
and circular traffic discourages them from
diverting their route south on Market Street.

“We can’t wait nine months, we need this
to be dealt with now,” Mr Bowe said.

“For us, this is an emergency, and the min-
ister knows full well that every day we wait
we go further into the hole and it’s harder for
us to recover, so it seems there’s an agenda to
put us Bahamian businesses out of business.”

The business owners maintain they were
not consulted about the change in traffic
flow prior to its implementation despite the
severe impact it has had on their livelihoods,
that of their staff and the community at large.





“T just don’t understand the thinking of
government,” Mr Bowe said.

“Without having jobs, I don’t know how
they can go ahead and look at this and say
lets destroy some jobs.

“They are now fully aware of what they
are doing and if they know, they are respon-
sible, and they will be held responsible.”

The Ministry of Works made the traffic
change to improve traffic management and
flow, and to improve road safety.

Mr Grant claims it has been a success in
that respect.

As businesses also reported a drop in
business after road works commenced and
prior to the traffic diversion, he asked pro-
prietors to wait for road improvements to be
completed.

“Traffic is flowing extremely well
between Wulff and Robinson Roads and
we feel that the same thing will happen on
Baillou Hill Road once the construction
has been completed,” Mr Grant said.

“While I assured the business owners
that I heard their concerns, I also respect-
fully asked them to give the project a
chance.

“Wait until we would have completed



BAILLOW HILL RO
ONE WAT
NORTH BOUND
TO WULFF ROAD

the work between Robinson Road and
Wulff Road, and for the traffic to flow for
those persons who might have been reluc-
tant to stop to their various business hous-
es because of the road construction.”

The minister argued that it is more
important for government to accomplish
what it seeks to do in regards to alleviating
traffic so that the greatest number of people
can benefit.

Nevertheless, businesses in the area are
gathering signatures for a petition to protest
the road changes and are planning a public
demonstration next week.

“We will resist this,” Mr Bowe said.

“Businesses are binding together in a
strong way and everybody has stood up
passionately and directly pointed to the
minister and said this cannot stick, you can-
not do this.”

Former PLP leadership contender Paul
Moss, who intends to run as an indepen-
dent parliamentary candidate for St Cecilia
in the next general election, has pledged
his support for the call to scrap the one-
way system, saying the change is “utter
madness” as it is distressing for businesses
and residents.

Some pharmacies ‘have signed on to drug plan’



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: The walk will start at police headquarters on East Street.
: The route for the fun walk is as follows: North on East
: Street to Bay Street, east on Bay Street to the new bridge,
: over the new bridge to the Paradise Island golf course; from
: the golf course, down the old bridge onto Shirley Street,
: west on Shirley Street to East Street, south on East Street
: and back to police headquarters.

Members of the public are encouraged to bring their
: family and walk with the police.

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By ALESHA CADET

DESPITE ongoing negoti-
ations between the Bahamas
Pharmacy Association and
the National Insurance Board
over the terms of the new
National Prescription Drug
Plan, some pharmacies have
reportedly gone ahead and
signed on to the initiative.

BPA president Marvin
Smith said yesterday he is not
aware of any members signing
on, but according to NIB sev-
eral private pharmacies and
government facilities have
executed contacts to serve as
pharmacy providers when the
plan is launched.

This comes as the BPA
continued to discuss its
counter-proposal — which it
intends to present to NIB
shortly — at a regular monthly
meeting last night.

Once implemented, the
National Prescription Drug
Plan (NPDP) will provide

more than 160 prescription
drugs free of charge to suf-
ferers of 11 chronic diseases.
The first phase will cover NIB
pensioners, invalids, children,
and Bahamians over 65.

For months, NIB has been
reporting success with the reg-
istration of beneficiaries.
Tami Francis, NPDP manag-
er, said 7,000 persons have
already signed on.

She said her team is feel-
ing increasingly confident of a
smooth launch this summer.

“We have procured the
information technology sys-
tem and its installation is in
progress; registration and
related activities are ongoing.
So we will be ready,” said Ms
Francis.

However, the BPA is still
not satisfied with the plan.
Among the points of con-
tention are subsidies for the
installation of IT infrastruc-
ture and IT maintenance
responsibilities.

The pharmacies NIB said
have signed on to the NPDP
are: Lowe’s Pharmacy’s Town
Centre Mall and Soldier Road
locations; Betande Drugs on
West Bay Street; the Walk-
In Clinic’s Centreville loca-
tion and the People’s Phar-
macy’s Prince Charles,
Carmichael Road, and Sol-
dier Road locations.

William Cash, CFO of
Lowe’s Pharmacy, said:
“Lowe’s has been involved in
the plan since its inception
and we’ve been following it
all the way through. We feel
its something that the com-
munity needs and we feel its
going to take care of the niche
that’s out there of folk who
are not currently covered. We
intend to give it support and
work with it and try to per-
fect it as quickly as we can.”

Jonathan Fraser of the Peo-
ple’s Pharmacy said: “I think
its long overdue and our
Bahamian people are going

to really appreciate it once we
can get it up and running. The
People’s Pharmacy is excited;
we’re very enthusiastic about
this plan.”

Philip Kemp of the Walk-In
Clinic confirmed that the
company has signed on to the
NPDP and said he thinks it
will have a huge impact on
business.

“Tt will allow us to improve
our customer base.

“Tt will allow access to cus-
tomers that we may not nor-
mally have access to, and
hopefully the services that we
offer will appeal to them oth-
er than just prescriptions,” he
said.

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CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

Notes to Statement of Financial Position

December 31, 2009

4.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

A previously recognized impairment loss is reversed only if there has been a change in
the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount of an asset, however, not to an
amount higher than the carrying amount that would have been determined (net of any
depreciation), had no impairment loss been recognized for the asset in prior years.

A reversal of an impairment loss is credited to current operations.

Related party transactions

Transactions between related parties are based on terms similar to those offered to non-
related parties. Parties are considered to be related if one party has the ability, directly or
indirectly, to control the other party or exercise significant influence over the other party
in making financial and operating decisions and the parties are subject to common control
or common significant influence. Related parties may be individuals or corporate entities.

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Cash and cash equivalents of $148,835 as at December 31, 2009 are comprised of the
following:
Interest 2009 2008
rate $ $
Cash on hand 300 300
Current accounts:
First Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) Limited (B$)
SG Hambros Bank and Trust (Bahamas)
Limited (US$) - 6,266 7,242
Fixed deposit: ;
SG Hambros Bank and Trust (Bahamas) Limited

27,255 31,017

2.61% 115,014

148,835

115,393
153,952

FIXED ASSETS

Fixed assets as at December 31, 2009 are comprised of the following:
2008 Additions Adjustments 2009

$ $ $ $
Cost:

Furniture and equipment
Leasehold improvements

28,583 10,736 -
10,867 2,041
39,450 12,777

39,319
- 12,908
- $2,227
Accumulated depreciation:
Furniture and equipment
Leasehold improvements

27,420 2,794
10,867 453
38,287 3,247

(3,245) 26,969
- 11,320
(3,245) 38,289

Net carrying value 1,163 9,530 3,245 13,938

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

Notes to Statement of Financial Position

December 31, 2009

7.

RISK MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

The Company’s financial instruments include non-derivative instruments such as cash
and cash equivalents and accounts payable, which arise directly from its operations. The

risks arising from the use of financial instruments are liquidity risk and credit risk.

Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk arises from the possibility that the Company may encounter difficulties in
raising funds to meet commitments from financial instruments or that a market for the

financial instruments may not exist in some circumstances.

The Company seeks to manage its liquidity profile to be able to finance operations and
capital expenditures. As part of the liquidity risk management program, the Company
regularly evaluates the projected and actual cash flow information. One of management’s
initiatives is to negotiate increases in trust fees to cover operating expenses. Trust fees for
the year ended December 31, 2009 increased to $505,000 from $487,000 in 2008.

Credit risk

Credit risk is the risk that a counterparty fails to discharge an obligation to the Company.
The Company’s maximum exposure to credit risk in the event the counterparties fail to
perform their obligations in relation to each recognized financial asset, is the carrying
amount of these assets as indicated in the statement of financial position.

It is the Company’s policy to invest excess cash in low risk fixed deposits in reputable
financial institutions and the Company has invested in a fixed deposit with SG Hambros
Bank and Trust (Bahamas) Limited amounting to $115,014 as at December 31,
2009(2008:$1 15,393).

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The Company’s objectives in managing capital are to maintain a strong capital base so as
to maintain stakeholders’ confidence by providing adequate return and to ensure the

Company’s ability to continue as a going concern, and sustain future development of the
business.

In order to maintain or adjust the capital structure, the Company may adjust the amount of
dividends paid to shareholders, return capital to shareholders or issue new shares.

The Company is not exposed to a high level of risk since there are no existing

borrowings. It is more flexible in terms of managing its operations, as it is not subject to
restrictions that might be imposed if there were loans.

Report of Independent Auditors pages 1 and 2,



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 9



Founder of Charles W Saunders

Baptist School is honoured

STUDENTS of the Charles
W Saunders Baptist School locat-
ed on Jean Street honoured their
founder, Rev Dr Charles W
Saunders, in a ceremony attend-
ed by political and religious lead-
ers, former colleagues, friends
and well-wishers on Monday.

Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister was among
those paying homage to an edu-
cator who is known throughout
his five decades of teaching for
being a crusader for excellence.

Minister Bannister, a former
student of Rev Dr Saunders, told
the students that the best way
they can pay tribute to their
patron is to learn their lessons,
become disciplined and respect-
ful human beings and have God
at the centre of their lives.

“Tf you acquire one or more of
these principles, Dr Saunders
would say that his life and labour
to God and country were not in
vain,” he said.

Mr Bannister also quoted
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham when he described Rev
Saunders as a “prince of the Bap-
tist Church in the Bahamas.”

He noted that the prime min-
ister recognised Rev Saunders at
a 2002 banquet stating that:

“Like his predecessors (late
Rev Dr Harcourt W Brown, the
Rev Talmadge Sands, and the
Rev Reuben E Cooper Sr) in the
church, Rev Dr Saunders has
sought to promote respect for,
and protection of the rights and
the dignity of God's people in
the Bahamas. Throughout his
life, he stood for improving the
lot of those least able to assist
themselves, the young, the elder-
ly, and the disenfranchised. He
took a fearless stance in opposi-
tion to the (inbred) inequalities
and prejudices which blighted
our country during the period of
minority government forming an
important part of our history.”

Among the dignitaries that
attended the event were Earl
Deveaux, Minister of the Envi-
ronment; Sir Arlington Butler;
Rev Dr William Thompson; Pas-
tor Hugh Roach; Dr Baltron
Bethel, and Rev T G Morrison.

Rev Dr Saunders appeared
humbled by the recollections of
his life’s achievements, songs and
other expressions of apprecia-

a -













REV CHARLES W SAUNDERS is pictured recounting the history of the
school named in his honour to leaders who attended the affair.

Attending the ceremony were (I-r) Rev Anthony Carroll, president-
elect of the Bahamas National Baptist Missionary and Educational Con-
vention; Wenley Miller, principal of the C W Saunders Baptist School; Rev-
erend Patrick Smith, secretary of the Bahamas National Baptist Mis-
sionary and Educational Convention; Desmond Bannister, Minister of
Education, and Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Environment.

At back is Dr Baltron Bethel, former Director General of Tourism and
Reverend T G Morrison, Pastor of Zion Baptist Church, Shirley Street.

tion made by staff and students.

