Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

HIGH
LOW

em, PARTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 106 No.123

aU a

NUMIDENS licences

Pim blowin’ it

SOF
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The Tribune



ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1







Reports: Four local
operators would have
to pay $5m cash bond

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

LOCAL number operators
will reportedly be asked to put
up a $5 million cash bond
before they are issued with one
of what is reported to be only
four issued licences.

As the government is cur-
rently mulling over whether or
not to legalize the local lottery
business, reports have started
to surface as to how regulators
would go about issuing licences
for an industry that is already
flooded with large and small
scale operators.

Currently, there exists four
main local number houses -

FML, Asue Draw, NWS and
Island Luck — that make up the
majority of sales in New Provi-
dence and in most Family
Islands, with eight smaller num-
ber operators filling in the gaps.
Of the four larger entities, FML
remains by far the most domi-
nate force on which other,
smaller, number houses “bank”
their daily tickets as insurance
against any possible “big hit”
for a given day.

With the daily payouts hav-
ing dropped in the past week
from $900 to $800 for the dollar
played during the Early Mia-
mi, Early Chicago, and Early
New York lottos, local number

SEE page 11

Union willing to talk to COB, but strike goes on

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



THE Union of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas (UTEB)
said last night it is willing to sit down to new talks with the Col-
lege of the Bahamas (COB), but the strike is still on in the

meantime.

Education Minister Desmond Bannister told The Tribune
that Labour Minister Dion Foulkes was working with both
the union and college representatives yesterday and that it had
been decided that talks between the two parties would resume

on Monday.
SEE page 11



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eS
SH
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POLICE remove the body of Leonardo Black siceltnm inten Or-Uaann Tc aIan a Reet Tee off Faith Avenue. « SEE STORY ABOVE

Tornatio ‘was too sudden for port Lawyer in court to face

to implement all its procedures’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



A "PRELIMINARY" incident report
into the events surrounding the deadly tor-
nado that killed three workers at the
Freeport Container Port said the trans-
shipment facility had sufficient extreme
weather procedures in place to mitigate
damage, but could not implement them all
in time because they had no severe weath-
er reports.

The report reveals that suspected torna-
do reports reached FHC officials at approx-
imately 11.17 am on March, 29. The facility
then began shut down operations but lost
power three minutes later at 11.20 am. At
11.23 am, it was reported that crane number
10, with several employees trapped inside,
had overturned.

"The terminal has well established
adverse/severe weather procedures — due

SEE page 11



ES 4

ERO
Trade,





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Knowles
teams up
with Hewitt

SEE PAGE NINE

‘Street brawl’ after
Defence Force
marine shot dead



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net





. a





additional theft charges

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A LOCAL lawyer already facing a
number of stealing and fraud charges
was back in court yesterday to face
additional charges of stealing more
than $350,000 worth of property from
his clients.

Ralph Jan Ward, 48, was
arraigned before Deputy Chief Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane yesterday charged with
stealing by reason of service as well
as fraudulent breach of trust.

It is alleged that Ward between
Wednesday, August 30, 2006, and
Monday, April 16, 2007, stole
$361,000 in property by reason of
employment or by reason of service.

SEE page 11







A STREET brawl erupted between relatives
of Royal Bahamas Defence Force marine
Leonardo Black after he was shot dead in his
home, eye-witnesses claim.

Police responding to the country’s 27th homi-
cide broke up the vicious braw] outside Seaman
Black’s apartment in Adderley Terrace, off Faith
Avenue, just before midnight on Monday.

They had been called by the wife of the 27-
year-old marine who asked for officers to

SEE page 11

BODY OF Wat ea







Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Homicide Squad
to add more trained

detectives this year

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE number of trained detectives on
the police force’s Homicide Squad will
be increased this year as the organisation
seeks to shore up “areas that need
strengthening” across its various depart-
ments.

The Drug Enforcement Unit will be
similarly reinforced with extra personnel
and more police officers will hit the streets
as part of the force’s Mobile Patrol Divi-
sion.

That division is also set to benefit from
the acquisition of a new fleet of “high
visibility” police vehicles that will be oper-
ated in addition to those already on the

SEE page 11



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NASSAU AND BAHAM

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



7 =
Marley Resort and Spa staff
‘facing salary delays again’

Cause of tourist
diving deaths yet
to be determined

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



POLICE have yet to determine what caused the
death of two tourists killed in recent diving expeditions.
In the case of the American tourist who died while

diving with Stuart Cove’s Dive Bahamas last month,
police liaison officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings con-
firmed that the matter is going to the Coroner’s Court
for an inquest.

The 55-year-old California man was found floating
near the dive spot in a black and blue dive suit with his
breathing apparatus attached.

Police received reports that when the group he had
been diving with surfaced, they realised someone was
missing. The body was located after a search of the
immediate area.

Sources at the dive company said the incident had no
impact on the business, and noted that all divers who
participate with the company are certified.

“A person is responsible for their own certification
level. If they have not been diving for three years, we
give them a refresher. If they are licensed, they are not
required to disclose any health conditions: they are only
required to prove they have a licence,” said the employ-
ee.

Over the weekend, Illinois native David Gozinsky
died during a diving trip with International Field Stud-
ies, an American environmental education initiative
headquartered i in Andros.

Mr Gozinsky was taken to a clinic in Blanket Sound,
Andros, where he was pronounced dead by the presid-
ing doctor.

He was visiting the island with his wife, who accompa-
nied the body to New Providence where an autopsy will
be conducted.

The company’s executive director Dr Ben Bohl was
not available for comment yesterday.



It feels
kno

is looking
them as

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAFF at the Marley Resort
and Spa say they are facing
salary delays again this month
— this time without prior warn-
ing or any explanation from
management.

Just over a week after staff
were supposed to receive two
weeks salary on April 8, an
employee who contacted The
Tribune said the payment had
still not come through.

She said staff morale is at an
all time low at the Cable Beach
resort, with many employees
finding it hard to put on a brave
face at work as they fight mount-
ing bills at home.

“You see tourists paying mon-
ey, coming here to have a good
time and it’s not their fault so
you want to make it happen for
them, but it’s really hard when
youre not getting paid,” said the
employee.

General manager of the
resort, Barbara Hanna-Cox, said
she had “no comment” when
contacted on the latest salary
delays.

The Tribune was directed to
speak with resort owner,
Stephanie Marley, daughter of
reggae legend Bob Marley, but a

message left for Ms Marley at
the Bob Marley Charitable
Foundation in Jamaica was not
returned.

In late March, Ms Hanna-Cox
claimed that salary delays at that
time were the result of a combi-
nation of low occupancy at the
boutique hotel and a “huge”
electricity bill leaving the com-
pany temporarily unable to meet
its financial obligations in a time-
ly manner. She apologised to
employees, calling the salary
delays “short term.”

Her response came after an
employee of the resort com-
plained that staff had been given
just one day’s notice in a memo
that their March 25 bi-monthly
salary payment would not arrive
on time.

Ultimately that payment was



made in two instalments, accord-
ing to sources — with one week’s
salary paid on April 2, and
another on April 7.

Now staff have been disap-
pointed again, finding that their
April 8 salary payment had not
been made.

“There was no money on the
account. Nothing there. No one
is saying anything — a week has
passed — nothing. The Marleys
are not here, no one seems to
know what’s going on,” said an
employee.

“How do people continue to
work under those conditions?
They expect you to come to
work and if you don’t you lose
your job, but then they aren’t
paying you. It seems like they
just don’t care. There’s no apol-
ogy or anything.

“T never knew that something
like this could exist in the
Bahamas. We have labour
laws!” added the worker.

The employee said that while
a complaint was made to the
Labour Board about concerns
over delayed salaries and a 12
per cent pay cut last year, she is
concerned about the lack of fol-
low through.

Staff were allegedly encour-
aged by a Department of Labour
official to come and file a trade
dispute, but many workers are
afraid to make their disgruntle-
ment known for fear of losing
their jobs.

“(The Department of Labour)
are the ones responsible for
making sure these laws are
adhered to; they know what’s
going on, but they’re not doing
anything, we don’t know where
to turn,” said the employee.

“You're telling the landlord
I’ve got to pay you when I get
paid, you’re calling the bank say-
ing I can’t make the payment
right now, the light bill, the
phone bill, everything’s backing
up,” she said.

Deputy director of labour
Josephine Bennons said that any
staff members who wish to see
the matter addressed must first
file a trade dispute with the
Labour Board.

Commissioner backs Bail Act amendment plan

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Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE Commissioner of Police has lent his
support to the government’s plan to amend the
Bail Act as a means of reducing the number of
crimes committed by those released back into
the community prior to going to trial.

Commissioner Ellison Greenslade comment-
ed on the matter during a question and answer
session with the media on Monday followed a
press conference in which he launched the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force’s “Policing Plan for
2010.”

In the Speech from the Throne on April 14,
the government said it would further restrict
the right to bail for people accused of serious
crimes in response to the number of crimes
committed by people out on bail.

Asked what he thinks of the plan and the
extent it would “make the efforts of police more
realistic”, Mr Greenslade said: “It’s very impor-
tant.”

“Anything that goes towards an improve-
ment, would cause things to work more effi-
ciently and effectively and would cause us to
increase public safety is welcomed by the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force.”

He then pointed out that police recently
arrested a young man who was then charged
with committing 16 armed robberies all over
New Providence.

“That man was on bail for armed robbery,”
revealed the Commissioner.

Mr Greenslade then pointed to a poster high-
lighting 22 individuals who have been arrested
by police and charged with murder this year

“Look at this look carefully . . . look at the
faces .. . these people were all charged with
murder. Look at the details below, and you do
the math. Some of those men (are accused of
committing) multiple murders at different times
over a short period of time,” he said.

The Commissioner’s 2010 Policing Plan notes
under the heading “Reducing Serious Crimes”
that the police intend to “advocate for the incar-
ceration of prolific offenders until their trial
date” — in other words, suggesting they should
not get bail when they go before the courts.

Crime

However, some lawmakers and attorneys
have expressed scepticism about the govern-
ment’s proposed plan to amend the Bail Act as
a means of addressing crime, suggesting that
the constitutional right to a trial in a “reason-
able” period of time would still trump the new
bail regulations if a defendant came before a
judge and was deemed unlikely to be put on
trial expeditiously.

One prominent criminal lawyer told The Tri-
bune that the number of accused criminals who
get bail will not be reduced unless judges re-con-
sider what constitutes a “reasonable period” of
time to await a trial, lawyers who represent
defendants to stop asking for bail on their behalf
if they think they might re-offend, and the gov-
ernment speeds up the criminal justice system.

Anti-crime advocate Bishop Simeon Hall of
the National Advisory Council on Crime wel-
comed the new plan as a concrete step towards
cutting crime that is in accordance with the
council’s own recommendations.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010, PAGE 3



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

GAMING advocates are
applauding the government for
its decision to consider legalis-
ing the popular Bahamian pas-
time of playing “numbers”.

However, some are of the
opinion that government
should go even further and
reform the Gaming and Lot-
teries Act to also legalise casi-
no gambling for all Bahamians.

“T think legalising the num-
bers game is a step in the right
direction of course, but it is yust
one step. As an international
person myself I have a lot of
friends and guests who come
here and go to the casino. It is
embarrassing as a law abiding
citizen to have to walk through
the casino with my hands in my
pockets,” said Lincoln Bain,
equal rights advocate, media
personality and entrepreneur.

Mr Bain said the Bahamian
public should not be fooled
into thinking a referendum is
needed to decide this matter.

He said Section 67J of the
Lotteries and Gaming Act,
which states that the minister
responsible has the power to
“make regulations regulating
and restricting the admission
of persons on premises licensed
under this Act”, is proof of this.

“The minister can wake up
and say Bahamians can gam-
ble. Only people making
$50,000 per year can gamble;
only Bahamians who have nev-
er been bankrupt, or Bahami-
ans who have not been diag-
nosed with a gambling prob-
lem. He can also blacklist per-
sons who are deemed unfit,”
said Mr Bain.

Last week the Free National
Movement said the its council
and parliamentarians favoured

en

LOCAL NEWS

Gaming advocates want
full gambling reform

SOME GAMING advocates want legalised casino gambling for Bahamians.

legalising gambling as it would
bring major financial benefits
to the government.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said the government
was consulting on the matter,
although no final decision has
been made.

Local advocates, like the
Bahamas Gaming Reform
(BGR) agree. In a press state-
ment, the committee noted the
new regulations could gener-
ate thousands of jobs and mil-
lions in incremental revenue
for the government.

“In spite of the heavy sighs
of relief from many quarters of
the country, anything short of
complete reform (permitting
Bahamians to be stakeholders
and players in our casino) will
be an affront to Bahamians and
only deepen the social divide
as foreigners will again be
afforded more privileges in this
country,” said Sidney Strachan,
BGR spokesperson.

“With any progress there is
going to be adverse affects.
Hotel developments have a

negative side. Progress always
brings that. I am waiting on
someone to show me any other
country in the world where the
entire moral fabric of the coun-
try was broken down or where
there has been less productivi-
ty as a result of gambling. Iam
not sure where those people
are getting their data from,”
said Mr Strachan.

The GBR has not been
granted an audience with the
prime minister, although rep-
resentatives said they have spo-
ken to Minister of Tourism and
Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, the minister responsi-
ble for gaming.

While the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) supports
the concept of a national lot-
tery and the legalisation of the
numbers business, it is main-
taining its opposition to total
access to casinos for Bahami-
ans.

“The BHA believes that
gambling can and should be
supported and expanded. We
have presented a variety of

URC te pa sla



HUNDREDS of European tourists stranded in the
Bahamas may be able to return home today as UK air-

ports reopened last night after being closed for six days.

day and Thursday.



The blanket ban on air traffic over the UK and parts
of Europe was imposed last Thursday amid serious safe-
ty concerns posed by volcanic activity in Iceland.

British Airways announced yesterday they will pri-
oritise the recommencement of long-haul flights today to
help get more aircraft, pilots and crew out to passengers
stranded around the world.

However, the airline was unable to confirm whether
the direct flight between Nassau and London will oper-
ate today before The Tribune went to press last night.

The airline anticipates it will be some time before
they are able to restore a full flying programme.

Direct flights between Nassau and London Heathrow
are operated by British Airways every day except Mon-





a





=< |

AN ICELANDAIR plane takes
off from Glasgow International

Airport traveling to Reykjavik
in Iceland, as flights resume
after disruption ash from a vol-
cano in Iceland choked the jet
age to a halt. (AP)










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positions to the competent
authorities in government on
gambling.

“The primary areas would
have a direct incremental
impact on the competitiveness
of our business and allow
access to new games and items
present in international mar-
kets,” said Robert Sands, BHA
president.

Some of the recommenda-
tions made by the BHA relate
to the Gaming Board’s
approval processes and initia-
tives to allow junket represen-
tatives, entertainers, and per-
manent residents with a cer-
tain level of net worth to gam-
ble.

Mr Bain said there should
be one moral standard for gam-
bling. He said if the churches
believe gambling is wrong they
“should be in front of the casi-
nos picketing”.

“There should not be a law
that allows some people to
gamble but not all. There
would not be a law to allow
tourists to smoke marijuana
and prohibit Bahamians, or for
tourists to run the red light and
not Bahamians. The whole law
is ludicrous and reminiscent of
the 1950s and 1960s segrega-
tion area,” said Mr Bain.

_ Stuck tourists provite economic hoost

THE ASH-SPEWING volcano in Iceland has given the Caribbean
an unexpected economic boost, causing some hotels to fill up with
stranded travelers and increasing demand for tourist activities, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

: Hotel managers have called in extra staff and hiked purchases of
: food, helping earnings in a region struggling with a tourism downturn.
: Adventure tour operators also have benefited as hotels hire them to
: keep guests entertained. Not everyone is seeing an increase in revenue
: — especially islands like Barbados and Antigua that depend largely
: on British vacationers stuck at home by airline flight cancellations.

: But stranded tourists are helping make up for that loss, said John-
: son JohnRose, spokesman for the Caribbean Tourism Organiza-
: tion.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

To fly through ash or not? A hard question

SIX days after volcanic ash shut down
the skies over much of Europe, planes are
back in the air, but science still can't answer
the question:

Is it safe to fly again?

Mother Nature has given Europe a lesson
in risk, aviation technology, scientific uncer-
tainty and economics. And how these fields
intersect is messy.

Watching the same people who earlier
said it was too dangerous to fly now say it's
safe "is just more proof that risk is a subjec-
tive idea," said David Ropeik, a risk per-
ception expert at Harvard University.

When people turn to science for answers,
they get a lot equivocation.

"We really don't have as good a handle as
we should on the ash particle size, the ash
concentration and most important, just exact-
ly how high the ash got up into the atmos-
phere," said Gary Hufford, a U.S. govern-
ment volcano expert based in Anchorage,
Alaska.

Would he get on a plane and fly into the
ash cloud? "I would be cautious," he said in
a Tuesday conference call.

Abrasive gritty ash can damage jet
engines, and experts don't know what density
levels are safe. For that matter, they can't say
how much of it is floating in any one spot
along the air traffic routes or where it is
specifically going next.

But airlines know what cancelled flights
can do to their bottom lines. And passen-
gers know when those cancelled flights cross
the line from inconvenience to pain.

So Monday night and into Tuesday,
planes began flying across most of Europe —
many for the first time since April 14. Safety
officials called for closer inspections of planes
for damage after they land.

As airports reopen, passengers may have
to decide for themselves what risk is accept-
able.

"There are really no facts about risk. It's
just how we interpret the information we
have," said Ropeik, author of the book "How
Risky Is It, Really?"

"This is a great example of how the pace
of modern technological invention is making
a lot more people nervous about just how
sure science can be about anything,” he said.

It is one of the hardest risk decisions soci-
ety has faced in a while, agrees Paul Fis-
chbeck, a risk analysis expert at Carnegie
Mellon University and a former military
pilot. "With the amount of uncertainty, this
now I think is a very hard decision,” he said.
"How much risk are you willing to accept
to reduce economic hardship and inconve-
nience?"

It isn't a small amount of money at stake.
It's billions of dollars with millions of strand-
ed passengers, said Fischbeck. But if an air-
plane goes down, the company would be
shut down by lawsuits, he said.

When the Eyjafjallajokull volcano first

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spewed, the answer was simple. Authorities
usually shut down airspace when there's vol-
canic ash. It's the precautionary principle of
erring on the side of caution, Fischbeck said.

"Standard safety procedure is: Don't go
there if you don't know," said Michael Fabi-
an, a professor of mechanical engineering at
Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in
Prescott, Ariz.

But the days went on and the pain for
airline companies and passengers increased
and then people started questioning: How
bad is it? How do you know?

"Hard questions reveal that the science
isn't as settled as first presented," said
George Gray, an expert on risk at George
Washington University and former science
adviser at the U.S. Environmental Protection
agency. The real question about how much
risk is acceptable is personal based on the
benefits we each get, Gray said.

Fischbeck believes authorities should fly
more test flights into the plume to see what
kind of damage occurs and at what frequen-
cy to help them make a more informed deci-
sion.

Engineers worry about immediate cata-
strophic damage when the ash dust congeals
in an engine turbine, blocking air flow and
shutting it down, Fabian said. In 1989, when
a Boeing 747 flew through volcanic ash over
Alaska, all four engines failed and the plane
dropped more than two miles in five minutes,
before engines restarted. Ash can also cause
long-term abrasive damage to planes that
could lead to later disasters if not dealt with.

Fabian said the reason engineers know
so little about the risks from volcanic ash is
that it would take many hours and great
expense to do repeated tests. And tests
would be needed for the 20 different types of
engines currently flown.

And even if engineers knew how much
ash a plane's engines could handle, atmos-
pheric scientists can't say how much ash is in
any one place or predict what will happen
next, said Jon Davidson, a professor of earth
sciences at Durham University in England.
The ash becomes more diluted as it goes
higher in altitude but also clumps together at
times like sediments in a river, he said.

"We have built a society that's fairly sen-
sitive to natural changes," Davidson said.
"An eruption like this 100 years ago would-
n't have caused any issues in Europe. Possi-
bly we'd not even know about it."

But the more technology and the faster
the speed of travel, the more types of risks we
are forced to accept, Fischbeck said. "You
can get hurt only so bad walking; you adda
horse and you can hurt more."

At the same time, with improved tech-
nology "you see an evolution of the risks,
not necessarily an increase of risks," he said.

(This article was written by Seth
Borenstein, AP Science Writer).







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The poor
treatment
of animals
in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune

In response to the GB
Humane Society article
regarding the relocation of
healthy loving dogs to the US,
I would like to tell Mr.
Roberts that the disgrace he
should be looking at is how
the Bahamian Government
has fostered the attitudes for
poor treatment of animals in
The Bahamas over the last 40
years.

So many private citizens
make the attempt to better
the lives of animals in this
country, only to meet resis-
tance from the Government.
The Canine Control Unit in
Nassau is an utter waste of
taxpayer's dollars and a hell
hole for the animals that end
up in there due to the poor
management and overall lack
of concern from Government
officials.

Numerous N.G.O's have
stepped forward to try and
improve the disgraceful con-
ditions, only to be seen as a
nuisance.

Noah's Ark Petting Zoo
on Malcolm Road in New
Providence has been an on
going issue of animal cruelty
for approximately 30 years.
The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety and other Animal Rights
groups have tried to close it
down. When letters are writ-
ten to the Government ask-
ing them to stop issuing
import permits for the pro-
prietor to bring in animals,
the response is that as long as
the permit requirements are
met the permits are issued as
cruelty is not their department
— Another disgraceful exam-
ple of the Government's lack
of accountability.

Animals suffer in the
Bahamas and so do people.
Every ailment of The
Bahamas is connected and
cannot be looked at as sepa-
rate issues, hence the digres-
sion into other topics in this
letter.

Task Mr. Roberts and oth-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia. net






er Government officials to
stop pointing fingers and for
once start taking accountabil-
ity and do something for this
country. I am embarrassed
and depressed to call The
Bahamas my home at this
point in time. There is no for-
ward momentum. We are
sinking into a blue hole of
apathy. The Bahamas is a dis-
grace.

The Ministers and other
Government officials need to
restructure the way this coun-
try is operated, starting first
with the belief that when you
are employed with the Gov-
ernment it is for life, and you
are required to do very little
work as you will never get
fired. Second should be the
education system. Please
Google Geoffrey Canada to
see what he has accomplished
in Harlem, NYC. The Edu-
cation system is another dis-
grace that Mr. Roberts should
look at before criticising the
GB Humane Society attempt
to give healthy animals a
future. The poor education
system provided by the Gov-
ernment is the preliminary
issue and the cause of the
ignorant minds of this coun-
try. This ignorance is then
seen in the treatment of ani-
mals, the treatment of cus-
tomers at the work place, the
crime, the violence and the
lack of motivation and open
mindedness to make changes
in order to progress and bet-
ter ourselves for the future.

Many people like to say
that other countries are worse
off than the Bahamas but that
just reinforces our lack of
accountability. Things are
always worse somewhere but
that does not give us the
excuse to not make things
better. The fact is The
Bahamas is a small nation of

only 335,047 in 2008 according
to the World Bank. We have
the amazing resources of loca-
tion, foreign investment and
an environment that is very
appealing to visitors. Yet the
attitudes and mentalities
being fostered in this country
are destroying us. We have so
much potential, yet somehow
we cannot figure out how to
make progress and move for-
ward.

The Bahamas Government
is so bogged down in red tape,
laziness and corruption that
change is almost impossible.
The prominent leaders in this
country must step up and
make this change possible.
Change must emanate from
the top. We need Ministers
and Government officials who
are not just there to fatten
their personal pockets but to
work for The Bahamas and
improve it. So I hope Mr.
Bradley Roberts can read this
letter and step up to the chal-
lenge, as my response to him
is this entire country, starting
with the Politicians and Civil
Servants, is a DISGRACE.

HOPING FOR A CHANGE
Nassau,
April 19, 2010

(A few weeks ago a Canadi-

an business woman, who is
very interested in animals,
particularly horses, was in
Nassau. During her stay here
she visited the Noah’s Ark
Petting Zoo and found the
animals in such an appalling
condition that she sent us
photographs. She has also
made a complaint to the
Humane Society questioning
how and why government
would permit such an estab-
lishment to continue with ani-
mals in such poor condition.
(To protect the name of this
country it would be advisable
for government to inspect
such establishments before
approving permits for the
importation of animals. —
Ed).

Offensive state of the Montagu Park area

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas government
has done a good job cleaning
and beautifying many areas of






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the island. Unfortunately, the
Montagu Park area continues
to be a problem, in spite of
promises from the area’s rep-
resentative.

There is a general disregard
for law and order as vendors,
their customers and small boat
operators seem to feel entitled
to block the road.

The area is unkempt and
often strewn with litter.

The corner of Shirley Street
and Village Road (on the north
side) is squalid with large,
cheap broken signs.

This state of affairs is offen-
sive to the growing number of
businesses and homeowners in
the area.

There are laws regarding sig-
nage and we hope the Ministry
of Works and the representa-
tive will take note and have the
signs removed.

The dilapidated signs and
unkempt verges stick out like a
sore thumb now that Shirley
Street has been resurfaced and
looks so much better.

Private businesses also have
a duty to keep their premises
tidy and it wouldn’t hurt the
Montagu Beach Inn to spruce
up the front of its premises and
look after the verge in front.

M. JOHNSON
Nassau,
April 9, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

WS
Police hoping crime information
can help reduce fears of pone |

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE police is hoping to reduce peo-
ple’s fear of crime by letting the public
know the truth about the extent of law-
lessness in certain communities, reveal-
ing that contrary to popular belief, some
areas are in fact rarely targeted by crimi-
nals.

In its newly released policing plan for
2010, the force expressed its intent to
become a more data-driven organisation,
undertaking crime perception surveys and
employing crime trend analysts to sup-
port “proactive” policing.

The crime perception surveys will give
the police force a more accurate impres-
sion of how people in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and select Family
Islands feel about “safety in their
homes, on their jobs and in their com-
munities”.

Survey

The results of the survey will also allow
for the creation of a “perception/reality
matrix” whereby residents can discover if
their fear of crime is borne out by crime
statistics in their area.

The police hopes that by exposing the
fact that some communities are rarely tar-
geted by criminals, it can reduce the over-
all fear of crime in those areas.

The results of the surveys, which the
force hopes will be administered inde-
pendently of police by entities such as

the College of the Bahamas so as to

“engender credibility in the process”,
will also act as a baseline for future com-
parisons that will help the police assess
their effectiveness.

Meanwhile, the hiring and training of
crime analysts to be deployed throughout
various departments this year will allow
police to use data to more successfully
foresee “when and where things will or
may happen” and re-focus resources
accordingly.

With crime data being made available to
academic researchers at COB and to oth-
ers, the police hope that these outside
entities can further provide the force with
insights that can be put to use in the fight
against crime.

The computerisation of crime facts in a
timely manner, data mining and analytical
tools will also be emphasised as the force
seeks to “ensure informed decisions are
made in the deployment of police
resources.”

These new initiatives were incorporated
in the Commissioner of Police’s Policing
Plan for 2010, also known as the Integrat-
ed Crime Prevention Intervention and
Response Strategy.

The 35-page document was formally
released on Monday at police headquar-
ters by Commissioner Ellison Greenslade,
but has been guiding the police force’s
work since earlier this year.

In the area of information communica-
tion, the police will launch a new Public
Affairs and Communications Department
to improve how information about the
force and crimes is disseminated to the
public.

| 9 | yo
POLICE COMMISSIONER Ellison Greenslade



West End to benefit from
expansion of osmosis plant

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Ginn is
expanding its reverse osmo-
sis plant, significantly increas-
ing its capacity of fresh water
at West End.

In a press statement, the
developers of a $4.9 billion
resort in West End,
announced that they will
install two additional new
reverse osmosis units.

There are currently two
reverse osmosis units that
have been in operation since
July 2009.

“We will have a million and
a half gallons of storage on
site and another 300,000 gal-
lons of storage at Old
Bahama Bay. There will be
room for a second tank and
its capacity will be 600,000
gallons, thereby having a total
capacity of 2.1 million gal-
lons,” Ginn said.

An adequate supply of

Man wanted for questioning in
connection with Abaco hoat theft

POLICE in Abaco are seek-
ing the public’s assistance in
locating 31-year-old Gereno
Poitier, also known as Bailey,
who is wanted for questioning in

a boat theft case.

The man is wanted in connec-
tion with the theft of a 23-foot
white Man-o-War vessel that was
stolen from Casuarina Point in

Abaco.

Poitier’s last known address is

in Stevenson, Cat Island.

He is described as being of
dark brown complexion, of aver-
age build, 5’9” tall and weighing

approximately 140lbs.

The suspect is considered

armed and dangerous.

Anyone with information





regarding the suspect’s where- GERENO POITIER
abouts is asked to contact the
police emergency hotline at 919 or 911; the Central Detec-

tive Unit at 502-9930/9991; the Police Control Room at
322-3333; Crime Stoppers at 328-8477 or the nearest police

station.

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort
& Offshore Island

Invites application for the positions:

BUTLER & FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGERS

The successful candidate should have the following

qualifications:

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Management with special emphasis Food &

Beverage Management

A minimum of 5 years in a similar position of
a luxury hotel/resort operation with multiple Food

& Beverage outlets

Good Knowledge of the culinary arts and

international cuisine

Experience in Food & Beverage training

Must be computer literate in Excel & Word
Strong communication skills oral and written
Willing to work long hours

Have strong organizational and leadership skills

SALARY BENEFIT Commensurate with experience.

Applications should be email to:
cmajor@grp.sandals.com



fresh water is critical to Gin-
n’s development.

The two new units will not
only help in the irrigation of
the Arnold Palmer Signature
golf course, but also produce
drinking water.

Darron Grant, assistant
project manager, said the cur-
rent reverse osmosis opera-
tion is not sufficient for the
amount of water needed once
the Ginn project is completed
within the next few years.

Ginn is currently being sup-
plied with water from the
Grand Bahama Utility Com-
pany.

Mr Grant said eventually
Ginn will have its own water
supply, only using the Grand
Bahama Utility Company as a
back-up.

“We have drilled two wells
and we have room for a third,
fourth and fifth well. The
ground water is drawn up and
it goes into the reverse osmo-
sis units and both of the two
containers are capable of pro-
ducing 250,000 gallons per
day of fresh water from the
ground water, which is prac-
tically ocean water quality,”

Drive one.

said Mr Grant.

“If there is a storm or hur-
ricane, we will be able to store
lots of water and be able to
produce water. We have
back-up generators for all of
our critical infrastructure, and
water is definitely considered
to be critical.”

Mr Grant said rain water is
also collected at Ginn when-
ever possible.

“When it rains at the air-
port the water drains down
into a pond, which is inter-
connected into a series of
ponds.

“The fresh water is thereby
mixed with the R/O water.
The water used for irrigation
is therefore a combination of
the rain water and the water
we pump and desalinate by
use of the R/O plant,” he said.

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Murder trial suspended
_ for voir dire proceedings

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT -— The murder trial of Herman Natari
Francis and Raymond Darling was suspended in the
Supreme Court for voir dire proceedings to be held on
Monday. This is a hearing without the jury.