In his response, he asked the
audience to allow him to speak
candidly about the origin of the
school.

He recounted that it was born
out of many tears shed at night
and a dispute between the South-
ern Baptists United States and
the Bahamas National Mission-
ary and Educational Conference.

Rev Dr Saunders, who was
head of the organisation at that
time, said he was given a mere six
months to secure a loan to pay
the Southern Baptist Church for
the property on which the school
stood.

The group offered Rev Dr
Saunders a down payment on
the property but he refused and
through his own efforts and even
with opposition from within his
organisation, he obtained a loan
and repaid it a mere six weeks.

The school started out as the
Bahamas Baptist College but was
renamed the Charles W Saun-
ders Baptist School in 1996.

In his message to the students,
Rev Dr Saunders told them that

| Eastern Community Association

it was time to settle down and
start to learn as the future of the
Bahamas is in their hands.

He also told them that if they
attended the school that bears
his name they should know how
to properly dress and carry them-
selves,

Rev Dr Saunders reminded
the teachers that they are to be
serious about teaching students
and to do the best they can, while
they can.

In addition to honouring Rev
Dr Saunders, the school also
recognised past administrators
who were instrumental in the
development of the school.

The school also hoisted its new
flag for the first time which was
deigned by Jacoby Johnson, a
10th grade student.

Rev Dr Saunders has served
as a monitor, teacher and princi-
pal in schools throughout the
country and rose through the
ranks at the Ministry of Educa-
tion to become Deputy Perma-
nent Secretary. He has also con-
tributed to several task forces to
develop educational policies.

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Funeral Service For

Melita Eliza Ferguson, 75



of Blue Hills and formerly of
“S@) Bullet Hill, Crooked Island, will
| be held on Saturday at 2:00 p.m.
) at New Bethany Baptist Church,
Key West Street. Officiating will
be Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper.
Interment will follow in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, J.

F, Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish her memories

forever her loving and devoted
husband of 55 years Benjamin; two sons, Winston and
Lloyd Ferguson; four daughters, Joan Clarke, Yvonne
Cooper, Beverly Ferguson and Rose Morrison; son-in-
law, Oswald Morrison; daughters-in-law, Althea; one
brother, Nehemiah Moss of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania;
three sisters, Naomi Munnings, Elizabeth Adderley, Beulah
McPhee; Fifteen grand children, Raquel Kellman, Jerrett,
Shakera & Ryan Clarke, Ashley Williams, Sasha Ferguson,
Cherita Cooper, Jasmine, Jade & Emerald Ferguson,
Rashad Ferguson, Adam Miller, Chad Woodside, and
Tyler & Tarah-Rose Morrison; Six great grand children,
Kevin Kellman, Jahvaughn Clarke, Devonte & Darren
Clarke, Alia Pitt and Sapphire Clarke; two sisters-in-law,
Barbara and Lorraine Moss; one brother-in-law, Laban
Ferguson; four sisters-in-law, Vera Ferguson, Irene
Ferguson, Estella Cox, and Florence Lewis; numerous
relatives and friends Including, Reverend Franklyn and
Sister Katie Clarke, Reverend Wendell Lewis, Minister
Marion Sturrup, Tristina Ferguson, Edna Ferguson her
dedicated caregivers, Natalie Bruno and Josianne Charles,
New Bethany Baptist Church famlly, Alice Rolle, Reverend
Melvin & Bernadette Grant, Dr. Christine Chin and the
dedicated staff of Private Medical Ward, Nurse Ingraham
& Staff of Gambier Clinic, Dr. Sharma from the Trauma
Unit and the Sisal Road East family; a host of other
relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at
Evergreen Mortuary located on Mackey South, from
10:00a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and again at the church from 1pm
service time.



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE







LOCAL NEWS

STUDENTS at the Mangrove Cay High School
in Andros, perform a choral verse piece
during the E Clement Bethel National Arts
Festival adjudications on April 14, 2010.







Mangrove Cay High School scores
high in National Arts Festival

By ERIC ROSE

MANGROVE CAY,
Andros - Mangrove Cay
High School students per-
forming in the Choral
Verse Speaking of the E
Clement Bethel National
Arts Festival adjudications
scored big last week.

The students scored a 98
out of 100, one of the high-
est received so far this year
in that dramatic class.

School Principal Anna
Clarke Rolle said she was
very proud of the students’
performance in front of
drama adjudicator and
Bahamian cultural icon,
James Catalyn. She was
glad that the hard work
they put into it paid off.

“T always knew that the
students here at the Man-
grove Cay High School
have a lot of potential,” she
said. “Sometimes we do not

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4435, 326-7039
Haesau Street, P.0.Box N-1726

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT



Thursday, 22 April, 2010

Jane Fitzroy Butler Bethel,

aged 92, of 44 Nassau Street, died at her residence
Thursday morning. She is survived by her daugh-
ters, Rubie Marie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr.
Paulette Bethel, Marion Bethel, Paulette Rah-
ming; sons Dr. Marcus Bethel, Michael Bethel,
Owen Bethel; sister, Halson Butler; 18 grandchil-
dren, 8 great grandchildren. Numerous other rela-

tives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.







DRAMA ADJUDICATOR James Catalyn speaks to students at the
Mangrove Cay High School in Andros after they performed a choral
verse on April 14, 2010.

enjoyed her individual part
most of all.

get the opportunity to dis-
play or refine what we have

here.”

Seventh-grader Fremee-
ka King said she was happy
that her school did well and

“T enjoyed being able to
say it loud and doing it
myself,” she said. “I cannot
wait to tell my family how

#10 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 ¢ Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 © Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 ¢ Evening: 324-4687

James Harold Larkin, 27

of Price Street, Nassau Village who
died on Saturday, April 10th, 2010
will be held on Saturday, April 24th,
at 10:00am at Commonwealth
Mission Baptist Church,
Commonwealth Boulevard,
Elizabeth Estates. Officiating will
be Bishop Arnold Josey, assisted by
other Ministers. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soldier Road.

=~ 5

Left to cherish unforgettable and
precious memories are his Mother: Patricia Sands-Armbrister;
(1) Daughter: Jhayda Larkin, (1) Son: Jayden Larkin; (3) Sisters:
Michelle & Patricia “Pattie” Larkin & Arnette Sands;
Grandmother: Patsy Anderson; (5) Aunts: Staff Nurse Jean
Sands, Patrice Tynes, Eldora Sands, Jolean & Dianna Williams-
Edwards; (2) Uncles: Dr. David Sands & Philip Sherman of Miami,
Fla; (4) Nieces: Paige Bastian, Anneja Sands, Terren Fulford &
Megan Rolle; (4) Nephews: Miguel Strachan, Quentin Rolle &
Damien Brown Jr.; Numerous cousins including: Malik Sands,
Chauncey, Corey, Nicole, Cleveland, William, Antoinette Sherman
of Miami, Fla. & Ricardo Smith; Special Friend: Vanessa Seymour;
A host of other relatives and friends including: Cyril & Neville
Mackey of Miami, Fla., Ken Sands & family, Vangy Rolle &
family, Roslyn Speights & family of Miami Fla, Lillian Smith &
family of Miami, Fla, Norma Coleman & family of Miami, Fla,
Paula Knight & family of Miami, Fla, Delena Taylor & family of
Miami, Fla, Sandra Roberts & family, Sydney Smith & family,
Mark Armbrister & family, Monica Stuart & family, Edna & family,
Jestina Linsey & family of Miami Fla, Brenda Strachan & family,
Lucy Woodside & family, Sandria Williams & family, Edwin
Johnson & family, Alfred Johnson & family, Antionette Culmer
& family, Donna Wood & family, Denise Godet & family, Racquel
Piper & family of Miami, Fla, Terran, Val & Glen Fulford,
Sharmaine Woodside & family, Delerese Brown & family, Shelly
Bethel & family, Marcia Turnquest & family, Sharell Musgrove
& family, Fredrick & Samuel Wallace & family, Sherilyn Wallace
& family, Sarah Collie & family, Kim Laguerre & family, Catherine
Rolle & family, Vinshan Andrews & family, Roslyn & Sybil Peters
& family, Oliver Hunt & family, Nicole Kemp, Marion Culmer &
family, Joycelyn Woodside & family, Tricia Hilton, Kendrell
Hepburn, Melinda Whitney & family & Quilamae Clarke;
Numerous Close Friends including: Julian Collie, Erica Collie,
Zchivargo Mackey, Trevis Demeritte, Lavardo Miller, Henry
Burnside, Tamiko Wallace, Torshie Ranger, Pastor Jermaine Watkins
and the officers and members of New Life Ministries, Pastor Ed
Allen & Gail Maycock and the officers and members of Abundant
Life Ministries, Bishop Neil C. Ellis and the officers and members
of Mount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist Church, State Bishop Arnold
Josey and the officers and members of Commonwealth Mission
Baptist Church, South Beach Health Center, Nassau Village Urban
Renewal Center and many, many others too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at Clarke’s Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway on Friday, April 23rd, from 10:00am
to 6:00pm and on Saturday at the church from 9:00am until service
time.



well we did. I will feel hap-
py and proud,” she said.

“I feel good because we
did our performance well
and the judge gave us a
great score,” added Christ-
ian Miller.

Kayvohan Gibson said it
made him feel special and
excited.

“IT will feel awesome
when I tell my parents after
school,” he said. “They will
be so proud of me and how
we did.”

Kayvohan also com-
mended his teacher, Nor-
ma Semple, on the amount
of practising they did for
their performance.

Ms Semple said she was
happy for the students she
trained and knew that they
had it in them to do so well.

“They surprised me
because all of the trouble
and the worry that I had
with them rehearsing,” she
joked. “This is their pay-
ment to me. They had to
pay me this way. I am so
pleased and proud of
them.”

Organising secretary of
the Festival, Keva
Cartwright, commended
Ms Semple and the stu-
dents on how well they did
and the level of discipline
they showed in their per-
formance.

“T think you do have a lot
to be proud of,” Ms
Cartwright said. “It is going
to be very hard for them to
be beaten in that class and I
think that you might have a
national winner in this
group.

“Excellent. From the
minute they walked on, you
could tell they were disci-
plined, and that is impor-
tant. All of it is a part of
the performance, as Mr
Catalyn said.”

Principal Rolle added
that she was pleased the
Festival adjudicators came
to her school to listen to
her students.

She also stressed the
importance cultural expres-
sion has in student educa-
tion.

“It is a part of the whole
system,” Ms Rolle said.
“Without culture, the other
part of it would be off bal-
ance; so I think that the cul-
ture blends in with every-
thing else that they do.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




FRIDAY, APRIL 23,

rT

2010



Bahamas’ Fed Cup ladies team recover after humpy start

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE quest for promotion
to Americas Zone Group I
for the Bahamas’ Fed Cup
ladies national team began
with a few bumps in the
road.

At the Americas Zone
Group I, the Bahamas lost
its first tie, but has recovered
to take back-to-back wins
with one match left to play
to qualify for the group
finals.

At the tournament host-
ed at the National Tennis

Team would advance with
win over Dominican Republic

Club in Guayaquil, Ecuador,
the Bahamas’ team of Kerrie
Cartwright, Simone Pratt
and Gabrielle Moxey fell to
the host country 3-0.

Pratt lost the opening
match to Marianna Correa,
6-1, 6-4 while Cartwright fell
in the second singles match
to Marie Elise Casares in
three sets, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.