Francis and Darling are accused of the attempted rob-
bery and murder of Tyna “Penny” Pinder on November
25, 2005 at the Cool Breeze Apartments on Hudson
Avenue.

Ms Pinder, 34, was shot to death in her office by a
gunman armed with a shotgun.

The prosecution alleged that Francis and Darling act-
ed together by planning the robbery and carrying it out by
using a shotgun.

About 16 witnesses will give evidence on behalf of the
prosecution.

Dr H C Govinda Raju testified last week in the
Supreme Court, telling jurors that Ms Pinder sustained a
severe shotgun injury to the neck which caused her
death.

Donnet Richards a tenant at the Cool Breeze Apart-
ments, also testified. She told the court that she saw a man
enter the office and right after heard “Penny” say, “Oh
my God” and then heard a loud bang.

She said the man was wearing a white shirt, a pair of
jeans, and green sweater jacket with a hood.

Fredrick Bastian and Solomon Hield also testified that
they saw a man wearing similar clothing in the area with
a shotgun after the shooting.

Justice Hartman Longley is presiding over the mat-
ter, which is before a jury of seven men and five women.

Attorney Jillian Williams, along with Anthony Delaney,
Olivia Blatch and Erica Kemp of the Attorney General’s
Office are prosecuting on behalf of the Crown.

K Brian Hanna is representing Darling and Mario
Grey is representing Francis.

The voir dire is conducted in the absence of the jury and
the proceedings can neither be reported nor published. It
is a hearing within the course of a trial to determine
whether evidence put forward by one party or the other
is admissible.

If found to be inadmissible the evidence in question
cannot be considered by the jury.

SD

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



GN-1036

MINISTRY OF TOURISM & AVIATION
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION

Publication By The Ministry of Tourism & Aviation
Department Of Civil Aviation
Particulars Of An Application To
Operate Scheduled Air Services

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation 9 of the Civil Aviation
(Licensing of Air Services) Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for
Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars of the under-mentioned
applicant to operate scheduled air services to and from The Bahamas.

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION

1. Application: REGIONAL AIR

2. Date of first publication: 14 April, 2010

3. Routes: Nassau, Freeport, Bimini and Marsh Harbour on the one
Hand and Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm Beach on the other.

4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

5. Provisional time table:

Freeport/Ft. Lauderdale

Ft. Lauderdale/Freeport
Freeport/Ft. Lauderdale

Ft. Lauderdale/Freeport
Freeport/West Palm Beach
West Palm Beach/Freeport
Marsh Harbour/Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Lauderdale/Marsh Harbour

Local Times

0915/1015 Fri, Sun & Mon
1130/1230 Fri, Sun & Mon
1915/2015 Fri, Sun & Mon
2115/2215 Fri, Sun & Mon
0915/1015 Sat

1115/1215 Sat

1345/11515 Sun

1630/1800 Sun

Marsh Harbour/West Palm Beach 1315/1445 Sat
West Palm Beach/Marsh Harbour 1545/1715 Sat

Bimini/Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Lauderdale/Bimini
Bimini/Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Lauderdale/Bimini

0900/0930 Daily
1000/1030 Daily
1500/1530 Daily
1600/1630 Daily

6. Frequency of flights: See above timetable.
7. Type of Aircraft: BEECH1900 & CESSNA-402

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in accordance with
Regulation 10 must be received by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry
of Tourism & Aviation & the Department of Civil Aviation within
fourteen (14) days after the date of first publication of this Notice.

Hyacinth Pratt
Permanent Secretary

1--4/8/03

An International Offshore Company

is presently considering applications for a

Treasury Administrator & Deputy Head of
Treasury & Execution

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Minimum Qualifications:

* Three — Five years International Banking experience in treasury/
execution and related departments of an offshore bank

* Strong management and leadership skills

- In-depth knowledge of international Money Market/Forex and Securities
Trading and Execution Department of an offshore bank or Asset

Management Company

- Well versed in Swiss banking practices and standards

* PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel)

* International banking knowledge and keen knowledge of
(trading and settling) capital market instruments

¢ German or French would be an asset

- A Bachelors degree with a concentration in Finance or Accounting

Personal Qualities:

- Excellent organizational and communication skills

*A commitment to service excellence

* Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

* Goal oriented

Benefits provided include:
* Competitive salary

¢ Pension Plan
¢ Health and Life Insurance

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. ONLY PERSONS
MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY

Applications should be submitted via email to
recruiting.bahamas@gmail.com

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: 26th

April, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



LOCAL NEWS









FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Front row - Gequahn Colebrooke, Shaun Ingraham, President, Rotary Club of



Eleuthera, Jermaine Sands and Carolyn Birkweiser, Pineapple Fields Resort. Back row: Oceanna Carey,
Anna Horton, Advisor/Coach, Carleen Etienne and Nicole Evans (Advisor/Coach and Secretary, Rotary

Club of Eleuthera.

Eleuthera to send first team to

Model United Nations Session
Rotary Club, Pineapple Fields Resort supporting students

HISTORY is about to be
made as Eleuthera's first
Model United Nations Ses-
sion (MUNS) team will
travel to Nassau to partici-
pate in the Annual MUNS
Bahamas event on Monday.

MUNS is a simulation of
the United Nations within
an academic platform.

Each year students from
high school to university
levels, in more than 32
countries around the world
participate in this pro-
gramme.

Through the cooperative
efforts of the Rotary Clubs
of the Bahamas and the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
MUNS Bahamas began in
1998.

This year, the island of
Eleuthera will be repre-
sented at the event as a
result of the generous spon-
sorship of Pineapple Fields

Resort, Eleuthera and the
support of The Rotary Club
of Eleuthera.

The objective of MUNS
is to educate, and in part,
train the participants in
matters relating to civics,
globalisation, communica-
tion and diplomacy.

Diplomats

Participating students are
assigned a representative
country of the United
Nations and take on the
role of diplomats; debating
various international topics
that encompass human
rights, conflict resolutions,
sustained economic devel-
opment, and issues pertain-
ing to families, particularly
women and children.

It is important that the
participating schools
research with the aim of

critically understanding the
rationale and position of
their respective assigned
countries.

Preparation is key to how
effective the participants
are able to deliberate, nego-
tiate, and present their
views on the issues.

The winning team of
MUNS Bahamas will travel
to New York as special
guests of the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs to attend
the Minister Brent Symon-
ette’s address before the
United Nations General
Assembly.

The Eleuthera team is
made up of four Preston
Albury High School stu-
dents: Gequahn Cole-
brooke, Jermaine Sands,
Oceanna Carey and Car-
leen Etienne, and two advi-
sors/coaches, Anna Horton
and Nicole Evans.

OPEN rOUSE for Educators

BARRY UNIVERSITY is hosting an Open House
for Educators “informational meeting.” Join us

April 22 and April 24 to learn how BARRY UNIVERSITY

can provide you with the foundational knowledge
and support you need to develop professionally and
take your career fo the next level. BARRY offers
educators sustained professional development,

a reputation of academic excellence, and
affordable academic programs.
www.barry.edu/Elementary

You're invited ¢
GRADUATE OPEN HOUSE

FOR EDUCATORS
April 22, 6:00-8:00 pm

April 24, 10:00 am-12:00 pm

and 1:00-3:00 pm
British Colonial Hilton
Number One Bay Street

Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

BARRY

UNIVERSITY

RSVP at www.barry.edu/ed/rsvp

For questions contact Lincoln Pettaway

at 305-899-3705

Ipettaway@mail.barry.edu

arn a Master of Scien

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“Veducators"* Courses 10 be offered one weekend each month in Nassau with

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ry







THE TRIBUNE













































EG Ce as

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



HEY’RE unseeded, but Mark

Knowles is hoping that he and Aus-

tralian Lleyton Hewitt will go fur-

ther than he and Brazilian Bruno
Soares went last week.

Knowles and Hewitt, who has a home in Old
Fort Bay, teamed up for the first time and were
successful in their first round of the men’s doubles
at the Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell in Spain.

The duo powered past Soares and Marcelo
Melo in straight set victories of 6-4, 6-1 on Mon-
day. They will have another day off before they
play their second round match against Lukasz
Kubot and Oliver Marach.

“It was good. Obviously, I’m playing with Lley-
ton, so it’s a pleasure,” said Knowles of the for-
mer number one singles player in the world.

“He’s a great player and he’s someone that I
can get along with. It’s the first time that we are
playing together, so it was a little bit awkward
because we had to play against my partner I
played with last week and who I’m scheduled to
play with next week.”

Knowles, 38, said despite the circumstances
that he found himself in, he was thrilled to have
been able to come out with the victory and he can
finally get to play another match.

He was referring to the fact that he and Soares,
seeded at No.8 at the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters
last week, got a bye in the first round and was
awarded a walk-over in the second round.

However, in the quarter-final, he and Soares
went right down to the wire before they got elim-
inated 6-2, 6-7 (4), 10-6 to the team of his former
long-time partner Daniel Nestor from Canada
and Zimonjic from Serbia.

Nestor and Zimonjic went on to win the title

PAGE 9

ke





rts

2010



LLEYTON HEWITT of
Austraiia hits a back-
hand as he defeats
Somdev Devvarman of
India 1-6, 6-0, 7-6 (2)
in a singles tennis
match at the US Men’s
Clay Court Champi-
onships at River Oaks
Country Club in Hous-
ton, Thursday, April 8,
2010.

(AP Phota/Steve
Campbell)

with a 6-3, 2-0 retire decision over Knowles’
immediate past partner Mahesh Bhupathi from
India and Max Mirnyi.

As for playing against Soares, Knowles said it’s
the nature of the business, so he had to take it in
his stride.

“It was the luck of the draw, but it’s really
how my career has been going,” said Knowles, of
having to be matched up against a lot of players
whom he played with in the past. “It wasn’t easy,
but we all understand. We’re professionals.”

Due to the injury to his new partner, American
Mardy Fish, Knowles said he will find himself
having to secure a different partner just about
every week until they get to the French Open at
the end of May. That is when Fish is scheduled to
make his return to action.

As he look ahead to his partnership with
Hewitt, Knowles said it definitely won’t get any
easier because “we are playing the sixth seeds,
whom I played twice and beat them both times.

“They’re a very good clay court team, so I
think it will be a very difficult match. But right
now, we are capable of winning that match. We’re
just going to take it one match at a time.”

Nestor and Zimonjic are the top seeds once
again, while the American identical twin brothers
of Bob and Mike Bryans are No.2. The Bryans
got ousted by Bhupathi and Mirnyi in the second
round last week.

Bhupathi and Mirnyi, however, are not entered
in Spain. Despite the fact that the injury bug has
been a thorn in his side, Knowles said he’s
presently healthy and if he can maintain that
position, he should be able to continue to make
his presence felt on the tour.

Knowles and Hewitt will have today off simply
because of the fact that Hewitt has to play his sec-
ond round singles match against Eduardo
Schwank of Argentina.

Hewitt is seeded at No.12 and Schwank is not.

The top seed in singles is Rafael Nadal.

High hopes for Family Island Regatta



















By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE the state of the
economy, commodore Danny
Strachan said the 57th National
Family Island Regatta should
surpass all expectations in
Georgetown, Exuma this week-
end.

As usual, Strachan said head-
ing into the Skipper’s meeting
and final registration last night,
they were anticipating a fleet
of 60-plus boats competing in
the A, B, C and D classes as
well as the junior division.

“We normally have between
50-60 boats each year, but I
expect that we will have more
than 60 this year,” Strachan

stressed. “So it’s going to be
very competitive.”

Held in honor of Huey
Lloyd, the famous boat builder
and skipper from Barraterre,
Exuma, the competition is
expected to get underway today
in Elizabeth Harbor.

“T think it’s going to be very
good this year because the
atmosphere is charged here in
Exuma,” Strachan noted. “We
expected the Lady Muriel to
make her return, but she won’t
be coming anymore.

“But we have a new A Class
boat from Barraterre. We were
also looking forward to a new
A class from Long Island, but
unfortunately she didn’t make
it.”

Today, the races will take

place in the A, B and C classes
for the Prime Minister, Gover-
nor General and Commodor-
e’s Cups respectively.

The actual series races will
begin on Thursday and con-
clude on Saturday.

Also on Saturday, the junior
competition will also take place.

“We had about 17 boats last
year, but with the junior sail-
ing not being held during the
school days, we expect the
numbers to be much higher,”
Strachan said.

The junior races, held in hon-
or of Sir Durward ‘Sea Wolf’
Knowles, is being organized by
Clyde Rolle. Knowles is still

SEE page ten



OTES

BASKETBALL
ST. GEORGE’S
SHOWCASE



THE 8th annual St.
George’s Jaquars basketball
showcase will take place
from Friday to Sunday at St.
Geoerge’s Gymnasium in
Grand Bahama. The event is
open to all high school male
basketball players in grades
9-12.

The event is being held in
conjunction with Caribbean
Network under the theme:
“Make Your College
Dreams A Reality.” It will
feature a number of visiting
coaches from the United
States.

The showcase will run
from 6-10 pm on Friday and
from 9 am on Saturday and
on Sunday at the same time.
The registration fee is $30
per player.

TRACK
COB MEET



THE College of the
Bahamas will host its track
and field meet on Saturday
at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium. It
will get started at 10 a.m.
and will offer competition
for the age group segment.
The open segment will take
place in the afternoon.

The public is invited to
come out and watch some of
the top athletes in the coun-
try compete. There are
expected to some athletes
coming in from Florida to
compete as well.

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Bittersweet end to
Autise Mortimer’s
collegiate career

Individual win but team falls short

BY RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



Bahamian tennis ace Autise Mortimer
ended her collegiete career on a bitterweet
note with a result similar to other matches in
her season year, an individual win but her
team falling short on the final scoreboard.

Mortimer ended her season and collegiate
career at Newberry College on Senior Days
with a pair of wins, however the Indians fell
to Converse, 7-2.

Mortimer, the lone The Newberry Col-
lege women’s tennis team saw its lone senior
notch two wins on Senior Day she won in
both singles and doubles despite the team's
overall loss.

Newberry finished the year at 1-15 overall.

The team honoured Mortimer before
match play and Mortimer did not dissap-
point by ending her career on a high note.

She defeated Olivia Self at the top flight in
singles play, 6-4, 6-1.

In doubles action, Mortimer earned her
second win of the day with doubles partner
Stephanie Matthews as the two topped Self
and Kelly, 8-3.

Mortimer said her time at Newberry has
served her game well in her development as
a tennis player through a wealth of experi-
ence. “I feel more confident than I did four
years ago because i have been playing the
same high level of competition for about
four years now,” she said, "So I know the
game better and I feel like Ihave became a
better player on the court. I think my results
show that because I have beaten a few
ranked schools."

In her freshman season she was South
Atlantic Conference Freshman of the Year
and was First Team All-South Atlantic Con-
ference. She was also named South Atlantic
Conference Player of the Week, went 9-8 in
singles play including a 5-2 conference

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"My teamates always looked up
to me and my coaching staff
always counted on me to win and
encourage everybody else at the
same time. I also think by being
the team's top player it pushed
me and also made me a better
player both mentally and physi-
cally."

record. Mortimer also became a quick study
in doubles play as she Went 12-7 with Lau-
ren Hartley,7-0 in conference.

In her sophomore season she went 8-7
and a perfect 7-0 record at the second flight.

In doubles she was 5-0 with Hartley at
the top flight.

Last season, her first as the team's ace,
she finished 5-8. 3-5 in the conference.

With the burden of being her team's top
ranked player on a weekly basis, Mortimer
said she was forced into a leadership role
which she readily accepted

"My teamates always looked up to me
and my coaching staff always counted on
me to win and encourage everybody else at
the same time,” she said, "I also think by
being the team's top player it pushed me
and also made me a better player both men-
tally and physically."

Mortimer said she remains unsure about
the next step in her progression with the
game, but hopes to become involved in
coaching at some point, particularly to an
new generation of Bahamian female tennis
players to rival the success of the men.

"We can have greater succes at the colle-
giate level and in other areas if players just
work hard and stay dedicated," she said,

"Sucess will come."

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BAAA offers incentive to teams in

school track and field championships

APPRECIATING the need for addition-
al competition for High School teams, the
BAAA offered an incentive to teams par-
ticipating in the BAAA Scotiabank Nation-
al High School Track and Field Champi-
onships. The incentive was to select a num-
ber of relay teams who won their events to
sponsor them to participate in the presti-
gious Penn Relays to be held this weekend.

e The teams selected are:

St. Augustine’s College — Boys 4x400m
Relay and Girls 4x400m Relay.

Queen’s College — Girls 4x100m Relay.

Moores Island — Boys 4x100m Relay.

Other schools were encouraged to send or
add to their existing teams:

St. Augustine’s College — Girls 4x100m
Relay.



Moores Island — Boys 4x400m Relay.

e Additional High School participation
not sponsored by the BAAA will come from:
Anatol Rodgers High — Jack Hayward.

Devinn Cartwright from Queen’s College
will participate in the Girls 400m Hurdles
and Nejmi Burnside from St. Andrews will
participate in the Boys 400m Hurdles.

Numerous teams from Jamaica have par-
ticipated over the years. Several teams from
The Bahamas have also participated over
the years.

The BAAA felt that it was important to
have Bahamian High School teams partici-
pating in this Relay Carnival and made the
effort to arrange for their participation with
the funding of the BAAA.





GARY MARKHAM: BAAA’s
treasurer Laura Charlton
presents Queen’s College
coach Gary Markham with
the airline tickets as mem-
bers of the team, along with
BAAA’s president Mike
Sands and first vice presi-
dent Sherwin Stuart looks
on.



DIANNE WOODSIDE:
BAAA’s treasurer Laura
Charlton presents SAC’s
coach Dianne Woodside
with the airline tickets for
her Big Red Machine team
that looks on at left. BAAA’s
president Mike Sands and
first vice president Sherwin
Stuart looks on at right.



Se
Tn

ALL














KATRINA SEYMOUR:
QUEEN’S College quarter-
miler Katrina Seymour
express her thanks to the
BAAA on behalf of her
Comets’ team-mates for
making it possible for
them to travel to the Penn
Relays this weekend.



LARON HIELD: MOORES
Island’s sprinter Laron Hield
speaks on behalf of his
team-mates as they
expressed thanks to the
BAAA for allowing them to
travel to the Penn Relays
this weekend.








EARL RAHMING: ST.
Augustine’s College middle
distance runner Earl Rah-
ming speaks on behalf of his
Big Red Machines team as
they are afforded the oppor-
tunity to travel to the Penn
Relays thos weekend cour-
tesy of the BAAA.





DESHANA BURNSIDE: ST.
Augustine’s College 800
metre runner Deshana
Burnside gives thanks to
the BAAA for allowing her
Big Red Machines team to
travel to the Penn Relays
this weekend.









High hopes for Family Island Regatta

FROM page nine
recuperating from an automo-
bile accident that he suffered
last week.

“All of the guys are here and
all of the boats are here who
are coming,” Strachan said. “So
the enthusiasm is running very
high and they are ready to get
sailing.

“This is for bragging rights
about who is the best for the
next year. So the competition is

going to be very stiff in all of
the classes.”

Strachan said the organizing
committee have also been
pleased with the tremendous
support from the spectators as
there are quite a number of
people who have already
arrived in Exuma.

“A lot of people are already
here and we haven’t started
sailing yet,” he said. “I expect
that we will have a huge crowd

here over the next three-four
days.

“All of the hotels are
booked, all of the rental cars
have been rented out. All of
the guests houses are rented
out. The airlines are putting on
extra flights, so we should have
a lot of people here.”

Strachan said at the end of
the week, the regatta should be
a big economic boost for the
communities in Exuma.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

to the suddenness with which the torna-
do materialised there was no time to
implement them all. The weather fore-
cast did not speak to any possible (tor-
nado) activity," said the report, prepared
by a FCP safety officer.

"Initial reports indicate that the safe-
ty features in place on all of the gantry
cranes were operational. This is evi-
denced by the fact that at least two of
the gantry crane operators reported los-
ing all control power when a strong gust
of wind hit their cranes.

"The rail brakes and the gantry motor
brakes on a number of the cranes were
completely destroyed. This was a direct
result of both sets of brakes doing exact-
ly what they were designed to do; pre-
vent the crane from moving in emer-
gency situations once control power is
lost if an operator engages the emer-
gency shut down.

"The winds were so strong that they
overcame the crane braking systems and

FROM page one

According to reports, a new
deadline has been set for May
14 for the parties to reach
agreement on all outstanding

Union willing to
talk to COB, but

Tornado

continued to propel the crane down the
rails," said the report, a copy of which
was obtained by The Tribune.

The report also states that operations
at the facility were suspended twice
before the tornado struck — about an
hour before the killer storm and again
just a few minutes before the tornado hit
— because of "low visibility due to heavy
rains."

"According to reports from witnesses,
terminal operations had to be suspend-
ed approximately one hour before the
incident owing to low visibility due to
heavy rains. Also, according to witness
accounts the terminal operations were
stopped again several minutes before
the accident occurred when operators
reported sudden heavy winds and poor
visibility,” the report said.

The sudden storm toppled heavy
equipment, including gantry crane num-
ber 10, which was acquired at a cost of
$10 million. Three men — Michael

Young, 43, Cleveland Lowe, 49, and
Shawn Saunders, 23 — were inside the
crane doing maintenance work when it
fell to the ground.

Four workers — Glen Bodie, Saman-
tha Rolle, Rommel McIntosh and Sam-
my Swann — were also seriously injured
during the storm. Two others, Broderick
Pinder and Kevin Archer, were treated
for injuries and released.

The preliminary incident report also
states that around 11.17 am, a safety and
security manager, who received sus-
pected tornado reports from a cargo
manager, contacted a duty operations
manager explaining that there was a
report of a possible tornado headed to
Grand Bahama and to cease all opera-
tions and secure equipment.

The duty operations manager
"acknowledged the report and advised
that operations had already been
stopped and efforts were underway.
Cranes one and two had already been
pinned down and straddles either
returned to the park up position or

locked onto full containers in the yard."

Three minutes later, at approximate-
ly 11.20 am, power was lost at the ter-
minal.

At around 11. 23 am it was reported
over the FCP radio system that crane
number 10 “had collapsed and was on
the ground and in water."

The Tribune understands that this
report was turned over to the Depart-
ment of Labour last week as they con-
tinue to probe whether there was any
negligence of health and safety stan-
dards at the FPO when the tornado hit.

A severe weather warning was not
issued by the Department of Meteorol-
ogy, which is based in Nassau, until noon
after the tornado had struck. Met offi-
cials have admitted that a weather
observer in Freeport had informed them
of possible tornado activity from as ear-
ly as 6 am that day. However, these mes-
sages were not passed on to the director
of meteorology, and other emergency
officials who would have issued a severe
weather warning.

tion policies of what was
required.

The exams that have not
been distributed to lecturers
for grading remain in the cus-
tody of the college.

Dr Cleare maintained that

matters.

However, UTEB president
Jennifer Dotson-Isaacs told
The Tribune at 10pm yester-
day that the strike will con-
tinue for now.

The Tribune was unable to
contact Labour Minister
Foulkes for further details
before going to press last
night.At a press conference
held yesterday afternoon,
COB revealed its contingency
plan for this year’s exam
process as the faculty’s strike
continues.

It had been suggested by
some commentators that the
exam results might be ques-
tionable considering the
upheaval at the college, how-
ever at a press conference yes-
terday it was reported that of
the 60 examinations held on
Monday, only 24 needed sup-
port invigilators — a number

Strike goes on

reduced to 13 by yesterday
afternoon.

College president Janyne
Hodder said: “All exams have
been invigilated to the highest
standard and in accordance
with academic policy, whether
invigilated by the faculty — as
happened in nearly 70 per
cent of the cases — or by mem-
bers of the invigilation sup-
port team.

“There is no issue of quali-
ty here.”

The institution’s decision to
go ahead with examinations
on Monday in the face of
industrial action by Union of
Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas (UTEB) members
was met with heavy criticism
and concern from students
and observers.

The biggest concern among

mn USTRIAL action continued yesterday.

students was that the faculty
strike will push back final
grading and ultimately tran-
scripts, hampering student
progress indefinitely.

However, Ms Hodder
maintained that the college
still plans to meet its May 8
transcript deadline.

Led by the dean of pure
and applied sciences Dr Bren-
damae Cleare, the invigilation
support team consists of 59



persons — 52 of whom hold
one degree or more. It
includes senior college admin-
istrators such as vice-presi-
dents, associate vice-presi-
dents and deans, as well as
volunteers from middle man-
agement, the administrative
support staff and government
volunteers.

The college held a short
workshop to inform those
unfamiliar with the examina-

all students are required to sit
their exams, and — as follows
normal examination policy —
allowances will only be made
for those students whose
absence is related to illness
or the death of a loved one.

Negotiations for a new
industrial agreement for the
faculty are being facilitated
through the ministries of
Labour and Education, and
at this time there is no indica-
tion of when talks will
resume.

UTEB has stated that its
members will not return to
the table until they see evi-
dence that the college will act
in “good faith” and agree toa
deadline for a new industrial
agreement.

There were no reported dis-
ruptions of the exam sched-
ule at the college’s northern
campus in Grand Bahama.

Homicide
Squad to add

i more trained

detectives

: FROM page one

: roads.

These crime fighting plans

: and more were unveiled on
: Monday as the Commission-
: er of Police launched his first
: policing plan for The
: Bahamas, the “Integrated
: Crime Prevention Interven-
: tion and Response Strategy.”

The 35-page document is

: intended to guide the force
: throughout 2010, with divi-
: sional commanders required
? to submit monthly “produc-
: tivity reports” to Commis-
: sioner Ellison Greenslade
: illustrating how they have
? moved to achieve its objec-
: tives in their divisions.

The strategic policing plan

: reveals that in order to effec-
: tively fight the burgeoning
: tide of crime “there are
: many areas of the (police
: force) that require strength-
: ening.”

“Greater attention will be

: paid to these areas to build
: capacity and improve capa-
: bilities” in 2010, it states.

Further sharpening the

force’s murder-solving poten-
: tial, the plan announces that
: a Cold Case Investigation
: Squad will be set up to
: review unsolved murder files
: and look at potential new
: lines of inquiry.

Led by Director of the

: newly established National
: Crime Prevention Office,
: Supt Stephen Dean, that
: squad has already held sev-
: eral “cold case” press con-
: ferences this year in which
: family members of murder
: victims have appealed to the
: public to come forward with
: any information that could

: lead to the conviction of their

CAARCCIUM ILM CiLiccecm ltactteecy cps sins

FROM page one will not be able to stay in the business as there o Pvp rays maar 8 erg
is no way he could come up with $5 million. : eete-on the Die Enforce:
“That price is ridiculous. I’ve been in the : t Unit will ee 4
business for a little while, and I want to remain cer al ag acai ihc
in the business. : while the Firearms Tracing
“Right now I have 32 people employed and ; and Investigations Unit in
for me to come up with that big bond, I could | ; CDU will be strengthened
never make that. ; through the provision of bet-
“I don’t feel that they should only give certain : ter technology and training
people a licence and kick everybody else out. If : opportunities for officers
the government wants us to contribute $10,000 : working on the squad.
for every six months from every number house, : The force also wishes to
that should be enough. Or whatever fee they : see the Business and Tech-
want to impose, but to knock everybody out : nology Crimes Unit — which
and only give a certain set a licence, that isn’t : pursues perpetrators of so-
fair. I don’t see how the government could do : called technology crimes,
that,” he said. . . : cyber crimes and financial
While the government through Prime Min- : crimes — play a more promi-
ister Hubert Ingraham has voiced its support for nent role.
discussions on the matter of legalizing the indus- > Meanwhil e, bolstering
laa has been little to no further discussion : anti-vehicle theft efforts, the
In fact, when The Tribune attempted to reach : ores oe eee oe :
a number of officials at the Ministry of Finance i Task F ‘lb i
on the topic, we were informed that “no one” at ; 2 as One © Seta
their offices would be authorized to speak on : lished within the police force
“that issue” at this time. ; this year.

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Lawyer back in court to face
theft of $350,000 charges

FROM page one

operators have expressed their fears that the
government could be “unfairly” manipulating
the requirements to “price out” the majority of
the current operators.

Currently it is being rumoured that each
number operator would be required, along with
the $5 million bond, to pay out to the govern-
ment a certain percentage of their annual rake
as a “fee”, along with the actual cost of the
licence which is said to be anywhere in the “six
figure” range.

Also, it is being said that in their initial dis-
cussions on the matter it has already been pro-
posed to limit the possibility of licences to
“three or four”, instead of a full-scale opening
of the current market.

This report, however, is being frowned upon
by many “smaller” number operators who fear
that these requirements are being “hiked out of
proportion” to limit access to the market, or in
fact even open it up for “other more politically
connected persons” to enter the field.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, one
small number operator said that he fears he

Ward, who was represented by attorney Philip “Brave”
Davis, was not required to enter a plea to the charges dur-
ing his arraignment yesterday. Prosecutors intend to pro-
ceed with a Voluntary Bill of Indictment in the matters,
bypassing a preliminary inquiry.

In October of last year, Ward, a resident of Paradise
Island, was charged with stealing $55,100 cash from Wayde
Wilson by reason of employment. In April 2008, he was
charged with stealing £500,000 or US $986,446.39 from
Robert James Lloyd by reason of service as well as £350,000
— roughly US $690,594.66 from Pochins Plc- a British con-
struction and development group.

Ward, who was already out on bail, was granted bail yes-
terday in the sum of $100,000. His case was adjourned to
June 26.





‘Street brawl
after Defence Force

marine shot dead
FROM page one



respond to an argument at his apartment at around 10.30pm.

When they arrived Seaman Black was found dead with gun-
shot wounds on the left side of his face, and officers recovered
a shotgun and ammunition at the property.

Emergency Medical Services personnel pronounced Seaman
Black dead at the scene and the woman relative, who had
called police earlier, was taken into custody for questioning.

RBDF press officer Lieutenant Carlon Bethel said a somber
mood took hold of the base in Coral Harbour yesterday as
Defence Force officers were shocked by the violent shooting of
a bright young marine.

Seaman Black was part of the enlisted branch of line staff on
the force and Lt Bethel worked in the supply department with
him during his short career.

“He was an excellent marine,” Lt Bethel said.

“Very proficient in his duties and the type of marine you
could leave alone to do whatever he had to do without anyone
senior standing over him.

“From what I could see he had a pretty bright career ahead
of him.

“T don’t think you will find anyone saying anything ill about
him, so the death is a shock to us all.

“He was well-known, and although he wasn’t the life of the
party, he had such a calm demeanor, and such a dedicated
outlook in his work.

“He was quiet, humble, and always respectful.”

The Tribune understands Seaman Black had worked at SG
Hambros Bank and Trust before enlisting in the Defence Force
and was a father, although this was unconfirmed before press
time.

Members of his family were seen arguing with another fam-
ily outside his home as police responded to the homicide.

Emotions ran high and angry words were exchanged with
punches as around 25 people who had known the dedicated
marine started warring with each other outside the cordoned off
crime scene in Adderley Terrace as they returned to their cars
parked nearby.