Pratt and Cartwright also
lost in doubles to Correa and

a aU
A Lh

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

REPRESENTATIVES
of an increasingly popular
Martial Arts community
paid a courtesy call on the
Ministry of Sports to out-
line their immediate plans
for the growth and devel-
opment of the sport.

Representatives from the
Bahamas Martial Arts Fed-
eration, President Brian
Beckford and Executive
Member Oran Rolle along
with with “the father of
MMA in the Bahamas"
Scott Groff plan to elevate
the profile of local mixed
martial arts.

Rolle, who also serves as
chief instructor at Personal
Protection Concepts, said
one of the federation's
main goals was to unify the
sport.

"We are trying to bring
what we do to light and cul-
tivate its growth here in the
Bahamas. Mixed Martial
Arts is the fast growing
sport worldwide and as a
full contact sport its popu-
larity has surpassed that of
boxing," he said. "For the
recognition and to reach
the status we have to
achieve we have to start
from the ground up, build
slowly and gradually until
we one day have locally
based fighters achieve pro-
fessional status. With the
Federation we want to
bring structure to the sport
and present the country
with a unified body for
Martial Arts."

Groff is credited with
popularising the sport of

MMA in the Bahamas and
training some of the sport's
first local participants as far
back as 1992.

He brings over 20 years
of experience training oth-
ers in the sport and spent
years on professional cir-
cuits in the United States,
Japan and Brazil.

"MMA has the potential
to become a bigger and bet-
ter entity in the Bahamas
and the doors are right now
wide open,” Groff said.
"For something like that to
happen, these guys [Beck-
ford and Rolle] are the
right people to make some-
thing of that nature hap-
pen. They have been on the
training, fighting and pro-
motional end of things so
they have a full grasp of
what is going on and what
it takes to be caretakers of
the sport here in the
Bahamas."

Groff has secured the
backing of one of the lead-
ing training and promo-
tional entities in the state
of Texas, XKO Entertain-
ment, which has become
receptive to the idea of
working closely with
Bahamian fighters.

"XKO Entertainment
has pledged to put their
support behind the
Bahamas Martial Arts Fed-
eration and will send about
15 fighters to compete in
the next major event host-
ed by the federation,” he
said. "They are also pre-
pared to host Bahamian
fighters at ‘The Gym' in
Dallas to aid in their train-
ing toward professional sta-
tus."

Permanent Secretary for

Domenica Gonzalez.

In its second tie, the
Bahamas experienced a
complete turnaround with a
3-0 win over Trinidad and
Tobago. Pratt opened the tie
with a 6-2, 7-6 win over Lee-
Anne Lingo, while
Cartwright followed with a
dominating 6-0,6-0 win over
Olivia Bennett.

Moxey experienced her
first action of the tourna-

ment when she teamed with
Pratt to win doubles 6-1, 4-6,
6-4 over Dayna Grazette and
Breana Stampfli.

Team Bahamas moved on
with a 2-1 win over Costa
Rica in its next tie.

After Pratt lost in the
opening singles match to
Camilla Quesada, 6-7 (4), 7-
5, 6-2, Cartwright rebounded
to defeat Laura Viquez, 6-2,
6-1.

Cartwright and Moxey
returned in doubles to secure
the tie for the Bahamas
when they topped Quesada
and Melissa Golfin, 6-0, 6-3.

The Bahamas has one

remaining tie in the opening
round robin when they will
face the Dominican Repub-
lic.

The Dominican Republic
faced undefeated Ecuador
last night, however results
were unavailable to press
time.

They opened the Round
Robin with a 2-1 loss to Cos-
ta Rica and a 3-0 shutout to
Trinidad and Tobago.

The format of play fea-
tures ten countries divided
into two groups.

The Bahamas is grouped
with Ecuador, Trinidad and
Tobago, Costa Rica and the

Dominican Republic while
group B includes Bermuda,
Guatemala, Mexico, Pana-
ma and Peru.

The top country in each
pool will advance to the pool
playoffs and face the runner
up in the opposing group.

The two winning countries
will be promoted to Ameri-
cas Zone Group I.

The Bahamas currently
holds tie breakers over
Trinidad and Tobago and
Costa Rica.

With a win over the
Dominican Republic they
would advance to the group
playoff round.








SEATED from left to right: Brian Beckford, Scott Groff, Archie Nairn, Kevin Colebrooke and Oran Rolle.

the Ministry of Sports,
Archie Nairn, underscored
the importance of a unified
body and highlighted the
impact martial arts can
have on a generation of
untapped potential.

"As with any sport we
find it important to develop
a direct relationship with
the main umbrella organi-
sation and this group seems
poised to ensure that rela-
tionship fosters," he said.
"When I think of this sport
I think of the discipline it
can bring to the young peo-
ple that have the desire and
passion to achieve. We
must continue to expand
the knowledge of the craft
and develop and acumen
for the sport to grow."

Bahamians making major
impacts on the internation-
al MMA scene include
Yves Edwards, credited
with inventing the "Thug-
Jitsu" fighting style and as a
lightweight fighter in
organisations such as the
UFC, PRIDE, Bodog-
FIGHT, and EliteXC; and
Internet sensation turned
MMA fighter, Kevin "Kim-
bo Slice" Ferguson.



Temple Fellowship knocks off
Church of the Nazarene 39-24

AFTER playing two excit-
ing encounters on Saturday,
Temple Fellowship stepped
it up a notch on Tuesday
night and made sure that
Church of the Nazarene did-
n't ruin their bid to win the
men's division of the Bap-
tist Sports Council's 2010
Kendal Rolle Basketball
Classic.

In the third and decisive
game of the president divi-
sional semifinal, Temple Fel-
lowship knocked off Church
of the Nazarene 39-24 to
secure their berth in Satur-
day's semifinals against pen-
nant winning Christian
Tabernacle.

Temple Fellowship
jumped out to an 18-10 lead
after the first quarter and
they posted a 24-12 lead at
the half and they never

trailed by less than double
digits the rest of the way.

Gabi Laurent led the
attack with 12 points, while
Kevin Burrows had 10,
Jason Cooper nine and
Eddie Miller six.

The difference in the
game, however, was the
defensive efforts of Ian Pin-
der, who didn't play in the
two games on Saturday.

Perry Lubin matched Lau-
rent's efforts with 12 for the
losers. Smith Baptiste fin-
ished with eight.Evins Mil-
ford and Robinson Esetor-
cion both scored their four
other points with two apiece.

The postseason will con-
tinue on Saturday with the
following games on tap:

COURT ONE

10 am Macedonia vs Christian

Tabernacle (15)

11 am St. John's vs Golden
Gates (19)

Noon Macedonia vs Bahamas
Harvest (M)

1 pm Latter-Day vs Temple
Fellowship (15)

2 pm Game three of 19-and-
under, if necessary or Men's
game two

3 pm. Game three of 15-and-
under or men's playoffs.

COURT TWO

10 a.m. Temple Fellowship vs
Latter-Day (15)

11 a.m. Christian Tabernacle
vs Macedonia (19)

Noon Mt. Tabor vs Temple
Fellowship (19)

1 p.m. Christian Tabernacle
vs Temple Fellowship (M)

2 p.m. Macedonia vs Christian
Tabernacle (15)

3 p.m. Game three in any
series, if necessary.

GN1040

MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971

CHAPTER 329

THE PRICE CONTROL |GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)

|AMENCMENT) |

) REGULATIONS, 2002

The public is advised that prices ag shown in the Schedule for DWESEL OIL and
LEAD FREE GASOLINE sckd by Chevron (TEXACO) Bahamas Ltd. wil become effective on
Wonday, April 26, 2070 and Thursday, April 29, 2010 respectively.

PLACE

PARTA
NEW PROVIDENCE

Chevron (TEXACO]
Bahamas Ltd.
PART C

GRAND BAHAMA
(NOT FREEPORT)

ARTICLE

DIESEL OIL
| LEAD FREE

SCHEDULE

MAXIMUW WHOLESALE SELLING

PRICE PER U.S. GALLON

MARIMIUM
SUPPLIERS’
PRICE
$

INCLUDING SEA

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IN®LUDING

Chevron (TEXACO) | DIESEL GIL

Bahamas Lid.
PART Ci

ABACO, ANDROS

ELEUTHERA

Chevron (TEXACO|
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ALL OTHER
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Chevron (TEXACO)
| Bahamas Lid.

Permanent Secretary

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| LEAD FREE

NOT INCLUDING

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Signed
Barbara Burrows



MAXIMUM
DISTRIBUTORS’
PRICE

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INCLUDING

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PER US.
GALLON

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS





THE CAR was parked in this area when the girl was found inside.



‘T did not kill
my baby’

FROM page one

mother’s house intending to
go with her father. The fam-
ily suspect that the toddler
let herself into her father’s
car, which was not working
at the time, and became
trapped inside.

It wasn’t until Mr
Demeritte returned alone to
watch the children while Ms
McDonald went to work,
that they realised Sandria
was missing.

While family members,
neighbours and friends in the
community scoured the sur-
rounding area for the tod-
dler, Ms McDonald and Mr
Demeritte went to Fox Hill
Police Station to report San-
dria missing. It was while
they were at the station, that
Sandria’s body was found in
the car by a neighbour.

The neighbour said: “We
looked and looked but we
didn’t think to look in the
car, because she had never
gone into the car alone
before. But one of the guys I
guess decided to check
because they know that she’s
always in that yard with her
father. They [Sandria and her
father] were always togeth-
er and he used to hang
around there a lot.”

Sandra continued: “The
car wasn’t abandoned, it just
isn’t working. The windows
and everything worked but
it’s just that one of the inside
all the knobs were broken —
an adult would have been
able to get out, but not a
child.”

At the station, Sandria’s
aunt Lisa Pugh — who would
later identify the body -
overheard a police dispatch
say they had found a girl. Ms
Pugh said she wasn’t sure
who they had found but
immediately left the station
and went back to the area to
find out.

Ms McDonald reflected:
“Someone called for me at
the station, and when they
gave me the phone they said
they found her. I said where
and they said she was in the
car and I just rest the phone
down.

“Whatever it was they
were saying after that I didn’t
hear, and I started to cry in
the station. Her daddy was
standing at the counter and
he just looked at me but I
don’t think he knew at that
time what I was crying for.”

But it wasn’t until Ms Pugh
returned and confirmed San-
dria’s death, that Ms McDon-
ald said she completely broke
down.

She continued: “She say
they find Sandria in the car,
and I just wanted to go to
her [Sandria] but they would-
mt let me go. I begged and
begged the officers, I just
wanted to go to her. I told
them I needed to go but they
refused.”

Ms McDonald says she
and Mr Demeritte were not
allowed to identify their
daughter’s body. The pair
were held in police custody
until Tuesday evening. As of

Uma ea

yesterday, Ms McDonald
says she had still not seen :

Sandria’s body.

She described the interro-
gation period as a horrible :

and frustrating process,

where investigators repeat- :
edly accused her and her :
boyfriend of murdering their

daughter.

“T would never kill my :
child,” she said. “Why would :
T kill her? I don’t know what :
kind of conclusion could they :

come to.

“T was telling them the :
truth but it couldn’t get :
through to them. Why would :
we walk from here and put :
her in the car, knowing the :
consequences? They tried to :
use all these things on us to :
get us to say that we had :

murdered her.”
She continued:

there.”

One neighbor lamented: :
“This is the Fox Hill com- :
munity, everyone know one :
another and their children — :
her daddy was always in that :
yard, she waited for him. If :
he had gone straight, when :
he looked back maybe he :
would have seen her, but he :
turned off. This was an acci- :

dent man.”