They then hit out at a police officer who attempted to break
up the angry brawl.

A man who looked on in horror from about 50ft away said:
“IT could see fighting and blows being thrown, and a police
officer trying to stop the fight got hit.”

Police continued to detain the marine’s 22-year-old wife for
questioning last night, however, no charges had been made
before The Tribune went to press. Ww Www

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

. Btormie;eterai«m c om



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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010
LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





STUDENTS of Carlton Francis Primary had fun partici-
pating in a track meet during their Annual House Sports
Day on Monday at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.





























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Reports: Four local
operators would have
to pay $5m cash bond

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

LOCAL number operators
will reportedly be asked to put
up a $5 million cash bond
before they are issued with one
of what is reported to be only
four issued licences.

As the government is cur-
rently mulling over whether or
not to legalize the local lottery
business, reports have started
to surface as to how regulators
would go about issuing licences
for an industry that is already
flooded with large and small
scale operators.

Currently, there exists four
main local number houses -

FML, Asue Draw, NWS and
Island Luck — that make up the
majority of sales in New Provi-
dence and in most Family
Islands, with eight smaller num-
ber operators filling in the gaps.
Of the four larger entities, FML
remains by far the most domi-
nate force on which other,
smaller, number houses “bank”
their daily tickets as insurance
against any possible “big hit”
for a given day.

With the daily payouts hav-
ing dropped in the past week
from $900 to $800 for the dollar
played during the Early Mia-
mi, Early Chicago, and Early
New York lottos, local number

SEE page 11

Union willing to talk to COB, but strike goes on

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net



THE Union of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas (UTEB)
said last night it is willing to sit down to new talks with the Col-
lege of the Bahamas (COB), but the strike is still on in the

meantime.

Education Minister Desmond Bannister told The Tribune
that Labour Minister Dion Foulkes was working with both
the union and college representatives yesterday and that it had
been decided that talks between the two parties would resume

on Monday.
SEE page 11



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eS
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POLICE remove the body of Leonardo Black siceltnm inten Or-Uaann Tc aIan a Reet Tee off Faith Avenue. « SEE STORY ABOVE

Tornatio ‘was too sudden for port Lawyer in court to face

to implement all its procedures’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



A "PRELIMINARY" incident report
into the events surrounding the deadly tor-
nado that killed three workers at the
Freeport Container Port said the trans-
shipment facility had sufficient extreme
weather procedures in place to mitigate
damage, but could not implement them all
in time because they had no severe weath-
er reports.

The report reveals that suspected torna-
do reports reached FHC officials at approx-
imately 11.17 am on March, 29. The facility
then began shut down operations but lost
power three minutes later at 11.20 am. At
11.23 am, it was reported that crane number
10, with several employees trapped inside,
had overturned.

"The terminal has well established
adverse/severe weather procedures — due

SEE page 11



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Knowles
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SEE PAGE NINE

‘Street brawl’ after
Defence Force
marine shot dead



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net





. a





additional theft charges

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



A LOCAL lawyer already facing a
number of stealing and fraud charges
was back in court yesterday to face
additional charges of stealing more
than $350,000 worth of property from
his clients.

Ralph Jan Ward, 48, was
arraigned before Deputy Chief Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane yesterday charged with
stealing by reason of service as well
as fraudulent breach of trust.

It is alleged that Ward between
Wednesday, August 30, 2006, and
Monday, April 16, 2007, stole
$361,000 in property by reason of
employment or by reason of service.

SEE page 11







A STREET brawl erupted between relatives
of Royal Bahamas Defence Force marine
Leonardo Black after he was shot dead in his
home, eye-witnesses claim.

Police responding to the country’s 27th homi-
cide broke up the vicious braw] outside Seaman
Black’s apartment in Adderley Terrace, off Faith
Avenue, just before midnight on Monday.

They had been called by the wife of the 27-
year-old marine who asked for officers to

SEE page 11

BODY OF Wat ea







Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Homicide Squad
to add more trained

detectives this year

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE number of trained detectives on
the police force’s Homicide Squad will
be increased this year as the organisation
seeks to shore up “areas that need
strengthening” across its various depart-
ments.

The Drug Enforcement Unit will be
similarly reinforced with extra personnel
and more police officers will hit the streets
as part of the force’s Mobile Patrol Divi-
sion.

That division is also set to benefit from
the acquisition of a new fleet of “high
visibility” police vehicles that will be oper-
ated in addition to those already on the

SEE page 11



medeen, Sat domo We 242304) 1) ew bohamohondpnnts com







NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



7 =
Marley Resort and Spa staff
‘facing salary delays again’

Cause of tourist
diving deaths yet
to be determined

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



POLICE have yet to determine what caused the
death of two tourists killed in recent diving expeditions.
In the case of the American tourist who died while

diving with Stuart Cove’s Dive Bahamas last month,
police liaison officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings con-
firmed that the matter is going to the Coroner’s Court
for an inquest.

The 55-year-old California man was found floating
near the dive spot in a black and blue dive suit with his
breathing apparatus attached.

Police received reports that when the group he had
been diving with surfaced, they realised someone was
missing. The body was located after a search of the
immediate area.

Sources at the dive company said the incident had no
impact on the business, and noted that all divers who
participate with the company are certified.

“A person is responsible for their own certification
level. If they have not been diving for three years, we
give them a refresher. If they are licensed, they are not
required to disclose any health conditions: they are only
required to prove they have a licence,” said the employ-
ee.

Over the weekend, Illinois native David Gozinsky
died during a diving trip with International Field Stud-
ies, an American environmental education initiative
headquartered i in Andros.

Mr Gozinsky was taken to a clinic in Blanket Sound,
Andros, where he was pronounced dead by the presid-
ing doctor.

He was visiting the island with his wife, who accompa-
nied the body to New Providence where an autopsy will
be conducted.

The company’s executive director Dr Ben Bohl was
not available for comment yesterday.



It feels
kno

is looking
them as

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAFF at the Marley Resort
and Spa say they are facing
salary delays again this month
— this time without prior warn-
ing or any explanation from
management.

Just over a week after staff
were supposed to receive two
weeks salary on April 8, an
employee who contacted The
Tribune said the payment had
still not come through.

She said staff morale is at an
all time low at the Cable Beach
resort, with many employees
finding it hard to put on a brave
face at work as they fight mount-
ing bills at home.

“You see tourists paying mon-
ey, coming here to have a good
time and it’s not their fault so
you want to make it happen for
them, but it’s really hard when
youre not getting paid,” said the
employee.

General manager of the
resort, Barbara Hanna-Cox, said
she had “no comment” when
contacted on the latest salary
delays.

The Tribune was directed to
speak with resort owner,
Stephanie Marley, daughter of
reggae legend Bob Marley, but a

message left for Ms Marley at
the Bob Marley Charitable
Foundation in Jamaica was not
returned.

In late March, Ms Hanna-Cox
claimed that salary delays at that
time were the result of a combi-
nation of low occupancy at the
boutique hotel and a “huge”
electricity bill leaving the com-
pany temporarily unable to meet
its financial obligations in a time-
ly manner. She apologised to
employees, calling the salary
delays “short term.”

Her response came after an
employee of the resort com-
plained that staff had been given
just one day’s notice in a memo
that their March 25 bi-monthly
salary payment would not arrive
on time.

Ultimately that payment was



made in two instalments, accord-
ing to sources — with one week’s
salary paid on April 2, and
another on April 7.

Now staff have been disap-
pointed again, finding that their
April 8 salary payment had not
been made.

“There was no money on the
account. Nothing there. No one
is saying anything — a week has
passed — nothing. The Marleys
are not here, no one seems to
know what’s going on,” said an
employee.

“How do people continue to
work under those conditions?
They expect you to come to
work and if you don’t you lose
your job, but then they aren’t
paying you. It seems like they
just don’t care. There’s no apol-
ogy or anything.

“T never knew that something
like this could exist in the
Bahamas. We have labour
laws!” added the worker.

The employee said that while
a complaint was made to the
Labour Board about concerns
over delayed salaries and a 12
per cent pay cut last year, she is
concerned about the lack of fol-
low through.

Staff were allegedly encour-
aged by a Department of Labour
official to come and file a trade
dispute, but many workers are
afraid to make their disgruntle-
ment known for fear of losing
their jobs.

“(The Department of Labour)
are the ones responsible for
making sure these laws are
adhered to; they know what’s
going on, but they’re not doing
anything, we don’t know where
to turn,” said the employee.

“You're telling the landlord
I’ve got to pay you when I get
paid, you’re calling the bank say-
ing I can’t make the payment
right now, the light bill, the
phone bill, everything’s backing
up,” she said.

Deputy director of labour
Josephine Bennons said that any
staff members who wish to see
the matter addressed must first
file a trade dispute with the
Labour Board.

Commissioner backs Bail Act amendment plan

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Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE Commissioner of Police has lent his
support to the government’s plan to amend the
Bail Act as a means of reducing the number of
crimes committed by those released back into
the community prior to going to trial.

Commissioner Ellison Greenslade comment-
ed on the matter during a question and answer
session with the media on Monday followed a
press conference in which he launched the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force’s “Policing Plan for
2010.”

In the Speech from the Throne on April 14,
the government said it would further restrict
the right to bail for people accused of serious
crimes in response to the number of crimes
committed by people out on bail.

Asked what he thinks of the plan and the
extent it would “make the efforts of police more
realistic”, Mr Greenslade said: “It’s very impor-
tant.”

“Anything that goes towards an improve-
ment, would cause things to work more effi-
ciently and effectively and would cause us to
increase public safety is welcomed by the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force.”

He then pointed out that police recently
arrested a young man who was then charged
with committing 16 armed robberies all over
New Providence.

“That man was on bail for armed robbery,”
revealed the Commissioner.

Mr Greenslade then pointed to a poster high-
lighting 22 individuals who have been arrested
by police and charged with murder this year

“Look at this look carefully . . . look at the
faces .. . these people were all charged with
murder. Look at the details below, and you do
the math. Some of those men (are accused of
committing) multiple murders at different times
over a short period of time,” he said.

The Commissioner’s 2010 Policing Plan notes
under the heading “Reducing Serious Crimes”
that the police intend to “advocate for the incar-
ceration of prolific offenders until their trial
date” — in other words, suggesting they should
not get bail when they go before the courts.

Crime

However, some lawmakers and attorneys
have expressed scepticism about the govern-
ment’s proposed plan to amend the Bail Act as
a means of addressing crime, suggesting that
the constitutional right to a trial in a “reason-
able” period of time would still trump the new
bail regulations if a defendant came before a
judge and was deemed unlikely to be put on
trial expeditiously.

One prominent criminal lawyer told The Tri-
bune that the number of accused criminals who
get bail will not be reduced unless judges re-con-
sider what constitutes a “reasonable period” of
time to await a trial, lawyers who represent
defendants to stop asking for bail on their behalf
if they think they might re-offend, and the gov-
ernment speeds up the criminal justice system.

Anti-crime advocate Bishop Simeon Hall of
the National Advisory Council on Crime wel-
comed the new plan as a concrete step towards
cutting crime that is in accordance with the
council’s own recommendations.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010, PAGE 3



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

GAMING advocates are
applauding the government for
its decision to consider legalis-
ing the popular Bahamian pas-
time of playing “numbers”.

However, some are of the
opinion that government
should go even further and
reform the Gaming and Lot-
teries Act to also legalise casi-
no gambling for all Bahamians.

“T think legalising the num-
bers game is a step in the right
direction of course, but it is yust
one step. As an international
person myself I have a lot of
friends and guests who come
here and go to the casino. It is
embarrassing as a law abiding
citizen to have to walk through
the casino with my hands in my
pockets,” said Lincoln Bain,
equal rights advocate, media
personality and entrepreneur.

Mr Bain said the Bahamian
public should not be fooled
into thinking a referendum is
needed to decide this matter.

He said Section 67J of the
Lotteries and Gaming Act,
which states that the minister
responsible has the power to
“make regulations regulating
and restricting the admission
of persons on premises licensed
under this Act”, is proof of this.

“The minister can wake up
and say Bahamians can gam-
ble. Only people making
$50,000 per year can gamble;
only Bahamians who have nev-
er been bankrupt, or Bahami-
ans who have not been diag-
nosed with a gambling prob-
lem. He can also blacklist per-
sons who are deemed unfit,”
said Mr Bain.

Last week the Free National
Movement said the its council
and parliamentarians favoured

en

LOCAL NEWS

Gaming advocates want
full gambling reform

SOME GAMING advocates want legalised casino gambling for Bahamians.

legalising gambling as it would
bring major financial benefits
to the government.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said the government
was consulting on the matter,
although no final decision has
been made.

Local advocates, like the
Bahamas Gaming Reform
(BGR) agree. In a press state-
ment, the committee noted the
new regulations could gener-
ate thousands of jobs and mil-
lions in incremental revenue
for the government.

“In spite of the heavy sighs
of relief from many quarters of
the country, anything short of
complete reform (permitting
Bahamians to be stakeholders
and players in our casino) will
be an affront to Bahamians and
only deepen the social divide
as foreigners will again be
afforded more privileges in this
country,” said Sidney Strachan,
BGR spokesperson.

“With any progress there is
going to be adverse affects.
Hotel developments have a

negative side. Progress always
brings that. I am waiting on
someone to show me any other
country in the world where the
entire moral fabric of the coun-
try was broken down or where
there has been less productivi-
ty as a result of gambling. Iam
not sure where those people
are getting their data from,”
said Mr Strachan.

The GBR has not been
granted an audience with the
prime minister, although rep-
resentatives said they have spo-
ken to Minister of Tourism and
Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, the minister responsi-
ble for gaming.

While the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) supports
the concept of a national lot-
tery and the legalisation of the
numbers business, it is main-
taining its opposition to total
access to casinos for Bahami-
ans.

“The BHA believes that
gambling can and should be
supported and expanded. We
have presented a variety of

URC te pa sla



HUNDREDS of European tourists stranded in the
Bahamas may be able to return home today as UK air-

ports reopened last night after being closed for six days.

day and Thursday.



The blanket ban on air traffic over the UK and parts
of Europe was imposed last Thursday amid serious safe-
ty concerns posed by volcanic activity in Iceland.

British Airways announced yesterday they will pri-
oritise the recommencement of long-haul flights today to
help get more aircraft, pilots and crew out to passengers
stranded around the world.

However, the airline was unable to confirm whether
the direct flight between Nassau and London will oper-
ate today before The Tribune went to press last night.

The airline anticipates it will be some time before
they are able to restore a full flying programme.

Direct flights between Nassau and London Heathrow
are operated by British Airways every day except Mon-





a





=< |

AN ICELANDAIR plane takes
off from Glasgow International

Airport traveling to Reykjavik
in Iceland, as flights resume
after disruption ash from a vol-
cano in Iceland choked the jet
age to a halt. (AP)










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positions to the competent
authorities in government on
gambling.

“The primary areas would
have a direct incremental
impact on the competitiveness
of our business and allow
access to new games and items
present in international mar-
kets,” said Robert Sands, BHA
president.

Some of the recommenda-
tions made by the BHA relate
to the Gaming Board’s
approval processes and initia-
tives to allow junket represen-
tatives, entertainers, and per-
manent residents with a cer-
tain level of net worth to gam-
ble.

Mr Bain said there should
be one moral standard for gam-
bling. He said if the churches
believe gambling is wrong they
“should be in front of the casi-
nos picketing”.

“There should not be a law
that allows some people to
gamble but not all. There
would not be a law to allow
tourists to smoke marijuana
and prohibit Bahamians, or for
tourists to run the red light and
not Bahamians. The whole law
is ludicrous and reminiscent of
the 1950s and 1960s segrega-
tion area,” said Mr Bain.

_ Stuck tourists provite economic hoost

THE ASH-SPEWING volcano in Iceland has given the Caribbean
an unexpected economic boost, causing some hotels to fill up with
stranded travelers and increasing demand for tourist activities, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

: Hotel managers have called in extra staff and hiked purchases of
: food, helping earnings in a region struggling with a tourism downturn.
: Adventure tour operators also have benefited as hotels hire them to
: keep guests entertained. Not everyone is seeing an increase in revenue
: — especially islands like Barbados and Antigua that depend largely
: on British vacationers stuck at home by airline flight cancellations.

: But stranded tourists are helping make up for that loss, said John-
: son JohnRose, spokesman for the Caribbean Tourism Organiza-
: tion.

¢ SEE STORY AT BOTTOM OF PAGE

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

To fly through ash or not? A hard question

SIX days after volcanic ash shut down
the skies over much of Europe, planes are
back in the air, but science still can't answer
the question:

Is it safe to fly again?

Mother Nature has given Europe a lesson
in risk, aviation technology, scientific uncer-
tainty and economics. And how these fields
intersect is messy.

Watching the same people who earlier
said it was too dangerous to fly now say it's
safe "is just more proof that risk is a subjec-
tive idea," said David Ropeik, a risk per-
ception expert at Harvard University.

When people turn to science for answers,
they get a lot equivocation.

"We really don't have as good a handle as
we should on the ash particle size, the ash
concentration and most important, just exact-
ly how high the ash got up into the atmos-
phere," said Gary Hufford, a U.S. govern-
ment volcano expert based in Anchorage,
Alaska.

Would he get on a plane and fly into the
ash cloud? "I would be cautious," he said in
a Tuesday conference call.

Abrasive gritty ash can damage jet
engines, and experts don't know what density
levels are safe. For that matter, they can't say
how much of it is floating in any one spot
along the air traffic routes or where it is
specifically going next.

But airlines know what cancelled flights
can do to their bottom lines. And passen-
gers know when those cancelled flights cross
the line from inconvenience to pain.

So Monday night and into Tuesday,
planes began flying across most of Europe —
many for the first time since April 14. Safety
officials called for closer inspections of planes
for damage after they land.

As airports reopen, passengers may have
to decide for themselves what risk is accept-
able.

"There are really no facts about risk. It's
just how we interpret the information we
have," said Ropeik, author of the book "How
Risky Is It, Really?"

"This is a great example of how the pace
of modern technological invention is making
a lot more people nervous about just how
sure science can be about anything,” he said.

It is one of the hardest risk decisions soci-
ety has faced in a while, agrees Paul Fis-
chbeck, a risk analysis expert at Carnegie
Mellon University and a former military
pilot. "With the amount of uncertainty, this
now I think is a very hard decision,” he said.
"How much risk are you willing to accept
to reduce economic hardship and inconve-
nience?"

It isn't a small amount of money at stake.
It's billions of dollars with millions of strand-
ed passengers, said Fischbeck. But if an air-
plane goes down, the company would be
shut down by lawsuits, he said.

When the Eyjafjallajokull volcano first

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spewed, the answer was simple. Authorities
usually shut down airspace when there's vol-
canic ash. It's the precautionary principle of
erring on the side of caution, Fischbeck said.

"Standard safety procedure is: Don't go
there if you don't know," said Michael Fabi-
an, a professor of mechanical engineering at
Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in
Prescott, Ariz.

But the days went on and the pain for
airline companies and passengers increased
and then people started questioning: How
bad is it? How do you know?

"Hard questions reveal that the science
isn't as settled as first presented," said
George Gray, an expert on risk at George
Washington University and former science
adviser at the U.S. Environmental Protection
agency. The real question about how much
risk is acceptable is personal based on the
benefits we each get, Gray said.

Fischbeck believes authorities should fly
more test flights into the plume to see what
kind of damage occurs and at what frequen-
cy to help them make a more informed deci-
sion.

Engineers worry about immediate cata-
strophic damage when the ash dust congeals
in an engine turbine, blocking air flow and
shutting it down, Fabian said. In 1989, when
a Boeing 747 flew through volcanic ash over
Alaska, all four engines failed and the plane
dropped more than two miles in five minutes,
before engines restarted. Ash can also cause
long-term abrasive damage to planes that
could lead to later disasters if not dealt with.

Fabian said the reason engineers know
so little about the risks from volcanic ash is
that it would take many hours and great
expense to do repeated tests. And tests
would be needed for the 20 different types of
engines currently flown.

And even if engineers knew how much
ash a plane's engines could handle, atmos-
pheric scientists can't say how much ash is in
any one place or predict what will happen
next, said Jon Davidson, a professor of earth
sciences at Durham University in England.
The ash becomes more diluted as it goes
higher in altitude but also clumps together at
times like sediments in a river, he said.

"We have built a society that's fairly sen-
sitive to natural changes," Davidson said.
"An eruption like this 100 years ago would-
n't have caused any issues in Europe. Possi-
bly we'd not even know about it."

But the more technology and the faster
the speed of travel, the more types of risks we
are forced to accept, Fischbeck said. "You
can get hurt only so bad walking; you adda
horse and you can hurt more."

At the same time, with improved tech-
nology "you see an evolution of the risks,
not necessarily an increase of risks," he said.

(This article was written by Seth
Borenstein, AP Science Writer).







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The poor
treatment
of animals
in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune

In response to the GB
Humane Society article
regarding the relocation of
healthy loving dogs to the US,
I would like to tell Mr.
Roberts that the disgrace he
should be looking at is how
the Bahamian Government
has fostered the attitudes for
poor treatment of animals in
The Bahamas over the last 40
years.

So many private citizens
make the attempt to better
the lives of animals in this
country, only to meet resis-
tance from the Government.
The Canine Control Unit in
Nassau is an utter waste of
taxpayer's dollars and a hell
hole for the animals that end
up in there due to the poor
management and overall lack
of concern from Government
officials.

Numerous N.G.O's have
stepped forward to try and
improve the disgraceful con-
ditions, only to be seen as a
nuisance.

Noah's Ark Petting Zoo
on Malcolm Road in New
Providence has been an on
going issue of animal cruelty
for approximately 30 years.
The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety and other Animal Rights
groups have tried to close it
down. When letters are writ-
ten to the Government ask-
ing them to stop issuing
import permits for the pro-
prietor to bring in animals,
the response is that as long as
the permit requirements are
met the permits are issued as
cruelty is not their department
— Another disgraceful exam-
ple of the Government's lack
of accountability.

Animals suffer in the
Bahamas and so do people.
Every ailment of The
Bahamas is connected and
cannot be looked at as sepa-
rate issues, hence the digres-
sion into other topics in this
letter.

Task Mr. Roberts and oth-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia. net






er Government officials to
stop pointing fingers and for
once start taking accountabil-
ity and do something for this
country. I am embarrassed
and depressed to call The
Bahamas my home at this
point in time. There is no for-
ward momentum. We are
sinking into a blue hole of
apathy. The Bahamas is a dis-
grace.

The Ministers and other
Government officials need to
restructure the way this coun-
try is operated, starting first
with the belief that when you
are employed with the Gov-
ernment it is for life, and you
are required to do very little
work as you will never get
fired. Second should be the
education system. Please
Google Geoffrey Canada to
see what he has accomplished
in Harlem, NYC. The Edu-
cation system is another dis-
grace that Mr. Roberts should
look at before criticising the
GB Humane Society attempt
to give healthy animals a
future. The poor education
system provided by the Gov-
ernment is the preliminary
issue and the cause of the
ignorant minds of this coun-
try. This ignorance is then
seen in the treatment of ani-
mals, the treatment of cus-
tomers at the work place, the
crime, the violence and the
lack of motivation and open
mindedness to make changes
in order to progress and bet-
ter ourselves for the future.

Many people like to say
that other countries are worse
off than the Bahamas but that
just reinforces our lack of
accountability. Things are
always worse somewhere but
that does not give us the
excuse to not make things
better. The fact is The
Bahamas is a small nation of

only 335,047 in 2008 according
to the World Bank. We have
the amazing resources of loca-
tion, foreign investment and
an environment that is very
appealing to visitors. Yet the
attitudes and mentalities
being fostered in this country
are destroying us. We have so
much potential, yet somehow
we cannot figure out how to
make progress and move for-
ward.

The Bahamas Government
is so bogged down in red tape,
laziness and corruption that
change is almost impossible.
The prominent leaders in this
country must step up and
make this change possible.
Change must emanate from
the top. We need Ministers
and Government officials who
are not just there to fatten
their personal pockets but to
work for The Bahamas and
improve it. So I hope Mr.
Bradley Roberts can read this
letter and step up to the chal-
lenge, as my response to him
is this entire country, starting
with the Politicians and Civil
Servants, is a DISGRACE.

HOPING FOR A CHANGE
Nassau,
April 19, 2010

(A few weeks ago a Canadi-

an business woman, who is
very interested in animals,
particularly horses, was in
Nassau. During her stay here
she visited the Noah’s Ark
Petting Zoo and found the
animals in such an appalling
condition that she sent us
photographs. She has also
made a complaint to the
Humane Society questioning
how and why government
would permit such an estab-
lishment to continue with ani-
mals in such poor condition.
(To protect the name of this
country it would be advisable
for government to inspect
such establishments before
approving permits for the
importation of animals. —
Ed).

Offensive state of the Montagu Park area

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas government
has done a good job cleaning
and beautifying many areas of






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the island. Unfortunately, the
Montagu Park area continues
to be a problem, in spite of
promises from the area’s rep-
resentative.

There is a general disregard
for law and order as vendors,
their customers and small boat
operators seem to feel entitled
to block the road.

The area is unkempt and
often strewn with litter.

The corner of Shirley Street
and Village Road (on the north
side) is squalid with large,
cheap broken signs.

This state of affairs is offen-
sive to the growing number of
businesses and homeowners in
the area.

There are laws regarding sig-
nage and we hope the Ministry
of Works and the representa-
tive will take note and have the
signs removed.

The dilapidated signs and
unkempt verges stick out like a
sore thumb now that Shirley
Street has been resurfaced and
looks so much better.

Private businesses also have
a duty to keep their premises
tidy and it wouldn’t hurt the
Montagu Beach Inn to spruce
up the front of its premises and
look after the verge in front.

M. JOHNSON
Nassau,
April 9, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

WS
Police hoping crime information
can help reduce fears of pone |

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE police is hoping to reduce peo-
ple’s fear of crime by letting the public
know the truth about the extent of law-
lessness in certain communities, reveal-
ing that contrary to popular belief, some
areas are in fact rarely targeted by crimi-
nals.

In its newly released policing plan for
2010, the force expressed its intent to
become a more data-driven organisation,
undertaking crime perception surveys and
employing crime trend analysts to sup-
port “proactive” policing.

The crime perception surveys will give
the police force a more accurate impres-
sion of how people in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and select Family
Islands feel about “safety in their
homes, on their jobs and in their com-
munities”.

Survey

The results of the survey will also allow
for the creation of a “perception/reality
matrix” whereby residents can discover if
their fear of crime is borne out by crime
statistics in their area.

The police hopes that by exposing the
fact that some communities are rarely tar-
geted by criminals, it can reduce the over-
all fear of crime in those areas.

The results of the surveys, which the
force hopes will be administered inde-
pendently of police by entities such as

the College of the Bahamas so as to

“engender credibility in the process”,
will also act as a baseline for future com-
parisons that will help the police assess
their effectiveness.

Meanwhile, the hiring and training of
crime analysts to be deployed throughout
various departments this year will allow
police to use data to more successfully
foresee “when and where things will or
may happen” and re-focus resources
accordingly.

With crime data being made available to
academic researchers at COB and to oth-
ers, the police hope that these outside
entities can further provide the force with
insights that can be put to use in the fight
against crime.

The computerisation of crime facts in a
timely manner, data mining and analytical
tools will also be emphasised as the force
seeks to “ensure informed decisions are
made in the deployment of police
resources.”

These new initiatives were incorporated
in the Commissioner of Police’s Policing
Plan for 2010, also known as the Integrat-
ed Crime Prevention Intervention and
Response Strategy.

The 35-page document was formally
released on Monday at police headquar-
ters by Commissioner Ellison Greenslade,
but has been guiding the police force’s
work since earlier this year.

In the area of information communica-
tion, the police will launch a new Public
Affairs and Communications Department
to improve how information about the
force and crimes is disseminated to the
public.

| 9 | yo
POLICE COMMISSIONER Ellison Greenslade



West End to benefit from
expansion of osmosis plant

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Ginn is
expanding its reverse osmo-
sis plant, significantly increas-
ing its capacity of fresh water
at West End.

In a press statement, the
developers of a $4.9 billion
resort in West End,
announced that they will
install two additional new
reverse osmosis units.

There are currently two
reverse osmosis units that
have been in operation since
July 2009.

“We will have a million and
a half gallons of storage on
site and another 300,000 gal-
lons of storage at Old
Bahama Bay. There will be
room for a second tank and
its capacity will be 600,000
gallons, thereby having a total
capacity of 2.1 million gal-
lons,” Ginn said.

An adequate supply of

Man wanted for questioning in
connection with Abaco hoat theft

POLICE in Abaco are seek-
ing the public’s assistance in
locating 31-year-old Gereno
Poitier, also known as Bailey,
who is wanted for questioning in

a boat theft case.

The man is wanted in connec-
tion with the theft of a 23-foot
white Man-o-War vessel that was
stolen from Casuarina Point in

Abaco.

Poitier’s last known address is

in Stevenson, Cat Island.

He is described as being of
dark brown complexion, of aver-
age build, 5’9” tall and weighing

approximately 140lbs.

The suspect is considered

armed and dangerous.

Anyone with information





regarding the suspect’s where- GERENO POITIER
abouts is asked to contact the
police emergency hotline at 919 or 911; the Central Detec-

tive Unit at 502-9930/9991; the Police Control Room at
322-3333; Crime Stoppers at 328-8477 or the nearest police

station.

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Have strong organizational and leadership skills

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fresh water is critical to Gin-
n’s development.

The two new units will not
only help in the irrigation of
the Arnold Palmer Signature
golf course, but also produce
drinking water.

Darron Grant, assistant
project manager, said the cur-
rent reverse osmosis opera-
tion is not sufficient for the
amount of water needed once
the Ginn project is completed
within the next few years.

Ginn is currently being sup-
plied with water from the
Grand Bahama Utility Com-
pany.

Mr Grant said eventually
Ginn will have its own water
supply, only using the Grand
Bahama Utility Company as a
back-up.

“We have drilled two wells
and we have room for a third,
fourth and fifth well. The
ground water is drawn up and
it goes into the reverse osmo-
sis units and both of the two
containers are capable of pro-
ducing 250,000 gallons per
day of fresh water from the
ground water, which is prac-
tically ocean water quality,”

Drive one.

said Mr Grant.

“If there is a storm or hur-
ricane, we will be able to store
lots of water and be able to
produce water. We have
back-up generators for all of
our critical infrastructure, and
water is definitely considered
to be critical.”

Mr Grant said rain water is
also collected at Ginn when-
ever possible.

“When it rains at the air-
port the water drains down
into a pond, which is inter-
connected into a series of
ponds.

“The fresh water is thereby
mixed with the R/O water.
The water used for irrigation
is therefore a combination of
the rain water and the water
we pump and desalinate by
use of the R/O plant,” he said.

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Murder trial suspended
_ for voir dire proceedings

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT -— The murder trial of Herman Natari
Francis and Raymond Darling was suspended in the
Supreme Court for voir dire proceedings to be held on
Monday. This is a hearing without the jury.

Francis and Darling are accused of the attempted rob-
bery and murder of Tyna “Penny” Pinder on November
25, 2005 at the Cool Breeze Apartments on Hudson
Avenue.