Now that she is out of cus- :
tody, Ms McDonald said that :
she doesn’t yet know how :
she and her family will move :

on from this tragedy.

Ms McDonald said: “He’s :
[Sandria’s father] taken this :
especially hard. She was his :
heart — he has 14 children, :
but she was his heart. He still :
cries, every time he comes :
home here, he always say his :
baby isn’t here to come and :

take off his shoes.

“This is something she :
always did, she just love to :
go behind her daddy. Every- :
thing to her is just her daddy, :
she used to do everything for :
him, put on his socks, put on :
his shoes, put on his belt. If I :
cooked, she wouldn’t be sat- :
isfied unless she took him the :

food.”

She continued: “Every- :
body knows that Sandria, :
that’s my daughter and that I :
love my children. I wouldn’t :
do anything to harm them. :
Anyone who see me and :
know me — and know that I :
carry my children behind me :
wherever I g0 —I tote them. I :
have three children I still :
count Sandria as my child. I :
would never go out there and :
kill my children or put them :

in a car to kill them.”

Ms McDonald has two :
other children, two boys, one :
aged 14, the other two. Due :
to their close ages, Ms :
McDonald said Sandria and :
her younger brother shared a :
strong bond, the two-year- :
old still has not grasped San- :

dria’s absence.

When asked for his sister,
Ms McDonald said his :
response is “she gone with }

daddy.”

“Tt frus- :
trated me but I said to myself :
there’s a God above. They :
will find out the truth one :
way or another. I know :
myself and I know my :
boyfriend, none of us killed :
her and we didn’t put her :

Ryan Pinder misses first
chance to vote as MP

FROM page one

port for the Bill during the
House debate, describing it
as a “fundamental compo-
nent” of achieving the results
he promised to his con-
stituents during his campaign
in terms of training small busi-
ness development.

He went on to declare his
intention to vote “every time”
in the House of Assembly;
however the FNM were quick
to point out that so far, the
new MP’s parliamentary vot-
ing record stands at “O for 1”.

Carl Bethel, the FNM
chairman and MP _ for
Seabreeze, said he and some
of his colleagues had planned
to stand and applaud Mr Pin-
der when it came time for the
House to take a vote on the
Bill.

He said the MP was notice-
ably absent from the lower
chamber, which led to an out-
burst of laughter from the
governing side.

“We were ready to stand
and cheer,” Mr Bethel
exclaimed. “Because finally
he would have voted in the
Bahamas. But alas we were
denied that privilege.

“We can only hope that
before this legislative year is
over, Mr Pinder would have
exercised his constitutional
right,” Mr Bethel quipped.

Addressing the chairman’s
remarks, Mr Pinder said he
intends to vote “every time”
he is required to in the House
of Assembly. However, as for
Wednesday’s session, the
Elizabeth MP said he had a
previous speaking engage-
ment that was set “a long time
before the legislative session
was set out.”

“T support the BTVI Bill,
and I have expressed that in
the House and would vote in
favour it. So I don’t under-
stand what (Mr Bethel)

EW.

means. I wouldn’t understand
why they would jump up and
down on a piece of legisla-
tion. It sounds juvenile to me
and certainly sounds like they
are preoccupied with Ryan
Pinder and not the business
of running this country,” Mr
Pinder shot back.

However, the MP’s former
rival for the Elizabeth con-
stituency said that it appears
Mr Pinder’s priorities are not
in the right place.

Dr Duane Sands said: “I
think it’s a bit disappointing
that after waiting such a long
time for representation, at the
first opportunity that the peo-
ple of Elizabeth would have a

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chance to have their voices
heard on an important vote,
their representative was not
available.”

Looking forward to the rest
of the legislative year, Dr
Sands said he hoped the peo-
ple of Elizabeth’s concerns
would attract more attention
from their MP.

Speaking on the matter
before the vote, Mr Pinder
told the House he supports
the Bill, and hoped it wasn’t
“too little, too late”.

He said: “I support it, Mr
Speaker, because I promised
my constituents, the good
constituents of Elizabeth that
Tam a 21st century politician,







Storm Frame Windows Ltd. 74 Mount Royal Ave.

i

;

focused on training and small
business development.

“This Bill is a fundamental
component to achieving these
goals, short term and long
term.

“This Bill is the crux in
developing the skills labour
necessary to build today’s
Bahamas and to ensure eco-
nomic expansion on a sus-
tained basis from among a
segment of our society who
may never get the opportuni-
ty to travel beyond these bor-
ders for tertiary education. So
on behalf of the good people
of Elizabeth, I lend my sup-
port to this Bill which is long
overdue.”


































































RM FRAME

WINDOWS

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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

BNT on Earth Day
FROM page one

guiding principles of development, and con-
scious, deliberate decisions.”

Dr Deveaux outlined how he is working on
legislation such as the Building and Subdivi-
sions Act to improve development and plan-
ning, and the Bahamas National Trust (BNT)
expressed appreciation for the $140,000 gov-
ernment grant used to build a road to Bonefish
Pond, clear dumped waste, and construct a
600ft of boardwalk with viewing platform over
the mangroves and shallow waters.

The park will serve as a living classroom for
students, adults, children and families who can
observe the diverse natural wildlife, go snor-
keling, kayaking, bonefishing, and cultivate
an interest in the natural world.

Despite the dredging and construction tak-
ing place at the mouth of Bonefish Pond for
the South Seas development the BNT had
fought for several years, the Trust hopes to
preserve what is left of the southern wetlands
and celebrated the progress marked yester-
day.

BNT President Neil McKinney said: “We
are fortunate in this country to have a gov-
ernment that supports national parks, while
in so many other countries, where there hasn’t
been the foresight to put protection in place,
animals and plants have become extinct.

“In New Providence, where there’s huge
population pressure to use the land, it’s impor-
tant to have the land for an educational facil-
ity, and area where families can get together
for recreation in a wholesome way.”

Charles Maynard, the local MP and Minister
of Youth, Sports and Culture said he had
always hoped the mangrove wetlands would be
a protected national park.

“Tm so pleased that this beautiful site is in









CHILDREN from the Discovery Club check out the
new national park yesterday.

the heart of the Golden Isles constituency,” Mr
Maynard said.

“T believe we have to conserve these beau-
tiful sites for future generations.”

Deputy executive director Lynn Gape
added: “This wetland is going to echo with
lots of excitement, and excited children’s voic-
es, about the importance of the mangroves
and why they are so essential for our fish-
eries.”

Bonefish Pond is off Cowpen Road, west
of Gladstone Road, and is open during day-
light hours.

d by July 5.
FROM page one Man accused arn eset to

Hanna being released on

and a two-year-old boy. Indictment, bypassing a pre- hail. He told the court that
Prosecutor Lennox Cole- liminary inquiry in the Mag- investigators claimed the

by said the prosecution — istrate’s Court.

young boys were “dis-

intends to have the matters He said the Attorney — turbed” by the incidents.
proceed in Supreme Court General’s Office expects to Hanna, 36, of Peardale
by way of Voluntary Bill of have filed all the necessary Road, was denied bail.

FROM page one

for the smooth operation of the new regulating
body, the Bahamas Pharmacy Council (BPC).

The sources also claimed the HPC “demand-
ed payment” for copies of the original docu-
ments being withheld.

According to insiders, the documents are
the “legal property” of the new governing
body, and the HPC had “no reasonable, nor
legal reason” to hold the documents hostage
for months.

Dr Horizal Simmons, chairman of the HPC,
said his only statement on the matter was:
“The Health Professions Council is doing all
they can to facilitate an easy and smooth tran-
sition.”

He declined to respond to any specific ques-
tions regarding the conflict.

Dr Minnis said the matter was brought to his
attention on Wednesday, which was one day
after a letter detailing the problem was sent to
the Ministry by the Bahamas Pharmacy Asso-
ciation (BPA).

He said the matter was resolved one day
later after speaking to the HPC and his Per-
manent Secretary Camille Johnson.

“The HPC is something in our past. We
take the approach that all is well that ends
well,” said Marvin Smith, BPA president.

Mr Smith said several association members
called and e-mailed to alert him of the “hur-
dles” they were experiencing, and the associ-
ation wrote to the ministry to reinforce the
work already being done by the BPC to resolve
the issue.

He conceded that there were growing pains
experienced as a result of the transition.

But Mr Smith said this is the case with all
transitions, particularly “if not all parties are

me al

The Minister of Health

brought on line at the same time in the same
way.”

He said the swift intervention of Minister
Minnis is a testament to the supportive work-
ing relationship between the new council, the
association and the ministry, and he had noth-
ing but “thanks and congratulations” for the
ministry.

The documents allegedly being held by the
HPC were important for the operation of phar-
macy businesses to provide proof of registra-
tion to the BPC.

The failure to provide such proof reported-
ly created a problem for small pharmacy own-
ers, who faced challenges with being properly
licenced and procuring funds from local banks;
delays in stock orders and other challenges,
according to sources.

“Those documents are imperative for a
seamless process for registration and gover-
nance. We followed the prescribed protocols to
get the end point. The minister and the per-
manent secretary have always been very effi-
cient in assisting the council in the transition
period,” said Philip Gray, BPC chairman. He
said the intervention of the minister “certain-
ly aids the process.”

The deadline for registration with the BPC
was February 28, 2010, although the deadline
was extended and there was a grace period.

Mr Gray said no penalties had to be applied
to pharmacies as a result of exceeding the stip-
ulated time frame for registration.

All practising pharmacies, he said, are now
registered with the BPC and official inspections
are under way.

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THE TRIBUNE

usine

FRIDAY,



ACP R U2 25.7

2010

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





rn
flledges




TUR YAT])

PTTL Ch

* But Caledonia clients
said to be further upset
over liquidator’s latest
Supreme Court
application for $540k
in costs

* Deloitte partner
charges $500 per hour
for wind-up, and firm’s
fees in line with ‘other
major accounting firms
in the Bahamas’

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Securities Commis-
sion’s executive director yes-
terday pledged that the regu-
lator was investigating the $25
million collapse of a Bahami-
an broker/dealer, as its liq-
uidator applied for Supreme
Court approval to pay anoth-
er $544,000 in costs incurred
by himself and his agents in
the firm’s winding-up.

Hillary Deveaux told Tri-
bune Business that the capital
markets/investment funds reg-
ulator was prohibited by
Bahamian law from disclosing
any details relating to matters
it was investigating, but
promised that the Securities
Commission was looking into
issues surrounding the col-
lapse of Caledonia Corporate
Management.

“T can assure you that we
are investigating matters
related to Caledonia,” Mr
Deveaux told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We cannot disclose to
the public any information on
any investigations going on in
the Commission; that’s basi-
cally the position.

“We are, in fact, compelled
by law not to make public any
of our investigations dealing
with matters arising out of the
Commission. While they
[Caledonia’s clients] may see
nothing happening, we are
continuing with our investiga-
tions.”

Mr Deveaux said the Com-
mission’s investigations were
confidential until they were
completed. He was respond-
ing after Tribune Business
contacted him to relay com-
plaints voiced to this newspa-
per by Caledonia’s clients,
many of whom were question-
ing what the Bahamian regu-
lator had been doing since
the broker/dealer’s collapse
more than two years ago, and
whether it would take any
action against the key parties
involved.