Ms Pinder, 34, was shot to death in her office by a
gunman armed with a shotgun.

The prosecution alleged that Francis and Darling act-
ed together by planning the robbery and carrying it out by
using a shotgun.

About 16 witnesses will give evidence on behalf of the
prosecution.

Dr H C Govinda Raju testified last week in the
Supreme Court, telling jurors that Ms Pinder sustained a
severe shotgun injury to the neck which caused her
death.

Donnet Richards a tenant at the Cool Breeze Apart-
ments, also testified. She told the court that she saw a man
enter the office and right after heard “Penny” say, “Oh
my God” and then heard a loud bang.

She said the man was wearing a white shirt, a pair of
jeans, and green sweater jacket with a hood.

Fredrick Bastian and Solomon Hield also testified that
they saw a man wearing similar clothing in the area with
a shotgun after the shooting.

Justice Hartman Longley is presiding over the mat-
ter, which is before a jury of seven men and five women.

Attorney Jillian Williams, along with Anthony Delaney,
Olivia Blatch and Erica Kemp of the Attorney General’s
Office are prosecuting on behalf of the Crown.

K Brian Hanna is representing Darling and Mario
Grey is representing Francis.

The voir dire is conducted in the absence of the jury and
the proceedings can neither be reported nor published. It
is a hearing within the course of a trial to determine
whether evidence put forward by one party or the other
is admissible.

If found to be inadmissible the evidence in question
cannot be considered by the jury.

SD

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



GN-1036

MINISTRY OF TOURISM & AVIATION
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION

Publication By The Ministry of Tourism & Aviation
Department Of Civil Aviation
Particulars Of An Application To
Operate Scheduled Air Services

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation 9 of the Civil Aviation
(Licensing of Air Services) Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for
Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars of the under-mentioned
applicant to operate scheduled air services to and from The Bahamas.

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION

1. Application: REGIONAL AIR

2. Date of first publication: 14 April, 2010

3. Routes: Nassau, Freeport, Bimini and Marsh Harbour on the one
Hand and Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm Beach on the other.

4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

5. Provisional time table:

Freeport/Ft. Lauderdale

Ft. Lauderdale/Freeport
Freeport/Ft. Lauderdale

Ft. Lauderdale/Freeport
Freeport/West Palm Beach
West Palm Beach/Freeport
Marsh Harbour/Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Lauderdale/Marsh Harbour

Local Times

0915/1015 Fri, Sun & Mon
1130/1230 Fri, Sun & Mon
1915/2015 Fri, Sun & Mon
2115/2215 Fri, Sun & Mon
0915/1015 Sat

1115/1215 Sat

1345/11515 Sun

1630/1800 Sun

Marsh Harbour/West Palm Beach 1315/1445 Sat
West Palm Beach/Marsh Harbour 1545/1715 Sat

Bimini/Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Lauderdale/Bimini
Bimini/Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Lauderdale/Bimini

0900/0930 Daily
1000/1030 Daily
1500/1530 Daily
1600/1630 Daily

6. Frequency of flights: See above timetable.
7. Type of Aircraft: BEECH1900 & CESSNA-402

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in accordance with
Regulation 10 must be received by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry
of Tourism & Aviation & the Department of Civil Aviation within
fourteen (14) days after the date of first publication of this Notice.

Hyacinth Pratt
Permanent Secretary

1--4/8/03

An International Offshore Company

is presently considering applications for a

Treasury Administrator & Deputy Head of
Treasury & Execution

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Minimum Qualifications:

* Three — Five years International Banking experience in treasury/
execution and related departments of an offshore bank

* Strong management and leadership skills

- In-depth knowledge of international Money Market/Forex and Securities
Trading and Execution Department of an offshore bank or Asset

Management Company

- Well versed in Swiss banking practices and standards

* PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel)

* International banking knowledge and keen knowledge of
(trading and settling) capital market instruments

¢ German or French would be an asset

- A Bachelors degree with a concentration in Finance or Accounting

Personal Qualities:

- Excellent organizational and communication skills

*A commitment to service excellence

* Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

* Goal oriented

Benefits provided include:
* Competitive salary

¢ Pension Plan
¢ Health and Life Insurance

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. ONLY PERSONS
MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY

Applications should be submitted via email to
recruiting.bahamas@gmail.com

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: 26th

April, 2010

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



LOCAL NEWS









FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Front row - Gequahn Colebrooke, Shaun Ingraham, President, Rotary Club of



Eleuthera, Jermaine Sands and Carolyn Birkweiser, Pineapple Fields Resort. Back row: Oceanna Carey,
Anna Horton, Advisor/Coach, Carleen Etienne and Nicole Evans (Advisor/Coach and Secretary, Rotary

Club of Eleuthera.

Eleuthera to send first team to

Model United Nations Session
Rotary Club, Pineapple Fields Resort supporting students

HISTORY is about to be
made as Eleuthera's first
Model United Nations Ses-
sion (MUNS) team will
travel to Nassau to partici-
pate in the Annual MUNS
Bahamas event on Monday.

MUNS is a simulation of
the United Nations within
an academic platform.

Each year students from
high school to university
levels, in more than 32
countries around the world
participate in this pro-
gramme.

Through the cooperative
efforts of the Rotary Clubs
of the Bahamas and the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
MUNS Bahamas began in
1998.

This year, the island of
Eleuthera will be repre-
sented at the event as a
result of the generous spon-
sorship of Pineapple Fields

Resort, Eleuthera and the
support of The Rotary Club
of Eleuthera.

The objective of MUNS
is to educate, and in part,
train the participants in
matters relating to civics,
globalisation, communica-
tion and diplomacy.

Diplomats

Participating students are
assigned a representative
country of the United
Nations and take on the
role of diplomats; debating
various international topics
that encompass human
rights, conflict resolutions,
sustained economic devel-
opment, and issues pertain-
ing to families, particularly
women and children.

It is important that the
participating schools
research with the aim of

critically understanding the
rationale and position of
their respective assigned
countries.

Preparation is key to how
effective the participants
are able to deliberate, nego-
tiate, and present their
views on the issues.

The winning team of
MUNS Bahamas will travel
to New York as special
guests of the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs to attend
the Minister Brent Symon-
ette’s address before the
United Nations General
Assembly.

The Eleuthera team is
made up of four Preston
Albury High School stu-
dents: Gequahn Cole-
brooke, Jermaine Sands,
Oceanna Carey and Car-
leen Etienne, and two advi-
sors/coaches, Anna Horton
and Nicole Evans.

OPEN rOUSE for Educators

BARRY UNIVERSITY is hosting an Open House
for Educators “informational meeting.” Join us

April 22 and April 24 to learn how BARRY UNIVERSITY

can provide you with the foundational knowledge
and support you need to develop professionally and
take your career fo the next level. BARRY offers
educators sustained professional development,

a reputation of academic excellence, and
affordable academic programs.
www.barry.edu/Elementary

You're invited ¢
GRADUATE OPEN HOUSE

FOR EDUCATORS
April 22, 6:00-8:00 pm

April 24, 10:00 am-12:00 pm

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Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

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THE TRIBUNE













































EG Ce as

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



HEY’RE unseeded, but Mark

Knowles is hoping that he and Aus-

tralian Lleyton Hewitt will go fur-

ther than he and Brazilian Bruno
Soares went last week.

Knowles and Hewitt, who has a home in Old
Fort Bay, teamed up for the first time and were
successful in their first round of the men’s doubles
at the Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell in Spain.

The duo powered past Soares and Marcelo
Melo in straight set victories of 6-4, 6-1 on Mon-
day. They will have another day off before they
play their second round match against Lukasz
Kubot and Oliver Marach.

“It was good. Obviously, I’m playing with Lley-
ton, so it’s a pleasure,” said Knowles of the for-
mer number one singles player in the world.

“He’s a great player and he’s someone that I
can get along with. It’s the first time that we are
playing together, so it was a little bit awkward
because we had to play against my partner I
played with last week and who I’m scheduled to
play with next week.”

Knowles, 38, said despite the circumstances
that he found himself in, he was thrilled to have
been able to come out with the victory and he can
finally get to play another match.

He was referring to the fact that he and Soares,
seeded at No.8 at the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters
last week, got a bye in the first round and was
awarded a walk-over in the second round.

However, in the quarter-final, he and Soares
went right down to the wire before they got elim-
inated 6-2, 6-7 (4), 10-6 to the team of his former
long-time partner Daniel Nestor from Canada
and Zimonjic from Serbia.

Nestor and Zimonjic went on to win the title

PAGE 9

ke





rts

2010



LLEYTON HEWITT of
Austraiia hits a back-
hand as he defeats
Somdev Devvarman of
India 1-6, 6-0, 7-6 (2)
in a singles tennis
match at the US Men’s
Clay Court Champi-
onships at River Oaks
Country Club in Hous-
ton, Thursday, April 8,
2010.

(AP Phota/Steve
Campbell)

with a 6-3, 2-0 retire decision over Knowles’
immediate past partner Mahesh Bhupathi from
India and Max Mirnyi.

As for playing against Soares, Knowles said it’s
the nature of the business, so he had to take it in
his stride.

“It was the luck of the draw, but it’s really
how my career has been going,” said Knowles, of
having to be matched up against a lot of players
whom he played with in the past. “It wasn’t easy,
but we all understand. We’re professionals.”

Due to the injury to his new partner, American
Mardy Fish, Knowles said he will find himself
having to secure a different partner just about
every week until they get to the French Open at
the end of May. That is when Fish is scheduled to
make his return to action.

As he look ahead to his partnership with
Hewitt, Knowles said it definitely won’t get any
easier because “we are playing the sixth seeds,
whom I played twice and beat them both times.

“They’re a very good clay court team, so I
think it will be a very difficult match. But right
now, we are capable of winning that match. We’re
just going to take it one match at a time.”

Nestor and Zimonjic are the top seeds once
again, while the American identical twin brothers
of Bob and Mike Bryans are No.2. The Bryans
got ousted by Bhupathi and Mirnyi in the second
round last week.

Bhupathi and Mirnyi, however, are not entered
in Spain. Despite the fact that the injury bug has
been a thorn in his side, Knowles said he’s
presently healthy and if he can maintain that
position, he should be able to continue to make
his presence felt on the tour.

Knowles and Hewitt will have today off simply
because of the fact that Hewitt has to play his sec-
ond round singles match against Eduardo
Schwank of Argentina.

Hewitt is seeded at No.12 and Schwank is not.

The top seed in singles is Rafael Nadal.

High hopes for Family Island Regatta



















By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE the state of the
economy, commodore Danny
Strachan said the 57th National
Family Island Regatta should
surpass all expectations in
Georgetown, Exuma this week-
end.

As usual, Strachan said head-
ing into the Skipper’s meeting
and final registration last night,
they were anticipating a fleet
of 60-plus boats competing in
the A, B, C and D classes as
well as the junior division.

“We normally have between
50-60 boats each year, but I
expect that we will have more
than 60 this year,” Strachan

stressed. “So it’s going to be
very competitive.”

Held in honor of Huey
Lloyd, the famous boat builder
and skipper from Barraterre,
Exuma, the competition is
expected to get underway today
in Elizabeth Harbor.

“T think it’s going to be very
good this year because the
atmosphere is charged here in
Exuma,” Strachan noted. “We
expected the Lady Muriel to
make her return, but she won’t
be coming anymore.

“But we have a new A Class
boat from Barraterre. We were
also looking forward to a new
A class from Long Island, but
unfortunately she didn’t make
it.”

Today, the races will take

place in the A, B and C classes
for the Prime Minister, Gover-
nor General and Commodor-
e’s Cups respectively.

The actual series races will
begin on Thursday and con-
clude on Saturday.

Also on Saturday, the junior
competition will also take place.

“We had about 17 boats last
year, but with the junior sail-
ing not being held during the
school days, we expect the
numbers to be much higher,”
Strachan said.

The junior races, held in hon-
or of Sir Durward ‘Sea Wolf’
Knowles, is being organized by
Clyde Rolle. Knowles is still

SEE page ten



OTES

BASKETBALL
ST. GEORGE’S
SHOWCASE



THE 8th annual St.
George’s Jaquars basketball
showcase will take place
from Friday to Sunday at St.
Geoerge’s Gymnasium in
Grand Bahama. The event is
open to all high school male
basketball players in grades
9-12.

The event is being held in
conjunction with Caribbean
Network under the theme:
“Make Your College
Dreams A Reality.” It will
feature a number of visiting
coaches from the United
States.

The showcase will run
from 6-10 pm on Friday and
from 9 am on Saturday and
on Sunday at the same time.
The registration fee is $30
per player.

TRACK
COB MEET



THE College of the
Bahamas will host its track
and field meet on Saturday
at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium. It
will get started at 10 a.m.
and will offer competition
for the age group segment.
The open segment will take
place in the afternoon.

The public is invited to
come out and watch some of
the top athletes in the coun-
try compete. There are
expected to some athletes
coming in from Florida to
compete as well.

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Bittersweet end to
Autise Mortimer’s
collegiate career

Individual win but team falls short

BY RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



Bahamian tennis ace Autise Mortimer
ended her collegiete career on a bitterweet
note with a result similar to other matches in
her season year, an individual win but her
team falling short on the final scoreboard.

Mortimer ended her season and collegiate
career at Newberry College on Senior Days
with a pair of wins, however the Indians fell
to Converse, 7-2.

Mortimer, the lone The Newberry Col-
lege women’s tennis team saw its lone senior
notch two wins on Senior Day she won in
both singles and doubles despite the team's
overall loss.

Newberry finished the year at 1-15 overall.

The team honoured Mortimer before
match play and Mortimer did not dissap-
point by ending her career on a high note.

She defeated Olivia Self at the top flight in
singles play, 6-4, 6-1.

In doubles action, Mortimer earned her
second win of the day with doubles partner
Stephanie Matthews as the two topped Self
and Kelly, 8-3.

Mortimer said her time at Newberry has
served her game well in her development as
a tennis player through a wealth of experi-
ence. “I feel more confident than I did four
years ago because i have been playing the
same high level of competition for about
four years now,” she said, "So I know the
game better and I feel like Ihave became a
better player on the court. I think my results
show that because I have beaten a few
ranked schools."

In her freshman season she was South
Atlantic Conference Freshman of the Year
and was First Team All-South Atlantic Con-
ference. She was also named South Atlantic
Conference Player of the Week, went 9-8 in
singles play including a 5-2 conference

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"My teamates always looked up
to me and my coaching staff
always counted on me to win and
encourage everybody else at the
same time. I also think by being
the team's top player it pushed
me and also made me a better
player both mentally and physi-
cally."

record. Mortimer also became a quick study
in doubles play as she Went 12-7 with Lau-
ren Hartley,7-0 in conference.

In her sophomore season she went 8-7
and a perfect 7-0 record at the second flight.

In doubles she was 5-0 with Hartley at
the top flight.

Last season, her first as the team's ace,
she finished 5-8. 3-5 in the conference.

With the burden of being her team's top
ranked player on a weekly basis, Mortimer
said she was forced into a leadership role
which she readily accepted

"My teamates always looked up to me
and my coaching staff always counted on
me to win and encourage everybody else at
the same time,” she said, "I also think by
being the team's top player it pushed me
and also made me a better player both men-
tally and physically."

Mortimer said she remains unsure about
the next step in her progression with the
game, but hopes to become involved in
coaching at some point, particularly to an
new generation of Bahamian female tennis
players to rival the success of the men.

"We can have greater succes at the colle-
giate level and in other areas if players just
work hard and stay dedicated," she said,

"Sucess will come."