Meanwhile, Anthony Kiki-
varakis, the Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas) partner
and accountant who is acting
as Caledonia’s “court-super-
vised liquidator,” has filed an
affidavit with the Supreme
Court seeking payment for
the work done by himself, the
firm and his attorneys on the
winding-up between April 1-
December 31 2009.

The costs hearing, and their
taxation, was due to have tak-
en place yesterday, but is
understood to have been post-
poned until Friday, April 30,
2010, after the application
once again drew the ire of
many Caledonia clients and
their legal representatives.
Tribune Business understands
that the Caledonia Clients
Committee is due to meet this
Monday to determine how it
and its attorneys can be heard
by the Supreme Court’s
deputy registrar, Ernie Wal-
lace, with sources telling this
newspaper they are unhappy
about the situation.

Mr Kikivarakis’s April 19,
2010, affidavit supporting his
application for costs gives
Bahamians an insight into the
fees charged by professionals
such as accountants and attor-
neys, whose earnings often
appear out of reach of the
average citizen.

The Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas) bills his hourly rate
as Caledonia’s liquidator at

SEE page 9B

prohe ongoing im:

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

85-90% export

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

An estimated 85-90 per
cent of the engineering work
on major Bahamas-based
development projects goes to
foreign firms, the Bahamas
Society of Engineers’ presi-
dent telling Tribune Business
yesterday that “the wholesale
export” of such services
“absolutely guts our entire
industry”.

Robert Reiss, who is also
principal of Islands by
Design/Reiss, said qualified
Bahamian engineers were still
being denied the opportuni-
ty to fully participate in their

profession through the con-
tinuing tendency of both local
and foreign developers, plus
the Government, to look out-
side this nation on jobs that
Bahamians can do.

“One of the key elements
of my platform, a key tenet, is
the fact that I want the
Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers to support the imple-
mentation of the Professional
Engineers Act and Board
and, beyond just the Act, sup-
porting securing and keeping
Bahamian engineering jobs
for Bahamians,” Mr Reiss
told Tribune Business.

“For too long and too
often, our engineering work

in the Bahama goes to for-
eign firms. It’s fine if there’s a
need for specialist expertise,
but there’s a wholesale export
of our money, our opportu-
nities. The dollars and the
opportunities for Bahamian
engineers, who have gone
abroad to school to get quali-
fied, to participate in our pro-
fession get exported. It
absolutely guts our entire
industry.”

Emphasising that “this sit-
uation of having Bahamians
do Bahamian engineering
work is not insular or inward-
looking”, Mr Reiss said the

SEE page 7B

25% of accounts receivables in ‘bad debt’ rating

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Services, told Tribune Business that the failing
economy last year drove demand for his debt
collection services up. However, he has noticed



Up to 25 per cent of accounts receivables
held by Bahamian companies are bad debt on
their books, the head of a debt collection
agency said yesterday, although a recent
decrease in unemployment was driving that

number down.

arecent decline in the amount of firms seeking

the service.

Rory Higgs,president of Apex Management

New store to grow AMLs
Sales 10-12% per annum







GAVIN WATCHORN

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The new Solomon’s Fresh
Market store will increase
AML Foods’ annual sales by
10-12 per cent when it opens in
Spring 2011, its chief executive
telling Tribune Business yes-
terday that the BISX-listed
food group had narrowed its
fourth quarter sales decline “by
40-50 per cent” in March.

Gavin Watchorn, who is also
AML Foods’ president, said
that while the company was
unlikely to match the $3.9 mil-
lion net profit generated dur-
ing the year to January 31,
2010, it was “pretty confident
we’re going to remain prof-
itable” in the face of the wider
economy’s problems and
increased competition in the
food retailing business.

“We had seen quite a bit of
sluggishness in sales in January
and February,” Mr Watchorn
said, following behind the 9 per
cent reduction experienced in
the last three months of the
previous fiscal year.

“We saw that trend in the
fourth quarter numbers, but in
March we have seen quite a
drop in the sales differential.
The sales decrease over last
year came down quite a bit. It
probably came back by about
40-50 per cent from where we
were off in the fourth quarter.”

Helping to compensate for
the decline in food sales,
induced by increased competi-
tion in a crowded grocery mar-
ketplace, Mr Watchorn said
AML Foods’ clothing and gen-
eral merchandise sales “were
up quite a bit over last year”.
He attributed this to the “ven-
dor lines now in place”, plus
the fact that consumers still
holding down jobs had adjusted
their budgets and spending pat-
terns to the new economic real-
ity.

“Our sales will not be as

SEE page 4B



* BISX-listed food group
slashes fourth quarter sales
decline ‘by 40-50% in
March’

* Expects to regain level
pegging with 2009 sales by
Back-to-School period, then
surpass them in last quarter,
although profits for current
year expected to be weaker
* Takes back pharmacy and
bakery in Solomon’s
SuperCentre

* Aiming to pay dividends
on annual basis, increasing
them each year

FAMILY GUARDIAN



Speaking at the Chamber Institute’s Debt
Collection Seminar, Mr Higgs advised busi-
ness owners and individuals involved in debt

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.









95,000 sq ft
shopping centre



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

outs’ engineers a ‘slam dunk’

Robin Hood hopes to have land
under contract in 30-60 days



tenant.

own shopping centre.”

debt from rental income.”

SEE page 2B



Robin Hood yesterday said it had could have the land for
its planned 95,000 square foot shopping centre in eastern
New Providence “under contract” within 30-60 days, its
president telling Tribune Business that the project should be
a “slam dunk” with the expansive retailer acting as anchor

“We've narrowed it down to two options, and in 60 days,
possibly 30, we could have it under contract,” Sandy Schae-
fer said of Robin Hood’s planned $7-$8 million expansion.

“We're going to build 45,000 square feet of retail space for
Robin Hood, and 25,000 square feet around it which we can
lease to other tenants. There will be 25,000 square feet of
second floor space that we can lease out for a medical cen-
tre, offices and gym, etc. Basically, we will be building our

This will transform Robin Hood from a pure retail outlet,
since its present Summerwinds Plaza location is owned by
former PLP Cabinet Minister and MP, Leslie Miller, into a
property development company, too.

This transition held no fear for Mr Schaefer, though,
who told Tribune Business: “There’s nothing like owning,
particularly when you can lease out space and service the

He added that he had previously been involved in retail
leasing in the US, and while this was a “whole other science”
from retailing itself, a priceless advantage with this devel-
opment was that Robin Hood would perform the “Wal-
Mart role’ and act as the anchor tenant to draw other retail-





Water Corp covers just
64% of operating costs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government-owned
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion is selling water to its
Bahamian client base at ‘below
cost’ because its tariffs have not
been increased since 1999, the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) revealing that it
was only recovering 64 per cent
of its operating costs in 2008.

The IDB’s 2010-2014 country
strategy report for the

SEE page 7B

Financial Strength Rating

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

call our mortgage department today at
396-4040 (Nassau) or 352-3670 (Freeport)

aw the home

* State-owned Corporation
selling water ‘below cost’
due to no tariff increase for
decade, as IDB targets
elimination of $20m-plus
subsidies by 2014

* Bank wants to raise
operating cost recovery to
84%, and increase
customer connections

from 66,000 to 75,000

* Corporation hit by
‘tripling’ of reliance on
more expensive reverse
osmosis water to 58% of
total supply

ie
of

Of your dreams

[ affordable terms
[1 swift response
[ down payment as low as 5%"

qZ all of the above

*with mortgage indemnity insurance

A SUBSIDIARY OF

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbaha


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

BUSINESS
FOR SALE

Well established marine supply
store with Yamaha dealership,
hurricane shutter manufacturing
and wide range assembly license
in Freeport, Bahamas. Consistent
history of protit and zero debt.
Includes: building, land, equipment
and inventory.

Please contact
Alexander Rademaker.
rademaker_alexander@hotmail.com

LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

NONA HOLDINGS
MANAGEMENT INC.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), — the
Dissolution of NONA HOLDINGS MANAGEMENT INC. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was the 25th Day of March, 2010

fst see

PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Liquidator



Important

Notice
SERVICE INTERRUPTION | g

From tam to 7am



25% of accounts receivables in ‘bad debt’ rating

FROM page 1B

collection on behalf of large
Bahamian and international
firms how to apply best prac-
tices when attempting to
recover past due receivables.

“What we are trying to do
is deal with the fundamentals
of debt collection, because we
realise that the economy right
now has been down and, as a
result ,there are a great num-
ber of businesses suffering
from having bad debt on their
books,” he said. “That
includes some of the key prin-

ciples and best practices of
going about collecting the
debt.”

According to Mr Higgs,
many of the businesses suf-
fering huge arrears are those
that grant credit, such as
financial institutions and
banks that do consumer loans
and credit cards, plus health
care facilities, to name a few.

“They extend the credit and
collecting it then becomes a
challenge,” he said.

He added, however, that
the turnaround in the US
could bode well for debtors,



95,000 sq ft shopping

centre a ‘slam dunk’
FROM page 1B

ers in. “For us, it should be a slam dunk,” Mr Schaefer said. “It
should be a lot easier than someone building on spec. We are the
anchor tenant, so that gives us a whole lot of confidence.”

The Robin Hood president pledged that the per square foot
rental price for the company’s planned shopping centre would be
competitive with all other centres. The strategy, he added, was to
attract strong tenants and, by charging a reasonable rent, lower
their overheads and enable them to lower prices and make profits.

Apart from the eastern New Providence shopping centre, Mr
Schaefer said Robin Hood was also looking to expand its existing
Tonique Wiliams-Darling Highway store by another 90,000 square
feet within “a year-and-a-half”, something likely to cost a further
$5-$6 million in inventory and fixtures.

Robin Hood will not incur costs for the structure, as it is a ten-
ant. Mr Schaefer said he had offered to acquire the property from
Mr Miller, but the latter wanted it as a legacy for his family.

And the retailer was “already looking at and getting offers”
for a third store in New Providence, and had “just had some talks
about” a potential expansion into the Freeport market in the past
week.

“T’m not looking out west,” Mr Schaefer said of his third store.
“T don’t think it’s going to hit critical mass for another five to six
years in terms of population base. We get a lot of shoppers coming
from out west.”

Having invested “a couple of hundred thousand dollars to get
things going”, Mr Schaefer said he was only awaiting government
permits to begin shipping to the containers of product to the Fam-
ily Islands. Robin Hood was targeting the likes of Abaco, Exuma
and Eleuthera for one to two day sales stints, bringing its products
and prices to the Family Islands.

The ultimate goal, Mr Schaefer said, was to partner with local
retailers on the main Family Islands and eventually end up with a
Robin Hood-branded outlet on each one. Any surplus produce left
over from its Family Islands sales would be handed over to a
retailer there, he added, who would sell it at Robin Hood prices.

Meanwhile, back in Nassau, Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood’s sales
were still enjoying “double digit increases” above 2009 compar-
isons, with customer counts also up.

March saw customer numbers in the mid-50,000s, but Mr Schae-
fer said this was expected to increase to the mid-60,000s in May,
with the summer months seeing brisk business in appliance sales as
a result of air conditioning demand.

business

as they see income regener-
ate and the job market
reopen. “Our economies are
tied and, listening to reports,
particularly in the mortgage
market, they are starting to
see a peak,” said Mr Higgs.

“Tt is starting to reach the
height and is turning around a
little bit. Our economy here in
the Bahamas lags behind the
States, so if they are starting
to see a turnaround it means
we still have some time left
before we could see ourselves
out of the woods.”

Growth

He reported a growth in
business near the height of
the economic crisis, but
requests for debt collection
services seem to be taking an
opposite turn.

“T have seen a tremendous
growth in the number of
accounts assigned to me and it
hasn’t eased up - it is a steady
flow of business,” Mr Higgs
said.

“We noticed somewhat of
an improvement compared to
times when you call a person
and they are not employed,
and therefore, have no means

of paying. Now, more and
more people are saying they
have a job and to give them a
couple months and they will
take care of it, so we see that
a good number of persons are
going back into the job mar-
ket and finding employment.”

Mr Higgs said internal debt
collection departments, who
do not consider outsourcing
to a firm such as his, must
know and exercise best prac-
tices when calling debtors.

He said businesses should
focus internally on front end
debt that is between 30 to 90
days in arrears, and possibly
get a debt collector to handle
any that are older.

Organizer of the seminar
for the Chamber Institute,
Russ Abrams, said the
Bahamas Employers Confed-
eration (BECon) and Cham-
ber plan to conduct more
workshops like this in the
future. “We have done HR
(Human Resources) work-
shops, employment legislation
workshops and we have cus-
tomer service workshop next
week,” said Mr Abrams. “I
have been very pleased with
the response from the busi-
ness community.”

IOs ULSD

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), TUBO GALVA HOLDING (BAHAMAS) LTD, is in
dissolution. ALBERTO ESCOBAR is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at calle 116715 piso 17, Bogota, Colombia. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are

required to send their name, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before May 21st, 2010.

ALBERTO ESCOBAR
Liquidator



|
CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

A leading Bahamian group of companies is seeking to
hire a Deputy General Manager to assist with managing
and developing a large retail business. The duties will
include but are not limited to:

April 25th, 2010.

Managing the daily operations of a multi-facet retail

FirstCaribbean would like to advise the public that its
Electronic Banking Services will be unavailable during
the time listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance. The bank apologizes for this service
interruption, and for any inconvenience caused.

During this period the following services will be
unavailable:

e ABM

e Visa transactions via ABM

e FCIB Debit Point of Sale transactions
e Internet Banking

¢ Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance.





FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK



GET THERE. TOGETHER.



www firstcaribbeanbank.com





® Provide leadership and supervision of staff to ensure
excellent customer service

® Direct the audit staff in monitoring inventory controls
and daily reconciliation

® Assist with the development of the business by
identifying new retailing opportunities

The qualified applicant will have:

® Working knowledge of management principles,
accounting principles, proficient in the use of
computers and previous experience at a senior
management level
Must be available to work flexible hours to monitor
the business operations as needed.
Uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Candidate must be a mature individual and a team
player who is self-motivated, organized, able to work
under pressure, meet deadlines with consistent and
high degree of accuracy

Education and Experience:

® Bachelor’s degree from an accredited College or
University

& Seven (7) years experience in a retail business at a
senior management level

Benefits and salary commensurate with qualifications
and experience.

Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter
and resume to the following e-mail address by 7th May,

2010: applybahamas@yahoo.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

strong as last year for the first
half, but by the Back-to-School
period of the third quarter they
will be on level terms, and once
we get to the fourth quarter we
will be in growth mode yet
again,” Mr Watchorn told Tri-
bune Business. “Solomon’s
Fresh Market will increase sales
by 10-12 per cent once that gets
up and running.”

The AML Foods chief exec-

New store to grow AMLs
Sales 10-12% per annum

utive added that the company
had “started to look at new rev-
enue streams that are coming
on board one by one in this
quarter”.

Chief among these were the

TAYLOR
INDUSTRIES LTD.

111 Shirley Street

OO
RS

PUL URL

new Cost Right website, which
was already taking orders “pre-
dominantly from the Family
Islands”. Interest in Nassau was
also starting to pick up, and
while not making a tremendous
contribution to AML Foods’
business just yet, Mr Watchorn
said this would increase once
the company embarked on a
“fairly significant marketing
campaign” of the site in the
next month.

AML Foods had taken back
ownership of the pharmacy and
bakery outlets in its Solomon’s
SuperCentre in Nassau, which
were previously leased to ten-
ants, while “new departments”
had been created in some of its
retail outlets.

“We’ve expanded and taken
on more space in Solomon’s in
Nassau, and now have an appli-
ances and furniture section,”
Mr Watchorn said. “That’s

will be able to move the space
allocation about.

“You can’t stand still in this
business, and when we saw the
sales numbers decline coming
down the road a couple of
months back, we had to do
what we needed to maintain
our share of a stagnant market.

“Our customer counts have
held up quite well, but the aver-
age spend is down a couple of
points here and there.”

Mr Watchorn said the reces-
sion, combined with rising
unemployment and reduced
incomes, meant Bahamian
shoppers were less loyal to a
particular brand or store than
they had been 24 months pre-
viously, and were more inclined
to shop around for the best
prices on food items.

“Our margins have taken a
little drop. It’s just the nature of
the market right now,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We have to be competi-
tive, and that drops margins
down a little, yes.”

Besides its online ordering
website, Mr Watchorn said
AML Foods’ Dominos Pizza
franchise was looking to fur-

on one or two buildings, and
we’re hoping to get an answer
on one or both shortly,” he
added.

“That’s in New Providence,
and we’re in discussions with
another group for 2011.”

The AML Foods chief exec-
utive said he was especially
pleased that the group had
reduced shrinkage by 6 per cent
in its last financial year, having
“thrown everything bar the
kitchen sink” at this problem
for several years.

AML Foods will pay out a
total of $624,000 in dividends

to shareholders on May 7, 2010,
the first dividend they have
received for nine years.

Mr Watchorn revealed that
despite the softness predicted
for the first quarter of the com-
pany’s current financial year,
its Board felt investors needed
to be rewarded for their
patience.

“At this point, we’re going
to look at it on an annual
basis,” Mr Watchorn said of the
dividend issue, “with the inten-
tion of dividend payments
creeping up each time we do
it.”

Thursday, April 22
Friday, April 23
Saturday, April 24

We regret any inconvenience
this will cause to our
customers.

Requests for service work will
still be accepted.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006/FAM/div/588

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Divorce & Matrimonial Side

BETWEEN

JOHNATHAN MONCUR
Petitioner

AND
LEAH ESTHER MONCUR
Respondent

AND
EVAMAE RAHMING
Party-cited

NOTICE OF PROCEEDINGS

TAKE NOTICE that the Petitioner
JOHNATHAN MONCUR has commenced
Divorce Proceedings in the Family Division
of the Supreme Court against LEAH
ESTHER MONCUR. EVAMAE RAHMING
has been named as the ‘st Party-cited.

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that in the
event EVAMAE RAHMING desires to defend
the proceedings in the Supreme Court
EVAMAE RAHMING will be required to enter
an Appearance in the Supreme Court by
filing a Memorandum of Appearance in the
Registry of the Supreme Court which is situate
on the Third Floor in the Ansbacher Building,
Bank Lane and East Street North in the City
of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
and by delivering the said Memorandum
of Appearance at the Chambers. of
Clarita V. Lockhart, No. 90 Shirley Street,
Shirley Street & Elizabeth Avenue, on or
before the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2010.

Dated: This 21st day of April, A.D., 2010

CLARITA V. LOCKHART

CHAMBERS

NO. 90

SHIRLEY STREET SHIRLEY STREET & ELIZABETH AVE.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Attorney for the Respondent



going to allow us to expand the
electronics department, as we

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DIABAS PREMIER
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above named Company is _ in
dissolution, which commenced on the 20th day
of April, 2010. The Liquidator is BdS Corporate
Services Limited, George House, George Street,
P.O. Box N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas.



BdS Corporate Services Ltd.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

WHITEPEAK HOLDING S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International

Business Companies Act. 2000,
WHITEPEAK HOLDING S.A. is in
dissolution as of April 19, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc.
situated at 35A Regent Street, PO.
Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

LEADERBELL LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, LEADERBELL
LIMITED is in dissolution as of April 7, 2010.

Dima Yim situated at Street no. 6, Phum

Salakanseng, Svan Dongkom Siep Riem
Cambodia is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting

career opportunity?

AVAILABLE POSITION:

The Senior Manager -
Watch listed Accounts

e Manage a portfolio of high risk business accounts
and supervise/monitor the banks potential loss
exposure accounts

ther grow its presence in New
Providence. “We have offers in

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that we, ALICIA SHARI CLEARE
MELIER and FELIX MELIER of Wellington Road off Stapleton
Gardens, PO. Box N-7126 intent to change my child’s

name from ALEO FELIX MELIER to ALEO FELIX COOPER. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ALICIA SHARI
CLEARE MELIER of Wellington Road off Stapleton
Gardens, P.O. Box N-7126 intent to change my name to
ALICIA SHARICLEARE COOPER. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY EDWARD PURVIS
of #16 SEAHORSE LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of APRIL, 2010 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



NOTICE

WRIGLEY DEVELOPMENT INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International
Business Companies Act. 2000,
WRIGLEY DEVELOPMENT INC.
is in dissolution as of April 19, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc.
situated at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box
1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

JOUST LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in
accordance with Section 138(4) of
the International Business Companies
Act. 2000, JOUST LIMITED is in

dissolution as of February 11, 2010.

International Liquidator Services Inc.
situated at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box
1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:
www-firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

) FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
CONCENTRATION OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

At December 31, 2009, assets and liabilities of the Bank were concentrated in the following
geographical areas:

2009 Assets
Europe

Liabilities

93,423 45,188
Central and South America - 23,993
The Bahamas 76 21
Other 208 -

93,707 € 69,202

2008 Assets
Europe

Liabilities

60,278 30,699
Central and South America - 20,721
The Bahamas 45 31

€ 60,323 € 51,451

The assets include cash and due from banks, loans and advances to customers, net and other
assets.

MATURITIES OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

The scheduled maturities of the Bank’s fixed-term assets and liabilities from December 31,
2009, to the contractual maturity date are as follows:

2009 Assets
Sight-less than 8 days

Liabilities
35,286 €
8 days-less than 1 month 31,507 30,290
1 month-less than 3 months 10,985 10,902
3 months-less than 6 months 2,387 1,187
6 months-less than 1 year 10,255 6,976
1 year-less than 3 years 2,563 2,563
5 years and over 724 703

93,707 €

16,581

69,202

2008 Assets
Sight-less than 8 days

Liabilities

10,049 1,266
8 days-less than 1 month 28,643 28,568
1 month-less than 3 months 7,482 7,505
3 months-less than 6 months 1,837 1,827
6 months-less than | year 11,598 11,586
1 year-less than 3 years 711 699
5 years and over 3 -

€ 60,323 € 31,451

The assets include cash and due from banks, loans and advances to customers, net and other
assets,

CURRENCY CONCENTRATION

At December 31, 2009, assets and liabilities of the Bank were concentrated in the following
currencies:

2009 . Assets
Euro

Liabilities

89,775 65,230
US dollar 3,512 3,565
Bahamian dollar 17 3

Pound Sterling 403 404

93,707 69,202

2008 Assets
Euro

Liabilities
$9,235 50,363
US dollar 966 966
Bahamian dollar 5 5
Others 117 117

€ 60,323 € 51,451

The assets include cash and due from banks, loans and advances to customers, net and other
assets.