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BAAA offers incentive to teams in

school track and field championships

APPRECIATING the need for addition-
al competition for High School teams, the
BAAA offered an incentive to teams par-
ticipating in the BAAA Scotiabank Nation-
al High School Track and Field Champi-
onships. The incentive was to select a num-
ber of relay teams who won their events to
sponsor them to participate in the presti-
gious Penn Relays to be held this weekend.

e The teams selected are:

St. Augustine’s College — Boys 4x400m
Relay and Girls 4x400m Relay.

Queen’s College — Girls 4x100m Relay.

Moores Island — Boys 4x100m Relay.

Other schools were encouraged to send or
add to their existing teams:

St. Augustine’s College — Girls 4x100m
Relay.



Moores Island — Boys 4x400m Relay.

e Additional High School participation
not sponsored by the BAAA will come from:
Anatol Rodgers High — Jack Hayward.

Devinn Cartwright from Queen’s College
will participate in the Girls 400m Hurdles
and Nejmi Burnside from St. Andrews will
participate in the Boys 400m Hurdles.

Numerous teams from Jamaica have par-
ticipated over the years. Several teams from
The Bahamas have also participated over
the years.

The BAAA felt that it was important to
have Bahamian High School teams partici-
pating in this Relay Carnival and made the
effort to arrange for their participation with
the funding of the BAAA.





GARY MARKHAM: BAAA’s
treasurer Laura Charlton
presents Queen’s College
coach Gary Markham with
the airline tickets as mem-
bers of the team, along with
BAAA’s president Mike
Sands and first vice presi-
dent Sherwin Stuart looks
on.



DIANNE WOODSIDE:
BAAA’s treasurer Laura
Charlton presents SAC’s
coach Dianne Woodside
with the airline tickets for
her Big Red Machine team
that looks on at left. BAAA’s
president Mike Sands and
first vice president Sherwin
Stuart looks on at right.



Se
Tn

ALL














KATRINA SEYMOUR:
QUEEN’S College quarter-
miler Katrina Seymour
express her thanks to the
BAAA on behalf of her
Comets’ team-mates for
making it possible for
them to travel to the Penn
Relays this weekend.



LARON HIELD: MOORES
Island’s sprinter Laron Hield
speaks on behalf of his
team-mates as they
expressed thanks to the
BAAA for allowing them to
travel to the Penn Relays
this weekend.








EARL RAHMING: ST.
Augustine’s College middle
distance runner Earl Rah-
ming speaks on behalf of his
Big Red Machines team as
they are afforded the oppor-
tunity to travel to the Penn
Relays thos weekend cour-
tesy of the BAAA.





DESHANA BURNSIDE: ST.
Augustine’s College 800
metre runner Deshana
Burnside gives thanks to
the BAAA for allowing her
Big Red Machines team to
travel to the Penn Relays
this weekend.









High hopes for Family Island Regatta

FROM page nine
recuperating from an automo-
bile accident that he suffered
last week.

“All of the guys are here and
all of the boats are here who
are coming,” Strachan said. “So
the enthusiasm is running very
high and they are ready to get
sailing.

“This is for bragging rights
about who is the best for the
next year. So the competition is

going to be very stiff in all of
the classes.”

Strachan said the organizing
committee have also been
pleased with the tremendous
support from the spectators as
there are quite a number of
people who have already
arrived in Exuma.

“A lot of people are already
here and we haven’t started
sailing yet,” he said. “I expect
that we will have a huge crowd

here over the next three-four
days.

“All of the hotels are
booked, all of the rental cars
have been rented out. All of
the guests houses are rented
out. The airlines are putting on
extra flights, so we should have
a lot of people here.”

Strachan said at the end of
the week, the regatta should be
a big economic boost for the
communities in Exuma.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

to the suddenness with which the torna-
do materialised there was no time to
implement them all. The weather fore-
cast did not speak to any possible (tor-
nado) activity," said the report, prepared
by a FCP safety officer.

"Initial reports indicate that the safe-
ty features in place on all of the gantry
cranes were operational. This is evi-
denced by the fact that at least two of
the gantry crane operators reported los-
ing all control power when a strong gust
of wind hit their cranes.

"The rail brakes and the gantry motor
brakes on a number of the cranes were
completely destroyed. This was a direct
result of both sets of brakes doing exact-
ly what they were designed to do; pre-
vent the crane from moving in emer-
gency situations once control power is
lost if an operator engages the emer-
gency shut down.

"The winds were so strong that they
overcame the crane braking systems and

FROM page one

According to reports, a new
deadline has been set for May
14 for the parties to reach
agreement on all outstanding

Union willing to
talk to COB, but

Tornado

continued to propel the crane down the
rails," said the report, a copy of which
was obtained by The Tribune.

The report also states that operations
at the facility were suspended twice
before the tornado struck — about an
hour before the killer storm and again
just a few minutes before the tornado hit
— because of "low visibility due to heavy
rains."

"According to reports from witnesses,
terminal operations had to be suspend-
ed approximately one hour before the
incident owing to low visibility due to
heavy rains. Also, according to witness
accounts the terminal operations were
stopped again several minutes before
the accident occurred when operators
reported sudden heavy winds and poor
visibility,” the report said.

The sudden storm toppled heavy
equipment, including gantry crane num-
ber 10, which was acquired at a cost of
$10 million. Three men — Michael

Young, 43, Cleveland Lowe, 49, and
Shawn Saunders, 23 — were inside the
crane doing maintenance work when it
fell to the ground.

Four workers — Glen Bodie, Saman-
tha Rolle, Rommel McIntosh and Sam-
my Swann — were also seriously injured
during the storm. Two others, Broderick
Pinder and Kevin Archer, were treated
for injuries and released.

The preliminary incident report also
states that around 11.17 am, a safety and
security manager, who received sus-
pected tornado reports from a cargo
manager, contacted a duty operations
manager explaining that there was a
report of a possible tornado headed to
Grand Bahama and to cease all opera-
tions and secure equipment.

The duty operations manager
"acknowledged the report and advised
that operations had already been
stopped and efforts were underway.
Cranes one and two had already been
pinned down and straddles either
returned to the park up position or

locked onto full containers in the yard."

Three minutes later, at approximate-
ly 11.20 am, power was lost at the ter-
minal.

At around 11. 23 am it was reported
over the FCP radio system that crane
number 10 “had collapsed and was on
the ground and in water."

The Tribune understands that this
report was turned over to the Depart-
ment of Labour last week as they con-
tinue to probe whether there was any
negligence of health and safety stan-
dards at the FPO when the tornado hit.

A severe weather warning was not
issued by the Department of Meteorol-
ogy, which is based in Nassau, until noon
after the tornado had struck. Met offi-
cials have admitted that a weather
observer in Freeport had informed them
of possible tornado activity from as ear-
ly as 6 am that day. However, these mes-
sages were not passed on to the director
of meteorology, and other emergency
officials who would have issued a severe
weather warning.

tion policies of what was
required.

The exams that have not
been distributed to lecturers
for grading remain in the cus-
tody of the college.

Dr Cleare maintained that

matters.

However, UTEB president
Jennifer Dotson-Isaacs told
The Tribune at 10pm yester-
day that the strike will con-
tinue for now.

The Tribune was unable to
contact Labour Minister
Foulkes for further details
before going to press last
night.At a press conference
held yesterday afternoon,
COB revealed its contingency
plan for this year’s exam
process as the faculty’s strike
continues.

It had been suggested by
some commentators that the
exam results might be ques-
tionable considering the
upheaval at the college, how-
ever at a press conference yes-
terday it was reported that of
the 60 examinations held on
Monday, only 24 needed sup-
port invigilators — a number

Strike goes on

reduced to 13 by yesterday
afternoon.

College president Janyne
Hodder said: “All exams have
been invigilated to the highest
standard and in accordance
with academic policy, whether
invigilated by the faculty — as
happened in nearly 70 per
cent of the cases — or by mem-
bers of the invigilation sup-
port team.

“There is no issue of quali-
ty here.”

The institution’s decision to
go ahead with examinations
on Monday in the face of
industrial action by Union of
Tertiary Educators of the
Bahamas (UTEB) members
was met with heavy criticism
and concern from students
and observers.

The biggest concern among

mn USTRIAL action continued yesterday.

students was that the faculty
strike will push back final
grading and ultimately tran-
scripts, hampering student
progress indefinitely.

However, Ms Hodder
maintained that the college
still plans to meet its May 8
transcript deadline.

Led by the dean of pure
and applied sciences Dr Bren-
damae Cleare, the invigilation
support team consists of 59



persons — 52 of whom hold
one degree or more. It
includes senior college admin-
istrators such as vice-presi-
dents, associate vice-presi-
dents and deans, as well as
volunteers from middle man-
agement, the administrative
support staff and government
volunteers.

The college held a short
workshop to inform those
unfamiliar with the examina-

all students are required to sit
their exams, and — as follows
normal examination policy —
allowances will only be made
for those students whose
absence is related to illness
or the death of a loved one.

Negotiations for a new
industrial agreement for the
faculty are being facilitated
through the ministries of
Labour and Education, and
at this time there is no indica-
tion of when talks will
resume.

UTEB has stated that its
members will not return to
the table until they see evi-
dence that the college will act
in “good faith” and agree toa
deadline for a new industrial
agreement.

There were no reported dis-
ruptions of the exam sched-
ule at the college’s northern
campus in Grand Bahama.

Homicide
Squad to add

i more trained

detectives

: FROM page one

: roads.

These crime fighting plans

: and more were unveiled on
: Monday as the Commission-
: er of Police launched his first
: policing plan for The
: Bahamas, the “Integrated
: Crime Prevention Interven-
: tion and Response Strategy.”

The 35-page document is

: intended to guide the force
: throughout 2010, with divi-
: sional commanders required
? to submit monthly “produc-
: tivity reports” to Commis-
: sioner Ellison Greenslade
: illustrating how they have
? moved to achieve its objec-
: tives in their divisions.

The strategic policing plan

: reveals that in order to effec-
: tively fight the burgeoning
: tide of crime “there are
: many areas of the (police
: force) that require strength-
: ening.”

“Greater attention will be

: paid to these areas to build
: capacity and improve capa-
: bilities” in 2010, it states.

Further sharpening the

force’s murder-solving poten-
: tial, the plan announces that
: a Cold Case Investigation
: Squad will be set up to
: review unsolved murder files
: and look at potential new
: lines of inquiry.

Led by Director of the

: newly established National
: Crime Prevention Office,
: Supt Stephen Dean, that
: squad has already held sev-
: eral “cold case” press con-
: ferences this year in which
: family members of murder
: victims have appealed to the
: public to come forward with
: any information that could

: lead to the conviction of their

CAARCCIUM ILM CiLiccecm ltactteecy cps sins

FROM page one will not be able to stay in the business as there o Pvp rays maar 8 erg
is no way he could come up with $5 million. : eete-on the Die Enforce:
“That price is ridiculous. I’ve been in the : t Unit will ee 4
business for a little while, and I want to remain cer al ag acai ihc
in the business. : while the Firearms Tracing
“Right now I have 32 people employed and ; and Investigations Unit in
for me to come up with that big bond, I could | ; CDU will be strengthened
never make that. ; through the provision of bet-
“I don’t feel that they should only give certain : ter technology and training
people a licence and kick everybody else out. If : opportunities for officers
the government wants us to contribute $10,000 : working on the squad.
for every six months from every number house, : The force also wishes to
that should be enough. Or whatever fee they : see the Business and Tech-
want to impose, but to knock everybody out : nology Crimes Unit — which
and only give a certain set a licence, that isn’t : pursues perpetrators of so-
fair. I don’t see how the government could do : called technology crimes,
that,” he said. . . : cyber crimes and financial
While the government through Prime Min- : crimes — play a more promi-
ister Hubert Ingraham has voiced its support for nent role.
discussions on the matter of legalizing the indus- > Meanwhil e, bolstering
laa has been little to no further discussion : anti-vehicle theft efforts, the
In fact, when The Tribune attempted to reach : ores oe eee oe :
a number of officials at the Ministry of Finance i Task F ‘lb i
on the topic, we were informed that “no one” at ; 2 as One © Seta
their offices would be authorized to speak on : lished within the police force
“that issue” at this time. ; this year.

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Lawyer back in court to face
theft of $350,000 charges

FROM page one

operators have expressed their fears that the
government could be “unfairly” manipulating
the requirements to “price out” the majority of
the current operators.

Currently it is being rumoured that each
number operator would be required, along with
the $5 million bond, to pay out to the govern-
ment a certain percentage of their annual rake
as a “fee”, along with the actual cost of the
licence which is said to be anywhere in the “six
figure” range.

Also, it is being said that in their initial dis-
cussions on the matter it has already been pro-
posed to limit the possibility of licences to
“three or four”, instead of a full-scale opening
of the current market.

This report, however, is being frowned upon
by many “smaller” number operators who fear
that these requirements are being “hiked out of
proportion” to limit access to the market, or in
fact even open it up for “other more politically
connected persons” to enter the field.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, one
small number operator said that he fears he

Ward, who was represented by attorney Philip “Brave”
Davis, was not required to enter a plea to the charges dur-
ing his arraignment yesterday. Prosecutors intend to pro-
ceed with a Voluntary Bill of Indictment in the matters,
bypassing a preliminary inquiry.

In October of last year, Ward, a resident of Paradise
Island, was charged with stealing $55,100 cash from Wayde
Wilson by reason of employment. In April 2008, he was
charged with stealing £500,000 or US $986,446.39 from
Robert James Lloyd by reason of service as well as £350,000
— roughly US $690,594.66 from Pochins Plc- a British con-
struction and development group.

Ward, who was already out on bail, was granted bail yes-
terday in the sum of $100,000. His case was adjourned to
June 26.





‘Street brawl
after Defence Force

marine shot dead
FROM page one



respond to an argument at his apartment at around 10.30pm.

When they arrived Seaman Black was found dead with gun-
shot wounds on the left side of his face, and officers recovered
a shotgun and ammunition at the property.

Emergency Medical Services personnel pronounced Seaman
Black dead at the scene and the woman relative, who had
called police earlier, was taken into custody for questioning.

RBDF press officer Lieutenant Carlon Bethel said a somber
mood took hold of the base in Coral Harbour yesterday as
Defence Force officers were shocked by the violent shooting of
a bright young marine.

Seaman Black was part of the enlisted branch of line staff on
the force and Lt Bethel worked in the supply department with
him during his short career.

“He was an excellent marine,” Lt Bethel said.

“Very proficient in his duties and the type of marine you
could leave alone to do whatever he had to do without anyone
senior standing over him.

“From what I could see he had a pretty bright career ahead
of him.

“T don’t think you will find anyone saying anything ill about
him, so the death is a shock to us all.

“He was well-known, and although he wasn’t the life of the
party, he had such a calm demeanor, and such a dedicated
outlook in his work.

“He was quiet, humble, and always respectful.”

The Tribune understands Seaman Black had worked at SG
Hambros Bank and Trust before enlisting in the Defence Force
and was a father, although this was unconfirmed before press
time.

Members of his family were seen arguing with another fam-
ily outside his home as police responded to the homicide.

Emotions ran high and angry words were exchanged with
punches as around 25 people who had known the dedicated
marine started warring with each other outside the cordoned off
crime scene in Adderley Terrace as they returned to their cars
parked nearby.

They then hit out at a police officer who attempted to break
up the angry brawl.

A man who looked on in horror from about 50ft away said:
“IT could see fighting and blows being thrown, and a police
officer trying to stop the fight got hit.”

Police continued to detain the marine’s 22-year-old wife for
questioning last night, however, no charges had been made
before The Tribune went to press. Ww Www

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

. Btormie;eterai«m c om



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LOCAL NEWS

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STUDENTS of Carlton Francis Primary had fun partici-
pating in a track meet during their Annual House Sports
Day on Monday at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.





























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