Interested persons wishing to inspect the full set of audited financial statements may do so by

re our office, Andbanc (Bahamas) Limited located at suite 304, 1 Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Deloitte

Deloitte & Touche

Chartered Accountants

and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centrevitle

P.O, Box N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www. deloitte.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Shareholders of
Andbanc (Bahamas) Limited:

We have audited the statement of financial position of Andbanc (Bahamas) Limited (the “Bank”) as
at December 31, 2009. This statement of financial position is the responsibility of the Bank’s
management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this statement of financial position
based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
statement of financial position is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a
test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the statement of financial position.
An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the statement of financial position.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the statement of financial position presents fairly, in all material respects, the
financial position of the Bank as at December 31, 2009 in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards.

Without qualifying our opinion, we draw your attention to Notes 11 and 12 to the statement of
financial position. Note 11 provides details of the credit risk with its related parties and Note 12
provides details on concentration of customer deposits.

We also emphasize that the statement of financial position does not comprise a complete set of
financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. Information on

results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to obtain a complete
understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial position of the Bank.

hela, ¢ truke

March 18, 2010



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1B

Bahamas, a copy of which has
been seen by Tribune Business,
said that while the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s tariff
rates had remained the same,
non-revenue water (water lost
from the system before reach-
ing the end user) had risen to 55
per cent.

In addition, more expensive
reverse osmosis water had
increased to 58 per cent of the
supply sold to Bahamian con-
sumers by the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation, meaning that
while its revenues had fallen or
remained flat, costs had
increased markedly.

Outlining its goals for the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, the IDB report said that
by 2014 it wanted to improve
its operating cost recovery to
84 per cent from the current 64
per cent. The Bank, perhaps
ambitiously, also wants to
reduce to zero the subsidies the
Corporation currently receives
from the Bahamian govern-
ment (taxpayer). These stood
at $24 million in 2008.

The IDB is also targeting a
reduction in non-revenue water
from the present 55 per cent to
45 per cent by 2014, and is seek-
ing to help the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation increase its
customer connections from
66,845 in 2008 to 75,000 in 2014.

Summing up the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s weak-
nesses succinctly, the IDB
report said: “Additionally,
while the Water & Sewerage
Corporation supplies water to
only 30 per cent of the potential
clientele, it is losing market
share to private operators and
consumers (tourist develop-
ments) who source their water
from private wells.

“Due to the limited avail-
ability of safe groundwater,
unregulated use of private wells
may have a significant impact
on the sustainability of the sec-

Water Corn

tor, as well as serious environ-
mental and health conse-
quences.”

And with the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation dependent
on government subsidies
(which reached $30 million in
fiscal 2008-2009, and around
$25.8 million this fiscal year) to
cover its operating losses, the
IDB said the amount of financ-
ing available for capital expen-
diture was seriously reduced.

“This reduction in capital
expenditures (including com-
mercial-loss reduction equip-
ment), particularly in New
Providence, has contributed to
a high and rising level of non-
revenue water (55 per cent in
2008) as well as a deteriorating
physical infrastructure,” the
IDB report said.

“The Corporation’s direct
cost of water production has
increased as its reliance on the
more expensive reverse osmosis
modality tripled since 2000 as a
percentage of total production
(58 per cent in 2008).

“Conversely, Water & Sew-
erage Corporation’s tariffs - last
increased in 1999 - have fallen
below the company’s cost of
service. Therefore, the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas has
prioritised the financial restora-
tion and infrastructure upgrad-
ing of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation as part of a larger
objective of achieving sustain-
able provision and coverage of
water and sanitation services in
the Bahamas.”

The IDB said it was focus-
ing on increasing the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s oper-
ating margins, decreasing non-
revenue water volumes and
“enhancing its corporate gov-
ernance”.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has long said that the
subsidies provided to govern-

Makers Wap

BOLF & OFC

EAH CLUB

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Golf Professional/Developer

Key Responsibilities

* Communicate on a daily basis with the General
Manager and Assistant General Manager to
ensure a coordinated effort at providing year
round quality experiences for members and

guests.

Coordinate development of operating and capital
budgets according to the budget calendar;
monitors monthly and takes effective corrective

action as required.

Analyzes other financial statements and
establishes controls to safeguard funds. Reviews
income and costs relative to goals; takes
corrective action as necessary.

Welcomes new club members; meets and greets
all club members as practical during their visits to

the club.

Enforce all of the club rules and regulations
governing the use of Baker’s Bay facilities.
Establish Operating Criteria for Golf Operations.
Develop an opening critical path for Golf

Operations

Develop standards of service for Golf Operations
and an opening and ongoing training program for

new employees.

Oversee the design, purchase, and installation of
all Golf Operations Department FF&E.
Supervise all Golf Operations staff.
Daily/Weekly job responsibilities developed for
all positions in Golf Operations

Job Descriptions developed for all positions in

Golf Operations.

Weekly scheduling of all Golf Operations

employees.

Handle personnel problems as they arise in Golf

Operations.

Evaluate employee’s introductory and annual

performance reviews.

Interview prospective employees and supervisory

staff.

Attend all relevant operational meetings.
Conduct weekly meetings with line staff and

supervisory staff.

Complete daily, weekly and monthly reports as

required.

Qualifications and Skills

Associate degree in Golf Operations,

Golf Management, Management, Business
Administration or related area of study.

Strong leadership, organizational, computer, and

communication skills.

Strong operational background in retail, golf, food
and beverage, and member services.
Ability to source, design and implement training

programs.

Financial experience especially with creating and

implementing budgets.

Experience with private club and/or start up

operations a plus.

If you would like to be a part of a dynamic,
progressive and growing organization, send your

resume to hr@bakersbayclub.com or to the

attention of the VP Human Resources at fax:

242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”



ment-owned Corporations,
chiefly Bahamasair and the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, are “unsustainable”. With
the Government’s fiscal posi-
tion increasingly squeezed, now
appears as good a time as any
to find the political will to deal
with this issue.

“Subdues domestic activity
intensifies fiscal pressures as
the Government rationalises
expenditure on public enter-
prises and employs counter-
cyclical measures to revitalise
the economy,” the IDB said
succinctly. “A disproportionate
burden from the capital budget
reduces the country’s ability to
maintain efficient transport,
communications and public ser-
vices. Two utility companies,
BEC and Water & Sewerage
Corporation, together with the
deficit financing for Bahama-
sair, the nationally-owned air-
line, absorb some 30 per cent of
the allocations in the capital
budget.”

And the IDB added that “ris-
ing social costs have increased
demand for public services,
while declining stimulus from
private sector credit provides
little public sector relief and
adversely affects operating
trends of private sector estab-
lishments.”

* The IDB’s Bahamas coun-
try representative, Oscar
Spencer, yesterday told Tribune
Business that the bank’s data
on the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s (BEC) non-tech-
nical losses was incorrect.

He said the latest BEC
report submitted by the IDB-
hired German consultants,
Fichtner, showed that non-tech-
nical losses (losses resulting
from theft and meter tamper-
ing) were around 6-7 per cent,
rather than 15.7 per cent. Total
losses stood at 14 per cent and
technical losses at 8 per cent,
the former much reduced from
the IDB report’s 25.7 per cent.

85-90%
export
‘guts’
engineers
FROM page 1B

drive to ensure qualified
Bahamian engineers obtained
work they were qualified to
do would “improve our eco-
nomic engine” by keeping
dollars at home.

Mr Reiss, who has been
heavily involved in water and
wastewater treatment engi-
neering work in the US and
abroad, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Even though I’m
Bahamian, I see the compa-
nies I compete against and
beat in foreign locations very
smoothly get work off the
Government that I even have
difficulty in getting shortlisted
for.

“T would easily guess that
85-90 per cent of the engi-
neering work on major devel-
opment projects is done by
foreign engineers.”

Culprit

Mario’ Bastian, the
Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers’ secretary, added that
the Government was just as
big a culprit as developers
when it came to denying
Bahamian engineers oppor-
tunities on projects they were
perfectly qualified to perform.

Local expertise and knowl-
edge would be harnessed on
many projects by using
Bahamian engineers, Mr
Reiss argued, and the passage
of the Act and set-up of the
Professional Engineers Board,
with its registration require-
ments, is viewed as a tool to
aid this goal.

The Act requires foreign
engineers to obtain a certifi-
cate of temporary registration
from the Professional Engi-
neers Board when working in
this nation, and also joint ven-
ture with Bahamian engineers
when working on major pro-
jects in this nation.

The Board, and the
requirement that Bahamian
engineers (and their foreign
counterparts) be registered in
all the disciplines they per-
form, will enhance consumer
protection by letting Bahami-
ans know exactly what an
engineer is qualified to do,
plus enable the sector to be
self-regulating and put certi-
fication standards in place.

Mr Reiss praised develop-
ments such as Albany, the
National Sports Stadium and
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA) rede-
velopment for allowing
Bahamian engineers to play
a key role on those projects.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010, PAGE 9B



Regulator pledges probe ongoing into $25m failed broker

FROM page 1B

$500. This means that an eight-
hour (daily) stint on the bro-
ker/dealer’s wind-up could earn
Mr Kikivarakis $4,000, a sum
larger than most Bahamians’
average monthly salary, and
likely to make many wonder
whether they are in the right
job.

“My services as Official Lig-
uidator are charged at an
hourly rate of $500, which is
within the range of $500-$650,
the charge out rates applied by
Deloitte for services as liquida-
tor rendered by a partner,” Mr
Kikivarakis said in his affidavit.

“Regarding general admin-
istrative and accounting ser-
vices, the prevailing fee sched-
ule, on an hourly basis, applied
by Deloitte during the material
period (which I verily believe
conform with those of other
major accounting firms in the
Bahamas), is as follows.”

The affidavit lists these fees
as thus:

Partners (other than Mr
Kikivarakis): $400-$600 per
hour

Managers: $225-$250 per
hour

Staff accountants: $50-$165
per hour

Consultants: $50-$150 per
hour

Assistants: $50 per hour

In his affidavit, Mr Kiki-
varakis asked for the Supreme
Court to approve a $158,750
payment to himself; $321,345
to Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas); and $64,362 to his
attorney, Alfred Sears, at Sears
& Co.

The issue of the Caledonia
liquidator’s fees has arisen
before, but Tribune Business
has been told by reliable
sources that the Clients Com-
mittee is “extremely unhappy”
over the issue given the
progress of the winding-up to

date. Among the concerns are,
as previously reported by Tri-
bune Business, the fact that the
liquidator has incurred $1 mil-
lion in fees over the last year,
despite the Caledonia matter
having no presiding judge
supervising it following the
departure of former Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons some 11
months ago.

Another issue that has
angered many Caledonia clients
is that in his last report to the
Supreme Court, Mr Kikivarakis
said he would seek court
approval allowing him to retain
a further 2.5 per cent of total
client assets — roughly some
$1.675 million — to meet the liq-
uidation’s continuing costs.

That is in addition to the pre-
vious 2 per cent, or $1.35 mil-
lion, that clients paid into a
security account to fund the lig-
uidator, with some alleging they
were told this was adequate to
fund the winding-up. Thus the
demand for more money has
not gone down well.

The Chents Committee is
also thought to be concerned
that Mr Kikivarakis is seeking
payment of more than $500,000
when, according to his last
Supreme Court report, there
was just $53,393 left in the
Clients Security Account
financing his work. This would
mean that there are not enough
funds to pay him, especially
since Caledonia was insolvent
and had no money of its own.

The liquidator also retained a
further 8 per cent, roughly $5.36
million, of client assets in
escrow as a reserve to cover the
outcome of his investigation
into “an unexpected shortfall”
in Caledonia’s accounts. Some
clients, sources have told Tri-
bune Business, are questioning
why this sum was necessary giv-
en that there was an estimated
shortfall of just $500,000-$1 mil-
lion.

In a previous report to the
Supreme Court, Mr Kikivarakis
said he and Mr Sears took an 11
per cent and 20.83 per cent fee
cut respectively after becoming
involved in “a long, drawn-out
battle” over his costs with the
late Emerick Knowles, QC, and
Brian Simms, partner and head

52wk-Low

Securit y

of litigation at Lennox Paton.

Both men, representing Cale-
donia clients, had opposed a
previous application for pay-
ment of his costs, and Mr Kiki-
varakis alleged that his time
and money could have been
better spent returning assets to
clients.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Mimsy at Work

The report also detailed how
Caledonia clients, and the com-
mittee representing their inter-
ests, objected to the payment
of some $43,000, shared
between three attorneys, to
cover their appearance costs in
hearings to determine Mr Kiki-
varakis's fees, and those of his

attorneys. The $43,000 came
out of the Caledonia Clients
Security Account, into which
all the Bahamian broker/deal-
er's clients had been required
by the Supreme Court to pay
a sum equivalent to 2 per cent
of their assets to cover the liq-
uidator's costs.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 22 APRIL 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.57 | CHG 4.55 | %CHG 0.29 | YTD 5.10| YTD % 0.33
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S$)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
10.00
S5S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

CFAL Bond Fund

2.8266
1.4548
2.9343
12.6816
100.5448
93.1998
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund

10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

100
10.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
700.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol

Bahamas Supermarkets

Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Last Price.
14.00
4.00
0.55

Daily Vek.

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV

2.9116
1.5268
3.2025
13.4986
107.5706
105.7706
1.1034
1.0764
1.1041
9.5795

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

10.0000

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund

10.5417

Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2

4.8105

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Shange - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stack Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

7.6928

5.33

-2.

-0.31

NAV 3MTH

Last 12 Months %

103.987340
101.725415

5.33
13 10.96

47.51

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Golina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS$

Prime + 1.75%

Prime + 1.75%

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVECES

clic rca MH A TT.

Div $

0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)

64.1

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

103.095570
99.417680

31-Dec-09
31-Mar-10

31-Dec-09

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525







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PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

8m Bahamian
owned project
aids recovery

THE TRIBUNE





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Wis a ey ape pepe
| Saas



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aa er cat i



AN ARTIST’S rendering of Dunmore Court.

An $8 million Bahamian-
owned and built townhome
community has begun con-
struction in western New
Providence with the first
homes scheduled for occu-
pancy by January 2011, its
proponents arguing that the
development is a further sign
of economic recovery taking
shape.

Sidney Bethell, sales asso-
ciate at Mario Carey Realty,
said the project was signifi-
cant for several reasons.

“Dunmore Court is an
interesting development — 28
townhomes, each of them
2,200 square feet, with four
bedrooms and three-and-a-
half baths, starting at
$499,000, packed with very
high-end appointments, but it
is also important because of
who is behind the develop-
ment,” said Mr Bethell.

“The project is 100 per cent
Bahamian-owned, and every
bit of the work - from foun-
dations to the finish on the
swimming pool - is being car-
ried out by Bahamian con-



tractors and sub-contractors.”

The primary developer is
Thompson Plumbing, which
got its start in Harbour Island
and took the name of the
island’s historic settlement to
the new development, which
has a similar in-town, intimate
and cozy feel.

Gated

Located near the high-end
Albany resort and residential
project, Dunmore Court is a
gated community with homes
gathered around a central
avenue. Each townhouse is
three storeys. Residences are
designed to appeal to local
professionals, retirees or for-
eign owners searching for a
primary or secondary home.

The amenities include 24-
hour security, landscaping, fit-
ness centre, swimming pool
and designated parking. The
project will be built in four
phases.

“For nearly three decades,
we have had the opportunity

to partner with a number of
highly respected companies,
including some of the largest
in the business, helping them
manage Family Island pro-
jects on several occasions,”
said Vhaul Thompson of
Thompson Plumbing.

“Dunmore Court is an
opportunity for us to use
those skills developed over
decades to do a complete
community from start to fin-
ish, producing a product cre-
ated with excellence and
attention to detail.”

The architect is Edward
Missick of Missick Designs.
Other contracts have been
awarded to Nassau residents
Lloyd Saunders, of L&B Con-
struction, and Candice Hanna
of Khanaali Media Group.

The interiors will be
designed by Bahamian com-
pany Roomers Ltd, led by
Leslie Callender and Hazel
Stirling. Mario Carey Realty,
which has an exclusive on the
listing, said it anticipates
working with other real estate
firms.





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ety eC bb eter a es ay

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



THE Bahamas Olympic
Association, under the presi-
dency of Wellington Miller,
is making some positive
strides since the drama that
unfolded as it attempted to
hold its last annual general
meeting and election of offi-
cers.

The association has since
relocated to the comfort of its
new home in the JS Johnson
Building on Village Road. It’s
certainly a lot more spacious
than the previous office space
that it occupied.

Additionally, the associa-
tion has been working fever-
ishly trying to secure funding
from its international organi-
sations for its entire member
sporting federations.

So far, the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation has been the
first to benefit from such a
venture and even though he
served as the immediate past



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STUBBS BOA makin

president of the BSF, secre-
tary general Rommel
Knowles has assured all of the
other disciplines that they will
be doing the same for them.

Last when he took office,
replacing long-time outgoing
president Arlington Butler,
Miller said he discovered that
there is a lot of money avail-
able to assist all of the sport-
ing bodies that come under
the International Olympic
Committee.

He says associations and
federation only need to apply
for it.

With the country rebuild-
ing from the global economic
crisis and the need for more
and more funding to sustain
the various national pro-
gramme, it’s going to be
incumbent on the BOA to do
that it can to assist its mem-
bers.

The BSF benefited from a

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two-year grant that is contin-
gent on its rebuilding pro-
gramme as it prepares for the
qualifying tournament for the
Central American and
Caribbean Games.

Basketball is definitely one
of those sports that could
surely use such a grant, con-
sidering the fact that there are
a lot more players at the inter-
national level, who could help
the Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration in its quest to qualify
for the World Championships
and subsequently the Olympic
Games.

I’m sure that with such a
grant in place, the federation
could be in a much better
position to lure more of the
professional players stretched
across Europe and even in the
United States to give the
Bahamas a push to the top.

Over the years, we’ve seen
so many of our talented play-
ers fall by the wayside and
have even retired before they
had a chance to represent the
country at prestigious tour-
nament because of the lack
of funding.

The BSF have certainly got-
ten the ball rolling by receiv-
ing the first grant.

But they will need a lot of
work to get the national pro-
gramme to the level where we
can get back to being a con-
tender and our appearances
doesn’t just signal a free ride
to the visiting country for our
players.

It’s a good opportunity for
the BSF to go back into the
Family Islands and try to
rediscover some of the raw
talent that helped to make the
Bahamas the household name
that it has achieved over the
years in the region.

PENN RELAYS A
GOOD START
I think the initiative by the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations to award

some of its outstanding
schools from the National
high School Track and Field
Championships a trip to the
Penn Relays this weekend is
an excellent one.

Take a team like Moores
Island for example. They
came from Abaco and
stunned the field in winning
the under-20 boys 4 x 100
metre relay. They also had a
second place finisher in the
100 final.

It’s incentives such as these
that help to bring out the best
in our athletes, especially
those in the Family Islands,
who something feel that they
never receive their just
reward simply because they
are not from New Providence
or Grand Bahama.

Consider this, the Moores
Island All-Age School has a
population of about 180 stu-
dents. That’s about the
amount in one graduating
class in the majority of the
high schools in New Provi-
dence.

Yet coach Anthony
Williams was able to groom
five young men who came
here and left an impression
on their peers and the
BAAA, so much so that they
are off to Pennsyvlvia,
Philadelphia this weekend.

The 800-plus residence of
Moores Island should be feel-
ing a real sense of pride for
the achievement of Williams
and the young men, for their
accomplishments.

Williams, an ordained pas-
tor and fisherman, has indi-
cated that they are forced to
train on a grass surface simply
because they don’t have the
proper sporting facility.

And he’s pointed out that
they lack the use of the prop-
er facilities like the starting
blocks and weights, yet his
athletes have been able to
persevere to this point.

It just goes to show what a
little bit of motivation can do.

g positive strides

Hopefully this will be a
trend that the BAAA will
continue to do as they expose
more and more high school
athletes from throughout the
country to the biggest relay
type meet in the United
States with the view of trying
to get some of them exposed
to the college scouts waiting
to distribute athletic scholar-
ships to the deserving student-
athletes.

BASKETBALL SHOW-
CASE

Over the next three days,
high school and players out
of school will have another
golden opportunity to display
their skills in Grand Bahama
as the St. George’s Jaguars
host their 8th annual Basket-
ball Showcase.

Coach Darrell Sears and his
staff at St. George’s should
be commended for not just
trying to push the players
from the Jaguars, but they’ve
opened it up to any player in
the country who feels they
have the potential to secure
a scholarship.

Some players might feel it’s
a costly venture to make the
trip to Grand Bahama and
also find accommodations for
the weekend once they get
there.

But there are a lot of play-
ers who wouldn’t mind spend-
ing the money to travel to the
United States for a clinic, a
camp or a similar type Show-
case and incur the same type
of expenses.

If you’re serious about your
future in the sport and the
opportunity to impress the
visiting coaches for a chance
of obtaining a scholarship,
then you should take advan-
tage of the Showcase.

Hopefully through the
efforts of Sears and his staff,
we will see some more players
make their dream of playing
collegiate basketball a reali-
ty as a result of making the
effort to participate.

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LIVERPOOL'S Dirk Kuyt of the Netherlands, right, vies for the ball against Atletico de Madrid's Alvaro
Dominguez, left, during their UEFA Europa League semifinal first leg at the Vicente Calderon stadium in
Madrid on Thursday, April 22, 2010.

GOA ONG Yhaysn Selected Appliances








JONES & CO

322-2188/9





Cruz Azul wins
CONCACAF
final first leg

SOCCER
MEXICO CITY
Associated Press

CRUZ AZUL defeated fel-
low Mexican club Pachuca 2-1
on Wednesday in the first-leg
of the CONCACAF Champi-
ons League final.

Argentine striker Emanuel
Villa, formerly of Derby Coun-
ty, gave Cruz Azula 1-0 lead in
the 19th minute, and an own-
goal by Carlos Gerardo
Rodriguez made it 2-0 in the
23rd.

Pachuca scored what could
be an important away goal in
the 69th through Argentine
midfielder Damian Alvarez.

The second leg will be on
April 28 at Pachuca. Cruz Azul
lost last year's final to fellow
Mexican club Atlante.

This is the fourth time in five
seasons that it's been an all-
Mexico final. Pachuca has won
two of the past three CON-
CACAF Champions League
titles. The winner advances to
the Club World Cup.

Cruz Azul, considered one
of Mexico's four largest clubs,
is the sentimental favorite.

In addition to losing last
year's final to Atlante, Cruz
Azul has also lost three Mexi-
can league finals in recent sea-
sons. It last won a major title
13 years ago, when it took both
the Mexican league title and
the CONCACAF title.

Cruz Azul's manager this
season is Enrique Meza, who
coached Pachuca to two of the
past three CONCACAF titles.

Meza also coached Pachuca
to the Copa Sudamerica title in
2006.

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